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Sample records for detectable pulmonary inflammation

  1. Pulmonary magnetic resonance imaging is similar to chest tomography in detecting inflammation in patients with systemic sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Müller, Carolina de Souza; Warszawiak, Danny; Paiva, Eduardo Dos Santos; Escuissato, Dante Luiz

    2017-02-20

    Interstitial lung disease (ILD) and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) are prevalent complications of systemic sclerosis (SS) and are currently the leading causes of death related to the disease. The accurate recognition of these conditions is therefore of utmost importance for patient management. A study was carried out with 24 SS patients being followed at the Rheumatology Department of the Hospital de Clínicas of Universidade Federal do Paraná (UFPR) and 14 healthy volunteers, with the objective of evaluating the usefulness of lung magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) when assessing ILD in SS patients. The results obtained with lung MRI were compared to those obtained by computed tomography (CT) of the chest, currently considered the examination of choice when investigating ILD in SS patients. The assessed population was predominantly composed of women with a mean age of 50 years, limited cutaneous SS, and a disease duration of approximately 7 years. In most cases, there was agreement between the findings on chest CT and lung MRI. Considering it is a radiation-free examination and capable of accurately identifying areas of lung tissue inflammatory involvement, lung MRI showed to be a useful examination, and further studies are needed to assess whether there is an advantage in using lung MRI instead of chest CT when assessing ILD activity in SS patients.

  2. Physicochemical characteristics of nanomaterials that affect pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The increasing manufacture and use of products based on nanotechnology raises concerns for both workers and consumers. Various studies report induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanoparticles, which can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Each of these aspects can affect their toxicity, although it is largely unknown to what extent. The aim of the current review is to analyse published data on inhalation of nanoparticles to identify and evaluate the contribution of their physicochemical characteristics to the onset and development of pulmonary inflammation. Many physicochemical characteristics of nanoparticles affect their lung deposition, clearance, and pulmonary response that, in combination, ultimately determine whether pulmonary inflammation will occur and to what extent. Lung deposition is mainly determined by the physical properties of the aerosol (size, density, shape, hygroscopicity) in relation to airflow and the anatomy of the respiratory system, whereas clearance and translocation of nanoparticles are mainly determined by their geometry and surface characteristics. Besides size and chemical composition, other physicochemical characteristics influence the induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation. As some nanoparticles dissolve, they can release toxic ions that can damage the lung tissue, making dissolution rate an important characteristic that affects lung inflammation. Fibre-shaped materials are more toxic to the lungs compared to spherical shaped nanoparticles of the same chemical composition. In general, cationic nanoparticles are more cytotoxic than neutral or anionic nanoparticles. Finally, surface reactivity correlates well with observed pulmonary inflammation. With all these characteristics affecting different stages of the events leading to pulmonary inflammation, no unifying dose metric could be identified to describe pulmonary

  3. Carbon dioxide inhalation causes pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Abolhassani, Mohammad; Guais, Adeline; Chaumet-Riffaud, Philippe; Sasco, Annie J; Schwartz, Laurent

    2009-04-01

    The aim of this study was to assess whether one of the most common poisons of cellular respiration, i.e., carbon dioxide, is proinflammatory. CO(2) is naturally present in the atmosphere at the level of 0.038% and involved in numerous cellular biochemical reactions. We analyzed in vitro the inflammation response induced by exposure to CO(2) for 48 h (0-20% with a constant O(2) concentration of 21%). In vivo mice were submitted to increasing concentrations of CO(2) (0, 5, 10, and 15% with a constant O(2) concentration of 21%) for 1 h. The exposure to concentrations above 5% of CO(2) resulted in the increased transcription (RNase protection assay) and secretion (ELISA) of proinflammatory cytokines [macrophage inflammatory protein-1alpha (MIP-1alpha), MIP-1beta, MIP-2, IL-8, IL-6, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed, and, presumably, secreted (RANTES)] by epithelial cell lines HT-29 or A549 and primary pulmonary cells retrieved from the exposed mice. Lung inflammation was also demonstrated in vivo by mucin 5AC-enhanced production and airway hyperreactivity induction. This response was mostly mediated by the nuclear translocation of p65 NF-kappaB, itself a consequence of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) activation. Short inhibiting RNAs (siRNAs) targeted toward PP2Ac reversed the effect of carbon dioxide, i.e., disrupted the NF-kappaB activation and the proinflammatory cytokine secretion. In conclusion, this study strongly suggests that exposure to carbon dioxide may be more toxic than previously thought. This may be relevant for carcinogenic effects of combustion products.

  4. H2S inhibits pulmonary arterial endothelial cell inflammation in rats with monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shasha; Chen, Siyao; Yu, Wen; Zhang, Da; Zhang, Chunyu; Tang, Chaoshu; Du, Junbao; Jin, Hongfang

    2017-03-01

    This study aimed to determine whether hydrogen sulfide (H2S) inhibits pulmonary arterial endothelial inflammation in rats with monocrotaline (MCT)-induced pulmonary hypertension and its possible mechanisms. Twenty-four male Wistar rats were divided randomly into control, MCT, and MCT+H2S treatment groups. Human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAEC) were cultured and divided into four groups: control, MCT, MCT+H2S, and H2S. Pulmonary artery pressure was determined using a right cardiac catheterization procedure 3 weeks after MCT administration. Pulmonary vascular morphological changes and inflammatory infiltration were measured. Endogenous H2S levels, cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) expression, and inflammatory cytokines were determined both in vivo and in vitro. In addition, phosphorylation of NF-κB p65 and IκBα was detected by western blotting, and NF-κB p65 nuclear translocation, as well as its DNA-binding activity, was determined. Pulmonary hypertension and vascular remolding developed 3 wks after MCT administration, with elevated lung tissue inflammatory infiltration and cytokine level associated with activation of the NF-κB pathway, both in vivo and in vitro. However, the endogenous H2S/CSE pathway was downregulated in MCT rats. By contrast, an H2S donor markedly reduced pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary vascular structural remolding, and increased lung inflammatory infiltration and cytokine levels of MCT-treated rats. Meanwhile, H2S reversed the activation of the NF-κB pathway successfully. The downregulated pulmonary arterial endothelial H2S/CSE pathway is involved in the pulmonary inflammatory response in MCT-treated pulmonary hypertensive rats. H2S attenuated endothelial inflammation by inhibiting the NF-κB pathway.

  5. Inflammation and repair processes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Rennard, S I

    1999-11-01

    COPD is characterized by chronic inflammation and injury of both the airways and the parenchymal structures of the lung. These processes are associated with ongoing repair. Whether repair leads to restoration of normal tissue architecture or to altered tissue structure with loss of function depends on complex interrelationships of a variety of interacting mediators. The possibility that repair processes can be modulated by exogenous agents raises the possibility that therapeutic strategies aimed at repair can be effective. Such strategies offer tremendous promise both for slowing the relentlessly progressive natural history which most often characterizes COPD and, possibly, for restoring lung function. Rennard SI. Inflammation and repair processes in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  6. Multi-walled carbon nanotube physicochemical properties predict pulmonary inflammation and genotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Sarah S.; Jackson, Petra; Kling, Kirsten; Knudsen, Kristina B.; Skaug, Vidar; Kyjovska, Zdenka O.; Thomsen, Birthe L.; Clausen, Per Axel; Atluri, Rambabu; Berthing, Trine; Bengtson, Stefan; Wolff, Henrik; Jensen, Keld A.; Wallin, Håkan; Vogel, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lung deposition of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) induces pulmonary toxicity. Commercial MWCNT vary greatly in physicochemical properties and consequently in biological effects. To identify determinants of MWCNT-induced toxicity, we analyzed the effects of pulmonary exposure to 10 commercial MWCNT (supplied in three groups of different dimensions, with one pristine and two/three surface modified in each group). We characterized morphology, chemical composition, surface area and functionalization levels. MWCNT were deposited in lungs of female C57BL/6J mice by intratracheal instillation of 0, 6, 18 or 54 μg/mouse. Pulmonary inflammation (neutrophil influx in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL)) and genotoxicity were determined on day 1, 28 or 92. Histopathology of the lungs was performed on day 28 and 92. All MWCNT induced similar histological changes. Lymphocytic aggregates were detected for all MWCNT on day 28 and 92. Using adjusted, multiple regression analyses, inflammation and genotoxicity were related to dose, time and physicochemical properties. The specific surface area (BET) was identified as a positive predictor of pulmonary inflammation on all post-exposure days. In addition, length significantly predicted pulmonary inflammation, whereas surface oxidation (–OH and –COOH) was predictor of lowered inflammation on day 28. BET surface area, and therefore diameter, significantly predicted genotoxicity in BAL fluid cells and lung tissue such that lower BET surface area or correspondingly larger diameter was associated with increased genotoxicity. This study provides information on possible toxicity-driving physicochemical properties of MWCNT. The results may contribute to safe-by-design manufacturing of MWCNT, thereby minimizing adverse effects. PMID:27323647

  7. Distal airway dysfunction identifies pulmonary inflammation in asymptomatic smokers

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Kenneth I.; Pradhan, Deepak R.; Goldring, Roberta M.; Oppenheimer, Beno W.; Rom, William N.

    2016-01-01

    Smoking induced inflammation leads to distal airway destruction. However, the relationship between distal airway dysfunction and inflammation remains unclear, particularly in smokers prior to the development of airway obstruction. Seven normal controls and 16 smokers without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were studied. Respiratory function was assessed using the forced oscillation technique (FOT). Abnormal FOT was defined as elevated resistance at 5 Hz (R5). Parameters reflecting distal lung function included frequency dependence of resistance (R5–20) and dynamic elastance (X5). Inflammation was quantified in concentrated bronchoalveolar lavage utilising cell count differential and cytokines expressed as concentration per mL epithelial lining fluid. All control subjects and seven smokers had normal R5. Nine smokers had elevated R5 with abnormal R5–20 and X5, indicating distal lung dysfunction. The presence of abnormal FOT was associated with two-fold higher lymphocyte and neutrophil counts (p<0.025) and with higher interleukin (IL)-8, eotaxin and fractalkine levels (p<0.01). Reactivity of R5–20 and X5 correlated with levels of IL-8, eotaxin, fractalkine, IL-12p70 and transforming growth factor-α (r>0.47, p<0.01). Distal airway dysfunction in smokers without COPD identifies the presence of distal lung inflammation that parallel reported observations in established COPD. These findings were not evident on routine pulmonary function testing and may allow the identification of smokers at risk of progression to COPD. PMID:27995132

  8. Distal airway dysfunction identifies pulmonary inflammation in asymptomatic smokers.

    PubMed

    Berger, Kenneth I; Pradhan, Deepak R; Goldring, Roberta M; Oppenheimer, Beno W; Rom, William N; Segal, Leopoldo N

    2016-10-01

    Smoking induced inflammation leads to distal airway destruction. However, the relationship between distal airway dysfunction and inflammation remains unclear, particularly in smokers prior to the development of airway obstruction. Seven normal controls and 16 smokers without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) were studied. Respiratory function was assessed using the forced oscillation technique (FOT). Abnormal FOT was defined as elevated resistance at 5 Hz (R5). Parameters reflecting distal lung function included frequency dependence of resistance (R5-20) and dynamic elastance (X5). Inflammation was quantified in concentrated bronchoalveolar lavage utilising cell count differential and cytokines expressed as concentration per mL epithelial lining fluid. All control subjects and seven smokers had normal R5. Nine smokers had elevated R5 with abnormal R5-20 and X5, indicating distal lung dysfunction. The presence of abnormal FOT was associated with two-fold higher lymphocyte and neutrophil counts (p<0.025) and with higher interleukin (IL)-8, eotaxin and fractalkine levels (p<0.01). Reactivity of R5-20 and X5 correlated with levels of IL-8, eotaxin, fractalkine, IL-12p70 and transforming growth factor-α (r>0.47, p<0.01). Distal airway dysfunction in smokers without COPD identifies the presence of distal lung inflammation that parallel reported observations in established COPD. These findings were not evident on routine pulmonary function testing and may allow the identification of smokers at risk of progression to COPD.

  9. Intercellular Adhesion Molecule 1 Knockout Abrogates Radiation Induced Pulmonary Inflammation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hallahan, Dennis E.; Virudachalam, Subbulakshmi

    1997-06-01

    Increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1; CD54) is induced by exposure to ionizing radiation. The lung was used as a model to study the role of ICAM-1 in the pathogenesis of the radiation-induced inflammation-like response. ICAM-1 expression increased in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium and not in the endothelium of larger pulmonary vessels following treatment of mice with thoracic irradiation. To quantify radiation-induced ICAM-1 expression, we utilized fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis of anti-ICAM-1 antibody labeling of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells from human cadaver donors (HMVEC-L cells). Fluorochrome conjugates and UV microscopy were used to quantify the fluorescence intensity of ICAM in the irradiated lung. These studies showed a dose- and time-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium. Peak expression occurred at 24 h, while threshold dose was as low as 2 Gy. To determine whether ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration into the irradiated lung, the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody was administered by tail vein injection to mice following thoracic irradiation. Inflammatory cells were quantified by immunofluorescence for leukocyte common antigen (CD45). Mice treated with the anti-ICAM-1 blocking antibody showed attenuation of inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to ionizing radiation exposure. To verify the requirement of ICAM-1 in the inflammation-like radiation response, we utilized the ICAM-1 knockout mouse. ICAM-1 was not expressed in the lungs of ICAM-1-deficient mice following treatment with thoracic irradiation. ICAM-1 knockout mice had no increase in the inflammatory cell infiltration into the lung in response to thoracic irradiation. These studies demonstrate a radiation dose-dependent increase in ICAM-1 expression in the pulmonary microvascular endothelium, and show that ICAM-1 is required for inflammatory cell infiltration

  10. Chronic Thromboembolic Pulmonary Hypertension Associated with Chronic Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Kuse, Naoyuki; Abe, Shinji; Kuribayashi, Hidehiko; Fukuda, Asami; Kusunoki, Yuji; Narato, Ritsuko; Saito, Hitoshi; Gemma, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is one of the leading causes of severe pulmonary hypertension. According to previously reported studies in the pertinent literature, chronic inflammatory conditions may be implicated in the development of CTEPH. We herein describe the case of a 56-year-old woman who was diagnosed with CTEPH in association with chronic infection. The patient had experienced five episodes of pneumonia in the five years prior to the diagnosis of CTEPH. Blood tests from the previous five years of outpatient follow-up demonstrated that the C-reactive protein level was slightly elevated. This case suggests that a relationship exists between chronic inflammation and CTEPH, and furthermore, may contribute towards elucidating the pathophysiology of CTEPH.

  11. Systemic inflammation after inspiratory loading in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, Antonia; Sauleda, Jaume; Sala, Ernest; Barceló, Bernardí; Pons, Jaume; Carrera, Miguel; Noguera, Aina; Togores, Bernat; Agustí, Alvar GN

    2008-01-01

    Objective Patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) present systemic inflammation. Strenuous resistive breathing induces systemic inflammation in healthy subjects. We hypothesized that the increased respiratory load that characterizes COPD can contribute to systemic inflammation in these patients. Patients and methods To test this hypothesis, we compared leukocyte numbers and levels of circulating cytokines (tumor necrosis factor alpha [TNFα], interleukin-1β [IL-1β], IL-6, IL-8, and IL-10), before and 1 hour after maximal incremental inspiratory loading in 13 patients with stable COPD (forced expiratory volume in one second [FEV1] 29 ± 2.5% ref) and in 8 healthy sedentary subjects (FEV1 98 ± 5% ref). Results We found that: (1) at baseline, patients with COPD showed higher leukocyte counts and IL-8 levels than controls (p < 0.01); and, (2) one hour after maximal inspiratory loading these values were unchanged, except for IL-10, which increased in controls (p < 0.05) but not in patients with COPD. Conclusions This study confirms the presence of systemic inflammation in COPD, shows that maximal inspiratory loading does not increase the levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-8) in COPD patients or controls, but suggests that the former may be unable to mount an appropriate systemic anti-inflammatory response to exercise. PMID:18488438

  12. Grouping nanomaterials to predict their potential to induce pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Braakhuis, Hedwig M; Oomen, Agnes G; Cassee, Flemming R

    2016-05-15

    The rapidly expanding manufacturing, production and use of nanomaterials have raised concerns for both worker and consumer safety. Various studies have been published in which induction of pulmonary inflammation after inhalation exposure to nanomaterials has been described. Nanomaterials can vary in aspects such as size, shape, charge, crystallinity, chemical composition, and dissolution rate. Currently, efforts are made to increase the knowledge on the characteristics of nanomaterials that can be used to categorise them into hazard groups according to these characteristics. Grouping helps to gather information on nanomaterials in an efficient way with the aim to aid risk assessment. Here, we discuss different ways of grouping nanomaterials for their risk assessment after inhalation. Since the relation between single intrinsic particle characteristics and the severity of pulmonary inflammation is unknown, grouping of nanomaterials by their intrinsic characteristics alone is not sufficient to predict their risk after inhalation. The biokinetics of nanomaterials should be taken into account as that affects the dose present at a target site over time. The parameters determining the kinetic behaviour are not the same as the hazard-determining parameters. Furthermore, characteristics of nanomaterials change in the life-cycle, resulting in human exposure to different forms and doses of these nanomaterials. As information on the biokinetics and in situ characteristics of nanomaterials is essential but often lacking, efforts should be made to include these in testing strategies. Grouping nanomaterials will probably be of the most value to risk assessors when information on intrinsic characteristics, life-cycle, biokinetics and effects are all combined.

  13. CFTR-regulated MAPK/NF-κB signaling in pulmonary inflammation in thermal inhalation injury

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Zhi Wei; Chen, Jing; Ruan, Ye Chun; Zhou, Tao; Chen, Yu; Chen, YaJie; Tsang, Lai Ling; Chan, Hsiao Chang; Peng, Yi Zhi

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism underlying pulmonary inflammation in thermal inhalation injury remains elusive. Cystic fibrosis, also hallmarked with pulmonary inflammation, is caused by mutations in CFTR, the expression of which is temperature-sensitive. We investigated whether CFTR is involved in heat-induced pulmonary inflammation. We applied heat-treatment in 16HBE14o- cells with CFTR knockdown or overexpression and heat-inhalation in rats in vivo. Heat-treatment caused significant reduction in CFTR and, reciprocally, increase in COX-2 at early stages both in vitro and in vivo. Activation of ERK/JNK, NF-κB and COX-2/PGE2 were detected in heat-treated cells, which were mimicked by knockdown, and reversed by overexpression of CFTR or VX-809, a reported CFTR mutation corrector. JNK/ERK inhibition reversed heat-/CFTR-knockdown-induced NF-κB activation, whereas NF-κB inhibitor showed no effect on JNK/ERK. IL-8 was augmented by heat-treatment or CFTR-knockdown, which was abolished by inhibition of NF-κB, JNK/ERK or COX-2. Moreover, in vitro or in vivo treatment with curcumin, a natural phenolic compound, significantly enhanced CFTR expression and reversed the heat-induced increases in COX-2/PGE2/IL-8, neutrophil infiltration and tissue damage in the airway. These results have revealed a CFTR-regulated MAPK/NF-κB pathway leading to COX-2/PGE2/IL-8 activation in thermal inhalation injury, and demonstrated therapeutic potential of curcumin for alleviating heat-induced pulmonary inflammation. PMID:26515683

  14. Inhalation of Respirable Crystalline Rifapentine Particles Induces Pulmonary Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Parumasivam, Thaigarajan; Ashhurst, Anneliese S; Nagalingam, Gayathri; Britton, Warwick J; Chan, Hak-Kim

    2017-01-03

    Rifapentine is an anti-tuberculosis (anti-TB) drug with a prolonged half-life, but oral delivery results in low concentrations in the lungs because of its high binding (98%) to plasma proteins. We have shown that inhalation of crystalline rifapentine overcomes the limitations of oral delivery by significantly enhancing and prolonging the drug concentration in the lungs. The delivery of crystalline particles to the lungs may promote inflammation. This in vivo study characterizes the inflammatory response caused by pulmonary deposition of the rifapentine particles. The rifapentine powder was delivered to BALB/c mice by intratracheal insufflation at a dose of 20 mg/kg. The inflammatory response in the lungs and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was examined at 12 h, 24 h, and 7 days post-treatment by flow cytometry and histopathology. At 12 and 24 h post-treatment, there was a significant influx of neutrophils into the lungs, and this returned to normal by day 7. A significant recruitment of macrophages occurred in the BAL at 24 h. Consistent with these findings, histopathological analysis demonstrated pulmonary vascular congestion and significant macrophage recruitment at 12 and 24 h post-treatment. In conclusion, the pulmonary delivery of crystalline rifapentine caused a transient neutrophil-associated inflammatory response in the lungs that resolved over 7 days. This observation may limit pulmonary delivery of rifapentine to once a week at a dose of 20 mg/kg or less. The effectiveness of weekly dosing with inhalable rifapentine will be assessed in murine Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

  15. Immune Inflammation and Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Balestro, Elisabetta; Calabrese, Fiorella; Turato, Graziella; Lunardi, Francesca; Bazzan, Erica; Marulli, Giuseppe; Biondini, Davide; Rossi, Emanuela; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Rea, Federico; Rigobello, Chiara; Gregori, Dario; Baraldo, Simonetta; Spagnolo, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    The clinical course in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is highly heterogeneous, with some patients having a slow progression and others an accelerated clinical and functional decline. This study aims to clinically characterize the type of progression in IPF and to investigate the pathological basis that might account for the observed differences in disease behavior. Clinical and functional data were analyzed in 73 IPF patients, followed long-time as candidates for lung transplantation. The forced vital capacity (FVC) change/year (< or ≥10% predicted) was used to define “slow” or “rapid” disease progression. Pathological abnormalities were quantified in the explanted lung of 41 out of 73 patients undergoing lung transplantation. At diagnosis, slow progressors (n = 48) showed longer duration of symptoms and lower FVC than rapid progressors (n = 25). Eleven slow and 3 rapid progressors developed an acute exacerbation (AE) during follow-up. Quantitative lung pathology showed a severe innate and adaptive inflammatory infiltrate in rapid progressors, markedly increased compared to slow progressors and similar to that observed in patients experiencing AE. The extent of inflammation was correlated with the yearly FVC decline (r = 0.52, p = 0.005). In conclusion an innate and adaptive inflammation appears to be a prominent feature in the lung of patients with IPF and could contribute to determining of the rate of disease progression. PMID:27159038

  16. Immune Inflammation and Disease Progression in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Balestro, Elisabetta; Calabrese, Fiorella; Turato, Graziella; Lunardi, Francesca; Bazzan, Erica; Marulli, Giuseppe; Biondini, Davide; Rossi, Emanuela; Sanduzzi, Alessandro; Rea, Federico; Rigobello, Chiara; Gregori, Dario; Baraldo, Simonetta; Spagnolo, Paolo; Cosio, Manuel G; Saetta, Marina

    2016-01-01

    The clinical course in idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) is highly heterogeneous, with some patients having a slow progression and others an accelerated clinical and functional decline. This study aims to clinically characterize the type of progression in IPF and to investigate the pathological basis that might account for the observed differences in disease behavior. Clinical and functional data were analyzed in 73 IPF patients, followed long-time as candidates for lung transplantation. The forced vital capacity (FVC) change/year (< or ≥10% predicted) was used to define "slow" or "rapid" disease progression. Pathological abnormalities were quantified in the explanted lung of 41 out of 73 patients undergoing lung transplantation. At diagnosis, slow progressors (n = 48) showed longer duration of symptoms and lower FVC than rapid progressors (n = 25). Eleven slow and 3 rapid progressors developed an acute exacerbation (AE) during follow-up. Quantitative lung pathology showed a severe innate and adaptive inflammatory infiltrate in rapid progressors, markedly increased compared to slow progressors and similar to that observed in patients experiencing AE. The extent of inflammation was correlated with the yearly FVC decline (r = 0.52, p = 0.005). In conclusion an innate and adaptive inflammation appears to be a prominent feature in the lung of patients with IPF and could contribute to determining of the rate of disease progression.

  17. Inhalation of Carbon Black Nanoparticles Aggravates Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Saputra, Devina; Yoon, Jin-ha; Park, Hyunju; Heo, Yongju; Yang, Hyoseon; Lee, Eun Ji; Lee, Sangjin; Song, Chang-Woo; Lee, Kyuhong

    2014-01-01

    An increasing number of recent studies have focused on the impact of particulate matter on human health. As a model for atmospheric particulate inhalation, we investigated the effects of inhaled carbon black nanoparticles (CBNP) on mice with bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. The CNBPs were generated by a novel aerosolization process, and the mice were exposed to the aerosol for 4 hours. We found that CBNP inhalation exacerbated lung inflammation, as evidenced by histopathology analysis and by the expression levels of interleukin-6 protein, fibronectin, and interferon-γ mRNAs in lung tissues. Notably, fibronectin mRNA expression showed a statistically significant increase in expression after CBNP exposure. These data suggest that the concentration of CBNPs delivered (calculated to be 12.5 μg/m3) can aggravate lung inflammation in mice. Our results also suggest that the inhalation of ultrafine particles like PM 2.5 is an impactful environmental risk factor for humans, particularly in susceptible populations with predisposing lung conditions. PMID:25071917

  18. Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation are Modulated by Adrenal-Derived Stress Hormones

    EPA Science Inventory

    Ozone exposure promotes pulmonary injury and inflammation. Previously we have characterized systemic changes that occur immediately after acute ozone exposure and are mediated by neuro-hormonal stress response pathway. Both HPA axis and sympathetic tone alterations induce the rel...

  19. Protective role of interleukin-10 in Ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation**

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The mechanisms underlying ozone (03)-induced pulmonary inflammation remain unclear. Interleukin-10 (IL-10) is an anti-inflammatory cytokine that is known to inhibit inflammatory mediators. Objectives: We investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying interleuken-10...

  20. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and dysregulated iron homeostatis in rat models of cardiovascular disease

    EPA Science Inventory

    Underlying cardiovascular disease (CVD) is considered a risk factor for the exacerbation of air pollution health effects. Therefore, rodent models of CVD are increasingly used to examine mechanisms ofvariation in susceptibility. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and altere...

  1. Dermatophagoides-farinae-induced pulmonary eosinophilic inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Yu, C K; Yang, B C; Lee, S C; Wang, J Y; Hsiue, T R; Lei, H Y

    1997-01-01

    a mixed granulocytic, monocytic pulmonary inflammation with a large number of eosinophils accumulating within the submucosa of the airways and blood vessels of sensitized mice after challenge. Der f challenge induced a sequential expression pattern of eight cytokine genes in BAL cells. The mRNA of interleukin (IL)-1 beta and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha strongly expressed throughout the course of the experiment. The IL-6 mRNA expression peaked at 0.5-72 h, IL-10 at 1-6 and 48-72 h, IL-4 at 6-72 h, IL-2 at 6-96 h, IL-5 at 24-72 h, and interferon-gamma at 24-96 h. Intraperitoneal injection of sensitized mice with monoclonal antibody (mAb) to murine IL-5 (TRFK5, 300 micrograms/mouse) 1 h before challenge caused 62% suppression of eosinophils in the BAL fluids. The concomitant accumulation of neutrophils and mononuclear cells, however, was not affected by this treatment. On the other hand, intranasal administration of mAb to murine TNF-alpha (MP6-XT3, 20 micrograms/ mouse), but not IL-5, 1 h before challenge and 24 h AC significantly reduced the numbers of eosinophils, neutrophils, and lymphocytes in the BAL fluids. The intraperitoneal injection of dexamethasone (50 mg/kg) for a total of four times resulted in total inhibition of the Der-f-induced cellular responses, whereas vasoactive amine antagonists (diphenhydramine, ketanserin and cyprohepatidine) did not show any effect.

  2. Exposure to nickel oxide nanoparticles induces pulmonary inflammation through NLRP3 inflammasome activation in rats

    PubMed Central

    Cao, Zhengwang; Fang, Yiliang; Lu, Yonghui; Qian, Fenghua; Ma, Qinglong; He, Mingdi; Pi, Huifeng; Yu, Zhengping; Zhou, Zhou

    2016-01-01

    With recent advances in the manufacture and application of nickel oxide nanoparticles (NiONPs), concerns about their adverse effects on the respiratory system are increasing. However, the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms of NiONP-induced pulmonary toxicity remain unclear. In this study, we focused on the impacts of NiONPs on pulmonary inflammation and investigated whether the NLRP3 inflammasome is involved in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and injury. NiONP suspensions were administered by single intratracheal instillation to rats, and inflammatory responses were evaluated at 3 days, 7 days, or 28 days after treatment. NiONP exposure resulted in sustained pulmonary inflammation accompanied by inflammatory cell infiltration, alveolar proteinosis, and cytokine secretion. Expression of Nlrp3 was markedly upregulated by the NiONPs, which was accompanied by overexpression of the active form of caspase-1 (p20) and interleukin (IL)-1β secretion in vivo. NiONP-induced IL-1β secretion was partially prevented by co-treatment with a caspase-1 inhibitor in macrophages. Moreover, siRNA-mediated Nlrp3 knockdown completely attenuated NiONP-induced cytokine release and caspase-1 activity in macrophages in vitro. In addition, NiONP-induced NLRP3 inflammasome activation requires particle uptake and reactive oxygen species production. Collectively, our findings suggest that the NLRP3 inflammasome participates in NiONP-induced pulmonary inflammation and offer new strategies to combat the pulmonary toxicity induced by NiONPs. PMID:27524893

  3. Rosiglitazone dampens pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of acute lung injury.

    PubMed

    Mirakaj, Valbona; Mutz, Christian; Vagts, Dierk; Henes, Janek; Haeberle, Helene A; Husung, Susanne; König, Tony; Nöldge-Schomburg, Gabriele; Rosenberger, Peter

    2014-08-01

    The hallmarks of acute lung injury (ALI) are the compromised alveolar-capillary barrier and the extravasation of leukocytes into the alveolar space. Given the fact that the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonist rosiglitazone holds significant anti-inflammatory properties, we aimed to evaluate whether rosiglitazone could dampen these hallmarks of local pulmonary inflammation in a porcine model of lung injury. For this purpose, we used a model of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 50 μg/kg)-induced ALI. One hundred twenty minutes following the infusion of LPS, we started the exposure to rosiglitazone through inhalation or infusion. We found that intravenous rosiglitazone significantly controlled local pulmonary inflammation as determined through the expression of cytokines within the alveolar compartment. Furthermore, we found a significant reduction of the protein concentration and neutrophil activity within the alveolar space. In summary, we therefore conclude that the treatment with rosiglitazone might dampen local pulmonary inflammation during the initial stages of ALI.

  4. The role of inflammation and autoimmunity in the pathophysiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Kherbeck, Nada; Tamby, Mathieu C; Bussone, Guillaume; Dib, Hanadi; Perros, Frederic; Humbert, Marc; Mouthon, Luc

    2013-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension is characterized by a remodeling of pulmonary arteries with endothelial cell, fibroblast, and vascular smooth muscle cell activation and proliferation. Since pulmonary arterial hypertension occurs frequently in autoimmune conditions such as systemic sclerosis, inflammation and autoimmunity have been suspected to play a critical role in both idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension and systemic sclerosis-associated pulmonary arterial hypertension. High levels of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-1 and interleukin-6, platelet-derived growth factor, or macrophage inflammatory protein 1 have been found in lung samples of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension, along with inflammatory cell infiltrates mainly composed of macrophages and dendritic cells, T and B lymphocytes. In addition, circulating autoantibodies are found in the peripheral blood of patients. Thus, autoimmunity and inflammation probably play a role in the development of pulmonary arterial hypertension. In this setting, it would be important to set-up new experimental models of pulmonary arterial hypertension, in order to define novel therapeutics that specifically target immune disturbances in this devastating condition.

  5. Lung inflammation and genotoxicity following pulmonary exposure to nanoparticles in ApoE-/- mice

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Nicklas Raun; Møller, Peter; Jensen, Keld Alstrup; Vogel, Ulla; Ladefoged, Ole; Loft, Steffen; Wallin, Håkan

    2009-01-01

    Background The toxic and inflammatory potential of 5 different types of nanoparticles were studied in a sensitive model for pulmonary effects in apolipoprotein E knockout mice (ApoE-/-). We studied the effects instillation or inhalation Printex 90 of carbon black (CB) and compared CB instillation in ApoE-/- and C57 mice. Three and 24 h after pulmonary exposure, inflammation was assessed by mRNA levels of cytokines in lung tissue, cell composition, genotoxicity, protein and lactate dehydrogenase activity in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. Results Firstly, we found that intratracheal instillation of CB caused far more pulmonary toxicity in ApoE-/- mice than in C57 mice. Secondly, we showed that instillation of CB was more toxic than inhalation of a presumed similar dose with respect to inflammation in the lungs of ApoE-/- mice. Thirdly, we compared effects of instillation in ApoE-/- mice of three carbonaceous particles; CB, fullerenes C60 (C60) and single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT) as well as gold particles and quantum dots (QDs). Characterization of the instillation media revealed that all particles were delivered as agglomerates and aggregates. Significant increases in Il-6, Mip-2 and Mcp-1 mRNA were detected in lung tissue, 3 h and 24 h following instillation of SWCNT, CB and QDs. DNA damage in BAL cells, the fraction of neutrophils in BAL cells and protein in BAL fluid increased statistically significantly. Gold and C60 particles caused much weaker inflammatory responses. Conclusion Our data suggest that ApoE-/- model is sensitive for evaluating particle induced inflammation. Overall QDs had greatest effects followed by CB and SWCNT with C60 and gold being least inflammatory and DNA-damaging. However the gold was used at a much lower mass dose than the other particles. The strong effects of QDs were likely due to Cd release. The surface area of the instilled dose correlated well the inflammatory response for low toxicity particles. PMID:19138394

  6. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves clinical features and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients.

    PubMed

    do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Gomes, Evelim Leal Freitas Dantas; Greiffo, Flavia Regina; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Stirbulov, Roberto; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease characterized by chronic airflow limitation that leads beyond the pulmonary changes to important systemic effects. COPD is characterized by pulmonary and systemic inflammation. However, increases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma are found even when the disease is stable. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves physical exercise capacity and quality of life and decreases dyspnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR) program improves exercise tolerance in COPD patients, as well as health-related quality of life and systemic inflammation. This prospective study was conducted at the Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil. After anamnesis, patients were subjected to evaluations of health-related quality of life and dyspnea, spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, upper limbs incremental test, incremental shuttle walk test, and blood test for quantification of systemic inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6 and IL-8). At the end of the evaluations, patients received a booklet containing the physical exercises to be performed at home, three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Around 25 patients were enrolled, and 14 completed the pre- and post-HBPR ratings. There was a significant increase in the walked distance and the maximal inspiratory pressure, improvements on two components from the health-related quality-of-life questionnaire, and a decrease in plasma IL-8 levels after the intervention. The HBPR is an important and viable alternative to pulmonary rehabilitation for the treatment of patients with COPD; it improves exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle strength, quality of life, and systemic inflammation in COPD patients.

  7. Home-based pulmonary rehabilitation improves clinical features and systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease patients

    PubMed Central

    do Nascimento, Eloisa Sanches Pereira; Sampaio, Luciana Maria Malosá; Peixoto-Souza, Fabiana Sobral; Dias, Fernanda Dultra; Gomes, Evelim Leal Freitas Dantas; Greiffo, Flavia Regina; Ligeiro de Oliveira, Ana Paula; Stirbulov, Roberto; Vieira, Rodolfo Paula; Costa, Dirceu

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a respiratory disease characterized by chronic airflow limitation that leads beyond the pulmonary changes to important systemic effects. COPD is characterized by pulmonary and systemic inflammation. However, increases in the levels of inflammatory cytokines in plasma are found even when the disease is stable. Pulmonary rehabilitation improves physical exercise capacity and quality of life and decreases dyspnea. The aim of this study was to evaluate whether a home-based pulmonary rehabilitation (HBPR) program improves exercise tolerance in COPD patients, as well as health-related quality of life and systemic inflammation. This prospective study was conducted at the Laboratory of Functional Respiratory Evaluation, Nove de Julho University, São Paulo, Brazil. After anamnesis, patients were subjected to evaluations of health-related quality of life and dyspnea, spirometry, respiratory muscle strength, upper limbs incremental test, incremental shuttle walk test, and blood test for quantification of systemic inflammatory markers (interleukin [IL]-6 and IL-8). At the end of the evaluations, patients received a booklet containing the physical exercises to be performed at home, three times per week for 8 consecutive weeks. Around 25 patients were enrolled, and 14 completed the pre- and post-HBPR ratings. There was a significant increase in the walked distance and the maximal inspiratory pressure, improvements on two components from the health-related quality-of-life questionnaire, and a decrease in plasma IL-8 levels after the intervention. The HBPR is an important and viable alternative to pulmonary rehabilitation for the treatment of patients with COPD; it improves exercise tolerance, inspiratory muscle strength, quality of life, and systemic inflammation in COPD patients. PMID:25848241

  8. Reducing hypoxia and inflammation during invasive pulmonary aspergillosis by targeting the Interleukin-1 receptor

    PubMed Central

    Gresnigt, Mark S.; Rekiki, Abdessalem; Rasid, Orhan; Savers, Amélie; Jouvion, Grégory; Dannaoui, Eric; Parlato, Marianna; Fitting, Catherine; Brock, Matthias; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc; van de Veerdonk, Frank L.; Ibrahim-Granet, Oumaïma

    2016-01-01

    Hypoxia as a result of pulmonary tissue damage due to unresolved inflammation during invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is associated with a poor outcome. Aspergillus fumigatus can exploit the hypoxic microenvironment in the lung, but the inflammatory response required for fungal clearance can become severely disregulated as a result of hypoxia. Since severe inflammation can be detrimental to the host, we investigated whether targeting the interleukin IL-1 pathway could reduce inflammation and tissue hypoxia, improving the outcome of IPA. The interplay between hypoxia and inflammation was investigated by in vivo imaging of hypoxia and measurement of cytokines in the lungs in a model of corticosteroid immunocompromised and in Cxcr2 deficient mice. Severe hypoxia was observed following Aspergillus infection in both models and correlated with development of pulmonary inflammation and expression of hypoxia specific transcripts. Treatment with IL-1 receptor antagonist reduced hypoxia and slightly, but significantly reduced mortality in immunosuppressed mice, but was unable to reduce hypoxia in Cxcr2−/− mice. Our data provides evidence that the inflammatory response during invasive pulmonary aspergillosis, and in particular the IL-1 axis, drives the development of hypoxia. Targeting the inflammatory IL-1 response could be used as a potential immunomodulatory therapy to improve the outcome of aspergillosis. PMID:27215684

  9. Skeletal muscle response to inflammation--lessons for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Reid, W Darlene; Rurak, Jennifer; Harris, R Luke

    2009-10-01

    To describe how inflammation affects muscle adaptation and performance in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. In chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, an increasingly sedentary lifestyle is a primary contributor to muscle dysfunction that results in a loss of mobility and independence and, ultimately, mortality. Given the systemic chronic inflammation and profound limb muscle atrophy in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, it is tempting to speculate that the inflammatory process is deleterious to skeletal muscle. In healthy people, however, the inflammatory process initially is dominated by a destructive phase that is tightly regulated and modulates a reparative, regenerative phase. Although the inflammatory process and associated oxidative stress is more closely connected to muscle wasting in animal models of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, the causative role of inflammation toward muscle atrophy and weakness in people with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has not been definitively shown. Anti-inflammatory interventions aimed toward tempering muscle wasting and weakness in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease may not prove to be beneficial because of longer-term disruption of the regeneration of muscle tissue. Temporally and spatially targeted interventions aimed toward ameliorating oxidative stress, such as antioxidants, nutritional supplements, and chronic exercise training, may optimize outcomes toward maintaining muscle mass and performance.

  10. Fas ligand-expressing lymphocytes enhance alveolar macrophage apoptosis in the resolution of acute pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Barthel, Lea; Bednarek, Joseph M.; Yunt, Zulma X.; Henson, Peter M.; Janssen, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Apoptosis of alveolar macrophages and their subsequent clearance by neighboring phagocytes are necessary steps in the resolution of acute pulmonary inflammation. We have recently identified that activation of the Fas death receptor on the cell surface of macrophages drives macrophage apoptosis. However, the source of the cognate ligand for Fas (FasL) responsible for induction of alveolar macrophage apoptosis is not defined. Given their known role in the resolution of inflammation and ability to induce macrophage apoptosis ex vivo, we hypothesized that T lymphocytes represented a critical source of FasL. To address this hypothesis, C57BL/6J and lymphocyte-deficient (Rag-1−/−) mice were exposed to intratracheal lipopolysaccharide to induce pulmonary inflammation. Furthermore, utilizing mice expressing nonfunctional FasL, we adoptively transferred donor lymphocytes into inflamed lymphocyte-deficient mice to characterize the effect of lymphocyte-derived FasL on alveolar macrophage apoptosis in the resolution of inflammation. Herein, evidence is presented that lymphocytes expressing FasL enhance alveolar macrophage apoptosis during the resolution of LPS-induced inflammation. Moreover, lymphocyte induction of alveolar macrophage apoptosis results in contraction of the alveolar macrophage pool, which occurs in a FasL-dependent manner. Specifically, FasL-expressing CD8+ T lymphocytes potently induce alveolar macrophage apoptosis and contraction of the alveolar macrophage pool. Together, these studies identify a novel role for CD8+ T lymphocytes in the resolution of acute pulmonary inflammation. PMID:24838751

  11. Inhibitory effects of hydrogen sulphide on pulmonary fibrosis in smoking rats via attenuation of oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xiang; An, Guoyin; Chen, Jianchang

    2014-06-01

    Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that hydrogen sulphide (H2 S) is involved in the pathogenesis of various respiratory diseases. In the present study, we established a rat model of passive smoking and investigated whether or not H2 S has protective effects against pulmonary fibrosis induced by chronic cigarette smoke exposure. Rat lung tissues were stained with haematoxylin-eosin and Masson's trichrome. The expression of type I collagen was detected by immunohistochemistry. Oxidative stress was evaluated by detecting serum levels of malondialdehyde, superoxide dismutase and glutathione peroxidase and measuring reactive oxygen species generation in lung tissue. Inflammation was assessed by measuring serum levels of inflammatory cytokines, including high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, tumour necrosis factor-α, interleukin (IL)-1β and IL-6. The protein expression of Nrf2, NF-κB and phosphorylated mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the pulmonary tissue was determined by Western blotting. Our findings indicated that administration of NaHS (a donor of H2 S) could protect against pulmonary fibrosis in the smoking rats. H2 S was found to induce the nuclear accumulation of Nrf2 in lung tissue and consequently up-regulate the expression of antioxidant genes HO-1 and Trx-1 in the smoking rats. Moreover, H2 S could also reduce cigarette smoking-induced inflammation by inhibiting the phosphorylation of ERK 1/2, JNK and p38 MAPKs and negatively regulating NF-κB activation. In conclusion, our study suggests that H2 S has protective effects against pulmonary fibrosis in the smoking rats by attenuating oxidative stress and inflammation.

  12. Global analysis of gene expression in pulmonary fibrosis reveals distinct programs regulating lung inflammation and fibrosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Naftali; Allard, John D.; Pittet, Jean F.; Zuo, Fengrong; Griffiths, Mark J. D.; Morris, David; Huang, Xiaozhu; Sheppard, Dean; Heller, Renu A.

    2000-02-01

    The molecular mechanisms of pulmonary fibrosis are poorly understood. We have used oligonucleotide arrays to analyze the gene expression programs that underlie pulmonary fibrosis in response to bleomycin, a drug that causes lung inflammation and fibrosis, in two strains of susceptible mice (129 and C57BL/6). We then compared the gene expression patterns in these mice with 129 mice carrying a null mutation in the epithelial-restricted integrin 6 subunit (6/-), which develop inflammation but are protected from pulmonary fibrosis. Cluster analysis identified two distinct groups of genes involved in the inflammatory and fibrotic responses. Analysis of gene expression at multiple time points after bleomycin administration revealed sequential induction of subsets of genes that characterize each response. The availability of this comprehensive data set should accelerate the development of more effective strategies for intervention at the various stages in the development of fibrotic diseases of the lungs and other organs.

  13. The role of inflammation in hypoxic pulmonary hypertension: from cellular mechanisms to clinical phenotypes

    PubMed Central

    Poth, Jens M.; Fini, Mehdi A.; Olschewski, Andrea; El Kasmi, Karim C.; Stenmark, Kurt R.

    2014-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (PH) comprises a heterogeneous group of diseases sharing the common feature of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. The disease is usually characterized by mild to moderate pulmonary vascular remodeling that is largely thought to be reversible compared with the progressive irreversible disease seen in World Health Organization (WHO) group I disease. However, in these patients, the presence of PH significantly worsens morbidity and mortality. In addition, a small subset of patients with hypoxic PH develop “out-of-proportion” severe pulmonary hypertension characterized by pulmonary vascular remodeling that is irreversible and similar to that in WHO group I disease. In all cases of hypoxia-related vascular remodeling and PH, inflammation, particularly persistent inflammation, is thought to play a role. This review focuses on the effects of hypoxia on pulmonary vascular cells and the signaling pathways involved in the initiation and perpetuation of vascular inflammation, especially as they relate to vascular remodeling and transition to chronic irreversible PH. We hypothesize that the combination of hypoxia and local tissue factors/cytokines (“second hit”) antagonizes tissue homeostatic cellular interactions between mesenchymal cells (fibroblasts and/or smooth muscle cells) and macrophages and arrests these cells in an epigenetically locked and permanently activated proremodeling and proinflammatory phenotype. This aberrant cellular cross-talk between mesenchymal cells and macrophages promotes transition to chronic nonresolving inflammation and vascular remodeling, perpetuating PH. A better understanding of these signaling pathways may lead to the development of specific therapeutic targets, as none are currently available for WHO group III disease. PMID:25416383

  14. Pulmonary epithelial CCR3 promotes LPS-induced lung inflammation by mediating release of IL-8.

    PubMed

    Li, Bo; Dong, Chunling; Wang, Guifang; Zheng, Huiru; Wang, Xiangdong; Bai, Chunxue

    2011-09-01

    Interleukin (IL)-8 from pulmonary epithelial cells has been suggested to play an important role in the airway inflammation, although the mechanism remains unclear. We envisioned a possibility that pulmonary epithelial CCR3 could be involved in secretion and regulation of IL-8 and promote lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced lung inflammation. Human bronchial epithelial cell line NCI-H292 and alveolar type II epithelial cell line A549 were used to test role of CCR3 in production of IL-8 at cellular level. In vivo studies were performed on C57/BL6 mice instilled intratracheally with LPS in a model of acute lung injury (ALI). The activity of a CCR3-specific inhibitor (SB-328437) was measured in both in vitro and in vivo systems. We found that expression of CCR3 in NCI-H292 and A549 cells were increased by 23% and 16%, respectively, 24 h after the challenge with LPS. LPS increased the expression of CCR3 in NCI-H292 and A549 cells in a time-dependent manner, which was inhibited significantly by SB-328437. SB-328437 also diminished neutrophil recruitment in alveolar airspaces and improved LPS-induced ALI and production of IL-8 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. These results suggest that pulmonary epithelial CCR3 be involved in progression of LPS-induced lung inflammation by mediating release of IL-8. CCR3 in pulmonary epithelia may be an attractive target for development of therapies for ALI.

  15. Muscle wasting and impaired muscle regeneration in a murine model of chronic pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Langen, Ramon C J; Schols, Annemie M W J; Kelders, Marco C J M; van der Velden, Jos L J; Wouters, Emiel F M; Janssen-Heininger, Yvonne M W

    2006-12-01

    Muscle wasting and increased circulating levels of inflammatory cytokines, including TNF-alpha, are common features of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. To investigate whether inflammation of the lung is responsible for systemic inflammation and muscle wasting, we adopted a mouse model of pulmonary inflammation resulting from directed overexpression of a TNF-alpha transgene controlled by the surfactant protein C (SP-C) promoter. Compared with wild-type mice, SP-C/TNF-alpha mice exhibited increased levels of TNF-alpha in the circulation and increased endogenous TNF-alpha expression in skeletal muscle, potentially reflecting an amplificatory response to circulating TNF-alpha. Decreased muscle and body weights observed in SP-C/TNF-alpha mice were indicative of muscle wasting. Further evaluation of the SP-C/TNF-alpha mouse musculature revealed a decreased muscle regenerative capacity, shown by attenuated myoblast proliferation and differentiation in response to reloading of disuse-atrophied muscle, which may contribute to skeletal muscle wasting. Importantly, incubation of cultured myoblasts with TNF-alpha also resulted in elevated TNF-alpha mRNA levels and inhibition of myoblast differentiation. Collectively, our results demonstrate that chronic pulmonary inflammation results in muscle wasting and impaired muscle regeneration in SP-C/TNF-alpha mice, possibly as a consequence of an amplificatory TNF-alpha expression circuit extending from the lung to skeletal muscle.

  16. ALLERGIC PULMONARY INFLAMMATION PROMOTES THE RECRUITMENT OF CIRCULATING TUMOR CELLS TO THE LUNG

    PubMed Central

    Taranova, Anna G.; Maldonado, David; Vachon, Celine M.; Jacobsen, Elizabeth A.; Abdala-Valencia, Hiam; McGarry, Michael P.; Ochkur, Sergei I.; Protheroe, Cheryl A.; Doyle, Alfred; Grant, Clive S.; Cook-Mills, Joan; Birnbaumer, Lutz; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.

    2010-01-01

    Allergen-induced respiratory inflammation facilitates and/or elicits the extravasation of proinflammatory leukocytes by well understood mechanisms that mediate the movement of multiple cell types. The non-specific character of these pathways led us to hypothesize that circulating cancer cells use similar mechanisms, promoting secondary tumor formation at distal sites. To test this hypothesis, the frequency of metastasis to the lung as a function of allergic pulmonary inflammation was assessed following the intravenous injection of B16-F10 melanoma cells in mice. These studies demonstrated that allergen-induced pulmonary inflammation resulted in a >3-fold increase in lung metastases. This increase was dependent on CD4+ T cell activities; however, it occurred independent of the induced eosinophilia associated with allergen provocation. Interventional strategies showed that existing therapeutic modalities for asthma, such as inhaled corticosteroids, were sufficient to block the enhanced pulmonary recruitment of cancer cells from circulation. Additional mechanistic studies further suggested that the ability of circulating cancer cells to extravasate to surrounding lung tissues was linked to the activation of the vascular endothelium via one or more Gαi-coupled receptors. Interestingly, a survey of a clinical breast cancer surgical database showed that the incidence of asthma was higher among patients with lung metastases. Thus, our data demonstrate that allergic respiratory inflammation may represent a risk factor for the development of lung metastases and suggests that amelioration of the pulmonary inflammation associated with asthma will have a direct and immediate benefit to the 7–8% of breast cancer patients with this lung disease. PMID:18922934

  17. Kallistatin protects against bleomycin-induced idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis by inhibiting angiogenesis and inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Xiaoping; Wang, Xiao; Xie, Xiaolan; Zeng, Shulan; Li, Zhaofa; Xu, Xianxiang; Yang, Huiyong; Qiu, Fei; Lin, Junsheng; Diao, Yong

    2017-01-01

    Aberrant angiogenesis and vascular remodeling are the main features of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. Kallistatin is an anti-angiogenic peptide with known effects on endothelial cells. This study aimed to demonstrate that kallistatin has beneficial effects on bleomycin (BLM)-induced pulmonary fibrosis in a rat model by inhibiting angiogenesis. Twenty-five rats were randomly divided into five experimental groups: (A) Saline only (SA)-as the negative control, (B) BLM only (BLM)-as the model group, (C) BLM and 0.1 mg/kg kallistatin (L-Kal), (D) BLM and 0.5 mg/kg kallistatin (M-Kal), and (E) BLM and 2.5 mg/kg kallistatin (H-Kal). Fibrillar collagen was quantified by Masson’s trichrome and hematoxylin-eosin staining. Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1), α-smooth-muscle-actin (α-SMA) and microvascular density (MVD) were measured by immunohistochemistry. Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR), and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were assayed by Western immunoblotting or ELISA. Daily administration of kallistatin attenuated fibrosis in BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis, as shown by histology. During inflammation from BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis, kallistatin reduced the number of inflammatory cells infiltrating the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Kallistatin also inhibited VEGF expression and phosphorylation of VEGFR2 (Flk-1). In vitro, kallistatin blocked tube formation by inhibiting Flk-1 and GSK-3β phosphorylation. The results demonstrated that continuous administration of kallistatin attenuated BLM-induced pulmonary fibrosis and improved survival of BLM rats. Reducing pulmonary fibrosis was achieved by partial inhibition of pulmonary inflammation and angiogenesis. PMID:28386328

  18. Manganese (II) induces chemical hypoxia by inhibiting HIF-prolyl hydroxylase: Implication in manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Jeongoh; Lee, Jong-Suk; Choi, Daekyu; Lee, Youna; Hong, Sungchae; Choi, Jungyun; Han, Songyi; Ko, Yujin; Kim, Jung-Ae; Mi Kim, Young; Jung, Yunjin

    2009-03-15

    Manganese (II), a transition metal, causes pulmonary inflammation upon environmental or occupational inhalation in excess. We investigated a potential molecular mechanism underlying manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation. Manganese (II) delayed HIF-1{alpha} protein disappearance, which occurred by inhibiting HIF-prolyl hydroxylase (HPH), the key enzyme for HIF-1{alpha} hydroxylation and subsequent von Hippel-Lindau(VHL)-dependent HIF-1{alpha} degradation. HPH inhibition by manganese (II) was neutralized significantly by elevated dose of iron. Consistent with this, the induction of cellular HIF-1{alpha} protein by manganese (II) was abolished by pretreatment with iron. Manganese (II) induced the HIF-1 target gene involved in pulmonary inflammation, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), in lung carcinoma cell lines. The induction of VEGF was dependent on HIF-1. Manganese-induced VEGF promoted tube formation of HUVEC. Taken together, these data suggest that HIF-1 may be a potential mediator of manganese-induced pulmonary inflammation.

  19. Bufei Huoxue Capsule Attenuates PM2.5-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Yue; Cai, Zhe; Zhao, Yukun; Wu, Ye; Zheng, Xuan; Liu, Ying; Qin, Yuying; Gu, Mingjie; Jin, Jin

    2017-01-01

    Atmospheric fine particulate matter 2.5 (PM 2.5) may carry many toxic substances on its surface and this may pose a public health threat. Epidemiological research indicates that cumulative ambient PM2.5 is correlated to morbidity and mortality due to pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Mitigating the toxic effects of PM2.5 is therefore highly desired. Bufei Huoxue (BFHX) capsules have been used in China to treat pulmonary heart disease (cor pulmonale). Thus, we assessed the effects of BFHX capsules on PM2.5-induced pulmonary inflammation and the underlying mechanisms of action. Using Polysearch and Cytoscape 3.2.1 software, pharmacological targets of BFHX capsules in atmospheric PM2.5-related respiratory disorders were predicted and found to be related to biological pathways of inflammation and immune function. In a mouse model of PM2.5-induced inflammation established with intranasal instillation of PM2.5 suspension, BFHX significantly reduced pathological response and inflammatory mediators including IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-8, TNF-α, and IL-1β. BFHX also reduced keratinocyte growth factor (KGF), secretory immunoglobulin A (sIgA), and collagen fibers deposition in lung and improved lung function. Thus, BFHX reduced pathological responses induced by PM2.5, possibly via regulation of inflammatory mediators in mouse lungs. PMID:28337225

  20. Diabetic Microvascular Disease and Pulmonary Fibrosis: The Contribution of Platelets and Systemic Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Jagadapillai, Rekha; Rane, Madhavi J.; Lin, Xingyu; Roberts, Andrew M.; Hoyle, Gary W.; Cai, Lu; Gozal, Evelyne

    2016-01-01

    Diabetes is strongly associated with systemic inflammation and oxidative stress, but its effect on pulmonary vascular disease and lung function has often been disregarded. Several studies identified restrictive lung disease and fibrotic changes in diabetic patients and in animal models of diabetes. While microvascular dysfunction is a well-known complication of diabetes, the mechanisms leading to diabetes-induced lung injury have largely been disregarded. We described the potential involvement of diabetes-induced platelet-endothelial interactions in perpetuating vascular inflammation and oxidative injury leading to fibrotic changes in the lung. Changes in nitric oxide synthase (NOS) activation and decreased NO bioavailability in the diabetic lung increase platelet activation and vascular injury and may account for platelet hyperreactivity reported in diabetic patients. Additionally, the Janus kinase/signal transducer and activator of transcription (JAK/STAT) pathway has been reported to mediate pancreatic islet damage, and is implicated in the onset of diabetes, inflammation and vascular injury. Many growth factors and diabetes-induced agonists act via the JAK/STAT pathway. Other studies reported the contribution of the JAK/STAT pathway to the regulation of the pulmonary fibrotic process but the role of this pathway in the development of diabetic lung fibrosis has not been considered. These observations may open new therapeutic perspectives for modulating multiple pathways to mitigate diabetes onset or its pulmonary consequences. PMID:27834824

  1. Inflammation in pulmonary hypertension: what we know and what we could logically and safely target first.

    PubMed

    Cohen-Kaminsky, Sylvia; Hautefort, Aurélie; Price, Laura; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric

    2014-08-01

    Inflammation is important for the initiation and the maintenance of vascular remodeling in most of the animal models of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), and therapeutic targeting of inflammation in these models blocks PAH development. In humans, pulmonary vascular lesions of PAH are the source of cytokine and chemokine production, related to inflammatory cell recruitment and lymphoid neogenesis. Circulating autoantibodies to endothelial cells and to fibroblasts have been reported in 10-40% of patients with idiopathic PAH, suggesting a possible role for autoimmunity in the pathogenesis of pulmonary vascular lesions. Current specific PAH treatments have immunomodulatory properties, and some studies have demonstrated a correlation between levels of circulating inflammatory mediators and patient survival. New immunopathological approaches to PAH should enable the development of innovative treatments for this severe condition.

  2. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F; Hoyle, Gary W

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury.

  3. Prostaglandin D2 Attenuates Bleomycin-Induced Lung Inflammation and Pulmonary Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Omori, Keisuke; Nakamura, Tatsuro; Maehara, Toko; Aritake, Kosuke; Urade, Yoshihiro; Murata, Takahisa

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a progressive and fatal lung disease with limited therapeutic options. Although it is well known that lipid mediator prostaglandins are involved in the development of pulmonary fibrosis, the role of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) remains unknown. Here, we investigated whether genetic disruption of hematopoietic PGD synthase (H-PGDS) affects the bleomycin-induced lung inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis in mouse. Compared with H-PGDS naïve (WT) mice, H-PGDS-deficient mice (H-PGDS-/-) represented increased collagen deposition in lungs 14 days after the bleomycin injection. The enhanced fibrotic response was accompanied by an increased mRNA expression of inflammatory mediators, including tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, and cyclooxygenase-2 on day 3. H-PGDS deficiency also increased vascular permeability on day 3 and infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages in lungs on day 3 and 7. Immunostaining showed that the neutrophils and macrophages expressed H-PGDS, and its mRNA expression was increased on day 3and 7 in WT lungs. These observations suggest that H-PGDS-derived PGD2 plays a protective role in bleomycin-induced lung inflammation and pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:27992456

  4. Carbocisteine reduces virus-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice exposed to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Yageta, Yuichi; Ishii, Yukio; Morishima, Yuko; Ano, Satoshi; Ohtsuka, Shigeo; Matsuyama, Masashi; Takeuchi, Kaoru; Itoh, Ken; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Hizawa, Nobuyuki

    2014-05-01

    Carbocisteine (S-CMC) inhibits viral infection and prevents acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. We recently demonstrated the protective effects of NF-E2-related factor (Nrf) 2 against influenza virus (FluV)-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS). In our current study, we investigated the effects of S-CMC on Nrf2 activation in cultured macrophages, and in mice infected with influenza after exposure to CS. Nuclear translocation of Nrf2 and the expression of Nrf2-targeted antioxidant genes, such as heavy and light subunits of γ glutamyl cysteine synthetase and heme oxigenase-1, were enhanced in a dose-dependent manner after treatment with S-CMC in peritoneal and alveolar macrophages of wild-type mice, but not in those of Nrf2-deficient mice. Nuclear translocation of Nrf2 in macrophages was inhibited by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase inhibitor, LY294002. Phosphorylated Akt, Nrf2, and heme oxigenase-1 were induced in the alveolar macrophages of the lungs in wild-type mice after S-CMC administration. The extent of oxidative stress, inflammatory cell infiltration, pulmonary edema, and goblet cell hyperplasia was suppressed by S-CMC administration in the lungs of wild-type mice after exposure to both CS and FluV. Our findings suggest that S-CMC reduces pulmonary inflammation and mucus overproduction in mice exposed to CS after infection with FluV via the activation of Nrf2.

  5. Pulmonary and pleural inflammation after intratracheal instillation of short single-walled and multi-walled carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Katsuhide; Fukuda, Makiko; Endoh, Shigehisa; Maru, Junko; Kato, Haruhisa; Nakamura, Ayako; Shinohara, Naohide; Uchino, Kanako; Honda, Kazumasa

    2016-08-22

    Relationships between the physical properties of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) and their toxicities have been studied. However, little research has been conducted to investigate the pulmonary and pleural inflammation caused by short-fiber single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs) and multi-walled CNTs (MWCNTs). This study was performed to characterize differences in rat pulmonary and pleural inflammation caused by intratracheal instillation with doses of 0.15 or 1.5mg/kg of either short-sized SWCNTs or MWCNTs. Data from bronchoalveolar lavage fluid analysis, histopathological findings, and transcriptional profiling of rat lungs obtained over a 90-day period indicated that short SWCNTs caused persistent pulmonary inflammation. In addition, the short MWCNTs markedly impacted alveoli immediately after instillation, with the levels of pulmonary inflammation following MWCNT instillation being reduced in a time-dependent manner. MWCNT instillation induced greater levels of pleural inflammation than did short SWCNTs. SWCNTs and MWCNTs translocated in mediastinal lymph nodes were observed, suggesting that SWCNTs and MWCNTs underwent lymphatic drainage to the mediastinal lymph nodes after pleural penetration. Our results suggest that short SWCNTs and MWCNTs induced pulmonary and pleural inflammation and that they might be transported throughout the body after intratracheal instillation. The extent of changes in inflammation differed following SWCNT and MWCNT instillation in a time-dependent manner.

  6. Resveratrol alleviate hypoxic pulmonary hypertension via anti-inflammation and anti-oxidant pathways in rats

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Dunquan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yanxia; Liu, Yi; Luo, Ying; Niu, Wen; Dong, Mingqing; Liu, Manling; Dong, Haiying; Zhao, Pengtao; Li, Zhichao

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a plant-derived polyphenolic compound and a phytoestrogen, was shown to possess multiple protective effects including anti-inflammatory response and anti-oxidative stress. Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is a progressive disease characterized by sustained vascular resistance and marked pulmonary vascular remodeling. The exact mechanisms of HPH are still unclear, but inflammatory response and oxidative stress was demonstrated to participate in the progression of HPH. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of resveratrol on HPH development. Sprague-Dawley rats were challenged by hypoxia exposure for 28 days to mimic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension along with treating resveratrol (40 mg/kg/day). Hemodynamic and pulmonary pathomorphology data were then obtained, and the anti-proliferation effect of resveratrol was determined by in vitro assays. The anti-inflammation and anti-oxidative effects of resveratrol were investigated in vivo and in vitro. The present study showed that resveratrol treatment alleviated right ventricular systolic pressure and pulmonary arterial remodeling induced by hypoxia. In vitro experiments showed that resveratrol notably inhibited proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells in an ER-independent manner. Data showed that resveratrol administration inhibited HIF-1 α expression in vivo and in vitro, suppressed inflammatory cells infiltration around the pulmonary arteries, and decreased ROS production induced by hypoxia in PAMSCs. The inflammatory cytokines' mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6, and interleukin 1β were all suppressed by resveratrol treatment. The in vitro assays showed that resveratrol inhibited the expression of HIF-1 α via suppressing the MAPK/ERK1 and PI3K/AKT pathways. The antioxidant axis of Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2/ Thioredoxin 1 (Nrf-2/Trx-1) was up-regulated both in lung tissues and in cultured PASMCs. In general, the current study

  7. Resveratrol alleviate hypoxic pulmonary hypertension via anti-inflammation and anti-oxidant pathways in rats.

    PubMed

    Xu, Dunquan; Li, Yan; Zhang, Bo; Wang, Yanxia; Liu, Yi; Luo, Ying; Niu, Wen; Dong, Mingqing; Liu, Manling; Dong, Haiying; Zhao, Pengtao; Li, Zhichao

    2016-01-01

    Resveratrol, a plant-derived polyphenolic compound and a phytoestrogen, was shown to possess multiple protective effects including anti-inflammatory response and anti-oxidative stress. Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) is a progressive disease characterized by sustained vascular resistance and marked pulmonary vascular remodeling. The exact mechanisms of HPH are still unclear, but inflammatory response and oxidative stress was demonstrated to participate in the progression of HPH. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of resveratrol on HPH development. Sprague-Dawley rats were challenged by hypoxia exposure for 28 days to mimic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension along with treating resveratrol (40 mg/kg/day). Hemodynamic and pulmonary pathomorphology data were then obtained, and the anti-proliferation effect of resveratrol was determined by in vitro assays. The anti-inflammation and anti-oxidative effects of resveratrol were investigated in vivo and in vitro. The present study showed that resveratrol treatment alleviated right ventricular systolic pressure and pulmonary arterial remodeling induced by hypoxia. In vitro experiments showed that resveratrol notably inhibited proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells in an ER-independent manner. Data showed that resveratrol administration inhibited HIF-1 α expression in vivo and in vitro, suppressed inflammatory cells infiltration around the pulmonary arteries, and decreased ROS production induced by hypoxia in PAMSCs. The inflammatory cytokines' mRNA levels of tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 6, and interleukin 1β were all suppressed by resveratrol treatment. The in vitro assays showed that resveratrol inhibited the expression of HIF-1 α via suppressing the MAPK/ERK1 and PI3K/AKT pathways. The antioxidant axis of Nuclear factor erythroid-2 related factor 2/ Thioredoxin 1 (Nrf-2/Trx-1) was up-regulated both in lung tissues and in cultured PASMCs. In general, the current study

  8. Sequential Exposure to Carbon Nanotubes and Bacteria Enhances Pulmonary Inflammation and Infectivity

    PubMed Central

    Shvedova, Anna A.; Fabisiak, James P.; Kisin, Elena R.; Murray, Ashley R.; Roberts, Jenny R.; Tyurina, Yulia Y.; Antonini, James M.; Feng, Wei Hong; Kommineni, Choudari; Reynolds, Jeffrey; Barchowsky, Aaron; Castranova, Vince; Kagan, Valerian E.

    2008-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT), with their applications in industry and medicine, may lead to new risks to human health. CNT induce a robust pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress in rodents. Realistic exposures to CNT may occur in conjunction with other pathogenic impacts (microbial infections) and trigger enhanced responses. We evaluated interactions between pharyngeal aspiration of single-walled CNT (SWCNT) and bacterial pulmonary infection of C57BL/6 mice with Listeria monocytogenes (LM). Mice were given SWCNT (0, 10, and 40 μg/mouse) and 3 days later were exposed to LM (103 bacteria/mouse). Sequential exposure to SWCNT/LM amplified lung inflammation and collagen formation. Despite this robust inflammatory response, SWCNT pre-exposure significantly decreased the pulmonary clearance of LM-exposed mice measured 3 to 7 days after microbial infection versus PBS/LM-treated mice. Decreased bacterial clearance in SWCNT-pre-exposed mice was associated with decreased phagocytosis of bacteria by macrophages and a decrease in nitric oxide production by these phagocytes. Pre-incubation of naïve alveolar macrophages with SWCNT in vitro also resulted in decreased nitric oxide generation and suppressed phagocytizing activity toward LM. Failure of SWCNT-exposed mice to clear LM led to a continued elevation in nearly all major chemokines and acute phase cytokines into the later course of infection. In SWCNT/LM-exposed mice, bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils, alveolar macrophages, and lymphocytes, as well as lactate dehydrogenase level, were increased compared with mice exposed to SWCNT or LM alone. In conclusion, enhanced acute inflammation and pulmonary injury with delayed bacterial clearance after SWCNT exposure may lead to increased susceptibility to lung infection in exposed populations. PMID:18096873

  9. Non-invasive biomarkers of pulmonary damage and inflammation: Application to children exposed to ozone and trichloramine

    SciTech Connect

    Bernard, Alfred . E-mail: bernard@toxi.ucl.ac.be; Carbonnelle, Sylviane; Nickmilder, Marc; Burbure, Claire de

    2005-08-07

    To date, airways injury or inflammation caused by air pollutants has been evaluated mainly by analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage, an invasive technique totally unsuitable to children. The assessment of respiratory risks in this particularly vulnerable population has thus for a long time relied on spirometric tests and self-reported symptoms which are relatively late and inaccurate indicators of lung damage. Research in the field of biomarkers is now opening new perspectives with the development of non-invasive tests allowing to monitor inflammation and damage in the deep lung. Blood tests measuring lung-specific proteins (pneumoproteins) such as Clara cell protein (CC16) and surfactant-associated proteins (A, B or D) are now available to evaluate the permeability and/or the cellular integrity of the pulmonary epithelium. The application of these tests to children has recently led to the discovery of a lung epithelium hyperpermeability caused by trichloramine (nitrogen trichloride), an irritant gas contaminating the air of indoor-chlorinated pools. Serum CC16 can also serve to detect increases of airway permeability during short-term exposures to ambient ozone. Indicators measurable in exhaled air such as nitric oxide (NO) appear more useful to detect airway inflammation. By applying the exhaled NO test to children attending summer camps, we recently found that ambient ozone produces an acute inflammatory response in children from levels slightly lower than current air quality guidelines. In a study exploring the links between atopy, asthma, and exposure to chlorination products in indoor pools, we also found that the exhaled NO test can serve to detect the chronic airway inflammation associated with excessive exposure to trichloramine. Lung-specific proteins measurable in serum and markers in exhaled air represent sensitive tools that can be used to assess non-invasively the effects of air pollutants on the respiratory tract of children.

  10. Inhibition of chlorine-induced pulmonary inflammation and edema by mometasone and budesonide

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jing; Mo, Yiqun; Schlueter, Connie F.; Hoyle, Gary W.

    2013-10-15

    Chlorine gas is a widely used industrial compound that is highly toxic by inhalation and is considered a chemical threat agent. Inhalation of high levels of chlorine results in acute lung injury characterized by pneumonitis, pulmonary edema, and decrements in lung function. Because inflammatory processes can promote damage in the injured lung, anti-inflammatory therapy may be of potential benefit for treating chemical-induced acute lung injury. We previously developed a chlorine inhalation model in which mice develop epithelial injury, neutrophilic inflammation, pulmonary edema, and impaired pulmonary function. This model was used to evaluate nine corticosteroids for the ability to inhibit chlorine-induced neutrophilic inflammation. Two of the most potent corticosteroids in this assay, mometasone and budesonide, were investigated further. Mometasone or budesonide administered intraperitoneally 1 h after chlorine inhalation caused a dose-dependent inhibition of neutrophil influx in lung tissue sections and in the number of neutrophils in lung lavage fluid. Budesonide, but not mometasone, reduced the levels of the neutrophil attractant CXCL1 in lavage fluid 6 h after exposure. Mometasone or budesonide also significantly inhibited pulmonary edema assessed 1 day after chlorine exposure. Chlorine inhalation resulted in airway hyperreactivity to inhaled methacholine, but neither mometasone nor budesonide significantly affected this parameter. The results suggest that mometasone and budesonide may represent potential treatments for chemical-induced lung injury. - Highlights: • Chlorine causes lung injury when inhaled and is considered a chemical threat agent. • Corticosteroids may inhibit lung injury through their anti-inflammatory actions. • Corticosteroids inhibited chlorine-induced pneumonitis and pulmonary edema. • Mometasone and budesonide are potential rescue treatments for chlorine lung injury.

  11. Inhibitory effects of Cnidium monnieri fruit extract on pulmonary inflammation in mice induced by cigarette smoke condensate and lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed

    Kwak, Ho-Geun; Lim, Heung-Bin

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the inhibitory effect of Cnidium monnieri fruit (CM) extracts on pulmonary inflammation induced in mice by cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Pulmonary inflammation was induced by intratracheal instillation of LPS and CSC five times within 12 days. CM extract was administered orally at a dose of 50 or 200 mg·kg(-1). The number of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid was counted using a fluorescence activated cell sorter. Inflammatory mediator levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The administration of LPS and CSC exacerbated airway hyper-responsiveness (AHR) and induced an accumulation of inflammatory cells and mediators, and led to histological changes. However, these responses are modulated by treatment with CM, and the treatment with CM extract produces similar or more extensive results than the treatment with cyclosporin A (CSA). CM extract may have an inhibitory effect on pulmonary inflammation related with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  12. Clinical application of autologous technetium-99m-labelled eosinophils to detect focal eosinophilic inflammation in the lung.

    PubMed

    Loutsios, Chrystalla; Farahi, Neda; Simmonds, Rosalind; Cullum, Ian; Gillett, Daniel; Solanki, Chandra; Solanki, Kishor; Buscombe, John; Condliffe, Alison M; Peters, A Mike; Chilvers, Edwin R

    2015-11-01

    The detection of focal eosinophilic inflammation by non-invasive means may aid the diagnosis and follow-up of a variety of pulmonary pathologies. All current methods of detection involve invasive sampling, which may be contraindicated or too high-risk to be performed safely. The use of injected autologous technetium-99m (Tc-99m)-labelled eosinophils coupled to single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) has been demonstrated to localise eosinophilic inflammation in the lungs of a patient with antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-positive vasculitis. Here, we report on the utility of this technique to detect active eosinophilic inflammation in a patient with focal lung inflammation where a biopsy was contraindicated.

  13. Matrikines are key regulators in modulating the amplitude of lung inflammation in acute pulmonary infection

    PubMed Central

    Akthar, Samia; Patel, Dhiren F.; Beale, Rebecca C.; Peiró, Teresa; Xu, Xin; Gaggar, Amit; Jackson, Patricia L.; Blalock, J. Edwin; Lloyd, Clare M.; Snelgrove, Robert J.

    2015-01-01

    Bioactive matrix fragments (matrikines) have been identified in a myriad of disorders, but their impact on the evolution of airway inflammation has not been demonstrated. We recently described a pathway where the matrikine and neutrophil chemoattractant proline–glycine–proline (PGP) could be degraded by the enzyme leukotriene A4 hydrolase (LTA4H). LTA4H classically functions in the generation of pro-inflammatory leukotriene B4, thus LTA4H exhibits opposing pro- and anti-inflammatory activities. The physiological significance of this secondary anti-inflammatory activity remains unknown. Here we show, using readily resolving pulmonary inflammation models, that loss of this secondary activity leads to more pronounced and sustained inflammation and illness owing to PGP accumulation. PGP elicits an exacerbated neutrophilic inflammation and protease imbalance that further degrades the extracellular matrix, generating fragments that perpetuate inflammation. This highlights a critical role for the secondary anti-inflammatory activity of LTA4H and thus has consequences for the generation of global LTA4H inhibitors currently being developed. PMID:26400771

  14. Effect of naturally occurring ozone air pollution episodes on pulmonary oxidative stress and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Pirozzi, Cheryl; Sturrock, Anne; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Greene, Tom; Scholand, Mary Beth; Kanner, Richard; Paine, Robert

    2015-05-12

    This study aimed to determine if naturally occurring episodes of ozone air pollution in the Salt Lake Valley in Utah, USA, during the summer are associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, increased respiratory symptoms, and decreased lung function in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared to controls. We measured biomarkers (nitrite/nitrate (NOx), 8-isoprostane) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), spirometry, and respiratory symptoms in 11 former smokers with moderate-to-severe COPD and nine former smokers without airflow obstruction during periods of low and high ozone air pollution. High ozone levels were associated with increased NOx in EBC in both COPD (8.7 (±8.5) vs. 28.6 (±17.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p < 0.01) and control participants (7.6 (±16.5) vs. 28.5 (±15.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p = 0.02). There was no difference in pollution effect between COPD and control groups, and no difference in EBC 8-isoprostane, pulmonary function, or respiratory symptoms between clean air and pollution days in either group. Former smokers both with and without airflow obstruction developed airway oxidative stress and inflammation in association with ozone air pollution episodes.

