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Sample records for detect protein aggregates

  1. Sensitive detection of aggregated prion protein via proximity ligation

    PubMed Central

    Hammond, Maria; Wik, Lotta; Deslys, Jean-Philippe; Comoy, Emmanuel; Linné, Tommy; Landegren, Ulf; Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood

    2014-01-01

    The DNA assisted solid-phase proximity ligation assay (SP-PLA) provides a unique opportunity to specifically detect prion protein (PrP) aggregates by investigating the collocation of 3 or more copies of the specific protein. We have developed an SP-PLA that can detect PrP aggregates in brain homogenates from infected hamsters even after a 107-fold dilution. In contrast, brain homogenate from uninfected animals did not generate a detectable signal at 100-fold higher concentration. Using either of the 2 monoclonal anti-PrP antibodies, 3F4 and 6H4, we successfully detected low concentrations of aggregated PrP. The presented results provide a proof of concept that this method might be an interesting tool in the development of diagnostic approaches of prion diseases. PMID:25482604

  2. Sensitive detection of aggregated prion protein via proximity ligation.

    PubMed

    Hammond, Maria; Wik, Lotta; Deslys, Jean-Philippe; Comoy, Emmanuel; Linné, Tommy; Landegren, Ulf; Kamali-Moghaddam, Masood

    2014-01-01

    The DNA assisted solid-phase proximity ligation assay (SP-PLA) provides a unique opportunity to specifically detect prion protein (PrP) aggregates by investigating the collocation of 3 or more copies of the specific protein. We have developed an SP-PLA that can detect PrP aggregates in brain homogenates from infected hamsters even after a 10(7)-fold dilution. In contrast, brain homogenate from uninfected animals did not generate a detectable signal at 100-fold higher concentration. Using either of the 2 monoclonal anti-PrP antibodies, 3F4 and 6H4, we successfully detected low concentrations of aggregated PrP. The presented results provide a proof of concept that this method might be an interesting tool in the development of diagnostic approaches of prion diseases.

  3. Holographic characterization of protein aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Chen; Zhong, Xiao; Ruffner, David; Stutt, Alexandra; Philips, Laura; Ward, Michael; Grier, David

    Holographic characterization directly measures the size distribution of subvisible protein aggregates in suspension and offers insights into their morphology. Based on holographic video microscopy, this analytical technique records and interprets holograms of individual aggregates in protein solutions as they flow down a microfluidic channel, without requiring labeling or other exceptional sample preparation. The hologram of an individual protein aggregate is analyzed in real time with the Lorenz-Mie theory of light scattering to measure that aggregate's size and optical properties. Detecting, counting and characterizing subvisible aggregates proceeds fast enough for time-resolved studies, and lends itself to tracking trends in protein aggregation arising from changing environmental factors. No other analytical technique provides such a wealth of particle-resolved characterization data in situ. Holographic characterization promises accelerated development of therapeutic protein formulations, improved process control during manufacturing, and streamlined quality assurance during storage and at the point of use. Mrsec and MRI program of the NSF, Spheryx Inc.

  4. Thermodynamics of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osborne, Kenneth L.; Barz, Bogdan; Bachmann, Michael; Strodel, Birgit

    Amyloid protein aggregation characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Creutz- feldt-Jakob disease. Evidence suggests that amyloid aggregates may share similar aggregation pathways, implying simulation of full-length amyloid proteins is not necessary for understanding amyloid formation. In this study we simulate GNNQQNY, the N-terminal prion-determining domain of the yeast protein Sup35 to investigate the thermodynamics of structural transitions during aggregation. We use a coarse-grained model with replica-exchange molecular dynamics to investigate the association of 3-, 6-, and 12-chain GNNQQNY systems and we determine the aggregation pathway by studying aggregation states of GN- NQQNY. We find that the aggregation of the hydrophilic GNNQQNY sequence is mainly driven by H-bond formation, leading to the formation of /3-sheets from the very beginning of the assembly process. Condensation (aggregation) and ordering take place simultaneously, which is underpinned by the occurrence of a single heat capacity peak only.

  5. Detection of Protein Aggregates in Brain and Cerebrospinal Fluid Derived from Multiple Sclerosis Patients

    PubMed Central

    David, Monique Antoinette; Tayebi, Mourad

    2014-01-01

    Studies of the properties of soluble oligomer species of amyloidogenic proteins, derived from different proteins with little sequence homology, have indicated that they share a common structure and may share similar pathogenic mechanisms. Amyloid β, tau protein, as well as amyloid precursor protein normally associated with Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease were found in lesions and plaques of multiple sclerosis patients. The objective of the study is to investigate whether brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples derived from multiple sclerosis patients demonstrate the presence of soluble oligomers normally associated with protein-misfolding diseases such as Alzheimer’s disease. We have used anti-oligomer monoclonal antibodies to immunodetect soluble oligomers in CSF and brain tissues derived from multiple sclerosis patients. In this report, we describe the presence of soluble oligomers in the brain tissue and cerebral spinal fluid of multiple sclerosis patients detected with our monoclonal anti-oligomer antibodies with Western blot and Sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (sELISA). These results might suggest that protein aggregation plays a role in multiple sclerosis pathogenesis although further and more refined studies are needed to confirm the role of soluble aggregates in multiple sclerosis. PMID:25520699

  6. Protein Colloidal Aggregation Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oliva-Buisson, Yvette J. (Compiler)

    2014-01-01

    To investigate the pathways and kinetics of protein aggregation to allow accurate predictive modeling of the process and evaluation of potential inhibitors to prevalent diseases including cataract formation, chronic traumatic encephalopathy, Alzheimer's Disease, Parkinson's Disease and others.

  7. dRHP-PseRA: detecting remote homology proteins using profile-based pseudo protein sequence and rank aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Junjie; Long, Ren; Wang, Xiao-long; Liu, Bin; Chou, Kuo-Chen

    2016-01-01

    Protein remote homology detection is an important task in computational proteomics. Some computational methods have been proposed, which detect remote homology proteins based on different features and algorithms. As noted in previous studies, their predictive results are complementary to each other. Therefore, it is intriguing to explore whether these methods can be combined into one package so as to further enhance the performance power and application convenience. In view of this, we introduced a protein representation called profile-based pseudo protein sequence to extract the evolutionary information from the relevant profiles. Based on the concept of pseudo proteins, a new predictor, called “dRHP-PseRA”, was developed by combining four state-of-the-art predictors (PSI-BLAST, HHblits, Hmmer, and Coma) via the rank aggregation approach. Cross-validation tests on a SCOP benchmark dataset have demonstrated that the new predictor has remarkably outperformed any of the existing methods for the same purpose on ROC50 scores. Accordingly, it is anticipated that dRHP-PseRA holds very high potential to become a useful high throughput tool for detecting remote homology proteins. For the convenience of most experimental scientists, a web-server for dRHP-PseRA has been established at http://bioinformatics.hitsz.edu.cn/dRHP-PseRA/. PMID:27581095

  8. Tracking protein aggregate interactions

    PubMed Central

    Bartz, Jason C; Nilsson, K Peter R

    2011-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils share a structural motif consisting of highly ordered β-sheets aligned perpendicular to the fibril axis.1, 2 At each fibril end, β-sheets provide a template for recruiting and converting monomers.3 Different amyloid fibrils often co-occur in the same individual, yet whether a protein aggregate aids or inhibits the assembly of a heterologous protein is unclear. In prion disease, diverse prion aggregate structures, known as strains, are thought to be the basis of disparate disease phenotypes in the same species expressing identical prion protein sequences.4–7 Here we explore the interactions reported to occur when two distinct prion strains occur together in the central nervous system. PMID:21597336

  9. Proteins aggregation and human diseases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chin-Kun

    2015-04-01

    Many human diseases and the death of most supercentenarians are related to protein aggregation. Neurodegenerative diseases include Alzheimer's disease (AD), Huntington's disease (HD), Parkinson's disease (PD), frontotemporallobar degeneration, etc. Such diseases are due to progressive loss of structure or function of neurons caused by protein aggregation. For example, AD is considered to be related to aggregation of Aβ40 (peptide with 40 amino acids) and Aβ42 (peptide with 42 amino acids) and HD is considered to be related to aggregation of polyQ (polyglutamine) peptides. In this paper, we briefly review our recent discovery of key factors for protein aggregation. We used a lattice model to study the aggregation rates of proteins and found that the probability for a protein sequence to appear in the conformation of the aggregated state can be used to determine the temperature at which proteins can aggregate most quickly. We used molecular dynamics and simple models of polymer chains to study relaxation and aggregation of proteins under various conditions and found that when the bending-angle dependent and torsion-angle dependent interactions are zero or very small, then protein chains tend to aggregate at lower temperatures. All atom models were used to identify a key peptide chain for the aggregation of insulin chains and to find that two polyQ chains prefer anti-parallel conformation. It is pointed out that in many cases, protein aggregation does not result from protein mis-folding. A potential drug from Chinese medicine was found for Alzheimer's disease.

  10. Method for detecting and diagnosing disease caused by pathological protein aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Stevens, F.J.

    1994-12-31

    A method is provided for detecting pathological macromolecules in a patient, comprising obtaining body fluid from the patient, pretreating the body fluid, subjecting the pretreated body fluid to size-exclusion chromatography to create an excluded fluid, and analyzing the excluded fluid to detect macromolecules having a predetermined molecular weight. The method also allows for comparing elution spectra with reference spectra of suspect pathologic proteins.

  11. Method for detecting and diagnosing disease caused by pathological protein aggregation

    DOEpatents

    Stevens, Fred J.; Myatt, Elizabeth A.; Solomon, Alan

    2000-01-01

    A method is provided for detecting pathological macromolecules in a patient, comprising obtaining body fluid from the patient, pretreating the body fluid, subjecting the pretreated body fluid to size-exclusion chromatography to create an excluded fluid, and analyzing the excluded fluid to detect macromolecules having a predetermined molecular weight. The method also allows for comparing elution spectra with reference spectra of suspect pathologic proteins.

  12. Recombinant proteins incorporating short non-native extensions may display increased aggregation propensity as detected by high resolution NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Zanzoni, Serena; D'Onofrio, Mariapina; Molinari, Henriette; Assfalg, Michael

    2012-10-26

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Bile acid binding proteins from different constructs retain structural integrity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NMR {sup 15}N-T{sub 1} relaxation data of BABPs show differences if LVPR extension is present. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Deviations from a {sup 15}N-T{sub 1}/molecular-weight calibration curve indicate aggregation. -- Abstract: The use of a recombinant protein to investigate the function of the native molecule requires that the former be obtained with the same amino acid sequence as the template. However, in many cases few additional residues are artificially introduced for cloning or purification purposes, possibly resulting in altered physico-chemical properties that may escape routine characterization. For example, increased aggregation propensity without visible protein precipitation is hardly detected by most analytical techniques but its investigation may be of great importance for optimizing the yield of recombinant protein production in biotechnological and structural biology applications. In this work we show that bile acid binding proteins incorporating the common C-terminal LeuValProArg extension display different hydrodynamic properties from those of the corresponding molecules without such additional amino acids. The proteins were produced enriched in nitrogen-15 for analysis via heteronuclear NMR spectroscopy. Residue-specific spin relaxation rates were measured and related to rotational tumbling time and molecular size. While the native-like recombinant proteins show spin-relaxation rates in agreement with those expected for monomeric globular proteins of their mass, our data indicate the presence of larger adducts for samples of proteins with very short amino acid extensions. The used approach is proposed as a further screening method for the quality assessment of biotechnological protein products.

  13. Protein aggregation in a membrane environment.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya

    2011-01-01

    Biological membranes are featured by a remarkable ability to modulate a wide range of physiological and pathological processes. Of these, protein aggregation is currently receiving the greatest attention, as one type of the ordered protein aggregates, amyloid fibrils, proved to be involved in molecular etiology of a number of fatal diseases. It has been hypothesized that nucleation of amyloid fibrils and toxic action of their precursors is mediated by lipid-protein interactions. Lipid bilayer provides a variety of environments in which aggregated state of polypeptide chain appears to be more thermodynamically favorable than its monomeric form. The major factors responsible for the enhanced self-association propensity of membrane-bound proteins include (i) structural transition of polypeptide chain into aggregation-prone conformation; (ii) protein crowding in a lipid phase; (iii) particular aggregation-favoring orientation and bilayer embedment of the protein molecules. All these factors are considered in the present review with an emphasis being put on the role of electrostatic, hydrophobic, and hydrogen-bonding phenomena in initiating and modulating the protein aggregation on a membrane template. Likewise, we survey the advanced experimental techniques employed for detection and structural characterization of the aggregated species in membrane systems.

  14. Protein aggregation in salt solutions

    PubMed Central

    Kastelic, Miha; Kalyuzhnyi, Yurij V.; Hribar-Lee, Barbara; Dill, Ken A.; Vlachy, Vojko

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation is broadly important in diseases and in formulations of biological drugs. Here, we develop a theoretical model for reversible protein–protein aggregation in salt solutions. We treat proteins as hard spheres having square-well-energy binding sites, using Wertheim’s thermodynamic perturbation theory. The necessary condition required for such modeling to be realistic is that proteins in solution during the experiment remain in their compact form. Within this limitation our model gives accurate liquid–liquid coexistence curves for lysozyme and γ IIIa-crystallin solutions in respective buffers. It provides good fits to the cloud-point curves of lysozyme in buffer–salt mixtures as a function of the type and concentration of salt. It than predicts full coexistence curves, osmotic compressibilities, and second virial coefficients under such conditions. This treatment may also be relevant to protein crystallization. PMID:25964322

  15. Detergent-mediated protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Neale, Chris; Ghanei, Hamed; Holyoake, John; Bishop, Russell E; Privé, Gilbert G; Pomès, Régis

    2013-04-01

    Because detergents are commonly used to solvate membrane proteins for structural evaluation, much attention has been devoted to assessing the conformational bias imparted by detergent micelles in comparison to the native environment of the lipid bilayer. Here, we conduct six 500-ns simulations of a system with >600,000 atoms to investigate the spontaneous self assembly of dodecylphosphocholine detergent around multiple molecules of the integral membrane protein PagP. This detergent formed equatorial micelles in which acyl chains surround the protein's hydrophobic belt, confirming existing models of the detergent solvation of membrane proteins. In addition, unexpectedly, the extracellular and periplasmic apical surfaces of PagP interacted with the headgroups of detergents in other micelles 85 and 60% of the time, respectively, forming complexes that were stable for hundreds of nanoseconds. In some cases, an apical surface of one molecule of PagP interacted with an equatorial micelle surrounding another molecule of PagP. In other cases, the apical surfaces of two molecules of PagP simultaneously bound a neat detergent micelle. In these ways, detergents mediated the non-specific aggregation of folded PagP. These simulation results are consistent with dynamic light scattering experiments, which show that, at detergent concentrations ≥600 mM, PagP induces the formation of large scattering species that are likely to contain many copies of the PagP protein. Together, these simulation and experimental results point to a potentially generic mechanism of detergent-mediated protein aggregation.

  16. Equilibrium studies of protein aggregates and homogeneous nucleation in protein formulation.

    PubMed

    Kiese, Sylvia; Pappenberger, Astrid; Friess, Wolfgang; Mahler, Hanns-Christian

    2010-02-01

    Shaking or heat stress may induce protein aggregates. Aggregation behavior of an IgG1 stressed by shaking or heat following static storage at 5 and 25 degrees C was investigated to determine whether protein aggregates exist in equilibrium. Aggregates were detected using different analytical methods including visual inspection, turbidity, light obscuration, size exclusion chromatography, and dynamic light scattering. Significant differences were evident between shaken and heated samples upon storage. Visible and subvisible particles (insoluble aggregates), turbidity and z-average diameter decreased whilst soluble aggregate content increased in shaken samples over time. Insoluble aggregates were considered to be reversible and dissociate into soluble aggregates and both aggregate types existed in equilibrium. Heat-induced aggregates had a denatured protein structure and upon static storage, no significant change in insoluble aggregates content was shown, whilst changes in soluble aggregates content occurred. This suggested that heat-induced insoluble aggregates were irreversible and not in equilibrium with soluble aggregates. Additionally, the aggregation behavior of unstressed IgG1 after spiking with heavily aggregated material (shaken or heat stressed) was studied. The aggregation behavior was not significantly altered, independent of the spiking concentration over time. Thus, neither mechanically stressed native nor temperature-induced denatured aggregates were involved in nucleating or propagating aggregation.

  17. Investigating the mechanisms leading to protein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McNamara, Ruth; McManus, Jennifer J.

    2014-03-01

    The formation of protein aggregates is a feature of several diseases and is a problem during the manufacture of biopharmaceutical and protein based food products. During processing, stability may become compromised leading to the condensation of proteins to form non-native aggregates. The aim of this work is to induce aggregation on model proteins by the imposition of a particular stress to evaluate the extent of aggregation and to assess the degree of structural change to the protein. Aggregation of two proteins, lysozyme and bovine serum albumin has been induced by several mechanisms. Using various techniques (electrophoresis, HPLC, spectroscopic analysis, and microscopic techniques) both the level of aggregation extent of protein unfolding has been investigated for a range of solution conditions. Our results show that the amount of aggregation depends strongly on the mechanism by which non-native aggregation proceeds, and within each mechanism, solution conditions are an important factor. With the exception of aggregation by self-association (which is concentration dependent), the appearance of aggregation is driven by structural changes induced by the applied stress (heat, chemical denaturant, oxidation or contact with a surface). Author would like to acknowledge support from Science Foundation Ireland (SFI), National University of Maynooth John and Pat Hume Scholarship.

  18. Protein Aggregation Profile of the Bacterial Cytosol

    PubMed Central

    de Groot, Natalia S.; Ventura, Salvador

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein misfolding is usually deleterious for the cell, either as a consequence of the loss of protein function or the buildup of insoluble and toxic aggregates. The aggregation behavior of a given polypeptide is strongly influenced by the intrinsic properties encoded in its sequence. This has allowed the development of effective computational methods to predict protein aggregation propensity. Methodology/Principal Findings Here, we use the AGGRESCAN algorithm to approximate the aggregation profile of an experimental cytosolic Escherichia coli proteome. The analysis indicates that the aggregation propensity of bacterial proteins is associated with their length, conformation, location, function, and abundance. The data are consistent with the predictions of other algorithms on different theoretical proteomes. Conclusions/Significance Overall, the study suggests that the avoidance of protein aggregation in functional environments acts as a strong evolutionary constraint on polypeptide sequences in both prokaryotic and eukaryotic organisms. PMID:20195530

  19. Anodic-stripping voltammetric immunoassay for ultrasensitive detection of low-abundance proteins using quantum dot aggregated hollow microspheres.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Bing; Tang, Dianping; Goryacheva, Irina Yu; Niessner, Reinhard; Knopp, Dietmar

    2013-02-11

    A new anodic-stripping voltammetric immunoassay protocol for detection of IgG1, as a model protein, was designed by using CdS quantum dot (QD) layer-by-layer assembled hollow microspheres (QDHMS) as molecular tags. Initially, monoclonal anti-human IgG1 specific antibodies were anchored on amorphous magnetic beads preferably selective to capture F(ab) of IgG1 analyte from the sample. For detection, monoclonal anti-human IgG1 (F(c)-specific) antibodies were covalently coupled to the synthesized QDHMS. In a sandwich-type immunoassay format, subsequent anodic-stripping voltammetric detection of cadmium released under acidic conditions from the coupled QDs was conducted at an in situ prepared mercury film electrode. The immunoassay combines highly efficient magnetic separation with signal amplification by the multilayered QD labels. The dynamic concentration range spanned from 1.0 fg mL(-1) to 1.0 μg mL(-1) of IgG1 with a detection limit of 0.1 fg mL(-1). The electrochemical immunoassay showed good reproducibility, selectivity, and stability. The analysis of clinical serum specimens revealed good accordance with the results obtained by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method. The new immunoassay is promising for enzyme-free, and cost-effective analysis of low-abundance biomarkers.

  20. Protein aggregation profile of the human kinome

    PubMed Central

    Graña-Montes, Ricardo; Sant'Anna de Oliveira, Ricardo; Ventura, Salvador

    2012-01-01

    Protein aggregation into amyloid fibrils is associated with the onset of an increasing number of human disorders, including Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and some types of cancer. The ability to form toxic amyloids appears to be a property of most polypeptides. Accordingly, it has been proposed that reducing aggregation and its effect in cell fitness is a driving force in the evolution of proteins sequences. This control of protein solubility should be especially important for regulatory hubs in biological networks, like protein kinases. These enzymes are implicated in practically all processes in normal and abnormal cell physiology, and phosphorylation is one of the most frequent protein modifications used to control protein activity. Here, we use the AGGRESCAN algorithm to study the aggregation propensity of kinase sequences. We compared them with the rest of globular proteins to decipher whether they display differential aggregation properties. In addition, we compared the human kinase complement with the kinomes of other organisms to see if we can identify any evolutionary trend in the aggregational properties of this protein superfamily. Our analysis indicates that kinase domains display significant aggregation propensity, a property that decreases with increasing organism complexity. PMID:23181023

  1. An energy landscape approach to protein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buell, Alexander; Knowles, Tuomas

    2012-02-01

    Protein aggregation into ordered fibrillar structures is the hallmark of a class of diseases, the most prominent examples of which are Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Recent results (e.g. Baldwin et al. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011) suggest that the aggregated state of a protein is in many cases thermodynamically more stable than the soluble state. Therefore the solubility of proteins in a cellular context appears to be to a large extent under kinetic control. Here, we first present a conceptual framework for the description of protein aggregation ( see AK Buell et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 2010) that is an extension to the generally accepted energy landscape model for protein folding. Then we apply this model to analyse and interpret a large set of experimental data on the kinetics of protein aggregation, acquired mainly with a novel biosensing approach (see TPJK Knowles et al, Proc. Nat. Acad. Sc. 2007). We show how for example the effect of sequence modifications on the kinetics and thermodynamics of human lysozyme aggregation can be understood and quantified (see AK Buell et al., J. Am. Chem. Soc. 2011). These results have important implications for therapeutic strategies against protein aggregation disorders, in this case lysozyme systemic amyloidosis.

  2. Influence of polysaccharides on wine protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Jaeckels, Nadine; Meier, Miriam; Dietrich, Helmut; Will, Frank; Decker, Heinz; Fronk, Petra

    2016-06-01

    Polysaccharides are the major high-molecular weight components of wines. In contrast, proteins occur only in small amounts in wine, but contribute to haze formation. The detailed mechanism of aggregation of these proteins, especially in combination with other wine components, remains unclear. This study demonstrates the different aggregation behavior between a buffer and a model wine system by dynamic light scattering. Arabinogalactan-protein, for example, shows an increased aggregation in the model wine system, while in the buffer system a reducing effect is observed. Thus, we could show the importance to examine the behavior of wine additives under conditions close to reality, instead of simpler buffer systems. Additional experiments on melting points of wine proteins reveal that only some isoforms of thaumatin-like proteins and chitinases are involved in haze formation. We can confirm interactions between polysaccharides and proteins, but none of these polysaccharides is able to prevent haze in wine.

  3. Aggregated Gas Molecules: Toxic to Protein?

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Meng; Zuo, Guanghong; Chen, Jixiu; Gao, Yi; Fang, Haiping

    2013-01-01

    The biological toxicity of high levels of breathing gases has been known for centuries, but the mechanism remains elusive. Earlier work mainly focused on the influences of dispersed gas molecules dissolved in water on biomolecules. However, recent studies confirmed the existence of aggregated gas molecules at the water-solid interface. In this paper, we have investigated the binding preference of aggregated gas molecules on proteins with molecular dynamics simulations, using nitrogen (N2) gas and the Src-homology 3 (SH3) domain as the model system. Aggregated N2 molecules were strongly bound by the active sites of the SH3 domain, which could impair the activity of the protein. In contrast, dispersed N2 molecules did not specifically interact with the SH3 domain. These observations extend our understanding of the possible toxicity of aggregates of gas molecules in the function of proteins. PMID:23588597

  4. Simulations of kinetically irreversible protein aggregate structure.

    PubMed Central

    Patro, S Y; Przybycien, T M

    1994-01-01

    We have simulated the structure of kinetically irreversible protein aggregates in two-dimensional space using a lattice-based Monte-Carlo routine. Our model specifically accounts for the intermolecular interactions between hydrophobic and hydrophilic protein surfaces and a polar solvent. The simulations provide information about the aggregate density, the types of inter-monomer contacts and solvent content within the aggregates, the type and extent of solvent exposed perimeter, and the short- and long-range order all as a function of (i) the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area and its distribution on the model protein surface and (ii) the magnitude of the hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energy. An increase in the extent of monomer hydrophobic surface area resulted in increased aggregate densities with concomitant decreased system free energies. These effects are accompanied by increases in the number of hydrophobic-hydrophobic contacts and decreases in the solvent-exposed hydrophobic surface area of the aggregates. Grouping monomer hydrophobic surfaces in a single contiguous stretch resulted in lower aggregate densities and lower short range order. More favorable hydrophobic-hydrophobic contact energies produced structures with higher densities but the number of unfavorable protein-protein contacts was also observed to increase; greater configurational entropy produced the opposite effect. Properties predicted by our model are in good qualitative agreement with available experimental observations. Images FIGURE 6 FIGURE 13 PMID:8061184

  5. Protein Aggregation Measurement through Electrical Impedance Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affanni, A.; Corazza, A.; Esposito, G.; Fogolari, F.; Polano, M.

    2013-09-01

    The paper presents a novel methodology to measure the fibril formation in protein solutions. We designed a bench consisting of a sensor having interdigitated electrodes, a PDMS hermetic reservoir and an impedance meter automatically driven by calculator. The impedance data are interpolated with a lumped elements model and their change over time can provide information on the aggregation process. Encouraging results have been obtained by testing the methodology on K-casein, a protein of milk, with and without the addition of a drug inhibiting the aggregation. The amount of sample needed to perform this measurement is by far lower than the amount needed by fluorescence analysis.

  6. The Mechanisms of Aberrant Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cohen, Samuel; Vendruscolo, Michele; Dobson, Chris; Knowles, Tuomas

    2012-02-01

    We discuss the development of a kinetic theory for understanding the aberrant loss of solubility of proteins. The failure to maintain protein solubility results often in the assembly of organized linear structures, commonly known as amyloid fibrils, the formation of which is associated with over 50 clinical disorders including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. A true microscopic understanding of the mechanisms that drive these aggregation processes has proved difficult to achieve. To address this challenge, we apply the methodologies of chemical kinetics to the biomolecular self-assembly pathways related to protein aggregation. We discuss the relevant master equation and analytical approaches to studying it. In particular, we derive the underlying rate laws in closed-form using a self-consistent solution scheme; the solutions that we obtain reveal scaling behaviors that are very generally present in systems of growing linear aggregates, and, moreover, provide a general route through which to relate experimental measurements to mechanistic information. We conclude by outlining a study of the aggregation of the Alzheimer's amyloid-beta peptide. The study identifies the dominant microscopic mechanism of aggregation and reveals previously unidentified therapeutic strategies.

  7. Pathophysiological importance of aggregated damaged proteins.

    PubMed

    Höhn, Annika; Jung, Tobias; Grune, Tilman

    2014-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are formed continuously in the organism even under physiological conditions. If the level of ROS in cells exceeds the cellular defense capacity, components such as RNA/DNA, lipids, and proteins are damaged and modified, thus affecting the functionality of organelles as well. Proteins are especially prominent targets of various modifications such as oxidation, glycation, or conjugation with products of lipid peroxidation, leading to the alteration of their biological function, nonspecific interactions, and the production of high-molecular-weight protein aggregates. To ensure the maintenance of cellular functions, two proteolytic systems are responsible for the removal of oxidized and modified proteins, especially the proteasome and organelles, mainly the autophagy-lysosomal systems. Furthermore, increased protein oxidation and oxidation-dependent impairment of proteolytic systems lead to an accumulation of oxidized proteins and finally to the formation of nondegradable protein aggregates. Accordingly, the cellular homeostasis cannot be maintained and the cellular metabolism is negatively affected. Here we address the current knowledge of protein aggregation during oxidative stress, aging, and disease.

  8. Sequence determinants of protein aggregation: tools to increase protein solubility

    PubMed Central

    Ventura, Salvador

    2005-01-01

    Escherichia coli is one of the most widely used hosts for the production of recombinant proteins. However, very often the target protein accumulates into insoluble aggregates in a misfolded and biologically inactive form. Bacterial inclusion bodies are major bottlenecks in protein production and are hampering the development of top priority research areas such structural genomics. Inclusion body formation was formerly considered to occur via non-specific association of hydrophobic surfaces in folding intermediates. Increasing evidence, however, indicates that protein aggregation in bacteria resembles to the well-studied process of amyloid fibril formation. Both processes appear to rely on the formation of specific, sequence-dependent, intermolecular interactions driving the formation of structured protein aggregates. This similarity in the mechanisms of aggregation will probably allow applying anti-aggregational strategies already tested in the amyloid context to the less explored area of protein aggregation inside bacteria. Specifically, new sequence-based approaches appear as promising tools to tune protein aggregation in biotechnological processes. PMID:15847694

  9. Interfacial adsorption and aggregation of amphiphilic proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheung, David

    2012-02-01

    The adsorption and aggregation on liquid interfaces of proteins is important in many biological contexts, such as the formation of aerial structures, immune response, and catalysis. Likewise the adsorption of proteins onto interfaces has applications in food technology, drug delivery, and in personal care products. As such there has been much interest in the study of a wide range of biomolecules at liquid interfaces. One class of proteins that has attracted particular attention are hydrophobins, small, fungal proteins with a distinct, amphiphilic surface structure. This makes these proteins highly surface active and they recently attracted much interest. In order to understand their potential applications a microscopic description of their interfacial and self-assembly is necessary and molecular simulation provides a powerful tool for providing this. In this presentation I will describe some recent work using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations to study the interfacial and aggregation behaviour of hydrophobins. Specifically this will present the calculation of their adsorption strength at oil-water and air-water interfaces, investigate the stability of hydrophobin aggregates in solution and their interaction with surfactants.

  10. Cellular strategies for regulating functional and nonfunctional protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Gsponer, Jörg; Babu, M Madan

    2012-11-29

    Growing evidence suggests that aggregation-prone proteins are both harmful and functional for a cell. How do cellular systems balance the detrimental and beneficial effect of protein aggregation? We reveal that aggregation-prone proteins are subject to differential transcriptional, translational, and degradation control compared to nonaggregation-prone proteins, which leads to their decreased synthesis, low abundance, and high turnover. Genetic modulators that enhance the aggregation phenotype are enriched in genes that influence expression homeostasis. Moreover, genes encoding aggregation-prone proteins are more likely to be harmful when overexpressed. The trends are evolutionarily conserved and suggest a strategy whereby cellular mechanisms specifically modulate the availability of aggregation-prone proteins to (1) keep concentrations below the critical ones required for aggregation and (2) shift the equilibrium between the monomeric and oligomeric/aggregate form, as explained by Le Chatelier's principle. This strategy may prevent formation of undesirable aggregates and keep functional assemblies/aggregates under control.

  11. Tau protein and tau aggregation inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Bulic, Bruno; Pickhardt, Marcus; Mandelkow, Eva-Maria; Mandelkow, Eckhard

    2010-01-01

    Alzheimer disease is characterized by pathological aggregation of two proteins, tau and Abeta-amyloid, both of which are considered to be toxic to neurons. In this review we summarize recent advances on small molecule inhibitors of protein aggregation with emphasis on tau, with activities mediated by the direct interference of self-assembly. The inhibitors can be clustered in several compound classes according to their chemical structure, with subsequent description of the structure-activity relationships, showing that hydrophobic interactions are prevailing. The description is extended to the pharmacological profile of the compounds in order to evaluate their drug-likeness, with special attention to toxicity and bioavailability. The collected data indicate that following the improvements of the in vitro inhibitory potencies, the consideration of the in vivo pharmacokinetics is an absolute prerequisite for the development of compounds suitable for a transfer from bench to bedside.

  12. Role of Prion Protein Aggregation in Neurotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Corsaro, Alessandro; Thellung, Stefano; Villa, Valentina; Nizzari, Mario; Florio, Tullio

    2012-01-01

    In several neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson, Alzheimer’s, Huntington, and prion diseases, the deposition of aggregated misfolded proteins is believed to be responsible for the neurotoxicity that characterizes these diseases. Prion protein (PrP), the protein responsible of prion diseases, has been deeply studied for the peculiar feature of its misfolded oligomers that are able to propagate within affected brains, inducing the conversion of the natively folded PrP into the pathological conformation. In this review, we summarize the available experimental evidence concerning the relationship between aggregation status of misfolded PrP and neuronal death in the course of prion diseases. In particular, we describe the main findings resulting from the use of different synthetic (mainly PrP106-126) and recombinant PrP-derived peptides, as far as mechanisms of aggregation and amyloid formation, and how these different spatial conformations can affect neuronal death. In particular, most data support the involvement of non-fibrillar oligomers rather than actual amyloid fibers as the determinant of neuronal death. PMID:22942726

  13. Protein oleogels from heat-set whey protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Auke; Wesseling, Anne; van der Linden, Erik; Scholten, Elke

    2017-01-15

    In this research we use heat-set whey protein aggregates (diameter∼200nm) as novel building blocks for structure formation in liquid oil to form oleogels. To transfer the aggregates to the oil phase, a solvent exchange procedure to sunflower oil was applied using acetone as an intermediate solvent. We found that agglomeration of the aggregates was prevented and the particle size in oil did not change from that in the initial aqueous phase. The small protein aggregates assemble into a space-spanning network, thereby providing solid-like properties to liquid oil. From oscillatory rheology we conclude that the aggregates are highly effective in forming a network. Already at ∼3% we found that G'>G″ and G' scales with protein concentration as G'∼cp(5.3). Applying a fractal gel network theory to the rheological data we deduce that the gels are in the strong link regime with a fractal dimension of 2.2. The results show that protein aggregates, besides their well-known functionality in aqueous solvents, are capable of forming a network in liquid oil. This provides a novel and promising way to design oleogels with tuneable rheological properties, applicable to e.g. foods, pharmaceuticals and/or cosmetics.

  14. Subassembly aggregates of papaya mosaic virus protein.

    PubMed

    Erickson, J W; Hallett, F R; Bancroft, J B

    1983-08-01

    An examination of the number of subunits in small aggregates of papaya mosaic virus (PMV) coat protein is presented based on a model system which gives results consistent with the experimental observation that the 14 S subassembly species is a double disc, composed of two rows of nine subunits each. The estimated hydration of the disc, about 0.85 g 1H20/9 protein, is unusually large and indicates a cavitated structure for the disc. Comparison with other rod-shaped viruses suggests that the flexuous nature of PMV is a consequence of sparse axial inter-subunit contacts at high radius.

  15. Single particle detection and characterization of synuclein co-aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Giese, Armin . E-mail: Armin.Giese@med.uni-muenchen.de; Bader, Benedikt; Bieschke, Jan; Schaffar, Gregor; Odoy, Sabine; Kahle, Philipp J.; Haass, Christian; Kretzschmar, Hans

    2005-08-12

    Protein aggregation is the key event in a number of human diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. We present a general method to quantify and characterize protein aggregates by dual-colour scanning for intensely fluorescent targets (SIFT). In addition to high sensitivity, this approach offers a unique opportunity to study co-aggregation processes. As the ratio of two fluorescently labelled components can be analysed for each aggregate separately in a homogeneous assay, the molecular composition of aggregates can be studied even in samples containing a mixture of different types of aggregates. Using this method, we could show that wild-type {alpha}-synuclein forms co-aggregates with a mutant variant found in familial Parkinson's disease. Moreover, we found a striking increase in aggregate formation at non-equimolar mixing ratios, which may have important therapeutic implications, as lowering the relative amount of aberrant protein may cause an increase of protein aggregation leading to adverse effects.

  16. ProADD: A database on Protein Aggregation Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Shobana, Ramesh; Pandaranayaka, Eswari PJ

    2014-01-01

    ProADD, a database for protein aggregation diseases, is developed to organize the data under a single platform to facilitate easy access for researchers. Diseases caused due to protein aggregation and the proteins involved in each of these diseases are integrated. The database helps in classification of proteins involved in the protein aggregation diseases based on sequence and structural analysis. Analysis of proteins can be done to mine patterns prevailing among the aggregating proteins. Availability http://bicmku.in/ProADD PMID:25097386

  17. In vitro aggregation of the regulated secretory protein chromogranin A.

    PubMed Central

    Jain, Renu K; Chang, Wen Tzu; Geetha, Chitta; Joyce, Paul B M; Gorr, Sven-Ulrik

    2002-01-01

    Aggregation chaperones, consisting of secretory proteins that contain a hexa-histidine epitope tag, enhance the calcium-induced aggregation of regulated secretory proteins and their sorting to secretory granules. The goal of this study was to gain a better understanding of this unusual aggregation mechanism. Hexa-histidine-epitope-tagged secreted alkaline phosphatase, an aggregation chaperone, enhanced the in vitro aggregation of chromogranin A in the presence of calcium, but not in the presence of magnesium or other divalent cations. As an exception, chromogranin was completely aggregated by zinc, even in the absence of the aggregation chaperone. In addition, fluorescence spectroscopy of the aggregation reaction mixture showed an increase in fluorescence intensity consistent with the formation of protein aggregates. The calcium-induced aggregation of chromogranin A was completely inhibited by 0.2% Triton X-100, suggesting that it involves hydrophobic interactions. In contrast, the detergent did not affect chaperone-enhanced aggregation, suggesting that this aggregation does not depend on hydrophobic interactions. EDTA-treated chaperone did not enhance chromogranin A aggregation, indicating that divalent cations are necessary for chaperone action. Although the structure of the aggregation chaperone was not important, the size of the chaperone was. Thus the free His-hexapeptide could not substitute for the aggregation chaperone. Based on these results, we propose that the hexa-histidine tag, in the context of a polypeptide, acts as a divalent cation-dependent nucleation site for chromogranin A aggregation. PMID:12175332

  18. Aggregate structure, morphology and the effect of aggregation mechanisms on viscosity at elevated protein concentrations.

    PubMed

    Barnett, Gregory V; Qi, Wei; Amin, Samiul; Neil Lewis, E; Roberts, Christopher J

    2015-12-01

    Non-native aggregation is a common issue in a number of degenerative diseases and during manufacturing of protein-based therapeutics. There is a growing interest to monitor protein stability at intermediate to high protein concentrations, which are required for therapeutic dosing of subcutaneous injections. An understanding of the impact of protein structural changes and interactions on the protein aggregation mechanisms and resulting aggregate size and morphology may lead to improved strategies to reduce aggregation and solution viscosity. This report investigates non-native aggregation of a model protein, α-chymotrypsinogen, under accelerated conditions at elevated protein concentrations. Far-UV circular dichroism and Raman scattering show structural changes during aggregation. Size exclusion chromatography and laser light scattering are used to monitor the progression of aggregate growth and monomer loss. Monomer loss is concomitant with increased β-sheet structures as monomers are added to aggregates, which illustrate a transition from a native monomeric state to an aggregate state. Aggregates grow predominantly through monomer-addition, resulting in a semi-flexible polymer morphology. Analysis of aggregation growth kinetics shows that pH strongly affects the characteristic timescales for nucleation (τn) and growth (τg), while the initial protein concentration has only minor effects on τn or τg. Low-shear viscosity measurements follow a common scaling relationship between average aggregate molecular weight (Mw(agg)) and concentration (σ), which is consistent with semi-dilute polymer-solution theory. The results establish a link between aggregate growth mechanisms, which couple Mw(agg) and σ, to increases in solution viscosity even at these intermediate protein concentrations (less than 3w/v %).

  19. Investigation of protein aggregation dynamics with a Bloch surface wave sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paeder, Vincent; Santi, Sara; Musi, Valeria; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2011-07-01

    We present a study of the dynamics of protein aggregation using a common path heterodyne Bloch surface wave sensing scheme. We demonstrate the ability to detect, during thermal incubation, the early events linked to the aggregation of proteins related to conformational diseases. Alzheimer's amyloid-β 1-42 is used to demonstrate the efficiency of the method. A model based on elementary interactions is shown to describe accurately the aggregation process. The described sensing scheme is sensitive to the early events of the aggregation process. is hence proposed as a method for the detection of early stages of the evolution of conformational diseases.

  20. Dynamics of proteins aggregation. I. Universal scaling in unbounded media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Size; Javidpour, Leili; Shing, Katherine S.; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    It is well understood that in some cases proteins do not fold correctly and, depending on their environment, even properly-folded proteins change their conformation spontaneously, taking on a misfolded state that leads to protein aggregation and formation of large aggregates. An important factor that contributes to the aggregation is the interactions between the misfolded proteins. Depending on the aggregation environment, the aggregates may take on various shapes forming larger structures, such as protein plaques that are often toxic. Their deposition in tissues is a major contributing factor to many neuro-degenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and prion. This paper represents the first part in a series devoted to molecular simulation of protein aggregation. We use the PRIME, a meso-scale model of proteins, together with extensive discontinuous molecular dynamics simulation to study the aggregation process in an unbounded fluid system, as the first step toward MD simulation of the same phenomenon in crowded cellular environments. Various properties of the aggregates have been computed, including dynamic evolution of aggregate-size distribution, mean aggregate size, number of peptides that contribute to the formation of β sheets, number of various types of hydrogen bonds formed in the system, radius of gyration of the aggregates, and the aggregates' diffusivity. We show that many of such quantities follow dynamic scaling, similar to those for aggregation of colloidal clusters. In particular, at long times the mean aggregate size S(t) grows with time as, S(t) ˜ tz, where z is the dynamic exponent. To our knowledge, this is the first time that the qualitative similarity between aggregation of proteins and colloidal aggregates has been pointed out.

  1. Role of Carbonyl Modifications on Aging-Associated Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanase, Maya; Urbanska, Aleksandra M.; Zolla, Valerio; Clement, Cristina C.; Huang, Liling; Morozova, Kateryna; Follo, Carlo; Goldberg, Michael; Roda, Barbara; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common biological phenomenon, observed in different physiological and pathological conditions. Decreased protein solubility and a tendency to aggregate is also observed during physiological aging but the causes are currently unknown. Herein we performed a biophysical separation of aging-related high molecular weight aggregates, isolated from the bone marrow and splenic cells of aging mice and followed by biochemical and mass spectrometric analysis. The analysis indicated that compared to younger mice an increase in protein post-translational carbonylation was observed. The causative role of these modifications in inducing protein misfolding and aggregation was determined by inducing carbonyl stress in young mice, which recapitulated the increased protein aggregation observed in old mice. Altogether our analysis indicates that oxidative stress-related post-translational modifications accumulate in the aging proteome and are responsible for increased protein aggregation and altered cell proteostasis.

  2. Intraneuronal protein aggregation as a trigger for inflammation and neurodegeneration in the aging brain.

    PubMed

    Currais, Antonio; Fischer, Wolfgang; Maher, Pamela; Schubert, David

    2017-01-01

    Age is, by far, the greatest risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD), yet few AD drug candidates have been generated that target pathways specifically associated with the aging process itself. Two ubiquitous features of the aging brain are the intracellular accumulation of aggregated proteins and inflammation. As intraneuronal amyloid protein is detected before markers of inflammation, we argue that old, age-associated, aggregated proteins in neurons can induce inflammation, resulting in multiple forms of brain toxicities. The consequence is the increased risk of old, age-associated, neurodegenerative diseases. As most of these diseases are associated with the accumulation of aggregated proteins, it is possible that any therapeutic that reduces intracellular protein aggregation will benefit all.-Currais, A., Fischer, W., Maher, P., Schubert, D. Intraneuronal protein aggregation as a trigger for inflammation and neurodegeneration in the aging brain.

  3. Cellular Strategies for Regulating Functional and Nonfunctional Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Gsponer, Jörg; Babu, M. Madan

    2012-01-01

    Summary Growing evidence suggests that aggregation-prone proteins are both harmful and functional for a cell. How do cellular systems balance the detrimental and beneficial effect of protein aggregation? We reveal that aggregation-prone proteins are subject to differential transcriptional, translational, and degradation control compared to nonaggregation-prone proteins, which leads to their decreased synthesis, low abundance, and high turnover. Genetic modulators that enhance the aggregation phenotype are enriched in genes that influence expression homeostasis. Moreover, genes encoding aggregation-prone proteins are more likely to be harmful when overexpressed. The trends are evolutionarily conserved and suggest a strategy whereby cellular mechanisms specifically modulate the availability of aggregation-prone proteins to (1) keep concentrations below the critical ones required for aggregation and (2) shift the equilibrium between the monomeric and oligomeric/aggregate form, as explained by Le Chatelier’s principle. This strategy may prevent formation of undesirable aggregates and keep functional assemblies/aggregates under control. PMID:23168257

  4. Contrasting effects of nanoparticle-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation.

    PubMed

    Radic, Slaven; Davis, Thomas P; Ke, Pu Chun; Ding, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Nanoparticles (NPs) have been experimentally found to either promote or inhibit amyloid aggregation of proteins, but the molecular mechanisms for such complex behaviors remain unknown. Using coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulations, we investigated the effects of varying the strength of nonspecific NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation of a model protein, the amyloid-beta peptide implicated in Alzheimer's disease. Specifically, with increasing NP-peptide attraction, amyloid aggregation on the NP surface was initially promoted due to increased local protein concentration on the surface and destabilization of the folded state. However, further increase of NP-peptide attraction decreased the stability of amyloid fibrils and reduced their lateral diffusion on the NP surface necessary for peptide conformational changes and self-association, thus prohibiting amyloid aggregation. Moreover, we found that the relative concentration between protein and NPs also played an important role in amyloid aggregation. With a high NP/protein ratio, NPs that intrinsically promote protein aggregation may display an inhibitive effect by depleting the proteins in solution while having a low concentration of the proteins on each NP's surface. Our coarse-grained molecular dynamics simulation study offers a molecular mechanism for delineating the contrasting and seemingly conflicting effects of NP-protein attraction on amyloid aggregation and highlights the potential of tailoring anti-aggregation nanomedicine against amyloid diseases.

  5. Heme and iron induce protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Travassos, Leonardo H; Vasconcellos, Luiz R C; Bozza, Marcelo T; Carneiro, Leticia A M

    2017-03-04

    Heme is an essential molecule expressed in many tissues where it plays key roles as the prosthetic group of several proteins involved in vital physiological and metabolic processes such as gas and electron transport. Structurally, heme is a tetrapyrrole ring containing an atom of iron (Fe) in its center. When released into the extracellular milieu, heme exerts several deleterious effects, which make it an important player in infectious and noninfectious hemolytic diseases where large amounts of free heme are observed such as malaria, dengue fever, β-thalassemia, sickle cell disease and ischemia-reperfusion. Our recent work has uncovered an unappreciated cellular response triggered by heme or Fe, one of its degradation products, on macrophages, which is the formation of protein aggregates known as aggresome-like induced structres (ALIS). This response was shown to be fully dependent on ROS production and the activation of the transcription factor NFE2L2/NRF2. In addition, we have demonstrated that heme degradation by HMOX1/HO-1 (heme oxygenase 1) is required and that Fe is essential for the formation of ALIS, as heme analogs lacking the central atom of Fe are not able to induce these structures. ALIS formation is also observed in vivo, in a model of phenylhydrazine (PHZ)-induced hemolysis, indicating that it is an integral part of the host response to excessive free heme and that it may play a role in cellular homeostasis.

  6. Targeting Protein Aggregation for the Treatment of Degenerative Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Eisele, Yvonne S.; Monteiro, Cecilia; Fearns, Colleen; Encalada, Sandra E.; Wiseman, R. Luke; Powers, Evan T.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2015-01-01

    The aggregation of specific proteins is hypothesized to underlie several degenerative diseases, collectively called amyloid disorders. However, the mechanistic connection between the process of protein aggregation and tissue degeneration is not yet fully understood. Here, we review current and emerging strategies to ameliorate aggregation-associated degenerative disorders, with a focus on disease-modifying strategies that prevent the formation of and/or eliminate protein aggregates. Persuasive pharmacologic and genetic evidence now support protein aggregation as the cause of post-mitotic tissue dysfunction or loss. However, a more detailed understanding of the factors that trigger and sustain aggregate formation, as well as the structure-activity relationships underlying proteotoxicity are needed to develop future disease-modifying therapies. PMID:26338154

  7. Predictive approach for protein aggregation: Correlation of protein surface characteristics and conformational flexibility to protein aggregation propensity.

    PubMed

    Galm, Lara; Amrhein, Sven; Hubbuch, Jürgen

    2016-02-08

    The aggregation of proteins became one of the major challenges in the development of biopharmaceu-ticals since the formation of aggregates can affect drug quality and immunogenicity. However, aggregation mechanisms are highly complex and the investigation requires cost, time, and material intensive experi-mental effort. In the present work, the predictive power of protein characteristics for the phase behavior of three different proteins which are very similar in size and structure was studied. In particular, the surface hydrophobicity, zeta potential, and conformational flexibility of human lysozyme, lysozyme from chicken egg white, and α-lactalbumin at pH 3, 5, 7, and 9 were assessed and examined for correlation with experimental stability studies focusing on protein phase behavior induced by sodium chloride and ammonium sulfate. The molecular dynamics (MD) simulation based study of the conformational flexibility without precipitants was able to identify highly flexible protein regions which could be associated to the less regular secondary structure elements and random coiled and terminal regions in particular. Conformational flex-ibility of the entire protein structure and protein surface hydrophobicity could be correlated to differing aggregation propensities among the studied proteins and could be identified to be applicable for predic-tion of protein phase behavior in aqueous solution without precipitants. For prediction of protein phase behavior and aggregation propensity in aqueous solution with precipitants, protein flexibility was further studied in dependency of salt concentration and species by means of human lysozyme. Even though the results of the salt dependent MD simulations could not be shown to be sufficient for prediction of salt depending phase behavior, this study revealed a more pronounced destabilizing effect of ammonium sulfate in comparison to sodium chloride and thus, was found to be in good agreement with theoretical considerations

  8. Fluctuations in Protein Aggregation: Design of Preclinical Screening for Early Diagnosis of Neurodegenerative Disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costantini, Giulio; Budrikis, Zoe; Taloni, Alessandro; Buell, Alexander K.; Zapperi, Stefano; La Porta, Caterina A. M.

    2016-09-01

    Autocatalytic fibril nucleation has recently been proposed to be a determining factor for the spread of neurodegenerative diseases, but the same process could also be exploited to amplify minute quantities of protein aggregates in a diagnostic context. Recent advances in microfluidic technology allow the analysis of protein aggregation in micron-scale samples, potentially enabling such diagnostic approaches, but the theoretical foundations for the analysis and interpretation of such data are, so far, lacking. Here, we study computationally the onset of protein aggregation in small volumes and show that the process is ruled by intrinsic fluctuations whose volume-dependent distribution we also estimate theoretically. Based on these results, we develop a strategy to quantify in silico the statistical errors associated with the detection of aggregate-containing samples. Our work explores a different perspective on the forecasting of protein aggregation in asymptomatic subjects.

  9. Ion exchange chromatography of proteins and clearance of aggregates.

    PubMed

    Yigzaw, Y; Hinckley, P; Hewig, A; Vedantham, G

    2009-06-01

    Clearance of product related aggregates in therapeutic proteins is a major focus of purification process development. A typical purification process will have one or two chromatographic steps that remove these product related aggregates to an acceptable level. Both cation exchange and anion exchange chromatography can provide robust clearance of aggregates. The primary factors that are critical for aggregate clearance are: resin chemistry, binding and elution condition, peak collection and column load factor. This review covers how these factors can be optimized to increase the effectiveness of ion exchange chromatography in removing aggregates.

  10. Conformational stability as a design target to control protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Joseph A; O'Brien, Christopher J; Tiller, Kathryn; Tamargo, Erin; Robinson, Anne Skaja; Roberts, Christopher J; Fernandez, Erik J

    2014-05-01

    Non-native protein aggregation is a prevalent problem occurring in many biotechnological manufacturing processes and can compromise the biological activity of the target molecule or induce an undesired immune response. Additionally, some non-native aggregation mechanisms lead to amyloid fibril formation, which can be associated with debilitating diseases. For natively folded proteins, partial or complete unfolding is often required to populate aggregation-prone conformational states, and therefore one proposed strategy to mitigate aggregation is to increase the free energy for unfolding (ΔGunf) prior to aggregation. A computational design approach was tested using human γD crystallin (γD-crys) as a model multi-domain protein. Two mutational strategies were tested for their ability to reduce/increase aggregation rates by increasing/decreasing ΔGunf: stabilizing the less stable domain and stabilizing the domain-domain interface. The computational protein design algorithm, RosettaDesign, was implemented to identify point variants. The results showed that although the predicted free energies were only weakly correlated with the experimental ΔGunf values, increased/decreased aggregation rates for γD-crys correlated reasonably well with decreases/increases in experimental ΔGunf, illustrating improved conformational stability as a possible design target to mitigate aggregation. However, the results also illustrate that conformational stability is not the sole design factor controlling aggregation rates of natively folded proteins.

  11. The influence of protein aggregation on adsorption kinetics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rovner, Joel; Roberts, Christopher; Furst, Eric; Hudson, Steven

    2015-03-01

    When proteins adsorb to an air-water interface they lower the surface tension and may form an age-dependent viscoelastic film. Protein adsorption to surfaces is relevant to both commercial uses and biological function. The rate at which the surface tension decreases depends strongly on temperature, solution pH, and protein structure. These kinetics also depend on the degree to which the protein is aggregated in solution. Here we explore these differences using Chymotrypsinogen as a model protein whose degree of aggregation is adjusted through controlled heat treatment and measured by chromatography. To study these effects we have used a micropipette tensiometer to produce a spherical-cap bubble whose interfacial pressure was controlled - either steady or oscillating. Short heat treatment produced small soluble aggregates, and these adsorbed faster than the original protein monomer. Longer heat treatment produced somewhat larger soluble aggregates which adsorbed more slowly. These results point to complex interactions during protein adsorption.

  12. Protein Aggregation and Its Impact on Product Quality

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    Protein pharmaceutical products are typically active as folded monomers that are composed of one or more protein chains, such as the heavy and light chains in monoclonal antibodies that are a mainstay of current drug pipelines. There are numerous possible aggregated states for a given protein, some of which are potentially useful, while most of which are considered deleterious from the perspective of pharmaceutical product quality and performance. This review provides an overview of how and why different aggregated states of proteins occur, how this potentially impacts product quality and performance, fundamental approaches to control aggregate formation, and the practical approaches that are currently used in the pharmaceutical industry. PMID:25173826

  13. Comparison of heat-induced aggregation of globular proteins.

    PubMed

    Delahaije, Roy J B M; Wierenga, Peter A; Giuseppin, Marco L F; Gruppen, Harry

    2015-06-03

    Typically, heat-induced aggregation of proteins is studied using a single protein under various conditions (e.g., temperature). Because different studies use different conditions and methods, a mechanistic relationship between molecular properties and the aggregation behavior of proteins has not been identified. Therefore, this study investigates the kinetics of heat-induced aggregation and the size/density of formed aggregates for three different proteins (ovalbumin, β-lactoglobulin, and patatin) under various conditions (pH, ionic strength, concentration, and temperature). The aggregation rate of β-lactoglobulin was slower (>10 times) than that of ovalbumin and patatin. Moreover, the conditions (pH, ionic strength, and concentration) affected the aggregation kinetics of β-lactoglobulin more strongly than for ovalbumin and patatin. In contrast to the kinetics, for all proteins the aggregate size/density increased with decreasing electrostatic repulsion. By comparing these proteins under these conditions, it became clear that the aggregation behavior cannot easily be correlated to the molecular properties (e.g., charge and exposed hydrophobicity).

  14. Single-Molecule Imaging of Individual Amyloid Protein Aggregates in Human Biofluids.

    PubMed

    Horrocks, Mathew H; Lee, Steven F; Gandhi, Sonia; Magdalinou, Nadia K; Chen, Serene W; Devine, Michael J; Tosatto, Laura; Kjaergaard, Magnus; Beckwith, Joseph S; Zetterberg, Henrik; Iljina, Marija; Cremades, Nunilo; Dobson, Christopher M; Wood, Nicholas W; Klenerman, David

    2016-03-16

    The misfolding and aggregation of proteins into amyloid fibrils characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. We report here a method, termed SAVE (single aggregate visualization by enhancement) imaging, for the ultrasensitive detection of individual amyloid fibrils and oligomers using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that this method is able to detect the presence of amyloid aggregates of α-synuclein, tau, and amyloid-β. In addition, we show that aggregates can also be identified in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Significantly, we see a twofold increase in the average aggregate concentration in CSF from Parkinson's disease patients compared to age-matched controls. Taken together, we conclude that this method provides an opportunity to characterize the structural nature of amyloid aggregates in a key biofluid, and therefore has the potential to study disease progression in both animal models and humans to enhance our understanding of neurodegenerative disorders.

  15. Single-Molecule Imaging of Individual Amyloid Protein Aggregates in Human Biofluids

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of proteins into amyloid fibrils characterizes many neurodegenerative disorders such as Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases. We report here a method, termed SAVE (single aggregate visualization by enhancement) imaging, for the ultrasensitive detection of individual amyloid fibrils and oligomers using single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. We demonstrate that this method is able to detect the presence of amyloid aggregates of α-synuclein, tau, and amyloid-β. In addition, we show that aggregates can also be identified in human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Significantly, we see a twofold increase in the average aggregate concentration in CSF from Parkinson’s disease patients compared to age-matched controls. Taken together, we conclude that this method provides an opportunity to characterize the structural nature of amyloid aggregates in a key biofluid, and therefore has the potential to study disease progression in both animal models and humans to enhance our understanding of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:26800462

  16. Prion-like spread of protein aggregates in neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Polymenidou, Magdalini; Cleveland, Don W

    2012-05-07

    Protein misfolding is common to most neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. Recent work using animal models with intracellular α-synuclein and tau inclusions adds decisively to a growing body of evidence that misfolded protein aggregates can induce a self-perpetuating process that leads to amplification and spreading of pathological protein assemblies. When coupled with the progressive nature of neurodegeneration, recognition of such cell-to-cell aggregate spread suggests a unifying mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of these disorders.

  17. Effect of heparin on protein aggregation: inhibition versus promotion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yisheng; Seeman, Daniel; Yan, Yunfeng; Sun, Lianhong; Post, Jared; Dubin, Paul L

    2012-05-14

    The effect of heparin on both native and denatured protein aggregation was investigated by turbidimetry and dynamic light scattering (DLS). Turbidimetric data show that heparin is capable of inhibiting and reversing the native aggregation of bovine serum albumin (BSA), β-lactoglobulin (BLG), and Zn-insulin at a pH near pI and at low ionic strength I; however, the results vary with regard to the range of pH, I, and protein-heparin stoichiometry required to achieve these effects. The kinetics of this process were studied to determine the mechanism by which interaction with heparin could result in inhibition or reversal of native protein aggregates. For each protein, the binding of heparin to distinctive intermediate aggregates formed at different times in the aggregation process dictates the outcome of complexation. This differential binding was explained by changes in the affinity of a given protein for heparin, partly due to the effects of protein charge anisotropy as visualized by electrostatic modeling. The heparin effect can be further extended to include inhibition of denaturing protein aggregation, as seen from the kinetics of BLG aggregation under conditions of thermally induced unfolding with and without heparin.

  18. Mechanisms of m-cresol induced protein aggregation studied using a model protein cytochrome c†

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Surinder M.; Hutchings, Regina L.; Mallela, Krishna M.G.

    2014-01-01

    Multi-dose protein formulations require an effective antimicrobial preservative (AP) to inhibit microbial growth during long-term storage of unused formulations. m-cresol is one such AP, but has been shown to cause protein aggregation. However, the fundamental physical mechanisms underlying such AP-induced protein aggregation are not understood. In this study, we used a model protein cytochrome c to identify the protein unfolding that triggers protein aggregation. m-cresol induced cytochrome c aggregation at preservative concentrations that are commonly used to inhibit microbial growth. Addition of m-cresol decreased the temperature at which the protein aggregated and increased the aggregation rate. However, m-cresol did not perturb the tertiary or secondary structure of cytochrome c. Instead, it populated an “invisible” partially unfolded intermediate where a local protein region around the methionine residue at position 80 was unfolded. Stabilizing the Met80 region drastically decreased the protein aggregation, which conclusively shows that this local protein region acts as an aggregation “hot-spot”. Based on these results, we propose that APs induce protein aggregation by partial rather than global unfolding. Because of the availability of site-specific probes to monitor different levels of protein unfolding, cytochrome c provided a unique advantage in characterizing the partial protein unfolding that triggers protein aggregation. PMID:21229618

  19. Aggregating tags for column-free protein purification.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhanglin; Zhao, Qing; Xing, Lei; Zhou, Bihong; Wang, Xu

    2015-12-01

    Protein purification remains a central need for biotechnology. In recent years, a class of aggregating tags has emerged, which offers a quick, cost-effective and column-free alternative for producing recombinant proteins (and also peptides) with yield and purity comparable to that of the popular His-tag. These column-free tags induce the formation of aggregates (during or after expression) when fused to a target protein or peptide, and upon separation from soluble impurities, the target protein or peptide is subsequently released via a cleavage site. In this review, we categorize these tags as follows: (i) tags that induce inactive protein aggregates in vivo; (ii) tags that induce active protein aggregates in vivo; and (iii) tags that induce soluble expression in vivo, but aggregates in vitro. The respective advantages and disadvantages of these tags are discussed, and compared to the three conventional tags (His-tag, maltose-binding protein [MBP] tag, and intein-mediated purification with a chitin-binding tag [IMPACT-CN]). While this new class of aggregating tags is promising, more systematic tests are required to further the use. It is conceivable, however, that the combination of these tags and the more traditional columns may significantly reduce the costs for resins and columns, particularly for the industrial scale.

  20. Strain-dependent profile of misfolded prion protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Rodrigo; Hu, Ping Ping; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Moda, Fabio; Diaz-Espinoza, Rodrigo; Chen, Baian; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Makarava, Natallia; Baskakov, Ilia V.; Soto, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Prions are composed of the misfolded prion protein (PrPSc) organized in a variety of aggregates. An important question in the prion field has been to determine the identity of functional PrPSc aggregates. In this study, we used equilibrium sedimentation in sucrose density gradients to separate PrPSc aggregates from three hamster prion strains (Hyper, Drowsy, SSLOW) subjected to minimal manipulations. We show that PrPSc aggregates distribute in a wide range of arrangements and the relative proportion of each species depends on the prion strain. We observed a direct correlation between the density of the predominant PrPSc aggregates and the incubation periods for the strains studied. The relative presence of PrPSc in fractions of different sucrose densities was indicative of the protein deposits present in the brain as analyzed by histology. Interestingly, no association was found between sensitivity to proteolytic degradation and aggregation profiles. Therefore, the organization of PrP molecules in terms of the density of aggregates generated may determine some of the particular strain properties, whereas others are independent from it. Our findings may contribute to understand the mechanisms of strain variation and the role of PrPSc aggregates in prion-induced neurodegeneration. PMID:26877167

  1. Strain-dependent profile of misfolded prion protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Morales, Rodrigo; Hu, Ping Ping; Duran-Aniotz, Claudia; Moda, Fabio; Diaz-Espinoza, Rodrigo; Chen, Baian; Bravo-Alegria, Javiera; Makarava, Natallia; Baskakov, Ilia V; Soto, Claudio

    2016-02-15

    Prions are composed of the misfolded prion protein (PrP(Sc)) organized in a variety of aggregates. An important question in the prion field has been to determine the identity of functional PrP(Sc) aggregates. In this study, we used equilibrium sedimentation in sucrose density gradients to separate PrP(Sc) aggregates from three hamster prion strains (Hyper, Drowsy, SSLOW) subjected to minimal manipulations. We show that PrP(Sc) aggregates distribute in a wide range of arrangements and the relative proportion of each species depends on the prion strain. We observed a direct correlation between the density of the predominant PrP(Sc) aggregates and the incubation periods for the strains studied. The relative presence of PrP(Sc) in fractions of different sucrose densities was indicative of the protein deposits present in the brain as analyzed by histology. Interestingly, no association was found between sensitivity to proteolytic degradation and aggregation profiles. Therefore, the organization of PrP molecules in terms of the density of aggregates generated may determine some of the particular strain properties, whereas others are independent from it. Our findings may contribute to understand the mechanisms of strain variation and the role of PrP(Sc) aggregates in prion-induced neurodegeneration.

  2. Tannin-assisted aggregation of natively unfolded proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zanchi, D.; Narayanan, T.; Hagenmuller, D.; Baron, A.; Guyot, S.; Cabane, B.; Bouhallab, S.

    2008-06-01

    Tannin-protein interactions are essentially physical: hydrophobic and hydrogen-bond-mediated. We explored the tannin-assisted protein aggregation on the case of β-casein, which is a natively unfolded protein known for its ability to form micellar aggregates. We used several tannins with specified length. Our SAXS results show that small tannins increase the number of proteins per micelle, but keeping their size constant. It leads to a tannin-assisted compactization of micelles. Larger tannins, with linear dimensions greater than the crown width of micelles, lead to the aggregation of micelles by a bridging effect. Experimental results can be understood within a model where tannins are treated as effective enhancers of hydrophobic attraction between specific sites in proteins.

  3. The importance of sequence diversity in the aggregation and evolution of proteins.

    PubMed

    Wright, Caroline F; Teichmann, Sarah A; Clarke, Jane; Dobson, Christopher M

    2005-12-08

    Incorrect folding of proteins, leading to aggregation and amyloid formation, is associated with a group of highly debilitating medical conditions including Alzheimer's disease and late-onset diabetes. The issue of how unwanted protein association is normally avoided in a living system is particularly significant in the context of the evolution of multidomain proteins, which account for over 70% of all eukaryotic proteins, where the effective local protein concentration in the vicinity of each domain is very high. Here we describe the aggregation kinetics of multidomain protein constructs of immunoglobulin domains and the ability of different homologous domains to aggregate together. We show that aggregation of these proteins is a specific process and that the efficiency of coaggregation between different domains decreases markedly with decreasing sequence identity. Thus, whereas immunoglobulin domains with more than about 70% identity are highly prone to coaggregation, those with less than 30-40% sequence identity do not detectably interact. A bioinformatics analysis of consecutive homologous domains in large multidomain proteins shows that such domains almost exclusively have sequence identities of less than 40%, in other words below the level at which coaggregation is likely to be efficient. We propose that such low sequence identities could have a crucial and general role in safeguarding proteins against misfolding and aggregation.

  4. Multi-block poloxamer surfactants suppress aggregation of denatured proteins.

    PubMed

    Mustafi, Devkumar; Smith, Catherine M; Makinen, Marvin W; Lee, Raphael C

    2008-01-01

    On the basis of elastic light scattering, we have compared the capacity of the multi-block, surfactant copolymers Poloxamer 108 (P108), Poloxamer 188 (P188), and Tetronic 1107 (T1107), of average molecular weight 4700, 8400, and 15,000, respectively, with that of polyethylene glycol (PEG, molecular weight 8000) to suppress aggregation of heat-denatured hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and bovine serum albumin (BSA). We also compared the capacity of P188 to that of PEG to suppress aggregation of carboxypeptidase A denatured in the presence of trifluoroethanol and to facilitate recovery of catalytic activity. In contrast to the multi-block copolymers, PEG had no effect in inhibiting aggregation of HEWL or of carboxypeptidase A with the recovery of catalytic activity. At very high polymer:protein ratios (>or=10:1), PEG increased aggregation of heat-denatured HEWL and BSA, consistent with its known properties to promote macromolecular crowding and crystallization of proteins. At a polymer:protein ratio of 2:1, the tetra-block copolymer T1107 was the most effective of the three surfactant copolymers, completely suppressing aggregation of heat-denatured HEWL. At a T1107:BSA ratio of 10:1, the poloxamer suppressed aggregation of heat-denatured BSA by 50% compared to that observed in the absence of the polymer. We showed that the extent of suppression of aggregation of heat-denatured proteins by multi-block surfactant copolymers is dependent on the size of the protein and the copolymer:protein molar ratio. We also concluded that at least one of the tertiary nitrogens in the ethylene-1,2-diamine structural core of the T1107 copolymer is protonated, and that this electrostatic factor underlies its capacity to suppress aggregation of denatured proteins more effectively than nonionic, multi-block poloxamers. These results indicate that amphiphilic, surfactant, multi-block copolymers are efficient as additives to suppress aggregation and to facilitate refolding of denatured

  5. Robustness of the Process of Nucleoid Exclusion of Protein Aggregates in Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Neeli-Venkata, Ramakanth; Martikainen, Antti; Gupta, Abhishekh; Gonçalves, Nadia; Fonseca, Jose

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Escherichia coli segregates protein aggregates to the poles by nucleoid exclusion. Combined with cell divisions, this generates heterogeneous aggregate distributions in subsequent cell generations. We studied the robustness of this process with differing medium richness and antibiotics stress, which affect nucleoid size, using multimodal, time-lapse microscopy of live cells expressing both a fluorescently tagged chaperone (IbpA), which identifies in vivo the location of aggregates, and HupA-mCherry, a fluorescent variant of a nucleoid-associated protein. We find that the relative sizes of the nucleoid's major and minor axes change widely, in a positively correlated fashion, with medium richness and antibiotic stress. The aggregate's distribution along the major cell axis also changes between conditions and in agreement with the nucleoid exclusion phenomenon. Consequently, the fraction of aggregates at the midcell region prior to cell division differs between conditions, which will affect the degree of asymmetries in the partitioning of aggregates between cells of future generations. Finally, from the location of the peak of anisotropy in the aggregate displacement distribution, the nucleoid relative size, and the spatiotemporal aggregate distribution, we find that the exclusion of detectable aggregates from midcell is most pronounced in cells with mid-sized nucleoids, which are most common under optimal conditions. We conclude that the aggregate management mechanisms of E. coli are significantly robust but are not immune to stresses due to the tangible effect that these have on nucleoid size. IMPORTANCE Escherichia coli segregates protein aggregates to the poles by nucleoid exclusion. From live single-cell microscopy studies of the robustness of this process to various stresses known to affect nucleoid size, we find that nucleoid size and aggregate preferential locations change concordantly between conditions. Also, the degree of influence of the nucleoid

  6. Protein aggregate spreading in neurodegenerative diseases: Problems and perspectives

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Seung-Jae; Lim, Hee-Sun; Masliah, Eliezer; Lee, He-Jin

    2014-01-01

    Progressive accumulation of specific protein aggregates is a defining feature of many major neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, fronto-temporal dementia, Huntington’s disease, and Creutzfeldt–Jakob disease (CJD). Findings from several recent studies have suggested that aggregation-prone proteins, such as tau, α-synuclein, polyglutamine-containing proteins, and amyloid-β, can spread to other cells and brain regions, a phenomenon considered unique to prion disorders, such as CJD and bovine spongiform encephalopathy. Cell-to-cell propagation of protein aggregates may be the general underlying principle for progressive deterioration of neurodegenerative diseases. This may also have significant implications in cell replacement therapies, as evidenced by the propagation of α-synuclein aggregates from host to grafted cells in long-term transplants in Parkinson’s patients. Here, we review recent progress in protein aggregate propagation in experimental model systems and discuss outstanding questions and future perspectives. Understanding the mechanisms of this pathological spreading may open the way to unique opportunities for development of diagnostic techniques and novel therapies for protein misfolding-associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:21624403

  7. Effects of Soy Protein Nanoparticle Aggregate Size on the Viscoelastic Properties of Styrene-Butadiene Composites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein nanoparticle aggregates were prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of soy protein isolate (SPI). Light scattering measurements indicated a narrow size distribution of SPI aggregates. Nanocomposites were formed by mixing hydrolyzed SPI (HSPI) nanoparticle aggregates with styrene-butadiene (SB...

