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Sample records for detect dysthyroid optic

  1. Methylprednisolone pulse therapy in severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Guy, J.R.; Fagien, S.; Donovan, J.P.; Rubin, M.L. )

    1989-07-01

    Five patients with severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy were treated with intravenous methylprednisolone (1 g daily for 3 consecutive days). Before administration, visual acuity of the more severely affected eyes of each patient was counting fingers at 5 feet, 8/200, 20/400, 20/200, and 20/80. Immediately after completion of pulse therapy, visual acuity improved to 20/25 in four patients and 20/30 in one. Remissions were maintained with oral prednisone and external beam irradiation of the orbit. Pulse methylprednisolone therapy appears to be beneficial in the initial management of severe dysthyroid optic neuropathy.

  2. Reversal of dysthyroid optic neuropathy following orbital fat decompression

    PubMed Central

    Kazim, M.; Trokel, S.; Acaroglu, G.; Elliott, A.

    2000-01-01

    AIMS—To document the successful treatment of five patients with dysthyroid optic neuropathy by orbital fat decompression instead of orbital bone decompression after failed medical therapy.
METHODS—Eight orbits of five patients with dysthyroid optic neuropathy were selected for orbital fat decompression as an alternative to bone removal decompression. Treatment with systemic corticosteroids and/or orbital radiotherapy was either unsuccessful or contraindicated in each case. All patients satisfied clinical indications for orbital bone decompression to reverse the optic neuropathy. High resolution computerised tomographic (CT) scans were performed in all cases and in each case showed signs of enlargement of the orbital fat compartment. As an alternative to bone decompression, orbital fat decompression was performed on all eight orbits.
RESULTS—Orbital fat decompression was performed on five patients (eight orbits) with optic neuropathy. Optic neuropathy was reversed in all cases. There were no cases of postoperative diplopia, enophthalmos, globe ptosis, or anaesthesia. All patients were followed for a minimum of 1 year.
CONCLUSIONS—In a subset of patients with an enlarged orbital fat compartment and in whom extraocular muscle enlargement is not the solitary cause of optic neuropathy, fat decompression is a surgical alternative to bony decompression.

 PMID:10837384

  3. A retrospective review of 26 cases of dysthyroid optic neuropathy

    SciTech Connect

    Panzo, G.J.; Tomsak, R.L.

    1983-08-01

    Sixteen patients (14 women and two men) with dysthyroid optic neuropathy (26 involved eyes) were treated with either oral corticosteroids, orbital irradiation, surgical orbital decompression, combined corticosteroids and irradiation, or combined corticosteroids and surgical decompression. Thirteen of 16 eyes responded favorably to corticosteroid therapy but eight of the 13 relapsed upon discontinuation of treatment. Two of four eyes responded to irradiation initially but later relapsed. The response to orbital decompression was almost uniformly beneficial (eight of nine eyes responded) and lasting in all. Combined modes of therapy offered no additional advantage.

  4. Imaging studies for diagnosing Graves' orbitopathy and dysthyroid optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Gonçalves, Allan C Pieroni; Gebrim, Eloísa M M S; Monteiro, Mário L R

    2012-11-01

    Although the diagnosis of Graves' orbitopathy is primarily made clinically based on laboratory tests indicative of thyroid dysfunction and autoimmunity, imaging studies, such as computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging, ultrasound and color Doppler imaging, play an important role both in the diagnosis and follow-up after clinical or surgical treatment of the disease. Imaging studies can be used to evaluate morphological abnormalities of the orbital structures during the diagnostic workup when a differential diagnosis versus other orbital diseases is needed. Imaging may also be useful to distinguish the inflammatory early stage from the inactive stage of the disease. Finally, imaging studies can be of great help in identifying patients prone to develop dysthyroid optic neuropathy and therefore enabling the timely diagnosis and treatment of the condition, avoiding permanent visual loss. In this paper, we review the imaging modalities that aid in the diagnosis and management of Graves' orbitopathy, with special emphasis on the diagnosis of optic nerve dysfunction in this condition.

  5. Dysthyroid optic neuropathy: update on pathogenesis, diagnosis, and management.

    PubMed

    Blandford, Alexander D; Zhang, Dalia; Chundury, Rao V; Perry, Julian D

    2017-01-01

    Dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON) is a severe manifestation of thyroid eye disease (TED) that can result in permanent vision loss. Management is complex, multidisciplinary, and involves medical and/or surgical therapies. This review describes current concepts in the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of DON. An extensive review of the literature was performed to detail current concepts on the diagnosis and management of DON. This includes utilization of various medical and surgical modalities for disease management. DON can result in permanent blindness and often requires the use of corticosteroids and surgical decompression. We favor the use of intravenous corticosteroids and a transcaruncular approach when surgical decompression is indicated. The use of orbital radiation for DON is often reserved for patients that are poor surgical candidates and/or patients with refractory disease.

  6. The effect of orbital radiation therapy on thyroid-associated orbitopathy complicated with dysthyroid optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yang; Zhou, Huifang; Fan, Xianqun

    2017-09-01

    Thyroid-associated orbitopathy (TAO) is an inflammatory autoimmune disorder. The most serious complication of TAO is dysthyroid optic neuropathy (DON), which can lead to permanent vision loss because of volume expansion in the orbital apex. Orbital radiation therapy (ORT) is an anti-inflammatory treatment used in the treatment of active TAO. Clinical studies support radiotherapy as having a modest effect on DON, and early radiotherapy may protect against disease progression to DON. Current studies suggest that radiotherapy is generally safe. However, risks still exist in some cases. The possible effects of radiotherapy on TAO, especially complicated with DON, are reviewed. The effects of radiotherapy on DON are not completely known, and evidence from standardized, prospective, and multicenter clinical trials is still lacking.

  7. Characterizing Intraorbital Optic Nerve Changes on Diffusion Tensor Imaging in Thyroid Eye Disease Before Dysthyroid Optic Neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hwa; Lee, Young Hen; Suh, Sang-Il; Jeong, Eun-Kee; Baek, Sehyun; Seo, Hyung Suk

    2017-09-20

    The aim of this study was to determine whether the optic nerve is affected by thyroid eye disease (TED) before the development of dysthyroid optic neuropathy with diffusion-tensor imaging (DTI). Twenty TED patients and 20 controls were included. The mean, axial, and radial diffusivities and fractional anisotropy (FA) value were measured at the optic nerves in DTI. Extraocular muscle diameters were measured on computed tomography. The diffusivities and FA of the optic nerves were compared between TED and controls and between active and inactive stages of TED. The correlations between these DTI parameters and the clinical features were determined. The mean, axial, and radial diffusivities were lower in TED compared with the controls (P < 0.05). In contrast, FA was higher in TED (P = 0.001). Radial diffusivity was lower in the active stage of TED than the inactive stage (P = 0.035). The FA was higher in the TED group than in the control group (P = 0.021) and was positively correlated with clinical activity score (r = 0.364, P = 0.021), modified NOSPECS score (r = 0.469, P = 0.002), and extraocular muscle thickness (r = 0.325, P = 0.041) in the TED group. Radial diffusivity was negatively correlated with modified NOSPECS score (r = -0.384, P = 0.014), and axial diffusivity was positively correlated with exophthalmos degree (r = 0.363, P = 0.025). The diffusivities and FA reflected changes in the optic nerve before dysthyroid optic neuropathy in TED. The FA, in particular, reflected TED activity and severity.

  8. Outcomes following surgical decompression for dysthyroid orbitopathy (Graves' disease).

    PubMed

    Leong, Samuel C; White, Paul S

    2010-02-01

    Graves' disease is a multiorgan autoimmune disease of complex pathophysiology that primarily affects the thyroid gland and orbit. The ophthalmic manifestations of Graves' disease may vary from mild proptosis which causes minimal cosmetic embarrassment to subluxation of the globe, exposure keratitis, corneal abrasion and even blindness. This article focuses on outcomes following orbital decompression. Surgical techniques have evolved with improved understanding of sinonasal anatomy and being technology-driven with the use of the fiberoptic endoscope and image guidance. The most common surgical outcome reported in the literature is reduction in proptosis, followed by visual acuity and intraocular pressure. Quality-of-life assessments are not routinely measured. There are a myriad of surgical techniques currently in practice which underscores the fact that no single technique is clearly superior to another. Endoscopic decompression results in a mean reduction of 3.50 mm and is associated with a low complication rate. Nevertheless, the literature suggests that the best techniques are likely to be multiwall approaches such as combined medial and lateral wall decompression. Management of dysthyroid ophthalmopathy is clearly multidisciplinary. Future studies should consider a minimum data set for reporting outcome measures which should include a quality of life tool.

  9. Effects of chronic dysthyroidism on activity and exploration.

    PubMed

    Sala-Roca, Josefina; Martí-Carbonell, Maria Assumpció; Garau, Adriana; Darbra, Sonia; Balada, Ferran

    2002-09-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the influence of thyroid function on the activity and exploratory behaviour of male Wistar rats. Dysthyroidism was induced by adding drugs to their drinking water from the ninth day of gestation. This method is not as stressful as daily thyroxine injections or thyroidectomy, and therefore did not affect the analysed behavioural patterns. After weaning, the drugs were administered to the young rats until the end of the experiment. Activity and exploration were measured using the Boissier test, a light-darkness test and an open-field test when they were 77 days old. In order to verify that the animals' motor capacity had not been impaired, a psychomotor battery was used. Chronic hyperthyroidism produced a significant increase in activity, but did not affect exploration. On the other hand, hypothyroidism did not affect activity, but did increase exploration. This increase in exploration was observed in activity-independent behavioural parameters, such as head dipping and glancing. Copyright 2002 Elsevier Science Inc.

  10. Optical Detection of Formaldehyde

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patty, Kira D.; Gregory, Don A.

    2008-01-01

    The potential for buildup .of formaldehyde in closed space environments poses a direct health hazard to personnel. The National Aeronautic Space Agency (NASA) has established a maximum permitted concentration of 0.04 ppm for 7 to 180 days for all space craft. Early detection is critical to ensure that formaldehyde levels do not accumulate. above these limits. New sensor technologies are needed to enable real time,in situ detection in a compact and reusable form factor. Addressing this need,research into the use of reactive fluorescent dyes which reversibly bind to formaldehyde (liquid or gas) has been conducted to support the development of a formaldehyde.sensor. In the presence of formaldehyde the dyes' characteristic fluorescence peaks shift providing the basis for an optical detection. Dye responses to formaldehyde exposure were characterized; demonstrating the optical detection of formaldehyde in under 10 seconds and down to concentrations of 0.5 ppm. To .incorporate the dye .in.an optical sensor device requires. a means of containing and manipulating the dye. Multiple form factors using two dissimilar sbstrates were considered to determine a suitable configuration. A prototype sensor was demonstrated and considerations for a field able sensor were presented. This research provides a necessary first step toward the development of a compact, reusable; real time optical formaldehyde sensor suitable for use in the U.S. space program,

  11. Hanle detection for optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shengnan; Pan, Duo; Chen, Peipei; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2015-01-01

    Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard.

  12. Hanle Detection for Optical Clocks

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shengnan; Pan, Duo; Chen, Peipei; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2015-01-01

    Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard. PMID:25734183

  13. Optical Detection System Model.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-04-01

    cases the wavelength 7 II TABLE 2 SAMPLE CONTENTS OF OPTICAL MATERIAL FILE ODSOPT.INP SRF2 3.000 0.120 13.000 9.000 0.120 0.100 0.130 0.600 0.200 0.850...N THESE ARE THE AVAILABLE FILTER TYPES: CORNING VYCOR SILICA MGF2 SRF2 VYC7905 INFRASIL SAPPHIRE MGO 1102 CDISE CBS CDTE SE ZNSE CAF2 DIAMOND

  14. MASTER: optical transients detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanutsa, P.; Pogrosheva, T.; Lipunov, V.; Buckley, D.; Rebolo, R.; Serra-Ricart, M.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kornilov, V.; Gress, O.; Shumkov, V.; Ivanov, K.; Vladimirov, V.; Chazov, V.; Vlasenko, D.; Potter, S.; Shurpakov, S.

    2016-11-01

    MASTER-IAC auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 18h 12m 58.26s +16d 02m 46.8s on 2016-11-06.81470 UT. The OT unfiltered magnitude is , mlim=18.0m.

  15. MASTER: optical transients detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balanutsa, P.; Shurpakov, S.; Pogrosheva, T.; Lipunov, V.; Buckley, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Tiurina, N.; Kuznetsov, A.; Kornilov, V.; Chazov, V.; Gorbunov, I.; Vlasenko, D.; Vladimirov, V.; Kuvshinov, D.; Ivanov, K.; Budnev, N.; Gress, O.

    2017-03-01

    MASTER-SAAO auto-detection system ( Lipunov et al., "MASTER Global Robotic Net", Advances in Astronomy, 2010, 30L ) discovered OT source at (RA, Dec) = 18h 49m 06.73s -27d 33m 34.9s on 2017-03-18.14205 UT. The OT unfiltered magnitude is 16.3m (mlim=18.2).

  16. Optical detection of intravenous infiltration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winchester, Leonard W.; Chou, Nee-Yin

    2006-02-01

    Infiltration of medications during infusion therapy results in complications ranging from erythema and pain to tissue necrosis requiring amputation. Infiltration occurs from improper insertion of the cannula, separation of the cannula from the vein, penetration of the vein by the cannula during movement, and response of the vein to the medication. At present, visual inspection by the clinical staff is the primary means for detecting intravenous (IV) infiltration. An optical sensor was developed to monitor the needle insertion site for signs of IV infiltration. Initial studies on simulated and induced infiltrations on a swine model validated the feasibility of the methodology. The presence of IV infiltration was confirmed by visual inspection of the infusion site and/or absence of blood return in the IV line. Potential sources of error due to illumination changes, motion artifacts, and edema were also investigated. A comparison of the performance of the optical device and blinded expert observers showed that the optical sensor has higher sensitivity and specificity, and shorter detection time than the expert observers. An improved model of the infiltration monitoring device was developed and evaluated in a clinical study on induced infiltrations of healthy adult volunteers. The performance of the device was compared with the observation of a blinded expert observer. The results show that the rates of detection of infiltrations are 98% and 82% for the optical sensor and the observer, respectively. The sensitivity and specificity of the optical sensor are 0.97 and 0.98, respectively.

  17. Schlieren optics for leak detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peale, Robert E.; Ruffin, Alranzo B.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to develop an optical method of leak detection. Various modifications of schlieren optics were explored with initial emphasis on leak detection of the plumbing within the orbital maneuvering system of the space shuttle (OMS pod). The schlieren scheme envisioned for OMS pod leak detection was that of a high contrast pattern on flexible reflecting material imaged onto a negative of the same pattern. We find that the OMS pod geometry constrains the characteristic length scale of the pattern to the order of 0.001 inch. Our experiments suggest that optical modulation transfer efficiency will be very low for such patterns, which will limit the sensitivity of the technique. Optical elements which allow a negative of the scene to be reversibly recorded using light from the scene itself were explored for their potential in adaptive single-ended schlieren systems. Elements studied include photochromic glass, bacteriorhodopsin, and a transmissive liquid crystal display. The dynamics of writing and reading patterns were studied using intensity profiles from recorded images. Schlieren detection of index gradients in air was demonstrated.

  18. Optically detected magnetic resonance imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Blank, Aharon; Shapiro, Guy; Fischer, Ran; London, Paz; Gershoni, David

    2015-01-19

    Optically detected magnetic resonance provides ultrasensitive means to detect and image a small number of electron and nuclear spins, down to the single spin level with nanoscale resolution. Despite the significant recent progress in this field, it has never been combined with the power of pulsed magnetic resonance imaging techniques. Here, we demonstrate how these two methodologies can be integrated using short pulsed magnetic field gradients to spatially encode the sample. This result in what we denote as an 'optically detected magnetic resonance imaging' technique. It offers the advantage that the image is acquired in parallel from all parts of the sample, with well-defined three-dimensional point-spread function, and without any loss of spectroscopic information. In addition, this approach may be used in the future for parallel but yet spatially selective efficient addressing and manipulation of the spins in the sample. Such capabilities are of fundamental importance in the field of quantum spin-based devices and sensors.

  19. Optical Detection of Blade Flutter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieberding, W. C.; Pollack, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    Dynamic strain gages mounted on rotor blades are used as the primary instrumentation for detecting the onset of flutter and defining the vibratory mode and frequency. Optical devices are evaluated for performing the same measurements as well as providing supplementary information on the vibratory characteristics. Two separate methods are studied: stroboscopic imagery of the blade tip and photoelectric scanning of blade tip motion. Both methods give visual data in real time as well as video tape records. The optical systems are described, and representative results are presented. The potential of this instrumentation in flutter research is discussed.

  20. Optical fibre gas detections systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Culshaw, Brian

    2016-05-01

    This tutorial review covers the principles of and prospects for fibre optic sensor technology in gas detection. Many of the potential benefits common to fibre sensor technology also apply in the context of gas sensing - notably long distance - many km - access to multiple remote measurement points; invariably intrinsic safety; access to numerous important gas species and often uniquely high levels of selectivity and/or sensitivity. Furthermore, the range of fibre sensor network architectures - single point, multiple point and distributed - enable unprecedented flexibility in system implementation. Additionally, competitive technologies and regulatory issues contribute to final application potential.

  1. Optical and acoustical UAV detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Christnacher, Frank; Hengy, Sébastien; Laurenzis, Martin; Matwyschuk, Alexis; Naz, Pierre; Schertzer, Stéphane; Schmitt, Gwenael

    2016-10-01

    Recent world events have highlighted that the proliferation of UAVs is bringing with it a new and rapidly increasing threat for national defense and security agencies. Whilst many of the reported UAV incidents seem to indicate that there was no terrorist intent behind them, it is not unreasonable to assume that it may not be long before UAV platforms are regularly employed by terrorists or other criminal organizations. The flight characteristics of many of these mini- and micro-platforms present challenges for current systems which have been optimized over time to defend against the traditional air-breathing airborne platforms. A lot of programs to identify cost-effective measures for the detection, classification, tracking and neutralization have begun in the recent past. In this paper, lSL shows how the performance of a UAV detection and tracking concept based on acousto-optical technology can be powerfully increased through active imaging.

  2. Optical fiber sensor for allergen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendoula, R.; Wacogne, B.; Giust, R.; Cherioux, F.; Sandoz, P.; Gharbi, T.

    2005-08-01

    The sensor is dedicated to the detection of allergens. We use a biochemical reaction in the vicinity of the core of an optical fiber which modifies the propagation conditions of the optical wave by evanescent coupling. The detection involves a intrinsic optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer.

  3. Fiber optic tracheal detection device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Souhan, Brian E.; Nawn, Corinne D.; Shmel, Richard; Watts, Krista L.; Ingold, Kirk A.

    2017-02-01

    Poorly performed airway management procedures can lead to a wide variety of adverse events, such as laryngeal trauma, stenosis, cardiac arrest, hypoxemia, or death as in the case of failed airway management or intubation of the esophagus. Current methods for confirming tracheal placement, such as auscultation, direct visualization or capnography, may be subjective, compromised due to clinical presentation or require additional specialized equipment that is not always readily available during the procedure. Consequently, there exists a need for a non-visual detection mechanism for confirming successful airway placement that can give the provider rapid feedback during the procedure. Based upon our previously presented work characterizing the reflectance spectra of tracheal and esophageal tissue, we developed a fiber-optic prototype to detect the unique spectral characteristics of tracheal tissue. Device performance was tested by its ability to differentiate ex vivo samples of tracheal and esophageal tissue. Pig tissue samples were tested with the larynx, trachea and esophagus intact as well as excised and mounted on cork. The device positively detected tracheal tissue 18 out of 19 trials and 1 false positive out of 19 esophageal trials. Our proof of concept device shows great promise as a potential mechanism for rapid user feedback during airway management procedures to confirm tracheal placement. Ongoing studies will investigate device optimizations of the probe for more refined sensing and in vivo testing.

  4. Capillary Electrophoresis - Optical Detection Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Sepaniak, M. J.

    2001-08-06

    Molecular recognition systems are developed via molecular modeling and synthesis to enhance separation performance in capillary electrophoresis and optical detection methods for capillary electrophoresis. The underpinning theme of our work is the rational design and development of molecular recognition systems in chemical separations and analysis. There have been, however, some subtle and exciting shifts in our research paradigm during this period. Specifically, we have moved from mostly separations research to a good balance between separations and spectroscopic detection for separations. This shift is based on our perception that the pressing research challenges and needs in capillary electrophoresis and electrokinetic chromatography relate to the persistent detection and flow rate reproducibility limitations of these techniques (see page 1 of the accompanying Renewal Application for further discussion). In most of our work molecular recognition reagents are employed to provide selectivity and enhance performance. Also, an emerging trend is the use of these reagents with specially-prepared nano-scale materials. Although not part of our DOE BES-supported work, the modeling and synthesis of new receptors has indirectly supported the development of novel microcantilevers-based MEMS for the sensing of vapor and liquid phase analytes. This fortuitous overlap is briefly covered in this report. Several of the more significant publications that have resulted from our work are appended. To facilitate brevity we refer to these publications liberally in this progress report. Reference is also made to very recent work in the Background and Preliminary Studies Section of the Renewal Application.

  5. Modulation and detection of optical signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goodwin, F. E.

    1972-01-01

    A summary of information is presented which is related to the modulation and detection of information on optical carriers. It emphasizes the treatment of information transfer through an entire system. The most common configurations are considered: intensity modulation, amplitude modulation, frequency or phase modulation, and both direct and coherent detection. In assessing these configurations information capacity and message signal-to-noise ratio are used as a basis of comparison. The physical and geometric treatment of optical heterodyne (or coherent) detection is given.

  6. Optical detection of glyphosate in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Góes, R. E.; Possetti, G. R. C.; Muller, M.; Fabris, J. L.

    2017-04-01

    This work shows preliminary results of the detection of Glyphosate in water by using optical fiber spectroscopy. A colloid with citrate-caped silver nanoparticles was employed as substrate for the measurements. A cross analysis between optical absorption and inelastic scattering evidenced a controlled aggregation of the sample constituents, leading to the possibility of quantitative detection of the analyte. The estimate limit of detection for Glyphosate in water for the proposed sensing scheme was about 1.7 mg/L.

  7. Fiber optic sensors for corrosion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Alphonso C.

    1993-01-01

    The development of fiber optic sensors for the detection of a variety of material parameters has grown tremendously over the past several years. Additionally, the potential for analytical applications of fiber optic sensors have become more widely used. New pH sensors have also been developed using fiber optic techniques to detect fluorescence characteristics from immobilized fluorogenic reagent chemicals. The primary purpose of this research was to investigate the feasibility of using fiber optic sensors to detect the presence of Al(sup 3+) ions made in the process of environmental corrosion of aluminum materials. The Al(sup 3+) ions plus a variety of other type of metal ions can be detected using analytical techniques along with fiber optic sensors.

  8. Optical Detection Theory for Laser Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osche, Gregory R.

    2002-07-01

    A comprehensive treatment of the fundamentals of optical detection theory Laser system applications are becoming more numerous, particularly in the fields of communications and remote sensing. Filling a significant gap in the literature, Optical Detection Theory for Laser Applications addresses the theoretical aspects of optical detection and associated phenomenologies, describing the fundamental optical, statistical, and mathematical principles of the modern laser system. The book is especially valuable for its extensive treatment of direct detection statistics, which has no analog in radar detection theory and which has never before been compiled in a cohesive manner in a single book. Coverage includes: * A review of mathematical statistics and statistical decision theory * Performance of truncated and untruncated coherent and direct detection systems using Huygens-Fresnel and Gaussian beam theories * Rough surface scatter and atmospheric propagation effects * Single-pulse detection statistics for direct and coherent detection systems * Multi-pulse detection statistics for direct and coherent detection systems Supported by additional comments providing further insights into the physics or mathematics discussed and an extensive list of classic references, Optical Detection Theory for Laser Applications comprises a much-needed reference for the professional scientist or engineer, as well as a solid textbook for advanced students.

  9. HETERODYNE DETECTION IN OPTICAL COMMUNICATION TECHNIQUES

    DTIC Science & Technology

    difference frequency in the presence of incoherent noise. The use of heterodyne detection in optical communication , demultiplexing of channels, demodulation...of FM and AM, Doppler and displacement measurements, and stabilization of LASERs is discussed. The elements of an optical communication link are discussed: LASERs, modulators, transmission path, and detectors.

  10. Developments in distributed optical fiber detection technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Wei; Zhu, Qianxia; You, Tianrong

    2014-12-01

    The distributed optical fiber detection technology plays an important role in many fields, such as key regional security monitoring, pipeline maintenance and communication cable protection. It is superior to the traditional detector, and has a good prospect. This paper presents an overview of various distributed optical fiber sensors. At first, some related technologies of the optical fiber detection schemes are introduced in respect of sensing distance, real-time ability, signal strength, and system complexity; and the advantages and limitations of fiber gratings sensors, reflection-based optical fiber sensors, and interference- based optical fiber sensors are discussed. Then some advanced distributed optical fiber detection systems are mentioned. And the double-loop Sagnac distributed system is improved by adding photoelectric modulators and depolarizers. In order to denoise and enhance the original signal, a spectral subtraction-likelihood ratio method is improved. The experiment results show the spatial resolution is +/-15m per kilometer. Finally, based on the development trends of optical fiber detection technology at home and abroad, development tendency and application fields are predicted.

  11. Combined hostile fire and optics detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brännlund, Carl; Tidström, Jonas; Henriksson, Markus; Sjöqvist, Lars

    2013-10-01

    Snipers and other optically guided weapon systems are serious threats in military operations. We have studied a SWIR (Short Wave Infrared) camera-based system with capability to detect and locate snipers both before and after shot over a large field-of-view. The high frame rate SWIR-camera allows resolution of the temporal profile of muzzle flashes which is the infrared signature associated with the ejection of the bullet from the rifle. The capability to detect and discriminate sniper muzzle flashes with this system has been verified by FOI in earlier studies. In this work we have extended the system by adding a laser channel for optics detection. A laser diode with slit-shaped beam profile is scanned over the camera field-of-view to detect retro reflection from optical sights. The optics detection system has been tested at various distances up to 1.15 km showing the feasibility to detect rifle scopes in full daylight. The high speed camera gives the possibility to discriminate false alarms by analyzing the temporal data. The intensity variation, caused by atmospheric turbulence, enables discrimination of small sights from larger reflectors due to aperture averaging, although the targets only cover a single pixel. It is shown that optics detection can be integrated in combination with muzzle flash detection by adding a scanning rectangular laser slit. The overall optics detection capability by continuous surveillance of a relatively large field-of-view looks promising. This type of multifunctional system may become an important tool to detect snipers before and after shot.

  12. Optical Detection Of Cryogenic Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, Lynn M.

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual system identifies leakage without requiring shutdown for testing. Proposed device detects and indicates leaks of cryogenic liquids automatically. Detector makes it unnecessary to shut equipment down so it can be checked for leakage by soap-bubble or helium-detection methods. Not necessary to mix special gases or other materials with cryogenic liquid flowing through equipment.

  13. Optical Detection Of Cryogenic Leaks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, Lynn M.

    1988-01-01

    Conceptual system identifies leakage without requiring shutdown for testing. Proposed device detects and indicates leaks of cryogenic liquids automatically. Detector makes it unnecessary to shut equipment down so it can be checked for leakage by soap-bubble or helium-detection methods. Not necessary to mix special gases or other materials with cryogenic liquid flowing through equipment.

  14. Optical fiber interferometric sensors for chemical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.

    1990-01-01

    Interferometric sensors take advantage of a unique property of light, its macroscopic coherence, which has resulted in extremely sensitive devices for the detection of physical parameters. In this paper I will discuss three new chemical detection mechanisms which utilize optical interferometric techniques. 15 refs., 11 figs.

  15. Optical detection dental disease using polarized light

    DOEpatents

    Everett, Matthew J.; Colston, Jr., Billy W.; Sathyam, Ujwal S.; Da Silva, Luiz B.; Fried, Daniel

    2003-01-01

    A polarization sensitive optical imaging system is used to detect changes in polarization in dental tissues to aid the diagnosis of dental disease such as caries. The degree of depolarization is measured by illuminating the dental tissue with polarized light and measuring the polarization state of the backscattered light. The polarization state of this reflected light is analyzed using optical polarimetric imaging techniques. A hand-held fiber optic dental probe is used in vivo to direct the incident beam to the dental tissue and collect the reflected light. To provide depth-resolved characterization of the dental tissue, the polarization diagnostics may be incorporated into optical coherence domain reflectometry and optical coherence tomography (OCDR/OCT) systems, which enables identification of subsurface depolarization sites associated with demineralization of enamel or bone.

  16. Polarization-dependent optical reflection ultrasonic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Xiaoyi; Huang, Zhiyu; Wang, Guohe; Li, Wenzhao; Li, Changhui

    2017-03-01

    Although ultrasound transducers based on commercial piezoelectric-material have been widely used, they generally have limited bandwidth centered at the resonant frequency. Currently, several pure-optical ultrasonic detection methods have gained increasing interest due to their wide bandwidth and high sensitivity. However, most of them require customized components (such as micro-ring, SPR, Fabry-Perot film, etc), which limit their broad implementations. In this study, we presented a simple pure-optical ultrasound detection method, called "Polarization-dependent Reflection Ultrasonic Detection" (PRUD). It detects the intensity difference between two polarization components of the probe beam that is modulated by ultrasound waves. PRUD detect the two components by using a balanced detector, which effectively suppressed much of the unwanted noise. We have achieved the sensitivity (noise equivalent pressure) to be 1.7kPa, and this can be further improved. In addition, like many other pure-optical ultrasonic detection methods, PRUD also has a flat and broad bandwidth from almost zero to over 100MHz. Besides theoretical analysis, we did a phantom study by imaging a tungsten filament to demonstrate the performance of PRUD. We believe this simple and economic method will attract both researchers and engineers in optical and ultrasound fields.

  17. Optical Detection of Lightning from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boccippio, Dennis J.; Christian, Hugh J.

    1998-01-01

    Optical sensors have been developed to detect lightning from space during both day and night. These sensors have been fielded in two existing satellite missions and may be included on a third mission in 2002. Satellite-hosted, optically-based lightning detection offers three unique capabilities: (1) the ability to reliably detect lightning over large, often remote, spatial regions, (2) the ability to sample all (IC and CG) lightning, and (3) the ability to detect lightning with uniform (i.e., not range-dependent) sensitivity or detection efficiency. These represent significant departures from conventional RF-based detection techniques, which typically have strong range dependencies (biases) or range limitations in their detection capabilities. The atmospheric electricity team of the NASA Marshall Space Flight Center's Global Hydrology and Climate Center has implemented a three-step satellite lightning research program which includes three phases: proof-of-concept/climatology, science algorithm development, and operational application. The first instrument in the program, the Optical Transient Detector (OTD), is deployed on a low-earth orbit (LEO) satellite with near-polar inclination, yielding global coverage. The sensor has a 1300 x 1300 sq km field of view (FOV), moderate detection efficiency, moderate localization accuracy, and little data bias. The OTD is a proof-of-concept instrument and its mission is primarily a global lightning climatology. The limited spatial accuracy of this instrument makes it suboptimal for use in case studies, although significant science knowledge has been gained from the instrument as deployed.

  18. Optical flow based finger stroke detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Zhongdi; Li, Bin; Wang, Kongqiao

    2010-07-01

    Finger stroke detection is an important topic in hand based Human Computer Interaction (HCI) system. Few research studies have carried out effective solutions to this problem. In this paper, we present a novel approach for stroke detection based on mono vision. Via analyzing the optical flow field within the finger area, our method is able to detect finger stroke under various camera position and visual angles. We present a thorough evaluation for each component of the algorithm, and show its efficiency and effectiveness on solving difficult stroke detection problems.

  19. Detectivity comparison of bolometric optical antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuadrado, Alexander; López-Alonso, José M.; Martínez-Antón, Juan C.; Ezquerro, Jose M.; González, Francisco J.; Alda, Javier

    2015-08-01

    The practical application of optical antennas in detection devices strongly depends on its ability to produce an acceptable signal-to-noise ratio for the given task. It is known that, due to the intrinsic problems arising from its sub-wavelength dimensions, optical antennas produce very small signals. The quality of these signals depends on the involved transduction mechanism. The contribution of different types of noise should be adapted to the transducer and to the signal extraction regime. Once noise is evaluated and measured, the specific detectivity, D*, becomes the parameter of interest when comparing the performance of antenna coupled devices with other detectors. However, this parameter involves some magnitudes that can be defined in several ways for optical antennas. In this contribution we are interested in the evaluation and comparison of D_ values for several bolometric optical antennas working in the infrared and involving two materials. At the same time, some material and geometrical parameters involved in the definition of noise and detectivity will be discussed to analyze the suitability of D_ to properly account for the performance of optical antennas.

  20. Integrated Micro-Optics for Microfluidic Detection.

    PubMed

    Kazama, Yuto; Hibara, Akihide

    2016-01-01

    A method of embedding micro-optics into a microfluidic device was proposed and demonstrated. First, the usefulness of embedded right-angle prisms was demonstrated in microscope observation. Lateral-view microscopic observation of an aqueous dye flow in a 100-μm-sized microchannel was demonstrated. Then, the embedded right-angle prisms were utilized for multi-beam laser spectroscopy. Here, crossed-beam thermal lens detection of a liquid sample was applied to glucose detection.

  1. OPAD data analysis. [Optical Plumes Anomaly Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buntine, Wray L.; Kraft, Richard; Whitaker, Kevin; Cooper, Anita E.; Powers, W. T.; Wallace, Tim L.

    1993-01-01

    Data obtained in the framework of an Optical Plume Anomaly Detection (OPAD) program intended to create a rocket engine health monitor based on spectrometric detections of anomalous atomic and molecular species in the exhaust plume are analyzed. The major results include techniques for handling data noise, methods for registration of spectra to wavelength, and a simple automatic process for estimating the metallic component of a spectrum.

  2. Reset Tree-Based Optical Fault Detection

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Dong-Geon; Choi, Dooho; Seo, Jungtaek; Kim, Howon

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a new reset tree-based scheme to protect cryptographic hardware against optical fault injection attacks. As one of the most powerful invasive attacks on cryptographic hardware, optical fault attacks cause semiconductors to misbehave by injecting high-energy light into a decapped integrated circuit. The contaminated result from the affected chip is then used to reveal secret information, such as a key, from the cryptographic hardware. Since the advent of such attacks, various countermeasures have been proposed. Although most of these countermeasures are strong, there is still the possibility of attack. In this paper, we present a novel optical fault detection scheme that utilizes the buffers on a circuit's reset signal tree as a fault detection sensor. To evaluate our proposal, we model radiation-induced currents into circuit components and perform a SPICE simulation. The proposed scheme is expected to be used as a supplemental security tool. PMID:23698267

  3. Optical detection of radon decay in air

    PubMed Central

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-01-01

    An optical radon detection method is presented. Radon decay is directly measured by observing the secondary radiolumines cence light that alpha particles excite in air, and the selectivity of coincident photon detection is further enhanced with online pulse-shape analysis. The sensitivity of a demonstration device was 6.5 cps/Bq/l and the minimum detectable concentration was 12 Bq/m3 with a 1 h integration time. The presented technique paves the way for optical approaches in rapid radon detec tion, and it can be applied beyond radon to the analysis of any alpha-active sample which can be placed in the measurement chamber. PMID:26867800

  4. Optical detection of radon decay in air.

    PubMed

    Sand, Johan; Ihantola, Sakari; Peräjärvi, Kari; Toivonen, Harri; Toivonen, Juha

    2016-02-12

    An optical radon detection method is presented. Radon decay is directly measured by observing the secondary radiolumines cence light that alpha particles excite in air, and the selectivity of coincident photon detection is further enhanced with online pulse-shape analysis. The sensitivity of a demonstration device was 6.5 cps/Bq/l and the minimum detectable concentration was 12 Bq/m(3) with a 1 h integration time. The presented technique paves the way for optical approaches in rapid radon detec tion, and it can be applied beyond radon to the analysis of any alpha-active sample which can be placed in the measurement chamber.

  5. Optical sensor for rapid microbial detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Adhami, Mustafa; Tilahun, Dagmawi; Rao, Govind; Kostov, Yordan

    2016-05-01

    In biotechnology, the ability to instantly detect contaminants is key to running a reliable bioprocess. Bioprocesses are prone to be contaminated by cells that are abundant in our environment; detection and quantification of these cells would aid in the preservation of the bioprocess product. This paper discusses the design and development of a portable kinetics fluorometer which acts as a single-excitation, single-emission photometer that continuously measures fluorescence intensity of an indicator dye, and plots it. Resazurin is used as an indicator dye since the viable contaminant cells reduce Resazurin toResorufin, the latter being strongly fluorescent. A photodiode detects fluorescence change by generating current proportional to the intensity of the light that reached it, and a trans-impedance differential op-amp ensures amplification of the photodiodes' signal. A microfluidic chip was designed specifically for the device. It acts as a fully enclosed cuvette, which enhances the Resazurin reduction rate. E. coli in LB media, along with Resazurin were injected into the microfluidic chip. The optical sensor detected the presence of E. coli in the media based on the fluorescence change that occurred in the indicator dye in concentrations as low as 10 CFU/ml. A method was devised to detect and determine an approximate amount of contamination with this device. This paper discusses application of this method to detect and estimate sample contamination. This device provides fast, accurate, and inexpensive means to optically detect the presence of viable cells.

  6. Target discrimination strategies in optics detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Lars; Allard, Lars; Henriksson, Markus; Jonsson, Per; Pettersson, Magnus

    2013-10-01

    Detection and localisation of optical assemblies used for weapon guidance or sniper rifle scopes has attracted interest for security and military applications. Typically a laser system is used to interrogate a scene of interest and the retro-reflected radiation is detected. Different system approaches for area coverage can be realised ranging from flood illumination to step-and-stare or continuous scanning schemes. Independently of the chosen approach target discrimination is a crucial issue, particularly if a complex scene such as in an urban environment and autonomous operation is considered. In this work target discrimination strategies in optics detection are discussed. Typical parameters affecting the reflected laser radiation from the target are the wavelength, polarisation properties, temporal effects and the range resolution. Knowledge about the target characteristics is important to predict the target discrimination capability. Two different systems were used to investigate polarisation properties and range resolution information from targets including e.g. road signs, optical reflexes, rifle sights and optical references. The experimental results and implications on target discrimination will be discussed. If autonomous operation is required target discrimination becomes critical in order to reduce the number of false alarms.

  7. Optical imaging module for astigmatic detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei-Min; Cheng, Chung-Hsiang; Molnar, Gabor; Danzebrink, Hans-Ulrich; Hwang, Ing-Shouh; Hwu, En-Te; Huang, Kuang-Yuh

    2016-05-15

    In this paper, an optical imaging module design for an astigmatic detection system (ADS) is presented. The module is based on a commercial optical pickup unit (OPU) and it contains a coaxial illuminant for illuminating a specimen. Furthermore, the imaging module facilitates viewing the specimen and the detection laser spot of the ADS with a lateral resolution of approximately 1 μm without requiring the removal of an element of the OPU. Two polarizers and one infrared filter are used to eliminate stray laser light in the OPU and stray light produced by the illuminant. Imaging modules designed for digital versatile disks (DVDs) and Blu-ray DVDs were demonstrated. Furthermore, the module can be used for imaging a small cantilever with approximate dimensions of 2 μm (width) × 5 μm (length), and therefore, it has the potential to be used in high-speed atomic force microscopy.

  8. Optical tomographic imaging for breast cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Cong, Wenxiang; Intes, Xavier; Wang, Ge

    2017-09-01

    Diffuse optical breast imaging utilizes near-infrared (NIR) light propagation through tissues to assess the optical properties of tissues for the identification of abnormal tissue. This optical imaging approach is sensitive, cost-effective, and does not involve any ionizing radiation. However, the image reconstruction of diffuse optical tomography (DOT) is a nonlinear inverse problem and suffers from severe illposedness due to data noise, NIR light scattering, and measurement incompleteness. An image reconstruction method is proposed for the detection of breast cancer. This method splits the image reconstruction problem into the localization of abnormal tissues and quantification of absorption variations. The localization of abnormal tissues is performed based on a well-posed optimization model, which can be solved via a differential evolution optimization method to achieve a stable reconstruction. The quantification of abnormal absorption is then determined in localized regions of relatively small extents, in which a potential tumor might be. Consequently, the number of unknown absorption variables can be greatly reduced to overcome the underdetermined nature of DOT. Numerical simulation experiments are performed to verify merits of the proposed method, and the results show that the image reconstruction method is stable and accurate for the identification of abnormal tissues, and robust against the measurement noise of data. (2017) COPYRIGHT Society of Photo-Optical Instrumentation Engineers (SPIE).

  9. Optical Detection of Life on Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara

    2009-01-01

    We describe what is known about the atmospheric properties (Teff, lob g, [FelH]) and fundamental properties (mass, age, and metal content) of nearby stars and how they influence the habitable zones and habitable eras of these stars. We then take an observer's point of view to assess the ability of optical telescopes to detect photosynthetic or methanogenic life on planets orbiting these stars.

  10. Optical Detection of Life on Exoplanets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heap, Sara

    2009-01-01

    We describe what is known about the atmospheric properties (Teff, lob g, [FelH]) and fundamental properties (mass, age, and metal content) of nearby stars and how they influence the habitable zones and habitable eras of these stars. We then take an observer's point of view to assess the ability of optical telescopes to detect photosynthetic or methanogenic life on planets orbiting these stars.

  11. Fiber optic hydrophones for acoustic neutrino detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buis, E. J.; Doppenberg, E. J. J.; Lahmann, R.; Toet, P. M.; de Vreugd, J.

    2016-04-01

    Cosmic neutrinos with ultra high energies can be detected acoustically using hydrophones. The detection of these neutrinos may provide crucial information about then GZK mechanism. The flux of these neutrinos, however, is expected to be low, so that a detection volume is required more than a order of magnitude larger than what has presently been realized. With a large detection volume and a large number of hydrophones, there is a need for technology that is cheap and easy to deploy. Fiber optics provide a natural way for distributed sensing. In addition, a sensor has been designed and manufactured that can be produced cost-effectively on an industrial scale. Sensitivity measurements show that the sensor is able to reach the required sea-state zero level. For a proper interpretation of the expected bipolar signals, filtering techniques should be applied to remove the effects of the unwanted resonance peaks.

  12. Optic disc detection using ant colony optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dias, Marcy A.; Monteiro, Fernando C.

    2012-09-01

    The retinal fundus images are used in the treatment and diagnosis of several eye diseases, such as diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. This paper proposes a new method to detect the optic disc (OD) automatically, due to the fact that the knowledge of the OD location is essential to the automatic analysis of retinal images. Ant Colony Optimization (ACO) is an optimization algorithm inspired by the foraging behaviour of some ant species that has been applied in image processing for edge detection. Recently, the ACO was used in fundus images to detect edges, and therefore, to segment the OD and other anatomical retinal structures. We present an algorithm for the detection of OD in the retina which takes advantage of the Gabor wavelet transform, entropy and ACO algorithm. Forty images of the retina from DRIVE database were used to evaluate the performance of our method.

  13. Renewable Surface Biosensors with Optical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W.

    2001-04-30

    One major challenge in the development of biosensors is the limited lifetime of a chemically selective surface that includes biomolecules. Renewable surface biosensors address this issue by using fresh aliquots of derivatized microbeads for each analysis. The analyte detection can then occur on the microbeads, or downstream from the microbeads. In this paper, we will describe two types of renewable surface biosensors. The first renewable biosensor system includes on-column optical detection for monitoring the binding of biomolecules onto protein or DNA-derivatized Sepharose beads. The second renewable biosensor system includes detection downstream from the microparticles and is based on the use of derivatized magnetic particles for selective binding. The magnetic particles are fluidically captured and released in a sequential injection system to allow the automation of an Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay.

  14. Renewable Surface Biosensors With Optical Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.; Ackerman, Eric J.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Holman, David A.; Grate, Jay W.

    2001-12-01

    One major challenge in the development of biosensors is the limited lifetime of a chemically selective surface that includes biomolecules. Renewable surface biosensors address this issue by using fresh aliquots of derivatized microbeads for each analysis. The analyte detection can then occur on the microbeads, or downstream from the microbeads. In this paper, we will describe two types of renewable surface biosensors. The first renewable biosensor system includes on-column optical detection for monitoring the binding of biomolecules onto protein or DNA-derivatized Sepharose beads. The second renewable biosensor system includes detection downstream from the microparticles and is based on the use of derivatized magnetic particles for selective binding. The magnetic particles are fluidically captured and released in a sequential injection system to allow the automation of an Enzyme Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay.

  15. Multilayer optical disc system using homodyne detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurokawa, Takahiro; Ide, Tatsuro; Tanaka, Yukinobu; Watanabe, Koichi

    2014-09-01

    A write/read system using high-productivity multilayer optical discs was developed. The recording medium used in the system consists of planar recording layers and a separated guide layer, and is fabricated by web coating and lamination process. The recording layers in the medium are made of one-photon-absorption material, on which data can be recorded with a normal laser diode. The developed system is capable of focusing and tracking on the medium and amplifying readout signals by using phase-diversity homodyne detection. A highly layer-selective focusing method using homodyne detection was also proposed. This method obtains stable focus-error signals with clearly separated S-shaped curves even when layer spacing is quite narrow, causing large interlayer crosstalk. Writing on the medium and reading with the signal amplification effect of homodyne detection was demonstrated. In addition, the effectiveness of the method was experimentally evaluated.

  16. Fiber Optic Thermal Detection of Composite Delaminations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.

    2011-01-01

    A recently developed technique is presented for thermographic detection of delaminations in composites by performing temperature measurements with fiber optic Bragg gratings. A single optical fiber with multiple Bragg gratings employed as surface temperature sensors was bonded to the surface of a composite with subsurface defects. The investigated structure was a 10-ply composite specimen with prefabricated delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The data obtained from grating sensors were analyzed with thermal modeling techniques of conventional thermography to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. Results were compared and found to be consistent with the calculations using numerical simulation techniques. Also discussed are methods including various heating sources and patterns, and their limitations for performing in-situ structural health monitoring.

  17. Optical and infrared detection using microcantilevers

    SciTech Connect

    Oden, P.I.; Datskos, P.G.; Warmack, R.J. |; Wachter, E.A.; Thundat, T.

    1996-05-01

    The feasibility of micromechanical optical and infrared (IR) detection using microcantilevers is demonstrated. Microcantilevers provide a simple means for developing single- and multi-element sensors for visible and infrared radiation that are smaller, more sensitive and lower in cost than quantum or thermal detectors. Microcantilevers coated with a heat absorbing layer undergo bending due to the differential stress originating from the bimetallic effect. Bending is proportional to the amount of heat absorbed and can be detected using optical or electrical methods such as resistance changes in piezoresistive cantilevers. The microcantilever sensors exhibit two distinct thermal responses: a fast one ({theta}{sub 1}{sup thermal} < ms) and a slower one ({tau}{sub 2}{sup thermal} {approximately} 10 ms). A noise equivalent temperature difference, NEDT = 90 mK was measured. When uncoated microcantilevers were irradiated by a low-power diode laser ({lambda} = 786 nm) the noise equivalent power, NEP, was found to be 3.5nW/{radical}Hz which corresponds to a specific detectivity, D*, of 3.6 {times} 10{sup 7} cm {center_dot} {radical}Hz/W at a modulation frequency of 20 Hz.

  18. Ultraviolet light detection using an optical microcavity.

    PubMed

    Harker, Audrey; Mehrabani, Simin; Armani, Andrea M

    2013-09-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) light exposure is connected to both physical and psychological diseases. As such, there is significant interest in developing sensors that can detect UV light in the mW/cm2 intensity range with a high signal-to-noise ratio. In this Letter, we demonstrate a UV sensor based on a silica integrated optical microcavity that has a linear operating response in both the forward and backward directions from 14 to 53 mW/cm2. The sensor response agrees with the developed predictive theory based on a thermodynamic model. Additionally, the signal-to-noise ratio is above 100 at physiologically relevant intensity levels.

  19. Optical "anti-transient" detected by MASTER

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denisenko, D.; Gorbovskoy, E.; Lipunov, V.; Balanutsa, P.; Yecheistov, V.; Tiurina, N.; Kornilov, V.; Belinski, A.; Shatskiy, N.; Chazov, V.; Kuznetsov, A.; Zimnukhov, D.; Krushinsky, V.; Zalozhnih, I.; Popov, A.; Bourdanov, A.; Punanova, A.; Ivanov, K.; Yazev, S.; Budnev, N.; Konstantinov, E.; Chuvalaev, O.; Poleshchuk, V.; Gress, O.; Parkhomenko, A.; Tlatov, A.; Dormidontov, D.; Senik, V.; Yurkov, V.; Sergienko, Y.; Varda, D.; Sinyakov, E.; Shurpakov, S.; Shumkov, V.; Podvorotny, P.; Levato, H.; Saffe, C.; Mallamaci, C.; Lopez, C.; Podest, F.

    2013-02-01

    We have started the search for the disappearing stars (optical "anti-transients", OATs) in the MASTER database. The first result is the detection of a deep (~3.5 magnitudes) fading of the bright star TYC 2505-672-1 whose variability was previously unknown. This star has the coordinates 09 53 10.00 +33 53 52.7 and magnitudes V=10.71, B=12.51 in Tycho2 catalogue and J=7.61, H=6.78, K=6.57 in 2MASS.

  20. Evolution in the optical detection of magnetization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zapasskii, V. S.; Kozlov, G. G.

    2017-06-01

    This paper represents an extended version of the talk given at the XVI Feofilov Symposium on the spectroscopy of crystals activated by rare-earth ions and devoted to the 100th anniversary of the birth of the outstanding physicist-spectroscopist and Corresponding Member of the USSR Academy of Sciences, Petr Petrovich Feofilov (Saint-Petersburg, November 9–13, 2015). In this review, we briefly elucidate the development of research on the optical detection of magnetization initiated by P P Feofilov and then carried on by his disciples and followers.

  1. Optical Detection Of Fractures In Ceramic Diaphragms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Laue, Eric G.

    1995-01-01

    Simple optical technique enables quick, nondestructive inspection of surfaces of ceramic diaphragms and disks for fractures and discontinuities. Involves reflecting beam of light from laser at glancing angle of about 20 degrees to 25 degrees off surface inspected and examining pattern of reflected light on suitable viewing surface as beam swept across surface. When fracture present, reflection pattern separates into two or more speckled spots. Technique applied in inspection of ceramic diaphragms bearing electronic circuits. Also useful in detection of fatigue cracks on aircraft.

  2. Space debris detection in optical image sequences.

    PubMed

    Xi, Jiangbo; Wen, Desheng; Ersoy, Okan K; Yi, Hongwei; Yao, Dalei; Song, Zongxi; Xi, Shaobo

    2016-10-01

    We present a high-accuracy, low false-alarm rate, and low computational-cost methodology for removing stars and noise and detecting space debris with low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) in optical image sequences. First, time-index filtering and bright star intensity enhancement are implemented to remove stars and noise effectively. Then, a multistage quasi-hypothesis-testing method is proposed to detect the pieces of space debris with continuous and discontinuous trajectories. For this purpose, a time-index image is defined and generated. Experimental results show that the proposed method can detect space debris effectively without any false alarms. When the SNR is higher than or equal to 1.5, the detection probability can reach 100%, and when the SNR is as low as 1.3, 1.2, and 1, it can still achieve 99%, 97%, and 85% detection probabilities, respectively. Additionally, two large sets of image sequences are tested to show that the proposed method performs stably and effectively.

  3. Detection of splices of optical fibers with low loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salikhov, Aydar I.; Kazbaeva, Dinara A.; Komissarov, Arkadiy M.; Kisselev, Anton E.; Zhdanov, Ruslan R.

    2017-04-01

    Optical Reflectometer (OTDR-Optical Time Domain Reflectometr) of various types are widely used in almost all stages of the fiber-optic communication systems, from production of fiber optic cable to the construction of fiber-optic communication lines and their operation. OTDR provides a quick and easy diagnosis of the state of fibers, cables and fiber-optic communication lines in general. A new method of analysis allowing visually detect traces of welding with low loss.

  4. Optics detection and laser countermeasures on a combat vehicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sjöqvist, Lars; Allard, Lars; Pettersson, Magnus; Börjesson, Per; Lindskog, Nils; Bodin, Johan; Widén, Anders; Persson, Hâkan; Fredriksson, Jan; Edström, Sten

    2016-10-01

    Magnifying optical assemblies used for weapon guidance or rifle scopes may possess a threat for a combat vehicle and its personnel. Detection and localisation of optical threats is consequently of interest in military applications. Typically a laser system is used in optics detection, or optical augmentation, to interrogate a scene of interest to localise retroreflected laser radiation. One interesting approach for implementing optics detection on a combat vehicle is to use a continuous scanning scheme. In addition, optics detection can be combined with laser countermeasures, or a laser dazzling function, to efficiently counter an optical threat. An optics detection laser sensor demonstrator has been implemented on a combat vehicle. The sensor consists of a stabilised gimbal and was integrated together with a LEMUR remote electro-optical sight. A narrow laser slit is continuously scanned around the horizon to detect and locate optical threats. Detected threats are presented for the operator within the LEMUR presentation system, and by cueing a countermeasure laser installed in the LEMUR sensor housing threats can be defeated. Results obtained during a field demonstration of the optics detection sensor and the countermeasure laser will be presented. In addition, results obtained using a dual-channel optics detection system designed for false alarm reduction are also discussed.

  5. Optical detection of microcystin produced by cyanobacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Al-Ammar, R.; Nabok, A.; Hashim, A.; Smith, T.

    2013-06-01

    Microcystin (MC-LR) produced by cyanobacteria (blue-green algae) was detected in direct immunoassay with specific monoclonal antibody MC10E7 using an optical method of Total Internal Reflection Ellipsometry (TIRE). The minimal detected concentration of MC-LR of 0.1 ng/ml is a remarkable achievement for direct immunoassay against such low molecular weight analyte molecule. The study of binding kinetics of MC-LR to MC10E7 antibody allowed the evaluation of the association constant KA of about 108 (l/Mol) typical for highly specific immune reactions. Concentration of MC-LR in aqueous solutions was reduced using an absorbent made of polyelectrolyte-coated microparticles functionalized with MC10E7 antibodies.

  6. Direct optical nanoscopy with axially localized detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourg, N.; Mayet, C.; Dupuis, G.; Barroca, T.; Bon, P.; Lécart, S.; Fort, E.; Lévêque-Fort, S.

    2015-09-01

    Evanescent light excitation is widely used in super-resolution fluorescence microscopy to confine light and reduce background noise. Here, we propose a method of exploiting evanescent light in the context of emission. When a fluorophore is located in close proximity to a medium with a higher refractive index, its near-field component is converted into light that propagates beyond the critical angle. This so-called supercritical-angle fluorescence can be captured using a high-numerical-aperture objective and used to determine the axial position of the fluorophore with nanometre precision. We introduce a new technique for three-dimensional nanoscopy that combines direct stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy (dSTORM) with dedicated detection of supercritical-angle fluorescence emission. We demonstrate that our approach of direct optical nanoscopy with axially localized detection (DONALD) typically yields an isotropic three-dimensional localization precision of 20 nm within an axial range of ∼150 nm above the coverslip.