  15. Effect of Naturally Occurring Ozone Air Pollution Episodes on Pulmonary Oxidative Stress and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pirozzi, Cheryl; Sturrock, Anne; Weng, Hsin-Yi; Greene, Tom; Scholand, Mary Beth; Kanner, Richard; Paine, Robert

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed to determine if naturally occurring episodes of ozone air pollution in the Salt Lake Valley in Utah, USA, during the summer are associated with increased pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress, increased respiratory symptoms, and decreased lung function in individuals with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) compared to controls. We measured biomarkers (nitrite/nitrate (NOx), 8-isoprostane) in exhaled breath condensate (EBC), spirometry, and respiratory symptoms in 11 former smokers with moderate-to-severe COPD and nine former smokers without airflow obstruction during periods of low and high ozone air pollution. High ozone levels were associated with increased NOx in EBC in both COPD (8.7 (±8.5) vs. 28.6 (±17.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p < 0.01) and control participants (7.6 (±16.5) vs. 28.5 (±15.6) μmol/L on clean air vs. pollution days, respectively, p = 0.02). There was no difference in pollution effect between COPD and control groups, and no difference in EBC 8-isoprostane, pulmonary function, or respiratory symptoms between clean air and pollution days in either group. Former smokers both with and without airflow obstruction developed airway oxidative stress and inflammation in association with ozone air pollution episodes. PMID:25985308

  16. Fresh frozen plasma lessens pulmonary endothelial inflammation and hyperpermeability after hemorrhagic shock and is associated with loss of syndecan 1.

    PubMed

    Peng, Zhanglong; Pati, Shibani; Potter, Daniel; Brown, Ryan; Holcomb, John B; Grill, Raymond; Wataha, Kathryn; Park, Pyong Woo; Xue, Hasen; Kozar, Rosemary A

    2013-09-01

    We have recently demonstrated that injured patients in hemorrhagic shock shed syndecan 1 and that the early use of fresh frozen plasma (FFP) in these patients is correlated with improved clinical outcomes. As the lungs are frequently injured after trauma, we hypothesized that hemorrhagic shock-induced shedding of syndecan 1 exposes the underlying pulmonary vascular endothelium to injury resulting in inflammation and hyperpermeability and that these effects would be mitigated by FFP. In vitro, pulmonary endothelial permeability, endothelial monolayer flux, transendothelial electrical resistance, and leukocyte-endothelial binding were measured in pulmonary endothelial cells after incubation with equal volumes of FFP or lactated Ringer's (LR). In vivo, using a coagulopathic mouse model of trauma and hemorrhagic shock, pulmonary hyperpermeability, neutrophil infiltration, and syndecan 1 expression and systemic shedding were assessed after 3 h of resuscitation with either 1× FFP or 3× LR and compared with shock alone and shams. In vitro, endothelial permeability and flux were decreased, transendothelial electrical resistance was increased, and leukocyte-endothelial binding was inhibited by FFP compared with LR-treated endothelial cells. In vivo, hemorrhagic shock was associated with systemic shedding of syndecan 1, which correlated with decreased pulmonary syndecan 1 and increased pulmonary vascular hyperpermeability and inflammation. Fresh frozen plasma resuscitation, compared with LR resuscitation, abrogated these injurious effects. After hemorrhagic shock, FFP resuscitation inhibits endothelial cell hyperpermeability and inflammation and restores pulmonary syndecan 1 expression. Modulation of pulmonary syndecan 1 expression may mechanistically contribute to the beneficial effects FFP.

  17. Serum amyloid A opposes lipoxin A₄ to mediate glucocorticoid refractory lung inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Bozinovski, Steven; Uddin, Mohib; Vlahos, Ross; Thompson, Michelle; McQualter, Jonathan L; Merritt, Anne-Sophie; Wark, Peter A B; Hutchinson, Anastasia; Irving, Louis B; Levy, Bruce D; Anderson, Gary P

    2012-01-17

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) will soon be the third most common cause of death globally. Despite smoking cessation, neutrophilic mucosal inflammation persistently damages the airways and fails to protect from recurrent infections. This maladaptive and excess inflammation is also refractory to glucocorticosteroids (GC). Here, we identify serum amyloid A (SAA) as a candidate mediator of GC refractory inflammation in COPD. Extrahepatic SAA was detected locally in COPD bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, which correlated with IL-8 and neutrophil elastase, consistent with neutrophil recruitment and activation. Immunohistochemistry detected SAA was in close proximity to airway epithelium, and in vitro SAA triggered release of IL-8 and other proinflammatory mediators by airway epithelial cells in an ALX/FPR2 (formyl peptide receptor 2) receptor-dependent manner. Lipoxin A(4) (LXA(4)) can also interact with ALX/FPR2 receptors and lead to allosteric inhibition of SAA-initiated epithelial responses (pA(2) 13 nM). During acute exacerbation, peripheral blood SAA levels increased dramatically and were disproportionately increased relative to LXA(4). Human lung macrophages (CD68(+)) colocalized with SAA and GCs markedly increased SAA in vitro (THP-1, pEC(50) 43 nM). To determine its direct actions, SAA was administered into murine lung, leading to induction of CXC chemokine ligand 1/2 and a neutrophilic response that was inhibited by 15-epi-LXA(4) but not dexamethasone. Taken together, these findings identify SAA as a therapeutic target for inhibition and implicate SAA as a mediator of GC-resistant lung inflammation that can overwhelm organ protective signaling by lipoxins at ALX/FPR2 receptors.

  18. Tissue heme oxygenase-1 exerts anti-inflammatory effects on LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Konrad, F M; Knausberg, U; Höne, R; Ngamsri, K-C; Reutershan, J

    2016-01-01

    Heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) has been shown to display anti-inflammatory properties in models of acute pulmonary inflammation. For the first time, we investigated the role of leukocytic HO-1 using a model of HO-1(flox/flox) mice lacking leukocytic HO-1 that were subjected to lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute pulmonary inflammation. Immunohistology and flow cytometry demonstrated that activation of HO-1 using hemin decreased migration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) to the lung interstitium and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) in the wild-type and, surprisingly, also in HO-1(flox/flox) mice, emphasizing the anti-inflammatory potential of nonmyeloid HO-1. Nevertheless, hemin reduced the CXCL1, CXCL2/3, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and interleukin 6 (IL6) levels in both animal strains. Microvascular permeability was attenuated by hemin in wild-type and HO-1(flox/flox) mice, indicating a crucial role of non-myeloid HO-1 in endothelial integrity. The determination of the activity of HO-1 in mouse lungs revealed no compensatory increase in the HO-1(flox/flox) mice. Topical administration of hemin via inhalation reduced the dose required to attenuate PMN migration and microvascular permeability by a factor of 40, emphasizing its clinical potential. In addition, HO-1 stimulation was protective against pulmonary inflammation when initiated after the inflammatory stimulus. In conclusion, nonmyeloid HO-1 is crucial for the anti-inflammatory effect of this enzyme on PMN migration to different compartments of the lung and on microvascular permeability.

  19. Neutrophil restraint by green tea: inhibition of inflammation, associated angiogenesis, and pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Donà, Massimo; Dell'Aica, Isabella; Calabrese, Fiorella; Benelli, Roberto; Morini, Monica; Albini, Adriana; Garbisa, Spiridione

    2003-04-15

    Neutrophils play an essential role in host defense and inflammation, but the latter may trigger and sustain the pathogenesis of a range of acute and chronic diseases. Green tea has been claimed to exert anti-inflammatory properties through unknown molecular mechanisms. We have previously shown that the most abundant catechin of green tea, (-)epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG), strongly inhibits neutrophil elastase. Here we show that 1) micromolar EGCG represses reactive oxygen species activity and inhibits apoptosis of activated neutrophils, and 2) dramatically inhibits chemokine-induced neutrophil chemotaxis in vitro; 3) both oral EGCG and green tea extract block neutrophil-mediated angiogenesis in vivo in an inflammatory angiogenesis model, and 4) oral administration of green tea extract enhances resolution in a pulmonary inflammation model, significantly reducing consequent fibrosis. These results provide molecular and cellular insights into the claimed beneficial properties of green tea and indicate that EGCG is a potent anti-inflammatory compound with therapeutic potential.

  20. Herbal Formula, PM014, Attenuates Lung Inflammation in a Murine Model of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hyojung; Kim, Youngeun; Kim, Hye Jin; Park, Soojin; Jang, Young Pyo; Jung, Sungki; Jung, Heejae; Bae, Hyunsu

    2012-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), which is characterized by airway obstruction, leads to, as the two major forms of COPD, chronic bronchitis and emphysema. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of herbal formula, PM014, in a murine model of COPD. Balb/c mice were treated once with each herb extract in PM014 or PM014 mixture via an oral injection. Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or elastase/LPS were administrated to the mice to induce a disease that resembles COPD. PM014 treatment significantly attenuated the increased accumulation of immune cells in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) compared to control mice. In addition, the TNF-α and IL-6 levels in BALF were decreased in the PM014 mice. Furthermore, histological analysis demonstrated that PM014 attenuated the hazardous effects of lung inflammation. These data suggest that PM014 exerts beneficial effects against forms of COPD such as lung inflammation. PMID:22778777

  1. Enrichment of lung microbiome with supraglottic taxa is associated with increased pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The lung microbiome of healthy individuals frequently harbors oral organisms. Despite evidence that microaspiration is commonly associated with smoking-related lung diseases, the effects of lung microbiome enrichment with upper airway taxa on inflammation has not been studied. We hypothesize that the presence of oral microorganisms in the lung microbiome is associated with enhanced pulmonary inflammation. To test this, we sampled bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) from the lower airways of 29 asymptomatic subjects (nine never-smokers, 14 former-smokers, and six current-smokers). We quantified, amplified, and sequenced 16S rRNA genes from BAL samples by qPCR and 454 sequencing. Pulmonary inflammation was assessed by exhaled nitric oxide (eNO), BAL lymphocytes, and neutrophils. Results BAL had lower total 16S than supraglottic samples and higher than saline background. Bacterial communities in the lower airway clustered in two distinct groups that we designated as pneumotypes. The rRNA gene concentration and microbial community of the first pneumotype was similar to that of the saline background. The second pneumotype had higher rRNA gene concentration and higher relative abundance of supraglottic-characteristic taxa (SCT), such as Veillonella and Prevotella, and we called it pneumotypeSCT. Smoking had no effect on pneumotype allocation, α, or β diversity. PneumotypeSCT was associated with higher BAL lymphocyte-count (P= 0.007), BAL neutrophil-count (P= 0.034), and eNO (P= 0.022). Conclusion A pneumotype with high relative abundance of supraglottic-characteristic taxa is associated with enhanced subclinical lung inflammation. PMID:24450871

  2. Pulmonary Remodeling in Equine Asthma: What Do We Know about Mediators of Inflammation in the Horse?

    PubMed Central

    Gehlen, Heidrun

    2016-01-01

    Equine inflammatory airway disease (IAD) and recurrent airway obstruction (RAO) represent a spectrum of chronic inflammatory disease of the airways in horses resembling human asthma in many aspects. Therefore, both are now described as severity grades of equine asthma. Increasing evidence in horses and humans suggests that local pulmonary inflammation is influenced by systemic inflammatory processes and the other way around. Inflammation, coagulation, and fibrinolysis as well as extracellular remodeling show close interactions. Cytology of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and tracheal wash is commonly used to evaluate the severity of local inflammation in the lung. Other mediators of inflammation, like interleukins involved in the chemotaxis of neutrophils, have been studied. Chronic obstructive pneumopathies lead to remodeling of bronchial walls and lung parenchyma, ultimately causing fibrosis. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are discussed as the most important proteolytic enzymes during remodeling in human medicine and increasing evidence exists for the horse as well. A systemic involvement has been shown for severe equine asthma by increased acute phase proteins like serum amyloid A and haptoglobin in peripheral blood during exacerbation. Studies focusing on these and further possible inflammatory markers for chronic respiratory disease in the horse are discussed in this review of the literature. PMID:28053371

  3. Eosinophilic airway inflammation: role in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    George, Leena; Brightling, Christopher E.

    2016-01-01

    The chronic lung diseases, asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), are common affecting over 500 million people worldwide and causing substantial morbidity and mortality. Asthma is typically associated with Th2-mediated eosinophilic airway inflammation, in contrast to neutrophilic inflammation observed commonly in COPD. However, there is increasing evidence that the eosinophil might play an important role in 10–40% of patients with COPD. Consistently in both asthma and COPD a sputum eosinophilia is associated with a good response to corticosteroid therapy and tailored strategies aimed to normalize sputum eosinophils reduce exacerbation frequency and severity. Advances in our understanding of the multistep paradigm of eosinophil recruitment to the airway, and the consequence of eosinophilic inflammation, has led to the development of new therapies to target these molecular pathways. In this article we discuss the mechanisms of eosinophilic trafficking, the tools to assess eosinophilic airway inflammation in asthma and COPD during stable disease and exacerbations and review current and novel anti-eosinophilic treatments. PMID:26770668

  4. Monoclonal antibody therapy for the treatment of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease with eosinophilic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Nixon, John; Newbold, Paul; Mustelin, Tomas; Anderson, Gary P; Kolbeck, Roland

    2017-01-01

    Eosinophils have been linked with asthma for more than a century, but their role has been unclear. This review discusses the roles of eosinophils in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and describes therapeutic antibodies that affect eosinophilia. The aims of pharmacologic treatments for pulmonary conditions are to reduce symptoms, slow decline or improve lung function, and reduce the frequency and severity of exacerbations. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) are important in managing symptoms and exacerbations in asthma and COPD. However, control with these agents is often suboptimal, especially for patients with severe disease. Recently, new biologics that target eosinophilic inflammation, used as adjunctive therapy to corticosteroids, have proven beneficial and support a pivotal role for eosinophils in the pathology of asthma. Nucala® (mepolizumab; anti-interleukin [IL]-5) and Cinquair® (reslizumab; anti-IL-5), the second and third biologics approved, respectively, for the treatment of asthma, exemplifies these new treatment options. Emerging evidence suggests that eosinophils may contribute to exacerbations and possibly to lung function decline for a subset of patients with COPD. Here we describe the pharmacology of therapeutic antibodies inhibiting IL-5 or targeting the IL-5 receptor, as well as other cytokines contributing to eosinophilic inflammation. We discuss their roles as adjuncts to conventional therapeutic approaches, especially ICS therapy, when disease is suboptimally controlled. These agents have achieved a place in the therapeutic armamentarium for asthma and COPD and will deepen our understanding of the pathogenic role of eosinophils.

  5. Interleukin-1beta causes pulmonary inflammation, emphysema, and airway remodeling in the adult murine lung.

    PubMed

    Lappalainen, Urpo; Whitsett, Jeffrey A; Wert, Susan E; Tichelaar, Jay W; Bry, Kristina

    2005-04-01

    The production of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin (IL)-1 is increased in lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) or asthma. To characterize the in vivo actions of IL-1 in the lung, transgenic mice were generated in which human IL-1beta was expressed in the lung epithelium with a doxycycline-inducible system controlled by the rat Clara cell secretory protein (CCSP) promoter. Induction of IL-1beta expression in the lungs of adult mice caused pulmonary inflammation characterized by neutrophil and macrophage infiltrates. IL-1beta caused distal airspace enlargement, consistent with emphysema. IL-1beta caused disruption of elastin fibers in alveolar septa and fibrosis in airway walls and in the pleura. IL-1beta increased the thickness of conducting airways, enhanced mucin production, and caused lymphocytic aggregates in the airways. Decreased immunostaining for the winged helix transcription factor FOXA2 was associated with goblet cell hyperplasia in IL-1beta-expressing mice. The production of the neutrophil attractant CXC chemokines KC (CXCL1) and MIP-2 (CXCL2), and of matrix metalloproteases MMP-9 and MMP-12, was increased by IL-1beta. Chronic production of IL-1beta in respiratory epithelial cells of adult mice causes lung inflammation, enlargement of distal airspaces, mucus metaplasia, and airway fibrosis in the adult mouse.

  6. Cannabidiol (CBD) enhances lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation in C57BL/6 mice.

    PubMed

    Karmaus, Peer W F; Wagner, James G; Harkema, Jack R; Kaminski, Norbert E; Kaplan, Barbara L F

    2013-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a plant-derived cannabinoid that has been predominantly characterized as anti-inflammatory. However, it is clear that immune effects of cannabinoids can vary with cannabinoid concentration, or type or magnitude of immune stimulus. The present studies demonstrate that oral administration of CBD enhanced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. The enhanced inflammatory cell infiltrate as observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was comprised mainly of neutrophils, with some monocytes. Concomitantly, CBD enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA production, including tumor necrosis factor-α (Tnfa), interleukins (IL)-5 and -23 (Il6, Il23), and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (Gcsf). These results demonstrate that the CBD-mediated enhancement of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation is mediated at the level of transcription of a variety of pro-inflammatory genes. The significance of these studies is that CBD is part of a therapeutic currently in use for spasticity and pain in multiple sclerosis patients, and therefore it is important to further understand mechanisms by which CBD alters immune function.

  7. TLR4 signalling in pulmonary stromal cells is critical for inflammation and immunity in the airways.

    PubMed

    Perros, Frederic; Lambrecht, Bart N; Hammad, Hamida

    2011-09-24

    Inflammation of the airways, which is often associated with life-threatening infection by Gram-negative bacteria or presence of endotoxin in the bioaerosol, is still a major cause of severe airway diseases. Moreover, inhaled endotoxin may play an important role in the development and progression of airway inflammation in asthma. Pathologic changes induced by endotoxin inhalation include bronchospasm, airflow obstruction, recruitment of inflammatory cells, injury of the alveolar epithelium, and disruption of pulmonary capillary integrity leading to protein rich fluid leak in the alveolar space. Mammalian Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are important signalling receptors in innate host defense. Among these receptors, TLR4 plays a critical role in the response to endotoxin. Lungs are a complex compartmentalized organ with separate barriers, namely the alveolar-capillary barrier, the microvascular endothelium, and the alveolar epithelium. An emerging theme in the field of lung immunology is that structural cells (SCs) of the airways such as epithelial cells (ECs), endothelial cells, fibroblasts and other stromal cells produce activating cytokines that determine the quantity and quality of the lung immune response. This review focuses on the role of TLR4 in the innate and adaptive immune functions of the pulmonary SCs.

  8. Standardized Herbal Formula PM014 Inhibits Radiation-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jee-Youn; Shin, Dasom; Lee, Gihyun; Kim, Jin-Mo; Kim, Dongwook; An, Yong-Min; Yoo, Byung Rok; Chang, Hanna; Kim, Miran; Cho, Jaeho; Bae, Hyunsu

    2017-01-01

    Radiation therapy is widely used for thoracic cancers. However, it occasionally causes radiation-induced lung injuries, including pneumonitis and fibrosis. Chung-Sang-Bo-Ha-Tang (CSBHT) has been traditionally used to treat chronic pulmonary disease in Korea. PM014, a modified herbal formula derived from CSBHT, contains medicinal herbs of seven species. In our previous studies, PM014 exhibited anti-inflammatory effects in a chronic obstructive pulmonary disease model. In this study, we have evaluated the effects of PM014 on radiation-induced lung inflammation. Mice in the treatment group were orally administered PM014 six times for 2 weeks. Effects of PM014 on radiation pneumonitis were evaluated based on histological findings and differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. PM014 treatment significantly inhibited immune cell recruitment and collagen deposition in lung tissue. Normal lung volume, evaluated by radiological analysis, in PM014-treated mice was higher compared to that in irradiated control mice. PM014-treated mice exhibited significant changes in inspiratory capacity, compliance and tissue damping and elastance. Additionally, PM014 treatment resulted in the downregulation of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and fibrosis-related genes and a reduction in the transforming growth factor-β1-positive cell population in lung tissue. Thus, PM014 is a potent therapeutic agent for radiation-induced lung fibrosis and inflammation. PMID:28322297

  9. Cannabidiol (CBD) Enhances Lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in C57BL/6 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Karmaus, Peer W. F.; Wagner, James G.; Harkema, Jack R.; Kaminski, Norbert E.; Kaplan, Barbara L.F.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a plant-derived cannabinoid that has been predominantly characterized as anti-inflammatory. However, it is clear that immune effects of cannabinoids can vary with cannabinoid concentration, or type or magnitude of immune stimulus. The present studies demonstrate that oral administration of CBD enhanced lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced pulmonary inflammation in C57BL/6 mice. The enhanced inflammatory cell infiltrate as observed in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) was comprised mainly of neutrophils, with some monocytes. Concomitantly, CBD enhanced pro-inflammatory cytokine mRNA production, including tumor necrosis factor-α (Tnfa), interleukins (IL) 6 and 23 (Il6, Il23), and granulocyte colony stimulating factor (Gcsf). These results demonstrate that the CBD-mediated enhancement of LPS-induced pulmonary inflammation is mediated at the level of transcription of a variety of pro-inflammatory genes. The significance of these studies is that CBD is part of a therapeutic currently in use for spasticity and pain in multiple sclerosis patients, and therefore it is important to further understand mechanisms by which CBD alters immune function. PMID:23173851

  10. Interleukin-6 neutralization alleviates pulmonary inflammation in mice exposed to cigarette smoke and poly(I:C).

    PubMed

    Hubeau, Cedric; Kubera, John E; Masek-Hammerman, Katherine; Williams, Cara M M

    2013-11-01

    Increased systemic and pulmonary levels of IL-6 (interleukin-6) are associated with the severity of exacerbations and decline of lung function in patients with COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease). Whether IL-6 is directly involved or plays a bystander role in the pathophysiology of COPD remains unclear. Here we hypothesized that neutralizing circulating levels of IL-6 would modulate episodes of acute pulmonary inflammation following CS (cigarette smoke) exposure and virus-like challenges. For this purpose, we used a model where C57BL/6 mice were exposed to CS twice daily via a nose-only system, and concomitant periodic intranasal challenge with poly(I:C), a synthetic ligand for TLR3 (Toll-like receptor 3) that mimics the encounter with double stranded RNA that is carried by influenza-like viruses. This protocol recapitulates several aspects of acute pulmonary inflammation associated with COPD, including prominent airway neutrophilia, insensitivity to steroid treatment and increased levels of several inflammatory cytokines in BAL (bronchoalveolar lavage) samples. Although IL-6-deficient mice exposed to CS/poly(I:C) developed pulmonary inflammation similar to WT (wild-type) controls, WT mice exposed to CS/poly(I:C) and treated intraperitoneally with IL-6-neutralizing antibodies showed significantly lower blood counts of lymphocytes and monocytes, lower BAL levels of IL-6 and CXCL1 (CXC chemokine ligand 1)/KC (keratinocyte chemoattractant), as well as reduced numbers of BAL neutrophils, lymphocytes and macrophages. Our results thus indicate that the systemic neutralization of IL-6 significantly reduces CS/poly(I:C)-induced pulmonary inflammation, which may be a relevant approach to the treatment of episodes of acute pulmonary inflammation associated with COPD.

  11. Arterial Carboxyhemoglobin Measurement Is Useful for Evaluating Pulmonary Inflammation in Subjects with Interstitial Lung Disease.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yu; Shinkai, Masaharu; Kanoh, Soichiro; Fujikura, Yuji; K Rubin, Bruce; Kawana, Akihiko; Kaneko, Takeshi

    2017-01-01

    Objective The arterial concentration of carboxyhemoglobin (CO-Hb) in subjects with inflammatory pulmonary disease is higher than that in healthy individuals. We retrospectively analyzed the relationship between the CO-Hb concentration and established markers of disease severity in subjects with interstitial lung disease (ILD). Methods The CO-Hb concentration was measured in subjects with newly diagnosed or untreated ILD and the relationships between the CO-Hb concentration and the serum biomarker levels, lung function, high-resolution CT (HRCT) findings, and the uptake in gallium-67 ((67)Ga) scintigraphy were evaluated. Results Eighty-one non-smoking subjects were studied (mean age, 67 years). Among these subjects, (A) 17 had stable idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), (B) 9 had an acute exacerbation of IPF, (C) 44 had stable non-IPF, and (D) 11 had an exacerbation of non-IPF. The CO-Hb concentrations of these subjects were (A) 1.5±0.5%, (B) 2.1±0.5%, (C) 1.2±0.4%, and (D) 1.7±0.5%. The CO-Hb concentration was positively correlated with the serum levels of surfactant protein (SP)-A (r=0.38), SP-D (r=0.39), and the inflammation index (calculated from HRCT; r=0.57) and was negatively correlated with the partial pressure of oxygen in the arterial blood (r=-0.56) and the predicted diffusion capacity of carbon monoxide (r=-0.61). The CO-Hb concentrations in subjects with a negative heart sign on (67)Ga scintigraphy were higher than those in subjects without a negative heart sign (1.4±0.5% vs. 1.1±0.3%, p=0.018). Conclusion The CO-Hb levels of subjects with ILD were increased, particularly during an exacerbation, and were correlated with the parameters that reflect pulmonary inflammation.

  12. Milano Summer Particulate Matter (PM10) Triggers Lung Inflammation and Extra Pulmonary Adverse Events in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Cristina; Tinaglia, Valentina; Mantecca, Paride; Camatini, Marina; Palestini, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies have suggested a link between particulate matter (PM) exposure and increased mortality and morbidity associated with pulmonary and cardiovascular diseases; accumulating evidences point to a new role for air pollution in CNS diseases. The purpose of our study is to investigate PM10sum effects on lungs and extra pulmonary tissues. Milano PM10sum has been intratracheally instilled into BALB/c mice. Broncho Alveolar Lavage fluid, lung parenchyma, heart and brain were screened for markers of inflammation (cell counts, cytokines, ET-1, HO-1, MPO, iNOS), cytotoxicity (LDH, ALP, Hsp70, Caspase8-p18, Caspase3-p17) for a putative pro-carcinogenic marker (Cyp1B1) and for TLR4 pathway activation. Brain was also investigated for CD68, TNF-α, GFAP. In blood, cell counts were performed while plasma was screened for endothelial activation (sP-selectin, ET-1) and for inflammation markers (TNF-α, MIP-2, IL-1β, MPO). Genes up-regulation (HMOX1, Cyp1B1, IL-1β, MIP-2, MPO) and miR-21 have been investigated in lungs and blood. Inflammation in the respiratory tract of PM10sum-treated mice has been confirmed in BALf and lung parenchyma by increased PMNs percentage, increased ET-1, MPO and cytokines levels. A systemic spreading of lung inflammation in PM10sum-treated mice has been related to the increased blood total cell count and neutrophils percentage, as well as to increased blood MPO. The blood-endothelium interface activation has been confirmed by significant increases of plasma ET-1 and sP-selectin. Furthermore PM10sum induced heart endothelial activation and PAHs metabolism, proved by increased ET-1 and Cyp1B1 levels. Moreover, PM10sum causes an increase in brain HO-1 and ET-1. These results state the translocation of inflammation mediators, ultrafine particles, LPS, metals associated to PM10sum, from lungs to bloodstream, thus triggering a systemic reaction, mainly involving heart and brain. Our results provided additional insight into the toxicity of PM10sum

  13. Machine learning-based automatic detection of pulmonary trunk

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hong; Deng, Kun; Liang, Jianming

    2011-03-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common cardiovascular emergency with about 600,000 cases occurring annually and causing approximately 200,000 deaths in the US. CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become the reference standard for PE diagnosis, but the interpretation of these large image datasets is made complex and time consuming by the intricate branching structure of the pulmonary vessels, a myriad of artifacts that may obscure or mimic PEs, and suboptimal bolus of contrast and inhomogeneities with the pulmonary arterial blood pool. To meet this challenge, several approaches for computer aided diagnosis of PE in CTPA have been proposed. However, none of these approaches is capable of detecting central PEs, distinguishing the pulmonary artery from the vein to effectively remove any false positives from the veins, and dynamically adapting to suboptimal contrast conditions associated the CTPA scans. To overcome these shortcomings, it requires highly efficient and accurate identification of the pulmonary trunk. For this very purpose, in this paper, we present a machine learning based approach for automatically detecting the pulmonary trunk. Our idea is to train a cascaded AdaBoost classifier with a large number of Haar features extracted from CTPA image samples, so that the pulmonary trunk can be automatically identified by sequentially scanning the CTPA images and classifying each encountered sub-image with the trained classifier. Our approach outperforms an existing anatomy-based approach, requiring no explicit representation of anatomical knowledge and achieving a nearly 100% accuracy tested on a large number of cases.

  14. Prevention of Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation and Fibrosis in Mice by Paeonol

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meng-Han; Lin, An-Hsuan; Ko, Hsin-Kuo; Perng, Diahn-Warng; Lee, Tzong-Shyuan; Kou, Yu Ru

    2017-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a severe and progressive disease that is characterized by an abnormal deposition of extracellular matrix, such as collagens. The pathogenesis of this disease may be initiated by oxidative damage of lung epithelial cells by fibrogenic stimuli, leading to lung inflammation, which in turn promotes various lung fibrotic responses. The profibrogenic effect of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) on lung fibroblasts is crucial for the pathogenesis of this disease. Paeonol, the main phenolic compound present in the Chinese herb Paeonia suffruticosa, has antioxidant and anti-inflammatory properties. However, whether paeonol has therapeutic effects against pulmonary fibrosis remains unclear. Using a murine model, we showed that 21 days after the insult, intratracheal bleomycin caused pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis, as evidenced by lung histopathological manifestations and increase in various indices. The inflammatory indices included an increase in total cell count, differential cell count, and total protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. The fibrotic indices included an increase in lung levels of TGF-β1, total collagen, type 1α1 collagen (COL1A1), and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA; a marker of myofibroblasts). Bleomycin also was found to cause an increase in oxidative stress as reflected by increased levels of malondialdehyde and 4-hydroxynonenal in the lungs. Importantly, all these pathophysiological events were suppressed by daily treatment with paeonol. Using human lung fibroblasts, we further demonstrated that exposure of human lung fibroblasts to TGF-β1 increased productions of α-SMA and COL1A1, both of which were inhibited by inhibitors of Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38, and Smad3. JNK and p38 are two subfamily members of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), whereas Smad3 is a transcription factor. TGF-β1 exposure also increased the phosphorylation of JNK, p38, and Smad3 prior to the induction of α-SMA and

  15. Dictionary learning-based CT detection of pulmonary nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Panpan; Xia, Kewen; Zhang, Yanbo; Qian, Xiaohua; Wang, Ge; Yu, Hengyong

    2016-10-01

    Segmentation of lung features is one of the most important steps for computer-aided detection (CAD) of pulmonary nodules with computed tomography (CT). However, irregular shapes, complicated anatomical background and poor pulmonary nodule contrast make CAD a very challenging problem. Here, we propose a novel scheme for feature extraction and classification of pulmonary nodules through dictionary learning from training CT images, which does not require accurately segmented pulmonary nodules. Specifically, two classification-oriented dictionaries and one background dictionary are learnt to solve a two-category problem. In terms of the classification-oriented dictionaries, we calculate sparse coefficient matrices to extract intrinsic features for pulmonary nodule classification. The support vector machine (SVM) classifier is then designed to optimize the performance. Our proposed methodology is evaluated with the lung image database consortium and image database resource initiative (LIDC-IDRI) database, and the results demonstrate that the proposed strategy is promising.

  16. Age-dependent neutrophil and blood flow responsiveness in acute pulmonary inflammation in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Hyde, D M; Downey, G P; Tablin, F; Rosengren, S; Giclas, P C; Henson, P M; Worthen, G S

    1997-03-01

    Diminished ability of neonatal neutrophils to orient and move in a chemotactic gradient has been linked to compromised pulmonary host defense. We investigated whether deficiency of neonatal neutrophil function in vitro was evident in acute pulmonary inflammation. Analysis of neutrophils in vitro showed impaired chemotaxis in 4-wk-old compared with adult rabbits. In vivo-directed migration of labeled neutrophils into the alveolar space of adult rabbits in response to C5f instillation was significantly less for neutrophils donated from 4-wk-old rabbits compared with those from adults. In contrast, there were no differences in the alveolar accumulation of 4-wk-old and adult labeled neutrophils in 4-wk-old rabbits in response to C5f instillation, although the response showed a shorter time course than seen in adult rabbits. Adult rabbits diverted 46% of the blood away from the right cranial lung lobe, whereas 4-wk-old rabbits showed no change in blood flow after C5f instillation. Megakaryocytes (a source of blood flow mediators) were 3.2-fold greater in adult compared with 4-wk-old lung. These data suggest that the lack of blood flow diversion from inflamed neonatal lung increases neutrophil migration into alveoli, allowing for preservation of an inflammatory response despite neutrophil deficiencies in chemotaxis.

  17. Recent insights into pulmonary repair following virus-induced inflammation of the respiratory tract

    PubMed Central

    Gorski, Stacey A.; Hufford, Matthew M.; Braciale, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    A hallmark of infection by respiratory viruses is productive infection of and the subsequent destruction of the airway epithelium. These viruses can also target other stromal cell types as well as in certain instances, CD45+ hematopoietic cells either resident in the lungs or part of the inflammatory response to infection. The mechanisms by which the virus produces injury to these cell types include direct infection with cytopathic effects as a consequence of replication. Host mediated damage is also a culprit in pulmonary injury as both innate and adaptive immune cells produce soluble and cell-associated pro-inflammatory mediators. Recently, it has become increasingly clear that in addition to control of excess inflammation and virus elimination, the resolution of infection requires an active repair process, which is necessary to regain normal respiratory function and restore the lungs to homeostasis. The repair response must re-establish the epithelial barrier and regenerate the microarchitecture of the lung. Emerging areas of research have highlighted the importance of innate immune cells, particularly the newly described innate lymphoid cells, as well as alternatively activated macrophages and pulmonary stem cells in the repair process. The mechanisms by which respiratory viruses may impede or alter the repair response will be important areas of research for identifying therapeutic targets aimed at limiting virus and host mediated injury and expediting recovery. PMID:22608464

  18. The Prevalence of Oral Inflammation Among Denture Wearing Patients with Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Przybyłowska, D; Rubinsztajn, R; Chazan, R; Swoboda-Kopeć, E; Kostrzewa-Janicka, J; Mierzwińska-Nastalska, E

    2015-01-01

    Oral inflammation is an important contributor to the etiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, which can impact patient's health status. Previous studies indicate that people with poor oral health are at higher risk for nosocomial pneumonia. Denture wearing is one promoting factor in the development of mucosal infections. Colonization of the denture plaque by Gram-negative bacteria, Candida spp., or other respiratory pathogens, occurring locally, may be aspirated to the lungs. The studies showed that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients treated with combinations of medicines with corticosteroids more frequently suffer from Candida-associated denture stomatitis. Treatment of oral candidiasis in patients with COPD constitutes a therapeutic problem. Therefore, it is essential to pay attention to the condition of oral mucosal membrane and denture hygiene habits. The guidelines for care and maintenance of dentures for COPD patients are presented in this paper. The majority of patients required improvement of their prosthetic and oral hygiene. Standard oral hygiene procedures in relation to dentures, conducted for prophylaxis of stomatitis complicated by mucosal infection among immunocompromised patients, are essential to maintain healthy oral tissues. The elimination of traumatic denture action in dental office, compliance with oral and denture hygiene, proper use and storage of prosthetic appliances in a dry environment outside the oral cavity can reduce susceptibility to infection. Proper attention to hygiene, including brushing and rinsing the mouth, may also help prevent denture stomatitis in these patients.

  19. Is airway inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) a risk factor for cardiovascular events?

    PubMed

    Calverley, Peter M A; Scott, Stephen

    2006-12-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a very common cause of death in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Smoking is a well-described risk factor for both COPD and CVD, but CVD in patients with COPD is likely to be due to other factors in addition to smoking. Inflammation may be an important common etiological link between COPD and CVD, being well described in both diseases. It is hypothesized that in COPD a "spill-over" of local airway inflammation into the systemic circulation could contribute to increased CVD in these patients. Inhaled corticosteroids (ICS) have well-documented anti-inflammatory effects and are commonly used for the treatment of COPD, but their effects on cardiovascular endpoints and all-cause mortality have only just started to be examined. A recent meta-analysis has suggested that ICS may reduce all-cause mortality in COPD by around 25%. A case-controlled study specifically examined the effects of ICS on myocardial infarction and suggested that ICS may decrease the incidence of MI by as much as 32%. A large multicenter prospective randomized trial (Towards a Revolution in COPD Health [TORCH]) is now ongoing and will examine the effect of fluticasone propionate in combination with salmeterol on all-cause mortality.

  20. Cigarette Smoke-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation and Autophagy Are Attenuated in Ephx2-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Yunxiao; Yu, Ganggang; Yuan, Shaopeng; Tan, Chunting; Lian, Puqiao; Fu, Lixia; Hou, Qi; Xu, Bo; Wang, Haoyan

    2016-12-27

    Cigarette smoke (CS) increases the risk of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) by causing inflammation, emphysema, and reduced lung function. Additionally, CS can induce autophagy which contributes to COPD. Arachidonic acid-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) have promising anti-inflammatory properties that may protect the heart and liver by regulating autophagy. For this reason, the effect of decreased soluble epoxide hydrolase (sEH, Ephx2)-mediated EET hydrolysis on inflammation, emphysema, lung function, and autophagy was here studied in CS-induced COPD in vivo. Adult male wild-type (WT) C57BL/6J and Ephx2(-/-) mice were exposed to air or CS for 12 weeks, and lung inflammatory responses, air space enlargement (emphysema), lung function, and autophagy were assessed. Lungs of Ephx2(-/-) mice had a less pronounced inflammatory response and less autophagy with mild distal airspace enlargement accompanied by restored lung function and steady weight gain. These findings support the idea that Ephx2 may hold promise as a therapeutic target for COPD induced by CS, and it may be protective property by inhibiting autophagy.

  1. Mechanisms of particle-induced pulmonary inflammation in a mouse model: exposure to wood dust.

    PubMed

    Määttä, Juha; Lehto, Maili; Leino, Marina; Tillander, Sari; Haapakoski, Rita; Majuri, Marja-Leena; Wolff, Henrik; Rautio, Sari; Welling, Irma; Husgafvel-Pursiainen, Kirsti; Savolainen, Kai; Alenius, Harri

    2006-09-01

    Repeated airway exposure to wood dust has long been known to cause adverse respiratory effects such as asthma and chronic bronchitis and impairment of lung function. However, the mechanisms underlying the inflammatory responses of the airways after wood dust exposure are poorly known. We used a mouse model to elucidate the mechanisms of particle-induced inflammatory responses to fine wood dust particles. BALB/c mice were exposed to intranasally administered fine (more than 99% of the particles had a particle size of < or = 5 microm, with virtually identical size distribution) birch or oak dusts twice a week for 3 weeks. PBS, LPS, and titanium dioxide were used as controls. Intranasal instillation of birch or oak dusts elicited influx of inflammatory cells to the lungs in mice. Enhancement of lymphocytes and neutrophils was seen after oak dust exposure, whereas eosinophil infiltration was higher after birch dust exposure. Infiltration of inflammatory cells was associated with an increase in the mRNA levels of several cytokines, chemokines, and chemokine receptors in lung tissue. Oak dust appeared to be a more potent inducer of these inflammatory mediators than birch dust. The results from our in vivo mouse model show that repeated airway exposure to wood dust can elicit lung inflammation, which is accompanied by induction of several proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Oak and birch dusts exhibited quantitative and qualitative differences in the elicitation of pulmonary inflammation, suggesting that the inflammatory responses induced by the wood species may rise via different cellular mechanisms.

  2. Rhinovirus-induced IL-25 in asthma exacerbation drives type 2 immunity and allergic pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Beale, Janine; Jayaraman, Annabelle; Jackson, David J; Macintyre, Jonathan D R; Edwards, Michael R; Walton, Ross P; Zhu, Jie; Ching, Yee Man; Shamji, Betty; Edwards, Matt; Westwick, John; Cousins, David J; Hwang, You Yi; McKenzie, Andrew; Johnston, Sebastian L; Bartlett, Nathan W

    2014-10-01

    Rhinoviruses (RVs), which are the most common cause of virally induced asthma exacerbations, account for much of the burden of asthma in terms of morbidity, mortality, and associated cost. Interleukin-25 (IL-25) activates type 2-driven inflammation and is therefore potentially important in virally induced asthma exacerbations. To investigate this, we examined whether RV-induced IL-25 could contribute to asthma exacerbations. RV-infected cultured asthmatic bronchial epithelial cells exhibited a heightened intrinsic capacity for IL-25 expression, which correlated with donor atopic status. In vivo human IL-25 expression was greater in asthmatics at baseline and during experimental RV infection. In addition, in mice, RV infection induced IL-25 expression and augmented allergen-induced IL-25. Blockade of the IL-25 receptor reduced many RV-induced exacerbation-specific responses including type 2 cytokine expression, mucus production, and recruitment of eosinophils, neutrophils, basophils, and T and non-T type 2 cells. Therefore, asthmatic epithelial cells have an increased intrinsic capacity for expression of a pro-type 2 cytokine in response to a viral infection, and IL-25 is a key mediator of RV-induced exacerbations of pulmonary inflammation.

  3. Erythromycin prevents the pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure to cigarette smoke.

    PubMed

    Mikura, Shinichiro; Wada, Hiroo; Higaki, Manabu; Yasutake, Tetsuo; Ishii, Haruyuki; Kamiya, Shigeru; Goto, Hajime

    2011-07-01

    The effect of erythromycin on the inflammation caused by exposure to cigarette smoke was investigated in this study. Mice were exposed either to cigarette smoke or to environmental air (control), and some mice exposed to cigarette smoke were treated with oral erythromycin (100 mg/kg/day for 8 days). Pulmonary inflammation was assessed by determining the cellular content of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. The messenger RNA (mRNA) levels of various mediators, including keratinocyte-derived chemokine (KC), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-2, surfactant protein (SP)-D, granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-6 in lung tissue were determined using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) assays. The exposure to cigarette smoke increased significantly the numbers of neutrophils (P = 0.029), macrophages (P = 0.029), and lymphocytes (P = 0.029) recovered in BAL fluid. Moreover, mRNA levels of KC (P = 0.029), MIP-2 (P = 0.029), SP-D (P = 0.029), and GM-CSF (P = 0.057) in the lung tissue were higher in mice exposed to cigarette smoke than in mice exposed to environmental air. In the erythromycin-treated mice that were exposed also to cigarette smoke, both neutrophil and lymphocyte counts were significantly lower in the BAL fluid than those in the vehicle-treated mice (P = 0.029). Erythromycin-treated mice exposed to cigarette smoke showed a trend of lower mRNA levels of KC and TNF-α in the lung tissue than those in the vehicle-treated mice, although the statistical significance was not achieved (P = 0.057). Our data demonstrated that erythromycin prevented lung inflammation induced by cigarette smoke, in parallel to the reduced mRNA levels of KC and TNF-α.

  4. Rac2 is involved in bleomycin-induced lung inflammation leading to pulmonary fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Pulmonary fibrotic diseases induce significant morbidity and mortality, for which there are limited therapeutic options available. Rac2, a ras-related guanosine triphosphatase expressed mainly in hematopoietic cells, is a crucial molecule regulating a diversity of mast cell, macrophage, and neutrophil functions. All these cell types have been implicated in the development of pulmonary fibrosis in a variety of animal models. For the studies described here we hypothesized that Rac2 deficiency protects mice from bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. Methods To determine the role of Rac2 in pulmonary fibrosis we used a bleomycin-induced mouse model. Anesthetized C57BL/6 wild type and rac2 -/- mice were instilled intratracheally with bleomycin sulphate (1.25 U/Kg) or saline as control. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples were collected at days 3 and 7 of treatment and analyzed for matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). On day 21 after bleomycin treatment, we measured airway resistance and elastance in tracheotomized animals. Lung sections were stained for histological analysis, while homogenates were analyzed for hydroxyproline and total collagen content. Results BLM-treated rac2 -/- mice had reduced MMP-9 levels in the BAL on day 3 and reduced neutrophilia and TNF and CCL3/MIP-1α levels in the BAL on day 7 compared to BLM-treated WT mice. We also showed that rac2 -/- mice had significantly lower mortality (30%) than WT mice (70%) at day 21 of bleomycin treatment. Lung function was diminished in bleomycin-treated WT mice, while it was unaffected in bleomycin-treated rac2 -/- mice. Histological analysis of inflammation and fibrosis as well as collagen and hydroxyproline content in the lungs did not show significant differences between BLM-treated rac2 -/- and WT and mice that survived to day 21. Conclusion Rac2 plays an important role in bleomycin-induced lung injury. It is an important signaling molecule leading to BLM-induced mortality and it also mediates the

  5. Edge density based automatic detection of inflammation in colonoscopy videos.

    PubMed

    Ševo, I; Avramović, A; Balasingham, I; Elle, O J; Bergsland, J; Aabakken, L

    2016-05-01

    Colon cancer is one of the deadliest diseases where early detection can prolong life and can increase the survival rates. The early stage disease is typically associated with polyps and mucosa inflammation. The often used diagnostic tools rely on high quality videos obtained from colonoscopy or capsule endoscope. The state-of-the-art image processing techniques of video analysis for automatic detection of anomalies use statistical and neural network methods. In this paper, we investigated a simple alternative model-based approach using texture analysis. The method can easily be implemented in parallel processing mode for real-time applications. A characteristic texture of inflamed tissue is used to distinguish between inflammatory and healthy tissues, where an appropriate filter kernel was proposed and implemented to efficiently detect this specific texture. The basic method is further improved to eliminate the effect of blood vessels present in the lower part of the descending colon. Both approaches of the proposed method were described in detail and tested in two different computer experiments. Our results show that the inflammatory region can be detected in real-time with an accuracy of over 84%. Furthermore, the experimental study showed that it is possible to detect certain segments of video frames containing inflammations with the detection accuracy above 90%.

  6. Mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists attenuate pulmonary inflammation and bleomycin-evoked fibrosis in rodent models.

    PubMed

    Lieber, Gissela B; Fernandez, Xiomara; Mingo, Garfield G; Jia, Yanlin; Caniga, Michael; Gil, Malgorzata A; Keshwani, Shanil; Woodhouse, Janice D; Cicmil, Milenko; Moy, Lily Y; Kelly, Nancy; Jimenez, Johanna; Crawley, Yvette; Anthes, John C; Klappenbach, Joel; Ma, Yu-Lu; McLeod, Robbie L

    2013-10-15

    Accumulating evidence indicates protective actions of mineralocorticoid antagonists (MR antagonists) on cardiovascular pathology, which includes blunting vascular inflammation and myocardial fibrosis. We examined the anti-inflammatory and anti-fibrotic potential of MR antagonists in rodent respiratory models. In an ovalbumin allergic and challenged Brown Norway rat model, the total cell count in nasal lavage was 29,348 ± 5451, which was blocked by spironolactone (0.3-60 mg/kg, p.o.) and eplerenone (0.3-30 mg/kg, p.o.). We also found that MR antagonists attenuated pulmonary inflammation in the Brown Norway rat. A series of experiments were conducted to determine the actions of MR blockade in acute/chronic lung injury models. (1) Ex vivo lung slice rat experiments found that eplerenone (0.01 and 10 µM) and spironolactone (10 µM) diminished lung hydroxyproline concentrations by 55 ± 5, 122 ± 9, and 83 ± 8%. (2) In in vivo studies, MR antagonists attenuated the increases in bronchioalveolar lavage (BAL) neutrophils and macrophages caused by lung bleomycin exposure. In separate studies, bleomycin (4.0 U/kg, i.t.) increased lung levels of hydroxyproline by approximately 155%, which was blocked by spironolactone (10-60 mg/kg, p.o.). In a rat Lipopolysaccharide (LPS) model, spironolactone inhibited acute increases in BAL cytokines with moderate effects on neutrophils. Finally, we found that chronic LPS exposure significantly increased end expiratory lung and decreased lung elastance in the mouse. These functional effects of chronic LPS were improved by MR antagonists. Our results demonstrate that MR antagonists have significant pharmacological actions in the respiratory system.

  7. Application of the open-lung concept during positive-pressure ventilation reduces pulmonary inflammation in newborn piglets.

    PubMed

    van Kaam, Anton H; Dik, Willem A; Haitsma, Jack J; De Jaegere, Anne; Naber, Birgitta A; van Aalderen, Wim M; Kok, Joke H; Lachmann, Burkhard

    2003-01-01

    It has been shown that application of the open-lung concept (OLC) during high-frequency oscillatory ventilation (HFOV) attenuates pulmonary inflammation. We hypothesized that this attenuation could also be achieved by applying the OLC during positive-pressure ventilation (PPV). After repeated whole-lung lavage, newborn piglets were assigned to one of three ventilation groups: (1) PPV(OLC); (2) HFOV(OLC), or (3) conventional PPV (PPV(CON)). After a ventilation period of 5 h, analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid showed a reduced influx of polymorphonuclear neutrophils, interleukin 8, and thrombin activity in both OLC groups as compared with the PPV(CON) group. There were no differences in tumor necrosis factor alpha levels. We conclude that application of the OLC during PPV reduces pulmonary inflammation as compared with conventional PPV and that the magnitude of this reduction is comparable to that of HFOV.

  8. Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis: Early detection and referral

    PubMed Central

    Oldham, Justin M.; Noth, Imre

    2016-01-01

    Summary Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), a devastating progressive interstitial lung disease (ILD) with no known cause or cure, is the most common and deadly of the idiopathic interstitial pneumonias. With a median survival of 3–5 years following diagnosis, IPF is characterized by a progressive decline in lung function and quality of life in most patients. Vigilance among clinicians in recognizing IPF early in the disease course remains critical to properly caring for these patients, as this provides the widest range of management options. When IPF is suspected, a multidisciplinary evaluation (MDE) by a clinician, radiologist and pathologist with ILD expertise should occur, as this improves diagnostic agreement in both community and academic settings. When community MDE is not possible, or diagnostic doubt exists, referral to an ILD center should be considered. ILD center referral may also provide access specialized care, including clinical trials and lung transplantation, and should be considered for any patient with an established diagnosis of IPF. PMID:24746629

  9. Acid sphingomyelinase inhibitors normalize pulmonary ceramide and inflammation in cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Becker, Katrin Anne; Riethmüller, Joachim; Lüth, Anja; Döring, Gerd; Kleuser, Burkhard; Gulbins, Erich

    2010-06-01

    Employing genetic mouse models we have recently shown that ceramide accumulation is critically involved in the pathogenesis of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. Genetic or systemic inhibition of the acid sphingomyelinase (Asm) is not feasible for treatment of patients or might cause adverse effects. Thus, a manipulation of ceramide specifically in lungs of CF mice must be developed. We tested whether inhalation of different acid sphingomyelinase inhibitors does reduce Asm activity and ceramide accumulation in lungs of CF mice. The efficacy and specificity of the drugs was determined. Ceramide was determined by mass spectrometry, DAG-kinase assays, and fluorescence microscopy. We determined pulmonary and systemic Asm activity, neutral sphingomyelinase (Nsm), ceramide, cytokines, and infection susceptibility. Mass spectroscopy, DAG-kinase assays, and semiquantitative immune fluorescence microscopy revealed that a standard diet did not influence ceramide in bronchial respiratory epithelial cells, while a diet with Peptamen severely affected the concentration of sphingolipids in CF lungs. Inhalation of the Asm inhibitors amitriptyline, trimipramine, desipramine, chlorprothixene, fluoxetine, amlodipine, or sertraline restored normal ceramide concentrations in murine bronchial epithelial cells, reduced inflammation in the lung of CF mice and prevented infection with Pseudomonas aeruginosa. All drugs showed very similar efficacy. Inhalation of the drugs was without systemic effects and did not inhibit Nsm. These findings employing several structurally different Asm inhibitors identify Asm as primary target in the lung to reduce ceramide concentrations. Inhaling an Asm inhibitor may be a beneficial treatment for CF, with minimal adverse systemic effects.

  10. Hirsutella sinensis mycelium attenuates bleomycin-induced pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Tsung-Teng; Lai, Hsin-Chih; Ko, Yun-Fei; Ojcius, David M.; Lan, Ying-Wei; Martel, Jan; Young, John D.; Chong, Kowit-Yu

    2015-01-01

    Hirsutella sinensis mycelium (HSM), the anamorph of Cordyceps sinensis, is a traditional Chinese medicine that has been shown to possess various pharmacological properties. We previously reported that this fungus suppresses interleukin-1β and IL-18 secretion by inhibiting both canonical and non-canonical inflammasomes in human macrophages. However, whether HSM may be used to prevent lung fibrosis and the mechanism underlying this activity remain unclear. Our results show that pretreatment with HSM inhibits TGF-β1–induced expression of fibronectin and α-SMA in lung fibroblasts. HSM also restores superoxide dismutase expression in TGF-β1–treated lung fibroblasts and inhibits reactive oxygen species production in lung epithelial cells. Furthermore, HSM pretreatment markedly reduces bleomycin–induced lung injury and fibrosis in mice. Accordingly, HSM reduces inflammatory cell accumulation in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and proinflammatory cytokines levels in lung tissues. The HSM extract also significantly reduces TGF-β1 in lung tissues, and this effect is accompanied by decreased collagen 3α1 and α-SMA levels. Moreover, HSM reduces expression of the NLRP3 inflammasome and P2X7R in lung tissues, whereas it enhances expression of superoxide dismutase. These findings suggest that HSM may be used for the treatment of pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis. PMID:26497260

  11. Foxa2 Regulates Leukotrienes to Inhibit Th2-mediated Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Xiaoju; Liu, Xiaojing J.; Tian, Cuijie; Su, Qiaoli; Lei, Yi; Wu, Qingbo; He, Yangyan; Whitsett, Jeffrey A.

    2013-01-01

    Foxa2 is a member of the Forkhead family of nuclear transcription factors that is highly expressed in respiratory epithelial cells of the developing and mature lung. Foxa2 is required for normal airway epithelial differentiation, and its deletion causes goblet-cell metaplasia and Th2-mediated pulmonary inflammation during postnatal development. Foxa2 expression is inhibited during aeroallergen sensitization and after stimulation with Th2 cytokines, when its loss is associated with goblet-cell metaplasia. Mechanisms by which Foxa2 controls airway epithelial differentiation and Th2 immunity are incompletely known. During the first 2 weeks after birth, the loss of Foxa2 increases the production of leukotrienes (LTs) and Th2 cytokines in the lungs of Foxa2 gene–targeted mice. Foxa2 expression inhibited 15-lipoxygenase (Alox15) and increased Alox5 transcription, each encoding key lipoxygenases associated with asthma. The inhibition of the cysteinyl LT (CysLT) signaling pathway by montelukast inhibited IL-4, IL-5, eotaxin-2, and regulated upon activation normal T cell expressed and presumably secreted expression in the developing lungs of Foxa2 gene–targeted mice. Montelukast inhibited the expression of genes regulating mucus metaplasia, including Spdef, Muc5ac, Foxa3, and Arg2. Foxa2 plays a cell-autonomous role in the respiratory epithelium, and is required for the suppression of Th2 immunity and mucus metaplasia in the developing lung in a process determined in part by its regulation of the CysLT pathway. PMID:23822876

  12. Acrolein induced both pulmonary inflammation and the death of lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yang; Ito, Sachiko; Nishio, Naomi; Tanaka, Yuriko; Chen, Nana; Isobe, Ken-Ichi

    2014-09-02

    Acrolein, a compound found in cigarette smoke, is a major risk factor for respiratory diseases. Previous research determined that both acrolein and cigarette smoke produced reactive oxygen species (ROS). As many types of pulmonary injuries are associated with inflammation, this study sought to ascertain the extent to which exposure to acrolein advanced inflammatory state in the lungs. Our results showed that intranasal exposure of mice to acrolein increased CD11c(+)F4/80(high) macrophages in the lungs and increased ROS formation via induction of NF-κB signaling. Treatment with acrolein activated macrophages and led to their increased production of ROS and expression of several key pro-inflammatory cytokines. In in vitro studies, acrolein treatment of bone marrow-derived GM-CSF-dependent immature macrophages (GM-IMs), activated the cells and led to their increased production of ROS and expression of several key pro-inflammatory cytokines. Acrolein treatment of macrophages induced apoptosis of lung epithelial cells. Inclusion of an inhibitor of ROS formation markedly decreased acrolein-mediated macrophage activation and reduced the extent of epithelial cell death. These results indicate that acrolein can cause lung damage, in great part by mediating the increased release of pro-inflammatory cytokines/factors by macrophages.

  13. A Plant Proteinase Inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum Attenuates Pulmonary Mechanics, Inflammation and Remodeling Induced by Elastase in Mice.

    PubMed

    Theodoro-Júnior, Osmar Aparecido; Righetti, Renato Fraga; Almeida-Reis, Rafael; Martins-Oliveira, Bruno Tadeu; Oliva, Leandro Vilela; Prado, Carla Máximo; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz Mangueira; Leick, Edna Aparecida; Pinheiro, Nathalia Montouro; Lobo, Yara Aparecida; Martins, Mílton de Arruda; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Tibério, Iolanda de Fátima Lopes Calvo

    2017-02-14

    Proteinase inhibitors have been associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and may represent a potential therapeutic treatment for emphysema. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of a plant Kunitz proteinase inhibitor, Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI), on several aspects of experimental elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice. C57/Bl6 mice were intratracheally administered elastase (ELA) or saline (SAL) and were treated intraperitoneally with EcTI (ELA-EcTI, SAL-EcTI) on days 1, 14 and 21. On day 28, pulmonary mechanics, exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) and number leucocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated. Subsequently, lung immunohistochemical staining was submitted to morphometry. EcTI treatment reduced responses of the mechanical respiratory system, number of cells in the BALF, and reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-positive cells and volume proportion of isoprostane, collagen and elastic fibers in the airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. EcTI treatment reduced elastase induced pulmonary inflammation, remodeling, oxidative stress and mechanical alterations, suggesting that this inhibitor may be a potential therapeutic tool for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management.

  14. A Plant Proteinase Inhibitor from Enterolobium contortisiliquum Attenuates Pulmonary Mechanics, Inflammation and Remodeling Induced by Elastase in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Theodoro-Júnior, Osmar Aparecido; Righetti, Renato Fraga; Almeida-Reis, Rafael; Martins-Oliveira, Bruno Tadeu; Oliva, Leandro Vilela; Prado, Carla Máximo; Saraiva-Romanholo, Beatriz Mangueira; Leick, Edna Aparecida; Pinheiro, Nathalia Montouro; Lobo, Yara Aparecida; Martins, Mílton de Arruda; Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Tibério, Iolanda de Fátima Lopes Calvo

    2017-01-01

    Proteinase inhibitors have been associated with anti-inflammatory and antioxidant activities and may represent a potential therapeutic treatment for emphysema. Our aim was to evaluate the effects of a plant Kunitz proteinase inhibitor, Enterolobium contortisiliquum trypsin inhibitor (EcTI), on several aspects of experimental elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice. C57/Bl6 mice were intratracheally administered elastase (ELA) or saline (SAL) and were treated intraperitoneally with EcTI (ELA-EcTI, SAL-EcTI) on days 1, 14 and 21. On day 28, pulmonary mechanics, exhaled nitric oxide (ENO) and number leucocytes in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were evaluated. Subsequently, lung immunohistochemical staining was submitted to morphometry. EcTI treatment reduced responses of the mechanical respiratory system, number of cells in the BALF, and reduced tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12), tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP-1), endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS)-positive cells and volume proportion of isoprostane, collagen and elastic fibers in the airways and alveolar walls compared with the ELA group. EcTI treatment reduced elastase induced pulmonary inflammation, remodeling, oxidative stress and mechanical alterations, suggesting that this inhibitor may be a potential therapeutic tool for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) management. PMID:28216579

  15. Detection of pulmonary amylase activity in exhaled breath condensate.

    PubMed

    Zweifel, M; Rechsteiner, T; Hofer, M; Boehler, A

    2013-12-01

    Amylase activity in exhaled breath condensate (EBC) is usually interpreted as an indication of oropharyngeal contamination despite the fact that amylase can be found in pulmonary excretions. The aim of this study was to recruit and refine an amylase assay in order to detect amylase activity in any EBC sample and to develop a method to identify EBC samples containing amylase of pulmonary origin. EBC was collected from 40 volunteers with an EcoScreen condenser. Amylase assays and methods to discriminate between oropharyngeal and pulmonary proteins were tested and developed using matched EBC and saliva samples. Our refined 2-chloro-4-nitrophenyl-α-D-maltotriosid (CNP-G3) assay was 40-fold more sensitive than the most sensitive commercial assay and allowed detection of amylase activity in 30 µl of EBC. We developed a dot-blot assay which allowed detection of salivary protein in saliva diluted up to 150 000-fold. By plotting amylase activity against staining intensity we identified a few EBC samples with high amylase activity which were aligned with diluted saliva. We believe that EBC samples aligned with diluted saliva contain amylase activity introduced during EBC collection and that all other EBC samples contain amylase activity of pulmonary origin and are basically free of oropharyngeal protein contamination.

  16. Human metapneumovirus infection activates the TSLP pathway that drives excessive pulmonary inflammation and viral replication in mice.

    PubMed

    Lay, Margarita K; Céspedes, Pablo F; Palavecino, Christian E; León, Miguel A; Díaz, Rodrigo A; Salazar, Francisco J; Méndez, Gonzalo P; Bueno, Susan M; Kalergis, Alexis M

    2015-06-01

    Human metapneumovirus (hMPV) is a leading cause of acute respiratory tract infections in children and the elderly. The mechanism by which this virus triggers an inflammatory response still remains unknown. Here, we evaluated whether the thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP) pathway contributes to lung inflammation upon hMPV infection. We found that hMPV infection promotes TSLP expression both in human airway epithelial cells and in the mouse lung. hMPV infection induced lung infiltration of OX40L(+) CD11b(+) DCs. Mice lacking the TSLP receptor deficient mice (tslpr(-/-) ) showed reduced lung inflammation and hMPV replication. These mice displayed a decreased number of neutrophils as well a reduction in levels of thymus and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL17, IL-5, IL-13, and TNF-α in the airways upon hMPV infection. Furthermore, a higher frequency of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells was found in tslpr(-/-) mice compared to WT mice, which could contribute to controlling viral spread. Depletion of neutrophils in WT and tslpr(-/-) mice decreased inflammation and hMPV replication. Remarkably, blockage of TSLP or OX40L with specific Abs reduced lung inflammation and viral replication following hMPV challenge in mice. Altogether, these results suggest that activation of the TSLP pathway is pivotal in the development of pulmonary pathology and pulmonary hMPV replication.

  17. Diet-induced obesity causes innate airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine and enhances ozone-induced pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Johnston, Richard A; Theman, Todd A; Lu, Frank L; Terry, Raya D; Williams, Erin S; Shore, Stephanie A

    2008-06-01

    We previously reported that genetically obese mice exhibit innate airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and enhanced ozone (O(3))-induced pulmonary inflammation. Such genetic deficiencies in mice are rare in humans, and they may not be representative of human obesity. Thus the purpose of this study was to determine the pulmonary phenotype of mice with diet-induced obesity (DIO), which more closely mimics the cause of human obesity. Therefore, wild-type C57BL/6 mice were reared from the time of weaning until at least 30 wk of age on diets in which either 10 or 60% of the calories are derived from fat in the form of lard. Body mass was approximately 40% greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. Baseline airway responsiveness to intravenous methacholine, measured by forced oscillation, was greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. We also examined lung permeability and inflammation after exposure to room air or O(3) (2 parts/million for 3 h), an asthma trigger. Four hours after the exposure ended, O(3)-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid protein, interleukin-6, KC, macrophage inflammatory protein-2, interferon-gamma-inducible protein-10, and eotaxin were greater in mice fed 60 vs. 10% fat diets. Innate AHR and augmented responses to O(3) were not observed in mice raised from weaning until 20-22 wk of age on a 60% fat diet. These results indicate that mice with DIO exhibit innate AHR and enhanced O(3)-induced pulmonary inflammation, similar to genetically obese mice. However, mice with DIO must remain obese for an extended period of time before this pulmonary phenotype is observed.

  18. Automated detection of pulmonary nodules in CT images with support vector machines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Lu; Liu, Wanyu; Sun, Xiaoming

    2008-10-01

    Many methods have been proposed to avoid radiologists fail to diagnose small pulmonary nodules. Recently, support vector machines (SVMs) had received an increasing attention for pattern recognition. In this paper, we present a computerized system aimed at pulmonary nodules detection; it identifies the lung field, extracts a set of candidate regions with a high sensitivity ratio and then classifies candidates by the use of SVMs. The Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system presented in this paper supports the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules from Computed Tomography (CT) images as inflammation, tuberculoma, granuloma..sclerosing hemangioma, and malignant tumor. Five texture feature sets were extracted for each lesion, while a genetic algorithm based feature selection method was applied to identify the most robust features. The selected feature set was fed into an ensemble of SVMs classifiers. The achieved classification performance was 100%, 92.75% and 90.23% in the training, validation and testing set, respectively. It is concluded that computerized analysis of medical images in combination with artificial intelligence can be used in clinical practice and may contribute to more efficient diagnosis.

  19. Variability in ozone-induced pulmonary injury and inflammation in healthy and cardiovascular-compromised rat models.

    PubMed

    Kodavanti, Urmila P; Ledbetter, Allen D; Thomas, Ronald F; Richards, Judy E; Ward, William O; Schladweiler, Mette C; Costa, Daniel L

    2015-01-01

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure dependent on the type and severity of disease. Healthy male 12-14-week-old Wistar Kyoto (WKY), Wistar (WS) and Sprague Dawley (SD); and CVD-compromised spontaneously hypertensive (SH), Fawn-Hooded hypertensive (FHH), stroke-prone spontaneously hypertensive (SHSP), obese spontaneously hypertensive heart failure (SHHF) and obese JCR (JCR) rats were exposed to 0.0, 0.25, 0.5, or 1.0 ppm ozone for 4 h; pulmonary injury and inflammation were analyzed immediately following (0-h) or 20-h later. Baseline bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) protein was higher in CVD strains except for FHH when compared to healthy. Ozone-induced increases in protein and inflammation were concentration-dependent within each strain but the degree of response varied from strain to strain and with time. Among healthy rats, SD were least affected. Among CVD strains, lean rats were more susceptible to protein leakage from ozone than obese rats. Ozone caused least neutrophilic inflammation in SH and SHHF while SHSP and FHH were most affected. BALF neutrophils and protein were poorly correlated when considering the entire dataset (r = 0.55). The baseline and ozone-induced increases in cytokine mRNA varied markedly between strains and did not correlate with inflammation. These data illustrate that the degree of ozone-induced lung injury/inflammation response is likely influenced by both genetic and physiological factors that govern the nature of cardiovascular compromise in CVD models.

  20. Exposure to Deepwater Horizon Crude Oil Burnoff Particulate Matter Induces Pulmonary Inflammation and Alters Adaptive Immune Response.

    PubMed

    Jaligama, Sridhar; Chen, Zaili; Saravia, Jordy; Yadav, Nikki; Lomnicki, Slawomir M; Dugas, Tammy R; Cormier, Stephania A

    2015-07-21

    The ″in situ burning" of trapped crude oil on the surface of Gulf waters during the 2010 Deepwater Horizon (DWH) oil spill released numerous pollutants, including combustion-generated particulate matter (PM). Limited information is available on the respiratory impact of inhaled in situ burned oil sail particulate matter (OSPM). Here we utilized PM collected from in situ burn plumes of the DWH oil spill to study the acute effects of exposure to OSPM on pulmonary health. OSPM caused dose-and time-dependent cytotoxicity and generated reactive oxygen species and superoxide radicals in vitro. Additionally, mice exposed to OSPM exhibited significant decreases in body weight gain, systemic oxidative stress in the form of increased serum 8-isoprostane (8-IP) levels, and airway inflammation in the form of increased macrophages and eosinophils in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Further, in a mouse model of allergic asthma, OSPM caused increased T helper 2 cells (Th2), peribronchiolar inflammation, and increased airway mucus production. These findings demonstrate that acute exposure to OSPM results in pulmonary inflammation and alteration of innate/adaptive immune responses in mice and highlight potential respiratory effects associated with cleaning up an oil spill.

  1. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  2. Scintigraphic detection of pulmonary embolism in patients with obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Alderson, P.O.; Biello, D.R.; Sachariah, K.G.; Siegel, B.A.

    1981-03-01

    The 133Xe ventilation studies, 99mTc perfusion lung images, and pulmonary angiograms of 83 patients with obstructive pulmonary disease and suspected pulmonary emboli were reviewed. Each patient had ventilation abnormalities suggesting OPD and at least one region showing matched V-P abnormalities. All angiograms were obtained within 72 hours of the V-P study and were reviewed independently. The overall sensitivity of V-P imaging for PE in this population was 0.83 and its specificity was 0.92. False-negative interpretations occurred in three of the 16 patients who showed ventilation abnormalities in more than 50% of their lung fields. In the 67 patients with ventilation abnormalities in less than or equal to 50% of their lung fields the sensitivity and specificity for detecting PE were high, V-P imaging is a reliable method for detecting PE in patients with regions of V-P match, if the ventilation abnormalities are limited in extent.

  3. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned media suppresses inflammation-associated overproliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in a rat model of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    LIU, JUNFENG; HAN, ZHIBO; HAN, ZHONGCHAO; HE, ZHIXU

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-associated overproliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). The administration of mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned media (MSC-CM) has displayed benefits in the treatment of PH, however, the exact mechanism has yet to be elucidated. The present study aimed to determine whether MSC-CM is able to suppress overproliferation of PASMCs in PH via immunoregulation. By the administration of MSC-CM to monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH rats, and the development of an in vitro co-culture system comprised of PASMCs and activated T cells, the therapeutic effects of MSC-CM on PH, and the changes in the expression of correlated factors, including TNF-α, calcineurin (CaN) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), were assessed. Immunohistochemical staining results indicated that MSC-CM was able to significantly suppress the production of TNF-α in MCT-induced PH and co-culture systems; and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed significant downregulation of the expression of CaN and NFATc2 in PASMCs (P<0.01). Furthermore, MSC-CM was able to significantly suppress CaN activity and NFATc2 activation (P<0.01), thus inhibiting the overproliferation of PASMCs. Finally, MSC-CM improved abnormalities in hemodynamics and pulmonary histology in MCT-induced PH. In conclusion, the findings of the current study suggest that administration of MSC-CM has the potential to suppress inflammation-associated overproliferation of PASMCs due to its immunosuppressive effects in PH and, thus, may serve as a beneficial therapeutic strategy. PMID:26893632

  4. EETs alleviate ox-LDL-induced inflammation by inhibiting LOX-1 receptor expression in rat pulmonary arterial endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Jun-xia; Zhang, Shui-juan; Liu, Ya-nan; Lin, Xi-xi; Sun, Yan-hong; Shen, Hui-juan; Yan, Xiao-feng; Xie, Qiang-min

    2014-03-15

    Oxidized low-density lipoprotein (Ox-LDL) is associated with atherosclerotic events through the modulation of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism and activation of inflammatory signaling. Cytochrome P450 (CYP) epoxygenase-derived epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs) mitigate inflammation through nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB). In this study, we explored the effects and mechanisms of exogenous EETs on the ox-LDL-induced inflammation of pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs), which were cultured from rat pulmonary arteries. We determined that pre-treatment with 11,12-EET or 14,15-EET attenuated the ox-LDL-induced expression and release of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), E-selectin, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) in a concentration-dependent manner. In addition, the ox-LDL-induced expression of CYP2J4 was upregulated by 11,12-EET and 14,15-EET (1μM). Furthermore, the endothelial receptor of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LOX-1) was downregulated in PAECs treated with EETs. The inflammatory responses evoked by ox-LDL (100μg/mL) were blocked by pharmacological inhibitors of Erk1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) (U0126), p38 MAPK (SB203580), and NF-κB (PDTC). In addition, we confirmed that 11,12-EET suppresses phosphorylation of p38, degradation of IκBα, and activation of NF-κB (p65), whereas 14,15-EET can significantly suppress the phosphorylation of p38 and Erk1/2. Our results indicate that EETs exert beneficial effects on ox-LDL-induced inflammation primarily through the inhibition of LOX-1 receptor upregulation, MAPK phosphorylation, and NF-κB activation and through the upregulation of CYP2J4 expression. This study helps focus the current understanding of the contribution of EETs to the regulation of the inflammation of pulmonary vascular endothelial cells. Furthermore, the therapeutic potential of targeting the EET pathway in pulmonary vascular disease will be highlighted.

  5. Acute pulmonary inflammation induced by exposure of the airways to staphylococcal enterotoxin type B in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Desouza, Ivani A. . E-mail: ivanidesouza@fcm.unicamp.br; Franco-Penteado, Carla F.; Camargo, Enilton A.; Lima, Carmen S.P.; Teixeira, Simone A.; Muscara, Marcelo N.; De Nucci, Gilberto; Antunes, Edson

    2006-11-15

    Staphylocococcus aureus is a gram-positive bacterium that produces several enterotoxins, which are responsible for most part of pathological conditions associated to staphylococcal infections, including lung inflammation. This study aimed to investigate the underlying inflammatory mechanisms involved in leukocyte recruitment in rats exposed to staphylococcal enterotoxin B (SEB). Rats were anesthetized with pentobarbital sodium and intratracheally injected with either SEB or sterile phosphate-buffered saline (PBS, 0.4 ml). Airways exposition to SEB (7.5-250 ng/trachea) caused a dose- and time-dependent neutrophil accumulation in BAL fluid, the maximal effects of which were observed at 4 h post-SEB exposure (250 ng/trachea). Eosinophils were virtually absent in BAL fluid, whereas mononuclear cell counts increased only at 24 h post-SEB. Significant elevations of granulocytes in bone marrow (mature and immature forms) and peripheral blood have also been detected. In BAL fluid, marked elevations in the levels of lipid mediators (LTB{sub 4} and PGE{sub 2}) and cytokines (TNF-{alpha}, IL-6 and IL-10) were observed after SEB instillation. The SEB-induced neutrophil accumulation in BAL fluid was reduced by pretreatment with dexamethasone (0.5 mg/kg), the COX-2 inhibitor celecoxib (3 mg/kg), the selective iNOS inhibitor compound 1400 W (5 mg/kg) and the lipoxygenase inhibitor AA-861 (200 {mu}g/kg). In separate experiments carried out with rat isolated peripheral neutrophils, SEB failed to induce neutrophil adhesion to serum-coated plates and chemotaxis. In conclusion, rat airways exposition to SEB causes a neutrophil-dependent lung inflammation at 4 h as result of the release of proinflammatory (NO, PGE{sub 2}, LTB{sub 4}, TNF-{alpha}, IL-6) and anti-inflammatory mediators (IL-10)

  6. PULMONARY INJURY AND INFLAMMATION FROM REPEATED EXPOSURE TO SOLUBLE COMPONENTS AND SOLID PARTICULATE MATTER (PM)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary injury from acute exposures to PM and the role of soluble versus insoluble PM have received considerable attention; however, their long-term impacts are less well understood. This study compared pulmonary injury and inflammatory responses from repeated exposure to solub...

  7. Klotho Reduction in Alveolar Macrophages Contributes to Cigarette Smoke Extract-induced Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Lingling; Wang, Yujie; Gao, Wei; Yuan, Cheng; Zhang, Sini; Zhou, Hong; Huang, Mao; Yao, Xin

    2015-11-13

    Abnormal inflammation and accelerated decline in lung function occur in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Klotho, an anti-aging protein, has an anti-inflammatory function. However, the role of Klotho has never been investigated in COPD. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible role of Klotho by alveolar macrophages in airway inflammation in COPD. Klotho levels were assessed in the lung samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of non-smokers, smokers, and patients with COPD. The regulation of Klotho expression by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) was studied in vitro, and small interfering RNA (siRNA) and recombinant Klotho were employed to investigate the role of Klotho on CSE-induced inflammation. Klotho expression was reduced in alveolar macrophages in the lungs and peripheral blood mononuclear cells of COPD patients. CSE decreased Klotho expression and release from MH-S cells. Knockdown of endogenous Klotho augmented the expression of the inflammatory mediators, such as MMP-9, IL-6, and TNF-α, by MH-S cells. Exogenous Klotho inhibited the expression of CSE-induced inflammatory mediators. Furthermore, we showed that Klotho interacts with IκBα of the NF-κB pathway. Dexamethasone treatment increased the expression and release level of Klotho in MH-S cells. Our findings suggest that Klotho plays a role in sustained inflammation of the lungs, which in turn may have therapeutic implications in COPD.