  8. Steroidal Surfactants: Detection of Premicellar Aggregation, Secondary Aggregation Changes in Micelles, and Hosting of a Highly Charged Negative Substance.

    PubMed

    Barnadas-Rodríguez, Ramon; Cladera, Josep

    2015-08-25

    CHAPSO and CHAPS are zwitterionic surfactants derived from bile salts which are usually employed in protein purification and for the preparation of liposomes and bicelles. Despite their spread use, there are significant discrepancies on the critical concentrations that determine their aggregation behavior. In this work, we study the interaction between these surfactants with the negative fluorescent dye pyranine (HPTS) by absorbance, fluorescence, and infrared spectrometry to establish their concentration-dependent aggregation. For the studied surfactants, we detect three critical concentrations showing their concentration-dependent presence as a monomeric form, premicellar aggregates, micelles, and a second type of micelle in aqueous medium. The nature of the interaction of HPTS with the surfactants was studied using analogues of their tails and the negative bile salt taurocholate (TC) as reference for the sterol ring. The results indicate that the chemical groups involved are the hydroxyl groups of the polar face of the sterol ring and the sulfonate groups of the dye. This interaction causes not only the incorporation of the negative dye in CHAPSO and CHAPS micelles but also its association with their premicellar aggregates. Surprisingly, this hosting behavior for a negative charged molecule was also detected for the negative bile salt TC, bypassing, in this way, the electrostatic repulsion between the guest and the host.

  9. Impact of aggregate formation on the viscosity of protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Lattuada, Marco; Yates, Andrew; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-07-21

    Gaining knowledge on the stability and viscosity of concentrated therapeutic protein solutions is of great relevance to the pharmaceutical industry. In this work, we borrow key concepts from colloid science to rationalize the impact of aggregate formation on the changes in viscosity of a concentrated monoclonal antibody solution. In particular, we monitor the kinetics of aggregate growth under thermal stress by static and dynamic light scattering, and we follow the rise in solution viscosity by measuring the diffusion coefficient of tracer nanoparticles with dynamic light scattering. Moreover, we characterize aggregate morphology in the frame of the fractal geometry. We show that the curves of the increase in viscosity with time monitored at three different protein concentrations collapse on one single master curve when the reaction profiles are normalized based on an effective volume fraction occupied by the aggregates, which depends on the aggregate size, concentration and morphology. Importantly, we find that the viscosity of an aggregate sample is lower than the viscosity of a monomeric sample of a similar occupied volume fraction due to the polydispersity of the aggregate distribution.

  10. Cellular factors modulating the mechanism of tau protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Fontaine, Sarah N.; Sabbagh, Jonathan J.; Baker, Jeremy; Martinez-Licha, Carlos R.; Darling, April

    2015-01-01

    Pathological accumulation of the microtubule-associated protein tau, in the form of neurofibrillary tangles, is a major hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease, the most prevalent neurodegenerative condition worldwide. In addition to Alzheimer’s disease, a number of neurodegenerative diseases, called tauopathies, are characterized by the accumulation of aggregated tau in a variety of brain regions. While tau normally plays an important role in stabilizing the microtubule network of the cytoskeleton, its dissociation from microtubules and eventual aggregation into pathological deposits is an area of intense focus for therapeutic development. Here we discuss the known cellular factors that affect tau aggregation, from post-translational modifications to molecular chaperones. PMID:25666877

  11. Interface interactions of natural rubber and protein/fiber aggregates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mechanical properties of natural rubber are improved with a renewable filler for rubber applications. Aggregates of protein and fiber that constitute soy protein concentrate were shear-reduced and used to enhance the tensile modulus of the natural rubber. The aqueous dispersion of the shear-reduced ...

  12. An in vivo platform for identifying inhibitors of protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Mahood, Rachel A.; Jackson, Matthew P.; Revill, Charlotte H.; Foster, Richard J.; Smith, D. Alastair; Ashcroft, Alison E.; Brockwell, David J.; Radford, Sheena E.

    2015-01-01

    Protein aggregation underlies an array of human diseases, yet only one small molecule therapeutic has been successfully developed to date. Here, we introduce an in vivo system, based on a β-lactamase tripartite fusion construct, capable of identifying aggregation-prone sequences in the periplasm of Escherichia coli and inhibitors that prevent their aberrant self-assembly. We demonstrate the power of the system using a range of proteins, from small unstructured peptides (islet amyloid polypeptide and amyloid β) to larger, folded immunoglobulin domains. Configured in a 48-well format, the split β-lactamase sensor readily differentiates between aggregation-prone and soluble sequences. Performing the assay in the presence of 109 compounds enabled a rank ordering of inhibition and revealed a new inhibitor of IAPP aggregation. This platform can be applied to both amyloidogenic and other aggregation-prone systems, independent of sequence or size, and can identify small molecules or other factors able to ameliorate or inhibit protein aggregation. PMID:26656088

  13. Autoimmune Responses to Soluble Aggregates of Amyloidogenic Proteins Involved in Neurodegenerative Diseases: Overlapping Aggregation Prone and Autoimmunogenic regions.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Sandeep; Thangakani, A Mary; Nagarajan, R; Singh, Satish K; Velmurugan, D; Gromiha, M Michael

    2016-02-29

    Why do patients suffering from neurodegenerative diseases generate autoantibodies that selectively bind soluble aggregates of amyloidogenic proteins? Presently, molecular basis of interactions between the soluble aggregates and human immune system is unknown. By analyzing sequences of experimentally validated T-cell autoimmune epitopes, aggregating peptides, amyloidogenic proteins and randomly generated peptides, here we report overlapping regions that likely drive aggregation as well as generate autoantibodies against the aggregates. Sequence features, that make short peptides susceptible to aggregation, increase their incidence in human T-cell autoimmune epitopes by 4-6 times. Many epitopes are predicted to be significantly aggregation prone (aggregation propensities ≥10%) and the ones containing experimentally validated aggregating regions are enriched in hydrophobicity by 10-20%. Aggregate morphologies also influence Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)--types recognized by the aggregating regions containing epitopes. Most (88%) epitopes that contain amyloid fibril forming regions bind HLA-DR, while majority (63%) of those containing amorphous β-aggregating regions bind HLA-DQ. More than two-thirds (70%) of human amyloidogenic proteins contain overlapping regions that are simultaneously aggregation prone and auto-immunogenic. Such regions help clear soluble aggregates by generating selective autoantibodies against them. This can be harnessed for early diagnosis of proteinopathies and for drug/vaccine design against them.

  14. Effects of osmolytes on protein folding and aggregation in cells.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Zoya; Gierasch, Lila M

    2007-01-01

    Nature has developed many strategies to ensure that the complex and challenging protein folding reaction occurs in vivo with adequate efficiency and fidelity for the success of the organism. Among the strategies widely employed in a huge range of species and cell types is the elaboration of small organic molecules called osmolytes that offset the potentially damaging effects of osmotic stress. While considerable knowledge has been gained in vitro regarding the influence of osmolytes on protein structure and folding, it is of great interest to probe the effects of osmolytes in cells. We have developed an in-cell fluorescent-labeling method that enables the study of protein stability and also protein aggregation in vivo. We utilize a genetically encoded tag called a tetra-Cys motif that binds specifically to a bis-arsenical fluorescein-based dye "FlAsH"; we inserted the tetra-Cys motif into a protein of interest in such a way that the FlAsH signal reported on the state of folding or aggregation of the protein. Then, we designed protocols to assess how various osmolytes influence the stability and propensity to aggregate of our protein of interest. These are described here. Not only are there potential biotechnological applications of osmolytes in the quest to produce greater quantities of well-folded proteins, but also osmolytes may serve as tools and points of departure for therapeutic intervention in protein folding and aggregation diseases. Having in vivo methods to analyze how osmolytes affect folding and aggregation enhances our ability to further these goals greatly.

  15. Applied Electric Fields and the Aggregation of Highly Charged Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nemzer, Louis; Flanders, Bret; Sorensen, Christopher

    2011-03-01

    The abnormal aggregation of misfolded proteins is associated with the onset of Alzheimer's disease, along with other neurodegenerative disorders, and there is increasing evidence that prefibrillar clusters, rather than fully-formed amyloid plaques, are primarily responsible. Therefore, weakly invasive methods, such as dynamic light scattering, which can probe the size distribution and structure factor of early nuclei and proto-aggregate clusters, can serve an important role in understanding this process, and may lead to insights regarding future therapeutic interventions. Here we study a highly charged model protein, lysozyme, under the influence of applied AC and DC fields in an effort to evaluate general models of protein aggregation, including the coarse-grained ``patchy protein'' method of visualizing charge heterogeneity. This anisotropy in the interprotein interaction can lead to frustrated crystalline order, resulting in low density phases. Dynamic measurements of the size distribution and structure factor can reveal local ordering, hierarchical clustering, and fractal properties of the aggregates. Early results show that applied fields affect early cluster growth by modulating local protein and counterion concentrations, in addition to their influence on protein alignment.

  16. The effects of excipients on protein aggregation during agitation: an interfacial shear rheology study.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Qi, Wei; Schwartz, Daniel K; Randolph, Theodore W; Carpenter, John F

    2013-08-01

    We investigated the effects of excipients in solutions of keratinocyte growth factor 2 (KGF-2) on protein aggregation during agitation as well as on interfacial shear rheology at the air-water interface. Samples were incubated with or without agitation, and in the presence or absence of the excipients heparin, sucrose, or polysorbate 80 (PS80). The effect of excipients on the extent of protein aggregation was determined by UV-visible spectroscopy and micro-flow imaging. Interfacial shear rheology was used to detect the gelation time and strength of protein gels at the air-water interface. During incubation, protein particles of size ≥1 μm and insoluble aggregates formed faster for KGF-2 solutions subjected to agitation. Addition of either heparin or sucrose promoted protein aggregation during agitation. In contrast, PS80 substantially inhibited agitation-induced KGF-2 aggregation but facilitated protein particulate formation in quiescent solutions. The combination of PS80 and heparin or sucrose completely prevented protein aggregation during both nonagitated and agitated incubations. Interfacial rheological measurements showed that KGF-2 in buffer alone formed an interfacial gel within a few minutes. In the presence of heparin, KGF-2 interfacial gels formed too quickly for gelation time to be determined. KGF-2 formed gels in about 10 min in the presence of sucrose. The presence of PS80 in the formulation inhibited gelation of KGF-2. Furthermore, the interfacial gels formed by the protein in the absence of PS80 were reversible when PS80 was added to the samples after gelation. Therefore, there is a correspondence between formulations that exhibited interfacial gelation and formulations that exhibited agitation-induced aggregation.

  17. Prion-like transmission of protein aggregates in neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Brundin, Patrik; Melki, Ronald; Kopito, Ron

    2010-01-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are commonly associated with the accumulation of intracellular or extracellular protein aggregates. Recent studies suggest that these aggregates are capable of crossing cellular membranes and can directly contribute to the propagation of neurodegenerative disease pathogenesis. We propose that, once initiated, neuropathological changes might spread in a ‘prion-like’ manner and that disease progression is associated with the intercellular transfer of pathogenic proteins. The transfer of naked infectious particles between cells could therefore be a target for new disease-modifying therapies. PMID:20308987

  18. CCT complex restricts neuropathogenic protein aggregation via autophagy

    PubMed Central

    Pavel, Mariana; Imarisio, Sara; Menzies, Fiona M.; Jimenez-Sanchez, Maria; Siddiqi, Farah H.; Wu, Xiaoting; Renna, Maurizio; O'Kane, Cahir J.; Crowther, Damian C.; Rubinsztein, David C.

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant protein aggregation is controlled by various chaperones, including CCT (chaperonin containing TCP-1)/TCP-1/TRiC. Mutated CCT4/5 subunits cause sensory neuropathy and CCT5 expression is decreased in Alzheimer's disease. Here, we show that CCT integrity is essential for autophagosome degradation in cells or Drosophila and this phenomenon is orchestrated by the actin cytoskeleton. When autophagic flux is reduced by compromise of individual CCT subunits, various disease-relevant autophagy substrates accumulate and aggregate. The aggregation of proteins like mutant huntingtin, ATXN3 or p62 after CCT2/5/7 depletion is predominantly autophagy dependent, and does not further increase with CCT knockdown in autophagy-defective cells/organisms, implying surprisingly that the effect of loss-of-CCT activity on mutant ATXN3 or huntingtin oligomerization/aggregation is primarily a consequence of autophagy inhibition rather than loss of physiological anti-aggregation activity for these proteins. Thus, our findings reveal an essential partnership between two key components of the proteostasis network and implicate autophagy defects in diseases with compromised CCT complex activity. PMID:27929117

  19. Intrinsic disorder modulates protein self-assembly and aggregation.

    PubMed

    De Simone, Alfonso; Kitchen, Craig; Kwan, Ann H; Sunde, Margaret; Dobson, Christopher M; Frenkel, Daan

    2012-05-01

    Protein molecules have evolved to adopt distinctive and well-defined functional and soluble states under physiological conditions. In some circumstances, however, proteins can self-assemble into fibrillar aggregates designated as amyloid fibrils. In vivo these processes are normally associated with severe pathological conditions but can sometimes have functional relevance. One such example is the hydrophobins, whose aggregation at air-water interfaces serves to create robust protein coats that help fungal spores to resist wetting and thus facilitate their dispersal in the air. We have performed multiscale simulations to address the molecular determinants governing the formation of functional amyloids by the class I fungal hydrophobin EAS. Extensive samplings of full-atom replica-exchange molecular dynamics and coarse-grained simulations have allowed us to identify factors that distinguish aggregation-prone from highly soluble states of EAS. As a result of unfavourable entropic terms, highly dynamical regions are shown to exert a crucial influence on the propensity of the protein to aggregate under different conditions. More generally, our findings suggest a key role that specific flexible structural elements can play to ensure the existence of soluble and functional states of proteins under physiological conditions.

  20. Aggregation propensity of critical regions of the protein Tau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthee, Micaiah; Ahmed, Azka; Larini, Luca

    The Alzheimer's disease is an irreversible, progressive brain disorder that slowly destroys memory and thinking skills, which eventually leads to the ability to not able to carry out the simplest tasks. The Alzheimer's disease is characterized by the formation of protein aggregates both within and outside of the brain's cells, the neurons. Within the neurons, the aggregation of the protein tau leads to the destruction of the microtubules in the axon of the neuron. Tau belongs to a group of proteins referred to as Microtubule-Associated Proteins. It is extremely flexible and is classified as an intrinsically unstructured protein due to its low propensity to form secondary structure. Tau promotes tubulin assembly into microtubules thereby stabilizing the cytoskeleton of the axon of the neurons. The microtubule binding region of tau consists of 4 pseudo-repeats. In this study, we will focus on the aggregation propensity of two fragments. In this study we will focus on the PHF43 fragment that contains the third pseudo-repeat and has been shown experimentally to aggregate readily. Another fragment that contains the second pseudo-repeat will be considered as well. Mutations in this region are associated with various form of dementia and for this reason we will consider the mutant P301L.

  1. Real-time protein aggregation monitoring with a Bloch surface wave-based approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santi, Sara; Barakat, Elsie; Descrovi, Emiliano; Neier, Reinhard; Herzig, Hans Peter

    2014-05-01

    The misfolding and aggregation of amyloid proteins has been associated with incurable diseases such as Alzheimer's or Parkinson's disease. In the specific case of Alzheimer's disease, recent studies have shown that cell toxicity is caused by soluble oligomeric forms of aggregates appearing in the early stages of aggregation, rather than by insoluble fibrils. Research on new strategies of diagnosis is imperative to detect the disease prior to the onset of clinical symptoms. Here, we propose the use of an optical method for protein aggregation dynamic studies using a Bloch surface wave based approach. A one dimension photonic crystal made of a periodic stack of silicon oxide and silicon nitride layers is used to excite a Bloch surface wave, which is sensitive to variation of the refractive index of an aqueous solution. The aim is to detect the early dynamic events of protein aggregation and fibrillogenesis of the amyloid-beta peptide Aβ42, which plays a central role in the onset of the Alzheimer's disease. The detection principle relies on the refractive index changes caused by the depletion of the Aβ42 monomer concentration during oligomerization and fibrillization. We demonstrate the efficacy of the Bloch surface wave approach by monitoring in real-time the first crucial steps of Aβ42 oligomerization.

  2. Evaluation of Nanoparticle Tracking for Characterization of Fibrillar Protein Aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Dennis T.; Lu, Xiaomeng; Fan, Yamin; Murphy, Regina M.

    2015-01-01

    Amyloidogenesis is the process of formation of protein aggregates with fibrillar morphology. Because amyloidogenesis is linked to neurodegenerative disease, there is interest in understanding the mechanism of fibril growth. Kinetic models of amyloidogenesis require data on the number concentration and size distribution of aggregates, but this information is difficult to obtain using conventional methods. Nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA) is a relatively new technique that may be uniquely suited for obtaining these data. In NTA, the two-dimensional (2-D) trajectory of individual particles is tracked, from which the diffusion coefficient, and, hence, hydrodynamic radius is obtained. Here we examine the validity of NTA in tracking number concentration and size of DNA, as a model of a fibrillar macromolecule. We use NTA to examine three amyloidogenic materials: beta-amyloid, transthyretin, and polyglutamine-containing peptides. Our results are instructive in demonstrating the advantages and some limitations of single-particle diffusion measurements for investigating aggregation in protein systems. PMID:25843955

  3. Role of arginine in the stabilization of proteins against aggregation.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Brian M; Wang, Daniel I C; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2005-03-29

    The amino acid arginine is frequently used as a solution additive to stabilize proteins against aggregation, especially in the process of protein refolding. Despite arginine's prevalence, the mechanism by which it stabilizes proteins is not presently understood. We propose that arginine deters aggregation by slowing protein-protein association reactions, with only a small concomitant effect on protein folding. The associated rate effect was observed experimentally in association of globular proteins (insulin and a monoclonal anti-insulin) and in refolding of carbonic anhydrase. We suggest that this effect arises because arginine is preferentially excluded from protein-protein encounter complexes but not from dissociated protein molecules. Such an effect is predicted by our gap effect theory [Baynes and Trout (2004) Biophys. J. 87, 1631] for "neutral crowder" additives such as arginine which are significantly larger than water but have only a small effect on the free energies of isolated protein molecules. The effect of arginine on refolding of carbonic anhydrase was also shown to be consistent with this hypothesis.

  4. Theory for the aggregation of proteins and copolymers

    SciTech Connect

    Fields, G.B.; Alonso, D.O.V.; Stigter, D.; Dill, K.A.

    1992-05-14

    We develop mean-field lattice statistical mechanics theory for the equilibrium between denatured and aggregated states of proteins and other random copolymers of hydrophobic and polar monomers in aqueous solution. We suppose that the aggregated state is a mixture of amorphous polymer plus solvent and that the driving forces are the hydrophobic interaction, which favors aggregation, and conformational and translational entropies, which favor disaggregation. The theory predicts that the phase diagram for thermal aggregation is an asymmetric closed loop, and for denaturants (guanidinium hydrochloride of urea) it is asymmetric with an upper consolute point. The theory predicts that a copolymer in a poor solvent will expand with increasing polymer concentration because of {open_quotes}screening{close_quotes} of the solvent interactions by the other chains; the chain ultimately reaches a theta-like state in the absence of solvent. The screening concentration depends strongly on the copolymer composition. We find two striking features of these copolymer phase diagrams. First, they are extraordinarily sensitive to the copolymer composition; a change of one amino acid can substantially change the aggregation behavior. Second, relative to homopolymers, copolymers should be stable against aggregation at concentrations that are higher by many orders of magnitude. 43 refs., 13 figs.

  5. Quantitative thermophoretic study of disease-related protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Wolff , Manuel; Mittag, Judith J.; Herling, Therese W.; Genst, Erwin De; Dobson, Christopher M.; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.; Braun, Dieter; Buell, Alexander K.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases. A detailed understanding of the physico-chemical properties of the different aggregated forms of proteins, and of their interactions with other compounds of diagnostic or therapeutic interest, is crucial for devising effective strategies against such diseases. Protein aggregates are situated at the boundary between soluble and insoluble structures, and are challenging to study because classical biophysical techniques, such as scattering, spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, are not well adapted for their study. Here we present a detailed characterization of the thermophoretic behavior of different forms of the protein α-synuclein, whose aggregation is associated with Parkinson’s disease. Thermophoresis is the directed net diffusional flux of molecules and colloidal particles in a temperature gradient. Because of their low volume requirements and rapidity, analytical methods based on this effect have considerable potential for high throughput screening for drug discovery. In this paper we rationalize and describe in quantitative terms the thermophoretic behavior of monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-synuclein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microscale thermophoresis (MST) is a valuable method for screening for ligands and binding partners of even such highly challenging samples as supramolecular protein aggregates. PMID:26984748

  6. Quantitative thermophoretic study of disease-related protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Wolff, Manuel; Mittag, Judith J; Herling, Therese W; Genst, Erwin De; Dobson, Christopher M; Knowles, Tuomas P J; Braun, Dieter; Buell, Alexander K

    2016-03-17

    Amyloid fibrils are a hallmark of a range of neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases. A detailed understanding of the physico-chemical properties of the different aggregated forms of proteins, and of their interactions with other compounds of diagnostic or therapeutic interest, is crucial for devising effective strategies against such diseases. Protein aggregates are situated at the boundary between soluble and insoluble structures, and are challenging to study because classical biophysical techniques, such as scattering, spectroscopic and calorimetric methods, are not well adapted for their study. Here we present a detailed characterization of the thermophoretic behavior of different forms of the protein α-synuclein, whose aggregation is associated with Parkinson's disease. Thermophoresis is the directed net diffusional flux of molecules and colloidal particles in a temperature gradient. Because of their low volume requirements and rapidity, analytical methods based on this effect have considerable potential for high throughput screening for drug discovery. In this paper we rationalize and describe in quantitative terms the thermophoretic behavior of monomeric, oligomeric and fibrillar forms of α-synuclein. Furthermore, we demonstrate that microscale thermophoresis (MST) is a valuable method for screening for ligands and binding partners of even such highly challenging samples as supramolecular protein aggregates.

  7. Exploring energy landscapes of protein folding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Mousseau, Normand; Derreumaux, Philippe

    2008-05-01

    Human diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Creutzfeldt-Jakob's are associated with misfolding and aggregation of specific proteins into amyloid fibrils sharing a generic cross-beta structure. The self-assembly process is complex, but once a nucleus is formed, rapid fibril formation occurs. Insight into the structures of the oligomers during the lag phase, varying between hours and days, is very difficult experimentally because these species are transient, and numerically using all-atom molecular dynamics because the time scale explored is on the order of 10-100 ns. It is therefore important to develop simplified protein models and alternative methods to sample more efficiently the conformational space. In the past few years, we have developed the activation-relaxation technique (ART nouveau) coupled to the OPEP coarse-grained force field. This review reports the application of ART-OPEP on protein folding and aggregation.

  8. Multirobot autonomous landmine detection using distributed multisensor information aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jumadinova, Janyl; Dasgupta, Prithviraj

    2012-06-01

    We consider the problem of distributed sensor information fusion by multiple autonomous robots within the context of landmine detection. We assume that different landmines can be composed of different types of material and robots are equipped with different types of sensors, while each robot has only one type of landmine detection sensor on it. We introduce a novel technique that uses a market-based information aggregation mechanism called a prediction market. Each robot is provided with a software agent that uses sensory input of the robot and performs calculations of the prediction market technique. The result of the agent's calculations is a 'belief' representing the confidence of the agent in identifying the object as a landmine. The beliefs from different robots are aggregated by the market mechanism and passed on to a decision maker agent. The decision maker agent uses this aggregate belief information about a potential landmine and makes decisions about which other robots should be deployed to its location, so that the landmine can be confirmed rapidly and accurately. Our experimental results show that, for identical data distributions and settings, using our prediction market-based information aggregation technique increases the accuracy of object classification favorably as compared to two other commonly used techniques.

  9. Modeling of chemical inhibition from amyloid protein aggregation kinetics

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds The process of amyloid proteins aggregation causes several human neuropathologies. In some cases, e.g. fibrillar deposits of insulin, the problems are generated in the processes of production and purification of protein and in the pump devices or injectable preparations for diabetics. Experimental kinetics and adequate modelling of chemical inhibition from amyloid aggregation are of practical importance in order to study the viable processing, formulation and storage as well as to predict and optimize the best conditions to reduce the effect of protein nucleation. Results In this manuscript, experimental data of insulin, Aβ42 amyloid protein and apomyoglobin fibrillation from recent bibliography were selected to evaluate the capability of a bivariate sigmoid equation to model them. The mathematical functions (logistic combined with Weibull equation) were used in reparameterized form and the effect of inhibitor concentrations on kinetic parameters from logistic equation were perfectly defined and explained. The surfaces of data were accurately described by proposed model and the presented analysis characterized the inhibitory influence on the protein aggregation by several chemicals. Discrimination between true and apparent inhibitors was also confirmed by the bivariate equation. EGCG for insulin (working at pH = 7.4/T = 37°C) and taiwaniaflavone for Aβ42 were the compounds studied that shown the greatest inhibition capacity. Conclusions An accurate, simple and effective model to investigate the inhibition of chemicals on amyloid protein aggregation has been developed. The equation could be useful for the clear quantification of inhibitor potential of chemicals and rigorous comparison among them. PMID:24572069

  10. 4D Imaging of Protein Aggregation in Live Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kaganovich, Daniel

    2013-01-01

    One of the key tasks of any living cell is maintaining the proper folding of newly synthesized proteins in the face of ever-changing environmental conditions and an intracellular environment that is tightly packed, sticky, and hazardous to protein stability1. The ability to dynamically balance protein production, folding and degradation demands highly-specialized quality control machinery, whose absolute necessity is observed best when it malfunctions. Diseases such as ALS, Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and certain forms of Cystic Fibrosis have a direct link to protein folding quality control components2, and therefore future therapeutic development requires a basic understanding of underlying processes. Our experimental challenge is to understand how cells integrate damage signals and mount responses that are tailored to diverse circumstances. The primary reason why protein misfolding represents an existential threat to the cell is the propensity of incorrectly folded proteins to aggregate, thus causing a global perturbation of the crowded and delicate intracellular folding environment1. The folding health, or "proteostasis," of the cellular proteome is maintained, even under the duress of aging, stress and oxidative damage, by the coordinated action of different mechanistic units in an elaborate quality control system3,4. A specialized machinery of molecular chaperones can bind non-native polypeptides and promote their folding into the native state1, target them for degradation by the ubiquitin-proteasome system5, or direct them to protective aggregation inclusions6-9. In eukaryotes, the cytosolic aggregation quality control load is partitioned between two compartments8-10: the juxtanuclear quality control compartment (JUNQ) and the insoluble protein deposit (IPOD) (Figure 1 - model). Proteins that are ubiquitinated by the protein folding quality control machinery are delivered to the JUNQ, where they are processed for degradation by the proteasome. Misfolded

  11. Pathophysiology of protein aggregation and extended phenotyping in filaminopathy

    PubMed Central

    Serdaroglu-Oflazer, Piraye; Leber, Yvonne; Odgerel, Zagaa; van der Ven, Peter F. M.; Olivé, Montse; Ferrer, Isidro; Onipe, Adekunle; Mihaylov, Mariya; Bilbao, Juan M.; Lee, Hee S.; Höhfeld, Jörg; Djinović-Carugo, Kristina; Kong, Kester; Tegenthoff, Martin; Peters, Sören A.; Stenzel, Werner; Vorgerd, Matthias; Goldfarb, Lev G.; Fürst, Dieter O.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in FLNC cause two distinct types of myopathy. Disease associated with mutations in filamin C rod domain leading to expression of a toxic protein presents with progressive proximal muscle weakness and shows focal destructive lesions of polymorphous aggregates containing desmin, myotilin and other proteins in the affected myofibres; these features correspond to the profile of myofibrillar myopathy. The second variant associated with mutations in the actin-binding domain of filamin C is characterized by weakness of distal muscles and morphologically by non-specific myopathic features. A frameshift mutation in the filamin C rod domain causing haploinsufficiency was also found responsible for distal myopathy with some myofibrillar changes but no protein aggregation typical of myofibrillar myopathies. Controversial data accumulating in the literature require re-evaluation and comparative analysis of phenotypes associated with the position of the FLNC mutation and investigation of the underlying disease mechanisms. This is relevant and necessary for the refinement of diagnostic criteria and developing therapeutic approaches. We identified a p.W2710X mutation in families originating from ethnically diverse populations and re-evaluated a family with a p.V930_T933del mutation. Analysis of the expanded database allows us to refine clinical and myopathological characteristics of myofibrillar myopathy caused by mutations in the rod domain of filamin C. Biophysical and biochemical studies indicate that certain pathogenic mutations in FLNC cause protein misfolding, which triggers aggregation of the mutant filamin C protein and subsequently involves several other proteins. Immunofluorescence analyses using markers for the ubiquitin–proteasome system and autophagy reveal that the affected muscle fibres react to protein aggregate formation with a highly increased expression of chaperones and proteins involved in proteasomal protein degradation and autophagy. However

  12. Exposure to selenomethionine causes selenocysteine misincorporation and protein aggregation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Plateau, Pierre; Saveanu, Cosmin; Lestini, Roxane; Dauplais, Marc; Decourty, Laurence; Jacquier, Alain; Blanquet, Sylvain; Lazard, Myriam

    2017-01-01

    Selenomethionine, a dietary supplement with beneficial health effects, becomes toxic if taken in excess. To gain insight into the mechanisms of action of selenomethionine, we screened a collection of ≈5900 Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutants for sensitivity or resistance to growth-limiting amounts of the compound. Genes involved in protein degradation and synthesis were enriched in the obtained datasets, suggesting that selenomethionine causes a proteotoxic stress. We demonstrate that selenomethionine induces an accumulation of protein aggregates by a mechanism that requires de novo protein synthesis. Reduction of translation rates was accompanied by a decrease of protein aggregation and of selenomethionine toxicity. Protein aggregation was supressed in a ∆cys3 mutant unable to synthetize selenocysteine, suggesting that aggregation results from the metabolization of selenomethionine to selenocysteine followed by translational incorporation in the place of cysteine. In support of this mechanism, we were able to detect random substitutions of cysteinyl residues by selenocysteine in a reporter protein. Our results reveal a novel mechanism of toxicity that may have implications in higher eukaryotes. PMID:28303947

  13. Failure of RQC machinery causes protein aggregation and proteotoxic stress.

    PubMed

    Choe, Young-Jun; Park, Sae-Hun; Hassemer, Timm; Körner, Roman; Vincenz-Donnelly, Lisa; Hayer-Hartl, Manajit; Hartl, F Ulrich

    2016-03-10

    Translation of messenger RNAs lacking a stop codon results in the addition of a carboxy-terminal poly-lysine tract to the nascent polypeptide, causing ribosome stalling. Non-stop proteins and other stalled nascent chains are recognized by the ribosome quality control (RQC) machinery and targeted for proteasomal degradation. Failure of this process leads to neurodegeneration by unknown mechanisms. Here we show that deletion of the E3 ubiquitin ligase Ltn1p in yeast, a key RQC component, causes stalled proteins to form detergent-resistant aggregates and inclusions. Aggregation is dependent on a C-terminal alanine/threonine tail that is added to stalled polypeptides by the RQC component, Rqc2p. Formation of inclusions additionally requires the poly-lysine tract present in non-stop proteins. The aggregates sequester multiple cytosolic chaperones and thereby interfere with general protein quality control pathways. These findings can explain the proteotoxicity of ribosome-stalled polypeptides and demonstrate the essential role of the RQC in maintaining proteostasis.

  14. Mechanisms of protein stabilization and prevention of protein aggregation by glycerol.

    PubMed

    Vagenende, Vincent; Yap, Miranda G S; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2009-11-24

    The stability of proteins in aqueous solution is routinely enhanced by cosolvents such as glycerol. Glycerol is known to shift the native protein ensemble to more compact states. Glycerol also inhibits protein aggregation during the refolding of many proteins. However, mechanistic insight into protein stabilization and prevention of protein aggregation by glycerol is still lacking. In this study, we derive mechanisms of glycerol-induced protein stabilization by combining the thermodynamic framework of preferential interactions with molecular-level insight into solvent-protein interactions gained from molecular simulations. Contrary to the common conception that preferential hydration of proteins in polyol/water mixtures is determined by the molecular size of the polyol and the surface area of the protein, we present evidence that preferential hydration of proteins in glycerol/water mixtures mainly originates from electrostatic interactions that induce orientations of glycerol molecules at the protein surface such that glycerol is further excluded. These interactions shift the native protein toward more compact conformations. Moreover, glycerol preferentially interacts with large patches of contiguous hydrophobicity where glycerol acts as an amphiphilic interface between the hydrophobic surface and the polar solvent. Accordingly, we propose that glycerol prevents protein aggregation by inhibiting protein unfolding and by stabilizing aggregation-prone intermediates through preferential interactions with hydrophobic surface regions that favor amphiphilic interface orientations of glycerol. These mechanisms agree well with experimental data available in the literature, and we discuss the extent to which these mechanisms apply to other cosolvents, including polyols, arginine, and urea.

  15. Benchtop Detection of Proteins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scardelletti, Maximilian C.; Varaljay, Vanessa

    2007-01-01

    A process, and a benchtop-scale apparatus for implementing the process, have been developed to detect proteins associated with specific microbes in water. The process and apparatus may also be useful for detection of proteins in other, more complex liquids. There may be numerous potential applications, including monitoring lakes and streams for contamination, testing of blood and other bodily fluids in medical laboratories, and testing for microbial contamination of liquids in restaurants and industrial food-processing facilities. A sample can be prepared and analyzed by use of this process and apparatus within minutes, whereas an equivalent analysis performed by use of other processes and equipment can often take hours to days. The process begins with the conjugation of near-infrared-fluorescent dyes to antibodies that are specific to a particular protein. Initially, the research has focused on using near-infrared dyes to detect antigens or associated proteins in solution, which has proven successful vs. microbial cells, and streamlining the technique in use for surface protein detection on microbes would theoretically render similar results. However, it is noted that additional work is needed to transition protein-based techniques to microbial cell detection. Consequently, multiple such dye/antibody pairs could be prepared to enable detection of multiple selected microbial species, using a different dye for each species. When excited by near-infrared light of a suitable wavelength, each dye fluoresces at a unique longer wavelength that differs from those of the other dyes, enabling discrimination among the various species. In initial tests, the dye/antibody pairs are mixed into a solution suspected of containing the selected proteins, causing the binding of the dye/antibody pairs to such suspect proteins that may be present. The solution is then run through a microcentrifuge that includes a membrane that acts as a filter in that it retains the dye/antibody/protein

  16. Protein disulphide isomerase protects against protein aggregation and is S-nitrosylated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Walker, Adam K; Farg, Manal A; Bye, Chris R; McLean, Catriona A; Horne, Malcolm K; Atkin, Julie D

    2010-01-01

    amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Using a biotin switch assay, we detected increased levels of S-nitrosylated protein disulphide isomerase in transgenic mutant superoxide dismutase 1 mouse and human sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis spinal cord tissues. Hence, despite upregulation, protein disulphide isomerase is also functionally inactivated in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, which may prevent its normal protective function and contribute to disease. We also found that a small molecule mimic of the protein disulphide isomerase active site, (+/-)-trans-1,2-bis(mercaptoacetamido)cyclohexane, protected against mutant superoxide dismutase 1 inclusion formation. These studies reveal that endoplasmic reticulum stress is important in the formation of mutant superoxide dismutase 1 inclusions, and protein disulphide isomerase has an important function in ameliorating mutant superoxide dismutase 1 aggregation and toxicity. Functional inhibition of protein disulphide isomerase by S-nitrosylation may contribute to pathophysiology in both mutant superoxide dismutase 1-linked disease and sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Protein disulphide isomerase is therefore a novel potential therapeutic target in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and (+/-)-trans-1,2-bis(mercaptoacetamido)cyclohexane and other molecular mimics of protein disulphide isomerase could be of benefit in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis and other neurodegenerative diseases related to protein misfolding.

  17. Computational Simulations of the Early Steps of Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Guanghong; Mousseau, Normand

    2007-01-01

    There is strong evidence that the oligomers of key proteins, formed during the early steps of aggregation, could be the primary toxic species associated with human neurodegenerative diseases, such as Alzheimer's and prion diseases. Here, we review recent progress in the development of computational approaches in order to understand the structures, dynamics and free energy surfaces of oligomers. We also discuss possible research directions for the coming years. PMID:19164927

  18. A Protein Aggregation Based Test for Screening of the Agents Affecting Thermostability of Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Eronina, Tatyana; Borzova, Vera; Maloletkina, Olga; Kleymenov, Sergey; Asryants, Regina; Markossian, Kira; Kurganov, Boris

    2011-01-01

    To search for agents affecting thermal stability of proteins, a test based on the registration of protein aggregation in the regime of heating with a constant rate was used. The initial parts of the dependences of the light scattering intensity (I) on temperature (T) were analyzed using the following empiric equation: I = Kagg(T−T0)2, where Kagg is the parameter characterizing the initial rate of aggregation and T0 is a temperature at which the initial increase in the light scattering intensity is registered. The aggregation data are interpreted in the frame of the model assuming the formation of the start aggregates at the initial stages of the aggregation process. Parameter T0 corresponds to the moment of the origination of the start aggregates. The applicability of the proposed approach was demonstrated on the examples of thermal aggregation of glycogen phosphorylase b from rabbit skeletal muscles and bovine liver glutamate dehydrogenase studied in the presence of agents of different chemical nature. The elaborated approach to the study of protein aggregation may be used for rapid identification of small molecules that interact with protein targets. PMID:21760963

  19. The ER Stress Surveillance (ERSU) pathway regulates daughter cell ER protein aggregate inheritance.

    PubMed

    Piña, Francisco J; Niwa, Maho

    2015-09-01

    Stress induced by cytoplasmic protein aggregates can have deleterious consequences for the cell, contributing to neurodegeneration and other diseases. Protein aggregates are also formed within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), although the fate of ER protein aggregates, specifically during cell division, is not well understood. By simultaneous visualization of both the ER itself and ER protein aggregates, we found that ER protein aggregates that induce ER stress are retained in the mother cell by activation of the ER Stress Surveillance (ERSU) pathway, which prevents inheritance of stressed ER. In contrast, under conditions of normal ER inheritance, ER protein aggregates can enter the daughter cell. Thus, whereas cytoplasmic protein aggregates are retained in the mother cell to protect the functional capacity of daughter cells, the fate of ER protein aggregates is determined by whether or not they activate the ERSU pathway to impede transmission of the cortical ER during the cell cycle.

  20. Confocal Spectroscopy to Study Dimerization, Oligomerization and Aggregation of Proteins: A Practical Guide.

    PubMed

    Gambin, Yann; Polinkovsky, Mark; Francois, Bill; Giles, Nichole; Bhumkar, Akshay; Sierecki, Emma

    2016-04-30

    Protein self-association is a key feature that can modulate the physiological role of proteins or lead to deleterious effects when uncontrolled. Protein oligomerization is a simple way to modify the activity of a protein, as the modulation of binding interfaces allows for self-activation or inhibition, or variation in the selectivity of binding partners. As such, dimerization and higher order oligomerization is a common feature in signaling proteins, for example, and more than 70% of enzymes have the potential to self-associate. On the other hand, protein aggregation can overcome the regulatory mechanisms of the cell and can have disastrous physiological effects. This is the case in a number of neurodegenerative diseases, where proteins, due to mutation or dysregulation later in life, start polymerizing and often fibrillate, leading to the creation of protein inclusion bodies in cells. Dimerization, well-defined oligomerization and random aggregation are often difficult to differentiate and characterize experimentally. Single molecule "counting" methods are particularly well suited to the study of self-oligomerization as they allow observation and quantification of behaviors in heterogeneous conditions. However, the extreme dilution of samples often causes weak complexes to dissociate, and rare events can be overlooked. Here, we discuss a straightforward alternative where the principles of single molecule detection are used at higher protein concentrations to quantify oligomers and aggregates in a background of monomers. We propose a practical guide for the use of confocal spectroscopy to quantify protein oligomerization status and also discuss about its use in monitoring changes in protein aggregation in drug screening assays.

  1. Natural biomolecules and protein aggregation: emerging strategies against amyloidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Sgarbossa, Antonella

    2012-12-14

    Biomolecular self-assembly is a fundamental process in all organisms. As primary components of the life molecular machinery, proteins have a vast array of resources available to them for self-assembly in a functional structure. Protein self-assembly, however, can also occur in an aberrant way, giving rise to non-native aggregated structures responsible for severe, progressive human diseases that have a serious social impact. Different neurodegenerative disorders, like Huntington's, Alzheimer's, and spongiform encephalopathy diseases, have in common the presence of insoluble protein aggregates, generally termed "amyloid," that share several physicochemical features: a fibrillar morphology, a predominantly beta-sheet secondary structure, birefringence upon staining with the dye Congo red, insolubility in common solvents and detergents, and protease resistance. Conformational constrains, hydrophobic and stacking interactions can play a key role in the fibrillogenesis process and protein-protein and peptide-peptide interactions-resulting in self-assembly phenomena of peptides yielding fibrils-that can be modulated and influenced by natural biomolecules. Small organic molecules, which possess both hydrophilic and hydrophobic moieties able to bind to peptide/protein molecules through hydrogen bonds and hydrophobic and aromatic interactions, are potential candidates against amyloidogenesis. In this review some significant case examples will be critically discussed.

  2. Oligomeric and polymeric aggregates formed by proteins containing expanded polyglutamine

    PubMed Central

    Iuchi, S.; Hoffner, G.; Verbeke, P.; Djian, P.; Green, H.

    2003-01-01

    Neurological diseases resulting from proteins containing expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) are characteristically associated with insoluble neuronal inclusions, usually intranuclear, and neuronal death. We describe here oligomeric and polymeric aggregates formed in cells by expanded polyQ. These aggregates are not dissociated by concentrated formic acid, an extremely effective solvent for otherwise insoluble proteins. Perinuclear inclusions formed in cultured cells by expanded polyQ can be completely dissolved in concentrated formic acid, but a soluble protein oligomer containing the expanded polyQ and released by the formic acid is not dissociated to monomer. In Huntington's disease, a formic acid-resistant oligomer is present in cerebral cortex, but not in cerebellum. Cortical nuclei contain a polymeric aggregate of expanded polyQ that is insoluble in formic acid, does not enter polyacrylamide gels, but is retained on filters. This finding shows that the process of polymerization is more advanced in the cerebral cortex than in cultured cells. The resistance of oligomer and polymer to formic acid suggests the participation of covalent bonds in their stabilization. PMID:12591956

  3. A polymer physics perspective on driving forces and mechanisms for protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Pappu, Rohit V; Wang, Xiaoling; Vitalis, Andreas; Crick, Scott L

    2008-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a commonly occurring problem in biology. Cells have evolved stress-response mechanisms to cope with problems posed by protein aggregation. Yet, these quality control mechanisms are overwhelmed by chronic aggregation-related stress and the resultant consequences of aggregation become toxic to cells. As a result, a variety of systemic and neurodegenerative diseases are associated with various aspects of protein aggregation and rational approaches to either inhibit aggregation or manipulate the pathways to aggregation might lead to an alleviation of disease phenotypes. To develop such approaches, one needs a rigorous and quantitative understanding of protein aggregation. Much work has been done in this area. However, several unanswered questions linger, and these pertain primarily to the actual mechanism of aggregation as well as to the types of inter-molecular associations and intramolecular fluctuations realized at low protein concentrations. It has been suggested that the concepts underlying protein aggregation are similar to those used to describe the aggregation of synthetic polymers. Following this suggestion, the relevant concepts of polymer aggregation are introduced. The focus is on explaining the driving forces for polymer aggregation and how these driving forces vary with chain length and solution conditions. It is widely accepted that protein aggregation is a nucleation-dependent process. This view is based mainly on the presence of long times for the accumulation of aggregates and the elimination of these lag times with "seeds". In this sense, protein aggregation is viewed as being analogous to the aggregation of colloidal particles. The theories for polymer aggregation reviewed in this work suggest an alternative mechanism for the origin of long lag times in protein aggregation. The proposed mechanism derives from the recognition that polymers have unique dynamics that distinguish them from other aggregation-prone systems such as

  4. A polymer physics perspective on driving forces and mechanisms for protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Pappu, Rohit V.; Wang, Xiaoling; Vitalis, Andreas; Crick, Scott L.

    2008-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a commonly occurring problem in biology. Cells have evolved stress-response mechanisms to cope with problems posed by protein aggregation. Yet, these quality control mechanisms are overwhelmed by chronic aggregation-related stress and the resultant consequences of aggregation become toxic to cells. As a result, a variety of systemic and neurodegenerative diseases are associated with various aspects of protein aggregation and rational approaches to either inhibit aggregation or manipulate the pathways to aggregation might lead to an alleviation of disease phenotypes. To develop such approaches, one needs a rigorous and quantitative understanding of protein aggregation. Much work has been done in this area. However, several unanswered questions linger, and these pertain primarily to the actual mechanism of aggregation as well as to the types of intermolecular associations and intramolecular fluctuations realized at low protein concentrations. It has been suggested that the concepts underlying protein aggregation are similar to those used to describe the aggregation of synthetic polymers. Following this suggestion, the relevant concepts of polymer aggregation are introduced. The focus is on explaining the driving forces for polymer aggregation and how these driving forces vary with chain length and solution conditions. It is widely accepted that protein aggregation is a nucleation-dependent process. This view is based mainly on the presence of long times for the accumulation of aggregates and the elimination of these lag times with “seeds”. In this sense, protein aggregation is viewed as being analogous to the aggregation of colloidal particles. The theories for polymer aggregation reviewed in this work suggest an alternative mechanism for the origin of long lag times in protein aggregation. The proposed mechanism derives from the recognition that polymers have unique dynamics that distinguish them from other aggregation-prone systems such

  5. Distinct stress conditions result in aggregation of proteins with similar properties

    PubMed Central

    Weids, Alan J.; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Tamás, Markus J.; Grant, Chris M.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is the abnormal association of proteins into larger aggregate structures which tend to be insoluble. This occurs during normal physiological conditions and in response to age or stress-induced protein misfolding and denaturation. In this present study we have defined the range of proteins that aggregate in yeast cells during normal growth and after exposure to stress conditions including an oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide), a heavy metal stress (arsenite) and an amino acid analogue (azetidine-2-carboxylic acid). Our data indicate that these three stress conditions, which work by distinct mechanisms, promote the aggregation of similar types of proteins probably by lowering the threshold of protein aggregation. The proteins that aggregate during physiological conditions and stress share several features; however, stress conditions shift the criteria for protein aggregation propensity. This suggests that the proteins in aggregates are intrinsically aggregation-prone, rather than being proteins which are affected in a stress-specific manner. We additionally identified significant overlaps between stress aggregating yeast proteins and proteins that aggregate during ageing in yeast and C. elegans. We suggest that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings and that the factors and components that control protein aggregation may be evolutionary conserved. PMID:27086931

  6. Distinct stress conditions result in aggregation of proteins with similar properties.

    PubMed

    Weids, Alan J; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Tamás, Markus J; Grant, Chris M

    2016-04-18

    Protein aggregation is the abnormal association of proteins into larger aggregate structures which tend to be insoluble. This occurs during normal physiological conditions and in response to age or stress-induced protein misfolding and denaturation. In this present study we have defined the range of proteins that aggregate in yeast cells during normal growth and after exposure to stress conditions including an oxidative stress (hydrogen peroxide), a heavy metal stress (arsenite) and an amino acid analogue (azetidine-2-carboxylic acid). Our data indicate that these three stress conditions, which work by distinct mechanisms, promote the aggregation of similar types of proteins probably by lowering the threshold of protein aggregation. The proteins that aggregate during physiological conditions and stress share several features; however, stress conditions shift the criteria for protein aggregation propensity. This suggests that the proteins in aggregates are intrinsically aggregation-prone, rather than being proteins which are affected in a stress-specific manner. We additionally identified significant overlaps between stress aggregating yeast proteins and proteins that aggregate during ageing in yeast and C. elegans. We suggest that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings and that the factors and components that control protein aggregation may be evolutionary conserved.

  7. Tom40 protein import channel binds to non-native proteins and prevents their aggregation.

    PubMed

    Esaki, Masatoshi; Kanamori, Takashi; Nishikawa, Shuh-ichi; Shin, Injae; Schultz, Peter G; Endo, Toshiya

    2003-12-01

    Mitochondria contain the translocator of the outer mitochondrial membrane (TOM) for protein entry into the organelle, and its subunit Tom40 forms a protein-conducting channel. Here we report the role of Tom40 in protein translocation across the membrane. The site-specific photocrosslinking experiment revealed that translocating unfolded or loosely folded precursor segments of up to 90 residues can be associated with Tom40. Purified Tom40 bound to non-native proteins and suppressed their aggregation when they are prone to aggregate. A denatured protein bound to the Tom40 channel blocked the protein import into mitochondria. These results indicate that, in contrast to the nonstick tunnel of the ribosome for polypeptide exit, the Tom40 channel offers an optimized environment to translocating non-native precursor proteins by preventing their aggregation.

  8. Detection and quantification of tau aggregation using a membrane filter assay.

    PubMed

    Chang, Edward; Kuret, Jeff

    2008-02-15

    Aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau contributes to the formation of neurofibrillary lesions in Alzheimer's disease and is a useful marker of disease progression. Although filter trap assays have been employed to assess the extent of tau aggregation in cells and tissues as well as in vitro, their performance relative to other assay modalities has not been reported. To clarify this issue, the ability of the filter trap approach to quantify aggregation of purified recombinant full-length tau protein in vitro was examined as a function of membrane chemistry in a 96-well format. Results showed that nitrocellulose yielded the greatest assay sensitivity relative to polyvinylidene fluoride or cellulose acetate at equal membrane porosity. However, all combinations of filter chemistries, porosities, and monoclonal detection antibodies yielded nonlinear correlations between signal intensity and analyte concentration. When corrected for nonlinearity, the filter trap assay determined a value for the critical monomer concentration for tau aggregation that was statistically identical to determinations made by electron microscopy assay. The data suggest conditions under which filter trap assays can be used to estimate tau aggregation kinetics.

  9. Thermal denaturation of Bungarus fasciatus acetylcholinesterase: Is aggregation a driving force in protein unfolding?

    PubMed Central

    Shin, I.; Wachtel, E.; Roth, E.; Bon, C.; Silman, I.; Weiner, L.

    2002-01-01

    A monomeric form of acetylcholinesterase from the venom of Bungarus fasciatus is converted to a partially unfolded molten globule species by thermal inactivation, and subsequently aggregates rapidly. To separate the kinetics of unfolding from those of aggregation, single molecules of the monomeric enzyme were encapsulated in reverse micelles of Brij 30 in 2,2,4-trimethylpentane, or in large unilamellar vesicles of egg lecithin/cholesterol at various protein/micelle (vesicle) ratios. The first-order rate constant for thermal inactivation at 45°C, of single molecules entrapped within the reverse micelles (0.031 min−1), was higher than in aqueous solution (0.007 min−1) or in the presence of normal micelles (0.020 min−1). This clearly shows that aggregation does not provide the driving force for thermal inactivation of BfAChE. Within the large unilamellar vesicles, at average protein/vesicle ratios of 1:1 and 10:1, the first-order rate constants for thermal inactivation of the encapsulated monomeric acetylcholinesterase, at 53°C, were 0.317 and 0.342 min−1, respectively. A crosslinking technique, utilizing the photosensitive probe, hypericin, showed that thermal denaturation produces a distribution of species ranging from dimers through to large aggregates. Consequently, at a protein/vesicle ratio of 10:1, aggregation can occur upon thermal denaturation. Thus, these experiments also demonstrate that aggregation does not drive the thermal unfolding of Bungarus fasciatus acetylcholinesterase. Our experimental approach also permitted monitoring of recovery of enzymic activity after thermal denaturation in the absence of a competing aggregation process. Whereas no detectable recovery of enzymic activity could be observed in aqueous solution, up to 23% activity could be obtained for enzyme sequestered in the reverse micelles. PMID:12142456

  10. A multi-dimensional Structure-Activity Relationship of a protein in its aggregated states

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Schubert, David; Sawaya, Michael R.; Eisenberg, David; Riek, Roland

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregates are both associated with disease and function. Because a variety of factors induce protein aggregation, a given protein can aggregate into different states. Here, we compare the structures and activities of five distinct protein aggregates of a single protein. Despite the diverse chemical, physical and biological treatments used to induce aggregation, all aggregate types contain the cross-β-sheet motif. However, they are structurally distinct, having different segments of the protein sequence involved in secondary structure formation. Because of these structural differences each aggregate has a unique set of properties. These include affinity to ATP, Thioflavin T, DNA, and membrane mimics, and interference with cell viability. The key to their multiple properties may be that the repetitive nature of the cross-β-sheet motif guarantees for many potent activities through cooperativity. The observed multidimensional structure-activity relationship of protein aggregates may be important for amyloid diseases but may also be advantageous in nanotechnology. PMID:20397175

  11. Probing Proteins and Differentiating Their Native and Denatured States with Aggregation-Induced Emission Fluorogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Chris Wai Tung; Hong, Yuning; Tang, Ben Zhong

    2013-06-01

    The tertiary 3D structures of proteins determine their unique functions. Perturbation of their native state including denaturation may cause loss of the protein functions. In this work, water-soluble tetraphenylethylene (TPE) fluorophore, sodium 1,2-bis[4-(3-sulfonatopropoxyl)phenyl]-1,2-diphenylethene (BSPOTPE), with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) characteristics is utilized as a fluorescent probe for protein detection and for differentiating their folding modes. Owing to hydrophobic interaction between the proteins and BSPOTPE, it provides a fast and simple method to differentiate the native and denatured states of the proteins through monitoring fluorescence change in solution and PAGE gels. Six proteins are chosen as model proteins in the study. Among them, cytochrome c shows distinctive behavior to other proteins due to the presence of heme group. A comprehensive study of cytochrome c and human serum albumin is carried out in this work.

  12. Bacillus thuringiensis Cyt2Aa2 toxin disrupts cell membranes by forming large protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Tharad, Sudarat; Toca-Herrera, José L.; Promdonkoy, Boonhiang; Krittanai, Chartchai

    2016-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis (Bt) Cyt2Aa2 showed toxicity against Dipteran insect larvae and in vitro lysis activity on several cells. It has potential applications in the biological control of insect larvae. Although pore-forming and/or detergent-like mechanisms were proposed, the mechanism underlying cytolytic activity remains unclear. Analysis of the haemolytic activity of Cyt2Aa2 with osmotic stabilizers revealed partial toxin inhibition, suggesting a distinctive mechanism from the putative pore formation model. Membrane permeability was studied using fluorescent dye entrapped in large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) at various protein/lipid molar ratios. Binding of Cyt2Aa2 monomer to the lipid membrane did not disturb membrane integrity until the critical protein/lipid molar ratio was reached, when Cyt2Aa2 complexes and cytolytic activity were detected. The complexes are large aggregates that appeared as a ladder when separated by agarose gel electrophoresis. Interaction of Cyt2Aa2 with Aedes albopictus cells was investigated by confocal microscopy and total internal reflection fluorescent microscopy (TIRF). The results showed that Cyt2Aa2 binds on the cell membrane at an early stage without cell membrane disruption. Protein aggregation on the cell membrane was detected later which coincided with cell swelling. Cyt2Aa2 aggregations on supported lipid bilayers (SLBs) were visualized by AFM. The AFM topographic images revealed Cyt2Aa2 aggregates on the lipid bilayer at low protein concentration and subsequently disrupts the lipid bilayer by forming a lesion as the protein concentration increased. These results supported the mechanism whereby Cyt2Aa2 binds and aggregates on the lipid membrane leading to the formation of non-specific hole and disruption of the cell membrane. PMID:27612497

  13. Amyloid Aggregation and Membrane Disruption by Amyloid Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2013-03-01

    Amyloidogenesis has been the focus of intense basic and clinical research, as an increasing number of amyloidogenic proteins have been linked to common and incurable degenerative diseases including Alzheimer's, type II diabetes, and Parkinson's. Recent studies suggest that the cell toxicity is mainly due to intermediates generated during the assembly process of amyloid fibers, which have been proposed to attack cells in a variety of ways. Disruption of cell membranes is believed to be one of the key components of amyloid toxicity. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is not fully understood. Our research in this area is focused on the investigation of the early events in the aggregation and membrane disruption of amyloid proteins, Islet amyloid polypeptide protein (IAPP, also known as amylin) and amyloid-beta peptide, on the molecular level. Structural insights into the mechanisms of membrane disruption by these amyloid proteins and the role of membrane components on the membrane disruption will be presented.

  14. F-box protein 7 mutations promote protein aggregation in mitochondria and inhibit mitophagy.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi Dong; Xie, Shao Ping; Sathiyamoorthy, Sushmitha; Saw, Wuan Ting; Sing, Tan Ye; Ng, Shin Hui; Chua, Heidi Pek Hup; Tang, Alyssa Mei Yan; Shaffra, Fathima; Li, Zeng; Wang, Hongyan; Ho, Patrick Ghim Hoe; Lai, Mitchell Kim Peng; Angeles, Dario C; Lim, Tit Meng; Tan, Eng-King

    2015-11-15

    The mutations of F-box protein 7 (FBXO7) gene (T22M, R378G and R498X) are associated with a severe form of autosomal recessive juvenile-onset Parkinson's disease (PD) (PARK 15). Here we demonstrated that wild-type (WT) FBXO7 is a stress response protein and it can play both cytoprotective and neurotoxic roles. The WT FBXO7 protein is vital to cell mitophagy and can facilitate mitophagy to protect cells, whereas mutant FBXO7 inhibits mitophagy. Upon stress, the endogenous WT FBXO7 gets up-regulated, concentrates into mitochondria and forms FBXO7 aggregates in mitochondria. However, FBXO7 mutations aggravate deleterious FBXO7 aggregation in mitochondria. The FBXO7 aggregation and toxicity can be alleviated by Proline, glutathione (GSH) and coenzyme Q10, whereas deleterious FBXO7 aggregation in mitochondria can be aggravated by prohibitin 1 (PHB1), a mitochondrial protease inhibitor. The overexpression of WT FBXO7 could lead to FBXO7 protein aggregation and dopamine neuron degeneration in transgenic Drosophila heads. The elevated FBXO7 expression and aggregation were identified in human fibroblast cells from PD patients. FBXO7 can also form aggregates in brains of PD and Alzheimer's disease. Our study provides novel pathophysiologic insights and suggests that FBXO7 may be a potential therapeutic target in FBXO7-linked neuron degeneration in PD.

  15. Protein engineering to stabilize soluble amyloid β-protein aggregates for structural and functional studies.

    PubMed

    Härd, Torleif

    2011-10-01

    The molecular biology underlying protein aggregation and neuronal death in Alzheimer's disease is not yet completely understood, but small soluble nonamyloid aggregates of the amyloid β-protein (Aβ) have been shown to play a fundamental neurotoxic role. The composition and biological action of such aggregates, known as oligomers and protofibrils, are therefore areas of intense study. However, research is complicated by the multitude of different interconverting aggregates that Aβ can form in vitro and in vivo, and by the inhomogeneity and instability of in vitro preparations. Here we review recent studies in which protein engineering, and in particular disulfide engineering, has been applied to stabilize different Aβ aggregates. For example, several techniques now exist to obtain stable and neurotoxic protofibrillar forms of Aβ, and engineered Aβ dimers, or larger aggregates formed by these, have been shown to specifically induce neuronal damage in a way that mimics Alzheimer's disease pathology. Disulfide engineering has also revealed structural properties of neurotoxic aggregates, for instance that Aβ in protofibrils and globular oligomers adopts a β-hairpin conformation that is similar to, but topologically distinct from, the conformation of Aβ in mature amyloid fibrils. Protein engineering is therefore a workable strategy to address many of the outstanding questions relating to the structure, interconversion and biological effects of oligomers and protofibrils of Aβ.

  16. Self-Templated Nucleation in Peptide and Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auer, Stefan; Dobson, Christopher M.; Vendruscolo, Michele; Maritan, Amos

    2008-12-01

    Peptides and proteins exhibit a common tendency to assemble into highly ordered fibrillar aggregates, whose formation proceeds in a nucleation-dependent manner that is often preceded by the formation of oligomeric assemblies. This process has received much attention because disordered oligomeric aggregates have been associated with neurodegenerative disorders such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease. Here we describe a self-templated nucleation mechanism that determines the transition between the initial condensation of polypeptide chains into disordered assemblies and their reordering into fibrillar structures. The results that we present show that at the molecular level this transition is due to the ability of polypeptide chains to reorder within oligomers into fibrillar assemblies whose surfaces act as templates that stabilize the disordered assemblies.

  17. Designed protein aggregates entrapping carbon nanotubes for bioelectrochemical oxygen reduction.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Kristen E; Babanova, Sofia; Scheffler, William; Hans, Mansij; Baker, David; Atanassov, Plamen; Banta, Scott

    2016-11-01

    The engineering of robust protein/nanomaterial interfaces is critical in the development of bioelectrocatalytic systems. We have used computational protein design to identify two amino acid mutations in the small laccase protein (SLAC) from Streptomyces coelicolor to introduce new inter-protein disulfide bonds. The new dimeric interface introduced by these disulfide bonds in combination with the natural trimeric structure drive the self-assembly of SLAC into functional aggregates. The mutations had a minimal effect on kinetic parameters, and the enzymatic assemblies exhibited an increased resistance to irreversible thermal denaturation. The SLAC assemblies were combined with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs), and explored for use in oxygen reduction electrodes. The incorporation of SWNTs into the SLAC aggregates enabled operation at an elevated temperature and reduced the reaction overpotential. A current density of 1.1 mA/cm(2) at 0 V versus Ag/AgCl was achieved in an air-breathing cathode system. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 2321-2327. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Orthogonal cross-seeding: an approach to explore protein aggregates in living cells.

    PubMed

    Hinz, Justyna; Gierasch, Lila M; Ignatova, Zoya

    2008-04-08

    Protein aggregation is associated with the pathology of many diseases, especially neurodegenerative diseases. A variety of structurally polymorphic aggregates or preaggregates including amyloid fibrils is accessible to any aggregating protein. Preaggregates are now believed to be the toxic culprits in pathologies rather than mature aggregates. Although clearly valuable, understanding the mechanism of formation and the structural characteristics of these prefibrillar species is currently lacking. We report here a simple new approach to map the nature of the aggregate core of transient aggregated species directly in the cell. The method is conceptually based on the highly discriminating ability of aggregates to recruit new monomeric species with equivalent molecular structure. Different soluble segments comprising parts of an amyloidogenic protein were transiently pulse-expressed in a tightly controlled, time-dependent manner along with the parent aggregating full-length protein, and their recruitment into the insoluble aggregate was monitored immunochemically. We used this approach to determine the nature of the aggregate core of the metastable aggregate species formed during the course of aggregation of a chimera containing a long polyglutamine repeat tract in a bacterial host. Strikingly, we found that different segments of the full-length protein dominated the aggregate core at different times during the course of aggregation. In its simplicity, the approach is also potentially amenable to screen also for compounds that can reshape the aggregate core and induce the formation of alternative nonamyloidogenic species.

  19. Protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and neuronal cell death in a murine model of multiple sclerosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dasgupta, Anushka

    Many studies have suggested that oxidative stress plays an important role in the pathophysiology of both multiple sclerosis (MS) and its animal model experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE). Yet, the mechanism by which oxidative stress leads to tissue damage in these disorders is unclear. Recent work from our laboratory has revealed that protein carbonylation, a major oxidative modification caused by severe and/or chronic oxidative stress conditions, is elevated in MS and EAE. Furthermore, protein carbonylation has been shown to alter protein structure leading to misfolding/aggregation. These findings prompted me to hypothesize that carbonylated proteins, formed as a consequence of oxidative stress and/or decreased proteasomal activity, promote protein aggregation to mediate neuronal apoptosis in vitro and in EAE. To test this novel hypothesis, I first characterized protein carbonylation, protein aggregation and apoptosis along the spinal cord during the course of myelin-oligodendrocyte glycoprotein (MOG)35-55 peptide-induced EAE in C57BL/6 mice [Chapter 2]. The results show that carbonylated proteins accumulate throughout the course of the disease, albeit by different mechanisms: increased oxidative stress in acute EAE and decreased proteasomal activity in chronic EAE. I discovered not only that there is a temporal correlation between protein carbonylation and apoptosis but also that carbonyl levels are significantly higher in apoptotic cells. A high number of juxta-nuclear and cytoplasmic protein aggregates containing the majority of the oxidized proteins are also present during the course of EAE, which seems to be due to reduced autophagy. In chapter 3, I show that when gluthathione levels are reduced to those in EAE spinal cord, both neuron-like PC12 (nPC12) cells and primary neuronal cultures accumulate carbonylated proteins and undergo cell death (both by necrosis and apoptosis). Immunocytochemical and biochemical studies also revealed a temporal

  20. Global analysis of protein aggregation in yeast during physiological conditions and arsenite stress

    PubMed Central

    Ibstedt, Sebastian; Sideri, Theodora C.; Grant, Chris M.; Tamás, Markus J.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Protein aggregation is a widespread phenomenon in cells and associated with pathological conditions. Yet, little is known about the rules that govern protein aggregation in living cells. In this study, we biochemically isolated aggregation-prone proteins and used computational analyses to identify characteristics that are linked to physiological and arsenite-induced aggregation in living yeast cells. High protein abundance, extensive physical interactions, and certain structural properties are positively correlated with an increased aggregation propensity. The aggregated proteins have high translation rates and are substrates of ribosome-associated Hsp70 chaperones, indicating that they are susceptible for aggregation primarily during translation/folding. The aggregation-prone proteins are enriched for multiple chaperone interactions, thus high protein abundance is probably counterbalanced by molecular chaperones to allow soluble expression in vivo. Our data support the notion that arsenite interferes with chaperone activity and indicate that arsenite-aggregated proteins might engage in extensive aberrant protein–protein interactions. Expression of aggregation-prone proteins is down-regulated during arsenite stress, possibly to prevent their toxic accumulation. Several aggregation-prone yeast proteins have human homologues that are implicated in misfolding diseases, suggesting that similar mechanisms may apply in disease- and non-disease settings. PMID:25217615

  1. Sequestration of Ribosome during Protein Aggregate Formation: Contribution of ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Pathak, Bani K.; Mondal, Surojit; Banerjee, Senjuti; Ghosh, Amar Nath; Barat, Chandana

    2017-01-01

    An understanding of the mechanisms underlying protein aggregation and cytotoxicity of the protein aggregates is crucial in the prevention of several diseases in humans. Ribosome, the cellular protein synthesis machine is capable of acting as a protein folding modulator. The peptidyltransferase center residing in the domain V of large ribosomal subunit 23S rRNA is the centre for the protein folding ability of the ribosome and is also the cellular target of several antiprion compounds. Our in vitro studies unexpectedly reveal that the partial unfolding or aggregation of lysozyme under reducing conditions in presence of the ribosome can induce aggregation of ribosomal components. Electrostatic interactions complemented by specific rRNA-protein interaction drive the ribosome-protein aggregation process. Under similar conditions the rRNA, especially the large subunit rRNA and in vitro transcribed RNA corresponding to domain V of 23S rRNA (bDV RNA) stimulates lysozyme aggregation leading to RNA-protein aggregate formation. Protein aggregation during the refolding of non-disulfide containing protein BCAII at high concentrations also induces ribosome aggregation. BCAII aggregation was also stimulated in presence of the large subunit rRNA. Our observations imply that the specific sequestration of the translation machine by aggregating proteins might contribute to their cytotoxicity. PMID:28169307

  2. Interactions of Lipid Membranes with Fibrillar Protein Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna; Trusova, Valeriya; Girych, Mykhailo; Adachi, Emi; Mizuguchi, Chiharu; Saito, Hiroyuki

    2015-01-01

    Amyloid fibrils are an intriguing class of protein aggregates with distinct physicochemical, structural and morphological properties. They display peculiar membrane-binding behavior, thus adding complexity to the problem of protein-lipid interactions. The consensus that emerged during the past decade is that amyloid cytotoxicity arises from a continuum of cross-β-sheet assemblies including mature fibrils. Based on literature survey and our own data, in this chapter we address several aspects of fibril-lipid interactions, including (i) the effects of amyloid assemblies on molecular organization of lipid bilayer; (ii) competition between fibrillar and monomeric membrane-associating proteins for binding to the lipid surface; and (iii) the effects of lipids on the structural morphology of fibrillar aggregates. To illustrate some of the processes occurring in fibril-lipid systems, we present and analyze fluorescence data reporting on lipid bilayer interactions with fibrillar lysozyme and with the N-terminal 83-residue fragment of amyloidogenic mutant apolipoprotein A-I, 1-83/G26R/W@8. The results help understand possible mechanisms of interaction and mutual remodeling of amyloid fibers and lipid membranes, which may contribute to amyloid cytotoxicity.

