Science.gov

Sample records for detect breast cancer

  1. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  2. Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection

    MedlinePlus

    ... saved articles window. My Saved Articles » My ACS » Breast Cancer Prevention and Early Detection Download Printable Version [PDF] » ( ... the factors that may affect your risk for breast cancer, and find out what you can do to ...

  3. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has come up with a technique to decrease exposure to harmful x-rays in mammographies or breast radiography. Usually, physicians make more than one exposure to arrive at an x-ray film of acceptable density. Now the same solar cells used to convert sunlight into electricity on space satellites can make a single exposure sufficient. When solar cell sensor is positioned directly beneath x-ray film, it can determine exactly when film has received sufficient radiation and has been exposed to optimum density. At that point associated electronic equipment sends signal to cut off x-ray source. Reduction of mammography to single exposures not only reduced x-ray hazard significantly, but doubled the number of patient examinations handled by one machine. The NASA laboratory used this control system at the Huntington Memorial Hospital with overwhelming success.

  4. Breast cancer detection by holographic interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woisetschlaeger, Jakob; Sheffer, Daniel B.; Mikati, H.; Somasundaram, Kavitha; Loughry, C. William; Chawla, Surendra K.; Wesolowski, Piotr J.

    1993-02-01

    The overall breast cancer mortality rate has remained unchanged the last 50 years. The most significant factor in the treatment is its early detection which will alter the mortality rate. In this investigation, the feasibility of holographic interferometry for the purpose of detecting breast cancer was examined. Optical setups were developed to enable the collection of holographic interferograms in vivo of asymptomatic breasts and those containing cancerous lesions. Different stressing concepts of holographic nondestructive testing and their applicability for the detection of breast cancer were tested.

  5. Modern Breast Cancer Detection: A Technological Review

    PubMed Central

    Nover, Adam B.; Jagtap, Shami; Anjum, Waqas; Yegingil, Hakki; Shih, Wan Y.; Shih, Wei-Heng; Brooks, Ari D.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is a serious threat worldwide and is the number two killer of women in the United States. The key to successful management is screening and early detection. What follows is a description of the state of the art in screening and detection for breast cancer as well as a discussion of new and emerging technologies. This paper aims to serve as a starting point for those who are not acquainted with this growing field. PMID:20069109

  6. Is clinical breast examination important for breast cancer detection?

    PubMed Central

    Provencher, L.; Hogue, J.C.; Desbiens, C.; Poirier, B.; Poirier, E.; Boudreau, D.; Joyal, M.; Diorio, C.; Duchesne, N.; Chiquette, J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Screening clinical breast examination (cbe) is controversial; the use of cbe is declining not only as a screening tool, but also as a diagnostic tool. In the present study, we aimed to assess the value of cbe in breast cancer detection in a tertiary care centre for breast diseases. Methods This retrospective study of all breast cancers diagnosed between July 1999 and December 2010 at our centre categorized cases according to the mean of detection (cbe, mammography, or both). A cbe was considered “abnormal” in the presence of a mass, nipple discharge, skin or nipple retraction, edema, erythema, peau d’orange, or ulcers. Results During the study period, a complete dataset was available for 6333 treated primary breast cancers. Cancer types were ductal carcinoma in situ (15.3%), invasive ductal carcinoma (75.7%), invasive lobular carcinoma (9.0%), or others (2.2%). Of the 6333 cancers, 36.5% (n = 2312) were detected by mammography alone, 54.8% (n = 3470) by mammography and cbe, and 8.7% (n = 551) by physician-performed cbe alone (or 5.3% if considering ultrasonography). Invasive tumours diagnosed by cbe alone were more often triple-negative, her2-positive, node-positive, and larger than those diagnosed by mammography alone (p < 0.05). Conclusions A significant number of cancers would have been missed if cbe had not been performed. Compared with cancers detected by mammography alone, those detected by cbe had more aggressive features. Clinical breast examination is a very low-cost test that could improve the detection of breast cancer and could prompt breast ultrasonography in the case of a negative mammogram. PMID:27536182

  7. Evolving neural networks for detecting breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Fogel, D B; Wasson, E C; Boughton, E M

    1995-09-01

    Artificial neural networks are applied to the problem of detecting breast cancer from histologic data. Evolutionary programming is used to train the networks. This stochastic optimization method reduces the chance of becoming trapped in locally optimal weight sets. Preliminary results indicate that very parsimonious neural nets can outperform other methods reported in the literature on the same data. The results are statistically significant.

  8. Infrared imager requirements for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    González, Francisco Javier

    2007-01-01

    Infrared imaging was introduced into medicine in the late 1950s, early studies suggested there were applications of the technology in areas as diverse as detection of breast cancer and malfunctions of the nervous system, however the early instrumentation was not sensitive enough to detect the subtle changes in temperature needed to accurately detect and monitor disease. In recent years the sensitivity of infrared instruments has greatly improved. In this paper the bioheat transfer equation is solved for a simplified model of a female breast and a cancerous tumor in order to quantify the minimum size of a tumor or the maximum depth of a certain sized tumor that a modern state-of-the-art imager can detect. Finite Element simulations showed that current state-of-the-art imagers are capable of detecting 3 cm tumors located deeper than 7 cm from the skin surface and tumors smaller than 0.5 cm can be detected if they are close to the surface of the skin.

  9. Ultrasonic imaging techniques for breast cancer detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, N. R.; Marquez, J. D.; Prewett, E. M.; Claytor, T. N.; Nadler, B. R.; Huang, L.

    2006-01-01

    Improving the resolution and specificity of current ultrasonic imaging technology can enhance its relevance to detection of early-stage breast cancers. Ultrasonic evaluation of breast lesions is desirable because it is quick, inexpensive, and does not expose the patient to potentially harmful ionizing radiation. Improved image quality and resolution enables earlier detection and more accurate diagnoses of tumors, thus reducing the number of biopsies performed, increasing treatment options, and lowering mortality, morbidity, and remission percentages. In this work, a novel ultrasonic imaging reconstruction method that exploits straight-ray migration is described. This technique, commonly used in seismic imaging, accounts for scattering more accurately than standard ultrasonic approaches, thus providing superior image resolution. A breast phantom with various inclusions is imaged using a pulse-echo approach. The data are processed using the ultrasonic migration method and results are compared to standard linear ultrasound and to x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. For an ultrasonic frequency of 2.25 MHz, imaged inclusions and features of approximately 1mm are resolved, although better resolution is expected with minor modifications. Refinement of this application using other imaging techniques such as time-reversal mirrors (TRM), synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), decomposition of the time reversal operator (DORT), and factorization methods is also briefly discussed.

  10. Breast Cancer Basics and You: Detection and Diagnosis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Basics and You: Detection and Diagnosis Past Issues / ... regular clinical breast exams and mammograms to find breast cancer early, when treatment is more likely to work ...

  11. Multimodal optical imaging for detecting breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patel, Rakesh; Khan, Ashraf; Wirth, Dennis; Kamionek, Michal; Kandil, Dina; Quinlan, Robert; Yaroslavsky, Anna N.

    2012-06-01

    The goal of the study was to evaluate wide-field and high-resolution multimodal optical imaging, including polarization, reflectance, and fluorescence for the intraoperative detection of breast cancer. Lumpectomy specimens were stained with 0.05 mg/ml aqueous solution of methylene blue (MB) and imaged. Wide-field reflectance images were acquired between 390 and 750 nm. Wide-field fluorescence images were excited at 640 nm and registered between 660 and 750 nm. High resolution confocal reflectance and fluorescence images were excited at 642 nm. Confocal fluorescence images were acquired between 670 nm and 710 nm. After imaging, the specimens were processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) histopathology. Histological slides were compared with wide-field and high-resolution optical images to evaluate correlation of tumor boundaries and cellular morphology, respectively. Fluorescence polarization imaging identified the location, size, and shape of the tumor in all the cases investigated. Averaged fluorescence polarization values of tumor were higher as compared to normal tissue. Statistical analysis confirmed the significance of these differences. Fluorescence confocal imaging enabled cellular-level resolution. Evaluation and statistical analysis of MB fluorescence polarization values registered from single tumor and normal cells demonstrated higher fluorescence polarization from cancer. Wide-field high-resolution fluorescence and fluorescence polarization imaging shows promise for intraoperative delineation of breast cancers.

  12. Computerized detection of breast cancer on automated breast ultrasound imaging of women with dense breasts

    PubMed Central

    Drukker, Karen; Sennett, Charlene A.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection method and investigate its feasibility for detection of breast cancer in automated 3D ultrasound images of women with dense breasts. Methods: The HIPAA compliant study involved a dataset of volumetric ultrasound image data, “views,” acquired with an automated U-Systems Somo•V® ABUS system for 185 asymptomatic women with dense breasts (BI-RADS Composition/Density 3 or 4). For each patient, three whole-breast views (3D image volumes) per breast were acquired. A total of 52 patients had breast cancer (61 cancers), diagnosed through any follow-up at most 365 days after the original screening mammogram. Thirty-one of these patients (32 cancers) had a screening-mammogram with a clinically assigned BI-RADS Assessment Category 1 or 2, i.e., were mammographically negative. All software used for analysis was developed in-house and involved 3 steps: (1) detection of initial tumor candidates, (2) characterization of candidates, and (3) elimination of false-positive candidates. Performance was assessed by calculating the cancer detection sensitivity as a function of the number of “marks” (detections) per view. Results: At a single mark per view, i.e., six marks per patient, the median detection sensitivity by cancer was 50.0% (16/32) ± 6% for patients with a screening mammogram-assigned BI-RADS category 1 or 2—similar to radiologists’ performance sensitivity (49.9%) for this dataset from a prior reader study—and 45.9% (28/61) ± 4% for all patients. Conclusions: Promising detection sensitivity was obtained for the computer on a 3D ultrasound dataset of women with dense breasts at a rate of false-positive detections that may be acceptable for clinical implementation. PMID:24387528

  13. Computerized detection of breast cancer on automated breast ultrasound imaging of women with dense breasts

    SciTech Connect

    Drukker, Karen Sennett, Charlene A.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection method and investigate its feasibility for detection of breast cancer in automated 3D ultrasound images of women with dense breasts. Methods: The HIPAA compliant study involved a dataset of volumetric ultrasound image data, “views,” acquired with an automated U-Systems Somo•V{sup ®} ABUS system for 185 asymptomatic women with dense breasts (BI-RADS Composition/Density 3 or 4). For each patient, three whole-breast views (3D image volumes) per breast were acquired. A total of 52 patients had breast cancer (61 cancers), diagnosed through any follow-up at most 365 days after the original screening mammogram. Thirty-one of these patients (32 cancers) had a screening-mammogram with a clinically assigned BI-RADS Assessment Category 1 or 2, i.e., were mammographically negative. All software used for analysis was developed in-house and involved 3 steps: (1) detection of initial tumor candidates, (2) characterization of candidates, and (3) elimination of false-positive candidates. Performance was assessed by calculating the cancer detection sensitivity as a function of the number of “marks” (detections) per view. Results: At a single mark per view, i.e., six marks per patient, the median detection sensitivity by cancer was 50.0% (16/32) ± 6% for patients with a screening mammogram-assigned BI-RADS category 1 or 2—similar to radiologists’ performance sensitivity (49.9%) for this dataset from a prior reader study—and 45.9% (28/61) ± 4% for all patients. Conclusions: Promising detection sensitivity was obtained for the computer on a 3D ultrasound dataset of women with dense breasts at a rate of false-positive detections that may be acceptable for clinical implementation.

  14. Detection of circulating breast cancer cells using photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran

    According to the American Cancer Society, more than 200,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed this year. Moreover, about 40,000 women died from breast cancer last year alone. As breast cancer progresses in an individual, it can transform from a localized state to a metastatic one with multiple tumors distributed through the body, not necessarily contained within the breast. Metastasis is the spread of cancer through the body by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which can be found in the blood and lymph of the diagnosed patient. Diagnosis of a metastatic state by the discovery of a secondary tumor can often come too late and hence, significantly reduce the patient's chance of survival. There is a current need for a CTC detection method which would diagnose metastasis before the secondary tumor occurs or reaches a size resolvable by current imaging systems. Since earlier detection would improve prognosis, this study proposes a method of labeling of breast cancer cells for detection with a photoacoustic flow cytometry system as a model for CTC detection in human blood. Gold nanoparticles and fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles are proposed as contrast agents for T47D, the breast cancer cell line of choice. The labeling, photoacoustic detection limit, and sensitivity are first characterized and then applied to a study to show detection from human blood.

  15. Automated System for Early Breast Cancer Detection in Mammograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankman, Isaac N.; Kim, Dong W.; Christens-Barry, William A.; Weinberg, Irving N.; Gatewood, Olga B.; Brody, William R.

    1993-01-01

    The increasing demand on mammographic screening for early breast cancer detection, and the subtlety of early breast cancer signs on mammograms, suggest an automated image processing system that can serve as a diagnostic aid in radiology clinics. We present a fully automated algorithm for detecting clusters of microcalcifications that are the most common signs of early, potentially curable breast cancer. By using the contour map of the mammogram, the algorithm circumvents some of the difficulties encountered with standard image processing methods. The clinical implementation of an automated instrument based on this algorithm is also discussed.

  16. Breast cancer detection in rotational thermography images using texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Sheeja V.; Sasikala, M.; Bhavani Bharathi, G.; Jaipurkar, Sandeep D.

    2014-11-01

    Breast cancer is a major cause of mortality in young women in the developing countries. Early diagnosis is the key to improve survival rate in cancer patients. Breast thermography is a diagnostic procedure that non-invasively images the infrared emissions from breast surface to aid in the early detection of breast cancer. Due to limitations in imaging protocol, abnormality detection by conventional breast thermography, is often a challenging task. Rotational thermography is a novel technique developed in order to overcome the limitations of conventional breast thermography. This paper evaluates this technique's potential for automatic detection of breast abnormality, from the perspective of cold challenge. Texture features are extracted in the spatial domain, from rotational thermogram series, prior to and post the application of cold challenge. These features are fed to a support vector machine for automatic classification of normal and malignant breasts, resulting in a classification accuracy of 83.3%. Feature reduction has been performed by principal component analysis. As a novel attempt, the ability of this technique to locate the abnormality has been studied. The results of the study indicate that rotational thermography holds great potential as a screening tool for breast cancer detection.

  17. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  18. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: Comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Roganovic, Dragana; Djilas, Dragana; Vujnovic, Sasa; Pavic, Dag; Stojanov, Dragan

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities. We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by three diagnostic modalities: digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, and subsequently confirmed by histopathology. Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was used for characterizing the lesions. One experienced radiologist interpreted all three diagnostic modalities. Twenty-nine of the breast lesions were malignant while 28 were benign. The sensitivity for digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, was 72.4%, 93.1%, and 100%, respectively; while the specificity was 46.4%, 60.7%, and 75%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis showed an overall diagnostic advantage of breast tomosynthesis over both breast MRI and digital mammography. with significant difference between breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography (p<0.001), while the difference between breast tomosynthesis and breast MRI was not significant (p = 0.20). PMID:26614855

  19. Flexible 16 Antenna Array for Microwave Breast Cancer Detection.

    PubMed

    Bahramiabarghouei, Hadi; Porter, Emily; Santorelli, Adam; Gosselin, Benoit; Popović, Milica; Rusch, Leslie A

    2015-10-01

    Radar-based microwave imaging has been widely studied for breast cancer detection in recent times. Sensing dielectric property differences of tissues has been studied over a wide frequency band for this application. We design single- and dual-polarization antennas for wireless ultrawideband breast cancer detection systems using an inhomogeneous multilayer model of the human breast. Antennas made from flexible materials are more easily adapted to wearable applications. Miniaturized flexible monopole and spiral antennas on a 50-μm Kapton polyimide are designed, using a high-frequency structure simulator, to be in contact with biological breast tissues. The proposed antennas are designed to operate in a frequency range of 2-4 GHz (with reflection coefficient (S11) below -10 dB). Measurements show that the flexible antennas have good impedance matching when in different positions with different curvature around the breast. Our miniaturized flexible antennas are 20 mm × 20 mm. Furthermore, two flexible conformal 4 × 4 ultrawideband antenna arrays (single and dual polarization), in a format similar to that of a bra, were developed for a radar-based breast cancer detection system. By using a reflector for the arrays, the penetration of the propagated electromagnetic waves from the antennas into the breast can be improved by factors of 3.3 and 2.6, respectively.

  20. Breast Cancer Detection with Reduced Feature Set

    PubMed Central

    Kılıç, Niyazi; Bilgili, Erdem

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores feature reduction properties of independent component analysis (ICA) on breast cancer decision support system. Wisconsin diagnostic breast cancer (WDBC) dataset is reduced to one-dimensional feature vector computing an independent component (IC). The original data with 30 features and reduced one feature (IC) are used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy of the classifiers such as k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), artificial neural network (ANN), radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), and support vector machine (SVM). The comparison of the proposed classification using the IC with original feature set is also tested on different validation (5/10-fold cross-validations) and partitioning (20%–40%) methods. These classifiers are evaluated how to effectively categorize tumors as benign and malignant in terms of specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, F-score, Youden's index, discriminant power, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with its criterion values including area under curve (AUC) and 95% confidential interval (CI). This represents an improvement in diagnostic decision support system, while reducing computational complexity. PMID:26078774

  1. 75 FR 7282 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... Force guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening; Impact of the revised clinical screening recommendations for both breast and cervical cancer on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early...

  2. 76 FR 30723 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... for breast and cervical cancer screening; updates on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early... Health and Human Services, and the Director, CDC, regarding the early detection and control of breast...

  3. Computerized detection of breast cancer with artificial intelligence and thermograms.

    PubMed

    Ng, E Y-K; Fok, S C; Peh, Y C; Ng, F C; Sim, L S J

    2002-01-01

    This paper shows the concurrent use of thermography and artificial neural networks (ANN) for the diagnosis of breast cancer, a disease that is growing in prominence in women all over the world. It has been reported that breast thermography itself could detect breast cancer up to 10 years earlier than the conventional golden methods such as mammography, in particular in the younger patient. However, the accuracy of thermography is dependent on many factors such as the symmetry of the breasts' temperature and temperature stability. A woman's body temperature is known to be stable in certain periods after menstruation and it was found that the accuracy of thermography in women whose thermal images are taken in a suitable period (5th - 12th and 21st day of menstruation) is higher (80%) than the total population of patients (73%). The stability of the body temperature will depend on physiological state. This paper examines the use of ANN to complement the infrared heat radiating from the surface of the body with other physiological data. Four backpropagation neural networks were developed and trained using the results from the Singapore General Hospital patients' physiological data and thermographs. Owing to the inaccuracies found in thermography and the low population size gathered for this project, the networks developed could only accurately diagnose about 61.54% of the breast cancer cases. Nevertheless, the basic neural network framework has been established and it has great potential for future development of an intelligent breast cancer diagnosis system. This would be especially useful to the teenagers and young adults who are unsuitable for mammography at a young age. An intelligent breast thermography-neural network will be able to give an accurate diagnosis of breast cancer and can make a positive impact on breast disease detection.

  4. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  5. Spectral imaging detects breast cancer in fresh unstained specimens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chung, Alice; Gaon, Mark; Jeong, Jihoon; Karlan, Scott; Lindsley, Erik; Wachsmann-Hogiu, Sebastian; Xiong, Yizhi; Zhao, Tong; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2006-02-01

    Spectral imaging has recently been introduced in the biomedical field as a noninvasive, quantitative means of studying biological tissues. Many of its potential applications have been demonstrated (in vitro and, to a lesser degree, in vivo) with the use of stains or dyes. Successful translation to the clinical environment has been largely lagging, due to safety considerations and regulatory limitations preventing use of contrast agents in humans. We report experiments showing the feasibility of high-resolution spectral imaging of breast cancer without the use of contrast agents, thus completing the continuum of translational research, to in vivo imaging that will be directly applicable in the clinical environment. Our initial work focused on image acquisition using Fourier transform microinterferometry and subsequent segmentation of both stained and unstained breast cancer slides-derived image sets. We then applied our techniques to imaging fresh unstained ex vivo specimens of rat breast cancer and sentinel lymph nodes. We also investigated multiple methods of classification to optimize our image analyses, and preliminary results for the best algorithm tested yielded an overall sensitivity of 96%, and a specificity of 92% for cancer detection. Using spectral imaging and classification techniques, we were able to demonstrate that reliable detection of breast cancer in fixed and fresh unstained specimens of breast tissue is possible.

  6. Millimeter Wave Spectroscopy for Breast Cancer Diagnostics and Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korolev, Konstantin; Chen, Shu; Afsar, Mohammed; Naber, Stephen

    2009-03-01

    Broad-band millimeter wave transmittance measurements of normal and tumorous (cancerous) human breast tissue samples have been acquired in--vitro by employing a free-space, quasi-optical spectrometer. Freshly excised breast tissues were prepared and preserved in 10% neutral-buffered formalin solution before testing. Significant differences in the transmittance profiles have been found between the normal and tumorous tissues. It has been found that despite the inhomogeneity and variable structure and composition of each single tissue, the tumorous specimens consistently manifest much higher absorption level of millimeter wave radiation than the normal ones. It has been shown that free space, quasi-optical spectrometer is capable of contributing valuable insights into the dielectric properties of normal and tumorous human breast tissues and aiding in further developments of millimeter wave spectroscopy and mammography for the breast cancer diagnostics and detection.

  7. 77 FR 66469 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... meeting of the aforementioned committee: Name: Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control..., regarding the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes...

  8. Applications of nanomedicine in breast cancer detection, imaging, and therapy.

    PubMed

    Saadeh, Yamaan; Leung, Tiffany; Vyas, Arpita; Chaturvedi, Lakshmi Shankar; Perumal, Omathanu; Vyas, Dinesh

    2014-01-01

    Worldwide, breast cancer remains as one of the most common cancer diagnosis and cause of cancer related death among women. Fortunately, nanomedicine has brought forth new potential and hope in breast cancer research. The extremely small size of nanoparticles makes it advantageous and potentially superior to use in tumor detection and imaging. One of the more extensively studied particles is quantum dots, semiconductor crystals which are capable of enhanced labeling and imaging of cancer cells. In addition, due to serious toxicity of chemotherapeutic agents, nano-formulations of breast cancer chemotherapy are under investigation and development. This may provide easier administering route and reduced frequency of drugs. With the use of nanoparticles, drug delivery can be carried out in a minimally invasive fashion and treatment regimens can be made much more targeted and specific for each patient. In this review article, we provide an overview on the role nanomedicine has played in breast cancer and mention some of the latest diagnostic and treatment modalities researched to date.

  9. Breast Cancer:Detection and Diagnosis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Past Issues / Summer 2014 ... treatment is more likely to work well. Clinical Breast Exam During a clinical breast exam, your health ...

  10. Flexible sixteen monopole antenna array for microwave breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Bahrami, H; Porter, E; Santorelli, A; Gosselin, B; Popovic, M; Rusch, L A

    2014-01-01

    Radar based microwave imaging (MI) has been widely studied for breast cancer detection in recent times. Sensing dielectric property differences of tissues over a wide frequency band has been made possible by ultra-wideband (UWB) techniques. In this paper, a flexible, compact monopole antenna on a 100 μm Kapton polyimide is designed, using a high frequency structure simulator (HFSS), to be in contact with biological breast tissues over the 2-5GHz frequency range. The antenna parameters are optimized to obtain a good impedance match over the required frequency range. The designed antenna size is 18mm × 18mm. Further, a flexible conformal 4×4 ultra-wideband antenna array, in a format similar to that of a bra, was developed for a radar-based breast cancer detection system.

  11. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Types of breast cancers What is breast cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... breast cancer? ” and Non-cancerous Breast Conditions . How Breast Cancer Spreads Breast cancer can spread through the lymph ...

  12. Sleep duration and breast cancer risk in the Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project follow-up cohort

    PubMed Central

    Qian, X; Brinton, L A; Schairer, C; Matthews, C E

    2015-01-01

    Background: Short sleep has been hypothesised to increase the risk of breast cancer. However, little is known about the association between sleep and different subtypes of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status. Methods: Among 40 013 women in the Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project, including 1846 incident breast cancer cases, we prospectively examined self-reported weekday and weekend sleep duration in relation to breast cancer risk. We used multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). Results: We found no association between sleep and overall breast cancer. However, we observed a decreased risk of ER+PR+ breast cancer (RR <6 vs 8 – 9 h (95% CI): 0.54 (0.31, 0.93), P for trend, 0.003) with shorter sleep duration. Conclusions: Our finding does not support an association between sleep duration and overall breast cancer risk. However, the effect of sleep on different subtypes of breast cancer deserves further investigation. PMID:25474248

  13. An exploration of rural and urban Kenyan women's knowledge and attitudes regarding breast cancer and breast cancer early detection measures.

    PubMed

    Muthoni, Ann; Miller, Ann Neville

    2010-09-01

    Many women in Kenya with breast cancer symptoms do not seek medical attention until their cancer is very advanced, leading to high mortality rates and a heavy cancer burden on the nation. In this study we employed eight focus groups with low- and middle-income rural and urban Kenyan women to explore their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors concerning breast cancer and its early detection measures. Topics for discussion were derived from the components of the Health Belief Model (HBM). Findings revealed a huge divide between urban middle-income women and all other groups with respect to knowledge of breast cancer and early detection measures. In addition, women viewed breast cancer as a highly severe disease. Perceived benefits of early detection measures centered around preparing themselves for what was assumed to be inevitable death. PMID:20677038

  14. Breast density and mode of detection in relation to breast cancer specific survival: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to examine breast density in relation to breast cancer specific survival and to assess if this potential association was modified by mode of detection. An additional aim was to study whether the established association between mode of detection and survival is modified by breast density. Methods The study included 619 cases from a prospective cohort, The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Breast density estimated qualitatively, was analyzed in relation to breast cancer death, in non-symptomatic and symptomatic women, using Cox regression calculating hazard ratios (HR) with 95% confidence intervals. Adjustments were made in several steps for; diagnostic age, tumour size, axillary lymph node involvement, grade, hormone receptor status, body mass index (baseline), diagnostic period, use of hormone replacement therapy at diagnosis and mode of detection. Detection mode in relation to survival was analyzed stratified for breast density. Differences in HR following different adjustments were analyzed by Freedmans%. Results After adjustment for age and other prognostic factors, women with dense, as compared to fatty breasts, had an increased risk of breast cancer death, HR 2.56:1.07-6.11, with a statistically significant trend over density categories, p = 0.04. In the stratified analysis, the effect was less pronounced in non-symptomatic women, HR 2.04:0.49-8.49 as compared to symptomatic, HR 3.40:1.06-10.90. In the unadjusted model, symptomatic women had a higher risk of breast cancer death, regardless of breast density. Analyzed by Freedmans%, age, tumour size, lymph nodes, grade, diagnostic period, ER and PgR explained 55.5% of the observed differences in mortality between non-symptomatic and symptomatic cases. Additional adjustment for breast density caused only a minor change. Conclusions High breast density at diagnosis may be associated with decreased breast cancer survival. This association appears to be stronger in women with

  15. Detection of eight BRCA1 mutations in 10 breast/ovarian cancer families, including 1 family with male breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sruewing, J.P.; Brody, L.C.; Erdos, M.R.

    1995-07-01

    Genetic epidemiological evidence suggests that mutations in BRCA1 may be responsible for approximately one half of early onset familial breast cancer and the majority of familial breast/ovarian cancer. The recent cloning of BRCA1 allows for the direct detection of mutations, but the feasibility of presymptomatic screening for cancer susceptibility is unknown. We analyzed genomic DNA from one affected individual from each of 24 families with at least three cases of ovarian or breast cancer, using SSCP assays. Variant SSCP bands were subcloned and sequenced. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization was used to verify sequence changes and to screen DNA from control individuals. Six frameshift and two missense mutations were detected in 10 different families. A frameshift mutation was detected in a male proband affected with both breast and prostate cancer. A 40-bp deletion was detected in a patient who developed intra-abdominal carcinomatosis 1 year after prophylactic oophorectomy. Mutations were detected throughout the gene, and only one was detected in more than a single family. These results provide further evidence that inherited breast and ovarian cancer can occur as a consequence of a wide array of BRCA1 mutations. These results suggests that development of a screening test for BRCA1 mutations will be technically challenging. The finding of a mutation in a family with male breast cancer, not previously thought to be related to BRCA1, also illustrates the potential difficulties of genetic counseling for individuals known to carry mutations. 37 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  16. Breast cancer detection: radiologists’ performance using mammography with and without automated whole-breast ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Judy; Lee, Sung-Jae; Comulada, W. Scott

    2010-01-01

    Objective Radiologist reader performance for breast cancer detection using mammography plus automated whole-breast ultrasound (AWBU) was compared with mammography alone. Methods Screenings for non-palpable breast malignancies in women with radiographically dense breasts with contemporaneous mammograms and AWBU were reviewed by 12 radiologists blinded to the diagnoses; half the studies were abnormal. Readers first reviewed the 102 mammograms. The American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) and Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) likelihood ratings were recorded with location information for identified abnormalities. Readers then reviewed the mammograms and AWBU with knowledge of previous mammogram-only evaluation. We compared reader performance across screening techniques using absolute callback, areas under the curve (AUC), and figure of merit (FOM). Results True positivity of cancer detection increased 63%, with only a 4% decrease in true negativity. Reader-averaged AUC was higher for mammography plus AWBU compared with mammography alone by BIRADS (0.808 versus 0.701) and likelihood scores (0.810 versus 0.703). Similarly, FOM was higher for mammography plus AWBU compared with mammography alone by BIRADS (0.786 versus 0.613) and likelihood scores (0.791 versus 0.614). Conclusion Adding AWBU to mammography improved callback rates, accuracy of breast cancer detection, and confidence in callbacks for dense-breasted women. PMID:20632009

  17. Skin artifact removal technique for breast cancer radar detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caorsi, S.; Lenzi, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose a new model-based skin artifact cleaning technique with the aim to remove skin reflections with good effectiveness, without introducing significant signal distortions, and without assuming a priori information on the real structure of the breast. The reference cleaning model, constituted by a two-layer geometry skin-adipose tissue, is oriented to all the ultrawideband radar methods able to detect the tumor starting by the knowledge of each trace recorded around the breast. All the radar signal measurements were simulated by using realistic breast models derived from the University of Wisconsin computational electromagnetic laboratory database and the finite difference time domain (FDTD)-based open source software GprMax. First, we have searched for the best configuration for the reference cleaning model with the aim to minimize the distortions introduced on the radar signal. Second, the performance of the proposed cleaning technique has been assessed by using a breast cancer radar detection technique based on the use of artificial neural network (ANN). In order to minimize the signal distortions, we found that it was necessary to use the real skin thickness and the static Debye parameters of both skin and adipose tissue. In such a case the ANN-based radar approach was able to detect the tumor with an accuracy of 87%. By extending the performance assessment also to the case when only average standard values are used to characterize the reference cleaning model, the detection accuracy was of 84%.

  18. Multiple-instance learning for breast cancer detection in mammograms.

    PubMed

    Sánchez de la Rosa, Rubén; Lamard, Mathieu; Cazuguel, Guy; Coatrieux, Gouenou; Cozic, Michel; Quellec, Gwenolé

    2015-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental computer-aided detection and diagnosis system for breast cancer, the most common form of cancer among women, using mammography. The system relies on the Multiple-Instance Learning (MIL) paradigm, which has proven useful for medical decision support in previous works from our team. In the proposed framework, the breasts are first partitioned adaptively into regions. Then, either textural features, or features derived from the detection of masses and microcalcifications, are extracted from each region. Finally, feature vectors extracted from each region are combined using an MIL algorithm (Citation k-NN or mi-Graph), in order to recognize "normal" mammography examinations or to categorize examinations as "normal", "benign" or "cancer". An accuracy of 91.1% (respectively 62.1%) was achieved for normality recognition (respectively three-class categorization) in a subset of 720 mammograms from the DDSM dataset. The paper also discusses future improvements, that will make the most of the MIL paradigm, in order to improve "benign" versus "cancer" discrimination in particular. PMID:26737917

  19. Mammaglobin peptide as a novel biomarker for breast cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Galvis-Jiménez, Julie M.; Curtidor, Hernando; Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Monterrey, Pedro; Ramírez-Clavijo, Sandra R.

    2013-01-01

    Among the different types of tests used for cancer diagnosis, molecular tests have been increrasingly incorporated because of their ability to detect either expression or functional changes in the molecules associated with the disease. Mammaglobin is a protein found in mammary tissue and can be detected in serum. This protein has been proposed as a biomarker to diagnose breast cancer, given that patients exhibit an increased amount of the protein in serum and tumor tissue, in comparison to healthy individuals. The ELISA test was used in the present study to detect mammaglobin in blood samples from 51 breast cancer patients and 51 control individuals. Antibodies against mamaglobin were generated in rabbits by using the following synthetic peptides: A (amino acids 13 to 21), B (amino acids 31 to 39), C (amino acids 56 to 64) and a D peptide, corresponding to the protein isoform without three amino acids (59, 60 and 61 amino acids) from peptide C. All peptides were immunogenic and allowed generation of antibodies that were able to discriminate patients from controls. The best results were obtained for antiserum B, achieving the best sensitivity (86.3%) and specificity (96%). PMID:23358476

  20. Adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference systems for automatic detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ubeyli, Elif Derya

    2009-10-01

    This paper intends to an integrated view of implementing adaptive neuro-fuzzy inference system (ANFIS) for breast cancer detection. The Wisconsin breast cancer database contained records of patients with known diagnosis. The ANFIS classifiers learned how to differentiate a new case in the domain by given a training set of such records. The ANFIS classifier was used to detect the breast cancer when nine features defining breast cancer indications were used as inputs. The proposed ANFIS model combined the neural network adaptive capabilities and the fuzzy logic qualitative approach. Some conclusions concerning the impacts of features on the detection of breast cancer were obtained through analysis of the ANFIS. The performance of the ANFIS model was evaluated in terms of training performances and classification accuracies and the results confirmed that the proposed ANFIS model has potential in detecting the breast cancer. PMID:19827261

  1. Digital Image Processing Technique for Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Cabrera, R.; Guzmán-Sepúlveda, J. R.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; May-Arrioja, D. A.; Ruiz-Pinales, J.; Ibarra-Manzano, O. G.; Aviña-Cervantes, G.; Parada, A. González

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of death in women and the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Primary prevention in the early stages of the disease becomes complex as the causes remain almost unknown. However, some typical signatures of this disease, such as masses and microcalcifications appearing on mammograms, can be used to improve early diagnostic techniques, which is critical for women’s quality of life. X-ray mammography is the main test used for screening and early diagnosis, and its analysis and processing are the keys to improving breast cancer prognosis. As masses and benign glandular tissue typically appear with low contrast and often very blurred, several computer-aided diagnosis schemes have been developed to support radiologists and internists in their diagnosis. In this article, an approach is proposed to effectively analyze digital mammograms based on texture segmentation for the detection of early stage tumors. The proposed algorithm was tested over several images taken from the digital database for screening mammography for cancer research and diagnosis, and it was found to be absolutely suitable to distinguish masses and microcalcifications from the background tissue using morphological operators and then extract them through machine learning techniques and a clustering algorithm for intensity-based segmentation.

  2. Multi-modal Ultrasound Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Valdés, L.; Pérez-Liva, M.; Camacho, J.; Udías, J. M.; Herraiz, J. L.; González-Salido, N.

    This work describes preliminary results of a two-modality imaging system aimed at the early detection of breast cancer. The first technique is based on compounding conventional echographic images taken at regular angular intervals around the imaged breast. The other modality obtains tomographic images of propagation velocity using the same circular geometry. For this study, a low-cost prototype has been built. It is based on a pair of opposed 128-element, 3.2 MHz array transducers that are mechanically moved around tissue mimicking phantoms. Compounded images around 360° provide improved resolution, clutter reduction, artifact suppression and reinforce the visualization of internal structures. However, refraction at the skin interface must be corrected for an accurate image compounding process. This is achieved by estimation of the interface geometry followed by computing the internal ray paths. On the other hand, sound velocity tomographic images from time of flight projections have been also obtained. Two reconstruction methods, Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and 2D Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (2D OSEM), were used as a first attempt towards tomographic reconstruction. These methods yield useable images in short computational times that can be considered as initial estimates in subsequent more complex methods of ultrasound image reconstruction. These images may be effective to differentiate malignant and benign masses and are very promising for breast cancer screening.

  3. Increasing cancer detection yield of breast MRI using a new CAD scheme of mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Aghaei, Faranak; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Stough, Rebecca G.; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Although breast MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality to detect early breast cancer, its cancer detection yield in breast cancer screening is quite low (< 3 to 4% even for the small group of high-risk women) to date. The purpose of this preliminary study is to test the potential of developing and applying a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme of digital mammograms to identify women at high risk of harboring mammography-occult breast cancers, which can be detected by breast MRI. For this purpose, we retrospectively assembled a dataset involving 30 women who had both mammography and breast MRI screening examinations. All mammograms were interpreted as negative, while 5 cancers were detected using breast MRI. We developed a CAD scheme of mammograms, which include a new quantitative mammographic image feature analysis based risk model, to stratify women into two groups with high and low risk of harboring mammography-occult cancer. Among 30 women, 9 were classified into the high risk group by CAD scheme, which included all 5 women who had cancer detected by breast MRI. All 21 low risk women remained negative on the breast MRI examinations. The cancer detection yield of breast MRI applying to this dataset substantially increased from 16.7% (5/30) to 55.6% (5/9), while eliminating 84% (21/25) unnecessary breast MRI screenings. The study demonstrated the potential of applying a new CAD scheme to significantly increase cancer detection yield of breast MRI, while simultaneously reducing the number of negative MRIs in breast cancer screening.

  4. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... who have family members with breast or ovarian cancer may wish to be tested for the genes. ...

  5. Pattern of Breast Cancer Distribution in Ghana: A Survey to Enhance Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment.

    PubMed

    Naku Ghartey Jnr, Frank; Anyanful, Akwasi; Eliason, Sebastian; Mohammed Adamu, Saanid; Debrah, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nearly 70% of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Ghana are in advanced stages of the disease due especially to low awareness, resulting in limited treatment success and high death rate. With limited epidemiological studies on breast cancer in Ghana, the aim of this study is to assess and understand the pattern of breast cancer distribution for enhancing early detection and treatment. Methods. We randomly selected and screened 3000 women for clinical palpable breast lumps and used univariate and bivariate analysis for description and exploration of variables, respectively, in relation to incidence of breast cancer. Results. We diagnosed 23 (0.76%) breast cancer cases out of 194 (6.46%) participants with clinically palpable breast lumps. Seventeen out of these 23 (0.56%) were premenopausal (<46.6 years) with 7 (0.23%) being below 35 years. With an overall breast cancer incidence of 0.76% in this study, our observation that about 30% of these cancer cases were below 35 years may indicate a relative possible shift of cancer burden to women in their early thirties in Ghana, compared to Western countries. Conclusion. These results suggest an age adjustment for breast cancer screening to early twenties for Ghanaian women and the need for a nationwide breast cancer screening to understand completely the pattern of breast cancer distribution in Ghana. PMID:27635263

  6. Pattern of Breast Cancer Distribution in Ghana: A Survey to Enhance Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Debrah, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nearly 70% of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Ghana are in advanced stages of the disease due especially to low awareness, resulting in limited treatment success and high death rate. With limited epidemiological studies on breast cancer in Ghana, the aim of this study is to assess and understand the pattern of breast cancer distribution for enhancing early detection and treatment. Methods. We randomly selected and screened 3000 women for clinical palpable breast lumps and used univariate and bivariate analysis for description and exploration of variables, respectively, in relation to incidence of breast cancer. Results. We diagnosed 23 (0.76%) breast cancer cases out of 194 (6.46%) participants with clinically palpable breast lumps. Seventeen out of these 23 (0.56%) were premenopausal (<46.6 years) with 7 (0.23%) being below 35 years. With an overall breast cancer incidence of 0.76% in this study, our observation that about 30% of these cancer cases were below 35 years may indicate a relative possible shift of cancer burden to women in their early thirties in Ghana, compared to Western countries. Conclusion. These results suggest an age adjustment for breast cancer screening to early twenties for Ghanaian women and the need for a nationwide breast cancer screening to understand completely the pattern of breast cancer distribution in Ghana. PMID:27635263

  7. Pattern of Breast Cancer Distribution in Ghana: A Survey to Enhance Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Debrah, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nearly 70% of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Ghana are in advanced stages of the disease due especially to low awareness, resulting in limited treatment success and high death rate. With limited epidemiological studies on breast cancer in Ghana, the aim of this study is to assess and understand the pattern of breast cancer distribution for enhancing early detection and treatment. Methods. We randomly selected and screened 3000 women for clinical palpable breast lumps and used univariate and bivariate analysis for description and exploration of variables, respectively, in relation to incidence of breast cancer. Results. We diagnosed 23 (0.76%) breast cancer cases out of 194 (6.46%) participants with clinically palpable breast lumps. Seventeen out of these 23 (0.56%) were premenopausal (<46.6 years) with 7 (0.23%) being below 35 years. With an overall breast cancer incidence of 0.76% in this study, our observation that about 30% of these cancer cases were below 35 years may indicate a relative possible shift of cancer burden to women in their early thirties in Ghana, compared to Western countries. Conclusion. These results suggest an age adjustment for breast cancer screening to early twenties for Ghanaian women and the need for a nationwide breast cancer screening to understand completely the pattern of breast cancer distribution in Ghana.

  8. Method of Detection of Breast Cancer in Low-Income Women

    PubMed Central

    Diamant, Allison; Hoq, Lalima; Maly, Rose

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background: Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women, and its timely diagnosis and treatment are of paramount importance, especially for vulnerable groups, such as low-income and uninsured women. Recent literature confirms that the method of breast cancer detection may be an important prognostic factor, but there are no studies that examine the method of breast cancer detection in low-income populations. We sought to analyze the determinants of method of detection (medical vs. self) in a cohort of low-income women with breast cancer receiving care through California's Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Program. Methods: This is a cross-sectional survey analysis of 921 low-income women interviewed within 6 months of definitive surgical treatment. The outcome analyzed was self vs. medical detection of breast cancer. Results: The mean age of the women was 53 years, with nearly 88% reporting an income of <$30,000 per year; 64% of women self-detected their breast cancer. Logistic regression analyses revealed that older women, Latinas, and women having any health insurance before diagnosis had lower odds of self-detecting their lesions. Conclusions: Patient age, ethnicity, and regular source of care were associated with method of breast cancer detection in a low-income underserved population. The rate of self-detection in our population correlates with the literature, but we need to improve efforts to increase mammography screening to ensure early detection of disease in this vulnerable group. PMID:19951215

  9. 76 FR 55915 - Request for Nominations of Candidates to Serve on the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... on the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC) The... the CDC on the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The role of the BCCEDCAC...

  10. Utility of Clinical Breast Exams in Detecting Local-Regional Breast Events after Breast-Conservation in Women with a Personal History of High-risk Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Heather B.; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Francescatti, Amanda B.; Adesoye, Taiwo; SB, Edge; ES, Burnside; DJ, Vanness; M, Yu; Y, Si; D, McKellar; DP, Winchester; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although breast cancer follow-up guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical exams, prior studies suggest a small fraction of local-regional events occurring after breast conservation are detected by exam alone. Our objective was to examine how local-regional events are detected in a contemporary, national cohort of high-risk breast cancer survivors. Methods A stage-stratified sample of stage II/III breast cancer patients diagnosed in 2006-2007 (n=11,099) were identified from 1,217 facilities within the National Cancer Data Base. Additional data on local-regional and distant breast events, method of event detection, imaging received, and mortality was collected. We further limited the cohort to patients with breast conservation (n=4,854). Summary statistics describe local-regional event rates and detection method. Results Local-regional events were detected in 5.5% (n=265). 83% were ipsilateral or contralateral in-breast events, and 17% within ipsilateral lymph nodes. 48% of local-regional events were detected on asymptomatic breast imaging, 29% by patients, and 10% on clinical exam. Overall, 0.5% of the 4,854 patients had a local-regional event detected on exam. Exams detected a higher proportion of lymph node (8/45) compared to in-breast events (18/220). No factors were associated with method of event detection. Discussion Clinical exams, as an adjunct to screening mammography, have a modest effect on local-regional event detection. This contradicts current belief that exams are a critical adjunct to mammographic screening. These findings can help to streamline follow-up care, potentially improving follow-up efficiency and quality. PMID:27491784

  11. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... to keep cancer from starting. General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  12. CEST-MRI detects metabolite levels altered by breast cancer cell aggressiveness and chemotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kannie W Y; Jiang, Lu; Cheng, Menglin; Wijnen, Jannie P; Liu, Guanshu; Huang, Peng; van Zijl, Peter C M; McMahon, Michael T; Glunde, Kristine

    2016-06-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is an MRI contrast mechanism that detects the exchange of protons from distinct hydroxyl, amine, and amide groups to tissue water through the transfer of signal loss, with repeated exchange enhancing their effective signal. We applied CEST to detect systematically 15 common cellular metabolites in a panel of differentially aggressive human breast cancer cell lines. The highest CEST contrast was generated by creatine, myo-inositol, glutamate, and glycerophosphocholine, whose cellular concentrations decreased with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness. These decreased metabolite concentrations resulted in turn in a decreased CEST profile with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. Treatment of both breast cancer cell lines with the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin resulted in increased metabolic CEST profiles, which correlated with significant increases in creatine, phosphocreatine, and glycerophosphocholine. CEST can detect breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. The presented results help shed light on possible contributions from CEST-active metabolites to the CEST contrast produced by breast cancers. The metabolic CEST profile may improve detection sensitivity over conventional MRS, and may have the potential to assess breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy non-invasively using MRI if specialized metabolic CEST profile detection can be realized in vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27100284

  13. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... drink per day (women at high risk for breast cancer should not drink alcohol at all) ... Services Task Force. Risk assessment, genetic counseling, and ... cancer treatment. Bethesda, MD: National Cancer Institute. Date ...

  14. DNA promoter hypermethylation in nipple fluid: a potential tool for early breast cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Jolien S.; Moelans, Cathy B.; Elias, Sjoerd G.; Fackler, Mary Jo; van Domselaar, Robert; Suijkerbuijk, Karijn P.M.; Witkamp, Arjen J.; Sukumar, Saraswati; van Diest, Paul J.; van der Wall, Elsken

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Nipple fluid aspiration provides direct non-invasive sampling of fluid from the mammary ductal system, where the majority of breast cancers originate. DNA promoter hypermethylation (“methylation”) occurs early and at high frequency in breast carcinogenesis, bearing the potential as a biomarker for cancer detection at its earliest stages. We assessed methylation in nipple fluid from breasts of healthy women, of women with sporadic breast cancer and of their contralateral breasts. Our goal was to investigate whether nipple fluid can be used as a reliable methylation biomarker source. Methods Methylation levels of 13 genes were analysed by quantitative multiplex-methylation specific PCR (QM-MSP) in nipple fluid samples from breasts of healthy women, and from the affected and contralateral breasts of breast cancer patients. Results Methylation analysis of the low-volume nipple fluid samples was feasible. Despite the generally low methylation levels, cancerous and healthy breasts nipple fluid could be discriminated with an area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 0.64 (p<0.01) based on a multivariate model including AKR1B1, ALX1, RASSF1A and TM6SF1. Within-patient differences between cancerous and contralateral nipple fluid samples were less prominent. Conclusions Cancerous nipple fluid contains increased levels of methylation of tumor suppressor genes that potentially could serve as a biomarker for early breast cancer detection. PMID:27028854

  15. Types of Breast Cancers

    MedlinePlus

    ... the key statistics about breast cancer? Types of breast cancers Breast cancer can be separated into different types ... than invasive ductal carcinoma. Less common types of breast cancer Inflammatory breast cancer This uncommon type of invasive ...

  16. The prevention, detection, and management of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Houssami, Nehmat; Cuzick, Jack; Dixon, J Michael

    2006-03-01

    The reduction in the incidence of contralateral breast cancer in women treated with adjuvant tamoxifen provided a model for prevention using endocrine agents. Oestrogen-receptor-positive cancer can be prevented with tamoxifen, but side effects limit its clinical utility, and the risk-benefit ratio is not sufficiently high to routinely recommend tamoxifen as a preventive agent. Agents being evaluated in prevention trials include raloxifene and the aromatase inhibitors; these are expected to be at least as effective as tamoxifen and to have fewer side effects. Core needle biopsy (providing histological information) and high-resolution breast ultrasound enhance preoperative assessment of breast cancer. Mammography remains the only screening test shown to reduce breast cancer deaths in randomised trials. Magnetic resonance imaging may have a role in screening women with inherited mutations of the breast cancer genes. Sentinel lymph node biopsy accurately assesses lymph node status and is associated with less morbidity than axillary dissection. Where the biopsy is negative (no histologic evidence of metastases), no further axillary treatment is necessary. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy can produce good cosmetic results, especially where autologous tissue is used. Myocutaneous flaps using latissimus dorsi or transverse rectus abdominus muscles are increasingly popular. Adjuvant trastuzumab therapy in patients whose tumours overexpress HER2 (growth factor receptor) can reduce recurrence rates and improve survival. Neoadjuvant endocrine therapy (as an initial treatment before surgery) is an underutilised treatment in postmenopausal women with oestrogen-receptor-positive large operable or locally advanced cancers. It makes more patients suitable for surgery and offers others the choice of breast conservation. PMID:16515434

  17. Detection of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes and Major BRCA Mutations in Familial Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Mohtasebi, Parinaz; Rassi, Hossein; Maleki, Fatemeh; Hajimohammadi, Sameh; Bagheri, Zahra; Fakhar Miandoab, Malihe; Naserbakht, Mahdieh

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer is a multistep disease and infection with a DNA virus could play a role in one or more of the steps in this pathogenic process. High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of several cancers. In this study, we investigated HPV genotypes associated with breast cancer and its relationship with BRCA mutation for the detection of familial breast cancer. We analyzed 84 formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue blocks from 38 familial breast cancer and 46 nonfamilial breast cancer samples by multiplex polymerase chain reaction and clinical parameters. Overall prevalence of HPV infection was 27 of 84: 10 (37.03%) HPV-16, 9 (29.62%) HPV-18, 4 (14.81%) HPV-11, 1 (3.7%) HPV-31, 1 (3.7%) HPV-33, and 2 (7.4%) HPV35. Furthermore, 17 mtDNA4977 deletions and 5 5382insC mutations were detected from 38 familial breast cancer samples. Our results demonstrate that infection with HPV was prevalent among Iranian women with familial breast cancer and the testing of mtDNA4977 deletions and 5382insC mutations in combination with clinical parameters as major risk factors can serve in the identification of familial breast cancer. PMID:27186947

  18. Three-dimensional photoacoustic imaging system in line confocal mode for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Fei; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2010-11-01

    We present a three-dimensional (3-D) photoacoustic imaging system (PAIS) in line confocal mode for breast cancer detection. With the line confocal mode, the spatial resolution of the PAIS was tested to be improved about three times compared with the nonconfocal mode PAIS. Furthermore, with a flexible scanning system and no compression on the breast, the PAIS could supply a comfortable and safe diagnosis process for the patient. An ex vivo breast tumor imaging experiment was performed and the tumor was visualized by the 3-D photoacoustic image. The experimental result demonstrated that the system had great potential of application in breast cancer detection.

  19. Breast cancer detection and differentiation using piezoelectric fingers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yegingil, Hakki Orhan

    A piezoelectric finger (PEF) is a tissue elasticity sensor developed in our laboratory. With a dual piezoelectric layer design, a PEF can apply a force and detect the resultant displacement all-electrically, ideal for potential in vivo tissue elasticity measurements. The goal of this thesis is to develop PEFs towards a breast cancer detector. The study encompasses (1) fundamental development and characterization of PEFs as a tissue elasticity sensor using model tissues, (2) application of PEFs to ex vivo breast samples, and (3) development of array PEFs towards in vivo measurements. I have shown that a PEF can accurately measure the elastic or shear moduli values of soft polymer samples using indentation methods. Furthermore, I have shown that a PEF has a depth sensitivity twice its width by testing inclusions embedded at various depths in model tissues. Using the measurements from two PEFs of different widths, I showed that the depth and modulus of an inclusion can be determined with an empirical "two-spring" model. I have shown that a PEF could distinguish between the 2-D and 3-D smooth and rough surface inclusions by examining the shear (G) to elastic (E) moduli ratio: smooth and rough inclusions have G/E ratio of ˜0.3 and >0.7, respectively. I have characterized 71 ex vivo breast tumors in terms of tumor size, location, malignancy and invasiveness. I have shown that PEFs predicted all abnormalities, including a 3 mm tumor. PEF's size predictions were accurate within 10% of the pathologic measurements. Furthermore, using G/E > 0.7 as a criterion, we predicted invasive carcinoma with 89% sensitivity and 82% specificity. With G/E = 0.3 and >0.7 as a criterion, the malignancy prediction had a 96% sensitivity and 54% specificity. Moving toward real patient applications, PEF compression array was developed, characterized over the model tissue samples, and successfully located an in-vivo tumor inside breast tissue and predicted its size, depth and modulus

  20. Mitosis Detection for Invasive Breast Cancer Grading in Histopathological Images.

    PubMed

    Paul, Angshuman; Mukherjee, Dipti Prasad

    2015-11-01

    Histopathological grading of cancer not only offers an insight to the patients' prognosis but also helps in making individual treatment plans. Mitosis counts in histopathological slides play a crucial role for invasive breast cancer grading using the Nottingham grading system. Pathologists perform this grading by manual examinations of a few thousand images for each patient. Hence, finding the mitotic figures from these images is a tedious job and also prone to observer variability due to variations in the appearances of the mitotic cells. We propose a fast and accurate approach for automatic mitosis detection from histopathological images. We employ area morphological scale space for cell segmentation. The scale space is constructed in a novel manner by restricting the scales with the maximization of relative-entropy between the cells and the background. This results in precise cell segmentation. The segmented cells are classified in mitotic and non-mitotic category using the random forest classifier. Experiments show at least 12% improvement in F1 score on more than 450 histopathological images at 40× magnification.

  1. Detection and genotyping of human papillomavirus in breast cancer tissues from Iraqi patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, S H M; Al-Alwan, N A S; Al-Alwany, S H M

    2014-06-18

    Studies have suggested a possible link between breast cancer pathogenesis and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. This study in Iraq used in situ hybridization to detect the frequency and genotyping of HPV in tissue specimens from 129 patients diagnosed with malignant breast cancer, 24 with benign breast tumours and 20 healthy controls. In the breast cancer group, cocktail HPV genotypes were detected in 60 (46.5%) archived tissue blocks. Of these, genotypes 16 (55.5%), 18 (58.4%), 31 (65.0%) and 33 (26.6%) were detected. Mixed HPV genotypes 16 + 18, 16 + 18 + 31, 16 + 18 + 33, 18 + 33, 16 + 31 and 18 + 31 were found in 5.0%, 25.0%, 8.3%, 7.7%, 10.0% and 13.3% of cancer cases respectively. Only 3 benign breast tumour tissues (12.5%) and none of the healthy breast tissue specimens were HPV-DNA-positive. The detection of high-oncogenic HPV genotypes in patients with breast cancer supports the hypothesis of an etiologic role for the virus in breast cancer development.

  2. Magnetic Resonance in the Detection of Breast Cancers of Different Histological Types

    PubMed Central

    Mayrhofer, Rebecca M.; Ng, Hsiao Piau; Putti, Thomas C.; Kuchel, Philip W.

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer incidence is increasing worldwide. Early detection is critical for long-term patient survival, as is monitoring responses to chemotherapy for management of the disease. Magnetic resonance imaging and spectroscopy (MRI/MRS) has gained in importance in the last decade for the diagnosis and monitoring of breast cancer therapy. The sensitivity of MRI/MRS for anatomical delineation is very high and the consensus is that MRI is more sensitive in detection than x-ray mammography. Advantages of MRS include delivery of biochemical information about tumor metabolism, which can potentially assist in the staging of cancers and monitoring responses to treatment. The roles of MRS and MRI in screening and monitoring responses to treatment of breast cancer are reviewed here. We rationalize how it is that different histological types of breast cancer are differentially detected and characterized by MR methods. PMID:25114543

  3. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  4. Detection, isolation, and capture of circulating breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Njoroge, Martin; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Gaffigan, Brian; Rood, Kyle; Viator, John A.

    2013-03-01

    According to the CDC, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis, or the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems, significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. In this study, a technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser with a 5 ns pulse at 532 nm is used to interrogate thousands of cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells which are pigmented, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to provide pigment. After which, the device is calibrated to demonstrate a single-cell detection limit. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25-45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro photoacoustic flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy, it can also be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  5. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer - Overview Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Overview Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial Board , ... bean-shaped organs that help fight infection. About breast cancer Cancer begins when healthy cells in the breast ...

  6. Breast Cancer Nodes Detection Using Ultrasonic Microscale Subarrayed MIMO RADAR

    PubMed Central

    Siwamogsatham, Siwaruk; Pomalaza-Ráez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of ultrasonic microscale subarrayed MIMO RADARs to estimate the position of breast cancer nodes. The transmit and receive antenna arrays are divided into subarrays. In order to increase the signal diversity each subarray is assigned a different waveform from an orthogonal set. High-frequency ultrasonic transducers are used since a breast is considered to be a superficial structure. Closed form expressions for the optimal Neyman-Pearson detector are derived. The combination of the waveform diversity present in the subarrayed deployment and traditional phased-array RADAR techniques provides promising results. PMID:25309591

  7. A Community-Oriented Approach to Breast Cancer in a Low-Resource Setting: Improving Awareness, Early Detection and Treatment of Breast Cancer in Tajikistan.

    PubMed

    Talib, Zohray; Shukurbekova, Irina; Sadonshoeva, Guldarbogh; Alibekov, Alibek; Jamshedov, Nekruz; Moloo, Zahir; Welji, Almas; Amersi, Farin; Muhammad, Aliya Amin; Jiwani, Aliya; Rais, Sheliza; Nazrishoeva, Akoyat; Ilnazarova, Surayo; Nuridinova, Shifo; Ukani, Hafiza; Alwani, Shireen; Saleh, Mansoor

    2016-05-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most common cancers and causes of death in females in Tajikistan; yet less than half of the adult women in Tajikistan have heard of breast cancer. Limited access to health care contributes to late stage presentation. We developed a public-private partnership to implement a breast cancer awareness intervention in a low-resource community in Khorog, Tajikistan. We trained local health professionals in clinical breast care and conducted a breast cancer screening and treatment program. The partnership involved visiting USA-based health professionals working alongside local health care providers (HCP) in the continuum of breast care-from education to the diagnostic evaluation and management of detected breast abnormalities. Patient data were collected using a web-based program (VirtualDoc). Twenty-four HCP received didactic and clinical breast examination training. 441 women underwent clinical breast evaluation. 74 (17%) had abnormal exams and underwent additional diagnostic procedures. We identified six (1.4%) cases of breast cancer (all locally advanced) and two women had benign fibroadenomas. All women with cancer underwent modified radical mastectomy, while the fibroadenomas were treated by cosmetically appropriate lumpectomy. Five of six subjects with cancer were previously aware of their breast lump and three had recently seen a family medicine (FM) doctor. Health systems assessment revealed availability of diagnostic equipment but lack of well-trained operators and clinician interpreters. We were successful in integrating clinical breast exams into the routine care of female patients by local FM doctors and in the process, achieved a better understanding of existing risk factors and barriers to breast cancer care. This public-private partnership, leveraging the technical expertise of visiting health professionals, demonstrates how a focused onsite training and awareness program can provide sustained improvements in breast care in a low

  8. Sensitivity of Noncommercial Computer-aided Detection System for Mammographic Breast Cancer Detection: Pilot Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Helvie, Mark A.; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Makariou, Erini; Chan, Heang-Ping; Petrick, Nicholas; Sahiner, Berkman; Lo, Shih-Chung B.; Freedman, Matthew; Adler, Dorit; Bailey, Janet; Blane, Caroline; Hoff, Donna; Hunt, Karen; Joynt, Lynn; Klein, Katherine; Paramagul, Chintana; Patterson, Stephanie K.; Roubidoux, Marilyn A.

