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Sample records for detecting disease-associated genotype

  1. Metagenomic approaches to disclose disease-associated pathogens: detection of viral pathogens in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Granberg, Fredrik; Karlsson, Oskar E; Belák, Sándor

    2015-01-01

    Metagenomic approaches have become invaluable for culture-independent and sequence-independent detection and characterization of disease-associated pathogens. Here, the sequential steps from sampling to verification of results are described for a metagenomic-based approach to detect potential pathogens in honeybees. The pre-sequencing steps are given in detail, but due to the rapid development of sequencing technologies, all platform-specific procedures, as well as subsequent bioinformatics analysis, are more generally described. It should also be noted that this approach could, with minor modifications, be adapted for other organisms and sample matrices.

  2. Detecting disease-associated genomic outcomes using constrained mixture of Bayesian hierarchical models for paired data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yunfeng; Morrow, Jarrett; Raby, Benjamin; Tantisira, Kelan; Weiss, Scott T.; Huang, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Detecting disease-associated genomic outcomes is one of the key steps in precision medicine research. Cutting-edge high-throughput technologies enable researchers to unbiasedly test if genomic outcomes are associated with disease of interest. However, these technologies also include the challenges associated with the analysis of genome-wide data. Two big challenges are (1) how to reduce the effects of technical noise; and (2) how to handle the curse of dimensionality (i.e., number of variables are way larger than the number of samples). To tackle these challenges, we propose a constrained mixture of Bayesian hierarchical models (MBHM) for detecting disease-associated genomic outcomes for data obtained from paired/matched designs. Paired/matched designs can effectively reduce effects of confounding factors. MBHM does not involve multiple testing, hence does not have the problem of the curse of dimensionality. It also could borrow information across genes so that it can be used for whole genome data with small sample sizes. PMID:28358896

  3. Disease-associated prion protein detected in lymphoid tissues from pigs challenged with the agent of chronic wasting disease

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: Chronic wasting disease (CWD) is a naturally-occurring, fatal neurodegenerative disease of cervids. We previously demonstrated that disease-associated prion protein (PrPSc) can be detected in the brain and retina from pigs challenged intracranially or orally with the CWD agent. In that study,...

  4. Disulfide-modified antigen for detection of celiac disease-associated anti-tissue transglutaminase autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Rivera, Luis Carlos; Dulay, Samuel; Lozano-Sánchez, Pablo; Katakis, Ioanis; Acero-Sánchez, Josep Lluís; O'Sullivan, Ciara K

    2017-03-29

    A simple and rapid immunosensor for the determination of the celiac disease-related antibody, anti-tissue transglutaminase, was investigated. The antigenic protein tissue transglutaminase was chemically modified, introducing disulfide groups through different moieties of the molecule (amine, carboxylic, and hydroxyl groups), self-assembled on gold surfaces, and used for the detection of IgA and IgG autoantibodies. The modified proteins were evaluated using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and surface plasmon resonance, which showed that only introduction of the disulfide groups through amine moieties in the tissue transglutaminase preserved its antigenic properties. The disulfide-modified antigen was co-immobilized via chemisorption with a poly(ethylene glycol) alkanethiol on gold electrodes. The modified electrodes were then exposed to IgA anti-tissue transglutaminase antibodies and subsequently to horseradish peroxidase-labeled anti-idiotypic antibodies, achieving a detection limit of 260 ng ml(-1). Immunosensor performance in the presence of complex matrixes, including clinically relevant serum reference solutions and real patient samples, was evaluated. The introduction of disulfides in the antigenic protein enabled a simple and convenient one-step surface immobilization procedure involving only spontaneous gold-thiol covalent binding. Complete amperometric assay time was 30 min.

  5. Kullback-Leibler divergence for detection of rare haplotype common disease association.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shili

    2015-11-01

    Rare haplotypes may tag rare causal variants of common diseases; hence, detection of such rare haplotypes may also contribute to our understanding of complex disease etiology. Because rare haplotypes frequently result from common single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), focusing on rare haplotypes is much more economical compared with using rare single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) from sequencing, as SNPs are available and 'free' from already amassed genome-wide studies. Further, associated haplotypes may shed light on the underlying disease causal mechanism, a feat unmatched by SNV-based collapsing methods. In recent years, data mining approaches have been adapted to detect rare haplotype association. However, as they rely on an assumed underlying disease model and require the specification of a null haplotype, results can be erroneous if such assumptions are violated. In this paper, we present a haplotype association method based on Kullback-Leibler divergence (hapKL) for case-control samples. The idea is to compare haplotype frequencies for the cases versus the controls by computing symmetrical divergence measures. An important property of such measures is that both the frequencies and logarithms of the frequencies contribute in parallel, thus balancing the contributions from rare and common, and accommodating both deleterious and protective, haplotypes. A simulation study under various scenarios shows that hapKL has well-controlled type I error rates and good power compared with existing data mining methods. Application of hapKL to age-related macular degeneration (AMD) shows a strong association of the complement factor H (CFH) gene with AMD, identifying several individual rare haplotypes with strong signals.

  6. SNP marker detection and genotyping in tilapia.

    PubMed

    Van Bers, N E M; Crooijmans, R P M A; Groenen, M A M; Dibbits, B W; Komen, J

    2012-09-01

    We have generated a unique resource consisting of nearly 175 000 short contig sequences and 3569 SNP markers from the widely cultured GIFT (Genetically Improved Farmed Tilapia) strain of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus). In total, 384 SNPs were selected to monitor the wider applicability of the SNPs by genotyping tilapia individuals from different strains and different geographical locations. In all strains and species tested (O. niloticus, O. aureus and O. mossambicus), the genotyping assay was working for a similar number of SNPs (288-305 SNPs). The actual number of polymorphic SNPs was, as expected, highest for individuals from the GIFT population (255 SNPs). In the individuals from an Egyptian strain and in individuals caught in the wild in the basin of the river Volta, 197 and 163 SNPs were polymorphic, respectively. A pairwise calculation of Nei's genetic distance allowed the discrimination of the individual strains and species based on the genotypes determined with the SNP set. We expect that this set will be widely applicable for use in tilapia aquaculture, e.g. for pedigree reconstruction. In addition, this set is currently used for assaying the genetic diversity of native Nile tilapia in areas where tilapia is, or will be, introduced in aquaculture projects. This allows the tracing of escapees from aquaculture and the monitoring of effects of introgression and hybridization.

  7. reGenotyper: Detecting mislabeled samples in genetic data

    PubMed Central

    Snoek, Basten L.; Elvin, Mark; Rodriguez, Miriam; Arends, Danny; Swertz, Morris A.; Kammenga, Jan E.; Li, Yang

    2017-01-01

    In high-throughput molecular profiling studies, genotype labels can be wrongly assigned at various experimental steps; the resulting mislabeled samples seriously reduce the power to detect the genetic basis of phenotypic variation. We have developed an approach to detect potential mislabeling, recover the “ideal” genotype and identify “best-matched” labels for mislabeled samples. On average, we identified 4% of samples as mislabeled in eight published datasets, highlighting the necessity of applying a “data cleaning” step before standard data analysis. PMID:28192439

  8. Detecting tissue-specific alternative splicing and disease-associated aberrant splicing of the PTCH gene with exon junction microarrays.

    PubMed

    Nagao, Kazuaki; Togawa, Naoyuki; Fujii, Katsunori; Uchikawa, Hideki; Kohno, Yoichi; Yamada, Masao; Miyashita, Toshiyuki

    2005-11-15

    Mutations in the human ortholog of Drosophila patched (PTCH) have been identified in patients with autosomal dominant nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS), characterized by minor developmental anomalies and an increased incidence of cancers such as medulloblastoma and basal cell carcinoma. We identified many isoforms of PTCH mRNA involving exons 1-5, exon 10 and a novel exon, 12b, generated by alternative splicing (AS), most of which have not been deposited in GenBank nor discussed earlier. To monitor splicing events of the PTCH gene, we designed oligonucleotide arrays on which exon probes and exon-exon junction probes as well as a couple of intron probes for the PTCH gene were placed in duplicate. Probe intensities were normalized on the basis of the total expression of PTCH and probe sensitivity. Tissue-specific regulation of AS identified with the microarrays closely correlated with the results obtained by RT-PCR. Of note, the novel exon, exon 12b, was specifically expressed in the brain and heart, especially in the cerebellum. Additionally, using these microarrays, we were able to detect disease-associated aberrant splicings of the PTCH gene in two patients with NBCCS. In both cases, cryptic splice donor sites located either in an exon or in an intron were activated because of the partial disruption of the consensus sequence for the authentic splice donor sites due to point mutations. Taken together, oligonucleotide microarrays containing exon junction probes are demonstrated to be a powerful tool to investigate tissue-specific regulation of AS and aberrant splicing taking place in genetic disorders.

  9. The Risk of Coronary Heart Disease Associated With Glycosylated Hemoglobin ≥ 6.5% is Pronounced in the Haptoglobin 2-2 Genotype

    PubMed Central

    Cahill, Leah E; Jensen, Majken K; Chiuve, Stephanie E; Shalom, Hadar; Pai, Jennifer K; Flint, Alan J; Mukamal, Kenneth J; Rexrode, Kathryn M; Levy, Andrew P; Rimm, Eric B

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND Research targeting glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) to < 6.5% to prevent coronary heart disease (CHD) events has conflicting results. We previously observed the haptoglobin (Hp) Hp2-2 genotype is associated with a ~10-fold increased CHD risk among individuals with HbA1c ≥ 6.5%, and thus might be useful in identifying those at high risk of CHD who would benefit from maintaining HbA1c < 6.5%. OBJECTIVES We modeled whether HbA1c ≥ 6.5% in the Hp2-2 genotype is associated with CHD in a prospective case-control study nested within the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study (HPFS). METHODS HbA1c concentration and Hp genotype were determined for 695 incident cases of CHD from 1994–2010 and matched controls. Logistic regression models calculated relative risk (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI), for the first and second halves of follow-up, adjusting for confounding variables. A dataset from the Nurses’ Health Study (NHS) served as a replication cohort. RESULTS Prevalence of Hp2-2 genotype in HPFS was 39%. Compared to HbA1c < 6.5%, RR of CHD for HbA1c ≥ 6.5% for the Hp2-2 genotype over full follow-up was 3.07 (1.37–6.86)-- 3.88 (1.31–11.52) during the first half of follow-up and 2.16 (0.61–7.61) in the second half. The corresponding RRs (95% CI) for the Hp1-1 + Hp2-1 genotypes were 2.19 (1.14–4.24) (full follow-up), 1.60 (0.73–3.53) (first half), and 4.72 (1.26–17.65) (second half). CONCLUSIONS In 2 independent cohorts, risk of CHD associated with HbA1c ≥ 6.5% is pronounced in the Hp2-2 genotype, particularly in early cases. The Hp2-2 genotype may identify individuals at greatest CHD risk from hyperglycemia. PMID:26483103

  10. Detection and integration of genotyping errors in statistical genetics.

    PubMed

    Sobel, Eric; Papp, Jeanette C; Lange, Kenneth

    2002-02-01

    Detection of genotyping errors and integration of such errors in statistical analysis are relatively neglected topics, given their importance in gene mapping. A few inopportunely placed errors, if ignored, can tremendously affect evidence for linkage. The present study takes a fresh look at the calculation of pedigree likelihoods in the presence of genotyping error. To accommodate genotyping error, we present extensions to the Lander-Green-Kruglyak deterministic algorithm for small pedigrees and to the Markov-chain Monte Carlo stochastic algorithm for large pedigrees. These extensions can accommodate a variety of error models and refrain from simplifying assumptions, such as allowing, at most, one error per pedigree. In principle, almost any statistical genetic analysis can be performed taking errors into account, without actually correcting or deleting suspect genotypes. Three examples illustrate the possibilities. These examples make use of the full pedigree data, multiple linked markers, and a prior error model. The first example is the estimation of genotyping error rates from pedigree data. The second-and currently most useful-example is the computation of posterior mistyping probabilities. These probabilities cover both Mendelian-consistent and Mendelian-inconsistent errors. The third example is the selection of the true pedigree structure connecting a group of people from among several competing pedigree structures. Paternity testing and twin zygosity testing are typical applications.

  11. Detection of genotype recycling fraud in U.S. immigrants.

    PubMed

    Wenk, Robert E

    2011-01-01

    Relationship testing laboratories provide genetic evidence to support or refute claims of kinship between U.S. citizen petitioners and potential immigrant beneficiaries. One female beneficiary presented a male amelogenin type and alleles at 15 autosomal loci that were identical to an alleged brother's. Laboratory records showed that her alleged father had petitioned to have 15 children emigrate from Ghana. The petitioner's 15 paternity indices exceeded 10⁵, but the children shared only four short tandem repeat (STR) profiles, suggesting fraudulent reuse of genotypes in this alleged pedigree (AP). To determine the extent of this "genotype recycling," I examined the laboratory's 555 APs from Ghana and 532 control APs from Nigeria. Seventeen Ghanaian APs (3.1%) but no Nigerian APs showed genotype recycling. Of 90 tested people in the 17 APs, 56 shared identical STR profiles with others in their AP. Of these 56 people, 10 were petitioners with unexpectedly high parentage indices. Seven of 56 had amelogenin types that disagreed with their declared genders. Database searches for identical multilocus genotypes in allegedly different people would best detect this fraud.

  12. Detection of a novel genotype of Cryptosporidium in Antarctic pinnipeds.

    PubMed

    Rengifo-Herrera, Claudia; Ortega-Mora, Luis Miguel; Gómez-Bautista, Mercedes; García-Peña, Francisco Javier; García-Párraga, Daniel; Pedraza-Díaz, Susana

    2013-01-16

    A study was conducted to investigate the presence of Cryptosporidium and Giardia in Antarctic marine mammals. A total of 270 faecal samples from different species of pinnipeds from different locations in the South Shetland Islands and Antarctic Peninsula were analysed by immunofluorescence microscopy and PCR. Cryptosporidium was detected by PCR in three samples from Southern elephant seals (Mirounga leonina) and 2 Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii). However, no oocysts were observed in any of the samples by immunofluorescence microscopy. Molecular characterisation of the isolates, using the 18S rDNA, the HSP70 and the COWP loci, revealed the presence of a Cryptosporidium sp., previously reported from an Antarctic Southern elephant seal, in the elephant seals and a novel genotype in Weddell seals. Giardia could not be detected in any of the samples analysed.

  13. American Behcet's Disease Association

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awareness Day May 20th is Behcet's Awareness Day Behcet's Disease Awareness Share your story and educate others about ... org/en/community/behcet-s-syndrome Upcoming Events American Behcet's Disease Association PO BOX 80576 Rochester, MI 48308 Contact ...

  14. Wilson's Disease Association International

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connect with Wilson Disease Association Send Email Physician Contacts List of Physicians and Institutions in Your Area View Contacts Support Contacts Individuals who can offer Support and Information View ...

  15. Kennedy's Disease Association

    MedlinePlus

    Kennedy's Disease Association A Public Benefit, Non-Profit Organization Register GTranslate GTranslate Javascript is required to use ... worldwide. Males generally inherit the disease symptoms and females are the carriers. Help Us Find A Cure! ...

  16. Total Coronary Atherosclerotic Plaque Burden Assessment by CT Angiography for Detecting Obstructive Coronary Artery Disease Associated with Myocardial Perfusion Abnormalities

    PubMed Central

    Kishi, Satoru; Magalhães, Tiago A.; Cerci, Rodrigo J.; Matheson, Matthew B.; Vavere, Andrea; Tanami, Yutaka; Kitslaar, Pieter H.; George, Richard T.; Brinker, Jeffrey; Miller, Julie M.; Clouse, Melvin E.; Lemos, Pedro A.; Niinuma, Hiroyuki; Reiber, Johan H.C.; Rochitte, Carlos E.; Rybicki, Frank J.; Di Carli, Marcelo F.; Cox, Christopher; Lima, Joao A.C.; Arbab-Zadeh, Armin

    2016-01-01

    Background Total atherosclerotic plaque burden assessment by CT angiography (CTA) is a promising tool for diagnosis and prognosis of coronary artery disease (CAD) but its validation is restricted to small clinical studies. We tested the feasibility of semi-automatically derived coronary atheroma burden assessment for identifying patients with hemodynamically significant CAD in a large cohort of patients with heterogenous characteristics. Methods This study focused on the CTA component of the CORE320 study population. A semi-automated contour detection algorithm quantified total coronary atheroma volume defined as the difference between vessel and lumen volume. Percent atheroma volume (PAV = [total atheroma volume/total vessel volume]×100) was the primary metric for assessment (n=374). The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) determined the diagnostic accuracy for identifying patients with hemodynamically significant CAD defined as ≥50% stenosis by quantitative coronary angiography and associated myocardial perfusion abnormality by SPECT. Results Of 374 patients, 139 (37%) had hemodynamically significant CAD. The AUC for PAV was 0.78 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.73–0.83) compared to 0.84 [0.79–0.88] by standard expert CTA interpretation (p=0.02). Accuracy for both CTA (0.91 [0.87, 0.96]) and PAV (0.86 [0.81–0.91]) increased after excluding patients with history of CAD (p<0.01 for both). Bland-Altman analysis revealed good agreement between two observers ( bias of 280.2 mm3 [161.8, 398.7]). Conclusions A semi-automatically derived index of total coronary atheroma volume yields good accuracy for identifying patients with hemodynamically significant CAD, though marginally inferior to CTA expert reading. These results convey promise for rapid, reliable evaluation of clinically relevant CAD. PMID:26817414

  17. Detection and genotyping of enteroviruses in cerebrospinal fluid in patients in Victoria, Australia, 2007-2013.

    PubMed

    Papadakis, Georgina; Chibo, Doris; Druce, Julian; Catton, Michael; Birch, Chris

    2014-09-01

    Genotyping by VP1 fragment polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and nucleic acid sequencing to detect enterovirus (EV) genotypes was performed directly on 729 EV PCR positive cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples collected between 2007 and 2012 from Victorian hospital inpatients. The overall genotype identification rate from CSF-positive material was 43%. The four most common genotypes identified were Echovirus 6 (24%), Echovirus 30 (17%), Echovirus 25 (10%), and Coxsackievirus A9 (10%), together comprising 61% of all EVs typed. The seasonal distribution of all EVs identified followed the recognized pattern of mainly summer epidemics. Three of the four predominant genotypes were present in each of the 6 years in which the study was conducted, with 20 other EV genotypes also detected, often in only a single year. Genotyping of EVs directly in CSF is faster, simpler and more sensitive than traditional virus neutralization assays performed on EV positive samples.

  18. Detection of disease-associated prion protein in the optic nerve and the adrenal gland of cattle with bovine spongiform encephalopathy by using highly sensitive immunolabeling procedures.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Fukuda, Shigeo; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou

    2012-04-01

    A sensitive immunohistochemical procedure, the tyramide signal amplification (TSA) system, was applied to detect the localization of immunolabeled disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in cattle affected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). In this procedure, immunolabeling could be visualized in the optic nerve and the adrenal medulla. In the optic nerve, the dual immunofluorescent technique showed that the granular PrP(Sc) was occasionally detected in the astrocytes, microglia, and myelin sheath adjacent to the axon. Clustered PrP(Sc) was also scattered in association with microglial cells and astrocytes of the optic nerve. In the adrenal gland, PrP(Sc) immunolabeling was confined within the sympathetic nerve fibers and endings. The results suggest that (1) PrP(Sc) might centrifugally spread within and between glial cells and/or the non-axonal (also known as ad-axonal) region of nerve fibers, rather than the axonal and/or extracellular space pathway in the optic nerve, and (2) the sympathetic innervations might be important for the trafficking of BSE agent in the adrenal glands of cattle. This study also suggests that tyramide-based immunochemical analysis should be performed to detect immunolabeled PrP(Sc) in the extracerebral tissues of BSE-affected cattle.

  19. Rapid SNP Detection and Genotyping of Bacterial Pathogens by Pyrosequencing.

    PubMed

    Amoako, Kingsley K; Thomas, Matthew C; Janzen, Timothy W; Goji, Noriko

    2017-01-01

    Bacterial identification and typing are fixtures of microbiology laboratories and are vital aspects of our response mechanisms in the event of foodborne outbreaks and bioterrorist events. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) is leading the way in terms of expanding our ability to identify and characterize bacteria through the identification of subtle differences between genomes (e.g. single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and insertions/deletions). Modern high-throughput technologies such as pyrosequencing can facilitate the typing of bacteria by generating short-read sequence data of informative regions identified by WGS analyses, at a fraction of the cost of WGS. Thus, pyrosequencing systems remain a valuable asset in the laboratory today. Presented in this chapter are two methods developed in the Amoako laboratory that detail the identification and genotyping of bacterial pathogens. The first targets canonical single nucleotide polymorphisms (canSNPs) of evolutionary importance in Bacillus anthracis, the causative agent of Anthrax. The second assay detects Shiga-toxin (stx) genes, which are associated with virulence in Escherichia coli and Shigella spp., and differentiates the subtypes of stx-1 and stx-2 based on SNP loci. These rapid methods provide end users with important information regarding virulence traits as well as the evolutionary and biogeographic origin of isolates.

  20. Immunohistochemical detection of disease-associated prion protein in the peripheral nervous system in experimental H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Okada, H; Iwamaru, Y; Yokoyama, T; Mohri, S

    2013-07-01

    H-type bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) has been identified in aged cattle in Europe and North America. To determine the localization of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in the peripheral nerve tissues of cattle affected with H-type BSE, we employed highly sensitive immunohistochemical and immunofluorescence techniques with the tyramide signal amplification (TSA) system. PrP(Sc) deposition was detected in the inferior ganglia, sympathetic nerve trunk, vagus nerve, spinal nerves, cauda equina, and adrenal medulla, using this system. Notably, granular PrP(Sc) deposits were present mainly in the Schwann cells and fibroblast-like cells and occasionally along certain nerve fibers at the surface of the axons. In the adrenal gland, PrP(Sc) immunolabeling was observed within the sympathetic nerve fibers and nerve endings in the adrenal medulla. Although our results were limited to only 3 experimental cases, these results suggest that the TSA system, a highly sensitive immunohistochemical procedure, may help in elucidating the peripheral pathogenesis of H-type BSE.

  1. Multicolor fluorescence detection for single nucleotide polymorphism genotyping using a filter-less fluorescence detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamasaki, Keita; Nakazawa, Hirokazu; Misawa, Nobuo; Ishida, Makoto; Sawada, Kazuaki

    2013-06-01

    Single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analysis that is commonly performed using fluorescence is important in drug development and pathology research. In this study, to facilitate the analysis, multicolor fluorescence detection for SNP genotyping using a filter-less fluorescence detector (FFD) was investigated. FFDs do not require any optical filters for multicolor fluorescence detection. From the experimental results, FFD could identify 0 μM, 1 μM, and 10 μM solutions of Texas Red and fluorescein isothiocyanate. Moreover, a mixture of Texas Red and 6-FAM could be detected in the SNP genotyping simulation. Therefore, a small and low-cost SNP genotyping system is feasible.

  2. Mycobacterium genotypes in pulmonary tuberculosis infections and their detection by trained African giant pouched rats.

    PubMed

    Mgode, Georgies F; Cohen-Bacrie, Stéphan; Bedotto, Marielle; Weetjens, Bart J; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Kuipers, Dian; Machang'u, Robert S; Kazwala, Rudovick; Mfinanga, Sayoki G; Kaufmann, Stefan H E; Drancourt, Michel

    2015-02-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) diagnosis in low-income countries is mainly done by microscopy. Hence, little is known about the diversity of Mycobacterium spp. in TB infections. Different genotypes or lineages of Mycobacterium tuberculosis vary in virulence and induce different inflammatory and immune responses. Trained Cricetomys rats show a potential for rapid diagnosis of TB. They detect over 28 % of smear-negative, culture-positive TB. However, it is unknown whether these rats can equally detect sputa from patients infected with different genotypes of M. tuberculosis. A 4-month prospective study on diversity of Mycobacterium spp. was conducted in Dar es Salaam, Tanzania. 252 sputa from 161 subjects were cultured on Lowenstein-Jensen medium and thereafter tested by rats. Mycobacterial isolates were subjected to molecular identification and multispacer sequence typing (MST) to determine species and genotypes. A total of 34 Mycobacterium spp. isolates consisting of 32 M. tuberculosis, 1 M. avium subsp. hominissuis and 1 M. intracellulare were obtained. MST analyses of 26 M. tuberculosis isolates yielded 10 distinct MST genotypes, including 3 new genotypes with two clusters of related patterns not grouped by geographic areas. Genotype MST-67, shared by one-third of M. tuberculosis isolates, was associated with the Mwananyamala clinic. This study shows that diverse M. tuberculosis genotypes (n = 10) occur in Dar es Salaam and trained rats detect 80 % of the genotypes. Sputa with two M. tuberculosis genotypes (20 %), M. avium hominissuis and M. intracellulare were not detected. Therefore, rats detect sputa with different M. tuberculosis genotypes and can be used to detect TB in resource-poor countries.

  3. Detection of genotype-specific Ehrlichia canis exposure in Brazilian dogs by TRP36 peptide ELISA.

    PubMed

    Aguiar, Daniel M; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Braga, Isis A; Taques, Isis I G G; McBride, Jere W

    2016-02-01

    We recently characterized a novel genotype of Ehrlichia canis based on the tandem repeat (TR) sequence of the TRP36 gene in Brazil. The TR amino acid sequence of the Brazilian (Br) genotype (ASVVPEAE) was divergent from the previously described US genotype (TEDSVSAPA) of E. canis. In this study, we developed an ELISA based on TRP36 TR synthetic peptides from both Br and US E. canis TRP36 genotypes to serologically detect and distinguish infections caused by these genotypes. Sera from 30 Brazilian dogs naturally infected with E. canis, sera from dogs experimentally infected E. canis (Jake and Cuiabá #1 strains) and E. chaffeensis (Arkansas strain) and 12 seronegative E. canis dogs were evaluated. Fifteen naturally infected Brazilian dogs had antibodies that reacted with the US TRP36 (n=9) or Br TRP36 (n=6) only, and 13 dogs had antibodies that reacted with both TPR36 peptides suggesting that these dogs were exposed to both genotypes. Most dogs (n=28) had antibodies that reacted with the highly conserved E. canis TRP19 peptide; however, two dogs had antibodies to E. canis TRP19, but did not have TRP36 antibodies, raising the possibility that another novel TRP36 genotype is circulating in Brazil. Our results demonstrate that synthetic peptides based on the TR region of E. canis TRP36 can be used to serologically distinguish infections or identify coinfections by different genotypes, and to determine the seroprevalence of various E. canis genotypes in Brazil.

  4. Universal Primers for Detection and Sequencing of Hepatitis B Virus Genomes across Genotypes A to G.

    PubMed

    Chook, Jack Bee; Teo, Woon Li; Ngeow, Yun Fong; Tee, Kok Keng; Ng, Kee Peng; Mohamed, Rosmawati

    2015-06-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has been divided into 10 genotypes, A to J, based on an 8% nucleotide sequence divergence between genotypes. The conventional practice of using a single set of primers to amplify a near-complete HBV genome is hampered by its low analytical sensitivity. The current practice of using overlapping conserved primer sets to amplify a complete HBV genome in a clinical sample is limited by the lack of pan-primers to detect all HBV genotypes. In this study, we designed six highly conserved, overlapping primer sets to cover the complete HBV genome. We based our design on the sequences of 5,154 HBV genomes of genotypes A to I downloaded from the GenBank nucleotide database. These primer sets were tested on 126 plasma samples from Malaysia, containing genotypes A to D and with viral loads ranging from 20 to >79,780,000 IU/ml. The overall success rates for PCR amplification and sequencing were >96% and >94%, respectively. Similarly, there was 100% amplification and sequencing success when the primer sets were tested on an HBV reference panel of genotypes A to G. Thus, we have established primer sets that gave a high analytical sensitivity for PCR-based detection of HBV and a high rate of sequencing success for HBV genomes in most of the viral genotypes, if not all, without prior known sequence data for the particular genotype/genome.

  5. [Hepatitis B virus genotype E infection in Turkey: the detection of the first case].

    PubMed

    Sayan, Murat; Sanlıdağ, Tamer; Akçalı, Sinem; Arıkan, Ayşe

    2014-10-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a global major health problem. Currently, 10 genotypes (A-J) of hepatitis B virus (HBV) are identified based on the nucleic acid sequence heterogeneity, and these genotypes have been shown to have distinct geographic distribution. Reports of the previous studies indicated that the genotype D is the predominant type among hepatitis B patients in different regions of Turkey. However, recent studies indicated that other HBV genotypes are also seen with an increasing rate. Although epidemiological and clinical information on genotype E infection is currently limited, it is known that genotype E infection is common in West and Central Africa. In this report, the first case of HBV genotype E infection in Turkey was presented. A 22-year-old Nigerian male employee who resided in Manisa for five years was admitted to Celal Bayar University Hospital Manisa, Turkey, for his routine check-up. Since HBsAg was found positive, other HBV markers were tested with a repeated serum sample. Laboratory findings were as follows; HBsAg (+), anti-HBs (-), HBeAg (-), anti-HBe (+), anti-HBc (+), anti-HCV (-), anti-HIV (-), ALT: 44 U/L and AST: 45 U/L. HBV-DNA level was detected as 700 IU/ml by real-time PCR (Artus HBV QS RGQ Qiagen, Germany). HBV-DNA isolated from the serum sample of the patient was amplified by PCR and polymerase gene segment of HBV was directly sequenced. UPGMA method was used for phylogenetic analysis and Inno-LIPA HBV genotyping method (Innogenetics, Belgium) was performed to determine multiple HBV genotype infection. On the basis of those methods the genotype of the virus was identified as genotype E. The partial sequences of the HBV polymerase gene were loaded to the international DNA data bank (GenBank) for contribution to the global HBV surveillance. This report emphasized that besides genotype D the other HBV genotypes could be found in Turkey. Since the patient was an inactive HBsAg carrier before his residence in Turkey, this

  6. Influence of breed and genotype on the onset and distribution of infectivity and disease-associated prion protein in sheep following oral infection with the bovine spongiform encephalopathy agent.