  3. Widespread Protein Aggregation as an Inherent Part of Aging in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    David, Della C.; Ollikainen, Noah; Trinidad, Jonathan C.; Cary, Michael P.; Burlingame, Alma L.; Kenyon, Cynthia

    2010-01-01

    Aberrant protein aggregation is a hallmark of many age-related diseases, yet little is known about whether proteins aggregate with age in a non-disease setting. Using a systematic proteomics approach, we identified several hundred proteins that become more insoluble with age in the multicellular organism Caenorhabditis elegans. These proteins are predicted to be significantly enriched in β-sheets, which promote disease protein aggregation. Strikingly, these insoluble proteins are highly over-represented in aggregates found in human neurodegeneration. We examined several of these proteins in vivo and confirmed their propensity to aggregate with age. Different proteins aggregated in different tissues and cellular compartments. Protein insolubility and aggregation were significantly delayed or even halted by reduced insulin/IGF-1-signaling, which also slows aging. We found a significant overlap between proteins that become insoluble and proteins that influence lifespan and/or polyglutamine-repeat aggregation. Moreover, overexpressing one aggregating protein enhanced polyglutamine-repeat pathology. Together our findings indicate that widespread protein insolubility and aggregation is an inherent part of aging and that it may influence both lifespan and neurodegenerative disease. PMID:20711477

  4. Opioid peptides derived from food proteins suppress aggregation and promote reactivation of partly unfolded stressed proteins.

    PubMed

    Artemova, N V; Bumagina, Z M; Kasakov, A S; Shubin, V V; Gurvits, B Ya

    2010-02-01

    A new view of the opioid peptides is presented. The potential of small peptides derived from precursor food proteins, to bind to partly unfolded stressed proteins to prevent their irreversible aggregation and inactivation has been demonstrated in various in vitro test systems: dithiothreitol-induced aggregation of alpha-lactalbumin (LA), heat-induced aggregation of alcohol dehydrogenase (ADH), and aggregation and inactivation of bovine erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase (CA) in the process of its refolding after removal of stress conditions. Using dynamic light scattering (DLS), turbidimetry, fluorescence, and circular dichroism measurements protective effects of the synthetic opioid peptides: exorphin C from wheat gluten (Tyr-Pro-Ile-Ser-Leu), rubiscolin-5 from spinach ribulose-bisphosphate-carboxylase/oxygenase (Rubisco) (Tyr-Pro-Leu-Asp-Leu), and hemorphin-6 from bovine hemoglobin (Tyr-Pro-Trp-Thr-Gln-Arg) have been revealed. We have demonstrated the concentration-dependent suppression of light scattering intensity of aggregates of LA and ADH in the presence of the peptides, the population of nanoparticles with higher hydrodynamic radii being shifted to the lower ones, accompanied by an increase in the lag period of aggregation. The presence of the peptides in the refolding solution was shown to assist reactivation of CA and enhance the yield of the CA soluble protein. The results suggest that bioactive food protein fragments may be regarded as exogenous supplements to the endogenous defense mechanisms of the human organism under stress conditions.

  5. Sequence-Specific Protein Aggregation Generates Defined Protein Knockdowns in Plants1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Vuylsteke, Marnik; Aesaert, Stijn; Rombaut, Debbie; De Smet, Frederik; Xu, Jie; Van Lijsebettens, Mieke; Rousseau, Frederic

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is determined by short (5–15 amino acids) aggregation-prone regions (APRs) of the polypeptide sequence that self-associate in a specific manner to form β-structured inclusions. Here, we demonstrate that the sequence specificity of APRs can be exploited to selectively knock down proteins with different localization and function in plants. Synthetic aggregation-prone peptides derived from the APRs of either the negative regulators of the brassinosteroid (BR) signaling, the glycogen synthase kinase 3/Arabidopsis SHAGGY-like kinases (GSK3/ASKs), or the starch-degrading enzyme α-glucan water dikinase were designed. Stable expression of the APRs in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and maize (Zea mays) induced aggregation of the target proteins, giving rise to plants displaying constitutive BR responses and increased starch content, respectively. Overall, we show that the sequence specificity of APRs can be harnessed to generate aggregation-associated phenotypes in a targeted manner in different subcellular compartments. This study points toward the potential application of induced targeted aggregation as a useful tool to knock down protein functions in plants and, especially, to generate beneficial traits in crops. PMID:27208282

  6. Fractal dimensions of soy protein nanoparticle aggregates determined by dynamic mechanical method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fractal dimension of the protein aggregates can be estimated by dynamic mechanical methods when the particle aggregates are imbedded in a polymer matrix. Nanocomposites were formed by mixing hydrolyzed soy protein isolate (HSPI) nanoparticle aggregates with styrene-butadiene (SB) latex, followe...

  7. Protein detection system

    DOEpatents

    Fruetel, Julie A.; Fiechtner, Gregory J.; Kliner, Dahv A. V.; McIlroy, Andrew

    2009-05-05

    The present embodiment describes a miniature, microfluidic, absorption-based sensor to detect proteins at sensitivities comparable to LIF but without the need for tagging. This instrument utilizes fiber-based evanescent-field cavity-ringdown spectroscopy, in combination with faceted prism microchannels. The combination of these techniques will increase the effective absorption path length by a factor of 10.sup.3 to 10.sup.4 (to .about.1-m), thereby providing unprecedented sensitivity using direct absorption. The coupling of high-sensitivity absorption with high-performance microfluidic separation will enable real-time sensing of biological agents in aqueous samples (including aerosol collector fluids) and will provide a general method with spectral fingerprint capability for detecting specific bio-agents.

  8. PIP3-binding proteins promote age-dependent protein aggregation and limit survival in C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Balasubramaniam, Meenakshisundaram; Johnson, Jay; Alla, Ramani; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Shmookler Reis, Robert J

    2016-08-02

    Class-I phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3KI) converts phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate (PIP2) to phosphatidylinositol 3,4,5-triphosphate (PIP3). PIP3 comprises two fatty-acid chains that embed in lipid-bilayer membranes, joined by glycerol to inositol triphosphate. Proteins with domains that specifically bind that head-group (e.g. pleckstrin-homology [PH] domains) are thus tethered to the inner plasma-membrane surface where they have an enhanced likelihood of interaction with other PIP3-bound proteins, in particular other components of their signaling pathways. Null alleles of the C. elegans age-1 gene, encoding the catalytic subunit of PI3KI, lack any detectable class-I PI3K activity and so cannot form PIP3. These mutant worms survive almost 10-fold longer than the longest-lived normal control, and are highly resistant to a variety of stresses including oxidative and electrophilic challenges. Traits associated with age-1 mutation are widely believed to be mediated through AKT-1, which requires PIP3 for both tethering and activation. Active AKT complex phosphorylates and thereby inactivates the DAF-16/FOXO transcription factor. However, extensive evidence indicates that pleiotropic effects of age-1-null mutations, including extreme longevity, cannot be explained by insulin like-receptor/AKT/FOXO signaling alone, suggesting involvement of other PIP3-binding proteins. We used ligand-affinity capture to identify membrane-bound proteins downstream of PI3KI that preferentially bind PIP3. Computer modeling supports a subset of candidate proteins predicted to directly bind PIP3 in preference to PIP2, and functional testing by RNAi knockdown confirmed candidates that partially mediate the stress-survival, aggregation-reducing and longevity benefits of PI3KI disruption. PIP3-specific candidate sets are highly enriched for proteins previously reported to affect translation, stress responses, lifespan, proteostasis, and lipid transport.

  9. Denatured state aggregation parameters derived from concentration dependence of protein stability.

    PubMed

    Schön, Arne; Clarkson, Benjamin R; Siles, Rogelio; Ross, Patrick; Brown, Richard K; Freire, Ernesto

    2015-11-01

    Protein aggregation is a major issue affecting the long-term stability of protein preparations. Proteins exist in equilibrium between the native and denatured or partially denatured conformations. Often denatured or partially denatured conformations are prone to aggregate because they expose to solvent the hydrophobic core of the protein. The aggregation of denatured protein gradually shifts the protein equilibrium toward increasing amounts of denatured and ultimately aggregated protein. Recognizing and quantitating the presence of denatured protein and its aggregation at the earliest possible time will bring enormous benefits to the identification and selection of optimal solvent conditions or the engineering of proteins with the best stability/aggregation profile. In this article, a new approach that allows simultaneous determination of structural stability and the amount of denatured and aggregated protein is presented. This approach is based on the analysis of the concentration dependence of the Gibbs energy (ΔG) of protein stability. It is shown that three important quantities can be evaluated simultaneously: (i) the population of denatured protein, (ii) the population of aggregated protein, and (iii) the fraction of denatured protein that is aggregated.

  10. Analyzing modifiers of protein aggregation in C. elegans by native agarose gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Holmberg, Mats; Nollen, Ellen A A

    2013-01-01

    The accumulation of specific aggregation-prone proteins during aging is thought to be involved in several diseases, most notably Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease as well as polyglutamine expansion disorders such as Huntington's disease. Caenorhabditis elegans disease models with transgenic expression of fluorescently tagged aggregation-prone proteins have been used to screen for genetic modifiers of aggregation. To establish the role of modifying factors in the generation of aggregation intermediates, a method has been developed using native agarose gel electrophoresis (NAGE) that enables parallel screening of aggregation patterns of fluorescently labeled aggregation-prone proteins. Together with microscopy-based genetic screens this method can be used to identify modifiers of protein aggregation and characterize their molecular function. Although described here for analyzing aggregates in C. elegans, NAGE can be adjusted for use in other model organisms as well as for cultured cells.

  11. A Dynamic Study of Protein Secretion and Aggregation in the Secretory Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Mossuto, Maria Francesca; Sannino, Sara; Mazza, Davide; Fagioli, Claudio; Vitale, Milena; Yoboue, Edgar Djaha; Anelli, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Precise coordination of protein biogenesis, traffic and homeostasis within the early secretory compartment (ESC) is key for cell physiology. As a consequence, disturbances in these processes underlie many genetic and chronic diseases. Dynamic imaging methods are needed to follow the fate of cargo proteins and their interactions with resident enzymes and folding assistants. Here we applied the Halotag labelling system to study the behavior of proteins with different fates and roles in ESC: a chaperone, an ERAD substrate and an aggregation-prone molecule. Exploiting the Halo property of binding covalently ligands labelled with different fluorochromes, we developed and performed non-radioactive pulse and chase assays to follow sequential waves of proteins in ESC, discriminating between young and old molecules at the single cell level. In this way, we could monitor secretion and degradation of ER proteins in living cells. We can also follow the biogenesis, growth, accumulation and movements of protein aggregates in the ESC. Our data show that protein deposits within ESC grow by sequential apposition of molecules up to a given size, after which novel seeds are detected. The possibility of using ligands with distinct optical and physical properties offers a novel possibility to dynamically follow the fate of proteins in the ESC. PMID:25279560

  12. A dynamic study of protein secretion and aggregation in the secretory pathway.

    PubMed

    Mossuto, Maria Francesca; Sannino, Sara; Mazza, Davide; Fagioli, Claudio; Vitale, Milena; Yoboue, Edgar Djaha; Sitia, Roberto; Anelli, Tiziana

    2014-01-01

    Precise coordination of protein biogenesis, traffic and homeostasis within the early secretory compartment (ESC) is key for cell physiology. As a consequence, disturbances in these processes underlie many genetic and chronic diseases. Dynamic imaging methods are needed to follow the fate of cargo proteins and their interactions with resident enzymes and folding assistants. Here we applied the Halotag labelling system to study the behavior of proteins with different fates and roles in ESC: a chaperone, an ERAD substrate and an aggregation-prone molecule. Exploiting the Halo property of binding covalently ligands labelled with different fluorochromes, we developed and performed non-radioactive pulse and chase assays to follow sequential waves of proteins in ESC, discriminating between young and old molecules at the single cell level. In this way, we could monitor secretion and degradation of ER proteins in living cells. We can also follow the biogenesis, growth, accumulation and movements of protein aggregates in the ESC. Our data show that protein deposits within ESC grow by sequential apposition of molecules up to a given size, after which novel seeds are detected. The possibility of using ligands with distinct optical and physical properties offers a novel possibility to dynamically follow the fate of proteins in the ESC.

  13. Raman studies of gluten proteins aggregation induced by dietary fibres.

    PubMed

    Nawrocka, Agnieszka; Szymańska-Chargot, Monika; Miś, Antoni; Kowalski, Radosław; Gruszecki, Wiesław I

    2016-03-01

    Interactions between gluten proteins and dietary fibre preparations are crucial in the baking industry. The addition of dietary fibre to bread causes significant reduction in its quality which is influenced by changes in the structure of gluten proteins. Fourier transform Raman spectroscopy was applied to determine changes in the structure of gluten proteins modified by seven dietary fibres. The commercially available gluten proteins without starch were mixed with the fibres in three concentrations: 3%, 6% and 9%. The obtained results showed that all fibres, regardless of their origin, caused the same kind of changes i.e. decrease in the α-helix content with a simultaneous increase in the content of antiparallel-β-sheet. The results indicated that presence of cellulose was the probable cause of these changes, and lead to aggregation or abnormal folding of the gluten proteins. Other changes observed in the gluten structure concerning β-structures, conformation of disulphide bridges, and aromatic amino acid environment, depended on the fibres chemical composition.

  14. Nanoparticles in relation to peptide and protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Zaman, Masihuz; Ahmad, Ejaz; Qadeer, Atiyatul; Rabbani, Gulam; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2014-01-01

    Over the past two decades, there has been considerable research interest in the use of nanoparticles in the study of protein and peptide aggregation, and of amyloid-related diseases. The influence of nanoparticles on amyloid formation yields great interest due to its small size and high surface area-to-volume ratio. Targeting nucleation kinetics by nanoparticles is one of the most searched for ways to control or induce this phenomenon. The observed effect of nanoparticles on the nucleation phase is determined by particle composition, as well as the amount and nature of the particle’s surface. Various thermodynamic parameters influence the interaction of proteins and nanoparticles in the solution, and regulate the protein assembly into fibrils, as well as the disaggregation of preformed fibrils. Metals, organic particles, inorganic particles, amino acids, peptides, proteins, and so on are more suitable candidates for nanoparticle formulation. In the present review, we attempt to explore the effects of nanoparticles on protein and peptide fibrillation processes from both perspectives (ie, as inducers and inhibitors on nucleation kinetics and in the disaggregation of preformed fibrils). Their formulation and characterization by different techniques have been also addressed, along with their toxicological effects, both in vivo and in vitro. PMID:24611007

  15. Distinct β-sheet structure in protein aggregates determined by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Shivu, Bhavana; Seshadri, Sangita; Li, Jie; Oberg, Keith A; Uversky, Vladimir N; Fink, Anthony L

    2013-08-06

    Attenuated total reflectance Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (ATR-FTIR) was used to study the conformation of aggregated proteins in vivo and in vitro. Several different protein aggregates, including amyloid fibrils from several peptides and polypeptides, inclusion bodies, folding aggregates, soluble oligomers, and protein extracts from stressed cells, were examined in this study. All protein aggregates demonstrate a characteristic new β structure with lower-frequency band positions. All protein aggregates acquire this new β band following the aggregation process involving intermolecular interactions. The β sheets in some proteins arise from regions of the polypeptide that are helical or non β in the native conformation. For a given protein, all types of the aggregates (e.g., inclusion bodies, folding aggregates, and thermal aggregates) showed similar spectra, indicating that they arose from a common partially folded species. All of the aggregates have some nativelike secondary structure and nonperiodic structure as well as the specific new β structure. The new β could be most likely attributed to stronger hydrogen bonds in the intermolecular β-sheet structure present in the protein aggregates.

  16. Delicate balance between functionally required flexibility and aggregation risk in a β-rich protein.

    PubMed

    Ferrolino, Mylene C; Zhuravleva, Anastasia; Budyak, Ivan L; Krishnan, Beena; Gierasch, Lila M

    2013-12-10

    Susceptibility to aggregation is general to proteins because of the potential for intermolecular interactions between hydrophobic stretches in their amino acid sequences. Protein aggregation has been implicated in several catastrophic diseases, yet we still lack in-depth understanding about how proteins are channeled to this state. Using a predominantly β-sheet protein whose folding has been explored in detail, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein 1 (CRABP1), as a model, we have tackled the challenge of understanding the links between a protein's natural tendency to fold, 'breathe', and function with its propensity to misfold and aggregate. We identified near-native dynamic species that lead to aggregation and found that inherent structural fluctuations in the native protein, resulting in opening of the ligand-entry portal, expose hydrophobic residues on the most vulnerable aggregation-prone sequences in CRABP1. CRABP1 and related intracellullar lipid-binding proteins have not been reported to aggregate inside cells, and we speculate that the cellular concentration of their open, aggregation-prone conformations is sufficient for ligand binding but below the critical concentration for aggregation. Our finding provides an example of how nature fine-tunes a delicate balance between protein function, conformational variability, and aggregation vulnerability and implies that with the evolutionary requirement for proteins to fold and function, aggregation becomes an unavoidable but controllable risk.

  17. Use of whey protein soluble aggregates for thermal stability-a hypothesis paper.

    PubMed

    Ryan, Kelsey N; Zhong, Qixin; Foegeding, Edward A

    2013-08-01

    Forming whey proteins into soluble aggregates is a modification shown to improve or expand the applications in foaming, emulsification, gelation, film-formation, and encapsulation. Whey protein soluble aggregates are defined as aggregates that are intermediates between monomer proteins and an insoluble gel network or precipitate. The conditions under which whey proteins denature and aggregate have been extensively studied and can be used as guiding principles of producing soluble aggregates. These conditions are reviewed for pH, ion type and concentration, cosolutes, and protein concentration, along with heating temperature and duration. Combinations of these conditions can be used to design soluble aggregates with desired physicochemical properties including surface charge, surface hydrophobicity, size, and shape. These properties in turn can be used to obtain target macroscopic properties, such as viscosity, clarity, and stability, of the final product. A proposed approach to designing soluble aggregates with improved thermal stability for beverage applications is presented.

  18. Altering protein surface charge with chemical modification modulates protein-gold nanoparticle aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamison, Jennifer A.; Bryant, Erika L.; Kadali, Shyam B.; Wong, Michael S.; Colvin, Vicki L.; Matthews, Kathleen S.; Calabretta, Michelle K.

    2011-02-01

    Gold nanoparticles (AuNP) can interact with a wide range of molecules including proteins. Whereas significant attention has focused on modifying the nanoparticle surface to regulate protein-AuNP assembly or influence the formation of the protein "corona," modification of the protein surface as a mechanism to modulate protein-AuNP interaction has been less explored. Here, we examine this possibility utilizing three small globular proteins—lysozyme with high isoelectric point (pI) and established interactions with AuNP; α-lactalbumin with similar tertiary fold to lysozyme but low pI; and myoglobin with a different globular fold and an intermediate pI. We first chemically modified these proteins to alter their charged surface functionalities, and thereby shift protein pI, and then applied multiple methods to assess protein-AuNP assembly. At pH values lower than the anticipated pI of the modified protein, AuNP exposure elicits changes in the optical absorbance of the protein-NP solutions and other properties due to aggregate formation. Above the expected pI, however, protein-AuNP interaction is minimal, and both components remain isolated, presumably because both species are negatively charged. These data demonstrate that protein modification provides a powerful tool for modulating whether nanoparticle-protein interactions result in material aggregation. The results also underscore that naturally occurring protein modifications found in vivo may be critical in defining nanoparticle-protein corona compositions.

  19. Unraveling the Early Events of Amyloid-β Protein (Aβ) Aggregation: Techniques for the Determination of Aβ Aggregate Size

    PubMed Central

    Pryor, N. Elizabeth; Moss, Melissa A.; Hestekin, Christa N.

    2012-01-01

    The aggregation of proteins into insoluble amyloid fibrils coincides with the onset of numerous diseases. An array of techniques is available to study the different stages of the amyloid aggregation process. Recently, emphasis has been placed upon the analysis of oligomeric amyloid species, which have been hypothesized to play a key role in disease progression. This paper reviews techniques utilized to study aggregation of the amyloid-β protein (Aβ) associated with Alzheimer’s disease. In particular, the review focuses on techniques that provide information about the size or quantity of oligomeric Aβ species formed during the early stages of aggregation, including native-PAGE, SDS-PAGE, Western blotting, capillary electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, fluorescence correlation spectroscopy, light scattering, size exclusion chromatography, centrifugation, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, and dot blotting. PMID:22489141

  20. Techniques for Monitoring Protein Misfolding and Aggregation in Vitro and in Living Cells

    PubMed Central

    Gregoire, Simpson; Irwin, Jacob; Kwon, Inchan

    2012-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation have been considered important in understanding many neurodegenerative diseases and recombinant biopharmaceutical production. Therefore, various traditional and modern techniques have been utilized to monitor protein aggregation in vitro and in living cells. Fibril formation, morphology and secondary structure content of amyloidogenic proteins in vitro have been monitored by molecular probes, TEM/AFM, and CD/FTIR analyses, respectively. Protein aggregation in living cells has been qualitatively or quantitatively monitored by numerous molecular folding reporters based on either fluorescent protein or enzyme. Aggregation of a target protein is directly correlated to the changes in fluorescence or enzyme activity of the folding reporter fused to the target protein, which allows non-invasive monitoring aggregation of the target protein in living cells. Advances in the techniques used to monitor protein aggregation in vitro and in living cells have greatly facilitated the understanding of the molecular mechanism of amyloidogenic protein aggregation associated with neurodegenerative diseases, optimizing culture conditions to reduce aggregation of biopharmaceuticals expressed in living cells, and screening of small molecule libraries in the search for protein aggregation inhibitors. PMID:23565019

  1. Glycosaminoglycan sulfation determines the biochemical properties of prion protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Ellett, Laura J; Coleman, Bradley M; Shambrook, Mitch C; Johanssen, Vanessa A; Collins, Steven J; Masters, Colin L; Hill, Andrew F; Lawson, Victoria A

    2015-07-01

    Prion diseases are transmissible neurodegenerative disorders associated with the conversion of the cellular prion protein, PrP(C), to a misfolded isoform called PrP(Sc). Although PrP(Sc) is a necessary component of the infectious prion, additional factors, or cofactors, have been shown to contribute to the efficient formation of transmissible PrP(Sc). Glycosaminoglycans (GAGs) are attractive cofactor candidates as they can be found associated with PrP(Sc) deposits, have been shown to enhance PrP misfolding in vitro, are found in the same cellular compartments as PrP(C) and have been shown to be disease modifying in vivo. Here we investigated the effects of the sulfated GAGs, heparin and heparan sulfate (HS), on disease associated misfolding of full-length recombinant PrP. More specifically, the degree of sulfation of these molecules was investigated for its role in modulating the disease-associated characteristics of PrP. Both heparin and HS induced a β-sheet conformation in recombinant PrP that was associated with the formation of aggregated species; however, the biochemical properties of the aggregates formed in the presence of heparin or HS varied in solubility and protease resistance. Furthermore, these properties could be modified by changes in GAG sulfation, indicating that subtle changes in the properties of prion disease cofactors could initiate disease associated misfolding.

  2. Flow cytometric quantification and characterization of intracellular protein aggregates in yeast.

    PubMed

    Shiber, Ayala; Breuer, William; Ravid, Tommer

    2014-01-01

    The sequestration of misfolded proteins into aggregates is an integral pathway of the protein quality control network that becomes particularly prominent during proteotoxic stress and in various pathologies. Methods for systematic analysis of cellular aggregate content are still largely limited to fluorescence microscopy and to separation by biochemical techniques. Here, we describe an alternative approach, using flow cytometric analysis, applied to protein aggregates released from their intracellular milieu by mild lysis of yeast cells. Protein aggregates were induced in yeast by heat shock or by chaperone deprivation and labeled using GFP- or mCherry-tagged quality control substrate proteins and chaperones. The fluorescence-labeled aggregate particles were distinguishable from cell debris by flow cytometry. The assay was used to quantify the number of fluorescent aggregates per μg of cell lysate protein and for monitoring changes in the cellular content and properties of aggregates, induced by stress. The results were normalized to the frequencies of fluorescent reporter expression in the cell population, allowing quantitative comparison. The assay also provided a quantitative measure of co-localization of aggregate components, such as chaperones and quality control substrates, within the same aggregate particle. This approach may be extended by fluorescence-activated sorting and isolation of various protein aggregates, including those harboring proteins associated with conformation disorders.

  3. Fluorescence lifetime dynamics of enhanced green fluorescent protein in protein aggregates with expanded polyglutamine.

    PubMed

    Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Hsu, Chih-Chun; Liu, Chia-Rung; Kao, Fu-Jen; Cheng, Tzu-Hao

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is one of the characteristic steps in a number of neurodegenerative diseases eventually leading to neuronal death and thorough study of aggregation is required for the development of effective therapy. We apply fluorescence lifetime imaging for the characterization of the fluorescence dynamics of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in fusion with the polyQ-expanded polyglutamine stretch. At the expansion of polyQ above 39 residues, it has an inherent propensity to form amyloid-like fibrils and aggregates, and is responsible for Huntington's disease. The results of the experiments show that expression of the eGFP in fusion with the 97Q protein leads to the decrease of the eGFP fluorescence lifetime by approximately 300 ps. This phenomenon does not appear in Hsp104-deficient cells, where the aggregation in polyQ is prevented. We demonstrate that the lifetime decrease observed is related to the aggregation per se and discuss the possible role of refractive index and homo-FRET in these dynamics.

  4. Fluorescence lifetime dynamics of enhanced green fluorescent protein in protein aggregates with expanded polyglutamine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Hsu, Chih-Chun; Liu, Chia-Rung; Kao, Fu-Jen; Cheng, Tzu-Hao

    2010-01-01

    Protein aggregation is one of the characteristic steps in a number of neurodegenerative diseases eventually leading to neuronal death and thorough study of aggregation is required for the development of effective therapy. We apply fluorescence lifetime imaging for the characterization of the fluorescence dynamics of the enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) in fusion with the polyQ-expanded polyglutamine stretch. At the expansion of polyQ above 39 residues, it has an inherent propensity to form amyloid-like fibrils and aggregates, and is responsible for Huntington's disease. The results of the experiments show that expression of the eGFP in fusion with the 97Q protein leads to the decrease of the eGFP fluorescence lifetime by ~300 ps. This phenomenon does not appear in Hsp104-deficient cells, where the aggregation in polyQ is prevented. We demonstrate that the lifetime decrease observed is related to the aggregation per se and discuss the possible role of refractive index and homo-FRET in these dynamics.

  5. Reactivation of Aggregated Proteins by the ClpB/DnaK Bi-chaperone System

    PubMed Central

    Zolkiewski, Michal; Chesnokova, Liudmila S.; Witt, Stephan N.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a common problem in protein biochemistry and is linked to many cellular pathologies and human diseases. The molecular chaperone ClpB can resolubilize and reactivate aggregated proteins. This unit describes the procedure for following reactivation of an aggregated enzyme glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase mediated by ClpB from Escherichia coli in cooperation with another molecular chaperone DnaK. The procedures for purification of these chaperones are also described. PMID:26836408

  6. Optical protein detection based on magnetic clusters rotation.

    PubMed

    Ramiandrisoa, Donatien; Brient-Litzler, Elodie; Daynes, Aurélien; Compain, Eric; Bibette, Jérôme; Baudry, Jean

    2015-09-25

    In this paper we present a simple method to quantify aggregates of 200nm magnetic particles. This method relies on the optical and magnetic anisotropy of particle aggregates, whereas dispersed particles are optically isotropic. We orientate aggregates by applying short pulses of a magnetic field, and we measure optical density variation directly linked to this reorientation. By computing the scattering efficiency of doublets and singlets, we demonstrate the absolute quantification of a few % of doublets in a well dispersed suspension. More generally, these optical variations are related to the aggregation state of the sample. This method can be easily applied to an agglutination assay, where target proteins induce aggregation of colloidal particles. By observing only aligned clusters, we increase sensitivity and we reduce the background noise as compared to a classical agglutination assay: we obtain a detection limit on the C-reactive protein of less than 3pM for a total assay time of 10min.

  7. Hydrolysis of whey protein isolate with Bacillus licheniformis protease: aggregating capacities of peptide fractions.

    PubMed

    Creusot, Nathalie; Gruppen, Harry

    2008-11-12

    In a previous study, peptides aggregating at pH 7.0 derived from a whey protein hydrolysate made with Bacillus licheniformis protease were fractionated and identified. The objective of the present work was to investigate the solubility of the fractionated aggregating peptides, as a function of concentration, and their aggregating capacities toward added intact proteins. The amount of aggregated material and the composition of the aggregates obtained were measured by nitrogen concentration and size exclusion chromatography, respectively. The results showed that of the four fractions obtained from the aggregating peptides, two were insoluble, while the other two consisted of 1:1 mixture of low and high solubility peptides. Therefore, insoluble peptides coaggregated, assumedly via hydrophobic interactions, other relatively more soluble peptides. It was also shown that aggregating peptides could aggregate intact protein nonspecifically since the same peptides were involved in the aggregation of whey proteins, beta-casein, and bovine serum albumin. Both insoluble and partly insoluble peptides were required for the aggregation of intact protein. These results are of interest for the applications of protein hydrolysates, as mixtures of intact protein and peptides are often present in these applications.

  8. MBAR-enhanced lattice Monte Carlo simulation of the effect of helices on membrane protein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yuanwei; Rodger, P. Mark

    2017-03-01

    We study the effect of helical structure on the aggregation of proteins using a simplified lattice protein model with an implicit membrane environment. A recently proposed Monte Carlo approach, which exploits the proven statistical optimality of the MBAR estimator in order to improve simulation efficiency, was used. The results show that with both two and four proteins present, the tendency to aggregate is strongly expedited by the presence of amphipathic helix (APH), whereas a transmembrane helix (TMH) slightly disfavours aggregation. When four protein molecules are present, partially aggregated states (dimers and trimers) were more common when the APH was present, compared with the cases where no helices or only the TMH is present.

  9. Robust quantitation of basic-protein higher-order aggregates using size-exclusion chromatography.

    PubMed

    Gervais, David; Downer, Andrew; King, Darryl; Kanda, Patrick; Foote, Nicholas; Smith, Stuart

    2017-05-30

    Detection of higher-order aggregates (HOA) using size-exclusion chromatography (SEC) was found to be variable for a basic protein, using exposed-silanol or diol-silica-based SEC columns. Preparations of the tetrameric biopharmaceutical enzyme Erwinia chrysanthemil-asparaginase (ErA), which has an isoelectric point of 8.6, were analysed using a diol-silica SEC column. Although the proportions of ErA main peak and octamer species were unaffected, HOA recovery and detection were extremely variable and had poor agreement with an orthogonal measurement technique, analytical ultracentrifugation (AUC). The observation that only HOA was selectively affected by non-specific silanol interactions was unexpected, so alternatives were sought. Coated-silica SEC columns improved the resolution and reproducibility of HOA detection for this alkaline-pI protein, and improved the agreement of HOA with the AUC method. Basic proteins, such as ErA, should be thoroughly evaluated in SEC method development, to ensure that resolution of larger aggregate species is not compromised.

  10. Legal but lethal: functional protein aggregation at the verge of toxicity

    PubMed Central

    Falsone, Angelika; Falsone, S. Fabio

    2015-01-01

    Many neurodegenerative disorders are linked to irreversible protein aggregation, a process that usually comes along with toxicity and serious cellular damage. However, it is emerging that protein aggregation can also serve for physiological purposes, as impressively shown for prions. While the aggregation of this protein family was initially considered exclusively toxic in mammalians organisms, it is now almost clear that many other proteins adopt prion-like attributes to rationally polymerize into higher order complexes with organized physiologic roles. This implies that cells can tolerate at least in some measure the accumulation of inherently dangerous protein aggregates for functional profit. This review summarizes currently known strategies that living organisms adopt to preserve beneficial aggregation, and to prevent the catastrophic accumulation of toxic aggregates that frequently accompany neurodegeneration. PMID:25741240

  11. Protein folding, misfolding, and aggregation. Formation of inclusion bodies and aggresomes.

    PubMed

    Markossian, K A; Kurganov, B I

    2004-09-01

    In this review the mechanisms of protein folding, misfolding, and aggregation as well as the mechanisms of cell defense against toxic protein aggregates are considered. Misfolded and aggregated proteins in cells are exposed to chaperone-mediated refolding and are degraded by proteasomes if refolding is impossible. Proteolysis-stable protein aggregates accumulate, forming inclusion bodies. In eucaryotic cells, protein aggregates form structures in the pericentrosomal area that have been termed "aggresomes". Formation of aggresomes in cells is a general cellular response to the presence of misfolded proteins when the degrading capacity of the cells is exceeded. The role of aggresomes in disturbance of the proteasomal system operation and in cellular death, particularly in the so-called "protein conformational diseases", is discussed.

  12. Wetting of nonconserved residue-backbones: A feature indicative of aggregation associated regions of proteins.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Mohan R; Pal, Arumay; Hu, Zhongqiao; Kannan, Srinivasaraghavan; Chee Keong, Kwoh; Lane, David P; Verma, Chandra S

    2016-02-01

    Aggregation is an irreversible form of protein complexation and often toxic to cells. The process entails partial or major unfolding that is largely driven by hydration. We model the role of hydration in aggregation using "Dehydrons." "Dehydrons" are unsatisfied backbone hydrogen bonds in proteins that seek shielding from water molecules by associating with ligands or proteins. We find that the residues at aggregation interfaces have hydrated backbones, and in contrast to other forms of protein-protein interactions, are under less evolutionary pressure to be conserved. Combining evolutionary conservation of residues and extent of backbone hydration allows us to distinguish regions on proteins associated with aggregation (non-conserved dehydron-residues) from other interaction interfaces (conserved dehydron-residues). This novel feature can complement the existing strategies used to investigate protein aggregation/complexation.

  13. Protein Misfolding and Aggregation in Cataract Disease and Prospects for Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Moreau, Kate L.; King, Jonathan A.

    2012-01-01

    The transparency of the eye lens depends on maintaining the native tertiary structures and solubility of the lens crystallin proteins over a lifetime. Cataract, the leading cause of blindness worldwide, is caused by protein aggregation within the protected lens environment. With age, covalent protein damage accumulates through pathways thought to include UV radiation, oxidation, deamidation, and truncations. Experiments suggest that the resulting protein destabilization leads to partially unfolded, aggregation-prone intermediates and the formation of insoluble, light-scattering protein aggregates. These aggregates either include or overwhelm the protein chaperone content of the lens. Here we review the causes of cataracts and non-surgical methods being investigated to inhibit or delay cataract development, including natural product-based therapies, modulators of oxidation, and protein aggregation inhibitors. PMID:22520268

  14. A multiscale view of therapeutic protein aggregation: a colloid science perspective.

    PubMed

    Nicoud, Lucrèce; Owczarz, Marta; Arosio, Paolo; Morbidelli, Massimo

    2015-03-01

    The formation of aggregates in protein-based pharmaceuticals is a major issue that can compromise drug safety and drug efficacy. With a view to improving protein stability, considerable effort is put forth to unravel the fundamental mechanisms underlying the aggregation process. However, therapeutic protein aggregation is a complex multistep phenomenon that involves time and length scales spanning several orders of magnitude, and strategies addressing protein aggregation inhibition are currently still largely empirical in practice. Here, we review how key concepts developed in the frame of colloid science can be applied to gain knowledge on the kinetics and thermodynamics of therapeutic protein aggregation across different length scales. In particular, we discuss the use of coarse-grained molecular interaction potentials to quantify protein colloidal stability. We then show how population balance equations simulations can provide insights into the mechanisms of aggregate formation at the mesoscale, and we highlight the strength of the concept of fractal scaling to quantify irregular aggregate morphologies. Finally, we correlate the macroscopic rheological properties of protein solutions with the occupied volume fraction and the aggregate structure. Overall, this work illustrates the power and limitations of colloidal approaches in the multiscale description of the aggregation of therapeutic proteins.

  15. Identification of an RNA Polymerase III Regulator Linked to Disease-Associated Protein Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Sin, Olga; de Jong, Tristan; Mata-Cabana, Alejandro; Kudron, Michelle; Zaini, Mohamad Amr; Aprile, Francesco A; Seinstra, Renée I; Stroo, Esther; Prins, Roméo Willinge; Martineau, Céline N; Wang, Hai Hui; Hogewerf, Wytse; Steinhof, Anne; Wanker, Erich E; Vendruscolo, Michele; Calkhoven, Cornelis F; Reinke, Valerie; Guryev, Victor; Nollen, Ellen A A

    2017-03-16

    Protein aggregation is associated with age-related neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's and polyglutamine diseases. As a causal relationship between protein aggregation and neurodegeneration remains elusive, understanding the cellular mechanisms regulating protein aggregation will help develop future treatments. To identify such mechanisms, we conducted a forward genetic screen in a C. elegans model of polyglutamine aggregation and identified the protein MOAG-2/LIR-3 as a driver of protein aggregation. In the absence of polyglutamine, MOAG-2/LIR-3 regulates the RNA polymerase III-associated transcription of small non-coding RNAs. This regulation is lost in the presence of polyglutamine, which mislocalizes MOAG-2/LIR-3 from the nucleus to the cytosol. We then show biochemically that MOAG-2/LIR-3 can also catalyze the aggregation of polyglutamine-expanded huntingtin. These results suggest that polyglutamine can induce an aggregation-promoting activity of MOAG-2/LIR-3 in the cytosol. The concept that certain aggregation-prone proteins can convert other endogenous proteins into drivers of aggregation and toxicity adds to the understanding of how cellular homeostasis can be deteriorated in protein misfolding diseases.

  16. Localization of protein aggregation in Escherichia coli is governed by diffusion and nucleoid macromolecular crowding effect.

    PubMed

    Coquel, Anne-Sophie; Jacob, Jean-Pascal; Primet, Mael; Demarez, Alice; Dimiccoli, Mariella; Julou, Thomas; Moisan, Lionel; Lindner, Ariel B; Berry, Hugues

    2013-04-01

    Aggregates of misfolded proteins are a hallmark of many age-related diseases. Recently, they have been linked to aging of Escherichia coli (E. coli) where protein aggregates accumulate at the old pole region of the aging bacterium. Because of the potential of E. coli as a model organism, elucidating aging and protein aggregation in this bacterium may pave the way to significant advances in our global understanding of aging. A first obstacle along this path is to decipher the mechanisms by which protein aggregates are targeted to specific intercellular locations. Here, using an integrated approach based on individual-based modeling, time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and automated image analysis, we show that the movement of aging-related protein aggregates in E. coli is purely diffusive (Brownian). Using single-particle tracking of protein aggregates in live E. coli cells, we estimated the average size and diffusion constant of the aggregates. Our results provide evidence that the aggregates passively diffuse within the cell, with diffusion constants that depend on their size in agreement with the Stokes-Einstein law. However, the aggregate displacements along the cell long axis are confined to a region that roughly corresponds to the nucleoid-free space in the cell pole, thus confirming the importance of increased macromolecular crowding in the nucleoids. We thus used 3D individual-based modeling to show that these three ingredients (diffusion, aggregation and diffusion hindrance in the nucleoids) are sufficient and necessary to reproduce the available experimental data on aggregate localization in the cells. Taken together, our results strongly support the hypothesis that the localization of aging-related protein aggregates in the poles of E. coli results from the coupling of passive diffusion-aggregation with spatially non-homogeneous macromolecular crowding. They further support the importance of "soft" intracellular structuring (based on macromolecular

  17. Localization of Protein Aggregation in Escherichia coli Is Governed by Diffusion and Nucleoid Macromolecular Crowding Effect

    PubMed Central

    Coquel, Anne-Sophie; Jacob, Jean-Pascal; Primet, Mael; Demarez, Alice; Dimiccoli, Mariella; Julou, Thomas; Moisan, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Aggregates of misfolded proteins are a hallmark of many age-related diseases. Recently, they have been linked to aging of Escherichia coli (E. coli) where protein aggregates accumulate at the old pole region of the aging bacterium. Because of the potential of E. coli as a model organism, elucidating aging and protein aggregation in this bacterium may pave the way to significant advances in our global understanding of aging. A first obstacle along this path is to decipher the mechanisms by which protein aggregates are targeted to specific intercellular locations. Here, using an integrated approach based on individual-based modeling, time-lapse fluorescence microscopy and automated image analysis, we show that the movement of aging-related protein aggregates in E. coli is purely diffusive (Brownian). Using single-particle tracking of protein aggregates in live E. coli cells, we estimated the average size and diffusion constant of the aggregates. Our results provide evidence that the aggregates passively diffuse within the cell, with diffusion constants that depend on their size in agreement with the Stokes-Einstein law. However, the aggregate displacements along the cell long axis are confined to a region that roughly corresponds to the nucleoid-free space in the cell pole, thus confirming the importance of increased macromolecular crowding in the nucleoids. We thus used 3D individual-based modeling to show that these three ingredients (diffusion, aggregation and diffusion hindrance in the nucleoids) are sufficient and necessary to reproduce the available experimental data on aggregate localization in the cells. Taken together, our results strongly support the hypothesis that the localization of aging-related protein aggregates in the poles of E. coli results from the coupling of passive diffusion-aggregation with spatially non-homogeneous macromolecular crowding. They further support the importance of “soft” intracellular structuring (based on macromolecular

  18. Protein Aggregates May Differ in Water Entrapment but Are Comparable in Water Confinement.

    PubMed

    Urbonaite, V; de Jongh, H H J; van der Linden, E; Pouvreau, L

    2015-10-14

    Aggregate size and density are related to gel morphology. In the context of the water distribution in complex food systems, in this study, it was aimed to investigate whether protein aggregates varying in size and density differ in entrapped and confined water. Heat-set soy protein aggregates (1%, v/v) prepared in the presence of 3.5 mM divalent salts increased in size and decreased in apparent density following the salt type order MgSO4, MgCl2, CaSO4, and CaCl2. In the absence of applied (centrifugal) forces, larger and less dense aggregates entrap more water. When force is applied from larger and more deformable aggregates, more water can be displaced. Entrapped water of ∼8-13 g of water/g of protein is associated with (pelleted) aggregates, of which approximately 4.5-8.5 g of water/g of protein is not constrained in exchangeability with the solvent. The amount of confined water within aggregates was found to be independent of the aggregate density and accounted for ∼3.5 g of water/g of protein. Confined water in aggregates is hindered in its diffusion because of physical structure constraints and, therefore, not directly exchangeable with the solvent. These insights in the protein aggregate size and deformability in relation to water entrapment and confinement could be used to tune water holding on larger length scales when force is applied.

  19. Effects of arginine on heat-induced aggregation of concentrated protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dhawal; Shaikh, Abdul Rajjak; Peng, Xinxia; Rajagopalan, Raj

    2011-01-01

    Arginine is one of the commonly used additives to enhance refolding yield of proteins, to suppress aggregation of proteins, and to increase solubility of proteins, and yet the molecular interactions that contribute to the role of arginine are unclear. Here, we present experiments, using bovine serum albumin (BSA), lysozyme (LYZ), and β-lactoglobulin (BLG) as model proteins, to show that arginine can enhance heat-induced aggregation of concentrated protein solutions, contrary to the conventional belief that arginine is a universal suppressor of aggregation. Results show that the enhancement in aggregation is caused only for BSA and BLG, but not for LYZ, indicating that arginine's preferential interactions with certain residues over others could determine the effect of the additive on aggregation. We use this previously unrecognized behavior of arginine, in combination with density functional theory calculations, to identify the molecular-level interactions of arginine with various residues that determine arginine's role as an enhancer or suppressor of aggregation of proteins. The experimental and computational results suggest that the guanidinium group of arginine promotes aggregation through the hydrogen-bond-based bridging interactions with the acidic residues of a protein, whereas the binding of the guanidinium group to aromatic residues (aggregation-prone) contributes to the stability and solubilization of the proteins. The approach, we describe here, can be used to select suitable additives to stabilize a protein solution at high concentrations based on an analysis of the amino acid content of the protein.

  20. LPS-protein aggregation influences protein partitioning in aqueous two-phase micellar systems.

    PubMed

    Lopes, André Moreni; Santos-Ebinuma, Valéria de Carvalho; Novaes, Leticia Celia de Lencastre; Molino, João Vitor Dutra; Barbosa, Leandro Ramos Souza; Pessoa, Adalberto; Rangel-Yagui, Carlota de Oliveira

    2013-07-01

    Lipopolysaccharide endotoxins (LPS) are the most common pyrogenic substances in recombinant peptides and proteins purified from Gram-negative bacteria, such as Escherichia coli. In this respect, aqueous two-phase micellar systems (ATPMS) have already proven to be a good strategy to purify recombinant proteins of pharmaceutical interest and remove high LPS concentrations. In this paper, we review our recent experimental work in protein partitioning in Triton X-114 ATPMS altogether with some new results and show that LPS-protein aggregation can influence both protein and LPS partitioning. Green fluorescent protein (GFPuv) was employed as a model protein. The ATPMS technology proved to be effective for high loads of LPS removal into the micelle-rich phase (%REM(LPS) > 98 %) while GFPuv partitioned preferentially to the micelle-poor phase (K GFP(uv) < 1.00) due to the excluded-volume interactions. However, theoretically predicted protein partition coefficient values were compared with experimentally obtained ones, and good agreement was found only in the absence of LPS. Dynamic light scattering measurements showed that protein-LPS interactions were taking place and influenced the partitioning process. We believe that this phenomenon should be considered in LPS removal employing any kind of aqueous two-phase system. Nonetheless, ATPMS can still be considered as an efficient strategy for high loads of LPS removal, but being aware that the excluded-volume partitioning theory available might overestimate partition coefficient values due to the presence of protein-LPS aggregation.

  1. Protein lipoxidation: Detection strategies and challenges

    PubMed Central

    Aldini, Giancarlo; Domingues, M. Rosário; Spickett, Corinne M.; Domingues, Pedro; Altomare, Alessandra; Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J.; Oeste, Clara L.; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2015-01-01

    Enzymatic and non-enzymatic lipid metabolism can give rise to reactive species that may covalently modify cellular or plasma proteins through a process known as lipoxidation. Under basal conditions, protein lipoxidation can contribute to normal cell homeostasis and participate in signaling or adaptive mechanisms, as exemplified by lipoxidation of Ras proteins or of the cytoskeletal protein vimentin, both of which behave as sensors of electrophilic species. Nevertheless, increased lipoxidation under pathological conditions may lead to deleterious effects on protein structure or aggregation. This can result in impaired degradation and accumulation of abnormally folded proteins contributing to pathophysiology, as may occur in neurodegenerative diseases. Identification of the protein targets of lipoxidation and its functional consequences under pathophysiological situations can unveil the modification patterns associated with the various outcomes, as well as preventive strategies or potential therapeutic targets. Given the wide structural variability of lipid moieties involved in lipoxidation, highly sensitive and specific methods for its detection are required. Derivatization of reactive carbonyl species is instrumental in the detection of adducts retaining carbonyl groups. In addition, use of tagged derivatives of electrophilic lipids enables enrichment of lipoxidized proteins or peptides. Ultimate confirmation of lipoxidation requires high resolution mass spectrometry approaches to unequivocally identify the adduct and the targeted residue. Moreover, rigorous validation of the targets identified and assessment of the functional consequences of these modifications are essential. Here we present an update on methods to approach the complex field of lipoxidation along with validation strategies and functional assays illustrated with well-studied lipoxidation targets. PMID:26072467

  2. Protein lipoxidation: Detection strategies and challenges.

    PubMed

    Aldini, Giancarlo; Domingues, M Rosário; Spickett, Corinne M; Domingues, Pedro; Altomare, Alessandra; Sánchez-Gómez, Francisco J; Oeste, Clara L; Pérez-Sala, Dolores

    2015-08-01

    Enzymatic and non-enzymatic lipid metabolism can give rise to reactive species that may covalently modify cellular or plasma proteins through a process known as lipoxidation. Under basal conditions, protein lipoxidation can contribute to normal cell homeostasis and participate in signaling or adaptive mechanisms, as exemplified by lipoxidation of Ras proteins or of the cytoskeletal protein vimentin, both of which behave as sensors of electrophilic species. Nevertheless, increased lipoxidation under pathological conditions may lead to deleterious effects on protein structure or aggregation. This can result in impaired degradation and accumulation of abnormally folded proteins contributing to pathophysiology, as may occur in neurodegenerative diseases. Identification of the protein targets of lipoxidation and its functional consequences under pathophysiological situations can unveil the modification patterns associated with the various outcomes, as well as preventive strategies or potential therapeutic targets. Given the wide structural variability of lipid moieties involved in lipoxidation, highly sensitive and specific methods for its detection are required. Derivatization of reactive carbonyl species is instrumental in the detection of adducts retaining carbonyl groups. In addition, use of tagged derivatives of electrophilic lipids enables enrichment of lipoxidized proteins or peptides. Ultimate confirmation of lipoxidation requires high resolution mass spectrometry approaches to unequivocally identify the adduct and the targeted residue. Moreover, rigorous validation of the targets identified and assessment of the functional consequences of these modifications are essential. Here we present an update on methods to approach the complex field of lipoxidation along with validation strategies and functional assays illustrated with well-studied lipoxidation targets.

  3. Protein aggregation in bacteria: the thin boundary between functionality and toxicity.

    PubMed

    Bednarska, Natalia G; Schymkowitz, Joost; Rousseau, Frederic; Van Eldere, Johan

    2013-09-01

    Misfolding and aggregation of proteins have a negative impact on all living organisms. In recent years, aggregation has been studied in detail due to its involvement in neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and Huntington's diseases, and type II diabetes--all associated with accumulation of amyloid fibrils. This research highlighted the central importance of protein homeostasis, or proteostasis for short, defined as the cellular state in which the proteome is both stable and functional. It implicates an equilibrium between synthesis, folding, trafficking, aggregation, disaggregation and degradation. In accordance with the eukaryotic systems, it has been documented that protein aggregation also reduces fitness of bacterial cells, but although our understanding of the cellular protein quality control systems is perhaps most detailed in bacteria, the use of bacterial proteostasis as a drug target remains little explored. Here we describe protein aggregation as a normal physiological process and its role in bacterial virulence and we shed light on how bacteria defend themselves against the toxic threat of aggregates. We review the impact of aggregates on bacterial viability and look at the ways that bacteria use to maintain a balance between aggregation and functionality. The proteostasis in bacteria can be interrupted via overexpression of proteins, certain antibiotics such as aminoglycosides, as well as antimicrobial peptides--all leading to loss of cell viability. Therefore intracellular protein aggregation and disruption of proteostatic balance in bacteria open up another strategy that should be explored towards the discovery of new antimicrobials.

  4. On the use of photoacoustics to detect red blood cell aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Hysi, Eno; Saha, Ratan K.; Kolios, Michael C.

    2012-01-01

    The feasibility of detecting red blood cell (RBC) aggregation with photoacoustics (PAs) was investigated theoretically and experimentally using human and porcine RBCs. The theoretical PA signals and spectra generated from such samples were examined for several hematocrit levels and aggregates sizes. The effect of a finite transducer bandwidth on the received PA signal was also examined. The simulation results suggest that the dominant frequency of the PA signals from non-aggregated RBCs decreases towards clinical frequency ranges as the aggregate size increases. The experimentally measured mean spectral power increased by ~6 dB for the largest aggregate compared to the non-aggregated samples. Such results confirm the theoretical predictions and illustrate the potential of using PA imaging for detecting RBC aggregation. PMID:23024924

  5. Combined Protein A and size exclusion high performance liquid chromatography for the single-step measurement of mAb, aggregates and host cell proteins.

    PubMed

    Gjoka, Xhorxhi; Schofield, Mark; Cvetkovic, Aleksandar; Gantier, Rene

    2014-12-01

    Quantification of monoclonal antibody (mAb) monomer, mAb aggregates, and host cell proteins (HCPs) is critical for the optimization of the mAb production process. The present work describes a single high throughput analytical tool capable of tracking the concentration of mAb, mAb aggregate and HCPs in a growing cell culture batch. By combining two analytical HPLC methods, Protein A affinity and size-exclusion chromatography (SEC), it is possible to detect a relative increase or decrease in the concentration of all three entities simultaneously. A comparison of the combined Protein A-SEC assay to SEC alone was performed, demonstrating that it can be useful tool for the quantification of mAb monomer along with trending data for mAb aggregate and HCP. Furthermore, the study shows that the Protein A-SEC method is at least as accurate as other commonly used analytical methods such as ELISA and Bradford.

  6. Proteins in aggregates functionally impact multiple neurodegenerative disease models by forming proteasome-blocking complexes

    PubMed Central

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Balasubramaniam, Meenakshisundaram; Gao, Yuan; Yu, Li-Rong; Alla, Ramani; Shmookler Reis, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Age-dependent neurodegenerative diseases progressively form aggregates containing both shared components (e.g., TDP-43, phosphorylated tau) and proteins specific to each disease. We investigated whether diverse neuropathies might have additional aggregation-prone proteins in common, discoverable by proteomics. Caenorhabditis elegans expressing unc-54p/Q40::YFP, a model of polyglutamine array diseases such as Huntington's, accrues aggregates in muscle 2–6 days posthatch. These foci, isolated on antibody-coupled magnetic beads, were characterized by high-resolution mass spectrometry. Three Q40::YFP-associated proteins were inferred to promote aggregation and cytotoxicity, traits reduced or delayed by their RNA interference knockdown. These RNAi treatments also retarded aggregation/cytotoxicity in Alzheimer's disease models, nematodes with muscle or pan-neuronal Aβ1–42 expression and behavioral phenotypes. The most abundant aggregated proteins are glutamine/asparagine-rich, favoring hydrophobic interactions with other random-coil domains. A particularly potent modulator of aggregation, CRAM-1/HYPK, contributed < 1% of protein aggregate peptides, yet its knockdown reduced Q40::YFP aggregates 72–86% (P < 10−6). In worms expressing Aβ1–42, knockdown of cram-1 reduced β-amyloid 60% (P < 0.002) and slowed age-dependent paralysis > 30% (P < 10−6). In wild-type worms, cram-1 knockdown reduced aggregation and extended lifespan, but impaired early reproduction. Protection against seeded aggregates requires proteasome function, implying that normal CRAM-1 levels promote aggregation by interfering with proteasomal degradation of misfolded proteins. Molecular dynamic modeling predicts spontaneous and stable interactions of CRAM-1 (or human orthologs) with ubiquitin, and we verified that CRAM-1 reduces degradation of a tagged-ubiquitin reporter. We propose that CRAM-1 exemplifies a class of primitive chaperones that are initially protective and highly

  7. The ER Stress Surveillance (ERSU) pathway regulates daughter cell ER protein aggregate inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Piña, Francisco J; Niwa, Maho

    2015-01-01

    Stress induced by cytoplasmic protein aggregates can have deleterious consequences for the cell, contributing to neurodegeneration and other diseases. Protein aggregates are also formed within the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), although the fate of ER protein aggregates, specifically during cell division, is not well understood. By simultaneous visualization of both the ER itself and ER protein aggregates, we found that ER protein aggregates that induce ER stress are retained in the mother cell by activation of the ER Stress Surveillance (ERSU) pathway, which prevents inheritance of stressed ER. In contrast, under conditions of normal ER inheritance, ER protein aggregates can enter the daughter cell. Thus, whereas cytoplasmic protein aggregates are retained in the mother cell to protect the functional capacity of daughter cells, the fate of ER protein aggregates is determined by whether or not they activate the ERSU pathway to impede transmission of the cortical ER during the cell cycle. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06970.001 PMID:26327697

  8. Modulus enhancement of natural rubber through the dispersion size reduction of protein/fiber aggregates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Improved mechanical properties of natural rubber are required for various rubber applications. Aggregates of protein and fiber that constitute soy protein concentrate were shear-reduced and used to enhance the tensile modulus of natural rubber. The aqueous dispersion of the shear-reduced aggregates ...

  9. Influence of denatured and intermediate states of folding on protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Fawzi, Nicolas L; Chubukov, Victor; Clark, Louis A; Brown, Scott; Head-Gordon, Teresa

    2005-04-01

    We simulate the aggregation thermodynamics and kinetics of proteins L and G, each of which self-assembles to the same alpha/beta [corrected] topology through distinct folding mechanisms. We find that the aggregation kinetics of both proteins at an experimentally relevant concentration exhibit both fast and slow aggregation pathways, although a greater proportion of protein G aggregation events are slow relative to those of found for protein L. These kinetic differences are correlated with the amount and distribution of intrachain contacts formed in the denatured state ensemble (DSE), or an intermediate state ensemble (ISE) if it exists, as well as the folding timescales of the two proteins. Protein G aggregates more slowly than protein L due to its rapidly formed folding intermediate, which exhibits native intrachain contacts spread across the protein, suggesting that certain early folding intermediates may be selected for by evolution due to their protective role against unwanted aggregation. Protein L shows only localized native structure in the DSE with timescales of folding that are commensurate with the aggregation timescale, leaving it vulnerable to domain swapping or nonnative interactions with other chains that increase the aggregation rate. Folding experiments that characterize the structural signatures of the DSE, ISE, or the transition state ensemble (TSE) under nonaggregating conditions should be able to predict regions where interchain contacts will be made in the aggregate, and to predict slower aggregation rates for proteins with contacts that are dispersed across the fold. Since proteins L and G can both form amyloid fibrils, this work also provides mechanistic and structural insight into the formation of prefibrillar species.

  10. Protein aggregates are associated with replicative aging without compromising protein quality control

    PubMed Central

    Saarikangas, Juha; Barral, Yves

    2015-01-01

    Differentiation of cellular lineages is facilitated by asymmetric segregation of fate determinants between dividing cells. In budding yeast, various aging factors segregate to the aging (mother)-lineage, with poorly understood consequences. In this study, we show that yeast mother cells form a protein aggregate during early replicative aging that is maintained as a single, asymmetrically inherited deposit over the remaining lifespan. Surprisingly, deposit formation was not associated with stress or general decline in proteostasis. Rather, the deposit-containing cells displayed enhanced degradation of cytosolic proteasome substrates and unimpaired clearance of stress-induced protein aggregates. Deposit formation was dependent on Hsp42, which collected non-random client proteins of the Hsp104/Hsp70-refolding machinery, including the prion Sup35. Importantly, loss of Hsp42 resulted in symmetric inheritance of its constituents and prolonged the lifespan of the mother cell. Together, these data suggest that protein aggregation is an early aging-associated differentiation event in yeast, having a two-faceted role in organismal fitness. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.06197.001 PMID:26544680

  11. The likelihood of aggregation during protein renaturation can be assessed using the second virial coefficient.

    PubMed

    Ho, Jason G S; Middelberg, Anton P J; Ramage, Paul; Kocher, Hans P

    2003-04-01

    Protein aggregation is commonly observed during protein refolding. To better understand this phenomenon, the intermolecular interactions experienced by a protein during unfolding and refolding are inferred from second virial coefficient (SVC) measurements. It is accepted that a negative SVC is indicative of protein-protein interactions that are attractive, whereas a positive SVC indicates net repulsive interactions. Lysozyme denatured and reduced in guanidinium hydrochloride exhibited a decreasing SVC as the denaturant was diluted, and the SVC approached zero at approximately 3 M GdnHCl. Further dilution of denaturant to renaturation conditions (1.25 M GdnHCl) led to a negative SVC, and significant protein aggregation was observed. The inclusion of 500 mM L-arginine in the renaturation buffer shifted the SVC to positive and suppressed aggregation, thereby increasing refolding yield. The formation of mixed disulfides in the denatured state prior to refolding also increased protein solubility and suppressed aggregation, even without the use of L-arginine. Again, the suppression of aggregation was shown to be caused by a shift from attractive to repulsive intermolecular interactions as reflected in a shift from a negative to a positive SVC value. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first time that SVC data have been reported for renaturation studies. We believe this technique will aid in our understanding of how certain conditions promote renaturation and increase protein solubility, thereby suppressing aggregation. SVC measurements provide a useful link, for protein folding and aggregation, between empirical observation and thermodynamics.

  12. Biophysical Insights into How Surfaces, Including Lipid Membranes, Modulate Protein Aggregation Related to Neurodegeneration

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Kathleen A.; Yates, Elizabeth A.; Legleiter, Justin

    2013-01-01

    There are a vast number of neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Huntington’s disease (HD), associated with the rearrangement of specific proteins to non-native conformations that promotes aggregation and deposition within tissues and/or cellular compartments. These diseases are commonly classified as protein-misfolding or amyloid diseases. The interaction of these proteins with liquid/surface interfaces is a fundamental phenomenon with potential implications for protein-misfolding diseases. Kinetic and thermodynamic studies indicate that significant conformational changes can be induced in proteins encountering surfaces, which can play a critical role in nucleating aggregate formation or stabilizing specific aggregation states. Surfaces of particular interest in neurodegenerative diseases are cellular and subcellular membranes that are predominately comprised of lipid components. The two-dimensional liquid environments provided by lipid bilayers can profoundly alter protein structure and dynamics by both specific and non-specific interactions. Importantly for misfolding diseases, these bilayer properties can not only modulate protein conformation, but also exert influence on aggregation state. A detailed understanding of the influence of (sub)cellular surfaces in driving protein aggregation and/or stabilizing specific aggregate forms could provide new insights into toxic mechanisms associated with these diseases. Here, we review the influence of surfaces in driving and stabilizing protein aggregation with a specific emphasis on lipid membranes. PMID:23459674

  13. Chemical and Biological Approaches for Adapting Proteostasis to Ameliorate Protein Misfolding and Aggregation Diseases–Progress and Prognosis

    PubMed Central

    Lindquist, Susan L.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2011-01-01

    Maintaining the proteome to preserve the health of an organism in the face of developmental changes, environmental insults, infectious diseases, and rigors of aging is a formidable task. The challenge is magnified by the inheritance of mutations that render individual proteins subject to misfolding and/or aggregation. Maintenance of the proteome requires the orchestration of protein synthesis, folding, degradation, and trafficking by highly conserved/deeply integrated cellular networks. In humans, no less than 2000 genes are involved. Stress sensors detect the misfolding and aggregation of proteins in specific organelles and respond by activating stress-responsive signaling pathways. These culminate in transcriptional and posttranscriptional programs that up-regulate the homeostatic mechanisms unique to that organelle. Proteostasis is also strongly influenced by the general properties of protein folding that are intrinsic to every proteome. These include the kinetics and thermodynamics of the folding, misfolding, and aggregation of individual proteins. We examine a growing body of evidence establishing that when cellular proteostasis goes awry, it can be reestablished by deliberate chemical and biological interventions. We start with approaches that employ chemicals or biological agents to enhance the general capacity of the proteostasis network. We then introduce chemical approaches to prevent the misfolding or aggregation of specific proteins through direct binding interactions. We finish with evidence that synergy is achieved with the combination of mechanistically distinct approaches to reestablish organismal proteostasis. PMID:21900404

  14. Ubiquitin-independent function of optineurin in autophagic clearance of protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Korac, Jelena; Schaeffer, Veronique; Kovacevic, Igor; Clement, Albrecht M.; Jungblut, Benno; Behl, Christian; Terzic, Janos; Dikic, Ivan

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Aggregation of misfolded proteins and the associated loss of neurons are considered as a hallmark of numerous neurodegenerative diseases. Optineurin is present in protein inclusions observed in various neurodegenerative diseases including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), Huntington’s disease, Alzheimer’s disease, Parkinson’s disease, Creutzfeld-Jacob disease and Pick’s disease. Optineurin deletion mutations have also been described in ALS patients. However, the role of optineurin in mechanisms of protein aggregation remains unclear. In this report, we demonstrate that optineurin recognized various protein aggregates via its C-terminal coiled-coil domain in a ubiquitin-independent manner. We also show that optineurin depletion significantly increase protein aggregation in HeLa cells and morpholino-silencing of the optineurin ortholog in zebrafish causes the motor axonopathy phenotype similar to a zebrafish model of ALS. A more severe phenotype is observed when optineurin is depleted in zebrafish carrying ALS mutations. Furthermore, TANK1 binding kinase 1 (TBK1) is co-localized with optineurin on protein aggregates and is important in clearance of protein aggregates through the autophagy-lysosome pathway. TBK1 phosphorylates optineurin at position Ser-177 and regulates its ability to interact with autophagy modifiers. This study provides evidence for a ubiquitin-independent function of optineurin in autophagic clearance of protein aggregates as well as additional relevance for TBK1 as an upstream regulator of the autophagic pathway. PMID:23178947

  15. Progressive aggregation of Tomato yellow leaf curl virus coat protein in systemically infected tomato plants, susceptible and resistant to the virus.

    PubMed

    Gorovits, Rena; Moshe, Adi; Kolot, Mikhail; Sobol, Iris; Czosnek, Henryk

    2013-01-01

    Tomato yellow leaf curl virus (TYLCV) coat protein (CP) accumulated in tomato leaves during infection. The CP was immuno-detected in the phloem associated cells. At the early stages of infection, punctate signals were detected in the cytoplasm, while in the later stages aggregates of increasing size were localized in cytoplasm and nuclei. Sedimentation of protein extracts through sucrose gradients confirmed that progress of infection was accompanied by the formation of CP aggregates of increasing size. Genomic ssDNA was found in the cytoplasm and in the nucleus, while the dsDNA replicative form was exclusively associated with the nucleus. CP-DNA complexes were detected by immuno-capture PCR in nuclear and cytoplasmic large aggregates. Nuclear aggregates contained infectious particles transmissible to test plants by whiteflies. In contrast to susceptible tomatoes, the formation of large CP aggregates in resistant plants was delayed. By experimentally changing the level of resistance/susceptibility of plants, we showed that maintenance of midsized CP aggregates was associated with resistance, while large aggregates where characteristic of susceptibility. We propose that sequestering of virus CP into midsized aggregates and retarding the formation of large insoluble aggregates containing infectious particles is part of the response of resistant plants to TYLCV.

  16. Reduced transglutaminase-catalyzed protein aggregation is observed in the presence of creatine using sedimentation velocity.

    PubMed

    Burguera, Elena F; Love, Brian J

    2006-03-01

    Transglutaminases (TGases) are enzymes that catalyze covalent isopeptide crosslinks between reactive lysine and glutamine residues in proteins. Higher than normal local concentrations of TGase have been correlated with increased protein aggregation in vivo. These insoluble protein aggregates are the hallmark of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and Huntington's diseases, although each aggregating protein involved is disease specific. Because TGase is implicated in protein aggregation, there is evidence that its regulation may retard disease progression. Here we report on a laser light transmission technique as an in vitro tool to gauge the efficacy of creatine, a candidate inhibitor, to regulate aggregation. Sedimentation velocities of protein-coated particles in TGase-containing water-glycerol solutions were tracked with different levels of creatine. Sedimentation velocities were converted to apparent aggregate sizes using Stoke's law of sedimentation. The results indicated that creatine promoted up to a 20% reduction in protein aggregation in vitro. This technique may prove to be useful in identifying other functional TGase inhibitors.

  17. Kinetics of Formation and Asymmetrical Distribution of Hsp104-Bound Protein Aggregates in Yeast.

    PubMed

    Paoletti, Camille; Quintin, Sophie; Matifas, Audrey; Charvin, Gilles

    2016-04-12

    Budding yeast cells have a finite replicative life span; that is, a mother cell produces only a limited number of daughter cells before it slows division and dies. Despite the gradual aging of the mother cell, all daughters are born rejuvenated and enjoy a full replicative lifespan. It has been proposed that entry of mother cells into senescence is driven by the progressive accumulation and retention of damaged material, including protein aggregates. This additionally allows the daughter cells to be born damage free. However, the mechanism underlying such asymmetrical segregation of protein aggregates by mother and daughter cells remains controversial, in part because of the difficulties inherent in tracking the dynamics and fate of protein aggregates in vivo. To overcome such limitations, we have developed single-cell real-time imaging methodology to track the formation of heat-induced protein aggregates in otherwise unperturbed dividing cells. By combining the imaging data with a simple computational model of protein aggregation, we show that the establishment of asymmetrical partitioning of protein aggregates upon division is driven by the large bud-specific dilution rate associated with polarized growth and the absence of significant mother/bud exchange of protein aggregates during the budded phase of the cell cycle. To our knowledge, this study sheds new light on the mechanism of establishment of a segregation bias, which can be accounted for by simple physical arguments.