    2009-01-01

    PURPOSE To evaluate a noncommercial computer-aided detection (CAD) program for breast cancer detection with screening mammography. MATERIALS AND METHODS A CAD program was developed for mammographic breast cancer detection. The program was applied to 2,389 patients’ screening mammograms at two geographically remote academic institutions (institutions A and B). Thirteen radiologists who specialized in breast imaging participated in this pilot study. For each case, the individual radiologist performed a prospective Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) assessment after viewing of the screening mammogram. Subsequently, the radiologist was shown CAD results and rendered a second BI-RADS assessment by using knowledge of both mammographic appearance and CAD results. Outcome analysis of results of examination in patients recalled for a repeat examination, of biopsy, and of 1-year follow-up examination was recorded. Correct detection with CAD included a computer-generated mark indicating a possible malignancy on craniocaudal or mediolateral oblique views or both. RESULTS Eleven (0.46%) of 2,389 patients had mammographically detected nonpalpable breast cancers. Ten (91%) of 11 (95% CI: 74%, 100%) cancers were correctly identified with CAD. Radiologist sensitivity without CAD was 91% (10 of 11; 95% CI: 74%, 100%). In 1,077 patients, follow-up findings were documented at 1 year. Five (0.46%) patients developed cancers, which were found on subsequent screening mammograms. The area where the cancers developed in two (40%) of these five patients was marked (true-positive finding) by the computer in the preceding year. Because of CAD results, a 9.7% increase in recall rate from 14.4% (344 of 2,389) to 15.8% (378 of 2,389) occurred. Radiologists’ recall rate of study patients prior to use of CAD was 31% higher than the average rate for nonstudy cases (10.3%) during the same time period at institution A. CONCLUSION Performance of the CAD program had a very high

  9. Simulations and phantom evaluations of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadleir, Rosalind J.; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2013-05-01

    MREIT is a new imaging modality that can be used to reconstruct high-resolution conductivity images of the human body. Since conductivity values of cancerous tissues in the breast are significantly higher than those of surrounding normal tissues, breast imaging using MREIT may provide a new noninvasive way of detecting early stage of cancer. In this paper, we present results of experimental and numerical simulation studies of breast MREIT. We built a realistic three-dimensional model of the human breast connected to a simplified model of the chest including the heart and evaluated the ability of MREIT to detect cancerous anomalies in a background material with similar electrical properties to breast tissue. We performed numerical simulations of various scenarios in breast MREIT including assessment of the effects of fat inclusions and effects related to noise levels, such as changing the amplitude of injected currents, effect of added noise and number of averages. Phantom results showed straightforward detection of cancerous anomalies in a background was possible with low currents and few averages. The simulation results showed it should be possible to detect a cancerous anomaly in the breast, while restricting the maximal current density in the heart below published levels for nerve excitation.

  10. Nuclear nano-morphology markers of histologically normal cells detect the "field effect" of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bista, Rajan K; Wang, Pin; Bhargava, Rohit; Uttam, Shikhar; Hartman, Douglas J; Brand, Randall E; Liu, Yang

    2012-08-01

    Accurate detection of breast malignancy from histologically normal cells ("field effect") has significant clinical implications in a broad base of breast cancer management, such as high-risk lesion management, personalized risk assessment, breast tumor recurrence, and tumor margin management. More accurate and clinically applicable tools to detect markers characteristic of breast cancer "field effect" that are able to guide the clinical management are urgently needed. We have recently developed a novel optical microscope, spatial-domain low-coherence quantitative phase microscopy, which extracts the nanoscale structural characteristics of cell nuclei (i.e., nuclear nano-morphology markers), using standard histology slides. In this proof-of-concept study, we present the use of these highly sensitive nuclear nano-morphology markers to identify breast malignancy from histologically normal cells. We investigated the nano-morphology markers from 154 patients with a broad spectrum of breast pathology entities, including normal breast tissue, non-proliferative benign lesions, proliferative lesions (without and with atypia), "malignant-adjacent" normal tissue, and invasive carcinoma. Our results show that the nuclear nano-morphology markers of "malignant-adjacent" normal tissue can detect the presence of invasive breast carcinoma with high accuracy and do not reflect normal aging. Further, we found that a progressive change in nuclear nano-morphology markers that parallel breast cancer risk, suggesting its potential use for risk stratification. These novel nano-morphology markers that detect breast cancerous changes from nanoscale structural characteristics of histologically normal cells could potentially benefit the diagnosis, risk assessment, prognosis, prevention, and treatment of breast cancer.

  11. Detecting and treating breast cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors

    DOEpatents

    Moonlee, Sun-Young; Bissell, Mina J.; Furuta, Saori; Meier, Roland; Kenny, Paraic A.

    2016-04-05

    The application describes therapeutic compositions and methods for treating cancer. For example, therapeutic compositions and methods related to inhibition of FAM83A (family with sequence similarity 83) are provided. The application also describes methods for diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors. For example, a method of diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors by detecting increased FAM83A levels is described.

  12. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Next Topic Breast-conserving surgery (lumpectomy) Surgery for breast cancer Most women with breast cancer have some type ... Relieve symptoms of advanced cancer Surgery to remove breast cancer There are two main types of surgery to ...

  13. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  14. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  15. AGR3 in Breast Cancer: Prognostic Impact and Suitable Serum-Based Biomarker for Early Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Garczyk, Stefan; von Stillfried, Saskia; Antonopoulos, Wiebke; Hartmann, Arndt; Schrauder, Michael G.; Fasching, Peter A.; Anzeneder, Tobias; Tannapfel, Andrea; Ergönenc, Yavuz; Knüchel, Ruth

    2015-01-01

    Blood-based early detection of breast cancer has recently gained novel momentum, as liquid biopsy diagnostics is a fast emerging field. In this study, we aimed to identify secreted proteins which are up-regulated both in tumour tissue and serum samples of breast cancer patients compared to normal tissue and sera. Based on two independent tissue cohorts (n = 75 and n = 229) and one serum cohort (n = 80) of human breast cancer and healthy serum samples, we characterised AGR3 as a novel potential biomarker both for breast cancer prognosis and early breast cancer detection from blood. AGR3 expression in breast tumours is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor α (P<0.001) and lower tumour grade (P<0.01). Interestingly, AGR3 protein expression correlates with unfavourable outcome in low (G1) and intermediate (G2) grade breast tumours (multivariate hazard ratio: 2.186, 95% CI: 1.008-4.740, P<0.05) indicating an independent prognostic impact. In sera analysed by ELISA technique, AGR3 protein concentration was significantly (P<0.001) elevated in samples from breast cancer patients (n = 40, mainly low stage tumours) compared to healthy controls (n = 40). To develop a suitable biomarker panel for early breast cancer detection, we measured AGR2 protein in human serum samples in parallel. The combined AGR3/AGR2 biomarker panel achieved a sensitivity of 64.5% and a specificity of 89.5% as shown by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve statistics. Thus our data clearly show the potential usability of AGR3 and AGR2 as biomarkers for blood-based early detection of human breast cancer. PMID:25875093

  16. Breast Cancer Detection by B7-H3 Targeted Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound complements mammography as an imaging modality for breast cancer detection, especially in patients with dense breast tissue, but its utility is limited by low diagnostic accuracy. One emerging molecular tool to address this limitation involves contrast-enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles targeted to molecular signatures on tumor neovasculature. In this study, we illustrate how tumor vascular expression of B7-H3 (CD276), a member of the B7 family of ligands for T cell co-regulatory receptors, can be incorporated into an ultrasound method that can distinguish normal, benign, precursor and malignant breast pathologies for diagnostic purposes. Through an immunohistochemical analysis of 248 human breast specimens, we found that vascular expression of B7-H3 was selectively and significantly higher in breast cancer tissues. B7-H3 immunostaining on blood vessels distinguished benign/precursors from malignant lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in human specimens. In a transgenic mouse model of cancer, the B7-H3-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues and highly correlated with ex vivo expression levels of B7-H3 on quantitative immunofluorescence. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of B7-H3-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging as a tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer detection in patients. PMID:25899053

  17. Canadian National Breast Screening Study: 1. Breast cancer detection and death rates among women aged 40 to 49 years.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A B; Baines, C J; To, T; Wall, C

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of the combination of annual screening with mammography, physical examination of the breasts and the teaching of breast self-examination in reducing the rate of death from breast cancer among women aged 40 to 49 years on entry. DESIGN: Individually randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Fifteen urban centres in Canada with expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. PARTICIPANTS: Women with no history of breast cancer and no mammography in the previous 12 months were randomly assigned to undergo either annual mammography and physical examination (MP group) or usual care after an initial physical examination (UC group). The 50,430 women enrolled from January 1980 through March 1985 were followed for a mean of 8.5 years. DATA COLLECTION: Derived from the participants by initial and annual self-administered questionnaires, from the screening examinations, from the patients' physicians, from the provincial cancer registries and by record linkage to the Canadian National Mortality Data Base. Expert panels evaluated histologic and death data. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of referral from screening, rates of detection of breast cancer from screening and from community care, nodal status, tumour size, and rates of death from all causes and from breast cancer. RESULTS: Over 90% of the women in each group attended the screening sessions or returned the annual questionnaires, or both, over years 2 to 5. The characteristics of the women in the two groups were similar. Compared with the Canadian population, the participants were more likely to be married, have fewer children, have more education, be in a professional occupation, smoke less and have been born in North America. The rate of screen-detected breast cancer on first examination was 3.89 per 1000 in the MP group and 2.46 per 1000 in the UC group; more node-positive tumours were found in the MP group than in the UC group. During years 2 through 5 the ratios of observed

  18. Breast cancer detection among young survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma with screening magnetic resonance imaging

    PubMed Central

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Cigsar, Candemir; Ahmed, Sameera; Ng, Andrea; Diller, Lisa; Millar, B-A; Crystal, Pavel; Hodgson, David C

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND Female survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) who have received chest radiotherapy are at increased risk of breast cancer. Guidelines for early breast cancer screening among these survivors are based on little data regarding clinical outcomes. This study reports outcomes of breast cancer screening with MRI and mammography (MMG) after childhood HL. METHODS We evaluated the results of breast MRI and MMG screening among 96 female survivors of childhood HL treated with chest radiotherapy. Outcomes measured included imaging sensitivity and specificity, breast cancer characteristics, and incidence of additional imaging and breast biopsy. RESULTS Median age at first screening was 30 years, and the median number of MRI screening rounds was 3. Ten breast cancers were detected in 9 women at a median age of 39 years (range, 24-43 years). Half were invasive and half were preinvasive. The median size of invasive tumors was 8 mm (range, 3-15 mm), and none had lymph node involvement. Sensitivity and specificity of the screening modalities were as follows: for MRI alone, 80% and 93.5%, respectively; MMG alone, 70% and 95%, respectively; both modalities combined, 100% and 88.6%, respectively. All invasive tumors were detected by MRI. Additional investigations were required in 52 patients, (54%), and 26 patients (27%) required breast biopsy, with 10 patients requiring more than 1 biopsy. CONCLUSIONS Screening including breast MRI with MMG has high sensitivity and specificity in pediatric HL survivors, with breast cancers detected at an early stage, although it is associated with a substantial rate of additional investigations. Cancer 2014;120:2507–2513. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. Screening female survivors of pediatric Hodgkin Lymphoma for breast cancer with MRI and mammography detected tumors at an earlier stage than prior studies of mammography alone, although a substantial proportion of

  19. Breast Cancer Detection in a Screening Population: Comparison of Digital Mammography, Computer-Aided Detection Applied to Digital Mammography and Breast Ultrasound

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kyu Ran; Woo, Ok Hee; Song, Sung Eun; Choi, Jungsoon; Whang, Shin Young; Park, Eun Kyung; Park, Ah Young; Shin, Hyeseon; Chung, Hwan Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We aimed to compare the detection of breast cancer using full-field digital mammography (FFDM), FFDM with computer-aided detection (FFDM+CAD), ultrasound (US), and FFDM+CAD plus US (FFDM+CAD+US), and to investigate the factors affecting cancer detection. Methods In this retrospective study conducted from 2008 to 2012, 48,251 women underwent FFDM and US for cancer screening. One hundred seventy-one breast cancers were detected: 115 invasive cancers and 56 carcinomas in situ. Two radiologists evaluated the imaging findings of FFDM, FFDM+CAD, and US, based on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon of the American College of Radiology by consensus. We reviewed the clinical and the pathological data to investigate factors affecting cancer detection. We statistically used generalized estimation equations with a logit link to compare the cancer detectability of different imaging modalities. To compare the various factors affecting detection versus nondetection, we used Wilcoxon rank sum, chi-square, or Fisher exact test. Results The detectability of breast cancer by US (96.5%) or FFDM+CAD+US (100%) was superior to that of FFDM (87.1%) (p=0.019 or p<0.001, respectively) or FFDM+ CAD (88.3%) (p=0.050 or p<0.001, respectively). However, cancer detectability was not significantly different between FFDM versus FFDM+CAD (p=1.000) and US alone versus FFDM+CAD+US (p=0.126). The tumor size influenced cancer detectability by all imaging modalities (p<0.050). In FFDM and FFDM+CAD, the nondetecting group consisted of younger patients and patients with a denser breast composition (p<0.050). In breast US, carcinoma in situ was more frequent in the nondetecting group (p=0.014). Conclusion For breast cancer screening, breast US alone is satisfactory for all age groups, although FFDM+ CAD+US is the perfect screening method. Patient age, breast composition, and pathological tumor size and type may influence cancer detection during screening. PMID:27721882

  20. From cancer screening to treatment: service delivery and referral in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jacqueline W; Hanson, Vivien; Johnson, Gale D; Royalty, Janet E; Richardson, Lisa C

    2014-08-15

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income and underserved women through a network of providers and health care organizations. Although the program serves women 40-64 years old for breast cancer screening and 21-64 years old for cervical cancer screening, the priority populations are women 50-64 years old for breast cancer and women who have never or rarely been screened for cervical cancer. From 1991 through 2011, the NBCCEDP provided screening and diagnostic services to more than 4.3 million women, diagnosing 54,276 breast cancers, 2554 cervical cancers, and 123,563 precancerous cervical lesions. A critical component of providing screening services is to ensure that all women with abnormal screening results receive appropriate and timely diagnostic evaluations. Case management is provided to assist women with overcoming barriers that would delay or prevent follow-up care. Women diagnosed with cancer receive treatment through the states' Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Programs (a special waiver for Medicaid) if they are eligible. The NBCCEDP has performance measures that serve as benchmarks to monitor the completeness and timeliness of care. More than 90% of the women receive complete diagnostic care and initiate treatment less than 30 days from the time of their diagnosis. Provision of effective screening and diagnostic services depends on effective program management, networks of providers throughout the community, and the use of evidence-based knowledge, procedures, and technologies.

  1. Canadian National Breast Screening Study: 2. Breast cancer detection and death rates among women aged 50 to 59 years.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A B; Baines, C J; To, T; Wall, C

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To evaluate the efficacy of annual mammography over and above annual physical examination of the breasts and the teaching of breast self-examination among women aged 50 to 59 on entry. DESIGN: Individually randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Fifteen urban centres in Canada with expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. PARTICIPANTS: Women with no history of breast cancer and no mammography in the previous 12 months were randomly assigned to undergo either annual mammography and physical examination (MP group) or annual physical examination only (PO group). The 39,405 women enrolled from January 1980 through March 1985 were followed for a mean of 8.3 years. DATA COLLECTION: Derived from the participants by initial and annual self-administered questionnaires, from the screening examinations, from the patients' physicians, from the provincial cancer registries and by record linkage to the Canadian National Mortality Data Base. Expert panels evaluated histologic and death data. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of referral from screening, rates of detection of breast cancer from screening and from community care, nodal status, tumour size and rates of death from all causes and from breast cancer. RESULTS: Over 85% of the women in each group attended the screening sessions after screen 1. The characteristics of the women in the two groups were similar. Compared with the Canadian population the participants were more likely to be married, have fewer children, have more education, be in a professional occupation, smoke less and have been born in North America. The rate of screen-detected breast cancer on first examination was 7.20 per 1000 in the MP group and 3.45 per 1000 in the PO group, more node-positive tumours were found in the MP group than in the PO group. At subsequent screens the detection rates were a little less than half the rates at screen 1. During years 2 through 5 the ratios of observed to expected cases of invasive breast cancer

  2. Fast 3-D Tomographic Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Meaney, Paul M.; Kaufman, Peter A.; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta M.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave breast imaging (using electromagnetic waves of frequencies around 1 GHz) has mostly remained at the research level for the past decade, gaining little clinical acceptance. The major hurdles limiting patient use are both at the hardware level (challenges in collecting accurate and noncorrupted data) and software level (often plagued by unrealistic reconstruction times in the tens of hours). In this paper we report improvements that address both issues. First, the hardware is able to measure signals down to levels compatible with sub-centimeter image resolution while keeping an exam time under 2 min. Second, the software overcomes the enormous time burden and produces similarly accurate images in less than 20 min. The combination of the new hardware and software allows us to produce and report here the first clinical 3-D microwave tomographic images of the breast. Two clinical examples are selected out of 400+ exams conducted at the Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (Lebanon, NH). The first example demonstrates the potential usefulness of our system for breast cancer screening while the second example focuses on therapy monitoring. PMID:22562726

  3. [Government actions for the early detection of breast cancer in Latin America. Future challenges].

    PubMed

    González-Robledo, Luz María; González-Robledo, María Cecilia; Nigenda, Gustavo; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth

    2010-01-01

    Documentary research carried out in 2009 aims to document the regulatory framework and existing programs for the early detection of breast cancer in Latin America and the Caribbean in order to establish the most important challenges for the containment of the epidemic in the region. The governments of the region have developed diverse efforts and initiatives to confront the rise in mortality due to said cause, including early detection, treatment and research strategies. Despite advances in the early detection of breast cancer, the challenge remains to link efforts to ensure continuity of care (diagnostic confirmation, treatment and monitoring) in order to achieve higher efficiency, effectiveness and benefits for women with this disease.

  4. Novel Ultrasound Sensor and Reconstruction Algorithm for Breast Cancer Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Ashby, A E; Ciarlo, D R; Thomas, G H

    2002-09-09

    Mammography is currently used for screening women over the age of 40 for breast cancer. It has not been used routinely on younger women because their breast composition is mostly glandular, or radiodense, meaning there is an increased radiation exposure risk as well as a high likelihood of poor image quality. For these younger women, it is calculated that the radiation exposure risk is higher than the potential benefit from the screening. It is anticipated that transmission ultrasound will enable screening of much younger women and complement mamographic screening in women over 40. Ultrasonic transmission tomography holds out the hope of being a discriminating tool for breast cancer screening that is safe, comfortable, and inexpensive. From its inception, however, this imaging modality has been plagued by the problem of how to quickly and inexpensively obtain the data necessary for the tomographic reconstruction. The objectives of this project were: to adapt a new kind of sensor to data acquisition for ultrasonic transmission tomography of the breast, to collect phantom data, to devise new reconstruction algorithms to use that data, and to recommend improved methods for displaying the reconstructions. The ultrasound sensor images an acoustic pressure wave over an entire surface by converting sound pressure into an optical modulation. At the beginning of this project the sensor imaged an area of approximately 7mm by 7mm and was very fragile. During the first year of this research we improved the production and assembly process of the sensors so they now last indefinitely. Our goal for the second year was to enlarge the sensor aperture. Due to unavailability of high quality materials, we were not able to enlarge our original design. We created a phantom of materials similar to those used in manufacturing breast phantoms. We used the sensors to collect data from this phantom. We used both established (diffraction tomography) and new (paraxial adjoint method tomography

  5. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  6. Detection of MAGE-A3 in breast cancer patients’ sentinel lymph nodes

    PubMed Central

    Wascher, R A; Bostick, P J; Huynh, K T; Turner, R; Qi, K; Giuliano, A E; Hoon, D S B

    2001-01-01

    The detection of occult metastatic breast cancer cells by RT-PCR is limited by the poor specificity of most tumour mRNA markers. MAGE-A3 is a highly specific tumour mRNA marker that is not expressed in non-cancer cells. This study assesses MAGE-A3 mRNA as a molecular marker for the detection of tumour cells in the sentinel lymph nodes (SLN) of breast cancer patients. Serial frozen sections of SLN (n= 121) were obtained from 77 AJCC (American Joint Committee on Cancer) Stage I–IIIA breast cancer patients. MAGE-A3 mRNA analysis of SLN was performed by RT-PCR and Southern blot analysis. Tumour cells were detected in 48 of 121 (40%) SLN from 77 patients by H&E or IHC staining, and 35 of 77 (45%) patients, overall, had histopathologically (H&E and/or IHC) positive SLN. Among histopathologically negative SLN, 28 of 73 (38%) SLN were MAGE-A3 mRNA positive by RT-PCR. Overall, 41 of 77 (53%) patients and 50 of 121 (41%) SLN were positive for MAGE-A3. MAGE-A3 mRNA expression in the SLN occurred more frequently with infiltrating lobular carcinoma (P< 0.001) than with infiltrating ductal carcinoma, adding further evidence of possible phenotypic differences between these 2 subtypes of breast cancer. Due to its high specificity, MAGE-A3 mRNA is a potentially useful marker for detecting breast cancer cells in the SLN. One half of breast tumours expressed MAGE-A3 mRNA, which has important potential implications for antigen-specific targeted immunotherapy. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:11720472

  7. Assessing Detection, Discrimination, and Risk of Breast Cancer According to Anisotropy Parameters of Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Ruisheng; Zeng, Xiangmin; Sun, Shihang; Ma, Zhijun; Wang, Ximing

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to investigate whether the anisotropy parameters are helpful in the detection and discrimination of breast cancers, and to determine its value in predicting the risk of cancers. Material/Methods There were 56 patients with 56 lesions (34 malignant, 22 benign) included in the study. DTI was performed in every patient and apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC), fractional anisotropy (FA), and eigenvalues E1, E2, and E3 were measured in every lesion and the normal breast tissue. Results ADC, FA, and eigenvalues of E1, E2, E3, and E1–E3 in breast cancers were all significantly lower than in normal tissue (P<0.001 for all) with mean reduction of (32±17)%, (24±13)%, (33±19)%, (32±17)%, (31±18)%, and (37±20)% for ADC, FA, E1, E2, E3, and E1–E3, respectively. These parameters were also statistically lower in cancers than in benign lesions (P<0.01 for all), except FA (P>0.05). ADC, E1, E2, and E3 were very similar in discriminating breast cancers and benign lesions, with area under the curve (AUC) 0.885–0.898, sensitivity 73.5–85.3%, and specificity 90.9–100%. Conclusions ADC, E1, E2, E3, and E1–E3 are much lower in breast cancers than in normal tissue and benign lesions. The reduction of ADC, E1, E2, E3, and E1–E3 of a mass in the breast is highly associated with the risk of breast cancer, but the FA has no utility in breast cancer risk prediction. PMID:27094307

  8. Impedimetric detection of mutant p53 biomarker-driven metastatic breast cancers under hyposmotic pressure.

    PubMed

    Shi, Menglu; Shtraizent, Nataly; Polotskaia, Alla; Bargonetti, Jill; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    In cancer cells, the oncogenic mutant p53 (mtp53) protein is present at high levels and gain-of-function (GOF) activities with more expression of mtp53 proteins contribute to tumor growth and metastasis. Robust analytical approaches that probe the degree of metastasis of cancer cells in connection with the mtp53 activity will be extremely useful not only for establishing a better cancer prognosis but also understanding the fundamental mechanism of mtp53 oncogenic action. Here we assessed the influence of mtp53 in breast cancers to the mechanical property of breast cancer cells. Recently, ovarian and kidney cancer cell lines have been shown to have higher cellular elasticity as compared to normal cells assessed by monitoring the degree of deformation under hyposmotic pressure. To make fast detection in large scale, the impedance measurement was applied to monitor the swelling ratio of cells with time. The results showed that knockdown of mtp53 leads to decrease in cell swelling. In addition, by means of two types of impedimetric detection systems we consistently detected enhancement of impedance signal in mtp53-expressing breast cancer cells. Based on this observation we hypothesize that highly expressed mtp53 in metastatic mutant breast cancers can promote tumor progression by making cells more deformable and easier to spread out through extracellular matrix. The identification via the electric measurement can be accomplished within 10 minutes. All results in this report suggest that electric probing for the extent of the mtp53 expression of breast cancer cells may serve as a meaningful fingerprint for the cancer diagnostics, and this outcome will also have an important clinical implication for the development of mtp53-based targeting for tumor detection and treatment.

  9. Method of Detection and Breast Cancer Survival Disparities in Hispanic Women

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Deirdre A.; Nibbe, Andrea; Royce, Melanie E.; Wallace, Anne Marie; Kang, Huining; Wiggins, Charles L.; Rosenberg, Robert D.

    2010-01-01

    Background Hispanic women in New Mexico (NM) are more likely to die of breast cancer-related causes than non-Hispanic women. We determined whether survival differences between Hispanic and non-Hispanic women might be attributable to the method of detection, an independent breast cancer prognostic factor in previous studies. Methods White women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer from 1995 through 2004 were identified from NM Surveillance Epidemiology End Results (SEER) files (n=5067), and matched to NM Mammography Project records. Method of cancer detection was categorized as “symptomatic” or “screen-detected”. The proportion of Hispanic survival disparity accounted for by included variables was assessed using Cox models. Results During 87 months median follow-up, 490 breast cancer deaths occurred. Symptomatic vs. screen-detection was classifiable for 3891 women (76.8%), and was independently related to breast cancer-specific survival (Hazard ratio (HR) 1.6; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.3–2.0). Hispanic women had a 1.5-fold increased risk of breast cancer-related death, relative to non-Hispanic women (95% CI 1.2–1.8). After adjustment for detection method, the Hispanic HR declined from 1.50 to 1.45 (10%), but after inclusion of other prognostic indicators, the Hispanic HR=1.23 (95% CI 1.01–1.48). Conclusions Although the Hispanic HR declined 50% after adjustment, the decrease was largely due to adverse tumor prognostic characteristics. Impact Reduction of disparate survival in Hispanic women may rely not only on increased detection of tumors when asymptomatic but on development of greater understanding of biological factors that predispose to poor prognosis tumors. PMID:20841385

  10. 77 FR 60703 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection...

  11. Detection of HER2 amplification in circulating free DNA in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Page, K; Hava, N; Ward, B; Brown, J; Guttery, D S; Ruangpratheep, C; Blighe, K; Sharma, A; Walker, R A; Coombes, R C; Shaw, J A

    2011-01-01

    Background: Human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2) is amplified and overexpressed in 20–25% of breast cancers. This study investigated circulating free DNA (cfDNA) for detection of HER2 gene amplification in patients with breast cancer. Methods: Circulating free DNA was extracted from plasma of unselected patients with primary breast cancer (22 before surgery and 68 following treatment), 30 metastatic patients and 98 female controls using the QIAamp Blood DNA Mini Kit (Qiagen). The ratio of HER2 to an unamplified reference gene (contactin-associated protein 1 (CNTNAP1)) was measured in cfDNA samples by quantitative PCR (qPCR) using SK-BR-3 cell line DNA as a positive control. Results: We validated the qPCR assay with DNA extracted from 23 HER2 3+ and 40 HER2-negative tumour tissue samples; the results agreed for 60 of 63 (95.2%) tumours. Amplification was detected in cfDNA for 8 of 68 patients following primary breast cancer treatment and 5 of 30 metastatic patients, but was undetected in 22 patients with primary breast cancer and 98 healthy female controls. Of the patients with amplification in cfDNA, 10 had HER2 3+ tumour status by immunohistochemistry. Conclusions: The results demonstrate for the first time the existence of amplified HER2 in cfDNA in the follow-up of breast cancer patients who are otherwise disease free. This approach could potentially provide a marker in patients with HER2-positive breast cancer. PMID:21427727

  12. Real-time Detection of Breast Cancer Cells Using Peptide-functionalized Microcantilever Arrays

    PubMed Central

    Etayash, Hashem; Jiang, Keren; Azmi, Sarfuddin; Thundat, Thomas; Kaur, Kamaljit

    2015-01-01

    Ligand-directed targeting and capturing of cancer cells is a new approach for detecting circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Ligands such as antibodies have been successfully used for capturing cancer cells and an antibody based system (CellSearch®) is currently used clinically to enumerate CTCs. Here we report the use of a peptide moiety in conjunction with a microcantilever array system to selectively detect CTCs resulting from cancer, specifically breast cancer. A sensing microcantilever, functionalized with a breast cancer specific peptide 18-4 (WxEAAYQrFL), showed significant deflection on cancer cell (MCF7 and MDA-MB-231) binding compared to when exposed to noncancerous (MCF10A and HUVEC) cells. The peptide-functionalized microcantilever allowed efficient capture and detection of cancer cells in MCF7 spiked human blood samples emulating CTCs in human blood. A detection limit of 50–100 cancer cells mL−1 from blood samples was achieved with a capture yield of 80% from spiked whole blood samples. The results emphasize the potential of peptide 18-4 as a novel peptide for capturing and detecting cancer cells in conjunction with nanomechanical cantilever platform. The reported peptide-based cantilever platform represents a new analytical approach that can lead to an alternative to the various detection platforms and can be leveraged to further study CTCs. PMID:26434765

  13. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Overview Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  14. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA injury and damage detection in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Radiotherapy is frequently used in patients with breast cancer, but some patients may be more susceptible to ionizing radiation, and increased exposure to radiation sources may be associated to radiation adverse events. This susceptibility may be related to deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms that are activated after cell-radiation, which causes DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks. Some of these genetic susceptibilities in DNA-repair mechanisms are implicated in the etiology of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (pathologic mutations in the BRCA 1 and 2 genes), but other less penetrant variants in genes involved in sporadic breast cancer have been described. These same genetic susceptibilities may be involved in negative radiotherapeutic outcomes. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement methods for detecting patients who are susceptible to radiotherapy-related adverse events. This review discusses mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, genes related to these functions, and the diagnosis methods designed and under research for detection of breast cancer patients with increased radiosensitivity. PMID:26692152

  15. Multiplexed detection of various breast cancer cells by perfluorocarbon/quantum dot nanoemulsions conjugated with antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Pan Kee; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2014-07-01

    The effective targeting of cancer cell surface antigens is an attractive approach in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Multifunctional nanoprobes with cell-targeting specificity are likely to find important applications in bioanalysis, biomedicine, and clinical diagnosis. In this study, we have fabricated biocompatible perfluorocan/quantum dot nanoemulsions as bimodal imaging nanoprobes for the targeting of breast cancer cells. Perfluorocarbon/quantum dot nanoemulsions conjugated with monoclonal antibodies, as a type of bimodal imaging nanoprobe based on 19 F-MR and optical imaging, have been synthesized and applied for targeted imaging of three different breast cancer cells (SKBR3, MCF-7, MDA-MB 468), respectively. We have shown that the cancer-detection capabilities of antibody-conjugated PFC/QDs nanoemulsions could be successfully applied to target of various breast cancer cells. These modified PFC/QDs nanoemulsions were shown to target the cancer cell surface receptors specially. Conjugation of ligands to nanoemulsions targeting over-expressed cell surface receptors is a promising approach for targeted imaging to tumor cells. We further propose that the PFC/QDs nanoemulsions could be used in targeted imaging of breast cancer cells.

  16. Aptamer-Assisted Detection of the Altered Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahirwar, Rajesh; Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen Karuthedath; Sett, Arghya; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod; Bora, Utpal; Borthakur, Bibhuti Bhusan; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    An increase in the expression of estrogen receptors (ER) and the expanded population of ER-positive cells are two common phenotypes of breast cancer. Detection of the aberrantly expressed ERα in breast cancer is carried out using ERα-antibodies and radiolabelled ligands to make decisions about cancer treatment and targeted therapy. Capitalizing on the beneficial advantages of aptamer over the conventional antibody or radiolabelled ligand, we have identified a DNA aptamer that selectively binds and facilitates the detection of ERα in human breast cancer tissue sections. The aptamer is identified using the high throughput sequencing assisted SELEX screening. Biophysical characterization confirms the binding and formation of a thermodynamically stable complex between the identified DNA aptamer (ERaptD4) and ERα (Ka = 1.55±0.298×108 M-1; ΔH = 4.32×104±801.1 cal/mol; ΔS = -108 cal/mol/deg). Interestingly, the specificity measurements suggest that the ERaptD4 internalizes into ERα-positive breast cancer cells in a target-selective manner and localizes specifically in the nuclear region. To harness these characteristics of ERaptD4 for detection of ERα expression in breast cancer samples, we performed the aptamer-assisted histochemical analysis of ERα in tissue samples from breast cancer patients. The results were validated by performing the immunohistochemistry on same samples with an ERα-antibody. We found that the two methods agree strongly in assay output (kappa value = 0.930, p-value <0.05 for strong ERα positive and the ERα negative samples; kappa value = 0.823, p-value <0.05 for the weak/moderate ER+ve samples, n = 20). Further, the aptamer stain the ERα-positive cells in breast tissues without cross-reacting to ERα-deficient fibroblasts, adipocytes, or the inflammatory cells. Our results demonstrate a significant consistency in the aptamer-assisted detection of ERα in strong ERα positive, moderate ERα positive and ERα negative breast cancer

  17. MRI breast screening in high-risk women: cancer detection and survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Evans, D Gareth; Gareth, Evans D; Kesavan, Nisha; Nisha, Kesavan; Lim, Yit; Yit, Lim; Gadde, Soujanye; Soujanye, Gadde; Hurley, Emma; Emma, Hurley; Massat, Nathalie J; Maxwell, Anthony J; Ingham, Sarah; Sarah, Ingham; Eeles, Rosalind; Rosalind, Eeles; Leach, Martin O; Howell, Anthony; Anthony, Howell; Duffy, Stephen W; Stephen, Duffy

    2014-06-01

    Women with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer tend to develop the disease at a younger age with denser breasts making mammography screening less effective. The introduction of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for familial breast cancer screening programs in recent years was intended to improve outcomes in these women. We aimed to assess whether introduction of MRI surveillance improves 5- and 10-year survival of high-risk women and determine the accuracy of MRI breast cancer detection compared with mammography-only or no enhanced surveillance and compare size and pathology of cancers detected in women screened with MRI + mammography and mammography only. We used data from two prospective studies where asymptomatic women with a very high breast cancer risk were screened by either mammography alone or with MRI also compared with BRCA1/2 carriers with no intensive surveillance. 63 cancers were detected in women receiving MRI + mammography and 76 in women receiving mammography only. Sensitivity of MRI + mammography was 93 % with 63 % specificity. Fewer cancers detected on MRI were lymph node positive compared to mammography/no additional screening. There were no differences in 10-year survival between the MRI + mammography and mammography-only groups, but survival was significantly higher in the MRI-screened group (95.3 %) compared to no intensive screening (73.7 %; p = 0.002). There were no deaths among the 21 BRCA2 carriers receiving MRI. There appears to be benefit from screening with MRI, particularly in BRCA2 carriers. Extended follow-up of larger numbers of high-risk women is required to assess long-term survival.

  18. Coded aperture coherent scatter imaging for breast cancer detection: a Monte Carlo evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Morris, Robert E.; Greenberg, Joel A.; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2016-03-01

    It is known that conventional x-ray imaging provides a maximum contrast between cancerous and healthy fibroglandular breast tissues of 3% based on their linear x-ray attenuation coefficients at 17.5 keV, whereas coherent scatter signal provides a maximum contrast of 19% based on their differential coherent scatter cross sections. Therefore in order to exploit this potential contrast, we seek to evaluate the performance of a coded- aperture coherent scatter imaging system for breast cancer detection and investigate its accuracy using Monte Carlo simulations. In the simulations we modeled our experimental system, which consists of a raster-scanned pencil beam of x-rays, a bismuth-tin coded aperture mask comprised of a repeating slit pattern with 2-mm periodicity, and a linear-array of 128 detector pixels with 6.5-keV energy resolution. The breast tissue that was scanned comprised a 3-cm sample taken from a patient-based XCAT breast phantom containing a tomosynthesis- based realistic simulated lesion. The differential coherent scatter cross section was reconstructed at each pixel in the image using an iterative reconstruction algorithm. Each pixel in the reconstructed image was then classified as being either air or the type of breast tissue with which its normalized reconstructed differential coherent scatter cross section had the highest correlation coefficient. Comparison of the final tissue classification results with the ground truth image showed that the coded aperture imaging technique has a cancerous pixel detection sensitivity (correct identification of cancerous pixels), specificity (correctly ruling out healthy pixels as not being cancer) and accuracy of 92.4%, 91.9% and 92.0%, respectively. Our Monte Carlo evaluation of our experimental coded aperture coherent scatter imaging system shows that it is able to exploit the greater contrast available from coherently scattered x-rays to increase the accuracy of detecting cancerous regions within the breast.

  19. Development of a Radiolabeled Peptide-Based Probe Targeting MT1-MMP for Breast Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Min, Kaiyin; Ji, Bin; Zhao, Min; Ji, Tiefeng; Chen, Bin; Fang, Xuedong; Ma, Qingjie

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most frequent and aggressive primary tumors among women of all races. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMPs), a family of zinc- and calcium-dependent secreted or membrane anchored endopeptidases, is overexpressed in varieties of diseases including breast cancer. Therefore, noninvasive visualization and quantification of MMP in vivo are of great interest in basic research and clinical application for breast cancer early diagnosis. Herein, we developed a 99mTc labeled membrane type I matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) specific binding peptide, [99mTc]-(HYNIC-AF7p)(tricine)(TPPTS), for in vivo detection of MDA-MB-231 breast tumor by single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). [99mTc]-(HYNIC-AF7p)(tricine)(TPPTS) demonstrated nice biostability and high MT1-MMP binding affinity in vitro and in vivo. Tumor-to-muscle ratio was found to reach to the highest (4.17±0.49) at 2 hour after intravenously administration of [99mTc]-(HYNIC-AF7P)(tricine)(TPPTS) into MDA-MB-231 tumor bearing mice. Overall, [99mTc]-(HYNIC-AF7P)(tricine)(TPPTS) demonstrated great potential for MT1-MMP targeted detection in vivo and it would be a promising molecular imaging probe that are probably beneficial to breast cancer early diagnoses. PMID:26437463

  20. NASA's Technology Transfer Program for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gregory; Frey, Mary Anne; Vernikos, Joan; Winfield, Daniel; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has led the development of advanced imaging sensors and image processing technologies for space science and Earth science missions. NASA considers the transfer and commercialization of such technologies a fundamental mission of the agency. Over the last two years, efforts have been focused on the application of aerospace imaging and computing to the field of diagnostic imaging, specifically to breast cancer imaging. These technology transfer efforts offer significant promise in helping in the national public health priority of the early detection of breast cancer.

  1. Detecting Emotional Expression in Face-to-Face and Online Breast Cancer Support Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liess, Anna; Simon, Wendy; Yutsis, Maya; Owen, Jason E.; Piemme, Karen Altree; Golant, Mitch; Giese-Davis, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Accurately detecting emotional expression in women with primary breast cancer participating in support groups may be important for therapists and researchers. In 2 small studies (N = 20 and N = 16), the authors examined whether video coding, human text coding, and automated text analysis provided consistent estimates of the level of emotional…

  2. 75 FR 57472 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC): Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC): Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the...

  3. 77 FR 71193 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Federal Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Federal Advisory Committee Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register...

  4. Lasting Effects of the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program on Breast Cancer Detection and Outcomes, Ohio, 2000–2009

    PubMed Central

    Bakaki, Paul M.; Han, Xiaozhen; Schluchter, Mark; Owusu, Cynthia; Cooper, Gregory S.; Flocke, Susan A.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (BCCP) in Ohio provides screening and treatment services for uninsured low-income women aged 40 to 64. Because participation in the BCCP might engender greater self-efficacy for cancer screening, we hypothesized that breast cancer and survival outcomes would be better in BCCP participants who become age-eligible to transition to Medicare than in their low-income non-BCCP counterparts. Methods Linking data from the 2000 through 2009 Ohio Cancer Incidence Surveillance System with the BCCP database, Medicare files, Ohio death certificates (through 2010), and the US Census, we identified Medicare beneficiaries who were aged 66 to 74 and diagnosed with incident invasive breast cancer. We compared the following outcomes between BCCP women (n = 93) and low-income non-BCCP women (n = 420): receipt of screening mammography in previous year, advanced-stage disease at diagnosis, timely and standard care, all-cause survival, and cancer survival. We conducted multivariable logistic regression and survival analysis to examine the association between BCCP status and each of the outcomes, adjusting for patient covariates. Results Women who participated in the BCCP were nearly twice as likely as low-income non-BCCP women to have undergone screening mammography in the previous year (adjusted odds ratio, 1.77; 95% confidence interval, 1.01–3.09). No significant differences were detected in any other outcomes. Conclusion With the exception of screening mammography, the differences in outcomes were not significant, possibly because of the small size of the study population. Future analysis should be directed toward identifying the factors that explain these findings. PMID:26203814

  5. Detection and classification of Breast Cancer in Wavelet Sub-bands of Fractal Segmented Cancerous Zones

    PubMed Central

    Shirazinodeh, Alireza; Noubari, Hossein Ahmadi; Rabbani, Hossein; Dehnavi, Alireza Mehri

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies on wavelet transform and fractal modeling applied on mammograms for the detection of cancerous tissues indicate that microcalcifications and masses can be utilized for the study of the morphology and diagnosis of cancerous cases. It is shown that the use of fractal modeling, as applied to a given image, can clearly discern cancerous zones from noncancerous areas. In this paper, for fractal modeling, the original image is first segmented into appropriate fractal boxes followed by identifying the fractal dimension of each windowed section using a computationally efficient two-dimensional box-counting algorithm. Furthermore, using appropriate wavelet sub-bands and image Reconstruction based on modified wavelet coefficients, it is shown that it is possible to arrive at enhanced features for detection of cancerous zones. In this paper, we have attempted to benefit from the advantages of both fractals and wavelets by introducing a new algorithm. By using a new algorithm named F1W2, the original image is first segmented into appropriate fractal boxes, and the fractal dimension of each windowed section is extracted. Following from that, by applying a maximum level threshold on fractal dimensions matrix, the best-segmented boxes are selected. In the next step, the segmented Cancerous zones which are candidates are then decomposed by utilizing standard orthogonal wavelet transform and db2 wavelet in three different resolution levels, and after nullifying wavelet coefficients of the image at the first scale and low frequency band of the third scale, the modified reconstructed image is successfully utilized for detection of breast cancer regions by applying an appropriate threshold. For detection of cancerous zones, our simulations indicate the accuracy of 90.9% for masses and 88.99% for microcalcifications detection results using the F1W2 method. For classification of detected mictocalcification into benign and malignant cases, eight features are identified and

  6. A research about breast cancer detection using different neural networks and K-MICA algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kalteh, A A; Zarbakhsh, Payam; Jirabadi, Meysam; Addeh, Jalil

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death for women all over the world. The correct diagnosis of breast cancer is one of the major problems in the medical field. From the literature it has been found that different pattern recognition techniques can help them to improve in this domain. This paper presents a novel hybrid intelligent method for detection of breast cancer. The proposed method includes two main modules: Clustering module and the classifier module. In the clustering module, first the input data will be clustered by a new technique. This technique is a suitable combination of the modified imperialist competitive algorithm (MICA) and K-means algorithm. Then the Euclidean distance of each pattern is computed from the determined clusters. The classifier module determines the membership of the patterns using the computed distance. In this module, several neural networks, such as the multilayer perceptron, probabilistic neural networks and the radial basis function neural networks are investigated. Using the experimental study, we choose the best classifier in order to recognize the breast cancer. The proposed system is tested on Wisconsin Breast Cancer (WBC) database and the simulation results show that the recommended system has high accuracy.

  7. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  8. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men between ... 60 and 70. Breast lumps usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. ...

  9. Investigation of near infrared autofluorescence imaging for the detection of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Bold, R; White, R d; Ramsamooj, R

    2005-08-19

    Detection of breast cancer in fresh tissue obtained from surgery is investigated using Near-infrared autofluorescence imaging under laser excitation at 532-nm and 632.8-nm. The differences in intensity between the three main components of breast tissue (cancer, fibrous and adipose) are estimated and compared to those obtained from cross-polarized light scattering images recorded under polarized illumination at 700-nm. The optical spectroscopic images for each tissue sample were subsequently compared with the histopathology slides. The experimental results indicate that the intensity of the near-infrared emission is considerably different in breast cancer compared to that of the adjacent non-neoplastic tissues (adipose and fibrous tissue). The experimental results suggest that 632.8-nm excitation offers key advantages compared to 532-nm excitation.

  10. Hot spot detection for breast cancer in Ki-67 stained slides: image dependent filtering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niazi, M. Khalid Khan; Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2014-03-01

    We present a new method to detect hot spots from breast cancer slides stained for Ki67 expression. It is common practice to use centroid of a nucleus as a surrogate representation of a cell. This often requires the detection of individual nuclei. Once all the nuclei are detected, the hot spots are detected by clustering the centroids. For large size images, nuclei detection is computationally demanding. Instead of detecting the individual nuclei and treating hot spot detection as a clustering problem, we considered hot spot detection as an image filtering problem where positively stained pixels are used to detect hot spots in breast cancer images. The method first segments the Ki-67 positive pixels using the visually meaningful segmentation (VMS) method that we developed earlier. Then, it automatically generates an image dependent filter to generate a density map from the segmented image. The smoothness of the density image simplifies the detection of local maxima. The number of local maxima directly corresponds to the number of hot spots in the breast cancer image. The method was tested on 23 different regions of interest images extracted from 10 different breast cancer slides stained with Ki67. To determine the intra-reader variability, each image was annotated twice for hot spots by a boardcertified pathologist with a two-week interval in between her two readings. A computer-generated hot spot region was considered a true-positive if it agrees with either one of the two annotation sets provided by the pathologist. While the intra-reader variability was 57%, our proposed method can correctly detect hot spots with 81% precision.

  11. Detection of miRNA regulatory effect on triple negative breast cancer transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Martignetti, Loredana; Tesson, Bruno; Almeida, Anna; Zinovyev, Andrei; Tucker, Gordon C; Dubois, Thierry; Barillot, Emmanuel

    2015-01-01

    Identifying key microRNAs (miRNAs) contributing to the genesis and development of a particular disease is a focus of many recent studies. We introduce here a rank-based algorithm to detect miRNA regulatory activity in cancer-derived tissue samples which combines measurements of gene and miRNA expression levels and sequence-based target predictions. The method is designed to detect modest but coordinated changes in the expression of sequence-based predicted target genes. We applied our algorithm to a cohort of 129 tumour and healthy breast tissues and showed its effectiveness in identifying functional miRNAs possibly involved in the disease. These observations have been validated using an independent publicly available breast cancer dataset from The Cancer Genome Atlas. We focused on the triple negative breast cancer subtype to highlight potentially relevant miRNAs in this tumour subtype. For those miRNAs identified as potential regulators, we characterize the function of affected target genes by enrichment analysis. In the two independent datasets, the affected targets are not necessarily the same, but display similar enriched categories, including breast cancer related processes like cell substrate adherens junction, regulation of cell migration, nuclear pore complex and integrin pathway. The R script implementing our method together with the datasets used in the study can be downloaded here (http://bioinfo-out.curie.fr/projects/targetrunningsum).

  12. Time-resolved fluorescence for breast cancer detection using an octreotate-indocyanine green derivative dye conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Das, B. B.; Pu, Yang; Liang, Kexian; Milione, Giovanni; Sordillo, Peter P.; Achilefu, Sam; Alfano, R. R.

    2013-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence was used to investigate malignant and normal adjacent breast tissues stained with a conjugate of indocyanine green and octreotate. A marked increase in fluorescence lifetime intensity was seen in the breast cancer sample compared to the normal sample. The fluorescent lifetimes were also investigated and showed similar fluorescence decay curves in stained malignant and normal breast tissue. These results confirm that somatostatin receptors occur on human breast carcinomas, suggest that the presence of somatostatin receptors should be investigated as a marker of breast cancer aggressiveness, and suggest that this conjugate might be used to detect the presence of residual breast cancer after surgery, allowing better assessment of tumor margins and reducing the need for second or repeat biopsies in selected patients. These results may also provide clues for designing future treatment options for breast cancer patients.

  13. Detection of Slit2 promoter hypermethylation in tissue and serum samples from breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Kim, Ga-Eon; Lee, Kyung Hwa; Choi, Yoo Duk; Lee, Ji Shin; Lee, Jae Hyuk; Nam, Jong Hee; Choi, Chan; Park, Min Ho; Yoon, Jung Han

    2011-10-01

    Promoter hypermethylation has been shown to be a common mechanism for inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of Slit2 promoter hypermethylation in both the tumor and serum samples of breast cancer patients with ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) or invasive breast carcinoma (IBC). The methylation status of Slit2 was investigated in 210 tissue samples (15 breast with no pathological findings, 26 DCIS, and 169 IBC samples) and 123 corresponding serum samples (15 breast with no pathological findings, 26 DCIS, and 82 IBC samples) using methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemical staining for Slit2 was also performed using tissue microarray blocks to determine whether Slit2 promoter hypermethylation correlated with loss of Slit2 expression. Slit2 promoter hypermethylation was not detected in breast tissue and serum samples from patients with no pathological findings. DCIS or IBC showed a statistically higher frequency of Slit2 promoter hypermethylation compared to breast with no pathological findings in both the tissue and serum samples; however, there were no statistically significant differences between DCIS and IBC samples. Similar Slit2 promoter hypermethylation patterns were seen in the tissue samples and corresponding serum specimens (p < 0.001). Slit2 promoter hypermethylation was associated with loss of Slit2 expression. These results suggest that Slit2 promoter hypermethylation appears to be responsible for functionally silencing Slit2 expression. Slit2 promoter hypermethylation may be considered as a possible serum marker for early detection of breast cancer.

  14. Upgrade of high-risk breast lesions detected on mammography in the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium

    PubMed Central

    Menes, Tehillah S.; Rosenberg, Robert; Balch, Steven; Jaffer, Shabnam; Kerlikowske, Karla; Miglioretti, Diana L.

    2013-01-01

    Background Upgrade rates of high-risk breast lesions after screening mammography were examined. Study design The Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium registry was used to identify all BI-RADS 4 assessments followed by needle biopsies with high-risk lesions. Follow-up was performed for all women. Results High-risk lesions were found in 957 needle biopsies, with excision documented in 53%. Most (N=685) were atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH), 173 were lobular neoplasia, and 99 were papillary lesions. Upgrade to cancer varied with type of lesion (18% in ADH, 10% in lobular neoplasia and 2% in papillary). In premenopausal women with ADH, upgrade was associated with family history. Cancers associated with ADH were mostly (82%) ductal carcinoma in situ, those associated with lobular neoplasia were mostly (56%) invasive. During further 2 years of follow-up, cancer was documented in 1% of women with follow-up surgery and in 3% with no surgery. Conclusion Despite low rates of surgery, low rates of cancer were documented during follow-up. Benign papillary lesions diagnosed on BI-RADS 4 mammograms among asymptomatic women do not justify surgical excision. PMID:24112677

  15. [Usefulness and risks of routine mammography for the detection of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino; Hernández-Quijano, Tomás; Zárate, Arturo; Saucedo, Renata

    2014-01-01

    It has been accepted that preclinicall detection of breast cancer by means of the routine practice of mammography could discover the disease at its initial stage; therefore, practicing a mammography annually became widespread as a preventive health measure to diagnose the disease and prevent death due to breast cancer. Over time, the benefit of detection tests has been questioned and demonstration of their benefit, as well as that of the undesirable effects they might cause, has been demanded. There is recent information with regard to an absence of difference in terms of breast cancer mortality as final index between women with or without routine mammography. Additionally, a 20 % frequency has been observed in false-positive diagnoses, with high numbers of women undergoing unnecessary diagnostic procedures due to suspicion of a non-clinically apparent presumed cancer. In Mexico, from 2004 on, the popularity of mammography to detect and effectively cure cancer has increased. Acceptance can be attributted to how easily detection campaigns can be promoted, since most women accept that mastography can offer the opportunity of receiving an early treatment that reduces dissemination and prevents early mortality. The age at which it is convenient to perform the first mammography, how frequently it should be repeated and even the age for its discontinuation is still under debate and no consensus has been reached.

  16. A Case of Suspected Breast Cancer Metastasis to Brachial Plexus Detected by Magnetic Resonance Neurography

    PubMed Central

    Mizuma, Atsushi; Kijima, Chikage; Nagata, Eiichiro; Takizawa, Shunya

    2016-01-01

    Metastasis of breast cancer is often detected through a long-term course and difficult to diagnose. We report a case of brachial plexopathy suspected to be the initial lesion of breast cancer metastasis, which was only detected by magnetic resonance (MR) neurography. A 61-year-old woman was admitted to our hospital within 2 years after operation for breast cancer because of progressive dysesthesia and motor weakness initially in the upper limb on the affected side and subsequently on the contralateral side. Enhanced computed tomography, axillary lymph node echo, gallium scintigraphy, and short tau inversion recovery MR images showed no abnormalities. MR neurography revealed a swollen region in the left brachial plexus. We suspected neuralgic amyotrophy and initiated treatment with intravenous immunoglobulin therapy and steroid therapy. However, there was no improvement, and the progression of motor weakness in the bilateral lower limbs appeared over 4 years. Concomitant elevation of carbohydrate antigen 15-3 level (58.9 U/ml) led us to suspect breast cancer metastasis, which was associated with the worsening of neurological findings, although gallium scintigraphy and bone scintigraphy showed no inflammatory and metastatic lesions. Swelling of the cauda equina in enhanced lumbar MR imaging and abnormal accumulation at the brachial plexus and cervical spinal cord in positron-emission tomography were newly detected contrary to the normal findings on the gallium scintigraphy, which suggested cerebrospinal fluid seeding. We suspected breast cancer metastasis about the initial brachial plexopathy based on the clinical course. MR neurography may be a helpful tool to detect metastatic lesion, especially in nerve roots. PMID:27721757

  17. National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program partnerships in action.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Latasha D; Larkins, Teri L; Boyle, John N; George, Susan F; Triplett, Erin W; Leypoldt, Melissa D

    2014-08-15

    Since the inception of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) in 1990, partnerships have played a significant role in providing breast and cervical cancer screening and early detection to uninsured and underinsured women. The state, tribal, and territorial NBCCEDP grantees have shared resources and responsibilities with a variety of partners (eg, community-based organizations, government agencies, tribes, health care systems, companies, professional organizations) to achieve common goals. National partners, such as the American Cancer Society, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, and the Avon Foundation for Women, have provided funding, lobbied for national and state funding, supported outreach and education activities, and provided treatment referral services for the programs. This article provides an overview of grantee partnerships to illustrate the effects, successes, and challenges of these partnerships and how they have affected the populations served by the program.

  18. General Information about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Breast ...

  19. Implementation of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy C.; Wong, Faye L.; Jamison, Patricia M.; Jones, Sandra F.; Galaska, Louise; Brady, Kevin T.; Wethers, Barbara; Stokes-Townsend, George-Ann

    2015-01-01

    In 1990, Congress passed the Breast and Cervical Cancer Mortality Prevention Act because of increases in the number of low-income and uninsured women being diagnosed with breast cancer. This act authorized the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to establish the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) to provide high-quality and timely breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income, uninsured women. The program started in 1991, and, in 1993, Congress amended the act to allow the CDC to fund American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and tribal organizations. By 1996, the program was providing cancer screening across the United States. To ensure appropriate delivery and monitoring of services, the program adopted detailed policies on program management, evidence-based guidelines for clinical services, a systematized clinical data system to track service quality, and key partnerships that expand the program’s reach. The NBCCEDP currently funds 67 programs, including all 50 states, the District of Columbia, 5 US territories, and 11 tribes or tribal organizations. PMID:25099896

  20. Detection of inherited mutations for breast and ovarian cancer using genomic capture and massively parallel sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Walsh, Tom; Lee, Ming K.; Casadei, Silvia; Thornton, Anne M.; Stray, Sunday M.; Pennil, Christopher; Nord, Alex S.; Mandell, Jessica B.; Swisher, Elizabeth M.; King, Mary-Claire

    2010-01-01

    Inherited loss-of-function mutations in the tumor suppressor genes BRCA1, BRCA2, and multiple other genes predispose to high risks of breast and/or ovarian cancer. Cancer-associated inherited mutations in these genes are collectively quite common, but individually rare or even private. Genetic testing for BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutations has become an integral part of clinical practice, but testing is generally limited to these two genes and to women with severe family histories of breast or ovarian cancer. To determine whether massively parallel, “next-generation” sequencing would enable accurate, thorough, and cost-effective identification of inherited mutations for breast and ovarian cancer, we developed a genomic assay to capture, sequence, and detect all mutations in 21 genes, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, with inherited mutations that predispose to breast or ovarian cancer. Constitutional genomic DNA from subjects with known inherited mutations, ranging in size from 1 to >100,000 bp, was hybridized to custom oligonucleotides and then sequenced using a genome analyzer. Analysis was carried out blind to the mutation in each sample. Average coverage was >1200 reads per base pair. After filtering sequences for quality and number of reads, all single-nucleotide substitutions, small insertion and deletion mutations, and large genomic duplications and deletions were detected. There were zero false-positive calls of nonsense mutations, frameshift mutations, or genomic rearrangements for any gene in any of the test samples. This approach enables widespread genetic testing and personalized risk assessment for breast and ovarian cancer. PMID:20616022

  1. Early detection of breast cancer: a molecular optical imaging approach using novel estrogen conjugate fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Shubhadeep; Jose, Iven

    2011-02-01

    Estrogen induced proliferation of mutant cells is widely understood to be the one of major risk determining factor in the development of breast cancer. Hence determination of the Estrogen Receptor[ER] status is of paramount importance if cancer pathogenesis is to be detected and rectified at an early stage. Near Infrared Fluorescence [NIRf] Molecular Optical Imaging is emerging as a powerful tool to monitor bio-molecular changes in living subjects. We discuss pre-clinical results in our efforts to develop an optical imaging diagnostic modality for the early detection of breast cancer. We have successfully carried out the synthesis and characterization of a novel target-specific NIRf dye conjugate aimed at measuring Estrogen Receptor[ER] status. The conjugate was synthesized by ester formation between 17-β estradiol and a hydrophilic derivative of Indocyanine Green (ICG) cyanine dye, bis-1,1-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5-carboxylic acid, sodium salt. In-vitro studies regarding specific binding and endocytocis of the dye performed on ER+ve [MCF-7] and control [MDA-MB-231] adenocarcinoma breast cancer cell lines clearly indicated nuclear localization of the dye for MCF-7 as compared to plasma level staining for MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, MCF-7 cells showed ~4.5-fold increase in fluorescence signal intensity compared to MDA-MB-231. A 3-D mesh model mimicking the human breast placed in a parallel-plate DOT Scanner is created to examine the in-vivo efficacy of the dye before proceeding with clinical trials. Photon migration and florescence flux intensity is modeled using the finite-element method with the coefficients (quantum yield, molar extinction co-efficient etc.) pertaining to the dye as obtained from photo-physical and in-vitro studies. We conclude by stating that this lipophilic dye can be potentially used as a target specific exogenous contrast agent in molecular optical imaging for early detection of breast cancer.

  2. Nano interfaced biosensor for detection of choline in triple negative breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Thiagarajan, Vignesh; Madhurantakam, Sasya; Sethuraman, Swaminathan; Balaguru Rayappan, John Bosco; Maheswari Krishnan, Uma

    2016-01-15

    Choline, a type of Vitamin B, is an important nutrient in the human body and is involved in key metabolic pathways. Abnormal levels of choline leads to diseased conditions. The levels of choline and its associated compounds are found to be elevated in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients. The choline level ranges from 0.4 to 4.9mmol/kg in TNBC. Thus the detection of choline levels in cells can aid in diagnosing breast cancer. The present work aims to develop a nano-interfaced electrochemical biosensor for the rapid detection of choline in cancer cells. For electrochemical detection, glassy carbon electrode coated with a zinc oxide nano-interface was used as the working electrode. Zinc oxide synthesized by hydrothermal method was characterized using SEM and XRD. The choline oxidase (ChOx) enzyme was immobilized on the nano-interface by drop-casting. Choline oxidase (ChOx) converts choline to betaine and H2O2 in the presence of oxygen. The H2O2 produced was determined amperometrically. The amount of H2O2 produced is directly proportional to concentration of choline present. The sensitivity, selectivity, stability and concentration studies were carried out and quantification of choline in TNBC was also carried out. The results demonstrate that this biosensor has the potential to be developed as a clinical tool for breast cancer detection. PMID:26476202

  3. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancer - Treatment Options Request Permissions Print to PDF Breast Cancer - Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  4. Detection of breast cancer cells using targeted magnetic nanoparticles and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer detection using mammography has improved clinical outcomes for many women, because mammography can detect very small (5 mm) tumors early in the course of the disease. However, mammography fails to detect 10 - 25% of tumors, and the results do not distinguish benign and malignant tumors. Reducing the false positive rate, even by a modest 10%, while improving the sensitivity, will lead to improved screening, and is a desirable and attainable goal. The emerging application of magnetic relaxometry, in particular using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors, is fast and potentially more specific than mammography because it is designed to detect tumor-targeted iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, magnetic relaxometry is theoretically more specific than MRI detection, because only target-bound nanoparticles are detected. Our group is developing antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles targeted to breast cancer cells that can be detected using magnetic relaxometry. Methods To accomplish this, we identified a series of breast cancer cell lines expressing varying levels of the plasma membrane-expressed human epidermal growth factor-like receptor 2 (Her2) by flow cytometry. Anti-Her2 antibody was then conjugated to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the carbodiimide method. Labeled nanoparticles were incubated with breast cancer cell lines and visualized by confocal microscopy, Prussian blue histochemistry, and magnetic relaxometry. Results We demonstrated a time- and antigen concentration-dependent increase in the number of antibody-conjugated nanoparticles bound to cells. Next, anti Her2-conjugated nanoparticles injected into highly Her2-expressing tumor xenograft explants yielded a significantly higher SQUID relaxometry signal relative to unconjugated nanoparticles. Finally, labeled cells introduced into breast phantoms were measured by magnetic relaxometry, and as few as 1 million labeled cells

  5. Performance assessment of a pendant-geometry CT scanner for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boone, John M.; Kwan, Alexander L. C.; Nelson, Thomas R.; Shah, Nikula; Burkett, George; Seibert, J. A.; Lindfors, Karen K.; Roos, Gerhardt

    2005-04-01

    While mammography is the gold standard for breast cancer screening worldwide, it is widely recognized that mammography has limitations, especially in women with dense breasts. In response to the need for a more sensitive approach to breast cancer screening, a CT scanner specifically for breast imaging in the pendant geometry was designed, fabricated, and is currently in clinical evaluation. The spatial resolution and noise properties are discussed, and breast images from a normal volunteer and a patient with breast cancer demonstrate very promising breast CT image quality from a qualitative perspective.