  8. Phytic acid, an iron chelator, attenuates pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in rats after intratracheal instillation of asbestos.

    PubMed

    Kamp, D W; Israbian, V A; Yeldandi, A V; Panos, R J; Graceffa, P; Weitzman, S A

    1995-01-01

    Reactive oxygen species, especially iron-catalyzed hydroxyl radicals (.OH) are implicated in the pathogenesis of asbestos-induced pulmonary toxicity. We previously demonstrated that phytic acid, an iron chelator, reduces amosite asbestos-induced .OH generation, DNA strand break formation, and injury to cultured pulmonary epithelial cells (268[1995, Am. J. Physiol.(Lung Cell. Mol. Physiol.) 12:L471-480]). To determine whether phytic acid diminishes pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in rats after a single intratracheal (it) instillation of amosite asbestos, Sprague-Dawley rats were given either saline (1 ml), amosite asbestos (5 mg; 1 ml saline), or amosite treated with phytic acid (500 microM) for 24 hr and then instilled. At various times after asbestos exposure, the rats were euthanized and the lungs were lavaged and examined histologically. A fibrosis score was determined from trichrome-stained specimens. As compared to controls, asbestos elicited a significant pulmonary inflammatory response, as evidence by an increase (approximately 2-fold) in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cell counts at 1 wk and the percentage of BAL neutrophils (PMNs) and giant cells at 2 wk (0.1 vs 6.5% and 1.3 vs 6.1%, respectively; p < 0.05). Asbestos significantly increased the fibrosis score at 2 wk (0 +/- 0 vs 5 +/- 1; p < 0.05). The inflammatory and fibrotic changes were, as expected, observed in the respiratory bronchioles and terminal alveolar duct bifurcations. The increased percentage of BAl PMNs and giant cells persisted at 4 wk, as did the fibrotic changes. Compared to asbestos alone, phytic acid-treated asbestos elicited significantly less BAL PMNs (6.5 vs 1.0%; p < 0.05) and giant cells (6.1 vs 0.2%; p < 0.05) and caused significantly less fibrosis (5 vs 0.8; p < 0.05) 2 wk after exposure. We conclude that asbestos causes pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in rats after it instillation and that phytic acid reduces these effects. These data support the role of iron

  9. Association of air pollution sources and aldehydes with biomarkers of blood coagulation, pulmonary inflammation, and systemic oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Altemose, Brent; Robson, Mark G; Kipen, Howard M; Ohman Strickland, Pamela; Meng, Qingyu; Gong, Jicheng; Huang, Wei; Wang, Guangfa; Rich, David Q; Zhu, Tong; Zhang, Junfeng

    2016-07-20

    Using data collected before, during, and after the 2008 Summer Olympic Games in Beijing, this study examines associations between biomarkers of blood coagulation (vWF, sCD62P and sCD40L), pulmonary inflammation (EBC pH, EBC nitrite, and eNO), and systemic oxidative stress (urinary 8-OHdG) with sources of air pollution identified utilizing principal component analysis and with concentrations of three aldehydes of health concern. Associations between the biomarkers and the air pollution source types and aldehydes were examined using a linear mixed effects model, regressing through seven lag days and controlling for ambient temperature, relative humidity, gender, and day of week for the biomarker measurements. The biomarkers for pulmonary inflammation, particularly EBC pH and eNO, were most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion, oil combustion, and vegetative burning. The biomarkers for blood coagulation, particularly vWF and sCD62p, were most consistently associated with oil combustion. Systemic oxidative stress biomarker (8-OHdG) was most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion. The associations of the biomarkers were generally not significant or consistent with secondary formation of pollutants and with the aldehydes. The findings support policies to control anthropogenic pollution sources rather than natural soil or road dust from a cardio-respiratory health standpoint.Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology advance online publication, 20 July 2016; doi:10.1038/jes.2016.38.

  10. Donor smoking is associated with pulmonary edema, inflammation and epithelial dysfunction in ex vivo human donor lungs

    PubMed Central

    Ware, Lorraine B.; Lee, Jae W.; Wickersham, Nancy; Nguyen, John; Matthay, Michael A.; Calfee, Carolyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Although recipients of donor lungs from smokers have worse clinical outcomes, the underlying mechanisms are unknown. We tested the association between donor smoking and the degree of pulmonary edema (as estimated by lung weight), the rate of alveolar fluid clearance (measured by airspace instillation of 5% albumin) and biomarkers of lung epithelial injury and inflammation (bronchoalveolar lavage surfactant protein-D and IL-8) in ex vivo lungs recovered from 298 organ donors. The extent of pulmonary edema was higher in current smokers (n=127) compared to non-smokers (median 408g, IQR 364-500 vs. 385g, IQR 340 - 460, p=0.009). Oxygenation at study enrollment was worse in current smokers versus non-smokers (median PaO2/FiO2 214 mmHg, IQR 126-323 vs. 266 mmHg, IQR 154-370, p=0.02). Current smokers with the highest exposure (≥20 pack-years) had significantly lower rates of alveolar fluid clearance, suggesting that the effects of cigarette smoke on alveolar epithelial fluid transport function may be dose related. BAL IL-8 was significantly higher in smokers while surfactant protein-D was lower. These findings indicate that chronic exposure to cigarette smoke has important effects on inflammation, gas exchange, lung epithelial function and lung fluid balance in the organ donor that could influence lung function in the lung transplant recipient. PMID:25146497

  11. Lipopolysaccharide and Interleukin 1 Augment the Effects of Hypoxia and Inflammation in Human Pulmonary Arterial Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziesche, Rolf; Petkov, Venzeslav; Williams, John; Zakeri, Schaker M.; Mosgoller, Wilhelm; Knofler, Martin; Block, Lutz H.

    1996-10-01

    The combined effects of hypoxia and interleukin 1, lipopolysaccharide, or tumor necrosis factor α on the expression of genes encoding endothelial constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthases, endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were investigated in human primary pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures. Hypoxia decreased the expression of constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS-3) mRNA and NOS-3 protein as compared with normoxic conditions. The inhibition of expression of NOS-3 corresponded with a reduced production of NO. A combination of hypoxia with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, interleukin 1β , or tumor necrosis factor α augmented both effects. In contrast, the combination of hypoxia and the inflammatory mediators superinduced the expression of endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8. Here, we have shown that inflammatory mediators aggravate the effect of hypoxia on the down-regulation of NOS-3 and increase the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in human pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures.

  12. Automatic two-step detection of pulmonary nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolejší, Martin; Kybic, Jan

    2007-03-01

    We present a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to detect small-size (from 2mm to around 10mm) pulmonary nodules from helical CT scans. A pulmonary nodule is a small, round (parenchymal nodule) or worm (juxta-pleural) shaped lesion in the lungs. Both have greater radio density than lungs parenchyma. Lung nodules may indicate a lung cancer and its detection in early stage improves survival rate of patients. CT is considered to be the most accurate imaging modality for detection of nodules. However, the large amount of data per examination makes the interpretation difficult. This leads to omission of nodules by human radiologist. CAD system presented is designed to help lower the number of omissions. Our system uses two different schemes to locate juxtapleural nodules and parenchymal nodules. For juxtapleural nodules, morphological closing and thresholding is used to find nodule candidates. To locate non-pleural nodule candidates, 3D blob detector uses multiscale filtration. Ellipsoid model is fitted on nodules. To define which of the nodule candidates are in fact nodules, an additional classification step is applied. Linear and multi-threshold classifiers are used. System was tested on 18 cases (4853 slices) with total sensitivity of 96%, with about 12 false positives/slice. The classification step reduces number of false positives to 9 per slice without significantly decreasing sensitivity (89,6%).

  13. Heme oxygenase-1 attenuates acute pulmonary inflammation by decreasing the release of segmented neutrophils from the bone marrow.

    PubMed

    Konrad, Franziska M; Braun, Stefan; Ngamsri, Kristian-Christos; Vollmer, Irene; Reutershan, Jörg

    2014-11-01

    Recruiting polymorphonuclear neutrophil granulocytes (PMNs) from circulation and bone marrow to the site of inflammation is one of the pivotal mechanisms of the innate immune system. During inflammation, the enzyme heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) has been shown to reduce PMN migration. Although these effects have been described in various models, underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Recent studies revealed an influence of HO-1 on different cells of the bone marrow. We investigated the particular role of the bone marrow in terms of HO-1-dependent pulmonary inflammation. In a murine model of LPS inhalation, stimulation of HO-1 by cobalt (III) protoporphyrin-IX-chloride (CoPP) resulted in reduced segmented PMN migration into the alveolar space. In the CoPP group, segmented PMNs were also decreased intravascularly, and concordantly, mature and immature PMN populations were higher in the bone marrow. Inhibition of the enzyme by tin protoporphyrin-IX increased segmented and banded PMN migration into the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid with enhanced PMN release from the bone marrow and aggravated parameters of tissue inflammation. Oxidative burst activity was significantly higher in immature compared with mature PMNs. The chemokine stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF-1), which mediates homing of leukocytes into the bone marrow and is decreased in inflammation, was increased by CoPP. When SDF-1 was blocked by the specific antagonist AMD3100, HO-1 activation was no longer effective in curbing PMN trafficking to the inflamed lungs. In conclusion, we show evidence that the anti-inflammatory effects of HO-1 are largely mediated by inhibiting the release of segmented PMNs from the bone marrow rather than direct effects within the lung.

  14. Schistosome-induced pulmonary B cells inhibit allergic airway inflammation and display a reduced Th2-driving function.

    PubMed

    van der Vlugt, L E; Obieglo, K; Ozir-Fazalalikhan, A; Sparwasser, T; Haeberlein, S; Smits, H H

    2017-04-04

    Chronic schistosome infections protect against allergic airway inflammation (AAI) via the induction of IL-10-producing splenic regulatory B (Breg) cells. Previous experiments have demonstrated that schistosome-induced pulmonary B cells can also reduce AAI, but act independently of IL-10. We have now further characterized the phenotype and inhibitory activity of these protective pulmonary B cells. We excluded a role for regulatory T (Treg) cell induction as putative AAI-protective mechanisms. Schistosome-induced B cells showed increased CD86 expression and reduced cytokine expression in response to Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands compared with control B cells. To investigate the consequences for T cell activation we cultured ovalbumin (OVA)-pulsed, schistosome-induced B cells with OVA-specific transgenic T cells and observed less Th2 cytokine expression and T cell proliferation compared with control conditions. This suppressive effect was preserved even under optimal T cell stimulation by anti-CD3/28. Blocking of the inhibitory cytokines IL-10 or TGF-β only marginally restored Th2 cytokine induction. These data suggest that schistosome-induced pulmonary B cells are impaired in their capacity to produce cytokines to TLR ligands and to induce Th2 cytokine responses independent of their antigen-presenting function. These findings underline the presence of distinct B cell subsets with different stimulatory or inhibitory properties even if induced by the same type of helminth.

  15. Systemic inflammation and skeletal muscle dysfunction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: state of the art and novel insights in regulation of muscle plasticity.

    PubMed

    Remels, Alexander H; Gosker, Harry R; van der Velden, Jos; Langen, Ramon C; Schols, Annemie M

    2007-09-01

    Systemic inflammation is a recognized hallmark of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease pathogenesis. Although the origin and mechanisms responsible for the persistent chronic inflammatory process remain to be elucidated, it is recognized that it plays an important role in skeletal muscle pathology as observed in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and several other chronic inflammatory disorders. This article describes state-of-the-art knowledge and novel insights in the role of inflammatory processes on several aspects of inflammation-related skeletal muscle pathology and offers new insights in therapeutic perspectives.

  16. Pulmonary instillation of low doses of titanium dioxide nanoparticles in mice leads to particle retention and gene expression changes in the absence of inflammation

    SciTech Connect

    Husain, Mainul; Saber, Anne T.; Guo, Charles; Jacobsen, Nicklas R.; Jensen, Keld A.; Yauk, Carole L.; Williams, Andrew; Vogel, Ulla; Wallin, Hakan; Halappanavar, Sabina

    2013-06-15

    We investigated gene expression, protein synthesis, and particle retention in mouse lungs following intratracheal instillation of varying doses of nano-sized titanium dioxide (nano-TiO{sub 2}). Female C57BL/6 mice were exposed to rutile nano-TiO{sub 2} via single intratracheal instillations of 18, 54, and 162 μg/mouse. Mice were sampled 1, 3, and 28 days post-exposure. The deposition of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. Biological responses in the pulmonary system were analyzed using DNA microarrays, pathway-specific real-time RT-PCR (qPCR), gene-specific qPCR arrays, and tissue protein ELISA. Hyperspectral mapping showed dose-dependent retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the lungs up to 28 days post-instillation. DNA microarray analysis revealed approximately 3000 genes that were altered across all treatment groups (± 1.3 fold; p < 0.1). Several inflammatory mediators changed in a dose- and time-dependent manner at both the mRNA and protein level. Although no influx of neutrophils was detected at the low dose, changes in the expression of several genes and proteins associated with inflammation were observed. Resolving inflammation at the medium dose, and lack of neutrophil influx in the lung fluid at the low dose, were associated with down-regulation of genes involved in ion homeostasis and muscle regulation. Our gene expression results imply that retention of nano-TiO{sub 2} in the absence of inflammation over time may potentially perturb calcium and ion homeostasis, and affect smooth muscle activities. - Highlights: • Pulmonary effects following exposure to low doses of nano-TiO{sub 2} were examined. • Particle retention in lungs was assessed using nanoscale hyperspectral microscopy. • Particles persisted up to 28 days in lungs in all dose groups. • Inflammation was the pathway affected in the high dose group at all time points. • Ion homeostasis and muscle activity pathways were affected in the low dose

  17. Effects of formoterol and ipratropium bromide on repeated cadmium inhalation-induced pulmonary inflammation and emphysema in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, WenHui; Fievez, Laurence; Zhang, Fan; Cheu, Esteban; Antoine, Nadine; Delguste, Catherine; Zhang, Yong; Rong, WeiFang; Bureau, Fabrice; Advenier, Charles; Gustin, Pascal

    2010-11-25

    The anti-inflammatory properties of inhaled formoterol and ipratropium bromide, alone or in combination, were investigated in a rat model of chronic pulmonary inflammation with airspace enlargement induced by cadmium inhalation. At the end of the protocol, cadmium-induced increase of airway resistance was prevented by formoterol (4 mg/30 ml) or ipratropium (0.20 mg/20 ml). Formoterol elicited a significant decrease in total cell and neutrophil counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as well as on the activity of gelatinase B (MMP-9), an enzyme strongly expressed in alveolar macrophages and epithelial cells. Additionally, a significant attenuation of the lung lesions characterized by inflammatory cell infiltration within the alveoli and the interstitium and a decrease in mean linear intercept were observed. Although ipratropium alone had no effects on the cadmium-induced pulmonary inflammation and emphysema, its combination with an inefficient concentration of formoterol (1 mg/30 ml) showed a synergistic inhibitory effect on neutrophil and total cell counts as well as on the mean linear intercept associated with a synergistic inhibition on the MMP-9 activity. Gelatinase A (MMP-2) activity was not influenced by drug pretreatments. Neither macrophage metalloelastase (MMP-12) activity nor levels of cytokines IL-1β, TNF-α and GM-CSF in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were modified in rats chronically exposed to cadmium. No desensitization of β(2)-adrenoceptors or cholinergic receptors on airway smooth muscles and inflammatory cells during the protocol was observed. In conclusion, formoterol alone or combined with ipratropium bromide partially protects the lungs against the chronic inflammation and airspace enlargement by reducing neutrophilic infiltration possibly via the inhibition of MMP-9 activity.

  18. Early pulmonary inflammation and lung damage in children with cystic fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Schultz, André; Stick, Stephen

    2015-05-01

    Individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF) suffer progressive airway inflammation, infection and lung damage. Airway inflammation and infection are present from early in life, often before children are symptomatic. CF gene mutations cause changes in the CF transmembrane regulator protein that result in an aberrant airway microenvironment including airway surface liquid (ASL) dehydration, reduced ASL acidity, altered airway mucin and a dysregulated inflammatory response. This review discusses how an altered microenvironment drives CF lung disease before overt airway infection, the response of the CF airway to early infection, and methods to prevent inflammation and early lung disease.

  19. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology

    PubMed Central

    Larsen, Jeppe M; Musavian, Hanieh S; Butt, Tariq M; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Thysen, Anna H; Brix, Susanne

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies of healthy human airways have revealed colonization by a distinct commensal bacterial microbiota containing Gram-negative Prevotella spp. However, the immunological properties of these bacteria in the respiratory system remain unknown. Here we compare the innate respiratory immune response to three Gram-negative commensal Prevotella strains (Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella nanceiensis and Prevotella salivae) and three Gram-negative pathogenic Proteobacteria known to colonize lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma (Haemophilus influenzae B, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis). The commensal Prevotella spp. and pathogenic Proteobacteria were found to exhibit intrinsic differences in innate inflammatory capacities on murine lung cells in vitro. In vivo in mice, non-typeable H. influenzae induced severe Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-independent COPD-like inflammation characterized by predominant airway neutrophilia, expression of a neutrophilic cytokine/chemokine profile in lung tissue, and lung immunopathology. In comparison, P. nanceiensis induced a diminished neutrophilic airway inflammation and no detectable lung pathology. Interestingly, the inflammatory airway response to the Gram-negative bacteria P. nanceiensis was completely TLR2-dependent. These findings demonstrate weak inflammatory properties of Gram-negative airway commensal Prevotella spp. that may make colonization by these bacteria tolerable by the respiratory immune system. PMID:25179236

  20. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma-associated Proteobacteria, but not commensal Prevotella spp., promote Toll-like receptor 2-independent lung inflammation and pathology.

    PubMed

    Larsen, Jeppe M; Musavian, Hanieh S; Butt, Tariq M; Ingvorsen, Camilla; Thysen, Anna H; Brix, Susanne

    2015-02-01

    Recent studies of healthy human airways have revealed colonization by a distinct commensal bacterial microbiota containing Gram-negative Prevotella spp. However, the immunological properties of these bacteria in the respiratory system remain unknown. Here we compare the innate respiratory immune response to three Gram-negative commensal Prevotella strains (Prevotella melaninogenica, Prevotella nanceiensis and Prevotella salivae) and three Gram-negative pathogenic Proteobacteria known to colonize lungs of patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and asthma (Haemophilus influenzae B, non-typeable Haemophilus influenzae and Moraxella catarrhalis). The commensal Prevotella spp. and pathogenic Proteobacteria were found to exhibit intrinsic differences in innate inflammatory capacities on murine lung cells in vitro. In vivo in mice, non-typeable H. influenzae induced severe Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2)-independent COPD-like inflammation characterized by predominant airway neutrophilia, expression of a neutrophilic cytokine/chemokine profile in lung tissue, and lung immunopathology. In comparison, P. nanceiensis induced a diminished neutrophilic airway inflammation and no detectable lung pathology. Interestingly, the inflammatory airway response to the Gram-negative bacteria P. nanceiensis was completely TLR2-dependent. These findings demonstrate weak inflammatory properties of Gram-negative airway commensal Prevotella spp. that may make colonization by these bacteria tolerable by the respiratory immune system.

  1. Mechanisms of carbon nanotube-induced toxicity: focus on pulmonary inflammation.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharya, Kunal; Andón, Fernando Torres; El-Sayed, Ramy; Fadeel, Bengt

    2013-12-01

    Carbon nanotubes have gained tremendous interest in a wide range of applications due to their unique physical, chemical, and electronic properties. Needless to say, close attention to the potential toxicity of carbon nanotubes is of paramount importance. Numerous studies have linked exposure of carbon nanotubes to the induction of inflammation, a complex protective response to harmful stimuli including pathogens, damaged or dying cells, and other irritants. However, inflammation is a double-edged sword as chronic inflammation can lead to destruction of tissues thus compromising the homeostasis of the organism. Here, we provide an overview of the process of inflammation, the key cells and the soluble mediators involved, and discuss research on carbon nanotubes and inflammation, including recent studies on the activation of the so-called inflammasome complex in macrophages resulting in secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, recent work has shown that inflammatory cells i.e. neutrophils and eosinophils are capable of enzymatic degradation of carbon nanotubes, with mitigation of the pro-inflammatory and pro-fibrotic effects of nanotubes thus underscoring that inflammation is both good and bad.

  2. Variability in Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Injury and Inflammation in Healthy and Cardiovascular Compromised Rat Models

    EPA Science Inventory

    The molecular bases for variability in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury due to underlying cardiovascular (CVD) and/or metabolic diseases are unknown. We hypothesized that healthy and genetic CVD-prone rat models will exhibit exacerbated response to acute ozone exposure depe...

  3. Pulmonary vascular inflammation: effect of TLR signalling on angiopoietin/TIE regulation.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Tobias; Dornbusch, Kathrin; Baumgarten, Georg; Hoeft, Andreas; Frede, Stilla; Klaschik, Sven

    2017-01-01

    Increased pulmonary vascular resistance is a critical complication in sepsis. Toll-like receptor (TLR) as well as angiopoietin (ANG) signalling both contribute to the emergence of pulmonary arterial hypertension. We hypothesized that TLR stimulation by bacterial ligands directly affects expression and secretion of ligands and receptors of the angiopoietin/TIE axis. Microvascular endothelial (HPMEC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) of pulmonary origin were incubated with thrombin and with ligands for TLR2, -4, -5, and -9. Expression and secretion of ANG1, -2, TIE2 and IL-8 were determined using quantitative real-time PCR and ELISA. TLR stimulation had no impact either on the expression of ANG2 and TIE2 in HPMEC or on that of ANG1 in SMC. However, overall levels of both released ANG1 and -2 were halved upon stimulation with the TLR9 ligand CpG, and ANG2 release was significantly enhanced by TLR4 activation when initially provoked by sequentially performed stimulation. Furthermore, enhanced ANG2 activity increased endothelial permeability, as demonstrated in an in vitro transwell assay. We conclude that sole TLR stimulation by bacterial ligands plays no significant role for altered expression and secretion of ANG1, -2 and TIE2 in human pulmonary vascular cells. The interplay between various stimuli is required to induce imbalances between ANG1 and -2.

  4. Impaired exercise capacity and skeletal muscle function in a mouse model of pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Kechun; Murano, George; Wagner, Harrieth; Nogueira, Leonardo; Wagner, Peter D.; Tang, Alisa; Dalton, Nancy D.; Gu, Yusu; Peterson, Kirk L.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary TNFα has been linked to reduced exercise capacity in a subset of patients with moderate to severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We hypothesized that prolonged, high expression of pulmonary TNFα impairs cardiac and skeletal muscle function, and both contribute to exercise limitation. Using a surfactant protein C promoter-TNFα construct, TNFα was overexpressed throughout life in mouse lungs (SP-C/TNFα+). TNFα levels in wild-type (WT) female serum and lung were two- and threefold higher than in WT male mice. In SP-C/TNFα+ mice, TNFα increased similarly in both sexes. Treadmill exercise was impaired only in male SP-C/TNFα+ mice. While increases in lung volume and airspace size induced by TNFα were comparable in both sexes, pulmonary hypertension along with lower body and muscle mass were evident only in male mice. Left ventricular (LV) function (cardiac output, stroke volume, LV maximal pressure, and LV maximal pressure dP/dt) was not altered by TNFα overexpression. Fatigue measured in isolated soleus and EDL was more rapid only in soleus of male SP-C/TNFα+ mice and accompanied by a loss of oxidative IIa fibers, citrate synthase activity, and PGC-1α mRNA and increase in atrogin-1 and MuRF1 expression also only in male mice. In situ gastrocnemius fatigue resistance, reflecting both oxygen availability and contractility, was decreased similarly in female and male SP-C/TNFα+ mice. These data indicate that male, but not female, mice overexpressing pulmonary TNFα are susceptible to exercise limitation, possibly due to muscle wasting and loss of the oxidative muscle phenotype, with protection in females possibly due to estrogen. PMID:23449936

  5. NF-κB Mediates Mesenchymal Transition, Remodeling, and Pulmonary Fibrosis in Response to Chronic Inflammation by Viral RNA Patterns.

    PubMed

    Tian, Bing; Patrikeev, Igor; Ochoa, Lorenzo; Vargas, Gracie; Belanger, KarryAnne K; Litvinov, Julia; Boldogh, Istvan; Ameredes, Bill T; Motamedi, Massoud; Brasier, Allan R

    2017-04-01

    Airway remodeling is resultant of a complex multicellular response associated with a progressive decline of pulmonary function in patients with chronic airway disease. Here, repeated infections with respiratory viruses are linked with airway remodeling through largely unknown mechanisms. Although acute activation of the Toll-like receptor (TLR) 3 pathway by extracellular polyinosinic:polycytidylic acid (poly[I:C]) induces innate signaling through the NF-κB transcription factor in normal human small airway epithelial cells, prolonged (repetitive or tonic) poly(I:C) stimulation produces chronic stress fiber formation, mesenchymal transition, and activation of a fibrotic program. Chronic poly(I:C) stimulation enhanced the expression of core mesenchymal regulators Snail family zinc finger 1, zinc finger E-box binding homeobox, mesenchymal intermediate filaments (vimentin), and extracellular matrix proteins (fibronectin-1), and collagen 1A. This mesenchymal transition was prevented by silencing expression of NF-κB/RelA or administration of a small-molecule inhibitor of the IκB kinase, BMS345541. Acute poly(I:C) exposure in vivo induced profound neutrophilic airway inflammation. When administered repetitively, poly(I:C) resulted in enhanced fibrosis observed by lung micro-computed tomography, second harmonic generation microscopy of optically cleared lung tissue, and by immunohistochemistry. Epithelial flattening, expansion of the epithelial mesenchymal trophic unit, and enhanced Snail family zinc finger 1 and fibronectin 1 expression in airway epithelium were also observed. Repetitive poly(I:C)-induced airway remodeling, fibrosis, and epithelial-mesenchymal transition was inhibited by BMS345541 administration. Based on this novel model of viral inflammation-induced remodeling, we conclude that NF-κB is a major controller of epithelial-mesenchymal transition and pulmonary fibrosis, a finding that has potentially important relevance to airway remodeling produced by

  6. Benzo(a)pyrene-induced pulmonary inflammation, edema, surfactant dysfunction, and injuries in rats: alleviation by farnesol.

    PubMed

    Qamar, Wajhul; Khan, Abdul Quaiyoom; Khan, Rehan; Lateef, Abdul; Tahir, Mir; Rehman, Muneeb U; Ali, Farrah; Sultana, Sarwat

    2012-02-01

    Benzo(a)pyrene (B(a)P) is a well-known environmental contaminant and carcinogen. Its sources include tobacco smoke, automobile exhaust, forest fire, and other combustion processes. Farnesol, an active principle of Vachellia farnesiana and other aromatic plants, possesses preventive properties against various toxicities. Present study was designed to estimate chemopreventive effects of farnesol against B(a)P-induced pulmonary injuries. To determine the protective effects of farnesol, it was administered orally at 2 doses (100 and 200 mg/kg body weight [b.w.]) once daily for 14 days. Rats were exposed intratracheally to B(a)P, 5 mg/kg b.w. on days 12 and 14, thereafter assessed for pulmonary toxicities 24 hours post last dose of B(a)P. B(a)P-induced edema, inflammation, oxidative stress, and consequent damages in lungs were assessed in terms of total protein, total cell count, nitric oxide (NO), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), alkaline phosphatase, and in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). B(a)P also reduced the levels of phospholipids (lung surfactants) in BALF. However, pretreatment with farnesol at both the doses significantly reduced the lung injuries and inflammatory responses. Farnesol also protected the levels of phospholipids to normal when compared with control. It also modified the activities of B(a)P metabolizing enzymes NADPH-cytochrome P450 reductase, microsomal epoxide hydrolase (mEH), and glutathione S-transferase (GST) in lung tissue of rats. Present findings suggest a prominent role of farnesol against B(a)P-induced lung inflammation, edema, surfactant dysfunction, and epithelial damages in Wistar rats. In conclusion, farnesol shows lung protection against B(a)P toxicities in Wistar rats.

  7. Anti-inflammatory effects of formoterol and ipratropium bromide against acute cadmium-induced pulmonary inflammation in rats.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wenhui; Fievez, Laurence; Cheu, Esteban; Bureau, Fabrice; Rong, Weifang; Zhang, Fan; Zhang, Yong; Advenier, Charles; Gustin, Pascal

    2010-02-25

    In this study, the anti-inflammatory properties of formoterol and ipratropium bromide, alone or in combination, were investigated in a rat model of acute pulmonary inflammation induced by cadmium inhalation. Airway resistance and inflammatory responses, including matrix metalloproteinease-2 (MMP-2) and matrix metalloproteinease-9 (MMP-9) activities, were evaluated. Compared to values obtained in rats exposed to cadmium, pretreatment by bronchodilators administered alone significantly prevented the cadmium-induced increase of airway resistance. Formoterol elicited a significant decrease in total cell number, neutrophil and macrophage counts in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, whereas ipratropium bromide reduced neutrophil numbers. The two compounds administered alone significantly attenuated the lung lesions associated with parenchyma inflammatory cell influx and congestion observed in the cadmium group. The increased MMP-9 activity was significantly attenuated. Although only formoterol induced a decrease protein concentration in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, both compounds inhibited the pulmonary edema by reducing wet-to-dry weight ratio which returned to values similar to those recorded in the sham group. All the effects of formoterol on the cadmium-induced inflammatory responses were reversed by propranolol. Similar anti-inflammatory effects were obtained in rats pretreated with ilomastat which showed a significant reduction on inflammatory cell infiltration and MMP-9 activity in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid. Neither synergistic nor additive effects were obtained when the two bronchodilators were administered in combination. In conclusion, formoterol and ipratropium bromide partially protect the lungs against the inflammation by reducing neutrophilic infiltration. This protective effect is associated with reduced MMP-9 activity known to play an important pro-inflammatory role in acute inflammatory process.

  8. Elevated circulating PAI-1 levels are related to lung function decline, systemic inflammation, and small airway obstruction in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hao; Yang, Ting; Li, Diandian; Wu, Yanqiu; Zhang, Xue; Pang, Caishuang; Zhang, Junlong; Ying, Binwu; Wang, Tao; Wen, Fuqiang

    2016-01-01

    Background Plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) and soluble urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (suPAR) participate in inflammation and tissue remolding in various diseases, but their roles in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are not yet clear. This study aimed to investigate if PAI-1 and suPAR were involved in systemic inflammation and small airway obstruction (SAO) in COPD. Methods Demographic and clinical characteristics, spirometry examination, and blood samples were obtained from 84 COPD patients and 51 healthy volunteers. Serum concentrations of PAI-1, suPAR, tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), Matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), and C-reactive protein (CRP) were detected with Magnetic Luminex Screening Assay. Differences between groups were statistically analyzed using one-way analysis of variance or chi-square test. Pearson’s partial correlation test (adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, cigarette status, and passive smoke exposure) and multivariable linear analysis were used to explore the relationships between circulating PAI-1 and indicators of COPD. Results First, we found that serum PAI-1 levels but not suPAR levels were significantly increased in COPD patients compared with healthy volunteers (125.56±51.74 ng/mL versus 102.98±36.62 ng/mL, P=0.007). Then, the correlation analysis showed that circulating PAI-1 was inversely correlated with pulmonary function parameters including the ratio of forced expiratory volume in 1 second to forced vital capacity (FEV1/FVC), FEV1/Pre (justified r=−0.308, P<0.001; justified r=−0.295, P=0.001, respectively) and SAO indicators such as FEV3/FVC, MMEF25–75/Pre (justified r=−0.289, P=0.001; justified r=−0.273, P=0.002, respectively), but positively related to the inflammatory marker CRP (justified r=0.351, P<0.001), the small airway remolding biomarker TIMP-1, and MMP-9 (justified r=0.498, P<0.001; justified r=0.267, P=0.002, respectively). Besides, multivariable

  9. The effects of aging on pulmonary oxidative damage, protein nitration, and extracellular superoxide dismutase down-regulation during systemic inflammation.

    PubMed

    Starr, Marlene E; Ueda, Junji; Yamamoto, Shoji; Evers, B Mark; Saito, Hiroshi

    2011-01-15

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS), a serious clinical condition characterized by whole-body inflammation, is particularly threatening for elderly patients, who suffer much higher mortality rates than the young. A major pathological consequence of SIRS is acute lung injury caused by neutrophil-mediated oxidative damage. Previously, we reported an increase in protein tyrosine nitration (a marker of oxidative/nitrosative damage) and a decrease in the antioxidant enzyme extracellular superoxide dismutase (EC-SOD) in the lungs of young mice during endotoxemia-induced SIRS. Here we demonstrate that during endotoxemia, down-regulation of EC-SOD is significantly more profound and prolonged, whereas up-regulation of iNOS is augmented, in aged compared to young mice. Aged mice also showed 2.5-fold higher protein nitration levels, compared to young mice, with particularly strong nitration in the pulmonary vascular endothelium during SIRS. Additionally, by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, Western blotting, and mass spectrometry, we identified proteins that show increased tyrosine nitration in age- and SIRS-dependent manners; these proteins (profilin-1, transgelin-2, LASP 1, tropomyosin, and myosin) include components of the actin cytoskeleton responsible for maintaining pulmonary vascular permeability. Reduced EC-SOD in combination with increased oxidative/nitrosative damage and altered cytoskeletal protein function due to tyrosine nitration may contribute to augmented lung injury in the aged with SIRS.

  10. Dietary long-chain omega-3 fatty acids do not diminish eosinophilic pulmonary inflammation in mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of fish oil supplements on diminishing airway inflammation in asthma have been studied in mouse models and human intervention trials with varying results. However, the independent effects of the main omega-3 PUFAs found in fish oil, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (D...

  11. Acute pulmonary toxicity and inflammation induced by combined exposure to didecyldimethylammonium chloride and ethylene glycol in rats.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Do Young; Kim, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Eunji; Lim, Yeon-Mi; Kim, Pilje; Choi, Kyunghee; Kwon, Jung-Taek

    2016-02-01

    Didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC), an antimicrobial agent, has been reported to induce pulmonary toxicity in animal studies. DDAC is frequently used in spray-form household products in combination with ethylene glycol (EG). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the toxic interaction between DDAC and EG in the lung. DDAC at a sub-toxic dose (100 μg/kg body weight) was mixed with a non-toxic dose of EG (100 or 200 μg/kg body weight), and was administrated to rats via intratracheal instillation. Lactate dehydrogenase activity and total protein content in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were not changed by singly treated DDAC or EG, but significantly enhanced at 1 d after treatment with the mixture, with the effect dependent on the dose of EG. Total cell count in BALF was largely increased and polymorphonuclear leukocytes were predominantly recruited to the lung in rats administrated with the mixture. Inflammatory cytokines, tumor necrosis factor-alpha and interleukin-6 also appeared to be increased by the mixture of DDAC and EG (200 μg/kg body weight) at 1 d post-exposure, which might be associated with the increase in inflammatory cells in lung. BALF protein content and inflammatory cell recruitment in the lung still remained elevated at 7 d after the administration of DDAC with the higher dose of EG. These results suggest that the combination of DDAC and EG can synergistically induce pulmonary cytotoxicity and inflammation, and EG appears to amplify the harmful effects of DDAC on the lung. Therefore pulmonary exposure to these two chemicals commonly found in commercial products can be a potential hazard to human health.

  12. Depletion of Neutrophils Promotes the Resolution of Pulmonary Inflammation and Fibrosis in Mice Infected with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis

    PubMed Central

    Arango, Julián Camilo

    2016-01-01

    Chronic stages of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM) are characterized by granulomatous lesions which promote the development of pulmonary fibrosis leading to the loss of respiratory function in 50% of patients; in addition, it has been observed that neutrophils predominate during these chronic stages of P. brasiliensis infection. The goal of this study was to evaluate the role of the neutrophil during the chronic stages of experimental pulmonary PCM and during the fibrosis development and tissue repair using a monoclonal specific to this phagocytic cell. Male BALB/c mice were inoculated intranasally with 1.5x106 P. brasiliensis yeast cells. A monoclonal antibody specific to neutrophils was administered at 4 weeks post-inoculation followed by doses every 48h during two weeks. Mice were sacrificed at 8 and 12 weeks post-inoculation to assess cellularity, fungal load, cytokine/chemokine levels, histopathological analysis, collagen and expression of genes related to fibrosis development. Depletion of neutrophils was associated with a significant decrease in the number of eosinophils, dendritic cells, B cells, CD4-T cells, MDSCs and Treg cells, fungal load and levels of most of the pro-inflammatory cytokines/chemokines evaluated, including IL-17, TNF-α and TGF-β1. Recovery of lung architecture was also associated with reduced levels of collagen, high expression of TGF-β3, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12 and -14, and decreased expression of tissue inhibitor metalloproteinase (TIMP)-2, and MMP-8. Depletion of neutrophils might attenuate lung fibrosis and inflammation through down-regulating TGF-β1, TNF-α, IL-17, MMP-8 and TIMP-2. These results suggest that neutrophil could be considered as a therapeutic target in pulmonary fibrosis induced by P. brasiliensis. PMID:27690127

  13. Pneumocystis colonization, airway inflammation, and pulmonary function decline in acquired immunodeficiency syndrome.

    PubMed

    Norris, Karen A; Morris, Alison; Patil, Sangita; Fernandes, Eustace

    2006-01-01

    As a result of improved diagnosis, treatment, and supportive care for HIV-infected patients, AIDS in developed countries has now become a chronic infection with prolonged survival time, but longterm complications are increasing contributors to morbidity and mortality. HIV-infected patients are at increased risk for the development of pulmonary complications, including chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD); however, the mechanisms associated with this increased susceptibility have not been defined. Infectious agents may contribute to the development of COPD by upregulating inflammatory mediators in the lung that act in concert with cigarette smoke to promote lung pathology. Studies in human subjects and non-human primate models of AIDS suggest that the inflammatory response to asymptomatic carriage or colonization by the opportunistic pathogen, Pneumocystis sp. (Pc), is similar to that of COPD, which is characterized by influx of CD8+ T cells, neutrophils, and macrophages into the lungs. We have shown a high frequency of Pc colonization among asymptomatic HIV-infected subjects and in non-HIV infected subjects with COPD. To investigate the role of Pc in the progression of obstructive lung disease in HIV infections, we developed a non-human primate model of Pc colonizatoin and infection in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques. These animals develop a prolonged colonization state characterized by a persistent influx of CD8+ T cells and neutrophils, and local increases in IL-8, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha. SIV-infected Pc-colonized monkeys show progressive decline in pulmonary function compared to SIV-infected monkeys. We hypothesize that in the context of AIDS-immune dysfunction, Pc colonization induces inflammatory responses leading to changes in pulmonary function and architecture similar to that seen in emphysema. Information gained from these studies will lead to the development of interventions to prevent lung injury associated with Pc

  14. Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung

    SciTech Connect

    Yanamala, Naveena; Birch, M. Eileen; Kisin, Elena; Bugarski, Aleksandar D.

    2013-10-15

    The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-based D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. - Highlights: • Exposure of mice to BDPM caused higher pulmonary toxicity compared to DPM. • Oxidative stress and inflammation were higher in BD vs to D exposed mice. • Inflammatory lymphocyte infiltrates were seen only in lungs of mice exposed to BD. • Ineffective clearance, prolonged PM retention was present only after BD exposure.

  15. Allergic pulmonary inflammation in mice is dependent on eosinophil-induced recruitment of effector T cells

    PubMed Central

    Jacobsen, Elizabeth A.; Ochkur, Sergei I.; Pero, Ralph S.; Taranova, Anna G.; Protheroe, Cheryl A.; Colbert, Dana C.; Lee, Nancy A.; Lee, James J.

    2008-01-01

    The current paradigm surrounding allergen-mediated T helper type 2 (Th2) immune responses in the lung suggests an almost hegemonic role for T cells. Our studies propose an alternative hypothesis implicating eosinophils in the regulation of pulmonary T cell responses. In particular, ovalbumin (OVA)-sensitized/challenged mice devoid of eosinophils (the transgenic line PHIL) have reduced airway levels of Th2 cytokines relative to the OVA-treated wild type that correlated with a reduced ability to recruit effector T cells to the lung. Adoptive transfer of Th2-polarized OVA-specific transgenic T cells (OT-II) alone into OVA-challenged PHIL recipient mice failed to restore Th2 cytokines, airway histopathologies, and, most importantly, the recruitment of pulmonary effector T cells. In contrast, the combined transfer of OT-II cells and eosinophils into PHIL mice resulted in the accumulation of effector T cells and a concomitant increase in both airway Th2 immune responses and histopathologies. Moreover, we show that eosinophils elicit the expression of the Th2 chemokines thymus- and activation-regulated chemokine/CCL17 and macrophage-derived chemokine/CCL22 in the lung after allergen challenge, and blockade of these chemokines inhibited the recruitment of effector T cells. In summary, the data suggest that pulmonary eosinophils are required for the localized recruitment of effector T cells. PMID:18316417

  16. An Immature Myeloid/Myeloid-Suppressor Cell Response Associated with Necrotizing Inflammation Mediates Lethal Pulmonary Tularemia

    PubMed Central

    Periasamy, Sivakumar; Avram, Dorina; McCabe, Amanda; MacNamara, Katherine C.; Sellati, Timothy J.; Harton, Jonathan A.

    2016-01-01

    Inhalation of Francisella tularensis (Ft) causes acute and fatal pneumonia. The lung cytokine milieu favors exponential Ft replication, but the mechanisms underlying acute pathogenesis and death remain unknown. Evaluation of the sequential and systemic host immune response in pulmonary tularemia reveals that in contrast to overwhelming bacterial burden or cytokine production, an overt innate cellular response to Ft drives tissue pathology and host mortality. Lethal infection with Ft elicits medullary and extra-medullary myelopoiesis supporting recruitment of large numbers of immature myeloid cells and MDSC to the lungs. These cells fail to mature and die, leading to subsequent necrotic lung damage, loss of pulmonary function, and host death that is partially dependent upon immature Ly6G+ cells. Acceleration of this process may account for the rapid lethality seen with Ft SchuS4. In contrast, during sub-lethal infection with Ft LVS the pulmonary cellular response is characterized by a predominance of mature neutrophils and monocytes required for protection, suggesting a required threshold for lethal bacterial infection. Further, eliciting a mature phagocyte response provides transient, but dramatic, innate protection against Ft SchuS4. This study reveals that the nature of the myeloid cell response may be the primary determinant of host mortality versus survival following Francisella infection. PMID:27015566

  17. Use of Metal Oxide Nanoparticle Band Gap to Develop a Predictive Paradigm for Oxidative Stress and Acute Pulmonary Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Haiyuan; Ji, Zhaoxia; Xia, Tian; Meng, Huan; Low-Kam, Cecile; Liu, Rong; Pokhrel, Suman; Lin, Sijie; Wang, Xiang; Liao, Yu-Pei; Wang, Meiying; Li, Linjiang; Rallo, Robert; Damoiseaux, Robert; Telesca, Donatello; Mädler, Lutz; Cohen, Yoram; Zink, Jeffrey I.; Nel, Andre E.

    2014-01-01

    We demonstrate for 24 metal oxide (MOx) nanoparticles that it is possible to use conduction band energy levels to delineate their toxicological potential at cellular and whole animal levels. Among the materials, the overlap of conduction band energy (Ec) levels with the cellular redox potential (−4.12 to −4.84 eV) was strongly correlated to the ability of Co3O4, Cr2O3, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles to induce oxygen radicals, oxidative stress and inflammation. This outcome is premised on permissible electron transfers from the biological redox couples that maintain the cellular redox equilibrium to the conduction band of the semiconductor particles. Both single parameter cytotoxic as well as multi-parameter oxidative stress assays in cells showed excellent correlation to the generation of acute neutrophilic inflammation and cytokine responses in the lungs of CB57 Bl/6 mice. Co3O4, Ni2O3, Mn2O3 and CoO nanoparticles could also oxidize cytochrome c as a representative redox couple involved in redox homeostasis. While CuO and ZnO generated oxidative stress and acute pulmonary inflammation that is not predicted by Ec levels, the adverse biological effects of these materials could be explained by their solubility, as demonstrated by ICP-MS analysis. Taken together, these results demonstrate, for the first time, that it is possible to predict the toxicity of a large series of MOx nanoparticles in the lung premised on semiconductor properties and an integrated in vitro/in vivo hazard ranking model premised on oxidative stress. This establishes a robust platform for modeling of MOx structure-activity relationships based on band gap energy levels and particle dissolution. This predictive toxicological paradigm is also of considerable importance for regulatory decision-making about this important class of engineered nanomaterials. PMID:22502734

  18. Characteristics of Allergic Pulmonary Inflammation in CXCR3Knockout Mice Sensitized and Challenged with House Dust Mite Protein

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiaolan; Gao, Jinming; Guo, Zijian

    2016-01-01

    Chemokine C-X-C motif receptor 3 (CXCR3) is a chemokine receptor that is mainly expressed by activated T lymphocytes. T cells play important roles in allergic pulmonary inflammation, which is a hallmark of asthma and elicits the localized accumulation of activated T cells in the lung. In China, a marked increase in the incidence rate of chronic allergic pulmonary inflammation has made it a major public health threat. In the present study, we investigated the role of CXCR3 and its ligands in airway inflammation induced by house dust mite protein (HDMP) in a CXCR3 knockout (CXCR3KO) asthma mouse model. Pathological manifestations in the lung, cell counts and bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) classifications were studied using hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining. The levels of IL-4 and IFN-γ in the BALF and splenocyte supernatants were measured using ELISA. CD4+ and CD8+ T cells in the lung and spleen were analyzed by flow cytometry. RT-PCR was applied to measure the mRNA transcript levels of monokines induced by IFN-γ(CXCL9) and IFN-γ inducible protein 10(CXCL10). The total cell counts, eosinophil counts, and IL-4 levels in the BALF and cultured splenocyte supernatants were significantly increased, while the levels of IFN-γ were reduced in the HDMP groups(P<0.01). Changes in the total cell counts, eosinophil counts, and lymphocyte counts, as well as the total protein levels in the BALF, the levels of IL-4 in splenocyte supernatants, and the pathological manifestations in the lung, were all greater in CXCR3KO mice than in C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Furthermore, the expression levels of CXCL9 and CXCL10 mRNA transcripts in the lungs of CXCR3KO mice were lower than those in C57BL/6 wild-type mice (P<0.05). CXCR3 and its ligands (i.e., CXCL9 and CXCL10) may play anti-inflammatory roles in this animal model. Promoting the expression of CXCR3 and its ligands may represent a novel therapeutic approach for preventing and curing asthma. PMID:27727269

  19. Improving performance of computer-aided detection of pulmonary embolisms by incorporating a new pulmonary vascular-tree segmentation algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xingwei; Song, XiaoFei; Chapman, Brian E.; Zheng, Bin

    2012-03-01

    We developed a new pulmonary vascular tree segmentation/extraction algorithm. The purpose of this study was to assess whether adding this new algorithm to our previously developed computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme of pulmonary embolism (PE) could improve the CAD performance (in particular reducing false positive detection rates). A dataset containing 12 CT examinations with 384 verified pulmonary embolism regions associated with 24 threedimensional (3-D) PE lesions was selected in this study. Our new CAD scheme includes the following image processing and feature classification steps. (1) A 3-D based region growing process followed by a rolling-ball algorithm was utilized to segment lung areas. (2) The complete pulmonary vascular trees were extracted by combining two approaches of using an intensity-based region growing to extract the larger vessels and a vessel enhancement filtering to extract the smaller vessel structures. (3) A toboggan algorithm was implemented to identify suspicious PE candidates in segmented lung or vessel area. (4) A three layer artificial neural network (ANN) with the topology 27-10-1 was developed to reduce false positive detections. (5) A k-nearest neighbor (KNN) classifier optimized by a genetic algorithm was used to compute detection scores for the PE candidates. (6) A grouping scoring method was designed to detect the final PE lesions in three dimensions. The study showed that integrating the pulmonary vascular tree extraction algorithm into the CAD scheme reduced false positive rates by 16.2%. For the case based 3D PE lesion detecting results, the integrated CAD scheme achieved 62.5% detection sensitivity with 17.1 false-positive lesions per examination.

  20. Acute pulmonary exacerbation and lung function decline in patients with cystic fibrosis: high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) between inflammation and infection.

    PubMed

    Chirico, V; Lacquaniti, A; Leonardi, S; Grasso, L; Rotolo, N; Romano, C; Di Dio, G; Lionetti, E; David, A; Arrigo, T; Salpietro, C; La Rosa, M

    2015-04-01

    Airway inflammation plays a central role in cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease, and biomarkers of inflammation, such as high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) could be used to monitor disease activity. The main aim of this study was to confirm the role of HMGB1 in CF patients, correlating its serum and sputum levels with pulmonary function and inflammation. Serum and sputum HMGB1 were evaluated in a cohort of 31 CF patients and 30 non-smoking healthy subjects (HS group). Acute pulmonary exacerbation events and lung function decline have been also evaluated during a 3-year follow-up period. Serum HMGB1 levels were significantly higher than those measured in HS, such as sputum HMGB1. Kaplan-Meier survival curves revealed that patients with high HMGB1 values experienced a significantly faster evolution to decline of lung function. A multiple Cox regression analysis assessed that an increase of serum HMGB1 was associated with 5% increased risk of pulmonary disease progression, whereas elevated sputum HMGB1 was related to a 10% increased risk of lung function decline. In CF patients, HMGB1 closely reflects the entity of pulmonary impairment and represents a strong and independent risk marker for progression of lung function decline.

  1. The role of neural inflammation in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Joos, Guy F; De Swert, Katelijne O; Schelfhout, Vanessa; Pauwels, Romain A

    2003-05-01

    The tachykinins substance P and neurokinin A are found within airway nerves and immune cells. They have various effects on the airways that can contribute to the changes observed in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Both tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptors have been involved in the bronchoconstriction and the proinflammatory changes induced by substance P and neurokinin A. Tachykinin NK(1) and NK(2) receptor antagonists have activity in various animal models of allergic asthma and chronic bronchitis. It is suggested that dual NK(1)/NK(2) and triple NK(1)/NK(2)/NK(3) tachykinin receptor antagonists have potential in the treatment of obstructive airway diseases.

  2. Equivalent Dipole Vector Analysis for Detecting Pulmonary Hypertension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Harlander, Matevz; Salobir, Barbara; Toplisek, Janez; Schlegel, Todd T.; Starc, Vito

    2010-01-01

    Various 12-lead ECG criteria have been established to detect right ventricular hypertrophy as a marker of pulmonary hypertension (PH). While some criteria offer good specificity they lack sensitivity because of a low prevalence of positive findings in the PH population. We hypothesized that three-dimensional equivalent dipole (ED) model could serve as a better detection tool of PH. We enrolled: 1) 17 patients (12 female, 5 male, mean age 57 years, range 19-79 years) with echocardiographically detected PH (systolic pulmonary arterial pressure greater than 35 mmHg) and no significant left ventricular disease; and 2) 19 healthy controls (7 female, 12 male, mean age 44, range 31-53 years) with no known heart disease. In each subject we recorded a 5-minute high-resolution 12-lead conventional ECG and constructed principal signals using singular value decomposition. Assuming a standard thorax dimension of an adult person with homogenous and isotropic distribution of thorax conductance, we determined moving equivalent dipoles (ED), characterized by the 3D location in the thorax, dipolar strength and the spatial orientation, in time intervals of 5 ms. We used the sum of all ED vectors in the second half of the QRS complex to derive the amplitude of the right-sided ED vector (RV), if the orientation of ED was to the right side of the thorax, and in the first half the QRS to derive the amplitude of the left-sided vector (LV), if the orientation was leftward. Finally, the parameter RV/LV ratio was determined over an average of 256 complexes. The groups differed in age and gender to some extent. There was a non-significant trend toward higher RV in patients with PH (438 units 284) than in controls (280 plus or minus 140) (p = 0.066) but the overlap was such that RV alone was not a good predictor of PH. On the other hand, the RV/LV ratio was a better predictor of PH, with 11/17 (64.7%) of PH patients but only in 1/19 (5.3%) control subjects having RV/LV ratio greater than or

  3. IL-13 induces disease-promoting type 2 cytokines, alternatively activated macrophages and allergic inflammation during pulmonary infection of mice with Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Müller, Uwe; Stenzel, Werner; Köhler, Gabriele; Werner, Christoph; Polte, Tobias; Hansen, Gesine; Schütze, Nicole; Straubinger, Reinhard K; Blessing, Manfred; McKenzie, Andrew N J; Brombacher, Frank; Alber, Gottfried

    2007-10-15

    In the murine model of Cryptococcus neoformans infection Th1 (IL-12/IFN-gamma) and Th17 (IL-23/IL-17) responses are associated with protection, whereas an IL-4-dependent Th2 response exacerbates disease. To investigate the role of the Th2 cytokine IL-13 during pulmonary infection with C. neoformans, IL-13-overexpressing transgenic (IL-13Tg(+)), IL-13-deficient (IL-13(-/-)), and wild-type (WT) mice were infected intranasally. Susceptibility to C. neoformans infection was found when IL-13 was induced in WT mice or overproduced in IL-13Tg(+) mice. Infected IL-13Tg(+) mice had a reduced survival time and higher pulmonary fungal load as compared with WT mice. In contrast, infected IL-13(-/-) mice were resistant and 89% of these mice survived the entire period of the experiment. Ag-specific production of IL-13 by susceptible WT and IL-13Tg(+) mice was associated with a significant type 2 cytokine shift but only minor changes in IFN-gamma production. Consistent with enhanced type 2 cytokine production, high levels of serum IgE and low ratios of serum IgG2a/IgG1 were detected in susceptible WT and IL-13Tg(+) mice. Interestingly, expression of IL-13 by susceptible WT and IL-13Tg(+) mice was associated with reduced IL-17 production. IL-13 was found to induce formation of alternatively activated macrophages expressing arginase-1, macrophage mannose receptor (CD206), and YM1. In addition, IL-13 production led to lung eosinophilia, goblet cell metaplasia and elevated mucus production, and enhanced airway hyperreactivity. This indicates that IL-13 contributes to fatal allergic inflammation during C. neoformans infection.

  4. Radiotracers Used for the Scintigraphic Detection of Infection and Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Tsopelas, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Over the last forty years, a small group of commercial radiopharmaceuticals have found their way into routine medical use, for the diagnostic imaging of patients with infection or inflammation. These molecular radiotracers usually participate in the immune response to an antigen, by tagging leukocytes or other molecules/cells that are endogenous to the process. Currently there is an advancing effort by researchers in the preclinical domain to design and develop new agents for this application. This review discusses radiopharmaceuticals used in the nuclear medicine clinic today, as well as those potential radiotracers that exploit an organism's defence mechanisms to an infectious or inflammatory event. PMID:25741532

  5. Pulmonary Inflammation Impacts on CYP1A1-Mediated Respiratory Tract DNA Damage Induced by the Carcinogenic Air Pollutant Benzo[a]pyrene

    PubMed Central

    Arlt, Volker M.; Krais, Annette M.; Godschalk, Roger W.; Riffo-Vasquez, Yanira; Mrizova, Iveta; Roufosse, Candice A.; Corbin, Charmaine; Shi, Quan; Frei, Eva; Stiborova, Marie; van Schooten, Frederik-Jan; Phillips, David H.; Spina, Domenico

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary inflammation can contribute to the development of lung cancer in humans. We investigated whether pulmonary inflammation alters the genotoxicity of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the lungs of mice and what mechanisms are involved. To model nonallergic acute inflammation, mice were exposed intranasally to lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 20 µg/mouse) and then instilled intratracheally with benzo[a]pyrene (BaP; 0.5 mg/mouse). BaP-DNA adduct levels, measured by 32P-postlabeling analysis, were approximately 3-fold higher in the lungs of LPS/BaP-treated mice than in mice treated with BaP alone. Pulmonary Cyp1a1 enzyme activity was decreased in LPS/BaP-treated mice relative to BaP-treated mice suggesting that pulmonary inflammation impacted on BaP-induced Cyp1a1 activity in the lung. Our results showed that Cyp1a1 appears to be important for BaP detoxification in vivo and that the decrease of pulmonary Cyp1a1 activity in LPS/BaP-treated mice results in a decrease of pulmonary BaP detoxification, thereby enhancing BaP genotoxicity (ie, DNA adduct formation) in the lung. Because less BaP was detoxified by Cyp1a1 in the lungs of LPS/BaP-treated mice, more BaP circulated via the blood to extrapulmonary tissues relative to mice treated with BaP only. Indeed, we observed higher BaP-DNA adduct levels in livers of LPS/BaP-treated mice compared with BaP-treated mice. Our results indicate that pulmonary inflammation could be a critical determinant in the induction of genotoxicity in the lung by PAHs like BaP. Cyp1a1 appears to be involved in both BaP bioactivation and detoxification although the contribution of other enzymes to BaP-DNA adduct formation in lung and liver under inflammatory conditions remains to be explored. PMID:25911668

  6. Pulmonary Inflammation Is Regulated by the Levels of the Vesicular Acetylcholine Transporter

    PubMed Central

    Perini, Adenir; Câmara, Niels O. S.; Costa, Soraia K. P.; Alonso-Vale, Maria Isabel C.; Caperuto, Luciana C.; Tibério, Iolanda F. L. C.; Prado, Marco Antônio M.; Martins, Mílton A.; Prado, Vânia F.; Prado, Carla M.

    2015-01-01

    Acetylcholine (ACh) plays a crucial role in physiological responses of both the central and the peripheral nervous system. Moreover, ACh was described as an anti-inflammatory mediator involved in the suppression of exacerbated innate response and cytokine release in various organs. However, the specific contributions of endogenous release ACh for inflammatory responses in the lung are not well understood. To address this question we have used mice with reduced levels of the vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), a protein required for ACh storage in secretory vesicles. VAChT deficiency induced airway inflammation with enhanced TNF-α and IL-4 content, but not IL-6, IL-13 and IL-10 quantified by ELISA. Mice with decreased levels of VAChT presented increased collagen and elastic fibers deposition in airway walls which was consistent with an increase in inflammatory cells positive to MMP-9 and TIMP-1 in the lung. In vivo lung function evaluation showed airway hyperresponsiveness to methacholine in mutant mice. The expression of nuclear factor-kappa B (p65-NF-kB) in lung of VAChT-deficient mice were higher than in wild-type mice, whereas a decreased expression of janus-kinase 2 (JAK2) was observed in the lung of mutant animals. Our findings show the first evidence that cholinergic deficiency impaired lung function and produce local inflammation. Our data supports the notion that cholinergic system modulates airway inflammation by modulation of JAK2 and NF-kB pathway. We proposed that intact cholinergic pathway is necessary to maintain the lung homeostasis. PMID:25816137

  7. Effect of early treatment with transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (TEDS) on pulmonary inflammation induced by bleomycin

    PubMed Central

    Santos, Laisa A.; Silva, Carlos A.; Polacow, Maria L. O.

    2013-01-01

    Background Bleomycin (B) is an antineoplastic drug that has pulmonary fibrosis as a side effect. There are few experimental studies about the effects of physical therapy treatment in this case. Objective The objective was to study rat lungs treated with B and precocious intervention by transcutaneous electrical diaphragmatic stimulation (TEDS). Method Wistar rats were divided into 4 groups (n=5): a control group (C); a stimulated group (TEDS); a group treated with a single dose of B (intratracheally, 2.5 mg/kg) (B); and a group treated with B and electric stimulation (B + TEDS). After the B instillation, the electrical stimulation was applied for 7 days, for a duration of 20 minutes. Lung fragments were histologically processed with hematoxylin and eosin (HE) and 8-isoprostane-PGF2α (8-iso-PGF2α). The density of the alveolar area was determined by planimetry, the inflammatory profile was defined by the number of cells, and the level of oxidative stress in the pulmonary tissue was evaluated by 8-iso-PGF2α. For statistical analysis of the data, the Shapiro-Wilk test was used, followed by a one-way ANOVA with the post-hoc Bonferroni test (p≤0.05). Results The B group exhibited a significant reduction in the area density, and the acute treatment with B + TEDS prevented this reduction. There were increased numbers of fibroblasts, leukocytes, and macrophages in the B group, as well as increased lipid peroxidation, which was observed only in this group. Conclusion B promoted a reduction in the alveolar density area, thereby inducing the inflammatory process and increasing the production of free radicals. These effects were minimized by the application of TEDS at the initial treatment stage. PMID:24346295

  8. Molecular Imaging of Activated Platelets Allows the Detection of Pulmonary Embolism with Magnetic Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Heidt, Timo; Ehrismann, Simon; Hövener, Jan-Bernd; Neudorfer, Irene; Hilgendorf, Ingo; Reisert, Marco; Hagemeyer, Christoph E.; Zirlik, Andreas; Reinöhl, Jochen; Bode, Christoph; Peter, Karlheinz; von Elverfeldt, Dominik; von zur Muhlen, Constantin

    2016-01-01

    Early and reliable detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) is critical for improving patient morbidity and mortality. The desire for low-threshold screening for pulmonary embolism is contradicted by unfavorable radiation of currently used computed tomography or nuclear techniques, while standard magnetic resonance imaging still struggles to provide sufficient diagnostic sensitivity in the lung. In this study we evaluate a molecular-targeted contrast agent against activated platelets for non-invasive detection of murine pulmonary thromboembolism using magnetic resonance imaging. By intravenous injection of human thrombin, pulmonary thromboembolism were consistently induced as confirmed by immunohistochemistry of the lung. Magnetic resonance imaging after thrombin injection showed local tissue edema in weighted images which co-localized with the histological presence of pulmonary thromboembolism. Furthermore, injection of a functionalized contrast agent targeting activated platelets provided sensitive evidence of focal accumulation of activated platelets within the edematous area, which, ex vivo, correlated well with the size of the pulmonary embolism. In summary, we here show delivery and specific binding of a functionalized molecular contrast agent against activated platelets for targeting pulmonary thromboembolism. Going forward, molecular imaging may provide new opportunities to increase sensitivity of magnetic resonance imaging for detection of pulmonary embolism. PMID:27138487

  9. Pulmonary inflammation induced by repeated inhalations of beta(1,3)-D-glucan and endotoxin.

    PubMed Central

    Fogelmark, B.; Sjöstrand, M.; Rylander, R.

    1994-01-01

    In an animal model of hypersensitivity pneumonitis (HP) guinea-pigs were exposed for 5 weeks to an aerosol of bacterial endotoxin, beta(1,3)-D-glucan (curdlan) or a combination. Exposure to endotoxin or curdlan showed only small changes in inflammatory cells in airways or the lung wall, histologically or in terms of enzyme secretion from alveolar macrophages. When the two agents were given together, a histology resembling HP was seen with alveolar infiltrates and early granulomas. Inflammatory cells in airways were increased and enzyme production of macrophages was changed, suggesting an effect of curdlan on the inflammatory regulating capacity of airway macrophages. The results suggest that interference with macrophage function and inflammation are important components in the development of HP. PMID:8199009

  10. Dietary long-chain omega-3 fatty acids do not diminish eosinophilic pulmonary inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Schuster, Gertrud U; Bratt, Jennifer M; Jiang, Xiaowen; Pedersen, Theresa L; Grapov, Dmitry; Adkins, Yuriko; Kelley, Darshan S; Newman, John W; Kenyon, Nicholas J; Stephensen, Charles B

    2014-03-01

    Although the effects of fish oil supplements on airway inflammation in asthma have been studied with varying results, the independent effects of the fish oil components, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), administered separately, are untested. Here, we investigated airway inflammation and hyperresponsiveness using a mouse ovalbumin exposure model of asthma assessing the effects of consuming EPA (1.5% wt/wt), DHA (1.5% wt/wt), EPA plus DHA (0.75% each), or a control diet with no added omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids. Consuming these diets for 6 weeks resulted in erythrocyte membrane EPA contents (molar %) of 9.0 (± 0.6), 3.2 (± 0.2), 6.8 (± 0.5), and 0.01 (± 0.0)%; DHA contents were 6.8 (± 0.1), 15.6 (± 0.5), 12.3 (± 0.3), and 3.8 (± 0.2)%, respectively. The DHA group had the highest bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid eosinophil and IL-6 levels (P < 0.05). Similar trends were seen for macrophages, IL-4, and IL-13, whereas TNF-α was lower in omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid groups than the control (P < 0.05). The DHA group also had the highest airway resistance, which differed significantly from the EPA plus DHA group (P < 0.05), which had the lowest. Oxylipins were measured in plasma and BAL fluid, with DHA and EPA suppressing arachidonic acid-derived oxylipin production. DHA-derived oxylipins from the cytochrome P450 and 15-lipoxygenase pathways correlated significantly with BAL eosinophil levels. The proinflammatory effects of DHA suggest that the adverse effects of individual fatty acid formulations should be thoroughly considered before any use as therapeutic agents in asthma.

  11. F-box protein FBXL19–mediated ubiquitination and degradation of the receptor for IL-33 limits pulmonary inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Wei, Jianxin; Mialki, Rachel K; Mallampalli, Daniel F; Chen, Bill B; Coon, Tiffany; Zou, Chunbin; Mallampalli, Rama K; Zhao, Yutong

    2013-01-01

    The ST2L receptor for interleukin 33 (IL-33) mediates pulmonary inflammation and immune system–related disorders, such as asthma and rheumatoid arthritis. At present, very little is known about the molecular regulation of ST2L expression. Here we found that FBXL19, an ‘orphan’ member of the Skp1–Cullin–F-box family of E3 ubiquitin ligases, selectively bound to ST2L to mediate its polyubiquitination and elimination in the proteasome. Degradation of ST2L involved phosphorylation of ST2L at Ser442 catalyzed by the kinase GSK3β. Overexpression of FBXL19 abrogated the proapoptotic and inflammatory effects of IL-33 and lessened the severity of lung injury in mouse models of pneumonia. Our results suggest that modulation of the IL-33–ST2L axis by ubiquitin ligases might serve as a unique strategy for lessening pulmonary inflammation. PMID:22660580

  12. Effectiveness of computer aided detection for solitary pulmonary nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiayong; Li, Wenjie; Du, Xiangying; Lu, Huihai; Xu, Jianrong; Xu, Mantao; Rong, Dongdong

    2009-02-01

    This study is to investigate the incremental effect of using a high performance computer-aided detection (CAD) system in detection of solitary pulmonary nodules in chest radiographs. The Kodak Chest CAD system was evaluated by a panel of six radiologists at different levels of experience. The observer study consisted of two independent phases: readings without CAD and readings with assistance of CAD. The study was conducted over a set of chest radiographs comprising 150 cancer cases and 150 cancer-free cases. The actual sensitivity of the CAD system is 72% with 3.7 false positives per case. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was used to assess the overall observer performance. The AUZ (area under ROC curve) showed a significantly improvement (P=0.0001) from 0.844 to 0.884 after using CAD. The ROC analysis was also applied for observer performances on nodules in different sizes and visibilities. The average AUZs are improved from 0.798 to 0.835 (P=0.0003) for 5-10mm nodules, 0.853 to 0.907 (P=0.001) for 10-15mm nodules, 0.864 to 0.897 (P=0.051) for 15-20 mm nodules and 0.859 to 0.896 (P=0.0342) for 20-30mm nodules, respectively. For different visibilities, the average AUZs are improved from 0.886 to 0.915 (P=0.0337), 0.803 to 0.840 (P=0.063), 0.830 to 0.893 (P=0.0001), and 0.813 to 0.847 (P=0.152), for nodules clearly visible, hidden by ribs, partially overlap with ribs, and overlap with other structures, respectively. These results showed that observer performance could be greatly improved when the CAD system is employed as a second reader, especially for small nodules and nodules occluded by ribs.

  13. Pulmonary oxidative stress, inflammation and cancer: respirable particulate matter, fibrous dusts and ozone as major causes of lung carcinogenesis through reactive oxygen species mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Valavanidis, Athanasios; Vlachogianni, Thomais; Fiotakis, Konstantinos; Loridas, Spyridon

    2013-08-27

    Reactive oxygen or nitrogen species (ROS, RNS) and oxidative stress in the respiratory system increase the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and initiate or promote mechanisms of carcinogenesis. The lungs are exposed daily to oxidants generated either endogenously or exogenously (air pollutants, cigarette smoke, etc.). Cells in aerobic organisms are protected against oxidative damage by enzymatic and non-enzymatic antioxidant systems. Recent epidemiologic investigations have shown associations between increased incidence of respiratory diseases and lung cancer from exposure to low levels of various forms of respirable fibers and particulate matter (PM), at occupational or urban air polluting environments. Lung cancer increases substantially for tobacco smokers due to the synergistic effects in the generation of ROS, leading to oxidative stress and inflammation with high DNA damage potential. Physical and chemical characteristics of particles (size, transition metal content, speciation, stable free radicals, etc.) play an important role in oxidative stress. In turn, oxidative stress initiates the synthesis of mediators of pulmonary inflammation in lung epithelial cells and initiation of carcinogenic mechanisms. Inhalable quartz, metal powders, mineral asbestos fibers, ozone, soot from gasoline and diesel engines, tobacco smoke and PM from ambient air pollution (PM₁₀ and PM₂.₅) are involved in various oxidative stress mechanisms. Pulmonary cancer initiation and promotion has been linked to a series of biochemical pathways of oxidative stress, DNA oxidative damage, macrophage stimulation, telomere shortening, modulation of gene expression and activation of transcription factors with important role in carcinogenesis. In this review we are presenting the role of ROS and oxidative stress in the production of mediators of pulmonary inflammation and mechanisms of carcinogenesis.

  14. Etanercept Exacerbates Inflammation and Pathology in a Rabbit Model of Active Pulmonary Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Tsenova, Liana; O'Brien, Paul; Holloway, Jennifer; Peixoto, Blas; Soteropoulos, Patricia; Fallows, Dorothy; Subbian, Selvakumar

    2014-01-01

    Treatment of chronic inflammatory diseases with tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) antagonists has been associated with increased risk of tuberculosis (TB). We examined the usefulness of the rabbit model of active pulmonary TB for studying the impact of the human immune modulatory reagent etanercept on the host immune response. Control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) infection, disease pathology, and the global transcriptional response in Mtb-infected lungs of rabbits were studied. Etanercept treatment exacerbated disease pathology and reduced bacillary control in the lungs, compared with infected untreated animals. Reduced collagen and fibrin deposition in the granulomas was associated with significant downregulation of the collagen metabolism and fibrosis network genes and upregulation of genes in the inflammatory response and cell recruitment networks in the lungs of etanercept treated, compared with untreated rabbits. Our results suggest that targeting the TNF-α signaling pathway disrupts the tissue remodeling process, which is required for the formation and maintenance of well-differentiated granulomas and for control of Mtb growth in the lungs. These results validate the use of the rabbit model for investigating the impact of selected human immune modulatory drugs, such as a TNF-α antagonist, on the host immune response and pathogenesis in TB. PMID:24831609

  15. Anergy-like immunosuppression in mice bearing pulmonary foreign-body granulomatous inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    Allred, D. C.; Kobayashi, K.; Yoshida, T.

    1985-01-01

    Pulmonary granulomas were induced in BALB/c mice by the intratracheal injection of insoluble polymerized dextran and latex microparticles. Very large granulomas developed around dextran beads, which reached peak intensity within 2-3 days and rapidly declined in size thereafter. Latex beads generated small stable lesions. The involvement of cell-mediated immunity could not be demonstrated in the inflammatory responses induced by either type of bead. Antigen-induced delayed type hypersensitivity (DTH) and mitogen-induced DTH-like footpad reactions were markedly suppressed in immunized mice bearing early dextran granulomas. Mitogen-induced DTH-like footpad reactions were suppressed in unimmunized animals bearing early dextran foreign-body granulomas. Antigen- and mitogen-induced footpad swelling recovered to normal levels as dextran granulomas diminished in size. No suppression of these footpad reactions was observed in mice bearing small latex foreign-body granulomas. The intraperitoneal injection of aqueous extracts prepared from the lungs of unimmunized donor animals bearing early dextran foreign-body granulomas could partially transfer suppression of mitogen DTH-like footpad responses to normal mice. These results suggest that cells within large, nonimmunologic lung granulomas produce a soluble factor which participates in the expression of anergy-like immunosuppression. Images Figure 2 PMID:3907366

  16. Current concepts on oxidative/carbonyl stress, inflammation and epigenetics in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    SciTech Connect

    Yao Hongwei; Rahman, Irfan

    2011-07-15

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a global health problem. The current therapies for COPD are poorly effective and the mainstays of pharmacotherapy are bronchodilators. A better understanding of the pathobiology of COPD is critical for the development of novel therapies. In the present review, we have discussed the roles of oxidative/aldehyde stress, inflammation/immunity, and chromatin remodeling in the pathogenesis of COPD. An imbalance of oxidants/antioxidants caused by cigarette smoke and other pollutants/biomass fuels plays an important role in the pathogenesis of COPD by regulating redox-sensitive transcription factors (e.g., NF-{kappa}B), autophagy and unfolded protein response leading to chronic lung inflammatory response. Cigarette smoke also activates canonical/alternative NF-{kappa}B pathways and their upstream kinases leading to sustained inflammatory response in lungs. Recently, epigenetic regulation has been shown to be critical for the development of COPD because the expression/activity of enzymes that regulate these epigenetic modifications have been reported to be abnormal in airways of COPD patients. Hence, the significant advances made in understanding the pathophysiology of COPD as described herein will identify novel therapeutic targets for intervention in COPD.

  17. Current concepts on oxidative/carbonyl stress, inflammation and epigenetics in pathogenesis of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hongwei; Rahman, Irfan

    2011-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a global health problem, and current therapy for COPD is poorly effective and the mainstays of pharmacotherapy are bronchodilators. A better understanding of the pathobiology of COPD is critical for the development of novel therapies. In the present review, we have discussed the roles of oxidative/aldehyde stress, inflammation/immunity, and chromatin remodeling in the pathogenesis of COPD. Imbalance of oxidant/antioxidant balance caused by cigarette smoke and other pollutants/biomass fuels plays an important role in the pathogenesis of COPD by regulating redox-sensitive transcription factors (e.g. NF-κB), autophagy and unfolded protein response leading to chronic lung inflammatory response. Cigarette smoke also activates canonical/alternative NF-κB pathways and their upstream kinases leading to sustained inflammatory response in lungs. Recently, epigenetic regulation has been shown to be critical for the development of COPD because the expression/activity of enzymes that regulate these epigenetic modifications have been reported to be abnormal in airways of COPD patients. Hence, the significant advances made in understanding the pathophysiology of COPD as described herein will identify novel therapeutic targets for intervening COPD. PMID:21296096

  18. Hemorrhagic shock primes for lung vascular endothelial cell pyroptosis: role in pulmonary inflammation following LPS

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Zhao, Yanfeng; Zhang, Peng; Li, Yuehua; Yang, Yong; Yang, Yang; Zhu, Junjie; Song, Xiao; Jiang, Gening; Fan, Jie

    2016-01-01

    Hemorrhagic shock (HS) often renders patients more susceptible to lung injury by priming for an exaggerated response to a second infectious stimulus. Acute lung injury (ALI) is a major component of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome following HS and regularly serves as a major cause of patient mortality. The lung vascular endothelium is an active organ that has a central role in the development of ALI through synthesizing and releasing of a number of inflammatory mediators. Cell pyroptosis is a caspase-1-dependent regulated cell death, which features rapid plasma membrane rupture and release of proinflammatory intracellular contents. In this study, we demonstrated an important role of HS in priming for LPS-induced lung endothelial cell (EC) pyroptosis. We showed that LPS through TLR4 activates Nlrp3 (NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains containing protein 3) inflammasome in mouse lung vascular EC, and subsequently induces caspase-1 activation. However, HS induced release of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), which acting through the receptor for advanced glycation end products initiates EC endocytosis of HMGB1, and subsequently triggers a cascade of molecular events, including cathepsin B release from ruptured lysosomes followed by pyroptosome formation and caspase-1 activation. These HS-induced events enhance LPS-induced EC pyroptosis. We further showed that lung vascular EC pyroptosis significantly exaggerates lung inflammation and injury. The present study explores a novel mechanism underlying HS-primed ALI and thus presents a potential therapeutic target for post-HS ALI. PMID:27607578

  19. Update on the Mechanisms of Pulmonary Inflammation and Oxidative Imbalance Induced by Exercise.

    PubMed

    Araneda, O F; Carbonell, T; Tuesta, M

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the generation of oxidative damage and lung inflammation induced by physical exercise are described. Changes in lung function induced by exercise involve cooling of the airways, fluid evaporation of the epithelial surface, increased contact with polluting substances, and activation of the local and systemic inflammatory response. The present work includes evidence obtained from the different types of exercise in terms of duration and intensity, the effect of both acute performance and chronic performance, and the influence of special conditions such as cold weather, high altitude, and polluted environments. Levels of prooxidants, antioxidants, oxidative damage to biomolecules, and cellularity, as well as levels of soluble mediators of the inflammatory response and its effects on tissues, are described in samples of lung origin. These samples include tissue homogenates, induced sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, biopsies, and exhaled breath condensate obtained in experimental protocols conducted on animal and human models. Finally, the need to simultaneously explore the oxidative/inflammatory parameters to establish the interrelation between them is highlighted.

