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Sample records for detect breast cancer

  1. Breast Cancer Early Detection and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... En Español Category Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Early Detection and Diagnosis Breast cancer is sometimes ... cancer screening is so important. Learn more. Can Breast Cancer Be Found Early? Breast cancer is sometimes found ...

  2. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    The BioScan System was developed by OmniCorder Technologies, Inc. at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory. The system is able to locate cancerous lesions by detecting the cancer's ability to recruit a new blood supply. A digital sensor detects infrared energy emitted from the body and identifies the minute differences accompanying the blood flow changes associated with cancerous cells. It also has potential use as a monitoring device during cancer treatment. This technology will reduce the time taken to detect cancerous cells and allow for earlier intervention, therefore increasing the overall survival rates of breast cancer patients.

  3. Fostering early breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Shackelford, Judy A; Weyhenmeyer, Diana P; Mabus, Linda K

    2014-12-01

    This article examines how faith community nurses (FCNs) fostered early breast cancer detection for those at risk in rural and African American populations throughout nine counties in midwestern Illinois to decrease breast cancer disparities. Flexible methods for breast cancer awareness education through FCNs, effective strategies for maximizing participation, and implications for practice were identified. In addition, networking within faith communities, connecting with complementary activities scheduled in those communities, and offering refreshments and gift items that support educational efforts were identified as effective ways of maximizing outcomes and reinforcing learning. Flexible educational programming that could be adapted to situational and learning needs was important to alleviate barriers in the project. As a result, the number of participants in the breast cancer awareness education program exceeded the grant goal, and the large number of African American participants and an unexpected number of Hispanic and Latino participants exceeded the target.

  4. Screening for Breast Cancer: Detection and Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... page please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Screening For Breast Cancer Detection and Diagnosis Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table ... States Preventive Services Task Force updated recommendations on breast cancer screening, suggesting that women ages 50 to 74 ...

  5. Early detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Nettles-Carlson, B

    1989-01-01

    Timely, comprehensive screening for breast cancer is a major, though often overlooked, component of primary health care for women. This article reviews the scientific rationale for screening and outlines the current recommendations of the American Cancer Society and the U.S. Preventive Services Task Force regarding the use of mammography, clinical breast examination (CBE), and breast self-examination (BSE). Nursing interventions to decrease barriers to effective screening are discussed, and an expanded role of nurses in breast cancer screening is proposed.

  6. Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory has come up with a technique to decrease exposure to harmful x-rays in mammographies or breast radiography. Usually, physicians make more than one exposure to arrive at an x-ray film of acceptable density. Now the same solar cells used to convert sunlight into electricity on space satellites can make a single exposure sufficient. When solar cell sensor is positioned directly beneath x-ray film, it can determine exactly when film has received sufficient radiation and has been exposed to optimum density. At that point associated electronic equipment sends signal to cut off x-ray source. Reduction of mammography to single exposures not only reduced x-ray hazard significantly, but doubled the number of patient examinations handled by one machine. The NASA laboratory used this control system at the Huntington Memorial Hospital with overwhelming success.

  7. Breast cancer detection using time reversal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sheikh Sajjadieh, Mohammad Hossein

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death after lung cancer among women. Mammography and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have certain limitations in detecting breast cancer, especially during its early stage of development. A number of studies have shown that microwave breast cancer detection has potential to become a successful clinical complement to the conventional X-ray mammography. Microwave breast imaging is performed by illuminating the breast tissues with an electromagnetic waveform and recording its reflections (backscatters) emanating from variations in the normal breast tissues and tumour cells, if present, using an antenna array. These backscatters, referred to as the overall (tumour and clutter) response, are processed to estimate the tumour response, which is applied as input to array imaging algorithms used to estimate the location of the tumour. Due to changes in the breast profile over time, the commonly utilized background subtraction procedures used to estimate the target (tumour) response in array processing are impractical for breast cancer detection. The thesis proposes a new tumour estimation algorithm based on a combination of the data adaptive filter with the envelope detection filter (DAF/EDF), which collectively do not require a training step. After establishing the superiority of the DAF/EDF based approach, the thesis shows that the time reversal (TR) array imaging algorithms outperform their conventional conterparts in detecting and localizing tumour cells in breast tissues at SNRs ranging from 15 to 30dB.

  8. Breast Cancer Detection Using Optical Vascular Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    growing characteristics in order to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the current non- invasive imaging technique . As a model for breast cancer...cells, to help improve technique detection and validation of the imaging system and protocols. In this work we used two human breast cancer models...brain cancer, and DLD-1 colon cancer). Our imaging technique examines the vasculature of the tumor through its response to inhalation of carbon

  9. Biostereometric analysis for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Proietti-Orlandi, F; Varga, R S; Sheffer, D B; Price, T E; Loughry, C W

    1988-05-01

    A measurement technique has been developed for noninvasive breast cancer detection. The process involves the use of close-range stereophotogrammetry as a data acquisition device for the determination of breast surface concavities. We report the methodology used to detect these surface depressions, the rationale for the study, and our preliminary findings.

  10. Modern Breast Cancer Detection: A Technological Review

    PubMed Central

    Nover, Adam B.; Jagtap, Shami; Anjum, Waqas; Yegingil, Hakki; Shih, Wan Y.; Shih, Wei-Heng; Brooks, Ari D.

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer is a serious threat worldwide and is the number two killer of women in the United States. The key to successful management is screening and early detection. What follows is a description of the state of the art in screening and detection for breast cancer as well as a discussion of new and emerging technologies. This paper aims to serve as a starting point for those who are not acquainted with this growing field. PMID:20069109

  11. Nuclear imaging and early breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Evangelista, Laura; Cervino, Anna Rita

    2014-01-01

    The present report discusses about the most important roles of nuclear medicine related to the early detection of breast cancer. We summarily describe the established and emerging diagnostic techniques, their indications and clinical impact for planar and tomographic breast scintigraphy, positron emission tomography (PET)/computed tomography (CT) and positron emission mammography (PEM).

  12. Barriers on Breast Cancer Early Detection Methods

    PubMed Central

    Aksoy, Yasemin Erkal; Turfan, Esin Çeber; Sert, Ebru; Mermer, Gülengül

    2015-01-01

    . Conclusion Barriers against implementation of breast cancer screening methods in women were related to level of education and lack of adequate information about breast cancer screening, and symptoms of breast cancer. Women’s lack of information about signs, symptoms and treatment in the early stages of breast cancer needs to be eliminated. Health care providers may have a key role in increasing breast cancer early detection rates.

  13. A Simple System for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0231 TITLE: A Simple System for Early Detection of Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stephen Johnston CONTRACTING...Detection of Breast Cancer 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Stephen Albert Johnston 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e...to determine if IMS could be applied to the early detection of breast cancer . It is well established that detection of breast cancer at Stage I or

  14. Breast cancer detection using mammary ductoscopy.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Edward

    2005-06-01

    Mammary ductoscopy (MD) has been used as a tool to evaluate the breast for cancer for over 10 years. MD allows the direct visualization of the duct lumen, providing a more targeted approach to the diagnosis of disease arising in the ductal system, since the lesion can be visualized and samples collected in the area of interest. Initial studies of MD evaluated women with pathologic spontaneous nipple discharge (PND), while more recent reports are also using MD to assess women without PND for the presence of breast cancer. Cytologic assessment of MD is highly specific but less sensitive in the detection of breast cancer. Nonetheless, a MD sample from a breast with PND may rarely undergo cytologic review and be interpreted as consistent with malignancy, only later to undergo surgical resection demonstrating benign pathology. For this reason, PND specimens interpreted as malignant on cytologic review require histopathologic confirmation prior to instituting therapy. Additional sample evaluation using image or molecular analysis may improve the sensitivity and specificity of MD in breast cancer detection.

  15. The management of screen-detected breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Muneer; Douek, Michael

    2014-03-01

    The increased use of mammography and introduction of breast screening programmes have resulted in a rise in clinically-occult breast cancer, with one-third of all breast carcinomata diagnosed being non-palpable. These types of cancer have a unique natural history and biology compared to symptomatic breast cancer and this needs to be taken into account when considering surgery and adjuvant treatment. The majority of studies demonstrating efficacy of adjuvant treatments are largely based on patients with symptomatic breast cancer. The current evidence for the role of surgery and adjuvant therapy for screen-detected breast cancer was reviewed in light of their improved prognosis, compared to symptomatic breast cancer.

  16. Pilot Implementation of Breast Cancer Early Detection Programs in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    Murillo, Raúl; Díaz, Sandra; Sánchez, Oswaldo; Perry, Fernando; Piñeros, Marion; Poveda, César; Salguero, Edgar; Osorio, Dimelza

    2008-01-01

    Summary Breast cancer is increasing in developing countries, and Colombia has a double burden from cervical and breast cancer. Suitable guidelines for breast cancer early detection are needed, and the Breast Health Global Initiative provides a favorable framework for breast cancer control in low resource nations. The Colombian National Cancer Institute developed evidence-based guidelines for breast cancer early detection in which coordinated early detection in symptomatic women and hospital-based screening in women aged 50–69 are recommended. A pilot project to evaluate programmatic approaches (opportunistic screening) was designed, and it is expected that organized hospital-based screening for breast cancer will represent a move towards population-based screening in the near future in accordance with country specific conditions. PMID:20824017

  17. [Public policies for the detection of breast cancer in Mexico].

    PubMed

    Martínez-Montañez, Olga Georgina; Uribe-Zúñiga, Patricia; Hernández-Avila, Mauricio

    2009-01-01

    Breast Cancer is a significant public health problem associated with epidemiological and demographic transitions that are currently taking place in Mexico. Aging and increased exposure to risk factors are thought to increase breast cancer incidence, having great relevance for the society and health services. Under this scenario, the health system must respond to the growing needs for better breast cancer screening services. In this paper we present an update of breast cancer mortality, general international recommendations for breast cancer screening programs and key aspects of the Mexico Action Program for Breast Cancer Screening and Control 2007-2012. Breast cancer policies are aimed at organizing and increasing the infrastructure to develop a National Program for Detection, Diagnosis and Treatment of Breast Cancer with optimal quality, friendliness and respect for patient's rights.

  18. The Management of Breast Cancer Detected by Reduction Mammaplasty.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Grant W

    2016-04-01

    The incidence of occult breast cancer detected by reduction mammoplasty is 0.06% to 5.45%. Preoperative screening mammography is indicated in all women 40 years and older and in women age 35 with a positive family or personal history of breast cancer before reduction mammoplasty. Breast MRI is considered in women with dense breasts and those with hereditary breast cancer syndromes. Management of occult breast cancer is impacted by specimens being typically removed in pieces and not oriented before submission to pathology. Total mastectomy is the most common treatment because of the uncertainties regarding margin status and disease extent.

  19. Breast cancer screening

    MedlinePlus

    Mammogram - breast cancer screening; Breast exam - breast cancer screening; MRI - breast cancer screening ... is performed to screen women to detect early breast cancer when it is more likely to be cured. ...

  20. Ultrasonic imaging techniques for breast cancer detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Goulding, N. R.; Marquez, J. D.; Prewett, E. M.; Claytor, T. N.; Nadler, B. R.; Huang, L.

    2006-01-01

    Improving the resolution and specificity of current ultrasonic imaging technology can enhance its relevance to detection of early-stage breast cancers. Ultrasonic evaluation of breast lesions is desirable because it is quick, inexpensive, and does not expose the patient to potentially harmful ionizing radiation. Improved image quality and resolution enables earlier detection and more accurate diagnoses of tumors, thus reducing the number of biopsies performed, increasing treatment options, and lowering mortality, morbidity, and remission percentages. In this work, a novel ultrasonic imaging reconstruction method that exploits straight-ray migration is described. This technique, commonly used in seismic imaging, accounts for scattering more accurately than standard ultrasonic approaches, thus providing superior image resolution. A breast phantom with various inclusions is imaged using a pulse-echo approach. The data are processed using the ultrasonic migration method and results are compared to standard linear ultrasound and to x-ray computed tomography (CT) scans. For an ultrasonic frequency of 2.25 MHz, imaged inclusions and features of approximately 1mm are resolved, although better resolution is expected with minor modifications. Refinement of this application using other imaging techniques such as time-reversal mirrors (TRM), synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), decomposition of the time reversal operator (DORT), and factorization methods is also briefly discussed.

  1. Breast Cancer Basics and You: Detection and Diagnosis | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    MedlinePlus

    ... of this page please turn Javascript on. Feature: Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Basics and You: Detection and Diagnosis Past Issues / ... regular clinical breast exams and mammograms to find breast cancer early, when treatment is more likely to work ...

  2. Novel Serum Inflammatory Biomarkers for Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-06-01

    Early Detection of Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Thomas R. Brown, Ph.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Oxford Biomedical...Biomarkers for Early Detection of Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-06-1-0711 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Thomas R. Brown, Ph.D. 5d... cancer however, their study as a source of cancer biomarkers is still at a relatively early stage. Identifying these biomarkers in serum presents a

  3. Breast Cancer: Computer-aided Detection with Digital Breast Tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Morra, Lia; Sacchetto, Daniela; Durando, Manuela; Agliozzo, Silvano; Carbonaro, Luca Alessandro; Delsanto, Silvia; Pesce, Barbara; Persano, Diego; Mariscotti, Giovanna; Marra, Vincenzo; Fonio, Paolo; Bert, Alberto

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate a commercial tomosynthesis computer-aided detection (CAD) system in an independent, multicenter dataset. Diagnostic and screening tomosynthesis mammographic examinations (n = 175; cranial caudal and mediolateral oblique) were randomly selected from a previous institutional review board-approved trial. All subjects gave informed consent. Examinations were performed in three centers and included 123 patients, with 132 biopsy-proven screening-detected cancers, and 52 examinations with negative results at 1-year follow-up. One hundred eleven lesions were masses and/or microcalcifications (72 masses, 22 microcalcifications, 17 masses with microcalcifications) and 21 were architectural distortions. Lesions were annotated by radiologists who were aware of all available reports. CAD performance was assessed as per-lesion sensitivity and false-positive results per volume in patients with negative results. Use of the CAD system showed per-lesion sensitivity of 89% (99 of 111; 95% confidence interval: 81%, 94%), with 2.7 ± 1.8 false-positive rate per view, 62 of 72 lesions detected were masses, 20 of 22 were microcalcification clusters, and 17 of 17 were masses with microcalcifications. Overall, 37 of 39 microcalcification clusters (95% sensitivity, 95% confidence interval: 81%, 99%) and 79 of 89 masses (89% sensitivity, 95% confidence interval: 80%, 94%) were detected with the CAD system. On average, 0.5 false-positive rate per view were microcalcification clusters, 2.1 were masses, and 0.1 were masses and microcalcifications. A digital breast tomosynthesis CAD system can allow detection of a large percentage (89%, 99 of 111) of breast cancers manifesting as masses and microcalcification clusters, with an acceptable false-positive rate (2.7 per breast view). Further studies with larger datasets acquired with equipment from multiple vendors are needed to replicate the findings and to study the interaction of radiologists and CAD systems. (©) RSNA, 2015.

  4. Ultrasonic Imaging Techniques for Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goulding, N. R.; Marquez, J. D.; Prewett, E. M.; Claytor, T. N.; Nadler, B. R.

    2008-02-01

    Improving the resolution and specificity of current ultrasonic imaging technology is needed to enhance its relevance to breast cancer detection. A novel ultrasonic imaging reconstruction method is described that exploits classical straight-ray migration. This novel method improves signal processing for better image resolution and uses novel staging hardware options using a pulse-echo approach. A breast phantom with various inclusions is imaged using the classical migration method and is compared to standard computed tomography (CT) scans. These innovative ultrasonic methods incorporate ultrasound data acquisition, beam profile characterization, and image reconstruction. For an ultrasonic frequency of 2.25 MHz, imaged inclusions of approximately 1 cm are resolved and identified. Better resolution is expected with minor modifications. Improved image quality and resolution enables earlier detection and more accurate diagnoses of tumors thus reducing the number of biopsies performed, increasing treatment options, and lowering remission percentages. Using these new techniques the inclusions in the phantom are resolved and compared to the results of standard methods. Refinement of this application using other imaging techniques such as time-reversal mirrors (TRM), synthetic aperture focusing technique (SAFT), decomposition of the time reversal operator (DORT), and factorization methods is also discussed.

  5. Novelty detection for breast cancer image classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cichosz, Pawel; Jagodziński, Dariusz; Matysiewicz, Mateusz; Neumann, Łukasz; Nowak, Robert M.; Okuniewski, Rafał; Oleszkiewicz, Witold

    2016-09-01

    Using classification learning algorithms for medical applications may require not only refined model creation techniques and careful unbiased model evaluation, but also detecting the risk of misclassification at the time of model application. This is addressed by novelty detection, which identifies instances for which the training set is not sufficiently representative and for which it may be safer to restrain from classification and request a human expert diagnosis. The paper investigates two techniques for isolated instance identification, based on clustering and one-class support vector machines, which represent two different approaches to multidimensional outlier detection. The prediction quality for isolated instances in breast cancer image data is evaluated using the random forest algorithm and found to be substantially inferior to the prediction quality for non-isolated instances. Each of the two techniques is then used to create a novelty detection model which can be combined with a classification model and used at the time of prediction to detect instances for which the latter cannot be reliably applied. Novelty detection is demonstrated to improve random forest prediction quality and argued to deserve further investigation in medical applications.

  6. Impact of breast cancer awareness month on detection of breast cancer in a private hospital.

    PubMed

    Karabay, Onder; Hasbahceci, Mustafa; Kadioglu, Huseyin

    2017-01-01

    Objective Breast cancer awareness month increases public awareness in association with increased rates of screening and new diagnoses. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of breast cancer awareness month on primary diagnosis of breast cancer. Methods Asymptomatic women with the intention of breast cancer screening were included. The non-BCAM (Breast cancer awareness month) group were screened from February to September 2016 and the BCAM group during October 2016. Ultrasound and mammography were performed in all women and in those aged ≥ 40 years, respectively. A BIRADS (Breast Imaging Reporting And Data Systems) score of ≥4 and solid palpable masses without features suggestive of malignancy and/or the physician's preference were regarded as indications for histopathological analysis. Requirement for histopathological analysis and detection of breast cancer were identified as the main variables. Results There were 198 women with a mean age of 49.3 ± 9.5 years. Sixty-nine and 129 women were in the non-BCAM and BCAM groups, respectively. Percutaneous biopsy was performed in seven (10.1%) and three patients (2.3%) in the non-BCAM and BCAM groups, respectively ( P = 0.035). Pathological examinations were benign. Conclusion Although public awareness campaigns lead to increased rates of screening, they may lose their impact on detecting breast cancer because of widespread use of routine screening programs.

  7. Optical tomographic imaging for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wenxiang; Intes, Xavier; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Diffuse optical breast imaging utilizes near-infrared (NIR) light propagation through tissues to assess the optical properties of tissues for the identification of abnormal tissue. This optical imaging approach is sensitive, cost-effective, and does not involve any ionizing radiation. However, the image reconstruction of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a nonlinear inverse problem and suffers from severe illposedness due to data noise, NIR light scattering, and measurement incompleteness. An image reconstruction method is proposed for the detection of breast cancer. This method splits the image reconstruction problem into the localization of abnormal tissues and quantification of absorption variations. The localization of abnormal tissues is performed based on a well-posed optimization model, which can be solved via a differential evolution optimization method to achieve a stable reconstruction. The quantification of abnormal absorption is then determined in localized regions of relatively small extents, in which a potential tumor might be. Consequently, the number of unknown absorption variables can be greatly reduced to overcome the underdetermined nature of DOT. Numerical simulation experiments are performed to verify merits of the proposed method, and the results show that the image reconstruction method is stable and accurate for the identification of abnormal tissues, and robust against the measurement noise of data. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  8. Computerized detection of breast cancer on automated breast ultrasound imaging of women with dense breasts

    SciTech Connect

    Drukker, Karen Sennett, Charlene A.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection method and investigate its feasibility for detection of breast cancer in automated 3D ultrasound images of women with dense breasts. Methods: The HIPAA compliant study involved a dataset of volumetric ultrasound image data, “views,” acquired with an automated U-Systems Somo•V{sup ®} ABUS system for 185 asymptomatic women with dense breasts (BI-RADS Composition/Density 3 or 4). For each patient, three whole-breast views (3D image volumes) per breast were acquired. A total of 52 patients had breast cancer (61 cancers), diagnosed through any follow-up at most 365 days after the original screening mammogram. Thirty-one of these patients (32 cancers) had a screening-mammogram with a clinically assigned BI-RADS Assessment Category 1 or 2, i.e., were mammographically negative. All software used for analysis was developed in-house and involved 3 steps: (1) detection of initial tumor candidates, (2) characterization of candidates, and (3) elimination of false-positive candidates. Performance was assessed by calculating the cancer detection sensitivity as a function of the number of “marks” (detections) per view. Results: At a single mark per view, i.e., six marks per patient, the median detection sensitivity by cancer was 50.0% (16/32) ± 6% for patients with a screening mammogram-assigned BI-RADS category 1 or 2—similar to radiologists’ performance sensitivity (49.9%) for this dataset from a prior reader study—and 45.9% (28/61) ± 4% for all patients. Conclusions: Promising detection sensitivity was obtained for the computer on a 3D ultrasound dataset of women with dense breasts at a rate of false-positive detections that may be acceptable for clinical implementation.

  9. Computerized detection of breast cancer on automated breast ultrasound imaging of women with dense breasts

    SciTech Connect

    Drukker, Karen Sennett, Charlene A.; Giger, Maryellen L.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Develop a computer-aided detection method and investigate its feasibility for detection of breast cancer in automated 3D ultrasound images of women with dense breasts. Methods: The HIPAA compliant study involved a dataset of volumetric ultrasound image data, “views,” acquired with an automated U-Systems Somo•V{sup ®} ABUS system for 185 asymptomatic women with dense breasts (BI-RADS Composition/Density 3 or 4). For each patient, three whole-breast views (3D image volumes) per breast were acquired. A total of 52 patients had breast cancer (61 cancers), diagnosed through any follow-up at most 365 days after the original screening mammogram. Thirty-one of these patients (32 cancers) had a screening-mammogram with a clinically assigned BI-RADS Assessment Category 1 or 2, i.e., were mammographically negative. All software used for analysis was developed in-house and involved 3 steps: (1) detection of initial tumor candidates, (2) characterization of candidates, and (3) elimination of false-positive candidates. Performance was assessed by calculating the cancer detection sensitivity as a function of the number of “marks” (detections) per view. Results: At a single mark per view, i.e., six marks per patient, the median detection sensitivity by cancer was 50.0% (16/32) ± 6% for patients with a screening mammogram-assigned BI-RADS category 1 or 2—similar to radiologists’ performance sensitivity (49.9%) for this dataset from a prior reader study—and 45.9% (28/61) ± 4% for all patients. Conclusions: Promising detection sensitivity was obtained for the computer on a 3D ultrasound dataset of women with dense breasts at a rate of false-positive detections that may be acceptable for clinical implementation.

  10. Detection of circulating breast cancer cells using photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran

    According to the American Cancer Society, more than 200,000 new cases of breast cancer are expected to be diagnosed this year. Moreover, about 40,000 women died from breast cancer last year alone. As breast cancer progresses in an individual, it can transform from a localized state to a metastatic one with multiple tumors distributed through the body, not necessarily contained within the breast. Metastasis is the spread of cancer through the body by circulating tumor cells (CTCs) which can be found in the blood and lymph of the diagnosed patient. Diagnosis of a metastatic state by the discovery of a secondary tumor can often come too late and hence, significantly reduce the patient's chance of survival. There is a current need for a CTC detection method which would diagnose metastasis before the secondary tumor occurs or reaches a size resolvable by current imaging systems. Since earlier detection would improve prognosis, this study proposes a method of labeling of breast cancer cells for detection with a photoacoustic flow cytometry system as a model for CTC detection in human blood. Gold nanoparticles and fluorescent polystyrene nanoparticles are proposed as contrast agents for T47D, the breast cancer cell line of choice. The labeling, photoacoustic detection limit, and sensitivity are first characterized and then applied to a study to show detection from human blood.

  11. Automated System for Early Breast Cancer Detection in Mammograms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bankman, Isaac N.; Kim, Dong W.; Christens-Barry, William A.; Weinberg, Irving N.; Gatewood, Olga B.; Brody, William R.

    1993-01-01

    The increasing demand on mammographic screening for early breast cancer detection, and the subtlety of early breast cancer signs on mammograms, suggest an automated image processing system that can serve as a diagnostic aid in radiology clinics. We present a fully automated algorithm for detecting clusters of microcalcifications that are the most common signs of early, potentially curable breast cancer. By using the contour map of the mammogram, the algorithm circumvents some of the difficulties encountered with standard image processing methods. The clinical implementation of an automated instrument based on this algorithm is also discussed.

  12. Recent Advances in Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Sollip

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is a disease that occurs most often in female cancer patients. Early detection can significantly reduce the mortality rate. Microwave breast imaging, which is noninvasive and harmless to human, offers a promising alternative method to mammography. This paper presents a review of recent advances in microwave imaging for breast cancer detection. We conclude by introducing new research on a microwave imaging system with time-domain measurement that achieves short measurement time and low system cost. In the time-domain measurement system, scan time would take less than 1 sec, and it does not require very expensive equipment such as VNA. PMID:28096808

  13. Breast cancer detection in rotational thermography images using texture features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, Sheeja V.; Sasikala, M.; Bhavani Bharathi, G.; Jaipurkar, Sandeep D.

    2014-11-01

    Breast cancer is a major cause of mortality in young women in the developing countries. Early diagnosis is the key to improve survival rate in cancer patients. Breast thermography is a diagnostic procedure that non-invasively images the infrared emissions from breast surface to aid in the early detection of breast cancer. Due to limitations in imaging protocol, abnormality detection by conventional breast thermography, is often a challenging task. Rotational thermography is a novel technique developed in order to overcome the limitations of conventional breast thermography. This paper evaluates this technique's potential for automatic detection of breast abnormality, from the perspective of cold challenge. Texture features are extracted in the spatial domain, from rotational thermogram series, prior to and post the application of cold challenge. These features are fed to a support vector machine for automatic classification of normal and malignant breasts, resulting in a classification accuracy of 83.3%. Feature reduction has been performed by principal component analysis. As a novel attempt, the ability of this technique to locate the abnormality has been studied. The results of the study indicate that rotational thermography holds great potential as a screening tool for breast cancer detection.

  14. Benefits and harms of detecting clinically occult breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Amir, Eitan; Bedard, Philippe L; Ocaña, Alberto; Seruga, Bostjan

    2012-10-17

    Over the last few decades there has been an increase in the use of strategies to detect clinically occult breast cancer with the aim of achieving diagnosis at an earlier stage when prognosis may be improved. Such strategies include screening mammography in healthy women, diagnostic imaging and axillary staging in those diagnosed with breast cancer, and the use of follow-up imaging for the early detection of recurrent or metastatic disease. Some of these strategies are established, whereas for others there are inconsistent supportive data. Although the potential benefit of early detection of clinically occult breast cancer seems intuitive, use of such strategies can also be associated with harm. In this commentary, we provide an extended discussion on the potential benefits and harms of the routine and frequent use of screening interventions to detect clinically occult breast cancer and question whether we may be causing more harm than good.

  15. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... version of this page please turn Javascript on. Breast Cancer What is Breast Cancer? How Tumors Form The body is made up ... tumors form in the breast tissue. Who Gets Breast Cancer? Breast cancer is one of the most common ...

  16. Radionuclide Methods and Instrumentation for Breast Cancer Detection and Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Surti, Suleman

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer mammography is a well-acknowledged technique for patient screening due to its high sensitivity. However, in addition to its low specificity the sensitivity of mammography is limited when imaging patients with dense breasts. Radionuclide imaging techniques, such as coincidence photon-based positron emission tomography and single photon emission computed tomography or scintimammography, can play a role in assisting screening of such patients. Radionuclide techniques can also be useful in assessing treatment response of patients with breast cancer to therapy, and staging of patients to diagnose the disease extent. However, the performance of these imaging modalities is generally limited because of the poor spatial resolution and sensitivity of the commercially available multipurpose imaging systems. Here, we describe some of the dedicated imaging systems (positron emission mammography [PEM] and breast-specific gamma imaging [BSGI]) that have been developed both commercially and in research laboratories for radionuclide imaging of breast cancer. Clinical studies with dedicated PEM scanners show improved sensitivity to detecting cancer in patients when using PEM in conjunction with additional imaging modalities, such as magnetic resonance imaging or mammography or both, as well as improved disease staging that can have an effect on surgical planning. High-resolution BSGI systems are more widely available commercially and several clinical studies have shown very high sensitivity and specificity in detecting cancer in high-risk patients. Further development of dedicated PEM and BSGI systems is ongoing, promising further expansion of radionuclide imaging techniques in the realm of breast cancer detection and treatment. PMID:23725989

  17. A New Immunologic Method for Detection of Occult Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-09-01

    tumor cells are detectable in axillary lymph nodes and/or bone marrow aspirates . A prognostic disadvantage of tumor ...neoplasms missed by mammography. *408 SIMULTANEOUS IMMUNOHISTOCHEMICAL (IHC) TUMOR CELLS DETECTION IN AXILLARY LYMPH NODES AND BONE MARROW ... detectable tumor recurrence in breast cancer patients? If they do, how far in advance? b. Can changes in antigen - specific IC levels be used

  18. Screen-detected versus interval cancers: Effect of imaging modality and breast density in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme.

    PubMed

    Timmermans, Lore; Bleyen, Luc; Bacher, Klaus; Van Herck, Koen; Lemmens, Kim; Van Ongeval, Chantal; Van Steen, Andre; Martens, Patrick; De Brabander, Isabel; Goossens, Mathieu; Thierens, Hubert

    2017-09-01

    To investigate if direct radiography (DR) performs better than screen-film mammography (SF) and computed radiography (CR) in dense breasts in a decentralized organised Breast Cancer Screening Programme. To this end, screen-detected versus interval cancers were studied in different BI-RADS density classes for these imaging modalities. The study cohort consisted of 351,532 women who participated in the Flemish Breast Cancer Screening Programme in 2009 and 2010. Information on screen-detected and interval cancers, breast density scores of radiologist second readers, and imaging modality was obtained by linkage of the databases of the Centre of Cancer Detection and the Belgian Cancer Registry. Overall, 67% of occurring breast cancers are screen detected and 33% are interval cancers, with DR performing better than SF and CR. The interval cancer rate increases gradually with breast density, regardless of modality. In the high-density class, the interval cancer rate exceeds the cancer detection rate for SF and CR, but not for DR. DR is superior to SF and CR with respect to cancer detection rates for high-density breasts. To reduce the high interval cancer rate in dense breasts, use of an additional imaging technique in screening can be taken into consideration. • Interval cancer rate increases gradually with breast density, regardless of modality. • Cancer detection rate in high-density breasts is superior in DR. • IC rate exceeds CDR for SF and CR in high-density breasts. • DR performs better in high-density breasts for third readings and false-positives.

  19. Ultrasound in Detecting Taxane-Induced Neuropathy in Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-05-15

    Peripheral Neuropathy; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  20. Breast Cancer Detection: Mammography and other methods in breast imaging, second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Bassett, L.W.; Gold, R.H.

    1987-01-01

    The text addresses mammography and the advantages and limitations of other breast imaging methods presently available. The establishment of X-ray mammography as the safest and most accurate noninvasive method of early, nonpalpable breast cancer detection is addressed in the first section of the book. The second section emphasizes the signs of early cancer, the complete mammographic examination, and the team approach to diagnosis. The advantages and limitations of film-screen mammography, zero mammography, breast ultrasound, thermography, light scanning, magnetic resonance imaging, and ductography are highlighted as alternate methods of detection. The benefits of mammography, and its unmatched value in screeening for breast cancer, are presented in the final section.

  1. Advances in molecular imaging for breast cancer detection and characterization

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Advances in our ability to assay molecular processes, including gene expression, protein expression, and molecular and cellular biochemistry, have fueled advances in our understanding of breast cancer biology and have led to the identification of new treatments for patients with breast cancer. The ability to measure biologic processes without perturbing them in vivo allows the opportunity to better characterize tumor biology and to assess how biologic and cytotoxic therapies alter critical pathways of tumor response and resistance. By accurately characterizing tumor properties and biologic processes, molecular imaging plays an increasing role in breast cancer science, clinical care in diagnosis and staging, assessment of therapeutic targets, and evaluation of responses to therapies. This review describes the current role and potential of molecular imaging modalities for detection and characterization of breast cancer and focuses primarily on radionuclide-based methods. PMID:22423895

  2. Breast cancer genetic risk profile is differentially associated with interval and screen-detected breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Li, J; Holm, J; Bergh, J; Eriksson, M; Darabi, H; Lindström, L S; Törnberg, S; Hall, P; Czene, K

    2015-03-01

    Polygenic risk profiles computed from multiple common susceptibility alleles for breast cancer have been shown to identify women at different levels of breast cancer risk. We evaluated whether this genetic risk stratification can also be applied to discriminate between screen-detected and interval cancers, which are usually associated with clinicopathological and survival differences. A 77 single-nucleotide polymorphism polygenic risk score (PRS) was constructed for breast cancer overall and by estrogen receptor (ER) status. PRS was inspected as a continuous (per standard deviation increment) variable in a case-only design. Modification of the PRS by mammographic density was evaluated by fitting an additional interaction term. PRS weighted by breast cancer overall estimates was found to be differentially associated with 1865 screen-detected and 782 interval cancers in the LIBRO-1 study {age-adjusted odds ratio (OR)perSD [95% confidence interval (CI)] 0.91 [0.83-0.99], P = 0.023}. The association was found to be more significant for PRS weighted by ER-positive breast cancer estimates [ORperSD = 0.90 (0.82-0.98), P = 0.011]. This result was corroborated by two independent studies [combined ORperSD = 0.87 (0.76-1.00), P = 0.058] with no evidence of heterogeneity. When enriched for 'true' interval cancers among nondense breasts, the difference in the association with PRS in screen-detected and interval cancers became more pronounced [ORperSD = 0.74 (0.62-0.89), P = 0.001], with a significant interaction effect between PRS and mammographic density (Pinteraction = 0.017). To our knowledge, this is the first report looking into the genetic differences between screen-detected and interval cancers. It is an affirmation that the two types of breast cancer may have unique underlying biology. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society for Medical Oncology. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Breast cancer in male-to-female transsexuals: use of breast imaging for detection.

    PubMed

    Maglione, Katharine D; Margolies, Laurie; Jaffer, Shabnam; Szabo, Janet; Schmidt, Hank; Weltz, Christina; Sonnenblick, Emily B

    2014-12-01

    The purposes of this article are to describe two cases of breast cancer in male-to-female transsexuals and to review eight cases previously reported in the literature. Breast cancer occurs in male-to-female transsexuals who receive high doses of exogenous estrogen and develop breast tissue histologically identical to that of a biologically female breast. This exposure to estrogen results in increased risk of breast cancer. The first patient described is a male-to-female transsexual with screening-detected ductal carcinoma in situ and a family history of breast cancer. The other patient is a male-to-female transsexual with invasive ductal carcinoma that was occult on diagnostic digital mammographic and ultrasound findings but visualized on digital breast tomosynthesis and breast MR images. The analysis of the eight previously reported cases showed that breast cancer in male-to-female transsexuals occurs at a younger age and is more frequently estrogen receptor negative than breast cancer in others born biologically male. Screening for breast cancer in male-to-female transsexuals should be undertaken for those with additional risk factors (e.g., family history, BRCA2 mutation, Klinefelter syndrome) and should be available to those who desire screening, preferably in a clinical trial.

  4. Flexible 16 Antenna Array for Microwave Breast Cancer Detection.

    PubMed

    Bahramiabarghouei, Hadi; Porter, Emily; Santorelli, Adam; Gosselin, Benoit; Popović, Milica; Rusch, Leslie A

    2015-10-01

    Radar-based microwave imaging has been widely studied for breast cancer detection in recent times. Sensing dielectric property differences of tissues has been studied over a wide frequency band for this application. We design single- and dual-polarization antennas for wireless ultrawideband breast cancer detection systems using an inhomogeneous multilayer model of the human breast. Antennas made from flexible materials are more easily adapted to wearable applications. Miniaturized flexible monopole and spiral antennas on a 50-μm Kapton polyimide are designed, using a high-frequency structure simulator, to be in contact with biological breast tissues. The proposed antennas are designed to operate in a frequency range of 2-4 GHz (with reflection coefficient (S11) below -10 dB). Measurements show that the flexible antennas have good impedance matching when in different positions with different curvature around the breast. Our miniaturized flexible antennas are 20 mm × 20 mm. Furthermore, two flexible conformal 4 × 4 ultrawideband antenna arrays (single and dual polarization), in a format similar to that of a bra, were developed for a radar-based breast cancer detection system. By using a reflector for the arrays, the penetration of the propagated electromagnetic waves from the antennas into the breast can be improved by factors of 3.3 and 2.6, respectively.

  5. Breast Cancer Detection with Reduced Feature Set.

    PubMed

    Mert, Ahmet; Kılıç, Niyazi; Bilgili, Erdem; Akan, Aydin

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores feature reduction properties of independent component analysis (ICA) on breast cancer decision support system. Wisconsin diagnostic breast cancer (WDBC) dataset is reduced to one-dimensional feature vector computing an independent component (IC). The original data with 30 features and reduced one feature (IC) are used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy of the classifiers such as k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), artificial neural network (ANN), radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), and support vector machine (SVM). The comparison of the proposed classification using the IC with original feature set is also tested on different validation (5/10-fold cross-validations) and partitioning (20%-40%) methods. These classifiers are evaluated how to effectively categorize tumors as benign and malignant in terms of specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, F-score, Youden's index, discriminant power, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with its criterion values including area under curve (AUC) and 95% confidential interval (CI). This represents an improvement in diagnostic decision support system, while reducing computational complexity.

  6. Breast Cancer Detection with Reduced Feature Set

    PubMed Central

    Kılıç, Niyazi; Bilgili, Erdem

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores feature reduction properties of independent component analysis (ICA) on breast cancer decision support system. Wisconsin diagnostic breast cancer (WDBC) dataset is reduced to one-dimensional feature vector computing an independent component (IC). The original data with 30 features and reduced one feature (IC) are used to evaluate diagnostic accuracy of the classifiers such as k-nearest neighbor (k-NN), artificial neural network (ANN), radial basis function neural network (RBFNN), and support vector machine (SVM). The comparison of the proposed classification using the IC with original feature set is also tested on different validation (5/10-fold cross-validations) and partitioning (20%–40%) methods. These classifiers are evaluated how to effectively categorize tumors as benign and malignant in terms of specificity, sensitivity, accuracy, F-score, Youden's index, discriminant power, and the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve with its criterion values including area under curve (AUC) and 95% confidential interval (CI). This represents an improvement in diagnostic decision support system, while reducing computational complexity. PMID:26078774

  7. 76 FR 30723 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-26

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... for breast and cervical cancer screening; updates on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early... Health and Human Services, and the Director, CDC, regarding the early detection and control of breast...

  8. 75 FR 7282 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-02-18

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... Force guidelines for breast and cervical cancer screening; Impact of the revised clinical screening recommendations for both breast and cervical cancer on the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early...

  9. Detectability of Hygroscopic Clips Used in Breast Cancer Surgery.

    PubMed

    Carmon, Moshe; Olsha, Oded; Gekhtman, David; Nikitin, Irena; Cohen, Yamin; Messing, Michael; Lioubashevsky, Natali; Abu Dalo, Ribhi; Hadar, Tal; Golomb, Eliahu

    2017-02-01

    Sonographically detectable clips were introduced over the last decade. We retrospectively studied the rate and duration of sonographically detectable clip detectability in patients with breast cancer who had sonographically detectable clips inserted over a 2-year period. Nine of 26 patients had neoadjuvant chemotherapy, with all clips remaining detectable 140 to 187 days after insertion. Six of the 9 had intraoperative sonographic localization, with 1 reoperation (17%). Eleven additional patients with nonpalpable tumors and sonographically detectable clips had intraoperative sonographic localization with 1 reoperation (9%). In 1 patient, a sonographically detectable clip enabled intraoperative identification of a suspicious lymph node. There were no complications or clip migration. Sonographically detectable clips are helpful in breast cancer surgery with and without neoadjuvant chemotherapy, remaining detectable for many months and often averting preoperative localization and scheduling difficulties.

  10. Breast MRI, digital mammography and breast tomosynthesis: comparison of three methods for early detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Roganovic, Dragana; Djilas, Dragana; Vujnovic, Sasa; Pavic, Dag; Stojanov, Dragan

    2015-11-16

    Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women and early detection is important for its successful treatment. The aim of this study was to investigate the sensitivity and specificity of three methods for early detection of breast cancer: breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), digital mammography, and breast tomosynthesis in comparison to histopathology, as well as to investigate the intraindividual variability between these modalities. We included 57 breast lesions, each detected by three diagnostic modalities: digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, and subsequently confirmed by histopathology. Breast Imaging-Reporting and Data System (BI-RADS) was used for characterizing the lesions. One experienced radiologist interpreted all three diagnostic modalities. Twenty-nine of the breast lesions were malignant while 28 were benign. The sensitivity for digital mammography, breast MRI, and breast tomosynthesis, was 72.4%, 93.1%, and 100%, respectively; while the specificity was 46.4%, 60.7%, and 75%, respectively. Receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis showed an overall diagnostic advantage of breast tomosynthesis over both breast MRI and digital mammography. The difference in performance between breast tomosynthesis and digital mammography was significant (p <0.001), while the difference between breast tomosynthesis and breast MRI was not significant (p=0.20).

  11. Liquid crystal foil for the detection of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biernat, Michał; Trzyna, Marcin; Byszek, Agnieszka; Jaremek, Henryk

    2016-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common malignant tumor in females around the world, representing 25.2% of all cancers in women. About 1.7 million women were diagnosed with breast cancer worldwide in 2012 with a death rate of about 522,0001,2. The most frequently used methods in breast cancer screening are imaging methods, i.e. ultrasonography and mammography. A common feature of these methods is that they inherently involve the use of expensive and advanced equipment. The development of advanced computer systems allowed for the continuation of research started already in the 1980s3 and the use of contact thermography in breast cancer screening. The physiological basis for the application of thermography in medical imaging diagnostics is the so-called dermothermal effect related to higher metabolism rate around focal neoplastic lesion. This phenomenon can occur on breast surface as localized temperature anomalies4. The device developed by Braster is composed of a detector that works on the basis of thermotropic liquid crystals, image acquisition device and a computer system for image data processing and analysis. Production of the liquid crystal detector was based on a proprietary CLCF technology (Continuous Liquid Crystal Film). In 2014 Braster started feasibility study to prove that there is a potential for artificial intelligence in early breast cancer detection using Braster's proprietary technology. The aim of this study was to develop a computer system, using a client-server architecture, to an automatic interpretation of thermographic pictures created by the Braster devices.

  12. Symptom report in detecting breast cancer-related lymphedema

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Mei R; Axelrod, Deborah; Cleland, Charles M; Qiu, Zeyuan; Guth, Amber A; Kleinman, Robin; Scagliola, Joan; Haber, Judith

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema is a syndrome of abnormal swelling coupled with multiple symptoms resulting from obstruction or disruption of the lymphatic system associated with cancer treatment. Research has demonstrated that with increased number of symptoms reported, breast cancer survivors’ limb volume increased. Lymphedema symptoms in the affected limb may indicate a latent stage of lymphedema in which changes cannot be detected by objective measures. The latent stage of lymphedema may exist months or years before overt swelling occurs. Symptom report may play an important role in detecting lymphedema in clinical practice. The purposes of this study were to: 1) examine the validity, sensitivity, and specificity of symptoms for detecting breast cancer-related lymphedema and 2) determine the best clinical cutoff point for the count of symptoms that maximized the sum of sensitivity and specificity. Data were collected from 250 women, including healthy female adults, breast cancer survivors with lymphedema, and those at risk for lymphedema. Lymphedema symptoms were assessed using a reliable and valid instrument. Validity, sensitivity, and specificity were evaluated using logistic regression, analysis of variance, and areas under receiver operating characteristic curves. Count of lymphedema symptoms was able to differentiate healthy adults from breast cancer survivors with lymphedema and those at risk for lymphedema. A diagnostic cutoff of three symptoms discriminated breast cancer survivors with lymphedema from healthy women with a sensitivity of 94% and a specificity of 97% (area under the curve =0.98). A diagnostic cutoff of nine symptoms discriminated at-risk survivors from survivors with lymphedema with a sensitivity of 64% and a specificity of 80% (area under the curve =0.72). In the absence of objective measurements capable of detecting latent stages of lymphedema, count of symptoms may be a cost-effective initial screening tool for detecting lymphedema

  13. Improving breast cancer detection using ultrasonography in asymptomatic women with non-fatty breast density.

    PubMed

    Korpraphong, Pornpim; Limsuwarn, Panida; Tangcharoensathien, Woranuj; Ansusingha, Tamnit; Thephamongkhol, Kullathorn; Chuthapisith, Suebwong

    2014-10-01

    Mammography (MX) is a reliable modality for detection of breast cancer in asymptomatic women. Use of additional whole breast ultrasonography (US) for breast cancer screening is widely recognized, in particular in women with dense breast parenchyma. To determine the subgroup of women, according to breast density and age, who receive most benefit from US following MX for detection of breast cancer in an asymptomatic condition. The study was conducted in asymptomatic women who had non-fatty breast parenchyma using MX and US during January 2006 and December 2007. Mammographic breast density was classified as recommended by ACR BI-RADS lexicon. Non-fatty breast referred to D2, D3, and D4. US was performed by the same radiologists who interpreted MX with a handheld machine during the same visit. Data on demographics, cancer detection rate (CDR), and incremental cancer detection rate (ICDR) were analyzed using 95% confident interval (CI). Of 14,483 breast cancer screenings in women who had non-fatty breast density, 115 cancers were documented. The mean age of cancer patients was 49.6 years. Of 115 cancers, 105 were evidenced on images (31 with MX alone, 19 with US alone, and 55 with both MX and US). Overall CDR was 7.9 per 1000 examination (95% CI, 6.5-9.5). CDR for MX only (MX-CDR) was 6.5 per 1000 examinations (95% CI, 5.2-7.9). Additional US could significantly improve CDR (P < 0.001; 95% CI, 0.9-2.2); US-ICDR was 1.4 per 1000 examinations. According to age group, the group of 40-59 years had statistically significant improvement of ICDR (P < 0.001). The ICDR was highest in D4 breast density (D4) (US-ICDR = 2.5 per 1000 examinations). Use of US adjunct to MX for detection of breast cancer in asymptomatic non-fatty, average-risk women for detection of breast cancer is a promising diagnostic procedure. A significant benefit was documented, in particular, in women aged 40-59 years old, and in women with D4 breast density. © The Foundation Acta Radiologica 2013 Reprints

  14. Breast-Conserving Surgery Followed by Radiation Therapy With MRI-Detected Stage I or Stage II Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2011-12-07

    Ductal Breast Carcinoma in Situ; Estrogen Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Estrogen Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; HER2-negative Breast Cancer; HER2-positive Breast Cancer; Invasive Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Invasive Lobular Breast Carcinoma; Male Breast Cancer; Medullary Ductal Breast Carcinoma With Lymphocytic Infiltrate; Mucinous Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Papillary Ductal Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor-negative Breast Cancer; Progesterone Receptor-positive Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Tubular Ductal Breast Carcinoma

  15. Breast-Specific γ-Imaging for the Detection of Mammographically Occult Breast Cancer in Women at Increased Risk.

    PubMed

    Brem, Rachel F; Ruda, Rachel C; Yang, Jialu L; Coffey, Caitrín M; Rapelyea, Jocelyn A

    2016-05-01

    Breast-specific γ-imaging (BSGI) is a physiologic imaging modality that can detect subcentimeter and mammographically occult breast cancer, with a sensitivity and specificity comparable to MRI. The purpose of this study was to determine the incremental increase in breast cancer detection when BSGI is used as an adjunct to mammography in women at increased risk for breast cancer. All patients undergoing BSGI from April 2010 through January 2014 were retrospectively reviewed. Eligible patients were identified as women at increased risk for breast cancer and whose most recent mammogram was benign. Examinations exhibiting focally increased radiotracer uptake were considered positive. Incremental increase in cancer detection was calculated as the percentage of mammographically occult BSGI-detected breast cancer and the number of mammographically occult breast cancers detected per 1,000 women screened. Included in this study were 849 patients in whom 14 BSGI examinations detected mammographically occult breast cancer. Patients ranged in age from 26 to 83 y, with a mean age of 57 y. Eleven of 14 cancers were detected in women with dense breasts. The addition of BSGI to the annual breast screen of asymptomatic women at increased risk for breast cancer yields 16.5 cancers per 1,000 women screened. When high-risk lesions and cancers were combined, BSGI detected 33.0 high-risk lesions and cancers per 1,000 women screened. BSGI is a reliable adjunct modality to screening mammography that increases breast cancer detection by 1.7% (14/849) in women at increased risk for breast cancer, comparable to results reported for breast MRI. BSGI is beneficial in breast cancer detection in women at increased risk, particularly in those with dense breasts. © 2016 by the Society of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Inc.

  16. Detecting breast cancer using microwave imaging and stochastic optimization.

    PubMed

    Jeremic, Aleksandar; Khoshrowshahli, Elham

    2015-01-01

    Breast cancer detection is one of the most important problems in health care as it is second most frequent cancer according to WHO. Breast cancer is among cancers which are most probably curable, only if it is diagnosed at early stages. To this purpose it has been recently proposed that microwave imaging could be used as a cheaper and safer alternative to the commonly used combination of mammography. From a physical standpoint breast cancer can be modelled as a scatterer with a significantly (tenfold) larger conductivity than a healthy tissue. In our previous work we proposed a maximum likelihood based method for detection of cancer which estimates the unknown parameters by minimizing the residual error vector assuming that the error can be modelled as a multivariate (multiple antennas) random variable. In this paper we utilize stochastic optimization technique and evaluate its applicability to the detection of cancer using numerical models. Although these models have significant limitations they are potentially useful as they provide insight in required levels of noise in order to achieve desirable detection rates.

  17. 77 FR 66469 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... meeting of the aforementioned committee: Name: Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control..., regarding the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The committee makes...

  18. Early Detection of Breast Cancer Using Molecular Beacons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    counterstaining ( Blue ). 7 Key Research Accomplishments: Publications: Fig. 5. Simultaneous detection of...tissues Frozen tissue sections of breast DCIS and invasive cancer were labeled with an anti-uPAR antibody. Red: uPAR positive cells, Blue ...caspase-3 were from Cell Signaling Technology Inc. (Beverly, MA). Goat anti-human survivin (Santa Cruz Biotechnology , Inc., Santa Cruz, CA) and mouse

  19. Detecting Breast Cancer with a Dual-Modality Device

    PubMed Central

    Padia, Kamila; Douglas, Tania S.; Cairncross, Lydia L.; Baasch, Roland V.; Vaughan, Christopher L.

    2017-01-01

    Although mammography has been the gold standard for the early detection of breast cancer, if a woman has dense breast tissue, a false negative diagnosis may occur. Breast ultrasound, whether hand-held or automated, is a useful adjunct to mammography but adds extra time and cost. The primary aim was to demonstrate that our second-generation Aceso system, which combines full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) in a single platform, is able to produce improved quality images that provide clinically meaningful results. Aceso was first tested using two industry standards: a Contrast Detail Mammography (CDMAM) phantom to assess the FFDM images, and the CIRS 054GS phantom to evaluate the ABUS images. In addition, 25 women participated in a clinical trial: 14 were healthy volunteers, while 11 were patients referred by the breast clinic at Groote Schuur Hospital. The CDMAM phantom results showed the FFDM results were better than the European Reference (EUREF) standard of “acceptable” and were approaching “achievable”. The ABUS results showed a lateral and axial spatial resolution of 0.5 mm and an adequate depth penetration of 80 mm. Our second-generation Aceso system, with its improved quality of clinical FFDM and ABUS images, has demonstrated its potential for the early detection of breast cancer in a busy clinic. PMID:28335472

  20. Diabetes and breast cancer in Taiwanese women: a detection bias?

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chin-Hsiao

    2014-10-01

    To evaluate whether diabetes is a risk factor for breast cancer considering confounders and potential detection examinations. National Health Insurance data on 501,747 women without breast cancer were retrieved. Three-year cumulative incidence (2003-2005) and risk ratios (RRs) between diabetic and nondiabetic women were calculated. Potential detection examinations were compared between diabetic and nondiabetic women by chi-square test. Odds ratios (ORs) were estimated by logistic regression for diabetes status/duration with and without adjustment for potential detection examinations and confounders. The crude RR (95% confidence interval [CI]) for all ages, and age groups < 50, 50-64 and ≥ 65 years, was 2·62 (2·31-2·91), 2·69 (2·11-3·44), 1·39 (1·15-1·68) and 1·37 (1·03-1·84), respectively. Patients with diabetes more frequently received potential detection examinations than nondiabetes (17·5% vs. 7·4%, P-value < 0·001). The unadjusted OR (95% CI) for breast cancer for diabetes status (yes vs. no) was 2·63 (2·31-2·98) and was significant for any diabetes duration. The OR for diabetes status was 1·81 (95% CI: 1·59-2·06) after adjustment for potential detection examinations. In models adjusted for potential detection examinations, age, living region, occupation, comorbidities and used medications, OR for diabetes status attenuated to 1·13 (95% CI 0·96-1·32, P-value = 0·14) and none was significant for any diabetes duration. Potential detection examinations were associated with a fivefold to sevenfold higher risk in various models, indicating a strong impact of detection bias. An association between diabetes and breast cancer is observed, but this can be due to potential detection bias and confounders. © 2014 Stichting European Society for Clinical Investigation Journal Foundation.

  1. Three-dimensional thermoacoustic imaging for early breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Ji, Zhong; Lou, Cunguang; Yang, Sihua; Xing, Da

    2012-11-01

    Microwave-induced thermoacoustic tomography (TAT) is a noninvasive modality based on the differences in microwave absorption of various biological tissues. In this paper, the feasibility of the early breast tumor detection by TAT system has been discussed and validated experimentally. A fast TAT system, which based on three 128-elements transducers, a 384-64ch switch and a parallel data acquisition system (DAS), was developed to reconstruct the three-dimensional (3D) image of a breast model with similar microwave absorption coefficient to breast tissue. A novel method to explore the ability of TAT system to distinguish absorption coefficient was introduced and the minimum absorption coefficient difference that can be distinguished clearly by our TAT system is 12 m(-1). The potential applications of the TAT system were clearly demonstrated by successfully mapping breast model with mimicked tumors and microcalcification. An imaging experiment of human breast tumor embedding in the breast model was performed and the tumor was visualized by the 3D thermoacoustic volume. The thermoacoustic images match well with the samples and achieve penetration depth of 6 cm. The experimental results indicate that TAT has a great potential to be used for detecting early-stage breast cancers with high contrast and high resolution.

  2. Tornosynthesis Breast Imaging: Early Detection and Characterization of Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-07-01

    Tomosynthesis is a method of obtaining tomographic images of the breast. We have developed a method for breast tomosynthesis using a full-field...source moves in an are above the breast. Our results indicate: (1) a radiation dose similar to a conventional mammogram may be used for tomosynthesis ...observer study. Our results indicate tomosynthesis will over improvements over conventional breast screening methods.

  3. An exploration of rural and urban Kenyan women's knowledge and attitudes regarding breast cancer and breast cancer early detection measures.

    PubMed

    Muthoni, Ann; Miller, Ann Neville

    2010-09-01

    Many women in Kenya with breast cancer symptoms do not seek medical attention until their cancer is very advanced, leading to high mortality rates and a heavy cancer burden on the nation. In this study we employed eight focus groups with low- and middle-income rural and urban Kenyan women to explore their knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors concerning breast cancer and its early detection measures. Topics for discussion were derived from the components of the Health Belief Model (HBM). Findings revealed a huge divide between urban middle-income women and all other groups with respect to knowledge of breast cancer and early detection measures. In addition, women viewed breast cancer as a highly severe disease. Perceived benefits of early detection measures centered around preparing themselves for what was assumed to be inevitable death.

  4. Sleep duration and breast cancer risk in the Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project follow-up cohort.

    PubMed

    Qian, X; Brinton, L A; Schairer, C; Matthews, C E

    2015-02-03

    Short sleep has been hypothesised to increase the risk of breast cancer. However, little is known about the association between sleep and different subtypes of breast cancer defined by hormone receptor status. Among 40 013 women in the Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project, including 1846 incident breast cancer cases, we prospectively examined self-reported weekday and weekend sleep duration in relation to breast cancer risk. We used multivariate Cox proportional hazards regression models to estimate relative risks (RRs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs). We found no association between sleep and overall breast cancer. However, we observed a decreased risk of ER+PR+ breast cancer (RR <6 vs 8 - 9 h (95% CI): 0.54 (0.31, 0.93), P for trend, 0.003) with shorter sleep duration. Our finding does not support an association between sleep duration and overall breast cancer risk. However, the effect of sleep on different subtypes of breast cancer deserves further investigation.

  5. Incremental cancer detection using breast ultrasonography versus breast magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    Plaxco, Jeri S; Wei, Wei; Huo, Lei; Candelaria, Rosalind P; Kuerer, Henry M; Yang, Wei T

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To compare the incremental cancer detection rate (ICDR) using bilateral whole-breast ultrasonography (BWBUS) vs dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in patients with primary breast cancer. Methods: A retrospective database search in a single institution identified 259 patients with breast cancer diagnosed from January 2011 to August 2014 who underwent mammography, BWBUS and MRI before surgery. Patient characteristics, tumour characteristics and lesions seen on each imaging modality were recorded. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for each modality were calculated. ICDRs according to index tumour histology and receptor status were also evaluated. The effect of additional cancer detection on surgical planning was obtained from the medical records. Results: A total of 266 additional lesions beyond 273 index malignancies were seen on at least 1 modality, of which 121 (45%) lesions were malignant and 145 (55%) lesions were benign. MRI was significantly more sensitive than BWBUS (p = 0.01), while BWBUS was significantly more accurate and specific than MRI (p < 0.0001). Compared with mammography, the ICDRs using BWBUS and MRI were significantly higher for oestrogen receptor-positive and triple-negative cancers, but not for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive cancers. 22 additional malignant lesions in 18 patients were seen on MRI only. Surgical planning remained unchanged in 8 (44%) of those 18 patients. Conclusion: MRI was more sensitive than BWBUS, while BWBUS was more accurate and specific than MRI. MRI-detected additional malignant lesions did not change surgical planning in almost half of these patients. Advances in knowledge: BWBUS may be a cost-effective and practical tool in breast cancer staging. PMID:27384241

  6. Incremental cancer detection using breast ultrasonography versus breast magnetic resonance imaging in the evaluation of newly diagnosed breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    He, Hongying; Plaxco, Jeri S; Wei, Wei; Huo, Lei; Candelaria, Rosalind P; Kuerer, Henry M; Yang, Wei T

    2016-09-01

    To compare the incremental cancer detection rate (ICDR) using bilateral whole-breast ultrasonography (BWBUS) vs dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI in patients with primary breast cancer. A retrospective database search in a single institution identified 259 patients with breast cancer diagnosed from January 2011 to August 2014 who underwent mammography, BWBUS and MRI before surgery. Patient characteristics, tumour characteristics and lesions seen on each imaging modality were recorded. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy for each modality were calculated. ICDRs according to index tumour histology and receptor status were also evaluated. The effect of additional cancer detection on surgical planning was obtained from the medical records. A total of 266 additional lesions beyond 273 index malignancies were seen on at least 1 modality, of which 121 (45%) lesions were malignant and 145 (55%) lesions were benign. MRI was significantly more sensitive than BWBUS (p = 0.01), while BWBUS was significantly more accurate and specific than MRI (p < 0.0001). Compared with mammography, the ICDRs using BWBUS and MRI were significantly higher for oestrogen receptor-positive and triple-negative cancers, but not for human epidermal growth factor receptor 2-positive cancers. 22 additional malignant lesions in 18 patients were seen on MRI only. Surgical planning remained unchanged in 8 (44%) of those 18 patients. MRI was more sensitive than BWBUS, while BWBUS was more accurate and specific than MRI. MRI-detected additional malignant lesions did not change surgical planning in almost half of these patients. BWBUS may be a cost-effective and practical tool in breast cancer staging.

  7. MR imaging of the breast for the detection, diagnosis, and staging of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Orel, S G; Schnall, M D

    2001-07-01

    With the introduction of contrast agents, advances in surface coil technology, and development of new imaging protocols, contrast agent-enhanced magnetic resonance (MR) imaging has emerged as a promising modality for detection, diagnosis, and staging of breast cancer. The reported sensitivity of MR imaging for the visualization of invasive cancer has approached 100%. There are many examples in the literature of MR imaging--demonstrated mammographically, sonographically, and clinically occult breast cancer. Often, breast cancer detected on MR images has resulted in a change in patient care. Despite these results, there are many unresolved issues, including no defined standard technique for contrast-enhanced breast MR imaging, no standard interpretation criteria for evaluating such studies, no consensus on what constitutes clinically important enhancement, and no clearly defined clinical indications for the use of MR imaging. Furthermore, this technology remains costly, and issues of cost-effectiveness and cost competition from percutaneous biopsy have yet to be fully addressed. These factors along with the lack of commercially available MR imaging--guided localization and biopsy systems have slowed the transfer of this imaging technology from research centers to clinical breast imaging practices. Technical requirements, potential clinical applications, and potential pitfalls and limitations of contrast-enhanced MR imaging as a method to help detect, diagnose, and stage breast cancer will be described.

  8. Computer-aided detection and diagnosis of breast cancer with mammography: recent advances.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinshan; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M; Xu, Jun; El Naqa, Issam; Yang, Yongyi

    2009-03-01

    Breast cancer is the second-most common and leading cause of cancer death among women. It has become a major health issue in the world over the past 50 years, and its incidence has increased in recent years. Early detection is an effective way to diagnose and manage breast cancer. Computer-aided detection or diagnosis (CAD) systems can play a key role in the early detection of breast cancer and can reduce the death rate among women with breast cancer. The purpose of this paper is to provide an overview of recent advances in the development of CAD systems and related techniques. We begin with a brief introduction to some basic concepts related to breast cancer detection and diagnosis. We then focus on key CAD techniques developed recently for breast cancer, including detection of calcifications, detection of masses, detection of architectural distortion, detection of bilateral asymmetry, image enhancement, and image retrieval.

  9. International programs for the detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Smith, Robert A

    2011-01-01

    The benefit of early breast cancer detection is the foundation for programs around the globe to reduce morbidity and mortality related to breast cancer. These programs range from educational programs targeted to women and health professionals to organized or opportunistic screening programs that target specific age groups of women. Modern mammography programs tend to follow the protocols from the randomized clinical trials, but there is variation in key program elements such as the age groups invited to screening, the screening interval, performance indicators, and the uptake rate. Until recently, the emphasis on early breast cancer detection was limited to mammography, but the steady rise in incidence and mortality in low and medium resource countries, where mammography may be unaffordable, has led to a renewal in emphasizing the incremental value of downsizing palpable tumors through physical exams. There is consensus that programs should be designed based on disease burden and available resources, but that even in low resource countries there are opportunities to reduce breast deaths through earlier diagnosis and effective treatment. Screening programs are most effective when they are organized, and program planners should consider WHO criteria and local input data as a basis for tailoring screening programs to the needs of their population.