  6. Detection of HER2 Gene Polymorphism in Breast Cancer: PCR Optimization Study

    PubMed Central

    Budiarto, Bugi Ratno; Desriani

    2016-01-01

    Cancers are the most deadly diseases in the world and their incidences continue to increase over time. Particularly, breast cancer in females places 1st rank among other types of cancers in term of cancer cases (23%) and death incidence (14%). Recent findings support the correlation between Ile655Val SNP in the HER2 gene with breast cancer risk. Moreover, the Ile655Val HER2 gene polymorphism could be a predictive factor in a neoadjuvant therapy setting. Precise detection of the Ile655Val HER2 gene SNP in early breast cancer patients will be beneficial in designing the most suitable treatment and in increasing the efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here we develop a rapid and inexpensive method for Ile655Val SNP detection in the HER2 gene based on allele-specific PCR technology. Two forward primers and one common reverse primer were designed to anneal specifically either on the HER2 gene fragment containing the GG genotype or to the HER2 gene fragment containing the AA genotype where one of these primers had been added with poly-GC at 5’ upstream. Moreover, to increase discrimination level, mismatch bases at the SNP site and the 3rd base of each forward primers from 3’end were added. To test the performance of the designed primers in discriminating a polymorphism and its annealing temperature, breast cancer specimen-derived genomic DNA (with GG genotype) and pGEM_HER2/AA (with AA genotype) were used as templates in the PCR reaction. The optimal annealing temperature for SNP detection was at 51.5°C as showed by the appearance of a 150 base pair (bp) band as AA genotype (pGEM_HER2/AA template), 116bp band as GG genotype (genomic DNA template), and both types of bands as AG genotype (mix of pGEM_HER2/AA and genomic DNA template). Allelic types of breast cancer patients were also determined using this optimized method compared to sanger sequencing. The 100% accordance was shown for all types of genotypes in both methods. The allele-specific PCR in this study may have

  7. Detection of HER2 Gene Polymorphism in Breast Cancer: PCR Optimization Study.

    PubMed

    Budiarto, Bugi Ratno; Desriani

    2016-01-01

    Cancers are the most deadly diseases in the world and their incidences continue to increase over time. Particularly, breast cancer in females places 1(st) rank among other types of cancers in term of cancer cases (23%) and death incidence (14%). Recent findings support the correlation between (Ile)655(Val) SNP in the HER2 gene with breast cancer risk. Moreover, the (Ile)655(Val) HER2 gene polymorphism could be a predictive factor in a neoadjuvant therapy setting. Precise detection of the (Ile)655(Val) HER2 gene SNP in early breast cancer patients will be beneficial in designing the most suitable treatment and in increasing the efficacy of anticancer drugs. Here we develop a rapid and inexpensive method for (Ile)655(Val) SNP detection in the HER2 gene based on allele-specific PCR technology. Two forward primers and one common reverse primer were designed to anneal specifically either on the HER2 gene fragment containing the GG genotype or to the HER2 gene fragment containing the AA genotype where one of these primers had been added with poly-GC at 5' upstream. Moreover, to increase discrimination level, mismatch bases at the SNP site and the 3(rd) base of each forward primers from 3'end were added. To test the performance of the designed primers in discriminating a polymorphism and its annealing temperature, breast cancer specimen-derived genomic DNA (with GG genotype) and pGEM_HER2/AA (with AA genotype) were used as templates in the PCR reaction. The optimal annealing temperature for SNP detection was at 51.5°C as showed by the appearance of a 150 base pair (bp) band as AA genotype (pGEM_HER2/AA template), 116bp band as GG genotype (genomic DNA template), and both types of bands as AG genotype (mix of pGEM_HER2/AA and genomic DNA template). Allelic types of breast cancer patients were also determined using this optimized method compared to sanger sequencing. The 100% accordance was shown for all types of genotypes in both methods. The allele-specific PCR in this

  8. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  9. Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... and symptoms of breast cancer in men Can breast cancer in men be found early? Early detection improves ... be treated successfully. Differences affecting early detection of breast cancers in men and women There are many similarities ...

  10. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ-male; Intraductal carcinoma-male; Inflammatory breast cancer-male; Paget disease of the nipple-male; Breast cancer-male ... The cause of breast cancer is not clear. But there are risk ... breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to radiation Higher ...

  11. Living Beyond Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Instagram YouTube 2,600 men are diagnosed with breast cancer each year. Learn about risk factors, treatment options ... help hundreds of thousands of people affected by breast cancer. Donate Today Breast Cancer inFocus: Breast Cancer During ...

  12. The value of the craniocaudal mammographic view in breast cancer detection: a preliminary study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trieu, Phuong Dung; Brennan, Patrick C.; Lee, Warwick; Ryan, Elaine; Reed, Warren; Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.

    2013-03-01

    Our research aims to assess the value of the single cranio-caudal view mammogram in the detection of breast cancer. 129 radiologists were asked to report 60 two-view mammograms of the left and right breasts and 55 radiologists assessed a set of 55 single cranio-caudal views. Participants were asked to search for the presence of any breast lesions and provide confidence scores for their decisions. Results showed that two-view mammograms were more effective in detecting malignant nodules than single cranio-caudal view in terms of sensitivity, localized-sensitivity, ROC and JAFROC. The single cranio-caudal view had a higher specificity as compared to two-view mammography.

  13. Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Hormone Therapy for Breast Cancer On This Page What are hormones? How do ... sensitive breast cancer: Adjuvant therapy for early-stage breast cancer : Research has shown that women treated for early- ...

  14. Computer-aided diagnostic system for breast cancer by detecting microcalcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chul S.; Kim, Jong K.; Park, Hyun Wook

    1998-06-01

    X-ray mammography is an important diagnostic imaging modality for early detection of breast cancer. The early detection of the breast cancer can reduce the mortality of middle-aged women, especially in the developed country. Computer aided diagnosis (CAD) technologies have been developed to assist radiologists to detect breast cancer in early stage. This paper presents a KCAD (KAIST Computer-Aided Diagnosis) system for detection of breast cancer, which consists of personal computer, high resolution X-ray film scanner, high-resolution display and application softwares. There are three algorithms implemented in the application softwares. The first algorithm is the enhancement of the digitized X-ray mammograms based on the gradient operation. The second algorithm is to detect the clustered microcalcifications based on the statistical texture analysis, which is called surrounding region dependence method (SRDM). The SRDM matrix is computed for each ROI, which has 128 by 128 pixels. The SRDM matrix characterizes the small and high-density regions in mammograms, which can be recognized as microcalcifications. Four textural features are computed from the SRDM matrix. Using these features, the neural network classifies the regions as normal or microcalcification region. The third algorithm is the classification of the clustered microcalcifications as malignant or benign based on the shape analysis. The microcalcifications are segmented using SRDM. Four shape features are extracted from each microcalcification and five representatives are computed for each shape feature. Twenty-one shape-based values containing the number of microcalcifications are used to classify the region as malignant or benign. These algorithms are verified by real experiments.

  15. Breast cancer characteristics associated with digital versus screen-film mammography for screen-detected and interval cancers

    PubMed Central

    Miglioretti, Diana L.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Wernli, Karen J.; Sprague, Brian L.; Lehman, Constance M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if pathologic findings of screen-detected and interval cancers differ for digital versus film mammography. Materials and Methods This study was institutional review board approved and HIPAA compliant. Using 2003–2011 Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium data, we included 3,021,515 screening mammograms (40.3% digital and 59.7% film) for women ages 40 to 89 years. Cancers were considered screen-detected if diagnosed within 12 months of a positive examination and interval if diagnosed within 12 months of a negative examination. Tumor characteristics for screen-detected and interval cancers were compared for digital versus film mammography using logistic regression models to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI), adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, hormone therapy use, screening interval, examination year, and registry while accounting for correlation within facilities using generalized estimating equations. Results Among 15,729 breast cancers, 85.3% were screen-detected and 14.7% were interval. Digital and film mammography had similar rates of screen-detected (4.47 vs. 4.42 per 1000 examinations) and interval cancers (0.73 vs. 0.79 per 1000 examinations) for digital versus film, respectively. In adjusted analyses, interval cancers following a negative digital examination were less likely to be AJCC stage IIB or higher (OR=0.69, 95%CI:0.52–0.93), have positive nodal status (OR=0.78, 95%CI:0.64–0.95), or be estrogen receptor-negative (OR=0.71, 95%CI:0.56–0.91) compared with interval cancers following a negative film examination. Conclusions Screen-detected cancers following digital and film mammography had similar rates of unfavorable tumor characteristics. Interval-detected cancers after a digital examination were less likely to have unfavorable tumor features than those diagnosed after film, but absolute differences were small. PMID:26295657

  16. Do pathological parameters differ with regard to breast density and mode of detection in breast cancer? The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Sartor, Hanna; Borgquist, Signe; Hartman, Linda; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2015-02-01

    Our aim was to study how breast density relates to tumor characteristics in breast cancer with emphasis on mode of detection. Among 17,035 women in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study 826 incident cases have been diagnosed (1991-2007). Data on tumor characteristics, mode of detection, and density at diagnosis were collected. Associations between density and tumor characteristics were analyzed using logistic and ordinal logistic regression models yielding OR and 95% CI. Adjustments for age at diagnosis, BMI at baseline, and the mode of detection, were performed. In denser breasts, large tumor size was more frequent (ORadj 1.59 (1.26-2.01)) as was lymph node involvement (ORadj 1.32 (1.00-1.74)). Further, the higher the density, the lower the grade (ORadj 0.73 (0.53-1.02) for having higher grade), in screening-detected invasive breast cancer. Our findings stress the importance of considering the impact of density in mammography image interpretation and the possible associations with tumor aggressiveness.

  17. Breast and Gynecologic Cancer | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    This group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HP | Prevention and early detection of breast, cervix, endometrial and ovarian cancers and their precursors.

  18. Topics and sources of memorable breast cancer messages and their impact on prevention and detection behaviors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sandi W; Nazione, Samantha; Laplante, Carolyn; Kotowski, Michael R; Atkin, Charles; Skubisz, Christine M; Stohl, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    Often, people are able to recall a message on a particular topic for a long period of time. These memorable messages have the ability to influence behavior when they are recalled from memory long after initial exposure. Knowing the topics and sources of the messages that are remembered about breast cancer can improve the efficacy of future breast cancer outreach. To this end, 359 women completed an online survey about memorable breast cancer messages. Most women (60%) recalled a memorable message, described it, identified its source, and noted whether it had resulted in prevention or detection behaviors. Four categories of message topics emerged: early detection (37.3%), awareness (30.9%), treatment (25.8%), and prevention (6%). Furthermore, five categories of sources of these memorable messages were found: media (35.5%), friends (22.2%), family (21.6%), medical professionals (15.2%), and others (5.5%). The media were a major source of all four topics of messages, although family members, friends, and the medical community were major sources for particular message topics as well. Memorable messages originating from medical professionals were substantially more likely to motivate detection behaviors than prevention behaviors. This research demonstrates that message topic and source both play roles in determining message recall as well as in determining how memorable messages impacted behavior.

  19. Topics and sources of memorable breast cancer messages and their impact on prevention and detection behaviors.

    PubMed

    Smith, Sandi W; Nazione, Samantha; Laplante, Carolyn; Kotowski, Michael R; Atkin, Charles; Skubisz, Christine M; Stohl, Cynthia

    2009-01-01

    Often, people are able to recall a message on a particular topic for a long period of time. These memorable messages have the ability to influence behavior when they are recalled from memory long after initial exposure. Knowing the topics and sources of the messages that are remembered about breast cancer can improve the efficacy of future breast cancer outreach. To this end, 359 women completed an online survey about memorable breast cancer messages. Most women (60%) recalled a memorable message, described it, identified its source, and noted whether it had resulted in prevention or detection behaviors. Four categories of message topics emerged: early detection (37.3%), awareness (30.9%), treatment (25.8%), and prevention (6%). Furthermore, five categories of sources of these memorable messages were found: media (35.5%), friends (22.2%), family (21.6%), medical professionals (15.2%), and others (5.5%). The media were a major source of all four topics of messages, although family members, friends, and the medical community were major sources for particular message topics as well. Memorable messages originating from medical professionals were substantially more likely to motivate detection behaviors than prevention behaviors. This research demonstrates that message topic and source both play roles in determining message recall as well as in determining how memorable messages impacted behavior. PMID:19440911

  20. Knowledge, facilitators and perceived barriers for early detection of breast cancer among elderly Turkish women.

    PubMed

    Kissal, Aygul; Beşer, Ayşe

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with elderly Turkish women's experiences with breast self examination, clinical breast examination and mammography screening, as well as perceived barriers and facilitators in the theoretical framework of the Health Belief Model and the Health Promotion Model. This is a qualitative study performed on 46 elderly women aged 60-75 years. Data were collected with focus group interviews and analyzed systematically with qualitative analysis techniques to determine themes concerning knowledge and facilitators of and perceived barriers to early detection of breast cancer among elderly women. Barriers to screening were insufficient knowledge, fear, neglect/postponement, embarrassment/religious beliefs, inability to make an appointment, lack of a physician's recommendation and health professionals' attitudes. Facilitating factors were being informed about screening, fear, awareness of cancer screening, familial history of breast cancer and social support, making an appointment, health professionals' communication and physicians' recommendations. Public health nurses and health professionals from other health disciplines should be aware of elderly women's need for knowledge about screening, understand elderly women's fear and worries about their health and know barriers to and facilitators of screening.

  1. Quasi-multistatic MIST beamforming for the early detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Martin; Jones, Edward; Glavin, Martin

    2010-04-01

    Microwave imaging via space-time (MIST) beamforming has been shown to be one of the most promising imaging modalities for detecting small malignant breast tumors. This paper outlines two modifications to the MIST system developed by Hagness for the early detection of breast cancer, resulting in a quasi-multistatic MIST beamformer (multi-MIST). Multistatic MIST beamforming involves illuminating the breast with an ultrawideband (UWB) signal from one antenna while collecting the reflections at an array of antennas, as opposed to traditional monostatic MIST beamforming where only the transmitting antenna records the reflections from the breast. In order to process the multistatic data, traditional data-adaptive artifact removal algorithms have to be modified to accommodate signals from all antennas. Also, the MIST beamforming algorithm, which spatially focuses the signal and compensates for frequency-dependent propagation effects, has to be modified. The algorithms are tested on a 2-D anatomically accurate finite-difference time-domain model of the breast. The multi-MIST beamformer described here is shown to offer an improved signal to clutter ratio when compared to the traditional monostatic MIST beamformer.

  2. The Ex-Vivo Detection of Human Breast Cancer through High-Frequency Ultrasound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jensen, Scott; Doyle, Timothy; Hart, Vern; Goodrich, Jeffrey; Neumayer, Leigh; Factor, Rachel

    2010-10-01

    Ex-vivo studies of human mammary surgical tissues were performed at the Huntsman Cancer Institute in order to develop an ultrasonic method to detect microscopic cancer in surgical margins during breast conservation surgery. Both pitch-catch and pulse-echo measurements were acquired using a high-frequency ultrasound system operating at 50 MHz. The ultrasonic tissue signatures were categorized into three groups: Malignant tumors, fibroadenomas, and normal tissues. An analysis in the frequency domain was performed to detect frequency dependencies and unique signatures for each of these groups. Signatures were then used in a final analysis to determine future possibilities in systematic cancer detection using this approach. Results of this study and spectral comparisons are reported.

  3. Detection of aberrant methylation of a six-gene panel in serum DNA for diagnosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ming; Yin, Huizi; Li, Junnan; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Dong; Su, Yonghui; Niu, Ming; Zhong, Zhenbin; Wang, Ji; Zhang, Xianyu; Kang, Wenli; Pang, Da

    2016-04-01

    Detection of breast cancer at an early stage is the key for successful treatment and improvement of outcome. However the limitations of mammography are well recognized, especially for those women with premenopausal breast cancer. Novel approaches to breast cancer screening are necessary, especially in the developing world where mammography is not feasible. In this study, we examined the promoter methylation of six genes (SFN, P16, hMLH1, HOXD13, PCDHGB7 and RASSF1a) in circulating free DNA (cfDNA) extracted from serum. We used a high-throughput DNA methylation assay (MethyLight) to examine serum from 749 cases including breast cancer patients, patients with benign breast diseases and healthy women. The six-gene methylation panel test achieved 79.6% and 82.4% sensitivity with a specificity of 72.4% and 78.1% in diagnosis of breast cancer when compared with healthy and benign disease controls, respectively. Moreover, the methylation panel positive group showed significant differences in the following independent variables: (a) involvement of family history of tumors; (b) a low proliferative index, ki-67; (c) high ratios in luminal subtypes. Additionally the panel also complemented some breast cancer cases which were neglected by mammography or ultrasound. These data suggest that epigenetic markers in serum have potential for diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:26918343

  4. Detection of aberrant methylation of a six-gene panel in serum DNA for diagnosis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junnan; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Dong; Su, Yonghui; Niu, Ming; Zhong, Zhenbin; Wang, Ji; Zhang, Xianyu; Kang, Wenli; Pang, Da

    2016-01-01

    Detection of breast cancer at an early stage is the key for successful treatment and improvement of outcome. However the limitations of mammography are well recognized, especially for those women with premenopausal breast cancer. Novel approaches to breast cancer screening are necessary, especially in the developing world where mammography is not feasible. In this study, we examined the promoter methylation of six genes (SFN, P16, hMLH1, HOXD13, PCDHGB7 and RASSF1a) in circulating free DNA (cfDNA) extracted from serum. We used a high-throughput DNA methylation assay (MethyLight) to examine serum from 749 cases including breast cancer patients, patients with benign breast diseases and healthy women. The six-gene methylation panel test achieved 79.6% and 82.4% sensitivity with a specificity of 72.4% and 78.1% in diagnosis of breast cancer when compared with healthy and benign disease controls, respectively. Moreover, the methylation panel positive group showed significant differences in the following independent variables: (a) involvement of family history of tumors; (b) a low proliferative index, ki-67; (c) high ratios in luminal subtypes. Additionally the panel also complemented some breast cancer cases which were neglected by mammography or ultrasound. These data suggest that epigenetic markers in serum have potential for diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:26918343

  5. Detection of aberrant methylation of a six-gene panel in serum DNA for diagnosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ming; Yin, Huizi; Li, Junnan; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Dong; Su, Yonghui; Niu, Ming; Zhong, Zhenbin; Wang, Ji; Zhang, Xianyu; Kang, Wenli; Pang, Da

    2016-04-01

    Detection of breast cancer at an early stage is the key for successful treatment and improvement of outcome. However the limitations of mammography are well recognized, especially for those women with premenopausal breast cancer. Novel approaches to breast cancer screening are necessary, especially in the developing world where mammography is not feasible. In this study, we examined the promoter methylation of six genes (SFN, P16, hMLH1, HOXD13, PCDHGB7 and RASSF1a) in circulating free DNA (cfDNA) extracted from serum. We used a high-throughput DNA methylation assay (MethyLight) to examine serum from 749 cases including breast cancer patients, patients with benign breast diseases and healthy women. The six-gene methylation panel test achieved 79.6% and 82.4% sensitivity with a specificity of 72.4% and 78.1% in diagnosis of breast cancer when compared with healthy and benign disease controls, respectively. Moreover, the methylation panel positive group showed significant differences in the following independent variables: (a) involvement of family history of tumors; (b) a low proliferative index, ki-67; (c) high ratios in luminal subtypes. Additionally the panel also complemented some breast cancer cases which were neglected by mammography or ultrasound. These data suggest that epigenetic markers in serum have potential for diagnosis of breast cancer.

  6. [Male breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Mattson, Johanna; Vehmanen, Leena

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is rare in men. Diagnosis of the illness may be delayed due to the fact that the doctor and the patient fail to suspect it. Male breast cancer is treated mainly on the same principles as female breast cancer. A man affected with breast cancer should always be directed to genetic testing, as inherited mutations increasing the risk of developing cancer are more common than in female breast cancer. Most breast cancers in men are hormone receptor positive. Among hormone treatments, the antiestrogen tamoxifen exhibits the best efficacy both in early-state and advanced cases. PMID:27188086

  7. Stages of Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  8. Comparison of mammography and ultrasound in detecting residual disease following bioptic lumpectomy in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    WU, XIUFENG; LIN, QINGZHONG; LU, JIANPING; CHEN, GANG; ZENG, YI; LIN, YINGLAN; CHEN, YING; WANG, YAOQIN; YAN, JUN

    2016-01-01

    Surgical biopsy is a method for diagnosing breast cancer. The aim of this study was to prospectively evaluate the relative accuracies of mammography (MMG) and ultrasound (US) in predicting residual disease following bioptic lumpectomy. Each prediction method was compared with the gold standard of surgical pathology. The results of MMG and US from 312 consecutive breast cancer patients diagnosed by surgical excision were analyzed. All the patients underwent re-excision mastectomy or lumpectomy and the imaging results were compared with the histopathological findings. The accuracy and sensitivity of each modality were investigated. A total of 312 patients with 312 primary breast cancers were investigated. Residual disease was identified in 118 patients. Of the 118 cases with residual disease, MMG and US were able to detect 77 (65.3%) and 32 (27.1%), respectively (chi-square P<0.001). MMG was also more sensitive compared with US in estimating residual ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) (94.2 vs. 33.3%, respectively; P<0.001). MMG was more accurate compared with US in detecting residual disease following bioptic lumpectomy and the diagnostic accuracy of MMG was associated with the presence of residual DCIS. PMID:26998296

  9. Image processing, radiological, and clinical information fusion in breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alto, Hilary; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Solaiman, Basel; Desautels, J. E. Leo; MacGregor, J. H.

    2002-03-01

    Screening mammography is the most efficient and cost-effective method available for detecting the signs of early breast cancer in asymptomatic women between the ages of 50 and 69. To improve the detection rate and reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies, many different computer-aided diagnosis techniques have been developed. Many of these techniques use image processing algorithms to automatically segment and classify the images. The decision-making process associated with the evaluation of mammograms is complex and incorporates multiple sources of information from standard medical knowledge and radiology to pathology. The use of this information combined with the results of image processing offers new challenges to the field of data and information fusion. In this paper, we describe the different information sources and their data as well as the framework that is needed to support this type of fusion. A database of breast cancer screening cases forms the basis of the resulting fusion model. The database and decision-level fusion techniques will facilitate unique and specialized approaches for efficient and sophisticated diagnosis of breast cancer.

  10. P-glycoprotein expression in primary breast cancer detected by immunocytochemistry with two monoclonal antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Wishart, G. C.; Plumb, J. A.; Going, J. J.; McNicol, A. M.; McArdle, C. S.; Tsuruo, T.; Kaye, S. B.

    1990-01-01

    We have investigated P-glycoprotein (P-gp) expression in samples of primary breast cancer from 29 patients before therapy. We employed immunohistochemical techniques using two monoclonal antibodies (C219 and MRK16) and an indirect alkaline phosphatase method. Heterogeneous expression in epithelial cells was detected with both C219 (21 of 29) and MRK16 (16 of 29). A surprising finding was P-glycoprotein expression in stromal cells with both C219 (26 of 29) and MRK16 (12 of 29). Our results suggest that significant levels of P-glycoprotein expression may be present in breast cancer before exposure to drugs associated with multidrug resistance. Images Figure 1 PMID:1978783

  11. Rapid Detection of Necrosis in Breast Cancer with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tata, Alessandra; Woolman, Michael; Ventura, Manuela; Bernards, Nicholas; Ganguly, Milan; Gribble, Adam; Shrestha, Bindesh; Bluemke, Emma; Ginsberg, Howard J.; Vitkin, Alex; Zheng, Jinzi; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Identification of necrosis in tumors is of prognostic value in treatment planning, as necrosis is associated with aggressive forms of cancer and unfavourable outcomes. To facilitate rapid detection of necrosis with Mass Spectrometry (MS), we report the lipid MS profile of necrotic breast cancer with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (DESI-MS) imaging validated with statistical analysis and correlating pathology. This MS profile is characterized by (1) the presence of the ion of m/z 572.48 [Cer(d34:1) + Cl]− which is a ceramide absent from the viable cancer subregions; (2) the absence of the ion of m/z 391.25 which is present in small abundance only in viable cancer subregions; and (3) a slight increase in the relative intensity of known breast cancer biomarker ions of m/z 281.25 [FA(18:1)-H]− and 303.23 [FA(20:4)-H]−. Necrosis is accompanied by alterations in the tissue optical depolarization rate, allowing tissue polarimetry to guide DESI-MS analysis for rapid MS profiling or targeted MS imaging. This workflow, in combination with the MS profile of necrosis, may permit rapid characterization of necrotic tumors from tissue slices. Further, necrosis-specific biomarker ions are detected in seconds with single MS scans of necrotic tumor tissue smears, which further accelerates the identification workflow by avoiding tissue sectioning and slide preparation. PMID:27734938

  12. Computer-aided diagnosis and lipidomics analysis to detect and treat breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Bäse, Anke; Retter, Felix; Steinbrücker, Frank; Görke, Robert; Burgeth, Bernhard; Schlossbauer, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Multi-modality diagnosis techniques are more and more replacing traditional medical imaging for breast cancer detection. Newly emerging advances in both intelligent cancer detection systems and lipidomics technologies offer an excellent opportunity to detect tumors and to understand regulation at the molecular level in many diseases such as cancer. In this paper, we present a detailed computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems combining motion artefact reduction and automated feature extraction and classification, and a novel data mining approach for visualization of gene therapy leading to apoptosis in U87 MG glioblastoma cells, a secondary tumor of breast cancer. The achieved results show that the CAD system represents a robust and integrative tool for reliable small contrast enhancing lesions. Graph-clustering methods are introduced as powerful correlation networks which enable a simultaneous exploration and visualization of co-regulation in glioblastoma data. These new paradigms are providing unique "fingerprints" by revealing how the intricate interactions at the lipidome level can be employed to induce apoptosis (cell death) and are thus opening a new window to biomedical frontiers.

  13. High-performance near-infrared imaging for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Yasser H; El-Sherif, Ashraf F

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for the noninvasive determination of the size, position, and optical properties of tumors in the human breast. The tumor is first detected by photothermal imaging. It is then sized, located, and optically characterized using designed digital image processing and edge-detection pattern recognition. The method assumes that the tumor is spherical and inhomogeneous and embedded in an otherwise homogeneous tissue. Heat energy is deposited in the tissue by absorption of near-infrared (NIR) Nd:YAG laser radiation, and its subsequent conversion to heat via vibrational relaxation causes a rise in temperature of the tissue. The tumor absorbs and scatters NIR light more strongly than the surrounding healthy tissue. Heat will diffuse through the tissue, causing a rise in temperature of the surrounding tissue. Differentiation between normal and cancerous tissues is determined using IR thermal imaging. Results are presented on a 55-year-old patient with a papillary breast cancer. We found that these results provide the clinician with more detailed information about breast lesions detected by photothermal imaging and thereby enhance its potential for specificity.

  14. High-performance near-infrared imaging for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for the noninvasive determination of the size, position, and optical properties of tumors in the human breast. The tumor is first detected by photothermal imaging. It is then sized, located, and optically characterized using designed digital image processing and edge-detection pattern recognition. The method assumes that the tumor is spherical and inhomogeneous and embedded in an otherwise homogeneous tissue. Heat energy is deposited in the tissue by absorption of near-infrared (NIR) Nd:YAG laser radiation, and its subsequent conversion to heat via vibrational relaxation causes a rise in temperature of the tissue. The tumor absorbs and scatters NIR light more strongly than the surrounding healthy tissue. Heat will diffuse through the tissue, causing a rise in temperature of the surrounding tissue. Differentiation between normal and cancerous tissues is determined using IR thermal imaging. Results are presented on a 55-year-old patient with a papillary breast cancer. We found that these results provide the clinician with more detailed information about breast lesions detected by photothermal imaging and thereby enhance its potential for specificity.

  15. Primary health care nurses’ knowledge practice and client teaching of early detection measures of breast cancer in Ibadan

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Early detection of breast cancer is vital to effective management and outcome of breast cancer. It has been suggested that women given information and instruction about breast self- examination and breast awareness by health care professionals demonstrated higher knowledge and confidence and tend to practice breast self-examination more than those who received information from other sources. Breast Self-Examination (BSE) and Clinical Breast Examination (CBE) have been recommended as Early Detection Measures (EDM) for developing countries. This study evaluated Primary Health Care (PHC) nurses’ knowledge, practice and client teaching of EDM of breast cancer. Methods A descriptive study that utilized stratified random method to select PHC settings for the study. Data was collected from 120 trained nurses in selected settings. This represented 66.3% of total population of PHC nurses (181) in Ibadan. The instrument for data collection was a structured questionnaire that explored the bio data of participants, knowledge, practice and client teaching of EDMs of breast cancer. Ethical approval was obtained from the Ethical Review Committee of Oyo State Ministry of Health, Nigeria. Results The mean age of the participants was 44.4±7.5 years. About half (52.2%) were double qualified (Registered Nurse and Midwife). Only 23 (20.0%) of the participants considered painless lump as an early sign of breast cancer while 47 (40.9%) considered pain as an early sign. BSE was listed as EDM of breast cancer by 80.9% of the participants while 40% and 30% listed CBE and mammogram respectively. Only eight (7.9%) have had a mammogram. The logistic regression of client teaching on four variables showed that for every increase in knowledge of breast cancer the odds of client teaching significantly increased by 7.5% (95% CI = 1.27 - 1.125). There were also significant relationships between knowledge of EDM, practice of BSE and client teaching. Conclusions It is vital that

  16. Beliefs and behaviours of Iranian teachers toward early detection of breast cancer and breast self-examination.

    PubMed

    Jarvandi, S; Montazeri, A; Harirchi, I; Kazemnejad, A

    2002-07-01

    A descriptive study was carried out to explore the beliefs and behaviours of Iranian teachers toward breast cancer and breast self-examination (BSE). A 10% random sample of 8000 teachers working in four central regions of Tehran was selected. Data on beliefs and behaviours regarding breast cancer and BSE were collected by means of a structured questionnaire. In all, 578 women participated in the study. The mean age of the respondents was 37.3 y (s.d.=8.8), and most were married (83%). The majority of the respondents believed that 'Like every other woman I am at risk of breast cancer' (67%) and that 'Family history of breast cancer is a risk factor for breast cancer' (59%). However, only 6% of them reported that they are performing BSE on a regular basis. The most common reasons for not doing BSE and not going for clinical examination were lack of knowledge and the belief that it was not necessary (34 and 36%, respectively). Doing BSE was more frequent in married (P<0.00001), and older (P<0.00001) women. Except for those with a positive family history of breast cancer, there was no association between breast cancer beliefs and almost all other variables studied. The findings suggest that although the majority of Iranian teachers seem to be quite knowledgeable about breast cancer, they need more education on breast cancer and BSE. Since teachers' beliefs and behaviours may have an impact on young females, planning training courses for this group of women is essential.

  17. Detection of circulating tumour cells in patients with breast or ovarian cancer by molecular cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Engel, H; Kleespies, C; Friedrich, J; Breidenbach, M; Kallenborn, A; Schöndorf, T; Kolhagen, H; Mallmann, P

    1999-01-01

    Detection of micrometastases in patients with solid tumours may aid the establishment of prognosis and development of new therapeutic approaches. This study was designed to investigate the presence and frequency of tumour cells in the peripheral blood (PB) of patients with breast or ovarian cancer by using a combination of magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Separated tumour cell and PB-samples from 48 patients (35 breast cancers, 12 ovarian tumours, one uterine sarcoma) were analysed for the presence of numerical aberrations of chromosomes 7, 12, 17 and 17 q11.2–q12. Twenty-five patients had primary disease and 23 had relapsed. The technique allows the detection of one tumour cell in 106 normal cells. Circulating tumour cells were detected in 35/48 cases (17 patients had relapsed and 13 primary carcinoma with lymph node or solid metastases) by the expression of anti-cytokeratin and the presence of numerical chromosomal abnormalities. PB-tumour cells of patients with a primary carcinoma and without solid metastases had a significantly lower percentage of chromosomal aberrations, especially for chromosome 12 (P = 0.035; P = 0.038) compared to those with relapsed disease and solid metastases. Detection and quantification of minimal residual disease may monitor the response to cytotoxic or hormonal therapy and may identify women at risk of relapse. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10584878

  18. Multispectral band selection and spatial characterization: Application to mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology.

    PubMed

    Irshad, H; Gouaillard, A; Roux, L; Racoceanu, D

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer is the second most frequent cancer. The reference process for breast cancer prognosis is Nottingham grading system. According to this system, mitosis detection is one of the three important criteria required for grading process and quantifying the locality and prognosis of a tumor. Multispectral imaging, as relatively new to the field of histopathology, has the advantage, over traditional RGB imaging, to capture spectrally resolved information at specific frequencies, across the electromagnetic spectrum. This study aims at evaluating the accuracy of mitosis detection on histopathological multispectral images. The proposed framework includes: selection of spectral bands and focal planes, detection of candidate mitotic regions and computation of morphological and multispectral statistical features. A state-of-the-art of the methods for mitosis classification is also provided. This framework has been evaluated on MITOS multispectral dataset and achieved higher detection rate (67.35%) and F-Measure (63.74%) than the best MITOS contest results (Roux et al., 2013). Our results indicate that the selected multispectral bands have more discriminant information than a single spectral band or all spectral bands for mitotic figures, validating the interest of using multispectral images to improve the quality of the diagnostic in histopathology.

  19. Salivary diagnostics: a new solution for an old problem: breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streckfus, Charles F.

    2009-05-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to determine if LC/MS/MS based isotopic tagging technique is useful to detect putative breast cancer markers in saliva. Methods: Six pooled (n=10 subjects per pool) stimulated whole saliva specimens from women were analyzed. One pooled specimen was from healthy women, another pooled specimen from women diagnosed with a benign breast tumor and the other four-pooled specimens were from women diagnosed with carcinoma of the breast. The four cancer specimens were staged 0, I, IIa and IIb (lymph node involvement). Isotopically tagging proteins in the tumor groups and comparing them to the healthy control group measured differential expression of proteins. The iTRAQ labels are isobaric and chemically identical, thus labeled peptides from the different pools have identical elution times and masses. The relative concentration of identified proteins in each of the mixtures is determined from the intensities of each of the reporter ions. Results: The results of the salivary analyses yielded approximately 209 proteins in the saliva specimens. These proteins were able to distinguish between the healthy control, the benign and the cancer patients. Additionally, there were proteins able to distinguish between node positive and node negative patients.

  20. Recurrent fusion transcripts detected by whole-transcriptome sequencing of 120 primary breast cancer samples.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jisun; Kim, Sehwan; Ko, Seyoon; In, Yong-ho; Moon, Hyeong-Gon; Ahn, Soo Kyung; Kim, Min Kyoon; Lee, Minju; Hwang, Jin-Ha; Ju, Young Seok; Kim, Jong-Il; Noh, Dong-Young; Kim, Sun; Park, Jung-Hoon; Rhee, Hwanseok; Kim, Sunghoon; Han, Wonshik

    2015-11-01

    Relatively few recurrent gene fusion events have been associated with breast cancer to date. In an effort to uncover novel fusion transcripts, we performed whole-transcriptome sequencing of 120 fresh-frozen primary breast cancer samples and five adjacent normal breast tissues using the Illumina HiSeq2000 platform. Three different fusion-detecting tools (deFuse, Chimerascan, and TopHatFusion) were used, and the results were compared. These tools detected 3,831, 6,630 and 516 fusion transcripts (FTs) overall. We primarily focused on the results obtained using the deFuse software. More FTs were identified from HER2 subtype breast cancer samples than from the luminal or triple-negative subtypes (P < 0.05). Seventy fusion candidates were selected for validation, and 32 (45.7%) were confirmed by RT-PCR and Sanger sequencing. Of the validated fusions, six were recurrent (found in 2 or more samples), three were in-frame (PRDX1-AKR1A1, TACSTD2-OMA1, and C2CD2-TFF1) and three were off-frame (CEACAM7-CEACAM6, CYP4X1-CYP4Z2P, and EEF1DP3-FRY). Notably, the novel read-through fusion, EEF1DP3-FRY, was identified and validated in 6.7% (8/120) of the breast cancer samples. This off-frame fusion results in early truncation of the FRY gene, which plays a key role in the structural integrity during mitosis. Three previously reported fusions, PPP1R1B-STARD3, MFGE8-HAPL, and ETV6-NTRK3, were detected in 8.3, 3.3, and 0.8% of the 120 samples, respectively, by both deFuse and Chimerascan. The recently reported MAGI3-AKT3 fusion was not detected in our analysis. Although future work will be needed to examine the biological significance of our new findings, we identified a number of novel fusions and confirmed some previously reported fusions. PMID:26227178

  1. On generating cell exemplars for detection of mitotic cells in breast cancer histopathology images.

    PubMed

    Aloraidi, Nada A; Sirinukunwattana, Korsuk; Khan, Adnan M; Rajpoot, Nasir M

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic activity is one of the main criteria that pathologists use to decide the grade of the cancer. Computerised mitotic cell detection promises to bring efficiency and accuracy into the grading process. However, detection and classification of mitotic cells in breast cancer histopathology images is a challenging task because of the large intra-class variation in the visual appearance of mitotic cells in various stages of cell division life cycle. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that cells in histopathology images can be effectively represented using cell exemplars derived from sub-images of various kinds of cells in an image for the purposes of mitotic cell classification. We compare three methods for generating exemplar cells. The methods have been evaluated in terms of classification performance on the MITOS dataset. The experimental results demonstrate that eigencells combined with support vector machines produce reasonably high detection accuracy among all the methods.

  2. Histochemistry to detect Helix pomatia lectin binding in breast cancer: methodology makes a difference.

    PubMed

    Brooks, S A; Lymboura, M; Schumacher, U; Leathem, A J

    1996-05-01

    A number of studies have shown that altered cellular glycosylation, as detected by binding of Helix pomatia lectin to paraffin sections, is associated with metastatic disease and consequent poor patient prognosis in breast and other cancers. In a 24-year retrospective study, sections of 373 primary breast cancers were stained for binding of the lectin using two different histochemical techniques: a direct method (using peroxidase-conjugated lectin) and an indirect method (using native, unconjugated lectin). Similar percentages of cases were positive (79%) and negative (21%) for lectin binding with either technique, but there was enormous inconsistency when individual cases were examined. A total of 38/373 (10.2%) cases that were negative by the indirect method were positive by the direct method, and 37/373 (9.9%) cases that were negative by the direct method were positive by the indirect method. Life tables calculated for lectin staining vs nonstaining cases showed a very strong correlation between lectin binding and long-term survival (p < 0.0001) when staining was performed by the indirect method, but only very weak correlation with prognosis (p < 0.03, borderline significance) when the direct technique was employed. SDS-PAGE revealed that there were differences in breast cancer glycoproteins recognized by native lectin and peroxidase-conjugated lectin immobilized on Sepharose 4B affinity beads. Helix pomatia lectin binding appears to be an intriguing and potentially valuable marker of biological behavior in breast cancer. This study emphasizes the importance of selecting an appropriate immunohistochemical technique for its visualization.

  3. Stages of Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  4. Breast Cancer Treatment

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  5. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    Doctors use 7 main stages to describe breast cancer. Stage 0, also called carcinoma in situ. This is cancer that is confined to the lobules or ducts in the breast. It has not spread to surrounding tissue. ...

  6. Affluence and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Steven; Green, Sheryl; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2016-09-01

    .624). The multivariate general linear model with income as covariate, 5-year survival by race as a dependent variable, showed a significant effect of income and White race on 5-year survival (p < 0.001), unrelated to Black race (p = 0.780) or other races (p = 0.618). In men, we found a nonsignificant positive correlation between county breast cancer incidence and income (r = 0.098, p = 0.168). Breast cancer risk factors, such as delayed childbirth, less breast-feeding, and use of hormone supplements, are more common in affluent women. Affluent women are more likely to have mammograms, which detect many cancers that might not otherwise be diagnosed. In addition, women in certain affluent ethnic groups-Ashkenazi Jews, Icelanders and the Dutch-are more likely to carry genetic mutations known to predispose to breast cancer. We hypothesize that women with more income can afford better cancer care and survive longer than poorer women. But our hypothesis does not explain why this effect should be limited to White women; or why node involvement increased with income in White women but not in Blacks or Hispanics. Further studies may be worthwhile. PMID:27296617

  7. [Identification of Circulating Tumor Cell(CTC)in Breast Cancer Patients Using a Newly Established CTC Detecting System].

    PubMed

    Nagata, Takuya; Ohnaga, Takashi; Lu, Xiao Long; Watanabe, Toru; Hirano, Katsuhisa; Okumura, Tomoyuki; Tsukada, Kazuhiro

    2015-10-01

    We developed a new circulating tumor cell (CTC) chip in order to identify CTCs in the peripheral blood of cancer patients. In this study, we aimed to identify CTCs in the blood of breast cancer patients by using this CTC detecting system. In addition, we used this system to evaluate the response to anticancer agents. We were able to identify CTCs in 5 of 6 patients. In addition, the system showed that the number of CTCs had decreased after chemotherapy. Thus, the CTC detecting system was useful in the identification of CTCs in the breast cancer patients and in the early prediction of response to anticancer agents. PMID:26489559

  8. Breast cancer detection based on serum sample surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Obieta, Enrique; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Zerega, Brenda Esmeralda; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; González-Solís, José Luis

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational technique which provides information about the chemical structure. Nevertheless, since many chemicals are present in a sample at very low concentration, the Raman signal observed is extremely weak. In surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), Raman signals can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude when nanoparticles are used. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the breast cancer detection based on serum SERS. The serum samples were obtained from 12 patients who were clinically diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and 15 controls. In the same proportion, the serum samples were mixed with colloidal gold nanoparticles of 40 nm using sonication. At least 10 spectra were collected of each serum sample using a Jobin-Yvon LabRAM Raman Spectrometer with a laser of 830 nm. Raw spectra were processed by carrying baseline correction, smoothing, and normalization and then analyzed using principle component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Raman spectra showed strongly enhanced bands in the 600-1800 cm (-1) range due to the nanoparticle colloidal clusters observed. These Raman bands allowed identifying biomolecules present at low concentration as amide I and III, β carotene, glutathione, tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. Preliminary results demonstrated that SERS and PCA-LDA can be used to discriminate between control and cancer samples with high sensitivity and specificity. SERS allowed short exposures and required a minimal sample preparation. The preliminary results suggest that SERS and PCA-LDA could be an excellent support technique for the breast cancer detection using serum samples.

  9. Breast cancer detection based on serum sample surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Obieta, Enrique; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Zerega, Brenda Esmeralda; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; González-Solís, José Luis

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational technique which provides information about the chemical structure. Nevertheless, since many chemicals are present in a sample at very low concentration, the Raman signal observed is extremely weak. In surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), Raman signals can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude when nanoparticles are used. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the breast cancer detection based on serum SERS. The serum samples were obtained from 12 patients who were clinically diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and 15 controls. In the same proportion, the serum samples were mixed with colloidal gold nanoparticles of 40 nm using sonication. At least 10 spectra were collected of each serum sample using a Jobin-Yvon LabRAM Raman Spectrometer with a laser of 830 nm. Raw spectra were processed by carrying baseline correction, smoothing, and normalization and then analyzed using principle component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Raman spectra showed strongly enhanced bands in the 600-1800 cm (-1) range due to the nanoparticle colloidal clusters observed. These Raman bands allowed identifying biomolecules present at low concentration as amide I and III, β carotene, glutathione, tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. Preliminary results demonstrated that SERS and PCA-LDA can be used to discriminate between control and cancer samples with high sensitivity and specificity. SERS allowed short exposures and required a minimal sample preparation. The preliminary results suggest that SERS and PCA-LDA could be an excellent support technique for the breast cancer detection using serum samples. PMID:27289243

  10. Detection of high-grade atypia nuclei in breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, Henri; Roux, Ludovic; Lu, Shijian; Boudier, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Along with mitotic count, nuclear pleomorphism or nuclear atypia is an important criterion for the grading of breast cancer in histopathology. Though some works have been done in mitosis detection (ICPR 2012,1 MICCAI 2013,2 and ICPR 2014), not much work has been dedicated to automated nuclear atypia grading, especially the most difficult task of detection of grade 3 nuclei. We propose the use of Convolutional Neural Networks for the automated detection of cell nuclei, using images from the three grades of breast cancer for training. The images were obtained from ICPR contests. Additional manual annotation was performed to classify pixels into five classes: stroma, nuclei, lymphocytes, mitosis and fat. At total of 3,000 thumbnail images of 101 × 101 pixels were used for training. By dividing this training set in an 80/20 ratio we could obtain good training results (around 90%). We tested our CNN on images of the three grades which were not in the training set. High grades nuclei were correctly classified. We then thresholded the classification map and performed basic analysis to keep only rounded objects. Our results show that mostly all atypical nuclei were correctly detected.

  11. Effects of Age on the Detection and Management of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    McGuire, Andrew; Brown, James A. L.; Malone, Carmel; McLaughlin, Ray; Kerin, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Currently, breast cancer affects approximately 12% of women worldwide. While the incidence of breast cancer rises with age, a younger age at diagnosis is linked to increased mortality. We discuss age related factors affecting breast cancer diagnosis, management and treatment, exploring key concepts and identifying critical areas requiring further research. We examine age as a factor in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment relating it to factors such as genetic status, breast cancer subtype, hormone factors and nodal status. We examine the effects of age as seen through the adoption of population wide breast cancer screening programs. Assessing the incidence rates of each breast cancer subtype, in the context of age, we examine the observed correlations. We explore how age affects patient’s prognosis, exploring the effects of age on stage and subtype incidence. Finally we discuss the future of breast cancer diagnosis and treatment, examining the potential of emerging tests and technologies (such as microRNA) and how novel research findings are being translated into clinically relevant practices. PMID:26010605

  12. Preventing cervical cancer : overviews of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program and 2 US immunization programs.

    PubMed

    Khan, Kris; Curtis, C Robinette; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Stokley, Shannon; Walker, Chastity; Roland, Katherine; Benard, Vicki; Saraiya, Mona

    2008-11-15

    Three federal programs with the potential to reduce cervical cancer incidence, morbidity, and mortality, especially among underserved populations, are administered by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC): the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP), the Vaccines for Children (VFC) Program, and the Section 317 immunization grant program. The NBCCEDP provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to uninsured and underinsured women. The VFC program and the Section 317 immunization grant program provide vaccines, including human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, to targeted populations at no cost for these vaccines. This article describes the programs, their histories, populations served, services offered, and roles in preventing cervical cancer through HPV vaccination and cervical cancer screening. Potential long-term reduction in healthcare costs resulting from HPV vaccination is also discussed. As an example of an initiative to vaccinate uninsured women aged 19-26 years through a cancer services program, a state-based effort that was recently launched in New York, is highlighted.

  13. Breast Cancer Knowledge, Attitudes, and Early Detection Practices in United States-Mexico Border Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Yelena; Moraros, John; King, Sasha; Prapsiri, Surasri; Thompson, Beti

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Evidence suggests Latinas residing along the United States-Mexico border face higher breast cancer mortality rates compared to Latinas in the interior of either country. The purpose of this study was to investigate breast cancer knowledge, attitudes, and use of breast cancer preventive screening among U.S. Latina and Mexican women residing along the U.S.-Mexico border. Methods For this binational cross-sectional study, 265 participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire that obtained information on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, attitudes, family history, and screening practices. Differences between Mexican (n=128) and U.S. Latina (n=137) participants were assessed by Pearson's chi-square, Fischer's exact test, t tests, and multivariate regression analyses. Results U.S. Latinas had significantly increased odds of having ever received a mammogram/breast ultrasound (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=2.95) and clinical breast examination (OR=2.67) compared to Mexican participants. A significantly greater proportion of Mexican women had high knowledge levels (54.8%) compared to U.S. Latinas (45.2%, p<0.05). Age, education, and insurance status were significantly associated with breast cancer screening use. Conclusions Despite having higher levels of breast cancer knowledge than U.S. Latinas, Mexican women along the U.S.-Mexico border are not receiving the recommended breast cancer screening procedures. Although U.S. border Latinas had higher breast cancer screening levels than their Mexican counterparts, these levels are lower than those seen among the general U.S. Latina population. Our findings underscore the lack of access to breast cancer prevention screening services and emphasize the need to ensure that existing breast cancer screening programs are effective in reaching women along the U.S.-Mexico border. PMID:21970564

  14. CT Findings of Axillary Tuberculosis Lymphadenitis: A Case Detected by Breast Cancer Screening Examination

    PubMed Central

    Tanada, Yasuko; Yoshida, Kouichi; Adachi, Yasuko; Matsui, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    We report the first description of CT findings of axillary tuberculous lymphadenitis confirmed by the pathological specimen. The breast cancer screening examination is one of the prime methods of detection of axillary tuberculous lymphadenitis. The most common site of axillary tuberculous lymphadenitis is the deep axilla. Screening mammography often fails to cover the whole axilla. The presence on the contrast-enhanced CT of unilateral multiple circumscribed dense nodes, some of which have large and dotted calcifications, might suggest tuberculous lymphadenitis in axillary region. PMID:27379192

  15. Full Angle Spatial Compound of ARFI images for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    González-Salido, Nuria; Medina, Luis; Camacho, Jorge

    2016-09-01

    Automated ultrasound breast imaging would overcome most of the limitations that precludes conventional hand-held echography to be an effective screening method for breast cancer diagnosis. If a three dimensional (3D) ultrasound dataset is acquired without manual intervention of the technician, repeatability and patient follow-up could be improved. Furthermore, depending on the system configuration, resolution and contrast could be enhanced with regard to conventional echography, improving lesion detectability and evaluation. Having multiple modalities is another major advantage of these automated systems, currently under development by several research groups. Because of their circular structure, some of them include through-transmission measurements that allow constructing speed of sound and attenuation maps, which adds complementary information to the conventional reflectivity B-Mode image. This work addresses the implementation of the Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse (ARFI) imaging technique in a Full Angle Spatial Compound (FASC) automated breast imaging system. It is of particular interest because of the high specificity of ARFI for breast cancer diagnosis, by representing tissue elasticity differences rather than acoustic reflectivity. First, the image formation process is analyzed and a compounding strategy is proposed for ARFI-FASC. Then, experimental results with a prototype system and two gelatin phantoms are presented: Phantom A with a hard inclusion in a soft background, and phantom B with three soft inclusions in a hard background and with three steel needles. It is demonstrated that the full angle composition of ARFI images improves image quality, enhancing Contrast to Noise Ratio (CNR) from 4.9 to 20.6 and 3.6 to 13.5 in phantoms A and B respectively. Furthermore, this CNR increase improved detectability of small structures (needles) with regard to images obtained from a single location, in which image texture masked their presence. PMID:27362998

  16. Breast Cancer Redox Heterogeneity Detectable with Chemical Exchange Satruation Transfer (CEST) MRI

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Kejia; Xu, He N.; Singh, Anup; Moon, Lily; Haris, Mohammad; Reddy, Ravinder; Li, Lin

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Tissue redox state is an important mediator of various biological processes in health and diseases such as cancer. Previously, we discovered that the mitochondrial redox state of ex vivo tissues detected by redox scanning (an optical imaging method) revealed interesting tumor redox state heterogeneity that could differentiate tumor aggressiveness. Because the noninvasive chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) MRI can probe the proton transfer and generate contrasts from endogenous metabolites, we aim to investigate if the in vivo CEST contrast is sensitive to proton transfer of the redox reactions so as to reveal the tissue redox states in breast cancer animal models. Procedures CEST MRI has been employed to characterize tumor metabolic heterogeneity and correlated with the redox states measured by the redox scanning in two human breast cancer mouse xenograft models, MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7. The possible biological mechanism on the correlation between the two imaging modalities was further investigated by phantom studies where the reductants and the oxidants of the representative redox reactions were measured. Results The CEST contrast is found linearly correlated with NADH concentration and the NADH redox ratio with high statistical significance, where NADH is the reduced form of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide. The phantom studies showed that the reductants of the redox reactions have more CEST contrast than the corresponding oxidants, indicating that higher CEST effect corresponds to the more reduced redox state. Conclusions This preliminary study suggests that CEST MRI, once calibrated, might provide a novel noninvasive imaging surrogate for the tissue redox state and a possible diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer in the clinic. PMID:24811957

  17. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  18. Early stage breast cancer detection by means of time-domain ultra-wide band sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanoon, T. F.; Abdullah, M. Z.

    2011-11-01

    The interest in the use of ultra-wide band (UWB) impulses for medical imaging, particularly early stage breast cancer detection, is driven by safety advantage, super resolution capability, significant dielectric contrast between tumours and their surrounding tissues, patient convenience and low operating costs. However, inversion algorithms leading to recovery of the dielectric profile are complex in their nature, and vulnerable to noisy experimental conditions and environment. In this paper, we present a simplified yet robust gradient-based iterative image reconstruction technique to solve the nonlinear inverse scattering problem. The calculation is based on the Polak-Ribière's approach while the Broyden's formula is used to update the gradient in an iterative scheme. To validate this approach, both numerical and experimental results are presented. Animal derived biological targets in the form of chicken skin, beef and salted butter are used to construct an experimental breast phantom, while vegetable oil is used as a background media. UWB transceivers in the form of biconical antennas contour the breast forming a full view scanning geometry at a frequency range of 0-5 GHz. Results indicate the feasibility of experimental detection of millimetre scaled targets.

  19. An interesting case of screen-detected breast cancer encasing a ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Jain, Yogesh Kumar; Kokan, Jalal S

    2013-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman was diagnosed with a breast cancer via screening encasing the ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Triple assessment including MRI scan of the breast confirmed the presence of a breast mass and the tubing of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt was running directly through the mass. She underwent wide local excision of the breast cancer as well as rerouting of VP shunt as a joint procedure with the neurosurgery team and recovered uneventfully. This is a very rare and an interesting case and required management involving a different specialty.

  20. Data mining approach to evaluating the use of skin surface electropotentials for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Sree, S Vinitha; Ng, E Y K; Acharya, U Rajendra

    2010-02-01

    The Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS) uses a score formed with measured skin surface electropotentials and a prior Level Of Suspicion (LOS) value (predicted by the physician based on the patient's ultrasound or mammography results) to calculate a revised Post-BDS LOS to indicate the presence of breast cancer. The demographic details, BDS test results, and the recorded electropotential values form a potentially useful dataset, which can be further explored with data mining tools to extract important information that can be used to improve the current predictive accuracy of the device. According to the proposed data mining framework, the BDS dataset with 291 cases was first pre-processed to remove outliers and then used to select relevant and informative features for classifier development and finally to evaluate the capability of the built classifiers in detecting the presence of the disease. Two popular feature selection techniques, namely, the filter and wrapper methods, were used in parallel for feature selection. A few statistical inference based classifiers and neural networks were used for classification. The proposed technique significantly improved the BDS prediction accuracy. Also, the use of prior LOS and, hence, the Post-BDS LOS, associates a mild subjective interpretation to the current prediction methodology used by BDS. However, the feature subset selected in our analysis that gave the best accuracy did not use either of these features. This result indicates the possibility of using BDS as a better objective assessment tool for breast cancer detection.

  1. Imaging of Her2-Targeted Magnetic Nanoparticles for Breast Cancer Detection: Comparison of SQUID-detected Magnetic Relaxometry and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Adolphi, Natalie L.; Butler, Kimberly S.; Lovato, Debbie M.; Tessier, T. E.; Trujillo, Jason E.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Fegan, Danielle L.; Monson, Todd C.; Stevens, Tyler E.; Huber, Dale L.; Ramu, Jaivijay; Milne, Michelle L.; Altobelli, Stephen A.; Bryant, Howard C.; Larson, Richard S.; Flynn, Edward R.

    2013-01-01

    Both magnetic relaxometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to detect and locate targeted magnetic nanoparticles, non-invasively and without ionizing radiation. Magnetic relaxometry offers advantages in terms of its specificity (only nanoparticles are detected) and the linear dependence of the relaxometry signal on the number of nanoparticles present. In this study, detection of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles by Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID)-detected magnetic relaxometry and standard 4.7 T MRI are compared. The nanoparticles were conjugated to a Her2 monoclonal antibody and targeted to Her2-expressing MCF7/Her2-18 breast cancer cells); binding of the nanoparticles to the cells was assessed by magnetic relaxometry and iron assay. The same nanoparticle-labeled cells, serially diluted, were used to assess the detection limits and MR relaxivities. The detection limit of magnetic relaxometry was 125,000 nanoparticle-labeled cells at 3 cm from the SQUID sensors. T2-weighted MRI yielded a detection limit of 15,600 cells in a 150 μl volume, with r1 = 1.1 mM−1s−1 and r2 = 166 mM−1s−1. Her2-targeted nanoparticles were directly injected into xenograft MCF7/Her2-18 tumors in nude mice, and magnetic relaxometry imaging and 4.7 T MRI were performed, enabling direct comparison of the two techniques. Co-registration of relaxometry images and MRI of mice resulted in good agreement. A method for obtaining accurate quantification of microgram quantities of iron in the tumors and liver by relaxometry was also demonstrated. These results demonstrate the potential of SQUID-detected magnetic relaxometry imaging for the specific detection of breast cancer and the monitoring of magnetic nanoparticle-based therapies. PMID:22539401

  2. Breast Cancer Detection with Short-Interval Follow-up Compared with Return to Annual Screening in Patients with Benign Stereotactic or US-guided Breast Biopsy Results

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Alisa K.; O’Meara, Ellen S.; Miglioretti, Diana L.; Geller, Berta M.; Hotaling, Elise N.; Herschorn, Sally D.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To compare the cancer detection rate and stage after benign stereotactic or ultrasonography (US)–guided core breast biopsy between patients with short-interval follow-up (SIFU) and those who return to annual screening. Materials and Methods The Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC) registry and the BCSC Statistical Coordinating Center received institutional review board approval for active and passive consent processes and a waiver of consent. All procedures were HIPAA compliant. BCSC data for 1994–2010 were used to compare ipsilateral breast cancer detection rates and tumor characteristics for diagnoses within 3 months after SIFU (3–8 months) versus return to annual screening (RTAS) mammography (9–18 months) after receiving a benign pathology result from image-guided breast biopsy. Results In total, 17 631 biopsies with benign findings were identified with SIFU or RTAS imaging. In the SIFU group, 27 ipsilateral breast cancers were diagnosed in 10 715 mammographic examinations (2.5 cancers per 1000 examinations) compared with 16 cancers in 6916 mammographic examinations in the RTAS group (2.3 cancers per 1000 examinations) (P = .88). Sixteen cancers after SIFU (59%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 39%, 78%) were invasive versus 12 after RTAS (75%; 95% CI: 48%, 93%). The invasive cancer rate was 1.5 per 1000 examinations after SIFU (95% CI: 0.9, 2.4) and 1.7 per 1000 examinations (95% CI: 0.9, 3.0) after RTAS (P = .70). Among invasive cancers, 25% were late stage (stage 2B, 3, or 4) in the SIFU group (95% CI: 7%, 52%) versus 27% in the RTAS group (95% CI: 6%, 61%). Positive lymph nodes were found in seven (44%; 95% CI: 20%, 70%) invasive cancers after SIFU and in three (25%; 95% CI: 5%, 57%) invasive cancers after RTAS. Conclusion Similar rates of cancer detection were found between SIFU and RTAS after benign breast biopsy with no significant differences in stage, tumor size, or nodal status, although the present study was limited by sample size

  3. Mammography use and mode of detection among breast cancer patients in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Innos, Kaire; Valvere, Vahur; Padrik, Peeter; Eelma, Evelyn; Kütner, Riina; Lehtsaar, Jaak; Tekkel, Mare

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine past mammography use and mode of detection among breast cancer (BC) patients in Estonia, a country that has low screening coverage and high BC mortality. Women newly diagnosed with primary BC in Estonia in 2008-2010 were interviewed. Determinants of past mammography use and the detection of BC by mammography were studied using multivariate logistic regression. Among 977 participants, almost half reported no mammograms prior to the detection of BC. Overall, 22% of the cases were detected by mammography (16% by screening mammography). Detection by mammography was strongly related to age, past mammography use, and obesity. Among cases detected by mammography, 10% were stage III/IV at diagnosis (32% among cases detected by other modes). This study showed low mammography utilization and high rate of self-detection of BC in Estonia. Increased detection by mammography would help diagnose the disease at an earlier stage and consequently avoid premature BC deaths. Efforts should be undertaken to increase participation in screening and improve the availability of mammography among older and high-risk women. The results are likely to be relevant for other countries and population groups with low screening coverage. PMID:26327255

  4. Chromosomal instability detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization in Japanese breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Takami, S; Kawasome, C; Kinoshita, M; Koyama, H; Noguchi, S

    2001-06-01

    The relationship between chromosomal instability (CIN) and prognostic factors was investigated in 31 breast cancers and 5 benign breast lesions (three fibroadenomas and two papillomas). Using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) with chromosome-specific DNA probes of chromosomes 1, 2, 6, 7, 10, 11, 17 and 18, CIN for each case was determined. CIN varied from 8.1% to 59.3% among the breast cancer patients tested, and was significantly higher than that observed in the benign breast lesions (p<0.01). Moreover, CIN showed a significant correlation with lymph node metastases (p<0.05) and estrogen receptor negativity (p<0.01). These findings suggest that CIN might be useful in the prediction of the biological aggressiveness of breast cancers. PMID:11412824

  5. Occurrence of Breast Cancer After Chest Wall Irradiation for Pediatric Cancer, as Detected by a Multimodal Screening Program

    SciTech Connect

    Terenziani, Monica; Casalini, Patrizia; Scaperrotta, Gianfranco; Gandola, Lorenza; Trecate, Giovanna; Catania, Serena; Cefalo, Graziella; Conti, Alberto; Massimino, Maura; Meazza, Cristina; Podda, Marta; Spreafico, Filippo; Suman, Laura; Gennaro, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the occurrence of breast cancer (BC) after exposure to ionizing radiation for pediatric cancer, by means of a multimodal screening program. Patients and Methods: We identified 86 patients who had received chest wall radiation therapy for pediatric cancer. Clinical breast examination (CBE), ultrasound (US), and mammography (MX) were performed yearly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was added as of October 2007. We calculated the risk of developing BC by radiation therapy dose, patient age, and menarche before or after primary treatment. Results: Eleven women developed a BC from July 2002-February 2010. The sensitivity of the screening methods was 36% for CBE, 73% for MX, 55% for US, and 100% for MRI; the specificity was 91%, 99%, 95%, and 80% for CBE, MX, US, and MRI, respectively. The annual BC detection rate was 2.9%. The median age at BC diagnosis was 33 years. Although age had no influence, menarche before as opposed to after radiation therapy correlated significantly with BC (P=.027): the annual BC detection rate in the former subgroup was 5.3%. Conclusions: Mammography proved more sensitive and specific in our cohort of young women than CBE or US. Magnetic resonance imaging proved 100% sensitive (but this preliminary finding needs to be confirmed). Our cohort of patients carries a 10-fold BC risk at an age more than 20 years younger than in the general population.