  7. On event-based optical flow detection

    PubMed Central

    Brosch, Tobias; Tschechne, Stephan; Neumann, Heiko

    2015-01-01

    Event-based sensing, i.e., the asynchronous detection of luminance changes, promises low-energy, high dynamic range, and sparse sensing. This stands in contrast to whole image frame-wise acquisition by standard cameras. Here, we systematically investigate the implications of event-based sensing in the context of visual motion, or flow, estimation. Starting from a common theoretical foundation, we discuss different principal approaches for optical flow detection ranging from gradient-based methods over plane-fitting to filter based methods and identify strengths and weaknesses of each class. Gradient-based methods for local motion integration are shown to suffer from the sparse encoding in address-event representations (AER). Approaches exploiting the local plane like structure of the event cloud, on the other hand, are shown to be well suited. Within this class, filter based approaches are shown to define a proper detection scheme which can also deal with the problem of representing multiple motions at a single location (motion transparency). A novel biologically inspired efficient motion detector is proposed, analyzed and experimentally validated. Furthermore, a stage of surround normalization is incorporated. Together with the filtering this defines a canonical circuit for motion feature detection. The theoretical analysis shows that such an integrated circuit reduces motion ambiguity in addition to decorrelating the representation of motion related activations. PMID:25941470

  8. Trace elements profile is associated with insulin resistance syndrome and oxidative damage in thyroid disorders: Manganese and selenium interest in Algerian participants with dysthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Maouche, Naima; Meskine, Djamila; Alamir, Barkahoum; Koceir, Elhadj-Ahmed

    2015-10-01

    The relationship between dysthyroidism and antioxidant trace elements (ATE) status is very subtle during oxidative stress (OS). This relationship is mediated by thyroid hormone (TH) disorder, insulin resistance syndrome (IRS) and inflammation. The aim of this study was to investigate ATE such as selenium (Se), manganese (Mn), zinc (Zn) and copper (Cu) status on thyroid dysfunction, and their interaction with antioxidant enzyme activities, mainly, superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GPx), TH profile (TSH, T(3), T(4)) and IRS clusters. The study was undertaken on 220 Algerian adults (30-50 years), including 157 women and 63 men who were divided to 4 groups: subclinical hypothyroidism (n = 50), overt hypothyroidism (n = 60), Graves's disease hyperthyroidism (n = 60) and euthyroid controls (n = 50). The IRS was confirmed according to NCEP (National Cholesterol Education Program). Insulin resistance was evaluated by HOMA-IR model. Trace elements were determined by the Flame Atomic Absorption Spectrometry (Flame-AAS) technique. The antioxidant enzymes activity and metabolic parameters were determined by biochemical methods. The TH profile and anti-Thyroperoxidase Antibodies (anti-TPO-Ab) were evaluated by radioimmunoassay. Results showed that the plasma manganese levels were significantly increased in all dysthyroidism groups (p ≤ 0.01). However, the plasma copper and zinc concentrations were maintained normal or not very disturbed vs control group. In contrast, the plasma selenium levels were highly decreased (p ≤ 0.001) and positively correlated with depletion of glutathione peroxidase activity; and associated both with anti-TPO-Ab overexpression and fulminant HS-CRP levels. This study confirms the oxidative stress-inflammation relationship in the dysthyroidism. The thyroid follicles antioxidant protection appears preserved in the cytosol (Cu/Zn-SOD), while it is altered in the mitochondria (Mn-SOD), which gives this cell organelle, a status of

  9. Detecting eavesdropping activity in fiber optic networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Gregory G.

    The secure transmission of data is critical to governments, military organizations, financial institutions, health care providers and other enterprises. The primary method of securing in-transit data is though data encryption. A number of encryption methods exist but the fundamental approach is to assume an eavesdropper has access to the encrypted message but does not have the computing capability to decrypt the message in a timely fashion. Essentially, the strength of security depends on the complexity of the encryption method and the resources available to the eavesdropper. The development of future technologies, most notably quantum computers and quantum computing, is often cited as a direct threat to traditional encryption schemes. It seems reasonable that additional effort should be placed on prohibiting the eavesdropper from coming into possession of the encrypted message in the first place. One strategy for denying possession of the encrypted message is to secure the physical layer of the communications path. Because the majority of transmitted information is over fiber-optic networks, it seems appropriate to consider ways of enhancing the integrity and security of the fiber-based physical layer. The purpose of this research is to investigate the properties of light, as they are manifested in single mode fiber, as a means of insuring the integrity and security of the physical layer of a fiber-optic based communication link. Specifically, the approach focuses on the behavior of polarization in single mode fiber, as it is shown to be especially sensitive to fiber geometry. Fiber geometry is necessarily modified during the placement of optical taps. The problem of detecting activity associated with the placement of an optical tap is herein approached as a supervised machine learning anomaly identification task. The inputs include raw polarization measurements along with additional features derived from various visualizations of the raw data (the inputs are

  10. Parallel Optical and Electrochemical DNA Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knoll, Wolfgang; Liu, Jianyun; Niu, Lifang; Nielsen, Peter Eigil; Tiefenauer, Louis

    This contribution introduces strategies for the sensitive detection of oligonucleotides as bio-analytes binding from solution to a variety of probe architectures assembled at the (Au-) sensor surface. Detection principles based on surface plasmon optics and electrochemical techniques are compared. In particular, cyclic- and square wave voltammetry (SWV) are applied for the read-out of ferrocene redox labels conjugated to streptavidin that binds to the (biotinylated) DNA targets after hybridizing to the interfacial probe matrix of either DNA or peptide nucleic acid (PNA) strands. By employing streptavidin modified with fluorophores the identical sensor architecture can be used for the recording of hybridization reactions by surface plasmon fluorescence spectroscopy (SPFS). The Langmuir isotherms determined by both techniques, i.e., by SWV and SPFS, give virtually identical affinity constants KA, confirming that the mode of detection has no influence on the hybridization reaction. By using semiconducting nanoparticles as luminescence labels that can be tuned in their bandgap energies over a wide range of emission wavelengths surface plasmon fluorescence microscopy allows for the parallel read-out of multiple analyte binding events simultaneously.

  11. Detection of Optically Faint GEO Debris

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seitzer, P.; Lederer, S.; Barker, E.; Cowardin, H.; Abercromby, K.; Silha, J.; Burkhardt, A.

    2014-01-01

    There have been extensive optical surveys for debris at geosynchronous orbit (GEO) conducted with meter-class telescopes, such as those conducted with MODEST (the Michigan Orbital DEbris Survey Telescope, a 0.6-m telescope located at Cerro Tololo in Chile), and the European Space Agency's 1.0-m space debris telescope (SDT) in the Canary Islands. These surveys have detection limits in the range of 18th or 19th magnitude, which corresponds to sizes larger than 10 cm assuming an albedo of 0.175. All of these surveys reveal a substantial population of objects fainter than R = 15th magnitude that are not in the public U.S. Satellite Catalog. To detect objects fainter than 20th magnitude (and presumably smaller than 10 cm) in the visible requires a larger telescope and excellent imaging conditions. This combination is available in Chile. NASA's Orbital Debris Program Office has begun collecting orbital debris observations with the 6.5-m (21.3-ft diameter) "Walter Baade" Magellan telescope at Las Campanas Observatory. The goal is to detect objects as faint as possible from a ground-based observatory and begin to understand the brightness distribution of GEO debris fainter than R = 20th magnitude.

  12. On-chip optical detection of laser cooled atoms.

    PubMed

    Quinto-Su, P; Tscherneck, M; Holmes, M; Bigelow, N

    2004-10-18

    We have used an optical fiber based system to implement optical detection of atoms trapped on a reflective "atom-chip". A fiber pair forms an emitter-detector setup that is bonded to the atom-chip surface to optically detect and probe laser cooled atoms trapped in a surface magneto-optical trap. We demonstrate the utility of this scheme by measuring the linewidth of the Cs D2 line at different laser intensities.

  13. On-chip optical detection of laser cooled atoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinto-Su, P. A.; Tscherneck, M.; Holmes, M.; Bigelow, N. P.

    2004-10-01

    We have used an optical fiber based system to implement optical detection of atoms trapped on a reflective "atom-chip". A fiber pair forms an emitter-detector setup that is bonded to the atom-chip surface to optically detect and probe laser cooled atoms trapped in a surface magneto-optical trap. We demonstrate the utility of this scheme by measuring the linewidth of the Cs D2 line at different laser intensities.

  14. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris; Bondur, Valery G.; Leung, Pak T.; Prandke, H.; Vithanage, D.

    2007-09-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed ~100 m spectral anomalies in km2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2 × 10 4 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA). Most of the bottom turbulent kinetic energy is converted to ~ 100 m fossil turbulence waves. These activate secondary (zombie) turbulence in outfall fossil turbulence patches that transmit heat, mass, chemical species, momentum and information vertically to the sea surface for detection in an efficient maser action. The transport is beamed in intermittent mixing chimneys.

  15. Submerged turbulence detection with optical satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gibson, Carl H.; Keeler, R. Norris; Bondur, Valery G.; Leung, Pak T.; Prandke, H.; Vithanage, D.

    2013-01-01

    During fall periods in 2002, 2003 and 2004 three major oceanographic expeditions were carried out in Mamala Bay, Hawaii. These were part of the RASP Remote Anthropogenic Sensing Program. Ikonos and Quickbird optical satellite images of sea surface glint revealed !100 m spectral anomalies in km2 averaging patches in regions leading from the Honolulu Sand Island Municipal Outfall diffuser to distances up to 20 km. To determine the mechanisms behind this phenomenon, the RASP expeditions monitored the waters adjacent to the outfall with an array of hydrographic, optical and turbulence microstructure sensors in anomaly and ambient background regions. Drogue tracks and mean turbulence parameters for 2 ! 104 microstructure patches were analyzed to understand complex turbulence, fossil turbulence and zombie turbulence near-vertical internal wave transport processes. The dominant mechanism appears to be generic to stratified natural fluids including planet and star atmospheres and is termed beamed zombie turbulence maser action (BZTMA). Most of the bottom turbulent kinetic energy is converted to ! 100 m fossil turbulence waves. These activate secondary (zombie) turbulence in outfall fossil turbulence patches that transmit heat, mass, chemical species, momentum and information vertically to the sea surface for detection in an efficient maser action. The transport is beamed in intermittent mixing chimneys.

  16. Fiber-optic sensor detects nonaqueous compounds

    SciTech Connect

    1992-11-01

    Scientists have used a fiber-optic sensor that detects scattered light to locate and identify nonaqueous liquids such as gasoline, that have seeped below the ground`s surface. The technique, called Raman spectroscopy, can be used to find both non-aqueous phase liquids - such as gasoline, that float on water, and dense nonaqueous phase liquids - such as the chemical perchloroethylene, or PCE - that sink below water. The in situ Raman spectra of the gasoline clearly showed the relative amounts of different chemical compounds, thus indicating the type of gasoline. The amount of fluorescence in the spectrum seems to be related to the degradation products in the gasoline and, thus, might be some measure of the history of the fuel.

  17. Optical Detection of Hepatic and Renal Function.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorshow, Richard B.; Bugaj, Joseph E.; Burleigh, B. Daniel; Johnson, Michael A.; Jones, William B.; Duncan, James R.

    1997-03-01

    The feasibility of a new methodology for organ function determination, based on optical detection, is investigated. Differentiation between normal and abnormal organ function is demonstrated in an animal model for both the liver and the kidney. Two commercial dyes were employed in this initial study. Characteristic blood clearance curves associated with normal hepatic function and normal renal function are obtained. Upon ablation of a portion of the liver, the clearance curve ascribed to hepatic function is greatly extended as expected. Upon ligation of both kidneys, the clearance curve ascribed to renal function remains elevated and constant, indicating little if any clearance. The clearance curves are fit to standard physiological compartment models to yield quantitative information on decay times.

  18. Optical Detection Properties of Silicon-Germanium Quantum Well Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-10-18

    AFIT/DS/ENP/96-07 OPTICAL DETECTION PROPERTIES OF SILICON-GERMANIUM QUANTUM WELL STRUCTURES DISSERTATION Michael R. Gregg, Captain, USAF AFIT/DS/ENP...96 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited DTC Qr. ~r AFIT/DS/ENP/96-07 Optical Detection Properties of Silicon-Germanium Quantum Well ...release; distribution unlimited AFIT/DS/ENP/96-07 Optical Detection Properties of Silicon-Germanium Quantum Well Structures Michael R. Gregg, BA, MS

  19. Polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography detection method

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, M J; Sathyam, U S; Colston, B W; DaSilva, L B; Fried, D; Ragadio, J N; Featherstone, J D B

    1999-05-12

    This study demonstrates the potential of polarization sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) for non-invasive in vivo detection and characterization of early, incipient caries lesions. PS-OCT generates cross-sectional images of biological tissue while measuring the effect of the tissue on the polarization state of incident light. Clear discrimination between regions of normal and demineralized enamel is first shown in PS-OCT images of bovine enamel blocks containing well-characterized artificial lesions. High-resolution, cross-sectional images of extracted human teeth are then generated that clearly discriminate between the normal and carious regions on both the smooth and occlusal surfaces. Regions of the teeth that appeared to be demineralized in the PS-OCT images were verified using histological thin sections examined under polarized light microscopy. The PS-OCT system discriminates between normal and carious regions by measuring the polarization state of the back-scattered 1310 nm light, which is affected by the state of demineralization of the enamel. Demineralization of enamel increases the scattereing coefficient, thus depolarizing the incident light. This study shows that PS-OCT has great potential for the detection, characterization, and monitoring of incipient caries lesions.

  20. Maneuver Detection and Estimation with Optical Tracklets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hill, K.

    2014-09-01

    A method is proposed for detecting and estimating maneuvers using optical (angles-only) tracklets. After the correlator recognizes that a Resident Space Object (RSO) has maneuvered and no longer matches its pre-maneuver trajectory, observations for that RSO will be classified as Uncorrelated Tracks (UCTs). Using an algorithm to indicate when known RSOs have gone missing, an initial estimate for a maneuver can be obtained by processing the pool of UCTs with an algorithm called Two Angle Pairs Initial Orbit with Conjunction Analysis (TAPIOCA). TAPIOCA computes hypothesized orbits on the admissible region for two angles-only observations and back-propagates the orbits to look for conjunctions with the last known trajectories for the missing RSOs. If a conjunction is found with a small miss distance and velocity difference, it is used as an estimate for a maneuver. Once an initial estimate for the maneuver is obtained from TAPIOCA, a batch least-squares process is outlined which can refine that maneuver estimate and provide predictions for the trajectory and covariance after the maneuver such that the correlator will correctly identify that object for subsequent tracklets. As more tracklets become available after the maneuver, it is continually refined in the least-squares estimator. The maneuver estimates include start time and thrust. Maneuver detection results are shown for both simulated and real geostationary objects. Using Raven observations of Galaxy 15, the method was able to find five maneuvers over four weeks which were verified against precise WAAS ephemeris.

  1. Electro-Optic Generation and Detection of Femtosecond Electromagnetic Pulses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-11-20

    electromagnetic pulses from an electro - optic crystal following their generation by electro - optic Cherenkov radiation, and their subsequent propagation and detection...in free space; (4) The measurement of subpicosecond electrical response of a new organic electrooptic material (polymer); (5) The observation of terahertz transition radiation from the surfaces of electro - optic crystals.

  2. Maximum Likelihood Detection of Electro-Optic Moving Targets

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-01-16

    The description of a maximum likelihood algorithm to detect moving targets in electro - optic data is presented. The algorithm is based on processing...optimum algorithm to determine the performance loss. A processing architecture concept is also described. Electro - optic sensor, detection, infrared sensor, moving target, binary integration, velocity filter.

  3. Photoelectronic detection of optical surface defects of optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Shou-Cheng; Wang, Fu

    1993-04-01

    This paper introduces an auto-photoelectronic instrument for evaluating the surface defects of the optical parts inside an optical instrument. By analyzing the effects of defects on image quality, we can present the possibility of evaluating the surface defects and its damage objectively and quantitatively by measuring stray-light. Detailed discussion is given about the physical procedure for generating and measuring stray-light. On the basis of this theoretical research a new type of auto-photoelectronic instrument used to evaluate the defects on the optical surface inside the optical system is given. In this instrument the technology of photoelectronics and microcomputer is applied, so a test result is given automatically.

  4. New optical cell design for pollutant detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conde, Olga M.; Garcia, Sergio; Mirapeix, Jesus M.; Echevarria, Juan; Madruga Saavedra, Francisco J.; Lopez-Higuera, Jose Miguel

    2002-02-01

    A new and simple optical gas cell, developed to perform as the transducer for a methane fiber optic sensor, is presented. Its main advantage lies in the fact that, employing low-cost components and an easy alignment process, the path where the light beam is in contact with the pollutant becomes maximized to as much as four times the physical length of the optical cell. This increment in optical length is directly related to the optimization of the fiber optic sensor since low levels of methane concentration can be measured as stated by Beer-Lambert's law. One of the main advantages of this design lies in the simplicity of the optic cell, which makes it very interesting when one has to deal with the manufacturing process. The cell is mounted on a reflective configuration which improves the connection as only one optical fiber is employed. The main elements of the cell are an optical fiber, a mirror of high reflectivity and a converging lens arranged in an appropriate fashion to obtain the desired result. With this relatively reduced and low cost set of devices the insertion losses achieved are in the range of the 4-5 dB's.

  5. Optic disc detection in retinal fundus images using gravitational law-based edge detection.

    PubMed

    Alshayeji, Mohammad; Al-Roomi, Suood Abdulaziz; Abed, Sa'ed

    2017-06-01

    Diabetic retinopathy is one of the primary causes of vision loss worldwide. Early detection of the condition is critical for providing adequate treatment of this ailment to prevent vision loss. This detection is achieved by processing retinal fundus images. A key step in detecting diabetic retinopathy is identifying the optic disc in these images. The optic disc is similar in color and contrast to the exudates that indicate diabetic retinopathy. Hence, the optic disc has to be removed from the fundus image before exudates can be detected. Detecting the optic disc is also required in algorithms used for blood vessel segmentation in fundus images. Therefore, there is a need for approaches that accurately and quickly detect optic disc. This paper proposes a simple, deterministic, and time-efficient approach for optic disc detection by adapting an edge detection algorithm inspired by the gravitational law. Our method introduces novel pre- and post-detection steps that aim to increase the accuracy of the adapted detection method. In addition, a candidate selection technique is proposed to decrease the number of missed optic discs. The proposed methodology was found to have a detection rate of 100, 97.75, 92.90, and 95 % for DRIVE, DiaRet, DMED, and STARE datasets, respectively, which is comparatively better than existing optic disc detection schemes. Experimental results showed an average running time of 0.40 s per image, which is significantly lower than available methods published in the literature.

  6. Computer-aided detection of polyps in optical colonoscopy images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadeem, Saad; Kaufman, Arie

    2016-03-01

    We present a computer-aided detection algorithm for polyps in optical colonoscopy images. Polyps are the precursors to colon cancer. In the US alone, 14 million optical colonoscopies are performed every year, mostly to screen for polyps. Optical colonoscopy has been shown to have an approximately 25% polyp miss rate due to the convoluted folds and bends present in the colon. In this work, we present an automatic detection algorithm to detect these polyps in the optical colonoscopy images. We use a machine learning algorithm to infer a depth map for a given optical colonoscopy image and then use a detailed pre-built polyp profile to detect and delineate the boundaries of polyps in this given image. We have achieved the best recall of 84.0% and the best specificity value of 83.4%.

  7. High performance fiber-based optical coherent detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Youming

    The sensitivity of signal detection is of major interest for optical high speed communication systems and LIght Detection And Ranging (lidar) systems. Sensitive receivers in fiber-optical networks can reduce transmitter power or amplifier amplification requirements and extend link spans. High receiver sensitivity allows links to be established over long distances in deep space satellite communication systems and large atmospheric attenuation to be overcome in terrestrial free space communications. For lidar systems, the sensitivity of signal detection determines how far and how accurately the lidar can detect the remote objects. Optical receivers employ either coherent or direct detection. In addition to amplitude, coherent detection extracts frequency and phase information from received signals, whereas direct detection extracts the received pulse amplitude only. In theory, coherent detection should yield the highest receiver sensitivity. Another possible technique to improve detection sensitivity is to employ a fiber preamplifier. This technique has been successfully demonstrated in direct detection systems but not in the coherent detection systems. Due to the existence of amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) inside the amplifier, the sensitivity of coherent detection varies with the data rate or pulse rate. For this reason, optically preamplified coherent detection is not used in applications as commonly as optically preamplified direct detection. We investigate the performance of coherent detection employing a fiber amplifier and time-domain-filter. The fiber amplifier is used as the optical preamplifier of the coherent detection system. To reduce the noise induced by the preamplifier to a maximum extent, we investigate the noise properties for both a single pass amplifier and a double pass amplifier. The relative intensity noise and linewidth broadening caused by ASE have been experimentally characterized. The results show that the double pass amplifier has

  8. Detecting atoms trapped in an optical lattice using a tapered optical nanofiber.

    PubMed

    Hennessy, T; Busch, Th

    2014-12-29

    Optical detection of structures with dimensions smaller than an optical wavelength requires devices that work on scales beyond the diffraction limit. Here we present the possibility of using a tapered optical nanofiber as a detector to resolve individual atoms trapped in an optical lattice in the Mott insulator phase. We show that the small size of the fiber combined with an enhanced photon collection rate can allow for the attainment of large and reliable measurement signals.

  9. Optical Magnetometry for Detecting Underwater Objects

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-21

    underwater object. The two mechanisms responsible for the polarization rotation are the Surface Magneto-Optical Kerr Effect ( SMOKE ) and the Faraday effect...due to an underwater object will result in variations in the polarization rotation of the laser light reflected off the water’s surface ( SMOKE ) and off...Washington, DC 20375-5320 October 2014 – August 2015 NRL *University of Maryland, College Park, MD 20742-4111 Faraday SMOKE 67-4374-C4 1 Optical

  10. Optimizing SCR Design for Optical Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    comparisons with similar CMOS processes (5 pp. 55-56), he generated the I-V curves in Figure 7 using a 7 SILVACO finite element simulator. The...middle p-n junction. As an optical detector , then, a thyristor can be stimulated either through the injection of current at the gate contact via a...this project imparts an assurance of the possibility of an optical detector conceived around a customized thyristor. Measurements in Part 1d confirm

  11. Chemical detection demonstrated using an evanescent wave graphene optical sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maliakal, Ashok; Reith, Leslie; Cabot, Steve

    2016-04-01

    Graphene devices have been constructed on silicon mirrors, and the graphene is optically probed through an evanescent wave interaction in an attenuated total reflectance configuration using an infrared spectrometer. The graphene is electrically biased in order to tune its optical properties. Exposure of the device to the chemicals iodine and ammonia causes observable and reversible changes to graphene's optical absorption spectra in the mid to near infrared range which can be utilized for the purpose of sensing. Electrical current measurements through the graphene are made simultaneously with optical measurements allowing for simultaneous sensing using two separate detection modalities. Our current results reveal sub-ppm detection limits for iodine and approximately 100 ppm detection limits for ammonia. We have also demonstrated that this approach will work at 1.55 μm, which opens up the possibility for graphene optical sensors that leverage commercial telecom light sources.

  12. Chemical detection demonstrated using an evanescent wave graphene optical sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Maliakal, Ashok; Reith, Leslie; Cabot, Steve

    2016-04-11

    Graphene devices have been constructed on silicon mirrors, and the graphene is optically probed through an evanescent wave interaction in an attenuated total reflectance configuration using an infrared spectrometer. The graphene is electrically biased in order to tune its optical properties. Exposure of the device to the chemicals iodine and ammonia causes observable and reversible changes to graphene's optical absorption spectra in the mid to near infrared range which can be utilized for the purpose of sensing. Electrical current measurements through the graphene are made simultaneously with optical measurements allowing for simultaneous sensing using two separate detection modalities. Our current results reveal sub-ppm detection limits for iodine and approximately 100 ppm detection limits for ammonia. We have also demonstrated that this approach will work at 1.55 μm, which opens up the possibility for graphene optical sensors that leverage commercial telecom light sources.

  13. Optical Techniques for the Remote Detection of Biological Aerosols

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-08-01

    enhancement of Raman or fluorescent signals, and multiwavelength differential. absorption. As will be evident from the discussions in subsequent sections of...detection of aerosols, using optical techniques. B. Rationale SRI Proposal ERU 72-62, which led to this project, describes several optical...enhancement of Raman or fluorescent signals, and multiwavelength differential absorption. The optical interactions were reviewed early in the project, with

  14. System and Method for Multi-Wavelength Optical Signal Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    McGlone, Thomas D. (Inventor)

    2017-01-01

    The system and method for multi-wavelength optical signal detection enables the detection of optical signal levels significantly below those processed at the discrete circuit level by the use of mixed-signal processing methods implemented with integrated circuit technologies. The present invention is configured to detect and process small signals, which enables the reduction of the optical power required to stimulate detection networks, and lowers the required laser power to make specific measurements. The present invention provides an adaptation of active pixel networks combined with mixed-signal processing methods to provide an integer representation of the received signal as an output. The present invention also provides multi-wavelength laser detection circuits for use in various systems, such as a differential absorption light detection and ranging system.

  15. Lamb wave detection with a fiber optic angular displacement sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Marlon R.; Sakamoto, João. M. S.; Higuti, Ricardo T.; Kitano, Cláudio

    2015-09-01

    In this work we show that the fiber optic angular displacement sensor is capable of Lamb wave detection, with results comparable to a piezoelectric transducer. Therefore, the fiber optic sensor has a great potential to be used as the Lamb wave ultrasonic receiver and to perform non-destructive and non-contact testing.

  16. Integrated optical biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Kelly, Dan; Grace, Karen M.; Song, Xuedong; Swanson, Basil I.; Frayer, Daniel; Mendes, Sergio B.; Peyghambarian, Nasser

    1999-12-01

    We have developed a simple, highly sensitive and specific optical waveguide sensor for the detection of multivalent proteins. The optical biosensor is based on optically tagged glycolipid receptors embedded within a fluid phospholipid bilayer membrane formed upon the surface of a planar optical waveguide. Binding of multivalent cholera toxin triggers a fluorescence resonance energy transfer that results in a two-color optical change that is monitored by measurement of emitted luminescence above the waveguide surface. The sensor approach is highly sensitive and specific and requires no additional reagents and washing steps. Demonstration of protein-receptor recognition by use of planar optical waveguides provides a path forward for the development of fieldable miniaturized biosensor arrays. (c) 1999 Optical Society of America.

  17. Electro-optical detection of single λ-DNA.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shuo; Wall, Thomas A; Ozcelik, Damla; Parks, Joshua W; Hawkins, Aaron R; Schmidt, Holger

    2015-02-07

    Single λ-DNA molecules are detected on a nanopore-gated optofluidic chip electrically and optically. Statistical variations in the single particle trajectories are used to predict the intensity distribution of the fluorescence signals.

  18. [Inter-regional differences in dysthyroidism due to amiodarone: comparison of spontaneous notifications in Aquitaine, Midi-Pyrenees and Languedoc-Roussillon].

    PubMed

    Bagheri, H; Lapeyre-Mestre, M; Levy, C; Haramburu, F; Hillaire-Buys, D; Blayac, J P; Montastruc, J L

    2001-01-01

    Amiodarone hydrochloride is used in the treatment of ventricular and supraventricular arrhythmias. Because of its iodinated structure, thyroid dysfunction can occur during amiodarone therapy. The reported overall incidence is variable (2-24 per cent) and depends on several factors (past thyroid history, daily iodine intake,...). The present retrospective (1990-97) study was performed using the French pharmacovigilance database in order to compare the frequency of hypo- and hyperthyroidism in three areas in the South of France: Midi-Pyrénées, Aquitaine and Languedoc-Roussillon. For each case, the following data were recorded: age, sex, dysthyroidism history, dosage, duration and indication of amiodarone and delay to onset of dysthyroidism. We collected respectively 37, 50 and 9 cases of hypothyroidism in Midi-Pyrénées, Aquitaine and Languedoc-Roussillon and 20, 69 and 11 cases of hyperthyroidism respectively in the same areas. These data show the predominance of reported amiodarone-induced hyperthyroidism in Aquitaine and Languedoc-Roussillon. Hypothyroidism seems more frequent in Midi-Pyrénées, a non-maritime area. The sex ratio (male/female) was significantly different for the occurrence of hypothyroidism in Midi-Pyrénées (1.8 versus 0.5 in Aquitaine and 0.8 in Languedoc-Roussillon). The delay to onset of hypothyroidism was significantly shorter in Midi-Pyrénées (17.1 months +/- 24.5) when compared with Aquitaine (28.7 +/- 28.1) or Languedoc-Roussillon (43.4 +/- 45). Our results show an interregional difference in the occurrence of hypo/hyperthyroidism due to amiodarone.

  19. Sequential and fused optical filters for clutter reduction and detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casasent, David P.

    1993-10-01

    For practical computer vision applications using optical processors, filters to reduce clutter and detect candidate regions of interest (ROIs) in a scene are necessary before the class of an object can be determined. We discuss new morphological wavelet, Gabor, and rank-order filters to achieve clutter reduction, object detection, and image enhancement. All operations (and hence all low, medium, and high level computer vision operations) can be performed on the same optical correlator architecture with such new filters.

  20. Generalized Optical Theorem Detection in Random and Complex Media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Jing

    The problem of detecting changes of a medium or environment based on active, transmit-plus-receive wave sensor data is at the heart of many important applications including radar, surveillance, remote sensing, nondestructive testing, and cancer detection. This is a challenging problem because both the change or target and the surrounding background medium are in general unknown and can be quite complex. This Ph.D. dissertation presents a new wave physics-based approach for the detection of targets or changes in rather arbitrary backgrounds. The proposed methodology is rooted on a fundamental result of wave theory called the optical theorem, which gives real physical energy meaning to the statistics used for detection. This dissertation is composed of two main parts. The first part significantly expands the theory and understanding of the optical theorem for arbitrary probing fields and arbitrary media including nonreciprocal media, active media, as well as time-varying and nonlinear scatterers. The proposed formalism addresses both scalar and full vector electromagnetic fields. The second contribution of this dissertation is the application of the optical theorem to change detection with particular emphasis on random, complex, and active media, including single frequency probing fields and broadband probing fields. The first part of this work focuses on the generalization of the existing theoretical repertoire and interpretation of the scalar and electromagnetic optical theorem. Several fundamental generalizations of the optical theorem are developed. A new theory is developed for the optical theorem for scalar fields in nonhomogeneous media which can be bounded or unbounded. The bounded media context is essential for applications such as intrusion detection and surveillance in enclosed environments such as indoor facilities, caves, tunnels, as well as for nondestructive testing and communication systems based on wave-guiding structures. The developed scalar

  1. Optical Detection of Anomalous Nitrogen in Comets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-12-01

    VLT Opens New Window towards Our Origins Summary A team of European astronomers [1] has used the UVES spectrograph on the 8.2-m VLT KUEYEN telescope to perform a uniquely detailed study of Comet LINEAR (C/2000 WM1) . This is the first time that this powerful instrument has been employed to obtain high-resolution spectra of a comet. At the time of the observations in mid-March 2002, Comet LINEAR was about 180 million km from the Sun, moving outwards after its perihelion passage in January. As comets are believed to carry "pristine" material - left-overs from the formation of the solar system, about 4,600 million years ago - studies of these objects are important to obtain clues about the origins of the solar system and the Earth in particular. The high quality of the data obtained of this moving 9th-magnitude object has permitted a determination of the cometary abundance of various elements and their isotopes [2]. Of particular interest is the unambiguous detection and measurement of the nitrogen-15 isotope. The only other comet in which this isotope has been observed is famous Comet Hale-Bopp - this was during the passage in 1997, when it was much brighter than Comet LINEAR. Most interestingly, Comet LINEAR and Comet Hale-Bopp display the same isotopic abundance ratio, about 1 nitrogen-15 atom for each 140 nitrogen-14 atoms ( 14 N/ 15 N = 140 ± 30) . That is about half of the terrestrial value (272). It is also very different from the result obtained by means of radio measurements of Comet Hale-Bopp ( 14 N/ 15 N = 330 ± 75). Optical and radio measurements concern different molecules (CN and HCN, respectively), and this isotopic anomaly must be explained by some differentiation mechanism. The astronomers conclude that part of the cometary nitrogen is trapped in macromolecules attached to dust particles . The successful entry of UVES into cometary research now opens eagerly awaited opportunities for similiar observations in other, comparatively faint comets. These

  2. Nanomechanical displacement detection using fiber-optic interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Azak, N. O.; Shagam, M. Y.; Karabacak, D. M.; Ekinci, K. L.; Kim, D. H.; Jang, D. Y.

    2007-08-27

    We describe a fiber-optic interferometer to detect the motion of nanomechanical resonators. In this system, the primary technical challenge of aligning the fiber-optic probe to nanometer-scale resonators is overcome by simply monitoring the scattered light from the devices. The system includes no free-space optical components, and is thus simple, stable, and compact with an estimated displacement sensitivity of {approx}0.3 pm/{radical}(Hz) at optical power levels of {approx}0.75 mW.

  3. An Optical Biosensor for Bacillus Cereus Spore Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chengquan; Tom, Harry W. K.

    2005-03-01

    We demonstrate a new transduction scheme for optical biosensing. Bacillus cereus is a pathogen that may be found in food and dairy products and is able to produce toxins and cause food poisoning. It is related to Bacillus anthracis (anthrax). A CCD array covered with micro-structured glass coverslip is used to detect the optical resonant shift due to the binding of the antigen (bacillus cereus spore) to the antibody (polyclonal antibody). This novel optical biosensor scheme has the potential for detecting 10˜100 bioagents in a single device as well as the potential to test for antigens with multiple antibody tests to avoid ``false positives.''

  4. [Optical detection system for micro biochemical analyses].

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Wu, Yi-hui; Zhao, Hua-bing; Ju, Hui

    2005-04-01

    For the need of biochemical chip, which consumes fewer specimens and is easy to integrate with micro-fluid chip, two kinds of spectrophotometric analysis methods are described in the present paper. Both the direct detection method and evanescent wave detection method are used in the experiments with visible light (460-800 nm). The experimental results proved that the direct detection is simple and evident; on the other hand the evanescent wave detection method consumes much less reagent and is easy to integrate with microchips.

  5. Detection of Laser Optic Defects Using Gradient Direction Matching

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, B Y; Kegelmeyer, L M; Liebman, J A; Salmon, J T; Tzeng, J; Paglieroni, D W

    2005-12-14

    That National Ignition Facility (NIF) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) will be the world's largest and most energetic laser. It has thousands of optics and depends heavily on the quality and performance of these optics. Over the past several years, we have developed the NIF Optics Inspection Analysis System that automatically finds defects in a specific optic by analyzing images taken of that optic. This paper describes a new and complementary approach for the automatic detection of defects based on detecting the diffraction ring patterns in downstream optic images caused by defects in upstream optics. Our approach applies a robust pattern matching algorithm for images called Gradient Direction Matching (GDM). GDM compares the gradient directions (the direction of flow from dark to light) of pixels in a test image to those of a specified model and identifies regions in the test image whose gradient directions are most in line with those of the specified model. For finding rings, we use luminance disk models whose pixels have gradient directions all pointing toward the center of the disk. After GDM identifies potential rings locations, we rank these rings by how well they fit the theoretical diffraction ring pattern equation. We perform false alarm mitigation by throwing out rings of low fit. A byproduct of this fitting procedure is an estimate of the size of the defect and its distance from the image plane. We demonstrate the potential effectiveness of this approach by showing examples of rings detected in real images of NIF optics.

  6. Optical detection of oil on water

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Arvesen, J. C.

    1973-01-01

    Three radiometric techniques utilizing sunlight reflected and backscattered from water bodies have potential application for remote sensing of oil spills. Oil on water can be detected by viewing perpendicular polarization component of reflected light or difference between polarization components. Best detection is performed in ultraviolet or far-red portions of spectrum and in azimuth directions toward or opposite sun.

  7. Optical detection strategies for centrifugal microfluidic platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Damien; O'Sullivan, Mary; Ducrée, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Centrifugal microfluidic systems have become one of the principal platforms for implementing bioanalytical assays, most notably for biomedical point-of-care diagnostics. These so-called 'lab-on-a-disc' systems primarily utilise the rotationally controlled centrifugal field in combination with capillary forces to automate a range of laboratory unit operations (LUOs) for sample preparation, such as metering, aliquoting, mixing and extraction for biofluids as well as sorting, isolation and counting of bioparticles. These centrifugal microfluidic LUOs have been regularly surveyed in the literature. However, even though absolutely essential to provide true sample-to-answer functionality of lab-on-a-disc platforms, systematic examination of associated, often optical, read-out technologies has been so far neglected. This review focusses on the history and state-of-the-art of optical read-out strategies for centrifugal microfluidic platforms, arising (commercial) application potential and future opportunities.

  8. Passive Optical Detection of a Vibrating Surface

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-01-01

    a refrigerator door vibrates from the compressor . The ability to optically image such vibrations may lead to a better speaker or a quieter...quote Nicode- mus: “Reflection is the process by which electromagnetic flux (power), incident on a stationary surface or medium, leaves that surface or...medium from the incident side without change in frequency; reflectance is the fraction of the incident flux that is reflected.” Nicodemus defines more

  9. Improvement of optical systems for detection of smokes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panin, V. F.; Dashkovskii, A. G.

    2015-04-01

    The theory of electromagnetic radiation dispersion by polydisperse particles is analyzed. Methods of reliable optical indication of smokes to identify Fire Danger are considered. The conventional method of optical smoke detection implies measuring optical characteristics of the environment under control. After that the results obtained are converted into microphysical parameters which can be compared to the known microphysical properties of smokes.The calculated optical portrait of smokes is offered. The portrait of smokes is the field of representation points in coordinates of the degree of diffusion radiation polarization for two diffusion angles. Each of the spots indicates one of the numerous realizations of smokes. The direct match of the representation spots in the optical increases the probability of smoke A different way to protect optical system is to use the device with mutually orthogonal polarizers of the light source and detector. If hindrance is nonspherical aerosol, the signal from the device is used to correct the signals from smoke detectors.

  10. Optical protein sensor for detecting cancer markers in saliva.

    PubMed

    Tan, Winny; Sabet, Leyla; Li, Yang; Yu, Tianwei; Klokkevold, Perry R; Wong, David T; Ho, Chih-Ming

    2008-10-15

    A surface immobilized optical protein sensor has been utilized to detect Interleukin-8 (IL-8) protein, an oral cancer marker, and can reach limit of detection (LOD) at 1.1 pM in buffer without using enzymatic amplification. Only after applying enzymatic amplification to increase the signal level by a few orders of magnitude, ELISA can reach the LOD of 1 pM level. We then develop the confocal optics based sensor for further reducing the optical noise and can extend the LOD of the surface immobilized optical protein sensor two orders in magnitude. These improvements have allowed us to detect IL-8 protein at 4.0 fM in buffer. In addition, these sensitive LODs were achieved without the use of enzymatic signal amplification, such that the simplified protocol can further facilitate the development of point-of-care devices. The ultra sensitive optical protein sensor presented in this paper has a wide number of applications in disease diagnoses. Measurements for detecting biomarkers in clinical sample are much more challenging than the measurements in buffer, due to high background noise contributed by large collections of non-target molecules. We used clinical saliva samples to validate the functionality of the optical protein sensor. Clinical detection of disease-specific biomarkers in saliva offers a non-invasive, alternative approach to using blood or urine. Currently, the main challenge of using saliva as a diagnostic fluid is its inherently low concentration of biomarkers. We compare the measurements of 40 saliva samples; half from oral cancer patients and half from a control group. The data measured by the optical protein sensor is compared with the traditional Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbant Assay (ELISA) values to validate the accuracy of our system. These positive results enable us to proceed to using confocal optical protein sensor to detect other biomarkers, which have much lower concentrations.

  11. Compact low-cost detection electronics for optical coherence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Akcay, A. C.; Lee, K. S.; Furenlid, L. R.; Costa, M. A.; Rolland, J. P.

    2015-01-01

    A compact and low-cost detection electronics scheme for optical coherence imaging is demonstrated. The performance of the designed electronics is analyzed in comparison to a commercial lock-in amplifier of equal bandwidth. Images of a fresh-onion sample are presented for each detection configuration. PMID:26617422

  12. Simultaneous detection and intensity estimation of an optical image

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, L.

    1979-01-01

    A statistical model for simultaneous detection and single parameter estimation of a stochastic signal against background noise is obtained. Two strategies, Bayes and maximum likelihood, are discussed. The detection of an optical point source imaged on a photosensitive surface and the estimation of its intensity based on such strategies are examined. An almost optimum estimate is also proposed and its statistical properties are studied.

  13. Selective detection of antibodies in microstructured polymer optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Jesper; Hoiby, Poul; Emiliyanov, Grigoriy; Bang, Ole; Pedersen, Lars; Bjarklev, Anders

    2005-07-25

    We demonstrate selective detection of fluorophore labeled antibodies from minute samples probed by a sensor layer of complementary biomolecules immobilized inside the air holes of microstructured Polymer Optical Fiber (mPOF). The fiber core is defined by a ring of 6 air holes and a simple procedure was applied to selectively capture either alpha-streptavidin or alpha-CRP antibodies inside these air holes. A sensitive and easy-to-use fluorescence method was used for the optical detection. Our results show that mPOF based biosensors can provide reliable and selective antibody detection in ultra small sample volumes.

  14. Detection of optical circulator crosstalk based on signal modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Qiu-feng; Zhang, Qian; Yang, Rui; Zhang, Heng

    2014-12-01

    A novel method based on piezoelectric transducer (PZT) modulation for detecting the crosstalk of optical circulator has been demonstrated. In the experiment, the lightwave emitted from a low-noise single-frequency laser passed through the circulator, reflected on the surface of the PZT, and returned to the circulator again. The PZT can modulate the frequency of the lightwave reflected on it due to the Doppler effect. Then the crosstalk of the circulator is obtained by measuring the induced optical difference frequency based on a difference-frequency detection technology. The results show that this method is very effective in detecting weak crosstalk of circulator.

  15. Detecting tissue optical and mechanical properties with an ultrasound modulated optical imaging system in reflection detection geometry

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yi; Li, Sinan; Eckersley, Robert J.; Elson, Daniel S.; Tang, Meng-Xing

    2014-01-01

    Tissue optical and mechanical properties are correlated to tissue pathologic changes. This manuscript describes a dual-mode ultrasound modulated optical imaging system capable of sensing local optical and mechanical properties in reflection geometry. The optical characterisation was achieved by the acoustic radiation force assisted ultrasound modulated optical tomography (ARF-UOT) with laser speckle contrast detection. Shear waves generated by the ARF were also tracked optically by the same system and the shear wave speed was used for the elasticity measurement. Tissue mimicking phantoms with multiple inclusions buried at 11 mm depth were experimentally scanned with the dual-mode system. The inclusions, with higher optical absorption and/or higher stiffness than background, were identified based on the dual results and their stiffnesses were quantified. The system characterises both optical and mechanical properties of the inclusions compared with the ARF-UOT or the elasticity measurement alone. Moreover, by detecting the backward scattered light in reflection detection geometry, the system is more suitable for clinical applications compared with transmission geometry. PMID:25657875

  16. Detection of Extraterrestrial Life. Method II- Optical Rotatory Dispersion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1963-01-01

    The object of this study is to develop polarimetric methods to detect the presence of DNA (deoxyribonucleic acid) or its congeners in soil suspensions, and through these methods determine the existence of life (as known terrestrially) on other planets. The cotton region associated with optically active organic compounds is being used to detect and characterize the compounds above. An apparatus has been designed and assembled which can measure optical rotations in systems which strongly attenuate incident-polarized, monochromatic light. This instrument was used to measure the optical rotatory dispersion spectra of nucleosides, a polynucleotide, and proteins whose optical density at 260 microns approached 1.0. This work is discussed in the final report on Contract NASR-85, Detection of Extraterrestrial Life, Method II: Optical Rotatory Dispersion. Recent work in Melpar laboratories has reaffirmed these rotatory dispersion spectra. Based upon the analysis of the optical components associated with this apparatus, however, these measurements must be considered as qualitative rather than quantitative. The reason for this is discussed in greater detail subsequently in this report. In addition, an evaluation of the theoretical and instrumental aspects of making rotatory-dispersion measurements in the cotton region has resulted in a procedure for measuring optical rotation.

  17. Optical Detection Of Deformations Of An Antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schumacher, L. L.; Vivian, H. C.

    1990-01-01

    Proposed control subsystem generates small aiming-bias signals to correct for deviations of 70-m-diameter reflector of microwave antenna from its ideal shape. Takes optical measurements to determine deformations produced by such environmental factors as wind, gravity, and thermal differentials. Using these measurements, subsystem estimates misalignment of radiation pattern caused by deformations. Signals to correct for estimated misalignment added to angle-command signals of main antenna-aiming system. To measure deviations laser ranging devices placed at base of feed on rigid intermediate reference structure, white retroreflectors placed on parts that deviate from assigned positions relative to intermediate reference structure.

  18. Fiber optic approach for detecting corrosion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostecki, Roman; Ebendorff-Heidepriem, Heike; Davis, Claire; McAdam, Grant; Wang, Tianyu; Monro, Tanya M.

    2016-04-01

    Corrosion is a multi-billion dollar problem faced by industry. The ability to monitor the hidden metallic structure of an aircraft for corrosion could result in greater availability of existing aircraft fleets. Silica exposed-core microstructured optical fiber sensors are inherently suited towards this application, as they are extremely lightweight, robust, and suitable both for distributed measurements and for embedding in otherwise inaccessible corrosion-prone areas. By functionalizing the fiber with chemosensors sensitive to corrosion by-products, we demonstrate in-situ kinetic measurements of accelerated corrosion in simulated aluminum aircraft joints.

  19. Optical Detection of Non-amplified Genomic DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Di; Fan, Chunhai

    Nucleic acid sequences are unique to every living organisms including animals, plants and even bacteria and virus, which provide a practical molecular target for the identification and diagnosis of various diseases. DNA contains heterocyclic rings that has inherent optical absorbance at 260 nm, which is widely used to quantify single and double stranded DNA in biology. However, this simple quantification method could not differentiate sequences; therefore it is not suitable for sequence-specific analyte detection. In addition to a few exceptions such as chiral-related circular dichroism spectra, DNA hybridization does not produce significant changes in optical signals, thus an optical label is generally needed for sequence-specific DNA detection with optical means. During the last two decades, we have witnessed explosive progress in the area of optical DNA detection, especially with the help of simultaneously rapidly developed nanomaterials. In this chapter, we will summarize recent advances in optical DNA detection including colorimetric, fluorescent, luminescent, surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and Raman scattering assays. Challenges and problems remained to be addressed are also discussed.

  20. Thermo-optical Characterization of Photothermal Optical Phase Shift Detection in Extended-Nano Channels and UV Detection of Biomolecules.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hisashi; Miyawaki, Naoya; Asano, Yoshihiro; Mawatari, Kazuma; Kitamori, Takehiko

    2017-06-06

    The expansion of microfluidics research to nanofluidics requires absolutely sensitive and universal detection methods. Photothermal detection, which utilizes optical absorption and nonradiative relaxation, is promising for the sensitive detection of nonlabeled biomolecules in nanofluidic channels. We have previously developed a photothermal optical phase shift (POPS) detection method to detect nonfluorescent molecules sensitively, while a rapid decrease of the sensitivity in nanochannels and the introduction of an ultraviolet (UV) excitation system were issues to be addressed. In the present study, our primary aim is to characterize the POPS signal in terms of the thermo-optical properties and quantitatively evaluate the causes for the decrease in sensitivity. The UV excitation system is then introduced into the POPS detector to realize the sensitive detection of nonlabeled biomolecules. The UV-POPS detection system is designed and constructed from scratch based on a symmetric microscope. The results of simulations and experiments reveal that the sensitivity decreases due to a reduction of the detection volume, dissipation of the heat, and cancellation of the changes in the refractive indices. Finally, determination of the concentration of a nonlabeled protein (bovine serum albumin) is performed in a very thin 900 nm deep nanochannel. As a result, the limit of detection (LOD) is 2.3 μM (600 molecules in the 440 attoliter detection volume), which is as low as that previously obtained for our visible POPS detector. UV-POPS detection is thus expected be a powerful technique for the study of biomolecules, including DNAs and proteins confined in nanofluidic channels.

  1. Nanostructured optical microchips for cancer biomarker detection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tianhua; He, Yuan; Wei, Jianjun; Que, Long

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report the label-free detection of a cancer biomarker using newly developed arrayed nanostructured Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) microchips. Specifically, the prostate cancer biomarker free prostate-specific antigen (f-PSA) has been detected with a mouse anti-human PSA monoclonal antibody (mAb) as the receptor. Experiments found that the limit-of-detection of current nanostructured FPI microchip for f-PSA is about 10 pg/mL and the upper detection range for f-PSA can be dynamically changed by varying the amount of the PSA mAb immobilized on the sensing surface. The control experiments have also demonstrated that the immunoassay protocol used in the experiments shows excellent specificity and selectivity, suggesting the great potential to detect the cancer biomarkers at trace levels in complex biofluids. In addition, given its nature of low cost, simple-to-operation and batch fabrication capability, the arrayed nanostructured FPI microchip-based platform could provide an ideal technical tool for point-of-care diagnostics application and anticancer drug screen and discovery.

  2. Optical methods for the detection of heavy metal ions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uglov, A. N.; Bessmertnykh-Lemeune, A.; Guilard, R.; Averin, A. D.; Beletskaya, I. P.

    2014-03-01

    The review covers an important area of the modern chemistry, namely, the detection of heavy metal ions using optical molecular detectors. The role of this method in metal ion detection and the physicochemical grounds of operation of chemosensors are discussed, and examples of detection of most abundant heavy metal ions and synthetic approaches to molecular detectors are presented. The immobilization of molecular detectors on solid substrates for the design of analytical sensor devices is described. The bibliography includes 178 references.

  3. Selective optical detection of aromatic vapors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podgorsek, Robert P.; Franke, Hilmar

    2002-02-01

    A sensitive layer system of amorphous Teflon AF on silver has been coated on a glass substrate. With a monochromatic light source the reflectivity of the layer system as a function of the angle of incidence exhibits the surface-plasmon resonance as well as a set of leaky-mode resonances. These optical resonance phenomena are sensitive to small refractive-index changes that may be induced by diffusion of particles into the Teflon AF layer. On the basis of this effect, the aromatic vapors benzene; toluene; and o-, p-, and m-xylene have been investigated with different vapor concentrations. By selection of a distinct angle at a particular resonance, dynamic measurements can be performed. Assuming a diffusion process in accordance with Fick's law, the diffusion profile can be calculated as a function of time. As described by the Lorentz-Lorenz relation a refractive-index profile is induced that consequently interacts with the electromagnetic fields of the optical modes. With the function of the diffusion-induced refractive-index profile the shift of the resonance lines can be calculated from the measured reflectivity change as a function of time. The characteristic diffusion coefficients of the particular vapor allow for a distinction between the different types of aromate, even between the different xylenes.

  4. The role of fiber optics in mass spectrometer electro-optical ion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norris, D. D.; Giffin, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    This paper describes the development of an electro-optical ion detector combining the best features of photographic and electrical ion detection (i.e., wide mass range coverage and low ion detection threshold respectively). A nineteen fold fiber optic image dissector is discussed which reformats the 1 mm x 361 mm mass spectrometer focal plane format to a 19 mm x 19 mm format suitable for vidicon imaging and electronic display of the data.

  5. Optic disc detection and boundary extraction in retinal images.

    PubMed

    Basit, A; Fraz, Muhammad Moazam

    2015-04-10

    With the development of digital image processing, analysis and modeling techniques, automatic retinal image analysis is emerging as an important screening tool for early detection of ophthalmologic disorders such as diabetic retinopathy and glaucoma. In this paper, a robust method for optic disc detection and extraction of the optic disc boundary is proposed to help in the development of computer-assisted diagnosis and treatment of such ophthalmic disease. The proposed method is based on morphological operations, smoothing filters, and the marker controlled watershed transform. Internal and external markers are used to first modify the gradient magnitude image and then the watershed transformation is applied on this modified gradient magnitude image for boundary extraction. This method has shown significant improvement over existing methods in terms of detection and boundary extraction of the optic disc. The proposed method has optic disc detection success rate of 100%, 100%, 100% and 98.9% for the DRIVE, Shifa, CHASE_DB1, and DIARETDB1 databases, respectively. The optic disc boundary detection achieved an average spatial overlap of 61.88%, 70.96%, 45.61%, and 54.69% for these databases, respectively, which are higher than currents methods.

  6. Amplifier Noise Based Optical Steganography with Coherent Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Ben; Chang, Matthew P.; Caldwell, Naomi R.; Caldwell, Myles E.; Prucnal, Paul R.

    2014-12-01

    We summarize the principle and experimental setup of optical steganography based on amplified spontaneous emission (ASE) noise. Using ASE noise as the signal carrier, optical steganography effectively hides a stealth channel in both the time domain and the frequency domain. Coherent detection is used at the receiver of the stealth channel. Because ASE noise has short coherence length and random phase, it only interferes with itself within a very short range. Coherent detection requires the stealth transmitter and stealth receiver to precisely match the optical delay,which generates a large key space for the stealth channel. Several methods to further improve optical steganography, signal to noise ratio, compatibility with the public channel, and applications of the stealth channel are also summarized in this review paper.

  7. Toxin detection using a fiber-optic-based biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogert, Robert A.; Shriver-Lake, Lisa C.; Ligler, Frances S.

    1993-05-01

    Using an evanescent wave fiber optic-based biosensor developed at Naval Research Laboratory, ricin toxin can be detected in the low ng/ml range. Sensitivity was established at 1 - 5 ng/ml using a two-step assay. The two-step assay showed enhanced signal levels in comparison to a one-step assay. A two-step assay utilizes a 10 minute incubation of an immobilized affinity purified anti-ricin antibody fiber optic probe in the ricin sample before placement in a solution of fluorophore-labeled goat anti-ricin antibodies. The specific fluorescent signal is obtained by the binding of the fluorophore-labeled antibodies to ricin which is bound by the immobilized antibodies on the fiber optic probe. The toxin can be detected directly from urine and river water using this fiber optic assay.

  8. Optically selective, acoustically resonant gas detecting transducer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dimeff, J. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    A gas analyzer is disclosed which responds to the resonant absorption or emission spectrum of a specific gas by producing an acoustic resonance in a chamber containing a sample of that gas, and which measures the amount of that emission or absorption by measuring the strength of that acoustic resonance, e.g., the maximum periodic pressure, velocity or density achieved. In the preferred embodiment, a light beam is modulated periodically at the acoustical resonance frequency of a closed chamber which contains an optically dense sample of the gas of interest. Periodic heating of the absorbing gas by the light beam causes a cyclic expansion, movement, and pressure within the gas. An amplitude is reached where the increased losses were the cyclic radiation energy received. A transducing system is inclined for converting the pressure variations of the resonant gas into electronic readout signals.

  9. Optical detection of cracks in translucent materials

    SciTech Connect

    Petrosky, E.J.; Meeks, R.F.

    1982-03-30

    The qualitative determination of macroscopic and microscopic cracking in ferroelectric ceramics and other translucent materials is achieved by observing the attenuation of light across internal fracture planes within the material. The study was performed on ferroelectric and ceramic disks up to 0.5 in. thick. The microscopic equipment used was an Olympus Vanox Microscope fitted with a vertical brightfield illuminator, polarizer, rotatable analyzer and a quartz-halogen light source. Macroscopic inspection was made with a typical laboratory quartz-halogen illuminator equipped with a fiber-optic light guide. It is shown that inspection by internal lighting using polarized light is a highly effective means for the nondestructive determination of microscopic and macroscopic cracking in translucent materials.

  10. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P [Los Alamos, NM; Chernobrod, Boris M [Los Alamos, NM

    2010-07-13

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  11. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2007-12-11

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  12. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P [Los Alamos, NM; Chernobrod, Boris M [Los Alamos, NM

    2010-06-29

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  13. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    DOEpatents

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-11-10

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of impaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  14. Spin microscope based on optically detected magnetic resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Berman, Gennady P.; Chernobrod, Boris M.

    2009-10-27

    The invention relates to scanning magnetic microscope which has a photoluminescent nanoprobe implanted in the tip apex of an atomic force microscope (AFM), a scanning tunneling microscope (STM) or a near-field scanning optical microscope (NSOM) and exhibits optically detected magnetic resonance (ODMR) in the vicinity of unpaired electron spins or nuclear magnetic moments in the sample material. The described spin microscope has demonstrated nanoscale lateral resolution and single spin sensitivity for the AFM and STM embodiments.

  15. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bagci, T.; Simonsen, A.; Schmid, S.; Villanueva, L. G.; Zeuthen, E.; Appel, J.; Taylor, J. M.; Sørensen, A.; Usami, K.; Schliesser, A.; Polzik, E. S.

    2014-03-01

    Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency and microwave signals is a ubiquitous challenge, crucial in radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation, and classical and quantum communication. Efficient up-conversion of radio-frequency signals to an optical carrier would enable their transmission through optical fibres instead of through copper wires, drastically reducing losses, and would give access to the set of established quantum optical techniques that are routinely used in quantum-limited signal detection. Research in cavity optomechanics has shown that nanomechanical oscillators can couple strongly to either microwave or optical fields. Here we demonstrate a room-temperature optoelectromechanical transducer with both these functionalities, following a recent proposal using a high-quality nanomembrane. A voltage bias of less than 10 V is sufficient to induce strong coupling between the voltage fluctuations in a radio-frequency resonance circuit and the membrane's displacement, which is simultaneously coupled to light reflected off its surface. The radio-frequency signals are detected as an optical phase shift with quantum-limited sensitivity. The corresponding half-wave voltage is in the microvolt range, orders of magnitude less than that of standard optical modulators. The noise of the transducer--beyond the measured Johnson noise of the resonant circuit--consists of the quantum noise of light and thermal fluctuations of the membrane, dominating the noise floor in potential applications in radio astronomy and nuclear magnetic imaging. Each of these contributions is inferred to be when balanced by choosing an electromechanical cooperativity of with an optical power of 1 mW. The noise temperature of the membrane is divided by the cooperativity. For the highest observed cooperativity of , this leads to a projected noise temperature of 40 mK and a sensitivity limit of . Our approach to all-optical, ultralow-noise detection of classical

  16. Coherent electro-optical detection of terahertz radiation from an optical parametric oscillator.

    PubMed

    Meng, F Z; Thomson, M D; Molter, D; Löffler, T; Jonuscheit, J; Beigang, R; Bartschke, J; Bauer, T; Nittmann, M; Roskos, H G

    2010-05-24

    We report the realization of coherent electro-optical detection of nanosecond terahertz (THz) pulses from an optical parametric oscillator, which is pumped by a Q-switched nanosecond Nd:YVO4 laser at 1064 nm and emits at approximately 1.5 THz. The beam profile and wavefront of the THz beam at focus are electro-optically characterized toward the realization of a real-time THz camera. A peak dynamic range of approximately 37 dB/radical Hz is achieved with single-pixel detection.

  17. Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-ray Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHaven, Stanton L.

    2009-01-01

    A novel scintillating optical fiber is presented using a composite micro-structured quartz optical fiber. Scintillating materials are introduced into the multiple inclusions of the fiber. This creates a composite optical fiber having quartz as a cladding with an organic scintillating material core. X-ray detection using these fibers is compared to a collimated cadmium telluride (CdTe) detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. Results show a good correlation between the fiber count rate trend and that of the CdTe detector.

  18. MASTER-SAAO: optical transient detections and followups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, David A. H.; Lipunov, Vladimir; Gorbovskoy, Evgeny; Gress, Oleg; Potter, Stephen Brian; Kniazev, Alexei

    2015-08-01

    Following its installation at Sutherland in late Dec 2014, the SAAO node of the MASTER optical transient detection network has been busy discovering new optical transient sources and following up on other transient triggers. This is the first general transient detection system to be installed at SAAO, allowing for the rapid detection and followup of the likes of CVs, GRBs, SNe and flaring blazars. Up to mid-March 2015, some 40 transients have been discovered by MASTER-SAAO. In addition several Gamma Ray Burst (GRB) follow-up observations were conducted with MASTER-SAAO, leading to the identification of optical counterparts and the determination of the afterglow decay light curves for two of them, and upper limits for the rest. We discuss the MASTER-SAAO system and future plans to automate followup observations with SALT and a new 1.0 m robotic telescope at SAAO.