  20. β-Glucans Are Masked but Contribute to Pulmonary Inflammation During Pneumocystis Pneumonia.

    PubMed

    Kutty, Geetha; Davis, A Sally; Ferreyra, Gabriela A; Qiu, Ju; Huang, Da Wei; Sassi, Monica; Bishop, Lisa; Handley, Grace; Sherman, Brad; Lempicki, Richard; Kovacs, Joseph A

    2016-09-01

    β-glucans, which can activate innate immune responses, are a major component in the cell wall of the cyst form of Pneumocystis In the current study, we examined whether β-1,3-glucans are masked by surface proteins in Pneumocystis and what role β-glucans play in Pneumocystis-associated inflammation. For 3 species, including Pneumocystis jirovecii, which causes Pneumocystis pneumonia in humans, Pneumocystis carinii, and Pneumocystis murina, β-1,3-glucans were masked in most organisms, as demonstrated by increased exposure following trypsin treatment. Using quantitative polymerase chain reaction and microarray techniques, we demonstrated in a mouse model of Pneumocystis pneumonia that treatment with caspofungin, an inhibitor of β-1,3-glucan synthesis, for 21 days decreased expression of a broad panel of inflammatory markers, including interferon γ, tumor necrosis factor α, interleukin 1β, interleukin 6, and multiple chemokines/chemokine ligands. Thus, β-glucans in Pneumocystis cysts are largely masked, which likely decreases innate immune activation; this mechanism presumably was developed for interactions with immunocompetent hosts, in whom organism loads are substantially lower. In immunosuppressed hosts with a high organism burden, organism death and release of glucans appears to be an important contributor to deleterious host inflammatory responses.

  1. Update on the Mechanisms of Pulmonary Inflammation and Oxidative Imbalance Induced by Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Araneda, O. F.; Carbonell, T.; Tuesta, M.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms involved in the generation of oxidative damage and lung inflammation induced by physical exercise are described. Changes in lung function induced by exercise involve cooling of the airways, fluid evaporation of the epithelial surface, increased contact with polluting substances, and activation of the local and systemic inflammatory response. The present work includes evidence obtained from the different types of exercise in terms of duration and intensity, the effect of both acute performance and chronic performance, and the influence of special conditions such as cold weather, high altitude, and polluted environments. Levels of prooxidants, antioxidants, oxidative damage to biomolecules, and cellularity, as well as levels of soluble mediators of the inflammatory response and its effects on tissues, are described in samples of lung origin. These samples include tissue homogenates, induced sputum, bronchoalveolar lavage fluid, biopsies, and exhaled breath condensate obtained in experimental protocols conducted on animal and human models. Finally, the need to simultaneously explore the oxidative/inflammatory parameters to establish the interrelation between them is highlighted. PMID:26881028

  2. Pentraxin 3 as a novel biomarker of inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Ozlem Kar; Tosun, Mehmet; Kurt, Emine Bahar; Talay, Fahrettin

    2015-02-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex chronic inflammatory disease of the lungs in which inflammatory markers are involved with significant extrapulmonary effects that may contribute to its severity and complications. Moreover, some of the inflammatory markers such as C-reactive protein (CRP) are associated with COPD. Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is the member of long pentraxins. The aim of the present study was to investigate the level of PTX3 in patients with COPD. Fifty-four COPD patients and 31 controls were enrolled in this study. Demographical data such as age, sex, cigarette smoking status, comorbidities, drugs, habits, and modified Medical Research Council (MMRC) dyspnea scores were recorded. All patients were asked for COPD Assessment Test™ (CAT). The mean age was 65.7 ± 9.8 years, 92 % male. Plasma levels of PTX3 were found to be markedly higher in COPD patients [1.65 (0.32-12.72) ng/ml] than in controls [1.05 (0.43-3.26) ng/ml; p = 0.005]. On the other hand, PTX3 values did not differ between COPD stages [A, 1.73 (0.69-11.03); B, 1.49 (0.84-12.52); C, 0.79 (0.52-1.06); and D, 2.09 (0.32-12.72); p = 0.27]. The plasma PTX3 levels were positively correlated with MMRC scores. We conclude that circulating PTX3 levels are elevated in COPD patients. Plasma levels of PTX3 were correlated with dyspnea (MMRC scores). But PTX3 levels were not correlated with the severity of COPD.

  3. Local pulmonary structure classification for computer-aided nodule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bahlmann, Claus; Li, Xianlin; Okada, Kazunori

    2006-03-01

    We propose a new method of classifying the local structure types, such as nodules, vessels, and junctions, in thoracic CT scans. This classification is important in the context of computer aided detection (CAD) of lung nodules. The proposed method can be used as a post-process component of any lung CAD system. In such a scenario, the classification results provide an effective means of removing false positives caused by vessels and junctions thus improving overall performance. As main advantage, the proposed solution transforms the complex problem of classifying various 3D topological structures into much simpler 2D data clustering problem, to which more generic and flexible solutions are available in literature, and which is better suited for visualization. Given a nodule candidate, first, our solution robustly fits an anisotropic Gaussian to the data. The resulting Gaussian center and spread parameters are used to affine-normalize the data domain so as to warp the fitted anisotropic ellipsoid into a fixed-size isotropic sphere. We propose an automatic method to extract a 3D spherical manifold, containing the appropriate bounding surface of the target structure. Scale selection is performed by a data driven entropy minimization approach. The manifold is analyzed for high intensity clusters, corresponding to protruding structures. Techniques involve EMclustering with automatic mode number estimation, directional statistics, and hierarchical clustering with a modified Bhattacharyya distance. The estimated number of high intensity clusters explicitly determines the type of pulmonary structures: nodule (0), attached nodule (1), vessel (2), junction (>3). We show accurate classification results for selected examples in thoracic CT scans. This local procedure is more flexible and efficient than current state of the art and will help to improve the accuracy of general lung CAD systems.

  4. [Effects of erdosteine on inflammation and fibrosis in rats with pulmonary fibrosis induced by bleomycin].

    PubMed

    Erden, Ersin Sükrü; Kirkil, Gamze; Deveci, Figen; Ilhan, Nevin; Cobanoğlu, Bengü; Turgut, Teyfik; Muz, Mehmet Hamdi

    2008-01-01

    We aimed to investigate the levels of some chemokines, inflammatory cell counts in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid, histopathological changes in lung tissue, to determine the effect of erdosteine on acute inflammatory changes and fibrosis in a rat fibrosis model induced by bleomycine (BLM). Forty-five Wistar male rats were taken into the study. On day 0, intratracheal saline to control group (group 1, n= 15), intratracheal BLM 7.5 U/kg to BLM (group 2, n= 15) and erdosteine group (group 3, n= 15) was administered. In group 3, oral erdosteine (10 mg/kg/day) was applied two days before BLM. On day 0, 14, and 29th five rats in each groups were sacrificed, BAL fluid was performed. Malonyldialdehyde (MDA), macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1alpha, MIP-2 levels in BAL fluid, hydroxyproline levels in lung tissue were measured. Histopathological examination was performed. When BLM group compared to erdosteine group, the levels of MDA, MIP-1alpha, MIP-2, and neutrophil counts, the hydroxyproline (OH-P) level of lung tissue were decreased in erdosteine group on acute inflammatory phase (day 14) (p< 0.001, p= 0.017, p= 0.009, p< 0.001, p= 0.009, respectively), and late fibrosis phase (day 29) except BAL MIP-2 (p= 0.022, p= 0.025, p= 0.01, p< 0.001, respectively). Fibrosis level was significantly lower in erdosteine group than BLM group on day 29 (p= 0.01). We conclude that erdosteine may prevent the acute lung inflammation and fibrosis by suppressing the accumulation of neutrophils, inhibition of lipid peroxydation, chemokine production, and release.

  5. Improving CAD performance in pulmonary embolism detection: preliminary investigation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang Cheol; Chapman, Brian; Deible, Christopher; Lee, Sean; Zheng, Bin

    2010-03-01

    In this preliminary study, a new computer-aided detection (CAD) scheme for pulmonary embolism (PE) detection was developed and tested. The scheme applies multiple steps including lung segmentation, candidate extraction using intensity mask and tobogganing method, feature extraction, false positive reduction using a multifeature based artificial neural network (ANN) and a k-nearest neighbor (KNN) classifier to detect and classify suspicious PE lesions. In particular, a new method to define the surrounding background regions of interest (ROI) depicting PE candidates was proposed and tested in an attempt to reduce the detection of false positive regions. In this study, the authors also investigated following methods to improve CAD performance, which include a grouping and scoring method, feature selection using genetic algorithm, and limitation on allowed suspicious lesions to be cued in one examination. To test the scheme performance, a set of 20 chest CT examinations were selected. Among them, 18 are positive cases depicted 44 verified PE lesions and the remaining 2 were negative cases. The dataset was also divided into a training subset (9 examinations) and a testing subset (11 examinations), respectively. The experimental results showed when applying to the testing dataset CAD scheme using tobogganing method alone achieved 2D region-based sensitivity of 72.1% (220/305) and 3D lesion-based sensitivity of 83.3% (20/24) with total 19,653 2D false-positive (FP) PE regions (1,786.6 per case or approximately 6.3 per CT slice). Applying the proposed new method to improve lung region segmentation and better define the surrounding background ROI, the scheme reduced the region-based sensitivity by 6.5% to 65.6% or lesion-based sensitivity by 4.1% to 79.2% while reducing the FP rate by 65.6% to 6,752 regions (or 613.8 per case). After applying the methods of grouping, the maximum scoring, a genetic algorithm (GA) to delete "redundant" features, and limiting the maximum

  6. Systemic inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Elevated circulating levels of several inflammatory biomarkers have been described in selected patient populations with COPD, although less is known about their population-based distribution. The aims of this study were to compare the levels of several systemic biomarkers between stable COPD patients and healthy subjects from a population-based sample, and to assess their distribution according to clinical variables. Methods This is a cross-sectional study design of participants in the EPI-SCAN study (40-80 years of age). Subjects with any other condition associated with an inflammatory process were excluded. COPD was defined as a post-bronchodilator FEV1/FVC < 0.70. The reference group was made of non-COPD subjects without respiratory symptoms, associated diseases or prescription of medication. Subjects were evaluated with quality-of-life questionnaires, spirometry and 6-minute walk tests. Serum C-reactive protein (CRP), tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukins (IL-6 and IL-8), alpha1-antitrypsin, fibrinogen, albumin and nitrites/nitrates (NOx) were measured. Results We compared 324 COPD patients and 110 reference subjects. After adjusting for gender, age, BMI and tobacco consumption, COPD patients showed higher levels of CRP (0.477 ± 0.023 vs. 0.376 ± 0.041 log mg/L, p = 0.049), TNF-α (13.12 ± 0.59 vs. 10.47 ± 1.06 pg/mL, p = 0.033), IL-8 (7.56 ± 0.63 vs. 3.57 ± 1.13 pg/ml; p = 0.033) and NOx (1.42 ± 0.01 vs. 1.36 ± 0.02 log nmol/l; p = 0.048) than controls. In COPD patients, serum concentrations of some biomarkers were related to severity and their exercise tolerance was related to serum concentrations of CRP, IL-6, IL-8, fibrinogen and albumin. Conclusions Our results provide population-based evidence that COPD is independently associated with low-grade systemic inflammation, with a different inflammatory pattern than that observed in healthy subjects. PMID:20500811

  7. A Single Aspiration of Rod-like Carbon Nanotubes Induces Asbestos-like Pulmonary Inflammation Mediated in Part by the IL-1 Receptor.

    PubMed

    Rydman, Elina M; Ilves, Marit; Vanhala, Esa; Vippola, Minnamari; Lehto, Maili; Kinaret, Pia A S; Pylkkänen, Lea; Happo, Mikko; Hirvonen, Maija-Riitta; Greco, Dario; Savolainen, Kai; Wolff, Henrik; Alenius, Harri

    2015-09-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNT) have been eagerly studied because of their multiple applications in product development and potential risks on health. We investigated the difference of two different CNT and asbestos in inducing proinflammatory reactions in C57BL/6 mice after single pharyngeal aspiration exposure. We used long tangled and long rod-like CNT, as well as crocidolite asbestos at a dose of 10 or 40 µg/mouse. The mice were sacrificed 4 and 16 h or 7, 14, and 28 days after the exposure. To find out the importance of a major inflammatory marker IL-1β in CNT-induced pulmonary inflammation, we used etanercept and anakinra as antagonists as well as Interleukin 1 (IL-1) receptor (IL-1R-/-) mice. The results showed that rod-like CNT, and asbestos in lesser extent, induced strong pulmonary neutrophilia accompanied by the proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines 16 h after the exposure. Seven days after the exposure, neutrophilia had essentially disappeared but strong pulmonary eosinophilia peaked in rod-like CNT and asbestos-exposed groups. After 28 days, pulmonary granulomas, goblet cell hyperplasia, and Charcot-Leyden-like crystals containing acidophilic macrophages were observed especially in rod-like CNT-exposed mice. IL-1R-/- mice and antagonists-treated mice exhibited a significant decrease in neutrophilia and messenger ribonucleic acid (mRNA) levels of proinflammatory cytokines at 16 h. However, rod-like CNT-induced Th2-type inflammation evidenced by the expression of IL-13 and mucus production was unaffected in IL-1R-/- mice at 28 days. This study provides knowledge about the pulmonary effects induced by a single exposure to the CNT and contributes to hazard assessment of carbon nanomaterials on airway exposure.

  8. Disruption of Sirtuin 1-Mediated Control of Circadian Molecular Clock and Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Yao, Hongwei; Sundar, Isaac K; Huang, Yadi; Gerloff, Janice; Sellix, Michael T; Sime, Patricia J; Rahman, Irfan

    2015-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth most common cause of death, and it is characterized by abnormal inflammation and lung function decline. Although the circadian molecular clock regulates inflammatory responses, there is no information available regarding the impact of COPD on lung molecular clock function and its regulation by sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). We hypothesize that the molecular clock in the lungs is disrupted, leading to increased inflammatory responses in smokers and patients with COPD and its regulation by SIRT1. Lung tissues, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and sputum cells were obtained from nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD for measurement of core molecular clock proteins (BMAL1, CLOCK, PER1, PER2, and CRY1), clock-associated nuclear receptors (REV-ERBα, REV-ERBβ, and RORα), and SIRT1 by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot. PBMCs were treated with the SIRT1 activator SRT1720 followed by LPS treatment, and supernatant was collected at 6-hour intervals. Levels of IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α released from PBMCs were determined by ELISA. Expression of BMAL1, PER2, CRY1, and REV-ERBα was reduced in PBMCs, sputum cells, and lung tissues from smokers and patients with COPD when compared with nonsmokers. SRT1720 treatment attenuated LPS-mediated reduction of BMAL1 and REV-ERBα in PBMCs from nonsmokers. Additionally, LPS differentially affected the timing and amplitude of cytokine (IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α) release from PBMCs in nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD. Moreover, SRT1720 was able to inhibit LPS-induced cytokine release from cultured PBMCs. In conclusion, disruption of the molecular clock due to SIRT1 reduction contributes to abnormal inflammatory response in smokers and patients with COPD.

  9. Disruption of Sirtuin 1–Mediated Control of Circadian Molecular Clock and Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Hongwei; Sundar, Isaac K.; Huang, Yadi; Gerloff, Janice; Sellix, Michael T.; Sime, Patricia J.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is the fourth most common cause of death, and it is characterized by abnormal inflammation and lung function decline. Although the circadian molecular clock regulates inflammatory responses, there is no information available regarding the impact of COPD on lung molecular clock function and its regulation by sirtuin 1 (SIRT1). We hypothesize that the molecular clock in the lungs is disrupted, leading to increased inflammatory responses in smokers and patients with COPD and its regulation by SIRT1. Lung tissues, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and sputum cells were obtained from nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD for measurement of core molecular clock proteins (BMAL1, CLOCK, PER1, PER2, and CRY1), clock-associated nuclear receptors (REV-ERBα, REV-ERBβ, and RORα), and SIRT1 by immunohistochemistry, immunofluorescence, and immunoblot. PBMCs were treated with the SIRT1 activator SRT1720 followed by LPS treatment, and supernatant was collected at 6-hour intervals. Levels of IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α released from PBMCs were determined by ELISA. Expression of BMAL1, PER2, CRY1, and REV-ERBα was reduced in PBMCs, sputum cells, and lung tissues from smokers and patients with COPD when compared with nonsmokers. SRT1720 treatment attenuated LPS-mediated reduction of BMAL1 and REV-ERBα in PBMCs from nonsmokers. Additionally, LPS differentially affected the timing and amplitude of cytokine (IL-8, IL-6, and TNF-α) release from PBMCs in nonsmokers, smokers, and patients with COPD. Moreover, SRT1720 was able to inhibit LPS-induced cytokine release from cultured PBMCs. In conclusion, disruption of the molecular clock due to SIRT1 reduction contributes to abnormal inflammatory response in smokers and patients with COPD. PMID:25905433

  10. Alum Adjuvant Enhances Protection against Respiratory Syncytial Virus but Exacerbates Pulmonary Inflammation by Modulating Multiple Innate and Adaptive Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ki-Hye; Lee, Young-Tae; Hwang, Hye Suk; Kwon, Young-Man; Jung, Yu-Jin; Lee, Youri; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Yu-Na; Park, Soojin; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2015-01-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is well-known for inducing vaccine-enhanced respiratory disease after vaccination of young children with formalin-inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) in alum formulation. Here, we investigated alum adjuvant effects on protection and disease after FI-RSV immunization with or without alum in comparison with live RSV reinfections. Despite viral clearance, live RSV reinfections caused weight loss and substantial pulmonary inflammation probably due to high levels of RSV specific IFN-γ+IL4-, IFN-γ-TNF-α+, IFN-γ+TNF-α- effector CD4 and CD8 T cells. Alum adjuvant significantly improved protection as evidenced by effective viral clearance compared to unadjuvanted FI-RSV. However, in contrast to unadjuvanted FI-RSV, alum-adjuvanted FI-RSV (FI-RSV-A) induced severe vaccine-enhanced RSV disease including weight loss, eosinophilia, and lung histopathology. Alum adjuvant in the FI-RSV-A was found to be mainly responsible for inducing high levels of RSV-specific IFN-γ-IL4+, IFN-γ-TNF-α+ CD4+ T cells, and proinflammatory cytokines IL-6 and IL-4 as well as B220+ plasmacytoid and CD4+ dendritic cells, and inhibiting the induction of IFN-γ+CD8 T cells. This study suggests that alum adjuvant in FI-RSV vaccines increases immunogenicity and viral clearance but also induces atypical T helper CD4+ T cells and multiple inflammatory dendritic cell subsets responsible for vaccine-enhanced severe RSV disease. PMID:26468884

  11. Sequential Treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules Reduce Inflammation and Improve Pulmonary Function in Acute Exacerbation-Risk Window of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Xiaofan; Li, Ya; Wang, Haifeng; Wu, Zhaohuan; Li, Hangjie; Wang, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Background. Sequential treatments of Chinese medicines for acute exacerbation of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (AECOPD) risk window (RW) have benefits for preventing reoccurrences of AEs; however, the effects on pulmonary function, pulmonary, and systemic inflammatory biomarkers remain unclear. Methods. Cigarette-smoke/bacterial infections induced rats were randomized into Control, COPD, AECOPD, Tongsai Granule/normal saline (TSG/NS), moxifloxacin + salbutamol/NS (MXF+STL/NS), TSG/Bufei Yishen Granule (BYG), MXF+STL/STL, and TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL groups and given corresponding medicine(s) in AE- and/or RW phase. Body temperature, pulmonary function, blood cytology, serum amyloid A (SAA) and C-reactive protein (CRP), pulmonary histomorphology and myeloperoxidase (MPO), polymorphonuclear (PMN) elastase, interleukins IL-1β, IL-6, and IL-10, and tumor necrosis factor- (TNF-) α expressions were determined. Results. Body temperature, inflammatory cells and cytokines, SAA, CRP, and pulmonary impairment were higher in AECOPD rats than stable COPD, while pulmonary function declined and recovered to COPD level in 14–18 days. All biomarkers were improved in treated groups with shorter recovery times of 4–10 days, especially in TSG+MXF+STL/BYG+STL group. Conclusion. Sequential treatments with Tongsai and Bufei Yishen Granules, during AECOPD-RW periods, can reduce inflammatory response and improve pulmonary function and shorten the recovery courses of AEs, especially the integrated Chinese and Western medicines. PMID:27563333

  12. Epithelial transglutaminase 2 is needed for T cell interleukin-17 production and subsequent pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis in bleomycin-treated mice

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Keunhee; Park, Hyung-Bae; Byoun, Ok-Jin; Shin, Dong-Myung; Jeong, Eui Man; Kim, Young Whan; Kim, Yon Su; Melino, Gerry

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a potentially life-threatening disease that may be caused by overt or asymptomatic inflammatory responses. However, the precise mechanisms by which tissue injury is translated into inflammation and consequent fibrosis remain to be established. Here, we show that in a lung injury model, bleomycin induced the secretion of IL-6 by epithelial cells in a transglutaminase 2 (TG2)–dependent manner. This response represents a key step in the differentiation of IL-17–producing T cells and subsequent inflammatory amplification in the lung. The essential role of epithelial cells, but not inflammatory cells, TG2 was confirmed in bone marrow chimeras; chimeras made in TG2-deficient recipients showed reduced inflammation and fibrosis, compared with those in wild-type mice, regardless of the bone marrow cell phenotype. Epithelial TG2 thus appears to be a critical inducer of inflammation after noninfectious pulmonary injury. We further demonstrated that fibroblast-derived TG2, acting downstream of transforming growth factor-β, is also important in the effector phase of fibrogenesis. Therefore, TG2 represents an interesting potential target for therapeutic intervention. PMID:21746810

  13. Detection of acute inflammation with /sup 111/In-labeled nonspecific polyclonal IgG

    SciTech Connect

    Fischman, A.J.; Rubin, R.H.; Khaw, B.A.; Callahan, R.J.; Wilkinson, R.; Keech, F.; Nedelman, M.; Dragotakes, S.; Kramer, P.B.; LaMuraglia, G.M.

    1988-10-01

    The detection of focal sites of inflammation is an integral part of the clinical evaluation of the febrile patient. When anatomically distinct abscesses are present, lesion detection can be accomplished by standard radiographic techniques, particularly in patients with normal anatomy. At the phlegmon stage, however, and in patients who have undergone surgery, these techniques are considerably less effective. While radionuclide methods, such as Gallium-67 (67Ga)-citrate and Indium-111 (111In)-labeled WBCs have been relatively successful for the detection of early inflammation, neither approach is ideal. In the course of studies addressing the use of specific organism-directed antibodies for imaging experimental infections in animals, we observed that nonspecific polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG) localized as well as specific antibodies. Preliminary experiments suggested that the Fc portion of IgG is necessary for effective inflammation localization. Since polyclonal IgG in gram quantities has been safely used for therapy in patients with immune deficiency states, we decided to test whether milligram quantities of radiolabeled IgG could image focal sites of inflammation in humans. Thus far, we have studied a series of 84 patients with suspected lesions in the abdomen, pelvis, vascular grafts, lungs, or bones/joints. In 48 of 52 patients with focal lesions detected by surgery, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), or ultrasound (US), the IgG scan correctly localized the site, while 31 patients without focal inflammation had no abnormal focal localization of the radiopharmaceutical. Four patients had false negative scans and one patient had a false positive scan. For this small series, the overall sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 95%, respectively. In this report, we review our experience with this exciting new agent.

  14. Osthole Alleviates Bleomycin-Induced Pulmonary Fibrosis via Modulating Angiotensin-Converting Enzyme 2/Angiotensin-(1-7) Axis and Decreasing Inflammation Responses in Rats.

    PubMed

    Hao, Yuewen; Liu, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Studies have shown that angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) plays modulating roles in lung pathophysiology, including pulmonary fibrosis (PF) and acute lung injury. Pulmonary fibrosis is a common complication in these interstitial lung diseases, and PF always has a poor prognosis and short survival. To date, there are few promising methods for treating PF, and they are invariably accompanied by severe side effects. Recent studies have showed that the traditional Chinese herbal extract, osthole, had beneficial effects on lipopolysaccharide (LPS) induced acute lung injury (ALI) via an ACE2 pathway. Here we further investigated the protective effects of osthole on bleomycin induced pulmonary fibrosis and attempted to determine the underlying mechanism. PF mode rats were induced by bleomycin (BLM) and then subsequently administered osthole. Histopathological analyses were employed to identify PF changes. The results showed that BLM resulted in severe PF and diffuse lung inflammation, together with significant elevation of inflammatory factors and a marked increase in expression of angiotensin II (ANG II) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-β1). ACE2 and angiotensin-(1-7) [ANG-(1-7)] were both greatly reduced after BLM administration. Meanwhile, osthole treatment attenuated BLM induced PF and inflammation, decreased the expression of these inflammatory mediators, ANG II, and TGF-β1, and reversed ACE2 and ANG-(1-7) production in rat lungs. We conclude that osthole may exert beneficial effects on BLM induced PF in rats, perhaps via modulating the ACE2/ANG-(1-7) axis and inhibiting lung inflammation pathways.

  15. Significance of Follow-up in Detection of Pulmonary Metastasis of Colorectal Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Jae Won; Lee, Sun Il

    2010-01-01

    Purpose This study was performed to evaluate the effectiveness of conventional chest radiography, carcinoembrionic antigen (CEA) level and abdominal computed tomography (CT) or chest CT for early detection of pulmonary metastasis after a curative resection of colorectal cancer. Methods We retrospectively reviewed 84 cases of pulmonary metastasis from a group of colorectal cancer patients who had a curative surgical resection from 2000 to 2006 at the Korea University Medical Center. Results Stage I tumors were detected in 4 patients, stage II tumors in 18, stage III tumors in 43 and stage IV tumors in 19. The detection rates for pulmonary metastasis were 28.5% by conventional chest radiography, 40.5% by increased CEA level and 28.5% by abdominal CT or chest CT. Among them, fourteen patients underwent a radical pneumonectomy. After detection of pulmonary metastasis, the survival outcome for the patients who underwent a resection of the lung was superior to the survival outcome of the patients who did not undergo a resection of the lung (43.7 months vs. 17.4 months, P = 0.001). For patients who underwent resections of the lung, pulmonary metastasis was detected by conventional chest radiography in 2 (14%) patients, by elevated CEA level in 6 (42%) patients, and by abdominal CT or chest CT in 6 (42%) patients. Conclusion Conventional chest radiography is no more useful in detecting early pulmonary metastasis after a curative colorectal surgery than a routine chest CT. Thus, we propose the use of routine chest CT for screening for lung metastasis. PMID:21152232

  16. Asthma–COPD Overlap. Clinical Relevance of Genomic Signatures of Type 2 Inflammation in Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Steiling, Katrina; van den Berge, Maarten; Hijazi, Kahkeshan; Hiemstra, Pieter S.; Postma, Dirkje S.; Lenburg, Marc E.; Spira, Avrum; Woodruff, Prescott G.

    2015-01-01

    Rationale: Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a heterogeneous disease and likely includes a subgroup that is biologically comparable to asthma. Studying asthma-associated gene expression changes in COPD could add insight into COPD pathogenesis and reveal biomarkers that predict a favorable response to corticosteroids. Objectives: To determine whether asthma-associated gene signatures are increased in COPD and associated with asthma-related features. Methods: We compared disease-associated airway epithelial gene expression alterations in an asthma cohort (n = 105) and two COPD cohorts (n = 237, 171). The T helper type 2 (Th2) signature (T2S) score, a gene expression metric induced in Th2-high asthma, was evaluated in these COPD cohorts. The T2S score was correlated with asthma-related features and response to corticosteroids in COPD in a randomized, placebo-controlled trial, the Groningen and Leiden Universities study of Corticosteroids in Obstructive Lung Disease (GLUCOLD; n = 89). Measurements and Main Results: The 200 genes most differentially expressed in asthma versus healthy control subjects were enriched among genes associated with more severe airflow obstruction in these COPD cohorts (P < 0.001), suggesting significant gene expression overlap. A higher T2S score was associated with decreased lung function (P < 0.001), but not asthma history, in both COPD cohorts. Higher T2S scores correlated with increased airway wall eosinophil counts (P = 0.003), blood eosinophil percentage (P = 0.03), bronchodilator reversibility (P = 0.01), and improvement in hyperinflation after corticosteroid treatment (P = 0.019) in GLUCOLD. Conclusions: These data identify airway gene expression alterations that can co-occur in asthma and COPD. The association of the T2S score with increased severity and “asthma-like” features (including a favorable corticosteroid response) in COPD suggests that Th2 inflammation is important in a

  17. Role of Chitinase 3-Like-1 in Interleukin-18-Induced Pulmonary Type 1, Type 2, and Type 17 Inflammation; Alveolar Destruction; and Airway Fibrosis in the Murine Lung.

    PubMed

    Kang, Min-Jong; Yoon, Chang Min; Nam, Milang; Kim, Do-Hyun; Choi, Je-Min; Lee, Chun Geun; Elias, Jack A

    2015-12-01

    Chitinase 3-like 1 (Chi3l1), which is also called YKL-40 in humans and BRP-39 in mice, is the prototypic chitinase-like protein. Recent studies have highlighted its impressive ability to regulate the nature of tissue inflammation and the magnitude of tissue injury and fibroproliferative repair. This can be appreciated in studies that highlight its induction after cigarette smoke exposure, during which it inhibits alveolar destruction and the genesis of pulmonary emphysema. IL-18 is also known to be induced and activated by cigarette smoke, and, in murine models, the IL-18 pathway has been shown to be necessary and sufficient to generate chronic obstructive pulmonary disease-like inflammation, fibrosis, and tissue destruction. However, the relationship between Chi3l1 and IL-18 has not been defined. To address this issue we characterized the expression of Chi3l1/BRP-39 in control and lung-targeted IL-18 transgenic mice. We also characterized the effects of transgenic IL-18 in mice with wild-type and null Chi3l1 loci. The former studies demonstrated that IL-18 is a potent stimulator of Chi3l1/BRP-39 and that this stimulation is mediated via IFN-γ-, IL-13-, and IL-17A-dependent mechanisms. The latter studies demonstrated that, in the absence of Chi3l1/BRP-39, IL-18 induced type 2 and type 17 inflammation and fibrotic airway remodeling were significantly ameliorated, whereas type 1 inflammation, emphysematous alveolar destruction, and the expression of cytotoxic T lymphocyte perforin, granzyme, and retinoic acid early transcript 1 expression were enhanced. These studies demonstrate that IL-18 is a potent stimulator of Chi3l1 and that Chi3l1 is an important mediator of IL-18-induced inflammatory, fibrotic, alveolar remodeling, and cytotoxic responses.

  18. Improved Diagnosis of Acute Pulmonary Histoplasmosis by Combining Antigen and Antibody Detection

    PubMed Central

    Richer, Sarah M.; Smedema, Melinda L.; Durkin, Michelle M.; Herman, Katie M.; Hage, Chadi A.; Fuller, Deanna; Wheat, L. Joseph

    2016-01-01

    Background. Acute pulmonary histoplasmosis can be severe, especially following heavy inoculum exposure. Rapid diagnosis is critical and often possible by detection of antigen, but this test may be falsely negative in 17% of such cases. Antibody detection by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) may increase sensitivity and permit the measurement of immunoglobulin M (IgM) and immunoglobulin G (IgG) classes of antibodies separately. Methods. Microplates coated with Histoplasma antigen were used for testing of serum from patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis and controls in the MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA. Results for IgG and IgM were reported independently. Results. IgG antibodies were detected in 87.5%, IgM antibodies in 67.5%, and IgG and/or IgM antibodies in 88.8% of patients with acute pulmonary histoplasmosis in this assay, while immunodiffusion, complement fixation, and antigen testing showed sensitivities of 55.0%, 73.1%, and 67.5%, respectively (n = 80). Combining antigen and antibody detection increased the sensitivity to 96.3%. Conclusions. The MVista Histoplasma antibody EIA offers increased sensitivity over current antibody tests while also allowing separate detection of IgG and IgM antibodies and complementing antigen detection. Combining antigen and EIA antibody testing provides an optimal method for diagnosis of acute pulmonary histoplasmosis. PMID:26797210

  19. SOPROCARE - 450 nm wavelength detection tool for microbial plaque and gingival inflammation: a clinical study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rechmann, P.; Liou, Shasan W.; Rechmann, Beate M.; Featherstone, John D.

    2014-02-01

    Gingivitis due to microbial plaque and calculus can lead over time if left untreated to advanced periodontal disease with non-physiological pocket formation. Removal of microbial plaque in the gingivitis stage typically achieves gingival health. The SOPROCARE camera system emits blue light at 450 nm wavelength using three blue diodes. The 450 nm wavelength is located in the non-ionizing, visible spectral wavelength region and thus is not dangerous. It is assumed that using the SOPROCARE camera in perio-mode inflamed gingiva can easily be observed and inflammation can be scored due to fluorescence from porphyrins in blood. The assumption is also that illumination of microbial plaque with blue light induces fluorescence due to the bacteria and porphyrin content of the plaque and thus can help to make microbial plaque and calculus visible. Aim of the study with 55 subjects was to evaluate the ability of the SOPROCARE fluorescence camera system to detect, visualize and allow scoring of microbial plaque in comparison to the Turesky modification of the Quigley and Hein plaque index. A second goal was to detect and score gingival inflammation and correlated the findings to the Silness and Löe gingival inflammation index. The study showed that scoring of microbial plaque as well as gingival inflammation levels similar to the established Turesky modified Quigley Hein index and the Silness and Löe gingival inflammation index can easily be done using the SOPROCARE fluorescence system in periomode. Linear regression fits between the different clinical indices and SOPROCARE scores in fluorescence perio-mode revealed the system's capacity for effective discrimination between scores.

  20. Pulmonary nodule detection in PET/CT images: improved approach using combined nodule detection and hybrid FP reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teramoto, Atsushi; Fujita, Hiroshi; Tomita, Yoya; Takahashi, Katsuaki; Yamamuro, Osamu; Tamaki, Tsuneo

    2012-03-01

    In this study, an automated scheme for detecting pulmonary nodules in PET/CT images has been proposed using combined detection and hybrid false-positive (FP) reduction techniques. The initial nodule candidates were detected separately from CT and PET images. FPs were then eliminated in the initial candidates by using support vector machine with characteristic values obtained from CT and PET images. In the experiment, we evaluated proposed method using 105 cases of PET/CT images that were obtained in the cancer-screening program. We evaluated true positive fraction (TPF) and FP / case. As a result, TPFs of CT and PET detections were 0.76 and 0.44, respectively. However, by integrating the both results, TPF was reached to 0.82 with 5.14 FPs/case. These results indicate that our method may be of practical use for the detection of pulmonary nodules using PET/CT images.

  1. NKT cells mediate pulmonary inflammation and dysfunction in murine sickle cell disease through production of IFN-γ and CXCR3 chemokines

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Kori L.; Marshall, Melissa A.; Ramos, Susan I.; Lannigan, Joanne A.; Field, Joshua J.; Strieter, Robert M.

    2009-01-01

    Ischemia-reperfusion injury (IRI) triggers an inflammatory cascade that is initiated by the activation of CD1d-restricted iNKT cells. In sickle cell disease (SCD), misshapen erythrocytes evoke repeated transient bouts of microvascular IRI. Compared with C57BL/6 controls, NY1DD mice have more numerous and activated (CD69+, interferon-γ+ [IFN-γ+]) lung, liver, and spleen iNKT cells that are hyperresponsive to hypoxia/reoxygenation. NY1DD mice have increased pulmonary levels of IFN-γ, IFN-γ–inducible chemokines (CXCL9, CXCL10), and elevated numbers of lymphocytes expressing the chemokine receptor CXCR3. Treating NY1DD mice with anti-CD1d antibody to inhibit iNKT cell activation reverses baseline pulmonary dysfunction manifested as elevated vascular permeability, decreased arterial oxygen saturation, and increased numbers of activated leukocytes. Anti-CD1d antibodies decrease pulmonary levels of IFN-γ and CXCR3 chemokines. Neutralization of CXCR3 receptors ameliorates pulmonary dysfunction. Crossing NY1DD to lymphocyte-deficient Rag1−/− mice decreases pulmonary dysfunction. This is counteracted by the adoptive transfer of 1 million NKT cells. Like mice, people with SCD have increased numbers of activated circulating iNKT cells expressing CXCR3. Together, these data indicate that iNKT cells play a pivotal role in sustaining inflammation in SCD mice by a pathway involving IFN-γ and production of chemotactic CXCR3 chemokines and that this mechanism may translate to human disease. PMID:19433855

  2. Associated inflammation or increased flow-mediated shear stress, but not pressure alone, disrupts endothelial caveolin-1 in infants with pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Dereddy, Narendra; Huang, Jing; Erb, Markus; Guzel, Sibel; Wolk, John H; Sett, Suvro S; Gewitz, Michael H; Mathew, Rajamma

    2012-01-01

    Endothelial caveolin-1 loss is an important feature of pulmonary hypertension (PH); the rescue of caveolin-1 abrogates experimental PH. Recent studies in human PH suggest that the endothelial caveolin-1 loss is followed by an enhanced expression of caveolin-1 in smooth muscle cells (SMC) with subsequent neointima formation. In order to evaluate caveolin-1 expression in infants with PH, we examined the available clinical histories, hemodynamic data, and the expression of caveolin-1, PECAM-1, vWF, and smooth muscle α-actin in the lung biopsy/autopsy specimens obtained from infants with congenital heart disease (CHD, n = 8) and lung disease (n = 9). In CHD group, PH associated with increased pulmonary blood flow exhibited loss of endothelial caveolin-1 and PECAM-1 in pulmonary arteries; additional vWF loss was associated with enhanced expression of caveolin-1 in SMC. In the absence of PH, increased or decreased pulmonary blood flow did not disrupt endothelial caveolin-1, PECAM-1, or vWF; nor was there any enhanced expression of caveolin-1 in SMC. In Lung Disease + PH group, caveolin-1, PECAM-1, and vWF were well preserved in seven infants, and importantly, SMC in these arteries did not exhibit enhanced caveolin-1 expression. Two infants with associated inflammatory disease exhibited loss of endothelial caveolin-1 and PECAM-1; additional loss of vWF was accompanied by enhanced expression of caveolin-1 in SMC. Thus, associated flow-induced shear stress or inflammation, but not elevated pulmonary artery pressure alone, disrupts endothelial caveolin-1. Subsequent vWF loss, indicative of extensive endothelial damage is associated with enhanced expression of caveolin-1 in SMC, which may worsen the disease. PMID:23372934

  3. Benefits of texture analysis of dual energy CT for Computer-Aided pulmonary embolism detection.

    PubMed

    Foncubierta-Rodríguez, Antonio; Jiménez del Toro, Óscar Alfonso; Platon, Alexandra; Poletti, Pierre-Alexandre; Müller, Henning; Depeursinge, Adrien

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is an avoidable cause of death if treated immediately but delays in diagnosis and treatment lead to an increased risk. Computer-assisted image analysis of both unenhanced and contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) have proven useful for diagnosis of pulmonary embolism. Dual energy CT provides additional information over the standard single energy scan by generating four-dimensional (4D) data, in our case with 11 energy levels in 3D. In this paper a 4D texture analysis method capable of detecting pulmonary embolism in dual energy CT is presented. The method uses wavelet-based visual words together with an automatic geodesic-based region of interest detection algorithm to characterize the texture properties of each lung lobe. Results show an increase in performance with respect to the single energy CT analysis, as well as an accuracy gain compared to preliminary work on a small dataset.

  4. Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex by nested polymerase chain reaction in pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens* ,**

    PubMed Central

    Furini, Adriana Antônia da Cruz; Pedro, Heloisa da Silveira Paro; Rodrigues, Jean Francisco; Montenegro, Lilian Maria Lapa; Machado, Ricardo Luiz Dantas; Franco, Célia; Schindler, Haiana Charifker; Batista, Ida Maria Foschiani Dias; Rossit, Andrea Regina Baptista

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the performance of nested polymerase chain reaction (NPCR) with that of cultures in the detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex in pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens. METHODS: We analyzed 20 and 78 pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens, respectively, of 67 hospitalized patients suspected of having tuberculosis. An automated microbial system was used for the identification of Mycobacterium spp. cultures, and M. tuberculosis IS6110 was used as the target sequence in the NPCR. The kappa statistic was used in order to assess the level of agreement among the results. RESULTS: Among the 67 patients, 6 and 5, respectively, were diagnosed with pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis, and the NPCR was positive in all of the cases. Among the 98 clinical specimens, smear microscopy, culture, and NPCR were positive in 6.00%, 8.16%, and 13.26%, respectively. Comparing the results of NPCR with those of cultures (the gold standard), we found that NPCR had a sensitivity and specificity of 100% and 83%, respectively, in pulmonary specimens, compared with 83% and 96%, respectively, in extrapulmonary specimens, with good concordance between the tests (kappa, 0.50 and 0.6867, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Although NPCR proved to be a very useful tool for the detection of M. tuberculosis complex, clinical, epidemiological, and other laboratory data should also be considered in the diagnosis and treatment of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis. PMID:24473765

  5. Modern Age Pathology of Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Stacher, Elvira; Graham, Brian B.; Hunt, James M.; Gandjeva, Aneta; Groshong, Steve D.; McLaughlin, Vallerie V.; Jessup, Marsha; Grizzle, William E.; Aldred, Michaela A.; Cool, Carlyne D.

    2012-01-01

    Rationale: The impact of modern treatments of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) on pulmonary vascular pathology remains unknown. Objectives: To assess the spectrum of pulmonary vascular remodeling in the modern era of PAH medication. Methods: Assessment of pulmonary vascular remodeling and inflammation in 62 PAH and 28 control explanted lungs systematically sampled. Measurements and Main Results: Intima and intima plus media fractional thicknesses of pulmonary arteries were increased in the PAH group versus the control lungs and correlated with pulmonary hemodynamic measurements. Despite a high variability of morphological measurements within a given PAH lung and among all PAH lungs, distinct pathological subphenotypes were detected in cohorts of PAH lungs. These included a subset of lungs lacking intima or, most prominently, media remodeling, which had similar numbers of profiles of plexiform lesions as those in lungs with more pronounced remodeling. Marked perivascular inflammation was present in a high number of PAH lungs and correlated with intima plus media remodeling. The number of profiles of plexiform lesions was significantly lower in lungs of male patients and those never treated with prostacyclin or its analogs. Conclusions: Our results indicate that multiple features of pulmonary vascular remodeling are present in patients treated with modern PAH therapies. Perivascular inflammation may have an important role in the processes of vascular remodeling, all of which may ultimately lead to increased pulmonary artery pressure. Moreover, our study provides a framework to interpret and design translational studies in PAH. PMID:22679007

  6. Hemoglobin induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contributes to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeat dose haptoglobin administration

    PubMed Central

    Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva

    2015-01-01

    Objective Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan with indications for trauma, burns and massive transfusion related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia mediated PH. Approach and results Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb-infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for five weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated non-heme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right ventricular hypertrophy, which suggest a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. Conclusions By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia; and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis associated PH. PMID:25656991

  7. Hemoglobin-induced lung vascular oxidation, inflammation, and remodeling contribute to the progression of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and is attenuated in rats with repeated-dose haptoglobin administration.

    PubMed

    Irwin, David C; Baek, Jin Hyen; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Eigenberger, Paul; Lisk, Christina; Loomis, Zoe; Maltzahn, Joanne; Stenmark, Kurt R; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Buehler, Paul W

    2015-05-01

    Haptoglobin (Hp) is an approved treatment in Japan for trauma, burns, and massive transfusion-related hemolysis. Additional case reports suggest uses in other acute hemolytic events that lead to acute kidney injury. However, Hp's protective effects on the pulmonary vasculature have not been evaluated within the context of mitigating the consequences of chronic hemoglobin (Hb) exposure in the progression of pulmonary hypertension (PH) secondary to hemolytic diseases. This study was performed to assess the utility of chronic Hp therapy in a preclinical model of Hb and hypoxia-mediated PH. Rats were simultaneously exposed to chronic Hb infusion (35 mg per day) and hypobaric hypoxia for 5 weeks in the presence or absence of Hp treatment (90 mg/kg twice a week). Hp inhibited the Hb plus hypoxia-mediated nonheme iron accumulation in lung and heart tissue, pulmonary vascular inflammation and resistance, and right-ventricular hypertrophy, which suggests a positive impact on impeding the progression of PH. In addition, Hp therapy was associated with a reduction in critical mediators of PH, including lung adventitial macrophage population and endothelial ICAM-1 expression. By preventing Hb-mediated pathology, Hp infusions: (1) demonstrate a critical role for Hb in vascular remodeling associated with hypoxia and (2) suggest a novel therapy for chronic hemolysis-associated PH.

  8. MAP3K19 Is Overexpressed in COPD and Is a Central Mediator of Cigarette Smoke-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation and Lower Airway Destruction

    PubMed Central

    Franz-Bacon, Karin; Ludka, John; DiTirro, Danielle N.; Ly, Tai Wei; Bacon, Kevin B.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by persistent airflow limitation and lung inflammation resulting in a progressive decline in lung function whose principle cause is cigarette smoke. MAP3K19 is a novel kinase expressed predominantly by alveolar and interstitial macrophages and bronchial epithelial cells in the lung. We found that MAP3K19 mRNA was overexpressed in a limited sampling of lung tissue from COPD patients, and a closer examination found it to be overexpressed in bronchoalveolar macrophages from COPD patients, as well as the bronchial epithelium and inflammatory cells in the lamina propria. We further found MAP3K19 to be induced in various cell lines upon environmental stress, such as cigarette smoke, oxidative and osmotic stress. Exogenous expression of MAP3K19 in cells caused an upregulation of transcriptionally active NF-κB, and secretion of the chemokines CXCL-8, CCL-20 and CCL-7. Inhibition of MAP3K19 activity by siRNA or small molecular weight inhibitors caused a decrease in cigarette smoke-induced inflammation in various murine models, which included a decrease in pulmonary neutrophilia and KC levels. In a chronic cigarette smoke model, inhibition of MAP3K19 significantly attenuated emphysematous changes in airway parenchyma. Finally, in a viral exacerbation model, mice exposed to cigarette smoke and influenza A virus showed a decrease in pulmonary neutrophilia, pro-inflammatory cytokines and viral load upon inhibition of MAP3K19. Collectively, these results suggest that inhibition of MAP3K19 may represent a novel strategy to target COPD that promises to have a potential therapeutic benefit for patients. PMID:27935962

  9. MAP3K19 Is Overexpressed in COPD and Is a Central Mediator of Cigarette Smoke-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation and Lower Airway Destruction.

    PubMed

    Boehme, Stefen A; Franz-Bacon, Karin; Ludka, John; DiTirro, Danielle N; Ly, Tai Wei; Bacon, Kevin B

    2016-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by persistent airflow limitation and lung inflammation resulting in a progressive decline in lung function whose principle cause is cigarette smoke. MAP3K19 is a novel kinase expressed predominantly by alveolar and interstitial macrophages and bronchial epithelial cells in the lung. We found that MAP3K19 mRNA was overexpressed in a limited sampling of lung tissue from COPD patients, and a closer examination found it to be overexpressed in bronchoalveolar macrophages from COPD patients, as well as the bronchial epithelium and inflammatory cells in the lamina propria. We further found MAP3K19 to be induced in various cell lines upon environmental stress, such as cigarette smoke, oxidative and osmotic stress. Exogenous expression of MAP3K19 in cells caused an upregulation of transcriptionally active NF-κB, and secretion of the chemokines CXCL-8, CCL-20 and CCL-7. Inhibition of MAP3K19 activity by siRNA or small molecular weight inhibitors caused a decrease in cigarette smoke-induced inflammation in various murine models, which included a decrease in pulmonary neutrophilia and KC levels. In a chronic cigarette smoke model, inhibition of MAP3K19 significantly attenuated emphysematous changes in airway parenchyma. Finally, in a viral exacerbation model, mice exposed to cigarette smoke and influenza A virus showed a decrease in pulmonary neutrophilia, pro-inflammatory cytokines and viral load upon inhibition of MAP3K19. Collectively, these results suggest that inhibition of MAP3K19 may represent a novel strategy to target COPD that promises to have a potential therapeutic benefit for patients.

  10. Inflammable gas mixture detection with a single catalytic sensor based on the electric field effect.

    PubMed

    Tong, Ziyuan; Tong, Min-Ming; Meng, Wen; Li, Meng

    2014-04-08

    This paper introduces a new way to analyze mixtures of inflammable gases with a single catalytic sensor. The analysis technology was based on a new finding that an electric field on the catalytic sensor can change the output sensitivity of the sensor. The analysis of mixed inflammable gases results from processing the output signals obtained by adjusting the electric field parameter of the catalytic sensor. For the signal process, we designed a group of equations based on the heat balance of catalytic sensor expressing the relationship between the output signals and the concentration of gases. With these equations and the outputs of different electric fields, the gas concentration in a mixture could be calculated. In experiments, a mixture of methane, butane and ethane was analyzed by this new method, and the results showed that the concentration of each gas in the mixture could be detected with a single catalytic sensor, and the maximum relative error was less than 5%.

  11. CD28/B7 Deficiency Attenuates Systolic Overload-Induced Congestive Heart Failure, Myocardial and Pulmonary Inflammation, and Activated T Cell Accumulation in the Heart and Lungs.

    PubMed

    Wang, Huan; Kwak, Dongmin; Fassett, John; Hou, Lei; Xu, Xin; Burbach, Brandon J; Thenappan, Thenappan; Xu, Yawei; Ge, Jun-Bo; Shimizu, Yoji; Bache, Robert J; Chen, Yingjie

    2016-09-01

    The inflammatory response regulates congestive heart failure (CHF) development. T cell activation plays an important role in tissue inflammation. We postulate that CD28 or B7 deficiency inhibits T cell activation and attenuates CHF development by reducing systemic, cardiac, and pulmonary inflammation. We demonstrated that chronic pressure overload-induced end-stage CHF in mice is characterized by profound accumulation of activated effector T cells (CD3(+)CD44(high) cells) in the lungs and a mild but significant increase of these cells in the heart. In knockout mice lacking either CD28 or B7, there was a dramatic reduction in the accumulation of activated effector T cells in both hearts and lungs of mice under control conditions and after transverse aortic constriction. CD28 or B7 knockout significantly attenuated transverse aortic constriction-induced CHF development, as indicated by less increase of heart and lung weight and less reduction of left ventricle contractility. CD28 or B7 knockout also significantly reduced transverse aortic constriction-induced CD45(+) leukocyte, T cell, and macrophage infiltration in hearts and lungs, lowered proinflammatory cytokine expression (such as tumor necrosis factor-α and interleukin-1β) in lungs. Furthermore, CD28/B7 blockade by CTLA4-Ig treatment (250 μg/mouse every 3 days) attenuated transverse aortic constriction-induced T cell activation, left ventricle hypertrophy, and left ventricle dysfunction. Our data indicate that CD28/B7 deficiency inhibits activated effector T cell accumulation, reduces myocardial and pulmonary inflammation, and attenuates the development of CHF. Our findings suggest that strategies targeting T cell activation may be useful in treating CHF.

  12. Detecting Renal Allograft Inflammation Using Quantitative Urine Metabolomics and CXCL10

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Julie; Sharma, Atul; Mandal, Rupasri; Wishart, David S.; Wiebe, Chris; Storsley, Leroy; Karpinski, Martin; Gibson, Ian W.; Nickerson, Peter W.; Rush, David N.

    2016-01-01

    Background The goal of this study was to characterize urinary metabolomics for the noninvasive detection of cellular inflammation and to determine if adding urinary chemokine ligand 10 (CXCL10) improves the overall diagnostic discrimination. Methods Urines (n = 137) were obtained before biopsy in 113 patients with no (n = 66), mild (borderline or subclinical; n = 58), or severe (clinical; n = 13) rejection from a prospective cohort of adult renal transplant patients (n = 113). Targeted, quantitative metabolomics was performed with direct flow injection tandem mass spectrometry using multiple reaction monitoring (ABI 4000 Q-Trap). Urine CXCL10 was measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. A projection on latent structures discriminant analysis was performed and validated using leave-one-out cross-validation, and an optimal 2-component model developed. Chemokine ligand 10 area under the curve (AUC) was determined and net reclassification index and integrated discrimination index analyses were performed. Results PLS2 demonstrated that urinary metabolites moderately discriminated the 3 groups (Cohen κ, 0.601; 95% confidence interval [95% CI], 0.46-0.74; P < 0.001). Using binary classifiers, urinary metabolites and CXCL10 demonstrated an AUC of 0.81 (95% CI, 0.74-0.88) and 0.76 (95% CI, 0.68-0.84), respectively, and a combined AUC of 0.84 (95% CI, 0.78-0.91) for detecting alloimmune inflammation that was improved by net reclassification index and integrated discrimination index analyses. Urinary CXCL10 was the best univariate discriminator, followed by acylcarnitines and hexose. Conclusions Urinary metabolomics can noninvasively discriminate noninflamed renal allografts from those with subclinical and clinical inflammation, and the addition of urine CXCL10 had a modest but significant effect on overall diagnostic performance. These data suggest that urinary metabolomics and CXCL10 may be useful for noninvasive monitoring of alloimmune inflammation in renal

  13. The standardized herbal formula, PM014, ameliorated cigarette smoke-induced lung inflammation in a murine model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In this study, we evaluated the anti-inflammatory effect of PM014 on cigarette smoke induced lung disease in the murine animal model of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Methods Mice were exposed to cigarette smoke (CS) for 2 weeks to induce COPD-like lung inflammation. Two hours prior to cigarette smoke exposure, the treatment group was administered PM014 via an oral injection. To investigate the effects of PM014, we assessed PM014 functions in vivo, including immune cell infiltration, cytokine profiles in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and histopathological changes in the lung. The efficacy of PM014 was compared with that of the recently developed anti-COPD drug, roflumilast. Results PM014 substantially inhibited immune cell infiltration (neutrophils, macrophages, and lymphocytes) into the airway. In addition, IL-6, TNF-α and MCP-1 were decreased in the BAL fluid of PM014-treated mice compared to cigarette smoke stimulated mice. These changes were more prominent than roflumilast treated mice. The expression of PAS-positive cells in the bronchial layer was also significantly reduced in both PM014 and roflumilast treated mice. Conclusions These data suggest that PM014 exerts strong therapeutic effects against CS induced, COPD-like lung inflammation. Therefore, this herbal medicine may represent a novel therapeutic agent for lung inflammation in general, as well as a specific agent for COPD treatment. PMID:24010767

  14. External detection of pulmonary accumulation of indium-113m labelled transferrin in the guinea pig.

    PubMed Central

    Hultkvist-Bengtsson, U; Mårtensson, L

    1990-01-01

    Accumulation of radioisotope labelled transferrin in the lungs of guinea pigs was determined with an external detection system. The method is based on the intravascular and extravascular distribution of indium-113m labelled transferrin compared with the intravascular distribution of technetium-99m labelled red blood cells. Guinea pigs were given iloprost, a prostacyclin analogue and potent pulmonary vasodilator, and noradrenaline, a pulmonary vasoconstrictor, in an attempt to increase and decrease respectively the blood volume in the lungs. Neither agent altered transferrin accumulation in the lung by comparison with a saline infusion. Iloprost infused before and after oleic acid infusion reduced macro-molecular leakage when compared with oleic acid alone. These data suggest that the double isotope method can distinguish between hydrostatic and injury induced pulmonary oedema. PMID:1699294

  15. Effects of Schisandra chinensis extracts on cough and pulmonary inflammation in a cough hypersensitivity guinea pig model induced by cigarette smoke exposure.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Shan; Nie, Yi-chu; Gan, Zhen-yong; Liu, Xiao-dong; Fang, Zhang-fu; Zhong, Bo-nian; Tian, Jin; Huang, Chu-qin; Lai, Ke-fang; Zhong, Nan-shan

    2015-05-13

    Schisandra chinensis (S. chinensis) is a traditional Chinese medicine commonly used in prescription medications for the treatment of chronic cough. However, the material basis of S. chinensis in relieving cough has not been completely elucidated yet. This study established a guinea pig model of cough hypersensitivity induced by 14 days of cigarette smoke (CS) exposure, to evaluate the antitussive, antioxidant, and anti-inflammatory effects of three S. chinensis extracts. And then the function of four lignans in reducing expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1 was examined using A549 cells induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE). The results demonstrated that both ethanol extract (EE) and ethanol-water extract (EWE) of S. chinensis, but not water extract (WE), significantly reduced the cough frequency enhanced by 0.4M citric acid solution in these cough hypersensitivity guinea pigs. Meanwhile, pretreatment with EE and EWE both significantly attenuated the CS-induced increase in infiltration of pulmonary neutrophils and total inflammatory cells, as well as pulmonary MDA, TNF-α, and IL-8, while remarkably increased activities of pulmonary SOD and GSH. According to H&E and immunofluorescence staining assays, airway epithelium hyperplasia, smooth muscle thickening, inflammatory cells infiltration, as well as expression of TRPV1 and TRPA1, were significantly attenuated in animals pretreatment with 1g/kg EE. Moreover, four lignans of EE, including schizandrin, schisantherin A, deoxyschizandrin and γ-schisandrin, significantly inhibited CSE-induced expression of TRPV1, TRPA1 and NOS3, as well as NO release in A549 cells. In conclusion, S. chinensis reduces cough frequency and pulmonary inflammation in the CS-induced cough hypersensitivity guinea pigs. Lignans may be the active components.

  16. Role of Cardiovascular Disease-associated iron overload in Libby amphibole-induced acute pulmonary injury and inflammation

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary toxicity induced by asbestos is thought to be mediated through redox-cycling of fiber-bound and bioavailable iron (Fe). We hypothesized that Libby amphibole (LA)-induced cute lung injury will be exacerbated in rat models of cardiovascular disease (CVD)-associated Fe-ove...

  17. DIFFERENTIAL PULMONARY INFLAMMATION AND IN VITRO CYTOTOXICITY BY SIZE-FRACTIONATED FLY ASH PARTICLES FROM PULVERIZED COAL COMBUSTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    The paper presents results of research on the adverse health effects associated with exposure to airborne particulate matter. Pulmonary inflammatory responses were examined in CDI mice after intratracheal instillation of 25 or 100 micrograms of ultrafine (<0.2 micrometers), fine ...

  18. An essential role for the Stat3 in regulating IgG immune complex-induced pulmonary inflammation

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Growing evidence suggests that transcription factor signal transducer and activator of transcription (Stat) 3 may play an important regulatory role during inflammation. However, the function of Stat3 in acute lung injury (ALI) is largely unknown. In the current study, by using an adenoviral vector e...

  19. Accuracy of pulmonary auscultation to detect abnormal respiratory mechanics: a cross-sectional diagnostic study.

    PubMed

    Xavier, Glaciele Nascimento; Duarte, Antonio Carlos Magalhães; Melo-Silva, César Augusto; dos Santos, Carlos Eduardo Ventura Gaio; Amado, Veronica Moreira

    2014-12-01

    Pulmonary auscultation is a method used in clinical practice for the evaluation and detection of abnormalities relating to the respiratory system. This method has limitations, as it depends on the experience and hearing acuity of the examiner to determine adventitious sounds. In this context, it's important to analyze whether there is a correlation between auscultation of lung sounds and the behavior of the respiratory mechanical properties of the respiratory system in patients with immediate postoperative cardiac surgery.

  20. Design, Tuning and Performance Evaluation of an Automated Pulmonary Nodule Detection System.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-02-01

    Lampeter TR 120 February 1983 This report reproduces a thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the r qiiiis I’m the degree of Master of Science in...faculty All the rewatch contained in this thesis and the preparation of tho document were completed at the University of Rochester. This work was funded in...Detection of the Pulmonary Nodule by the Human Viewer 9 1.4 Previous Work: Digital Processing and Analysis of Chest Radiographs 13 2- INTRODUCTION

  1. A hybrid preprocessing method using geometry based diffusion and elective enhancement filtering for pulmonary nodule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dhara, Ashis K.; Mukhopadhyay, Sudipta

    2012-03-01

    The computer aided diagnostic (CAD) system has been developed to assist radiologist for early detection and analysis of lung nodules. For pulmonary nodule detection, image preprocessing is required to remove the anatomical structure of lung parenchyma and to enhance the visibility of pulmonary nodules. In this paper a hybrid preprocessing technique using geometry based diffusion and selective enhancement filtering have been proposed. This technique provides a unified preprocessing framework for solid nodule as well as ground glass opacity (GGO) nodules. Geometry based diffusion is applied to smooth the images by preserving the boundary. In order to improve the sensitivity of pulmonary nodule detection, selective enhancement filter is used to highlight blob like structure. But selective enhancement filter sometimes enhances the structures like blood vessel and airways other than nodule and results in large number of false positive. In first step, geometry based diffusion (GBD) is applied for reduction of false positive and in second step, selective enhancement filtering is used for further reduction of false negative. Geometry based diffusion and selective enhancement filtering has been used as preprocessing step separately but their combined effect was not investigated earlier. This hybrid preprocessing approach is suitable for accurate calculation of voxel based features. The proposed method has been validated on one public database named Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) containing 50 nodules (30 solid and 20 GGO nodule) from 30 subjects and one private database containing 40 nodules (25 solid and 15 GGO nodule) from 30 subjects.

  2. Automatic detection of subsolid pulmonary nodules in thoracic computed tomography images.

    PubMed

    Jacobs, Colin; van Rikxoort, Eva M; Twellmann, Thorsten; Scholten, Ernst Th; de Jong, Pim A; Kuhnigk, Jan-Martin; Oudkerk, Matthijs; de Koning, Harry J; Prokop, Mathias; Schaefer-Prokop, Cornelia; van Ginneken, Bram

    2014-02-01

    Subsolid pulmonary nodules occur less often than solid pulmonary nodules, but show a much higher malignancy rate. Therefore, accurate detection of this type of pulmonary nodules is crucial. In this work, a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for subsolid nodules in computed tomography images is presented and evaluated on a large data set from a multi-center lung cancer screening trial. The paper describes the different components of the CAD system and presents experiments to optimize the performance of the proposed CAD system. A rich set of 128 features is defined for subsolid nodule candidates. In addition to previously used intensity, shape and texture features, a novel set of context features is introduced. Experiments show that these features significantly improve the classification performance. Optimization and training of the CAD system is performed on a large training set from one site of a lung cancer screening trial. Performance analysis on an independent test from another site of the trial shows that the proposed system reaches a sensitivity of 80% at an average of only 1.0 false positive detections per scan. A retrospective analysis of the output of the CAD system by an experienced thoracic radiologist shows that the CAD system is able to find subsolid nodules which were not contained in the screening database.

  3. Pulmonary nodule detection using a cascaded SVM classifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bergtholdt, Martin; Wiemker, Rafael; Klinder, Tobias

    2016-03-01

    Automatic detection of lung nodules from chest CT has been researched intensively over the last decades resulting also in several commercial products. However, solutions are adopted only slowly into daily clinical routine as many current CAD systems still potentially miss true nodules while at the same time generating too many false positives (FP). While many earlier approaches had to rely on rather few cases for development, larger databases become now available and can be used for algorithmic development. In this paper, we address the problem of lung nodule detection via a cascaded SVM classifier. The idea is to sequentially perform two classification tasks in order to select from an extremely large pool of potential candidates the few most likely ones. As the initial pool is allowed to contain thousands of candidates, very loose criteria could be applied during this pre-selection. In this way, the chances that a true nodule is falsely rejected as a candidate are reduced significantly. The final algorithm is trained and tested on the full LIDC/IDRI database. Comparison is done against two previously published CAD systems. Overall, the algorithm achieved sensitivity of 0.859 at 2.5 FP/volume where the other two achieved sensitivity values of 0.321 and 0.625, respectively. On low dose data sets, only slight increase in the number of FP/volume was observed, while the sensitivity was not affected.

  4. Inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibition attenuates lung tissue responsiveness and remodeling in a model of chronic pulmonary inflammation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Starling, Claudia M; Prado, Carla M; Leick-Maldonado, Edna A; Lanças, Tatiana; Reis, Fabiana G; Aristóteles, Luciana R C B R; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Martins, Mílton A; Tibério, Iolanda F L C

    2009-02-28

    We evaluated the influence of iNOS-derived NO on the mechanics, inflammatory, and remodeling process in peripheral lung parenchyma of guinea pigs with chronic pulmonary allergic inflammation. Animals treated or not with 1400 W were submitted to seven exposures of ovalbumin in increasing doses. Seventy-two hours after the 7th inhalation, lung strips were suspended in a Krebs organ bath, and tissue resistance and elastance measured at baseline and after ovalbumin challenge. The strips were submitted to histopathological measurements. The ovalbumin-exposed animals showed increased maximal responses of resistance and elastance (p<0.05), eosinophils counting (p<0.001), iNOS-positive cells (p<0.001), collagen and elastic fiber deposition (p<0.05), actin density (p<0.05) and 8-iso-PGF2alpha expression (p<0.001) in alveolar septa compared to saline-exposed ones. Ovalbumin-exposed animals treated with 1400 W had a significant reduction in lung functional and histopathological findings (p<0.05). We showed that iNOS-specific inhibition attenuates lung parenchyma constriction, inflammation, and remodeling, suggesting NO-participation in the modulation of the oxidative stress pathway.

  5. Neutral Lipids and Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor-γ Control Pulmonary Gene Expression and Inflammation-Triggered Pathogenesis in Lysosomal Acid Lipase Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Lian, Xuemei; Yan, Cong; Qin, Yulin; Knox, Lana; Li, Tingyu; Du, Hong

    2005-01-01

    The functional roles of neutral lipids in the lung are poorly understood. However, blocking cholesteryl ester and triglyceride metabolism in lysosomal acid lipase gene knockout mice (lal−/−) results in severe pathogenic phenotypes in the lung, including massive neutrophil infiltration, foamy macrophage accumulation, unwanted cell growth, and emphysema. To elucidate the mechanism underlining these pathologies, we performed Affymetrix GeneChip microarray analysis of 1-, 3-, and 6-month-old mice and identified aberrant gene expression that progressed with age. Among changed genes, matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-12, apoptosis inhibitor 6 (Api-6), erythroblast transformation-specific domain (Ets) transcription factor family member Spi-C, and oncogene MafB were increased 100-, 70-, 40-, and 10-fold, respectively, in lal−/− lungs versus the wild-type lungs. The pathogenic increases of these molecules occurred primarily in alveolar type II epithelial cells. Transcriptional activities of the MMP-12 and Api-6 promoters were stimulated by Spi-C or MafB in respiratory epithelial cells. Treatment with 9-hydroxyoctadecanoic acids and ciglitazone significantly rescued lal−/− pulmonary inflammation and aberrant gene expression. In addition, both compounds as well as peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma inhibited MMP-12 and Api-6 promoter activities. These data suggest that inflammation-triggered cell growth and emphysema during lysosomal acid lipase deficiency are partially caused by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ inactivation. PMID:16127159

  6. Virus-like particle vaccines containing F or F and G proteins confer protection against respiratory syncytial virus without pulmonary inflammation in cotton rats.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Hye Suk; Kim, Ki-Hye; Lee, Youri; Lee, Young-Tae; Ko, Eun-Ju; Park, SooJin; Lee, Jong Seok; Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kwon, Young-Man; Moore, Martin L; Kang, Sang-Moo

    2017-01-27

    Vaccine-enhanced disease has been a major obstacle in developing a safe vaccine against respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). This study demonstrates the immunogenicity, efficacy, and safety of virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines containing RSV F (F VLP), G (G VLP), or F and G proteins (FG VLP) in cotton rats. RSV specific antibodies were effectively induced by vaccination of cotton rats with F VLP or FG VLP vaccines. After challenge, lung RSV clearance was observed with RSV F, G, FG VLP, and formalin inactivated RSV (FI-RSV) vaccines. Upon RSV infection, cotton rats with RSV VLP vaccines were protected against airway hyper-responsiveness and weight loss, which are different from FI-RSV vaccination exhibiting vaccine-enhanced disease of airway obstruction, weight loss, and severe histopathology with eosinophilia and mucus production. FG VLP and F VLP vaccines did not cause pulmonary inflammation whereas G VLP induced moderate lung inflammation with eosinophilia and mucus production. In particular, F VLP and FG VLP vaccines were found to be effective in inducing antibody secreting cell responses in bone marrow and lymphoid organs as well as avoiding the induction of T helper type 2 cytokines. These results provide further evidence to develop a safe RSV vaccine based on VLP platforms.

  7. Computer-aided Detection Fidelity of Pulmonary Nodules in Chest Radiograph

    PubMed Central

    Dellios, Nikolaos; Teichgraeber, Ulf; Chelaru, Robert; Malich, Ansgar; Papageorgiou, Ismini E

    2017-01-01

    Aim: The most ubiquitous chest diagnostic method is the chest radiograph. A common radiographic finding, quite often incidental, is the nodular pulmonary lesion. The detection of small lesions out of complex parenchymal structure is a daily clinical challenge. In this study, we investigate the efficacy of the computer-aided detection (CAD) software package SoftView™ 2.4A for bone suppression and OnGuard™ 5.2 (Riverain Technologies, Miamisburg, OH, USA) for automated detection of pulmonary nodules in chest radiographs. Subjects and Methods: We retrospectively evaluated a dataset of 100 posteroanterior chest radiographs with pulmonary nodular lesions ranging from 5 to 85 mm. All nodules were confirmed with a consecutive computed tomography scan and histologically classified as 75% malignant. The number of detected lesions by observation in unprocessed images was compared to the number and dignity of CAD-detected lesions in bone-suppressed images (BSIs). Results: SoftView™ BSI does not affect the objective lesion-to-background contrast. OnGuard™ has a stand-alone sensitivity of 62% and specificity of 58% for nodular lesion detection in chest radiographs. The false positive rate is 0.88/image and the false negative (FN) rate is 0.35/image. From the true positive lesions, 20% were proven benign and 80% were malignant. FN lesions were 47% benign and 53% malignant. Conclusion: We conclude that CAD does not qualify for a stand-alone standard of diagnosis. The use of CAD accompanied with a critical radiological assessment of the software suggested pattern appears more realistic. Accordingly, it is essential to focus on studies assessing the quality-time-cost profile of real-time (as opposed to retrospective) CAD implementation in clinical diagnostics. PMID:28299236

  8. Comparison of histochemical methods for murine eosinophil detection in a RSV vaccine-enhanced inflammation model

    PubMed Central

    Meyerholz, David K.; Griffin, Michelle A.; Castilow, Elaine M.; Varga, Steven M.

    2009-01-01

    A comparative study of histochemical detection of eosinophils in fixed murine tissue is lacking. Five histochemical methods previously reported for eosinophil detection were quantitatively and qualitatively compared in an established murine RSV vaccine-enhanced inflammation model. Nonspecific neutrophil staining was evaluated in tissue sections of neutrophilic soft tissue lesions and bone marrow from respective animals. Eosinophils had granular red to orange-red cytoplasmic staining, depending on the method, whereas neutrophils had, when stained, a more homogenous cytoplasmic pattern. Nonspecific background staining of similar coloration was variably seen in arterial walls and erythrocytes. Astra Blue/Vital New Red, Congo Red, Luna, Modified Hematoxylin & Eosin, and Sirius Red techniques were all effective in detecting increased eosinophil recruitment compared to controls; however, differences in eosinophil quantification significantly varied between techniques. Astra Blue/Vital New Red had the best specificity for differentiating eosinophils and neutrophils, but had a reduced ability to enumerate eosinophils and was the most time intensive. The Luna stain had excessive non specific staining of tissues and a reduced enumeration of infiltrating eosinophils making it suboptimal. For multiple parameters such as eosinophil detection, specificity, and contrast with background tissues, the Sirius Red followed by Congo Red and Modified Hematoxylin & Eosin methods were useful, each with their own staining qualities. PMID:19181630

  9. C1q Deficiency Promotes Pulmonary Vascular Inflammation and Enhances the Susceptibility of the Lung Endothelium to Injury.

    PubMed

    Shah, Dilip; Romero, Freddy; Zhu, Ying; Duong, Michelle; Sun, Jianxin; Walsh, Kenneth; Summer, Ross

    2015-12-04

    The collectin proteins are innate immune molecules found in high concentrations on the epithelial and endothelial surfaces of the lung. While these proteins are known to have important anti-inflammatory actions in the airways of the lung little is known of their functional importance in the pulmonary circulation. We recently demonstrated that the circulating collectin protein adiponectin has potent anti-inflammatory effects on the lung endothelium, leading us to reason that other structurally related proteins might have similar effects. To test this hypothesis, we investigated the anti-inflammatory actions of C1q in lung endothelial homeostasis and the pulmonary vascular response to LPS or HCl injury. We show that lung endothelium from C1q-deficient (C1q(-/-)) mice expresses higher baseline levels of the vascular adhesion markers ICAM-1, VCAM-1, and E-selectin when compared with wild-type mice. Further, we demonstrate that these changes are associated with enhanced susceptibility of the lung to injury as evident by increased expression of adhesion markers, enhanced production of pro-inflammatory cytokines, and augmented neutrophil recruitment. Additionally, we found that C1q(-/-) mice also exhibited enhanced endothelial barrier dysfunction after injury as manifested by decreased expression of junctional adherens proteins and enhanced vascular leakage. Mechanistically, C1q appears to mediate its effects by inhibiting phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and blocking nuclear translocation of the P65 subunit of nuclear factor (NF)-κB. In summary, our findings indicate a previously unrecognized role for C1q in pulmonary vascular homeostasis and provide added support for the hypothesis that circulating collectin proteins have protective effects on the lung endothelium.

  10. Computer-assisted detection (CAD) of pulmonary nodules on thoracic CT scans using image processing and classification techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dehmeshki, Jamshid; Valdivieso-Casique, Manlio; Siddique, Musib; Dehkordi, Mandana E.; Costello, John; Roddie, Mary

    2004-05-01

    Computer assisted methods for the detection of pulmonary nodules have become more important as the resolution of CT scanners has increased and as more accurate and reproducible detections are needed. In this paper we describe the results of a CAD system for the detection of lung nodules and compare them against the interpretations of three independent radiologists.

  11. IL-10 is necessary for the expression of airway hyperresponsiveness but not pulmonary inflammation after allergic sensitization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mäkelä, M. J.; Kanehiro, A.; Borish, L.; Dakhama, A.; Loader, J.; Joetham, A.; Xing, Z.; Jordana, M.; Larsen, G. L.; Gelfand, E. W.

    2000-05-01

    Cytokines play an important role in modulating inflammatory responses and, as a result, airway tone. IL-10 is a regulatory cytokine that has been suggested for treatment of asthma because of its immunosuppressive and anti-inflammatory properties. In contrast to these suggestions, we demonstrate in a model of allergic sensitization that mice deficient in IL-10 (IL-10/) develop a pulmonary inflammatory response but fail to exhibit airway hyperresponsiveness in both in vitro and in vivo assessments of lung function. Reconstitution of these deficient mice with the IL-10 gene fully restores development of airway hyperresponsiveness comparable to control mice. These results identify an important role of IL-10, downstream of the inflammatory cascade, in regulating the tone of the airways after allergic sensitization and challenge.