  18. Editor’s Highlight: Subvisible Aggregates of Immunogenic Proteins Promote a Th1-Type Response

    PubMed Central

    Ratanji, Kirsty D.; Dearman, Rebecca J.; Kimber, Ian; Thorpe, Robin; Wadhwa, Meenu; Derrick, Jeremy P.

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation is associated with enhanced immunogenicity of biotherapeutics. As a result, regulatory guidelines recommend screening for aggregation during bioprocessing. However, the mechanisms underlying the enhanced immunogenicity of aggregates are poorly understood. In the investigations described herein, the immunogenicity in mice of a humanized single chain variable antibody fragment (scFv) purified after expression in Escherichia coli has been examined. Reproducible scFv aggregates were obtained within the subvisible particle size range (mean diameter 2 µm) using thermal and mechanical stresses. Intraperitoneal immunization of BALB/c strain mice with 1 mg/ml of aggregated or monomeric scFv induced similar IgG and IgG1 antibody responses. In contrast, aggregate preparations stimulated significantly higher levels of anti-scFv IgG2a antibody than did the monomer. In comparative studies, aggregates of ovalbumin (OVA) within the subvisible particle size range were prepared by stir stress, and their immunogenicity compared with that of monomeric OVA in mice. Aggregated and monomeric OVA induced similar anti-OVA IgG and IgG1 antibody responses, whereas IgG2a antibody levels were significantly higher in aggregate-immunized mice. Furthermore, cytokine profiles in supernatants taken from splenocyte-dendritic cell co-cultures were consistent with aggregated preparations inducing a T helper (Th) 1-type response. Aggregated proteins within the subvisible range were therefore shown to induce a preferential Th1 type response, whereas monomeric proteins elicited a selective Th2 response. These data indicate that protein aggregation can impact on both the vigor and quality of immune responses. PMID:27370416

  19. Pressure-induced unfolding and aggregation of the proteins in whey protein concentrate solutions.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hasmukh A; Singh, Harjinder; Havea, Palatasa; Considine, Thérèse; Creamer, Lawrence K

    2005-11-30

    Whey protein concentrate solutions (12% w/v, pH 6.65 +/- 0.05) were pressure treated at 800 MPa for 20-120 min and then examined using size exclusion chromatography (SEC), small deformation rheology, transmission electron microscopy, and various types of one-dimensional (1D) and two-dimensional (2D) polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The pressure-treated samples showed a time-dependent loss of native whey proteins by SEC and 1D PAGE and a corresponding increase in non-native proteins and protein aggregates of different sizes. These aggregates altered the viscosity and opacity of the samples and were shown to be cross-linked by intermolecular disulfide bonds and by noncovalent interactions using 1D PAGE [alkaline (or native), sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), and SDS of reduced samples (SDS(R))] and 2D PAGE (native:SDS and SDS:SDS(R)). The sensitivity of the major whey proteins to pressure was in the order beta-lactoglobulin B (beta-LG B) > beta-LG A > bovine serum albumin (BSA) > alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-LA), and the large internal hydrophobic cavity of beta-LG may have been partially responsible for its sensitivity to high-pressure treatments. It seemed likely that, at 800 MPa, the formation of a beta-LG disulfide-bonded network preceded the formation of disulfide bonds between alpha-LA or BSA and beta-LG to form multiprotein aggregates, possibly because the disulfide bonds of alpha-LA and BSA are less exposed than those of beta-LG either during or after pressure treatment. It may be possible that intermolecular disulfide bond formation occurred at high pressure and that hydrophobic association became important after the high-pressure treatment.

  20. Both protein adsorption and aggregation contribute to shear yielding and viscosity increase in protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Castellanos, Maria Monica; Pathak, Jai A; Colby, Ralph H

    2014-01-07

    A combination of sensitive rotational rheometry and surface rheometry with a double-wall ring were used to identify the origins of the viscosity increase at low shear rates in protein solutions. The rheology of two high molecular weight proteins is discussed: Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) in a Phosphate Buffered Saline solution and an IgG1 monoclonal antibody (mAb) in a formulation buffer containing small quantities of a non-ionic surfactant. For surfactant-free BSA solutions, the interfacial viscosity dominates the low shear viscosity measured in rotational rheometers, while the surfactant-laden mAb solution has an interfacial viscosity that is small compared to that from aggregation in the bulk. A viscoelastic film forms at the air/water interface in the absence of surfactant, contributing to an apparent yield stress (thus a low shear viscosity increase) in conventional bulk rheology measurements. Addition of surfactant eliminates the interfacial yield stress. Evidence of a bulk yield stress arising from protein aggregation is presented, and correlated with results from standard characterization techniques used in the bio-pharmaceutical industry. The protein film at the air/water interface and bulk aggregates both lead to an apparent viscosity increase and their contributions are quantified using a dimensionless ratio of the interfacial and total yield stress. While steady shear viscosities at shear rates below ∼1 s(-1) contain rich information about the stability of protein solutions, embodied in the measured yield stress, such low shear rate data are regrettably often not measured and reported in the literature.

  1. Spatially organized aggregation of misfolded proteins as cellular stress defense strategy.

    PubMed

    Miller, Stephanie B M; Mogk, Axel; Bukau, Bernd

    2015-04-10

    An evolutionary conserved response of cells to proteotoxic stress is the organized sequestration of misfolded proteins into subcellular deposition sites. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, three major sequestration sites for misfolded proteins exist, IPOD (insoluble protein deposit), INQ (intranuclear quality control compartment) [former JUNQ (juxtanuclear quality control compartment)] and CytoQ. IPOD is perivacuolar and predominantly sequesters amyloidogenic proteins. INQ and CytoQs are stress-induced deposits for misfolded proteins residing in the nucleus and the cytosol, respectively, and requiring cell-compartment-specific aggregases, nuclear Btn2 and cytosolic Hsp42 for formation. The organized aggregation of misfolded proteins is proposed to serve several purposes collectively increasing cellular fitness and survival under proteotoxic stress. These include (i) shielding of cellular processes from interference by toxic protein conformers, (ii) reducing the substrate burden for protein quality control systems upon immediate stress, (iii) orchestrating chaperone and protease functions for efficient repair or degradation of damaged proteins [this involves initial extraction of aggregated molecules via the Hsp70/Hsp104 bi-chaperone system followed by either refolding or proteasomal degradation or removal of entire aggregates by selective autophagy (aggrephagy) involving the adaptor protein Cue5] and (iv) enabling asymmetric retention of protein aggregates during cell division, thereby allowing for damage clearance in daughter cells. Regulated protein aggregation thus serves cytoprotective functions vital for the maintenance of cell integrity and survival even under adverse stress conditions and during aging.

  2. High-Throughput Multiplexed Quantitation of Protein Aggregation and Cytotoxicity in a Huntington’s Disease Model

    PubMed Central

    Titus, Steven A; Southall, Noel; Marugan, Juan; Austin, Christopher P; Zheng, Wei

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of Huntington’s disease is the presence of a large polyglutamine expansion in the first exon of the Huntingtin protein and the propensity of protein aggregation by the mutant proteins. Aberrant protein aggregation also occurs in other polyglutamine expansion disorders, as well as in other neurodegenerative diseases including Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s, and prion diseases. However, the pathophysiological role of these aggregates in the cell death that characterizes the diseases remains unclear. Identification of small molecule probes that modulate protein aggregation and cytotoxicity caused by aggregated proteins may greatly facilitate the studies on pathogenesis of these diseases and potentially lead to development of new therapies. Based on a detergent insoluble property of the Huntingtin protein aggregates, we have developed a homogenous assay to rapidly quantitate the levels of protein aggregates in a cellular model of Huntington’s disease. The protein aggregation assay has also been multiplexed with a protease release assay for the measurement of cytotoxicity resulting from aggregated proteins in the same cells. Through a testing screen of a compound library, we have demonstrated that this multiplexed cytotoxicity and protein aggregation assay has ability to identify active compounds that prevent cell death and/or modulate protein aggregation in cells of the Huntington’s disease model. Therefore, this multiplexed screening approach is also useful for development of high-throughput screening assays for other neurodegenerative diseases involving protein aggregation. PMID:23346268

  3. Detection and characterization of red blood cell (RBC) aggregation with photoacoustics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hysi, Eno; Saha, Ratan K.; Rui, Min; Kolios, Michael C.

    2012-02-01

    Red blood cells (RBCs) aggregate in the presence of increased plasma fibrinogen and low shear forces during blood flow. RBC aggregation has been observed in deep vein thrombosis, sepsis and diabetes. We propose using photoacoustics (PA) as a non-invasive imaging modality to detect RBC aggregation. The theoretical and experimental feasibility of PA for detecting and characterizing aggregation was assessed. A simulation study was performed to generate PA signals from non-aggregated and aggregated RBCs using a frequency domain approach and to study the PA signals' dependence on hematocrit and aggregate size. The effect of the finite bandwidth nature of transducers on the PA power spectra was also investigated. Experimental confirmation of theoretical results was conducted using porcine RBC samples exposed to 1064 nm optical wavelength using the Imagio Small Animal PA imaging system (Seno Medical Instruments, Inc., San Antonio, TX). Aggregation was induced with Dextran-70 (Sigma-Aldrich, St. Louis, MO) and the effect of hematocrit and aggregation level was investigated. The theoretical and experimental PA signal amplitude increased linearly with increasing hematocrit. The theoretical dominant frequency content of PA signals shifted towards lower frequencies (<30 MHz) and 9 dB enhancements in spectral power were observed as the size of aggregates increased compared to non-aggregating RBCs. Calibration of the PA spectra with the transducer response obtained from a 200 nm gold film was performed to remove system dependencies. Analysis of the spectral parameters from the calibrated spectra suggested that PA can assess the degree of aggregation at multiple hematocrit and aggregation levels.

  4. Protein aggregation in food models: effect of. gamma. -irradiation and lipid oxidation

    SciTech Connect

    Delincee, H.; Paul, P.

    1981-09-01

    Myoglobin and serum albumin have been irradiated in aqueous solution in the presence of varying amounts of carbohydrates and lipids, and the yield of protein aggregates has been determined by gel filtration. With myoglobin the formation of aggregates evolving from the reaction with oxidizing lipids was observed, which was not found for serum albumin. The production of protein-lipid complexes, in which lipid material was occluded in the high-molecular aggregates by physical forces was demonstrated. Gel filtration and gel electrophoresis, both in the presence of SDS, and thin-layer isoelectric focusing revealed distinct structural differenes between the protein aggregates induced by irradiation and the aggregates formed by interaction with oxidizing lipids.

  5. Quantitation of pH-induced aggregation in binary protein mixtures by dielectric spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Mellor, Brett L; Wood, Stephen J; Mazzeo, Brian A

    2012-12-01

    This paper presents a quantitative approach for measuring pH-controlled protein aggregation using dielectric spectroscopy. The technique is demonstrated through two aggregation experiments, the first between β-lactoglobulin (β-Lg) and hen lysozyme (HENL) and the second between bovine serum albumin (BSA) and HENL. In both experiments, the formation of aggregates is strongly dependent on the solution pH and is clearly indicated by a decrease in the measured permittivity when the second protein is added. A quantifiable lower-bound on the ratio of proteins involved in the aggregation process is obtained from the permittivity spectra. Lower-bound aggregation ratios of 83 % for β-Lg/HENL at pH 6.0 and 48 % for BSA/HENL at pH 9.2 were consistent with turbidity measurements made on the same solutions.

  6. Aggregation-based detection of M. smegmatis using D-arabinose-functionalized fluorescent silica nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Jayawardana, Kalana W; Wijesundera, Samurdhi A; Yan, Mingdi

    2015-11-14

    Fluorescein-doped silica nanoparticles (FSNPs) functionalized with D-arabinose (Ara) showed strong interactions with Mycobacterium smegmatis (M. smegmatis) and caused the bacteria to aggregate. This aggregate formation was used as a means to detect M. smegmatis at the concentration of 10(4) CFU per mL.

  7. HDAC6 controls major cell response pathways to cytotoxic accumulation of protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Boyault, Cyril; Zhang, Yu; Fritah, Sabrina; Caron, Cécile; Gilquin, Benoit; Kwon, So Hee; Garrido, Carmen; Yao, Tso-Pang; Vourc’h, Claire; Matthias, Patrick; Khochbin, Saadi

    2007-01-01

    A cellular defense mechanism counteracts the deleterious effects of misfolded protein accumulation by eliciting a stress response. The cytoplasmic deacetylase HDAC6 (histone deacetylase 6) was previously shown to be a key element in this response by coordinating the clearance of protein aggregates through aggresome formation and their autophagic degradation. Here, for the first time, we demonstrate that HDAC6 is involved in another crucial cell response to the accumulation of ubiquitinated protein aggregates, and unravel its molecular basis. Indeed, our data show that HDAC6 senses ubiquitinated cellular aggregates and consequently induces the expression of major cellular chaperones by triggering the dissociation of a repressive HDAC6/HSF1 (heat-shock factor 1)/HSP90 (heat-shock protein 90) complex and a subsequent HSF1 activation. HDAC6 therefore appears as a master regulator of the cell protective response to cytotoxic protein aggregate formation. PMID:17785525

  8. Hydrodynamic size-based separation and characterization of protein aggregates from total cell lysates

    PubMed Central

    Tanase, Maya; Zolla, Valerio; Clement, Cristina C; Borghi, Francesco; Urbanska, Aleksandra M; Rodriguez-Navarro, Jose Antonio; Roda, Barbara; Zattoni, Andrea; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Cuervo, Ana Maria; Santambrogio, Laura

    2016-01-01

    Herein we describe a protocol that uses hollow-fiber flow field-flow fractionation (FFF) coupled with multiangle light scattering (MALS) for hydrodynamic size-based separation and characterization of complex protein aggregates. The fractionation method, which requires 1.5 h to run, was successfully modified from the analysis of protein aggregates, as found in simple protein mixtures, to complex aggregates, as found in total cell lysates. In contrast to other related methods (filter assay, analytical ultracentrifugation, gel electrophoresis and size-exclusion chromatography), hollow-fiber flow FFF coupled with MALS allows a flow-based fractionation of highly purified protein aggregates and simultaneous measurement of their molecular weight, r.m.s. radius and molecular conformation (e.g., round, rod-shaped, compact or relaxed). The polyethersulfone hollow fibers used, which have a 0.8-mm inner diameter, allow separation of as little as 20 μg of total cell lysates. In addition, the ability to run the samples in different denaturing and nondenaturing buffer allows defining true aggregates from artifacts, which can form during sample preparation. The protocol was set up using Paraquat-induced carbonylation, a model that induces protein aggregation in cultured cells. This technique will advance the biochemical, proteomic and biophysical characterization of molecular-weight aggregates associated with protein mutations, as found in many CNS degenerative diseases, or chronic oxidative stress, as found in aging, and chronic metabolic and inflammatory conditions. PMID:25521790

  9. Recruitment into stress granules prevents irreversible aggregation of FUS protein mislocalized to the cytoplasm

    PubMed Central

    Shelkovnikova, Tatyana A; Robinson, Hannah K; Connor-Robson, Natalie; Buchman, Vladimir L

    2013-01-01

    Fused in sarcoma (FUS) belongs to the group of RNA-binding proteins implicated as underlying factors in amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and certain other neurodegenerative diseases. Multiple FUS gene mutations have been linked to hereditary forms, and aggregation of FUS protein is believed to play an important role in pathogenesis of these diseases. In cultured cells, FUS variants with disease-associated amino acid substitutions or short deletions affecting nuclear localization signal (NLS) and causing cytoplasmic mislocalization can be sequestered into stress granules (SGs). We demonstrated that disruption of motifs responsible for RNA recognition and binding not only prevents SG recruitment, but also dramatically increases the protein propensity to aggregate in the cell cytoplasm with formation of juxtanuclear structures displaying typical features of aggresomes. Functional RNA-binding domains from TAR DNA-binding protein of 43 kDa (TDP-43) fused to highly aggregation-prone C-terminally truncated FUS protein restored the ability to enter SGs and prevented aggregation of the chimeric protein. Truncated FUS was also able to trap endogenous FUS molecules in the cytoplasmic aggregates. Our data indicate that RNA binding and recruitment to SGs protect cytoplasmic FUS from aggregation, and loss of this protection may trigger its pathological aggregation in vivo. PMID:24013423

  10. Age- and Hypertension-Associated Protein Aggregates in Mouse Heart Have Similar Proteomic Profiles.

    PubMed

    Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Mercanti, Federico; Wang, Xianwei; Mackintosh, Samuel G; Tackett, Alan J; Prayaga, Sastry V S; Romeo, Francesco; Shmookler Reis, Robert J; Mehta, Jawahar L

    2016-05-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases are largely defined by protein aggregates in affected tissues. Aggregates contain some shared components as well as proteins thought to be specific for each disease. Aggregation has not previously been reported in the normal, aging heart or the hypertensive heart. Detergent-insoluble protein aggregates were isolated from mouse heart and characterized on 2-dimensional gels. Their levels increased markedly and significantly with aging and after sustained angiotensin II-induced hypertension. Of the aggregate components identified by high-resolution proteomics, half changed in abundance with age (392/787) or with sustained hypertension (459/824), whereas 30% (273/901) changed concordantly in both, each P<0.05. One fifth of these proteins were previously associated with age-progressive neurodegenerative or cardiovascular diseases, or both (eg, ApoE, ApoJ, ApoAIV, clusterin, complement C3, and others involved in stress-response and protein-homeostasis pathways). Because fibrosis is a characteristic of both aged and hypertensive hearts, we posited that aging of fibroblasts may contribute to the aggregates observed in cardiac tissue. Indeed, as cardiac myofibroblasts "senesced" (approached their replicative limit) in vitro, they accrued aggregates with many of the same constituent proteins observed in vivo during natural aging or sustained hypertension. In summary, we have shown for the first time that compact (detergent-insoluble) protein aggregates accumulate during natural aging, chronic hypertension, and in vitro myofibroblast senescence, sharing many common proteins. Thus, aggregates that arise from disparate causes (aging, hypertension, and replicative senescence) may have common underlying mechanisms of accrual.

  11. Ultrafast laser-probing spectroscopy for studying molecular structure of protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Jung, Huihun; Szwejkowski, Chester J; Pena-Francesch, Abdon; Tomko, John A; Allen, Benjamin; Özdemir, Şahin Kaya; Hopkins, Patrick; Demirel, Melik C

    2017-03-09

    We report the development of a new technique to screen protein aggregation based on laser-probing spectroscopy with sub-picosecond resolution. Protein aggregation is an important topic for materials science, fundamental biology as well as clinical studies in neurodegenerative diseases and translation studies in biomaterials engineering. However, techniques to study protein aggregation and assembly are limited to infrared spectroscopy, fluorescent assays, immunostaining, or functional assays among others. Here, we report a new technique to characterize protein structure-property relationship based on ultrafast laser-probing spectroscopy. First, we show theoretically that the temperature dependence of the refractive index of a protein is correlated to its crystallinity. Then, we performed time-domain thermo-transmission experiments on purified semi-crystalline proteins, both native and recombinant (i.e., silk and squid ring teeth), and also on intact E. coli cells bearing overexpressed recombinant protein. Our results demonstrate, for the first time, relative quantification of crystallinity in real time for protein aggregates. Our approach can potentially be used for screening an ultra-large number of proteins in vivo. Using this technique, we could answer many fundamental questions in structural protein research, such as the underlying sequence-structure relationship for protein assembly and aggregation.

  12. Mechanisms and consequences of protein aggregation: the role of folding intermediates.

    PubMed

    Seshadri, Sangita; Oberg, Keith A; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2009-10-01

    Protein aggregation, being one of the hottest topics of modern protein science, is recognized now as a serious biomedical and biotechnological problem. Protein aggregation is considered as a causative factor (or at least an associated symptom) of a wide spectrum of human pathologies. Furthermore, aggregation and precipitation are known to trammel recombinant protein production, as well as to affect the manufacture, storage and delivery of proteinaceous drugs. Therefore, this topic attracts the serious attention of many researchers, a conclusion that follows from the average daily publication of 7-8 scientific papers dedicated to the various aspects of protein aggregation. However, the situation was rather different 15-20 years ago when it was believed that the formation of protein aggregates causing the irreversibility of unfolding or denaturation of some proteins was nothing more than an annoying experimental artifact, hampering the detailed characterization of the unfolding/denaturation processes. At that time, only a few laboratories (including the laboratory of Prof. Anthony L. Fink) seriously worked on understanding the molecular mechanisms of this "artifact". In this review, we summarize some of the early work of Tony Fink on aggregation, of protein folding intermediates and on the analysis of the structural consequences of this process.

  13. Accelerating the clearance of mutant huntingtin protein aggregates through autophagy induction by europium hydroxide nanorods.

    PubMed

    Wei, Peng-Fei; Zhang, Li; Nethi, Susheel Kumar; Barui, Ayan Kumar; Lin, Jun; Zhou, Wei; Shen, Yi; Man, Na; Zhang, Yun-Jiao; Xu, Jing; Patra, Chitta Ranjan; Wen, Long-Ping

    2014-01-01

    Autophagy is one of the well-known pathways to accelerate the clearance of protein aggregates, which contributes to the therapy of neurodegenerative diseases. Although there are numerous reports that demonstrate the induction of autophagy with small molecules including rapamycin, trehalose and lithium, however, there are few reports mentioning the clearance of aggregate-prone proteins through autophagy induction by nanoparticles. In the present article, we have demonstrated that europium hydroxide [Eu(III)(OH)3] nanorods can reduce huntingtin protein aggregation (EGFP-tagged huntingtin protein with 74 polyQ repeats), responsible for neurodegenerative diseases. Again, we have found that these nanorods induce authentic autophagy flux in different cell lines (Neuro 2a, PC12 and HeLa cells) through the expression of higher levels of characteristic autophagy marker protein LC3-II and degradation of selective autophagy substrate/cargo receptor p62/SQSTM1. Furthermore, depression of protein aggregation clearance through the autophagy blockade has also been observed by using specific inhibitors (wortmannin and chloroquine), indicating that autophagy is involved in the degradation of huntingtin protein aggregation. Since [Eu(III)(OH)3] nanorods can enhance the degradation of huntingtin protein aggregation via autophagy induction, we strongly believe that these nanorods would be useful for the development of therapeutic treatment strategies for various neurodegenerative diseases in near future using nanomedicine approach.

  14. An online detection system for aggregate sizes and shapes based on digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Sijia

    2017-02-01

    Traditional aggregate size measuring methods are time-consuming, taxing, and do not deliver online measurements. A new online detection system for determining aggregate size and shape based on a digital camera with a charge-coupled device, and subsequent digital image processing, have been developed to overcome these problems. The system captures images of aggregates while falling and flat lying. Using these data, the particle size and shape distribution can be obtained in real time. Here, we calibrate this method using standard globules. Our experiments show that the maximum particle size distribution error was only 3 wt%, while the maximum particle shape distribution error was only 2 wt% for data derived from falling aggregates, having good dispersion. In contrast, the data for flat-lying aggregates had a maximum particle size distribution error of 12 wt%, and a maximum particle shape distribution error of 10 wt%; their accuracy was clearly lower than for falling aggregates. However, they performed well for single-graded aggregates, and did not require a dispersion device. Our system is low-cost and easy to install. It can successfully achieve online detection of aggregate size and shape with good reliability, and it has great potential for aggregate quality assurance.

  15. An online detection system for aggregate sizes and shapes based on digital image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jianhong; Chen, Sijia

    2016-07-01

    Traditional aggregate size measuring methods are time-consuming, taxing, and do not deliver online measurements. A new online detection system for determining aggregate size and shape based on a digital camera with a charge-coupled device, and subsequent digital image processing, have been developed to overcome these problems. The system captures images of aggregates while falling and flat lying. Using these data, the particle size and shape distribution can be obtained in real time. Here, we calibrate this method using standard globules. Our experiments show that the maximum particle size distribution error was only 3 wt%, while the maximum particle shape distribution error was only 2 wt% for data derived from falling aggregates, having good dispersion. In contrast, the data for flat-lying aggregates had a maximum particle size distribution error of 12 wt%, and a maximum particle shape distribution error of 10 wt%; their accuracy was clearly lower than for falling aggregates. However, they performed well for single-graded aggregates, and did not require a dispersion device. Our system is low-cost and easy to install. It can successfully achieve online detection of aggregate size and shape with good reliability, and it has great potential for aggregate quality assurance.

  16. Polythiophenes Inhibit Prion Propagation by Stabilizing Prion Protein (PrP) Aggregates*

    PubMed Central

    Margalith, Ilan; Suter, Carlo; Ballmer, Boris; Schwarz, Petra; Tiberi, Cinzia; Sonati, Tiziana; Falsig, Jeppe; Nyström, Sofie; Hammarström, Per; Åslund, Andreas; Nilsson, K. Peter R.; Yam, Alice; Whitters, Eric; Hornemann, Simone; Aguzzi, Adriano

    2012-01-01

    Luminescent conjugated polymers (LCPs) interact with ordered protein aggregates and sensitively detect amyloids of many different proteins, suggesting that they may possess antiprion properties. Here, we show that a variety of anionic, cationic, and zwitterionic LCPs reduced the infectivity of prion-containing brain homogenates and of prion-infected cerebellar organotypic cultured slices and decreased the amount of scrapie isoform of PrPC (PrPSc) oligomers that could be captured in an avidity assay. Paradoxically, treatment enhanced the resistance of PrPSc to proteolysis, triggered the compaction, and enhanced the resistance to proteolysis of recombinant mouse PrP(23–231) fibers. These results suggest that LCPs act as antiprion agents by transitioning PrP aggregates into structures with reduced frangibility. Moreover, ELISA on cerebellar organotypic cultured slices and in vitro conversion assays with mouse PrP(23–231) indicated that poly(thiophene-3-acetic acid) may additionally interfere with the generation of PrPSc by stabilizing the conformation of PrPC or of a transition intermediate. Therefore, LCPs represent a novel class of antiprion agents whose mode of action appears to rely on hyperstabilization, rather than destabilization, of PrPSc deposits. PMID:22493452

  17. Effects of Polymer Hydrophobicity on Protein Structure and Aggregation Kinetics in Crowded Milieu.

    PubMed

    Breydo, Leonid; Sales, Amanda E; Frege, Telma; Howell, Mark C; Zaslavsky, Boris Y; Uversky, Vladimir N

    2015-05-19

    We examined the effects of water-soluble polymers of various degrees of hydrophobicity on the folding and aggregation of proteins. The polymers we chose were polyethylene glycol (PEG) and UCON (1:1 copolymer of ethylene glycol and propylene glycol). The presence of additional methyl groups in UCON makes it more hydrophobic than PEG. Our earlier analysis revealed that similarly sized PEG and UCON produced different changes in the solvent properties of water in their solutions and induced morphologically different α-synuclein aggregates [Ferreira, L. A., et al. (2015) Role of solvent properties of aqueous media in macromolecular crowding effects. J. Biomol. Struct. Dyn., in press]. To improve our understanding of molecular mechanisms defining behavior of proteins in a crowded environment, we tested the effects of these polymers on secondary and tertiary structure and aromatic residue solvent accessibility of 10 proteins [five folded proteins, two hybrid proteins; i.e., protein containing ordered and disordered domains, and three intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs)] and on the aggregation kinetics of insulin and α-synuclein. We found that effects of both polymers on secondary and tertiary structures of folded and hybrid proteins were rather limited with slight unfolding observed in some cases. Solvent accessibility of aromatic residues was significantly increased for the majority of the studied proteins in the presence of UCON but not PEG. PEG also accelerated the aggregation of protein into amyloid fibrils, whereas UCON promoted aggregation to amyloid oligomers instead. These results indicate that even a relatively small change in polymer structure leads to a significant change in the effect of this polymer on protein folding and aggregation. This is an indication that protein folding and especially aggregation are highly sensitive to the presence of other macromolecules, and an excluded volume effect is insufficient to describe their effect.

  18. Inhibition of protein aggregation in vitro and in vivo by a natural osmoprotectant.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Zoya; Gierasch, Lila M

    2006-09-05

    Small organic molecules termed osmolytes are harnessed by a variety of cell types in a wide range of organisms to counter unfavorable physiological conditions that challenge protein stability and function. Using a well characterized reporter system that we developed to allow in vivo observations, we have explored how the osmolyte proline influences the stability and aggregation of a model aggregation-prone protein, P39A cellular retinoic acid-binding protein. Strikingly, we find that the natural osmolyte proline abrogates aggregation both in vitro and in vivo (in an Escherichia coli expression system). Importantly, proline also prevented aggregation of constructs containing exon 1 of huntingtin with extended polyglutamine tracts. Although compatible osmolytes are known to stabilize the native state, our results point to a destabilizing effect of proline on partially folded states and early aggregates and a solubilizing effect on the native state. Because proline is believed to act through a combination of solvophobic backbone interactions and favorable side-chain interactions that are not specific to a particular sequence or structure, the observed effect is likely to be general. Thus, the osmolyte proline may be protective against biomedically important protein aggregates that are hallmarks of several late-onset neurodegenerative diseases including Huntington's, Alzheimer's, and Parkinson's. In addition, these results should be of practical importance because they may enable protein expression at higher efficiency under conditions where aggregation competes with proper folding.

  19. Protein Aggregates Are Recruited to Aggresome by Histone Deacetylase 6 via Unanchored Ubiquitin C Termini

    SciTech Connect

    Ouyang, Hui; Ali, Yousuf O.; Ravichandran, Mani; Dong, Aiping; Qiu, Wei; MacKenzie, Farrell; Dhe-Paganon, Sirano; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.; Zhai, R. Grace

    2012-07-11

    The aggresome pathway is activated when proteasomal clearance of misfolded proteins is hindered. Misfolded polyubiquitinated protein aggregates are recruited and transported to the aggresome via the microtubule network by a protein complex consisting of histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) and the dynein motor complex. The current model suggests that HDAC6 recognizes protein aggregates by binding directly to polyubiquitinated proteins. Here, we show that there are substantial amounts of unanchored ubiquitin in protein aggregates with solvent-accessible C termini. The ubiquitin-binding domain (ZnF-UBP) of HDAC6 binds exclusively to the unanchored C-terminal diglycine motif of ubiquitin instead of conjugated polyubiquitin. The unanchored ubiquitin C termini in the aggregates are generated in situ by aggregate-associated deubiquitinase ataxin-3. These results provide structural and mechanistic bases for the role of HDAC6 in aggresome formation and further suggest a novel ubiquitin-mediated signaling pathway, where the exposure of ubiquitin C termini within protein aggregates enables HDAC6 recognition and transport to the aggresome.

  20. Oligomeric Neuronal Protein Aggregates as Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-10-01

    as Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD) PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Michael Sierks CONTRACTING...Oligomeric Neuronal Protein Aggregates as Biomarkers for Traumatic Brain Injury (TBI) and Alzheimer Disease (AD) 5b. GRANT NUMBER 12109023 5c

  1. Particle Formation and Aggregation of a Therapeutic Protein in Nanobubble Suspensions.

    PubMed

    Snell, Jared R; Zhou, Chen; Carpenter, John F; Randolph, Theodore W

    2016-10-01

    The generation of nanobubbles following reconstitution of lyophilized trehalose formulations has recently been reported. Here, we characterize particle formation and aggregation of recombinant human interleukin-1 receptor antagonist (rhIL-1ra) in reconstituted formulations of lyophilized trehalose. Particle characterization methods including resonant mass measurement and nanoparticle tracking analysis were used to count and size particles generated upon reconstitution of lyophilized trehalose formulations. In addition, accelerated degradation studies were conducted to monitor rhIL-1ra aggregation in solutions containing various concentrations of suspended nanobubbles. Reconstitution of lyophilized trehalose formulations with solutions containing rhIL-1ra reduced nanobubble concentrations and generated negatively buoyant particles attributed to aggregated rhIL-1ra. Furthermore, levels of rhIL-1ra aggregation following incubation in aqueous solution correlated with concentrations of suspended nanobubbles. The results of this study suggest that nanobubbles may be a contributor to protein aggregation and particle formation in reconstituted, lyophilized therapeutic protein formulations.

  2. Simple Model Study of Phase Transition Properties of Isolated and Aggregated Protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Yong-Yun; Yi, Wei-Qi; Zhang, Lin-Xi

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the phase transition properties of isolated and aggregated protein by exhaustive numerical study in the confined conformation space with maximally compact lattice model. The study within the confined conformation space shows some general folding properties. Various sequences show different folding properties: two-state folding, three-state folding and prion-like folding behavior. We find that the aggregated protein holds a more evident transition than isolated one and the transition temperature is generally lower than that in isolated case.

  3. Time-resolved FT-IR microspectroscopy of protein aggregation induced by heat-shock in live cells.

    PubMed

    Mitri, Elisa; Kenig, Saša; Coceano, Giovanna; Bedolla, Diana E; Tormen, Massimo; Grenci, Gianluca; Vaccari, Lisa

    2015-04-07

    Maintaining the correct folding of cellular proteins is essential for preserving cellular homeostasis. Protein dishomeostasis, aberrant protein folding, and protein aggregation are indeed involved in several diseases including cancer, aging-associated, and neurodegenerative disorders. Accumulation of protein aggregates can also be induced from a variety of stressful conditions, such as temperature increase or oxidative stress. In this work, we monitored by Fourier transform-infrared (FT-IR) microspectroscopy the response of live breast cancer MCF-7 and mammary breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB 231 cell lines to severe heat-shock (HS), caused by the rise of the cellular medium temperature from 37 ± 0.5 °C to 42 ± 0.5 °C. Through the study of the time-evolution of the second derivatives of the spectra and by the 2D correlation analysis of FT-IR absorbance data, we were able to identify a common sudden heat-shock response (HSR) among the two cell lines. The hyperfluidization of mammalian cell membranes, the transient increment of the signal lipids, as well as the alteration of proteome profile were all monitored within the first 40 min of stress application, while the persistent intracellular accumulation of extended β-folded protein aggregates was detected after 40 min up to 2 h. As a whole, this paper offers a further prove of the diagnostic capabilities of FT-IR microspectroscopy for monitoring in real-time the biochemical rearrangements undergone by live cells upon external stimulation.

  4. Fractal dimensions of soy protein nanoparticle aggregates determined by dynamic mechanical method

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soy protein isolate (SPI) is obtained from soybeans by removing soybean oil and soy carbohydrates. Soy protein nanoparticles were prepared by alkaline hydrolysis of SPI and centrifugal separation process. Structurally, SPI is a globular protein and its aggregates in water consist of sphere-like pr...

  5. Ubiquilin overexpression reduces GFP-polyalanine-induced protein aggregates and toxicity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang Hongmin; Monteiro, Mervyn J. . E-mail: monteiro@umbi.umd.edu

    2007-08-01

    Several human disorders are associated with an increase in a continuous stretch of alanine amino acids in proteins. These so-called polyalanine expansion diseases share many similarities with polyglutamine-related disorders, including a length-dependent reiteration of amino acid induction of protein aggregation and cytotoxicity. We previously reported that overexpression of ubiquilin reduces protein aggregates and toxicity of expanded polyglutamine proteins. Here, we demonstrate a similar role for ubiquilin toward expanded polyalanine proteins. Overexpression of ubiquilin-1 in HeLa cells reduced protein aggregates and the cytotoxicity associated with expression of a transfected nuclear-targeted GFP-fusion protein containing 37-alanine repeats (GFP-A37), in a dose dependent manner. Ubiquilin coimmunoprecipitated more with GFP proteins containing a 37-polyalanine tract compared to either 7 (GFP-A7), or no alanine tract (GFP). Moreover, overexpression of ubiquilin suppressed the increased vulnerability of HeLa cell lines stably expressing the GFP-A37 fusion protein to oxidative stress-induced cell death compared to cell lines expressing GFP or GFP-A7 proteins. By contrast, siRNA knockdown of ubiquilin expression in the GFP-A37 cell line was associated with decreased cellular proliferation, and increases in GFP protein aggregates, nuclear fragmentation, and cell death. Our results suggest that boosting ubiquilin levels in cells might provide a universal and attractive strategy to prevent toxicity of proteins containing reiterative expansions of amino acids involved in many human diseases.

  6. Aggregation of Whey Protein Hydrolysate Using Alcalase 2.4 L

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunhong; Liu, Wen; Feng, Zhibiao; Li, Dongmei

    2014-01-01

    Here, we describe peptide aggregation, which is also known as enzymatic protein resynthesis. Whey protein hydrolysate (WPH) is the starting material for assembling peptides. Analyses of the involved amino acids, intrinsic fluorescence, fluorescence phase diagram, secondary structure, turbidity, and surface hydrophobicity were performed to investigate the reaction process. The aggregation mechanism consists of two parts: 1) formation and 2) aggregation of the building blocks that form the ordered secondary β-sheet structure. Constructing the building blocks requires at least one intermediate state, which is formed after 0.5 hours. Non-synergistic changes in the secondary and tertiary structures then allow the intermediate state to emerge. PMID:25290460

  7. Optical tweezers study of red blood cell aggregation and disaggregation in plasma and protein solutions.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kisung; Kinnunen, Matti; Khokhlova, Maria D; Lyubin, Evgeny V; Priezzhev, Alexander V; Meglinski, Igor; Fedyanin, Andrey A

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of optical tweezers (OT)-induced spontaneous aggregation and disaggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied at the level of cell doublets to assess RBC interaction mechanics. Measurements were performed under in vitro conditions in plasma and fibrinogen and fibrinogen + albumin solutions. The RBC spontaneous aggregation kinetics was found to exhibit different behavior depending on the cell environment. In contrast, the RBC disaggregation kinetics was similar in all solutions qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating a significant contribution of the studied proteins to the process. The impact of the study on assessing RBC interaction mechanics and the protein contribution to the reversible RBC aggregation process is discussed.

  8. Optical tweezers study of red blood cell aggregation and disaggregation in plasma and protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Kisung; Kinnunen, Matti; Khokhlova, Maria D.; Lyubin, Evgeny V.; Priezzhev, Alexander V.; Meglinski, Igor; Fedyanin, Andrey A.

    2016-03-01

    Kinetics of optical tweezers (OT)-induced spontaneous aggregation and disaggregation of red blood cells (RBCs) were studied at the level of cell doublets to assess RBC interaction mechanics. Measurements were performed under in vitro conditions in plasma and fibrinogen and fibrinogen + albumin solutions. The RBC spontaneous aggregation kinetics was found to exhibit different behavior depending on the cell environment. In contrast, the RBC disaggregation kinetics was similar in all solutions qualitatively and quantitatively, demonstrating a significant contribution of the studied proteins to the process. The impact of the study on assessing RBC interaction mechanics and the protein contribution to the reversible RBC aggregation process is discussed.

  9. Protein aggregation can inhibit clathrin-mediated endocytosis by chaperone competition

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Anan; Shibata, Yoko; Shah, Bijal; Calamini, Barbara; Lo, Donald C.; Morimoto, Richard I.

    2014-01-01

    Protein conformational diseases exhibit complex pathologies linked to numerous molecular defects. Aggregation of a disease-associated protein causes the misfolding and aggregation of other proteins, but how this interferes with diverse cellular pathways is unclear. Here, we show that aggregation of neurodegenerative disease-related proteins (polyglutamine, huntingtin, ataxin-1, and superoxide dismutase-1) inhibits clathrin-mediated endocytosis (CME) in mammalian cells by aggregate-driven sequestration of the major molecular chaperone heat shock cognate protein 70 (HSC70), which is required to drive multiple steps of CME. CME suppression was also phenocopied by HSC70 RNAi depletion and could be restored by conditionally increasing HSC70 abundance. Aggregation caused dysregulated AMPA receptor internalization and also inhibited CME in primary neurons expressing mutant huntingtin, showing direct relevance of our findings to the pathology in neurodegenerative diseases. We propose that aggregate-associated chaperone competition leads to both gain-of-function and loss-of-function phenotypes as chaperones become functionally depleted from multiple clients, leading to the decline of multiple cellular processes. The inherent properties of chaperones place them at risk, contributing to the complex pathologies of protein conformational diseases. PMID:24706768

  10. Physicochemical properties that control protein aggregation also determine whether a protein is retained or released from necrotic cells

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Bosco; Au, Amanda E.; Schoenwaelder, Simone M.; Smyth, Mark J.; Bottomley, Stephen P.; Kleifeld, Oded; Medcalf, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    Amyloidogenic protein aggregation impairs cell function and is a hallmark of many chronic degenerative disorders. Protein aggregation is also a major event during acute injury; however, unlike amyloidogenesis, the process of injury-induced protein aggregation remains largely undefined. To provide this insight, we profiled the insoluble proteome of several cell types after acute injury. These experiments show that the disulfide-driven process of nucleocytoplasmic coagulation (NCC) is the main form of injury-induced protein aggregation. NCC is mechanistically distinct from amyloidogenesis, but still broadly impairs cell function by promoting the aggregation of hundreds of abundant and essential intracellular proteins. A small proportion of the intracellular proteome resists NCC and is instead released from necrotic cells. Notably, the physicochemical properties of NCC-resistant proteins are contrary to those of NCC-sensitive proteins. These observations challenge the dogma that liberation of constituents during necrosis is anarchic. Rather, inherent physicochemical features including cysteine content, hydrophobicity and intrinsic disorder determine whether a protein is released from necrotic cells. Furthermore, as half of the identified NCC-resistant proteins are known autoantigens, we propose that physicochemical properties that control NCC also affect immune tolerance and other host responses important for the restoration of homeostasis after necrotic injury. PMID:27810968

  11. Glycation of Lysozyme by Glycolaldehyde Provides New Mechanistic Insights in Diabetes-Related Protein Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Mariño, Laura; Maya-Aguirre, Carlos Andrés; Pauwels, Kris; Vilanova, Bartolomé; Ortega-Castro, Joaquin; Frau, Juan; Donoso, Josefa; Adrover, Miquel

    2017-03-14

    Glycation occurs in vivo as a result of the nonenzymatic reaction of carbohydrates (and/or their autoxidation products) with proteins, DNA, or lipids. Protein glycation causes loss-of-function and, consequently, the development of diabetic-related diseases. Glycation also boosts protein aggregation, which can be directly related with the higher prevalence of aggregating diseases in diabetic people. However, the molecular mechanism connecting glycation with aggregation still remains unclear. Previously we described mechanistically how glycation of hen egg-white lysozyme (HEWL) with ribose induced its aggregation. Here we address the question of whether the ribose-induced aggregation is a general process or it depends on the chemical nature of the glycating agent. Glycation of HEWL with glycolaldehyde occurs through two different scenarios depending on the HEWL concentration regime (both within the micromolar range). At low HEWL concentration, non-cross-linking fluorescent advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) are formed on Lys side chains, which do not change the protein structure but inhibit its enzymatic activity. These AGEs have little impact on HEWL surface hydrophobicity and, therefore, a negligible effect on its aggregation propensity. Upon increasing HEWL concentration, the glycation mechanism shifts toward the formation of intermolecular cross-links, which triggers a polymerization cascade involving the formation of insoluble spherical-like aggregates. These results notably differ with the aggregation-modulation mechanism of ribosylated HEWL directed by hydrophobic interactions. Additionally, their comparison constitutes the first experimental evidence showing that the mechanism underlying the aggregation of a glycated protein depends on the chemical nature of the glycating agent.

  12. Insights into the molecular mechanism of protein native-like aggregation upon glycation.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Luis M A; Gomes, Ricardo A; Yang, Dennis; Dennison, Sarah R; Família, Carlos; Lages, Ana; Coelho, Ana V; Murphy, Regina M; Phoenix, David A; Quintas, Alexandre

    2013-06-01

    Several human neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease, Parkinson's disease and Familial Amyloidotic Polyneuropathy, have long been associated with, structural and functional changes in disease related proteins leading to aggregation into amyloid fibrils. Such changes can be triggered by post-translational modifications. Methylglyoxal modifications have been shown to induce the formation of small and stable native-like aggregates in the case of the amyloidogenic proteins insulin and α-synuclein. However, the fundamental biophysical mechanism underlying such methylglyoxal-induced protein aggregation is not yet fully understood. In this work cytochrome c (Cyt c) was used as a model protein for the characterization of specific glycation targets and to study their impact on protein structure, stability, and ability to form native-like aggregates. Our results show that methylglyoxal covalently modifies Cyt c at a single residue and induces early conformational changes that lead to the formation of native-like aggregates. Furthermore, partially unfolded species are formed, but do not seem to be implicated in the aggregation process. This shows a clear difference from the amyloid fibril mechanisms which involve partially or totally unfolded intermediates. Equilibrium-unfolding experiments show that glycation strongly decreases Cyt c conformational stability, which is balanced with an increase of conformational stability upon aggregation. Data collected from analytical and spectroscopic techniques, along with kinetic analysis based on least-squares parameter fitting and statistical model discrimination are used to help to understand the driving force underlying glycation-induced native-like aggregation, and enable the proposal of a comprehensive thermodynamic and kinetic model for native-like aggregation of methylglyoxal glycated Cyt c.

  13. Controlling Agglomeration of Protein Aggregates for Structure Formation in Liquid Oil: A Sticky Business

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Proteins are known to be effective building blocks when it comes to structure formation in aqueous environments. Recently, we have shown that submicron colloidal protein particles can also be used to provide structure to liquid oil and form so-called oleogels (de VriesA.J. Colloid Interface Sci.2017, 486, 75−83)27693552. To prevent particle agglomeration, a solvent exchange procedure was used to transfer the aggregates from water to the oil phase. The aim of the current paper was to elucidate on the enhanced stability against agglomeration of heat-set whey protein isolate (WPI) aggregates to develop an alternative for the solvent exchange procedure. Protein aggregates were transferred from water to several solvents differing in polarity to investigate the effect on agglomeration and changes in protein composition. We show that after drying protein aggregates by evaporation from solvents with a low polarity (e.g., hexane), the protein powder shows good dispersibility in liquid oil compared to powders dried from solvents with a high polarity. This difference in dispersibility could not be related to changes in protein composition or conformation but was instead related to the reduction of attractive capillary forces between the protein aggregates during drying. Following another route, agglomeration was also prevented by applying high freezing rates prior to freeze-drying. The rheological properties of the oleogels prepared with such freeze-dried protein aggregates were shown to be similar to that of oleogels prepared using a solvent exchange procedure. This Research Article provides valuable insights in how to tune the drying process to control protein agglomeration to allow for subsequent structure formation of proteins in liquid oil. PMID:28225592

  14. Controlling Agglomeration of Protein Aggregates for Structure Formation in Liquid Oil: A Sticky Business.

    PubMed

    de Vries, Auke; Lopez Gomez, Yuly; Jansen, Bas; van der Linden, Erik; Scholten, Elke

    2017-03-22

    Proteins are known to be effective building blocks when it comes to structure formation in aqueous environments. Recently, we have shown that submicron colloidal protein particles can also be used to provide structure to liquid oil and form so-called oleogels ( de Vries , A. J. Colloid Interface Sci. 2017 , 486 , 75 - 83 ) . To prevent particle agglomeration, a solvent exchange procedure was used to transfer the aggregates from water to the oil phase. The aim of the current paper was to elucidate on the enhanced stability against agglomeration of heat-set whey protein isolate (WPI) aggregates to develop an alternative for the solvent exchange procedure. Protein aggregates were transferred from water to several solvents differing in polarity to investigate the effect on agglomeration and changes in protein composition. We show that after drying protein aggregates by evaporation from solvents with a low polarity (e.g., hexane), the protein powder shows good dispersibility in liquid oil compared to powders dried from solvents with a high polarity. This difference in dispersibility could not be related to changes in protein composition or conformation but was instead related to the reduction of attractive capillary forces between the protein aggregates during drying. Following another route, agglomeration was also prevented by applying high freezing rates prior to freeze-drying. The rheological properties of the oleogels prepared with such freeze-dried protein aggregates were shown to be similar to that of oleogels prepared using a solvent exchange procedure. This Research Article provides valuable insights in how to tune the drying process to control protein agglomeration to allow for subsequent structure formation of proteins in liquid oil.

  15. Simultaneous determination of protein aggregation, degradation, and absolute molecular weight by size exclusion chromatography-multiangle laser light scattering.

    PubMed

    Ye, Hongping

    2006-09-01

    The feasibility of size exclusion chromotography (SEC)-multiangle laser-light scattering as a technique to investigate aggregation and degradation of glycosylated and nonglycosylated proteins, and antibodies under various conditions such as addition of detergent, changes in pH, and variation of protein concentration and heat stress temperature was examined. Separation of proteins and their aggregates was performed using SEC-high-performance liquid chromatography. Detection of analytes was carried out with on-line UV, refractive index, and multiangle laser light-scattering detectors. Quantification and molecular weight determination were performed using commercial software. Aggregation and degradation were examined under various conditions and quantitative results are presented for bovine serum albumin, choriogonadotropin, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, Herceptin, and ReoPro. This method can simultaneously determine both the quantities and the molecular weights of macromolecules from a single injection. The determination of molecular weight is absolute which avoids misleading results caused by molecular shape or interactions with the column matrix. This technique is valuable not only for assessing the extent of aggregation but also for effectively monitoring molecule degradation as evidenced by molecular weight reduction and change in monomer amount.

  16. Protein aggregation activates erratic stress response in dietary restricted yeast cells

    PubMed Central

    Bhadra, Ankan Kumar; Das, Eshita; Roy, Ipsita

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stress and prolonged activation of defence pathways have deleterious consequences for the cell. Dietary restriction is believed to be beneficial as it induces the cellular stress response machinery. We report here that although the phenomenon is beneficial in a wild-type cell, dietary restriction leads to an inconsistent response in a cell that is already under proteotoxicity-induced stress. Using a yeast model of Huntington’s disease, we show that contrary to expectation, aggregation of mutant huntingtin is exacerbated and activation of the unfolded protein response pathway is dampened under dietary restriction. Global proteomic analysis shows that when exposed to a single stress, either protein aggregation or dietary restriction, the expression of foldases like peptidyl-prolyl isomerase, is strongly upregulated. However, under combinatorial stress, this lead is lost, which results in enhanced protein aggregation and reduced cell survival. Successful designing of aggregation-targeted therapeutics will need to take additional stressors into account. PMID:27633120

  17. Endoplasmic reticulum stress caused by aggregate-prone proteins containing homopolymeric amino acids.

    PubMed

    Uchio, Naohiro; Oma, Yoko; Toriumi, Kazuya; Sasagawa, Noboru; Tanida, Isei; Fujita, Eriko; Kouroku, Yoriko; Kuroda, Reiko; Momoi, Takashi; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2007-11-01

    Many human proteins have homopolymeric amino acid (HPAA) tracts, but their physiological functions or cellular effects are not well understood. Previously, we expressed 20 HPAAs in mammalian cells and showed characteristic intracellular localization, in that hydrophobic HPAAs aggregated strongly and caused high cytotoxicity in proportion to their hydrophobicity. In the present study, we investigated the cytotoxicity of these aggregate-prone hydrophobic HPAAs, assuming that the ubiquitin proteasome system is impaired in the same manner as other well-known aggregate-prone polyglutamine-containing proteins. Some highly hydrophobic HPAAs caused a deficiency in the ubiquitin proteasome system and excess endoplasmic reticulum stress, leading to apoptosis. These results indicate that the property of causing excess endoplasmic reticulum stress by proteasome impairment may contribute to the strong cytotoxicity of highly hydrophobic HPAAs, and proteasome impairment and the resulting excess endoplasmic reticulum stress is not a common cytotoxic effect of aggregate-prone proteins such as polyglutamine.

  18. Characterization of Sizes of Aggregates of Insulin Analogs and the Conformations of the Constituent Protein Molecules: A Concomitant Dynamic Light Scattering and Raman Spectroscopy Study.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chen; Qi, Wei; Lewis, E Neil; Carpenter, John F

    2016-02-01

    To generate aggregates, 3 insulin analogs, lispro, aspart, and glulisine, were incubated without phenolic preservatives for 30 days at 37 °C. As a function of incubation time, aggregation was quantified with size exclusion chromatography, and the sizes of aggregates and the conformations of the constituent molecules were characterized with concomitant dynamic light scattering and Raman spectroscopy. During incubation, lispro was progressively converted into soluble aggregates with hydrodynamic diameters of circa 15 nm, and 95% of the native protein had aggregated at day 30. Raman spectroscopy documented that aggregation resulted in conversion of a large fraction of native alpha helix into nonnative beta sheet structure and a distortion of disulfide bonds. In contrast, for aspart and glulisine only 20% of the native proteins aggregated after 30 days, and minimal structural perturbations were detected. In addition, consistent with the relative aggregation rates during isothermal incubation, Raman spectroscopy showed that during heating the onset temperature for secondary structural perturbations of lispro occurred 7 °C-10 °C lower than those for aspart or glulisine. Overall the results of this study demonstrated that-as in the case during formation of amyloid fibrils from insulin-formation of soluble aggregates of lispro resulted in a high level of conversion of alpha helix into beta sheet.

  19. Heat-Induced Soluble Protein Aggregates from Mixed Pea Globulins and β-Lactoglobulin.

    PubMed

    Chihi, Mohamed-Lazhar; Mession, Jean-luc; Sok, Nicolas; Saurel, Rémi

    2016-04-06

    The present work investigates the formation of protein aggregates (85 °C, 60 min incubation) upon heat treatment of β-lactoglobulin (βlg)-pea globulins (Glob) mixtures at pH 7.2 and 5 mM NaCl from laboratory-prepared protein isolates. Various βlg/Glob weight ratios were applied, for a total protein concentration of 2 wt % in admixture. Different analytical methods were used to determine the aggregation behavior of "mixed" aggregates, that is, surface hydrophobicity and also sulfhydryl content, protein interactions by means of SDS-PAGE electrophoresis, and molecule size distribution by DLS and gel filtration. The production of "mixed" thermal aggregates would involve both the formation of new disulfide bonds and noncovalent interactions between the denatured βlg and Glob subunits. The majority of "mixed" soluble aggregates displayed higher molecular weight and smaller diameter than those for Glob heated in isolation. The development of pea-whey protein "mixed" aggregates may help to design new ingredients for the control of innovative food textures.

  20. Revealing linear aggregates of light harvesting antenna proteins in photosynthetic membranes.

    PubMed

    He, Yufan; Zeng, Xiaohua; Mukherjee, Saptarshi; Rajapaksha, Suneth; Kaplan, Samuel; Lu, H Peter

    2010-01-05

    How light energy is harvested in a natural photosynthetic membrane through energy transfer is closely related to the stoichiometry and arrangement of light harvesting antenna proteins in the membrane. The specific photosynthetic architecture facilitates a rapid and efficient energy transfer among the light harvesting proteins (LH2 and LH1) and to the reaction center. Here we report the identification of linear aggregates of light harvesting proteins, LH2, in the photosynthetic membranes under ambient conditions by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) imaging and spectroscopic analysis. Our results suggest that the light harvesting protein, LH2, can exist as linear aggregates of 4 +/- 2 proteins in the photosynthetic membranes and that the protein distributions are highly heterogeneous. In the photosynthetic membranes examined in our measurements, the ratio of the aggregated to the nonaggregated LH2 proteins is about 3:1 to 5:1 depending on the intensity of the illumination used during sample incubation and on the bacterial species. AFM images further identify that the LH2 proteins in the linear aggregates are monotonically tilted at an angle 4 +/- 2 degrees from the plane of the photosynthetic membranes. The aggregates result in red-shifted absorption and emission spectra that are measured using various mutant membranes, including an LH2 knockout, LH1 knockout, and LH2 at different population densities. Measuring the fluorescence lifetimes of purified LH2 and LH2 in membranes, we have observed that the LH2 proteins in membranes exhibit biexponential lifetime decays whereas the purified LH2 proteins gave single exponential lifetime decays. We attribute that the two lifetime components originate from the existence of both aggregated and nonaggregated LH2 proteins in the photosynthetic membranes.

  1. Gold nanoparticle aggregation-based colorimetric assay for β-casein detection in bovine milk samples.

    PubMed

    Li, Y S; Zhou, Y; Meng, X Y; Zhang, Y Y; Song, F; Lu, S Y; Ren, H L; Hu, P; Liu, Z S; Zhang, J H

    2014-11-01

    Traditional Kjeldahl method, used for quality evaluation of bovine milk, has intrinsic defects of time-consuming sample preparation and two analyses to determine the difference between non-protein nitrogen content and total protein nitrogen content. Herein, based upon antibody functionalized gold nanoparticles (AuNPs), we described a colorimetric method for β-casein (β-CN) detection in bovine milk samples. The linear dynamic range and the LOD were 0.08-250 μg mL(-1), and 0.03 μg mL(-1) respectively. In addition, the real content of β-CN in bovine milk was measured by using the developed assay. The results are closely correlated with those from Kjeldahl method. The advantages of β-CN triggered AuNP aggregation-based colorimetric assay are simple signal generation, the high sensitivity and specificity as well as no need of complicated sample preparation, which make it for on-site detection of β-CN in bovine milk samples.

  2. Transmission electron microscopy as an orthogonal method to characterize protein aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Joyce J.; Pardeshi, Neha N.; Mulder, Anke M.; Mulligan, Sean K.; Quispe, Joel; On, Kathy; Carragher, Bridget; Potter, Clinton S.; Carpenter, John F.; Schneemann, Anette

    2015-01-01

    Aggregation of protein-based therapeutics is a challenging problem in the biopharmaceutical industry. Of particular concern are implications for product efficacy and clinical safety due to potentially increased immunogenicity of the aggregates. We used transmission electron microscopy (TEM) to characterize biophysical and morphological features of antibody aggregates formed upon controlled environmental stresses. TEM results were contrasted with results obtained in parallel by independent methods, including size exclusion chromatography, dynamic light scattering, microflow imaging and nanoparticle tracking. For TEM, stressed samples were imaged by negative staining and in the frozen-hydrated state. In both cases, aggregates appeared amorphous but differed in fine structural detail. Specifically, negatively stained aggregates were compact and consisted of smaller globular structures that had a notable three dimensional character. Elements of the native IgG structure were retained, suggesting that the aggregates were not assembled from denatured protein. In contrast, aggregates in frozen-hydrated samples appeared as extended, branched protein networks with large surface area. Using multiple scales of magnification, a wide range of particle sizes was observed and semi-quantitatively characterized. The detailed information provided by TEM extended observations obtained with the independent methods, demonstrating the suitability of TEM as a complementary approach to submicron particle analysis. PMID:25231267

  3. Effect of the addition of CMC on the aggregation behaviour of proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, H.; Sabato, S. F.; D'Aprano, G.; Lacroix, M.

    2004-09-01

    The effect of carboxymethylcellulose (CMC) on the aggregation of formulation based on calcium caseinate, commercial whey protein (WPC), and a 1:1 mixture of soy protein isolate (SPI) and whey protein isolate (WPI) was investigated. Protein aggregation could be observed upon addition of CMC, as demonstrated by size-exclusion chromatography. This aggregation behaviour was enhanced by means of physical treatments, such as heating at 90°C for 30 min or gamma-irradiation at 32 kGy. A synergy resulted from the combination of CMC to gamma-irradiation in Caseinate/CMC and SPI/WPI/CMC formulations. Furthermore, CMC prevented precipitation in irradiated protein solutions for a period of more than 3 months at 4°C.

  4. Amyloidogenicity at a Distance: How Distal Protein Regions Modulate Aggregation in Disease.

    PubMed

    Lucato, Christina M; Lupton, Christopher J; Halls, Michelle L; Ellisdon, Andrew M

    2017-03-22

    The misfolding of proteins to form amyloid is a key pathological feature of several progressive, and currently incurable, diseases. A mechanistic understanding of the pathway from soluble, native protein to insoluble amyloid is crucial for therapeutic design, and recent efforts have helped to elucidate the key molecular events that trigger protein misfolding. Generally, either global or local structural perturbations occur early in amyloidogenesis to expose aggregation-prone regions of the protein that can then self-associate to form toxic oligomers. Surprisingly, these initiating structural changes are often caused or influenced by protein regions distal to the classically amyloidogenic sequences. Understanding the importance of these distal regions in the pathogenic process has highlighted many remaining knowledge gaps regarding the precise molecular events that occur in classic aggregation pathways. In this review, we discuss how these distal regions can influence aggregation in disease and the recent technical and conceptual advances that have allowed this insight.

  5. Distinct role of hydration water in protein misfolding and aggregation revealed by fluctuating thermodynamics analysis.

    PubMed

    Chong, Song-Ho; Ham, Sihyun

    2015-04-21

    Protein aggregation in aqueous cellular environments is linked to diverse human diseases. Protein aggregation proceeds through a multistep process initiated by conformational transitions, called protein misfolding, of monomer species toward aggregation-prone structures. Various forms of aggregate species are generated through the association of misfolded monomers including soluble oligomers and amyloid fibrils. Elucidating the molecular mechanisms and driving forces involved in the misfolding and subsequent association has been a central issue for understanding and preventing protein aggregation diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's, and type II diabetes. In this Account, we provide a thermodynamic perspective of the misfolding and aggregation of the amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein implicated in Alzheimer's disease through the application of fluctuating thermodynamics. This approach "dissects" the conventional thermodynamic characterization of the end states into the one of the fluctuating processes connecting them, and enables one to analyze variations in the thermodynamic functions that occur during the course of protein conformational changes. The central quantity in this approach is the solvent-averaged effective energy, f = Eu + Gsolv, comprising the protein potential energy (Eu) and the solvation free energy (Gsolv), whose time variation reflects the protein dynamics on the free energy landscape. Protein configurational entropy is quantified by the magnitude of fluctuations in f. We find that misfolding of the Aβ monomer when released from a membrane environment to an aqueous phase is driven by favorable changes in protein potential energy and configurational entropy, but it is also accompanied by an unfavorable increase in solvation free energy. The subsequent dimerization of the misfolded Aβ monomers occurs in two steps. The first step, where two widely separated monomers come into contact distance, is driven by water-mediated attraction, that is, by a

  6. Protein structural and surface water rearrangement constitute major events in the earliest aggregation stages of tau

    PubMed Central

    Pavlova, Anna; Cheng, Chi-Yuan; Kinnebrew, Maia; Lew, John; Dahlquist, Frederick W.; Han, Songi

    2016-01-01

    Protein aggregation plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases, and the mechanism of its progression is poorly understood. Here, we examine the structural and dynamic characteristics of transiently evolving protein aggregates under ambient conditions by directly probing protein surface water diffusivity, local protein segment dynamics, and interprotein packing as a function of aggregation time, along the third repeat domain and C terminus of Δtau187 spanning residues 255–441 of the longest isoform of human tau. These measurements were achieved with a set of highly sensitive magnetic resonance tools that rely on site-specific electron spin labeling of Δtau187. Within minutes of initiated aggregation, the majority of Δtau187 that is initially homogeneously hydrated undergoes structural transformations to form partially structured aggregation intermediates. This is reflected in the dispersion of surface water dynamics that is distinct around the third repeat domain, found to be embedded in an intertau interface, from that of the solvent-exposed C terminus. Over the course of hours and in a rate-limiting process, a majority of these aggregation intermediates proceed to convert into stable β-sheet structured species and maintain their stacking order without exchanging their subunits. The population of β-sheet structured species is >5% within 5 min of aggregation and gradually grows to 50–70% within the early stages of fibril formation, while they mostly anneal block-wisely to form elongated fibrils. Our findings suggest that the formation of dynamic aggregation intermediates constitutes a major event occurring in the earliest stages of tau aggregation that precedes, and likely facilitates, fibril formation and growth. PMID:26712030

  7. Characterization of Aggregation Propensity of a Human Fc-Fusion Protein Therapeutic by Hydrogen/Deuterium Exchange Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Richard Y.-C.; Iacob, Roxana E.; Krystek, Stanley R.; Jin, Mi; Wei, Hui; Tao, Li; Das, Tapan K.; Tymiak, Adrienne A.; Engen, John R.; Chen, Guodong

    2016-08-01

    Aggregation of protein therapeutics has long been a concern across different stages of manufacturing processes in the biopharmaceutical industry. It is often indicative of aberrant protein therapeutic higher-order structure. In this study, the aggregation propensity of a human Fc-fusion protein therapeutic was characterized. Hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) was applied to examine the conformational dynamics of dimers collected from a bioreactor. HDX-MS data combined with spatial aggregation propensity calculations revealed a potential aggregation interface in the Fc domain. This study provides a general strategy for the characterization of the aggregation propensity of Fc-fusion proteins at the molecular level.

  8. Aggregation in concentrated protein solutions: Insights from rheology, neutron scattering and molecular simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castellanos, Maria Monica

    Aggregation of therapeutic proteins is currently one of the major challenges in the bio-pharmaceutical industry, because aggregates could induce immunogenic responses and compromise the quality of the product. Current scientific efforts, both in industry and academia, are focused on developing rational approaches to screen different drug candidates and predict their stability under different conditions. Moreover, aggregation is promoted in highly concentrated protein solutions, which are typically required for subcutaneous injection. In order to gain further understanding about the mechanisms that lead to aggregation, an approach that combined rheology, neutron scattering, and molecular simulations was undertaken. Two model systems were studied in this work: Bovine Serum Albumin in surfactant-free Phosphate Buffered Saline at pH = 7.4 at concentrations from 11 mg/mL up to ˜519 mg/mL, and a monoclonal antibody in 20 mM Histidine/Histidine Hydrochloride at pH = 6.0 with 60 mg/mL trehalose and 0.2 mg/mL polysorbate-80 at concentrations from 53 mg/mL up to ˜220 mg/mL. The antibody used here has three mutations in the CH2 domain, which result in lower stability upon incubation at 40 °C with respect to the wild-type protein, based on size-exclusion chromatography assays. This temperature is below 49 °C, where unfolding of the least stable, CH2 domain occurs, according to differential scanning calorimetry. This dissertation focuses on identifying the role of aggregation on the viscosity of protein solutions. The protein solutions of this work show an increase in the low shear viscosity in the absence of surfactants, because proteins adsorb at the air/water interface forming a viscoelastic film that affects the measured rheology. Stable surfactant-laden protein solutions behave as simple Newtonian fluids. However, the surfactant-laden antibody solution also shows an increase in the low shear viscosity from bulk aggregation, after prolonged incubation at 40 °C. Small

  9. Aggregation-induced changes in the chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) signals of proteins.

    PubMed

    Goerke, Steffen; Milde, Katharina S; Bukowiecki, Raul; Kunz, Patrick; Klika, Karel D; Wiglenda, Thomas; Mogk, Axel; Wanker, Erich E; Bukau, Bernd; Ladd, Mark E; Bachert, Peter; Zaiss, Moritz

    2017-01-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is an MRI technique that allows mapping of biomolecules (small metabolites, proteins) with nearly the sensitivity of conventional water proton MRI. In living organisms, several tissue-specific CEST effects have been observed and successfully applied to diagnostic imaging. In these studies, particularly the signals of proteins showed a distinct correlation with pathological changes. However, as CEST effects depend on various properties that determine and affect the chemical exchange processes, the origins of the observed signal changes remain to be understood. In this study, protein aggregation was identified as an additional process that is encoded in the CEST signals of proteins. Investigation of distinct proteins that are involved in pathological disorders, namely amyloid beta and huntingtin, revealed a significant decrease of all protein CEST signals upon controlled aggregation. This finding is of particular interest with regard to diagnostic imaging of patients with neurodegenerative diseases that involve amyloidogenesis, such as Alzheimer's or Huntington's disease. To investigate whether the observed CEST signal decrease also occurs in heterogeneous mixtures of aggregated cellular proteins, and thus prospectively in tissue, heat-shocked yeast cell lysates were employed. Additionally, investigation of different cell compartments verified the assignment of the protein CEST signals to the soluble part of the proteome. The results of in vitro experiments demonstrate that aggregation affects the CEST signals of proteins. This observation can enable hypotheses for CEST imaging as a non-invasive diagnostic tool for monitoring pathological alterations of the proteome in vivo.

  10. Impact of Proteins on Aggregation Kinetics and Adsorption Ability of Hematite Nanoparticles in Aqueous Dispersions.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Anxu; Liu, Feng; Xie, Nan; Liu, Juan

    2016-03-01

    The initial aggregation kinetics of hematite nanoparticles (NPs) that were conjugated with two model globular proteins-cytochrome c from bovine heart (Cyt) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)-were investigated over a range of monovalent (NaCl) and divalent (CaCl2) electrolyte concentrations at pH 5.7 and 9. The aggregation behavior of Cyt-NP conjugates was similar to that of bare hematite NPs, but the additional electrosteric repulsion increased the critical coagulation concentration (CCC) values from 69 mM to 113 mM in NaCl at pH 5.7. An unsaturated layer of BSA, a protein larger than Cyt, on hematite NPs resulted in fast aggregation at low salt concentrations and pH 5.7, due to the strong attractive patch-charge interaction. However, the BSA-NP conjugates could be stabilized simply by elevating salt concentrations, owing to the screening of the attractive patch-charge force and the increasing contribution from steric force. This study showed that the aggregation state of protein-conjugated NPs is proved to be completely switchable via ionic strength, pH, protein size, and protein coverage. Macroscopic Cu(II) sorption experiments further established that reducing aggregation of hematite NPs via tailoring ionic strength and protein conjugation could promote the metal uptake by hematite NPs under harsh conditions.