  6. Molecular detection of peripheral blood breast cancer mRNA transcripts as a surrogate biomarker for circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Lasa, Adriana; Garcia, Arnal; Alonso, Carmen; Millet, Pilar; Cornet, Mónica; Ramón y Cajal, Teresa; Baiget, Montserrat; Barnadas, Agusti

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are becoming a scientifically recognized indicator of primary tumors and/or metastasis. These cells can now be accurately detected and characterized as the result of technological advances. We analyzed the presence of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic breast cancer by real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) using a panel of selected genes. The analysis of a single marker, without an EpCAM based enrichment approach, allowed the positive identification of 35% of the metastatic breast cancer patients. The analysis of five genes (SCGB2, TFF1, TFF3, Muc1, KRT20) performed in all the samples increased the detection to 61%. We describe a sensitive, reproducible and easy to implement approach to characterize CTC in patients with metastasic breast cancer.

  7. Breast Cancer: Epidemiology and Etiology.

    PubMed

    Tao, ZiQi; Shi, Aimin; Lu, Cuntao; Song, Tao; Zhang, Zhengguo; Zhao, Jing

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer, the most frequently occurring cancer in women, is a major public health problem, with 1,384,155 estimated new cases worldwide with nearly 459,000 related deaths. Breast cancer is highly heterogeneous in its pathological characteristics, some cases showing slow growth with excellent prognosis, while others being aggressive tumors. Current predictions and statistics suggest that both worldwide incidence of breast cancer and related mortality are on the rise. According to 2012 GLOBOCAN statistics, nearly 1.7 million women were diagnosed with breast cancer with 522,000 related deaths-an increase in breast cancer incidence and related mortality by nearly 18 % from 2008. According to American Cancer Society, one in eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. It has been predicted that the worldwide incidence of female breast cancer will reach approximately 3.2 million new cases per year by 2050. These numbers reflect the magnitude of breast cancer incidence, its effect on society worldwide and the need for urgency for preventive and treatment measures. While technological advances in medical sciences and health care have made it possible to detect the disease early and to start the treatment early on to prevent the progress of the disease into a metastatic state, there are several unanswered questions with regard to the molecular mechanisms that underlie the aggressiveness of certain forms of this disease. Epidemiological studies suggest that addressing socio economical issues is utmost important, so that all women have equal access to medical care from screening to advanced treatment, and only such decisive action can help reduce the worldwide burden of breast cancer.

  8. Tumor response estimation in radar-based microwave breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Kurrant, Douglas J; Fear, Elise C; Westwick, David T

    2008-12-01

    Radar-based microwave imaging techniques have been proposed for early stage breast cancer detection. A considerable challenge for the successful implementation of these techniques is the reduction of clutter, or components of the signal originating from objects other than the tumor. In particular, the reduction of clutter from the late-time scattered fields is required in order to detect small (subcentimeter diameter) tumors. In this paper, a method to estimate the tumor response contained in the late-time scattered fields is presented. The method uses a parametric function to model the tumor response. A maximum a posteriori estimation approach is used to evaluate the optimal values for the estimates of the parameters. A pattern classification technique is then used to validate the estimation. The ability of the algorithm to estimate a tumor response is demonstrated by using both experimental and simulated data obtained with a tissue sensing adaptive radar system.

  9. Detecting emotional expression in face-to-face and online breast cancer support groups.

    PubMed

    Liess, Anna; Simon, Wendy; Yutsis, Maya; Owen, Jason E; Piemme, Karen Altree; Golant, Mitch; Giese-Davis, Janine

    2008-06-01

    Accurately detecting emotional expression in women with primary breast cancer participating in support groups may be important for therapists and researchers. In 2 small studies (N = 20 and N = 16), the authors examined whether video coding, human text coding, and automated text analysis provided consistent estimates of the level of emotional expression. In Study 1, the authors compared coding from videotapes and text transcripts of face-to-face groups. In Study 2, the authors examined transcripts of online synchronous groups. The authors found that human text coding significantly overestimated Positive Affect and underestimated Defensive/Hostile Affect compared with video coding. They found correlations were low for Positive Affect but moderate for negative affect between Linguistic Inquiry Word Count (LIWC) and video coding. The implications of utilizing text-only detection of emotion are discussed. PMID:18540745

  10. Integration of Breast Cancer Secretomes with Clinical Data Elucidates Potential Serum Markers for Disease Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Yvonne S.; Moresco, James J.; Yates, John R.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells secrete factors that influence adjacent cell behavior and can lead to enhanced proliferation and metastasis. To better understand the role of these factors in oncogenesis and disease progression, estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells, triple negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231, DT22, and DT28 cells, and MCF-10A non-transformed mammary epithelial cells were grown in 3D cultures. A special emphasis was placed on triple negative breast cancer since these tumors are highly aggressive and no targeted treatments are currently available. The breast cancer cells secreted factors of variable potency that stimulated proliferation of the relatively quiescent MCF-10A cells. The conditioned medium from each cell line was subjected to mass spectrometry analysis and a variety of secreted proteins were identified including glycolytic enzymes, proteases, protease inhibitors, extracellular matrix proteins, and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. An investigation of the secretome from each cell line yielded clues about strategies used for breast cancer proliferation and metastasis. Some of the proteins we identified may be useful in the development of a serum-based test for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring. PMID:27355404

  11. Living as a Breast Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... Emotional aspects of breast cancer Living as a breast cancer survivor For many women with breast cancer, treatment ... making some new choices. Follow-up care after breast cancer treatment Even after you have completed breast cancer ...

  12. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  13. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Me Understand Genetics Home Health Conditions breast cancer breast cancer Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. Download PDF Open All Close All Description Breast cancer is a disease in which certain cells in ...

  14. Women's perceptions of events impeding or facilitating the detection, investigation and treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bairati, I; Fillion, L; Meyer, F A; Héry, C; Larochelle, M

    2006-05-01

    An integrated network is currently being implemented in the province of Quebec in order to improve the cancer care continuum. In this context, formal trajectories for cancer patients through healthcare services are being established. The investigation of patients' perceptions of the healthcare continuum is essential as it allows us to identify the issue of continuity/discontinuity of health services. In addition, patients' perceptions of continuity of cancer care should be documented since they could influence the implementation of optimal trajectories through the healthcare services. An exploratory qualitative study was conducted in order to identify events, based on the perceptions of women with breast cancer, that made the patient progress more rapidly, facilitating events, or more slowly, impeding events, within the cancer care continuum. Two consecutive series of women receiving adjuvant radiation therapy in 2002 and 2003 at the University Hospital of Quebec City were recruited, for a total of 120 participants. A semi-structured interview was administered in order to identify women's perceptions regarding impeding and facilitating events during the detection, investigation and treatment periods of cancer, as well as the actors and reasons involved. Overall, 64% of women reported having at least one impeding event, while 68% reported at least one facilitating event. The periods most frequently affected by impeding or facilitating events were the investigation period, followed by the treatment period. The main stages affected by impeding or facilitating events were the scheduling of an appointment, during the investigation period, and the onset of treatment. Impeding events particularly affected the scheduling of mammography, the initial exam of the investigation for breast cancer, as well as the onset of radiation treatment. On the other hand, facilitating events mainly occurred at the time of the scheduling of medical consultations with specialists, during the

  15. Application of a miniature biochip using the molecular beacon probe in breast cancer gene BRCA1 detection.

    PubMed

    Culha, Mustafa; Stokes, David L; Griffin, Guy D; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2004-04-15

    We report for the first time the application of a biochip using the molecular beacon (MB) detection scheme. The usability of this biochip novel detection system for the analysis of the breast cancer gene BRCA1 is demonstrated using molecular beacon probes. The MB is designed for the BRCA1 gene and a miniature biochip system is used for detection. The performance of the biochip-MB detection system is evaluated. The optimum conditions for the MB system for highest fluorescence detection sensitivity are investigated for the detection system. The detection of BRCA1 gene is successfully demonstrated in solution and the limit of detection (LOD) is estimated as 70 nM.

  16. Scanning elastic scattering spectroscopy detects metastatic breast cancer in sentinel lymph nodes.

    PubMed

    Austwick, Martin R; Clark, Benjamin; Mosse, Charles A; Johnson, Kristie; Chicken, D Wayne; Somasundaram, Santosh K; Calabro, Katherine W; Zhu, Ying; Falzon, Mary; Kocjan, Gabrijela; Fearn, Tom; Bown, Stephen G; Bigio, Irving J; Keshtgar, Mohammed R S

    2010-01-01

    A novel method for rapidly detecting metastatic breast cancer within excised sentinel lymph node(s) of the axilla is presented. Elastic scattering spectroscopy (ESS) is a point-contact technique that collects broadband optical spectra sensitive to absorption and scattering within the tissue. A statistical discrimination algorithm was generated from a training set of nearly 3000 clinical spectra and used to test clinical spectra collected from an independent set of nodes. Freshly excised nodes were bivalved and mounted under a fiber-optic plate. Stepper motors raster-scanned a fiber-optic probe over the plate to interrogate the node's cut surface, creating a 20x20 grid of spectra. These spectra were analyzed to create a map of cancer risk across the node surface. Rules were developed to convert these maps to a prediction for the presence of cancer in the node. Using these analyses, a leave-one-out cross-validation to optimize discrimination parameters on 128 scanned nodes gave a sensitivity of 69% for detection of clinically relevant metastases (71% for macrometastases) and a specificity of 96%, comparable to literature results for touch imprint cytology, a standard technique for intraoperative diagnosis. ESS has the advantage of not requiring a pathologist to review the tissue sample. PMID:20799832

  17. Simultaneous Detection of Disseminated and Circulating Tumor Cells in Primary Breast Cancer Patients

    PubMed Central

    Hartkopf, Andreas D.; Wallwiener, Markus; Hahn, Markus; Fehm, Tanja N.; Brucker, Sara Y.; Taran, Florin-Andrei

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) from bone marrow (BM) are a surrogate of minimal residual disease (MRD) in primary breast cancer (PBC) patients and associated with an adverse prognosis. However, BM sampling is an invasive procedure. Although there is growing evidence that circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from the blood are also suitable for monitoring MRD, data on the simultaneous detection of DTCs and CTCs are limited. Materials and Methods We determined the presence of DTCs using immunocytochemistry and the pan-cytokeratin antibody A45-B/B3. CTCs were determined simultaneously using a reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction–based assay (AdnaTest Breast Cancer) and CellSearch (at least one CTC per 7.5 mL blood). We compared the detection of DTCs and CTCs and evaluated their impact on disease-free and overall survival. Results Of 585 patients, 131 (22%) were positive for DTCs; 19 of 202 (9%) and 18 of 383 (5%) patients were positive for CTCs, as shown by AdnaTest and CellSearch, respectively. No significant association was observed between DTCs and CTCs (p=0.248 and p=0.146 as shown by AdnaTest and CellSearch, respectively). The presence of DTCs (p=0.046) and the presence of CTCs as shown by CellSearch (p=0.007) were predictive of disease-free survival. Conclusion Our data confirm the prognostic relevance of DTCs and CTCs in patients with PBC. As we found no significant relationship between DTCs and CTCs, prospective trials should include their simultaneous detection. Within those trials, the question of whether or not DTCs and CTCs are independent subpopulations of malignant cell clones should be determined by molecular characterization. PMID:25687853

  18. Breast cancer detection and classification in digital mammography based on Non-Subsampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT) and Super Resolution.

    PubMed

    Pak, Fatemeh; Kanan, Hamidreza Rashidy; Alikhassi, Afsaneh

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most perilous diseases among women. Breast screening is a method of detecting breast cancer at a very early stage which can reduce the mortality rate. Mammography is a standard method for the early diagnosis of breast cancer. In this paper, a new algorithm is proposed for breast cancer detection and classification in digital mammography based on Non-Subsampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT) and Super Resolution (SR). The presented algorithm includes three main parts including pre-processing, feature extraction and classification. In the pre-processing stage, after determining the region of interest (ROI) by an automatic technique, the quality of image is improved using NSCT and SR algorithm. In the feature extraction part, several features of the image components are extracted and skewness of each feature is calculated. Finally, AdaBoost algorithm is used to classify and determine the probability of benign and malign disease. The obtained results on Mammographic Image Analysis Society (MIAS) database indicate the significant performance and superiority of the proposed method in comparison with the state of the art approaches. According to the obtained results, the proposed technique achieves 91.43% and 6.42% as a mean accuracy and FPR, respectively.

  19. Detection of Superior Markers for Polymerase Chain Reaction Diagnosis of Breast Cancer Micrometastasis in Sentinel Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Alizadeh Shargh, Shohreh; Movafagh, Abolfazl; Zarghami, Nosratolah; Sayad, Arezou; Mansouri, Neda; Taheri, Mohammad; Heidary Pour, Atefeh; Iranpour, Mostafa; Ghaedi, Hamid; Montazeri, Vahid; Massoudi, Nilofar; Hashemi, Mehrdad; Mortazavi-Tabatabaei, S A

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most prevalent type of cancer among women around the world, and mortality is primarily caused by micro-metastatic disease. The complex mechanisms of breast cancer invasion and metastasis are intrinsically related to the malignant cell type so that early detection of micro-metastases can help prolongation of survival for patient. The aim of the present research work was evaluation of the expression status of mammoglobin protein as a candidate molecular marker in the negative sentinel lymph node (SLN). Fifty tumor specimens, and 50 normal adjacent breast tissue samples from the same patients were selected on the basis of having more than 10% tumor content for RNA extraction from SLNs. Tumor samples and normal adjacent breast tissue were archived in the form of frozen fresh tissue in liquid nitrogen. Real-time PCR was performed on a Bioner life express gradient thermal cycler system. Mammoglobin gene overexpression in breast cancer metastasis was investigated. Single marker results were mammaglobin 66.7% and CK19 50.0%, with 58.3% for the two in combination. Due to improved outcome with at least 3 genes (83.3%), it seems, triple marker evaluation will be most likely useful for detecting micro-metastases instead of studying separate genes. PMID:27165222

  20. Chemoprevention of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Files, Julia A; Stan, Daniela L; Allen, Summer V; Pruthi, Sandhya

    2012-11-01

    The development of pharmacologic agents for the prevention of breast cancer is a significant milestone in medical and laboratory research. Despite these advances, the endorsement of preventive options has become challenging and complex, as physicians are expected to counsel and tailor their recommendations using a personalized approach taking into account medical comorbidities, degree of risk and patient preferences. This article provides a comprehensive overview of the major breast cancer prevention trials, review of the pharmacologic options available for breast cancer prevention, and strategies for integrating chemoprevention of breast cancer in high-risk women into clinical practice.

  1. A case of occult contralateral breast cancer incidentally detected by contrast-enhanced MRI; report of a case with review of literature.

    PubMed

    Komatsu, Shuhei; Lee, Chol Joo; Hosokawa, Yohei; Hamashima, Takashi; Shirono, Koichi; Ichikawa, Daisuke; Okabe, Harumi; Kurioka, Hideaki; Yamagishi, Hisakazu; Oka, Takahiro

    2005-01-01

    We encountered a case of occult contralateral breast cancer, previously undetected by conventional imaging such as mammography (MMG) and ultrasonography (US), but incidentally detected by contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI). We present it here with a review of the literature. A 67-year-old Japanese woman was referred to our hospital in October 2000 because of a 1.5 cm right breast lump detected in a medical checkup. MMG, US and fine needle aspiration cytology revealed a cancerous lesion during the right breast. No mass lesion was palpable nor was any detected by MMG or US in the left breast. Bilateral breast CE-MRI was performed for more detailed evaluation. Consequently, an occult contralateral breast cancerous lesion was detected incidentally by CE-MRI, with the images showing rapid initial enhancement of time to signal intensity curves. Before surgery, bilateral breast lesions were diagnosed as invasive ductal carcinoma by open biopsy. She underwent bilateral breast conserving surgery with bilateral axillary lymph node dissection. The postoperative course was uneventful and no recurrence has been noted as of January 18th, 2004. CE-MRI of the contralateral breast should be of value as a routine screen in those patients with a known or suspected malignancy in one breast considering the limits of breast cancer detection by such conventional modalities as MMG and US. PMID:16286918

  2. The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program: 25 Years of public health service to low-income women.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Paula M; Mullen, Jewel

    2015-05-01

    This article presents an overview of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP), a valuable and successful national public health program in the USA that will soon celebrate its 25th anniversary. Simulation modeling and other analyses have demonstrated that the NBCCEDP has significantly reduced breast and cervical cancer mortality among low-income uninsured and underinsured women in the USA, a major goal of the original legislation. The NBCCEDP has also served to build cancer prevention and control capacity in state and local health agencies and created strong and unique public-private partnerships aimed at improving women's health. As such, the impact of NBCCEDP extends beyond the millions of women served by the program to include increased public health system capacity and effectiveness regarding cancer early detection and control for all women.

  3. Strengthening breast and cervical cancer control through partnerships: American Indian and Alaska Native Women and the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    PubMed

    Espey, David; Castro, Georgina; Flagg, T'Ronda; Landis, Kate; Henderson, Jeffrey A; Benard, Vicki B; Royalty, Janet E

    2014-08-15

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) has played a critical role in providing cancer screening services to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/ANs) women and strengthening tribal screening capacity. Since 1991, the NBCCEDP has funded states, tribal nations, and tribal organizations to develop and implement organized screening programs. The ultimate goal is to deliver breast and cervical cancer screening to women who do not have health insurance and cannot afford to pay for these services. The delivery of clinical services is supported through complementary program efforts such as professional development, public education and outreach, and patient navigation. This article seeks to describe the growth of NBCCEDP's tribal commitment and the unique history and aspects of serving the AI/AN population. The article describes: 1) how this program has demonstrated success in improving screening of AI/AN women; 2) innovative partnerships with the Indian Health Service, state programs, and other organizations that have improved tribal public health infrastructure; and 3) the evolution of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention work with tribal communities. PMID:25099898

  4. Strengthening breast and cervical cancer control through partnerships: American Indian and Alaska Native Women and the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    PubMed

    Espey, David; Castro, Georgina; Flagg, T'Ronda; Landis, Kate; Henderson, Jeffrey A; Benard, Vicki B; Royalty, Janet E

    2014-08-15

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) has played a critical role in providing cancer screening services to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/ANs) women and strengthening tribal screening capacity. Since 1991, the NBCCEDP has funded states, tribal nations, and tribal organizations to develop and implement organized screening programs. The ultimate goal is to deliver breast and cervical cancer screening to women who do not have health insurance and cannot afford to pay for these services. The delivery of clinical services is supported through complementary program efforts such as professional development, public education and outreach, and patient navigation. This article seeks to describe the growth of NBCCEDP's tribal commitment and the unique history and aspects of serving the AI/AN population. The article describes: 1) how this program has demonstrated success in improving screening of AI/AN women; 2) innovative partnerships with the Indian Health Service, state programs, and other organizations that have improved tribal public health infrastructure; and 3) the evolution of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention work with tribal communities.

  5. Detecting microcalcifications in mammograms by using SVM method for the diagnostics of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wan, Baikun; Wang, Ruiping; Qi, Hongzhi; Cao, Xuchen

    2005-01-01

    Support vector machine (SVM) is a new statistical learning method. Compared with the classical machine learning methods, SVM learning discipline is to minimize the structural risk instead of the empirical risk of the classical methods, and it gives better generative performance. Because SVM algorithm is a convex quadratic optimization problem, the local optimal solution is certainly the global optimal one. In this paper a SVM algorithm is applied to detect the micro-calcifications (MCCs) in mammograms for the diagnostics of breast cancer that has not been reported yet. It had been tested with 10 mammograms and the results show that the algorithm can achieve a higher true positive in comparison with artificial neural network (ANN) based on the empirical risk minimization, and is valuable for further study and application in the clinical engineering.

  6. Plasmonics nanoprobes: detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the breast cancer BRCA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Wabuyele, Musundi B; Yan, Fei; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes the application of plasmonics-based nanoprobes that combine the modulation of the plasmonics effect to change the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of a Raman label and the specificity of a DNA hairpin loop sequence to recognize and discriminate a variety of molecular target sequences. Hybridization with target DNA opens the hairpin and physically separates the Raman label from the metal nanoparticle thus reducing the plasmonics effect and quenching the SERS signal of the label. We have successfully demonstrated the specificity and selectivity of the nanoprobes in the detection of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the breast cancer BRCA1 gene in a homogenous solution at room temperature. In addition, the potential application of plasmonics nanoprobes for quantitative DNA diagnostic testing is discussed.

  7. Highly sensitive detection of the MGB1 transcript (mammaglobin) in the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cerveira, Nuno; Torres, Lurdes; Rocha, Patrícia; Bizarro, Susana; Pereira, Deolinda; Abreu, Joaquim; Henrique, Rui; Teixeira, Manuel R; Castedo, Sérgio

    2004-02-10

    We describe a new one-step RT-PCR assay for the detection of the mammaglobin (MGB1) gene transcript in the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients. With this approach, the MGB1 transcript could be detected in the peripheral blood of 22 of 54 (41%) breast cancer patients prior to any therapy. This method, using specific primers for cDNA synthesis, proved to be more sensitive (10(-6) to 10(-11), usually 10(-7)) than previously reported methodologies. This increased sensitivity was achieved without compromising specificity, as the MGB1 transcript was not detected in 38 blood samples of healthy donors and in only 1 of 18 blood samples of patients presenting with hematologic malignancies. A positive correlation was seen between MGB1 positivity and breast cancer stage: 0/3 (0%) in stage 0, 3/13 (23%) in stage I, 6/17 (35%) in stage II, 5/10 (50%) in stage III, 8/11 (73%) in stage IV (p = 0.003). The prognostic and therapeutic implications of MGB1 positivity by one-step RT-PCR in the peripheral blood of breast cancer patients, especially in clinically localized disease (stages I and II), should be evaluated after long-term clinical follow-up of these patients. PMID:14696125

  8. Breast cancer epidemiology and risk factors.

    PubMed

    Broeders, M J; Verbeek, A L

    1997-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women in the Western society. Over the past decades it has become apparent that breast cancer incidence rates are increasing steadily, whereas the mortality rates for breast cancer have remained relatively constant. Information through the media on this rising number of cases has increased breast health awareness but has also introduced anxiety in the female population. This combination of factors has made the need for prevention of breast cancer an urgent matter. Breast cancer does not seem to be a single disease entity. A specific etiologic factor may therefore have more influence on one form of breast cancer than another. So far though, as shown in our summary of current knowledge on established and dubious risk factors, no risk factors have been identified that can explain a major part of the incidence. Efforts to identify other ways for primary prevention have also been discouraging, even though breast cancer is one of the most investigated tumours world-wide. Thus, at this point in time, the most important strategy to reduce breast cancer mortality is early detection through individual counselling and organised breast screening programs. The recent isolation of breast cancer susceptibility genes may introduce new ways to reduce the risk of breast cancer in a small subset of women. PMID:9274126

  9. An evaluation of molecular markers for improved detection of breast cancer metastases in sentinel nodes

    PubMed Central

    Abdul‐Rasool, S; Kidson, S H; Panieri, E; Dent, D; Pillay, K; Hanekom, G S

    2006-01-01

    Background and objectives In patients with breast cancer (BC), the sentinel node (SN) is the first node in the axillary basin that receives the primary lymphatic flow and can be used to accurately assess the axillary nodal status without removal of the axillary contents. Currently, histology and/or immunohistochemistry are the routine methods of SN analysis. The primary objective of this study was to develop a reproducible reverse transcription (RT) PCR assay, with emphasis on achieving high specificity for accurate detection of BC micrometastases in the SN. To correct for the heterogeneity of BC cells, a multimarker approach was followed, with the further aim of improving the detection rate of the assay. Methods In total, 73 markers were evaluated, of which 7 were breast epithelial markers and 66 were either cancer testis or tumour associated antigens. Twelve BC cell lines and 30 SNs (from 30 patients) were analysed using RT‐PCR to determine the in vitro and in vivo detection rates for each of the markers. In addition, 20 axillary nodes obtained from a patient with brain death were used as controls to optimise the PCR cycle numbers for all the markers. Results Of the 30 SNs, 37% (11/30) were positive on haematoxylin and eosin analysis. Extensive immunohistochemical (IHC) analyses of the haematoxylin and eosin negative nodes confirmed the presence of very small numbers of BC cells in an additional 40% (12/30) of SNs. Molecular analysis with the hMAM‐A alone identified metastases in 70% (21/30) of SNs. Using MAGE‐A3 in combination with hMAM‐A identified metastases in 90% (27/30) of patients. Seven SNs (23%) were negative for micrometastases (with haematoxylin and eosin and IHC) but RT‐PCR positive for either hMAM‐A or MAGE‐A3. Conclusions As IHC analysis resulted in a 77% detection rate compared with 37% for haematoxylin and eosin analysis, we consider that IHC is essential in order not to miss SN micrometastases. Molecular analysis with hMAM‐A and

  10. Carboplatin and Eribulin Mesylate in Triple Negative Breast Cancer Patients

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-30

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  11. Detection of HER2 breast cancer biomarker using the optofluidic ring resonator biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohring, John T.; Dale, Paul S.; Fan, Xudong

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we describe a novel approach for detecting the HER2/neu extra-cellular domain (ECD) protein in human serum samples using the opto-fluidic ring resonator (OFRR). OFRR sensing technology that incorporates microfluidics and optical sensing methods to achieve rapid label free detection in a small and low cost platform. In this study, HER2 proteins were spiked in PBS running buffer and serum at varying concentrations. Concentrations of the HER2 protein were adjusted in serum to levels typical of breast cancer patients that show over-expression of this particular beast cancer biomarker. The OFRR was modified with a biologically functional layer to efficiently capture the HER2 biomarker and produce a sensing signal through interaction with the evanescent field of the optical resonator. Results show effective capture of HER2 at medically relevant concentrations in serum and was achieved for concentrations as low as 13 ng/mL and ranged to above 100 ng/mL. This work will lead to a device that can be used as a tool for monitoring disease progression in a low cost sensing setup.

  12. Carbon nanotube based stationary x-ray tomosynthesis scanner for detection of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guang

    In this dissertation, my Ph.D. research during the past six years will be presented. My research mainly focused on design, fabrication and characterization of devices based on carbon nanotubes (CNT). Since the discovery of CNT in 1991, the research focus has gradually shifted from material synthesis and characterization to devices and applications. During early stages of my Ph.D. study, I worked on synthesizing CNT using laser ablation method, and fabricating CNT-AFM tips and magnetic wire MFM tips. During the second half of my Ph.D. study, my research focused more on design, fabrication, and testing the x-ray sources and imaging systems based on CNT, including both single-beam system (microCT) and multi-beam system (tomosysthesis). During the last two years, I worked on the project to develop a novel imaging system (Argus) using CNT x-ray source array for breast cancer detection. This is the first stationary digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) imaging system in the world. My research result has shown great clinical potentials of these imaging systems using x-ray source based on CNTs. This dissertation is composed by five chapters. In chapter one, the physics behind x-ray and field emission theory will be reviewed. Chapter two covers discovery, property and synthesis of CNT. Methods to fabricate CNT emitters and their emission property will also be introduced there. Single and multi beam x-ray sources and applications will be discussed in chapter three. The design and characteristic test results are presented. The application includes micro-CT, tomosynthesis and multiplexing. Chapter four is dedicated to the Argus system, the first stationary digital breast tomosynthesis imaging system. At last, conclusion is given in chapter five.

  13. BREAST CANCER AND EXERCISE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2008-03-19

    Prevent Osteoporosis and Osteoporotic Fractures; Improve Quality of Life; Improve Weight Control, and Muscular and Cardiovascular Fitness; Help the Patients to Return to Working Life; Reduce the Risk of Breast Cancer Recurrence; Prevent Other Diseases and Reduce All-Cause Mortality in Patients With Primary Breast Cancer.

  14. Generation of monoclonal antibodies against MGA and comparison of their application in breast cancer detection by immunohistochemistry

    PubMed Central

    Duan, Cuimi; Yang, Xiqin; Zhang, Xuhui; Feng, Jiannan; Liu, Zhiqiang; Que, Haiping; Johnson, Heather; Zhao, Yanfeng; Fan, Yawen; Lu, Yinglin; Zhang, Heqiu; Huang, Yan; Xiu, Bingshui; Feng, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Mammaglobin A (MGA) is an organ specific molecular biomarker for metastatic breast cancer diagnosis. However, there are still needs to develop optimal monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to detect MGA expression in breast carcinoma by immunohistochemistry. In this study, we first generated mAbs against MGA. Then, we used epitope prediction and computer-assisted structural analysis to screen five dominant epitopes and identified mAbs against five epitopes. Further immunohistochemical analysis on 42 breast carcinoma specimens showed that MHG1152 and MGD785 had intensive staining mainly in membrane, while CHH11617, CHH995 and MJF656 had more intensive staining within the cytoplasm. MGA scoring results showed that MJF656 had the highest rate (92.8%) of positive staining among five mAbs, including higher staining intensity when compared with that of MHG1152 (p < 0.01) and CHH995 (p < 0.05) and the highest the mean percentage of cells stained among mAbs. Furthermore, we analyzed the relationship of positive staining rate by mAbs with patient clinical characteristics. The results suggest that MJF656 was able to detect MGA expression, especially in early clinical stage, low grade and lymph node metastasis-negative breast carcinoma. In conclusion, our study generated five mAbs against MGA and identified the best candidate for detection of MGA expression in breast cancer tissues. PMID:26272389

  15. A comparative study of four serological tumor markers for the detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Shawn R; Beason, Kevin L; Bryant, Sabrina; Johnson, James T; Jackson, Margaret; Wilson, Cynthia; Holifield, Kay; Vincent, Charlton; Hall, Margot

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is currently the third most common cause of cancer in the world. Circulating tumor antigens are often used as a minimally invasive tool for noting breast cancer progression. The objective of this study was to compare four tumor antigens (CA 15-3, CA 27.29, alpha-fetoprotein [AFP], and carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA]) for their diagnostic efficacy in breast cancer patients. It was hypothesized that CA 15-3 would proved to be superior to CA 27.29, CEA, and AFP in assay performance. Tumor marker assays were performed according to the manufacturers' directions. Assays used in this study were CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 (Fujirebio Diagnostics/Centocor Inc.), AFP (Abbott Inc.), and CEA (Hybritech Inc.). A total of 554 patient samples were obtained from an area hospital, plus 200 healthy adult samples which were used for the determination of normal reference intervals. The patients included patients with no disease (184), with non-malignant disease (11), with breast cancer (87), and with other types of cancer (272). Diagnostic percent sensitivities for each marker were: CA 15-3 (63%), CA 27.29 (39%), CEA (22%), and AFP (22%). Diagnostic specificities for each marker were comparable, ranging from 80-88%. Analytical parameters were evaluated for the assays and compared favorably. We concluded that CA 15-3 was the best tumor antigen for use as a diagnostic aid and monitoring agent.

  16. Synchronous bilateral breast cancer in a male

    PubMed Central

    Rubio Hernández, María Caridad; Díaz Prado, Yenia Ivet; Pérez, Suanly Rodríguez; Díaz, Ronald Rodríguez; Aleaga, Zaili Gutiérrez

    2013-01-01

    Male breast cancer, which represents only 1% of all breast cancers, is occasionally associated with a family history of breast cancer. Sporadic male breast cancers presenting with another primary breast cancer are extremely rare. In this article, we report on a 70-year-old male patient with bilateral multifocal and synchronous breast cancer and without a family history of breast cancer. PMID:24319497

  17. Increased Detection of Lymphatic Vessel Invasion by D2-40 (Podoplanin) in Early Breast Cancer: Possible Influence on Patient Selection for Accelerated Partial Breast Irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Debald, Manuel; Poelcher, Martin; Flucke, Uta; Walgenbach-Bruenagel, Gisela

    2010-07-15

    Purpose: Several international trials are currently investigating accelerated partial breast irradiation (APBI) for patients with early-stage breast cancer. According to existing guidelines, patients with lymphatic vessel invasion (LVI) do not qualify for APBI. D2-40 (podoplanin) significantly increases the frequency of LVI detection compared with conventional hematoxylin and eosin (HE) staining in early-stage breast cancer. Our purpose was to retrospectively assess the hypothetical change in management from APBI to whole breast radiotherapy with the application of D2-40. Patients and Methods: Immunostaining with D2-40 was performed on 254 invasive breast tumors of 247 patients. The following criteria were used to determine the eligibility for APBI: invasive ductal adenocarcinoma of {<=}3 cm, negative axillary node status (N0), and unifocal disease. Of the 247 patients, 74 with available information concerning LVI, as detected by D2-40 immunostaining and routine HE staining, formed our study population. Results: Using D2-40, our results demonstrated a significantly greater detection rate (p = .031) of LVI compared with routine HE staining. LVI was correctly identified by D2-40 (D2-40-positive LVI) in 10 (13.5%) of 74 tumors. On routine HE staining, 4 tumors (5.4%) were classified as HE-positive LVI. Doublestaining of these specimens with D2-40 unmasked false-positive LVI status in 2 (50%) of the 4 tumors. According to the current recommendations for APBI, immunostaining with D2-40 would have changed the clinical management from APBI to whole breast radiotherapy in 8 (10.8%) of 74 patients and from whole breast radiotherapy to APBI in 2 patients (2.7%). Conclusion: These data support the implementation of D2-40 immunostaining in the routine workup to determine a patient's eligibility for APBI.

  18. CDC Vital Signs: Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  19. Aberrant reduction of telomere repetitive sequences in plasma cell-free DNA for early breast cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Xi; Tanaka, Hiromi

    2015-01-01

    Excessive telomere shortening is observed in breast cancer lesions when compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues, suggesting that telomere length may represent a key biomarker for early cancer detection. Because tumor-derived, cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is often released from cancer cells and circulates in the bloodstream, we hypothesized that breast cancer development is associated with changes in the amount of telomeric cfDNA that can be detected in the plasma. To test this hypothesis, we devised a novel, highly sensitive and specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay, termed telomeric cfDNA qPCR, to quantify plasma telomeric cfDNA levels. Indeed, the internal reference primers of our design correctly reflected input cfDNA amount (R2 = 0.910, P = 7.82 × 10−52), implying accuracy of this assay. We found that plasma telomeric cfDNA levels decreased with age in healthy individuals (n = 42, R2 = 0.094, P = 0.048), suggesting that cfDNA is likely derived from somatic cells in which telomere length shortens with increasing age. Our results also showed a significant decrease in telomeric cfDNA level from breast cancer patients with no prior treatment (n = 47), compared to control individuals (n = 42) (P = 4.06 × 10−8). The sensitivity and specificity for the telomeric cfDNA qPCR assay was 91.49% and 76.19%, respectively. Furthermore, the telomeric cfDNA level distinguished even the Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) group (n = 7) from the healthy group (n = 42) (P = 1.51 × 10−3). Taken together, decreasing plasma telomeric cfDNA levels could be an informative genetic biomarker for early breast cancer detection. PMID:26356673

  20. Zinc isotopic compositions of breast cancer tissue.

    PubMed

    Larner, Fiona; Woodley, Laura N; Shousha, Sami; Moyes, Ashley; Humphreys-Williams, Emma; Strekopytov, Stanislav; Halliday, Alex N; Rehkämper, Mark; Coombes, R Charles

    2015-01-01

    An early diagnostic biomarker for breast cancer is essential to improve outcome. High precision isotopic analysis, originating in Earth sciences, can detect very small shifts in metal pathways. For the first time, the natural intrinsic Zn isotopic compositions of various tissues in breast cancer patients and controls were determined. Breast cancer tumours were found to have a significantly lighter Zn isotopic composition than the blood, serum and healthy breast tissue in both groups. The Zn isotopic lightness in tumours suggests that sulphur rich metallothionein dominates the isotopic selectivity of a breast tissue cell, rather than Zn-specific proteins. This reveals a possible mechanism of Zn delivery to Zn-sequestering vesicles by metallothionein, and is supported by a similar signature observed in the copper isotopic compositions of one breast cancer patient. This change in intrinsic isotopic compositions due to cancer has the potential to provide a novel early biomarker for breast cancer.

  1. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Balance › Breast Cancer and Bone Loss Fact Sheet Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July, 2010 Download PDFs English ... JoAnn Pinkerton, MD What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  2. Multi-channels statistical and morphological features based mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology.

    PubMed

    Irshad, Humayun; Roux, Ludovic; Racoceanu, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    Accurate counting of mitosis in breast cancer histopathology plays a critical role in the grading process. Manual counting of mitosis is tedious and subject to considerable inter- and intra-reader variations. This work aims at improving the accuracy of mitosis detection by selecting the color channels that better capture the statistical and morphological features having mitosis discrimination from other objects. The proposed framework includes comprehensive analysis of first and second order statistical features together with morphological features in selected color channels and a study on balancing the skewed dataset using SMOTE method for increasing the predictive accuracy of mitosis classification. The proposed framework has been evaluated on MITOS data set during an ICPR 2012 contest and ranked second from 17 finalists. The proposed framework achieved 74% detection rate, 70% precision and 72% F-Measure. In future work, we plan to apply our mitosis detection tool to images produced by different types of slide scanners, including multi-spectral and multi-focal microscopy.

  3. Breast Cancers Detected at Screening MR Imaging and Mammography in Patients at High Risk: Method of Detection Reflects Tumor Histopathologic Results.

    PubMed

    Sung, Janice S; Stamler, Sarah; Brooks, Jennifer; Kaplan, Jennifer; Huang, Tammy; Dershaw, D David; Lee, Carol H; Morris, Elizabeth A; Comstock, Christopher E

    2016-09-01

    Purpose To compare the clinical, imaging, and histopathologic features of breast cancers detected at screening magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, screening mammography, and those detected between screening examinations (interval cancers) in women at high risk. Materials and Methods This retrospective institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant review of 7519 women at high risk for breast cancer who underwent screening with MR imaging and mammography between January 2005 and December 2010 was performed to determine the number of screening-detected and interval cancers diagnosed. The need for informed consent was waived. Medical records were reviewed for age, risk factors (family or personal history of breast cancer, BRCA mutation status, history of high-risk lesion or mantle radiation), tumor histopathologic results, and time between diagnosis of interval cancer and most recent screening examination. The χ(2) test and logistic regression methods were used to compare the features of screening MR imaging, screening mammography, and interval cancers. The Wilcoxon signed-rank test was used to calculate P values. Results A total of 18 064 screening MR imaging examinations and 26 866 screening mammographic examinations were performed. Two hundred twenty-two cancers were diagnosed in 219 women, 167 (75%) at MR imaging, 43 (19%) at mammography, and 12 (5%) interval cancers. Median age at diagnosis was 52 years. No risk factors were associated with screening MR imaging, screening mammography, or interval cancer (P > .06). Cancers found at screening MR imaging were more likely to be invasive cancer (118 of 167 [71%]; P < .0001). Of the 43 cancers found at screening mammography, 38 (88%) manifested as calcifications and 28 (65%) were ductal carcinoma in situ. Interval cancers were associated with nodal involvement (P = .005) and the triple-negative subtype (P = .03). Conclusion In women at high risk for breast cancer who underwent screening with mammography and MR

  4. Circulating Proteolytic Products of Carboxypeptidase N for Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yaojun; Li, Yueguo; Chen, Tao; Kuklina, Anna; Bernard, Paul; Esteva, Francisco J.; Shen, Haifa; Ferrari, Mauro; Hu, Ye

    2014-01-01

    Background Carboxypeptidase N (CPN) plays an important role in regulating vasoactive peptide hormones, growth factors, and cytokines by specifically cleaving their C-terminal basic residues. Herein we demonstrated that the circulating peptides specifically cleaved by CPN in the tumor microenvironment can indeed be stage-specific indicators of breast cancer. Methods The activity of CPN was evaluated using an ex-vivo peptide cleavage assay, in which synthesized C3f peptide (His6-C3f_S1304-R1320-His6) is incubated in interstitial fluids of breast tumor and adjacent normal breast tissues in mice with orthotopic implantation of the human cell line MDA-MB-231. Fragment profiling, by an approach combining nanopore fractionation and mass spectrometry, revealed the nature and extent of cleavage by CPN. These results correlated with the level of CPN-catalyzed peptides in blood specimens taken from the tumor-bearing mice, healthy women and breast cancer patients. CPN expression in the same set of samples was further examined by immunohistochemistry and immunoblotting. Results We showed that generation of C3f_R1310-L1319 specifically correlated with the CPN expression level. In both the mouse and clinical patient samples, the amount of CPN was clearly increased in tumor tissues compared to that seen in normal breast tissue, while its counterpart in blood remained constant. The amount of 6 CPN-catalyzed peptides predominantly increased in sera taken from the mice (n=8) at 2 weeks after orthotropic implantation. Six homologous peptides displayed the significantly higher expression in the patients’ plasma as early as the first pathologic stage of breast cancer. Conclusions The amount of circulating CPN-catalyzed peptides reported here reflects the extent of this enzyme’s activity in tumors, and our results clearly indicate their strong potential as biomarkers for non-invasive and early diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:24146311

  5. Mammography and breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Bassett, L W; Manjikian, V; Gold, R H

    1990-08-01

    Breast radiography should be performed only with film-screen mammography or xeromammography. At least two views of each breast should be obtained, and for film-screen mammography, at least one of these should be the oblique view. Quality assurance is becoming a significant concern in breast cancer screening. The ACR Mammography Accreditation Program takes into account the qualifications of the personnel, the performance of the x-ray equipment, and a peer review of the final product: the diagnostic image. The mammographic signs of malignancy can be divided into primary, secondary, and indirect. The accuracy of mammography depends on several factors, but the greatest limitation is the density of the breast tissue. Very dense tissue makes detection of breast cancer difficult, and a negative mammogram should never deter one from a biopsy of a clinically suspect mass. New consensus guidelines for breast cancer screening were developed to bring uniformity to the recommendations of the American Cancer Society, the National Cancer Institute, and various professional medical societies. These new guidelines reflect the encouraging results from recent clinical trials, as well as some discouraging reports on breast self-examination and the baseline mammogram. The underutilization of screening mammography is a problem of significant concern to both private and public health agencies. Barriers to mammographic screening include lack of awareness of the benefits of screening, physicians' misconceptions about patient compliance, concerns about radiation risk and overdiagnosis, fear of mastectomy, a perception that a mammogram involves great discomfort, and relatively high cost. Nationwide educational programs are under way to counter misconceptions about mammography, and various strategies are evolving to overcome the other barriers. Sonography is a useful adjunct to mammography for cyst-solid differentiation, but mammography is the only imaging modality effective for the early

  6. Breast Cancer Awareness and Prevention Behavior Among Women of Delhi, India: Identifying Barriers to Early Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Subhojit; Sharma, Surabhi; Mishra, Arti; Krishnan, Suneeta; Govil, Jyotsna; Dhillon, Preet K.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Globally, breast cancer (BC) has become the leading cause of mortality in women. Awareness and early detection can curb the growing burden of BC and are the first step in the battle against BC. The aim of this qualitative study was to explore the awareness and perceived barriers concerning the early detection of BC. METHODS A total of 20 focus group discussions (FGDs) were conducted during May 2013–March 2014. Pre-existing themes were used to conduct FGDs; each FGD group consisted of an average of ~10 women (aged ≥18–70 years) who came to participate in a BC awareness workshop. All FGDs were audio taped and transcribed verbatim. The transcripts were inductively analyzed using ATLAS.ti. Based on emerged codes and categories, thematic analysis was done, and theory was developed using the grounded theory approach. RESULTS Data were analyzed in three major themes: i) knowledge and perception about BC; ii) barriers faced by women in the early presentation of BC; and iii) healthcare-seeking behavior. The findings revealed that shyness, fear, and posteriority were the major behavioral barriers in the early presentation of BC. Erroneously, pain was considered as an initial symptom of BC by most women. Financial constraint was also mentioned as a cause for delay in accessing treatment. Social stigma that breast problems reflect bad character of women also contributed in hiding BC symptoms. CONCLUSIONS Lack of BC awareness was prevalent, especially in low socioeconomic class. Women’s ambivalence in prioritizing their own health and social and behavioral hurdles should be addressed by BC awareness campaigns appropriately suited for various levels of social class. PMID:27789957

  7. Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Abortion, Miscarriage, and Breast Cancer Risk A woman’s hormone levels normally change throughout ... the development of breast cancer. Important Information about Breast Cancer Risk Factors At present, the factors known to ...

  8. Serial monitoring of circulating tumor DNA in patients with primary breast cancer for detection of occult metastatic disease

    PubMed Central

    Olsson, Eleonor; Winter, Christof; George, Anthony; Chen, Yilun; Howlin, Jillian; Tang, Man-Hung Eric; Dahlgren, Malin; Schulz, Ralph; Grabau, Dorthe; van Westen, Danielle; Fernö, Mårten; Ingvar, Christian; Rose, Carsten; Bendahl, Pär-Ola; Rydén, Lisa; Borg, Åke; Gruvberger-Saal, Sofia K; Jernström, Helena; Saal, Lao H

    2015-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is usually diagnosed after becoming symptomatic, at which point it is rarely curable. Cell-free circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) contains tumor-specific chromosomal rearrangements that may be interrogated in blood plasma. We evaluated serial monitoring of ctDNA for earlier detection of metastasis in a retrospective study of 20 patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer and long follow-up. Using an approach combining low-coverage whole-genome sequencing of primary tumors and quantification of tumor-specific rearrangements in plasma by droplet digital PCR, we identify for the first time that ctDNA monitoring is highly accurate for postsurgical discrimination between patients with (93%) and without (100%) eventual clinically detected recurrence. ctDNA-based detection preceded clinical detection of metastasis in 86% of patients with an average lead time of 11 months (range 0–37 months), whereas patients with long-term disease-free survival had undetectable ctDNA postoperatively. ctDNA quantity was predictive of poor survival. These findings establish the rationale for larger validation studies in early breast cancer to evaluate ctDNA as a monitoring tool for early metastasis detection, therapy modification, and to aid in avoidance of overtreatment. PMID:25987569

  9. Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reasonable Accommodations (RA) Women with Disabilities and Breast Cancer Screening Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Finding Breast Cancer Early Can Save Lives Disabilities & Breast Cancer Screening ...

  10. Public Education and Targeted Outreach to Underserved Women Through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program

    PubMed Central

    Levano, Whitney; Miller, Jacqueline W.; Leonard, Banning; Bellick, Linda; Crane, Barbara E.; Kennedy, Stephenie K.; Haslage, Natalie M.; Hammond, Whitney; Tharpe, Felicia S.

    2015-01-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) was established to provide low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women access to cancer screening and diagnostic services with the goal of increasing the early detection and prevention of breast and cervical cancer. Although this is a valuable resource for women who might not have the means to get screened otherwise, providing services at no cost, by itself, does not guarantee uptake of screening services. Public education and targeted outreach facilitate the critical link between public service programs and the communities they serve. The purpose of public education and outreach in the NBCCEDP is to increase the number of women who use breast and cervical cancer screening services by raising awareness, providing education, addressing barriers, and motivating women to complete screening exams and follow-up. Effective strategies focus on helping to remove structural, physical, interpersonal, financial, and cultural barriers; educate women about the importance of screening and inform women about the services available to them. This article provides an overview of the importance of public education and targeted outreach activities for cancer screening through community-based programs including examples from NBCCEDP grantees that highlight successes, challenges, and solutions, encountered when conducting these types of interventions. PMID:25099902

  11. Diet and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blackburn, George L; Copeland, Trisha; Khaodhiar, Lalita; Buckley, Rita B

    2003-03-01

    Obesity, overweight, and a sedentary lifestyle-all common conditions in breast cancer patients-are likely to be associated with poor survival and poor quality of life in women with breast cancer. Diet-related factors are thought to account for about 30% of cancers in developed countries. Most studies of diet and healthcare have focused on the role of single nutrients, foods, or food groups in disease prevention or promotion. Recent cancer guidelines on nutrition and physical activity emphasize diets that promote maintenance of a healthy body weight and a prudent dietary pattern that is low in red and processed meats and high in a variety of vegetables, fruits, and whole grains. Except for dietary fat, few nutritional factors in adult life have been associated with breast cancer. Extensive data from animal model research, international correlations linking fat intake and breast cancer rates, and case-control studies support the hypothesis that a high-fat diet is conducive to the development of breast cancer in postmenopausal women. Conflicting findings from cohort studies, however, have created uncertainty over the role of dietary fat in breast cancer growth and recurrence. Results from large-scale nutritional intervention trials are expected to resolve such issues. As new and improved data on dietary factors and patterns accumulate, dietary guidelines for cancer risk reduction will become more focused.

  12. Comparison of breast specific gamma imaging and molecular breast tomosynthesis in breast cancer detection: Evaluation in phantoms

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Zongyi; Williams, Mark B.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Breast specific gamma imaging or molecular breast imaging (BSGI) obtains 2D images of 99mTc sestamibi distribution in the breast. Molecular breast tomosynthesis (MBT) maps the tracer distribution in 3D by acquiring multiple projections over a limited angular range. Here, the authors compare the performance of the two technologies in terms of spatial resolution, lesion contrast, and contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) in phantom studies under conditions of clinically relevant sestamibi dose and imaging time. Methods: The systems tested were a Dilon 6800 and a MBT prototype developed at the University of Virginia. Both systems comprise a pixelated sodium iodide scintillator, an array of position sensitive photomultipliers, and a parallel hole collimator. The active areas and energy resolution of the systems are similar. System sensitivity, spatial resolution, lesion contrast, and CNR were measured using a Petri dish, a point source phantom, and a breast phantom containing simulated lesions at two depths, respectively. A single BSGI projection was acquired. Five MBT projections were acquired over ±20°. For both modalities, the total scan count density was comparable to that observed for each in typical 10 min human scans following injection of 22 mCi (814 MBq) of 99mTc-sestamibi. To assess the impact of reducing the tracer dose, the pixel counts of projection images were later binomially subsampled by a factor of 2 to give images corresponding to an injected activity of approximately 11 mCi (407 MBq). Both unprocessed (pixelated) BSGI projections and interpolated (smoothed) BSGI images displayed by default on the Dilon 6800 workstation were analyzed. Volumetric images were reconstructed from the MBT projections using a maximum likelihood expectation maximization algorithm and extracted slices were analyzed. Results: Over a depth range of 1.5–7.5 cm, BSGI spatial resolution was 5.6–11.5 mm in unprocessed projections and 5.7–12.0 mm in interpolated images

  13. A Bayesian algorithm for detecting differentially expressed proteins and its application in breast cancer research

    PubMed Central

    Santra, Tapesh; Delatola, Eleni Ioanna

    2016-01-01

    Presence of considerable noise and missing data points make analysis of mass-spectrometry (MS) based proteomic data a challenging task. The missing values in MS data are caused by the inability of MS machines to reliably detect proteins whose abundances fall below the detection limit. We developed a Bayesian algorithm that exploits this knowledge and uses missing data points as a complementary source of information to the observed protein intensities in order to find differentially expressed proteins by analysing MS based proteomic data. We compared its accuracy with many other methods using several simulated datasets. It consistently outperformed other methods. We then used it to analyse proteomic screens of a breast cancer (BC) patient cohort. It revealed large differences between the proteomic landscapes of triple negative and Luminal A, which are the most and least aggressive types of BC. Unexpectedly, majority of these differences could be attributed to the direct transcriptional activity of only seven transcription factors some of which are known to be inactive in triple negative BC. We also identified two new proteins which significantly correlated with the survival of BC patients, and therefore may have potential diagnostic/prognostic values. PMID:27444576

  14. Combining peptide and DNA for protein assay: CRIP1 detection for breast cancer staging.

    PubMed

    Xie, Haona; Li, Hao; Huang, Yue; Wang, Xiaoying; Yin, Yongmei; Li, Genxi

    2014-01-01

    In this work, a novel method for a protein assay is proposed which uses the specific protein-binding peptide of the target protein and sequence-specific DNA to interact with the target as the capture and detection probe, respectively. Meanwhile, since the DNA sequence can be coupled with gold nanoparticles to amplify the signal readout, a sensitive and easily operated method for protein assay is developed. We have also employed a transcription factor named as cysteine-rich intestinal protein 1 (CRIP1), which has been identified as an ideal biomarker for staging of breast cancer, as the model protein for this study. With the proposed method, CRIP1 can be determined in a linear range from 1.25 to 10.13 ng/mL, with a detection limit of 1.25 ng/mL. Furthermore, the proposed method can be directly used to assay CRIP1 in tissue samples. Owing to its desirable sensitivity, excellent reproducibility, and high selectivity, the proposed method may hold great potential in clinical practice in the future.

  15. A Bayesian algorithm for detecting differentially expressed proteins and its application in breast cancer research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santra, Tapesh; Delatola, Eleni Ioanna

    2016-07-01

    Presence of considerable noise and missing data points make analysis of mass-spectrometry (MS) based proteomic data a challenging task. The missing values in MS data are caused by the inability of MS machines to reliably detect proteins whose abundances fall below the detection limit. We developed a Bayesian algorithm that exploits this knowledge and uses missing data points as a complementary source of information to the observed protein intensities in order to find differentially expressed proteins by analysing MS based proteomic data. We compared its accuracy with many other methods using several simulated datasets. It consistently outperformed other methods. We then used it to analyse proteomic screens of a breast cancer (BC) patient cohort. It revealed large differences between the proteomic landscapes of triple negative and Luminal A, which are the most and least aggressive types of BC. Unexpectedly, majority of these differences could be attributed to the direct transcriptional activity of only seven transcription factors some of which are known to be inactive in triple negative BC. We also identified two new proteins which significantly correlated with the survival of BC patients, and therefore may have potential diagnostic/prognostic values.

  16. Early breast cancer screening using iron/iron oxide-based nanoplatforms with sub-femtomolar limits of detection.

    PubMed

    Udukala, Dinusha N; Wang, Hongwang; Wendel, Sebastian O; Malalasekera, Aruni P; Samarakoon, Thilani N; Yapa, Asanka S; Abayaweera, Gayani; Basel, Matthew T; Maynez, Pamela; Ortega, Raquel; Toledo, Yubisela; Bossmann, Leonie; Robinson, Colette; Janik, Katharine E; Koper, Olga B; Li, Ping; Motamedi, Massoud; Higgins, Daniel A; Gadbury, Gary; Zhu, Gaohong; Troyer, Deryl L; Bossmann, Stefan H

    2016-01-01

    Proteases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), tissue serine proteases, and cathepsins (CTS) exhibit numerous functions in tumor biology. Solid tumors are characterized by changes in protease expression levels by tumor and surrounding tissue. Therefore, monitoring protease levels in tissue samples and liquid biopsies is a vital strategy for early cancer detection. Water-dispersable Fe/Fe3O4-core/shell based nanoplatforms for protease detection are capable of detecting protease activity down to sub-femtomolar limits of detection. They feature one dye (tetrakis(carboxyphenyl)porphyrin (TCPP)) that is tethered to the central nanoparticle by means of a protease-cleavable consensus sequence and a second dye (Cy 5.5) that is directly linked. Based on the protease activities of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA), MMPs 1, 2, 3, 7, 9, and 13, as well as CTS B and L, human breast cancer can be detected at stage I by means of a simple serum test. By monitoring CTS B and L stage 0 detection may be achieved. This initial study, comprised of 46 breast cancer patients and 20 apparently healthy human subjects, demonstrates the feasibility of protease-activity-based liquid biopsies for early cancer diagnosis.

  17. Detection of novel germline mutations for breast cancer in non-BRCA1/2 families.

    PubMed

    Aloraifi, Fatima; McDevitt, Trudi; Martiniano, Rui; McGreevy, Jonah; McLaughlin, Russell; Egan, Chris M; Cody, Nuala; Meany, Marie; Kenny, Elaine; Green, Andrew J; Bradley, Daniel G; Geraghty, James G; Bracken, Adrian P

    2015-09-01

    The identification of the breast cancer susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 enhanced clinicians' ability to select high-risk individuals for aggressive surveillance and prevention, and led to the development of targeted therapies. However, BRCA1/2 mutations account for only 25% of familial breast cancer cases. To systematically identify rare, probably pathogenic variants in familial cases of breast cancer without BRCA1/2 mutations, we developed a list of 312 genes, and performed targeted DNA enrichment coupled to multiplex next-generation sequencing on 104 'BRCAx' patients and 101 geographically matched controls in Ireland. As expected, this strategy allowed us to identify mutations in several well-known high-susceptibility and moderate-susceptibility genes, including ATM (~ 5%), RAD50 (~ 3%), CHEK2 (~ 2%), TP53 (~ 1%), PALB2 (~ 1%), and MRE11A (~ 1%). However, we also identified novel pathogenic variants in 30 other genes, which, when taken together, potentially explain the etiology of the missing heritability in up to 35% of BRCAx patients. These included novel potential pathogenic mutations in MAP3K1, CASP8, RAD51B, ZNF217, CDKN2B-AS1, and ERBB2, including a splice site mutation, which we predict would generate a constitutively active HER2 protein. Taken together, this work extends our understanding of the genetics of familial breast cancer, and supports the need to implement hereditary multigene panel testing to more appropriately orientate clinical management. PMID:26094658

  18. Use of indocyanine green for detecting the sentinel lymph node in breast cancer patients: from preclinical evaluation to clinical validation.

    PubMed

    Chi, Chongwei; Ye, Jinzuo; Ding, Haolong; He, De; Huang, Wenhe; Zhang, Guo-Jun; Tian, Jie

    2013-01-01

    Assessment of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) in patients with early stage breast cancer is vital in selecting the appropriate surgical approach. However, the existing methods, including methylene blue and nuclides, possess low efficiency and effectiveness in mapping SLNs, and to a certain extent exert side effects during application. Indocyanine green (ICG), as a fluorescent dye, has been proved reliable usage in SLN detection by several other groups. In this paper, we introduce a novel surgical navigation system to detect SLN with ICG. This system contains two charge-coupled devices (CCD) to simultaneously capture real-time color and fluorescent video images through two different bands. During surgery, surgeons only need to follow the fluorescence display. In addition, the system saves data automatically during surgery enabling surgeons to find the registration point easily according to image recognition algorithms. To test our system, 5 mice and 10 rabbits were used for the preclinical setting and 22 breast cancer patients were utilized for the clinical evaluation in our experiments. The detection rate was 100% and an average of 2.7 SLNs was found in 22 patients. Our results show that the usage of our surgical navigation system with ICG to detect SLNs in breast cancer patients is technically feasible.