  12. The administration of a high refined carbohydrate diet promoted an increase in pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress in mice exposed to cigarette smoke

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Karina Braga; Ramos, Camila de Oliveira; Soares, Nícia Pedreira; da Silva, Pamela Félix; Bandeira, Ana Carla Balthar; Costa, Guilherme de Paula; Cangussú, Sílvia Dantas; Talvani, André; Bezerra, Frank Silva

    2016-01-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of a high refined carbohydrate diet and pulmonary inflammatory response in C57BL/6 mice exposed to cigarette smoke (CS). Twenty-four male mice were divided into four groups: control group (CG), which received a standard diet; cigarette smoke group (CSG), which was exposed to CS; a high refined carbohydrate diet group (RG), which received a high refined carbohydrate diet; and a high refined carbohydrates diet and cigarette smoke group (RCSG), which received a high refined carbohydrate diet and was exposed to CS. The animals were monitored for food intake and body weight gain for 12 weeks. After this period, the CSG and RCSG were exposed to CS for five consecutive days. At the end of the experimental protocol, all animals were euthanized for subsequent analyses. There was an increase of inflammatory cells in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of CSG compared to CG and RCSG compared to CG, CSG, and RG. In addition, in the BALF, there was an increase of tumor necrosis factor alpha in RCSG compared to CG, CSG, and RG; interferon gamma increase in RCSG compared to the CSG; and increase in interleukin-10 in RCSG compared to CG and RG. Lipid peroxidation increased in RCSG compared to CG, CSG, and RG. Furthermore, the oxidation of proteins increased in CSG compared to CG. The analysis of oxidative stress showed an increase in superoxide dismutase in RCSG compared to CG, CSG, and RG and an increase in the catalase activity in RCSG compared with CG. In addition, there was a decrease in the glutathione reduced/glutathione total ratio of CSG, RG, and RCSG compared to CG. Therefore, the administration of a high refined carbohydrate diet promoted an increase in pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress in mice exposed to CS. PMID:28008246

  13. Comparative evaluation of physicians' pulmonary nodule detection with reduced slice thickness at CT screening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinsuat, Marodina; Shimamura, Ichiro; Saita, Shinsuke; Kubo, Mitsuru; Kawata, Yoshiki; Niki, Noboru; Ohmatsu, Hironobu; Kakinuma, Ryutaro; Eguchi, Kenji; Kaneko, Masahiro; Tominaga, Keigo; Moriyama, Noriyuki

    2008-03-01

    With thin and thick section Multi-slice CT images at lung cancer screening, we have statistically and quantitatively shown and evaluated the diagnostic capabilities of these slice thicknesses on physicians' pulmonary nodule diagnosis. To comparatively evaluate the 2 mm and 10 mm slice thicknesses, MSCT images of 360 people were read by six physicians. The reading criteria consisted of nodule for further examination (NFE), nodule for no further examination (NNFE) and no abnormality (NA) case. For reading results evaluation; firstly, cross-tabulation was carried out to roughly analyze the diagnoses based on whole lung field and each lung lobes. Secondly, from semi-automated extraction result of the nodule, detailed quantitative analysis was carried out to determine the diagnostic capabilities of two slice thicknesses. Finally, using the reading results of 2 mm thick image as the gold standard, the diagnostic capabilities were analyzed through the features and locations of pulmonary nodules. The study revealed that both slice thicknesses can depict lung cancer. Thin section may not be effective to diagnose nodules of <=3 mm in size and nodules of <= 5mm in size for thick section. Though thick section is less tiring for reading physicians, it is not good at depicting nodules located at the border of lung upper lobe and which have a pixel size distance of <=5 from the chest wall. The information presented may serve as a useful reference to determine in which particular pulmonary nodule condition the two slice thicknesses can be effectively used for early detection of lung cancer.

  14. γδ T Cells Are Required for M2 Macrophage Polarization and Resolution of Ozone-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation in Mice.

    PubMed

    Mathews, Joel A; Kasahara, David I; Ribeiro, Luiza; Wurmbrand, Allison P; Ninin, Fernanda M C; Shore, Stephanie A

    2015-01-01

    We examined the role of γδ T cells in the induction of alternatively activated M2 macrophages and the resolution of inflammation after ozone exposure. Wildtype (WT) mice and mice deficient in γδ T cells (TCRδ-/- mice) were exposed to air or to ozone (0.3 ppm for up to 72h) and euthanized immediately or 1, 3, or 5 days after cessation of exposure. In WT mice, M2 macrophages accumulated in the lungs over the course of ozone exposure. Pulmonary mRNA abundance of the M2 genes, Arg1, Retnla, and Clec10a, also increased after ozone. In contrast, no evidence of M2 polarization was observed in TCRδ-/- mice. WT but not TCRδ-/- mice expressed the M2c polarizing cytokine, IL-17A, after ozone exposure and WT mice treated with an IL-17A neutralizing antibody exhibited attenuated ozone-induced M2 gene expression. In WT mice, ozone-induced increases in bronchoalveolar lavage neutrophils and macrophages resolved quickly after cessation of ozone exposure returning to air exposed levels within 3 days. However, lack of M2 macrophages in TCRδ-/- mice was associated with delayed clearance of inflammatory cells after cessation of ozone and increased accumulation of apoptotic macrophages in the lungs. Delayed restoration of normal lung architecture was also observed in TCRδ-/- mice. In summary, our data indicate that γδ T cells are required for the resolution of ozone-induced inflammation, likely because γδ T cells, through their secretion of IL-17A, contribute to changes in macrophage polarization that promote clearance of apoptotic cells.

  15. Cross-Sectional Detection of Acute HIV Infection: Timing of Transmission, Inflammation and Antiretroviral Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Gay, Cynthia; Dibben, Oliver; Anderson, Jeffrey A.; Stacey, Andrea; Mayo, Ashley J.; Norris, Philip J.; Kuruc, JoAnn D.; Salazar-Gonzalez, Jesus F.; Li, Hui; Keele, Brandon F.; Hicks, Charles; Margolis, David; Ferrari, Guido; Haynes, Barton; Swanstrom, Ronald; Shaw, George M.; Hahn, Beatrice H.; Eron, Joseph J.; Borrow, Persephone; Cohen, Myron S.

    2011-01-01

    Background Acute HIV infection (AHI) is a critical phase of infection when irreparable damage to the immune system occurs and subjects are very infectious. We studied subjects with AHI prospectively to develop better treatment and public health interventions. Methods Cross-sectional screening was employed to detect HIV RNA positive, antibody negative subjects. Date of HIV acquisition was estimated from clinical history and correlated with sequence diversity assessed by single genome amplification (SGA). Twenty-two cytokines/chemokines were measured from enrollment through week 24. Results Thirty-seven AHI subjects were studied. In 7 participants with limited exposure windows, the median exposure to HIV occurred 14 days before symptom onset. Lack of viral sequence diversification confirmed the short duration of infection. Transmission dates estimated by SGA/sequencing using molecular clock models correlated with transmission dates estimated by symptom onset in individuals infected with single HIV variants (mean of 28 versus 33 days). Only 10 of 22 cytokines/chemokines were significantly elevated among AHI participants at enrollment compared to uninfected controls, and only 4 participants remained seronegative at enrollment. Discussion The results emphasize the difficulty in recruiting subjects early in AHI. Viral sequence diversity proved accurate in estimating time of infection. Regardless of aggressive screening, peak viremia and inflammation occurred before enrollment and potential intervention. Given the personal and public health importance, improved AHI detection is urgently needed. PMID:21573003

  16. Predictive model for the detection of pulmonary hypertension in dogs with myxomatous mitral valve disease

    PubMed Central

    MIKAWA, Shoma; MIYAGAWA, Yuichi; TODA, Noriko; TOMINAGA, Yoshinori; TAKEMURA, Naoyuki

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) often occurs due to a left heart disease, such as myxomatous mitral valve disease (MMVD), in dogs and is diagnosed using Doppler echocardiography and estimated pulmonary arterial pressure. Diagnosis of PH in dogs requires expertise in echocardiography: however, the examination for PH is difficult to perform in a clinical setting. Thus, simple and reliable methods are required for the diagnosis of PH in dogs. The purpose of this study was to develop models using multiple logistic regression analysis to detect PH due to left heart disease in dogs with MMVD without echocardiography. The medical records of dogs with MMVD were retrospectively reviewed, and 81 dogs were included in this study and classified into PH and non-PH groups. Bivariate analysis was performed to compare all parameters between the groups, and variables with P values of <0.25 in bivariate analysis were included in multiple logistic regression analysis to develop models for the detection of PH. In multiple logistic regression analysis, the model included a vertebral heart scale short axis of >5.2 v, and a length of sternal contact of >3.3 v was considered suitable for the detection of PH. The predictive accuracy of this model (85.9%) was judged statistically adequate, and therefore, this model may be useful to screen for PH due to left heart disease in dogs with MMVD without echocardiography. PMID:25319513

  17. A modified murine model of systemic sclerosis: bleomycin given by pump infusion induced skin and pulmonary inflammation and fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Liang, Minrui; Lv, Jiaoyan; Zou, Linlin; Yang, Wei; Xiong, Yingluo; Chen, Xiangjun; Guan, Ming; He, Rui; Zou, Hejian

    2015-03-01

    Daily subcutaneous (sc) injection of bleomycin (BLM) causes dermal fibrosis but rarely causes lung changes in mice. There are also significant disadvantages to this traditional model for systemic sclerosis, including a variable distribution of lesions and a requirement for repetitive procedures. The present study was undertaken to develop a convenient method of BLM administration that yields stable dermal inflammation and fibrosis with extensive and reproducible interstitial lung disease (ILD) in mice. Osmotic minipumps containing BLM (150 mg/kg) or saline were implanted sc in C57BL/6 mice and the drug was delivered as a continuous infusion over 1∼4 weeks. The time course of morphological features, collagen content, and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in the skin and the lungs were analyzed. Pathological examination demonstrated dominant inflammatory infiltrates at week 1 and significant fibrosis at week 4. Decreased microvessel density and increased myofibroblast counts were observed in the skin of BLM-treated mice at week 4. In addition, there were obvious increases in dermal infiltration of CD45(+) leukocytes, including F4/80(+) macrophages, Gr-1(+) neutrophils, and CD3(+) T lymphocytes in BLM-treated mice. IL-1β, IL-4, and CXCL2 transcripts were continually upregulated by BLM in the skin and lung tissues. In addition, lungs from BLM-treated mice showed significant inflammatory infiltrates and confluent subpleural fibrosis at week 4. In conclusion, this modified murine model for drug-induced systemic inflammation and fibrosis uses a single procedure and provides reproducible skin and lung lesions, mimicking human systemic sclerosis (SSc) with ILD-like manifestation.

  18. Pulmonary Nodule Detection Model Based on SVM and CT Image Feature-Level Fusion with Rough Sets

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Huiling; Zhang, Junjie; Shi, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    In order to improve the detection accuracy of pulmonary nodules in CT image, considering two problems of pulmonary nodules detection model, including unreasonable feature structure and nontightness of feature representation, a pulmonary nodules detection algorithm is proposed based on SVM and CT image feature-level fusion with rough sets. Firstly, CT images of pulmonary nodule are analyzed, and 42-dimensional feature components are extracted, including six new 3-dimensional features proposed by this paper and others 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional features. Secondly, these features are reduced for five times with rough set based on feature-level fusion. Thirdly, a grid optimization model is used to optimize the kernel function of support vector machine (SVM), which is used as a classifier to identify pulmonary nodules. Finally, lung CT images of 70 patients with pulmonary nodules are collected as the original samples, which are used to verify the effectiveness and stability of the proposed model by four groups' comparative experiments. The experimental results show that the effectiveness and stability of the proposed model based on rough set feature-level fusion are improved in some degrees. PMID:27722173

  19. False positive reduction for pulmonary nodule detection using two-dimensional principal component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Wook-Jin; Choi, Tae-Sun

    2009-08-01

    Pulmonary nodule detection is a binary classification problem. The main objective is to classify nodule from the lung computed tomography (CT) images. The intra class variability is mainly due to the grey-level variance, texture differences and shape. The purpose of this study is to develop a novel nodule detection method which is based on Two-dimensional Principal Component Analysis (2DPCA). We extract the futures using 2DPCA from nodule candidate images. Nodule candidates are classified using threshold. The proposed method reduces False Positive (FP) rate. We tested the proposed algorithm by using Lung Imaging Database Consortium (LIDC) database of National Cancer Institute (NCI). The experimental results demonstrate the effectiveness and efficiency of the proposed method. The proposed method achieved 85.11% detection rate with 1.13 FPs per scan.

  20. Comparison of thoracic radiographs and single breath-hold helical CT for detection of pulmonary nodules in dogs with metastatic neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Nemanic, Sarah; London, Cheryl A; Wisner, Erik R

    2006-01-01

    Imaging studies in people indicate that x-ray computed tomography (CT) is a more sensitive technique than thoracic radiography for the detection of pulmonary metastasic neoplasia. Systematic studies comparing CT and thoracic radiographic techniques in veterinary patients have not been performed. The present retrospective study was designed to directly compare the efficacy of these 2 techniques in detecting pulmonary nodules in dogs. Eighteen dogs with histologically confirmed pulmonary metastatic neoplasia had contemporaneous thoracic radiographs and pulmonary CT scans compared. Quantitative analyses included estimation of pulmonary nodule size, number, and lobar distribution on thoracic radiographs and CT images. Only 9% of CT-detected pulmonary nodules were identified on thoracic radiographs (P < .003). The lower size threshold was approximately 1 mm to detect pulmonary nodules on CT images and 7-9 mm to reliably detect nodules on radiographs (P < .0001). Additionally, pulmonary nodules were detected in a significantly greater number of lung lobes using CT as compared with thoracic radiographs (P < .0001). These data indicate that CT is significantly more sensitive than thoracic radiography for detecting soft-tissue nodules in dogs. As such, thoracic CT should be considered in any patient with neoplasia that has potential for pulmonary metastasis to more reliably stage the disease, particularly when accurate characterization of the extent and distribution of pulmonary metastatic disease affects therapeutic planning.

  1. Effects of Astragalus and Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharides on alveolar macrophage phagocytosis and inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease mice exposed to PM2.5.

    PubMed

    Chu, Xu; Liu, Xiao-Ju; Qiu, Jing-Man; Zeng, Xiao-Li; Bao, Hai-Rong; Shu, Juan

    2016-12-01

    Astragalus and Codonopsis pilosula are used for their immunomodulatory and anti-inflammatory effects. Here, we investigated the effects of Astragalus polysaccharides (APS) and Codonopsis pilosula polysaccharides (CPP) on alveolar macrophage (AM) phagocytosis and inflammation in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) associated with exposure to particulate matter with a mean aerodynamic diameter ≤2.5μm (PM2.5). A mouse model of COPD was established by cigarette smoke exposure. PM2.5 exposure was performed by inhalation of a PM2.5 solution aerosol. APS and CPP were administered intragastrically. COPD showed defective AM phagocytosis and increased levels of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and serum. PM2.5 exposure aggravated the damage, and this effect was reversed by APS and CPP gavage. The results indicate that APS and CPP may promote defective AM phagocytosis and ameliorate the inflammatory response in COPD with or without PM2.5 exposure.

  2. Effects of Mikania glomerata Spreng. and Mikania laevigata Schultz Bip. ex Baker (Asteraceae) extracts on pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress caused by acute coal dust exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Freitas, T.P.; Silveira, P.C.; Rocha, L.G.; Rezin, G.T.; Rocha, J.; Citadini-Zanette, V.; Romao, P.T.; Dal-Pizzol, F.; Pinho, R.A.; Andrade, V.M.; Streck, E.L.

    2008-12-15

    Several studies have reported biological effects of Mikania glomerata and Mikania laevigata, used in Brazilian folk medicine for respiratory diseases. Pneumoconiosis is characterized by pulmonary inflammation caused by coal dust exposure. In this work, we evaluated the effect of pretreatment with M. glomerata and M. laevigata extracts (MGE and MLE, respectively) (100 mg/kg, s.c.) on inflammatory and oxidative stress parameters in lung of rats subjected to a single coal dust intratracheal instillation. Rats were pretreated for 2 weeks with saline solution, MGE, or MLE. On day 15, the animals were anesthetized, and gross mineral coal dust or saline solutions were administered directly in the lung by intratracheal instillation. Fifteen days after coal dust instillation, the animals were killed. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained; total cell count and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity were determined. In the lung, myeloperoxidase activity, thiobarbituric acid-reactive substances (TBARS) level, and protein carbonyl and sulfhydryl contents were evaluated. In BAL of treated animals, we verified an increased total cell count and LDH activity. MGE and MLE prevented the increase in cell count, but only MLE prevented the increase in LDH. Myeloperoxidase and TBARS levels were not affected, protein carbonylation was increased, and the protein thiol levels were decreased by acute coal dust intratracheal administration. The findings also suggest that both extracts present an important protective effect on the oxidation of thiol groups. Moreover, pretreatment with MGE and MLE also diminished lung inflammatory infiltration induced by coal dust, as assessed by histopathologic analyses.

  3. Transcriptome of Cultured Lung Fibroblasts in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis: Meta-Analysis of Publically Available Microarray Datasets Reveals Repression of Inflammation and Immunity Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Plantier, Laurent; Renaud, Hélène; Respaud, Renaud; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Crestani, Bruno

    2016-01-01

    Heritable profibrotic differentiation of lung fibroblasts is a key mechanism of idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). Its mechanisms are yet to be fully understood. In this study, individual data from four independent microarray studies comparing the transcriptome of fibroblasts cultured in vitro from normal (total n = 20) and IPF (total n = 20) human lung were compiled for meta-analysis following normalization to z-scores. One hundred and thirteen transcripts were upregulated and 115 were downregulated in IPF fibroblasts using the Significance Analysis of Microrrays algorithm with a false discovery rate of 5%. Downregulated genes were highly enriched for Gene Ontology and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) functional classes related to inflammation and immunity such as Defense response to virus, Influenza A, tumor necrosis factor (TNF) mediated signaling pathway, interferon-inducible absent in melanoma2 (AIM2) inflammasome as well as Apoptosis. Although upregulated genes were not enriched for any functional class, select factors known to play key roles in lung fibrogenesis were overexpressed in IPF fibroblasts, most notably connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) and serum response factor (SRF), supporting their role as drivers of IPF. The full data table is available as a supplement. PMID:27983601

  4. Pulmonary Hypertension in Sarcoidosis.

    PubMed

    Baughman, Robert P; Engel, Peter J; Nathan, Steven

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complication of sarcoidosis leading to dyspnea and associated with increased morbidity and mortality. Sarcoidosis-associated pulmonary hypertension (SAPH) can be due to several factors, including vascular involvement by the granulomatous inflammation, compression of the pulmonary arteries by adenopathy, fibrotic changes within the lung, and left ventricular diastolic dysfunction. Several case series have suggested that some patients with SAPH benefit from specific therapy for pulmonary hypertension. A randomized, placebo-controlled trial found 16 weeks' bosentan therapy to be associated with significant improvement in pulmonary artery pressure. Future studies may better define who would respond to treatment of pulmonary hypertension.

  5. Risk assessment in relation to the detection of small pulmonary nodules

    PubMed Central

    Marcus, Michael W.

    2017-01-01

    The National Lung Cancer Screening trial (NLST) demonstrated that individuals assigned to the LDCT screening arm had a 20% lower mortality than those who were assigned to the conventional chest radiography. The NLST was thoroughly analyzed by the US Preventive Task Force on CT Screening and they recommended that lung cancer screening should be implemented. A number of other countries have also recommended implementation, whilst others are awaiting the outcome of the NELSON Trial. However, recommendations for the management of CT screen detected nodules have only recently had any clarity. The management of CT detected nodules in the NLST was based on the identification and reporting of 4 mm diameter nodules found on the CT screens but there was no NLST radiology protocol in place for the management of nodules. The use of volumetric analysis is not routinely used in the USA and there is still a reliance on utilising the CT nodule diameter as the management parameter. The first pulmonary risk model was developed by the Canadians, utilising data sets from the Pan-Canadian Early detection of Lung cancer (PanCan) and validated in the chemoprevention trial dataset at the British Columbian Agency. This Canadian model, known as the Brock Model, is currently available and has been integrated into the British Thoracic Society guidelines on the management of pulmonary nodules. The American College of Radiology setup a Lung Cancer Screening Committee subgroup on Lung-RADS, to standardize lung cancer screening CT reporting and provide management recommendations. However, it has been recommended that the Lung-RADS system should be revised as the system as it has never been studied in a prospective fashion. The NELSON trial introduced a third screening test, the “indeterminate” screening test result, this was done with the aim to reduce the false-positives CT screening results and also utilized by the UKLS trial successfully. On comparing the radiological CT screen volumetric

  6. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  7. Automatic detection of large pulmonary solid nodules in thoracic CT images

    SciTech Connect

    Setio, Arnaud A. A. Jacobs, Colin; Gelderblom, Jaap; Ginneken, Bram van

    2015-10-15

    Purpose: Current computer-aided detection (CAD) systems for pulmonary nodules in computed tomography (CT) scans have a good performance for relatively small nodules, but often fail to detect the much rarer larger nodules, which are more likely to be cancerous. We present a novel CAD system specifically designed to detect solid nodules larger than 10 mm. Methods: The proposed detection pipeline is initiated by a three-dimensional lung segmentation algorithm optimized to include large nodules attached to the pleural wall via morphological processing. An additional preprocessing is used to mask out structures outside the pleural space to ensure that pleural and parenchymal nodules have a similar appearance. Next, nodule candidates are obtained via a multistage process of thresholding and morphological operations, to detect both larger and smaller candidates. After segmenting each candidate, a set of 24 features based on intensity, shape, blobness, and spatial context are computed. A radial basis support vector machine (SVM) classifier was used to classify nodule candidates, and performance was evaluated using ten-fold cross-validation on the full publicly available lung image database consortium database. Results: The proposed CAD system reaches a sensitivity of 98.3% (234/238) and 94.1% (224/238) large nodules at an average of 4.0 and 1.0 false positives/scan, respectively. Conclusions: The authors conclude that the proposed dedicated CAD system for large pulmonary nodules can identify the vast majority of highly suspicious lesions in thoracic CT scans with a small number of false positives.

  8. Biodiesel versus diesel exposure: Enhanced pulmonary inflammation, oxidative stress, and differential morphological changes in the mouse lung

    PubMed Central

    Yanamala, Naveena; Hatfield, Meghan K.; Farcas, Mariana T.; Schwegler-Berry, Diane; Hummer, Jon A.; Shurin, Michael R.; Birch, M. Eileen; Gutkin, Dmitriy W.; Kisin, Elena; Kagan, Valerian E.; Bugarski, Aleksandar D.; Shvedova, Anna A.

    2015-01-01

    The use of biodiesel (BD) or its blends with petroleum diesel (D) is considered to be a viable approach to reduce occupational and environmental exposures to particulate matter (PM). Due to its lower particulate mass emissions compared to D, use of BD is thought to alleviate adverse health effects. Considering BD fuel is mainly composed of unsaturated fatty acids, we hypothesize that BD exhaust particles could induce pronounced adverse outcomes, due to their ability to readily oxidize. The main objective of this study was to compare the effects of particles generated by engine fueled with neat BD and neat petroleum-based D. Biomarkers of tissue damage and inflammation were significantly elevated in lungs of mice exposed to BD particulates. Additionally, BD particulates caused a significant accumulation of oxidatively modified proteins and an increase in 4-hydroxynonenal. The up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines/chemokines/growth factors was higher in lungs upon BD particulate exposure. Histological evaluation of lung sections indicated presence of lymphocytic infiltrate and impaired clearance with prolonged retention of BD particulate in pigment laden macrophages. Taken together, these results clearly indicate that BD exhaust particles could exert more toxic effects compared to D. PMID:23886933

  9. Feasibility of Using Wideband Microwave System for Non-Invasive Detection and Monitoring of Pulmonary Oedema

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeieh, S. Ahdi; Zamani, A.; Bialkowski, K. S.; Mahmoud, A.; Abbosh, A. M.

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary oedema is a common manifestation of various fatal diseases that can be caused by cardiac or non-cardiac syndromes. The accumulated fluid has a considerably higher dielectric constant compared to lungs’ tissues, and can thus be detected using microwave techniques. Therefore, a non-invasive microwave system for the early detection of pulmonary oedema is presented. It employs a platform in the form of foam-based bed that contains two linear arrays of wideband antennas covering the band 0.7-1 GHz. The platform is designed such that during the tests, the subject lays on the bed with the back of the torso facing the antenna arrays. The antennas are controlled using a switching network that is connected to a compact network analyzer. A novel frequency-based imaging algorithm is used to process the recorded signals and generate an image of the torso showing any accumulated fluids in the lungs. The system is verified on an artificial torso phantom, and animal organs. As a feasibility study, preclinical tests are conducted on healthy subjects to determinate the type of obtained images, the statistics and threshold levels of their intensity to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy subjects.

  10. Feasibility of Using Wideband Microwave System for Non-Invasive Detection and Monitoring of Pulmonary Oedema

    PubMed Central

    Rezaeieh, S. Ahdi; Zamani, A.; Bialkowski, K. S.; Mahmoud, A.; Abbosh, A. M.

    2015-01-01

    Pulmonary oedema is a common manifestation of various fatal diseases that can be caused by cardiac or non-cardiac syndromes. The accumulated fluid has a considerably higher dielectric constant compared to lungs’ tissues, and can thus be detected using microwave techniques. Therefore, a non-invasive microwave system for the early detection of pulmonary oedema is presented. It employs a platform in the form of foam-based bed that contains two linear arrays of wideband antennas covering the band 0.7–1 GHz. The platform is designed such that during the tests, the subject lays on the bed with the back of the torso facing the antenna arrays. The antennas are controlled using a switching network that is connected to a compact network analyzer. A novel frequency-based imaging algorithm is used to process the recorded signals and generate an image of the torso showing any accumulated fluids in the lungs. The system is verified on an artificial torso phantom, and animal organs. As a feasibility study, preclinical tests are conducted on healthy subjects to determinate the type of obtained images, the statistics and threshold levels of their intensity to differentiate between healthy and unhealthy subjects. PMID:26365299

  11. Hand-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery for Pulmonary Metastasectomy through Sternocostal Triangle Access: Superiority in Detection of Non-Imaged Pulmonary Nodules

    PubMed Central

    Hao, Long; Long, Jiang; YongBin, Lin; DongRong, Situ; Yan, Zheng; YiGong, Zhang; GuoWei, Ma

    2014-01-01

    Hand-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery for pulmonary metastasectomy through sternocostal triangle access allows manual palpation of both lungs, thus permitting effective treatment of lung metastases. In our research, 62 patients from November 2001 to January 2012 underwent our Hand-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery procedures for pulmonary metastasectomy. Clinical data, including the number of pulmonary metastases determined by Computed Tomography/Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography, surgical findings and survival data of these patients were collected. We found that the median follow-up time was 23.7 months (range 2.4 to 85.6 months). 30 cases of them had post-operative recurrences and the median disease-free survival period was 27.4 months. For Computed Tomography scan, the overall sensitivity for proved metastases was 63% (115/182). 67 non-imaged malignant nodules were palpated and removed in 14 cases. For Positron Emission Tomography-Computed Tomography scan, the overall sensitivity was 66% (79/120). 41 non-imaged malignant nodules were palpated and removed in 12 cases. This study show that the Hand-Assisted Thoracoscopic Surgery provides an easier way for routine bilateral pleural exploration, and thus is critical and effective in detection of non-imaged malignant pulmonary metastases, which might contribute to long-term disease-free survival. PMID:24687025

  12. [Effect of basic therapy on clinical symptoms, quality of life and systemic inflammation in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease].

    PubMed

    Baranova, I I; Leshchenko, I V

    2013-01-01

    The study included 38 men with moderately severe chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) (mean age 60.6 ± 10.2 yr) and 42 ones with severe COPD (mean age 61.2 ± 7.2 yr). They were treated with tiotropium bromide, formoterol and beclomethasone dipropionate for 24 weeks (stage 1), TB alone for 12 weeks (stage 2) and TB+formoterol (long-acting bronchodilators, LABD) for another 12 weeks. Each stage was followed by evaluation of COPD symptoms using the St-George's Hospital questionnaire, daily requirements for short-acting beta-2 agonists (SABA), heart rate (HR), forced expiratory volume in the 1st second (FEV-1) before and after SABA test, hemoglobin saturation with oxygen in arterial blood during pulse oxymetry before and after 6 min walking test, blood surfactant protein D level (SP-D). The control group was comprised of 34 healthy men (mean age 62.3 ± 5.8 yr). Patients with moderately severe COPD experienced worsening of clinical symptoms (p < 0.001), required more SABA (p < 0.001), had increased HR (p = 0.01) and SP-D levels (p = 0.01) whereas FEV-1 (p = 0.05) decreased during stage 2 as compared with stage 1. Positive dynamics of all these variables except COPD symptoms and HR was observed at stage 3. Alteration in the extent of basal therapy in patients with stage III COPD did not result in dynamics of clinical and laboratory characteristics. The data obtained suggest the necessity of combined therapy with LABD or triple basal therapy of moderately severe COPD and the possibility of therapy with one or two LABD having different sites of action in the patients with clinically stable stage II COPD.

  13. Preliminary clinical results: an analyzing tool for 2D optical imaging in detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adi Aizudin Bin Radin Nasirudin, Radin; Meier, Reinhard; Ahari, Carmen; Sievert, Matti; Fiebich, Martin; Rummeny, Ernst J.; No"l, Peter B.

    2011-03-01

    Optical imaging (OI) is a relatively new method in detecting active inflammation of hand joints of patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis (RA). With the high number of people affected by this disease especially in western countries, the availability of OI as an early diagnostic imaging method is clinically highly relevant. In this paper, we present a newly in-house developed OI analyzing tool and a clinical evaluation study. Our analyzing tool extends the capability of existing OI tools. We include many features in the tool, such as region-based image analysis, hyper perfusion curve analysis, and multi-modality image fusion to aid clinicians in localizing and determining the intensity of inflammation in joints. Additionally, image data management options, such as the full integration of PACS/RIS, are included. In our clinical study we demonstrate how OI facilitates the detection of active inflammation in rheumatoid arthritis. The preliminary clinical results indicate a sensitivity of 43.5%, a specificity of 80.3%, an accuracy of 65.7%, a positive predictive value of 76.6%, and a negative predictive value of 64.9% in relation to clinical results from MRI. The accuracy of inflammation detection serves as evidence to the potential of OI as a useful imaging modality for early detection of active inflammation in patients with rheumatoid arthritis. With our in-house developed tool we extend the usefulness of OI imaging in the clinical arena. Overall, we show that OI is a fast, inexpensive, non-invasive and nonionizing yet highly sensitive and accurate imaging modality.-

  14. Detection of Heart Sounds in Children with and without Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension―Daubechies Wavelets Approach

    PubMed Central

    Elgendi, Mohamed; Kumar, Shine; Guo, Long; Rutledge, Jennifer; Coe, James Y.; Zemp, Roger; Schuurmans, Dale; Adatia, Ian

    2015-01-01

    Background Automatic detection of the 1st (S1) and 2nd (S2) heart sounds is difficult, and existing algorithms are imprecise. We sought to develop a wavelet-based algorithm for the detection of S1 and S2 in children with and without pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Method Heart sounds were recorded at the second left intercostal space and the cardiac apex with a digital stethoscope simultaneously with pulmonary arterial pressure (PAP). We developed a Daubechies wavelet algorithm for the automatic detection of S1 and S2 using the wavelet coefficient ‘D6’ based on power spectral analysis. We compared our algorithm with four other Daubechies wavelet-based algorithms published by Liang, Kumar, Wang, and Zhong. We annotated S1 and S2 from an audiovisual examination of the phonocardiographic tracing by two trained cardiologists and the observation that in all subjects systole was shorter than diastole. Results We studied 22 subjects (9 males and 13 females, median age 6 years, range 0.25–19). Eleven subjects had a mean PAP < 25 mmHg. Eleven subjects had PAH with a mean PAP ≥ 25 mmHg. All subjects had a pulmonary artery wedge pressure ≤ 15 mmHg. The sensitivity (SE) and positive predictivity (+P) of our algorithm were 70% and 68%, respectively. In comparison, the SE and +P of Liang were 59% and 42%, Kumar 19% and 12%, Wang 50% and 45%, and Zhong 43% and 53%, respectively. Our algorithm demonstrated robustness and outperformed the other methods up to a signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 10 dB. For all algorithms, detection errors arose from low-amplitude peaks, fast heart rates, low signal-to-noise ratio, and fixed thresholds. Conclusion Our algorithm for the detection of S1 and S2 improves the performance of existing Daubechies-based algorithms and justifies the use of the wavelet coefficient ‘D6’ through power spectral analysis. Also, the robustness despite ambient noise may improve real world clinical performance. PMID:26629704

  15. GM-CSF Enhances Macrophage Glycolytic Activity In Vitro and Improves Detection of Inflammation In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Parmanand; González-Ramos, Silvia; Mojena, Marina; Rosales-Mendoza, César Eduardo; Emami, Hamed; Swanson, Jeffrey; Morss, Alex; Fayad, Zahi A.; Rudd, James H.F.; Gelfand, Jeffrey; Paz-García, Marta; Martín-Sanz, Paloma; Boscá, Lisardo

    2016-01-01

    18F-FDG accumulates in glycolytically active tissues and is known to concentrate in tissues that are rich in activated macrophages. In this study, we tested the hypotheses that human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), a clinically used cytokine, increases macrophage glycolysis and deoxyglucose uptake in vitro and acutely enhances 18F-FDG uptake within inflamed tissues such as atherosclerotic plaques in vivo. Methods: In vitro experiments were conducted on human macrophages whereby inflammatory activation and uptake of radiolabeled 2-deoxyglucose was assessed before and after GM-CSF exposure. In vivo studies were performed on mice and New Zealand White rabbits to assess the effect of GM-CSF on 18F-FDG uptake in normal versus inflamed arteries, using PET. Results: Incubation of human macrophages with GM-CSF resulted in increased glycolysis and increased 2-deoxyglucose uptake (P < 0.05). This effect was attenuated by neutralizing antibodies against tumor necrosis factor–α or after silencing or inhibition of 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase. In vivo, in mice and in rabbits, intravenous GM-CSF administration resulted in a 70% and 73% increase (P < 0.01 for both), respectively, in arterial 18F-FDG uptake in atherosclerotic animals but not in nonatherosclerotic controls. Histopathologic analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between in vivo 18F-FDG uptake and macrophage staining (R = 0.75, P < 0.01). Conclusion: GM-CSF substantially augments glycolytic flux in vitro (via a mechanism dependent on ubiquitous type 6-phosphofructo-2-kinase and tumor necrosis factor–α) and increases 18F-FDG uptake within inflamed atheroma in vivo. These findings demonstrate that GM-CSF can be used to enhance detection of inflammation. Further studies should explore the role of GM-CSF stimulation to enhance the detection of inflammatory foci in other disease states. PMID:27081166

  16. The Evaluation of a Pulmonary Display to Detect Adverse Respiratory Events Using High Resolution Human Simulator

    PubMed Central

    Wachter, S. Blake; Johnson, Ken; Albert, Robert; Syroid, Noah; Drews, Frank; Westenskow, Dwayne

    2006-01-01

    Objective Authors developed a picture-graphics display for pulmonary function to present typical respiratory data used in perioperative and intensive care environments. The display utilizes color, shape and emergent alerting to highlight abnormal pulmonary physiology. The display serves as an adjunct to traditional operating room displays and monitors. Design To evaluate the prototype, nineteen clinician volunteers each managed four adverse respiratory events and one normal event using a high-resolution patient simulator which included the new displays (intervention subjects) and traditional displays (control subjects). Between-group comparisons included (i) time to diagnosis and treatment for each adverse respiratory event; (ii) the number of unnecessary treatments during the normal scenario; and (iii) self-reported workload estimates while managing study events. Measurements Two expert anesthesiologists reviewed video-taped transcriptions of the volunteers to determine time to treat and time to diagnosis. Time values were then compared between groups using a Mann-Whitney-U Test. Estimated workload for both groups was assessed using the NASA-TLX and compared between groups using an ANOVA. P-values < 0.05 were considered significant. Results Clinician volunteers detected and treated obstructed endotracheal tubes and intrinsic PEEP problems faster with graphical rather than conventional displays (p < 0.05). During the normal scenario simulation, 3 clinicians using the graphical display, and 5 clinicians using the conventional display gave unnecessary treatments. Clinician-volunteers reported significantly lower subjective workloads using the graphical display for the obstructed endotracheal tube scenario (p < 0.001) and the intrinsic PEEP scenario (p < 0.03). Conclusion Authors conclude that the graphical pulmonary display may serve as a useful adjunct to traditional displays in identifying adverse respiratory events. PMID:16929038

  17. Detecting inflammation and fibrosis in bowel wall with photoacoustic imaging in a Crohn's disease animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Johnson, Laura A.; Hu, Jack; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Higgins, Peter D. R.; Wang, Xueding

    2015-03-01

    Crohn's disease (CD) is an autoimmune disease affecting 700,000 people in the United States. This condition may cause obstructing intestinal narrowings (strictures) due to inflammation, fibrosis (deposition of collagen), or a combination of both. Utilizing the unique strong optical absorption of hemoglobin at 532 nm and collagen at 1370 nm, this study investigated the feasibility of non-invasively characterizing intestinal strictures using photoacoustic imaging (PAI). Three normal controls, ten pure inflammation and 9 inflammation plus fibrosis rat bowel wall samples were imaged. Statistical analysis of the PA measurements has shown the capability of discriminating the purely inflammatory from mixed inflammatory and fibrotic strictures.

  18. Intraindividual comparison of gadolinium- and iodine-enhanced 64-slice multidetector CT pulmonary angiography for the detection of pulmonary embolism in a porcine model.

    PubMed

    Henes, Frank Oliver Gerhard; Groth, Michael; Begemann, Philipp G C; Adam, Gerhard; Regier, Marc

    2011-06-01

    This study is an evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of gadolinium-enhanced computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) for the detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) in comparison with iodine-enhanced CTPA. PE was induced in five anesthetized pigs by administration of blood clots through an 11-F catheter inside the jugular vein. Animals underwent CTPA in breathhold with i.v. bolus injection of 50 ml gadopentetate dimeglumine (0.4 mmol/kg, 4 ml/s). Subsequently, CTPA was performed using the same imaging parameters but under administration of 70 ml nonionic iodinated contrast material (400 mg/ml, 4 ml/s). All images were reconstructed with 1 mm slice thickness. A consensus readout of the iodium-enhanced CTPAs by both radiologists served as reference standard. Gadolinium-enhanced CTPAs were evaluated independently by two experienced radiologists, and differences in detection rate between both contrast agents were assessed on a per embolus basis using the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Interobserver agreement was determined by calculation of қ values. PE was diagnosed independently by both readers in all five pigs by the use of gadolinium-enhanced CTPA. Out of 60 pulmonary emboli detected in the iodine-enhanced scans, 47 (78.3%; reader 1) and 44 (62.8%; reader 2) emboli were detected by the use of gadolinium. All 13 (100%) emboli in lobar arteries (by both readers) and 26 (reader 1) and 25 (reader 2) out of 27 emboli (96.3% and 92.6%) in segmental arteries were detected by the use of the gadolinium-enhanced CTPA. In subsegmental arteries, only 8 (40%; reader 1) and 6 (30%; reader 2) out of 20 emboli were detected by the gadolinium-enhanced CTPA. By comparing both scans on a per vessel basis (Wilcoxon test), Gd-enhanced CTPA was significantly inferior in emboli detection on subsegmental level (P < 0.0001). The interobserver agreement was excellent on lobar and segmental level (қ = 1.0 and 0.93, respectively), whereas readers only reached moderate

  19. Guideline-Based Early Detection of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease in Eight Danish Municipalities: The TOP-KOM Study

    PubMed Central

    Hemmingsen, Ulla Borup; Stycke, Margit; Dollerup, Jens

    2017-01-01

    Background. Early detection of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and prevention of disease progression are important. Only 40% of COPD cases are diagnosed in Denmark. Recommendations for early case finding have been established. This study investigates early detection of pulmonary obstruction in a Danish municipality setting. Methods. Eight municipalities participated. Citizens fulfilling national case finding recommendations, age ≥35 years, smokers/ex-smokers/relevant occupational exposure, and at least one respiratory symptom, were invited to spirometry. Citizens with indication of pulmonary obstruction, forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1)/forced vital capacity (FVC) < 0.70, were referred to their general practitioner (GP). Results. 1,499 citizens were examined (53.6% male, mean age 57.2 years). 44.8% were current smokers with 57% planning for smoking cessation. The citizens recorded significant airway symptoms with dyspnea being the most important (71%). The mean FEV1/FVC score was 73.54 (SD 22.84). 456 citizens (30.4%) were found to have indication for pulmonary obstruction and were referred to GP for further diagnosis. Conclusion. Early detection in Danish municipalities proved effective finding nearly 1/3 being pulmonary obstructive. It seems to be of value to have municipalities to perform case finding together with smoking cessation as a primary intervention in COPD management. PMID:28321336

  20. Automatic 3D pulmonary nodule detection in CT images: A survey.

    PubMed

    Valente, Igor Rafael S; Cortez, Paulo César; Neto, Edson Cavalcanti; Soares, José Marques; de Albuquerque, Victor Hugo C; Tavares, João Manuel R S

    2016-02-01

    This work presents a systematic review of techniques for the 3D automatic detection of pulmonary nodules in computerized-tomography (CT) images. Its main goals are to analyze the latest technology being used for the development of computational diagnostic tools to assist in the acquisition, storage and, mainly, processing and analysis of the biomedical data. Also, this work identifies the progress made, so far, evaluates the challenges to be overcome and provides an analysis of future prospects. As far as the authors know, this is the first time that a review is devoted exclusively to automated 3D techniques for the detection of pulmonary nodules from lung CT images, which makes this work of noteworthy value. The research covered the published works in the Web of Science, PubMed, Science Direct and IEEEXplore up to December 2014. Each work found that referred to automated 3D segmentation of the lungs was individually analyzed to identify its objective, methodology and results. Based on the analysis of the selected works, several studies were seen to be useful for the construction of medical diagnostic aid tools. However, there are certain aspects that still require attention such as increasing algorithm sensitivity, reducing the number of false positives, improving and optimizing the algorithm detection of different kinds of nodules with different sizes and shapes and, finally, the ability to integrate with the Electronic Medical Record Systems and Picture Archiving and Communication Systems. Based on this analysis, we can say that further research is needed to develop current techniques and that new algorithms are needed to overcome the identified drawbacks.

  1. Neutralization of both IL-1α/IL-1β plays a major role in suppressing combined cigarette smoke/virus-induced pulmonary inflammation in mice.

    PubMed

    Bucher, Hannes; Mang, Samuel; Keck, Martina; Przibilla, Michèl; Lamb, David; Schiele, Felix; Wittenbrink, Mareike; Fuchs, Klaus; Jung, Birgit; Erb, Klaus J; Peter, Daniel

    2017-03-15

    Smoking is an important risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and viral infections are believed to be major triggers of exacerbations, which periodically lead to a worsening of symptoms. The pro-inflammatory IL-1 family members IL-1α and IL-1β are increased in COPD patients and might contribute to disease pathology. We investigated whether individual or combined inhibition of these cytokines reduced lung inflammation in cigarette smoke (CS)-exposed and H1N1-infected BALB/c mice. Animals were treated with individual or combined antibodies (Abs) directed against IL-1α, IL-1β or IL-1R1. Cells in BAL fluid and cytokines/chemokines in lung homogenate were determined. The viral load was investigated. Blocking IL-1α had significant suppressive effects on total cells, neutrophils, and macrophages. Furthermore, it reduced KC levels significantly. Blocking of IL-1β did not provide significant activity. In line with the in vivo findings, IL-1α Abs but not IL-1β Abs reduced levels of TNF-α and IL-6 in H1N1 infected primary human bronchial epithelial air-liquid-interface cell culture. Concomitant usage of Abs against IL-1α/IL-1β revealed strong effects in vivo and reduced total cells, neutrophils and macrophages. Additionally, levels of KC, IL-6, TNF-α, MCP-1, MIP-1α and MIP-1β were significantly reduced and ICAM-1 and MUC5 A/C mRNA expression was attenuated. The viral load decreased significantly upon combined IL-1α/IL-1β Ab treatment. Blocking the IL-1R1 provided significant effects on total cells, neutrophils and macrophages but was inferior compared to inhibiting both its soluble ligands IL-1α/IL-1β. Our results suggest that combined inhibition of IL-1α/IL-1β might be beneficial to reduce CS/H1N1-induced airway inflammation. Moreover, combined targeting of both IL-1α/IL-1β might be more efficient compared to individual neutralization IL-1α or IL-1β or inhibition of the IL-1R1.

  2. Incidentally detected right pulmonary artery agenesis with right coronary artery collateralization.

    PubMed

    Mikaberidze, Nino; Goldberg, Ythan; Khosraviani, Khashayar; Taub, Cynthia

    2014-01-01

    Unilateral pulmonary artery agenesis (UPAA) with pulmonary hypoplasia is a rare congenital anomaly. We describe a 71-year old male who was incidentally diagnosed with the right UPAA and a hypoplastic right lung supplied by collateralized right coronary.

  3. Computer-aided detection of lung cancer: combining pulmonary nodule detection systems with a tumor risk prediction model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Setio, Arnaud A. A.; Jacobs, Colin; Ciompi, Francesco; van Riel, Sarah J.; Winkler Wille, Mathilde M.; Dirksen, Asger; van Rikxoort, Eva M.; van Ginneken, Bram

    2015-03-01

    Computer-Aided Detection (CAD) has been shown to be a promising tool for automatic detection of pulmonary nodules from computed tomography (CT) images. However, the vast majority of detected nodules are benign and do not require any treatment. For effective implementation of lung cancer screening programs, accurate identification of malignant nodules is the key. We investigate strategies to improve the performance of a CAD system in detecting nodules with a high probability of being cancers. Two strategies were proposed: (1) combining CAD detections with a recently published lung cancer risk prediction model and (2) the combination of multiple CAD systems. First, CAD systems were used to detect the nodules. Each CAD system produces markers with a certain degree of suspicion. Next, the malignancy probability was automatically computed for each marker, given nodule characteristics measured by the CAD system. Last, CAD degree of suspicion and malignancy probability were combined using the product rule. We evaluated the method using 62 nodules which were proven to be malignant cancers, from 180 scans of the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial. The malignant nodules were considered as positive samples, while all other findings were considered negative. Using a product rule, the best proposed system achieved an improvement in sensitivity, compared to the best individual CAD system, from 41.9% to 72.6% at 2 false positives (FPs)/scan and from 56.5% to 88.7% at 8 FPs/scan. Our experiment shows that combining a nodule malignancy probability with multiple CAD systems can increase the performance of computerized detection of lung cancer.

  4. Improvement of method for computer-assisted detection of pulmonary nodules in CT of the chest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiebich, Martin; Wormanns, Dag; Heindel, Walter

    2001-07-01

    Computed tomography of the chest can be used as a screening method for lung cancer in a high-risk population. However, the detection of lung nodules is a difficult and time-consuming task for radiologists. The developed technique should improve the sensitivity of the detection of lung nodules without showing too many false positive nodules. In the first step the CAD technique for nodule detection in CT examinations of the lung eliminates all air outside the patient, then soft tissue and bony structures are removed. In the remaining lung fields a three-dimensional region detection is performed and rule-based analysis is used to detect possible lung nodules. In a study, which should evaluate the feasibility of screening lung cancer, about 2000 thoracic examinations were performed. The CAD system was used for reporting in a consecutive subset (n=100) of those studies. Computation time is about 5 min on an Silicon Graphics O2 workstation. Of the total number of found nodules >= 5 mm (n=68) 26 were found by the CAD scheme, 59 were detected by the radiologist. The CAD workstation helped the radiologist to identify 9 additional nodules. The false positive rate was less than 0.1 per image. The nodules missed by the CAD scheme were analyzed and the reasons for failure categorized into the density of the nodule is too low, nodules is connected to chest wall, segmentation error, and misclassification. Possible solutions for those problems are presented. We have developed a technique, which increased the detection rate of the radiologist in the detection of pulmonary nodules in CT exams of the chest. Correction of the CAD scheme using the analysis of the missed nodules will further enhance the performance of this method.

  5. Computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules using dynamic self-adaptive template matching and a FLDA classifier.

    PubMed

    Gong, Jing; Liu, Ji-Yu; Wang, Li-Jia; Zheng, Bin; Nie, Sheng-Dong

    2016-12-01

    Improving the performance of computer-aided detection (CAD) system for pulmonary nodules is still an important issue for its future clinical applications. This study aims to develop a new CAD scheme for pulmonary nodule detection based on dynamic self-adaptive template matching and Fisher linear discriminant analysis (FLDA) classifier. We first segment and repair lung volume by using OTSU algorithm and three-dimensional (3D) region growing. Next, the suspicious regions of interest (ROIs) are extracted and filtered by applying 3D dot filtering and thresholding method. Then, pulmonary nodule candidates are roughly detected with 3D dynamic self-adaptive template matching. Finally, we optimally select 11 image features and apply FLDA classifier to reduce false positive detections. The performance of the new method is validated by comparing with other methods through experiments using two groups of public datasets from Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) and ANODE09. By a 10-fold cross-validation experiment, the new CAD scheme finally has achieved a sensitivity of 90.24% and a false-positive (FP) of 4.54 FP/scan on average for the former dataset, and a sensitivity of 84.1% with 5.59 FP/scan for the latter. By comparing with other previously reported CAD schemes tested on the same datasets, the study proves that this new scheme can yield higher and more robust results in detecting pulmonary nodules.

  6. HMGB1 translocation and release mediate cigarette smoke–induced pulmonary inflammation in mice through a TLR4/MyD88-dependent signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Yao; Wang, Dan; Wang, Bin; Li, Huanan; Xiong, Junjie; Xu, Shuyun; Chen, Quan; Tao, Kun; Yang, Xiaoyan; Zhu, Yu; He, Sirong

    2017-01-01

    We performed studies to determine the role of high-mobility group box 1 (HMGB1) in cigarette smoke (CS)–induced pulmonary inflammation. After mice were exposed to five cigarettes four times a day for 3 d, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) expression and TLR4-mediated signaling were significantly up-regulated, and HMGB1 had translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in lung epithelial cells and then been released into the extracellular lung space. On CS exposure, inflammatory cell recruitment and proinflammatory cytokine production were significantly increased in lung tissue and bronchoalveolar lavage, and these effects depended on the TLR4 signaling pathway. HMGB1 inhibition decreased the CS-induced inflammatory response, whereas treatment with exogenous HMGB1 aggravated the damage and increased the phosphorylation of JNK, p38, and IκBα in the lungs of wild-type mice but not in TLR4-knockout mice. Blockade of TLR4 action or TLR4 knockout significantly inhibited HMGB1-induced proinflammatory cytokine production in mouse tracheal epithelial (MTE) cells and lung tissues. In addition, a MyD88 deficiency inhibited JNK, p38, and IκBα phosphorylation, and this effect was associated with the suppressed production of TNF-α and IL-1β in MTE cells and lung tissues in response to CS stimulation. Thus HMGB1 activates the NF-κB and JNK/p38 pathways through TLR4/MyD88-dependent signaling and induces an inflammatory response in lungs exposed to CS. PMID:27807045

  7. Detection of Alveolar Fibrocytes in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Systemic Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Phin, Sophie; Debray, Marie-Pierre; Marchal-Somme, Joelle; Tiev, Kiet; Bonay, Marcel; Fabre, Aurélie; Soler, Paul; Dehoux, Monique; Crestani, Bruno

    2013-01-01

    Background Fibrocytes are circulating precursors for fibroblasts. Blood fibrocytes are increased in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF). The aim of this study was to determine whether alveolar fibrocytes are detected in broncho-alveolar lavage (BAL), to identify their prognostic value, and their potential association with culture of fibroblasts from BAL. Methods We quantified fibrocytes in BAL from 26 patients with IPF, 9 patients with Systemic Sclerosis(SSc)-interstitial lung disease (ILD), and 11 controls. BAL cells were cultured to isolate alveolar fibroblasts. Results Fibrocytes were detected in BAL in 14/26 IPF (54%) and 5/9 SSc patients (55%), and never in controls. Fibrocytes were in median 2.5% [0.4–19.7] and 3.0% [2.7–3.7] of BAL cells in IPF and SSc-ILD patients respectively. In IPF patients, the number of alveolar fibrocytes was correlated with the number of alveolar macrophages and was associated with a less severe disease but not with a better outcome. Fibroblasts were cultured from BAL in 12/26 IPF (46%), 5/9 SSc-ILD (65%) and never in controls. The detection of BAL fibrocytes did not predict a positive culture of fibroblasts. Conclusion Fibrocytes were detected in BAL fluid in about half of the patients with IPF and SSc-ILD. Their number was associated with less severe disease in IPF patients and did not associate with the capacity to grow fibroblasts from BAL fluid. PMID:23341987

  8. CAD System for Pulmonary Nodule Detection Using Gabor Filtering and Template Matching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bastawrous, Hany Ayad; Nitta, Norihisa; Tsudagawa, Masaru

    This paper aims at developing a Computer Aided Diagnosis (CAD) system used for the detection of pulmonary nodules in chest Computed Tomography (CT) images. These lung nodules include both solid nodules and Ground Glass Opacity (GGO) nodules. In our scheme, we apply Gabor filter on the CT image in order to enhance the detection process. After this we perform some morphological operations including threshold process and labeling to extract all the objects inside the lung area. Then, some feature analysis is used to examine these objects to decide which of them are likely to be potential cancer candidates. Following the feature examination, a template matching between the potential cancer candidates and some Gaussian reference models is performed to determine the similarity between them. The algorithm was applied on 715 slices containing 25 GGO nodules and 82 solid nodules and achieved detection sensitivity of 92% for GGO nodules and 95% for solid nodules with False Positive (FP) rate of 0.75 FP/slice for GGO nodules and 2.32 FP/slice for solid nodules. Finally, we used an Artificial Neural Network (ANN) to reduce the number of FP findings. After using ANN, we were able to reduce the FP rate to 0.25 FP/slice for GGO nodules and 1.62 FP/slice for solid nodules but at the expense of detection sensitivity, which became 84 % for GGO nodules and 91% for solid nodules.

  9. Detecting active inflammation and fibrosis in pediatric Crohn's disease: prospective evaluation of MR-E and CT-E.

    PubMed

    Quencer, Keith B; Nimkin, Katherine; Mino-Kenudson, Mari; Gee, Michael S

    2013-08-01

    Symptoms of Crohn's disease (CD) can be due to active inflammation or fibrosis. Differentiating these based on clinical presentation, endoscopy, laboratory parameters, and clinical scoring methods can be inaccurate and/or invasive. As therapy decisions are often directed based on whether active disease or fibrosis is present, a reliable and non-invasive test to distinguish these two etiologies would be a powerful clinical tool. CT enterography (CT-E) and MR enterography (MR-E) are two non-invasive imaging modalities tailored to evaluate the small bowel. The purpose of our study was to compare the ability of MR-E and CT-E to assess for active inflammation and mural fibrosis in patients with known CD as compared to a histologic reference standard. After obtaining MR-E and CT-E on the same day, a total of 61 histologic samples were obtained from twelve subjects aged 12-20 years via full-thickness bowel resection or endoscopy. These were evaluated by the pathologist for active inflammation and fibrosis. We found that while CT-E and MR-E were similar in their accuracies of depicting active inflammation, MR-E was significantly more sensitive in detecting fibrosis. Because of this and the lack of ionizing radiation from MR-E, we believe that MR-E rather than CT-E should serve as the primary imaging modality for the assessment of CD pediatric patients with non-acute clinical exacerbations.

  10. Computerized detection of pulmonary nodules using cellular neural networks in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangwei; McLennan, Geoffrey; Hoffman, Eric A.; Sonka, Milan

    2004-05-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to detect small-sized (from 2mm to 10mm) non-pleural pulmonary nodules in high resolution helical CT scans. A new 3D automated scheme using cellular neural networks is presented. Different from most previous methods, this scheme employed the local shape property to perform voxel classification. The shape index feature successfully captured the local shape difference between nodules and non-nodules, especially vessels. A 3D discrete-time cellular neural network (DTCNN) was constructed to give a reliable voxel classification by collecting information in a neighborhood. To tailor it for lung nodule detection, this DTCNN was trained using genetic algorithms (GAs) to derive the shape index variation pattern of nodules. 19 clinical thoracic CT cases involving a total of 4838 sectional images were used in this work, with 2 scans forming the training set, and the remaining 17 cases being the testing set. The evaluation was composed of two stages. During the first stage, a pulmonologist and our CAD system independently detected nodules in the testing set. Then, the suspected nodule areas located by the computer were reviewed by the pulmonologist to confirm nodules missed by the human in the first review. There were 32 true nodules detected by the computer but missed by the pulmonologist in the first review, in which 30 non-juxtapleural nodules were found. Considering the nodules detected by the pulmonologist during the first and second reviews as the truth, 52 of 62 non-pleural nodules were detected by the CAD system (sensitivity being 83.9%), with the number of false positives being 3.47 per case.

  11. Right Pulmonary Artery Distensibility Index (RPAD Index). A field study of an echocardiographic method to detect early development of pulmonary hypertension and its severity even in the absence of regurgitant jets for Doppler evaluation in heartworm-infected dogs.

    PubMed

    Venco, Luigi; Mihaylova, Liliya; Boon, June A

    2014-11-15

    invasively and noninvasively if possible. Results of these evaluations indicated that RPAD Index is a valuable method for early detection of the presence and severity of pulmonary hypertension in heartworm-infected dogs even in the absence of regurgitant jets for Doppler evaluation and that there is a strong correlation between the RPAD Index and the level of pulmonary hypertension.

  12. Pulmonary Embolism Detection with Three-dimensional Ultrashort Echo Time MR Imaging: Experimental Study in Canines

    PubMed Central

    Bannas, Peter; Bell, Laura C.; Johnson, Kevin M.; Schiebler, Mark L.; François, Christopher J.; Motosugi, Utaroh; Consigny, Daniel; Reeder, Scott B.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of free-breathing three-dimensional (3D) radial ultrashort echo time (UTE) magnetic resonance (MR) imaging in the simultaneous detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) and high-quality evaluation of lung parenchyma. Materials and Methods The institutional animal care committee approved this study. A total of 12 beagles underwent MR imaging and computed tomography (CT) before and after induction of PE with autologous clots. Breath-hold 3D MR angiography and free-breathing 3D radial UTE (1.0-mm isotropic spatial resolution; echo time, 0.08 msec) were performed at 3 T. Two blinded radiologists independently marked and graded all PEs on a four-point scale (1 = low confidence, 4 = absolutely certain) on MR angiographic and UTE images. Image quality of pulmonary arteries and lung parenchyma was scored on a four-point-scale (1 = poor, 4 = excellent). Locations and ratings of emboli were compared with reference standard CT images by using an alternative free-response receiver operating characteristic curve (AFROC) method. Areas under the curve and image quality ratings were compared by using the F test and the Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Results A total of 48 emboli were detected with CT. Both readers showed higher sensitivity for PE detection with UTE (83% and 79%) than with MR angiography (75% and 71%). The AFROC area under the curve was higher for UTE than for MR angiography (0.95 vs 0.89), with a significant difference in area under the curve of 0.06 (95% confidence interval: 0.01, 0.11; P = .018). UTE image quality exceeded that of MR angiography for subsegmental arteries (3.5 ± 0.7 vs 2.9 ± 0.5, P = .002) and lung parenchyma (3.8 ± 0.5 vs 2.2 ± 0.2, P < .001). The apparent signal-to-noise ratio in pulmonary arteries and lung parenchyma was significantly higher for UTE than for MR angiography (41.0 ± 5.2 vs 24.5 ± 6.2 [P < .001] and 10.2 ± 1.8 vs 3.5 ± 0.8 [P < .001], respectively). The apparent contrast-to-noise ratio between

  13. Analysis of repeated 24-core saturation prostate biopsy: Inverse association between asymptomatic histological inflammation and prostate cancer detection

    PubMed Central

    Kato, Tomonori; Komiya, Akira; Morii, Akihiro; Iida, Hiroaki; Ito, Takatoshi; Fuse, Hideki

    2016-01-01

    Saturation prostate biopsy protocols have been developed to improve the prostate cancer (PCa) detection rate, particularly in the setting of repeat biopsies. The present study attempted to clarify the association between PCa detection and various risk factors in repeat saturation biopsies. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 78 Japanese patients for whom findings had caused suspicion of PCa despite previous negative prostate biopsies, and who consecutively underwent a 24-core transperineal repeat biopsy at Toyama University Hospital (Toyama, Japan). PCa was confirmed histologically in 16 of the 78 patients (20.5%). A univariate analysis revealed that the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at repeat biopsy was higher (P<0.01), the fPSA/tPSA ratio was lower (P=0.04), the total prostate volume was smaller (P=0.01) and the PSA density was higher (P<0.01) in PCa patients than in patients with benign prostatic disease (BPD). Histological inflammation was more frequently observed in BPD patients than in PCa patients (P<0.01). A multivariate analysis revealed that histological inflammation was the only independent predictor of the presence of a malignant lesion on repeat biopsy (odds ratio, 0.027; P=0.01). It must be considered that inflammation may cause a PSA increase in some patients with a negative initial biopsy, leading to unnecessary repeat biopsy. PMID:27446407

  14. Analysis of repeated 24-core saturation prostate biopsy: Inverse association between asymptomatic histological inflammation and prostate cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Kato, Tomonori; Komiya, Akira; Morii, Akihiro; Iida, Hiroaki; Ito, Takatoshi; Fuse, Hideki

    Saturation prostate biopsy protocols have been developed to improve the prostate cancer (PCa) detection rate, particularly in the setting of repeat biopsies. The present study attempted to clarify the association between PCa detection and various risk factors in repeat saturation biopsies. A retrospective analysis was conducted on 78 Japanese patients for whom findings had caused suspicion of PCa despite previous negative prostate biopsies, and who consecutively underwent a 24-core transperineal repeat biopsy at Toyama University Hospital (Toyama, Japan). PCa was confirmed histologically in 16 of the 78 patients (20.5%). A univariate analysis revealed that the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level at repeat biopsy was higher (P<0.01), the fPSA/tPSA ratio was lower (P=0.04), the total prostate volume was smaller (P=0.01) and the PSA density was higher (P<0.01) in PCa patients than in patients with benign prostatic disease (BPD). Histological inflammation was more frequently observed in BPD patients than in PCa patients (P<0.01). A multivariate analysis revealed that histological inflammation was the only independent predictor of the presence of a malignant lesion on repeat biopsy (odds ratio, 0.027; P=0.01). It must be considered that inflammation may cause a PSA increase in some patients with a negative initial biopsy, leading to unnecessary repeat biopsy.

  15. Detection of invariant natural killer T cells in ejaculates from infertile patients with chronic inflammation of genital tract.

    PubMed

    Duan, Yong-Gang; Chen, Shujian; Haidl, Gerhard; Allam, Jean-Pierre

    2017-04-03

    Chronic inflammation of genital tract is thought to play a major role in male fertility disorder. Natural killer (NK) T cells are a heterogeneous group of T cells that share properties of both T cells and NK cells which display immunoregulatory properties. However, little is known regarding the presence and function of NK T cells in ejaculates from patients with chronic inflammation of genital tract. Invariant NK T (iNK T) cells were detected by invariant (Vα24-JαQ) TCR chain in ejaculates from patients suffering from chronic inflammation of genital tract (CIGT) using flow cytometry and immunofluorescence of double staining (n=40). Inflammatory cytokines interleukin (IL)-6, IL-17, and IFN-γ were detected in cell-free seminal plasma using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The correlation between the percentage of iNK T cells and spermatozoa count, motility, vitality, seminal IL-6, IL-17, and IFN-γ was investigated. Significant percentages of iNK T cells above 10% were detected in 50% (CIGT-NKT(+) group). A negative correlation was detected between the percentage of iNK T cells and spermatozoa count (r=-.5957, P=.0056), motility (r=-.6163, P=.0038), and vitality (r=-.8032, P=.0019) in CIGT-NKT(+) group (n=20). Interestingly, a significant correlation of iNK T cells to seminal IL-6 (r=.7083, P=.0005), IFN-γ (r=.9578, P<.0001) was detected whereas lack of correlation between iNK T cells and IL-17 (r=-.1557, P=.5122) in CIGT-NKT(+) group. The proliferative response of iNK T cells could accompany an inflammatory response to spermatozoa and consequently influence sperm quality through secretion of IFN-γ but not IL-17 under chronic inflammatory condition.

  16. The Effects of Antigen-Specific IgG1 Antibody for the Pulmonary-Hypertension-Phenotype and B Cells for Inflammation in Mice Exposed to Antigen and Fine Particles from Air Pollution

    PubMed Central

    Park, Sung-Hyun; Chen, Wen-Chi; Durmus, Nedim; Bleck, Bertram; Reibman, Joan; Riemekasten, Gabriela; Grunig, Gabriele

    2015-01-01

    Air pollution is known to exacerbate chronic inflammatory conditions of the lungs including pulmonary hypertension, cardiovascular diseases and autoimmune diseases. Directly pathogenic antibodies bind pro-inflammatory cell receptors and cause or exacerbate inflammation. In contrast, anti-inflammatory antibody isotypes (e.g. mouse immunoglobulin G1, IgG1) bind inhibitory cell receptors and can inhibit inflammation. Our previous studies showed that co-exposure to antigen and urban ambient particulate matter (PM2.5) induced severe pulmonary arterial thickening and increased right ventricular systolic pressures in mice via T-cell produced cytokines, Interleukin (IL)-13 and IL-17A. The aim of the current study was to understand how B cell and antibody responses integrate into this T cell cytokine network for the pulmonary hypertension phenotype. Special focus was on antigen-specific IgG1 that is the predominant antibody in the experimental response to antigen and urban ambient PM2.5. Wild type and B cell-deficient mice were primed with antigen and then challenged with antigen and urban particulate matter and injected with antibodies as appropriate. Our data surprisingly showed that B cells were necessary for the development of increased right ventricular pressures and molecular changes in the right heart in response to sensitization and intranasal challenge with antigen and PM2.5. Further, our studies showed that both, the increase in right ventricular systolic pressure and right ventricular molecular changes were restored by reconstituting the B cell KO mice with antigen specific IgG1. In addition, our studies identified a critical, non-redundant role of B cells for the IL-17A-directed inflammation in response to exposure with antigen and PM2.5, which was not corrected with antigen-specific IgG1. In contrast, IL-13-directed inflammatory markers, as well as severe pulmonary arterial remodeling induced by challenge with antigen and PM2.5 were similar in B cell

  17. Right Aortic Arch Detected Prenatally: A Rare Case With Bilateral Arterial Duct and Nonconfluent Pulmonary Arteries.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Silvia; Fainardi, Valentina; Spaziani, Gaia; Favilli, Silvia; Chiappa, Enrico

    2015-09-01

    We describe a rare case of right aortic arch (RAA) and nonconfluent pulmonary arteries. RAA and a right-sided arterial duct (AD) were identified on the prenatal scan, but a second left-sided AD and disconnection of the left pulmonary artery were missed. The missed diagnosis in fetal life adversely affected postnatal management. We suggest that fetuses with a prenatal diagnosis of RAA and right-sided AD be delivered in tertiary care centres to rule out an association with bilateral AD and nonconfluent pulmonary arteries after birth. Prompt postnatal diagnosis will enable preservation of flow in the disconnected pulmonary artery through prostaglandin E1 infusion until surgical reconstruction.

  18. Pulmonary Artery Sarcoma Detected on 18F-FDG PET/CT With Unusual Findings.

    PubMed

    Guo, Yuehong; Wang, Tie; Yang, Minfu

    2015-11-01

    A 32-year-old woman, who presented with "sharp pain" in the right chest for more than 1 month and worsening dyspnea and fever for 10 days, was initially thought to have a pulmonary embolism. Cardiac ultrasound showed an ill-defined echogenic mass within the pulmonary trunk. F-FDG PET/CT was performed for further evaluation. PET/CT showed an intense hypermetabolism in the main, bilateral proximal, and the right main pulmonary arteries, suggesting the presence of a malignant lesion. Biopsy confirmed the lesion as a primary pulmonary artery sarcoma.

  19. Pulmonary Nodule Detection in CT Images: False Positive Reduction Using Multi-View Convolutional Networks.

    PubMed

    Setio, Arnaud Arindra Adiyoso; Ciompi, Francesco; Litjens, Geert; Gerke, Paul; Jacobs, Colin; van Riel, Sarah J; Wille, Mathilde Marie Winkler; Naqibullah, Matiullah; Sanchez, Clara I; van Ginneken, Bram

    2016-05-01

    We propose a novel Computer-Aided Detection (CAD) system for pulmonary nodules using multi-view convolutional networks (ConvNets), for which discriminative features are automatically learnt from the training data. The network is fed with nodule candidates obtained by combining three candidate detectors specifically designed for solid, subsolid, and large nodules. For each candidate, a set of 2-D patches from differently oriented planes is extracted. The proposed architecture comprises multiple streams of 2-D ConvNets, for which the outputs are combined using a dedicated fusion method to get the final classification. Data augmentation and dropout are applied to avoid overfitting. On 888 scans of the publicly available LIDC-IDRI dataset, our method reaches high detection sensitivities of 85.4% and 90.1% at 1 and 4 false positives per scan, respectively. An additional evaluation on independent datasets from the ANODE09 challenge and DLCST is performed. We showed that the proposed multi-view ConvNets is highly suited to be used for false positive reduction of a CAD system.

  20. Pulmonary blastomycosis.

    PubMed

    Bariola, J Ryan; Vyas, Keyur S

    2011-12-01

    Blastomyces dermatitidis is acquired in almost all cases via inhalation, and pulmonary disease is the most frequent clinical manifestation of blastomycosis. Pulmonary disease can range from asymptomatic infection to rapidly severe and fatal disease. Most cases will present as pneumonia, either acute or chronic, or as a lung mass. In rare cases pulmonary blastomycosis is associated with the acute respiratory distress syndrome. Blastomycosis can present as isolated pulmonary disease or along with coexisting extrapulmonary disease that usually will involve the skin, bony structures, genitourinary tract, or central nervous system. Diagnosis is largely based on isolation of the organism via culture or visualization of the organism in clinical specimens. Detection of urinary Blastomyces antigen is a recent addition to diagnostic options. Itraconazole is the drug of choice for most forms of the disease; amphotericin B is reserved for the more severe forms. Newer azoles such as voriconazole and posaconazole have a limited role in the treatment of pulmonary blastomycosis.

  1. Pulmonary nodule detection in CT images based on shape constraint CV model

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Bing; Tian, Xuedong; Wang, Qian; Yang, Ying; Xie, Hongzhi E-mail: xiehongzhi@medmail.com.cn; Zhang, Shuyang; Gu, Lixu E-mail: xiehongzhi@medmail.com.cn

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: Accurate detection of pulmonary nodules remains a technical challenge in computer-aided diagnosis systems because some nodules may adhere to the blood vessels or the lung wall, which have low contrast compared to the surrounding tissues. In this paper, the analysis of typical shape features of candidate nodules based on a shape constraint Chan–Vese (CV) model combined with calculation of the number of blood branches adhered to nodule candidates is proposed to reduce false positive (FP) nodules from candidate nodules. Methods: The proposed scheme consists of three major stages: (1) Segmentation of lung parenchyma from computed tomography images. (2) Extraction of candidate nodules. (3) Reduction of FP nodules. A gray level enhancement combined with a spherical shape enhancement filter is introduced to extract the candidate nodules and their sphere-like contour regions. FPs are removed by analysis of the typical shape features of nodule candidates based on the CV model using spherical constraint and by investigating the number of blood branches adhered to the candidate nodules. The constrained shapes of CV model are automatically achieved from the extracted candidate nodules. Results: The detection performance was evaluated on 127 nodules of 103 cases including three types of challenging nodules, which are juxta-pleural nodules, juxta-vascular nodules, and ground glass opacity nodules. The free-receiver operating characteristic (FROC) curve shows that the proposed method is able to detect 88% of all the nodules in the data set with 4 FPs per case. Conclusions: Evaluation shows that the authors’ method is feasible and effective for detection of three types of nodules in this study.

  2. A complete CAD system for pulmonary nodule detection in high resolution CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiangwei; McLennan, Geoffrey; Hoffman, Eric A.; Sonka, Milan

    2005-04-01

    The purpose of this study is to develop a computer-aided diagnosis (CAD) system to detect small-sized (from 2mm to 10mm) pulmonary nodules in high resolution helical CT scans. A new CAD system is proposed to locate both juxtapleural nodules and non-pleural nodules. Isotropic resampling and lung segmentation are performed as preprocessing steps. Morphological closing was utilized to smooth the lung contours to include the indented possible juxtapleural locations, thresholding and 3D component analysis were used to obtain 3D volumetric nodule candidates; furthermore, gray level and geometric features were extracted, and analyzed using linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier. Leave one case out method was used to evaluate the LDA. To deal with non-pleural nodules, a discrete-time cellular neural network (DTCNN) based on local shape features was developed. This scheme employed the local shape property to perform voxel classification. The shape index feature successfully captured the local shape difference between nodules and non-nodules, especially vessels. To tailor it for lung nodule detection, this DTCNN was trained using genetic algorithms (GAs) to derive the shape index variation pattern of nodules. Nonoverlapping training and testing sets were utilized in the non-pleural nodule detection. 19 clinical thoracic CT cases involving a total of 4838 sectional images were used in this work. The juxtapleural nodule detection method was able to obtain sensitivity 81.25% with an average of 8.29 FPs per case. The non-pleural nodule finding scheme attained sensitivity of 83.9% with an average 3.47 FPs/case. Combining the two subsystems together, an overall performance of 82.98% sensitivity with 11.76 FPs/case can be obtained.

  3. Impact of Dietary Tomato Juice on Changes in Pulmonary Oxidative Stress, Inflammation and Structure Induced by Neonatal Hyperoxia in Mice (Mus musculus)

    PubMed Central

    Bouch, Sheena; Harding, Richard; O’Reilly, Megan; Wood, Lisa G.; Sozo, Foula

    2016-01-01

    Many preterm infants require hyperoxic gas for survival, although it can contribute to lung injury. Experimentally, neonatal hyperoxia leads to persistent alterations in lung structure and increases leukocytes in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF). These effects of hyperoxia on the lungs are considered to be caused, at least in part, by increased oxidative stress. Our objective was to determine if dietary supplementation with a known source of antioxidants (tomato juice, TJ) could protect the developing lung from injury caused by breathing hyperoxic gas. Neonatal mice (C57BL6/J) breathed either 65% O2 (hyperoxia) or room air from birth until postnatal day 7 (P7d); some underwent necropsy at P7d and others were raised in room air until adulthood (P56d). In subsets of both groups, drinking water was replaced with TJ (diluted 50:50 in water) from late gestation to necropsy. At P7d and P56d, we analyzed total antioxidant capacity (TAC), markers of oxidative stress (nitrotyrosine and heme oxygenase-1 expression), inflammation (interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) expression), collagen (COL) and smooth muscle in the lungs; we also assessed lung structure. We quantified macrophages in lung tissue (at P7d) and leukocytes in BALF (at P56d). At P7d, TJ increased pulmonary TAC and COL1α1 expression and attenuated the hyperoxia-induced increase in nitrotyrosine and macrophage influx; however, changes in lung structure were not affected. At P56d, TJ increased TAC, decreased oxidative stress and reversed the hyperoxia-induced increase in bronchiolar smooth muscle. Additionally, TJ alone decreased IL-1β expression, but following hyperoxia TJ increased TNF-α expression and did not alter the hyperoxia-induced increase in leukocyte number. We conclude that TJ supplementation during and after neonatal exposure to hyperoxia protects the lung from some but not all aspects of hyperoxia-induced injury, but may also have adverse side-effects. The effects of

  4. Automated detection of pulmonary embolism (PE) in computed tomographic pulmonary angiographic (CTPA) images: multiscale hierachical expectation-maximization segmentation of vessels and PEs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Chughtai, Aamer; Patel, Smita; Cascade, Philip N.; Sahiner, Berkman; Wei, Jun; Ge, Jun; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2007-03-01

    CT pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has been reported to be an effective means for clinical diagnosis of pulmonary embolism (PE). We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system to assist radiologist in PE detection in CTPA images. 3D multiscale filters in combination with a newly designed response function derived from the eigenvalues of Hessian matrices is used to enhance vascular structures including the vessel bifurcations and suppress non-vessel structures such as the lymphoid tissues surrounding the vessels. A hierarchical EM estimation is then used to segment the vessels by extracting the high response voxels at each scale. The segmented vessels are pre-screened for suspicious PE areas using a second adaptive multiscale EM estimation. A rule-based false positive (FP) reduction method was designed to identify the true PEs based on the features of PE and vessels. 43 CTPA scans were used as an independent test set to evaluate the performance of PE detection. Experienced chest radiologists identified the PE locations which were used as "gold standard". 435 PEs were identified in the artery branches, of which 172 and 263 were subsegmental and proximal to the subsegmental, respectively. The computer-detected volume was considered true positive (TP) when it overlapped with 10% or more of the gold standard PE volume. Our preliminary test results show that, at an average of 33 and 24 FPs/case, the sensitivities of our PE detection method were 81% and 78%, respectively, for proximal PEs, and 79% and 73%, respectively, for subsegmental PEs. The study demonstrates the feasibility that the automated method can identify PE accurately on CTPA images. Further study is underway to improve the sensitivity and reduce the FPs.