    PubMed

    McGovern, G; Martin, S; Jeffrey, M; Bellworthy, S J; Spiropoulos, J; Green, R; Lockey, R; Vickery, C M; Thurston, L; Dexter, G; Hawkins, S A C; González, L

    2015-01-01

    The onset and distribution of infectivity and disease-specific prion protein (PrP(d)) accumulation was studied in Romney and Suffolk sheep of the ARQ/ARQ, ARQ/ARR and ARR/ARR prion protein gene (Prnp) genotypes (where A stands for alanine, R for arginine and Q for glutamine at codons 136, 154 and 171 of PrP), following experimental oral infection with cattle-derived bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) agent. Groups of sheep were killed at regular intervals and a wide range of tissues taken for mouse bioassay or immunohistochemistry (IHC), or both. Bioassay results for infectivity were mostly coincident with those of PrP(d) detection by IHC both in terms of tissues and time post infection. Neither PrP(d) nor infectivity was detected in any tissues of BSE-dosed ARQ/ARR or ARR/ARR sheep or of undosed controls. Moreover, four ARQ/ARQ Suffolk sheep, which were methionine (M)/threonine heterozygous at codon 112 of the Prnp gene, did not show any biological or immunohistochemical evidence of infection, while those homozygous for methionine (MARQ/MARQ) did. In MARQ/MARQ sheep of both breeds, initial PrP(d) accumulation was identified in lymphoreticular system (LRS) tissues followed by the central nervous system (CNS) and enteric nervous system (ENS) and finally by the autonomic nervous system and peripheral nervous system and other organs. Detection of infectivity closely mimicked this sequence. No PrP(d) was observed in the ENS prior to its accumulation in the CNS, suggesting that ENS involvement occurred simultaneously to that of, or followed centrifugal spread from, the CNS. The distribution of PrP(d) within the ENS further suggested a progressive spread from the ileal plexus to other ENS segments via neuronal connections of the gut wall. Differences between the two breeds were noted in terms of involvement of LRS and ENS tissues, with Romney sheep showing a more delayed and less consistent PrP(d) accumulation than Suffolk sheep in such tissues. Whether this

  7. FRET-based detection and genotyping of HPV-6 and HPV-11 causing recurrent respiratory papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Combrinck, Catharina E; Seedat, Riaz Y; Burt, Felicity J

    2013-05-01

    Recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) is a potentially life-threatening disease caused by human papillomavirus (HPV), usually HPV types 6 and 11. The conventional method used for detection and typing the RRP isolates in our laboratory is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and DNA sequencing method. A real-time PCR assay based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) probe technology was developed for the detection and rapid genotyping of HPV-6 and-11 isolates from biopsy material. The primers and probes were designed using multiple alignments of HPV-6 and HPV-11 partial E6 and E7 sequences that included prototypic and non-prototypic variants. Real-time PCR followed by probe-specific melting-curve analysis allowed differentiation of HPV-6 and HPV-11. HPV-6 and HPV-11 amplicons were used to determine detection limits and inter- and intra-assay variability. The detection limit of the assay was 12.8 DNA copies for HPV-6 and 22.5 DNA copies for HPV-11. A total of 60 isolates were genotyped using the FRET real-time PCR assay and a 100% concordance was obtained when results were compared with genotyping based on conventional DNA sequencing. The real-time PCR assay based on FRET technology was able to detect and rapidly genotype HPV from tissue biopsy obtained from patients with RRP. The assay reduces the time required for genotyping from three working days to less than a day.

  8. Detection of Helicobacter pylori and the genotypes of resistance to clarithromycin and the heterogeneous genotype to this antibiotic in biopsies obtained from symptomatic children.

    PubMed

    Aguilera-Correa, John Jairo; Urruzuno, Pedro; Barrio, Josefa; Martinez, María José; Agudo, Sonia; Somodevilla, Angela; Llorca, Laura; Alarcón, Teresa

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to use a commercially available kit (GenoType® HelicoDR; Hain Life Science, Germany) to detect Helicobacter pylori infection and clarithromycin resistance genotype in biopsies obtained from symptomatic children.

  9. Detection of Rotavirus Genotypes in Korea 5 Years after the Introduction of Rotavirus Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Chung, Ju-Young; Kim, Min-Sung; Jung, Tae Woong; Kim, Seong Joon; Kang, Jin-Han; Han, Seung Beom; Kim, Sang Yong; Rhim, Jung Woo; Kim, Hwang-Min; Park, Jae Hong; Jo, Dae Sun; Ma, Sang Hyuk; Jeong, Hye-Sook; Cheon, Doo-Sung; Kim, Jong-Hyun

    2015-10-01

    Rotavirus (RV) is one of the most important viral etiologic agents of acute gastroenteritis (AGE) in children. Although effective RV vaccines (RVVs) are now used worldwide, novel genotypes and outbreaks resulting from rare genotype combinations have emerged. This study documented RV genotypes in a Korean population of children with AGE 5 yr after the introduction of RVV and assessed potential genotype differences based on vaccination status or vaccine type. Children less than 5-yr-old diagnosed with AGE between October 2012 and September 2013 admitted to 9 medical institutions from 8 provinces in Korea were prospectively enrolled. Stool samples were tested for RV by enzyme immunoassay and genotyped by multiplex reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. In 346 patients, 114 (32.9%) were RV-positive. Among them, 87 (76.3%) patients were infected with RV alone. Eighty-six of 114 RV-positive stool samples were successfully genotyped, and their combinations of genotypes were G1P[8] (36, 41.9%), G2P[4] (12, 14.0%), and G3P[8] (6, 7.0%). RV was detected in 27.8% of patients in the vaccinated group and 39.8% in the unvaccinated group (P=0.035). Vaccination history was available for 67 of 86 cases with successfully genotyped RV-positive stool samples; RotaTeq (20, 29.9%), Rotarix (7, 10.4%), unvaccinated (40, 59.7%). The incidence of RV AGE is lower in the RV-vaccinated group compared to the unvaccinated group with no evidence of substitution with unusual genotype combinations.

  10. Giant Magnetoresistive Biochip for DNA Detection and HPV Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Liang; Yu, Heng; Akhras, Michael S.; Han, Shu-Jen; Osterfeld, Sebastian; White, Robert L.; Pourmand, Nader; Wang, Shan X.

    2008-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) biochip based on spin valve sensor array and magnetic nanoparticle labels was developed for inexpensive, sensitive and reliable DNA detection. The DNA targets detected in this experiment were PCR products amplified from Human Papillomavirus (HPV) plasmids. The concentrations of the target DNA after PCR were around 10 nM in most cases, but concentrations of 10 pM were also detectable, which is demonstrated by experiments with artificial DNA samples. A mild but highly specific surface chemistry was used for probe oligonucleotide immobilization. Double modulation technique was used for signal detection in order to reduce the 1/f noise in the sensor. Twelve assays were performed with an accuracy of approximately 90%. Magnetic signals were consistent with particle coverage data measured with Scanning Electron Microscopy. More recent research on microfluidics showed the potential of reducing the assay time below one hour. This is the first demonstration of magnetic DNA detection using plasmid-derived samples. This study provides a direct proof that GMR sensors can be used for biomedical applications. PMID:18457945

  11. Giant Magnetoresistive Biochips for Biomarker Detection and Genotyping: An Overview

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shan X.

    2008-06-01

    Giant magnetoresistive biochips based on spin valve sensor arrays and magnetic nanoparticle labels have been successfully applied to the detection of biological events in the form of both protein and DNA assays with great speed, sensitivity, selectivity and economy. The technology is highly scalable to deep multiplex detection of biomarkers in a complex disease, and amenable to integration of microfluidics and CMOS electronics for portable applications. The results suggest that a magneto-nano biochip holds great promises in biomedicine, particularly for point of care molecular diagnostics of cancer, infectious diseases, radiation injury, cardiac and other diseases.

  12. Genotypic and phenotypic detection of efflux pump in Rhodococcus equi

    PubMed Central

    Gressler, Letícia Trevisan; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna; da Costa, Mateus Matiuzzi; Pötter, Luciana; da Silveira, Bibiana Petri; Sangioni, Luis Antônio; de Avila Botton, Sônia

    2014-01-01

    The req_39680 gene, associated to a putative efflux system, was detected in 60% (54/90) of R. equi isolates by PCR. The phenotypic expression of efflux mechanism was verified in 20% of the isolates using ethidium bromide. For the first time, the expression of efflux mechanism was demonstrated in R. equi. PMID:25242956

  13. A sensitive method for detecting and genotyping Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts represent a considerable health risk to humans and animals because the parasite has a low infectious dose and usually exists in low numbers in environmental samples, which makes detection problematic. The purpose of this study was to evaluate Cryspovirus as a target f...

  14. Electronic hybridization detection in microarray format and DNA genotyping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blin, Antoine; Cissé, Ismaïl; Bockelmann, Ulrich

    2014-02-01

    We describe an approach to substituting a fluorescence microarray with a surface made of an arrangement of electrolyte-gated field effect transistors. This was achieved using a dedicated blocking of non-specific interactions and comparing threshold voltage shifts of transistors exhibiting probe molecules of different base sequence. We apply the approach to detection of the 35delG mutation, which is related to non-syndromic deafness and is one of the most frequent mutations in humans. The process involves barcode sequences that are generated by Tas-PCR, a newly developed replication reaction using polymerase blocking. The barcodes are recognized by hybridization to surface attached probes and are directly detected by the semiconductor device.

  15. Detection and Genotyping of Leuconostoc spp. in a Sausage Processing Plant.

    PubMed

    Padilla-Frausto, J J; Cepeda-Marquez, L G; Salgado, L M; Iturriaga, M H; Arvizu-Medrano, S M

    2015-12-01

    Some Leuconostoc spp. have the ability to produce slime and undesirable compounds in cooked sausage. The objectives of this research were to identify Leuconostoc sources in a Vienna-type sausage processing plant and to evaluate the genetic diversity of the isolated strains. Three hundred and two samples of sausage batter, sausages during processing, spoiled sausage, equipment surfaces, chilling brine, workers' gloves and aprons, and used casings were collected (March to November 2008 and February to April 2010) from a sausage processing plant. Lactic acid bacteria (LAB) were quantified, and Leuconostoc were detected using PCR. Strains were isolated and identified in Leuconostoc-positive samples. Leuconostoc strains were genotyped using randomly amplified polymorphic DNA and pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. LAB content of nonspoiled and spoiled sausage ranged from <0.8 to 4.4 log CFU/g and from 4.9 to 8.3 log CFU/g, respectively. LAB levels on equipment surfaces ranged from <1.3 to 4.8 log CFU/100 cm(2). Leuconostoc was detected in 35% of the samples, and 88 Leuconostoc spp. strains were isolated and genotyped. The main Leuconostoc spp. isolated were L. mesenteroides (37 genotypes), L. fallax (29 genotypes), and L. lactis (6 genotypes). Some strains of Leuconostoc isolated from equipment surfaces and sausages showed the same genotype. One L. lactis genotype included strains isolated from spoiled sausages analyzed in April 2008 and March to April 2010. Equipment and conveyor belts constitute Leuconostoc contamination sources. Leuconostoc persistence in the sausage processing environment and in the final product suggests the existence of microbial reservoirs, possibly on equipment surfaces.

  16. Detection of rare and possibly carcinogenic human papillomavirus genotypes as single infections in invasive cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Geraets, Daan; Alemany, Laia; Guimera, Nuria; de Sanjose, Silvia; de Koning, Maurits; Molijn, Anco; Jenkins, David; Bosch, Xavier; Quint, Wim

    2012-12-01

    The contribution of carcinogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types to the burden of cervical cancer has been well established. However, the role and contribution of phylogenetically related HPV genotypes and rare variants remains uncertain. In a recent global study of 8977 HPV-positive invasive cervical carcinomas (ICCs), the genotype remained unidentified in 3.7% by the HPV SPF10 PCR-DEIA-LiPA25 (version 1) algorithm. The 331 ICC specimens with unknown genotype were analysed by a novel sequence methodology, using multiple selected short regions in L1. This demonstrated HPV genotypes that have infrequently or never been detected in ICC, ie HPV26, 30, 61, 67, 68, 69, 73 and 82, and rare variants of HPV16, 18, 26, 30, 34, 39, 56, 67, 68, 69, 82 and 91. These are not identified individually by LiPA25 and only to some extent by other HPV genotyping assays. Most identified genotypes have a close phylogenetic relationship with established carcinogenic HPVs and have been classified as possibly carcinogenic by IARC. Except for HPV85, all genotypes in α-species 5, 6, 7, 9 and 11 were encountered as single infections in ICCs. These species of established and possibly carcinogenic HPV types form an evolutionary clade. We have shown that the possibly carcinogenic types were detected only in squamous cell carcinomas, which were often keratinizing and diagnosed at a relatively higher mean age (55.3 years) than those associated with established carcinogenic types (50.9 years). The individual frequency of the possibly carcinogenic types in ICCs is low, but together they are associated with 2.25% of the 8338 included ICCs with a single HPV type. This fraction is greater than seven of the established carcinogenic types individually. This study provides evidence that possibly carcinogenic HPV types occur as single infections in invasive cervical cancer, strengthening the circumstantial evidence of a carcinogenic role.

  17. DEVELOPMENT AND EVALUATION OF A MICROARRAY APPROACH TO DETECT AND GENOTYPE NOROVIRUSES IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    Noroviruses are the leading cause of nonbacterial gastroenteritis outbreaks in the United States, some of which are caused by the ingestion of contaminated water. These viruses are usually detected and genotyped using reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) base...

  18. Development of reference materials to detect 15 different human papillomavirus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Rhee, Jee Eun; Kang, Young Soon; Seo, Hyun Hee; Choi, Ju-yeon; Kee, Mee-Kyung; Kim, Tae-Jin; Hong, Sung Ran; Kim, Sung Soon

    2014-06-10

    Accurate human papillomavirus (HPV) typing is essential for evaluating and monitoring HPV vaccines in cervical cancer screening and in epidemiological surveys. In our country, different HPV DNA detection and genotyping methodologies have been established for diagnosing and monitoring HPV-related disease in clinical practice and for research. However, there is a lack of reference materials to standardize the methods for HPV detection and genotyping. In this study, we constructed candidate reference materials comprising 15 targets (13 types of high-risk HPV, two types of low-risk HPV). We evaluated whether the candidate reference materials could be used as the reference for HPV detection and genotyping using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction. Standard curves for the wide linear range (10(1)-10(6)copies/μL) produced high correlation regression coefficient R(2) of 0.99. The reaction efficiencies were 96.3% to 101.2% for the standard curves, indicating highly efficient reactions. Specific genotypes were detected in single or multiple mixed samples. Our results suggest that these reference materials may provide useful standards for standardizing quality assurance for different HPV-typing assays and for proficiency testing in diagnostic laboratories.

  19. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Lymphocystis Disease Virus Genotype VII by Loop-Mediated Isothermal Amplification.

    PubMed

    Valverde, Estefanía J; Cano, Irene; Castro, Dolores; Paley, Richard K; Borrego, Juan J

    2017-03-01

    Lymphocystis disease virus (LCDV) infections have been described in gilthead seabream (Sparus aurata L.) and Senegalese sole (Solea senegalensis, Kaup), two of the most important marine fish species in the Mediterranean aquaculture. In this study, a rapid, specific, and sensitive detection method for LCDV genotype VII based on loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) was developed. The LAMP assay, performed using an apparatus with real-time amplification monitoring, was able to specifically detect LCDV genotype VII from clinically positive samples in less than 12 min. In addition, the assay allowed the detection of LCDV in all asymptomatic carrier fish analysed, identified by qPCR, showing an analytical sensitivity of ten copies of viral DNA per reaction. The LCDV LAMP assay has proven to be a promising diagnostic method that can be used easily in fish farms to detect the presence and spread of this iridovirus.

  20. Development of T m -shift genotyping method for detection of cat-derived Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Pan, Weida; Fu, Yeqi; Abdullahi, Auwalu Yusuf; Wang, Mingwei; Shi, Xianli; Yang, Fang; Yu, Xingang; Yan, Xinxin; Zhang, Pan; Hang, Jianxiong; Li, Guoqing

    2017-04-01

    To develop T m -shift genotyping method for detection of cat-derived Giardia lamblia, two sets of primers with two GC-rich tails of unequal length attached to their 5'-end were designed according to two SNPs (BG434 and BG170) of β-giardin (bg) gene, and specific PCR products were identified by inspection of a melting curve on real-time PCR thermocycler. A series of experiments on the stability, sensitivity, and accuracy of T m -shift method was tested, and clinical samples were also detected. The results showed that two sets of primers based on SNP could distinguish accurately between assemblages A and F. Coefficient of variation of T m values of assemblage A and F was 0.14 and 0.07% in BG434 and 0.10 and 0.11% in BG170, respectively. The lowest detection concentration was 4.52 × 10(-5) and 4.88 × 10(-5) ng/μL samples of assemblage A and F standard plasmids. The T m -shift genotyping results of ten DNA samples from the cat-derived G. lamblia were consistent with their known genotypes. The detection rate of clinical samples by T m -shift was higher than that by microscopy, and their genotyping results were in complete accordance with sequencing results. It is concluded that the T m -shift genotyping method is rapid, specific, and sensitive and may provide a new technological mean for molecular detection and epidemiological investigation of the cat-derived G. lamblia.

  1. Easy and fast detection and genotyping of high-risk human papillomavirus by dedicated DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Valérie; Chevallier, Anne; Magnone, Virginie; Barbry, Pascal; Vandenbos, Fanny; Bongain, André; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2006-11-01

    Persistent cervical high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is correlated with an increased risk of developing a high-grade cervical intraepithelial lesion. A two-step method was developed for detection and genotyping of high-risk HPV. DNA was firstly amplified by asymmetrical PCR in the presence of Cy3-labelled primers and dUTP. Labelled DNA was then genotyped using DNA microarray hybridization. The current study evaluated the technical efficacy of laboratory-designed HPV DNA microarrays for high-risk HPV genotyping on 57 malignant and non-malignant cervical smears. The approach was evaluated for a broad range of cytological samples: high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and atypical squamous cells of high-grade (ASC-H). High-risk HPV was also detected in six atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) samples; among them only one cervical specimen was found uninfected, associated with no histological lesion. The HPV oligonucleotide DNA microarray genotyping detected 36 infections with a single high-risk HPV type and 5 multiple infections with several high-risk types. Taken together, these results demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the HPV DNA microarray approach. This approach could improve clinical management of patients with cervical cytological abnormalities.

  2. Genotypic diversity of Theileria orientalis detected from cattle grazing in Kumamoto and Okinawa prefectures of Japan.

    PubMed

    Yokoyama, Naoaki; Ueno, Akio; Mizuno, Daisuke; Kuboki, Noritaka; Khukhuu, Altangerel; Igarashi, Ikuo; Miyahara, Tokuji; Shiraishi, Takashi; Kudo, Ryuta; Oshiro, Mamoru; Zakimi, Satoshi; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Matsumoto, Kotaro; Inokuma, Hisashi

    2011-03-01

    Theileria orientalis is a benign protozoan species that is widely distributed in Japan, yet sometimes causes serious economic losses in the livestock industry. In this study, we conducted a molecular survey based on genes encoding the major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) and p23 for T. orientalis detected in cattle grazing in southern areas of Japan, consisting of 2 farms in Kumamoto prefecture (Aso and Kuma districts) and 3 farms in Okinawa prefecture (Ishigaki, Iriomote, and Yonaguni Islands). High prevalence rates of T. orientalis infection were shown in all the cattle populations using the diagnostic MPSP- and p23-PCR assays. Phylogenetic analyses revealed 4 MPSP genotypes and 3 p23 genotypes. Furthermore, MPSP genotype-specific PCR methods were developed in this study and wide distributions of 5-district genotypes of T. orientalis were observed for the examined farms. Our results indicate that at least 5 types of T. orientalis exist in Kumamoto and Okinawa prefectures of Japan and that genotype-specific PCR assays are highly applicable for the quarantine of transported cattle and for epidemiological surveys of bovine theileriosis in Japan.

  3. Detecting and genotyping Escherichia coli O157:H7 using multiplexed PCR and nucleic acid microarrays

    SciTech Connect

    Call, Douglas R.; Brockman, Fred J.; Chandler, Darrell P.

    2001-07-05

    Rapid detection and characterization of food borne pathogens such as Escherichia coli O157:H7 is crucial for epidemiological investigations and food safety surveillance. As an alternative to conventional technologies, we examined the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid microarrays for detecting and genotyping E. coli O157:H7. The array was composed of oligonucleotide probes (25-30 mer) complementary to four virulence loci (intimin, Shiga-like toxins I and II, and hemolysin A). Target DNA was amplified from whole cells or from purified DNA via single or multiplexed polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and PCR products were hybridized to the array without further modification or purification. The array was 32-fold more sensitive than gel electrophoresis and capable of detecting amplification products from < 1 cell equivalent of genomic DNA (1 fg). Immunomagnetic capture, PCR and a microarray were subsequently used to detect 55 CFUs ml-1 (E. coli O157:H7) from chicken rinsate without the aid of pre-enrichment. Four isolates of E. coli O157:H7 and one isolate of O91:H2, for which genotypic data were available, were unambiguously genotyped with this array. Glass based microarrays are relatively simple to construct and provide a rapid and sensitive means to detect multiplexed PCR products and the system is amenable to automation.

  4. HPV detection methods and genotyping techniques in screening for cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Eide, Maj Liv; Debaque, Hervé

    2012-12-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV), double-stranded DNA viruses, are causing many mucocutaneous diseases, benign or malignant, ranging from common warts to malignancies involving the upper aerodigestive tract and the anogenital sphere. The diagnosis of HPV infection is based primarily on the viral genome detection by molecular biological methods, given the difficulty in routine cultivation of these viruses. The current trend in screening against cervical cancer is to improve the sensitivity of screening with new methods and to propose new algorithms for diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. The development of liquid-based cytology facilitates the cytologic diagnosis and molecular assays from the same sample. There are two main types of HPV detection methods used on uterine cervical samples: signal amplification methods (hybridization techniques in liquid phase) and target amplification methods (the techniques of gene amplification or Polymerase Chain Reaction [PCR]). Genotyping techniques are also developed: they are based on an amplification technique followed by hybridization with probe specific types. In addition to the detection, genotyping techniques allow quantitative detection of viral DNA of HPV genotype and so monitor changes in viral load over time. Another approach relies on the detection of messenger RNA (mRNA) of HPV proteins E6 and E7 oncogenes, which would appear to be a relevant marker to identify and monitor women at risk of progression to a precancerous lesion or cervical cancer.

  5. New universal primers for genotyping and resistance detection of low HBV DNA levels.

    PubMed

    Tong, Yongqing; Liu, Bei; Liu, Hui; Zheng, Hongyun; Gu, Jian; Liu, Hang; Lin, Min; Ding, Yali; Song, Chunhua; Li, Yan

    2016-08-01

    HBV (hepatitis B virus) genotyping is important in determining the clinical manifestation of disease and treatment response, particularly, in patients with low viral loads. Also, sensitive detection of HBV antiviral drug resistance mutations is essential for monitoring therapy response.Asensitive direct sequencing method for genotyping and the drug resistance mutation detection of low levels of HBV DNA in patients' plasma is developed by PCR amplification of the DNA with novel universal primers.The novel, common, and universal primers were identified by alignment of RT region of all the HBV DNA sequences in databases. These primers could efficiently amplify the RT region of HBV virus at low DNA levels by directly sequencing the resulting PCR products, and mapping with the reference sequence made it possible to clearly obtain the HBV subtypes and identify the resistance mutations in the samples with HBV DNA level as low as 20 IU/mL. We examined the reliability of the method in clinical samples, and found it could detect the HBV subtypes and drug resistance mutations in 80 clinical HBV samples with low HBV DNA levels ranging from 20 to 200 IU/mL.This method is a sensitive and reliable direct sequencing method for HBV genotyping and antiviral drug resistance mutation detection, and is helpful for efficiently monitoring the response to therapy in HBV patients.

  6. A Bayesian clustering approach for detecting gene-gene interactions in high-dimensional genotype data.

    PubMed

    Chen, Sui-Pi; Huang, Guan-Hua

    2014-06-01

    This paper uses a Bayesian formulation of a clustering procedure to identify gene-gene interactions under case-control studies, called the Algorithm via Bayesian Clustering to Detect Epistasis (ABCDE). The ABCDE uses Dirichlet process mixtures to model SNP marker partitions, and uses the Gibbs weighted Chinese restaurant sampling to simulate posterior distributions of these partitions. Unlike the representative Bayesian epistasis detection algorithm BEAM, which partitions markers into three groups, the ABCDE can be evaluated at any given partition, regardless of the number of groups. This study also develops permutation tests to validate the disease association for SNP subsets identified by the ABCDE, which can yield results that are more robust to model specification and prior assumptions. This study examines the performance of the ABCDE and compares it with the BEAM using various simulated data and a schizophrenia SNP dataset.

  7. Highly specific and sensitive electrochemical genotyping via gap ligation reaction and surface hybridization detection.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yong; Zhang, Yan-Li; Xu, Xiangmin; Jiang, Jian-Hui; Shen, Guo-Li; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2009-02-25

    This paper developed a novel electrochemical genotyping strategy based on gap ligation reaction with surface hybridization detection. This strategy utilized homogeneous enzymatic reactions to generate molecular beacon-structured allele-specific products that could be cooperatively annealed to capture probes stably immobilized on the surface via disulfide anchors, thus allowing ultrasensitive surface hybridization detection of the allele-specific products through redox tags in close proximity to the electrode. Such a unique biphasic architecture provided a universal methodology for incorporating enzymatic discrimination reactions in electrochemical genotyping with desirable reproducibility, high efficiency and no interferences from interficial steric hindrance. The developed technique was demonstrated to show intrinsic high sensitivity for direct genomic analysis, and excellent specificity with discriminativity of single nucleotide variations.

  8. Detection and genotyping of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from soil in Ahvaz, southwest of Iran.

    PubMed

    Saki, J; Khademvatan, S; Yousefi, E; Tavalla, M; Abdizadeh, R

    2017-03-01

    To detection and genotype of Toxoplasma gondii isolated from soil in Ahvaz, southwest of Iran. Between August 2011 and May 2012 at different sites located in the area of the Ahvaz city south west Iran. A total of 200 soil samples were taken from different points of the region. Oocysts were recovered using the flotation method. Then, PCR reactions targeting the GRA6 gene were performed for specific T. gondii detection. The positive samples were studied by RFLP (random amplified fragment length polymorphism) using MseI enzymes to confirm the parasite linage. Toxoplasma DNA was found in 18 samples. Among them, 12 samples were successfully genotyped as GRA6 type III and 6 as GRA6 Type II. This is the first investigation detecting and genotyping T. gondii oocyst in environmental soil samples of Ahvaz, South west of Iran. The results of this study indicated that soil contaminated with T. gondii oocysts especially in public park may play a role in the epidemiology of human toxoplasmosis in southwest of Iran.

  9. Detecting Large Copy Number Variants Using Exome Genotyping Arrays In a Large Swedish Schizophrenia Sample

    PubMed Central

    Szatkiewicz, Jin P.; Neale, Benjamin M.; O'Dushlaine, Colm; Fromer, Menachem; Goldstein, Jacqueline I.; Moran, Jennifer L.; Chambert, Kimberly; Kähler, Anna; Magnusson, Patrik KE; Hultman, Christina M.; Sklar, Pamela; Purcell, Shaun; McCarroll, Steven A.; Sullivan, Patrick F.

    2014-01-01

    Although copy number variants (CNVs) are important in genomic medicine, CNVs have not been systematically assessed for many complex traits. Several large rare CNVs increase risk for schizophrenia (SCZ) and autism and often demonstrate pleiotropic effects; however, their frequencies in the general population and other complex traits are unknown. Genotyping large numbers of samples is essential for progress. Large cohorts from many different diseases are being genotyped using exome-focused arrays designed to detect uncommon or rare protein-altering sequence variation. Although these arrays were not designed for CNV detection, the hybridization intensity data generated in each experiment could, in principle, be used for gene-focused CNV analysis. Our goal was to evaluate the extent to which CNVs can be detected using data from one particular exome array (the Illumina Human Exome Bead Chip). We genotyped 9, 100 Swedish subjects (3, 962 cases with SCZ and 5, 138 controls) using both standard GWAS arrays and exome arrays. In comparison to CNVs detected using GWAS arrays, we observed high sensitivity and specificity for detecting genic CNVs ≥400 kb including known pathogentic CNVs along with replicating the literature finding that cases with SCZ had greater enrichment for genic CNVs. Our data confirm the association of SCZ with 16p11.2 duplications and 22q11.2 deletions and suggest a novel association with deletions at 11q12.2. Our results suggest the utility of exome focused arrays in surveying large genic CNVs in very large samples; and thereby open the door for new opportunities such as conducting well-powered CNV assessment and comparisons between different diseases. The use of a single platform also minimizes potential confounding factors that could impact accurate detection. PMID:23938935

  10. Detection of Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 1 Among Blood Donors From Southwest of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Parsa, Rahil; Adibzadeh, Setare; Behzad Behbahani, Abbas; Farhadi, Ali; Yaghobi, Ramin; Rafiei Dehbidi, Gholam Reza; Hajizamani, Saeideh; Rahbar, Sanaz; Nikouyan, Negin; Okhovat, Mohammad Ali; Naderi, Samaneh; Salehi, Saeede; Alizadeh, Marzieh; Ranjbaran, Reza; Zarnegar, Golnoosh; Alavi, Parnian

    2016-01-01

    Background Infection with hepatitis E virus (HEV) is endemic in developing countries and reveals significant regional differences. Several studies have reported virus transmission via blood transfusion. To date, however, no cases of HEV RNA detection in blood donors have been reported from Iran. Objectives The aim of this study was to determine the presence of HEV RNA in plasma samples of blood donors referred to a blood transfusion center in Shiraz in the southwest of Iran. The HEV genotypes were also investigated using nucleotide sequencing. Patients and Methods Blood samples were collected from 700 blood donors who were referred to Fars blood transfusion organization from January to March 2014. Plasma samples were screened for the presence of HEV IgG and IgM antibodies by standard enzyme immunoassay. Samples seroreactive to anti-HEV were further tested for the presence of HEV RNA using nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with universal primers for detection of all four HEV genotypes. Positive PCR samples were then subjected to DNA sequencing for further analysis. Results Fifty (50, 7.1%) out of 700 plasma samples tested positive for anti-HEV antibodies. HEV RNA was detected in 7/50 (12%) of the antibody-positive samples, the majority of which were IgM positive. Sequence analysis of seven isolates of the HEV RNA ORF 2 gene region revealed > 80% similarity with genotype 1. Conclusions The analysis indicates that the HEV isolated from blood donors in the southwest of Iran belongs to genotype 1. However, more samples from other geographic regions of Iran are needed to confirm these findings. Because transmission of HEV by administration of blood or blood components is likely to occur, it may be sensible to screen donor blood for HEV to eliminate transfusion-transmitted HEV infection when the recipient is immunocompromised. PMID:27630719

  11. Detection and genotyping of Chlamydia species responsible for reproductive disorders in Algerian small ruminants.

    PubMed

    Merdja, Salah-Eddine; Khaled, Hamza; Aaziz, Rachid; Vorimore, Fabien; Bertin, Claire; Dahmani, Ali; Bouyoucef, Abdallah; Laroucau, Karine

    2015-02-01

    Chlamydiosis in small ruminants is a zoonotic disease mainly related to Chlamydia abortus. This bacterium is responsible for abortions and reproductive disorders in sheep and goats. Stillbirth and infertility, leading to important economic losses, are also associated with this pathology. In Algeria, abortion cases are frequently reported by veterinarians but, except for brucellosis which is a notifiable disease in this country, abortive diseases are in general poorly studied. In order to detect and genotype Chlamydia species in small ruminants in different areas of Algeria, a study was conducted on samples collected from females (164 blood samples and 199 vaginal swabs) between October 2011 and March 2013. Serum samples were tested with a C. abortus-specific indirect ELISA test. Fourteen samples (8.5 %), from six farms (6/20, 30 %) were tested positive. Vaginal swabs were analysed with a real-time PCR targeting all Chlamydiaceae spp. Thirty samples (15 %) were diagnosed positive in 16 farms (16/25, 64 %). Positive samples were all re-tested with a C. abortus- and a C. pecorum-specific real-time PCR. Finally, 13/30 (43.3 %) and 6/30 (20 %) were identified as C. abortus and C. pecorum, respectively. Enough concentrated C. abortus samples were genotyped by multi-loci variable number of tandem repeat (VNTR) analysis (MLVA), and all were related to the genotype [2] group which mainly includes French C. abortus isolates. C. pecorum-positive samples were genotyped by multi-locus sequence typing (MLST). Interestingly, two of them were successfully genotyped and showed identical MLST sequences to VB2, AB10, E58 and SBE, a group which includes C. pecorum isolates considered as highly pathogenic. These findings suggest a possible role of C. abortus and C. pecorum strains in the aetiology of abortion in Algerian small ruminants.