  19. Detection and Analysis of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in Breast Cancer Patients by an Effective Method of HPV Capture

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiao; Lv, Yonggang; Wu, Jinghua; Zhuang, Xuehan; Zhang, Juliang; Zhao, Yi; Huang, Haodong; Fan, Jing; Yao, Qing; He, Chenyang; Zhang, Xiuqing; Huang, Chen; Chen, Jianghao; Wang, Ling

    2014-01-01

    Despite an increase in the number of molecular epidemiological studies conducted in recent years to evaluate the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and the risk of breast carcinoma, these studies remain inconclusive. Here we aim to detect HPV DNA in various tissues from patients with breast carcinoma using the method of HPV capture combined with massive paralleled sequencing (MPS). To validate the confidence of our methods, 15 cervical cancer samples were tested by PCR and the new method. Results showed that there was 100% consistence between the two methods.DNA from peripheral blood, tumor tissue, adjacent lymph nodes and adjacent normal tissue were collected from seven malignant breast cancer patients, and HPV type 16(HPV16) was detected in 1/7, 1/7, 1/7and 1/7 of patients respectively. Peripheral blood, tumor tissue and adjacent normal tissue were also collected from two patients with benign breast tumor, and 1/2, 2/2 and 2/2 was detected to have HPV16 DNA respectively. MPS metrics including mapping ratio, coverage, depth and SNVs were provided to characterize HPV in samples. The average coverage was 69% and 61.2% for malignant and benign samples respectively. 126 SNVs were identified in all 9 samples. The maximum number of SNVs was located in the gene of E2 and E4 among all samples. Our study not only provided an efficient method to capture HPV DNA, but detected the SNVS, coverage, SNV type and depth. The finding has provided further clue of association between HPV16 and breast cancer. PMID:24614680

  20. Targeting Breast Cancer Metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xin; Mu, Ping

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis is the leading cause of breast cancer-associated deaths. Despite the significant improvement in current therapies in extending patient life, 30–40% of patients may eventually suffer from distant relapse and succumb to the disease. Consequently, a deeper understanding of the metastasis biology is key to developing better treatment strategies and achieving long-lasting therapeutic efficacies against breast cancer. This review covers recent breakthroughs in the discovery of various metastatic traits that contribute to the metastasis cascade of breast cancer, which may provide novel avenues for therapeutic targeting. PMID:26380552

  1. Recent advances in breast cancer imaging.

    PubMed

    Newman, J

    1999-01-01

    Mammography is the best technique currently available for early detection of breast cancer, but it has limitations. Several new techniques are under investigation that may provide valuable complementary images. This article discusses some of the most promising adjuncts to film-screen mammography, including digital mammography, ultrasound of the breast, breast MR, scintimammography and sentinel node lymphoscintigraphy.

  2. Detection and Characterization of Circulating Tumor Associated Cells in Metastatic Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mu, Zhaomei; Benali-Furet, Naoual; Uzan, Georges; Znaty, Anaëlle; Ye, Zhong; Paolillo, Carmela; Wang, Chun; Austin, Laura; Rossi, Giovanna; Fortina, Paolo; Yang, Hushan; Cristofanilli, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    The availability of blood-based diagnostic testing using a non-invasive technique holds promise for real-time monitoring of disease progression and treatment selection. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have been used as a prognostic biomarker for the metastatic breast cancer (MBC). The molecular characterization of CTCs is fundamental to the phenotypic identification of malignant cells and description of the relevant genetic alterations that may change according to disease progression and therapy resistance. However, the molecular characterization of CTCs remains a challenge because of the rarity and heterogeneity of CTCs and technological difficulties in the enrichment, isolation and molecular characterization of CTCs. In this pilot study, we evaluated circulating tumor associated cells in one blood draw by size exclusion technology and cytological analysis. Among 30 prospectively enrolled MBC patients, CTCs, circulating tumor cell clusters (CTC clusters), CTCs of epithelial–mesenchymal transition (EMT) and cancer associated macrophage-like cells (CAMLs) were detected and analyzed. For molecular characterization of CTCs, size-exclusion method for CTC enrichment was tested in combination with DEPArray™ technology, which allows the recovery of single CTCs or pools of CTCs as a pure CTC sample for mutation analysis. Genomic mutations of TP53 and ESR1 were analyzed by targeted sequencing on isolated 7 CTCs from a patient with MBC. The results of genomic analysis showed heterozygous TP53 R248W mutation from one single CTC and pools of three CTCs, and homozygous TP53 R248W mutation from one single CTC and pools of two CTCs. Wild-type ESR1 was detected in the same isolated CTCs. The results of this study reveal that size-exclusion method can be used to enrich and identify circulating tumor associated cells, and enriched CTCs were characterized for genetic alterations in MBC patients, respectively. PMID:27706044

  3. Genomic profiling of breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review To describe recent advances in the application of advanced genomic technologies towards the identification of biomarkers of prognosis and treatment response in breast cancer. Recent findings Advances in high-throughput genomic profiling such as massively parallel sequencing have enabled researchers to catalogue the spectrum of somatic alterations in breast cancers. These tools also hold promise for precision medicine through accurate patient prognostication, stratification, and the dynamic monitoring of treatment response. For example, recent efforts have defined robust molecular subgroups of breast cancer and novel subtype-specific oncogenes. In addition, previously unappreciated activating mutations in human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 have been reported, suggesting new therapeutic opportunities. Genomic profiling of cell-free tumor DNA and circulating tumor cells has been used to monitor disease burden and the emergence of resistance, and such ‘liquid biopsy’ approaches may facilitate the early, noninvasive detection of aggressive disease. Finally, single-cell genomics is coming of age and will contribute to an understanding of breast cancer evolutionary dynamics. Summary Here, we highlight recent studies that employ high-throughput genomic technologies in an effort to elucidate breast cancer biology, discover new therapeutic targets, improve prognostication and stratification, and discuss the implications for precision cancer medicine. PMID:25502431

  4. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask about Your Treatment Research Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer This page lists cancer drugs approved by the ... are not listed here. Drugs Approved to Prevent Breast Cancer Evista (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Keoxifene (Raloxifene Hydrochloride) Nolvadex (Tamoxifen ...

  5. Breast Cancer in Young Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... Campaign Initiatives Participation in Cancer Moonshot Stay Informed Breast Cancer in Young Women Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Syndicate this page Marleah's family history of breast cancer was her motivation for pursuing a career where ...

  6. Digital versus screen-film mammography: impact of mammographic density and hormone therapy on breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Chiarelli, Anna M; Prummel, Maegan V; Muradali, Derek; Shumak, Rene S; Majpruz, Vicky; Brown, Patrick; Jiang, Hedy; Done, Susan J; Yaffe, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Most studies that have examined the effects of mammographic density and hormone therapy use on breast cancer detection have included screen-film mammography. This study further examines this association in post-menopausal women screened by digital mammography. Approved by the University of Toronto Research Ethics Board, this study identified 688,418 women of age 50-74 years screened with digital or screen-film mammography from 2008 to 2009 within the Ontario Breast Screening Program. Of 2993 eligible women with invasive breast cancer, 2450 were contacted and 1421 participated (847 screen-film mammography, 574 digital direct radiography). Mammographic density was measured by study radiologists using the standard BI-RADS classification system and by a computer-assisted method. Information on hormone therapy use was collected by a telephone-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression and two-tailed tests for significance evaluated associations between factors and detection method by mammography type. Women with >75 % radiologist-measured mammographic density compared to those with <25 % were more likely to be diagnosed with an interval than screen-detected cancer, with the difference being greater for those screened with screen-film (OR = 6.40, 95 % CI 2.30-17.85) than digital mammography (OR = 2.41, 95 % CI 0.67-8.58) and aged 50-64 years screened with screen-film mammography (OR = 10.86, 95 % CI 2.96-39.57). Recent former hormone therapy users were also at an increased risk of having an interval cancer with the association being significant for women screened with digital mammography (OR = 2.08, 95 % CI 1.17-3.71). Breast screening using digital mammography lowers the risk of having an interval cancer for post-menopausal women aged 50-64 with greater mammographic density. PMID:26518019

  7. Digital versus screen-film mammography: impact of mammographic density and hormone therapy on breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Chiarelli, Anna M; Prummel, Maegan V; Muradali, Derek; Shumak, Rene S; Majpruz, Vicky; Brown, Patrick; Jiang, Hedy; Done, Susan J; Yaffe, Martin J

    2015-11-01

    Most studies that have examined the effects of mammographic density and hormone therapy use on breast cancer detection have included screen-film mammography. This study further examines this association in post-menopausal women screened by digital mammography. Approved by the University of Toronto Research Ethics Board, this study identified 688,418 women of age 50-74 years screened with digital or screen-film mammography from 2008 to 2009 within the Ontario Breast Screening Program. Of 2993 eligible women with invasive breast cancer, 2450 were contacted and 1421 participated (847 screen-film mammography, 574 digital direct radiography). Mammographic density was measured by study radiologists using the standard BI-RADS classification system and by a computer-assisted method. Information on hormone therapy use was collected by a telephone-administered questionnaire. Logistic regression and two-tailed tests for significance evaluated associations between factors and detection method by mammography type. Women with >75 % radiologist-measured mammographic density compared to those with <25 % were more likely to be diagnosed with an interval than screen-detected cancer, with the difference being greater for those screened with screen-film (OR = 6.40, 95 % CI 2.30-17.85) than digital mammography (OR = 2.41, 95 % CI 0.67-8.58) and aged 50-64 years screened with screen-film mammography (OR = 10.86, 95 % CI 2.96-39.57). Recent former hormone therapy users were also at an increased risk of having an interval cancer with the association being significant for women screened with digital mammography (OR = 2.08, 95 % CI 1.17-3.71). Breast screening using digital mammography lowers the risk of having an interval cancer for post-menopausal women aged 50-64 with greater mammographic density.

  8. Docosahexaenoic Acid in Preventing Recurrence in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-20

    Benign Breast Neoplasm; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Paget Disease of the Breast; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  9. Mitosis detection in breast cancer histology images with deep neural networks.

    PubMed

    Cireşan, Dan C; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M; Schmidhuber, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    We use deep max-pooling convolutional neural networks to detect mitosis in breast histology images. The networks are trained to classify each pixel in the images, using as context a patch centered on the pixel. Simple postprocessing is then applied to the network output. Our approach won the ICPR 2012 mitosis detection competition, outperforming other contestants by a significant margin.

  10. Regression-Based Approach For Feature Selection In Classification Issues. Application To Breast Cancer Detection And Recurrence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belciug, Smaranda; Serbanescu, Mircea-Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    Feature selection is considered a key factor in classifications/decision problems. It is currently used in designing intelligent decision systems to choose the best features which allow the best performance. This paper proposes a regression-based approach to select the most important predictors to significantly increase the classification performance. Application to breast cancer detection and recurrence using publically available datasets proved the efficiency of this technique.

  11. Broccoli Sprout Extract in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-16

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Ductal Breast Carcinoma In Situ; Estrogen Receptor Negative; Estrogen Receptor Positive; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Postmenopausal; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  12. Characteristics of breast cancer in an incident cancer population

    SciTech Connect

    Schmitt, E.L.; Threatt, B.

    1984-08-01

    The effectiveness of film mammography is a source of concern to radiologists because neither the ribs nor retromammary space is included on the films in good quality examinations. One hundred seven incident cancers were detected in 10,034 self-referred women followed at the University of Michigan Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project (UM-BCDDP) for 5 years. These cancers were analyzed for location on the film, method of detection, size, histology, and the number of films required for detection. Mammography alone detected 52 (49%) of the cancers, whereas physical examination alone detected 15 (14%). The other 40 cancers were detectable on both examinations. All of the 92 cancers detected by mammography were visible in both the mediolateral and the craniocaudal views. Mammography consistently detected cancer in the breast, regardless of tumor size, histologic type, or location within the breast.

  13. [Epidemiology of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Rodríguez Cuevas, Sergio A; Capurso García, Marino

    2006-11-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent malignant tumor worldwide. In recent years there has been observed an increase in its frequency, especially in developing countries, as Mexico, where mortality is arriving to the first cause of death in females. This is, in part, due to a delayed diagnosis, most frequently done in locally advances stages with a low cure rate. This is a review of all risk factors: age, sex, personal and familial history, genetic syndromes, associated breast disease, geographic distribution, body structure and environmental, hormonal, reproductive and dietary factors. It is concluded that breast cancer is a public health problem in developed and developing countries, and the best methods to drop mortality for breast cancer is the wide use of screening mammography in women at risk, in order to find cancers at initial stages and offer the adequate treatment.

  14. General Information about Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  15. What Is Breast Cancer in Men?

    MedlinePlus

    ... statistics about breast cancer in men? What is breast cancer in men? A breast cancer is a malignant ... women but are very rare in men. General breast cancer terms Here are some of the key words ...

  16. General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Treatment and Pregnancy (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Breast Cancer and Pregnancy Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  17. Treatment Options for Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  18. Treatment Option Overview (Male Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Male Breast Cancer Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information about Male Breast Cancer Go to Health Professional Version Key Points Male ...

  19. Cutaneous manifestations of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Tan, Antoinette R

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer may present with cutaneous symptoms. The skin manifestations of breast cancer are varied. Some of the more common clinical presentations of metastatic cutaneous lesions from breast cancer will be described. Paraneoplastic cutaneous dermatoses have been reported as markers of breast malignancy and include erythema gyratum repens, acquired ichthyosis, dermatomyositis, multicentric reticulohistiocytosis, and hypertrichosis lanuginosa acquisita. Mammary Paget's disease, often associated with an underlying breast cancer, and Cowden syndrome, which has an increased risk of breast malignancy, each have specific dermatologic findings. Recognition of these distinct cutaneous signs is important in the investigation of either newly diagnosed or recurrent breast cancer. PMID:27178684

  20. Radiation protection program for early detection of breast cancer in a mammography facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Villagomez Casimiro, Mariana; Ruiz Trejo, Cesar; Espejo Fonseca, Ruby

    2014-11-01

    Mammography is the best tool for early detection of Breast Cancer. In this diagnostic radiology modality it is necessary to establish the criteria to ensure the proper use and operation of the equipment used to obtain mammographic images in order to contribute to the safe use of ionizing radiation. The aim of the work was to implement at FUCAM-AC the radiation protection program which must be established for patients and radiation workers according to Mexican standards [1-4]. To achieve this goal, radiation protection and quality control manuals were elaborated [5]. Furthermore, a quality control program (QCP) in the mammography systems (analog/digital), darkroom included, has been implemented. Daily sensitometry, non-variability of the image quality, visualizing artifacts, revision of the equipment mechanical stability, compression force and analysis of repetition studies are some of the QCP routine tests that must be performed by radiological technicians of this institution as a set of actions to ensure the protection of patients. Image quality and patients dose assessment were performed on 4 analog equipment installed in 2 mobile units. In relation to dose assessment, all equipment passed the acceptance criteria (<3 mGy per projection). The image quality test showed that most images (70%)- presented artifacts. A brief summary of the results of quality control tests applied to the equipment and film processor are presented. To maintain an adequate level of quality and safety at FUCAM-AC is necessary that the proposed radiation protection program in this work is applied.

  1. A dried blood spot mass spectrometry metabolomic approach for rapid breast cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingjun; Sun, Tao; Cao, Yunfeng; Gao, Peng; Dong, Jun; Fang, Yanhua; Fang, Zhongze; Sun, Xiaoyu; Zhu, Zhitu

    2016-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer (BC) is still a lethal threat to women worldwide. An accurate screening and diagnosis strategy performed in an easy-to-operate manner is highly warranted in clinical perspective. Besides the routinely focused protein markers, blood is full of small molecular metabolites with diverse structures and properties. This study aimed to screen metabolite markers with BC diagnosis potentials. Methods A dried blood spot-based direct infusion mass spectrometry (MS) metabolomic analysis was conducted for BC and non-BC differentiation. The targeted analytes included 23 amino acids and 26 acylcarnitines. Results Multivariate analysis screened out 21 BC-related metabolites in the blood. Regression analysis generated a diagnosis model consisting of parameters Pip, Asn, Pro, C14:1/C16, Phe/Tyr, and Gly/Ala. Tested with another set of BC and non-BC samples, this model showed a sensitivity of 92.2% and a specificity of 84.4%. Compared to the routinely used protein markers, this model exhibited distinct advantage with its higher sensitivity. Conclusion Blood metabolites screening is a more plausible approach for BC detection. Furthermore, this direct MS analysis could be finished within few minutes, which means that its throughput is higher than the currently used imaging techniques. PMID:27042107

  2. Detecting Susceptibility to Breast Cancer with SNP-SNP Interaction Using BPSOHS and Emotional Neural Networks.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao; Peng, Qinke; Fan, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Studies for the association between diseases and informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have received great attention. However, most of them just use the whole set of useful SNPs and fail to consider the SNP-SNP interactions, while these interactions have already been proven in biology experiments. In this paper, we use a binary particle swarm optimization with hierarchical structure (BPSOHS) algorithm to improve the effective of PSO for the identification of the SNP-SNP interactions. Furthermore, in order to use these SNP interactions in the susceptibility analysis, we propose an emotional neural network (ENN) to treat SNP interactions as emotional tendency. Different from the normal architecture, just as the emotional brain, this architecture provides a specific path to treat the emotional value, by which the SNP interactions can be considered more quickly and directly. The ENN helps us use the prior knowledge about the SNP interactions and other influence factors together. Finally, the experimental results prove that the proposed BPSOHS_ENN algorithm can detect the informative SNP-SNP interaction and predict the breast cancer risk with a much higher accuracy than existing methods. PMID:27294121

  3. Detecting Susceptibility to Breast Cancer with SNP-SNP Interaction Using BPSOHS and Emotional Neural Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao; Fan, Yue

    2016-01-01

    Studies for the association between diseases and informative single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have received great attention. However, most of them just use the whole set of useful SNPs and fail to consider the SNP-SNP interactions, while these interactions have already been proven in biology experiments. In this paper, we use a binary particle swarm optimization with hierarchical structure (BPSOHS) algorithm to improve the effective of PSO for the identification of the SNP-SNP interactions. Furthermore, in order to use these SNP interactions in the susceptibility analysis, we propose an emotional neural network (ENN) to treat SNP interactions as emotional tendency. Different from the normal architecture, just as the emotional brain, this architecture provides a specific path to treat the emotional value, by which the SNP interactions can be considered more quickly and directly. The ENN helps us use the prior knowledge about the SNP interactions and other influence factors together. Finally, the experimental results prove that the proposed BPSOHS_ENN algorithm can detect the informative SNP-SNP interaction and predict the breast cancer risk with a much higher accuracy than existing methods. PMID:27294121

  4. Radiation protection program for early detection of breast cancer in a mammography facility

    SciTech Connect

    Mariana, Villagomez Casimiro E-mail: cesar@fisica.unam.mx; Cesar, Ruiz Trejo E-mail: cesar@fisica.unam.mx; Ruby, Espejo Fonseca

    2014-11-07

    Mammography is the best tool for early detection of Breast Cancer. In this diagnostic radiology modality it is necessary to establish the criteria to ensure the proper use and operation of the equipment used to obtain mammographic images in order to contribute to the safe use of ionizing radiation. The aim of the work was to implement at FUCAM-AC the radiation protection program which must be established for patients and radiation workers according to Mexican standards [1–4]. To achieve this goal, radiation protection and quality control manuals were elaborated [5]. Furthermore, a quality control program (QCP) in the mammography systems (analog/digital), darkroom included, has been implemented. Daily sensitometry, non-variability of the image quality, visualizing artifacts, revision of the equipment mechanical stability, compression force and analysis of repetition studies are some of the QCP routine tests that must be performed by radiological technicians of this institution as a set of actions to ensure the protection of patients. Image quality and patients dose assessment were performed on 4 analog equipment installed in 2 mobile units. In relation to dose assessment, all equipment passed the acceptance criteria (<3 mGy per projection). The image quality test showed that most images (70%)– presented artifacts. A brief summary of the results of quality control tests applied to the equipment and film processor are presented. To maintain an adequate level of quality and safety at FUCAM-AC is necessary that the proposed radiation protection program in this work is applied.

  5. Women and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lippman, M E

    1987-01-01

    One in every 12 women will develop breast cancer; the incidence increases with age, dietary fat intake, caloric intake, height, and weight. The 10-year survival rate of breast cancer patients who refuse therapy is virtually zero. Segmental mastectomy plus radiation and lumpectomy, combined with systemic (adjuvant)chemotherapy, are alternatives under investigation at the National Institutes of Health that may increase the survival rate by decreasing metastatic complications.

  6. Direct detection of circulating free DNA extracted from serum samples of breast cancer using locked nucleic acid molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Gui, Zhen; Wang, Quanbo; Li, Jinchang; Zhu, Mingchen; Yu, Lili; Xun, Tang; Yan, Feng; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-07-01

    As an emerging noninvasive blood biomarker, circulating free DNA (cfDNA) can be utilized to assess diagnosis, progression and evaluate prognosis of cancer. However, cfDNAs are not "naked", they can be part of complexes, or are bound to the surface of the cells via proteins, which make the detection more challenging. Here, a simple method for the detection of Ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 1 (UHRF1) DNA exacted from serum of breast cancer (BC) has been developed using a novel locked nucleic acid molecular beacon (LNA-MB). In order to enhance the stability and detection efficiency of the probe in biofluids, we design a shared-stem molecular beacon containing a 27-mer loop and a 4-mer stem with DNA/LNA alternating bases. The fluorescence is released in the presence of target. The detection procedure is simple and can be completed within 1h. This method shows a sensitive response to UHRF1 DNA with a dynamic range of 3 orders of magnitude. The limit of detection is 11nM (S/N=3) with excellent selectivity. It can discriminate UHRF1 DNA from three-base mismatched DNA with a high specificity. More importantly, this method can distinguish the expression of serum UHRF1 DNA among 5 breast cancer patients and 5 healthy controls. The mentioned superiority may suggest that this assay can be served as a promising noninvasive detection tool for early BC diagnosis and monitoring. PMID:27154709

  7. Direct detection of circulating free DNA extracted from serum samples of breast cancer using locked nucleic acid molecular beacon.

    PubMed

    Gui, Zhen; Wang, Quanbo; Li, Jinchang; Zhu, Mingchen; Yu, Lili; Xun, Tang; Yan, Feng; Ju, Huangxian

    2016-07-01

    As an emerging noninvasive blood biomarker, circulating free DNA (cfDNA) can be utilized to assess diagnosis, progression and evaluate prognosis of cancer. However, cfDNAs are not "naked", they can be part of complexes, or are bound to the surface of the cells via proteins, which make the detection more challenging. Here, a simple method for the detection of Ubiquitin-like with PHD and ring finger domains 1 (UHRF1) DNA exacted from serum of breast cancer (BC) has been developed using a novel locked nucleic acid molecular beacon (LNA-MB). In order to enhance the stability and detection efficiency of the probe in biofluids, we design a shared-stem molecular beacon containing a 27-mer loop and a 4-mer stem with DNA/LNA alternating bases. The fluorescence is released in the presence of target. The detection procedure is simple and can be completed within 1h. This method shows a sensitive response to UHRF1 DNA with a dynamic range of 3 orders of magnitude. The limit of detection is 11nM (S/N=3) with excellent selectivity. It can discriminate UHRF1 DNA from three-base mismatched DNA with a high specificity. More importantly, this method can distinguish the expression of serum UHRF1 DNA among 5 breast cancer patients and 5 healthy controls. The mentioned superiority may suggest that this assay can be served as a promising noninvasive detection tool for early BC diagnosis and monitoring.

  8. Evaluation of the efficiency of biofield diagnostic system in breast cancer detection using clinical study results and classifiers.

    PubMed

    Subbhuraam, Vinitha Sree; Ng, E Y K; Kaw, G; Acharya U, Rajendra; Chong, B K

    2012-02-01

    The division of breast cancer cells results in regions of electrical depolarisation within the breast. These regions extend to the skin surface from where diagnostic information can be obtained through measurements of the skin surface electropotentials using sensors. This technique is used by the Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS) to detect the presence of malignancy. This paper evaluates the efficiency of BDS in breast cancer detection and also evaluates the use of classifiers for improving the accuracy of BDS. 182 women scheduled for either mammography or ultrasound or both tests participated in the BDS clinical study conducted at Tan Tock Seng hospital, Singapore. Using the BDS index obtained from the BDS examination and the level of suspicion score obtained from mammography/ultrasound results, the final BDS result was deciphered. BDS demonstrated high values for sensitivity (96.23%), specificity (93.80%), and accuracy (94.51%). Also, we have studied the performance of five supervised learning based classifiers (back propagation network, probabilistic neural network, linear discriminant analysis, support vector machines, and a fuzzy classifier), by feeding selected features from the collected dataset. The clinical study results show that BDS can help physicians to differentiate benign and malignant breast lesions, and thereby, aid in making better biopsy recommendations. PMID:20703753

  9. Evaluation of the efficiency of biofield diagnostic system in breast cancer detection using clinical study results and classifiers.

    PubMed

    Subbhuraam, Vinitha Sree; Ng, E Y K; Kaw, G; Acharya U, Rajendra; Chong, B K

    2012-02-01

    The division of breast cancer cells results in regions of electrical depolarisation within the breast. These regions extend to the skin surface from where diagnostic information can be obtained through measurements of the skin surface electropotentials using sensors. This technique is used by the Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS) to detect the presence of malignancy. This paper evaluates the efficiency of BDS in breast cancer detection and also evaluates the use of classifiers for improving the accuracy of BDS. 182 women scheduled for either mammography or ultrasound or both tests participated in the BDS clinical study conducted at Tan Tock Seng hospital, Singapore. Using the BDS index obtained from the BDS examination and the level of suspicion score obtained from mammography/ultrasound results, the final BDS result was deciphered. BDS demonstrated high values for sensitivity (96.23%), specificity (93.80%), and accuracy (94.51%). Also, we have studied the performance of five supervised learning based classifiers (back propagation network, probabilistic neural network, linear discriminant analysis, support vector machines, and a fuzzy classifier), by feeding selected features from the collected dataset. The clinical study results show that BDS can help physicians to differentiate benign and malignant breast lesions, and thereby, aid in making better biopsy recommendations.

  10. Prognostic relevance of urokinase plasminogen activator detection in micrometastatic cells in the bone marrow of patients with primary breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Solomayer, E. F.; Diel, I. J.; Wallwiener, D.; Bode, S.; Meyberg, G.; Sillem, M.; Gollan, C.; Kramer, M. D.; Krainick, U.; Bastert, G.

    1997-01-01

    Patients with an elevated level of urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) in breast cancer tissue have an adverse prognosis. This study evaluated the prognostic relevance of uPA detection in disseminated tumour cells in bone marrow. Bone marrow was sampled intraoperatively from both iliac crests in 280 patients with primary breast cancer. Interphase cells were enhanced and stained immunocytologically with two antibodies: 2E11, which detects TAG 12--a tumour-associated glycoprotein typically expressed by almost all breast cancer cells--and the anti-uPA antibody HD-UK9. Thirty-five of the 2E11-positive women (n = 132, 47%) developed metastatic disease (median follow-up time 44 months). Of these, most were uPA positive (n = 23, 65%) and only 12 were uPA negative. Patients with uPA-positive cells in bone marrow (n = 98, 35%) had a significantly shorter metastasis-free interval (36 months) than women who were uPA negative (44.5 months). The worst prognosis was seen in patients positive for both markers (29.5 months), followed by those who were uPA negative and 2E11 positive (37 months). The detection of uPA on disseminated tumour cells characterizes a subgroup of patients with an even worse prognosis, who should undergo more aggressive adjuvant systemic therapy. For the first time, it was possible to evaluate an important qualitative parameter involved in the process of breast cancer metastases. Images Figure 1 PMID:9310251

  11. Electroanalytical and surface plasmon resonance sensors for detection of breast cancer and Alzheimer's disease biomarkers in cells and body fluids.

    PubMed

    Yang, Minghui; Yi, Xinyao; Wang, Jianxiu; Zhou, Feimeng

    2014-04-21

    Cancer and neurological disorders are two leading causes of human death. Their early diagnoses will either greatly improve the survival rate or facilitate effective treatments or modalities. Detection of biomarkers in body fluids and some tissues (e.g., blood, urine and cerebrospinal fluids) is relatively non-invasive and provides useful chemical and biological information that is complementary to tomographic imaging (e.g., magnetic resonance imaging, positron emission tomography and X-ray computed tomography). Recent years have witnessed the contributions from and potential applications of bioanalytical methods for early detection of major diseases. In this review, we survey some recent developments of electroanalytical (as a representative label-based technique) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) (as a representative label-free technique) biosensors for detection of biomarkers relevant to etiologies of breast cancer and Alzheimer's disease (AD). While breast cancer is representative of cancers of complexity (multiple biomarkers, false positives from tomographic scans, and a need for more effective early diagnostic methods), AD is the most prevalent neurological disorder that is also linked to multiple biomarkers. Both electroanalytical and SPR-based sensors have attractive features of sensitivity, portability, obviation of large sample volumes, and capability of multiplexed detection. Various sensing protocols developed in the past five years are reviewed, demonstrating the feasibility of both techniques for diagnostic purposes. Problems inherent in these two techniques that must be overcome before being clinically viable are also discussed.

  12. Highly sensitive detection of HER2 extracellular domain (ECD) in the serum of breast cancer patients by piezoelectric microcantilevers (PEMS)

    PubMed Central

    Loo, LiNa; Capobianco, Joseph A.; Wu, Wei; Gao, Xiaotong; Shih, Wan Y.; Shih, Wei-Heng; Pourrezaei, Kambiz; Robinson, Matthew K.; Adams, Gregory P.

    2011-01-01

    Rapid and sensitive detection of serum tumor biomarkers are needed to monitor cancer patients for disease progression. Highly sensitive piezoelectric microcantilever sensors (PEMS) offer an attractive tool for biomarker detection, however their utility in the complex environment encountered in serum has yet to be determined. As a proof of concept, we have functionalized PEMS with antibodies that specifically bind to HER2, a biomarker (antigen) that is commonly overexpressed in the blood of breast cancer patients. The function and sensitivity of these anti-HER2 PEMS biosensors was initially assessed using recombinant HER2 spiked into human serum. Their ability to detect native HER2 present in the serum of breast cancer patients was then determined. We have found that the anti-HER2 PEMS were able to accurately detect both recombinant and naturally occurring HER2 at clinically relevant levels (>2 ng/ml). This indicates that PEMS-based biosensors provide a potentially effective tool for biomarker detection. PMID:21449604

  13. Addressing Breast Cancer Health Disparities in the Mississippi Delta Through an Innovative Partnership for Education, Detection, and Screening.

    PubMed

    Mayfield-Johnson, Susan; Fastring, Danielle; Fortune, Melody; White-Johnson, Freddie

    2016-06-01

    Projects to reduce disparities in cancer treatment and research include collaborative partnerships and multiple strategies to promote community awareness, education, and engagement. This is especially needed in underserved areas such as the Mississippi Delta where more women are diagnosed at regional and distant stages of breast cancer. The purpose for this project was to increase the relatively low screening rate for African American women in the Mississippi Delta through a partnership between the Mississippi Network for Cancer Control and Prevention at The University of Southern Mississippi, The Fannie Lou Hamer Cancer Foundation and the Mississippi State Department of Health to decrease health disparities in breast cancer through increased awareness on self-early detection methods, leveraging resources to provide mammography screenings, and adequate follow-up with services and treatment for abnormal findings. Through this collaborative effort, over 500 women in three rural Mississippi Delta counties were identified, provided community education on early self-detection, and given appointments for mammography screenings within one fiscal year. PMID:26578349

  14. Taguchi design-based optimization of sandwich immunoassay microarrays for detecting breast cancer biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Luo, Wen; Pla-Roca, Mateu; Juncker, David

    2011-07-15

    Taguchi design, a statistics-based design of experiment method, is widely used for optimization of products and complex production processes in many different industries. However, its use for antibody microarray optimization has remained underappreciated. Here, we provide a brief explanation of Taguchi design and present its use for the optimization of antibody sandwich immunoassay microarray with five breast cancer biomarkers: CA15-3, CEA, HER2, MMP9, and uPA. Two successive optimization rounds with each 16 experimental trials were performed. We tested three factors (capture antibody, detection antibody, and analyte) at four different levels (concentrations) in the first round and seven factors (including buffer solution, streptavidin-Cy5 dye conjugate concentration, and incubation times for five assay steps) with two levels each in the second round; five two-factor interactions between selected pairs of factors were also tested. The optimal levels for each factor as measured by net assay signal increase were determined graphically, and the significance of each factor was analyzed statistically. The concentration of capture antibody, streptavidin-Cy5, and buffer composition were identified as the most significant factors for all assays; analyte incubation time and detection antibody concentration were significant only for MMP9 and CA15-3, respectively. Interactions between pairs of factors were identified, but were less influential compared with single factor effects. After Taguchi optimization, the assay sensitivity was improved between 7 and 68 times, depending on the analyte, reaching 640 fg/mL for uPA, and the maximal signal intensity increased between 1.8 and 3 times. These results suggest that Taguchi design is an efficient and useful approach for the rapid optimization of antibody microarrays.

  15. Development of an integrated microsystem for the multiplexed detection of breast cancer markers in serum using electrochemical immunosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fragoso, Alex; Laboria, Noemi; Botero, Mary Luz; Bejarano, Diego; Latta, Daniel; Hansen-Hagge, Thomas E.; Kemmner, Wolfgang; Katakis, Ioanis; Gärtner, Claudia; Drese, Klaus; O'Sullivan, Ciara K.

    2010-02-01

    A microsystem integrating electrochemical biosensoric detection for the simultaneous multiplexed detection of protein markers of breast cancer is reported. The immobilization of antibodies against each of carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), prostate specific antigen (PSA) and cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3) was achieved via crosslinking to a bipodal dithiol chemisorbed on gold electrodes. This bipodal dithiol had the double function of eliminating non-specific binding and optimal spacing of the anchor antibodies for maximum accessibility to the target proteins. Storage conditions were optimized, demonstrating a long-term stability of the reporter conjugates jointly stored within a single reservoir in the microsystem. The final system has been optimized in terms of incubation times, temperatures and simultaneous, multiplexed detection of the protein markers was achieved in less than 10 minutes with less than ng/mL detection limits. The microsystem has been validated using real patient serum samples and excellent correlation with ELISA results obtained.

  16. Viruses and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lawson, James S.; Heng, Benjamin

    2010-01-01

    Viruses are the accepted cause of many important cancers including cancers of the cervix and anogenital area, the liver, some lymphomas, head and neck cancers and indirectly human immunodeficiency virus associated cancers. For over 50 years, there have been serious attempts to identify viruses which may have a role in breast cancer. Despite these efforts, the establishment of conclusive evidence for such a role has been elusive. However, the development of extremely sophisticated new experimental techniques has allowed the recent development of evidence that human papilloma virus, Epstein-Barr virus, mouse mammary tumor virus and bovine leukemia virus may each have a role in the causation of human breast cancers. This is potentially good news as effective vaccines are already available to prevent infections from carcinogenic strains of human papilloma virus, which causes cancer of the uterine cervix. PMID:24281093

  17. Nonpalpable invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Wilhelm, M C; Edge, S B; Cole, D D; deParedes, E; Frierson, H F

    1991-01-01

    The use of mammography has resulted in 1464 breast biopsies for nonpalpable abnormalities at the University of Virginia in the 10 years 1980 to 1989. Two hundred sixty-four cancerous lesions (18%) were found. One hundred seventy-eight of these (67%) were in situ lesions. Invasive cancer (86 of 264 lesions or 33%) forms the basis for this report. Mammographic findings leading to biopsy were a mass in 61 of 86 cases (71%), microcalcifications in 23 of 86 (27%), or both in 2 of 86 cases. Histologic subtypes were infiltrating ductal (63 of 86), infiltrating lobular (14 of 86), and other infiltrating (9 of 86). Mastectomy was performed in 71 of 86 lesions (82%), lumpectomy/radiation in 14 of 86 (16%), and lumpectomy alone in 1 of 86 lesions. Division of the tumors into size with nodal status revealed 19 of 86 lesions (22%) less than 0.5 cm with 0 of 14 positive nodes. Thirty-nine of eighty-six lesions (46%) measured 0.6 to 1.0 cm with 10 (26%) positive nodes. Twenty-eight of eighty-six lesions (32%) measured more than 1.0 cm with 8 of 28 (28%) positive nodes. Nodal status is unknown for eight patients. Overall 18 of 78 lesions (23%) had positive nodes. Median follow-up is 44 months. Disease-free survival rate is 92% (79 of 86 patients) and overall survival rate is 94% (81 of 86 patients). Six of seven recurrences occurred in node-positive patients. For those with negative or unknown nodes, the disease-free survival rate is 98% (67 of 68 patients). These findings emphasize the benefit of early detection of breast cancer through the use of mammography. PMID:2039291

  18. Sentinel lymph node detection in breast cancer patients using surgical navigation system based on fluorescence molecular imaging technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chi, Chongwei; Kou, Deqiang; Ye, Jinzuo; Mao, Yamin; Qiu, Jingdan; Wang, Jiandong; Yang, Xin; Tian, Jie

    2015-03-01

    Introduction: Precision and personalization treatments are expected to be effective methods for early stage cancer studies. Breast cancer is a major threat to women's health and sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) is an effective method to realize precision and personalized treatment for axillary lymph node (ALN) negative patients. In this study, we developed a surgical navigation system (SNS) based on optical molecular imaging technology for the precise detection of the sentinel lymph node (SLN) in breast cancer patients. This approach helps surgeons in precise positioning during surgery. Methods: The SNS was mainly based on the technology of optical molecular imaging. A novel optical path has been designed in our hardware system and a feature-matching algorithm has been devised to achieve rapid fluorescence and color image registration fusion. Ten in vivo studies of SLN detection in rabbits using indocyanine green (ICG) and blue dye were executed for system evaluation and 8 breast cancer patients accepted the combination method for therapy. Results: The detection rate of the combination method was 100% and an average of 2.6 SLNs was found in all patients. Our results showed that the method of using SNS to detect SLN has the potential to promote its application. Conclusion: The advantage of this system is the real-time tracing of lymph flow in a one-step procedure. The results demonstrated the feasibility of the system for providing accurate location and reliable treatment for surgeons. Our approach delivers valuable information and facilitates more detailed exploration for image-guided surgery research.

  19. Stereotactic Image-Guided Navigation During Breast Reconstruction in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-08-27

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  20. MARIA M4: clinical evaluation of a prototype ultrawideband radar scanner for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Preece, Alan W; Craddock, Ian; Shere, Mike; Jones, Lyn; Winton, Helen L

    2016-07-01

    A microwave imaging system has been developed as a clinical diagnostic tool operating in the 3- to 8-GHz region using multistatic data collection. A total of 86 patients recruited from a symptomatic breast care clinic were scanned with a prototype design. The resultant three-dimensional images have been compared "blind" with available ultrasound and mammogram images to determine the detection rate. Images show the location of the strongest signal, and this corresponded in both older and younger women, with sensitivity of [Formula: see text], which was found to be maintained in dense breasts. The pathway from clinical prototype to clinical evaluation is outlined.

  1. MARIA M4: clinical evaluation of a prototype ultrawideband radar scanner for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Preece, Alan W; Craddock, Ian; Shere, Mike; Jones, Lyn; Winton, Helen L

    2016-07-01

    A microwave imaging system has been developed as a clinical diagnostic tool operating in the 3- to 8-GHz region using multistatic data collection. A total of 86 patients recruited from a symptomatic breast care clinic were scanned with a prototype design. The resultant three-dimensional images have been compared "blind" with available ultrasound and mammogram images to determine the detection rate. Images show the location of the strongest signal, and this corresponded in both older and younger women, with sensitivity of [Formula: see text], which was found to be maintained in dense breasts. The pathway from clinical prototype to clinical evaluation is outlined. PMID:27446970

  2. Mammographycally occult high grade ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) as second primary breast cancer, detected with MRI: a case report

    PubMed Central

    Zebic-Sinkovec, Marta; Kadivec, Maksimiljan; Podobnik, Gasper; Skof, Erik; Snoj, Marko

    2010-01-01

    Background Contralateral breast cancer (CLB) is the most common second primary breast cancer in patients diagnosed with breast cancer. The majority of patients harbouring CLB tumours develop the invasive disease. Almost all invasive carcinomas are believed to begin as ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions. The sensitivity of MRI for DCIS is much higher than that of mammography. Case report We report the case of a woman who was treated with breast conserving therapy 10 years ago. At that time the invasive medullary carcinoma was diagnosed in the left breast. Ten years later mammographically occult DCIS was diagnosed with MRI-guided core biopsy in contralateral breast. Conclusions There might be a potential role of MRI screening as part of an annual follow-up for patients diagnosed with breast cancer. PMID:22933920

  3. Bisphosphonates in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mathew, Aju; Brufsky, Adam

    2015-08-15

    Bisphosphonates are osteoclast inhibitors, currently being used in oncology to prevent or delay bone morbidity in cancer. Oral and intravenous formulations of bisphosphonates have been found to be efficacious in preventing skeletal-related events such as bone pain, pathologic fractures, spinal cord compression and hypercalcemia of malignancy, in patients with bone metastatic breast cancer. Bisphosphonates are also used to prevent bone loss associated with anti-estrogen therapy using aromatase inhibitors. In addition to its role in preventing bone resorption, several pre-clinical studies have noted an anti-tumor role as well. Recent research effort has particularly focused on investigating an adjuvant role for bisphosphonates in early breast cancer. Recently, few randomized trials have found a beneficial effect for adjuvant use of the aminobisphosphonate, zoledronate, in older patients who are post-menopausal. This review article will summarize the various clinical studies investigating the role of bisphosphonates in breast cancer.

  4. [Breast tomosynthesis: a new tool for diagnosing breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Martínez Miravete, P; Etxano, J

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer continues to be the most common malignant tumor in women in occidental countries. Mammography is currently the technique of choice for screening programs; however, although it has been widely validated, mammography has its limitations, especially in dense breasts. Breast tomosynthesis is a revolutionary advance in the diagnosis of breast cancer. It makes it possible to define lesions that are occult in the glandular tissue and therefore to detect breast tumors that are impossible to see on conventional mammograms. In considering the combined use of mammography and tomosynthesis, many factors must be taken into account apart from cancer detection; these include additional radiation, the recall rate, and the time necessary to carry out and interpret the two tests. In this article, we review the technical principles of tomosynthesis, it main uses, and the future perspective for this imaging technique.

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... to treat breast cancer. Internal radiation therapy with strontium-89 (a radionuclide ) is used to relieve bone pain ... breast cancer that has spread to the bones. Strontium-89 is injected into a vein and travels to ...

  6. Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress

    MedlinePlus

    ... Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Preventing Breast Cancer: Making Progress Past Issues / Fall 2006 Table of ... 000 women will have been diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, and nearly 41,000 women will die from ...

  7. Gene expression profiling detects gene amplification and differentiates tumor types in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Dressman, Marlene A; Baras, Alex; Malinowski, Rachel; Alvis, Lisa B; Kwon, Irene; Walz, Thomas M; Polymeropoulos, Mihael H

    2003-05-01

    Global gene expression analysis using microarrays has been used to characterize the molecular profile of tumors. Gene expression variability at the mRNA level can be caused by a number of different events, including novel signaling, downstream activation of transcription enhancers or silencers, somatic mutation, and genetic amplification or deletion. Genomic amplifications are commonly observed in cancer and often include known oncogenes. The tyrosine kinase-type cell surface receptor, ERBB2, is an oncogene located on chromosome 17q21.1 that is amplified in 10-40% of breast tumors. We report for the first time that phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), proteasome subunit, beta type 3 (PSMB3), ribosomal protein L19 (RPL19), and nuclear receptor subfamily 1, group D, member 1 (NR1D1) are coexpressed with ERBB2 in 34 breast cancer biopsies and also mapped within the same chromosomal location as the ERBB2 gene. Consistent with previous reports, we also observed that the steroidogenic acute regulatory protein-related gene, MLN64, and growth factor receptor bound protein 7 were coexpressed with ERBB2. Coexpression and colocalization of PNMT and MLN64 with ERBB2 suggested that the amplification of ERBB2 includes the chromosomal region harboring these genes. This hypothesis was validated in a subset of 12 biopsies. Gene amplification of ERBB2, PNMT, and MLN64 significantly correlated with increased mRNA gene expression (P < 0.05). These results suggest that gene expression profiling of breast biopsies may become a valuable method for adequately characterizing and choosing treatment modality for patients with breast cancer. PMID:12727839

  8. Tumour cell detection in G-CSF mobilised stem cell harvests of patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Krüger, W; Tögel, F; Kröger, N; Rössing, S; Gieseking, F; Gutensohn, K; Lindner, C; Jänicke, F; Zander, A R

    1999-04-01

    Peripheral blood stem cells were mobilised with G-CSF from steady-state haemopoiesis after previous anthracyclin-containing standard dose chemotherapy in patients with high-risk breast cancer. 48 samples were obtained from patients with stage II-III breast cancer and > or = 10 lymph nodes, 15 samples from patients with chemotherapy sensitive metastatic disease, and 13 samples from women with inflammatory breast cancer. 44 samples were first or single leukaphereses and 32 samples were second or third harvests. Aliquots were searched for contaminating tumour cells by immunocytochemistry (IC) and cytokeratin-19 reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction rtPCR). The median count of MNCs examined by IC was 2 x 10(6); cDNA prepared from 2 x 10(7) cells was subjected to PCR. Fifty-nine samples were examined by immunocytochemistry, 36 samples by rtPCR, and 19 samples by both techniques. Samples investigated by IC and rtPCR were judged as positive if there was at least one positive test. On the whole, 42/79 (55.3%) of the samples were positive with an insignificant trend to a higher positivity rate in second or subsequent leukaphereses (52.3% vs 59.3%). The median tumour cell load per 10(6) MNCs was low with 0.5 (0-7) cells in all, and a total of 2.2 (0.5-7) cells in positive specimen. Differences in the cancer cell load of first and subsequent leukaphereses and between subgroups of patients were not found. PCR and IC gave consistent results in 63.2%. This phenomenon can be explained by the greater sensitivity of the molecular method and by a Poisson distribution of coharvested tumour cells in samples. Tumour cell contamination in G-CSF mobilised stem cells from patients with breast cancer from steady state haemopoiesis after preceding anthacyclin-containing chemotherapy is frequent, but the tumour cell load is low. To allow a comparison of different studies dealing with cancer cell contamination in stem cells, standardisation of assays is necessary.

  9. Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... SIR login) Interventional Radiology Minimally Invasive Treatments for Breast Cancer Interventional Radiology Treatments Offer New Options and Hope ... have in the fight against breast cancer. About Breast Cancer When breast tissue divides and grows at an ...

  10. Computerized Cognitive Retraining in Improving Cognitive Function in Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-26

    Cancer Survivor; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  11. Genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells not an ideal choice as positive control for PCR amplification based detection of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus-Like Sequences.

    PubMed

    Kulkarni, Bhushan B; Hiremath, Shivaprakash V; Kulkarni, Suyamindra S; Hallikeri, Umesh R; Patil, Basavaraj R; Gai, Pramod B

    2013-11-01

    The identification of the etiology of breast cancer is a crucial research issue for the development of an effective preventive and treatment strategies. Researchers are exploring the possible involvement of Mouse Mammary Tumor Virus (MMTV) in causing human breast cancer. Hence, it becomes very important to use a consistent positive control agent in PCR amplification based detection of MMTV-Like Sequence (MMTV-LS) in human breast cancer for accurate and reproducible results. This study was done to investigate the feasibility of using genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells to detect MMTV-LS using PCR amplification based detection. MMTV env and SAG gene located at the 3' long terminal repeat (LTR) sequences were targeted for the PCR based detection. No amplification was observed in case of the genomic DNA of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. However, the 2.7 kb DNA fragment comprising MMTV env and SAG LTR sequences yielded the products of desired size. From these results it can be concluded that Genomic DNA of MCF-7 cell is not a suitable choice as positive control for PCR or RT-PCR based detection of MMTV-LS. It is also suggested that plasmids containing the cloned genes or sequences of MMTV be used as positive control for detection of MMTV-LS.

  12. Multifunctional Oval Shape Gold Nanoparticle Based Selective Detection of Breast Cancer Cells Using Simple Colorimetric and Highly Sensitive Two-Photon Scattering Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wentong; Arumugam, Sri Ranjini; Senapati, Dulal; Singh, Anant K.; Arbneshi, Tahir; Yu, Sadia Afrin Khan Hongtao; Ray, Paresh Chandra

    2010-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer among women and it is the second leading cause of cancer deaths in women today. The key to the effective and ultimately successful treatment of diseases such as cancer is an early and accurate diagnosis. Driven by the need, in this article, we report for the first time a simple colorimetric and highly sensitive two-photon scattering assay for highly selective and sensitive detection of breast cancer SK-BR-3 cell lines in 100-cells/ml level using multifunctional (monoclonal anti-HER2/c-erb-2 antibody and S6 RNA aptamers conjugated) oval shape gold nanoparticle based nanoconjugate. When multifunctional oval shape gold nanoparticles were mixed with breast cancer SK-BR-3 cell line, a distinct color change occurs and two-photon scattering intensity increases by about 13 times. Experimental data with HaCaT non-cancerous cell line, as well as with MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell line clearly demonstrated that our assay was highly sensitive to SK-BR-3 and it was able to distinguish from other breast cancer cell line which expresses low levels of HER-2. The mechanism of selectivity and assay’s response change, have been discussed. Our experimental results reported here open up a new possibility of rapid, easy and reliable diagnosis of cancer cell lines by monitoring the colorimetric change and measuring TPS intensity from multifunctional gold nanosystems. PMID:20155973

  13. The impact of breast cancer knowledge and attitudes on screening and early detection among an immigrant Iranian population in southern California.

    PubMed

    Kobeissi, L; Samari, G; Telesca, D; Esfandiari, M; Galal, O

    2014-12-01

    Few studies explored factors influencing breast cancer screening and early detection behaviors among immigrant Iranian women residing in the USA. Using a cross-sectional survey, a convenience sample of 319 Iranian American women was selected to investigate the impact of breast cancer knowledge and attitude on screening. A self-administered questionnaire assessed breast cancer screening knowledge, attitude, and mammography use (ever, previous year, and future intention). 79 % of the women in the study reported ever receiving at least one mammogram and 74 % received a mammogram in the past year. Personal attitude had an independent significant effect on: mammography use in the last year, ever use of mammography, and future intention to screen. Knowledge and morality-induced attitude influenced screening behavior but not significantly. Interventions targeting breast cancer screening among immigrant Iranian women in the USA should focus on enhancing personal attitudes in order to influence actual screening behavior.

  14. The impact of breast cancer knowledge and attitudes on screening and early detection among an immigrant Iranian population in southern California

    PubMed Central

    Kobeissi, Loulou; Samari, Goleen; Telesca, Donatello; Esfandiari, Mahtash; Galal, Osman

    2014-01-01

    Background Few studies explore factors influencing breast cancer screening and early detection behaviors among immigrant Iranian women residing in the United States. Methods Using a cross-sectional survey, a convenience sample of 319 Iranian-American women was selected to explore the impact of breast cancer knowledge and attitude on screening. A self-administered questionnaire assessed: breast cancer screening knowledge, attitude, and mammography use (ever, previous year and future intention). Results 79 % of the women in the study reported ever-receiving at least one mammogram and 74 % received a mammogram in the past year. Personal attitude had an independent significant effect on: mammography use in the last year, ever use of mammography and future intention to screen. Knowledge and morality-induced attitude influenced screening behavior but not significantly. Conclusion Interventions targeting breast cancer screening among immigrant Iranian women in the US should focus on enhancing personal attitudes in order to influence actual screening behavior. PMID:24096382

  15. 76 FR 62285 - National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-07

    ... Documents#0;#0; ] Proclamation 8724 of October 3, 2011 National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, 2011 By the... of our commitment to preventing and treating breast cancer, and to supporting those courageously... recent decades in the prevention, early detection, and treatment of breast cancer. Still, this...

  16. Omega-3 Fatty Acid in Treating Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-17

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Male Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  17. Cryosurgery of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Liang; Xu, Kecheng

    2012-01-01

    With recent improvements in breast imaging, the ability to identify small breast tumors is markedly improved, prompting significant interest in the use of cryoablation without surgical excision to treat early-stage breast cancer. The cryoablation is often performed using ultrasound-guided tabletop argon-gas-based cryoablation system with a double freeze/thaw cycle. Recent studies have demonstrated that, as a primary therapy for small breast cancer, cryoablation is safe and effective with durable results, and can successfully destroy all cancers <1.0 cm and tumors between 1.0 and 1.5 cm without a significant ductal carcinoma-in-situ (DCIS) component. Presence of noncalcified DCIS is the cause of most cryoablation failures. At this time, cryoablation should be limited to patients with invasive ductal carcinoma <1.5 cm and with <25% DCIS in the core biopsy. For unresectable advanced breast cancer, cryoablation is a palliation modality and may be used as complementary for subsequent resection or other therapies. PMID:25083433

  18. Bioelectrical impedance for detecting and monitoring lymphedema in patients with breast cancer. Preliminary results of the florence nightingale breast study group.

    PubMed

    Erdogan Iyigun, Zeynep; Selamoglu, Derya; Alco, Gul; Pilancı, Kezban Nur; Ordu, Cetin; Agacayak, Filiz; Elbüken, Filiz; Bozdogan, Atilla; Ilgun, Serkan; Guler Uysal, Fusun; Ozmen, Vahit

    2015-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy of bioimpedance spectroscopy for the follow-up of patients with lymphedema in Turkey and its benefits in the diagnosis of stage 0, 1, and 2 lymphedema in patients who are under treatment for breast cancer. Thirty-seven female patients with breast cancer who underwent surgical procedures in our Breast Health Centre were followed up for lymphedema using bioimpedance, and clinical measurements were taken for a minimum period of 1 year at 3-month intervals. Patients who had been monitored regularly between November, 2011, and September, 2013, were enrolled to the study. In total, 8 patients developed lymphedema with an overall rate of 21.6%. Among the 8 patients who developed lymphedema, 4 had Stage 2, 1 had Stage 1, and 3 had Stage 0 lymphedema. Stage 0 lymphedema could not be detected with clinical measurements. During the patients' 1-year follow-up period using measurements of bioimpedance, a statistically significant relationship was observed between the occurrence of lymphedema and the disease characteristics. including the number of the extracted and remaining lymph nodes and the region of radiotherapy (p=0.042, p=0.024, p=0.040). Bioimpedance analysis seems to be a practical and reliable method for the early diagnosis of lymphedema. It is believed that regular monitoring of patients in the high-risk group using bioimpedance analyses increases the ability to treat lymphedema.

  19. Mitosis detection in breast cancer pathology images by combining handcrafted and convolutional neural network features.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haibo; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Basavanhally, Ajay; Gilmore, Hannah; Shih, Natalie; Feldman, Mike; Tomaszewski, John; Gonzalez, Fabio; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-10-01

    Breast cancer (BCa) grading plays an important role in predicting disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. A key component of BCa grade is the mitotic count, which involves quantifying the number of cells in the process of dividing (i.e., undergoing mitosis) at a specific point in time. Currently, mitosis counting is done manually by a pathologist looking at multiple high power fields (HPFs) on a glass slide under a microscope, an extremely laborious and time consuming process. The development of computerized systems for automated detection of mitotic nuclei, while highly desirable, is confounded by the highly variable shape and appearance of mitoses. Existing methods use either handcrafted features that capture certain morphological, statistical, or textural attributes of mitoses or features learned with convolutional neural networks (CNN). Although handcrafted features are inspired by the domain and the particular application, the data-driven CNN models tend to be domain agnostic and attempt to learn additional feature bases that cannot be represented through any of the handcrafted features. On the other hand, CNN is computationally more complex and needs a large number of labeled training instances. Since handcrafted features attempt to model domain pertinent attributes and CNN approaches are largely supervised feature generation methods, there is an appeal in attempting to combine these two distinct classes of feature generation strategies to create an integrated set of attributes that can potentially outperform either class of feature extraction strategies individually. We present a cascaded approach for mitosis detection that intelligently combines a CNN model and handcrafted features (morphology, color, and texture features). By employing a light CNN model, the proposed approach is far less demanding computationally, and the cascaded strategy of combining handcrafted features and CNN-derived features enables the possibility of maximizing the performance

  20. Mitosis detection in breast cancer pathology images by combining handcrafted and convolutional neural network features

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Haibo; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Basavanhally, Ajay; Gilmore, Hannah; Shih, Natalie; Feldman, Mike; Tomaszewski, John; Gonzalez, Fabio; Madabhushi, Anant

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. Breast cancer (BCa) grading plays an important role in predicting disease aggressiveness and patient outcome. A key component of BCa grade is the mitotic count, which involves quantifying the number of cells in the process of dividing (i.e., undergoing mitosis) at a specific point in time. Currently, mitosis counting is done manually by a pathologist looking at multiple high power fields (HPFs) on a glass slide under a microscope, an extremely laborious and time consuming process. The development of computerized systems for automated detection of mitotic nuclei, while highly desirable, is confounded by the highly variable shape and appearance of mitoses. Existing methods use either handcrafted features that capture certain morphological, statistical, or textural attributes of mitoses or features learned with convolutional neural networks (CNN). Although handcrafted features are inspired by the domain and the particular application, the data-driven CNN models tend to be domain agnostic and attempt to learn additional feature bases that cannot be represented through any of the handcrafted features. On the other hand, CNN is computationally more complex and needs a large number of labeled training instances. Since handcrafted features attempt to model domain pertinent attributes and CNN approaches are largely supervised feature generation methods, there is an appeal in attempting to combine these two distinct classes of feature generation strategies to create an integrated set of attributes that can potentially outperform either class of feature extraction strategies individually. We present a cascaded approach for mitosis detection that intelligently combines a CNN model and handcrafted features (morphology, color, and texture features). By employing a light CNN model, the proposed approach is far less demanding computationally, and the cascaded strategy of combining handcrafted features and CNN-derived features enables the possibility of maximizing the

  1. [Sentinel lymph node detection in breast cancer. Experience of the Institut Curie].

    PubMed

    Nos, C; Fréneaux, P; Clough, K B

    2000-05-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy is a recently developed, minimally invasive technique for staging the axilla in breast cancer. This new procedure of selective lymphadenectomy has been the subject of several studies, and a consensus of opinion is starting to form to define indications and methods of identification concerning the use of this technique. At the Institut Curie since 1996, we have been using the Patenté blue dye technique and from 1998 we have used the combination of blue dye and technetium labeled sulfur colloid. This article summarizes the principales aspect of this technique. PMID:10804363

  2. [Sentinel lymph node detection in breast cancer. Experience of the Institut Curie].

    PubMed

    Nos, C; Fréneaux, P; Clough, K B

    2000-05-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy is a recently developed, minimally invasive technique for staging the axilla in breast cancer. This new procedure of selective lymphadenectomy has been the subject of several studies, and a consensus of opinion is starting to form to define indications and methods of identification concerning the use of this technique. At the Institut Curie since 1996, we have been using the Patenté blue dye technique and from 1998 we have used the combination of blue dye and technetium labeled sulfur colloid. This article summarizes the principales aspect of this technique.