  10. Detection of eight BRCA1 mutations in 10 breast/ovarian cancer families, including 1 family with male breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Sruewing, J.P.; Brody, L.C.; Erdos, M.R.

    1995-07-01

    Genetic epidemiological evidence suggests that mutations in BRCA1 may be responsible for approximately one half of early onset familial breast cancer and the majority of familial breast/ovarian cancer. The recent cloning of BRCA1 allows for the direct detection of mutations, but the feasibility of presymptomatic screening for cancer susceptibility is unknown. We analyzed genomic DNA from one affected individual from each of 24 families with at least three cases of ovarian or breast cancer, using SSCP assays. Variant SSCP bands were subcloned and sequenced. Allele-specific oligonucleotide hybridization was used to verify sequence changes and to screen DNA from control individuals. Six frameshift and two missense mutations were detected in 10 different families. A frameshift mutation was detected in a male proband affected with both breast and prostate cancer. A 40-bp deletion was detected in a patient who developed intra-abdominal carcinomatosis 1 year after prophylactic oophorectomy. Mutations were detected throughout the gene, and only one was detected in more than a single family. These results provide further evidence that inherited breast and ovarian cancer can occur as a consequence of a wide array of BRCA1 mutations. These results suggests that development of a screening test for BRCA1 mutations will be technically challenging. The finding of a mutation in a family with male breast cancer, not previously thought to be related to BRCA1, also illustrates the potential difficulties of genetic counseling for individuals known to carry mutations. 37 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  11. Living as a Breast Cancer Survivor

    MedlinePlus

    ... a Breast Cancer Survivor Follow up Care After Breast Cancer Treatment Many women are relieved or excited to ... Menopausal Hormone Therapy After Breast Cancer More In Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer Risk and Prevention Early Detection ...

  12. Do We Know What Causes Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer How Does Breast Cancer Form? Changes or mutations in DNA can cause ... please see our Content Usage Policy . More In Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer Risk and Prevention Early Detection ...

  13. Ultrasonic Detection of Microscopic Breast Cancer in Cell Cultures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goodrich, Jeffrey B.; Patel, Hemang; Doyle, Timothy E.; Kwon, Soonjo

    2010-10-01

    A current problem in breast cancer treatment is the detection of microscopic cancer in surgical margins to ensure all of the cancer has been removed. Current methods rely on extensive pathology work that may take several days to complete. Positive findings for cancer in margins require follow-up surgery for up to 50% of lumpectomy patients to remove more tissue. A microscopic detection method for use during surgery would be preferable to reduce the risks, costs, and patient suffering of follow-up operations. Ultrasound is a promising in vivo detection method due to its low cost, portability, and ability to detect malignant tissue changes. Recent experiments have demonstrated the ultrasonic detection of microscopic cancer in cell cultures. Ultrasonic waveforms from pulse echo measurements showed significant differences between normal and malignant cell monolayers. The ultrasound also detected normal and malignant monolayer growth that displayed good correlations with cell counts. These results support the use of ultrasound as a viable method for in vivo detection. Testing of surgical samples at the Huntsman Cancer Institute is now in progress.

  14. Breast cancer detection: radiologists' performance using mammography with and without automated whole-breast ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Kelly, Kevin M; Dean, Judy; Lee, Sung-Jae; Comulada, W Scott

    2010-11-01

    Radiologist reader performance for breast cancer detection using mammography plus automated whole-breast ultrasound (AWBU) was compared with mammography alone. Screenings for non-palpable breast malignancies in women with radiographically dense breasts with contemporaneous mammograms and AWBU were reviewed by 12 radiologists blinded to the diagnoses; half the studies were abnormal. Readers first reviewed the 102 mammograms. The American College of Radiology (ACR) Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System (BIRADS) and Digital Mammographic Imaging Screening Trial (DMIST) likelihood ratings were recorded with location information for identified abnormalities. Readers then reviewed the mammograms and AWBU with knowledge of previous mammogram-only evaluation. We compared reader performance across screening techniques using absolute callback, areas under the curve (AUC), and figure of merit (FOM). True positivity of cancer detection increased 63%, with only a 4% decrease in true negativity. Reader-averaged AUC was higher for mammography plus AWBU compared with mammography alone by BIRADS (0.808 versus 0.701) and likelihood scores (0.810 versus 0.703). Similarly, FOM was higher for mammography plus AWBU compared with mammography alone by BIRADS (0.786 versus 0.613) and likelihood scores (0.791 versus 0.614). Adding AWBU to mammography improved callback rates, accuracy of breast cancer detection, and confidence in callbacks for dense-breasted women.

  15. Genomic Approaches for Detection and Treatment of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    AD Award Number: W81XWH-04- 1 -0197 TITLE: Genomic Approaches for Detection and Treatment of Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Stephen J. Elledge...No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for this collection of information is estimated to average 1 hour per response, including the time for reviewing...FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1 . REPORT DATE 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 01-07-2005 Annual 1 Jul 2004 - 30 Jun 2005 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a

  16. Targeting Premalignant Lesions: Implications for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Intervention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-04-01

    1 AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-14-1-0032 TITLE: Targeting Premalignant Lesions: Implications for Early Breast Cancer Detection and Intervention...ABSTRACT Breast cancer progression constitutes a multistep process through a series of intermediate hyperplastic and neoplastic stages to invasive...Considerable numbers of CAFs are frequently observed within the tumor- associated stroma of various human cancers , including those of the breast

  17. Nipple aspirate fluid and ductoscopy to detect breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Sauter, Edward R; Klein-Szanto, Andres; Macgibbon, Brenda; Ehya, Hormoz

    2010-04-01

    We prospectively performed cytologic assessment and image analysis (IA) on matched nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) and mammary ductoscopy (MD) specimens to determine (1) the accuracy of these methods in cancer detection and (2) whether the two collection methods provide complementary information.NAF and MD specimens were collected from 84 breasts from 75 women (nine bilateral samples) who underwent breast surgery. Cytologic evaluation was performed on all samples. IA was performed on slides with sufficient epithelial cells.Cytologic evaluation proved more accurate in patients without pathologic spontaneous nipple discharge (PND) than those with PND, mainly because of the potential false positive diagnosis in the latter. While the sensitivity of NAF and MD cytology was low (10% and 14%, respectively), both were 100% specific in cancer detection in the non-PND cohort. Combining NAF and MD cytology information improved sensitivity (24%) without sacrificing specificity. Similar to cytology, IA was more accurate in patients without PND having high specificity (100% for aneuploid IA), but relatively low sensitivity (36%). Combining NAF and MD cytology with aneuploid IA improved the sensitivity (45%) while maintaining high specificity (100%). The best predictive model was positive NAF cytology and/or MD cytology combined with IA aneuploidy, which resulted in 55% sensitivity and 100% specificity in breast cancer detection.Cytologic evaluation and IA of NAF and MD specimens are complementary. The presence of atypical cells arising from an intraductal papilloma in ductoscopic specimens is a potential source of false positive diagnosis in patients with nipple discharge.

  18. Computer-aided detection and diagnosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Collins, Michael J; Hoffmeister, Jeffrey; Worrell, Steven W

    2006-08-01

    The use of computer-aided detection (CAD) with film or digital mammography is now widely regarded as the standard of practice in mammography and has been shown to increase the rate of breast cancer detection. There are inherent limitations in 2D mammography, and new technologies involving 2D and 3D imaging with X-rays, ultrasound, and MRI are in use or under investigation. CAD can aid in the reduction of oversight error for these modalities and has the potential to assist the physician in unifying the interpretation across alternative modalities. We believe the result will be improved sensitivity and specificity due to both improved detection and diagnosis.

  19. Hybrid Nanotechnologies for Detection and Synergistic Therapies for Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    and a Scholar to develop a novel nanotechnology platform for the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer . The prevalence of breast cancer and the...the strategies towards developing a cure for breast cancer . Nanotechnology has the potential of causing such a paradigm shift. Some clinically...used anti- cancer drugs (e.g. Abraxane, Doxil) and imaging agents are already nanoparticle - based. While highly effective, these first generation products

  20. Skin artifact removal technique for breast cancer radar detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caorsi, S.; Lenzi, C.

    2016-06-01

    In this paper we propose a new model-based skin artifact cleaning technique with the aim to remove skin reflections with good effectiveness, without introducing significant signal distortions, and without assuming a priori information on the real structure of the breast. The reference cleaning model, constituted by a two-layer geometry skin-adipose tissue, is oriented to all the ultrawideband radar methods able to detect the tumor starting by the knowledge of each trace recorded around the breast. All the radar signal measurements were simulated by using realistic breast models derived from the University of Wisconsin computational electromagnetic laboratory database and the finite difference time domain (FDTD)-based open source software GprMax. First, we have searched for the best configuration for the reference cleaning model with the aim to minimize the distortions introduced on the radar signal. Second, the performance of the proposed cleaning technique has been assessed by using a breast cancer radar detection technique based on the use of artificial neural network (ANN). In order to minimize the signal distortions, we found that it was necessary to use the real skin thickness and the static Debye parameters of both skin and adipose tissue. In such a case the ANN-based radar approach was able to detect the tumor with an accuracy of 87%. By extending the performance assessment also to the case when only average standard values are used to characterize the reference cleaning model, the detection accuracy was of 84%.

  1. Abbreviated MRI Protocols for Detecting Breast Cancer in Women with Dense Breasts.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang-Qing; Huang, Min; Shen, Yu-Ying; Liu, Chen-Lu; Xu, Chuan-Xiao

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the validity of two abbreviated protocols (AP) of MRI in breast cancer screening of dense breast tissue. This was a retrospective study in 356 participants with dense breast tissue and negative mammography results. The study was approved by the Nanjing Medical University Ethics Committee. Patients were imaged with a full diagnostic protocol (FDP) of MRI. Two APs (AP-1 consisting of the first post-contrast subtracted [FAST] and maximum-intensity projection [MIP] images, and AP-2 consisting of AP-1 combined with diffusion-weighted imaging [DWI]) and FDP images were analyzed separately, and the sensitivities and specificities of breast cancer detection were calculated. Of the 356 women, 67 lesions were detected in 67 women (18.8%) by standard MR protocol, and histological examination revealed 14 malignant lesions and 53 benign lesions. The average interpretation time of AP-1 and AP-2 were 37 seconds and 54 seconds, respectively, while the average interpretation time of the FDP was 3 minutes and 25 seconds. The sensitivities of the AP-1, AP-2, and FDP were 92.9, 100, and 100%, respectively, and the specificities of the three MR protocols were 86.5, 95.0, and 96.8%, respectively. There was no significant difference among the three MR protocols in the diagnosis of breast cancer (p > 0.05). However, the specificity of AP-1 was significantly lower than that of AP-2 (p = 0.031) and FDP (p = 0.035), while there was no difference between AP-2 and FDP (p > 0.05). The AP may be efficient in the breast cancer screening of dense breast tissue. FAST and MIP images combined with DWI of MRI are helpful to improve the specificity of breast cancer detection.

  2. What Is Breast Cancer?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Research? Breast Cancer About Breast Cancer What Is Breast Cancer? Breast cancer starts when cells in the breast ... spread, see our section on Cancer Basics . Where breast cancer starts Breast cancers can start from different parts ...

  3. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Breast cancer affects one in eight women during their lives. No one knows why some women get breast cancer, but there are many risk factors. Risks that ... age 35, and having dense breasts. Symptoms of breast cancer may include a lump in the breast, a ...

  4. Tracking the Mammary Architectural Features and Detecting Breast Cancer with Magnetic Resonance Diffusion Tensor Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Nissan, Noam; Furman-Haran, Edna; Feinberg-Shapiro, Myra; Grobgeld, Dov; Eyal, Erez; Zehavi, Tania; Degani, Hadassa

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer among women worldwide. Early detection of breast cancer has a critical role in improving the quality of life and survival of breast cancer patients. In this paper a new approach for the detection of breast cancer is described, based on tracking the mammary architectural elements using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The paper focuses on the scanning protocols and image processing algorithms and software that were designed to fit the diffusion properties of the mammary fibroglandular tissue and its changes during malignant transformation. The final output yields pixel by pixel vector maps that track the architecture of the entire mammary ductal glandular trees and parametric maps of the diffusion tensor coefficients and anisotropy indices. The efficiency of the method to detect breast cancer was tested by scanning women volunteers including 68 patients with breast cancer confirmed by histopathology findings. Regions with cancer cells exhibited a marked reduction in the diffusion coefficients and in the maximal anisotropy index as compared to the normal breast tissue, providing an intrinsic contrast for delineating the boundaries of malignant growth. Overall, the sensitivity of the DTI parameters to detect breast cancer was found to be high, particularly in dense breasts, and comparable to the current standard breast MRI method that requires injection of a contrast agent. Thus, this method offers a completely non-invasive, safe and sensitive tool for breast cancer detection. PMID:25549209

  5. Tracking the mammary architectural features and detecting breast cancer with magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging.

    PubMed

    Nissan, Noam; Furman-Haran, Edna; Feinberg-Shapiro, Myra; Grobgeld, Dov; Eyal, Erez; Zehavi, Tania; Degani, Hadassa

    2014-12-15

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of cancer among women worldwide. Early detection of breast cancer has a critical role in improving the quality of life and survival of breast cancer patients. In this paper a new approach for the detection of breast cancer is described, based on tracking the mammary architectural elements using diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). The paper focuses on the scanning protocols and image processing algorithms and software that were designed to fit the diffusion properties of the mammary fibroglandular tissue and its changes during malignant transformation. The final output yields pixel by pixel vector maps that track the architecture of the entire mammary ductal glandular trees and parametric maps of the diffusion tensor coefficients and anisotropy indices. The efficiency of the method to detect breast cancer was tested by scanning women volunteers including 68 patients with breast cancer confirmed by histopathology findings. Regions with cancer cells exhibited a marked reduction in the diffusion coefficients and in the maximal anisotropy index as compared to the normal breast tissue, providing an intrinsic contrast for delineating the boundaries of malignant growth. Overall, the sensitivity of the DTI parameters to detect breast cancer was found to be high, particularly in dense breasts, and comparable to the current standard breast MRI method that requires injection of a contrast agent. Thus, this method offers a completely non-invasive, safe and sensitive tool for breast cancer detection.

  6. Bone Sialoproteins and Breast Cancer Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-01

    Fig. 8 shows (DSPP) gene within the critical dentinogenesis imperfecta type 11 and BSP with an intact RGD bridging MMP-2 to its cell-surface dentin...sialoprotein (BSP) and the pivotal transcriptional oebter Gasy seler I Freedma NcWe of BiselarMa.tMatix regulator of osteogenesis , Cbfal/Runx2, in malignant...potential the pathogenesis of dentinogenesis imperfecta type II. Genomics 1997; diagnostic biomarker for ovarian cancer. JAMA 2002;287:1671-9. 42:38-45

  7. Detection of Methylated Circulating DNA as Noninvasive Biomarkers for Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Cheuk, Isabella Wai Yin; Shin, Vivian Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    Internationally, breast cancer is the most common female cancer, and is induced by a combination of environmental, genetic, and epigenetic risk factors. Despite the advancement of imaging techniques, invasive sampling of breast epithelial cells is the only definitive diagnostic procedure for patients with breast cancer. To date, molecular biomarkers with high sensitivity and specificity for the screening and early detection of breast cancer are lacking. Recent evidence suggests that the detection of methylated circulating cell-free DNA in the peripheral blood of patients with cancer may be a promising quantitative and noninvasive method for cancer diagnosis. Methylation detection based on a multi-gene panel, rather than on the methylation status of a single gene, may be used to increase the sensitivity and specificity of breast cancer screening. In this review, the results of 14 relevant studies, investigating the efficacy of cell-free DNA methylation screening for breast cancer diagnosis, have been summarized. The genetic risk factors for breast cancer, the methods used for breast cancer detection, and the techniques and limitations related to the detection of cell-free DNA methylation status, have also been reviewed and discussed. From this review, we conclude that the analysis of peripheral blood or other samples to detect differentially methylated cell-free DNA is a promising technique for use in clinical settings, and may improve the sensitivity of screening for both, early detection and disease relapse, and thus improve the future prognosis of patients with breast cancer. PMID:28382090

  8. Detection of breast cancer with full-field digital mammography and computer-aided detection.

    PubMed

    The, Juliette S; Schilling, Kathy J; Hoffmeister, Jeffrey W; Friedmann, Euvondia; McGinnis, Ryan; Holcomb, Richard G

    2009-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate computer-aided detection (CAD) performance with full-field digital mammography (FFDM). CAD (Second Look, version 7.2) was used to evaluate 123 cases of breast cancer detected with FFDM (Senographe DS). Retrospectively, CAD sensitivity was assessed using breast density, mammographic presentation, histopathology results, and lesion size. To determine the case-based false-positive rate, patients with four standard views per case were included in the study group. Eighteen unilateral mammography examinations with nonstandard views were excluded, resulting in a sample of 105 bilateral cases. CAD detected 115 (94%) of 123 cancer cases: six of six (100%) in fatty breasts, 63 of 66 (95%) in breasts containing scattered fibroglandular densities, 43 of 46 (93%) in heterogeneously dense breasts, and three of five (60%) in extremely dense breasts. CAD detected 93% (41/44) of cancers manifesting as calcifications, 92% (57/62) as masses, and 100% (17/17) as mixed masses and calcifications. CAD detected 94% of the invasive ductal carcinomas (n = 63), 100% of the invasive lobular carcinomas (n = 7), 91% of the other invasive carcinomas (n = 11), and 93% of the ductal carcinomas in situ (n = 42). CAD sensitivity for cancers 1-10 mm (n = 55) was 89%; 11-20 mm (n = 37), 97%; 21-30 mm (n = 16), 100%; and larger than 30 mm (n = 15), 93%. The CAD false-positive rate was 2.3 marks per four-image case. CAD with FFDM showed a high sensitivity in identifying cancers manifesting as calcifications and masses. Sensitivity was maintained in cancers with lower mammographic sensitivity, including invasive lobular carcinomas and small neoplasms (1-20 mm). CAD with FFDM should be effective in assisting radiologists with earlier detection of breast cancer. Future studies are needed to assess CAD accuracy in larger populations.

  9. Decision support system for breast cancer detection using mammograms.

    PubMed

    Ganesan, Karthikeyan; Acharya, Rajendra U; Chua, Chua K; Min, Lim C; Mathew, Betty; Thomas, Abraham K

    2013-07-01

    Mammograms are by far one of the most preferred methods of screening for breast cancer. Early detection of breast cancer can improve survival rates to a greater extent. Although the analysis and diagnosis of breast cancer are done by experienced radiologists, there is always the possibility of human error. Interobserver and intraobserver errors occur frequently in the analysis of medical images, given the high variability between every patient. Also, the sensitivity of mammographic screening varies with image quality and expertise of the radiologist. So, there is no golden standard for the screening process. To offset this variability and to standardize the diagnostic procedures, efforts are being made to develop automated techniques for diagnosis and grading of breast cancer images. This article presents a classification pipeline to improve the accuracy of differentiation between normal, benign, and malignant mammograms. Several features based on higher-order spectra, local binary pattern, Laws' texture energy, and discrete wavelet transform were extracted from mammograms. Feature selection techniques based on sequential forward, backward, plus-l-takeaway-r, individual, and branch-and-bound selections using the Mahalanobis distance criterion were used to rank the features and find classification accuracies for combination of several features based on the ranking. Six classifiers were used, namely, decision tree classifier, fisher classifier, linear discriminant classifier, nearest mean classifier, Parzen classifier, and support vector machine classifier. We evaluated our proposed methodology with 300 mammograms obtained from the Digital Database for Screening Mammography and 300 mammograms from the Singapore Anti-Tuberculosis Association CommHealth database. Sensitivity, specificity, and accuracy values were used to compare the performances of the classifiers. Our results show that the decision tree classifier demonstrated an excellent performance compared to

  10. Mammaglobin peptide as a novel biomarker for breast cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Galvis-Jiménez, Julie M.; Curtidor, Hernando; Patarroyo, Manuel A.; Monterrey, Pedro; Ramírez-Clavijo, Sandra R.

    2013-01-01

    Among the different types of tests used for cancer diagnosis, molecular tests have been increrasingly incorporated because of their ability to detect either expression or functional changes in the molecules associated with the disease. Mammaglobin is a protein found in mammary tissue and can be detected in serum. This protein has been proposed as a biomarker to diagnose breast cancer, given that patients exhibit an increased amount of the protein in serum and tumor tissue, in comparison to healthy individuals. The ELISA test was used in the present study to detect mammaglobin in blood samples from 51 breast cancer patients and 51 control individuals. Antibodies against mamaglobin were generated in rabbits by using the following synthetic peptides: A (amino acids 13 to 21), B (amino acids 31 to 39), C (amino acids 56 to 64) and a D peptide, corresponding to the protein isoform without three amino acids (59, 60 and 61 amino acids) from peptide C. All peptides were immunogenic and allowed generation of antibodies that were able to discriminate patients from controls. The best results were obtained for antiserum B, achieving the best sensitivity (86.3%) and specificity (96%). PMID:23358476

  11. Risk factors for second screen-detected or interval breast cancers in women with a personal history of breast cancer participating in mammography screening.

    PubMed

    Houssami, Nehmat; Abraham, Linn A; Kerlikowske, Karla; Buist, Diana S M; Irwig, Les; Lee, Janie; Miglioretti, Diana L

    2013-05-01

    Women with a personal history of breast cancer (PHBC) have increased risk of an interval cancer. We aimed to identify risk factors for second (ipsilateral or contralateral) screen-detected or interval breast cancer within 1 year of screening in PHBC women. Screening mammograms from women with history of early-stage breast cancer at Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium-affiliated facilities (1996-2008) were examined. Associations between woman-level, screen-level, and first cancer variables and the probability of a second breast cancer were modeled using multinomial logistic regression for three outcomes [screen-detected invasive breast cancer, interval invasive breast cancer, or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS)] relative to no second breast cancer. There were 697 second breast cancers, of these 240 were interval cancers, among 67,819 screens in 20,941 women. In separate models for women with DCIS or invasive first cancer, first breast cancer surgery predicted all three second breast cancer outcomes (P < 0.001), and high ORs for second breast cancers (between 1.95 and 4.82) were estimated for breast conservation without radiation (relative to mastectomy). In women with invasive first breast cancer, additional variables predicted risk (P < 0.05) for at least one of the three outcomes: first-degree family history, dense breasts, longer time between mammograms, young age at first breast cancer, first breast cancer stage, and adjuvant systemic therapy for first breast cancer; and risk of interval invasive breast cancer was highest in women <40 years at first breast cancer (OR, 3.41; 1.34-8.70), those with extremely dense breasts (OR, 2.55; 1.4-4.67), and those treated with breast conservation without radiation (OR, 2.67; 1.53-4.65). Although the risk of a second breast cancer is modest, our models identify risk factors for interval second breast cancer in PHBC women. Our findings may guide discussion and evaluations of tailored breast screening in PHBC women, and

  12. The Cancer Worry Scale: detecting fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors.

    PubMed

    Custers, José A E; van den Berg, Sanne W; van Laarhoven, Hanneke W M; Bleiker, Eveline M A; Gielissen, Marieke F M; Prins, Judith B

    2014-01-01

    In 9% to 34% of cancer patients, the fear of cancer recurrence becomes so overwhelming that it affects quality of life. Clinicians need a brief questionnaire with a cutoff point that is able to differentiate between high- and low-fearful survivors. This study investigated if the Cancer Worry Scale (CWS) could serve as an instrument to detect high levels of fear of recurrence in female breast cancer survivors. One hundred ninety-four female breast cancer patients were assessed up to 11 years after their primary treatment for cancer. The women returned the questionnaires including the 8-item CWS, 2 items of the Cancer Acceptance Scale, the Checklist Individual Strength-Fatigue subscale, and the Cancer Empowerment Questionnaire. A cutoff score of 13 versus 14 (low: ≤13, high: ≥14) on the CWS was optimal for detecting severe levels of fear of recurrence. A cutoff score of 11 versus 12 (low: ≤11, high: ≥12) was optimal for screening. The Cronbach α coefficient of the CWS was .87; evidence to support the convergent and divergent validity of the CWS was also obtained. The CWS is able to detect high levels of fear of recurrence. The CWS is a reliable and valid questionnaire to assess fear of recurrence in breast cancer survivors. With the CWS, it is possible for nurses to screen breast cancer survivors for severe levels of fear of cancer recurrence. Thereby, nurses can screen and assist survivors in accessing appropriate and available support.

  13. Photonic crystal enhanced fluorescence for early breast cancer biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Cunningham, Brian T; Zangar, Richard C

    2012-08-01

    Photonic crystal surfaces offer a compelling platform for improving the sensitivity of surface-based fluorescent assays used in disease diagnostics. Through the complementary processes of photonic crystal enhanced excitation and enhanced extraction, a periodic dielectric-based nanostructured surface can simultaneously increase the electric field intensity experienced by surface-bound fluorophores and increase the collection efficiency of emitted fluorescent photons. Through the ability to inexpensively fabricate photonic crystal surfaces over substantial surface areas, they are amenable to single-use applications in biological sensing, such as disease biomarker detection in serum. In this review, we will describe the motivation for implementing high-sensitivity, multiplexed biomarker detection in the context of breast cancer diagnosis. We will summarize recent efforts to improve the detection limits of such assays though the use of photonic crystal surfaces. Reduction of detection limits is driven by low autofluorescent substrates for photonic crystal fabrication, and detection instruments that take advantage of their unique features.

  14. NIPPLE ASPIRATE FLUID AND DUCTOSCOPY TO DETECT BREAST CANCER

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Edward R.; Klein-Szanto, Andres; MacGibbon, Brenda; Ehya, Hormoz

    2012-01-01

    Background We prospectively performed cytologic assessment and image analysis (IA) on matched nipple aspirate fluid (NAF) and mammary ductoscopy (MD) specimens to determine 1) the accuracy of these methods in cancer detection, and 2) whether the two collection methods provide complementary information. Methods NAF and MD specimens were collected from 84 breasts from 75 women (nine bilateral samples) who underwent breast surgery. Cytologic evaluation was performed on all samples. Image analysis was performed on slides with sufficient epithelial cells. Results Cytologic evaluation proved more accurate in patients without pathologic spontaneous nipple discharge (PND) than those with PND, mainly because of the potential false positive diagnosis in the latter. While the sensitivity of NAF and MD cytology was low (10% and 14%, respectively), both were 100% specific in cancer detection in the non-PND cohort. Combining NAF and MD cytology information improved sensitivity (24%) without sacrificing specificity. Similar to cytology, image analysis was more accurate in patients without PND having high specificity (100% for aneuploid IA), but relatively low sensitivity (36%). Combining NAF and MD cytology with aneuploid IA improved the sensitivity (45%) while maintaining high specificity (100%). The best predictive model was positive NAF cytology and/or MD cytology combined with IA aneuploidy, which resulted in 55% sensitivity and 100% specificity in breast cancer detection. Conclusions Cytologic evaluation and IA of NAF and MD specimens are complementary. The presence of atypical cells arising from an intraductal papilloma in ductoscopic specimens is a potential source of false positive diagnosis in patients with nipple discharge. PMID:19795490

  15. CS based confocal microwave imaging algorithm for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Sun, Y P; Zhang, S; Cui, Z; Qu, L L

    2016-04-29

    Based on compressive sensing (CS) technology, a high resolution confocal microwave imaging algorithm is proposed for breast cancer detection. With the exploitation of the spatial sparsity of the target space, the proposed image reconstruction problem is cast within the framework of CS and solved by the sparse constraint optimization. The effectiveness and validity of the proposed CS imaging method is verified by the full wave synthetic data from numerical breast phantom using finite-difference time-domain (FDTD) method. The imaging results have shown that the proposed imaging scheme can improve the imaging quality while significantly reducing the amount of data measurements and collection time when compared to the traditional delay-and-sum imaging algorithm.

  16. Digital Image Processing Technique for Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guzmán-Cabrera, R.; Guzmán-Sepúlveda, J. R.; Torres-Cisneros, M.; May-Arrioja, D. A.; Ruiz-Pinales, J.; Ibarra-Manzano, O. G.; Aviña-Cervantes, G.; Parada, A. González

    2013-09-01

    Breast cancer is the most common cause of death in women and the second leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Primary prevention in the early stages of the disease becomes complex as the causes remain almost unknown. However, some typical signatures of this disease, such as masses and microcalcifications appearing on mammograms, can be used to improve early diagnostic techniques, which is critical for women’s quality of life. X-ray mammography is the main test used for screening and early diagnosis, and its analysis and processing are the keys to improving breast cancer prognosis. As masses and benign glandular tissue typically appear with low contrast and often very blurred, several computer-aided diagnosis schemes have been developed to support radiologists and internists in their diagnosis. In this article, an approach is proposed to effectively analyze digital mammograms based on texture segmentation for the detection of early stage tumors. The proposed algorithm was tested over several images taken from the digital database for screening mammography for cancer research and diagnosis, and it was found to be absolutely suitable to distinguish masses and microcalcifications from the background tissue using morphological operators and then extract them through machine learning techniques and a clustering algorithm for intensity-based segmentation.

  17. Breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... idea of what to expect in the future. Breast cancer stages range from 0 to IV. The higher the ... is based on many factors, including: Type of breast cancer Stage of the cancer (staging is a tool your ...

  18. Mammography, thermography, and ultrasound in breast cancer detection

    SciTech Connect

    Basset, L.W.; Gold, R.H.

    1982-01-01

    The book begins with a brief discussion of the history of mammography and a good review and discussion of the mammorgraphy controversy. The section on diagnosis is excellent with very good anatomic-pathologic correlation of the mammography signs. The preoperative localization is well described. Section 3 on performing the examination is an excellent discussion of the various modes of mammography and their techniques. Magnification mammography, computed tomographic mammography, thermography, sonomammography, and ductography are very well covered. In Section 4, the benefits and risk of mammography are well discussed enabling the reader to understand the controversy surrounding breast cancer detection techniques.

  19. Multi-modal Ultrasound Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Medina-Valdés, L.; Pérez-Liva, M.; Camacho, J.; Udías, J. M.; Herraiz, J. L.; González-Salido, N.

    This work describes preliminary results of a two-modality imaging system aimed at the early detection of breast cancer. The first technique is based on compounding conventional echographic images taken at regular angular intervals around the imaged breast. The other modality obtains tomographic images of propagation velocity using the same circular geometry. For this study, a low-cost prototype has been built. It is based on a pair of opposed 128-element, 3.2 MHz array transducers that are mechanically moved around tissue mimicking phantoms. Compounded images around 360° provide improved resolution, clutter reduction, artifact suppression and reinforce the visualization of internal structures. However, refraction at the skin interface must be corrected for an accurate image compounding process. This is achieved by estimation of the interface geometry followed by computing the internal ray paths. On the other hand, sound velocity tomographic images from time of flight projections have been also obtained. Two reconstruction methods, Filtered Back Projection (FBP) and 2D Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (2D OSEM), were used as a first attempt towards tomographic reconstruction. These methods yield useable images in short computational times that can be considered as initial estimates in subsequent more complex methods of ultrasound image reconstruction. These images may be effective to differentiate malignant and benign masses and are very promising for breast cancer screening.

  20. Increasing cancer detection yield of breast MRI using a new CAD scheme of mammograms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Maxine; Aghaei, Faranak; Hollingsworth, Alan B.; Stough, Rebecca G.; Liu, Hong; Zheng, Bin

    2016-03-01

    Although breast MRI is the most sensitive imaging modality to detect early breast cancer, its cancer detection yield in breast cancer screening is quite low (< 3 to 4% even for the small group of high-risk women) to date. The purpose of this preliminary study is to test the potential of developing and applying a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme of digital mammograms to identify women at high risk of harboring mammography-occult breast cancers, which can be detected by breast MRI. For this purpose, we retrospectively assembled a dataset involving 30 women who had both mammography and breast MRI screening examinations. All mammograms were interpreted as negative, while 5 cancers were detected using breast MRI. We developed a CAD scheme of mammograms, which include a new quantitative mammographic image feature analysis based risk model, to stratify women into two groups with high and low risk of harboring mammography-occult cancer. Among 30 women, 9 were classified into the high risk group by CAD scheme, which included all 5 women who had cancer detected by breast MRI. All 21 low risk women remained negative on the breast MRI examinations. The cancer detection yield of breast MRI applying to this dataset substantially increased from 16.7% (5/30) to 55.6% (5/9), while eliminating 84% (21/25) unnecessary breast MRI screenings. The study demonstrated the potential of applying a new CAD scheme to significantly increase cancer detection yield of breast MRI, while simultaneously reducing the number of negative MRIs in breast cancer screening.

  1. Early Detection of Breast Cancer via Multiplane Correlation Breast Imaging

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-04-01

    superior diagnostic information. Towards this end, a LG CHO mathematical observer model was constructed to assess the detectability of a simulated mass...on mathematical observer model was developed to assess the detectability of the mass. Detectability was measured in terms of Receiver Operating...This task has been accomplished. The goal of this task was to develop an observer model which could be used to quantify the performance of MCI in

  2. Cancer Specific Proliferating Cell Nuclear Antigen as a Novel Diagnostic Marker for the Detection of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-10-01

    CELLS(BIOLOGY), *ANTIGENS, *MAMMARY GLANDS, *BREAST CANCER, TISSUES(BIOLOGY), DETECTION, PEPTIDES, ENZYMES, PROTEINS , DIAGNOSIS(MEDICINE), PATIENTS, BLOOD SERUM, IMMUNOASSAY, GELS, ELECTROPHORESIS, SENSE ORGANS, ESTROGENS.

  3. Pattern of Breast Cancer Distribution in Ghana: A Survey to Enhance Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Treatment

    PubMed Central

    Debrah, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    Background. Nearly 70% of women diagnosed with breast cancer in Ghana are in advanced stages of the disease due especially to low awareness, resulting in limited treatment success and high death rate. With limited epidemiological studies on breast cancer in Ghana, the aim of this study is to assess and understand the pattern of breast cancer distribution for enhancing early detection and treatment. Methods. We randomly selected and screened 3000 women for clinical palpable breast lumps and used univariate and bivariate analysis for description and exploration of variables, respectively, in relation to incidence of breast cancer. Results. We diagnosed 23 (0.76%) breast cancer cases out of 194 (6.46%) participants with clinically palpable breast lumps. Seventeen out of these 23 (0.56%) were premenopausal (<46.6 years) with 7 (0.23%) being below 35 years. With an overall breast cancer incidence of 0.76% in this study, our observation that about 30% of these cancer cases were below 35 years may indicate a relative possible shift of cancer burden to women in their early thirties in Ghana, compared to Western countries. Conclusion. These results suggest an age adjustment for breast cancer screening to early twenties for Ghanaian women and the need for a nationwide breast cancer screening to understand completely the pattern of breast cancer distribution in Ghana. PMID:27635263

  4. Indocyanine green detects sentinel lymph nodes in early breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Huang, Linping; Wang, Ning; Chen, Ping

    2017-04-01

    Objective To explore the clinical value of indocyanine green (ICG) for the fluorescence-guided detection of sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) during sentinel lymph node biopsy (SLNB) in patients with early breast cancer. Methods This retrospective study included female patients with breast cancer. Patients were administered methylene blue and ICG using standard techniques. All SLNs that were collected during surgery were submitted for pathological examination. SLNs were defined as those that were either fluorescent, blue, fluorescent and blue or palpably suspicious. Surgical complications, axillary recurrence, distant metastasis and overall survival rates were observed postoperatively. Results A total of 60 patients were enrolled in the study. The fluorescence detection rate of SLNs was 100% ( n = 177), with a mean of 2.95 SLNs per patient. The methylene blue staining rate was 88.3% ( n = 106), with a mean of 1.77 SLNs per patient. Pathological assessment of intraoperative frozen specimens revealed SLN metastases in 10 patients, who immediately underwent axillary lymph node dissection. No patient had axillary recurrence or distant metastases, with a survival rate of 100%. Patients who underwent SLNB showed good appearance in the axillary wound, with no limited shoulder joint abduction and upper limb oedema. Conclusion Fluorescence-guided SLNB has several advantages and is suitable for clinical application.

  5. Supramolecular Control in Nanostructured Film Architectures for Detecting Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Soares, Juliana Coatrini; Shimizu, Flavio Makoto; Soares, Andrey Coatrini; Caseli, Luciano; Ferreira, Jacqueline; Oliveira, Osvaldo N

    2015-06-10

    The need for early detection of various diseases, including breast cancer, has motivated research into nanomaterials that can be assembled in organized films which serve as biosensors. Owing to the variety of possible materials and film architectures, procedures are required to design optimized biosensors. In this study, we combine surface-specific methods to monitor the assembly of antibodies on nanostructured films with two distinct architectures. In the first, a layer of the antibody type mouse anti-HER2 (clone tab250) was immobilized on a self-assembled monolayer (SAM) of 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid modified with N-hydroxysuccinimide (NHS) and 1-ethyl-3-(3-(dimethylamino)propyl)carbodiimide (EDC). In the second approach, a SAM of cysteamine was coated with a biotin/spreptavidin bilayer on which a layer of biotinylated antibody type MSx2HUp185/her biotin was adsorbed. The rougher, less passivating coating with cysteamine determined from cyclic voltammetry and scanning electron microscopy led to biosensors that are more sensitive to detect the breast cancer ERBB2 (HER2) biomarker in impedance spectroscopy measurements. This higher distinguishing ability of the cysteamine-containing film architecture was proven with information visualization methods to treat the impedance data. Polarization-modulated infrared reflection absorption spectroscopy (PM-IRRAS) confirmed that biosensing resulted from the antibody-ERBB2 antigen affinity.

  6. 76 FR 55915 - Request for Nominations of Candidates to Serve on the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-09

    ... on the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC) The... the CDC on the early detection and control of breast and cervical cancer. The role of the BCCEDCAC...

  7. The Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program, Medicaid, and breast cancer outcomes among Ohio's underserved women.

    PubMed

    Koroukian, Siran M; Bakaki, Paul M; Htoo, Phyo Than; Han, Xiaozhen; Schluchter, Mark; Owusu, Cynthia; Cooper, Gregory S; Rose, Johnie; Flocke, Susan A

    2017-08-15

    As an organized screening program, the national Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (BCCEDP) was launched in the early 1990s to improve breast cancer outcomes among underserved women. To analyze the impact of the BCCEDP on breast cancer outcomes in Ohio, this study compared cancer stages and mortality across BCCEDP participants, Medicaid beneficiaries, and "all others." This study linked data across the Ohio Cancer Incidence Surveillance System, Medicaid, the BCCEDP database, death certificates, and the US Census and identified 26,426 women aged 40 to 64 years who had been diagnosed with incident invasive breast cancer during the years 2002-2008 (deaths through 2010). The study groups were as follows: BCCEDP participants (1-time or repeat users), Medicaid beneficiaries (women enrolled in Medicaid before their cancer diagnosis [Medicaid/prediagnosis] or around the time of their cancer diagnosis [Medicaid/peridiagnosis]), and all others (women identified as neither BCCEDP participants nor Medicaid beneficiaries). The outcomes included advanced-stage cancer at diagnosis and mortality. A multivariable logistic and survival analysis was conducted to examine the independent association between the BCCEDP and Medicaid status and the outcomes. The percentage of women presenting with advanced-stage disease was highest among women in the Medicaid/peridiagnosis group (63.4%) and lowest among BCCEDP repeat users (38.6%). With adjustments for potential confounders and even in comparison with Medicaid/prediagnosis beneficiaries, those in the Medicaid/peridiagnosis group were twice as likely to be diagnosed with advanced-stage disease (adjusted odds ratio, 2.20; 95% confidence interval, 1.83-2.66). Medicaid/peridiagnosis women are at particularly high risk to be diagnosed with advanced-stage disease. Efforts to reduce breast cancer disparities must target this group of women before they present to Medicaid. Cancer 2017;123:3097-106. © 2017 American Cancer Society

  8. Thermal analysis of multiple-antenna-excited breast model for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Yinan Li; Fahimi, Babak

    2016-08-01

    Infrared thermography (IRT), or thermal imaging has long been proposed as a novel method in early detection of breast cancer. Most of the work done was through the detection of abnormal hotspot, or asymmetries in a thermal texture map. However, the surface temperature may not appear symmetric even for a healthy breast because of variations in blood supply and individual differences. In this paper, a method that is independent of the aforementioned symmetry is proposed. The breast under detection is initially excited by a group of patch antennas. Because of the differences in electromagnetic and thermal properties, the temperature increase will be different for healthy and abnormal tissues. Through the analysis of the temperature changing behavior, comparison of the temperature under each antenna with its vicinity point is done to determine whether cancerous tissue is present or not and further to detect its approximate location. A three-dimensional (3-D) finite-element method (FEM) has been used to simulate the thermal behavior of breast tissue exposed to antenna excitations.

  9. Tomosynthesis Breast Imaging: Early Detection and Characterization of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    developed phantoms and to quantitate tomosynthesis image quality parameters by using image post processing. Moreover we have further improved the...contrast lesion detection characteristics of our digital mammography system capable of tomosynthesis and did a comparison with a - conventional film/screen technique.

  10. Contour classification in thermographic images for detection of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okuniewski, Rafał; Nowak, Robert M.; Cichosz, Paweł; Jagodziński, Dariusz; Matysiewicz, Mateusz; Neumann, Łukasz; Oleszkiewicz, Witold

    2016-09-01

    Thermographic images of breast taken by the Braster device are uploaded into web application which uses different classification algorithms to automatically decide whether a patient should be more thoroughly examined. This article presents the approach to the task of classifying contours visible on thermographic images of breast taken by the Braster device in order to make the decision about the existence of cancerous tumors in breast. It presents the results of the researches conducted on the different classification algorithms.

  11. [Correct utilization of breast cancer detection techniques in Mexican women].

    PubMed

    López-Carrillo, Lizbeth; Torres-Sánchez, Luisa; Blanco-Muñoz, Julia; Hernández-Ramírez, Raúl U; Knaul, Felicia Marie

    2014-01-01

    Identify the characteristics associated with correct utilization of self examination (SE), clinical exam (CE) and mammography (MA) for breast cancer (BC) early detection. Interviews were undertaken with 1 030 Mexican women (n=1 030), 20 to 88 years of age, regarding their reproductive and sociodemographic characteristics. An index of correct utilization was constructed based on the form and frequency practice of those techniques. The prevalence of correct utilization of SE was 11% and 5.4% for CE. Further, 7.6% of women 40-49 years of age with 2 or more BC risk factors had MA during the two years prior to the interview, and for 31.6% among women ≥50 years of age the MA was annually. The main determinant of MA utilization was having financial protection from either IMSS, ISSSTE or Seguro Popular. It is necessary to improve the correct utilization of BC detection techniques in Mexico.

  12. Utility of Clinical Breast Examinations in Detecting Local-Regional Breast Events After Breast-Conservation in Women with a Personal History of High-Risk Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Neuman, Heather B; Schumacher, Jessica R; Francescatti, Amanda B; Adesoye, Taiwo; Edge, Stephen B; Burnside, Elizabeth S; Vanness, David J; Yu, Menggang; Si, Yajuan; McKellar, Dan; Winchester, David P; Greenberg, Caprice C

    2016-10-01

    Although breast cancer follow-up guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical examinations, prior studies suggest a small fraction of local-regional events occurring after breast conservation are detected by examination alone. Our objective was to examine how local-regional events are detected in a contemporary, national cohort of high-risk breast cancer survivors. A stage-stratified sample of stage II/III breast cancer patients diagnosed in 2006-2007 (n = 11,099) were identified from 1217 facilities within the National Cancer Data Base. Additional data on local-regional and distant breast events, method of event detection, imaging received, and mortality were collected. We further limited the cohort to patients with breast conservation (n = 4854). Summary statistics describe local-regional event rates and detection method. Local-regional events were detected in 5.5 % (n = 265) of patients. Eighty-three percent were ipsilateral or contralateral in-breast events, and 17 % occurred within ipsilateral lymph nodes. Forty-eight percent of local-regional events were detected on asymptomatic breast imaging, 29 % by patients, and 10 % on clinical examination. Overall, 0.5 % of the 4854 patients had a local-regional event detected on examination. Examinations detected a higher proportion of lymph node events (8/45) compared with in-breast events (18/220). No factors were associated with method of event detection. Clinical examinations, as an adjunct to screening mammography, have a modest effect on local-regional event detection. This contradicts current belief that examinations are a critical adjunct to mammographic screening. These findings can help to streamline follow-up care, potentially improving follow-up efficiency and quality.

  13. Utility of Clinical Breast Exams in Detecting Local-Regional Breast Events after Breast-Conservation in Women with a Personal History of High-risk Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Neuman, Heather B.; Schumacher, Jessica R.; Francescatti, Amanda B.; Adesoye, Taiwo; SB, Edge; ES, Burnside; DJ, Vanness; M, Yu; Y, Si; D, McKellar; DP, Winchester; Greenberg, Caprice C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Although breast cancer follow-up guidelines emphasize the importance of clinical exams, prior studies suggest a small fraction of local-regional events occurring after breast conservation are detected by exam alone. Our objective was to examine how local-regional events are detected in a contemporary, national cohort of high-risk breast cancer survivors. Methods A stage-stratified sample of stage II/III breast cancer patients diagnosed in 2006-2007 (n=11,099) were identified from 1,217 facilities within the National Cancer Data Base. Additional data on local-regional and distant breast events, method of event detection, imaging received, and mortality was collected. We further limited the cohort to patients with breast conservation (n=4,854). Summary statistics describe local-regional event rates and detection method. Results Local-regional events were detected in 5.5% (n=265). 83% were ipsilateral or contralateral in-breast events, and 17% within ipsilateral lymph nodes. 48% of local-regional events were detected on asymptomatic breast imaging, 29% by patients, and 10% on clinical exam. Overall, 0.5% of the 4,854 patients had a local-regional event detected on exam. Exams detected a higher proportion of lymph node (8/45) compared to in-breast events (18/220). No factors were associated with method of event detection. Discussion Clinical exams, as an adjunct to screening mammography, have a modest effect on local-regional event detection. This contradicts current belief that exams are a critical adjunct to mammographic screening. These findings can help to streamline follow-up care, potentially improving follow-up efficiency and quality. PMID:27491784

  14. Preprocessing for classification of thermograms in breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neumann, Łukasz; Nowak, Robert M.; Okuniewski, Rafał; Oleszkiewicz, Witold; Cichosz, Paweł; Jagodziński, Dariusz; Matysiewicz, Mateusz

    2016-09-01

    Performance of binary classification of breast cancer suffers from high imbalance between classes. In this article we present the preprocessing module designed to negate the discrepancy in training examples. Preprocessing module is based on standardization, Synthetic Minority Oversampling Technique and undersampling. We show how each algorithm influences classification accuracy. Results indicate that described module improves overall Area Under Curve up to 10% on the tested dataset. Furthermore we propose other methods of dealing with imbalanced datasets in breast cancer classification.

  15. Semi-automatic ultrasonic full-breast scanner and computer-assisted detection system for breast cancer mass screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Etsuo; Ikedo, Yuji; Fukuoka, Daisuke; Hara, Takeshi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Endo, Tokiko; Morita, Takako

    2007-03-01

    Breast cancer mass screening is widely performed by mammography but in some population with dense breast, ultrasonography is much effective for cancer detection. For this purpose it is necessary to develop special ultrasonic equipment and the system for breast mass screening. It is important to design scanner, image recorder, viewer with CAD (Computer-assisted detection) as a system. Authors developed automatic scanner which scans unilateral breast within 30 seconds. An electric linear probe visualizes width of 6cm, the probe moves 3 paths for unilateral breast. Ultrasonic images are recorded as movie files. These files are treated by microcomputer as volume data. Doctors can diagnose by digital rapid viewing with 3D function. It is possible to show unilateral or bilateral images on a screen. The viewer contains reporting function as well. This system is considered enough capability to perform ultrasonic breast cancer mass screening.

  16. Tissue phantom-based breast cancer detection using continuous near-infrared sensor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Dan; Liu, Xin; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Qisong; Lu, Jingyang

    2016-09-02

    Women's health is seriously threatened by breast cancer. Taking advantage of efficient diagnostic instruments to identify the disease is very meaningful in prolonging life. As a cheap noninvasive radiation-free technology, Near-infrared Spectroscopy is suitable for general breast cancer examination. A discrimination method of breast cancer is presented using the deference between absorption coefficients and applied to construct a blood oxygen detection device based on Modified Lambert-Beer theory. Combined with multi-wavelength multi-path near-infrared sensing technology, the proposed method can quantitatively distinguish the normal breast from the abnormal one by measuring the absorption coefficients of breast tissue and the blood oxygen saturation. An objective judgment about the breast tumor is made according to its high absorption of near-infrared light. The phantom experiment is implemented to show the presented method is able to recognize the absorption differences between phantoms and demonstrates its feasibility in the breast tumor detection.

  17. Accuracy and Significance of Polymerase Chain Reaction Detection of Sentinel Node Metastases in Breast Cancer Patients

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-10-01

    specific marker for RT-PCR detection of breast cancer metastases in sentinel lymph nodes. Society of Surgical Oncology Book of Abstracts 1999; 38: P16 ... Cancer Patients PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Kathryn M. Verbanac, Ph.D. Lorraine Tafra, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: East Carolina University...Detection of Sentinel Node Metastases Breast Cancer Patients in 6. AUTHOR(S) Kathryn Verbanac, Ph.D. Lorraine Tafra, M.D. 5. FUNDING NUMBERS

  18. Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Korean Breast Cancer Patients by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and Meta-Analysis of Human Papillomavirus and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinhyuk; Kim, Chungyeul; Lee, Hye Seung; Choi, Yoo Jin; Kim, Ha Yeon; Lee, Jinhwan; Chang, Hyeyoon; Kim, Aeree

    2016-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established oncogenic virus of cervical, anogenital, and oropharyngeal cancer. Various subtypes of HPV have been detected in 0% to 60% of breast cancers. The roles of HPV in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer remain controversial. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of HPV-positive breast cancer in Korean patients and to evaluate the possibility of carcinogenic effect of HPV on breast. Methods Meta-analysis was performed in 22 case-control studies for HPV infection in breast cancer. A total of 123 breast cancers, nine intraductal papillomas and 13 nipple tissues of patients with proven cervical HPV infection were tested by real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect 28 subtypes of HPV. Breast cancers were composed of 106 formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) breast cancer samples and 17 touch imprint cytology samples of breast cancers. Results The overall odds ratio between breast cancer and HPV infection was 5.43 (95% confidence interval, 3.24 to 9.12) with I2 = 34.5% in meta-analysis of published studies with case-control setting and it was statistically significant. HPV was detected in 22 cases of breast cancers (17.9%) and two cases of intaductal papillomas (22.2%). However, these cases had weak positivity. Conclusions These results failed to serve as significant evidence to support the relationship between HPV and breast cancer. Further study with larger epidemiologic population is merited to determine the relationship between HPV and breast cancer. PMID:27725620

  19. Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Korean Breast Cancer Patients by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and Meta-Analysis of Human Papillomavirus and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jinhyuk; Kim, Chungyeul; Lee, Hye Seung; Choi, Yoo Jin; Kim, Ha Yeon; Lee, Jinhwan; Chang, Hyeyoon; Kim, Aeree

    2016-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established oncogenic virus of cervical, anogenital, and oropharyngeal cancer. Various subtypes of HPV have been detected in 0% to 60% of breast cancers. The roles of HPV in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer remain controversial. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of HPV-positive breast cancer in Korean patients and to evaluate the possibility of carcinogenic effect of HPV on breast. Meta-analysis was performed in 22 case-control studies for HPV infection in breast cancer. A total of 123 breast cancers, nine intraductal papillomas and 13 nipple tissues of patients with proven cervical HPV infection were tested by real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect 28 subtypes of HPV. Breast cancers were composed of 106 formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) breast cancer samples and 17 touch imprint cytology samples of breast cancers. The overall odds ratio between breast cancer and HPV infection was 5.43 (95% confidence interval, 3.24 to 9.12) with I2 = 34.5% in meta-analysis of published studies with case-control setting and it was statistically significant. HPV was detected in 22 cases of breast cancers (17.9%) and two cases of intaductal papillomas (22.2%). However, these cases had weak positivity. These results failed to serve as significant evidence to support the relationship between HPV and breast cancer. Further study with larger epidemiologic population is merited to determine the relationship between HPV and breast cancer.

  20. Breast and cervical cancers diagnosed and stage at diagnosis among women served through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jacqueline W; Royalty, Janet; Henley, Jane; White, Arica; Richardson, Lisa C

    2015-05-01

    To assess cancers diagnosed and the stage of cancer at the time of diagnosis among low-income, under-insured, or uninsured women who received services through the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP). Using the NBCCEDP database, we examined the number and percent of women diagnosed during 2009-2011 with in situ breast cancer, invasive breast cancer, and invasive cervical cancer by demographic and clinical characteristics, including age, race and ethnicity, test indication (screening or diagnostic), symptoms (for breast cancer), and screening history (for cervical cancer). We examined these characteristics by stage at diagnosis, a new variable included in the database obtained by linking with state-based central cancer registries. There were 11,569 women diagnosed with invasive breast cancer, 1,988 with in situ breast cancer, and 583 with invasive cervical cancer through the NBCCEDP. Women who reported breast symptoms or who had diagnostic mammography were more likely to be diagnosed with breast cancer, and at a later stage, than those who did not have symptoms or who had screening mammography. Women who had been rarely or never screened for cervical cancer were more likely to be diagnosed with cervical cancer, and at a later stage, than women who received regular screenings. Women served through the NBCCEDP who have not had prior screening or who have symptoms were more often diagnosed with late-stage disease.

  1. Retrospective observation on contribution and limitations of screening for breast cancer with mammography in Korea: detection rate of breast cancer and incidence rate of interval cancer of the breast.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kunsei; Kim, Hyeongsu; Lee, Jung Hyun; Jeong, Hyoseon; Shin, Soon Ae; Han, Taehwa; Seo, Young Lan; Yoo, Youngbum; Nam, Sang Eun; Park, Jong Heon; Park, Yoo Mi

    2016-11-18

    The purpose of this study was to determine the benefits and limitations of screening for breast cancer using mammography. Descriptive design with follow-up was used in the study. Data from breast cancer screening and health insurance claim data were used. The study population consisted of all participants in breast cancer screening from 2009 to 2014. Crude detection rate, positive predictive value and sensitivity and specificity of breast cancer screening and, incidence rate of interval cancer of the breast were calculated. The crude detection rate of breast cancer screening per 100,000 participants increased from 126.3 in 2009 to 182.1 in 2014. The positive predictive value of breast cancer screening per 100,000 positives increased from 741.2 in 2009 to 1,367.9 in 2014. The incidence rate of interval cancer of the breast per 100,000 negatives increased from 51.7 in 2009 to 76.3 in 2014. The sensitivities of screening for breast cancer were 74.6% in 2009 and 75.1% in 2014 and the specificities were 83.1% in 2009 and 85.7% in 2014. To increase the detection rate of breast cancer by breast cancer screening using mammography, the participation rate should be higher and an environment where accurate mammography and reading can be performed and reinforcement of quality control are required. To reduce the incidence rate of interval cancer of the breast, it will be necessary to educate women after their 20s to perform self-examination of the breast once a month regardless of participation in screening for breast cancer.

  2. Six cases showing radial scar/complex sclerosing lesions of the breast detected by breast cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Shingo; Inoue, Masayuki; Kawasaki, Tomonori; Takahashi, Hifumi; Inoue, Ayako; Maruyama, Takanori; Matsuda, Kei; Kunitomo, Kazuyoshi; Murata, Shinichi; Fujii, Hideki

    2008-01-01

    Recently, the number of radial scars (RS)/complex sclerosing lesions (CSL) of the breast has been increasingly detected by mammography screening. Six RS/CSL cases encountered clinicopathologically in the last 2 years are presented. All patients were pre-menopausal. Three cases were detected by ultrasonography (US) screening, and the others were detected by mammography (MG) screening. Partial mastectomy was carried out for both diagnosis and treatment, since it was difficult to discriminate whether RS/CSL accompanied breast cancer even by US, MG, MRI, aspiration cytology, and spring-loaded core needle biopsy (CNB). RS/CSL was histologically confirmed in all cases, and atypical ductal hyperplasia (ADH) or ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) accompanied RS/CSL in each case. At present, the clinical diagnosis of complicated breast cancer is difficult. Therefore, we selected partial mastectomy that resects a wider area than surgical biopsy to adequately diagnose breast cancer and to achieve a resected margin that is free from breast cancer. But it may be that partial resection should be performed in case of older age with larger RS/CSL, since it is over-surgery for RS/CSL without breast cancer. Further studies where complicated breast cancer is certainly identified are necessary.

  3. Determination of Catechol Estrogen Adducts by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography: Establishing Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-07-01

    Catechol Estrogen Adducts by High- Performance Liquid Chromatography: Establishing Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL...DAMD17-98-1-8216 Chromatography: Establishing Biomarkers for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer 6. AUTHOR(S) Douglas E. Stack, Ph.D. 7. PERFORMING...ultimate goal of this research is the development of a biomarker for the early detection of breast cancer. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES Breast

  4. Mitosis Detection for Invasive Breast Cancer Grading in Histopathological Images.

    PubMed

    Paul, Angshuman; Mukherjee, Dipti Prasad

    2015-11-01

    Histopathological grading of cancer not only offers an insight to the patients' prognosis but also helps in making individual treatment plans. Mitosis counts in histopathological slides play a crucial role for invasive breast cancer grading using the Nottingham grading system. Pathologists perform this grading by manual examinations of a few thousand images for each patient. Hence, finding the mitotic figures from these images is a tedious job and also prone to observer variability due to variations in the appearances of the mitotic cells. We propose a fast and accurate approach for automatic mitosis detection from histopathological images. We employ area morphological scale space for cell segmentation. The scale space is constructed in a novel manner by restricting the scales with the maximization of relative-entropy between the cells and the background. This results in precise cell segmentation. The segmented cells are classified in mitotic and non-mitotic category using the random forest classifier. Experiments show at least 12% improvement in F1 score on more than 450 histopathological images at 40× magnification.

  5. Breast Cancer Prevention

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Prevention (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is prevention? Go ... from starting. Risk-reducing surgery . General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  6. Breast cancer detection using high-density flexible electrode arrays and electrical impedance tomography.

    PubMed

    Campisi, Matthew S; Barbre, Curtis; Chola, Aditya; Cunningham, Gisselle; Woods, Virginia; Viventi, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    While mammography remains the gold standard for breast cancer screening, additional adjunctive tools for early detection of breast cancer are needed especially for young women, women with dense breast tissue and those at increased risk due to genetic factors. These patient populations, along with those populations for whom mammography is not readily available, require alternative technologies capable of effectively detecting breast cancer. One such adjunctive modality for breast cancer detection is Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT). It is a non-invasive technique that measures tissue conductivity by injecting a small current through a surface electrode while measuring electrode voltage(s). The surface measurements are then used to reconstruct a conductivity mapping of the tissue. The difference in conductivities between healthy tissue and that of carcinoma enable EIT to detect cancer. Electrical Impedance Tomography does not subject the patient to ionizing radiation, and offers significant potential for detecting very small tumors in early stages of development at a low cost. While prior systems have demonstrated success using EIT for breast cancer detection, the resolution of the reconstructed image was limited by the spatial resolution of the sensing electrode array. Here, we report the use of higher density (3mm spacing) flexible micro-electrode arrays to obtain tissue impedance maps. Accurate EIT reconstruction is highly dependent on the spatial resolution and fidelity of the surface measurements. High-density, flexible arrays that conform to the breast surface can offer great potential in reconstructing higher resolution conductivity maps than have been previously achieved.

  7. Validation of a Medicare Claims-based Algorithm for Identifying Breast Cancers Detected at Screening Mammography

    PubMed Central

    Fenton, Joshua J.; Onega, Tracy; Zhu, Weiwei; Balch, Steven; Smith-Bindman, Rebecca; Henderson, Louise; Sprague, Brian L.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Hubbard, Rebecca A.

    2013-01-01

    Background The breast cancer detection rate is a benchmark measure of screening mammography quality, but its computation requires linkage of mammography interpretive performance information with cancer incidence data. A Medicare claims-based measure of detected breast cancers could simplify measurement of this benchmark and facilitate mammography quality assessment and research. Objectives To validate a claims-based algorithm that can identify with high positive predictive value (PPV) incident breast cancers that were detected at screening mammography. Research Design Development of a claims-derived algorithm using classification and regression tree analyses within a random half-sample of Medicare screening mammography claims followed by validation of the algoritm in the remaining half-sample using clinical data on mammography results and cancer incidence from the Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium (BCSC). Subjects Female fee-for-service Medicare enrollees age 68 years and older who underwent screening mammography from 2001 to 2005 within BCSC registries in four states (CA, NC, NH, and VT), enabling linkage of claims and BCSC mammography data (N=233,044 mammograms obtained by 104,997 women). Measures Sensitivity, specificity, and PPV of algorithmic identification of incident breast cancers that were detected by radiologists relative to a reference standard based on BCSC mammography and cancer incidence data. Results An algorithm based on subsequent codes for breast cancer diagnoses and treatments and follow-up mammography identified incident screen-detected breast cancers with 92.9% sensitivity (95% CI: 91.0%-94.8%), 99.9% specificity (95% CI: 99.9%-99.9%), and a PPV of 88.0% (95% CI: 85.7%-90.4%). Conclusions A simple claims-based algorithm can accurately identify incident breast cancers detected at screening mammography among Medicare enrollees. The algorithm may enable mammography quality assessment using Medicare claims alone. PMID:23929404

  8. Status of scintimammography and its relationship to other detection methods for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kakuda, J T; Stuntz, M E; Vargas, H I; Khalkhali, I

    1999-12-01

    Breast cancer is the most important malignancy for women of the world's industrialized nations. It is second only to lung cancer in cancer-related mortality. Early detection is the best means of improving survival; the cornerstone of early diagnosis is mammography. Given the endemic nature of breast cancer, screening mammography has secured a routine place in health maintenance for women, although it is less than perfect. To aid in the diagnosis of malignant breast disease, other imaging modalities have evolved: ultrasound, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), and SMM. Scintimammography (SMM) is rapidly with a variety of applications for the management of breast disease. This technology has become a complementary modality to other conventional methods of breast imaging. This review will focus on the science behind SMM and how it is currently used in the management of breast lesions.

  9. Improved cancer detection in automated breast ultrasound by radiologists using Computer Aided Detection.

    PubMed

    van Zelst, J C M; Tan, T; Platel, B; de Jong, M; Steenbakkers, A; Mourits, M; Grivegnee, A; Borelli, C; Karssemeijer, N; Mann, R M

    2017-04-01

    To investigate the effect of dedicated Computer Aided Detection (CAD) software for automated breast ultrasound (ABUS) on the performance of radiologists screening for breast cancer. 90 ABUS views of 90 patients were randomly selected from a multi-institutional archive of cases collected between 2010 and 2013. This dataset included normal cases (n=40) with >1year of follow up, benign (n=30) lesions that were either biopsied or remained stable, and malignant lesions (n=20). Six readers evaluated all cases with and without CAD in two sessions. CAD-software included conventional CAD-marks and an intelligent minimum intensity projection of the breast tissue. Readers reported using a likelihood-of-malignancy scale from 0 to 100. Alternative free-response ROC analysis was used to measure the performance. Without CAD, the average area-under-the-curve (AUC) of the readers was 0.77 and significantly improved with CAD to 0.84 (p=0.001). Sensitivity of all readers improved (range 5.2-10.6%) by using CAD but specificity decreased in four out of six readers (range 1.4-5.7%). No significant difference was observed in the AUC between experienced radiologists and residents both with and without CAD. Dedicated CAD-software for ABUS has the potential to improve the cancer detection rates of radiologists screening for breast cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Pearce, Lynne

    2016-08-17

    Essential facts Breast cancer is the most common cancer in the UK, with around 60,000 new cases diagnosed each year, according to the charity Breast Cancer Care. Over a lifetime, women have a one in eight risk of developing it.