  19. Multimodal non-contact photoacoustic imaging and optical coherence tomography using all optical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leiss-Holzinger, Elisabeth; Bauer-Marschallinger, Johannes; Berer, Thomas

    2017-02-01

    We present a multimodal optical setup, allowing non-contact photoacoustic imaging (PAI) and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Optical coherence tomography is sensitive to changes in the specimen's refractive index, thereby offering complementary information to photoacoustic signals which are induced by light absorption. A multimodal setup, allowing OCT and photoacoustic measurements, should ideally not rely on any physical contact to a specimen and, thus, commonly used transducers for photoacoustic signal detection which require acoustic coupling to the specimen should be avoided. In this work photoacoustic signals are acquired by measuring the surface displacement of a specimen using a fiber-optic Mach-Zehnder interferometer. Photoacoustic signals are excited with a Nd:YAG pulse laser. The interferometer for non-contact photoacoustic detection and the OCT system are realized in the same fiber-optic network. Light from the PAI detection laser and the OCT source are multiplexed into a single optical fiber and the same objective is used for both imaging modalities. Light reflected from specimens is demultiplexed and guided to the respective imaging systems. To allow fast non-contact PAI and OCT imaging the detection spot is scanned across the specimens' surface using a galvanometer scanner. As the same fiber-network and optical components are used for photoacoustic and OCT imaging the obtained, images are co-registered intrinsically. Imaging is demonstrated on a tissue mimicking sample.

  20. LLNL electro-optical mine detection program

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.; Aimonetti, W.; Barth, M.; Buhl, M.; Bull, N.; Carter, M.; Clark, G.; Fields, D.; Fulkerson, S.; Kane, R.

    1994-09-30

    Under funding from the Advanced Research Projects Agency (ARPA) and the US Marine Corps (USMC), Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has directed a program aimed at improving detection capabilities against buried mines and munitions. The program has provided a national test facility for buried mines in arid environments, compiled and distributed an extensive data base of infrared (IR), ground penetrating radar (GPR), and other measurements made at that site, served as a host for other organizations wishing to make measurements, made considerable progress in the use of ground penetrating radar for mine detection, and worked on the difficult problem of sensor fusion as applied to buried mine detection. While the majority of our effort has been concentrated on the buried mine problem, LLNL has worked with the U.S.M.C. on surface mine problems as well, providing data and analysis to support the COBRA (Coastal Battlefield Reconnaissance and Analysis) program. The original aim of the experimental aspect of the program was the utilization of multiband infrared approaches for the detection of buried mines. Later the work was extended to a multisensor investigation, including sensors other than infrared imagers. After an early series of measurements, it was determined that further progress would require a larger test facility in a natural environment, so the Buried Object Test Facility (BOTF) was constructed at the Nevada Test Site. After extensive testing, with sensors spanning the electromagnetic spectrum from the near ultraviolet to radio frequencies, possible paths for improvement were: improved spatial resolution providing better ground texture discrimination; analysis which involves more complicated spatial queueing and filtering; additional IR bands using imaging spectroscopy; the use of additional sensors other than IR and the use of data fusion techniques with multi-sensor data; and utilizing time dependent observables like temperature.

  1. Breast Cancer Detection Using Optical Vascular Fusion

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    growing characteristics in order to determine the strengths and weaknesses of the current non- invasive imaging technique . As a model for breast cancer...cells, to help improve technique detection and validation of the imaging system and protocols. In this work we used two human breast cancer models...brain cancer, and DLD-1 colon cancer). Our imaging technique examines the vasculature of the tumor through its response to inhalation of carbon

  2. Tumor margin detection using optical biopsy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Li, Jiyou; Li, Zhongwu; Zhou, Lixin; Chen, Ke; Pu, Yang; He, Yong; Zhu, Ke; Li, Qingbo; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    The aim of this study is to use the Resonance Raman (RR) and fluorescence spectroscopic technique for tumor margin detection with high accuracy based on native molecular fingerprints of breast and gastrointestinal (GI) tissues. This tumor margins detection method utilizes advantages of RR spectroscopic technique in situ and in real-time to diagnose tumor changes providing powerful tools for clinical guiding intraoperative margin assessments and postoperative treatments. The tumor margin detection procedures by RR spectroscopy were taken by scanning lesion from center or around tumor region in ex-vivo to find the changes in cancerous tissues with the rim of normal tissues using the native molecular fingerprints. The specimens used to analyze tumor margins include breast and GI carcinoma and normal tissues. The sharp margin of the tumor was found by the changes of RR spectral peaks within 2 mm distance. The result was verified using fluorescence spectra with 300 nm, 320 nm and 340 nm excitation, in a typical specimen of gastric cancerous tissue within a positive margin in comparison with normal gastric tissues. This study demonstrates the potential of RR and fluorescence spectroscopy as new approaches with labeling free to determine the intraoperative margin assessment.

  3. Optical detection of ultrasound from optically rough surfaces using a custom CMOS sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achamfuo-Yeboah, S. O.; Light, R. A.; Sharples, S. D.

    2015-01-01

    The optical detection of ultrasound from optically rough surfaces is severely limited when using a conventional interferometric or optical beam deflection (OBD) setup because the detected light is speckled. This means that complicated and expensive setups are required to detect ultrasound optically on rough surfaces. We present a CMOS integrated circuit that can detect laser ultrasound in the presence of speckle. The detector circuit is based on the simple knife edge detector. It is self-adapting and is fast, inxepensive, compact and robust. The CMOS circuit is implemented as a widefield array of 32×32 pixels. At each pixel the received light is compared with an adjacent pixel in order to determine the local light gradient. The result of this comparison is stored and used to connect each pixel to the positive or negative gradient output as appropriate (similar to a balanced knife edge detector). The perturbation of the surface due to ultrasound preserves the speckle distribution whilst deflecting it. The spatial disturbance of the speckle pattern due to the ultrasound is detected by considering each pair of pixels as a knife edge detector. The sensor can adapt itself to match the received optical speckle pattern in less than 0.1 μs, and then detect the ultrasound within 0.5 μs of adaptation. This makes it possible to repeatedly detect ultrasound from optically rough surfaces very quickly. The detector is capable of independent operation controlled by a local microcontroller, or it may be connected to a computer for more sophisticated configuration and control. We present the theory of its operation and discuss results validating the concept and operation of the device. We also present preliminary results from an improved design which grants a higher bandwidth, allowing for optical detection of higher frequency ultrasound.

  4. Approximate nearest neighbour field based optic disk detection.

    PubMed

    Ramakanth, S Avinash; Babu, R Venkatesh

    2014-01-01

    Approximate Nearest Neighbour Field maps are commonly used by computer vision and graphics community to deal with problems like image completion, retargetting, denoising, etc. In this paper, we extend the scope of usage of ANNF maps to medical image analysis, more specifically to optic disk detection in retinal images. In the analysis of retinal images, optic disk detection plays an important role since it simplifies the segmentation of optic disk and other retinal structures. The proposed approach uses FeatureMatch, an ANNF algorithm, to find the correspondence between a chosen optic disk reference image and any given query image. This correspondence provides a distribution of patches in the query image that are closest to patches in the reference image. The likelihood map obtained from the distribution of patches in query image is used for optic disk detection. The proposed approach is evaluated on five publicly available DIARETDB0, DIARETDB1, DRIVE, STARE and MESSIDOR databases, with total of 1540 images. We show, experimentally, that our proposed approach achieves an average detection accuracy of 99% and an average computation time of 0.2 s per image.

  5. Digitalized detection of optical axes' parallelism in multi-optical axes system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Bingqi; Ling, Jun; Zhou, Bing; Zhao, Xilin

    2002-09-01

    Automation and intelligent function in performance testing of optical instrument are the key problems in modern detection technology. In this paper a testing system based on the detection in laboratory is proposed and has successfully realized the detection of multi-optical axes" parallelism. This system is on the base of optics, mechanics and electricity, and combines the modern computer technology to gather and process the data obtained in the experiment, finally high-precision quantified results can be gotten, so these results can provide reliable data for the alignment of optical axes. The paper introduces the whole testing system"s design options, system composition, operational principle and software design in detail, and it"s technical difficulties and emphases are also analyzed and discussed.

  6. Optical detection of terahertz using nonlinear parametric upconversion.

    PubMed

    Khan, M Jalal; Chen, Jerry C; Kaushik, Sumanth

    2008-12-01

    We extend our work to perform sensitive, room-temperature optical detection of terahertz (THz) by using nonlinear parametric upconversion. THz radiation at 700 GHz is mixed with pump light at 1,550 nm in a bulk GaAs crystal to generate an idler wave at 1,555.6 nm. The idler is separated, coupled into optical fiber, and detected using a gated Geiger-mode avalanche photodiode. The resulting THz detector has a power sensitivity of 4.5 pW/Hz and a timing resolution of 1 ns.

  7. Optical mammography combined with fluorescence imaging: lesion detection using scatterplots

    PubMed Central

    Leproux, Anaïs; van der Voort, Marjolein; van der Mark, Martin B.; Harbers, Rik; van de Ven, Stephanie M. W. Y.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.

    2011-01-01

    Using scatterplots of 2 or 3 parameters, diffuse optical tomography and fluorescence imaging are combined to improve detectability of breast lesions. Small or low contrast phantom-lesions that were missed in the optical and fluorescence images were detected in the scatterplots. In patient measurements, all tumors were visible and easily differentiated from artifacts and areolas in the scatterplots. The different rate of intake and wash out of the fluorescent contrast agent in the healthy versus malignant tissues was also observed in the scatterplot: this information can be used to discriminate malignant lesion from normal structures. PMID:21483622

  8. An optical processor for zero-crossing edge detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jared, David A.; Johnson, Kristina M.

    1993-01-01

    An optical processor for zero-crossing edge detection is presented, which consists of two defocused imaging systems to perform the Gaussian convolutions and a VLSI, ferroelectric liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM) to determine the zero-crossings. The zero-crossing SLM is a 32 x 32 array of pixels located on 100 microns centers. Each pixels contains a phototransistor, an auto-scaling amplifier, a zero-crossing detection circuit, and a liquid crystal modulating pad. Electrical and optical characteristics of the zero-crossing SLM are presented along with experimental results of the system.

  9. Optical fiber fluorescence spectroscopy for detecting AFM1 in milk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignani, A. G.; Cucci, C.; Ciaccheri, L.; Dall'Asta, C.; Galaverna, G.; Dossena, A.; Marchelli, R.

    2008-04-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy carried out by means of optical fibers was used for the rapid screening of M1 aflatoxin in milk, enabling the detection of concentrations up to the legal limit, which is 50 ppt. A compact fluorometric device equipped with a LED source, a miniaturized spectrometer, and optical fibers for illumination/detection of the measuring micro-cell was tested for measuring threshold values of AFM1 in pre-treated milk samples. Multivariate processing of the spectral data made it possible to obtain a preliminary screening at the earlier stages of the industrial process, as well as to discard contaminated milk stocks before their inclusion in the production chain.

  10. Airborne optical detection of oil on water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Arvesen, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Airborne measurements were made over controlled oil-spill test sites to evaluate various techniques, utilizing reflected sunlight, for detecting oil on water. The results of these measurements show that (1) maximum contrast between oil and water is in the UV and red portions of the spectrum; (2) minimum contrast is in the blue-green; (3) differential polarization appears to be a very promising technique; (4) no characteristic absorption bands, which would permit one oil to be distinguished from another, were discovered in the spectral regions measured; (5) sky conditions greatly influence the contrast between oil and water; and (6) highest contrast was achieved under overcast sky conditions.

  11. Airborne optical detection of oil on water.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Millard, J. P.; Arvesen, J. C.

    1972-01-01

    Airborne measurements were made over controlled oil-spill test sites to evaluate various techniques, utilizing reflected sunlight, for detecting oil on water. The results of these measurements show that (1) maximum contrast between oil and water is in the UV and red portions of the spectrum; (2) minimum contrast is in the blue-green; (3) differential polarization appears to be a very promising technique; (4) no characteristic absorption bands, which would permit one oil to be distinguished from another, were discovered in the spectral regions measured; (5) sky conditions greatly influence the contrast between oil and water; and (6) highest contrast was achieved under overcast sky conditions.

  12. Optical and SAR data integration for automatic change pattern detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mishra, B.; Susaki, J.

    2014-09-01

    Automatic change pattern mapping in urban and sub-urban area is important but challenging due to the diversity of urban land use pattern. With multi-sensor imagery, it is possible to generate multidimensional unique information of Earth surface features that allow developing a relationship between a response of each feature to synthetic aperture radar (SAR) and optical sensors to track the change automatically. Thus, a SAR and optical data integration framework for change detection and a relationship for automatic change pattern detection were developed. It was carried out in three steps: (i) Computation of indicators from SAR and optical images, namely: normalized difference ratio (NDR) from multi-temporal SAR images and the normalized difference vegetation index difference (NDVI) from multi-temporal optical images, (ii) computing the change magnitude image from NDR and ΔNDVI and delineating the change area and (iii) the development of an empirical relationship, for automatic change pattern detection. The experiment was carried out in an outskirts part of Ho Chi Minh City, one of the fastest growing cities in the world. The empirical relationship between the response of surface feature to optical and SAR imagery has successfully delineated six changed classes in a very complex urban sprawl area that was otherwise impossible with multi-spectral imagery. The improvement of the change detection results by making use of the unique information on both sensors, optical and SAR, is also noticeable with a visual inspection and the kappa index was increased by 0.13 (0.75 to 0.88) in comparison to only optical images.

  13. Optical biopsy - a new armamentarium to detect disease using light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pu, Yang; Alfano, Robert R.

    2015-03-01

    Optical spectroscopy has been considered a promising method for cancer detection for past thirty years because of its advantages over the conventional diagnostic methods of no tissue removal, minimal invasiveness, rapid diagnoses, less time consumption and reproducibility since the first use in 1984. It offers a new armamentarium. Human tissue is mainly composed of extracellular matrix of collagen fiber, proteins, fat, water, and epithelial cells with key molecules in different structures. Tissues contain a number of key fingerprint native endogenous fluorophore molecules, such as tryptophan, collagen, elastin, reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD) and porphyrins. It is well known that abnormalities in metabolic activity precede the onset of a lot of main diseases: carcinoma, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, Alzheimer, and Parkinson's disease, etc. Optical spectroscopy may help in detecting various disorders. Conceivably the biochemical or morphologic changes that cause the spectra variations would appear earlier than the histological aberration. Therefore, "optical biopsy" holds a great promise as clinical tool for diagnosing early stage of carcinomas and other deceases by combining with available photonic technology (e.g. optical fibers, photon detectors, spectrographs spectroscopic ratiometer, fiber-optic endomicroscope and nasopharyngoscope) for in vivo use. This paper focuses on various methods available to detect spectroscopic changes in tissues, for example to distinguish cancerous prostate tissues and/or cells from normal prostate tissues and/or cells. The methods to be described are fluorescence, stokes shift, scattering, Raman, and time-resolved spectroscopy will be reviewed. The underlying physical and biological basis for these optical approaches will be discussed with examples. The idea is to present some of the salient works to show the usefulness and methods of Optical Biopsy for cancer detection and

  14. Detecting magnetically guided atoms with an optical cavity.

    PubMed

    Haase, Albrecht; Hessmo, Björn; Schmiedmayer, Jörg

    2006-01-15

    We show that a low-finesse cavity can be efficient for detecting neutral atoms. The low finesse can be compensated for by decreasing the mode waist of the cavity. We have used a near-concentric resonator with a beam waist of 12 microm and a finesse of only 1100 to detect magnetically guided Rb atoms with a detection sensitivity of 0.1 atom in the mode volume. For future experiments on single-atom detection and cavity QED applications, it should be beneficial to use miniaturized optical resonators integrated on atom chips.

  15. Optical carrier wave shocking: detection and dispersion.

    PubMed

    Kinsler, P; Radnor, S B P; Tyrrell, J C A; New, G H C

    2007-06-01

    Carrier wave shocking is studied using the pseudospectral spatial-domain (PSSD) technique. We describe the shock detection diagnostics necessary for this numerical study and verify them against theoretical shocking predictions for the dispersionless case. These predictions show a carrier envelope phase and pulse bandwidth sensitivity in the single-cycle regime. The flexible dispersion management offered by the PSSD enables us to independently control the linear and nonlinear dispersion. Customized dispersion profiles allow us to analyze the development of both carrier self-steepening and shocks. The results exhibit a marked asymmetry between normal and anomalous dispersion, both in the limits of the shocking regime and in the (near) shocked pulse wave forms. Combining these insights, we offer some suggestions on how carrier shocking (or at least extreme self-steepening) might be realized experimentally.

  16. Fingerprint fake detection by optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meissner, Sven; Breithaupt, Ralph; Koch, Edmund

    2013-03-01

    The most established technique for the identification at biometric access control systems is the human fingerprint. While every human fingerprint is unique, fingerprints can be faked very easily by using thin layer fakes. Because commercial fingerprint scanners use only a two-dimensional image acquisition of the finger surface, they can only hardly differentiate between real fingerprints and fingerprint fakes applied on thin layer materials. A Swept Source OCT system with an A-line rate of 20 kHz and a lateral and axial resolution of approximately 13 μm, a centre wavelength of 1320 nm and a band width of 120 nm (FWHM) was used to acquire fingerprints and finger tips with overlying fakes. Three-dimensional volume stacks with dimensions of 4.5 mm x 4 mm x 2 mm were acquired. The layering arrangement of the imaged finger tips and faked finger tips was analyzed and subsequently classified into real and faked fingerprints. Additionally, sweat gland ducts were detected and consulted for the classification. The manual classification between real fingerprints and faked fingerprints results in almost 100 % correctness. The outer as well as the internal fingerprint can be recognized in all real human fingers, whereby this was not possible in the image stacks of the faked fingerprints. Furthermore, in all image stacks of real human fingers the sweat gland ducts were detected. The number of sweat gland ducts differs between the test persons. The typical helix shape of the ducts was observed. In contrast, in images of faked fingerprints we observe abnormal layer arrangements and no sweat gland ducts connecting the papillae of the outer fingerprint and the internal fingerprint. We demonstrated that OCT is a very useful tool to enhance the performance of biometric control systems concerning attacks by thin layer fingerprint fakes.

  17. Flexible-rate optical packet generation/detection and label swapping for optical label switching networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhongying; Li, Juhao; Tian, Yu; Ge, Dawei; Zhu, Paikun; Chen, Yuanxiang; Chen, Zhangyuan; He, Yongqi

    2017-03-01

    In recent years, optical label switching (OLS) gains lots of attentions due to its intrinsic advantages to implement protocol, bit-rate, granularity and data format transparency packet switching. In this paper, we propose a novel scheme to realize flexible-rate optical packet switching for OLS networks. At the transmitter node, flexible-rate packet is generated by parallel modulating different combinations of optical carriers generated from the optical multi-carrier generator (OMCG), among which the low-speed optical label occupies one carrier. At the switching node, label is extracted and re-generated in label processing unit (LPU). The payloads are switched based on routing information and new label is added after switching. At the receiver node, another OMCG serves as local oscillators (LOs) for optical payloads coherent detection. The proposed scheme offers good flexibility for dynamic optical packet switching by adjusting the payload bandwidth and could also effectively reduce the number of lasers, modulators and receivers for packet generation/detection. We present proof-of-concept demonstrations of flexible-rate packet generation/detection and label swapping in 12.5 GHz grid. The influence of crosstalk for cascaded label swapping is also investigated.

  18. Standoff detection of explosives: a challenging approach for optical technologies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Désilets, S.; Hô, N.; Mathieu, P.; Simard, J. R.; Puckrin, E.; Thériault, J. M.; Lavoie, H.; Théberge, F.; Babin, F.; Gay, D.; Forest, R.; Maheux, J.; Roy, G.; Châteauneuf, M.

    2011-06-01

    Standoff detection of explosives residues on surfaces at few meters was made using optical technologies based on Raman scattering, Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) and passive standoff FTIR radiometry. By comparison, detection and analysis of nanogram samples of different explosives was made with a microscope system where Raman scattering from a micron-size single point illuminated crystal of explosive was observed. Results from standoff detection experiments using a telescope were compared to experiments using a microscope to find out important parameters leading to the detection. While detection and spectral identification of the micron-size explosive particles was possible with a microscope, standoff detection of these particles was very challenging due to undesired light reflected and produced by the background surface or light coming from other contaminants. Results illustrated the challenging approach of detecting at a standoff distance the presence of low amount of micron or submicron explosive particles.

  19. New Optical Methods for Liveness Detection on Fingers

    PubMed Central

    Dolezel, Michal; Vana, Jan; Brezinova, Eva; Yim, Jaegeol; Shim, Kyubark

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to new optical methods, which are supposed to be used for liveness detection on fingers. First we describe the basics about fake finger use in fingerprint recognition process and the possibilities of liveness detection. Then we continue with introducing three new liveness detection methods, which we developed and tested in the scope of our research activities—the first one is based on measurement of the pulse, the second one on variations of optical characteristics caused by pressure change, and the last one is based on reaction of skin to illumination with different wavelengths. The last part deals with the influence of skin diseases on fingerprint recognition, especially on liveness detection. PMID:24151584

  20. Detection of Abnormal Events via Optical Flow Feature Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Tian; Snoussi, Hichem

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, a novel algorithm is proposed to detect abnormal events in video streams. The algorithm is based on the histogram of the optical flow orientation descriptor and the classification method. The details of the histogram of the optical flow orientation descriptor are illustrated for describing movement information of the global video frame or foreground frame. By combining one-class support vector machine and kernel principal component analysis methods, the abnormal events in the current frame can be detected after a learning period characterizing normal behaviors. The difference abnormal detection results are analyzed and explained. The proposed detection method is tested on benchmark datasets, then the experimental results show the effectiveness of the algorithm. PMID:25811227

  1. Integrated optics ring-resonator sensors for protein detection.

    PubMed

    Ksendzov, A; Lin, Y

    2005-12-15

    Using an integrated optics ring-resonator biosensor, we have demonstrated the detection of protein in low concentrations. We detected 0.3 nM of avidin in a buffered saline solution; the calculated detection limit is 0.1 nM (6.8 ng/ml) for avidin, which compares favorably with those of other optical protein detection techniques. Further improvement is possible. Our ring resonator utilizes Si(x)N(y)/SiO2 waveguides, which, owing to evanescent field interaction, change the effective refractive index when target molecules are immobilized on their surfaces. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the biotin surface coating, which causes the specific binding and immobilization of avidin.

  2. A very sensitive electro-optical simultaneous ion detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    1982-02-01

    A fully operational, electro-optical system for simultaneous detection is discussed. This system is applied for the simultaneous detection of fragment mass spectra, obtained by collision activated dissociation experiments. The detector itself consists of two chevron channelplates, phospher screen, fiber optics, camera objective and photodiode array. If forms part of an extensive information system, which controls the photodiode array and performs data processing as for example background subtraction and correction of the spectrum for spatial sensitivity variations of the detector. The detection system is characterized by a very low noise rate with an average value of about one dark ion per 250 s for each mass peak in the spectrum. The dynamic range of peak heights in a simultaneously detected spectrum can be up to 2.3 x 10 to the 4th power at a signal to noise ratio of 1. The reproducibility of peak area measurements is better than 20% over the entire length of the detector.

  3. Integrated optics ring-resonator sensors for protein detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ksendzov, A.; Lin, Y.

    2005-12-01

    Using an integrated optics ring-resonator biosensor, we have demonstrated the detection of protein in low concentrations. We detected 0.3 nM of avidin in a buffered saline solution; the calculated detection limit is 0.1 nM (6.8ng/ml) for avidin, which compares favorably with those of other optical protein detection techniques. Further improvement is possible. Our ring resonator utilizes SixNy/SiO2 waveguides, which, owing to evanescent field interaction, change the effective refractive index when target molecules are immobilized on their surfaces. The selectivity of the sensor depends on the biotin surface coating, which causes the specific binding and immobilization of avidin.

  4. Violence detection based on histogram of optical flow orientation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Zhijie; Zhang, Tao; Yang, Jie; Wu, Qiang; Bai, Li; Yao, Lixiu

    2013-12-01

    In this paper, we propose a novel approach for violence detection and localization in a public scene. Currently, violence detection is considerably under-researched compared with the common action recognition. Although existing methods can detect the presence of violence in a video, they cannot precisely locate the regions in the scene where violence is happening. This paper will tackle the challenge and propose a novel method to locate the violence location in the scene, which is important for public surveillance. The Gaussian Mixed Model is extended into the optical flow domain in order to detect candidate violence regions. In each region, a new descriptor, Histogram of Optical Flow Orientation (HOFO), is proposed to measure the spatial-temporal features. A linear SVM is trained based on the descriptor. The performance of the method is demonstrated on the publicly available data sets, BEHAVE and CAVIAR.

  5. Label-Free, Single-Molecule Detection with Optical Microcavities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Armani, Andrea M.; Kulkarni, Rajan P.; Fraser, Scott E.; Flagan, Richard C.; Vahala, Kerry J.

    2007-08-01

    Current single-molecule detection techniques require labeling the target molecule. We report a highly specific and sensitive optical sensor based on an ultrahigh quality (Q) factor (Q > 108) whispering-gallery microcavity. The silica surface is functionalized to bind the target molecule; binding is detected by a resonant wavelength shift. Single-molecule detection is confirmed by observation of single-molecule binding events that shift the resonant frequency, as well as by the statistics for these shifts over many binding events. These shifts result from a thermo-optic mechanism. Additionally, label-free, single-molecule detection of interleukin-2 was demonstrated in serum. These experiments demonstrate a dynamic range of 1012 in concentration, establishing the microcavity as a sensitive and versatile detector.

  6. Characterization of fiber optic Cerenkov radiation sensor for detecting neutrons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jang, K. W.; Yagi, T.; Pyeon, C. H.; Shin, S. H.; Yoo, W. J.; Misawa, T.; Lee, B.

    2013-09-01

    Cerenkov radiation can be observed easily as a shimmer of blue light from the water in boiling- and pressurized-water reactors, or spent fuel storage pools. In this research, we fabricated the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor using a Gdfoil, rutile crystal and optical fiber for detecting neutrons. Also, the reference sensor for measuring background gammarays was fabricated with the rutile crystal and optical fiber. The neutron fluxes could be obtained by measuring the signal difference between two sensors. To characterize the fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor, we measured neutron fluxes using a Cf-252 neutron source according to depths of polyethylene. As the results, the counts of fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor were higher than those of reference sensor due to additional interactions between Gd-foil and neutrons. Also, the counts of Cerenkov radiation decreased with increasing polyethylene thickness. It is anticipated that the novel and simple fiber-optic Cerenkov radiation sensor using the Cerenkov effect can be widely used to detect the neutrons in hazardous nuclear facilities.

  7. Surface-bonded fiber optic Sagnac sensors for ultrasound detection.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Seong; Lee, Seung Seok; Kim, Young Gil

    2004-04-01

    This paper describes a fiber optic sensor suitable for remote sensing and multi-point detection of ultrasound. This ultrasound sensor is based on the surface-bonded fiber optic Sagnac interferometer with the output fringe visibility of 1; it consists of a laser source, an ordinary single mode fiber delay line, a fiber coupler, a phase modulator and polarization controllers. For the validation of the sensor, surface acoustic waves and Lamb waves are excited by illuminating a steel specimen with an array of Q-switched Nd:YAG laser-generated line sources and the measurement of laser-generated ultrasonic waves are performed on the specimen surface using the surface-mounting fiber optic Sagnac sensor. The surface-bonded fiber optic sensor developed in this study has a simple configuration for detection of ultrasonic waves. Effectiveness of surface-bonded fiber optic Sagnac sensors for remote sensing of ultrasound and in situ monitoring of structures is investigated. The capability of multi-point detection of ultrasound by this Sagnac sensor is also discussed.

  8. West Ford Dipole Belt: Optical Detection at Palomar.

    PubMed

    Sandage, A; Kowal, C

    1963-08-30

    Optical detection of the West Ford orbiting dipole belt was accomplished on at least four occasions during the second week in May 1963. The maxi-mum surface brightness was about 4 percent of the night sky radiation at an effective wavelength of lambda = 4400 A The density of the belt has evidently decreased because it was not detected in a second observation period during the third week in June.

  9. Optical knife-edge technique for nanomechanical displacement detection

    SciTech Connect

    Karabacak, D.; Kouh, T.; Huang, C.C.; Ekinci, K.L.

    2006-05-08

    We describe an optical knife-edge technique for nanomechanical displacement detection. Here, one carefully focuses a laser spot on a moving edge and monitors the reflected power as the edge is displaced sideways. To demonstrate nanomechanical displacement detection using the knife-edge technique, we have measured in-plane resonances of nanometer scale doubly clamped beams. The obtained displacement sensitivity is in the {approx}1 pm/{radical}(Hz) range--in close agreement with a simple analytical model.

  10. Photoacoustic microtomography using optical interferometric detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nuster, Robert; Holotta, Markus; Kremser, Christian; Grossauer, Harald; Burgholzer, Peter; Paltauf, Günther

    2010-03-01

    A device for three-dimensional (3-D) photoacoustic tomography with resolution in the range of tens of micrometers is presented that uses a light beam for interferometric detection of acoustic waves. Reconstruction of the 3-D initial pressure distribution from the signals representing line integrals of the acoustic field is a two-step process. It uses an inversion of 2-D wave propagation to obtain line projections of the initial pressure distribution and the inverse Radon transform. The light beam, propagating freely in a water bath, is scanned either in an arc- or box-shaped curve around the object. Simulations are performed to compare the two scanning procedures. The projection images are obtained either using the filtered back projection algorithm for the π-arc scanning mode or the frequency domain algorithm for the box scanning mode. While the former algorithm provides slightly better image quality, the latter is about 20 times faster. The ability of the photoacoustic tomography device to create 3-D images with constant resolution throughout the reconstruction volume is demonstrated experimentally using a human hair phantom. These measurements revealed a 3-D resolution below 100 μm. In a second experiment, 3-D imaging of an isolated mouse heart is demonstrated to show the applicability for preclinical and biological research.

  11. Integrated optical biosensor for rapid detection of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathesz, Anna; Valkai, Sándor; Újvárosy, Attila; Aekbote, Badri; Sipos, Orsolya; Stercz, Balázs; Kocsis, Béla; Szabó, Dóra; Dér, András

    2016-02-01

    In medical diagnostics, rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria from body fluids is one of the basic issues. Most state-of-the-art methods require optical labeling, increasing the complexity, duration and cost of the analysis. Therefore, there is a strong need for developing selective sensory devices based on label-free techniques, in order to increase the speed, and reduce the cost of detection. In a recent paper, we have shown that an integrated optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a highly sensitive all-optical device made of a cheap photopolymer, can be used as a powerful lab-on-a-chip tool for specific, labelfree detection of proteins. By proper modifications of this technique, our interferometric biosensor was combined with a microfluidic system allowing the rapid and specific detection of bacteria from solutions, having the surface of the sensor functionalized by bacterium-specific antibodies. The experiments proved that the biosensor was able to detect Escherichia coli bacteria at concentrations of 106 cfu/ml within a few minutes, that makes our device an appropriate tool for fast, label-free detection of bacteria from body fluids such as urine or sputum. On the other hand, possible applications of the device may not be restricted to medical microbiology, since bacterial identification is an important task in microbial forensics, criminal investigations, bio-terrorism threats and in environmental studies, as well.

  12. Integrated optical biosensor for rapid detection of bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathesz, Anna; Valkai, Sándor; Újvárosy, Attila; Aekbote, Badri; Sipos, Orsolya; Stercz, Balázs; Kocsis, Béla; Szabó, Dóra; Dér, András

    2015-12-01

    In medical diagnostics, rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria from body fluids is one of the basic issues. Most state-of-the-art methods require optical labeling, increasing the complexity, duration and cost of the analysis. Therefore, there is a strong need for developing selective sensory devices based on label-free techniques, in order to increase the speed, and reduce the cost of detection. In a recent paper, we have shown that an integrated optical Mach-Zehnder interferometer, a highly sensitive all-optical device made of a cheap photopolymer, can be used as a powerful lab-on-a-chip tool for specific, labelfree detection of proteins. By proper modifications of this technique, our interferometric biosensor was combined with a microfluidic system allowing the rapid and specific detection of bacteria from solutions, having the surface of the sensor functionalized by bacterium-specific antibodies. The experiments proved that the biosensor was able to detect Escherichia coli bacteria at concentrations of 106 cfu/ml within a few minutes, that makes our device an appropriate tool for fast, label-free detection of bacteria from body fluids such as urine or sputum. On the other hand, possible applications of the device may not be restricted to medical microbiology, since bacterial identification is an important task in microbial forensics, criminal investigations, bio-terrorism threats and in environmental studies, as well.

  13. Contactless ultrasound detection using an optical ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kyu Hyun; Luo, Wei; Zhang, Cheng; Guo, L. Jay; Fan, Xudong

    2016-03-01

    We develop an air-couple ultrasound detector based on an optical fluidic ring resonator (OFRR) suspended on a Ushaped holder. The OFRR is a glass capillary with an outer diameter of approximately 130 μm and a wall thickness in the order of 1~10 μm. The circular cross section of the OFRR supports the high-Q whispering gallery mode (WGM) that circulates along the circumference. Incoming ultrasound pressure results in a small refractive index change in the glass wall and geometrical change in the OFRR shape, both of which in turn lead to a spectral shift in the WGM that can be sensitively detected owing to WGM with high optical Q-factors (>107). Due to the suspension nature of the OFRR, the ultrasound detection can be carried out in air, which is advantageous in comparison with other ultrasound detections that require acoustic coupling media such water, gel or solid. The sensitivity can be tuned and optimized by changing the diameter and wall thickness. Besides the optical detection, we also demonstrate optomechanical ultrasound mixing, in which optomechanical vibration is first excited within the OFRR that subsequently modulates the ultrasound wave. Our work will lead to the development of a new type of air-coupled ultrasound detector that can be used for photo-acoustic imaging, non-invasive ultrasound detection of external objects, and ultrasound detection/characterization of internal objects (such as particles and liquids) flowing inside the capillary.

  14. Optical protein detection based on magnetic clusters rotation.

    PubMed

    Ramiandrisoa, Donatien; Brient-Litzler, Elodie; Daynes, Aurélien; Compain, Eric; Bibette, Jérôme; Baudry, Jean

    2015-09-25

    In this paper we present a simple method to quantify aggregates of 200nm magnetic particles. This method relies on the optical and magnetic anisotropy of particle aggregates, whereas dispersed particles are optically isotropic. We orientate aggregates by applying short pulses of a magnetic field, and we measure optical density variation directly linked to this reorientation. By computing the scattering efficiency of doublets and singlets, we demonstrate the absolute quantification of a few % of doublets in a well dispersed suspension. More generally, these optical variations are related to the aggregation state of the sample. This method can be easily applied to an agglutination assay, where target proteins induce aggregation of colloidal particles. By observing only aligned clusters, we increase sensitivity and we reduce the background noise as compared to a classical agglutination assay: we obtain a detection limit on the C-reactive protein of less than 3pM for a total assay time of 10min.

  15. Automated detection of optical counterparts to GRBs with RAPTOR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wozniak, P. R.; Vestrand, W. T.; Evans, S.; White, R.; Wren, J.

    2006-05-01

    The RAPTOR system (RAPid Telescopes for Optical Response) is an array of several distributed robotic telescopes that automatically respond to GCN localization alerts. Raptor-S is a 0.4-m telescope with 24 arc min. field of view employing a 1k × 1k Marconi CCD detector, and has already detected prompt optical emission from several GRBs within the first minute of the explosion. We present a real-time data analysis and alert system for automated identification of optical transients in Raptor-S GRB response data down to the sensitivity limit of ~ 19 mag. Our custom data processing pipeline is designed to minimize the time required to reliably identify transients and extract actionable information. The system utilizes a networked PostgreSQL database server for catalog access and distributes email alerts with successful detections.

  16. Development of ratiometric optical fiber sensor for ammonia gas detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Cheng-Shane; Chen, Yen-Fu

    2017-04-01

    A simple, low cost technique to fabricate a ratiometric optical fiber ammonia (NH3) sensor has been presented. The ratiometric optical fiber ammonia sensor was based on the ammonia induced absorbance change of sensing material Oxazine 170 perchlorate (O170) in ethyl cellulose (EC) with the luminescence intensity of 7-amino-4-trifluoromethyl coumarin (AFC). The observed luminescence intensity from AFC at 487 nm decreased with increasing the ammonia concentration. The sensitivity of optical ammonia sensor is quantified in terms of the ratio I0/I100, where I0 and I100 represent the detected luminescence intensities in nitrogen and 1000 ppm ammonia concentration, respectively. The experimental result shows that the sensitivity of the ratiometric optical fiber ammonia sensor is estimated to be 1.44. The sensitive optical ammonia sensor based on fluorescence intensity changes of AFC due to the absorption change of Oxazine 170 perchlorate in EC layer with ammonia is achieved. The ratiometric sensing approach presented in this study has the advantage of suppressing spurious fluctuations in the intensity of the excitation source and optical transmission properties of the optical sensor.

  17. Novel optical sensors for detection of toxins, viruses and bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emmerson, Gregory D.; Sparrow, Ian J. G.; Bhatta, Devaki; SohnaSohna, Jean E.

    2008-10-01

    A novel optical sensor system for rapid, sensitive and robust biological detection is presented. Sensor elements based on integrated optical circuits confine all optical signals into a planar format, resulting in a small, low-cost and mechanically stable refractive index sensor, without any external bulk optics. Consequently, the sensor elements are able to operate in real-world environments, resilient to vibration and temperature changes, whilst maintaining refractive index resolution of 10-6. Oxide surfaces on the sensor are ideal for protein attachment and have a long lifetime in buffer solutions (>100hrs). Real-time, label-free detection of biological agents has been demonstrated using antibodies attached to the sensor surface. The sensor design results in a large penetration depth of the sensing light, up to 1μm into the sample liquid, conferring the ability to detect various classes of biological targets, spanning toxins, viruses and bacteria. Each sensing element utilizes parallel multiple wavelength data to provide additional information at the point of measurement, resulting in on-chip temperature and strain referencing, focused towards increased accuracy and reduction of false alarms. The large size range of biological detection, coupled with the long lifetime of the sensors makes the system ideally suited to applications ranging from medical diagnostics to confirmatory detectors for homeland security

  18. Time-resolved pulsed EPR: microwave and optical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunac, A.D.; Smith, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Time-resolved pulsed EPR spectrometers are described. EPR spectra, kinetic profiles, and relaxation studies are used to illustrate some capabilities of the pulsed EPR experiment. Optical detection of time-resolved EPR spectra of radical ion pairs is used to study radical-ion recombination kinetics, recombination pathways, and the structure of radical anions and cations. 17 figures.

  19. Channel simulation for direct-detection optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tycz, M.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for simulating the random modulation imposed by atmospheric scintillation and transmitter pointing jitter on a direct-detection optical communication system. The system is capable of providing signal fading statistics which obey log-normal, beta, Rayleigh, Ricean, or chi-square density functions. Experimental tests of the performance of the channel simulator are presented.

  20. Gravitational wave detection with optical lattice atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolkowitz, S.; Pikovski, I.; Langellier, N.; Lukin, M. D.; Walsworth, R. L.; Ye, J.

    2016-12-01

    We propose a space-based gravitational wave (GW) detector consisting of two spatially separated, drag-free satellites sharing ultrastable optical laser light over a single baseline. Each satellite contains an optical lattice atomic clock, which serves as a sensitive, narrowband detector of the local frequency of the shared laser light. A synchronized two-clock comparison between the satellites will be sensitive to the effective Doppler shifts induced by incident GWs at a level competitive with other proposed space-based GW detectors, while providing complementary features. The detected signal is a differential frequency shift of the shared laser light due to the relative velocity of the satellites, and the detection window can be tuned through the control sequence applied to the atoms' internal states. This scheme enables the detection of GWs from continuous, spectrally narrow sources, such as compact binary inspirals, with frequencies ranging from ˜3 mHz - 10 Hz without loss of sensitivity, thereby bridging the detection gap between space-based and terrestrial optical interferometric GW detectors. Our proposed GW detector employs just two satellites, is compatible with integration with an optical interferometric detector, and requires only realistic improvements to existing ground-based clock and laser technologies.

  1. Prospects of Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaideep

    2015-10-01

    We will discuss the prospects of optically detecting single atoms captured in a cryogenic thin film of a noble gas such as neon. This proposed detection scheme, when coupled with a recoil separator, could be used to measure rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. In particular, we will focus on the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg reaction, which is an important source of neutrons for the s-process. Noble gas solids are an attractive medium because they are optically transparent and provide efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. Atoms embedded inside of noble gas solids have a fluorescence spectrum that is often significantly shifted from its absorption spectrum. This makes possible the detection of individual fluorescence photons against a background of intense excitation light, which can be suppressed using the appropriate optical filters. We will report on our efforts to optically detect single Yb atoms in solid Ne. Yb is an ideal candidate for initial studies because it emits a strong green fluorescence when excited by blue light and it has an atomic structure that very closely resembles that of Mg. This work is supported by funds from Michigan State University.

  2. Channel simulation for direct detection optical communication systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tycz, M.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.

    1974-01-01

    A technique is described for simulating the random modulation imposed by atmospheric scintillation and transmitter pointing jitter on a direct detection optical communication system. The system is capable of providing signal fading statistics which obey log normal, beta, Rayleigh, Ricean or chi-squared density functions. Experimental tests of the performance of the Channel Simulator are presented.

  3. M-ARY POISSON DETECTION AND OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    noise. When the observables correspond to counts of emitted photoelectrons, the problem models a discrete version of a coherent M-ary optical ... communication system using photon counters in the presence of background radiation. Consideration is given to an average distance and a detection probability

  4. Fiber-optic polarization diversity detection for rotary probe optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anthony M D; Pahlevaninezhad, Hamid; Yang, Victor X D; Lam, Stephen; MacAulay, Calum; Lane, Pierre

    2014-06-15

    We report a polarization diversity detection scheme for optical coherence tomography with a new, custom, miniaturized fiber coupler with single mode (SM) fiber inputs and polarization maintaining (PM) fiber outputs. The SM fiber inputs obviate matching the optical lengths of the X and Y OCT polarization channels prior to interference and the PM fiber outputs ensure defined X and Y axes after interference. Advantages for this scheme include easier alignment, lower cost, and easier miniaturization compared to designs with free-space bulk optical components. We demonstrate the utility of the detection system to mitigate the effects of rapidly changing polarization states when imaging with rotating fiber optic probes in Intralipid suspension and during in vivo imaging of human airways.

  5. Optical Detection of Organic Chemical Biosignatures at Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, P. G.; Lane, A. L.; Bhartia, R.; Hug, W. H.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a non-contact, optical life detection instrument that can detect organic chemical biosignatures in a number of different environments, including dry land, shallow aqueous, deep marine or in ice. Hence, the instrument is appropriate as a biosignature survey tool both for Mars exploration or in situ experiments in an ice-covered ocean such as one might wish to explore on Europa. Here, we report the results we obtained on an expedition aboard the Russian oceanographic vessel Akademik Mstislav Keldysh to hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific Ocean using our life detection instrument MCDUVE, a multichannel, deep ultraviolet excitation fluorescence detector. MCDUVE detected organic material distribution on rocks near the vent, as well as direct detection of organisms, both microbial and microscopic. We also were able to detect organic material issuing directly from vent chimneys, measure the organic signature of the water column as we ascended, and passively observe the emission of light directly from some vents.

  6. Optical Detection of Organic Chemical Biosignatures at Hydrothermal Vents

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conrad, P. G.; Lane, A. L.; Bhartia, R.; Hug, W. H.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a non-contact, optical life detection instrument that can detect organic chemical biosignatures in a number of different environments, including dry land, shallow aqueous, deep marine or in ice. Hence, the instrument is appropriate as a biosignature survey tool both for Mars exploration or in situ experiments in an ice-covered ocean such as one might wish to explore on Europa. Here, we report the results we obtained on an expedition aboard the Russian oceanographic vessel Akademik Mstislav Keldysh to hydrothermal vent sites in the Pacific Ocean using our life detection instrument MCDUVE, a multichannel, deep ultraviolet excitation fluorescence detector. MCDUVE detected organic material distribution on rocks near the vent, as well as direct detection of organisms, both microbial and microscopic. We also were able to detect organic material issuing directly from vent chimneys, measure the organic signature of the water column as we ascended, and passively observe the emission of light directly from some vents.

  7. Multivariate optical element platform for compressed detection of fluorescence markers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Priore, Ryan J.; Swanstrom, Joseph A.

    2014-05-01

    The success of a commercial fluorescent diagnostic assay is dependent on the selection of a fluorescent biomarker; due to the broad nature of fluorescence biomarker emission profiles, only a small number of fluorescence biomarkers may be discriminated from each other as a function of excitation source. Multivariate Optical Elements (MOEs) are thin-film devices that encode a broad band, spectroscopic pattern allowing a simple broadband detector to generate a highly sensitive and specific detection for a target analyte. MOEs have historically been matched 1:1 to a discrete analyte or class prediction; however, MOE filter sets are capable of sensing projections of the original sparse spectroscopic space enabling a small set of MOEs to discriminate a multitude of target analytes. This optical regression can offer real-time measurements with relatively high signal-to-noise ratios that realize the advantages of multiplexed detection and pattern recognition in a simple optical instrument. The specificity advantage of MOE-based sensors allows fluorescent biomarkers that were once incapable of discrimination from one another via optical band pass filters to be employed in a common assay panel. A simplified MOE-based sensor may ultimately reduce the requirement for highly trained operators as well as move certain life science applications like disease prognostication from the laboratory to the point of care. This presentation will summarize the design and fabrication of compressed detection MOE filter sets for detecting multiple fluorescent biomarkers simultaneously with strong spectroscopic interference as well as comparing the detection performance of the MOE sensor with traditional optical band pass filter methodologies.

  8. Optical symbolic substitution: edge detection using Prewitt, Sobel, and Roberts operators.

    PubMed

    Cherri, A K; Karim, M A

    1989-11-01

    Edge detection schemes based on Prewitt, Sobel, and Roberts operators are realized using optical symbolic substitution. The corresponding optical systems are compared in terms of hardware and performance.

  9. Metamaterial optical refractive index sensor detected by the naked eye

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiaonong; Luo, Chunrong; Hong, Gang; Zhao, Xiaopeng

    2013-03-01

    An optical refractive index sensor that can be detected by the naked eye is presented in this paper. The sensor is developed based on the theory that metamaterials can completely absorb incident electric and magnetic field near its resonant frequencies. By inserting different mediums in the sensor or by dropping the mediums on the surface of the sensor, we detect the medium with a different refractive index through qualitative and quantitative analysis. The sensor is convenient for the detection of the liquid refractive index.

  10. Epithelial cancer detection by oblique-incidence optical spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Uribe, Alejandro; Balareddy, Karthik C.; Zou, Jun; Wang, Kenneth K.; Duvic, Madeleine; Wang, Lihong V.

    2009-02-01

    This paper presents a study on non-invasive detection of two common epithelial cancers (skin and esophagus) based on oblique incidence diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (OIDRS). An OIDRS measurement system, which combines fiber optics and MEMS technologies, was developed. In our pilot studies, a total number of 137 cases have been measured in-vivo for skin cancer detection and a total number of 20 biopsy samples have been measured ex-vivo for esophageal cancer detection. To automatically differentiate the cancerous cases from benign ones, a statistical software classification program was also developed. An overall classification accuracy of 90% and 100% has been achieved for skin and esophageal cancer classification, respectively.

  11. Balanced detection in Brillouin optical time domain analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dominguez-Lopez, Alejandro; Lopez-Gil, Alexia; Martin-Lopez, Sonia; Gonzalez-Herraez, Miguel

    2014-05-01

    We propose the use of balanced detection in Brillouin Optical Time Domain Analysis (BOTDA) sensors. Balanced detection can be effectively accomplished among the Stokes and anti-Stokes bands in the probe signal. This type of detection leads to a doubling of the trace amplitude and at least a √2 increase in signal to noise ratio over the conventional configuration. Moreover, it leads to a complete cancellation of the common-mode noise in the probe signal, including relative intensity noise in Raman-assisted configurations. We show all these benefits both theoretically and experimentally.

  12. Fiber-Optic Based Compact Gas Leak Detection System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    deGroot, Wim A.

    1995-01-01

    A propellant leak detection system based on Raman scattering principles is introduced. The proposed system is flexible and versatile as the result of the use of optical fibers. It is shown that multiple species can be monitored simultaneously. In this paper oxygen, nitrogen, carbon monoxide, and hydrogen are detected and monitored. The current detection sensitivity for both hydrogen and carbon monoxide is 1% partial pressure at ambient conditions. The sensitivity for oxygen and nitrogen is 0.5% partial pressure. The response time to changes in species concentration is three minutes. This system can be used to monitor multiple species at several locations.

  13. Noncontact detection of ultrasonic waves using fiber optic Sagnac interferometer.

    PubMed

    Jang, Tae Seong; Lee, Seung Seok; Kwon, Il Bum; Lee, Wang Joo; Lee, Jung Ju

    2002-06-01

    This paper describes a fiber optic sensor suitable for noncontact detection of ultrasonic waves. This sensor is based on the fiber optic Sagnac interferometer, which has a path-matched configuration and does not require active stabilization. Quadrature phase bias between two interfering laser beams in the Sagnac loop is applied by controlling the birefringence using a fiber polarization controller. A stable quadrature phase bias can be confirmed by observing the interferometer output according to the change of phase bias. Additional signal processing is not needed for the detection of ultrasonic waves using the Sagnac interferometer. Ultrasonic oscillations produced by conventional ultrasonic piezoelectric transducers were successfully detected, and the performance of this interferometer was investigated by a power spectrum analysis of the output signal. Based on the validation of the fiber optic Sagnac interferometer, noncontact detection of laser-generated surface waves was performed. The configured Sagnac interferometer is very effective for the detection of small displacement with high frequency, such as ultrasonic waves used in conventional nondestructive testing (NDT).

  14. MEMS-based extreme adaptive optics for planet detection

    SciTech Connect

    Macintosh, B A; Graham, J R; Oppenheimer, B; Poyneer, L; Sivaramakrishnan, A; Veran, J

    2005-11-18

    The next major step in the study of extrasolar planets will be the direct detection, resolved from their parent star, of a significant sample of Jupiter-like extrasolar giant planets. Such detection will open up new parts of the extrasolar planet distribution and allow spectroscopic characterization of the planets themselves. Detecting Jovian planets at 5-50 AU scale orbiting nearby stars requires adaptive optics systems and coronagraphs an order of magnitude more powerful than those available today--the realm of ''Extreme'' adaptive optics. We present the basic requirements and design for such a system, the Gemini Planet Imager (GPI.) GPI will require a MEMS-based deformable mirror with good surface quality, 2-4 micron stroke (operated in tandem with a conventional low-order ''woofer'' mirror), and a fully-functional 48-actuator-diameter aperture.

  15. Periodic optical variability of radio-detected ultracool dwarfs

    SciTech Connect

    Harding, L. K.; Golden, A.; Singh, Navtej; Sheehan, B.; Butler, R. F.; Hallinan, G.; Boyle, R. P.; Zavala, R. T.

    2013-12-20

    A fraction of very low mass stars and brown dwarfs are known to be radio active, in some cases producing periodic pulses. Extensive studies of two such objects have also revealed optical periodic variability, and the nature of this variability remains unclear. Here, we report on multi-epoch optical photometric monitoring of six radio-detected dwarfs, spanning the ∼M8-L3.5 spectral range, conducted to investigate the ubiquity of periodic optical variability in radio-detected ultracool dwarfs. This survey is the most sensitive ground-based study carried out to date in search of periodic optical variability from late-type dwarfs, where we obtained 250 hr of monitoring, delivering photometric precision as low as ∼0.15%. Five of the six targets exhibit clear periodicity, in all cases likely associated with the rotation period of the dwarf, with a marginal detection found for the sixth. Our data points to a likely association between radio and optical periodic variability in late-M/early-L dwarfs, although the underlying physical cause of this correlation remains unclear. In one case, we have multiple epochs of monitoring of the archetype of pulsing radio dwarfs, the M9 TVLM 513–46546, spanning a period of 5 yr, which is sufficiently stable in phase to allow us to establish a period of 1.95958 ± 0.00005 hr. This phase stability may be associated with a large-scale stable magnetic field, further strengthening the correlation between radio activity and periodic optical variability. Finally, we find a tentative spin-orbit alignment of one component of the very low mass binary, LP 349–25.

  16. Ultrafast Radiation Detection by Modulation of an Optical Probe Beam

    SciTech Connect

    Vernon, S P; Lowry, M E

    2006-02-22

    We describe a new class of radiation sensor that utilizes optical interferometry to measure radiation-induced changes in the optical refractive index of a semiconductor sensor medium. Radiation absorption in the sensor material produces a transient, non-equilibrium, electron-hole pair distribution that locally modifies the complex, optical refractive index of the sensor medium. Changes in the real (imaginary) part of the local refractive index produce a differential phase shift (absorption) of an optical probe used to interrogate the sensor material. In contrast to conventional radiation detectors where signal levels are proportional to the incident energy, signal levels in these optical sensors are proportional to the incident radiation energy flux. This allows for reduction of the sensor form factor with no degradation in detection sensitivity. Furthermore, since the radiation induced, non-equilibrium electron-hole pair distribution is effectively measured ''in place'' there is no requirement to spatially separate and collect the generated charges; consequently, the sensor risetime is of the order of the hot-electron thermalization time {le} 10 fs and the duration of the index perturbation is determined by the carrier recombination time which is of order {approx} 600 fs in, direct-bandgap semiconductors, with a high density of recombination defects; consequently, the optical sensors can be engineered with sub-ps temporal response. A series of detectors were designed, and incorporated into Mach Zehnder and Fabry-Perot interferometer-based detection systems: proof of concept, lower detection sensitivity, Mach-Zehnder detectors were characterized at beamline 6.3 at SSRL; three generations of high sensitivity single element and imaging Fabry-Perot detectors were measured at the LLNL Europa facility. Our results indicate that this technology can be used to provide x-ray detectors and x-ray imaging systems with single x-ray sensitivity and S/N {approx} 30 at x

  17. Plastic optical fibre sensor for damage detection in offshore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, K. S. C.; Koh, C. G.

    2010-03-01

    It is important to ensure the safe and reliable use of massive engineering structures such as offshore platforms, including all aspects of safety and design code compliance. Although routine inspection is an integral part of the safety protocol in operating and maintaining these structures, regular assessment of the effectiveness and efficiency of existing safety evaluation methods is clearly desired in view of emerging technologies for structural health monitoring of engineering structures. The recent advancement in plastic optical fibre (POF) materials and processing render POF sensors an attractive alternative to glass-based optical fibre sensors as they offer much greater being flexibility, high resistance to fracture and hence the ease in their handling and installation. In this paper, some preliminary results demonstrating the use of plastic optical fibre sensors for damage detection and structural health monitoring for offshore and marine-related applications will be summarized. In this study, POF will be used for crack detection in tubular steel specimens in conjunction with a high-resolution photon-counting optical time-domain reflectrometry (v-OTDR). Although the use of OTDR technique is an established method in the telecommunication industry, this study is new in that it is now possible, with the availability of v-OTDR and graded-index perfluorinated POF, to detect and locate the crack position in the host structure to within 10 cm accuracy or better. It will also be shown that this technique could readily be configured to monitor crack growth in steel tubular members.

  18. Plastic optical fibre sensor for damage detection in offshore structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuang, K. S. C.; Koh, C. G.

    2009-12-01

    It is important to ensure the safe and reliable use of massive engineering structures such as offshore platforms, including all aspects of safety and design code compliance. Although routine inspection is an integral part of the safety protocol in operating and maintaining these structures, regular assessment of the effectiveness and efficiency of existing safety evaluation methods is clearly desired in view of emerging technologies for structural health monitoring of engineering structures. The recent advancement in plastic optical fibre (POF) materials and processing render POF sensors an attractive alternative to glass-based optical fibre sensors as they offer much greater being flexibility, high resistance to fracture and hence the ease in their handling and installation. In this paper, some preliminary results demonstrating the use of plastic optical fibre sensors for damage detection and structural health monitoring for offshore and marine-related applications will be summarized. In this study, POF will be used for crack detection in tubular steel specimens in conjunction with a high-resolution photon-counting optical time-domain reflectrometry (v-OTDR). Although the use of OTDR technique is an established method in the telecommunication industry, this study is new in that it is now possible, with the availability of v-OTDR and graded-index perfluorinated POF, to detect and locate the crack position in the host structure to within 10 cm accuracy or better. It will also be shown that this technique could readily be configured to monitor crack growth in steel tubular members.

  19. Progress Towards Optical Single Atom Detection for Nuclear Astrophysics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Jaideep; Wenzl, Jennifer; Frisbie, Dustin; Parzuchowski, Kristen; Johnson, Maegan

    2016-09-01

    We are developing the technique of optically detecting individual atoms embedded in thin films of cryogenically frozen solids. Noble gas solids such as frozen neon are an attractive medium because they are optically transparent and provide efficient, pure, stable, & chemically inert confinement for a wide variety of atomic and molecular species. We propose to couple this new detection technique to a recoil separator with the goal of measuring rare nuclear reactions relevant for nuclear astrophysics. Because of the additional selectivity provided by the atomic transitions of the captured atom, this detection scheme would help loosen the often demanding beam rejection requirements imposed on recoil separators. Our initial focus is the 22Ne(α, n)25Mg reaction, which is an important source of neutrons for the s-process. We will describe our measurements of the atomic & optical parameters needed to optimize the optical layout as well as a promising design for a prototype detector. This work is generously supported by Michigan State University.

  20. Method and means for detecting optically transmitted signals and establishing optical interference pattern between electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Kostenbauder, Adnah G.