  3. Preventing breast cancer in LMICs via screening and/or early detection: The real and the surreal.

    PubMed

    Dey, Subhojit

    2014-08-10

    To review the present status of breast cancer (BC) screening/early detection in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and identify the way forward, an open focused search for articles was undertaken in PubMed, Google Scholar and Google, and using a snowball technique, further articles were obtained from the reference list of initial search results. In addition, a query was put up on ResearchGate to obtain more references and find out the general opinion of experts on the topic. Experts were also personally contacted for their opinion. Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer in women in the world. The rise in incidence is highest in LMICs where the incidence has often been much lower than high-income countries. In spite of more women dying of cancer than pregnancy or childbirth related causes in LMICs, most of the focus and resources are devoted to maternal health. Also, the majority of women in LMICs present at late stages to a hospital to initiate treatment. A number of trials have been conducted in various LMICs regarding the use of clinical breast examination and mammography in various combinations to understand the best ways of implementing a population level screening/early detection of BC; nevertheless, more research in this area is badly needed for different LMIC specific contexts. Notably, very few LMICs have national level programs for BC prevention via screening/early detection and even stage reduction is not on the public health agenda. This is in addition to other barriers such as lack of awareness among women regarding BC and the presence of stigma, inappropriate attitudes and lack of following proper screening behavior, such as conducting breast self-examinations. The above is mixed with the apathy and lack of awareness of policy makers regarding the fact that BC prevention is much more cost-effective and humane than BC treatment. Implementation of population level programs for screening/early detection of BC, along with use of ways to improve

  4. Preventing breast cancer in LMICs via screening and/or early detection: The real and the surreal

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Subhojit

    2014-01-01

    To review the present status of breast cancer (BC) screening/early detection in low- and middle-income countries (LMICs) and identify the way forward, an open focused search for articles was undertaken in PubMed, Google Scholar and Google, and using a snowball technique, further articles were obtained from the reference list of initial search results. In addition, a query was put up on ResearchGate to obtain more references and find out the general opinion of experts on the topic. Experts were also personally contacted for their opinion. Breast cancer (BC) is the most common cancer in women in the world. The rise in incidence is highest in LMICs where the incidence has often been much lower than high-income countries. In spite of more women dying of cancer than pregnancy or childbirth related causes in LMICs, most of the focus and resources are devoted to maternal health. Also, the majority of women in LMICs present at late stages to a hospital to initiate treatment. A number of trials have been conducted in various LMICs regarding the use of clinical breast examination and mammography in various combinations to understand the best ways of implementing a population level screening/early detection of BC; nevertheless, more research in this area is badly needed for different LMIC specific contexts. Notably, very few LMICs have national level programs for BC prevention via screening/early detection and even stage reduction is not on the public health agenda. This is in addition to other barriers such as lack of awareness among women regarding BC and the presence of stigma, inappropriate attitudes and lack of following proper screening behavior, such as conducting breast self-examinations. The above is mixed with the apathy and lack of awareness of policy makers regarding the fact that BC prevention is much more cost-effective and humane than BC treatment. Implementation of population level programs for screening/early detection of BC, along with use of ways to improve

  5. Vitamin D and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Klein, Paula; Grossbard, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    In addition to its role in calcium homeostasis and bone health, vitamin D has also been reported to have anticancer activities against many cancer types, including breast cancer. The discovery that breast epithelial cells possess the same enzymatic system as the kidney, allowing local manufacture of active vitamin D from circulating precursors, makes the effect of vitamin D in breast cancer biologically plausible. Preclinical and ecologic studies have suggested a role for vitamin D in breast cancer prevention. Inverse associations have also been shown between serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D level (25(OH)D) and breast cancer development, risk for breast cancer recurrence, and mortality in women with early-stage breast cancer. Clinical trials of vitamin D supplementation, however, have yielded inconsistent results. Regardless of whether or not vitamin D helps prevent breast cancer or its recurrence, vitamin D deficiency in the U.S. population is very common, and the adverse impact on bone health, a particular concern for breast cancer survivors, makes it important to understand vitamin D physiology and to recognize and treat vitamin D deficiency. In this review, we discuss vitamin D metabolism and its mechanism of action. We summarize the current evidence of the relationship between vitamin D and breast cancer, highlight ongoing research in this area, and discuss optimal dosing of vitamin D for breast cancer prevention. PMID:22234628

  6. Virtual Weight Loss Program in Maintaining Weight in African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-01

    Cancer Survivor; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cassano, E; Rizzo, S; Bozzini, A; Menna, S; Bellomi, M

    2006-01-01

    The importance of ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of breast cancer has been widely demonstrated. During the last few years, the introduction of ultrasound contrast media has been considered a promising tool for studying the vascular pattern of focal lesions within the breast. Our purpose was to assess whether contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasound examination, performed using specific contrast imaging modes, can be helpful for detection and characterization of breast lesions, and for prediction of the response of breast cancer to therapy. PMID:16478698

  8. Contrast enhanced ultrasound of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Cassano, E; Rizzo, S; Bozzini, A; Menna, S; Bellomi, M

    2006-01-01

    The importance of ultrasound examination in the diagnosis of breast cancer has been widely demonstrated. During the last few years, the introduction of ultrasound contrast media has been considered a promising tool for studying the vascular pattern of focal lesions within the breast. Our purpose was to assess whether contrast-enhanced (CE) ultrasound examination, performed using specific contrast imaging modes, can be helpful for detection and characterization of breast lesions, and for prediction of the response of breast cancer to therapy. PMID:16478698

  9. Detection of single amino acid mutation in human breast cancer by disordered plasmonic self-similar chain.

    PubMed

    Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Das, Gobind; Nicastri, Annalisa; Perri, Angela Mena; Candeloro, Patrizio; Perozziello, Gerardo; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Gongora, Juan Sebastian Totero; Alrasheed, Salma; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Limongi, Tania; Cuda, Giovanni; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2015-09-01

    Control of the architecture and electromagnetic behavior of nanostructures offers the possibility of designing and fabricating sensors that, owing to their intrinsic behavior, provide solutions to new problems in various fields. We show detection of peptides in multicomponent mixtures derived from human samples for early diagnosis of breast cancer. The architecture of sensors is based on a matrix array where pixels constitute a plasmonic device showing a strong electric field enhancement localized in an area of a few square nanometers. The method allows detection of single point mutations in peptides composing the BRCA1 protein. The sensitivity demonstrated falls in the picomolar (10(-12) M) range. The success of this approach is a result of accurate design and fabrication control. The residual roughness introduced by fabrication was taken into account in optical modeling and was a further contributing factor in plasmon localization, increasing the sensitivity and selectivity of the sensors. This methodology developed for breast cancer detection can be considered a general strategy that is applicable to various pathologies and other chemical analytical cases where complex mixtures have to be resolved in their constitutive components.

  10. Lymph node revealing solution: a new method for detection of minute axillary lymph nodes in breast cancer specimens.

    PubMed

    Koren, R; Kyzer, S; Paz, A; Veltman, V; Klein, B; Gal, R

    1997-11-01

    The staging and prognosis of patients with breast cancer is related to the presence or absence of axillary lymph node involvement. However, in some cases no lymph nodes or too small a number of lymph nodes are revealed by the traditional method of palpating and sectioning the axillary fat. In the present study we demonstrate the usefulness of the lymph node revealing solution (LNRS) in breast cancer. Specimens from 13 patients, in whom <10 lymph nodes were identified in the axilla by the traditional method, were included in the study. After excising the lymph nodes by the traditional method, axillary tissue was immersed in LNRS for 6-12 hours. Additional lymph nodes, which stood out as white chalky nodules, were excised and processed as usual. The LNRS increased the mean number of nodes per case from 6.0+/-2.5 found by the traditional method to 12.54+/-4.61 nodes per case (p < 0.01). The size of the nodes identified by the LNRS was significantly smaller (p < 0.01) than those detected by the traditional method. The LNRS changed the lymph node stage of the disease in four of the studied cases (30%). LNRS seems to be the technique of choice for detection of axillary lymph nodes in cases where the number of detected lymph nodes by the traditional method is too small for accurate staging. PMID:9351579

  11. Detection of single amino acid mutation in human breast cancer by disordered plasmonic self-similar chain

    PubMed Central

    Coluccio, Maria Laura; Gentile, Francesco; Das, Gobind; Nicastri, Annalisa; Perri, Angela Mena; Candeloro, Patrizio; Perozziello, Gerardo; Proietti Zaccaria, Remo; Gongora, Juan Sebastian Totero; Alrasheed, Salma; Fratalocchi, Andrea; Limongi, Tania; Cuda, Giovanni; Di Fabrizio, Enzo

    2015-01-01

    Control of the architecture and electromagnetic behavior of nanostructures offers the possibility of designing and fabricating sensors that, owing to their intrinsic behavior, provide solutions to new problems in various fields. We show detection of peptides in multicomponent mixtures derived from human samples for early diagnosis of breast cancer. The architecture of sensors is based on a matrix array where pixels constitute a plasmonic device showing a strong electric field enhancement localized in an area of a few square nanometers. The method allows detection of single point mutations in peptides composing the BRCA1 protein. The sensitivity demonstrated falls in the picomolar (10−12 M) range. The success of this approach is a result of accurate design and fabrication control. The residual roughness introduced by fabrication was taken into account in optical modeling and was a further contributing factor in plasmon localization, increasing the sensitivity and selectivity of the sensors. This methodology developed for breast cancer detection can be considered a general strategy that is applicable to various pathologies and other chemical analytical cases where complex mixtures have to be resolved in their constitutive components. PMID:26601267

  12. Detection of prolactin inducible protein mRNA, a biomarker for breast cancer metastasis, using a molecular beacon-based assay.

    PubMed

    Guetschow, Erik D; Black, Will; Walsh, Carolyn M; Furchak, Jennifer R W

    2012-08-01

    Mortality due to breast cancer is increasingly linked to early, undetected metastasis, making methods for earlier detection acutely necessary. We describe the development of an assay based on molecular beacon (MB) chemistry with fluorescence detection to monitor a breast cancer biomarker for the analysis of breast cancer metastasis. The MB assay is based on the complementary base-pairing interactions of the MB nucleic acid with mRNA indicative of breast cancer metastasis. The presence of mRNA is characterized by an increase in the fluorescence intensity of the molecular beacon. The assay gives a linear, reproducible response to prolactin inducible protein mRNA, with a limit of detection in the high picomolar range. This method sensitively and specifically identifies a biomarker directly in serum samples in minimal time and with a straightforward procedure, dramatically reducing the total time for sample analysis over current methods from days to hours. The potential impact of this work in detection and understanding of breast cancer metastasis lies in improvements in simplicity, accuracy, and speed over current methods, which could allow for improved patient treatment and prognoses. Ultimately, additional sample throughput will result in better understanding of disease progression.

  13. Accelerated Radiation Therapy After Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-16

    Inflammatory Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  14. A signal-on fluorescent aptasensor based on single-stranded DNA-sensitized luminescence of terbium (III) for label-free detection of breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Shuxian; Li, Guangwen; Zhang, Xi; Xia, Yaokun; Chen, Mei; Wu, Dongzhi; Chen, Qiuxiang; Zhang, Jing; Chen, Jinghua

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer is the most common type of malignant tumor in women. Recently, it has been shown that detection of breast cancer tumor cells outside the primitive tumor is an effective early diagnosis with great prognostic and clinical utility. For this purpose, we developed a signal-on fluorescence aptasensor for label-free, facile and sensitive detection of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Due to target-aptamer specific recognition and single-stranded DNA-sensitized luminescence of terbium (III), the proposed aptasensor exhibits excellent sensitivity with detection limit as low as 70 cells mL(-1). Compared with common organic dyes and the emerging nano-technological probes, the combination of terbium (III) and single-stranded DNA signal probe (Tb(3+)-SP) serves as a more powerful bio-probe because of its stable optical property, good biocompatibility and free from complex synthesis. The feasibility investigations have illustrated the potential applicability of this aptasensor for selective and sensitive detection of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Moreover, this proposed aptasensor can be also extended for the determination of other tumor cancers or bio-molecules by altering corresponding aptamers. Taken together, this easy-to-perform aptasensor may represent a promising way for early screening and detection of tumor cancers or other bio-molecules in clinical diagnosis.

  15. Aetio-pathogenesis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Abdulkareem, Imran Haruna

    2013-01-01

    This is a literature review on the aetiology and pathogenesis of breast cancer, which is the most common cancer worldwide, and the second leading cause of cancer death, especially in Western countries. Several aetiological factors have been implicated in its pathogenesis, and include age, genetics, family history, diet, alcohol, obesity, lifestyle, physical inactivity, as well as endocrine factors. These factors act separately or together in the causation of breast cancer. More recently, triple negative breast cancer has been described in certain categories of patients and is associated with poorer prognosis and earlier recurrence compared with the conventional breast cancer. Therefore, adequate knowledge of these factors is important in identifying high risk groups and individuals, which will help in screening, early detection and follow-up. This will help to decrease the morbidity and mortality from this life-threatening disease. PMID:24665149

  16. Prostate cancer is not breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Venniyoor, Ajit

    2016-01-01

    Cancers of the prostate and breast are hormone dependent cancers. There is a tendency to equate them and apply same algorithms for treatment. It is pointed out that metastatic prostate cancer with bone-only disease is a potentially fatal condition with a much poorer prognosis than metastatic breast cancer and needs a more aggressive approach. PMID:27051149

  17. Detection of isolated ipsilateral regional lymph node recurrences by F18-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-CT in follow-up of postoperative breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Ohsumi, Shozo; Inoue, Takeshi; Kiyoto, Sachiko; Hara, Fumikata; Takahashi, Mina; Takabatake, Daisuke; Takashima, Seiki; Aogi, Kenjiro; Takashima, Shigemitsu

    2011-11-01

    Imaging diagnostic methods except for mammograms are not recommended for follow-up of postoperative breast cancer patients in order to detect small recurrences because of the poor survival improvement in earlier randomized trials. However, the use of new imaging modalities may improve survival by detection of small isolated regional lymph node recurrences which are potentially curable. Between April 2006 and December 2008, we used PET-CT to find small recurrences in follow-up of 1,907 postoperative breast cancer patients. A total of 3,280 PET-CT imagings were performed. The median age at PET-CT imaging was 58 years, with a median 48-month interval from definitive surgery to the PET-CT imaging. Twenty-two patients were found to have isolated ipsilateral regional recurrences only by PET-CT (axillary node recurrences in 6, infraclavicular node recurrences in 5, supraclavicular node recurrences in 6, and parasternal node recurrences in 5). All of those recurrences were missed by palpation or were nonpalpable. The pathological lymph node status at the definitive surgery for the primary breast cancer of 22 patients with the isolated ipsilateral regional lymph node recurrences was positive in 17 patients. If patients are limited to those who had pathologically positive node(s) at definitive surgery, the incidence of patients with isolated regional lymph node recurrences found only by PET-CT would be 2.6% (17/663 patients). Seventeen other asymptomatic cancers including contralateral breast cancers were found only by PET-CT. Early detection of isolated loco-regional recurrences of breast cancer is suggested to result in improved survival. Therefore, the use of PET-CT in follow-up of postoperative node-positive breast cancer patients may improve their survival because of early detection of isolated regional lymph node recurrences which are still potentially curable, and screening of other asymptomatic cancers. PMID:21590272

  18. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Harry Mahtani analyzes the gas content of nutrient media from Bioreactor used in research on human breast cancer. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  19. Peptide-based method for detection of metastatic transformation in primary tumors of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Huang, Yue; Yu, Yue; Li, Weiwei; Yin, Yongmei; Li, Genxi

    2015-09-15

    Detection of metastatic activity before the onset of the actual metastasis can be a promising method to combat metastasis, the foremost cause of death in cancer. Therefore, in this work, we have developed an assay method for the detection of metastatic tumor cells in primary tumor, by using a protein of the metastatic cell signaling as the biomarker. In this assay, a peptide-based probe targeting the marker protein and a sensitive nanoparticle doped graphene nanolabel are combined to enable the detection of metastatic cells. Consequently, the metastatic cells can be specifically detected and discriminated from primary tumor cells. By applying this assay method to clinical samples of primary tumor, a low amount of metastatic activity can be detected in the tumor sites, which may suggest the activity of local metastatic transformation. So, these results may point to the prospect of using the proposed method for controlling metastatic cancer.

  20. Breast self-exam

    MedlinePlus

    Self-examination of the breast; BSE; Breast cancer - BSE; Breast cancer screening - self exam ... American Cancer Society. Recommendations for early breast cancer detection in women without breast symptoms. Revised October 20, ... ...

  1. Pertuzumab, Trastuzumab, and Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Patients With HER2-Positive Advanced Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-06-23

    HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Breast Adenocarcinoma; Inflammatory Breast Carcinoma

  2. About the Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group | Division of Cancer Prevention

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast and Gynecologic Cancer Research Group conducts and fosters the development of research on the prevention and early detection of breast cancer, cervix and human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cancers, endometrial cancers, ovarian cancers, and precursor conditions related to these cancers. |

  3. The Use of Sensitive Chemical Antibodies for Diagnosis: Detection of Low Levels of Epcam in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shigdar, Sarah; Qian, Christine; Lv, Li; Pu, Chunwen; Li, Yong; Li, Lianhong; Marappan, Manju; Lin, Jia; Wang, Lifen; Duan, Wei

    2013-01-01

    EpCAM is expressed at low levels in a variety of normal human epithelial tissues, but is overexpressed in 70–90% of carcinomas. From a clinico-pathological point of view, this has both prognostic and therapeutic significance. EpCAM was first suggested as a therapeutic target for the treatment of epithelial cancers in the 1990s. However, following several immunotherapy trials, the results have been mixed. It has been suggested that this is due, at least in part, to an unknown level of EpCAM expression in the tumors being targeted. Thus, selection of patients who would benefit from EpCAM immunotherapy by determining EpCAM status in the tumor biopsies is currently undergoing vigorous evaluation. However, current EpCAM antibodies are not robust enough to be able to detect EpCAM expression in all pathological tissues. Here we report a newly developed EpCAM RNA aptamer, also known as a chemical antibody, which is not only specific but also more sensitive than current antibodies for the detection of EpCAM in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary breast cancers. This new aptamer, together with our previously described aptamer, showed no non-specific staining or cross-reactivity with tissues that do not express EpCAM. They were able to reliably detect target proteins in breast cancer xenograft where an anti-EpCAM antibody (323/A3) showed limited or no reactivity. Our results demonstrated a more robust detection of EpCAM using RNA aptamers over antibodies in clinical samples with chromogenic staining. This shows the potential of aptamers in the future of histopathological diagnosis and as a tool to guide targeted immunotherapy. PMID:23460885

  4. Detection and downregulation of type I IGF receptor expression by antibody-conjugated quantum dots in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hua; Sachdev, Deepali; Wang, Chun; Hubel, Allison; Gaillard-Kelly, Martine; Yee, Douglas

    2009-03-01

    The type I insulin-like growth factor (IGF) receptor (IGF1R) is a transmembrane tyrosine kinase involved in breast cancer proliferation, survival, and metastasis. Several monoclonal antibodies directed against the receptor are in clinical trials. In order to develop a methodology to detect and measure IGF1R levels in breast cancer cells, we covalently conjugated an IGF1R antibody, AVE-1642, with quantum dots (Qdots), which are nanocrystals that emit fluorescence upon excitation. AVE-1642 Qdots only bound to cells that express IGF1R, and measured IGF1R levels by fluorescence emission at 655 nm. After binding to the cell surface, AVE-1642 Qdots underwent receptor mediated endocytosis, localized to endosome, and later translocated into the nucleus. Treating MCF-7 cells with AVE-1642 Qdots, but not unconjugated Qdots alone, downregulated IGF1R levels and rendered cells refractory to IGF-I stimulation. Furthermore, cell proliferation was slightly inhibited by AVE-1642 Qdots, but not the unconjugated Qdots. Our data suggest that AVE-1642 Qdots can be used to detect IGF1R expression and measure changes in cell surface receptor levels. In addition, the inhibitory effect of AVE-1642 Qdots to cell proliferation implies that it may serve as a traceable therapeutic agent. PMID:18418709

  5. Detection of cancer cells in peripheral blood stem cells of women with breast cancer by RT-PCR and cell culture.

    PubMed

    Krüger, W H; Stockschläder, M; Hennings, S; Aschenbrenner, M; Gruber, M; Gutensohn, K; Löliger, C; Gieseking, F; Jonat, W; Zander, A R

    1996-09-01

    The benefit of high-dose therapy and blood stem cell reinfusion for women with high-risk breast cancer is currently under investigation. Contaminations of autologous blood stem cells with cancer cells have been described. Cancer micrometastases may be detected by immunocytochemistry, culture techniques and cytokeratin-19 mRNA reverse transcriptase PCR. Women with breast cancer received adjuvant HD-CTM with peripheral blood stem cell (PBSC) support after surgical therapy and 4 cycles conventional chemotherapy. Peripheral blood stem cells were mobilised by G-CsF and harvested after the third or fourth cycle of standard therapy. Aliquots of PBSC-collections (10(7)-2*10(7) cells) were subjected to CK19-mRNA reverse transcriptase PCR. RNA was extracted by standard methods and reverse transcription was performed with MMV-RT. Integrity of RNA was checked by coamplification of housekeeping sequences. Aliquots of the RT-mix were subjected to PCR-amplification with outer and inner primer pairs, subsequently. A second aliquot of 2*10(7) cells was cultured over 42 days in liquid culture. Cytospins were prepared weekly from cultured cells and evaluated by light microscopy with or without prior immunocytochemistry. Ten leukaphereses from 6 women were available for PCR-analysis and cell culture. Six leukaphereses were negative for CK19-mRNA and for detection of cancer cells by culture technique, two samples were positive for CK19-mRNA and culturally enriched cells and two samples were positive for CK19-mRNA and negative for cultured cancer cells. No sample was positive for cultured cells and negative for CK19-mRNA. Overall, the results corresponded in 80%. Two sensitive techniques for the detection of cancer micrometastases were applied to aliquots from 10 leukaphereses of six breast cancer patients with corresponding results in 80%. PCR-mediated detection of cancer cells was confirmed by culture technique and light microscopy, however, further comparison of CK19-PCR with

  6. Supervised automated microscopy increases sensitivity and efficiency of detection of sentinel node micrometastases in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Mesker, W E; Torrenga, H; Sloos, W C R; Vrolijk, H; Tollenaar, R A E M; de Bruin, P C; van Diest, P J; Tanke, H J

    2004-01-01

    Aims: To investigate the practicality and sensitivity of supervised automated microscopy (AM) for the detection of micrometastasis in sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) from patients with breast carcinoma. Methods: In total, 440 SLN slides (immunohistochemically stained for cytokeratin) from 86 patients were obtained from two hospitals. Samples were selected on the basis of: (1) a pathology report mentioning micrometastases or isolated tumour cells (ITCs) and (2) reported as negative nodes (N0). Results: From a test set of 29 slides (12 SLN positive patients, including positive and negative nodes), 18 slides were scored positive by supervised AM and 11 were negative. Routine examination revealed 17 positive slides and 12 negative. Subsequently, automated reanalysis of 187 slides (34 patients; institute I) and 216 slides (40 patients; institute II) from reported node negative (N0) patients showed that two and seven slides (from two and five patients, respectively) contained ITCs, respectively, all confirmed by the pathologists, corresponding to 5.9% and 12.5% missed patients. In four of the seven missed cases from institute II, AM also detected clusters of four to 30 cells, but all with a size ⩽ 0.2 mm. Conclusions: Supervised AM is a more sensitive method for detecting immunohistochemically stained micrometastasis and ITCs in SLNs than routine pathology. However, the clinical relevance of detecting cytokeratin positive cells in SLNs of patients with breast cancer is still an unresolved issue and is at the moment being validated in larger clinical trials. PMID:15333658

  7. Autoantibodies to MUC1 glycopeptides cannot be used as a screening assay for early detection of breast, ovarian, lung or pancreatic cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burford, B; Gentry-Maharaj, A; Graham, R; Allen, D; Pedersen, J W; Nudelman, A S; Blixt, O; Fourkala, E O; Bueti, D; Dawnay, A; Ford, J; Desai, R; David, L; Trinder, P; Acres, B; Schwientek, T; Gammerman, A; Reis, C A; Silva, L; Osório, H; Hallett, R; Wandall, H H; Mandel, U; Hollingsworth, M A; Jacobs, I; Fentiman, I; Clausen, H; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Menon, U; Burchell, J M

    2013-01-01

    Background: Autoantibodies have been detected in sera before diagnosis of cancer leading to interest in their potential as screening/early detection biomarkers. As we have found autoantibodies to MUC1 glycopeptides to be elevated in early-stage breast cancer patients, in this study we analysed these autoantibodies in large population cohorts of sera taken before cancer diagnosis. Methods: Serum samples from women who subsequently developed breast cancer, and aged-matched controls, were identified from UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS) and Guernsey serum banks to formed discovery and validation sets. These were screened on a microarray platform of 60mer MUC1 glycopeptides and recombinant MUC1 containing 16 tandem repeats. Additional case–control sets comprised of women who subsequently developed ovarian, pancreatic and lung cancer were also screened on the arrays. Results: In the discovery (273 cases, 273 controls) and the two validation sets (UKCTOCS 426 cases, 426 controls; Guernsey 303 cases and 606 controls), no differences were found in autoantibody reactivity to MUC1 tandem repeat peptide or glycoforms between cases and controls. Furthermore, no differences were observed between ovarian, pancreatic and lung cancer cases and controls. Conclusion: This robust, validated study shows autoantibodies to MUC1 peptide or glycopeptides cannot be used for breast, ovarian, lung or pancreatic cancer screening. This has significant implications for research on the use of MUC1 in cancer detection. PMID:23652307

  8. Breast cancer margin detection with a single frequency terahertz imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yngvesson, Sigfrid K.; Karellas, Andrew; Glick, Stephen; Khan, Ashraf; Siqueira, Paul R.; Kelly, Patrick A.; St. Peter, Benjamin

    2016-03-01

    The ability to discern malignant from benign tissue in excised human breast specimens in Breast Conservation Surgery (BCS) was evaluated using a prototype single frequency terahertz radiation. Terahertz (THz) images of the specimens in reflection mode were obtained by employing a gas laser source and mechanical scanning. The images were correlated with optical histological micrographs of the same specimens, and a mean discrimination of 73% was found for five out of six samples using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. This result is similar to what has previously been obtained using Terahertz pulsed imaging (TPI) techniques. We will discuss the specific advantages of Single frequency THz imaging (SFTI) compared with TPI for potentially allowing the development of much faster, more compact and less expensive cancer imaging systems that could be adapted for employment in the operating room. The system design and characterization of the prototype SFTI system are discussed in detail. The initial results are encouraging but further development of the technology and clinical evaluation is needed to evaluate its feasibility in the clinical environment.

  9. Access to Mammography Facilities and Detection of Breast Cancer by Screening Mammography: A GIS Approach.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Selina; Price, James H; Dignan, Mark; Rahman, Saleh; Lindquist, Peter S; Jordan, Timothy R

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of the study was to examine the association between access to mammography facilities and utilization of screening mammography in an urban population. METHODS: Data on female breast cancer cases were obtained from an extensive mammography surveillance project. Distance to mammography facilities was measured by using GIS, which was followed by measuring geographical access to mammography facilities using Floating Catchment Area (FCA) method (considering all available facilities within an arbitrary radius from the woman's residence by using Arc GIS 9.0 software). RESULTS: Of 2,024 women, 91.4% were Caucasian; age ranged from 25 to 98 years; most (95%) were non-Hispanic in origin. Logistic regression found age, family history, hormone replacement therapy, physician recommendation, and breast cancer stage at diagnosis to be significant predictors of having had a previous mammogram. Women having higher access to mammography facilities were less likely to have had a previous mammogram compared to women who had low access, considering all the facilities within 10 miles (OR=0.41, CI=0.22-0.76), 30 miles (OR=0.52, CI=0.29-0.91) and 40 miles (OR=0.51, CI=0.28-0.92) radiuses. CONCLUSIONS: Physical distance to mammography facilities does not necessarily predict utilization of mammogram and greater access does not assure greater utilizations, due to constraints imposed by socio economic and cultural barriers. Future studies should focus on measuring access to mammography facilities capturing a broader dimension of access considering qualitative aspect of facilities, as well as other travel impedances. PMID:20628557

  10. Azacitidine in Treating Patients With Triple Negative Stage I-IV Invasive Breast Cancer That Can Be Removed By Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  11. Frequency and Clinical Significance of Previously Undetected Incidental Findings Detected on Computed Tomography Simulation Scans for Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Nakamura, Naoki; Tsunoda, Hiroko; Takahashi, Osamu; Kikuchi, Mari; Honda, Satoshi; Shikama, Naoto; Akahane, Keiko; Sekiguchi, Kenji

    2012-11-01

    Purpose: To determine the frequency and clinical significance of previously undetected incidental findings found on computed tomography (CT) simulation images for breast cancer patients. Methods and Materials: All CT simulation images were first interpreted prospectively by radiation oncologists and then double-checked by diagnostic radiologists. The official reports of CT simulation images for 881 consecutive postoperative breast cancer patients from 2009 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Potentially important incidental findings (PIIFs) were defined as any previously undetected benign or malignancy-related findings requiring further medical follow-up or investigation. For all patients in whom a PIIF was detected, we reviewed the clinical records to determine the clinical significance of the PIIF. If the findings from the additional studies prompted by a PIIF required a change in management, the PIIF was also recorded as a clinically important incidental finding (CIIF). Results: There were a total of 57 (6%) PIIFs. The 57 patients in whom a PIIF was detected were followed for a median of 17 months (range, 3-26). Six cases of CIIFs (0.7% of total) were detected. Of the six CIIFs, three (50%) cases had not been noted by the radiation oncologist until the diagnostic radiologist detected the finding. On multivariate analysis, previous CT examination was an independent predictor for PIIF (p = 0.04). Patients who had not previously received chest CT examinations within 1 year had a statistically significantly higher risk of PIIF than those who had received CT examinations within 6 months (odds ratio, 3.54; 95% confidence interval, 1.32-9.50; p = 0.01). Conclusions: The rate of incidental findings prompting a change in management was low. However, radiation oncologists appear to have some difficulty in detecting incidental findings that require a change in management. Considering cost, it may be reasonable that routine interpretations are given to those who have not

  12. Toward Carbon-Nanotube-Based Theranostic Agents for Microwave Detection and Treatment of Breast Cancer: Enhanced Dielectric and Heating Response of Tissue-Mimicking Materials

    PubMed Central

    Mashal, Alireza; Sitharaman, Balaji; Li, Xu; Avti, Pramod; Sahakian, Alan V.; Booske, John H.; Hagness, Susan C.

    2010-01-01

    The experimental results reported in this letter suggest that single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) have the potential to enhance dielectric contrast between malignant and normal tissue for microwave detection of breast cancer and facilitate selective heating of malignant tissue for microwave hyperthermia treatment of breast cancer. In this study, we constructed tissue-mimicking materials with varying concentrations of SWCNTs and characterized their dielectric properties and heating response. At SWCNT concentrations of less than 0.5% by weight, we observed significant increases in the relative permittivity and effective conductivity. In microwave heating experiments, we observed significantly greater temperature increases in mixtures containing SWCNTs. These temperature increases scaled linearly with the effective conductivity of the mixtures. This work is a first step towards the development of functionalized, tumor-targeting SWCNTs as theranostic (integrated therapeutic and diagnostic) agents for microwave breast cancer detection and treatment. PMID:20176534

  13. Pharmacokinetically Guided Everolimus in Patients With Breast Cancer, Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumors, or Kidney Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Gastrinoma; Glucagonoma; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Insulinoma; Mucositis; Oral Complications; Pancreatic Polypeptide Tumor; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Recurrent Islet Cell Carcinoma; Recurrent Renal Cell Cancer; Somatostatinoma; Stage III Renal Cell Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Stage IV Renal Cell Cancer

  14. What's New in Breast Cancer Research and Treatment?

    MedlinePlus

    ... References: Breast cancer detailed guide What`s new in breast cancer research and treatment? Researchers around the world are ... for breast cancer Breast cancer treatment Causes of breast cancer Studies continue to uncover lifestyle factors and habits, ...

  15. You, Your Teenage Daughter and Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brateman, Libby

    1991-01-01

    Discusses breast cancer and teenagers, focusing on how parents can introduce the subject and encourage breast self-examination. The article provides information on breast cancer statistics, mammography, and American Cancer Society services. (SM)

  16. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... therapy for breast cancer in men Surgery for breast cancer in men The thought of surgery can be ... 2 to 3 hours. What to expect after breast cancer surgery: After your surgery, you will be taken ...

  17. Multifunctional magnetic nanowires: A novel breakthrough for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cancer cells from non-metastatic early breast cancer patients using small volumes of blood.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wooyoung; Lee, Sooyeon; Chang, Hee Jin; Lee, Eun Sook; Cho, Youngnam

    2016-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are recognized as promising biomarkers for diagnosis and indication of the prognosis of several epithelial cancers. However, at present, CTC monitoring is available only for advanced-stage patients rather than for those at an early stage of cancer. This is because of the extraordinary rarity of CTCs and the limited sensitivity of current methods. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional magnetic nanowires for the efficient isolation and detection of CTCs from the blood of patients, especially those with non-metastatic early-stage cancer. The nanowires, which are equipped with a high density of magnetic nanoparticles and five different types of antibodies (Ab mixture_mPpyNWs), offer a significant improvement in cell-isolation efficiency, even from very small amounts of blood (250 μL-1 mL). Notably, CTCs were isolated and identified in 29 out of 29 patients (100%) with non-metastatic early breast cancer, indicating that this procedure allowed detection of CTCs with greater accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. In addition, we demonstrated in situ "naked eye" identification of the captured cancer cells via a simple colorimetric immunoassay. Our results show that antibody-functionalized magnetic nanowires offer great potential for a broad range of practical clinical applications, including early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer. PMID:27552318

  18. Multifunctional magnetic nanowires: A novel breakthrough for ultrasensitive detection and isolation of rare cancer cells from non-metastatic early breast cancer patients using small volumes of blood.

    PubMed

    Hong, Wooyoung; Lee, Sooyeon; Chang, Hee Jin; Lee, Eun Sook; Cho, Youngnam

    2016-11-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are recognized as promising biomarkers for diagnosis and indication of the prognosis of several epithelial cancers. However, at present, CTC monitoring is available only for advanced-stage patients rather than for those at an early stage of cancer. This is because of the extraordinary rarity of CTCs and the limited sensitivity of current methods. Herein, we report the development of multifunctional magnetic nanowires for the efficient isolation and detection of CTCs from the blood of patients, especially those with non-metastatic early-stage cancer. The nanowires, which are equipped with a high density of magnetic nanoparticles and five different types of antibodies (Ab mixture_mPpyNWs), offer a significant improvement in cell-isolation efficiency, even from very small amounts of blood (250 μL-1 mL). Notably, CTCs were isolated and identified in 29 out of 29 patients (100%) with non-metastatic early breast cancer, indicating that this procedure allowed detection of CTCs with greater accuracy, sensitivity, and specificity. In addition, we demonstrated in situ "naked eye" identification of the captured cancer cells via a simple colorimetric immunoassay. Our results show that antibody-functionalized magnetic nanowires offer great potential for a broad range of practical clinical applications, including early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of cancer.

  19. Chemoprevention for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bozovic-Spasojevic, I; Azambuja, E; McCaskill-Stevens, Worta; Dinh, P; Cardoso, F

    2012-08-01

    Despite the progress that has been made in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment, this disease is still a major health problem, being the most frequently diagnosed cancer and the first leading cause of cancer death among women both in developed and economically developing countries. In some developed countries incidence rate start to decrease from the end of last millennium and this can be explained, at least in part, by the decrease in hormone replacement therapy use by post-menopausal women. Chemoprevention has the potential to be an approach of utmost importance to reduce cancer burden at least among high-risk populations. Tamoxifen and raloxifene are both indicated for the prevention of breast cancer in women at high risk for the development of the disease, although raloxifene may have a more favorable adverse-effect profile, causing fewer uterine cancers and thromboembolic events. Aromatase inhibitors will most probably become an additional prevention treatment option in the near future, in view of the promising results observed in adjuvant trials and the interesting results of the very recently published first chemoprevention trial using an aromatase inhibitor.(2) Despite impressive results in most clinical trials performed to date, chemoprevention is still not widely used. Urgently needed are better molecular risk models to accurately identify high-risk subjects, new agents with a better risk/benefit ratio and validated biomarkers. PMID:21856081

  20. Optical imaging for breast cancer prescreening

    PubMed Central

    Godavarty, Anuradha; Rodriguez, Suset; Jung, Young-Jin; Gonzalez, Stephanie

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer prescreening is carried out prior to the gold standard screening using X-ray mammography and/or ultrasound. Prescreening is typically carried out using clinical breast examination (CBE) or self-breast examinations (SBEs). Since CBE and SBE have high false-positive rates, there is a need for a low-cost, noninvasive, non-radiative, and portable imaging modality that can be used as a prescreening tool to complement CBE/SBE. This review focuses on the various hand-held optical imaging devices that have been developed and applied toward early-stage breast cancer detection or as a prescreening tool via phantom, in vivo, and breast cancer imaging studies. Apart from the various optical devices developed by different research groups, a wide-field fiber-free near-infrared optical scanner has been developed for transillumination-based breast imaging in our Optical Imaging Laboratory. Preliminary in vivo studies on normal breast tissues, with absorption-contrasted targets placed in the intramammary fold, detected targets as deep as 8.8 cm. Future work involves in vivo imaging studies on breast cancer subjects and comparison with the gold standard X-ray mammography approach. PMID:26229503

  1. Progress in breast cancer: overview.

    PubMed

    Arteaga, Carlos L

    2013-12-01

    This edition of CCR Focus titled Research in Breast Cancer: Frontiers in Genomics, Biology, and Clinical Investigation reviews six topics that cover areas of translational research of high impact in breast cancer. These topics represent areas of breast cancer research where significant progress has occurred but also where very important challenges remain. The papers in this CCR Focus section are contributed by experts in the respective areas of investigation. Herein, key aspects of these contributions and the research directions they propose are reviewed.

  2. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Dr. Robert Richmond extracts breast cell tissue from one of two liquid nitrogen dewars. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  3. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Breast tissue specimens in traditional sample dishes. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  4. Breast cancer axillary lymph node metastasis detection by a high-resolution dedicated breast camera: a comparative study with SPECT and pinhole SPECT.

    PubMed

    Spanu, Angela; Chessa, Francesca; Sanna, Daniela; Cottu, Pierina; Manca, Alessandra; Nuvoli, Susanna; Madeddu, Giuseppe

    2007-12-01

    We evaluated the usefulness of (99m)Tc-tetrofosmin planar scintigraphy acquired with a high-resolution (HR) dedicated breast camera in comparison with conventional single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and pinhole-SPECT (P-SPECT) in breast cancer (BC) axillary lymph node metastasis detection in a consecutive series of 76 BC patients, 28 of whom had axillary lymph node metastases, including 9 positive at clinical examination. HR planar scintigraphy was true positive in only 7 patients with >3 palpable metastases (sensitivity: 25%), while SPECT was true positive in 23 of 28 cases (sensitivity: 82.1%) and P-SPECT in 25 of 28 (sensitivity: 89.3%). SPECT was false negative in 5 patients with nonpalpable detection, only succeeding in identifying palpable and >3 metastatic nodes. SPECT should be preferred, significantly improving the sensitivity of planar scintigraphy, especially when using a pinhole collimator.

  5. Breast cancer susceptibility genes.

    PubMed

    Lubinski, Jan; Korzen, Marcin; Gorski, Bohdan; Cybulski, Cezary; Debniak, Tadeusz; Jakubowska, Anna; Medrek, Krzysztof; Matyjasik, Joanna; Huzarski, Tomasz; Byrski, Tomasz; Gronwald, Jacek; Masojc, Bartlomiej; Lener, Marcin; Szymanska, Anna; Szymanska-Pasternak, Jolanta; Fernandez, Pablo Serrano; Wokolorczyk, Dominika; Piegat, Andrzej; Ucinski, Michal; Domagala, Pawel; Kladny, Jozef; Gorecka, Barbara; Scott, Rodney; Narod, Steven

    2007-09-01

    In 1999 it has been recognized that 3 BRCA1 abnormalities - 5382insC, C61G and 4153delA - constitute almost 90% of all germline mutations of this gene in Poland. Due to the above findings we started performing the cheap and quick large scale testing for BRCA1 mutations and, these days, we have almost 4,000 carriers diagnosed and under direct or indirect supervision what is probably the largest number in the world. Additionally, the above results pushed us to hypothesize that genetic homogeneity will be seen in Poland in studies of other genes. Actually, the next studies allowed us to identify genes / changes associated with moderate / low breast cancer risk and showed, similarly to BRCA1, high level of genetic homogeneity. This series included BRCA2, C5972T, CHEK2 del5395; 1100delC, I157T or IVS2 + 1G > A, CDKN2A (p16) A148T, XPD Asp312Asn and Lys751Gln, CYP1B1 R48G, A119S and L43V. The results of the above studies led us in 2004 already to hypothesize that >90% of all cancers have genetic (constitutional) background. Two years later we were able to show a panel of markers covering 92% of consecutive breast cancers in Poland, and we formulated the hypothesis that all cancers have a genetic background. These days we are demonstrating for the first time that genetic components to malignancy play a role in all cancers. We are presenting it on examples of late-onset breast cancers from Poland, but it seems to be justified to expect that similar results can be achieved from other malignancies. PMID:17935274

  6. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification view of human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. The arrow points to bead surface indicating breast cancer cells (as noted by the staining of tumor cell intermediate filaments). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  7. Electrical detection of specific versus non-specific binding events in breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Benjamin C.; Clark, Michael; Burkhead, Thomas; Sethu, Palaniappan; Rai, Shesh; Kloecker, Goetz; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2012-10-01

    Detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from patient blood samples offers a desirable alternative to invasive tissue biopsies for screening of malignant carcinomas. A rigorous CTC detection method must identify CTCs from millions of other formed elements in blood and distinguish them from healthy tissue cells also present in the blood. CTCs are known to overexpress surface receptors, many of which aid them in invading other tissue, and these provide an avenue for their detection. We have developed carbon nanotube (CNT) thin film devices to specifically detect these receptors in intact cells. The CNT sidewalls are functionalized with antibodies specific to Epithelial Cell Adhesion Molecule (EpCAM), a marker overexpressed by breast and other carcinomas. Specific binding of EpCAM to anti-EpCAM antibodies causes a change in the local charge environment of the CNT surface which produces a characteristic electrical signal. Two cell lines were tested in the device: MCF7, a mammary adenocarcinoma line which overexpresses EpCAM, and MCF10A, a non-tumorigenic mammary epithelial line which does not. Introduction of MCF7s caused significant changes in the electrical conductance of the devices due to specific binding and associated charge environment change near the CNT sidewalls. Introduction of MCF10A displays a different profile due to purely nonspecific interactions. The profile of specific vs. nonspecific interaction signatures using carbon based devices will guide development of this diagnostic tool towards clinical sample volumes with wide variety of markers.

  8. Analysis of factors influencing the degree of detectability on diffusion-weighted MRI and diffusion background signals in patients with invasive breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Soo Yeon; Ko, Eun Sook; Han, Boo-Kyung; Lim, Yaeji; Gu, Seonhye; Ko, Eun Young

    2016-07-01

    To determine the factors influencing the degree of detectability of lesions and diffusion background signals on magnetic resonance diffusion-weighted imaging (DWI) in invasive breast cancer.Institutional review board approval was obtained and patient consent was waived. Patients with newly diagnosed invasive ductal carcinoma, who underwent preoperative breast magnetic resonance imaging with DWI were included in this study (n = 167). Lesion detectability on DWI and contrast-enhanced subtracted T1-weighted images, the degree of background parenchymal enhancement (BPE), and diffusion background signal were qualitatively rated. Detectability of lesions on DWI was compared with clinicopathological findings including menopausal status, mammographic density, and molecular subtype of breast cancer. Multivariate linear regression analysis was performed to determine variables independently associated with detectability of lesions on DWI and diffusion background signals.Univariate analysis showed that the detectability of lesions on DWI was significantly associated with lesion size (P = 0.001), diffuse background signal (P < 0.0001), and higher detectability scores for contrast-enhanced T1-weighted subtraction images (P = 0.000). The degree of diffusion background signal was significantly affected by age (P < 0.0001), BPE (P < 0.0001), mammographic density (P = 0.002), and menopausal status (P < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, the diffusion background signal (P < 0.0001) and histologic grade (P < 0.0001) were correlated with the detectability on DWI of invasive breast cancer. Only BPE was correlated with the amount of diffusion background signal on DWI (P < 0.0001).For invasive breast cancers, detectability on DWI was significantly affected by the diffusion background signal. BPE, menopausal status, menstrual cycle, or mammographic density did not show statistically significant correlation with the diffusion detectability of lesions on DWI. PMID

  9. [Neoadjuvant therapy in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Ena, G

    2011-09-01

    Neoadjuvant treatment is the standard therapy for inflammatory and locally advanced breast cancer but is also applied in patients with primary operable breast cancer to facilitate breast-conserving surgery. Disease-free survival and overall survival are equivalent between patients treated with preoperative chemotherapy and patient receiving the same regimen postoperatively. Nevertheless, pathologic complete response can be a predictive indicator of long-term outcomes. Initially encompassing chemotherapy, it is actually extended to hormonotherapy for hormonoresponsive tumor and to targeted therapy such as trastuzumab for the HER2 positive tumor. The neoadjuvant approach of breast cancer will provide better understanding of breast cancer biology and promote translational research. In this paper, a review of the role of preoperative treatment in the management of breast cancer disease is discussed.

  10. Assessment of algorithms for mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology images.

    PubMed

    Veta, Mitko; van Diest, Paul J; Willems, Stefan M; Wang, Haibo; Madabhushi, Anant; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Gonzalez, Fabio; Larsen, Anders B L; Vestergaard, Jacob S; Dahl, Anders B; Cireşan, Dan C; Schmidhuber, Jürgen; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M; Tek, F Boray; Walter, Thomas; Wang, Ching-Wei; Kondo, Satoshi; Matuszewski, Bogdan J; Precioso, Frederic; Snell, Violet; Kittler, Josef; de Campos, Teofilo E; Khan, Adnan M; Rajpoot, Nasir M; Arkoumani, Evdokia; Lacle, Miangela M; Viergever, Max A; Pluim, Josien P W

    2015-02-01

    The proliferative activity of breast tumors, which is routinely estimated by counting of mitotic figures in hematoxylin and eosin stained histology sections, is considered to be one of the most important prognostic markers. However, mitosis counting is laborious, subjective and may suffer from low inter-observer agreement. With the wider acceptance of whole slide images in pathology labs, automatic image analysis has been proposed as a potential solution for these issues. In this paper, the results from the Assessment of Mitosis Detection Algorithms 2013 (AMIDA13) challenge are described. The challenge was based on a data set consisting of 12 training and 11 testing subjects, with more than one thousand annotated mitotic figures by multiple observers. Short descriptions and results from the evaluation of eleven methods are presented. The top performing method has an error rate that is comparable to the inter-observer agreement among pathologists.

  11. Assessment of algorithms for mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology images.

    PubMed

    Veta, Mitko; van Diest, Paul J; Willems, Stefan M; Wang, Haibo; Madabhushi, Anant; Cruz-Roa, Angel; Gonzalez, Fabio; Larsen, Anders B L; Vestergaard, Jacob S; Dahl, Anders B; Cireşan, Dan C; Schmidhuber, Jürgen; Giusti, Alessandro; Gambardella, Luca M; Tek, F Boray; Walter, Thomas; Wang, Ching-Wei; Kondo, Satoshi; Matuszewski, Bogdan J; Precioso, Frederic; Snell, Violet; Kittler, Josef; de Campos, Teofilo E; Khan, Adnan M; Rajpoot, Nasir M; Arkoumani, Evdokia; Lacle, Miangela M; Viergever, Max A; Pluim, Josien P W

    2015-02-01

    The proliferative activity of breast tumors, which is routinely estimated by counting of mitotic figures in hematoxylin and eosin stained histology sections, is considered to be one of the most important prognostic markers. However, mitosis counting is laborious, subjective and may suffer from low inter-observer agreement. With the wider acceptance of whole slide images in pathology labs, automatic image analysis has been proposed as a potential solution for these issues. In this paper, the results from the Assessment of Mitosis Detection Algorithms 2013 (AMIDA13) challenge are described. The challenge was based on a data set consisting of 12 training and 11 testing subjects, with more than one thousand annotated mitotic figures by multiple observers. Short descriptions and results from the evaluation of eleven methods are presented. The top performing method has an error rate that is comparable to the inter-observer agreement among pathologists. PMID:25547073

  12. The use of 99mTc-Al2O3 for detection of sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinilkin, I.; Chernov, V.; Medvedeva, A.; Zeltchan, R.; Slonimskaya, E.; Doroshenko, A.; Varlamova, N.; Skuridin, V.

    2016-08-01

    Purpose: to study the feasibility of using the new radiopharmaceutical based on the technetium-99m-labeled gamma-alumina for identification of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) in breast cancer patients. The study included two groups of breast cancer patients who underwent single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) and intraoperaive gamma probe identification of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs). To identify SLNs, the day before surgery Group I patients (n = 34) were injected with radioactive 99mTc-Al2O3, and Group II patients (n = 30) received 99mTc-labeled phytate colloid. A total of 37 SLNs were detected in Group I patients. The number of identified SLNs per patient ranged from 1 to 2 (the average number of identified SLNs was 1.08). Axillary lymph nodes were the most common site of SLN localization. 18 hours after 99mTc-Al2O3 injection, the percentage of its accumulation in the SLN was 7-11% (of the counts in the injection site) by SPECT and 17-31% by gamma probe detection. In Group II SLNs were detected in 27 patients. 18 hours after injection of the phytate colloid the percentage of its accumulation in the SLN was 1.5-2% out of the counts in the injection site by SPECT and 4-7% by gamma probe. The new radiopharmaceutical based on the 99mTc-Al2O3 demonstrates high accumulation in SLNs without redistribution through the entire lymphatic basin. The sensitivity and specificity of 99mTc-Al2O3 were 100% for both SPECT and intraoperative gamma probe identification.

  13. Detection of mitomycin C-DNA adducts in human breast cancer cells grown in culture, as xenografted tumors in nude mice, and in biopsies of human breast cancer patient tumors as determined by (32)P-postlabeling.

    PubMed

    Warren, A J; Mustra, D J; Hamilton, J W

    2001-04-01

    Mitomycin C (MMC) is a DNA cross-linking agent that has been used in cancer chemotherapy for >20 years. However, little is known either qualitatively or quantitatively about the relationship between formation and repair of specific MMC-DNA adducts and specific biological outcomes. The goal of this study was to examine formation and removal of specific MMC-DNA adducts in breast cancer cells using a (32)P-postlabeling assay in relation to cytotoxicity and other biological end points. MMC-DNA adducts were measured in cultured human metastatic MDA-MB-435 cells, in the same cells xenografted as a mammary tumor in nude mice, and in metastatic tumor biopsies obtained from human breast cancer patients undergoing MMC-based therapy. MMC adducts corresponding to the CpG interstrand cross-link, the MMC-G bifunctional monoadduct, and two isomers of the MMC-G monofunctional monoadduct were detected in most samples. Despite similarities in the overall patterns of adduct formation, there were substantial differences between the cultured cells and the in vivo tumors in their adduct distribution profile, kinetics of adduct formation and removal, and relationship of specific adduct levels to cytotoxicity, suggesting that the in vivo microenvironment (e.g., degree of oxygenation, pH, activity of oxidoreductases, and other factors) of breast cancer cells may significantly modulate these parameters. PMID:11309355

  14. Reproductive factors and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kelsey, J L; Gammon, M D; John, E M

    1993-01-01

    Early age at menarche, late age at menopause, and late age at first full-term pregnancy are linked to a modest increase in the risk of developing breast cancer. Some evidence suggests that the earlier the full-term pregnancy, the earlier the period of decreased susceptibility of breast tissue changes begins. Nulliparity is related to an increased risk for breast cancer diagnosed after 40 years old. Multiple full-term pregnancies decrease the risk of breast cancers diagnosed after 40 years regardless of the age at first birth. On the other hand, they may increase the risk for breast cancers diagnosed before 40 years old. Surgical removal of the ovaries protects against breast cancer. Breast feeding apparently protects against breast cancer in China, but a protective effect has not been established in the US. Other than shorter intervals between menstrual periods, which tend to increase the risk, research has not yet made clear the etiologic roles of menstrual cycle characteristics. Other unclear etiologic roles include increased intervals between births, spontaneous and induced abortion, infertility, multiple births at last pregnancy, and hypertension during pregnancy. Researchers tend to accept a mechanism to explain the epidemiologic characteristics of menstrual activity and the increased risk of breast cancer, but no mechanisms have emerged for the other likely risk factors. Greater exposure to estrogen and progesterone simultaneously are linked to early age at menarche, late age at menopause, and shorter menstrual cycle length. So far, data show that long-term combined estrogen/progestin hormone replacement therapy and long-term use of oral contraceptives increase the risk of breast cancer. Moderately increased risks linked to longterm estrogen replacement therapy and obesity in postmenopausal women indicate that estrogen alone influences breast cancer risk. Since much of the research on breast cancer risk factors are inconclusive, more research is needed

  15. Survivorship care in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sally L.; Murchison, Sonja; Singh-Carlson, Savitri; Alexander, Cheryl; Wai, Elaine S.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To compare the perceptions of breast cancer survivors and primary care physicians (PCPs) about PCPs’ ability to deliver survivorship care in breast cancer. Design Mailed survey. Setting British Columbia. Participants A total of 1065 breast cancer survivors who had completed treatment of nonmetastatic breast cancer within the previous year, and 587 PCPs who had patients with nonmetastatic breast cancer discharged to their care within the preceding 18 months. Main outcome measures Breast cancer survivors’ and PCPs’ confidence ratings of PCPs’ ability to deliver the following aspects of care: screening for recurrence; managing osteoporosis, lymphedema, endocrine therapy, menopausal symptoms, and anxiety about or fear of recurrence; and providing nutrition and exercise counseling, sex and body image counseling, and family counseling. Response options for each question included low, adequate, or good. Responses were summarized as frequencies and compared using χ2 tests. Results Response rates for breast cancer survivors and PCPs were 47% and 59%, respectively. Responses were statistically different in all categories (P < .05). Both groups were most confident in the ability of PCPs to screen for recurrence, but breast cancer survivors were 10 times as likely to indicate low confidence (10% of breast cancer survivors vs 1% of PCPs) in this aspect of care. More breast cancer survivors (23%) expressed low confidence in PCPs’ ability to provide counseling about fear of recurrence compared with PCPs (3%). Aspects of care in which both breast cancer survivors and PCPs were most likely to express low confidence included sex and body image counseling (35% of breast cancer survivors vs 26% of PCPs) and family counseling (33% of breast cancer survivors vs 24% of PCPs). Primary care physicians (24%) described low confidence in their ability to manage lymphedema. Conclusion Breast cancer survivors and PCPs are reasonably confident in a PCP-based model

  16. Evolution of breast cancer therapeutics: Breast tumour kinase's role in breast cancer and hope for breast tumour kinase targeted therapy.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Haroon A; Harvey, Amanda J

    2014-08-10

    There have been significant improvements in the detection and treatment of breast cancer in recent decades. However, there is still a need to develop more effective therapeutic techniques that are patient specific with reduced toxicity leading to further increases in patients' overall survival; the ongoing progress in understanding recurrence, resistant and spread also needs to be maintained. Better understanding of breast cancer pathology, molecular biology and progression as well as identification of some of the underlying factors involved in breast cancer tumourgenesis and metastasis has led to the identification of novel therapeutic targets. Over a number of years interest has risen in breast tumour kinase (Brk) also known as protein tyrosine kinase 6; the research field has grown and Brk has been described as a desirable therapeutic target in relation to tyrosine kinase inhibition as well as disruption of its kinase independent activity. This review will outline the current "state of play" with respect to targeted therapy for breast cancer, as well as discussing Brk's role in the processes underlying tumour development and metastasis and its potential as a therapeutic target in breast cancer.

  17. Breast cancer statistics and markers.

    PubMed

    Donepudi, Mallika Siva; Kondapalli, Kasturi; Amos, Seelam Jeevan; Venkanteshan, Pavithra

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the familiar diseases in women. Incidence and mortality due to cancer, particularly breast cancer has been increasing for last 50 years, even though there is a lacuna in the diagnosis of breast cancer at early stages. According to World Health Organization (WHO) 2012 reports, breast cancer is the leading cause of death in women, accounting 23% of all cancer deaths. In Asia, one in every three women faces the risk of breast cancer in their lifetime as per reports of WHO 2012. Here, the review is been focused on different breast cancer markers, that is, tissue markers (hormone receptors, human epidermal growth factor-2, urokinase plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor, p53 and cathepsin D), genetic markers (BRAC1 and 2 and gene expression microarray technique, etc.), and serum markers (CA 15.3, BR 27.29, MCA, CA 549, carcinoembryonic antigen, oncoproteins, and cytokeratins) used in present diagnosis, but none of the mentioned markers can diagnose breast cancer at an early stage. There is a disquieting need for the identification of best diagnosing marker, which can be able to diagnose even in early stage of breast carcinogenesis.

  18. Diet and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Adlercreutz, H; Mousavi, Y; Höckerstedt, K

    1992-01-01

    It is a general opinion that the Western diet plays a significant role in increasing the risk of breast cancer in the Western World. Recently some likely mechanisms involved in increasing the risk have been disclosed. It has been found that a Western-type diet elevates plasma levels of sex hormones and decreases the sex hormone binding globulin concentration, increasing the availability of these steroids for peripheral tissues. The same diet results in low formation by intestinal bacteria of mammalian lignans and isoflavonoid phyotestrogens from plant precursors. These diphenolic compounds seem to affect hormone metabolism and production and cancer cell growth by many different mechanisms making them strong candidates for a role as cancer protective substances. The sex hormone pattern found in connection with a Western-type diet combined with low lignan and isoflavonoid excretion was found particularly in postmenopausal breast cancer patients and omnivores living in high-risk areas, and to a lesser degree in areas with less risk. However, the pattern observed was not entirely due to diet.

  19. Drugs Approved for Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for breast cancer. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters.

  20. Social Network Effects of Nonlifesaving Early-Stage Breast Cancer Detection on Mammography Rates

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Andrew M.

    2014-01-01

    Objectives. We estimated the effect of anecdotes of early-stage, screen-detected cancer for which screening was not lifesaving on the demand for mammography. Methods. We constructed an agent-based model of mammography decisions, in which 10 000 agents that represent women aged 40 to 100 years were linked together on a social network, which was parameterized with a survey of 716 women conducted through the RAND American Life Panel. Our model represents a population in equilibrium, with demographics reflecting the current US population based on the most recent available census data. Results. The aggregate effect of women learning about 1 category of cancers—those that would be detected but would not be lethal in the absence of screening—was a 13.8 percentage point increase in annual screening rates. Conclusions. Anecdotes of detection of early-stage cancers relayed through social networks may substantially increase demand for a screening test even when the detection through screening was nonlifesaving. PMID:25322304

  1. Early breast cancer detection method based on a simulation study of single-channel passive microwave radiometry imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostopoulos, Spiros A.; Savva, Andonis D.; Asvestas, Pantelis A.; Nikolopoulos, Christos D.; Capsalis, Christos N.; Cavouras, Dionisis A.

    2015-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to provide a methodology for detecting temperature alterations in human breast, based on single channel microwave radiometer imaging. Radiometer measurements were simulated by modelling the human breast, the temperature distribution, and the antenna characteristics. Moreover, a simulated lesion of variable size and position in the breast was employed to provide for slight temperature changes in the breast. To detect the presence of a lesion, the temperature distribution in the breast was reconstructed. This was accomplished by assuming that temperature distribution is the mixture of distributions with unknown parameters, which were determined by means of the least squares and the singular value decomposition methods. The proposed method was validated in a variety of scenarios by altering the lesion size and location and radiometer position. The method proved capable in identifying temperature alterations caused by lesions, at different locations in the breast.

  2. Detection of HER2-positive metastases in patients with HER2-negative primary breast cancer using 89Zr-trastuzumab PET/CT

    PubMed Central

    Ulaner, Gary A.; Hyman, David M.; Ross, Dara S.; Corben, Adriana; Chandarlapaty, Sarat; Goldfarb, Shari; McArthur, Heather; Erinjeri, Joseph P; Solomon, Stephen B; Kolb, Hartmuth; Lyashchenko, Serge K; Lewis, Jason S.; Carrasquillo, Jorge A.

    2016-01-01

    To determine if imaging with a human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2)-targeting PET tracer can detect HER2-positive metastases in patients with HER2-negative primary breast cancer. Materials and Methods Patients with HER2-negative primary breast cancer and evidence of distant metastases were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board (IRB)-approved prospective clinical trial. Archived pathology from the patient’s primary breast cancer was retested to confirm HER2-negative disease. Patients with confirmed HER2-negative primary breast cancer underwent 89Zr-trastuzumab PET/CT to screen for 89Zr-trastuzumab metastases. Metastases avid for 89Zr-trastuzumab by PET/CT were biopsied and pathologically examined to define HER2 status. Patients with pathologically proven HER2-positive metastases subsequently received off-protocol HER2 targeted therapy to evaluate treatment response. Results Nine patients were enrolled, all of whom had pathologic retesting that confirmed HER2-negative primary breast cancer. Five demonstrated suspicious foci on 89Zr-trastuzumab PET/CT. Of these five with suspicious foci, two had biopsy proven HER2-positive metastases and went on to benefit from HER2 targeted therapy. Three of the five patients with suspicious foci had biopsy without evidence of HER2-positive disease, and were considered false positive false positive 89Zr-trastuzumab PET foci. Conclusion In this proof-of-concept study, we demonstrate that 89Zr-trastuzmab PET/CT detects unsuspected HER2-positive metastases in patients with HER2-negtive primary breast cancer. While these are only initial results in a small sample, it is a proof of concept that HER2-targeted imaging can identify additional candidates for HER2-targeted therapy. More specific HER2-targeting agents will be needed for clinical use. PMID:27151988

  3. Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Velasco-Velázquez, Marco A.; Homsi, Nora; De La Fuente, Marisol; Pestell, Richard G.

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer stem cells (BCSCs) constitute a subpopulation of tumor cells that express stem cell-associated markers and have a high capacity for tumor generation in vivo. Identification of BCSCs from tumor samples or breast cancer cell lines has been based mainly on CD44+/CD24−/low or ALDH+ phenotypes. BCSCs isolation has allowed the analysis of the molecular mechanisms involved in their origin, self-renewal, differentiation into tumor cells, resistance to radiation therapy and chemotherapy, and invasiveness and metastatic ability. Molecular genetic analysis using knockout animals and inducible transgenics have identified NF-κB, c-Jun, p21CIP1, and Forkhead-like-protein Dach1 in BCSC expansion and fate. Clinical analyses of BCSCs in breast tumors have found a correlation between the proportion of BCSCs and poor prognosis. Therefore, new therapies that specifically target BCSCs are an urgent need. We summarize recent evidence that partially explain the biological characteristics of BCSCs. PMID:22249027

  4. Advanced Breast Cancer as Indicator of Quality Mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaona, Enrique

    2003-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed cancer and is the second leading cause of cancer death among women in the Mexican Republic. Mammography is the more important screening tool for detecting early breast cancer. Screening mammography involves taking x-rays from two views from each breast, typically from above (cranial-caudal view, CC) and from an oblique or angled view (mediolateral-oblique, MLO). The purpose of this study was to carry out an exploratory survey of the issue of patients with advanced breast cancer who have had a screening mammography. A general result of the survey is that 22.5% of all patients (102) with advanced breast cancer that participated in the study had previous screening mammography. But we should consider that 10% of breast cancers are not detected by mammography. Only 70% of the family doctors prescribed a diagnostic mammography when the first symptoms were diagnosed.