  11. Visualizing research themes in radiological applications for breast cancer detection, diagnosis and treatment.

    PubMed

    Li, Guisu; McCain, Katherine W

    2008-11-06

    We present a visualization of basic and clinical research in radiological detection, diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer based on an analysis of almost 14,000 articles indexed in the Web of Science from 1997 to 2006. Using bibliometric and network visualization software, we identified highly cited key papers linked to seven visible, persistent research themes spanning detection, diagnosis, and radiotherapy for breast cancer.

  12. Detection, isolation, and capture of circulating breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Njoroge, Martin; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Gaffigan, Brian; Rood, Kyle; Viator, John A.

    2013-03-01

    According to the CDC, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis, or the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems, significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. In this study, a technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser with a 5 ns pulse at 532 nm is used to interrogate thousands of cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells which are pigmented, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to provide pigment. After which, the device is calibrated to demonstrate a single-cell detection limit. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25-45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro photoacoustic flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy, it can also be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  13. Detection and capture of breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2016-08-01

    According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis-the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems-significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. A technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser is used to interrogate thousands of blood cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells that are optically absorbing, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to enhance optical absorption. After which, the PA cytometry device is calibrated to demonstrate the ability to detect single cells. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25 to 45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro PA flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy but also it can be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied.

  14. Detection and capture of breast cancer cells with photoacoustic flow cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kiran; Goldschmidt, Benjamin S.; Viator, John A.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, breast cancer is the most common cancer and the second leading cause of cancer related deaths among women. Metastasis—the presence of secondary tumors caused by the spread of cancer cells via the circulatory or lymphatic systems—significantly worsens the prognosis of any breast cancer patient. A technique is developed to detect circulating breast cancer cells in human blood using a photoacoustic flow cytometry method. A Q-switched laser is used to interrogate thousands of blood cells with one pulse as they flow through the beam path. Cells that are optically absorbing, either naturally or artificially, emit an ultrasound wave as a result of the photoacoustic (PA) effect. Breast cancer cells are targeted with chromophores through immunochemistry in order to enhance optical absorption. After which, the PA cytometry device is calibrated to demonstrate the ability to detect single cells. Cultured breast cancer cells are added to whole blood to reach a biologically relevant concentration of about 25 to 45 breast cancer cells per 1 mL of blood. An in vitro PA flow cytometer is used to detect and isolate these cells followed by capture with the use of a micromanipulator. This method can not only be used to determine the disease state of the patient and the response to therapy but also it can be used for genetic testing and in vitro drug trials since the circulating cell can be captured and studied. PMID:27580367

  15. Initiators and promoters for the occurrence of screen-detected breast cancer and the progression to clinically-detected interval breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Yen, Amy Ming-Fang; Wu, Wendy Yi-Ying; Tabar, Laszlo; Duffy, Stephen W; Smith, Robert A; Chen, Hsiu-Hsi

    2017-03-01

    The risk factors responsible for breast cancer have been well documented, but the roles of risk factors as initiators, causing the occurrence of screen-detected breast cancer, or promoters, responsible for the progression of the screen-detected to the clinically-detected breast cancer, have been scarcely evaluated. We used data from women in a cohort in Kopparberg (Dalarna), Sweden between 1977 and 2010. Conventional risk factors, breast density, and tumor-specific biomarkers are superimposed to the temporal course of the natural history of the disease. The results show that older age at first full-term pregnancy, dense breast, and a family history of breast cancer increased the risk of entering the preclinical screen-detectable phase of breast cancer by 23%, 41%, and 89%, respectively. Overweight/obesity (body mass index ≥25 kg/m(2)) was a significant initiator (adjusted relative risk [aRR] 1.15; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.99-1.33), but was inversely associated with the role of promoter (aRR 0.65; 95% CI, 0.51-0.82). Dense breast (aRR 1.46; 95% CI, 1.12-1.91), triple-negative (aRR 2.07; 95% CI, 1.37-3.15), and Ki-67 positivity (aRR 1.66; 95% CI, 1.19-2.30) were statistically significant promoters. When the molecular biomarkers were considered collectively as one classification, the basal-like subtype was the most influential subtype on promoters (aRR 4.24; 95% CI, 2.56-7.02) compared with the Luminal A subtype. We ascertained state-dependent covariates of initiators and promoters to classify the risk of the two-step progression of breast cancer. The results of the current study are useful for individually-tailored screening and personalized clinical surveillance of patients with breast cancer that was detected at an early stage. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Production and hosting by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Tumour-related factors and prognosis in breast cancer detected by screening.

    PubMed

    Olsson, A; Borgquist, S; Butt, S; Zackrisson, S; Landberg, G; Manjer, J

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancer detected by screening has an unexplained prognostic advantage beyond stage shift compared with cancers detected clinically. The aim was to investigate biological factors in invasive breast cancer, with reference to mode of detection and rate of death from breast cancer. Histology, oestrogen receptor α and β, progesterone receptor, human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER) 2, cyclin D1, p27, Ki-67 and perinodal growth were analysed in 466 tumours from a prospective cohort, the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study. Using logistic regression, odds ratios were calculated to investigate the relationship between tumour characteristics and mode of detection. The same tumour factors were analysed in relation to standard prognostic features. Death from breast cancer was analysed using Cox regression with adjustments for standard tumour factors; differences following adjustment were analysed by means of Freedman statistics. None of the biological tumour characteristics varied with mode of detection of breast cancer. After adjustment for age, tumour size, axillary lymph node involvement (ALNI) and grade, women with cancer detected clinically had an increased risk of death from breast cancer (hazard ratio 2·48, 95 per cent confidence interval 1·34 to 4·59), corresponding to a 37·2 per cent difference compared with the unadjusted model. Additional adjustment for biological tumour factors studied caused only minor changes. None of the biological tumour markers investigated explained the improved prognosis in breast cancer detected by screening. None of the factors was related to ALNI, suggesting that other mechanisms may be responsible for tumour spread. Copyright © 2011 British Journal of Surgery Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Breast Cancer Nodes Detection Using Ultrasonic Microscale Subarrayed MIMO RADAR

    PubMed Central

    Siwamogsatham, Siwaruk; Pomalaza-Ráez, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    This paper proposes the use of ultrasonic microscale subarrayed MIMO RADARs to estimate the position of breast cancer nodes. The transmit and receive antenna arrays are divided into subarrays. In order to increase the signal diversity each subarray is assigned a different waveform from an orthogonal set. High-frequency ultrasonic transducers are used since a breast is considered to be a superficial structure. Closed form expressions for the optimal Neyman-Pearson detector are derived. The combination of the waveform diversity present in the subarrayed deployment and traditional phased-array RADAR techniques provides promising results. PMID:25309591

  18. Breast cancer detection among young survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma with screening magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Tieu, Minh Thi; Cigsar, Candemir; Ahmed, Sameera; Ng, Andrea; Diller, Lisa; Millar, B-A; Crystal, Pavel; Hodgson, David C

    2014-08-15

    Female survivors of pediatric Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) who have received chest radiotherapy are at increased risk of breast cancer. Guidelines for early breast cancer screening among these survivors are based on little data regarding clinical outcomes. This study reports outcomes of breast cancer screening with MRI and mammography (MMG) after childhood HL. We evaluated the results of breast MRI and MMG screening among 96 female survivors of childhood HL treated with chest radiotherapy. Outcomes measured included imaging sensitivity and specificity, breast cancer characteristics, and incidence of additional imaging and breast biopsy. Median age at first screening was 30 years, and the median number of MRI screening rounds was 3. Ten breast cancers were detected in 9 women at a median age of 39 years (range, 24-43 years). Half were invasive and half were preinvasive. The median size of invasive tumors was 8 mm (range, 3-15 mm), and none had lymph node involvement. Sensitivity and specificity of the screening modalities were as follows: for MRI alone, 80% and 93.5%, respectively; MMG alone, 70% and 95%, respectively; both modalities combined, 100% and 88.6%, respectively. All invasive tumors were detected by MRI. Additional investigations were required in 52 patients, (54%), and 26 patients (27%) required breast biopsy, with 10 patients requiring more than 1 biopsy. Screening including breast MRI with MMG has high sensitivity and specificity in pediatric HL survivors, with breast cancers detected at an early stage, although it is associated with a substantial rate of additional investigations. © 2014 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society.

  19. Endoscopic Breast Surgery in Treating Patients With Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2014-02-05

    Male Breast Cancer; Recurrent Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Stage IV Breast Cancer

  20. Effectiveness of early detection on breast cancer mortality reduction in Catalonia (Spain)

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background At present, it is complicated to use screening trials to determine the optimal age intervals and periodicities of breast cancer early detection. Mathematical models are an alternative that has been widely used. The aim of this study was to estimate the effect of different breast cancer early detection strategies in Catalonia (Spain), in terms of breast cancer mortality reduction (MR) and years of life gained (YLG), using the stochastic models developed by Lee and Zelen (LZ). Methods We used the LZ model to estimate the cumulative probability of death for a cohort exposed to different screening strategies after T years of follow-up. We also obtained the cumulative probability of death for a cohort with no screening. These probabilities were used to estimate the possible breast cancer MR and YLG by age, period and cohort of birth. The inputs of the model were: incidence of, mortality from and survival after breast cancer, mortality from other causes, distribution of breast cancer stages at diagnosis and sensitivity of mammography. The outputs were relative breast cancer MR and YLG. Results Relative breast cancer MR varied from 20% for biennial exams in the 50 to 69 age interval to 30% for annual exams in the 40 to 74 age interval. When strategies differ in periodicity but not in the age interval of exams, biennial screening achieved almost 80% of the annual screening MR. In contrast to MR, the effect on YLG of extending screening from 69 to 74 years of age was smaller than the effect of extending the screening from 50 to 45 or 40 years. Conclusion In this study we have obtained a measure of the effect of breast cancer screening in terms of mortality and years of life gained. The Lee and Zelen mathematical models have been very useful for assessing the impact of different modalities of early detection on MR and YLG in Catalonia (Spain). PMID:19754959

  1. Simulations and phantom evaluations of magnetic resonance electrical impedance tomography (MREIT) for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadleir, Rosalind J.; Sajib, Saurav Z. K.; Kim, Hyung Joong; Kwon, Oh In; Woo, Eung Je

    2013-05-01

    MREIT is a new imaging modality that can be used to reconstruct high-resolution conductivity images of the human body. Since conductivity values of cancerous tissues in the breast are significantly higher than those of surrounding normal tissues, breast imaging using MREIT may provide a new noninvasive way of detecting early stage of cancer. In this paper, we present results of experimental and numerical simulation studies of breast MREIT. We built a realistic three-dimensional model of the human breast connected to a simplified model of the chest including the heart and evaluated the ability of MREIT to detect cancerous anomalies in a background material with similar electrical properties to breast tissue. We performed numerical simulations of various scenarios in breast MREIT including assessment of the effects of fat inclusions and effects related to noise levels, such as changing the amplitude of injected currents, effect of added noise and number of averages. Phantom results showed straightforward detection of cancerous anomalies in a background was possible with low currents and few averages. The simulation results showed it should be possible to detect a cancerous anomaly in the breast, while restricting the maximal current density in the heart below published levels for nerve excitation.

  2. Detecting and treating breast cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Moonlee, Sun-Young; Bissell, Mina J.; Furuta, Saori; Meier, Roland; Kenny, Paraic A.

    2016-04-05

    The application describes therapeutic compositions and methods for treating cancer. For example, therapeutic compositions and methods related to inhibition of FAM83A (family with sequence similarity 83) are provided. The application also describes methods for diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors. For example, a method of diagnosing cancer resistance to EGFR inhibitors by detecting increased FAM83A levels is described.

  3. Effect of radiologists' experience on breast cancer detection and localization using digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Alakhras, Maram M; Brennan, Patrick C; Rickard, Mary; Bourne, Roger; Mello-Thoms, Claudia

    2015-02-01

    The objectives are To to compare the diagnostic performance of combined digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) and digital mammography (DM) with that of DM alone, as a function of radiologists' experience with DBT. Ethical committee approval was obtained. Fifty cases (27 cancer, 23 normal), each containing both digital mammography (DM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) images, were reviewed by 26 radiologists, divided into three groups according to level of experience with DBT (none, workshop experience, and clinical experience). The radiologists' diagnostic performance using DM was compared with that using DM + DBT, and evaluated by area under receiver-operating characteristic curve (AUC), jackknife free-response receiver-operator characteristics figure of metric (JAFROC FOM), sensitivity, location sensitivity, and specificity. For all readers combined, performance using DM + DBT was significantly higher than for DM alone by both AUC (0.788 vs 0.681, p < 0.001) and JAFROC FOM (0.745 vs 0.621, p < 0.001). Similar results were obtained for readers with no DBT experience (AUC 0.775 vs 0.682, p = 0.004; JAFROC FOM 0.695 vs 0.603, p = 0.016) and with clinical DBT experience (AUC 0.789 vs 0.681, p = 0.042; and JAFROC FOM 0.764 vs 0.632, p = 0.031). Addition of DBT to DM significantly improves radiologists' diagnostic performance whether or not they have prior DBT experience. • Adding DBT to DM increased the number of detected cancers • DBT + DM led to more accurate localization of breast cancers than DM • Addition of DBT improved radiologists' performance regardless of prior DBT experience • High-volume radiologists with different DBT experience levels performed similarly on DM + DBT.

  4. Application of Canonical Correlation Analysis for Detecting Risk Factors Leading to Recurrence of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sadoughi, Farahnaz; Lotfnezhad Afshar, Hadi; Olfatbakhsh, Asiie; Mehrdad, Neda

    2016-03-01

    Advances in treatment options of breast cancer and development of cancer research centers have necessitated the collection of many variables about breast cancer patients. Detection of important variables as predictors and outcomes among them, without applying an appropriate statistical method is a very challenging task. Because of recurrent nature of breast cancer occurring in different time intervals, there are usually more than one variable in the outcome set. For the prevention of this problem that causes multicollinearity, a statistical method named canonical correlation analysis (CCA) is a good solution. The purpose of this study was to analyze the data related to breast cancer recurrence of Iranian females using the CCA method to determine important risk factors. In this cross-sectional study, data of 584 female patients (mean age of 45.9 years) referred to Breast Cancer Research Center (Tehran, Iran) were analyzed anonymously. SPSS and NORM softwares (2.03) were used for data transformation, running and interpretation of CCA and replacing missing values, respectively. Data were obtained from Breast Cancer Research Center, Tehran, Iran. Analysis showed seven important predictors resulting in breast cancer recurrence in different time periods. Family history and loco-regional recurrence more than 5 years after diagnosis were the most important variables among predictors and outcomes sets, respectively. Canonical correlation analysis can be used as a useful tool for management and preparing of medical data for discovering of knowledge hidden in them.

  5. UWB based low-cost and non-invasive practical breast cancer early detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vijayasarveswari, V.; Khatun, S.; Fakir, M. M.; Jusoh, M.; Ali, S.

    2017-03-01

    Breast cancer is one of the main causes of women death worldwide. Breast tumor is an early stage of cancer that locates in cells of a human breast. As there is no remedy, early detection is crucial. Towards this, Ultra-Wideband (UWB) is a prominent candidate. It is a wireless communication technology which can achieve high bandwidth with low power utilization. UWB is suitable to be used for short range communication systems including breast cancer detection since it is secure, non-invasive and human health friendly. This paper presents the low-cost and non-invasive early breast cancer detection strategy using UWB sensor (or antenna). Emphasis is given here to detect breast tumor in 2D and 3D environments. The developed system consisted of hardware and software. Hardware included UWB transceiver and a pair of home-made directional sensor/antenna. The software included feed-forward back propagation Neural Network (NN) module to detect the tumor existence, size and location along with soft interface between software and hardware. Forward scattering technique was used by placing two sensors diagonally opposite sides of a breast phantom. UWB pulses were transmitted from one side of phantom and received from other side, controlled by the software interface in PC environment. Collected received signals were then fed into the NN module for training, testing and validation. The system exhibited detection efficiency on tumor existence, location (x, y, z), and size were approximately 100%, (78.17%, 70.66%, 92.46%), 85.86% respectively. The proposed UWB based early breast cancer detection system could be more practical with low-cost, user friendly and non-harmful features. This project may help users to monitor their breast health regularly at their home.

  6. Developing a discrete choice experiment in Malawi: eliciting preferences for breast cancer early detection services.

    PubMed

    Kohler, Racquel E; Lee, Clara N; Gopal, Satish; Reeve, Bryce B; Weiner, Bryan J; Wheeler, Stephanie B

    2015-01-01

    In Malawi, routine breast cancer screening is not available and little is known about women's preferences regarding early detection services. Discrete choice experiments are increasingly used to reveal preferences about new health services; however, selecting appropriate attributes that describe a new health service is imperative to ensure validity of the choice experiment. To identify important factors that are relevant to Malawian women's preferences for breast cancer detection services and to select attributes and levels for a discrete choice experiment in a setting where both breast cancer early detection and choice experiments are rare. We reviewed the literature to establish an initial list of potential attributes and levels for a discrete choice experiment and conducted qualitative interviews with health workers and community women to explore relevant local factors affecting decisions to use cancer detection services. We tested the design through cognitive interviews and refined the levels, descriptions, and designs. Themes that emerged from interviews provided critical information about breast cancer detection services, specifically, that breast cancer interventions should be integrated into other health services because asymptomatic screening may not be practical as an individual service. Based on participants' responses, the final attributes of the choice experiment included travel time, health encounter, health worker type and sex, and breast cancer early detection strategy. Cognitive testing confirmed the acceptability of the final attributes, comprehension of choice tasks, and women's abilities to make trade-offs. Applying a discrete choice experiment for breast cancer early detection was feasible with appropriate tailoring for a low-income, low-literacy African setting.

  7. Early Detection of Breast Cancer by Florescence Molecular Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    and C. G., "Conservative treatment versus mastectomy in early breast cancer: patterns of failure with 15 years of follow-up data. Institut Gustave...as increased tissue density or scarring from prior surgery. Functional imaging, which includes Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Positron Emission...therapeutic strategies and will enable the effects of treatment to be more closely followed in time scales of hours or days instead of the longer

  8. Breast Cancer: Treatment Options

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer > Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Request Permissions Breast Cancer: Treatment Options Approved by the Cancer.Net Editorial ... recommendations for ovarian ablation . Hormonal therapy for metastatic breast cancer Hormonal therapies are also commonly used to treat ...

  9. Calponin-h2: a potential serum marker for the early detection of human breast cancer?

    PubMed

    Debald, Manuel; Jin, Jian-Ping; Linke, Andrea; Walgenbach, Klaus-Jürgen; Rauch, Peter; Zellmer, Angela; Fimmers, Rolf; Kuhn, Walther; Hartmann, Gunther; Walgenbach-Brünagel, Gisela

    2014-11-01

    Early diagnosis is the key for the successful treatment of breast cancer. A serum marker for the early detection of breast cancer could significantly reduce breast cancer morbidity and mortality by bringing the time of diagnosis at an earlier and therefore still curable stage. So far, no biomarker for the early detection is available for the clinical routine. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the use of calponin-h2 as a blood-based biomarker for the early diagnosis of this disease. Using two monoclonal antibodies against calponin-h2, we developed a sandwich ELISA to analyze the serum levels of calponin-h2. In order to evaluate the diagnostic potential of this biomarker, patients with breast cancer (n = 76), benign diseases of the breast (n = 51) and healthy females (n = 24) were analyzed. Serum levels above 10 ng/ml were only observed in patients with breast cancer (n = 8; 10.5%). Further large-scale studies and preanalytic evaluations are necessary to clarify the definite role of calponin-h2 as a biomarker in breast cancer management.

  10. Breast Cancer Stage, Surgery, and Survival Statistics for Idaho’s National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program Population, 2004–2012

    PubMed Central

    Graff, Robert; Moran, Patti; Cariou, Charlene; Bordeaux, Susan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides access to breast and cervical cancer screening for low-income, uninsured, and underinsured women in all states and US territories. In Idaho, a rural state with very low breast and cervical cancer screening rates, this program is called Women’s Health Check (WHC). The program has been operating continuously since 1997 and served 4,719 enrollees in 2013. The objective of this study was to assess whether disparities existed in cause-specific survival (a net survival measure representing survival of a specified cause of death in the absence of other causes of death) between women screened by WHC and outside WHC and to determine how type of surgery or survival varies with stage at diagnosis. Methods WHC data were linked to Idaho’s central cancer registry to compare stage distribution, type of surgery, and cause-specific survival between women with WHC-linked breast cancer and a comparison group of women whose records did not link to the WHC database (nonlinked breast cancer). Results WHC-linked breast cancer was significantly more likely to be diagnosed at a later stage of disease than nonlinked breast cancer. Because of differences in stage distribution between WHC-linked and nonlinked breast cancers, overall age-standardized, cause-specific breast cancer survival proportions diverged over time, with a 5.1 percentage-point deficit in survival among WHC-linked cases at 5 years of follow-up (83.9% vs 89.0%). Differences in type of surgery and cause-specific survival were attenuated when controlling for stage. Conclusion This study suggests that disparities may exist for Idaho WHC enrollees in the timely diagnosis of breast cancer. To our knowledge, this is the first study to publish comparisons of cause-specific breast cancer survival between NBCCEDP-linked and nonlinked cases. PMID:25789497

  11. AGR3 in breast cancer: prognostic impact and suitable serum-based biomarker for early cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Garczyk, Stefan; von Stillfried, Saskia; Antonopoulos, Wiebke; Hartmann, Arndt; Schrauder, Michael G; Fasching, Peter A; Anzeneder, Tobias; Tannapfel, Andrea; Ergönenc, Yavuz; Knüchel, Ruth; Rose, Michael; Dahl, Edgar

    2015-01-01

    Blood-based early detection of breast cancer has recently gained novel momentum, as liquid biopsy diagnostics is a fast emerging field. In this study, we aimed to identify secreted proteins which are up-regulated both in tumour tissue and serum samples of breast cancer patients compared to normal tissue and sera. Based on two independent tissue cohorts (n = 75 and n = 229) and one serum cohort (n = 80) of human breast cancer and healthy serum samples, we characterised AGR3 as a novel potential biomarker both for breast cancer prognosis and early breast cancer detection from blood. AGR3 expression in breast tumours is significantly associated with oestrogen receptor α (P<0.001) and lower tumour grade (P<0.01). Interestingly, AGR3 protein expression correlates with unfavourable outcome in low (G1) and intermediate (G2) grade breast tumours (multivariate hazard ratio: 2.186, 95% CI: 1.008-4.740, P<0.05) indicating an independent prognostic impact. In sera analysed by ELISA technique, AGR3 protein concentration was significantly (P<0.001) elevated in samples from breast cancer patients (n = 40, mainly low stage tumours) compared to healthy controls (n = 40). To develop a suitable biomarker panel for early breast cancer detection, we measured AGR2 protein in human serum samples in parallel. The combined AGR3/AGR2 biomarker panel achieved a sensitivity of 64.5% and a specificity of 89.5% as shown by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve statistics. Thus our data clearly show the potential usability of AGR3 and AGR2 as biomarkers for blood-based early detection of human breast cancer.

  12. Exploring Early Detection Methods: Using the Intraductal Approach to Predict Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    diagnosed found in nipple aspirate fluid and atypical proliferative disease with several different cancers, cancers present in two or more found in...characteristics of Dr. Sartorius’ patients with and without breast disease . As a prior patient of Dr. Sartorius, you are invited to participate in...this research study. Dr. Sartorius was a pioneering physician who developed innovative procedures to help detect breast disease at early stages. Your

  13. Hydrophobic Fractionation Enhances Novel Protein Detection by Mass Spectrometry in Triple Negative Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Ming; Whitelegge, Julian P.; Whelan, Stephen A.; He, Jianbo; Saxton, Romaine E.; Faull, Kym F.; Chang, Helena R.

    2010-01-01

    It is widely believed that discovery of specific, sensitive and reliable tumor biomarkers can improve the treatment of cancer. The goal of this study was to develop a novel fractionation protocol targeting hydrophobic proteins as possible cancer cell membrane biomarkers. Hydrophobic proteins of breast cancer tissues and cell lines were enriched by polymeric reverse phase columns. The retained proteins were eluted and digested for peptide identification by nano-liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry using a hybrid linear ion-trap Orbitrap. Hundreds of proteins were identified from each of these three specimens: tumors, normal breast tissue, and breast cancer cell lines. Many of the identified proteins defined key cellular functions. Protein profiles of cancer and normal tissues from the same patient were systematically examined and compared. Stem cell markers were overexpressed in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC) compared with non-TNBC samples. Because breast cancer stem cells are known to be resistant to radiation and chemotherapy, and can be the source of metastasis frequently seen in patients with TNBC, our study may provide evidence of molecules promoting the aggressiveness of TNBC. The initial results obtained using a combination of hydrophobic fractionation and nano-LC mass spectrometry analysis of these proteins appear promising in the discovery of potential cancer biomarkers. When sufficiently refined, this approach may prove useful for early detection and better treatment of breast cancer. PMID:20596302

  14. Earlier Detection of Breast Cancer with Ultrasound Molecular Imaging in a Transgenic Mouse Model

    PubMed Central

    Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Lutz, Amelie M.; Gambhir, Sanjiv S.; Tranquart, Francois; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2013-01-01

    While there is an increasing role of ultrasound for breast cancer screening in patients with dense breast, conventional anatomical-ultrasound lacks sensitivity and specificity for early breast cancer detection. In this study we assessed the potential of molecular-ultrasound imaging, using clinically-translatable vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR2)-targeted microbubbles (MBVEGFR2), to improve the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in earlier detection of breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in a transgenic mouse model (FVB/N-Tg(MMTV-PyMT)634Mul). In vivo binding specificity studies (n=26 tumors) showed that ultrasound imaging signal was significantly higher (P<0.001) using MBVEGFR2 compared to non-targeted microbubbles and imaging signal significantly decreased (P<0.001) by blocking antibodies. Ultrasound molecular imaging signal significantly increased (P<0.001), when breast tissue (n=315 glands) progressed from normal (1.65±0.17 a.u.) to hyperplasia (4.21±1.16), DCIS (15.95±1.31) and invasive cancer (78.1±6.31) and highly correlated with ex vivo VEGFR2 expression (R2=0.84; 95% CI, 0.72, 0.91; P<0.001). At an imaging signal threshold of 4.6 a.u., ultrasound molecular imaging differentiated benign from malignant entities with a sensitivity of 84% (95% CI, 78, 88) and specificity of 89% (95% CI, 81, 94). In a prospective screening trail (n=63 glands) diagnostic performance of detecting DCIS and breast cancer was assessed and two independent readers correctly diagnosed malignant disease in >95% of cases and highly agreed between each other (ICC=0.98; 95% CI, 97, 99). These results suggest that VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging allows highly accurate detection of DCIS and breast cancer in transgenic mice and may be a promising approach for early breast cancer detection in women. PMID:23328585

  15. Self-examination in the early detection of breast cancer: Memorandum from a WHO Meeting*

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    Breast self-examination is of interest for the early detection of breast cancer, especially in areas where mammography and regular physical examination of the breasts are not practicable as public health policies. At present, there is insufficient evidence that breast self-examination is effective in reducing mortality from breast cancer. To determine its effectiveness, this method should be applied in a comprehensive programme that provides teaching and guidance on practice of the technique, and facilities for self-referral and diagnosis (when any abnormality is detected) as well as treatment, taking into account the background (economic, social, and cultural) of the country or area concerned. Once the programme has been developed, its effectiveness in reducing breast cancer mortality will have to be assessed in carefully designed research studies. The favoured design for assessment is a randomized controlled trial. Other types of studies, such as quasi-experimental comparisons or a case-control study, are less satisfactory, but may be conducted under strictly specified conditions. Until the effectiveness of breast self-examination has been established, it cannot be recommended as a public health measure for control of breast cancer. PMID:6335844

  16. Early detection of breast cancer using total biochemical analysis of peripheral blood components: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Zelig, Udi; Barlev, Eyal; Bar, Omri; Gross, Itai; Flomen, Felix; Mordechai, Shaul; Kapelushnik, Joseph; Nathan, Ilana; Kashtan, Hanoch; Wasserberg, Nir; Madhala-Givon, Osnat

    2015-05-15

    Most of the blood tests aiming for breast cancer screening rely on quantification of a single or few biomarkers. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of detecting breast cancer by analyzing the total biochemical composition of plasma as well as peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) using infrared spectroscopy. Blood was collected from 29 patients with confirmed breast cancer and 30 controls with benign or no breast tumors, undergoing screening for breast cancer. PBMCs and plasma were isolated and dried on a zinc selenide slide and measured under a Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) microscope to obtain their infrared absorption spectra. Differences in the spectra of PBMCs and plasma between the groups were analyzed as well as the specific influence of the relevant pathological characteristics of the cancer patients. Several bands in the FTIR spectra of both blood components significantly distinguished patients with and without cancer. Employing feature extraction with quadratic discriminant analysis, a sensitivity of ~90 % and a specificity of ~80 % for breast cancer detection was achieved. These results were confirmed by Monte Carlo cross-validation. Further analysis of the cancer group revealed an influence of several clinical parameters, such as the involvement of lymph nodes, on the infrared spectra, with each blood component affected by different parameters. The present preliminary study suggests that FTIR spectroscopy of PBMCs and plasma is a potentially feasible and efficient tool for the early detection of breast neoplasms. An important application of our study is the distinction between benign lesions (considered as part of the non-cancer group) and malignant tumors thus reducing false positive results at screening. Furthermore, the correlation of specific spectral changes with clinical parameters of cancer patients indicates for possible contribution to diagnosis and prognosis.

  17. Breast Cancer Detection by B7-H3-Targeted Ultrasound Molecular Imaging.

    PubMed

    Bachawal, Sunitha V; Jensen, Kristin C; Wilson, Katheryne E; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2015-06-15

    Ultrasound complements mammography as an imaging modality for breast cancer detection, especially in patients with dense breast tissue, but its utility is limited by low diagnostic accuracy. One emerging molecular tool to address this limitation involves contrast-enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles targeted to molecular signatures on tumor neovasculature. In this study, we illustrate how tumor vascular expression of B7-H3 (CD276), a member of the B7 family of ligands for T-cell coregulatory receptors, can be incorporated into an ultrasound method that can distinguish normal, benign, precursor, and malignant breast pathologies for diagnostic purposes. Through an IHC analysis of 248 human breast specimens, we found that vascular expression of B7-H3 was selectively and significantly higher in breast cancer tissues. B7-H3 immunostaining on blood vessels distinguished benign/precursors from malignant lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in human specimens. In a transgenic mouse model of cancer, the B7-H3-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues and highly correlated with ex vivo expression levels of B7-H3 on quantitative immunofluorescence. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of B7-H3-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging as a tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer detection in patients.

  18. Breast Cancer Detection by B7-H3 Targeted Ultrasound Molecular Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Bachawal, Sunitha V.; Jensen, Kristin C.; Wilson, Katheryne E.; Tian, Lu; Lutz, Amelie M.; Willmann, Jürgen K.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound complements mammography as an imaging modality for breast cancer detection, especially in patients with dense breast tissue, but its utility is limited by low diagnostic accuracy. One emerging molecular tool to address this limitation involves contrast-enhanced ultrasound using microbubbles targeted to molecular signatures on tumor neovasculature. In this study, we illustrate how tumor vascular expression of B7-H3 (CD276), a member of the B7 family of ligands for T cell co-regulatory receptors, can be incorporated into an ultrasound method that can distinguish normal, benign, precursor and malignant breast pathologies for diagnostic purposes. Through an immunohistochemical analysis of 248 human breast specimens, we found that vascular expression of B7-H3 was selectively and significantly higher in breast cancer tissues. B7-H3 immunostaining on blood vessels distinguished benign/precursors from malignant lesions with high diagnostic accuracy in human specimens. In a transgenic mouse model of cancer, the B7-H3-targeted ultrasound imaging signal was increased significantly in breast cancer tissues and highly correlated with ex vivo expression levels of B7-H3 on quantitative immunofluorescence. Our findings offer a preclinical proof of concept for the use of B7-H3-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging as a tool to improve the diagnostic accuracy of breast cancer detection in patients. PMID:25899053

  19. Breast Cancer Detection in a Screening Population: Comparison of Digital Mammography, Computer-Aided Detection Applied to Digital Mammography and Breast Ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kyu Ran; Seo, Bo Kyoung; Woo, Ok Hee; Song, Sung Eun; Choi, Jungsoon; Whang, Shin Young; Park, Eun Kyung; Park, Ah Young; Shin, Hyeseon; Chung, Hwan Hoon

    2016-09-01

    We aimed to compare the detection of breast cancer using full-field digital mammography (FFDM), FFDM with computer-aided detection (FFDM+CAD), ultrasound (US), and FFDM+CAD plus US (FFDM+CAD+US), and to investigate the factors affecting cancer detection. In this retrospective study conducted from 2008 to 2012, 48,251 women underwent FFDM and US for cancer screening. One hundred seventy-one breast cancers were detected: 115 invasive cancers and 56 carcinomas in situ. Two radiologists evaluated the imaging findings of FFDM, FFDM+CAD, and US, based on the Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System lexicon of the American College of Radiology by consensus. We reviewed the clinical and the pathological data to investigate factors affecting cancer detection. We statistically used generalized estimation equations with a logit link to compare the cancer detectability of different imaging modalities. To compare the various factors affecting detection versus nondetection, we used Wilcoxon rank sum, chi-square, or Fisher exact test. The detectability of breast cancer by US (96.5%) or FFDM+CAD+US (100%) was superior to that of FFDM (87.1%) (p=0.019 or p<0.001, respectively) or FFDM+ CAD (88.3%) (p=0.050 or p<0.001, respectively). However, cancer detectability was not significantly different between FFDM versus FFDM+CAD (p=1.000) and US alone versus FFDM+CAD+US (p=0.126). The tumor size influenced cancer detectability by all imaging modalities (p<0.050). In FFDM and FFDM+CAD, the nondetecting group consisted of younger patients and patients with a denser breast composition (p<0.050). In breast US, carcinoma in situ was more frequent in the nondetecting group (p=0.014). For breast cancer screening, breast US alone is satisfactory for all age groups, although FFDM+ CAD+US is the perfect screening method. Patient age, breast composition, and pathological tumor size and type may influence cancer detection during screening.

  20. Development of Technologies for Early Detection and Stratification of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    and tested microchips with 1000, 5000, and 20,000 microslits. These chips helped us to determine the flow resistance across the filtration area, which...useful for detecting early stage breast cancer or tumor aggressiveness is underway. Finally, we have begun testing serum collected from a Human-in-Mouse... immunoassay for measuring proteins from breast tumors, excised samples, and serum, has a lower detection limit of ~1-10 pM,5 which is not sensitive enough to

  1. Prognosis of screen-detected breast cancers: results of a population based study

    PubMed Central

    Cortesi, Laura; Chiuri, Vincenzo E; Ruscelli, Silvia; Bellelli, Valeria; Negri, Rossella; Rashid, Ivan; Cirilli, Claudia; Fracca, Antonella; Gallo, Ennio; Federico, Massimo

    2006-01-01

    Background The reduced mortality rate from breast carcinoma among women offered screening mammography is demonstrated after 15–20 years of follow-up. However, the assessment of 5-year overall and event-free survival could represent an earlier measure of the efficacy of mammography screening program (MSP). Methods All cases of breast cancer diagnosed in the Province of Modena between years 1996 and 2000 in women aged 50 to 69 years, were identified through the Modena Cancer Registry (MCR). Stage of disease and treatment information were obtained from clinical records. All the events occurring up to June 30, 2003 were retrieved by experienced monitors. Five-year overall and event-free survival were the principal end-points of the study. Results During a 5-year period, 587 primary breast cancers were detected by the MSP and 471 primary breast cancers were diagnosed out of the MSP. The screen-detected breast cancers were smaller, more likely node negative, with low histological grade, low proliferative activity and positive receptors status. Furthermore, the breast cancer diagnosed through the MSP more frequently received a conservative surgery. The 5-year survival rate was 94% in the screen-detected group, versus 84% in the other group (p = 0.0001). The rate of 5-year event-free survival was 89% and 75% for the MSP participants and not participants, respectively (p = 0.0001). Conclusions Our data confirm a favourable outcome of screen-detected breast cancers in terms of five-year overall and event-free survival, which reflect the good quality assurance parameters of the MSP. Finally, a cancer registry should be implemented in every area covered by screening programs. PMID:16430776

  2. Canadian National Breast Screening Study: 1. Breast cancer detection and death rates among women aged 40 to 49 years.

    PubMed Central

    Miller, A B; Baines, C J; To, T; Wall, C

    1992-01-01

    OBJECTIVES: To evaluate the efficacy of the combination of annual screening with mammography, physical examination of the breasts and the teaching of breast self-examination in reducing the rate of death from breast cancer among women aged 40 to 49 years on entry. DESIGN: Individually randomized controlled trial. SETTING: Fifteen urban centres in Canada with expertise in the diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. PARTICIPANTS: Women with no history of breast cancer and no mammography in the previous 12 months were randomly assigned to undergo either annual mammography and physical examination (MP group) or usual care after an initial physical examination (UC group). The 50,430 women enrolled from January 1980 through March 1985 were followed for a mean of 8.5 years. DATA COLLECTION: Derived from the participants by initial and annual self-administered questionnaires, from the screening examinations, from the patients' physicians, from the provincial cancer registries and by record linkage to the Canadian National Mortality Data Base. Expert panels evaluated histologic and death data. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Rates of referral from screening, rates of detection of breast cancer from screening and from community care, nodal status, tumour size, and rates of death from all causes and from breast cancer. RESULTS: Over 90% of the women in each group attended the screening sessions or returned the annual questionnaires, or both, over years 2 to 5. The characteristics of the women in the two groups were similar. Compared with the Canadian population, the participants were more likely to be married, have fewer children, have more education, be in a professional occupation, smoke less and have been born in North America. The rate of screen-detected breast cancer on first examination was 3.89 per 1000 in the MP group and 2.46 per 1000 in the UC group; more node-positive tumours were found in the MP group than in the UC group. During years 2 through 5 the ratios of observed

  3. Asymmetry features for classification of thermograms in breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nowak, Robert M.; Okuniewski, Rafał; Oleszkiewicz, Witold; Cichosz, Paweł; Jagodziński, Dariusz; Matysiewicz, Mateusz; Neumann, Łukasz

    2016-09-01

    The computer system for an automatic interpretation of thermographic pictures created by the Br-aster devices uses image processing and machine learning algorithms. The huge set of attributes analyzed by this software includes the asymmetry measurements between corresponding images, and these features are analyzed in presented paper. The system was tested on real data and achieves accuracy comparable to other popular techniques used for breast tumour detection.

  4. Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... how early the cancer was diagnosed. Left untreated, breast cancer can spread to other parts of the body, including internal organs. This could cause serious health problems or be fatal. It is very important to get treatment as soon as possible.Living with cancer during ...

  5. Learning about Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... genetic terms used on this page Learning About Breast Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast ... Cancer What do we know about heredity and breast cancer? Breast cancer is a common disease. Each year, ...

  6. Surgery for Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Oncology . 5th ed. Philadelphia, Pa: Elsevier; 2014. Last Medical Review: June 1, 2016 Last Revised: August 18, 2016 Breast Cancer Treatment Surgery for Breast Cancer Radiation for Breast Cancer Chemotherapy for Breast Cancer Hormone ...

  7. From cancer screening to treatment: service delivery and referral in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jacqueline W; Hanson, Vivien; Johnson, Gale D; Royalty, Janet E; Richardson, Lisa C

    2014-08-15

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income and underserved women through a network of providers and health care organizations. Although the program serves women 40-64 years old for breast cancer screening and 21-64 years old for cervical cancer screening, the priority populations are women 50-64 years old for breast cancer and women who have never or rarely been screened for cervical cancer. From 1991 through 2011, the NBCCEDP provided screening and diagnostic services to more than 4.3 million women, diagnosing 54,276 breast cancers, 2554 cervical cancers, and 123,563 precancerous cervical lesions. A critical component of providing screening services is to ensure that all women with abnormal screening results receive appropriate and timely diagnostic evaluations. Case management is provided to assist women with overcoming barriers that would delay or prevent follow-up care. Women diagnosed with cancer receive treatment through the states' Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Programs (a special waiver for Medicaid) if they are eligible. The NBCCEDP has performance measures that serve as benchmarks to monitor the completeness and timeliness of care. More than 90% of the women receive complete diagnostic care and initiate treatment less than 30 days from the time of their diagnosis. Provision of effective screening and diagnostic services depends on effective program management, networks of providers throughout the community, and the use of evidence-based knowledge, procedures, and technologies.

  8. From Cancer Screening to Treatment: Service Delivery and Referral in the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Jacqueline W.; Hanson, Vivien; Johnson, Gale D.; Royalty, Janet E.; Richardson, Lisa C.

    2015-01-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) provides breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income and underserved women through a network of providers and health care organizations. Although the program serves women 40-64 years old for breast cancer screening and 21-64 years old for cervical cancer screening, the priority populations are women 50-64 years old for breast cancer and women who have never or rarely been screened for cervical cancer. From 1991 through 2011, the NBCCEDP provided screening and diagnostic services to more than 4.3 million women, diagnosing 54,276 breast cancers, 2554 cervical cancers, and 123,563 precancerous cervical lesions. A critical component of providing screening services is to ensure that all women with abnormal screening results receive appropriate and timely diagnostic evaluations. Case management is provided to assist women with overcoming barriers that would delay or prevent follow-up care. Women diagnosed with cancer receive treatment through the states' Breast and Cervical Cancer Treatment Programs (a special waiver for Medicaid) if they are eligible. The NBCCEDP has performance measures that serve as benchmarks to monitor the completeness and timeliness of care. More than 90% of the women receive complete diagnostic care and initiate treatment less than 30 days from the time of their diagnosis. Provision of effective screening and diagnostic services depends on effective program management, networks of providers throughout the community, and the use of evidence-based knowledge, procedures, and technologies. PMID:25099897

  9. 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Current Issue Past Issues 6 Common Cancers - Breast Cancer Past Issues / Spring 2007 Table of Contents For ... slow her down. Photo: AP Photo/Brett Flashnick Breast Cancer Breast cancer is a malignant (cancerous) growth that ...

  10. Time-domain microwave breast cancer detection: extensive system testing with phantoms.

    PubMed

    Porter, Emily; Santorelli, Adam; Coates, Mark; Popovic, Milica

    2013-04-01

    Early detection of breast cancer is known to be a key factor in the successful treatment of the disease. Here, we present a detection technique complementary to the currently used modalities (primarily mammography, ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging). Our time-domain breast cancer detection system transmits microwave-range pulses into the breast and records the scattering off of the breast in order to detect malignancies. This method is made possible by an intrinsic contrast in the dielectric parameters, specifically the relative permittivity and conductivity, of the healthy and malignant breast tissues over the microwave frequency range. The long-term goal of our work is to develop a system that can be used periodically to monitor for unusual changes in breast tissues; for instance, healthy breasts would be scanned, and follow-up scans at regular intervals would detect any small changes in breast tissue composition that could indicate the presence of a malignant growth. At that point, the patient would be referred to see a doctor for further investigation of the abnormal results. Such a system would compare each new scan with previous ones to determine the level of tissue changes, and would be used by patients at home. We report feasibility and performance tests for our initial system, conducted with breast phantoms made up of tissue-mimicking materials (unique skin, fat, gland and tumor mixtures). We initiated the system testing with simple homogeneous phantoms, consisting solely of adipose tissue. Then, we extended our tests to cases of increasing complexity by adding a skin layer and varying percentages of glandular structures and tumor sizes. In order to optimize the experimental system, we performed tests with multiple antenna arrangements, tumor sizes and locations. This work shows that there are specific antenna arrangements that are advantageous for tumor detection and demonstrates the capabilities of our time-domain microwave breast tumor detection

  11. [Government actions for the early detection of breast cancer in Latin America. Future challenges].

    PubMed

    González-Robledo, Luz María; González-Robledo, María Cecilia; Nigenda, Gustavo; López-Carrillo, Lizbeth

    2010-01-01

    Documentary research carried out in 2009 aims to document the regulatory framework and existing programs for the early detection of breast cancer in Latin America and the Caribbean in order to establish the most important challenges for the containment of the epidemic in the region. The governments of the region have developed diverse efforts and initiatives to confront the rise in mortality due to said cause, including early detection, treatment and research strategies. Despite advances in the early detection of breast cancer, the challenge remains to link efforts to ensure continuity of care (diagnostic confirmation, treatment and monitoring) in order to achieve higher efficiency, effectiveness and benefits for women with this disease.

  12. How Is Breast Cancer in Men Diagnosed?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging How Is Breast Cancer in Men Diagnosed? Medical history and physical exam ... in Men Survival Rates, by Stage More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  13. Fast 3-d tomographic microwave imaging for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Grzegorczyk, Tomasz M; Meaney, Paul M; Kaufman, Peter A; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta M; Paulsen, Keith D

    2012-08-01

    Microwave breast imaging (using electromagnetic waves of frequencies around 1 GHz) has mostly remained at the research level for the past decade, gaining little clinical acceptance. The major hurdles limiting patient use are both at the hardware level (challenges in collecting accurate and noncorrupted data) and software level (often plagued by unrealistic reconstruction times in the tens of hours). In this paper we report improvements that address both issues. First, the hardware is able to measure signals down to levels compatible with sub-centimeter image resolution while keeping an exam time under 2 min. Second, the software overcomes the enormous time burden and produces similarly accurate images in less than 20 min. The combination of the new hardware and software allows us to produce and report here the first clinical 3-D microwave tomographic images of the breast. Two clinical examples are selected out of 400+ exams conducted at the Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (Lebanon, NH). The first example demonstrates the potential usefulness of our system for breast cancer screening while the second example focuses on therapy monitoring.

  14. Fast 3-D Tomographic Microwave Imaging for Breast Cancer Detection

    PubMed Central

    Meaney, Paul M.; Kaufman, Peter A.; diFlorio-Alexander, Roberta M.; Paulsen, Keith D.

    2013-01-01

    Microwave breast imaging (using electromagnetic waves of frequencies around 1 GHz) has mostly remained at the research level for the past decade, gaining little clinical acceptance. The major hurdles limiting patient use are both at the hardware level (challenges in collecting accurate and noncorrupted data) and software level (often plagued by unrealistic reconstruction times in the tens of hours). In this paper we report improvements that address both issues. First, the hardware is able to measure signals down to levels compatible with sub-centimeter image resolution while keeping an exam time under 2 min. Second, the software overcomes the enormous time burden and produces similarly accurate images in less than 20 min. The combination of the new hardware and software allows us to produce and report here the first clinical 3-D microwave tomographic images of the breast. Two clinical examples are selected out of 400+ exams conducted at the Dartmouth Hitchcock Medical Center (Lebanon, NH). The first example demonstrates the potential usefulness of our system for breast cancer screening while the second example focuses on therapy monitoring. PMID:22562726

  15. Serum biomarker 3144 m/z for prognostic detection in Chinese postmenopausal breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yun; Xu, ShenHua; Cao, Wenming; Chen, Zhanhong; Wang, Xiaojia; Zou, Dehong

    2015-08-01

    Breast cancer becomes more prevalent with advancing age. The increased risk of breast cancer needs to be considered when choosing a treatment plan and a kind of detection method for the postmenopausal woman. Better breast cancer prognostication may improve selection of patients for adjuvant therapy. The aim of this study is to investigate the role of serum protein peak 3144 m/z in postmenopausal breast cancer patients, whether if it could be used as a potential prognostic tool. Two hundred and two postmenopausal breast cancer patients were involved in this retrospective study at Zhejiang Cancer Hospital. Serum level of protein peak 3144 m/z was assessed by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Prognostic factors were compared across subgroups of patients depending on the protein peak 3144 m/z levels by Chi-square test. The log-rank test was used to compare survival curves, and Cox proportional hazards regression analysis was performed to identify prognostic factors. The percentage of cases with higher 3144 m/z protein peak was 32.7% (66/202) in postmenopausal breast cancer patients. The serum protein peak 3144 m/z was positively related to lymph node metastasis. Patients with higher protein peak 3144 m/z had significantly poorer overall survival compared with patients with lower serum protein peak 3144 m/z (P = 0.0053). Multivariate regression analysis also revealed that protein peak 3144 m/z was an independent prognostic factor in postmenopausal breast cancer patients (borderline, P = 0.064). The protein peak 3144 m/z was a potential prognostic factor, and it could be used as a prognostic monitoring tool in postmenopausal breast cancer patients.

  16. Novel Ultrasound Sensor and Reconstruction Algorithm for Breast Cancer Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Kallman, J S; Ashby, A E; Ciarlo, D R; Thomas, G H

    2002-09-09

    Mammography is currently used for screening women over the age of 40 for breast cancer. It has not been used routinely on younger women because their breast composition is mostly glandular, or radiodense, meaning there is an increased radiation exposure risk as well as a high likelihood of poor image quality. For these younger women, it is calculated that the radiation exposure risk is higher than the potential benefit from the screening. It is anticipated that transmission ultrasound will enable screening of much younger women and complement mamographic screening in women over 40. Ultrasonic transmission tomography holds out the hope of being a discriminating tool for breast cancer screening that is safe, comfortable, and inexpensive. From its inception, however, this imaging modality has been plagued by the problem of how to quickly and inexpensively obtain the data necessary for the tomographic reconstruction. The objectives of this project were: to adapt a new kind of sensor to data acquisition for ultrasonic transmission tomography of the breast, to collect phantom data, to devise new reconstruction algorithms to use that data, and to recommend improved methods for displaying the reconstructions. The ultrasound sensor images an acoustic pressure wave over an entire surface by converting sound pressure into an optical modulation. At the beginning of this project the sensor imaged an area of approximately 7mm by 7mm and was very fragile. During the first year of this research we improved the production and assembly process of the sensors so they now last indefinitely. Our goal for the second year was to enlarge the sensor aperture. Due to unavailability of high quality materials, we were not able to enlarge our original design. We created a phantom of materials similar to those used in manufacturing breast phantoms. We used the sensors to collect data from this phantom. We used both established (diffraction tomography) and new (paraxial adjoint method tomography

  17. In newly diagnosed breast cancer, screening MRI of the contralateral breast detects mammographically occult cancer, even in elderly women: the mayo clinic in Florida experience.

    PubMed

    Bernard, Johnny Ray; Vallow, Laura A; DePeri, Elizabeth R; McNeil, Rebecca B; Feigel, Deborah G; Amar, Surabhi; Buskirk, Steven J; Perez, Edith A

    2010-01-01

    The role of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer is somewhat controversial. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of synchronous, occult contralateral breast cancer detected by MRI but not by mammography or clinical breast examination in women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, including those aged 70 years or older at our institution. MRI results for women with newly diagnosed breast cancer who underwent bilateral breast MRI after negative mammography and clinical examination between February 2003 and November 2007 at Mayo Clinic in Florida were reviewed. The prevalence of pathologically confirmed contralateral carcinoma diagnosed solely by MRI was determined and analyzed in the context of age, family history, menopausal status, breast density, and primary-tumor characteristics. Logistic regression was used to explore the association between contralateral carcinoma and potential patient risk factors. A total of 425 women were evaluated, of whom 129 (30%) were aged 70 years or older. A contralateral biopsy was recommended and performed solely on the basis of MRI in 72 of the 425 women (17%). Sixteen of these 72 women (22%) had pathologically confirmed carcinoma, including seven in the older subgroup. The prevalence of clinically and mammographically occult contralateral carcinoma detected by MRI was 3.8% (16/425) overall and 5.4% (7/129) in the group of older women. When potential risk factors for contralateral breast cancer were evaluated, postmenopausal status was the only significant predictor of contralateral cancer detected by MRI (p = 0.016). We concluded that contralateral breast screening with MRI should be considered in postmenopausal women with newly diagnosed breast cancer, even those aged 70 years or older at diagnosis.

  18. Early Detection of Breast Cancer Using Autoantibody Markers — EDRN Public Portal

    Cancer.gov

    To identify large numbers of antigens that can be used to recognize the presence of cancer by detecting antibodies to tumor proteins in the serum of the test subjects. Our technology will provide an early detection test for breast cancer in asymptomatic women. We will use bioinformatics techniques to analyze these protein microarray-immunoassays to discriminate between cancer patients and healthy subjects so as to detect disease prior to standard diagnoses as well as discriminate patients with benign conditions or other cancers that might be a false positive in less specific assays.

  19. Application of SVM classifier in thermographic image classification for early detection of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oleszkiewicz, Witold; Cichosz, Paweł; Jagodziński, Dariusz; Matysiewicz, Mateusz; Neumann, Łukasz; Nowak, Robert M.; Okuniewski, Rafał

    2016-09-01

    This article presents the application of machine learning algorithms for early detection of breast cancer on the basis of thermographic images. Supervised learning model: Support vector machine (SVM) and Sequential Minimal Optimization algorithm (SMO) for the training of SVM classifier were implemented. The SVM classifier was included in a client-server application which enables to create a training set of examinations and to apply classifiers (including SVM) for the diagnosis and early detection of the breast cancer. The sensitivity and specificity of SVM classifier were calculated based on the thermographic images from studies. Furthermore, the heuristic method for SVM's parameters tuning was proposed.

  20. Chemiluminescent optical fiber immunosensor for detection of autoantibodies to ovarian and breast cancer-associated antigens.

    PubMed

    Salama, Orly; Herrmann, Sebastien; Tziknovsky, Alina; Piura, Benjamin; Meirovich, Michael; Trakht, Ilya; Reed, Brent; Lobel, Leslie I; Marks, Robert S

    2007-02-15

    We report herein the development of an optical fiber based chemiluminescent immunosensor for detection of the native autoimmune response to GIPC-1, a PDZ containing protein involved in regulation of G-protein signaling. The recombinant protein GIPC-1 was expressed in bacteria, purified, refolded and conjugated to the tip of an optical fiber. A human monoclonal 27.B1 IgM isolated from a breast cancer patient, which targets the GIPC-1 protein, was used for calibration of the immunosensor and was detected down to a concentration of 30 pg/ml. We determined that the fiber-optic immunosensor had a detection limit 50 times lower than chemiluminescent ELISA, and approximately 500 times lower than colorimetric ELISA. In addition, sera from 11 ovarian cancer patients, 22 breast cancer patients and asymptomatic controls were tested for the presence of IgM anti-GIPC-1 autoantibodies in their serum using the two methods. The immunosensor assay detected 54% and 77% GIPC-1 positive sera within ovarian and breast cancer patients, respectively, as compared to chemiluminescent ELISA, which only detected 18% and 27%, respectively. We envision that this immunosensor may serve as a diagnostic tool for screening women for ovarian and breast cancer at an early stage, thus increasing their chance of survival.

  1. 77 FR 60703 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee: Notice of Charter Renewal

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-04

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and... Committee Act (Pub. L. 92-463) of October 6, 1972, that the Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection...

  2. Early detection of breast cancer through population-based mammographic screening in Asian women: a comparison study between screen-detected and symptomatic breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Chuwa, Esther W L; Yeo, Allen W Y; Koong, Heng Nung; Wong, Chow Yin; Yong, Wei Sean; Tan, Puay Hoon; Ho, Juliana T S; Wong, Jill S L; Ho, Gay Hui

    2009-01-01

    The first nation-wide mammographic screening program in Asia, BreastScreen Singapore (BSS), was launched in Singapore in January 2002. This study compared the presentation and results of screen-detected breast cancers with symptomatic breast cancers in two affiliated high-volume institutions, one of which was an assessment centre for BSS. The medical records of patients diagnosed with primary breast cancer at the Department of General Surgery, Singapore General Hospital and the Department of Surgical Oncology, National Cancer Centre, Singapore, during the period January 2002 to December 2003 were reviewed. Clinical and pathological comparisons were made between screen-detected lesions and symptomatic lesions. Of a total of 767 cases, 640 (83.4%) were invasive carcinomas and 127 (16.6%) were ductal carcinoma in-situ (DCIS) lesions. Only 13.4% of them were screen-detected. Compared to symptomatic cancers, screen-detected lesions were of smaller size (median size 18 versus 23 mm), a lower stage (stages 0-2, 95 versus 83.2%) and histologic grade (grade 1-2, 71 versus 60%), with a higher incidence of DCIS (31.0 versus 14.3%) and had higher rates of breast conservation (45.6 versus 28.2%) (all p-values <0.05). By multivariate analysis, tumor palpability, tumor size >20 mm, nodal involvement, cerbB2 overexpression, and advanced disease stage were independent poor prognostic factors for disease-free survival, whereas nodal involvement, advanced disease, and recurrence predicted poor cancer-specific survival. However, there was no statistically significant difference in disease-free survival or cancer-specific survival between the two groups at a median follow-up of 38 months. Screening mammography has allowed the detection of smaller and hence oncologically more favorable lesions in Asian women. Although no significant survival benefit was demonstrated in our study, a longer period of follow-up is essential before the benefit of mortality reduction, as a result of

  3. Yo antibodies in ovarian and breast cancer patients detected by a sensitive immunoprecipitation technique.

    PubMed

    Monstad, S E; Storstein, A; Dørum, A; Knudsen, A; Lønning, P E; Salvesen, H B; Aarseth, J H; Vedeler, C A

    2006-04-01

    Onconeural antibodies are found in patients with cancer and are associated with paraneoplastic neurological syndromes (PNS). The objective of the present study was to assess the frequency of Yo antibodies in ovarian and breast cancer using a sensitive immunoprecipitation technique, and to look for any association of Yo antibodies with neurological symptoms and prognostic factors. A multiwell adapted fluid-phase immunoassay using radiolabelled recombinant cerebellar degeneration related protein (cdr2), produced by coupled in vitro transcription/translation was used for the detection of Yo antibodies. This technique combines high specificity and sensitivity with high sample analysing capacity for the antibody in question. Sera or EDTA-blood from 810 ovarian (n = 557) and breast cancer (n = 253) patients were analysed for Yo antibodies by immunoprecipitation, as well as immunofluorescence and immune blots. Two hundred healthy blood donors and sera from 17 patients with paraneoplastic cerebellar degeneration and Yo antibodies served as controls. Immunoprecipitation was more sensitive in detecting Yo antibodies than immunofluorescence and immune blots. The prevalence of Yo antibodies was 13/557 (2.3%) in ovarian cancer and 4/253 (1.6%) in breast cancer using immunoprecipitation. Yo antibodies were not correlated with specific histological subgroups. The Yo index of ovarian cancer patients in FIGO stage IV was higher compared to FIGO stage I-III. The prevalence of Yo antibodies was 3 times higher in patients with stage III breast cancer than in stage I and II. Only 2/17 (11.8%) patients with Yo antibodies detected during the screen of 810 cancer patients had PNS. The results show that the prevalence of Yo antibodies is low in ovarian and breast cancer. Yo antibodies may be associated with advanced cancer, but less often with PNS.

  4. Risks of Breast Cancer Screening

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Screening (PDQ®)–Patient Version What is screening? Go ... cancer screening: Cancer Screening Overview General Information About Breast Cancer Key Points Breast cancer is a disease in ...

  5. [Occult breast cancer. Detection and radioguided surgery with 99mTc-MIBI].

    PubMed

    Barberá, L; Illanes, L; Terrier, F; Dopta, G

    2003-01-01

    We include those patients who present with an isolated metastasis of axillary adenopathy in the occult primary breast cancer group. Presumably, the primary tumor is a primitive breast carcinoma, unsuspected until this moment and not clinically demonstrable by mammography or ultrasonography. When no method succeeds in confirming the primary breast lesion, the patients are usually treated assuming the existing of breast cancer. Several diagnostic methods have been used to find the primary breast lesion. Magnetic Resonance imaging (MRI), Positron Emission (PET) and Doppler sonography have been used in this way and several papers present the results reached with them. Our group incorporates detection and radioguided surgery with 99mTechnetium (99mTc) methoxyisobutil isonitrile into the study of these patients. We perform a planar scintimammography and SPECT (Single Photon Emission Computed Tomography) with 99mTc-MIBI. If the radioisotopic method shows a functional image compatible with a carcinoma, a gamma detecting probe is then used to locate the lesion and guide its surgical removal. In this paper, we present the application of the technique in 5 cases and describe the technique and its possibilities. Its advantages are explained in comparison with other methods. The dosimetric values found in the performance of the technique are reported. We consider that detection and radioguided surgery with 99mTc-MIBI in the diagnosis and treatment of occult breast cancer adds an effective tool and means progress in the approach to this disease.

  6. Novel Multistatic Adaptive Microwave Imaging Methods for Early Breast Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Yao; Guo, Bin; Li, Jian; Stoica, Petre

    2006-12-01

    Multistatic adaptive microwave imaging (MAMI) methods are presented and compared for early breast cancer detection. Due to the significant contrast between the dielectric properties of normal and malignant breast tissues, developing microwave imaging techniques for early breast cancer detection has attracted much interest lately. MAMI is one of the microwave imaging modalities and employs multiple antennas that take turns to transmit ultra-wideband (UWB) pulses while all antennas are used to receive the reflected signals. MAMI can be considered as a special case of the multi-input multi-output (MIMO) radar with the multiple transmitted waveforms being either UWB pulses or zeros. Since the UWB pulses transmitted by different antennas are displaced in time, the multiple transmitted waveforms are orthogonal to each other. The challenge to microwave imaging is to improve resolution and suppress strong interferences caused by the breast skin, nipple, and so forth. The MAMI methods we investigate herein utilize the data-adaptive robust Capon beamformer (RCB) to achieve high resolution and interference suppression. We will demonstrate the effectiveness of our proposed methods for breast cancer detection via numerical examples with data simulated using the finite-difference time-domain method based on a 3D realistic breast model.

  7. Microwave power imaging for ultra-wide band early breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Wenyi

    Due to the critical need for complementary or/and alternative modalities to current X-ray mammography for early-stage breast cancer detection, a 3D active microwave imaging system has been developed. This thesis presents a detailed method for rapid, high contrast microwave imaging for the purpose of breast survey. In the proposed imaging system, several transmitters polarized in different directions take turns sending out a low-power UWB pulse into the breast; backscattered signals are recorded by a synthetic aperture antenna array. These backscattered signals are passed through a beamformer, which spatially focuses the waveforms to image backscattered energy as a function of location in the breast. A simple Delay-and-Sum algorithm is applied to test the proposed multistatic multi-polarized detection scheme. The obtained 2-D and 3-D numerical results have demonstrated the feasibility and superiority of detecting small malignant breast tumors using our antenna strategy. An improved algorithm of microwave power imaging for detecting small breast tumors within an MRI-derived phantom is also introduced. Our imaging results demonstrate that a high-quality image can be reached without solving the inverse problem. To set up an experimental system for future clinical investigation, we developed two Vivaldi antennas, which have a notable broad band property, good radiation pattern, and a suitable size for breast cancer detection. Finally, an antenna array which consists of eight proposed Vivaldi antennas is introduced. By conveniently moving up/down and rotating this antenna array, it can be used for the multistatic breast cancer imaging and qualified for our multi-polarized scan mode.