  5. MR Imaging of Pulmonary Nodules: Detection Rate and Accuracy of Size Estimation in Comparison to Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Cieszanowski, Andrzej; Lisowska, Antonina; Dabrowska, Marta; Korczynski, Piotr; Zukowska, Malgorzata; Grudzinski, Ireneusz P.; Pacho, Ryszard; Rowinski, Olgierd; Krenke, Rafal

    2016-01-01

    Objective The aims of this study were to assess the sensitivity of various magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) sequences for the diagnosis of pulmonary nodules and to estimate the accuracy of MRI for the measurement of lesion size, as compared to computed tomography (CT). Methods Fifty patients with 113 pulmonary nodules diagnosed by CT underwent lung MRI and CT. MRI studies were performed on 1.5T scanner using the following sequences: T2-TSE, T2-SPIR, T2-STIR, T2-HASTE, T1-VIBE, and T1-out-of-phase. CT and MRI data were analyzed independently by two radiologists. Results The overall sensitivity of MRI for the detection of pulmonary nodules was 80.5% and according to nodule size: 57.1% for nodules ≤4mm, 75% for nodules >4-6mm, 87.5% for nodules >6-8mm and 100% for nodules >8mm. MRI sequences yielded following sensitivities: 69% (T1-VIBE), 54.9% (T2-SPIR), 48.7% (T2-TSE), 48.7% (T1-out-of-phase), 45.1% (T2-STIR), 25.7% (T2-HASTE), respectively. There was very strong agreement between the maximum diameter of pulmonary nodules measured by CT and MRI (mean difference -0.02 mm; 95% CI –1.6–1.57 mm; Bland-Altman analysis). Conclusions MRI yielded high sensitivity for the detection of pulmonary nodules and enabled accurate assessment of their diameter. Therefore it may be considered an alternative to CT for follow-up of some lung lesions. However, due to significant number of false positive diagnoses, it is not ready to replace CT as a tool for lung nodule detection. PMID:27258047

  6. Noninvasive Detection and Differentiation of Axonal Injury/Loss, Demyelination, and Inflammation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    eye. Optic nerve swelling was seen at Time 1 and 2 caused by inflammation associated increase in cellularity and edema . Significantly increased optic...cellularity (restricted diffusion ratio) and edema (non-restricted diffusion ratio) was as prominent in 0.3 mg/kg dexamethasone treated EAE mice as those...restricted ratio) and edema (non-restricted ratio). - 6 - filed a self-reported adverse event to our IACUC followed by an updated animal protocol

  7. Diffuse pulmonary ossification detected by bone scanning with Tc-99m hydroxymethylene diphosphate

    SciTech Connect

    Saks, D.A.; McClees, E.C.; Fajman, W.A.; Hollinger, W.M.; Gilman, M.J.

    1984-10-01

    Diffuse pulmonary ossification (DPO) is a rare pathologic finding of heterotropic bone formation within the lungs. It has been associated with mitral stenosis, chronic left ventricular failure, interstitial fibrosis, metastatic breast cancer, pulmonary amyloidosis, histoplasmosis, and chronic busulfan therapy. This patient represents a case associated with Placidyl use.

  8. Pulmonary nodules detected by thoracic computed tomography scan after exposure to asbestos: diagnostic significance

    PubMed Central

    Clin, Bénédicte; Luc, Amandine; Morlais, Fabrice; Paris, Chrisophe; Ameille, Jacques; Brochard, Patrick; De Girolamo, Julien; Gislard, Antoine; Laurent, François; Letourneux, Marc; Schorle, Evelyne; Launoy, Guy; Pairon, Jean-Claude

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Objective The aim of the study was to analyse the relationships between CT pulmonary nodules mentioned by radiologists and cumulative exposure to asbestos or asbestos-related pleuro-pulmonary diseases, among 5,662 asbestos-exposed subjects, and the relationships between pulmonary nodules and thoracic cancer, in order to determine whether a specific surveillance strategy according to cumulative asbestos exposure, should be adopted. Design Standardised Incidence and Mortality Ratios for lung cancer and pleural mesothelioma were calculated among patients with and without mention of pulmonary nodules, and compared via the Comparative Morbidity Figure. Results A significant over-incidence of primary lung cancer and pleural mesothelioma was observed among subjects presenting with pulmonary nodule(s) (SIR respectively 1.95 [1.22; 2.95] and 11.88 [3.20; 30.41]). However, there was no significant relationship between pulmonary nodules mentioned by radiologists and cumulative asbestos exposure or between pulmonary nodules and the presence of asbestos-related benign diseases. Conclusions This study confirms the expected excess of lung cancer in subjects presenting with pulmonary nodules in the radiologist’s diagnostic report, and shows the absence of relationship between these nodules and the level of cumulative asbestos exposure. Consequently, our study offers no argument in favour of specific surveillance modalities with regard to these nodules based on estimated cumulative asbestos exposure. PMID:22118184

  9. Pulmonary circulatory parameters as indices for the early detection of acute rejection after single lung transplantation.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, H; Okada, M; Tobe, S; Tsuji, F; Ohbo, H; Nakamura, H; Yamashita, C

    1998-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between the changes in the pulmonary blood flow and histology during acute rejection following single lung transplantation. In single lung transplantation using adult mongrel dogs, immunosuppression with cyclosporine and azathioprine was discontinued after postoperative day 14 to induce rejection. Doppler flow probes were placed adjacent to the ascending aorta and the left pulmonary artery to measure the blood flow on a daily basis. In addition, chest roentgenograms were also examined daily. The pulmonary pressure was measured using a Swan-Ganz catheter prior to and following the induction of rejection. Open lung biopsies were performed when the left pulmonary artery flow decreased to half of the prerejection value. The pulmonary artery flow decreased to 14.3% of the aortic flow 5 days after the discontinuation of immunosuppression. The graft pulmonary vascular resistance increased significantly compared to the prerejection values (P < 0.001). This was not accompanied by any abnormalities on chest roentgenography. The histology was consistent, with marked perivascular lymphocytic infiltration with little alveolar or interstitial changes. During rejection, the increased pulmonary vascular resistance in the graft was probably the result of perivascular inflammatory cell infiltration, which was seen prior to changes on chest roentgenography. Changes in the left pulmonary artery flow and histology thus appear to be closely correlated in the early stages of acute rejection.

  10. Accuracy of a new rapid antigen detection test for pulmonary tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Aliannejad, Rasoul; Bahrmand, Ahmadreza; Abtahi, Hamidreza; Seifi, Mahnaz; Safavi, Enayat; Abdolrahimi, Farid; Shahriaran, Shahriyar

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives: Tuberculosis (TB) is a major problem in the world. Treatment and control of TB needs detection of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MT) in the proper samples. While smear doesn’t have enough sensitivity, culture and PCR are expensive, time consuming and unavailable in many centers. Recent development of a rapid TB antigen detection test (PrTBK) at Pasteur Institute of Iran could give a simple way for diagnosis of TB in about two hours. In this test the antigen-antibody complex will change color when gold conjugated mouse anti-rabbit antibody detects specific MT cell wall antigen in suspected samples. Materials and Methods: We evaluated the diagnostic accuracy of PrTBK for diagnosis of pulmonary TB in comparison with smear, culture and PCR techniques in 56 consecutive samples (47 BAL and 13 sputum samples) obtained from patients with clinical suspicion of active TB. Results: Twentynine patients (52%) were female and seven patients were HIV positive. PrTBK was positive in 17 culture positive and 4 culture negative samples (100% sensitivity, 89% specificity and 92% accuracy in comparison with culture method). In two out of four patients with negative culture who were positive for PrTBK, PCR and anti-tuberculosis drugs trial therapy responses were in favor of tuberculosis. If we take this finding into account, the accuracy of PrTBK will rise. Conclusion: High sensitivity and accuracy of PrTBK test enable us to initiate treatment on the basis of this convenient and rapid test. PMID:28210462

  11. The influence of CT dose and reconstruction parameters on automated detection of small pulmonary nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ochs, Robert; Angel, Erin; Boedeker, Kirsten; Petkovska, Iva; Panknin, Christoph; Goldin, Jonathan; Aberle, Denise; McNitt-Gray, Michael; Brown, Matthew

    2006-03-01

    The aim of our investigation was to assess the influence of both CT acquisition dose and reconstruction kernel on computer-aided detection (CAD) of pulmonary nodules. Our hypothesis is that the detection of small nodules is affected by the noise characteristics of the image and the signal to noise ratio of the nodule and bronchiovascular anatomy. Knowledge gained from this experiment will assist in developing an advanced CAD system designed to detect smaller and more subtle nodules with minimal false positives. Eleven research subjects were selected from the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC) database based on our inclusion criteria of: 1) having at least one nodule and 2) available raw CT projection data for the series that our institution submitted to the LIDC study. Using the original raw projection data, research software simulated raw projection data acquired with a dose reduced 32-40% from the original scan. Projection data for both dose levels was reconstructed with smooth to very sharp kernels (B10f, B30f, B50f, and B70f). The resulting series were used to investigate the influence of dose and reconstruction kernel on CAD performance. A prototype CAD system was used to investigate changes in sensitivity and false positives with varying imaging parameters. In a sub-study, the prototype system was compared to a commercial CAD system. We did not have enough subjects to conclude significance, but the results indicate our research system had a higher sensitivity with the smooth or medium reconstruction kernels than with the sharper kernels. The sensitivity was similar for both dose levels. The false positive rate was higher with the smooth kernels and the lower dose levels.

  12. Automated detection of pulmonary nodules in CT: false positive reduction by combining multiple classifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suárez-Cuenca, Jorge Juan; Guo, Wei; Li, Qiang

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the usefulness of various classifier combination methods for improving the performance of a CAD system for pulmonary nodule detection in CT. We employed CT cases in the publicly available lung image database consortium (LIDC) dataset, which included 85 CT cases with 110 nodules. We first used six individual classifiers for nodule detection in CT, including linear discriminant analysis (LDA), quadratic discriminant analysis (QDA), artificial neural network (ANN), and three types of support vector machines (SVM). Five informationfusion methods were then employed to combine the classifiers' outputs for improving detection performance. The five combination methods included two supervised (likelihood ratio method and neural network) and three unsupervised ones (the mean, the product, and the majority-vote of the output scores from the six individual classifiers). Leave-one-caseout was employed to train and test individual classifiers and supervised combination methods. At a sensitivity of 80 %, the numbers of false positives per case for the six individual classifiers were 6.1 for LDA, 19.9 for QDA, 8.6 for ANN, 23.7 for SVM-dot, 17.0 for SVM-poly, and 23.35 for SVM-ANOVA; the numbers of false positives per case for the five combination methods were 3.4 for the majority-vote rule, 6.2 for the mean, 5.7 for the product, 9.7 for the neural network, and 28.1 for the likelihood ratio method. The majority-vote rule achieved higher performance levels than other combination methods. It also achieved higher performance than the best individual classifier, which is not the case for other combination methods.

  13. Cellular and molecular mechanisms of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Peter J

    2014-03-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is associated with chronic inflammation affecting predominantly lung parenchyma and peripheral airways and results in largely irreversible and progressive airflow limitation. This inflammation is characterized by increased numbers of alveolar macrophages, neutrophils, and T lymphocytes, which are recruited from the circulation. Oxidative stress plays a key role in driving this inflammation. The pulmonary inflammation may enhance the development and growth of lung cancer. The peripheral inflammation extends into the circulation, resulting in systemic inflammation with the same inflammatory proteins. Systemic inflammation may worsen comorbidities. Treatment of pulmonary inflammation may therefore have beneficial effects.

  14. Upregulation of Transient Receptor Potential Canonical Channels Contributes to Endotoxin-Induced Pulmonary Arterial Stenosis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gui-Lan; Jiang, Hongni; Zou, Fangdong

    2016-01-01

    Background Septic shock is a pathologic condition caused by endotoxin-producing bacteria, and often associated with severe pulmonary hypertension. Inflammation is a major systemic response to endotoxin; however, it is unknown whether endotoxin has a direct impact on pulmonary arteries that contributes to pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension. Material/Methods Rat pulmonary arteries and primary pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were cultured in vitro and treated with lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and blockers of transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) channels. Neointimal growth and arterial stenosis were observed on cryosections of cultured pulmonary arteries. Proliferation of PASMCs was examined by a WST-1 (water-soluble tetrazolium salt) assay. Expression of TRPC genes in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs were detected and quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blotting. Results LPS significantly induced neointimal growth and stenosis of pulmonary arteries and promoted proliferation of PASMCs. TRPC channel blockers 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate and SKF-96365 inhibited LPS-induced remodeling of pulmonary arteries and PASMC proliferation. Expression of TRPC1/3/4/6 was detected in pulmonary arteries and PASMCs. LPS treatment dramatically increased the expression of TRPC3 and TRPC4 at both messenger RNA and protein levels. Conclusions LPS stimulates stenosis of pulmonary arteries through enhancement of TRPC-mediated Ca2+ entry into PASMCs, which is caused by upregulation of TRPC3 and TRPC4 channels. PMID:27471122

  15. Pulmonary extraction of C-11 chlorpromazine, measured by residue detection in man

    SciTech Connect

    Syrota, A.; Pascal, O.; Crouzel, M.; Kellershohn, C.

    1981-02-01

    Uptake of C-11 chlorpromazine (CPZ) was measured to evaluate the nonrespiratory function of lung in patients. A multiple-indicator dilution technique was used with external detection. Following intravenous bolus injection of C-11 CPZ, with In-113m transferrin as an intravascular reference molecule, counts were recorded with a scintillation camera using two energy windows. The residue functions, R(t), for C-11 CPZ and In-113m transferrin were plotted against time for selected areas of interest, and the CPZ area-weighted extraction, E(t), was computed for the same areas every 250 msec using the formula: E(t) = (R/sub T/(t) - R/sub R/(t))/(1 - R/sub R/(t)), where R/sub T/ and R/sub R/ are the normalized residue functions for CPZ and transferrin, respectively. The initial extraction was 90 +- 5% in four normal subjects and 64 +- 7% in six patients with chronic obstructive lung disease (C.O.L.D.), these values being significantly different (p < 0.001). The large initial extraction of CPZ in a single passage through the pulmonary vasculature resulted from a fixation to membranes, due to its high liposolubility. The lower extraction seen in patients with C.O.L.D. was explained by weaker fixation to lung tissue.

  16. Identification of MMP-9 as a biomarker for detecting progression of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Abd El-Fatah, Marwa F; Ghazy, Mohamed A; Mostafa, Mohamed S; El-Attar, May M; Osman, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is a complex immunological disease with multiple pathological features that is primarily induced by smoking together with additional genetic risk factors. COPD is frequently underdiagnosed; forced expiratory volume in the first second (FEV1) is considered to be the main diagnostic measure for COPD, yet it is insufficiently sensitive to monitor disease progression. Biomarkers capable of monitoring COPD progression and severity are needed. In this report, we evaluated matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) as an early marker for the detection and staging of COPD, by assessing the mRNA levels of MMP-9 in peripheral blood samples collected from 22 COPD patients, 6 asymptomatic smokers, and 5 healthy controls. Our results demonstrate that the mRNA levels of MMP-9 increased more than two-fold in severe COPD relative to non-COPD smokers or moderate COPD groups. Moreover, in the very severe COPD group, MMP-9 mRNA levels showed a 4-fold increase relative to the non-COPD smokers or the moderate COPD groups, while there was a mild increase (∼40%) when compared to the severe COPD group. Taken together, our results suggest that MMP-9 serves as a biomarker for the grade and severity of COPD.

  17. Pulmonary intravascular lymphoma detected by FDG PET-CT: a case report.

    PubMed

    Kohan, A A; Paganini, L; Biedak, P; Arma, J I; Dalurzo, M C L; Garcia-Monaco, R D

    2013-01-01

    Intravascular lymphoma is a rare subtype of extranodal Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. Its prognosis is poor in a high percentage of cases due to its insidious appearance and low clinical suspicion. Its diagnosis is usually only reached after an autopsy. It may affect different organs as a whole or only one organ. It is extremely rare that the lung is the only damaged organ. Its diagnosis depends of the clinician's suspicion and proper evaluation with imaging studies as well as correct selection of the organ to be biopsied. When detected on time, the treatment of choice is a combination of a series of chemotherapy associated to a monoclonal antibody (anti-CD20). We present the case of a male patient who underwent a positron emission tomography-computed tomography with 2-[F-18]-fluoro-2 deoxy-D-glucose (FDG) due to symptoms suggestive of a lymphoproliferative disease with no clear structural abnormalities. The images led to a diagnosis of pulmonary intravascular large B cell lymphoma.

  18. A new computationally efficient CAD system for pulmonary nodule detection in CT imagery.

    PubMed

    Messay, Temesguen; Hardie, Russell C; Rogers, Steven K

    2010-06-01

    Early detection of lung nodules is extremely important for the diagnosis and clinical management of lung cancer. In this paper, a novel computer aided detection (CAD) system for the detection of pulmonary nodules in thoracic computed tomography (CT) imagery is presented. The paper describes the architecture of the CAD system and assesses its performance on a publicly available database to serve as a benchmark for future research efforts. Training and tuning of all modules in our CAD system is done using a separate and independent dataset provided courtesy of the University of Texas Medical Branch (UTMB). The publicly available testing dataset is that created by the Lung Image Database Consortium (LIDC). The LIDC data used here is comprised of 84 CT scans containing 143 nodules ranging from 3 to 30mm in effective size that are manually segmented at least by one of the four radiologists. The CAD system uses a fully automated lung segmentation algorithm to define the boundaries of the lung regions. It combines intensity thresholding with morphological processing to detect and segment nodule candidates simultaneously. A set of 245 features is computed for each segmented nodule candidate. A sequential forward selection process is used to determine the optimum subset of features for two distinct classifiers, a Fisher Linear Discriminant (FLD) classifier and a quadratic classifier. A performance comparison between the two classifiers is presented, and based on this, the FLD classifier is selected for the CAD system. With an average of 517.5 nodule candidates per case/scan (517.5+/-72.9), the proposed front-end detector/segmentor is able to detect 92.8% of all the nodules in the LIDC/testing dataset (based on merged ground truth). The mean overlap between the nodule regions delineated by three or more radiologists and the ones segmented by the proposed segmentation algorithm is approximately 63%. Overall, with a specificity of 3 false positives (FPs) per case/patient on

  19. A novel computer-aided detection system for pulmonary nodule identification in CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Hao; Li, Lihong; Wang, Huafeng; Zhang, Hao; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-03-01

    Computer-aided detection (CADe) of pulmonary nodules from computer tomography (CT) scans is critical for assisting radiologists to identify lung lesions at an early stage. In this paper, we propose a novel approach for CADe of lung nodules using a two-stage vector quantization (VQ) scheme. The first-stage VQ aims to extract lung from the chest volume, while the second-stage VQ is designed to extract initial nodule candidates (INCs) within the lung volume. Then rule-based expert filtering is employed to prune obvious FPs from INCs, and the commonly-used support vector machine (SVM) classifier is adopted to further reduce the FPs. The proposed system was validated on 100 CT scans randomly selected from the 262 scans that have at least one juxta-pleural nodule annotation in the publicly available database - Lung Image Database Consortium and Image Database Resource Initiative (LIDC-IDRI). The two-stage VQ only missed 2 out of the 207 nodules at agreement level 1, and the INCs detection for each scan took about 30 seconds in average. Expert filtering reduced FPs more than 18 times, while maintaining a sensitivity of 93.24%. As it is trivial to distinguish INCs attached to pleural wall versus not on wall, we investigated the feasibility of training different SVM classifiers to further reduce FPs from these two kinds of INCs. Experiment results indicated that SVM classification over the entire set of INCs was in favor of, where the optimal operating of our CADe system achieved a sensitivity of 89.4% at a specificity of 86.8%.

  20. Quantitative In Vivo Detection of Chlamydia muridarum Associated Inflammation in a Mouse Model Using Optical Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Manishkumar; Boddicker, Melissa A.; DeMaula, Christopher; Connolly, Brett; Bednar, Bohumil; Heinrichs, Jon H.; Smith, Jeffrey G.

    2015-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is a bacterial sexually transmitted disease with over 1.3 million cases reported to the CDC in 2010. While Chlamydia infection is easily treated with antibiotics, up to 70% of infections are asymptomatic and go untreated. The current mouse model relies on invasive upper genital tract gross pathology readouts at ~60–80 days postinfection. High throughput optical imaging through the use of biomarkers has been successfully used to quickly evaluate several disease processes. Here we evaluate Neutrophil Elastase 680 (Elastase680) for its ability to measure Chlamydia muridarum associated inflammation in live mice using fluorescence molecular tomography (FMT) and In Vivo Imaging System (IVIS). Optical imaging was able to distinguish with statistical significance between vaccinated and nonvaccinated mice as well as mock-challenged and challenged mice 2 weeks after challenge which was 9 weeks sooner than typical gross pathological assessment. Immunohistochemistry confirmed the presence of neutrophils and correlated well with both in vivo and ex vivo imaging. In this report we demonstrate that Elastase680 can be used as a molecular imaging biomarker for inflammation associated with chlamydial infection in a mouse model and that these biomarkers can significantly decrease the time for pathology evaluation and thus increase the rate of therapeutics discovery. PMID:26663988

  1. A symptom-related monitoring program following pulmonary embolism for the early detection of CTEPH: a prospective observational registry study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) is a long-term complication following an acute pulmonary embolism (PE). It is frequently diagnosed at advanced stages which is concerning as delayed treatment has important implications for favourable clinical outcome. Performing a follow-up examination of patients diagnosed with acute PE regardless of persisting symptoms and using all available technical procedures would be both cost-intensive and possibly ineffective. Focusing diagnostic procedures therefore on only symptomatic patients may be a practical approach for detecting relevant CTEPH. This study aimed to evaluate if a follow-up program for patients with acute PE based on telephone monitoring of symptoms and further examination of only symptomatic patients could detect CTEPH. In addition, we investigated the role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) as a diagnostic tool. Methods In a prospective cohort study all consecutive patients with newly diagnosed PE (n=170, 76 males, 94 females within 26 months) were recruited according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria. Patients were contacted via telephone and asked to answer standardized questions relating to symptoms. At the time of the final analysis 130 patients had been contacted. Symptomatic patients underwent a structured evaluation with echocardiography, CPET and complete work-up for CTEPH. Results 37.7%, 25.5% and 29.3% of the patients reported symptoms after three, six, and twelve months respectively. Subsequent clinical evaluation of these symptomatic patients saw 20.4%, 11.5% and 18.8% of patients at the respective three, six and twelve months time points having an echocardiography suggesting pulmonary hypertension (PH). CTEPH with pathological imaging and a mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) ≥ 25 mm Hg at rest was confirmed in eight subjects. Three subjects with mismatch perfusion defects showed an exercise induced increase of PAP without increasing pulmonary artery

  2. Early Detection of Schistosoma Egg–Induced Pulmonary Granulomas in a Returning Traveler

    PubMed Central

    Coron, Noémie; Le Govic, Yohann; Kettani, Sami; Pihet, Marc; Hemery, Sandrine; de Gentile, Ludovic; Chabasse, Dominique

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a French traveler who developed acute pulmonary schistosomiasis 2 months after visiting Benin. He presented with a 1-month history of fever, cough, and thoracic pain. Initial investigations revealed hypereosinophilia and multiple nodular lesions on chest computed tomography scan. Lung biopsies were performed 2 months later because of migrating chest infiltrates and increasing eosinophilia. Histological examination showed schistosomal egg–induced pulmonary granulomas with ova exhibiting a prominent terminal spine, resembling Schistosoma haematobium. However, egg shells were Ziehl–Neelsen positive, raising the possibility of a Schistosoma intercalatum or a Schistosoma guineensis infection. Moreover, involvement of highly infectious hybrid species cannot be excluded considering the atypical early pulmonary oviposition. This case is remarkable because of the rarity of pulmonary schistosomiasis, its peculiar clinical presentation and difficulties in making species identification. It also emphasizes the need to consider schistosomiasis diagnosis in all potentially exposed travelers with compatible symptoms. PMID:26787142

  3. Cardiomyopathy confers susceptibility to particulate matter-induced oxidative stress, vagal dominance, arrhythmia, pulmonary inflammation in heart failure-prone rats

    EPA Science Inventory

    Acute exposure to ambient fine particulate matter (PM2.5) is tied to cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, especially among those with prior cardiac injury. The mechanisms and pathophysiologic events precipitating these outcomes remain poorly understood but may involve inflamm...

  4. Reader characteristics linked to detection of pulmonary nodules on radiographs: ROC vs. JAFROC analyses of performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohli, Akshay; Robinson, John W.; Ryan, John; McEntee, Mark F.; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2011-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to explore whether reader characteristics are linked to heightened levels of diagnostic performance in chest radiology using receiver operating characteristic (ROC) and jackknife free response ROC (JAFROC) methodologies. A set of 40 postero-anterior chest radiographs was developed, of which 20 were abnormal containing one or more simulated nodules, of varying subtlety. Images were independently reviewed by 12 boardcertified radiologists including six chest specialists. The observer performance was measured in terms of ROC and JAFROC scores. For the ROC analysis, readers were asked to rate their degree of suspicion for the presence of nodules by using a confidence rating scale (1-6). JAFROC analysis required the readers to locate and rate as many suspicious areas as they wished using the same scale and resultant data were used to generate Az and FOM scores for ROC and JAFROC analyses respectively. Using Pearson methods, scores of performance were correlated with 7 reader characteristics recorded using a questionnaire. JAFROC analysis showed that improved reader performance was significantly (p<=0.05) linked with chest specialty (p<0.03), hours per week reading chest radiographs (p<0.03) and chest readings per year (p<0.04). ROC analyses demonstrated only one significant relationship, hours per week reading chest radiographs (p<0.02).The results of this study have shown that radiologist's performance in the detection of pulmonary nodules on radiographs is significantly linked to chest specialty, hours reading per week and number of radiographs read per year. Also, JAFROC is a more powerful predictor of performance as compared to ROC.

  5. Role of oxidative stress, inflammation, nitric oxide and transforming growth factor-beta in the protective effect of diosgenin in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Lamiaa A; Obaid, Al Arqam Z; Zaki, Hala F; Agha, Azza M

    2014-10-05

    Pulmonary hypertension is a progressive disease of various origins that is associated with right ventricular dysfunction. In the present study, the protective effect of diosgenin was investigated in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension in rats. Pulmonary hypertension was induced by a single subcutaneous injection of monocrotaline (60 mg/kg). Diosgenin (100 mg/kg) was given by oral administration once daily for 3 weeks. At the end of the experiment, mean arterial blood pressure, electrocardiography and echocardiography were recorded. Rats were then sacrificed and serum was separated for determination of total nitrate/nitrite level. Right ventricles and lungs were isolated for estimation of oxidative stress markers, tumor necrosis factor-alpha, total nitrate/nitrite and transforming growth factor-beta contents. Myeloperoxidase and caspase-3 activities in addition to endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression were also determined. Moreover, histological analysis of pulmonary arteries and cardiomyocyte cross-sectional area was performed. Diosgenin treatment provided a significant improvement toward preserving hemodynamic changes and alleviating oxidative stress, inflammatory and apoptotic markers induced by monocrotaline in rats. Furthermore, diosgenin therapy prevented monocrotaline-induced changes in nitric oxide production, endothelial and inducible nitric oxide synthase protein expression as well as histological analysis. These findings support the beneficial effect of diosgenin in pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline in rats.

  6. Inhaled sulfur dioxide causes pulmonary and systemic inflammation leading to fibrotic respiratory disease in a rat model of chemical-induced lung injury.

    PubMed

    Wigenstam, Elisabeth; Elfsmark, Linda; Bucht, Anders; Jonasson, Sofia

    2016-08-10

    Inhalation of high concentrations of sulfur dioxide (SO2) affects the lungs and can be immediately dangerous to life. We examined the development of acute and long-term effects after exposure of SO2 in Sprague-Dawley rats, in particular inflammatory responses, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and lung fibrosis. Animals were subjected to a single exposure of 2200ppm SO2 during 10min and treated with a single dose of the anti-inflammatory corticosteroid dexamethasone 1h following exposure. Exposed rats showed labored breathing, decreased body-weight and an acute inflammation with neutrophil and macrophage airway infiltrates 5h post exposure. The acute effects were characterized by bronchial damage restricted to the larger bronchi with widespread injured mucosal epithelial lining. Rats displayed hyperreactive airways 24h after exposure as indicated by increased methacholine-induced respiratory resistance. The inflammatory infiltrates remained in lung tissue for at least 14 days but at the late time-point the dominating granulocyte types had changed from neutrophils to eosinophils. Analysis of immunoregulatory and pro-inflammatory cytokines in serum and airways implicated mixed macrophage phenotypes (M1/M2) and T helper cell activation of both TH1 and TH2 subtypes. Increased expression of the pro-fibrotic cytokine TGFβ1 was detected in airways 24h post exposure and remained increased at the late time-points (14 and 28 days). The histopathology analysis confirmed a significant collagen deposition 14 days post exposure. Treatment with dexamethasone significantly counteracted the acute inflammatory response but was insufficient for complete protection against SO2-induced adverse effects, i.e. treatment only provided partial protection against AHR and the long-term fibrosis.

  7. Detection of Pulmonary Nodules in CT Images Based on Fuzzy Integrated Active Contour Model and Hybrid Parametric Mixture Model

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bin; Chen, Kan; Tian, Lianfang; Yeboah, Yao; Ou, Shanxing

    2013-01-01

    The segmentation and detection of various types of nodules in a Computer-aided detection (CAD) system present various challenges, especially when (1) the nodule is connected to a vessel and they have very similar intensities; (2) the nodule with ground-glass opacity (GGO) characteristic possesses typical weak edges and intensity inhomogeneity, and hence it is difficult to define the boundaries. Traditional segmentation methods may cause problems of boundary leakage and “weak” local minima. This paper deals with the above mentioned problems. An improved detection method which combines a fuzzy integrated active contour model (FIACM)-based segmentation method, a segmentation refinement method based on Parametric Mixture Model (PMM) of juxta-vascular nodules, and a knowledge-based C-SVM (Cost-sensitive Support Vector Machines) classifier, is proposed for detecting various types of pulmonary nodules in computerized tomography (CT) images. Our approach has several novel aspects: (1) In the proposed FIACM model, edge and local region information is incorporated. The fuzzy energy is used as the motivation power for the evolution of the active contour. (2) A hybrid PMM Model of juxta-vascular nodules combining appearance and geometric information is constructed for segmentation refinement of juxta-vascular nodules. Experimental results of detection for pulmonary nodules show desirable performances of the proposed method. PMID:23690876

  8. Detection of pulmonary nodules in CT images based on fuzzy integrated active contour model and hybrid parametric mixture model.

    PubMed

    Li, Bin; Chen, Kan; Tian, Lianfang; Yeboah, Yao; Ou, Shanxing

    2013-01-01

    The segmentation and detection of various types of nodules in a Computer-aided detection (CAD) system present various challenges, especially when (1) the nodule is connected to a vessel and they have very similar intensities; (2) the nodule with ground-glass opacity (GGO) characteristic possesses typical weak edges and intensity inhomogeneity, and hence it is difficult to define the boundaries. Traditional segmentation methods may cause problems of boundary leakage and "weak" local minima. This paper deals with the above mentioned problems. An improved detection method which combines a fuzzy integrated active contour model (FIACM)-based segmentation method, a segmentation refinement method based on Parametric Mixture Model (PMM) of juxta-vascular nodules, and a knowledge-based C-SVM (Cost-sensitive Support Vector Machines) classifier, is proposed for detecting various types of pulmonary nodules in computerized tomography (CT) images. Our approach has several novel aspects: (1) In the proposed FIACM model, edge and local region information is incorporated. The fuzzy energy is used as the motivation power for the evolution of the active contour. (2) A hybrid PMM Model of juxta-vascular nodules combining appearance and geometric information is constructed for segmentation refinement of juxta-vascular nodules. Experimental results of detection for pulmonary nodules show desirable performances of the proposed method.

  9. Adenosine A2A receptors induced on iNKT and NK cells reduce pulmonary inflammation and injury in mice with sickle cell disease

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Kori L.

    2010-01-01

    We showed previously that pulmonary function and arterial oxygen saturation in NY1DD mice with sickle cell disease (SCD) are improved by depletion of invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells or blockade of their activation. Here we demonstrate that SCD causes a 9- and 6-fold induction of adenosine A2A receptor (A2AR) mRNA in mouse pulmonary iNKT and natural killer (NK) cells, respectively. Treating SCD mice with the A2AR agonist ATL146e produced a dose-dependent reversal of pulmonary dysfunction with maximal efficacy at 10 ng/kg/minute that peaked within 3 days and persisted throughout 7 days of continuous infusion. Crossing NY1DD mice with Rag1−/− mice reduced pulmonary injury that was restored by adoptive transfer of 106 purified iNKT cells. Reconstituted injury was reversed by ATL146e unless the adoptively transferred iNKT cells were pretreated with the A2AR alkylating antagonist, FSPTP (5-amino-7-[2-(4-fluorosulfonyl)phenylethyl]-2-(2-furyl)-pryazolo[4,3-ϵ]-1,2,4-triazolo[1,5-c]pyrimidine), which completely prevented pro-tection. In NY1DD mice exposed to hypoxia-reoxygenation, treatment with ATL146e at the start of reoxygenation prevented further lung injury. Together, these data indicate that activation of induced A2ARs on iNKT and NK cells in SCD mice is sufficient to improve baseline pulmonary function and prevent hypoxia-reoxygenation–induced exacerbation of pulmonary injury. A2A agonists have promise for treating diseases associated with iNKT or NK cell activation. PMID:20798237

  10. Pulmonary C Fibers Modulate MMP-12 Production via PAR2 and Are Involved in the Long-Term Airway Inflammation and Airway Hyperresponsiveness Induced by Respiratory Syncytial Virus Infection

    PubMed Central

    Zang, Na; Zhuang, Jianguo; Deng, Yu; Yang, Zhimei; Ye, Zhixu; Xie, Xiaohong; Ren, Luo; Fu, Zhou; Luo, Zhengxiu; Xu, Fadi

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Children with acute respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection often develop sequelae of persistent airway inflammation and wheezing. Pulmonary C fibers (PCFs) are involved in the generation of airway inflammation and resistance; however, their role in persistent airway diseases after RSV is unexplored. Here, we elucidated the pathogenesis of PCF activation in RSV-induced persistent airway disorders. PCF-degenerated and intact mice were used in the current study. Airway inflammation and airway resistance were evaluated. MMP408 and FSLLRY-NH2 were the selective antagonists for MMP-12 and PAR2, respectively, to investigate the roles of MMP-12 and PAR2 in PCFs mediating airway diseases. As a result, PCF degeneration significantly reduced the following responses to RSV infection: augmenting of inflammatory cells, especially macrophages, and infiltrating of inflammatory cells in lung tissues; specific airway resistance (sRaw) response to methacholine; and upregulation of MMP-12 and PAR2 expression. Moreover, the inhibition of MMP-12 reduced the total number of cells and macrophages in bronchiolar lavage fluid (BALF), as well infiltrating inflammatory cells, and decreased the sRaw response to methacholine. In addition, PAR2 was upregulated especially at the later stage of RSV infection. Downregulation of PAR2 ameliorated airway inflammation and resistance following RSV infection and suppressed the level of MMP-12. In all, the results suggest that PCF involvement in long-term airway inflammation and airway hyperresponsiveness occurred at least partially via modulating MMP-12, and the activation of PAR2 might be related to PCF-modulated MMP-12 production. Our initial findings indicated that the inhibition of PCF activity would be targeted therapeutically for virus infection-induced long-term airway disorders. IMPORTANCE The current study is critical to understanding that PCFs are involved in long-term airway inflammation and airway resistance after RSV infection

  11. A novel probe for the non-invasive detection of tumor-associated inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Balducci, Anthony; Wen, Yi; Zhang, Yang; Helfer, Brooke M.; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Meng, Wilson S.; Wesa, Amy K.; Janjic, Jelena M.

    2013-01-01

    A novel dual-mode contrast agent was formulated through the addition of an optical near infrared (NIR) probe to a perfluorocarbon (PFC)-based 19F magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) agent, which labels inflammatory cells in situ. A single PFC-NIR imaging agent enables both a qualitative, rapid optical monitoring of an inflammatory state and a quantitative, detailed and tissue-depth independent magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The feasibility of in vivo optical imaging of the inflammatory response was demonstrated in a subcutaneous murine breast carcinoma model. Ex vivo optical imaging was used to quantify the PFC-NIR signal in the tumor and organs, and results correlated well with quantitative 19F NMR analyses of intact tissues. 19F MRI was employed to construct a three-dimensional image of the cellular microenvironment at the tumor site. Flow cytometry of isolated tumor cells was used to identify the cellular localization of the PFC-NIR probe within the tumor microenvironment. Contrast is achieved through the labeling of host cells involved in the immune response, but not tumor cells. The major cellular reservoir of the imaging agent were tumor-infiltrating CD11b+ F4/80low Gr-1low cells, a cell subset sharing immunophenotypic features with myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs). These cells are recruited to sites of inflammation and are implicated in immune evasion and tumor progression. This PFC-NIR contrast agent coupled to non-invasive, quantitative imaging techniques could serve as a valuable tool for evaluating novel anticancer agents. PMID:23526711

  12. Efficacy and Pharmacology of the NLRP3 Inflammasome Inhibitor CP-456,773 (CRID3) in Murine Models of Dermal and Pulmonary Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Primiano, Michael J; Lefker, Bruce A; Bowman, Michael R; Bree, Andrea G; Hubeau, Cedric; Bonin, Paul D; Mangan, Matthew; Dower, Ken; Monks, Brian G; Cushing, Leah; Wang, Stephen; Guzova, Julia; Jiao, Aiping; Lin, Lih-Ling; Latz, Eicke; Hepworth, David; Hall, J Perry

    2016-09-15

    A critical component of innate immune response to infection and tissue damage is the NACHT, LRR, and PYD domains-containing protein 3 (NLRP3) inflammasome, and this pathway and its activation products have been implicated in the pathophysiology of a variety of diseases. NLRP3 inflammasome activation leads to the cleavage of pro-IL-1β and pro-IL-18, as well as the subsequent release of biologically active IL-1β, IL-18, and other soluble mediators of inflammation. In this study, we further define the pharmacology of the previously reported NLRP3 inflammasome-selective, IL-1β processing inhibitor CP-456,773 (also known as MCC950), and we demonstrate its efficacy in two in vivo models of inflammation. Specifically, we show that in human and mouse innate immune cells CP-456,773 is an inhibitor of the cellular release of IL-1β, IL-1α, and IL-18, that CP-456,773 prevents inflammasome activation induced by disease-relevant soluble and crystalline NLRP3 stimuli, and that CP-456,773 inhibits R848- and imiquimod-induced IL-1β release. In mice, CP-456,773 demonstrates potent inhibition of the release of proinflammatory cytokines following acute i.p. challenge with LPS plus ATP in a manner that is proportional to the free/unbound concentrations of the drug, thereby establishing an in vivo pharmacokinetic/pharmacodynamic model for CP-456,773. Furthermore, CP-456,773 reduces ear swelling in an imiquimod cream-induced mouse model of skin inflammation, and it reduces airway inflammation in mice following acute challenge with house dust mite extract. These data implicate the NLRP3 inflammasome in the pathogenesis of dermal and airway inflammation, and they highlight the utility of CP-456,773 for interrogating the contribution of the NLRP3 inflammasome and its outputs in preclinical models of inflammation and disease.

  13. Exposure for ultrafine carbon particles at levels below detectable pulmonary inflammation affects cardiovascular performance in spontaneously hypertensive rats*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Rationale: Exposure to particulate matter is a risk factor for cardiopulmonary disease but the related molecular mechanisms are poorly understood. Previously we studied cardiovascular responses in healthy WKY rats following inhalation exposure to ultrafine carbon particles (UfCPs...

  14. In vivo anti-influenza virus activity of Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicine "sho-seiryu-to"--stimulation of mucosal immune system and effect on allergic pulmonary inflammation model mice.

    PubMed

    Nagai, T; Yamada, H

    1998-05-01

    When BALB/c mice were treated with a Kampo (Japanese herbal) medicine "Sho-seiryu-to (SST)" (1 g/kg, 10 times) orally from 7 days before to 5 days after the infection and infected with mouse-adapted influenza virus A/PR/8/34 by nasal-site restricted infection, SST caused increment of the influenza virus hemagglutinin-specific IgA antibody secreting cells in nasal lymphocyte but not in Peyer's patch lymphocyte at 6 days after infection in comparison with water-treated mice. Oral administration of SST also augmented IL-2 receptor beta chain+ (activated) T-cell in Peyer's patch lymphocyte, but not in the nasal lymphocyte. We previously reported that SST showed potent anti-influenza virus activity through augmentation of the antiviral IgA antibody titer in the nasal and broncho-alveolar cavities of the mice (T. Nagai and H. Yamada, 1994, Int. J. Immunopharmacol. 16, 605-613). These results suggest that oral administration of SST shows anti-influenza virus activity in the nasal cavity by activation of T-cell in Peyer's patch lymphocyte and stimulation of production of anti-influenza virus IgA antibody in nasal lymphocyte. When ovalbumin-sensitized allergic pulmonary inflammation model mice were administered orally with SST (1 g/kg) from 8 days before (11 times) or from 2 h after (4 times) to 4 days after the infection and infected with mouse-adapted influenza virus A/PR/8/34, replications of the virus in the both nasal and broncho-alveolar cavities or only nasal cavity were significantly inhibited at 5 days after infection in comparison with water-treated control by augmenting antiviral IgA antibody, respectively. These results suggest that SST is useful for both prophylaxis and treatment of influenza virus infection on patients with allergic pulmonary inflammation, such as bronchial asthma.

  15. Silkworm larvae plasma (SLP) assay for detection of bacteria: False positives secondary to inflammation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ma, Michelle; Rice, Tyler A; Percopo, Caroline M; Rosenberg, Helene F

    2017-01-01

    The silkworm larvae plasma (SLP) assay has been developed as a means to detect bacterial peptidoglycan as a surrogate for live bacteria. Here, we present results that indicate that generation of melanin by this assay is not fully reliable as a surrogate marker for bacterial count.

  16. Fast and Adaptive Detection of Pulmonary Nodules in Thoracic CT Images Using a Hierarchical Vector Quantization Scheme

    PubMed Central

    Han, Hao; Li, Lihong; Han, Fangfang; Song, Bowen; Moore, William; Liang, Zhengrong

    2014-01-01

    Computer-aided detection (CADe) of pulmonary nodules is critical to assisting radiologists in early identification of lung cancer from computed tomography (CT) scans. This paper proposes a novel CADe system based on a hierarchical vector quantization (VQ) scheme. Compared with the commonly-used simple thresholding approach, high-level VQ yields a more accurate segmentation of the lungs from the chest volume. In identifying initial nodule candidates (INCs) within the lungs, low-level VQ proves to be effective for INCs detection and segmentation, as well as computationally efficient compared to existing approaches. False-positive (FP) reduction is conducted via rule-based filtering operations in combination with a feature-based support vector machine classifier. The proposed system was validated on 205 patient cases from the publically available on-line LIDC (Lung Image Database Consortium) database, with each case having at least one juxta-pleural nodule annotation. Experimental results demonstrated that our CADe system obtained an overall sensitivity of 82.7% at a specificity of 4 FPs/scan, and 89.2% sensitivity at 4.14 FPs/scan for the classification of juxta-pleural INCs only. With respect to comparable CADe systems, the proposed system shows outperformance and demonstrates its potential for fast and adaptive detection of pulmonary nodules via CT imaging. PMID:25486657

  17. Pulmonary TCR γδ T cells induce the early inflammation of granuloma formation by a glycolipid trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM) isolated from Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Saitoh, Takayoshi; Yano, Ikuya; Kumazawa, Yoshio; Takimoto, Hiroaki

    2012-10-01

    We previously showed that formation of pulmonary granulomas in mice in response to a mycobacterial glycolipid, trehalose 6,6'-dimycolate (TDM) is due to the action of TNF-α and not of IFN-γ. However, the mechanisms of formation and maintenance of pulmonary granulomas are not yet clear. The purpose of the present study is to evaluate the mechanisms of granuloma formation by TDM at the early phase. Histological analysis showed that inflammatory cells infiltrated the murine pulmonary interstitium on day 2 after an intravenous injection with TDM as a w/o/w emulsion. Clear granuloma formation was observed on day 7 after the injection. The mRNA expression of IL-17, IFN-γ and macrophage inflammatory protein 2 was found in lung mononuclear cells at the day after TDM injection. The major IL-17-producing cells were T-cell receptor (TCR) γδ T cells expressing Vγ6. In mice depleted of γδ T cells by treatment with anti-TCR γδ monoclonal antibody, the number of TDM-induced granuloma was decreased, but the size of granuloma was not affected. Our results suggest that the mycobacterial glycolipid TDM causes activation of IL-17-producing TCR γδ T cells and stimulates chemotaxis of inflammatory cells including neutrophils in to lung.

  18. Detection of the Inflammation Biomarker C-Reactive Protein in Serum Samples: Towards an Optimal Biosensor Formula

    PubMed Central

    Fakanya, Wellington M.; Tothill, Ibtisam E.

    2014-01-01

    The development of an electrochemical immunosensor for the biomarker, C-reactive protein (CRP), is reported in this work. CRP has been used to assess inflammation and is also used in a multi-biomarker system as a predictive biomarker for cardiovascular disease risk. A gold-based working electrode sensor was developed, and the types of electrode printing inks and ink curing techniques were then optimized. The electrodes with the best performance parameters were then employed for the construction of an immunosensor for CRP by immobilizing anti-human CRP antibody on the working electrode surface. A sandwich enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was then constructed after sample addition by using anti-human CRP antibody labelled with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). The signal was generated by the addition of a mediator/substrate system comprised of 3,3,5',5'-Tetramethylbenzidine dihydrochloride (TMB) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Measurements were conducted using chronoamperometry at −200 mV against an integrated Ag/AgCl reference electrode. A CRP limit of detection (LOD) of 2.2 ng·mL−1 was achieved in spiked serum samples, and performance agreement was obtained with reference to a commercial ELISA kit. The developed CRP immunosensor was able to detect a diagnostically relevant range of the biomarker in serum without the need for signal amplification using nanoparticles, paving the way for future development on a cardiac panel electrochemical point-of-care diagnostic device. PMID:25587427

  19. A novel spherical shell filter for reducing false positives in automatic detection of pulmonary nodules in thoracic CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van de Leemput, Sil; Dorssers, Frank; Ehteshami Bejnordi, Babak

    2015-03-01

    Early detection of pulmonary nodules is crucial for improving prognosis of patients with lung cancer. Computer-aided detection of lung nodules in thoracic computed tomography (CT) scans has a great potential to enhance the performance of the radiologist in detecting nodules. In this paper we present a computer-aided lung nodule detection system for computed tomography (CT) scans that works in three steps. The system first segments the lung using thresholding and hole filling. From this segmentation the system extracts candidate nodules using Laplacian of Gaussian. To reject false positives among the detected candidate nodules, multiple established features are calculated. We propose a novel feature based on a spherical shell filter, which is specifically designed to distinguish between vascular structures and nodular structures. The performance of the proposed CAD system was evaluated by partaking in the ANODE09 challenge, which presents a platform for comparing automatic nodule detection programs. The results from the challenge show that our CAD system ranks third among the submitted works, demonstrating the efficacy of our proposed CAD system. The results also show that our proposed spherical shell filter in combination with conventional features can significantly reduce the number of false positives from the detected candidate nodules.

  20. Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary valve.

    PubMed

    Scheidl, Stefan; Taghavi, Shahrokh; Reiter, Ursula; Tröster, Natascha; Kovacs, Gabor; Rienmüller, Rainer; Lang, Susanna; Klepetko, Walter; Olschewski, Horst

    2010-04-01

    Pulmonary artery intimal sarcoma is a rare tumor of the cardiovascular system. Intimal sarcoma of the pulmonary valve itself has not been described. Embolization into pulmonary arteries originating from the pulmonary valve intimal sarcoma can mimic chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension and mislead the diagnosis. We present and discuss a patient initially diagnosed as chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension, treated by pulmonary endarterectomy. After 24 months, a tumor of the pulmonary valve was detected by echocardiography. The patient underwent removal and replacement of the pulmonary valve. Histology revealed pulmonary valve intimal sarcoma.

  1. A minimally invasive technique for the detection and analysis of pulmonary fat embolism: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Filograna, Laura; Bolliger, Stephan A; Kneubuehl, Beat; Jackowski, Christian; Hatch, Gary M; Thali, Michael J

    2012-09-01

    We investigated the feasibility of postmortem percutaneous needle biopsy (PNB) for obtaining pulmonary samples adequate for the study of pulmonary fat embolism (PFE). Samples of both lungs were obtained from 26 cadavers via two different methods: (i) PNB and (ii) the double-edged knife technique, the gold standard at our institute. After water storage and Sudan III staining, six forensic pathologists independently examined all samples for the presence and severity of PFE. The results were compared and analyzed in each case regarding the vitality of the PFE and its relationship to the cause of death. The results showed that PFE was almost identically diagnosed and graded on the samples obtained via both methods. The discrepancies between the two techniques did not affect the diagnoses of vitality or cause of death related to PFE. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the PNB sampling method for the diagnosis and interpretation of PFE in the postmortem setting.

  2. The Most Common Detected Risk and Etiologic Factors of Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Cukic, Vesna; Baljic, Rusmir

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) is the most serious manifestation of thromboembolic disease. Objective: To determine the most common risk and etiologic factors of pulmonary tromboembolism in patients treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year- period from 2008. to 2010. Material and methods: We retrospectively analysed patients with PTE treated in Intensive care unit of Clinic for Pulmonary Diseases and TB “Podhrastovi” in three-year period from 2008. to 2010. PTE was diagnosed by high resolute computed tomography, in most of them ventilatory /perfusion scintigraphy (V/P SPECT) was made, with proper laboratory analyses (D-dimmer, platelets , fibrinogen, and if it was needed protein C, S and AT III factor were examined). In all of them echosonography of abdomen and pelvis was done, also the examination by angiologist, and in patients with indications echosonography of the heart and Color Doppler of leg veins was made. We analysed risk and etiologic factors for PTE in each patient. Results: In 222 treated patients with PTE risk factors were found in 124 or 55.86% patients, etiologic factors were found in 31 or 13.96%, and both risk and etiologic factors in one patient were found in 18 or 8.11% patients. Conclusion: PTE is very serious disease that very often has fatal prognosis, and can develop with previously entirely healthy people, and as soon as we become suspicious of its presence we have to made appropriate diagnostic procedures and include appropriate therapy. We can after look for risk and etiologic factors and try to influence them. PMID:23922531

  3. Pulmonary edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... congestion; Lung water; Pulmonary congestion; Heart failure - pulmonary edema ... Pulmonary edema is often caused by congestive heart failure . When the heart is not able to pump efficiently, blood ...

  4. Sarcoma of the pulmonary trunk and the main pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed

    Huwer, Hanno; Ozbek, Cem; Waldmann, Rita; Winning, Johannes; Isringhaus, Helmut; Kalweit, Gerhard

    2008-04-01

    We report on a sarcoma of the central pulmonary arteries. Surgical therapy consisted in replacing both main pulmonary arteries and the pulmonary trunk including the pulmonary valve. Six months later a left-sided pneumonectomy had to be performed due to an intravascular tumor. Fifteen months after first resection treatment, recurrent tumors of the right pulmonary artery and the right ventricle were resected. Two years after the first operation the patient has no detectable tumor.

  5. Nanoparticles activate the NLR pyrin domain containing 3 (Nlrp3) inflammasome and cause pulmonary inflammation through release of IL-1α and IL-1β

    PubMed Central

    Yazdi, Amir S.; Guarda, Greta; Riteau, Nicolas; Drexler, Stefan K.; Tardivel, Aubry; Couillin, Isabelle; Tschopp, Jürg

    2010-01-01

    Nanoparticles are increasingly used in various fields, including biomedicine and electronics. One application utilizes the opacifying effect of nano-TiO2, which is frequently used as pigment in cosmetics. Although TiO2 is believed to be biologically inert, an emerging literature reports increased incidence of respiratory diseases in people exposed to TiO2. Here, we show that nano-TiO2 and nano-SiO2, but not nano-ZnO, activate the NLR pyrin domain containing 3 (Nlrp3) inflammasome, leading to IL-1β release and in addition, induce the regulated release of IL-1α. Unlike other particulate Nlrp3 agonists, nano-TiO2–dependent-Nlrp3 activity does not require cytoskeleton-dependent phagocytosis and induces IL-1α/β secretion in nonphagocytic keratinocytes. Inhalation of nano-TiO2 provokes lung inflammation which is strongly suppressed in IL-1R– and IL-1α–deficient mice. Thus, the inflammation caused by nano-TiO2 in vivo is largely caused by the biological effect of IL-1α. The current use of nano-TiO2 may present a health hazard due to its capacity to induce IL-1R signaling, a situation reminiscent of inflammation provoked by asbestos exposure. PMID:20974980

  6. Detection of pulmonary embolism with 99mTc-labeled F(ab)2 fragment of anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody in dogs.

    PubMed

    Ji, Shundong; Fang, Wei; Zhu, Mingqing; Bai, Xia; Wang, Chen; Ruan, Changgeng

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary embolism is a common and potentially life-threatening condition, and its correct diagnosis is highly desirable before anticoagulant therapy is initiated. However, the safe and accurate diagnosis of acute pulmonary embolism remains a challenge. Single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) is a highly sensitive scintigraphic imaging technique. Pulmonary embolism can be detected by SPECT with (99m)Tc-labeled imaging agents that bind to components present predominantly on thromboemboli. P-selectin is an adhesion glycoprotein that is expressed in platelets and endothelial cells. P-selectin on activated platelets is a suitable biomarker of the active thrombus process. The objective of this study was to evaluate (99m)Tc-labeled F(ab)(2) fragment of anti-P-selectin monoclonal antibody SZ51, (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2), for imaging pulmonary embolism in beagle canines. SZ51 was digested to F(ab)(2) fragment, named SZ51-F(ab)(2), and its specific binding to P-selectin on either human or canine platelets was verified by flow cytometry assay. In each dog, an 18-gauge catheter was inserted into left or right pulmonary artery, and a two-stranded spiral stainless-steel coil (20 mm) was inserted through catheter. At 30 min after coil placement, X-ray angiography was performed to document the pulmonary embolism and the locations of the coil. After intravenous injection of (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2), experimental thrombi in dogs could be consistently visualized for 2-3 hours by SPECT. Pulmonary embolism showed higher uptake of (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2). The present study suggests that (99m)Tc-SZ51-F(ab)(2) may be a promising agent for detecting pulmonary embolism.

  7. Chlamydial heat shock protein 60 induces acute pulmonary inflammation in mice via the Toll-like receptor 4- and MyD88-dependent pathway.

    PubMed

    Bulut, Yonca; Shimada, Kenichi; Wong, Michelle H; Chen, Shuang; Gray, Pearl; Alsabeh, Randa; Doherty, Terence M; Crother, Timothy R; Arditi, Moshe

    2009-07-01

    Heat shock protein 60 derived from Chlamydia pneumoniae (cHSP60) activates Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling through the MyD88 pathway in vitro, but it is not known how cHSP60 contributes to C. pneumoniae-induced lung inflammation. We treated wild-type (WT), TLR2(-/-), TLR4(-/-), or MyD88(-/-) mice intratracheally (i.t.) with recombinant cHSP60 (50 microg), UV-killed C. pneumoniae (UVCP; 5 x 10(6) inclusion-forming units/mouse), lipopolysaccharide (2 microg), or phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) and sacrificed mice 24 h later. Bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) was obtained to measure cell counts and cytokine levels, lungs were analyzed for histopathology, and lung homogenate chemokine concentrations were determined. Bone marrow-derived dendritic cells (BMDDCs) were generated and stimulated with live C. pneumoniae (multiplicity of infection [MOI], 5), UVCP (MOI, 5), or cHSP60 for 24 h, and the expression of costimulatory molecules (CD80 and CD86) was measured by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. cHSP60 induced acute lung inflammation with the same intensity as that of UVCP-induced inflammation in WT mice but not in TLR4(-/-) or MyD88(-/-) mice. cHSP60- and UVCP-induced lung inflammation was associated with increased numbers of cells in BAL, increased neutrophil recruitment, and elevated BAL interleukin-6 (IL-6) levels. Both cHSP60 and UVCP induced IL-6 release and CD80 and CD86 expression in WT cells but not in MyD88(-/-) BMDDCs. cHSP60 stimulated DC activation in a TLR4- and MyD88-dependent manner with an intensity similar to that induced by UVCP. These data suggest that cHSP60 promotes lung inflammation and DC activation via TLR4 and MyD88 and therefore may play a significant role in the pathogenesis of C. pneumoniae-induced chronic inflammatory lung diseases.

  8. Non-invasive biomarkers of lung inflammation in smoking subjects.

    PubMed

    Malerba, M; Montuschi, P

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoking is the most important risk factor for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and lung cancer, but only a part of smoking subjects develop these respiratory pathologies. Therefore, it is necessary to find sensible parameters to detect early lung alterations due to chronic tobacco smoke exposure. Long-term cigarette smoking is associated with a persistent inflammatory response in the lung that leads to tissue injury and dysfunction. Bronchoscopy and bronchial biopsies are the gold standard techniques for assessing pulmonary inflammation, but are invasive and not routinely used. Cellular analysis of induced sputum and measurement of fraction of exhaled nitric oxide (F(E)NO) are validated non-invasive techniques for assessing respiratory inflammation. Measurement of biomolecules in sputum supernatants and exhaled breath condensate (EBC) are used as a research tool, but require standardization of procedures and, generally, analytical validation. Electronic nose differentiates healthy smokers from healthy nonsmokers based on breath volatile organic compounds (VOC) patterns. These techniques are potentially useful for identifying biomarkers of pulmonary inflammation and oxidative stress. Induced sputum, F(E)NO, EBC and electronic nose are suitable for longitudinal sampling, thereby facilitating monitoring of lung damage process. This approach could enable an early identification of subgroups of healthy smokers at higher risk for tobacco-induced lung damage and prompt planning of secondary prevention strategies.

  9. Clinical application of a novel computer-aided detection system based on three-dimensional CT images on pulmonary nodule.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jian-Ye; Ye, Hai-Hong; Yang, Shi-Xiong; Jin, Ren-Chao; Huang, Qi-Liang; Wei, Yong-Chu; Huang, Si-Guang; Wang, Bin-Qiang; Ye, Jia-Zhou; Qin, Jian-Ying

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical application effects of a novel computer-aided detection (CAD) system based on three-dimensional computed tomography (CT) images on pulmonary nodule. 98 cases with pulmonary nodule (PN) in our hospital from Jun, 2009 to Jun, 2013 were analysed in this study. All cases underwent PN detection both by the simple spiral CT scan and by the computer-aided system based on 3D CT images, respectively. Postoperative pathological results were considered as the "gold standard", for both two checking methods, the diagnostic accuracies for determining benign and malignant PN were calculated. Under simple spiral CT scan method, 63 cases is malignant, including 50 true positive cases and 13 false positive cases from the "gold standard"; 35 cases is benign, 16 true negative case and 19 false negative cases, the Sensitivity 1 (Se1)=0.725, Specificity1 (Sp1)=0.448, Agreement rate1 (Kappa 1)=0.673, J1 (Youden's index 1)=0.173, LR(+)1=1.616, LR(-)1=0.499. Kappa 1=0.673 between the 0.4 and 0.75, has a moderate consistency. Underwent computer-aided detection (CAD) based on 3D CT method, 67cases is malignant, including 62 true positive cases and 7 false positive cases; 31 cases is benign, 24 true negative case and 7 false negative cases, Sensitivity 2 (Se2)=0.899, Specificity2 (Sp2)=0.828, Agreement rate (Kappa 2)=0.877, J2 (Youden's index 2)=0.727, LR(+)2=5.212, LR(-)2=0.123. Kappa 2=0.877 >0.75, has a good consistency. Computer-aided PN detecting system based on 3D CT images has better clinical application value, and can help doctor carry out early diagnosis of lung disease (such as cancer, etc.) through CT images.

  10. Initiation of antiretroviral therapy before detection of colonic infiltration by HIV reduces viral reservoirs, inflammation and immune activation

    PubMed Central

    Crowell, Trevor A; Fletcher, James LK; Sereti, Irini; Pinyakorn, Suteeraporn; Dewar, Robin; Krebs, Shelly J; Chomchey, Nitiya; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Schuetz, Alexandra; Michael, Nelson L; Phanuphak, Nittaya; Chomont, Nicolas; Ananworanich, Jintanat

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Colonic infiltration by HIV occurs soon after infection, establishing a persistent viral reservoir and a barrier to cure. We investigated virologic and immunologic correlates of detectable colonic HIV RNA during acute HIV infection (AHI) and their response to antiretroviral treatment (ART). Methods From 49,458 samples screened for HIV, 74 participants were enrolled during AHI and 41 consented to optional sigmoidoscopy, HIV RNA was categorized as detectable (≥50 copies/mg) or undetectable in homogenized colon biopsy specimens. Biomarkers and HIV burden in blood, colon and cerebrospinal fluid were compared between groups and after 24 weeks of ART. Results Colonic HIV RNA was detectable in 31 participants (76%) and was associated with longer duration since HIV exposure (median 16 vs. 11 days, p=0.02), higher median plasma levels of cytokines and inflammatory markers (CXCL10 476 vs. 148 pg/mL, p=0.02; TNF-RII 1036 vs. 649 pg/mL, p<0.01; neopterin 2405 vs. 1368 pg/mL, p=0.01) and higher levels of CD8+ T cell activation in the blood (human leukocyte antigen - antigen D related (HLA-DR)/CD38 expression 14.4% vs. 7.6%, p <0.01) and colon (8.9% vs. 4.5%, p=0.01). After 24 weeks of ART, participants with baseline detectable colonic HIV RNA demonstrated persistent elevations in total HIV DNA in colonic mucosal mononuclear cells (CMMCs) (median 61 vs. 0 copies/106 CMMCs, p=0.03) and a trend towards higher total HIV DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) (41 vs. 1.5 copies/106 PBMCs, p=0.06). There were no persistent differences in immune activation and inflammation. Conclusions The presence of detectable colonic HIV RNA at the time of ART initiation during AHI is associated with higher levels of proviral DNA after 24 weeks of treatment. Seeding of HIV in the gut may have long-lasting effects on the size of persistent viral reservoirs and may represent an important therapeutic target in eradication strategies. PMID:27637172

  11. Pulmonary embolus

    MedlinePlus

    ... clot - lung; Embolus; Tumor embolus; Embolism - pulmonary; DVT-pulmonary embolism; Thrombosis - pulmonary embolism ... Main symptoms of a pulmonary embolism include chest pain that may be any of the following: Under the breastbone or on one side Sharp or stabbing ...

  12. Recent technological and application developments in computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging for improved pulmonary nodule detection and lung cancer staging

    PubMed Central

    Sieren, Jessica C.; Ohno, Yoshiharu; Koyama, Hisanobu; Sugimura, Kazuro; McLennan, Geoffrey

    2010-01-01

    This review compares the emerging technologies and approaches in the application of magnetic resonance (MR) and computed tomography (CT) imaging for the assessment of pulmonary nodules and staging of malignant findings. Included in this review is a brief definition of pulmonary nodules and an introduction to the challenges faced. We have highlighted the current status of both MR and CT for the early detection of lung nodules. Developments are detailed in this review for the management of pulmonary nodules using advanced imaging, including; dynamic imaging studies, dual energy CT, computer aided detection and diagnosis, and imaging assisted nodule biopsy approaches which have improved lung nodule detection and diagnosis rates. Recent advancements linking in-vivo imaging to corresponding histological pathology are also highlighted. In-vivo imaging plays a pivotal role in the clinical staging of pulmonary nodules through TNM assessment. While CT and PET/CT are currently the most commonly clinically employed modalities for pulmonary nodule staging, studies are presented which highlight the augmentative potential of MR. PMID:21105140

  13. Scintigraphic detection of TNF-driven inflammation by radiolabelled certolizumab pegol in patients with rheumatoid arthritis and spondyloarthritis

    PubMed Central

    Carron, Philippe; Lambert, Bieke; Van Praet, Liesbet; De Vos, Filip; Varkas, Gaëlle; Jans, Lennart; Elewaut, Dirk; Van den Bosch, Filip

    2016-01-01

    Background Biologicals are the cornerstone for many treatment algorithms in inflammatory arthritis. While tumour necrosis factor (TNF) inhibitors may achieve important responses in ∼50% of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and spondyloarthritis (SpA), a significant fraction of patients are partial or non-responders. We hypothesised that in vivo assessment of TNF by scintigraphy with 99mTc-radiolabelled certolizumab pegol (CZP) might lead to a more ‘evidence-based biological therapy’. Objectives Our goal was to perform a proof-of-concept study of in vivo detection of TNF by immunoscintigraphy of a radiolabelled TNF inhibitor in RA and SpA, and correlate this with clinical, imaging findings and therapeutic outcome. Methods CZP was conjugated with succinimidyl-6-hydrazino-nicotinamide and subsequently radiolabelled with Tc99m. Whole body and static images of hands, feet and sacroiliac joints of 20 patients (5 RA; 15 SpA) were acquired at 3 time points. Immunoscintigraphic findings were scored semiquantitatively. Subsequently, all patients were treated with CZP. Results In peripheral joints, clinically affected joints or abnormal ultrasound findings were observed more frequently (p<0.001) in the scintigraphic-positive group. In patients with axial SpA, bone marrow edema on MRI was detected more frequently (p<0.001) in quadrants with tracer uptake. At the patient level, the odds of a joint remaining tender despite 24 weeks of CZP treatment was significantly smaller in joints with clear tracer uptake as compared with those with no uptake (OR=0.42, p=0.04). Conclusions Immunoscintigraphy with radiolabelled CZP demonstrated both axial and peripheral inflammation, and displayed good correlation with clinical features, conventional imaging and therapy response. Trial registration number NCT01590966; Results. PMID:27403334

  14. Evaluation of GeneXpert MTB/RIF for detection of pulmonary tuberculosis at peripheral tuberculosis clinics.

    PubMed

    Shao, Yan; Peng, Hong; Chen, Cheng; Zhu, Tao; Ji, Ming; Jiang, Wei; Zhu, Wei; Zhai, Xiang Jun; Lu, Wei

    2017-02-28

    Tuberculosis is one of the most common infectious diseases in China, while delayed patient finding obstructed disease control, especially for smear-negative patients. The current study was undertaken to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of GeneXpert MTB/RIF compared with conventional methods in the detection of pulmonary tuberculosis patients. A total of 295 spot sputum samples from confirmed pulmonary tuberculosis patients were evaluated from September 2014 to June 2015. Each sample was examined by acid-fast bacillus smear microscopy, culture and GeneXpert MTB/RIF. The sputum culture on Löwenstein-Jensen (L-J) was considered as the gold-standard. After testing by smear, 68.81% (203/295) was negative and 31.19% (92/295) was positive. As the gold-standard, L-J culture detected 37.97% (112/295) positive of all specimens, while the positivity for GeneXpert MTB/RIF was 46.44% (137/295). Compared with L-J culture, the combined sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) for GeneXpert MTB/RIF were 94.64%, 82.97%, 77.37% and 96.18% respectively. For smear-negative specimens, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for GeneXpert MTB/RIF were 96.00%, 83.05%, 44.44% and 99.32%; while for smear-positive specimens, the corresponding accuracy values were 94.25%, 80.00%, 98.80% and 44.44%. The findings of study indicated that GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay demonstrated a high sensitivity in detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis compared to smear method and a high NPV among smear negative patients.

  15. Electrical impedance tomography for assessing ventilation/perfusion mismatch for pulmonary embolism detection without interruptions in respiration.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Doan Trang; Thiagalingam, Aravinda; Bhaskaran, Abhishek; Barry, Michael A; Pouliopoulos, Jim; Jin, Craig; McEwan, Alistair L

    2014-01-01

    Recent studies have shown high correlation between pulmonary perfusion mapping with impedance contrast enhanced Electrical Impedance Tomography (EIT) and standard perfusion imaging methods such as Computed Tomography (CT) and Single Photon Emission Computerized Tomography (SPECT). EIT has many advantages over standard imaging methods as it is highly portable and non-invasive. Contrast enhanced EIT uses hypertonic saline bolus instead of nephrotoxic contrast medium that are utilized by CT and nuclear Ventilation/Perfusion (V/Q) scans. However, current implementation of contrast enhanced EIT requires induction of an apnea period for perfusion measurement, rendering it disadvantageous compared with current gold standard imaging modalities. In the present paper, we propose the use of a wavelet denoising algorithm to separate perfusion signal from ventilation signal such that no interruption in patient's ventilation would be required. Furthermore, right lung to left lung perfusion ratio and ventilation ratio are proposed to assess the mismatch between ventilation and perfusion for detection of Pulmonary Embolism (PE). The proposed methodology was validated on an ovine model (n=3, 83.7±7.7 kg) with artificially induced PE in the right lung. The results showed a difference in right lung to left lung perfusion ratio between baseline and diseased states in all cases with all paired t-tests between baseline and PE yielding p <; 0.01, while the right lung to left lung ventilation ratio remained unchanged in two out of three experiments. Statistics were pooled from multiple repetitions of measurements per experiment.

  16. Combined comparative genomic hybridization and genomic microarray for detection of gene amplifications in pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas and adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianming; Roth, Jürgen; Bode-Lesniewska, Beata; Pfaltz, Madeleine; Heitz, Philipp U; Komminoth, Paul

    2002-05-01

    Identification of gene amplifications in human tumors is important for the understanding of tumorigenesis and may lead to discovery of diagnostic and prognostic markers. In this study, we used a microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization (CGH) technique, combined with conventional CGH, to identify gene amplifications in 43 tumors including eight pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas and 35 adrenocortical tumors. Conventional CGH revealed gains or amplifications of 12q13-q15 in six sarcomas and in two adrenocortical carcinomas. Using microarrays, we demonstrated that, among genes located on 12q13-q15, SAS/CDK4 were amplified in six sarcomas, and MDM2 and GLI in five and four sarcomas, respectively. The two adrenocortical tumors showed coamplifications of SAS/CDK4 and MDM2. Furthermore, PDGFRA (located on 4q12) amplification was identified in five sarcomas. Our data demonstrate: (1) amplifications of SAS/CDK4, MDM2, GLI, and PDGFRA are strongly associated with the tumorigenesis of pulmonary artery intimal sarcomas, whereas SAS/CDK4 and MDM2 coamplification may contribute to the progression of adrenocortical tumors; (2) microarray-based CGH is a useful tool for simultaneous detection of multiple gene amplifications, with a high sensitivity and resolution compared to that of conventional CGH.

  17. Detection of pulmonary nodule growth with dose reduced chest tomosynthesis: a human observer study using simulated nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Söderman, Christina; Johnsson, Ã. se; Vikgren, Jenny; Rossi Norrlund, Rauni; Molnar, David; Mirzai, Maral; Svalkvist, Angelica; Mânsson, Lars Gunnar; Bâth, Magnus

    2016-03-01

    Chest tomosynthesis may be a suitable alternative to computed tomography for the clinical task of follow up of pulmonary nodules. The aim of the present study was to investigate the detection of pulmonary nodule growth suggestive of malignancy using chest tomosynthesis. Previous studies have indicated remained levels of detection of pulmonary nodules at dose levels corresponding to that of a conventional lateral radiograph, approximately 0.04 mSv, which motivated to perform the present study this dose level. Pairs of chest tomosynthesis image sets, where the image sets in each pair were acquired of the same patient at two separate occasions, were included in the study. Simulated nodules with original diameters of approximately 8 mm were inserted in the pairs of image sets, simulating situations where the nodule had remained stable in size or increased isotropically in size between the two different imaging occasions. Four different categories of nodule growth were included, corresponding to a volume increase of approximately 21 %, 68 %, 108 % and 250 %. All nodules were centered in the depth direction in the tomosynthesis images. All images were subjected to a simulated dose reduction, resulting in images corresponding to an effective dose of 0.04 mSv. Four observers were given the task of rating their confidence that the nodule was stable in size or not on a five-level rating scale. This was done both before any size measurements were made of the nodule as well as after measurements were performed. Using Receiver operating characteristic analysis, the rating data for the nodules that were stable in size was compared to the rating data for the nodules simulated to have increased in size. Statistically significant differences between the rating distributions for the stable nodules and all of the four nodule growth categories were found. For the three largest nodule growths, nearly perfect detection of nodule growth was seen. In conclusion, the present study

  18. Detection of HTLV-III RNA in lungs of patients with AIDS and pulmonary involvement

    SciTech Connect

    Chayt, K.J.; Harper, M.E.; Marselle, L.M.; Lewin, E.B.; Rose, R.M.; Oleske, J.M.; Epstein, L.G.; Wong-Staal, F.; Gallo, R.C.

    1986-11-07

    A majority of pediatric patients and rare adult patients with the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) develop a chronic respiratory disorder referred to as lymphocytic interstitial pneumonitis (LIP). Efforts to identify an infectious agent responsible for this process so far have failed. In this study, frozen sections of lungs from patients with AIDS and pulmonary disease were tested by in situ molecular hybridization for the presence of cells infected with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type III (HTLV-III) and expressing viral RNA. In the case of an infant with LIP, a relatively high frequency (0.1%) of cells in the lung were found to be positive for HTLV-III RNA. This number is the lower limit of total cells infected since the in situ hybridization technique as applied in this study depends on expression of HTLV-III genes, and previous evidence indicates that a proportion of cells infected with HTLV-III may not express viral RNA. Moreover, this degree of infection of the lung is likely limited to LIP, since in ten patients with AIDS and pulmonary diseases other than LIP, only 0% to 0.002% of cells in lung were positive for viral RNA expression. Thus, HTLV-III may play a direct causal role in the development of LIP in infected patients, implicating its involvement in yet another of the diverse clinical diseases associated with this virus.

  19. Rapid detection of Candida species in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with pulmonary symptoms.

    PubMed

    Zarrinfar, Hossein; Kaboli, Saeed; Dolatabadi, Somayeh; Mohammadi, Rasoul

    2016-01-01

    Candida species, especially C. albicans, are commensals on human mucosal surfaces, but are increasingly becoming one of the important invasive pathogens as seen by a rise in its prevalence in immunocompromised patients and in antibiotic consumption. Thus, an accurate identification of Candida species in patients with pulmonary symptoms can provide important information for effective treatment. A total of 75 clinical isolates of Candida species were obtained from the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid of both immunocompromised and immunocompetent patients with pulmonary symptoms. Candida cultures were identified based on nuclear ribosomal Internal Transcribed Spacer (ITS1-ITS2 rDNA) sequence analysis by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLP). Molecular identification indicated that the isolates belonged predominantly to C. albicans (52%), followed by C. tropicalis (24%), C. glabrata (14.7%), C. krusei (5.3%), C. parapsilosis (1.3%), C. kefyr (1.3%) and C. guilliermondii (1.3%). Given the increasing complexity of disease profiles and their management regimens in diverse patients, rapid and accurate identification of Candida species can lead to timely and appropriate antifungal therapy.

  20. Retroperitoneal inflammation

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001255.htm Retroperitoneal inflammation To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Retroperitoneal inflammation is swelling that occurs in the retroperitoneal space. ...

  1. LED fluorescence microscopy increases the detection of smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in medical colleges of India.