  5. Circadian clocks and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Blakeman, Victoria; Williams, Jack L; Meng, Qing-Jun; Streuli, Charles H

    2016-01-01

    Circadian clocks respond to environmental time cues to coordinate 24-hour oscillations in almost every tissue of the body. In the breast, circadian clocks regulate the rhythmic expression of numerous genes. Disrupted expression of circadian genes can alter breast biology and may promote cancer. Here we overview circadian mechanisms, and the connection between the molecular clock and breast biology. We describe how disruption of circadian genes contributes to cancer via multiple mechanisms, and link this to increased tumour risk in women who work irregular shift patterns. Understanding the influence of circadian rhythms on breast cancer could lead to more efficacious therapies, reformed public health policy and improved patient outcome. PMID:27590298

  6. Vascular and Cognitive Assessments in Patients With Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy After Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-07-27

    Cognitive/Functional Effects; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  7. Optofluidic ring resonator sensor for sensitive label-free detection of breast cancer antigen CA15-3 in human serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Hongying; Dale, Paul S.; Fan, Xudong

    2009-05-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequently diagnosed malignancy in women worldwide. Because of its great impact on society, a lot of research funding has been used to develop novel detection tools for aiding breast cancer diagnosis and prognosis. In this work, we demonstrated a simple, fast, and sensitive detection of circulating breast cancer biomarker CA15-3 with opto-fluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensors. The OFRR sensor employs a thin-walled capillary with wall thickness less than 4 μm. The circular cross section of the capillary forms the optical ring resonator, in which the light circulates in the form of whispering gallery modes (WGMs). The capillary wall is thin enough that the evanescent field of the WGM extends into the capillary core and responds to refractive index changes in the capillary core or close to its interior surface. The WGM spectral position will change when the biomolecules bind to the surface, yielding quantitative and kinetic information about the biomolecule interaction. Here, the direct immunoassay method was employed for the detection of CA15-3 antigen without any signal amplification steps. The sensor performance in both PBS buffer and human serum were investigated, respectively. The experimental detection limit was 5 units/mL in PBS buffer and 30 units/mL for CA15-3 spiked in serum, both of which satisfied clinical diagnosis requirements. The potential use of the OFRR as the point-of-care device for breast cancer detection was tested by measuring the CA15-3 level in blood samples collected from stage IV breast cancer patients and the results were compared with standard clinical test.

  8. Preoperative Breast Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Contralateral Breast Cancer Occurrence Among Older Women With Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Long, Jessica B.; Killelea, Brigid K.; Evans, Suzanne B.; Roberts, Kenneth B.; Silber, Andrea; Gross, Cary P.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Preoperative magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) detects occult contralateral breast cancers (CBCs) in women with breast cancer, but the impact of detection on long-term CBC events is unclear. We examined whether MRI use decreases the occurrence of CBCs and the detection of stages II to IV disease among women who develop a CBC. Patients and Methods Analyzing the SEER-Medicare database, we assessed overall, synchronous (< 6 months after primary cancer diagnosis), and subsequent (ie, metachronous) stage-specific CBC occurrences in women who were diagnosed with stages I and II breast cancer during 2004-2009 and who were observed through 2011. Results Among 38,971 women with breast cancer, 6,377 (16.4%) received preoperative MRI. After propensity score matching, and compared with women who did not undergo MRI, preoperative MRI use was significantly associated with a higher synchronous CBC detection rate (126.4 v 42.9 per 1,000 person-years, respectively; hazard ratio, 2.85; P < .001) but a lower subsequent CBC detection rate (3.3 v 4.5 per 1,000 person-years, respectively; hazard ratio, 0.68; P = .002). However, the 5-year cumulative incidence of CBC remained significantly higher among women undergoing MRI compared with those not undergoing MRI (7.2% v 4.0%, respectively; P < .001). The analyses of projected CBC events for 10,000 patients who receive MRI indicated that, after a 5-year follow-up, MRI use would detect an additional 192 in situ CBCs (95% CI, 125 to 279) and 120 stage I CBCs (95% CI, 62 to 193) but would not have a significant impact on stages II to IV CBC occurrences (∼ 6; 95% CI, −21 to 47). Conclusion An increased synchronous CBC detection rate, attributable to MRI, was not offset by a decrease of subsequent CBC occurrence among older women with early-stage breast cancer, suggesting that preoperative MRI in women with breast cancer may lead to overdiagnosis. PMID:26628465

  9. Breast and Colon Cancer Family Registries

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer Family Registry and the Colon Cancer Family Registry were established by the National Cancer Institute as a resource for investigators to use in conducting studies on the genetics and molecular epidemiology of breast and colon cancer.

  10. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-06-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. Materials and Methods: a total of 220 patients were included into the study. Of them, there were 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and '00 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). Results: no abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In breast cancer patients, increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI in 93.4% patients. Increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients and 99mTc-MIBI in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI were 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. Conclusion: the data obtained show that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  11. Radiopharmaceuticals for SPECT cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernov, V. I.; Medvedeva, A. A.; Zelchan, R. V.; Sinilkin, I. G.; Stasyuk, E. S.; Larionova, L. A.; Slonimskaya, E. M.; Choynzonov, E. L.

    2016-08-01

    The purpose of the study was to assess the efficacy of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI in the detection of breast, laryngeal and hypopharyngeal cancers. A total of 220 patients were included into the study: 120 patients with breast lesions (100 patients with breast cancer and 20 patients with benign breast tumors) and 100 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal diseases (80 patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer and 20 patients with benign laryngeal/hypopharyngeal lesions). No abnormal 199Tl uptake was seen in all patients with benign breast and laryngeal lesions, indicating a 100% specificity of 199Tl SPECT. In the breast cancer patients, the increased 199Tl uptake in the breast was visualized in 94.8% patients, 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.4% patients. The increased 199Tl uptake in axillary lymph nodes was detected in 60% patients, and 99mTc-MIBI—in 93.1% patients. In patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer, the sensitivity of SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI was 95%. The 199Tl SPECT sensitivity in identification of regional lymph node metastases in the patients with laryngeal/hypopharyngeal cancer was 75% and the 99mTc-MIBI SPECT sensitivity was 17%. The data obtained showed that SPECT with 199Tl and 99mTc-MIBI can be used as one of the additional imaging methods in detection of tumors.

  12. Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation in Treating Older Patients With Locally Advanced or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-14

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  13. Acute Radiation Effects on Cardiac Function Detected by Strain Rate Imaging in Breast Cancer Patients

    SciTech Connect

    Erven, Katrien; Jurcut, Ruxandra; Weltens, Caroline; Giusca, Sorin; Ector, Joris; Wildiers, Hans; Van den Bogaert, Walter; Voigt, Jens-Uwe

    2011-04-01

    Purpose: To investigate the occurrence of early radiation-induced changes in regional cardiac function using strain rate imaging (SRI) by tissue Doppler echocardiography. Methods and Materials: We included 20 left-sided and 10 right-sided breast cancer patients receiving radiotherapy (RT) to the breast or chest wall. Standard echocardiography and SRI were performed before RT (baseline), immediately after RT (post-RT), and at 2 months follow-up (FUP) after RT. Regional strain (S) and strain rate (SR) values were obtained from all 18 left ventricular (LV) segments. Data were compared to the regional radiation dose. Results: A reduction in S was observed post-RT and at FUP in left-sided patients (S{sub post-RT}: -17.6 {+-} 1.5%, and S{sub FUP}: -17.4 {+-} 2.3%, vs. S{sub baseline}: -19.5 {+-} 2.1%, p < 0.001) but not in right-sided patients. Within the left-sided patient group, S and SR were significantly reduced after RT in apical LV segments (S{sub post-RT}: -15.3 {+-} 2.5%, and S{sub FUP}: -14.3 {+-} 3.7%, vs. S{sub baseline}: -19.3 {+-} 3.0%, p < 0.01; and SR{sub post-RT}: -1.06 {+-} 0.15 s {sup -1}, and SR{sub FUP}: -1.16 {+-} 0.28 s {sup -1}, vs. SR{sub baseline}: -1.29 {+-} 0.27s {sup -1}, p = 0.01), but not in mid- or basal segments. Furthermore, we observed that segments exposed to more than 3 Gy showed a significant decrease in S after RT (S{sub post-RT}: -16.1 {+-} 1.6%, and S{sub FUP}: -15.8 {+-} 3.4%, vs. S{sub baseline}: -18.9 {+-} 2.6%, p < 0.001). This could not be observed in segments receiving less than 3 Gy. Conclusions: SRI shows a dose-related regional decrease in myocardial function after RT. It might be a useful tool in the evaluation of modern RT techniques, with respect to cardiac toxicity.

  14. Do fatty breasts increase or decrease breast cancer risk?

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Few studies have investigated the association of non-dense area or fatty breasts in conjunction with breast density and breast cancer risk. Two articles in a recent issue of Breast Cancer Research investigate the role of absolute non-dense breast area measured on mammograms and find conflicting results: one article finds that non-dense breast area has a modest positive association with breast cancer risk, whereas the other finds that non-dense breast area has a strong protective effect to reduce breast cancer risk. Understanding the interplay of body mass index, menopause status, and measurement of non-dense breast area would help to clarify the contribution of non-dense breast area to breast cancer risk. PMID:22277587

  15. Unemployment and the likelihood of detecting early-stage breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Catalano, R A; Satariano, W A

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: The objective of this study was to test the hypothesis that unexpectedly high unemployment in a community is associated with reduced odds that registered breast tumors are local. METHODS: The hypothesis was tested with data from San Francisco for the 132 months beginning with January 1983. RESULTS: Registered breast tumors were less likely to be local during periods of unexpectedly high unemployment (8% less likely among non-Hispanic White women and 24% less likely among African-American women). CONCLUSIONS: Job loss may restrict access to health services. Fear of job loss may also distract women from breast self-examination and the identification of suspicious breast signs. PMID:9550999

  16. Economies of scale in federally-funded state-organized public health programs: results from the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Programs.

    PubMed

    Trogdon, Justin G; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Subramanian, Sujha; Crouse, Wesley

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the existence of economies of scale in the provision of breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services by state National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) grantees. A translog cost function is estimated as a system with input factor share equations. The estimated cost function is then used to determine output levels for which average costs are decreasing (i.e., economies of scale exist). Data were collected from all state NBCCEDP programs and District of Columbia for program years 2006-2007, 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 (N = 147). Costs included all programmatic and in-kind contributions from federal and non-federal sources, allocated to breast and cervical cancer screening activities. Output was measured by women served, women screened and cancers detected, separately by breast and cervical services for each measure. Inputs included labor, rent and utilities, clinical services, and quasi-fixed factors (e.g., percent of women eligible for screening by the NBCCEDP). 144 out of 147 program-years demonstrated significant economies of scale for women served and women screened; 136 out of 145 program-years displayed significant economies of scale for cancers detected. The cost data were self-reported by the NBCCEDP State programs. Quasi-fixed inputs were allowed to affect costs but not economies of scale or the share equations. The main analysis accounted for clustering of observations within State programs, but it did not make full use of the panel data. The average cost of providing breast and cervical cancer screening services decreases as the number of women screened and served increases.

  17. Economies of scale in federally-funded state-organized public health programs: results from the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Programs.

    PubMed

    Trogdon, Justin G; Ekwueme, Donatus U; Subramanian, Sujha; Crouse, Wesley

    2014-12-01

    This study investigates the existence of economies of scale in the provision of breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services by state National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) grantees. A translog cost function is estimated as a system with input factor share equations. The estimated cost function is then used to determine output levels for which average costs are decreasing (i.e., economies of scale exist). Data were collected from all state NBCCEDP programs and District of Columbia for program years 2006-2007, 2008-2009 and 2009-2010 (N = 147). Costs included all programmatic and in-kind contributions from federal and non-federal sources, allocated to breast and cervical cancer screening activities. Output was measured by women served, women screened and cancers detected, separately by breast and cervical services for each measure. Inputs included labor, rent and utilities, clinical services, and quasi-fixed factors (e.g., percent of women eligible for screening by the NBCCEDP). 144 out of 147 program-years demonstrated significant economies of scale for women served and women screened; 136 out of 145 program-years displayed significant economies of scale for cancers detected. The cost data were self-reported by the NBCCEDP State programs. Quasi-fixed inputs were allowed to affect costs but not economies of scale or the share equations. The main analysis accounted for clustering of observations within State programs, but it did not make full use of the panel data. The average cost of providing breast and cervical cancer screening services decreases as the number of women screened and served increases. PMID:24326873

  18. Fulvestrant and/or Anastrozole in Treating Postmenopausal Patients With Stage II-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-15

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Exogenous progestins and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Stanford, J L; Thomas, D B

    1993-01-01

    More research on the effect of exogenous progestins on breast cancer risk is clearly needed. Biologic evidence that progestins may act synergistically with estrogen to enhance proliferation of breast epithelial cells emphasizes the importance of further exploration of this issue, particularly given the increasing prevalence of exposure to contraceptive and noncontraceptive progestins. No specific type or dose of progestin in monophasic combination oral contraceptives has been linked to breast cancer. Based on the few epidemiologic studies of progestin-only oral contraceptives, there also is no evidence that they increase risk of breast cancer. Two studies found that longer-term use of progestin-only pills was associated with a decreased risk of breast cancer. However, given the low prevalence of use of minipills, it is unlikely that this exposure substantially affects the incidence of breast cancer in the population as a whole. Use of the injectable contraceptive DMPA has been positively associated with risk of breast cancer in some subgroups of women, although no significant overall adverse effect has been observed in the two largest studies conducted to date. There is suggestive evidence that use at an early age or prior to a first term birth and recent use may increase risk of breast cancer. It remains unclear, however, whether or not surveillance bias may explain the positive association observed in recent users. Additional research on DMPA and breast cancer incidence is needed, since studies published to date have lacked sufficient power to evaluate risk in relation to long-term use. Future studies of breast cancer in relation to use of other long-acting progestational agents such as Norplant will also be important. There is concern about the relation between breast cancer incidence and use of combined estrogen-progestin replacement therapy, especially extended periods of use. At the present time, only one study (45) has estimated risk according to duration of

  20. Minimal elastographic modeling of breast cancer for model based tumor detection in a digital image elasto tomography (DIET) system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lotz, Thomas F.; Muller, Natalie; Hann, Christopher E.; Chase, J. Geoffrey

    2011-03-01

    Digital Image Elasto Tomography (DIET) is a non-invasive breast cancer screening technology that images the surface motion of a breast under harmonic mechanical actuation. A new approach capturing the dynamics and characteristics of tumor behavior is presented. A simple mechanical model of the breast is used to identify a transfer function relating the input harmonic actuation to the output surface displacements using imaging data of a silicone phantom. Areas of higher stiffness cause significant changes of damping and resonant frequencies as seen in the resulting Bode plots. A case study on a healthy and tumor silicone breast phantom shows the potential for this model-based method to clearly distinguish cancerous and healthy tissue as well as correctly predicting the tumor position.

  1. Breast cancer metastatic to the kidney with renal vein involvement.

    PubMed

    Nasu, Hatsuko; Miura, Katsutoshi; Baba, Megumi; Nagata, Masao; Yoshida, Masayuki; Ogura, Hiroyuki; Takehara, Yasuo; Sakahara, Harumi

    2015-02-01

    The common sites of breast cancer metastases include bones, lung, brain, and liver. Renal metastasis from the breast is rare. We report a case of breast cancer metastatic to the kidney with extension into the renal vein. A 40-year-old woman had undergone left mastectomy for breast cancer at the age of 38. A gastric tumor, which was later proved to be metastasis from breast cancer, was detected by endoscopy. Computed tomography performed for further examination of the gastric tumor revealed a large left renal tumor with extension into the left renal vein. It mimicked a primary renal tumor. Percutaneous biopsy of the renal tumor confirmed metastasis from breast cancer. Surgical intervention of the stomach and the kidney was avoided, and she was treated with systemic chemotherapy. Breast cancer metastatic to the kidney may present a solitary renal mass with extension into the renal vein, which mimics a primary renal tumor.

  2. Curing Metastatic Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sledge, George W

    2016-01-01

    Metastatic breast cancer is generally considered incurable, and this colors doctor-patient interactions for patients with metastatic disease. Although true for most patients, there appear to be important exceptions, instances where long-term disease-free survival occurs. Although these instances are few in number, they suggest the possibility of cure. How will we move toward cure for a much larger population of patients with metastatic disease? This article outlines a potential research agenda that might move us toward that distant goal. PMID:26759458

  3. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way.

  4. Digital dermatoglyphics and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Seltzer, M H; Plato, C C; Engler, P E; Fletcher, H S

    1982-01-01

    Fingerprints of one hundred nineteen Caucasian females were obtained. Of these females, thirty-four had histologically proven breast cancer, fifty-three were at high risk for development of breast cancer, and thirty-two comprised a control group. The digital pattern frequencies and the pattern intensity index were significantly different between the three groups. The presence of six or more whorls appears significant as noted by 32.4% of breast cancer patients possessing this number of whorls as compared to 3.1% controls. Also of note is that 95% of subjects with six or more whorls either had cancer or were at high risk.

  5. Optimal breast cancer pathology manifesto.

    PubMed

    Tot, T; Viale, G; Rutgers, E; Bergsten-Nordström, E; Costa, A

    2015-11-01

    This manifesto was prepared by a European Breast Cancer (EBC) Council working group and launched at the European Breast Cancer Conference in Glasgow on 20 March 2014. It sets out optimal technical and organisational requirements for a breast cancer pathology service, in the light of concerns about variability and lack of patient-centred focus. It is not a guideline about how pathology services should be performed. It is a call for all in the cancer community--pathologists, oncologists, patient advocates, health administrators and policymakers--to check that services are available that serve the needs of patients in a high quality, timely way. PMID:26283037

  6. Scatter free imaging for the improvement of breast cancer detection in mammography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Green, F. H.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Seller, P.; Scuffham, J.; Pani, S.

    2016-10-01

    In mammography, the reduction of scattered x-rays is vital due to the low contrast or small dimension of the details that are searched for. The typical method of doing so in current conventional mammography is the anti-scatter grid. The disadvantage of this method is the absorption of a proportion of the primary beam and therefore an increase in dose is required to compensate for the loss of counts. An alternative method is proposed, using quasi-monochromatic beams and a pixellated spectroscopic detector. As Compton-scattered x-rays lose energy in the scattering process, they are detected at a lower energy in the spectrum. Therefore the spectrum can be windowed around the monochromatic energy peak, removing the scattered x-rays from the image. The work presented here shows contrast improvement of up to 50% and contrast to noise ratio improvements of around 20% for scatter free imaging in comparison to full spectrum imaging. Contrast improvements of around 45% were found when comparing scatter free images to conventional polychromatic imaging for both the low contrast test object and the Rachel anthropomorphic breast phantom.

  7. Detection of high frequency of mutations in a breast and/or ovarian cancer cohort: implications of embracing a multi-gene panel in molecular diagnosis in India.

    PubMed

    Mannan, Ashraf U; Singh, Jaya; Lakshmikeshava, Ravikiran; Thota, Nishita; Singh, Suhasini; Sowmya, T S; Mishra, Avshesh; Sinha, Aditi; Deshwal, Shivani; Soni, Megha R; Chandrasekar, Anbukayalvizhi; Ramesh, Bhargavi; Ramamurthy, Bharat; Padhi, Shila; Manek, Payal; Ramalingam, Ravi; Kapoor, Suman; Ghosh, Mithua; Sankaran, Satish; Ghosh, Arunabha; Veeramachaneni, Vamsi; Ramamoorthy, Preveen; Hariharan, Ramesh; Subramanian, Kalyanasundaram

    2016-06-01

    Breast and/or ovarian cancer (BOC) are among the most frequently diagnosed forms of hereditary cancers and leading cause of death in India. This emphasizes on the need for a cost-effective method for early detection of these cancers. We sequenced 141 unrelated patients and families with BOC using the TruSight Cancer panel, which includes 13 genes strongly associated with risk of inherited BOC. Multi-gene sequencing was done on the Illumina MiSeq platform. Genetic variations were identified using the Strand NGS software and interpreted using the StrandOmics platform. We were able to detect pathogenic mutations in 51 (36.2%) cases, out of which 19 were novel mutations. When we considered familial breast cancer cases only, the detection rate increased to 52%. When cases were stratified based on age of diagnosis into three categories, ⩽40 years, 40-50 years and >50 years, the detection rates were higher in the first two categories (44.4% and 53.4%, respectively) as compared with the third category, in which it was 26.9%. Our study suggests that next-generation sequencing-based multi-gene panels increase the sensitivity of mutation detection and help in identifying patients with a high risk of developing cancer as compared with sequential tests of individual genes. PMID:26911350

  8. American Cancer Society guidelines for breast cancer screening: update 2003.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A; Saslow, Debbie; Sawyer, Kimberly Andrews; Burke, Wylie; Costanza, Mary E; Evans, W Phil; Foster, Roger S; Hendrick, Edward; Eyre, Harmon J; Sener, Steven

    2003-01-01

    In 2003, the American Cancer Society updated its guidelines for early detection of breast cancer based on recommendations from a formal review of evidence and a recent workshop. The new screening recommendations address screening mammography, physical examination, screening older women and women with comorbid conditions, screening women at high risk, and new screening technologies.

  9. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer. PMID:16045991

  10. Aluminium, antiperspirants and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Darbre, P D

    2005-09-01

    Aluminium salts are used as the active antiperspirant agent in underarm cosmetics, but the effects of widespread, long term and increasing use remain unknown, especially in relation to the breast, which is a local area of application. Clinical studies showing a disproportionately high incidence of breast cancer in the upper outer quadrant of the breast together with reports of genomic instability in outer quadrants of the breast provide supporting evidence for a role for locally applied cosmetic chemicals in the development of breast cancer. Aluminium is known to have a genotoxic profile, capable of causing both DNA alterations and epigenetic effects, and this would be consistent with a potential role in breast cancer if such effects occurred in breast cells. Oestrogen is a well established influence in breast cancer and its action, dependent on intracellular receptors which function as ligand-activated zinc finger transcription factors, suggests one possible point of interference from aluminium. Results reported here demonstrate that aluminium in the form of aluminium chloride or aluminium chlorhydrate can interfere with the function of oestrogen receptors of MCF7 human breast cancer cells both in terms of ligand binding and in terms of oestrogen-regulated reporter gene expression. This adds aluminium to the increasing list of metals capable of interfering with oestrogen action and termed metalloestrogens. Further studies are now needed to identify the molecular basis of this action, the longer term effects of aluminium exposure and whether aluminium can cause aberrations to other signalling pathways in breast cells. Given the wide exposure of the human population to antiperspirants, it will be important to establish dermal absorption in the local area of the breast and whether long term low level absorption could play a role in the increasing incidence of breast cancer.

  11. Breast cancer in Mexico: a pressing priority.

    PubMed

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Nigenda, Gustavo; Lozano, Rafael; Arreola-Ornelas, Hector; Langer, Ana; Frenk, Julio

    2008-11-01

    Breast cancer is a serious threat to the health of women globally, and an unrecognised priority in middle-income countries. This paper presents data from Mexico. It shows that breast cancer accounts for more deaths than cervical cancer since 2006. It is the second cause of death for women aged 30-54 and affects all socio-economic groups. Data on detection, although under-reported, show 6,000 new cases in 1990, and a projected increase to over 16,500 per year by 2020. Further, the majority of cases are self-detected and only 10% of all cases are detected in stage one. Mexico's social security systems cover approximately 40-45% of the population, and include breast cancer treatment. As of 2007, the rest of the population has the right to breast cancer treatment through the Popular Health Insurance. Despite these entitlements, services are lacking and interventions for early detection, particularly mammography, are very limited. As of 2006 only 22% of women aged 40-69 reported having a mammogram in the past year. Barriers exist on both the demand and supply sides. Lobbying, education, awareness-building and an articulated policy response will be important to ensure expanded coverage, access to and take-up of both treatment and early detection.

  12. [Breast cancer in Mexico: an urgent priority].

    PubMed

    Knaul, Felicia Marie; Nigenda, Gustavo; Lozano, Rafael; Arreola-Ornelas, Héctor; Langer, Ana; Frenk, Julio

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is a serious threat to the health of women globally and an unrecognized priority in middle-income countries. This paper presents data from Mexico. It shows that breast cancer accounts for more deaths than cervical cancer since 2006. It is the second cause of death among women aged 30 to 54 and affects all socioeconomic groups. Data on detection, although underreported, show 6000 new cases in 1990 and a projected increase to over 16500 per year by 2020. Further, the majority of cases are self-detected and only 10% of all cases are detected in stage I. Mexico s social security systems cover approximately 40 to 45% of the population and include breast cancer treatments. Since 2007 the rest of the population has had the right to breast cancer treatment through Seguro Popular. Despite these entitlements, services are lacking and interventions for early detection, particularly mammography, are very limited. As of 2006 only 22% of women aged 40 to 69 reported having a mammography in the past year. Barriers exist on both the demand and supply sides. Lobbying, education, awareness building and an articulated policy response will be important to ensure extended coverage, access to and acceptance of both treatment and early detection.

  13. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Time-lapse exposure depicts Bioreactor rotation. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues.

  14. Carboplatin and Combination Chemotherapy With or Without Veliparib in Treating Patients With Stage IIB-IIIC Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  15. Addition of Carboplatin to Neoadjuvant Therapy for Triple-negative and HER2-positive Early Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-02-12

    Tubular Breast Cancer Stage II; Mucinous Breast Cancer Stage II; Breast Cancer Female NOS; Invasive Ductal Breast Cancer; Tubular Breast Cancer Stage III; HER-2 Positive Breast Cancer; Inflammatory Breast Cancer Stage IV; Inflammatory Breast Cancer

  16. [Radiotherapy of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hennequin, C; Barillot, I; Azria, D; Belkacémi, Y; Bollet, M; Chauvet, B; Cowen, D; Cutuli, B; Fourquet, A; Hannoun-Lévi, J M; Leblanc, M; Mahé, M A

    2016-09-01

    In breast cancer, radiotherapy is an essential component of the treatment. After conservative surgery for an infiltrating carcinoma, radiotherapy must be systematically performed, regardless of the characteristics of the disease, because it decreases the rate of local recurrence and by this way, specific mortality. Partial breast irradiation could not be proposed routinely but only in very selected and informed patients. For ductal carcinoma in situ, adjuvant radiotherapy must be also systematically performed after lumpectomy. After mastectomy, chest wall irradiation is required for pT3-T4 tumours and if there is an axillary nodal involvement, whatever the number of involved lymph nodes. After neo-adjuvant chemotherapy and mastectomy, in case of pN0 disease, chest wall irradiation is recommended if there is a clinically or radiologically T3-T4 or node positive disease before chemotherapy. Axillary irradiation is recommended only if there is no axillary surgical dissection and a positive sentinel lymph node. Supra and infra-clavicular irradiation is advised in case of positive axillary nodes. Internal mammary irradiation must be discussed case by case, according to the benefit/risk ratio (cardiac toxicity). Dose to the chest wall or the breast must be between 45-50Gy with a conventional fractionation. A boost dose over the tumour bed is required if the patient is younger than 60 years old. Hypofractionation (42.5 Gy in 16 fractions, or 41.6 Gy en 13 or 40 Gy en 15) is possible after tumorectomy and if a nodal irradiation is not mandatory. Delineation of the breast, the chest wall and the nodal areas are based on clinical and radiological evaluations. 3D-conformal irradiation is the recommended technique, intensity-modulated radiotherapy must be proposed only in case of specific clinical situations. Respiratory gating could be useful to decrease the cardiac dose. Concomitant administration of chemotherapy in unadvised, but hormonal treatment could be start with

  17. Secondary prevention: screening for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Chamberlain, J

    1985-01-01

    Screening healthy women in order to detect the earliest signs of breast cancer may offer a possibility of curing many breast cancer patients who would be incurable if left until they developed symptoms. However, the natural history of breast cancer is very variable, probably indicating a wide spectrum of different growth rates of the tumour. Therefore it cannot necessarily be assumed that cancers detected by screening at an apparently early stage will behave in the same way as symptomatic cancers at that stage. To prove that screening enables cancer to be cured one needs to compare the number of deaths in a group of women who have been offered screening with those in a comparable group who have not. Unlike the situation in clinical trials of different treatments, comparison of the survival of screen-detected cancers with symptom-detected cancers is inadequate proof, because of selection bias, lead-time bias and length-bias. One randomized controlled trial of screening for breast cancer has so far been published and this shows that women in the group who were offered screening suffered one third fewer deaths from breast cancer than women in the control group, the difference persisting for up to 14 years from the first screening invitation. Further trials are now under way in Canada and various European countries, hoping to confirm this finding and to explore various other issues. Of the screening test methods currently available mammography seems the most sensitive and specific and its radiation hazard is now of almost negligible proportions provided that regular careful monitoring of the equipment is carried out. However it may have the disadvantage of overdiagnosing cases of borderline non-invasive neoplasia which might not progress to invasive cancer within the woman's lifetime. Clinical examination of the breasts is a less satisfactory test in older women but it may be useful in premenopausal women in whom mammography is less sensitive. The validity of self

  18. Epigenetics and Breast Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Vo, An T.; Millis, Richard M.

    2012-01-01

    Several of the active compounds in foods, poisons, drugs, and industrial chemicals may, by epigenetic mechanisms, increase or decrease the risk of breast cancers. Enzymes that are involved in DNA methylation and histone modifications have been shown to be altered in several types of breast and other cancers resulting in abnormal patterns of methylation and/or acetylation. Hypermethylation at the CpG islands found in estrogen response element (ERE) promoters occurs in conjunction with ligand-bonded alpha subunit estrogen receptor (Erα) dimers wherein the ligand ERα dimer complex acts as a transcription factor and binds to the ERE promoter. Ligands could be 17-β-estradiol (E2), phytoestrogens, heterocyclic amines, and many other identified food additives and heavy metals. The dimer recruits DNA methyltransferases which catalyze the transfer of methyl groups from S-adenosyl-L-methionine (SAM) to 5′-cytosine on CpG islands. Other enzymes are recruited to the region by ligand-ERα dimers which activate DNA demethylases to act simultaneously to increase gene expression of protooncogenes and growth-promoting genes. Ligand-ERα dimers also recruit histone acetyltransferase to the ERE promoter region. Histone demethylases such as JMJD2B and histone methyltransferases are enzymes which demethylate lysine residues on histones H3 and/or H4. This makes the chromatin accessible for transcription factors and enzymes. PMID:22567014

  19. Neo-adjuvant Therapy With Anastrozole Plus Pazopanib in Stage II and III ER+ Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-05-24

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Human Epidermal Growth Factor 2 Negative Carcinoma of Breast; Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  20. Biomarkers in Tissue Samples From Patients With Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Treated With Zoledronic Acid

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-07-12

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer

  1. Enhanced resting-state dynamics of the hemoglobin signal as a novel biomarker for detection of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Graber, Harry L. Xu, Yong; Barbour, Randall L.; Al abdi, Rabah; Asarian, Armand P.; Pappas, Peter J.; Dresner, Lisa; Patel, Naresh; Jagarlamundi, Kuppuswamy; Solomon, William B.

    2015-11-15

    Purpose: The work presented here demonstrates an application of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) to the problem of breast-cancer diagnosis. The potential for using spatial and temporal variability measures of the hemoglobin signal to identify useful biomarkers was studied. Methods: DOT imaging data were collected using two instrumentation platforms the authors developed, which were suitable for exploring tissue dynamics while performing a simultaneous bilateral exam. For each component of the hemoglobin signal (e.g., total, oxygenated), the image time series was reduced to eight scalar metrics that were affected by one or more dynamic properties of the breast microvasculature (e.g., average amplitude, amplitude heterogeneity, strength of spatial coordination). Receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analyses, comparing groups of subjects with breast cancer to various control groups (i.e., all noncancer subjects, only those with diagnosed benign breast pathology, and only those with no known breast pathology), were performed to evaluate the effect of cancer on the magnitudes of the metrics and of their interbreast differences and ratios. Results: For women with known breast cancer, simultaneous bilateral DOT breast measures reveal a marked increase in the resting-state amplitude of the vasomotor response in the hemoglobin signal for the affected breast, compared to the contralateral, noncancer breast. Reconstructed 3D spatial maps of observed dynamics also show that this behavior extends well beyond the tumor border. In an effort to identify biomarkers that have the potential to support clinical aims, a group of scalar quantities extracted from the time series measures was systematically examined. This analysis showed that many of the quantities obtained by computing paired responses from the bilateral scans (e.g., interbreast differences, ratios) reveal statistically significant differences between the cancer-positive and -negative subject groups, while the

  2. Rapid and label-free detection of breast cancer biomarker CA15-3 in clinical human serum samples with optofluidic ring resonator sensors.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongying; Dale, Paul S; Caldwell, Charles W; Fan, Xudong

    2009-12-15

    Sensitive and specific detection of breast cancer biomarker CA15-3 in human serum is an important step toward successful evaluation of clinical treatment and prediction of breast cancer recurrence. In this work, we developed an optofluidic ring resonator (OFRR) sensor and the corresponding sensing protocols for label-free CA15-3 detection without any additional signal amplification steps. Nonspecific serum protein adsorption was minimized with effective surface blocking methods. The sensor performance for CA15-3 detection was first characterized in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) buffer and in fetal calf serum. Then the potential use of the OFRR as a simple clinical laboratory testing device for breast cancer diagnostics was tested by measuring the CA15-3 level in clinical human serum samples, and the results were compared with those of standard clinical lab tests. It was found that the OFRR was capable of detecting approximately 1 unit/mL CA15-3 in both PBS buffer and diluted serum within approximately 30 min. Our work marks the first demonstration of the optical ring resonator biosensor in real clinical applications that features low cost, simple detection procedures, rapid response time, low sample consumption, and high specificity.

  3. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. A cross-section of a construct, grown from surgical specimens of brease cancer, stained for microscopic examination, reveals areas of tumor cells dispersed throughout the non-epithelial cell background. The arrow denotes the foci of breast cancer cells. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  4. Acoustic wave biosensor for the detection of the breast and prostate cancer metastasis biomarker protein PTHrP.

    PubMed

    Crivianu-Gaita, Victor; Aamer, Mohamed; Posaratnanathan, Roy T; Romaschin, Alexander; Thompson, Michael

    2016-04-15

    There are currently no biosensors that are able to reliably detect the process of cancer metastasis. We describe the first label-free real-time ultra-high frequency acoustic wave biosensor prototype capable of detecting the breast and prostate cancer metastasis biomarker, parathyroid hormone-related peptide (PTHrP). Two different linkers - 11-trichlorosilyl-undecanoic acid pentafluorophenyl ester (PFP) and S-(11-trichlorosilyl-undecanyl)-benzothiosulfonate (TUBTS) - were used to immobilize whole anti-PTHrP antibodies and Fab' fragments to surfaces as biorecognition elements. The biosensor surfaces were optimized using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and the ultra-high frequency electromagnetic piezoelectric acoustic sensor (EMPAS). One optimized whole antibody-based surface (PFP/protein G'/whole antibodies/ethanolamine) and one optimized Fab' fragment-based surface (TUBTS/Fab' fragments) were tested as biosensors. It was determined that an in-line injection of bovine serum albumin prior to analyte injection yielded the most minimally fouling surfaces. Each surface was tested with no mass amplification and with sandwich-type secondary antibody mass amplification. The whole antibody-based mass-amplified biosensor yielded the lowest limit of detection (61 ng/mL), highest sensitivity, and a linear range from 61 ng/mL to 100 μg/mL. However, the Fab' fragment-based biosensor displayed better regenerability as a loss of ~20% of the initial analyte signal intensity was observed with each subsequent injection. The whole antibody-based biosensor was only capable of producing an analyte signal in the first injection.

  5. Understanding Lymphedema (For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer)

    MedlinePlus

    ... My ACS » Understanding Lymphedema: For Cancers Other Than Breast Cancer Download Printable Version [PDF] » Lymphedema can be caused ... News About Cancer Expert Voices Blog Programs & Services Breast Cancer Support TLC Hair Loss & Mastectomy Products Hope Lodge® ...

  6. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    High magnification of view of tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads, illustrting breast cells with intercellular boundaires on bead surface and aggregates of cells achieving 3-deminstional growth outward from bead after 56 days of culture in a NASA Bioreactor. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida.

  7. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Human primary breast tumor cells after 49 days of growth in a NASA Bioreactor. Tumor cells aggregate on microcarrier beads (indicated by arrow). NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Jearne Becker, University of South Florida

  8. Breast Cancer In Women Infographic

    Cancer.gov

    This infographic shows the Breast Cancer Subtypes in Women. It’s important for guiding treatment and predicting survival. Know the Science: HR = Hormone receptor. HR+ means tumor cells have receptors for the hormones estrogen or progesterone, which can promote the growth of HR+ tumors. Hormone therapies like tamoxifen can be used to treat HR+ tumors. HER2 = Human epidermal growth Factor receptor, HER2+ means tumor cells overexpress (make high levels of) a protein, called HE2/neu, which has been shown to be associated with certain aggressive types of breast cancer. Trastuzumab and some other therapies can target cells that overexpress HER2. HR+/HER2, aka “LuminalA”. 73% of all breast cancer cases: best prognosis, most common subtype for every race, age, and poverty level. HR-/HER2, aka “Triple Negative”: 13% of all breast cancer cases, Worst prognosis, Non-Hispanic blacks have the highest rate of this subtype at every age and poverty level. HR+/HER2+, aka “Luminal B”, 10% of all breast cancer cases, little geographic variation by state. HR-/HER2+, aka”HER2-enriched”, 5% of all breast cancer cases, lowest rates for all races and ethnicities. www.cancer.gov Source: Special section of the Annual Report to the Nation on the Status of Cancer, 1975-2011.

  9. Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia

    PubMed Central

    Altantsetseg, Dalkhjav; Davaasambuu, Ganmaa; Rich-Edwards, Janet; Davaalkham, Dambadarjaa; Tretli, Steinar; Hoover, Robert N.; Frazier, A. Lindsay

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Data on international variation in breast cancer incidence may help to identify additional risk factors. Substantially lower breast cancer rates in Asia than in North America and Western Europe are established, but differences within Asia have been largely ignored despite heterogeneity in lifestyles and environments. Mongolia’s breast cancer experience is of interest because of its shared genetics but vastly different diet compared with other parts of Asia. Methods Age-standardized breast cancer incidence and mortality rates obtained from the International Association of Cancer Registries are presented for several Asian countries. Mongolian incidence rates obtained from its cancer registry describe incidence within the country. Results Breast cancer incidence in Mongolia (age standardized 8.0/100,000) is almost a third of rates in China (21.6/100,000), and over five times that of Japan (42.7/100,000) and Russia (43.2/100,000). Rates within Mongolia appear to have increased slightly over the last decade and are higher in urban than rural areas (annual percentage increase of age-standardized rates from 1998 to 2005 was 3.60 and 2.57%, respectively). The increase in breast cancer incidence with age plateaus at menopause, as in other Asian populations. Conclusions Mongolia’s low breast cancer incidence is of particular interest because of their unusual diet (primarily red meat and dairy) compared with other Asian countries. More intensive study of potential dietary, reproductive and lifestyle factors in Mongolia with comparison to other Asian populations may provide more clarity in what drives the international breast cancer rate differences. PMID:22543542

  10. Sentinel lymph node detection by intranipple injection of patent blue dye in breast cancer: a preliminary report of a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Zervoudis, S; Iatrakis, G; Paschopoulos, M; Dousias, V; Geahchan, N; Stefos, T; Pechlivani, F; Navrozoglou, I

    2012-01-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) biopsy is a well established option for assessing axillary lymph node status in breast cancer. Several techniques have been applied so far (superficial or deeper ones). Based on anatomical features of the lymphatic drainage in the breast, we assessed the feasibility of an intranipple approach for SLN mapping. Our data support the feasibility of SLN detection by our technique, with a high rate of SLN identification, which could be used in clinical practice as an alternative to the peri-areolar approach.

  11. Comparison of Image Quality Criteria between Digital Storage Phosphor Plate in Mammography and Full-Field Digital Mammography in the Detection of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Thevi Rajendran, Pushpa; Krishnapillai, Vijayalakshmi; Tamanang, Sulaiman; Kumari Chelliah, Kanaga

    2012-01-01

    Background: Digital mammography is slowly replacing screen film mammography. In digital mammography, 2 methods are available in acquiring images: digital storage phosphor plate and full-field digital mammography. The aim of this study was to compare the image quality acquired from the 2 methods of digital mammography in the detection of breast cancer. Methods: The study took place at the National Cancer Society, Kuala Lumpur, and followed 150 asymptomatic women for the duration of 1 year. Participating women gave informed consent and were exposed to 4 views from each system. Two radiologists independently evaluated the printed images based on the image quality criteria in mammography. McNemar’s test was used to compare the image quality criteria between the systems. Results: The agreement between the radiologists for the digital storage phosphor plate was к = 0.551 and for full-field digital mammography was к = 0.523. Full-field digital mammography was significantly better compared with the digital storage phosphor plate in right and left mediolateral oblique views (P < 0.05) in the detection of microcalcifications, which are early signs of breast cancer. However, both systems were comparable in all other aspects of image quality. Conclusion: Digital mammography is a useful screening tool for the detection of early breast cancer and ensures better prognosis and quality of life. PMID:22977375

  12. Recurrent read-through fusion transcripts in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Varley, Katherine E; Gertz, Jason; Roberts, Brian S; Davis, Nicholas S; Bowling, Kevin M; Kirby, Marie K; Nesmith, Amy S; Oliver, Patsy G; Grizzle, William E; Forero, Andres; Buchsbaum, Donald J; LoBuglio, Albert F; Myers, Richard M

    2014-07-01

    Read-through fusion transcripts that result from the splicing of two adjacent genes in the same coding orientation are a recently discovered type of chimeric RNA. We sought to determine if read-through fusion transcripts exist in breast cancer. We performed paired-end RNA-seq of 168 breast samples, including 28 breast cancer cell lines, 42 triple negative breast cancer primary tumors, 42 estrogen receptor positive (ER+) breast cancer primary tumors, and 56 non-malignant breast tissue samples. We analyzed the sequencing data to identify breast cancer associated read-through fusion transcripts. We discovered two recurrent read-through fusion transcripts that were identified in breast cancer cell lines, confirmed across breast cancer primary tumors, and were not detected in normal tissues (SCNN1A-TNFRSF1A and CTSD-IFITM10). Both fusion transcripts use canonical splice sites to join the last splice donor of the 5' gene to the first splice acceptor of the 3' gene, creating an in-frame fusion transcript. Western blots indicated that the fusion transcripts are translated into fusion proteins in breast cancer cells. Custom small interfering RNAs targeting the CTSD-IFITM10 fusion junction reduced expression of the fusion transcript and reduced breast cancer cell proliferation. Read-through fusion transcripts between adjacent genes with different biochemical functions represent a new type of recurrent molecular defect in breast cancer that warrant further investigation as potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets. Both breast cancer associated fusion transcripts identified in this study involve membrane proteins (SCNN1A-TNFRSF1A and CTSD-IFITM10), which raises the possibility that they could be breast cancer-specific cell surface markers. PMID:24929677

  13. Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart

    MedlinePlus

    ... of the American Heart Association Cardiology Patient Page Breast Cancer Chemotherapy and Your Heart Christine Unitt , Kamaneh Montazeri , ... Disclosures Footnotes Figures & Tables Info & Metrics eLetters Introduction Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer in women. ...

  14. Adhesion between peptides/antibodies and breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, J.; Paetzell, E.; Bogorad, A.; Soboyejo, W. O.

    2010-06-01

    Atomic force microscopy (AFM) techniques were used to measure the adhesion forces between the receptors on breast cancer cells specific to human luteinizing hormone-releasing hormone (LHRH) peptides and antibodies specific to the EphA2 receptor. The adhesion forces between LHRH-coated AFM tips and human MDA-MB-231 cells (breast cancer cells) were shown to be about five times greater than those between LHRH-coated AFM tips and normal Hs578Bst breast cells. Similarly, those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and breast cancer cells were over five times greater than those between EphA2 antibody-coated AFM tips and normal breast cells. The results suggest that AFM can be used for the detection of breast cancer cells in biopsies. The implications of the results are also discussed for the early detection and localized treatment of cancer.

  15. Breast cancer: new technologies for risk assessment and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tracey; McGechan, Adam

    2003-01-01

    In the US, one in every eight women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Despite the advances made in treating breast cancer, the causal mechanisms underlying this disease have yet to be fully elucidated; 85% of breast cancer cases occur sporadically without any known genetic mutation. Too little is known about the pathogenesis of breast cancer for primary prevention to be feasible in the near- to mid-term. Secondary prevention through screening offers an alternative that has been widely adopted. For decades, breast self-examination has been touted as a technique for the early identification of breast cancer. However, it has been recently suggested that this technique is a waste of time and resources for both doctors and patients. Mammography finds breast cancer earlier than breast self-examination, and will reduce the risk of death from breast cancer by approximately 30% in women over 50 years old. Mammography is limited in that cancer, like breast tissue, appears white on the x-ray; therefore lesions may be difficult to detect in women with very dense breasts, and a tumor may not cast a significant shadow until it is quite large. Some cancers are so aggressive that they can spread quickly, before routine screening can detect them. Despite these limitations, mammography is still viewed as the best tool currently available for screening and early diagnosis. Improved methods to detect and diagnose breast cancer early, when it is most curable, are required if a significant impact on morbidity and mortality from breast cancer is to be made. Various new and innovative technologies are being investigated for improving the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. About 85% of breast cancers begin in the milk ductal system of the breast. As cancer develops in the breast, abnormalities occur, including atypical hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ, and invasive breast carcinoma. Thus, the early screening of ductal cells can provide a parallel benefit to the

  16. Breast cancer: new technologies for risk assessment and diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Wright, Tracey; McGechan, Adam

    2003-01-01

    In the US, one in every eight women will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. Despite the advances made in treating breast cancer, the causal mechanisms underlying this disease have yet to be fully elucidated; 85% of breast cancer cases occur sporadically without any known genetic mutation. Too little is known about the pathogenesis of breast cancer for primary prevention to be feasible in the near- to mid-term. Secondary prevention through screening offers an alternative that has been widely adopted. For decades, breast self-examination has been touted as a technique for the early identification of breast cancer. However, it has been recently suggested that this technique is a waste of time and resources for both doctors and patients. Mammography finds breast cancer earlier than breast self-examination, and will reduce the risk of death from breast cancer by approximately 30% in women over 50 years old. Mammography is limited in that cancer, like breast tissue, appears white on the x-ray; therefore lesions may be difficult to detect in women with very dense breasts, and a tumor may not cast a significant shadow until it is quite large. Some cancers are so aggressive that they can spread quickly, before routine screening can detect them. Despite these limitations, mammography is still viewed as the best tool currently available for screening and early diagnosis. Improved methods to detect and diagnose breast cancer early, when it is most curable, are required if a significant impact on morbidity and mortality from breast cancer is to be made. Various new and innovative technologies are being investigated for improving the early detection and diagnosis of breast cancer. About 85% of breast cancers begin in the milk ductal system of the breast. As cancer develops in the breast, abnormalities occur, including atypical hyperplasia, ductal carcinoma in situ, and invasive breast carcinoma. Thus, the early screening of ductal cells can provide a parallel benefit to the

  17. Molecular breast imaging: an emerging modality for breast cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Michael K

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Screening mammography is recognized as an imperfect imaging tool that performs poorly in women with dense breast tissue – a limitation which has driven demand for supplemental screening techniques. One potential supplemental technique is molecular breast imaging (MBI). Significant improvements in gamma camera technology allow MBI to be performed at low radiation doses, comparable with those of tomosynthesis and mammography. A recent screening trial in women with dense breast tissue yielded a cancer detection rate of 3.2 per 1000 for mammography alone and 12.0 per 1000 for the combination of mammography and MBI. MBI also demonstrated a lower recall rate than that of mammography. MBI is a promising supplemental screening technique in women with dense breast tissue. PMID:25621015

  18. Highly sensitive and robust peroxidase-like activity of porous nanorods of ceria and their application for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Tian, Zhimin; Li, Jing; Zhang, Zhiyun; Gao, Wei; Zhou, Xuemei; Qu, Yongquan

    2015-08-01

    Porous nanorods of ceria (PN-Ceria), a novel ceria nanostructure with a large surface area and a high surface Ce(3+) fraction, exhibited strong intrinsic peroxidase activity toward a classical peroxidase substrate in the presence of H2O2. Peroxidase-like activity of ceria originated from surface Ce(3+) species as the catalytic center, thereby explaining the high performance of PN-Ceria as an artificial enzyme mimicking peroxidase. Compared with the natural enzyme horseradish peroxidase (HRP), PN-Ceria showed several advantages such as low cost, easy storage, high sensitivity, and, prominently, chemical and catalytic stability under harsh conditions. Importantly, the enzymatic activity of PN-Ceria remained nearly constant and stable over a wide range of temperature and pH values, ensuring the accuracy and reliability of measurements of its peroxidase-like activity. A PN-Ceria based novel diagnostic system was developed for breast cancer detection with a higher sensitivity than the standard HRP detection system. Our work has laid a solid foundation for the development of PN-Ceria as a novel diagnostic tool for clinical use.

  19. Optimization of breast cancer detection in Dual Energy X-ray Mammography using a CMOS imaging detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koukou, V.; Fountos, G.; Martini, N.; Sotiropoulou, P.; Michail, C.; Kalyvas, N.; Valais, I.; Bakas, A.; Kounadi, E.; Kandarakis, I.; Nikiforidis, G.

    2015-01-01

    Dual energy mammography has the ability to improve the detection of microcalcifications leading to early diagnosis of breast cancer. In this simulation study, a prototype dual energy mammography system, using a CMOS based imaging detector with different X-ray spectra, was modeled. The device consists of a 33.91 mg/cm2 Gd2O2S:Tb scintillator screen, placed in direct contact with the sensor, with a pixel size of 22.5 μm. Various filter materials and tube voltages of a Tungsten (W) anode for both the low and high energy were examined. The selection of the filters applied to W spectra was based on their K- edges (K-edge filtering). Hydroxyapatite (HAp) was used to simulate microcalcifications. Calcification signal-to-noise ratio (SNRtc) was calculated for entrance surface dose within the acceptable levels of conventional mammography. Optimization was based on the maximization of SNRtc while minimizing the entrance dose. The best compromise between SNRtc value and dose was provided by a 35kVp X-ray spectrum with added beam filtration of 100μm Pd and a 70kVp Yb filtered spectrum of 800 μm for the low and high energy, respectively. Computer simulation results show that a SNRtc value of 3.6 can be achieved for a calcification size of 200 μm. Compared with previous studies, this method can improve detectability of microcalcifications.

  20. Detection of Canonical Hedgehog Signaling in Breast Cancer by 131-Iodine-Labeled Derivatives of the Sonic Hedgehog Protein

    PubMed Central

    Sims-Mourtada, Jennifer; Yang, David; Tworowska, Izabela; Larson, Richard; Smith, Daniel; Tsao, Ning; Opdenaker, Lynn; Mourtada, Firas; Woodward, Wendy

    2012-01-01

    Activation of hedgehog (HH) pathway signaling is observed in many tumors. Due to a feedback loop, the HH receptor Patched (PTCH-1) is overexpressed in tumors with activated HH signaling. Therefore, we sought to radiolabel the PTCH-1 ligand sonic (SHH) for detection of cancer cells with canonical HH activity. Receptor binding of 131I-SHH was increased in cell lines with high HH pathway activation. Our findings also show that PTCH-1 receptor expression is decreased upon treatment with HH signaling inhibitors, and receptor binding of 131I-SHH is significantly decreased following treatment with cyclopamine. In vivo imaging and biodistribution studies revealed significant accumulation of 131I-SHH within tumor tissue as compared to normal organs. Tumor-to-muscle ratios were approximately 8 : 1 at 5 hours, while tumor to blood and tumor to bone were 2 : 1 and 5 : 1, respectively. Significant uptake was also observed in liver and gastrointestinal tissue. These studies show that 131I-SHH is capable of in vivo detection of breast tumors with high HH signaling. We further demonstrate that the hedgehog receptor PTCH-1 is downregulated upon treatment with hedgehog inhibitors. Our data suggests that radiolabeled SHH derivatives may provide a method to determine response to SHH-targeted therapies. PMID:22811598

  1. Development of a novel PTT assay for mutation detection in PALB2 large exons and PALB2 screening in medullary breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Poumpouridou, Nikoleta; Goutas, Nikolaos; Tsionou, Christina; Dimas, Kleanthi; Lianidou, Evi; Kroupis, Christos

    2016-04-01

    Beyond BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, PALB2 (Partner and localizer of BRCA2) emerges as the third breast cancer susceptibility gene due to its role in the same DNA repair pathway: homologous recombination. In most populations studied so far, PALB2 mutations are detected in 1-2% of BRCA negative female patients. PALB2 gene contains 13 exons; exons 4 and 5 consist 65% of the coding area. We developed a protein truncation test (PTT) for quick screening of truncating pathogenic mutations of these two large exons. Specific primers were de novo, in silico designed and the PTT-PCR products were translated in the presence of biotinylated lysine and detected colorimetrically. The assay was initially tested in 30 patients with hereditary breast cancer, negative for BRCA mutations and then, in 17 patients with the rare medullary breast cancer subtype. Small PALB2 exons were screened with high-resolution melting curve analysis (HRMA) and the large DNA rearrangements with multiplex ligation-dependent probe amplification (MLPA). Any alterations detected were verified by Sanger DNA Sequencing. The developed PTT methodology is highly specific for clinical significant mutations; positive control samples that produce truncated PALB2 peptides were correctly identified and the method was accurate when compared to DNA sequencing. We did not detect any deleterious PALB2 mutation in both groups of patients. HRMA and MLPA were also negative for all tested samples. However, our novel, fast and cost-effective PTT method for pathogenic mutation detection of the two large PALB2 exons can be applied in screening of a large number of breast cancer patients. PMID:26573693

  2. Development and Testing of a Single Frequency Terahertz Imaging System for Breast Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    St. Peter, Benjamin; Yngvesson, Sigfrid; Siqueira, Paul; Kelly, Patrick; Khan, Ashraf; Glick, Stephen; Karellas, Andrew

    2013-01-01

    The ability to discern malignant from benign tissue in excised human breast specimens in Breast Conservation Surgery (BCS) was evaluated using single frequency terahertz radiation. Terahertz (THz) images of the specimens in reflection mode were obtained by employing a gas laser source and mechanical scanning. The images were correlated with optical histological micrographs of the same specimens, and a mean discrimination of 73% was found for five out of six samples using Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis. The system design and characterization is discussed in detail. The initial results are encouraging but further development of the technology and clinical evaluation is needed to evaluate its feasibility in the clinical environment. PMID:25055306

  3. In vitro detection of human breast cancer cells (SK-BR3) using herceptin-conjugated liquid crystal microdroplets as a sensing platform.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wang; Gupta, Kailash Chandra; Park, Soo-Young; Kim, Young-Kyoo; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2016-10-20

    The present study utilizes antibody-protein interactions to develop an LC microdroplet based biosensor for naked eye detection of SK-BR3 human breast cancer cells. The herceptin antibody-conjugated LC microdroplets were fabricated using 4-cyano-4'-pentyl biphenyl (5CB) as the liquid crystalline phase and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as the surfactant. The poly (styrene-b-acrylic acid) amphiphilic block copolymer (PS-b-PA) played a role as a modifier for the liquid crystalline interfaces. The 5CB molecules in the herceptin antibody-conjugated LC microdroplets have shown an orientation transition from radial to bipolar on selective interactions with targeted SK-BR3 breast cancer cells, which are over expressed by the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2). The herceptin antibody-conjugated LC microdroplets are found to be highly selective in the detection of SK-BR3 cancer cells in the presence of control cells, such as KB cancer cells and fibroblast (FB), and also in the presence of 10% human blood plasma. The interaction forces of the SK-BR3 cancer cells were only effective in causing orientation transitions in 5CB molecules in the LC microdroplets, which clearly suggested that the herceptin antibody-conjugated LC microdroplets could be used as a selective biosensor for a real-time detection of SK-BR3 cancer cells in biological fluids.

  4. In vitro detection of human breast cancer cells (SK-BR3) using herceptin-conjugated liquid crystal microdroplets as a sensing platform.

    PubMed

    Ding, Wang; Gupta, Kailash Chandra; Park, Soo-Young; Kim, Young-Kyoo; Kang, Inn-Kyu

    2016-10-20

    The present study utilizes antibody-protein interactions to develop an LC microdroplet based biosensor for naked eye detection of SK-BR3 human breast cancer cells. The herceptin antibody-conjugated LC microdroplets were fabricated using 4-cyano-4'-pentyl biphenyl (5CB) as the liquid crystalline phase and sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) as the surfactant. The poly (styrene-b-acrylic acid) amphiphilic block copolymer (PS-b-PA) played a role as a modifier for the liquid crystalline interfaces. The 5CB molecules in the herceptin antibody-conjugated LC microdroplets have shown an orientation transition from radial to bipolar on selective interactions with targeted SK-BR3 breast cancer cells, which are over expressed by the human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive (HER2). The herceptin antibody-conjugated LC microdroplets are found to be highly selective in the detection of SK-BR3 cancer cells in the presence of control cells, such as KB cancer cells and fibroblast (FB), and also in the presence of 10% human blood plasma. The interaction forces of the SK-BR3 cancer cells were only effective in causing orientation transitions in 5CB molecules in the LC microdroplets, which clearly suggested that the herceptin antibody-conjugated LC microdroplets could be used as a selective biosensor for a real-time detection of SK-BR3 cancer cells in biological fluids. PMID:27533001

  5. Triiodothyronine and breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    De Sibio, Maria Teresa; de Oliveira, Miriane; Moretto, Fernanda Cristina Fontes; Olimpio, Regiane Marques Castro; Conde, Sandro José; Luvizon, Aline Carbonera; Nogueira, Célia Regina

    2014-01-01

    The thyroid hormones (THs), triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4), are essential for survival; they are involved in the processes of development, growth, and metabolism. In addition to hyperthyroidism or hypothyroidism, THs are involved in other diseases. The role of THs in the development and differentiation of mammary epithelium is well established; however, their specific role in the pathogenesis of breast cancer (BC) is controversial. Steroid hormones affect many human cancers and the abnormal responsiveness of the mammary epithelial cells to estradiol (E2) in particular is known to be an important cause for the development and progression of BC. The proliferative effect of T3 has been demonstrated in various types of cancer. In BC cell lines, T3 may foster the conditions for tumor proliferation and increase the effect of cell proliferation by E2; thus, T3 may play a role in the development and progression of BC. Studies show that T3 has effects similar to E2 in BC cell lines. Despite controversy regarding the relationship between thyroid disturbances and the incidence of BC, studies show that thyroid status may influence the development of tumor, proliferation and metastasis. PMID:25114863

  6. Main controversies in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zervoudis, Stephane; Iatrakis, George; Tomara, Eirini; Bothou, Anastasia; Papadopoulos, George; Tsakiris, George

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we have reviewed available evidence for diagnosis, treatment, and follow-up in female breast cancer (BC). Into daily clinical practice some controversies are occurred. Especially, in the diagnosis field, despite the fact that the optimal age in which screening mammography should start is a subject of intense controversy, there is a shift toward the beginning at the age of 40 although it is suggested that the net benefit is small for women aged 40 to 49 years. In addition, a promising tool in BC screening seems to be breast tomosynthesis. Other tools such as 3D ultrasound and shear wave elastography (SWE) are full of optimism in BC screening although ultrasonography is not yet a first-line screening method and there is insufficient evidence to recommend the systemic use of the SWE for BC screening. As for breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), even if it is useful in BC detection in women who have a strong family history of BC, it is not generally recommended as a screening tool. Moreover, based on the lack of randomized clinical trials showing a benefit of presurgical breast MRI in overall survival, it’s integration into breast surgical operations remains debatable. Interestingly, in contrast to fine needle aspiration, core biopsy has gained popularity in presurgical diagnosis. Furthermore, after conservative surgery in patients with positive sentinel lymph nodes, the recent tendency is the shift from axillary dissection to axillary conserving strategies. While the accuracy of sentinel lymph node after neoadjuvant chemotherapy and second BC surgery remains controversial, more time is needed for evaluation and for determining the optimal interval between the two surgeries. Additionally, in the decision between immediate or delayed breast reconstruction, there is a tendency in the immediate use. In the prevention of BC, the controversial issue between tamoxifen and raloxifene becomes clear with raloxifene be more profitable through the toxicities

  7. Metals and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Celia; Divekar, Shailaja D.; Storchan, Geoffrey B.; Parodi, Daniela A.; Martin, Mary Beth

    2014-01-01

    Metalloestrogens are metals that activate the estrogen receptor in the absence of estradiol. The metalloestrogens fall into two subclasses: metal/metalloid anions and bivalent cationic metals. The metal/metalloid anions include compounds such as arsenite, nitrite, selenite, and vanadate while the bivalent cations include metals such as cadmium, calcium, cobalt, copper, nickel, chromium, lead, mercury, and tin. The best studied metalloestrogen is cadmium. It is a heavy metal and a prevalent environmental contaminant with no known physiological function. This review addresses our current understanding of the mechanism by which cadmium and the bivalent cationic metals activate estrogen receptor-α. The review also summarizes the in vitro and in vivo evidence that cadmium functions as an estrogen and the potential role of cadmium in breast cancer. PMID:23338949

  8. Immune cell dysfunctions in breast cancer patients detected through whole blood multi-parametric flow cytometry assay

    PubMed Central

    Verronèse, E.; Delgado, A.; Valladeau-Guilemond, J.; Garin, G.; Guillemaut, S.; Tredan, O.; Ray-Coquard, I.; Bachelot, T.; N'Kodia, A.; Bardin-Dit-Courageot, C.; Rigal, C.; Pérol, D.; Caux, C.; Ménétrier-Caux, C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Monitoring functional competence of immune cell populations in clinical routine represents a major challenge. We developed a whole-blood assay to monitor functional competence of peripheral innate immune cells including NK cells, dendritic and monocyte cell subsets through their ability to produce specific cytokines after short-term stimulation, detected through intra-cytoplasmic staining and multi-parametric flow-cytometry. A PMA/ionomycin T cell activation assay complemented this analysis. Comparing cohorts of healthy women and breast cancer (BC) patients at different stages, we identified significant functional alteration of circulating immune cells during BC progression prior to initiation of treatment. Of upmost importance, as early as the localized primary tumor (PT) stage, we observed functional alterations in several innate immune populations and T cells i.e. (i) reduced TNFα production by BDCA-1+ DC and non-classical monocytes in response to Type-I IFN, (ii) a strong drop in IFNγ production by NK cells in response to either Type-I IFN or TLR7/8 ligand, and (iii) a coordinated impairment of cytokine (IL-2, IFNγ, IL-21) production by T cell subpopulations. Overall, these alterations are further accentuated according to the stage of the disease in first-line metastatic patients. Finally, whereas we did not detect functional modification of DC subsets in response to TLR7/8 ligand, we highlighted increased IL-12p40 production by monocytes specifically at first relapse (FR). Our results reinforce the importance of monitoring both innate and adaptive immunity to better evaluate dysfunctions in cancer patients and suggest that our whole-blood assay will be useful to monitor response to treatment, particularly for immunotherapeutic strategies. PMID:27141361

  9. Palbociclib for Advanced Breast Cancer

    Cancer.gov

    An interim analysis of the PALOMA3 trial shows that women with hormone receptor-positive metastatic breast cancer who received palbociclib plus fulvestrant had longer progression-free survival rates than women who received a placebo plus fulvestrant.