  8. Blueprint of quartz crystal microbalance biosensor for early detection of breast cancer through salivary autoantibodies against ATP6AP1.

    PubMed

    Arif, Sania; Qudsia, Syeda; Urooj, Samina; Chaudry, Nazia; Arshad, Aneeqa; Andleeb, Saadia

    2015-03-15

    Breast cancer represents a significant health problem because of its high prevalence. Tests like mammography, which are used abundantly for the detection of breast cancer, suffer from serious limitations. Mammography correctly detects malignancy about 80-90% of the times, failing in places when (1) the tumor is small at early stage, (2) breast tissue is dense or (3) in women of less than 40 years. Serum-based detection of biomarkers involves risk of disease transfer, along with other concerns. These techniques compromise in the early detection of breast cancer. Early detection of breast cancer is a crucial factor to enhance the survival rate of patient. Development of regular screening tests for early diagnosis of breast cancer is a challenge. This review highlights the design of a handy and household biosensor device aimed for self-screening and early diagnosis of breast cancer. The design makes use of salivary autoantibodies for specificity to develop a noninvasive procedure, breast cancer specific biomarkers for precision for the development of device, and biosensor technology for sensitivity to screen the early cases of breast cancer more efficiently.

  9. Ionizing radiation-induced DNA injury and damage detection in patients with breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Borrego-Soto, Gissela; Ortiz-López, Rocío; Rojas-Martínez, Augusto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Breast cancer is the most common malignancy in women. Radiotherapy is frequently used in patients with breast cancer, but some patients may be more susceptible to ionizing radiation, and increased exposure to radiation sources may be associated to radiation adverse events. This susceptibility may be related to deficiencies in DNA repair mechanisms that are activated after cell-radiation, which causes DNA damage, particularly DNA double strand breaks. Some of these genetic susceptibilities in DNA-repair mechanisms are implicated in the etiology of hereditary breast/ovarian cancer (pathologic mutations in the BRCA 1 and 2 genes), but other less penetrant variants in genes involved in sporadic breast cancer have been described. These same genetic susceptibilities may be involved in negative radiotherapeutic outcomes. For these reasons, it is necessary to implement methods for detecting patients who are susceptible to radiotherapy-related adverse events. This review discusses mechanisms of DNA damage and repair, genes related to these functions, and the diagnosis methods designed and under research for detection of breast cancer patients with increased radiosensitivity. PMID:26692152

  10. Detection of Genes Modifying Sensitivity to Proteasome Inhibitors Using a shRNA Library in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    TITLE: Detection of genes modifying sensitivity to proteasome inhibitors using a shRNA Library in Breast Cancer PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gregory J...shRNA Library in Breast Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) Gregory J. Hannon, Ph.D. 5d. PROJECT NUMBER...clinical trials for breast and lung cancers . We are identifying genes that mediate resistance against Velcade that could serve as potential drug

  11. Breast cancer detected with screening US: reasons for nondetection at mammography.

    PubMed

    Bae, Min Sun; Moon, Woo Kyung; Chang, Jung Min; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Kim, Won Hwa; Cho, Nariya; Yi, Ann; Yun, Bo La; Lee, Su Hyun; Kim, Mi Young; Ryu, Eun Bi; Seo, Mirinae

    2014-02-01

    To retrospectively review the mammograms of women with breast cancers detected at screening ultrasonography (US) to determine the reasons for nondetection at mammography. This study received institutional review board approval, and informed consent was waived. Between 2003 and 2011, a retrospective database review revealed 335 US-depicted cancers in 329 women (median age, 47 years; age range, 29-69 years) with Breast Imaging Reporting and Data System breast density type 2-4. Five blinded radiologists independently reviewed the mammograms to determine whether the findings on negative mammograms should be recalled. Three unblinded radiologists re-reviewed the mammograms to determine the reasons for nondetection by using the reference location of the cancer on mammograms obtained after US-guided wire localization or breast magnetic resonance imaging. The number of cancers recalled by the blinded radiologists were compared with the reasons for nondetection determined by the unblinded radiologists. Of the 335 US-depicted cancers, 63 (19%) were recalled by three or more of the five blinded radiologists, and 272 (81%) showed no mammographic findings that required immediate action. In the unblinded repeat review, 263 (78%) cancers were obscured by overlapping dense breast tissue, and nine (3%) were not included at mammography owing to difficult anatomic location or poor positioning. Sixty-three (19%) cancers were considered interpretive errors. Of these, 52 (82%) were seen as subtle findings (46 asymmetries, six calcifications) and 11 (18%) were evident (six focal asymmetries, one distortion, four calcifications). Most breast cancers (81%) detected at screening US were not seen at mammography, even in retrospect. In addition, 19% had subtle or evident findings missed at mammography. ©RSNA, 2013.

  12. Multiplexed detection of various breast cancer cells by perfluorocarbon/quantum dot nanoemulsions conjugated with antibodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bae, Pan Kee; Chung, Bong Hyun

    2014-07-01

    The effective targeting of cancer cell surface antigens is an attractive approach in cancer diagnosis and therapy. Multifunctional nanoprobes with cell-targeting specificity are likely to find important applications in bioanalysis, biomedicine, and clinical diagnosis. In this study, we have fabricated biocompatible perfluorocan/quantum dot nanoemulsions as bimodal imaging nanoprobes for the targeting of breast cancer cells. Perfluorocarbon/quantum dot nanoemulsions conjugated with monoclonal antibodies, as a type of bimodal imaging nanoprobe based on 19 F-MR and optical imaging, have been synthesized and applied for targeted imaging of three different breast cancer cells (SKBR3, MCF-7, MDA-MB 468), respectively. We have shown that the cancer-detection capabilities of antibody-conjugated PFC/QDs nanoemulsions could be successfully applied to target of various breast cancer cells. These modified PFC/QDs nanoemulsions were shown to target the cancer cell surface receptors specially. Conjugation of ligands to nanoemulsions targeting over-expressed cell surface receptors is a promising approach for targeted imaging to tumor cells. We further propose that the PFC/QDs nanoemulsions could be used in targeted imaging of breast cancer cells.

  13. Breast cancer screening and biomarkers.

    PubMed

    Brooks, Mai

    2009-01-01

    Annual screening mammograms have been shown to be cost-effective and are credited for the decline in mortality of breast cancer. New technologies including breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may further improve early breast cancer detection in asymptomatic women. Serum tumor markers such as CA 15-3, carcinoembyonic antigen (CEA), and CA 27-29 are ordered in the clinic mainly for disease surveillance, and not useful for detection of localized cancer. This review will discuss blood-based markers and breast-based markers, such as nipple/ductal fluid, with an emphasis on biomarkers for early detection of breast cancer. In the future, it is likely that a combination approach to simultaneously measure multiple markers would be most successful in detecting early breast cancer. Ideally, such a biomarker panel should be able to detect breast cancer in asymptomatic patients, even in the setting of normal mammogram and physical examination results.

  14. Aptamer-Assisted Detection of the Altered Expression of Estrogen Receptor Alpha in Human Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ahirwar, Rajesh; Vellarikkal, Shamsudheen Karuthedath; Sett, Arghya; Sivasubbu, Sridhar; Scaria, Vinod; Bora, Utpal; Borthakur, Bibhuti Bhusan; Kataki, Amal Chandra; Sharma, Jagannath Dev; Nahar, Pradip

    2016-01-01

    An increase in the expression of estrogen receptors (ER) and the expanded population of ER-positive cells are two common phenotypes of breast cancer. Detection of the aberrantly expressed ERα in breast cancer is carried out using ERα-antibodies and radiolabelled ligands to make decisions about cancer treatment and targeted therapy. Capitalizing on the beneficial advantages of aptamer over the conventional antibody or radiolabelled ligand, we have identified a DNA aptamer that selectively binds and facilitates the detection of ERα in human breast cancer tissue sections. The aptamer is identified using the high throughput sequencing assisted SELEX screening. Biophysical characterization confirms the binding and formation of a thermodynamically stable complex between the identified DNA aptamer (ERaptD4) and ERα (Ka = 1.55±0.298×108 M-1; ΔH = 4.32×104±801.1 cal/mol; ΔS = -108 cal/mol/deg). Interestingly, the specificity measurements suggest that the ERaptD4 internalizes into ERα-positive breast cancer cells in a target-selective manner and localizes specifically in the nuclear region. To harness these characteristics of ERaptD4 for detection of ERα expression in breast cancer samples, we performed the aptamer-assisted histochemical analysis of ERα in tissue samples from breast cancer patients. The results were validated by performing the immunohistochemistry on same samples with an ERα-antibody. We found that the two methods agree strongly in assay output (kappa value = 0.930, p-value <0.05 for strong ERα positive and the ERα negative samples; kappa value = 0.823, p-value <0.05 for the weak/moderate ER+ve samples, n = 20). Further, the aptamer stain the ERα-positive cells in breast tissues without cross-reacting to ERα-deficient fibroblasts, adipocytes, or the inflammatory cells. Our results demonstrate a significant consistency in the aptamer-assisted detection of ERα in strong ERα positive, moderate ERα positive and ERα negative breast cancer

  15. Microwave radar and microwave-induced thermoacoustics: dual-modality approach for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Kirshin, Evgeny; Oreshkin, Borislav; Zhu, Guangran Kevin; Popović, Milica; Coates, Mark

    2013-02-01

    Microwave radar and microwave-induced thermoacoustics, recently proposed as promising breast cancer detection techniques, each have shortcomings that reduce detection performance. Making the assumption that the measurement noises experienced when applying these two techniques are independent, we propose a methodology to process the input signals jointly based on a hypothesis testing framework. We present two test statistics and derive their distributions to set the thresholds. The methodology is evaluated on numerically simulated signals acquired from 2-D numerical breast models using finite-difference time-domain method. Our results show that the proposed dual-modality approach can give a significant improvement in detection performance.

  16. The evolving role of the dynamic thermal analysis in the early detection of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Salhab, M; Al Sarakbi, W; Mokbel, K

    2005-01-01

    It is now recognised that the breast exhibits a circadian rhythm which reflects its physiology. There is increasing evidence that rhythms associated with malignant cells proliferation are largely non-circadian and that a circadian to ultradian shift may be a general correlation to neoplasia. Cancer development appears to generate its own thermal signatures and the complexity of these signatures may be a reflection of its degree of development. The limitations of mammography as a screening modality especially in young women with dense breasts necessitated the development of novel and more effective screening strategies with a high sensitivity and specificity. Dynamic thermal analysis of the breast is a safe, non invasive approach that seems to be sensitive for the early detection of breast cancer. This article focuses on dynamic thermal analysis as an evolving method in breast cancer detection in pre-menopausal women with dense breast tissue. Prospective multi-centre trials are required to validate this promising modality in screening. The issue of false positives require further investigation using molecular genetic markers of malignancy and novel techniques such as mammary ductoscopy. PMID:15819982

  17. Detection of Circulating Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer Patients Using Cytokeratin-19 Real-Time RT-PCR

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hyung Seok; Han, Hyun Ju; Lee, Soohyeon; Kim, Gun Min; Park, Seho; Choi, Yeon A; Lee, Jeong Dong; Kim, Gi Moon

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The roles of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) as predictive and prognostic factors, as well as key mediators in the metastatic cascade, have been investigated. This study aimed to validate a method to quantify CTCs in peripheral blood using a real-time reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay for cytokeratin (CK)-19 and to evaluate the utility of this assay in detecting CTCs in breast cancer patients. Materials and Methods Real-time monitoring PCR of fluorescently labeled specific hybridization probes for CK-19 mRNA was established. Peripheral blood samples from 30 healthy donors, 69 patients with early breast cancer, 47 patients with locally advanced breast cancer, and 126 patients with metastatic breast cancer were prospectively obtained and analyzed for CTC detection. Results CK-19 mRNA was not detectable in healthy subjects using the real-time RT-PCR method. The detection rates of CK-19 mRNA in breast cancer patients were 47.8% for early breast cancer (33/69), 46.8% for locally advanced breast cancer (22/47), and 61.1% for metastatic breast cancer (77/129). The detection rate of CK-19-positive CTCs in metastatic disease was slightly higher than early or locally advanced breast cancer; however, the detection rate according to disease burden was not statistically different (p=0.097). The detection rate was higher in patients with pleural metastasis (p=0.045). CTC detection was associated with poor survival (p=0.014). Conclusion A highly specific and sensitive CK-19 mRNA-based method to detect CTCs in peripheral blood in breast cancer patients can be used in further prospective studies to evaluate the predictive and prognostic importance of CTCs. PMID:27873491

  18. Cancer early detection program based on awareness and clinical breast examination: Interim results from an urban community in Mumbai, India.

    PubMed

    Gadgil, Anita; Sauvaget, Catherine; Roy, Nobhojit; Muwonge, Richard; Kantharia, Surita; Chakrabarty, Anuradha; Bantwal, Kanchan; Haldar, Indrani; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy

    2017-02-01

    Indian women with breast cancer are usually diagnosed in advanced stages leading to poor survival. Improving breast awareness and increasing access to early diagnosis and adequate treatment has been advocated for breast cancer control. We implemented a program to increase awareness on breast cancer and access to its early detection in an occupational health care scheme in Mumbai, India. Breast awareness brochures were mailed annually between June 2013 and June 2016 to a cohort of 22,500 eligible women aged 30-69 years old receiving universal health care from an occupational health care scheme comprising of primary health centres and a referral secondary care hospital in Mumbai. Women with suspected breast cancers were provided with diagnostic investigations and treatment. Socio-demographic information and tumour characteristics were compared between the breast awareness pre-intervention period (Jan 2005-May 2013) and the breast awareness intervention period after four rounds of mailers (June 2013-June 2016). The proportion of women with early tumours and axillary lymph node negative cancers increased from 74% to 81% and 46% to 53% respectively, between the two periods. While the proportion of patients receiving breast conserving surgery increased from 39% to 51%, the proportion receiving chemotherapy decreased from 84% to 56%. Interim results following efforts to improve breast awareness and access to care in a cohort of women in an occupational health care scheme indicate early detection and more conservative treatment of breast cancers. Creating awareness and improving access to care may result in cancer down-staging.

  19. MRI breast screening in high-risk women: cancer detection and survival analysis.

    PubMed

    Evans, D Gareth; Gareth, Evans D; Kesavan, Nisha; Nisha, Kesavan; Lim, Yit; Yit, Lim; Gadde, Soujanye; Soujanye, Gadde; Hurley, Emma; Emma, Hurley; Massat, Nathalie J; Maxwell, Anthony J; Ingham, Sarah; Sarah, Ingham; Eeles, Rosalind; Rosalind, Eeles; Leach, Martin O; Howell, Anthony; Anthony, Howell; Duffy, Stephen W; Stephen, Duffy

    2014-06-01

    Women with a genetic predisposition to breast cancer tend to develop the disease at a younger age with denser breasts making mammography screening less effective. The introduction of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for familial breast cancer screening programs in recent years was intended to improve outcomes in these women. We aimed to assess whether introduction of MRI surveillance improves 5- and 10-year survival of high-risk women and determine the accuracy of MRI breast cancer detection compared with mammography-only or no enhanced surveillance and compare size and pathology of cancers detected in women screened with MRI + mammography and mammography only. We used data from two prospective studies where asymptomatic women with a very high breast cancer risk were screened by either mammography alone or with MRI also compared with BRCA1/2 carriers with no intensive surveillance. 63 cancers were detected in women receiving MRI + mammography and 76 in women receiving mammography only. Sensitivity of MRI + mammography was 93 % with 63 % specificity. Fewer cancers detected on MRI were lymph node positive compared to mammography/no additional screening. There were no differences in 10-year survival between the MRI + mammography and mammography-only groups, but survival was significantly higher in the MRI-screened group (95.3 %) compared to no intensive screening (73.7 %; p = 0.002). There were no deaths among the 21 BRCA2 carriers receiving MRI. There appears to be benefit from screening with MRI, particularly in BRCA2 carriers. Extended follow-up of larger numbers of high-risk women is required to assess long-term survival.

  20. Coded aperture coherent scatter imaging for breast cancer detection: a Monte Carlo evaluation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lakshmanan, Manu N.; Morris, Robert E.; Greenberg, Joel A.; Samei, Ehsan; Kapadia, Anuj J.

    2016-03-01

    It is known that conventional x-ray imaging provides a maximum contrast between cancerous and healthy fibroglandular breast tissues of 3% based on their linear x-ray attenuation coefficients at 17.5 keV, whereas coherent scatter signal provides a maximum contrast of 19% based on their differential coherent scatter cross sections. Therefore in order to exploit this potential contrast, we seek to evaluate the performance of a coded- aperture coherent scatter imaging system for breast cancer detection and investigate its accuracy using Monte Carlo simulations. In the simulations we modeled our experimental system, which consists of a raster-scanned pencil beam of x-rays, a bismuth-tin coded aperture mask comprised of a repeating slit pattern with 2-mm periodicity, and a linear-array of 128 detector pixels with 6.5-keV energy resolution. The breast tissue that was scanned comprised a 3-cm sample taken from a patient-based XCAT breast phantom containing a tomosynthesis- based realistic simulated lesion. The differential coherent scatter cross section was reconstructed at each pixel in the image using an iterative reconstruction algorithm. Each pixel in the reconstructed image was then classified as being either air or the type of breast tissue with which its normalized reconstructed differential coherent scatter cross section had the highest correlation coefficient. Comparison of the final tissue classification results with the ground truth image showed that the coded aperture imaging technique has a cancerous pixel detection sensitivity (correct identification of cancerous pixels), specificity (correctly ruling out healthy pixels as not being cancer) and accuracy of 92.4%, 91.9% and 92.0%, respectively. Our Monte Carlo evaluation of our experimental coded aperture coherent scatter imaging system shows that it is able to exploit the greater contrast available from coherently scattered x-rays to increase the accuracy of detecting cancerous regions within the breast.

  1. Breast self-examination for the early detection of breast cancer: a USSR/WHO controlled trial in Leningrad

    PubMed Central

    Semiglazov, V. F.; Moiseenko, V. M.

    1987-01-01

    Breast self-examination (BSE) is of great potential value for the early detection of breast cancer, especially in areas where mammography and regular examinations by physicians are not practicable. However, BSE cannot be recommended for routine public health practice until there is good evidence that it is effective in reducing mortality from breast cancer. Prospective controlled trials of BSE were therefore initiated in 1985 in Leningrad and Moscow, under the auspices of WHO, in order to establish the value of this potentially cost-effective technique. More than 62 000 women aged 40-64 years have been enrolled in the BSE and control groups in Leningrad and another 88 000 will be added in the next three years. This paper presents the results of the study in Leningrad after the first 15 months. PMID:3311442

  2. Circulating miRNAs revealed as surrogate molecular signatures for the early detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sanjay; Srivastava, Amit Kumar; Suman, Shankar; Kumar, Vijay; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2015-12-01

    The miRNAs have well studied roles in cancer. Here, we identified altered miRNA expression by global miRNA profiling in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of breast cancer (n = 15) and healthy subjects (n = 15), and further validated the selected miRNAs in PBMCs (n = 45), blood plasma (n = 45) and breast tissue samples (n = 09). The expression of altered miRNAs was also evaluated in PBMCs among early stage (n = 32), advanced stage (n = 13), triple positive (n = 5) and triple negative (n = 5) breast cancer patients. Results showed differential pattern of expressions of these miRNAs in multiple cohorts, however in early stage breast cancer, miR-106a-5p and miR-454-3p were upregulated (p < 0.05), miR-195-5p and miR-495 were downregulated (p < 0.05) in PBMCs. In addition, these miRNAs were also significantly associated with cancer and ErbB signaling pathways. Multiple regression analysis and receiver-operative curve (ROC) analysis of miR-195-5p and miR-495 with area under curve (AUC) of 0.901 showed best discriminating combination for early stage breast cancer detection. In summary, the present study delineated the importance of miR-195-5p and miR-495 miRNAs as prospective circulating surrogate molecular signatures for early detection of breast cancer.

  3. Detection of occult metastasis in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hawes, D; Neville, A M; Cote, R J

    2001-06-01

    The most important factor affecting the outcome of patients with invasive cancer is whether the tumor has spread, either regionally (to regional lymph nodes) or systemically. However, a proportion of patients with no evidence of systemic dissemination will develop recurrent disease after primary "curative" therapy. Clearly, these patients had occult systemic spread of disease that was undetectable by routinely employed methods (careful pathological, clinical, biochemical, and radiological evaluation). In addition, the success of adjuvant therapy is assumed to stem from its ability to eradicate occult metastases before they become clinically evident. Therefore, methods for the detection of occult metastases in patients with the earliest stage of cancer, i.e., prior to detection of metastases by any other clinical or pathological analysis, have received a great deal of attention.

  4. Impact of mammography detection on the course of breast cancer in women aged 40-49 years.

    PubMed

    Malmgren, Judith A; Parikh, Jay; Atwood, Mary K; Kaplan, Henry G

    2012-03-01

    To analyze trends in detection method related to breast cancer stage at diagnosis, treatments, and outcomes over time among 40-49-year-old women. i This study was institutional review board approved, with a waiver of informed consent, and HIPAA compliant. A longitudinal prospective cohort study was conducted of women aged 40-49 years who had primary breast cancer, during 1990-2008, and were identified and tracked by a dedicated registry database (n = 1977). Method of detection--patient detected (PtD), physician detected (PhysD), or mammography detected (MamD)--was chart abstracted. Disease-specific survival and relapse-free survival statistics were calculated by using the Kaplan-Meier method for stage I-IV breast cancer. A significant increase in the percentage of MamD breast cancer over time (28%-58%) and a concurrent decline in patient and physician detected (Pt/PhysD) breast cancer (73%-42%) (Pearson x(2) = 72.72, P < .001) were observed over time from 1990 to 2008, with an overall increase in lower-stage disease detection and a decrease in higher-stage disease. MamD breast cancer patients were more likely to undergo lumpectomy (67% vs 48% of Pt/PhysD breast cancer patients) and less likely to undergo modified radical mastectomy (25% vs 47% of the Pt/PhysD breast cancer patients) (P < .001). Uncorrected for stage, 13% of MamD breast cancer patients underwent surgery and chemotherapy versus 22% of Pt/PhysD breast cancer patients (P < .001), and 31% of MamD breast cancer patients underwent surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy versus 59% of Pt/PhysD breast cancer patients (x(2) = 305.13, P < .001). Analyzing invasive cancers only, 5-year relapse-free survival for MamD breast cancer patients was 92% versus 88% for Pt/PhysD patients (log-rank test, 12.47; P < .001). Increased mammography-detected breast cancer over time coincided with lower-stage disease detection resulting in reduced treatment and lower rates of recurrence, adding factors to consider when

  5. Comparison of clinical and pathological characteristics between screen-detected and self-detected breast cancers: a Hong Kong study.

    PubMed

    Lau, S Ss; Cheung, P Sy; Wong, T T; Ma, M Kg; Kwan, W H

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of death of Hong Kong women with increasing incidence. This study aimed to determine any prognostic differences between screen-detected and self-detected cases of breast cancer in a cohort of Hong Kong patients. This was a case series with internal comparison carried out in a private hospital in Hong Kong. Approximately 3000 cases of Chinese patients diagnosed with ductal carcinoma in situ or invasive breast cancer were reviewed. The screen-detected group showed better pathological characteristics than the self-detected group. Number of lymph nodes involved, invasive tumour size, and tumour grade were more favourable in the screen-detected group. There was also a lower proportion of patients with pure invasive ductal carcinoma and mastectomy in the screen-detected group. This study provides indirect evidence that women in the local population may gain clinical benefit from regular breast cancer screening. The findings need to be validated in a representative population of Hong Kong women.

  6. Diaphanography as a means of detecting breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Marshall, V.; Williams, D.C.; Smith, K.D.

    1984-02-01

    Diaphanography (lightscanning) is a noninvasive method of examining the breast by transillumination using visible or infrared light. It was compared to xeromammography in 1000 patients, 91 of whom had biopsy. There were 34 malignant tumors, of which 29 were detected by xeromammography and 26 by lightscanning; 27 patients with positive lightscans were not biopsied. All patients with true-positive lightscans also had positive mammograms. Major criteria of malignancy on diaphanography included an area of light absorption and abnormal or hypervascularity. These criteria could be demonstrated on retrospect on 6 scans previously considered negative; one xeromammogram previously interpreted as negative was diagnosed as positive on retrospect. Diaphanography may be sensitive enough to warrant further investigation.

  7. Recurrent Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... you may have received after your first breast cancer diagnosis was intended to kill any cancer cells that ... 35 at the time of their original breast cancer diagnosis, face a higher risk of recurrent breast cancer. ...

  8. Elevated HGF Levels in Sera from Breast Cancer Patients Detected Using a Protein Microarray ELISA

    SciTech Connect

    Woodbury, Ronald L. ); Varnum, Susan M. ); Zangar, Richard C. )

    2002-01-01

    We developed an ELISA in high-density microassay format to detect hepatocyte growth factor (HGF) in human serum. The microassay can detect HGF at sub-pg/mL concentrations in sample volumes of 100 uL or less. The microassay is also quantitative and was used to detect elevated HGF levels in sera from recurrent breast cancer patients. The microarray format provides the potential for high-throughput quantitation of multiple biomarkers in parallel.

  9. Earlier detection of breast cancer by surveillance of women at familial risk.

    PubMed

    Tilanus-Linthorst, M M; Bartels, C C; Obdeijn, A I; Oudkerk, M

    2000-03-01

    A positive family history increases the risk for breast cancer which oft en occurs at a much younger age than in the general population. We stud ied whether surveillance of these women resulted in the detection of bre ast cancer in an earlier stage than in symptomatic patients with a famil y history. Between January 1994 and April 1998, 294 women with 15-25% r isk (moderate), mean age:43.3 (22-75) years, were screened with a yearly physical examination and mammography from 5 years before the youngest ag e of onset in the family and 384 women with >25% risk (high) for breast cancer, mean age: 42.9 (20-74) years were screened with a physical examination every 6 months and yearly mammography. From September 1995 breast magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was also carried out for 109 high risk women where mammography showed over 50% density. 26 breast cancers detected under surveillance were significantly more often found in an early T1N0 stage than the 24 breast cancers in patients with a family history referred in that period because of symptoms: 81 versus 46% (P=0.018). Patients under surveillance were also less frequently node-positive than the symptomatic group: 19 versus 42% (P=0.12). 20 patients with a family history referred by our national screening programme in that period had 21 breast cancers detected, 81% in stage T1N0 and 5% node-positive, which was comparable to the results in our national screening programme T1N0 66%, N+ 24% resulting in a 30% reduction in mortality. The incidence in women under surveillance was 10.1 per 1000 in the 'high' risk group and 13.3 per 1000 in the 'moderate' risk group. Expected incidence in an average risk population aged 40-50 years is 1.5, expected if the group consisted of only gene carriers 15 per 1000. 23% of the breast cancers in the surveillance group were detected at physical examination, but occult at mammography. 38% were detected at mammography and clinically occult. Breast MRI (in the subgroup) detected 3 occult

  10. Modeling of electrical impedance tomography to detect breast cancer by finite volume methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ain, K.; Wibowo, R. A.; Soelistiono, S.

    2017-05-01

    The properties of the electrical impedance of tissue are an interesting study, because changes of the electrical impedance of organs are related to physiological and pathological. Both physiological and pathological properties are strongly associated with disease information. Several experiments shown that the breast cancer has a lower impedance than the normal breast tissue. Thus, the imaging based on impedance can be used as an alternative equipment to detect the breast cancer. This research carries out by modelling of Electrical Impedance Tomography to detect the breast cancer by finite volume methods. The research includes development of a mathematical model of the electric potential field by 2D Finite Volume Method, solving the forward problem and inverse problem by linear reconstruction method. The scanning is done by 16 channel electrode with neighbors method to collect data. The scanning is performed at a frequency of 10 kHz and 100 kHz with three objects numeric includes an anomaly at the surface, an anomaly at the depth and an anomaly at the surface and at depth. The simulation has been successfully to reconstruct image of functional anomalies of the breast cancer at the surface position, the depth position or a combination of surface and the depth.

  11. 75 FR 57472 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC): Notice of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-21

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection and Control Advisory Committee (BCCEDCAC): Notice of Charter Renewal This gives notice under the...

  12. 77 FR 71193 - Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Federal Advisory Committee

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ] DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Federal Advisory Committee Correction: This notice was published in the Federal Register...

  13. Detecting Emotional Expression in Face-to-Face and Online Breast Cancer Support Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liess, Anna; Simon, Wendy; Yutsis, Maya; Owen, Jason E.; Piemme, Karen Altree; Golant, Mitch; Giese-Davis, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Accurately detecting emotional expression in women with primary breast cancer participating in support groups may be important for therapists and researchers. In 2 small studies (N = 20 and N = 16), the authors examined whether video coding, human text coding, and automated text analysis provided consistent estimates of the level of emotional…

  14. Detecting Emotional Expression in Face-to-Face and Online Breast Cancer Support Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liess, Anna; Simon, Wendy; Yutsis, Maya; Owen, Jason E.; Piemme, Karen Altree; Golant, Mitch; Giese-Davis, Janine

    2008-01-01

    Accurately detecting emotional expression in women with primary breast cancer participating in support groups may be important for therapists and researchers. In 2 small studies (N = 20 and N = 16), the authors examined whether video coding, human text coding, and automated text analysis provided consistent estimates of the level of emotional…

  15. Low-frequency phased-array 2D fluorescence localization in breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qian; Chen, Yu; Chance, Britton; Luo, Qingming

    2003-12-01

    A method for rapid, non-invasive 2D fluorescence localization of breast cancer using low frequency phased array near-infrared technique is presented in this article. In our study, we have developed a dual-channel fluorescence detection system to locate breast cancer. This system consists two pair of in-phase and out-of-phase light emitting diodes (LEDs) as the light sources and Photomultiplier Tube (PMT) as the detector. Two null planes generated by cancellation of diffusion photon density waves (DPDW) will indicate the 2D position of breast cancer with exogenous contrast agents. The fluorescent contrast agent used in this study is Indocyanine Green (ICG) and the minimum amount of ICG detected by our system is 0.5 μM. With the 2 cm separation of sources and detector, the maximum depth our system can detect is 10 mm. The whole system is in compact size and portable. Phantom experiments show that the system can provide real time detection and localization of small hidden absorbing-fluorescent objects inside the highly scattering medium with high accuracy of +/-3 mm. The potential application is that it is low-cost and can be used for breast cancer localization as operation aid and self-examination.

  16. Universal Breast Cancer Antigens as Targets Linking Early Detection and Therapeutic Vaccination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Timeline: 1. Attempt to enroll patients with BIRADS category 4 mammograms on ductal lavage study (0-12 months) limited by poor accrual 2. Establish...Summary 11 Aug 2004 - 100 Aug 2005 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Universal Breast Cancer Antigens as Targets Linking Early Detection and...3 Reportable Outcomes ....................................................................... 4

  17. NASA's Technology Transfer Program for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schmidt, Gregory; Frey, Mary Anne; Vernikos, Joan; Winfield, Daniel; Dalton, Bonnie P. (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has led the development of advanced imaging sensors and image processing technologies for space science and Earth science missions. NASA considers the transfer and commercialization of such technologies a fundamental mission of the agency. Over the last two years, efforts have been focused on the application of aerospace imaging and computing to the field of diagnostic imaging, specifically to breast cancer imaging. These technology transfer efforts offer significant promise in helping in the national public health priority of the early detection of breast cancer.

  18. Plasma MicroRNA Panel for Minimally Invasive Detection of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cuk, Katarina; Zucknick, Manuela; Madhavan, Dharanija; Schott, Sarah; Golatta, Michael; Heil, Jörg; Marmé, Frederik; Turchinovich, Andrey; Sinn, Peter; Sohn, Christof; Junkermann, Hans; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Burwinkel, Barbara

    2013-01-01

    Over the last few years, circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) have emerged as promising novel and minimally invasive markers for various diseases, including cancer. We already showed that certain miRNAs are deregulated in the plasma of breast cancer patients when compared to healthy women. Herein we have further explored their potential to serve as breast cancer early detection markers in blood plasma. Circulating miR-127-3p, miR-376a and miR-652, selected as candidates from a miRNA array-based screening, were found to be associated with breast cancer for the first time (n = 417). Further we validated our previously reported circulating miRNAs (miR-148b, miR-376c, miR-409-3p and miR-801) in an independent cohort (n = 210) as elevated in the plasma of breast cancer patients compared to healthy women. We described, for the first time in breast cancer, an over-representation of deregulated miRNAs (miR-127-3p, miR-376a, miR-376c and miR-409-3p) originating from the chromosome 14q32 region. The inclusion of patients with benign breast tumors enabled the observation that miR-148b, miR-652 and miR-801 levels are even elevated in the plasma of women with benign tumors when compared to healthy controls. Furthermore, an analysis of samples stratified by cancer stage demonstrated that miR-127-3p, miR-148b, miR-409-3p, miR-652 and miR-801 can detect also stage I or stage II breast cancer thus making them attractive candidates for early detection. Finally, ROC curve analysis showed that a panel of these seven circulating miRNAs has substantial diagnostic potential with an AUC of 0.81 for the detection of benign and malignant breast tumors, which further increased to 0.86 in younger women (up to 50 years of age). PMID:24194846

  19. Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... Category Cancer A-Z Breast Cancer Understanding a Breast Cancer Diagnosis If you’ve been diagnosed with breast ... cancer or how fast it’s growing. Types of Breast Cancer There are several types of breast cancer. The ...

  20. Earlier detection of breast cancer with ultrasound molecular imaging in a transgenic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Bachawal, Sunitha V; Jensen, Kristin C; Lutz, Amelie M; Gambhir, Sanjiv S; Tranquart, Francois; Tian, Lu; Willmann, Jürgen K

    2013-03-15

    While there is an increasing role of ultrasound for breast cancer screening in patients with dense breast, conventional anatomical ultrasound lacks sensitivity and specificity for early breast cancer detection. In this study, we assessed the potential of ultrasound molecular imaging using clinically translatable vascular endothelial growth factor receptor type 2 (VEGFR2)-targeted microbubbles (MB(VEGFR2)) to improve the diagnostic accuracy of ultrasound in earlier detection of breast cancer and ductal carcinoma in situ (DCIS) in a transgenic mouse model [FVB/N-Tg(MMTV-PyMT)634Mul]. In vivo binding specificity studies (n = 26 tumors) showed that ultrasound imaging signal was significantly higher (P < 0.001) using MB(VEGFR2) than nontargeted microbubbles and imaging signal significantly decreased (P < 0.001) by blocking antibodies. Ultrasound molecular imaging signal significantly increased (P < 0.001) when breast tissue (n = 315 glands) progressed from normal [1.65 ± 0.17 arbitrary units (a.u.)] to hyperplasia (4.21 ± 1.16), DCIS (15.95 ± 1.31), and invasive cancer (78.1 ± 6.31) and highly correlated with ex vivo VEGFR2 expression [R(2) = 0.84; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.72-0.91; P < 0.001]. At an imaging signal threshold of 4.6 a.u., ultrasound molecular imaging differentiated benign from malignant entities with a sensitivity of 84% (95% CI, 78-88) and specificity of 89% (95% CI, 81-94). In a prospective screening trail (n = 63 glands), diagnostic performance of detecting DCIS and breast cancer was assessed and two independent readers correctly diagnosed malignant disease in more than 95% of cases and highly agreed between each other [intraclass correlation coefficient (ICC) = 0.98; 95% CI, 97-99]. These results suggest that VEGFR2-targeted ultrasound molecular imaging allows highly accurate detection of DCIS and breast cancer in transgenic mice and may be a promising approach for early breast cancer detection in women.

  1. Simulation modeling of change to breast cancer detection age eligibility recommendations in Ontario, 2002-2021.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Duncan J W; Drake, Sean M; Shortt, Samuel E D; Dorland, John L; Tran, Ninh

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this project was to demonstrate the development and use of a decision support tool based on simulation modeling of breast cancer screening to evaluate the implications for the provision of health services and the economic impact of extending routine radiographic screening for breast cancer to women in the 40-49 age group between 2002 and 2021. The main method was computer simulation with a Markov model that used published estimates of population size by age group, breast cancer prevalence and incidence, screening program participation rate, sensitivity and specificity of the screening test and diagnostic test, stage transition probabilities, directed diagnosis rates and costs. The model predicted that changes to age eligibility requirements would result in the detection of an additional 6610 women with breast cancer in Ontario requiring treatment, at an additional cost of 795 Canadian per case. These costs include those related to screening, diagnosis and initial treatment and apply to the 20-year period. The model provided a useful decision support tool for those planning and implementing breast cancer screening programs.

  2. Risk profile of breast cancer following atypical hyperplasia detected through organized screening.

    PubMed

    Buckley, Elizabeth; Sullivan, Tom; Farshid, Gelareh; Hiller, Janet; Roder, David

    2015-06-01

    Few population-based data are available indicating the breast cancer risk following detection of atypia within a breast screening program. Prospectively collected data from the South Australian screening program were linked with the state cancer registry. Absolute and relative breast cancer risk estimates were calculated for ADH and ALH separately, and by age at diagnosis and time since diagnosis. Post-hoc analysis was undertaken of the effect of family history on breast cancer risk. Women with ADH and ALH had an increase in relative risk for malignancy (ADH HR 2.81 [95% CI 1.72, 4.59] and (ALH HR 4.14 [95% CI 1.97, 8.69], respectively. Differences in risk profile according to time since diagnosis and age at diagnosis were not statistically significant. Estimates of the relative risk of breast cancer are necessary to inform decisions regarding clinical management and/or treatment of women with ADH and ALH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A research about breast cancer detection using different neural networks and K-MICA algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kalteh, A A; Zarbakhsh, Payam; Jirabadi, Meysam; Addeh, Jalil

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of death for women all over the world. The correct diagnosis of breast cancer is one of the major problems in the medical field. From the literature it has been found that different pattern recognition techniques can help them to improve in this domain. This paper presents a novel hybrid intelligent method for detection of breast cancer. The proposed method includes two main modules: Clustering module and the classifier module. In the clustering module, first the input data will be clustered by a new technique. This technique is a suitable combination of the modified imperialist competitive algorithm (MICA) and K-means algorithm. Then the Euclidean distance of each pattern is computed from the determined clusters. The classifier module determines the membership of the patterns using the computed distance. In this module, several neural networks, such as the multilayer perceptron, probabilistic neural networks and the radial basis function neural networks are investigated. Using the experimental study, we choose the best classifier in order to recognize the breast cancer. The proposed system is tested on Wisconsin Breast Cancer (WBC) database and the simulation results show that the recommended system has high accuracy.

  4. Breast cancer detection using neutron stimulated emission computed tomography: prominent elements and dose requirements.

    PubMed

    Bender, Janelle E; Kapadia, Anuj J; Sharma, Amy C; Tourassi, Georgia D; Harrawood, Brian P; Floyd, Carey E

    2007-10-01

    Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) is being developed to noninvasively determine concentrations of trace elements in biological tissue. Studies have shown prominent differences in the trace element concentration of normal and malignant breast tissue. NSECT has the potential to detect these differences and diagnose malignancy with high accuracy with dose comparable to that of a single mammogram. In this study, NSECT imaging was simulated for normal and malignant human breast tissue samples to determine the significance of individual elements in determining malignancy. The normal and malignant models were designed with different elemental compositions, and each was scanned spectroscopically using a simulated 2.5 MeV neutron beam. The number of incident neutrons was varied from 0.5 million to 10 million neutrons. The resulting gamma spectra were evaluated through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to determine which trace elements were prominent enough to be considered markers for breast cancer detection. Four elemental isotopes (133Cs, 81Br, 79Br, and 87Rb) at five energy levels were shown to be promising features for breast cancer detection with an area under the ROC curve (A(Z)) above 0.85. One of these elements--87Rb at 1338 keV--achieved perfect classification at 10 million incident neutrons and could be detected with as low as 3 million incident neutrons. Patient dose was calculated for each gamma spectrum obtained and was found to range from between 0.05 and 0.112 mSv depending on the number of neutrons. This simulation demonstrates that NSECT has the potential to noninvasively detect breast cancer through five prominent trace element energy levels, at dose levels comparable to other breast cancer screening techniques.

  5. Breast cancer detection using neutron stimulated emission computed tomography: Prominent elements and dose requirements

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, Janelle E.; Kapadia, Anuj J.; Sharma, Amy C.; Tourassi, Georgia D.; Harrawood, Brian P.; Floyd, Carey E. Jr.

    2007-10-15

    Neutron stimulated emission computed tomography (NSECT) is being developed to noninvasively determine concentrations of trace elements in biological tissue. Studies have shown prominent differences in the trace element concentration of normal and malignant breast tissue. NSECT has the potential to detect these differences and diagnose malignancy with high accuracy with dose comparable to that of a single mammogram. In this study, NSECT imaging was simulated for normal and malignant human breast tissue samples to determine the significance of individual elements in determining malignancy. The normal and malignant models were designed with different elemental compositions, and each was scanned spectroscopically using a simulated 2.5 MeV neutron beam. The number of incident neutrons was varied from 0.5 million to 10 million neutrons. The resulting gamma spectra were evaluated through receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis to determine which trace elements were prominent enough to be considered markers for breast cancer detection. Four elemental isotopes ({sup 133}Cs, {sup 81}Br, {sup 79}Br, and {sup 87}Rb) at five energy levels were shown to be promising features for breast cancer detection with an area under the ROC curve (A{sub Z}) above 0.85. One of these elements - {sup 87}Rb at 1338 keV - achieved perfect classification at 10 million incident neutrons and could be detected with as low as 3 million incident neutrons. Patient dose was calculated for each gamma spectrum obtained and was found to range from between 0.05 and 0.112 mSv depending on the number of neutrons. This simulation demonstrates that NSECT has the potential to noninvasively detect breast cancer through five prominent trace element energy levels, at dose levels comparable to other breast cancer screening techniques.

  6. Investigation of near infrared autofluorescence imaging for the detection of breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Demos, S G; Bold, R; White, R d; Ramsamooj, R

    2005-08-19

    Detection of breast cancer in fresh tissue obtained from surgery is investigated using Near-infrared autofluorescence imaging under laser excitation at 532-nm and 632.8-nm. The differences in intensity between the three main components of breast tissue (cancer, fibrous and adipose) are estimated and compared to those obtained from cross-polarized light scattering images recorded under polarized illumination at 700-nm. The optical spectroscopic images for each tissue sample were subsequently compared with the histopathology slides. The experimental results indicate that the intensity of the near-infrared emission is considerably different in breast cancer compared to that of the adjacent non-neoplastic tissues (adipose and fibrous tissue). The experimental results suggest that 632.8-nm excitation offers key advantages compared to 532-nm excitation.

  7. Hot spot detection for breast cancer in Ki-67 stained slides: image dependent filtering approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niazi, M. Khalid Khan; Downs-Kelly, Erinn; Gurcan, Metin N.

    2014-03-01

    We present a new method to detect hot spots from breast cancer slides stained for Ki67 expression. It is common practice to use centroid of a nucleus as a surrogate representation of a cell. This often requires the detection of individual nuclei. Once all the nuclei are detected, the hot spots are detected by clustering the centroids. For large size images, nuclei detection is computationally demanding. Instead of detecting the individual nuclei and treating hot spot detection as a clustering problem, we considered hot spot detection as an image filtering problem where positively stained pixels are used to detect hot spots in breast cancer images. The method first segments the Ki-67 positive pixels using the visually meaningful segmentation (VMS) method that we developed earlier. Then, it automatically generates an image dependent filter to generate a density map from the segmented image. The smoothness of the density image simplifies the detection of local maxima. The number of local maxima directly corresponds to the number of hot spots in the breast cancer image. The method was tested on 23 different regions of interest images extracted from 10 different breast cancer slides stained with Ki67. To determine the intra-reader variability, each image was annotated twice for hot spots by a boardcertified pathologist with a two-week interval in between her two readings. A computer-generated hot spot region was considered a true-positive if it agrees with either one of the two annotation sets provided by the pathologist. While the intra-reader variability was 57%, our proposed method can correctly detect hot spots with 81% precision.

  8. Development of Technologies for Early Detection and Stratification of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-10-01

    efficiency and decreasing the background. Circulating tumor cell isolation using microfluidics has been accomplished and these methods will soon be...detection, cancer biomarkers, ultra-sensitive protein assays, single cells , human-in-mouse model, miRNA, circulating tumor cells 16. SECURITY...to characterize breast cancer biopsy samples with single cell resolution to discover the nature of the underlying heterogeneity in complex cell

  9. Breast Cancer -- Male

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer in Men Breast Cancer in Men This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer in Men. Use the menu below to choose ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer in Men Introduction Statistics Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  10. Breast Cancer Overview

    MedlinePlus

    ... are here Home > Types of Cancer > Breast Cancer Breast Cancer This is Cancer.Net’s Guide to Breast Cancer. Use the menu below to choose the Overview/ ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Breast Cancer Introduction Statistics Medical Illustrations Risk Factors and Prevention ...

  11. Harnessing Raman spectroimmunoassay for detection of serological breast cancer markers (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barman, Ishan; Li, Ming

    2017-02-01

    Two critical, unmet needs in breast cancer are the early detection of cancer metastasis and recurrence, and the sensitive assessment of temporal changes in tumor burden in response to therapy. The present research is directed towards developing a non-invasive, ultrasensitive and specific tool that provides a comprehensive real-time picture of the metastatic tumor burden and provides a radically new route to address these overarching challenges. As the continuing search for better diagnostic and prognostic clues has shifted away from a singular focus on primary tumor lesions, circulating and disseminated biomarkers have surfaced as attractive candidates due to the intrinsic advantages of a non-invasive, repeatable "liquid biopsy" procedure. However, a reproducible, facile blood-based test for diagnosis and follow-up of breast cancer has yet to be incorporated into a clinical laboratory assay due to the limitations of existing assays in terms of sensitivity, extensive sample processing requirements and, importantly, multiplexing capability. Here, by architecting nano-structured probes for detection of specific molecular species, we engineer a novel plasmon-enhanced Raman spectroscopic platform that offers a paradigmatic shift from the capabilities of today's diagnostic test platforms. Specifically, quantitative single-droplet serum tests reveal ultrasensitive and multiplexed detection of three key breast cancer biomarkers, cancer antigen 15-3 (CA15-3), CA27-29 and carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), over several order of magnitude range of biomarker concentration and clear segmentation of the sera between normal and metastatic cancer levels.

  12. Time-resolved fluorescence for breast cancer detection using an octreotate-indocyanine green derivative dye conjugate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sordillo, Laura A.; Das, B. B.; Pu, Yang; Liang, Kexian; Milione, Giovanni; Sordillo, Peter P.; Achilefu, Sam; Alfano, R. R.

    2013-03-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence was used to investigate malignant and normal adjacent breast tissues stained with a conjugate of indocyanine green and octreotate. A marked increase in fluorescence lifetime intensity was seen in the breast cancer sample compared to the normal sample. The fluorescent lifetimes were also investigated and showed similar fluorescence decay curves in stained malignant and normal breast tissue. These results confirm that somatostatin receptors occur on human breast carcinomas, suggest that the presence of somatostatin receptors should be investigated as a marker of breast cancer aggressiveness, and suggest that this conjugate might be used to detect the presence of residual breast cancer after surgery, allowing better assessment of tumor margins and reducing the need for second or repeat biopsies in selected patients. These results may also provide clues for designing future treatment options for breast cancer patients.

  13. Breast cancer in women under 40 years: preoperative detection by mammography.

    PubMed

    Muttarak, M; Pojchamarnwiputh, S; Chaiwun, B

    2003-07-01

    This article assesses the diagnostic sensitivity of mammography in the preoperative detection of breast cancer in young women. We retrospectively reviewed 1010 women with breast carcinoma between January 1996 and September 2002. The patients were identified from pathological reports. Of these, 237 women were below 40 years of age, accounting for 23.5% of all breast cancers. Only 76 of 237 patients had mammograms performed prior to surgery. Seventy-five of the 76 patients also had ultrasonography performed. Histological types were reviewed and the proportions of each type were compared with those found in a consecutive series of 773 breast carcinomas in women above 40 years of age seen during the same period in our hospital. The breast patterns, as seen on mammograms, were classified as follows: fatty, scattered fibroglandular, heterogeneously dense and homogeneously dense. Specific features of a mass, microcalcifications, architectural distortion and asymmetrical density were evaluated. Of the 76 patients who had mammograms performed prior to surgery, 81 cancers were found. The patients' age ranged from 25 to 40 years, with a mean of 36.4 years. The breast parenchymal patterns were homogeneously dense in 6.6%, heterogeneously dense in 67.1% and had scattered fibroglandular density in 26.3%. Abnormal mammographical findings were present in 93.8%. The most common mammographical findings were mass in 60% and microcalcifications, with or without associated breast abnormality, in 28.7%. The most frequent tumour (82.7%) was invasive ductal carcinoma, which is not significantly different to those found in older women (P = 0.895). Ultrasonography showed solid masses in 73 patients and was negative in the other 2 patients. Mammography is a useful imaging technique in providing preoperative detection and diagnosis of breast carcinoma in women below 40 years of age with clinical suspicion of malignancy. Mass and microcalcifications are the most common abnormal mammographical

  14. [Usefulness and risks of routine mammography for the detection of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino; Hernández-Quijano, Tomás; Zárate, Arturo; Saucedo, Renata

    2014-01-01

    It has been accepted that preclinicall detection of breast cancer by means of the routine practice of mammography could discover the disease at its initial stage; therefore, practicing a mammography annually became widespread as a preventive health measure to diagnose the disease and prevent death due to breast cancer. Over time, the benefit of detection tests has been questioned and demonstration of their benefit, as well as that of the undesirable effects they might cause, has been demanded. There is recent information with regard to an absence of difference in terms of breast cancer mortality as final index between women with or without routine mammography. Additionally, a 20 % frequency has been observed in false-positive diagnoses, with high numbers of women undergoing unnecessary diagnostic procedures due to suspicion of a non-clinically apparent presumed cancer. In Mexico, from 2004 on, the popularity of mammography to detect and effectively cure cancer has increased. Acceptance can be attributted to how easily detection campaigns can be promoted, since most women accept that mastography can offer the opportunity of receiving an early treatment that reduces dissemination and prevents early mortality. The age at which it is convenient to perform the first mammography, how frequently it should be repeated and even the age for its discontinuation is still under debate and no consensus has been reached.

  15. Fibronectin on circulating extracellular vesicles as a liquid biopsy to detect breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Pyong-Gon; Lee, Jeong-Eun; Cho, Young-Eun; Lee, Soo Jung; Chae, Yee Soo; Jung, Jin Hyang; Kim, In-San; Park, Ho Yong; Baek, Moon-Chang

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) secreted from cancer cells have potential for generating cancer biomarker signatures. Fibronectin (FN) was selected as a biomarker candidate, due to the presence in surface on EVs secreted from human breast cancer cell lines. A subsequent study used two types of enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) to determine the presence of these proteins in plasma samples from disease-free individuals (n=70), patients with BC (n=240), BC patients after surgical resection (n=40), patients with benign breast tumor (n=55), and patients with non-cancerous diseases (thyroiditis, gastritis, hepatitis B, and rheumatoid arthritis; n=80). FN levels were significantly elevated (p<. 0001) at all stages of BC, and returned to normal after tumor removal. The diagnostic accuracy for FN detection in extracellular vesicles (ELISA method 1) (area under the curve, 0.81; 95% CI, 0.76 to 0.86; sensitivity of 65.1% and specificity of 83.2%) were also better than those for FN detection in the plasma (ELISA method 2) (area under the curve, 0.77; 95% CI, 0.72 to 0.83; sensitivity of 69.2% and specificity of 73.3%) in BC. The diagnostic accuracy of plasma FN was similar in both the early-stage BC and all BC patients, as well as in the two sets. This liquid biopsy to detect FN on circulating EVs could be a promising method to detect early breast cancer. PMID:27250024

  16. Influence of the organism interface on the breast cancer detection by UWB

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xia; Kikkawa, Takamaro

    2008-11-01

    Ultra-wide band (UWB) imaging technique is very attractive for the early breast cancer detection based on the obvious contrast in the electrical properties of malignant tumor to the normal fatty breast tissue. The tumor can be detected by analyzing the reflecting and scattering behavior of the UWB microwaves propagating in the breast. In this study, the influence of the organism interfaces is investigated from different cases of breast configuration involving different gland shapes as well as the tumor locations. Results show that the gland structure and tumor status have large influences on the reconstructed images generated from the detected signals due to the interface varieties. The tumor information in the proposed configurations can be obtained by series signal processing including eliminating the early time response of the detected signals caused by the direct wave and the reflection from the interface between the skin and the breast fat, and compensating the path loss of the propagating signal due to the radial spreading and the attenuation in the lossy breast. The location and the number of emitters and detectors affect the quality of the reconstructed image.

  17. Oxalate induces breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Castellaro, Andrés M; Tonda, Alfredo; Cejas, Hugo H; Ferreyra, Héctor; Caputto, Beatriz L; Pucci, Oscar A; Gil, German A

    2015-10-22

    Microcalcifications can be the early and only presenting sign of breast cancer. One shared characteristic of breast cancer is the appearance of mammographic mammary microcalcifications that can routinely be used to detect breast cancer in its initial stages, which is of key importance due to the possibility that early detection allows the application of more conservative therapies for a better patient outcome. The mechanism by which mammary microcalcifications are formed is still largely unknown but breast cancers presenting microcalcifications are more often associated with a poorer prognosis. We combined Capillary Electrochromatography, histology, and gene expression (qRT-PCR) to analyze patient-matched normal breast tissue vs. breast tumor. Potential carcinogenicity of oxalate was tested by its inoculation into mice. All data were subjected to statistical analysis. To study the biological significance of oxalates within the breast tumor microenvironment, we measured oxalate concentration in both human breast tumor tissues and adjoining non-pathological breast tissues. We found that all tested breast tumor tissues contain a higher concentration of oxalates than their counterpart non-pathological breast tissue. Moreover, it was established that oxalate induces proliferation of breast cells and stimulates the expression of a pro-tumorigenic gene c-fos. Furthermore, oxalate generates highly malignant and undifferentiated tumors when it was injected into the mammary fatpad in female mice, but not when injected into their back, indicating that oxalate does not induce cancer formation in all types of tissues. Moreover, neither human kidney-epithelial cells nor mouse fibroblast cells proliferate when are treated with oxalate. We found that the chronic exposure of breast epithelial cells to oxalate promotes the transformation of breast cells from normal to tumor cells, inducing the expression of a proto-oncogen as c-fos and proliferation in breast cancer cells

  18. Breast cancer in the 21st century: from early detection to new therapies.

    PubMed

    Merino Bonilla, J A; Torres Tabanera, M; Ros Mendoza, L H

    The analysis of the causes that have given rise to a change in tendency in the incidence and mortality rates of breast cancer in the last few decades generates important revelations regarding the role of breast screening, the regular application of adjuvant therapies and the change of risk factors. The benefits of early detection have been accompanied by certain adverse effects, even in terms of an excessive number of prophylactic mastectomies. Recently, several updates have been published on the recommendations in breast cancer screening at an international level. On the other hand, the advances in genomics have made it possible to establish a new molecular classification of breast cancer. Our aim is to present an updated overview of the epidemiological situation of breast cancer, as well as some relevant issues from the point of view of diagnosis, such as molecular classification and different strategies for both population-based and opportunistic screening. Copyright © 2017 SERAM. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. The potential role of dynamic thermal analysis in breast cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Salhab, M; Keith, LG; Laguens, M; Reeves, W; Mokbel, K

    2006-01-01

    (72%) out of 105 breast cancer patients and 37 of the 55 benign cases. Then we developed a new algorithm using multiple-layer perception and SoftMax output artificial neural networks (ANN) on a subgroup (n = 38) of recorded files. The sensitivity improved to 76% (16/21) and false positives decreased to 26% (7/27) Conclusion DTA of the breast is a feasible, non invasive approach that seems to be sensitive for the detection of breast cancer. However, the test has a limited specificity that can be improved further using ANN. Prospective multi-centre trials are required to validate this promising modality as an adjunct to screening mammography especially in young women with dense breasts. PMID:16584542

  20. Discovery and Preclinical Validation of Salivary Transcriptomic and Proteomic Biomarkers for the Non-Invasive Detection of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gross, Jenny; Elashoff, David; Akin, David; Yan, Xinmin; Chia, David; Karlan, Beth; Wong, David T.

    2010-01-01

    Background A sensitive assay to identify biomarkers using non-invasively collected clinical specimens is ideal for breast cancer detection. While there are other studies showing disease biomarkers in saliva for breast cancer, our study tests the hypothesis that there are breast cancer discriminatory biomarkers in saliva using de novo discovery and validation approaches. This is the first study of this kind and no other study has engaged a de novo biomarker discovery approach in saliva for breast cancer detection. In this study, a case-control discovery and independent preclinical validations were conducted to evaluate the performance and translational utilities of salivary transcriptomic and proteomic biomarkers for breast cancer detection. Methodology/Principal Findings Salivary transcriptomes and proteomes of 10 breast cancer patients and 10 matched controls were profiled using Affymetrix HG-U133-Plus-2.0 Array and two-dimensional difference gel electrophoresis (2D-DIGE), respectively. Preclinical validations were performed to evaluate the discovered biomarkers in an independent sample cohort of 30 breast cancer patients and 63 controls using RT-qPCR (transcriptomic biomarkers) and quantitative protein immunoblot (proteomic biomarkers). Transcriptomic and proteomic profiling revealed significant variations in salivary molecular biomarkers between breast cancer patients and matched controls. Eight mRNA biomarkers and one protein biomarker, which were not affected by the confounding factors, were pre-validated, yielding an accuracy of 92% (83% sensitive, 97% specific) on the preclinical validation sample set. Conclusions Our findings support that transcriptomic and proteomic signatures in saliva can serve as biomarkers for the non-invasive detection of breast cancer. The salivary biomarkers possess discriminatory power for the detection of breast cancer, with high specificity and sensitivity, which paves the way for prediction model validation study followed by

  1. Human mammaglobin: a superior marker for reverse-transcriptase PCR in detecting circulating tumor cells in breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Li, GuangLiang; Zhang, Jing; Jin, KeTao; He, KuiFeng; Wang, HaoHao; Lu, HaiQi; Teng, LiSong

    2011-04-01

    Breast cancer is the most frequent cancer in women in the USA and the second most common cause of death in females who develop cancer. Recently, the detection of circulating tumor cells has emerged as a promising tool for monitoring the progression of clinically occult micrometastases in breast cancer patients. Sensitive molecular techniques, primarily based upon the reverse-transcriptase PCR, using various molecules as markers, have been developed to detect circulating tumor cells. Among those molecules, human mammaglobin mRNA has been found to be the most specific marker for the hematogenous spread of breast cancer cells. In this article, we review the current knowledge regarding the use of reverse-transcriptase PCR for detecting human mammaglobin mRNA as a biomarker for circulating tumor cells in breast cancer patients, and evaluate the clinical implications of human mammaglobin since it was first isolated in 1996.

  2. National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program partnerships in action.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Latasha D; Larkins, Teri L; Boyle, John N; George, Susan F; Triplett, Erin W; Leypoldt, Melissa D

    2014-08-15

    Since the inception of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) in 1990, partnerships have played a significant role in providing breast and cervical cancer screening and early detection to uninsured and underinsured women. The state, tribal, and territorial NBCCEDP grantees have shared resources and responsibilities with a variety of partners (eg, community-based organizations, government agencies, tribes, health care systems, companies, professional organizations) to achieve common goals. National partners, such as the American Cancer Society, Susan G. Komen for the Cure, and the Avon Foundation for Women, have provided funding, lobbied for national and state funding, supported outreach and education activities, and provided treatment referral services for the programs. This article provides an overview of grantee partnerships to illustrate the effects, successes, and challenges of these partnerships and how they have affected the populations served by the program.

  3. Action Tendency Emotions Evoked by Memorable Breast Cancer Messages and Their Association With Prevention and Detection Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sandi W.; Hamel, Lauren M; Kotowski, Michael R.; Nazione, Samantha; LaPlante, Carolyn; Atkin, Charles K.; Stohl, Cynthia; Skubisz, Christine

    2010-01-01

    Memorable messages about breast cancer sent by different sources, such as friends and family members, were analyzed for the action tendency emotions that they evoked. Negative emotions of fear, sadness, and anger, and positive emotions of hope and relief were analyzed for their associations with prevention and detection breast cancer behaviors. Messages that evoked fear were significantly more likely to be associated with detection behaviors, whereas messages that evoked relief were significantly less likely to be associated with detection behaviors than messages that did not evoke these emotions. These results are consistent with control theory and also show that friends and family are important sources of memorable messages about breast cancer. PMID:21153990

  4. SWIFT MRI Enhances Detection of Breast Cancer Metastasis to the Lung

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Naoharu; Idiyatullin, Djaudat; Corum, Curt; Weber, Joseph; Garwood, Michael; Sachdev, Deepali

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the capability of longitudinal MR scans using sweep imaging with Fourier transformation (SWIFT) to detect breast cancer metastasis to the lung in mice. Methods Mice with breast cancer metastatic to the lung were generated by tail vein injection of MDA-MB-231-LM2 cells. Thereafter, MR imaging was performed every week using three different pulse sequences: SWIFT (TE~3 μs), concurrent dephasing and excitation (CODE; TE~300 μs), and 3D gradient echo (GRE; TE=2.2 ms). Motion during the long SWIFT MR scans was compensated for by rigid-body motion correction. Maximum intensity projection (MIP) images were generated to visualize changes in lung vascular structures during the development and growth of metastases. Results SWIFT MRI was more sensitive to signals from the lung parenchyma than CODE or 3D GRE MRI. Metastatic tumor growth in the lungs induced a progressive increase in intensity of parenchymal signals in SWIFT images. MIP images from SWIFT clearly visualized lung vascular structures and their disruption due to progression of breast cancer metastases in the lung. Conclusion SWIFT MRI’s sensitivity to fast-decaying signals and tolerance of magnetic susceptibility enhances its effectiveness at detecting structural changes in lung parenchyma and vasculature due to breast cancer metastases in the lung. PMID:24919566

  5. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... de los dientes Video: Getting an X-ray Breast Cancer KidsHealth > For Kids > Breast Cancer Print A A ... for it when they are older. What Is Breast Cancer? The human body is made of tiny building ...

  6. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    Although breast cancer is much more common in women, men can get it too. It happens most often to men ... usually aren't cancer. However, most men with breast cancer have lumps. Other breast symptoms can include Dimpled ...

  7. Breast Cancer Trends

    MedlinePlus

    ... Breast Cancer Funding: Young Breast Cancer Survivors Funding: Breast Cancer Genomics Statistics Rates by Race and Ethnicity Rates by State Risk by Age Trends What CDC Is Doing Research African American Women and Mass Media Campaign Public Service Announcements Print ...