    PubMed

    Reza, L W; Satyanarayana, S; Pandey, A; Kumar, S; Devendrappa, N M; Anand, L; Singh, G; Kumar, A M V; Chadha, S S; Wilson, N; Sachdeva, K S; Nair, S A

    2013-09-21

    In July 2012, light-emitting diode fluorescence microscopy (LED-FM) replaced conventional light microscopy using Ziehl-Neelsen stain in the detection of sputum-positive pulmonary tuberculosis in 190 microscopy centres of medical colleges operating under India's Revised National Tuberculosis Control Programme. We compared the performance of LED-FM (July-December 2012) to that of conventional microscopy (July-December 2011) across 190 sites. Of 222 658 patients examined using conventional microscopy, 28 042 (12.6%) were smear-positive, while of 224 714 examined using LED-FM, 33 552 (14.9%) were smear-positive, an additional yield of 5251 cases after adjusting for the increase in patients examined. We recommend replacing conventional microscopy with LED-FM in high workload microscopy centres in India.

  2. Baicalein inhibits pulmonary carcinogenesis-associated inflammation and interferes with COX-2, MMP-2 and MMP-9 expressions in-vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chandrashekar, Naveenkumar; Selvamani, Asokkumar; Subramanian, Raghunandhakumar; Pandi, Anandakumar; Thiruvengadam, Devaki

    2012-05-15

    The objective of the present study is to investigate the therapeutic efficacy of baicalein (BE) on inflammatory cytokines, which is in line with tumor invasion factors and antioxidant defensive system during benzo(a)pyrene [B(a)P] (50 mg/kg body weight) induced pulmonary carcinogenesis in Swiss albino mice. After experimental period, increased levels of total and differential cell count in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid were observed. Accompanied by marked increase in immature mast cell by toluidine blue staining and mature mast cell by safranin–alcian blue staining in B(a)P-induced lung cancer bearing animals. Protein expression levels studied by immunohistochemistry and immunoblot analysis of cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor-α, interleukin-1β and inducible nitric oxide synthase were also found to be significantly increased in lung cancer bearing animals. B(a)P-exposed mice lung exhibits activated expression of nuclear transcription factor kappa-B as confirmed by immunofluorescence and immunoblot analysis. Administration of BE (12 mg/kg body weight) significantly counteracted all the above deleterious changes. Moreover, assessment of tumor invasion factors on protein levels by immunoblot and mRNA expression levels by RT-PCR revealed that BE treatment effectively negates B(a)P-induced upregulated expression of matrix metalloproteinase-2, matrix metalloproteinase-9 and cyclo-oxygenase-2. Further analysis of lipid peroxidation markers such as thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, hydro-peroxides and antioxidants such as glutathione-S-transferase and reduced glutathione in lung tissue was carried out to substantiate the antioxidant effect of BE. The chemotherapeutic effect observed in the present study is attributed to the potent anti-inflammatory and antioxidant potential by BE against pulmonary carcinogenesis. -- Highlights: ► BE treatment protects from inflammatory cells and mast-cells accumulation in lungs. ► BE altered the expressions of TNF

  3. Intravital excitation increases detection sensitivity for pulmonary tuberculosis by whole-body imaging with β-lactamase reporter enzyme fluorescence.

    PubMed

    Nooshabadi, Fatemeh; Yang, Hee-Jeong; Cheng, Yunfeng; Durkee, Madeleine S; Xie, Hexin; Rao, Jianghong; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Maitland, Kristen C

    2016-10-18

    Tuberculosis is a pulmonary disease with an especially high mortality rate in immuno-compromised populations, specifically children and HIV positive individuals. The causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), is a very slow growing and difficult organism to work with, making both diagnosis and development of effective treatments cumbersome. We utilize a fiber-optic fluorescence microendoscope integrated with a whole-body imaging system for in vivo Mtb detection. The system exploits an endogenous enzyme of Mtb (β-lactamase, or BlaC) using a BlaC-specific NIR fluorogenic substrate. In the presence of BlaC, this substrate is cleaved and becomes fluorescent. Using intravital illumination of the lung to excite this probe, sensitivity of the optical system increases over trans- and epi-illumination methods of whole-body fluorescence imaging. We demonstrate that integration of these imaging technologies with BlaC-specific fluorescent reporter probe improves the level of detection to ∼100 colony forming units, a 100× increase in sensitivity in comparison to epi-illumination and a 10× increase in sensitivity in comparison to previous work in intravital excitation of tdTomato-expressing Mtb. This lower detection threshold enables the study of early stage bacterial infections with clinical strains of Mtb and longitudinal studies of disease pathogenesis and therapeutic efficacy with multiple time points in a single animal.

  4. Arctigenin Protects against Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Pulmonary Oxidative Stress and Inflammation in a Mouse Model via Suppression of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS Signaling.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-zhou; Jiang, Zheng-kui; He, Bao-xia; Liu, Xian-ben

    2015-08-01

    Arctigenin, a bioactive component of Arctium lappa (Nubang), has anti-inflammatory activity. Here, we investigated the effects of arctigenin on lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced acute lung injury. Mice were divided into four groups: control, LPS, LPS + DMSO, and LPS + Arctigenin. Mice in the LPS + Arctigenin group were injected intraperitoneally with 50 mg/kg of arctigenin 1 h before an intratracheal administration of LPS (5 mg/kg). Lung tissues and bronchoalveolar lavage fluids (BALFs) were collected. Histological changes of the lung were analyzed by hematoxylin and eosin staining. Arctigenin decreased LPS-induced acute lung inflammation, infiltration of inflammatory cells into BALF, and production of pro-inflammatory cytokines. Moreover, arctigenin pretreatment reduced the malondialdehyde level and increased superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and glutathione peroxidase/glutathione disulfide ratio in the lung. Mechanically, arctigenin significantly reduced the production of nitric oxygen and inducible nitric oxygen synthase (iNOS) expression, enhanced the expression of heme oxygenase-1, and decreased the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs). Arctigenin has anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects on LPS-induced acute lung injury, which are associated with modulation of MAPK, HO-1, and iNOS signaling.

  5. Depressiveness, symptoms of anxiety and cognitive dysfunctions in patients with asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD): possible associations with inflammation markers: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Bratek, Agnieszka; Zawada, Karolina; Beil-Gawełczyk, Julia; Beil, Sonia; Sozańska, Ewa; Krysta, Krzysztof; Barczyk, Adam; Krupka-Matuszczyk, Irena; Pierzchała, Władysław

    2015-08-01

    Psychiatric symptoms of anxiety, depression and cognitive dysfunction often occur in patients suffering from somatic conditions such as asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) which constitute a major and growing public health problem. In the present study we therefore aimed at analyzing depressive symptoms as well as symptoms of anxiety and cognitive problems in patients with mild to moderate asthma and COPD. 59 participants-17 with asthma, 24 with COPD and 18 healthy controls were enrolled. Depressiveness was assessed with the beck depression inventory (BDI); anxiety symptoms were measured with the State-Trait Anxiety Inventory Part 1 and 2, and cognitive function levels were estimated with the Trail Making Test Part A and B. A score above the threshold indicative for depression was found by 33 % (n = 8) of COPD patients, 29 % (n = 5) of asthma patients compared to 0.05 % (n = 1) of the control group. Clinically relevant anxiety levels were found in 42 % (n = 10) of the COPD group, 41 % (n = 7) of the asthma patients and 17 % (n = 3) of the controls. Patients with COPD performed significantly worse on the TMT than other groups. Psychoemotional state and cognitive functions were found to be correlated with exposure to tobacco smoke (measured in pack-years) and airway obstruction (measured with FEV1). In conclusion, patients with mild to moderate asthma and COPD exhibit significantly higher levels of depressive and anxiety symptoms as well as cognitive dysfunctions than controls. The prevalence of these symptoms is related to the amount of exposure to tobacco smoke and the severity of airflow obstruction.

  6. The Src family tyrosine kinases src and yes have differential effects on inflammation-induced apoptosis in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nelin, Leif D; White, Hilary A; Jin, Yi; Trittmann, Jennifer K; Chen, Bernadette; Liu, Yusen

    2016-05-01

    Endothelial cells are essential for normal lung function: they sense and respond to circulating factors and hemodynamic alterations. In inflammatory lung diseases such as acute respiratory distress syndrome, endothelial cell apoptosis is an inciting event in pathogenesis and a prominent pathological feature. Endothelial cell apoptosis is mediated by circulating inflammatory factors, which bind to receptors on the cell surface, activating signal transduction pathways, leading to caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. We hypothesized that yes and src have differential effects on caspase-3 activation in human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (hPMVEC) due to differential downstream signaling effects. To test this hypothesis, hPMVEC were treated with siRNA against src (siRNAsrc), siRNA against yes (siRNAyes), or their respective scramble controls. After recovery, the hPMVEC were treated with cytomix (LPS, IL-1β, TNF-α, and IFN-γ). Treatment with cytomix induced activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) pathway and caspase-3-mediated apoptosis. Treatment with siRNAsrc blunted cytomix-induced ERK activation and enhanced cleaved caspase-3 levels, while treatment with siRNAyes enhanced cytomix-induced ERK activation and attenuated levels of cleaved caspase-3. Inhibition of the ERK pathway using U0126 enhanced cytomix-induced caspase-3 activity. Treatment of hPMVEC with cytomix induced Akt activation, which was inhibited by siRNAsrc. Inhibition of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway using LY294002 prevented cytomix-induced ERK activation and augmented cytomix-induced caspase-3 cleavage. Together, our data demonstrate that, in hPMVEC, yes activation blunts the ERK cascade in response to cytomix, resulting in greater apoptosis, while cytomix-induced src activation induces the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase pathway, which leads to activation of Akt and ERK and attenuation of apoptosis.

  7. Molecular Detection of Capillaria aerophila, an Agent of Canine and Feline Pulmonary Capillariosis

    PubMed Central

    Di Cesare, Angela; Castagna, Giuseppe; Otranto, Domenico; Meloni, Silvana; Milillo, Piermarino; Latrofa, Maria Stefania; Paoletti, Barbara; Bartolini, Roberto

    2012-01-01

    Capillaria aerophila, a trichuroid nematode causing pulmonary infections in wild and domestic carnivores, is occasionally and potentially poorly recognized in infections of humans due to clinicopathological mimicry and a lack of accurate, robust laboratory diagnostics. The present work evaluated the efficiency of a DNA-based assay amplifying a partial cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (cox1) gene of C. aerophila in the diagnosis of lung capillariosis. Fecal samples from 34 dogs and 10 cats positive at parasitological examination for C. aerophila and other endoparasites (i.e., other lungworms, whipworms, roundworms, hookworms, tapeworms, and/or coccidia) and from 44 animals negative for C. aerophila but positive for other endoparasites were molecularly examined. Of the 44 samples positive for C. aerophila at copromicroscopy, 43 scored positive (i.e., 33/34 dogs and 10/10 cats) in seminested PCR, resulting in a sensitivity of 97 to 100%. Samples that were copromicroscopy negative for C. aerophila although positive for other endoparasites never produced a PCR product or nonspecific amplicons. The specific PCR amplification of C. aerophila (i.e., specificity of 100%) was confirmed by a nucleotide sequence analysis of the cox1 amplicons. The potential implications of the molecular diagnosis of lung capillariosis are discussed. PMID:22442326

  8. Automatic detection of spiculation of pulmonary nodules in computed tomography images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciompi, F.; Jacobs, C.; Scholten, E. T.; van Riel, S. J.; W. Wille, M. M.; Prokop, M.; van Ginneken, B.

    2015-03-01

    We present a fully automatic method for the assessment of spiculation of pulmonary nodules in low-dose Computed Tomography (CT) images. Spiculation is considered as one of the indicators of nodule malignancy and an important feature to assess in order to decide on a patient-tailored follow-up procedure. For this reason, lung cancer screening scenario would benefit from the presence of a fully automatic system for the assessment of spiculation. The presented framework relies on the fact that spiculated nodules mainly differ from non-spiculated ones in their morphology. In order to discriminate the two categories, information on morphology is captured by sampling intensity profiles along circular patterns on spherical surfaces centered on the nodule, in a multi-scale fashion. Each intensity profile is interpreted as a periodic signal, where the Fourier transform is applied, obtaining a spectrum. A library of spectra is created by clustering data via unsupervised learning. The centroids of the clusters are used to label back each spectrum in the sampling pattern. A compact descriptor encoding the nodule morphology is obtained as the histogram of labels along all the spherical surfaces and used to classify spiculated nodules via supervised learning. We tested our approach on a set of nodules from the Danish Lung Cancer Screening Trial (DLCST) dataset. Our results show that the proposed method outperforms other 3-D descriptors of morphology in the automatic assessment of spiculation.

  9. Inflammatory cytokines in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is an “umbrella term” used for a spectrum of entities resulting in an elevation of the pulmonary arterial pressure. Clinical symptoms include dyspnea and fatigue which in the absence of adequate therapeutic intervention may lead to progressive right heart failure and death. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension is characterized by three major processes including vasoconstriction, vascular remodeling and microthrombotic events. In addition accumulating evidence point to a cytokine driven inflammatory process as a major contributor to the development of pulmonary hypertension. This review summarizes the latest clinical and experimental developments in inflammation associated with pulmonary hypertension with special focus on Interleukin-6, and its role in vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24739042

  10. Did FIDELIS projects contribute to the detection of new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases in China?

    PubMed Central

    Rusen, I. D.; Hinderaker, S. G.; Roldan, A.; Heldal, E.; Enarson, D. A.; Zhang, L-X.

    2016-01-01

    Setting: The first phase of the Fund for Innovative DOTS Expansion through Local Initiatives to Stop TB (FIDELIS) projects in China started in 2003. Objective: To determine whether the FIDELIS projects contributed to the increased case detection rate for new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in China. Methods: We compared the case notification rates (CNRs) in the intervention year with those of the previous year in the FIDELIS areas, then compared the difference between the CNRs of the intervention year and the previous year in the FIDELIS areas with those in the non-FI-DELIS areas within the province. Results: There was an increase in the CNR in the intervention year compared with the previous year for all the project sites. The differences between the CNR in the intervention year and the previous year ranged from 6.4 to 31.1 per 100 000 population in the FIDELIS areas and from 2.9 to 20.4/100 000 in the non-FIDELIS areas. Differences-in-differences analysis shows that the differences in the CNRs in the FIDELIS areas were not statistically significantly different from those in the non-FIDELIS areas (P = 0.393). Conclusion: The FIDELIS projects may have contributed to the increase in case detection of new smear-positive PTB in China, but the level of evidence is low. PMID:27695680

  11. Did FIDELIS projects contribute to the detection of new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis cases in China?

    PubMed

    Lin, Y; Chiang, C-Y; Rusen, I D; Hinderaker, S G; Roldan, A; Heldal, E; Enarson, D A; Zhang, L-X

    2016-09-01

    Setting: The first phase of the Fund for Innovative DOTS Expansion through Local Initiatives to Stop TB (FIDELIS) projects in China started in 2003. Objective: To determine whether the FIDELIS projects contributed to the increased case detection rate for new smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) in China. Methods: We compared the case notification rates (CNRs) in the intervention year with those of the previous year in the FIDELIS areas, then compared the difference between the CNRs of the intervention year and the previous year in the FIDELIS areas with those in the non-FI-DELIS areas within the province. Results: There was an increase in the CNR in the intervention year compared with the previous year for all the project sites. The differences between the CNR in the intervention year and the previous year ranged from 6.4 to 31.1 per 100 000 population in the FIDELIS areas and from 2.9 to 20.4/100 000 in the non-FIDELIS areas. Differences-in-differences analysis shows that the differences in the CNRs in the FIDELIS areas were not statistically significantly different from those in the non-FIDELIS areas (P = 0.393). Conclusion: The FIDELIS projects may have contributed to the increase in case detection of new smear-positive PTB in China, but the level of evidence is low.

  12. Diagnosis of pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis based on detection of mycobacterial antigen 85B by immuno-PCR.

    PubMed

    Singh, Netrapal; Sreenivas, Vishnubhatla; Gupta, Krishna B; Chaudhary, Anil; Mittal, Anshu; Varma-Basil, Mandira; Prasad, Rajendra; Gakhar, Surender K; Khuller, Gopal K; Mehta, Promod K

    2015-12-01

    We developed a novel indirect sandwich immuno-polymerase chain reaction (I-PCR) assay for the detection of mycobacterial antigen 85B (Ag85B, 30kDa, Rv1886c) in pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB) and extrapulmonary tuberculosis (EPTB) patients. The amino-modified reporter DNA was covalently attached with the antidetection antibody through a heterobifunctional cross-linking agent succinimidyl 4-[N-maleimidomethyl]-cyclohexane-1-carboxylate. The detection limit of Ag85B by I-PCR was found to be 1 femtogram (fg)/mL, which was 10(6)-fold lower than an analogous enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The sensitivities of 85% and 77% with I-PCR and 77.6% and 62.5% with ELISA were observed in smear-positive and smear-negative PTB patients, respectively, with high specificity. On the other hand, sensitivities of 84% and 63.7% with I-PCR and 68% and 47.5% with ELISA were observed in confirmed and clinically suspected EPTB cases, respectively, with high specificity.

  13. Ultrasound detects subclinical joint inflammation in the hands and wrists of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus without musculoskeletal symptoms

    PubMed Central

    Malheiro, Rui; Oliveira, João F; Pinheiro, Sofia; Vieira, Luís S; Moraes-Fontes, Maria Francisca

    2017-01-01

    Objectives To assess the prevalence and severity of ultrasonographic abnormalities of the hand and wrist of asymptomatic patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and compare these findings with those from patients with SLE with musculoskeletal signs or symptoms and healthy controls. Methods We conducted a prospective cross-sectional study that evaluated bilaterally, with grey-scale and power Doppler (PD) ultrasound (US), the dorsal hand (2nd to 5th metacarpophalangeal and 2nd to 5th proximal interphalangeal joints) and wrist (radiocarpal, ulnocarpal and intercarpal joints) of 30 asymptomatic patients with SLE, 6 symptomatic patients with SLE and 10 controls. Synovial hypertrophy (SH) and intra-articular PD signal were scored using semiquantitative grading scales (0–3). Individual scores were graded as normal (SH≤1 and PD=0) or abnormal (SH≥2 or PD≥1). Global indexes for SH and PD were also calculated. US findings were correlated with clinical and laboratory data and disease activity indexes. Results US detected SH (score ≥1) in 77% asymptomatic patients with SLE, mostly graded as minimal (score 1: 63%). 23% of the asymptomatic patients with SLE showed abnormal US PD findings (SH≥2 or PD≥1). SH was present in all symptomatic patients with SLE, mostly graded as moderate (grade 2: 67%), and with associated PD signal (83%). SH (score 1) was identified in 50% of controls, however, none presented abnormal US PD findings. SH index in the asymptomatic SLE group was higher than in the control group (2.0 (0–5) vs 0.5 (0–2), median (range), p=0.01) and lower than in the symptomatic SLE group (7.0 (4–23), median (range), p<0.001). No significant correlation was demonstrated between US PD findings and clinical or laboratory variables and disease activity indexes. Conclusion A small subgroup of asymptomatic patients with SLE may present subclinical joint inflammation. Global US scores and PD signal may be important in disease evaluation and

  14. iPads and LCDs show similar performance in the detection of pulmonary nodules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEntee, Mark F.; Lowe, Joanna; Butler, Marie Louise; Pietrzyk, Mariusz; Evanoff, Michael G.; Ryan, John; Brennan, Patrick C.; Rainford, Louise A.

    2012-02-01

    In February 2011 the University of Chicago Medical School distributed iPads to its trainee doctors for use when reviewing clinical information and images on the ward or clinics. The use of tablet computing devices is becoming widespread in medicine with Apple™ heralding them as "revolutionary" in medicine. The question arises, just because it is technical achievable to use iPads for clinical evaluation of images, should we do so? The current work assesses the diagnostic efficacy of iPads when compared with LCD secondary display monitors for identifying lung nodules on chest x-rays. Eight examining radiologists of the American Board of Radiology were involved in the assessment, reading chest images on both the iPad and the an off-the-shelf LCD monitor. Thirty chest images were shown to each observer, of which 15 had one or more lung nodules. Radiologists were asked to locate the nodules and score how confident they were with their decision on a scale of 1-5. An ROC and JAFROC analysis was performed and modalities were compared using DBM MRMC. The results demonstrate no significant differences in performance between the iPad and the LCD for the ROC AUC (p<0.075) or JAFROC FOM (p<0.059) for random readers and random cases. Sample size estimation showed that this result is significant at a power of 0.8 and an effect size of 0.05 for ROC and 0.07 for JAFROC. This work demonstrates that for the task of identifying pulmonary nodules, the use of the iPad does not significantly change performance compared to an off-the-shelf LCD.

  15. Detection and identification of oral anaerobes in intraoperative bronchial fluids of patients with pulmonary carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Ayako; Sato, Takuichi; Hoshikawa, Yasushi; Ishida, Naoko; Tanda, Naoko; Kawamura, Yoshiaki; Kondo, Takashi; Takahashi, Nobuhiro

    2014-07-01

    Postoperative pneumonia may occur when upper respiratory tract protective reflexes such as cough and/or swallowing reflexes are impaired; thus, silent aspiration of oral bacteria may be a causative factor in postoperative pneumonia. This study aimed to quantify and identify bacteria in intraoperative bronchial fluids and to evaluate the relationship between impairment of cough/swallowing reflexes and silent aspiration of oral bacteria in elderly patients. After obtaining informed consent, cough and swallowing reflexes were assessed using an ultrasonic nebulizer and a nasal catheter, respectively. Using a micro-sampling probe, intraoperative bronchial fluids were collected from nine subjects with pulmonary carcinoma and cultured anaerobically on blood agar plates. After 7 days, CFUs were counted and isolated bacteria were identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing. Four subjects (aged 71.0 ± 8.4 years) had impaired swallowing reflexes with normal cough reflexes, whereas five subjects (73.6 ± 6.5 years) had normal cough and swallowing reflexes. The bacterial counts (mean CFU ± SD) tended to be higher in intraoperative bronchial fluids of subjects with impaired swallowing reflexes ([5.1 ± 7.7] × 10(5)) than in those of subjects with normal reflexes ([1.2 ± 1.9] × 10(5)); however, this difference was not statistically significant. Predominant isolates from intraoperative bronchial fluids were Streptococcus (41.8%), Veillonella (11.4%), Gemella (8.9%), Porphyromonas (7.6%), Olsenella (6.3%) and Eikenella (6.3%). These findings indicate that intraoperative bronchial fluids contain bacteria, probably derived from the oral microbiota, and suggest that silent aspiration of oral bacteria occurs in elderly patients irrespective of impairment of swallowing reflex.

  16. Pulmonary angiography

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pulmonary arteriography; Pulmonary angiogram; Angiogram of the lungs Images Pulmonary arteries References Jackson JE, Meaney JFM. Angiography. ... urac.org). URAC's accreditation program is an independent audit to verify that A.D.A.M. follows ...

  17. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topics Bronchitis COPD Cystic Fibrosis Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis Sarcoidosis Send a link to NHLBI to someone by ... people who have COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease), sarcoidosis (sar-koy-DOE-sis), idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis , or ...

  18. Changes in respiratory function impairment following the treatment of severe pulmonary tuberculosis – limitations for the underlying COPD detection

    PubMed Central

    Radovic, Milan; Ristic, Lidija; Ciric, Zorica; Dinic-Radovic, Violeta; Stankovic, Ivana; Pejcic, Tatjana; Rancic, Milan; Bogdanovic, Dragan

    2016-01-01

    Background During the treatment phase of active pulmonary tuberculosis (PTB), respiratory function impairment is usually restrictive. This may become obstructive, as a PTB-associated airflow obstruction (AFO) or as a later manifestation of underlying COPD. Purpose The aim of the study was to examine the potential causes and risks for AFO development in PTB by exploring the aspects of spirometry limitations and clinical implications for the underlying COPD detection, taking into account various confounding factors. Patients and methods Prospective, nest case–control study on 40 new cases of PTB with initial restrictive respiratory function impairment, diagnosed and treated according to the directly observed treatment short course (DOTS) strategy. Results From all observed patients, 37.5% of them developed AFO upon the completion of PTB treatment, with significantly increased average of forced vital capacity (%) (P<0.01). Their changes in forced expiratory volume in the first second (%) during the PTB treatment were strongly associated with the air pollution exposure in living (0.474%–20.971% for 95% confidence interval [CI]; P=0.041) and working environments (3.928%–20.379% for 95% CI; P=0.005), initial radiological extent of PTB lesions (0.018%–0.700% for 95% CI; P=0.047), leukocyte count (0.020%–1.328% for 95% CI; P=0.043), and C-reactive protein serum level (0.046%–0.205% for 95% CI; P=0.003) compared to the other patients. The multivariate logistic regression analysis model shows initial radiological extent of pulmonary tuberculosis lesions (OR 1.01–1.05 for 95% CI; P=0.02) and sputum conversion rate on culture (OR 1.02–1.68 for 95% CI; P=0.04) as the most significant predictors for the risk of AFO development. Conclusion AFO upon PTB treatment is a common manifestation of underlying COPD, which mostly occurs later, during the reparative processes in active PTB, even in the absence of major risk factors, such as cigarette smoking and biomass fuel

  19. Mycobacterium genotypes in pulmonary tuberculosis infections and their detection by trained African giant pouched rats.

    PubMed

    Mgode, Georgies F; Cohen-Bacrie, Stéphan; Bedotto, Marielle; Weetjens, Bart J; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Kuipers, Dian; Machang'u, Robert S; Kazwala, Rudovick; Mfinanga, Sayoki G; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in low-income countries is mainly done by microscopy. Hence, little is known about the diversity of Mycobacterium spp. in TB infections. Different genotypes or lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vary in virulence and induce different inflammatory and immune responses. Trained Cricetomys rats show a potential for rapid diagnosis of TB. They detect over 28 % of smear-negative, culture-positive TB. However, it is unknown whether these rats can equally detect sputa from patients infected with different genotypes of M. tuberculosis. A 4-month prospective study on diversity of Mycobacterium spp. was conducted in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. 252 sputa from 161 subjects were cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen medium and thereafter tested by rats. Mycobacterial isolates were subjected to molecular identification and multispacer sequence typing (MST) to determine species and genotypes. A total of 34 Mycobacterium spp. isolates consisting of 32 M. tuberculosis, 1 M. avium subsp. hominissuis and 1 M. intracellulare were obtained. MST analyses of 26 M. tuberculosis isolates yielded 10 distinct MST genotypes, including 3 new genotypes with two clusters of related patterns not grouped by geographic areas. Genotype MST-67, shared by one-third of M. tuberculosis isolates, was associated with the Mwananyamala clinic. This study shows that diverse M. tuberculosis genotypes (n = 10) occur in Dar es Salaam and trained rats detect 80 % of the genotypes. Sputa with two M. tuberculosis genotypes (20 %), M. avium hominissuis and M. intracellulare were not detected. Therefore, rats detect sputa with different M. tuberculosis genotypes and can be used to detect TB in resource-poor countries.

  20. Contribution of exhaled nitric oxide measurement in airway inflammation assessment in asthma. A position paper from the French Speaking Respiratory Society.

    PubMed

    Dinh-Xuan, A T; Annesi-Maesano, I; Berger, P; Chambellan, A; Chanez, P; Chinet, T; Degano, B; Delclaux, C; Demange, V; Didier, A; Garcia, G; Magnan, A; Mahut, B; Roche, N

    2015-02-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is both a gas and a ubiquitous inter- and intracellular messenger with numerous physiological functions. As its synthesis is markedly increased during inflammatory processes, NO can be used as a surrogate marker of acute and/or chronic inflammation. It is possible to quantify fractional concentration of NO in exhaled breath (FENO) to detect airway inflammation, and thus improve the diagnosis of asthma by better characterizing asthmatic patients with eosinophilic bronchial inflammation, and eventually improve the management of targeted asthmatic patients. FENO measurement can therefore be viewed as a new, reproducible and easy to perform pulmonary function test. Measuring FENO is the only non-invasive pulmonary function test allowing (1) detecting, (2) quantifying and (3) monitoring changes in inflammatory processes during the course of various respiratory disorders, including corticosensitive asthma.

  1. Air pollution source apportionment before, during, and after the 2008 Beijing Olympics and association of sources to aldehydes and biomarkers of blood coagulation, pulmonary and systemic inflammation, and oxidative stress in healthy young adults

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altemose, Brent A.

    Based on principal component analysis (PCA) of air pollution data collected during the Summer Olympic Games held in Beijing, China during 2008, the five source types of air pollution identified -- natural soil/road dust, vehicle and industrial combustion, vegetative burning, oil combustion, and secondary formation, were all distinctly lower during the Olympics. This was particularly true for vehicle and industrial combustion and oil combustion, and during the main games period between the opening and closing ceremonies. The reduction in secondary formation was reflective of a reduction in nitrogen oxides, but this also contributed to increased ozone concentrations during the Olympic period. Among three toxic aldehydes measured in Beijing during the same time period, only acetaldehyde had a reduction in mean concentration during the Olympic air pollution control period compared to the pre-Olympic period. Accordingly, acetaldehyde was significantly correlated with primary emission sources including vegetative burning and oil combustion, and with several pollutants emitted mainly from primary sources. In contrast, formaldehyde and acrolein increased during the Olympic air pollution control period; accordingly both were significantly correlated with ozone and with the secondary formation source type. These findings indicate primary sources may dominate for acetaldehyde while secondary sources may dominate for formaldehyde and acrolein. Biomarkers for pulmonary inflammation (exhaled breath condensate (EBC) pH, exhaled nitric oxide, and EBC nitrite) and hemostasis and blood coagulation (vWF and sCD62p) were most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion, oil combustion, and vegetative burning. The systemic inflammation biomarker 8-OHdG was most consistently associated with vehicle and industrial combustion. In contrast, the associations between the biomarkers and the aldehydes were generally not significant or in the hypothesized direction, although

  2. Improved Detection of Invasive Pulmonary Aspergillosis Arising during Leukemia Treatment Using a Panel of Host Response Proteins and Fungal Antigens

    PubMed Central

    Ju, Hyunsu; Wheat, L. Joseph; Baden, Lindsey; Stafford, Susan; Wu, Zheng; Issa, Nicolas; Caliendo, Angela M.; Denning, David W.; Soman, Kizhake; Clancy, Cornelius J.; Nguyen, M. Hong; Sugrue, Michele W.; Alexander, Barbara D.; Wingard, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Invasive pulmonary aspergillosis (IPA) is an opportunistic fungal infection in patients undergoing chemotherapy for hematological malignancy, hematopoietic stem cell transplant, or other forms of immunosuppression. In this group, Aspergillus infections account for the majority of deaths due to mold pathogens. Although early detection is associated with improved outcomes, current diagnostic regimens lack sensitivity and specificity. Patients undergoing chemotherapy, stem cell transplantation and lung transplantation were enrolled in a multi-site prospective observational trial. Proven and probable IPA cases and matched controls were subjected to discovery proteomics analyses using a biofluid analysis platform, fractionating plasma into reproducible protein and peptide pools. From 556 spots identified by 2D gel electrophoresis, 66 differentially expressed post-translationally modified plasma proteins were identified in the leukemic subgroup only. This protein group was rich in complement components, acute-phase reactants and coagulation factors. Low molecular weight peptides corresponding to abundant plasma proteins were identified. A candidate marker panel of host response (9 plasma proteins, 4 peptides), fungal polysaccharides (galactomannan), and cell wall components (β-D glucan) were selected by statistical filtering for patients with leukemia as a primary underlying diagnosis. Quantitative measurements were developed to qualify the differential expression of the candidate host response proteins using selective reaction monitoring mass spectrometry assays, and then applied to a separate cohort of 57 patients with leukemia. In this verification cohort, a machine learning ensemble-based algorithm, generalized pathseeker (GPS) produced a greater case classification accuracy than galactomannan (GM) or host proteins alone. In conclusion, Integration of host response proteins with GM improves the diagnostic detection of probable IPA in patients undergoing treatment

  3. Evaluation of the GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay for rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and detection of rifampin resistance in pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens.

    PubMed

    Zeka, Arzu N; Tasbakan, Sezai; Cavusoglu, Cengiz

    2011-12-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis remains one of the most significant causes of death from an infectious agent. The rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and detection of rifampin (RIF) resistance are essential for early disease management. The GeneXpert MTB/RIF assay is a novel integrated diagnostic device for the diagnosis of tuberculosis and rapid detection of RIF resistance in clinical specimens. We determined the performance of the MTB/RIF assay for rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis and detection of rifampin resistance in smear-positive and smear-negative pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens obtained from possible tuberculosis patients. Two hundred fifty-three pulmonary and 176 extrapulmonary specimens obtained from 429 patients were included in the study. One hundred ten (89 culture positive and 21 culture negative for M. tuberculosis) of the 429 patients were considered to have tuberculosis. In pulmonary specimens, sensitivities were 100% (27/27) and 68.6% (24/35) for smear-positive and smear-negative specimens, respectively. It had a lower sensitivity with extrapulmonary specimens: 100% for smear-positive specimens (4/4) and 47.7% for smear-negative specimens (21/44). The test accurately detected the absence of tuberculosis in all 319 patients without tuberculosis studied. The MTB/RIF assay also detected 1 RIF-resistant specimen and 88 RIF-susceptible specimens, and the results were confirmed by drug susceptibility testing. We concluded that the MTB/RIF test is a simple method, and routine staff with minimal training can use the system. The test appeared to be as sensitive as culture with smear-positive specimens but less sensitive with smear-negative pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens that include low numbers of bacilli.

  4. Allergic Lung Inflammation Reduces Tissue Invasion and Enhances Survival from Pulmonary Pneumococcal Infection in Mice, Which Correlates with Increased Expression of Transforming Growth Factor β1 and SiglecF(low) Alveolar Macrophages.

    PubMed

    Sanfilippo, Alan M; Furuya, Yoichi; Roberts, Sean; Salmon, Sharon L; Metzger, Dennis W

    2015-07-01

    Asthma is generally thought to confer an increased risk for invasive pneumococcal disease (IPD) in humans. However, recent reports suggest that mortality rates from IPD are unaffected in patients with asthma and that chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), a condition similar to asthma, protects against the development of complicated pneumonia. To clarify the effects of asthma on the subsequent susceptibility to pneumococcal infection, ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic lung inflammation (ALI) was induced in mice followed by intranasal infection with A66.1 serotype 3 Streptococcus pneumoniae. Surprisingly, mice with ALI were significantly more resistant to lethal infection than non-ALI mice. The heightened resistance observed following ALI correlated with enhanced early clearance of pneumococci from the lung, decreased bacterial invasion from the airway into the lung tissue, a blunted inflammatory cytokine and neutrophil response to infection, and enhanced expression of transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1). Neutrophil depletion prior to infection had no effect on enhanced early bacterial clearance or resistance to IPD in mice with ALI. Although eosinophils recruited into the lung during ALI appeared to be capable of phagocytizing bacteria, neutralization of interleukin-5 (IL-5) to inhibit eosinophil recruitment likewise had no effect on early clearance or survival following infection. However, enhanced resistance was associated with an increase in levels of clodronate-sensitive, phagocytic SiglecF(low) alveolar macrophages within the airways following ALI. These findings suggest that, while the risk of developing IPD may actually be decreased in patients with acute asthma, additional clinical data are needed to better understand the risk of IPD in patients with different asthma phenotypes.

  5. Newly Detected Pulmonary Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Infection and Peripheral Lung Cancers in Patients During Follow-Up of Idiopathic Interstitial Pneumonia

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Sang Young; Kim, Mi Young; Hwang, Hye Jeon; Shim, Tae Sun; Choi, Chang-Min; Kim, Sung-Soo; Kim, Dong Soon

    2015-01-01

    Abstract This article describes the difference between the computed tomography (CT) findings in patients with newly detected pulmonary nontuberculous mycobacterial infection (NTM-IIP) and Cancer-IIP. We retrospectively evaluated 35 NTM-IIP and 78 Cancer-IIP patients in reference to their null idiopathic interstitial pneumonia CT (n = 113), using >10 years of data. Two independent radiologists analyzed the CT characteristics and the axial location of the main opacity. The interobserver agreement was good (κ > 0.771). The NTM-IIP patients were older (P = 0.034). The median size of the main opacity in the NTM-IIP (27 mm; 11–73) was larger (19 mm; 5–60; P = 0.002). Consolidation (n = 30; 85.7%; odds ratio [OR], 45) and cavities (n = 14; 40%, OR, 25) were more common in NTM-IIP (all P < 0.001). The midst of the fibrotic cysts including honeycomb cysts (n = 16; 45.7%, OR, 4.95) was more common in NTM-IIP (P = 0.006). NTM-IIP appeared larger, with more frequent consolidation and cavities, and was more likely to have been located in the midst of the fibrotic cysts including honeycomb cysts at the CT, which showed that it was older than Cancer-IIP. PMID:25837763

  6. A New Method of Detecting Pulmonary Nodules with PET/CT Based on an Improved Watershed Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Juanjuan; Ji, Guohua; Qiang, Yan; Han, Xiaohong; Pei, Bo; Shi, Zhenghao

    2015-01-01

    Background Integrated 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computed tomography (18F-FDG PET/CT) is widely performed for staging solitary pulmonary nodules (SPNs). However, the diagnostic efficacy of SPNs based on PET/CT is not optimal. Here, we propose a method of detection based on PET/CT that can differentiate malignant and benign SPNs with few false-positives. Method Our proposed method combines the features of positron-emission tomography (PET) and computed tomography (CT). A dynamic threshold segmentation method was used to identify lung parenchyma in CT images and suspicious areas in PET images. Then, an improved watershed method was used to mark suspicious areas on the CT image. Next, the support vector machine (SVM) method was used to classify SPNs based on textural features of CT images and metabolic features of PET images to validate the proposed method. Results Our proposed method was more efficient than traditional methods and methods based on the CT or PET features alone (sensitivity 95.6%; average of 2.9 false positives per scan). PMID:25853496

  7. Pulmonary inflammation in rats after intratracheal instillation of quartz, amorphous SiO2, carbon black, and coal dust and the influence of poly-2-vinylpyridine-N-oxide (PVNO).

    PubMed

    Ernst, Heinrich; Rittinghausen, Susanne; Bartsch, Wilfried; Creutzenberg, Otto; Dasenbrock, Clemens; Görlitz, Bernd-Detlef; Hecht, Matthias; Kairies, Ulf; Muhle, Hartwig; Müller, Meike; Heinrich, Uwe; Pott, Friedrich

    2002-08-01

    Effects of poly-2-vinylpyridine-N-oxide (PVNO) were investigated in numerous in vivo and in vitro studies published in the nineteen sixties and seventies. These studies showed that PVNO inhibited development of fibrosis from quartz dust and improved lung clearance of quartz after inhalation exposure. Ameliorating effects of PVNO were observed also for pulmonary damage from colloidal SiO2 and organic substances, and the fibrogenic inflammation caused by carrageenan. Although it is not proven that silicosis is a precondition for quartz-induced lung tumours, we investigated the hypothesis that PVNO could reduce the lung tumour risk from quartz in rats. A carcinogenicity study was therefore started in rats with the main focus on the quantitative relationships among pulmonary inflammation, fibrosis and neoplasia caused by intratracheal instillation of 3 mg quartz DQ 12 with or without additional subcutaneous PVNO treatment. Other study groups were treated with multiple dust instillations, i.e. 30 instillations of 0.5 mg amorphous SiO2 at intervals of 2 weeks, 10 instillations of 0.5 mg of ultrafine carbon black or 1 mg coal at weekly intervals. The analyses of the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) 9 months after start of the life-time study showed that the aim of producing similar levels of increased enzyme concentrations in the four groups treated with quartz/PVNO, amorphous SiO2, carbon black and coal was achieved. A 2.5- to 7.7-fold increase for lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), total protein, alkaline phosphatase and gamma-glutamyl transferase (gamma-GT) was found in these groups as compared to the control. In contrast, quartz treatment without PVNO increased the LDH level up to 24-fold and of total protein to 13-fold. However, the cell counts in the BALF were not so much different in all five groups, i.e. quartz without PVNO (leukocytes: 480.000, PMN: 190.000), quartz with PVNO (leukocytes: 300.000, PMN: 100.000), amorphous SiO2 (leukocytes: 570.000, PMN: 315

  8. A Systematic Analysis of the Sensitivity of Plasma Pharmacokinetics to Detect Differences in the Pulmonary Performance of Inhaled Fluticasone Propionate Products Using a Model-Based Simulation Approach.

    PubMed

    Weber, Benjamin; Hochhaus, Guenther

    2015-07-01

    The role of plasma pharmacokinetics (PK) for assessing bioequivalence at the target site, the lung, for orally inhaled drugs remains unclear. A validated semi-mechanistic model, considering the presence of mucociliary clearance in central lung regions, was expanded for quantifying the sensitivity of PK studies in detecting differences in the pulmonary performance (total lung deposition, central-to-peripheral lung deposition ratio, and pulmonary dissolution characteristics) between test (T) and reference (R) inhaled fluticasone propionate (FP) products. PK bioequivalence trials for inhaled FP were simulated based on this PK model for a varying number of subjects and T products. The statistical power to conclude bioequivalence when T and R products are identical was demonstrated to be 90% for approximately 50 subjects. Furthermore, the simulations demonstrated that PK metrics (area under the concentration time curve (AUC) and C max) are capable of detecting differences between T and R formulations of inhaled FP products when the products differ by more than 20%, 30%, and 25% for total lung deposition, central-to-peripheral lung deposition ratio, and pulmonary dissolution characteristics, respectively. These results were derived using a rather conservative risk assessment approach with an error rate of <10%. The simulations thus indicated that PK studies might be a viable alternative to clinical studies comparing pulmonary efficacy biomarkers for slowly dissolving inhaled drugs. PK trials for pulmonary efficacy equivalence testing should be complemented by in vitro studies to avoid false positive bioequivalence assessments that are theoretically possible for some specific scenarios. Moreover, a user-friendly web application for simulating such PK equivalence trials with inhaled FP is provided.

  9. Pulmonary-impedance power spectral analysis: A facile means of detecting radiation-induced gastrointestinal distress and performance decrement in man

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rick, R. C.; Lushbaugh, C. C.; Mcdow, E.; Frome, E.

    1972-01-01

    Changes in respiratory variance revealed by power spectral analysis of the pulmonary impedance pneumogram can be used to detect and measure stresses directly or indirectly affecting human respiratory function. When gastrointestinal distress occurred during a series of 5 total-body exposures of 30 R at a rate of 1.5 R/min, it was accompanied by typical shifts in pulmonary impedance power spectra. These changes did not occur after protracted exposure of 250 R (30 R daily) at 1.5 R/hr that failed to cause radiation sickness. This system for quantitating respiratory effort can also be used to detect alterations in one's ability to perform under controlled exercise conditions.

  10. Radiolabeled, nonspecific, polyclonal human immunoglobulin in the detection of focal inflammation by scintigraphy: Comparison with gallium-67 citrate and technetium-99m-labeled albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Rubin, R.H.; Fischman, A.J.; Needleman, M.; Wilkinson, R.; Callahan, R.J.; Khaw, B.A.; Hansen, W.P.; Kramer, P.B.; Strauss, H.W.

    1989-03-01

    The accumulation of nonspecific polyclonal human immunoglobulin (IgG) radiolabeled with /sup 125/I or /sup 111/In was compared to that of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate and (/sup 99m/Tc)albumin in rats with deep thigh inflammation due to Escherichia coli infection. Serial scintigrams were acquired at 1, 3, 24, and in some cases, 48 hr after injection. As early as 3 hr postinjection, (/sup 111/In)IgG showed greater accumulation at the lesion than (/sup 99m/Tc)HSA (p less than 0.01). Both (/sup 125/I)IgG and (/sup 111/In)IgG showed greater accumulation than (/sup 67/Ga)citrate (p less than 0.01). At 24 hr, IgG image definition increased, while HSA image definition decreased, and the intensity of accumulation of both IgG preparations was greater than that of (/sup 67/Ga)citrate or (/sup 99m/Tc)HSA (p less than 0.01). At all imaging times, (/sup 67/Ga)citrate accumulation was surprisingly low. In inflammation produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Staphylococcus aureus, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Candida albicans, or turpentine, (/sup 111/In)IgG accumulation was similar to the results obtained with Escherichia coli. These studies suggest that focal sites of inflammation can be detected with radiolabeled nonspecific human polyclonal IgG.

  11. Molecular detection of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis among smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Jigjiga town, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Brhane, Mussie; Kebede, Ameha; Petros, Yohannes

    2017-01-01

    Background Molecular methods that target drug resistance mutations are suitable approaches for rapid drug susceptibility testing to detect multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB). The aim of the study was to determine MDR-TB cases and to analyze the frequency of gene mutations associated with rifampicin (RIF) and/or isoniazid (INH) resistance of Mycobacterium tuberculosis among smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients. Methods Institution-based cross-sectional study design was employed. Sputum specimens were collected, and using a pretested questionnaire, data for associated risk factors for drug resistance were collected from 105 consecutive smear-positive pulmonary tuberculosis patients in Karamara General Hospital. Specimens were transported to Harar Health Research and Regional Laboratory, Harar, where molecular drug susceptibility testing was performed using GenoType® MTBDRplus assay. Results Of the total 105 sputum specimens, 98 (93.3%) gave interpretable results, in which 67 (68.4%) were new cases and 31 (31.6%) were previously treated cases. Of these, 80 (81.6%) were sensitive to both drugs and 18 (18.4%) were resistant to RIF and/or INH. The prevalences of MDR-TB in total cases, new, and previously treated cases were 10 (10.2%), 3 (4.5%), and 7 (22.6%), respectively. Among the ten total RIF-resistant specimens, eight (80%) had resulted because of absence of rpoB WT8 and presence of MUT3 and in all specimens, the amino acids changed were Ser531Lue. Of the 18 total INH-resistant specimens, 15 (83.3%) had mutations in the katG gene (katG MUT1, Ser315Thr1), indicating high-level resistance, while 3 (14.7%) had mutations in the inhA promoter gene (Cys15Thr), indicating low-level resistance. Conclusion Among the mutations associated with resistance to RIF and INH, the majority were in codon 531 of the rpoB gene and codon 315 of the katG gene. Relatively high prevalence of MDR-TB was observed in the study. PMID:28331348

  12. [Detection of alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency: A study on patients diagnosed with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease in primary health care].

    PubMed

    García-Palenzuela, R; Timiraos Carrasco, R; Gómez-Besteiro, M I; Lavia, G; Lago Pose, M; Lara, B

    2016-06-25

    The prevalence of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in Spain is 10.2%. Although tobacco is the main aetiological factor, biomass smoke exposure and alpha-1 antitrypsin deficiency (AATD) have also been related to its development. AATD is a genetic condition which could be causing 2-3% of COPD cases. The aim of this cross-sectional descriptive study was to exclude the existence of AATD in a population of COPD patients from CS Culleredo, A Coruña. The thick blood drop test on blotting paper, as well as the analysis of the mutations PI*S and PI*Z of the gene SERPINA 1 by the analysis of denaturing gradients after simultaneous amplification related to PCR (polymerase chain reaction). The study population included 80 patients between 40-80 years old, of whom 30% were carriers of a deficient allele (heterozygous), and 80% of them were the allele PiS. Only one PiSZ (1.25%) individual and no PiZZ was detected. This represents an allelic frequency of 3.1% (PiZ), and 13.1% (PiS). The detected allelic frequencies are higher than previously reported in the Spanish population. Severe AATD has been excluded in 98.75% of the study population. The Pi*SZ patient has been diagnosed in an early stage of the disease. We have also achieved one of the quality indicators recommended by GesEPOC. Our area has shown a high PiS and PiZ frequency, thus our study could be used as a reference for further research in the Galician population.

  13. Gene Expression Profiling of Pulmonary Artery in a Rabbit Model of Pulmonary Thromboembolism

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Jianfei; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Xie, Hao; Zhu, Qilin; Huang, Minjie

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) refers to the obstruction of thrombus in pulmonary artery or its branches. Recent studies have suggested that PTE-induced endothelium injury is the major physiological consequence of PTE. And it is reasonal to use PTE-induced endothelium injury to stratify disease severity. According to the massive morphologic and histologic findings, rabbit models could be applied to closely mimic the human PE. Genomewide gene expression profiling has not been attempted in PTE. In this study, we determined the accuracy of rabbit autologous thrombus PTE model for human PTE disease, then we applied gene expression array to identify gene expression changes in pulmonary arteries under PTE to identify potential molecular biomarkers and signaling pathways for PTE. We detected 1343 genes were upregulated and 923 genes were downregulated in PTE rabbits. The expression of several genes (IL-8, TNF-α, and CXCL5) with functional importance were further confirmed in transcript and protein levels. The most significantly differentially regulated genes were related to inflammation, immune disease, pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular diseases. Totally 87 genes were up-regulated in the inflammatory genes. We conclude that gene expression profiling in rabbit PTE model could extend the understanding of PTE pathogenesis at the molecular level. Our study provides the fundamental framework for future clinical research on human PTE, including identification of potential biomarkers for prognosis or therapeutic targets for PTE. PMID:27798647

  14. Gene Expression Profiling of Pulmonary Artery in a Rabbit Model of Pulmonary Thromboembolism.

    PubMed

    Tang, Zhiyuan; Wang, Xudong; Huang, Jianfei; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Xie, Hao; Zhu, Qilin; Huang, Minjie; Ni, Songshi

    2016-01-01

    Acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE) refers to the obstruction of thrombus in pulmonary artery or its branches. Recent studies have suggested that PTE-induced endothelium injury is the major physiological consequence of PTE. And it is reasonal to use PTE-induced endothelium injury to stratify disease severity. According to the massive morphologic and histologic findings, rabbit models could be applied to closely mimic the human PE. Genomewide gene expression profiling has not been attempted in PTE. In this study, we determined the accuracy of rabbit autologous thrombus PTE model for human PTE disease, then we applied gene expression array to identify gene expression changes in pulmonary arteries under PTE to identify potential molecular biomarkers and signaling pathways for PTE. We detected 1343 genes were upregulated and 923 genes were downregulated in PTE rabbits. The expression of several genes (IL-8, TNF-α, and CXCL5) with functional importance were further confirmed in transcript and protein levels. The most significantly differentially regulated genes were related to inflammation, immune disease, pulmonary disease, and cardiovascular diseases. Totally 87 genes were up-regulated in the inflammatory genes. We conclude that gene expression profiling in rabbit PTE model could extend the understanding of PTE pathogenesis at the molecular level. Our study provides the fundamental framework for future clinical research on human PTE, including identification of potential biomarkers for prognosis or therapeutic targets for PTE.

  15. Studies on experimental pulmonary granulomas. I. Detection of lymphokines in granulomatous lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Masih, N.; Majeska, J.; Yoshida, T.

    1979-01-01

    Granulomatous reactions were immunologically induced in guinea pigs by several procedures, including intravenous injections of Bacille Calmette Gúerin (BCG) into animals immunized with complete Freund's Adjuvant and an intravenous injection of agarose beads linked to a specific antigen (dinitrophenylated bovine serum albumin) into immune animals. The tissue extracts obtained from lungs at various stages of granuloma formation were examined for macrophage migration inhibition (MIF) activity. The activity was found in a high incidence during the early stages of the granulomatous response. In contrast, MIF activity could be detected only rarely in granulomatous spleens and not in granulomatous livers. Chemotactic factor activity and mitogenic factor activity were only sporadically detectable. The MIF activity was associated with fractions showing chemical heterogeneity. One fraction was physicochemically indistinguishable from conventional lymphocyte-derived MIF; the other was a substance of large molecular weight. These results demonstrate the presence of biologically active mediators in immune granulomas, which may be related to early events involved in the induction or enhancement of such reactions. Images Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 1 Figure 4 PMID:377991

  16. Rationale and Design of a Randomized Trial of Home Electronic Symptom and Lung Function Monitoring to Detect Cystic Fibrosis Pulmonary Exacerbations: the early intervention in cystic fibrosis exacerbation (eICE) Trial

    PubMed Central

    Lechtzin, N; West, N; Allgood, S; Wilhelm, E; Khan, U; Mayer-Hamblett, N; Aitken, M L; Ramsey, BW; Boyle, MP; Mogayzel, PJ; Goss, CH

    2013-01-01

    Background Acute pulmonary exacerbations are central events in the lives of individuals with cystic fibrosis (CF). Pulmonary Exacerbations lead to impaired lung function, worse quality of life, and shorter survival. We hypothesized that aggressive early treatment of acute pulmonary exacerbation may improve clinical outcomes. Purpose Describe the rationale of an ongoing trial designed to determine the efficacy of home monitoring of both lung function measurements and symptoms for early detection and subsequent early treatment of acute CF pulmonary exacerbations. Study Design A randomized, non-blinded, multi-center trial in 320 individuals with CF age 14 years and older. The study compares usual care to a twice a week assessment of home spirometry and CF respiratory symptoms using an electronic device with data transmission to the research personnel to identify and trigger early treatment of CF pulmonary exacerbation. Participants will be enrolled in the study for 12 months. The primary endpoint is change in FEV1 (L) from baseline to 12 months determined by a linear mixed effects model incorporating all quarterly FEV1 measurements. Secondary endpoints include time to first acute protocol-defined pulmonary exacerbation, number of acute pulmonary exacerbations, number of hospitalization days for acute pulmonary exacerbation, time from the end of acute pulmonary exacerbation to onset of subsequent pulmonary exacerbation, change in Health related quality of life, change in treatment burden, change in CF respiratory symptoms, and adherence to the study protocol. Conclusions This study is a first step in establishing alternative approaches to the care of CF pulmonary exacerbations. We hypothesize that early treatment of pulmonary exacerbations has the potential to slow lung function decline, reduce respiratory symptoms and improve the quality of life for individuals with CF. PMID:24055998

  17. Implementation of combined SVM-algorithm and computer-aided perception feedback for pulmonary nodule detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pietrzyk, Mariusz W.; Rannou, Didier; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2012-02-01

    This pilot study examines the effect of a novel decision support system in medical image interpretation. This system is based on combining image spatial frequency properties and eye-tracking data in order to recognize over and under calling errors. Thus, before it can be implemented as a detection aided schema, training is required during which SVMbased algorithm learns to recognize FP from all reported outcomes, and, FN from all unreported prolonged dwelled regions. Eight radiologists inspected 50 PA chest radiographs with the specific task of identifying lung nodules. Twentyfive cases contained CT proven subtle malignant lesions (5-20mm), but prevalence was not known by the subjects, who took part in two sequential reading sessions, the second, without and with support system feedback. MCMR ROC DBM and JAFROC analyses were conducted and demonstrated significantly higher scores following feedback with p values of 0.04, and 0.03 respectively, highlighting significant improvements in radiology performance once feedback was used. This positive effect on radiologists' performance might have important implications for future CAD-system development.

  18. Magnetic bead fluorescent immunoassay for the rapid detection of the novel inflammation marker YKL40 at the point-of-care.

    PubMed

    Schmalenberg, Michael; Beaudoin, Christopher; Bulst, Ludwig; Steubl, Dominik; Luppa, Peter B

    2015-12-01

    Pneumonia is one of the leading causes of death worldwide.We present a magnetic bead fluorescent sandwich immunoassay that allows rapid serum measurement of the novel inflammation marker YKL40 (CHI3L1) at the point of care (POC) that could aid pneumonia diagnosis. The magnetic beads serve as the solid phase for separation of YKL40 from serum. The readout is performed using a small and robust fluorescence reader,which detects the turnover of a fluorescent substrate. The assay procedure, from sample addition to data retrieval, consists of three steps and is performed in less than 20 min. The presented assay has a linear range from 3 to 111 ng/mL, with a limit of detection of 2.9 ng/mL. The average recoveries were found between 101 and 111%. The developed method was applied in sera from healthy subjects (n= 14; c(YKL40)= 50 ± 49 ng/mL) and from pneumonia patients (n = 14; c(YKL40) = 333.6 ± 225 ng/mL). The elevated YKL40 concentrations in pneumonia-diseased patients are in good agreement with previously published data. The POC-ready device provides a simple immunoassay that could help to optimize pneumonia inflammation diagnostics in low-resource settings.

  19. CT pulmonary angiography of adult pulmonary vascular diseases: Technical considerations and interpretive pitfalls.

    PubMed

    Taslakian, Bedros; Latson, Larry A; Truong, Mylene T; Aaltonen, Eric; Shiau, Maria C; Girvin, Francis; Alpert, Jeffrey B; Wickstrom, Maj; Ko, Jane P

    2016-11-01

    Computed tomography pulmonary angiography (CTPA) has become the primary imaging modality for evaluating the pulmonary arteries. Although pulmonary embolism is the primary indication for CTPA, various pulmonary vascular abnormalities can be detected in adults. Knowledge of these disease entities and understanding technical pitfalls that can occur when performing CTPA are essential to enable accurate diagnosis and allow timely management. This review will cover a spectrum of acquired abnormalities including pulmonary embolism due to thrombus and foreign bodies, primary and metastatic tumor involving the pulmonary arteries, pulmonary hypertension, as well as pulmonary artery aneurysms and stenoses. Additionally, methods to overcome technical pitfalls and interventional treatment options will be addressed.

  20. Rapid detection and identification of mucormycetes in bronchoalveolar lavage samples from immunocompromised patients with pulmonary infiltrates by use of high-resolution melt analysis.

    PubMed

    Lengerova, Martina; Racil, Zdenek; Hrncirova, Kristyna; Kocmanova, Iva; Volfova, Pavlina; Ricna, Dita; Bejdak, Petr; Moulis, Mojmir; Pavlovsky, Zdenek; Weinbergerova, Barbora; Toskova, Martina; Mayer, Jiri

    2014-08-01

    Rapid differential diagnostics of pulmonary infiltrates suspected of invasive fungal disease in an immunocompromised host and early initiation of effective antifungal therapy are crucial for patient outcomes. There are no serological tests available to detect mucormycetes; therefore, PCR-based methods are highly suitable. We validated our previously published PCR followed by high-resolution melt analysis (PCR/HRMA) to detect Rhizopus spp., Rhizomucor pusillus, Lichtheimia corymbifera, and Mucor spp. in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) samples from immunocompromised patients who were at risk of invasive fungal disease. All PCR/HRMA-positive samples were retested using novel real-time quantitative PCR (RQ PCR) assays specific to the species identified. In total, between January 2009 and December 2012 we analyzed 99 BAL samples from 86 patients with pulmonary abnormalities using PCR/HRMA. Ninety (91%) BAL samples were negative, and 9 (9%) samples were positive. The sensitivity and specificity of PCR/HRMA were 100% and 93%, respectively. By combining the positive results of PCR/HRMA with positive RQ PCR results, the specificity was raised to 98%. PCR/HRMA, due to its high negative predictive value (99%), represents a fast and reliable tool for routine BAL sample screening for the differential diagnosis of pulmonary infiltrates in immunocompromised patients for the four most clinically important mucormycetes.

  1. Necrotizing arteritis occurring in an intralobar pulmonary sequestration of a patient without systemic vasculitis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Hashimoto, Hirotsugu; Hara, Kei; Matsumoto, Jun; Nashiro, Tamaki; Nagano, Masaaki; Kusakabe, Masashi; Kurata, Atsushi; Kuroda, Masahiko; Suzuki, Yoshio; Horiuchi, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Necrotizing arteritis is a complex lesion of pulmonary hypertension, as are plexiform lesions, and is classically recognized as grade 6 in the Heath and Edwards grading scheme for hypertensive pulmonary vascular disease. The vascular changes observed in intralobar pulmonary sequestration have been reported to be similar to those observed in pulmonary hypertension, such as plexiform lesions. However, necrotizing arteritis occurring in an intralobar sequestration of a patient without systemic vasculitis syndrome has never been reported to our knowledge. Here, we report a case of a 38-year-old woman with pulmonary sequestration detected on a medical checkup. She was treated with surgery, and subsequent pathological analyses revealed necrotizing vasculitis in her sequestrated lung. We suspected systemic vasculitis syndromes, such as Takayasu arteritis, polyarteritis nodosa, and antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody-associated vasculitis. However, physical and blood examination did not show any other abnormalities, and hence, she did not have systemic vasculitis syndrome. Immunohistochemical analyses of the resected specimen showed that inflammatory cells of the arteries were mainly composed of T lymphocytes. T-lymphocytic inflammation with little neutrophil and histiocyte infiltration may be a pathological feature of necrotizing arteritis observed in pulmonary sequestration. This is the first case to our knowledge of necrotizing arteritis in an intralobar pulmonary sequestration of a patient without systemic vasculitis syndrome.

  2. [First detection of psittacid herpesvirus 2 in Congo African grey parrots (Psittacus erithacus erithacus) associated with pharyngeal papillomas and cloacal inflammation in Germany].

    PubMed

    Legler, Marko; Kothe, Ruth; Wohlsein, Peter; Hewicker-Trautwein, Marion; Kummerfeld, Norbert; Rautenschlein, Silke

    2014-01-01

    Congo African Grey Parrots (GP; Psittacus erithacus erithacus) from four different avicultures, presented in the Clinic for Exotic Pets, Reptiles and Birds, University of Veterinary Medicine Hannover, Foundation, showed choanal papillomas or hyperemia of the cloacal mucosa. Histologically, the mucosal choanal proliferations were diagnosed as exophytic papillomas and a mild hyperplasia of the cloacal mucosa with lympho-histiocytic inflammation with no visible inclusion bodies was found. Herpesvirus genome was detected by nested PCR in pooled choanal and cloacal swabs from clinically diseased parrots and healthy contact animals. Sequencing of parts of the herpesvirus DNA-polymerase gene indicated 98-100% homology of the detected herpesviruses with the Psittacid Herpesvirus 2 (PsHV-2). In one aviculture with cloacal inflammation papillomavirus-DNA was concurrently found to a PsHV-2 infection. In addition to the four avicultures with clinical symptoms 25 more flocks of grey parrots, in total 57 Congo-GP and 13 Timneh-GP, were examined for a herpesvirus infection. A total of six out of 29 studied parrot avicultures were tested positive for PsHV-2. The detection of this virus also in flocks of GP, which were bred in Europe, shows the establishment of this infection in the GP population in captivity. As indicated in the literature as well as in our study PsHV-2 could be only detected in Congo-GP, independently if they were kept either alone or in mixed avicultures with amazon and macaw species. These findings suggest that PsHV-2 is adapted to this Psittacus species.

  3. Keratinocyte growth factor protects against elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in mice.

    PubMed

    Plantier, Laurent; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Antico Arciuch, Valeria G; Antico, Valeria G; Boyer, Laurent; De Coster, Cécile; Marchal, Joëlle; Bachoual, Rafik; Mailleux, Arnaud; Boczkowski, Jorge; Crestani, Bruno

    2007-11-01

    Pulmonary emphysema is characterized by persistent inflammation and progressive alveolar destruction. The keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) favorably influences alveolar maintenance and repair and possesses anti-inflammatory properties. We aimed to determine whether exogenous KGF prevented or corrected elastase-induced pulmonary emphysema in vivo. Treatment with 5 mg x kg(-1) x day(-1) KGF before elastase instillation prevented pulmonary emphysema. This effect was associated with 1) a sharp reduction in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid total protein and inflammatory cell recruitment, 2) a reduction in the pulmonary expression of the chemokines CCL2 (or monocyte chemoattractant protein-1) and CXCL2 (or macrophage inflammatory protein-2alpha) and of the adhesion molecules ICAM-1 and VCAM-1, 3) a reduction in matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 activity at day 3, and 4) a major reduction in DNA damage detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) in alveolar cells at day 7. Treatment with KGF after elastase instillation had no effect on elastase-induced emphysema despite the conserved expression of the KGF receptor in the lungs of elastase-instilled animals as determined by immunohistochemistry. In vitro, KGF abolished the elastase-induced increase in CCL2, CXCL2, and ICAM-1 mRNA in the MLE-12 murine alveolar epithelial cell line. We conclude that KGF pretreatment protected against elastase-induced pulmonary inflammation, activation of MMPs, alveolar cell DNA damage, and subsequent emphysema in mice.

  4. Ultrasound Elasticity Imaging for Detecting Intestinal Fibrosis and Inflammation in Rats and Humans With Crohn’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Stidham, Ryan W.; Xu, Jingping; Johnson, Laura A.; Kim, Kang; Moons, David S.; Mckenna, Barbara J.; Rubin, Jonathan M.; Higgins, Peter D. R.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Intestinal fibrosis causes many complications of Crohn’s disease (CD). Available biomarkers and imaging modalities lack sufficient accuracy to distinguish intestinal inflammation from fibrosis. Transcutaneous ultrasound elasticity imaging (UEI) is a promising, noninvasive approach for measuring tissue mechanical properties. We hypothesized that UEI could differentiate inflammatory from fibrotic bowel wall changes in both animal models of colitis and humans with CD. METHODS Female Lewis rats underwent weekly trinitrobenzene sulfonic acid enemas yielding models of acute inflammatory colitis (n = 5) and chronic intestinal fibrosis (n = 6). UEI scanning used a novel speckle-tracking algorithm to estimate tissue strain. Resected bowel segments were evaluated for evidence of inflammation and fibrosis. Seven consecutive patients with stenotic CD were studied with UEI and their resected stenotic and normal bowel segments were evaluated by ex vivo elastometry and histopathology. RESULTS Transcutaneous UEI normalized strain was able to differentiate acutely inflamed (−2.07) versus chronic fibrotic (−1.10) colon in rat models of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD; P = .037). Transcutaneous UEI normalized strain also differentiated stenotic (−0.87) versus adjacent normal small bowel (−1.99) in human CD (P = .0008), and this measurement also correlated well with ex vivo elastometry (r = −0.81). CONCLUSIONS UEI can differentiate inflammatory from fibrotic intestine in rat models of IBD and can differentiate between fibrotic and unaffected intestine in a pilot study in humans with CD. UEI represents a novel technology with potential to become a new objective measure of progression of intestinal fibrosis. Prospective clinical studies in CD are needed. PMID:21784048

  5. 99mTc-labelled anti-CD11b SPECT/CT imaging allows detection of plaque destabilization tightly linked to inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guobing; Hu, Yan; Xiao, Jie; Li, Xiao; Li, Yanli; Tan, Hui; Zhao, Yanzhao; Cheng, Dengfeng; Shi, Hongcheng

    2016-01-01

    It remains challenging to predict the risk of rupture for a specific atherosclerotic plaque timely, a thrombotic trigger tightly linked to inflammation. CD11b, is a biomarker abundant on inflammatory cells, not restricted to monocytes/macrophages. In this study, we fabricated a probe named as 99mTc-MAG3-anti-CD11b for detecting inflamed atherosclerotic plaques with single photon emission computed tomography/computed tomography (SPECT/CT). The ApoE-knockout (ApoE−/−) mice were selected to establish animal models, with C57BL/6J mice used for control. A higher CD11b+-cell recruitment with higher CD11b expression and more serious whole-body inflammatory status were identified in ApoE−/− mice. The probe showed high in vitro affinity and specificity to the Raw-264.7 macrophages, as well as inflammatory cells infiltrated in atherosclerotic plaques, either in ex vivo fluorescent imaging or in in vivo micro-SPECT/CT imaging, which were confirmed by ex vivo planar gamma imaging, Oil-Red-O staining and CD11b-immunohistochemistry staining. A significant positive relationship was identified between the radioactivity intensity on SPECT/CT images and the CD11b expression in plaques. In summary, this study demonstrates the feasibility of anti-CD11b antibody mediated noninvasive SPECT/CT imaging of inflammatory leukocytes in murine atherosclerotic plaques. This imaging strategy can identify inflammation-rich plaques at risk for rupture and evaluate the effectiveness of inflammation-targeted therapies in atheroma. PMID:26877097

  6. Pulmonary artery sarcoma detected on F-18 FDG PET/CT as origin of multiple spinal metastases.

    PubMed

    Chun, In Kook; Eo, Jae Seon; Paeng, Jin Chul; Kim, Dong Wan; Chung, June-Key; Lee, Dong Soo

    2011-08-01

    A 67-year-old man with back pain was diagnosed as having multiple spinal metastases on MRI. On CT scan, only a filling defect in the right pulmonary artery was observed and suspected as venous thromboembolism. On F-18 fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET/CT, intense hypermetabolism was observed in the right pulmonary artery in addition to the metastatic spine lesions. Biopsy confirmed the lesion as a primary pulmonary artery sarcoma (PAS), and the spine lesions as metastases of PAS. Although PAS is rare and its bone metastasis presenting initial symptom is extremely rare, FDG PET/CT is an effective diagnostic modality for PAS, not only in discrimination from venous thromboembolism, but also in workup of metastatic origin.

  7. Pulmonary Hypertension and Pulmonary Vasodilators.

    PubMed

    Keller, Roberta L

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in the perinatal period can present acutely (persistent pulmonary hypertension of the newborn) or chronically. Clinical and echocardiographic diagnosis of acute pulmonary hypertension is well accepted but there are no broadly validated criteria for echocardiographic diagnosis of pulmonary hypertension later in the clinical course, although there are significant populations of infants with lung disease at risk for this diagnosis. Contributing cardiovascular comorbidities are common in infants with pulmonary hypertension and lung disease. It is not clear who should be treated without confirmation of pulmonary vascular disease by cardiac catheterization, with concurrent evaluation of any contributing cardiovascular comorbidities.

  8. Pulmonary Edema

    MedlinePlus

    ... suddenly or develop over time. Sudden (acute) pulmonary edema symptoms Extreme shortness of breath or difficulty breathing ( ... fatal if not treated. Long-term (chronic) pulmonary edema symptoms Having more shortness of breath than normal ...

  9. Pulmonary Rehabilitation

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary Rehabilitation If you have shortness of breath because of lung problems, you may have asked yourself: • Can I ... medications do I really need to take? Pulmonary rehabilitation can help answer these and other questions. Enrolling ...

  10. Pulmonary Fibrosis

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary fibrosis is a condition in which the tissue deep in your lungs becomes scarred over time. This tissue ... may not get enough oxygen. Causes of pulmonary fibrosis include environmental pollutants, some medicines, some connective tissue ...

  11. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... pulmonary embolism is a sudden blockage in a lung artery. The cause is usually a blood clot ... loose and travels through the bloodstream to the lung. Pulmonary embolism is a serious condition that can ...

  12. Risk Stratification Model to Detect Early Pulmonary Disease in Infants With Cystic Fibrosis Diagnosed by Newborn Screening

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Lacrecia J.; Oates, Gabriela R.; Oster, Robert A.; Self, Staci T.; Troxler, Robert B.; Hoover, Wynton C.; Gutierrez, Hector H.; Harris, William T.

    2017-01-01

    Summary Objective The clinical benefit of newborn screening (NBS) for cystic fibrosis (CF) has been primarily nutritional, with less overt respiratory impact. Identification of risk factors for infant CF lung disease could facilitate targeted interventions to improve pulmonary outcomes. Methods This retrospective study evaluated socioeconomic information, clinical data, and results from routine infant pulmonary function testing (iPFT) of infants diagnosed with CF through NBS (N = 43) at a single CF center over a 4-year period (2008–2012). A five-item composite clinical score was developed and combined with socioeconomic indicators to facilitate identification of CF infants at increased risk of early-onset respiratory impairment. Results Paternal education was positively associated with lung function (P = 0.02). Clinical score <7 (on a scale of 0–10) predicted diminished pulmonary measure (P < 0.005). Retrospective risk stratification by clinical score and paternal education identified CF infants at low, intermediate, or high risk of pulmonary disease. Forced expiratory volume (FEV0.5%, mean ± SD) averaged 115 ± 19% in the low-risk group, 97 ± 17% in the intermediate-risk group, and 90 ± 8% in the high-risk group (P < 0.005). Results were similar for mid-expiratory flows (FEF25–75%). Multiple regression analysis confirmed the predictive value of this risk stratification model of CF infant pulmonary health. Conclusion We combined socioeconomic and clinical data to risk-stratify CF infants for early-onset lung disease as quantified by iPFT. Our model showed significant differences in infant pulmonary function across risk groups. The developed tool offers an easily available, inexpensive, and non-invasive way to assess risk of respiratory decline in CF infants and identify those meriting targeted therapeutic attention. PMID:27556254

  13. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    ... on Twitter. What Is Pulmonary Hypertension? Pulmonary hypertension (PULL-mun-ary HI-per-TEN-shun), or PH, is increased pressure in the pulmonary arteries. These arteries carry blood from your heart to your lungs to pick up oxygen. PH causes symptoms such as shortness of ...

  14. Detection of Aspergillus fumigatus pulmonary fungal infections in mice with 99mTc-labeledMORF oligomers targeting ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yuzhen; Chen, Ling; Liu, Xinrong; Cheng, Dengfeng; Liu, Guozheng; Liu, Yuxia; Dou, Shuping; Hnatowich, Donald J.; Rusckowski, Mary

    2012-01-01

    Purpose Invasive aspergillosis is a major cause of infectious morbidity and mortality in immunocompromised hosts. The fungus Aspergillus fumigatus (A. fumigatus) is the primary causative agent of invasive aspergillosis. However, A. fumigatus infections remain difficult to diagnose particularly in the early stages due to the lack of a rapid, sensitive and specific diagnostic approach. In this study, we investigated 99mTc labeled MORF oligomers targeting fungal ribosomal RNA (rRNA) for the imaging detection of fungal infections. Procedures Three phosphorodiamidate morpholino (MORF) oligomer (a DNA analogue) probes were designed: AGEN, complementary to a sequence of the fungal 28S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) of Aspergillus, as a genus-specific probe; AFUM, complementary to the 28S rRNA sequence of A. fumigatus, as a fungus species-specific probe; and cMORF, irrelevant to all fungi species, as a control probe. The probes were conjugated with Alexa Fluor 633 carboxylic acid succinimidyl ester (AF633) for fluorescence imaging or with NHS-mercaptoacetyl triglycine (NHS-MAG3) for nuclear imaging with 99mTc and then evaluated in vitro and in vivo. Results The specific binding of AGEN and AFUM to fungal total RNA was confirmed by dot blot hybridization while specific binding of AGEN and AFUM in fixed and live A. fumigatus was demonstrated by both fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis and accumulation in live cells. SPECT imaging of BALB/c mice with pulmonary A. fumigatus infections and administered 99mTc labeled AGEN and AFUM showed immediate and obvious accumulation in the infected lungs, while no significant accumulation of the control 99mTc-cMORF in the infected lung was observed. Compared to non-infected mice, with sacrifice at 1 hour, the accumulation of 99mTc-AGEN and 99mTc-AFUM in the lungs of mice infected with A. fumigatus were 2 and 2.7 fold higher respectively. Conclusions In vivo targeting fungal ribosomal RNA with 99mTc labeled MORF probes AGEN and AFUM may

  15. Whole-body magnetic resonance imaging in myxoid liposarcoma: A useful adjunct for the detection of extra-pulmonary metastatic disease.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, J D; Watson, J J; Cool, P; Cribb, G L; Jenkins, J P R; Leahy, M; Gregory, J J

    2016-04-01

    Myxoid liposarcomas (MLS) are a subgroup of soft-tissue sarcomas which have a propensity for extra-pulmonary metastases. Conventional radiological staging of soft-tissue sarcomas consists of chest radiographs (CXR) and thoracic computed tomography (CT) for possible chest metastases, supplemented by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) for local disease. The optimal radiological modality to detect extra-pulmonary metastases for systemic staging has not been proven. We reviewed the efficacy of Whole-Body MRI (WBMRI) for this purpose. 33 WBMRI and simultaneous CT scans were performed in 28 patients suffering from MLS between 2007 and 2015. 38 metastases were identified in seven patients via WBMRI. Osseous lesions predominated (spine, pelvis, chest-wall and long bones), followed by soft-tissue and abdominal lesions. Of the 29 soft-tissue or osseous metastases that were within the field-of-view of the simultaneous CT scans, five soft-tissue and zero osseous metastases were identified using CT. Metastatic disease was detected in three patients solely using WBMRI, which directly influenced their management. WBMRI is a useful adjunct in the detection of extra-pulmonary metastatic disease, which directly alters patient management. WBMRI has demonstrated an ability to identify more sites of metastatic disease compared to CT. WBMRI should be used in two situations. Firstly, at diagnosis where ablative treatment will be required e.g. amputation, when the diagnosis of occult metastasis would change treatment planning. Secondly, at diagnosis of relapse to confirm if it is a solitary site of relapse prior to consideration of metastectomy.

  16. Intrapericardial extralobar pulmonary sequestration detected as an intrathoracic cystic mass by using prenatal ultrasonography: case report and review of the literature.