  12. Development of a rapid HRM genotyping method for detection of dog-derived Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Tan, Liping; Yu, Xingang; Abdullahi, Auwalu Yusuf; Wu, Sheng; Zheng, Guochao; Hu, Wei; Song, Meiran; Wang, Zhen; Jiang, Biao; Li, Guoqing

    2015-11-01

    Giardia lamblia is a zoonotic flagellate protozoan in the intestine of human and many mammals including dogs. To assess a threat of dog-derived G. lamblia to humans, the common dog-derived G. lamblia assemblages A, C, and D were genotyped by high-resolution melting (HRM) technology. According to β-giardin gene sequence, the qPCR-HRM primers BG5 and BG7 were designed. A series of experiments on the stability, sensitivity, and accuracy of the HRM method were also tested. Results showed that the primers BG5 and BG7 could distinguish among three assemblages A, C, and D, which Tm value differences were about 1 °C to each other. The melting curves of intra-assay reproducibility were almost coincided, and those of inter-assay reproducibility were much the same shape. The lowest detection concentration was about 5 × 10(-6)-ng/μL sample. The genotyping results from 21 G. lamblia samples by the HRM method were in complete accordance with sequencing results. It is concluded that the HRM genotyping method is rapid, stable, specific, highly sensitive, and suitable for clinical detection and molecular epidemiological survey of dog-derived G. lamblia.

  13. [Comparison of three genotyping methods for the detection of HIV-1 resistance to antiretroviral drugs].

    PubMed

    Suárez, A; Picazo, J; Alonso, R; Bouza, E; Delgado, R; Rodríguez-Noriega, A; Bernal, A; García, A

    2002-03-01

    Highly active antiretroviral therapy has dramatically improved the life expectancy of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients, but mutations in the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT) and protease (P) genes confer drug failure. Evaluation of drug resistance genotyping in HIV-1 has proven to be useful for the selection of drug combinations with maximum antiretroviral activity. The aim of this study was to evaluate the optimal procedure to determine the resistance profile in the laboratory. Plasma from 90 antiretroviral-treated patients was analyzed by reverse hybridization, which identifies the presence of wild-types or mutations at the 19 key codons for protease and RT regions, and was compared with two other methods of direct cDNA sequencing. A total of 408 mutations were detected by InnoLiPA HIV-1, (Line Probe Assay, Innogenetics, Belgium), 572 by TrueGene HIV-1 Genotyping System (Visible Genetics, Canada), and 721 by ViroSeq HIV-1 Genotyping System (Perkin Elmer/Applied Biosystems, California). Hybridization detected a significantly higher number of primary mutations which are associated with a high level of drug resistance (p <0.001). Hybridization also detected a higher number of mixtures of wild-type and mutant viruses. There was a good concordance among the three methods, although it was higher between the two sequencing methods. Sequencing determines a higher number of mutations, but hybridization better identifies primary mutations correlated with a high level of drug resistance. Hybridization is more suitable for detecting mixed populations and is easier to implement in clinical laboratories but does not eliminate the need for sequence analysis for detection of drug-resistant HIV.

  14. Detection of HCV genotypes 1b and 2a by a reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Na; Liu, Jinxia; Sun, Dianxing

    2016-12-09

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes 1b and 2a are the major cause of liver disease in northern China; however, conventional detection tools are labor-consuming, technically demanding, and costly. Here, we assessed the specificity, sensitivity, and clinical utility of reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay for detection of HCV genotypes 1b and 2a. Firstly, clinical samples were collected from HCV genotype 1b and 2a infected patients and the RNA were extracted. Secondly, specificity of RT-LAMP assay for detection HCV genotypes 1b and 2a were tested against viral genomes of other hepatitis viruses. Sensitivity of RT-LAMP assay was determined using serial dilutions of standard HCV genotypes 1b and 2a. The amplified products were detected by both electrophoresis and calcein/Mn(2+) -dependent visual methods. Finally, we compared the clinical detection rate of RT-LAMP to that of real-time PCR. RT-LAMP assay showed high specificity to detect HCV genotypes 1b and 2b since there was no cross-reactivity with other hepatitis viruses. Sensitivity of RT-LAMP was 100 IU/mL for both genotypes detected by either electrophoresis or calcein/Mn(2+) -dependent visual methods. The detection rate of RT-LAMP assay in clinical samples was also comparable to that of real-time PCR without significant difference between the both assays. This study proposes a newly developed RT-LAMP assay for detection of HCV genotypes 1b and 2a. RT-LAMP is highly specific, sensitive, and simple diagnostic tool which would be useful for screening and early diagnosis of HCV especially in resource-limited environments.

  15. Microarray for Hepatitis B Virus Genotyping and Detection of 994 Mutations along the Genome ▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Gauthier, Marie; Bonnaud, Bertrand; Arsac, Maud; Lavocat, Fabien; Maisetti, Jérôme; Kay, Alan; Simon, François; Zoulim, Fabien; Vernet, Guy

    2010-01-01

    Genome analysis of hepatitis B virus (HBV) in patient sera is helpful for monitoring treatment. We developed an improved version of a DNA microarray to identify HBV genotypes and to detect mutations of interest in the S, Pol, Core, and X genes. It includes an automated software analysis of fluorescence values for simpler, more robust data interpretation. In this version, probes were added to identify genotype H, to analyze 155 additional positions, and to detect 561 additional polymorphisms. Sequences were added to the alignments to resolve hybridization problems due to natural polymorphisms in the vicinity of important codons. The duplex PCR protocol allowed whole-genome analysis in a single tube. An alternative nested-PCR protocol allowed genotyping and mutations in S and reverse transcriptase (rt) genes in patients with low viral loads, as demonstrated in patients with less than 400 HBV genome copies/ml. Reproducibility was high, with variation coefficients lower than 3%. Only 0.57% of 20,771 codons from 253 samples could not be identified. The concordance with Sanger sequencing for the identification of codons improved from 92.8% to 95.7% with the improved version. Concordance was higher than 91% for codons associated with resistance to lamivudine, emtricitabine, telbivudine, famciclovir, entecavir, and tenofovir with vaccine escape and for pre-Core mutants. Concordance was lower for adefovir resistance mutations (68.6%) and mutations in the basal core promoter (60.3%), probably because hybridization efficiency was affected by the low GC content of the probes. A concordance of 93.7% with sequencing for genotype identification was observed in 190 specimens, lower than that obtained with the first version, possibly due to mixed virus populations. PMID:20826635

  16. A single-nucleotide-polymorphism-based genotyping assay for simultaneous detection of different carbendazim-resistant genotypes in the Fusarium graminearum species complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hao; Brankovics, Balázs; van der Lee, Theo A.J.; Waalwijk, Cees; van Diepeningen, Anne A.D.; Xu, Jin; Xu, Jingsheng

    2016-01-01

    The occurrence resistance to methyl benzimidazole carbamates (MBC)-fungicides in the Fusarium graminearum species complex (FGSC) is becoming a serious problem in the control of Fusarium head blight in China. The resistance is caused by point mutations in the β2-tubulingene. So far, five resistant genotypes (F167Y, E198Q, E198L, E198K and F200Y) have been reported in the field. To establish a high-throughput method for rapid detection of all the five mutations simultaneously, an efficient single-nucleotide-polymorphism-based genotyping method was developed based on the Luminex xMAP system. One pair of amplification primers and five allele specific primer extension probes were designed and optimized to specially distinguish the different genotypes within one single reaction. This method has good extensibility and can be combined with previous reported probes to form a highly integrated tool for species, trichothecene chemotype and MBC resistance detection. Using this method, carbendazim resistant FGSC isolates from Jiangsu, Anhui and Sichuan Province in China were identified. High and moderate frequencies of resistance were observed in Jiangsu and Anhui Province, respectively. Carbendazim resistance in F. asiaticum is only observed in the 3ADON genotype. Overall, our method proved to be useful for early detection of MBC resistance in the field and the result aids in the choice of fungicide type. PMID:27812414

  17. Immunohistochemical detection of disease-associated prion protein in the intestine of cattle naturally affected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy by using an alkaline-based chemical antigen retrieval method.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Iwamaru, Yoshihumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Masujin, Kentaro; Yokoyama, Takashi; Mohri, Shirou

    2010-11-01

    An alkaline-based chemical antigen retrieval pretreatment step was used to enhance immunolabeling of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded tissue sections from cattle naturally affected with bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE). The modified chemical method used in this study amplified the PrP(Sc) signal by unmasking PrP(Sc) compared with the normal cellular prion protein. In addition, this method reduced nonspecific background immunolabeling that resulted from the destruction of the residual normal cellular form of prion protein, and reduced the treatment time compared with the usual autoclave pretreatment step. Immunolabeled PrP(Sc) was thereby clearly detected in the myenteric plexus of the ileum in naturally occurring BSE cattle.

  18. Rotavirus Diarrhea among Children in Taiz, Yemen: Prevalence—Risk Factors and Detection of Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Al-Badani, Abdulmalik; Al-Areqi, Leena; Majily, Abdulatif; AL-Sallami, Saleh; AL-Madhagi, Anwar; Amood AL-Kamarany, Mohammed

    2014-01-01

    Diarrheal diseases are a great public health problem; they are among the most causes leading to morbidity and mortality of infants and children particularly in developing countries and even in developed countries. Rotavirus is the most common cause of severe gastroenteritis in infants and young children in both developed and developing countries. The purpose of this study was to determine the incidence rate of Rotavirus infection, its genotypes, and risk factors among children with diarrhea in Taiz, Yemen. 795 fecal samples were collected from children (less than 5 years old), suffering from diarrhea and attending the Yemeni-Swedish Hospital (YSH) in Taiz , Yemen, from November 2006 to February 2008. Rotavirus was detected by enzyme linkage immunosorbent assay (ELISA) on stool specimens of children. Genotypes of Rotavirus were characterized by reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). The results showed that 358 (45.2%) were Rotavirus-positive and the most prevalent genotypes were G2P[4] (55%), followed by G1P[8] (15%). In addition, Rotavirus was found through the whole year; however, higher frequency during the summer season (53.4%) and lower frequency during the winter season (37.1%). PMID:25197286

  19. [HPV genotypes prevalence in México and worldwide detected by Linear Array].

    PubMed

    Flores-Miramontes, María G; Torres-Reyes, Luis A; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Vallejo-Ruíz, Verónica; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Cortés-Gutiérrez, Elva; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe

    2015-01-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main factor associated with the development of cervical cancer (CC). Knowing about the prevalence of HPVs at different stages in the development of CC is important for determining the HPV oncogenic risk, the development of screening strategies, the evaluation of prevention programs, and also for vaccine designing. This paper is a meta-analysis of HPV prevalence worldwide and in Mexico from studies using the Linear Array® HPV Genotyping Test as a diagnostic test (it is the commercial test that, up to date, identifies the largest number of HPV genotypes in a single sample) in DNA of cervical samples from women with normal cytology, with low grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LGSIL), with high grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HGSIL) and with CC. The most prevalent genotypes after HPV-16 and -18 in women with CC varies depending on geographic region, which supports the need to develop detection and prevention strategies according to the characteristics of the population.

  20. The power of gene-based rare variant methods to detect disease-associated variation and test hypotheses about complex disease.

    PubMed

    Moutsianas, Loukas; Agarwala, Vineeta; Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Rivas, Manuel A; Gaulton, Kyle J; Albers, Patrick K; McVean, Gil; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I

    2015-04-01

    Genome and exome sequencing in large cohorts enables characterization of the role of rare variation in complex diseases. Success in this endeavor, however, requires investigators to test a diverse array of genetic hypotheses which differ in the number, frequency and effect sizes of underlying causal variants. In this study, we evaluated the power of gene-based association methods to interrogate such hypotheses, and examined the implications for study design. We developed a flexible simulation approach, using 1000 Genomes data, to (a) generate sequence variation at human genes in up to 10K case-control samples, and (b) quantify the statistical power of a panel of widely used gene-based association tests under a variety of allelic architectures, locus effect sizes, and significance thresholds. For loci explaining ~1% of phenotypic variance underlying a common dichotomous trait, we find that all methods have low absolute power to achieve exome-wide significance (~5-20% power at α = 2.5 × 10(-6)) in 3K individuals; even in 10K samples, power is modest (~60%). The combined application of multiple methods increases sensitivity, but does so at the expense of a higher false positive rate. MiST, SKAT-O, and KBAC have the highest individual mean power across simulated datasets, but we observe wide architecture-dependent variability in the individual loci detected by each test, suggesting that inferences about disease architecture from analysis of sequencing studies can differ depending on which methods are used. Our results imply that tens of thousands of individuals, extensive functional annotation, or highly targeted hypothesis testing will be required to confidently detect or exclude rare variant signals at complex disease loci.

  1. The Power of Gene-Based Rare Variant Methods to Detect Disease-Associated Variation and Test Hypotheses About Complex Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuchsberger, Christian; Flannick, Jason; Rivas, Manuel A.; Gaulton, Kyle J.; Albers, Patrick K.; McVean, Gil; Boehnke, Michael; Altshuler, David; McCarthy, Mark I.

    2015-01-01

    Genome and exome sequencing in large cohorts enables characterization of the role of rare variation in complex diseases. Success in this endeavor, however, requires investigators to test a diverse array of genetic hypotheses which differ in the number, frequency and effect sizes of underlying causal variants. In this study, we evaluated the power of gene-based association methods to interrogate such hypotheses, and examined the implications for study design. We developed a flexible simulation approach, using 1000 Genomes data, to (a) generate sequence variation at human genes in up to 10K case-control samples, and (b) quantify the statistical power of a panel of widely used gene-based association tests under a variety of allelic architectures, locus effect sizes, and significance thresholds. For loci explaining ~1% of phenotypic variance underlying a common dichotomous trait, we find that all methods have low absolute power to achieve exome-wide significance (~5-20% power at α=2.5×10-6) in 3K individuals; even in 10K samples, power is modest (~60%). The combined application of multiple methods increases sensitivity, but does so at the expense of a higher false positive rate. MiST, SKAT-O, and KBAC have the highest individual mean power across simulated datasets, but we observe wide architecture-dependent variability in the individual loci detected by each test, suggesting that inferences about disease architecture from analysis of sequencing studies can differ depending on which methods are used. Our results imply that tens of thousands of individuals, extensive functional annotation, or highly targeted hypothesis testing will be required to confidently detect or exclude rare variant signals at complex disease loci. PMID:25906071

  2. Detection of clinically relevant genotypes of vancomycin-resistant enterococci in nosocomial surveillance specimens by PCR.

    PubMed

    Jayaratne, P; Rutherford, C

    1999-06-01

    This study evaluated a PCR method for the rapid detection of clinically significant genotypes of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) in nosocomial surveillance specimens. Detection of the vanA and vanB genes by multiplex PCR using 657 specimens that showed presumptive growth of VRE on bile esculin azide agar containing 6 mg of vancomycin/liter was compared to the conventional method. The diagnostic values for the PCR compared to the phenotypic method were as follows: 99.8% specificity, 95.4% sensitivity, 98.8% positive predictive value, and 99.3% negative predictive value. The average cost per test for PCR is $8.26, compared to $9.45 for the phenotypic method. The average turnaround time for detecting a VRE is 48 h for PCR, compared to 96 h for the conventional method.

  3. Molecular Detection and Genotyping of Chlamydia psittaci in Captive Psittacines from Costa Rica

    PubMed Central

    Sheleby-Elías, Jessica; Solórzano-Morales, Ántony; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José

    2013-01-01

    Oropharyngeal and cloacal swabs from 117 captive psittacine birds presented at veterinary clinics (88) and from shelters/rescue centers of wildlife (29) were collected to determine the prevalence of C. psittaci in captive birds in Costa Rica. Samples were collected during 2009 from a total of 19 different species of parrots, with Ara macao (33), Amazona autumnalis (24), Amazona ochrocephala (21), and Ara ararauna (8) being the most representative species sampled. C. psittaci was detected in four (3.4%) birds using molecular detection (PCR). The positive samples belonged to birds presented at veterinary clinics; three of them were Ara macao and one Amazona ochrocephala. Three birds were adults; all positive birds showed no symptoms of illness and lived in homes with other birds, two in San José and two in Heredia. Sequencing was used to confirm the PCR positive results, showing that two samples of C. psittaci belonged to genotype A, representing the first report of the presence of this genotype in Costa Rica. The detection of this bacterium in captive psittacine birds shows that there is a potential risk for people living or having contact with them and that there is a possibility of infecting other birds. PMID:24163776

  4. Genotyping of DNA using sequence-specific methyltransferases followed by immunochemical detection.

    PubMed

    López, Osvaldo J; Quintanar, André; Padhye, Nisha V; Nelson, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Modern molecular genetics relies on the ability to map the positions of genes on chromosomes, relative to known DNA markers. The first such DNA markers described were Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphisms, but any restriction endonuclease used for RFLP mapping is just one member of a restriction-modification pair. For each restriction endonuclease, there is a companion methyltransferase (MTase) that has the same DNA sequence specificity. Therefore, in principle, it should be possible to use MTases rather than restriction enzymes to detect polymorphic sites in DNA. We have used sequence-specific DNA MTases to detect polym orphisms in closely related viral pathogens. If at least one MTase recognition site is present in PCR-amplified DNA, then methyl groups are incorporated; if no MTase site is present, then methyl groups are not incorporated. When several different sequence-specific DNA MTase reactions are carried out, the pattern of methyl incorporation defines a DNA MTase genotype. DNA MTase Genotyping (DMG) can be used to rapidly diagnose heritable or infectious diseases, to immunochemically detect DNA at defined 2 to 8 base pair sites, or to characterize the amplicons by constructing ordered maps.

  5. A broadly reactive monoclonal antibody detects multiple genotypes of hepatitis B virus X protein.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lili; Shen, Zhongliang; Zhao, Xue; Wu, Yanxin; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Junqi; Xie, Youhua; Liu, Jing

    2014-10-01

    A highly specific and broadly reactive monoclonal antibody against hepatitis B virus X (HBx) protein was developed that detected, in both immunoblotting and immunofluorescence, HBx proteins of seven of the eight currently known genotypes of HBV, which were overexpressed in cultured cells. Evaluation of HBx expression levels in cultured hepatocytes using this monoclonal antibody showed that cells transiently and stably transfected with HBV genomes expressed far less HBx protein than cells transiently transfected with an HBx overexpression plasmid routinely used for studying HBx functions. The availability of such sensitive and broadly reactive monoclonal antibodies against HBx will enable more-quantitative studies of HBx functions.

  6. Novel genotype of Ehrlichia canis detected in samples of human blood bank donors in Costa Rica.

    PubMed

    Bouza-Mora, Laura; Dolz, Gaby; Solórzano-Morales, Antony; Romero-Zuñiga, Juan José; Salazar-Sánchez, Lizbeth; Labruna, Marcelo B; Aguiar, Daniel M

    2017-01-01

    This study focuses on the detection and identification of DNA and antibodies to Ehrlichia spp. in samples of blood bank donors in Costa Rica using molecular and serological techniques. Presence of Ehrlichia canis was determined in 10 (3.6%) out of 280 blood samples using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting the ehrlichial dsb conserved gene. Analysis of the ehrlichial trp36 polymorphic gene in these 10 samples revealed substantial polymorphism among the E. canis genotypes, including divergent tandem repeat sequences. Nucleotide sequences of dsb and trp36 amplicons revealed a novel genotype of E. canis in blood bank donors from Costa Rica. Indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA) detected antibodies in 35 (35%) of 100 serum samples evaluated. Thirty samples showed low endpoint titers (64-256) to E. canis, whereas five sera yielded high endpoint titers (1024-8192); these five samples were also E. canis-PCR positive. These findings represent the first report of the presence of E. canis in humans in Central America.

  7. [Investigation on HPV DNA detection and genotyping practices used in French laboratories in 2009].

    PubMed

    Heard, Isabelle; Favre, Michel; Fihman, Valentine

    2011-01-01

    The French National reference Laboratory for Human papillomavirus (HPV) performed in 2009 a national study in order to review the methods used to detect and identify HR HPV genotypes in microbiology laboratories. Results from this study show a great diversity in volumes of samples treated in laboratories. Among clinical indications, the most frequent is a result of ASC-US at a Pap smear. This indication in the only one covered by the National Public Insurance System and is mostly performed in laboratories from private sector. Other indications mainly correspond to research programs and are performed in public Hospitals. This study allowed also to review the adequacy between the liquid based cytology samples and the assays used for direct detection of HR HPV or identification of the genotypes present in the sample. The right tests were not carried in the right solution storage according to the recommendations from different HPV testing assays. National recommendations should be elaborated in order to improve the performance of the test used.

  8. Molecular detection of Rickettsia felis, Rickettsia typhi and two genotypes closely related to Bartonella elizabethae.

    PubMed

    De Sousa, Rita; Edouard-Fournier, Pierre; Santos-Silva, Margarida; Amaro, Fatima; Bacellar, Fatima; Raoult, Didier

    2006-10-01

    A total of 56 fleas were collected from mice, rats, and one hedgehog in national parks of mainland Portugal and the Madeira Island. All fleas were tested for the presence of bacteria of the genera Rickettsia and Bartonella using PCR assays. In fleas from mainland Portugal, we detected Rickettsia felis in one Archaeopsylla erinacei maura flea and in one Ctenophtalmus sp. In five Leptopsylla segnis fleas taken from rats in the Madeira Island, we identified Rickettsia typhi. In addition, in four fleas from the genera Ornithophaga and Stenoponia collect from mice and a rat in mainland Portugal, we detected the presence of two new Bartonella genotypes closely related to Bartonella elizabethae. Our findings emphasize the potential risk of flea-transmitted infections in mainland Portugal and the Madeira archipelago, and extend our knowledge of the potential flea vectors of human pathogens.

  9. Genotyping of Norovirus strains detected in outbreaks between April 2002 and March 2003 in Osaka City, Japan.

    PubMed

    Seto, Yoshiyuki; Iritani, Nobuhiro; Kubo, Hideyuki; Kaida, Atsushi; Murakami, Tsukasa; Haruki, Kosuke; Nishio, Osamu; Ayata, Minoru; Ogura, Hisashi

    2005-01-01

    Noroviruses (NVs) are the major cause of food- and waterborne nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Japan. Between April 2002 and March 2003, a total of 111 fecal specimens from 40 outbreaks of acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in Osaka City, Japan were subject to NV detection. Seventy-two samples (64.9%) from 31 outbreaks (77.5%) were NV positive by a real time reverse transcription (RT)-PCR assay. To further determine the genotype of individual NV strains, we sequenced the capsid N-terminal/shell (N/S) domain of some representative strains from each outbreak. The 51 NV strains detected in this study were segregated into 15 genotypes (6 in genogroup I and 9 in genogroup II), and GII/5 genotype NV was a dominant outbreak genotype.

  10. Molecular and statistical approaches to the detection and correction of errors in genotype databases

    SciTech Connect

    Brzustowicz, L.M.; Xie, X.; Merette, C.; Townsend, L.; Gilliam, T.C.; Ott, J. )

    1993-11-01

    Errors in genotyping data have been shown to have a significant effect on the estimation of recombination fractions in high-resolution genetic maps. Previous estimates of errors in existing databases have been limited to the analysis of relatively few markers and have suggested rates in the range 0.5%-1.5%. The present study capitalizes on the fact that within the Centre d'Etude du Polymorphisme Humain (CEPH) collection of reference families, 21 individuals are members of more than one family, with separate DNA samples provided by CEPH for each appearance of these individuals. By comparing the genotypes of these individuals in each of the families in which they occur, an estimated error rate of 1.4% was calculated for all loci in the version 4.0 CEPH database. Removing those individuals who were clearly identified by CEPH as appearing in more than one family resulted in a 3.0% error rate for the remaining samples, suggesting that some error checking of the identified repeated individuals may occur prior to data submission. An error rate of 3.0% for version 4.0 data was also obtained for four chromosome 5 markers that were retyped through the entire CEPH collection. The effects of these errors on a multipoint map were significant, with a total sex-averaged length of 36.09 cM with the errors, and 19.47 cM with the errors corrected. Several statistical approaches to detect and allow for errors during linkage analysis are presented. One method, which identified families containing possible errors on the basis of the impact on the maximum lod score, showed particular promise, especially when combined with the limited retyping of the identified families. The impact of the demonstrated error rate in an established genotype database on high-resolution mapping is significant, raising the question of the overall value of incorporating such existing data into new genetic maps. 15 refs., 8 tabs.

  11. Development of a real-time quantitative PCR for detecting duck hepatitis a virus genotype C.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qiuxue; Yue, Hua; Zhang, Bin; Nie, Peiting; Tang, Cheng

    2012-10-01

    Recently, duck hepatitis A virus genotype C (DHAV-C), a causative agent of duck viral hepatitis, has been responsible for increasing economic losses in the duck industry in China and South Korea. In this study, a real-time PCR assay targeting the 2C gene for detecting DHAV-C was developed. The assay was confirmed to be specific and sensitive, and the minimum detection limit was 3.36 × 10(3) copies per reaction, making this assay suitable for rapid diagnosis of DHAV-C infection from clinical samples. In addition, the dynamics of the viral loads in tissues of specific-pathogen-free (SPF) ducklings infected with DHAV-C were investigated using this method. The DHAV-C could be detected earliest in the liver within 12 h postinfection. Moreover, high viral loads were identified in the heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney, bursa of Fabricius, thymus, pancreas, brain, and small intestine after 24 h postinfection. Taking the data collectively, the study described in this report is the first to have developed a real-time PCR method for detection of DHAV-C and thus contributes to pathogenicity research.

  12. Phenotypic- and Genotypic-Resistance Detection for Adaptive Resistance Management in Tetranychus urticae Koch

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Deok Ho; Kang, Taek-Jun; Kim, Young Ho; Lee, Si Hyeock

    2015-01-01

    Rapid resistance detection is necessary for the adaptive management of acaricide-resistant populations of Tetranychus urticae. Detection of phenotypic and genotypic resistance was conducted by employing residual contact vial bioassay (RCV) and quantitative sequencing (QS) methods, respectively. RCV was useful for detecting the acaricide resistance levels of T. urticae, particularly for on-site resistance detection; however, it was only applicable for rapid-acting acaricides (12 out of 19 tested acaricides). QS was effective for determining the frequencies of resistance alleles on a population basis, which corresponded to 12 nonsynonymous point mutations associated with target-site resistance to five types of acaricides [organophosphates (monocrotophos, pirimiphos-methyl, dimethoate and chlorpyrifos), pyrethroids (fenpropathrin and bifenthrin), abamectin, bifenazate and etoxazole]. Most field-collected mites exhibited high levels of multiple resistance, as determined by RCV and QS data, suggesting the seriousness of their current acaricide resistance status in rose cultivation areas in Korea. The correlation analyses revealed moderate to high levels of positive relationships between the resistance allele frequencies and the actual resistance levels in only five of the acaricides evaluated, which limits the general application of allele frequency as a direct indicator for estimating actual resistance levels. Nevertheless, the resistance allele frequency data alone allowed for the evaluation of the genetic resistance potential and background of test mite populations. The combined use of RCV and QS provides basic information on resistance levels, which is essential for choosing appropriate acaricides for the management of resistant T. urticae. PMID:26545209

  13. Investigating the Epidemiology of Repeat Chlamydia trachomatis Detection after Treatment by Using C. trachomatis OmpA Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Kapil, Richa; Press, Christen G.; Hwang, M. Lisa; Brown, LaDraka

    2014-01-01

    Repeat Chlamydia trachomatis detection frequently occurs within months after C. trachomatis infection treatment. The origins of such infection (persistence versus reinfection from untreated or new partners) are varied and difficult to determine. C. trachomatis strains can be differentiated by sequencing the ompA gene encoding the outer membrane protein A (OmpA). We used OmpA genotyping to investigate the epidemiology of repeat C. trachomatis detection after treatment in C. trachomatis-infected subjects seen at a sexually transmitted diseases clinic. Subjects were enrolled, tested for C. trachomatis, treated with azithromycin, and scheduled for a 6-month follow-up for repeat C. trachomatis testing. OmpA genotyping was performed on C. trachomatis-positive urogenital specimens obtained from patients at enrollment and follow-up. The enrollment visit OmpA genotypes for C. trachomatis were determined for 162 subjects (92% female, 94% African American). C. trachomatis was detected at follow-up in 39 subjects (24%). The OmpA genotype distribution at enrollment did not differ in those with versus those without repeat C. trachomatis detection. Of the 35 subjects with C. trachomatis strains genotyped at enrollment and follow-up, 7 (20%) had the same ompA sequence at both visits, while 28 (80%) had discordant sequences. A new sexual partner was reported more often in subjects with discordant C. trachomatis strains than in those with concordant strains (13 [46%] versus 1 [14%]; P = 0.195). Half of the subjects with discordant C. trachomatis strains who reported sexual activity since treatment denied a new sexual partner; 62% of these subjects reported that their partner was treated. Our study demonstrates that most repeat C. trachomatis detections after treatment were new infections with a different C. trachomatis strain rather than reinfection with the same strain. OmpA genotyping can be a useful tool in understanding the origins of repeat C. trachomatis detection after

  14. Molecular detection and genotyping of Aphanomyces astaci directly from preserved crayfish samples uncovers the Norwegian crayfish plague disease history.