  10. Understanding your breast cancer risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... proven. Studies look at things like smoking, diet, chemicals, and types of birth control pills. Talk to your provider if you are interested in joining a clinical trial for breast cancer prevention.

  11. Relevance of Health Economics in the Early Detection of Breast Cancer in Germany – the View of the Professional Association of Practicing Gynecologic Oncologists e.V. (BNGO)

    PubMed Central

    Uleer, Christoph; Wagner, Joachim; Moisidis-Tesch, Christina

    2013-01-01

    Summary The introduction of the Mammography Screening Program (MSP) in 2005 has changed the early detection of breast cancer in Germany significantly. We analyzed the frequency and ensuing health care costs of mammograms performed for the early detection of breast cancer before and after the introduction of the MSP. Furthermore, we analyzed the influence of the MSP on the demographics of physicians (gynecologists versus radiologists) performing mammograms in Germany. Whereas the number of ‘curative’ mammograms has decreased since the introduction of the MSP, 2 million ‘curative’ mammograms per year are still being performed in addition to the 4.6 million mammograms performed annually in the MSP at an additional health care cost of approximately €100 million per year. Only 12% of screening and ‘curative’ mammograms are being performed and evaluated by gynecologists. PMID:24715841

  12. Weighted Change-Point Method for Detecting Differential Gene Expression in Breast Cancer Microarray Data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yao; Sun, Guang; Ji, Zhaohua; Xing, Chong; Liang, Yanchun

    2012-01-01

    In previous work, we proposed a method for detecting differential gene expression based on change-point of expression profile. This non-parametric change-point method gave promising result in both simulation study and public dataset experiment. However, the performance is still limited by the less sensitiveness to the right bound and the statistical significance of the statistics has not been fully explored. To overcome the insensitiveness to the right bound we modified the original method by adding a weight function to the Dn statistic. Simulation study showed that the weighted change-point statistics method is significantly better than the original NPCPS in terms of ROC, false positive rate, as well as change-point estimate. The mean absolute error of the estimated change-point by weighted change-point method was 0.03, reduced by more than 50% comparing with the original 0.06, and the mean FPR was reduced by more than 55%. Experiment on microarray Dataset I resulted in 3974 differentially expressed genes out of total 5293 genes; experiment on microarray Dataset II resulted in 9983 differentially expressed genes among total 12576 genes. In summary, the method proposed here is an effective modification to the previous method especially when only a small subset of cancer samples has DGE. PMID:22276133

  13. Doxorubicin Hydrochloride, Cyclophosphamide, and Filgrastim Followed By Paclitaxel Albumin-Stabilized Nanoparticle Formulation With or Without Trastuzumab in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer Previously Treated With Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2013-05-07

    Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  14. der(16)t(1;16)/der(1;16) in breast cancer detected by fluorescence in situ hybridization is an indicator of better patient prognosis.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, H; Takarabe, T; Fukutomi, T; Hirohashi, S

    1999-01-01

    By two-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), der(16)t(1;16) or der(1;16) was frequently detected in low-grade papillary carcinoma but not in benign intraductal papilloma of the breast. In order to clarify the incidence and clinicopathological significance of der(16)t(1;16)/der(1;16) in common breast cancers, der(16)t(1;16)/der(1;16) was examined by two-color FISH in breast cancers resected from 51 patients by using DNA probes for 16cen, 16q11.2, and 1q12 labeled with biotin or digoxigenin. der(16)t(1;16)/der(1;16) was clonally detected in 16 cancers (31%), being more frequent in ductal carcinomas of lower grade and invasive lobular carcinoma than in high-grade invasive ductal carcinoma (P<0.001). der(16)t(1;16)/der(1;16) was also correlated with a higher amount of hormone receptors in the tumor (P<0.05). Disease-free and overall survival rates of the patient group with der(16)t(1;16)/der(1;16)-positive cancer were higher (88% and 94%) than those of the group with der(16)t(1;16)/der(1; 16)-negative cancer (39% and 68%) (P<0.05). Among the 16 patients with lymph node metastasis who received one of two similar forms of postsurgical adjuvant chemo-endocrine therapy, the prognosis of those with der(16)t(1;16)/der(1;16)-positive cancer was better than that of those with der(16)t(1;16)/der(1;16)-negative cancer (P<0.05). der(16)t(1;16)/der(1;16) detected by FISH is considered helpful in identifying patients with a better prognosis and for stratification of patients in randomized clinical trials of adjuvant chemo-endocrine therapies. PMID:9892111

  15. Digital breast tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) screening: A pictorial review of screen-detected cancers and false recalls attributed to tomosynthesis in prospective screening trials.

    PubMed

    Houssami, Nehmat; Lång, Kristina; Bernardi, Daniela; Tagliafico, Alberto; Zackrisson, Sophia; Skaane, Per

    2016-04-01

    This pictorial review highlights cancers detected only at tomosynthesis screening and screens falsely recalled in the course of breast tomosynthesis screening, illustrating both true-positive (TP) and false-positive (FP) detection attributed to tomosynthesis. Images and descriptive data were used to characterise cases of screen-detection with tomosynthesis, sourced from prospective screening trials that performed standard (2D) digital mammography (DM) and tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) in the same screening participants. Exemplar cases from four trials highlight common themes of relevance to screening practice including: the type of lesions frequently made more conspicuous or perceptible by tomosynthesis (spiculated masses, and architectural distortions); the histologic findings (both TP and FP) of tomosynthesis-only detection; and the need to extend breast work-up protocols (additional imaging including ultrasound and MRI, and tomosynthesis-guided biopsy) if tomosynthesis is adopted for primary screening. PMID:27017251

  16. Soy Isoflavones Supplementation in Treating Women at High Risk For or With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-04-06

    BRCA1 Mutation Carrier; BRCA2 Mutation Carrier; Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Lobular Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer

  17. Tumor-dependent down-regulation of the ζ-chain in T-cells is detectable in early breast cancer and correlates with immune cell function.

    PubMed

    Boniface, J De; Poschke, I; Mao, Y; Kiessling, R

    2012-07-01

    Suppressive factors produced by tumors or tumor-associated cells represent a major obstacle to immune-mediated tumor eradication and immunotherapy. We studied tumor-dependent changes in expression of the ζ-chain, a key molecule for the transduction of stimulatory signals through the T-cell receptor and activating receptors on natural killer (NK) cells, in patients with early (stages 1 and 2) breast cancer. Ex-vivo levels of ζ-chain expression, proliferation and cytokine expression in lymphocyte subpopulations were measured in breast tumors, their draining lymph nodes and in pre- and postoperative blood samples of cancer patients and healthy controls by multi-parametric flow cytometry. We found that T-cell ζ-chain expression in peripheral blood of breast cancer patients (n = 29) was down-regulated compared with healthy controls (n = 10) (p ≤ 0.033), which was most pronounced in stage 2 (n = 15, p ≤ 0.004). T- and NK-cell ζ-chain loss was most distinct in the tumor and decreased with increasing distance (p ≤ 0.015). After surgical tumor resection, peripheral blood ζ-chain levels normalized to those observed in healthy controls. ζ-chain expression in peripheral blood T-cells correlated with lymphocytic proliferative activity (p ≤ 0.035), and with the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in CD8+ T-cells (p ≤ 0.035). Breast cancer patients had lower numbers of circulating early memory CD8+ T-cells than healthy donors (p ≤ 0.000), correlating with lower T-cell ζ-chain levels (p ≤ 0.011). Our findings suggest that phenotypic and functional alterations in lymphocytes can be detected even in early stage breast cancer patients. The observed immunosuppression appears to be systemic and tumor dependent, as it is strongest in the tumor, correlates with tumor stage and normalizes after surgery.

  18. Targeting autophagy in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Maycotte, Paola; Thorburn, Andrew

    2014-01-01

    Macroautophagy (referred to as autophagy here) is an intracellular degradation pathway enhanced in response to a variety of stresses and in response to nutrient deprivation. This process provides the cell with nutrients and energy by degrading aggregated and damaged proteins as well as compromised organelles. Since autophagy has been linked to diverse diseases including cancer, it has recently become a very interesting target in breast cancer treatment. Indeed, current clinical trials are trying to use chloroquine or hydroxychloroquine, alone or in combination with other drugs to inhibit autophagy during breast cancer therapy since chemotherapy and radiation, regimens that are used to treat breast cancer, are known to induce autophagy in cancer cells. Importantly, in breast cancer, autophagy has been involved in the development of resistance to chemotherapy and to anti-estrogens. Moreover, a close relationship has recently been described between autophagy and the HER2 receptor. Here, we discuss some of the recent findings relating autophagy and cancer with a particular focus on breast cancer therapy. PMID:25114840

  19. Iodide transport and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Poole, Vikki L; McCabe, Christopher J

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer worldwide and the leading cause of cancer death in women, with incidence rates that continue to rise. The heterogeneity of the disease makes breast cancer exceptionally difficult to treat, particularly for those patients with triple-negative disease. To address the therapeutic complexity of these tumours, new strategies for diagnosis and treatment are urgently required. The ability of lactating and malignant breast cells to uptake and transport iodide has led to the hypothesis that radioiodide therapy could be a potentially viable treatment for many breast cancer patients. Understanding how iodide is transported, and the factors regulating the expression and function of the proteins responsible for iodide transport, is critical for translating this hypothesis into reality. This review covers the three known iodide transporters - the sodium iodide symporter, pendrin and the sodium-coupled monocarboxylate transporter - and their role in iodide transport in breast cells, along with efforts to manipulate them to increase the potential for radioiodide therapy as a treatment for breast cancer.

  20. Digital Mammography: Improvements in Breast Cancer Diagnostic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montaño Zetina, Luis Manuel

    2006-01-01

    X-ray mammography is the most sensitive imaging technique for early detection of breast cancer (diagnostics). It is performed by a radiological system equipped with a rotating molybdenum (Mo) anode tube with an additional Mo filter. In the production of X-ray, bremsstrahlung photons produce an intense diffuse radiation, affecting the contrast between normal and cancerous tissue. So it is known that a good mammographic imaging can help to detect cancer in the first stages avoiding surgery, amputation or even death. In the last years there has been some developments in new imaging techniques to improve the contrast spatial resolution between different tissues: digital imaging, or the so call digital mammography. Digital mammographic imaging is considered an improvement in the prevention of breast cancer due to the advantages it offers.

  1. Digital Mammography: Improvements in Breast Cancer Diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Montano Zetina, Luis Manuel

    2006-01-06

    X-ray mammography is the most sensitive imaging technique for early detection of breast cancer (diagnostics). It is performed by a radiological system equipped with a rotating molybdenum (Mo) anode tube with an additional Mo filter. In the production of X-ray, bremsstrahlung photons produce an intense diffuse radiation, affecting the contrast between normal and cancerous tissue. So it is known that a good mammographic imaging can help to detect cancer in the first stages avoiding surgery, amputation or even death. In the last years there has been some developments in new imaging techniques to improve the contrast spatial resolution between different tissues: digital imaging, or the so call digital mammography. Digital mammographic imaging is considered an improvement in the prevention of breast cancer due to the advantages it offers.

  2. Survivorship Care Plan in Promoting Physical Activity in Breast or Colorectal Cancer Survivors in Wisconsin

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-19

    Cancer Survivor; Healthy Subject; Stage I Colorectal Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIC Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Colorectal Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Colorectal Cancer

  3. Genomic profiling of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anjita; Singh, Alok Kumar; Maurya, Sanjeev Kumar; Rai, Rajani; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Hari S

    2009-05-01

    Genome study provides significant changes in the advancement of molecular diagnosis and treatment in Breast cancer. Several recent critical advances and high-throughput techniques identified the genomic trouble and dramatically accelerated the pace of research in preventing and curing this malignancy. Tumor-suppressor genes, proto-oncogenes, DNA-repair genes, carcinogen-metabolism genes are critically involved in progression of breast cancer. We reviewed imperative finding in breast genetics, ongoing work to segregate further susceptible genes, and preliminary studies on molecular profiling. PMID:19235775

  4. Genomic profiling of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pandey, Anjita; Singh, Alok Kumar; Maurya, Sanjeev Kumar; Rai, Rajani; Tewari, Mallika; Kumar, Mohan; Shukla, Hari S

    2009-05-01

    Genome study provides significant changes in the advancement of molecular diagnosis and treatment in Breast cancer. Several recent critical advances and high-throughput techniques identified the genomic trouble and dramatically accelerated the pace of research in preventing and curing this malignancy. Tumor-suppressor genes, proto-oncogenes, DNA-repair genes, carcinogen-metabolism genes are critically involved in progression of breast cancer. We reviewed imperative finding in breast genetics, ongoing work to segregate further susceptible genes, and preliminary studies on molecular profiling.

  5. Breast Cancer: The Perspective of Northern Nigerian Women

    PubMed Central

    Azubuike, Samuel O.; Celestina, U Onuoha

    2015-01-01

    Background: The rising incidence of breast cancer is complicated by late presentation, which marks breast cancer diagnosis in Nigeria with about 70% of cases presenting at advanced stages of the disease. The aim of this study is to determine the general level of awareness of breast cancer, breast cancer risk factors, signs/symptoms as well as preventive measures nothern Nigerian women. It also aimed at determining their attitudes toward breast cancer cure, prevention and cause. Finally, it aims to determine their practices toward breast cancer and its associated factors. Methods: A cross-sectional community survey was used to study 230 women aged 15–60 years in Chikun Local Government Area. The subjects were selected based on nonprobability sampling. Data collected using self-administered questionnaire were analyzed using Statistical Package for Social Science students (version 16). Test of associations employed Chi-square statistical tool with the level of significance taken at 0.05. Results: About 75.2% knew about breast cancer with health facility (29.13%) being the greatest source of information. An average of 29.35% had knowledge of the risk factors tested. Mean knowledge of the signs and symptoms was 50.1% Average knowledge of breast cancer screening methods was 34.26% with breast self-examination (BSE) (46.1%) being the most recognized. In relation to perception, about 21.7% strongly agreed with the fact that breast cancer is treatable following early detection while 18.3% strongly agreed that screening is effective in detecting breast cancer. Concerning practice, an average of 10.2% practiced any of the screening methods, with BSE (17.4%) being the most practiced. Strongest reasons for nonpractice was ignorance (17.4%). An association was established between knowledge and practice of all the screening methods (P = 0.001 respectively). Conclusions: There is insufficient knowledge, as well as poor practices in relation to important factors associated with

  6. Oxidative stress induces the acquisition of cancer stem-like phenotype in breast cancer detectable by using a Sox2 regulatory region-2 (SRR2) reporter

    PubMed Central

    Gopal, Keshav; Gupta, Nidhi; Zhang, Haifeng; Alshareef, Abdulraheem; Alqahtani, Hind; Bigras, Gilbert; Lewis, Jamie; Douglas, Donna; Kneteman, Norman; Lavasanifar, Afsaneh; Lai, Raymond

    2016-01-01

    We have previously identified a novel intra-tumoral dichotomy in breast cancer based on the differential responsiveness to a Sox2 reporter (SRR2), with cells responsive to SRR2 (RR) being more stem-like than unresponsive cells (RU). Here, we report that RR cells derived from MCF7 and ZR751 displayed a higher tolerance to oxidative stress than their RU counterparts, supporting the concept that the RR phenotype correlates with cancer stemness. Sox2 is directly implicated in this differential H2O2 tolerance, since siRNA knockdown of Sox2 in RR cells leveled this difference. Interestingly, H2O2 converted a proportion of RU cells into RR cells, as evidenced by their expression of luciferase and GFP, markers of SRR2 activity. Compared to RU cells, converted RR cells showed a significant increase in mammosphere formation and tolerance to H2O2. Converted RR cells also adopted the biochemical features of RR cells, as evidenced by their substantial increase in Sox2-SRR2 binding and the expression of 3 signature genes of RR cells (CD133, GPR49 and MUC15). Lastly, the H2O2-induced RU/RR conversion was detectable in a SCID mouse xenograft model and primary tumor cells. To conclude, the H2O2-induced RU/RR conversion has provided a novel model to study the acquisition of cancer stemness and plasticity. PMID:26683522

  7. Overdiagnosis and overtreatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Alvarado, Michael; Ozanne, Elissa; Esserman, Laura

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women. Through greater awareness, mammographic screening, and aggressive biopsy of calcifications, the proportion of low-grade, early stage cancers and in situ lesions among all breast cancers has risen substantially. The introduction of molecular testing has increased the recognition of lower risk subtypes, and less aggressive treatments are more commonly recommended for these subtypes. Mammographically detected breast cancers are much more likely to have low-risk biology than symptomatic tumors found between screenings (interval cancers) or that present as clinical masses. Recognizing the lower risk associated with these lesions and the ability to confirm the risk with molecular tests should safely enable the use of less aggressive treatments. Importantly, ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) lesions, or what have been called stage I cancers, in and of themselves are not life-threatening. In situ lesions have been treated in a manner similar to that of invasive cancer, but there is little evidence to support that this practice has improved mortality. It is also being recognized that DCIS lesions are heterogeneous, and a substantial proportion of them may in fact be precursors of more indolent invasive cancers. Increasing evidence suggests that these lesions are being overtreated. The introduction of molecular tests should be able to help usher in a change in approach to these lesions. Reclassifying these lesions as part of the spectrum of high-risk lesions enables the use of a prevention approach. Learning from the experience with active surveillance in prostate cancer should empower the introduction of new approaches, with a focus on preventing invasive cancer, especially given that there are effective, United States Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved breast cancer preventive interventions. PMID:24451829

  8. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Partners & Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ... Collaborators Spotlight on Scientists NCI Research Areas Cancer Biology Cancer Genomics Causes of Cancer Diagnosis Prevention Screening & ...

  9. The role of lymphatic and blood vessel invasion in predicting survival and methods of detection in patients with primary operable breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Gujam, Fadia J A; Going, James J; Edwards, Joanne; Mohammed, Zahra M A; McMillan, Donald C

    2014-02-01

    Lymphovascular invasion (LBVI) has long been recognized as an essential step of metastases in patients with cancer. However, the process of invasion into lymphatic and blood vessels is still not well defined in breast cancer. To examine the evidence for LBVI, lymphatic vessel invasion (LVI) and blood vessel invasion (BVI) in predicting survival in patients with primary operable breast cancer, and to evaluate the detection methods of vessel invasion. A systematic review of data published from 1964 to 2012 was undertaken according to a pre-defined protocol. There is robust evidence that general LBVI and LVI are independent prognostic factors of poorer survival. The prognostic role of BVI remains unclear. Most studies detected LBVI using H&E stained sections. The overall weighted average of the LBVI rate using immunostaining was higher (35%) than H&E (24%). The LBVI rate using H&E was variable (9-50%) and less variable using immunostaining (32-41%). The overall weighted average of the LVI rate was similar using H&E and immunostaining (33% vs. 25%). The LVI rate using H&E was variable (10-49%) and less variable using immunostaining (21-42%). The overall weighted average of the BVI rate was similar using H&E and/or classical staining and immunostaining (16% vs. 10%). The BVI rates using H&E and/or classical staining approach (4-46%) and immunostaining (1-29%) were both variable. The LBVI and LVI are powerful prognostic factors in primary operable breast cancer. However, BVI was rarely specifically examined and its role in predicting survival is not clear. Further work is required using reliable specific staining to establish the routine use of LVI and BVI in the prediction of outcome in patients with primary operable breast cancer.

  10. Environmental pollutants and breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Brody, Julia Green; Rudel, Ruthann A

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women and the leading cause of cancer death among women 35-54 years of age. Rising incidence, increased risk among migrants to higher risk regions, and poor prediction of individual risk have prompted a search for additional modifiable factors. Risk factors for breast cancer include reproductive characteristics associated with estrogen and other hormones, pharmaceutical hormones, and activities such as alcohol use and lack of exercise that affect hormone levels. As a result, investigation of hormonally active compounds in commercial products and pollution is a priority. Compounds that cause mammary tumors in animals are additional priorities. Animal models provide insight into possible mechanisms for effects of environmental pollutants on breast cancer and identify chemical exposures to target in epidemiologic studies. Although few epidemiologic studies have been conducted for chemical exposures, occupational studies show associations between breast cancer and exposure to certain organic solvents and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs). Population-based studies have been limited to a few organochlorine compounds and PAHs and have been mostly negative. A variety of challenges in studies of breast cancer and the environment may have contributed to negative findings. Lack of exposure assessment tools and few hypothesis-generating toxicologic studies limit the scope of epidemiologic studies. Issues of timing with respect to latency and periods of breast vulnerability, and individual differences in susceptibility pose other challenges. Substantial work is needed in exposure assessment, toxicology, and susceptibility before we can expect a pay-off from large epidemiologic studies of breast cancer and environment. PMID:12826474

  11. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-12-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  12. Natural Products for Chemoprevention of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Eun-Yi; Moon, Aree

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer is the primary cause of cancer death in women. Although current therapies have shown some promise against breast cancer, there is still no effective cure for the majority of patients in the advanced stages of breast cancer. Development of effective agents to slow, reduce, or reverse the incidence of breast cancer in high-risk women is necessary. Chemoprevention of breast cancer by natural products is advantageous, as these compounds have few side effects and low toxicity compared to synthetic compounds. In the present review, we summarize natural products which exert chemopreventive activities against breast cancer, such as curcumin, sauchinone, lycopene, denbinobin, genipin, capsaicin, and ursolic acid. This review examines the current knowledge about natural compounds and their mechanisms that underlie breast cancer chemopreventive activity both in vitro and in vivo. The present review may provide information on the use of these compounds for the prevention of breast cancer. PMID:26734584

  13. Nerve Fibers in Breast Cancer Tissues Indicate Aggressive Tumor Progression

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Di; Su, Shicheng; Cui, Xiuying; Shen, Ximing; Zeng, Yunjie; Wu, Wei; Chen, Jianing; Chen, Fei; He, Chonghua; Liu, Jiang; Huang, Wei; Liu, Qiang; Su, Fengxi; Song, Erwei; Ouyang, Nengtai

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Emerging evidence has indicated nerve fibers as a marker in the progression of various types of cancers, such as pancreatic cancer and prostate cancer. However, whether nerve fibers are associated with breast cancer progression remains unclear. In this study, we evaluated the presence of nerve fibers in 352 breast cancer specimens and 83 benign breast tissue specimens including 43 cases of cystic fibrosis and 40 cases of fibroadenoma from 2 independent breast tumor center using immunohistochemical staining for specific peripheral nerve fiber markers. In all, nerve fibers were present in 130 out of 352 breast cancer tissue specimens, while none were detected in normal breast tissue specimens. Among 352 cases, we defined 239 cases from Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Guangzhou, China, as the training set, and 113 cases from the First Affiliated Hospital of Shantou University, Guangdong, China, as the validation set. The thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is significantly correlated with poor differentiation, lymph node metastasis, high clinical staging, and triple negative subtype in breast cancer. More importantly, Cox multifactor analysis indicates that the thickness of tumor-involving nerve fibers is a previously unappreciated independent prognostic factors associated with shorter disease-free survival of breast cancer patients. Our findings are further validated by online Oncomine database. In conclusion, our results show that nerve fiber involvement in breast cancer is associated with progression of the malignancy and warrant further studies in the future. PMID:25501061

  14. Breast cancer diagnosis: biographical disruption, emotional experiences and strategic management in Thai women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liamputtong, Pranee; Suwankhong, Dusanee

    2015-09-01

    In this article we draw on Bury's theory of biographical disruption to discuss the meanings of, and emotional experiences related to, being diagnosed with breast cancer among southern Thai women. Qualitative methods, including in-depth interviewing and drawing methods, were used to collect data from 20 women with breast cancer. The women perceived breast cancer to be a rhok raai; an evil or dread disease. They believed that breast cancer would lead to death. The disruption in their biography occurred when they detected abnormalities indicating breast cancer. The women's narratives revealed their chaotic lives upon this diagnosis and the news precipitated in them shock, fear, anxiety and loss of hope. Although they experienced chaos and disruption, the women cultivated strategies that helped them cope with their experiences by accepting their fate and adhering to Buddhist beliefs and practices. Through their narratives of biographical disruption, the women in our study offer healthcare providers knowledge that could lead to an appreciation of their needs and concerns. This knowledge is crucial for health professionals who wish to provide emotional support to women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer in Thailand and elsewhere.

  15. Breast cancer diagnosis: biographical disruption, emotional experiences and strategic management in Thai women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liamputtong, Pranee; Suwankhong, Dusanee

    2015-09-01

    In this article we draw on Bury's theory of biographical disruption to discuss the meanings of, and emotional experiences related to, being diagnosed with breast cancer among southern Thai women. Qualitative methods, including in-depth interviewing and drawing methods, were used to collect data from 20 women with breast cancer. The women perceived breast cancer to be a rhok raai; an evil or dread disease. They believed that breast cancer would lead to death. The disruption in their biography occurred when they detected abnormalities indicating breast cancer. The women's narratives revealed their chaotic lives upon this diagnosis and the news precipitated in them shock, fear, anxiety and loss of hope. Although they experienced chaos and disruption, the women cultivated strategies that helped them cope with their experiences by accepting their fate and adhering to Buddhist beliefs and practices. Through their narratives of biographical disruption, the women in our study offer healthcare providers knowledge that could lead to an appreciation of their needs and concerns. This knowledge is crucial for health professionals who wish to provide emotional support to women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer in Thailand and elsewhere. PMID:25922881

  16. Animal testing using 3D microwave tomography system for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jong Moon; Son, Sung Ho; Kim, Hyuk Je; Kim, Bo Ra; Choi, Heyng Do; Jeon, Soon Ik

    2014-01-01

    The three dimensional microwave tomography (3D MT) system of the Electronics and Telecommunications Research Institute (ETRI) comprises an antenna array, transmitting receiving module, switch matrix module and a signal processing component. This system also includes a patient interface bed as well as a 3D reconstruction algorithm. Here, we perform a comparative analysis of image reconstruction results using the assembled system and MRI results, which is used to image the breasts of dogs. Microwave imaging reconstruction results (at 1,500 MHz) obtained using the ETRI 3D MT system are presented. The system provides computationally reliable diagnosis results from the reconstructed MT Image. PMID:25160233

  17. NASA SMART Probe: Breast Cancer Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mah, Robert W.; Norvig, Peter (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    There is evidence in breast cancer and other malignancies that the physiologic environment within a tumor correlates with clinical outcome. We are developing a unique percutaneous Smart Probe to be used at the time of needle biopsy of the breast. The Smart Probe will simultaneously measure multiple physiologic parameters within a breast tumor. Direct and indirect measurements of tissue oxygen levels, blood flow, pH, and tissue fluid pressure will be analyzed in real-time. These parameters will be interpreted individually and collectively by innovative neural network techniques using advanced intelligent software. The goals are 1) develop a pecutaneous Smart Probe with multiple sensor modalities and applying advanced Information Technologies to provide real time diagnostic information of the tissue at tip of the probe, 2) test the percutaneous Smart Probe in women with benign and malignant breast masses who will be undergoing surgical biopsy, 3) correlate probe sensor data with benign and malignant status of breast masses, 4) determine whether the probe can detect physiologic differences within a breast tumor, and its margins, and in adjacent normal breast tissue, 5) correlate probe sensor data with known prognostic factors for breast caner, including tumor size, tumor grade, axillary lymph node metastases, estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor status.

  18. The Italian multi-centre project on evaluation of MRI and other imaging modalities in early detection of breast cancer in subjects at high genetic risk.

    PubMed

    Podo, F; Sardanelli, F; Canese, R; D'Agnolo, G; Natali, P G; Crecco, M; Grandinetti, M L; Musumeci, R; Trecate, G; Bergonzi, S; De Simone, T; Costa, C; Pasini, B; Manuokian, S; Spatti, G B; Vergnaghi, D; Morassut, S; Boiocchi, M; Dolcetti, R; Viel, A; De Giacomi, C; Veronesi, A; Coran, F; Silingardi, V; Turchett, D; Cortesi, L; De Santis, M; Federico, M; Romagnoli, R; Ferrari, S; Bevilacqua, G; Bartolozzi, C; Caligo, M A; Cilotti, A; Marini, C; Cirillo, S; Marra, V; Martincich, L; Contegiacomo, A; Pensabene, M; Capuano, I; Burgazzi, G B; Petrillo, A; Bonomo, L; Carriero, A; Mariani-Costantini, R; Battista, P; Cama, A; Palca, G; Di Maggio, C; D'Andrea, E; Bazzocchi, M; Francescutti, G E; Zuiani, C; Londero, V; Zunnui, I; Gustavino, C; Centurioni, M G; Iozzelli, A; Panizza, P; Del Maschio, A

    2002-09-01

    This report presents the preliminary results of the first phase (21 months) of a multi-centre, non-randomised, prospective study, aimed at evaluating the effectiveness of contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), X-ray mammography (XM) and ultrasound (US) in early diagnosis of breast cancer (BC) in subjects at high genetic risk. This Italian national trial (coordinated by the Istituto Superiore di Sanità, Rome) so far recruited 105 women (mean age 46.0 years; median age 51.0; age range 25-77 years), who were either proven BRCA1 or BRCA2 mutation carriers or had a 1 in 2 probability of being carriers (40/105 with a previous personal history of BC). Eight cases of breast carcinomas were detected in the trial (mean age 55.3 years, median age 52.5; age range 35-70 years; five with previous personal history of BC). All trial-detected BC cases (8/8) were identified by MRI, while XM and US correctly classified only one. MRI had one false positive case, XM and US none. Seven "MRI-only" detected cancers (4 invasive, 3 in situ) occurred in both pre- (n = 2) and post-menopausal (n = 5) women. With respect to the current XM screening programmes addressed to women in the age range 50-69 years, the global incidence of BC in the trial (7.6%) was over ten-fold higher. The cost per "MRI-only" detected cancer in this particular category of subjects at high genetic risk was substantially lower than that of an XM-detected cancer in the general women population. These preliminary results confirmed that MRI is a very useful tool to screen subjects at high genetic risk for breast carcinoma, not only in pre-, but also in post-menopausal age, with a low probability of false positive cases.

  19. [Immunotherapy opportunities in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Pusztai, Lajos; Ladányi, Andrea; Székely, Borbála; Dank, Magdolna

    2016-03-01

    The prognostic value of tumor infiltrating lymphocytes in breast cancer has long been recognized by histopathologists. These observations were reaffirmed by recent immunohistochemistry and gene expression profiling studies that also revealed an association between greater chemotherapy sensitivity and extensive lymphocytic infiltration in early stage breast cancers treated with neoadjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest that local anti-tumor immune response can at least partially control cancer growth and may mediate the antitumor effects of chemotherapy. However, until recently, there was no direct clinical evidence to demonstrate that enhancing anti-tumor immune response could lead to clinical benefit in breast cancer patients. The recent development of clinically effective immune checkpoint inhibitors made it possible to test the therapeutic impact of augmenting the local anti-tumor immune response. Two Phase I clinical trials using single agent anti-PD-1 (MK-3475, pembrolizumab) and anti-PD-L1 (MPDL3280A, atezolizumab) antibodies demonstrated close to 20% tumor response rates in heavily pretreated, metastatic, triple negative breast cancers. The most remarkable feature of the responses was their long duration. Several patients had disease control close to a year, or longer, which has not previously been seen with chemotherapy regimens in this patient population. A large number of clinical trials are currently underway with these and similar drugs in the neoadjuvant, adjuvant and metastatic settings to define the role of this new treatment modality in breast cancer. PMID:26934349

  20. Breast cancer and fertility preservation

    PubMed Central

    Kim, S. Samuel; Klemp, Jennifer; Fabian, Carol

    2014-01-01

    Objective To review the benefits of adjuvant systemic therapy given to women with breast cancer of reproductive age, its effects on fertility, and options for fertility preservation. Design Publications relevant to fertility preservation and breast cancer were identified through a PubMed database search. Conclusion(s) Most women who develop invasive breast cancer under age 40 will be advised to undergo adjuvant chemotherapy with or without extended antihormonal therapy to reduce the risk of recurrence and death from breast cancer. Adjuvant chemotherapy particularly with alkylating agents such as cyclophosphamide is gonadotoxic and markedly accelerates the rate of age-related ovarian follicle loss. Although loss of fertility is an important issue for young cancer survivors, there is often little discussion about fertility preservation before initiation of adjuvant therapy. Greater familiarity with prognosis and effects of different types of adjuvant therapy on the part of infertility specialists and fertility preservation options such cryopreservation of embryos, oocytes, and ovarian tissue on the part of oncologists would facilitate these discussions. Establishment of rapid fertility consultation links within cancer survivorship programs can help ensure that every young woman who is likely to undergo gonadotoxic cancer treatment is counseled about the effects of therapy and options available to her to increase the likelihood of childbearing after cancer treatment. PMID:21272867

  1. Breast Cancer Risk Prediction Models

    Cancer.gov

    Developing statistical models that estimate the probability of developing breast cancer over a defined period of time will help clinicians identify individuals at higher risk of specific cancers, allowing for earlier or more frequent screening and counseling of behavioral changes to decrease risk.

  2. Lung cancer after treatment for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lorigan, Paul; Califano, Raffaele; Faivre-Finn, Corinne; Howell, Anthony; Thatcher, Nick

    2010-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cancer in women, and the second most common cause of cancer death after lung cancer. Improvements in the outcome of breast cancer mean that more patients are living longer and are, therefore, at risk of developing a second malignancy. The aim of this review is to present the current understanding of the risk of lung cancer arising in patients previously treated for early stage breast cancer. We review data on the effect of treatment factors (ie, surgery type, radiotherapy technique, and adjuvant chemotherapy) and patient factors (ie, age and smoking) on the risk of developing a subsequent lung cancer. The evidence suggests that older radiotherapy techniques were associated with a substantially increased risk of developing lung cancer in the ipsilateral lung, but there is no clear evidence of an increased risk with modern techniques. Smoking is an important risk factor, and increases the risk of lung cancer in those receiving radiotherapy. Adjuvant chemotherapy is not significantly associated with an increased risk. The risk of developing lung cancer increases with time elapsed since treatment, but any effect of age at treatment is unclear.

  3. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Isolate of long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from outgrowth of duct element; cells shown soon after isolation and early in culture in a dish. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  4. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Same long-term growth human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC), but after 3 weeks in concinuous culture. Note attempts to reform duct elements, but this time in two dimensions in a dish rather that in three demensions in tissue. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  5. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Isolation of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Outgrowth of cells from duct element in upper right corner cultured in a standard dish; most cells spontaneously die during early cell divisions, but a few will establish long-term growth. NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cell (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunorous tissue. Credit: Dr. Robert Tichmond, NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC).

  6. Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research Antiperspirants/Deodorants and Breast Cancer On This Page Can antiperspirants or deodorants cause breast cancer? What do scientists know about the ingredients in ...

  7. Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk

    MedlinePlus

    ... Overview–for health professionals Research Reproductive History and Breast Cancer Risk On This Page Is there a relationship between pregnancy and breast cancer risk? Are any pregnancy-related factors associated with ...

  8. Innovative Trials Produce Promising Breast Cancer Drugs

    MedlinePlus

    ... news/fullstory_159762.html Innovative Trials Produce Promising Breast Cancer Drugs Adaptive study design allows researchers to match ... provide a fighting chance for women with advanced breast cancer. The drugs, neratinib and veliparib, both appear effective ...

  9. Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Honoring Pioneers in Breast Cancer Research Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... Distinguished Medical Service Award for their pioneering breast cancer research. Photo courtesy of Bill Branson, NIH In this ...

  10. Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program

    Cancer.gov

    The Breast Cancer and the Environment Research Program supports a multidisciplinary network of scientists, clinicians, and community partners to examine the effects of environmental exposures that may predispose a woman to breast cancer throughout her life.

  11. In vitro comparative models for canine and human breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Visan, Simona; Balacescu, Ovidiu; Berindan-Neagoe, Ioana; Catoi, Cornel

    2016-01-01

    During the past four decades, an increased number of similarities between canine mammary tumors and human breast cancer have been reported: molecular, histological, morphological, clinical and epidemiological, which lead to comparative oncological studies. One of the most important goals in human and veterinary oncology is to discover potential molecular biomarkers that could detect breast cancer in an early stage and to develop new effective therapies. Recently, cancer cell lines have successfully been used as an in vitro model to study the biology of cancer, to investigate molecular pathways and to test the efficiency of anticancer drugs. Moreover, establishment of an experimental animal model for the study of human breast cancer will improve testing potential anti-cancer therapies and the discovery of effective therapeutic schemes suitable for human clinical trials. In this review, we collected data from previous studies that strengthen the value of canine mammary cancer cell lines as an in vitro model for the study of human breast cancer. PMID:27004024

  12. In vitro comparative models for canine and human breast cancers

    PubMed Central

    VISAN, SIMONA; BALACESCU, OVIDIU; BERINDAN-NEAGOE, IOANA; CATOI, CORNEL

    2016-01-01

    During the past four decades, an increased number of similarities between canine mammary tumors and human breast cancer have been reported: molecular, histological, morphological, clinical and epidemiological, which lead to comparative oncological studies. One of the most important goals in human and veterinary oncology is to discover potential molecular biomarkers that could detect breast cancer in an early stage and to develop new effective therapies. Recently, cancer cell lines have successfully been used as an in vitro model to study the biology of cancer, to investigate molecular pathways and to test the efficiency of anticancer drugs. Moreover, establishment of an experimental animal model for the study of human breast cancer will improve testing potential anti-cancer therapies and the discovery of effective therapeutic schemes suitable for human clinical trials. In this review, we collected data from previous studies that strengthen the value of canine mammary cancer cell lines as an in vitro model for the study of human breast cancer. PMID:27004024

  13. Circulating Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Hall, Carolyn; Valad, Lily; Lucci, Anthony

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most commonly diagnosed cancer among women, resulting in an estimated 40,000 deaths in 2014.1 Metastasis, a complex, multi-step process, remains the primary cause of death for these patients. Although the mechanisms involved in metastasis have not been fully elucidated, considerable evidence suggests that metastatic spread is mediated by rare cells within the heterogeneous primary tumor that acquire the ability to invade into the bloodstream. In the bloodstream, they can travel to distant sites, sometimes remaining undetected and in a quiescent state for an extended period of time before they establish distant metastases in the bone, lung, liver, or brain. These occult micrometastatic cells (circulating tumor cells, CTCs) are rare, yet their prognostic significance has been demonstrated in both metastatic and non-metastatic breast cancer patients. Because repeated tumor tissue collection is typically not feasible and peripheral blood draws are minimally invasive, serial CTC enumeration might provide "real-time liquid biopsy" snapshots that could be used to identify early-stage breast cancer patients with micrometastatic disease who are at risk for disease progression and monitor treatment response in patients with advanced disease. In addition, characterizing CTCs might aid in the development of novel, personalized therapies aimed at eliminating micrometastases. This review describes current CTC isolation, detection, and characterization strategies in operable breast cancer. PMID:27481009

  14. [Breast cancer. Individualized therapy concepts].

    PubMed

    Harbeck, N; Wuerstlein, R

    2013-02-01

    Personalized medicine in the sense of individualized therapy concepts plays an important role in breast cancer. In early breast cancer the molecular subtypes luminal A and B and basal-like are important for planning adjuvant systemic therapy. Prognostic and predictive markers, such as hormone receptor status, HER2, Ki-67, uPA/PAI-1 or multiple gene tests, such as Oncotype DX® currently allow avoidance of an over therapy or under therapy. In early and also advanced breast cancer there are an increasing number of new targeted therapies which represent an augmentation of standard endocrine and chemotherapy and in the future could at least partially replace them. As a whole the therapy regimens for breast cancer have become more complex due to the inclusion of molecular information, new therapies and the withdrawal of conventional treatment concepts. Decisive for the future will be the confirmation of this development by modern study concepts contemporarily with adequate evidence. It could then be expected that a personalized therapy for early breast cancer and in particular adjuvant chemotherapy would only be used for those patients for whom it is really necessary. In advanced stage disease there is justified hope that the survival time in the sense of a chronic disease can be improved by the use of targeted therapy.

  15. Veliparib, Cisplatin, and Vinorelbine Ditartrate in Treating Patients With Recurrent and/or Metastatic Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-01

    Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA1; Hereditary Breast/Ovarian Cancer - BRCA2; Male Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer

  16. Incidence of primary breast cancer in Iran: Ten-year national cancer registry data report.

    PubMed

    Jazayeri, Seyed Behzad; Saadat, Soheil; Ramezani, Rashid; Kaviani, Ahmad

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer is the leading type of malignancy and the leading cause of cancer-related deaths in women worldwide. The screening programs and advances in the treatment of patients with breast cancer have led to an increase in overall survival. Cancer registry systems play an important role in providing basic data for research and the monitoring of the cancer status. In this study, the results of the 10-year national cancer registry (NCR) of Iran in breast cancer are reviewed. NCR database records were searched for primary breast cancer records according to ICD-O-3 coding and the cases were reviewed. A total of 52,068 cases were found with the coding of primary breast cancer. Females constituted 97.1% of the cases. Breast cancer was the leading type of cancer in Iranian females, accounting for 24.6% of all cancers. The mean age of the women with breast cancer was 49.6 years (95%CI 49.5-49.6). Most of the cases (95.7%) were registered as having invasive pathologies (behavior code 3). The most common morphology of primary breast cancer was invasive ductal carcinoma (ICD-O 8500/3) followed by invasive lobular carcinoma (ICD-O 8520/3) with relative frequencies of 77.8% and 5.2%, respectively. The average annual crude incidence of primary breast cancer in females was 22.6 (95%CI 22.1-23.1) per 100,000 females, with an age-standardized rate (ASR) of 27.4 (95%CI 22.5-35.9). There were no data on survival, staging or immunohistochemical marker(s) of the breast-cancer-registered cases. The incidence of breast cancer in Iran is lower than in low-middle-income neighboring countries. The NCR data registry of breast cancer is not accurate in monitoring the effect of screening programs or determining the current status of breast cancer in Iran. Screening programs of breast cancer in Iran have failed to enhance the detection of the patients with in situ lesion detection. A quality breast cancer registry and a screening program for breast cancer are both needed.

  17. Detection of Clonal and Subclonal Copy-Number Variants in Cell-Free DNA from Patients with Breast Cancer Using a Massively Multiplexed PCR Methodology.

    PubMed

    Kirkizlar, Eser; Zimmermann, Bernhard; Constantin, Tudor; Swenerton, Ryan; Hoang, Bin; Wayham, Nicholas; Babiarz, Joshua E; Demko, Zachary; Pelham, Robert J; Kareht, Stephanie; Simon, Alexander L; Jinnett, Kristine N; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Hill, Matthew

    2015-10-01

    We demonstrate proof-of-concept for the use of massively multiplexed PCR and next-generation sequencing (mmPCR-NGS) to identify both clonal and subclonal copy-number variants (CNVs) in circulating tumor DNA. This is the first report of a targeted methodology for detection of CNVs in plasma. Using an in vitro model of cell-free DNA, we show that mmPCR-NGS can accurately detect CNVs with average allelic imbalances as low as 0.5%, an improvement over previously reported whole-genome sequencing approaches. Our method revealed differences in the spectrum of CNVs detected in tumor tissue subsections and matching plasma samples from 11 patients with stage II breast cancer. Moreover, we showed that liquid biopsies are able to detect subclonal mutations that may be missed in tumor tissue biopsies. We anticipate that this mmPCR-NGS methodology will have broad applicability for the characterization, diagnosis, and therapeutic monitoring of CNV-enriched cancers, such as breast, ovarian, and lung cancer. PMID:26500031

  18. Minocycline Hydrochloride in Reducing Chemotherapy Induced Depression and Anxiety in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-03-07

    Anxiety Disorder; Depression; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  19. Fulvestrant and Palbociclib in Treating Older Patients With Hormone Responsive Breast Cancer That Cannot Be Removed by Surgery

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-09-21

    Estrogen Receptor and/or Progesterone Receptor Positive; HER2/Neu Negative; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  20. Heavy Metal Exposure in Predicting Peripheral Neuropathy in Patients With Stage I-III Breast Cancer Undergoing Chemotherapy

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2015-05-01

    Male Breast Cancer; Neurotoxicity; Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer

  1. Breast Cancer, Version 3.2013

    PubMed Central

    Theriault, Richard L.; Carlson, Robert W.; Allred, Craig; Anderson, Benjamin O.; Burstein, Harold J.; Edge, Stephen B.; Farrar, William B.; Forero, Andres; Giordano, Sharon Hermes; Goldstein, Lori J.; Gradishar, William J.; Hayes, Daniel F.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Isakoff, Steven J.; Ljung, Britt-Marie E.; Mankoff, David A.; Marcom, P. Kelly; Mayer, Ingrid A.; McCormick, Beryl; Pierce, Lori J.; Reed, Elizabeth C.; Schwartzberg, Lee S.; Smith, Mary Lou; Soliman, Hatem; Somlo, George; Ward, John H.; Wolff, Antonio C.; Zellars, Richard; Shead, Dorothy A.; Kumar, Rashmi

    2014-01-01

    These NCCN Guidelines Insights highlight the important updates specific to the management of HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer in the 2013 version of the NCCN Clinical Practice Guidelines in Oncology for Breast Cancer. These include new first-line and subsequent therapy options for patients with HER2-positive metastatic breast cancer. PMID:23847214

  2. Do underarm cosmetics cause breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Gikas, Panagiotis D; Mansfield, Lucy; Mokbel, Kefah

    2004-01-01

    Although animal and laboratory studies suggest a possible link between certain chemicals used in underarm cosmetics and breast cancer development, there is no reliable evidence that underarm cosmetics use increases breast cancer risk in humans. This article reviews the evidence for and against the possible link between breast cancer and underarm cosmetics and highlights the need for further research to clarify this issue.

  3. Internet Use and Breast Cancer Survivors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Muhamad, Mazanah; Afshari, Mojgan; Mohamed, Nor Aini

    2011-01-01

    A survey was administered to 400 breast cancer survivors at hospitals and support group meetings in Peninsular Malaysia to explore their level of Internet use and factors related to the Internet use by breast cancer survivors. Findings of this study indicated that about 22.5% of breast cancer survivors used Internet to get information about breast…

  4. Microcalcifications detection using Fisher's linear discriminant and breast density.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, G A; Gonzalez, J A; Altamirano, L; Guichard, J S; Diaz, R

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer is one of the main causes of death in women. However, its early detection through microcalcifications identification is a powerful tool to save many lives. In this study, we present a supervised microcalcifications detection method based on Fisher's Linear Discriminant. Our method considers knowledge about breast density allowing it to identify microcalcifications even in difficult cases (when there is not high contrast between the microcalcification and the surrounding breast tissue). We evaluated our method with two mammograms databases for each of its phases: breast density classification, microcalcifications segmentation, and false-positive reduction, obtaining cumulative accuracy results around 90% for the microcalcifications detection task.

  5. Can We Prevent Breast Cancer?

    PubMed Central

    Saadat, Sabiha

    2008-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second most common cancer in the world and the most common cancer in females accounting to 23% of all cases. Between January 1998 and December 2004–2004, 6,882 cases were reported from all GCC states accounting to 11.8% from all cancers and 22.7% from cancers in females. An ASR/100,000 woman was 46.4 from Bahrain, 44.3 from Kuwait, 35.5 from Qatar, 19.2 from UAE, 14.2 from Oman and 12.9 from KSA. Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in Arab women constituting 14–42% of all women cancers. Breast cancer in Arab countries presents almost 10 yrs younger than in USA and Europe. Median age at presentation is 48–52 and 50% of all cases are below the age of 50 where as only 25% of cases in industrialized nations are below the age of 50 yrs. What we need to fight this deadly disease is opening of screening centers with trained physicians equipped with ultrasound, x-ray unit, a pathology lab and most of all a system where a patient is seen urgently on referral to a secondary level care. Health education campaigns should be organized, female medical students should be encouraged to be general surgeons in a community where social customs still have value. PMID:21475500

  6. Chapter 27 -- Breast Cancer Genomics, Section VI, Pathology and Biological Markers of Invasive Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Spellman, Paul T.; Heiser, Laura; Gray, Joe W.

    2009-06-18

    molecular differences between cancer and normal that may be exploited to therapeutic benefit or that provide targets for molecular assays that may enable early cancer detection, and predict individual disease progression or response to treatment. This chapter reviews current and future directions in genome analysis and summarizes studies that provide insights into breast cancer pathophysiology or that suggest strategies to improve breast cancer management.

  7. Direct Extraction of Tumor Response Based on Ensemble Empirical Mode Decomposition for Image Reconstruction of Early Breast Cancer Detection by UWB.

    PubMed

    Li, Qinwei; Xiao, Xia; Wang, Liang; Song, Hang; Kono, Hayato; Liu, Peifang; Lu, Hong; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2015-10-01

    A direct extraction method of tumor response based on ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD) is proposed for early breast cancer detection by ultra-wide band (UWB) microwave imaging. With this approach, the image reconstruction for the tumor detection can be realized with only extracted signals from as-detected waveforms. The calibration process executed in the previous research for obtaining reference waveforms which stand for signals detected from the tumor-free model is not required. The correctness of the method is testified by successfully detecting a 4 mm tumor located inside the glandular region in one breast model and by the model located at the interface between the gland and the fat, respectively. The reliability of the method is checked by distinguishing a tumor buried in the glandular tissue whose dielectric constant is 35. The feasibility of the method is confirmed by showing the correct tumor information in both simulation results and experimental results for the realistic 3-D printed breast phantom.

  8. Ultrasound-guided photoacoustic imaging for the selective detection of EGFR-expressing breast cancer and lymph node metastases

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meihua; Kim, Hoe Suk; Jin, Tiefeng; Yi, Ann; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    We assessed the use of ultrasound (US)-guided photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and anti-EGFR antibody-conjugated gold nanorods (anti-EGFR-GNs) to non-invasively detect EGFR-expressing primary tumor masses and regional lymph node (LN) metastases in breast tumor mice generated by injecting MCF-7 (EGFR-negative) or MDA-MB-231 (EGFR-positive) human breast cells using a preclinical Vevo 2100 LAZR Imaging system. Anti-EGFR-GNs provided a significant enhancement in the PA signal in MDA-MB-231 tumor and the axillary LN metastases relative to MCF-7 tumor and non-LN metastases. We demonstrated that US-guided PAI using anti-EGFR-GNs is highly sensitive for the selective visualization of EGFR-expressing breast primary tumors as well as LN micrometastases. PMID:27231631

  9. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Alex C.; Hitt, Austin; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-03-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists' manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  10. Automated assessment of bilateral breast volume asymmetry as a breast cancer biomarker during mammographic screening

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Alex C; Hitt, Austin N; Voisin, Sophie; Tourassi, Georgia

    2013-01-01

    The biological concept of bilateral symmetry as a marker of developmental stability and good health is well established. Although most individuals deviate slightly from perfect symmetry, humans are essentially considered bilaterally symmetrical. Consequently, increased fluctuating asymmetry of paired structures could be an indicator of disease. There are several published studies linking bilateral breast size asymmetry with increased breast cancer risk. These studies were based on radiologists manual measurements of breast size from mammographic images. We aim to develop a computerized technique to assess fluctuating breast volume asymmetry in screening mammograms and investigate whether it correlates with the presence of breast cancer. Using a large database of screening mammograms with known ground truth we applied automated breast region segmentation and automated breast size measurements in CC and MLO views using three well established methods. All three methods confirmed that indeed patients with breast cancer have statistically significantly higher fluctuating asymmetry of their breast volumes. However, statistically significant difference between patients with cancer and benign lesions was observed only for the MLO views. The study suggests that automated assessment of global bilateral asymmetry could serve as a breast cancer risk biomarker for women undergoing mammographic screening. Such biomarker could be used to alert radiologists or computer-assisted detection (CAD) systems to exercise increased vigilance if higher than normal cancer risk is suspected.

  11. Secretory breast cancer. Case report

    PubMed Central

    LOMBARDI, A.; MAGGI, S.; BERSIGOTTI, L.; LAZZARIN, G.; NUCCETELLI, E.; AMANTI, C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Secretory carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor initially described in children but occurring equally in adult population. This unusual breast cancer subtype has a generally favorable prognosis, although several cases have been described in adults with increased aggressiveness and a risk of metastases. However, surgery is still considered the most appropriate treatment for this pathology. We describe the case of a 50 – year-old woman who has undergone a breast conservative surgery for a little tumor, preoperatively diagnosticated by a fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) as a well differentiated infiltrating carcinoma. PMID:23660165

  12. Secretory breast cancer. Case report.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, A; Maggi, S; Bersigotti, L; Lazzarin, G; Nuccetelli, E; Amanti, C

    2013-04-01

    Secretory carcinoma of the breast is a rare tumor initially described in children but occurring equally in adult population. This unusual breast cancer subtype has a generally favorable prognosis, although several cases have been described in adults with increased aggressiveness and a risk of metastases. However, surgery is still considered the most appropriate treatment for this pathology. We describe the case of a 50 -year-old woman who has undergone a breast conservative surgery for a little tumor, preoperatively diagnosticated by a fine needle aspiration biopsy (FNAB) as a well differentiated infiltrating carcinoma.

  13. Evaluate Risk/Benefit of Nab Paclitaxel in Combination With Gemcitabine and Carboplatin Compared to Gemcitabine and Carboplatin in Triple Negative Metastatic Breast Cancer (or Metastatic Triple Negative Breast Cancer)

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-10-25

    Breast Tumor; Breast Cancer; Cancer of the Breast; Estrogen Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; HER2- Negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor- Negative Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Breast Cancer; Triple-negative Metastatic Breast Cancer; Metastatic Breast Cancer

  14. Tamoxifen for breast cancer prevention

    SciTech Connect

    Jordan, V.C.

    1995-02-01

    The case for tamoxifen to be tested as a preventive for breast cancer has merit. Animal studies demonstrate that tamoxifen prevents mammary carcinogenesis and clinical studies now confirm that adjuvant tamoxifen therapy is the only systemic treatment that will prevent contralateral breast cancer. Developing clinical studies confirm the laboratory data that tamoxifen will maintain post-menopausal bone density in the lumbar spine and the neck of the femur; two important skeletal sites for the ultimate prevention of osteoporosis. However, a most important target site-specific effect of tamoxifen is the decrease in low-density lipoprotein cholesterol levels in postmenopausal women. This positive property of tamoxifen may be responsible for the recorded decreases in hospital visits for the treatment of cardiac conditions and the significant decrease in fatal myocardial infarction for women treated with 5 years of adjuvant tamoxifen. These data provide the scientific basis to undertake randomized, placebocontrolled clinical trials to test the worth of tamoxifen to prevent breast cancer.

  15. Breast Cancer Research at NASA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) is sponsoring research with Bioreactors, rotating wall vessels designed to grow tissue samples in space, to understand how breast cancer works. This ground-based work studies the growth and assembly of human mammary epithelial cells (HMEC) from breast cancer susceptible tissue. Radiation can make the cells cancerous, thus allowing better comparisons of healthy vs. tunourous tissues. Here, two High-Aspect Ratio Vessels turn at about 12 rmp to keep breast tissue constructs suspended inside the culture media. Syringes allow scientists to pull for analysis during growth sequences. The tube in the center is a water bubbler that dehumidifies the air to prevent evaporation of the media and thus the appearance of destructive bubbles in the bioreactor.

  16. Inflammatory breast cancer: an overview.

    PubMed

    van Uden, D J P; van Laarhoven, H W M; Westenberg, A H; de Wilt, J H W; Blanken-Peeters, C F J M

    2015-02-01

    Inflammatory breast cancer (IBC) is the most aggressive entity of breast cancer. Management involves coordination of multidisciplinary management and usually includes neoadjuvant chemotherapy, ablative surgery if a tumor-free resection margin is expected and locoregional radiotherapy. This multimodal therapeutic approach has significantly improved patient survival. However, the median overall survival among women with IBC is still poor. By elucidating the biologic characteristics of IBC, new treatment options may become available. We performed a comprehensive review of the English-language literature on IBC through computerized literature searches. The objective of the current review is to present an overview of the literature related to the biology, imaging and multidisciplinary treatment of inflammatory breast cancer.

  17. Epidemiology, Incidence and Mortality of Breast Cancer in Asia.

    PubMed

    Ghoncheh, Mahshid; Momenimovahed, Zohre; Salehiniya, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women around the world. Information on the incidence and mortality of breast cancer is essential for planning health measures. This study aimed to investigate the incidence and mortality of breast cancer in the world using age-specific incidence and mortality rates for the year 2012 acquired from the global cancer project (GLOBOCAN 2012) as well as data about incidence and mortality of the cancer based on national reports. It was estimated that 1,671,149 new cases of breast cancer were identified and 521,907 cases of deaths due to breast cancer occurred in the world in 2012. According to GLOBOCAN, it is the most common cancer in women, accounting for 25.1% of all cancers. Breast cancer incidence in developed countries is higher, while relative mortality is greatest in less developed countries. Education of women is suggested in all countries for early detection and treatment. Plans for the control and prevention of this cancer must be a high priority for health policy makers; also, it is necessary to increase awareness of risk factors and early detection in less developed countries. PMID:27165207

  18. 76 FR 787 - Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young Women (ACBCYW)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-06

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Breast Cancer in Young... prevent breast cancer (particularly among those at heightened risk) and promote the early detection and... recommendations and the public health aspects of breast cancer in young women including biology,...

  19. Simultaneous detection of two breast cancer-related miRNAs in tumor tissues using p19-based disposable amperometric magnetobiosensing platforms.

    PubMed

    Torrente-Rodríguez, R M; Campuzano, S; López-Hernández, E; Montiel, V Ruiz-Valdepeñas; Barderas, R; Granados, R; Sánchez-Puelles, J M; Pingarrón, J M

    2015-04-15

    A novel magnetobiosensing approach for the rapid and simultaneous detection of two breast cancer-related miRs (miR-21 and miR-205) is reported. It involves the use of antimiR-21 and antimiR-205 specific probes, chitin-modified magnetic beads (Chitin-MBs), the p19 viral protein as capture bioreceptor and amperometric detection with the H2O2/hydroquinone (HQ) system at dual screen-printed carbon electrodes (SPdCEs). The use of SPdCEs allows the simultaneous independent amperometric readout for each target miR to be measured. The magnetosensor exhibited sensitive and selective detection with dynamic ranges from 2.0 to 10.0nM and detection limits of 0.6nM (6fmol) for both target miRs without any amplification step in less than 2h. The usefulness of the approach was evaluated by detecting the endogenous levels of both target miRs in total RNA (RNAt) extracted from metastatic breast cancer cell lines and human tissues.