  11. Enhancing Nanoparticle-Based Visible Detection by Controlling the Extent of Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Seokwon; Koo, Ok Kyung; You, Young Sang; Lee, Yeong Eun; Kim, Min-Sik; Chang, Pahn-Shick; Kang, Dong Hyun; Yu, Jae-Hyuk; Choi, Young Jin; Gunasekaran, Sundaram

    2012-06-01

    Visible indication based on the aggregation of colloidal nanoparticles (NPs) is highly advantageous for rapid on-site detection of biological entities, which even untrained persons can perform without specialized instrumentation. However, since the extent of aggregation should exceed a certain minimum threshold to produce visible change, further applications of this conventional method have been hampered by insufficient sensitivity or certain limiting characteristics of the target. Here we report a signal amplification strategy to enhance visible detection by introducing switchable linkers (SLs), which are designed to lose their function to bridge NPs in the presence of target and control the extent of aggregation. By precisely designing the system, considering the quantitative relationship between the functionalized NPs and SLs, highly sensitive and quantitative visible detection is possible. We confirmed the ultrahigh sensitivity of this method by detecting the presence of 20 fM of streptavidin and fewer than 100 CFU/mL of Escherichia coli.

  12. The role of proline in the prevention of aggregation during protein folding in vitro.

    PubMed

    Kumar, T K; Samuel, D; Jayaraman, G; Srimathi, T; Yu, C

    1998-10-01

    Proline effectively inhibits protein aggregation during the refolding of bovine carbonic anhydrase. Other osmolytes used such as glycine and ethylene glycol fail to exhibit the 'aggregation-blockade' role shown by proline. Results of viscosity and ANS fluorescence (1-anilino-8-naphthalene sulphonic acid) experiments suggest that proline at high concentrations forms an ordered supramolecular assembly. Based on these results, it is proposed that proline behaves as a protein folding chaperone due to the formation of an ordered, amphipathic supramolecular assembly. To our knowledge, this is the first report wherein proline is proposed as a protein folding aid.

  13. Metacaspase Yca1 is required for clearance of insoluble protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Lee, Robin E C; Brunette, Steve; Puente, Lawrence G; Megeney, Lynn A

    2010-07-27

    In complex organisms, caspase proteases mediate a variety of cell behaviors, including proliferation, differentiation, and programmed cell death/apoptosis. Structural homologs to the caspase family (termed metacaspases) engage apoptosis in single-cell eukaryotes, yet the molecular mechanisms that contribute to nondeath roles are currently undefined. Here, we report an unexpected role for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae metacaspase Yca1 in protein quality control. Quantitative proteomic analysis of Deltayca1 cells identified significant alterations to vacuolar catabolism and stress-response proteins in the absence of induced stress. Yca1 protein complexes are enriched for aggregate-remodeling chaperones that colocalize with Yca1-GFP fusions. Finally, deletion and inactivation mutants of Yca1 accrue protein aggregates and autophagic bodies during log-phase growth. Together, our results show that Yca1 contributes to the fitness and adaptability of growing yeast through an aggregate remodeling activity.

  14. Structural Basis for Protein anti-Aggregation Activity of the Trigger Factor Chaperone*

    PubMed Central

    Saio, Tomohide; Guan, Xiao; Rossi, Paolo; Economou, Anastassios; Kalodimos, Charalampos G.

    2014-01-01

    Molecular chaperones prevent aggregation and misfolding of proteins but scarcity of structural data has impeded an understanding of the recognition and anti-aggregation mechanisms. Here we report the solution structure, dynamics and energetics of three Trigger Factor (TF) chaperone molecules in complex with alkaline phosphatase (PhoA) captured in the unfolded state. Our data show that TF uses multiple sites to bind to several regions of the PhoA substrate protein primarily through hydrophobic contacts. NMR relaxation experiments show that TF interacts with PhoA in a highly dynamic fashion but as the number and length of the PhoA regions engaged by TF increases, a more stable complex gradually emerges. Multivalent binding keeps the substrate protein in an extended, unfolded conformation. The results show how molecular chaperones recognize unfolded polypeptides and how by acting as unfoldases and holdases prevent the aggregation and premature (mis)folding of unfolded proteins. PMID:24812405

  15. Electrostatically-controlled protein adsorption onto lipid bilayer: modeling adsorbate aggregation behavior.

    PubMed

    Trusova, Valeriya M; Gorbenko, Galyna P

    2008-03-01

    Using adsorption models based on scaled particle (SPT) and double layer theories the electrostatically-controlled protein adsorption onto membrane surface has been simulated for non-associating and self-associating ligands. The binding isotherms of monomeric and oligomeric protein species have been calculated over a range of variable parameters including lipid and protein concentrations, protein and membrane charges, pH and ionic strength. Adsorption behavior of monomers appeared to be the most sensitive to the changes in the protein aggregation state. The hallmarks of the protein oligomerization are identified. The practical guides for optimal design of binding experiments focused on obtaining proofs of protein self-association are suggested.

  16. Nanoelectrochemical Immunosensors for Protein Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carpentiero, Alessandro; de Leo, Manuela; Garcia Romero, Ivan; Pozzi Mucelli, Stefano; Reuther, Freimut; Stanta, Giorgio; Tormen, Massimo; Ugo, Paolo; Zamuner, Martina

    Nanoelectrochemical immunosensors fabricated by templated electrodeposition of gold nanoelectrodes inside the pores of polycarbonate (PC) track-etched membranes, followed by the immobilization of the biorecognition elements on the surrounding PC, have proven high sensitivity and specificity for protein detection. The signal transduction scheme involves a suitable redox mediator added to the sample solution to shuttle electrons from the gold nanoelectrodes to the biorecognition layer, both elements being in strict spatial proximity. Highly improved signal-to-background current ratio, which are peculiar of NEEs with respect to other electrochemical transducers, can be exploited in this way. Two detection schemes were tested: one based on the direct immobilization of the target protein on the PC of the NEE (approach A) and the other based on the immobilisation on PC of an antibody to capture the target protein (approach B). The biorecognition process was completed by adding a primary antibody and a secondary antibody with horse radish peroxidase (HRP) as enzyme label; methylene blue was the redox mediator added to the electrolyte solution. Typical target analytes were single chain fragment variable proteins, for approach A, and trastuzumab (also known as Herceptin®), for approach B. NEE-based capture sensors were tested successfully to detect small amounts of the receptor protein HER2 in biological samples. Finally, motivated by the target of a better control of the geometrical characteristics of ensembles of nanoelectrodes (size, density, geometrical arrangement, and degree of recession), and by the positive results obtained with track-etch membranes of PC from the standpoint of protein immobilization, we demonstrated the fabrication of nanobiosensors by patterning ordered arrays of nanoelectrodes (NEAs) by electron beam lithography (EBL) on polycarbonate. EBL results perfectly suitable for the top-down fabrication of arrays of nanobiosensors on thin PC films

  17. CAG Expansions Are Genetically Stable and Form Nontoxic Aggregates in Cells Lacking Endogenous Polyglutamine Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Zurawel, Ashley A.; Kabeche, Ruth; DiGregorio, Sonja E.; Deng, Lin; Menon, Kartikeya M.; Opalko, Hannah

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteins containing polyglutamine (polyQ) regions are found in almost all eukaryotes, albeit with various frequencies. In humans, proteins such as huntingtin (Htt) with abnormally expanded polyQ regions cause neurodegenerative diseases such as Huntington’s disease (HD). To study how the presence of endogenous polyQ aggregation modulates polyQ aggregation and toxicity, we expressed polyQ expanded Htt fragments (polyQ Htt) in Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In stark contrast to other unicellular fungi, such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae, S. pombe is uniquely devoid of proteins with more than 10 Q repeats. We found that polyQ Htt forms aggregates within S. pombe cells only with exceedingly long polyQ expansions. Surprisingly, despite the presence of polyQ Htt aggregates in both the cytoplasm and nucleus, no significant growth defect was observed in S. pombe cells. Further, PCR analysis showed that the repetitive polyQ-encoding DNA region remained constant following transformation and after multiple divisions in S. pombe, in contrast to the genetic instability of polyQ DNA sequences in other organisms. These results demonstrate that cells with a low content of polyQ or other aggregation-prone proteins can show a striking resilience with respect to polyQ toxicity and that genetic instability of repetitive DNA sequences may have played an important role in the evolutionary emergence and exclusion of polyQ expansion proteins in different organisms. PMID:27677791

  18. Principles, approaches, and challenges for predicting protein aggregation rates and shelf life.

    PubMed

    Weiss, William F; Young, Teresa M; Roberts, Christopher J

    2009-04-01

    Control and prevention of unwanted aggregation for therapeutic proteins is a ubiquitous hurdle during biopharmaceutical product manufacture, storage, shipping, and administration. Methods to predict the relative or absolute rates of aggregation are therefore of great practical interest in biopharmaceutical research and development. Aggregation is often well-described as a multi-stage process involving unfolding or misfolding of free monomers, along with one or more assembly steps to form soluble or insoluble oligomers or higher-molecular-weight species. This report reviews the current state of the art in experimental and practical theoretical approaches that attempt to predict in vitro protein aggregation rates or propensities relevant to pharmaceutical proteins. Most available approaches fall within four primary categories. The principles and assumptions underlying each category are reviewed, along with advantages and limitations in each case. The importance of appropriate experimental techniques and models to probe and quantify the thermodynamics and/or dynamics of multiple steps or stages within the overall aggregation process is stressed. The primary focus is on aggregation in solution, relevant to parenteral dosage forms. Additional challenges are briefly reviewed.

  19. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 protein aggregates cause deficits in motor learning and cerebellar plasticity.

    PubMed

    Mark, Melanie D; Krause, Martin; Boele, Henk-Jan; Kruse, Wolfgang; Pollok, Stefan; Kuner, Thomas; Dalkara, Deniz; Koekkoek, Sebastiaan; De Zeeuw, Chris I; Herlitze, Stefan

    2015-06-10

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 6 (SCA6) is linked to poly-glutamine (polyQ) within the C terminus (CT) of the pore-forming subunits of P/Q-type Ca(2+) channels (Cav2.1) and is characterized by CT protein aggregates found in cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs). One hypothesis regarding SCA6 disease is that a CT fragment of the Cav2.1 channel, which is detected specifically in cytosolic and nuclear fractions in SCA6 patients, is associated with the SCA6 pathogenesis. To test this hypothesis, we expressed P/Q-type channel protein fragments from two different human CT splice variants, as predicted from SCA6 patients, in PCs of mice using viral and transgenic approaches. These splice variants represent a short (CT-short without polyQs) and a long (CT-long with 27 polyQs) CT fragment. Our results show that the different splice variants of the CTs differentially distribute within PCs, i.e., the short CTs reveal predominantly nuclear inclusions, whereas the long CTs prominently reveal both nuclear and cytoplasmic aggregates. Postnatal expression of CTs in PCs in mice reveals that only CT-long causes SCA6-like symptoms, i.e., deficits in eyeblink conditioning (EBC), ataxia, and PC degeneration. The physiological phenotypes associated specifically with the long CT fragment can be explained by an impairment of LTD and LTP at the parallel fiber-to-PC synapse and alteration in spontaneous PC activity. Thus, our results suggest that the polyQ carrying the CT fragment of the P/Q-type channel is sufficient to cause SCA6 pathogenesis in mice and identifies EBC as a new diagnostic strategy to evaluate Ca(2+) channel-mediated human diseases.

  20. Use of dielectric properties to detect egg protein denaturation.

    PubMed

    Bircan, C; Barringer, S A

    2002-01-01

    Changes in water and ion binding that occur during egg protein denaturation can be detected by measuring the dielectric properties. The dielectric properties of egg yolk, egg white and egg ovalbumin were tested from 25 to 105 degrees C at 11 frequencies from 300-2450 MHz. DSC was used to determine the temperature of protein denaturation. Both the dielectric constant and loss factor of egg yolk decreased due to denaturation of the protein lipovitellin. The dielectric constant increased at the initial denaturation and decreased after the complete denaturation and aggregation of egg ovalbumin in both egg white and ovalbumin.

  1. Relationship between functional properties and aggregation changes of whey protein induced by high pressure microfluidization.

    PubMed

    Liu, Cheng-Mei; Zhong, Jun-Zhen; Liu, Wei; Tu, Zong-Cai; Wan, Jie; Cai, Xiao-Fei; Song, Xin-Yun

    2011-05-01

    Aggregation changes of whey protein induced by high-pressure microfluidization (HPM) treatment have been investigated in relation with their functional properties. Whey protein was treated with HPM under pressure from 40 to 160 MPa. Functional properties (solubility, foaming, and emulsifying properties) of whey protein concentrate (WPC) ultrafiltered from fluid whey were evaluated. The results showed significant modifications in the solubility (30% to 59%) and foaming properties (20% to 65%) of WPC with increasing pressure. However, emulsifying property of WPC treated at different pressures was significantly worse than untreated sample. To better understand the mechanism of the modification by HPM, the HPM-induced aggregation changes were examined using particle size distribution, scanning electron microscopy, and hydrophobicity. It was indicated that HPM induced 2 kinds of aggregation changes on WPC: deaggregation and reaggregation of WPC, which resulted in the changes of functional properties of WPC modified by HPM.

  2. Membrane Remodeling by Surface-Bound Protein Aggregates: Insights from Coarse-Grained Molecular Dynamics Simulation

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of curvature generation in membranes has been studied for decades due to its important role in many cellular functions. However, it is not clear if, or how, aggregates of lipid-anchored proteins might affect the geometry and elastic property of membranes. As an initial step toward addressing this issue, we performed structural, geometrical, and stress field analyses of coarse-grained molecular dynamics trajectories of a domain-forming bilayer in which an aggregate of lipidated proteins was asymmetrically bound. The results suggest a general mechanism whereby asymmetric incorporation of lipid-modified protein aggregates curve multidomain membranes primarily by expanding the surface area of the monolayer in which the lipid anchor is inserted. PMID:24803997

  3. Network Intrusion Detection and Visualization using Aggregations in a Cyber Security Data Warehouse

    SciTech Connect

    Czejdo, Bogdan; Ferragut, Erik M; Goodall, John R; Laska, Jason A

    2012-01-01

    The challenge of achieving situational understanding is a limiting factor in effective, timely, and adaptive cyber-security analysis. Anomaly detection fills a critical role in network assessment and trend analysis, both of which underlie the establishment of comprehensive situational understanding. To that end, we propose a cyber security data warehouse implemented as a hierarchical graph of aggregations that captures anomalies at multiple scales. Each node of our pro-posed graph is a summarization table of cyber event aggregations, and the edges are aggregation operators. The cyber security data warehouse enables domain experts to quickly traverse a multi-scale aggregation space systematically. We describe the architecture of a test bed system and a summary of results on the IEEE VAST 2012 Cyber Forensics data.

  4. Extended polyglutamine tracts cause aggregation and structural perturbation of an adjacent beta barrel protein.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Zoya; Gierasch, Lila M

    2006-05-05

    Formation of fibrillar intranuclear inclusions and related neuropathologies of the CAG-repeat disorders are linked to the expansion of a polyglutamine tract. Despite considerable effort, the etiology of these devastating diseases remains unclear. Although polypeptides with glutamine tracts recapitulate many of the observed characteristics of the gene products with CAG repeats, such as in vitro and in vivo aggregation and toxicity in model organisms, extended polyglutamine segments have also been reported to structurally perturb proteins into which they are inserted. Additionally, the sequence context of a polyglutamine tract has recently been shown to modulate its propensity to aggregate. These findings raise the possibility that indirect influences of the repeat tract on adjacent protein domains are contributory to pathologies. Destabilization of an adjacent domain may lead to loss of function, as well as favoring non-native structures in the neighboring domain causing them to be prone to intermolecular association and consequent aggregation. To explore these phenomena, we have used chimeras of a well studied globular protein and exon 1 of huntingtin. We find that expansion of the polyglutamine segment beyond the pathological threshold (>35 glutamines) results in structural perturbation of the neighboring protein whether the huntingtin exon is N- or C-terminal. Elongation of the polyglutamine region also substantially increases the propensity of the chimera to aggregate, both in vitro and in vivo, and in vitro aggregation kinetics of a chimera with a 53-glutamine repeat follow a nucleation polymerization mechanism with a monomeric nucleus.

  5. Small surfactant-like peptides can drive soluble proteins into active aggregates

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Inactive protein inclusion bodies occur commonly in Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells expressing heterologous proteins. Previously several independent groups have found that active protein aggregates or pseudo inclusion bodies can be induced by a fusion partner such as a cellulose binding domain from Clostridium cellulovorans (CBDclos) when expressed in E. coli. More recently we further showed that a short amphipathic helical octadecapeptide 18A (EWLKAFYEKVLEKLKELF) and a short beta structure peptide ELK16 (LELELKLKLELELKLK) have a similar property. Results In this work, we explored a third type of peptides, surfactant-like peptides, for performing such a "pulling-down" function. One or more of three such peptides (L6KD, L6K2, DKL6) were fused to the carboxyl termini of model proteins including Aspergillus fumigatus amadoriase II (AMA, all three peptides were used), Bacillus subtilis lipase A (LipA, only L6KD was used, hereinafter the same), Bacillus pumilus xylosidase (XynB), and green fluorescent protein (GFP), and expressed in E. coli. All fusions were found to predominantly accumulate in the insoluble fractions, with specific activities ranging from 25% to 92% of the native counterparts. Transmission electron microscopic (TEM) and confocal fluorescence microscopic analyses confirmed the formation of protein aggregates in the cell. Furthermore, binding assays with amyloid-specific dyes (thioflavin T and Cong red) to the AMA-L6KD aggregate and the TEM analysis of the aggregate following digestion with protease K suggested that the AMA-L6KD aggregate may contain structures reminiscent of amyloids, including a fibril-like structure core. Conclusions This study shows that the surfactant-like peptides L6KD and it derivatives can act as a pull-down handler for converting soluble proteins into active aggregates, much like 18A and ELK16. These peptide-mediated protein aggregations might have important implications for protein aggregation in vivo, and can be

  6. Effect of Excipients on Liquid-Liquid Phase Separation and Aggregation in Dual Variable Domain Immunoglobulin Protein Solutions.

    PubMed

    Raut, Ashlesha S; Kalonia, Devendra S

    2016-03-07

    Liquid-liquid phase separation (LLPS) and aggregation can reduce the physical stability of therapeutic protein formulations. On undergoing LLPS, the protein-rich phase can promote aggregation during storage due to high concentration of the protein. Effect of different excipients on aggregation in protein solution is well documented; however data on the effect of excipients on LLPS is scarce in the literature. In this study, the effect of four excipients (PEG 400, Tween 80, sucrose, and hydroxypropyl beta-cyclodextrin (HPβCD)) on liquid-liquid phase separation and aggregation in a dual variable domain immunoglobulin protein solution was investigated. Sucrose suppressed both LLPS and aggregation, Tween 80 had no effect on either, and PEG 400 increased LLPS and aggregation. Attractive protein-protein interactions and liquid-liquid phase separation decreased with increasing concentration of HPβCD, indicating its specific binding to the protein. However, HPβCD had no effect on the formation of soluble aggregates and fragments in this study. LLPS and aggregation are highly temperature dependent; at low temperature protein exhibits LLPS, at high temperature protein exhibits aggregation, and at an intermediate temperature both phenomena occur simultaneously depending on the solution conditions.

  7. The aggregation behavior and interactions of yak milk protein under thermal treatment.

    PubMed

    Wang, T T; Guo, Z W; Liu, Z P; Feng, Q Y; Wang, X L; Tian, Q; Ren, F Z; Mao, X Y

    2016-08-01

    The aggregation behavior and interactions of yak milk protein were investigated after heat treatments. Skim yak milk was heated at temperatures in the range of 65 to 95°C for 10 min. The results showed that the whey proteins in yak milk were denatured after heat treatment, especially at temperatures higher than 85°C. Sodium dodecyl sulfate-PAGE analysis indicated that heat treatment induced milk protein denaturation accompanied with aggregation to a certain extent. When the heating temperature was 75 and 85°C, the aggregation behavior of yak milk proteins was almost completely due to the formation of disulfide bonds, whereas denatured α-lactalbumin and β-lactoglobulin interacted with κ-casein. When yak milk was heated at 85 and 95°C, other noncovalent interactions were found between proteins including hydrophobic interactions. The particle size distributions and microstructures demonstrated that the heat stability of yak milk proteins was significantly lowered by heat treatment. When yak milk was heated at 65 and 75°C, no obvious changes were found in the particle size distribution and microstructures in yak milk. When the temperature was 85 and 95°C, the particle size distribution shifted to larger size trend and aggregates were visible in the heated yak milk.

  8. The Role of Aggregates of Therapeutic Protein Products in Immunogenicity: An Evaluation by Mathematical Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Yin, Liusong; Chen, Xiaoying; Tiwari, Abhinav; Vicini, Paolo; Hickling, Timothy P.

    2015-01-01

    Therapeutic protein products (TPP) have been widely used to treat a variety of human diseases, including cancer, hemophilia, and autoimmune diseases. However, TPP can induce unwanted immune responses that can impact both drug efficacy and patient safety. The presence of aggregates is of particular concern as they have been implicated in inducing both T cell-independent and T cell-dependent immune responses. We used mathematical modeling to evaluate several mechanisms through which aggregates of TPP could contribute to the development of immunogenicity. Modeling interactions between aggregates and B cell receptors demonstrated that aggregates are unlikely to induce T cell-independent immune responses by cross-linking B cell receptors because the amount of signal transducing complex that can form under physiologically relevant conditions is limited. We systematically evaluate the role of aggregates in inducing T cell-dependent immune responses using a recently developed multiscale mechanistic mathematical model. Our analysis indicates that aggregates could contribute to T cell-dependent immune response by inducing high affinity epitopes which may not be present in the nonaggregated TPP and/or by enhancing danger signals to break tolerance. In summary, our computational analysis is suggestive of novel insights into the mechanisms underlying aggregate-induced immunogenicity, which could be used to develop mitigation strategies. PMID:26682236

  9. Protein- protein interaction detection system using fluorescent protein microdomains

    DOEpatents

    Waldo, Geoffrey S.; Cabantous, Stephanie

    2010-02-23

    The invention provides a protein labeling and interaction detection system based on engineered fragments of fluorescent and chromophoric proteins that require fused interacting polypeptides to drive the association of the fragments, and further are soluble and stable, and do not change the solubility of polypeptides to which they are fused. In one embodiment, a test protein X is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 10, amino acids 198-214), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. A second test protein Y is fused to a sixteen amino acid fragment of GFP (.beta.-strand 11, amino acids 215-230), engineered to not perturb fusion protein solubility. When X and Y interact, they bring the GFP strands into proximity, and are detected by complementation with a third GFP fragment consisting of GFP amino acids 1-198 (strands 1-9). When GFP strands 10 and 11 are held together by interaction of protein X and Y, they spontaneous association with GFP strands 1-9, resulting in structural complementation, folding, and concomitant GFP fluorescence.

  10. Silk protein aggregation kinetics revealed by Rheo-IR.

    PubMed

    Boulet-Audet, Maxime; Terry, Ann E; Vollrath, Fritz; Holland, Chris

    2014-02-01

    The remarkable mechanical properties of silk fibres stem from a multi-scale hierarchical structure created when an aqueous protein "melt" is converted to an insoluble solid via flow. To directly relate a silk protein's structure and function in response to flow, we present the first application of a Rheo-IR platform, which couples cone and plate rheology with attenuated total reflectance infrared spectroscopy. This technique provides a new window into silk processing by linking shear thinning to an increase in molecular alignment, with shear thickening affecting changes in the silk protein's secondary structure. Additionally, compared to other static characterization methods for silk, Rheo-IR proved particularly useful at revealing the intrinsic difference between natural (native) and reconstituted silk feedstocks. Hence Rheo-IR offers important novel insights into natural silk processing. This has intrinsic academic merit, but it might also be useful when designing reconstituted silk analogues alongside other polymeric systems, whether natural or synthetic.

  11. Effect of protein glycation in the presence or absence of wheat proteins on detection of soybean proteins by commercial ELISA.

    PubMed

    Platteau, C; Cucu, T; De Meulenaer, B; Devreese, B; De Loose, M; Taverniers, I

    2011-02-01

    Soybean (Glycine max) is the world's primary provider of protein and oil and is widely used in foodstuffs. However, the use of soybean in foodstuffs might pose a serious threat to allergic consumers since some proteins can cause allergic reactions. To date mostly ELISA methods are used for testing contamination of foodstuffs with soybean. In view of the complexity regarding allergen detection in foodstuffs and appropriate food product labelling, the aim of this study was to investigate the impact of the Maillard reaction on the detectability of soybean proteins using commercial ELISA kits. Accumulation of protein-bound carbonyls, modification of reactive lysine residues and severe aggregation as a result of incubation with glucose, in the presence or absence of soluble wheat proteins, were recorded. Moreover, detection of soybean proteins by means of three commercial ELISA kits was strongly altered and was highly dependent on the type of kit used.

  12. Prion Aggregates Are Recruited to the Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD) via Myosin 2-Based Vesicular Transport

    PubMed Central

    Nawroth, Peter P.; Tyedmers, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. Sequestration of misfolded and aggregated proteins into specialized deposition sites may reduce their potentially detrimental properties. Yeast exhibits a distinct deposition site for amyloid aggregates termed “Insoluble PrOtein Deposit (IPOD)”, but nothing is known about the mechanism of substrate recruitment to this site. The IPOD is located directly adjacent to the Phagophore Assembly Site (PAS) where the cell initiates autophagy and the Cytoplasm-to-Vacuole Targeting (CVT) pathway destined for delivery of precursor peptidases to the vacuole. Recruitment of CVT substrates to the PAS was proposed to occur via vesicular transport on Atg9 vesicles and requires an intact actin cytoskeleton and “SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein) Receptor Proteins (SNARE)” protein function. It is, however, unknown how this vesicular transport machinery is linked to the actin cytoskeleton. We demonstrate that recruitment of model amyloid PrD-GFP and the CVT substrate precursor-aminopeptidase 1 (preApe1) to the IPOD or PAS, respectively, is disturbed after genetic impairment of Myo2-based actin cable transport and SNARE protein function. Rather than accumulating at the respective deposition sites, both substrates reversibly accumulated often together in the same punctate structures. Components of the CVT vesicular transport machinery including Atg8 and Atg9 as well as Myo2 partially co-localized with the joint accumulations. Thus we propose a model where vesicles, loaded with preApe1 or PrD-GFP, are recruited to tropomyosin coated actin cables via the Myo2 motor protein for delivery to the PAS and IPOD, respectively. We discuss that deposition at the IPOD is not an integrated mandatory part of the degradation pathway for amyloid aggregates, but more likely stores excess aggregates until downstream degradation pathways have the capacity to turn them over after liberation by the Hsp104

  13. Prion Aggregates Are Recruited to the Insoluble Protein Deposit (IPOD) via Myosin 2-Based Vesicular Transport.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Rajesh; Nawroth, Peter P; Tyedmers, Jens

    2016-09-01

    Aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins is associated with several neurodegenerative diseases. Sequestration of misfolded and aggregated proteins into specialized deposition sites may reduce their potentially detrimental properties. Yeast exhibits a distinct deposition site for amyloid aggregates termed "Insoluble PrOtein Deposit (IPOD)", but nothing is known about the mechanism of substrate recruitment to this site. The IPOD is located directly adjacent to the Phagophore Assembly Site (PAS) where the cell initiates autophagy and the Cytoplasm-to-Vacuole Targeting (CVT) pathway destined for delivery of precursor peptidases to the vacuole. Recruitment of CVT substrates to the PAS was proposed to occur via vesicular transport on Atg9 vesicles and requires an intact actin cytoskeleton and "SNAP (Soluble NSF Attachment Protein) Receptor Proteins (SNARE)" protein function. It is, however, unknown how this vesicular transport machinery is linked to the actin cytoskeleton. We demonstrate that recruitment of model amyloid PrD-GFP and the CVT substrate precursor-aminopeptidase 1 (preApe1) to the IPOD or PAS, respectively, is disturbed after genetic impairment of Myo2-based actin cable transport and SNARE protein function. Rather than accumulating at the respective deposition sites, both substrates reversibly accumulated often together in the same punctate structures. Components of the CVT vesicular transport machinery including Atg8 and Atg9 as well as Myo2 partially co-localized with the joint accumulations. Thus we propose a model where vesicles, loaded with preApe1 or PrD-GFP, are recruited to tropomyosin coated actin cables via the Myo2 motor protein for delivery to the PAS and IPOD, respectively. We discuss that deposition at the IPOD is not an integrated mandatory part of the degradation pathway for amyloid aggregates, but more likely stores excess aggregates until downstream degradation pathways have the capacity to turn them over after liberation by the Hsp104

  14. Detection of hydrogen sulfide through photoluminescence quenching of penicillamine-copper nanocluster aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jia-Ying; Chen, Po-Cheng; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2014-05-01

    We have developed a one-pot, inexpensive, simple and rapid method to synthesize photoluminescent copper nanocluster (Cu NC) aggregates from Cu2+ ions in 65% (v v-1) dimethylformamide aqueous solution containing penicillamine (PA) as a capping and reducing agent. As-prepared PA-Cu NC aggregates emit at 580 nm when excited at 326 nm, with a quantum yield of 2.0%. The photoluminescence of PA-Cu NC aggregates originate from ligand-to-metal charge transfer, which is supported by a long lifetime (126.5 ns) and a large Stokes shift (254 nm). As-prepared PA-Cu NC aggregates have different emission wavelengths with the same excitation wavelength in various organic-aqueous solutions. The PA-Cu NC aggregates are highly selective and sensitive to the detection of hydrogen sulfide (H2S), based on analyte-induced photoluminescence quenching through the formation of CuS nanoparticles. The probe allows the detection of H2S, with a linear range of 1-100 μM and a limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio = 3) of 500 nM. The practicality of this probe has been validated through the analysis of hot spring water samples.

  15. Detection of hydrogen sulfide through photoluminescence quenching of penicillamine-copper nanocluster aggregates.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jia-Ying; Chen, Po-Cheng; Chang, Huan-Tsung

    2014-05-16

    We have developed a one-pot, inexpensive, simple and rapid method to synthesize photoluminescent copper nanocluster (Cu NC) aggregates from Cu(2+) ions in 65% (v v(-1)) dimethylformamide aqueous solution containing penicillamine (PA) as a capping and reducing agent. As-prepared PA-Cu NC aggregates emit at 580 nm when excited at 326 nm, with a quantum yield of 2.0%. The photoluminescence of PA-Cu NC aggregates originate from ligand-to-metal charge transfer, which is supported by a long lifetime (126.5 ns) and a large Stokes shift (254 nm). As-prepared PA-Cu NC aggregates have different emission wavelengths with the same excitation wavelength in various organic-aqueous solutions. The PA-Cu NC aggregates are highly selective and sensitive to the detection of hydrogen sulfide (H₂S), based on analyte-induced photoluminescence quenching through the formation of CuS nanoparticles. The probe allows the detection of H₂S, with a linear range of 1-100 μM and a limit of detection (signal-to-noise ratio = 3) of 500 nM. The practicality of this probe has been validated through the analysis of hot spring water samples.

  16. A network of ubiquitin ligases is important for the dynamics of misfolded protein aggregates in yeast.

    PubMed

    Theodoraki, Maria A; Nillegoda, Nadinath B; Saini, Jagdeep; Caplan, Avrom J

    2012-07-06

    Quality control ubiquitin ligases promote degradation of misfolded proteins by the proteasome. If the capacity of the ubiquitin/proteasome system is exceeded, then misfolded proteins accumulate in aggregates that are cleared by the autophagic system. To identify components of the ubiquitin/proteasome system that protect against aggregation, we analyzed a GFP-tagged protein kinase, Ste11ΔN(K444R)-GFP, in yeast strains deleted for 14 different ubiquitin ligases. We show that deletion of almost all of these ligases affected the proteostatic balance in untreated cells such that Ste11ΔN(K444R)-GFP aggregation was changed significantly compared with the levels found in wild type cells. By contrast, aggregation was increased significantly in only six E3 deletion strains when Ste11ΔN(K444R)-GFP folding was impaired due to inhibition of the molecular chaperone Hsp90 with geldanamycin. The increase in aggregation of Ste11ΔN(K444R)-GFP due to deletion of UBR1 and UFD4 was partially suppressed by deletion of UBR2 due to up-regulation of Rpn4, which controls proteasome activity. Deletion of UBR1 in combination with LTN1, UFD4, or DOA10 led to a marked hypersensitivity to azetidine 2-carboxylic acid, suggesting some redundancy in the networks of quality control ubiquitin ligases. Finally, we show that Ubr1 promotes clearance of protein aggregates when the autophagic system is inactivated. These results provide insight into the mechanics by which ubiquitin ligases cooperate and provide feedback regulation in the clearance of misfolded proteins.

  17. Discrete Molecular Dynamics Approach to the Study of Disordered and Aggregating Proteins.

    PubMed

    Emperador, Agustí; Orozco, Modesto

    2017-03-14

    We present a refinement of the Coarse Grained PACSAB force field for Discrete Molecular Dynamics (DMD) simulations of proteins in aqueous conditions. As the original version, the refined method provides good representation of the structure and dynamics of folded proteins but provides much better representations of a variety of unfolded proteins, including some very large, impossible to analyze by atomistic simulation methods. The PACSAB/DMD method also reproduces accurately aggregation properties, providing good pictures of the structural ensembles of proteins showing a folded core and an intrinsically disordered region. The combination of accuracy and speed makes the method presented here a good alternative for the exploration of unstructured protein systems.

  18. Amyloid β-sheet mimics that antagonize protein aggregation and reduce amyloid toxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Pin-Nan; Liu, Cong; Zhao, Minglei; Eisenberg, David; Nowick, James S.

    2012-11-01

    The amyloid protein aggregation associated with diseases such as Alzheimer's, Parkinson's and type II diabetes (among many others) features a bewildering variety of β-sheet-rich structures in transition from native proteins to ordered oligomers and fibres. The variation in the amino-acid sequences of the β-structures presents a challenge to developing a model system of β-sheets for the study of various amyloid aggregates. Here, we introduce a family of robust β-sheet macrocycles that can serve as a platform to display a variety of heptapeptide sequences from different amyloid proteins. We have tailored these amyloid β-sheet mimics (ABSMs) to antagonize the aggregation of various amyloid proteins, thereby reducing the toxicity of amyloid aggregates. We describe the structures and inhibitory properties of ABSMs containing amyloidogenic peptides from the amyloid-β peptide associated with Alzheimer's disease, β2-microglobulin associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease, islet amyloid polypeptide associated with type II diabetes, human and yeast prion proteins, and Tau, which forms neurofibrillary tangles.

  19. Protein aggregation and neurodegeneration in prototypical neurodegenerative diseases: Examples of amyloidopathies, tauopathies and synucleinopathies.

    PubMed

    Bourdenx, Mathieu; Koulakiotis, Nikolaos Stavros; Sanoudou, Despina; Bezard, Erwan; Dehay, Benjamin; Tsarbopoulos, Anthony

    2015-07-21

    Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases are the most prevalent neurodegenerative diseases that generate important health-related direct and indirect socio-economic costs. They are characterized by severe neuronal losses in several disease-specific brain regions associated with deposits of aggregated proteins. In Alzheimer's disease, β-amyloid peptide-containing plaques and intraneuronal neurofibrillary tangles composed of hyperphosphorylated microtubule-associated protein tau are the two main neuropathological lesions, while Parkinson's disease is defined by the presence of Lewy Bodies that are intraneuronal proteinaceous cytoplasmic inclusions. α-Synuclein has been identified as a major protein component of Lewy Bodies and heavily implicated in the pathogenesis of Parkinson's disease. In the past few years, evidence has emerged to explain how these aggregate-prone proteins can undergo spontaneous self-aggregation, propagate from cell to cell, and mediate neurotoxicity. Current research now indicates that oligomeric forms are probably the toxic species. This article discusses recent progress in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these diseases, with a focus on the underlying mechanisms of protein aggregation, and emphasizes the pathophysiological molecular mechanisms leading to cellular toxicity. Finally, we present the putative direct link between β-amyloid peptide and tau in causing toxicity in Alzheimer's disease as well as α-synuclein in Parkinson's disease, along with some of the most promising therapeutic strategies currently in development for those incurable neurodegenerative disorders.

  20. In vivo aggregation properties of the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein PABPN1.

    PubMed

    Tavanez, João Paulo; Calado, Patricia; Braga, José; Lafarga, Miguel; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2005-05-01

    A broad range of degenerative diseases is associated with intracellular inclusions formed by toxic, aggregation-prone mutant proteins. Intranuclear inclusions constitute a pathological hallmark of oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy (OPMD), a dominantly inherited disease caused by (GCG) repeat expansions in the gene that encodes for nuclear poly(A) binding protein (PABPN1). The mutation results in an extended polyalanine stretch that has been proposed to induce protein aggregation and formation of intranuclear inclusions. Here we show that normal PABPN1 is inherently aggregation-prone when exogenously expressed in either HeLa or myogenic C2 cells. Similar deposits of insoluble PABPN1 are formed by variant forms of the protein containing either a polyalanine expansion or a complete deletion of the polyalanine tract, indicating that the mutation responsible for OPMD is not essential for formation of PABPN1 inclusions. In contrast, interfering with any of the protein domains required for stimulation of poly(A) polymerase prevents the formation of inclusions. Most surprisingly, photobleaching experiments reveal that both normal and expanded PABPN1 molecules are not irreversibly sequestered into aggregates, but rather move rapidly in and out of the inclusions. These findings have important implications for the interpretation of OPMD model systems based on exogenous expression of PABPN1.

  1. Small molecule proteostasis regulators that reprogram the ER to reduce extracellular protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Plate, Lars; Cooley, Christina B; Chen, John J; Paxman, Ryan J; Gallagher, Ciara M; Madoux, Franck; Genereux, Joseph C; Dobbs, Wesley; Garza, Dan; Spicer, Timothy P; Scampavia, Louis; Brown, Steven J; Rosen, Hugh; Powers, Evan T; Walter, Peter; Hodder, Peter; Wiseman, R Luke; Kelly, Jeffery W

    2016-01-01

    Imbalances in endoplasmic reticulum (ER) proteostasis are associated with etiologically-diverse degenerative diseases linked to excessive extracellular protein misfolding and aggregation. Reprogramming of the ER proteostasis environment through genetic activation of the Unfolded Protein Response (UPR)-associated transcription factor ATF6 attenuates secretion and extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins. Here, we employed a screening approach that included complementary arm-specific UPR reporters and medium-throughput transcriptional profiling to identify non-toxic small molecules that phenocopy the ATF6-mediated reprogramming of the ER proteostasis environment. The ER reprogramming afforded by our molecules requires activation of endogenous ATF6 and occurs independent of global ER stress. Furthermore, our molecules phenocopy the ability of genetic ATF6 activation to selectively reduce secretion and extracellular aggregation of amyloidogenic proteins. These results show that small molecule-dependent ER reprogramming, achieved through preferential activation of the ATF6 transcriptional program, is a promising strategy to ameliorate imbalances in ER function associated with degenerative protein aggregation diseases. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15550.001 PMID:27435961

  2. Dynamics of protein aggregation and oligomer formation governed by secondary nucleation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaels, Thomas C. T.; Lazell, Hamish W.; Arosio, Paolo; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-08-01

    The formation of aggregates in many protein systems can be significantly accelerated by secondary nucleation, a process where existing assemblies catalyse the nucleation of new species. In particular, secondary nucleation has emerged as a central process controlling the proliferation of many filamentous protein structures, including molecular species related to diseases such as sickle cell anemia and a range of neurodegenerative conditions. Increasing evidence suggests that the physical size of protein filaments plays a key role in determining their potential for deleterious interactions with living cells, with smaller aggregates of misfolded proteins, oligomers, being particularly toxic. It is thus crucial to progress towards an understanding of the factors that control the sizes of protein aggregates. However, the influence of secondary nucleation on the time evolution of aggregate size distributions has been challenging to quantify. This difficulty originates in large part from the fact that secondary nucleation couples the dynamics of species distant in size space. Here, we approach this problem by presenting an analytical treatment of the master equation describing the growth kinetics of linear protein structures proliferating through secondary nucleation and provide closed-form expressions for the temporal evolution of the resulting aggregate size distribution. We show how the availability of analytical solutions for the full filament distribution allows us to identify the key physical parameters that control the sizes of growing protein filaments. Furthermore, we use these results to probe the dynamics of the populations of small oligomeric species as they are formed through secondary nucleation and discuss the implications of our work for understanding the factors that promote or curtail the production of these species with a potentially high deleterious biological activity.

  3. Competition between protein folding and aggregation: A three-dimensional lattice-model simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bratko, D.; Blanch, H. W.

    2001-01-01

    Aggregation of protein molecules resulting in the loss of biological activity and the formation of insoluble deposits represents a serious problem for the biotechnology and pharmaceutical industries and in medicine. Considerable experimental and theoretical efforts are being made in order to improve our understanding of, and ability to control, the process. In the present work, we describe a Monte Carlo study of a multichain system of coarse-grained model proteins akin to lattice models developed for simulations of protein folding. The model is designed to examine the competition between intramolecular interactions leading to the native protein structure, and intermolecular association, resulting in the formation of aggregates of misfolded chains. Interactions between the segments are described by a variation of the Go potential [N. Go and H. Abe, Biopolymers 20, 1013 (1981)] that extends the recognition between attracting types of segments to pairs on distinct chains. For the particular model we adopt, the global free energy minimum of a pair of protein molecules corresponds to a dimer of native proteins. When three or more molecules interact, clusters of misfolded chains can be more stable than aggregates of native folds. A considerable fraction of native structure, however, is preserved in these cases. Rates of conformational changes rapidly decrease with the size of the protein cluster. Within the timescale accessible to computer simulations, the folding-aggregation balance is strongly affected by kinetic considerations. Both the native form and aggregates can persist in metastable states, even if conditions such as temperature or concentration favor a transition to an alternative form. Refolding yield can be affected by the presence of an additional polymer species mimicking the function of a molecular chaperone.

  4. Dynamics of protein aggregation and oligomer formation governed by secondary nucleation

    SciTech Connect

    Michaels, Thomas C. T. Lazell, Hamish W.; Arosio, Paolo; Knowles, Tuomas P. J.

    2015-08-07

    The formation of aggregates in many protein systems can be significantly accelerated by secondary nucleation, a process where existing assemblies catalyse the nucleation of new species. In particular, secondary nucleation has emerged as a central process controlling the proliferation of many filamentous protein structures, including molecular species related to diseases such as sickle cell anemia and a range of neurodegenerative conditions. Increasing evidence suggests that the physical size of protein filaments plays a key role in determining their potential for deleterious interactions with living cells, with smaller aggregates of misfolded proteins, oligomers, being particularly toxic. It is thus crucial to progress towards an understanding of the factors that control the sizes of protein aggregates. However, the influence of secondary nucleation on the time evolution of aggregate size distributions has been challenging to quantify. This difficulty originates in large part from the fact that secondary nucleation couples the dynamics of species distant in size space. Here, we approach this problem by presenting an analytical treatment of the master equation describing the growth kinetics of linear protein structures proliferating through secondary nucleation and provide closed-form expressions for the temporal evolution of the resulting aggregate size distribution. We show how the availability of analytical solutions for the full filament distribution allows us to identify the key physical parameters that control the sizes of growing protein filaments. Furthermore, we use these results to probe the dynamics of the populations of small oligomeric species as they are formed through secondary nucleation and discuss the implications of our work for understanding the factors that promote or curtail the production of these species with a potentially high deleterious biological activity.

  5. A Multistage Pathway for Human Prion Protein Aggregation in Vitro: From Multimeric Seeds to β-Oligomers and Nonfibrillar Structures

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Kang R.; Yu, Shuiliang; Yin, Shaoman; Plomp, Marco; Qiu, S. Roger; Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Moradian-Oldak, Janet; Sy, Man-Sun

    2015-01-01

    Aberrant protein aggregation causes numerous neurological diseases including Creutzfeldt—Jakob disease (CJD), but the aggregation mechanisms remain poorly understood. Here, we report AFM results on the formation pathways of β-oligomers and nonfibrillar aggregates from wild-type full-length recombinant human prion protein (WT) and an insertion mutant (10OR) with five additional octapeptide repeats linked to familial CJD. Upon partial denaturing, seeds consisting of 3–4 monomers quickly appeared. Oligomers of ∼11–12 monomers then formed through direct interaction of seeds, rather than by subsequent monomer attachment. All larger aggregates formed through association of these β-oligomers. Although both WT and 10OR exhibited identical aggregation mechanisms, the latter oligomerized faster due to lower solubility and, hence, thermodynamic stability. This novel aggregation pathway has implications for prion diseases as well as others caused by protein aggregation. PMID:21534611

  6. Heavy Metals and Metalloids As a Cause for Protein Misfolding and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Tamás, Markus J.; Sharma, Sandeep K.; Ibstedt, Sebastian; Jacobson, Therese; Christen, Philipp

    2014-01-01

    While the toxicity of metals and metalloids, like arsenic, cadmium, mercury, lead and chromium, is undisputed, the underlying molecular mechanisms are not entirely clear. General consensus holds that proteins are the prime targets; heavy metals interfere with the physiological activity of specific, particularly susceptible proteins, either by forming a complex with functional side chain groups or by displacing essential metal ions in metalloproteins. Recent studies have revealed an additional mode of metal action targeted at proteins in a non-native state; certain heavy metals and metalloids have been found to inhibit the in vitro refolding of chemically denatured proteins, to interfere with protein folding in vivo and to cause aggregation of nascent proteins in living cells. Apparently, unfolded proteins with motile backbone and side chains are considerably more prone to engage in stable, pluridentate metal complexes than native proteins with their well-defined 3D structure. By interfering with the folding process, heavy metal ions and metalloids profoundly affect protein homeostasis and cell viability. This review describes how heavy metals impede protein folding and promote protein aggregation, how cells regulate quality control systems to protect themselves from metal toxicity and how metals might contribute to protein misfolding disorders. PMID:24970215

  7. Structural coalescence underlies the aggregation propensity of a β-barrel protein motif

    PubMed Central

    Angelani, Carla R.; Caramelo, Julio J.; Curto, Lucrecia M.; Delfino, José M.

    2017-01-01

    A clear understanding of the structural foundations underlying protein aggregation is an elusive goal of central biomedical importance. A step toward this aim is exemplified by the β-barrel motif represented by the intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) and two abridged all-β sheet forms (Δ98Δ and Δ78Δ). At odds with the established notion that a perturbation of the native fold should necessarily favor a buildup of intermediate forms with an enhanced tendency to aggregate, the intrinsic stability (ΔG°H2O) of these proteins does not bear a straightforward correlation with their trifluoroethanol (TFE)-induced aggregation propensity. In view of this fact, we found it more insightful to delve into the connection between structure and stability under sub-aggregating conditions (10% TFE). In the absence of the co-solvent, the abridged variants display a common native-like region decorated with a disordered C-terminal stretch. Upon TFE addition, an increase in secondary structure content is observed, assimilating them to the parent protein. In this sense, TFE perturbs a common native like region while exerting a global compaction effect. Importantly, in all cases, fatty acid binding function is preserved. Interestingly, energetic as well as structural diversity in aqueous solution evolves into a common conformational ensemble more akin in stability. These facts reconcile apparent paradoxical findings related to stability and rates of aggregation. This scenario likely mimics the accrual of aggregation-prone species in the population, an early critical event for the development of fibrillation. PMID:28187186

  8. Structural coalescence underlies the aggregation propensity of a β-barrel protein motif.

    PubMed

    Angelani, Carla R; Caramelo, Julio J; Curto, Lucrecia M; Delfino, José M

    2017-01-01

    A clear understanding of the structural foundations underlying protein aggregation is an elusive goal of central biomedical importance. A step toward this aim is exemplified by the β-barrel motif represented by the intestinal fatty acid binding protein (IFABP) and two abridged all-β sheet forms (Δ98Δ and Δ78Δ). At odds with the established notion that a perturbation of the native fold should necessarily favor a buildup of intermediate forms with an enhanced tendency to aggregate, the intrinsic stability (ΔG°H2O) of these proteins does not bear a straightforward correlation with their trifluoroethanol (TFE)-induced aggregation propensity. In view of this fact, we found it more insightful to delve into the connection between structure and stability under sub-aggregating conditions (10% TFE). In the absence of the co-solvent, the abridged variants display a common native-like region decorated with a disordered C-terminal stretch. Upon TFE addition, an increase in secondary structure content is observed, assimilating them to the parent protein. In this sense, TFE perturbs a common native like region while exerting a global compaction effect. Importantly, in all cases, fatty acid binding function is preserved. Interestingly, energetic as well as structural diversity in aqueous solution evolves into a common conformational ensemble more akin in stability. These facts reconcile apparent paradoxical findings related to stability and rates of aggregation. This scenario likely mimics the accrual of aggregation-prone species in the population, an early critical event for the development of fibrillation.

  9. Effect of electrostatics on aggregation of prion protein Sup35 peptide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Portillo, Alexander M.; Krasnoslobodtsev, Alexey V.; Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2012-04-01

    Self-assembly of misfolded proteins into ordered fibrillar structures is a fundamental property of a wide range of proteins and peptides. This property is also linked with the development of various neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s. Environmental conditions modulate the misfolding and aggregation processes. We used a peptide, CGNNQQNY, from yeast prion protein Sup35, as a model system to address effects of environmental conditions on aggregate formation. The GNNQQNY peptide self-assembles in fibrils with structural features that are similar to amyloidogenic proteins. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay were employed to follow the aggregation process at various pHs and ionic strengths. We also used single molecule AFM force spectroscopy to probe interactions between the peptides under various conditions. The ThT fluorescence data showed that the peptide aggregates fast at pH values approaching the peptide isoelectric point (pI = 5.3) and the kinetics is 10 times slower at acidic pH (pH 2.0), suggesting that electrostatic interactions contribute to the peptide self-assembly into aggregates. This hypothesis was tested by experiments performed at low (11 mM) and high (150 mM) ionic strengths. Indeed, the aggregation lag time measured at pH 2 at low ionic strength (11 mM) is 195 h, whereas the lag time decreases ˜5 times when the ionic strength is increased to 150 mM. At conditions close to the pI value, pH 5.6, the aggregation lag time is 12 ± 6 h under low ionic strength, and there is minimal change to the lag time at 150 mM NaCl. The ionic strength also influences the morphology of aggregates visualized with AFM. In pH 2.0 and at high ionic strength, the aggregates are twofold taller than those formed at low ionic strength. In parallel, AFM force spectroscopy studies revealed minimal contribution of electrostatics to dissociation of transient peptide dimers.

  10. Chapter 3: A fluorescent window into protein folding and aggregation in cells.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Zoya; Gierasch, Lila M

    2008-01-01

    Evolutionary selective pressures have tuned the efficiency of the protein-folding reaction in the crowded complex environment in the cell. Nevertheless, the fidelity of folding is imperfect, leading to off-pathway intermolecular interactions that compete with proper folding and to consequent formation of thermodynamically stable aggregates. Such aggregates constitute the histopathological hallmarks of many neurodegenerative pathologies. Yet, most of the approaches to characterize protein folding and/or misfolding are limited to in vitro conditions. Here, we describe a strategy to directly monitor the behavior of a protein in prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. The method is based on incorporation of structurally non-perturbing, specific binding motifs for a bis-arsenical fluoroscein dye, FlAsH, in sites that result in distinct dye fluorescence signals for the folded and unfolded states of the protein under study. Our approach has been developed using as a case study the predominantly beta-sheet intracellular lipid-binding protein, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein, alone or as a chimera fused to the exon 1-encoded fragment of huntingtin, which harbors a polyglutamine repeat tract. We have designed protocols to label this protein in vivo and to monitor the resulting fluorescence signal, which reports on any misfolding transition and formation of aggregates, yielding quantitatively interpretable data.

  11. Inhibitory effect of corcin on aggregation of 1N/4R human tau protein in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Karakani, Ali Mohammadi; Riazi, Gholamhossein; Mahmood Ghaffari, Seyed; Ahmadian, Shahin; Mokhtari, Farzad; Jalili Firuzi, Mahshad; Zahra Bathaie, Seyedeh

    2015-01-01

    Objective(s): Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common age-related neurodegenerative disorder. One of the hallmarks of AD is an abnormal accumulation of fibril forms of tau protein which is known as a microtubule associated protein. In this regard, inhibition of tau aggregation has been documented to be a potent therapeutic approach in AD and tauopathies. Unfortunately, the available synthetic drugs have modest beneficial efficacy with several side effects. Therefore, pipeline drugs from natural sources with anti-aggregation properties can be useful in the prevention and treatment of AD. Among medicinal plants, saffron (Crocus sativus, L.), as a traditional herbal medicine has different pharmacological properties and can be used as treatment for several nervous system impairment including depression and dementia. Crocin as a major constituent of saffron is the glycosylated form of crocetin. Materials and Methods: In this study, we investigated the inhibitory effect of crocin on aggregation of recombinant human tau protein 1N/4R isoform using biochemical methods and cell culture. Results: Results revealed that tau protein under the fibrillation condition and in the presence of crocin had enough stability with low tendency for aggregation. Crocin inhibited tau aggregation with IC50 of 100 µg/ml. Furthermore, transmission electron microscopy images confirmed that crocin could suppress the formation of tau protein filaments. Conclusion: Inhibitory effect of crocin could be related to its interference with nucleation phase that led to increases in monomer species of tau protein. Based on our results, crocin is recommended as a proper candidate to be used in AD treatment. PMID:26124935

  12. [Role of protein kinases of human red cell membrane in deformability and aggregation changes].

    PubMed

    Murav'ev, A V; Maĭmistova, A A; Tikhomirova, I A; Bulaeva, S V; Mikhaĭlov, P V; Murav'ev, A A

    2012-01-01

    The proteomic analysis has showed that red cell membrane contains several kinases and phosphatases. Therefore the aim of this study was to investigate the role of protein kinases of human red cell membrane in deformability and aggregation changes. Exposure of red blood cells (RBCs) to some chemical compounds led to change in the RBC microrheological properties. When forskolin (10 microM), an adenylyl cyclase (AC) and a protein kinase A (PKA) stimulator was added to RBC suspension, the RBC deformability (RBCD) was increased by 20% (p < 0.05). Somewhat more significant deformability rise appeared after RBC incubation with dB-AMP (by 26%; p < 0.01). Red cell aggregation (RBCA) was significantly decreased under these conditions (p < 0.01). Markedly less changes of deformability was found after RBC incubation with protein kinase stimulator C (PKC)--phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). This drug reduced red cell aggregation only slightly. It was inhibited red cell tyrosine phosphotase activity by N-vanadat and was obtained a significant RBCD rise and RBCA lowering. The similar effect was found when cells were incubated with cisplatin as a tyrosine protein kinase (TPK) activator. It is important to note that a selective TPK inhibitor--lavendustin eliminated the above mention effects. On the whole the total data clearly show that the red cell aggregation and deformation changes were connected with an activation of the different intracellular signaling pathways.

  13. Impact of Sterilization Method on Protein Aggregation and Particle Formation in Polymer-Based Syringes.

    PubMed

    Kiminami, Hideaki; Krueger, Aaron B; Abe, Yoshihiko; Yoshino, Keisuke; Carpenter, John F

    2017-04-01

    The effects of sterilization methods on the storage stability of erythropoietin (EPO) in polymer-based syringes were assessed by quantifying protein oxidation, aggregation, and particle formation. Micro-particle counting and size exclusion chromatography coupled with a multi-angle light scattering detector demonstrated much lower levels of protein particles and aggregates for EPO stored for 12 weeks in steam-sterilized than in radiation (Rad)-sterilized syringes. Intermediate levels of damage were observed for EPO stored in ethylene oxide-sterilized syringes. HPLC analysis documented that the Rad-sterilized syringes caused increased oxidation of the protein during storage. In contrast, in the steam- and ethylene oxide-sterilized syringes EPO oxidation did not change. Analysis with electron spin resonance revealed that only Rad-sterilized syringes formed radicals in the syringe body, which persisted over the 12-week storage period. These results demonstrated that Rad-sterilization generated radicals in the syringes which in turn caused increased EPO oxidation, particle formation, and protein aggregation. Therefore, steam sterilization was shown to be a preferable sterilization method for the polymer-based syringe system when using biopharmaceutical drugs highly sensitive to oxidation, and particle formation and aggregation.

  14. Expression of Cardamom mosaic virus coat protein in Escherichia coli and its assembly into filamentous aggregates.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Thomas; Usha, R

    2002-06-01

    Cardamom mosaic virus (CdMV), a member of the genus Macluravirus of Potyviridae, causes a mosaic disease in cardamom. A polyclonal antiserum was raised against the purified virus and IgG was prepared. Electron microscopic studies on the purified virus showed flexuous filamentous particles of approximately 800 nm in length, typical of members of Potyviridae. The coat protein (CP) encoding sequence of the virus was expressed in Escherichia coli and the protein purified by affinity chromatography under denaturing conditions. The viral nature of the expressed CP was confirmed by positive reaction with anti CdMV IgG in a Western blot. The expressed CP aggregated irreversibly upon renaturation at concentrations above 0.07 mg/ml. The expression of the CP led to the formation of filamentous aggregates in E. coli as observed by immuno-gold electron microscopy. The filamentous aggregates were of 100-150 nm in length. Immuno-capture RT-PCR confirmed the absence of coat protein mRNA in the filamentous aggregates. Deletion mutations, which were expected to inhibit virus assembly, were introduced in the core region of the coat protein. However, these mutations did not improve the solubility of the CP in non-denaturing buffers.

  15. Inhibition of protein aggregation by zwitterionic polymer-based core-shell nanogels

    PubMed Central

    Rajan, Robin; Matsumura, Kazuaki

    2017-01-01

    Protein aggregation is a process by which misfolded proteins polymerizes into aggregates and forms fibrous structures with a β-sheet conformation, known as amyloids. It is an undesired outcome, as it not only causes numerous neurodegenerative diseases, but is also a major deterrent in the development of protein biopharmaceuticals. Here, we report a rational design for the synthesis of novel zwitterionic polymer-based core-shell nanogels via controlled radical polymerization. Nanogels with different sizes and functionalities in the core and shell were prepared. The nanogels exhibit remarkable efficiency in the protection of lysozyme against aggregation. Addition of nanogels suppresses the formation of toxic fibrils and also enables lysozyme to retain its enzymatic activity. Increasing the molecular weight and degree of hydrophobicity markedly increases its overall efficiency. Investigation of higher order structures revealed that lysozyme when heated without any additive loses its secondary structure and transforms into a random coil conformation. In contrast, presence of nanogels facilitates the retention of higher order structures by acting as molecular chaperones, thereby reducing molecular collisions. The present study is the first to show that it is possible to design zwitterionic nanogels using appropriate polymerization techniques that will protect proteins under conditions of extreme stress and inhibit aggregation. PMID:28374820

  16. Bayesian Aggregation of Evidence for Detection and Characterization of Patterns in Multiple Noisy Observations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-07-01

    limited sensor data is one of the important research challenges in robotic sensing. This thesis develops techniques for detecting and characterizing...patterns in noisy sensor data. Our Bayesian Aggregation (BA) algorithmic framework can leverage data fusion from multiple low Signal-To-Noise Ratio (SNR... sensor observations to boost the capability to detect and characterize the properties of a signal generating source or process of interest. We

  17. Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters RNA binding proteins and impairs RNA granules formation

    SciTech Connect

    Takanashi, Keisuke; Yamaguchi, Atsushi

    2014-09-26

    Highlights: • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters ALS-associated RNA-binding proteins (FUS wt, hnRNP A1, and hnRNP A2). • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant sequesters SMN1 in the detergent-insoluble fraction. • Aggregation of ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of speckles in the nucleus. • Overproduced ALS-linked FUS mutant reduced the number of processing-bodies (PBs). - Abstract: Protein aggregate/inclusion is one of hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). FUS/TLS, one of causative genes for familial ALS, encodes a multifunctional DNA/RNA binding protein predominantly localized in the nucleus. C-terminal mutations in FUS/TLS cause the retention and the inclusion of FUS/TLS mutants in the cytoplasm. In the present study, we examined the effects of ALS-linked FUS mutants on ALS-associated RNA binding proteins and RNA granules. FUS C-terminal mutants were diffusely mislocalized in the cytoplasm as small granules in transiently transfected SH-SY5Y cells, whereas large aggregates were spontaneously formed in ∼10% of those cells. hnRNP A1, hnRNP A2, and SMN1 as well as FUS wild type were assembled into stress granules under stress conditions, and these were also recruited to FUS mutant-derived spontaneous aggregates in the cytoplasm. These aggregates stalled poly(A) mRNAs and sequestered SMN1 in the detergent insoluble fraction, which also reduced the number of nuclear oligo(dT)-positive foci (speckles) in FISH (fluorescence in situ hybridization) assay. In addition, the number of P-bodies was decreased in cells harboring cytoplasmic granules of FUS P525L. These findings raise the possibility that ALS-linked C-terminal FUS mutants could sequester a variety of RNA binding proteins and mRNAs in the cytoplasmic aggregates, which could disrupt various aspects of RNA equilibrium and biogenesis.

  18. Vitamin k3 inhibits protein aggregation: Implication in the treatment of amyloid diseases

    PubMed Central

    Alam, Parvez; Chaturvedi, Sumit Kumar; Siddiqi, Mohammad Khursheed; Rajpoot, Ravi Kant; Ajmal, Mohd Rehan; Zaman, Masihuz; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2016-01-01

    Protein misfolding and aggregation have been associated with several human diseases such as Alzheimer’s, Parkinson’s and familial amyloid polyneuropathy etc. In this study, anti-fibrillation activity of vitamin k3 and its effect on the kinetics of amyloid formation of hen egg white lysozyme (HEWL) and Aβ-42 peptide were investigated. Here, in combination with Thioflavin T (ThT) fluorescence assay, circular dichroism (CD), transmission electron microscopy and cell cytotoxicity assay, we demonstrated that vitamin k3 significantly inhibits fibril formation as well as the inhibitory effect is dose dependent manner. Our experimental studies inferred that vitamin k3 exert its neuro protective effect against amyloid induced cytotoxicity through concerted pathway, modifying the aggregation formation towards formation of nontoxic aggregates. Molecular docking demonstrated that vitamin k3 mediated inhibition of HEWL and Aβ-42 fibrillogenesis may be initiated by interacting with proteolytic resistant and aggregation prone regions respectively. This work would provide an insight into the mechanism of protein aggregation inhibition by vitamin k3; pave the way for discovery of other small molecules that may exert similar effect against amyloid formation and its associated neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:27230476

  19. Strategies for the assessment of protein aggregates in pharmaceutical biotech product development.

    PubMed

    den Engelsman, John; Garidel, Patrick; Smulders, Ronald; Koll, Hans; Smith, Bryan; Bassarab, Stefan; Seidl, Andreas; Hainzl, Otmar; Jiskoot, Wim

    2011-04-01

    Within the European Immunogenicity Platform (EIP) ( http://www.e-i-p.eu ), the Protein Characterization Subcommittee (EIP-PCS) has been established to discuss and exchange experience of protein characterization in relation to unwanted immunogenicity. In this commentary, we, as representatives of EIP-PCS, review the current state of methods for analysis of protein aggregates. Moreover, we elaborate on why these methods should be used during product development and make recommendations to the biotech community with regard to strategies for their application during the development of protein therapeutics.

  20. Regulation of Protein Secretion Through Controlled Aggregation in the Endoplasmic Reticulum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rivera, Victor M.; Wang, Xiurong; Wardwell, Scott; Courage, Nancy L.; Volchuk, Allen; Keenan, Terence; Holt, Dennis A.; Gilman, Michael; Orci, Lelio; Cerasoli, Frank; Rothman, James E.; Clackson, Tim

    2000-02-01

    A system for direct pharmacologic control of protein secretion was developed to allow rapid and pulsatile delivery of therapeutic proteins. A protein was engineered so that it accumulated as aggregates in the endoplasmic reticulum. Secretion was then stimulated by a synthetic small-molecule drug that induces protein disaggregation. Rapid and transient secretion of growth hormone and insulin was achieved in vitro and in vivo. A regulated pulse of insulin secretion resulted in a transient correction of serum glucose concentrations in a mouse model of hyperglycemia. This approach may make gene therapy a viable method for delivery of polypeptides that require rapid and regulated delivery.

  1. Aggregation-induced emission active tetraphenylethene-based sensor for uranyl ion detection.

    PubMed

    Wen, Jun; Huang, Zeng; Hu, Sheng; Li, Shuo; Li, Weiyi; Wang, Xiaolin

    2016-11-15

    A novel tetraphenylethene-based fluorescent sensor, TPE-T, was developed for the detection of uranyl ions. The selective binding of TPE-T to uranyl ions resulted in a detectable signal owing to the quenching of its aggregation-induced emission. The developed sensor could be used to visually distinguish UO2(2+) from lanthanides, transition metals, and alkali metals under UV light; the presence of other metal ions did not interfere with the detection of uranyl ions. In addition, TPE-T was successfully used for the detection of uranyl ions in river water, illustrating its potential applications in environmental systems.

  2. Predictive response surface model for heat-induced rheological changes and aggregation of whey protein concentrate.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Pedro A; Emond, Charles; Gomaa, Ahmed; Remondetto, Gabriel E; Subirade, Muriel

    2015-02-01

    Whey proteins are now far more than a by-product of cheese processing. In the last 2 decades, food manufacturers have developed them as ingredients, with the dairy industry remaining as a major user. For many applications, whey proteins are modified (denatured) to alter their structure and functional properties. The objective of this research was to study the influence of 85 to 100 °C, with protein concentration of 8% to 12%, and treatment times of 5 to 30 min, while measuring rheological properties (storage modulus, loss modulus, and complex viscosity) and aggregation (intermolecular beta-sheet formation) in dispersions of whey protein concentrate (WPC). A Box-Behnken Response Surface Methodology modeled the heat denaturation of liquid sweet WPC at 3 variables and 3 levels. The model revealed a very significant fit for viscoelastic properties, and a lesser fit for protein aggregation, at temperatures not previously studied. An exponential increase of rheological parameters was governed by protein concentration and temperature, while a modest linear relationship of aggregation was governed by temperature. Models such as these can serve as valuable guides to the ingredient and dairy industries to develop target products, as whey is a major ingredient in many functional foods.

  3. Proteasome dysfunction induces muscle growth defects and protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Kitajima, Yasuo; Tashiro, Yoshitaka; Suzuki, Naoki; Warita, Hitoshi; Kato, Masaaki; Tateyama, Maki; Ando, Risa; Izumi, Rumiko; Yamazaki, Maya; Abe, Manabu; Sakimura, Kenji; Ito, Hidefumi; Urushitani, Makoto; Nagatomi, Ryoichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Aoki, Masashi

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The ubiquitin–proteasome and autophagy–lysosome pathways are the two major routes of protein and organelle clearance. The role of the proteasome pathway in mammalian muscle has not been examined in vivo. In this study, we report that the muscle-specific deletion of a crucial proteasomal gene, Rpt3 (also known as Psmc4), resulted in profound muscle growth defects and a decrease in force production in mice. Specifically, developing muscles in conditional Rpt3-knockout animals showed dysregulated proteasomal activity. The autophagy pathway was upregulated, but the process of autophagosome formation was impaired. A microscopic analysis revealed the accumulation of basophilic inclusions and disorganization of the sarcomeres in young adult mice. Our results suggest that appropriate proteasomal activity is important for muscle growth and for maintaining myofiber integrity in collaboration with autophagy pathways. The deletion of a component of the proteasome complex contributed to myofiber degeneration and weakness in muscle disorders that are characterized by the accumulation of abnormal inclusions. PMID:25380823

  4. Prefoldin Plays a Role as a Clearance Factor in Preventing Proteasome Inhibitor-induced Protein Aggregation*

    PubMed Central

    Abe, Akira; Takahashi-Niki, Kazuko; Takekoshi, Yuka; Shimizu, Takashi; Kitaura, Hirotake; Maita, Hiroshi; Iguchi-Ariga, Sanae M. M.; Ariga, Hiroyoshi

    2013-01-01

    Prefoldin is a molecular chaperone composed of six subunits, PFD1–6, and prevents misfolding of newly synthesized nascent polypeptides. Although it is predicted that prefoldin, like other chaperones, modulates protein aggregation, the precise function of prefoldin against protein aggregation under physiological conditions has never been elucidated. In this study, we first established an anti-prefoldin monoclonal antibody that recognizes the prefoldin complex but not its subunits. Using this antibody, it was found that prefoldin was localized in the cytoplasm with dots in co-localization with polyubiquitinated proteins and that the number and strength of dots were increased in cells that had been treated with lactacystin, a proteasome inhibitor, and thapsigargin, an inducer of endoplasmic reticulum stress. Knockdown of prefoldin increased the level of SDS-insoluble ubiquitinated protein and reduced cell viability in lactacystin and thapsigargin-treated cells. Opposite results were obtained in prefoldin-overexpressed cells. It has been reported that mice harboring a missense mutation L110R of MM-1α/PFD5 exhibit neurodegeneration in the cerebellum. Although the prefoldin complex containing L110R MM-1α was properly formed in vitro and in cells derived from L110R MM-1α mice, the levels of ubiquitinated proteins and cytotoxicity were higher in L110R MM-1α cells than in wild-type cells under normal conditions and were increased by lactacystin and thapsigargin treatment, and growth of L110R MM-1α cells was attenuated. Furthermore, the polyubiquitinated protein aggregation level was increased in the brains of L110R MM-1α mice. These results suggest that prefoldin plays a role in quality control against protein aggregation and that dysfunction of prefoldin is one of the causes of neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:23946485

  5. Weak protein interactions and pH- and temperature-dependent aggregation of human Fc1

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Haixia; Truncali, Kristopher; Ritchie, Julie; Kroe-Barrett, Rachel; Singh, Sanjaya; Robinson, Anne S; Roberts, Christopher J

    2015-01-01

    The Fc (fragment crystallizable) is a common structural region in immunoglobulin gamma (IgG) proteins, IgG-based multi-specific platforms, and Fc-fusion platform technologies. Changes in conformational stability, protein-protein interactions, and aggregation of NS0-produced human Fc1 were quantified experimentally as a function of pH (4 to 6) and temperature (30 to 77°C), using a combination of differential scanning calorimetry, laser light scattering, size-exclusion chromatography, and capillary electrophoresis. The Fc1 was O-glycosylated at position 3 (threonine), and confirmed to correspond to the intact IgG1 by comparison with Fc1 produced by cleavage of the parent IgG1. Changing the pH caused large effects for thermal unfolding transitions, but it caused surprisingly smaller effects for electrostatic protein-protein interactions. The aggregation behavior was qualitatively similar across different solution conditions, with soluble dimers and larger oligomers formed in most cases. Aggregation rates spanned approximately 5 orders of magnitude and could be divided into 2 regimes: (i) Arrhenius, unfolding-limited aggregation at temperatures near or above the midpoint-unfolding temperature of the CH2 domain; (ii) a non-Arrhenius regime at lower temperatures, presumably as a result of the temperature dependence of the unfolding enthalpy for the CH2 domain. The non-Arrhenius regime was most pronounced for lower temperatures. Together with the weak protein-protein repulsions, these highlight challenges that are expected for maintaining long-term stability of biotechnology products that are based on human Fc constructs. PMID:26267255

  6. Automatic segmentation and 3D feature extraction of protein aggregates in Caenorhabditis elegans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodrigues, Pedro L.; Moreira, António H. J.; Teixeira-Castro, Andreia; Oliveira, João; Dias, Nuno; Rodrigues, Nuno F.; Vilaça, João L.