    PubMed

    Vrålstad, Trude; Strand, David A; Grandjean, Frédéric; Kvellestad, Agnar; Håstein, Tore; Knutsen, Ann Kristin; Taugbøl, Trond; Skaar, Ida

    2014-09-17

    Aphanomyces astaci causes crayfish plague in European freshwater crayfish, but most historical epizootics lack agent isolation and identification. Although declared as crayfish plague outbreaks by the Norwegian Competent Authorities, only presumptive diagnoses without agent isolation exist from Norwegian epizootics until 2005. Molecular methods now allow both A. astaci detection and genotype determination from preserved samples. We therefore aimed to (1) investigate molecularly if A. astaci was involved in a selection of mass-mortality events in Norwegian noble crayfish populations from 1971 to 2004, and (2) determine the eventually involved A. astaci genotype groups both from these historical and also more recent mass-mortality events. DNA was extracted directly from presumptively infected crayfish tissues, and screened by A. astaci specific qPCR. A representative selection of positive samples was confirmed by ITS-sequencing. Finally, genotype determination was performed with microsatellite markers that distinguish all known A. astaci genotype groups. The molecular examination detected A. astaci in crayfish materials from all examined mass-mortality events. The first event in 1971-1974 was caused by the A. astaci genotype group A, presumably the first genotype group that entered Europe more than 150 years ago. All later outbreaks were caused by the A. astaci genotype group B which was introduced to Europe by importation of signal crayfish in the 1960s. The results suggest that molecular methods can verify the involvement of A. astaci in the vast majority of observed crayfish mass mortalities in Europe whenever preserved materials exist. Moreover, microsatellite genotyping can reveal at least parts of the underlying epidemiology.

  15. Toxoplasma gondii and Neospora caninum in wild small mammals: Seroprevalence, DNA detection and genotyping.

    PubMed

    Machačová, Tereza; Ajzenberg, Daniel; Žákovská, Alena; Sedlák, Kamil; Bártová, Eva

    2016-06-15

    Generally, rodents and other small mammals are considered as one of the sources of Toxoplasma gondii or Neospora caninum infection for cats and dogs as the definitive hosts of these two parasites, respectively. The aim of the study was to find out the prevalence of these two parasites in wild small mammals from the Czech Republic and to characterize T. gondii isolates by methods of molecular biology. A total of 621 wild small mammals were caught in the Czech Republic during years 2002-2014. Antibodies to T. gondii were detected by latex agglutination test in six (2.5%) of 240 small mammals (in two A. agrarius and four A. flavicollis). Antibodies to N. caninum were detected by commercially available competitive-inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay in one A. flavicolis (0.4%). Three of 427 (0.7%) liver samples were positive for T. gondii by PCR while negative for N. caninum. All embryo samples (n=102) were negative for both T. gondii and N. caninum. The three liver samples positive for T. gondii DNA (two from A. flavicollis and one from A. sylvaticus) were genotyped by 15 microsatellite markers and characterized as type II. To our knowledge, this is the first information about genetic characterization of T. gondii isolates in small mammals from Europe and the first detection of N. caninum antibodies in wild rodents from the Czech Republic.

  16. Detecting small-scale genotype-environment interactions in apomictic dandelion (Taraxacum officinale) populations.

    PubMed

    McLeod, K A; Scascitelli, M; Vellend, M

    2012-08-01

    Studies of genotype × environment interactions (G × E) and local adaptation provide critical tests of natural selection's ability to counter opposing forces such as gene flow. Such studies may be greatly facilitated in asexual species, given the possibility for experimental replication at the level of true genotypes (rather than populations) and the possibility of using molecular markers to assess genotype-environment associations in the field (neither of which is possible for most sexual species). Here, we tested for G × E in asexual dandelions (Taraxacum officinale) by subjecting six genotypes to experimental drought, mown and benign (control) conditions and subsequently using microsatellites to assess genotype-environment associations in the field. We found strong G × E, with genotypes that performed poorly under benign conditions showing the highest performance under stressful conditions (drought or mown). Our six focal genotypes comprise > 80% of plants in local populations. The most common genotype in the field showed its highest relative performance under mown conditions (the most common habitat in our study area), and almost all plants of this genotype in the field were found growing in mowed lawns. Genotypes performing best under benign experimental conditions were found most frequently in unmown conditions in the field. These results are strongly indicative of local adaptation at a very small scale, with unmown microsites of only a few square metres typically embedded within larger mown lawns. By studying an asexual species, we were able to map genotypes with known ecological characteristics to environments with high spatial precision.

  17. Genotypic and phenotypic detection of macrolide and lincosamide resistance in Streptococcus uberis.

    PubMed

    Schmitt-Van de Leemput, E; Zadoks, R N

    2007-11-01

    Streptococcus uberis isolates (n = 55) were obtained from milk samples of cases of mild clinical mastitis in 55 dairy cows from 35 herds serviced by one veterinary practice in Mayenne, France. Isolates were tested for macrolide and lincosamide resistance by using phenotypic and genotypic methods. Erythromycin resistance was detected in 12 of the 55 (22%) isolates based on agar disc diffusion testing and MIC measurements, and was encoded by ermB. This gene also conferred phenotypic resistance to pirlimycin based on MIC measurements, but the D-test was needed for detection of the resistance phenotype in the agar disc diffusion test. Isolates with ermB were also highly resistant to the macrolide antibiotic spiramycin. Seventeen of the 55 isolates (31%) were classified as resistant to spiramcyin only and as having intermediate susceptibility to spiramycin based on agar disc diffusion testing and MIC measurements, respectively. The genetic mechanism behind this phenotype and its clinical relevance are unknown. The efflux pump gene mefA was not detected in any of the 55 isolates in this study. Pirlimycin resistance without macrolide resistance was encoded by the lincosamide resistance gene linB in 4 isolates. Based on current guidelines, some linB-positive isolates would be classified as susceptible by using phenotypic tests, and alternative values for the interpretation of the agar disc diffusion test are suggested. We conclude that the agar disc diffusion test is a useful indicator for macrolide and lincosamide resistance of Strep. uberis in veterinary practice, provided that the D-test is used for detection of pirlimycin resistance.

  18. Postnatal and non-invasive prenatal detection of β-thalassemia mutations based on Taqman genotyping assays

    PubMed Central

    Breveglieri, Giulia; Travan, Anna; D’Aversa, Elisabetta; Cosenza, Lucia Carmela; Pellegatti, Patrizia; Guerra, Giovanni; Gambari, Roberto

    2017-01-01

    The β-thalassemias are genetic disorder caused by more than 200 mutations in the β-globin gene, resulting in a total (β0) or partial (β+) deficit of the globin chain synthesis. The most frequent Mediterranean mutations for β-thalassemia are: β039, β+IVSI-110, β+IVSI-6 and β0IVSI-1. Several molecular techniques for the detection of point mutations have been developed based on the amplification of the DNA target by polymerase chain reaction (PCR), but they could be labor-intensive and technically demanding. On the contrary, TaqMan® genotyping assays are a simple, sensitive and versatile method suitable for the single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping affecting the human β-globin gene. Four TaqMan® genotyping assays for the most common β-thalassemia mutations present in the Mediterranean area were designed and validated for the genotype characterization of genomic DNA extracted from 94 subjects comprising 25 healthy donors, 33 healthy carriers and 36 β-thalassemia patients. In addition, 15 specimens at late gestation (21–39 gestational weeks) and 11 at early gestation (5–18 gestational weeks) were collected from pregnant women, and circulating cell-free fetal DNAs were extracted and analyzed with these four genotyping assays. We developed four simple, inexpensive and versatile genotyping assays for the postnatal and prenatal identification of the thalassemia mutations β039, β+IVSI-110, β+IVSI-6, β0IVSI-1. These genotyping assays are able to detect paternally inherited point mutations in the fetus and could be efficiently employed for non-invasive prenatal diagnosis of β-globin gene mutations, starting from the 9th gestational week. PMID:28235086

  19. Birth of correctly genotyped calves after multiplex marker detection from bovine embryo microblade biopsies.

    PubMed

    Peippo, Jaana; Viitala, Sirja; Virta, Jouni; Räty, Mervi; Tammiranta, Niina; Lamminen, Terttu; Aro, Johanna; Myllymäki, Hannu; Vilkki, Johanna

    2007-11-01

    We report a method for multiplex genotyping of bovine embryo microblade biopsies. We have tested the reliability of the method and the viability of the embryos in vitro and in vivo. Two polymorphic gene markers (GHR F279Y and PRLR S18N) associated with milk production traits and one marker for sex diagnosis (ZFX/ZFY) were genotyped simultaneously with a method that combines nested PCR and allelic discrimination. To test the accuracy of genotyping, in the first experiment the genotypes of 134 biopsies from in vitro produced embryos were compared to genotypes determined from the corresponding embryos after biopsy. The method proved to be highly accurate as only in three cases (two for PRLR S18N and one for GHR F279Y) out of 395 genotypes the genotype was in disagreement between the two samples. The viability of similarly biopsied embryos was tested in parallel: after 24-hr culture 94.6% of embryos recovered in vitro. In the second experiment, a total of 150 in vivo-produced embryos were biopsied on Day 7 and genotyped. After the genotyping results were obtained on Day 8, female embryos were selected for transfer. From a total of 57 selected embryos 43 were transferred individually and 14 as pairs. After single embryo transfers, 19 recipients became pregnant and after embryo transfers in pairs one became pregnant. The success of genotyping was tested with the genotypes of donors and bulls and also from the hair samples of born calves. All calves were females and of the same genotypes determined from the biopsy.

  20. Detection of the Cryptosporidium parvum "human" genotype in a dugong (Dugong dugon).

    PubMed

    Morgan, U M; Xiao, L; Hill, B D; O'Donoghue, P; Limor, J; Lal, A; Thompson, R C

    2000-12-01

    The Cryptosporidium "human" genotype was identified in a paraffin-embedded tissue section from a dugong (Dugong dugon) by 2 independent laboratories. DNA sequencing and polymerase chain reaction/restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene and the acetyl CoA synthethase gene clearly identified the genotype as that of the Cryptosporidium variant that infects humans. This is the first report of the human Cryptosporidium genotype in a nonprimate host.

  1. Diseases associated with genomic imprinting.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Jon F; Úbeda, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    Genomic imprinting is the phenomenon where the expression of a locus differs between the maternally and paternally inherited alleles. Typically, this manifests as transcriptional silencing of one of the alleles, although many genes are imprinted in a tissue- or isoform-specific manner. Diseases associated with imprinted genes include various cancers, disorders of growth and metabolism, and disorders in neurodevelopment, cognition, and behavior, including certain major psychiatric disorders. In many cases, the disease phenotypes associated with dysfunction at particular imprinted loci can be understood in terms of the evolutionary processes responsible for the origin of imprinting. Imprinted gene expression represents the outcome of an intragenomic evolutionary conflict, where natural selection favors different expression strategies for maternally and paternally inherited alleles. This conflict is reasonably well understood in the context of the early growth effects of imprinted genes, where paternally inherited alleles are selected to place a greater demand on maternal resources than are maternally inherited alleles. Less well understood are the origins of imprinted gene expression in the brain, and their effects on cognition and behavior. This chapter reviews the genetic diseases that are associated with imprinted genes, framed in terms of the evolutionary pressures acting on gene expression at those loci. We begin by reviewing the phenomenon and evolutionary origins of genomic imprinting. We then discuss diseases that are associated with genetic or epigenetic defects at particular imprinted loci, many of which are associated with abnormalities in growth and/or feeding behaviors that can be understood in terms of the asymmetric pressures of natural selection on maternally and paternally inherited alleles. We next described the evidence for imprinted gene effects on adult cognition and behavior, and the possible role of imprinted genes in the etiology of certain

  2. Molecular Detection and Genotypic Characterization of Toxoplasma gondii in Paraffin-Embedded Fetoplacental Tissues of Women with Recurrent Spontaneous Abortion

    PubMed Central

    Abdoli, Amir; Dalimi, Abdolhossein; Soltanghoraee, Haleh; Ghaffarifar, Fatemeh

    2017-01-01

    Background Congenital toxoplasmosis is an important cause of spontaneous abortion worldwide. However, there is limited information on detection and genotypic characterization of Toxoplasma gondii (T. gondii) in women with recurrent spontaneous abortion (RSA). The aim of this study is the molecular detection and genotypic characterization of T. gondii in formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded fetoplacental tissues (FFPTs) of women with RSA that have referred to the Avicenna Research Institute in Tehran, Iran. Materials and Methods This experimental research was undertaken on 210 FFPTs of women with RSA. The information of the patients was collected from the archives of Avicenna Research Institute in Tehran, Iran. After DNA extraction, the presence of T. gondii was examined by nested polymerase chain reaction targeting the GRA6 gene. Genotyping was performed on positive samples using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) that targeted the GRA6 and SAG3 genes. Sequencing was conducted on two GRA6 positive samples. Results T. gondii DNA was detected in 3.8% (8/210) of the samples. Genotyping showed that all positive samples belonged to type III of the T. gondii genotype. Sequencing two genomic DNAs of the GRA6 gene revealed 99% similarity with each other and 99-100% similarity with T. gondii sequences deposited in GenBank. There were six patients with histories of more than three abortions; one patient had a healthy girl and another patient had two previous abortions. Abortions occurred in the first trimester of pregnancy in seven patients and in the second trimester of pregnancy in one patient. Conclusion The results of this study have indicated that genotype III is the predominant type of T. gondii in women with RSA in Tehran, Iran. Also, our findings suggest that toxoplasmosis may play a role in the pathogenesis of RSA. However, further studies are needed to elucidate a clear relationship between T. gondii infection and RSA. PMID

  3. Genetic analysis of attachment glycoprotein (G) gene in new genotype ON1 of human respiratory syncytial virus detected in Japan.

    PubMed

    Tsukagoshi, Hiroyuki; Yokoi, Hajime; Kobayashi, Miho; Kushibuchi, Izumi; Okamoto-Nakagawa, Reiko; Yoshida, Ayako; Morita, Yukio; Noda, Masahiro; Yamamoto, Norio; Sugai, Kazuko; Oishi, Kazunori; Kozawa, Kunihisa; Kuroda, Makoto; Shirabe, Komei; Kimura, Hirokazu

    2013-09-01

    We studied the evolution of the G gene in the new genotype ON1 of RSV detected from patients with acute respiratory infection in Japan. Phylogenetic analyses and the evolutionary timescale were obtained by the Bayesian MCMC method. We also analyzed p-distance and positive selection sites. A new genotype ON1 emerged around 2001. The evolution rate was rapid (3.57 × 10(-3) substitutions/site per year). The p-distance was short and no positive selection site was found in the present strains. These results suggested that a new genotype ON1 of RSV-A emerged approximately10 years ago and spread to some countries with a high evolution rate.

  4. A new sieving matrix for DNA sequencing, genotyping and mutation detection and high-throughput genotyping with a 96-capillary array system

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, David

    1999-11-08

    Capillary electrophoresis has been widely accepted as a fast separation technique in DNA analysis. In this dissertation, a new sieving matrix is described for DNA analysis, especially DNA sequencing, genetic typing and mutation detection. A high-throughput 96 capillary array electrophoresis system was also demonstrated for simultaneous multiple genotyping. The authors first evaluated the influence of different capillary coatings on the performance of DNA sequencing. A bare capillary was compared with a DB-wax, an FC-coated and a polyvinylpyrrolidone dynamically coated capillary with PEO as sieving matrix. It was found that covalently-coated capillaries had no better performance than bare capillaries while PVP coating provided excellent and reproducible results. The authors also developed a new sieving Matrix for DNA separation based on commercially available poly(vinylpyrrolidone) (PVP). This sieving matrix has a very low viscosity and an excellent self-coating effect. Successful separations were achieved in uncoated capillaries. Sequencing of M13mp18 showed good resolution up to 500 bases in treated PVP solution. Temperature gradient capillary electrophoresis and PVP solution was applied to mutation detection. A heteroduplex sample and a homoduplex reference were injected during a pair of continuous runs. A temperature gradient of 10 C with a ramp of 0.7 C/min was swept throughout the capillary. Detection was accomplished by laser induced fluorescence detection. Mutation detection was performed by comparing the pattern changes between the homoduplex and the heteroduplex samples. High throughput, high detection rate and easy operation were achieved in this system. They further demonstrated fast and reliable genotyping based on CTTv STR system by multiple-capillary array electrophoresis. The PCR products from individuals were mixed with pooled allelic ladder as an absolute standard and coinjected with a 96-vial tray. Simultaneous one-color laser-induced fluorescence

  5. Detection and genotyping of human rotavirus VP4 and VP7 genes by reverse transcriptase PCR and reverse hybridization.

    PubMed

    van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Kleter, Bernhard; Hoefnagel, Evert; Stainier, Isabelle; Poliszczak, Annick; Colau, Brigitte; Quint, Wim

    2009-09-01

    Rotavirus infections can be diagnosed in stool samples by serological and molecular methods. We developed a novel reverse transcriptase PCR (RT-PCR) method for the amplification of rotavirus RNA and a reverse hybridization assay on a strip to detect amplimers and identify the specific G and P genotypes present in human stool specimens. An additional aim was to permit specific identification of the rotavirus G1P[8] strain, used in the Rotarix vaccine. Novel broad-spectrum PCR primers were developed for both VP4 and VP7, permitting the amplification of a wide range of rotavirus genotypes. Primer sets comprise mixtures of defined primer sequences. For the identification of G and P genotypes, two reverse hybridization strip assays were developed. Both the VP4 and the VP7 strip contain universal probes for the detection of VP4 and VP7 sequences, irrespective of the G or P genotype. The VP4 strip contains type-specific probes for P[4], P[6], P[8], P[9], and P[10]. The VP7 strip contains type-specific probes for G1, G2, G3, G4, G5, G6, G8, and G9. In addition, probes to distinguish between wild-type G1 and G1 vaccine strain sequences were present. Testing by analysis of multiple reference strains confirmed that both RT-PCR methods allowed the detection of a broad spectrum of genotypes. RT-PCR for VP7 was more sensitive than RT-PCR for VP4, but all samples identified as positive for rotavirus antigen by an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were also positive for both VP4 and VP7. The high specificity of the reverse hybridization method was confirmed by sequence analysis as well as by type-specific PCR, and the vaccine strain could also be specifically identified. The reverse hybridization method permits accurate identification of mixed infections with different genotypes. Rotavirus genotypes for which no type-specific probes were present on the strip were adequately identified by the universal detection probes. The assay was formally validated by analyses of

  6. HPV genotypes detected in the oropharyngeal mucosa of HIV-infected men who have sex with men in Northern Italy.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, M; Mazza, F; Frati, E R; Fasolo, M M; Colzani, D; Bianchi, S; Fasoli, E; Amendola, A; Orlando, G; Tanzi, E

    2016-09-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the epidemiological profile of HPV oropharyngeal infections in HIV-infected men who have sex with men. A total of 135 subjects were enrolled at the L. Sacco University Hospital (Milan, Italy) to evaluate their HPV oropharyngeal infection status at baseline and at a follow-up visit at least 12 months later. HPV DNA was detected from oropharyngeal swabs using an in-house nested PCR that amplifies a segment of the L1 gene. The PCR products were then sequenced and genotyped. A greater percentage of high-risk genotypes was identified compared to low-risk genotypes (13·7% vs. 6·9%, P < 0·05), and two uncommon alpha-HPV genotypes were detected, i.e. HPV-102 and HPV-114. HPV infection prevalence was 24·4% and the cumulative incidence was 24·1%. During the follow-up period, one case of HPV infection (HPV-33) persisted, while the overall rate of infection clearance was 58·3%. HPV oropharyngeal infection was widespread in the cohort examined, and most of the infections were transient and cleared within 12 months. These results may help to clarify the role of HPV in the oropharynx and may also improve our understanding of the need to implement preventive strategies in at-risk populations.

  7. [Detection of ABO genotype genetic polymorphism by multiplex-PCR based sequencing and application in forensic medicine].

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng; Chen, Teng; Yan, Chun-Xia; Dang, Yong-Hui; Mu, Hao-Fang; Yu, Xiao-Guang; Zhang, Bo; Deng, Ya-Jun

    2008-06-01

    Multiplex PCR-direct sequencing method was established to detect 9 different SNPs in exon 6 and exon 7 of ABO genes and could identify at least 28 different ABO genotypes. Population study was carried out in a sample of 80 unrelated Chinese Tibetan minority individual dwelled in Qinghai Province. The method was also applied to forensic cases. A variety of degeneration forensic samples, including blood stain, hair root, swab, bone and mixed stain were successfully identified by this efficient method and in conformance with serological typing. There were no significant deviations from Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium in ABO genotypes of Tibetan population. The heterozygosity, polymorphic information content, discrimination power, paternity of exclusion, and probability of genetic identity were 0.675, 0.672, 0.874, 0.391, and 0.126 respectively. The gene frequency of ABO was O>B>A. The multiplex PCR-directed sequencing method can accurately and reliably detect ABO genotypes in many kinds of samples, and it improves personal identification efficiency. The ABO genotype is high variance in Qinghai Tibetan minority group, and it can be applied in forensic medicine and population genetic study.

  8. Comparison of methods to detect copy number alterations in cancer using simulated and real genotyping data

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The detection of genomic copy number alterations (CNA) in cancer based on SNP arrays requires methods that take into account tumour specific factors such as normal cell contamination and tumour heterogeneity. A number of tools have been recently developed but their performance needs yet to be thoroughly assessed. To this aim, a comprehensive model that integrates the factors of normal cell contamination and intra-tumour heterogeneity and that can be translated to synthetic data on which to perform benchmarks is indispensable. Results We propose such model and implement it in an R package called CnaGen to synthetically generate a wide range of alterations under different normal cell contamination levels. Six recently published methods for CNA and loss of heterozygosity (LOH) detection on tumour samples were assessed on this synthetic data and on a dilution series of a breast cancer cell-line: ASCAT, GAP, GenoCNA, GPHMM, MixHMM and OncoSNP. We report the recall rates in terms of normal cell contamination levels and alteration characteristics: length, copy number and LOH state, as well as the false discovery rate distribution for each copy number under different normal cell contamination levels. Assessed methods are in general better at detecting alterations with low copy number and under a little normal cell contamination levels. All methods except GPHMM, which failed to recognize the alteration pattern in the cell-line samples, provided similar results for the synthetic and cell-line sample sets. MixHMM and GenoCNA are the poorliest performing methods, while GAP generally performed better. This supports the viability of approaches other than the common hidden Markov model (HMM)-based. Conclusions We devised and implemented a comprehensive model to generate data that simulate tumoural samples genotyped using SNP arrays. The validity of the model is supported by the similarity of the results obtained with synthetic and real data. Based on these results and

  9. Nested PCR for detection and genotyping of Ehrlichia ruminantium: use in genetic diversity analysis.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Dominique; Vachiéry, Nathalie; Stachurski, Frederic; Kandassamy, Yane; Raliniaina, Modestine; Aprelon, Rosalie; Gueye, Arona

    2004-10-01

    Ehrlichia ruminantium, the agent of cowdriosis transmitted by Amblyomma ticks, presents an extensive genetic and antigenic diversity of key importance for vaccine formulation. Two means of nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting were developed to conduct molecular epidemiology studies in the Caribbean and Africa. The first used a conserved DNA fragment for detection of the pathogen in animals and vectors, and the second relied on the polymorphic map1 gene for genotyping. As compared to a PCR, the nested PCR showed a 2-Log10 improvement of sensitivity and allowed amplification from ticks, blood, brain, and lungs from infected animals, providing a more accurate picture of the tick infection rate. In Guadeloupe, this rate reached 36% (N = 212) instead of 1.7% (N = 224), as previously estimated. Genetic typing was done by restriction fragment length polymorphism or sequencing of map1 amplification products. Molecular epidemiology studies conducted in field sites selected for vaccination trials with inactivated vaccine, revealed the circulation of genetically divergent strains in limited geographical areas. It is known, then, that genetic clustering based on map1 has no predictive value regarding the protective value of a given strain against a new strain. However, tracing the strains by this technique revealed the extent of E. ruminantium diversity that one can expect in a given region, and the method allows differentiation between an inadequate immune response and the challenge by a breakthrough strain on animals dying despite vaccination. Up to now, genetic typing does not avoid cross-protection studies, which were conducted in parallel, although on a more limited scale. The importance of pathogen diversity studies for optimization of vaccine design is discussed as well as the research for new polymorphic genes. These genes may allow better predictions on cross-protection, given the recent completion of the sequence of the full genome of two E. ruminantium

  10. Molecular prevalence of different genotypes of Theileria orientalis detected from cattle and water buffaloes in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Altangerel, Khukhuu; Sivakumar, Thillaiampalam; Inpankaew, Tawin; Jittapalapong, Sathaporn; Terkawi, Mohamad Alaa; Ueno, Akio; Xuan, Xuenan; Igarashi, Ikuo; Yokoyama, Naoaki

    2011-12-01

    Here we report on an epidemiological study regarding the molecular prevalence of different genotypes of Theileria orientalis present among domestic cattle and water buffalo populations bred in Thailand. A phylogenetic analysis based on the parasitic gene encoding a major piroplasm surface protein revealed the presence of 5 genotypes (Types 1, 3, 5, 7, and N-3) in cattle and 7 genotypes (Types 1, 3, 4, 5, 7, N-2, and N-3) in water buffaloes. Types 4, 7, and N-3 of T. orientalis were reported for the first time in water buffaloes. The previously reported C and Thai types from Thailand clustered as types 7 and 6, respectively, in the present analysis. Great similarities were observed among nucleotide sequences of isolates of the same genotype from cattle and water buffaloes, and, therefore, water buffaloes were considered to serve as a reservoir for these genotypes of T. orientalis in Thailand. In conclusion, T. orientalis parasites circulating in Thailand are more diverse in their genetic characters than previously anticipated.

  11. Rapid Detection of Rare Deleterious Variants by Next Generation Sequencing with Optional Microarray SNP Genotype Data.

    PubMed

    Watson, Christopher M; Crinnion, Laura A; Gurgel-Gianetti, Juliana; Harrison, Sally M; Daly, Catherine; Antanavicuite, Agne; Lascelles, Carolina; Markham, Alexander F; Pena, Sergio D J; Bonthron, David T; Carr, Ian M

    2015-09-01

    Autozygosity mapping is a powerful technique for the identification of rare, autosomal recessive, disease-causing genes. The ease with which this category of disease gene can be identified has greatly increased through the availability of genome-wide SNP genotyping microarrays and subsequently of exome sequencing. Although these methods have simplified the generation of experimental data, its analysis, particularly when disparate data types must be integrated, remains time consuming. Moreover, the huge volume of sequence variant data generated from next generation sequencing experiments opens up the possibility of using these data instead of microarray genotype data to identify disease loci. To allow these two types of data to be used in an integrated fashion, we have developed AgileVCFMapper, a program that performs both the mapping of disease loci by SNP genotyping and the analysis of potentially deleterious variants using exome sequence variant data, in a single step. This method does not require microarray SNP genotype data, although analysis with a combination of microarray and exome genotype data enables more precise delineation of disease loci, due to superior marker density and distribution.

  12. Comparing Human Metapneumovirus and Respiratory Syncytial Virus: Viral Co-Detections, Genotypes and Risk Factors for Severe Disease

    PubMed Central

    Moe, Nina; Krokstad, Sidsel; Stenseng, Inger Heimdal; Christensen, Andreas; Skanke, Lars Høsøien; Risnes, Kari Ravndal; Nordbø, Svein Arne; Døllner, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    Background It is unclarified as to whether viral co-detection and human metapneumovirus (HMPV) genotypes relate to clinical manifestations in children with HMPV and lower respiratory tract infection (LRTI), and if the clinical course and risk factors for severe LRTI differ between HMPV and respiratory syncytial virus (RSV). Methods We prospectively enrolled hospitalized children aged <16 years with LRTI from 2006 to 2015. Children were clinically examined, and nasopharyngeal aspirates were analyzed using semi-quantitative, real-time polymerase chain reaction tests for HMPV, RSV and 17 other pathogens. HMPV-positive samples were genotyped. Results A total of 171 children had HMPV infection. HMPV-infected children with single virus (n = 106) and co-detections (n = 65) had similar clinical manifestations. No clinical differences were found between HMPV genotypes A (n = 67) and B (n = 80). The HMPV-infected children were older (median 17.2 months) than RSV-infected children (median 7.3 months, n = 859). Among single virus-infected children, no differences in age-adjusted LRTI diagnoses were found between HMPV and RSV. Age was an important factor for disease severity among single virus-infected children, where children <6 months old with HMPV had a milder disease than those with RSV, while in children 12–23 months old, the pattern was the opposite. In multivariable logistic regression analysis for each virus type, age ≥12 months (HMPV), and age <6 months (RSV), prematurity, ≥1 chronic disease and high viral loads of RSV, but not high HMPV viral loads, were risk factors for severe disease. Conclusions Among hospitalized children with LRTI, HMPV manifests independently of viral co-detections and HMPV genotypes. Disease severity in HMPV- and RSV-infected children varies in relation to age. A history of prematurity and chronic disease increases the risk of severe LRTI among HMPV- and RSV-infected children. PMID:28095451

  13. DNA detection and genotypic identification of potentially human-pathogenic microsporidia from asymptomatic pet parrots in South Korea as a risk factor for zoonotic emergence.

    PubMed

    Lee, So-Young; Lee, Sung-Seok; Lyoo, Young S; Park, Hee-Myung

    2011-12-01

    We detected and identified genotypes of human-pathogenic microsporidia in fecal samples from 51 asymptomatic captive-bred pet parrots in South Korea. Microsporidia were identified in 8 samples (15.7%); 7 parrots tested positive for Encephalitozoon hellem, and 1 parrot tested positive for both E. hellem and Encephalitozoon cuniculi. In genotypic identifications, E. hellem was present in genotypes 1A and 2B and E. cuniculi was present in genotype II. Pet parrots might be a source of human microsporidian infection.