  8. Implementation of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Nancy C.; Wong, Faye L.; Jamison, Patricia M.; Jones, Sandra F.; Galaska, Louise; Brady, Kevin T.; Wethers, Barbara; Stokes-Townsend, George-Ann

    2015-01-01

    In 1990, Congress passed the Breast and Cervical Cancer Mortality Prevention Act because of increases in the number of low-income and uninsured women being diagnosed with breast cancer. This act authorized the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to establish the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) to provide high-quality and timely breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income, uninsured women. The program started in 1991, and, in 1993, Congress amended the act to allow the CDC to fund American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and tribal organizations. By 1996, the program was providing cancer screening across the United States. To ensure appropriate delivery and monitoring of services, the program adopted detailed policies on program management, evidence-based guidelines for clinical services, a systematized clinical data system to track service quality, and key partnerships that expand the program’s reach. The NBCCEDP currently funds 67 programs, including all 50 states, the District of Columbia, 5 US territories, and 11 tribes or tribal organizations. PMID:25099896

  9. Implementation of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program: the beginning.

    PubMed

    Lee, Nancy C; Wong, Faye L; Jamison, Patricia M; Jones, Sandra F; Galaska, Louise; Brady, Kevin T; Wethers, Barbara; Stokes-Townsend, George-Ann

    2014-08-15

    In 1990, Congress passed the Breast and Cervical Cancer Mortality Prevention Act because of increases in the number of low-income and uninsured women being diagnosed with breast cancer. This act authorized the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to establish the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) to provide high-quality and timely breast and cervical cancer screening and diagnostic services to low-income, uninsured women. The program started in 1991, and, in 1993, Congress amended the act to allow the CDC to fund American Indian and Alaska Native tribes and tribal organizations. By 1996, the program was providing cancer screening across the United States. To ensure appropriate delivery and monitoring of services, the program adopted detailed policies on program management, evidence-based guidelines for clinical services, a systematized clinical data system to track service quality, and key partnerships that expand the program's reach. The NBCCEDP currently funds 67 programs, including all 50 states, the District of Columbia, 5 US territories, and 11 tribes or tribal organizations.

  10. Detection and identification of mouse mammary tumor virus-like DNA sequences in blood and breast tissues of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Naushad, Wasifa; Bin Rahat, Talha; Gomez, Miriam Kathleen; Ashiq, Muhammad Taimoor; Younas, Muhammad; Sadia, Hajra

    2014-08-01

    Mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV) is a well-known cause of mammary tumors in mice transmitted as endogenous proviruses or exogenously as infectious virions. The hypothesis that a retrovirus homologous to MMTV is involved in human breast cancers has resulted in renewed interest in the etiology of human breast cancer. Therefore, the detection of MMTV-like exogenous sequences in 30-40 % of invasive breast cancer has increased attention towards this hypothesis. To detect the prevalence of MMTV in Pakistani population, 666-bp-long MMTV envelop and 630-bp LTR sequences were amplified from breast cancer patient samples (tissue biopsies and peripheral blood) using mouse with mammary tumor as control. MMTV-like virus env and LTR DNA sequences were detected in 20 and 26 % of breast tumor samples, respectively, from the total of 80 breast cancer patients' blood and tissue samples. No significant association was observed between age, grade of disease, and lymph node involvement with the prevalence of MMTV-like sequences. Our data add to the growing number of studies implicating MMTV-like virus in human breast cancer, but still clear causal association of MMTV to breast cancer remains to be reputable.

  11. Early detection of breast cancer: a molecular optical imaging approach using novel estrogen conjugate fluorescent dye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Shubhadeep; Jose, Iven

    2011-02-01

    Estrogen induced proliferation of mutant cells is widely understood to be the one of major risk determining factor in the development of breast cancer. Hence determination of the Estrogen Receptor[ER] status is of paramount importance if cancer pathogenesis is to be detected and rectified at an early stage. Near Infrared Fluorescence [NIRf] Molecular Optical Imaging is emerging as a powerful tool to monitor bio-molecular changes in living subjects. We discuss pre-clinical results in our efforts to develop an optical imaging diagnostic modality for the early detection of breast cancer. We have successfully carried out the synthesis and characterization of a novel target-specific NIRf dye conjugate aimed at measuring Estrogen Receptor[ER] status. The conjugate was synthesized by ester formation between 17-β estradiol and a hydrophilic derivative of Indocyanine Green (ICG) cyanine dye, bis-1,1-(4-sulfobutyl) indotricarbocyanine-5-carboxylic acid, sodium salt. In-vitro studies regarding specific binding and endocytocis of the dye performed on ER+ve [MCF-7] and control [MDA-MB-231] adenocarcinoma breast cancer cell lines clearly indicated nuclear localization of the dye for MCF-7 as compared to plasma level staining for MDA-MB-231. Furthermore, MCF-7 cells showed ~4.5-fold increase in fluorescence signal intensity compared to MDA-MB-231. A 3-D mesh model mimicking the human breast placed in a parallel-plate DOT Scanner is created to examine the in-vivo efficacy of the dye before proceeding with clinical trials. Photon migration and florescence flux intensity is modeled using the finite-element method with the coefficients (quantum yield, molar extinction co-efficient etc.) pertaining to the dye as obtained from photo-physical and in-vitro studies. We conclude by stating that this lipophilic dye can be potentially used as a target specific exogenous contrast agent in molecular optical imaging for early detection of breast cancer.

  12. Screening sensitivity and sojourn time from breast cancer early detection clinical trials: mammograms and physical examinations.

    PubMed

    Shen, Y; Zelen, M

    2001-08-01

    To estimate sensitivities of breast cancer screening modalities and preclinical duration of the disease from eight breast cancer screening clinical trials. Screening programs invariably lead to diagnosis of disease before signs or symptoms are present. Two key quantities of screening programs are the sensitivity of the disease detection modality and the mean sojourn time (MST). The observed screening histories in a periodically screened cohort make it possible to estimate these quantities of interest. We applied recently developed statistical methods to data from eight randomized breast cancer screening trials to estimate the sensitivities of early detection modalities and MST. Moreover, when a screening trial involved two screening modalities, our methods enabled the estimation of the individual sensitivity of each screening modality. We analyzed breast cancer data from several screening trials and have relatively complete data from the Health Insurance Plan (HIP), Edinburgh, and two Canadian studies. The screening sensitivity for mammography, physical examination, and MST were, respectively, HIP: 0.39, 0.47, and 2.5 years; Edinburgh: 0.63, 0.40, and 4.3 years; Canadian (age 40 to 49 at entry): 0.61, 0.59, and 1.9 years; Canadian (age 50 to 59 at entry): 0.66, 0.39, and 3.1 years. The public debate on early breast cancer detection is mainly centered on mammograms. However, the current study indicates that a physical examination is of comparable importance. Cautious interpretation of trial differences is required as a result of various experimental designs and the age dependency of screening sensitivity and MST.

  13. Detection of breast cancer cells using targeted magnetic nanoparticles and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensors.

    PubMed

    Hathaway, Helen J; Butler, Kimberly S; Adolphi, Natalie L; Lovato, Debbie M; Belfon, Robert; Fegan, Danielle; Monson, Todd C; Trujillo, Jason E; Tessier, Trace E; Bryant, Howard C; Huber, Dale L; Larson, Richard S; Flynn, Edward R

    2011-11-03

    Breast cancer detection using mammography has improved clinical outcomes for many women, because mammography can detect very small (5 mm) tumors early in the course of the disease. However, mammography fails to detect 10 - 25% of tumors, and the results do not distinguish benign and malignant tumors. Reducing the false positive rate, even by a modest 10%, while improving the sensitivity, will lead to improved screening, and is a desirable and attainable goal. The emerging application of magnetic relaxometry, in particular using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors, is fast and potentially more specific than mammography because it is designed to detect tumor-targeted iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, magnetic relaxometry is theoretically more specific than MRI detection, because only target-bound nanoparticles are detected. Our group is developing antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles targeted to breast cancer cells that can be detected using magnetic relaxometry. To accomplish this, we identified a series of breast cancer cell lines expressing varying levels of the plasma membrane-expressed human epidermal growth factor-like receptor 2 (Her2) by flow cytometry. Anti-Her2 antibody was then conjugated to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the carbodiimide method. Labeled nanoparticles were incubated with breast cancer cell lines and visualized by confocal microscopy, Prussian blue histochemistry, and magnetic relaxometry. We demonstrated a time- and antigen concentration-dependent increase in the number of antibody-conjugated nanoparticles bound to cells. Next, anti Her2-conjugated nanoparticles injected into highly Her2-expressing tumor xenograft explants yielded a significantly higher SQUID relaxometry signal relative to unconjugated nanoparticles. Finally, labeled cells introduced into breast phantoms were measured by magnetic relaxometry, and as few as 1 million labeled cells were detected at a distance of 4

  14. Detection of breast cancer cells using targeted magnetic nanoparticles and ultra-sensitive magnetic field sensors

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction Breast cancer detection using mammography has improved clinical outcomes for many women, because mammography can detect very small (5 mm) tumors early in the course of the disease. However, mammography fails to detect 10 - 25% of tumors, and the results do not distinguish benign and malignant tumors. Reducing the false positive rate, even by a modest 10%, while improving the sensitivity, will lead to improved screening, and is a desirable and attainable goal. The emerging application of magnetic relaxometry, in particular using superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) sensors, is fast and potentially more specific than mammography because it is designed to detect tumor-targeted iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles. Furthermore, magnetic relaxometry is theoretically more specific than MRI detection, because only target-bound nanoparticles are detected. Our group is developing antibody-conjugated magnetic nanoparticles targeted to breast cancer cells that can be detected using magnetic relaxometry. Methods To accomplish this, we identified a series of breast cancer cell lines expressing varying levels of the plasma membrane-expressed human epidermal growth factor-like receptor 2 (Her2) by flow cytometry. Anti-Her2 antibody was then conjugated to superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles using the carbodiimide method. Labeled nanoparticles were incubated with breast cancer cell lines and visualized by confocal microscopy, Prussian blue histochemistry, and magnetic relaxometry. Results We demonstrated a time- and antigen concentration-dependent increase in the number of antibody-conjugated nanoparticles bound to cells. Next, anti Her2-conjugated nanoparticles injected into highly Her2-expressing tumor xenograft explants yielded a significantly higher SQUID relaxometry signal relative to unconjugated nanoparticles. Finally, labeled cells introduced into breast phantoms were measured by magnetic relaxometry, and as few as 1 million labeled cells

  15. Digital Breast Tomosynthesis (DBT) to Characterize MRI-Detected Additional Lesions Unidentified at Targeted Ultrasound in Newly Diagnosed Breast Cancer Patients.

    PubMed

    Mariscotti, Giovanna; Houssami, Nehmat; Durando, Manuela; Campanino, Pier Paolo; Regini, Elisa; Fornari, Alberto; Bussone, Riccardo; Castellano, Isabella; Sapino, Anna; Fonio, Paolo; Gandini, Giovanni

    2015-09-01

    Preoperative breast magnetic resonance (MR) often generates additional suspicious findings needing further investigations. Targeted breast ultrasound (US) is the standard tool to characterize MR additional lesions. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the potential role of digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to characterize MR detected additional findings, unidentified at targeted breast US. This prospective study included women who a) had biopsy-proven, newly diagnosed breast cancers detected at conventional 2D mammography and/or US, referred to breast MR for tumour staging; and b) had DBT if additional MR findings were not detected at targeted ('second look') US. In 520 patients, MR identified 164 (in 114 women, 22%) additional enhancing lesions. Targeted US identified 114/164 (69.5%) of these, whereas 50/164 (30.5%) remained unidentified. DBT identified 32/50 of these cases, increasing the overall characterization of MR detected additional findings to 89.0% (146/164). Using DBT the identified lesions were significantly more likely to be malignant than benign MR-detected additional lesions (p = 0.04). DBT improves the characterization of additional MR findings not identified at targeted breast US in preoperative breast cancer staging. • Targeted US identified 114 of 164 (69.5%) additional enhancing lesions at preoperative breast MRI. • DBT identified a further 32 of the 50 lesions unidentified on targeted US. • DBT improved the characterization of additional MR findings for breast cancer staging.

  16. Feature selection and definition for contours classification of thermograms in breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jagodziński, Dariusz; Matysiewicz, Mateusz; Neumann, Łukasz; Nowak, Robert M.; Okuniewski, Rafał; Oleszkiewicz, Witold; Cichosz, Paweł

    2016-09-01

    This contribution introduces the method of cancer pathologies detection on breast skin temperature distribution images. The use of thermosensitive foils applied to the breasts skin allows to create thermograms, which displays the amount of infrared energy emitted by all breast cells. The significant foci of hyperthermia or inflammation are typical for cancer cells. That foci can be recognized on thermograms as a contours, which are the areas of higher temperature. Every contour can be converted to a feature set that describe it, using the raw, central, Hu, outline, Fourier and colour moments of image pixels processing. This paper defines also the new way of describing a set of contours through theirs neighbourhood relations. Contribution introduces moreover the way of ranking and selecting most relevant features. Authors used Neural Network with Gevrey`s concept and recursive feature elimination, to estimate feature importance.

  17. Breast Cancer Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    FACTS FOR LIFE Breast Cancer Surgery The goal of breast cancer surgery is to remove the whole tumor from the breast. Some lymph nodes ... might still be in the body. Types of breast cancer surgery There are two types of breast cancer ...

  18. Methods of generating state revenue for breast cancer prevention and early detection: an analysis of pink dollars.

    PubMed

    Eyler, Amy A; Dodson, Elizabeth A; Chalifour, Stephanie; Brownson, Ross C

    2011-01-01

    We assessed income tax check-offs, specialty license plates, and lottery tickets as ways states raise funds for the early detection and prevention of breast cancer. We conducted an inventory of state legislation allowing these revenue-generating methods, and collected and compared information on each initiative. We conducted logistic regression analyses to compare these methods with state breast cancer mortality rates. Eighteen states had programs for contributions through an income tax check-off. Revenue for tax check-offs and plates is influenced by state population. The median annual revenue for the income tax check-off was $115,000. Twenty-six states had breast cancer license plates generating more than $4.1 million in revenue. The extra cost of the plates ranged from $20 to 75 (mean = $37). Only Illinois offered a state breast cancer lottery ticket, which raised $4 million from 2005 to 2009. States with medium or high breast cancer mortality rates were 2.5 times more likely to offer breast cancer specialty license plates than states with low breast cancer mortality rates; however, we found no statistically significant difference in breast cancer mortality tertiles by income tax check-off. Revenue-generating breast cancer initiatives can be successful strategies for states to raise funds for breast cancer prevention and early detection programs. Although these initiatives can generate revenue, amounts are variable due to population differences, the number of other plates/check-offs/lotteries offered, and the choice to decrease donations during difficult economic times. State breast cancer mortality rates may influence the availability of these initiatives.

  19. [SentiMag--the magnetic detection system of sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Coufal, O; Fait, V; Lžičařová, E; Chrenko, V; Žaloudík, J

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the feasibility of the new detection system of sentinel lymph nodes in breast cancer (SentiMag) and to compare its use to the standard method of detection with a radioisotope and a gamma-probe. Twenty breast cancer patients scheduled for sentinel lymph node biopsy underwent standard lymphatic mapping with a radioisotope and also with the Sienna+ tracer. During the surgery, sentinel lymph nodes were identified preferably with the SentiMag system. The gamma-probe was used only at the end of the surgery to verify whether all sentinel lymph nodes had been harvested. The sentinel lymph node was detected in all cases. Both methods agreed in 18 cases, i.e. the lymph node with the highest magnetic value ex vivo was the same node as the one with the highest radioactivity. A metastasis in the sentinel lymph node was found in three patients. It is very likely that with the sole use of the SentiMag system, the results would have been identical to those of using the standard method with a radioisotope and the gamma-probe. The new magnetic detection method of sentinel lymph nodes (SentiMag) is feasible and clinically comparable to the gold standard method of detection with a radioisotope and the gamma-probe in patients with breast cancer. The new method could find its use not only in hospitals where the department of nuclear medicine is not available but in all hospitals performing sentinel lymph node biopsies in breast cancer and possibly other types of cancer.

  20. Multicentric Cancer Detected at Breast MR Imaging and Not at Mammography: Important or Not?

    PubMed Central

    Galman, Lanie; Zheng, Junting; Sacchini, Virgilio; Sutton, Elizabeth J.; Dershaw, David; Morris, Elizabeth A.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To review the magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and pathologic features of multicentric cancer detected only at MR imaging and to evaluate its potential biologic value. Materials and Methods This retrospective study was institutional review board approved and HIPAA compliant; informed consent was waived. A review of records from 2001 to 2011 yielded 2021 patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer who underwent biopsy after preoperative MR imaging, 285 (14%) of whom had additional cancer detected at MR imaging that was occult at mammography. In 73 patients (3.6%), MR imaging identified 87 cancers in different quadrants than the known index cancer, constituting the basis of this report. In 62 of 73 patients (85%; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 75, 92), one additional cancer was found, and in 11 of 73 (15%; 95% CI: 8, 25), multiple additional cancers were found. A χ2 test with adjustment for multiple lesions was used to examine whether MR imaging and pathologic features differ between the index lesion and additional multicentric lesions seen only at MR imaging. Results Known index cancers were more likely to be invasive than MR imaging–detected multicentric cancers (88% vs 76%, P = .023). Ductal carcinoma in situ (21 of 87 lesions [24%]; 95% CI: 15, 36) represented a minority of additional MR imaging–detected multicentric cancers. Overall, the size of MR imaging–detected multicentric invasive cancers (median, 0.6 cm; range, 0.1–6.3 cm) was smaller than that of the index cancer (median, 1.2 cm; range, 0.05–7.0 cm; P = .023), although 17 of 73 (23%) (95% CI: 14, 35) patients had larger MR imaging–detected multicentric cancers than the known index lesion, and 18 of 73 (25%) (95% CI: 15, 36) had MR imaging–detected multicentric cancers larger than 1 cm. MR imaging–detected multicentric cancers and index cancers differed in histologic characteristics, invasiveness, and grade in 27 of 73 (37%) patients (95% CI: 26, 49). In four of 73 (5%) patients (95

  1. Does adjuvant radiation therapy benefit women with small mammography-detected breast cancers?

    PubMed Central

    Jerzak, K.; Dudalski, N.; Pritchard, K.; Sun, P.; Narod, S.A.

    2017-01-01

    Background Women with small nonpalpable breast tumours have an excellent prognosis. The benefit of radiotherapy in this group of low-risk women is unknown. Methods A cohort of 1595 women with stages i–iii invasive breast cancer treated with breast-conserving surgery were followed for local recurrence. Using t-tests, baseline demographic data and tumour characteristics were compared for the women who had palpable (n = 1023) and mammography-detected (n = 572) breast cancers. The 15-year actuarial risk of local recurrence was estimated using a Kaplan–Meier method, stratified for adjuvant radiation therapy (yes or no), tumour palpability (palpable or not), and tumour size (≤1 cm or >1 cm). Hazard ratios (hrs) and 95% confidence intervals (95% cis) were calculated using a multivariate Cox regression model. Results were considered statistically significant if 2-tailed p values were less than 0.05. Results Among women with a nonpalpable tumour, the 15-year actuarial rates of local recurrence were, respectively, 13.9% and 18.3% for those treated and not treated with adjuvant radiation therapy (hr: 0.65; 95%ci: 0.40 to 1.06; p = 0.08). Among women with small nonpalpable breast cancers (≤1.0 cm), the rates were 14.6% and 13.4% respectively (p = 0.67). The absolute reduction in 15-year local recurrence was 11.0% for women with palpable tumours. Conclusions Our results suggest that women with small (<1 cm) screen-detected nonpalpable breast cancers likely derive little benefit from adjuvant radiotherapy; however, an adequately powered randomized trial would be required to make definitive conclusions. PMID:28270722

  2. Contrast-enhanced microwave detection and treatment of breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Fuqiang

    Contrast agents and heating agents have been proposed for microwave breast tumor imaging and treatment, respectively. The dielectric properties of the tumor are altered with contrast agents or heating agents that locally accumulate in the tumor. The resulting change in dielectric properties of the tumor has the potential to enhance the sensitivity of microwave imaging of breast tumors and increase the efficiency and selectivity of microwave thermal therapy of breast tumors. This dissertation addresses several key challenges in contrast-enhanced microwave imaging and treatment of breast tumors. Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been shown to enhance both the relative permittivity and effective conductivity of the host medium, and are promising as theranostic (integrated therapeutic and diagnostic) agents. Thus, our properties characterization work focuses on CNT dispersions. We performed in vitro microwave dielectric properties and heating response characterization of dispersions of CNTs treated by different functionalization methods and identified a CNT formulation that is very promising as a microwave theranostic agent. Stable dispersions of CNTs with concentrations up to 20 mg/ml are obtained with this formulation, and the enhanced microwave properties of these dispersions are extraordinary compared to the control. We also conducted in vivo dielectric properties characterization of mouse tumors with intra-tumoral injections of CNT dispersions and confirmed that the presence of CNTs increases the dielectric properties of the tumor. In parallel, we developed a contrast-enhanced microwave breast tumor imaging algorithm using sparse reconstruction methods. We demonstrated that this algorithm accurately localizes small tumors in 3D numerical breast phantoms. We also demonstrated the experimental feasibility of this method using physical breast phantoms. Lastly, we studied the sensitivity of the distorted Born iterative method (DBIM) to initial guesses and developed a

  3. Catching broken hearts: pre-clinical detection of doxorubicin and trastuzumab mediated cardiac dysfunction in the breast cancer setting.

    PubMed

    Saeed, Mahwash F; Premecz, Sheena; Goyal, Vineet; Singal, Pawan K; Jassal, Davinder S

    2014-07-01

    Although breast cancer is one of the leading causes of death in women worldwide, there is an overall improvement in the survival of this patient population. This is likely due to a combination of early detection through screening and awareness, improved targeted biological therapy, and an overall improvement in disease management. Despite the beneficial effects of the 2 anti-cancer drugs doxorubicin (DOX) and trastuzumab (TRZ) in women with breast cancer, development of cardiotoxicity is a major concern. The occurrence of left ventricular systolic dysfunction is unacceptably high in nearly 1 in 4 women treated with DOX+TRZ in the breast cancer setting. In this review, we explore the use of non-invasive cardiac imaging for the early detection of chemotherapy-mediated cardiotoxicity in women with breast cancer, in the hope of preventing end-stage heart disease in this cancer population.

  4. Breast Cancer Characteristics Associated With Digital Versus Film-Screen Mammography for Screen-Detected and Interval Cancers.

    PubMed

    Henderson, Louise M; Miglioretti, Diana L; Kerlikowske, Karla; Wernli, Karen J; Sprague, Brian L; Lehman, Constance D

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether pathologic findings of screen-detected and interval cancers differ for digital versus film mammography. Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium data from 2003-2011 on 3,021,515 screening mammograms (40.3% digital, 59.7% film) of women 40-89 years old were reviewed. Cancers were considered screen detected if diagnosed within 12 months of an examination with positive findings and interval if diagnosed within 12 months of an examination with negative findings. Tumor characteristics for screen-detected and interval cancers were compared for digital versus film mammography by use of logistic regression models to estimate the odds ratio and 95% CI with adjustment for age, race and ethnicity, hormone therapy use, screening interval, examination year, and registry. Generalized estimating equations were used to account for correlation within facilities. Among 15,729 breast cancers, 85.3% were screen detected and 14.7% were interval. Digital and film mammography had similar rates of screen-detected (4.47 vs 4.42 per 1000 examinations) and interval (0.73 vs 0.79 per 1000 examinations) cancers for digital versus film. In adjusted analyses, interval cancers diagnosed after digital examinations with negative findings were less likely to be American Joint Committee on Cancer stage IIB or higher (odds ratio, 0.69; 95% CI, 0.52-0.93), have positive nodal status (odds ratio, 0.78; 95% CI, 0.64-0.95), or be estrogen receptor negative (odds ratio, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.56-0.91) than were interval cancers diagnosed after a film examination with negative findings. Screen-detected cancers diagnosed after digital and film mammography had similar rates of unfavorable tumor characteristics. Interval-detected cancers diagnosed after a digital examination were less likely to have unfavorable tumor features than those diagnosed after film mammography, but the absolute differences were small.

  5. Sentinel Lymph Node Detection Using Carbon Nanoparticles in Patients with Early Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Jianping; Zeng, Yi; Chen, Xia; Yan, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Carbon nanoparticles have a strong affinity for the lymphatic system. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of sentinel lymph node biopsy using carbon nanoparticles in early breast cancer and to optimize the application procedure. Methods Firstly, we performed a pilot study to demonstrate the optimized condition using carbon nanoparticles for sentinel lymph nodes (SLNs) detection by investigating 36 clinically node negative breast cancer patients. In subsequent prospective study, 83 patients with clinically node negative breast cancer were included to evaluate SLNs using carbon nanoparticles. Another 83 SLNs were detected by using blue dye. SLNs detection parameters were compared between the methods. All patients irrespective of the SLNs status underwent axillary lymph node dissection for verification of axillary node status after the SLN biopsy. Results In pilot study, a 1 ml carbon nanoparticles suspension used 10–15min before surgery was associated with the best detection rate. In subsequent prospective study, with carbon nanoparticles, the identification rate, accuracy, false negative rate was 100%, 96.4%, 11.1%, respectively. The identification rate and accuracy were 88% and 95.5% with 15.8% of false negative rate using blue dye technique. The use of carbon nanoparticles suspension showed significantly superior results in identification rate (p = 0.001) and reduced false-negative results compared with blue dye technique. Conclusion Our study demonstrated feasibility and accuracy of using carbon nanoparticles for SLNs mapping in breast cancer patients. Carbon nanoparticles are useful in SLNs detection in institutions without access to radioisotope. PMID:26296136

  6. Computer-aided diagnostic system for breast cancer by detecting microcalcifications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Chul S.; Kim, Jong K.; Park, Hyun Wook

    1998-06-01

    X-ray mammography is an important diagnostic imaging modality for early detection of breast cancer. The early detection of the breast cancer can reduce the mortality of middle-aged women, especially in the developed country. Computer aided diagnosis (CAD) technologies have been developed to assist radiologists to detect breast cancer in early stage. This paper presents a KCAD (KAIST Computer-Aided Diagnosis) system for detection of breast cancer, which consists of personal computer, high resolution X-ray film scanner, high-resolution display and application softwares. There are three algorithms implemented in the application softwares. The first algorithm is the enhancement of the digitized X-ray mammograms based on the gradient operation. The second algorithm is to detect the clustered microcalcifications based on the statistical texture analysis, which is called surrounding region dependence method (SRDM). The SRDM matrix is computed for each ROI, which has 128 by 128 pixels. The SRDM matrix characterizes the small and high-density regions in mammograms, which can be recognized as microcalcifications. Four textural features are computed from the SRDM matrix. Using these features, the neural network classifies the regions as normal or microcalcification region. The third algorithm is the classification of the clustered microcalcifications as malignant or benign based on the shape analysis. The microcalcifications are segmented using SRDM. Four shape features are extracted from each microcalcification and five representatives are computed for each shape feature. Twenty-one shape-based values containing the number of microcalcifications are used to classify the region as malignant or benign. These algorithms are verified by real experiments.

  7. Breast cancer screening with imaging: recommendations from the Society of Breast Imaging and the ACR on the use of mammography, breast MRI, breast ultrasound, and other technologies for the detection of clinically occult breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, Carol H; Dershaw, D David; Kopans, Daniel; Evans, Phil; Monsees, Barbara; Monticciolo, Debra; Brenner, R James; Bassett, Lawrence; Berg, Wendie; Feig, Stephen; Hendrick, Edward; Mendelson, Ellen; D'Orsi, Carl; Sickles, Edward; Burhenne, Linda Warren

    2010-01-01

    Screening for breast cancer with mammography has been shown to decrease mortality from breast cancer, and mammography is the mainstay of screening for clinically occult disease. Mammography, however, has well-recognized limitations, and recently, other imaging including ultrasound and magnetic resonance imaging have been used as adjunctive screening tools, mainly for women who may be at increased risk for the development of breast cancer. The Society of Breast Imaging and the Breast Imaging Commission of the ACR are issuing these recommendations to provide guidance to patients and clinicians on the use of imaging to screen for breast cancer. Wherever possible, the recommendations are based on available evidence. Where evidence is lacking, the recommendations are based on consensus opinions of the fellows and executive committee of the Society of Breast Imaging and the members of the Breast Imaging Commission of the ACR.

  8. Artificial Neural Networks in Image Processing for Early Detection of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Ng, P. Y.; Saleh, N. I. Md

    2017-01-01

    Medical imaging techniques have widely been in use in the diagnosis and detection of breast cancer. The drawback of applying these techniques is the large time consumption in the manual diagnosis of each image pattern by a professional radiologist. Automated classifiers could substantially upgrade the diagnosis process, in terms of both accuracy and time requirement by distinguishing benign and malignant patterns automatically. Neural network (NN) plays an important role in this respect, especially in the application of breast cancer detection. Despite the large number of publications that describe the utilization of NN in various medical techniques, only a few reviews are available that guide the development of these algorithms to enhance the detection techniques with respect to specificity and sensitivity. The purpose of this review is to analyze the contents of recently published literature with special attention to techniques and states of the art of NN in medical imaging. We discuss the usage of NN in four different medical imaging applications to show that NN is not restricted to few areas of medicine. Types of NN used, along with the various types of feeding data, have been reviewed. We also address hybrid NN adaptation in breast cancer detection. PMID:28473865

  9. [The social representation that adolescents from Jalisco, Mexico have of early detection of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Tapia Curiel, Amparo; Villaseñor Farías, Martha; Lidia Nuño Gutiérrez, Bertha; Rodríguez Carlos, Aída Araceli; Salas González, Efraín; López López, José Luis

    2014-10-01

    To describe the social representation that adolescents from Jalisco, Mexico, have of early detection of breast cancer. Qualitative cross, analytical interpretative and based on the theory of social representations. Non-probability sampling. Contact schools in basic education level of 7municipalities of the State of Jalisco, Mexico, through various government and educational institutions. A hundred thirty five schooled adolescents, men and women. Interview with 12 focus group 8-12participants and 1 with 18participants. The interviews were transcribed in Atlas Ti program version 4.1 for a semiotic analysis to identify components of social representation. The precocious detection linked itself to the decrease of deaths for cancer of breast, long treatments and mastectomy, but little coverage was perceived to the mammary health of the teenager. They refer as limiter elements of the precocious detection the aspects of kind, psychological and of access to the information and services of health; since facilitators there was mentioned the transition of the limiter elements to facilitators. A favorable panorama appears on the level of awareness of the teenagers on his mammary health, identifying as a sector highly sensitive to the information about cancer of breast and with disposition to effect actions of early detection; there are identified as important challenge the generation of campaigns, educational materials and spaces of health focused on the teenager. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of optoacoustic tomography with ultrasound and x-ray imaging for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larin, Kirill V.; Hartrumpf, O.; Larina, Irina V.; Esenaliev, Rinat O.

    2001-06-01

    This paper is devoted to comparison new optoacoustic tomography with conventional breast tumors diagnostic techniques such as ultrasonography and X-ray radiography. Experiments were performed in phantoms simulating breast with tumors. The fundamental harmonic of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser (λ = 1064 nm) was used to generate optoacoustic pressure waves. Laser induced pressure waves were detected by a wide-band acoustic transducer. Digital oscilloscope controlled by PC was used to store and process optoacoustic signals. Gelatin phantoms with controlled optical parameters were prepared to simulate breast with tumors. Absorbing volumes colored with naphthol green and hemoglobin were embedded in the gelatin phantoms to model the breast tumors with increased optical absorption. Optoacoustic pressure waves form the phantoms were detected at different angles and 2D images were reconstructed. Comparison of optoacoustic images with images obtained with ultrasound and X-ray techniques proved that optoacoustic method has substantially higher contrast and resolution. Obtained results confirm that laser optoacoustic imaging technique can be an important tool for early breast cancer detection with tumors less than 5 mm in diameter.

  11. Breast cancer characteristics associated with digital versus screen-film mammography for screen-detected and interval cancers

    PubMed Central

    Miglioretti, Diana L.; Kerlikowske, Karla; Wernli, Karen J.; Sprague, Brian L.; Lehman, Constance M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To determine if pathologic findings of screen-detected and interval cancers differ for digital versus film mammography. Materials and Methods This study was institutional review board approved and HIPAA compliant. Using 2003–2011 Breast Cancer Surveillance Consortium data, we included 3,021,515 screening mammograms (40.3% digital and 59.7% film) for women ages 40 to 89 years. Cancers were considered screen-detected if diagnosed within 12 months of a positive examination and interval if diagnosed within 12 months of a negative examination. Tumor characteristics for screen-detected and interval cancers were compared for digital versus film mammography using logistic regression models to estimate the odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (95%CI), adjusting for age, race/ethnicity, hormone therapy use, screening interval, examination year, and registry while accounting for correlation within facilities using generalized estimating equations. Results Among 15,729 breast cancers, 85.3% were screen-detected and 14.7% were interval. Digital and film mammography had similar rates of screen-detected (4.47 vs. 4.42 per 1000 examinations) and interval cancers (0.73 vs. 0.79 per 1000 examinations) for digital versus film, respectively. In adjusted analyses, interval cancers following a negative digital examination were less likely to be AJCC stage IIB or higher (OR=0.69, 95%CI:0.52–0.93), have positive nodal status (OR=0.78, 95%CI:0.64–0.95), or be estrogen receptor-negative (OR=0.71, 95%CI:0.56–0.91) compared with interval cancers following a negative film examination. Conclusions Screen-detected cancers following digital and film mammography had similar rates of unfavorable tumor characteristics. Interval-detected cancers after a digital examination were less likely to have unfavorable tumor features than those diagnosed after film, but absolute differences were small. PMID:26295657

  12. Detection of Lysyl Oxidase-Like 2 (LOXL2), a Biomarker of Metastasis from Breast Cancers Using Human Blood Samples.

    PubMed

    Janyasupab, Metini; Lee, Ying-Hui; Zhang, Yuan; Liu, Chen W; Cai, Jieyi; Popa, Adriana; Samia, Anna C; Wang, Kuan W; Xu, Jiaqiang; Hu, Chi-Chang; Wendt, Michael K; Schiemann, Barbara J; Thompson, Cheryl L; Yen, Yun; Schiemann, William P; Liu, Chung C

    2015-01-01

    Metastasis accounts for 90% of the mortality associated with breast cancer. Upregulated expression of members of the lysyl oxidase (LOX) family of secreted copper amine oxidases catalyzes the crosslinking of collagens and elastin in the extracellular matrix. LOXs are linked to the development and metastatic progression of breast cancers. Accordingly, aberrant expression of LOX-like 2 (LOXL2) is observed in poorly differentiated, high-grade tumors and is predictive of diseases recurrence, and for decreased overall patient survival. Therefore, LOXL2 expression may serve as a biomarker for breast cancer. Mechanistically, hydrogen peroxide is produced as a byproduct of LOXL2 when using an appropriate substrate, lysine. We exploited this chemistry to generate a revolutionary gold-based electrochemical biosensor capable of accurately detecting nanomolar quantities of LOXL2 in mouse blood, and in human blood samples. Two different sources of the blood samples obtained from breast cancer patients were used in this study indicating the applicability of detecting LOXL2 in breast cancers patients. Limited numbers of urine specimens from breast cancer patients were also tested. Collectively, all of these tests show the promise and potential of this biosensor for detecting LOXL2 as a surrogate biomarker of breast cancer. This work is described in WO 052962 A1 (2014).

  13. Seamless Integration of Detection and Therapy for Breast Cancer using Targeted Engineered Nanoparticles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-01

    have spread to regional lymph nodes (stage III). Overall, 50% of surgically treated patients sufferCorresponding author: Fortina, P. (paolo.fortina...Detection of lymph node involvement in hematologic malignancies using micromagnetic resonance lymphan- giography with a gadolinum-labeled dendrimer...nanoparticle. Neoplasia 7, 984–991 42 Kobayashi, H. et al. (2004) Lymphatic drainage imaging of breast cancer in mice by micro-magnetic resonance

  14. Early Detection of Breast Cancer and Recurrence Following Therapy with Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Spectroscopy.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    reduction in breast cancer mortality with screening (9). Typical screening programs include annual physical examination and mammography, supplemented ...carcinoma. These authors found that three ratios of compounds detected by NMR (the creatine/fat, choline/fat and carnitine /fat ratios) could distinguish...data source. This technique will allow us to look for consistency among values across data sources. Estimates from these sources will be supplemented

  15. Detection of Circulating Tumour Cells from Blood of Breast Cancer Patients via RT-qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Andergassen, Ulrich; Kölbl, Alexandra C.; Hutter, Stefan; Friese, Klaus; Jeschke, Udo

    2013-01-01

    Breast cancer is still the most frequent cause of cancer-related death in women worldwide. Often death is not caused only by the primary tumour itself, but also by metastatic lesions. Today it is largely accepted, that these remote metastases arise out of cells, which detach from the primary tumour, enter circulation, settle down at secondary sites in the body and are called Circulating Tumour Cells (CTCs). The occurrence of such minimal residual diseases in the blood of breast cancer patients is mostly linked to a worse prognosis for therapy outcome and overall survival. Due to their very low frequency, the detection of CTCs is, still a technical challenge. RT-qPCR as a highly sensitive method could be an approach for CTC-detection from peripheral blood of breast cancer patients. This assumption is based on the fact that CTCs are of epithelial origin and therefore express a different gene panel than surrounding blood cells. For the technical approach it is necessary to identify appropriate marker genes and to correlate their gene expression levels to the number of tumour cells within a sample in an in vitro approach. After that, samples from adjuvant and metastatic patients can be analysed. This approach may lead to new concepts in diagnosis and treatment. PMID:24202442

  16. Rapid review: Estimates of incremental breast cancer detection from tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) screening in women with dense breasts.

    PubMed

    Houssami, Nehmat; Turner, Robin M

    2016-12-01

    High breast tissue density increases breast cancer (BC) risk, and the risk of an interval BC in mammography screening. Density-tailored screening has mostly used adjunct imaging to screen women with dense breasts, however, the emergence of tomosynthesis (3D-mammography) provides an opportunity to steer density-tailored screening in new directions potentially obviating the need for adjunct imaging. A rapid review (a streamlined evidence synthesis) was performed to summarise data on tomosynthesis screening in women with heterogeneously dense or extremely dense breasts, with the aim of estimating incremental (additional) BC detection attributed to tomosynthesis in comparison with standard 2D-mammography. Meta-analysed data from prospective trials comparing these mammography modalities in the same women (N = 10,188) in predominantly biennial screening showed significant incremental BC detection of 3.9/1000 screens attributable to tomosynthesis (P < 0.001). Studies comparing different groups of women screened with tomosynthesis (N = 103,230) or with 2D-mammography (N = 177,814) yielded a pooled difference in BC detection of 1.4/1000 screens representing significantly higher BC detection in tomosynthesis-screened women (P < 0.001), and a pooled difference for recall of -23.3/1000 screens representing significantly lower recall in tomosynthesis-screened groups (P < 0.001), than for 2D-mammography. These estimates can inform planning of future trials of density-tailored screening and may guide discussion of screening women with dense breasts.

  17. Digital breast tomosynthesis for detecting multifocal and multicentric breast cancer: influence of acquisition geometry on model observer performance in breast phantom images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Gezheng; Park, Subok; Markey, Mia K.

    2017-03-01

    Multifocal and multicentric breast cancer (MFMC), i.e., the presence of two or more tumor foci within the same breast, has an immense clinical impact on treatment planning and survival outcomes. Detecting multiple breast tumors is challenging as MFMC breast cancer is relatively uncommon, and human observers do not know the number or locations of tumors a priori. Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT), in which an x-ray beam sweeps over a limited angular range across the breast, has the potential to improve the detection of multiple tumors.1, 2 However, prior efforts to optimize DBT image quality only considered unifocal breast cancers (e.g.,3-9), so the recommended geometries may not necessarily yield images that are informative for the task of detecting MFMC. Hence, the goal of this study is to employ a 3D multi-lesion (ml) channelized-Hotelling observer (CHO) to identify optimal DBT acquisition geometries for MFMC. Digital breast phantoms and simulated DBT scanners of different geometries (e.g., wide or narrow arc scans, different number of projections in each scan) were used to generate image data for the simulation study. Multiple 3D synthetic lesions were inserted into different breast regions to simulate MF cases and MC cases. 3D partial least squares (PLS) channels, and 3D Laguerre-Gauss (LG) channels were estimated to capture discriminant information and correlations among signals in locally varying anatomical backgrounds, enabling the model observer to make both image-level and location-specific detection decisions. The 3D ml-CHO with PLS channels outperformed that with LG channels in this study. The simulated MC cases and MC cases were not equally difficult for the ml-CHO to detect across the different simulated DBT geometries considered in this analysis. Also, the results suggest that the optimal design of DBT may vary as the task of clinical interest changes, e.g., a geometry that is better for finding at least one lesion may be worse for counting the

  18. Topics and Sources of Memorable Breast Cancer Messages and Their Impact on Prevention and Detection Behaviors

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Often, people are able to recall a message on a particular topic for a long period of time. These memorable messages have the ability to influence behavior when they are recalled from memory long after initial exposure. Knowing the topics and sources of the messages that are remembered about breast cancer can improve the efficacy of future breast cancer outreach. To this end, 359 women completed an online survey about memorable breast cancer messages. Most women (60%) recalled a memorable message, described it, identified its source, and noted whether it had resulted in prevention or detection behaviors. Four categories of message topics emerged: early detection (37.3%), awareness (30.9%), treatment (25.8%), and prevention (6%)). Furthermore, five categories of sources of these memorable messages were found: (media (35.5%), friends (22.2%), family (21.6%), medical professionals (15.2%), and others (5.5%)). The media were a major source of all four topics of messages although family members, friends, and the medical community were major sources for particular message topics, as well. Memorable messages originating from medical professionals were substantially more likely to motivate detection behaviors than prevention behaviors. This research demonstrates that message topic and source both play roles in determining message recall as well as in determining how memorable messages impacted behavior. PMID:19440911

  19. Effect of background parenchymal enhancement on breast cancer detection with magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Telegrafo, M; Rella, L; Stabile Ianora, A A; Angelelli, G; Moschetta, M

    2016-03-01

    To investigate whether background parenchymal enhancement (BPE) may influence the sensitivity of dynamic contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance (DCE-MR) imaging in breast cancer detection. A total of 180 consecutive women with 194 breast cancers underwent MR imaging examination. Women were assigned to two different groups depending on the degree of BPE. Group 1 consisted of women with minimal or mild BPE and group 2 of women with moderate or marked BPE. The distributions of histotypes of tumors within the two groups were compared using the χ(2) test. Difference in sensitivities of DCE-MR imaging for tumor detection between the two groups was searched for using the Student t-test. No differences in terms of distributions of histotypes of tumors between the two groups of women were found (P=0.5). The 11% difference in sensitivity of DCE-MR imaging for tumor detection between group 1 (91/92; 99%; 95% CI: 94-100%) and group 2 (90/102; 88%; 95% CI: 80-94%) was statistically significant (P=0.0058). The sensitivity of DCE-MR imaging is significantly lower in women with moderate and marked BPE as compared with women with minimal and mild BPE regardless of cancer histotype. BPE could represent a limitation for breast MR imaging interpretation and should be indicated in MR imaging reports. Copyright © 2015 Éditions françaises de radiologie. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  20. Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance among African American Breast Cancer Survivors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    predictors of surveillance and follow-up care is Baldwin’s Afrocentric model for describing AA women’s participation in breast and cervical cancer screening...African American women’s participation in breast and cervical cancer early detection and screening. Adv Nurs Sci. 1996;19(2):27Y42. 28. Marin G. Subjective...AD_________________ Award Number: DAMD17-03-1-0454 TITLE: Increasing Breast Cancer Surveillance

  1. Frequency-domain diffuse optical tomography with single source-detector pair for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlova, A. G.; Turchin, I. V.; Plehanov, V. I.; Shakhova, N. M.; Fiks, I. I.; Kleshnin, M. I.; Konuchenko, N. Yu; Kamensky, V. A.

    2008-04-01

    An experimental setup for multicolor frequency-domain diffuse optical tomography (FD DOT) was created to visualize neoplasia of breast tissue and to estimate its size. The breast is gently pressed between two glass plates and scanned in the transilluminative configuration by a single source and detector pair. Illumination at three wavelengths (684 nm, 794 nm, and 850 nm) which correspond to different parts of the absorption spectrum in a therapeutic transparency window provides information about concentration of the main absorbers (oxygenated hemoglobin, deoxygenated hemoglobin, and fat/water). Source amplitude modulation at 140 MHz increases spatial resolution and provides separate reconstruction of scattering and absorption coefficients. Moreover, it gives information about breast thickness, which is important for reconstruction. The sensitivity of the system enables one to detect the light propagated through tissue having thickness up to 8 cm. Studies on model media and preliminary in vivo experiments with normal breast and breast carcinoma were performed. An increase of scattering coefficient and total hemoglobin concentration is observed in the tumor area. This corroborates validity of the FD DOT method for breast cancer diagnosis.

  2. Do pathological parameters differ with regard to breast density and mode of detection in breast cancer? The Malmö Diet and Cancer Study.

    PubMed

    Sartor, Hanna; Borgquist, Signe; Hartman, Linda; Zackrisson, Sophia

    2015-02-01

    Our aim was to study how breast density relates to tumor characteristics in breast cancer with emphasis on mode of detection. Among 17,035 women in the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study 826 incident cases have been diagnosed (1991-2007). Data on tumor characteristics, mode of detection, and density at diagnosis were collected. Associations between density and tumor characteristics were analyzed using logistic and ordinal logistic regression models yielding OR and 95% CI. Adjustments for age at diagnosis, BMI at baseline, and the mode of detection, were performed. In denser breasts, large tumor size was more frequent (ORadj 1.59 (1.26-2.01)) as was lymph node involvement (ORadj 1.32 (1.00-1.74)). Further, the higher the density, the lower the grade (ORadj 0.73 (0.53-1.02) for having higher grade), in screening-detected invasive breast cancer. Our findings stress the importance of considering the impact of density in mammography image interpretation and the possible associations with tumor aggressiveness.

  3. UWB microwave breast cancer detection: generalized models and performance prediction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yifan; Gunawan, Erry; Kim, Yongmin; Low, Kay Soon; Soh, Cheong Boon; Thi, Lin Lin

    2006-01-01

    This paper presents a generic framework for the modeling of ultra-wideband (UWB) signal propagation in human breast, which facilitates system-level simulations and provides performance prediction. The clutter associated with the breast tissue heterogeneity is modeled through several key parameters depending on the tissue compositions. Subsequently, important channel properties such as the backscatter energy and the probability density function of time-of-arrival are derived. The modified Hermite polynomials, which fit well into the real pulse shapes, are then used to model the UWB signals. Armed with the channel/signal model preliminaries, three metrics are proposed, namely, the mean clutter response, the clean tumor response, and the worst-case clutter response. The generalized model provides a parsimonious way to study the effects of tissue structures, pulse templates, and array setup on the performance of a specified UWB imaging system. Numerical examples are used to demonstrate the usefulness of the proposed approach.

  4. Knowledge, facilitators and perceived barriers for early detection of breast cancer among elderly Turkish women.

    PubMed

    Kissal, Aygul; Beşer, Ayşe

    2011-01-01

    This article deals with elderly Turkish women's experiences with breast self examination, clinical breast examination and mammography screening, as well as perceived barriers and facilitators in the theoretical framework of the Health Belief Model and the Health Promotion Model. This is a qualitative study performed on 46 elderly women aged 60-75 years. Data were collected with focus group interviews and analyzed systematically with qualitative analysis techniques to determine themes concerning knowledge and facilitators of and perceived barriers to early detection of breast cancer among elderly women. Barriers to screening were insufficient knowledge, fear, neglect/postponement, embarrassment/religious beliefs, inability to make an appointment, lack of a physician's recommendation and health professionals' attitudes. Facilitating factors were being informed about screening, fear, awareness of cancer screening, familial history of breast cancer and social support, making an appointment, health professionals' communication and physicians' recommendations. Public health nurses and health professionals from other health disciplines should be aware of elderly women's need for knowledge about screening, understand elderly women's fear and worries about their health and know barriers to and facilitators of screening.

  5. Early Detection of Breast Cancer Using Molecular Beacons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    mouse that received ATF-IO nanoparticle injection but not in a mouse that received non-targeted IO nanoparticles. Spontaneous lung metastasis (pink...for in vivo tumor imaging. It is well known that the lung is one of the most common organ sites for developing metastatic disease from breast...mouse mammary tumors in the lung . First, we used QDs that give rise to visible red fluorescence (emission: 580 nm), which allow us to determine the

  6. Breast Cancer Disparities

    MedlinePlus

    ... 2.65 MB] Read the MMWR Science Clips Breast Cancer Black Women Have Higher Death Rates from Breast ... of Page U.S. State Info Number of Additional Breast Cancer Deaths Among Black Women, By State SOURCE: National ...

  7. Detection of breast cancer with addition of annual screening ultrasound or a single screening MRI to mammography in women with elevated breast cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Berg, Wendie A; Zhang, Zheng; Lehrer, Daniel; Jong, Roberta A; Pisano, Etta D; Barr, Richard G; Böhm-Vélez, Marcela; Mahoney, Mary C; Evans, W Phil; Larsen, Linda H; Morton, Marilyn J; Mendelson, Ellen B; Farria, Dione M; Cormack, Jean B; Marques, Helga S; Adams, Amanda; Yeh, Nolin M; Gabrielli, Glenna

    2012-04-04

    Annual ultrasound screening may detect small, node-negative breast cancers that are not seen on mammography. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) may reveal additional breast cancers missed by both mammography and ultrasound screening. To determine supplemental cancer detection yield of ultrasound and MRI in women at elevated risk for breast cancer. From April 2004-February 2006, 2809 women at 21 sites with elevated cancer risk and dense breasts consented to 3 annual independent screens with mammography and ultrasound in randomized order. After 3 rounds of both screenings, 612 of 703 women who chose to undergo an MRI had complete data. The reference standard was defined as a combination of pathology (biopsy results that showed in situ or infiltrating ductal carcinoma or infiltrating lobular carcinoma in the breast or axillary lymph nodes) and 12-month follow-up. Cancer detection rate (yield), sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV3) of biopsies performed and interval cancer rate. A total of 2662 women underwent 7473 mammogram and ultrasound screenings, 110 of whom had 111 breast cancer events: 33 detected by mammography only, 32 by ultrasound only, 26 by both, and 9 by MRI after mammography plus ultrasound; 11 were not detected by any imaging screen. Among 4814 incidence screens in the second and third years combined, 75 women were diagnosed with cancer. Supplemental incidence-screening ultrasound identified 3.7 cancers per 1000 screens (95% CI, 2.1-5.8; P < .001). Sensitivity for mammography plus ultrasound was 0.76 (95% CI, 0.65-0.85); specificity, 0.84 (95% CI, 0.83-0.85); and PPV3, 0.16 (95% CI, 0.12-0.21). For mammography alone, sensitivity was 0.52 (95% CI, 0.40-0.64); specificity, 0.91 (95% CI, 0.90-0.92); and PPV3, 0.38 (95% CI, 0.28-0.49; P < .001 all comparisons). Of the MRI participants, 16 women (2.6%) had breast cancer diagnosed. The supplemental yield of MRI was 14.7 per 1000 (95% CI, 3.5-25.9; P = .004). Sensitivity for MRI and

  8. Association between season of first detection of breast cancer and disease progression.

    PubMed

    Mason, B H; Holdaway, I M; Skinner, S J; Stewart, A W; Kay, R G; Neave, L M; Anderson, J

    1987-01-01

    The season of recurrence of tumour was investigated by follow-up of 1324 patients with breast cancer and compared with the season of initial tumour detection. Unlike primary tumours, where an increased incidence of detection has previously been observed in late spring and early summer, there was no significant seasonal variation in the time of recurrence. However, women with oestrogen receptor positive or progesterone receptor negative primary tumours recurred significantly more frequently in the same season that their primary cancer was initially detected. Overall there was an increased frequency of recurrence one year from diagnosis. Women less than age 50 who initially found their tumour in winter or autumn had a significantly shorter disease-free interval before recurrence than those first detecting their tumour in summer or spring. This relationship was independent of nodal status and tumour size. Tumours initially detected in winter or autumn thus appeared to follow a more aggressive growth profile. This study indicates that the season of first detection of a breast cancer relates significantly to aspects of the future biologic behaviour of the tumour.

  9. Detection of architectural distortion in mammograms acquired prior to the detection of breast cancer using texture and fractal analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prajna, Shormistha; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Ayres, Fábio J.; Desautels, J. E. Leo

    2008-03-01

    Mammography is a widely used screening tool for the early detection of breast cancer. One of the commonly missed signs of breast cancer is architectural distortion. The purpose of this study is to explore the application of fractal analysis and texture measures for the detection of architectural distortion in screening mammograms taken prior to the detection of breast cancer. A method based on Gabor filters and phase portrait analysis was used to detect initial candidates of sites of architectural distortion. A total of 386 regions of interest (ROIs) were automatically obtained from 14 "prior mammograms", including 21 ROIs related to architectural distortion. The fractal dimension of the ROIs was calculated using the circular average power spectrum technique. The average fractal dimension of the normal (false-positive) ROIs was higher than that of the ROIs with architectural distortion. For the "prior mammograms", the best receiver operating characteristics (ROC) performance achieved was 0.74 with the fractal dimension and 0.70 with fourteen texture features, in terms of the area under the ROC curve.

  10. Quasi-multistatic MIST beamforming for the early detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    O'Halloran, Martin; Jones, Edward; Glavin, Martin

    2010-04-01

    Microwave imaging via space-time (MIST) beamforming has been shown to be one of the most promising imaging modalities for detecting small malignant breast tumors. This paper outlines two modifications to the MIST system developed by Hagness for the early detection of breast cancer, resulting in a quasi-multistatic MIST beamformer (multi-MIST). Multistatic MIST beamforming involves illuminating the breast with an ultrawideband (UWB) signal from one antenna while collecting the reflections at an array of antennas, as opposed to traditional monostatic MIST beamforming where only the transmitting antenna records the reflections from the breast. In order to process the multistatic data, traditional data-adaptive artifact removal algorithms have to be modified to accommodate signals from all antennas. Also, the MIST beamforming algorithm, which spatially focuses the signal and compensates for frequency-dependent propagation effects, has to be modified. The algorithms are tested on a 2-D anatomically accurate finite-difference time-domain model of the breast. The multi-MIST beamformer described here is shown to offer an improved signal to clutter ratio when compared to the traditional monostatic MIST beamformer.

  11. Breast cancer in men

    MedlinePlus

    ... in situ - male; Intraductal carcinoma - male; Inflammatory breast cancer - male; Paget disease of the nipple - male; Breast cancer - male ... The cause of breast cancer in men is not clear. But there are risk factors that make breast cancer more likely in men: Exposure to ...

  12. Detection of aberrant methylation of a six-gene panel in serum DNA for diagnosis of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Shan, Ming; Yin, Huizi; Li, Junnan; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Dong; Su, Yonghui; Niu, Ming; Zhong, Zhenbin; Wang, Ji; Zhang, Xianyu; Kang, Wenli; Pang, Da

    2016-04-05

    Detection of breast cancer at an early stage is the key for successful treatment and improvement of outcome. However the limitations of mammography are well recognized, especially for those women with premenopausal breast cancer. Novel approaches to breast cancer screening are necessary, especially in the developing world where mammography is not feasible. In this study, we examined the promoter methylation of six genes (SFN, P16, hMLH1, HOXD13, PCDHGB7 and RASSF1a) in circulating free DNA (cfDNA) extracted from serum. We used a high-throughput DNA methylation assay (MethyLight) to examine serum from 749 cases including breast cancer patients, patients with benign breast diseases and healthy women. The six-gene methylation panel test achieved 79.6% and 82.4% sensitivity with a specificity of 72.4% and 78.1% in diagnosis of breast cancer when compared with healthy and benign disease controls, respectively. Moreover, the methylation panel positive group showed significant differences in the following independent variables: (a) involvement of family history of tumors; (b) a low proliferative index, ki-67; (c) high ratios in luminal subtypes. Additionally the panel also complemented some breast cancer cases which were neglected by mammography or ultrasound. These data suggest that epigenetic markers in serum have potential for diagnosis of breast cancer.

  13. Detection of aberrant methylation of a six-gene panel in serum DNA for diagnosis of breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Li, Junnan; Li, Xiaobo; Wang, Dong; Su, Yonghui; Niu, Ming; Zhong, Zhenbin; Wang, Ji; Zhang, Xianyu; Kang, Wenli; Pang, Da

    2016-01-01

    Detection of breast cancer at an early stage is the key for successful treatment and improvement of outcome. However the limitations of mammography are well recognized, especially for those women with premenopausal breast cancer. Novel approaches to breast cancer screening are necessary, especially in the developing world where mammography is not feasible. In this study, we examined the promoter methylation of six genes (SFN, P16, hMLH1, HOXD13, PCDHGB7 and RASSF1a) in circulating free DNA (cfDNA) extracted from serum. We used a high-throughput DNA methylation assay (MethyLight) to examine serum from 749 cases including breast cancer patients, patients with benign breast diseases and healthy women. The six-gene methylation panel test achieved 79.6% and 82.4% sensitivity with a specificity of 72.4% and 78.1% in diagnosis of breast cancer when compared with healthy and benign disease controls, respectively. Moreover, the methylation panel positive group showed significant differences in the following independent variables: (a) involvement of family history of tumors; (b) a low proliferative index, ki-67; (c) high ratios in luminal subtypes. Additionally the panel also complemented some breast cancer cases which were neglected by mammography or ultrasound. These data suggest that epigenetic markers in serum have potential for diagnosis of breast cancer. PMID:26918343

  14. Axillary lymph node metastases detection with nuclear medicine approaches in patients with newly diagnosed breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bombardieri, E; Crippa, F; Maffioli, L; Chiti, A; Castellani, M; Greco, M; Agresti, R; Bogni, A; Chiesa, C; Desanctis, V; Massaron, S; Pascali, C

    1996-04-01

    Three different tracers, Tc-99m-Sesta MIBI, In-111-Pentetreotide and F-18-FDG, were evaluated in a preliminary study in three different groups of 10 breast cancer patients programmed for breast cancer resection and axillary dissection. Planar scintigraphy and single photon emission tomography (SPET) technique were used for imaging with Tc-99m-Sesta-MIBI and In-111-Pentetreotide, positron emission tomography (PET) was used for imaging with F-18-FDG. We studied 30 breast cancer patients; their clinical stage according to the TNM classification was 30 T1-T2, 1 T4 and 1 Tx (one patient had bilateral cancer and one had bifocal cancer). The lymph nodal status ranged from NO to N2 (14 NO, 16 N1, 1 N2). Tc-99m-Sesta MIBI, In-111 Pentetreotide SPET and F-18-FDG PET were randomly performed before surgery to visualize the primary tumors and to detect axillary lymph node invasion. Tc-99m-Sesta MIBI correctly visualized 10 out of 11 primary cancers in 10 patients. In-111-Pentetreotide detected 9 out of 10 primary cancers. F-18-FDG imaged all the tumors (10). As regards the axillary nodes, Tc-99m-MIBI excluded axilla involvement in 7 out of 7 negative axillae (N-), while it was positive in 2 out of 3 positive cases (N+); In-111-Pentetreotide correctly identified 7 out of 8 negative axillae (N-), while it detected 2 of 3 positive sites. F-18-FDG visualized all positive axillary lymph nodes (4 out of 4 N+ patients) and correctly excluded involvement in all negative patients (6 out of 6 N- cases). This study demonstrated that all three tracers are adequate to be proposed as tumor seeking agents with the aim of developing non-invasive diagnostic methods for pre-operative detection of axillary metastases, so that surgical dissection can be limited to selected patients. The authors discuss the advantages and disadvantages of the different radiopharmaceuticals and conclude that in centers with PET facilities F-18-FDG is the best tumor seeking agent for the evaluation of axillary status

  15. Margins and outcome of screen-detected breast cancer with extensive in situ component.

    PubMed

    Kitchen, Paul R B; Cawson, Jennifer N; Moore, Suzanne E; Hill, Prue A; Barbetti, Toni M; Wilkins, Pamela A; Power, Ann-Marie; Henderson, Michael A

    2006-07-01

    In situ disease surrounding invasive tumours is an important consideration in the management of patients with early breast cancer. This study of screen-detected breast cancers assessed the influence of in situ disease including an extensive in situ component (defined as ductal carcinoma in situ involving more than 25% of the area within the invasive tumour) on surgical management, local recurrence and survival of a group of patients. A total of 595 cases of invasive breast cancer detected at St Vincent's BreastScreen were retrospectively reviewed to determine presence and extent of in situ disease, the surgical procedure and adequacy of excision. Outcome was examined in a cohort of 126 cases. A total of 438 (74%) patients had in situ foci in or around the invasive tumour and 107 (18%) were defined as extensive in situ component (EIC)-positive. The initial procedure was mastectomy in 20% of the cases and breast-conserving surgery in 80% including 18% who underwent further surgery. Re-excision (P = 0.02) or mastectomy (P = 0.01) was more often required in patients with EIC. After definitive local excision, margins were close or involved with invasive disease in 3% but the patients with EIC were more likely to have margins close or involved with in situ disease (16 vs 2%; P = 0.001). There were seven deaths and one local invasive recurrence in the follow-up group and none of the deaths were in patients who were EIC-positive. EIC predicts for a higher rate of re-excision and/or mastectomy. For patients with EIC, there is an acceptably low risk of local recurrence if margins are clear.

  16. Image processing, radiological, and clinical information fusion in breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alto, Hilary; Rangayyan, Rangaraj M.; Solaiman, Basel; Desautels, J. E. Leo; MacGregor, J. H.

    2002-03-01

    Screening mammography is the most efficient and cost-effective method available for detecting the signs of early breast cancer in asymptomatic women between the ages of 50 and 69. To improve the detection rate and reduce the number of unnecessary biopsies, many different computer-aided diagnosis techniques have been developed. Many of these techniques use image processing algorithms to automatically segment and classify the images. The decision-making process associated with the evaluation of mammograms is complex and incorporates multiple sources of information from standard medical knowledge and radiology to pathology. The use of this information combined with the results of image processing offers new challenges to the field of data and information fusion. In this paper, we describe the different information sources and their data as well as the framework that is needed to support this type of fusion. A database of breast cancer screening cases forms the basis of the resulting fusion model. The database and decision-level fusion techniques will facilitate unique and specialized approaches for efficient and sophisticated diagnosis of breast cancer.