    2012-03-01

    In the last years, it has become increasingly clear that neurodegenerative diseases involve protein aggregation, a process often used as disease progression readout and to develop therapeutic strategies. This work presents an image processing tool to automatic segment, classify and quantify these aggregates and the whole 3D body of the nematode Caenorhabditis Elegans. A total of 150 data set images, containing different slices, were captured with a confocal microscope from animals of distinct genetic conditions. Because of the animals' transparency, most of the slices pixels appeared dark, hampering their body volume direct reconstruction. Therefore, for each data set, all slices were stacked in one single 2D image in order to determine a volume approximation. The gradient of this image was input to an anisotropic diffusion algorithm that uses the Tukey's biweight as edge-stopping function. The image histogram median of this outcome was used to dynamically determine a thresholding level, which allows the determination of a smoothed exterior contour of the worm and the medial axis of the worm body from thinning its skeleton. Based on this exterior contour diameter and the medial animal axis, random 3D points were then calculated to produce a volume mesh approximation. The protein aggregations were subsequently segmented based on an iso-value and blended with the resulting volume mesh. The results obtained were consistent with qualitative observations in literature, allowing non-biased, reliable and high throughput protein aggregates quantification. This may lead to a significant improvement on neurodegenerative diseases treatment planning and interventions prevention.

  7. Inhibition of bovine platelets aggregation in response to Hyalomma anatolicum salivary gland proteins/peptides

    PubMed Central

    Surbhi; Sangwan, Nirmal; Sangwan, Arun K.; Singh, Vijender; Kumar, Ankit

    2016-01-01

    Aim: Ticks are obligate ectoparasites that have an impact on wide range of vertebrates and also act as a potential vector for the transmission of tropical theileriosis, babesiosis, etc., causing significant loss to livestock production worldwide. While feeding, they introduce their saliva containing different bioactive molecules into the host. These molecules have the capability to counteract the host hemostatic mechanism to suck host blood successfully. Therefore, the study was aimed to isolate anti-platelet aggregating peptides from salivary gland extract (SGE) of Hyalomma anatolicum ticks, a commonly available tick in India. Materials and Methods: Female H. anatolicum salivary glands were dissected out and SGE was prepared by homogenizing it in a suitable buffer under ice. Extract so obtained was fractionated by gel filtration chromatography using Sephacryl S-200 column. Total protein concentration in fractions was estimated and bovine platelets were isolated, stimulated with thrombin (positive control), treated with Gly-Pro-Arg-Pro amide (negative control) and with salivary gland fractions for identification of proteins/peptides having anti-platelet aggregating activities. Results: Proteins/peptides present in various salivary gland fractions inhibited the bovine platelet aggregation and the percent inhibition ranged between 33% and 35.8%. Conclusion: The results suggests that the fractions of H. anatolicum salivary glands possess thrombin-induced anti-platelet aggregating activity and which could be further exploited for raising anti-tick vaccine and also for therapeutic purpose. PMID:27956779

  8. SeqA protein aggregation is necessary for SeqA function.

    PubMed

    Lee, H; Kang, S; Bae, S H; Choi, B S; Hwang, D S

    2001-09-14

    The binding of SeqA protein to hemimethylated GATC sequences is important in the negative modulation of chromosomal initiation at oriC, and in the formation of SeqA foci necessary for Escherichia coli chromosome segregation. Using gel-filtration chromotography and glycerol gradient sedimentation, we demonstrate that SeqA exists as a homotetramer. SeqA tetramers are able to aggregate or multimerize in a reversible, concentration-dependent manner. Using a bacterial two-hybrid system, we demonstrate that the N-terminal region of SeqA, especifically the 9th amino acid residue, glutamic acid, is required for functional SeqA-SeqA interaction. Although the SeqA(E9K) mutant protein, containing lysine rather than glutamic acid at the 9th amino acid residue, exists as a tetramer, the mutant protein binds to hemimethylated DNA with altered binding patterns as compared with wild-type SeqA. Aggregates of SeqA(E9K) are defective in hemimethylated DNA binding. Here we demonstrate that proper interaction between SeqA tetramers is required for both hemimethylated DNA binding and formation of active aggregates. SeqA tetramers and aggregates might be involved in the formation of SeqA foci required for the segregation of chromosomal DNA as well as the regulation of chromosomal initiation.

  9. Pharmacological Tuning of Heat Shock Protein 70 Modulates Polyglutamine Toxicity and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Chafekar, Sidhartha M.; Wisén, Susanne; Thompson, Andrea D.; Echeverria, AnaLisa; Walter, Gladis M.; Evans, Christopher G.; Makley, Leah N.; Gestwicki, Jason E.; Duennwald, Martin L.

    2012-01-01

    Nine neurodegenerative disorders are caused by the abnormal expansion of polyglutamine (polyQ) regions within distinct proteins. Genetic and biochemical evidence has documented that the molecular chaperone, heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70), modulates polyQ toxicity and aggregation, yet it remains unclear how Hsp70 might be used as a potential target in polyQ-related diseases. We have utilized a pair of membrane-permeable compounds that tune the activity of Hsp70 by either stimulating or by inhibiting its ATPase functions. Using these two pharmacological agents in both yeast and PC12 cell models of polyQ aggregation and toxicity, we were surprised to find that stimulating Hsp70 solubilized polyQ conformers and simultaneously exacerbated polyQ-mediated toxicity. By contrast, inhibiting Hsp70’s ATPase activity protected against polyQ toxicity and promoted aggregation. These findings clarify Hsp70’s role as a possible drug target in polyQ disorders and suggest that Hsp70 uses ATP hydrolysis to help partition polyQ proteins into structures with varying levels of proteotoxicity. Our results thus support an emerging concept in which certain kinds of polyQ aggregates may be protective, while more soluble polyQ species are toxic. PMID:22709427

  10. Effect of protein aggregates on characterization of FcRn binding of Fc-fusion therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Bajardi-Taccioli, Adriana; Blum, Andrew; Xu, Chongfeng; Sosic, Zoran; Bergelson, Svetlana; Feschenko, Marina

    2015-10-01

    Recycling of antibodies and Fc containing therapeutic proteins by the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn) is known to prolong their persistence in the bloodstream. Fusion of Fc fragment of IgG1 to other proteins is one of the strategies to improve their pharmacokinetic properties. Accurate measurement of Fc-FcRn binding provides information about the strength of this interaction, which in most cases correlates with serum half-life of the protein. It can also offer insight into functional integrity of Fc region. We investigated FcRn binding activity of a large set of Fc-fusion samples after thermal stress by the method based on AlphaScreen technology. An unexpected significant increase in FcR binding was found to correlate with formation of aggregates in these samples. Monomer purified from a thermally-stressed sample had normal FcRn binding, confirming that its Fc portion was intact. Experiments with aggregates spiked into a sample with low initial aggregation level, demonstrated strong correlation between the level of aggregates and FcRn binding. This correlation varied significantly in different methods. By introducing modifications to the assay format we were able to minimize the effects of aggregated species on FcRn binding, which should prevent masking functional changes of Fc-fusion protein. Biolayer interferometry (BLI) was used as an alternative method to measure FcRn binding. Both optimized AlphaScreen- and BLI-based assays were sensitive to structural changes in Fc portion of the molecule, such as oxidation of methionines 252 and 428, and therefore suitable for characterization of FcRn binding.

  11. Heat-shock protein dysregulation is associated with functional and pathological TDP-43 aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiang-Yu; Hou, Shin-Chen; Way, Tzong-Der; Wong, Chi-Huey; Wang, I.-Fan

    2013-11-01

    Conformational disorders are involved in various neurodegenerative diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are the major contributors to neurodegenerative disease; however, ROS that affect the structural changes in misfolded disease proteins have yet to be well characterized. Here we demonstrate that the intrinsic propensity of TDP-43 to aggregate drives the assembly of TDP-43-positive stress granules and soluble toxic TDP-43 oligomers in response to a ROS insult via a disulfide crosslinking-independent mechanism. Notably, ROS-induced TDP-43 protein assembly correlates with the dynamics of certain TDP-43-associated chaperones. The heat-shock protein (HSP)-90 inhibitor 17-AAG prevents ROS-induced TDP-43 aggregation, alters the type of TDP-43 multimers and reduces the severity of pathological TDP-43 inclusions. In summary, our study suggests that a common mechanism could be involved in the pathogenesis of conformational diseases that result from HSP dysregulation.

  12. Controllable g5p-Protein-Directed Aggregation of ssDNA-Gold Nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, S.; Maye, M; Zhang, Y; Gang, O; van der Lelie, D

    2009-01-01

    We assembled single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) conjugated nanoparticles using the phage M13 gene 5 protein (g5p) as the molecular glue to bind two antiparallel noncomplementary ssDNA strands. The entire process was controlled tightly by the concentration of the g5p protein and the presence of double-stranded DNA. The g5p-ssDNA aggregate was disintegrated by hybridization with complementary ssDNA (C-ssDNA) that triggers the dissociation of the complex. Polyhistidine-tagged g5p was bound to nickel nitrilotriacetic acid (Ni2+-NTA) conjugated nanoparticles and subsequently used to coassemble the ssDNA-conjugated nanoparticles into multiparticle-type aggregates. Our approach offers great promise for designing biologically functional, controllable protein/nanoparticle composites.

  13. Role of the disaggregase ClpB in processing of proteins aggregated as inclusion bodies.

    PubMed

    Zblewska, Kamila; Krajewska, Joanna; Zolkiewski, Michal; Kędzierska-Mieszkowska, Sabina

    2014-08-01

    Overproduction of heterologous proteins in bacterial systems often results in the formation of insoluble inclusion bodies (IBs), which is a major impediment in biochemical research and biotechnology. In principle, the activity of molecular chaperones could be employed to gain control over the IB formation and to improve the recombinant protein yields, but the potential of each of the major bacterial chaperones (DnaK/J, GroEL/ES, and ClpB) to process IBs has not been fully established yet. We investigated the formation of inclusion bodies (IBs) of two aggregation-prone proteins, VP1LAC and VP1GFP, overproduced in Escherichiacoli in the presence and absence of the chaperone ClpB. We found that both ClpB isoforms, ClpB95 and ClpB80 accumulated in E. coli cells during the production of IBs. The amount of IB proteins increased in the absence of ClpB. ClpB supported the resolubilization and reactivation of the aggregated VP1LAC and VP1GFP in E. coli cells. The IB disaggregation was optimal in the presence of both ClpB95 and ClpB80. Our results indicate an essential role of ClpB in controlling protein aggregation and inclusion body formation in bacteria.

  14. Resonant energy transfer based biosensor for detection of multivalent proteins.

    SciTech Connect

    Song, X.; Swanson, Basil I.

    2001-01-01

    We have developed a new fluorescence-based biosensor for sensitive detection of species involved in a multivslent interaction. The biosensor system utilizes specific interactions between proteins and cell surface receptors, which trigger a receptor aggregation process. Distance-dependent fluorescence self-quenching and resonant energy transfer mechanisms were coupled with a multivalent interaction to probe the receptor aggregation process, providing a sensitive and specific signal transduction method for such a binding event. The fluorescence change induced by the aggregation process can be monitored by different instrument platforms, e.g. fluorimetry and flow cytometry. In this article, a sensitive detection of pentavalent cholera toxin which recognizes ganglioside GM1 has been demonstrated through the resonant energy transfer scheme, which can achieve a double color change simultaneously. A detection sensitivity as high as 10 pM has been achieved within a few minutes (c.a. 5 minutes). The simultaneous double color change (an increase of acceptor fluorescence and a decrease of donor fluorescence intensity) of two similar fluorescent probes provides particularly high detection reliability owing to the fact that they act as each other's internal reference. Any external perturbation such as environmental temperature change causes no significant change in signal generation. Besides the application for biological sensing, the method also provides a useful tool for investigation of kinetics and thermodynamics of a multivalent interaction. Keywords: Biosensor, Fluorescence resonant energy transfer, Multivalent interaction, Cholera Toxin, Ganglioside GM1, Signal Transduction

  15. Analysis of the potency of various low molecular weight chemical chaperones to prevent protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Upagupta, Chandak; Carlisle, Rachel E; Dickhout, Jeffrey G

    2017-04-22

    Newly translated proteins must undergo proper folding to ensure their function. To enter a low energy state, misfolded proteins form aggregates, which are associated with many degenerative diseases, such as Huntington's disease and chronic kidney disease (CKD). Recent studies have shown the use of low molecular weight chemical chaperones to be an effective method of reducing protein aggregation in various cell types. This study demonstrates a novel non-biased assay to assess the molecular efficacy of these compounds at preventing protein misfolding and/or aggregation. This assay utilizes a thioflavin T fluorescent stain to provide a qualitative and quantitative measure of protein misfolding within cells. The functionality of this method was first assessed in renal proximal tubule epithelial cells treated with various endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress inducers. Once established in the renal model system, we analyzed the ability of some known chemical chaperones to reduce ER stress. A total of five different compounds were selected: 4-phenylbutyrate (4-PBA), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), tauroursodeoxycholic acid, trehalose, and glycerol. The dose-dependent effects of these compounds at reducing thapsigargin-induced ER stress was then analyzed, and used to determine their EC50 values. Of the chaperones, 4-PBA and DHA provided the greatest reduction of ER stress and did so at relatively low concentrations. Upon analyzing the efficiency of these compounds and their corresponding structures, it was determined that chaperones with a localized hydrophilic, polar end followed by a long hydrophobic chain, such as 4-PBA and DHA, were most effective at reducing ER stress. This study provides some insight into the use of low molecular weight chemical chaperones and may serve as the first step towards developing new chaperones of greater potency thereby providing potential treatments for diseases caused by protein aggregation.

  16. Protein Folding and Aggregation into Amyloid: The Interference by Natural Phenolic Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Stefani, Massimo; Rigacci, Stefania

    2013-01-01

    Amyloid aggregation is a hallmark of several degenerative diseases affecting the brain or peripheral tissues, whose intermediates (oligomers, protofibrils) and final mature fibrils display different toxicity. Consequently, compounds counteracting amyloid aggregation have been investigated for their ability (i) to stabilize toxic amyloid precursors; (ii) to prevent the growth of toxic oligomers or speed that of fibrils; (iii) to inhibit fibril growth and deposition; (iv) to disassemble preformed fibrils; and (v) to favor amyloid clearance. Natural phenols, a wide panel of plant molecules, are one of the most actively investigated categories of potential amyloid inhibitors. They are considered responsible for the beneficial effects of several traditional diets being present in green tea, extra virgin olive oil, red wine, spices, berries and aromatic herbs. Accordingly, it has been proposed that some natural phenols could be exploited to prevent and to treat amyloid diseases, and recent studies have provided significant information on their ability to inhibit peptide/protein aggregation in various ways and to stimulate cell defenses, leading to identify shared or specific mechanisms. In the first part of this review, we will overview the significance and mechanisms of amyloid aggregation and aggregate toxicity; then, we will summarize the recent achievements on protection against amyloid diseases by many natural phenols. PMID:23765219

  17. Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy: A Tool to Study Protein Oligomerization and Aggregation In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Sahoo, Bankanidhi; Drombosky, Kenneth W; Wetzel, Ronald

    2016-01-01

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a highly sensitive analytical technique used to measure dynamic molecular parameters, such as diffusion time (from which particle size can be calculated), conformation, and concentration of fluorescent molecules. It has been particularly powerful in characterizing size distributions in molecular associations (e.g., dimer/multimer formation) both in well-behaved thermodynamically equilibrated systems in vitro as well as in more complex environments in vivo. Protein aggregation reactions like amyloid formation, in contrast, are complex, often involving a series of uniquely structured aggregation intermediates appearing at different time scales. Nonetheless, FCS can be used in appropriate cases to characterize the early stages of some aggregation reactions. Here are described step-by-step protocols and experimental procedures for the study of molecular complex formation in aggregation systems as observed in simple buffer systems, cell extracts, and living cells. The methods described are illustrated with examples from studies of the self-assembly of huntingtin fragments, but in principle can be adapted for any aggregating system.

  18. Gelation by phase separation in a whey protein system: in-situ kinetics of aggregation.

    PubMed

    Renard, D; Robert, P; Garnier, C; Dufour, E; Lefebvre, J

    2000-05-26

    The aggregation and gelation properties of beta-lactoglobulin (BLG), a globular protein from milk, was studied in aqueous ethanol solutions at room temperature. The phase state diagrams as a function of pH and ethanol concentration showed that a gel structure appeared after a period ranging from 1 min to 1 week, depending on the physico-chemical conditions. The in-situ kinetics of aggregation were followed by several methods in order to obtain a better understanding of the building of aggregates by the addition of ethanol. It was shown that the aggregation kinetics highly depended upon the pH, the process being fastest at pH 7. Viscoelasticity and infrared measurements indicated that alcohol-induced gelation would proceed via a two-step mechanism: small aggregates loosely connected between them were first built up; a real network took place in a second step. The coarse and irregular structures formed in aqueous ethanol gels revealed by confocal laser scanning microscopy could be analysed in terms of a phase separation. This observation was supported by a syneresis phenomenon visible in the final gel state. BLG in water-ethanol solution would undergo either an inhibition of the demixing by gelation or a binary phase separation accompanied by an irreversible gelation transition.

  19. Human myocytes are protected from titin aggregation-induced stiffening by small heat shock proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kötter, Sebastian; Unger, Andreas; Hamdani, Nazha; Lang, Patrick; Vorgerd, Matthias; Nagel-Steger, Luitgard

    2014-01-01

    In myocytes, small heat shock proteins (sHSPs) are preferentially translocated under stress to the sarcomeres. The functional implications of this translocation are poorly understood. We show here that HSP27 and αB-crystallin associated with immunoglobulin-like (Ig) domain-containing regions, but not the disordered PEVK domain (titin region rich in proline, glutamate, valine, and lysine), of the titin springs. In sarcomeres, sHSP binding to titin was actin filament independent and promoted by factors that increased titin Ig unfolding, including sarcomere stretch and the expression of stiff titin isoforms. Titin spring elements behaved predominantly as monomers in vitro. However, unfolded Ig segments aggregated, preferentially under acidic conditions, and αB-crystallin prevented this aggregation. Disordered regions did not aggregate. Promoting titin Ig unfolding in cardiomyocytes caused elevated stiffness under acidic stress, but HSP27 or αB-crystallin suppressed this stiffening. In diseased human muscle and heart, both sHSPs associated with the titin springs, in contrast to the cytosolic/Z-disk localization seen in healthy muscle/heart. We conclude that aggregation of unfolded titin Ig domains stiffens myocytes and that sHSPs translocate to these domains to prevent this aggregation. PMID:24421331

  20. 2D View Aggregation for Lymph Node Detection Using a Shallow Hierarchy of Linear Classifiers

    PubMed Central

    Seff, Ari; Lu, Le; Cherry, Kevin M.; Roth, Holger; Liu, Jiamin; Wang, Shijun; Hoffman, Joanne; Turkbey, Evrim B.; Summers, Ronald M.

    2015-01-01

    Enlarged lymph nodes (LNs) can provide important information for cancer diagnosis, staging, and measuring treatment reactions, making automated detection a highly sought goal. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm representation of decomposing the LN detection problem into a set of 2D object detection subtasks on sampled CT slices, largely alleviating the curse of dimensionality issue. Our 2D detection can be effectively formulated as linear classification on a single image feature type of Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG), covering a moderate field-of-view of 45 by 45 voxels. We exploit both simple pooling and sparse linear fusion schemes to aggregate these 2D detection scores for the final 3D LN detection. In this manner, detection is more tractable and does not need to perform perfectly at instance level (as weak hypotheses) since our aggregation process will robustly harness collective information for LN detection. Two datasets (90 patients with 389 mediastinal LNs and 86 patients with 595 abdominal LNs) are used for validation. Cross-validation demonstrates 78.0% sensitivity at 6 false positives/volume (FP/vol.) (86.1% at 10 FP/vol.) and 73.1% sensitivity at 6 FP/vol. (87.2% at 10 FP/vol.), for the mediastinal and abdominal datasets respectively. Our results compare favorably to previous state-of-the-art methods. PMID:25333161

  1. 2D view aggregation for lymph node detection using a shallow hierarchy of linear classifiers.

    PubMed

    Seff, Ari; Lu, Le; Cherry, Kevin M; Roth, Holger R; Liu, Jiamin; Wang, Shijun; Hoffman, Joanne; Turkbey, Evrim B; Summers, Ronald M

    2014-01-01

    Enlarged lymph nodes (LNs) can provide important information for cancer diagnosis, staging, and measuring treatment reactions, making automated detection a highly sought goal. In this paper, we propose a new algorithm representation of decomposing the LN detection problem into a set of 2D object detection subtasks on sampled CT slices, largely alleviating the curse of dimensionality issue. Our 2D detection can be effectively formulated as linear classification on a single image feature type of Histogram of Oriented Gradients (HOG), covering a moderate field-of-view of 45 by 45 voxels. We exploit both max-pooling and sparse linear fusion schemes to aggregate these 2D detection scores for the final 3D LN detection. In this manner, detection is more tractable and does not need to perform perfectly at instance level (as weak hypotheses) since our aggregation process will robustly harness collective information for LN detection. Two datasets (90 patients with 389 mediastinal LNs and 86 patients with 595 abdominal LNs) are used for validation. Cross-validation demonstrates 78.0% sensitivity at 6 false positives/volume (FP/vol.) (86.1% at 10 FP/vol.) and 73.1% sensitivity at 6 FP/vol. (87.2% at 10 FP/vol.), for the mediastinal and abdominal datasets respectively. Our results compare favorably to previous state-of-the-art methods.

  2. DNA breakage and induction of DNA damage response proteins precede the appearance of visible mutant huntingtin aggregates.

    PubMed

    Illuzzi, Jennifer; Yerkes, Sarah; Parekh-Olmedo, Hetal; Kmiec, Eric B

    2009-02-15

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a neurodegenerative disorder that follows an autosomal-dominant inheritance pattern. The pathogenesis of the disease depends on the degree of expansion of triplet (CAG) repeats located in the first exon on the gene. An expanded polyglutamine tract within the protein huntingtin (Htt) enables a gain-of-function phenotype that is often exhibited by a dysfunctional oligomerization process and the formation of protein aggregates. How this process leads to neurodegeneration remains undefined. We report that expression of a Htt-fragment containing an expanded glutamine tract induces DNA damage and activates the DNA damage response pathway. Both single-strand and double-strand breaks are observed as the mutant protein accumulates in the cell; these breaks precede the appearance of detectable protein aggregates containing mutant Htt. We also observe activation of H2AX, ATM, and p53 in cells expressing mutant Htt, a predictable response in cells containing chromosomal breakage. Expression of wild-type Htt does not affect the integrity of DNA, nor does it activate the same pathway. Furthermore, DNA damage and activated H2AX are present in HD transgenic mice before the formation of mutant Htt aggregates and HD pathogenesis. Taken together, our data suggest that the expression of mutant Htt causes an accumulation of DNA breaks that activates the DNA damage response pathway, a process that can disable cell function. Because these events can lead to apoptosis, it is possible that the DNA damage response pathway activated by single- and double-strand breaks that we found contributes to neurodegeneration.

  3. Rapid KRAS Mutation Detection via Hybridization-Induced Aggregation of Microbeads.

    PubMed

    Sloane, Hillary S; Kelly, Kimberly A; Landers, James P

    2015-10-20

    Using hybridization-induced aggregation (HIA), a unique bead-based DNA detection technology scalable for a microchip platform, we describe a simplistic, low-cost method for rapid mutation testing. HIA utilizes a pair of sequence-specific oligonucleotide probes bound to magnetic microbeads. Hybridization to a target DNA strand tethers the beads together, inducing bead aggregation. By simply using the extent of bead aggregation as a measure of the hybridization efficiency, we avoid the need for additional labels and sophisticated analytical equipment. Through strategic manipulation of the assay design and experimental parameters, we use HIA to facilitate, for the first time, the detection of single base mutations in a gene segment and, specifically, the detection of activating KRAS mutations. Following the development and optimization of the assay, we apply it for KRAS mutation analysis of four human cancer cell lines. Ultimately, we present a proof-of-principle method for detecting any of the common KRAS mutations in a single-step, 2 min assay, using only one set of oligonucleotide probes, for a total analysis time of less than 10 min post-PCR. The assay is performed at room temperature and uses simple, inexpensive instrumentation that permits multiplexed analysis.

  4. Colloidal behavior of proteins: effects of the second virial coefficient on solubility, crystallization and aggregation of proteins in aqueous solution.

    PubMed

    Valente, Joseph J; Payne, Robert W; Manning, Mark Cornell; Wilson, W William; Henry, Charles S

    2005-12-01

    There has been an increasing awareness that proteins, like other biopolymers, are large enough to exhibit colloidal behavior in aqueous solution. Net attractive or repulsive forces have been found to govern important physical properties, such as solubility and aggregation. The extent of intermolecular interactions, usually expressed in terms of the osmotic second virial coefficient, B, is most often measured using static light scattering. More recently, self-interaction chromatography (SIC) has emerged as a method for rapid determination of B in actual formulations, as it uses much less protein and has higher throughput. This review will summarize the relationship of B to crystallization, solubility, and aggregation of proteins in aqueous solution. Moreover, the capability of SIC to obtain B values in a rapid and reproducible fashion will be described in detail. Finally, the use of miniaturized devices to measure B is presented.

  5. Rational design of mutations that change the aggregation rate of a protein while maintaining its native structure and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Camilloni, Carlo; Sala, Benedetta Maria; Sormanni, Pietro; Porcari, Riccardo; Corazza, Alessandra; De Rosa, Matteo; Zanini, Stefano; Barbiroli, Alberto; Esposito, Gennaro; Bolognesi, Martino; Bellotti, Vittorio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Ricagno, Stefano

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of human diseases is associated with mutations that, destabilizing proteins native state, promote their aggregation. However, the mechanisms leading from folded to aggregated states are still incompletely understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we used a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to compare the native state dynamics of Beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), whose aggregation is associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, and its aggregation-resistant mutant W60G. Our results indicate that W60G low aggregation propensity can be explained, beyond its higher stability, by an increased average protection of the aggregation-prone residues at its surface. To validate these findings, we designed β2m variants that alter the aggregation-prone exposed surface of wild-type and W60G β2m modifying their aggregation propensity. These results allowed us to pinpoint the role of dynamics in β2m aggregation and to provide a new strategy to tune protein aggregation by modulating the exposure of aggregation-prone residues.

  6. Rational design of mutations that change the aggregation rate of a protein while maintaining its native structure and stability

    PubMed Central

    Camilloni, Carlo; Sala, Benedetta Maria; Sormanni, Pietro; Porcari, Riccardo; Corazza, Alessandra; De Rosa, Matteo; Zanini, Stefano; Barbiroli, Alberto; Esposito, Gennaro; Bolognesi, Martino; Bellotti, Vittorio; Vendruscolo, Michele; Ricagno, Stefano

    2016-01-01

    A wide range of human diseases is associated with mutations that, destabilizing proteins native state, promote their aggregation. However, the mechanisms leading from folded to aggregated states are still incompletely understood. To investigate these mechanisms, we used a combination of NMR spectroscopy and molecular dynamics simulations to compare the native state dynamics of Beta-2 microglobulin (β2m), whose aggregation is associated with dialysis-related amyloidosis, and its aggregation-resistant mutant W60G. Our results indicate that W60G low aggregation propensity can be explained, beyond its higher stability, by an increased average protection of the aggregation-prone residues at its surface. To validate these findings, we designed β2m variants that alter the aggregation-prone exposed surface of wild-type and W60G β2m modifying their aggregation propensity. These results allowed us to pinpoint the role of dynamics in β2m aggregation and to provide a new strategy to tune protein aggregation by modulating the exposure of aggregation-prone residues. PMID:27150430

  7. Hsp105 reduces the protein aggregation and cytotoxicity by expanded-polyglutamine proteins through the induction of Hsp70

    SciTech Connect

    Yamagishi, Nobuyuki; Goto, Kazumasa; Nakagawa, Satomi; Saito, Youhei; Hatayama, Takumi

    2010-09-10

    Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta} are major heat shock proteins in mammalian cells and belong to the HSP105/110 family. Hsp105{alpha} is expressed constitutively in the cytoplasm of cells, while Hsp105{beta}, an alternatively spliced form of Hsp105{alpha}, is expressed specifically in the nucleus of cells during mild heat shock. Here, we show that not only Hsp105{beta} but also Hsp105{alpha} accumulated in the nucleus of cells following the expression of enhanced green fluorescent protein with a pathological length polyQ tract (EGFP-polyQ97) and suppressed the intranuclear aggregation of polyQ proteins and apoptosis induced by EGFP-polyQ97. Mutants of Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta} with changes in the nuclear localization signal sequences, which localized exclusively in the cytoplasm with or without the expression of EGFP-polyQ97, did not suppress the intranuclear aggregation of polyQ proteins and apoptosis induced by EGFP-polyQ97. Furthermore, Hsp70 was induced by the co-expression of Hsp105{alpha} and EGFP-polyQ97, and the knockdown of Hsp70 reduced the inhibitory effect of Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta} on the intranuclear aggregation of polyQ proteins and apoptosis induced by EGFP-polyQ97. These observations suggested that Hsp105{alpha} and Hsp105{beta} suppressed the expanded polyQ tract-induced protein aggregation and apoptosis through the induction of Hsp70.

  8. The second virial coefficient as a predictor of protein aggregation propensity: A self-interaction chromatography study.

    PubMed

    Quigley, A; Williams, D R

    2015-10-01

    The second osmotic virial coefficients (b2) of four proteins - lysozyme, recombinant human lactoferrin, concanavalin A and catalase were measured by self-interaction chromatography (SIC) in solutions of varying salt type, concentration and pH. Protein aggregate sizes based on the initial hydrodynamic radius of the protein solution species present were measured using dynamic light scattering, and the relationship between b2 and protein aggregate size was studied. A linear correlation was established between b2 values and protein aggregate hydrodynamic size for all proteins, and for almost all solution conditions. Aggregate sizes of <∼10nm, indicative of non-aggregated protein systems, were consistently observed to have b2 values >0. The observed b2 trends as a function of solution conditions were very much protein dependent, with notable trends including the existence of attractive interactions (negative b2 values) at low ionic strengths for catalase and concanavalin A, and the highly positive b2 values observed for lactoferrin over a wide range of solution conditions, reflecting lactoferrin's innately high stability. It is concluded that the quantification of protein-protein interactions using SIC based b2 data is a potentially valuable screening tool for predicting protein aggregation propensity.

  9. Tau Protein Hyperphosphorylation and Aggregation in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Tauopathies, and Possible Neuroprotective Strategies.

    PubMed

    Šimić, Goran; Babić Leko, Mirjana; Wray, Selina; Harrington, Charles; Delalle, Ivana; Jovanov-Milošević, Nataša; Bažadona, Danira; Buée, Luc; de Silva, Rohan; Di Giovanni, Giuseppe; Wischik, Claude; Hof, Patrick R

    2016-01-06

    Abnormal deposition of misprocessed and aggregated proteins is a common final pathway of most neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD is characterized by the extraneuronal deposition of the amyloid β (Aβ) protein in the form of plaques and the intraneuronal aggregation of the microtubule-associated protein tau in the form of filaments. Based on the biochemically diverse range of pathological tau proteins, a number of approaches have been proposed to develop new potential therapeutics. Here we discuss some of the most promising ones: inhibition of tau phosphorylation, proteolysis and aggregation, promotion of intra- and extracellular tau clearance, and stabilization of microtubules. We also emphasize the need to achieve a full understanding of the biological roles and post-translational modifications of normal tau, as well as the molecular events responsible for selective neuronal vulnerability to tau pathology and its propagation. It is concluded that answering key questions on the relationship between Aβ and tau pathology should lead to a better understanding of the nature of secondary tauopathies, especially AD, and open new therapeutic targets and strategies.

  10. Modification of Platelet Proteins by 4-hydroxynonenal: Potential Mechanisms for Inhibition of Aggregation and Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Ravi, Saranya; Johnson, Michelle S.; Chacko, Balu K.; Kramer, Philip A.; Sawada, Hirotaka; Locy, Morgan L.; Wilson, Landon. S.; Barnes, Stephen; Marques, Marisa B.; Darley-Usmar, Victor M.

    2015-01-01

    Platelet aggregation is an essential response to tissue injury and is associated with activation of pro-oxidant enzymes, such as cyclooxygenase, and is also a highly energetic process. The two central energetic pathways in the cell, glycolysis and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation, are susceptible to damage by reactive lipid species. Interestingly, how platelet metabolism is affected by the oxidative stress associated with aggregation is largely unexplored. To address this issue, we examined the response of human platelets to 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), a reactive lipid species which is generated during thrombus formation and during oxidative stress. Elevated plasma 4-HNE has been associated with renal failure, septic shock and cardiopulmonary bypass surgery. In this study, we found that 4-HNE decreased thrombin stimulated platelet aggregation by approximately 60%. The metabolomics analysis demonstrated that underlying our previous observation of a stimulation of platelet energetics by thrombin glycolysis and TCA (Tricarboxylic acid) metabolites were increased. Next, we assessed the effect of both 4-HNE and alkyne HNE (A-HNE) on bioenergetics and targeted metabolomics, and found a stimulatory effect on glycolysis, associated with inhibition of bioenergetic parameters. In the presence of HNE and thrombin glycolysis was further stimulated but the levels of the TCA metabolites were markedly suppressed. Identification of proteins modified by A-HNE followed by click chemistry and mass spectrometry revealed essential targets in platelet activation including proteins involved in metabolism, adhesion, cytoskeletal reorganization, aggregation, vesicular transport, protein folding, antioxidant proteins, and small GTPases. In summary, the biological effects of 4-HNE can be more effectively explained in platelets by the integrated effects of the modification of an electrophile responsive proteome rather than the isolated effects of candidate proteins. PMID:26475426

  11. Binding of lysozyme to phospholipid bilayers: evidence for protein aggregation upon membrane association.

    PubMed

    Gorbenko, Galyna P; Ioffe, Valeriya M; Kinnunen, Paavo K J

    2007-07-01

    Biological functions of lysozyme, including its antimicrobial, antitumor, and immune-modulatory activities have been suggested to be largely determined by the lipid binding properties of this protein. To gain further insight into these interactions on a molecular level the association of lysozyme to liposomes composed of either 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine or its mixtures with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-glycerol, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-phosphatidylserine, or bovine heart cardiolipin was studied by a combination of fluorescence techniques. The characteristics of the adsorption of lysozyme to lipid bilayers were investigated using fluorescein 5'-isothiocyanate labeled protein, responding to membrane association by a decrease in fluorescence. Upon increasing the content of anionic phospholipids in lipid vesicles, the binding isotherms changed from Langmuir-like to sigmoidal. Using adsorption models based on scaled particle and double-layer theories, this finding was rationalized in terms of self-association of the membrane-bound protein. The extent of quenching of lysozyme tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide decreased upon membrane binding, revealing a conformational transition for the protein upon its surface association, resulting in a diminished access of the fluorophore to the aqueous phase. Steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of bilayer-incorporated probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene was measured at varying lipid-to-protein molar ratios. Lysozyme was found to increase acyl-chain order for liposomes with the content of acidic phospholipid exceeding 10 mol %. Both electrostatic and hydrophobic protein-lipid interactions can be concluded to modulate the aggregation behavior of lysozyme when bound to lipid bilayers. Modulation of lysozyme aggregation propensity by membrane binding may have important implications for protein fibrillogenesis in vivo. Disruption of membrane integrity by the aggregated

  12. Binding of Lysozyme to Phospholipid Bilayers: Evidence for Protein Aggregation upon Membrane Association

    PubMed Central

    Gorbenko, Galyna P.; Ioffe, Valeriya M.; Kinnunen, Paavo K. J.

    2007-01-01

    Biological functions of lysozyme, including its antimicrobial, antitumor, and immune-modulatory activities have been suggested to be largely determined by the lipid binding properties of this protein. To gain further insight into these interactions on a molecular level the association of lysozyme to liposomes composed of either 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine or its mixtures with 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-glycerol, 1-palmitoyl-2-oleoyl-sn-glycero-3-phospho-rac-phosphatidylserine, or bovine heart cardiolipin was studied by a combination of fluorescence techniques. The characteristics of the adsorption of lysozyme to lipid bilayers were investigated using fluorescein 5′-isothiocyanate labeled protein, responding to membrane association by a decrease in fluorescence. Upon increasing the content of anionic phospholipids in lipid vesicles, the binding isotherms changed from Langmuir-like to sigmoidal. Using adsorption models based on scaled particle and double-layer theories, this finding was rationalized in terms of self-association of the membrane-bound protein. The extent of quenching of lysozyme tryptophan fluorescence by acrylamide decreased upon membrane binding, revealing a conformational transition for the protein upon its surface association, resulting in a diminished access of the fluorophore to the aqueous phase. Steady-state fluorescence anisotropy of bilayer-incorporated probe 1,6-diphenyl-1,3,5-hexatriene was measured at varying lipid-to-protein molar ratios. Lysozyme was found to increase acyl-chain order for liposomes with the content of acidic phospholipid exceeding 10 mol %. Both electrostatic and hydrophobic protein-lipid interactions can be concluded to modulate the aggregation behavior of lysozyme when bound to lipid bilayers. Modulation of lysozyme aggregation propensity by membrane binding may have important implications for protein fibrillogenesis in vivo. Disruption of membrane integrity by the aggregated

  13. Heat induced aggregation of gold nanorods for rapid visual detection of lysozyme.

    PubMed

    Tohidi Moghadam, Tahereh; Ranjbar, Bijan

    2015-11-01

    Gold nanorods have been nominated as propitious candidates for nanobiodiagnostic applications. Herein, a technique has been introduced for rapid visual detection of lysozyme, as its high level of excretion in biological fluids is a characteristic sign of leukemia and kidney disorders. Gold nanorods were biofunctionalized with lysozyme aptamer and characterized with UV-Visible and FTIR spectroscopy, zeta potential analyzer and transmission electron microscopy. Exposure of the nanoprobe to nano molar levels of lysozyme (20 nmol l(-1)) lead to dictated aggregation of the nanostructures at ambient temperature; which was significantly improved by heat induced morphological perturbations and rapid detection by the naked eye (down to pico molar level). Qualitative analysis of Acute myeloid leukemia, Acute lymphocytic leukemia and Lymphoma blood serums showed sensitivity and specificity of the fabricated aptasensor under both temperature conditions. This report encourages utilization of heat-induced aggregation of gold nanorods as a promising nanodiagnostic technique for the emerging nanotechnologies.

  14. The effect of graphene oxide on conformation change, aggregation and cytotoxicity of HIV-1 regulatory protein (Vpr).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Min; Mao, Xiaobo; Wang, Chenxuan; Zeng, Wenfeng; Zhang, Chunling; Li, Zhongjun; Fang, Ying; Yang, Yanlian; Liang, Wei; Wang, Chen

    2013-01-01

    The fragment of viral protein R (Vpr), Vpr13-33, plays an important role in regulating nuclear importing of HIV through ion channel formation with a leucine-zipper-like α-helical conformation. Herein we report an approach to reduce cytotoxicity of Vpr13-33 by graphene oxide induced conformation change and aggregation. Preferential adsorption of Vpr13-33 on graphene oxide accompanied by conformation change from α-helix to β-sheet structures has been observed by using atomic force microscopy (AFM) and circular dichroism (CD). The submolecular structures of the Vpr13-33 peptide assembly on graphite surface have been identified by using scanning tunneling microscopy (STM), which confirms the β-sheet structures of Vpr13-33 on graphene oxide surface. The reduced cytotoxicity of Vpr13-33 to neuroblastoma cells and T cells are detected by MTT assay, which could be associated with the conformation change and stimulated aggregation of Vpr13-33 upon addition of graphene oxide through hydrophobic interaction. Furthermore, fluorescent leakage assay by using large unilamellar vesicles (LUVs) indicated that the GO reduced Vpr13-33-induced cytotoxicity could be associated with the inhibited "pore forming" function of Vpr13-33 by conformation change and aggregation.

  15. The second virial coefficient as a predictor of protein aggregation propensity: A self-interaction chromatography study

    PubMed Central

    Quigley, A.; Williams, D.R.

    2015-01-01

    The second osmotic virial coefficients (b2) of four proteins – lysozyme, recombinant human lactoferrin, concanavalin A and catalase were measured by self-interaction chromatography (SIC) in solutions of varying salt type, concentration and pH. Protein aggregate sizes based on the initial hydrodynamic radius of the protein solution species present were measured using dynamic light scattering, and the relationship between b2 and protein aggregate size was studied. A linear correlation was established between b2 values and protein aggregate hydrodynamic size for all proteins, and for almost all solution conditions. Aggregate sizes of <∼10 nm, indicative of non-aggregated protein systems, were consistently observed to have b2 values >0. The observed b2 trends as a function of solution conditions were very much protein dependent, with notable trends including the existence of attractive interactions (negative b2 values) at low ionic strengths for catalase and concanavalin A, and the highly positive b2 values observed for lactoferrin over a wide range of solution conditions, reflecting lactoferrin’s innately high stability. It is concluded that the quantification of protein–protein interactions using SIC based b2 data is a potentially valuable screening tool for predicting protein aggregation propensity. PMID:26259782

  16. Phthalocyanines as Molecular Scaffolds to Block Disease-Associated Protein Aggregation.

    PubMed

    Valiente-Gabioud, Ariel A; Miotto, Marco C; Chesta, María E; Lombardo, Verónica; Binolfi, Andres; Fernández, Claudio O

    2016-05-17

    The aggregation of proteins into toxic conformations plays a critical role in the development of different neurodegenerative diseases such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), and Creutzfled-Jakob's disease (CJD). These disorders share a common pathological mechanism that involves the formation of aggregated protein species including toxic oligomers and amyloid fibrils. The aggregation of alpha-synuclein (αS) in PD and the amyloid beta peptide (Aβ) and tau protein in AD results in neuronal death and disease onset. In the case of CJD, the misfolding of the physiological prion protein (PrP) induces a chain reaction that results in accumulation of particles that elicit brain damage. Currently, there is no preventive therapy for these diseases and the available therapeutic approaches are based on the treatment of the symptoms rather than the underlying causes of the disease. Accordingly, the aggregation pathway of these proteins represents a useful target for therapeutic intervention. Therefore, understanding the mechanism of amyloid formation and its inhibition is of high clinical importance. The design of small molecules that efficiently inhibit the aggregation process and/or neutralize its associated toxicity constitutes a promising tool for the development of therapeutic strategies against these disorders. In this accounts, we discuss current knowledge on the anti-amyloid activity of phthalocyanines and their potential use as drug candidates in neurodegeneration. These tetrapyrrolic compounds modulate the amyloid assembly of αS, tau, Aβ, and the PrP in vitro, and protect cells from the toxic effects of amyloid aggregates. In addition, in scrapie-infected mice, these compounds showed important prophylactic antiscrapie properties. The structural basis for the inhibitory effect of phthalocyanines on amyloid filament assembly relies on specific π-π interactions between the aromatic ring system of these molecules and aromatic residues in the

  17. Prion protein helix1 promotes aggregation but is not converted into beta-sheet.

    PubMed

    Watzlawik, Jens; Skora, Lukasz; Frense, Dieter; Griesinger, Christian; Zweckstetter, Markus; Schulz-Schaeffer, Walter J; Kramer, Michael L

    2006-10-06

    Prion diseases are caused by the aggregation of the native alpha-helical prion protein PrP(C) into its pathological beta-sheet-rich isoform PrP(Sc). In current models of PrP(Sc), helix1 is assumed to be preferentially converted into beta-sheet during aggregation of PrP(C). This was supported by the NMR structure of PrP(C) since, in contrast to the isolated helix1, helix2 and helix3 are connected by a small loop and are additionally stabilized by an interhelical disulfide bond. However, helix1 is extremely hydrophilic and has a high helix propensity. This prompted us to investigate the role of helix1 in prion aggregation using humPrP(23-159) including helix1 (144-156) compared with the C-terminal-truncated isoform humPrP(23-144) corresponding to the pathological human stop mutations Q160Stop and Y145Stop, respectively. Most unexpectedly, humPrP(23-159) aggregated significantly faster compared with the truncated fragment humPrP(23-144), clearly demonstrating that helix1 is involved in the aggregation process. However, helix1 is not resistant to digestion with proteinase K in fibrillar humPrP(23-159), suggesting that helix1 is not converted to beta-sheet. This is confirmed by Fourier transformation infrared spectroscopy since there is almost no difference in beta-sheet content of humPrP(23-159) fibrils compared with humPrP(23-144). In conclusion, we provide strong direct evidence that in contrast to earlier assumptions helix1 is not converted into beta-sheet during aggregation of PrP(C) to PrP(Sc).

  18. Molecular Dynamics Simulations to Clarify the Concentration Dependency of Protein Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishikawa, Naohiro; Sakae, Yoshitake; Okamoto, Yuko

    We examined the concentration dependency of amyloid protein aggregation by using several molecular dynamics simulations, which were performed with different concentrations for each system. For these simulations, we used a fragment of amyloid-β, which is believed to be the cause of Alzheimer's disease, as our simulation system. We found that high concentration of amyloid peptides promotes the formation of β-structures which is the origin of amyloid fibrils.

  19. Detection of Alzheimer's amyloid beta aggregation by capturing molecular trails of individual assemblies

    SciTech Connect

    Vestergaard, Mun'delanji Hamada, Tsutomu; Saito, Masato; Yajima, Yoshifumi; Kudou, Monotori; Tamiya, Eiichi; Takagi, Masahiro

    2008-12-12

    Assembly of Amyloid beta (A{beta}) peptides, in particular A{beta}-42 is central to the formation of the amyloid plaques associated with neuro-pathologies such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Molecular assembly of individual A{beta}-42 species was observed using a simple fluorescence microscope. From the molecular movements (aka Brownian motion) of the individual peptide assemblies, we calculated a temporal evolution of the hydrodynamic radius (R{sub H}) of the peptide at physiological temperature and pH. The results clearly show a direct relationship between R{sub H} of A{beta}-42 and incubation period, corresponding to the previously reported peptide's aggregation kinetics. The data correlates highly with in solution-based label-free electrochemical detection of the peptide's aggregation, and A{beta}-42 deposited on a solid surface and analysed using atomic force microscopy (AFM). To the best of our knowledge, this is the first analysis and characterisation of A{beta} aggregation based on capturing molecular trails of individual assemblies. The technique enables both real-time observation and a semi-quantitative distribution profile of the various stages of A{beta} assembly, at microM peptide concentration. Our method is a promising candidate for real-time observation and analysis of the effect of other pathologically-relevant molecules such as metal ions on pathways to A{beta} oligomerisation and aggregation. The method is also a promising screening tool for AD therapeutics that target A{beta} assembly.

  20. Detecting the Formation and Transformation of Oligomers during Insulin Fibrillation by a Dendrimer Conjugated with Aggregation-Induced Emission Molecule.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qin; Xie, Jing; Liu, Yanpeng; Zhou, Anna; Li, Jianshu

    2017-02-08

    The fibrillation of protein is harmful and impedes the use of protein drugs. It also relates to various debilitating diseases such as Alzheimer's diseases. Thus, investigating the protein fibrillation process is necessary. In this study, poly(amido amine) dendrimers (PAMAM) of generation 3 (G3) and generation 4 (G4) were synthesized and conjugated with 4-aminobiphenyl, an aggregation-induced emission (AIE) moiety, at varied grafting ratios. Among them, one fluorescence probe named G3-biph-3 that was grafted average 3.25 4-aminobiphenyl to the G3, can detect the transformations both from native insulin to oligomers and from oligomers to fibrils. The size difference of native insulin, oligomers, and fibrils was proposed to be the main factor leading to the detection of the above transformations. Different molecular weights of sodium polyacrylate (PAAS) were also applied as a model to interact with G3-biph-3 to further reveal the mechanism. The results indicated that PAMAM with a certain generation and grafted with appropriate AIE groups can detect the oligomer formation and transformation during the insulin fibrillation process.

  1. Nanoparticulate strategies for the treatment of polyglutamine diseases by halting the protein aggregation process (†).

    PubMed

    Escalona-Rayo, Oscar; Fuentes-Vázquez, Paulina; Leyva-Gómez, Gerardo; Cisneros, Bulmaro; Villalobos, Rafael; Magaña, Jonathan J; Quintanar-Guerrero, David

    2017-06-01

    Polyglutamine (polyQ) diseases are a class of neurodegenerative disorders that cause cellular dysfunction and, eventually, neuronal death in specific regions of the brain. Neurodegeneration is linked to the misfolding and aggregation of expanded polyQ-containing proteins, and their inhibition is one of major therapeutic strategies used commonly. However, successful treatment has been limited to date because of the intrinsic properties of therapeutic agents (poor water solubility, low bioavailability, poor pharmacokinetic properties), and difficulty in crossing physiological barriers, including the blood-brain barrier (BBB). In order to solve these problems, nanoparticulate systems with dimensions of 1-1000 nm able to incorporate small and macromolecules with therapeutic value, to protect and deliver them directly to the brain, have recently been developed, but their use for targeting polyQ disease-mediated protein misfolding and aggregation remains scarce. This review provides an update of the polyQ protein aggregation process and the development of therapeutic strategies for halting it. The main features that a nanoparticulate system should possess in order to enhance brain delivery are discussed, as well as the different types of materials utilized to produce them. The final part of this review focuses on the potential application of nanoparticulate system strategies to improve the specific and efficient delivery of therapeutic agents to the brain for the treatment of polyQ diseases.

  2. Aging, Protein Aggregation, Chaperones, and Neurodegenerative Disorders: Mechanisms of Coupling and Therapeutic Opportunities

    PubMed Central

    Cohen, Ehud

    2012-01-01

    Late onset is a key unifying feature of human neurodegenerative maladies such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s diseases and prion disorders. While sporadic cases typically emerge during the patient’s seventh decade of life or later, mutation-linked, familial cases manifest during the fifth or sixth decade. This common temporal emergence pattern raises the prospect that slowing aging may prevent the accumulation of toxic protein aggregates that lead to the development of these disorders, postpone the onset of these maladies, and alleviate their symptoms once emerged. Invertebrate-based studies indicated that reducing the activity of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS), a prominent aging regulatory pathway, protects from neurodegeneration-linked toxic protein aggregation. The validity of this approach has been tested and confirmed in mammals as reducing the activity of the IGF-1 signaling pathway-protected Alzheimer’s model mice from the behavioral and biochemical impairments associated with the disease. Here I review the recent advances in the field, describe the known mechanistic links between toxic protein aggregation and the aging process, and delineate the future therapeutic potential of IIS reduction as a treatment for various neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23908845

  3. Aging, protein aggregation, chaperones, and neurodegenerative disorders: mechanisms of coupling and therapeutic opportunities.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Ehud

    2012-10-01

    Late onset is a key unifying feature of human neurodegenerative maladies such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's diseases and prion disorders. While sporadic cases typically emerge during the patient's seventh decade of life or later, mutation-linked, familial cases manifest during the fifth or sixth decade. This common temporal emergence pattern raises the prospect that slowing aging may prevent the accumulation of toxic protein aggregates that lead to the development of these disorders, postpone the onset of these maladies, and alleviate their symptoms once emerged. Invertebrate-based studies indicated that reducing the activity of insulin/IGF signaling (IIS), a prominent aging regulatory pathway, protects from neurodegeneration-linked toxic protein aggregation. The validity of this approach has been tested and confirmed in mammals as reducing the activity of the IGF-1 signaling pathway-protected Alzheimer's model mice from the behavioral and biochemical impairments associated with the disease. Here I review the recent advances in the field, describe the known mechanistic links between toxic protein aggregation and the aging process, and delineate the future therapeutic potential of IIS reduction as a treatment for various neurodegenerative disorders.

  4. Electrostatics promotes molecular crowding and selects the aggregation pathway in fibril-forming protein solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raccosta, S.; Blanco, M.; J. Roberts, C.; Martorana, V.; Manno, M.

    2016-05-01

    The role of intermolecular interaction in fibril-forming protein solutions and its relation with molecular conformation are crucial aspects for the control and inhibition of amyloid structures. Here, we study the fibril formation and the protein-protein interactions for two proteins at acidic p H, lysozyme and α -chymotrypsinogen. By using light scattering experiments and the Kirkwood-Buff integral approach, we show how concentration fluctuations are damped even at moderate protein concentrations by the dominant long-ranged electrostatic repulsion, which determines an effective crowded environment. In denaturing conditions, electrostatic repulsion keeps the monomeric solution in a thermodynamically metastable state, which is escaped through kinetically populated conformational sub-states. This explains how electrostatics acts as a gatekeeper in selecting a specific aggregation pathway.

  5. Soy protein nanoparticle aggregates as pickering stabilizers for oil-in-water emulsions.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fu; Tang, Chuan-He

    2013-09-18

    In recent years, there have been increasing interests in developing food-grade Pickering stabilizers, due to their potential applications in formulations of novel functional foods. The present work was to investigate the potential of soy proteins to be developed into a kind of Pickering-like stabilizer for oil-in-water emulsions. The nanoparticle aggregates of soy protein isolate (SPI) were formed by sequential treatments of heating at 95 °C for 15 min and then electrostatic screening with NaCl addition. The particle size and microstructure of these aggregates were characterized using dynamic light scattering and atomic force microscopy, indicating that the fabricated nanoparticle aggregates were ∼100 nm in size with more surface hydrophobic nature (relative to unheated SPI). The influence of particle concentration (c; 0.5-6.0%, w/w) and increasing oil fraction (ϕ; in the range 0.2-0.6) on the droplet size and coalescence and/or creaming stability of the emulsions stabilized by these nanoparticle aggregates was investigated. The results showed that, at ϕ = 0.2, increasing the c resulted in a progressive but slight decrease in droplet size, and improved the stability against coalescence and creaming; at a specific c, the creaming stability was progressively increased by increasing the ϕ, with better improvement observed at a higher c (e.g., 6.0% vs 2.0%). The improvement of creaming stability was largely associated with the formation of a gel-like network that could entrap the oil droplets within the network. The observations are generally consistent with those observed for the conventional Pickering emulsions, confirming that soy proteins could be applied as a kind of effective Pickering-like stabilizer. The finding may have important implications for the design and fabrication of protein-based emulsion formulations, and even for the development of soy protein products with some unique functions. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first work to report

  6. ELISA detection of hazelnut proteins: effect of protein glycation in the presence or absence of wheat proteins.

    PubMed

    Cucu, T; Platteau, C; Taverniers, I; Devreese, B; de Loose, M; de Meulenaer, B

    2011-01-01

    Hazelnuts are widely used in the food industry, especially confectionary foods. Nevertheless, these nuts contain several allergenic proteins that may be unexpectedly present as contaminants in various foods and may pose a serious threat to allergic consumers. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) is the preferred method to assess the level of hazelnut protein contamination. It is commonly used by both the food industry and enforcement agencies. Several ELISA kits are commercially available. However, protein detectability by ELISA may be affected by severe changes that proteins undergo during processing. The aim of this study is therefore to investigate the impact of processing on the ability to detect hazelnut protein by four commercial ELISA kits. Hazelnut proteins in the presence or absence of soluble wheat proteins were modified with glucose via the Maillard reaction. Changes in hazelnut proteins, such as the formation of protein-bound carbonyls, losses of reactive lysine residues and free amino groups, and severe aggregation dramatically affected the hazelnut protein detection by the commercial kits. The observed impact was highly dependent on the type of ELISA kit used.

  7. Quantitative and spatio-temporal features of protein aggregation in Escherichia coli and consequences on protein quality control and cellular ageing.

    PubMed

    Winkler, Juliane; Seybert, Anja; König, Lars; Pruggnaller, Sabine; Haselmann, Uta; Sourjik, Victor; Weiss, Matthias; Frangakis, Achilleas S; Mogk, Axel; Bukau, Bernd

    2010-03-03

    The aggregation of proteins as a result of intrinsic or environmental stress may be cytoprotective, but is also linked to pathophysiological states and cellular ageing. We analysed the principles of aggregate formation and the cellular strategies to cope with aggregates in Escherichia coli using fluorescence microscopy of thermolabile reporters, EM tomography and mathematical modelling. Misfolded proteins deposited at the cell poles lead to selective re-localization of the DnaK/DnaJ/ClpB disaggregating chaperones, but not of GroEL and Lon to these sites. Polar aggregation of cytosolic proteins is mainly driven by nucleoid occlusion and not by an active targeting mechanism. Accordingly, cytosolic aggregation can be efficiently re-targeted to alternative sites such as the inner membrane in the presence of site-specific aggregation seeds. Polar positioning of aggregates allows for asymmetric inheritance of damaged proteins, resulting in higher growth rates of damage-free daughter cells. In contrast, symmetric damage inheritance of randomly distributed aggregates at the inner membrane abrogates this rejuvenation process, indicating that asymmetric deposition of protein aggregates is important for increasing the fitness of bacterial cell populations.

  8. Beta-catenin Forms Protein Aggregation at High Concentrations in HEK293TCells

    PubMed Central

    Jazi, Marie Saghaeian; Najafi, Seyed Mahmoud Arab

    2017-01-01

    Background: The canonical Wnt signal transduction (or the Wnt/β-catenin pathway) plays a crucial role in the development of animals and in carcinogenesis. Beta-catenin is the central component of this signaling pathway. The activation of Wnt/β-catenin signaling results in the cytoplasmic and nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. In the nucleus, β-catenin interacts with the TCF/LEF transcription factors and, therefore, participates in the upregulation or downregulation of some important genes involved in diverse cellular activities. In addition, β-catenin is a critical component of the cadherin-mediated cell adherens junction. We had previously noticed that very high cellular concentrations of β-catenin had a negative effect on the transcriptional activity of this protein and, therefore, the aim of this study was to find a mechanism for this negative interaction. Methods: Cell fractionation, western blotting, and immunofluorescence microscopy experiments were performed to measure β-catenin protein levels and β-catenin cellular localization in HEK293Tcells transfected with various amounts of a β-catenin-encoding plasmid. Also, total RNA was extracted from the cells and used for reverse transcriptase-PCR experiments to measure the expression of the β-catenin target genes. SPSS, version 16, was used to analyze the results statistically. Results: We demonstrated that overexpression of β-catenin led to the formation of rod-shaped protein aggregates. The aggregate structures were mainly formed in the cell nucleus and were heavy enough to be isolated by centrifugation. Beta-catenin aggregate formation was accompanied by a decrease in the expression of the β-catenin target genes used in this study. Conclusion: Since deregulation of β-catenin function occurs in several human diseases, including cancer and neurological disorders, the results of this paper further support the possible biological and clinical significance of β-catenin aggregate formation. PMID

  9. Aggregate structure and effect of phthalic anhydride modified soy protein on the mechanical properties of styrene-butadiene copolymer

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The aggregate structure of phthalic anhydride (PA) modified soy protein isolate (SPI) was investigated by estimating its fractal dimension from the equilibrated dynamic strain sweep experiments. The estimated fractal dimensions of the filler aggregates were less than 2, indicating that these partic...

  10. Insights in understanding aggregate formation and dissociation in cation exchange chromatography for a structurally unstable Fc-fusion protein.

    PubMed

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Huang, Chao; Chennamsetty, Naresh; Xu, Xuankuo; Li, Zheng Jian

    2016-08-19

    Cation-exchange chromatography (CEX) of a structurally unstable Fc-fusion protein exhibited multi-peak elution profile upon a salt-step elution due to protein aggregation during intra-column buffer transition where low pH and high salt coexisted. The protein exhibited a single-peak elution behavior during a pH-step elution; nevertheless, the levels of soluble aggregates (i.e. high molecular weight species, HMW) in the CEX eluate were still found up to 12-fold higher than that for the load material. The amount of the aggregates formed upon the pH-step elution was dependent on column loading with maximum HMW achieved at intermediate loading levels, supporting the hypothesis that the aggregation was the result of both the conformational changes of the bound protein and the solution concentration of the aggregation-susceptible proteins during elution. Factors such as high load pH, short protein/resin contact time, hydrophilic resin surface, and weak ionizable ligand were effective, to some extent, to reduce aggregate formation by improving the structural integrity of the bound protein. An orthogonal technique, differential scanning fluorimetry (DSF) using Sypro Orange dye confirmed that the bound protein exposed more hydrophobic area than the native molecule in free solution, especially in the pH 4-5 range. The Sypro Orange dye study of resin surface property also demonstrated that the poly[styrene-divinylbenzene]-based Poros XS with polyhydroxyl surface coating is more hydrophobic compared to the agarose-based CM Sepharose FF and SP Sepharose FF. The hydrophobic property of Poros XS contributed to stronger interactions with the partially unfolded bound protein and consequently to the higher aggregate levels seen in Poros XS eluate. This work also investigates the aggregation reversibility in CEX eluate where up to 66% of the aggregates were observed to dissociate into native monomers over a period of 120h, and links the aggregate stability to such conditions as resin

  11. Rational Design of Solution Additives for the Prevention of Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Baynes, Brian M.; Trout, Bernhardt L.

    2004-01-01

    We have developed a statistical-mechanical model of the effect of solution additives on protein association reactions. This model incorporates solvent radial distribution functions obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of particular proteins into simple models of protein interactions. In this way, the effects of additives can be computed along the entire association/dissociation reaction coordinate. We used the model to test our hypothesis that a class of large solution additives, which we term “neutral crowders,” can slow protein association and dissociation by being preferentially excluded from protein-protein encounter complexes, in a manner analogous to osmotic stress. The magnitude of this proposed “gap effect” was probed for two simple model systems: the association of two spheres and the association of two planes. Our results suggest that for a protein of 20 Å radius, an 8 Å additive can increase the free energy barrier for association and dissociation by as much as 3–6 kcal/mol. Because the proposed gap effect is present only for reactions involving multiple molecules, it can be exploited to develop novel additives that affect protein association reactions although having little or no effect on unimolecular reactions such as protein folding. This idea has many potential applications in areas such as the stabilization of proteins against aggregation during folding and in pharmaceutical formulations. PMID:15345542

  12. Rational design of solution additives for the prevention of protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Baynes, Brian M; Trout, Bernhardt L

    2004-09-01

    We have developed a statistical-mechanical model of the effect of solution additives on protein association reactions. This model incorporates solvent radial distribution functions obtained from all-atom molecular dynamics simulations of particular proteins into simple models of protein interactions. In this way, the effects of additives can be computed along the entire association/dissociation reaction coordinate. We used the model to test our hypothesis that a class of large solution additives, which we term "neutral crowders," can slow protein association and dissociation by being preferentially excluded from protein-protein encounter complexes, in a manner analogous to osmotic stress. The magnitude of this proposed "gap effect" was probed for two simple model systems: the association of two spheres and the association of two planes. Our results suggest that for a protein of 20 A radius, an 8 A additive can increase the free energy barrier for association and dissociation by as much as 3-6 kcal/mol. Because the proposed gap effect is present only for reactions involving multiple molecules, it can be exploited to develop novel additives that affect protein association reactions although having little or no effect on unimolecular reactions such as protein folding. This idea has many potential applications in areas such as the stabilization of proteins against aggregation during folding and in pharmaceutical formulations.

  13. Protein misfolding and aggregation in Alzheimer’s disease and Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

    PubMed Central

    Ashraf, Ghulam Md; Greig, Nigel H.; Khan, Taqi Ahmad; Hassan, Iftekhar; Tabrez, Shams; Shakil, Shazi; Sheikh, Ishfaq Ahmed; Zaidi, Syed Kashif; Wali, Mohammad Akram; Jabir, Nasimudeen R.; Firoz, C.K.; Naeem, Aabgeena; Alhazza, Ibrahim M.; Damanhouri, Ghazi A.; Kamal, Mohammad Amjad

    2016-01-01

    In general, proteins can only execute their various biological functions when they are appropriately folded. Their amino acid sequence encodes the relevant information required for correct three-dimensional folding, with or without the assistance of chaperones. The challenge associated with understanding protein folding is currently one of the most important aspects of the biological sciences. Misfolded protein intermediates form large polymers of unwanted aggregates and are involved in the pathogenesis of many human diseases, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). AD is one of the most prevalent neurological disorders and has worldwide impact; whereas T2DM is considered a metabolic disease that detrementally influences numerous organs, afflicts some 8% of the adult population, and shares many risk factors with AD. Research data indicates that there is a widespread conformational change in the proteins involved in AD and T2DM that form β-sheets like motifs. Although conformation of these β-sheets is common to many functional proteins, the transition from α-helix to β-sheet is a typical characteristic of amyloid deposits. Any abnormality in this transition results in protein aggregation and generation of insoluble fibrils. The abnormal and toxic proteins can interact with other native proteins and consequently catalyze their transition into the toxic state. Both AD and T2DM are prevalent in the aged population. AD is characterized by the accumulation of amyloid-β (Aβ) in brain, while T2DM is characterized by the deposition of islet amyloid polypeptide (IAPP, also known as amylin) within beta-cells of the pancreas. T2DM increases pathological angiogenesis and immature vascularisation. This also leads to chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, which results in dysfunction and degeneration of neuroglial cells. With an abundance of common mechanisms underpinning both disorders, a significant question that can be posed is whether T2DM

  14. Biphasic cultivation strategy to avoid Epo-Fc aggregation and optimize protein expression.

    PubMed

    Kaisermayer, Christian; Reinhart, David; Gili, Andreas; Chang, Martina; Aberg, Per-Mikael; Castan, Andreas; Kunert, Renate

    2016-06-10

    In biphasic cultivations, the culture conditions are initially kept at an optimum for rapid cell growth and biomass accumulation. In the second phase, the culture is shifted to conditions ensuring maximum specific protein production and the protein quality required. The influence of specific culture parameters is cell line dependent and their impact on product quality needs to be investigated. In this study, a biphasic cultivation strategy for a Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell line expressing an erythropoietin fusion protein (Epo-Fc) was developed. Cultures were run in batch mode and after an initial growth phase, cultivation temperature and pH were shifted. Applying a DoE (Design of Experiments) approach, a fractional factorial design was used to systematically evaluate the influence of cultivation temperature and pH as well as their synergistic effect on cell growth as well as on recombinant protein production and aggregation. All three responses were influenced by the cultivation temperature. Additionally, an interaction between pH and temperature was found to be related to protein aggregation. Compared with the initial standard conditions of 37°C and pH 7.05, a parameter shift to low temperature and acidic pH resulted in a decrease in the aggregate fraction from 75% to less than 1%. Furthermore, the synergistic effect of temperature and pH substantially lowered the cell-specific rates of glucose and glutamine consumption as well as lactate and ammonium production. The optimized culture conditions also led to an increase of the cell-specific rates of recombinant Epo-Fc production, thus resulting in a more economic bioprocess.