  14. DNA Detection and Genotypic Identification of Potentially Human-Pathogenic Microsporidia from Asymptomatic Pet Parrots in South Korea as a Risk Factor for Zoonotic Emergence ▿

    PubMed Central

    Lee, So-Young; Lee, Sung-Seok; Lyoo, Young S.; Park, Hee-Myung

    2011-01-01

    We detected and identified genotypes of human-pathogenic microsporidia in fecal samples from 51 asymptomatic captive-bred pet parrots in South Korea. Microsporidia were identified in 8 samples (15.7%); 7 parrots tested positive for Encephalitozoon hellem, and 1 parrot tested positive for both E. hellem and Encephalitozoon cuniculi. In genotypic identifications, E. hellem was present in genotypes 1A and 2B and E. cuniculi was present in genotype II. Pet parrots might be a source of human microsporidian infection. PMID:21965400

  15. Detection of mumps virus genotype H in two previously vaccinated patients from Mexico City.

    PubMed

    Del Valle, Alberto; García, Alí A; Barrón, Blanca L

    2016-06-01

    Infections caused by mumps virus (MuV) have been successfully prevented through vaccination; however, in recent years, an increasing number of mumps outbreaks have been reported within vaccinated populations. In this study, MuV was genotyped for the first time in Mexico. Saliva samples were obtained from two previously vaccinated patients in Mexico City who had developed parotitis. Viral isolation was carried out in Vero cells, and the SH and HN genes were amplified by RT-PCR. Amplicons were sequenced and compared to a set of reference sequences to identify the MuV genotype.

  16. Molecular Detection and Genotyping of Male-Specific Coliphages by Reverse Transcription-PCR and Reverse Line Blot Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Vinjé, Jan; Oudejans, Sjon J. G.; Stewart, Jill R.; Sobsey, Mark D.; Long, Sharon C.

    2004-01-01

    In recent years, there has been increased interest in the use of male-specific or F+ coliphages as indicators of microbial inputs to source waters. Sero- or genotyping of these coliphages can also be used for microbial source tracking (MST). Among the male-specific coliphages, the F+ RNA (FRNA) viruses are well studied, while little is known about the F+ DNA (FDNA) viruses. We have developed a reverse line blot hybridization (RLB) assay which allows for the simultaneous detection and genotyping of both FRNA as well as FDNA coliphages. These assays included a novel generic duplex reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) assay for FRNA viruses as well as a generic PCR for FDNA viruses. The RT-PCR assays were validated by using 190 field and prototype strains. Subsequent DNA sequencing and phylogenetic analyses of RT-PCR products revealed the classification of six different FRNA clusters, including the well-established subgroups I through IV, and three different FDNA clusters, including one (CH) not previously described. Within the leviviruses, a potentially new subgroup (called JS) including strains having more than 40% nucleotide sequence diversity with the known levivirus subgroups (MS2 and GA) was identified. We designed subgroup-specific oligonucleotides that were able to genotype all nine (six FRNA, three FDNA) different clusters. Application of the method to a panel of 351 enriched phage samples from animal feces and wastewater, including known prototype strains (MS2, GA, Qβ, M11, FI, and SP for FRNA and M13, f1, and fd for FDNA), resulted in successful genotyping of 348 (99%) of the samples. In summary, we developed a novel method for standardized genotyping of F+ coliphages as a useful tool for large-scale MST studies. PMID:15466543

  17. High performance of a new PCR-based urine assay for HPV-DNA detection and genotyping.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Silvia; Fasolo, Maria Michela; Frati, Elena R; Mazza, Francesca; Martinelli, Marianna; Colzani, Daniela; Beretta, Rosangela; Zappa, Alessandra; Orlando, Giovanna

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing has been proposed as a means of replacing or supporting conventional cervical screening (Pap test). However, both methods require the collection of cervical samples. Urine sample is easier and more acceptable to collect and could be helpful in facilitating cervical cancer screening. The aim of this study was to evaluate the sensitivity and specificity of urine testing compared to conventional cervical smear testing using a PCR-based method with a new, designed specifically primer set. Paired cervical and first voided urine samples collected from 107 women infected with HIV were subjected to HPV-DNA detection and genotyping using a PCR-based assay and a restriction fragment length polymorphism method. Sensitivity, specificity, Positive Predictive Value (PPV), and Negative Predictive Value (NPV) were calculated using the McNemar's test for differences. Concordance between tests was assessed using the Cohen's unweighted Kappa (k). HPV DNA was detected in 64.5% (95% CI: 55.1-73.1%) of both cytobrush and urine samples. High concordance rates of HPV-DNA detection (k = 0.96; 95% CI: 0.90-1.0) and of high risk-clade and low-risk genotyping in paired samples (k = 0.80; 95% CI: 0.67-0.92 and k = 0.74; 95% CI: 0.60-0.88, respectively) were observed. HPV-DNA detection in urine versus cervix testing revealed a sensitivity of 98.6% (95% CI: 93.1-99.9%) and a specificity of 97.4% (95% CI: 87.7-99.9%), with a very high NPV (97.4%; 95% CI: 87.7-99.9%). The PCR-based assay utilized in this study proved highly sensitive and specific for HPV-DNA detection and genotyping in urine samples. These data suggest that a urine-based assay would be a suitable and effective tool for epidemiological surveillance and, most of all, screening programs.

  18. Microsporidia Detection and Genotyping Study of Human Pathogenic E. bieneusi in Animals from Spain

    PubMed Central

    Galván-Díaz, Ana Luz; Magnet, Angela; Fenoy, Soledad; Henriques-Gil, Nuno; Haro, María; Gordo, Francisco Ponce; Miró, Guadalupe; del Águila, Carmen; Izquierdo, Fernando

    2014-01-01

    Microsporidia are ubiquitous parasites infecting all animal phyla and we present evidence that supports their zoonotic potential. Fecal samples taken from domestic (cats and dogs), farm (pigs, rabbits and ostriches) and wild animals (foxes) from different provinces of Spain were evaluated for microsporidia infection by light microscopy and PCR. After Microsporidia species identification, E. bieneusi genotypes were additionally studied by sequence analysis of the ITS region. Eighty-five samples out of 159 exhibited structures that were compatible with microsporidia spores by Webeŕs stain with 37 of them being confirmed by PCR. Microsporidia species identified included E. bieneusi, E. intestinalis and A. algerae. We report the first diagnosis of E. intestinalis and E. bieneusi in ostriches and A. algerae in pigs. We also provide new information on the molecular characterization of E. bieneusi isolates both in rabbits and ostriches. All of the E. bieneusi genotypes identified belonged to the zoonotic group of genotypes (Group I) including genotypes A (dogs), I (pigs), D (rabbits and foxes) and type IV (ostriches). Our results demonstrate that microsporidia are present in domestic, farm and wild animals in Spain, corroborating their potential role as a source of human infection and environmental contamination. PMID:24651457

  19. Detecting High-Order Epistasis in Nonlinear Genotype-Phenotype Maps

    PubMed Central

    Sailer, Zachary R.; Harms, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    High-order epistasis has been observed in many genotype-phenotype maps. These multi-way interactions between mutations may be useful for dissecting complex traits and could have profound implications for evolution. Alternatively, they could be a statistical artifact. High-order epistasis models assume the effects of mutations should add, when they could in fact multiply or combine in some other nonlinear way. A mismatch in the “scale” of the epistasis model and the scale of the underlying map would lead to spurious epistasis. In this article, we develop an approach to estimate the nonlinear scales of arbitrary genotype-phenotype maps. We can then linearize these maps and extract high-order epistasis. We investigated seven experimental genotype-phenotype maps for which high-order epistasis had been reported previously. We find that five of the seven maps exhibited nonlinear scales. Interestingly, even after accounting for nonlinearity, we found statistically significant high-order epistasis in all seven maps. The contributions of high-order epistasis to the total variation ranged from 2.2 to 31.0%, with an average across maps of 12.7%. Our results provide strong evidence for extensive high-order epistasis, even after nonlinear scale is taken into account. Further, we describe a simple method to estimate and account for nonlinearity in genotype-phenotype maps. PMID:28100592

  20. Detecting High-Order Epistasis in Nonlinear Genotype-Phenotype Maps.

    PubMed

    Sailer, Zachary R; Harms, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    High-order epistasis has been observed in many genotype-phenotype maps. These multi-way interactions between mutations may be useful for dissecting complex traits and could have profound implications for evolution. Alternatively, they could be a statistical artifact. High-order epistasis models assume the effects of mutations should add, when they could in fact multiply or combine in some other nonlinear way. A mismatch in the "scale" of the epistasis model and the scale of the underlying map would lead to spurious epistasis. In this article, we develop an approach to estimate the nonlinear scales of arbitrary genotype-phenotype maps. We can then linearize these maps and extract high-order epistasis. We investigated seven experimental genotype-phenotype maps for which high-order epistasis had been reported previously. We find that five of the seven maps exhibited nonlinear scales. Interestingly, even after accounting for nonlinearity, we found statistically significant high-order epistasis in all seven maps. The contributions of high-order epistasis to the total variation ranged from 2.2 to 31.0%, with an average across maps of 12.7%. Our results provide strong evidence for extensive high-order epistasis, even after nonlinear scale is taken into account. Further, we describe a simple method to estimate and account for nonlinearity in genotype-phenotype maps.

  1. Development of a single nucleotide polymorphism DNA microarray for the detection and genotyping of the SARS coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xi; Geng, Peng; Wang, Quan; Cao, Boyang; Liu, Bin

    2014-10-01

    Severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), a disease that spread widely in the world during late 2002 to 2004, severely threatened public health. Although there have been no reported infections since 2004, the extremely pathogenic SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV), as the causative agent of SARS, has recently been identified in animals, showing the potential for the re-emergence of this disease. Previous studies showed that 27 single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) mutations among the spike (S) gene of this virus are correlated closely with the SARS pathogenicity and epidemicity. We have developed a SNP DNA microarray in order to detect and genotype these SNPs, and to obtain related information on the pathogenicity and epidemicity of a given strain. The microarray was hybridized with PCR products amplified from cDNAs obtained from different SARS-CoV strains. We were able to detect 24 SNPs and determine the type of a given strain. The hybridization profile showed that 19 samples were detected and genotyped correctly by using our microarray, with 100% accuracy. Our microarray provides a novel method for the detection and epidemiological surveillance of SARS-CoV.

  2. Genotyping approach for non-invasive foetal RHD detection in an admixed population

    PubMed Central

    Boggione, Carolina Trucco; Luján Brajovich, Melina E.; Mattaloni, Stella M.; Di Mónaco, René A.; García Borrás, Silvia E.; Biondi, Claudia S.; Cotorruelo, Carlos M.

    2017-01-01

    Background Non-invasive foetal RHD genotyping can predict haemolytic disease of the foetus and the newborn in pregnancies with anti-D alloantibodies and also avoid antenatal anti-D prophylaxis in pregnant women carrying an RHD negative foetus. Considering that the Argentine genetic background is the result of generations of intermixing between several ethnic groups, we evaluated the diagnostic performance of a non-invasive foetal RHD determination strategy to guide targeted antenatal RhD immunoprophylaxis. This algorithm is based on the analysis of four regions of the RHD gene in cell-free foetal DNA in maternal plasma and maternal and paternal RHD genotyping. Materials and methods DNA from 298 serologically D negative pregnant women between 19–28 weeks gestation were RHD genotyped. Foetal RHD status was determined by real-time PCR in 296 maternal plasma samples. In particular cases, RHDΨ and RHD-CE-Ds alleles were investigated in paternal DNA. Umbilical cord blood was collected at birth, and serological and molecular studies were performed. Results Of the 298 maternal samples, 288 were D−/RHD− and 10 D−/RHD+ (2 RHD*DAR; 5 RHD-CE-Ds; 3 RHDΨ). Plasma from RHD*DAR carriers was not analysed. Real-time PCR showed 210 RHD+ and 78 RHD− foetuses and 8 inconclusive results. In this latter group, paternal molecular studies were useful to report a RHD negative status in 5 foetuses while only 3 remained inconclusive. All the results, except one false positive due to a silent allele (RHD[581insG]), agreed with the neonatal typing performed in cord blood. Discussion The protocol used for non-invasive prenatal RHD genotyping proved to be suitable to determine foetal RHD status in our admixed population. The knowledge of the genetic background of the population under study and maternal and paternal molecular analysis can reduce the number of inconclusive results when investigating foetal RHD status. PMID:27136427

  3. Detection of Genotype 4 Swine Hepatitis E Virus in Systemic Tissues in Cross-Species Infected Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Qiaoxing; An, Junqing; She, Ruiping; Shi, Ruihan; Hao, Wenzhuo; Soomro, MajidHussain; Yuan, Xuerui; Yang, Jinling; Wang, Jingyuan

    2017-01-01

    Increasing evidence demonstrates that hepatitis E virus (HEV) can be transmitted across species. According to previous reports, swine HEV has two genotypes, genotype 3 and 4, and both can infect humans by the fecal-oral route. Thus, it is crucial for the control of HEV zoonotic transmission to evaluate the dynamics of viral shedding and distribution in different tissues during cross-species infection by HEV. In this study, rabbits were infected with genotype 4 swine HEV by the intraperitoneal route. The results showed that HEV RNA not only shed in the feces but also in the saliva of some rabbits during infection with swine HEV. Viremia appeared late after infection, and anti-HEV IgG was not obvious until the appearance of high viremia levels. After the rabbits were euthanized, a histopathological examination showed that the livers developed overt hepatitis accompanied by an elevation of alanine aminotransferase (ALT) and aspartate transaminase (AST). Furthermore, HEV RNA was detected in various tissues, especially in the salivary glands and tonsils. Subsequently, negative-stranded HEV RNA was practiced in tissues with positive HEV RNA, which demonstrated that HEV replicated in the tissues. Next, we harvested additional tissues from the liver, salivary gland, tonsil, spleen, thymus gland, lymph node and intestine, which are known as replication sites of swine HEV. Additionally, we also observed the HEV antigen distributed in the organs above through immunohistochemical staining. These results demonstrate that rabbits could be used as an animal model for researching cross-species infection of genotype 4 HEV. It is also noteworthy that HEV can shed in the saliva and presents the risk of droplet transmission. These new data provide valuable information for understanding cross-species infection by HEV. PMID:28129390

  4. Simultaneous Detection and Genotype Determination of HSV 1 and 2 by Real-time PCR Using Melting Curve Analysis and a Unique Pair of Primers.

    PubMed

    Paryan, Mahdi; Mohammadi-Yeganeh, Samira; Rezvan, Houri; Kia, Vahid; Mansouri, Ardalan; Mirab Samiee, Siamak

    2017-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a human pathogen that causes different pathologic manifestations. Rapid and feasible detection and discrimination methods for HSV genotyping is a challenge in clinical laboratories, especially in children suffering from herpetic encephalitis. A quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genotyping assay using SYBR Green I was established. We designed only 1 pair of primer for HSV 1 and 2, targeting thymidine kinase gene conserved region. HSV genotypes were determined by PCR using melting curve analysis with LightCycler. Different HSV genotypes were successfully detected in all clinical samples. The melting temperature for HSV 1 and 2 was 85.5±0.78°C and 89±0.53°C, respectively. These 2 genotypes were completely distinguished by means of the accurate melting assay. Importantly, detection was reliably performed within only 1 hour. The assay had no cross-reactivity across species, an excellent dynamic range from 10 to 10 copies per reaction, a good intra-assay and interassay reproducibility, and a detection limit of a single copy per reaction. Our homebrew designed and validated quantitative real-time PCR followed by a melting curve analysis provided a rapid and convenient screening test for differential identification of HSV genotypes 1 and 2. We recommend the large-scale application of this method for HSV 1 and 2 detection.

  5. Detection and Genotyping of Human Papillomaviruses from Archival Formalin-Fixed Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Chen, Zigui; McBride, Alison A

    2016-11-18

    Pathology departments routinely process and store formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for clinical diagnosis. These collections often contain decades' worth of samples and represent a treasure trove of specimens that can be analyzed for retrospective epidemiological studies, diagnostics, and pathogen discovery. Accurate amplification and sequencing of DNA from these samples is critical for the usability of these FFPE samples. Here we present a collection of protocols that describe extraction of DNA from FFPE tissues, PCR amplification of human papillomavirus DNA, and subsequent genotyping of the infecting virus. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  6. Magnetic nanowires for rapid and ultrasensitive isolation of DNA from cervical specimens for the detection of multiple human papillomaviruses genotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, HyungJae; Hwang, Na Rae; Hwang, Sang-Hyun; Cho, Youngnam

    2016-12-15

    Detecting human papillomavirus (HPV) is central in diagnosing and monitoring HPV-related disease. However, limited sensitivity and the wide variability of the HPV genome pose challenges in the identification of HPV genes, particularly high-risk types. This study reports the development of polyethyleneimine-conjugated magnetic nanowires (PEI-MNWs) and their use in the isolation, identification, and analysis of multiple genotypes of HPV DNA from cervical cancer specimens. The nanowires are electrochemically doped with a high density of magnetic nanoparticles and biotin moieties during potentiostatic deposition, thereby allowing conjugating cationic branched polymers to direct the attachment of negatively charged DNA molecules with strong magnetic response. For proof of concept, the rapid and ultrasensitive isolation of HPV DNA is performed at concentrations as low as 10pg/mL with an efficiency of >95%. For clinical optimization, the analytical and clinical sensitivity of PEI-MNWs is compared with that of the Roche Cobas 4800 HPV Test and demonstrates excellent correlation for multiple HPV DNA genotypes with superior threshold cycle values. The high sensitivity, specificity, and good reproducibility of PEI-MNWs are particularly well suited for the recovery of DNA and provide significant and clinically meaningful evidence for the early detection and treatment of HPV-associated cancers.

  7. Genotypic detection of acyclovir-resistant HSV-1: characterization of 67 ACV-sensitive and 14 ACV-resistant viruses.

    PubMed

    Frobert, Emilie; Cortay, Jean-Claude; Ooka, Tadamasa; Najioullah, Fatiha; Thouvenot, Danielle; Lina, Bruno; Morfin, Florence

    2008-07-01

    Infections due to herpes simplex virus (HSV) resistant to acyclovir (ACV) represent an important clinical concern in immunocompromised patients. In order to switch promptly to an appropriate treatment, rapid viral susceptibility assays are required. We developed herein a genotyping analysis focusing on thymidine kinase gene (TK) mutations in order to detect acyclovir-resistant HSV in clinical specimens. A total of 85 HSV-1 positive specimens collected from 69 patients were analyzed. TK gene could be sequenced directly for 81 clinical specimens (95%) and 68 HSV-1 specimens could be characterized as sensitive or resistant by genotyping (84%). Genetic characterization of 67 susceptible HSV-1 specimens revealed 10 polymorphisms never previously described. Genetic characterization of 14 resistant HSV-1 revealed 12 HSV-1 with either TK gene additions/deletions (8 strains) or substitutions (4 strains) and 2 HSV-1 with no mutation in the TK gene. DNA polymerase gene was afterwards explored. With this rapid PCR-based assay, ACV-resistant HSV could be detected directly in clinical specimens within 24 h.

  8. Molecular detection and genotyping of Acanthamoeba spp. among stray dogs using conjunctival swab sampling.

    PubMed

    Karakuş, Mehmet; Aykur, Mehmet; Özbel, Yusuf; Töz, Seray; Dağcı, Hande

    2016-12-01

    Acanthamoeba is one of the most common free-living amoebas (FLA) that present in environment. In humans, Acanthamoeba can cause an infection of the eye termed Acanthamoeba keratitis, which mostly occurs in contact lens wearers. In the present study, we aimed to screen the presence of Acanthamoeba DNA in stray dogs using previously collected conjunctival swab samples in a hyper-endemic area for canine leishmaniasis. Totally, 184 dogs were included in the study and 27 of them (14.6%) were found positive for Acanthamoeba according to the 18s rRNA gene sequencing. Two different genotypes (T4 and T5) were identified and T5 was firstly reported in Turkey in the present study. Statistical analysis was performed and no correlation was found between Leishmania and Acanthamoeba positivity (P<0.05). To best of our knowledge, this is the first study conducted to screen Acanthamoeba among stray dogs. Further studies are necessary to reveal the infection status and genotypes among dogs and its possible correlation with leishmaniasis.

  9. Ovine plasma prion protein levels show genotypic variation detected by C-terminal epitopes not exposed in cell-surface PrPC.

    PubMed

    Thackray, Alana M; Fitzmaurice, Tim J; Hopkins, Lee; Bujdoso, Raymond

    2006-12-01

    Ovine PBMCs (peripheral blood mononuclear cells) express PrP(C) [cellular PrP (prion-related protein)] and have the potential to harbour and release disease-associated forms of PrP during scrapie in sheep. Cell-surface PrP(C) expression by PBMCs, together with plasma PrP(C) levels, may contribute to the regulatory mechanisms that determine susceptibility and resistance to natural scrapie in sheep. Here, we have correlated cell-surface PrP(C) expression on normal ovine PBMCs by FACS with the presence of PrP(C) in plasma measured by capture-detector immunoassay. FACS showed similar levels of cell-surface PrP(C) on homozygous ARR (Ala136-Arg154-Arg171), ARQ (Ala136-Arg154-Gln171) and VRQ (Val136-Arg154-Gln171) PBMCs. Cell-surface ovine PrP(C) showed modulation of N-terminal epitopes, which was more evident on homozygous ARR cells. Ovine plasma PrP(C) levels showed genotypic variation and the protein displayed C-terminal epitopes not available in cell-surface PrP(C). Homozygous VRQ sheep showed the highest plasma PrP(C) level and homozygous ARR animals the lowest. For comparison, similar analyses were performed on normal bovine PBMCs and plasma. PrP(C) levels in bovine plasma were approx. 4-fold higher than ovine homozygous ARQ plasma despite similar levels of PBMC cell-surface PrP(C) expression. Immunoassays using C-terminal-specific anti-PrP monoclonal antibodies as capture and detector reagents revealed the highest level of PrP(C) in both ovine and bovine plasma, whilst lower levels were detected using N-terminal-specific monoclonal antibody FH11 as the capture reagent. This suggested that a proportion of plasma PrP(C) was N-terminally truncated. Our results indicate that the increased susceptibility to natural scrapie displayed by homozygous VRQ sheep correlates with a higher level of plasma PrP(C).

  10. Multiplex detection and genotyping of pathogenic bacteria on paper-based biosensor with a novel universal primer mediated asymmetric PCR.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Liu, Hongxing; Liao, Yuhui; Wei, Jitao; Zhou, Xiaoming; Xing, Da

    2015-12-15

    Traditionary multiplex asymmetric polymerase chain reaction (PCR) can be applied to detect multiplex target organisms simultaneously, but complex optimizations of primer concentrations and staggered additions of primers are required to achieve equal amplification of multiplex genes. To overcome this shortcoming, we propose a novel method based on multiplex asymmetric PCR and paper-based nucleic acid diagnostics (PBNAD). In the asymmetric PCR, a universal primer was introduced to break the bottlenecks of low sensitivity and self-inhibition among different sets of primers. Amplification using the novel multiplex asymmetric PCR boosted the quantity of single-stranded amplicons, and the amplified products contained the same sequence at the 5' end. Therefore, only one gold nanoparticle-based signal probe was needed for the simultaneous detection of three genes using the PBNAD platform, and the detection signals could be observed with the naked eye. With this highly efficient, novel multiplex asymmetric PCR, as little as 1 pg/μL genomic DNA can be detected. This method can also be applied to genotyping for reliable epidemiological investigations. This proof-of-concept study highlights the potential of the PBNAD platform for cost- and labor-effective applications in the detection of pathogenic bacteria.

  11. PCR detection and PFGE genotype analyses of streptococcal clinical isolates from tilapia in China.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ming; Li, Li-Ping; Wang, Rui; Liang, Wan-Wen; Huang, Yan; Li, Jian; Lei, Ai-Ying; Huang, Wei-Yi; Gan, Xi

    2012-10-12

    Large-scale streptococcal outbreaks occurred continuously in tilapia farms of China from 2009 to 2011. The objective of this study was to characterize the prevalent strains of tilapia streptococci from the main cultured areas of China through species specific PCR and pulse field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). A total of 105 prevalent strains were isolated from Guangdong, Guangxi, Hainan and Fujian provinces between 2006 and 2011, 85 of which were identified as Streptococcus agalactiae while the rest were all identified as Streptococcus iniae. The prevalent stains in 2006 and 2007 were S. iniae (94.7%, 18/19), with S. agalactiae account for only 5.3% (1/19); The prevalent strains in 2009 and 2011 however changed to S. agalactiae (97.7%, 84/86), with only 2.3% (2/86) was S. iniae. Of these 105 strains, a total of 13 PFGE types (A-M) were characterized, among which D, F, G and K genotypes were predominant, accounting for 81.90% (86/105). The cluster analysis of PFGE electropherograms separated S. iniae and S. agalactiae to two distinctive branches, 20 strains of S. iniae exhibiting 3 types of PFGE band patterns with a similarity of 94.8-100%, and the 85 strains of S. agalactiae producing 10 types of PFGE band patterns with a similarity between 48.4% and 100%. Data suggested that the prevalent strains of tilapia streptococci in China have shifted from the former (before 2008) dominant strains of S. iniae to the current (2009-2011) dominant strains of S. agalactiae. Moreover, PFGE genotypes of the prevalent strains demonstrated geographic differences and temporal changes.

  12. Rapid detection of apolipoprotein E genotypes in Alzheimer's disease using polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism.

    PubMed

    Kamruecha, Worawan; Chansirikarnjana, Sirintorn; Nimkulrat, Ekapot; Udommongkol, Chesda; Wongmek, Wanna; Thangnipon, Wipawan

    2006-07-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE) gene on chromosome 19q13.2 is encoded by three common alleles designated as epsilon2, epsilon3 and epsilon4. In Alzheimer's disease (AD) the epsilon4 allele is over-represented and is considered to be a major genetic risk factor. Several methods have been developed to determine APOE genotypes. Among them, polymerase chain reaction-single strand conformation polymorphism (PCR-SSCP) appears to be highly reliable. In this study, we improved the nonisotopic PCR-SSCP method for determining APOE genotypes in 42 cases of AD patients, 40 cases of non-AD dementia patients, and 49 cases of age-matched controls. DNA from the target sequence on APOE was amplified by PCR from peripheral blood genomic DNA. PCR products were electrophoresed in a non-denaturing polyacrylamide gel and visualized by silver staining. We found that the epsilon4 allele had a significantly high frequency of occurrence in AD patients (33.3%) compared with age-matched controls (13.3%) (chi(2) = 10.43, p = 0.001) and non-AD dementia (10%) (chi(2) = 13.02, p<0.001) whereas the epsilon3 allele was of high frequency in non-AD dementia (90%) compared with age-matched controls (85.7%) and AD patients (66.7%). APOE epsilon4 homozygotes were found only in AD groups. On the other hand, the epsilon2 allele was found only in an age-matched control. This study confirmed that the APOE psilon4 allele is a risk factor in Thai AD subjects and that the PCR-SSCP method is a rapid and useful means of detecting the APOE genotype in AD.

  13. Newly Identified Enterovirus C Genotypes, Identified in the Netherlands through Routine Sequencing of All Enteroviruses Detected in Clinical Materials from 2008 to 2015

    PubMed Central

    Poelman, Randy; Borger, Renze; Niesters, Hubert G. M.

    2016-01-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) are a group of human and animal viruses that are capable of causing a variety of clinical syndromes. Different genotypes classified into species can be distinguished on the basis of sequence divergence in the VP1 capsid-coding region. Apparently new genotypes are discovered regularly, often as incidental findings in studies investigating respiratory syndromes or as part of poliovirus surveillance. Recently, some EVs have become recognized as significant respiratory pathogens, and a number of new genotypes belonging to species C have been identified. The circulation of these newly identified species C EVs, such as EV-C104, EV-C105, EV-C109, and EV-C117, nevertheless appears to be limited. In this report, we show the results of routine genotyping of all enteroviruses detected in our tertiary care hospital between January 2008 and April 2015. We detected 365 EVs belonging to 40 genotypes. Interestingly, several newly identified species C EVs were detected during the study period. Sequencing of the 5′ untranslated region (5′ UTR) of these viruses shows divergence in this region, which is a target region in many detection assays. PMID:27358467

  14. Newly Identified Enterovirus C Genotypes, Identified in the Netherlands through Routine Sequencing of All Enteroviruses Detected in Clinical Materials from 2008 to 2015.

    PubMed

    Van Leer-Buter, Coretta C; Poelman, Randy; Borger, Renze; Niesters, Hubert G M

    2016-09-01

    Enteroviruses (EVs) are a group of human and animal viruses that are capable of causing a variety of clinical syndromes. Different genotypes classified into species can be distinguished on the basis of sequence divergence in the VP1 capsid-coding region. Apparently new genotypes are discovered regularly, often as incidental findings in studies investigating respiratory syndromes or as part of poliovirus surveillance. Recently, some EVs have become recognized as significant respiratory pathogens, and a number of new genotypes belonging to species C have been identified. The circulation of these newly identified species C EVs, such as EV-C104, EV-C105, EV-C109, and EV-C117, nevertheless appears to be limited. In this report, we show the results of routine genotyping of all enteroviruses detected in our tertiary care hospital between January 2008 and April 2015. We detected 365 EVs belonging to 40 genotypes. Interestingly, several newly identified species C EVs were detected during the study period. Sequencing of the 5' untranslated region (5' UTR) of these viruses shows divergence in this region, which is a target region in many detection assays.

  15. Detection and Genotyping of Human Papillomavirus DNA in Formalin-Fixed Paraffin-Embedded Specimens with the HPV Direct Flow CHIP System.

    PubMed

    Herraez-Hernandez, Elsa; Preda, Ovidiu; Alonso, Sonia; Pardo, Rosario Serrano; Olmo, Asuncion

    2013-01-01

    The novel HPV Direct Flow CHIP commercial system for Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping is based on rapid PCR and automatic reverse dot blot hybridization to genotype-specific probes, allowing the detection of 36 HPV genotypes. This study examined the performance of HPV Direct Flow CHIP in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) samples (n= 99). Each sample was analyzed both by Direct PCR, using crude cell extracts without DNA purification, and by conventional PCR, using purified DNA. Pair-wise analysis of the results demonstrated strong concordance between the results obtained with the two protocols, although a slightly higher rate of multiple infections was detected by conventional PCR. In summary, HPV Direct Flow CHIP achieves effective HPV detection from FFPE samples with both Direct PCR and Conventional PCR protocols.

  16. Detection of Mutually Exclusive Mosaicism in a Girl with Genotype-Phenotype Discrepancies

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Minjie; Mulchandani, Surabhi; Dubbs, Holly A.; Swarr, Daniel; Pyle, Louise; Zackai, Elaine H.; Spinner, Nancy B.; Conlin, Laura K.