    1988-01-01

    A photodetector for detecting signal pulses transmitted in an optical carrier signal relies on the generation of electron-hole pairs and the diffusion of the generated electrons and holes to the electrodes on the surface of the semiconductor detector body for generating photovoltaic pulses. The detector utilizes the interference of optical waves for generating an electron-hole grating within the semiconductor body, and, by establishing an electron-hole pair maximum at one electrode and a minimum at the other electrode, a detectable voltaic pulse is generated across the electrode.

  1. Method and means for detecting optically transmitted signals and establishing optical interference pattern between electrodes

    DOEpatents

    Kostenbauder, A.G.

    1988-06-28

    A photodetector for detecting signal pulses transmitted in an optical carrier signal relies on the generation of electron-hole pairs and the diffusion of the generated electrons and holes to the electrodes on the surface of the semiconductor detector body for generating photovoltaic pulses. The detector utilizes the interference of optical waves for generating an electron-hole grating within the semiconductor body, and, by establishing an electron-hole pair maximum at one electrode and a minimum at the other electrode, a detectable voltaic pulse is generated across the electrode. 4 figs.

  2. Plastic optical fiber sensor for gastric ph detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldini, Francesco; Bracci, Susanna; Cosi, Franco

    1994-02-01

    An optical fiber sensor for gastric pH detection is described, making use of plastic fibers as light carriers and a proper electronic system for both source driving and signal processing. The use of a suitable microprocessor and an internal buffer allows the realization of a portable and reliable device, fed by batteries. The indicators, bromophenol blue (BPB) or thymol blue (TB), are immobilized on controlled pore glass (CPG) fixed at the end of plastic optical fibers following a proprietary process. The realized optrode, satisfying clinical requirements, was tested `in vitro.' A precision of

  3. Quantum Dots Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHaven, S. L.; Williams, P. A.; Burke, E. R.

    2015-01-01

    A novel concept for the detection of x-rays with microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide is presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dots application technique are discussed.

  4. Generalized model for incoherent detection in confocal optical microscopy.

    PubMed

    Hammoum, Rachid; Hamady, Sidi Ould Saad; Fontana, Marc D

    2010-06-01

    We develop a generalized model in order to calculate the point spread functions in both the focal and the detection planes for the electric field strengths. In these calculations, based on the generalized Jones matrices, we introduce all of the interdependent parameters that could influence the spatial resolution of a confocal optical microscope. Our proposed model is more nearly complete, since we make no approximations of the scattered electric fields. These results can be successfully applied to standard confocal optical techniques to get a better understanding for more quantitative interpretations of the probe.

  5. Quantum dots microstructured optical fiber for x-ray detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeHaven, S. L.; Williams, P. A.; Burke, E. R.

    2016-02-01

    A novel concept for the detection of x-rays with microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide is presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dots application technique are discussed.

  6. Optical spectroscopy for the detection of ischemic tissue injury

    DOEpatents

    Demos, Stavros; Fitzgerald, Jason; Troppmann, Christoph; Michalopoulou, Andromachi

    2009-09-08

    An optical method and apparatus is utilized to quantify ischemic tissue and/or organ injury. Such a method and apparatus is non-invasive, non-traumatic, portable, and can make measurements in a matter of seconds. Moreover, such a method and apparatus can be realized through optical fiber probes, making it possible to take measurements of target organs deep within a patient's body. Such a technology provides a means of detecting and quantifying tissue injury in its early stages, before it is clinically apparent and before irreversible damage has occurred.

  7. Detecting ionizing radiation with optical fibers down to biomedical doses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Avino, S.; D'Avino, V.; Giorgini, A.; Pacelli, R.; Liuzzi, R.; Cella, L.; De Natale, P.; Gagliardi, G.

    2013-10-01

    We report on a passive ionizing radiation sensor based on a fiber-optic resonant cavity interrogated by a high resolution interferometric technique. After irradiation in clinical linear accelerators, we observe significant variations of the fiber thermo-optic coefficient. Exploiting this effect, we demonstrate an ultimate detection limit of 160 mGy with an interaction volume of only 6 × 10-4 mm3. Thanks to its reliability, compactness, and sensitivity at biomedical dose levels, our system lends itself to real applications in radiation therapy procedures as well as in radiation monitoring and protection in medicine, aerospace, and nuclear power plants.

  8. A fibre optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. Hien; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Hardwick, S. A.

    2010-09-01

    A fibre-optic chemical sensor for the detection of cocaine has been developed, based on a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) containing a fluorescein moiety as the signalling group. The fluorescent MIP was formed and covalently attached to the distal end of an optical fibre. The sensor exhibited an increase in fluorescence intensity in response to cocaine in the concentration range of 0 - 500 μM in aqueous acetonitrile mixtures with good reproducibility over 24 h. Selectivity for cocaine over others drugs has also been demonstrated.

  9. Optical detection of radio waves through a nanomechanical transducer.

    PubMed

    Bagci, T; Simonsen, A; Schmid, S; Villanueva, L G; Zeuthen, E; Appel, J; Taylor, J M; Sørensen, A; Usami, K; Schliesser, A; Polzik, E S

    2014-03-06

    Low-loss transmission and sensitive recovery of weak radio-frequency and microwave signals is a ubiquitous challenge, crucial in radio astronomy, medical imaging, navigation, and classical and quantum communication. Efficient up-conversion of radio-frequency signals to an optical carrier would enable their transmission through optical fibres instead of through copper wires, drastically reducing losses, and would give access to the set of established quantum optical techniques that are routinely used in quantum-limited signal detection. Research in cavity optomechanics has shown that nanomechanical oscillators can couple strongly to either microwave or optical fields. Here we demonstrate a room-temperature optoelectromechanical transducer with both these functionalities, following a recent proposal using a high-quality nanomembrane. A voltage bias of less than 10 V is sufficient to induce strong coupling between the voltage fluctuations in a radio-frequency resonance circuit and the membrane's displacement, which is simultaneously coupled to light reflected off its surface. The radio-frequency signals are detected as an optical phase shift with quantum-limited sensitivity. The corresponding half-wave voltage is in the microvolt range, orders of magnitude less than that of standard optical modulators. The noise of the transducer--beyond the measured 800 pV Hz-1/2 Johnson noise of the resonant circuit--consists of the quantum noise of light and thermal fluctuations of the membrane, dominating the noise floor in potential applications in radio astronomy and nuclear magnetic imaging. Each of these contributions is inferred to be 60 pV Hz-1/2 when balanced by choosing an electromechanical cooperativity of ~150 with an optical power of 1 mW. The noise temperature of the membrane is divided by the cooperativity. For the highest observed cooperativity of 6,800, this leads to a projected noise temperature of 40 mK and a sensitivity limit of 5 pV Hz-1/2. Our approach to

  10. Nanoparticle detection by microfluidic resistive pulse sensor with optical evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongpeng; Song, Yongxin; Pan, Xinxiang; Sun, Yuqing; Li, Dongqing; Jiang, Jihai

    2010-12-01

    This paper reports a device that performs nanoparticle detection with a microfluidic differential Resistive Pulse Sensor (RPS). By using a single microfluidic channel with two detecting arm channels placed at the two ends of the sensing section, the microfluidic differential RPS can achieve a high sensitivity allowing the detection of nanometer size particles. Two-stage differential amplification is used to further increase the signal-to-noise ratio. This method is able to detect nanoparticles of 490nm on a microfluidic chip. An 8μm gate and a 2.7μm gate detected the 490 nm particle. The electrical signal was with optical evidence. The result showed 2.7μm chip can realize signal to noise ratio higher than 10. The method described in this paper is simple and can be applied to develop a compact device without the need of bulky, sophisticated electronic instruments or complicated nano-fabrication processes.

  11. Microvasculature dropout detected by the optical coherence tomography angiography in nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy.

    PubMed

    Song, Yi; Min, Jing-Yu; Mao, Lei; Gong, Yuan-Yuan

    2017-10-07

    To investigate microcirculation characteristics of peripapillary superficial retina and optic disc in eyes with nonarteritic anterior ischemic optic neuropathy (NAION) using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA). Forty-one eyes of 30 NAION patients and 30 eyes of 30 normal subjects were evaluated with OCTA (AngioVue, Optovue). The whole vessel density, inside disc vessel density, peripapillary vessel density, and vessel densities based on the sectorial division in the nerve head mode peripapillary superficial retina and RPC mode optic disc were measured respectively. In the NAION group, vessel densities in both the peripapillary superficial retina and optic disc were significant reduced (P < 0.01), as compared with the control group. The whole vessel density of the optic disc in chronic NAION group were significantly lower than that in acute NAION group (P < 0.01). The whole and temporal vessel density of the peripapillary superficial retina was significantly correlated with log MAR VA (r = -0.381 and r = -0.337, both P < 0.05). Vessel densities in both the peripapillary superficial retina and optic disc were reduced (P < 0.05) in unilateral involved eyes, as compared to the unaffected fellow eyes, except for the inside disc (P = 0.270) and SN (P = 0.054) vessel density in the optic disc, while there was no difference in the fellow eyes compared to the normal eyes. In NAION patients, a dropout of microvasculature in peripapillary superficial retina and optic disc could be detected by OCTA directly. OCTA might become a useful tool for detection and monitoring of NAION. Lasers Surg. Med. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Noninvasive detection of cardiovascular pulsations by optical Doppler techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hong, HyunDae; Fox, Martin D.

    1997-10-01

    A system has been developed based on the measurement of skin surface vibration that can be used to detect the underlying vascular wall motion of superficial arteries and the chest wall. Data obtained from tissue phantoms suggested that the detected signals were related to intravascular pressure, an important clinical and physiological parameter. Unlike the conventional optical Doppler techniques that have been used to measure blood perfusion in skin layers and blood flow within superficial arteries, the present system was optimized to pick up skin vibrations. An optical interferometer with a 633-nm He:Ne laser was utilized to detect micrometer displacements of the skin surface. Motion velocity profiles of the skin surface near each superficial artery and auscultation points on a chest for the two heart valve sounds exhibited distinctive profiles. The theoretical and experimental results demonstrated that the system detected the velocity of skin movement, which is related to the time derivative of the pressure. The system also reduces the loading effect on the pulsation signals and heart sounds produced by the conventional piezoelectric vibration sensors. The system's sensitivity, which could be optimized further, was 366.2 micrometers /s for the present research. Overall, optical cardiovascular vibrometry has the potential to become a simple noninvasive approach to cardiovascular screening.

  13. A two-level detection algorithm for optical fiber vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Fukun; Ren, Xuecong; Qu, Hongquan; Jiang, Ruiqing

    2015-09-01

    Optical fiber vibration is detected by the coherent optical time domain reflection technique. In addition to the vibration signals, the reflected signals include clutters and noises, which lead to a high false alarm rate. The "cell averaging" constant false alarm rate algorithm has a high computing speed, but its detection performance will be declined in nonhomogeneous environments such as multiple targets. The "order statistics" constant false alarm rate algorithm has a distinct advantage in multiple target environments, but it has a lower computing speed. An intelligent two-level detection algorithm is presented based on "cell averaging" constant false alarm rate and "order statistics" constant false alarm rate which work in serial way, and the detection speed of "cell averaging" constant false alarm rate and performance of "order statistics" constant false alarm rate are conserved, respectively. Through the adaptive selection, the "cell averaging" is applied in homogeneous environments, and the two-level detection algorithm is employed in nonhomogeneous environments. Our Monte Carlo simulation results demonstrate that considering different signal noise ratios, the proposed algorithm gives better detection probability than that of "order statistics".

  14. Recent developments in optical detection methods for microchip separations.

    PubMed

    Götz, Sebastian; Karst, Uwe

    2007-01-01

    This paper summarizes the features and performances of optical detection systems currently applied in order to monitor separations on microchip devices. Fluorescence detection, which delivers very high sensitivity and selectivity, is still the most widely applied method of detection. Instruments utilizing laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) and lamp-based fluorescence along with recent applications of light-emitting diodes (LED) as excitation sources are also covered in this paper. Since chemiluminescence detection can be achieved using extremely simple devices which no longer require light sources and optical components for focusing and collimation, interesting approaches based on this technique are presented, too. Although UV/vis absorbance is a detection method that is commonly used in standard desktop electrophoresis and liquid chromatography instruments, it has not yet reached the same level of popularity for microchip applications. Current applications of UV/vis absorbance detection to microchip separations and innovative approaches that increase sensitivity are described. This article, which contains 85 references, focuses on developments and applications published within the last three years, points out exciting new approaches, and provides future perspectives on this field.

  15. Smart optical distance sensor for automatic welding detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahl, Michael; Rinner, Stefan; Ettemeyer, Andreas

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, we describe a simple and cost-effective method and measuring device for automatic detection of welding. The sensor is to be used in automatic darkening filters (ADF) of welding helmets protecting the operator from intensive hazardous UV radiation. For reasons discussed in detail below, conventional sensor principles used in ADF are being out-dated. Here, we critically revise some alternatives and propose an approach comprising an optical distance sensor. Its underlying principle is triangulation with two pin-hole cameras. The absence of optical components such as lenses results in very low cost. At first, feasibility is tested with optical simulations. Additionally, we present measurement results that prove the practicability of our proposal.

  16. Real-time detection of optical transients with RAPTOR

    SciTech Connect

    Borozdin, K. N.; Brumby, Steven P.; Galassi, M. C.; McGowan, K. E.; Starr, D. L.; Vestrand, W. T.; White, R. R.; Wozniak, P. R.; Wren, J.

    2002-01-01

    Fast variability of optical objects is an interesting though poorly explored subject in modern astronomy. Real-time data processing and identification of transient, celestial events in the images is very important, for such study as it allows rapid follow-up with more sensitive instruments, We discuss an approach which we have chosen for the RAPTOR project which is a pioneering close-loop system combining real-time transient detection with rapid follow-up. Our data processing pipeline is able to identify and localize an optical transient within seconds after the observation. We describe the challenges we met, solutions we found and some results obtained in our search for fast optical transients. The software pipeline we have developed for RAPTOR can easily be applied to the data from other experiments.

  17. Procedure to detect anatomical structures in optical fundus images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gagnon, Langis; Lalonde, Marc; Beaulieu, Mario; Boucher, Marie-Carole

    2001-07-01

    We present an overview of the design and test of an image processing procedure for detecting all important anatomical structures in color fundus images. These structures are the optic disk, the macula and the retinal network. The algorithm proceeds through five main steps: (1) automatic mask generation using pixels value statistics and color threshold, (2) visual image quality assessment using histogram matching and Canny edge distribution modeling, (3) optic disk localization using pyramidal decomposition, Hausdorff-based template matching and confidence assignment, (4) macula localization using pyramidal decomposition and (5) bessel network tracking using recursive dual edge tracking and connectivity recovering. The procedure has been tested on a database of about 40 color fundus images acquired from a digital non-mydriatic fundus camera. The database is composed of images of various types (macula- and optic disk-centered) and of various visual quality (with or without abnormal bright or dark regions, blurred, etc).

  18. Partially Nondestructive Continuous Detection of Individual Traveling Optical Photons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Mahdi; Beck, Kristin M.; Duan, Yiheng; Chen, Wenlan; Vuletić, Vladan

    2016-01-01

    We report the continuous and partially nondestructive measurement of optical photons. For a weak light pulse traveling through a slow-light optical medium (signal), the associated atomic-excitation component is detected by another light beam (probe) with the aid of an optical cavity. We observe strong correlations of gsp (2 )=4.4 (5 ) between the transmitted signal and probe photons. The observed (intrinsic) conditional nondestructive quantum efficiency ranges between 13% and 1% (65% and 5%) for a signal transmission range of 2% to 35%, at a typical time resolution of 2.5 μ s . The maximal observed (intrinsic) device nondestructive quantum efficiency, defined as the product of the conditional nondestructive quantum efficiency and the signal transmission, is 0.5% (2.4%). The normalized cross-correlation function violates the Cauchy-Schwarz inequality, confirming the nonclassical character of the correlations.

  19. Fiber Optic Sensors for Detection of Toxic and Biological Threats

    PubMed Central

    El-Sherif, Mahmoud; Bansal, Lalitkumar; Yuan, Jianming

    2007-01-01

    Protection of public and military personnel from chemical and biological warfare agents is an urgent and growing national security need. Along with this idea, we have developed a novel class of fiber optic chemical sensors, for detection of toxic and biological materials. The design of these fiber optic sensors is based on a cladding modification approach. The original passive cladding of the fiber, in a small section, was removed and the fiber core was coated with a chemical sensitive material. Any change in the optical properties of the modified cladding material, due to the presence of a specific chemical vapor, changes the transmission properties of the fiber and result in modal power redistribution in multimode fibers. Both total intensity and modal power distribution (MPD) measurements were used to detect the output power change through the sensing fibers. The MPD technique measures the power changes in the far field pattern, i.e. spatial intensity modulation in two dimensions. Conducting polymers, such as polyaniline and polypyrrole, have been reported to undergo a reversible change in conductivity upon exposure to chemical vapors. It is found that the conductivity change is accompanied by optical property change in the material. Therefore, polyaniline and polypyrrole were selected as the modified cladding material for the detection of hydrochloride (HCl), ammonia (NH3), hydrazine (H4N2), and dimethyl-methl-phosphonate (DMMP) {a nerve agent, sarin stimulant}, respectively. Several sensors were prepared and successfully tested. The results showed dramatic improvement in the sensor sensitivity, when the MPD method was applied. In this paper, an overview on the developed class of fiber optic sensors is presented and supported with successful achieved results. PMID:28903282

  20. Stokes-vector direct detection for optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, William; Li, An; Che, Di; Yuan, Feng; Khodakarami, Hamid

    2017-01-01

    To cope with the exponential growth of the Internet traffic, optical communications has advanced by leaps and bounds. For several decades, Intensity modulation with direct detection (IM-DD) dominates the commercial short-reach optical communications. However, when upgrading the data-rate distance product to 1000 Gb/s·km per wavelength and beyond, IM-DD faces severe performance barrier. Aiming to improve the electrical SE and extend the transmission distance, advanced DD modulation formats have been proposed through a so-called self-coherent (SCOH) approach, where a carrier is transmitted together with the signal to achieve a linear mapping between the electrical baseband signal and the optical field. In that way, the impact of the CD can be removed from the received signal, greatly extending the transmission distance of the DD system. Particularly, Stokes-vector direct detection (SV-DD) has been proposed to realize linear complex optical channels as well as enhance the electrical spectral efficiency and transmission reach. In this talk, we present the principle and discuss the performance of SV-DD systems.

  1. Optical detection of parasitic protozoa in sol-gel matrices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livage, Jacques; Barreau, J. Y.; Da Costa, J. M.; Desportes, I.

    1994-10-01

    Whole cell parasitic protozoa have been entrapped within sol-gel porous silica matrices. Stationary phase promastigote cells of Leishmania donovani infantum are mixed with a silica sol before gelation occurs. They remain trapped within the growing oxide network and their cellular organization appears to be well preserved. Moreover protozoa retain their antigenic properties in the porous gel. They are still able to detect parasite specific antibodies in serum samples from infected patients via an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Antigen- antibody associations occurring in the gel are optically detected via the reactions of a peroxidase conjugate with ortho-phenylenediamine leading to the formation of a yellow coloration. A clear-cut difference in optical density is measured between positive and negative sera. Such an entrapment of antigenic species into porous sol-gel matrices avoids the main problems due to non specific binding and could be advantageously used in diagnostic kits.

  2. Fluorescent optical fibre chemosensor for the detection of mercury

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, T. Hien; Wren, Stephen P.; Sun, Tong; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.

    2016-11-01

    This work aims to develop a stable, compact and portable fibre optic sensing system which is capable of real time detection of the mercury ion (II), Hg2+. A novel fluorescent polymeric material for Hg2+ detection, based on a coumarin derivative (acting as the fluorophore) and an azathia crown ether moiety (acting as the mercury ion receptor), has been designed and synthesized. The material was covalently attached to the distal end of an optical fibre and exhibited a significant increase in fluorescence intensity in response to Hg2+ in the μM concentration range via a photoinduced electron transfer (PET) mechanism. The sensor has also demonstrated a high selectivity for Hg2+ over other metal ions. A washing protocol was identified for sensor regeneration, allowing the probe to be re-used. The approach developed in this work can also be used for the preparation of sensors for other heavy metals.

  3. Improvements in NDIR gas detection within the same optical chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez-Anton, Juan Carlos; Silva-Lopez, Manuel

    2011-10-01

    Non-dispersive infrared (NDIR) is a well known technique for gas concentration monitoring. Lead salt photoconductors and thermopile detectors are typically used. Together with gas filter correlation (GFC) they are the basis for a reference standard in environmental gas monitoring like carbon monoxide determination and other gas species. To increase gas sensitivity, a multi-pass optical cavity is often used. In this contribution we propose a new optical design that allows for auto-reference multiple gas detection. It basically consists of an array of White's cell multi-pass camera that allows multiple channels with independent lengths inside the same volume. We explore its performance for carbon monoxide detection and based on recent commercial developments in infrared detector and emitter technologies.

  4. Cholesterol detection using optical fiber sensor based on intensity modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budiyanto, Moh; Suhariningsih; Yasin, Moh

    2017-05-01

    The aim of the research is to detect the concentration of cholesterol by using the principle that a laser beam propagation is guided by optical fiber bundle in term of intensity profile through solution with vary concentrations of cholesterol from 0 to 300 ppm. The mechanism of cholesterol concentration detection is the propagation of He-Ne laser beam with wavelength of 632.5 nm through a fiber optic bundle and a solution of cholesterol, then is reflected by a flat mirror and enters receiving fiber. This signal is captured by a silicon detector (SL-818, Newport) in the form of output voltage. The result showed that the output voltage decrease linearly with the increase of concentration of cholesterol with a sensitivity of 0.0004 mV/ppm and the linearity more than 97%.

  5. Resonant optical transducers for in-situ gas detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bond, Tiziana C; Cole, Garrett; Goddard, Lynford

    2016-06-28

    Configurations for in-situ gas detection are provided, and include miniaturized photonic devices, low-optical-loss, guided-wave structures and state-selective adsorption coatings. High quality factor semiconductor resonators have been demonstrated in different configurations, such as micro-disks, micro-rings, micro-toroids, and photonic crystals with the properties of very narrow NIR transmission bands and sensitivity up to 10.sup.-9 (change in complex refractive index). The devices are therefore highly sensitive to changes in optical properties to the device parameters and can be tunable to the absorption of the chemical species of interest. Appropriate coatings applied to the device enhance state-specific molecular detection.

  6. Detection of cortical optical changes during seizure activity using optical coherence tomography (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ornelas, Danielle; Hasan, Md.; Gonzalez, Oscar; Krishnan, Giri; Szu, Jenny I.; Myers, Timothy; Hirota, Koji; Bazhenov, Maxim; Binder, Devin K.; Park, Boris H.

    2017-02-01

    Electrophysiology has remained the gold standard of neural activity detection but its resolution and high susceptibility to noise and motion artifact limit its efficiency. Imaging techniques, including fMRI, intrinsic optical imaging, and diffuse optical imaging, have been used to detect neural activity, but rely on indirect measurements such as changes in blood flow. Fluorescence-based techniques, including genetically encoded indicators, are powerful techniques, but require introduction of an exogenous fluorophore. A more direct optical imaging technique is optical coherence tomography (OCT), a label-free, high resolution, and minimally invasive imaging technique that can produce depth-resolved cross-sectional and 3D images. In this study, we sought to examine non-vascular depth-dependent optical changes directly related to neural activity. We used an OCT system centered at 1310 nm to search for changes in an ex vivo brain slice preparation and an in vivo model during 4-AP induced seizure onset and propagation with respect to electrical recording. By utilizing Doppler OCT and the depth-dependency of the attenuation coefficient, we demonstrate the ability to locate and remove the optical effects of vasculature within the upper regions of the cortex from in vivo attenuation calculations. The results of this study show a non-vascular decrease in intensity and attenuation in ex vivo and in vivo seizure models, respectively. Regions exhibiting decreased optical changes show significant temporal correlation to regions of increased electrical activity during seizure. This study allows for a thorough and biologically relevant analysis of the optical signature of seizure activity both ex vivo and in vivo using OCT.

  7. Experimental constraint on dark matter detection with optical atomic clocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wcisło, P.; Morzyński, P.; Bober, M.; Cygan, A.; Lisak, D.; Ciuryło, R.; Zawada, M.

    2016-12-01

    The total mass density of the Universe appears to be dominated by dark matter. However, beyond its gravitational interactions at the galactic scale, little is known about its nature1. Several proposals have been advanced in recent years for the detection of dark matter2-4. In particular, a network of atomic clocks could be used to search for transient indicators of hypothetical dark matter5 in the form of stable topological defects; for example, monopoles, strings or domain walls6. The clocks become desynchronized when a dark-matter object sweeps through the network. This pioneering approach5 requires a comparison between at least two distant optical atomic clocks7-9. Here, by exploiting differences in the susceptibilities of the atoms and the cavity to the fine-structure constant10,11, we show that a single optical atomic clock12 is already sensitive to dark-matter events. This implies that existing optical atomic clocks13,14 can serve as a global topological-defect dark-matter observatory, without any further developments in experimental apparatus or the need for long phase-noise-compensated optical-fibre links15. Using optical atomic clocks, we explored a new dimension of astrophysical observations by constraining the strength of atomic coupling to hypothetical dark-matter cosmic objects. Under the conditions of our experiments, the degree of constraint was found to exceed the previously reported limits16 by more than three orders of magnitude.

  8. Optical Path Switching Based Differential Absorption Radiometry for Substance Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A system and method are provided for detecting one or more substances. An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. The first wavelength band and second wavelength band are unique. Further, spectral absorption of a substance of interest is different at the first wavelength band as compared to the second wavelength band. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  9. Optical aptasensors for quantitative detection of small biomolecules: a review.

    PubMed

    Feng, Chunjing; Dai, Shuang; Wang, Lei

    2014-09-15

    Aptasensors are aptamer-based biosensors with excellent recognition capability towards a wide range of targets. Specially, there have been ever-growing interests in the development of aptasensors for the detection of small molecules. This phenomenon is contributed to two reasons. On one hand, small biomolecules play an important role in living organisms with many kinds of biological function, such as antiarrhythmic effect and vasodilator activity of adenosine. On the other hand, the concentration of small molecules can be an indicator for disease diagnosis, for example, the concentration of ATP is closely associated with cell injury and cell viability. As a potential analysis tool in the construction of aptasensors, optical analysis has attracted much more interest of researchers due to its high sensitivity, quick response and simple operation. Besides, it promises the promotion of aptasensors in performance toward a new level. Review the development of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules will give readers an overall understanding of its progress and provide some theoretical guidelines for its future development. Hence, we give a mini-review on the advance of optical aptasensors for small biomolecules. This review focuses on recent achievements in the design of various optical aptasensors for small biomolecules, containing fluorescence aptasensors, colorimetric aptasensors, chemiluminescence aptasensors and other optical aptasensors.

  10. Optical detection of the Casimir force between macroscopic objects.

    PubMed

    Petrov, Victor; Petrov, Mikhail; Bryksin, Valeriy; Petter, Juergen; Tschudi, Theo

    2006-11-01

    We report the optical detection of mechanical deformation of a macroscopic object induced by the Casimir force. An adaptive holographic interferometer based on a photorefractive BaTiO3:Co crystal was used to measure periodical nonlinear deformations of a thin pellicle caused by an oscillating Casimir force. A reasonable agreement between the experimental and calculated values of the first and second harmonics of the Casimir force oscillations has been obtained.

  11. Detection of biological molecules using chemical amplification and optical sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Antwerp, W.P. van; Mastrototaro, J.J.

    2000-01-04

    Methods are provided for the determination of the concentration of biological levels of polyhydroxylated compounds, particularly glucose. The methods utilize an amplification system that is an analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix, where the system is implantable and biocompatible. Upon interrogation by an optical system, the amplification system produces a signal capable of detection external to the skin of the patient. Quantitation of the analyte of interest is achieved by measurement of the emitted signal.

  12. Water wave frequency detection by optical fiber sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ziyi; Bao, Xiaoyi; Rennie, Colin D.; Nistor, Ioan; Cornett, Andrew

    2008-12-01

    An optical fiber sensor has been developed and applied to measure frequency of water waves based on wave induced polarization change of the light. The fiber sensor can accurately detect water wave frequency for regular and irregular waves. The optimum sag of sensing fiber to the sensor output's linearity has been studied. The agreement of the fiber sensor and wave gauge in frequency and time domain suggests that the fiber sensor has great potential for passive acoustic sensing and wave monitoring.

  13. Use of Optical and Thermal Sights in Daylight Target Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    demonstrated in this research (see Table 1), it is clear that this variable had an effect on performance. Second , the proportion of t arge t perimeter... Research Report 1358 0- Use of Optical and Thermal Sights in Daylight Target Detection,, Brian L. Kottas and David W. Bessemer ARI Field Unit at Fort...Knox, Kentucky Training Research Laboratory DTIC ":1 Al ELECTE APR20 984 O3 U. S. Army Research Institute for the Behavioral and Social Sciences

  14. Detection of biological molecules using chemical amplification and optical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Van Antwerp, William Peter; Mastrototaro, John Joseph

    2004-10-12

    Methods are provided for the determination of the concentration of biological levels of polyhydroxylated compounds, particularly glucose. The methods utilize an amplification system that is an analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix, where the system is implantable and biocompatible. Upon interrogation by an optical system, the amplification system produces a signal capable of detection external to the skin of the patient. Quantitation of the analyte of interest is achieved by measurement of the emitted signal.

  15. Detection of biological molecules using chemical amplification and optical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Van Antwerp, William Peter; Mastrototaro, John Joseph

    2000-01-01

    Methods are provided for the determination of the concentration of biological levels of polyhydroxylated compounds, particularly glucose. The methods utilize an amplification system that is an analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix, where the system is implantable and biocompatible. Upon interrogation by an optical system, the amplification system produces a signal capable of detection external to the skin of the patient. Quantitation of the analyte of interest is achieved by measurement of the emitted signal.

  16. Detecting high-frequency gravitational waves with optically levitated sensors.

    PubMed

    Arvanitaki, Asimina; Geraci, Andrew A

    2013-02-15

    We propose a tunable resonant sensor to detect gravitational waves in the frequency range of 50-300 kHz using optically trapped and cooled dielectric microspheres or microdisks. The technique we describe can exceed the sensitivity of laser-based gravitational wave observatories in this frequency range, using an instrument of only a few percent of their size. Such a device extends the search volume for gravitational wave sources above 100 kHz by 1 to 3 orders of magnitude, and could detect monochromatic gravitational radiation from the annihilation of QCD axions in the cloud they form around stellar mass black holes within our galaxy due to the superradiance effect.

  17. Optical detection of meteoroidal impacts on the Moon

    PubMed

    Ortiz; Sada; Bellot Rubio LR; Aceituno; Aceituno; Gutierrez; Thiele

    2000-06-22

    Impacts of meteoroids on the Moon should cause detectable optical flashes, but the population of objects that are big enough is very low, and hitherto no unambiguous impact flashes have been recorded. The flux of meteoroids associated with the Leonid meteor shower of 18 November 1999 was predicted to produce observable flashes on the night side of the Moon. Here we report the unambiguous detection of five such impact flashes, three of which were seen simultaneously by other observers. We also observed a possible impact flash on 16 July 1999. All of the flashes were of very brief duration (<0.02 s), as expected for high-speed impacts.

  18. Balanced detection for spectral domain optical coherence tomography.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Wen-Chuan; Lai, Chih-Ming; Huang, Yi-Shiang; Chang, Cheng-Yi; Kuo, Yue-Ming

    2013-08-12

    The use and advantages of applying balanced-detection (BD) operation method to high speed spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SDOCT) are presented in this study, which we believe is the first such demonstration. Compared to conventional SDOCT, BD-SDOCT provides two unique advantages. First, the method can suppress background noise and autocorrelation artifacts in biological tissues. Second, it is a power-efficient method which is particularly helpful for high speed SDOCT to eliminate random intensity noise and to achieve shot noise limited detection. This performance allows in vivo three-dimensional tissue visualization with high imaging quality and high speed.

  19. Hyperpolarized Xenon Nuclear Spins Detected by Optical Atomic Magnetometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yashchuk, V. V.; Granwehr, J.; Kimball, D. F.; Rochester, S. M.; Trabesinger, A. H.; Urban, J. T.; Budker, D.; Pines, A.

    2004-10-01

    We report the use of an atomic magnetometer based on nonlinear magneto-optical rotation with frequency-modulated light to detect nuclear magnetization of xenon gas. The magnetization of a spin-exchange-polarized xenon sample (1.7 c m3 at a pressure of 5bars, natural isotopic abundance, polarization 1% ), prepared remotely to the detection apparatus, is measured with an atomic sensor. An average magnetic field of ˜10 nG induced by the xenon sample on the 10cm diameter atomic sensor is detected with signal-to-noise ratio ˜10 , limited by residual noise in the magnetic environment. The possibility of using modern atomic magnetometers as detectors of nuclear magnetic resonance and in magnetic resonance imaging is discussed. Atomic magnetometers appear to be ideally suited for emerging low-field and remote-detection magnetic resonance applications.

  20. Development of optical automatic positioning and wafer defect detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tien, Chuen-Lin; Lai, Qun-Huang; Lin, Chern-Sheng

    2016-02-01

    The data of a wafer with defects can provide engineers with very important information and clues to improve the yield rate and quality in manufacturing. This paper presents a microscope automatic positioning and wafer detection system with human-machine interface based on image processing and fuzzy inference algorithms. In the proposed system, a XY table is used to move the position of each die on 6 inch or 8 inch wafers. Then, a high-resolution CCD and one set of two-axis optical linear encoder are used to accurately measure the position on the wafer. Finally, the developed human-machine interface is used to display the current position of an actual wafer in order to complete automatic positioning, and a wafer map database can be created. In the process of defect detection, CCD is used for image processing, and during preprocessing, it is required to filter noise, acquire the defect characteristics, define the defective template, and then take the characteristic points of the defective template as the reference input for fuzzy inference. A high-accuracy optical automatic positioning and wafer defect detection system is thus constructed. This study focused on automatic detection of spots, scratches, and bruises, and attempted to reduce the time to detect defective die and improve the accuracy of determining the defects of semiconductor devices.

  1. Quantum dots as optical labels for ultrasensitive detection of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Akshath, Uchangi Satyaprasad; Shubha, Likitha R; Bhatt, Praveena; Thakur, Munna Singh

    2014-07-15

    Considering the fact that polyphenols have versatile activity in-vivo, its detection and quantification is very much important for a healthy diet. Laccase enzyme can convert polyphenols to yield mono/polyquinones which can quench Quantum dots fluorescence. This phenomenon of charge transfer from quinones to QDs was exploited as optical labels to detect polyphenols. CdTe QD may undergo dipolar interaction with quinones as a result of broad spectral absorption due to multiple excitonic states resulting from quantum confinement effects. Thus, "turn-off" fluorescence method was applied for ultrasensitive detection of polyphenols by using laccase. We observed proportionate quenching of QDs fluorescence with respect to polyphenol concentration in the range of 100 µg to 1 ng/mL. Also, quenching of the photoluminescence was highly efficient and stable and could detect individual and total polyphenols with high sensitivity (LOD-1 ng/mL). Moreover, proposed method was highly efficient than any other reported methods in terms of sensitivity, specificity and selectivity. Therefore, a novel optical sensor was developed for the detection of polyphenols at a sensitive level based on the charge transfer mechanism.

  2. Optical sensors for the detection of trace chloroform.

    PubMed

    Fong, Jonathan K; Pena, Justin K; Xue, Zi-Ling; Alam, Maksudul M; Sampathkumaran, Uma; Goswami, Kisholoy

    2015-02-03

    Optical thin film sensors have been developed to detect chloroform in aqueous and nonaqueous solutions. These sensors utilize a modified Fujiwara reaction, one of the only known methods for detecting halogenated hydrocarbons in the visible spectrum. The modified Fujiwara reagents, 2,2'-dipyridyl and tetra-n-butyl ammonium hydroxide (n-Bu4NOH or TBAH), are encapsulated in an ethyl cellulose (EC) or sol-gel film. Upon exposure of the EC sensor film to HCCl3 in petroleum ether, a colored product is produced within the film, which is analyzed spectroscopically, yielding a detection limit of 0.830 ppm (parts per million v/v or μL/L hereinafter) and a quantification limit of 2.77 ppm. When the chloroform concentration in pentane is ≥5 ppm, the color change of the EC sensor is visible to the naked eye. In aqueous chloroform solution, reaction in the sol-gel sensor film turns the sensor from colorless to dark yellow/brown, also visible to the naked eye, with a detection limit of 500 ppm. This is well below the solubility of chloroform in water (ca. 5,800 ppm). To our knowledge, these are the first optical quality thin film sensors using Fujiwara reactions for halogenated hydrocarbon detection.

  3. Optical detection of E. coli bacteria by mesoporous silicon biosensors.

    PubMed

    Massad-Ivanir, Naama; Shtenberg, Giorgi; Segal, Ester

    2013-11-20

    A label-free optical biosensor based on a nanostructured porous Si is designed for rapid capture and detection of Escherichia coli K12 bacteria, as a model microorganism. The biosensor relies on direct binding of the target bacteria cells onto its surface, while no pretreatment (e.g. by cell lysis) of the studied sample is required. A mesoporous Si thin film is used as the optical transducer element of the biosensor. Under white light illumination, the porous layer displays well-resolved Fabry-Pérot fringe patterns in its reflectivity spectrum. Applying a fast Fourier transform (FFT) to reflectivity data results in a single peak. Changes in the intensity of the FFT peak are monitored. Thus, target bacteria capture onto the biosensor surface, through antibody-antigen interactions, induces measurable changes in the intensity of the FFT peaks, allowing for a 'real time' observation of bacteria attachment. The mesoporous Si film, fabricated by an electrochemical anodization process, is conjugated with monoclonal antibodies, specific to the target bacteria. The immobilization, immunoactivity and specificity of the antibodies are confirmed by fluorescent labeling experiments. Once the biosensor is exposed to the target bacteria, the cells are directly captured onto the antibody-modified porous Si surface. These specific capturing events result in intensity changes in the thin-film optical interference spectrum of the biosensor. We demonstrate that these biosensors can detect relatively low bacteria concentrations (detection limit of 10(4) cells/ml) in less than an hour.

  4. Detecting cell death with optical coherence tomography and envelope statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Golnaz; Yang, Victor X. D.; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2011-02-01

    Currently no standard clinical or preclinical noninvasive method exists to monitor cell death based on morphological changes at the cellular level. In our past work we have demonstrated that quantitative high frequency ultrasound imaging can detect cell death in vitro and in vivo. In this study we apply quantitative methods previously used with high frequency ultrasound to optical coherence tomography (OCT) to detect cell death. The ultimate goal of this work is to use these methods for optically-based clinical and preclinical cancer treatment monitoring. Optical coherence tomography data were acquired from acute myeloid leukemia cells undergoing three modes of cell death. Significant increases in integrated backscatter were observed for cells undergoing apoptosis and mitotic arrest, while necrotic cells induced a decrease. These changes appear to be linked to structural changes observed in histology obtained from the cell samples. Signal envelope statistics were analyzed from fittings of the generalized gamma distribution to histograms of envelope intensities. The parameters from this distribution demonstrated sensitivities to morphological changes in the cell samples. These results indicate that OCT integrated backscatter and first order envelope statistics can be used to detect and potentially differentiate between modes of cell death in vitro.

  5. Detecting Casimir torque with an optically levitated nanorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Zhujing; Li, Tongcang

    2017-09-01

    The linear momentum and angular momentum of virtual photons of quantum vacuum fluctuations can induce the Casimir force and the Casimir torque, respectively. While the Casimir force has been measured extensively, the Casimir torque has not been observed experimentally though it was predicted over 40 years ago. Here we propose to detect the Casimir torque with an optically levitated nanorod near a birefringent plate in vacuum. The axis of the nanorod tends to align with the polarization direction of the linearly polarized optical tweezer. When its axis is not parallel or perpendicular to the optical axis of the birefringent crystal, it will experience a Casimir torque that shifts its orientation slightly. We calculate the Casimir torque and Casimir force acting on a levitated nanorod near a birefringent crystal. We also investigate the effects of thermal noise and photon recoils on the torque and force detection. We prove that a levitated nanorod in vacuum will be capable of detecting the Casimir torque under realistic conditions, and will be an important tool in precision measurements.

  6. Are Optical Gas Imaging Technologies Effective For Methane Leak Detection?

    PubMed

    Ravikumar, Arvind P; Wang, Jingfan; Brandt, Adam R

    2017-01-03

    Concerns over mitigating methane leakage from the natural gas system have become ever more prominent in recent years. Recently, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency proposed regulations requiring use of optical gas imaging (OGI) technologies to identify and repair leaks. In this work, we develop an open-source predictive model to accurately simulate the most common OGI technology, passive infrared (IR) imaging. The model accurately reproduces IR images of controlled methane release field experiments as well as reported minimum detection limits. We show that imaging distance is the most important parameter affecting IR detection effectiveness. In a simulated well-site, over 80% of emissions can be detected from an imaging distance of 10 m. Also, the presence of "superemitters" greatly enhance the effectiveness of IR leak detection. The minimum detectable limits of this technology can be used to selectively target "superemitters", thereby providing a method for approximate leak-rate quantification. In addition, model results show that imaging backdrop controls IR imaging effectiveness: land-based detection against sky or low-emissivity backgrounds have higher detection efficiency compared to aerial measurements. Finally, we show that minimum IR detection thresholds can be significantly lower for gas compositions that include a significant fraction nonmethane hydrocarbons.

  7. Distributed Fiber Optic Sensors for Earthquake Detection and Early Warning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karrenbach, M. H.; Cole, S.

    2016-12-01

    Fiber optic cables placed along pipelines, roads or other infrastructure provide dense sampling of passing seismic wavefields. Laser interrogation units illuminate the fiber over its entire length, and strain at desired points along the fiber can be determined from the reflected signal. Single-mode optical fibers up to 50 km in length can provide a distributed acoustic sensing system (DAS) where the acoustic bandwidth of each channel is limited only by the round-trip time over the length of the cable (0.0005 s for a 50 km cable). Using a 10 m spatial resolution results in 4000 channels sampled at 2.5 kHz spanning a 40 km-long fiber deployed along a pipeline. The inline strain field is averaged along the fiber over a 10 m section of the cable at each desired spatial sample, creating a virtual sensor location. Typically, a dynamic strain sensitivity of sub-nanometers within each gauge along the entire length of the fiber can be achieved. This sensitivity corresponds to a particle displacement figure of approximately -90 dB ms-2Hz-½. Such a fiber optic sensor is not as sensitive as long-period seismometers used in earthquake networks, but given the large number of channels, small to medium-sized earthquakes can be detected, depending on distance from the array, and can be located with precision through arrival time inversions. We show several examples of earthquake recordings using distributed fiber optic arrays that were deployed originally for other purposes. A 480 km long section of a pipeline in Turkey was actively monitored with a DAS fiber optic system for activities in the immediate vicinity of the pipeline. The densely spaced sensor array along the pipeline detected earthquakes of 3.6 - 7.2 magnitude range, centered near Van, Turkey. Secondly, a fiber optic system located along a rail line near the Salton Sea in California was used to create a smaller scale fiber optic sensor array, on which earthquakes with magnitudes 2.2 - 2.7 were recorded from epicenters

  8. Signal-carrier interleaved optical OFDM for direct detection optical communication.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xi; Che, Di; Li, An; He, Jiayuan; Shieh, William

    2013-12-30

    We propose signal-carrier interleaved (SCI) optical OFDM for direct detected transmission systems. Such a scheme can be considered as a variation of self-coherent detection where the carrier and signal are supplied at the transmitter and extracted at the receiver for coherent-like detection. This provides high OSNR sensitivity while maintaining very low carrier-to-signal power ratio (CSR). Our experiment results show that with 0 dB CSR, 43.2 Gb/s 16 QAM OFDM signal can be successfully delivered over 80 km standard single mode fiber (SSMF) with 24 dB OSNR requirements at 7% FEC limit.

  9. Fiber Optic Sensors For Detection of Toxic and Biological Threats.

    PubMed

    El-Sherif, Mahmoud; Bansal, Lalitkumar; Yuan, Jianming

    2007-12-04

    Protection of public and military personnel from chemical and biological warfareagents is an urgent and growing national security need. Along with this idea, we havedeveloped a novel class of fiber optic chemical sensors, for detection of toxic and biologicalmaterials. The design of these fiber optic sensors is based on a cladding modificationapproach. The original passive cladding of the fiber, in a small section, was removed and thefiber core was coated with a chemical sensitive material. Any change in the opticalproperties of the modified cladding material, due to the presence of a specific chemicalvapor, changes the transmission properties of the fiber and result in modal powerredistribution in multimode fibers. Both total intensity and modal power distribution (MPD)measurements were used to detect the output power change through the sensing fibers. TheMPD technique measures the power changes in the far field pattern, i.e. spatial intensitymodulation in two dimensions. Conducting polymers, such as polyaniline and polypyrrole,have been reported to undergo a reversible change in conductivity upon exposure tochemical vapors. It is found that the conductivity change is accompanied by optical propertychange in the material. Therefore, polyaniline and polypyrrole were selected as the modifiedcladding material for the detection of hydrochloride (HCl), ammonia (NH₃), hydrazine(H₄N₂), and dimethyl-methl-phosphonate (DMMP) {a nerve agent, sarin stimulant},respectively. Several sensors were prepared and successfully tested. The results showeddramatic improvement in the sensor sensitivity, when the MPD method was applied. In thispaper, an overview on the developed class of fiber optic sensors is presented and supportedwith successful achieved results.

  10. A survey on object detection in optical remote sensing images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Gong; Han, Junwei

    2016-07-01

    Object detection in optical remote sensing images, being a fundamental but challenging problem in the field of aerial and satellite image analysis, plays an important role for a wide range of applications and is receiving significant attention in recent years. While enormous methods exist, a deep review of the literature concerning generic object detection is still lacking. This paper aims to provide a review of the recent progress in this field. Different from several previously published surveys that focus on a specific object class such as building and road, we concentrate on more generic object categories including, but are not limited to, road, building, tree, vehicle, ship, airport, urban-area. Covering about 270 publications we survey (1) template matching-based object detection methods, (2) knowledge-based object detection methods, (3) object-based image analysis (OBIA)-based object detection methods, (4) machine learning-based object detection methods, and (5) five publicly available datasets and three standard evaluation metrics. We also discuss the challenges of current studies and propose two promising research directions, namely deep learning-based feature representation and weakly supervised learning-based geospatial object detection. It is our hope that this survey will be beneficial for the researchers to have better understanding of this research field.

  11. Comparison of direct and heterodyne detection optical intersatellite communication links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C. C.; Gardner, C. S.

    1987-01-01

    The performance of direct and heterodyne detection optical intersatellite communication links are evaluated and compared. It is shown that the performance of optical links is very sensitive to the pointing and tracking errors at the transmitter and receiver. In the presence of random pointing and tracking errors, optimal antenna gains exist that will minimize the required transmitter power. In addition to limiting the antenna gains, random pointing and tracking errors also impose a power penalty in the link budget. This power penalty is between 1.6 to 3 dB for a direct detection QPPM link, and 3 to 5 dB for a heterodyne QFSK system. For the heterodyne systems, the carrier phase noise presents another major factor of performance degradation that must be considered. In contrast, the loss due to synchronization error is small. The link budgets for direct and heterodyne detection systems are evaluated. It is shown that, for systems with large pointing and tracking errors, the link budget is dominated by the spatial tracking error, and the direct detection system shows a superior performance because it is less sensitive to the spatial tracking error. On the other hand, for systems with small pointing and tracking jitters, the antenna gains are in general limited by the launch cost, and suboptimal antenna gains are often used in practice. In which case, the heterodyne system has a slightly higher power margin because of higher receiver sensitivity.

  12. Breaking the concentration limit of optical single-molecule detection.

    PubMed

    Holzmeister, Phil; Acuna, Guillermo P; Grohmann, Dina; Tinnefeld, Philip

    2014-02-21

    Over the last decade, single-molecule detection has been successfully utilized in the life sciences and materials science. Yet, single-molecule measurements only yield meaningful results when working in a suitable, narrow concentration range. On the one hand, diffraction limits the minimal size of the observation volume in optical single-molecule measurements and consequently a sample must be adequately diluted so that only one molecule resides within the observation volume. On the other hand, at ultra-low concentrations relevant for sensing, the detection volume has to be increased in order to detect molecules in a reasonable timespan. This in turn results in the loss of an optimal signal-to-noise ratio necessary for single-molecule detection. This review discusses the requirements for effective single-molecule fluorescence applications, reflects on the motivation for the extension of the dynamic concentration range of single-molecule measurements and reviews various approaches that have been introduced recently to solve these issues. For the high-concentration limit, we identify four promising strategies including molecular confinement, optical observation volume reduction, temporal separation of signals and well-conceived experimental designs that specifically circumvent the high concentration limit. The low concentration limit is addressed by increasing the measurement speed, parallelization, signal amplification and preconcentration. The further development of these ideas will expand our possibilities to interrogate research questions with the clarity and precision provided only by the single-molecule approach.

  13. Optical Fiber Nanotips Coated with Molecular Beacons for DNA Detection

    PubMed Central

    Giannetti, Ambra; Barucci, Andrea; Cosi, Franco; Pelli, Stefano; Tombelli, Sara; Trono, Cosimo; Baldini, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Optical fiber sensors, thanks to their compactness, fast response and real-time measurements, have a large impact in the fields of life science research, drug discovery and medical diagnostics. In recent years, advances in nanotechnology have resulted in the development of nanotools, capable of entering the single cell, resulting in new nanobiosensors useful for the detection of biomolecules inside living cells. In this paper, we provide an application of a nanotip coupled with molecular beacons (MBs) for the detection of DNA. The MBs were characterized by hybridization studies with a complementary target to prove their functionality both free in solution and immobilized onto a solid support. The solid support chosen as substrate for the immobilization of the MBs was a 30 nm tapered tip of an optical fiber, fabricated by chemical etching. With this set-up promising results were obtained and a limit of detection (LOD) of 0.57 nM was reached, opening up the possibility of using the proposed nanotip to detect mRNAs inside the cytoplasm of living cells. PMID:25919369

  14. Optical design of MWIR detection system for near-space infrared detecting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Pei-pei; Liu, Kai; Li, Gang; Shan, Qiusha; Duan, Jing; Jiang, Kai

    2015-10-01

    Near-space platform has a high signal contrast and a long detection time. In order to realize effective detection of low altitude penetration target, a middle wave infrared (MWIR) optical system used in near space detection with high optical performance is given. First, the optical system scheme was described. Then on the basis of instrument and system consideration, the optical design parameters were distributed reasonably. The system had an effective focal length of 600 mm, an F-Number of F/4, a field of view of 2ω=1.16°, spatial resolution of 18 lp/mm and a working wavelength range of 3~5μm. The system structure is simple. And the requirements of the spot, energy concentration, distortion are all satisfied. Because the change of environment temperature will deeply influence image quality of MWIR optical system, the temperature characteristic of the system is analyzed. Moreover, first -order ghost and narcissus effect of the system are all analyzed in CODEV software. The analysis results show that temperature, first-order ghost and narcissus effect requests are all satisfied.

  15. Automatic detection of tooth cracks in optical coherence tomography images

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Purpose The aims of the present study were to compare the image quality and visibility of tooth cracks between conventional methods and swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) and to develop an automatic detection technique for tooth cracks by SS-OCT imaging. Methods We evaluated SS-OCT with a near-infrared wavelength centered at 1,310 nm over a spectral bandwidth of 100 nm at a rate of 50 kHz as a new diagnostic tool for the detection of tooth cracks. The reliability of the SS-OCT images was verified by comparing the crack lines with those detected using conventional methods. After performing preprocessing of the obtained SS-OCT images to emphasize cracks, an algorithm was developed and verified to detect tooth cracks automatically. Results The detection capability of SS-OCT was superior or comparable to that of trans-illumination, which did not discriminate among the cracks according to depth. Other conventional methods for the detection of tooth cracks did not sense initial cracks with a width of less than 100 μm. However, SS-OCT detected cracks of all sizes, ranging from craze lines to split teeth, and the crack lines were automatically detected in images using the Hough transform. Conclusions We were able to distinguish structural cracks, craze lines, and split lines in tooth cracks using SS-OCT images, and to automatically detect the position of various cracks in the OCT images. Therefore, the detection capability of SS-OCT images provides a useful diagnostic tool for cracked tooth syndrome. PMID:28261523

  16. Deep-Space Optical Transceiver Uplink Detection Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tkacenko, A.; Quirk, J. J.; Srinivasan, M.

    2013-05-01

    In this article, we develop and analyze an uplink signal detection technique for the Deep-Space Optical Transceiver (DOT). Here, the detection is carried out using a set of test statistics obtained from up-down counter (UDC) photon detection systems. Specifically, we address two sets of statistics: the count outputs from a bank of uniformly temporally spaced UDCs as well as the counts from a single UDC that cycles through multiple uniformly spaced timing phases. From these test statistics, we derive the Neyman-Pearson decision rule under certain input conditions and analyze the performance of this hypothesis test. We show the performance trade-offs associated with both sets of test statistics, which can then be used to determine which set to use as well as the number of UDCs or timing phases required for implementation.

  17. Coherent Detection of High-Rate Optical PPM Signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vilnrotter, Victor; Fernandez, Michela Munoz

    2006-01-01

    A method of coherent detection of high-rate pulse-position modulation (PPM) on a received laser beam has been conceived as a means of reducing the deleterious effects of noise and atmospheric turbulence in free-space optical communication using focal-plane detector array technologies. In comparison with a receiver based on direct detection of the intensity modulation of a PPM signal, a receiver based on the present method of coherent detection performs well at much higher background levels. In principle, the coherent-detection receiver can exhibit quantum-limited performance despite atmospheric turbulence. The key components of such a receiver include standard receiver optics, a laser that serves as a local oscillator, a focal-plane array of photodetectors, and a signal-processing and data-acquisition assembly needed to sample the focal-plane fields and reconstruct the pulsed signal prior to detection. The received PPM-modulated laser beam and the local-oscillator beam are focused onto the photodetector array, where they are mixed in the detection process. The two lasers are of the same or nearly the same frequency. If the two lasers are of different frequencies, then the coherent detection process is characterized as heterodyne and, using traditional heterodyne-detection terminology, the difference between the two laser frequencies is denoted the intermediate frequency (IF). If the two laser beams are of the same frequency and remain aligned in phase, then the coherent detection process is characterized as homodyne (essentially, heterodyne detection at zero IF). As a result of the inherent squaring operation of each photodetector, the output current includes an IF component that contains the signal modulation. The amplitude of the IF component is proportional to the product of the local-oscillator signal amplitude and the PPM signal amplitude. Hence, by using a sufficiently strong local-oscillator signal, one can make the PPM-modulated IF signal strong enough to

  18. Detection of filarial antibody using an fiber optics immunosensor (FOI).

    PubMed

    Madhan Mohan, T; Nath, N; Anand, S

    1997-12-01

    Optical waveguides based immunoassay has been reported in the literature for the detection of pathogens likeC. botulinum and F1 antigen ofY. pestis (3) and also for the antibodies to pathogens like the Rubella virus (4) in the serum or the whole blood. In this line we have demonstrated the FOI for the detection ofS. digitata antibody. Experiments are in progress in our laboratory to standardise the sensor for detection of Bancroftian filariasis caused byW. bancrofti. Few modifications are also in the process so as to improve the signal amplification at evanescent region as well as to reduce the two step method into single step method. The FOI has an advantage over other conventional methods because no extensive washing steps are required and the whole procedure takes just 15 minutes to get the result. The FOI designed for this experiment can be made portable for use in the field level for epidemiological studies.

  19. Quantum dot optical encoded polystyrene beads for DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yuan-Cheng; Liu, Tian-Cai; Hua, Xiao-Feng; Zhu, Xiao-Xia; Wang, Hai-Qiao; Huang, Zhen-Li; Zhao, Yuan-Di; Liu, Man-Xi; Luo, Qing-Ming

    2006-01-01

    A novel multiplex analysis technology based on quantum dot (QD) optical encoded beads was studied. Carboxyl functionalized polystyrene beads, about 100 microm in size, were precisely encoded by the various ratios of two types of QDs whose emission wavelengths are 576 and 628 nm, respectively. Then the different encoded beads were covalently immobilized with different probes in the existing of sulfo-NHS and 1-[3-(Dimethylamino) propyl]-3-ethylcarbodiimide methiodide, and the probe density could reach to 3.1 mmol/g. These probe-linked encoded beads were used to detect the target DNA sequences in complex DNA solution by hybridization. Hybridization was visualized using fluorescein isothiocynate-labeled DNA sequences. The results show that the QDs and target signals can be obviously identified from a single-bead-level spectrum. This technology can detect DNA targets effectively with a detection limit of 0.2 microg/mL in complex solution.

  20. Optical cloud detection from a disposable airborne sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicoll, Keri; Harrison, R. Giles; Brus, David

    2016-04-01

    In-situ measurement of cloud droplet microphysical properties is most commonly made from manned aircraft platforms due to the size and weight of the instrumentation, which is both costly and typically limited to sampling only a few clouds. This work describes the development of a small, lightweight (<200g), disposable, optical cloud sensor which is designed for use on routine radiosonde balloon flights and also small unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) platforms. The sensor employs the backscatter principle, using an ultra-bright LED as the illumination source, with a photodiode detector. Scattering of the LED light by cloud droplets generates a small optical signal which is separated from background light fluctuations using a lock-in technique. The signal to noise obtained permits cloud detection using the scattered LED light, even in daytime. During recent field tests in Pallas, Finland, the retrieved optical sensor signal has been compared with the DMT Cloud and Aerosol Spectrometer (CAS) which measures cloud droplets in the size range from 0.5 to 50 microns. Both sensors were installed at the hill top observatory of Sammaltunturi during a field campaign in October and November 2015, which experienced long periods of immersion inside cloud. Preliminary analysis shows very good agreement between the CAPS and the disposable cloud sensor for cloud droplets >5micron effective diameter. Such data and calibration of the sensor will be discussed here, as will simultaneous balloon launches of the optical cloud sensor through the same cloud layers.