  15. Fluorescence lifetime dynamics of eGFP in protein aggregates with expanded polyQ

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghukasyan, Vladimir; Hsu, Chih-Chun; Liu, Chia-Rung; Kao, Fu-Jen; Cheng, Tzu-Hao

    2009-02-01

    Expanding a polyglutamine (polyQ) stretch at the N-terminus of huntingtin protein is the main cause of the neurodegenerative disorder Huntington's disease (HD). Expansion of polyQ above 39 residues has an inherent propensity to form amyloid-like fibrils and aggregation of the mutant protein is found to be a critical component for abnormal pathology of HD. Using yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as a model system, we have observed a decrease in fluorescence lifetime of the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP) fused to 97 successive glutamine residues (97Q). Compared to the sample expressing evenly distributed eGFP, the 97Q-eGFP fusion proteins show the formation of grain-like particles and the reduction of eGFP lifetime by ~250 ps as measured by time-correlated single-photon counting technique (TCSPC). More importantly, this phenomenon does not appear in Hsp104-deficient cells. The gene product of HSP104 is required for the formation of polyQ aggregates in yeast cells; therefore, the cellular 97Q-eGFP become soluble and evenly distributive in the absence of Hsp104. Under this condition, the lifetime value of 97Q-eGFP is close to the one exhibited by eGFP alone. The independence of the effect of the environmental parameters, such as pH and refraction index is demonstrated. These data indicate that the fluorescence lifetime dynamics of eGFP is linked to the process of polyQ protein aggregation per se.

  16. A coarse grained protein model with internal degrees of freedom. Application to α-synuclein aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilie, Ioana M.; den Otter, Wouter K.; Briels, Wim J.

    2016-02-01

    Particles in simulations are traditionally endowed with fixed interactions. While this is appropriate for particles representing atoms or molecules, objects with significant internal dynamics—like sequences of amino acids or even an entire protein—are poorly modelled by invariable particles. We develop a highly coarse grained polymorph patchy particle with the ultimate aim of simulating proteins as chains of particles at the secondary structure level. Conformational changes, e.g., a transition between disordered and β-sheet states, are accommodated by internal coordinates that determine the shape and interaction characteristics of the particles. The internal coordinates, as well as the particle positions and orientations, are propagated by Brownian Dynamics in response to their local environment. As an example of the potential offered by polymorph particles, we model the amyloidogenic intrinsically disordered protein α-synuclein, involved in Parkinson's disease, as a single particle with two internal states. The simulations yield oligomers of particles in the disordered state and fibrils of particles in the "misfolded" cross-β-sheet state. The aggregation dynamics is complex, as aggregates can form by a direct nucleation-and-growth mechanism and by two-step-nucleation through conversions between the two cluster types. The aggregation dynamics is complex, with fibrils formed by direct nucleation-and-growth, by two-step-nucleation through the conversion of an oligomer and by auto-catalysis of this conversion.

  17. Crowding Activates ClpB and Enhances Its Association with DnaK for Efficient Protein Aggregate Reactivation

    PubMed Central

    Martín, Ianire; Celaya, Garbiñe; Alfonso, Carlos; Moro, Fernando; Rivas, Germán; Muga, Arturo

    2014-01-01

    Reactivation of intracellular protein aggregates after a severe stress is mandatory for cell survival. In bacteria, this activity depends on the collaboration between the DnaK system and ClpB, which in vivo occurs in a highly crowded environment. The reactivation reaction includes two steps: extraction of unfolded monomers from the aggregate and their subsequent refolding into the native conformation. Both steps might be compromised by excluded volume conditions that would favor aggregation of unstable protein folding intermediates. Here, we have investigated whether ClpB and the DnaK system are able to compensate this unproductive effect and efficiently reactivate aggregates of three different substrate proteins under crowding conditions. To this aim, we have compared the association equilibrium, biochemical properties, stability, and chaperone activity of the disaggregase ClpB in the absence and presence of an inert macromolecular crowding agent. Our data show that crowding i), increases three to four orders of magnitude the association constant of the functional hexamer; ii), shifts the conformational equilibrium of the protein monomer toward a compact state; iii), stimulates its ATPase activity; and iv), favors association of the chaperone with substrate proteins and with aggregate-bound DnaK. These effects strongly enhance protein aggregate reactivation by the DnaK-ClpB network, highlighting the importance of volume exclusion in complex processes in which several proteins have to work in a sequential manner. PMID:24806934

  18. The Hexapeptide Repeated Segment LIAGY is a Hot Spot of Aggregation of the Pseudomonas syringae Ice Nucleation Protein.

    PubMed

    Di Martino, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Ice nucleation proteins (INPs) form oligomeric structures by self-assembly and aggregation. We looked for the presence of potential aggregating sequences inside the INP from Pseudomonas syringae by a computational approach with the AGGRESCAN, FOMDAMYLOID and TANGO softwares. A total of 38 hot spots of aggregation were predicted in the INP sequence: 7 localized in the Nterminal domain, 2 in the C-terminal region, 28 in the highly repetitive central (HRC) region and 1 shared between the HRC and the Carboxyl-terminus regions of the protein. All the hot spots of aggregation identified in the HRC domain overlapped a 8-residue low fidelity repeat including a LIAGYrelated sequence. We confirmed the predictions by an experimental approach using synthetic peptides corresponding to different parts of the INP central sequence, absorbance spectroscopy and fluorescence spectroscopy in the presence of Congo red (CR) or Thioflavin T (ThT), respectively. Peptide 620-SFIIAGYG-627 predicted to aggregate by the three softwares induced an increase in fluorescence of ThT. Peptide 729-GFKSILTAGY-738 predicted to aggregate by AGGRESCAN and FOLDAMYLOID induced a shift in the maximum of absorbance of CR. Peptide 1124-SVLTAGA-1130 predicted to aggregate only by TANGO did not interfere with CR absorbance or ThT fluorescence. In conclusion, the use of three aggregation prediction algorithms and two biochemical assays showed that the hexapeptide repeated segment LIAGY, previously shown to form a hairpin loop may be involved in the aggregation of the P. syringae INP.

  19. In vitro plasma protein binding and aqueous aggregation behavior of astaxanthin dilysinate tetrahydrochloride.

    PubMed

    Zsila, Ferenc; Fitos, Ilona; Bikádi, Zsolt; Simonyi, Miklós; Jackson, Henry L; Lockwood, Samuel F

    2004-11-01

    The tetrahydrochloride salt of astaxanthin di-L-lysinate (lys(2)AST) is a highly water-dispersible astaxanthin-amino acid conjugate, with an aqueous dispersibility of > or = 181.6 mg/mL. The statistical mixture of stereoisomers has been well characterized as an aqueous-phase superoxide anion scavenger, effective at micromolar (microM) concentrations. In the current study, the aqueous aggregation behavior and in vitro plasma protein binding [with fatty-acid-free human serum albumin (HSA) and alpha(1)-acid glycoprotein (AGP)] were investigated with a suite of techniques, including circular dichroism (CD) and UV-vis spectroscopy, ultrafiltration, competitive ligand displacement, and fluorescence quenching. Induced CD bands obtained in Ringer buffer solution of HSA demonstrated high affinity monomeric binding of the compound at low ligand per protein (L/P) ratios (in aqueous solution alone the carotenoid molecules formed card-pack aggregates). The binding constant ( approximately 10(6)M(-1)) and the binding stoichiometry (approximately 0.2 per albumin molecule) were calculated from CD titration data. CD displacement and ultrafiltration experiments performed with marker ligands of HSA indicated that the ligand binding occurred at a site distinct from the main drug binding sites of HSA (i.e., Sites I and II). At intermediate L/P ratios, both monomeric and aggregated ("chirally complexed") binding occurred simultaneously at distinct sites of the protein. At high L/P ratios, chiral complexation predominantly occurred on the asymmetric protein template. The tentative location of the chirally-complexed aggregation on the HSA template was identified as the large interdomain cleft of HSA, where carotenoid derivatives have been found to bind previously. Only weak binding to AGP was observed. These results suggest that parenteral use of this highly potent, water-dispersible astaxanthin-amino acid conjugate will result in plasma protein association, and plasma protein binding at

  20. Lysine methylation is an endogenous post-translational modification of tau protein in human brain and a modulator of aggregation propensity

    PubMed Central

    Funk, Kristen E.; Thomas, Stefani N.; Schafer, Kelsey N.; Cooper, Grace L.; Liao, Zhongping; Clark, David J.; Yang, Austin J.; Kuret, Jeff

    2015-01-01

    In Alzheimer disease, the microtubule-associated protein tau dissociates from the neuronal cytoskeleton and aggregates to form cytoplasmic inclusions. Although hyper-phosphorylation of tau Ser and Thr residues is an established trigger of tau misfunction and aggregation, tau modifications extend to Lys residues as well, raising the possibility that different modification signatures depress or promote aggregation propensity depending on site occupancy. To identify Lys-residue modifications associated with normal tau function, soluble tau proteins isolated from four cognitively normal human brains were characterized by mass spectrometry methods. The major detectable Lys modification was found to be methylation, which appeared in the form of mono- and di-methyl Lys residues distributed among at least eleven sites. Unlike tau phosphorylation sites, the frequency of Lys methylation was highest in the microtubule binding repeat region that mediates both microtubule binding and homotypic interactions. When purified recombinant human tau was modified in vitro through reductive methylation, its ability to promote tubulin polymerization was retained, whereas its aggregation propensity was greatly attenuated at both nucleation and extension steps. These data establish Lys methylation as part of the normal tau post-translational modification signature in human brain, and suggest that it can function in part to protect against pathological tau aggregation. PMID:24869773

  1. Rational approach for design and evaluation of anti-aggregation agents for protein stabilization: A case study of trehalose phenylalaninate.

    PubMed

    Kale, Smita S; Akamanchi, Krishnacharya G

    2017-03-30

    The present work introduces new anti-aggregation agent (AAA) derived through our new approach for design and evaluation of anti-aggregation agent as a multi-purpose excipient to combat protein aggregation. Therapeutic proteins undergo aggregation due to even minor changes in environmental conditions like temperature, pH, shear and stress. Excipients play a vital role in prevention of aggregation. To stabilize a protein formulation different classes of excipients are used in combination after carefully selecting through laborious and time consuming trial and error experiments. To resolve these concerns, we have developed a rational approach based on molecular docking analysis and have designed, synthesized AAAs, and validated the approach by experimental studies. Trehalose phenylalaninate (TPA) has been synthesized and evaluated for stabilization of Bovine serum albumin (BSA). TPA was found to be non-toxic with a LC50 of >80μg/ml. BSA solutions with and without TPA were subjected to thermal and agitation stress and aggregation was monitored using sophisticated analytical techniques. The helical structure of BSA was completely retained in stressed samples at 0.1% concentration of TPA. SEC-HPLC clearly demonstrated the absence of aggregates in presence of TPA. Although aggregation was not seen in fluorescence spectra but quenching due to TPA was evident. Moreover, molecular dynamics study on BSA-TPA complex showed lower RMSD.

  2. Influence of heat and shear induced protein aggregation on the in vitro digestion rate of whey proteins.

    PubMed

    Singh, Tanoj K; Øiseth, Sofia K; Lundin, Leif; Day, Li

    2014-11-01

    Protein intake is essential for growth and repair of body cells, the normal functioning of muscles, and health related immune functions. Most food proteins are consumed after undergoing various degrees of processing. Changes in protein structure and assembly as a result of processing impact the digestibility of proteins. Research in understanding to what extent the protein structure impacts the rate of proteolysis under human physiological conditions has gained considerable interest. In this work, four whey protein gels were prepared using heat processing at two different pH values, 6.8 and 4.6, with and without applied shear. The gels showed different protein network microstructures due to heat induced unfolding (at pH 6.8) or lack of unfolding, thus resulting in fine stranded protein networks. When shear was applied during heating, particulate protein networks were formed. The differences in the gel microstructures resulted in considerable differences in their rheological properties. An in vitro gastric and intestinal model was used to investigate the resulting effects of these different gel structures on whey protein digestion. In addition, the rate of digestion was monitored by taking samples at various time points throughout the in vitro digestion process. The peptides in the digesta were profiled using SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis, reversed-phase-HPLC and LC-MS. Under simulated gastric conditions, whey proteins in structured gels were hydrolysed faster than native proteins in solution. The rate of peptides released during in vitro digestion differed depending on the structure of the gels and extent of protein aggregation. The outcomes of this work highlighted that changes in the network structure of the protein can influence the rate and pattern of its proteolysis under gastrointestinal conditions. Such knowledge could assist the food industry in designing novel food formulations to control the digestion kinetics and the release of biologically

  3. The boson peak of amyloid fibrils: probing the softness of protein aggregates by inelastic neutron scattering.

    PubMed

    Schirò, G; Vetri, V; Andersen, C B; Natali, F; Koza, M M; Leone, M; Cupane, A

    2014-03-20

    Proteins and polypeptides are characterized by low-frequency vibrations in the terahertz regime responsible for the so-called "boson peak". The shape and position of this peak are related to the mechanical properties of peptide chains. Amyloid fibrils are ordered macromolecular assemblies, spontaneously formed in nature, characterized by unique biological and nanomechanical properties. In this work, we investigate the effects of the amyloid state and its polymorphism on the boson peak. We used inelastic neutron scattering to probe low-frequency vibrations of the glucagon polypeptide in the native state and in two different amyloid morphologies in both dry and hydrated sample states. The data show that amyloid fibril formation and hydration state affect the softness of the polypeptide not only by changing the distribution of vibrational modes but also, and most significantly, the dissipative mechanisms of collective low-frequency vibrations provided by water-protein and protein-protein interactions. We show how the morphology of the fibril is able to tune these effects. Atomic fluctuations were also measured by elastic neutron scattering. The data confirm that any effect of protein aggregation on fluctuation amplitudes is essentially due to changes in surface exposure to hydration water. The results demonstrate the importance of protein-protein and protein-water interactions in the dynamics and mechanics of amyloid fibrils.

  4. Effect of protein aggregation on the spectroscopic properties and excited state kinetics of the LHCII pigment–protein complex from green plants.

    PubMed

    Magdaong, Nikki M; Enriquez, Miriam M; LaFountain, Amy M; Rafka, Lauren; Frank, Harry A

    2013-12-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved absorption and fluorescence spectroscopic experiments have been carried out at room and cryogenic temperatures on aggregated and unaggregated monomeric and trimeric LHCII complexes isolated from spinach chloroplasts. Protein aggregation has been hypothesized to be one of the mechanistic factors controlling the dissipation of excess photo-excited state energy of chlorophyll during the process known as nonphotochemical quenching. The data obtained from the present experiments reveal the role of protein aggregation on the spectroscopic properties and dynamics of energy transfer and excited state deactivation of the protein-bound chlorophyll and carotenoid pigments.

  5. Asymmetric Inheritance of Aggregated Proteins and Age Reset in Yeast Are Regulated by Vac17-Dependent Vacuolar Functions.

    PubMed

    Hill, Sandra Malmgren; Hao, Xinxin; Grönvall, Johan; Spikings-Nordby, Stephanie; Widlund, Per O; Amen, Triana; Jörhov, Anna; Josefson, Rebecca; Kaganovich, Daniel; Liu, Beidong; Nyström, Thomas

    2016-07-19

    Age can be reset during mitosis in both yeast and stem cells to generate a young daughter cell from an aged and deteriorated one. This phenomenon requires asymmetry-generating genes (AGGs) that govern the asymmetrical inheritance of aggregated proteins. Using a genome-wide imaging screen to identify AGGs in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we discovered a previously unknown role for endocytosis, vacuole fusion, and the myosin-dependent adaptor protein Vac17 in asymmetrical inheritance of misfolded proteins. Overproduction of Vac17 increases deposition of aggregates into cytoprotective vacuole-associated sites, counteracts age-related breakdown of endocytosis and vacuole integrity, and extends replicative lifespan. The link between damage asymmetry and vesicle trafficking can be explained by a direct interaction between aggregates and vesicles. We also show that the protein disaggregase Hsp104 interacts physically with endocytic vesicle-associated proteins, such as the dynamin-like protein, Vps1, which was also shown to be required for Vac17-dependent sequestration of protein aggregates. These data demonstrate that two physiognomies of aging-reduced endocytosis and protein aggregation-are interconnected and regulated by Vac17.

  6. The neuronal extracellular matrix restricts distribution and internalization of aggregated Tau-protein.

    PubMed

    Suttkus, A; Holzer, M; Morawski, M; Arendt, T

    2016-01-28

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a chronic degenerative disorder characterized by fibrillary aggregates of Aß and Tau-protein. Formation and progression of these pathological hallmarks throughout the brain follow a specific spatio-temporal pattern which provides the basis for neuropathological staging. Previously, we could demonstrate that cortical and subcortical neurons are less frequently affected by neurofibrillary degeneration if they are enwrapped by a specialized form of the hyaluronan-based extracellular matrix (ECM), the so called 'perineuronal net' (PN). PNs are composed of large aggregating chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans connected to a hyaluronan backbone, stabilized by link proteins and cross-linked via tenascin-R. Recently, PN-associated neurons were shown to be better protected against iron-induced neurodegeneration compared to neurons without PN, indicating a neuroprotective function. Here, we investigated the role of PNs in distribution and internalization of exogenous Tau-protein by using organotypic slice cultures of wildtype mice as well as mice lacking the ECM-components aggrecan, HAPLN1 or tenascin-R. We could demonstrate that PNs restrict both distribution and internalization of Tau. Accordingly, PN-ensheathed neurons were less frequently affected by Tau-internalization, than neurons without PN. Finally, the PNs as well as their three investigated components were shown to modulate the processes of distribution as well as internalization of Tau.

  7. Bayesian model aggregation for ensemble-based estimates of protein pKa values

    SciTech Connect

    Gosink, Luke J.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Pulsipher, Trenton C.; Baker, Nathan A.

    2014-03-01

    This paper investigates an ensemble-based technique called Bayesian Model Averaging (BMA) to improve the performance of protein amino acid p$K_a$ predictions. Structure-based p$K_a$ calculations play an important role in the mechanistic interpretation of protein structure and are also used to determine a wide range of protein properties. A diverse set of methods currently exist for p$K_a$ prediction, ranging from empirical statistical models to {\\it ab initio} quantum mechanical approaches. However, each of these methods are based on a set of assumptions that have inherent bias and sensitivities that can effect a model's accuracy and generalizability for p$K_a$ prediction in complicated biomolecular systems. We use BMA to combine eleven diverse prediction methods that each estimate pKa values of amino acids in staphylococcal nuclease. These methods are based on work conducted for the pKa Cooperative and the pKa measurements are based on experimental work conducted by the Garc{\\'i}a-Moreno lab. Our study demonstrates that the aggregated estimate obtained from BMA outperforms all individual prediction methods in our cross-validation study with improvements from 40-70\\% over other method classes. This work illustrates a new possible mechanism for improving the accuracy of p$K_a$ prediction and lays the foundation for future work on aggregate models that balance computational cost with prediction accuracy.

  8. Small heat shock proteins protect against {alpha}-synuclein-induced toxicity and aggregation

    SciTech Connect

    Outeiro, Tiago Fleming; Klucken, Jochen; Strathearn, Katherine E.; Liu Fang; Nguyen, Paul; Rochet, Jean-Christophe; Hyman, Bradley T.; McLean, Pamela J. . E-mail: touteiro@partners.org

    2006-12-22

    Protein misfolding and inclusion formation are common events in neurodegenerative diseases, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), Alzheimer's disease (AD) or Huntington's disease (HD). {alpha}-Synuclein (aSyn) is the main protein component of inclusions called Lewy bodies (LB) which are pathognomic of PD, Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and other diseases collectively known as LB diseases. Heat shock proteins (HSPs) are one class of the cellular quality control system that mediate protein folding, remodeling, and even disaggregation. Here, we investigated the role of the small heat shock proteins Hsp27 and {alpha}B-crystallin, in LB diseases. We demonstrate, via quantitative PCR, that Hsp27 messenger RNA levels are {approx}2-3-fold higher in DLB cases compared to control. We also show a corresponding increase in Hsp27 protein levels. Furthermore, we found that Hsp27 reduces aSyn-induced toxicity by {approx}80% in a culture model while {alpha}B-crystallin reduces toxicity by {approx}20%. In addition, intracellular inclusions were immunopositive for endogenous Hsp27, and overexpression of this protein reduced aSyn aggregation in a cell culture model.

  9. FRG1P-mediated aggregation of proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing.

    PubMed

    van Koningsbruggen, Silvana; Straasheijm, Kirsten R; Sterrenburg, Ellen; de Graaf, Natascha; Dauwerse, Hans G; Frants, Rune R; van der Maarel, Silvère M

    2007-02-01

    FRG1 is considered a candidate gene for facioscapulohumeral muscular dystrophy (FSHD) based on its location at chromosome 4qter and its upregulation in FSHD muscle. The FRG1 protein (FRG1P) localizes to nucleoli, Cajal bodies (and speckles), and has been suggested to be a component of the human spliceosome but its exact function is unknown. Recently, transgenic mice overexpressing high levels of FRG1P in skeletal muscle were described to present with muscular dystrophy. Moreover, upregulation of FRG1P was demonstrated to correlate with missplicing of specific pre-mRNAs. In this study, we have combined colocalization studies with yeast two-hybrid screens to identify proteins that associate with FRG1P. We demonstrate that artificially induced nucleolar aggregates of VSV-FRG1P specifically sequester proteins involved in pre-mRNA processing. In addition, we have identified SMN, PABPN1, and FAM71B, a novel speckle and Cajal body protein, as binding partners of FRG1P. All these proteins are, or seem to be, involved in RNA biogenesis. Our data confirm the presence of FRG1P in protein complexes containing human spliceosomes and support a potential role of FRG1P in either splicing or another step in nuclear RNA biogenesis. Intriguingly, among FRG1P-associated proteins are SMN and PABPN1, both being involved in neuromuscular disorders, possibly through RNA biogenesis-related processes.

  10. Ethanol extract of Brazilian propolis ameliorates cognitive dysfunction and suppressed protein aggregations caused by hyperhomocysteinemia.

    PubMed

    Miyazaki, Yuta; Sugimoto, Yasushi; Fujita, Akikazu; Kanouchi, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    Homocysteine (Hcy) has been proposed to be a risk factor for cognitive dysfunction. We investigated the effects and the underlying mechanisms of action of propolis, which has antioxidant activity on Hcy-induced oxidative stress in vitro and in vivo. For the in vitro assays, neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y and glioblastoma U-251MG cells were cultured with Hcy and various concentrations of propolis. Cell death and reactive oxygen species production were significantly suppressed by propolis in dose-dependent manner, compared with Hcy alone. For the in vivo assays, mice were fed a propolis-containing diet and Hcy thiolactone in water. Cognitive function was evaluated using the Morris water maze test. Propolis suppressed cognitive dysfunction caused by hyperhomocysteinemia. Accumulation of aggregated protein in brain was accelerated in hyperhomocysteinemia, and the accumulation was suppressed by propolis. Hyperhomocysteinemia, however, did not enhance the oxidative stress in brain. In vitro amyloid formation assay showed that Hcy accelerated lysozyme aggregation and propolis inhibited the aggregation.

  11. o-Amino Analogs of Green Fluorescence Protein Chromophore: Photoisomerization, Photodimerization and Aggregation-induced Emission.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guan-Jhih; Lin, Che-Jen; Liu, Yi-Hung; Peng, Shie-Ming; Yang, Jye-Shane

    2015-01-01

    The photochemical properties of three o-amino analogs of the green fluorescence protein chromophore O0, O1 and O8 (o-ABDIs) have been investigated and compared with those of the m- and p-amino isomers (m-ABDIs and p-ABDIs) in solutions, aggregates, and the solid state. In aprotic solvents, the fluorescence competes with the Z → E photoisomerization for all cases, and the o-ABDIs display a fluorescence quantum efficiency of 1-6%, lying between the m-ABDIs of 5-48% and the p-ABDIs of < 0.1%. The fluorescence of both the o- and m-ABDIs is nearly quenched in protic solvents, attributable to the solvent-solute hydrogen bonding (SSHB) interactions. The phenomenon of aggregation-induced emission observed for O8 in poor solvents resembles the behavior of M8 as a consequence of exclusion of the SSHB interactions and restriction of internal rotation for molecules located inside the aggregates. The occurrence of [2 + 2] photodimerization for O0 in the solid state is unique among the ABDIs, and the X-ray crystal structures of O0 and the photodimer OD reveal the head-to-tail syn-oriented stereochemistry. Analysis on the X-ray crystal structures of O0, O1, M0, M1 and P0 shows that not only the pairwise topochemical geometry but also the columnar packing mode is important in determining the photodimerization reactivity.

  12. Adsorption of a Protein Monolayer via Hydrophobic Interactions Prevents Nanoparticle Aggregation under Harsh Environmental Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Dominguez-Medina, Sergio; Blankenburg, Jan; Olson, Jana; Landes, Christy F.; Link, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    We find that citrate-stabilized gold nanoparticles aggregate and precipitate in saline solutions below the NaCl concentration of many bodily fluids and blood plasma. Our experiments indicate that this is due to complexation of the citrate anions with Na+ cations in solution. A dramatically enhanced colloidal stability is achieved when bovine serum albumin is adsorbed to the gold nanoparticle surface, completely preventing nanoparticle aggregation under harsh environmental conditions where the NaCl concentration is well beyond the isotonic point. Furthermore, we explore the mechanism of the formation of this albumin ‘corona’ and find that monolayer protein adsorption is most likely ruled by hydrophobic interactions. As for many nanotechnology-based biomedical and environmental applications, particle aggregation and sedimentation are undesirable and could substantially increase the risk of toxicological side-effects, the formation of the BSA corona presented here provides a low-cost bio-compatible strategy for nanoparticle stabilization and transport in highly ionic environments. PMID:23914342

  13. Optical Imaging of Paramagnetic Bead-DNA Aggregation Inhibition Allows for Low Copy Number Detection of Infectious Pathogens.

    PubMed

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Borba, Juliane C; Shafagati, Nazly; Luzader, Deborah; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kendall, Melissa M; Feldman, Sanford H; Landers, James P

    2015-01-01

    DNA-paramagnetic silica bead aggregation in a rotating magnetic field facilitates the quantification of DNA with femtogram sensitivity, but yields no sequence-specific information. Here we provide an original description of aggregation inhibition for the detection of DNA and RNA in a sequence-specific manner following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The fragments generated via LAMP fail to induce chaotrope-mediated bead aggregation; however, due to their ability to passivate the bead surface, they effectively inhibit bead aggregation by longer 'trigger' DNA. We demonstrate the utility of aggregation inhibition as a method for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens with sensitivity that approaches single copies of the target. We successfully use this methodology for the detection of notable food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica, as well as Rift Valley fever virus, a weaponizable virus of national security concern. We also show the concentration dependence of aggregation inhibition, suggesting the potential for quantification of target nucleic acid in clinical and environmental samples. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly detect infectious pathogens by utilizing a cell phone and custom-written application (App), making this novel detection modality fully portable for point-of-care use.

  14. Optical Imaging of Paramagnetic Bead-DNA Aggregation Inhibition Allows for Low Copy Number Detection of Infectious Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A.; Borba, Juliane C.; Shafagati, Nazly; Luzader, Deborah; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kendall, Melissa M.; Feldman, Sanford H.; Landers, James P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-paramagnetic silica bead aggregation in a rotating magnetic field facilitates the quantification of DNA with femtogram sensitivity, but yields no sequence-specific information. Here we provide an original description of aggregation inhibition for the detection of DNA and RNA in a sequence-specific manner following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The fragments generated via LAMP fail to induce chaotrope-mediated bead aggregation; however, due to their ability to passivate the bead surface, they effectively inhibit bead aggregation by longer ‘trigger’ DNA. We demonstrate the utility of aggregation inhibition as a method for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens with sensitivity that approaches single copies of the target. We successfully use this methodology for the detection of notable food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica, as well as Rift Valley fever virus, a weaponizable virus of national security concern. We also show the concentration dependence of aggregation inhibition, suggesting the potential for quantification of target nucleic acid in clinical and environmental samples. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly detect infectious pathogens by utilizing a cell phone and custom-written application (App), making this novel detection modality fully portable for point-of-care use. PMID:26068926

  15. Protein A chromatography increases monoclonal antibody aggregation rate during subsequent low pH virus inactivation hold.

    PubMed

    Mazzer, Alice R; Perraud, Xavier; Halley, Jennifer; O'Hara, John; Bracewell, Daniel G

    2015-10-09

    Protein A chromatography is a near-ubiquitous method of mAb capture in bioprocesses. The use of low pH buffer for elution from protein A is known to contribute to product aggregation. Yet, a more limited set of evidence suggests that low pH may not be the sole cause of aggregation in protein A chromatography, rather, other facets of the process may contribute significantly. This paper presents a well-defined method for investigating this problem. An IgG4 was incubated in elution buffer after protein A chromatography (typical of the viral inactivation hold) and the quantity of monomer in neutralised samples was determined by size exclusion chromatography; elution buffers of different pH values predetermined to induce aggregation of the IgG4 were used. Rate constants for monomer decay over time were determined by fitting exponential decay functions to the data. Similar experiments were implemented in the absence of a chromatography step, i.e. IgG4 aggregation at low pH. Rate constants for aggregation after protein A chromatography were considerably higher than those from low pH exposure alone; a distinct shift in aggregation rates was apparent across the pH range tested.

  16. Amyloid misfolding, aggregation, and the early onset of protein deposition diseases: insights from AFM experiments and computational analyses

    PubMed Central

    Lyubchenko, Yuri L.

    2016-01-01

    The development of Alzheimer’s disease is believed to be caused by the assembly of amyloid β proteins into aggregates and the formation of extracellular senile plaques. Similar models suggest that structural misfolding and aggregation of proteins are associated with the early onset of diseases such as Parkinson’s, Huntington’s, and other protein deposition diseases. Initially, the aggregates were structurally characterized by traditional techniques such as x-ray crystallography, NMR, electron microscopy, and AFM. However, data regarding the structures formed during the early stages of the aggregation process were unknown. Experimental models of protein deposition diseases have demonstrated that the small oligomeric species have significant neurotoxicity. This highlights the urgent need to discover the properties of these species, to enable the development of efficient diagnostic and therapeutic strategies. The oligomers exist transiently, making it impossible to use traditional structural techniques to study their characteristics. The recent implementation of single-molecule imaging and probing techniques that are capable of probing transient states have enabled the properties of these oligomers to be characterized. Additionally, powerful computational techniques capable of structurally analyzing oligomers at the atomic level advanced our understanding of the amyloid aggregation problem. This review outlines the progress in AFM experimental studies and computational analyses with a primary focus on understanding the very first stage of the aggregation process. Experimental approaches can aid in the development of novel sensitive diagnostic and preventive strategies for protein deposition diseases, and several examples of these approaches will be discussed. PMID:27830177

  17. Quality control of Photosystem II: reversible and irreversible protein aggregation decides the fate of Photosystem II under excessive illumination

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yasusi; Hori, Haruka; Kai, Suguru; Ishikawa, Tomomi; Ohnishi, Atsuki; Tsumura, Nodoka; Morita, Noriko

    2013-01-01

    In response to excessive light, the thylakoid membranes of higher plant chloroplasts show dynamic changes including the degradation and reassembly of proteins, a change in the distribution of proteins, and large-scale structural changes such as unstacking of the grana. Here, we examined the aggregation of light-harvesting chlorophyll-protein complexes and Photosystem II core subunits of spinach thylakoid membranes under light stress with 77K chlorophyll fluorescence; aggregation of these proteins was found to proceed with increasing light intensity. Measurement of changes in the fluidity of thylakoid membranes with fluorescence polarization of diphenylhexatriene showed that membrane fluidity increased at a light intensity of 500–1,000 μmol photons m-2 s-1, and decreased at very high light intensity (1,500 μmol photons m-2 s-1). The aggregation of light-harvesting complexes at moderately high light intensity is known to be reversible, while that of Photosystem II core subunits at extremely high light intensity is irreversible. It is likely that the reversibility of protein aggregation is closely related to membrane fluidity: increases in fluidity should stimulate reversible protein aggregation, whereas irreversible protein aggregation might decrease membrane fluidity. When spinach leaves were pre-illuminated with moderately high light intensity, the qE component of non-photochemical quenching and the optimum quantum yield of Photosystem II increased, indicating that Photosystem II/light-harvesting complexes rearranged in the thylakoid membranes to optimize Photosystem II activity. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the thylakoids underwent partial unstacking under these light stress conditions. Thus, protein aggregation is involved in thylakoid dynamics and regulates photochemical reactions, thereby deciding the fate of Photosystem II. PMID:24194743

  18. Heat-induced aggregation of whey proteins: comparison of cheese WPC with acid WPC and relevance of mineral composition.

    PubMed

    Havea, Palatasa; Singh, Harjinder; Creamer, Lawrence K

    2002-07-31

    Heat-induced aggregation of whey proteins in solutions made from two commercial whey protein concentrates (WPCs), one derived from mineral acid whey (acid WPC) and the other from cheese whey (cheese WPC), was studied using polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE), size exclusion chromatography (SEC), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Heat treatment (75 degrees C) of acid WPC solutions (12.0%, w/w, pH 6.9) resulted in formation of relatively small "soluble" aggregates that were predominantly disulfide-linked. By contrast, heat treatment of the cheese WPC solutions (under the same conditions) caused formation of relatively large aggregates, containing high proportions of aggregates linked by noncovalent associations. The rate of aggregation of both beta-lactoglobulin and alpha-lactalbumin at 75 degrees C, measured as the loss of native proteins by PAGE, was higher in the cheese WPC solution than in the acid WPC solution. Cross dialysis of the two WPC solutions resulted in alteration of the mineral composition of each WPC solution and reversing their heat-induced aggregation behavior. The results demonstrated that the mineral composition is very important in controlling the aggregation behavior of WPC products.

  19. Aggregation of a slow-folding mutant of a beta-clam protein proceeds through a monomeric nucleus.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Zoya; Gierasch, Lila M

    2005-05-17

    Mechanistic understanding of protein aggregation, leading either to structured amyloid fibrils or to amorphous inclusion body-like deposits, should facilitate the identification of potential therapeutic intervention strategies for the devastating amyloid-based diseases. Here we focus on the in vitro aggregation of a slow-folding mutant of the beta-clam protein, cellular retinoic acid-binding protein I (P39A CRABP I), which forms inclusion bodies when expressed in Escherichia coli. Aggregation was monitored by observing the fluorescence of a fluorescein-based biarsenical dye (FlAsH) that ligates to a tetra-Cys motif, here incorporated into a flexible Omega-loop. The fluorescence signal of FlAsH on the tetra-Cys-containing P39A CRABP I is sensitive to whether this protein is native or unfolded, and was used in combination with other techniques to follow aggregate formation. The aggregation time course is compatible with a nucleation-dependent polymerization model, and detailed kinetic analysis showed that the energetically unfavorable nucleus is monomeric. A similar conclusion was reached previously for poly(Gln) species [Chen, S., Ferrone, F. A., and Wetzel, R. (2002) Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U.S.A. 99, 11884-11889] and points to an unfavorable equilibrium between the misfolded intermediate and the bulk pool of monomers as causative in aggregation. The P39A mutation, which removes a helix-stop signal, may slow closure of the beta-barrel in P39A CRABP I relative to the wild type, leaving it vulnerable to aggregation. Wide-angle X-ray scattering showed that the amorphous aggregates formed by the aggregation-prone intermediates of P39A CRABP I contain predominantly beta-strands structured in a lamellar fashion with 10.03 A spacing between adjacent beta-sheets.

  20. A naked eye aggregation assay for Pb2+ detection based on glutathione-coated gold nanostars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    D'Agostino, Agnese; Taglietti, Angelo; Bassi, Barbara; Donà, Alice; Pallavicini, Piersandro

    2014-10-01

    Gold nanostars (AuNS) with a mean hydrodynamic size of 40 nm, obtained with a seed-growth approach using a zwitterionic surfactant (laurylsulfobetaine, LSB), were successfully coated with glutathione (GSH), obtaining a stable and purified solid product which can be easily stored and re-dissolved on need in 0.1 M aqueous solution of Hepes buffered at pH 7. Upon exposure to micromolar concentrations of Pb2+ cation, the GSH-coated nano-objects undergo a fast aggregation followed by sedimentation leading to complete precipitation in about an hour. The subsequent disappearing of the intense LSPR extinction can of course be followed spectrophotometrically but, most importantly, can be easily detected with the naked eye. No signs of this event are noticed when other divalent cations are added to the colloidal suspension in the same condition. A careful investigation was performed to study this selectivity and the behaviour of aggregation as a function of time and Pb2+ cation concentration. We demonstrate that an easy, rapid, instrument-free, visual detection of micromolar levels of Pb2+ is thus possible with this assay, showing a good selectivity towards other investigated metal cations.

  1. Fps/Fes and Fer non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinases regulate collagen- and ADP-induced platelet aggregation.

    PubMed

    Senis, Y A; Sangrar, W; Zirngibl, R A; Craig, A W B; Lee, D H; Greer, P A

    2003-05-01

    Fps/Fes and Fer proto-oncoproteins are structurally related non-receptor protein-tyrosine kinases implicated in signaling downstream from cytokines, growth factors and immune receptors. We show that Fps/Fes and Fer are expressed in human and mouse platelets, and are activated following stimulation with collagen and collagen-related peptide (CRP), suggesting a role in GPVI receptor signaling. Fer was also activated following stimulation with thrombin and a protease-activated receptor4 (PAR4)-activating peptide, suggesting a role in signaling downstream from the G protein-coupled PAR4. There were no detectable perturbations in CRP-induced activation of Syk, PLCgamma2, cortactin, Erk, Jnk, Akt or p38 in platelets from mice lacking Fps/Fes, Fer, or both kinases. Platelets lacking Fps/Fes, from a targeted fps/fes null strain of mice, showed increased rates and amplitudes of collagen-induced aggregation, relative to wild-type platelets. P-Selectin expression was also elevated on the surface of Fps/Fes-null platelets in response to CRP. Fer-deficient platelets, from mice targeted with a kinase-inactivating mutation, disaggregated more rapidly than wild-type platelets in response to ADP. This report provides the first evidence that Fps/Fes and Fer are expressed in platelets and become activated downstream from the GPVI collagen receptor, and that Fer is activated downstream from a G-protein coupled receptor. Furthermore, using targeted mouse models we show that deficiency in Fps/Fes or Fer resulted in disregulated platelet aggregation and disaggregation, demonstrating a role for these kinases in regulating platelet functions.

  2. Identification of Structural Features of Condensed Tannins That Affect Protein Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Ropiak, Honorata M.; Lachmann, Peter; Ramsay, Aina; Green, Rebecca J.; Mueller-Harvey, Irene

    2017-01-01

    A diverse panel of condensed tannins was used to resolve the confounding effects of size and subunit composition seen previously in tannin-protein interactions. Turbidimetry revealed that size in terms of mean degree of polymerisation (mDP) or average molecular weight (amw) was the most important tannin parameter. The smallest tannin with the relatively largest effect on protein aggregation had an mDP of ~7. The average size was significantly correlated with aggregation of bovine serum albumin, BSA (mDP: r = -0.916; amw: r = -0.925; p<0.01; df = 27), and gelatin (mDP: r = -0.961; amw: r = -0.981; p<0.01; df = 12). The procyanidin/prodelphinidin and cis-/trans-flavan-3-ol ratios gave no significant correlations. Tryptophan fluorescence quenching indicated that procyanidins and cis-flavan-3-ol units contributed most to the tannin interactions on the BSA surface and in the hydrophobic binding pocket (r = 0.677; p<0.05; df = 9 and r = 0.887; p<0.01; df = 9, respectively). Circular dichroism revealed that higher proportions of prodelphinidins decreased the apparent α-helix content (r = -0.941; p<0.01; df = 5) and increased the apparent β-sheet content (r = 0.916; p<0.05; df = 5) of BSA. PMID:28125657

  3. LMP1 mediates multinuclearity through downregulation of shelterin proteins and formation of telomeric aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Lajoie, Valérie; Lemieux, Bruno; Sawan, Bassem; Lichtensztejn, Daniel; Lichtensztejn, Zelda; Wellinger, Raymund; Mai, Sabine

    2015-01-01

    Hodgkin lymphoma (HL) and Burkitt lymphoma are both germinal center–derived B-cell lymphomas. To assess the consequences of permanent latent membrane protein 1 (LMP1) expression as observed in tumor cells of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) –associated HL, we analyzed 3-dimensional (3D) telomere dynamics and measured the expression of shelterin proteins at the transcriptional and translational level and their topographic distribution in the EBV-negative Burkitt cell line BJAB stably transfected with an inducible LMP1 system. Stable LMP1 expression led to a highly significant increase of multinucleated cells, nuclear volume, and 3D telomeric aggregates when compared with the LMP1-suppressed BJAB controls. Most importantly, LMP1 induced a significant downregulation of the shelterin components TRF1, TRF2, and POT1 at the transcriptional and translational level, and this downregulation was reversed after resuppression of LMP1. In addition, as revealed by spectral karyotyping, LMP1 induced “outré” giant cells and hypoploid “ghost” cells. This LMP1-induced multinucleation was blocked upon LMP1-independent TRF2 expression. These results show that LMP1-dependent deregulation of telomere stability and nuclear organization via shelterin downregulation, in particular TRF2, favors chromosomal rearrangements. We speculate that telomeric aggregates and ongoing breakage-bridge-fusion cycles lead to disturbed cytokinesis and finally to multinuclearity, as observed in EBV-associated HL. PMID:25568351

  4. Exploring the aggregation free energy landscape of the amyloid-β protein (1-40).

    PubMed

    Zheng, Weihua; Tsai, Min-Yeh; Chen, Mingchen; Wolynes, Peter G

    2016-10-18

    A predictive coarse-grained protein force field [associative memory, water-mediated, structure, and energy model for molecular dynamics (AWSEM)-MD] is used to study the energy landscapes and relative stabilities of amyloid-β protein (1-40) in the monomer and all of its oligomeric forms up to an octamer. We find that an isolated monomer is mainly disordered with a short α-helix formed at the central hydrophobic core region (L17-D23). A less stable hairpin structure, however, becomes increasingly more stable in oligomers, where hydrogen bonds can form between neighboring monomers. We explore the structure and stability of both prefibrillar oligomers that consist of mainly antiparallel β-sheets and fibrillar oligomers with only parallel β-sheets. Prefibrillar oligomers are polymorphic but typically take on a cylindrin-like shape composed of mostly antiparallel β-strands. At the concentration of the simulation, the aggregation free energy landscape is nearly downhill. We use umbrella sampling along a structural progress coordinate for interconversion between prefibrillar and fibrillar forms to identify a conversion pathway between these forms. The fibrillar oligomer only becomes favored over its prefibrillar counterpart in the pentamer where an interconversion bottleneck appears. The structural characterization of the pathway along with statistical mechanical perturbation theory allow us to evaluate the effects of concentration on the free energy landscape of aggregation as well as the effects of the Dutch and Arctic mutations associated with early onset of Alzheimer's disease.

  5. The self-assembly, aggregation and phase transitions of food protein systems in one, two and three dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzenga, Raffaele; Fischer, Peter

    2013-04-01

    The aggregation of proteins is of fundamental relevance in a number of daily phenomena, as important and diverse as blood coagulation, medical diseases, or cooking an egg in the kitchen. Colloidal food systems, in particular, are examples that have great significance for protein aggregation, not only for their importance and implications, which touches on everyday life, but also because they allow the limits of the colloidal science analogy to be tested in a much broader window of conditions, such as pH, ionic strength, concentration and temperature. Thus, studying the aggregation and self-assembly of proteins in foods challenges our understanding of these complex systems from both the molecular and statistical physics perspectives. Last but not least, food offers a unique playground to study the aggregation of proteins in three, two and one dimensions, that is to say, in the bulk, at air/water and oil/water interfaces and in protein fibrillation phenomena. In this review we will tackle this very ambitious task in order to discuss the current understanding of protein aggregation in the framework of foods, which is possibly one of the broadest contexts, yet is of tremendous daily relevance.

  6. Clozapine Modulates Glucosylceramide, Clears Aggregated Proteins, and Enhances ATG8/LC3 in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Hao, Limin; Ben-David, Oshrit; Babb, Suzann M; Futerman, Anthony H; Cohen, Bruce M; Buttner, Edgar A

    2017-03-01

    Defining the mechanisms of action of the antipsychotic drug (APD), clozapine, is of great importance, as clozapine is more effective and has therapeutic benefits in a broader range of psychiatric disorders compared with other APDs. Its range of actions have not been fully characterized. Exposure to APDs early in development causes dose-dependent developmental delay and lethality in Caenorhabditis elegans. A previous genome-wide RNAi screen for suppressors of clozapine-induced developmental delay and lethality revealed 40 candidate genes, including sms-1, which encodes a sphingomyelin synthase. One sms-1 isoform is expressed in the C. elegans pharynx, and its transgene rescues the sms-1 mutant phenotype. We examined pharyngeal pumping and observed that clozapine-induced inhibition of pharyngeal pumping requires sms-1, a finding that may explain the role of the gene in mediating clozapine-induced developmental delay/lethality. By analyzing multiple enzymes involved in sphingolipid metabolism, and by observing the effect of addition of various lipids directly to the worms, we suggest that glucosylceramide may be a key mediator of the effects of clozapine. We further observed that clozapine clears protein aggregates, such as α-synuclein, PolyQ protein, and α-1-antitrypsin mutant protein. In addition, it enhances ATG8/LC3. We conclude that clozapine appears to affect the development and induce lethality of worms, in part, through modulating glucosylceramide. We discuss the possible connections among glucosylceramide, protein aggregate clearance, and autophagy. Interactions, including mechanistic pathways involving these elements, may underlie some of the clinical effects of clozapine.

  7. Promiscuous modification of the nuclear poly(A)-binding protein by multiple protein-arginine methyltransferases does not affect the aggregation behavior.

    PubMed

    Fronz, Katharina; Otto, Silke; Kölbel, Knut; Kühn, Uwe; Friedrich, Henning; Schierhorn, Angelika; Beck-Sickinger, Annette G; Ostareck-Lederer, Antje; Wahle, Elmar

    2008-07-18

    The mammalian nuclear poly(A)-binding protein, PABPN1, carries 13 asymmetrically dimethylated arginine residues in its C-terminal domain. By fractionation of cell extracts, we found that protein-arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs)-1, -3, and -6 are responsible for the modification of PABPN1. Recombinant PRMT1, -3, and -6 also methylated PABPN1. Our data suggest that these enzymes act on their own, and additional polypeptides are not involved in recognizing PABPN1 as a substrate. PRMT1 is the predominant methyltransferase acting on PABPN1. Nevertheless, PABPN1 was almost fully methylated in a Prmt1(-/-) cell line; thus, PRMT3 and -6 suffice for methylation. In contrast to PABPN1, the heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP) K is selectively methylated only by PRMT1. Efficient methylation of synthetic peptides derived from PABPN1 or hnRNP K suggested that PRMT1, -3, and -6 recognize their substrates by interacting with local amino acid sequences and not with additional domains of the substrates. However, the use of fusion proteins suggested that the inability of PRMT3 and -6 to modify hnRNP K is because of structural masking of the methyl-accepting amino acid sequences by neighboring domains. Mutations leading to intracellular aggregation of PABPN1 cause the disease oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy. The C-terminal domain containing the methylated arginine residues is known to promote PAPBN1 self-association, and arginine methylation has been reported to inhibit self-association of an orthologous protein. Thus, arginine methylation might be relevant for oculopharyngeal muscular dystrophy. However, in two different types of assays we have been unable to detect any effect of arginine methylation on the aggregation of bovine PABPN1.

  8. STJ detectors for protein detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kobayashi, Y.; Ukibe, M.; Chiba-Kamoshida, K.; Nakanishi, H.; Shiki, S.; Suzuki, K.; Ohkubo, M.

    2008-09-01

    Time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS) with matrix assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) has become an essential spectrometry for a research field of bioscience. However, the mass limit of the conventional TOF-MS spectrometer frequently prevent us from measuring the mass values for large biomolecules without chemical or enzymatic digestion. Overcoming the circumstance, a TOF-MS instrument with superconducting tunnel junction (STJ) detectors (Super TOF-MS) were developed. The direct observation of the kinetic energy for each ion by Super TOF-MS leads to the two considerable capabilities: the observation of large proteins up to 1 MDa and the ionic charge-state discrimination of them, which are impossible with conventional ion detectors. In this paper, it is demonstrated that the these advantages of Super TOF-MS is a powerful tool at performing a fragment analysis of, for example, immunoglobulin G (IgG) which is a large protein playing a key role in an immune system.

  9. The Copper Metabolism MURR1 domain protein 1 (COMMD1) modulates the aggregation of misfolded protein species in a client-specific manner.

    PubMed

    Vonk, Willianne I M; Kakkar, Vaishali; Bartuzi, Paulina; Jaarsma, Dick; Berger, Ruud; Hofker, Marten H; Klomp, Leo W J; Wijmenga, Cisca; Kampinga, Harm H; van de Sluis, Bart

    2014-01-01

    The Copper Metabolism MURR1 domain protein 1 (COMMD1) is a protein involved in multiple cellular pathways, including copper homeostasis, NF-κB and hypoxia signalling. Acting as a scaffold protein, COMMD1 mediates the levels, stability and proteolysis of its substrates (e.g. the copper-transporters ATP7B and ATP7A, RELA and HIF-1α). Recently, we established an interaction between the Cu/Zn superoxide dismutase 1 (SOD1) and COMMD1, resulting in a decreased maturation and activation of SOD1. Mutations in SOD1, associated with the progressive neurodegenerative disorder Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), cause misfolding and aggregation of the mutant SOD1 (mSOD1) protein. Here, we identify COMMD1 as a novel regulator of misfolded protein aggregation as it enhances the formation of mSOD1 aggregates upon binding. Interestingly, COMMD1 co-localizes to the sites of mSOD1 inclusions and forms high molecular weight complexes in the presence of mSOD1. The effect of COMMD1 on protein aggregation is client-specific as, in contrast to mSOD1, COMMD1 decreases the abundance of mutant Parkin inclusions, associated with Parkinson's disease. Aggregation of a polyglutamine-expanded Huntingtin, causative of Huntington's disease, appears unaltered by COMMD1. Altogether, this study offers new research directions to expand our current knowledge on the mechanisms underlying aggregation disease pathologies.

  10. Long-term manure amendments reduced soil aggregate stability via redistribution of the glomalin-related soil protein in macroaggregates.

    PubMed

    Xie, Hongtu; Li, Jianwei; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Lianfeng; Wang, Jingkuan; He, Hongbo; Zhang, Xudong

    2015-10-01

    Glomalin-related soil protein (GRSP) contributes to the formation and maintenance of soil aggregates, it is however remains unclear whether long-term intensive manure amendments alter soil aggregates stability and whether GRSP regulates these changes. Based on a three-decade long fertilization experiment in northeast China, this study examined the impact of long-term manure input on soil organic carbon (SOC), total and easily extractable GRSP (GRSPt and GRSPe) and their respective allocations in four soil aggregates (>2000 μm; 2000-250 μm; 250-53 μm; and <53 μm). The treatments include no fertilization (CK), low and high manure amendment (M1, M2), chemical nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium fertilizers (NPK), and combined manure and chemical fertilizers (NPKM1, NPKM2). Though SOC, GRSPe and GRSPt in soil and SOC in each aggregate generally increased with increasing manure input, GRSPt and GRSPe in each aggregate showed varying changes with manure input. Both GRSP in macroaggregates (2000-250 μm) were significantly higher under low manure input, a pattern consistent with changes in soil aggregate stability. Constituting 38~49% of soil mass, macroaggregates likely contributed to the nonlinear changes of aggregate stability under manure amendments. The regulatory process of GRSP allocations in soil aggregates has important implications for manure management under intensive agriculture.

  11. Docosahexaenoic acid-mediated protein aggregates may reduce proteasome activity and delay myotube degradation during muscle atrophy in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Seung Kyun; Kim, Ji Hyeon; Lee, Jung Hoon; Son, Young Hoon; Lee, Min Wook; Kim, Hak Joong; Noh, Sue Ah; Kim, Kwang Pyo; Kim, In-Gyu; Lee, Min Jae

    2017-01-01

    Proteasomes are the primary degradation machinery for oxidatively damaged proteins that compose a class of misfolded protein substrates. Cellular levels of reactive oxygen species increase with age and this cellular propensity is particularly harmful when combined with the age-associated development of various human disorders including cancer, neurodegenerative disease and muscle atrophy. Proteasome activity is reportedly downregulated in these disease conditions. Herein, we report that docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), a major dietary omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid, mediates intermolecular protein cross-linkages through oxidation, and the resulting protein aggregates potently reduce proteasomal activity both in vitro and in cultured cells. Cellular models overexpressing aggregation-prone proteins such as tau showed significantly elevated levels of tau aggregates and total ubiquitin conjugates in the presence of DHA, thereby reflecting suppressed proteasome activity. Strong synergetic cytotoxicity was observed when the cells overexpressing tau were simultaneously treated with DHA. Antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine significantly desensitized the cells to DHA-induced oxidative stress. DHA significantly delayed the proteasomal degradation of muscle proteins in a cellular atrophy model. Thus, the results of our study identified DHA as a potent inducer of cellular protein aggregates that inhibit proteasome activity and potentially delay systemic muscle protein degradation in certain pathologic conditions. PMID:28104914

  12. Dictyostelium discoideum has a highly Q/N-rich proteome and shows an unusual resilience to protein aggregation.

    PubMed

    Malinovska, Liliana; Palm, Sandra; Gibson, Kimberley; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Alberti, Simon

    2015-05-19

    Many protein-misfolding diseases are caused by proteins carrying prion-like domains. These proteins show sequence similarity to yeast prion proteins, which can interconvert between an intrinsically disordered and an aggregated prion state. The natural presence of prions in yeast has provided important insight into disease mechanisms and cellular proteostasis. However, little is known about prions in other organisms, and it is not yet clear whether the findings in yeast can be generalized. Using bioinformatics tools, we show that Dictyostelium discoideum has the highest content of prion-like proteins of all organisms investigated to date, suggesting that its proteome has a high overall aggregation propensity. To study mechanisms regulating these proteins, we analyze the behavior of several well-characterized prion-like proteins, such as an expanded version of human huntingtin exon 1 (Q103) and the prion domain of the yeast prion protein Sup35 (NM), in D. discoideum. We find that these proteins remain soluble and are innocuous to D. discoideum, in contrast to other organisms, where they form cytotoxic cytosolic aggregates. However, when exposed to conditions that compromise molecular chaperones, these proteins aggregate and become cytotoxic. We show that the disaggregase Hsp101, a molecular chaperone of the Hsp100 family, dissolves heat-induced aggregates and promotes thermotolerance. Furthermore, prion-like proteins accumulate in the nucleus, where they are targeted by the ubiquitin-proteasome system. Our data suggest that D. discoideum has undergone specific adaptations that increase the proteostatic capacity of this organism and allow for an efficient regulation of its prion-like proteome.

  13. Dictyostelium discoideum has a highly Q/N-rich proteome and shows an unusual resilience to protein aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Malinovska, Liliana; Palm, Sandra; Gibson, Kimberley; Verbavatz, Jean-Marc; Alberti, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Many protein-misfolding diseases are caused by proteins carrying prion-like domains. These proteins show sequence similarity to yeast prion proteins, which can interconvert between an intrinsically disordered and an aggregated prion state. The natural presence of prions in yeast has provided important insight into disease mechanisms and cellular proteostasis. However, little is known about prions in other organisms, and it is not yet clear whether the findings in yeast can be generalized. Using bioinformatics tools, we show that Dictyostelium discoideum has the highest content of prion-like proteins of all organisms investigated to date, suggesting that its proteome has a high overall aggregation propensity. To study mechanisms regulating these proteins, we analyze the behavior of several well-characterized prion-like proteins, such as an expanded version of human huntingtin exon 1 (Q103) and the prion domain of the yeast prion protein Sup35 (NM), in D. discoideum. We find that these proteins remain soluble and are innocuous to D. discoideum, in contrast to other organisms, where they form cytotoxic cytosolic aggregates. However, when exposed to conditions that compromise molecular chaperones, these proteins aggregate and become cytotoxic. We show that the disaggregase Hsp101, a molecular chaperone of the Hsp100 family, dissolves heat-induced aggregates and promotes thermotolerance. Furthermore, prion-like proteins accumulate in the nucleus, where they are targeted by the ubiquitin–proteasome system. Our data suggest that D. discoideum has undergone specific adaptations that increase the proteostatic capacity of this organism and allow for an efficient regulation of its prion-like proteome. PMID:25941378

  14. Ultrasensitive detection of target analyte-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles using laser-induced nanoparticle Rayleigh scattering.

    PubMed

    Lin, Jia-Hui; Tseng, Wei-Lung

    2015-01-01

    Detection of salt- and analyte-induced aggregation of gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) mostly relies on costly and bulky analytical instruments. To response this drawback, a portable, miniaturized, sensitive, and cost-effective detection technique is urgently required for rapid field detection and monitoring of target analyte via the use of AuNP-based sensor. This study combined a miniaturized spectrometer with a 532-nm laser to develop a laser-induced Rayleigh scattering technique, allowing the sensitive and selective detection of Rayleigh scattering from the aggregated AuNPs. Three AuNP-based sensing systems, including salt-, thiol- and metal ion-induced aggregation of the AuNPs, were performed to examine the sensitivity of laser-induced Rayleigh scattering technique. Salt-, thiol-, and metal ion-promoted NP aggregation were exemplified by the use of aptamer-adsorbed, fluorosurfactant-stabilized, and gallic acid-capped AuNPs for probing K(+), S-adenosylhomocysteine hydrolase-induced hydrolysis of S-adenosylhomocysteine, and Pb(2+), in sequence. Compared to the reported methods for monitoring the aggregated AuNPs, the proposed system provided distinct advantages of sensitivity. Laser-induced Rayleigh scattering technique was improved to be convenient, cheap, and portable by replacing a diode laser and a miniaturized spectrometer with a laser pointer and a smart-phone. Using this smart-phone-based detection platform, we can determine whether or not the Pb(2+) concentration exceed the maximum allowable level of Pb(2+) in drinking water.

  15. Interactions of ataxin-3 with its molecular partners in the protein machinery that sorts protein aggregates to the aggresome.

    PubMed

    Bonanomi, Marcella; Mazzucchelli, Serena; D'Urzo, Annalisa; Nardini, Marco; Konarev, Petr V; Invernizzi, Gaetano; Svergun, Dmitri I; Vanoni, Marco; Regonesi, Maria Elena; Tortora, Paolo

    2014-06-01

    Ataxin-3 (AT3) is the protein that triggers the inherited neurodegenerative disorder spinocerebellar ataxia type 3 when its polyglutamine (polyQ) stretch close to the C-terminus exceeds a critical length. AT3 consists of the N-terminal globular Josephin domain (JD) and the C-terminal disordered one. It cleaves isopeptide bonds between ubiquitin monomers, an event involved in protein quality control mechanisms. AT3 has been implicated in the pathway that sorts aggregated protein to aggresomes via microtubules, in which dynein and histone deacetylase 6 (HDAC6) also seem to be involved. By taking advantage of small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) and surface plasmon resonance (SPR), we have investigated the interaction of AT3 with tubulin and HDAC6. Based on SAXS results, the AT3 oligomer, consisting of 6-7 subunits, tightly binds to the tubulin hexameric oligomer in a "parallel" fashion. By SPR analysis we have demonstrated that AT3 binds to tubulin dimer with a 50nM affinity. Binding fits with a Langmuir 1:1 model and involves a single binding interface. Nevertheless, the interaction surface consists of three distinct, discontinuous tubulin-binding regions (TBR), one located in the JD, and the two others in the disordered domain, upstream and downstream of the polyQ stretch. In the absence of any of the three TBRs, the affinity is drastically reduced. By SPR we have also provided the first evidence of direct binding of AT3 to HDAC6, with affinity in the range 0.1-1μM. These results shed light on the interactions among the components of the transport machinery that sorts aggregate protein to the aggresome, and pave the way to in vivo studies aimed at further clarifying their roles.

  16. Milk protein suspensions enriched with three essential minerals: Physicochemical characterization and aggregation induced by a novel enzymatic pool.

    PubMed

    Lombardi, Julia; Spelzini, Darío; Corrêa, Ana Paula Folmer; Brandelli, Adriano; Risso, Patricia; Boeris, Valeria

    2016-04-01

    Structural changes of casein micelles and their aggregation induced by a novel enzymatic pool isolated from Bacillus spp. in the presence of calcium, magnesium or zinc were investigated. The effect of cations on milk protein structure was studied using fluorescence and dynamic light scattering. In the presence of cations, milk protein structure rearrangements and larger casein micelle size were observed. The interaction of milk proteins with zinc appears to be of a different nature than that with calcium or magnesium. Under the experimental conditions assayed, the affinity of each cation for some groups present in milk proteins seems to play an important role, besides electrostatic interaction. On the other hand, the lowest aggregation times were achieved at the highest calcium and zinc concentrations (15 mM and 0.25 mM, respectively). The study found that the faster the aggregation of casein micelles, the less compact the gel matrix obtained. Cation concentrations affected milk protein aggregation kinetics and the structure of the aggregates formed.

  17. The Physical Relationship between Infectivity and Prion Protein Aggregates Is Strain-Dependent

    PubMed Central

    Tixador, Philippe; Herzog, Laëtitia; Reine, Fabienne; Jaumain, Emilie; Chapuis, Jérôme; Le Dur, Annick; Laude, Hubert; Béringue, Vincent

    2010-01-01

    Prions are unconventional infectious agents thought to be primarily composed of PrPSc, a multimeric misfolded conformer of the ubiquitously expressed host-encoded prion protein (PrPC). They cause fatal neurodegenerative diseases in both animals and humans. The disease phenotype is not uniform within species, and stable, self-propagating variations in PrPSc conformation could encode this ‘strain’ diversity. However, much remains to be learned about the physical relationship between the infectious agent and PrPSc aggregation state, and how this varies according to the strain. We applied a sedimentation velocity technique to a panel of natural, biologically cloned strains obtained by propagation of classical and atypical sheep scrapie and BSE infectious sources in transgenic mice expressing ovine PrP. Detergent-solubilized, infected brain homogenates were used as starting material. Solubilization conditions were optimized to separate PrPSc aggregates from PrPC. The distribution of PrPSc and infectivity in the gradient was determined by immunoblotting and mouse bioassay, respectively. As a general feature, a major proteinase K-resistant PrPSc peak was observed in the middle part of the gradient. This population approximately corresponds to multimers of 12–30 PrP molecules, if constituted of PrP only. For two strains, infectivity peaked in a markedly different region of the gradient. This most infectious component sedimented very slowly, suggesting small size oligomers and/or low density PrPSc aggregates. Extending this study to hamster prions passaged in hamster PrP transgenic mice revealed that the highly infectious, slowly sedimenting particles could be a feature of strains able to induce a rapidly lethal disease. Our findings suggest that prion infectious particles are subjected to marked strain-dependent variations, which in turn could influence the strain biological phenotype, in particular the replication dynamics. PMID:20419156

  18. Markovian and Non-Markovian Protein Sequence Evolution: Aggregated Markov Process Models

    PubMed Central

    Kosiol, Carolin; Goldman, Nick

    2011-01-01

    Over the years, there have been claims that evolution proceeds according to systematically different processes over different timescales and that protein evolution behaves in a non-Markovian manner. On the other hand, Markov models are fundamental to many applications in evolutionary studies. Apparent non-Markovian or time-dependent behavior has been attributed to influence of the genetic code at short timescales and dominance of physicochemical properties of the amino acids at long timescales. However, any long time period is simply the accumulation of many short time periods, and it remains unclear why evolution should appear to act systematically differently across the range of timescales studied. We show that the observed time-dependent behavior can be explained qualitatively by modeling protein sequence evolution as an aggregated Markov process (AMP): a time-homogeneous Markovian substitution model observed only at the level of the amino acids encoded by the protein-coding DNA sequence. The study of AMPs sheds new light on the relationship between amino acid-level and codon-level models of sequence evolution, and our results suggest that protein evolution should be modeled at the codon level rather than using amino acid substitution models. PMID:21718704

  19. Advances in development of fluorescent probes for detecting amyloid-β aggregates.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ming-Ming; Ren, Wen-Ming; Tang, Xi-Can; Hu, You-Hong; Zhang, Hai-Yan

    2016-06-01

    With accumulating evidence suggesting that amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition is a good diagnostic biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the discovery of active Aβ probes has become an active area of research. Among the existing imaging methods, optical imaging targeting Aβ aggregates (fibrils or oligomers), especially using near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes, is increasingly recognized as a promising approach for the early diagnosis of AD due to its real time detection, low cost, lack of radioactive exposure and high-resolution. In the past decade, a variety of fluorescent probes have been developed and tested for efficiency in vitro, and several probes have shown efficacy in AD transgenic mice. This review classifies these representative probes based on their chemical structures and functional modes (dominant solvent-dependent mode and a novel solvent-independent mode). Moreover, the pharmaceutical characteristics of these representative probes are summarized and discussed. This review provides important perspectives for the future development of novel NIR Aβ diagnostic probes.

  20. A novel cationic triazatetrabenzcorrole: selective detection of mercury(II) by nucleic acid-induced aggregation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yangyang; Deng, Minggang; Du, Yuanyuan; Yan, Shengyong; Huang, Rong; Weng, Xiaocheng; Yang, Chuluo; Zhang, Xiaolian; Zhou, Xiang

    2011-03-07

    In the present work, a novel water-soluble cationic triazatetrabenzcorrole compound was synthesised. Its aggregation and fluorescence quenching properties are demonstrated by serval methods, such as UV-vis and fluorescence spectroscopic studies and naked-eye visualization. Unlike the traditional Hg(2+) sensor based on thymine-Hg(2+)-thymine, we use a novel approach, exploiting the high affinity of Hg(2+) for sulfur in phosphorothioate DNA. Based on the S-Hg(2+)-S pairs, we designed the phosphorothioate DNA T4G4-S3 as an Hg(2+) sensor, which can detect Hg(2+) sensitively and selectively in aqueous solution. And this sensing system is fairly fast and convenient.

  1. UV-visible absorption spectroscopy for the detection of differences in oligonucleotide influenced aggregation of colloidal gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chowdury, Mustafa H.; Julian, Andrea M.; Coates, Craig J.; Cote, Gerard L.

    2005-04-01

    Transposable elements (TEs) or transposons are mobile segments of DNA that are capable of being excised and moved from one chromosomal location to another by a process known as transposition. This process requires an enzyme called the transposase that performs the excision reaction, recognizes specific target site sequences and then promotes insertion of the TE at the target site (transposition). This study provides new clues towards unraveling the causes behind the preferential affinity of the Hermes transposable element for certain insertion sites compared to other sequences which also contain recognizable target sites. The technique consists of a rapid, simple and reproducible assay that can be used to detect differences in the ability of various oligonucleotides to influence the aggregation of colloidal gold nanoparticles. The aggregation of the gold nanoparticles is monitored through UV-Visible absorption spectroscopy. Single isolated colloidal gold particles have a surface plasmon resonance manifested as a single absorbance peak at approximately 520 nm and aggregated gold complexes develop new red-shifted peaks/shoulders depending on the nature and extent of the aggregated complex. A simple ratiometric study of the area under the single and aggregated plasmon resonance peaks gives information about the extent of the aggregation. It is postulated that differences in dynamic flexibility of the oligonucleotides affect their influence on the aggregation state of the gold nanoparticles. Therefore such differences in dynamic flexibility between various insertion sites could directly or indirectly contribute to the observed target site preferences of the Hermes transposable element.

  2. Validity of Particle-Counting Method Using Laser-Light Scattering for Detecting Platelet Aggregation in Diabetic Patients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakadate, Hiromichi; Sekizuka, Eiichi; Minamitani, Haruyuki

    We aimed to study the validity of a new analytical approach that reflected the phase from platelet activation to the formation of small platelet aggregates. We hoped that this new approach would enable us to use the particle-counting method with laser-light scattering to measure platelet aggregation in healthy controls and in diabetic patients without complications. We measured agonist-induced platelet aggregation for 10 min. Agonist was added to the platelet-rich plasma 1 min after measurement started. We compared the total scattered light intensity from small aggregates over a 10-min period (established analytical approach) and that over a 2-min period from 1 to 3 min after measurement started (new analytical approach). Consequently platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c ≥ 6.5% was significantly greater than in healthy controls by both analytical approaches. However, platelet aggregation in diabetics with HbA1c < 6.5%, i.e. patients in the early stages of diabetes, was significantly greater than in healthy controls only by the new analytical approach, not by the established analytical approach. These results suggest that platelet aggregation as detected by the particle-counting method using laser-light scattering could be applied in clinical examinations by our new analytical approach.

  3. The non-protein amino acid BMAA is misincorporated into human proteins in place of L-serine causing protein misfolding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Dunlop, Rachael Anne; Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne; Rodgers, Kenneth John

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of protein misfolding are of increasing interest in the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein aggregation and tangles including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease (PD), Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Some forms of neurodegenerative illness are associated with mutations in genes which control assembly of disease related proteins. For example, the mouse sticky mutation sti, which results in undetected mischarging of tRNA(Ala) with serine resulting in the substitution of serine for alanine in proteins causes cerebellar Purkinje cell loss and ataxia in laboratory animals. Replacement of serine 422 with glutamic acid in tau increases the propensity of tau aggregation associated with neurodegeneration. However, the possibility that environmental factors can trigger abnormal folding in proteins remains relatively unexplored. We here report that a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), can be misincorporated in place of L-serine into human proteins. We also report that this misincorporation can be inhibited by L-serine. Misincorporation of BMAA into human neuroproteins may shed light on putative associations between human exposure to BMAA produced by cyanobacteria and an increased incidence of ALS.