  17. Human Breast Cancer Histoid

    PubMed Central

    Kaur, Pavinder; Ward, Brenda; Saha, Baisakhi; Young, Lillian; Groshen, Susan; Techy, Geza; Lu, Yani; Atkinson, Roscoe; Taylor, Clive R.; Ingram, Marylou

    2011-01-01

    Progress in our understanding of heterotypic cellular interaction in the tumor microenvironment, which is recognized to play major roles in cancer progression, has been hampered due to unavailability of an appropriate in vitro co-culture model. The aim of this study was to generate an in vitro 3-dimensional human breast cancer model, which consists of cancer cells and fibroblasts. Breast cancer cells (UACC-893) and fibroblasts at various densities were co-cultured in a rotating suspension culture system to establish co-culture parameters. Subsequently, UACC-893, BT.20, or MDA.MB.453 were co-cultured with fibroblasts for 9 days. Co-cultures resulted in the generation of breast cancer histoid (BCH) with cancer cells showing the invasion of fibroblast spheroids, which were visualized by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining of sections (4 µm thick) of BCH. A reproducible quantitative expression of C-erbB.2 was detected in UACC-893 cancer cells in BCH sections by IHC staining and the Automated Cellular Imaging System. BCH sections also consistently exhibited qualitative expression of pancytokeratins, p53, Ki-67, or E-cadherin in cancer cells and that of vimentin or GSTPi in fibroblasts, fibronectin in the basement membrane and collagen IV in the extracellular matrix. The expression of the protein analytes and cellular architecture of BCH were markedly similar to those of breast cancer tissue. PMID:22034518

  18. Rapid Detection of Necrosis in Breast Cancer with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Tata, Alessandra; Woolman, Michael; Ventura, Manuela; Bernards, Nicholas; Ganguly, Milan; Gribble, Adam; Shrestha, Bindesh; Bluemke, Emma; Ginsberg, Howard J.; Vitkin, Alex; Zheng, Jinzi; Zarrine-Afsar, Arash

    2016-01-01

    Identification of necrosis in tumors is of prognostic value in treatment planning, as necrosis is associated with aggressive forms of cancer and unfavourable outcomes. To facilitate rapid detection of necrosis with Mass Spectrometry (MS), we report the lipid MS profile of necrotic breast cancer with Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry (DESI-MS) imaging validated with statistical analysis and correlating pathology. This MS profile is characterized by (1) the presence of the ion of m/z 572.48 [Cer(d34:1) + Cl]− which is a ceramide absent from the viable cancer subregions; (2) the absence of the ion of m/z 391.25 which is present in small abundance only in viable cancer subregions; and (3) a slight increase in the relative intensity of known breast cancer biomarker ions of m/z 281.25 [FA(18:1)-H]− and 303.23 [FA(20:4)-H]−. Necrosis is accompanied by alterations in the tissue optical depolarization rate, allowing tissue polarimetry to guide DESI-MS analysis for rapid MS profiling or targeted MS imaging. This workflow, in combination with the MS profile of necrosis, may permit rapid characterization of necrotic tumors from tissue slices. Further, necrosis-specific biomarker ions are detected in seconds with single MS scans of necrotic tumor tissue smears, which further accelerates the identification workflow by avoiding tissue sectioning and slide preparation. PMID:27734938

  19. Computer-aided diagnosis and lipidomics analysis to detect and treat breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer-Bäse, Anke; Retter, Felix; Steinbrücker, Frank; Görke, Robert; Burgeth, Bernhard; Schlossbauer, Thomas

    2010-04-01

    Multi-modality diagnosis techniques are more and more replacing traditional medical imaging for breast cancer detection. Newly emerging advances in both intelligent cancer detection systems and lipidomics technologies offer an excellent opportunity to detect tumors and to understand regulation at the molecular level in many diseases such as cancer. In this paper, we present a detailed computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) systems combining motion artefact reduction and automated feature extraction and classification, and a novel data mining approach for visualization of gene therapy leading to apoptosis in U87 MG glioblastoma cells, a secondary tumor of breast cancer. The achieved results show that the CAD system represents a robust and integrative tool for reliable small contrast enhancing lesions. Graph-clustering methods are introduced as powerful correlation networks which enable a simultaneous exploration and visualization of co-regulation in glioblastoma data. These new paradigms are providing unique "fingerprints" by revealing how the intricate interactions at the lipidome level can be employed to induce apoptosis (cell death) and are thus opening a new window to biomedical frontiers.

  20. Comparison of Breast Cancer to Healthy Control Tissue Discovers Novel Markers with Potential for Prognosis and Early Detection

    PubMed Central

    Schummer, Michèl; Green, Ann; Beatty, J. David; Karlan, Beth Y.; Karlan, Scott; Gross, Jenny; Thornton, Sean; McIntosh, Martin; Urban, Nicole

    2010-01-01

    This study was initiated to identify biomarkers with potential value for the early detection of poor-outcome breast cancer. Two sets of well-characterized tissues were utilized: one from breast cancer patients with favorable vs. poor outcome and the other from healthy women undergoing reduction mammaplasty. Over 46 differentially expressed genes were identified from a large list of potential targets by a) mining publicly available expression data (identifying 134 genes for quantitative PCR) and b) utilizing a commercial PCR array. Three genes show elevated expression in cancers with poor outcome and low expression in all other tissues, warranting further investigation as potential blood markers for early detection of cancers with poor outcome. Twelve genes showed lower expression in cancers with poor outcome than in cancers with favorable outcome but no differential expression between aggressive cancers and most healthy controls. These genes are more likely to be useful as prognostic tissue markers than as serum markers for early detection of aggressive disease. As a secondary finding was that, when histologically normal breast tissue was removed from a distant site in a breast with cancer, 7 of 38 specimens displayed a cancer-like expression profile, while the remaining 31 were genetically similar to the reduction mammaplasty control group. This finding suggests that some regions of ipsilateral histologically ‘normal’ breast tissue are predisposed to becoming malignant and that normal-appearing tissue with malignant signature might warrant treatment to prevent new primary tumors. PMID:20161755

  1. Comparison of breast cancer to healthy control tissue discovers novel markers with potential for prognosis and early detection.

    PubMed

    Schummer, Michèl; Green, Ann; Beatty, J David; Karlan, Beth Y; Karlan, Scott; Gross, Jenny; Thornton, Sean; McIntosh, Martin; Urban, Nicole

    2010-02-09

    This study was initiated to identify biomarkers with potential value for the early detection of poor-outcome breast cancer. Two sets of well-characterized tissues were utilized: one from breast cancer patients with favorable vs. poor outcome and the other from healthy women undergoing reduction mammaplasty. Over 46 differentially expressed genes were identified from a large list of potential targets by a) mining publicly available expression data (identifying 134 genes for quantitative PCR) and b) utilizing a commercial PCR array. Three genes show elevated expression in cancers with poor outcome and low expression in all other tissues, warranting further investigation as potential blood markers for early detection of cancers with poor outcome. Twelve genes showed lower expression in cancers with poor outcome than in cancers with favorable outcome but no differential expression between aggressive cancers and most healthy controls. These genes are more likely to be useful as prognostic tissue markers than as serum markers for early detection of aggressive disease. As a secondary finding was that, when histologically normal breast tissue was removed from a distant site in a breast with cancer, 7 of 38 specimens displayed a cancer-like expression profile, while the remaining 31 were genetically similar to the reduction mammaplasty control group. This finding suggests that some regions of ipsilateral histologically 'normal' breast tissue are predisposed to becoming malignant and that normal-appearing tissue with malignant signature might warrant treatment to prevent new primary tumors.

  2. Evidence for Detection Bias by Medication Use in a Cohort Study of Breast Cancer Survivors.

    PubMed

    Wirtz, Heidi S; Calip, Gregory S; Buist, Diana S M; Gralow, Julie R; Barlow, William E; Gray, Shelly; Boudreau, Denise M

    2017-04-15

    In previous studies, we found modestly decreased and increased risks of second breast cancer events with the use of statins and antibiotics, respectively, after adjustment for surveillance mammography. We evaluated detection bias by comparing receipt of surveillance mammography among users of these 2 disparate classes of medication. Adult women diagnosed with early-stage breast cancer during 1990-2008 (n = 3,965) while enrolled in an integrated health-care plan (Group Health Cooperative; Washington State) were followed for up to 10 years in the Commonly Used Medications and Breast Cancer Outcomes (COMBO) Study. Categories of antibiotic use included infrequent (1-3 dispensings/12 months) and frequent (≥4 dispensings/12 months) use, and categories of statin use included less adherent (1 dispensing/6 months) and adherent (≥2 dispensings/6 months). We examined associations between medication use and surveillance mammography using multivariable generalized estimating equations and evaluated the impact of adjusting for surveillance within Cox proportional hazard models. Frequent antibiotic users were less likely to receive surveillance mammography (odds ratio (OR) = 0.90, 95% confidence interval (CI): 0.82, 0.99) than were nonusers; no association was found among infrequent users (OR = 0.96, 95% CI: 0.90, 1.03). Adherent statin use was associated with more surveillance compared with nonuse (OR = 1.11, 95% CI: 1.01, 1.25), but less adherent statin use was not (OR = 1.03, 95% CI: 0.81, 1.31). No difference in associations between medications of interest and second breast cancer events was observed when surveillance was removed from otherwise adjusted models. The influence of detection bias by medication use warrants further exploration. © The Author 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  3. Update on detection of sentinel lymph nodes in patients with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Aarsvold, John N; Alazraki, Naomi P

    2005-04-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy is now the practice of choice for the management of many patients with breast cancer. This was not true in the early 1990s, when the first such procedures were performed and protocols for such were refined often. This was also not true in the first years of the 21st century, when a decade of collective experience and information acquired from numerous clinical investigations dictated additional subtle and not-so-subtle refinements of the procedures. However, it is true today; reports of the latest round of clinical investigations indicate that there are several breast cancer sentinel node procedures that result in successful identification of potential sentinel nodes in nearly all patients who are eligible for such procedures. A significant component of many of these successful sentinel node procedures is a detection and localization protocol that involves radiotracer methodologies, including radiopharmaceutical administration, preoperative nuclear medicine imaging, and intraoperative gamma counting. The present state and roles of nuclear medicine protocols used in breast cancer sentinel lymph node biopsy procedures is reviewed with emphasis on discussion of recent results, unresolved issues, and future considerations. Included are brief reviews of present radiotracer and blue-dye techniques for node localization, including remarks about injection strategies, counting probe technology, and radiation safety. Included also are discussions of on-going investigations of the implications of the presence of micrometastases; of the management value of detection, localization, and excision of extra-axillary nodes such as internal mammary nodes; and of the broad range of recurrence rates presently being reported. Remarks on the present and possible near- and long-term roles for nuclear medicine in the staging of breast cancer patients including comments on positron emission tomography and intraoperative imaging conclude the article.

  4. High-performance near-infrared imaging for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Sharkawy, Yasser H.; El-Sherif, Ashraf F.

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for the noninvasive determination of the size, position, and optical properties of tumors in the human breast. The tumor is first detected by photothermal imaging. It is then sized, located, and optically characterized using designed digital image processing and edge-detection pattern recognition. The method assumes that the tumor is spherical and inhomogeneous and embedded in an otherwise homogeneous tissue. Heat energy is deposited in the tissue by absorption of near-infrared (NIR) Nd:YAG laser radiation, and its subsequent conversion to heat via vibrational relaxation causes a rise in temperature of the tissue. The tumor absorbs and scatters NIR light more strongly than the surrounding healthy tissue. Heat will diffuse through the tissue, causing a rise in temperature of the surrounding tissue. Differentiation between normal and cancerous tissues is determined using IR thermal imaging. Results are presented on a 55-year-old patient with a papillary breast cancer. We found that these results provide the clinician with more detailed information about breast lesions detected by photothermal imaging and thereby enhance its potential for specificity.

  5. High-performance near-infrared imaging for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    El-Sharkawy, Yasser H; El-Sherif, Ashraf F

    2014-01-01

    We present a method for the noninvasive determination of the size, position, and optical properties of tumors in the human breast. The tumor is first detected by photothermal imaging. It is then sized, located, and optically characterized using designed digital image processing and edge-detection pattern recognition. The method assumes that the tumor is spherical and inhomogeneous and embedded in an otherwise homogeneous tissue. Heat energy is deposited in the tissue by absorption of near-infrared (NIR) Nd:YAG laser radiation, and its subsequent conversion to heat via vibrational relaxation causes a rise in temperature of the tissue. The tumor absorbs and scatters NIR light more strongly than the surrounding healthy tissue. Heat will diffuse through the tissue, causing a rise in temperature of the surrounding tissue. Differentiation between normal and cancerous tissues is determined using IR thermal imaging. Results are presented on a 55-year-old patient with a papillary breast cancer. We found that these results provide the clinician with more detailed information about breast lesions detected by photothermal imaging and thereby enhance its potential for specificity.

  6. Breast cancer screening with digital breast tomosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Skaane, Per

    2017-01-01

    To give an overview of studies comparing full-field digital mammography (FFDM) and digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) in breast cancer screening. The implementation of tomosynthesis in breast imaging is rapidly increasing world-wide. Experimental clinical studies of relevance for DBT screening have shown that tomosynthesis might have a great potential in breast cancer screening, although most of these retrospective reading studies are based on small populations, so that final conclusions are difficult to draw from individual reports. Several retrospective studies and three prospective trials on tomosynthesis in breast cancer screening have been published so far, confirming the great potential of DBT in mammography screening. The main results of these screening studies are presented. The retrospective screening studies from USA have all shown a significant decrease in the recall rate using DBT as adjunct to mammography. Most of these studies have also shown an increase in the cancer detection rate, and the non-significant results in some studies might be explained by a lack of statistical power. All the three prospective European trials have shown a significant increase in the cancer detection rate. The retrospective and the prospective screening studies comparing FFDM and DBT have all demonstrated that tomosynthesis has a great potential for improving breast cancer screening. DBT should be regarded as a better mammogram that could improve or overcome limitations of the conventional mammography, and tomosynthesis might be considered as the new technique in the next future of breast cancer screening.

  7. Biomarker Analysis on Ductal Lavage Fluid as a Tool for Breast Cancer Early Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-10-01

    ploidy, p53 and G-actin as breast cancer biomarkers. Cancer Epidemiology , Biomarkers and Prevention, 7(11)1027-1033, 1998. 4 Rao, JY, Apple, S, Jin...YS, et al. Comparative PCR analysis of c-myc amplification on archival breast fine needle aspiration (FNA) materials. Cancer Epidemiology , Biomarkers

  8. Gene expression profiles of estrogen receptor positive and estrogen receptor negative breast cancers are detectable in histologically normal breast epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Kelly; Ge, Xijin; de las Morenas, Antonio; Tripathi, Anusri; Rosenberg, Carol L.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose Previously, we found that gene expression in histologically normal breast epithelium (NlEpi) from women at high breast cancer risk can resemble gene expression in NlEpi from cancer-containing breasts. Therefore, we hypothesized that gene expression characteristic of a cancer subtype might be seen in NlEpi of breasts containing that subtype. Experimental Design We examined gene expression in 46 cases of microdissected NlEpi from untreated women undergoing breast cancer surgery. From 30 age-matched cases (15 estrogen receptor (ER)+, 15 ER-) we used Affymetryix U133A arrays. From 16 independent cases (9 ER+, 7 ER-), we validated selected genes using qPCR. We then compared gene expression between NlEpi and invasive breast cancer using 4 publicly available datasets. Results We identified 198 genes that are differentially expressed between NlEpi from breasts with ER+ (NlEpiER+) compared to ER- cancers (NlEpiER-). These include genes characteristic of ER+ and ER- cancers (e.g., ESR1, GATA3, and CX3CL1, FABP7). QPCR validated the microarray results in both the 30 original cases and the 16 independent cases. Gene expression in NlEpiER+ and NlEpiER- resembled gene expression in ER+ and ER- cancers, respectively: 25-53% of the genes or probes examined in 4 external datasets overlapped between NlEpi and the corresponding cancer subtype. Conclusions Gene expression differs in NlEpi of breasts containing ER+ compared to ER- breast cancers. These differences echo differences in ER+ and ER- invasive cancers. NlEpi gene expression may help elucidate subtype-specific risk signatures, identify early genomic events in cancer development and locate targets for prevention and therapy. PMID:21059815

  9. Detection of circulating tumour cells in patients with breast or ovarian cancer by molecular cytogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Engel, H; Kleespies, C; Friedrich, J; Breidenbach, M; Kallenborn, A; Schöndorf, T; Kolhagen, H; Mallmann, P

    1999-01-01

    Detection of micrometastases in patients with solid tumours may aid the establishment of prognosis and development of new therapeutic approaches. This study was designed to investigate the presence and frequency of tumour cells in the peripheral blood (PB) of patients with breast or ovarian cancer by using a combination of magnetic activated cell sorting (MACS) and fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). Separated tumour cell and PB-samples from 48 patients (35 breast cancers, 12 ovarian tumours, one uterine sarcoma) were analysed for the presence of numerical aberrations of chromosomes 7, 12, 17 and 17 q11.2–q12. Twenty-five patients had primary disease and 23 had relapsed. The technique allows the detection of one tumour cell in 106 normal cells. Circulating tumour cells were detected in 35/48 cases (17 patients had relapsed and 13 primary carcinoma with lymph node or solid metastases) by the expression of anti-cytokeratin and the presence of numerical chromosomal abnormalities. PB-tumour cells of patients with a primary carcinoma and without solid metastases had a significantly lower percentage of chromosomal aberrations, especially for chromosome 12 (P = 0.035; P = 0.038) compared to those with relapsed disease and solid metastases. Detection and quantification of minimal residual disease may monitor the response to cytotoxic or hormonal therapy and may identify women at risk of relapse. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10584878

  10. Multispectral band selection and spatial characterization: Application to mitosis detection in breast cancer histopathology.

    PubMed

    Irshad, H; Gouaillard, A; Roux, L; Racoceanu, D

    2014-07-01

    Breast cancer is the second most frequent cancer. The reference process for breast cancer prognosis is Nottingham grading system. According to this system, mitosis detection is one of the three important criteria required for grading process and quantifying the locality and prognosis of a tumor. Multispectral imaging, as relatively new to the field of histopathology, has the advantage, over traditional RGB imaging, to capture spectrally resolved information at specific frequencies, across the electromagnetic spectrum. This study aims at evaluating the accuracy of mitosis detection on histopathological multispectral images. The proposed framework includes: selection of spectral bands and focal planes, detection of candidate mitotic regions and computation of morphological and multispectral statistical features. A state-of-the-art of the methods for mitosis classification is also provided. This framework has been evaluated on MITOS multispectral dataset and achieved higher detection rate (67.35%) and F-Measure (63.74%) than the best MITOS contest results (Roux et al., 2013). Our results indicate that the selected multispectral bands have more discriminant information than a single spectral band or all spectral bands for mitotic figures, validating the interest of using multispectral images to improve the quality of the diagnostic in histopathology. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Genomic Approaches for Detection and Treatment of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    pathways or processes not previously implicated in human cancer. References Chong, J. A., Tapia - Ramirez , J., Kim, S., Toledo-Aral, J. J., Zheng...References Chong, J. A., Tapia - Ramirez , J., Kim, S., Toledo-Aral, J. J., Zheng, Y., Boutros, M. C., Altshuller, Y. M., Frohman, M. A

  12. Imaging in breast cancer: diffuse optics in breast cancer: detecting tumors in pre-menopausal women and monitoring neoadjuvant chemotherapy.

    PubMed

    Tromberg, Bruce J; Cerussi, Albert; Shah, Natasha; Compton, Montana; Durkin, Amanda; Hsiang, David; Butler, John; Mehta, Rita

    2005-01-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and diffuse optical imaging (DOI) are non-invasive diagnostic techniques that employ near-infrared (NIR) light to quantitatively characterize the optical properties of centimeter-thick, multiple-scattering tissues. Although NIR was first applied to breast diaphanography more than 70 years ago, quantitative optical methods employing time- or frequency-domain 'photon migration' technologies have only recently been used for breast imaging. Because their performance is not limited by mammographic density, optical methods can provide new insight regarding tissue functional changes associated with the appearance, progression, and treatment of breast cancer, particularly for younger women and high-risk subjects who may not benefit from conventional imaging methods. This paper reviews the principles of diffuse optics and describes the development of broadband DOS for quantitatively measuring the optical and physiological properties of thick tissues. Clinical results are shown highlighting the sensitivity of diffuse optics to malignant breast tumors in 12 pre-menopausal subjects ranging in age from 30 to 39 years and a patient undergoing neoadjuvant chemotherapy for locally advanced breast cancer. Significant contrast was observed between normal and tumor regions of tissue for deoxy-hemoglobin (p = 0.005), oxy-hemoglobin (p = 0.002), water (p = 0.014), and lipids (p = 0.0003). Tissue hemoglobin saturation was not found to be a reliable parameter for distinguishing between tumor and normal tissues. Optical data were converted into a tissue optical index that decreased 50% within 1 week in response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy. These results suggest a potential role for diffuse optics as a bedside monitoring tool that could aid the development of new strategies for individualized patient care.

  13. A sensitive test for the detection of specific DSB repair defects in primary cells from breast cancer specimens.

    PubMed

    Keimling, Marlen; Kaur, Jatinder; Bagadi, Sarangadhara Appala Raju; Kreienberg, Rolf; Wiesmüller, Lisa; Ralhan, Ranju

    2008-08-01

    Increasing evidence indicates that breast cancer pathogenesis is linked with DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair dysfunction. This conclusion is based on advances in the study of functions of breast cancer susceptibility genes such as BRCA1 and BRCA2, on the identification of breast cancer-associated changes regarding the genetics, expression, and localization of multiple DSB repair factors, and on observations indicating enhanced radiation-induced chromosomal damage in cells from predisposed individuals and sporadic breast cancer patients. In this pilot study, we describe a sensitive method for the analysis of DSB repair functions in mammary carcinomas. Using this method we firstly document alterations in pathway-specific DSB repair activities in primary cells originating from familial as well as sporadic breast cancer. In particular, we identified increases in the mutagenic nonhomologous end joining and single-strand annealing mechanisms in sporadic breast cancers with wild-type BRCA1 and BRCA2, and, thus, similar phenotypes to tumors with mutant alleles of BRCA1 and BRCA2. This suggests that detection of error-prone DSB repair activities may be useful to extend the limits of genotypic characterization of high-risk susceptibility genes. This method may, therefore, serve as a marker for breast cancer risk assessment and, even more importantly, for the prediction of responsiveness to targeted therapies such as to inhibitors of poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase (PARP1).

  14. Early Detection of Breast Cancer Using Molecular Beacons

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    localized to green microtubules, suggesting that survivin mRNAs are located around microtubules. Interestedly, docetaxel- treatment stabilizes...that No treatment 50 nM docetaxel for 3 hours upregulation of survivin gene expression in those cells prevents the effect of docetaxel even before...nanoparticles for non-invasive in vivo imaging and treatment of human cancer. 7). We have produced promising results on tumor targeted nanoparticles

  15. Genomic Approaches for Detection and Treatment of Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-07-01

    lineage when overproduced or inappropriately stabilized. Consistent with this notion, REST is overexpressed in human medulloblastoma and ectopic REST...expression in v-myc-immortalized neural stem cells promotes medulloblastoma formation in mice(26-27). Thus, the contrasting roles of REST as an...frequencies in pancreatic, thyroid , colon, lung and liver cancers and in myelodyspastic syndrome and are correlated with poor prognosis(34

  16. Detection of Internal Mammary Adenopathy in Patients With Breast Cancer by PET/CT and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Jochelson, Maxine S.; Lebron, Lizza; Jacobs, Stefanie S.; Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya S.; Powell, Simon N.; Sacchini, Virgilio; Ulaner, Gary A.; Morris, Elizabeth A.; Dershaw, D. David

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of internal mammary node (IMN) adenopathy in patients with breast cancer and compare breast MRI and PET/CT for detection of IMN adenopathy. MATERIALS AND METHODS This retrospective study included 90 women who underwent MRI and PET/CT before neoadjuvant chemotherapy for clinical stage IIA through IIIA disease. MRI and PET/CT examinations were read independently by two readers trained in breast imaging and nuclear medicine. All patients underwent follow-up MRI at the end of chemotherapy, and 10 with hypermetabolic IMNs underwent follow-up PET/CT. Histology was not obtained. Women were considered to have IMN adenopathy when nodes seen on MRI or having standardized uptake value (SUV) greater than mediastinal blood pool decreased in either size or SUV (or both) after treatment. Features including lymphovascular invasion, tumor quadrant(s), and axillary adenopathy were compared between presence and absence of IMN adenopathy using Fisher’s exact test. Prevalence was determined on the basis of the percentage of patients with IMN adenopathy by either modality. The McNemar test compared the prevalence of IMN adenopathy on MRI to its prevalence on PET/CT. RESULTS Prevalence of IMN adenopathy was 16% (14/90) by MRI and 14% (13/90) by PET/CT (p = 0.317). After chemotherapy, IMN adenopathy resolved in 12 of 14 patients (86%). In two patients with poor responses in primary tumors, IMN adenopathy persisted, and both patients developed metastatic disease within 6 months. At 3 years, survival was significantly worse in patients with IMN adenopathy than in those without (85.7% vs 53.3%, respectively; p = 0.009). CONCLUSION In women with advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemotherapy, prevalence of IMN adenopathy was 16%, equally detected by breast MRI and PET/CT. Identification of IMN adenopathy may affect treatment and provides prognostic information. PMID:26397342

  17. Detection of Internal Mammary Adenopathy in Patients With Breast Cancer by PET/CT and MRI.

    PubMed

    Jochelson, Maxine S; Lebron, Lizza; Jacobs, Stefanie S; Zheng, Junting; Moskowitz, Chaya S; Powell, Simon N; Sacchini, Virgilio; Ulaner, Gary A; Morris, Elizabeth A; Dershaw, D David

    2015-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the prevalence of internal mammary node (IMN) adenopathy in patients with breast cancer and compare breast MRI and PET/CT for detection of IMN adenopathy. This retrospective study included 90 women who underwent MRI and PET/CT before neoadjuvant chemotherapy for clinical stage IIA through IIIA disease. MRI and PET/CT examinations were read independently by two readers trained in breast imaging and nuclear medicine. All patients underwent follow-up MRI at the end of chemotherapy, and 10 with hypermetabolic IMNs underwent follow-up PET/CT. Histology was not obtained. Women were considered to have IMN adenopathy when nodes seen on MRI or having standardized uptake value (SUV) greater than mediastinal blood pool decreased in either size or SUV (or both) after treatment. Features including lymphovascular invasion, tumor quadrant(s), and axillary adenopathy were compared between presence and absence of IMN adenopathy using Fisher's exact test. Prevalence was determined on the basis of the percentage of patients with IMN adenopathy by either modality. The McNemar test compared the prevalence of IMN adenopathy on MRI to its prevalence on PET/CT. Prevalence of IMN adenopathy was 16% (14/90) by MRI and 14% (13/90) by PET/CT (p = 0.317). After chemotherapy, IMN adenopathy resolved in 12 of 14 patients (86%). In two patients with poor responses in primary tumors, IMN adenopathy persisted, and both patients developed metastatic disease within 6 months. At 3 years, survival was significantly worse in patients with IMN adenopathy than in those without (85.7% vs 53.3%, respectively; p = 0.009). In women with advanced breast cancer receiving neoadjuvant chemo-therapy, prevalence of IMN adenopathy was 16%, equally detected by breast MRI and PET/CT. Identification of IMN adenopathy may affect treatment and provides prognostic information.

  18. On generating cell exemplars for detection of mitotic cells in breast cancer histopathology images.

    PubMed

    Aloraidi, Nada A; Sirinukunwattana, Korsuk; Khan, Adnan M; Rajpoot, Nasir M

    2014-01-01

    Mitotic activity is one of the main criteria that pathologists use to decide the grade of the cancer. Computerised mitotic cell detection promises to bring efficiency and accuracy into the grading process. However, detection and classification of mitotic cells in breast cancer histopathology images is a challenging task because of the large intra-class variation in the visual appearance of mitotic cells in various stages of cell division life cycle. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that cells in histopathology images can be effectively represented using cell exemplars derived from sub-images of various kinds of cells in an image for the purposes of mitotic cell classification. We compare three methods for generating exemplar cells. The methods have been evaluated in terms of classification performance on the MITOS dataset. The experimental results demonstrate that eigencells combined with support vector machines produce reasonably high detection accuracy among all the methods.

  19. Salivary diagnostics: a new solution for an old problem: breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Streckfus, Charles F.

    2009-05-01

    Objective: The objective of this study is to determine if LC/MS/MS based isotopic tagging technique is useful to detect putative breast cancer markers in saliva. Methods: Six pooled (n=10 subjects per pool) stimulated whole saliva specimens from women were analyzed. One pooled specimen was from healthy women, another pooled specimen from women diagnosed with a benign breast tumor and the other four-pooled specimens were from women diagnosed with carcinoma of the breast. The four cancer specimens were staged 0, I, IIa and IIb (lymph node involvement). Isotopically tagging proteins in the tumor groups and comparing them to the healthy control group measured differential expression of proteins. The iTRAQ labels are isobaric and chemically identical, thus labeled peptides from the different pools have identical elution times and masses. The relative concentration of identified proteins in each of the mixtures is determined from the intensities of each of the reporter ions. Results: The results of the salivary analyses yielded approximately 209 proteins in the saliva specimens. These proteins were able to distinguish between the healthy control, the benign and the cancer patients. Additionally, there were proteins able to distinguish between node positive and node negative patients.

  20. Elastic Scattering Spectroscopy for the Detection of Pre-Cancer and Early Cancer of the Breast

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    caliber fibre-optic endoscopes which are introduced into the ductal system through the nipple. 80% of breast cancers are ductal in origin. Ductoscopy...taken using the mammotome ( vacuum assisted biopsy). The work under this objective was limited to axillary nodes and will be presented in two...their nature using ESS. a) To undertake ductoscopy on mastectomy specimens, taking ESS measurements through the endoscope and matching these

  1. Detecting and Targeting Oncogenic Myc in Breast Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    Proteomics, Ontario Cancer Institute/Princess Margaret Hospital, 610 University Avenue, Toronto, Canada M5G 2M9. Phone: 416- 946 -2276; Fax: 416- 946 -2840; E...rights reserved. doi:10.1016/j.ejca.2005.08.017 * Corresponding author. Tel.: +1 416 946 2276; fax: +1 416 946 2840. E-mail address: lpenn...etic cells [133], mammary gland [134], liver [135], skin [135,136] and pancreatic islets [137] have demonstrated that induction of oncogenic Myc leads

  2. Collagen fibers mediate MRI-detected water diffusion and anisotropy in breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Kakkad, Samata; Zhang, Jiangyang; Akhbardeh, Alireza; Jacob, Desmond; Krishnamachary, Balaji; Solaiyappan, Meiyappan; Jacobs, Michael A; Raman, Venu; Leibfritz, Dieter; Glunde, Kristine; Bhujwalla, Zaver M

    2016-10-01

    Collagen 1 (Col1) fibers play an important role in tumor interstitial macromolecular transport and cancer cell dissemination. Our goal was to understand the influence of Col1 fibers on water diffusion, and to examine the potential of using noninvasive diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) to indirectly detect Col1 fibers in breast lesions. We previously observed, in human MDA-MB-231 breast cancer xenografts engineered to fluoresce under hypoxia, relatively low amounts of Col1 fibers in fluorescent hypoxic regions. These xenograft tumors together with human breast cancer samples were used here to investigate the relationship between Col1 fibers, water diffusion and anisotropy, and hypoxia. Hypoxic low Col1 fiber containing regions showed decreased apparent diffusion coefficient (ADC) and fractional anisotropy (FA) compared to normoxic high Col1 fiber containing regions. Necrotic high Col1 fiber containing regions showed increased ADC with decreased FA values compared to normoxic viable high Col1 fiber regions that had increased ADC with increased FA values. A good agreement of ADC and FA patterns was observed between in vivo and ex vivo images. In human breast cancer specimens, ADC and FA decreased in low Col1 containing regions. Our data suggest that a decrease in ADC and FA values observed within a lesion could predict hypoxia, and a pattern of high ADC with low FA values could predict necrosis. Collectively the data identify the role of Col1 fibers in directed water movement and support expanding the evaluation of DTI parameters as surrogates for Col1 fiber patterns associated with specific tumor microenvironments as companion diagnostics and for staging.

  3. Comparing screening mammography for early breast cancer detection in Vermont and Norway.

    PubMed

    Hofvind, Solveig; Vacek, Pamela M; Skelly, Joan; Weaver, Donald L; Geller, Berta M

    2008-08-06

    Most screening mammography in the United States differs from that in countries with formal screening programs by having a shorter screening interval and interpretation by a single reader vs independent double reading. We examined how these differences affect early detection of breast cancer by comparing performance measures and histopathologic outcomes in women undergoing opportunistic screening in Vermont and organized screening in Norway. We evaluated recall, screen detection, and interval cancer rates and prognostic tumor characteristics for women aged 50-69 years who underwent screening mammography in Vermont (n = 45 050) and in Norway (n = 194 430) from 1997 through 2003. Rates were directly adjusted for age by weighting the rates within 5-year age intervals to reflect the age distribution in the combined data and were compared using two-sided Z tests. The age-adjusted recall rate was 9.8% in Vermont and 2.7% in Norway (P < .001). The age-adjusted screen detection rate per 1000 woman-years after 2 years of follow-up was 2.77 in Vermont and 2.57 in Norway (P = .12), whereas the interval cancer rate per 1000 woman-years was 1.24 and 0.86, respectively (P < .001). Larger proportions of invasive interval cancers in Vermont than in Norway were 15 mm or smaller (55.9% vs 38.2%, P < .001) and had no lymph node involvement (67.5% vs 57%, P = .01). The prognostic characteristics of all invasive cancers (screen-detected and interval cancer) were similar in Vermont and Norway. Screening mammography detected cancer at about the same rate and at the same prognostic stage in Norway and Vermont, with a statistically significantly lower recall rate in Norway. The interval cancer rate was higher in Vermont than in Norway, but tumors that were diagnosed in the Vermont women tended to be at an earlier stage than those diagnosed in the Norwegian women.

  4. Circulating Tumor Cells and Tumor Stem Cells Detection in the Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells of Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Feng; Li, Yuan-Chun; Liu, Li-Ping; Zhang, Hao-Min; Tong, Song

    2016-09-01

    Our aim was to retrospectively analyze the relationships between circulating tumor cells (CTCs) and the development of breast cancer, for elucidating the role of CTCs in breast cancer. A total of 107 female patients with primary breast cancer and 48 matched healthy female volunteers were recruited. After blood collection, isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) was performed followed by the detection of cytokeratin 19 positive (CK19(+) ) and CD44(+) /CD24(-/low) cells, as well as estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone, and CerbB2. Data were analyzed with the SPSS 20.0 software. None of the 48 volunteers were detected with CK19(+) cells in their PBMC, while in 77 patients, 72% of 107 female patients with primary breast cancer, the CK19(+) cells were detected. CK19(+) could also be detected among patients in each grouping by different clinical staging and lymph node metastasis, with statistical differences (all P < 0.05). Further, among the 83 CK19(+) specimens, 32 were also detected with CD44(+) /CD24(-/low) cells. Comparisons of CK19(+) and CD44(+) /CD24(-/low) cells in patients with different clinical features (ER positive vs. ER negative, C-erbB2 positive vs. C-erbB2 negative) and molecular subtypes (triple-negative breast cancer, ER positive, and C-erbB2 positive) showed no obvious difference (all P > 0.05). Both CTCs and tumor stem cells (TSCs) could be detected in the PBMC of breast cancer patients; besides, positive expression rate of CTCs might be obviously associated with the clinical stage and metastasis. Positive relationship of TSCs and the clinical stage of breast cancer was also proved in this study. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Positron emission mammography (PEM): A promising technique for detecting breast cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Thompson, C.J.; Murthy, K.; Picard, Y.; Mako, R.; Weinberg, I.N.

    1995-08-01

    The authors are developing a high specificity technique for detecting the increased metabolic rate of breast tumors. The glucose analog FDG is known to concentrate in breast tumors rendering them easily detectable in conventional PET scans. Since PET is a relatively expensive imaging technique it has not been used routinely in the detection of breast cancer. Positron emission mammography (PEM) will provide a highly efficient, high spatial resolution, and low cost positron imaging system whose metabolic images are co-registered with conventional mammography. Coincidences between two BGO blocks cut into 2 x 2 mm squares coupled to two 7.5 cm square imaging PMTs are detected and back-projected to form real-time multiple plane images. The design is about 20 times more sensitive than a conventional multi-slice PET body scanner, so much less radio-pharmaceutical can be used, reducing the patient dose and cost per scan. Prototype detectors have been made and extensive measurements done. The device is expected to have an in-plane spatial resolution about 2 mm FWHM. Besides the application as a secondary screening tool the device may be beneficial in measuring a tumor`s response to radio-therapy or chemo-therapy, as well as aiding the surgeon in optimizing the removal of malignant tissue.

  6. Stacked Sparse Autoencoder (SSAE) for Nuclei Detection on Breast Cancer Histopathology Images.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jun; Xiang, Lei; Liu, Qingshan; Gilmore, Hannah; Wu, Jianzhong; Tang, Jinghai; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-01-01

    Automated nuclear detection is a critical step for a number of computer assisted pathology related image analysis algorithms such as for automated grading of breast cancer tissue specimens. The Nottingham Histologic Score system is highly correlated with the shape and appearance of breast cancer nuclei in histopathological images. However, automated nucleus detection is complicated by 1) the large number of nuclei and the size of high resolution digitized pathology images, and 2) the variability in size, shape, appearance, and texture of the individual nuclei. Recently there has been interest in the application of "Deep Learning" strategies for classification and analysis of big image data. Histopathology, given its size and complexity, represents an excellent use case for application of deep learning strategies. In this paper, a Stacked Sparse Autoencoder (SSAE), an instance of a deep learning strategy, is presented for efficient nuclei detection on high-resolution histopathological images of breast cancer. The SSAE learns high-level features from just pixel intensities alone in order to identify distinguishing features of nuclei. A sliding window operation is applied to each image in order to represent image patches via high-level features obtained via the auto-encoder, which are then subsequently fed to a classifier which categorizes each image patch as nuclear or non-nuclear. Across a cohort of 500 histopathological images (2200 × 2200) and approximately 3500 manually segmented individual nuclei serving as the groundtruth, SSAE was shown to have an improved F-measure 84.49% and an average area under Precision-Recall curve (AveP) 78.83%. The SSAE approach also out-performed nine other state of the art nuclear detection strategies.

  7. Stacked Sparse Autoencoder (SSAE) for Nuclei Detection on Breast Cancer Histopathology Images

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Jun; Xiang, Lei; Liu, Qingshan; Gilmore, Hannah; Wu, Jianzhong; Tang, Jinghai; Madabhushi, Anant

    2016-01-01

    Automated nuclear detection is a critical step for a number of computer assisted pathology related image analysis algorithms such as for automated grading of breast cancer tissue specimens. The Nottingham Histologic Score system is highly correlated with the shape and appearance of breast cancer nuclei in histopathological images. However, automated nucleus detection is complicated by (1) the large number of nuclei and the size of high resolution digitized pathology images, and (2) the variability in size, shape, appearance, and texture of the individual nuclei. Recently there has been interest in the application of “Deep Learning” strategies for classification and analysis of big image data. Histopathology, given its size and complexity, represents an excellent use case for application of deep learning strategies. In this paper, a Stacked Sparse Autoencoder (SSAE), an instance of a deep learning strategy, is presented for efficient nuclei detection on high-resolution histopathological images of breast cancer. The SSAE learns high-level features from just pixel intensities alone in order to identify distinguishing features of nuclei. A sliding window operation is applied to each image in order to represent image patches via high-level features obtained via the auto-encoder, which are then subsequently fed to a classifier which categorizes each image patch as nuclear or non-nuclear. Across a cohort of 500 histopathological images (2200 × 2200) and approximately 3500 manually segmented individual nuclei serving as the groundtruth, SSAE was shown to have an improved F-measure 84.49% and an average area under Precision-Recall curve (AveP) 78.83%. The SSAE approach also out-performed 9 other state of the art nuclear detection strategies. PMID:26208307

  8. Usefulness of MRI in detecting occult breast cancer associated with Paget's disease of the nipple-areolar complex.

    PubMed

    Echevarria, J J; Lopez-Ruiz, J A; Martin, D; Imaz, I; Martin, M

    2004-12-01

    MRI allows for the detection of mammographically and clinically occult breast neoplasms. We analysed the ability of MRI to detect occult breast cancer in three patients with Paget's disease of the nipple-areolar complex, proven histologically. In all three cases we observed differences in the morphological and dynamic features of healthy and pathological nipples, and we also found enhancement foci in breast tissue, with suspicious kinetic and morphological characteristics, which in the case of two patients corresponded to ductal carcinoma in situ. The detection and location with MRI of underlying neoplastic foci may be of help in choosing the most reasonable and conservative treatment in these patients.

  9. Subcellular localization of leptin and leptin receptor in breast cancer detected in an electron microscopic study.

    PubMed

    Al-Shibli, Saad M; Amjad, Nasser M; Al-Kubaisi, Muna K; Mizan, Shaikh

    2017-01-22

    Leptin (LEP) and leptin receptor (LEPR) have long been found associated with breast cancer. So far no high-resolution method such as electron microscopy has been used to investigate the subcellular localization of leptin and leptin receptor in breast cancer. We collected cancer and non-cancer breast tissues from 51 women with invasive ductal breast cancer. Leptin and leptin receptor in the tissues were estimated using immunohistochemistry (IHC). LEP and LEPR were localized at subcellular level by immunocytochemistry (ICC) using ultra-fine gold particle conjugated antibody, and visualized with transmission electron microscopy (TEM). IHC showed high presence of LEP and LEPR in 65% and 67% respectively of the breast cancer samples, 100% and 0% respectively of the adipose tissue samples, and no high presence in the non-cancer breast tissue samples. On TEM views both LEP and LEPR were found highly concentrated within the nucleus of the cancer cells, indicating that nucleus is the principal seat of action. However, presence of high concentration of LEP does not necessarily prove its over-expression, as often concluded, because LEP could be internalized from outside by LEPR in the cells. In contrast, LEPR is definitely over-expressed in the ductal breast cancer cells. Therefore, we hypothesize that over-expression of LEPR, rather than that of LEP has a fundamental role in breast carcinogenesis in particular, and probably for LEP-LEPR associated tumors in general. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Early Detection of Breast Cancer by Fluorescence Molecular Tomography

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-07-01

    development of appropriate fluorescence imaging methods for highly reliable and quantitative fluorescence imaging ii ) the establishment and imaging of...Tomography (FMT) is a relatively new optical tomographic imaging approach that capitalizes on the strengths of molecular imaging. It bases detection...The large boxes on Fig.5 b,c indicate the detector FOV. Fig.5 b,c depict FMT ( tomo - synthesis) images in color, obtained with an empirical

  11. Design and evaluation of a novel breast cancer detection system combining both thermoacoustic (TA) and photoacoustic (PA) tomography

    PubMed Central

    Pramanik, Manojit; Ku, Geng; Li, Changhui; Wang, Lihong V.

    2008-01-01

    We have developed a novel scanner for breast cancer detection, integrating both thermoacoustic and photoacoustic techniques to achieve dual contrast (microwave and light absorption) imaging. This scanner is nonionizing, low cost, and can potentially provide high-resolution, dual modality three-dimensional images of the breast. The scanner uses front instead of side breast compression and dry instead of gel ultrasonic coupling. Here we present the design of the breast scanner along with initial tissue phantom study results as a precursor to an actual patient study. PMID:18649451

  12. Breast cancer detection based on time reversal and the optical theorem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marengo, Edwin A.; Tu, Jing

    2015-03-01

    We report a wave physics-based approach to change detection which can be used to detect anomalies in biological tissues such as cancer lesions from active sensing data. Of particular interest are nonionizing radiation methods such as microwave breast imaging, ultrasound imaging, and diffuse optical tomography. The biological medium surrounding the target of interest, e.g., a tumor, is assumed to be highly nonhomogeneous and reverberating. This implies that there are in general multiple paths for the propagation of wave signals from an interior domain where the target of interest is located to the sensing aperture where the scattered fields are measured. Two physical concepts are used to exploit this rich multipath environment so as to enhance change detection performance: wave time reversal, and the optical theorem which describes energy conservation in scattering phenomena. Previous related work has reported the use of time reversal for breast cancer detection. We use not only time reversal, but also the optical theorem, and propose novel algorithms based on both.

  13. Optical detection of CA 15.3 breast cancer antigen using CdS quantum dot.

    PubMed

    Elakkiya, Venugopal; Menon, Mridula Prakash; Nataraj, Devaraj; Biji, Pullithadathil; Selvakumar, Rajendran

    2017-04-01

    The present study focus on optical sensing of breast cancer antigen 15.3 (CA 15.3) using cadmium sulphide quantum dot (CdS-QD) in saline and serum samples spiked with antigen. The surface of CdS-QD was modified by cysteamine capping followed by tagging of CA 15.3 antibody. The samples were characterised using UV-visible absorption spectroscopy (UV-VIS Spectroscopy), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) attached with energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, phase contrast inverted epi-fluorescence microscopy and photoluminescence (PL) spectrophotometry (EDS). The CdS-QD showed a mean diameter of 3.02 ± 0.6 nm. The complex formed after antigen-antibody interaction resulted in distinguishable optical and fluorescence intensity with respect to varying concentration of antigen. The PL study revealed that CA 15.3 antibody labelled CdS QD can detect CA 15.3 tumour marker even at very low concentration of 0.002 KU/L with a constant response time of 15 min. This study clearly indicates that detection of CA 15.3 at low concentration is possible using surface modified CdS QD in serum samples and can find immense applications in biosensor development for detection of breast cancer marker similar to various automated detection kits available in market.

  14. Detection of high-grade atypia nuclei in breast cancer imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noël, Henri; Roux, Ludovic; Lu, Shijian; Boudier, Thomas

    2015-03-01

    Along with mitotic count, nuclear pleomorphism or nuclear atypia is an important criterion for the grading of breast cancer in histopathology. Though some works have been done in mitosis detection (ICPR 2012,1 MICCAI 2013,2 and ICPR 2014), not much work has been dedicated to automated nuclear atypia grading, especially the most difficult task of detection of grade 3 nuclei. We propose the use of Convolutional Neural Networks for the automated detection of cell nuclei, using images from the three grades of breast cancer for training. The images were obtained from ICPR contests. Additional manual annotation was performed to classify pixels into five classes: stroma, nuclei, lymphocytes, mitosis and fat. At total of 3,000 thumbnail images of 101 × 101 pixels were used for training. By dividing this training set in an 80/20 ratio we could obtain good training results (around 90%). We tested our CNN on images of the three grades which were not in the training set. High grades nuclei were correctly classified. We then thresholded the classification map and performed basic analysis to keep only rounded objects. Our results show that mostly all atypical nuclei were correctly detected.

  15. The impact of early detection and intervention of breast cancer-related lymphedema: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Shah, Chirag; Arthur, Douglas W; Wazer, David; Khan, Atif; Ridner, Sheila; Vicini, Frank

    2016-06-01

    Breast cancer-related lymphedema (BCRL) has become an increasingly important clinical issue as noted by the recent update of the 2015 NCCN breast cancer guidelines which recommends to "educate, monitor, and refer for lymphedema management." The purpose of this review was to examine the literature regarding early detection and management of BCRL in order to (1) better characterize the benefit of proactive surveillance and intervention, (2) clarify the optimal monitoring techniques, and (3) help better define patient groups most likely to benefit from surveillance programs. A Medline search was conducted for the years 1992-2015 to identify articles addressing early detection and management of BCRL. After an initial search, 127 articles were identified, with 13 of these studies focused on early intervention (three randomized (level of evidence 1), four prospective (level of evidence 2-3), six retrospective trials (level of evidence 4)). Data from two, small (n = 185 cases), randomized trials with limited follow-up demonstrated a benefit to early intervention (physiotherapy, manual lymphatic drainage) with regard to reducing the rate of chronic BCRL (>50% reduction) with two additional studies underway (n = 1280). These findings were confirmed by larger prospective and retrospective series. Several studies were identified that demonstrate that newer diagnostic modalities (bioimpedance spectroscopy, perometry) have increased sensitivity allowing for the earlier detection of BCRL. Current data support the development of surveillance programs geared toward the early detection and management of BCRL in part due to newer, more sensitive diagnostic modalities.

  16. An amperometric biosensor for the detection of hydrogen peroxide released from human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jing; Yan, Yalin; Zhu, Li; Li, Xiaoxi; Li, Genxi

    2013-03-15

    The rapid, accurate and sensitive determination of hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) is of great significance in the physiological, pathological and environmental fields. In this work, we have proposed a highly sensitive and selective amperometric biosensor for the detection of extracellular H(2)O(2) released from human breast cancer cells with the help of a sequence-specific peptide. Since the peptide immobilized on the electrode surface can specifically bind with horseradish peroxidase (HRP) in a favorable orientation, which then well promotes the catalytic activities of the immobilized enzyme toward the reaction of o-phenylenediamine and H(2)O(2), the proposed biosensor can detect H(2)O(2) in a wide linear range from 1.0×10(-7) M to 1.0×10(-4) M with a low detection limit of 3.0×10(-8) M. It can be also directly used to efficiently trace extracellular H(2)O(2) released from human breast cancer cells MCF-7. Furthermore, the reproducibility, stability and selectivity of the biosensor are also quite well compared with the previous report, so our biosensor might be potentially useful in physiological and pathological detection of H(2)O(2) in the future. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Breast cancer detection based on serum sample surface enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Vargas-Obieta, Enrique; Martínez-Espinosa, Juan Carlos; Martínez-Zerega, Brenda Esmeralda; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; González-Solís, José Luis

    2016-09-01

    Raman spectroscopy is a vibrational technique which provides information about the chemical structure. Nevertheless, since many chemicals are present in a sample at very low concentration, the Raman signal observed is extremely weak. In surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS), Raman signals can be enhanced by many orders of magnitude when nanoparticles are used. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report in the breast cancer detection based on serum SERS. The serum samples were obtained from 12 patients who were clinically diagnosed with advanced breast cancer and 15 controls. In the same proportion, the serum samples were mixed with colloidal gold nanoparticles of 40 nm using sonication. At least 10 spectra were collected of each serum sample using a Jobin-Yvon LabRAM Raman Spectrometer with a laser of 830 nm. Raw spectra were processed by carrying baseline correction, smoothing, and normalization and then analyzed using principle component analysis (PCA) and linear discriminant analysis (LDA). Raman spectra showed strongly enhanced bands in the 600-1800 cm (-1) range due to the nanoparticle colloidal clusters observed. These Raman bands allowed identifying biomolecules present at low concentration as amide I and III, β carotene, glutathione, tryptophan, tyrosine, and phenylalanine. Preliminary results demonstrated that SERS and PCA-LDA can be used to discriminate between control and cancer samples with high sensitivity and specificity. SERS allowed short exposures and required a minimal sample preparation. The preliminary results suggest that SERS and PCA-LDA could be an excellent support technique for the breast cancer detection using serum samples.

  18. Analysis of potential markers for detection of submicroscopic lymph node metastases in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Merrie, A E H; Yun, K; Gunn, J; Phillips, L V; McCall, J L

    1999-01-01

    We have developed sensitive assays for cytokeratin (K) 8, 16, 19, stromelysin 3 (ST3), MUC1 and maspin mRNAs using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and used these to assess lymph node status in patients undergoing surgery for breast cancer. In addition the RT-PCR assays were tested against lymph nodes from non-cancer patients to determine their specificity. Despite high sensitivity RT-PCR assays for K8, K16, K19, ST3 and maspin were not found to be useful as markers of submicroscopic disease as transcripts of these genes were detected in the great majority of control lymph nodes tested. Expression of MUC1 was also not found to be useful as it was both insensitive and non-specific. The importance of assessing potential markers against an adequately sized control population is demonstrated, as failure to do so can lead to erroneous conclusions. © 1999 Cancer Research Campaign PMID:10471055

  19. Breast self-examination programmes in the trial of early detection of breast cancer: ten year findings.

    PubMed Central

    Ellman, R.; Moss, S. M.; Coleman, D.; Chamberlain, J.

    1993-01-01

    Programmes of education in breast self-examination with specialist clinics for self-referral were introduced in two health districts around 1980. Combining the results from the two centres showed no reduction in mortality from breast cancer over the following 10 years but the mortality was low in one of the centres whilst in the other it was higher than in four geographically separate comparison centres in which there was similar careful monitoring of breast cancer incidence and mortality. Because this was not a randomised controlled trial and lacked a uniform treatment protocol, biases may be responsible for the differences observed, but it is also possible that BSE education with annual reinforcement contributed to the breast cancer mortality reduction seen in one district. The overall conclusion however is that the value of breast self-examination remains unproven. PMID:8318415

  20. [Proportion of breast cancer in women aged 50 to 69 years from Girona, Spain, according to detection method].

    PubMed

    Puig-Vives, Montse; Osca-Gelis, Gemma; Camprubí-Font, Carla; Vilardell, M Loreto; Izquierdo, Angel; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael

    2014-10-07

    The aim of this study was to determine the tumor stage, the proportion of cases and the age specific rate of breast cancer (BC) cases according to detection method. Cases of women aged 50 to 69 years diagnosed with BC in the Girona province during 1999-2006 were extracted from the population-based Girona Cancer Registry (n=1,254). BC was classified by detection method: screen-detected cancer, interval cancer and others. Proportion of cases and age-specific incidence were calculated according to detection method. During the period 2002-2006, the proportion of screen-detected cancers, interval cancers and other cancers were 42.2%, 5.8% and 52.2%, respectively. After implementation of the early detection of breast cancer program (PDPCM), the incidence of screen-detected cases raised; thereafter, interval cancers also increased and the rate of other cancers decreased. In the Girona province during the fully implemented PDPCM period (2002-2006), interval cancers represented a low proportion (5.8%) of women diagnosed with BC at 50 to 69 years old. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  1. Testing breast cancer serum biomarkers for early detection and prognosis in pre-diagnosis samples

    PubMed Central

    Kazarian, Anna; Blyuss, Oleg; Metodieva, Gergana; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Ryan, Andy; Kiseleva, Elena M; Prytomanova, Olga M; Jacobs, Ian J; Widschwendter, Martin; Menon, Usha; Timms, John F

    2017-01-01

    Background: Breast cancer is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Although mammography screening is available, there is an ongoing interest in improved early detection and prognosis. Herein, we have analysed a combination of serological biomarkers in a case–control cohort of sera taken before diagnosis. Methods: This nested case–control study within the UK Collaborative Trial of Ovarian Cancer Screening (UKCTOCS) used serum samples from 239 women who subsequently developed breast cancer and 239 matched cancer-free controls. Sera were screened by ELISA for 9 candidate markers. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to examine associations with clinico-pathological features and between case controls in different time groups before diagnosis. Results: Significant associations with clinico-pathological features related to prognosis were found for several candidates (CA15-3, HSP90A and PAI-1). However, there were no consistent differences between cases and controls for any candidate in the lead up to diagnosis. Whilst combination models outperformed single markers, there was no increase in performance towards diagnosis. Conclusions: This study using unique pre-diagnosis samples shows that CA15-3, HSP90A and PAI-1 have potential as early prognostic markers and warrant further investigation. However, none of the candidates or combinations would be useful for screening. PMID:28081538

  2. Detection methods predict differences in biology and survival in breast cancer patients

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The aim of this study was to measure the biological characteristics involved in tumorigenesis and the progression of breast cancer in symptomatic and screen-detected carcinomas to identify possible differences. Methods For this purpose, we evaluated clinical-pathological parameters and proliferative and apoptotic activities in a series of 130 symptomatic and 161 screen-detected tumors. Results After adjustment for the smaller size of the screen-detected carcinomas compared with symptomatic cancers, those detected in the screening program presented longer disease-free survival (RR = 0.43, CI = 0.19-0.96) and had high estrogen and progesterone receptor concentrations more often than did symptomatic cancers (OR = 3.38, CI = 1.72-6.63 and OR = 3.44, CI = 1.94-6.10, respectively). Furthermore, the expression of bcl-2, a marker of good prognosis in breast cancer, was higher and HER2/neu expression was lower in screen-detected cancers than in symptomatic cancers (OR = 1.77, CI = 1.01-3.23 and OR = 0.64, CI = 0.40-0.98, respectively). However, when comparing prevalent vs incident screen-detected carcinomas, prevalent tumors were larger (OR = 2.84, CI = 1.05-7.69), were less likely to be HER2/neu positive (OR = 0.22, CI = 0.08-0.61) and presented lower Ki67 expression (OR = 0.36, CI = 0.17-0.77). In addition, incident tumors presented a shorter survival time than did prevalent ones (RR = 4.88, CI = 1.12-21.19). Conclusions Incident carcinomas include a variety of screen-detected carcinomas that exhibit differences in biology and prognosis relative to prevalent carcinomas. The detection method is important and should be taken into account when making therapy decisions. PMID:23244222

  3. Sentinel node detection and radioguided occult lesion localization in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Trifirò, Guiseppe; Lavinia Travaini, Laura; De Cicco, Concetta; Paganelli, Giovanni

    2006-01-01

    Sentinel lymph node biopsy might replace complete axillary dissection for staging of the axilla in clinically N0 breast cancer patients and represent a significant advantage as a minimally invasive procedure, considering that about 70% of patients are found to be free from metastatic disease, yet axillary node dissection can lead to significant morbidity. In our Institute, Radioguided Occult Lesion Localization is the standard method to locate non-palpable breast lesions and the gamma probes is very effective in assisting intra-operative localization and removal, as in sentinel node biopsy. The rapid spread of sentinel lymph node biopsy has led to its use in clinical settings previously considered contraindications to sentinel lymph node biopsy. In this contest, we evaluated in a large group of patients possible factors affecting sentinel node detection and the reliability of sentinel lymph node biopsy carried out after large excisional breast biopsy. Our data confirm that a previous breast surgery does not prohibit efficient sentinel lymph node localization and sentinel lymph node biopsy can correctly stage the axialla in these patients.

  4. Breast Cancer Knowledge, Attitudes, and Early Detection Practices in United States-Mexico Border Latinas

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Yelena; Moraros, John; King, Sasha; Prapsiri, Surasri; Thompson, Beti

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Introduction Evidence suggests Latinas residing along the United States-Mexico border face higher breast cancer mortality rates compared to Latinas in the interior of either country. The purpose of this study was to investigate breast cancer knowledge, attitudes, and use of breast cancer preventive screening among U.S. Latina and Mexican women residing along the U.S.-Mexico border. Methods For this binational cross-sectional study, 265 participants completed an interviewer-administered questionnaire that obtained information on sociodemographic characteristics, knowledge, attitudes, family history, and screening practices. Differences between Mexican (n=128) and U.S. Latina (n=137) participants were assessed by Pearson's chi-square, Fischer's exact test, t tests, and multivariate regression analyses. Results U.S. Latinas had significantly increased odds of having ever received a mammogram/breast ultrasound (adjusted odds ratio [OR]=2.95) and clinical breast examination (OR=2.67) compared to Mexican participants. A significantly greater proportion of Mexican women had high knowledge levels (54.8%) compared to U.S. Latinas (45.2%, p<0.05). Age, education, and insurance status were significantly associated with breast cancer screening use. Conclusions Despite having higher levels of breast cancer knowledge than U.S. Latinas, Mexican women along the U.S.-Mexico border are not receiving the recommended breast cancer screening procedures. Although U.S. border Latinas had higher breast cancer screening levels than their Mexican counterparts, these levels are lower than those seen among the general U.S. Latina population. Our findings underscore the lack of access to breast cancer prevention screening services and emphasize the need to ensure that existing breast cancer screening programs are effective in reaching women along the U.S.-Mexico border. PMID:21970564

  5. Comparison of two software versions of a commercially available computer-aided detection (CAD) system for detecting breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Ja; Moon, Woo Kyung; Kim, Soo-Yeon; Chang, Jung Min; Kim, Sun Mi; Cho, Nariya

    2010-06-01

    The performance of the computer-aided detection (CAD) system can be determined by the sensitivity and false-positive marks rate, therefore these factors should be improved by upgrading the software version of the CAD system. To compare retrospectively the performances of two software versions of a commercially available CAD system when applied to full-field digital mammograms for the detection of breast cancers in a screening group. Versions 3.1 and 8.3 of a CAD software system (ImageChecker, R2 Technology) were applied to the full-field digital mammograms of 130 women (age range 36-80, mean age 53 years) with 130 breast cancers detected by screening. The overall sensitivities of the version 3.1 and 8.3 CAD systems were 92.3% (120 of 130) and 96.2% (125 of 130) (P=0.025), respectively, and sensitivities for masses were 78.3% (36 of 46) and 89.1% (41 of 46) (P=0.024) and for microcalcifications 100% (84 of 84) and 100% (84 of 84), respectively. Version 8.3 correctly marked five lesions of invasive ductal carcinoma that were missed by version 3.1. Average numbers of false-positive marks per image were 0.38 (0.15 for calcifications, 0.23 for masses) for version 3.1 and 0.46 (0.13 for calcifications, 0.33 for masses) for version 8.3 (P=0.1420). The newer version 8.3 of the CAD system showed better overall sensitivity for the detection of breast cancer than version 3.1 due to its improved sensitivity for masses when applied to full-field digital mammograms.

  6. Evaluation of the interval cancer rate and its determinants on the Girona Health Region's early breast cancer detection program.

    PubMed

    Renart-Vicens, Gemma; Puig-Vives, Montserrat; Albanell, Joan; Castañer, Francesc; Ferrer, Joana; Carreras, Miquel; Tarradas, Joan; Sala, Maria; Marcos-Gragera, Rafael

    2014-08-01

    The main aim of this study is to estimate the rate of false negative and true IC on the Program for the Early Detection of Breast Cancer (PEDBC) run by the Girona Health Region (GHR) and compare the clinicopathological characteristics of these tumors with those detected within the same program. A retrospective cohort study including all women participating on the Girona PEDBC between 2000 and 2006, with negative mammography screening. The IC included are those detected between the first and second round of screening and between the second and third round. We identified a total of 43 IC, representing an incidence rate of 0.70 cases per 1,000 screened women. Of the 43 probable IC, we were able to classify a total of 22 (51.2%) cases. Of these 22 cases, 54.5% were classified as true interval tumors, 13.6% false negatives, 18.2% occult tumors and the remaining 13.6% minimal sign.We found significant differences in some clinicopathological characteristics of the IC comparing with the tumors detected within the program during the same period. The IC rate for the PEDBC is within the expected parameters, with a high proportion of cases of true interval cancers (54.5%) and a low proportion of false negatives (13.6%). The results show that the proportional incidence of IC is within the limits set by European Guidelines. Furthermore, it has been confirmed that IC display more aggressive clinicopathological characteristics than screening breast cancers.

  7. Variation in Breast Cancer-Risk Factor Associations by Method of Detection: Results From a Series of Case-Control Studies.

    PubMed

    Sprague, Brian L; Gangnon, Ronald E; Hampton, John M; Egan, Kathleen M; Titus, Linda J; Kerlikowske, Karla; Remington, Patrick L; Newcomb, Polly A; Trentham-Dietz, Amy

    2015-06-15

    Concerns about breast cancer overdiagnosis have increased the need to understand how cancers detected through screening mammography differ from those first detected by a woman or her clinician. We investigated risk factor associations for invasive breast cancer by method of detection within a series of case-control studies (1992-2007) carried out in Wisconsin, Massachusetts, and New Hampshire (n=15,648 invasive breast cancer patients and 17,602 controls aged 40-79 years). Approximately half of case women reported that their cancer had been detected by mammographic screening and half that they or their clinician had detected it. In polytomous logistic regression models, parity and age at first birth were more strongly associated with risk of mammography-detected breast cancer than with risk of woman/clinician-detected breast cancer (P≤0.01; adjusted for mammography utilization). Among postmenopausal women, estrogen-progestin hormone use was predominantly associated with risk of woman/clinician-detected breast cancer (odds ratio (OR)=1.49, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.29, 1.72), whereas obesity was predominantly associated with risk of mammography-detected breast cancer (OR=1.72, 95% CI: 1.54, 1.92). Among regularly screened premenopausal women, obesity was not associated with increased risk of mammography-detected breast cancer (OR=0.99, 95% CI: 0.83, 1.18), but it was associated with reduced risk of woman/clinician-detected breast cancer (OR=0.53, 95% CI: 0.43, 0.64). These findings indicate important differences in breast cancer risk factors according to method of detection.