  1. A Fiber Optic Probe for the Detection of Cataracts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Dhadwal, Harbans S.

    1993-01-01

    A compact fiber optic probe developed for on-orbit science experiments was used to detect the onset of cataracts, a capability that could eliminate physicians' guesswork and result in new drugs to 'dissolve' or slow down the cataract formation before surgery is necessary. The probe is based upon dynamic light scattering (DLS) principles. It has no moving parts, no apertures, and requires no optical alignment. It is flexible and easy to use. Results are presented for excised but intact human eye lenses. In a clinical setting, the device can be easily incorporated into a slit-lamp apparatus (ophthalmoscope) for complete eye diagnostics. In this set-up, the integrated fiber optic probe, the size of a pencil, delivers a low power cone of laser light into the eye of a patient and guides the light which is backscattered by the protein molecules of the lens through a receiving optical fiber to a photo detector. The non-invasive DLS measurements provide rapid determination of protein crystalline size and its size distribution in the eye lens.

  2. Ferromagnetic Resonance detection using stroboscopic magneto optical Kerr effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seungha; Moriyama, Takahiro; McMichael, Robert

    2015-03-01

    Ferromagnetic resonance (FMR) is a powerful method for measuring the magnetic properties of ferromagnets. A number of related optical techniques have become popular, including time-resolved magneto-optical Kerr effect (TR-MOKE) microscopy and Brillouin light scattering (BLS). In this presentation we describe a new, stroboscopic method of measuring FMR based on the magneto-optical Kerr effect (MOKE). We use a polarized telecommunications fiber laser (wavelength = 1550 nm) and a fiber modulator driven at a frequency of interest (1 GHz to 10 GHz) to create pulsed, linearly polarized light incident on a CoFeB thin film sample. Precession in the sample is driven via a coplanar waveguide in the sample holder while the reflected light is split by a polarizing beam splitter and detected by a balanced detector. As the magnetic field is swept, oscillations in the Kerr angle and in the light intensity mix to produce a DC resonance signal. The spectra are Lorentzian, with a superposition of symmetric and anti-symmetric shapes that depends on the phase of the optical and microwave signals. In the presentation, we will also discuss phase sensitive measurements with this technique as well as the advantages over other FMR techniques.

  3. Fiber optic oxygen sensor leak detection system for space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kazemi, Alex A.; Goswami, Kish; Mendoza, Edgar A.; Kempen, Lothar U.

    2007-09-01

    This paper describes the successful test of a multi-point fiber optic oxygen sensor system during the static firing of an Evolved Expandable Launch Vehicle (EELV)/Delta IV common booster core (CBC) rocket engine at NASA's Stennis Flight Center. The system consisted of microsensors (optrodes) using an oxygen gas sensitive indicator incorporated onto an optically transparent porous substrate. The modular optoelectronics and multiplexing network system was designed and assembled utilizing a multi-channel opto-electronic sensor readout unit that monitored the oxygen and temperature response of the individual optrodes in real-time and communicated this information via a serial communication port to a remote laptop computer. The sensor packaging for oxygen consisted of two optrodes - one doped with an indicator sensitive to oxygen, and the other doped with an indicator sensitive to temperature. The multichannel oxygen sensor system is fully reversible. It has demonstrated a dynamic response to oxygen gas in the range of 0% to 100% with 0.1% resolution and a response time of <=10 seconds. The sensor package was attached to a custom fiber optic ribbon cable, which was then connected to a fiber optic trunk communications cable (standard telecommunications-grade fiber) that connected to the optoelectronics module. Each board in the expandable module included light sources, photo-detectors, and associated electronics required for detecting oxygen and temperature. The paper illustrates the sensor design and performance data under field deployment conditions.

  4. Research on key problems for LAMOST optical fiber detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Mengxin; Chen, Jianjun; Luo, Ali; Chen, Xiaoran

    2014-07-01

    The large sky area multi-object fiber spectroscopic telescope (LAMOST) is an innovative reflecting schmidt telescope, promising a very high spectrum acquiring rate of several ten-thousands of spectra per night. By using the parallel controllable fiber positioning technique, LAMOST makes reconfiguration of fibers accurately according to the positions of objects in minutes and fine adjusting the fibers. During telescope observation period, each optical fiber unit positional accuracy directly determines the quality of subsequent spectrum acqusition, yet for real-time optical fiber positional accuracy, there only exists an internal information feedback which focus on the corresponding stepper motor driving conditions, however, this available information is not comprehensive, it can not offer the actual positional information for each fiber unit. Considering the LAMOST on-site environment, a novel real-time optical fiber positional accuracy detection system which can be integrated in the existing observation and control system need to be developed to solve this problem. During the observation interval, this system can offer a comprehensive and effective information feedback about the focal optical fiber positional accuracy. Based on this feedback, the observation assistants can properly adjust the observation strategies to ensure the effectiveness and accuracy of acquired spectrum. Furthermore, this fiber positional accuracy feedback can provide prior spectral quality information to the spectral processing personnel and optimal the spectrum processing efficiency.

  5. Biomimetic/Optical Sensors for Detecting Bacterial Species

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homer, Margie; Ksendzov, Alexander; Yen, Shiao-Pin; Ryan, Margaret; Lazazzera, Beth

    2006-01-01

    Biomimetic/optical sensors have been proposed as means of real-time detection of bacteria in liquid samples through real-time detection of compounds secreted by the bacteria. Bacterial species of interest would be identified through detection of signaling compounds unique to those species. The best-characterized examples of quorum-signaling compounds are acyl-homoserine lactones and peptides. Each compound, secreted by each bacterium of an affected species, serves as a signal to other bacteria of the same species to engage in a collective behavior when the population density of that species reaches a threshold level analogous to a quorum. A sensor according to the proposal would include a specially formulated biomimetic film, made of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP), that would respond optically to the signaling compound of interest. The MIP film would be integrated directly onto an opticalwaveguide- based ring resonator for optical readout. Optically, the sensor would resemble the one described in Chemical Sensors Based on Optical Ring Resonators (NPO-40601), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 29, No. 10 (October 2005), page 32. MIPs have been used before as molecular- recognition compounds, though not in the manner of the present proposal. Molecular imprinting is an approach to making molecularly selective cavities in a polymer matrix. These cavities function much as enzyme receptor sites: the chemical functionality and shape of a cavity in the polymer matrix cause the cavity to bind to specific molecules. An MIP matrix is made by polymerizing monomers in the presence of the compound of interest (template molecule). The polymer forms around the template. After the polymer solidifies, the template molecules are removed from the polymer matrix by decomplexing them from their binding sites and then dissolving them, leaving cavities that are matched to the template molecules in size, shape, and chemical functionality. The cavities thus become molecular-recognition sites

  6. Integration of waveguides for optical detection in microfabricated analytical devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kutter, Joerg P.; Mogensen, Klaus B.; Friis, Peter; Jorgensen, Anders M.; Petersen, Nickolaj J.; Telleman, Pieter; Huebner, Joerg

    2000-08-01

    Buried optical channel waveguides integrated with a fluidic channel network on a planar microdevice are presented. The waveguides were fabricated using silica-on-silicon technology with the goal to replace bulk optical elements and facilitate various optical detection techniques for miniaturized total analysis systems or lab-on-a-chip systems. Waveguide structures with core layers doped with germanium were employed for fluorescence measurements, while waveguides with nitrogen- only doped core layers were used for absorbance measurements. By the elimination of germanium oxygen deficiency centers transmission of light down to 210nm was possible, allowing absorance measurements in the mid and far UV region (210 to 280nm), which is the region where a large number of different molecules absorb light. Robust, alignment-free microdevices, which can easily be hooked up to a number of light sources and detectors were used for fluorescence measurements of two dyes, fluorescein and Bodipy, and absorbance measurements of a stres-reducing drug, propranolol. The lowest detected concentrations were 250pM for fluorescein, 100nM for Bodipy and 12(mu) M for propranolol.

  7. High-dose radiation sensor with wireless optical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knapkiewicz, Paweł; Augustyniak, Izabela; Sareło, Katarzyna; Gorecka-Drzazga, Anna; Dziuban, Jan

    2017-05-01

    We present a miniature silicon-glass MEMS sensor for measurement of high doses of ionizing radiation (above 10 kGy) using a novel wireless optical detection method. The radiation sensor is a miniaturized version of the so-called hydrogen dosimeter. An amount of high-density polyethylene, located inside the MEMS sensor, degrades under ionizing radiation, releasing gaseous hydrogen. The increasing pressure deflects the thin silicon membrane. The sensor’s destructive and proportional modes of work are also proposed. In the destructive mode, sensors provide in situ information on excessive and discrete levels of radiation. The optical detection method is based on an optical head consisting of a moving membrane and a silicon screen with a matrix of micro-holes. Laser light is reflected from the membrane and scattered when the membrane is deflected, in the process illuminating the holes on the silicon screen. The number of illuminated holes is a function of the degree of membrane deflection; the transformation of the holes to the deflection allows for the calculation of pressure and eventually the dose of ionizing radiation.

  8. Optical detection of spin Hall effect in metals

    SciTech Connect

    Erve, O. M. J. van ‘t Hanbicki, A. T.; McCreary, K. M.; Li, C. H.; Jonker, B. T.

    2014-04-28

    Optical techniques have been widely used to probe the spin Hall effect in semiconductors. In metals, however, only electrical methods such as nonlocal spin valve transport, ferromagnetic resonance, or spin torque transfer experiments have been successful. These methods require complex processing techniques and measuring setups. We show here that the spin Hall effect can be observed in non-magnetic metals such as Pt and β-W, using a standard bench top magneto-optical Kerr system with very little sample preparation. Applying a square wave current and using Fourier analysis significantly improve our detection level. One can readily determine the angular dependence of the induced polarization on the bias current direction (very difficult to do with voltage detection), the orientation of the spin Hall induced polarization, and the sign of the spin Hall angle. This optical approach is free from the complications of various resistive effects, which can compromise voltage measurements. This opens up the study of spin Hall effect in metals to a variety of spin dynamic and spatial imaging experiments.

  9. Miniature endoscopic optical coherence tomography for calculus detection.

    PubMed

    Kao, Meng-Chun; Lin, Chun-Li; Kung, Che-Yen; Huang, Yi-Fung; Kuo, Wen-Chuan

    2015-08-20

    The effective treatment of periodontitis involves the detection and removal of subgingival dental calculus. However, subgingival calculus is more difficult to detect than supragingival calculus because it is firmly attached to root surfaces within periodontal pockets. To achieve a smooth root surface, clinicians often remove excessive amounts of root structure because of decreased visibility. In addition, enamel pearl, a rare type of ectopic enamel formation on the root surface, can easily be confused with dental calculus in the subgingival environment. In this study, we developed a fiber-probe swept-source optical coherence tomography (SSOCT) technique and combined it with the quantitative measurement of an optical parameter [standard deviation (SD) of the optical coherence tomography (OCT) intensity] to differentiate subgingival calculus from sound enamel, including enamel pearl. Two-dimensional circumferential images were constructed by rotating the miniprobe (0.9 mm diameter) while acquiring image lines, and the adjacent lines in each rotation were stacked to generate a three-dimensional volume. In OCT images, compared to sound enamel and enamel pearls, dental calculus showed significant differences (P<0.001) in SD values. Finally, the receiver operating characteristic curve had a high capacity (area under the curve=0.934) for discriminating between healthy regions (including enamel pearl) and dental calculus.

  10. Fully automated procedure for ship detection using optical satellite imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corbane, C.; Pecoul, E.; Demagistri, L.; Petit, M.

    2009-01-01

    Ship detection from remote sensing imagery is a crucial application for maritime security which includes among others traffic surveillance, protection against illegal fisheries, oil discharge control and sea pollution monitoring. In the framework of a European integrated project GMES-Security/LIMES, we developed an operational ship detection algorithm using high spatial resolution optical imagery to complement existing regulations, in particular the fishing control system. The automatic detection model is based on statistical methods, mathematical morphology and other signal processing techniques such as the wavelet analysis and Radon transform. This paper presents current progress made on the detection model and describes the prototype designed to classify small targets. The prototype was tested on panchromatic SPOT 5 imagery taking into account the environmental and fishing context in French Guiana. In terms of automatic detection of small ship targets, the proposed algorithm performs well. Its advantages are manifold: it is simple and robust, but most of all, it is efficient and fast, which is a crucial point in performance evaluation of advanced ship detection strategies.

  11. Digital balanced detection for fast optical computerized tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hafiz, Rehan; Ozanyan, Krikor B.

    2006-10-01

    Analogue Balanced Photo-detection has found extensive usage in high- sensitivity small signal applications e.g. coherent heterodyne detection. It is particularly effective for laser intensity noise removal. Nevertheless, the high cost of the commercially available analogue systems makes them unsuitable for multi-channel applications, such as fast tomography. In this paper a flexible, scalable, inexpensive and compact solution for multi channel digital balanced detection is presented. The proposed system has two components: an analogue front-end, comprising a differential photodiode amplifier for minimizing the external interference noise, and a digital balanced noise remover. The latter component initially calculates a balancing factor (BF) from the average power ratio of the signal and reference photocurrents, measured with the object removed from the signal path. Three digital balancing algorithms (DBAx) are considered for subsequent processing. In DBA1, BF is directly used in real-time ratiometric calculations. In DBA2, the BF is adjusted in real time by monitoring the window-averaged power of the received photocurrents. In DBA3, first the baseline is removed using differentiation and then ratiometric detection is performed. Using the digital alternative only one measurement of the reference beam is necessary for single-source, multi-channel detection systems. The data from multiple channels are processed in parallel by pipelined hardware, configured as a state machine. The proposed system leads to a fast optical computerized tomography system using digital balanced detection.

  12. Optical detection of blade flutter. [in YF-100 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieberding, W. C.; Pollack, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper examines the capabilities of photoelectric scanning (PES) and stroboscopic imagery (SI) as optical monitoring tools for detection of the onset of flutter in the fan blades of an aircraft gas turbine engine. Both optical techniques give visual data in real time as well as video-tape records. PES is shown to be an ideal flutter monitor, since a single cathode ray tube displays the behavior of all the blades in a stage simultaneously. Operation of the SI system continuously while searching for a flutter condition imposes severe demands on the flash tube and affects its reliability, thus limiting its use as a flutter monitor. A better method of operation is to search for flutter with the PES and limit the use of SI to those times when the PES indicates interesting blade activity.

  13. Compact fiber optic dual-detection confocal displacement sensor.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Ryoung; Jang, Suin; Lee, Min Woo; Yoo, Hongki

    2016-09-20

    We propose a dual-detection confocal displacement sensor (DDCDS) with a compact fiber-based optical probe. This all-fiber-optic sensor probe is simple and robust, since it only requires simple alignment of a gradient refractive index lens and a double-clad fiber (DCF). The DDCDS is composed of two point detectors, one coupled to a single mode fiber and the other coupled to a multimode fiber, which are used to measure the light intensity from a core and an inner clad of a DCF, respectively. The ratio of the axial response curves, measured by the two detectors, can be used to obtain a linear relationship between the axial position of the object plane and the ratio of the intensity signals. We demonstrate the performance of the proposed method by measuring micromovement and fast vibration.

  14. Optical detection of blade flutter. [in YF-100 turbofan engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nieberding, W. C.; Pollack, J. L.

    1977-01-01

    The paper examines the capabilities of photoelectric scanning (PES) and stroboscopic imagery (SI) as optical monitoring tools for detection of the onset of flutter in the fan blades of an aircraft gas turbine engine. Both optical techniques give visual data in real time as well as video-tape records. PES is shown to be an ideal flutter monitor, since a single cathode ray tube displays the behavior of all the blades in a stage simultaneously. Operation of the SI system continuously while searching for a flutter condition imposes severe demands on the flash tube and affects its reliability, thus limiting its use as a flutter monitor. A better method of operation is to search for flutter with the PES and limit the use of SI to those times when the PES indicates interesting blade activity.

  15. Short-Range Force Detection Using Optically Cooled Levitated Microspheres

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geraci, Andrew A.; Papp, Scott B.; Kitching, John

    2010-09-01

    We propose an experiment using optically trapped and cooled dielectric micro-spheres for the detection of short-range forces. The center-of-mass motion of a microsphere trapped in vacuum can experience extremely low dissipation and quality factors of 1012, leading to yoctonewton force sensitivity. Trapping the sphere in an optical field enables positioning at less than 1μm from a surface, a regime where exotic new forces may exist. We expect that the proposed system could advance the search for non-Newtonian gravity forces via an enhanced sensitivity of 105-107 over current experiments at the 1μm length scale. Moreover, our system may be useful for characterizing other short-range physics such as Casimir forces.

  16. Magneto-optical contrast in liquid-state optically detected NMR spectroscopy

    PubMed Central

    Pagliero, Daniela; Meriles, Carlos A.

    2011-01-01

    We use optical Faraday rotation (OFR) to probe nuclear spins in real time at high-magnetic field in a range of diamagnetic sample fluids. Comparison of OFR-detected NMR spectra reveals a correlation between the relative signal amplitude and the fluid Verdet constant, which we interpret as a manifestation of the variable detuning between the probe beam and the sample optical transitions. The analysis of chemical-shift-resolved, optically detected spectra allows us to set constraints on the relative amplitudes of hyperfine coupling constants, both for protons at chemically distinct sites and other lower-gyromagnetic-ratio nuclei including carbon, fluorine, and phosphorous. By considering a model binary mixture we observe a complex dependence of the optical response on the relative concentration, suggesting that the present approach is sensitive to the solvent-solute dynamics in ways complementary to those known in inductive NMR. Extension of these experiments may find application in solvent suppression protocols, sensitivity-enhanced NMR of metalloproteins in solution, the investigation of solvent-solute interactions, or the characterization of molecular orbitals in diamagnetic systems. PMID:22100736

  17. Optical beat interference noise reduction in OFDMA optical access link using self-homodyne balanced detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sang-Min; Won, Yong-Yuk; Han, Sang-Kook

    2013-12-01

    A Novel technique for reducing the OBI noise in optical OFDMA-PON uplink is presented. OFDMA is a multipleaccess/ multiplexing scheme that can provide multiplexing operation of user data streams onto the downlink sub-channels and uplink multiple access by means of dividing OFDM subcarriers as sub-channels. The main issue of high-speed, single-wavelength upstream OFDMA-PON arises from optical beating interference noise. Because the sub-channels are allocated dynamically to multiple access users over same nominal wavelength, it generates the optical beating interference among upstream signals. In this paper, we proposed a novel scheme using self-homodyne balanced detection in the optical line terminal (OLT) to reduce OBI noise which is generated in the uplink transmission of OFDMA-PON system. When multiple OFDMA sub-channels over the same nominal wavelength are received at the same time in the proposed architecture, OBI noises can be removed using balanced detection. Using discrete multitone modulation (DMT) to generate real valued OFDM signals, the proposed technique is verified through experimental demonstration.

  18. Dental caries detection by optical spectroscopy: a polarized Raman approach with fibre-optic coupling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, A. C.-T.; Choo-Smith, L.-P.; Werner, J.; Hewko, M.; Sowa, M. G.; Dong, C.; Cleghorn, B.

    2006-09-01

    Incipient dental caries lesions appear as white spots on the tooth surface; however, accurate detection of early approximal lesions is difficult due to limited sensitivity of dental radiography and other traditional diagnostic tools. A new fibre-optic coupled spectroscopic method based on polarized Raman spectroscopy (P-RS) with near-IR laser excitation is introduced which provides contrast for detecting and characterizing incipient caries. Changes in polarized Raman spectra are observed in PO 4 3- vibrations arising from hydroxyapatite of mineralized tooth tissue. Demineralization-induced morphological/orientational alteration of enamel crystallites is believed to be responsible for the reduction of Raman polarization anisotropy observed in the polarized Raman spectra of caries lesions. Supporting evidence obtained by polarized Raman spectral imaging is presented. A specially designed fibre-optic coupled setup for simultaneous measurement of parallel- and cross-polarized tooth Raman spectra is demonstrated in this study.

  19. Detection of defects in optics based on scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Bin; Bai, Jian; Liang, Yiyong; Wang, Kaiwei; Lu, Qianbo; Zhang, Sai

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, a method to detect internal pocks and bubbles of optical elements based on laser line source scanning is proposed. In dark field environment, a laser line source is used to illuminate from one side of the glass under test, a high-resolution CCD camera is used to take pictures in front of the glass sample. Images which contain information of defects are acquired through rough scanning and accurate scanning. Accurate three-dimensional coordinates of the internal defects are acquired after image processing, which descript the characteristic information of internal defects quantificationally. Compared with the microscope imaging measurement, this proposed detection of defects in optics based on laser line source scanning has a relative aberration smaller than 2%. In addition, the detection time is approximately reduced to 20 minutes from 1 hour dramatically. The analysis indicates that the error of the position of defects is much smaller than the size of them, which means the position of the defects can be acquired accurately by this approach.

  20. Tapered optical fiber sensor for chemical pollutants detection in seawater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irigoyen, Maite; Sánchez-Martin, Jose Antonio; Bernabeu, Eusebio; Zamora, Alba

    2017-04-01

    Three tapered silica optical fibers, uncoated and coated with metallic (Al or Cu) and dielectric layers (TiO2), are employed to determine the presence of oil and Hazardous and Noxious Substances (HNS from now on) in water, by means of the measurement of their spectral transmittance. With our experimental assembly, the presence of oil and HNS spills can be detected employing the three different kinds of tapers, since the complete range of refractive indices of the pollutants (1.329-1.501) is covered with these tapers. The most suitable spectral range to detect the presence of a chemical pollutant in seawater has been identified and a complete spectral characterization of the three types of optical fiber tapers has been carried out. The results obtained show that, in general terms, these devices working together can be employed for the early detection of oil and HNS spills in seawater in a marine industrial environment. These sensors have many advantages, such as its low cost, its simplicity and versatility (with interesting properties as quick response and repeatability), and especially that they can be self-cleaned with seawater in motion.

  1. CRTS detection of optical outburst of PKS 2023-07

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahabal, A. A.; Djorgovski, S. G.; Drake, A. J.; Graham, M. J.; Williams, R.; Catelan, M.; Beshore, E. C.; Larson, S. M.; Christensen, E.

    2009-08-01

    We report on the discovery of an optical outburst associated with PKS 2023-07 by the Catalina Real-Time Transient Survey (CRTS). Recently, Gasparrini et al. ATel#2175 noted the Fermi LAT detection of a GeV flare from blazar PKS 2023-07. On Aug 29.17 UT CRTS automatically detected and alerted that this object was undergoing a significant optical outburst with V~15.2.

    ID Detection DateRADecMagVOEvent ID
    CSS090829:202541-073553 2009-08-29 UT 04:15:36 20:25:40.63-07:35:52.7 15.2 908290071094126135
    Past photometry dating back to April 2005 suggests that this blazar is highly variable often showing wild variations in brightness over relatively short periods, and is in that sense unlike most blazars.

  2. Multiplexed detection of biological agents using optical microchip sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatta, D.; McDonnell, M. B.; Perkins, E.

    2010-10-01

    A multi-channel optical microchip sensor system suitable for real-time, label-free detection of a wide range of biological agents is presented. SpectroSensTM chips containing multiple high-precision planar Bragg gratings are exploited as lowcost, robust refractive index sensors. Sensitivity to biological agents is conferred by functionalising individual sensing regions with different antibodies selected against numerous targets of interest. Antigen binding to the surfaceimmobilised antibodies results in localised changes in refractive index; upon laser-induced interrogation of the sensing region via optical fibres, these antibody-antigen interactions manifest as increases in wavelength of light reflected from the sensor chip. Real-time detection of multiple biological agents including bacterial cells/spores, viruses and toxins has been demonstrated. Further improvements to sensor performance including physical and chemical methods are also investigated. This multi-analyte capability highlights the potential use of this sensing technology in applications ranging from bio-hazard detection for defence purposes to point-of-care clinical diagnostics.

  3. All optical contention detection and resolution for asynchronous variable length optical packets switching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Rim; Farhat, Amel; Menif, Mourad

    2016-04-01

    We proposed a novel 2×2 all optical packet switching router architecture supporting asynchronous, labelled and variablelength packet. A proof of concept through Matlab Simulink simulation is validated. Then we discussed the three possible scenarios to demonstrate the contention resolution technique based on deflection routing. We have showing that the contending packet is detected and forwarded according FIFO (First In First Out) strategy to another output.

  4. Depth resolved detection of lipid using spectroscopic optical coherence tomography

    PubMed Central

    Fleming, Christine P.; Eckert, Jocelyn; Halpern, Elkan F.; Gardecki, Joseph A.; Tearney, Guillermo J.

    2013-01-01

    Optical frequency domain imaging (OFDI) can identify key components related to plaque vulnerability but can suffer from artifacts that could prevent accurate identification of lipid rich regions. In this paper, we present a model of depth resolved spectral analysis of OFDI data for improved detection of lipid. A quadratic Discriminant analysis model was developed based on phantom compositions known chemical mixtures and applied to a tissue phantom of a lipid-rich plaque. We demonstrate that a combined spectral and attenuation model can be used to predict the presence of lipid in OFDI images. PMID:24009991

  5. Preparation and detection of magnetic quantum phases in optical superlattices.

    PubMed

    Rey, A M; Gritsev, V; Bloch, I; Demler, E; Lukin, M D

    2007-10-05

    We describe a novel approach to prepare, detect, and characterize magnetic quantum phases in ultracold spinor atoms loaded in optical superlattices. Our technique makes use of singlet-triplet spin manipulations in an array of isolated double-well potentials in analogy to recently demonstrated control in quantum dots. We also discuss the many-body singlet-triplet spin dynamics arising from coherent coupling between nearest neighbor double wells and derive an effective description for such systems. We use it to study the generation of complex magnetic states by adiabatic and nonequilibrium dynamics.

  6. Fiber Optic Thermographic Detection of Flaws in Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, Meng-Chou; Winfree, William P.

    2009-01-01

    Optical fibers with multiple Bragg gratings bonded to surfaces of structures were used for thermographic detection of subsurface defects in structures. The investigated structures included a 10-ply composite specimen with subsurface delaminations of various sizes and depths. Both during and following the application of a thermal heat flux to the surface, the individual Bragg grating sensors measured the temporal and spatial temperature variations. The obtained data were analyzed with thermal modeling to reveal particular characteristics of the interested areas. These results were found to be consistent with the simulation results.

  7. Depth resolution enhancement in double-detection optical scanning holography.

    PubMed

    Ou, Haiyan; Poon, Ting-Chung; Wong, Kenneth K Y; Lam, Edmund Y

    2013-05-01

    We propose an optical scanning holography system with enhanced axial resolution using two detections at different depths. By scanning the object twice, we can obtain two different sets of Fresnel zone plates to sample the same object, which in turn provides more information for the sectional image reconstruction process. We develop the computation algorithm that makes use of such information, solving a constrained optimization problem using the conjugate gradient method. Simulation results show that this method can achieve a depth resolution up to 1 μm.

  8. Automated detection of dilated capillaries on optical coherence tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Dongye, Changlei; Zhang, Miao; Hwang, Thomas S.; Wang, Jie; Gao, Simon S.; Liu, Liang; Huang, David; Wilson, David J.; Jia, Yali

    2017-01-01

    Automated detection and grading of angiographic high-risk features in diabetic retinopathy can potentially enhance screening and clinical care. We have previously identified capillary dilation in angiograms of the deep plexus in optical coherence tomography angiography as a feature associated with severe diabetic retinopathy. In this study, we present an automated algorithm that uses hybrid contrast to distinguish angiograms with dilated capillaries from healthy controls and then applies saliency measurement to map the extent of the dilated capillary networks. The proposed algorithm agreed well with human grading. PMID:28271005

  9. Dual collection mode optical microscope with single-pixel detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodríguez, A. D.; Clemente, P.; Fernández-Alonso, Mercedes; Tajahuerce, E.; Lancis, J.

    2015-07-01

    In this work we have developed a single-pixel optical microscope that provides both re ection and transmission images of the sample under test by attaching a diamond pixel layout DMD to a commercial inverted microscope. Our system performs simultaneous measurements of re ection and transmission modes. Besides, in contrast with a conventional system, in our single-element detection system both images belong, unequivocally, to the same plane of the sample. Furthermore, we have designed an algorithm to modify the shape of the projected patterns that improves the resolution and prevents the artifacts produced by the diamond pixel architecture.

  10. Detection of biological molecules using chemical amplification and optical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Van Antwerp, William Peter; Mastrototaro, John Joseph

    2001-01-01

    Methods are provided for the determination of the concentration of biological levels of polyhydroxylated compounds, particularly glucose. The methods utilize an amplification system that is an analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix, where the system is implantable and biocompatible. Upon interrogation by an optical system, the amplification system produces a signal capable of detection external to the skin of the patient. Quantitation of the analyte of interest is achieved by measurement of the emitted signal. Specifically, the analyte transducer immobilized in a polymeric matrix can be a boronic acid moiety.

  11. Spectral domain optical coherence tomography with dual-balanced detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bo, En; Liu, Xinyu; Chen, Si; Luo, Yuemei; Wang, Nanshuo; Wang, Xianghong; Liu, Linbo

    2016-03-01

    We developed a spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT) system employing dual-balanced detection (DBD) for direct current term suppression and SNR enhancement, especially for auto-autocorrelation artifacts reduction. The DBD was achieved by using a beam splitter to building a free-space Michelson interferometer, which generated two interferometric spectra with a phase difference of π. These two phase-opposed spectra were guided to the spectrometer through two single mode fibers of the 8 fiber v-groove array and acquired by ultizing the upper two lines of a three-line CCD camera. We rotated this fiber v-groove array by 1.35 degrees to focus two spectra onto the first and second line of the CCD camera. Two spectra were aligned by optimum spectrum matching algorithm. By subtracting one spectrum from the other, this dual-balanced detection system achieved a direct current term suppression of ~30 dB, SNR enhancement of ~3 dB, and auto-autocorrelation artifacts reduction of ~10 dB experimentally. Finally we respectively validated the feasibility and performance of dual-balanced detection by imaging a glass plate and swine corneal tissue ex vivo. The quality of images obtained using dual-balanced detection was significantly improved with regard to the conventional single-detection (SD) images.

  12. Multistage optical smoke detection approach for smoke alarm systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nguyen, Truc Kim Thi; Kim, Jong-Myon

    2013-05-01

    We propose a novel multistage smoke detection algorithm based on inherent optical characteristics such as diffusion, color, and texture of smoke. Moving regions in a video frame are detected by an approximate median background subtraction method using the diffusion behavior of smoke. These moving regions are segmented by a fuzzy C-means (FCM) clustering algorithm that uses the hue and saturation components of moving pixels in the hue-saturation-intensity color space. A decision rule is used to select candidate smoke regions from smoke-colored FCM clusters. An object tracking approach is employed in the candidate smoke region to detect candidate smoke objects in the video frame, and image texture parameters are extracted from these objects using a gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The thirteen GLCM features are selected to constitute the feature vector by applying principal components analysis, resulting in high-accuracy smoke detection. Finally, a back propagation neural network is utilized as a classifier to discriminate smoke and nonsmoke using the selected feature vector. Experimental results using a standard experimental dataset of video clips demonstrate that the proposed approach outperforms state-of-the-art smoke detection approaches in terms of accuracy, making real-life implementation feasible.

  13. Detecting single DNA molecule interactions with optical microcavities (Presentation Recording)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vollmer, Frank

    2015-09-01

    Detecting molecules and their interactions lies at the heart of all biosensor devices, which have important applications in health, environmental monitoring and biomedicine. Achieving biosensing capability at the single molecule level is, moreover, a particularly important goal since single molecule biosensors would not only operate at the ultimate detection limit by resolving individual molecular interactions, but they could also monitor biomolecular properties which are otherwise obscured in ensemble measurements. For example, a single molecule biosensor could resolve the fleeting interaction kinetics between a molecule and its receptor, with immediate applications in clinical diagnostics. We have now developed a label-free biosensing platform that is capable of monitoring single DNA molecules and their interaction kinetics[1], hence achieving an unprecedented sensitivity in the optical domain, Figure 1. We resolve the specific contacts between complementary oligonucleotides, thereby detecting DNA strands with less than 2.4 kDa molecular weight. Furthermore we can discern strands with single nucleotide mismatches by monitoring their interaction kinetics. Our device utilizes small glass microspheres as optical transducers[1,2, 3], which are capable of increasing the number of interactions between a light beam and analyte molecules. A prism is used to couple the light beam into the microsphere. Ourr biosensing approach resolves the specific interaction kinetics between single DNA fragments. The optical transducer is assembled in a simple three-step protocol, and consists of a gold nanorod attached to a glass microsphere, where the surface of the nanorod is further modified with oligonucleotide receptors. The interaction kinetics of an oligonucleotide receptor with DNA fragments in the surrounding aqueous solution is monitored at the single molecule level[1]. The light remains confined inside the sphere where it is guided by total internal reflections along a

  14. Amylin Detection with a Miniature Optical-Fiber Based Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhaowen; Ann, Matsko; Hughes, Adam; Reeves, Mark

    We present results of a biosensor based on shifts in the localized surface plasmon resonance of gold nanoparticles self-assembled on the end of an optical fiber. This system allows for detection of protein expression in low sensing volumes and for scanning in cell cultures and tissue samples. Positive and negative controls were done using biotin/avidin and the BSA/Anti-BSA system. These demonstrate that detection is specific and sensitive to nanomolar levels. Sensing of amylin, an important protein for pancreatic function, was performed with polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies. The measured data demonstrates the difference in sensitivity to the two types of antibodies, and titration experiments establish the sensitivity of the sensor. Further experiments demonstrate that the sensor can be regenerated and then reused.

  15. Chirality detection of enantiomers using twisted optical metamaterials

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Yang; Askarpour, Amir N.; Sun, Liuyang; Shi, Jinwei; Li, Xiaoqin; Alù, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Many naturally occurring biomolecules, such as amino acids, sugars and nucleotides, are inherently chiral. Enantiomers, a pair of chiral isomers with opposite handedness, often exhibit similar physical and chemical properties due to their identical functional groups and composition, yet show different toxicity to cells. Detecting enantiomers in small quantities has an essential role in drug development to eliminate their unwanted side effects. Here we exploit strong chiral interactions with plasmonic metamaterials with specifically designed optical response to sense chiral molecules down to zeptomole levels, several orders of magnitude smaller than what is typically detectable with conventional circular dichroism spectroscopy. In particular, the measured spectra reveal opposite signs in the spectral regime directly associated with different chiral responses, providing a way to univocally assess molecular chirality. Our work introduces an ultrathin, planarized nanophotonic interface to sense chiral molecules with inherently weak circular dichroism at visible and near-infrared frequencies. PMID:28120825

  16. Optical leak detection of oxygen using IR-laser diodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Disimile, P. J.; Fox, C.; Toy, N.

    1991-01-01

    The ability to accurately measure the concentration of gaseous oxygen and its corresponding flow rate is becoming of greater importance. The technique being presented is based on the principal of light attenuation due to the absorption of radiation by the A-band of oxygen which is located in the 759-770 nm wavelength range. With an ability to measure the change in the light transmission to 0.05 percent, a sensitive optical leak detection system which has a rapid time response is possible. In this research program, the application of laser diode technology and its ability to be temperature tuned to a selected oxygen absorption spectral peak has allowed oxygen concentrations as low as 16,000 ppm to be detected.

  17. Detecting staphylococcal enterotoxin B using an automated fiber optic biosensor.

    PubMed

    King, K D; Anderson, G P; Bullock, K E; Regina, M J; Saaski, E W; Ligler, F S

    1999-02-01

    The Man-portable Analyte Identification System (MANTIS), the first fully automated, self-contained, portable fiber optic biosensor, was utilized for the detection of Staphylococcal Enterotoxin B (SEB), a bacterial toxin produced by Staphylococcus aureus that commonly causes food poisoning. Because of its remarkable toxicity and stability, SEB is considered a prime threat as a biological weapon of mass destruction. The assay for SEB was used to evaluate the MANTIS' ability to function in the presence of various environmental interferents. The sensor could reliably detect SEB spiked into liquid samples containing a variety of smoke particles. However, substantial interference occurred when SEB was mixed into matrices capable of adsorbing SEB, such as 1% solutions of clay, topsoil, or pollen. Of equal importance, none of the interferents produced false positives in the MANTIS. The MANTIS demonstrated the capability to perform simultaneous immunoassays rapidly in the field with little or no user intervention.

  18. Chirality detection of enantiomers using twisted optical metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yang; Askarpour, Amir N.; Sun, Liuyang; Shi, Jinwei; Li, Xiaoqin; Alù, Andrea

    2017-01-01

    Many naturally occurring biomolecules, such as amino acids, sugars and nucleotides, are inherently chiral. Enantiomers, a pair of chiral isomers with opposite handedness, often exhibit similar physical and chemical properties due to their identical functional groups and composition, yet show different toxicity to cells. Detecting enantiomers in small quantities has an essential role in drug development to eliminate their unwanted side effects. Here we exploit strong chiral interactions with plasmonic metamaterials with specifically designed optical response to sense chiral molecules down to zeptomole levels, several orders of magnitude smaller than what is typically detectable with conventional circular dichroism spectroscopy. In particular, the measured spectra reveal opposite signs in the spectral regime directly associated with different chiral responses, providing a way to univocally assess molecular chirality. Our work introduces an ultrathin, planarized nanophotonic interface to sense chiral molecules with inherently weak circular dichroism at visible and near-infrared frequencies.

  19. A porous silicon optical microcavity for sensitive bacteria detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sha; Huang, Jianfeng; Cai, Lintao

    2011-10-01

    A porous silicon microcavity (PSM) is highly sensitive to subtle interface changes due to its high surface area, capillary condensation ability and a narrow resonance peak (~10 nm). Based on the well-defined optical properties of a PSM, we successfully fabricated a bacteria detection chip for molecular or subcellular analysis by surface modification using undecylenic acid (UA), and the specific recognition binding of vancomycin to the D-alanyl-D-alanine of bacteria. The red shift of the PSM resonance peak showed a good linear relationship with bacteria concentration ranging from 100 to 1000 bacteria ml - 1 at the level of relative standard deviation of 0.994 and detection limit of 20 bacteria ml - 1. The resulting PSM sensors demonstrated high sensitivity, good reproducibility, fast response and low cost for biosensing.

  20. Detection of tunnel excavation using fiber optic reflectometry: experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linker, Raphael; Klar, Assaf

    2013-06-01

    Cross-border smuggling tunnels enable unmonitored movement of people and goods, and pose a severe threat to homeland security. In recent years, we have been working on the development of a system based on fiber- optic Brillouin time domain reflectometry (BOTDR) for detecting tunnel excavation. In two previous SPIE publications we have reported the initial development of the system as well as its validation using small-scale experiments. This paper reports, for the first time, results of full-scale experiments and discusses the system performance. The results confirm that distributed measurement of strain profiles in fiber cables buried at shallow depth enable detection of tunnel excavation, and by proper data processing, these measurements enable precise localization of the tunnel, as well as reasonable estimation of its depth.

  1. UV LED fiber optic detection System for DNA and protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belz, Mathias; Klein, Felix A.; Habhegger, Heidi

    2007-02-01

    Concentrations of DNA and proteins are traditionally detected at 260/280nm using laboratory spectrophotometers. Recently, AlGaN/GaN ultraviolet Light Emitting Diodes (LED) became available in the 250 nm to 350 nm wavelength region. An inexpensive fiber optic detection system based on these UV LEDs and photodiodes has been developed. It allows concentration measurements of such popular biochemistry samples. Measurement stability and noise will be discussed. The performance of the system in comparison to a standard spectrophotometer will be evaluated. In particular, the effect of decreasing the spectral resolution from usually used 2-3 nm to 10-20 nm Full Width Half Maximum (FWHM) is simulated and experimentally confirmed.

  2. Adaptive target detection with a polarization-sensitive optical system.

    PubMed

    Meng, Lingfei; Kerekes, John P

    2011-05-01

    We developed an adaptive polarimetric target detector (APTD) to determine the optimum combination strategy for a multichannel polarization-sensitive optical system. The proposed algorithm is based on scene-derived polarization properties of the target and background, and it seeks to find an optimum multichannel combination of linear polarizing filters that maximizes the signal-to-clutter ratio (SCR) in intensity and Stokes parameter images. The algorithm is validated by performing RX anomaly detection and a generalized likelihood ratio test on both synthetic and real imagery. The experimental results are analyzed through calculated SCR and receiver operating characteristic curves. Compared with several conventional operation methods, we find that better target detection performance is achieved with the APTD algorithm.

  3. Optical Cluster Detection in the Post-SDSS Era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koester, Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Near the conclusion of the first Sloan Digital Sky Survey, the development of optical cluster detection algorithms, quantification of their selection functions, and mass and redshift calibration hit full swing. Catalogs typically include thousands of massive (>1x1014 Msun) clusters reaching z 0.5, with selection functions that are routinely calibrated with realistic mock galaxy simulations, and cluster mass proxies that are cross-calibrated against X-ray, weak-lensing, dynamical, and SZ observations. All of this is folded into analyses that offer cosmological constraints competitive with catalogs created at other wavelengths. In this talk, these developments are reviewed from the perspective of the MaxBCG cluster catalog. The lessons learned from optical cluster-finding efforts are then turned to the next generation of optical/NIR surveys soon to come online, using the Dark Energy Survey (DES) as an example. In DES, this past experience guides the coordination of vast resources that will culminate in well-understood cluster catalogs specifically tailored to cosmological applications reaching z 1.

  4. Optical techniques for millimeter-wave detection and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuetz, Christopher Arnim

    The benefits of imaging using regions of the electromagnetic spectrum outside the visible range have been known for decades. Infrared and radio frequency imaging techniques have achieved great successes in both military and civilian applications. However, there remains a range of the spectrum between these two regimes that remains relatively unexplored. Millimeter waves, or the range of wavelengths between one millimeter and one centimeter, have remained relatively unexplored as an imaging technology, largely due to the lack of sufficiently sensitive, practical detectors for passive imaging in this regime. At these short wavelengths, the diffraction limit imposed by the limited extent of the imaging aperture significantly limits attainable image resolution. Recent developments in semiconductor low-noise amplifiers have demonstrated many desirable applications for such imaging technology, but have, as yet, not been able to demonstrate the economical, small-format imagers necessary to make such imagers practical in most of the conceived applications. In this regard, I present a new approach to millimeter-wave detection based on optical modulation with subsequent carrier suppression. This approach demonstrates promise in achieving the goal of economical, high-resolution imagers with sufficient sensitivity for passive millimeter-wave imaging. In this thesis, I explain the operational requirements of such detectors, provide theoretical background for their operation, and describe current experimental results obtained using commercially available components in the 35 GHz. In addition, I describe successful efforts to fabricate modulators with improved modulation bandwidths for detection in the 95 GHz atmospheric window. These demonstration systems have attained sufficient single pixel performance to detect thermal emission with a noise equivalent temperature difference (NETD) approaching 1K/ Hz at both 35 and 95 GHz. The NETDs attained correspond to sub-picowatt noise

  5. Laser spot detection and characteristic analysis in space optical communication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Jin; Kong, Chuiliu; Jing, Wenbo; Zhang, Dan; Jiang, Huilin

    2007-11-01

    In the space laser communication, the link of communication is builded in atmospheric random channel. the laser transmission is affected by the atmospheric turbulence seriously. The communication laser is modulated to circular polarized light in order to reduce the influence of the atmospheric turbulence. A several experiments are designed to validate that the circular polarized laser is available to reduce the communication noise in the space optical communication. The methods of the laser spot detection and spot parameter analysis is put forward in this paper: Firstly the subtraction of the background is used in image preprocessing in order to eliminate the influence of static background, then a series of methods such as the local dynamic threshold segmentation, edge extraction are used to detect and recognize the spot. Finally the parameters of the spot are calculated such as spot's average brightness, background's average brightness and the contrast gradient, and the characteristic of the laser communication is analyzed. The experiment results show that the circular polarized laser can enhance the contrast and improve the communication quality in the spatial optical communication. This method satisfies the request of real-time processing in communication, and is also effective and practical. practical.

  6. A dual-detector optical receiver for PDM signals detection

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guanyu; Yu, Yu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-01-01

    We propose and fabricate a silicon based dual-detector optical receiver, which consists of a two dimensional (2D) grating coupler (GC) and two separate germanium photodetectors (Ge PDs). The 2D GC performs polarization diversity, and thus demultiplexing and detection for polarization division multiplexed (PDM) signals can be achieved. Through a specific design with double-sides illumination, the space charge density can be reduced and the responsivity and saturation power can be improved significantly. The measured dark current, responsivity and bandwidth are 0.86 μA, 1.06 A/W and 36 GHz under 3 V reverse biased voltage, respectively. Both DC currents and eye diagrams are measured for the proposed device and the results validate its performance successfully. The power penalty between the single and dual polarized signals is about 1.9 dB under 10 and 20 Gb/s cases for both the two Ge PDs. The proposed direct detection (DD) for PDM signals with high speed, high responsivity and large saturation power is cost-effective and promising for short reach optical communication. PMID:27198501

  7. Micromachined microphones with diffraction-based optical displacement detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Wook; Hall, Neal A.; Jeelani, M. Kamran; Bicen, Baris; Okandan, Murat; Degertekin, F. Levent; Qureshi, Shakeel

    2005-07-01

    Micromachined microphones with diffraction-based optical displacement detection are introduced. The approach enables interferometric displacement detection sensitivity in a system that can be optoelectronically integrated with a multichip module into mm{sup 3} volumes without beamsplitters, focusing optics, or critical alignment problems. Prototype devices fabricated using Sandia National Laboratories silicon based SwIFT-Lite{trademark} process are presented and characterized in detail. Integrated electrostatic actuation capabilities of the microphone diaphragm are used to perform dynamic characterization in vacuum and air environments to study the acoustic impedances in an equivalent circuit model of the device. The characterization results are used to predict the thermal mechanical noise spectrum, which is in excellent agreement with measurements performed in an anechoic test chamber. An A weighted displacement noise of 2.4 x 10{sup -2} {angstrom} measured from individual prototype 2100 {micro}m x 2100 {micro}m diaphragms demonstrates the potential for achieving precision measurement quality microphone performance from elements 1 mm{sup 2} in size. The high sensitivity to size ratio coupled with the ability to fabricate elements with precisely matched properties on the same silicon chip may make the approach ideal for realizing high fidelity miniature microphone arrays (sub-cm{sup 2} aperture) employing recently developed signal processing algorithms for sound source separation and localization in the audio frequency range.

  8. Single-target molecule detection with nonbleaching multicolor optical immunolabels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, Sheldon; Smith, David R.; Mock, Jack J.; Schultz, David A.

    2000-02-01

    We introduce and demonstrate the use of colloidal silver plasmon-resonant particles (PRPs) as optical reporters in typical biological assays. PRPs are ultrabright, nanosized optical scatterers, which scatter light elastically and can be prepared with a scattering peak at any color in the visible spectrum. PRPs are readily observed individually with a microscope configured for dark-field microscopy, with white-light illumination of typical power. Here we illustrate the use of PRPs, surface coated with standard ligands, as target-specific labels in an in situ hybridization and an immunocytology assay. We propose that PRPs can replace or complement established labels, such as those based on radioactivity, fluorescence, chemiluminescence, or enzymatic/colorimetric detection that are used routinely in biochemistry, cell biology, and medical diagnostic applications. Moreover, because PRP labels are nonbleaching and bright enough to be rapidly identified and counted, an ultrasensitive assay format based on single-target molecule detection is now practical. We also present the results of a model sandwich immunoassay for goat anti-biotin antibody, in which the number of PRP labels counted in an image constitutes the measured signal.

  9. Micromachined microphones with diffraction-based optical displacement detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hall, Neal A.; Bicen, Baris; Jeelani, M. Kamran; Lee, Wook; Qureshi, Shakeel; Degertekin, F. Levent; Okandan, Murat

    2005-11-01

    Micromachined microphones with diffraction-based optical displacement detection are introduced. The approach enables interferometric displacement detection sensitivity in a system that can be optoelectronically integrated with a multichip module into mm3 volumes without beamsplitters, focusing optics, or critical alignment problems. Prototype devices fabricated using Sandia National Laboratories' silicon based SwIFT-Lite™ process are presented and characterized in detail. Integrated electrostatic actuation capabilities of the microphone diaphragm are used to perform dynamic characterization in vacuum and air environments to study the acoustic impedances in an equivalent circuit model of the device. The characterization results are used to predict the thermal mechanical noise spectrum, which is in excellent agreement with measurements performed in an anechoic test chamber. An A weighted displacement noise of 2.4×10-2 A˚ measured from individual prototype 2100 μm×2100 μm diaphragms demonstrates the potential for achieving precision measurement quality microphone performance from elements 1 mm2 in size. The high sensitivity to size ratio coupled with the ability to fabricate elements with precisely matched properties on the same silicon chip may make the approach ideal for realizing high fidelity miniature microphone arrays (sub-cm2 aperture) employing recently developed signal processing algorithms for sound source separation and localization in the audio frequency range.

  10. Metrological characterization of the pulsed Rb clock with optical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Micalizio, S.; Calosso, C. E.; Godone, A.; Levi, F.

    2012-08-01

    We report on the implementation and metrological characterization of a vapour-cell Rb frequency standard working in a pulsed regime. The three main parts of the clock, physics package, optics and electronics, are described in detail in this paper. The prototype is designed and optimized to detect the clock transition in the optical domain. Specifically, the reference atomic transition, excited with a Ramsey scheme, is detected by observing the interference pattern on a laser absorption signal. The metrological analysis includes the observation and characterization of the clock signal and the measurement of frequency stability and drift. In terms of Allan deviation, the measured frequency stability is as low as 1.7 × 10-13τ-1/2, τ being the averaging time, and reaches the value of a few units of 10-15 for τ = 104 s, an unprecedented result for a vapour-cell clock. We discuss the physical effects leading to this result in this paper with particular care to laser and microwave noises transferred to the clock signal. The frequency drift, probably related to temperature, stays below 10-14 per day, and no evidence of flicker floor is observed. We also mention some possible improvements that in principle would lead to a clock stability below the 10-13 level at 1 s and to a drift of a few units of 10-15 per day.

  11. Design and study on optic fiber sensor detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Xuemei; Liu, Quan; Liang, Xiaoyu; Lin, Haiyan

    2005-11-01

    With the development of industry and agriculture, the environmental pollution becomes more and more serious. Various kinds of poisonous gas are the important pollution sources. Various kinds of poisonous gas, such as the carbon monoxide, sulfureted hydrogen, sulfur dioxide, methane, acetylene are threatening human normal life and production seriously especially today when industry and various kinds of manufacturing industries develop at full speed. The acetylene is a kind of gas with very lively chemical property, extremely apt to burn, resolve and explode, and it is great to destroy things among these poisonous gases. Comparing with other inflammable and explosive gas, the explosion range of the acetylene is heavier. Therefore carrying on monitoring acetylene pollution sources scene in real time, grasping the state of pollution taking place and development in time, have very important meanings. Aim at the above problems, a set of optical fiber detection system of acetylene gas based on the characteristic of spectrum absorption of acetylene is presented in this paper, which has reference channel and is for on-line and real-time detection. In order to eliminate the effect of other factors on measurement precision, the double light sources, double light paths and double cells are used in this system. Because of the use of double wavelength compensating method, this system can eliminate the disturbance in the optical paths, the problem of instability is solved and the measurement precision is greatly enhanced. Some experimental results are presented at the end of this paper.

  12. Pressure and Temperature Spin Crossover Sensors with Optical Detection

    PubMed Central

    Linares, Jorge; Codjovi, Epiphane; Garcia, Yann

    2012-01-01

    Iron(II) spin crossover molecular materials are made of coordination centres switchable between two states by temperature, pressure or a visible light irradiation. The relevant macroscopic parameter which monitors the magnetic state of a given solid is the high-spin (HS) fraction denoted nHS, i.e., the relative population of HS molecules. Each spin crossover material is distinguished by a transition temperature T1/2 where 50% of active molecules have switched to the low-spin (LS) state. In strongly interacting systems, the thermal spin switching occurs abruptly at T1/2. Applying pressure induces a shift from HS to LS states, which is the direct consequence of the lower volume for the LS molecule. Each material has thus a well defined pressure value P1/2. In both cases the spin state change is easily detectable by optical means thanks to a thermo/piezochromic effect that is often encountered in these materials. In this contribution, we discuss potential use of spin crossover molecular materials as temperature and pressure sensors with optical detection. The ones presenting smooth transitions behaviour, which have not been seriously considered for any application, are spotlighted as potential sensors which should stimulate a large interest on this well investigated class of materials. PMID:22666041

  13. A dual-detector optical receiver for PDM signals detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Guanyu; Yu, Yu; Zhang, Xinliang

    2016-05-01

    We propose and fabricate a silicon based dual-detector optical receiver, which consists of a two dimensional (2D) grating coupler (GC) and two separate germanium photodetectors (Ge PDs). The 2D GC performs polarization diversity, and thus demultiplexing and detection for polarization division multiplexed (PDM) signals can be achieved. Through a specific design with double-sides illumination, the space charge density can be reduced and the responsivity and saturation power can be improved significantly. The measured dark current, responsivity and bandwidth are 0.86 μA, 1.06 A/W and 36 GHz under 3 V reverse biased voltage, respectively. Both DC currents and eye diagrams are measured for the proposed device and the results validate its performance successfully. The power penalty between the single and dual polarized signals is about 1.9 dB under 10 and 20 Gb/s cases for both the two Ge PDs. The proposed direct detection (DD) for PDM signals with high speed, high responsivity and large saturation power is cost-effective and promising for short reach optical communication.

  14. Optical system and method for gas detection and monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Polzin, Kurt A. (Inventor); Korman, Valentin (Inventor); Witherow, William K. (Inventor); Hendrickson, Adam Gail (Inventor); Sinko, John Elihu (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A free-space optical path of an optical interferometer is disposed in an environment of interest. A light beam is guided to the optical interferometer using a single-mode optical fiber. The light beam traverses the interferometer's optical path. The light beam guided to the optical path is combined with the light beam at the end of the optical path to define an output light. A temporal history of the output light is recorded.

  15. Fiber optic system design for vehicle detection and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nedoma, Jan; Zboril, Ondrej; Fajkus, Marcel; Zavodny, Petr; Kepak, Stanislav; Bednarek, Lukas; Martinek, Radek; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2016-04-01

    Fiber optic interferometers belong to a group of highly sensitive and precise devices enabling to measure small changes in the deformation shapes, changes in pressure, temperature, vibration and so on. The basis of their activity is to evaluate the number of fringes over time, not changes in the intensity of the optical signal. The methodology described in the article is based on using the interferometer to monitor traffic density. The base of the solution is a Mach-Zehnder interferometer operating with single-mode G.652 optical fiber at the wavelength of 1550 nm excited by a DFB laser. The power distribution of the laser light into the individual arms of the interferometer is in the ratio 1:1. Realized measuring scheme was terminated by an optical receiver including InGaAs PIN photodiode. Registered signal from the photodetector was through 8 Hz high pass filter fed to the measuring card that captures the analog input voltage using an application written in LabView development environment. The interferometer was stored in a waterproof box and placed at the side of the road. Here panned individual transit of cars in his environs. Vertically across the road was placed in contact removable belt simulating a retarder, which was used when passing cars to create sufficient vibration response detecting interferometer. The results demonstrated that the individual vehicles passing around boxing showed characteristic amplitude spectra, which was unique for each object, and had sufficient value signal to noise ratio (SNR). The signal was processed by applications developed for the amplitude-frequency spectrum. Evaluated was the maximum amplitude of the signal and compared to the noise. The results were verified by repeated transit of the different types of cars.

  16. Configuration of electro-optic fire source detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, Ram Z.; Steiner, Zeev; Hofman, Nir

    2007-04-01

    The recent fighting activities in various parts of the world have highlighted the need for accurate fire source detection on one hand and fast "sensor to shooter cycle" capabilities on the other. Both needs can be met by the SPOTLITE system which dramatically enhances the capability to rapidly engage hostile fire source with a minimum of casualties to friendly force and to innocent bystanders. Modular system design enable to meet each customer specific requirements and enable excellent future growth and upgrade potential. The design and built of a fire source detection system is governed by sets of requirements issued by the operators. This can be translated into the following design criteria: I) Long range, fast and accurate fire source detection capability. II) Different threat detection and classification capability. III) Threat investigation capability. IV) Fire source data distribution capability (Location, direction, video image, voice). V) Men portability. ) In order to meet these design criteria, an optimized concept was presented and exercised for the SPOTLITE system. Three major modular components were defined: I) Electro Optical Unit -Including FLIR camera, CCD camera, Laser Range Finder and Marker II) Electronic Unit -including system computer and electronic. III) Controller Station Unit - Including the HMI of the system. This article discusses the system's components definition and optimization processes, and also show how SPOTLITE designers successfully managed to introduce excellent solutions for other system parameters.

  17. Evolution of a totally fiber optic fluid detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Schopper, M.D.; Taylor, J.L. III; Bennett, P.R. Jr.

    1995-12-31

    As environmental and safety requirements for Aboveground Storage Tank (AST) operators increase, the demand for suitable leak detection equipment and methodology has brought about innovative sensor technology. Increasing opportunities to apply this new technology have arisen as state and local ordinances begin to mandate secondary containment and continuous leak detection. Similar federal requirements appear to be on the horizon. Due to the fact that most available leak detection systems have been devised for use in underground storage tank (UST) systems, most products currently available are not amenable to AST application. This is due to the long distances and the vast electrically restricted areas typical in AST setting. There now exists a need for innovative AST specific fluid detection technology. An improved method has been developed for continuously monitoring roof drains and the interstitial spaces in double-bottomed ASTs. Additionally, the system is used for conducting bottom water draws and monitors storm water drains. This technique employs fiber optic sensors which can be placed up to 100 meters from their photoelectric controller. Because the sensor system distinguishes between fluids based on the principle of refractive index, the intermittent presence of water does not undermine its function as a fluid detector since water is discerned from various hydrocarbons. This paper describes the evolution of the new methodology, from initial analog prototype to fully digital, commercial implementation in a modern fuel terminal.