    2015-01-01

    Discordance between clinical phenotype and genotype has multiple causes, including mosaicism. Phenotypes can be modified due to tissue distribution, or the presence of multiple abnormal cell lines with different genomic contributions. We have studied a 20-month-old female whose main phenotypes were failure to thrive, developmental delay, and patchy skin pigmentation. Initial chromosome and SNP microarray analysis of her blood revealed a non-mosaic ~24 Mb duplication of 15q25.1q26.3 resulting from the unbalanced translocation of terminal 15q to the short arm of chromosome 15. The most common feature associated with distal trisomy 15q is prenatal and postnatal overgrowth, which was not consistent with this patient’s phenotype. The phenotypic discordance, in combination with the patchy skin pigmentation, suggested the presence of mosaicism. Further analysis of skin biopsies from both hyper- and hypopigmented regions confirmed the presence of an additional cell line with the short arm of chromosome X deleted and replaced by the entire long arm of chromosome 15. The Xp deletion, consistent with a variant Turner Syndrome diagnosis, better explained the patient’s phenotype. Parental studies revealed that the alterations in both cell lines were de novo and the duplicated distal 15q and the deleted Xp were from different parental origins, suggesting a mitotic event. The possible mechanism for the occurrence of two mutually exclusive structural rearrangements with both involving the long arm of chromosome 15 is discussed. PMID:26198585

  17. Detection of Self Incompatibility Genotypes in Prunus africana: Characterization, Evolution and Spatial Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Nantongo, Judith Ssali; Eilu, Gerald; Geburek, Thomas; Schueler, Silvio; Konrad, Heino

    2016-01-01

    In flowering plants, self-incompatibility is an effective genetic mechanism that prevents self-fertilization. Most Prunus tree species exhibit a homomorphic gametophytic self-incompatibility (GSI) system, in which the pollen phenotype is encoded by its own haploid genome. To date, no identification of S-alleles had been done in Prunus africana, the only member of the genus in Africa. To identify S-RNase alleles and hence determine S-genotypes in African cherry (Prunus africana) from Mabira Forest Reserve, Uganda, primers flanking the first and second intron were designed and these amplified two bands in most individuals. PCR bands on agarose indicated 26 and 8 different S-alleles for second and first intron respectively. Partial or full sequences were obtained for all these fragments. Comparison with published S-RNase data indicated that the amplified products were S-RNase alleles with very high interspecies homology despite the high intraspecific variation. Against expectations for a locus under balancing selection, frequency and spatial distribution of the alleles in a study plot was not random. Implications of the results to breeding efforts in the species are discussed, and mating experiments are strongly suggested to finally prove the functionality of SI in P. africana. PMID:27348423

  18. Molecular characterization of human respiratory syncytial virus NA1 and GA5 genotypes detected in Assam in northeast India, 2009-2012.

    PubMed

    Biswas, Dipankar; Yadav, Kaushal; Borkakoty, Biswajyoti; Mahanta, Jagadish

    2013-09-01

    A significant number of children die each year from acute respiratory tract infections especially in developing countries. Human respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is the most common virus identified in such cases. Genetic characterization and the circulation pattern of RSV is important for future selection of appropriate vaccine strains. Limited information is available on the circulation of RSV in developing countries including India. The present study aimed to provide baseline information on the genetic variability of RSV in the Dibrugarh district of Assam, northeast India. Clinical specimens collected from children aged ≤6 years for routine influenza surveillance in the Dibrugarh district of Assam during the period 2009-2012, were screened for RSV by real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction. Genotyping was based on partial sequencing of the RSV attachment glycoprotein gene. RSV was detected in 7.9% (39/493) of cases. Only RSV group A viruses were detected during the study period with predominance of NA1 genotypes (89%). Two RSV GA5 genotypes were found to be co-circulating during 2012. The specific amino acid substitutions characteristics of the NA1 genotypes were distinct from RSV strains reported from the rest of India. It is concluded that the circulating genotypes of RSV in Assam, northeast India are NA1 and GA5. To our knowledge this is the first report of circulation of the NA1 genotype in India.

  19. Detection of Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA Type I Genotype in Gingivitis by Real-Time PCR–A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Krishnan, Mahalakshmi; Chandrasekaran, S.C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Published literature till date reveals a high prevalence of Porphyromonas gingivalis fimA type I genotype among healthy subjects. Quite a few studies have reported its prevalence also in periodontitis patients. Nevertheless incidence of this genotype in gingivitis is lacking in adult population. Aim The present study was chosen to detect P. gingivalis fimA type I genotype among chronic gingivitis patients. Materials and Methods A total of 46 subgingival plaque samples collected from chronic marginal gingivitis (n=23) and chronic periodontitis subjects (control group) (n=23) were subjected to Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction to detect the P. gingivalis fimA type I gene. Statistical analysis was performed using chi-square test. Results Prevalence of P. gingivalis fimA type I gene among chronic periodontitis and chronic gingivitis patients were 8.7% and 30.4% respectively. P. gingivalis fimA type I genotype prevalence was found to be statistically insignificant between the two study groups (p=0.135). Conclusion The avirulent P. gingivalis fimA type I genotype, occurred in high prevalence among chronic gingivitis patients, while its presence was low in chronic periodontitis patients. Presence of this avirulent genotype in chronic marginal gingivitis signifies its reversible condition. PMID:27504406

  20. Evaluation of a new-generation line-probe assay that detects 5' untranslated and core regions to genotype and subtype hepatitis C virus.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Rohan; Khan, G Yasmeen; Miller, Steven A; Brooks, Geo F

    2007-08-01

    The VERSANT HCV Genotype 2.0 Assay (LiPA 2.0; Innogenetics, Ghent, Belgium; distributed by Siemens Medical Solutions Diagnostics, Tarrytown, NY) is a new-generation line-probe assay that simultaneously detects sequences in the 5' untranslated (5'UTR) and core regions to genotype and subtype hepatitis C virus (HCV). We tested 60 specimens of known genotype and subtype and 2 specimens with mixed infections with the LiPA 2.0 assay. After arbitration based on genotype and subtype determined by sequencing, there was concordance in 58 of 60 specimens (specificity, 96.7%). Computer-assisted typing yielded comparable results, but much more rapidly. Of 67 clinical specimens, 64 readily yielded genotype and subtype; 3 indeterminate specimens were typed by sequencing and were uncommon types not in the database. The newgeneration line-probe assay that detects the 5'UTR and core regions to genotype and subtype HCV is applicable to more than 95% of specimens. Interpretation is facilitated by computer-assisted analysis.

  1. Detection of Leptospira spp. in wildlife reservoir hosts in Ontario through comparison of immunohistochemical and polymerase chain reaction genotyping methods

    PubMed Central

    Shearer, Karen E.; Harte, Michael J.; Ojkic, Davor; DeLay, Josepha; Campbell, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    A total of 460 kidney samples from wildlife (beavers, coyotes, deer, foxes, opossums, otters, raccoons, skunks) were obtained from road-kill and hunter/trapper donations in Ontario between January 2010 and November 2012. The objectives of the study were to detect Leptospira spp. by immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction (PCR), to map presence of leptospires in wildlife relative to livestock and human populations, and to characterize positive samples by sequencing and comparison to leptospires known to affect domestic animals and humans. The proportion of samples that tested positive ranged from 0% to 42%, with the highest rates in skunks and raccoons. Leptospira spp. were present in kidneys of wildlife across Ontario, particularly in areas of high human density, and areas in which livestock populations are abundant. The PCR was too weak in most samples to permit genotyping and examination of the relationship between the leptospires found in this study and those affecting domestic animals and humans. PMID:24587507

  2. Limitations of vitek GPS-418 cards in exact detection of vancomycin-resistant enterococci with the vanB genotype.

    PubMed

    Okabe, T; Oana, K; Kawakami, Y; Yamaguchi, M; Takahashi, Y; Okimura, Y; Honda, T; Katsuyama, T

    2000-06-01

    The susceptibilities of 20 strains of vancomycin-resistant enterococci (VRE) with the vanB genotype obtained by using Vitek GPS-418 cards were compared with those obtained by the broth dilution method of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) (approved standard M7-A4) and with those obtained by the agar screen method using bile esculin azide agar containing 6 microgram of vancomycin per ml. Although both the broth dilution and agar screen methods disclosed no discordance, Vitek GPS-418 cards yielded a very major error compared with the results obtained by the reference broth dilution method of the NCCLS. Vitek GPS-418 cards were therefore found to have considerable room for improvement for the accurate detection of vanB VRE strains.

  3. Molecular epidemiology of group A rotavirus among children admitted to hospital in Salto, Uruguay, 2011-2012: first detection of the emerging genotype G12.

    PubMed

    Tort, Luis Fernando López; Victoria, Matías; Lizasoain A, Andrés; Castells, Matías; Maya, Leticia; Gómez, Mariela Martínez; Arreseigor, Edit; López, Patricia; Cristina, Juan; Leite, Jose Paulo Gagliardi; Colina, Rodney

    2015-05-01

    Group A rotavirus (RVA) is the most important etiologic agent of infant acute gastroenteritis (AGE) worldwide. Detection and molecular characterization of RVA in Salto department, Northwestern region of Uruguay, was conducted on 175 clinical samples, being 153 stool and 22 vomit samples, collected from hospitalized children with AGE, between 0-15 years old, from two hospitals of Salto city during 2011 and 2012. RVA was detected and genotyped by seminested multiplex RT-PCR in order to determine G- and P-genotypes. Positive samples were sequenced and phylogenetic analyses were carried out in order to determine lineages and sub-lineages. RVA were detected in 64 (37%) of the samples and the G and P genotypes observed were: 6% G1P[8], 23% G2P[4]/G2P[X]/GXP[4], 23% G3P[8]/G3P[X], 14% G12P[8]/G12P[X], 16% GXP[8], 1,5% G12P[9], 3% G2P[4]/[8], and 16% non-typeable. VP7 and VP4 genotypes related to DS-1 like gene constellation were prevalent during 2011 and those VP7 and VP4 genotypes related to Wa-like constellation were prevalent during 2012 (mainly represented by G3P[8]). Interestingly, RVA was detected in vomit samples in a high prevalence (41%). RVA was observed mainly in the age group between 1 and 5 years old (75% of the cases), and seasonality with a high detection rate in winter season was observed for the two consecutive years of surveillance. To our knowledge, this study represents the first detection and molecular characterization of RVA in Salto department, Northwestern region of Uruguay; and the first identification of the emerging genotype G12 in the country.

  4. Whole genome analysis of porcine astroviruses detected in Japanese pigs reveals genetic diversity and possible intra-genotypic recombination.

    PubMed

    Ito, Mika; Kuroda, Moegi; Masuda, Tsuneyuki; Akagami, Masataka; Haga, Kei; Tsuchiaka, Shinobu; Kishimoto, Mai; Naoi, Yuki; Sano, Kaori; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Katayama, Yukie; Oba, Mami; Aoki, Hiroshi; Ichimaru, Toru; Mukono, Itsuro; Ouchi, Yoshinao; Yamasato, Hiroshi; Shirai, Junsuke; Katayama, Kazuhiko; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Nagai, Makoto

    2017-02-09

    Porcine astroviruses (PoAstVs) are ubiquitous enteric virus of pigs that are distributed in several countries throughout the world. Since PoAstVs are detected in apparent healthy pigs, the clinical significance of infection is unknown. However, AstVs have recently been associated with a severe neurological disorder in animals, including humans, and zoonotic potential has been suggested. To date, little is known about the epidemiology of PoAstVs among the pig population in Japan. In this report, we present an analysis of nearly complete genomes of 36 PoAstVs detected by a metagenomics approach in the feces of Japanese pigs. Based on a phylogenetic analysis and pairwise sequence comparison, 10, 5, 15, and 6 sequences were classified as PoAstV2, PoAstV3, PoAstV4, and PoAstV5, respectively. Co-infection with two or three strains was found in individual fecal samples from eight pigs. The phylogenetic trees of ORF1a, ORF1b, and ORF2 of PoAstV2 and PoAstV4 showed differences in their topologies. The PoAstV3 and PoAstV5 strains shared high sequence identities within each genotype in all ORFs; however, one PoAstV3 strain and one PoAstV5 strain showed considerable sequence divergence from the other PoAstV3 and PoAstV5 strains, respectively, in ORF2. Recombination analysis using whole genomes revealed evidence of multiple possible intra-genotype recombination events in PoAstV2 and PoAstV4, suggesting that recombination might have contributed to the genetic diversity and played an important role in the evolution of Japanese PoAstVs.

  5. Rapid detection of duck hepatitis A virus genotype C using reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Li, Chuanfeng; Chen, Zongyan; Meng, Chunchun; Liu, Guangqing

    2014-02-01

    A one-step reverse transcription loop-mediated isothermal amplification (RT-LAMP) assay was used and optimized to develop a rapid and sensitive detection system for duck hepatitis A virus genotype C (DHAV-C) RNA. A set of four specific primers was designed against highly conserved sequences located within the 3D gene from DHAV (strain GX1201). Under optimal reaction conditions, the sensitivity of DHAV-C-specific RT-LAMP was 100-fold higher than that of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), with a detection limit of 0.3pg (6.59×10(4) copies) per reaction. No cross-reactivity was observed from the samples of other duck viruses, which is in good accordance with RT-PCR. Furthermore, a positive reaction can be visually inspected by observing turbidity or color change after the addition of SYBR green I dye. The DHAV-C-specific RT-LAMP assay was applied to the samples and compared with RT-PCR. The positive-sample ratios were 26.7% (12 of 45) by RT-LAMP and 20% (9 of 45) by RT-PCR. Therefore, the newly developed RT-LAMP assay is a rapid, specific, sensitive, and cost-effective method of DHAV-C detection. This assay has potential applications in both clinical diagnosis and field surveillance of DHAV-C infection.

  6. Use of genotypic selection to detect P53 codon 273 CGT>CTT transversion: application to an occupationally exposed population.

    PubMed

    Carton, T; Tan, X D; Hartemann, P; Joyeux, M

    2007-01-01

    CGT>CTT transversion in codon 273 of the P53 tumor-suppressor gene is one of the major mutations detected in human tumors. Within an epidemiological framework, we investigated the use of a genotypic selection method to measure this point mutation. The allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (AS-PCR) that was developed was able to detect 10 mutant copies of the gene among a total of 5 x 10(5) wild-type copies. We used this assay to detect CGT>CTT transversions in buccal cell DNA of production workers (n=76) from a viscose factory exposed to carbon disulfide (amongst other pollutants) and in the DNA of non-exposed office workers (n=67). The mutation appeared more frequently in the exposed than in the non-exposed worker who were smokers. The results of the study indicate that occupational exposure results in a significant increase in P53 CGT>CTT transversions and more especially identified occupational exposure in combination with smoking as a significant risk factor for the mutation. We conclude that AS-PCR of the P53 273rd codon transversions is a suitable technique for studying the effects of occupational exposure.

  7. FIRST MOLECULAR DETECTION AND VP7 (G) GENOTYPING OF GROUP A ROTAVIRUS BY SEMI-NESTED RT-PCR FROM SEWAGE IN NIGERIA

    PubMed Central

    MOTAYO, Babatunde Olanrewaju; ADENIJI, Adekunle Johnson; FANEYE, Adedayo Omotayo

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Rotavirus is the leading cause of viral gastroenteritis worldwide, and sewage is a major source of the virus dissemination in the environment. Our aim was to detect and genotype rotaviruses from sewages in Nigeria. One hundred and ninety sewage samples were collected between June 2014 and January 2015. The two phase concentration method using PEG 6000 and dextran was used to concentrate sewage samples following WHO protocols. Molecular detection was performed by RT-PCR, and VP7 genotyping by semi-nested multiplex PCR. A total of 14.2% (n = 27) samples tested positive. Monthly distribution showed that June to September had a lower rate (3.7% to 7.4%), while October to January recorded 11% to 26%. Genotype G1 predominated followed by G8, G9, G4 and lastly G2, 7.4% (n = 2) of isolates were nontypeable. This is the first report of rotavirus detection in sewages from Nigeria. Genotype G1 remains the most prevalent genotype. This observation calls for an effort by the governmental authorities to implement a molecular surveillance, both clinical and environmental, in order to provide vital information for the control and the vaccine efficacy not only in Nigeria, but globally. PMID:27828615

  8. A new molecular diagnostic tool for quantitatively detecting and genotyping “Candidatus Liberibacter species”

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new molecular diagnostic method was developed for quantitative detection of “Candidatus Liberibacter” species associated with citrus Huanglongbing (“Ca. Liberibacter asiaticus”, “Ca. Liberibacter africanus” and “Ca. Liberibacter americanus”) and potato zebra chip disorder (“Ca. Liberibacter solana...

  9. Sensitive detection of multiple hepatitis A virus genotypes with a single polony-based assay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hepatitis A virus (HAV) is one of the major causes of non-bacterial gastroenteritis in humans worldwide. HAV is mostly transmitted via direct person-to-person contact, or by consumption of contaminated foods and water. Since only a few viral particles may cause disease, detection of low levels of HA...

  10. International Collaborative Study To Compare Reverse Transcriptase PCR Assays for Detection and Genotyping of Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Vinjé, Jan; Vennema, Harry; Maunula, Leena; von Bonsdorff, Carl-Henrik; Hoehne, Marina; Schreier, Eckart; Richards, Alison; Green, Jon; Brown, David; Beard, Suzanne S.; Monroe, Stephan S.; de Bruin, Erwin; Svensson, Lennart; Koopmans, Marion P. G.

    2003-01-01

    To allow more rapid and internationally standardized assessment of the spread of noroviruses (previously called Norwalk-like viruses [NLVs]) as important food-borne pathogens, harmonization of methods for their detection is needed. Diagnosis of NLVs in clinical diagnostic laboratories is usually performed by reverse transciptase PCR (RT-PCR) assays. In the present study, the performance of five different RT-PCR assays for the detection of NLVs was evaluated in an international collaborative study by five laboratories in five countries with a coded panel of 91 fecal specimens. The assays were tested for their sensitivity, detection limit, and ease of standardization. In total, NLVs could be detected by at least one RT-PCR assay in 69 (84%) of the samples that originally tested positive. Sensitivity ranged from 52 to 73% overall and from 54 to 100% and 58 to 85% for genogroup I and II viruses, respectively. In all, 64% of the false-negative results were obtained with a set of diluted stools (n = 20) that may have lost quality upon storage. Sensitivity was improved when these samples were excluded from analysis. No one single assay stood out as the best, although the p1 assay demonstrated the most satisfactory overall performance. To promote comparability of data, this assay will be recommended for newly starting groups in future collaborative studies. PMID:12682125

  11. Performance evaluation of Anyplex™II HPV28 detection kit in a routine diagnostic setting: comparison with the HPV Sign® Genotyping Test.

    PubMed

    Marcuccilli, Fabbio; Farchi, Francesca; Mirandola, Walter; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Paba, Pierpaolo; Bonanno, Elena; Perno, Carlo Federico; Ciotti, Marco

    2015-06-01

    Anyplex™II HPV28 is a new PCR assay designed for HPV genotyping. It can detect 28 HPV types including 19 high-risk and 9 low-risk types. This study evaluated the performance of Anyplex™II HPV28 on 123 fresh cervical samples screened in parallel with HPV Sign® Genotyping Test. Of the 123 samples screened, 93 were positive, 15 negative, and 15 discordant. The total number of HPV positive samples combined was 108: 38 single infections and 70 multiple infections. The agreement between the two tests was 87.8%, κ=0.592. Genotype specific agreement was strong for HPV 16 (k=0.761), HPV 18 (k=0.674), and HPV 35 (k=0.796). Sensitivity and specificity of Anyplex™II HPV28 assay using HPV Sign® Genotyping Test as reference was 84.8% and 94%; conversely, sensitivity and specificity of HPV Sign® Genotyping Test was 29% and 99.5%. Anyplex™II HPV28 assay is a sensitive and specific assay suitable for HPV genotyping but requires clinical validation.

  12. Molecular detection and genotyping of Japanese Encephalitis Virus in mosquitoes during a 2010 outbreak in the Republic of Korea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Seo, Hyun-Ji; Kim, Heung Chul; Klein, Terry A.; Ramey, Andrew M.; Lee, Ji-Hyee; Kyung, Soon-Goo; Park, Jee-Yong; Cho, In-Soo; Yeh, Jung-Yong

    2013-01-01

    Japanese encephalitis virus (JEV), a mosquito-borne zoonotic pathogen, is one of the major causes of viral encephalitis. To reduce the impact of Japanese encephalitis among children in the Republic of Korea (ROK), the government established a mandatory vaccination program in 1967. Through the efforts of this program only 0-7 (mean 2.1) cases of Japanese encephalitis were reported annually in the ROK during the period of 1984-2009. However, in 2010 there was an outbreak of 26 confirmed cases of Japanese encephalitis, including 7 deaths. This represented a >12-fold increase in the number of confirmed cases of Japanese encephalitis in the ROK as compared to the mean number reported over the last 26 years and a 3.7-fold increase over the highest annual number of cases during this same period (7 cases). Surveillance of adult mosquitoes was conducted during the 2010 outbreak of Japanese encephalitis in the ROK. A total of 6,328 culicine mosquitoes belonging to 12 species from 5 genera were collected at 6 survey sites from June through October 2010 and assayed by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) for the presence of JEV. A total of 34/371 pooled samples tested positive for JEV (29/121 Culex tritaeniorhynchus, 4/64 Cx. pipiens, and 1/26 Cx. bitaeniorhynchus) as confirmed by sequencing of the pre-membrane and envelope protein coding genes. The maximum likelihood estimates of JEV positive individuals per 1,000 culicine vectors for Cx. tritaeniorhynchus, Cx. pipiens, and Cx. bitaeniorhynchus were 11.8, 5.6, and 2.8, respectively. Sequences of the JEV pre-membrane and envelope protein coding genes amplified from the culicine mosquitoes by RT-PCR were compared with those of JEV genotypes I-V. Phylogenetic analyses support the detection of a single genotype (I) among samples collected from the ROK in 2010.

  13. High-resolution melting analysis for detection of a single-nucleotide polymorphism and the genotype of the myostatin gene in warmblood horses.

    PubMed

    Serpa, Priscila B S; Garbade, Petra; Natalini, Cláudio C; Pires, Ananda R; Tisotti, Tainor M

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To develop a high-resolution melting (HRM) assay to detect the g.66493737C>T polymorphism in the myostatin gene (MSTN) and determine the frequency of 3 previously defined g.66493737 genotypes (T/T, T/C, and C/C) in warmblood horses. SAMPLES Blood samples from 23 horses. PROCEDURES From each blood sample, DNA was extracted and analyzed by standard PCR methods and an HRM assay to determine the MSTN genotype. Three protocols (standard protocol, protocol in which a high-salt solution was added to the reaction mixture before the first melting cycle, and protocol in which an unlabeled probe was added to the reaction mixture before analysis) for the HRM assay were designed and compared. Genotype results determined by the HRM protocol that generated the most consistent melting curves were compared with those determined by sequencing. RESULTS The HRM protocol in which an unlabeled probe was added to the reaction mixture generated the most consistent melting curves. The genotypes of the g.66493737C>T polymorphism were determined for 22 horses (16 by HRM analysis and 20 by sequencing); 14, 7, and 1 had the T/T, T/C, and C/C genotypes, respectively. The genotype determined by HRM analysis agreed with that determined by sequencing for 14 of 16 horses. The frequency of alleles T and C was 79.5% and 20.5%, respectively. CONCLUSIONS AND CLINICAL RELEVANCE Results indicated that HRM analysis may be a faster and more economical alternative than PCR methods for genotyping. Genotyping results might be useful as predictors of athletic performance for horses.

  14. Phenotypic and genotypic detection of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus in hunting dogs in Maiduguri metropolitan, Borno State, Nigeria

    PubMed Central

    Mustapha, Muhammad; Bukar-Kolo, Yachilla Maryam; Geidam, Yaqub Ahmed; Gulani, Isa Adamu

    2016-01-01

    Aim: To determine the presence of MRSA in hunting dogs in Maiduguri metropolitan. Materials and Methods: Phenotypic methods used includes microscopic technique, colony morphology study, catalase-coagulase tests, and the use of mannitol salt agar test, oxacillin resistance screening agar base, and antibiotic susceptibility testing methods. Genotypic approach was used for deoxyribonucleic acid extraction, and the presence of nuc and mecA gene was detected using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. Results: Examination of 416 swab samples from nasal and perineal region of dogs revealed a total of 79.5% of S. aureus, where 62.5% of the isolates were MRSA. Molecular analysis revealed that 7nuc genes specific for S. aureus from 20 presumptive MRSA assay were all mecA PCR negative. The isolates were sensitive to gentamicin and ciprofloxacin but proved resistant to cefoxitin and oxacillin. Conclusion: High isolation rate of MRSA was found in hunting dogs. Significant level (p<0.05) of MRSA was isolated in the nasal cavity of hunting dogs than its perineum. Only nuc genes were detected from the MRSA isolates. PMID:27284227

  15. Detection and differentiation of human papillomavirus genotypes HPV-6 and HPV-11 by FRET-based real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Kocjan, Bostjan J; Seme, Katja; Poljak, Mario

    2008-11-01

    A real-time PCR (RT-PCR) assay was developed based on fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) hybridization probe technology, allowing very sensitive and specific detection of HPV-6 and HPV-11, reliable differentiation of HPV-6 and HPV-11, as well as prototypic and non-prototypic HPV-6 genomic variants, in a single PCR reaction. The primers and probe were designed on the basis of multiple alignments of 74 HPV-6 E2 gene sequences and 20 HPV-11 E2 gene sequences. Testing on defined plasmid standards showed that the RT-PCR allowed simple and reliable identification of HPV-6 and HPV-11 using type specific amplification followed by probe-specific post-amplification dissociation analysis. Sensitivity, assessed by probit analysis at a 95% detection level, was 42.9, 43.4, and 25.3 DNA copies per assay for prototypic and non-prototypic HPV-6 variants and HPV-11, respectively. The results obtained by the developed assay on 51 HPV DNA-negative samples and 149 HPV DNA-positive samples, including 81 HPV-6 positive samples (19 prototypic and 62 non-prototypic HPV-6 variants), 28 HPV-11 positive samples, 10 samples of HPV-44 and HPV-74 (the closest relatives of HPV-6 and HPV-11) and 30 samples of 15 other important alpha HPV, showed complete agreement with those obtained with the INNO-LiPA human papillomavirus (HPV) Genotyping Assay and HPV-6 E2 and E6 gene sequencing.

  16. Development of a Rapid High-Throughput Method for High-Resolution Melting Analysis for Routine Detection and Genotyping of Noroviruses▿

    PubMed Central

    Tajiri-Utagawa, Etsuko; Hara, Masayuki; Takahashi, Kuniaki; Watanabe, Mayumi; Wakita, Takaji

    2009-01-01

    We developed a simple, rapid, high-throughput detection and genotyping method for noroviruses using real-time reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR) and high-resolution melting (HRM) analysis to create a difference plot. The capsid gene was amplified by real-time RT-PCR in the presence of ResoLight HRM dye, a saturating DNA dye. Following optimization of the HRM assay conditions, the major norovirus genotypes were selected. Because we had only small quantities of the patient stool samples used in this study, we constructed plasmids for each genotype and used these to optimize the HRM assay. We selected six stool samples, each positive for one of the six dominant subtypes of noroviruses that have been circulating in Japan, namely, genotypes 4, 8, and 9 from genogroup 1 and genotypes 3, 4, and 10 from genogroup 2. The specific high-resolution derivate plot of the HRM assay for each plasmid was constructed by subtracting the melting-curve shape of the plasmid from the reference or base curve. The RNAs extracted from 14 clinical samples positive for small round structured viruses were then directly analyzed using the HRM assay. The HRM data from the clinical RNA samples corresponded with the genotype results obtained by RT-PCR and sequencing of the clinical samples. In addition, the HRM data from the clinical RNA samples corresponded with the HRM data from the six reference plasmid DNAs, indicating that this assay is useful for the direct detection and genotyping of noroviruses in clinical samples. This assay requires no multiplexing or hybridization probes and provides a new approach to the genetic screening of noroviruses in clinical virology laboratories. PMID:19073870

  17. Application of DNA-DNA colony hybridization to the detection of catabolic genotypes in environmental samples.

    PubMed Central

    Sayler, G S; Shields, M S; Tedford, E T; Breen, A; Hooper, S W; Sirotkin, K M; Davis, J W

    1985-01-01

    The application of preexisting DNA hybridization techniques was investigated for potential in determining populations of specific gene sequences in environmental samples. Cross-hybridizations among two degradative plasmids, TOL and NAH, and two cloning vehicles, pLAFR1 and RSF1010, were determined. The detection limits for the TOL plasmid against a nonhomologous plasmid-bearing bacterial background was ascertained. The colony hybridization technique allowed detection of one colony containing TOL plasmid among 10(6) Escherichia coli colonies of nonhomologous DNA. Comparisons between population estimates derived from growth on selective substrates and from hybridizations were examined. Findings indicated that standard sole carbon source enumeration procedures for degradative populations lead to overestimations due to nonspecific growth of other bacteria on the microcontaminant carbon sources present in the media. Population estimates based on the selective growth of a microcosm population on two aromatic substrates (toluene and naphthalene) and estimates derived from DNA-DNA colony hybridizations, using the TOL or NAH plasmid as a probe, corresponded with estimates of substrate mineralization rates and past exposure to environmental contaminants. The applications of such techniques are hoped to eventually allow enumeration of any specific gene sequences in the environment, including both anabolic and catabolic genes. In addition, this procedure should prove useful in monitoring recombinant DNA clones released into environmental situations. Images PMID:4004244

  18. A finite mixture model for genotype and environment interactions: detecting latent population heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Gillespie, Nathan A; Neale, Michael C

    2006-06-01

    Approaches such as DeFries-Fulker extremes regression (LaBuda et al., 1986) are commonly used in genetically informative studies to assess whether familial resemblance varies as a function of the scores of pairs of twins. While useful for detecting such effects, formal modeling of differences in variance components as a function of pairs' trait scores is rarely attempted. We therefore present a finite mixture model which specifies that the population consists of latent groups which may differ in (i) their means, and (ii) the relative impact of genetic and environmental factors on within-group variation and covariation. This model may be considered as a special case of a factor mixture model, which combines the features of a latent class model with those of a latent trait model. Various models for the class membership of twin pairs may be employed, including additive genetic, common environment, specific environment or major locus (QTL) factors. Simulation results based on variance components derived from Turkheimer and colleagues (2003), illustrate the impact of factors such as the difference in group means and variance components on the feasibility of correctly estimating the parameters of the mixture model. Model-fitting analyses estimated group heritability as .49, which is significantly greater than heritability for the rest of the population in early childhood. These results suggest that factor mixture modeling is sufficiently robust for detecting heterogeneous populations even when group mean differences are modest.

  19. AN EVALUATION OF CRYPTOSPORIDIUM PARVUM GENOTYPING

    EPA Science Inventory

    We evaluated the specificity and sensitivity of 11 previously described species differentiation and genotyping PCR protocols for detection of Cryptosporidium parasites. Genomic DNA from three species of Crytosporidium parasites (genotype 1 and genotype 2 of C. parvum, C. muris, a...