  4. The Non-Protein Amino Acid BMAA Is Misincorporated into Human Proteins in Place of l-Serine Causing Protein Misfolding and Aggregation

    PubMed Central

    Dunlop, Rachael Anne; Cox, Paul Alan; Banack, Sandra Anne; Rodgers, Kenneth John

    2013-01-01

    Mechanisms of protein misfolding are of increasing interest in the aetiology of neurodegenerative diseases characterized by protein aggregation and tangles including Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS), Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Parkinson’s disease (PD), Lewy Body Dementia (LBD), and Progressive Supranuclear Palsy (PSP). Some forms of neurodegenerative illness are associated with mutations in genes which control assembly of disease related proteins. For example, the mouse sticky mutation sti, which results in undetected mischarging of tRNAAla with serine resulting in the substitution of serine for alanine in proteins causes cerebellar Purkinje cell loss and ataxia in laboratory animals. Replacement of serine 422 with glutamic acid in tau increases the propensity of tau aggregation associated with neurodegeneration. However, the possibility that environmental factors can trigger abnormal folding in proteins remains relatively unexplored. We here report that a non-protein amino acid, β-N-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), can be misincorporated in place of l-serine into human proteins. We also report that this misincorporation can be inhibited by l-serine. Misincorporation of BMAA into human neuroproteins may shed light on putative associations between human exposure to BMAA produced by cyanobacteria and an increased incidence of ALS. PMID:24086518

  5. Nitrosative stress mediated misfolded protein aggregation mitigated by Na-D-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate intervention

    SciTech Connect

    Kabiraj, Parijat; Pal, Rituraj; Varela-Ramirez, Armando; Miranda, Manuel; Narayan, Mahesh

    2012-09-28

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Rotenone is a model for inducing apoptosis and synphilin-1 accumulation in Parkinson Prime s studies. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The metabolite sodium betahydroxybutryate mitigates these effects in SHSY5Y cell lines. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Results reveal a novel and innate mechanism to prevent neurodegeneration/cell death. -- Abstract: Mitochondrial dysfunction, leading to elevated levels of reactive oxygen species, is associated with the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative disorders. Rotenone, a mitochondrial stressor induces caspase-9 and caspase-3 activation leading proteolytic cleavage of substrate nuclear poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP). PARP cleavage is directly related to apoptotic cell death. In this study, we have monitored the aggregation of green-fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged synphilin-1, as a rotenone-induced Parkinsonia-onset biomarker. We report that the innate ketone body, Na-D-{beta}-hydroxybutyrate (Na{beta}HB) reduces markedly the incidence of synphilin-1 aggregation. Furthermore, our data reveal that the metabolic byproduct also prevents rotenone-induced caspase-activated apoptotic cell death in dopaminergic SH-SY5Y cells. Together, these results suggest that Na{beta}HB is neuroprotective; it attenuates effects originating from mitochondrial insult and can serve as a scaffold for the design and development of sporadic neuropathies.

  6. Detection of Functional Modes in Protein Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Hub, Jochen S.; de Groot, Bert L.

    2009-01-01

    Proteins frequently accomplish their biological function by collective atomic motions. Yet the identification of collective motions related to a specific protein function from, e.g., a molecular dynamics trajectory is often non-trivial. Here, we propose a novel technique termed “functional mode analysis” that aims to detect the collective motion that is directly related to a particular protein function. Based on an ensemble of structures, together with an arbitrary “functional quantity” that quantifies the functional state of the protein, the technique detects the collective motion that is maximally correlated to the functional quantity. The functional quantity could, e.g., correspond to a geometric, electrostatic, or chemical observable, or any other variable that is relevant to the function of the protein. In addition, the motion that displays the largest likelihood to induce a substantial change in the functional quantity is estimated from the given protein ensemble. Two different correlation measures are applied: first, the Pearson correlation coefficient that measures linear correlation only; and second, the mutual information that can assess any kind of interdependence. Detecting the maximally correlated motion allows one to derive a model for the functional state in terms of a single collective coordinate. The new approach is illustrated using a number of biomolecules, including a polyalanine-helix, T4 lysozyme, Trp-cage, and leucine-binding protein. PMID:19714202

  7. Changes of protein stiffness during folding detect protein folding intermediates.

    PubMed

    Małek, Katarzyna E; Szoszkiewicz, Robert

    2014-01-01

    Single-molecule force-quench atomic force microscopy (FQ-AFM) is used to detect folding intermediates of a simple protein by detecting changes of molecular stiffness of the protein during its folding process. Those stiffness changes are obtained from shape and peaks of an autocorrelation of fluctuations in end-to-end length of the folding molecule. The results are supported by predictions of the equipartition theorem and agree with existing Langevin dynamics simulations of a simplified model of a protein folding. In the light of the Langevin simulations the experimental data probe an ensemble of random-coiled collapsed states of the protein, which are present both in the force-quench and thermal-quench folding pathways.

  8. Bond slip detection of steel plate and concrete beams using smart aggregates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Feng; Kong, Qingzhao; Li, Mo; Mo, Y. L.; Song, Gangbing; Fan, Feng

    2015-11-01

    The newly emerged steel plate concrete (SC), benefited from a composite effect of steel and concrete materials, has been applied to shield building and internal structures of AP1000 nuclear power plants. The detection of bond-slip between steel plate and concrete is of great importance to provide early warnings of steel plate and concrete debonding and to ensure the safety of SC structures. In this paper, an active sensing approach using smart aggregates (SAs) is developed to detect the initiation and to monitor the development of bond-slip. A SA, designed by sandwiching a fragile piezoceramic patch between protection materials, can be utilized as both actuator and sensor by taking advantage of the piezoelectricity of piezoceramic material. Two SC beams with distinct shear reinforcement ratios ≤ft({ρ }t\\right) were experimentally investigated. Based on the wavelet packet decomposition of the received signals from SAs, the initiation of bond-slip is detected, and the development of bond-slip is quantitatively monitored to better understand the structural performance of SC beams, including the stiffness and capacity. The bond-slip severities of the two SC beams are compared to study the improvement of bond-slip condition rendered by providing more shear reinforcement.

  9. Micro-flow imaging analyses reflect mechanisms of aggregate formation: Comparing protein particle data sets using the Kullback-Leibler divergence.

    PubMed

    Maddux, Nathaniel R; Daniels, Austin L; Randolph, Theodore W

    2017-01-31

    Sub-visible particles in therapeutic protein formulations are an increasing manufacturing and regulatory concern due to their potential to cause adverse immune responses. Flow imaging microscopy is used extensively to detect sub-visible particles and investigate product deviations, typically by comparing imaging data using histograms of particle descriptors. Such an approach discards much information, and requires effort to interpret differences, which is problematic when comparing many data sets. We propose to compare imaging data by using the Kullback-Leibler divergence, an information theoretic measure of the difference of distributions.(1) We use the divergence to generate scatter plots representing the similarity between data sets, and to classify new data into previously determined categories. Our approach is multidimensional, automated and less biased than traditional techniques. We demonstrate the method with FlowCAM® imagery of protein aggregates acquired from monoclonal antibody samples subjected to different stresses. The method succeeds in classifying aggregated samples by stress condition, and, once trained, is able to identify the stress that caused aggregate formation in new samples. In addition to potentially detecting subtle incipient manufacturing faults, the method may have applications to verification of product uniformity after manufacturing changes, identification of counterfeit products, and development of closely matching bio-similar products.

  10. Ageing and protein aggregation-mediated disorders: from invertebrates to mammals.

    PubMed

    Dillin, Andrew; Cohen, Ehud

    2011-01-12

    Late onset is a common hallmark character of numerous disorders including human neurodegenerative maladies such as Huntington's, Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Why these diseases manifest in aged individuals and why distinct disorders share strikingly similar emergence patterns were until recently unsolved enigmas. During the past decade, invertebrate-based studies indicated that the insulin/IGF signalling pathway (IIS) mechanistically links neurodegenerative-associated toxic protein aggregation and ageing; yet, until recently it was unclear whether this link is conserved from invertebrates to mammals. Recent studies performed in Alzheimer's mouse models indicated that ageing alteration by IIS reduction slows the progression of Alzheimer's-like disease, protects the brain and mitigates the behavioural, pathological and biochemical impairments associated with the disease. Here, we review these novel studies and discuss the potential of ageing alteration as a therapeutic approach for the treatment of late onset neurodegeneration.

  11. Kirkwood-Buff theory of molecular and protein association, aggregation, and cellular crowding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, Moon Bae; Smith, Paul E.

    2009-10-01

    An analysis of the effect of a cosolvent on the association of a solute in solution using the Kirkwood-Buff theory of solutions is presented. The approach builds on the previous results of Ben-Naim by extending the range of applicability to include any number of components at finite concentrations in both closed and semiopen systems. The derived expressions, which are exact, provide a foundation for the analysis and rationalization of cosolvent effects on molecular and biomolecular equilibria including protein association, aggregation, and cellular crowding. A slightly different view of cellular crowding is subsequently obtained. In particular, it is observed that the addition of large cosolvents still favors the associated form even when traditional excluded volume effects are absent.

  12. Detection of electrophile-sensitive proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Stephanie B.; Smith, M. Ryan; Ricart, Karina; Zhou, Fen; Vayalil, Praveen K.; Oh, Joo-Yeun; Landar, Aimee

    2013-01-01

    Background Redox signaling is an important emerging mechanism of cellular function. Dysfunctional redox signaling is increasingly implicated in numerous pathologies, including atherosclerosis, diabetes, and cancer. The molecular messengers in this type of signaling are reactive species which can mediate the post-translational modification of specific groups of proteins, thereby effecting functional changes in the modified proteins. Electrophilic compounds comprise one class of reactive species which can participate in redox signaling. Electrophiles modulate cell function via formation of covalent adducts with proteins, particularly cysteine residues. Scope of Review This review will discuss the commonly used methods of detection for electrophile-sensitive proteins, and will highlight the importance of identifying these proteins for studying redox signaling and developing novel therapeutics. Major Conclusions There are several methods which can be used to detect electrophile-sensitive proteins. These include the use of tagged model electrophiles, as well as derivatization of endogenous electrophile-protein adducts. General Significance In order to understand the mechanisms by which electrophiles mediate redox signaling, it is necessary to identify electrophile-sensitive proteins and quantitatively assess adduct formation. Strengths and limitations of these methods will be discussed. PMID:24021887

  13. Generic phosphatase activity detection using zinc mediated aggregation modulation of polypeptide-modified gold nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selegård, Robert; Enander, Karin; Aili, Daniel

    2014-11-01

    A challenge in the design of plasmonic nanoparticle-based colorimetric assays is that the change in colloidal stability, which generates the colorimetric response, is often directly linked to the biomolecular recognition event. New assay strategies are hence required for every type of substrate and enzyme of interest. Here, a generic strategy for monitoring of phosphatase activity is presented where substrate recognition is completely decoupled from the nanoparticle stability modulation mechanism, which enables detection of a wide range of enzymes using different natural substrates with a single simple detection scheme. Phosphatase activity generates inorganic phosphate that forms an insoluble complex with Zn2+. In a sample containing a preset concentration of Zn2+, phosphatase activity will markedly reduce the concentration of dissolved Zn2+ from the original value, which in turn affects the aggregation of gold nanoparticles functionalized with a designed Zn2+ responsive polypeptide. The change in nanoparticle stability thus provides a rapid and sensitive readout of the phosphatase activity. The assay is not limited to a particular enzyme or enzyme substrate, which is demonstrated using three completely different phosphatases and five different substrates, and thus constitutes a highly interesting system for drug screening and diagnostics.A challenge in the design of plasmonic nanoparticle-based colorimetric assays is that the change in colloidal stability, which generates the colorimetric response, is often directly linked to the biomolecular recognition event. New assay strategies are hence required for every type of substrate and enzyme of interest. Here, a generic strategy for monitoring of phosphatase activity is presented where substrate recognition is completely decoupled from the nanoparticle stability modulation mechanism, which enables detection of a wide range of enzymes using different natural substrates with a single simple detection scheme

  14. Detection of Platelet-Monocyte Aggregates by the ADAM® Image Cytometer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Bo Kyeung; Cho, Chi Hyun; Moon, Kyung Chul; sung Hur, Dae; Yoon, Jeong-Ah; Yoon, Soo-Young

    2014-01-01

    Background: Inappropriate platelet activation is known to be associated with various thrombotic disorders. Platelet-monocyte aggregates (PMAs), whose formation is mediated by platelet surface P-selectin (CD62P), can be used as a reliable marker to detect platelet activation. Previous studies have generally detected PMAs through flow cytometry-based approaches. Recently, the ADAM® image cytometer (Nanoentek Inc., Seoul, Korea) was developed for image-based cellular analysis. In this study, we detected PMAs with the ADAM® cytometer, evaluated the reproducibility of the measurements made by the ADAM® cytometer, and compared the abilities of the ADAM® cytometer and a flow cytometric assay to detect PMAs. Methods: Whole blood samples were collected from patients. Within 5 minutes of collection, anticoagulated whole blood samples were fixed in 10% paraformaldehyde and 5% glyoxal. Nineteen clinical specimens were collected; each was analyzed three times with the ADAM® cytometer in order to assess the reproducibility of its measurements. To compare the ability of the ADAM® cytometer with that of a flow cytometer to detect PMAs, each cytometer was used for 23 clinical samples and the correlation of the measurements was determined. Results: The PMA measurements made by the ADAM® cytometer showed good reproducibility (CV < 10% for all specimens). Moreover, the PMA measurements made by the ADAM® cytometer exhibited a high correlation with those made by a flow cytometric assay (R = 0.944). Conclusions: The ADAM® cytometer is a suitable alternative method to the flow cytometry-based assays. Since the ADAM cytometer does not need specialized instrument knowledge or software proficiency (unlike flow cytometry), the ADAM® cytometer can be used as a rapid and reliable POCT device to measure platelet activation in peripheral blood. This, in turn, will provide valuable information regarding patient propensities to thrombotic diseases. PMID:25317068

  15. Theory and practice of size exclusion chromatography for the analysis of protein aggregates.

    PubMed

    Fekete, Szabolcs; Beck, Alain; Veuthey, Jean-Luc; Guillarme, Davy

    2014-12-01

    Size exclusion chromatography (SEC) is a historical technique widely employed for the detailed characterization of therapeutic proteins and can be considered as a reference and powerful technique for the qualitative and quantitative evaluation of aggregates. The main advantage of this approach is the mild mobile phase conditions that permit the characterization of proteins with minimal impact on the conformational structure and local environment. Despite the fact that the chromatographic behavior and peak shape are hardly predictable in SEC, some generic rules can be applied for SEC method development, which are described in this review. During recent years, some improvements were introduced to conventional SEC that will also be discussed. Of these new SEC characteristics, we discuss (i) the commercialization of shorter and narrower columns packed with reduced particle sizes allowing an improvement in the resolution and throughput; (ii) the possibility of combining SEC with various detectors, including refractive index (RI), ultraviolet (UV), multi-angle laser light scattering (MALLS) and viscometer (IV), for extensive characterization of protein samples and (iii) the possibility of hyphenating SEC with mass spectrometry (MS) detectors using an adapted mobile phase containing a small proportion of organic modifiers and ion-pairing reagents.

  16. Two Ser/Thr protein kinases essential for efficient aggregation and spore morphogenesis in Myxococcus xanthus.

    PubMed

    Stein, Emily A; Cho, Kyungyun; Higgs, Penelope I; Zusman, David R

    2006-06-01

    Myxococcus xanthus has a complex life cycle that involves vegetative growth and development. Previously, we described the espAB locus that is involved in timing events during the initial stages of fruiting body formation. Deletion of espA caused early aggregation and sporulation, whereas deletion of espB caused delayed aggregation and sporulation resulting in reduced spore yields. In this study, we describe two genes, pktA5 and pktB8, that flank the espAB locus and encode Ser/Thr protein kinase (STPK) homologues. Cells deficient in pktA5 or pktB8 formed translucent mounds and produced low spore yields, similar in many respects to espB mutants. Double mutant analysis revealed that espA was epistatic to pktA5 and pktB8 with respect to aggregation and fruiting body morphology, but that pktA5 and pktB8 were epistatic to espA with respect to sporulation efficiency. Expression profiles of pktA5-lacZ and pktB8-lacZ fusions and Western blot analysis showed that the STPKs are expressed under vegetative and developmental conditions. In vitro kinase assays demonstrated that the RD kinase, PktA5, autophosphorylated on threonine residue(s) and phosphorylated the artificial substrate, myelin basic protein. In contrast, autophosphorylation of the non-RD kinase, PktB8, was not observed in vitro; however, the phenotype of a pktB8 kinase-dead point mutant resembled the pktB8 deletion mutant, indicating that this residue was important for function and that it likely functions as a kinase in vivo. Immunoprecipitation of Tap-tagged PktA5 and PktB8 revealed an interaction with EspA during development in M. xanthus. These results, taken together, suggest that PktA5 and PktB8 are STPKs that function during development by interacting with EspA and EspB to regulate M. xanthus development.

  17. Fluorescence anisotropy uncovers changes in protein packing with inclusion growth in a cellular model of polyglutamine aggregation.

    PubMed

    Bhardwaj, Vishal; Panicker, Mitradas M; Udgaonkar, Jayant B

    2014-06-10

    The aggregation of polyglutamine-rich proteins is closely linked with numerous neurodegenerative disorders. In pathological and cellular models, the appearance of protein-rich inclusions in cells acts as a read out of protein aggregation. The precise organization of aggregated protein in these inclusions and their mode of growth are still poorly understood. Here, fluorescence anisotropy-based measurements have been used to probe protein packing across inclusions of varying brightness, formed by an monomeric enhanced green fluorescent protein (mEGFP)-tagged polyglutamine model peptide in cells. High-resolution, confocal-based steady-state anisotropy measurements report a large depolarization, consistent with extensive homo-Förster (fluorescence) resonance energy transfer (FRET) between the sequestered mEGFP-tagged protein molecules. An inverse correlation of fluorescence anisotropy with intensity is seen across inclusions, which becomes emphasized when the observed fluorescence anisotropy values of inclusions are corrected for the fluorescence contribution of the diffusible protein, present within and around smaller inclusions. Homo-FRET becomes enhanced as inclusion size increases. This enhancement is confirmed by two-photon excitation-based time-resolved fluorescence anisotropy decay measurements, which also suggest that the mEGFP-tagged protein molecules are arranged in multiple ways within inclusions. Bright inclusions display faster FRET rates with a larger number of mEGFP moieties participating in homo-FRET than faint inclusions do. These results are consistent with a model in which the protein is more closely packed in the brighter inclusions. In such a possible mechanism, the higher packing density of protein molecules in brighter inclusions would suggest that inclusion growth could involve an intermolecular compaction event within the inclusion, as more monomers and aggregates are recruited into the growing inclusion.

  18. Effect of three cations on the stability and microstructure of protein aggregate from duck egg white under alkaline condition.

    PubMed

    Ganasen, P; Benjakul, S

    2011-08-01

    Pidan (alkaline egg) has been consumed widely in oriental countries and lead, a toxic element, has been used traditionally to yield the desirable characteristics. For safety concerns, alternative cations can be used for the production of pidan with comparable properties to traditionally prepared pidan. Turbidity measured as absorbance at 400 nm and microstructure of duck egg white proteins at pH 12 as influenced by three cations at various levels were investigated. Turbidity and particle size of egg white protein (20 g/kg) in 10 g/kg NaCl sample with CaCl2, PbO2 or ZnCl2 added at a level of 1 g/kg increased with time up to 1 h, followed by a decrease (p<0.05). Nevertheless, the turbidity was retained more in samples added with PbO2, suggesting high stability of the aggregate formed. Zeta potential showed that the aggregates treated with PbO2 had a comparatively lower negative charge. Light microscopic studies indicated that the aggregation of egg white proteins was induced by ions but varied with the types of ions and incubation time. Therefore, PbO2 exhibited the highest stabilizing effect on egg white protein under alkaline condition. However, ZnCl2 can be used as an alternative compound even if it had lower impact on stability of aggregate of duck egg white protein.

  19. O-GlcNAc modification blocks the aggregation and toxicity of the protein α-synuclein associated with Parkinson's disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marotta, Nicholas P.; Lin, Yu Hsuan; Lewis, Yuka E.; Ambroso, Mark R.; Zaro, Balyn W.; Roth, Maxwell T.; Arnold, Don B.; Langen, Ralf; Pratt, Matthew R.

    2015-11-01

    Several aggregation-prone proteins associated with neurodegenerative diseases can be modified by O-linked N-acetyl-glucosamine (O-GlcNAc) in vivo. One of these proteins, α-synuclein, is a toxic aggregating protein associated with synucleinopathies, including Parkinson's disease. However, the effect of O-GlcNAcylation on α-synuclein is not clear. Here, we use synthetic protein chemistry to generate both unmodified α-synuclein and α-synuclein bearing a site-specific O-GlcNAc modification at the physiologically relevant threonine residue 72. We show that this single modification has a notable and substoichiometric inhibitory effect on α-synuclein aggregation, while not affecting the membrane binding or bending properties of α-synuclein. O-GlcNAcylation is also shown to affect the phosphorylation of α-synuclein in vitro and block the toxicity of α-synuclein that was exogenously added to cells in culture. These results suggest that increasing O-GlcNAcylation may slow the progression of synucleinopathies and further support a general function for O-GlcNAc in preventing protein aggregation.

  20. Effect of Surface Curvature and Chemistry on Protein Stability, Adsorption and Aggregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishna, Mithun

    Enzyme immobilization has been of great industrial importance because of its use in various applications like bio-fuel cells, bio-sensors, drug delivery and bio-catalytic films. Although research on enzyme immobilization dates back to the 1970's, it has been only in the past decade that scientists have started to address the problems involved systematically. Most of the previous works on enzyme immobilization have been retrospective in nature i.e enzymes were immobilized on widely used substrates without a compatibility study between the enzyme and the substrate. Consequently, most of the enzymes lost their activity upon immobilization onto these substrates due to many governing factors like protein-surface and inter-protein interactions. These interactions also play a major role biologically in cell signaling, cell adhesion and inter-protein interactions specifically is believed to be the major cause for neurodegenerative diseases like Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. Therefore understanding the role of these forces on proteins is the need of the hour. In my current research, I have mainly focused on two factors a) Surface Curvature b) Surface Chemistry as both of these play a pivotal role in influencing the activity of the enzymes upon immobilization. I study the effect of these factors computationally using a stochastic method known as Monte Carlo simulations. My research work carried out in the frame work of a Hydrophobic-Polar (HP) lattice model for the protein shows that immobilizing enzymes inside moderately hydrophilic or hydrophobic pores results in an enhancement of the enzymatic activity compared to that in the bulk. Our results also indicate that there is an optimal value of surface curvature and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity where this enhancement of enzymatic activity is highest. Further, our results also show that immobilization of enzymes inside hydrophobic pores of optimal sizes are most effective in mitigating protein-aggregation. These

  1. Sensitive and selective detection of copper ions based on the aggregation of chitosan-stablized silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Zuo, Ying; Zhao, Hua Wen; Huang, Cheng Zhi; Zhang, Qing

    2011-06-01

    In this contribution, we present a simple and sensitive method for detecting Cu2+ based on the Cu(2+)-induced aggregation of silver nanoparticle (AgNPs) capped with chitosan. Chitosan could be adsorbed on the surface of AgNPs, and keep AgNPs against aggregation. However, in the presence of Cu2+, AgNPs aggregate again, the absorption decreases, and the color changes from yellow to colorless, which is due to the coordination of Cu2+ and chitosan. The depressed intensity (deltaA) is in proportion to the concentration of Cu2+ over the range of 3.33-40.0 microM with the limit of detection (3sigma) of 10.25 nM, the recovery of 92.60-104.20% and R.S.D. of 0.94-4.62%. The advantages of this method are simple, sensitive and low cost.

  2. Microfluidic-based speckle analysis for sensitive measurement of erythrocyte aggregation: A comparison of four methods for detection of elevated erythrocyte aggregation in diabetic rat blood.

    PubMed

    Yeom, Eunseop; Lee, Sang Joon

    2015-03-01

    Biochemical alterations in the plasma and red blood cell (RBC) membrane of diabetic blood lead to excessive erythrocyte aggregation (EA). EA would significantly impede the blood flow and increase the vascular flow resistance contributing to peripheral vascular diseases. In this study, a simple microfluidic-based method is proposed to achieve sensitive detection of hyperaggregation. When a blood sample is delivered into the device, images of blood flows are obtained with a short exposure time for a relatively long measuring time. A micro-particle image velocimetry technique was employed to monitor variation of the flow rate of blood as a function of time. Given that EA formation in the channel creates clear speckle patterns, the EA extent can be estimated by calculating a speckle area (ASpeckle) through a normalized autocovariance function. The hematocrit effect is assessed by comparing optical images transmitted through blood samples. EA variations caused by dextran treatment are quantitatively evaluated using characteristic time (λSpeckle) obtained by fitting the variations of ASpeckle. Other indices including number of RBCs in an aggregate (NRBC), characteristic time of erythrocyte sedimentation rate (λESR), and aggregation index estimated from ultrasound signals (AIEcho) are determined under different EA conditions using conventional techniques. The four different methods are applied to diabetic blood samples to compare their indices under hyperaggregation conditions. It is found that the proposed method can detect variation of EA reasonably, compared with conventional measurement techniques. These experimental demonstrations support the notion that the proposed method is capable of effectively monitoring the biophysical properties of diabetic blood.

  3. Using three-dimensional protein structure to model protein aggregation: Collagen fibrillogenesis in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderson, Darren; Graovac, Ivan; Rainey, Jan; Goh, M. Cynthia

    2004-03-01

    Collagen is the most prevalent protein in mammals. In vitro, it self-assembles into a variety of fibrillar constructs which depend on solution conditions. These assembly processes are still not understood in a thorough manner, in part because of the lack of a three-dimensional structure of the rather large monomer ( 3000 amino acids). Using a statistically-based reduced-rotamer representation alongside a triple-helical backbone parameterization, we have created a 3-D collagen model, and examined the location of charges as a function of pH. Using this representation, we propose a mechanism of assembly that accounts for the morphology (observed using atomic force microscopy) of the most common fibrillar construct. Furthermore, we demonstrate that the experimentally observed effects of pH and ionic strength on the assembly process can be related to the three-dimensional structure of the monomer.

  4. A Fiber Optic Probe for Monitoring Protein Aggregation, Nucleation, and Crystallization

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ansari, Rafat R.; Suh, Kwang I.; Arabshahi, Alireza; Wilson, William W.; Bray, Terry L.; DeLucas, Lawrence J.

    1996-01-01

    Protein crystals are experimentally grown in hanging drops in microgravity experiments on-board the Space Shuttle orbiter. The technique of dynamic light scattering (DLS) can be used to monitor crystal growth process in hanging droplets (approx. 30 (L)) in microgravity experiments, but elaborate instrumentation and optical alignment problems have made in-situ applications difficult. In this paper we demonstrate that such experiments are now feasible. We apply a newly developed fiber optic probe to various earth and space (micro- gravity) bound protein crystallization system configurations to test its capability. These include conventional batch (cuvette or capillary) systems, hanging drop method in a six-pack hanging drop vapor diffusion apparatus (HDVDA), a modified HDVDA for temperature- induced nucleation and aggregation studies, and a newly envisioned dynamically controlled vapor diffusion system (DCVDS) configuration. Our compact system exploits the principles of DLS and offers a fast (within a few seconds) means of quantitatively and non-invasively monitoring the various growth stages of protein crystallization. In addition to DLS capability, the probe can also be used for performing single-angle static light scattering measurements. It utilizes extremely low levels of laser power (approx. few (W)) without a need of having any optical alignment and vibration isolation. The compact probe is also equipped with a miniaturized microscope for visualization of macroscopic protein crystals. This new optical diagnostic system opens up enormous opportunity for exploring new ways to grow good quality crystals suitable for x-ray crystallographic analysis and may help develop a concrete scientific basis for understanding the process of crystallization.

  5. SERS detection of Biomolecules at Physiological pH via aggregation of Gold Nanorods mediated by Optical Forces and Plasmonic Heating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fazio, Barbara; D'Andrea, Cristiano; Foti, Antonino; Messina, Elena; Irrera, Alessia; Donato, Maria Grazia; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto; Maragò, Onofrio M.; Gucciardi, Pietro G.

    2016-06-01

    Strategies for in-liquid molecular detection via Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) are currently based on chemically-driven aggregation or optical trapping of metal nanoparticles in presence of the target molecules. Such strategies allow the formation of SERS-active clusters that efficiently embed the molecule at the “hot spots” of the nanoparticles and enhance its Raman scattering by orders of magnitude. Here we report on a novel scheme that exploits the radiation pressure to locally push gold nanorods and induce their aggregation in buffered solutions of biomolecules, achieving biomolecular SERS detection at almost neutral pH. The sensor is applied to detect non-resonant amino acids and proteins, namely Phenylalanine (Phe), Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and Lysozyme (Lys), reaching detection limits in the μg/mL range. Being a chemical free and contactless technique, our methodology is easy to implement, fast to operate, needs small sample volumes and has potential for integration in microfluidic circuits for biomarkers detection.

  6. SERS detection of Biomolecules at Physiological pH via aggregation of Gold Nanorods mediated by Optical Forces and Plasmonic Heating

    PubMed Central

    Fazio, Barbara; D’Andrea, Cristiano; Foti, Antonino; Messina, Elena; Irrera, Alessia; Donato, Maria Grazia; Villari, Valentina; Micali, Norberto; Maragò, Onofrio M.; Gucciardi, Pietro G.

    2016-01-01

    Strategies for in-liquid molecular detection via Surface Enhanced Raman Scattering (SERS) are currently based on chemically-driven aggregation or optical trapping of metal nanoparticles in presence of the target molecules. Such strategies allow the formation of SERS-active clusters that efficiently embed the molecule at the “hot spots” of the nanoparticles and enhance its Raman scattering by orders of magnitude. Here we report on a novel scheme that exploits the radiation pressure to locally push gold nanorods and induce their aggregation in buffered solutions of biomolecules, achieving biomolecular SERS detection at almost neutral pH. The sensor is applied to detect non-resonant amino acids and proteins, namely Phenylalanine (Phe), Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA) and Lysozyme (Lys), reaching detection limits in the μg/mL range. Being a chemical free and contactless technique, our methodology is easy to implement, fast to operate, needs small sample volumes and has potential for integration in microfluidic circuits for biomarkers detection. PMID:27246267

  7. Energy efficient data representation and aggregation with event region detection in wireless sensor networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Torsha

    Detection (PERD) for WSNs. When a single event occurs, a child of the tree sends a Flagged Polynomial (FP) to its parent, if the readings approximated by it falls outside the data range defining the existing phenomenon. After the aggregation process is over, the root having the two polynomials, P and FP can be queried for FP (approximating the new event region) instead of flooding the whole network. For multiple such events, instead of computing a polynomial corresponding to each new event, areas with same data range are combined by the corresponding tree nodes and the aggregated coefficients are passed on. Results reveal that a new event can be detected by PERD while error in detection remains constant and is less than a threshold of 10%. As the node density increases, accuracy and delay for event detection are found to remain almost constant, making PERD highly scalable. Whenever an event occurs in a WSN, data is generated by closeby sensors and relaying the data to the base station (BS) make sensors closer to the BS run out of energy at a much faster rate than sensors in other parts of the network. This gives rise to an unequal distribution of residual energy in the network and makes those sensors with lower remaining energy level die at much faster rate than others. We propose a scheme for enhancing network Lifetime using mobile cluster heads (CH) in a WSN. To maintain remaining energy more evenly, some energy-rich nodes are designated as CHs which move in a controlled manner towards sensors rich in energy and data. This eliminates multihop transmission required by the static sensors and thus increases the overall lifetime of the WSN. We combine the idea of clustering and mobile CH to first form clusters of static sensor nodes. A collaborative strategy among the CHs further increases the lifetime of the network. Time taken for transmitting data to the BS is reduced further by making the CHs follow a connectivity strategy that always maintain a connected path to the BS

  8. Developmentally Regulated RNA-binding Protein 1 (Drb1)/RNA-binding Motif Protein 45 (RBM45), a Nuclear-Cytoplasmic Trafficking Protein, Forms TAR DNA-binding Protein 43 (TDP-43)-mediated Cytoplasmic Aggregates.

    PubMed

    Mashiko, Takafumi; Sakashita, Eiji; Kasashima, Katsumi; Tominaga, Kaoru; Kuroiwa, Kenji; Nozaki, Yasuyuki; Matsuura, Tohru; Hamamoto, Toshiro; Endo, Hitoshi

    2016-07-15

    Cytoplasmic protein aggregates are one of the pathological hallmarks of neurodegenerative disorders, including amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Several RNA-binding proteins have been identified as components of inclusion bodies. Developmentally regulated RNA-binding protein 1 (Drb1)/RNA-binding motif protein 45 is an RNA-binding protein that was recently described as a component in ALS- and FTLD-related inclusion bodies. However, the molecular mechanism underlying cytoplasmic Drb1 aggregation remains unclear. Here, using an in vitro cellular model, we demonstrated that Drb1 co-localizes with cytoplasmic aggregates mediated by TAR DNA-binding protein 43, a major component of ALS and FTLD-related inclusion bodies. We also defined the domains involved in the subcellular localization of Drb1 to clarify the role of Drb1 in the formation of cytoplasmic aggregates in ALS and FTLD. Drb1 predominantly localized in the nucleus via a classical nuclear localization signal in its carboxyl terminus and is a shuttling protein between the nucleus and cytoplasm. Furthermore, we identify a double leucine motif serving as a nuclear export signal. The Drb1 mutant, presenting mutations in both nuclear localization signal and nuclear export signal, is prone to aggregate in the cytoplasm. The mutant Drb1-induced cytoplasmic aggregates not only recruit TAR DNA-binding protein 43 but also decrease the mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, these results indicate that perturbation of Drb1 nuclear-cytoplasmic trafficking induces toxic cytoplasmic aggregates, suggesting that mislocalization of Drb1 is involved in the cause of cytotoxicity in neuronal cells.

  9. Evaluating the inter and intra batch variability of protein aggregation behaviour using Taylor dispersion analysis and dynamic light scattering.

    PubMed

    Hulse, Wendy L; Gray, Jason; Forbes, Robert T

    2013-09-10

    Biosimilar pharmaceuticals are complex biological molecules that have similar physicochemical properties to the originator therapeutic protein. They are produced by complex multi-stage processes and are not truly equivalent. Therefore, for a biosimilar to be approved for market it is important to demonstrate that the biological product is highly similar to a reference product. This includes its primary and higher order structures and its aggregation behaviour. Representative lots of both the proposed biosimilar and the reference product are analysed to understand the lot-to-lot variability of both drug substances in the manufacturing processes. Whilst it is not easy to characterise every variation of a protein structure at present additional analytical technologies need to be utilised to ensure the safety and efficacy of any potential biosimilar product. We have explored the use of Taylor dispersion analysis (TDA) to analyse such batch to batch variations in the model protein, bovine serum albumin (BSA) and compared the results to that obtained by conventional dynamic light scattering analysis (DLS). Inter and intra batch differences were evident in all grades of BSA analysed. However, the reproducibility of the TDA measurements, enabled the stability and reversibility of BSA aggregates to be more readily monitored. This demonstrates that Taylor dispersion analysis is a very sensitive technique to study higher order protein states and aggregation. The results, here, also indicate a correlation between protein purity and the physical behaviour of the samples after heat shocking. Here, the protein with the highest quoted purity resulted in a reduced increase in the measured hydrodynamic radius after heat stressing, indicating that less unfolding/aggregation had occurred. Whilst DLS was also able to observe the presence of aggregates, its bias towards larger aggregates indicated a much larger increase in hydrodynamic radii and is less sensitive to small changes in

  10. Detection of soil microarthropod aggregations in soybean fields, using a modified tullgren extractor

    SciTech Connect

    Farrar, F.P. Jr.; Crossley, D.A. Jr.

    1983-01-01

    The spatial distribution of soil microarthropods in soybean fields was investigated by use of a modified Tullgren extractor. Blocks of soil were extracted over a grid of collection cells from which microarthropod aggregations could be identified and measured. Aggregations in conventionally tilled soybeans were smaller than those in no tillage soybeans, and had less influence on population distributions. Population size was highly correlated with the area of soil microarthropod aggregations. 10 references, 5 figures, 3 tables.

  11. Aggregation of scaffolding protein DISC1 dysregulates phosphodiesterase 4 in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Motomasa; Ishizuka, Koko; Nekooki-Machida, Yoko; Endo, Ryo; Takashima, Noriko; Sasaki, Hideyuki; Komi, Yusuke; Gathercole, Amy; Huston, Elaine; Ishii, Kazuhiro; Hui, Kelvin Kai-Wan; Kurosawa, Masaru; Kim, Sun-Hong; Nukina, Nobuyuki; Takimoto, Eiki; Houslay, Miles D; Sawa, Akira

    2017-04-03

    Huntington's disease (HD) is a polyglutamine (polyQ) disease caused by aberrant expansion of the polyQ tract in Huntingtin (HTT). While motor impairment mediated by polyQ-expanded HTT has been intensively studied, molecular mechanisms for nonmotor symptoms in HD, such as psychiatric manifestations, remain elusive. Here we have demonstrated that HTT forms a ternary protein complex with the scaffolding protein DISC1 and cAMP-degrading phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) to regulate PDE4 activity. We observed pathological cross-seeding between DISC1 and mutant HTT aggregates in the brains of HD patients as well as in a murine model that recapitulates the polyQ pathology of HD (R6/2 mice). In R6/2 mice, consequent reductions in soluble DISC1 led to dysregulation of DISC1-PDE4 complexes, aberrantly increasing the activity of PDE4. Importantly, exogenous expression of a modified DISC1, which binds to PDE4 but not mutant HTT, normalized PDE4 activity and ameliorated anhedonia in the R6/2 mice. We propose that cross-seeding of mutant HTT and DISC1 and the resultant changes in PDE4 activity may underlie the pathology of a specific subset of mental manifestations of HD, which may provide an insight into molecular signaling in mental illness in general.

  12. Pharmacological chaperone reshapes the energy landscape for folding and aggregation of the prion protein

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Amar Nath; Neupane, Krishna; Rezajooei, Negar; Cortez, Leonardo M.; Sim, Valerie L.; Woodside, Michael T.

    2016-06-01

    The development of small-molecule pharmacological chaperones as therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases has proven challenging, partly because their mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we study Fe-TMPyP, a tetrapyrrole that binds to the prion protein PrP and inhibits misfolding, examining its effects on PrP folding at the single-molecule level with force spectroscopy. Single PrP molecules are unfolded with and without Fe-TMPyP present using optical tweezers. Ligand binding to the native structure increases the unfolding force significantly and alters the transition state for unfolding, making it more brittle and raising the barrier height. Fe-TMPyP also binds the unfolded state, delaying native refolding. Furthermore, Fe-TMPyP binding blocks the formation of a stable misfolded dimer by interfering with intermolecular interactions, acting in a similar manner to some molecular chaperones. The ligand thus promotes native folding by stabilizing the native state while also suppressing interactions driving aggregation.

  13. Acupuncture promotes mTOR-independent autophagic clearance of aggregation-prone proteins in mouse brain.

    PubMed

    Tian, Tian; Sun, Yanhong; Wu, Huangan; Pei, Jian; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Yi; Wang, Lu; Li, Bin; Wang, Lihua; Shi, Jiye; Hu, Jun; Fan, Chunhai

    2016-01-21

    Acupuncture has historically been practiced to treat medical disorders by mechanically stimulating specific acupoints with fine needles. Despite its well-documented efficacy, its biological basis remains largely elusive. In this study, we found that mechanical stimulation at the acupoint of Yanglingquan (GB34) promoted the autophagic clearance of α-synuclein (α-syn), a well known aggregation-prone protein closely related to Parkinson's disease (PD), in the substantia nigra par compacta (SNpc) of the brain in a PD mouse model. We found the protein clearance arose from the activation of the autophagy-lysosome pathway (ALP) in a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-independent approach. Further, we observed the recovery in the activity of dopaminergic neurons in SNpc, and improvement in the motor function at the behavior level of PD mice. Whereas acupuncture and rapamycin, a chemical mTOR inhibitor, show comparable α-syn clearance and therapeutic effects in the PD mouse model, the latter adopts a distinctly different, mTOR-dependent, autophagy induction process. Due to this fundamental difference, acupuncture may circumvent adverse effects of the rapamycin treatment. The newly discovered connection between acupuncture and autophagy not only provides a new route to understanding the molecular mechanism of acupuncture but also sheds new light on cost-effective and safe therapy of neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Pharmacological chaperone reshapes the energy landscape for folding and aggregation of the prion protein

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Amar Nath; Neupane, Krishna; Rezajooei, Negar; Cortez, Leonardo M.; Sim, Valerie L.; Woodside, Michael T.

    2016-01-01

    The development of small-molecule pharmacological chaperones as therapeutics for protein misfolding diseases has proven challenging, partly because their mechanism of action remains unclear. Here we study Fe-TMPyP, a tetrapyrrole that binds to the prion protein PrP and inhibits misfolding, examining its effects on PrP folding at the single-molecule level with force spectroscopy. Single PrP molecules are unfolded with and without Fe-TMPyP present using optical tweezers. Ligand binding to the native structure increases the unfolding force significantly and alters the transition state for unfolding, making it more brittle and raising the barrier height. Fe-TMPyP also binds the unfolded state, delaying native refolding. Furthermore, Fe-TMPyP binding blocks the formation of a stable misfolded dimer by interfering with intermolecular interactions, acting in a similar manner to some molecular chaperones. The ligand thus promotes native folding by stabilizing the native state while also suppressing interactions driving aggregation. PMID:27346148

  15. Nanoscale understanding of thermal aggregation of whey protein pretreated by transglutaminase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wan; Zhong, Qixin; Hu, Zhixiong

    2013-01-16

    Nanoscale structures of whey protein isolate (WPI) pretreated by microbial transglutaminase (mTGase) and subsequent heating were studied in this work and were correlated to zeta-potential, surface hydrophobicity, thermal denaturation properties, and macroscopic turbidity and viscosity. Dispersions of 5% w/v WPI were pretreated by individual or sequential steps of preheating at 80 °C for 15 min and mTGase, used at 2.0-10.2 U/g WPI for 1-15 h, before adjustment of the pH to 7.0 and to 0-100 mM NaCl for heating at 80 °C for 15 and 90 min. The zeta potential and surface hydrophobicity of WPI increased after all pretreatment steps. Preheating increased cross-linking reactivity of WPI by mTGase, corresponding to significantly increased denaturation temperature. Particle size analysis and atomic force microscopy revealed that structures of sequentially pretreated WPI remained stable after heating at 100 mM NaCl, corresponding to transparent dispersions. Conversely, WPI pretreated by one step aggregated at only 100 mM NaCl and resulted in turbid dispersions. Besides reporting a practical approach to produce transparent beverages, nanoscale phenomena in the present study are important for understanding whey protein structures in relevant applications.

  16. Effect of cysteine on lowering protein aggregation and subsequent hardening of whey protein isolate (WPI) protein bars in WPI/buffer model systems.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Dan; Labuza, Theodore P

    2010-07-14

    Whey protein isolate (WPI) bar hardening without and with cysteine (Cys) or N-ethylmaleimide (NEM) was investigated in model systems (WPI/buffer = 6:4, by weight, pH 6.8, a(w) approximately 0.97) in an accelerated shelf-life test (ASLT) at 45 degrees C over a period of up to 35 days. The formation of insoluble aggregates as determined by solubility and the structural rearrangement of WPI protein aggregates as observed by SEM were responsible for the WPI bars' hardening. As corroborated by electrophoresis analysis, both beta-lactoglobulin (beta-lg) and alpha-lactalbumin (alpha-la) were involved in the formation of aggregates via the thiol-disulfide interchange reaction and/or noncovalent interactions. The former force dominated the bar hardening at an earlier stage, whereas the latter force played a role for the long-term hardening. In comparison with the control bar without Cys, the thiol-disulfide interchange reaction was significantly reduced by Cys (WPI/Cys = 0.05), increased by Cys (WPI/Cys = 0.25), and inhibited by NEM (WPI/NEM = 2). Therefore, bar hardening was significantly delayed by Cys (WPI/Cys = 0.05) and NEM but accelerated by Cys (WPI/Cys = 0.25).

  17. Perturbed Amelogenin Secondary Structure Leads to Uncontrolled Aggregation in Amelogenesis Imperfecta Mutant Proteins*

    PubMed Central

    Lakshminarayanan, Rajamani; Bromley, Keith M.; Lei, Ya-Ping; Snead, Malcolm L.; Moradian-Oldak, Janet

    2010-01-01

    Mutations in amelogenin sequence result in defective enamel, and the diverse group of genetically altered conditions is collectively known as amelogenesis imperfecta (AI). Despite numerous studies, the detailed molecular mechanism of defective enamel formation is still unknown. In this study, we have examined the biophysical properties of a recombinant murine amelogenin (rM180) and two point mutations identified from human DNA sequences in two cases of AI (T21I and P41T). At pH 5.8 and 25 °C, wild type (WT) rM180 and mutant P41T existed as monomers, and mutant T21I formed lower order oligomers. CD, dynamic light scattering, and fluorescence studies indicated that rM180 and P41T can be classified as a premolten globule-like subclass protein at 25 °C. Thermal denaturation and refolding monitored by CD ellipticity at 224 nm indicated the presence of a strong hysteresis in mutants compared with WT. Variable temperature tryptophan fluorescence and dynamic light scattering studies showed that WT transformed to a partially folded conformation upon heating and remained stable. The partially folded conformation formed by P41T, however, readily converted into a heterogeneous population of aggregates. T21I existed in an oligomeric state at room temperature and, upon heating, rapidly formed large aggregates over a very narrow temperature range. Thermal denaturation and refolding studies indicated that the mutants are less stable and exhibit poor refolding ability compared with WT rM180. Our results suggest that alterations in self-assembly of amelogenin are a consequence of destabilization of the intrinsic disorder. Therefore, we propose that, like a number of other human diseases, AI appears to be due to the destabilization of the secondary structure as a result of amelogenin mutations. PMID:20929860

  18. TDP-43 aggregation mirrors TDP-43 knockdown, affecting the expression levels of a common set of proteins

    PubMed Central

    Prpar Mihevc, S.; Baralle, Marco; Buratti, Emanuele; Rogelj, Boris

    2016-01-01

    TDP-43 protein plays an important role in regulating transcriptional repression, RNA metabolism, and splicing. Typically it shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm to perform its functions, while abnormal cytoplasmic aggregation of TDP-43 has been associated with neurodegenerative diseases amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). For the purpose of this study we selected a set of proteins that were misregulated following silencing of TDP-43 and analysed their expression in a TDP-43-aggregation model cell line HEK293 Flp-in Flag-TDP-43-12x-Q/N F4L. Following TDP-43 sequestration in insoluble aggregates, we observed higher nuclear levels of EIF4A3, and POLDIP3β, whereas nuclear levels of DNMT3A, HNRNPA3, PABPC1 and POLDIP3α dropped, and cytoplasmic levels of RANBP1 dropped. In addition, immunofluorescence signal intensity quantifications showed increased nuclear expression of HNRNPL and YARS, and downregulation of cytoplasmic DPCD. Furthermore, cytoplasmic levels of predominantly nuclear protein ALYREF increased. In conclusion, by identifying a common set of proteins that are differentially expressed in a similar manner in these two different conditions, we show that TDP-43 aggregation has a comparable effect to TDP-43 knockdown. PMID:27665936

  19. Protein aggregation with poly(vinyl) alcohol surfactant reduces double emulsion-encapsulated mammalian cell-free expression

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Kenneth K. Y.; Lee, Jin Woo; Durand, Grégory; Majumder, Sagardip

    2017-01-01

    Development of artificial cell models requires encapsulation of biomolecules within membrane-bound compartments. There have been limited studies of using mammalian cell-free expression (CFE) system as the ‘cytosol’ of artificial cells. We exploit glass capillary droplet microfluidics for the encapsulation of mammalian CFE within double emulsion templated vesicles. The complexity of the physicochemical properties of HeLa cell-free lysate poses a challenge compared with encapsulating simple buffer solutions. In particular, we discovered the formation of aggregates in double emulsion templated vesicles encapsulating mammalian HeLa CFE, but not with bacterial CFE. The aggregates did not arise from insolubility of the proteins made from CFE nor due to the interaction of mammalian CFE with the organic solvents in the middle phase of the double emulsions. We found that aggregation is dependent on the concentration of poly(vinyl) alcohol (PVA) surfactant, a critical double emulsion-stabilizing surfactant, and the lysate concentration in mammalian CFE. Despite vesicle instability and reduced protein expression, we demonstrate protein expression by encapsulating mammalian CFE system. Using mass spectrometry and Western blot, we identified and verified that actin is one of the proteins inside the mammalian CFE that aggregated with PVA surfactant. Our work establishes a baseline description of mammalian CFE system encapsulated in double emulsion templated vesicles as a platform for building artificial cells. PMID:28358875

  20. Formation of nucleoplasmic protein aggregates impairs nuclear function in response to SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles

    SciTech Connect

    Chen Min; Mikecz, Anna von . E-mail: mikecz@uni-duesseldorf.de

    2005-04-15

    Despite of their exponentially growing use, little is known about cell biological effects of nanoparticles. Here, we report uptake of silica (SiO{sub 2}) nanoparticles to the cell nucleus where they induce aberrant clusters of topoisomerase I (topo I) in the nucleoplasm that additionally contain signature proteins of nuclear domains, and protein aggregation such as ubiquitin, proteasomes, cellular glutamine repeat (polyQ) proteins, and huntingtin. Formation of intranuclear protein aggregates (1) inhibits replication, transcription, and cell proliferation; (2) does not significantly alter proteasomal activity or cell viability; and (3) is reversible by Congo red and trehalose. Since SiO{sub 2} nanoparticles trigger a subnuclear pathology resembling the one occurring in expanded polyglutamine neurodegenerative disorders, we suggest that integrity of the functional architecture of the cell nucleus should be used as a read out for cytotoxicity and considered in the development of safe nanotechnology.

  1. Detection of Prion Protein Particles in Blood Plasma of Scrapie Infected Sheep

    PubMed Central

    Reinartz, Elke; Jaeger, Karl-Erich; Langeveld, Jan P. M.; Rohwer, Robert G.; Gregori, Luisa; Terry, Linda A.; Willbold, Dieter; Riesner, Detlev

    2012-01-01

    Prion diseases are transmissible neurodegenerative diseases affecting humans and animals. The agent of the disease is the prion consisting mainly, if not solely, of a misfolded and aggregated isoform of the host-encoded prion protein (PrP). Transmission of prions can occur naturally but also accidentally, e.g. by blood transfusion, which has raised serious concerns about blood product safety and emphasized the need for a reliable diagnostic test. In this report we present a method based on surface-FIDA (fluorescence intensity distribution analysis), that exploits the high state of molecular aggregation of PrP as an unequivocal diagnostic marker of the disease, and show that it can detect infection in blood. To prepare PrP aggregates from blood plasma we introduced a detergent and lipase treatment to separate PrP from blood lipophilic components. Prion protein aggregates were subsequently precipitated by phosphotungstic acid, immobilized on a glass surface by covalently bound capture antibodies, and finally labeled with fluorescent antibody probes. Individual PrP aggregates were visualized by laser scanning microscopy where signal intensity was proportional to aggregate size. After signal processing to remove the background from low fluorescence particles, fluorescence intensities of all remaining PrP particles were summed. We detected PrP aggregates in plasma samples from six out of ten scrapie-positive sheep with no false positives from uninfected sheep. Applying simultaneous intensity and size discrimination, ten out of ten samples from scrapie sheep could be differentiated from uninfected sheep. The implications for ante mortem diagnosis of prion diseases are discussed. PMID:22567169

  2. Rescue of αB Crystallin (HSPB5) Mutants Associated Protein Aggregation by Co-Expression of HSPB5 Partners.

    PubMed

    Hussein, Rasha M; Benjamin, Ivor J; Kampinga, Harm H

    2015-01-01

    HSPB5 (also called αB-crystallin) is a ubiquitously expressed small heat shock protein. Mutations in HSPB5 have been found to cause cataract, but are also associated with a subgroup of myofibrillar myopathies. Cells expressing each of these HSPB5 mutants are characterized by the appearance of protein aggregates of primarily the mutant HSPB5. Like several members of the HSPB family, HSPB5 can form both homo-oligomeric and hetero-oligomeric complexes. Previous studies showed that co-expression of HSPB1 and HSPB8 can prevent the aggregation associated with the HSPB5 (R120G) mutant in cardiomyocytes and in transgenic mice. In this study, we systematically compared the effect of co-expression of each of the members of the human HSPB family (HSPB1-10) on the aggregation of three different HSPB5 mutants (R120G, 450 Δ A, 464 Δ CT). Of all members, co-expression of HSPB1, HSPB4 and HSPB5 itself, most effectively prevent the aggregation of these 3 HSPB5 mutants. HSPB6 and HSPB8 were also active but less, whilst the other 5 HSPB members were ineffective. Co-expression of Hsp70 did not reduce the aggregation of the HSPB5 mutants, suggesting that aggregate formation is most likely not related to a toxic gain of function of the mutants per se, but rather related to a loss of chaperone function of the oligomeric complexes containing the HSPB5 mutants (dominant negative effects). Our data suggest that the rescue of aggregation associated with the HSPB5 mutants is due to competitive incorporation of its partners into hetero-oligomers hereby negating the dominant negative effects of the mutant on the functioning of the hetero-oligomer.

  3. Highly sensitive dual-mode fluorescence detection of lead ion in water using aggregation-induced emissive polymers.

    PubMed

    Saha, Sukanta Kumar; Ghosh, Khama Rani; Gao, Jian Ping; Wang, Zhi Yuan

    2014-09-01

    A series of fluorene-based conjugated polymers containing the aggregation-induced emissive (AIE)-active tetraphenylethene and dicarboxylate pseudocrown as a receptor exhibits a unique dual-mode sensing ability for selective detection of lead ion in water. Fluorescence turn-off and turn-on detections are realized in 80%-90% and 20% water in tetrahydrofuran (THF), respectively, for lead ion with a concentration as low as 10(-8) m.

  4. Sugar-coated proteins: the importance of degree of polymerisation of oligo-galacturonic acid on protein binding and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Amy Y; Melton, Laurence D; Ryan, Timothy M; Mata, Jitendra P; Jameson, Geoffrey B; Rekas, Agata; Williams, Martin A K; McGillivray, Duncan J

    2017-04-05

    We have simplified the structural heterogeneity of protein-polysaccharide binding by investigating protein binding to oligosaccharides. The interactions between bovine beta-lactoglobulin A (βLgA) and oligo-galacturonic acids (OGAs) with various numbers of sugar residues have been investigated with a range of biophysical techniques. We show that the βLgA-OGA interaction is critically dependent on the length of the oligosaccharide. Isothermal titration calorimetry results suggest that a minimum length of 7 or 8 sugar residues is required in order to exhibit appreciable exothermic interactions with βLgA - shorter oligosaccharides show no enthalpic interactions at any concentration ratio. When titrating βLgA into OGAs with more than 7-8 sugar residues the sample solution also became turbid with increasing amounts of βLgA, indicating the formation of macroscopic assemblies. Circular dichroism, thioflavin T fluorescence and small angle X-ray/neutron scattering experiments revealed two structural regimes during the titration. When OGAs were in excess, βLgA formed discrete assemblies upon OGA binding, and no subsequent aggregation was observed. However, when βLgA was present in excess, multi-scale structures were formed and this eventually led to the separation of the solution into two liquid-phases.

  5. Kinesin-1 inhibits the aggregation of amyloid-β peptide as detected by fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Yanpeng; Tian, Shijun; Peng, Xianglei; Yang, Jingfa; Fu, Yuanhui; Jiao, Yueying; Zhao, Jiang; He, Jinsheng; Hong, Tao

    2016-04-01

    Although the exact etiology and pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) are still unclear, amyloid-β (Aβ) generated by the proteolytic processing of amyloid-β precursor protein (APP) aggregate to form toxic amyloid species. Kinesin-1 is the first identified ATP-dependent axonal transport motor protein that has been proven to affect Aβ generation and deposition. In this paper, we applied dual-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (DC-FCCS) to investigate the direct interaction of Aβ with kinesin-1 at the single-molecule fluorescence level in vitro. The results showed that two kinds of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-tagged kinesin light-chain subunits of kinesin-1(KLCs), KLC-E and E-KLC inhibited the aggregation of Aβ over a period of time, providing additional insight into the mechanism of axonal transport deficits in AD.

  6. Protein quantitation by complexation of fluorescent tetraphenylthiophene cation to anion-terminated poly(N-isopropylacrylamide): aggregation-enhanced emission and electrostatic interaction.

    PubMed

    Deng, Shiang-Lin; Hsiao, Tai-Shen; Shih, Ke-Ying; Hong, Jin-Long

    2014-09-05

    A fluorescent biological sensor utilizing aggregation-enhanced emission (AEE) property was developed in our laboratory. First, the AEE-active fluorescent tetraphenylthiophene (TP) unit was synthetically connected to poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) by covalent and ionic bonds, resulting in the respective c- and i-TP-PNIPAM for the detection and quantification of the bovine serum albumin (BSA) model protein. When bind to BSA, the ionic i-TP-PNIPAM shows much better fluorescence (FL) sensitivity compared to c-PNIPAM. The fluorescence (FL) intensity of i-TP-PNIAPM displays a good linear dependence on concentration of BSA (0-1 mg/mL), indicating quantitative fluorimetric protein detection can be achieved. Further addition of anionic surfactant of sodium dodecylsulfate (SDS) considerably raised the FL intensity of the complex solution. All the FL response was discussed in term of conformational freedom of the TP unit under different environmental constraints.

  7. Rapid detection of Clostridium difficile via magnetic bead aggregation in cost-effective polyester microdevices with cell phone image analysis.

    PubMed

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Cabaniss, Scott T; Angotti, Morgan L; Moore, John H; Abhyankar, Mayuresh; Shukla, Nishant; Mills, Daniel L; Kessel, Bryan G; Garner, Gavin T; Swami, Nathan S; Landers, James P

    2016-10-07

    Pathogen detection has traditionally been accomplished by utilizing methods such as cell culture, immunoassays, and nucleic acid amplification tests; however, these methods are not easily implemented in resource-limited settings because special equipment for detection and thermal cycling is often required. In this study, we present a magnetic bead aggregation assay coupled to an inexpensive microfluidic fabrication technique that allows for cell phone detection and analysis of a notable pathogen in less than one hour. Detection is achieved through the use of a custom-built system that allows for fluid flow control via centrifugal force, as well as manipulation of magnetic beads with an adjustable rotating magnetic field. Cell phone image capture and analysis is housed in a 3D-printed case with LED backlighting and a lid-mounted Android phone. A custom-written application (app.) is employed to interrogate images for the extent of aggregation present following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) coupled to product-inhibited bead aggregation (PiBA) for detection of target sequences. Clostridium difficile is a pathogen of increasing interest due to its causative role in intestinal infections following antibiotic treatment, and was therefore chosen as the pathogen of interest in the present study to demonstrate the rapid, cost-effective, and sequence-specific detection capabilities of the microfluidic platform described herein.

  8. Kinetics of inclusion body formation and its correlation with the characteristics of protein aggregates in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Upadhyay, Arun K; Murmu, Aruna; Singh, Anupam; Panda, Amulya K

    2012-01-01

    The objective of the research was to understand the structural determinants governing protein aggregation into inclusion bodies during expression of recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli. Recombinant human growth hormone (hGH) and asparaginase were expressed as inclusion bodies in E.coli and the kinetics of aggregate formation was analyzed in details. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were of smaller size (200 nm) and the size of the aggregates did not increase with induction time. In contrast, the seeding and growth behavior of hGH inclusion bodies were found to be sequential, kinetically stable and the aggregate size increased from 200 to 800 nm with induction time. Human growth hormone inclusion bodies showed higher resistance to denaturants and proteinase K degradation in comparison to those of asparaginase inclusion bodies. Asparaginase inclusion bodies were completely solubilized at 2-3 M urea concentration and could be refolded into active protein, whereas 7 M urea was required for complete solubilization of hGH inclusion bodies. Both hGH and asparaginase inclusion bodies showed binding with amyloid specific dyes. In spite of its low β-sheet content, binding with dyes was more prominent in case of hGH inclusion bodies than that of asparaginase. Arrangements of protein molecules present in the surface as well as in the core of inclusion bodies were similar. Hydrophobic interactions between partially folded amphiphillic and hydrophobic alpha-helices were found to be one of the main determinants of hGH inclusion body formation. Aggregation behavior of the protein molecules decides the nature and properties of inclusion bodies.

  9. Protein aggregation as a possible cause for pathology in a subset of familial Unverricht-Lundborg disease.

    PubMed

    Ceru, Slavko; Rabzelj, Sabina; Kopitar-Jerala, Natasa; Turk, Vito; Zerovnik, Eva

    2005-01-01

    Loss of function mutations in the gene (CSTB) encoding human cystatin B, a widely expressed cysteine protease inhibitor, are responsible for a severe neurological disorder known as an Unverricht-Lundborg disease (EPM1). EPM1 had been linked to chromosome 21q22.3 in Finnish families and it is an autosomal recessive inherited disorder with a homozygous minisatellite expansion in the cystatin B gene (stefin B gene). This disease is difficult to treat because it is refractory to most antiepileptic drugs and using multiple medications had been unsuccessful so far. To come a step closer to understanding of the nature of this disease, especially about the events on the molecular level, in vitro properties of missense EPM1 mutant G4R were determined. It was observed that the mutant has a prolonged lag phase of fibrillation at the same protein stability, which could indicate it were more toxic to the cells. Similar experiments with the N-terminal fragment of 67 aminoacid residues are ongoing, showing higher propensity to aggregate. Therefore, a hypothesis is launched that at least in a subset of Unverricht-Lundborg disease patients, cystatin B protein may aggregate in the cell. Protein aggregation can be secondary to external insults or aging, however, inherited forms of neurodegenerative diseases, such as familial Parkinson's, Huntington's or familial Alzheimer's disease, are directly linked to the mutant proteins aggregation. Protein aggregates in the form of amyloid plaques, neurofibrilary tangles, intra-cytoplasmic or intra-nuclear inclusions lead to increased production of the reactive oxygen species and dysfunction of the ubiquitine/proteasome system. Finally, mitochondrial dysfunction and cell death are observed. Certainly, it remains to be checked by experiments whether overexpression in cell culture of the missense mutants G4R and N-terminal fragment to residue 68 lead to cellular inclusions and the accompanying changes characteristic for the conformational

  10. A role for a Hevea latex lectin-like protein in mediating rubber particle aggregation and latex coagulation.

    PubMed

    Wititsuwannakul, Rapepun; Pasitkul, Piyaporn; Kanokwiroon, Kamonwan; Wititsuwannakul, Dhirayos

    2008-01-01

    An in vitro aggregation of washed lutoid membrane and rubber particles, respectively, prepared from the bottom (lutoid) fraction and rubber layer of centrifuged fresh latex, leading to the formation of rubber coagulum necessary for a latex coagulation was demonstrated. A Triton X-100 extract of washed lutoid membrane proteins, isolated and prepared from the bottom fraction of centrifuged fresh latex was examined for its role in the latex coagulation process. It induced agglutination of rabbit erythrocytes, indicating the presence of a lectin-like protein. Hevea latex lectin-like protein (HLL) was purified to homogeneity by active chitin binding separation, followed by DEAE-Sepharose chromatography. Its M(r) analyzed by SDS-PAGE was 17 kDa, whereas that determined by gel filtration was 267 kDa. The HLL had a pI value of 7.2. Several glycoproteins were shown to inhibit the HLL-induced hemagglutination. The hemagglutinin activity of HLL was enhanced by Ca(2+). Of most interest was the finding that HLL strongly induced aggregation of the Hevea latex rubber particles (RP). This strong RP aggregation leads to latex coagulation, indicating the possibility that it is involved in the formation of the coagulum that plugs the latex vessel ends and stops the flow of latex upon tapping. In addition, the purified HLL also induced aggregation of RP taken from several other non-Hevea latex producing plants. This might indicate either a common or universal role of this lectin-like protein in RP aggregation and hence latex coagulation. This paper, for the first time, provides clear and unequivocal evidence for either a key biological role or physiological function of an endogenous latex lectin-like protein in the sequential process of latex coagulation.

  11. Immunohistochemical detection of S-nitrosylated proteins.

    PubMed

    Gow, Andrew J; Davis, Christiana W; Munson, David; Ischiropoulos, Harry

    2004-01-01

    Accumulating evidence shows that S-nitrosothiols, formed by the addition of nitric oxide (NO) to a cysteine thiol, S-nitrosylation, are involved in basal cellular regulation. It has been proposed that SNO formation/removal may be disrupted in a variety of pathophysiological conditions. Two types of methodology are presently available to identify specific S-nitrosylated proteins: (1) derivatization and (2) post-purification chemical detection. Neither of these techniques allows for in situ visualization of SNOs. Recently, we demonstrated that an antibody generated to the SNO moiety could be used to detect SNO formation from each of three isoforms of NOS by immunohistochemistry. This chapter details the immunohistochemical methodology used to detect SNOs in situ, offering a potentially powerful alternative for detection of SNO within tissue sections.

  12. From the test tube to the cell: exploring the folding and aggregation of a beta-clam protein.

    PubMed

    Ignatova, Zoya; Krishnan, Beena; Bombardier, Jeffrey P; Marcelino, Anna Marie C; Hong, Jiang; Gierasch, Lila M

    2007-01-01

    A crucial challenge in present biomedical research is the elucidation of how fundamental processes like protein folding and aggregation occur in the complex environment of the cell. Many new physico-chemical factors like crowding and confinement must be considered, and immense technical hurdles must be overcome in order to explore these processes in vivo. Understanding protein misfolding and aggregation diseases and developing therapeutic strategies to these diseases demand that we gain mechanistic insight into behaviors and misbehaviors of proteins as they fold in vivo. We have developed a fluorescence approach using FlAsH labeling to study the thermodynamics of folding of a model beta-rich protein, cellular retinoic acid binding protein (CRABP) in Escherichia coli cells. The labeling approach has also enabled us to follow aggregation of a modified version of CRABP and chimeras between CRABP and huntingtin exon 1 with its glutamine repeat tract. In this article, we review our recent results using FlAsH labeling to study in-vivo folding and present new observations that hint at fundamental differences between the thermodynamics and kinetics of protein folding in vivo and in vitro.

  13. Advances in development of fluorescent probes for detecting amyloid-β aggregates

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ming-ming; Ren, Wen-ming; Tang, Xi-can; Hu, You-hong; Zhang, Hai-yan

    2016-01-01

    With accumulating evidence suggesting that amyloid-β (Aβ) deposition is a good diagnostic biomarker for Alzheimer's disease (AD), the discovery of active Aβ probes has become an active area of research. Among the existing imaging methods, optical imaging targeting Aβ aggregates (fibrils or oligomers), especially using near-infrared (NIR) fluorescent probes, is increasingly recognized as a promising approach for the early diagnosis of AD due to its real time detection, low cost, lack of radioactive exposure and high-resolution. In the past decade, a variety of fluorescent probes have been developed and tested for efficiency in vitro, and several probes have shown efficacy in AD transgenic mice. This review classifies these representative probes based on their chemical structures and functional modes (dominant solvent-dependent mode and a novel solvent-independent mode). Moreover, the pharmaceutical characteristics of these representative probes are summarized and discussed. This review provides important perspectives for the future development of novel NIR Aβ diagnostic probes. PMID:26997567

  14. A sensitive and selective colorimetric method for detection of copper ions based on anti-aggregation of unmodified gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Hormozi-Nezhad, M Reza; Abbasi-Moayed, Samira

    2014-11-01

    A highly sensitive and selective colorimetric method for detection of copper ions, based on anti-aggregation of D-penicillamine (D-PC) induced aggregated gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) was developed. Copper ions can hinder the aggregation of AuNPs induced by D-PC, through formation of mixed-valence complex with D-PC that is a selective copper chelator. In the presence of a fixed amount of D-PC, the aggregation of AuNPs decreases with increasing concentrations of Cu(2+) along with a color change from blue to red in AuNPs solution and an increase in the absorption ratio (A520/A650). Under the optimum experimental conditions (pH 7, [AuNPs] =3.0 nmol L(-1) and [NaCl]=25 mmol L(-1)), a linear calibration curve for Cu(2+) was obtained within the range of 0.05-1.85 µmol L(-1) with a limit of detection (3Sb) of 30 nmol L(-1). Excellent selectivity toward Cu(2+) was observed among various metal ions due to a specific complex formation between Cu(2+) and D-PC. The proposed method has been successfully applied for the detection of Cu(2+) in various real samples.

  15. In situ characterization of protein aggregates in human tissues affected by light chain amyloidosis: a FTIR microspectroscopy study

    PubMed Central

    Ami, Diletta; Lavatelli, Francesca; Rognoni, Paola; Palladini, Giovanni; Raimondi, Sara; Giorgetti, Sofia; Monti, Luca; Doglia, Silvia Maria; Natalello, Antonino; Merlini, Giampaolo

    2016-01-01

    Light chain (AL) amyloidosis, caused by deposition of amyloidogenic immunoglobulin light chains (LCs), is the most common systemic form in industrialized countries. Still open questions, and premises for developing targeted therapies, concern the mechanisms