    PubMed

    Yanagisawa, Satohiko; Maeda, Kosaku; Tazuke, Yuko; Baba, Katsuhisa; Tuji, Yuki; Kawahara, Insu; Nakagami, Tomokazu

    2012-12-01

    Intrapericardial extralobar pulmonary sequestration is a very rare congenital lung anomaly. We report a case of this condition, detected as an intrathoracic cystic lesion by using prenatal ultrasonography. The neonate was born at 38 weeks of gestation with no progression of the lesion and no respiratory or cardiac symptoms. Ultrasonography and computed tomography (CT) revealed a 40 × 17 × 17-mm intrapericardial lesion, composed of cystic components and a solid component. Intrapericardial extrapulmonary sequestration was suspected largely because CT showed a vague aberrant artery. At the age of 3 months, elective surgery was performed, and the postoperative course was uneventful.

  17. CT-Guided Biopsy in Suspected Spondylodiscitis – The Association of Paravertebral Inflammation with Microbial Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Spira, Daniel; Germann, Thomas; Lehner, Burkhard; Hemmer, Stefan; Akbar, Michael; Jesser, Jessica; Weber, Marc-André; Rehnitz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To search for imaging characteristics distinguishing patients with successful from those with futile microbiological pathogen detection by CT-guided biopsy in suspected spondylodiscitis. Methods 34 consecutive patients with suspected spondylodiscitis underwent CT-guided biopsy for pathogen detection. MR-images were assessed for inflammatory infiltration of disks, adjacent vertebrae, epidural and paravertebral space. CT-images were reviewed for arrosion of adjacent end plates and reduced disk height. Biopsy samples were sent for microbiological examination in 34/34 patients, and for additional histological analysis in 28/34 patients. Results Paravertebral infiltration was present in all 10/10 patients with positive microbiology and occurred in only 12/24 patients with negative microbiology, resulting in a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 50% for pathogen detection. Despite its limited sensitivities, epidural infiltration and paravertebral abscesses showed considerably higher specificities of 83.3% and 90.9%, respectively. Paravertebral infiltration was more extensive in patients with positive as compared to negative microbiology (p = 0.002). Even though sensitivities for pathogen detection were also high in case of vertebral and disk infiltration, or end plate arrosion, specificities remained below 10%. Conclusions Inflammatory infiltration of the paravertebral space indicated successful pathogen detection by CT-guided biopsy. Specificity was increased by the additional occurrence of epidural infiltration or paravertebral abscesses. PMID:26727377

  18. Cardiovascular Function in Pulmonary Emphysema

    PubMed Central

    Visca, Dina; Aiello, Marina; Chetta, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic cardiovascular disease, such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias, have a strong influence on each other, and systemic inflammation has been considered as the main linkage between them. On the other hand, airflow limitation may markedly affect lung mechanics in terms of static and dynamic hyperinflation, especially in pulmonary emphysema, and they can in turn influence cardiac performance as well. Skeletal mass depletion, which is a common feature in COPD especially in pulmonary emphysema patients, may have also a role in cardiovascular function of these patients, irrespective of lung damage. We reviewed the emerging evidence that highlights the role of lung mechanics and muscle mass impairment on ventricular volumes, stroke volume, and stroke work at rest and on exercise in the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Patients with emphysema may differ among COPD population even in terms of cardiovascular function. PMID:24369007

  19. Cardiovascular function in pulmonary emphysema.

    PubMed

    Visca, Dina; Aiello, Marina; Chetta, Alfredo

    2013-01-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and chronic cardiovascular disease, such as coronary artery disease, congestive heart failure, and cardiac arrhythmias, have a strong influence on each other, and systemic inflammation has been considered as the main linkage between them. On the other hand, airflow limitation may markedly affect lung mechanics in terms of static and dynamic hyperinflation, especially in pulmonary emphysema, and they can in turn influence cardiac performance as well. Skeletal mass depletion, which is a common feature in COPD especially in pulmonary emphysema patients, may have also a role in cardiovascular function of these patients, irrespective of lung damage. We reviewed the emerging evidence that highlights the role of lung mechanics and muscle mass impairment on ventricular volumes, stroke volume, and stroke work at rest and on exercise in the presence of pulmonary emphysema. Patients with emphysema may differ among COPD population even in terms of cardiovascular function.

  20. Evaluation of the role of oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the pulmonary and the hepatic toxicity induced by cerium oxide nanoparticles following intratracheal instillation in male Sprague-Dawley rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nalabotu, Siva Krishna

    The field of nanotechnology is rapidly progressing with potential applications in the automobile, healthcare, electronics, cosmetics, textiles, information technology, and environmental sectors. Nanomaterials are engineered structures with at least one dimension of 100 nanometers or less. With increased applications of nanotechnology, there are increased chances of exposure to manufactured nanomaterials. Recent reports on the toxicity of engineered nanomaterials have given scientific and regulatory agencies concerns over the safety of nanomaterials. Specifically, the Organization for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) has identified fourteen high priority nanomaterials for study. Cerium oxide (CeO2) nanoparticles are one among the high priority group. Recent data suggest that CeO2 nanoparticles may be toxic to lung cell lines in vitro and lung tissues in vivo. Other work has proposed that oxidative stress may play an important role in the toxicity; however, the exact mechanism of the toxicity, has to our knowledge, not been investigated. Similarly, it is not clear whether CeO2 nanoparticles exhibit systemic toxicity. Here, we investigate whether pulmonary exposure to CeO2 nanoparticles is associated with oxidative stress, inflammation and apoptosis in the lungs and liver of adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. Our data suggest that the intratracheal instillation of CeO2 nanoparticles can cause an increased lung weight to body weight ratio. Changes in lung weights were associated with the accumulation of cerium in the lungs, elevations in serum inflammatory markers, an increased Bax to Bcl-2 ratio, elevated caspase-3 protein levels, increased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and diminished phosphorylation of ERK1/2-MAPK. Our findings from the study evaluating the possible translocation of CeO2 nanoparticles from the lungs to the liver suggest that CeO 2 nanoparticle exposure was associated with increased liver ceria levels, elevations in serum alanine transaminase

  1. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA detected in pulmonary metastases from a penile squamous cell carcinoma: a case study.

    PubMed

    Lorenzon, Laura; Benevolo, Maria; Visca, Paolo; Venturo, Irene; Filippetti, Massimo; Piro, Francesca Romana; Rollo, Francesca; Vocaturo, Amina

    2013-02-01

    This report describe the case of a patient presenting with pulmonary metastases from a penile cancer, where the presence of the human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA both in the primary tumor and in the distant metastases confirmed the spreading of the disease, ruling out a possible primary lung squamous cell carcinoma. Indeed, according to the findings, the HPV genotyping test might help in the identification of metastatic disease from anogenital malignancies or other HPV-related cancers.

  2. Improving the Diagnostic Specificity of CT for Early Detection of Lung Cancer: 4D CT-Based Pulmonary Nodule Elastometry

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-08-01

    International Conference of Computer Assisted Radiology and Surgery (CARS); June. Berlin, Germany2007. 3. Rohr K, Stiehl HS, Sprengel R, Buzug TM...protocol for the pulmonary benign model: 8 Two parameters were considered in developing the protocol:  Implanting the benign mode (carbon...ability to distinguish malignant tissue from lung tissue Reportable Outcomes: The following abstracts have been selected for oral presentation: 1

  3. Ultrasound-detected joint inflammation and B cell count: related variables for rituximab-treated RA patients?

    PubMed

    Valor, Lara; Martínez-Estupiñán, Lina; Janta, Iustina; Nieto, Juan Carlos; Ovalles-Bonilla, Juan Gabriel; González-Fernández, Carlos; Del Rio, Tamara; Hernández-Flórez, Diana; Monteagudo, Indalecio; López-Longo, Francisco Javier; Naredo, Esperanza

    2016-06-01

    This cross-sectional observational study aimed to explore the relationship between B cell count and ultrasound (US)-detected synovitis, in patients with rheumatoid arthritis treated with rituximab. Thirty-seven consecutive RA patients treated with RTX were recruited for the study. The patients underwent clinical [i.e., Disease Activity Score 28 joints (DAS28)], laboratory, and US assessment of 12 joints. Each joint was semiquantitatively (0-3) scored on B-mode and power Doppler mode. The scores were summed, and a global index was created for BM (BMS) and PD scores (PDI) synovitis. BM subclinical synovitis was evident in all patients, with PD synovial signal detected in 16 patients (43.2 %). No correlation was found between DAS28 and US scores. B cells were detected in 27 (72.9 %) patients, but there was no association in the mean B cell count and disease activity as measured by DAS28 (DAS28 < 2.6 = 34.53, DAS28 > 2.6 = 49.45, p = 0.52) and PDI score (PDI < 1 = 49.48, PDI > 1 = 35.44, p = 0.54). There was no correlation between the B cell count and DAS28, BMS, and PDI (r = 0.020, p = 0.907; r = -0.151, p = 0.371; r = -0.099, p = 0.558, respectively). In RTX-treated RA patients, no relationship could be established between US-detected synovitis and peripheral blood B cell count.

  4. When a pulmonary embolism is not a pulmonary embolism: a rare case of primary pulmonary leiomyosarcoma

    PubMed Central

    Muganlinskaya, Nargiz; Guzman, Amanda; Dahagam, Chanukya; Selinger, Stephen R.

    2015-01-01

    Arterial leiomyosarcomas account for up to 21% of vascular leiomyosarcomas, with 56% of arterial leiomyosarcomas occurring in the pulmonary artery. While isolated cases of primary pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma document survival up to 36 months after treatment, these uncommon, aggressive tumors are highly lethal, with 1-year survival estimated at 20% from the onset of symptoms. We discuss a rare case of a pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma that was originally diagnosed as a pulmonary embolism (PE). A 72-year-old Caucasian female was initially diagnosed with ‘saddle pulmonary embolism’ based on computerized tomographic angiography of the chest 2 months prior to admission and placed on anticoagulation. Dyspnea escalated, and serial computed tomography scans showed cardiomegaly with pulmonary emboli involving the right and left main pulmonary arteries with extension into the right and left upper and lower lobe branches. An echocardiogram on admission showed severe pulmonary hypertension with a pulmonary artery pressure of 82.9 mm Hg, and a severely enlarged right ventricle. Respiratory distress and multiorgan failure developed and, unfortunately, the patient expired. Autopsy showed a lobulated, yellow mass throughout the main pulmonary arteries measuring 13 cm in diameter. The mass extended into the parenchyma of the right upper lobe. On microscopy, the mass was consistent with a high-grade primary pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma. Median survival of patients with primary pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma without surgery is one and a half months, and mortality is usually due to right-sided heart failure. Pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma is a rare but highly lethal disease commonly mistaken for PE. Thus, we recommend clinicians to suspect this malignancy when anticoagulation fails to relieve initial symptoms. In conclusion, early detection and suspicion of pulmonary artery leiomyosarcoma should be considered in patients refractory to anticoagulation, prompting initiation

  5. Direct detection of nano-scale extracellular vesicles derived from inflammation-triggered endothelial cells using surface plasmon resonance.

    PubMed

    Hosseinkhani, Baharak; van den Akker, Nynke; D'Haen, Jan; Gagliardi, Mick; Struys, Tom; Lambrichts, Ivo; Waltenberger, Johannes; Nelissen, Inge; Hooyberghs, Jef; Molin, Daniel G M; Michiels, Luc

    2017-03-30

    A major conceptual breakthrough in cell signaling has been the finding of EV as new biomarker shuttles in body fluids. Now, one of the major challenges in using these nanometer-sized biological entities as diagnostic marker is the development of translational methodologies to profile them. SPR offers a promising label-free and real time platform with a high potential for biomarker detection. Therefore, we aimed to develop a uniform SPR methodology to detect specific surface markers on EV derived from patient with CHD. EVs having an approximate size range between 30 and 100 nm (~48.5%) and 100-300 nm (~51.5%) were successfully isolated. The biomarker profile of EV was verified using immunogold labeling, ELISA and SPR. Using SPR, we demonstrated an increased binding of EV derived from patients with CHD to anti-ICAM-1 antibodies as compared to EV from healthy donors. Our current findings open up novel opportunities for in-depth and label-free investigation of EV.

  6. Ion channels in inflammation.

    PubMed

    Eisenhut, Michael; Wallace, Helen

    2011-04-01

    Most physical illness in vertebrates involves inflammation. Inflammation causes disease by fluid shifts across cell membranes and cell layers, changes in muscle function and generation of pain. These disease processes can be explained by changes in numbers or function of ion channels. Changes in ion channels have been detected in diarrhoeal illnesses, pyelonephritis, allergy, acute lung injury and systemic inflammatory response syndromes involving septic shock. The key role played by changes in ion transport is directly evident in inflammation-induced pain. Expression or function of all major categories of ion channels like sodium, chloride, calcium, potassium, transient receptor potential, purinergic receptor and acid-sensing ion channels can be influenced by cyto- and chemokines, prostaglandins, leukotrienes, histamine, ATP, reactive oxygen species and protons released in inflammation. Key pathways in this interaction are cyclic nucleotide, phosphoinositide and mitogen-activated protein kinase-mediated signalling, direct modification by reactive oxygen species like nitric oxide, ATP or protons and disruption of the cytoskeleton. Therapeutic interventions to modulate the adverse and overlapping effects of the numerous different inflammatory mediators on each ion transport system need to target adversely affected ion transport systems directly and locally.

  7. The In-Vivo Use of Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles to Detect Inflammation Elicits a Cytokine Response but Does Not Aggravate Experimental Arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Vermeij, Eline A.; Koenders, Marije I.; Bennink, Miranda B.; Crowe, Lindsey A.; Maurizi, Lionel; Vallée, Jean-Paul; Hofmann, Heinrich; van den Berg, Wim B.; van Lent, Peter L. E. M.; van de Loo, Fons A. J.

    2015-01-01

    Background Superparamagnetic Iron Oxide Nanoparticles (SPION) are used in diagnostic imaging of a variety of different diseases. For such in-vivo application, an additional coating with a polymer, for example polyvinyl alcohol (PVA), is needed to stabilize the SPION and prevent aggregation. As the particles are foreign to the body, reaction against the SPION could occur. In this study we investigated the effects that SPION may have on experimental arthritis after intra-articular (i.a.) or intravenous (i.v.) injection. Methods PVA-coated SPION were injected either i.a. (6 or 24 μg iron) or i.v. (100 μg or 1 mg iron) into naïve Toll-like receptor-4 deficient (TLR4-/-) or wild-type C57Bl/6 mice, or C57Bl/6 mice with antigen-induced arthritis. As control, some mice were injected with PVA or PBS. MR imaging was performed at 1 and 7 days after injection. Mice were sacrificed 2 hours and 1, 2, 7, 10 and 14 days after injection of the SPION, and RNA from synovium and liver was isolated for pro-inflammatory gene expression analysis. Serum cytokine measurements and whole knee joint histology were also performed. Results Injection of a high dose of SPION or PVA into naïve knee joints resulted in an immediate upregulation of pro-inflammatory gene expression in the synovium. A similar gene expression profile was observed after SPION or PVA injection into knee joints of TLR4-/- mice, indicating that this effect is not due to LPS contamination. Histological analysis of the knee joints also revealed synovial inflammation after SPION injection. Two hours after i.v. injection of SPION or PVA into naïve mice, an upregulation of pro-inflammatory gene expression was detected in the liver. Administration of SPION or PVA into arthritic mice via i.a. injection did not result in an upregulation in gene expression and also no additional effects were observed on histology. MR imaging and histology showed long-term retention of SPION in the inflamed joint. However, 14 days after the

  8. Pulmonary fibrosis: pathogenesis, etiology and regulation

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, MS; Wynn, TA

    2009-01-01

    Pulmonary fibrosis and architectural remodeling of tissues can severely disrupt lung function, often with fatal consequences. The etiology of pulmonary fibrotic diseases is varied, with an array of triggers including allergens, chemicals, radiation and environmental particles. However, the cause of one of the most common pulmonary fibrotic conditions, idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF), is still unclear. This review examines common mechanisms of pulmonary wound-healing responses following lung injury, and highlights the pathogenesis of some of the most widespread pulmonary fibrotic diseases. A three phase model of wound repair is reviewed that includes; (1) injury; (2) inflammation; and (3) repair. In most pulmonary fibrotic conditions dysregulation at one or more of these phases has been reported. Chronic inflammation can lead to an imbalance in the production of chemokines, cytokines, growth factors, and disrupt cellular recruitment. These changes coupled with excessive pro-fibrotic IL-13 and/or TGFβ1 production can turn a well-controlled healing response into a pathogenic fibrotic response. Endogenous regulatory mechanisms are discussed including novel areas of therapeutic intervention. Restoring homeostasis to these dysregulated healing responses, or simply neutralizing the key pro-fibrotic mediators may prevent or slow the progression of pulmonary fibrosis. PMID:19129758

  9. A rare case of human pulmonary dirofilariasis with a growing pulmonary nodule after migrating infiltration shadows, mimicking primary lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Haro, Akira; Tamiya, Sadafumi; Nagashima, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary dirofilariasis is a rare pulmonary parasitic infection by the nematode Dirofilaria immitis. It is characterized by an asymptomatic pulmonary nodule usually seen on chest X-ray. The differential diagnosis of pulmonary dirofilariasis includes other pulmonary diseases, primary lung carcinoma and metastatic lung tumor. Case presentation Pulmonary dirofilariasis was diagnosed in a woman who presented with interstitial pneumonia. Growth of the pulmonary nodule was detected subsequent to hemoptysis. The histological diagnosis was made based on a wedge resection performed under video-associated thoracic surgery (VATS). Conclusion Pulmonary dirofilariasis often varies in its clinical course. The diagnosis is best made using wedge resection under VATS. PMID:27015012

  10. Acute pulmonary inflammation induced by lung overloading with selenium particles: leukocyte response and in situ detection of selenium at high resolution.

    PubMed

    Cherdwongcharoensuk, Duangrudee; Upatham, Suchart; Pereira, António Sousa; Aguas, Artur P

    2004-12-15

    The kinetics of the acute inflammatory response of the lung was triggered in CD-1 mice by a single intratracheal instillation of a large amount of Se (10 mg); it was studied by quantitative cytology of bronchoalveolar lavage samples, light microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy coupled with x-ray elemental microanalysis. Bronchoalveolar lavage leukocytes were mostly neutrophils and increased from 12 to 24 h of Se treatment and decreased at 72 h. Only less than half of the granulocytes showed ingested Se particles; in contrast, virtually all BAL macrophages contained Se particles. Scanning electron microscopy coupled with X-ray elemental microanalysis revealed that the intracellular Se particles were heterogeneous in size (diameters from 0.4 and up to 14 microm), and that Se inclusions were sometimes accumulated at a pole of the cell. At 72 h after instillation of the particles, Se-loaded alveolar macrophages were migrated in the interstitial space of the alveoli. Se-positive regions had a focal distribution in the lung; accumulation of inflammatory cells erased the alveolar architecture of these areas of the deep lung. Our data indicates that Se overloading of the lung results in: (1) an acute inflammatory response that is dominated by neutrophils; (2) early removal of Se done mostly by alveolar macrophages, and (3) formation of focal areas of invasion of the lung parenchyma by inflammatory infiltrates.

  11. Association of Sand Dust Particles with Pulmonary Function and Respiratory Symptoms in Adult Patients with Asthma in Western Japan Using Light Detection and Ranging: A Panel Study.

    PubMed

    Watanabe, Masanari; Noma, Hisashi; Kurai, Jun; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sano, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazuhiro; Mikami, Masaaki; Ueda, Yasuto; Tatsukawa, Toshiyuki; Ohga, Hideki; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kitano, Hiroya; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-10-16

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) can estimate daily volumes of sand dust particles from the East Asian desert to Japan. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sand dust particles and pulmonary function, and respiratory symptoms in adult patients with asthma. One hundred thirty-seven patients were included in the study. From March 2013 to May 2013, the patients measured their morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) and kept daily lower respiratory symptom diaries. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the correlation of the median daily levels of sand dust particles, symptoms scores, and PEF. A heavy sand dust day was defined as an hourly concentration of sand dust particles of >0.1 km(-1). By this criterion, there were 8 heavy sand dust days during the study period. Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.03, 0.05), and this increase persisted for 5 days. There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, -0.62, 0.11). The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function.

  12. Immunohistochemical detection of IgM and IgG in lung tissue of dogs with leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS).

    PubMed

    Schuller, Simone; Callanan, John J; Worrall, Sheila; Francey, Thierry; Schweighauser, Ariane; Kohn, Barbara; Klopfleisch, Robert; Posthaus, Horst; Nally, Jarlath E

    2015-06-01

    Leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS) is a severe form of leptospirosis. Pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Lung tissues from 26 dogs with LPHS, 5 dogs with pulmonary haemorrhage due to other causes and 6 healthy lungs were labelled for IgG (n=26), IgM (n=25) and leptospiral antigens (n=26). Three general staining patterns for IgG/IgM were observed in lungs of dogs with LPHS with most tissues showing more than one staining pattern: (1) alveolar septal wall staining, (2) staining favouring alveolar surfaces and (3) staining of intra-alveolar fluid. Healthy control lung showed no staining, whereas haemorrhagic lung from dogs not infected with Leptospira showed staining of intra-alveolar fluid and occasionally alveolar septa. Leptospiral antigens were not detected. We conclude that deposition of IgG/IgM is demonstrable in the majority of canine lungs with naturally occurring LPHS, similar to what has been described in other species. Our findings suggest involvement of the host humoral immunity in the pathogenesis of LPHS and provide further evidence to support the dog as a natural disease model for human LPHS.

  13. Association of Sand Dust Particles with Pulmonary Function and Respiratory Symptoms in Adult Patients with Asthma in Western Japan Using Light Detection and Ranging: A Panel Study

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Masanari; Noma, Hisashi; Kurai, Jun; Shimizu, Atsushi; Sano, Hiroyuki; Kato, Kazuhiro; Mikami, Masaaki; Ueda, Yasuto; Tatsukawa, Toshiyuki; Ohga, Hideki; Yamasaki, Akira; Igishi, Tadashi; Kitano, Hiroya; Shimizu, Eiji

    2015-01-01

    Light detection and ranging (LIDAR) can estimate daily volumes of sand dust particles from the East Asian desert to Japan. The objective of this study was to investigate the relationship between sand dust particles and pulmonary function, and respiratory symptoms in adult patients with asthma. One hundred thirty-seven patients were included in the study. From March 2013 to May 2013, the patients measured their morning peak expiratory flow (PEF) and kept daily lower respiratory symptom diaries. A linear mixed model was used to estimate the correlation of the median daily levels of sand dust particles, symptoms scores, and PEF. A heavy sand dust day was defined as an hourly concentration of sand dust particles of >0.1 km−1. By this criterion, there were 8 heavy sand dust days during the study period. Elevated sand dust particles levels were significantly associated with the symptom score (0.04; 95% confidence interval (CI); 0.03, 0.05), and this increase persisted for 5 days. There was no significant association between PEF and heavy dust exposure (0.01 L/min; 95% CI, −0.62, 0.11). The present study found that sand dust particles were significantly associated with worsened lower respiratory tract symptoms in adult patients with asthma, but not with pulmonary function. PMID:26501307

  14. An evaluation of range gated pulsed Doppler echocardiography for detecting pulmonary outflow tract obstruction in d-transposition of the great vessels.

    PubMed

    Areias, J C; Goldberg, S J; Spitaels, S E; de Villeneuve, V H

    1978-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the accuracy of range gated pulsed Doppler (RGPD) echocardiography for detecting obstruction to the pulmonary outflow tract in children with d-transposition of the great vessels (d-TGV). Twenty-one children were randomly selected for those available with d-TGV and were studied by precordial and suprasternal RGPD echocardiography. Three were excluded, leaving a population of 18 subjects. The exclusive criterion used to judge the RGPD results was the output of the time interval histogram (TIH). Coherence of the TIH was considered to represent laminar flow. Dispersion of the TIH was considered evidence of flow disturbance and obstruction to the outflow tract. With the range gating feature, the first site of disturbance could be localized. Information was handled by a technique that decreased bias. RGPD results were then compared to diagnoses of the outflow tract established at cardiac catheterization or operation. Comparison of these results indicated that all seven children with obstruction were correctly identified by RGPD study, and the level of the first obstruction was correctly identified. With one exception, all children without pulmonary obstruction were correctly identified by the examination.

  15. Pulmonary Embolism

    MedlinePlus

    ... for the Public » Health Topics » Pulmonary Embolism Explore Pulmonary Embolism What Is... Other Names Causes Who Is at Risk Signs & Symptoms Diagnosis Treatments Prevention Living With Clinical Trials Links Related Topics Arrhythmia Deep Vein Thrombosis Lung VQ Scan Overweight and Obesity Send a ...

  16. Pulmonary extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue associated with granulomatous inflammation in a child with chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome (DiGeorge syndrome).

    PubMed

    Pongpruttipan, Tawatchai; Cook, James R; Reyes-Mugica, Miguel; Spahr, Jonathan E; Swerdlow, Steven H

    2012-11-01

    Patients with immunodeficiency disorders have an increased incidence of lymphoproliferative disorders; however, only 4 such patients with DiGeorge/chromosome 22q11.2 deletion syndrome have been reported. We report a case of a pulmonary Epstein-Barr virus-negative extranodal marginal zone lymphoma of mucosa-associated lymphoid tissue in a child with this syndrome.

  17. Detection of fusobacterium nucleatum and fadA adhesin gene in patients with orthodontic gingivitis and non-orthodontic periodontal inflammation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Liu, Yi; Wang, Jianning; Guo, Yang; Zhang, Yujie; Xiao, Shuiqing

    2014-01-01

    Fusobacterium nucleatum is one of the most abundant gram-negative bacilli colonizing the subgingival plaque and closely associated with periodontal disease. However it is unclear whether F. nucleatum is involved in gingival inflammation under orthodontic appliance. A novel adhesin, FadA, which is unique to oral Fusobacteria, is required for F. nucleatum binding and invasion to epithelial cells and thus may play an important role in colonization of Fusobacterium in the host. In this study, we evaluated the prevalence of F. nucleatum and its virulence factor FadA adhesion gene (fadA) in 169 subgingival biofilm samples from 55 cases of gingivitis patients with orthodontic appliances, 49 cases of gingivitis patients without orthodontic treatment, 35 cases of periodontitis patients and 30 cases of periodontally healthy people via PCR. The correlations between the F. nucleatum/fadA and gingivitis index(GI)was also analyzed. The detection rate of F. nucleatum/fadA in periodontitis group and non-orthodontic gingivitis group was higher than the other two groups (p<0.01) while it was higher in orthodontic gingivitis group than in health people (p<0.05). An obviously positive correlation was observed between the prevalence of F. nucleatum/fadA and GI. F. nucleatum carrying fadA may be more closely related to the development of gingivitis and periodontal disease compared with orthodontic gingivitis.

  18. Pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Kosmadakis, George; Aguilera, Didier; Carceles, Odette; Da Costa Correia, Enrique; Boletis, Ioannis

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension in end-stage renal disease patients is associated with significantly increased morbidity and mortality. The prevalence of pulmonary hypertension in dialysis patients is relatively high and varies in different studies from 17% to 49.53% depending on the mode of dialysis and other selection factors, such as the presence of other cardiovascular comorbidities. The etiopathogenic mechanisms that have been studied in relatively small studies mainly include arteriovenous fistula-induced increased cardiac output, which cannot be accomodated by, the spacious under normal conditions pulmonary circulation. Additionally, pulmonary vessels show signs of endothelial dysfunction, dysregulation of vascular tone due to an imbalance in vasoactive substances, and local as well as systemic inflammation. It is also believed that microbubbles escaping from the dialysis circuit can trigger vasoconstriction and vascular sclerosis. The non-specific therapeutic options that proved to be beneficial in pulmonary artery pressure reduction are endothelin inhibitors, phosphodiesterase inhibitor sildenafil, and vasodilatory prostaglandins in various forms. The specific modes of treatment are renal transplantation, size reduction or closure of high-flow arteriovenous fistulas, and transfer from hemodialysis to peritoneal dialysis-a modality that is associated with a lesser prevalence of pulmonary hypertension.

  19. [Prediction of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis outcomes depending on the procedure of its detection and on the manifestation of clinical and x-ray symptoms].

    PubMed

    Volchegorskiĭ, I A; Novoselov, P N; Bolotov, A A

    2009-01-01

    The possibility of predicting the outcomes of infiltrative pulmonary tuberculosis (IPT) depending on the procedure of its detection and on the manifestations of clinical and X-ray symptoms has been assessed. The severity of clinical symptoms of IPT is shown to be much higher in patients who actively seek medical aid than that in patients identified at planned fluorographic study. Actively seeking medical aid and the high baseline degree of clinical and X-ray manifestations have been found to be significant predictors of a good response to combined drug therapy for IPT with the clinical recovery being achieved in patients, the minor residual (posttuberculosis) changes developed in the lung, and the decreased need for surgical treatment for IPT.

  20. PULMONARY INFLAMMATORY HYPERINFLATION IN INFANTS

    PubMed Central

    Vaudagna, J. S.; Volpe, F.

    1963-01-01

    In infants less than 3 years old pulmonary hyperinflation can be a clinical and radiological sign of acute pneumonitis. It is an early, nonspecific occurrence in the presence of inflammation. The most reliable radiologic signs include flattening and undulation of the diaphragm, mediastinal elongation and narrowing, and a cardiac outline completely visualized above the diaphragm. ImagesFigure 2.Figure 3.Figure 4.Figure 5. PMID:13996469

  1. Lung function in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Low, A T; Medford, A R L; Millar, A B; Tulloh, R M R

    2015-10-01

    Breathlessness is a common symptom in pulmonary hypertension (PH) and an important cause of morbidity. Though this has been attributed to the well described pulmonary vascular abnormalities and subsequent cardiac remodelling, changes in the airways of these patients have also been reported and may contribute to symptoms. Our understanding of these airway abnormalities is poor with conflicting findings in many studies. The present review evaluates these studies for the major PH groups. In addition we describe the role of cardiopulmonary exercise testing in the assessment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) by evaluating cardiopulmonary interaction during exercise. As yet, the reasons for the abnormalities in lung function are unclear, but potential causes and the possible role of inflammation are discussed. Future research is required to provide a better understanding of this to help improve the management of these patients.

  2. [Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap].

    PubMed

    Müller, Veronika; Gálffy, Gabriella; Tamási, Lilla

    2011-01-16

    Asthma bronchiale and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease are the most prevalent lung diseases characterized by inflammation of the airways. International and Hungarian guidelines provide proper definitions for clinical symptoms, diagnostics and therapy of both diseases. However, in everyday clinical practice, overlap of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease has become more frequent. As guidelines are mainly based on large, multicenter, randomized, controlled trials that exclude overlap patients, there is a lack of diagnostic and especially therapeutic strategies for these patients. This review summarizes clinical characteristics of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease overlap, and provides daily practical examples for its management.

  3. Exposure to cigarette smoke downregulates β2-adrenergic receptor expression and upregulates inflammation in alveolar macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wei; Li, Xiaoguang; Xu, Jie

    2015-01-01

    Cigarette smoke-triggered inflammation is important in the pathophysiology of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). β2-Adrenergic receptor (β2-AR) is abundantly expressed on inflammatory cells, which is associated with inflammation regulation. To observe alterations in inflammation, pathological changes in lung tissues, and detect changes in β2-AR expression, rats were exposed for 4 months to cigarette smoke. Pathological changes were observed in lung tissue sections. The levels of inflammatory mediators tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α, interleukin (IL)-1β in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF), and lung tissues were measured using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Nuclear factor (NF)-κB activity was detected by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA). Exposure to this regimen of cigarette smoke induced peribronchial and perivascular lymphocytic aggregates and parenchymal accumulation of macrophages in rats. EMSA demonstrated that smoke exposure enhanced NF-κB activation in rats' alveolar macrophages (AMs). Compared with the control group, smoke exposure induced a notable increase in TNF-α and IL-1β in BALF, lung tissues, and a decrease of β2-AR expression of AMs. The expression of β2-AR from AMs was inversely correlated with TNF-α and IL-1β levels of BALF. These data demonstrated that chronic smoke-triggered lung inflammation was accompanied by down-regulation of β2-AR in rat lungs' AMs.

  4. Detection of a Molecular Biomarker for Zygomycetes by Quantitative PCR Assays of Plasma, Bronchoalveolar Lavage, and Lung Tissue in a Rabbit Model of Experimental Pulmonary Zygomycosis▿

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Miki; Harrington, Susan M.; Francesconi, Andrea; Petraitis, Vidmantas; Petraitiene, Ruta; Beveridge, Mara G.; Knudsen, Tena; Milanovich, Jeffery; Cotton, Margaret P.; Hughes, Johanna; Schaufele, Robert L.; Sein, Tin; Bacher, John; Murray, Patrick R.; Kontoyiannis, Dimitrios P.; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2008-01-01

    We developed two real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays, targeting the 28S rRNA gene, for the diagnosis of zygomycosis caused by the most common, clinically significant Zygomycetes. The amplicons of the first qPCR assay (qPCR-1) from Rhizopus, Mucor, and Rhizomucor species were distinguished through melt curve analysis. The second qPCR assay (qPCR-2) detected Cunninghamella species using a different primer/probe set. For both assays, the analytic sensitivity for the detection of hyphal elements from germinating sporangiospores in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid and lung tissue homogenates from rabbits was 1 to 10 sporangiospores/ml. Four unique and clinically applicable models of invasive pulmonary zygomycosis served as surrogates of human infections, facilitating the validation of these assays for potential diagnostic utility. For qPCR-1, 5 of 98 infarcted lung specimens were positive by qPCR and negative by quantitative culture (qCx). None were qCx positive only. Among 23 BAL fluid samples, all were positive by qPCR, while 22 were positive by qCx. qPCR-1 detected Rhizopus and Mucor DNA in 20 (39%) of 51 serial plasma samples as early as day 1 postinoculation. Similar properties were observed for qPCR-2, which showed greater sensitivity than qCx for BAL fluid (100% versus 67%; P = 0.04; n = 15). The assay detected Cunninghamella DNA in 18 (58%) of 31 serial plasma samples as early as day 1 postinoculation. These qPCR assays are sensitive and specific for the detection of Rhizopus, Mucor, Rhizomucor, and Cunninghamella species and can be used for the study and detection of infections caused by these life-threatening pathogens. PMID:18845827

  5. Inflammation and Heart Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Venous Thromboembolism Aortic Aneurysm More Inflammation and Heart Disease Updated:Oct 12,2016 Understand the risks of ... inflammation causes cardiovascular disease, inflammation is common for heart disease and stroke patients and is thought to be ...

  6. Multicenter Evaluation of Anyplex Plus MTB/NTM MDR-TB Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Multidrug-Resistant Isolates in Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Specimens.

    PubMed

    Sali, Michela; De Maio, Flavio; Caccuri, Francesca; Campilongo, Federica; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Fiorentini, Simona; Delogu, Giovanni; Giagulli, Cinzia

    2016-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and the detection of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are critical for successful public health interventions. Therefore, TB diagnosis requires the availability of diagnostic tools that allow the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis and drug resistance in clinical samples. Here, we performed a multicenter study to evaluate the performance of the Seegene Anyplex MTB/NTM MDR-TB assay, a new molecular method based on a multiplex real-time PCR system, for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), and genetic determinants of drug resistance. In total, the results for 755 samples (534 pulmonary and 221 extrapulmonary samples) were compared with the results of smears and cultures. For pulmonary specimens, the sensitivities of the Anyplex assay and acid-fast bacillus smear testing were 86.4% and 75.0%, respectively, and the specificities were 99% and 99.4%. For extrapulmonary specimens, the sensitivities of the Anyplex assay and acid-fast bacillus smear testing were 83.3% and 50.0%, respectively, and the specificities of both were 100%. The negative and positive predictive values of the Anyplex assay for pulmonary specimens were 97% and 100%, respectively, and those for extrapulmonary specimens were 84.6% and 100%. The sensitivities of the Anyplex assay for detecting isoniazid resistance in MTBC strains from pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens were 83.3% and 50%, respectively, while the specificities were 100% for both specimen types. These results demonstrate that the Anyplex MTB/NTM MDR-TB assay is an efficient and rapid method for the diagnosis of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB and the detection of isoniazid resistance.

  7. Multicenter Evaluation of Anyplex Plus MTB/NTM MDR-TB Assay for Rapid Detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Multidrug-Resistant Isolates in Pulmonary and Extrapulmonary Specimens

    PubMed Central

    De Maio, Flavio; Caccuri, Francesca; Campilongo, Federica; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Fiorentini, Simona; Giagulli, Cinzia

    2015-01-01

    The rapid diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB) and the detection of drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are critical for successful public health interventions. Therefore, TB diagnosis requires the availability of diagnostic tools that allow the rapid detection of M. tuberculosis and drug resistance in clinical samples. Here, we performed a multicenter study to evaluate the performance of the Seegene Anyplex MTB/NTM MDR-TB assay, a new molecular method based on a multiplex real-time PCR system, for detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTBC), nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM), and genetic determinants of drug resistance. In total, the results for 755 samples (534 pulmonary and 221 extrapulmonary samples) were compared with the results of smears and cultures. For pulmonary specimens, the sensitivities of the Anyplex assay and acid-fast bacillus smear testing were 86.4% and 75.0%, respectively, and the specificities were 99% and 99.4%. For extrapulmonary specimens, the sensitivities of the Anyplex assay and acid-fast bacillus smear testing were 83.3% and 50.0%, respectively, and the specificities of both were 100%. The negative and positive predictive values of the Anyplex assay for pulmonary specimens were 97% and 100%, respectively, and those for extrapulmonary specimens were 84.6% and 100%. The sensitivities of the Anyplex assay for detecting isoniazid resistance in MTBC strains from pulmonary and extrapulmonary specimens were 83.3% and 50%, respectively, while the specificities were 100% for both specimen types. These results demonstrate that the Anyplex MTB/NTM MDR-TB assay is an efficient and rapid method for the diagnosis of pulmonary and extrapulmonary TB and the detection of isoniazid resistance. PMID:26491178

  8. Pulmonary aspergilloma

    MedlinePlus

    ... Coccidioidomycosis Cystic fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung abscess Lung cancer Sarcoidosis The most common species of fungus that causes ... fibrosis Histoplasmosis Lung cancer - small cell Pulmonary tuberculosis Sarcoidosis Review Date 7/31/2016 Updated by: Jatin ...

  9. Pulmonary atresia

    MedlinePlus

    ... blood flow from the right ventricle (right side pumping chamber) to the lungs. In pulmonary atresia, a ... Reconstructing the heart as a single ventricle (1 pumping chamber instead of 2) Heart transplant Outlook (Prognosis) ...

  10. Pulmonary Hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is high blood pressure in the arteries to your lungs. It is a serious condition. If you have ... and you can develop heart failure. Symptoms of PH include Shortness of breath during routine activity, such ...

  11. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance. PMID:27076594

  12. Microarray analysis in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Hoffmann, Julia; Wilhelm, Jochen; Olschewski, Andrea; Kwapiszewska, Grazyna

    2016-07-01

    Microarrays are a powerful and effective tool that allows the detection of genome-wide gene expression differences between controls and disease conditions. They have been broadly applied to investigate the pathobiology of diverse forms of pulmonary hypertension, namely group 1, including patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension, and group 3, including pulmonary hypertension associated with chronic lung diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis. To date, numerous human microarray studies have been conducted to analyse global (lung homogenate samples), compartment-specific (laser capture microdissection), cell type-specific (isolated primary cells) and circulating cell (peripheral blood) expression profiles. Combined, they provide important information on development, progression and the end-stage disease. In the future, system biology approaches, expression of noncoding RNAs that regulate coding RNAs, and direct comparison between animal models and human disease might be of importance.

  13. Pathology and immune reactivity: understanding multidimensionality in pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Dorhoi, Anca; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2016-03-01

    Heightened morbidity and mortality in pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) are consequences of complex disease processes triggered by the causative agent, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb). Mtb modulates inflammation at distinct stages of its intracellular life. Recognition and phagocytosis, replication in phagosomes and cytosol escape induce tightly regulated release of cytokines [including interleukin (IL)-1, tumor necrosis factor (TNF), IL-10], chemokines, lipid mediators, and type I interferons (IFN-I). Mtb occupies various lung lesions at sites of pathology. Bacteria are barely detectable at foci of lipid pneumonia or in perivascular/bronchiolar cuffs. However, abundant organisms are evident in caseating granulomas and at the cavity wall. Such lesions follow polar trajectories towards fibrosis, encapsulation and mineralization or liquefaction, extensive matrix destruction, and tissue injury. The outcome is determined by immune factors acting in concert. Gradients of cytokines and chemokines (CCR2, CXCR2, CXCR3/CXCR5 agonists; TNF/IL-10, IL-1/IFN-I), expression of activation/death markers on immune cells (TNF receptor 1, PD-1, IL-27 receptor) or abundance of enzymes [arginase-1, matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-1, MMP-8, MMP-9] drive genesis and progression of lesions. Distinct lesions coexist such that inflammation in TB encompasses a spectrum of tissue changes. A better understanding of the multidimensionality of immunopathology in TB will inform novel therapies against this pulmonary disease.

  14. Pulmonary Agenesis.

    PubMed

    Chawla, Rakesh K; Madan, Arun; Chawla, Aditya; Arora, Harsh Nandini; Chawla, Kiran

    2015-01-01

    Unilateral opaque lung with ipsilateral mediastinal shift is an uncommon cause of respiratory distress in newborn which can be found on simple radiograph of the chest. Pulmonary agenesis is a rare cause of unilateral opaque lung in the newborn. Nearly 50% cases of pulmonary agenesis are associated with other congenital defects including cardiovascular, skeletal, gastrointestinal or genitourinary systems. We report an infant with agenesis of the right lung associated with other congenital anomalies.

  15. Modeling the respiratory motion of solitary pulmonary nodules and determining the impact of respiratory motion on their detection in SPECT imaging

    PubMed Central

    Smyczynski, Mark S.; Gifford, Howard C.; Lehovich, Andre; McNamara, Joseph E.; Segars, W. Paul; Hoffman, Eric A.; Tsui, Benjamin M. W.; King, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The objectives of this investigation were to model the respiratory motion of solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) and then use this model to determine the impact of respiratory motion on the localization and detection of small SPN in SPECT imaging for four reconstruction strategies. The respiratory motion of SPN was based on that of normal anatomic structures in the lungs determined from breath-held CT images of a volunteer acquired at two different stages of respiration. End-expiration (EE) and time-averaged (Frame Av) non-uniform-B-spline cardiac torso (NCAT) digital-anthropomorphic phantoms were created using this information for respiratory motion within the lungs. SPN were represented as 1 cm diameter spheres which underwent linear motion during respiration between the EE and end-inspiration (EI) time points. The SIMIND Monte Carlo program was used to produce SPECT projection data simulating Tc-99m depreotide (NeoTect) imaging. The projections were reconstructed using 1) no correction (NC), 2) attenuation correction (AC), 3) resolution compensation (RC), and 4) attenuation correction, scatter correction, and resolution compensation (AC_SC_RC). A human-observer localization receiver operating characteristics (LROC) study was then performed to determine the difference in localization and detection accuracy with and without the presence of respiratory motion. The LROC comparison determined that respiratory motion degrades tumor detection for all four reconstruction strategies, thus correction for SPN motion would be expected to improve detection accuracy. The inclusion of RC in reconstruction improved detection accuracy for both EE and Frame Av over NC and AC. Also the magnitude of the impact of motion was least for AC_SC_RC. PMID:27182079

  16. LTB4 activates pulmonary artery adventitial fibroblasts in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xinguo; Tamosiuniene, Rasa; Sung, Yon K.; Shuffle, Eric M.; Tu, Allen B.; Valenzuela, Antonia; Jiang, Shirley; Zamanian, Roham T.; Fiorentino, David F.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Chung, Lorinda; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Nicolls, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    A recent study demonstrated a significant role for leukotriene B4 (LTB4) causing pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). LTB4 was found to directly injure luminal endothelial cells and promote growth of the smooth muscle cell layer of pulmonary arterioles. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of LTB4 on the pulmonary adventitial layer, largely composed of fibroblasts. Here, we demonstrate that LTB4 enhanced human pulmonary artery adventitial fibroblast (HPAAF) proliferation, migration and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner through its cognate G-protein coupled receptor, BLT1. LTB4 activated HPAAF by up-regulating p38 MAPK as well as Nox4 signaling pathways. In an autoimmune model of PH, inhibition of these pathways blocked perivascular inflammation, decreased Nox4 expression, reduced reactive oxygen species production, reversed arteriolar adventitial fibroblast activation and attenuated PH development. This study uncovers a novel mechanism by which LTB4 further promotes PAH pathogenesis, beyond its established effects on endothelial and smooth muscle cells, by activating adventitial fibroblasts. PMID:26558820

  17. Detection and Quantification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis in the Sputum of Culture-Negative HIV-infected Pulmonary Tuberculosis Suspects: A Proof-of-Concept Study

    PubMed Central

    Madico, Guillermo; Mpeirwe, Moses; White, Laura; Vinhas, Solange; Orr, Beverley; Orikiriza, Patrick; Miller, Nancy S.; Gaeddert, Mary; Mwanga-Amumpaire, Juliet; Palaci, Moises; Kreiswirth, Barry; Straight, Joe; Dietze, Reynaldo; Boum, Yap; Jones-López, Edward C.

    2016-01-01

    Rationale Rapid diagnosis of pulmonary tuberculosis (TB) is critical for timely initiation of treatment and interruption of transmission. Yet, despite recent advances, many patients remain undiagnosed. Culture, usually considered the most sensitive diagnostic method, is sub-optimal for paucibacillary disease. Methods We evaluated the Totally Optimized PCR (TOP) TB assay, a new molecular test that we hypothesize is more sensitive than culture. After pre-clinical studies, we estimated TOP’s per-patient sensitivity and specificity in a convenience sample of 261 HIV-infected pulmonary TB suspects enrolled into a TB diagnostic study in Mbarara, Uganda against MGIT culture, Xpert MTB/RIF and a composite reference standard. We validated results with a confirmatory PCR used for sequencing M. tuberculosis. Measurements and Results Using culture as reference, TOP had 100% sensitivity but 35% specificity. Against a composite reference standard, the sensitivity of culture (27%) and Xpert MTB/RIF (27%) was lower than TOP (99%), with similar specificity (100%, 98% and 87%, respectively). In unadjusted analyses, culture-negative/TOP-positive patients were more likely to be older (P<0·001), female (P<0·001), have salivary sputum (P = 0·05), sputum smear-negative (P<0.001) and less advanced disease on chest radiograph (P = 0.05). M. tuberculosis genotypes identified in sputum by DNA sequencing exhibit differential growth in culture. Conclusions These findings suggest that the TOP TB assay is accurately detecting M. tuberculosis DNA in the sputum of culture-negative tuberculosis suspects. Our results require prospective validation with clinical outcomes. If the operating characteristics of the TOP assay are confirmed in future studies, it will be justified as a “TB rule out” test. PMID:27391604

  18. DNA Damage and Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Ranchoux, Benoît; Meloche, Jolyane; Paulin, Roxane; Boucherat, Olivier; Provencher, Steeve; Bonnet, Sébastien

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension (PH) is defined by a mean pulmonary arterial pressure over 25 mmHg at rest and is diagnosed by right heart catheterization. Among the different groups of PH, pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by a progressive obstruction of distal pulmonary arteries, related to endothelial cell dysfunction and vascular cell proliferation, which leads to an increased pulmonary vascular resistance, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right heart failure. Although the primary trigger of PAH remains unknown, oxidative stress and inflammation have been shown to play a key role in the development and progression of vascular remodeling. These factors are known to increase DNA damage that might favor the emergence of the proliferative and apoptosis-resistant phenotype observed in PAH vascular cells. High levels of DNA damage were reported to occur in PAH lungs and remodeled arteries as well as in animal models of PH. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated that impaired DNA-response mechanisms may lead to an increased mutagen sensitivity in PAH patients. Finally, PAH was linked with decreased breast cancer 1 protein (BRCA1) and DNA topoisomerase 2-binding protein 1 (TopBP1) expression, both involved in maintaining genome integrity. This review aims to provide an overview of recent evidence of DNA damage and DNA repair deficiency and their implication in PAH pathogenesis. PMID:27338373

  19. The role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system in the pathobiology of pulmonary arterial hypertension (2013 Grover Conference series).

    PubMed

    Maron, Bradley A; Leopold, Jane A

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is associated with aberrant pulmonary vascular remodeling that leads to increased pulmonary artery pressure, pulmonary vascular resistance, and right ventricular dysfunction. There is now accumulating evidence that the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system is activated and contributes to cardiopulmonary remodeling that occurs in PAH. Increased plasma and lung tissue levels of angiotensin and aldosterone have been detected in experimental models of PAH and shown to correlate with cardiopulmonary hemodynamics and pulmonary vascular remodeling. These processes are abrogated by treatment with angiotensin receptor or mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists. At a cellular level, angiotensin and aldosterone activate oxidant stress signaling pathways that decrease levels of bioavailable nitric oxide, increase inflammation, and promote cell proliferation, migration, extracellular matrix remodeling, and fibrosis. Clinically, enhanced renin-angiotensin activity and elevated levels of aldosterone have been detected in patients with PAH, which suggests a role for angiotensin and mineralocorticoid receptor antagonists in the treatment of PAH. This review will examine the current evidence linking renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system activation to PAH with an emphasis on the cellular and molecular mechanisms that are modulated by aldosterone and may be of importance for the pathobiology of PAH.

  20. A multiscale Laplacian of Gaussian filtering approach to automated pulmonary nodule detection from whole-lung low-dose CT scans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotin, Sergei V.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Biancardi, Alberto M.; Yankelevitz, David F.; Henschke, Claudia I.

    2009-02-01

    The primary stage of a pulmonary nodule detection system is typically a candidate generator that efficiently provides the centroid location and size estimate of candidate nodules. A scale-normalized Laplacian of Gaussian (LOG) filtering method presented in this paper has been found to provide high sensitivity along with precise locality and size estimation. This approach involves a computationally efficient algorithm that is designed to identify all solid nodules in a whole lung anisotropic CT scan. This nodule candidate generator has been evaluated in conjunction with a set of discriminative features that target both isolated and attached nodules. The entire detection system was evaluated with respect to a sizeenriched dataset of 656 whole-lung low-dose CT scans containing 459 solid nodules with diameter greater than 4 mm. Using a soft margin SVM classifier, and setting false positive rate of 10 per scan, we obtained a sensitivity of 97% for isolated, 93% for attached, and 89% for both nodule types combined. Furthermore, the LOG filter was shown to have good agreement with the radiologist ground truth for size estimation.

  1. LROC Investigation of Three Strategies for Reducing the Impact of Respiratory Motion on the Detection of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules in SPECT.

    PubMed

    Smyczynski, Mark S; Gifford, Howard C; Dey, Joyoni; Lehovich, Andre; McNamara, Joseph E; Segars, W Paul; King, Michael A

    2016-02-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the effectiveness of three motion reducing strategies in diminishing the degrading impact of respiratory motion on the detection of small solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) in single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging in comparison to a standard clinical acquisition and the ideal case of imaging in the absence of respiratory motion. To do this non-uniform rational B-spline cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantoms based on human-volunteer CT studies were generated spanning the respiratory cycle for a normal background distribution of Tc-99m NeoTect. Similarly, spherical phantoms of 1.0 cm diameter were generated to model small SPN for each of 150 uniquely located sites within the lungs whose respiratory motion was based on the motion of normal structures in the volunteer CT studies. The SIMIND Monte Carlo program was used to produce SPECT projection data from these. Normal and single-lesion containing SPECT projection sets with a clinically realistic Poisson noise level were created for the cases of: 1) the end-expiration (EE) frame with all counts, 2) respiration-averaged motion with all counts, 3) one-fourth of the 32 frames centered around EE (Quarter-Binning), 4) one-half of the 32 frames centered around EE (Half-Binning), and 5) eight temporally binned frames spanning the respiratory cycle. Each of the sets of combined projection data were reconstructed with RBI-EM with system spatial-resolution compensation (RC). Based on the known motion for each of the 150 different lesions, the reconstructed volumes of respiratory bins were shifted so as to superimpose the locations of the SPN onto that in the first bin (Reconstruct and Shift). Five human-observers performed localization receiver operating characteristics (LROC) studies of SPN detection. The observer results were analyzed for statistical significance differences in SPN detection accuracy among the three correction strategies, the standard acquisition

  2. LROC Investigation of Three Strategies for Reducing the Impact of Respiratory Motion on the Detection of Solitary Pulmonary Nodules in SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Smyczynski, Mark S.; Gifford, Howard C.; Dey, Joyoni; Lehovich, Andre; McNamara, Joseph E.; Segars, W. Paul; King, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to determine the effectiveness of three motion reducing strategies in diminishing the degrading impact of respiratory motion on the detection of small solitary pulmonary nodules (SPN) in single photon emission computed tomographic (SPECT) imaging in comparison to a standard clinical acquisition and the ideal case of imaging in the absence of respiratory motion. To do this non-uniform rational B-spline cardiac-torso (NCAT) phantoms based on human-volunteer CT studies were generated spanning the respiratory cycle for a normal background distribution of Tc-99m NeoTect. Similarly, spherical phantoms of 1.0 cm diameter were generated to model small SPN for each of 150 uniquely located sites within the lungs whose respiratory motion was based on the motion of normal structures in the volunteer CT studies. The SIMIND Monte Carlo program was used to produce SPECT projection data from these. Normal and single-lesion containing SPECT projection sets with a clinically realistic Poisson noise level were created for the cases of: 1) the end-expiration (EE) frame with all counts, 2) respiration-averaged motion with all counts, 3) one-fourth of the 32 frames centered around EE (Quarter-Binning), 4) one-half of the 32 frames centered around EE (Half-Binning), and 5) eight temporally binned frames spanning the respiratory cycle. Each of the sets of combined projection data were reconstructed with RBI-EM with system spatial-resolution compensation (RC). Based on the known motion for each of the 150 different lesions, the reconstructed volumes of respiratory bins were shifted so as to superimpose the locations of the SPN onto that in the first bin (Reconstruct and Shift). Five human-observers performed localization receiver operating characteristics (LROC) studies of SPN detection. The observer results were analyzed for statistical significance differences in SPN detection accuracy among the three correction strategies, the standard acquisition

  3. Pulmonary Vascular Impedance in Chronic Pulmonary Hypertension.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    PULMONARY HYPERTENSION , *PULMONARY BLOOD CIRCULATION, BLOOD CIRCULATION, LUNG, PATHOLOGY, VASCULAR DISEASES, ARTERIES, OBSTRUCTION(PHYSIOLOGY...EMBOLISM, HISTOLOGY, DOGS, LABORATORY ANIMALS, BLOOD PRESSURE , EXPERIMENTAL DATA, PHYSIOLOGY.

  4. Pulmonary vasculature in COPD: The silent component.

    PubMed

    Blanco, Isabel; Piccari, Lucilla; Barberà, Joan Albert

    2016-08-01

    Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) is characterized by airflow obstruction that results from an inflammatory process affecting the airways and lung parenchyma. Despite major abnormalities taking place in bronchial and alveolar structures, changes in pulmonary vessels also represent an important component of the disease. Alterations in vessel structure are highly prevalent and abnormalities in their function impair gas exchange and may result in pulmonary hypertension (PH), an important complication of the disease associated with reduced survival and worse clinical course. The prevalence of PH is high in COPD, particularly in advanced stages, although it remains of mild to moderate severity in the majority of cases. Endothelial dysfunction, with imbalance between vasodilator/vasoconstrictive mediators, is a key determinant of changes taking place in pulmonary vasculature in COPD. Cigarette smoke products may perturb endothelial cells and play a critical role in initiating vascular changes. The concurrence of inflammation, hypoxia and emphysema further contributes to vascular damage and to the development of PH. The use of drugs that target endothelium-dependent signalling pathways, currently employed in pulmonary arterial hypertension, is discouraged in COPD due to the lack of efficacy observed in randomized clinical trials and because there is compelling evidence indicating that these drugs may worsen pulmonary gas exchange. The subgroup of patients with severe PH should be ideally managed in centres with expertise in both PH and chronic lung diseases because alterations of pulmonary vasculature might resemble those observed in pulmonary arterial hypertension. Because this condition entails poor prognosis, it warrants specialist treatment.

  5. Evaluation of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Detecting Major Bacterial Enteric Pathogens in Fecal Specimens: Intestinal Inflammation and Bacterial Load Are Correlated in Campylobacter Infections

    PubMed Central

    Wohlwend, Nadia; Tiermann, Sacha; Risch, Lorenz; Risch, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A total of 1,056 native or Cary-Blair-preserved stool specimens were simultaneously tested by conventional stool culturing and by enteric bacterial panel (EBP) multiplex real-time PCR for Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Salmonella spp., and shigellosis disease-causing agents (Shigella spp. and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli [EIEC]). Overall, 143 (13.5%) specimens tested positive by PCR for the targets named above; 3 coinfections and 109 (10.4%) Campylobacter spp., 17 (1.6%) Salmonella spp., and 20 (1.9%) Shigella spp./EIEC infections were detected. The respective positive stool culture rates were 75 (7.1%), 14 (1.3%), and 7 (0.7%). The median threshold cycle (CT) values of culture-positive specimens were significantly lower than those of culture-negative ones (CT values, 24.3 versus 28.7; P < 0.001), indicating that the relative bacterial load per fecal specimen was significantly associated with the culture results. In Campylobacter infections, the respective median fecal calprotectin concentrations in PCR-negative/culture-negative (n = 40), PCR-positive/culture-negative (n = 14), and PCR-positive/culture-positive (n = 15) specimens were 134 mg/kg (interquartile range [IQR], 30 to 1,374 mg/kg), 1,913 mg/kg (IQR, 165 to 3,813 mg/kg), and 5,327 mg/kg (IQR, 1,836 to 18,213 mg/kg). Significant differences were observed among the three groups (P < 0.001), and a significant linear trend was identified (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the fecal calprotectin concentrations and CT values were found to be correlated (r = −0.658). Our results demonstrate that molecular screening of Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., and Shigella spp./EIEC using the BD Max EBP assay will result in timely diagnosis and improved sensitivity. The determination of inflammatory markers, such as calprotectin, in fecal specimens may aid in the interpretation of PCR results, particularly for enteric pathogens associated with mucosal damage and colonic inflammation. PMID:27307458

  6. Evaluation of a Multiplex Real-Time PCR Assay for Detecting Major Bacterial Enteric Pathogens in Fecal Specimens: Intestinal Inflammation and Bacterial Load Are Correlated in Campylobacter Infections.

    PubMed

    Wohlwend, Nadia; Tiermann, Sacha; Risch, Lorenz; Risch, Martin; Bodmer, Thomas

    2016-09-01

    A total of 1,056 native or Cary-Blair-preserved stool specimens were simultaneously tested by conventional stool culturing and by enteric bacterial panel (EBP) multiplex real-time PCR for Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Salmonella spp., and shigellosis disease-causing agents (Shigella spp. and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli [EIEC]). Overall, 143 (13.5%) specimens tested positive by PCR for the targets named above; 3 coinfections and 109 (10.4%) Campylobacter spp., 17 (1.6%) Salmonella spp., and 20 (1.9%) Shigella spp./EIEC infections were detected. The respective positive stool culture rates were 75 (7.1%), 14 (1.3%), and 7 (0.7%). The median threshold cycle (CT) values of culture-positive specimens were significantly lower than those of culture-negative ones (CT values, 24.3 versus 28.7; P < 0.001), indicating that the relative bacterial load per fecal specimen was significantly associated with the culture results. In Campylobacter infections, the respective median fecal calprotectin concentrations in PCR-negative/culture-negative (n = 40), PCR-positive/culture-negative (n = 14), and PCR-positive/culture-positive (n = 15) specimens were 134 mg/kg (interquartile range [IQR], 30 to 1,374 mg/kg), 1,913 mg/kg (IQR, 165 to 3,813 mg/kg), and 5,327 mg/kg (IQR, 1,836 to 18,213 mg/kg). Significant differences were observed among the three groups (P < 0.001), and a significant linear trend was identified (P < 0.001). Furthermore, the fecal calprotectin concentrations and CT values were found to be correlated (r = -0.658). Our results demonstrate that molecular screening of Campylobacter spp., Salmonella spp., and Shigella spp./EIEC using the BD Max EBP assay will result in timely diagnosis and improved sensitivity. The determination of inflammatory markers, such as calprotectin, in fecal specimens may aid in the interpretation of PCR results, particularly for enteric pathogens associated with mucosal damage and colonic inflammation.

  7. Immunohistochemical detection of IgM and IgG in lung tissue of dogs with leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leptospiral pulmonary haemorrhage syndrome (LPHS) is a severe form of leptospirosis. Pathogenic mechanisms are poorly understood. Lung tissues from 26 dogs with LPHS, 5 dogs with pulmonary haemorrhage due to other causes and 6 healthy lungs were labelled for IgG, IgM and leptospiral antigens. Three ...

  8. [Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis].

    PubMed

    Cottin, Vincent; Cordier, Jean-François

    2008-11-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis is a chronic disorder characterized histopathologically by a pattern of usual interstitial pneumonia, with heterogeneous and mutilating interstitial fibrosis with foci of proliferating fibroblasts, honeycomb lung, and little if any inflammation. The diagnosis is based on a pluridisciplinary analysis of the clinical symptoms, the chest high-resolution computerized tomography features, and pathology on video-thoracoscopic lung biopsy when indicated. In half of the cases, the typical tomodensitometric pattern allows to make a confident diagnosis without a lung biopsy. The median survival is only about 3 years and is presently not improved by any treatment. Treatment with N-acetylcysteine (antioxydant) in association with corticosteroids and azathioprine may slightly reduce the rate of functional worsening. Clinical trials are in progress to improve the treatment of this still incurable disease.

  9. Protective Effects of Diallyl Sulfide on Ovalbumin-Induced Pulmonary Inflammation of Allergic Asthma Mice by MicroRNA-144, -34a, and -34b/c-Modulated Nrf2 Activation.

    PubMed

    Ho, Cheng-Ying; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Weng, Chia-Jui; Yen, Gow-Chin

    2016-01-13

    Allergic airway disorder is characterized by an increase in the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The induction of inflammation and hyperresponsiveness by an allergen was ameliorated by antioxidants in vivo. This study investigated the protective effects and underlying mechanism of diallyl sulfide (DAS) on ovalbumin (OVA)-induced allergic asthma of BALB/c mice. The animals were intraperitoneally sensitized by inhaling OVA to induce chronic airway inflammation. By administering DAS, a decrease of the infiltrated inflammatory cell counts and the levels of IL-4 and IL-10 in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid as well as the OVA-specific immunoglobulin E levels in sera were observed. DAS also effectively inhibited OVA-induced inflammatory cell infiltration and mucus hypersecretion in lung tissue. Several OVA-induced inflammatory factors (ROS, 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, 8-iso-prostaglandin F2α, and NF-κB) were inhibited by DAS. In addition, DAS increased OVA inhalation-reduced levels of Nrf2 activation by regulating microRNA-144, -34a and -34b/c. Together, the pathogenesis of OVA-induced asthma is highly associated with oxidative stress, and DAS may be an effective supplement to alleviate this disease.

  10. Cardiovascular and blood coagulative effects of pulmonary zinc exposure

    SciTech Connect

    Gilmour, Peter S.; Nyska, Abraham; Schladweiler, Mette C.; McGee, John K.; Wallenborn, J. Grace; Richards, Judy H.; Kodavanti, Urmila P. . E-mail: kodavanti.urmila@epa.gov

    2006-02-15

    Cardiovascular damage induced by pulmonary exposure to environmental chemicals can result from direct action or, secondarily from pulmonary injury. We have developed a rat model of pulmonary exposure to zinc to demonstrate cardiac, coagulative, and fibrinolytic alterations. Male Wistar Kyoto rats were instilled intratracheally with saline or zinc sulfate, 131 {mu}g/kg (2 {mu}mol/kg); the alterations were determined at 1, 4, 24, and 48 h postexposure. High-dose zinc enabled us to show changes in circulating levels of zinc above normal and induce significant pulmonary inflammation/injury such that cardiac impairments were likely. At 1-24 h postexposure, plasma levels of zinc increased to nearly 20% above the base line. Significant pulmonary inflammation and injury were determined by analysis of bronchoalveolar lavage fluid and histopathology in zinc-exposed rats at all time points. Starting at 4 h postexposure, pulmonary damage was accompanied by persistently increased gene expressions of tissue factor (TF) and plasminogen activator-inhibitor-1 (PAI-1), but not thrombomodulin (TM). Cardiac tissues demonstrated similar temporal increases in expressions of TF, PAI-1, and TM mRNA following pulmonary instillation of zinc. In contrast to extensive pulmonary edema and inflammation, only mild, and focal acute, myocardial lesions developed in a few zinc-exposed rats; no histological evidence showed increased deposition of fibrin or disappearance of troponin. At 24 and 48 h postexposure to zinc, increases occurred in levels of systemic fibrinogen and the activated partial thromboplastin time. These data suggest that cardiovascular blood coagulation impairments are likely following pulmonary zinc exposure and associated pulmonary injury and inflammation.

  11. [Abdominal pain and flatulence. Intestinal and pulmonary tuberculosis. IgG kappa paraproteinemia].

    PubMed

    Schulthess, G; Osterwalder, P; Valentini, T; Bicik, I; Widmer, U

    1998-03-04

    A 21-year-old woman suffered from cramplike abdominal pain, flatulence and occasional diarrhoea for about one year. Over the past few weeks the abdominal symptoms exacerbated, besides productive cough and subfebrile temperatures developed. Coloscopy revealed two isolated, short ulcers in the proximal colon. The histological examination of the biopsies taken from these ulcers indicated granulomatous inflammation. Moreover small acinar infiltrates in both pulmonary apices were visualized. The findings in this patient originating from Turkey were suspicious for intestinal and pulmonary tuberculosis. Though sensitive methods were used (Ziehl-Neelson stam, amplified M. tuberculosis direct test, a polymerase chain reaction) direct tests allowed no detection of mycobacteria. Antituberculous therapy was initiated on a probatory basis to which the patient responded well and promptly. The diagnosis was confirmed by culture results: M. tuberculosis was grown from colonic biopsies, morning sputa and bronchioalveolar lavage.

  12. Pulmonary Function Reduction in Diabetes With and Without Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kinney, Gregory L.; Black-Shinn, Jennifer L.; Wan, Emily S.; Make, Barry; Regan, Elizabeth; Lutz, Sharon; Soler, Xavier; Silverman, Edwin K.; Crapo, James; Hokanson, John E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Diabetes damages major organ systems through disrupted glycemic control and increased inflammation. The effects of diabetes on the lung have been of interest for decades, but the modest reduction in pulmonary function and its nonprogressive nature have limited its investigation. A recent systematic review found that diabetes was associated with reductions in forced expiratory volume in 1 s (FEV1), forced vital capacity (FVC), and diffusing capacity for carbon monoxide of the lung and increased FEV1/FVC. They reported pooled results including few smokers. This study will examine measures of pulmonary function in participants with extensive smoking exposure. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We examined pulmonary function in participants with a >10–pack-year history of smoking with and without diabetes with and without chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). We measured pulmonary function, exercise capacity, and pulmonary-related quality of life in 10,129 participants in the Genetic Epidemiology of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPDGene) Study. RESULTS Participants with diabetes were observed to have reduced pulmonary function after controlling for known risk factors and also significant reductions in exercise capacity and quality of life across functional stages of COPD. CONCLUSIONS Pulmonary function in patients with ≥10 pack-years of smoking and diabetes is reduced, and this decrease is associated with significant reductions in activity-related quality of life and exercise capacity. PMID:24026562

  13. PULMONARY TOXICOLOGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pulmonary disease and dysfunction exact a tremendous health burden on society. In a recent survey of lung disease published by the American Lung Association in 2012, upwards of 10 million Americans were diagnosed with chronic bronchitis while over 4 million Americans had emphysem...

  14. First Description of a New Disease in Rainbow Trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss (Walbaum)) Similar to Heart and Skeletal Muscle Inflammation (HSMI) and Detection of a Gene Sequence Related to Piscine Orthoreovirus (PRV)

    PubMed Central

    Olsen, Anne Berit; Hjortaas, Monika; Tengs, Torstein; Hellberg, Hege; Johansen, Renate

    2015-01-01

    In fall 2013, anorexia, lethargy and mortalities up to 10-12,000 dead fish per week were observed in rainbow trout Oncorhynchus mykiss in three fresh water hatcheries (salinity 0-1 ‰) on the west coast of Norway. The fish (25-100 g) showed signs of circulatory failure with haemorrhages, ascites and anaemia. The histopathological findings comprised inflammation of the heart and red muscle and liver necrosis. The affected fish had a common origin. Disease and mortalities were also observed up to four months after sea water transfer. Microbiological examination did not reveal presence of any known pathogens. Based on histopathological similarities to heart and skeletal inflammation (HSMI) in Atlantic salmon, associated with piscine orthoreovirus (PRV), extended investigations to detect a virus within the family Reoviridae were conducted. By the use of primer sets targeting the PRV genome, a sequence with 85% identity to a part of segment S1 of PRV was obtained. Further analysis showed that the virus sequence could only be aligned with PRV and no other reoviruses both on amino acid and nucleotide level. Two PCR assays were developed for specific detection of the virus. High amounts of the virus were detected in diseased fish at all affected farms and low amounts were detected in low prevalence at the broodfish farms. Further investigations are needed to determine if the virus is associated with the new disease in rainbow trout and to further characterize the virus with respect to classification, relationship with PRV, virulence, pathology and epidemiology. PMID:26176955

  15. Chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Vijayan, V K

    2013-02-01

    The global prevalence of physiologically defined chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) in adults aged >40 yr is approximately 9-10 per cent. Recently, the Indian Study on Epidemiology of Asthma, Respiratory Symptoms and Chronic Bronchitis in Adults had shown that the overall prevalence of chronic bronchitis in adults >35 yr is 3.49 per cent. The development of COPD is multifactorial and the risk factors of COPD include genetic and environmental factors. Pathological changes in COPD are observed in central airways, small airways and alveolar space. The proposed pathogenesis of COPD includes proteinase-antiproteinase hypothesis, immunological mechanisms, oxidant-antioxidant balance, systemic inflammation, apoptosis and ineffective repair. Airflow limitation in COPD is defined as a postbronchodilator FEV1 (forced expiratory volume in 1 sec) to FVC (forced vital capacity) ratio <0.70. COPD is characterized by an accelerated decline in FEV1. Co morbidities associated with COPD are cardiovascular disorders (coronary artery disease and chronic heart failure), hypertension, metabolic diseases (diabetes mellitus, metabolic syndrome and obesity), bone disease (osteoporosis and osteopenia), stroke, lung cancer, cachexia, skeletal muscle weakness, anaemia, depression and cognitive decline. The assessment of COPD is required to determine the severity of the disease, its impact on the health status and the risk of future events (e.g., exacerbations, hospital admissions or death) and this is essential to guide therapy. COPD is treated with inhaled bronchodilators, inhaled corticosteroids, oral theophylline and oral phosphodiesterase-4 inhibitor. Non pharmacological treatment of COPD includes smoking cessation, pulmonary rehabilitation and nutritional support. Lung volume reduction surgery and lung transplantation are advised in selected severe patients. Global strategy for the diagnosis, management and prevention of Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease guidelines

  16. Detection and follow-up of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and risk factors in the Southern Cone of Latin America. the pulmonary risk in South America (PRISA) study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The World Health Organization has estimated that by 2030, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease will be the third leading cause of death worldwide. Most knowledge of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease is based on studies performed in Europe or North America and little is known about the prevalence, patient characteristics and change in lung function over time in patients in developing countries, such as those of Latin America. This lack of knowledge is in sharp contrast to the high levels of tobacco consumption and exposure to biomass fuels exhibited in Latin America, both major risk factors for the development of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Studies have also demonstrated that most Latin American physicians frequently do not follow international chronic obstructive pulmonary disease diagnostic and treatment guidelines. The PRISA Study will expand the current knowledge regarding chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and risk factors in Argentina, Chile and Uruguay to inform policy makers and health professionals on the best policies and practices to address this condition. Methods/Design PRISA is an observational, prospective cohort study with at least four years of follow-up. In the first year, PRISA has employed a randomized three-staged stratified cluster sampling strategy to identify 6,000 subjects from Marcos Paz and Bariloche, Argentina, Temuco, Chile, and Canelones, Uruguay. Information, such as comorbidities, socioeconomic status and tobacco and biomass exposure, will be collected and spirometry, anthropometric measurements, blood sampling and electrocardiogram will be performed. In year four, subjects will have repeat measurements taken. Discussion There is no longitudinal data on chronic obstructive pulmonary disease incidence and risk factors in the southern cone of Latin America, therefore this population-based prospective cohort study will fill knowledge gaps in the prevalence and incidence of chronic obstructive pulmonary

  17. Sex differences in the pulmonary circulation: implications for pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Yvette N.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a form of pulmonary hypertension, is a complex disease of multifactorial origin. While new developments regarding pathophysiological features and therapeutic options in PAH are being reported, one important fact has emerged over the years: there is a sex difference in the incidence of this disease such that while there is a higher incidence in females, disease outcomes are much worse in males. Accordingly, recent attention has been focused on understanding the features of sex differences in the pulmonary circulation and the contributory mechanisms, particularly sex hormones and their role in the pathological and pathophysiological features of PAH. However, to date, there is no clear consensus whether sex hormones (particularly female sex steroids) are beneficial or detrimental in PAH. In this review, we highlight some of the most recent evidence regarding the influence of sex hormones (estrogen, testosterone, progesterone, dehydroepiandrosterone) and estrogen metabolites on key pathophysiological features of PAH such as proliferation, vascular remodeling, vasodilation/constriction, and inflammation, thus setting the stage for research avenues to identify novel therapeutic target for PAH as well as potentially other forms of pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24610923

  18. False-positive reduction using Hessian features in computer-aided detection of pulmonary nodules on thoracic CT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahiner, Berkman; Ge, Zhanyu; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Bogot, Naama; Cascade, Philip N.; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2005-04-01

    We are developing a computer-aided detection (CAD) system for lung nodules in thoracic CT volumes. During false positive (FP) reduction, the image structures around the identified nodule candidates play an important role in differentiating nodules from vessels. In our previous work, we exploited shape and first-order derivative information of the images by extracting ellipsoid and gradient field features. The purpose of this study was to explore the object shape information using second-order derivatives and the Hessian matrix to further improve the performance of our detection system. Eight features related to the eigenvalues of the Hessian matrix were extracted from a volume of interest containing the object, and were combined with ellipsoid and gradient field features to discriminate nodules from FPs. A data set of 82 CT scans from 56 patients was used to evaluate the usefulness of the FP reduction technique. The classification accuracy was assessed using the area Az under the receiving operating characteristic curve and the number of FPs per section at 80% sensitivity. In the combined feature space, we obtained a test Az of 0.97 +/- 0.01, and 0.27 FPs/section at 80% sensitivity. Our results indicate that combining the Hessian, ellipsoid and gradient field features can significantly improve the performance of our FP reduction stage.

  19. Multi-Institutional Evaluation of Digital Tomosynthesis, Dual-Energy Radiography, and Conventional Chest Radiography for the Detection and Management of Pulmonary Nodules.

    PubMed

    Dobbins, James T; McAdams, H Page; Sabol, John M; Chakraborty, Dev P; Kazerooni, Ella A; Reddy, Gautham P; Vikgren, Jenny; Båth, Magnus

    2017-01-01

    Purpose To conduct a multi-institutional, multireader study to compare the performance of digital tomosynthesis, dual-energy (DE) imaging, and conventional chest radiography for pulmonary nodule detection and management. Materials and Methods In this binational, institutional review board-approved, HIPAA-compliant prospective study, 158 subjects (43 subjects with normal findings) were enrolled at four institutions. Informed consent was obtained prior to enrollment. Subjects underwent chest computed tomography (CT) and imaging with conventional chest radiography (posteroanterior and lateral), DE imaging, and tomosynthesis with a flat-panel imaging device. Three experienced thoracic radiologists identified true locations of nodules (n = 516, 3-20-mm diameters) with CT and recommended case management by using Fleischner Society guidelines. Five other radio