  18. Automated Detection of Uninformative Frames in Pulmonary Optical Endomicroscopy.

    PubMed

    Perperidis, Antonios; Akram, Ahsan; Altmann, Yoann; McCool, Paul; Westerfeld, Jody; Wilson, David; Dhaliwal, Kevin; McLaughlin, Stephen

    2017-01-01

    Optical endomicroscopy (OEM) is a novel real-time imaging technology that provides endoscopic images at a microscopic level. The nature of OEM data, as acquired in clinical use, gives rise to the presence of uninformative frames (i.e., pure-noise and motion-artefacts). Uninformative frames can comprise a considerable proportion (up to > 25%) of a dataset, increasing the resources required for analyzing the data (both manually and automatically), as well as diluting the results of any automated quantification analysis. There is, therefore, a need to automatically detect and remove as many of these uninformative frames as possible while keeping frames with structural information intact. This paper employs Gray Level Cooccurrence Matrix texture measures and detection theory to identify and remove such frames. The detection of pure-noise and motion-artefacts frames is treated as two independent problems. Pulmonary OEM frame sequences of the distal lung are employed for the development and assessment of the approach. The proposed approach identifies and removes uninformative frames with a sensitivity of 93% and a specificity of 92.6%. The detection algorithm is accurate and robust in pulmonary OEM frame sequences. Conditional to appropriate model refinement, the algorithms can become applicable in other organs.

  19. An integrated CMOS detection system for optical short-pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Chang-Gun; Hong, Nam-Pyo; Choi, Young-Wan

    2014-03-01

    We present design of a front-end readout system consisting of charge sensitive amplifier (CSA) and pulse shaper for detection of stochastic and ultra-small semiconductor scintillator signal. The semiconductor scintillator is double sided silicon detector (DSSD) or avalanche photo detector (APD) for high resolution and peak signal reliability of γ-ray or X-ray spectroscopy. Such system commonly uses low noise multichannel CSA. Each CSA in multichannel includes continuous reset system based on tens of MΩ and charge-integrating capacitor in feedback loop. The high value feedback resistor requires large area and huge power consumption for integrated circuits. In this paper, we analyze these problems and propose a CMOS short pulse detection system with a novel CSA. The novel CSA is composed of continuous reset system with combination of diode connected PMOS and 100 fF. This structure has linearity with increased input charge quantity from tens of femto-coulomb to pico-coulomb. Also, the front-end readout system includes both slow and fast shapers for detecting CSA output and preventing pile-up distortion. Shaping times of fast and slow shapers are 150 ns and 1.4 μs, respectively. Simulation results of the CMOS detection system for optical short-pulse implemented in 0.18 μm CMOS technology are presented.

  20. Optical detection of disordered water within a protein cavity.

    PubMed

    Goldbeck, Robert A; Pillsbury, Marlisa L; Jensen, Russell A; Mendoza, Juan L; Nguyen, Rosa L; Olson, John S; Soman, Jayashree; Kliger, David S; Esquerra, Raymond M

    2009-09-02

    Internal water molecules are important to protein structure and function, but positional disorder and low occupancies can obscure their detection by X-ray crystallography. Here, we show that water can be detected within the distal cavities of myoglobin mutants by subtle changes in the absorbance spectrum of pentacoordinate heme, even when the presence of solvent is not readily observed in the corresponding crystal structures. A well-defined, noncoordinated water molecule hydrogen bonded to the distal histidine (His64) is seen within the distal heme pocket in the crystal structure of wild type (wt) deoxymyoglobin. Displacement of this water decreases the rate of ligand entry into wt Mb, and we have shown previously that the entry of this water is readily detected optically after laser photolysis of MbCO complexes. However, for L29F and V68L Mb no discrete positions for solvent molecules are seen in the electron density maps of the crystal structures even though His64 is still present and slow rates of ligand binding indicative of internal water are observed. In contrast, time-resolved perturbations of the visible absorption bands of L29F and V68L deoxyMb generated after laser photolysis detect the entry and significant occupancy of water within the distal pockets of these variants. Thus, the spectral perturbation of pentacoordinate heme offers a potentially robust system for measuring nonspecific hydration of the active sites of heme proteins.

  1. Liquid crystals as optical amplifiers for bacterial detection.

    PubMed

    Zafiu, C; Hussain, Z; Küpcü, S; Masutani, A; Kilickiran, P; Sinner, E-K

    2016-06-15

    Interactions of bacteria with target molecules (e.g. antibiotics) or other microorganisms are of growing interest. The first barrier for targeting gram-negative bacteria is layer of a Lipopolysaccharides (LPS). Liquid crystal (LC) based sensors covered with LPS monolayers, as presented in this study, offer a simple model to study and make use of this type of interface for detection and screening. This work describes in detail the production and application of such sensors based on three different LPS that have been investigated regarding their potential to serve as sensing layer to detect bacteria. The LPS O127:B8 in combination with a LC based sensor was identified to be most useful as biomimetic sensing surface. This LPS/LC combination interacts with three different bacteria species, one gram-positive and two gram-negative species, allowing the detection of bacterial presence regardless from their viability. It could be shown that even very low bacterial cell numbers (minimum 500 cell ml(-1)) could be detected within minutes (maximum 15 min). The readout mechanism is the adsorption of bacterial entities on surface bond LPS molecules with the LC serving as an optical amplifier.

  2. Optical Monitoring and Detection of Spinal Cord Ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Mesquita, Rickson C.; D’Souza, Angela; Bilfinger, Thomas V.; Galler, Robert M.; Emanuel, Asher; Schenkel, Steven S.; Yodh, Arjun G.; Floyd, Thomas F.

    2013-01-01

    Spinal cord ischemia can lead to paralysis or paraparesis, but if detected early it may be amenable to treatment. Current methods use evoked potentials for detection of spinal cord ischemia, a decades old technology whose warning signs are indirect and significantly delayed from the onset of ischemia. Here we introduce and demonstrate a prototype fiber optic device that directly measures spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. This technical advance in neurological monitoring promises a new standard of care for detection of spinal cord ischemia and the opportunity for early intervention. We demonstrate the probe in an adult Dorset sheep model. Both open and percutaneous approaches were evaluated during pharmacologic, physiological, and mechanical interventions designed to induce variations in spinal cord blood flow and oxygenation. The induced variations were rapidly and reproducibly detected, demonstrating direct measurement of spinal cord ischemia in real-time. In the future, this form of hemodynamic spinal cord diagnosis could significantly improve monitoring and management in a broad range of patients, including those undergoing thoracic and abdominal aortic revascularization, spine stabilization procedures for scoliosis and trauma, spinal cord tumor resection, and those requiring management of spinal cord injury in intensive care settings. PMID:24358279

  3. Streak detection and analysis pipeline for optical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Virtanen, J.; Granvik, M.; Torppa, J.; Muinonen, K.; Poikonen, J.; Lehti, J.; Säntti, T.; Komulainen, T.; Flohrer, T.

    2014-07-01

    We describe a novel data processing and analysis pipeline for optical observations of moving objects, either of natural (asteroids, meteors) or artificial origin (satellites, space debris). The monitoring of the space object populations requires reliable acquisition of observational data to support the development and validation of population models, and to build and maintain catalogues of orbital elements. The orbital catalogues are, in turn, needed for the assessment of close approaches (for asteroids, with the Earth; for satellites, with each other) and for the support of contingency situations or launches. For both types of populations, there is also increasing interest to detect fainter objects corresponding to the small end of the size distribution. We focus on the low signal-to-noise (SNR) detection of objects with high angular velocities, resulting in long and faint object trails, or streaks, in the optical images. The currently available, mature image processing algorithms for detection and astrometric reduction of optical data cover objects that cross the sensor field-of-view comparably slowly, and, particularly for satellites, within a rather narrow, predefined range of angular velocities. By applying specific tracking techniques, the objects appear point-like or as short trails in the exposures. However, the general survey scenario is always a 'track-before-detect' problem, resulting in streaks of arbitrary lengths. Although some considerations for low-SNR processing of streak-like features are available in the current image processing and computer vision literature, algorithms are not readily available yet. In the ESA-funded StreakDet (Streak detection and astrometric reduction) project, we develop and evaluate an automated processing pipeline applicable to single images (as compared to consecutive frames of the same field) obtained with any observing scenario, including space-based surveys and both low- and high-altitude populations. The algorithmic

  4. Optical detection of sepsis markers using liquid crystal based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCamley, Maureen K.; Artenstein, Andrew W.; Opal, Steven M.; Crawford, Gregory P.

    2007-02-01

    A liquid crystal based biosensor for the detection and diagnosis of sepsis is currently in development. Sepsis, a major clinical syndrome with a significant public health burden in the US due to a large elderly population, is the systemic response of the body to a localized infection and is defined as the combination of pathologic infection and physiological changes. Bacterial infections are responsible for 90% of cases of sepsis in the US. Currently there is no bedside diagnostic available to positively identify sepsis. The basic detection scheme employed in a liquid crystal biosensor contains attributes that would find value in a clinical setting, especially for the early detection of sepsis. Utilizing the unique properties of liquid crystals, such as birefringence, a bedside diagnostic is in development which will optically report the presence of biomolecules. In a septic patient, an endotoxin known as lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is released from the outer membrane of Gram-negative bacteria and can be found in the blood stream. It is hypothesized that this long chained molecule will cause local disruptions to the open surface of a sensor containing aligned liquid crystal. The bulk liquid crystal ampli.es these local changes at the surface due to the presence of the sepsis marker, providing an optical readout through polarizing microscopy images. Liquid crystal sensors consisting of both square and circular grids, 100-200 μm in size, have been fabricated and filled with a common liquid crystal material, 5CB. Homeotropic alignment was confirmed using polarizing microscopy. The grids were then contacted with either saline only (control), or saline with varying concentrations of LPS. Changes in the con.guration of the nematic director of the liquid crystal were observed through the range of concentrations tested (5mg/mL - 1pg/mL) which have been confirmed by a consulting physician as clinically relevant levels.

  5. Quantitative optical imaging for the detection of early cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Tao

    The objectives of this thesis are to provide insight of fundamental mechanisms of acetowhitening effect, upon which the colposcopic diagnosis of human cervical cancer is based and to develop novel quantitative optical imaging technologies supplementing colposcopy to improve its performance in detecting early cancer. Firstly, the temporal characteristics of acetowhitening process are studied on monolayer cell cultures. It is found that the dynamic acetowhitening processes in normal and cancerous cells are significantly different. Secondly, the changes in light scattering induced by acetic acid in intact cells and isolated cellular fractions are investigated by using confocal microscopy and light scattering spectroscopy. The results provide evidence that the small-sized components in the cytoplasm are the major contributors to the acetowhitening effect. Thirdly, a unified Mie and fractal model is proposed to interpret light scattering by biological cells. It is found that light scattering in forward directions is dominated by Mie scattering by bare cells and nuclei, whereas light scattering at large angles is determined by fractal scattering by subcellular structures. Fourthly, an optical imaging system based on active stereo vision and motion tracking is built to measure the 3-D surface topology of cervix and track the motion of patient. The information of motion tracking is used to register the time-sequenced images of cervix recorded during colposcopic examination. The imaging system is evaluated by tracking the movements of cervix models. The results demonstrate that the imaging technique holds the promise to enable the quantitative mapping of the acetowhitening kinetics over cervical surface for more accurate diagnosis of cervical cancer. At last, a calibrated autofluorescence imaging system is instrumented for detecting neoplasia in vivo. It is found that the calibrated autofluorescence signals from neoplasia are generally lower than signals from normal

  6. Assessment of detection limits of fiber-optic distributed temperature sensing for detection of illicit connections.

    PubMed

    Nienhuis, Jaap; de Haan, Cornelis; Langeveld, Jeroen; Klootwijk, Martijn; Clemens, François

    2013-01-01

    Distributed temperature sensing (DTS) with fiber-optic cables is a powerful tool to detect illicit connections in storm sewer systems. High-frequency temperature measurements along the in-sewer cable create a detailed representation of temperature anomalies due to illicit discharges. The detection limits of the monitoring equipment itself are well-known, but there is little information available on detection limits for the discovery of illicit connections, as in mixing of sewers, and attenuation also plays an important role. This paper describes the results of full-scale experiments aiming to quantify the detection limits for illicit connections under various sewer conditions. Based on the results, a new monitoring set-up for (partially) filled sewer conduits has been proposed.

  7. Influence of laser beam characteristics and focusing optics on optical laser-induced breakdown detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, C.; Hauser, W.

    2009-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) is a well established technique for measuring size and concentration of inorganic colloids in liquids. However, most applications of LIBD are restricted to the measurement of mean sizes, which is problematic in cases of wide colloid size distributions (PSD) as typically is the case in natural systems. Evaluation of PSDs from LIBD is possible but requires detailed control of the power density within the laser focus. In the present work we describe the mathematical treatment how to calculate this power density from the beam characteristics of the light source and the optical properties of the focusing optics. The results are compared to measured spatial distributions of breakdown events of three LIBD setups.

  8. Phase and Frequency Tracking-Accuracy in Direct-Detection Optical-Communication Systems.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Lower bounds are given on the attainable mean-square performance in causally tracking the phase and frequency of a subcarrier that modulates an optical carrier in a direct-detection optical - communication system. (Author)

  9. Noninvasive optical detection of carotenoid antioxidants in the human retina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharifzadeh, Mohsen

    wavelengths, respectively, results in pixel intensity maps which are used to quantify the macular pigment levels. The results obtained to date show that optical imaging approaches are very promising, that they are well suited for clinical applications, and that they may well lead to a widely used, early screening technology of subjects based on a non-invasive, rapid, precise, and objective optical detection technology.

  10. Damage detection and characterization using fiber optic sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glisic, Branko; Sigurdardottir, Dorotea; Yao, Yao; Hubbell, David

    2013-04-01

    Fiber optic sensors (FOS) have significantly evolved and have reached their market maturity during the last decade. Their widely recognized advantages are high precision, long-term stability, and durability. But in addition to these advantageous performances, FOS technologies allow for affordable instrumentation of large areas of structure enabling global large-scale monitoring based on long-gauge sensors and integrity monitoring based on distributed sensors. These two approaches are particularly suitable for damage detection and characterization, i.e., damage localization and to certain extent quantification and propagation, as illustrated by two applications presented in detail in this paper: post-tensioned concrete bridge and segmented concrete pipeline. Early age cracking was detected, localized and quantified in the concrete deck of a pedestrian bridge using embedded long-gauge FOS. Post-tensioning of deck closed the cracks; however, permanent weakening in a bridge joint occurred due to cracking and it was identified and quantified. The damage was confirmed using embedded distributed FOS and a separate load test of the bridge. Real-size concrete pipeline specimens and surrounding soil were equipped with distributed FOS and exposed to permanent ground displacement in a large-scale testing facility. Two tests were performed on different pipeline specimens. The sensors bonded on the pipeline specimens successfully detected and localized rupture of pipeline joints, while the sensors embedded in the soil were able to detect and localize the failure plane. Comparison with strain-gauges installed on the pipeline and visual inspection after the test confirmed accurate damage detection and characterization.

  11. Passive radiation detection using optically active CMOS sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dosiek, Luke; Schalk, Patrick D.

    2013-05-01

    Recently, there have been a number of small-scale and hobbyist successes in employing commodity CMOS-based camera sensors for radiation detection. For example, several smartphone applications initially developed for use in areas near the Fukushima nuclear disaster are capable of detecting radiation using a cell phone camera, provided opaque tape is placed over the lens. In all current useful implementations, it is required that the sensor not be exposed to visible light. We seek to build a system that does not have this restriction. While building such a system would require sophisticated signal processing, it would nevertheless provide great benefits. In addition to fulfilling their primary function of image capture, cameras would also be able to detect unknown radiation sources even when the danger is considered to be low or non-existent. By experimentally profiling the image artifacts generated by gamma ray and β particle impacts, algorithms are developed to identify the unique features of radiation exposure, while discarding optical interaction and thermal noise effects. Preliminary results focus on achieving this goal in a laboratory setting, without regard to integration time or computational complexity. However, future work will seek to address these additional issues.

  12. Noninvasive detection of plant nutrient stress using fiber optic spectrophotometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jun-Wei; Asundi, Anand K.; Liew, Oi Wah; Boey, William S. L.

    2001-05-01

    In a previous paper, we described the use of fiber optic spectrophotometry as a non-destructive and sensitive method to detect early symptoms of plant nutrient deficiency. We report further developments of our work on Brassica chinensis var parachinensis (Bailey) showing reproducibility of our data collected at a different seasonal period. Plants at the mid-log growth phase were subjected to nutrient stress by transferring them to nitrate- and calcium- deficient nutrient solution in a standing aerated hydroponic system. After tracking changes in leaf reflectance by FOSpectr for nine days, the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution and their recovery was monitored for a further nine days. The responses of nutrient stressed plants were compared with those grown under complete nutrient solution over the 18-day trial period. We also compared the sensitivity of FOSpectr detection against plant growth measurements vis-a-vis average leaf number and leaf width and show that the former method gave an indication of nutrient stress much earlier than the latter. In addition, this work indicated that while normal and nutrient-stressed plants could not be distinguished within the first 7 days by tracking plant growth indicators, stressed plants did show a clear decline in average leaf number and leaf width in later stages of growth even after the plants were returned to complete nutrient solution. The results further reinforce the need for early detection of nutrient stress, as late remedial action could not reverse the loss in plant growth in later stages of plant development.

  13. Detection of early seizures by diffuse optical tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Tao; Hajihashemi, M. Reza; Zhou, Junli; Carney, Paul R.; Jiang, Huabei

    2015-03-01

    In epilepsy it has been challenging to detect early changes in brain activity that occurs prior to seizure onset and to map their origin and evolution for possible intervention. Besides, preclinical seizure experiments need to be conducted in awake animals with images reconstructed and displayed in real-time. We demonstrate using a rat model of generalized epilepsy that diffuse optical tomography (DOT) provides a unique functional neuroimaging modality for noninvasively and continuously tracking brain activities with high spatiotemporal resolution. We developed methods to conduct seizure experiments in fully awake rats using a subject-specific helmet and a restraining mechanism. For the first time, we detected early hemodynamic responses with heterogeneous patterns several minutes preceding the electroencephalographic seizure onset, supporting the presence of a "pre-seizure" state both in anesthetized and awake rats. Using a novel time-series analysis of scattering images, we show that the analysis of scattered diffuse light is a sensitive and reliable modality for detecting changes in neural activity associated with generalized seizure. We found widespread hemodynamic changes evolving from local regions of the bilateral cortex and thalamus to the entire brain, indicating that the onset of generalized seizures may originate locally rather than diffusely. Together, these findings suggest DOT represents a powerful tool for mapping early seizure onset and propagation pathways.

  14. Optical fiber sensor-based detection of partial discharges in power transformers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jiangdong; Xiao, Hai; Huo, Wei; Luo, Ming; May, Russ; Wang, Anbo; Liu, Yilu

    2001-07-01

    In this paper, a fiber optic acoustic sensor system is designed and tested for on-line detection of the partial discharges inside high voltage power transformers. The fiber optic sensor uses a silica diaphragm and a single mode optical fiber encapsulated in a silica glass tube to form an extrinsic Fabry-Perot interferometer. Test results indicate that the developed fiber optic sensors are capable of detecting the acoustic signals propagating inside the transformer oil with high resolution and high frequency.

  15. Detection of crevice corrosion of metallic alloys by optical interferometry

    SciTech Connect

    Habib, K.

    1999-11-01

    In the present investigation, an optical corrosion-meter has been developed for materials testing and evaluation of different corrosion phenomena. The idea of the optical corrosion-meter was established based on principles of 3D-holographic interferometry for measuring microsurface dissolution, i.e. mass loss, and on those of electrochemistry for measuring the bulk electronic current, i.e. corrosion current of metallic samples in aqueous solutions. In the present work, an early stage of crevice corrosion of a titanium alloy, a carbon steel and a pure aluminum in seawater was monitored in situ by the optical corrosion-meter during the cyclic polarization test. The observations of crevice corrosion were basically interferometric perturbations detected only on the surface of the titanium alloy and the carbon steel underneath a crevice assembly, made of Teflon bolt, Teflon nut, and Teflon washer. The crevice assembly used on all tested samples to create a differential aeration cell between the surface of the sample and areas underneath the crevice assembly in seawater. Each Teflon washer contained radial grooves and had 20 plateaus which formed crevices ( shield areas) when pressed against the surface of the sample. The interferometric perturbations interpreted as a localized corrosion in a form of an early crevice corrosion of a depth ranged between 0.3 pm to several micrometers. Consequently, results of the present work indicate that holographic interferometry is very useful technique as a 3D-interferometric microscope for monitoring crevice corrosion at the initiation stage of the phenomenon for different metallic samples in aqueous solutions.

  16. Super Smooth Optics for Extra-Solar Planet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrile, Richard J.; Ftaclas, Christ

    1989-01-01

    The goal of imaging planets around the nearby stars has important scientific significance but requires the use of advanced methods of controlling diffracted and scattered light. Over the last three years we have undertaken a study of coronagraphic methods of controlling diffracted light and of figuring hyper-contrast optics. Progress in these two general areas have led to a proposed space-based, 1.9 meter diameter coronagraphic telescope designed specifically for very high performance in the imaging of faint objects near bright sources. This instrument, called the Circumstellar Imaging Telescope (CIT), relies on a new high efficiency coronagraph design and the careful control of scattered light by extremely smooth optics. The high efficiency coronagraph uses focal plane apodization in order to concentrate diffracted light more efficiently in the pupil. This allows convenient removal of the diffracted light by masking off parts of the telescope pupil while not sacrificing the center of the field. Reductions of diffracted light by factors exceeding 1000 are not only possible but are required in order to detect extra-solar planets. Laboratory experiments with this new design have confirmed the theoretical diffraction reductions to the limits of the optics used (factors of about 300) . The extremely high efficiency of this coronagraph puts strong constraints on the narrow angle scattered light due to figure errors in the telescope mirror. Since planets orbiting nearby stars are expected at angular distances of about 1 arcsecond, it is in this small angular range in which scattering must be controlled. The figure errors responsible for scattering in this range come from mid-spatial frequencies corresponding to correlation lengths of about 10 cm on the primary mirror. A primary mirror about 15 times smoother than the Hubble Space Telescope mirror is required for the CIT. Laboratory experiments indicate that small test mirrors can be fabricated with existing technology

  17. Super Smooth Optics for Extra-Solar Planet Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Terrile, Richard J.; Ftaclas, Christ

    1989-01-01

    The goal of imaging planets around the nearby stars has important scientific significance but requires the use of advanced methods of controlling diffracted and scattered light. Over the last three years we have undertaken a study of coronagraphic methods of controlling diffracted light and of figuring hyper-contrast optics. Progress in these two general areas have led to a proposed space-based, 1.9 meter diameter coronagraphic telescope designed specifically for very high performance in the imaging of faint objects near bright sources. This instrument, called the Circumstellar Imaging Telescope (CIT), relies on a new high efficiency coronagraph design and the careful control of scattered light by extremely smooth optics. The high efficiency coronagraph uses focal plane apodization in order to concentrate diffracted light more efficiently in the pupil. This allows convenient removal of the diffracted light by masking off parts of the telescope pupil while not sacrificing the center of the field. Reductions of diffracted light by factors exceeding 1000 are not only possible but are required in order to detect extra-solar planets. Laboratory experiments with this new design have confirmed the theoretical diffraction reductions to the limits of the optics used (factors of about 300) . The extremely high efficiency of this coronagraph puts strong constraints on the narrow angle scattered light due to figure errors in the telescope mirror. Since planets orbiting nearby stars are expected at angular distances of about 1 arcsecond, it is in this small angular range in which scattering must be controlled. The figure errors responsible for scattering in this range come from mid-spatial frequencies corresponding to correlation lengths of about 10 cm on the primary mirror. A primary mirror about 15 times smoother than the Hubble Space Telescope mirror is required for the CIT. Laboratory experiments indicate that small test mirrors can be fabricated with existing technology

  18. Measuring human ventilation for apnoea detection using an optical encoder.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, G M; Webster, J G

    1998-08-01

    We have designed, built and tested a proof-of-concept system based on optical encoder technology for measuring adult or infant ventilation. It uses change in chest circumference to provide an indirect measure of ventilation. The Hewlett-Packard HEDS-9720 optical encoder senses displacement of its matching codestrip. It yields a resolution of 0.17 mm and is accurate to 0.008 mm over a 10 mm test distance. The encoder is mounted on a nylon web belt wrapped around the torso and responds to changes in circumference. Motion of the code strip during respiration is converted to direction of movement (inhalation or exhalation) as well as magnitude of circumference change. Use of two sensor bands, one on the chest and one on the abdomen, may allow detection of obstructive apnoea in which there is no air flow out of or into the subject despite respiratory movement. Applications of this technology include infant apnoea monitoring as well as long-term adult monitoring.

  19. Detecting concentrations of milk components by an iterative optical technique.

    PubMed

    Yariv, Inbar; Kapp-Barnea, Yaara; Genzel, Eran; Duadi, Hamootal; Fixler, Dror

    2015-11-01

    This paper introduces a theoretical and practical model for reconstructing the scattering properties of a participating media. Our theory is based on a robust generalization of the Gerchberg-Saxton (G-S) algorithm. At the end of this algorithm the reduced scattering coefficient μ's of a given substance, can be estimated from the standard deviation (STD) of the retrieved phase of the remitted light. We use the theory to compute the phase's STD that directly correlated to the optical properties for different types of milk components, and we derive a novel appearance model for milk parameterized by the lactose and protein contents. Our results show that we are able to detect the possibility of lactose and milk proteins' quantitative signature by the G-S optical tool, en route to the design of a novel milk-content-monitoring tool. Sketch of the experimental setup for light intensity measurements and reduced scattering coefficient reconstruction. The samples were prepared from various milk components: whey protein, sodium casienate and lactose, at different concentrations. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Brain metastasis detection by resonant Raman optical biopsy method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Yan; Liu, Cheng-hui; Cheng, Gangge; Zhou, Lixin; Zhang, Chunyuan; Pu, Yang; Li, Zhongwu; Liu, Yulong; Li, Qingbo; Wang, Wei; Alfano, Robert R.

    2014-03-01

    Resonant Raman (RR) spectroscopy provides an effective way to enhance Raman signal from particular bonds associated with key molecules due to changes on a molecular level. In this study, RR is used for detection of human brain metastases of five kinds of primary organs of lung, breast, kidney, rectal and orbital in ex-vivo. The RR spectra of brain metastases cancerous tissues were measured and compared with those of normal brain tissues and the corresponding primary cancer tissues. The differences of five types of brain metastases tissues in key bio-components of carotene, tryptophan, lactate, alanine and methyl/methylene group were investigated. The SVM-KNN classifier was used to categorize a set of RR spectra data of brain metastasis of lung cancerous tissues from normal brain tissue, yielding diagnostic sensitivity and specificity at 100% and 75%, respectively. The RR spectroscopy may provide new moleculebased optical probe tools for diagnosis and classification of brain metastatic of cancers.

  1. Optical Fluorescence Detected from X-ray Irradiated Liquid Water.

    PubMed

    Hans, Andreas; Ozga, Christian; Seidel, Robert; Schmidt, Philipp; Ueltzhöffer, Timo; Holzapfel, Xaver; Wenzel, Philip; Reiß, Philipp; Pohl, Marvin N; Unger, Isaak; Aziz, Emad F; Ehresmann, Arno; Slavíček, Petr; Winter, Bernd; Knie, André

    2017-03-16

    Despite its importance, the structure and dynamics of liquid water are still poorly understood in many apsects. Here, we report on the observation of optical fluorescence upon soft X-ray irradiation of liquid water. Detection of spectrally resolved fluorescence was achieved by a combination of the liquid microjet technique and fluorescence spectroscopy. We observe a genuine liquid-phase fluorescence manifested by a broad emission band in the 170-340 nm (4-7 eV) photon wavelength range. In addition, another narrower emission near 300 nm can be assigned to the fluorescence of OH (A state) in the gas phase, the emitting species being formed by Auger electrons escaping from liquid water. We argue that the newly observed broad-band emission of liquid water is relevant in search of extraterrestrial life, and we also envision the observed electron-ejection mechanism to find application for exploring solutes at liquid-vapor interfaces.

  2. Remote measurement of microwave distribution based on optical detection

    SciTech Connect

    Ji, Zhong; Ding, Wenzheng; Yang, Sihua; Chen, Qun E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn; Xing, Da E-mail: xingda@scnu.edu.cn

    2016-01-04

    In this letter, we present the development of a remote microwave measurement system. This method employs an arc discharge lamp that serves as an energy converter from microwave to visible light, which can propagate without transmission medium. Observed with a charge coupled device, quantitative microwave power distribution can be achieved when the operators and electronic instruments are in a distance from the high power region in order to reduce the potential risk. We perform the experiments using pulsed microwaves, and the results show that the system response is dependent on the microwave intensity over a certain range. Most importantly, the microwave distribution can be monitored in real time by optical observation of the response of a one-dimensional lamp array. The characteristics of low cost, a wide detection bandwidth, remote measurement, and room temperature operation make the system a preferred detector for microwave applications.

  3. Optical coherence tomography speckle decorrelation for detecting cell death

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farhat, Golnaz; Mariampillai, Adrian; Yang, Victor X. D.; Czarnota, Gregory J.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2011-03-01

    We present a dynamic light scattering technique applied to optical coherence tomography (OCT) for detecting changes in intracellular motion caused by cellular reorganization during apoptosis. We have validated our method by measuring Brownian motion in microsphere suspensions and comparing the measured values to those derived based on particle diffusion calculated using the Einstein-Stokes equation. Autocorrelations of OCT signal intensities acquired from acute myeloid leukemia cells as a function of treatment time demonstrated a significant drop in the decorrelation time after 24 hours of cisplatin treatment. This corresponded with nuclear fragmentation and irregular cell shape observed in histological sections. A similar analysis conducted with multicellular tumor spheroids indicated a shorter decorrelation time in the spheroid core relative to its edges. The spheroid core corresponded to a region exhibiting signs of cell death in histological sections and increased backscatter intensity in OCT images.

  4. Detection of typhoid fever by diatom-based optical biosensor.

    PubMed

    Selvaraj, Viji; Muthukumar, Anbazhagi; Nagamony, Ponpandian; Chinnuswamy, Viswanathan

    2017-06-02

    Surface-modified diatom substrates are employed for the development of immunocomplex-based optical biosensor for diagnosis of typhoid. Biosensor has been prepared by covalent immobilization of Salmonella typhi antibody onto the crosslinked diatom substrates via glutaraldehyde. Photoluminescent (PL) studies revealed good specificity and ability of conjugated diatom substrates to distinguish complementary (S. typhi) and non-complementary (Escherichia coli) antigens. The immunocomplexed biosensor showed detection limit of 10 pg. The excellent performance of biosensor is associated to its large surface-to-volume ratio, good photoluminescent property, and biocompatibility of diatom frustules, which enhances the antibody immobilization and facilitates the nucleophilic electron transfer between antibody and conjugated diatom surface. Hence, immunocomplexed diatom substrates are considered to be a suitable platform for the environmental monitoring of water-borne pathogen S. typhi.

  5. Highly sensitive optical sensor system for blood leakage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ueda, Masahiro; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Jie, Chen; Sanae, Mizuno; Touma, Yasunori

    A highly sensitive method for the detection of blood leakage has been developed, and a practical sensor system for blood concentration measurement has been constructed. The present method is based on the attenuation of laser light by blood cells. The effects of the fluctuations of the incident laser light power are eliminated by normalizing the attenuated light intensity by the incident light intensity. A part of the incident laser light is reflected by a beam splitter mounted at the entrance of the test cell, of which the power is measured to provide base data for normalization. The optical path is extended to enhance sensitivity by using a pair of side mirrors. This multi-reflection method is very effective to increase sensitivity; the maximum sensitivity obtained for blood concentration is about 4 X 10 -6 by volume, which is significantly higher than that of the conventional sensors.

  6. Optimum detection of an optical image on a photoelectric surface

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.; Wang, L.

    1972-01-01

    The detection of an optical image in the presence of uniform background light is based on a likelihood ratio formed of the numbers of photoelectrons emitted from small elements of a photoelectric surface onto which the image is focused. When diffraction is negligible and the surface has unit quantum efficiency, this detector is equipollent with the optimum detector of the image forming light. Its performance is compared with that of the threshold detector and that of a detector basing its decisions on the total number of photoelectrons from a finite area of the image. The illuminance of the image is postulated to have a Gaussian spatial distribution. All three detectors exhibit nearly the same reliability.

  7. Optical detection of chemical warfare agents and toxic industrial chemicals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webber, Michael E.; Pushkarsky, Michael B.; Patel, C. Kumar N.

    2004-12-01

    We present an analytical model evaluating the suitability of optical absorption based spectroscopic techniques for detection of chemical warfare agents (CWAs) and toxic industrial chemicals (TICs) in ambient air. The sensor performance is modeled by simulating absorption spectra of a sample containing both the target and multitude of interfering species as well as an appropriate stochastic noise and determining the target concentrations from the simulated spectra via a least square fit (LSF) algorithm. The distribution of the LSF target concentrations determines the sensor sensitivity, probability of false positives (PFP) and probability of false negatives (PFN). The model was applied to CO2 laser based photoacosutic (L-PAS) CWA sensor and predicted single digit ppb sensitivity with very low PFP rates in the presence of significant amount of interferences. This approach will be useful for assessing sensor performance by developers and users alike; it also provides methodology for inter-comparison of different sensing technologies.

  8. A portable cell-based optical detection device for rapid detection of Listeria and Bacillus toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Pratik; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Rickus, Jenna L.; Morgan, Mark T.; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2005-11-01

    A mammalian cell-based optical biosensor was built to detect pathogenic Listeria and Bacillus species. This sensor measures the ability of the pathogens to infect and induce cytotoxicity on hybrid lymphocyte cell line (Ped-2E9) resulting in the release of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) that can be detected optically using a portable spectrophotometer. The Ped-2E9 cells were encapsulated in collagen gel matrices and grown in 48-well plates or in specially designed filtration tube units. Toxin preparations or bacterial cells were introduced and ALP release was assayed after 3-5 h. Pathogenic L. monocytogenes strains or the listeriolysin toxins preparation showed cytotoxicity ranging from 55% - 92%. Toxin preparations (~20 μg/ml) from B. cereus strains showed 24 - 98% cytotoxicity. In contrast, a non-pathogenic L. innocua (F4247) and a B. substilis induced only 2% and 8% cytotoxicity, respectively. This cell-based detection device demonstrates its ability to detect the presence of pathogenic Listeria and Bacillus species and can potentially be used onsite for food safety or in biosecurity application.

  9. Distributed optical microsensors for hydrogen leak detection and related applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, Scott R.; Patton, James F.; Sepaniak, Michael J.; Datskos, Panos G.; Smith, D. Barton

    2010-04-01

    Significant advances have recently been made to develop optically interrogated microsensor based chemical sensors with specific application to hydrogen vapor sensing and leak detection in the hydrogen economy. We have developed functionalized polymer-film and palladium/silver alloy coated microcantilever arrays with nanomechanical sensing for this application. The uniqueness of this approach is in the use of independent component analysis (ICA) and the classification techniques of neural networks to analyze the signals produced by an array of microcantilever sensors. This analysis identifies and quantifies the amount of hydrogen and other trace gases physisorbed on the arrays. Selectivity is achieved by using arrays of functionalized sensors with a moderate distribution of specificity among the sensing elements. The device consists of an array of beam-shaped transducers with molecular recognition phases (MRPs) applied to one surface of the transducers. Bending moments on the individual transducers can be detected by illuminating them with a laser or an LED and then reading the reflected light with an optical position sensitive detector (PSD) such as a CCD. Judicious selection of MRPs for the array provides multiple isolated interaction surfaces for sensing the environment. When a particular chemical agent binds to a transducer, the effective surface stresses of its modified and uncoated sides change unequally and the transducer begins to bend. The extent of bending depends upon the specific interactions between the microcantilever's MRP and the analyte. Thus, the readout of a multi-MRP array is a complex multidimensional signal that can be analyzed to deconvolve a multicomponent gas mixture. The use of this sensing and analysis technique in unattended networked arrays of sensors for various monitoring and surveillance applications is discussed.

  10. Distributed optical microsensors for hydrogen leak detection and related applications

    SciTech Connect

    Hunter, Scott Robert; Patton, James; Sepaniak, Michael; Datskos, Panos G; Smith, Barton

    2010-01-01

    Significant advances have recently been made to develop optically interrogated microsensor based chemical sensors with specific application to hydrogen vapor sensing and leak detection in the hydrogen economy. We have developed functionalized polymer-film and palladium/silver alloy coated microcantilever arrays with nanomechanical sensing for this application. The uniqueness of this approach is in the use of independent component analysis (ICA) and the classi cation techniques of neural networks to analyze the signals produced by an array of microcantilever sensors. This analysis identifies and quantifies the amount of hydrogen and other trace gases physisorbed on the arrays. Selectivity is achieved by using arrays of functionalized sensors with a moderate distribution of specificity among the sensing elements. The device consists of an array of beam-shaped transducers with molecular recognition phases (MRPs) applied to one surface of the transducers. Bending moments on the individual transducers can be detected by illuminating them with a laser or an LED and then reading the reflected light with an optical position sensitive detector (PSD) such as a CCD. Judicious selection of MRPs for the array provides multiple isolated interaction surfaces for sensing the environment. When a particular chemical agent binds to a transducer, the effective surface stresses of its modified and uncoated sides change unequally and the transducer begins to bend. The extent of bending depends upon the specific interactions between the microcantilever s MRP and the analyte. Thus, the readout of a multi-MRP array is a complex multi-dimensional signal that can be analyzed to deconvolve a multicomponent gas mixture. The use of this sensing and analysis technique in unattended networked arrays of sensors for various monitoring and surveillance applications is discussed.

  11. Oil spill disasters detection and monitoring by optical satellite data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livia Grimaldi, Caterina Sara; Coviello, Irina; Lacava, Teodosio; Pergola, Nicola; Tramutoli, Valerio

    2010-05-01

    Marine oil spill disasters may be related to natural hazards, when storms and hurricanes cause the sinking of tankers carrying crude or refined oil, as well as to human action, as illegal discharges, assessment errors (failures or collisions) or acts of warfare. Their consequence has a devastating effects on the marine and coastal environment. In order to reduce the environmental impact of such kind of hazard, giving to local authorities necessary information of pollution entity and evolution, timely detection and continuously updated information are fundamental. Satellite remote sensing can give a significant contribution in such a direction. Nowadays, SAR (Synthetic Aperture Radar) technology has been recognized as the most efficient for oil spill detection and description, thanks to the high spatial resolution and all-time/weather capability of the present operational sensors. Anyway, the actual SARs revisiting time does not allow a rapid detection and near real-time monitoring of these phenomena at global scale. The COSMO-Skymed Italian dual-mission (expected in the 2010) will overcome this limitation improving the temporal resolution until 12 hours by a SAR constellation of four satellites, but several open questions regarding costs and global delivery policy of such data, might prevent their use in an operational context. Passive optical sensors, on board meteorological satellites, thanks to their high temporal resolution (from a few hours to 15 minutes, depending on the characteristics of the platform/sensor), may represent, at this moment, a suitable SAR alternative/complement for oil spill detection and monitoring. Up to now, some techniques have been proposed for mapping known oil spill discharges monitoring using optical satellite data, on the other hand, reliable satellite methods for an automatic and timely detection of oil spill are still currently missing. Existing methods, in fact, can localize the presence of an oil spill only after an alert and

  12. Optical extinction monitor using cw cavity enhanced detection.

    PubMed

    Kebabian, Paul L; Robinson, Wade A; Freedman, Andrew

    2007-06-01

    We present details of an apparatus capable of measuring optical extinction (i.e., scattering and/or absorption) with high precision and sensitivity. The apparatus employs one variant of cavity enhanced detection, specifically cavity attenuated phase shift spectroscopy, using a near-confocal arrangement of two high reflectivity (R approximately 0.9999) mirrors in tandem with an enclosed cell 26 cm in length, a light emitting diode (LED), and a vacuum photodiode detector. The square wave modulated light from the LED passes through the absorption cell and is detected as a distorted wave form which is characterized by a phase shift with respect to the initial modulation. The amount of that phase shift is a function of fixed instrument properties-cell length, mirror reflectivity, and modulation frequency-and of the presence of a scatterer or absorber (air, particles, trace gases, etc.) within the cell. The specific implementation reported here employs a blue LED; the wavelength and spectral bandpass of the measurement are defined by the use of an interference filter centered at 440 nm with a 20 nm wide bandpass. The monitor is enclosed within a standard 19 in. rack-mounted instrumentation box, weighs 10 kg, and uses 70 W of electrical power including a vacuum pump. Measurements of the phase shift induced by Rayleigh scattering from several gases (which range in extinction coefficient from 0.4-32 Mm(-1)) exhibit a highly linear dependence (r(2)=0.999 97) when plotted as the co-tangent of the phase shift versus the expected extinction. Using heterodyne demodulation techniques, we demonstrate a detection limit of 0.04 Mm(-1) (4 x 10(-10) cm(-1)) (2sigma) in 10 s integration time and a base line drift of less than +/-0.1 Mm(-1) over a 24 h period. Detection limits decrease as the square root of integration time out to approximately 150 s.

  13. Cloud Detection of Optical Satellite Images Using Support Vector Machine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kuan-Yi; Lin, Chao-Hung

    2016-06-01

    Cloud covers are generally present in optical remote-sensing images, which limit the usage of acquired images and increase the difficulty of data analysis, such as image compositing, correction of atmosphere effects, calculations of vegetation induces, land cover classification, and land cover change detection. In previous studies, thresholding is a common and useful method in cloud detection. However, a selected threshold is usually suitable for certain cases or local study areas, and it may be failed in other cases. In other words, thresholding-based methods are data-sensitive. Besides, there are many exceptions to control, and the environment is changed dynamically. Using the same threshold value on various data is not effective. In this study, a threshold-free method based on Support Vector Machine (SVM) is proposed, which can avoid the abovementioned problems. A statistical model is adopted to detect clouds instead of a subjective thresholding-based method, which is the main idea of this study. The features used in a classifier is the key to a successful classification. As a result, Automatic Cloud Cover Assessment (ACCA) algorithm, which is based on physical characteristics of clouds, is used to distinguish the clouds and other objects. In the same way, the algorithm called Fmask (Zhu et al., 2012) uses a lot of thresholds and criteria to screen clouds, cloud shadows, and snow. Therefore, the algorithm of feature extraction is based on the ACCA algorithm and Fmask. Spatial and temporal information are also important for satellite images. Consequently, co-occurrence matrix and temporal variance with uniformity of the major principal axis are used in proposed method. We aim to classify images into three groups: cloud, non-cloud and the others. In experiments, images acquired by the Landsat 7 Enhanced Thematic Mapper Plus (ETM+) and images containing the landscapes of agriculture, snow area, and island are tested. Experiment results demonstrate the detection

  14. Edge Detection to Isolate Motion in Adaptive Optics Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, C W

    2003-07-11

    Adaptive optics uses signal processing techniques and deformable mirrors to minimize image degradation caused by phase aberrations. In the case of telescope imaging, the atmosphere causes phase aberrations. In the case of satellite imaging, errors due to the ultra-light-weight characteristics of the primary mirror cause phase aberrations. Scene-based Shack-Hartmann Wave Front Sensing takes the correlation between successive wavelets to determine these phase aberrations. A large problem with the scene-based approach is that motion, such as a moving car, can cause the correlation of two lenslets to peak, not where the scenes align, but where the moving object in each frame aligns. As such, the continued use of scene-based Wave Front Sensing necessitates successful isolation of moving objects from a stationary background scene. With the knowledge of which pixels are immobile, one should avoid the problem of locking onto a moving object when taking the correlation of two successive frames in time. Two main requirements of isolation are consistency and efficiency. In this document I will discuss the different edge detection algorithms explored for moving object isolation and how I came to the conclusion that, for our purposes of scene-based Shack-Hartmann WFS, edge detection is too inconsistent to be of any use. Because the Shack-Hartmann lenslets limits us to low resolutions, edge detection that works on higher resolution images will not work on our images. The results of each algorithm will show that with so few pixels per subaperature, edge detection is a poor method of identifying moving objects.

  15. Communication: atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Saurabh, Prasoon; Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ((3))) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ((2))).

  16. Communication: Atomic force detection of single-molecule nonlinear optical vibrational spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Saurabh, Prasoon Mukamel, Shaul

    2014-04-28

    Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) allows for a highly sensitive detection of spectroscopic signals. This has been first demonstrated for NMR of a single molecule and recently extended to stimulated Raman in the optical regime. We theoretically investigate the use of optical forces to detect time and frequency domain nonlinear optical signals. We show that, with proper phase matching, the AFM-detected signals closely resemble coherent heterodyne-detected signals. Applications are made to AFM-detected and heterodyne-detected vibrational resonances in Coherent Anti-Stokes Raman Spectroscopy (χ{sup (3)}) and sum or difference frequency generation (χ{sup (2)})

  17. Label-free detection with the liquid core optical ring resonator sensing platform

    PubMed Central

    White, Ian M.; Zhu, Hongying; Suter, Jonathan D.; Fan, Xudong; Zourob, Mohammed

    2009-01-01

    Optical label-free detection avoids the cost and complexity of fluorescence and radio labeling while providing accurate quantitative and kinetic results. We have developed a new optical label-free sensor called the liquid core optical ring resonator (LCORR). The LCORR integrates optical ring resonator sensors into the microfluidic delivery system by using glass capillaries with a thin wall. The LCORR is capable of performing refractive index detection on liquid samples, as well as bio/chemical analyte detection down to detection limits on the scale of pg/mm2. PMID:19151939

  18. Detecting faint nearby companions to geostationary satellites with optical interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Henrique R.; Restaino, Sergio R.; Armstrong, J. Thomas; Baines, Ellyn K.

    2017-05-01

    One of the main problems faced by the Space Situational Awareness community is the detection and characterization of faint objects around geosats. Independent of the origin of these objects, whether they are debris or controlled spacecraft, they can potentially harm these assets and contaminate the geobelt environment. The challenge of detecting these companion objects comes from their proximity and brightness ratio relative to geosats. Here we present a novel interferometric fringe nulling technique, aimed at solving these issues. This technique takes advantage of the fact that the presence of companions introduces large phase fluctuations in the fringe phase observed by an interferometer, when the interferometer is observing a target at spatial frequencies where the fringe amplitude is near zero. We describe the ongoing development of this technique at the Navy Precision Optical Interferometer, and the results of simulations of interferometric observations of satellites with companions. We also present the current state of the NPOI and related SSA work being done with this interferometer, as well as undergoing upgrades to the system.

  19. Optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer for microorganism growth detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaohui; Jiang, Mingshun; Sui, Qingmei; Luo, Shuyang; Geng, Xiangyi

    2016-07-01

    An optical fiber Fabry-Perot interferometer (FPI) based on hollow-core photonic crystal fiber (HCPCF) for microorganism growth detection is proposed and demonstrated. The FPI is formed by splicing both ends of a short section of HCPCF to SMFs and cleaving the SMF pigtail to a proper length. By measuring the fringe contrast of interference pattern, the refractive index (RI) changes of analyte during microorganism growth can be obtained. RI response of the sensor was investigated theoretically and experimentally. It shows linear response with sensitivity of -136 dB/RIU and good repeatability. Temperature response was also tested and the result confirms the low temperature cross-sensitivity of the sensor. Detection of yeast growth in liquid medium by the FPI sensor was conducted and the result shows the characteristic of typical yeast growth curve. With its advantages of high RI sensitivity, low temperature cross-sensitivity, capability for real-time measurement and so on, this FPI sensor has great potential in biosensing.

  20. Optical humidity detection based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Keke; Liu, Shixuan; Chen, Shizhe; Zhao, Qiang; Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Xuanqun; Wang, Wenyan; Wu, Yushang

    2017-02-01

    Humidity is an important environmental parameter, which is difficult to be measured accurately and quickly using traditional measurement methods. Under the environment of low temperature or high humidity, traditional humidity and temperature sensor has shortages in humidity measurement accuracy, corresponding time and wet fade speed. To solve these problems, this paper proposes a method to measure the environmental humidity with wavelength modulation technology and harmonic detection technology based on tunable diode laser absorption spectroscopy. H2O molecular absorption line near 1392 nm is selected as the characteristic spectra. The effects of temperature, pressure and water concentration on the absorption spectrum width, the wavelength modulation coefficient and the amplitude of the harmonic signal are analyzed. Humidity and temperature sensor is modified using temperature and pressure compensation model, and the influence of the water concentration variation is eliminated by the iterative algorithm. The new humidity and temperature sensor prototype is developed, and the structure of the optical system is simple, which is easy to be adjusted. The response frequency of the humidity detection is 40 Hz. The experiment was carried out for 3 months at Qingdao national basic weather station. Experimental results show that the consistency of the humidity and temperature data is very good, which can proves the validity of the humidity measurement technology.

  1. Optical Myography: Detecting Finger Movements by Looking at the Forearm

    PubMed Central

    Nissler, Christian; Mouriki, Nikoleta; Castellini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    One of the crucial problems found in the scientific community of assistive/rehabilitation robotics nowadays is that of automatically detecting what a disabled subject (for instance, a hand amputee) wants to do, exactly when she wants to do it, and strictly for the time she wants to do it. This problem, commonly called “intent detection,” has traditionally been tackled using surface electromyography, a technique which suffers from a number of drawbacks, including the changes in the signal induced by sweat and muscle fatigue. With the advent of realistic, physically plausible augmented- and virtual-reality environments for rehabilitation, this approach does not suffice anymore. In this paper, we explore a novel method to solve the problem, which we call Optical Myography (OMG). The idea is to visually inspect the human forearm (or stump) to reconstruct what fingers are moving and to what extent. In a psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects, we used visual fiducial markers (AprilTags) and a standard web camera to visualize the deformations of the surface of the forearm, which then were mapped to the intended finger motions. As ground truth, a visual stimulus was used, avoiding the need for finger sensors (force/position sensors, datagloves, etc.). Two machine-learning approaches, a linear and a non-linear one, were comparatively tested in settings of increasing realism. The results indicate an average error in the range of 0.05–0.22 (root mean square error normalized over the signal range), in line with similar results obtained with more mature techniques such as electromyography. If further successfully tested in the large, this approach could lead to vision-based intent detection of amputees, with the main application of letting such disabled persons dexterously and reliably interact in an augmented-/virtual-reality setup. PMID:27148039

  2. Optical Myography: Detecting Finger Movements by Looking at the Forearm.

    PubMed

    Nissler, Christian; Mouriki, Nikoleta; Castellini, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    One of the crucial problems found in the scientific community of assistive/rehabilitation robotics nowadays is that of automatically detecting what a disabled subject (for instance, a hand amputee) wants to do, exactly when she wants to do it, and strictly for the time she wants to do it. This problem, commonly called "intent detection," has traditionally been tackled using surface electromyography, a technique which suffers from a number of drawbacks, including the changes in the signal induced by sweat and muscle fatigue. With the advent of realistic, physically plausible augmented- and virtual-reality environments for rehabilitation, this approach does not suffice anymore. In this paper, we explore a novel method to solve the problem, which we call Optical Myography (OMG). The idea is to visually inspect the human forearm (or stump) to reconstruct what fingers are moving and to what extent. In a psychophysical experiment involving ten intact subjects, we used visual fiducial markers (AprilTags) and a standard web camera to visualize the deformations of the surface of the forearm, which then were mapped to the intended finger motions. As ground truth, a visual stimulus was used, avoiding the need for finger sensors (force/position sensors, datagloves, etc.). Two machine-learning approaches, a linear and a non-linear one, were comparatively tested in settings of increasing realism. The results indicate an average error in the range of 0.05-0.22 (root mean square error normalized over the signal range), in line with similar results obtained with more mature techniques such as electromyography. If further successfully tested in the large, this approach could lead to vision-based intent detection of amputees, with the main application of letting such disabled persons dexterously and reliably interact in an augmented-/virtual-reality setup.

  3. Optical galaxy cluster detection across a wide redshift range

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Jiangang

    2009-04-01

    The past decade is one of the most exciting period in the history of physics and astronomy. The discovery of cosmic acceleration dramatically changed our understanding about the evolution and constituents of the Universe. To accommodate the new acceleration phase into our well established Big Bang cosmological scenario under the frame work of General Relativity, there must exist a very special substance that has negative pressure and make up about 73% of the total energy density in our Universe. It is called Dark Energy. For the first time people realized that the vast majority of our Universe is made of things that are totally different from the things we are made of. Therefore, one of the major endeavors in physics and astronomy in the coming years is trying to understand, if we can, the nature of dark energy. Understanding dark energy cannot be achieved from pure logic. We need empirical evidence to finally determine about what is dark energy. The better we can constrain the energy density and evolution of the dark energy, the closer we will get to the answer. There are many ways to constrain the energy density and evolution of dark energy, each of which leads to degeneracy in certain directions in the parameter space. Therefore, a combination of complimentary methods will help to reduce the degeneracies and give tighter constraints. Dark energy became dominate over matter in the Universe only very recently (at about z ~ 1.5) and will affect both the cosmological geometry and large scale structure formation. Among the various experiments, some of them constrain the dark energy mainly via geometry (such as CMB, Supernovae) while some others provides constraints from both structures and geometry (such as BAO, Galaxy Clusters) Galaxy clusters can be used as a sensitive probe for cosmology. A large cluster catalog that extends to high redshift with well measured masses is indispensable for precisely constraining cosmological parameters. Detecting clusters in optical

  4. Enabling Technologies for Direct Detection Optical Phase Modulation Formats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xian

    Phase modulation formats are believed to be one of the key enabling techniques for next generation high speed long haul fiber-optic communication systems due to the following main advantages: (1) with a balanced detection, a better receiver sensitivity over conventional intensity modulation formats, e.g., a ˜3-dB sensitivity improvement using differential phase shift keying (DPSK) and a ˜1.3-dB sensitivity improvement using differential quadrature phase shift keying (DQPSK); (2) excellent robustness against fiber nonlinearities; (3) high spectrum efficiency when using multilevel phase modulation formats, such as DQPSK. As the information is encoded in the phase of the optical field, the phase modulation formats are sensitive to the phase-related impairments and the deterioration induced in the phase-intensity conversion. This consequently creates new challenging issues. The research objective of this thesis is to depict some of the challenging issues and provide possible solutions. The first challenge is the cross-phase modulation (XPM) penalty for the phase modulated channels co-propagating with the intensity modulated channels. The penalty comes from the pattern dependent intensity fluctuations of the neighboring intensity modulated channels being converted into phase noise in the phase modulation channels. We propose a model to theoretically analyze the XPM penalty dependence on the walk off effect. From this model, we suggest that using fibers with large local dispersion or intentionally introducing some residual dispersion per span would help mitigate the XPM penalty. The second challenge is the polarization dependent frequency shift (PDf) induced penalty during the phase-intensity conversion. The direct detection DPSK is usually demodulated in a Mach-Zehnder delay interferometer (DI). The polarization dependence of DI introduces a PDf causing a frequency offset between the laser's frequency and the transmissivity peak of DI, degrading the demodulated DPSK

  5. Optical Production and Detection of Ultrasonic Waves in Metals for Nondestructive Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morrison, R. A.

    1972-01-01

    Ultrasonic waves were produced by striking the surface of a metal with the focused one-joule pulse of a Q-switched ruby laser. Rayleigh (surface) waves and longitudinal waves were detected with conventional transducers. Optical methods of detection were tested and developed. Rayleigh waves were produced with an oscillator and transducer. They were optically detected on curved polished surfaces, and on unpolished surfaces. The technique uses a knife edge to detect small angle changes of the surface as the wave pulse passes the illuminated spot. Optical flaw detection using pulse echo and attenuation is demonstrated.

  6. Coherent detection and digital signal processing for fiber optic communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ip, Ezra

    The drive towards higher spectral efficiency in optical fiber systems has generated renewed interest in coherent detection. We review different detection methods, including noncoherent, differentially coherent, and coherent detection, as well as hybrid detection methods. We compare the modulation methods that are enabled and their respective performances in a linear regime. An important system parameter is the number of degrees of freedom (DOF) utilized in transmission. Polarization-multiplexed quadrature-amplitude modulation maximizes spectral efficiency and power efficiency as it uses all four available DOF contained in the two field quadratures in the two polarizations. Dual-polarization homodyne or heterodyne downconversion are linear processes that can fully recover the received signal field in these four DOF. When downconverted signals are sampled at the Nyquist rate, compensation of transmission impairments can be performed using digital signal processing (DSP). Software based receivers benefit from the robustness of DSP, flexibility in design, and ease of adaptation to time-varying channels. Linear impairments, including chromatic dispersion (CD) and polarization-mode dispersion (PMD), can be compensated quasi-exactly using finite impulse response filters. In practical systems, sampling the received signal at 3/2 times the symbol rate is sufficient to enable an arbitrary amount of CD and PMD to be compensated for a sufficiently long equalizer whose tap length scales linearly with transmission distance. Depending on the transmitted constellation and the target bit error rate, the analog-to-digital converter (ADC) should have around 5 to 6 bits of resolution. Digital coherent receivers are naturally suited for the implementation of feedforward carrier recovery, which has superior linewidth tolerance than phase-locked loops, and does not suffer from feedback delay constraints. Differential bit encoding can be used to prevent catastrophic receiver failure due

  7. Non-invasive Optical Molecular Imaging for Cancer Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Zhen

    Cancer is a leading cause of death worldwide. It remains the second most common cause of death in the US, accounting for nearly 1 out of every 4 deaths. Improved fundamental understanding of molecular processes and pathways resulting in cancer development has catalyzed a shift towards molecular analysis of cancer using imaging technologies. It is expected that the non-invasive or minimally invasive molecular imaging analysis of cancer can significantly aid in improving the early detection of cancer and will result in reduced mortality and morbidity associated with the disease. The central hypothesis of the proposed research is that non-invasive imaging of changes in metabolic activity of individual cells, and extracellular pH within a tissue will improve early stage detection of cancer. The specific goals of this research project were to: (a) develop novel optical imaging probes to image changes in choline metabolism and tissue pH as a function of progression of cancer using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (b) correlate changes in tissue extracellular pH and metabolic activity of tissues as a function of disease state using clinically isolated tissue biopsies; (c) provide fundamental understanding of relationship between tumor hypoxia, acidification of the extracellular space and altered cellular metabolism with progression of cancer. Three novel molecular imaging probes were developed to detect changes in choline and glucose metabolism and extracellular pH in model systems and clinically isolated cells and biopsies. Glucose uptake and metabolism was measured using a fluorescence analog of glucose, 2-NBDG (2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl)amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose), while choline metabolism was measured using a click chemistry analog of choline, propargyl choline, which can be in-situ labeled with a fluorophore Alexa-488 azide via a click chemistry reaction. Extracellular pH in tissue were measured by Alexa-647 labeled pHLIP (pH low insertion peptide

  8. Frequency interleaving towards spectrally efficient directly detected optical OFDM for next-generation optical access networks.