  8. Real-time intraoperative detection of breast cancer using near-infrared fluorescence imaging and Methylene Blue.

    PubMed

    Tummers, Q R J G; Verbeek, F P R; Schaafsma, B E; Boonstra, M C; van der Vorst, J R; Liefers, G-J; van de Velde, C J H; Frangioni, J V; Vahrmeijer, A L

    2014-07-01

    Despite recent developments in preoperative breast cancer imaging, intraoperative localization of tumor tissue can be challenging, resulting in tumor-positive resection margins during breast conserving surgery. Based on certain physicochemical similarities between Technetium((99m)Tc)-sestamibi (MIBI), an SPECT radiodiagnostic with a sensitivity of 83-90% to detect breast cancer preoperatively, and the near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore Methylene Blue (MB), we hypothesized that MB might detect breast cancer intraoperatively using NIR fluorescence imaging. Twenty-four patients with breast cancer, planned for surgical resection, were included. Patients were divided in 2 administration groups, which differed with respect to the timing of MB administration. N = 12 patients per group were administered 1.0 mg/kg MB intravenously either immediately or 3 h before surgery. The mini-FLARE imaging system was used to identify the NIR fluorescent signal during surgery and on post-resected specimens transferred to the pathology department. Results were confirmed by NIR fluorescence microscopy. 20/24 (83%) of breast tumors (carcinoma in N = 21 and ductal carcinoma in situ in N = 3) were identified in the resected specimen using NIR fluorescence imaging. Patients with non-detectable tumors were significantly older. No significant relation to receptor status or tumor grade was seen. Overall tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) was 2.4 ± 0.8. There was no significant difference between TBR and background signal between administration groups. In 2/4 patients with positive resection margins, breast cancer tissue identified in the wound bed during surgery would have changed surgical management. Histology confirmed the concordance of fluorescence signal and tumor tissue. This feasibility study demonstrated an overall breast cancer identification rate using MB of 83%, with real-time intraoperative guidance having the potential to alter patient management. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All

  9. Real-Time Intraoperative Detection of Breast Cancer using Near-infrared Fluorescence Imaging and Methylene Blue

    PubMed Central

    Tummers, Quirijn R.J.G.; Verbeek, Floris P.R.; Schaafsma, Boudewijn E.; Boonstra, Martin C.; van der Vorst, Joost R.; Liefers, Gerrit-Jan; van de Velde, Cornelis J.H.; Frangioni, John V.; Vahrmeijer, Alexander L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Despite recent developments in preoperative breast cancer imaging, intraoperative localization of tumor tissue can be challenging, resulting in tumor-positive resection margins during breast-conserving surgery. Based on certain physicochemical similarities between Technetium(99mTc)-sestamibi (MIBI), a SPECT radiodiagnostic with a sensitivity of 83–90% to detect breast cancer preoperatively, and the near-infrared (NIR) fluorophore Methylene Blue (MB), we hypothesized that MB might detect breast cancer intraoperatively using NIR fluorescence imaging. Methods Twenty-four patients with breast cancer, planned for surgical resection, were included. Patients were divided in 2 administration groups, which differed with respect to the timing of MB administration. N = 12 patients per group were administered 1.0 mg/kg MB intravenously either immediately or 3 h before surgery. The mini-FLARE imaging system was used to identify the NIR fluorescent signal during surgery and on post-resected specimens transferred to the pathology department. Results were confirmed by NIR fluorescence microscopy. Results 20/24 (83%) of breast tumors (carcinoma in N=21 and ductal carcinoma in situ in N=3) were identified in the resected specimen using NIR fluorescence imaging. Patients with non-detectable tumors were significantly older. No significant relation to receptor status or tumor grade was seen. Overall tumor-to-background ratio (TBR) was 2.4 ± 0.8. There was no significant difference between TBR and background signal between administration groups. In 2/4 patients with positive resection margins, breast cancer tissue identified in the wound bed during surgery would have changed surgical management. Histology confirmed the concordance of fluorescence signal and tumor tissue. Conclusions This feasibility study demonstrated an overall breast cancer identification rate using MB of 83%, with real-time intraoperative guidance having the potential to alter patient management. PMID

  10. Genetics Home Reference: breast cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... cancers . A small percentage of all breast cancers cluster in families. These cancers are described as hereditary ... will develop breast cancer . Some breast cancers that cluster in families are associated with inherited mutations in ...

  11. Clinical impact of detection of loss of heterozygosity of BRCA1 and BRCA2 markers in sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Beckmann, M. W.; Picard, F.; An, H. X.; van Roeyen, C. R.; Dominik, S. I.; Mosny, D. S.; Schnürch, H. G.; Bender, H. G.; Niederacher, D.

    1996-01-01

    The development of familial and sporadic breast cancer is based on genetic alterations of tumour-suppressor genes, for which loss of heterozygosity (LOH) is one mechanism of gene inactivation. To investigate LOH of BRCA1 (17q21) and BRCA2 (13-q12-13) in sporadic breast cancer, polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based fluorescent DNA technology for detection of microsatellite polymorphisms was applied. A total of 137 breast cancer and 15 benign breast specimens with matched normal tissue were examined. Fluorescent-labelled PCR products were analysed in an automated DNA sequencer (ALFTM Pharmacia). Losses at both loci were correlated with different histological types, age, tumour size, lymph node status, grading and steroid hormone receptor expression, [SHR: oestrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PgR)]. For BRCA1 (D17S855, THRA1, D17S579) losses could be detected in invasive ductal carcinoma (IDC; n = 108) in 32-38%, invasive lobular carcinoma (ILC; n = 19) in 21-42% depending on the marker applied, but not in benign breast tumours (n = 15). Losses of BRCA1 markers correlated with larger tumour size, higher grade, and PgR expression. For BRCA2 (D13S260, D13S267, D13S171) losses could be detected in 108 IDCs in 30-38%, in 19 ILCs in 17-39% depending on the marker applied, but not in benign breast tumours. Losses of BRCA2 markers correlated only with higher grade. Microsatellite analyses combined with detection of fluorescent-labelled PCR products by an automated laser DNA sequencer can be used for routine determination of LOH. In sporadic breast cancer, LOH of BRCA1 of BRCA2 does not add decisive prognostic value as stated for familial breast cancer. Images Figure 1 PMID:8630282

  12. Detection of disseminated tumor cells in locally advanced breast cancer patients before primary systemic therapy.

    PubMed

    Solá, Montserrat; Margelí, Mireia; Castellá, Eva; Cirauqui, Beatriz; Mariscal, Antonio; Rull, Miquel; Julian, Juan F; Luna, Miquel; Vallejo, Virginia; Fraile, Manuel

    2013-10-01

    To assess the prevalence and prognostic power of disseminated tumor cells (DTC) in patients with locally advanced breast cancer (LABC) before primary systemic therapy (PST). LABC patients attending our Breast Unit were studied between 2002 and 2012, all of them being considered for PST. To determine the presence of DTC, posterior iliac crest aspirates were obtained and marrow samples were processed by gradient separation with Ficoll (Lymphoprep(®)) and immunohistochemical staining using the antiCK A45-B/B3 (EPIMET) antibody. Clinicopathologic variables were recorded before and after PST to assess response. Disease-free survival (DFS) and overall survival (OS) were determined after follow-up. The presence of DTC as a predictor of response to PST and as a prognostic tool for OS and DSF was evaluated. DTC were observed in 26% of 47 patients included in the study. PST consisted of chemotherapy in 94% and hormone therapy in 6%. Breast-conserving therapy was attained in 33%. Mean follow-up was 68 months. Complete clinical response (CR) after PST was seen in 26%, disease recurrence in 38%, and cancer-related death in 8%; tumor size and negative estrogen receptors were significant predictors of CR and mastectomy was associated with DFS. Persistent axillary disease after PST and previous recurrence were predictive of OS. DTC were detected more often in patients who did not achieve CR and those who presented recurrence. DTC detection was a significant prognostic factor for a worse OS (OR = 7.62; CI95%: 1.46-39.61; p = 0.009) and a decreased survival time (62 versus 82 months, p = 0.004). Presence of DTC before PST was found in a significant number of patients with LABC. DTC were found to be a significant prognostic factor for cancer-related death. DTC could be a surrogate predictor of response to PST and also of disease recurrence in LABC patients. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Detection of occult disease in breast cancer using fluorodeoxyglucose camera-based positron emission tomography.

    PubMed

    Pecking, A P; Mechelany-Corone, C; Bertrand-Kermorgant, F; Alberini, J L; Floiras, J L; Goupil, A; Pichon, M F

    2001-10-01

    An isolated increase of blood tumor marker CA 15.3 in breast cancer is considered a sensitive indicator for occult metastatic disease but by itself is not sufficient for initiating therapeutic intervention. We investigated the potential of camera-based positron emission tomography (PET) imaging using [18F]-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) to detect clinically occult recurrences in 132 female patients (age, 35-69 years) treated for breast cancer, all presenting with an isolated increase in blood tumor marker CA 15.3 without any other evidence of metastatic disease. FDG results were correlated to pathology results or to a sequentially guided conventional imaging method. One hundred nineteen patients were eligible for correlations. Positive FDG scans were obtained for 106 patients, including 89 with a single lesion and 17 with 2 or more lesion. There were 92 true-positive and 14 false-positive cases, 10 of which became true positive within 1 year. Among the 13 negative cases, 7 were false negative and 6 were true negative. Camera-based PET using FDG has successfully identified clinically occult disease with an overall sensitivity of 93.6% and a positive predictive value of 96.2%. The smallest detected size was 6 mm for a lymph node metastasis (tumor to nontumor ratio, 4:2). FDG camera-based PET localized tumors in 85.7% of cases suspected for clinically occult metastatic disease on the basis of a significant increase in blood tumor marker. A positive FDG scan associated with an elevated CA 15.3 level is most consistent with metastatic relapse of breast cancer.

  14. Elapsed time from breast cancer detection to first adjuvant therapy in a Canadian province, 1999–2000

    PubMed Central

    Rayson, Daniel; Chiasson, Darrell; Dewar, Ron

    2004-01-01

    Background A number of studies have examined time intervals between care steps in breast cancer diagnosis and treatment. The objective of this study was to document the elapsed time from first clinical or mammographic detection of breast abnormality to initiation of first adjuvant therapy in women with invasive breast cancer in Nova Scotia and to examine the effect of age, disease stage and place of residence on these intervals. Methods All dates were abstracted from patient charts and the Oncology Patient Information System. Eligible women were those with invasive breast cancer detected by Sept. 1, 1999, who were referred to 1 of 2 provincial cancer treatment centres by Sept. 1, 2000. All time intervals were calculated in days, and only patients experiencing both care events defining an interval were included in the analysis of time to event for that interval. We used proportional hazards regression analysis to evaluate the influence of patient age, disease stage and place of residence on times between care events. Results A total of 776 new diagnoses of breast cancer were reported to the Nova Scotia Cancer Registry over the study period. Of the 776, 467 met the inclusion criteria, and 364 patients were eligible for analysis. The overall median time from clinical or mammographic detection of breast cancer to initiation of first adjuvant therapy was 91 days (interquartile range 72–123 days). Disease stage was the strongest predictor of elapsed time: the median interval from disease detection to initiation of first adjuvant therapy for patients with stage I disease was 118 days, as compared with 85 days for those with stage II disease and 75 days for those with stage III disease (adjusted hazard ratio [HR] 2.1, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.6–2.8). Patients aged 70 years or more at diagnosis experienced longer elapsed times (median interval 98 days) than did younger patients (93 days for those aged 50–69 years and 82 days for those aged 49 years or less

  15. Agreement of Different Methods for Tissue Based Detection of HER2 Signal in Invasive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Thakral, Gaurav; Wey, Andrew; Rahman, Mobeen; Fang, Rui; Lum, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Breast cancer is the second leading cause of cancer mortality amongst American women. The HER2 gene encodes a cell surface receptor that affects cell proliferation and has been recognized as a diagnostic factor in treatment selection for invasive breast cancer. Examine accuracy in HER2 detection between manual count, computer assisted, and automated tiling algorithm. 42 randomly selected invasive breast cancer specimens were enumerated by fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH)for HER2 and CEP17 markers using the Vysis HER2 assay (AbbotLaboratory, North Chicago, IL). Specimens were tested using three methods: Manual, computer assisted nuclei selection (Tissue FISH MetaSystems, Newton, MA), and automated enumeration (MetaSystems, Newton, MA). The greatest bias and widest agreement limits for HER2 and CEP17 were seen in Automatic versus Manual, the gold standard. HER2 values greater than 6 possessed the greatest bias and widest agreement limits. CEP17 comparison showed similar bias and agreement limits for each comparison. Kappa values indicated good agreement for all methods although Tissue FISH and Manual possessed better agreement. Higher agreement at lower HER2 & CEP17 count maybe due to fewer chromosomal aberrations, in which selection of field of views has less variation between methods. Alternatively, increased background signals seen in polyploidy may be responsible for the variations in signal count. Manual and Tissue FISH demonstrated good agreement amongst by both Altman Bland and Cohen's Kappa. While the automatic method has good agreement at lower HER2, the sharp increase in variability at higher HER2 counts illustrates a limitation of the automatic method.

  16. Affluence and Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Lehrer, Steven; Green, Sheryl; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E

    2016-09-01

    .624). The multivariate general linear model with income as covariate, 5-year survival by race as a dependent variable, showed a significant effect of income and White race on 5-year survival (p < 0.001), unrelated to Black race (p = 0.780) or other races (p = 0.618). In men, we found a nonsignificant positive correlation between county breast cancer incidence and income (r = 0.098, p = 0.168). Breast cancer risk factors, such as delayed childbirth, less breast-feeding, and use of hormone supplements, are more common in affluent women. Affluent women are more likely to have mammograms, which detect many cancers that might not otherwise be diagnosed. In addition, women in certain affluent ethnic groups-Ashkenazi Jews, Icelanders and the Dutch-are more likely to carry genetic mutations known to predispose to breast cancer. We hypothesize that women with more income can afford better cancer care and survive longer than poorer women. But our hypothesis does not explain why this effect should be limited to White women; or why node involvement increased with income in White women but not in Blacks or Hispanics. Further studies may be worthwhile. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Male Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... or to other parts of the body. Where breast cancer begins in men Everyone is born with a ... skin around the nipple. Inherited genes that increase breast cancer risk Some men inherit abnormal (mutated) genes from ...

  18. Breast cancer staging

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000911.htm Breast cancer staging To use the sharing features on this ... Once your health care team knows you have breast cancer , they will do more tests to stage it. ...

  19. Early stage breast cancer detection by means of time-domain ultra-wide band sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanoon, T. F.; Abdullah, M. Z.

    2011-11-01

    The interest in the use of ultra-wide band (UWB) impulses for medical imaging, particularly early stage breast cancer detection, is driven by safety advantage, super resolution capability, significant dielectric contrast between tumours and their surrounding tissues, patient convenience and low operating costs. However, inversion algorithms leading to recovery of the dielectric profile are complex in their nature, and vulnerable to noisy experimental conditions and environment. In this paper, we present a simplified yet robust gradient-based iterative image reconstruction technique to solve the nonlinear inverse scattering problem. The calculation is based on the Polak-Ribière's approach while the Broyden's formula is used to update the gradient in an iterative scheme. To validate this approach, both numerical and experimental results are presented. Animal derived biological targets in the form of chicken skin, beef and salted butter are used to construct an experimental breast phantom, while vegetable oil is used as a background media. UWB transceivers in the form of biconical antennas contour the breast forming a full view scanning geometry at a frequency range of 0-5 GHz. Results indicate the feasibility of experimental detection of millimetre scaled targets.

  20. Bioluminescence-based detection of microRNA, miR21 in breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Cissell, Kyle A; Rahimi, Yasmeen; Shrestha, Suresh; Hunt, Eric A; Deo, Sapna K

    2008-04-01

    A hybridization assay for the detection of microRNA, miR21 in cancer cells using the bioluminescent enzyme Renilla luciferase (Rluc) as a label, has been developed. MicroRNAs are small RNAs found in plants, animals, and humans that perform key functions in gene silencing and affect early-stage cell development, cell differentiation, and cell death. miRNAs are considered useful early diagnostic and prognostic markers of cancer, candidates for therapeutic intervention, and targets for basic biomedical research. However, methods for highly sensitive and rapid detection of miRNA directly from samples such as cells that can serve as a suitable diagnostics platform are lacking. In that regard, the utilization of the bioluminescent label, Rluc, that offers the advantage of high signal-to-noise ratio, allows for the development of highly sensitive assays for the determination of miRNA in a variety of matrixes. In this paper, we have described the development of a competitive oligonucleotide hybridization assay for the detection of miR21 using the free miR21 and Rluc-labeled miR21 that competes to bind to an immobilized miR21 complementary probe. The miR21 microRNA chosen for this study is of biomedical significance because its levels are elevated in a variety of cancers. Using the optimized assay, a detection limit of 1 fmol was obtained. The assay was employed for the detection of miR21 in human breast adenocarcinoma MCF-7 cells and nontumorigenic epithelial MCF-10A cells. The comparison of miR21 expression level in two cell lines demonstrated higher expression of miR21 in breast cancer cell line MCF-7 compared to the nontumorigenic MCF-10A cells. Further, using the assay developed, the miR21 quantification could be performed directly in cell extracts. The hybridization assay was developed in a microplate format with a total assay time of 1.5 h and without the need for sample PCR amplification. The need for early molecular markers and their detection methods in cancer

  1. Imaging of Her2-Targeted Magnetic Nanoparticles for Breast Cancer Detection: Comparison of SQUID-detected Magnetic Relaxometry and MRI

    PubMed Central

    Adolphi, Natalie L.; Butler, Kimberly S.; Lovato, Debbie M.; Tessier, T. E.; Trujillo, Jason E.; Hathaway, Helen J.; Fegan, Danielle L.; Monson, Todd C.; Stevens, Tyler E.; Huber, Dale L.; Ramu, Jaivijay; Milne, Michelle L.; Altobelli, Stephen A.; Bryant, Howard C.; Larson, Richard S.; Flynn, Edward R.

    2013-01-01

    Both magnetic relaxometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to detect and locate targeted magnetic nanoparticles, non-invasively and without ionizing radiation. Magnetic relaxometry offers advantages in terms of its specificity (only nanoparticles are detected) and the linear dependence of the relaxometry signal on the number of nanoparticles present. In this study, detection of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles by Superconducting Quantum Interference Device (SQUID)-detected magnetic relaxometry and standard 4.7 T MRI are compared. The nanoparticles were conjugated to a Her2 monoclonal antibody and targeted to Her2-expressing MCF7/Her2-18 breast cancer cells); binding of the nanoparticles to the cells was assessed by magnetic relaxometry and iron assay. The same nanoparticle-labeled cells, serially diluted, were used to assess the detection limits and MR relaxivities. The detection limit of magnetic relaxometry was 125,000 nanoparticle-labeled cells at 3 cm from the SQUID sensors. T2-weighted MRI yielded a detection limit of 15,600 cells in a 150 μl volume, with r1 = 1.1 mM−1s−1 and r2 = 166 mM−1s−1. Her2-targeted nanoparticles were directly injected into xenograft MCF7/Her2-18 tumors in nude mice, and magnetic relaxometry imaging and 4.7 T MRI were performed, enabling direct comparison of the two techniques. Co-registration of relaxometry images and MRI of mice resulted in good agreement. A method for obtaining accurate quantification of microgram quantities of iron in the tumors and liver by relaxometry was also demonstrated. These results demonstrate the potential of SQUID-detected magnetic relaxometry imaging for the specific detection of breast cancer and the monitoring of magnetic nanoparticle-based therapies. PMID:22539401

  2. Imaging of Her2-targeted magnetic nanoparticles for breast cancer detection: comparison of SQUID-detected magnetic relaxometry and MRI.

    PubMed

    Adolphi, Natalie L; Butler, Kimberly S; Lovato, Debbie M; Tessier, T E; Trujillo, Jason E; Hathaway, Helen J; Fegan, Danielle L; Monson, Todd C; Stevens, Tyler E; Huber, Dale L; Ramu, Jaivijay; Milne, Michelle L; Altobelli, Stephen A; Bryant, Howard C; Larson, Richard S; Flynn, Edward R

    2012-01-01

    Both magnetic relaxometry and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to detect and locate targeted magnetic nanoparticles, noninvasively and without ionizing radiation. Magnetic relaxometry offers advantages in terms of its specificity (only nanoparticles are detected) and the linear dependence of the relaxometry signal on the number of nanoparticles present. In this study, detection of single-core iron oxide nanoparticles by superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID)-detected magnetic relaxometry and standard 4.7 T MRI are compared. The nanoparticles were conjugated to a Her2 monoclonal antibody and targeted to Her2-expressing MCF7/Her2-18 (breast cancer cells); binding of the nanoparticles to the cells was assessed by magnetic relaxometry and iron assay. The same nanoparticle-labeled cells, serially diluted, were used to assess the detection limits and MR relaxivities. The detection limit of magnetic relaxometry was 125 000 nanoparticle-labeled cells at 3 cm from the SQUID sensors. T(2)-weighted MRI yielded a detection limit of 15 600 cells in a 150 µl volume, with r(1) = 1.1 mm(-1) s(-1) and r(2) = 166 mm(-1) s(-1). Her2-targeted nanoparticles were directly injected into xenograft MCF7/Her2-18 tumors in nude mice, and magnetic relaxometry imaging and 4.7 T MRI were performed, enabling direct comparison of the two techniques. Co-registration of relaxometry images and MRI of mice resulted in good agreement. A method for obtaining accurate quantification of microgram quantities of iron in the tumors and liver by relaxometry was also demonstrated. These results demonstrate the potential of SQUID-detected magnetic relaxometry imaging for the specific detection of breast cancer and the monitoring of magnetic nanoparticle-based therapies. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Detection of Metastatic Breast and Thyroid Cancer in Lymph Nodes by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jialing; Feider, Clara L.; Nagi, Chandandeep; Yu, Wendong; Carter, Stacey A.; Suliburk, James; Cao, Hop S. Tran; Eberlin, Livia S.

    2017-06-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry has been widely applied to image lipids and metabolites in primary cancer tissues with the purpose of detecting and understanding metabolic changes associated with cancer development and progression. Here, we report the use of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) to image metastatic breast and thyroid cancer in human lymph node tissues. Our results show clear alterations in lipid and metabolite distributions detected in the mass spectra profiles from 42 samples of metastatic thyroid tumors, metastatic breast tumors, and normal lymph node tissues. 2D DESI-MS ion images of selected molecular species allowed discrimination and visualization of specific histologic features within tissue sections, including regions of metastatic cancer, adjacent normal lymph node, and fibrosis or adipose tissues, which strongly correlated with pathologic findings. In thyroid cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of ceramides and glycerophosphoinisitols were observed. In breast cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of various fatty acids and specific glycerophospholipids were seen. Trends in the alterations in fatty acyl chain composition of lipid species were also observed through detailed mass spectra evaluation and chemical identification of molecular species. The results obtained demonstrate DESI-MSI as a potential clinical tool for the detection of breast and thyroid cancer metastasis in lymph nodes, although further validation is needed. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  4. Detection of Metastatic Breast and Thyroid Cancer in Lymph Nodes by Desorption Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jialing; Feider, Clara L.; Nagi, Chandandeep; Yu, Wendong; Carter, Stacey A.; Suliburk, James; Cao, Hop S. Tran; Eberlin, Livia S.

    2017-02-01

    Ambient ionization mass spectrometry has been widely applied to image lipids and metabolites in primary cancer tissues with the purpose of detecting and understanding metabolic changes associated with cancer development and progression. Here, we report the use of desorption electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (DESI-MS) to image metastatic breast and thyroid cancer in human lymph node tissues. Our results show clear alterations in lipid and metabolite distributions detected in the mass spectra profiles from 42 samples of metastatic thyroid tumors, metastatic breast tumors, and normal lymph node tissues. 2D DESI-MS ion images of selected molecular species allowed discrimination and visualization of specific histologic features within tissue sections, including regions of metastatic cancer, adjacent normal lymph node, and fibrosis or adipose tissues, which strongly correlated with pathologic findings. In thyroid cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of ceramides and glycerophosphoinisitols were observed. In breast cancer metastasis, increased relative abundances of various fatty acids and specific glycerophospholipids were seen. Trends in the alterations in fatty acyl chain composition of lipid species were also observed through detailed mass spectra evaluation and chemical identification of molecular species. The results obtained demonstrate DESI-MSI as a potential clinical tool for the detection of breast and thyroid cancer metastasis in lymph nodes, although further validation is needed.

  5. Contribution to the design and implementation of a microwave tomography system for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz Bolado, Alvaro

    This thesis represents a contribution to the design and implementation of a microwave tomography system applied to breast cancer detection. Microwave tomography is an imaging technique that aims to reconstruct the permittivity and conductivity of an unknown object from measurements of its scattered field. This technique has been used in a variety of applications such as non-destructive testing, geophysical surveys and biomedical imaging. Here, we will concentrate in the breast cancer detection, where this technique have received a lot of attention in the recent years. A microwave tomography system usually involves two separate parts, a measurement system capable of performing accurate measurements of the scattered field and a set of algorithms for solving the inverse problem of retrieving the permittivity and conductivity spatial distribution of the unknown object from the scattered field measurements. This inverse problem is particularly difficult to solve, since it is non-linear and ill posed. In order to achieve a good reconstruction of the object, we need to illuminate it under several independent conditions, such as different antenna positions, frequencies or polarizations. In this thesis, we concentrate in the design of an efficient illumination configuration that tries to maximize the quality of the reconstructed images. After a litterature review, it is observed that most of the proposed measurement systems share a common configuration, where in order to maximize the comfort of the patient, the antennas are arranged in a cylindrical or hemi-spherical configuration. On the other hand, the most popular method for breast cancer detection is mammography, where a X-ray image of the compressed breast at two different projections is performed. Taking this into account, two alternative configurations based on a compression of the breast are proposed, the camera and waveguide configurations. The main hypothesis behind this proposition is that a compression of the

  6. An interesting case of screen-detected breast cancer encasing a ventriculoperitoneal shunt.

    PubMed

    Jain, Yogesh Kumar; Kokan, Jalal S

    2013-01-23

    A 67-year-old woman was diagnosed with a breast cancer via screening encasing the ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Triple assessment including MRI scan of the breast confirmed the presence of a breast mass and the tubing of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt was running directly through the mass. She underwent wide local excision of the breast cancer as well as rerouting of VP shunt as a joint procedure with the neurosurgery team and recovered uneventfully. This is a very rare and an interesting case and required management involving a different specialty.

  7. An interesting case of screen-detected breast cancer encasing a ventriculoperitoneal shunt

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Yogesh Kumar; Kokan, Jalal S

    2013-01-01

    A 67-year-old woman was diagnosed with a breast cancer via screening encasing the ventriculoperitoneal shunt. Triple assessment including MRI scan of the breast confirmed the presence of a breast mass and the tubing of the ventriculoperitoneal shunt was running directly through the mass. She underwent wide local excision of the breast cancer as well as rerouting of VP shunt as a joint procedure with the neurosurgery team and recovered uneventfully. This is a very rare and an interesting case and required management involving a different specialty. PMID:23349174

  8. [Detection of circulating tumor cells and its clinical value for different stages and various subtypes of breast cancer].

    PubMed

    Li, Lei; Liu, Yi; Zhang, Shaohua; Wang, Tao; Bian, Li; Wu, Shikai; Song, Santai; Liu, Bing; Jiang, Zefei

    2014-09-30

    To explore the prognostic value of applying a semi-automated detection system for detecting circulating tumor cells (CTC) for different stages and various subtypes of breast cancer. Immunomagnetic separation and immunofluorescent staining were employed to detect the expressions of CTC and CTC HER-2. Chi-square test, univariate and multivariate analyses were used to examine the correlations between CTC and clinical characteristics. CTC was detected in 57.5% (138/240) of metastatic breast cancer (MBC). CTC enumeration, HER-2 status, number of metastasis and bone metastasis were relevant (P < 0.05). CTC was detected in 23.1% (6/26) of early-stage breast cancer (EBC). CTC enumeration, pathological type, estrogen receptor (ER), progesterone receptor (PR), Ki-67, tumor size and lymph node metastasis were irrelevant (P > 0.05). HER-2-positive MBC detected less CTC than HER-2-negative (χ(2) = 12.296, P < 0.001) . CTC HER-2 expression was different between HER-2-positive and negative patients in 99 MBC cases (χ(2) = 8.082, P = 0.004). CTC enumeration is different for various stages and different subtypes of breast cancer. CTC enumeration and bone metastasis are relevant. CTC detection in EBC may predict tumor relapse. And CTC HER-2 expression is different between HER-2-positive and negative MBC patients.

  9. Changes in keratin expression during metastatic progression of breast cancer: impact on the detection of circulating tumor cells.

    PubMed

    Joosse, Simon A; Hannemann, Juliane; Spötter, Julia; Bauche, Andreas; Andreas, Antje; Müller, Volkmar; Pantel, Klaus

    2012-02-15

    Circulating tumor cells (CTC) might function as early markers for breast cancer metastasis or monitoring therapy efficacy. Enrichment and identification of CTCs are based on epithelial markers that might be modulated during epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Little is known about the expression of keratins in CTCs and whether all CTCs can be detected with antibodies directed against a limited panel of keratins. Protein expression of keratin 2, 4-10, 13-16, 18, and 19 were assessed by a cocktail of antibodies (C11, AE1, AE3, and K7) and keratin antibodies C11 and A45-B/B3 alone in 11 breast cancer cell lines and 50 primary breast carcinomas and their lymph node metastases. Furthermore, CTCs were assessed in blood of 70 metastatic breast cancer patients. Claudin-low cell lines did not show expression of normal breast epithelial keratins but were positive for K14 and K16, detected by the cocktail only. Primary breast carcinomas showed changes in keratin expression during metastatic progression to the lymph nodes. In 35 of 70 patients CTCs were identified, of which 83%, 40%, and 57% were identified by the cocktail, C11 and A45-B/B3, respectively. Identification of CTCs by the cocktail was associated with shorter survival (P < 0.01). In silico analyses revealed association between KRT16 expression and shorter relapse-free survival in metastatic breast cancer. Breast cancer cells show a complex pattern of keratin expression with potential biologic relevance. Individual keratin antibodies recognizing only a limited set of keratins inherit the risk to miss biologically relevant CTCs in cancer patients, and antibody cocktails including these keratins are therefore recommended. ©2012 AACR.

  10. Data mining approach to evaluating the use of skin surface electropotentials for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Sree, S Vinitha; Ng, E Y K; Acharya, U Rajendra

    2010-02-01

    The Biofield Diagnostic System (BDS) uses a score formed with measured skin surface electropotentials and a prior Level Of Suspicion (LOS) value (predicted by the physician based on the patient's ultrasound or mammography results) to calculate a revised Post-BDS LOS to indicate the presence of breast cancer. The demographic details, BDS test results, and the recorded electropotential values form a potentially useful dataset, which can be further explored with data mining tools to extract important information that can be used to improve the current predictive accuracy of the device. According to the proposed data mining framework, the BDS dataset with 291 cases was first pre-processed to remove outliers and then used to select relevant and informative features for classifier development and finally to evaluate the capability of the built classifiers in detecting the presence of the disease. Two popular feature selection techniques, namely, the filter and wrapper methods, were used in parallel for feature selection. A few statistical inference based classifiers and neural networks were used for classification. The proposed technique significantly improved the BDS prediction accuracy. Also, the use of prior LOS and, hence, the Post-BDS LOS, associates a mild subjective interpretation to the current prediction methodology used by BDS. However, the feature subset selected in our analysis that gave the best accuracy did not use either of these features. This result indicates the possibility of using BDS as a better objective assessment tool for breast cancer detection.

  11. Breast Cancer (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... With Breast Cancer Breast Cancer Prevention en español Cáncer de mama You may have heard about special events, like walks or races, to raise money for breast cancer research. Or maybe you've seen people wear ...

  12. Non-contact acoustic radiation force impulse microscopy via photoacoustic detection for probing breast cancer cell mechanics

    PubMed Central

    Hwang, Jae Youn; Kang, Bong Jin; Lee, Changyang; Kim, Hyung Ham; Park, Jinhyoung; Zhou, Qifa; Shung, K. Kirk

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate a novel non-contact method: acoustic radiation force impulse microscopy via photoacoustic detection (PA-ARFI), capable of probing cell mechanics. A 30 MHz lithium niobate ultrasound transducer is utilized for both detection of phatoacoustic signals and generation of acoustic radiation force. To track cell membrane displacements by acoustic radiation force, functionalized single-walled carbon nanotubes are attached to cell membrane. Using the developed microscopy evaluated with agar phantoms, the mechanics of highly- and weakly-metastatic breast cancer cells are quantified. These results clearly show that the PA-ARFI microscopy may serve as a novel tool to probe mechanics of single breast cancer cells. PMID:25657870

  13. When performance management works: a study of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    PubMed

    DeGroff, Amy; Royalty, Janet E; Howe, Will; Buckman, Dennis W; Gardner, James; Poister, Theodore; Hayes, Nikki

    2014-08-15

    Little empirical evidence exists about the effectiveness of performance management systems in government. This study assessed the effectiveness of the performance management system of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) and explored why it works. Generalized estimating equation models were used to assess change in program performance after the implementation of a performance management system. In addition, qualitative case study data including observations, interviews, and document review were analyzed using inductive methods. Five of the 7 indicators tested had statistically significant increases in performance postimplementation. Case study results suggest that the system is characterized by high-quality data, measures viewed by grantees as meaningful and fair, and institutionalized data use. Several factors help to explain the system's effectiveness including characteristics of the NBCCEDP program (eg, service delivery program), qualities of the indicators (eg, process level), financial investment in the system, and a culture of data use. © 2014 American Cancer Society.

  14. Quantum dot-based quantitative immunofluorescence detection and spectrum analysis of epidermal growth factor receptor in breast cancer tissue arrays

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xue-Qin; Chen, Chuang; Peng, Chun-Wei; Hou, Jin-Xuan; Liu, Shao-Ping; Qi, Chu-Bo; Gong, Yi-Ping; Zhu, Xiao-Bo; Pang, Dai-Wen; Li, Yan

    2011-01-01

    Background The epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) is a promising therapeutic target in cancer, but its clinical value in breast cancer remains controversial. Our previous studies have found that quantitative analysis of biomarkers with quantum dot-based nanotechnology had better detection performance than conventional immunohistochemistry. The present study was undertaken to investigate the prognostic value of EGFR in breast cancer using quantum dot-based quantitative spectral analysis. Methods EGFR expression in 65 breast cancer specimens was detected by immunohistochemistry and quantum dot-immunohistochemistry, and comparisons were made between the two methods. EGFR expression in tissue microarrays of 240 breast cancer patients was then detected by quantum dot-immunohistochemistry and spectral analysis. The prognostic value of EGFR immunofluorescence area (EGFR area) for five-year recurrence-free survival was investigated. Results The same antigen localization, high correlation of staining rates (r = 0.914), and high agreement of measurement (κ = 0.848) of EGFR expression in breast cancer were found by quantum dot-immunohistochemistry and immunohistochemistry. The EGFR area showed significant differences by tumor grade, lymph node status, HER2 status, and hormone receptor status (all P < 0.05). Patients in the large EGFR area (≥30.51) group had a significantly higher five-year recurrence rate (47.2% versus 27.4%, P = 0.002) and worse five-year recurrence-free survival (log-rank test, P = 0.0015) than those in the small EGFR area (<30.51) group. In the subgroups, EGFR area was an independent prognosticator in the HER2-positive and lymph node-positive subgroups. Conclusion Quantum dot-based quantitative detection demonstrates the prognostic value of EGFR area in the HER2-positive and lymph node-positive subgroups of invasive breast cancer. PMID:22072864

  15. BILATERAL BREAST CANCER: DIAGNOSIS AND PROGNOSIS.

    PubMed

    Ursaru, Manuela; Jari, Irma; Gheorghe, Liliana; Naum, A G; Scripcariu, V; Negru, D

    2016-01-01

    To assess bilateral breast cancer patients, initially diagnosed with stage II unilateral breast cancer. 113 patients with stage 0-II breast cancer diagnosed between 1983 and 2011 were assessed. Of these, 8 patients had bilateral breast cancer: 7 patients with metachronous bilateral breast cancer and 1 patient with synchronous breast cancer. Breast ultrasound, mammography, computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging were used to diagnose recurrence, loco regional and distant metastasis. Age at diagnosis ranged from 37 to 59 years, with a maximum age incidence in the 4th decade (age between: 31-40 years). The average time interval between the two breast cancers was 8.125 years. The most common histological type was invasive ductal carcinoma. All eight patients with bilateral breast cancer had at least one type of recurrence/metastasis, mostly in the liver, and statistically the pleuropulmonary and liver metastases were the most frequent causes of death. Patients in the 4th decade diagnosed with unilateral breast cancer are at risk of developing bilateral breast cancer. In metachronous breast cancer, the time interval between the detection of the second breast cancer and death is directly proportional to the time interval between the two breast cancers. TASTASES, DEATH.

  16. Computerized detection of breast cancer using resonance-frequency-based electrical impedance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Wei; Fan, Ming; Zhao, Weijie; Zheng, Bin; Li, Lihua

    2017-03-01

    This study developed and tested a multi-probe resonance-frequency-based electrical impedance spectroscopy (REIS) system aimed at detection of breast cancer. The REIS system consists of specially designed mechanical supporting device that can be easily lifted to fit women of different height, a seven probe sensor cup, and a computer providing software for system control and management. The sensor cup includes one central probe for direct contact with the nipple, and other six probes uniformly distributed at a distance of 35mm away from the center probe to enable contact with breast skin surface. It takes about 18 seconds for this system to complete a data acquisition process. We utilized this system for examination of breast cancer, collecting a dataset of 289 cases including biopsy verified 74 malignant and 215 benign tumors. After that, 23 REIS based features, including seven frequency, fifteen magnitude features were extracted, and an age feature. To reduce redundancy we selected 6 features using the evolutionary algorithm for classification. The area under a receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) was computed to assess classifier performance. A multivariable logistic regression method was performed for detection of the tumors. The results of our study showed for the 23 REIS features AUC and ACC, Sensitivity and Specificity of 0.796, 0.727, 0.731 and 0.726, respectively. The AUC and ACC, Sensitivity and Specificity for the 6 REIS features of 0.840, 0.80, 0.703 and 0.833, respectively, and AUC of 0.662 and 0.619 for the frequency and magnitude based REIS features, respectively. The performance of the classifiers using all the 6 features was significantly better than solely using magnitude features (p=3.29e-08) and frequency features (5.61e-07). Smote algorithm was used to expand small samples to balance the dataset, the AUC after data balance of 0.846 increased than the original data classification performance. The results indicated that the REIS system is

  17. Mammography use and mode of detection among breast cancer patients in Estonia.

    PubMed

    Innos, Kaire; Valvere, Vahur; Padrik, Peeter; Eelma, Evelyn; Kütner, Riina; Lehtsaar, Jaak; Tekkel, Mare

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine past mammography use and mode of detection among breast cancer (BC) patients in Estonia, a country that has low screening coverage and high BC mortality. Women newly diagnosed with primary BC in Estonia in 2008-2010 were interviewed. Determinants of past mammography use and the detection of BC by mammography were studied using multivariate logistic regression. Among 977 participants, almost half reported no mammograms prior to the detection of BC. Overall, 22% of the cases were detected by mammography (16% by screening mammography). Detection by mammography was strongly related to age, past mammography use, and obesity. Among cases detected by mammography, 10% were stage III/IV at diagnosis (32% among cases detected by other modes). This study showed low mammography utilization and high rate of self-detection of BC in Estonia. Increased detection by mammography would help diagnose the disease at an earlier stage and consequently avoid premature BC deaths. Efforts should be undertaken to increase participation in screening and improve the availability of mammography among older and high-risk women. The results are likely to be relevant for other countries and population groups with low screening coverage.

  18. A circulating miRNA signature as a diagnostic biomarker for non-invasive early detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Xu, Ye; Jin, Xingyu; Wang, Zengwu; Wu, Yidi; Zhao, Deyao; Chen, Gang; Li, Deyu; Wang, Xiaoxia; Cao, Huiqing; Xie, Yuntao; Liang, Zicai

    2015-11-01

    Novel, non-invasive biomarkers to diagnose breast cancer with high sensitivity and specificity are greatly desired. Circulating microRNAs (miRNAs) show potential for breast cancer detection, but the existing results appear to be mixed. Using microscale serum, we established a novel serum-direct multiplex detection assay based on RT-PCR (SdM-RT-PCR). Ninety-three miRNAs dysregulated or with functions in breast cancer were selected as candidates, and additional 3 miRNAs were chosen as endogenous controls. We first conducted miRNA profiling of these 96 miRNAs by SdM-RT-PCR using the sera of 25 breast cancer patients at diagnosis prior to treatment and 20 age-matched healthy controls. miRNAs showing significantly different expression levels between patients and controls were further analyzed using a logistic regression model. A miRNA signature was validated in an independent set of 128 serum samples composed of 76 breast cancer patients and 52 healthy controls. In the discovery stage, we identified 23 miRNAs as significantly dysregulated in breast cancer patients compared with healthy controls. Of these, 10 miRNAs were previously identified as dysregulated in breast cancer; 14 miRNAs remained significant after P-values were adjusted by both correction methods. Principal component analysis and hierarchical clustering of these miRNAs separated patients from controls. Furthermore, the 3-miRNA signature (miR-199a, miR-29c, and miR-424) with the highest diagnostic accuracy for distinguishing breast cancer patients from controls by ROC curve analysis (AUC = 0.888) was successfully confirmed in the validation set (AUC = 0.901). Our data demonstrate that the SdM-RT-PCR assay is an effective breast cancer profiling method that utilizes very small volumes and is compatible with Biobank. Furthermore, the identified 3-miRNA signature is a promising circulating biomarker for breast cancer diagnosis.

  19. Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project data can determine whether the prognosis of breast cancer is affected by the time of surgery during the menstrual cycle.

    PubMed

    Spratt, J S; Zirnheld, J; Yancey, J M

    1993-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the feasibility of using Breast Cancer Detection Demonstration Project (BCDDP) data to ascertain whether the prognosis of breast cancer in premenopausal women is affected when surgery is performed relative to the different phases of the menstrual cycle. In the Louisville BCDDP only 40 cases were available for study, but even with this small number, the data indicate that survivorship was superior when the surgery was performed between days 7-20 of the menstrual cycle (P < 0.06). One thousand eighty-seven premenopausal women underwent surgery for breast cancer during the first 5 years of the national BCDDP, beginning in 1972. This large number of cases, plus the long period of follow-up should provide sufficient statistical power for us to evaluate if there is any relationship between the day of the menstrual cycle, the day surgery was performed, and prognosis. This feasibility study indicates that these women should be followed up and the appropriate statistical studies should be done.

  20. [CEA and early detection of relapse in breast cancer subtypes: Comparison with CA 15-3].

    PubMed

    Riedinger, Jean-Marc; Goussot, Vincent; Desmoulins, Isabelle; Lorgis, Véronique; Coutant, Charles; Beltjens, Françoise; Lizard, Sarab; Fumoleau, Pierre

    2016-05-01

    This retrospective study evaluates the interest of CEA measurement for early detection of breast cancer recurrences. Among 804 patients with invasive breast cancer, we selected 97 patients without recurrence (WR) for 5 years or more, 32 with a local recurrence (LR) and 131 with at least one distant metastasis (DM). Elevated CEA and CA 15-3 levels (>3.1 μg/L and >26 kU/L respectively) were found in 6 % and 22 % of patients with RL respectively and in 49 % and 69 % of patients with DM. Both CEA and CA 15-3 retained a significant value in predicting DM by univariate and multivariate analysis. Higher sensitivity of CEA and CA 15-3 were found in tumors with positive hormonal receptor status. CEA and CA 15-3 levels at DM were raised respectively in 23 and 65 % of the triple negative group, 58 and 75 % of the luminal, 56 and 78 % of the luminal-HER2 and 50 and 30 % of HER2-enriched group (P=0.0094 and 0.0252 respectively). The combination of CEA and CA 15-3 increased CA 15-3 sensitivity in especially luminal and HER2-enriched groups. In conclusion, elevated CA 15-3 and CEA levels at initial diagnosis of recurrence were found to be associated with hormonal receptor status and breast cancer subtypes. The combination of CEA and CA 15-3 appeared useful especially luminal and HER2-enriched groups.

  1. Molecular Detection of Peripheral Blood Breast Cancer mRNA Transcripts as a Surrogate Biomarker for Circulating Tumor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lasa, Adriana; Garcia, Arnal; Alonso, Carmen; Millet, Pilar; Cornet, Mónica; Cajal, Teresa Ramón y; Baiget, Montserrat; Barnadas, Agusti

    2013-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are becoming a scientifically recognized indicator of primary tumors and/or metastasis. These cells can now be accurately detected and characterized as the result of technological advances. We analyzed the presence of CTCs in the peripheral blood of patients with metastatic breast cancer by real-time reverse-transcription PCR (RT-qPCR) using a panel of selected genes. The analysis of a single marker, without an EpCAM based enrichment approach, allowed the positive identification of 35% of the metastatic breast cancer patients. The analysis of five genes (SCGB2, TFF1, TFF3, Muc1, KRT20) performed in all the samples increased the detection to 61%. We describe a sensitive, reproducible and easy to implement approach to characterize CTC in patients with metastasic breast cancer. PMID:24058517

  2. Inverse scattering in a Bayesian framework: application to microwave imaging for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gharsalli, Leila; Ayasso, Hacheme; Duchêne, Bernard; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, we deal with a nonlinear inverse scattering problem where the goal is to detect breast cancer from measurements of the scattered field that results from the interaction between the breast and a known interrogating wave in the microwave frequency range. Modeling of the wave-object (breast) interaction is tackled through a domain integral representation of the electric field in a 2D-TM configuration. The inverse problem is solved in a Bayesian framework where prior information, which consists in the fact that the object is supposed to be composed of compact homogeneous regions made of a restricted number of different materials, is introduced via a Gauss-Markov-Potts model. As an analytic expression for the joint maximum a posteriori (MAP) estimators yields an intractable solution, an approximation of the latter is proposed. This is done by means of a variational Bayesian approximation (VBA) technique that is adapted to complex-valued contrast and applied to compute the posterior estimators, and reconstruct maps of both permittivity and conductivity of the sought object. This leads to a joint semi-supervised estimation approach, which allows us to estimate the induced currents, the contrast and all of the parameters introduced in the prior model. The method is tested on two sets of synthetic data generated in different configurations and its performances are compared to that given by a contrast source inversion technique.

  3. Breast cancer detection rates using four different types of mammography detector

    PubMed Central

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Warren, Lucy M.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Cooke, Julie; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Dance, David R.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Halling-Brown, Mark D.; Looney, Padraig T.; Young, Kenneth C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To compare the performance of different types of detectors in breast cancer detection. Methods A mammography image set containing subtle malignant non-calcification lesions, biopsy-proven benign lesions, simulated malignant calcification clusters and normals was acquired using amorphous-selenium (a-Se) detectors. The images were adapted to simulate four types of detectors at the same radiation dose: digital radiography (DR) detectors with a-Se and caesium iodide (CsI) convertors, and computed radiography (CR) detectors with a powder phosphor (PIP) and a needle phosphor (NIP). Seven observers marked suspicious and benign lesions. Analysis was undertaken using jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristics weighted figure of merit (FoM). The cancer detection fraction (CDF) was estimated for a representative image set from screening. Results No significant differences in the FoMs between the DR detectors were measured. For calcification clusters and non-calcification lesions, both CR detectors’ FoMs were significantly lower than for DR detectors. The calcification cluster’s FoM for CR NIP was significantly better than for CR PIP. The estimated CDFs with CR PIP and CR NIP detectors were up to 15% and 22% lower respectively than for DR detectors. Conclusion Cancer detection is affected by detector type and the use of CR in mammography should be reconsidered. PMID:26105023

  4. Occurrence of Breast Cancer After Chest Wall Irradiation for Pediatric Cancer, as Detected by a Multimodal Screening Program

    SciTech Connect

    Terenziani, Monica; Casalini, Patrizia; Scaperrotta, Gianfranco; Gandola, Lorenza; Trecate, Giovanna; Catania, Serena; Cefalo, Graziella; Conti, Alberto; Massimino, Maura; Meazza, Cristina; Podda, Marta; Spreafico, Filippo; Suman, Laura; Gennaro, Massimiliano

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the occurrence of breast cancer (BC) after exposure to ionizing radiation for pediatric cancer, by means of a multimodal screening program. Patients and Methods: We identified 86 patients who had received chest wall radiation therapy for pediatric cancer. Clinical breast examination (CBE), ultrasound (US), and mammography (MX) were performed yearly. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was added as of October 2007. We calculated the risk of developing BC by radiation therapy dose, patient age, and menarche before or after primary treatment. Results: Eleven women developed a BC from July 2002-February 2010. The sensitivity of the screening methods was 36% for CBE, 73% for MX, 55% for US, and 100% for MRI; the specificity was 91%, 99%, 95%, and 80% for CBE, MX, US, and MRI, respectively. The annual BC detection rate was 2.9%. The median age at BC diagnosis was 33 years. Although age had no influence, menarche before as opposed to after radiation therapy correlated significantly with BC (P=.027): the annual BC detection rate in the former subgroup was 5.3%. Conclusions: Mammography proved more sensitive and specific in our cohort of young women than CBE or US. Magnetic resonance imaging proved 100% sensitive (but this preliminary finding needs to be confirmed). Our cohort of patients carries a 10-fold BC risk at an age more than 20 years younger than in the general population.

  5. Nanotube antibody biosensor arrays for the detection of circulating breast cancer cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Ning; Wickstrom, Eric; Panchapakesan, Balaji

    2008-11-01

    Recent reports have shown that nanoscale electronic devices can be used to detect a change in electrical properties when receptor proteins bind to their corresponding antibodies functionalized on the surface of the device, in extracts from as few as ten lysed tumor cells. We hypothesized that nanotube-antibody devices could sensitively and specifically detect entire live cancer cells. We report for the first time a single nanotube field effect transistor array, functionalized with IGF1R-specific and Her2-specific antibodies, which exhibits highly sensitive and selective sensing of live, intact MCF7 and BT474 human breast cancer cells in human blood. Those two cell lines both overexpress IGF1R and Her2, at different levels. Single or small bundle of nanotube devices that were functionalized with IGF1R-specific or Her2-specific antibodies showed 60% decreases in conductivity upon interaction with BT474 or MCF7 breast cancer cells in two µl drops of blood. Control experiments with non-specific antibodies or with MCF10A control breast cells produced a less than 5% decrease in electrical conductivity, illustrating the high sensitivity for whole cell binding by these single nanotube-antibody devices. We postulate that the free energy change due to multiple simultaneous cell-antibody binding events exerted stress along the nanotube surface, decreasing its electrical conductivity due to an increase in band gap. Because the free energy change upon cell-antibody binding, the stress exerted on the nanotube, and the change in conductivity are specific to a specific antigen-antibody interaction; these properties might be used as a fingerprint for the molecular sensing of circulating cancer cells. From optical microscopy observations during sensing, it appears that the binding of a single cell to a single nanotube field effect transistor produced the change in electrical conductivity. Thus we report a nanoscale oncometer with single cell sensitivity with a diameter 1000 times

  6. A progressive processing method for breast cancer detection via UWB based on an MRI-derived model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Xia; Song, Hang; Wang, Zong-Jie; Wang, Liang

    2014-07-01

    Ultra-wideband (UWB) microwave imaging is a promising method for breast cancer detection based on the large contrast of electric parameters between the malignant tumor and its surrounded normal breast organisms. In the case of multiple tumors being present, the conventional imaging approaches may be ineffective to detect all the tumors clearly. In this paper, a progressive processing method is proposed for detecting more than one tumor. The method is divided into three stages: primary detection, refocusing and image optimization. To test the feasibility of the approach, a numerical breast model is developed based on the realistic magnetic resonance image (MRI). Two tumors are assumed embedded in different positions. Successful detection of a 3.6 mm-diameter tumor at a depth of 42 mm is achieved. The correct information of both tumors is shown in the reconstructed image, suggesting that the progressive processing method is promising for multi-tumor detection.

  7. Detecting emotional expression in face-to-face and online breast cancer support groups.

    PubMed

    Liess, Anna; Simon, Wendy; Yutsis, Maya; Owen, Jason E; Piemme, Karen Altree; Golant, Mitch; Giese-Davis, Janine

    2008-06-01

    Accurately detecting emotional expression in women with primary breast cancer participating in support groups may be important for therapists and researchers. In 2 small studies (N = 20 and N = 16), the authors examined whether video coding, human text coding, and automated text analysis provided consistent estimates of the level of emotional expression. In Study 1, the authors compared coding from videotapes and text transcripts of face-to-face groups. In Study 2, the authors examined transcripts of online synchronous groups. The authors found that human text coding significantly overestimated Positive Affect and underestimated Defensive/Hostile Affect compared with video coding. They found correlations were low for Positive Affect but moderate for negative affect between Linguistic Inquiry Word Count (LIWC) and video coding. The implications of utilizing text-only detection of emotion are discussed. (c) 2008 APA, all rights reserved

  8. Tumor response estimation in radar-based microwave breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Kurrant, Douglas J; Fear, Elise C; Westwick, David T

    2008-12-01

    Radar-based microwave imaging techniques have been proposed for early stage breast cancer detection. A considerable challenge for the successful implementation of these techniques is the reduction of clutter, or components of the signal originating from objects other than the tumor. In particular, the reduction of clutter from the late-time scattered fields is required in order to detect small (subcentimeter diameter) tumors. In this paper, a method to estimate the tumor response contained in the late-time scattered fields is presented. The method uses a parametric function to model the tumor response. A maximum a posteriori estimation approach is used to evaluate the optimal values for the estimates of the parameters. A pattern classification technique is then used to validate the estimation. The ability of the algorithm to estimate a tumor response is demonstrated by using both experimental and simulated data obtained with a tissue sensing adaptive radar system.

  9. Breast Cancer Rates by State

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Lung Ovarian Prostate Skin Uterine Cancer Home Breast Cancer Rates by State Language: English Español (Spanish) Recommend ... from breast cancer each year. Rates of Getting Breast Cancer by State The number of people who get ...

  10. Detection of circulating tumor cell-specific markers in breast cancer patients using the quantitative RT-PCR assay.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hye-Young; Ahn, Sungwoo; Kim, Sunghyun; Park, Sunyoung; Jung, Dongju; Park, Sangjung; Han, Hyunju; Sohn, JooHyuk; Kim, SeungIl; Lee, Hyeyoung

    2015-10-01

    Breast cancer is a highly prevalent disease among women worldwide. While the expression of certain proteins within breast cancer tumors is used to determine the prognosis and select therapies, additional markers need to be identified. Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) are constituent cells that have detached from a primary tumor to circulate in the bloodstream. CTCs are considered the main source of breast cancer metastases; therefore, detection of CTCs could be a promising diagnostic method for metastatic breast cancer. In this study, the CircleGen CTC RT-qDx assay was used to analyze the mRNA expression levels of six CTC-specific markers including EpCAM, CK19, HER2, Ki67, hTERT, and vimentin with a total of 692 peripheral whole blood samples from 221 breast cancer patients and 376 healthy individuals. This assay showed high specificity with multiple markers; none of the healthy controls were detected positive, whereas 21.7 and 14 % of breast cancer patients were positive for EpCAM and CK19, respectively. Of the 221 breast cancer patients, 84 (38 %), 46 (20.8 %), 83 (37.6 %), and 39 (17.6 %) were positively for HER2, Ki67, hTERT, and vimentin mRNA, respectively. Of the 84 patients who were HER2 positive, nine (4 %) were also positive for EpCAM, CK19, Ki67, hTERT, and vimentin. Of the 139 breast cancer patients who were HER2 negative, 65 (29.1 %) were negative for EpCAM, CK19, Ki67, hTERT, and vimentin. Furthermore, the EpCAM-positive population decreased from 21.5 to 8.3 % after completion of anti-tumor treatment (TP4). Similarly, the CK19, HER2, hTERT, and vimentin positives also decreased from 13.9 to 9.5 %, from 37.7 to 21.4 %, from 37.2 to 33.3 %, and from 17.5 to 14.3 %, respectively, after completion of anti-tumor treatment. In contrast, the Ki67 positives increased from 20.6 to 41.7 % after completion of anti-tumor treatment. mRNA overexpression of six CTC-specific markers was detected by the CircleGen CTC RT-qDx assay with high specificity, and the obtained m

  11. Comparing Screening Mammography for Early Breast Cancer Detection in Vermont and Norway

    PubMed Central

    Hofvind, Solveig; Vacek, Pamela M.; Skelly, Joan; Weaver, Donald L.

    2008-01-01

    Background Most screening mammography in the United States differs from that in countries with formal screening programs by having a shorter screening interval and interpretation by a single reader vs independent double reading. We examined how these differences affect early detection of breast cancer by comparing performance measures and histopathologic outcomes in women undergoing opportunistic screening in Vermont and organized screening in Norway. Methods We evaluated recall, screen detection, and interval cancer rates and prognostic tumor characteristics for women aged 50–69 years who underwent screening mammography in Vermont (n = 45 050) and in Norway (n = 194 430) from 1997 through 2003. Rates were directly adjusted for age by weighting the rates within 5-year age intervals to reflect the age distribution in the combined data and were compared using two-sided Z tests. Results The age-adjusted recall rate was 9.8% in Vermont and 2.7% in Norway (P < .001). The age-adjusted screen detection rate per 1000 woman-years after 2 years of follow-up was 2.77 in Vermont and 2.57 in Norway (P = .12), whereas the interval cancer rate per 1000 woman-years was 1.24 and 0.86, respectively (P < .001). Larger proportions of invasive interval cancers in Vermont than in Norway were 15 mm or smaller (55.9% vs 38.2%, P < .001) and had no lymph node involvement (67.5% vs 57%, P = .01). The prognostic characteristics of all invasive cancers (screen-detected and interval cancer) were similar in Vermont and Norway. Conclusion Screening mammography detected cancer at about the same rate and at the same prognostic stage in Norway and Vermont, with a statistically significantly lower recall rate in Norway. The interval cancer rate was higher in Vermont than in Norway, but tumors that were diagnosed in the Vermont women tended to be at an earlier stage than those diagnosed in the Norwegian women. PMID:18664650

  12. Differential expression of prognostic biomarkers between interval and screen-detected breast cancers: does age or family history matter?

    PubMed

    Lowery, Jan T; Byers, Tim; Kittelson, John; Hokanson, John E; Mouchawar, Judy; Lewin, John; Merrick, Dan; Hines, Lisa; Singh, Meenakshi

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare tumor expression of prognostic biomarkers between interval breast cancers and screen-detected breast cancers overall, and according to age at diagnosis and familial risk. Tissue micro-arrays were constructed from 98 breast cancers (47 interval and 51 screen-detected) diagnosed in women in the Cancer Genetics Network. Arrays were immuno-stained to compare protein expression of six biomarkers including estrogen and progesterone receptor (ER/PR), Her2/neu, EGFR, cytokeratin 5/6, and Ki67. Fisher's Exact test was used to compare expression between interval and screen-detected cancers. Interval cancers were larger (P = 0.04), higher stage (P < 0.001), and more likely to have lobular histology (P = 0.01) than screen-detected cancers. Overall, interval cancers more often overexpressed EGFR (P = 0.01) and were somewhat more likely to be ER- (55% vs. 43%, P = 0.3), and triple negative (ER-/PR-/Her2-) (21 vs. 12%, P = 0.26). A greater difference in the proportion of interval versus screen-detected tumors that were ER- (53 vs. 35%; P = 0.29), PR- (35 vs. 21%; P = 0.25) and EGFR+ (17 vs. 0%; P = 0.02) was evident among women over 50. There was a trend toward differential expression among women with familial risk for PR- (P = 0.005) and triple negative status (P = 0.02). This study provides new data indicating that EGFR may be important in the etiology of interval cancer and be a possible therapeutic target. Our data also suggest that biological differences between interval and screen-detected cancers are more defined in older women. Future studies to confirm this finding and to elucidate novel markers for characterizing interval cancers may be more beneficial to this subgroup.

  13. Integration of Breast Cancer Secretomes with Clinical Data Elucidates Potential Serum Markers for Disease Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, Yvonne S; Moresco, James J; Yates, John R; Nardulli, Ann M

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells secrete factors that influence adjacent cell behavior and can lead to enhanced proliferation and metastasis. To better understand the role of these factors in oncogenesis and disease progression, estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells, triple negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231, DT22, and DT28 cells, and MCF-10A non-transformed mammary epithelial cells were grown in 3D cultures. A special emphasis was placed on triple negative breast cancer since these tumors are highly aggressive and no targeted treatments are currently available. The breast cancer cells secreted factors of variable potency that stimulated proliferation of the relatively quiescent MCF-10A cells. The conditioned medium from each cell line was subjected to mass spectrometry analysis and a variety of secreted proteins were identified including glycolytic enzymes, proteases, protease inhibitors, extracellular matrix proteins, and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. An investigation of the secretome from each cell line yielded clues about strategies used for breast cancer proliferation and metastasis. Some of the proteins we identified may be useful in the development of a serum-based test for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring.

  14. Integration of Breast Cancer Secretomes with Clinical Data Elucidates Potential Serum Markers for Disease Detection, Diagnosis, and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Ziegler, Yvonne S.; Moresco, James J.; Yates, John R.; Nardulli, Ann M.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cells secrete factors that influence adjacent cell behavior and can lead to enhanced proliferation and metastasis. To better understand the role of these factors in oncogenesis and disease progression, estrogen and progesterone receptor positive MCF-7 cells, triple negative breast cancer MDA-MB-231, DT22, and DT28 cells, and MCF-10A non-transformed mammary epithelial cells were grown in 3D cultures. A special emphasis was placed on triple negative breast cancer since these tumors are highly aggressive and no targeted treatments are currently available. The breast cancer cells secreted factors of variable potency that stimulated proliferation of the relatively quiescent MCF-10A cells. The conditioned medium from each cell line was subjected to mass spectrometry analysis and a variety of secreted proteins were identified including glycolytic enzymes, proteases, protease inhibitors, extracellular matrix proteins, and insulin-like growth factor binding proteins. An investigation of the secretome from each cell line yielded clues about strategies used for breast cancer proliferation and metastasis. Some of the proteins we identified may be useful in the development of a serum-based test for breast cancer detection, diagnosis, prognosis, and monitoring. PMID:27355404

  15. Lytic Viral Replication as a Contributor to the Detection of Epstein-Barr Virus in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huang, J.; Chen, H.; Hutt-Fletcher , L.; Ambinder, R. F.; Hayward, S. D.