  20. Differential Detection of Human Papillomavirus Genotypes and Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia by Four Commercial Assays

    PubMed Central

    Bonde, Jesper; Preisler, Sarah; Ejegod, Ditte; Rygaard, Carsten; Lynge, Elsebeth

    2016-01-01

    Laboratories now can choose from >100 human papillomavirus (HPV) assays for cervical screening. Our previous analysis based on the data from the Danish Horizon study, however, showed that four widely used assays, Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), cobas, CLART, and Aptima, frequently do not detect the same HPV infections. Here, we determined the characteristics of the concordant samples (all four assays returning a positive HPV test result) and discordant samples (all other HPV-positive samples) in primary cervical screening at 30 to 65 years of age (n = 2,859) and in a concurrent referral population from the same catchment area (n = 885). HPV testing followed the manufacturers' protocols. Women with abnormal cytology were managed according to the routine recommendations. Cytology-normal/HPV-positive women were invited for repeated testing in 18 months. Screening history and histologically confirmed cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) in 2.5 years after the baseline testing were determined from the national pathology register. HPV-positive women undergoing primary screening having concordant samples were more likely to harbor high-risk infections and less likely to harbor only low-risk infections than women with discordant samples. Additionally, assay signal strengths were substantially higher in concordant samples. More than 80% of ≥CIN2 results were found for women with concordant samples, and no ≥CIN2 results were found when the infection was detected by only one assay. These patterns were similar in the referral population despite the younger age and higher number of HPV infections. HPV test result discordance identified a cluster of low-risk HPV infections that were hardly ever associated with high-grade CIN and, almost exclusively, represented false-positive screening findings. PMID:27535689

  1. Detection of Common, Emerging and Uncommon VP4, and VP7 Human Group A Rotavirus Genotypes from Urban Sewage Samples in Uruguay.

    PubMed

    Tort, Luis Fernando Lopez; Victoria, Matías; Lizasoain, Andrés; García, Mariana; Berois, Mabel; Cristina, Juan; Leite, José Paulo Gagliardi; Gómez, Mariela Martínez; Miagostovich, Marize Pereira; Colina, Rodney

    2015-12-01

    Environmental approach has proven to be a useful tool for epidemiological studies demonstrating through environmental studies the diversity of viruses circulating in a given population. The aim of this study was to perform a phylogenetic characterization of the group A rotavirus (RVA) glycoprotein (G)- and protease-sensitive (P)-genotypes obtained from sewage samples (n = 116) collected in six cities of Uruguay during March 2011 to April 2013. A worldwide standardized semi-nested multiplex RT-PCR (SNM RT-PCR) protocol directed against VP4 and VP7 genes were conducted for RVA detection and consensual DNA fragments were submitted to nucleotide sequencing. P and/or G genotype was successfully determined by phylogenetic analysis in 61% (n = 37) of the positive samples obtained by SNM RT-PCR (n = 61). The RVA genotypes were as follow: G1 (n = 2), G2 (n = 14), G3 (n = 5), G12 (n = 2), P[4] (n = 4), P[8] (n = 16), and P[3] (n = 2). Interestingly, through phylogenetic analysis, emerging, and uncommon human genotypes could be detected. Results obtained from the comparison of RVA genotypes detected in the current study and Uruguayan RVA strains previously described for contemporary clinical pediatric cases showed that monitoring sewage may be a good screening option for a rapid and economical overview of the circulating genotypes in the surrounding human population and a useful approximation to study RVA epidemiology in a future vaccine monitoring program. The present study represents the first report in Uruguay that describes the phylogenetic diversity of RVA from urban sewage samples.

  2. Biomedical Information Extraction: Mining Disease Associated Genes from Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Zhong

    2014-01-01

    Disease associated gene discovery is a critical step to realize the future of personalized medicine. However empirical and clinical validation of disease associated genes are time consuming and expensive. In silico discovery of disease associated genes from literature is therefore becoming the first essential step for biomarker discovery to…

  3. Generalist dinoflagellate endosymbionts and host genotype diversity detected from mesophotic (67-100 m depths) coral Leptoseris

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yvonne L; Pochon, Xavier; Fisher, Marla A; Wagner, Daniel; Concepcion, Gregory T; Kahng, Samuel E; Toonen, Robert J; Gates, Ruth D

    2009-01-01

    Background Mesophotic corals (light-dependent corals in the deepest half of the photic zone at depths of 30 - 150 m) provide a unique opportunity to study the limits of the interactions between corals and endosymbiotic dinoflagellates in the genus Symbiodinium. We sampled Leptoseris spp. in Hawaii via manned submersibles across a depth range of 67 - 100 m. Both the host and Symbiodinium communities were genotyped, using a non-coding region of the mitochondrial ND5 intron (NAD5) and the nuclear ribosomal internal transcribed spacer region 2 (ITS2), respectively. Results Coral colonies harbored endosymbiotic communities dominated by previously identified shallow water Symbiodinium ITS2 types (C1_ AF333515, C1c_ AY239364, C27_ AY239379, and C1b_ AY239363) and exhibited genetic variability at mitochondrial NAD5. Conclusion This is one of the first studies to examine genetic diversity in corals and their endosymbiotic dinoflagellates sampled at the limits of the depth and light gradients for hermatypic corals. The results reveal that these corals associate with generalist endosymbiont types commonly found in shallow water corals and implies that the composition of the Symbiodinium community (based on ITS2) alone is not responsible for the dominance and broad depth distribution of Leptoseris spp. The level of genetic diversity detected in the coral NAD5 suggests that there is undescribed taxonomic diversity in the genus Leptoseris from Hawaii. PMID:19747389

  4. Familial Case of Pelizaeus-Merzbacher Disorder Detected by Oligoarray Comparative Genomic Hybridization: Genotype-to-Phenotype Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Kariminejad, Roxana; Hosseini, Kaveh; Moshtagh, Azadeh; Abbassi, Gole Maryam; Sadatian, Neda; Bazrgar, Masood; Kariminejad, Ariana; Kariminejad, Mohamad Hassan

    2017-01-01

    Introduction. Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD) is an X-linked recessive hypomyelinating leukodystrophy characterized by nystagmus, spastic quadriplegia, ataxia, and developmental delay. It is caused by mutation in the PLP1 gene. Case Description. We report a 9-year-old boy referred for oligoarray comparative genomic hybridization (OA-CGH) because of intellectual delay, seizures, microcephaly, nystagmus, and spastic paraplegia. Similar clinical findings were reported in his older brother and maternal uncle. Both parents had normal phenotypes. OA-CGH was performed and a 436 Kb duplication was detected and the diagnosis of PMD was made. The mother was carrier of this 436 Kb duplication. Conclusion. Clinical presentation has been accepted as being the mainstay of diagnosis for most conditions. However, recent developments in genetic diagnosis have shown that, in many congenital and sporadic disorders lacking specific phenotypic manifestations, a genotype-to-phenotype approach can be conclusive. In this case, a diagnosis was reached by universal genomic testing, namely, whole genomic array. PMID:28133555

  5. Development and evaluation of a seminested PCR for detection and differentiation of Babesia gibsoni (Asian genotype) and B. canis DNA in canine blood samples.

    PubMed

    Birkenheuer, Adam J; Levy, Michael G; Breitschwerdt, Edward B

    2003-09-01

    Canine babesiosis has recently been recognized as an emerging infectious disease of dogs in North America. We sought to develop a seminested PCR to detect and differentiate Babesia gibsoni (Asian genotype), B. canis subsp. vogeli, B. canis subsp. canis, and B. canis subsp. rossi DNA in canine blood samples. An outer primer pair was designed to amplify an approximately 340-bp fragment of the 18S rRNA genes from B. gibsoni (Asian genotype), B. canis subsp. vogeli, B. canis subsp. rossi, and B. canis subsp. canis but not mammalian DNA. Forward primers were designed that would specifically amplify a smaller fragment from each organism in a seminested PCR. The practical limit of detection was 50 organisms/ml of mock-infected EDTA anticoagulated whole blood. The primer pair also amplified an approximately 370-bp fragment of the B. gibsoni (USA/California genotype) 18S rRNA gene from the blood of an experimentally infected dog with a high percentage of parasitemia. Amplicons were not detected when DNA extracted from the blood of a dog that was naturally infected with Theileria annae at a low percentage of parasitemia was amplified. Due to limited sensitivity, this test is not recommended for the routine diagnosis of B. gibsoni (USA/California genotype) or T. annae. The PCR test did not amplify Toxoplasma gondii, Neospora caninum, Leishmania infantum, Cryptosporidium parvum, or canine DNA under any of the conditions tested. The seminested PCR test was able to detect and discriminate B. gibsoni (Asian genotype), B. canis subsp. vogeli, B. canis subsp. canis, and B. canis subsp. rossi DNA in blood samples from infected dogs.

  6. Oligoclonal bands in the cerebrospinal fluid of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis patients with disease-associated mutations.

    PubMed

    Ticozzi, Nicola; Tiloca, Cinzia; Mencacci, Niccolò E; Morelli, Claudia; Doretti, Alberto; Rusconi, Daniela; Colombrita, Claudia; Sangalli, Davide; Verde, Federico; Finelli, Palma; Messina, Stefano; Ratti, Antonia; Silani, Vincenzo

    2013-01-01

    In amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis is usually performed to exclude inflammatory processes of the central nervous system. Although in a small subset of patients an intrathecal synthesis of IgG is detectable, usually there is no clear explanation for this evidence. This study investigates the occurrence of oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in the CSF of a large series of ALS patients, attempting a correlation with genotype data. CSF was collected from 259 ALS patients. CSF parameters were measured according to standard procedures, and detection of OCBs performed by isoelectric focusing. The patients were screened for mutations in SOD1, FUS, TARDBP, ANG, OPTN, and C9ORF72. We observed the presence of OCBs in the CSF of 9/259 ALS patients (3.5 %), and of disease-associated mutations in 12 cases. OCBs were significantly more frequent in mutation carriers compared to the remaining cohort (3/12 vs 6/247; p < 0.01). Among patients with OCBs, two patients had the TARDBP p.A382T mutation (one of which in homozygous state), and one the ANG p.P-4S variant. Both patients carrying the p.A382T mutation had an atypical phenotype, one of them manifesting signs suggestive of a cerebellar involvement, and the other presenting neuroradiological findings suggestive of an inflammatory disorder of the central nervous system. Our results suggest that ALS patients with OCBs may harbor mutations in disease-causing genes. We speculate that mutations in both TARDBP and ANG genes may disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB), promoting local immune responses and neuroinflammation. The role of mutant TARDBP and ANG genes on BBB integrity of ALS patients warrants further investigation.

  7. Detection of parasitizing coccidia and determination of host crane species, sex and genotype by faecal DNA analysis.

    PubMed

    Honma, H; Suyama, Y; Nakai, Y

    2011-11-01

    In Japan, the three main crane species are the endangered red-crowned crane (Grus japonensis) inhabiting Hokkaido, the northernmost island of Japan; the vulnerable hooded crane (Grus monacha); and the vulnerable white-naped crane (Grus vipio). Both the hooded and white-naped cranes migrate in winter to Izumi in Kyushu, the southern island of Japan. In this study, we investigated the cranes and their coccidian parasites, through a targeted molecular approach using faecal DNA to develop a noninvasive method for infectious disease research. To determine the origin of noninvasively collected faecal samples, host species were identified by sequencing a region of approximately 470 bp of the mitochondrial 16S ribosomal RNA gene in the faecal DNA. Furthermore, to avoid sample redundancy, individual determination was performed by fragment analysis using microsatellite and sex-linked markers. For microsatellite genotyping, previously reported markers and markers isolated in this study were examined, and seven loci for red-crowned cranes, eight for hooded cranes and six for white-naped cranes displayed polymorphisms. A low error rate was demonstrated by comparing microsatellite data generated from faecal DNA samples with that generated from feather DNA samples, indicating a high reliability. Polymerase chain reaction-based capillary electrophoresis (PCR-CE), employing genetic markers in the second internal transcribed spacer (ITS2) of nuclear ribosomal DNA, was employed to detect crane coccidia. The sensitivity of detection of PCR-CE using faecal DNA was inferior to that with traditional microscopy; however, our results suggest that PCR-CE can depict crane coccidia diversity with higher resolution and it is a useful tool to characterize community composition of coccidia in detail.

  8. Detection, genotyping and quantitation of multiple hpv infections in south African women with cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Lebelo, Ramokone L; Bogers, Johannes J; Thys, Sofie; Depuydt, Christophe; Benoy, Ina; Selabe, S Gloria; Bida, Meshack N; Mphahlele, M Jeffrey

    2015-09-01

    In Africa, data is limited on quantitation of human papillomavirus (HPV) types in women with multiple infections. This study applied a real time PCR (qPCR) assay for detection, genotyping and quantitation of multiple HPV infections in 90 tissue blocks of South African women with cervical squamous cell carcinoma. One sample with multiple HPV types was subjected to laser micro-dissection and qPCR. Four samples were negative for β-globin and these were excluded from the analysis. The HPV DNA positivity rate was 93.0% (80/86). All 80 positives showed the presence of HR HPV types; HPV 68 was the only type negative in all the samples. Overall, HPV 16 was positive in most of the samples (88.8%), followed by HPV 56 (28.7%), HPV 18 (20.0%) and HPV 39 (18.7%). More than half of the samples (65.0%) had multiple infections. HPV 16 was present in majority of single (85.7%) and multiple infections (90.4%). HPV 16 showed higher viral loads in 70.3% of the HPV 16 co-infected samples. In one multiple infected sample laser micro-dissection and qPCR identified HPV 18 with higher viral load as the most likely cause of the invasive lesion. There is large number of multiple HPV infections in South African women with cervical squamous cell carcinoma. HPV 16 is the most frequently detected type and often presents with higher viral load, suggesting it could be responsible for pathogenesis of the lesions in the majority of cases.

  9. Highly multiplex and sensitive SNP genotyping method using a three-color fluorescence-labeled ligase detection reaction coupled with conformation-sensitive CE.

    PubMed

    Choi, Woong; Jung, Gyoo Yeol

    2017-02-01

    For the development of clinically useful genotyping methods for SNPs, accuracy, simplicity, sensitivity, and cost-effectiveness are the most important criteria. Among the methods currently being developed for SNP genotyping technology, the ligation-dependent method is considered the simplest for clinical diagnosis. However, sensitivity is not guaranteed by the ligation reaction alone, and analysis of multiple targets is limited by the detection method. Although CE is an attractive alternative to error-prone hybridization-based detection, the multiplex assay process is complicated because of the size-based DNA separation principle. In this study, we employed the ligase detection reaction coupled with high-resolution CE-SSCP to develop an accurate, sensitive, and simple multiplex genotyping method. Ligase detection reaction could amplify ligated products through recurrence of denaturation and ligation reaction, and SSCP could separate these products according to each different structure conformation without size variation. Thus, simple and sensitive SNP analysis can be performed using this method involving the use of similar-sized probes, without complex probe design steps. We found that this method could not only accurately discriminate base mismatches but also quantitatively detect 37 SNPs of the tp53 gene, which are used as targets in multiplex analysis, using three-color fluorescence-labeled probes.

  10. SYBR Green based real-time RT-PCR assay for detection and genotype prediction of bovine noroviruses and assessment of clinical significance in Norway.

    PubMed

    Jor, Evert; Myrmel, Mette; Jonassen, Christine M

    2010-10-01

    A novel SYBR Green based real-time RT-PCR assay for detection of genogroup III bovine noroviruses (BoNoV) was developed and the assay applied to 419 faecal samples from calves with and without diarrhoea. The samples were obtained from 190 Norwegian dairy and beef herds. BoNoV was detected in 49.6% of the samples from 61.1% of the herds indicating that BoNoV is ubiquitous in Norway. The overall prevalence was not significantly different in diarrhoea and non-diarrhoea samples. Analyses of polymerase gene sequences revealed both genotype III/1 and III/2 with genotype III/2 (Newbury2-like) being the most prevalent. Detected capsid sequences were restricted to Newbury2-like and the chimeric Bo/Thirsk10/00/UK strain. The RNA polymerase genotypes of the circulating BoNoVs in Norway were predicted by melting temperature analysis. Additional data from a challenge experiment suggest that a high proportion of young calves are shedding low levels of BoNoV for a prolonged time after recovering from the associated diarrhoea. The findings may explain some of the discrepancies in detection rates from previous studies and explain why some studies have failed to detect significant prevalence differences between calves with and without diarrhoea. It may also shed new light on some epidemiological aspects of norovirus infections.

  11. Comparison of Detection Rate and Mutational Pattern of Drug-Resistant Mutations Between a Large Cohort of Genotype B and Genotype C Hepatitis B Virus-Infected Patients in North China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaodong; Liu, Yan; Xin, Shaojie; Ji, Dong; You, Shaoli; Hu, Jinhua; Zhao, Jun; Wu, Jingjing; Liao, Hao; Zhang, Xin-Xin; Xu, Dongping

    2016-10-28

    The study aimed to investigate the association of prevalent genotypes in China (HBV/C and HBV/B) with HBV drug-resistant mutations. A total of 13,847 nucleos(t)ide analogue (NA)-treated patients with chronic HBV infection from North China were enrolled. HBV genotypes and resistant mutations were determined by direct sequencing and confirmed by clonal sequencing if necessary. HBV/B, HBV/C, and HBV/D occupied 14.3%, 84.9%, and 0.8% across the study population, respectively. NA usage had no significant difference between HBV/B- and HBV/C-infected patients. Lamivudine-resistant mutations were more frequently detected in HBV/C-infected patients, compared with HBV/B-infected patients (31.67% vs. 25.26%, p < 0.01). Adefovir- and entecavir-resistant mutation detection rates were similar, but the mutational pattern was different between the two genotypes. For adefovir-resistant mutations, HBV/C-infected patients had a higher detection rate of rtA181 V (HBV/C 5.29% vs. HBV/B 1.36%, p < 0.01) and a lower detection rate of rtN236T (2.70% vs. 6.54%, p < 0.01). For entecavir-resistant mutations, HBV/C-infected patients had a higher detection rate of rtM204 V/I+T184 substitution or S202G/C (3.66% vs. 2.16%, p < 0.01) and a lower detection rate of rtM204 V/I+M250 V/I/L substitution (0.67% vs. 1.46%, p < 0.01). Multidrug-resistant mutations (defined as coexistence of mutation to nucleoside and nucleotide analogues) were detected in 104 patients. HBV/C-infected patients had a higher detection rate of multidrug-resistant mutation than HBV/B-infected patients (0.83% vs. 0.35%, p < 0.05). The study for the first time clarified that HBV/C-infected patients had a higher risk to develop multidrug-resistant mutations, compared with HBV/B-infected patients; and HBV/C- and HBV/B-infected patients had different inclinations in the ETV-resistant mutational pattern.

  12. [Evaluation of rapid genotype assay for the identification of gram-positive cocci from blood cultures and detection of mecA and van genes].

    PubMed

    Gülhan, Barış; Atmaca, Selahattin; Ozekinci, Tuncer; Suay, Adnan

    2011-10-01

    Rapid and accurate identification of bacterial pathogens grown in blood cultures of patients with sepsis is crucial for prompt initiation of appropriate therapy in order to decrease related morbidity and mortality rates. Although current automated blood culture systems led to a significant improvement in bacterial detection time, more rapid identification systems are still needed to optimise the establishment of treatment. Novel genotype technology which is developed for the rapid diagnosis of sepsis, is a molecular genetic assay based on DNA multiplex amplification with biotinylated primers followed by hybridization to membrane bound probes. The aim of this study was to evaluate the performance of "Genotype® BC gram-positive” test for the identification of gram-positive cocci grown in blood cultures and rapid detection of mecA and van genes. This test uses DNA.STRIP® technology which includes a panel of probes for identification of 17 gram-positive bacterial species and is able to determinate the methicillin and vancomycin resistance mediating genes (mecA and vanA, vanB, vanC1, vanC2/C3) simultaneously, in a single test run. A total of 55 positive blood cultures from BACTECTM Plus/F (Becton Dickinson, USA) aerobic and pediatric blood culture vials were included in the study. The isolates which exhibit gram-positive coccus morphology by Gram staining were identified by Genotype ® BC gram-positive test (Hain Life Science, Germany). All of the samples were also identified with the use of Phoenix PMIC/ID Panel (Becton Dickinson, USA) and antibiotic susceptibilities were determined. Of the 55 blood culture isolates, 17 were identified as Staphylococcus epidermidis [all were methicillin-resistant (MR)], 9 were S.aureus (one was MR), 18 were S.hominis (10 were MR), 4 were E.faecalis, 3 were E. faecium (one was vanconycin-resistant), 2 were S.saprophyticus (one was MR), 1 was S.warneri and 1 was S.haemolyticus, by Phoenix automated system. Genotype® BC gram

  13. Detection of a new subgenotype of hepatitis B virus genotype A in Cameroon but not in neighbouring Nigeria.

    PubMed

    Hübschen, J M; Mbah, P O; Forbi, J C; Otegbayo, J A; Olinger, C M; Charpentier, E; Muller, C P

    2011-01-01

    To further investigate the genetic diversity of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genotype A in Africa, we analysed 263 HBV strains from Nigeria (n=163) and Cameroon (n=100). Phylogenetic analysis of S fragment sequences attributed 175 strains (66.5%) to genotype E and 88 (33.5%) to genotype A. In Cameroon, genotype A strains were the most prevalent (79/100, 79.0%), whereas, in Nigeria, genotype E was highly dominant (154/163, 94.5%). The genotype A strains grouped with reference strains of subgenotype A3 (n=8), the provisional subgenotype A5 (n=43), a recently reported new variant from Rwanda (n=35), or as outliers (n=2). Ten complete genome sequences obtained from strains that clustered with the new variant from Rwanda formed a separate group supported by a bootstrap value of 96. The between-group distance to other potential or recognized subgenotypes of genotype A was at least 3.81%. Thus, the new group of strains could be considered as a new subgenotype of HBV genotype A, tentatively named 'A7'. Interestingly, the 'A7' strains from Rwanda and Cameroon showed an interspersed clustering, but essentially no other (sub)genotypes were shared between the two countries, suggesting that 'A7' may have evolved in a yet unknown place and may have only relatively recently spread to Rwanda and Western Cameroon. Strains attributed to provisional subgenotype A5 were found for the first time in Cameroon (n=36) and Central Nigeria (n=2), indicating that A5 is more widespread than previously thought.

  14. Collective judgment predicts disease-associated single nucleotide variants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In recent years the number of human genetic variants deposited into the publicly available databases has been increasing exponentially. The latest version of dbSNP, for example, contains ~50 million validated Single Nucleotide Variants (SNVs). SNVs make up most of human variation and are often the primary causes of disease. The non-synonymous SNVs (nsSNVs) result in single amino acid substitutions and may affect protein function, often causing disease. Although several methods for the detection of nsSNV effects have already been developed, the consistent increase in annotated data is offering the opportunity to improve prediction accuracy. Results Here we present a new approach for the detection of disease-associated nsSNVs (Meta-SNP) that integrates four existing methods: PANTHER, PhD-SNP, SIFT and SNAP. We first tested the accuracy of each method using a dataset of 35,766 disease-annotated mutations from 8,667 proteins extracted from the SwissVar database. The four methods reached overall accuracies of 64%-76% with a Matthew's correlation coefficient (MCC) of 0.38-0.53. We then used the outputs of these methods to develop a machine learning based approach that discriminates between disease-associated and polymorphic variants (Meta-SNP). In testing, the combined method reached 79% overall accuracy and 0.59 MCC, ~3% higher accuracy and ~0.05 higher correlation with respect to the best-performing method. Moreover, for the hardest-to-define subset of nsSNVs, i.e. variants for which half of the predictors disagreed with the other half, Meta-SNP attained 8% higher accuracy than the best predictor. Conclusions Here we find that the Meta-SNP algorithm achieves better performance than the best single predictor. This result suggests that the methods used for the prediction of variant-disease associations are orthogonal, encoding different biologically relevant relationships. Careful combination of predictions from various resources is therefore a good strategy

  15. PennCNV: An integrated hidden Markov model designed for high-resolution copy number variation detection in whole-genome SNP genotyping data

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Kai; Li, Mingyao; Hadley, Dexter; Liu, Rui; Glessner, Joseph; Grant, Struan F.A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Bucan, Maja

    2007-01-01

    Comprehensive identification and cataloging of copy number variations (CNVs) is required to provide a complete view of human genetic variation. The resolution of CNV detection in previous experimental designs has been limited to tens or hundreds of kilobases. Here we present PennCNV, a hidden Markov model (HMM) based approach, for kilobase-resolution detection of CNVs from Illumina high-density SNP genotyping data. This algorithm incorporates multiple sources of information, including total signal intensity and allelic intensity ratio at each SNP marker, the distance between neighboring SNPs, the allele frequency of SNPs, and the pedigree information where available. We applied PennCNV to genotyping data generated for 112 HapMap individuals; on average, we detected ∼27 CNVs for each individual with a median size of ∼12 kb. Excluding common rearrangements in lymphoblastoid cell lines, the fraction of CNVs in offspring not detected in parents (CNV-NDPs) was 3.3%. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of whole-genome fine-mapping of CNVs via high-density SNP genotyping. PMID:17921354

  16. Construction and applications of DNA probes for detection of polychlorinated biphenyl-degrading genotypes in toxic organic-contaminated soil environments

    SciTech Connect

    Walia, S.; Khan, A.; Rosenthal, N. )

    1990-01-01

    Several DNA probes for polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB)-degrading genotypes were constructed from PCB-degrading bacteria. These laboratory-engineered DNA probes were used for the detection, enumeration, and isolation of specific bacteria degrading PCBs. Dot blot analysis of purified DNA from toxic organic chemical-contaminated soil bacterial communities showed positive DNA-DNA hybridization with a 32P-labeled DNA probe (pAW6194, cbpABCD). Less than 1% of bacterial colonies isolated from garden topsoil and greater than 80% of bacteria isolated from PCB-contaminated soils showed DNA homologies with 32P-labeled DNA probes. Some of the PCB-degrading bacterial isolates detected by the DNA probe method did not show biphenyl clearance. The DNA probe method was found to detect additional organisms with greater genetic potential to degrade PCBs than the biphenyl clearance method did. Results from this study demonstrate the usefulness of DNA probes in detecting specific PCB-degrading bacteria, abundance of PCB-degrading genotypes, and genotypic diversity among PCB-degrading bacteria in toxic chemical-polluted soil environments. We suggest that the DNA probe should be used with caution for accurate assessment of PCB-degradative capacity within soils and further recommend that a combination of DNA probe and biodegradation assay be used to determine the abundance of PCB-degrading bacteria in the soil bacterial community.

  17. Development and evaluation of a real-time RT-qPCR for detection of Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever virus representing different genotypes.

    PubMed

    Jääskeläinen, Anne J; Kallio-Kokko, Hannimari; Ozkul, Aykut; Bodur, Hurrem; Korukruoglu, Gulay; Mousavi, Mehrdad; Pranav, Patel; Vaheri, Antti; Mirazimi, Ali; Vapalahti, Olli

    2014-12-01

    Crimean-Congo hemorrhagic fever (CCHF) is a zoonotic disease caused by a nairovirus belonging to family Bunyaviridae. The CCHF virus (CCHFV) can be transmitted to humans by Hyalomma ticks as well as by direct contact with infected body fluids or tissues from viremic livestock or humans. Our aim was to set up a fast RT-qPCR for detection of the different CCHFV genotypes in clinical samples, including an inactivation step to make the sample handling possible in lower biosafety levels (BSL) than BSL-4. This method was evaluated against commercial reference assays and international External Quality Assessment (EQA) samples. The analytical limit of detection for the developed CCHFV-S RT-qPCR was 11 CCHFV genomes per reaction. After exclusion of four dubious samples, we studied 38 CCHFV-positive samples (using reference tests) of which 38 were found positive by CCHFV-S RT-qPCR, suggesting a sensitivity of 100%. CCHFV-S RT q-PCR detected all eight different CCHFV strains representing five different CCHFV genotypes. In conclusion, the CCHFV-S RT-qPCR described in this study was evaluated using various sources of CCHFV samples and shown to be an accurate tool to detect human CCHFV infection caused by different genotypes of the virus.

  18. Hepatitis C virus long-term persistence in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in patients with haemophilia. Detection of occult genotype 1.

    PubMed

    Parodi, C; García, G; Monzani, M C; Culasso, A; Aloisi, N; Corti, M; Campos, R; de E de Bracco, M M; Baré, P

    2015-07-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from chronic hepatitis C virus-infected persons can harbour viral variants that are not detected in plasma samples. We explored the presence and persistence of HCV genotypes in plasma and PBMC cultures from 25 HCV-monoinfected and 25 HIV/HCV-coinfected patients with haemophilia. Cell cultures were performed at different time points between 1993 and 2010-2011, and the HCV genome was examined in culture supernatants. Sequential plasma samples were studied during the same time period. Analysing sequential plasma samples, 21% of patients had mixed-genotype infections, while 50% had mixed infections determined from PBMC culture supernatants. HIV coinfection was significantly associated with the presence of mixed infections (OR = 4.57, P = 0.02; 95% CI = 1.38-15.1). In our previous study, genotype 1 was found in 72% of 288 patients of this cohort. Similar results were obtained with the sequential plasma samples included in this study, 69% had genotype 1. However, when taking into account plasma samples and the results from PBMC supernatants, genotype 1 was identified in 94% of the population. The PBMC-associated variants persisted for 10 years in some subjects, emphasizing their role as long-term reservoirs. The presence of genotype 1 in PBMC may be associated with therapeutic failure and should not be disregarded when treating haemophilic patients who have been infected by contaminated factor concentrates. The clinical implications of persistent lymphotropic HCV variants deserve further examination among multiple exposed groups of HCV-infected patients.

  19. Molecular Detection and Genotyping of Coxiella-Like Endosymbionts in Ticks that Infest Horses in South Korea

    PubMed Central

    Seo, Min-Goo; Lee, Seung-Hun; Ouh, In-Ohk; Lee, Gwang Hyeop; Goo, Youn-Kyoung; Kim, Seungjoon; Kwon, Oh-Deog

    2016-01-01

    Members of the genus Coxiella can be transmitted from ticks to humans during contact with animals; Coxiella may thus spread from the infected horses or ticks to humans. In this study, the presence of Coxiella burnetii and Coxiella-like endosymbionts (CLE) in ticks found on infested horses was determined using PCR and genotyping. A total of 213 ticks were randomly collected from 51 horses (4–5 ticks per horse) raised on Jeju Island, Korea, between 2009 and 2013. All ticks were morphologically identified as adult Haemaphysalis longicornis, a predominant tick species widespread in Korea. Based on the results of nested PCR and 16S rRNA sequencing, CLE were detected in 121 (52.4%, 95% CI: 45.9–58.8) ticks. CLE 16S rRNA sequences from 9 randomly selected ticks were 100% identical. Phylogenetic analysis showed that these 9 sequences were highly similar (97.9–100%) to the sequences of clade B species, like the CLE previously described to be found in Haemaphysalis spp. This study showed that CLE are prevalent in ticks that infest horses reared on Jeju Island, and this is, to the best of our knowledge, the first study to describe CLE occurrence in ticks infesting animals reared in Korea. Because of the high prevalence of CLE in ticks found on horses, CLE transmission from ticks to other animals and humans remains a possibility. This warrants a detailed study of other hosts and regions. Considering the zoonotic potential of Coxiella, further strategic surveillance of Coxiella transmission is necessary. PMID:27792764

  20. A simple and rapid genotyping assay for simultaneous detection of two ADRB2 allelic variants using fluorescence resonance energy transfer probes and melting curve analysis.