    PubMed

    Mehedy, Lenin; Bakaul, Masuduzzaman; Nirmalathas, Ampalavanapillai

    2010-10-25

    In this paper, we theoretically analyze and demonstrate that spectral efficiency of a conventional direct detection based optical OFDM system (DDO-OFDM) can be improved significantly using frequency interleaving of adjacent DDO-OFDM channels where OFDM signal band of one channel occupies the spectral gap of other channel and vice versa. We show that, at optimum operating condition, the proposed technique can effectively improve the spectral efficiency of the conventional DDO-OFDM system as much as 50%. We also show that such a frequency interleaved DDO-OFDM system, with a bit rate of 48 Gb/s within 25 GHz bandwidth, achieves sufficient power budget after transmission over 25 km single mode fiber to be used in next-generation time-division-multiplexed passive optical networks (TDM-PON). Moreover, by applying 64- quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM), the system can be further scaled up to 96 Gb/s with a power budget sufficient for 1:16 split TDM-PON.

  9. Displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Gang; Cuomo, Frank W.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present the evaluation of the displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors in a general format to establish their dependence on fiber sizes, optoelectronic detector specifications, input power, and other relevant parameters. The formations for the normalized reflected optical power change are derived for the evaluation of the optimal sensor response, the linearity range, and the minimum detectable displacement. The theoretical models are verified by an experiment which determines sensor response, modulation index, reflected optical power change, and linear response range through dynamic measurement. The application of this theoretical model to the study of a fiber-optic microphone for acoustic pressure detection is considered.

  10. Displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Gang; Cuomo, Frank W.

    1991-01-01

    The authors present the evaluation of the displacement response, detection limit, and dynamic range of fiber-optic lever sensors in a general format to establish their dependence on fiber sizes, optoelectronic detector specifications, input power, and other relevant parameters. The formations for the normalized reflected optical power change are derived for the evaluation of the optimal sensor response, the linearity range, and the minimum detectable displacement. The theoretical models are verified by an experiment which determines sensor response, modulation index, reflected optical power change, and linear response range through dynamic measurement. The application of this theoretical model to the study of a fiber-optic microphone for acoustic pressure detection is considered.

  11. Advances in optical fiber sensors for vehicle detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meller, Scott A.; de Vries, Marten J.; Arya, Vivek; Claus, Richard O.; Zabaronick, Noel

    1998-01-01

    THe primary objective for this project is the design of optical fiber-based sensor instrumentation for specific ITS applications. Specifically, this paper discusses research on optical fiber sensors that can be used for traffic monitoring and vehicle classification. This paper also discusses developments on the application of optical fiber sensor that can be used for monitoring visibility. This research is directly beneficial to the implementation of driver advisory and safety systems, traffic control system, and other ITS applications. This paper summarizes research performed on optical fiber sensors used for measuring traffic flow on highways and discusses progress on optical fiber sensors used for monitoring visibility.

  12. Fovea detection in optical coherence tomography using convolutional neural networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liefers, Bart; Venhuizen, Freerk G.; Theelen, Thomas; Hoyng, Carel; van Ginneken, Bram; Sánchez, Clara I.

    2017-02-01

    The fovea is an important clinical landmark that is used as a reference for assessing various quantitative measures, such as central retinal thickness or drusen count. In this paper we propose a novel method for automatic detection of the foveal center in Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) scans. Although the clinician will generally aim to center the OCT scan on the fovea, post-acquisition image processing will give a more accurate estimate of the true location of the foveal center. A Convolutional Neural Network (CNN) was trained on a set of 781 OCT scans that classifies each pixel in the OCT B-scan with a probability of belonging to the fovea. Dilated convolutions were used to obtain a large receptive field, while maintaining pixel-level accuracy. In order to train the network more effectively, negative patches were sampled selectively after each epoch. After CNN classification of the entire OCT volume, the predicted foveal center was chosen as the voxel with maximum output probability, after applying an optimized three-dimensional Gaussian blurring. We evaluate the performance of our method on a data set of 99 OCT scans presenting different stages of Age-related Macular Degeneration (AMD). The fovea was correctly detected in 96:9% of the cases, with a mean distance error of 73 μm(+/-112 μm). This result was comparable to the performance of a second human observer who obtained a mean distance error of 69 μm (+/-94 μm). Experiments showed that the proposed method is accurate and robust even in retinas heavily affected by pathology.

  13. Supervised Classification of Underwater Optical Imagery for Improved Detection and Characterization of Underwater Military Munitions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-06-01

    FINAL REPORT Supervised Classification of Underwater Optical Imagery for Improved Detection and Characterization of Underwater Military...SUBTITLE Supervised Classification of Underwater Optical Imagery for 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER W912HQ-14-P-0012 Improved Detection and...image classification algorithm was tested for identifying UWMM and seabed types. Also, an extension to the algorithm using seabed microtopography

  14. Hough-transform-based circle detection using an array of multimode optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yao; Eichmann, George

    1987-02-01

    The generation of an optical Hough transform (OHT) to detect a circle is proposed. The method is based on the use of a 2D multimode step-index optical fiber array. Both the position and radius of a circle can be detected. Some of the OHT performance parameters are also discussed.

  15. Optical fiber waveguide sensor for the colorimetric detection of ammonia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmitt, Katrin; Rist, Jonas; Peter, Carolin; Wöllenstein, Jürgen

    2011-06-01

    We present the development and characterization of a fiber-optic colorimetric gas sensor combined with the electronic circuitry for measurement control and RFID communication. The gas sensor detects ammonia using a 300 μm polyolefin fiber coated with a gas-sensitive polymer film. The spectral and time-dependent sensitivity of various polymer films was tested in transmission measurements. Light from a standard LED at λ = 590 nm was coupled into the polyolefin fiber through the front face. A prototype of the gas sensor with the direct coupling method was tested under realistic measurement conditions, i.e. battery-driven and in a completely autonomous mode. The sensor system showed good sensitivity to the ammonia concentrations and response times in the order of minutes. The achievable power consumption was below 100μW.The films contained the pH-sensitive dyes bromocresol purple or bromophenol blue embedded in either ethyl cellulose or polyvinyl butyral, and optionally tributyl phosphate as plasticizer. The bromophenol blue based films showed a strong reaction to ammonia, with saturation concentrations around 1000 ppm and response times of about 15 seconds to 100ppm. The colorimetric reaction was simulated using a simple kinetic model which was in good agreement with the experimental results.

  16. Sequence Detection for PPM Optical Communication With ISI

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Srinivasan, Meera; Lee, Clement

    2006-01-01

    A method of sequence detection has been proposed to mitigate the effects of inter-slot interference and inter-symbol interference (both denoted ISI) in the reception of M-ary pulse-position modulation (PPM) optical signals. The method would make it possible to reduce the error rate for a given slot duration, to use a shorter slot duration (and, hence, to communicate at a higher rate) without exceeding a given error rate, or to use a lower-bandwidth (and, hence, less-expensive) receiver to receive a signal of a given slot width without exceeding a given error rate. In M-ary PPM, a symbol period is divided into M time slots, each of duration T(sub s), and a symbol consists of a binary sequence ones and zeros represented by pulses or the absence of pulses, respectively, in the time slots. At the transmitter, the bit stream is used to modulate a laser, the output of which is constant (either full power or zero power, representing 1 or 0, respectively) during each time slot. However, the signal becomes attenuated (signal photons are lost) in propagation from the transmitter to the receiver and noise enters at the receiver, complicating the problem of determining the timing of the symbol periods and slots and identifying the symbols.

  17. Automated optic disk boundary detection by modified active contour model.

    PubMed

    Xu, Juan; Chutatape, Opas; Chew, Paul

    2007-03-01

    This paper presents a novel deformable-model-based algorithm for fully automated detection of optic disk boundary in fundus images. The proposed method improves and extends the original snake (deforming-only technique) in two aspects: clustering and smoothing update. The contour points are first self-separated into edge-point group or uncertain-point group by clustering after each deformation, and these contour points are then updated by different criteria based on different groups. The updating process combines both the local and global information of the contour to achieve the balance of contour stability and accuracy. The modifications make the proposed algorithm more accurate and robust to blood vessel occlusions, noises, ill-defined edges and fuzzy contour shapes. The comparative results show that the proposed method can estimate the disk boundaries of 100 test images closer to the groundtruth, as measured by mean distance to closest point (MDCP) <3 pixels, with the better success rate when compared to those obtained by gradient vector flow snake (GVF-snake) and modified active shape models (ASM).

  18. Online technique for detecting state of onboard fiber optic gyroscope

    SciTech Connect

    Miao, Zhiyong; He, Kunpeng Pang, Shuwan; Xu, Dingjie; Tian, Chunmiao

    2015-02-15

    Although angle random walk (ARW) of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) has been well modeled and identified before being integrated into the high-accuracy attitude control system of satellite, aging and unexpected failures can affect the performance of FOG after launch, resulting in the variation of ARW coefficient. Therefore, the ARW coefficient can be regarded as an indicator of “state of health” for FOG diagnosis in some sense. The Allan variance method can be used to estimate ARW coefficient of FOG, however, it requires a large amount of data to be stored. Moreover, the procedure of drawing slope lines for estimation is painful. To overcome the barriers, a weighted state-space model that directly models the ARW to obtain a nonlinear state-space model was established for FOG. Then, a neural extended-Kalman filter algorithm was implemented to estimate and track the variation of ARW in real time. The results of experiment show that the proposed approach is valid to detect the state of FOG. Moreover, the proposed technique effectively avoids the storage of data.

  19. Optical detection of spin Hall effect in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van T Erve, Olaf; Hanbicki, Aubrey; Li, Connie; Jonker, Berend

    Spin Hall effects in metals have been successfully measured using electrical methods such as nonlocal spin valve transport, ferromagnetic resonance or spin torque transfer experiments. These methods require complex processing techniques and measuring setups. Here we present room temperature measurements of the spin Hall effect in non-magnetic metals such as Pt and β-W using a standard bench top magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) system. With this system, one can readily determine the angular dependence of the induced polarization on the bias current direction. When a bias current is applied, the spin Hall effect causes electrons of opposite spin to be scattered in opposite directions, resulting in a spin accumulation at the surface of the film. The MOKE signal tracks the applied square wave bias current with an amplitude and phase directly related to the spin Hall angle. Using this technique, we show that the spin-Hall angle of β-W is opposite in sign and significantly larger than that of Pt. In addition, we use this technique to detect spin diffusion from β-W into Al thin films, as well as spin diffusion from the topological surface states of Bi2Se3 into Al. We will also show direct modulation of the reflected light up to 100 kHz, using Bi doped Cu samples. This work was supported by internal programs at NRL.

  20. Optical detection of spin Hall effect in metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van T Erve, Olaf; Hanbicki, Aubrey; McCreary, Kathy; Li, Connie; Jonker, Berry

    2015-03-01

    Here we present room temperature measurements of the spin Hall effect in non-magnetic metals such as Pt and β-W using a standard bench top magneto-optic Kerr effect (MOKE) system. With this system, one can readily determine the angular dependence of the induced polarization on the bias current direction, the orientation of the spin Hall induced polarization, and the sign of the spin Hall angle. When a bias current is applied, the spin Hall effect causes electrons of opposite spin to be scattered in orthogonal directions, resulting in a spin accumulation at the surface of the film. The MOKE signal tracks the applied square wave bias current with an amplitude and phase directly related to the spin Hall angle. Using this technique, we show that the spin-Hall angle of β-W is opposite in sign and significantly larger than that of Pt, and follow the structural phase transition from β-W to α-W as the film is annealed through the dependence of the spin Hall angle on crystal structure. We also use this technique to detect spin diffusion from β-W into Al thin films. This work was supported by internal programs at NRL and the NRL Nanoscience Institute

  1. Online technique for detecting state of onboard fiber optic gyroscope.

    PubMed

    Miao, Zhiyong; Xu, Dingjie; He, Kunpeng; Pang, Shuwan; Tian, Chunmiao

    2015-02-01

    Although angle random walk (ARW) of fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) has been well modeled and identified before being integrated into the high-accuracy attitude control system of satellite, aging and unexpected failures can affect the performance of FOG after launch, resulting in the variation of ARW coefficient. Therefore, the ARW coefficient can be regarded as an indicator of "state of health" for FOG diagnosis in some sense. The Allan variance method can be used to estimate ARW coefficient of FOG, however, it requires a large amount of data to be stored. Moreover, the procedure of drawing slope lines for estimation is painful. To overcome the barriers, a weighted state-space model that directly models the ARW to obtain a nonlinear state-space model was established for FOG. Then, a neural extended-Kalman filter algorithm was implemented to estimate and track the variation of ARW in real time. The results of experiment show that the proposed approach is valid to detect the state of FOG. Moreover, the proposed technique effectively avoids the storage of data.

  2. Optical heterodyne detection for cavity ring-down spectroscopy

    DOEpatents

    Levenson, Marc D.; Paldus, Barbara A.; Zare, Richard N.

    2000-07-25

    A cavity ring-down system for performing cavity ring-down spectroscopy (CRDS) using optical heterodyne detection of a ring-down wave E.sub.RD during a ring-down phase or a ring-up wave E.sub.RU during a ring up phase. The system sends a local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and a signal wave E.sub.SIGNAL to the cavity, preferably a ring resonator, and derives an interference signal from the combined local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD (or ring-up wave E.sub.RU). The local oscillator wave E.sub.LO has a first polarization and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD has a second polarization different from the first polarization. The system has a combining arrangement for combining or overlapping local oscillator wave E.sub.LO and the ring-down wave E.sub.RD at a photodetector, which receives the interference signal and generates a heterodyne current I.sub.H therefrom. Frequency and phase differences between the waves are adjustable.

  3. Development of fibre-optic confocal microscopy for detection and diagnosis of dental caries.

    PubMed

    Rousseau, C; Poland, S; Girkin, J M; Hall, A F; Whitters, C J

    2007-01-01

    We report on the development of a fibre-optics-based confocal imaging system for the detection and potential diagnosis of early dental caries. A novel optical instrument, capable of recording axial profiles through caries lesions using single-mode optical fibres, has been developed. The practical study illustrates that miniature confocal devices based around single-mode optical fibres may provide additional diagnostic information for the general dental practitioner.

  4. Acousto-Optic Spectrum Analyzer: Temporal Response and Detection of Pulsed Signals.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    ACOUSTO - OPTIC SPECTRUM ANALYZER: TEMPORAL RESPONSE AND I/i DETECTION OF PULSED SIGUALS(U) DEFENCE RESEARCH ESTABLISHMENT OTTANA (ONTARIO) J...8217:. -.....:.-...............--.. - ---:-..--.-..,. ,: i’,.. IJT~c FILE C P National Defe’ se + Deence nationale 0 0 ACOUSTO - OPTIC SPECTRUM ANALYZER: TEMPORAL RESPONSE AND DETECTION 0 OF PULSED...Ottawa |S, .±~ |-----------------------..,---.-- -- - - - rNatiorna! Defen~se Deterice r dornale ACOUSTO - OPTIC SPECTRUM ANALYZER: TEMPORAL RESPONSE

  5. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images.

    PubMed

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N; Zangwill, Linda M

    2014-03-18

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

  6. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    PubMed Central

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-01-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the “non-progressing” and “progressing” glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection. PMID:25606299

  7. A joint estimation detection of Glaucoma progression in 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography optic nerve head images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belghith, Akram; Bowd, Christopher; Weinreb, Robert N.; Zangwill, Linda M.

    2014-03-01

    Glaucoma is an ocular disease characterized by distinctive changes in the optic nerve head (ONH) and visual field. Glaucoma can strike without symptoms and causes blindness if it remains without treatment. Therefore, early disease detection is important so that treatment can be initiated and blindness prevented. In this context, important advances in technology for non-invasive imaging of the eye have been made providing quantitative tools to measure structural changes in ONH topography, an essential element for glaucoma detection and monitoring. 3D spectral domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT), an optical imaging technique, has been commonly used to discriminate glaucomatous from healthy subjects. In this paper, we present a new framework for detection of glaucoma progression using 3D SD-OCT images. In contrast to previous works that the retinal nerve fiber layer (RNFL) thickness measurement provided by commercially available spectral-domain optical coherence tomograph, we consider the whole 3D volume for change detection. To integrate a priori knowledge and in particular the spatial voxel dependency in the change detection map, we propose the use of the Markov Random Field to handle a such dependency. To accommodate the presence of false positive detection, the estimated change detection map is then used to classify a 3D SDOCT image into the "non-progressing" and "progressing" glaucoma classes, based on a fuzzy logic classifier. We compared the diagnostic performance of the proposed framework to existing methods of progression detection.

  8. Optimization of detection sensitivity for a Fiber Optic Intrusion Detection System (FOIDS) using design of experiments.

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, Larry D.; Mack, Thomas Kimball; Mitchiner, Kim W.; Varoz, Carmella A.

    2010-06-01

    The Fiber Optic Intrusion Detection System (FOIDS)1 is a physical security sensor deployed on fence lines to detect climb or cut intrusions by adversaries. Calibration of detection sensitivity can be time consuming because, for example, the FiberSenSys FD-332 has 32 settings that can be adjusted independently to provide a balance between a high probability of detection and a low nuisance alarm rate. Therefore, an efficient method of calibrating the FOIDS in the field, other than by trial and error, was needed. This study was conducted to: x Identify the most significant settings for controlling detection x Develop a way of predicting detection sensitivity for given settings x Develop a set of optimal settings for validation The Design of Experiments (DoE) 2-4 methodology was used to generate small, planned test matrixes, which could be statistically analyzed to yield more information from the test data. Design of Experiments is a statistical methodology for quickly optimizing performance of systems with measurable input and output variables. DoE was used to design custom screening experiments based on 11 FOIDS settings believed to have the most affect on WKH types of fence perimeter intrusions were evaluated: simulated cut intrusions and actual climb intrusions. Two slightly different two-level randomized fractional factorial designed experiment matrixes consisting of 16 unique experiments were performed in the field for each type of intrusion. Three repetitions were conducted for every cut test; two repetitions were conducted for every climb test. Total number of cut tests analyzed was 51; the total number of climb tests was 38. This paper discusses the results and benefits of using Design of Experiments (DoE) to calibrate and optimize the settings for a FOIDS sensor

  9. SiPM electro-optical detection system noise suppression method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Xiangli; Yang, Suhui; Hu, Tao; Song, Yiheng

    2014-11-01

    In this paper, the single photon detection principle of Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPM) device is introduced. The main noise factors that infect the sensitivity of the electro-optical detection system are analyzed, including background light noise, detector dark noise, preamplifier noise and signal light noise etc. The Optical, electrical and thermodynamic methods are used to suppress the SiPM electro-optical detection system noise, which improved the response sensitivity of the detector. Using SiPM optoelectronic detector with a even high sensitivity, together with small field large aperture optical system, high cutoff narrow bandwidth filters, low-noise operational amplifier circuit, the modular design of functional circuit, semiconductor refrigeration technology, greatly improved the sensitivity of optical detection system, reduced system noise and achieved long-range detection of weak laser radiation signal. Theoretical analysis and experimental results show that the proposed methods are reasonable and efficient.

  10. Label-free optical detection of action potential in mammalian neurons

    PubMed Central

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Bui, Loan; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra; Bachoo, Robert; Davé, Digant P.

    2017-01-01

    We describe an optical technique for label-free detection of the action potential in cultured mammalian neurons. Induced morphological changes due to action potential propagation in neurons are optically interrogated with a phase sensitive interferometric technique. Optical recordings composed of signal pulses mirror the electrical spike train activity of individual neurons in a network. The optical pulses are transient nanoscale oscillatory changes in the optical path length of varying peak magnitude and temporal width. Exogenous application of glutamate to cortical neuronal cultures produced coincident increase in the electrical and optical activity; both were blocked by application of a Na-channel blocker, Tetrodotoxin. The observed transient change in optical path length in a single optical pulse is primarily due to physical fluctuations of the neuronal cell membrane mediated by a yet unknown electromechanical transduction phenomenon. Our analysis suggests a traveling surface wave in the neuronal cell membrane is responsible for the measured optical signal pulses. PMID:28856044

  11. Detecting the Milky Way Halo Structure and Sub-Structure with OPTICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sans Fuentes, S. A.; De Ridder, J.

    2014-07-01

    The detection of stellar streams, tidal disruptions and merger remnants within the stellar halo provide observational insight into the formation and evolution history of the Galaxy. Often these stellar over-densities have in the past been detected using visual inspection. However, the expected data volume from Gaia will make detection via visual inspection unfeasible and requires an effective detection methodology. Here we present proof of concept results using a point ordering method to identify clustering (OPTICS). We find that OPTICS is an advantageous clustering algorithm to detect non-convex and irregular shaped streams and clouds while simultaneously detecting small scale-substructure in large scale over-densities.

  12. The optical detection of individual DNA-conjugated gold nanoparticle labels after metal enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Csáki, Andrea; Kaplanek, Pia; Möller, Robert; Fritzsche, Wolfgang

    2003-12-01

    The detection of DNA using nanoparticles as labels is an interesting alternative to the standard fluorescence technique. It requires simpler detection equipment, resulting in higher stability and lower costs. Besides easier detection, metal enhancement allows a higher sensitivity of detection. The signal-response curve for labelled DNA before and after silver enhancement was studied, applying both atomic force microscope (AFM) and optical (reflection/transmission) measurements. The dynamic range and the sensitivity were determined for nanoparticle labelling with and without metal enhancement. Nanoparticle concentrations down to the fM range could be detected. The ultimate limit of detection, the identification of individual labels, is demonstrated for the optical readout. Therefore, AFM images of the particles were correlated with the optical signal of individual or clustered particles. We demonstrate that the optical signal allows the identification of single particles.

  13. Detection of dermal systemic sclerosis using noncontact optical coherence elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Chih-Hao; Du, Yong; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Wu, Chen; Han, Zhaolong; Raghunathan, Raksha; Hsu, Thomas; Noorani, Shezaan; Hicks, M. John; Mohan, Chandra; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Systemic sclerosis (SSc) is a connective tissue disease that results in excessive accumulation of collagen in the skin and internal organs. Overall, SSc is a rare disorder, but has a high mortality, particularly in last decade of life. To improve the survival rate, an accurate and early diagnosis is crucial. Currently, the modified Rodnan skin score (mRSS) is the gold standard for evaluating SSc progression based on clinical palpation at 17 sites on the body. However, this procedure can be time consuming, and the assessed score may be biased by the experience of the clinician, causing inter- and intraobserver variabilities. Moreover, the instrinsic elasticity of skin may further bias the mRSS assessment in the early stages of SSc, such as oedematous. To overcome these limitations, there is a need for a rapid, accurate, and objective assessment technique. Optical coherence elastography (OCE) is a novel, rapidly emerging technique, which can assess mechanical contrast in tissues with micrometer spatial resolution. In this work, we demonstrate the first use of OCE to assess the mechanical properties of control and SSc-like diseased skin non-invasively. A focused air-pulse induced an elastic wave in the skin, which was detected by a home-built OCE system. The elastic wave propagated significantly faster in SSc skin compared to healthy skin. The Young's modulus of the SSc skin was significantly higher than that of normal skin (P<0.05). Thus, OCE was able to objectively differentiate healthy and fibrotic skin completely noninvasively and is a promising and potentially useful new technology for quantifying skin involvement in SSc.

  14. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Baoquan; Bai, Qing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-01-01

    Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach–Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications. PMID:27472334

  15. EVALUATION OF OPTICAL DETECTION METHODS FOR WATERBORNE SUSPENSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Turbidimeters and optical paricle counters (OPCs) are used to monitor particulate matter in water. The response from these instruments is governed by the optical properties of the suspension and the instrument design. The recommended design criteria for turbidimeters allows for l...

  16. EVALUATION OF OPTICAL DETECTION METHODS FOR WATERBORNE SUSPENSIONS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Turbidimeters and optical paricle counters (OPCs) are used to monitor particulate matter in water. The response from these instruments is governed by the optical properties of the suspension and the instrument design. The recommended design criteria for turbidimeters allows for l...

  17. Distributed Fiber-Optic Sensors for Vibration Detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Jin, Baoquan; Bai, Qing; Wang, Yu; Wang, Dong; Wang, Yuncai

    2016-07-26

    Distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors receive extensive investigation and play a significant role in the sensor panorama. Optical parameters such as light intensity, phase, polarization state, or light frequency will change when external vibration is applied on the sensing fiber. In this paper, various technologies of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensing are reviewed, from interferometric sensing technology, such as Sagnac, Mach-Zehnder, and Michelson, to backscattering-based sensing technology, such as phase-sensitive optical time domain reflectometer, polarization-optical time domain reflectometer, optical frequency domain reflectometer, as well as some combinations of interferometric and backscattering-based techniques. Their operation principles are presented and recent research efforts are also included. Finally, the applications of distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors are summarized, which mainly include structural health monitoring and perimeter security, etc. Overall, distributed fiber-optic vibration sensors possess the advantages of large-scale monitoring, good concealment, excellent flexibility, and immunity to electromagnetic interference, and thus show considerable potential for a variety of practical applications.

  18. Ultrafast dynamics in complex fluids observed through the ultrafast optically-heterodyne-detected optical-Kerr-effect (OHD-OKE).

    PubMed

    Hunt, Neil T; Jaye, Andrew A; Meech, Stephen R

    2007-06-14

    The ultrafast molecular dynamics of complex fluids have been recorded using the optically-heterodyne-detected optical-Kerr-effect (OHD-OKE). The OHD-OKE method is reviewed and some recent refinements to the method are described. Applications to a range of complex fluids, including microemulsions, polymer melts and solutions, liquid crystal and ionic liquids are surveyed. The level of detail attainable with the OHD-OKE method in these complex fluids is discussed. The prospects for future experiments are discussed.

  19. Optical path switching based differential absorption radiometry for substance detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  20. Optical path switching based differential absorption radiometry for substance detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sachse, Glen W. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    An optical path switch divides sample path radiation into a time series of alternating first polarized components and second polarized components. The first polarized components are transmitted along a first optical path and the second polarized components along a second optical path. A first gasless optical filter train filters the first polarized components to isolate at least a first wavelength band thereby generating first filtered radiation. A second gasless optical filter train filters the second polarized components to isolate at least a second wavelength band thereby generating second filtered radiation. A beam combiner combines the first and second filtered radiation to form a combined beam of radiation. A detector is disposed to monitor magnitude of at least a portion of the combined beam alternately at the first wavelength band and the second wavelength band as an indication of the concentration of the substance in the sample path.

  1. Time resolved optical detection for white matter lesion detection: preclinical tests on macaque brains and MRI co-registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Planat-Chrétien, A.; Berger, M.; Hervé, L.; Watroba, L.; Demilly, J.; Flament, J.; Stimmer, L.; Aubourg, P.; Dinten, J.-M.

    2015-07-01

    We conducted a preclinical assessment on young macaques aimed at detecting white matter lesions. We present the protocol we implemented to achieve the lesions detection using a bedside non-invasive optical-based Time-Resolved instrumentation we have optimized for this purpose. We validated the reconstructed 3D absorption map with co-registration of MRI data.

  2. Coherent (photon) vs incoherent (current) detection of multidimensional optical signals from single molecules in open junctions

    SciTech Connect

    Agarwalla, Bijay Kumar; Hua, Weijie; Zhang, Yu; Mukamel, Shaul; Harbola, Upendra

    2015-06-07

    The nonlinear optical response of a current-carrying single molecule coupled to two metal leads and driven by a sequence of impulsive optical pulses with controllable phases and time delays is calculated. Coherent (stimulated, heterodyne) detection of photons and incoherent detection of the optically induced current are compared. Using a diagrammatic Liouville space superoperator formalism, the signals are recast in terms of molecular correlation functions which are then expanded in the many-body molecular states. Two dimensional signals in benzene-1,4-dithiol molecule show cross peaks involving charged states. The correlation between optical and charge current signal is also observed.

  3. Possibility of using laser-fibre optics as a fire detection system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, W. K.; Wan, Eric T. K.; Cheung, K. P.

    1997-05-01

    Optical fibres together with a helium-neon laser is proposed to be used as a new fire detection system. This has been Investigated experimentally and reported in this paper. Results on the coupling loss, bending loss, extinction loss of the fibres due to smoke and refraction loss through hot air shimmer are described. Comparison with the performance of common optical and ionization detectors is made. Experimental results indicate that the optical signal would be significantly changed when there is smoke. Hence it is highly probable that a new fire detection system can be designed using laser-fibre optics.

  4. Design of a Fiber Optic Biosensor for Cholesterol Detection in Human Blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yunianto, M.; Permata, A. N.; Eka, D.; Ariningrum, D.; Wahyuningsih, S.; Marzuki, A.

    2017-02-01

    A fiber optic sensor is to detect the cholesterol content in blood serum-based biosensor using plastic optical fiber that has been designed. The fiber optic sensor designed with sensing area was a fiber optic grated by 5 scratches then given bending treatment by 5 cm. The first test was by UV-Vis spectrometer with linearity of 0.96. The second test was by light spectrometer with linearity in white LED of 0.94. Optical fiber sensors were made to work well on a range of blood serum concentration of 140 mg/dL to 250 mg/dL.

  5. Evaluating the Accuracy of Optic Nerve Detections in Retina Imaging Using Complementary Methods

    SciTech Connect

    Karnowski, Thomas Paul; Aykac, Deniz; Chaum, Edward; Giancardo, Luca; Tobin Jr, Kenneth William

    2009-01-01

    The detection of the optic nerve in retina images is a key element of detecting the anatomical structure of the retina. In this work we report on the fusion of two complementary optic nerve detection methods. The methods are complementary in the sense that they use different fundamental queues for locating the optic nerve. By fusing the methods through applying simple distance-based threshold, a confidence level may be assigned to the quality of the optic nerve detection. In a practical screening system this metric can be used to determine if the images should be immediately reviewed by a physician or if further automatic processing is feasible. We report on the results for two different data sets and show that the use of the threshold improves detection quality.

  6. Weak scratch detection and defect classification methods for a large-aperture optical element

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Xian; Xu, De; Zhang, Zheng-Tao; Zhang, Feng; Liu, Xi-Long; Zhang, Da-Peng

    2017-03-01

    Surface defects on optics cause optic failure and heavy loss to the optical system. Therefore, surface defects on optics must be carefully inspected. This paper proposes a coarse-to-fine detection strategy of weak scratches in complicated dark-field images. First, all possible scratches are detected based on bionic vision. Then, each possible scratch is precisely positioned and connected to a complete scratch by the LSD and a priori knowledge. Finally, multiple scratches with various types can be detected in dark-field images. To classify defects and pollutants, a classification method based on GIST features is proposed. This paper uses many real dark-field images as experimental images. The results show that this method can detect multiple types of weak scratches in complex images and that the defects can be correctly distinguished with interference. This method satisfies the real-time and accurate detection requirements of surface defects.

  7. Optical excitation and detection of vapor bubbles around plasmonic nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Lapotko, Dmitri

    2009-02-16

    Laser-induced generation of the vapor bubbles in water around plasmonic nanoparticles was experimentally studied with optical scattering methods. Nanoparticle-generated bubbles temporally and spatially localize laser-induced thermal field and also amplify optical scattering relatively to that of gold nanoparticles. Bubble lifetimes and threshold fluencies were determined as functions of the laser (pulse duration, fluence, inter-pulse interval), nanoparticle (size, shape, aggregation state) and sample chamber parameters so to optimize bubble generation around plasmonic nanoparticles. Nanoparticle-generated bubbles are suggested as nano-scaled optical sensors and sources of localized thermal and mechanical impact.

  8. Interference-free optical detection for Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Quang-Viet (Inventor); Fischer, David G (Inventor); Kojima, Jun (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An architecture for spontaneous Raman scattering (SRS) that utilizes a frame-transfer charge-coupled device (CCD) sensor operating in a subframe burst gating mode to realize time-resolved combustion diagnostics is disclosed. The technique permits all-electronic optical gating with microsecond shutter speeds (<5 .mu.s), without compromising optical throughput or image fidelity. When used in conjunction with a pair of orthogonally-polarized excitation lasers, the technique measures time-resolved vibrational Raman scattering that is minimally contaminated by problematic optical background noise.

  9. Detection of optical neuronal signals in the visual cortex using continuous wave near-infrared spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sun, Bailei; Zhang, Lei; Gong, Hui; Sun, Jinyan; Luo, Qingming

    2014-02-15

    Near-infrared spectroscopy (NIRS) measures slow hemodynamic signals noninvasively to indirectly infer the neuronal activity in the brain. However, it remains a controversy on whether this optical measurement technique can detect the optical neuronal signal, which reflects the optical changes directly associated with neuronal activity, within the visual cortex of human and non-human primates. By carefully reviewing the important factors in the detection of optical neuronal signals, we aim to investigate the feasibility of performing NIRS measurements of optical neuronal signals within the visual cortex in humans. To ensure a strong optical neuronal response, a full-field circular black and white reversing checkerboard stimulus was presented, and the reversal frequency was carefully chosen. We used a homemade continuous wave (CW) NIRS system with high detection sensitivity (of the order of 0.1 pW) to record a large area of the visual cortex (approximately 6 × 14 cm(2)). EEG was simultaneously acquired with the optical signal. Based on the mathematical morphology, we adapted the filter proposed by Gratton et al. to remove the influence of arterial pulsation and facilitate the detection and elimination of unknown artifacts from the data. We obtained reliable optical neuronal signals in 77% of the participants (10 out of 13). The amplitudes (latencies) of the obtained optical neuronal signals corresponding to the 785 and 850 nm wavelengths were 0.017 ± 0.003% (94.7 ± 8.4 ms) and 0.025 ± 0.006% (99.0 ± 7.7 ms), respectively. There were no significant differences between the latencies of the N75 component of the visual evoked potential (VEP) and optical neuronal signals at either wavelength. This is the first study to report optical neuronal signals within the visual cortex in the intact human brain using a CW NIRS system. These results indicate the feasibility of measuring noninvasive optical neuronal signals using a CW NIRS system with high detection sensitivity.

  10. Polymer slab waveguides for the optical detection of nanoparticles in evanescent field based biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teigell Beneitez, Nuria; Missinne, Jeroen; Schleipen, Jean; Orsel, Joke; Prins, Menno W. J.; Van Steenberge, Geert

    2014-02-01

    We present a polymer optical waveguide integration technology for the detection of nanoparticles in an evanescent field based biosensor. In the proposed biosensor concept, super-paramagnetic nanoparticles are used as optical contrast labels. The nanoparticles capture target molecules from a sample fluid and bind to the sensor surface with biological specificity. The surface-bound nanoparticles are then detected using frustration of an evanescent field. In the current paper we elaborate on the polymer waveguides which are used to generate a well-defined optical field for nanoparticle detection.

  11. Passive optical sensor for lightning detection on overhead power lines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosolem, J. B.; Barbosa, C. F.; Florídia, C.; Bezerra, E. L.

    2009-10-01

    In this work we present the results of a passive optical sensor for monitoring lightning strikes on overhead power lines, which can also be used for several other applications. The optic sensor is very simple and cheap and basically consists in the use of an antenna connected directly to a semiconductor laser. No batteries and solar panels are necessary to implement this sensing system in power lines towers. It was tested in laboratory and showed a good performance.

  12. Feasibility of fiber-optic radiation sensor using Cerenkov effect for detecting thermal neutrons.

    PubMed

    Jang, Kyoung Won; Yagi, Takahiro; Pyeon, Cheol Ho; Yoo, Wook Jae; Shin, Sang Hun; Misawa, Tsuyoshi; Lee, Bongsoo

    2013-06-17

    In this research, we propose a novel method for detecting thermal neutrons with a fiber-optic radiation sensor using the Cerenkov effect. We fabricate a fiber-optic radiation sensor that detects thermal neutrons with a Gd-foil, a rutile crystal, and a plastic optical fiber. The relationship between the fluxes of electrons inducing Cerenkov radiation in the sensor probe of the fiber-optic radiation sensor and thermal neutron fluxes is determined using the Monte Carlo N-particle transport code simulations. To evaluate the fiber-optic radiation sensor, the Cerenkov radiation generated in the fiber-optic radiation sensor by irradiation of pure thermal neutron beams is measured according to the depths of polyethylene.

  13. Detecting Optic Atrophy in Multiple Sclerosis Patients Using New Colorimetric Analysis Software: From Idea to Application.

    PubMed

    Bambo, Maria Pilar; Garcia-Martin, Elena; Perez-Olivan, Susana; Larrosa-Povés, José Manuel; Polo-Llorens, Vicente; Gonzalez-De la Rosa, Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Neuro-ophthalmologists typically observe a temporal pallor of the optic disc in patients with multiple sclerosis. Here, we describe the emergence of an idea to quantify these optic disc color changes in multiple sclerosis patients. We recruited 12 multiple sclerosis patients with previous optic neuritis attack and obtained photographs of their optic discs. The Laguna ONhE, a new colorimetric software using hemoglobin as the reference pigment in the papilla, was used for the analysis. The papilla of these multiple sclerosis patients showed greater pallor, especially in the temporal sector. The software detected the pallor and assigned hemoglobin percentages below normal reference values. Measurements of optic disc hemoglobin levels obtained with the Laguna ONhE software program had good ability to detect optic atrophy and, consequently, axonal loss in multiple sclerosis patients. This new technology is easy to implement in routine clinical practice.

  14. Angle of Arrival Detection Through Artificial Neural Network Analysis of Optical Fiber Intensity Patterns

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-12-01

    ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK ANALYSIS OF OPTICAL FIBER INTENSITY PATTERNS THESIS Scott Thomas Captain, USAF AFIT/GE/ENG/90D-62 DTIC...ELECTE ao • JAN08 1991 Approved for public release; distribution unlimited. AFIT/GE/ENG/90D-62 ANGLE OF ARRIVAL DETECTION THROUGH ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK ANALYSIS... ARTIFICIAL NEURAL NETWORK ANALYSIS OF OPTICAL FIBER INTENSITY PATTERNS L Introduction The optical sensors of United States Air Force reconnaissance

  15. A technique for detecting and locating polarisation nonuniformities in an anisotropic optical fibre

    SciTech Connect

    Burdin, V V; Konstantinov, Yurii A; Pervadchuk, Vladimir P; Smirnov, A S

    2013-06-30

    One of the most important requirements for optical fibres as waveguiding media is uniformity. Polarisation-maintaining anisotropic fibres contain a special type of nonuniformity, which leads to polarisation cross-talk: optical power is transferred from one polarisation mode to the orthogonal mode. In this paper, we report a technique for detecting and locating such nonuniformities in a PANDA anisotropic single-mode fibre using polarised reflectometry. (fiber optics)

  16. Optical lock-in detection imaging microscopy for contrast-enhanced imaging in living cells.

    PubMed

    Marriott, Gerard; Mao, Shu; Sakata, Tomoyo; Ran, Jing; Jackson, David K; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Gomez, Timothy J; Warp, Erica; Tulyathan, Orapim; Aaron, Holly L; Isacoff, Ehud Y; Yan, Yuling

    2008-11-18

    One of the limitations on imaging fluorescent proteins within living cells is that they are usually present in small numbers and need to be detected over a large background. We have developed the means to isolate specific fluorescence signals from background by using lock-in detection of the modulated fluorescence of a class of optical probe termed "optical switches." This optical lock-in detection (OLID) approach involves modulating the fluorescence emission of the probe through deterministic, optical control of its fluorescent and nonfluorescent states, and subsequently applying a lock-in detection method to isolate the modulated signal of interest from nonmodulated background signals. Cross-correlation analysis provides a measure of correlation between the total fluorescence emission within single pixels of an image detected over several cycles of optical switching and a reference waveform detected within the same image over the same switching cycles. This approach to imaging provides a means to selectively detect the emission from optical switch probes among a larger population of conventional fluorescent probes and is compatible with conventional microscopes. OLID using nitrospirobenzopyran-based probes and the genetically encoded Dronpa fluorescent protein are shown to generate high-contrast images of specific structures and proteins in labeled cells in cultured and explanted neurons and in live Xenopus embryos and zebrafish larvae.

  17. Optical lock-in detection imaging microscopy for contrast-enhanced imaging in living cells

    PubMed Central

    Marriott, Gerard; Mao, Shu; Sakata, Tomoyo; Ran, Jing; Jackson, David K.; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Gomez, Timothy J.; Warp, Erica; Tulyathan, Orapim; Aaron, Holly L.; Isacoff, Ehud Y.; Yan, Yuling

    2008-01-01

    One of the limitations on imaging fluorescent proteins within living cells is that they are usually present in small numbers and need to be detected over a large background. We have developed the means to isolate specific fluorescence signals from background by using lock-in detection of the modulated fluorescence of a class of optical probe termed “optical switches.” This optical lock-in detection (OLID) approach involves modulating the fluorescence emission of the probe through deterministic, optical control of its fluorescent and nonfluorescent states, and subsequently applying a lock-in detection method to isolate the modulated signal of interest from nonmodulated background signals. Cross-correlation analysis provides a measure of correlation between the total fluorescence emission within single pixels of an image detected over several cycles of optical switching and a reference waveform detected within the same image over the same switching cycles. This approach to imaging provides a means to selectively detect the emission from optical switch probes among a larger population of conventional fluorescent probes and is compatible with conventional microscopes. OLID using nitrospirobenzopyran-based probes and the genetically encoded Dronpa fluorescent protein are shown to generate high-contrast images of specific structures and proteins in labeled cells in cultured and explanted neurons and in live Xenopus embryos and zebrafish larvae. PMID:19004775

  18. Application of signal detection theory to optics. [image evaluation and restoration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Helstrom, C. W.

    1973-01-01

    Basic quantum detection and estimation theory, applications to optics, photon counting, and filtering theory are studied. Recent work on the restoration of degraded optical images received at photoelectrically emissive surfaces is also reported, the data used by the method are the numbers of electrons ejected from various parts of the surface.

  19. QUANTITATIVE DETECTION OF ENVIRONMENTALLY IMPORTANT DYES USING DIODE LASER/FIBER-OPTIC RAMAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compact diode laser/fiber-optic Raman spectrometer is used for quantitative detection of environmentally important dyes. This system is based on diode laser excitation at 782 mm, fiber optic probe technology, an imaging spectrometer, and state-of-the-art scientific CCD camera. ...

  20. QUANTITATIVE DETECTION OF ENVIRONMENTALLY IMPORTANT DYES USING DIODE LASER/FIBER-OPTIC RAMAN

    EPA Science Inventory

    A compact diode laser/fiber-optic Raman spectrometer is used for quantitative detection of environmentally important dyes. This system is based on diode laser excitation at 782 mm, fiber optic probe technology, an imaging spectrometer, and state-of-the-art scientific CCD camera. ...

  1. A fiber optic sensor for web edge detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seshadri, Aravind; Pagilla, Prabhakar R.

    2007-04-01

    A laser based fiber-optic sensor was proposed in our previous work. The sensor developed was based on the principle of scattering of light and the sensitivity directional property of optical fibers. A beam of light is incident on a surface or an edge, the scattered light is received by a linear array of optical fibers. The lateral position of the web edge is determined based on the intensity of light received by each fiber in the fiber array. Static experiments were conducted to show the feasibility of the sensing strategy. In this work, the performance of the sensor is evaluated on an actual web handling platform. The analysis of static and dynamic (with non-zero web transport velocity) experimental data of the sensor under various realistic operating conditions and disturbances is conducted. A direct comparison of the fiber optic sensor and two existing industrial sensors is presented. The experimental data from the sensors are compared using different web materials and under different operating conditions. The new fiber optic sensor is more accurate and the measurements are less noisy. Further, the new sensor overcomes some of the key limitations of existing sensors. The problem of determining the actual position of the web when it is completely outside the sensing window or when it completely covers the sensing windows is resolved; the solution consists of a new configuration. The new configuration also improves the precision of the sensor.

  2. Radical ions and excited states in radiolysis. Optically detected time resolved EPR

    SciTech Connect

    Trifunac, A.D.; Smith, J.P.

    1981-01-01

    Excited-state production and radical-ion recombination kinetics in pulse-irradiated solutions of aromatic solutes in cyclohexane are studied by a new method of optical detection of time-resolved electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectra. 7 figures.

  3. Photon Counting System for High-Sensitivity Detection of Bioluminescence at Optical Fiber End.

    PubMed

    Iinuma, Masataka; Kadoya, Yutaka; Kuroda, Akio

    2016-01-01

    The technique of photon counting is widely used for various fields and also applicable to a high-sensitivity detection of luminescence. Thanks to recent development of single photon detectors with avalanche photodiodes (APDs), the photon counting system with an optical fiber has become powerful for a detection of bioluminescence at an optical fiber end, because it allows us to fully use the merits of compactness, simple operation, highly quantum efficiency of the APD detectors. This optical fiber-based system also has a possibility of improving the sensitivity to a local detection of Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) by high-sensitivity detection of the bioluminescence. In this chapter, we are introducing a basic concept of the optical fiber-based system and explaining how to construct and use this system.

  4. Surface-enhanced nonlinear optical effects and detection of adsorbed molecular monolayers

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Y.R.; Chen, C.K.; Heinz, T.F.; Ricard, D.

    1981-01-01

    The observation of a number of surface-enhanced nonlinear optical effects is discussed. The feasibility of using second-harmonic generation to detect the adsorption of molecular monolayers on a metal surface in an electrolytic solution is shown.

  5. Fiber-optic-based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) sensors for the detection of toxic nerve agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prakash, Anna M. C.; Kim, Yoon-Chang; Banerji, Soame; Masson, Jean-Francois; Booksh, Karl S.

    2004-03-01

    Analytical instruments capable of detecting nerve agents in battlefield conditions where speed, accuracy and ease of operation are a must in today's military. Fast detection and decontamination of nerve agents in very low concentrations is the primary focus of our research. The method presented here focuses on optimizing polymer stabilized sensing elements on the surface of SPR fiber-optic probes. A number of polymers & polymer supported metal complexes capable of reversibly binding to the species of interest & which have robust operation in hostile environments are incorporated with the fiber optic sensing elements. An optical technique, such as Surface Plasmon Resonance (SPR), better suited to rapid data collection without sample pretreatment is employed. The approach using polymer-based optical fibers with off-the-shelf SPR system components has been tested for the detection of Pinacolyl methylphosphonate (PMP), a simulant for nerve agent Soman. Surface initiated polymeric sensors have higher sensitivity toward detecting PMP than bulk-polymerized sensors.

  6. Optical design of an optical coherence tomography and multispectral fluorescence imaging endoscope to detect early stage ovarian cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tate, Tyler; Keenan, Molly; Swan, Elizabeth; Black, John; Utzinger, Urs; Barton, Jennifer

    2014-12-01

    The five year survival rate for ovarian cancer is over 90% if early detection occurs, yet no effective early screening method exists. We have designed and are constructing a dual modality Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) and Multispectral Fluorescence Imaging (MFI) endoscope to optically screen the Fallopian tube and ovary for early stage cancer. The endoscope reaches the ovary via the natural pathway of the vagina, cervix, uterus and Fallopian tube. In order to navigate the Fallopian tube the endoscope must have an outer diameter of 600 μm, be highly flexible, steerable, tracking and nonperforating. The imaging systems consists of six optical subsystems, two from OCT and four from MFI. The optical subsystems have independent and interrelated design criteria. The endoscope will be tested on realistic tissue models and ex vivo tissue to prove feasibility of future human trials. Ultimately the project aims to provide women the first effective ovarian cancer screening technique.

  7. All-optical envelope detection for radio-over- fiber links using external optical injection of a DFB laser.

    PubMed

    Prince, Kamau; Tafur Monroy, Idelfonso; Seoane, Jorge; Jeppesen, Palle

    2008-02-04

    We outline a novel method performing all-optical envelope detection of radio-frequency signals for radio-over-fiber links. A high frequency modulated signal with a slower-varying envelope is injected into a DFB laser which, due to gain suppression effects, recovers only the envelope of the optical signal. We characterize the DFB gain suppression effect in terms of injected signal wavelength and power level requirements. System performance is assessed, including experimental bit-error rate results; these illustrate successful envelope detection for a 20 GHz carrier with ASK modulation operating at 2.5 Gbit/second. Preliminary results at 5.5 Gbit/s show significant potential for application in hybrid optical-wireless communications networks.

  8. Detection of avian influenza antigens in proximity fiber, droplet, and optical waveguide microfluidics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Jeong-Yeol; Heinze, Brian C.; Gamboa, Jessica; You, David J.

    2009-05-01

    Virus antigens of avian influenza subtype H3N2 were detected on two different microfluidic platforms: microchannel and droplet. Latex immunoagglutination assays were performed using 920-nm highly carboxylated polystyrene beads that are conjugated with antibody to avian influenza virus. The bead suspension was merged with the solutions of avian influenza virus antigens in a Y-junction of a microchannel made by polydimethylsiloxane soft lithography. The resulting latex immunoagglutinations were measured with two optical fibers in proximity setup to detect 45° forward light scattering. Alternatively, 10 μL droplets of a bead suspension and an antigen solution were merged on a superhydrophobic surface (water contact angle = 155°), whose movement was guided by a metal wire, and 180° back light scattering is measured with a backscattering optical probe. Detection limits were 0.1 pg mL-1 for both microchannel with proximity fibers and droplet microfluidics, thanks to the use of micro-positioning stages to help generate reproducible optical signals. Additionally, optical waveguide was tested by constructing optical waveguide channels (filled with mineral oil) within a microfluidic device to detect the same light scattering. Detection limit was 0.1 ng mL-1 for an optical waveguide device, with a strong potential of improvement in the near future. The use of optical waveguide enabled smaller device setup, easier operation, smaller standard deviations and broader linear range of assay than proximity fiber microchannel and droplet microfluidics. Total assay time was less than 10 min.

  9. X-ray excited optical luminescence detection by scanning near-field optical microscope: a new tool for nanoscience.

    PubMed

    Larcheri, Silvia; Rocca, Francesco; Jandard, Frank; Pailharey, Daniel; Graziola, Roberto; Kuzmin, Alexei; Purans, Juris

    2008-01-01

    Investigations of complex nanostructured materials used in modern technologies require special experimental techniques able to provide information on the structure and electronic properties of materials with a spatial resolution down to the nanometer scale. We tried to address these needs through the combination of x-ray absorption spectroscopy (XAS) using synchrotron radiation microbeams with scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM) detection of the x-ray excited optical luminescence (XEOL) signal. This new instrumentation offers the possibility to carry out a selective structural analysis of the sample surface with the subwavelength spatial resolution determined by the SNOM probe aperture. In addition, the apex of the optical fiber plays the role of a topographic probe, and chemical and topographic mappings can be simultaneously recorded. Our working XAS-SNOM prototype is based on a quartz tuning-fork head mounted on a high stability nanopositioning system; a coated optical fiber tip, operating as a probe in shear-force mode; a detection system coupled with the microscope head control system; and a dedicated software/hardware setup for synchronization of the XEOL signal detection with the synchrotron beamline acquisition system. We illustrate the possibility to obtain an element-specific contrast and to perform nano-XAS experiments by detecting the Zn K and W L(3) absorption edges in luminescent ZnO and mixed ZnWO(4)-ZnO nanostructured thin films.

  10. Optical Detection of core-gold nanoshells inside biosystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Acunto, Mario; Dinarelli, Simone; Cricenti, Antonio; Luce, Marco

    2016-02-01

    Metal nanoshells having a dielectric core with a thin gold layer are generating new interest due to the unique optical, electric and magnetic properties exhibited by the local field enhancement near the metal - dielectric core interface. These nanoshells possess strong, highly tunable local plasmon resonances with frequencies dependent upon the nanoshell shape and core material. These unique characteristics have applications in biosensing, optical communication and medicine. In this paper, we developed a theoretical, numerical and experimental approach based on a scanning near optical microscope to identify nanoshells inside mouse cells. Taking advantage of the characteristic near-infrared transparency window of many biological systems, i.e. the low light absorption coefficient of biological systems between 750-1100 nm, we were able to identify a 100-150 nm diameter barium titanate-gold nanoshell inside the h9c2 mouse cells.

  11. Electron cascades in sensors for optical detection of ionizing radiation

    SciTech Connect

    London, Richard A.; Lowry, Mark E.; Vernon, Stephen P.; Stewart, Richard E.

    2013-10-21

    A new class of high-speed detectors, called RadOptic detectors, measures ionizing radiation incident on a transparent semiconductor by sensing changes in the refractive index with an optical probe beam. We describe the role of radiation-initiated electron cascades in setting the sensitivity and the spatial and temporal resolution of RadOptic detectors. We model electron cascades with both analytical and Monte Carlo computational methods. We find that the timescale for the development of an electron cascade is less than of order 100 fs and is not expected to affect the time response of a detector. The characteristic size of the electron cloud is typically less than 2 μm, enabling high spatial resolution in imaging systems. The electron-hole pair density created by single x-rays is much smaller than the saturation density and, therefore, single events should not saturate the detector.

  12. Automatic Detection of Optic Disc in Retinal Image by Using Keypoint Detection, Texture Analysis, and Visual Dictionary Techniques.

    PubMed

    Akyol, Kemal; Şen, Baha; Bayır, Şafak

    2016-01-01

    With the advances in the computer field, methods and techniques in automatic image processing and analysis provide the opportunity to detect automatically the change and degeneration in retinal images. Localization of the optic disc is extremely important for determining the hard exudate lesions or neovascularization, which is the later phase of diabetic retinopathy, in computer aided eye disease diagnosis systems. Whereas optic disc detection is fairly an easy process in normal retinal images, detecting this region in the retinal image which is diabetic retinopathy disease may be difficult. Sometimes information related to optic disc and hard exudate information may be the same in terms of machine learning. We presented a novel approach for efficient and accurate localization of optic disc in retinal images having noise and other lesions. This approach is comprised of five main steps which are image processing, keypoint extraction, texture analysis, visual dictionary, and classifier techniques. We tested our proposed technique on 3 public datasets and obtained quantitative results. Experimental results show that an average optic disc detection accuracy of 94.38%, 95.00%, and 90.00% is achieved, respectively, on the following public datasets: DIARETDB1, DRIVE, and ROC.

  13. Automatic Detection of Optic Disc in Retinal Image by Using Keypoint Detection, Texture Analysis, and Visual Dictionary Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Bayır, Şafak

    2016-01-01

    With the advances in the computer field, methods and techniques in automatic image processing and analysis provide the opportunity to detect automatically the change and degeneration in retinal images. Localization of the optic disc is extremely important for determining the hard exudate lesions or neovascularization, which is the later phase of diabetic retinopathy, in computer aided eye disease diagnosis systems. Whereas optic disc detection is fairly an easy process in normal retinal images, detecting this region in the retinal image which is diabetic retinopathy disease may be difficult. Sometimes information related to optic disc and hard exudate information may be the same in terms of machine learning. We presented a novel approach for efficient and accurate localization of optic disc in retinal images having noise and other lesions. This approach is comprised of five main steps which are image processing, keypoint extraction, texture analysis, visual dictionary, and classifier techniques. We tested our proposed technique on 3 public datasets and obtained quantitative results. Experimental results show that an average optic disc detection accuracy of 94.38%, 95.00%, and 90.00% is achieved, respectively, on the following public datasets: DIARETDB1, DRIVE, and ROC. PMID:27110272

  14. Detecting quantum coherence of Bose gases in optical lattices by scattering light intensity in cavity.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiaoji; Xu, Xu; Yin, Lan; Liu, W M; Chen, Xuzong

    2010-07-19

    We propose a new method of detecting quantum coherence of a Bose gas trapped in a one-dimensional optical lattice by measuring the light intensity from Raman scattering in cavity. After pump and displacement process, the intensity or amplitude of scattering light is different for different quantum states of a Bose gas, such as superfluid and Mott-Insulator states. This method can also be useful to detect quantum states of atoms with two components in an optical lattice.