    2003-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) has an accepted association with the epithelial malignancy nasopharyngeal carcinoma and has also been reported in other more controversial carcinoma settings. Evaluation of EBV association with epithelial carcinomas such as breast cancer would benefit from a better understanding of the outcome of EBV infection of these cells. Cell-free preparations of a green fluorescent protein-expressing virus, BX1, were used to infect breast cancer cell lines, which were then examined for EBV gene expression and viral genome copy number. Reverse transcription-PCR analyses revealed that the cells supported a mixture of latency II and lytic EBV gene expression. Lytic Zta and BMRF1 protein expression was detected by immunohistochemistry, and DNA PCR analyses estimated an EBV copy number of 300 to 600 genomes per infected cell. Evidence for lytic EBV expression was also found in breast tissue, where reverse transcription-PCR analyses detected lytic Zta transcripts in 7 of 10 breast carcinoma tissues and 4 of 10 normal tissues from the same patients. Scattered cells immunoreactive for Zta protein were also detectable in breast carcinoma. Quantitative real-time PCR analysis of EBV-positive breast carcinoma tissues suggested that less than 0.1% of the cells contained viral genomes. We suggest that sporadic lytic EBV infection may contribute to PCR-based detection of EBV in traditionally nonvirally associated epithelial malignancies. PMID:14645583

  16. Smart nanoprobes for ultrasensitive detection of breast cancer via magnetic resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jaemin; Yang, Jaemoon; Seo, Sung-Baek; Ko, Hyun-Ju; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2008-12-01

    Antibody-conjugated hydrophilic magnetic nanocrystals for use as smart nanoprobes were developed for ultrasensitive detection of breast cancer via magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. MnFe2O4 nanocrystals (MNCs) for use as MR imaging contrast agents were synthesized by thermal decomposition to take advantage of their MR signal enhancement effect. The MNC surfaces were then modified with amphiphilic tri-block copolymers (dicarboxy poly(ethylene glycol)-block-poly(propylene glycol)-block-poly(ethylene glycol)), not only allowing the MNCs to transfer from the organic to the aqueous phase, but also increasing the colloidal stability of the MNCs by masking poly(ethylene glycol). The physicochemical properties of the synthesized hydrophilic magnetic nanocrystals (HMNCs) were fully investigated. Trastuzumab (TZ), a monoclonal antibody against human epidermal growth factor receptor (HER2/neu), was further conjugated on the surface of HMNCs to specifically target HER2/neu over-expressed breast cancer cells. MR imaging analysis of target cells treated with TZ-conjugated HMNCs (TZ-HMNCs) clearly demonstrated their potential as high-performance nanoprobes for selective imaging.

  17. Development of a hand-held 3D photoacoustic imaging system for breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Aabed, Hazem; Roumeliotis, Michael; Carson, Jeffrey J. L.

    2010-06-01

    Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a non-invasive imaging modality that employs non-ionizing near infrared (NIR) laser light to obtain optical images of tissues with depth penetration and resolution comparable to ultrasound imaging. PA images are created by illuminating tissues with a short laser pulse (~10 ns), which causes optically absorbing structures to heat up slightly, but so rapidly that conditions of thermal and stress confinement are met and the structure emits a pressure wave at ultrasonic frequencies. Detection of the pressure waves at the tissue surface with an ultrasound transducer array provides the data needed to reconstruct the distribution of light-absorbing structures within the tissue. Since it is recognized that cancerous breast lesions absorb light to a greater degree than surrounding normal tissue, PA imaging is a viable candidate for detection of lesions within the intact human breast. Therefore, we have constructed a transportable PA imaging system suitable for breast imaging. The system incorporates a hand-held transducer array with 30 detector elements arranged on a ring. Laser light is delivered coaxially in relation to the ring using a fiber optic light guide. The supporting hardware includes a NIR tuneable laser, transducer cabling, 30 preamplifiers, 30 independent data acquisition channels with onboard memory, and a computer with control and image reconstruction software. Initial tests with the transducer array suggest that it has sufficient sensitivity to detect optically absorbent objects on the order of 1- mm at a depth of 2 cm. It is anticipated that a small hand-held PA imaging unit will be amenable to patient work-up and would complement standard ultrasound imaging.

  18. A situational analysis of breast cancer early detection services in Trinidad and Tobago.

    PubMed

    Badal, Kimberly; Rampersad, Fidel; Warner, Wayne A; Toriola, Adetunji T; Mohammed, Hamish; Scheffel, Harold-Alexis; Ali, Rehanna; Moosoodeen, Murrie; Konduru, Siva; Russel, Adaila; Haraksingh, Rajini

    2017-08-11

    A situational analysis of breast cancer (BC) early detection services was carried out to investigate whether Trinidad and Tobago (T&T) has the framework for successful organized national screening. An online survey was designed to assess the availability, accessibility, quality control and assurance (QC&A), and monitoring and evaluation (M&E) mechanisms for public and private BC early detection. A focus group with local radiologists (n = 3) was held to identify unaddressed challenges and make recommendations for improvement. Major public hospitals offer free detection services with wait times of 1-6 months for an appointment. Private institutions offer mammograms for TTD$240 (USD$37) at minimum with same day service. Both sectors report a lack of trained staff. Using 1.2 mammograms per 10,000 women ≥40 years as sufficient, the public sector's rate of 0.19 mammograms per 10,000 women ≥40 years for screening and diagnosis is inadequate. Program M&E mechanisms, QC&A guidelines for machinery use, delays in receipt of pathology reports, and unreliable drug access are further unaddressed challenges. T&T must first strengthen its human and physical resources, implement M&E and QC&A measures, strengthen cancer care, and address other impediments to BC early detection before investing in nationally organized BC screening.

  19. Consumer Health Education. Breast Cancer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Arkansas Univ., Fayetteville, Cooperative Extension Service.

    This short booklet is designed to be used by health educators when teaching women about breast cancer and its early detection and the procedure for breast self-examination. It includes the following: (1) A one-page teaching plan consisting of objectives, subject matter, methods (including titles of films and printed materials), target audience,…

  20. Pembrolizumab in Treating Patients With Triple-Negative Breast Cancer

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-10-12

    Estrogen Receptor Negative; HER2/Neu Negative; Invasive Breast Carcinoma; Progesterone Receptor Negative; Stage 0 Breast Cancer; Stage I Breast Cancer; Stage IA Breast Cancer; Stage IB Breast Cancer; Stage II Breast Cancer; Stage IIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIB Breast Cancer; Stage III Breast Cancer; Stage IIIA Breast Cancer; Stage IIIB Breast Cancer; Stage IIIC Breast Cancer; Triple-Negative Breast Carcinoma

  1. Hook Wire Localization Procedure and Early Detection of Breast Cancer - Our Experience

    PubMed Central

    Dimitrovska, Maja Jakimovska; Mitreska, Nadica; Lazareska, Menka; Jovanovska, Elizabeta Stojovska; Dodevski, Ace; Stojkoski, Aleksandar

    2015-01-01

    AIM: The purpose of this study is to describe our experience with needle localization technique in diagnosing small breast cancers. MATERIAL AND METHODS: This retrospective study included a hundred and twenty patients’ with impalpable breast lesions and they underwent wire localization. All patients had mammography, ultrasound exam and pathohystological results. We use Mammomat Inspiration Siemens digital unit for diagnosing mammography, machine - Lorad Affinity with fenestrated compressive pad for wire localization and ultrasound machine Acuson X300 with linear array probe 10 MhZ. We use two types of wire: Bard hook wire and Kopans breast lesion localization needle, Cook. Comparative radiologic and pathologic data were collected and analyzed. RESULTS: In 120 asymptomatic women, 68 malignancies and 52 benign findings were detected with mammography and ultrasound. The mean age for patients with malignancy was 58.6 years. According BI-RADS classification for mammography the distribution is our group was: BI-RADS 3 was presented in 6 (8.82%) patients, BI-RADS 4 was presented in 56 (82.35%) patients and BI-RADS 5 was present in 6 (8.82%) of the patients. Most wire localizations were performed under mammographic guidance in 58 from 68 patients with malignant lesions (85.29%) and with ultrasound in 10 (14.7%). According the mammographic findings patients with mass on mammograms were 29 (42.65%), mass with calcifications 9 (13.23%), calcifications 20 (29.41%) and architectural distortions or asymmetry 10 (14.71%). CONCLUSION: Wire localization is a well established technique for the management of impalpable breast lesions. PMID:27275234

  2. Detection of primary breast cancer presenting as metastatic carcinoma of unknown primary origin by 111In-pentetreotide scan.

    PubMed

    Lenzi, R; Kim, E E; Raber, M N; Abbruzzese, J L

    1998-02-01

    Women with isolated metastatic carcinoma or adenocarcinoma involving axillary lymph nodes are a well-recognized group of unknown primary carcinoma (UPC) patients with a favorable prognosis. This group of patients are generally treated based on the assumption that they have occult breast cancer. However, to facilitate patient access to the whole spectrum of therapies available for patients with breast cancer, including strategies involving the use of high-dose chemotherapy, a precise diagnosis is increasingly important. In this clinical case we report the detection of a primary breast cancer by 111In-pentetreotide scanning in a woman who presented with metastatic carcinoma in axillary nodes, no palpable breast lesion, a nondiagnostic mammogram, and negative breast ultrasonography. Previous outcomes analysis of patients with UPC have emphasized the value of identifying women with breast cancer. This report suggests that the 111In-pentetreotide scan can contribute specific, clinically useful information in the evaluation of women presenting with metastatic carcinoma in axillary nodes and an occult primary and deserves prospective study in women with UPC presenting with isolated axillary metastases.

  3. Breast Cancer Knowledge and Early Detection among Hispanic Women with a Family History of Breast Cancer along the U.S.-Mexico Border

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Yelena; Moraros, John; Banegas, Matthew P.; King, Sasha; Prapasiri, Surasri; Thompson, Beti

    2013-01-01

    Background Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related death among U.S. Hispanic women. Hispanics are less likely than non-Hispanic White women to be diagnosed at an early stage and survive breast cancer. Methods For this cross-sectional study, we assessed differences in breast cancer knowledge, attitudes, and screening practices between Hispanic women with (FH+) and without (FH−) a family history of breast cancer in three U.S.-Mexico border counties. Results Among 137 Hispanic women age 40 and older, FH+ women had levels of knowledge and attitudes about breast cancer similar to those of FH− women. FH+ participants were more likely to have ever performed breast self-examinations, although levels of compliance with screening guidelines did not significantly differ between FH+ and FH− groups. Conclusion U.S. Hispanic women with a family history of breast cancer constitute an at-risk group for which adhering to preventive screening guidelines could substantially reduce breast cancer mortality. PMID:20453351

  4. Methylation analysis of plasma cell-free DNA for breast cancer early detection using bisulfite next-generation sequencing.

    PubMed

    Li, Zibo; Guo, Xinwu; Tang, Lili; Peng, Limin; Chen, Ming; Luo, Xipeng; Wang, Shouman; Xiao, Zhi; Deng, Zhongping; Dai, Lizhong; Xia, Kun; Wang, Jun

    2016-10-01

    Circulating cell-free DNA (cfDNA) has been considered as a potential biomarker for non-invasive cancer detection. To evaluate the methylation levels of six candidate genes (EGFR, GREM1, PDGFRB, PPM1E, SOX17, and WRN) in plasma cfDNA as biomarkers for breast cancer early detection, quantitative analysis of the promoter methylation of these genes from 86 breast cancer patients and 67 healthy controls was performed by using microfluidic-PCR-based target enrichment and next-generation bisulfite sequencing technology. The predictive performance of different logistic models based on methylation status of candidate genes was investigated by means of the area under the ROC curve (AUC) and odds ratio (OR) analysis. Results revealed that EGFR, PPM1E, and 8 gene-specific CpG sites showed significantly hypermethylation in cancer patients' plasma and significantly associated with breast cancer (OR ranging from 2.51 to 9.88). The AUC values for these biomarkers were ranging from 0.66 to 0.75. Combinations of multiple hypermethylated genes or CpG sites substantially improved the predictive performance for breast cancer detection. Our study demonstrated the feasibility of quantitative measurement of candidate gene methylation in cfDNA by using microfluidic-PCR-based target enrichment and bisulfite next-generation sequencing, which is worthy of further validation and potentially benefits a broad range of applications in clinical oncology practice. Quantitative analysis of methylation pattern of plasma cfDNA by next-generation sequencing might be a valuable non-invasive tool for early detection of breast cancer.

  5. Ultrafast time-dependent fluorescence spectroscopy for human breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Tang, Guichen; Das, B. B.; Liu, C.-H.; Pradhan, Asima; Alfano, Robert R.

    2012-01-01

    Time-resolved fluorescence emission from normal breast tissue, benign and malignant breast tumors were measured using excitation of 100 fs pulses at 310nm. Fluorescence relaxation decay parameters were extracted from the measured temporal emission profiles. The decay times and amplitudes of fast and slow profiles of malignant tissues were different from normal and benign tissues, which allows the malignant tumor to be separated from non-malignant breast tissue. The differences between the decay times of slow and fast component can be explained by tissue structure changes during breast cancer evolution.

  6. Scanning elastic scattering spectroscopy detects metastatic breast cancer in sentinel lymph nodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austwick, Martin R.; Clark, Benjamin; Mosse, Charles A.; Johnson, Kristie; Chicken, D. Wayne; Somasundaram, Santosh K.; Calabro, Katherine W.; Zhu, Ying; Falzon, Mary; Kocjan, Gabrijela; Fearn, Tom; Bown, Stephen G.; Bigio, Irving J.; Keshtgar, Mohammed R. S.

    2010-07-01

    A novel method for rapidly detecting metastatic breast cancer within excised sentinel lymph node(s) of the axilla is presented. Elastic scattering spectroscopy (ESS) is a point-contact technique that collects broadband optical spectra sensitive to absorption and scattering within the tissue. A statistical discrimination algorithm was generated from a training set of nearly 3000 clinical spectra and used to test clinical spectra collected from an independent set of nodes. Freshly excised nodes were bivalved and mounted under a fiber-optic plate. Stepper motors raster-scanned a fiber-optic probe over the plate to interrogate the node's cut surface, creating a 20×20 grid of spectra. These spectra were analyzed to create a map of cancer risk across the node surface. Rules were developed to convert these maps to a prediction for the presence of cancer in the node. Using these analyses, a leave-one-out cross-validation to optimize discrimination parameters on 128 scanned nodes gave a sensitivity of 69% for detection of clinically relevant metastases (71% for macrometastases) and a specificity of 96%, comparable to literature results for touch imprint cytology, a standard technique for intraoperative diagnosis. ESS has the advantage of not requiring a pathologist to review the tissue sample.

  7. Hyaluronan-modified magnetic nanoclusters for detection of CD44-overexpressing breast cancer by MR imaging.

    PubMed

    Lim, Eun-Kyung; Kim, Hyun-Ouk; Jang, Eunji; Park, Joseph; Lee, Kwangyeol; Suh, Jin-Suck; Huh, Yong-Min; Haam, Seungjoo

    2011-11-01

    We fabricated hyaluronan-modified magnetic nanoclusters (HA-MNCs) for detection of CD44-overexpressing breast cancer using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. CD44 is closely associated with cancer growth, including proliferation, metastasis, invasion, and angiogenesis. Hence, pyrenyl hyaluronan (Py-HA) conjugates were synthesized as CD44-targetable surfactants with hyaluronan (HA) and 1-pyrenylbutyric acid (Py) to modify hyaluronan on hydrophobic magnetic nanocrystals. Subsequently, HA-MNCs were fabricated using the nano-emulsion method; magnetic nanocrystals were simultaneously self-assembled with Py-HA conjugates, and their physical and magnetic properties depended on the degree of substitution (DS) of Py in Py-HA conjugates. HA-MNCs exhibited superior targeting efficiency with MR sensitivity as well as excellent biocompatibility through in vitro/in vivo studies. This suggests that HA-MNCs can be a potent cancer specific molecular imaging agent via targeted detection of CD44 with MR imaging. Crown Copyright © 2011. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. The utility of cardiac stress testing for detection of cardiovascular disease in breast cancer survivors: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Kirkham, Amy A; Virani, Sean A; Campbell, Kristin L

    2015-01-01

    Heart function tests performed with myocardial stress, or "cardiac stress tests", may be beneficial for detection of cardiovascular disease. Women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer are more likely to develop cardiovascular diseases than the general population, in part due to the direct toxic effects of cancer treatment on the cardiovascular system. The aim of this review was to determine the utility of cardiac stress tests for the detection of cardiovascular disease after cardiotoxic breast cancer treatment. Systematic review. Medline and Embase were searched for studies utilizing heart function tests in breast cancer survivors. Studies utilizing a cardiac stress test and a heart function test performed at rest were included to determine whether stress provided added benefit to identifying cardiac abnormalities that were undetected at rest within each study. Fourteen studies were identified. Overall, there was a benefit to utilizing stress tests over tests at rest in identifying evidence of cardiovascular disease in five studies, a possible benefit in five studies, and no benefit in four studies. The most common type of stress test was myocardial perfusion imaging, where reversible perfusion defects were detected under stress in individuals who had no defects at rest, in five of seven studies of long-term follow-up. Two studies demonstrated the benefit of stress echocardiography over resting echocardiography for detecting left ventricular dysfunction in anthracycline-treated breast cancer survivors. There was no benefit of stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in one study. Two studies showed a potential benefit of stress electrocardiography, whereas three others did not. The use of cardiac stress with myocardial perfusion imaging and echocardiography may provide added benefit to tests performed at rest for detection of cardiovascular disease in breast cancer survivors, and merits further research.

  9. The utility of cardiac stress testing for detection of cardiovascular disease in breast cancer survivors: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Kirkham, Amy A; Virani, Sean A; Campbell, Kristin L

    2015-01-01

    Background Heart function tests performed with myocardial stress, or “cardiac stress tests”, may be beneficial for detection of cardiovascular disease. Women who have been diagnosed with breast cancer are more likely to develop cardiovascular diseases than the general population, in part due to the direct toxic effects of cancer treatment on the cardiovascular system. The aim of this review was to determine the utility of cardiac stress tests for the detection of cardiovascular disease after cardiotoxic breast cancer treatment. Design Systematic review. Methods Medline and Embase were searched for studies utilizing heart function tests in breast cancer survivors. Studies utilizing a cardiac stress test and a heart function test performed at rest were included to determine whether stress provided added benefit to identifying cardiac abnormalities that were undetected at rest within each study. Results Fourteen studies were identified. Overall, there was a benefit to utilizing stress tests over tests at rest in identifying evidence of cardiovascular disease in five studies, a possible benefit in five studies, and no benefit in four studies. The most common type of stress test was myocardial perfusion imaging, where reversible perfusion defects were detected under stress in individuals who had no defects at rest, in five of seven studies of long-term follow-up. Two studies demonstrated the benefit of stress echocardiography over resting echocardiography for detecting left ventricular dysfunction in anthracycline-treated breast cancer survivors. There was no benefit of stress cardiac magnetic resonance imaging in one study. Two studies showed a potential benefit of stress electrocardiography, whereas three others did not. Conclusion The use of cardiac stress with myocardial perfusion imaging and echocardiography may provide added benefit to tests performed at rest for detection of cardiovascular disease in breast cancer survivors, and merits further research. PMID

  10. Novel mammographic image features differentiate between interval and screen-detected breast cancer: a case-case study.

    PubMed

    Strand, Fredrik; Humphreys, Keith; Cheddad, Abbas; Törnberg, Sven; Azavedo, Edward; Shepherd, John; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila

    2016-10-05

    Interval breast cancers are often diagnosed at a more advanced stage than screen-detected cancers. Our aim was to identify features in screening mammograms of the normal breast that would differentiate between future interval cancers and screen-detected cancers, and to understand how each feature affects tumor detectability. From a population-based cohort of invasive breast cancer cases in Stockholm-Gotland, Sweden, diagnosed from 2001 to 2008, we analyzed the contralateral mammogram at the preceding negative screening of 394 interval cancer cases and 1009 screen-detected cancers. We examined 32 different image features in digitized film mammograms, based on three alternative dense area identification methods, by a set of logistic regression models adjusted for percent density with interval cancer versus screen-detected cancer as the outcome. Features were forward-selected into a multiple logistic regression model adjusted for mammographic percent density, age, BMI and use of hormone replacement therapy. The associations of the identified features were assessed also in a sample from an independent cohort. Two image features, 'skewness of the intensity gradient' and 'eccentricity', were associated with the risk of interval compared with screen-detected cancer. For the first feature, the per-standard deviation odds ratios were 1.32 (95 % CI: 1.12 to 1.56) and 1.21 (95 % CI: 1.04 to 1.41) in the primary and validation cohort respectively. For the second feature, they were 1.20 (95 % CI: 1.04 to 1.39) and 1.17 (95%CI: 0.98 to 1.39) respectively. The first feature was associated with the tumor size at screen detection, while the second feature was associated with the tumor size at interval detection. We identified two novel mammographic features in screening mammograms of the normal breast that differentiated between future interval cancers and screen-detected cancers. We present a starting point for further research into features beyond percent density that might be

  11. In vivo detection of HSP90 identifies breast cancers with aggressive behavior.

    PubMed

    Osada, Takuya; Kaneko, Kensuke; Gwin, William R; Morse, Michael A; Hobeika, Amy; Pogue, Brian W; Hartman, Zachary C; Hughes, Philip F; Haystead, Timothy; Lyerly, H Kim

    2017-10-09

    Heat shock protein 90 (Hsp90), a chaperone to numerous molecular pathways in malignant cells, is elevated in aggressive breast cancers (BC). We hypothesized that identifying breast cells with elevated Hsp90 activity in situ could result in early detection of aggressive BC. We exploited the uptake of a Hsp90 inhibitor by malignant cells to create an imaging probe (HS131) of Hsp90 activity by linking it to a near infrared (nIR) dye. HS131 uptake into cells correlated with cell membrane expression of Hsp90 and was used to image molecular subtypes of murine and human BC in vitro and in murine models. HS131 imaging was both sensitive and specific in detecting the murine 4T1 BC cell line, as well as subclones with differing metastatic potential. Highly metastatic subclones (4T07) had high HS131 uptake, but subclones with lower metastatic potential (67NR, 168FARN) had low HS131 uptake. We generated isogenic cell lines to demonstrate that overexpression of a variety of specific oncogenes resulted in high HS131 uptake and retention. Finally, we demonstrated that HS131 could be used to detect spontaneous tumors in MMTV-neu mice, as well as primary and metastatic human BC xenografts. HS131 could image invasive lobular BC, a histologic subtype of BC which is often undetectable by mammography. An HSP90-targeting nIR probe is sensitive and specific in imaging all molecular subtypes of murine and human BC, with higher uptake in aggressive and highly metastatic clones. Clinical studies with Hsp90-targeting nIR probes will be initiated shortly. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. [Influence of tumor location in patients with breast cancer on the sentinel node detection].

    PubMed

    González-Soto, M J; Bajén, M T; Pla, M J; Carrera, D; Gil, D; Benito, E; Ricart, Y; Roca, M; Martín-Comín, J

    2006-01-01

    To evaluate the influence of tumour quadrant localization on the sentinel node (SN) detection and the visualisation of internal mammary chain (IM) drainage by radioisotopic techniques. 316 patients with breast cancer were studied. Mean age 57 years (range 29-88). All patients received 37-74 MBq of 99mTc-albumin nanocolloid in 2 ml by peritumoral injection. The breast cancer was located in the upper outer quadrant in 189 patients, in the upper inner in 57, in the lower outer in 57, in the lower inner in 55 and in the subareolar area in 18 patients. At two hours p.i., anterior and lateral chest lymphographies were obtained. The SN location was marked on the patient skin with permanent ink. SN was identified intraoperatively by the gamma probe. Histopatological analysis included imprints, delayed hematoxilin-eosin, inmunohistochemistry CAM 19-2 and PCR. The scintigraphy and surgical detection was in the upper outer quadrant of 90 % and 93 % respectively; in the lower outer quadrant of 91 % and 95 %, in the upper inner quadrant of 93 % and 95 %, in the lower inner quadrant 87 % and 95 % and in the subareolar area in 94 % and 83 %. The IM chain drainage was of 6 % in the UO, in the LO of 5 %, in the UI of 12 %, in the LI of 20 % and none in subareolar. Our data suggest that sentinel node location (quadrant) is not a influential factor in the scintigraphy and surgical detection. Tumours localised in internal quadrant show a higher rate of IM chain drainage.

  13. Breast cancer detection and classification in digital mammography based on Non-Subsampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT) and Super Resolution.

    PubMed

    Pak, Fatemeh; Kanan, Hamidreza Rashidy; Alikhassi, Afsaneh

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer is one of the most perilous diseases among women. Breast screening is a method of detecting breast cancer at a very early stage which can reduce the mortality rate. Mammography is a standard method for the early diagnosis of breast cancer. In this paper, a new algorithm is proposed for breast cancer detection and classification in digital mammography based on Non-Subsampled Contourlet Transform (NSCT) and Super Resolution (SR). The presented algorithm includes three main parts including pre-processing, feature extraction and classification. In the pre-processing stage, after determining the region of interest (ROI) by an automatic technique, the quality of image is improved using NSCT and SR algorithm. In the feature extraction part, several features of the image components are extracted and skewness of each feature is calculated. Finally, AdaBoost algorithm is used to classify and determine the probability of benign and malign disease. The obtained results on Mammographic Image Analysis Society (MIAS) database indicate the significant performance and superiority of the proposed method in comparison with the state of the art approaches. According to the obtained results, the proposed technique achieves 91.43% and 6.42% as a mean accuracy and FPR, respectively.

  14. An Evaluation of Stereoscopic Digital Mammography for Earlier Detection of Breast Cancer and Reduced Rate of Recall

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-08-01

    for finding 2 3 4 3. BIRADS Category for patient: Comments: 03/26/05 APPENDIX D SDM DATA FORM D - BIOPSY PATIENT STUDY NUMBER: DATE OF BIOPSY...31 Jul 2005 4 . TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER An Evaluation of Stereoscopic Digital Mammography for Earlier Detection of Breast Cancer and...3 Introduction .................................................................................... 4 B o dy

  15. Male Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yalaza, Metin; İnan, Aydın; Bozer, Mikdat

    2016-01-01

    Male breast cancer (MBC) is a rare disease, accounting for less than 1% of all breast cancer diagnoses worldwide. Although breast carcinomas share certain characteristics in both genders, there are notable differences. Most studies on men with breast cancer are very small. Thus, most data on male breast cancer are derived from studies on females. However, when a number of these small studies are grouped together, we can learn more from them. This review emphasizes the incidence, etiology, clinical features, diagnosis, treatment, pathology, survival, and prognostic factors related to MBC.

  16. Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early?

    MedlinePlus

    ... in Men Early Detection, Diagnosis, and Staging Can Breast Cancer in Men Be Found Early? Early detection improves ... be treated successfully. Differences affecting early detection of breast cancers in men and women There are many similarities ...

  17. The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program: 25 Years of public health service to low-income women.

    PubMed

    Lantz, Paula M; Mullen, Jewel

    2015-05-01

    This article presents an overview of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP), a valuable and successful national public health program in the USA that will soon celebrate its 25th anniversary. Simulation modeling and other analyses have demonstrated that the NBCCEDP has significantly reduced breast and cervical cancer mortality among low-income uninsured and underinsured women in the USA, a major goal of the original legislation. The NBCCEDP has also served to build cancer prevention and control capacity in state and local health agencies and created strong and unique public-private partnerships aimed at improving women's health. As such, the impact of NBCCEDP extends beyond the millions of women served by the program to include increased public health system capacity and effectiveness regarding cancer early detection and control for all women.

  18. Breast Cancer: Epidemiology and Etiology.

    PubMed

    Tao, ZiQi; Shi, Aimin; Lu, Cuntao; Song, Tao; Zhang, Zhengguo; Zhao, Jing

    2015-06-01

    Breast cancer, the most frequently occurring cancer in women, is a major public health problem, with 1,384,155 estimated new cases worldwide with nearly 459,000 related deaths. Breast cancer is highly heterogeneous in its pathological characteristics, some cases showing slow growth with excellent prognosis, while others being aggressive tumors. Current predictions and statistics suggest that both worldwide incidence of breast cancer and related mortality are on the rise. According to 2012 GLOBOCAN statistics, nearly 1.7 million women were diagnosed with breast cancer with 522,000 related deaths-an increase in breast cancer incidence and related mortality by nearly 18 % from 2008. According to American Cancer Society, one in eight women in the United States will develop breast cancer in her lifetime. It has been predicted that the worldwide incidence of female breast cancer will reach approximately 3.2 million new cases per year by 2050. These numbers reflect the magnitude of breast cancer incidence, its effect on society worldwide and the need for urgency for preventive and treatment measures. While technological advances in medical sciences and health care have made it possible to detect the disease early and to start the treatment early on to prevent the progress of the disease into a metastatic state, there are several unanswered questions with regard to the molecular mechanisms that underlie the aggressiveness of certain forms of this disease. Epidemiological studies suggest that addressing socio economical issues is utmost important, so that all women have equal access to medical care from screening to advanced treatment, and only such decisive action can help reduce the worldwide burden of breast cancer.

  19. Plasmonics nanoprobes: detection of single-nucleotide polymorphisms in the breast cancer BRCA1 gene.

    PubMed

    Wabuyele, Musundi B; Yan, Fei; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2010-09-01

    This paper describes the application of plasmonics-based nanoprobes that combine the modulation of the plasmonics effect to change the surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) of a Raman label and the specificity of a DNA hairpin loop sequence to recognize and discriminate a variety of molecular target sequences. Hybridization with target DNA opens the hairpin and physically separates the Raman label from the metal nanoparticle thus reducing the plasmonics effect and quenching the SERS signal of the label. We have successfully demonstrated the specificity and selectivity of the nanoprobes in the detection of a single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the breast cancer BRCA1 gene in a homogenous solution at room temperature. In addition, the potential application of plasmonics nanoprobes for quantitative DNA diagnostic testing is discussed.

  20. Sentinel node staging of early breast cancer using lymphoscintigraphy and the intraoperative gamma-detecting probe.

    PubMed

    Alazraki, N P; Styblo, T; Grant, S F; Cohen, C; Larsen, T; Aarsvold, J N

    2000-01-01

    Sentinel node staging for breast cancer is increasingly used in place of axillary lymph node dissection but is not yet universally accepted. The problems of non-standardized methodologies and lack of consensus on the optimum techniques to identify sentinel nodes are being addressed. Complementary use of radionuclide imaging before surgery, intraoperative probe detection, and blue dye have yielded the best reported sensitivities for finding a sentinel node (94%). The importance of imaging is summarized as identifying sentinel node(s), distinguishing sentinel from secondary nodes, guiding surgical incision planning, and facilitating lower doses. The learning curve phenomenon, which applies to the surgeon and the nuclear medicine physician, has been recognized; measures to minimize it are being implemented. Radiation exposure to operating room and pathology personnel is very low; estimates of exposure to the surgeon's hands are 0.2% of the annual whole body dose received by every human being from natural background and cosmic sources.

  1. Addition of Digital Breast Tomosynthesis to Full-Field Digital Mammography in the Diagnostic Setting: Additional Value and Cancer Detectability

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Mirinae; Kim, Sun Ah; Kim, Won Hwa; Lim, Ji He; Lee, Su Hyun; Bae, Min Sun; Koo, Hye Ryoung; Cho, Nariya; Moon, Woo Kyung

    2016-01-01

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to assess the value of adding digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) to full-field digital mammography (FFDM) in the diagnostic workup of breast cancer and to determine which lesion variables affect cancer detectability in the combined modality. Methods Between March and May 2012, paired FFDM and DBT images were obtained from 203 women as part of a diagnostic workup for breast cancer. Images from FFDM alone, DBT alone, and DBT combined with FFDM were reviewed in separate sessions by six blinded readers. Jackknife alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic (JAFROC) figure of merit (FOM), sensitivity, and specificity were compared between the modalities. Lesion characteristics affecting the cancer detection rate when using the combined modality were also analyzed. Results Among the 203 women, 126 women had a total of 129 malignancies and 77 women had total of 77 benign lesions. The overall JAFROC FOM of the combined modality was higher than that of FFDM alone (0.827 vs. 0.775, p<0.001) and that of DBT alone was higher than that of FFDM alone (0.807 vs. 0.775, p=0.027). The overall sensitivity of the combined modality was higher than that of FFDM alone (80.0% vs. 73.2%, p<0.001) and that of DBT alone was higher than that of FFDM alone (78.3% vs. 73.2%, p=0.007). Compared to FFDM alone, the combined modality detected an additional 48 cancers. Using the combined modality, the presence of masses or microcalcifications was significantly associated with the cancer detection rate (p<0.001). Conclusion The combination of DBT with FFDM results in a higher diagnostic yield than FFDM alone. Additionally, DBT alone performs better than FFDM alone. However, even when DBT is combined with FFDM, breast cancers with no discernible masses and those lacking calcifications are difficult to detect. PMID:28053633

  2. Inflammatory Breast Cancer

    MedlinePlus

    ... red, or inflamed. Inflammatory breast cancer is rare, accounting for 1 to 5 percent of all breast ... Publications Site Map Digital Standards for NCI Websites POLICIES Accessibility Comment Policy Disclaimer FOIA Privacy & Security Reuse & ...

  3. Circulating tumor cell detection during chemotherapy in patients with breast cancer is not associated with plasma homocysteine levels.

    PubMed

    Yoshihara, Renata Nunes; Teixeira, Bianca Marinelli; Adami, Fernando; Kuniyoshi, Renata K; Alves, Beatriz C A; Gehrke, Flávia S; Vilas-Bôas, Viviane A; Azzalis, Ligia A; Junqueira, Virginia B C; Pereira, Edimar Cristiano; Fonseca, Fernando L A

    2013-10-01

    Breast cancer remains the second most frequent type of cancer in the world and the first among women, and systemic chemotherapy is an adjuvant therapeutic modality that improves survival in a great part of patients. Women with breast cancer, however, frequently show a higher risk of thromboembolism, an event associated to hyperhomocysteinemia and the presence of circulating tumor cells (CTC). Our aim is to correlate the presence of CTCs, detected by the analysis of CK19 and c-erbB2 gene expressions, and the homocysteine plasma levels in the peripheral blood in patients with breast cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Epithelial marker expression (CK19 and c-erbB2) and homocysteine levels were analyzed in a mononuclear fraction of the peripheral blood and plasma, respectively, obtained from 35 patients diagnosed with breast cancer at diagnosis and throughout chemotherapy treatment. No significant relation between the CK19 and c-erbB2 expressions and hyperhomocysteinemia was observed at any moment of the evaluation throughout the chemotherapy treatment (3 and 6 months after the onset). Among clinical data, only menopausal status showed a statistically significant correlation with homocysteine concentration. Although differences in the expressions of the analyzed epithelial markers were detected at 3 and 6 months of chemotherapy treatment, no relation between plasma homocysteine variations and the CK19 and c-erbB2 gene expressions was found in patients under chemotherapy treatment at any moment of the evaluation, suggesting that chemotherapy affects the expressions of the studied genes independently.

  4. Skeletal manifestations of treatment of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Choksi, Palak; Williams, Margaret; Clark, Patricia M; Van Poznak, Catherine

    2013-12-01

    Breast cancer and osteoporosis are common diagnoses in women. Breast cancer survival has improved due to earlier detection and improved treatments. As most breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive, treatment is often aimed at altering the hormonal environment. Both pre and postmenopausal women undergoing these therapies are at risk for bone loss. The patient's health care team ought to have an awareness of the potential for breast cancer treatments to accelerate bone loss. Women with early stage breast cancer are treated with curative intent and, therefore, maintaining bone health is important and is part of the survivorship care to ensure an optimal quality of life.

  5. Skeletal Manifestations of Treatment of Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choksi, Palak; Williams, Margaret; Clark, Patricia M.; Van Poznak, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancer and osteoporosis are common diagnoses in women. Breast cancer survival has improved due to earlier detection and improved treatments. As most breast cancers are estrogen receptor positive, treatment is often aimed at altering the hormonal environment. Both pre and postmenopausal women undergoing these therapies are at risk for bone loss. The patient's health care team ought to have an awareness of the potential for breast cancer treatments to accelerate bone loss. Women with early stage breast cancer are treated with curative intent and, therefore, maintaining bone health is important and is part of the survivorship care to ensure an optimal quality of life. PMID:24132726

  6. Treating Male Breast Cancer by Stage

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Treating Breast Cancer in Men Treatment of Breast Cancer in Men, by Stage Because there have been ... Doctor About Breast Cancer in Men? More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  7. Breast Cancer Risk in American Women

    MedlinePlus

    ... of Breast & Gynecologic Cancers Breast Cancer Screening Research Breast Cancer Risk in American Women On This Page What ... risk of developing the disease. Personal history of breast cancer : Women who have had breast cancer are more ...

  8. Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men

    MedlinePlus

    ... Men Treating Breast Cancer in Men Surgery for Breast Cancer in Men The thought of surgery can be ... Doctor About Breast Cancer in Men? More In Breast Cancer In Men About Breast Cancer in Men Causes, ...

  9. Strengthening breast and cervical cancer control through partnerships: American Indian and Alaska Native Women and the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program.

    PubMed

    Espey, David; Castro, Georgina; Flagg, T'Ronda; Landis, Kate; Henderson, Jeffrey A; Benard, Vicki B; Royalty, Janet E

    2014-08-15

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) has played a critical role in providing cancer screening services to American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/ANs) women and strengthening tribal screening capacity. Since 1991, the NBCCEDP has funded states, tribal nations, and tribal organizations to develop and implement organized screening programs. The ultimate goal is to deliver breast and cervical cancer screening to women who do not have health insurance and cannot afford to pay for these services. The delivery of clinical services is supported through complementary program efforts such as professional development, public education and outreach, and patient navigation. This article seeks to describe the growth of NBCCEDP's tribal commitment and the unique history and aspects of serving the AI/AN population. The article describes: 1) how this program has demonstrated success in improving screening of AI/AN women; 2) innovative partnerships with the Indian Health Service, state programs, and other organizations that have improved tribal public health infrastructure; and 3) the evolution of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention work with tribal communities.

  10. Improving Cancer Detection and Dose Efficiency in Dedicated Breast Cancer CT

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    including breast tomosynthesis [2] and dedicated breast computer tomography CT [3,4], that can form three-dimensional (3D) images of the breast, thus...2. J. T. Dobbins III and D. J. Godfrey: “Digital X-ray tomosynthesis : current state of the TV and clinical potential”, Phys. Med. Biol., Vol. 48, pp

  11. Universal Breast Cancer Antigens as Targets Linking Early Detection and Therapeutic Vaccination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    Rennert G, Eng C, Weitzel J, Sun P, Narod SA: Age at first bith and the risk of breast cancer in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers Breast Cancer Res... Ann B. Young Assistant Professor in Cancer Research, University of Pennsylvania 2002-2005 Tracey Starr Award 2003-2006 Department of Defense...Eisen A, Daly M, Karlan B, Saal HM, Couch F, Pasini B, Wagner T, Friedman E, Rennert G, Eng C, Weitzel J, Sun P, Narod SA: Age at first bith and the

  12. Patient-Specific Circulating Tumor DNA Detection during Neoadjuvant Chemotherapy in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Riva, Francesca; Bidard, Francois-Clement; Houy, Alexandre; Saliou, Adrien; Madic, Jordan; Rampanou, Aurore; Hego, Caroline; Milder, Maud; Cottu, Paul; Sablin, Marie-Paule; Vincent-Salomon, Anne; Lantz, Olivier; Stern, Marc-Henri; Proudhon, Charlotte; Pierga, Jean-Yves

    2017-03-01

    In nonmetastatic triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) patients, we investigated whether circulating tumor DNA (ctDNA) detection can reflect the tumor response to neoadjuvant chemotherapy (NCT) and detect minimal residual disease after surgery. Ten milliliters of plasma were collected at 4 time points: before NCT; after 1 cycle; before surgery; after surgery. Customized droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) assays were used to track tumor protein p53 (TP53) mutations previously characterized in tumor tissue by massively parallel sequencing (MPS). Forty-six patients with nonmetastatic TNBC were enrolled. TP53 mutations were identified in 40 of them. Customized ddPCR probes were validated for 38 patients, with excellent correlation with MPS (r = 0.99), specificity (≥2 droplets/assay), and sensitivity (at least 0.1%). At baseline, ctDNA was detected in 27/36 patients (75%). Its detection was associated with mitotic index (P = 0.003), tumor grade (P = 0.003), and stage (P = 0.03). During treatment, we observed a drop of ctDNA levels in all patients but 1. No patient had detectable ctDNA after surgery. The patient with rising ctDNA levels experienced tumor progression during NCT. Pathological complete response (16/38 patients) was not correlated with ctDNA detection at any time point. ctDNA positivity after 1 cycle of NCT was correlated with shorter disease-free (P < 0.001) and overall (P = 0.006) survival. Customized ctDNA detection by ddPCR achieved a 75% detection rate at baseline. During NCT, ctDNA levels decreased quickly and minimal residual disease was not detected after surgery. However, a slow decrease of ctDNA level during NCT was strongly associated with shorter survival. © 2016 American Association for Clinical Chemistry.

  13. Using image simulation to test the effect of detector type on breast cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mackenzie, Alistair; Warren, Lucy M.; Dance, David R.; Chakraborty, Dev P.; Cooke, Julie; Halling-Brown, Mark D.; Looney, Padraig T.; Wallis, Matthew G.; Given-Wilson, Rosalind M.; Alexander, Gavin G.; Young, Kenneth C.

    2014-03-01

    Introduction: The effect that the image quality associated with different image receptors has on cancer detection in mammography was measured using a novel method for changing the appearance of images. Method: A set of 270 mammography cases (one view, both breasts) was acquired using five Hologic Selenia and two Hologic Dimensions X-ray sets: 160 normal cases, 80 cases with subtle real non-calcification malignant lesions and 30 cases with biopsy proven benign lesions. Simulated calcification clusters were inserted into half of the normal cases. The 270 cases (Arm 1) were converted to appear as if they had been acquired on three other imaging systems: caesium iodide detector (Arm 2), needle image plate computed radiography (CR) (Arm 3) and powder phosphor CR (Arm 4). Five experienced mammography readers marked the location of suspected cancers in the images and classified the degree of visibility of the lesions. Statistical analysis was performed using JAFROC. Results: The differences in the visibility of calcification clusters between all pairs of arms were statistically significant (p<0.05), except between Arms 1 and 2. The difference in the visibility of non-calcification lesions was smaller than for calcification clusters, but the differences were still significant except between Arms 1 and 2 and between Arms 3 and 4. Conclusion: Detector type had a significant impact on the visibility of all types of subtle cancers, with the largest impact being on the visibility of calcification clusters.

  14. Breast Cancer and Bone Loss

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menopause Map Featured Resource Find an Endocrinologist Search Breast Cancer and Bone Loss July 2010 Download PDFs English ... G. Komen Foundation What is the link between breast cancer and bone loss? Certain treatments for breast cancer ...

  15. Impedance measurements for early detection of breast cancer in younger women: a preliminary assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sumkin, Jules H.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Huerbin, Michelle; Klym, Amy H.; McHugh, Linda; Sobran, Cynthia M.; Leader, J. Ken; Zheng, Bin; Gur, David

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this preliminary investigation is to explore the possibility that electrical impedance measurements of the breast can ultimately be used to screen younger women for early detection of breast cancer. As a part of a comprehensive protocol to compare different modalities, participating women undergo a series of diagnostic examinations, including impedance measurements under IRB-approved protocols. The results of the frequency-dependent algorithm are compared with the results of other imaging modalities as well as diagnostic outcome when available. In a preliminary series of 83 patients (divided into two groups) with varying risk levels, a significant correlation between impedance measurements and results from other diagnostic modalities was observed. The specific algorithm developed for high specificity resulted in an overall performance level of 90 percent specificity. The procedure was found to be "simple," "fast," and "easy to use" by the technologists. The interpretation of the results is straightforward. Our preliminary assessment is encouraging and indicates that the system may prove extremely useful for the purpose it was designed. Further technical improvements and clinical assessments are underway.

  16. Detection of HER2 breast cancer biomarker using the optofluidic ring resonator biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gohring, John T.; Dale, Paul S.; Fan, Xudong

    2010-04-01

    In this work, we describe a novel approach for detecting the HER2/neu extra-cellular domain (ECD) protein in human serum samples using the opto-fluidic ring resonator (OFRR). OFRR sensing technology that incorporates microfluidics and optical sensing methods to achieve rapid label free detection in a small and low cost platform. In this study, HER2 proteins were spiked in PBS running buffer and serum at varying concentrations. Concentrations of the HER2 protein were adjusted in serum to levels typical of breast cancer patients that show over-expression of this particular beast cancer biomarker. The OFRR was modified with a biologically functional layer to efficiently capture the HER2 biomarker and produce a sensing signal through interaction with the evanescent field of the optical resonator. Results show effective capture of HER2 at medically relevant concentrations in serum and was achieved for concentrations as low as 13 ng/mL and ranged to above 100 ng/mL. This work will lead to a device that can be used as a tool for monitoring disease progression in a low cost sensing setup.

  17. A signal detection analysis of gist-based discrimination of genetic breast cancer risk

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Christopher R.; Reyna, Valerie F.; Widmer, Colin L.; Cedillos, Elizabeth M.; Brust-Renck, Priscilla G.

    2013-01-01

    Pervasive biases in probability judgment render the probability scale a poor response mode for assessing risk judgments. By applying fuzzy trace theory, we used ordinal gist categories as a response mode, coupled with a signal detection model to assess risk judgments. The signal detection model is an extension of the familiar model used in binary choice paradigms. It provides three measures of discriminability—low versus medium risk, medium versus high risk, and low versus high risk—and two measures of response bias. We used the model to assess the effectiveness of BRCA Gist, an intelligent tutoring system designed to improve women’s judgments and understanding of genetic risk for breast cancer. Participants were randomly assigned to the BRCA Gist intelligent tutoring system, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) Web pages, or a control group, and then they rated cases that had been developed using the Pedigree Assessment Tool and also vetted by medical experts. BRCA Gist participants demonstrated increased discriminability for all three risk categories, relative to the control group; the NCI group showed increased discriminability for two of the three levels. This result suggests that BRCA Gist best improved discriminability among genetic risk categories, and both BRCA Gist and the NCI website improved participants’ ability to discriminate, rather than simply shifting their decision criterion. A spreadsheet that fits the model and compares parameters across the conditions can be downloaded from the Behavior Research Methods website and used in any research involving categorical responses. PMID:23784010

  18. Cost analysis of the National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program: selected states, 2003 to 2004.

    PubMed

    Ekwueme, Donatus U; Gardner, James G; Subramanian, Sujha; Tangka, Florence K; Bapat, Bela; Richardson, Lisa C

    2008-02-01

    The National Breast and Cervical Cancer Early Detection Program (NBCCEDP) was established by the U.S. Congress in 1990. In recent years, there has been an emphasis on ascertaining the NBCCEDP's costs of delivering screening and diagnostic services to medically underserved, low-income women. The objective of this report was to address 3 economic questions: What is the cost per woman served in the program, what is the cost per woman served by program component, and what is the cost per cancer detected through the program? The authors developed a questionnaire to systematically collect activity-based costs on screening for breast and cervical cancer from 9 participating programs. The questionnaire was developed based on well established methods of collecting cost data for program evaluation. Data were collected from July 2003 through June 2004. With in-kind contributions, the cost of screening services to women in 9 programs was estimated at $555 per woman served. Without in-kind contributions, this cost was $519. Among the program components, screening and coalitions/partnerships accounted for the highest and lowest cost per woman served, respectively. The median cost of screening a woman for breast cancer was $94, and the cost per breast cancer detected was $10,566. For cervical cancer, these costs were $56 and $13,340, respectively. Costs per woman served, screened, and cancers detected are needed for programs to accurately determine the resources required to reach and screen eligible women. With limited program resources, these cost estimates can provide useful information to assist programs in planning and implementing cost-effective activities that could maximize the allocation of program resources.

  19. [Organized breast cancer screening].

    PubMed

    Rouëssé, Jacques; Sancho-Garnier, Hélèn

    2014-02-01

    Breast screening programs are increasingly controversial, especially regarding two points: the number of breast cancer deaths they avoid, and the problem of over-diagnosis and over-treatment. The French national breast cancer screening program was extended to cover the whole country in 2004. Ten years later it is time to examine the risk/benefit ratio of this program and to discuss the need for change. Like all forms of cancer management, screening must be regularly updated, taking into account the state of the art, new evidence, and uncertainties. All screening providers should keep themselves informed of the latest findings. In the French program, women aged 50-74 with no major individual or familial risk factors for breast cancer are offered screening mammography and clinical breast examination every two years. Images considered non suspicious of malignancy by a first reader are re-examined by a second reader. The devices and procedures are subjected to quality controls. Participating radiologists (both public and private) are required to read at least 500 mammographies per year. The program's national participation rate was 52.7 % in 2012. When individual screening outside of the national program is taken into account (nearly 15 % of women), coverage appears close to the European recommendation of 65 %. Breast cancer mortality has been falling in France by 0.6 % per year for over 30 years, starting before mass screening was implemented, and by 1.5 % since 2005. This decline can be attributed in part to earlier diagnosis and better treatment, so that the specific impact of screening cannot easily be measured. Over-treatment, defined as the detection and treatment of low-malignancy tumors that would otherwise not have been detected in a person's lifetime, is a major negative effect of screening, but its frequency is not precisely known (reported to range from 1 % to 30 %). In view of these uncertainties, it would be advisable to modify the program in order to

  20. Breast Cancer Sentinel Node Detection: An Alternative Solution for Centers Lacking Nuclear Technology.

    PubMed

    Alhussini, Mahmoud A; Awad, Ahmed T; Ashour, Mohamed H; Abdelateef, Ahmed; Fayed, Haytham

    2016-08-01

    Sentinel lymph node (SLN) has become the gold standard for all cases with no axillary nodal metastasis. The combined radioisotope and blue dye technique is adopted in most centers. The lack of the technology for radioisotope in our institution encouraged us to study the feasibility of methylene blue (MB) for SLN detection in breast cancer patients admitted to Alexandria Surgical Oncology Unit. A total of 144 cases were subjected to SLN detection by injecting 2 ml of MB 1%. This was followed by standard axillary lymph node dissection. The safety and accuracy of MB as a tracer for detection of SLN were studied. The identification rate was 93.15%. The number of SLN identified ranged from 1 to 8 nodes with a mean of 1.75 ± 1.17. The sensitivity of MB dye technique was 96.3%. The false negative rate was 3.7%. The negative predictive value was 97.6% and the accuracy was 98.5%. MB is a safe, reliable, cheap, and accurate alternative tracer for detection of SLN.

  1. Breast cancer evaluation by fluorescent dot detection using combined mathematical morphology and multifractal techniques

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) is very accurate method for measuring HER2 gene copies, as a sign of potential breast cancer. This method requires small tissue samples, and has a high sensitivity to detect abnormalities from a histological section. By using multiple colors, this method allows the detection of multiple targets simultaneously. The target parts in the cells become visible as colored dots. The HER-2 probes are visible as orange stained spots under a fluorescent microscope while probes for centromere 17 (CEP-17), the chromosome on which the gene HER-2/neu is located, are visible as green spots. Methods The conventional analysis involves the scoring of the ratio of HER-2/neu over CEP 17 dots within each cell nucleus and then averaging the scores for a number of 60 cells. A ratio of 2.0 of HER-2/neu to CEP 17 copy number denotes amplification. Several methods have been proposed for the detection and automated evaluation (dot counting) of FISH signals. In this paper the combined method based on the mathematical morphology (MM) and inverse multifractal (IMF) analysis is suggested. Similar method was applied recently in detection of microcalcifications in digital mammograms, and was very successful. Results The combined MM using top-hat and bottom-hat filters, and the IMF method was applied to FISH images from Molecular Biology Lab, Department of Pathology, Wielkoposka Cancer Center, Poznan. Initial results indicate that this method can be applied to FISH images for the evaluation of HER2/neu status. Conclusions Mathematical morphology and multifractal approach are used for colored dot detection and counting in FISH images. Initial results derived on clinical cases are promising. Note that the overlapping of colored dots, particularly red/orange dots, needs additional improvements in post-processing. PMID:21489192

  2. Prognostic value of tumour cell detection in peripheral blood of breast cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Zach, O; Kasparu, H; Wagner, H; Krieger, O; Lutz, D

    2002-01-01

    To investigate the prognostic value of tumour cells in peripheral blood (pB) of breast cancer (BC) patients, pB samples from 143 patients with benign lesions of the breast and from 467 BC patients were tested via a nested RT-PCR assay for mammaglobin mRNA. No sample from patients with benign lesions of the breast was found to be mammaglobin positive in contrast to 5/310 (2%) BC patients with no evidence of disease (NED) and 46/157 (29%) patients with metastatic disease (MD). Two hundred and eighteen BC patients with NED were followed for at least 12 months. All five mammaglobin-positive BC patients relapsed 1-13 months after first examination of positive pB samples in contrast to 27/213 (13%) patients without detectable tumour cells in pB. Fifty-nine BC patients with MD were tested for mammaglobin expression in pB at the time of first diagnosis of MD; 20 of them (34%) were mammaglobin positive. Patients were followed for a median of 19 months (2-51 months). During this time, 19/59 (32%) died due to tumour progression. In Kaplan-Meier survival analysis, BC patients with mammaglobin-negative pB samples at time of diagnosis of MD lived significantly longer than mammaglobin-positive patients (log-rank test: P = 0.0013). In addition, mammaglobin was an independent prognostic parameter and the difference reached significance in univariate as well as in multivariate analysis (P < 0.01). We conclude that the presence of tumour cells in pB of BC patients is of prognostic value.

  3. Non-invasive Detection of Breast Cancer Lymph Node Metastasis using Carbonic Anhydrases IX and XII Targeted Imaging Probes

    PubMed Central

    Tafreshi, Narges K.; Bui, Marilyn M.; Bishop, Kellsey; Lloyd, Mark C.; Enkemann, Steven A.; Lopez, Alexis S.; Abrahams, Dominique; Carter, Bradford W.; Vagner, Josef; Grobmyer, Stephen R.; Gillies, Robert J.; Morse, David L.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop targeted molecular imaging probes for the non-invasive detection of breast cancer lymph node metastasis. Methods Six cell surface or secreted markers were identified by expression profiling and from the literature as being highly expressed in breast cancer lymph node metastases. Two of these markers were cell surface carbonic anhydrase isozymes (CAIX and/or CAXII) and were validated for protein expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) of patient tissue samples on a breast cancer tissue microarray containing 47 normal breast tissue samples, 42 ductal carcinoma in situ, 43 invasive ductal carcinomas without metastasis, 46 invasive ductal carcinomas with metastasis and 49 lymph node macrometastases of breast carcinoma. Targeted probes were developed by conjugation of CAIX and CAXII specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) to a near-infrared fluorescent dye. Results Together, these two markers were expressed in 100% of the lymph node metastases surveyed. Selectivity of the imaging probes were confirmed by intravenous injection into nude mice bearing mammary fat pad tumors of marker expressing cells, and non-expressing cells or by pre-injection of unlabeled antibody. Imaging of LN metastases showed that peritumorally-injected probes detected nodes harboring metastatic tumor cells. As few as 1,000 cells were detected, as determined by implanting, under ultrasound guidance, a range in number of CAIX and CAXII expressing cells into the axillary LNs. Conclusion These imaging probes have potential for non-invasive staging of breast cancer in the clinic and elimination of unneeded surgery, which is costly and associated with morbidities. PMID:22016510

  4. Detection of Metastatic Potential in Breast Cancer by RhoC-GTPase and WISP3 Proteins

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-01

    clinicopathologic features of lymphocytic mastitis . i. We have also identified that EZH2 is a marker of aggressive breast cancer and that it promotes the...Epstein-Barr virus is involved in breast adenomas, and that the lymphocytic infiltrate in lymphocytic mastitis is polyclonal in nature. "* Discovered...Lymphocytic Mastitis / Diabetic Mastopathy: A Molecular, Immunophenotypic, and Clinicopathologic Evaluation of Eleven Cases. Modern Pathology 16: 223-228

  5. Computer-aided detection system performance on current and previous digital mammograms in patients with contralateral metachronous breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Kim, Seung Ja; Moon, Woo Kyung; Cho, Nariya; Chang, Jung Min

    2012-05-01

    The computer-aided detection (CAD) system is widely used for screening mammography. The performance of the CAD system for contralateral breast cancer has not been reported for women with a history of breast cancer. To retrospectively evaluate the performance of a CAD system on current and previous mammograms in patients with contralateral metachronous breast cancer. During a 3-year period, 4945 postoperative patients had follow-up examinations, from whom we selected 55 women with contralateral breast cancers. Among them, 38 had visible malignant signs on the current mammograms. We analyzed the sensitivity and false-positive marks of the system on the current and previous mammograms according to lesion type and breast density. The total visible lesion components on the current mammograms included 27 masses and 14 calcifications in 38 patients. The case-based sensitivity for all lesion types was 63.2% (24/38) with false-positive marks of 0.71 per patient. The lesion-based sensitivity for masses and calcifications was 59.3% (16/27) and 71.4% (10/14), respectively. The lesion-based sensitivity for masses in fatty and dense breasts was 68.8% (11/16) and 45.5% (5/11), respectively. The lesion-based sensitivity for calcifications in fatty and dense breasts was 100.0% (3/3) and 63.6% (7/11), respectively. The total visible lesion components on the previous mammograms included 13 masses and three calcifications in 16 patients, and the sensitivity for all lesion types was 31.3% (5/16) with false-positive marks of 0.81 per patient. On these mammograms, the sensitivity for masses and calcifications was 30.8% (4/13) and 33.3% (1/3), respectively. The sensitivity in fatty and dense breasts was 28.6% (2/7) and 33.3% (3/9), respectively. In the women with a history of breast cancer, the sensitivity of the CAD system in visible contralateral breast cancer was lower than in most previous reports using the same CAD system probably due to the relatively small size, subtlety of the

  6. Use of a panel of novel genes for differentiating breast cancer from non-breast tissues.

    PubMed

    O'Brien, Neil; O'Donovan, Norma; Foley, Deirdre; Hill, Arnold D K; McDermott, Enda; O'Higgins, Niall; Duffy, Michael J

    2007-01-01

    Existing serum markers for breast cancer such as CA 15-3, BR 27.29 and CEA lack sensitivity and specificity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the value of new putative breast-specific markers for differentiating breast cancer from non-breast tissues. Expression of mammaglobin A (MGA), B726P, small breast epithelial mucin (SBEM) and MUC1 was measured by RT-PCR. MGA mRNA was detected in 86/162 (60%) breast cancers but in only 1/32 (3%) non-breast tissues; B726P was detected in 44/108 (41%) breast cancers but in none of 20 non-breast tissues, while SBEM was present in 52/103 (51%) breast cancers but in only 1/26 non-breast cancer tissues. In contrast to these novel markers, the established breast cancer marker MUC1 was detected in 72/99 (73%) breast cancers and in 22/32 (59%) of non-breast tissues. Combining MGA with B726P separated breast cancer from non-breast tissue with a sensitivity of 71% and a specificity of 95% while combining MGA with SBEM differentiated breast cancer from non-breast tissues with a sensitivity of 76% and a specificity of 89%. Genes such as MGA, B726P and SBEM that are expressed relatively exclusively in breast tissue are potential new markers for breast cancer.

  7. Aberrant reduction of telomere repetitive sequences in plasma cell-free DNA for early breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xi; Tanaka, Hiromi

    2015-10-06

    Excessive telomere shortening is observed in breast cancer lesions when compared to adjacent non-cancerous tissues, suggesting that telomere length may represent a key biomarker for early cancer detection. Because tumor-derived, cell-free DNA (cfDNA) is often released from cancer cells and circulates in the bloodstream, we hypothesized that breast cancer development is associated with changes in the amount of telomeric cfDNA that can be detected in the plasma. To test this hypothesis, we devised a novel, highly sensitive and specific quantitative PCR (qPCR) assay, termed telomeric cfDNA qPCR, to quantify plasma telomeric cfDNA levels. Indeed, the internal reference primers of our design correctly reflected input cfDNA amount (R(2) = 0.910, P = 7.82 × 10(-52)), implying accuracy of this assay. We found that plasma telomeric cfDNA levels decreased with age in healthy individuals (n = 42, R(2) = 0.094, P = 0.048), suggesting that cfDNA is likely derived from somatic cells in which telomere length shortens with increasing age. Our results also showed a significant decrease in telomeric cfDNA level from breast cancer patients with no prior treatment (n = 47), compared to control individuals (n = 42) (P = 4.06 × 10(-8)). The sensitivity and specificity for the telomeric cfDNA qPCR assay was 91.49% and 76.19%, respectively. Furthermore, the telomeric cfDNA level distinguished even the Ductal Carcinoma In Situ (DCIS) group (n = 7) from the healthy group (n = 42) (P = 1.51 × 10(-3)). Taken together, decreasing plasma telomeric cfDNA levels could be an informative genetic biomarker for early breast cancer detection.

  8. Tumour markers in breast cancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cove, D. H.; Woods, K. L.; Smith, S. C.; Burnett, D.; Leonard, J.; Grieve, R. J.; Howell, A.

    1979-01-01

    The clinical usefulness of 8 potential tumour markers has been evaluated in 69 patients with Stage I and II breast cancer and 57 patients with Stage III and IV. Serum CEA concentrations were raised in 13% of patients with local and 65% of those with advanced breast cancer. In patients with clinical evidence of progression or regression of tumour, serum CEA levels changed appropriately in 83% of cases. Taking 4 of the markers (carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), lactalbumin, alpha subunit and haptoglobin) serum concentrations of one or more were raised in 33% of patients with local disease and 81% of those with advanced breast cancer. However, marker concentrations were often only marginally raised, and are unlikely to provide sensitive guide to tumour burden. CEA, lactalbumin and alpha subunit were detectable in 68%, 43% and 40% respectively of extracts of primary breast cancers. PMID:92331

  9. A comparative study of four serological tumor markers for the detection of breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Clinton, Shawn R; Beason, Kevin L; Bryant, Sabrina; Johnson, James T; Jackson, Margaret; Wilson, Cynthia; Holifield, Kay; Vincent, Charlton; Hall, Margot

    2003-01-01

    Breast cancer is currently the third most common cause of cancer in the world. Circulating tumor antigens are often used as a minimally invasive tool for noting breast cancer progression. The objective of this study was to compare four tumor antigens (CA 15-3, CA 27.29, alpha-fetoprotein [AFP], and carcinoembryonic antigen [CEA]) for their diagnostic efficacy in breast cancer patients. It was hypothesized that CA 15-3 would proved to be superior to CA 27.29, CEA, and AFP in assay performance. Tumor marker assays were performed according to the manufacturers' directions. Assays used in this study were CA 15-3 and CA 27.29 (Fujirebio Diagnostics/Centocor Inc.), AFP (Abbott Inc.), and CEA (Hybritech Inc.). A total of 554 patient samples were obtained from an area hospital, plus 200 healthy adult samples which were used for the determination of normal reference intervals. The patients included patients with no disease (184), with non-malignant disease (11), with breast cancer (87), and with other types of cancer (272). Diagnostic percent sensitivities for each marker were: CA 15-3 (63%), CA 27.29 (39%), CEA (22%), and AFP (22%). Diagnostic specificities for each marker were comparable, ranging from 80-88%. Analytical parameters were evaluated for the assays and compared favorably. We concluded that CA 15-3 was the best tumor antigen for use as a diagnostic aid and monitoring agent.

  10. Mucin1 antibody-conjugated dye-doped mesoporous silica nanoparticles for breast cancer detection in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vivero-Escoto, Juan L.; Moore Jeffords, Laura; Dréau, Didier; Alvarez-Berrios, Merlis; Mukherjee, Pinku

    2017-02-01

    The development of novel methods for tumor detection is a burgeoning area of research. In particular, the use of silica nanoparticles for optical imaging in the near infrared (NIR) represents a valuable tool because their chemical inertness, biocompatibility, and transparency in the ultraviolet-visible and NIR regions of the electromagnetic spectrum. Moreover, silica nanoparticles can be modified with