  15. Fiber Optic Coupled Raman Based Detection of Hazardous Liquids Concealed in Commercial Products

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-01-01

    Detecting explosives by portable Raman ana- lyzers: a comparison of 785, 976, 1064 ,and 1550 nm (Retina- Safe) laser excitation,” Spectroscopy, pp...agent (CWA) simulant triethyl phosphate (TEP), hydrogen peroxide, and acetone as representative of toxic industrial compounds (TICs). Fiber optic...distribution is unlimited. Fiber Optic Coupled Raman Based Detection of Hazardous Liquids Concealed in Commercial Products The views, opinions and/or

  16. Guided Wave and Damage Detection in Composite Laminates Using Different Fiber Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH0) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent. PMID:22412347

  17. Guided wave and damage detection in composite laminates using different fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Li, Fucai; Murayama, Hideaki; Kageyama, Kazuro; Shirai, Takehiro

    2009-01-01

    Guided wave detection using different fiber optic sensors and their applications in damage detection for composite laminates were systematically investigated and compared in this paper. Two types of fiber optic sensors, namely fiber Bragg gratings (FBG) and Doppler effect-based fiber optic (FOD) sensors, were addressed and guided wave detection systems were constructed for both types. Guided waves generated by a piezoelectric transducer were propagated through a quasi-isotropic carbon fiber reinforced plastic (CFRP) laminate and acquired by these fiber optic sensors. Characteristics of these fiber optic sensors in ultrasonic guided wave detection were systematically compared. Results demonstrated that both the FBG and FOD sensors can be applied in guided wave and damage detection for the CFRP laminates. The signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of guided wave signal captured by an FOD sensor is relatively high in comparison with that of the FBG sensor because of their different physical principles in ultrasonic detection. Further, the FOD sensor is sensitive to the damage-induced fundamental shear horizontal (SH(0)) guided wave that, however, cannot be detected by using the FBG sensor, because the FOD sensor is omnidirectional in ultrasound detection and, in contrast, the FBG sensor is severely direction dependent.

  18. Quantum Dots Microstructured Optical Fiber for X-Ray Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeHaven, Stan; Williams, Phillip; Burke, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Microstructured optical fibers containing quantum dots scintillation material comprised of zinc sulfide nanocrystals doped with magnesium sulfide are presented. These quantum dots are applied inside the microstructured optical fibers using capillary action. The x-ray photon counts of these fibers are compared to the output of a collimated CdTe solid state detector over an energy range from 10 to 40 keV. The results of the fiber light output and associated effects of an acrylate coating and the quantum dot application technique are discussed.

  19. Pathogen detection using evanescent-wave fiber optic biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Aldo P.; Werneck, Marcelo M.; Ribeiro, R. M.; Lins, U. G.

    1999-07-01

    This paper describes a real time optical biosensor that utilizes the evanescent field technique for monitoring microorganisms in hospital environment. The biosensor monitors interactions between the analytic (bacteria) and the evanescent field of an optical fiber passing through the culture media where the bacteria grows. The objective is to monitor atmospheres in hospital areas for the Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus pneumonia. The results lead us the conclusion that this kind of sensor presents quick response, good performance, easy of construction and low cost. We expect that the sensor will be of great help in controlling the hospital environment.

  20. Highly sensitive evanescent wave combination tapered fiber optic fluorosensor for protein detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nardone, Vincent; Kapoor, Rakesh

    2008-02-01

    In this paper we are reporting the development of a highly sensitive evanescent wave combination tapered fiber optic fluorosensor. We have demonstrated detection of 5 pM Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) protein using these fiber optic sensors. The sensor can be easily adopted for detection of other proteins. Six identical probes were prepared and affinity pure Goat anti-BSA antibodies were immobilized on the probe surface. We could detect signal from all the probes kept in 5 pM to 1 nM BSA solution while no signal was detected from the probes kept in 20 nM labeled ESA solution.

  1. REVIEW OF METHODS OF OPTICAL GAS Detection by Direct Optical Spectroscopy, with Emphasis on Correlation Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dakin, John P.; Chambers, Paul

    This chapter reviews the development of optical gas sensors, starting with an initial emphasis on optical-fibre remoted techniques and finishing with a particular focus on our own group's work on highly selective methods using correlation spectroscopy. This latter section includes extensive theoretical modelling of a correlation spectroscopy method, and compares theory with practice for a CO2 sensor.

  2. Research on vision-based error detection system for optic fiber winding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenchao; Li, Huipeng; Yang, Dewei; Zhang, Min

    2011-11-01

    Optic fiber coils are the hearts of fiber optic gyroscopes (FOGs). To detect the irresistible errors during the process of winding of optical fibers, such as gaps, climbs and partial rises between fibers, when fiber optic winding machines are operated, and to enable fully automated winding, we researched and designed this vision-based error detection system for optic fiber winding, on the basis of digital image collection and process[1]. When a Fiber-optic winding machine is operated, background light is used as illumination system to strength the contrast of images between fibers and background. Then microscope and CCD as imaging system and image collecting system are used to receive the analog images of fibers. After that analog images are shifted into digital imagines, which can be processed and analyzed by computers. Canny edge detection and a contour-tracing algorithm are used as the main image processing method. The distances between the fiber peaks were then measured and compared with the desired values. If these values fall outside of a predetermined tolerance zone, an error is detected and classified either as a gap, climb or rise. we used OpenCV and MATLAB database as basic function library and used VC++6.0 as the platform to show the results. The test results showed that the system was useful, and the edge detection and contour-tracing algorithm were effective, because of the high rate of accuracy. At the same time, the results of error detection are correct.

  3. Applicability of Fiber Optics to Aircraft Fire Detection Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-10-01

    34bare detector" gas discharge tube concept. However, the most serious limitation is operating temperature. This report treats the use of fiber optics...nearly 1,000 to 10,000 times as sensitive as the gas - discharge tube ).’ v In both the "short-range", distributed sensor and "long look" concepts for

  4. Modal Frequency Detection in Composite Beams Using Fiber Optic Sensors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-07-28

    optic sensors showed more sensitivity and better signal-to-noise ratios. The analytical classical beam theory and a finite element model validated the...61 C. INPUT AND OUTPUT FOR THE FINITE ELEMENT MODEL ..... 88 B IB LIO G RA PH Y...beam compared to MATLAB generated frequencies of classical beam theory and frequencies calculated using a finite element model (FEM

  5. New radiological material detection technologies for nuclear forensics: Remote optical imaging and graphene-based sensors.

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Richard Karl; Martin, Jeffrey B.; Wiemann, Dora K.; Choi, Junoh; Howell, Stephen W.

    2015-09-01

    We developed new detector technologies to identify the presence of radioactive materials for nuclear forensics applications. First, we investigated an optical radiation detection technique based on imaging nitrogen fluorescence excited by ionizing radiation. We demonstrated optical detection in air under indoor and outdoor conditions for alpha particles and gamma radiation at distances up to 75 meters. We also contributed to the development of next generation systems and concepts that could enable remote detection at distances greater than 1 km, and originated a concept that could enable daytime operation of the technique. A second area of research was the development of room-temperature graphene-based sensors for radiation detection and measurement. In this project, we observed tunable optical and charged particle detection, and developed improved devices. With further development, the advancements described in this report could enable new capabilities for nuclear forensics applications.

  6. Optical detection of potassium chloride vapor using collinear photofragmentation and atomic absorption spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Sorvajärvi, Tapio; Saarela, Jaakko; Toivonen, Juha

    2012-10-01

    A sensitive and selective optical technique to detect potassium chloride (KCl) vapor is introduced. The technique is based on the photofragmentation of KCl molecules, using a pulsed UV laser, and optical probing of the temporarily increased amount of potassium atoms with a near-infrared laser. The two laser beams are aligned to go through the sample volume along the same optical path. The performance of the technique is demonstrated by detecting KCl concentrations from 25 ppb to 30 ppm in a temperature-controlled cell.

  7. Improved detection limits using a hand-held optical imager with coregistration capabilities.

    PubMed

    Erickson, Sarah J; Martinez, Sergio L; Gonzalez, Jean; Caldera, Lizeth; Godavarty, Anuradha

    2010-07-15

    Optical imaging is emerging as a non-invasive and non-ionizing method for breast cancer diagnosis. A hand-held optical imager has been developed with coregistration facilities towards flexible imaging of different tissue volumes and curvatures in near real-time. Herein, fluorescence-enhanced optical imaging experiments are performed to demonstrate deeper target detection under perfect and imperfect (100:1) uptake conditions in (liquid) tissue phantoms and in vitro. Upon summation of multiple scans (fluorescence intensity images), fluorescent targets are detected at greater depths than from single scan alone.

  8. S-shaped SU-8 optical waveguide immobilized with gold nanoparticles for trace detection of explosives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bharadwaj, Reshma; Tripathi, Rakesh; Prabhakar, Amit; Mukherji, Soumyo

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we report a miniaturized optical sensor for direct detection of vapors of nitro-based explosives using gold nanoparticle (AuNP) coated SU-8 polymer optical waveguides. S-shaped waveguide geometry was chosen due its enhanced evanescent field sensitivity. Light was coupled into the waveguide structure to evanescently excite the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) modes of the immobilized AuNP. The AuNP were functionalized with 4- mercaptobenzoic acid (4-MBA) which acts as the receptor for nitro-based explosives. The AuNP coated SU-8 optical waveguide sensor demonstrated an ability to detect 10 parts per billion (ppb) concentration of explosive analytes.

  9. Functionalization of optical nanotip arrays with an electrochemical microcantilever for multiplexed DNA detection.

    PubMed

    Descamps, Emeline; Duroure, Nathalie; Deiss, Frédérique; Leichlé, Thierry; Adam, Catherine; Mailley, Pascal; Aït-Ikhlef, Ali; Livache, Thierry; Nicu, Liviu; Sojic, Neso

    2013-08-07

    Optical nanotip arrays fabricated on etched fiber bundles were functionalized with DNA spots. Such unconventional substrates (3D and non-planar) are difficult to pattern with standard microfabrication techniques but, using an electrochemical cantilever, up to 400 spots were electrodeposited on the nanostructured optical surface in 5 min. This approach allows each spot to be addressed individually and multiplexed fluorescence detection is demonstrated. Finally, remote fluorescence detection was performed by imaging through the optical fiber bundle itself after hybridisation with the complementary sequence.

  10. [Effect of Optical Length on Detection Accuracy of Camellia Oil Adulteration by Near Infrared Spectroscopy].

    PubMed

    Sun, Tong; Wu, Yi-qing; Xu, Peng; Wen, Zhen-cai; Hu, Tian; Liu, Mu-hua

    2015-07-01

    In this research, near infrared spectroscopy was used to detect adulterated percent of camellia oil adulterated with soybean oil quantificationally at different optical lengths, and the effect of optical length on detection accuracy of adulterated percent was investigated. Soybean oil was put into camellia oil according to different mass fraction, the adulterated mass fraction was ranged from 1% to 50%. Transmission spectra of samples were acquired by a Quality Specspectrometer at different optical lengths (1, 2, 4, 10 mm), and effect of optical length on detection accuracy of adulterated percent was analyzed by comparing quantitative prediction models that developed at different calibration methods, pretreatment methods and wavelength range. The results indicate that the performance of quantitative prediction model of adulterated percent is improved as the optical length is increasing from 1 to 4 mm, while the performance of quantitative prediction model of adulterated percent is deteriorated as the optical length is increasing from 4 to 10 mm. 4 mm is a better optical length for camellia oil adulteration. The coefficients of determination of prediction (R2(P)) and root mean square error of prediction (RMSEP) in quantitative prediction models of adulterated percent for optical lengths of 1, 2, 4, 10 mm are 0.923, 0.977, 0.989, 0.962 and 4.58%, 2.54%, 1.72%, 3.20%, respectively.

  11. Effect of adaptive optical system on the capability of lidar detection in atmosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, Xue-chun; Wu, Zhi-chao; Liang, Zhu

    2009-05-01

    Since atmosphere turbulence has an effect on laser propagation, it causes wavefront error usually , changes intensity and coherence of laser, disturbs detection of lidar. The adaptive optical system has broad application in the field of laser transmission because it can adjust characters of optical system ,detect and correct the wavefront error at the same time. Adaptive optics technology uses deformable mirrors to perform dynamic phase modulation and endow optical system the ability to decrease the influence of dynamic wavefront errors. In this paper ,a correction method of the micro-miniature adaptive optical system based on Micro Electromechanical System (MEMS) technology is proposed by analyzing the working theory of the adaptive optical system. An experimental system including deformable mirror based on Micro Electromechanical System (MEMS) technology is designed to correct a factitious wavefront error.The influence function and voltage-deflection curve are researched, and the voltage control matrix is educed. By using the voltage control , the static wavefront aberration is corrected. Several important capabilities of deformable mirrors is tested. With the voltage control matrix, the corrected capability of the adaptive optical system is achieved successfully .The experimental results show that the adaptive optical system can preferably correct the wavefront error, that has small volume and steady capability, and greatly improve the capability of lidar detection.

  12. Optic Disc and Optic Cup Segmentation Methodologies for Glaucoma Image Detection: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Almazroa, Ahmed; Burman, Ritambhar; Raahemifar, Kaamran; Lakshminarayanan, Vasudevan

    2015-01-01

    Glaucoma is the second leading cause of loss of vision in the world. Examining the head of optic nerve (cup-to-disc ratio) is very important for diagnosing glaucoma and for patient monitoring after diagnosis. Images of optic disc and optic cup are acquired by fundus camera as well as Optical Coherence Tomography. The optic disc and optic cup segmentation techniques are used to isolate the relevant parts of the retinal image and to calculate the cup-to-disc ratio. The main objective of this paper is to review segmentation methodologies and techniques for the disc and cup boundaries which are utilized to calculate the disc and cup geometrical parameters automatically and accurately to help the professionals in the glaucoma to have a wide view and more details about the optic nerve head structure using retinal fundus images. We provide a brief description of each technique, highlighting its classification and performance metrics. The current and future research directions are summarized and discussed. PMID:26688751

  13. Meeting current public health needs: optical biosensors for pathogen detection and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minghui; Sapsford, Kim E.; Sergeev, Nikolay; Sun, Steven; Rasooly, Avraham

    2009-02-01

    Pathogen detection and analysis is critical for medicine, food safety, agriculture, public health and biosecurity. Many current microbial detection approaches are based on century-old culturing methods which, while reliable, are slow, provide relatively little information about the pathogens and are not adaptable to high throughput operations. Optical biodetection represents a potential alternative. Most ELISA and chromatography systems are based on optical methods that are also used for analysis of molecular interactions, such as DNA hybridization and protein-protein interactions (e.g. microarrays or SPR biosensors). Various optical biosensor platforms have been developed that have many of the characteristics essential for modern pathogen molecular analysis including sensitivity, speed of analysis, multi-channel capability, relative simplicity and low cost. Here we provide several examples of the use of optical biosensor technology for pathogen detection and analysis including high throughput DNA microarray analysis, SPR-based rapid direct detection of bacterial toxins, CCD-based fluorescent activity analysis of microbial toxins and a simple ECL-based CCD detection system. However, while effective for molecular analysis, most of these technologies are not as sensitive as traditional culturing methods for detecting microorganisms. There is a need to combine optical biosensors with traditional methods to speed culture-based detection and to provide more information regarding the pathogens.

  14. Design of tracking and detecting lens system by diffractive optical method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jiang; Qi, Bo; Ren, Ge; Zhou, Jianwei

    2016-10-01

    Many target-tracking applications require an optical system to acquire the target for tracking and identification. This paper describes a new detecting optical system that can provide automatic flying object detecting, tracking and measuring in visible band. The main feature of the detecting lens system is the combination of diffractive optics with traditional lens design by a technique was invented by Schupmann. Diffractive lens has great potential for developing the larger aperture and lightweight lens. First, the optical system scheme was described. Then the Schupmann achromatic principle with diffractive lens and corrective optics is introduced. According to the technical features and requirements of the optical imaging system for detecting and tracking, we designed a lens system with flat surface Fresnel lens and cancels the optical system chromatic aberration by another flat surface Fresnel lens with effective focal length of 1980mm, an F-Number of F/9.9 and a field of view of 2ωω = 14.2', spatial resolution of 46 lp/mm and a working wavelength range of 0.6 0.85um. At last, the system is compact and easy to fabricate and assembly, the diffuse spot size and MTF function and other analysis provide good performance.

  15. Fiber optic aspects of UV laser spectroscopic in situ detection of water pollutants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillrichs, Georg; Karlitschek, Peter; Neu, Walter

    1994-10-01

    The use of different ultraviolet lasers for fluorescence spectroscopic detection of water pollutants with fiber optical sensors has been studied. Especially detection of small aromatic hydrocarbons via laser induced fluorescence requires short wavelength excitation. Interaction of intense ultraviolet light with the commonly used fused silica fibers leads to a decrease of fiber transmission. Some transmission affecting laser parameters have been studied. A new concept for the use of fiber optic sensors with ultraviolet excitation has been developed. This method is based on transmission of visible laser radiation through the fiber and creation of ultraviolet radiation by optical harmonic generation at the distal end of the fiber. So the unfavorable fiber behavior at short wavelengths can be avoided. Simultaneous coupling of the beam from a single laser source into several optical fibers is interesting for distributed sensor applications. In order to minimize coupling losses for these purposes we developed a new coupling scheme based on a special optical lens array.

  16. OMCat: Catalogue of Serendipitous Sources Detected with the XMM-Newton Optical Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuntz, K. D.; Harrus, Ilana; McGlynn, Thomas A.; Mushotsky, Richard F.; Snowden, Steven L.

    2007-01-01

    The Optical Monitor Catalogue of serendipitous sources (OMCat) contains entries for every source detected in the publically available XMM-Newton Optical Monitor (OM) images taken in either the imaging or "fast" modes. Since the OM records data simultaneously with the X-ray telescopes on XMM-Newton, it typically produces images in one or more near-UV/optical bands for every pointing of the observatory. As of the beginning of 2006, the public archive had covered roughly 0.5% of the sky in 2950 fields. The OMCat is not dominated by sources previously undetected at other wavelengths; the bulk of objects have optical counterparts. However, the OMCat can be used to extend optical or X-ray spectral energy distributions for known objects into the ultraviolet, to study at higher angular resolution objects detected with GALEX, or to find high-Galactic-latitude objects of interest for UV spectroscopy.

  17. Highly sensitive fluorescence detection of avidin/streptavidin with an optical interference mirror slide.

    PubMed

    Yasuda, Mitsuru; Akimoto, Takuo

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents highly sensitive fluorescence detections of avidin and streptavidin using an optical interference mirror (OIM) slide consisting of a plane mirror covered with an optical interference layer. Compared with a common glass slide, the OIM slide can enhance the fluorescence from a dye by more than 100-fold. We fabricated an OIM slide by depositing an optical interference layer of Al(2)O(3) on an Ag mirror. To enhance the fluorescence maximally, the optimal thickness of the Al(2)O(3) layer was estimated from optical interference theory. For detections of protein, avidin/streptavidin labeled with fluorescein, Cy3, and Cy5 were detected with biotin immobilized on an OIM slide with the optimal Al(2)O(3) thickness. We achieved a sensitivity improvement of more than 50-fold, comparing with a glass slide. Such a high degree of improvement would be a significant contribution to further progress in biomedical research and medical diagnostics.

  18. High Sensitivity Detection of ATP Using Bioluminescence at An Optical Fiber End

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iinuma, Masataka; Ushio, Yasuaki; Kuroda, Akio; Kadoya, Yutaka

    We investigated the sensitivity of ATP detection based on bioluminescence at an optical fiber end where luciferase molecules were immobilized via silica-binding protein molecules. Luminescence was detected by an avalanche photo diode (APD), with coupling optics to make full use of the merit of compactness, high quantum efficiency and low noise of the APD. The core diameter and the numerical aperture of the optical fiber, as well as the design of the coupling optics, were optimized so as to realize high photon-collection efficiency. A detection limit of about 10-10 M was obtained, which corresponds to 10-15 mol of ATP. A rough estimation shows that the photon count rate is still two orders of magnitude lower than that limited by diffusion or reaction processes, implying a possibility of further improvement of the sensitivity.

  19. Reversible optical control of cyanine fluorescence in fixed and living cells: optical lock-in detection immunofluorescence imaging microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yuling; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Mao, Shu; Marriott, Gerard

    2013-01-01

    Optical switch probes undergo rapid and reversible transitions between two distinct states, one of which may fluoresce. This class of probe is used in various super-resolution imaging techniques and in the high-contrast imaging technique of optical lock-in detection (OLID) microscopy. Here, we introduce optimized optical switches for studies in living cells under standard conditions of cell culture. In particular, a highly fluorescent cyanine probe (Cy or Cy3) is directly or indirectly linked to naphthoxazine (NISO), a highly efficient optical switch that undergoes robust, 405/532 nm-driven transitions between a colourless spiro (SP) state and a colourful merocyanine (MC) state. The intensity of Cy fluorescence in these Cy/Cy3-NISO probes is reversibly modulated between a low and high value in SP and MC states, respectively, as a result of Förster resonance energy transfer. Cy/Cy3-NISO probes are targeted to specific proteins in living cells where defined waveforms of Cy3 fluorescence are generated by optical switching of the SP and MC states. Finally, we introduce a new imaging technique (called OLID-immunofluorescence microscopy) that combines optical modulation of Cy3 fluorescence from Cy3/NISO co-labelled antibodies within fixed cells and OLID analysis to significantly improve image contrast in samples having high background or rare antigens. PMID:23267183

  20. Reversible optical control of cyanine fluorescence in fixed and living cells: optical lock-in detection immunofluorescence imaging microscopy.

    PubMed

    Yan, Yuling; Petchprayoon, Chutima; Mao, Shu; Marriott, Gerard

    2013-02-05

    Optical switch probes undergo rapid and reversible transitions between two distinct states, one of which may fluoresce. This class of probe is used in various super-resolution imaging techniques and in the high-contrast imaging technique of optical lock-in detection (OLID) microscopy. Here, we introduce optimized optical switches for studies in living cells under standard conditions of cell culture. In particular, a highly fluorescent cyanine probe (Cy or Cy3) is directly or indirectly linked to naphthoxazine (NISO), a highly efficient optical switch that undergoes robust, 405/532 nm-driven transitions between a colourless spiro (SP) state and a colourful merocyanine (MC) state. The intensity of Cy fluorescence in these Cy/Cy3-NISO probes is reversibly modulated between a low and high value in SP and MC states, respectively, as a result of Förster resonance energy transfer. Cy/Cy3-NISO probes are targeted to specific proteins in living cells where defined waveforms of Cy3 fluorescence are generated by optical switching of the SP and MC states. Finally, we introduce a new imaging technique (called OLID-immunofluorescence microscopy) that combines optical modulation of Cy3 fluorescence from Cy3/NISO co-labelled antibodies within fixed cells and OLID analysis to significantly improve image contrast in samples having high background or rare antigens.

  1. Detection, Evaluation, and Optimization of Optical Signals Generated by Fiber Optic Bragg Gratings Under Dynamic Excitations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adamovsky, Grigory; Lekki, John; Lock, James A.

    2002-01-01

    The dynamic response of a fiber optic Bragg grating to mechanical vibrations is examined both theoretically and experimentally. The theoretical expressions describing the consequences of changes in the grating's reflection spectrum are derived for partially coherent beams in an interferometer. The analysis is given in terms of the dominant wavelength, optical bandwidth, and optical path difference of the interfering signals. Changes in the reflection spectrum caused by a periodic stretching and compression of the grating were experimentally measured using an unbalanced Michelson interferometer, a Michelson interferometer with a non-zero optical path difference. The interferometer's sensitivity to changes in dominant wavelength of the interfering beams was measured as a function of interferometer unbalance and was compared to theoretical predictions. The theoretical analysis enables the user to determine the optimum performance for an unbalanced interferometer.

  2. Wave Optics Simulation of Optically Augmented Retroreflections for Mononstatic/Bistatic Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Laser Range Equation," , 2008. 98 [24] Walter P Cole, M A Marciniak, S C Cain, J E McCrae, and M B Haeri, "Laser Illumination of Optical...19 e . Modeling Atmospheric Turbulence...39 E . Summary ...........................................................................................................42 IV

  3. Photoacoustic wave detection on water using a fiber optic transducer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montoya, Jose P.; Munera, Natalia; Acuna-Herrera, Rodrigo

    2016-09-01

    In this work, a fiber optic microphone system was built and tested. The purpose of the fiber microphone is to sense photoacoustic waves produced by water molecules excited by an ultrafast laser. The use of a fiber sensor allows for ease of three-dimension measurement implementation for a 3-D imaging based on water amounts of different materials, this sensor can be directly submerged in water or a phantom gel without electromagnetic interference nor corrosion.

  4. Optical Detection Using Four-Layer Semiconductor Structures

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    existing theory of static forward-biased operation to simulation results obtained using ATLAS by Silvaco , Inc. The results include identification of...and simulated IV curves are presented. 15. NUMBER OF PAGES 92 14. SUBJECT TERMS Thyristor, optical detector, pulse-mode, Silvaco , ATLAS...thyristor is in- vestigated by comparing the existing theory of static forward-biased operation to simula- tion results obtained using ATLAS by Silvaco

  5. Simultaneous three-dimensional tracking of individual signals from multi-trap optical tweezers using fast and accurate photodiode detection.

    PubMed

    Ott, Dino; Nader, S; Reihani, S; Oddershede, Lene B

    2014-09-22

    Multiple-beam optical traps facilitate advanced trapping geometries and exciting discoveries. However, the increased manipulation capabilities come at the price of more challenging position and force detection. Due to unrivaled bandwidth and resolution, photodiode based detection is preferred over camera based detection in most single/dual-beam optical traps assays. However, it has not been trivial to implement photodiode based detection for multiple-beam optical traps. Here, we present a simple and efficient method based on spatial filtering for parallel photodiode detection of multiple traps. The technique enables fast and accurate 3D force and distance detection of multiple objects simultaneously manipulated by multiple-beam optical tweezers.

  6. NASA/GSFC program in direct detection optical communications for intersatellite links

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzmaurice, M.; Bruno, R.

    1989-10-01

    NASA-Goddard has undertaken the development of direct-detection optical communications for space applications at the Gbps data rate channel capability level. The primary challenges to optical communications designers lie in the development of reliable optical power sources, as well as of high performance pointing/acquisition/tracking systems required by the narrow widths of the transmitted optical beams. GaAlAs diodes and their arrays are currently the most attractive technology for optical transmitters; pioneering work has also been conducted on dichroic and grating techniques for combining the power of several laser diodes. Attention is given to the performance obtained for an optical link acquisition and submicroradian tracking/pointing system.

  7. NASA/GSFC program in direct detection optical communications for intersatellite links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzmaurice, M.; Bruno, R.

    1989-01-01

    NASA-Goddard has undertaken the development of direct-detection optical communications for space applications at the Gbps data rate channel capability level. The primary challenges to optical communications designers lie in the development of reliable optical power sources, as well as of high performance pointing/acquisition/tracking systems required by the narrow widths of the transmitted optical beams. GaAlAs diodes and their arrays are currently the most attractive technology for optical transmitters; pioneering work has also been conducted on dichroic and grating techniques for combining the power of several laser diodes. Attention is given to the performance obtained for an optical link acquisition and submicroradian tracking/pointing system.

  8. NASA/GSFC program in direct detection optical communications for intersatellite links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzmaurice, M.; Bruno, R.

    1989-01-01

    NASA-Goddard has undertaken the development of direct-detection optical communications for space applications at the Gbps data rate channel capability level. The primary challenges to optical communications designers lie in the development of reliable optical power sources, as well as of high performance pointing/acquisition/tracking systems required by the narrow widths of the transmitted optical beams. GaAlAs diodes and their arrays are currently the most attractive technology for optical transmitters; pioneering work has also been conducted on dichroic and grating techniques for combining the power of several laser diodes. Attention is given to the performance obtained for an optical link acquisition and submicroradian tracking/pointing system.

  9. Detection of acetone vapor using graphene on polymer optical fiber.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hang; Kulkarni, Atul; Kim, Hyeongkeun; Woo, Daekwang; Kim, Young-Jin; Hong, Byung Hee; Choi, Jae-Boong; Kim, Taesung

    2011-07-01

    Recently, many studies have been focused on the development of fiber optic sensor systems for various gases and vapors. In the present study, an intrinsic polymer optical fiber (POF) sensor using graphene is described for the purpose of acetone vapor sensing for the first time. Observations on the continuous measurement of acetone vapor in dehydrated air are presented. The principle of operation of sensor transduction relies on the dependence of the reflectance on the optical and geometric properties of the sensitive over layered when the vapor molecules are adsorbed on the graphene film. For the same purpose the CVD synthesized graphene film was transferred on the POF end. The synthesized graphene film thickness was evaluated using atomic force microscopy (AFM), Raman spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). For the preliminary evaluation using volatile organic compounds, we evaluated the sensor performance for acetone. Upon the interaction of the sensor with acetone vapor, the variation in the reflected light was monitored as a function of the acetone concentration. The sensor response shows a significant change in sensitivity as compared with the POF probe without a graphene coating. The present sensor shows a satisfactory response upon exposure to various concentrations of acetone vapor from 44 ppm to 352 ppm. To the best of our knowledge, the use of graphene film along with POF for the sensing of volatile organic compounds has not previously been reported.

  10. Detection and laser ranging of orbital objects using optical methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, P.; Hampf, D.; Sproll, F.; Hasenohr, T.; Humbert, L.; Rodmann, J.; Riede, W.

    2016-09-01

    Laser ranging to satellites (SLR) in earth orbit is an established technology used for geodesy, fundamental science and precise orbit determination. A combined active and passive optical measurement system using a single telescope mount is presented which performs precise ranging measurements of retro reflector equipped objects in low earth orbit (LEO). The German Aerospace Center (DLR) runs an observatory in Stuttgart where a system has been assembled completely from commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) components. The visible light directed to the tracking camera is used to perform angular measurements of objects under investigation. This is done astrometrically by comparing the apparent target position with cataloged star positions. First successful satellite laser ranging was demonstrated recently using an optical fiber directing laser pulses onto the astronomical mount. The transmitter operates at a wavelength of 1064 nm with a repetition rate of 3 kHz and pulse energy of 25 μJ. A motorized tip/tilt mount allows beam steering of the collimated beam with μrad accuracy. The returning photons reflected from the object in space are captured with the tracking telescope. A special low aberration beam splitter unit was designed to separate the infrared from visible light. This allows passive optical closed loop tracking and operation of a single photon detector for time of flight measurements at a single telescope simultaneously. The presented innovative design yields to a compact and cost effective but very precise ranging system which allows orbit determination.

  11. Label-free optical detection of action potential in mammalian neurons (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batabyal, Subrata; Satpathy, Sarmishtha; Bui, Loan; Kim, Young-Tae; Mohanty, Samarendra K.; Davé, Digant P.

    2017-02-01

    Electrophysiology techniques are the gold standard in neuroscience for studying functionality of a single neuron to a complex neuronal network. However, electrophysiology techniques are not flawless, they are invasive nature, procedures are cumbersome to implement with limited capability of being used as a high-throughput recording system. Also, long term studies of neuronal functionality with aid of electrophysiology is not feasible. Non-invasive stimulation and detection of neuronal electrical activity has been a long standing goal in neuroscience. Introduction of optogenetics has ushered in the era of non-invasive optical stimulation of neurons, which is revolutionizing neuroscience research. Optical detection of neuronal activity that is comparable to electro-physiology is still elusive. A number of optical techniques have been reported recording of neuronal electrical activity but none is capable of reliably measuring action potential spikes that is comparable to electro-physiology. Optical detection of action potential with voltage sensitive fluorescent reporters are potential alternatives to electrophysiology techniques. The heavily rely on secondary reporters, which are often toxic in nature with background fluorescence, with slow response and low SNR making them far from ideal. The detection of one shot (without averaging)-single action potential in a true label-free way has been elusive so far. In this report, we demonstrate the optical detection of single neuronal spike in a cultured mammalian neuronal network without using any exogenous labels. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first demonstration of label free optical detection of single action potentials in a mammalian neuronal network, which was achieved using a high-speed phase sensitive interferometer. We have carried out stimulation and inhibition of neuronal firing using Glutamate and Tetrodotoxin respectively to demonstrate the different outcome (stimulation and inhibition) revealed in

  12. Detection of swelling of single isolated mitochondrion with optical microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Morikawa, Daisuke; Kanematsu, Keita; Shibata, Takahiro; Haseda, Keisuke; Umeda, Norihiro; Ohta, Yoshihiro

    2014-01-01

    Volume regulation under osmotic loading is one of the most fundamental functions in cells and organelles. However, the effective method to detect volume changes of a single organelle has not been developed. Here, we present a novel technique for detecting volume changes of a single isolated mitochondrion in aqueous solution based on the transmittance of the light through the mitochondrion. We found that 70% and 21% of mitochondria swelled upon addition of a hypotonic solution and Ca2+, respectively. These results show the potential of the present technique to detect the physiological volume changes of individual small organelles such as mitochondria. PMID:24688818

  13. An evaluation of fiber optic intrusion detection systems in interior applications

    SciTech Connect

    Vigil, J.T.

    1994-03-01

    This report discusses the testing and evaluation of four commercially available fiber optic intrusion detection systems. The systems were tested under carpet-type matting and in a vaulted ceiling application. This report will focus on nuisance alarm data and intrusion detection results. Tests were conducted in a mobile office building and in a bunker.

  14. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2016-02-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the Sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds). In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during nighttime from moonlight measurements. Recently, ODS has been selected at the METEO meteorological station on board the ExoMars 2018 Lander. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa) between November 2004 and October 2005, a Sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL sunphotometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.77 for the whole data set and 0.94 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole data set, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC) were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10-3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further optimizations and comparisons of ODS terrestrial measurements are required, results indicate the potential of these measurements to retrieve the AOD and detect sub-visual clouds.

  15. Measurement of aerosol optical depth and sub-visual cloud detection using the optical depth sensor (ODS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toledo, D.; Rannou, P.; Pommereau, J.-P.; Sarkissian, A.; Foujols, T.

    2015-09-01

    A small and sophisticated optical depth sensor (ODS) has been designed to work in the atmosphere of Earth and Mars. The instrument measures alternatively the diffuse radiation from the sky and the attenuated direct radiation from the sun on the surface. The principal goals of ODS are to retrieve the daily mean aerosol optical depth (AOD) and to detect very high and optically thin clouds, crucial parameters in understanding the Martian and Earth meteorology and climatology. The detection of clouds is undertaken at twilight, allowing the detection and characterization of clouds with opacities below 0.03 (sub-visual clouds). In addition, ODS is capable to retrieve the aerosol optical depth during night-time from moonlight measurements. In order to study the performance of ODS under Mars-like conditions as well as to evaluate the retrieval algorithms for terrestrial measurements, ODS was deployed in Ouagadougou (Africa) between November 2004 and October 2005, a sahelian region characterized by its high dust aerosol load and the frequent occurrence of Saharan dust storms. The daily average AOD values retrieved by ODS were compared with those provided by a CIMEL Sun-photometer of the AERONET (Aerosol Robotic NETwork) network localized at the same location. Results represent a good agreement between both ground-based instruments, with a correlation coefficient of 0.79 for the whole data set and 0.96 considering only the cloud-free days. From the whole dataset, a total of 71 sub-visual cirrus (SVC) were detected at twilight with opacities as thin as 1.10-3 and with a maximum of occurrence at altitudes between 14 and 20 km. Although further analysis and comparisons are required, results indicate the potential of ODS measurements to detect sub-visual clouds.

  16. Optical spectroscopy for clinical detection of pancreatic cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandra, Malavika; Wilson, Robert H.; Scheiman, James; Simeone, Diane; McKenna, Barbara; Purdy, Julianne; Mycek, Mary-Ann

    2009-07-01

    A prototype clinical fluorescence and reflectance spectrometer was developed and employed to detect human pancreatic adenocarcinoma. For the first time, quantitative pancreatic tissue models and chemometric algorithms were applied to successfully distinguish among tissue types.

  17. Optical detection system for multispectral UV fluorescence laser remote sensing measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Tisone, G.C.; Clark, B.; Wakefield-Reyes, C.; Hargis, P.H. Jr.; Michie, B.; Downey, T.L.; Mills, R.A.

    1994-05-25

    A mobile laser remote sensing system is being developed for multispectral UV fluorescence detection of vapor, liquid, and solid effluents. TM system uses laser wavelengths between 250 and 400 nm to excite UV fluorescence spectra that can be used to detect and identify species in multicomponent chemical mixtures. With a scanning mirror assembly, the system is designed to map chemical concentrations with a range resolution of {approximately}5 m. In this paper we describe the optical detection system (scanning mirror assembly, 76 cm diameter collection telescope, relay optics, spectrometers, and detectors) associated data acquisition and control electronics. We also describe unique diagnostic software that is used for instrument setup and control.

  18. Single-molecule detection sensitivity using planar integrated optics on a chip.

    PubMed

    Yin, Dongliang; Deamer, David W; Schmidt, Holger; Barber, John P; Hawkins, Aaron R

    2006-07-15

    We present a fully planar integrated optical approach to single-molecule detection based on microfabricated planar networks of intersecting solid and liquid-core waveguides. We study fluorescence from dye molecules in liquid-core antiresonant reflecting optical waveguides, and demonstrate subpicoliter excitation volumes, parallel excitation through multiple pump waveguides, and single-molecule detection sensitivity. Integrated silicon photonics combined with single-molecule detection in solution create a compact, robust, and sensitive platform that has applications in numerous fields ranging from atomic physics to the life sciences.

  19. Optical Gating of Black Phosphorus for Terahertz Detection.

    PubMed

    Mittendorff, Martin; Suess, Ryan J; Leong, Edward; Murphy, Thomas E

    2017-09-13

    Photoconductive antennas are widely used for time-resolved detection of terahertz (THz) pulses. In contrast to photothermoelectric or bolometric THz detection, the coherent detection allows direct measurement of the electric field transient of a THz pulse, which contains both spectral and phase information. In this Letter, we demonstrate for the first time photoconductive detection of free-space propagating THz radiation with thin flakes of a van der Waals material. Mechanically exfoliated flakes of black phosphorus are combined with an antenna that concentrates the THz fields to the small flake (∼10 μm). Similar performance is reached at gating wavelengths of 800 and 1550 nm, which suggests that the narrow bandgap of black phosphorus could allow operation at wavelengths as long as 4 μm. The detected spectrum peaks at 60 GHz, where the signal-to-noise ratio is of the order of 40 dB, and the detectable signal extends to 0.2 THz. The measured signal strongly depends on the polarization of the THz field and the gating pulse, which is explained by the role of the antenna and the anisotropy of the black phosphorus flake, respectively. We analyze the limitations of the device and show potential improvements that could significantly increase the efficiency and bandwidth.

  20. Moiré deflectometry-based position detection for optical tweezers.

    PubMed

    Khorshad, Ali Akbar; Reihani, S Nader S; Tavassoly, Mohammad Taghi

    2017-09-01

    Optical tweezers have proven to be indispensable tools for pico-Newton range force spectroscopy. A quadrant photodiode (QPD) positioned at the back focal plane of an optical tweezers' condenser is commonly used for locating the trapped object. In this Letter, for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, we introduce a moiré pattern-based detection method for optical tweezers. We show, both theoretically and experimentally, that this detection method could provide considerably better position sensitivity compared to the commonly used detection systems. For instance, position sensitivity for a trapped 2.17 μm polystyrene bead is shown to be 71% better than the commonly used QPD-based detection method. Our theoretical and experimental results are in good agreement.

  1. A novel fiber optic geophone with high sensitivity for geo-acoustic detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhenhui; Yang, Huayong; Xiong, Shuidong; Luo, Hong; Cao, Chunyan; Ma, Shuqing

    2014-12-01

    A novel interferometric fiber optic geophone is introduced in this paper. This geophone is mainly used for geo-acoustic signal detection. The geophone use one of the three orthogonal components of mandrel type push-pull structure in mechanically and single-mode fiber optic Michelson interferometer structure with Faraday Rotation Mirror (FRM) elements in optically. The resonance frequency of the geophone is larger than 1000Hz. The acceleration sensitivity is as high as 56.6 dB (0dB re 1rad/g) with a slight sensitivity fluctuation of +/-0. 2dB within the frequency band from 20Hz to 200Hz. The geo-acoustic signals generated by underwater blasting are detected successfully. All the channels show good uniformity in the detected wave shape and the amplitudes exhibit very slight differences. The geo-acoustic signal excitated by the engine of surface vehicles was also detected successfully.

  2. Generation and homodyne detection of continuous-variable entangled optical beams with a large wavelength difference

    SciTech Connect

    Guo Xiaomin; Xie Changde; Li Yongmin

    2011-08-15

    We present a scheme for generating and homodyne detecting of continuous-variable entanglement of bright optical beams with a large wavelength difference by utilizing an optical parametric oscillator (OPO) and an optical parametric amplifier (OPA) simultaneously. Entangled optical beams at 0.8 and 1.5 {mu}m are generated from the OPA; the seed beams injected in the OPA as well as the local oscillators at the two wavelengths needed for homodyne detection are provided by the OPO. The entangler is a ring resonator involving a second-order nonlinear crystal that is pumped from two opposite directions. In one direction the pump power is above the oscillation threshold and the optical nonlinear resonator operates as an OPO. In the other direction the pump power is below the threshold and it operates as a phase-sensitive frequency nondegenerate optical parametric amplifier. Our scheme combines the advantages of both OPO and OPA quantum optical devices and opens another avenue for preparation and homodyne detection of high quality bright entangled light with a large wavelength difference.

  3. Detecting X-rays with an optical imaging chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Austin, Robert A.; Ramsey, Brian D.

    1992-01-01

    The light emitted by electron avalanches in a parallel plate chamber can be used to image the tracks of photoelectrons liberated by the interaction of an incident X-ray with the gas filling the chamber. The different morphologies of photoelectron tracks and minimum ionizing tracks can be used for charged particle rejection. The initial direction (before scattering) of the liberated photoelectron also contains information about the polarization of the incident radiation. We have built a small test chamber with which we have imaged photoelectron tracks using an intensified CCD camera. Our results show that optical imaging could be used in a hard X-ray imaging polarimeter useful for astronomy.

  4. Detecting X-rays with an optical imaging chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Robert A.; Ramsey, Brian D.

    1992-10-01

    The light emitted by electron avalanches in a parallel plate chamber can be used to image the tracks of photoelectrons liberated by the interaction of an incident X-ray with the gas filling the chamber. The different morphologies of photoelectron tracks and minimum ionizing tracks can be used for charged particle rejection. The initial direction (before scattering) of the liberated photoelectron also contains information about the polarization of the incident radiation. We have built a small test chamber with which we have imaged photoelectron tracks using an intensified CCD camera. Our results show that optical imaging could be used in a hard X-ray imaging polarimeter useful for astronomy.

  5. Impact damage detection in filament wound tubes utilizing embedded optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Anthony R.; Hayes, Simon A.; Fernando, Gerard F.; Hale, Ken F.

    1995-04-01

    Filament wound tubes are currently being used extensively in service because of their superior specific properties and the relatively simple manufacturing technique involved in their properties. However, the reinforcing fibers can suffer from low velocity impact damage (approximately 10 ms-1) during service. Such damage can result in poor post- impact properties which in certain applications can reduce the burst strength below safe working levels. This paper discusses the use of optical fiber sensors, embedded during the filament winding process, to provide information on specified levels of impact damage incurred by the tube during service. The sensors being developed use silica based optical fibers in composites made from E-glass reinforcing fibers and high temperature cure epoxy resins. Various methods of damage detection are being evaluated to select the optimum sensor arrangement. These systems detect changes in the transmission characteristics of the optical fiber. The objective being to produce a working damage detection system which provides sensitive, cheap, accurate and reliable information about the levels of impact damage sustained by the tube. This paper presents initial results from the impact damage detection systems being evaluated for use in filament wound tubes. Issues relating to chemical compatibility between optical fiber sensors and the epoxy resin system were also investigated as part of this study. These results aid selection of the correct optical fiber properties to achieve reliable and sensitive systems. The advantages of using a new profile sensor compared to an optical fiber are also discussed.

  6. Optical fluorescence biosensor for plant water stress detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chong, Jenny P. C.; Liew, O. W.; Li, B. Q.; Asundi, A. K.

    2007-05-01

    Precision farming in arable agriculture and horticulture allows conservative use of resources that are applied according to plant needs. The growing concern for sustainability in crop production has accentuated the significance of our work to develop a rapid, sensitive and non-destructive spectroscopic method for real-time monitoring of plant water stress. Elucidation of crop water status before the onset of irreversible cellular damage is critical for effective water management to ensure maximum crop yield and profit margin. A two-component bio-sensing system comprising transgenic 'Indicator Plants' and a spectrometer-linked stereoscopic microscope was developed to detect early signs of water stress before the permanent wilting point is reached. The 'Indicator Plants' are transgenic Petunia hybrida genetically engineered with a drought-responsive promoter-linked enhanced green fluorescent protein marker gene (EGFP). No EGFP fluorescence was detected prior to induction of dehydration stress. Fluorescence emission intensity increased with dehydration period and was found mainly in the stems, leaf veins and leaf tips. While fluorescence emission above endogenous background was detectable after 2 hours of water stress treatment, the plants reached permanent wilting point after 6 hours, showing that our system was able to detect water stress prior to plant entry into the stage of irreversible damage. Future work will be geared towards overcoming biological and instrument-related difficulties encountered in our initial detection system.

  7. A novel differential optical beam deflection detection system for measuring laser-generated surface acoustic waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Yifei; Shen, Zhonghua; Ni, Xiaowu; Lu, Jian

    2008-03-01

    As the application of the laser ultrasonics developed rapidly, there is especial call for more sensitive and convenient optical installation to detect the ultrasonic waves induced by pulsed laser. The optical beam deflection (OBD) methods have abstracted the interest of people for many years for their merits over the interference method. In this paper a novel differential OBD detection system for measuring laser-generated surface acoustic waves (SAW) is presented. The detection principle of this optical system is discussed in detail according to the scheme. And we get the linear relation between the physical parameter of the SAW and the output of the detection system. For confirm the conclusion the Monte Carlo computation method is utilized to simulate the ray propagation in the system, adding the consideration of the light spot distribution of the detection laser. The numerical result agrees with the analytic method. The linear relation between the detection system output current and the deflection angle induced by SAW is validated. Furthermore, the sensitivity and the spatial resolution of the system proposed are also calculated for comparing with the other OBD methods. The results show that this differential optical beam deflection detection system is more sensitive to the small disturbance and has higher space resolution. It has considerable potential in ultrasonic measurement.

  8. Optical Jitter Effects on Target Detection and Tracking of Overhead Persistent Infrared Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-12-01

    demonstrated the jitter blur’s effects on spatial resolution and intensity, which significantly decreased the system’s ability to detect and track ... EFFECTS ON TARGET DETECTION AND TRACKING OF OVERHEAD PERSISTENT INFRARED SYSTEMS by Christopher R. Flores December 2015 Thesis Advisor...December 2015 3. REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE OPTICAL JITTER EFFECTS ON TARGET DETECTION AND TRACKING OF

  9. Optical detection of evanescent ultrasound waves in water.

    PubMed

    Nunez, I; Negreira, C

    1998-01-01

    Acoustical perturbation by targets smaller than the wavelength can generate evanescent waves, which decay with the distance of propagation. By putting such targets immediately under the free surface of water, the diffracted acoustical field can excite the surface membrane before evanescence, and it produces a static ripple because of the radiation pressure. A collimated beam of light reflects at the perturbed surface, and it becomes modulated in phase. In this work we show experimental results where we achieve an optical image of the acoustical evanescent waves produced by an array-like target. Arising from the theory, we present a numerical calculus of the optical image produced by the ultrasonic field diffracted from the target in order to verify the experimental results. With this method, we look for a spatial resolution smaller than acoustical wavelength, for normal incidence and plane waves. In our experimental device, we use a sound wavelength in water greater than 1.5 mm, generated by a PZT transducer. We can resolve an array of 1.0 mm of periodicity.

  10. Detection of Chamber Conditioning Through Optical Emission and Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2001-01-01

    During oxide etch processes, buildup of fluorocarbon residues on reactor sidewalls can cause run-to-run drift and will necessitate some time for conditioning and seasoning of the reactor. Though diagnostics can be applied to study and understand these phenomena, many of them are not practical for use in an industrial reactor. For instance, measurements of ion fluxes and energy by mass spectrometry show that the buildup of insulating fluorocarbon films on the reactor surface will cause a shift in both ion energy and current in an argon plasma. However, such a device cannot be easily integrated into a processing system. The shift in ion energy and flux will be accompanied by an increase in the capacitance of the plasma sheath. The shift in sheath capacitance can be easily measured by a common commercially available impedance probe placed on the inductive coil. A buildup of film on the chamber wall is expected to affect the production of fluorocarbon radicals, and thus the presence of such species in the optical emission spectrum of the plasma can be monitored as well. These two techniques are employed on a GEC (Gaseous Electronics Conference) Reference Cell to assess the validity of optical emission and impedance monitoring as a metric of chamber conditioning. These techniques are applied to experimental runs with CHF3 and CHF3/O2/Ar plasmas, with intermediate monitoring of pure argon plasmas as a reference case for chamber conditions.

  11. Detection of Chamber Conditioning Through Optical Emission and Impedance Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cruden, Brett A.; Rao, M. V. V. S.; Sharma, Surendra P.; Meyyappan, Meyya

    2001-01-01

    During oxide etch processes, buildup of fluorocarbon residues on reactor sidewalls can cause run-to-run drift and will necessitate some time for conditioning and seasoning of the reactor. Though diagnostics can be applied to study and understand these phenomena, many of them are not practical for use in an industrial reactor. For instance, measurements of ion fluxes and energy by mass spectrometry show that the buildup of insulating fluorocarbon films on the reactor surface will cause a shift in both ion energy and current in an argon plasma. However, such a device cannot be easily integrated into a processing system. The shift in ion energy and flux will be accompanied by an increase in the capacitance of the plasma sheath. The shift in sheath capacitance can be easily measured by a common commercially available impedance probe placed on the inductive coil. A buildup of film on the chamber wall is expected to affect the production of fluorocarbon radicals, and thus the presence of such species in the optical emission spectrum of the plasma can be monitored as well. These two techniques are employed on a GEC (Gaseous Electronics Conference) Reference Cell to assess the validity of optical emission and impedance monitoring as a metric of chamber conditioning. These techniques are applied to experimental runs with CHF3 and CHF3/O2/Ar plasmas, with intermediate monitoring of pure argon plasmas as a reference case for chamber conditions.

  12. Ultrasensitive detection system for fiber optic-based ultraviolet spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Karl-Friedrich; Belz, Mathias; Dress, Peter; Schelle, B.; Boyle, William J. O.; Grattan, Kenneth T. V.; Franke, Hilmar

    1998-03-01

    A fiber optic based deep UV-absorption sensor system is characterized, using fibers for light delivery and a liquid core waveguide (LCW) for analyzing liquids. UN-improved fibers with 500 micrometers core diameter are capable of transmitting light intensities below 230 nm with spectral radiant powers above 500 nW/nm at 214 nm. Their short-term behavior and lifetime in respect to UV-stability have been investigated, using a broadband deuterium lamp. To raise the sensitivity of the total system, the absorption path length has been increased significantly using the lightguiding properties of the LCW consisting of a cylindrical glass tube with a Teflon AF 2400 inner coating of about 50 micrometers thickness. Due to lower refractive index of Teflon in comparison to water, the LCW concept offers significant advantages, especially for long optical pathlengths. However, the basic attenuation of the liquid in dependence on the wavelength as to be taken into account. Results on the use of such a system monitoring concentrations of acetylsalicylic acid, acetone and toluene in water are reported and discussed.

  13. Activatable Optical Probes for the Detection of Enzymes

    PubMed Central

    Drake, Christopher R.; Miller, David C.; Jones, Ella F.

    2013-01-01

    The early detection of many human diseases is crucial if they are to be treated successfully. Therefore, the development of imaging techniques that can facilitate early detection of disease is of high importance. Changes in the levels of enzyme expression are known to occur in many diseases, making their accurate detection at low concentrations an area of considerable active research. Activatable fluorescent probes show immense promise in this area. If properly designed they should exhibit no signal until they interact with their target enzyme, reducing the level of background fluorescence and potentially endowing them with greater sensitivity. The mechanisms of fluorescence changes in activatable probes vary. This review aims to survey the field of activatable probes, focusing on their mechanisms of action as well as illustrating some of the in vitro and in vivo settings in which they have been employed. PMID:23519774

  14. Optical tomograph optimized for tumor detection inside highly absorbent organs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boutet, Jérôme; Koenig, Anne; Hervé, Lionel; Berger, Michel; Dinten, Jean-Marc; Josserand, Véronique; Coll, Jean-Luc

    2011-05-01

    This paper presents a tomograph for small animal fluorescence imaging. The compact and cost-effective system described in this article was designed to address the problem of tumor detection inside highly absorbent heterogeneous organs, such as lungs. To validate the tomograph's ability to detect cancerous nodules inside lungs, in vivo tumor growth was studied on seven cancerous mice bearing murine mammary tumors marked with Alexa Fluor 700. They were successively imaged 10, 12, and 14 days after the primary tumor implantation. The fluorescence maps were compared over this time period. As expected, the reconstructed fluorescence increases with the tumor growth stage.

  15. Coherent Detection of Optical Quadrature Phase-Shift Keying Signals With Carrier Phase Estimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ly-Gagnon, Dany-Sebastien; Tsukamoto, Satoshi; Katoh, Kazuhiro; Kikuchi, Kazuro

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes a coherent optical receiver for demodulating optical quadrature phase-shift keying (QPSK) signals. At the receiver, a phase-diversity homodyne detection scheme is employed without locking the phase of the local oscillator (LO). To handle the carrier phase drift, the carrier phase is estimated with digital signal processing (DSP) on the homodyne-detected signal. Such a scheme presents the following major advantages over the conventional optical differential detection. First, its bit error rate (BER) performance is better than that of differential detection. This higher sensitivity can extend the reach of unrepeated transmission systems and reduce crosstalk between multiwavelength channels. Second, the optoelectronic conversion process is linear, so that the whole optical signal information can be postprocessed in the electrical domain. Third, this scheme is applicable to multilevel modulation formats such as M-array PSK and quadrature amplitude modulation (QAM). The performance of the receiver is evaluated through various simulations and experiments. As a result, an unrepeated transmission over 210 km with a 20-Gb/s optical QPSK signal is achieved. Moreover, in wavelength-division multiplexing (WDM) environment, coherent detection allows the filtering of a desired wavelength channel to reside entirely in the electrical domain, taking advantage of the sharp cutoff characteristics of electrical filters. The experiments show the feasibility to transmit polarization-multiplexed 40-Gb/s QPSK signals over 200 km with channel spacing of 16 GHz, leading to a spectral efficiency as high as 2.5 b/s/Hz.

  16. Linear polarization detection of polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography in the early detection of the application of dental caries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lei; Zeng, Nan; Yang, Lifeng

    2010-11-01

    Polarization-Sensitive Optical Coherence Tomography (PS-OCT) is an important functional OCT. By extracting the polarization properties from PS-OCT signals we can obtain more information about the structural and optical features of tissues or materials. Dental caries is one of the most prevalent chronic diseases of people worldwide. The primary caries detection and the structure transformation of the enamel and dentin between sound and broken teeth are given serious attention by dentists. In this paper, using our Fourier-domain polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (FD-PS-OCT) setup by three incident linear polarization states and two detection states, we can get the 9 Mueller matrix elements from M11to M33 of the decay areas of the artificial caries measured. We also applied our polarized sensitive Monte Carlo program in the simulation of the PS-OCT detection process. We used a sphere-cylinder scattering model as an approximation of anisotropic tissues to describe the optical properties of tooth. By comparing the Mueller matrix elements of both experimental and simulation results, especially the diagonal elements (M11, M22 and M33), we reach the point that the main structural change of the caries that affects its scattering features is the expanded diameter of the enamel rods and dentinal tubules caused by the acid corrosion due to caries lesion.

  17. Electro-optical detection probability of optical devices determined by bidirectional laser retro-reflection cross section

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurenzis, Martin; Christnacher, Frank; Matwyschuk, Alexis; Schertzer, Stephane; Hengy, Sebastien

    2015-05-01

    A good measure for the probability to detect a sniper telescopic sight is the effective bi-directional laser retro-reflection cross section. This angular (bi-directional) property of an optical device can be measured and can be used for a fist estimation of its probability to be detected by an active imaging. In the present paper, the authors give examples for resolved and non-resolved sensing of a telescopic sight under mono-static and bi-static conditions. As a result of these measurements, the resolved sensing under mono-static conditions shows the highest signal response in a wide angular range.

  18. Stokes vector direct detection for short-reach optical communication.

    PubMed

    Che, Di; Li, An; Chen, Xi; Hu, Qian; Wang, Yifei; Shieh, William

    2014-06-01

    We propose the Stokes vector direct detection (SV-DD) scheme which simultaneously achieves receiver phase diversity and the cancellation of photodetection nonlinearity. An 80  Gb/s single-polarization modulated SV-DD signal is successfully received after 160 km SSMF transmission with 11.64  bit/s/Hz electrical spectrum efficiency.

  19. Optical correlator based target detection, recognition, classification, and tracking.

    PubMed

    Manzur, Tariq; Zeller, John; Serati, Steve

    2012-07-20

    A dedicated automatic target recognition and tracking optical correlator (OC) system using advanced processing technology has been developed. Rapidly cycling data-cubes with size, shape, and orientation are employed with software algorithms to isolate correlation peaks and enable tracking of targets in maritime environments with future track prediction. The method has been found superior to employing maximum average correlation height filters for which the correlation peak intensity drops off in proportion to the number of training images. The physical dimensions of the OC system may be reduced to as small as 2 in. × 2 in. × 3 in. (51 mm × 51 mm × 76 mm) by modifying and minimizing the OC components.

  20. Micromachined force-balance feedback accelerometer with optical displacement detection

    DOEpatents

    Nielson, Gregory N.; Langlois, Eric; Baker, Michael; Okandan, Murat; Anderson, Robert

    2014-07-22

    An accelerometer includes a proof mass and a frame that are formed in a handle layer of a silicon-on-an-insulator (SOI). The proof mass is separated from the frame by a back-side trench that defines a boundary of the proof mass. The accelerometer also includes a reflector coupled to a top surface of the proof mass. An optical detector is located above the reflector at the device side. The accelerometer further includes at least one suspension spring. The suspension spring has a handle anchor that extends downwards from the device side to the handle layer to mechanically support upward and downward movement of the proof mass relative to a top surface of the proof mass.