    PubMed

    Sábato, M Fernanda; Irani, Anne-Marie; Bukaveckas, Bonny L; Schwartz, Lawrence B; Wilkinson, David S; Ferreira-Gonzalez, Andrea

    2008-05-01

    Allelic variants at codons 16 and 27 of the beta(2)-adrenergic receptor gene (ADRB2) have shown clinical and pharmacological implications in asthma, hypertension, ischemic heart failure, diabetes, obesity, and cystic fibrosis. We have developed a simultaneous genotyping assay for the c.46A>G and c.79C>G allelic variants using hybridization probes and melting curve analysis. The assay was optimized on a panel of 30 DNA samples of known ADRB2 genotype as determined by sequencing with 100% concordance between the two techniques. Melting temperature (Tm) ranges for the different genotypes were obtained using data from three independent experiments. Single peaks for p.Arg16Arg (Tm = 57.76 degrees C +/- 0.10 degrees C) and p.Gly16Gly (Tm = 66.73 degrees C +/- 0.18 degrees C) and two melting peaks for p.Arg16Gly were obtained. Similarly, single peaks for p.Gln27Gln (Tm = 53.98 degrees C +/- 0.19 degrees C) and p.Glu27Glu (Tm = 64.93 degrees C +/- 0.16 degrees C) and two peaks for p.Gln27Glu were detected. Independent operators easily assigned genotypes in a sample set of 385 asthmatic patients. Haplotype and allele frequencies were in concordance with previously published data: Arg allele frequencies in children/adults were 0.34/0.30 in Caucasians and 0.45/0.52 in African Americans, and Gln allele frequencies were 0.58/0.52 in Caucasians and 0.82/0.84 in African Americans. Thus, the ADRB2 genotyping assay represents a highly reliable and rapid technique for routine clinical use in the simultaneous detection of ADRB2 variants.

  1. Simultaneous detection and genotyping of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) by real-time RT-PCR and amplicon melting curve analysis using SYBR Green.

    PubMed

    Martínez, E; Riera, P; Sitjà, M; Fang, Y; Oliveira, S; Maldonado, J

    2008-08-01

    The feasibility of using a SYBR Green-based real-time RT-PCR assay (SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR) followed by melting curve analysis (MCA) for detecting and genotyping porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) was assessed. The SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR and a previously reported two-step, non-nested RT-PCR assays were simultaneously tested on selected European (EU) and North American (US) PRRSV strains and isolates collected from diverse clinical, temporal, and geographical origins. The validation experiments showed that the optimised SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR can sensitively and specifically detect PRRSV, consistently detecting as little as 0.03TCID(50)/sample of each virus genotype, with no type-bias and no amplification signal for other swine pathogens. After MCA, two well-differentiated melting temperature (T(m)) profiles for each virus genotype were obtained, as sequencing confirmed it. High repeatability was obtained for the T(m) values, with intra-run coefficients of variation (CoVs) of 0.25 and 0.32 and inter-run CoVs of 0.42 and 0.52 for EU and US genotypes, respectively. The sensitivity of the SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR (100%) was higher than that of the RT-PCR (95.7%) when testing field isolates. This greater sensitivity of the SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR was further confirmed by the detection of a higher proportion of PRRSV-positive diagnostic specimens (29.7%) than by the RT-PCR (28.5%). The SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR test detected infection as early as 2 dpi in the sera of experimentally infected pigs regardless of virus genotype, and discriminated negative (non-inoculated), EU- and US-infected pigs. In conclusion, the reported SYBR Green ReTi RT-PCR assay coupled with MCA can detect and type PRRSV and may be useful as an alternative diagnostic assay in diverse PRRSV epidemiological circumstances.

  2. Neurological diseases associated with viral and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections

    PubMed Central

    Assaad, F.; Gispen, R.; Kleemola, M.; Syrůček, L.; Esteves, K.

    1980-01-01

    In 1963 the World Health Organization established a system for the collection and dissemination of information on viral infections and by 1976, laboratories in 49 countries were participating in this scheme. The present study is in two parts: part 1 is an analysis of almost 60 000 reports on neurological disease associated with viral and Mycoplasma pneumoniae infections reported during the 10-year period 1967-76. This analysis showed a steady increase in the yearly number of reports of viral neurological diseases, which closely followed the general increase in the overall reporting of virus diseases. Likewise, the seasonal pattern was similar to that seen in general for any given virus. Over 75% of the cases were in children. Over half of all viral neurological diseases were associated with enteroviruses, while the myxoviruses accounted for almost 30%. Among the myxoviruses, mumps virus was by far the most frequently reported. The polioviruses were the agents most commonly detected in cases of paralytic disease. The other enteroviruses, mumps virus, and the herpesviruses were the most frequently reported viruses in cases of aseptic meningitis or encephalitis. On the other hand, one-third to over one-half of the reports on the myxoviruses (excluding mumps and measles) related to ill-defined clinical conditions. Part 2 of the study deals in particular with viruses whose role in neurological disease is less well documented. One laboratory reported an outbreak of adenoviral aseptic meningitis in Czechoslovakia, while another described neurological disease associated with M. pneumoniae infection in Finland. Part 2 also includes a detailed appraisal of viral infections diagnosed in the Netherlands during the period 1973-76. The results are very similar to those routinely reported. PMID:6249511

  3. Disease-associated repeat instability and mismatch repair.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Monika H M; Pearson, Christopher E

    2016-02-01

    Expanded tandem repeat sequences in DNA are associated with at least 40 human genetic neurological, neurodegenerative, and neuromuscular diseases. Repeat expansion can occur during parent-to-offspring transmission, and arise at variable rates in specific tissues throughout the life of an affected individual. Since the ongoing somatic repeat expansions can affect disease age-of-onset, severity, and progression, targeting somatic expansion holds potential as a therapeutic target. Thus, understanding the factors that regulate this mutation is crucial. DNA repair, in particular mismatch repair (MMR), is the major driving force of disease-associated repeat expansions. In contrast to its anti-mutagenic roles, mammalian MMR curiously drives the expansion mutations of disease-associated (CAG)·(CTG) repeats. Recent advances have broadened our knowledge of both the MMR proteins involved in disease repeat expansions, including: MSH2, MSH3, MSH6, MLH1, PMS2, and MLH3, as well as the types of repeats affected by MMR, now including: (CAG)·(CTG), (CGG)·(CCG), and (GAA)·(TTC) repeats. Mutagenic slipped-DNA structures have been detected in patient tissues, and the size of the slip-out and their junction conformation can determine the involvement of MMR. Furthermore, the formation of other unusual DNA and R-loop structures is proposed to play a key role in MMR-mediated instability. A complex correlation is emerging between tissues showing varying amounts of repeat instability and MMR expression levels. Notably, naturally occurring polymorphic variants of DNA repair genes can have dramatic effects upon the levels of repeat instability, which may explain the variation in disease age-of-onset, progression and severity. An increasing grasp of these factors holds prognostic and therapeutic potential.

  4. Detection of rotavirus species A, B and C in domestic mammalian animals with diarrhoea and genotyping of bovine species A rotavirus strains.

    PubMed

    Otto, Peter H; Rosenhain, Stefanie; Elschner, Mandy C; Hotzel, Helmut; Machnowska, Patrycja; Trojnar, Eva; Hoffmann, Kathrin; Johne, Reimar

    2015-09-30

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are a major cause of neonatal diarrhoea in humans and animals worldwide. In this study, 425 faecal samples were collected between 1999 and 2013 from diarrhoeic livestock and companion animals at different locations in Germany and tested for RVs. A previously published real-time RT-PCR assay was optimized for detection of a larger variety of RV species A (RVA) strains, and real-time RT-PCR assays for detection of RV species B (RVB) and C (RVC) were newly developed. The detection limits of the assays were 1.54×10(2), 3.95×10(2) and 3.60×10(3) genome copies for RVA, RVB and RVC, respectively. RVA was identified in 85.2% of bovine samples, 51.2% of porcine samples, 50.0% of feline samples, 43.2% of equine samples and 39.7% of canine samples. RVB was found in 3.0% of bovine samples, 2.7% of equine samples and 1.6% of porcine samples. RVC was detected in 31.0% of porcine samples, 21.7% of feline samples, 9.0% of canine samples and 6.0% of bovine samples. For genotyping, 101 RVA-positive bovine samples were further analysed by semi-nested RT-PCR. Genotype combination G6P[5] was most frequently detected (67.3% of samples), followed by G6P[11] (13.9%), G10P[5] (4.0%), G8P[11] (3.0%), G6P[1] (1.0%), and G10P[11] (1.0%). Mixed RVA infections were detected in 5.9% of samples; no or incomplete typing was possible in 4.0% of the samples. This first overview on RV species and RVA genotypes in diarrhoeic livestock and companion animals from Germany indicates a broad circulation of a large variety of RVs.

  5. Identification of Four Distinct Genotypes of Candida dubliniensis and Detection of Microevolution In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Gee, Sarah F.; Joly, Sophie; Soll, David R.; Meis, Jacques F. G. M.; Verweij, Paul E.; Polacheck, Itzhack; Sullivan, Derek J.; Coleman, David C.

    2002-01-01

    The present study investigates further the population structure of Candida dubliniensis and its ability to exhibit microevolution. Using 98 isolates (including 80 oral isolates) from 94 patients in 15 countries, we confirmed the existence of two distinct populations within the species C. dubliniensis, designated Cd25 group I and Cd25 group II, respectively, on the basis of DNA fingerprints generated with the C. dubliniensis-specific probe Cd25. The majority of Cd25 group I isolates (48 of 71, 67.6%) were from human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals, whereas the majority of Cd25 group II isolates (19 of 27, 70.4%) were from HIV-negative individuals (P ≤ 0.001). Nucleotide sequence analysis of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) regions of the rRNA genes from 19 representative isolates revealed the presence of four separate genotypes. All of the Cd25 group I isolates tested belonged to genotype 1, while the Cd25 group II population was comprised of three distinct genotypes (genotypes 2 to 4), which corresponded to distinct clades within the Cd25 group II population. These findings were confirmed using genotype-specific PCR primers with 70 isolates. We also showed that C. dubliniensis can exhibit microevolution in vivo and in vitro as occurs in other yeast species. DNA fingerprinting using the C. dubliniensis probes Cd25, Cd24, and Cd1 and karyotype analysis of multiple oral isolates recovered from the same specimen from each of eight separate patients revealed microevolution in six of eight of the clonal populations. Similarly, sequential clonal isolates from various anatomical sites in two separate patients exhibited microevolution. Microevolution was also shown to occur when two clinical isolates susceptible to fluconazole were exposed to the drug in vitro. The epidemiological significance of the four C. dubliniensis genotypes and the ability of C. dubliniensis to undergo microevolution has yet to be established. PMID:11825972

  6. Detection of a Knockdown Resistance Mutation Associated with Permethrin Resistance in the Body Louse Pediculus humanus corporis by Use of Melting Curve Analysis Genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Drali, Rezak; Benkouiten, Samir; Badiaga, Sékéné; Bitam, Idir

    2012-01-01

    Louse-borne diseases are prevalent in the homeless, and body louse eradication has thus far been unsuccessful in this population. We aim to develop a rapid and robust genotyping method usable in large field-based clinical studies to monitor permethrin resistance in the human body louse Pediculus humanus corporis. We assessed a melting curve analysis genotyping method based on real-time PCR using hybridization probes to detect the M815I-T917I-L920F knockdown resistance (kdr) mutation in the paraorthologous voltage-sensitive sodium channel (VSSC) α subunit gene, which is associated with permethrin resistance. The 908-bp DNA fragment of the VSSC gene, encoding the α subunit of the sodium channel and encompassing the three mutation sites, was PCR sequenced from 65 lice collected from a homeless population. We noted a high prevalence of the 3 indicated mutations in the body lice collected from homeless people (100% for the M815I and L920F mutations and 56.73% for the T917I mutation). These results were confirmed by melting curve analysis genotyping, which had a calculated sensitivity of 100% for the M815I and T917I mutations and of 98% for the L920F mutation. The specificity was 100% for M815I and L920F and 96% for T917I. Melting curve analysis genotyping is a fast, sensitive, and specific tool that is fully compatible with the analysis of a large number of samples in epidemiological surveys, allowing the simultaneous genotyping of 96 samples in just over an hour (75 min). Thus, it is perfectly suited for the epidemiological monitoring of permethrin resistance in human body lice in large-scale clinical studies. PMID:22573588

  7. A comparison of human papillomavirus genotype-specific DNA and E6/E7 mRNA detection to identify anal precancer among HIV-infected men who have sex with men

    PubMed Central

    Castle, Philip E.; Follansbee, Stephen; Borgonovo, Sylvia; Tokugawa, Diane; Schwartz, Lauren M.; Lorey, Thomas S.; LaMere, Brandon; Gage, Julia C.; Fetterman, Barbara; Darragh, Teresa M.; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2012-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) RNA detection is reportedly more specific for the detection of anogenital precancer than HPV DNA but it is unknown whether this is due to detection of RNA or due to HPV genotype restriction. Materials and Methods 363 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive men who have sex with men had two anal cytology samples taken and were evaluated using high-resolution anoscopy and biopsies of visible lesions. Anal specimens were tested for E6/E7 RNA for 5 carcinogenic HPV genotypes (HPV16, 18, 31, 33, and 45) and tested for the DNA of 13 carcinogenic HPV genotypes. Results DNA testing was more likely to be positive than RNA testing (53% vs. 48%, p = 0.02) for the same 5 HPV genotypes in aggregate. When restricted to 5 HPV genotypes targeted by the RNA test, the sensitivity to detect anal precancer was the same for DNA and RNA (81%) while RNA was more specific than DNA (65% vs. 58%, p = 0.007). By comparison, DNA detection of all 13 carcinogenic HPV genotypes was more sensitive (96% vs. 81%, p = 0.001) but much less specific (65% vs. 33%, p < 0.001) compared to RNA detection of the 5 HPV genotypes. Conclusion After controlling for HPV genotypes, RNA was only slightly more specific than DNA detection for anal precancer. Impact DNA or RNA testing for a subset of the most carcinogenic HPV genotypes may be useful for distinguishing between those HPV-positive men at higher and lower risk of anal precancer and cancer. PMID:23155136

  8. A novel species within the Fusarium graminearum complex from Ethiopia detected by a multilocus genotyping assay and molecular phylogenetics

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Twenty isolates resembling members of the Fusarium graminearum species complex (Fg complex; O’Donnell et al., Fungal Genet. Biol. 41:600-623, 2004) were isolated from ground wheat samples collected in two different geographic areas in Ethiopia. Results of a multilocus genotyping (MLGT) assay (Ward ...

  9. Detection of the emerging rotavirus G12P[8] genotype at high frequency in brazil in 2014: Successive replacement of predominant strains after vaccine introduction.

    PubMed

    Luchs, Adriana; Cilli, Audrey; Morillo, Simone Guadagnucci; Gregório, Debora de Souza; de Souza, Karen Aparecida Farias; Vieira, Heloísa Rosa; Fernandes, Adeline de Mira; Carmona, Rita de Cássia Compagnoli; Timenetsky, Maria do Carmo Sampaio Tavares

    2016-04-01

    The continuum characterization of rotavirus (RVA) genotypes is essential to understand how vaccine introduction could impact virus epidemiology. In the present study, an unexpected rapid changing pattern of RVA genotypes distribution in Brazilian population during three followed seasons is described. From January/2012 to December/2014, a total of 3441 fecal specimens were collected from collaborating centers across Southern, Southeastern and Midwest of Brazil. All specimens were screened for RVA using ELISA, and genotyped by RT-PCR. Differences in proportions were tested using Chi-Squares. A p-value of less than 0.05 was considered statistically significant. RVA was detected in 19.7% (677/3441). Among RVA positive cases (n=677), a total of 652 (96.3%) samples were successfully amplified by RT-PCR. G3P[8] remained prevalent in 2012 (37.6%, 69/185) and 2013 (40.1%, 74/186) (χ(2)=0.107, p=0.743), but declined markedly in 2014 (3.5%, 10/281) (χ(2)=71.770, p=0.000). G12P[8] was second highest strain in 2012 (22.7%, 42/185), decrease rapidly in 2013 (2.7%, 5/186) (χ(2)=26.224, p=0.000) and re-emerged as the predominant genotype in 2014 (86.6%, 243/281) (χ(2)=118.299, p=0.000). From July/2014, G12P[8] was the single genotype detected in all regions studied. The sudden emergence, spread and predominance of G12P[8] strain in Brazil, raised the hypothesis of a possible G12 outbreak being in progress. Nationally, the long term decline in gastroenteritis hospitalization observed in the country after RVA vaccine introduction was confirmed. Nevertheless, the sharp increase in diarrhea hospitalization prevalence from 2013 to 2014 observed in Southern and Southeastern regions is consistent with what appears to be an outbreak of G12P[8]. Continued surveillance is needed to verify the effectiveness of the RotarixTM vaccine in Brazil together with potential emergence of unusual genotypes.

  10. Toward fully automated genotyping: allele assignment, pedigree construction, phase determination, and recombination detection in Duchenne muscular dystrophy.

    PubMed Central

    Perlin, M. W.; Burks, M. B.; Hoop, R. C.; Hoffman, E. P.

    1994-01-01

    Human genetic maps have made quantum leaps in the past few years, because of the characterization of > 2,000 CA dinucleotide repeat loci: these PCR-based markers offer extraordinarily high PIC, and within the next year their density is expected to reach intervals of a few centimorgans per marker. These new genetic maps open new avenues for disease gene research, including large-scale genotyping for both simple and complex disease loci. However, the allele patterns of many dinucleotide repeat loci can be complex and difficult to interpret, with genotyping errors a recognized problem. Furthermore, the possibility of genotyping individuals at hundreds or thousands of polymorphic loci requires improvements in data handling and analysis. The automation of genotyping and analysis of computer-derived haplotypes would remove many of the barriers preventing optimal use of dense and informative dinucleotide genetic maps. Toward this end, we have automated the allele identification, genotyping, phase determinations, and inheritance consistency checks generated by four CA repeats within the 2.5-Mbp, 10-cM X-linked dystrophin gene, using fluorescein-labeled multiplexed PCR products analyzed on automated sequencers. The described algorithms can deconvolute and resolve closely spaced alleles, despite interfering stutter noise; set phase in females; propagate the phase through the family; and identify recombination events. We show the implementation of these algorithms for the completely automated interpretation of allele data and risk assessment for five Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy families. The described approach can be scaled up to perform genome-based analyses with hundreds or thousands of CA-repeat loci, using multiple fluorophors on automated sequencers. PMID:7942856

  11. Toward fully automated genotyping: Allele assignment, pedigree construction, phase determination, and recombination detection in Duchenne muscular dystrophy

    SciTech Connect

    Perlin, M.W.; Burks, M.B.; Hoop, R.C.; Hoffman, E.P.

    1994-10-01

    Human genetic maps have made quantum leaps in the past few years, because of the characterization of >2,000 CA dinucleotide repeat loci: these PCR-based markers offer extraordinarily high PIC, and within the next year their density is expected to reach intervals of a few centimorgans per marker. These new genetic maps open new avenues for disease gene research, including large-scale genotyping for both simple and complex disease loci. However, the allele patterns of many dinucleotide repeat loci can be complex and difficult to interpret, with genotyping errors a recognized problem. Furthermore, the possibility of genotyping individuals at hundreds or thousands of polymorphic loci requires improvements in data handling and analysis. The automation of genotyping and analysis of computer-derived haplotypes would remove many of the barriers preventing optimal use of dense and informative dinucleotide genetic maps. Toward this end, we have automated the allele identification, genotyping, phase determinations, and inheritance consistency checks generated by four CA repeats within the 2.5-Mbp, 10-cM X-linked dystrophin gene, using fluorescein-labeled multiplexed PCR products analyzed on automated sequencers. The described algorithms can deconvolute and resolve closely spaced alleles, despite interfering stutter noise; set phase in females; propagate the phase through the family; and identify recombination events. We show the implementation of these algorithms for the completely automated interpretation of allele data and risk assessment for five Duchenne/Becker muscular dystrophy families. The described approach can be scaled up to perform genome-based analyses with hundreds or thousands of CA-repeat loci, using multiple fluorophors on automated sequencers. 16 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  12. An Improved PCR-RFLP Assay for Detection and Genotyping of Asymptomatic Giardia lamblia Infection in a Resource-Poor Setting

    PubMed Central

    Hawash, Yoursry; Ghonaim, M. M.; Al-Shehri, S. S.

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory workers, in resource-poor countries, still consider PCR detection of Giardia lamblia more costly and more time-consuming than the classical parasitological techniques. Based on 2 published primers, an in-house one-round touchdown PCR-RFLP assay was developed. The assay was validated with an internal amplification control included in reactions. Performance of the assay was assessed with DNA samples of various purities, 91 control fecal samples with various parasite load, and 472 samples of unknown results. Two cysts per reaction were enough for PCR detection by the assay with exhibited specificity (Sp) and sensitivity (Se) of 100% and 93%, respectively. Taking a published small subunit rRNA reference PCR test results (6%; 29/472) as a nominated gold standard, G. lamblia was identified in 5.9% (28/472), 5.2%, (25/472), and 3.6% (17/472) by PCR assay, RIDA® Quick Giardia antigen detection test (R-Biopharm, Darmstadt, Germany), and iodine-stained smear microscopy, respectively. The percent agreements (kappa values) of 99.7% (0.745), 98.9% (0.900), and 97.7% (0.981) were exhibited between the assay results and that of the reference PCR, immunoassay, and microscopy, respectively. Restriction digestion of the 28 Giardia-positive samples revealed genotype A pattern in 12 and genotype B profile in 16 samples. The PCR assay with the described format and exhibited performance has a great potential to be adopted in basic clinical laboratories as a detection tool for G. lamblia especially in asymptomatic infections. This potential is increased more in particular situations where identification of the parasite genotype represents a major requirement as in epidemiological studies and infection outbreaks. PMID:26951972

  13. An Improved PCR-RFLP Assay for Detection and Genotyping of Asymptomatic Giardia lamblia Infection in a Resource-Poor Setting.

    PubMed

    Hawash, Yoursry; Ghonaim, M M; Al-Shehri, S S

    2016-02-01

    Laboratory workers, in resource-poor countries, still consider PCR detection of Giardia lamblia more costly and more time-consuming than the classical parasitological techniques. Based on 2 published primers, an in-house one-round touchdown PCR-RFLP assay was developed. The assay was validated with an internal amplification control included in reactions. Performance of the assay was assessed with DNA samples of various purities, 91 control fecal samples with various parasite load, and 472 samples of unknown results. Two cysts per reaction were enough for PCR detection by the assay with exhibited specificity (Sp) and sensitivity (Se) of 100% and 93%, respectively. Taking a published small subunit rRNA reference PCR test results (6%; 29/472) as a nominated gold standard, G. lamblia was identified in 5.9% (28/472), 5.2%, (25/472), and 3.6% (17/472) by PCR assay, RIDA(®) Quick Giardia antigen detection test (R-Biopharm, Darmstadt, Germany), and iodine-stained smear microscopy, respectively. The percent agreements (kappa values) of 99.7% (0.745), 98.9% (0.900), and 97.7% (0.981) were exhibited between the assay results and that of the reference PCR, immunoassay, and microscopy, respectively. Restriction digestion of the 28 Giardia-positive samples revealed genotype A pattern in 12 and genotype B profile in 16 samples. The PCR assay with the described format and exhibited performance has a great potential to be adopted in basic clinical laboratories as a detection tool for G. lamblia especially in asymptomatic infections. This potential is increased more in particular situations where identification of the parasite genotype represents a major requirement as in epidemiological studies and infection outbreaks.

  14. Evaluation of an Array-Based Method for Human Papillomavirus Detection and Genotyping in Comparison with Conventional Methods Used in Cervical Cancer Screening▿

    PubMed Central

    García-Sierra, Nerea; Martró, Elisa; Castellà, Eva; Llatjós, Mariona; Tarrats, Antoni; Bascuñana, Elisabet; Díaz, Rosana; Carrasco, María; Sirera, Guillem; Matas, Lurdes; Ausina, Vicente

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second-most prevalent cancer in young women around the world. Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV), especially high-risk HPV types (HR-HPV), is necessary for the development of this cancer. HPV-DNA detection is increasingly being used in cervical cancer screening programs, together with the Papanicolau smear test. We evaluated the usefulness of introducing this new array-based HPV genotyping method (i.e., Clinical Arrays Papillomavirus Humano) in the cervical cancer screening algorithm in our center. The results obtained using this method were compared to those obtained by the hybrid capture II high-risk HPV DNA test (HC-II) and Papanicolau in a selected group of 408 women. The array-based assay was performed in women that were HC-II positive or presented cytological alterations. Among 246 array-positive patients, 123 (50%) presented infection with ≥2 types, and HR-HPV types were detected in 206 (83.7%), mainly HPV-16 (24.0%). Up to 132 (33.2%) specimens were classified as ASCUS (for atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance), and only 48 (36.4%) of them were HPV-DNA positive by either assay; however, 78.7% of these cases were caused by HR-HPV types. The agreement between both HPV-DNA detection techniques was fairly good (n = 367). Screening with Papanicolau smear and HC-II tests, followed by HPV detection and genotyping, provided an optimal identification of women at risk for the development of cervical cancer. Furthermore, with the identification of specific genotypes, either in single or multiple infections, a better prediction of disease progression was achieved. The array method also made allowed us to determine the possible contribution of the available vaccines in our setting. PMID:19439534

  15. Detection of hepatitis B virus infection in wild-born chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes verus): phylogenetic relationships with human and other primate genotypes.

    PubMed

    MacDonald, D M; Holmes, E C; Lewis, J C; Simmonds, P

    2000-05-01

    Infection with hepatitis B virus (HBV) was detected by serological testing for HBV surface antigen and by PCR assay for HBV DNA in serum samples from two common chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes subsp. verus) born in West Africa. The complete genome sequences obtained by nucleotide sequencing of overlapping DNA fragments amplified by PCR were compared with HBV variants recovered from other primates and with human genotypes A to F. Both chimpanzee sequences were 3, 182 nucleotides in length, and the surface gene sequence predicted the existence of a, d, and w serological determinants. Neither sequence contained stop codons in the precore region. On phylogenetic analysis, the HBV variants infecting the chimpanzees clustered together with a third chimpanzee HBV isolate independently obtained from an infected captive animal (A. J. Zuckerman, A. Thornton, C. R. Howard, K. N. Tsiquaye, D. M. Jones, and M. R. Brambell, Lancet ii:652-654, 1978), with an overall sequence similarity of >94%. This provides strong evidence for a chimpanzee-specific genotype of HBV which circulates in nature. These findings add to the recent evidence for infection in the wild of other Old and New World primates (gibbon, orangutan, and woolly monkey) with species-specific variants of HBV. There is no evidence for close phylogenetic clustering of variants found so far in primates with any of the established HBV genotypes from humans. With the new evidence for the widespread distribution of HBV in primates, hypotheses for the origins of human infection are reviewed.

  16. Comparison of real-time multiplex human papillomavirus (HPV) PCR assays with the linear array HPV genotyping PCR assay and influence of DNA extraction method on HPV detection.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Christine C; Swoyer, Ryan; Bryan, Janine T; Taddeo, Frank J

    2011-05-01

    Real-time human papillomavirus (HPV) type-specific multiplex PCR assays were developed to detect HPV DNA in specimens collected for the efficacy determination of the quadrivalent HPV (type 6, 11, 16, and 18) L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine (Gardasil). We evaluated the concordance between type-specific multiplex HPV PCR and the widely used, commercially available Roche Linear Array genotyping PCR assay. Female genital swab specimens were tested for the presence of L1, E6, and E7 sequences of HPV type 6 (HPV6), HPV11, HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV45, HPV52, and HPV58 and E6 and E7 sequences of HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV51, HPV56, and HPV59 in type- and gene-specific real-time multiplex PCR assays. Specimens were also tested for the presence of L1 sequences using two versions of the Roche Linear Array genotyping assay. Measures of concordance of a modified version of the Linear Array and the standard Linear Array PCR assay were evaluated. With specimen DNA extraction using the Qiagen Spin blood kit held as the constant, multiplex PCR assays detect more HPV-positive specimens for the 14 HPV types common to both than either version of the Linear Array HPV genotyping assay. Type-specific agreements between the assays were good, at least 0.838, but were often driven by negative agreement in HPV types with low prevalence, as evidenced by reduced proportions of positive agreement. Overall HPV status agreements ranged from 0.615 for multiplex PCR and standard Linear Array to 0.881 for multiplex PCR and modified Linear Array. An alternate DNA extraction technique, that used by the Qiagen MinElute kit, impacted subsequent HPV detection in both the multiplex PCR and Linear Array assays.

  17. Sequence-specific label-free nucleic acid biosensor for the detection of the hepatitis C virus genotype 1a using a disposable pencil graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    Donmez, Soner; Arslan, Fatma; Arslan, Halit

    2016-05-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a simple, sensitive, inexpensive, disposable and label-free electrochemical nucleic acid biosensor for the detection of the hepatitis C virus genotype 1a (HCV1a). The nucleic acid biosensor was designed with the amino-linked inosine-substituted 20-mer probes, which were immobilized onto a disposable pencil graphite electrode (PGE) by covalent linking. The proposed nucleic acid biosensor was linear in the range of 0.05 and 0.75 μM, exhibiting a limit of detection of 54.9 nM. The single-stranded synthetic PCR product analogs of HCV1a were also detected with satisfactory results under optimal conditions, showing the potential application of this biosensor.

  18. European Multicenter Evaluation of High-Density DNA Probe Arrays for Detection of Hepatitis B Virus Resistance Mutations and Identification of Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Tran, N.; Berne, R.; Chann, R.; Gauthier, M.; Martin, D.; Armand, M.-A.; Ollivet, A.; Teo, C. G.; Ijaz, S.; Flichman, D.; Brunetto, M.; Bielawski, K. P.; Pichoud, C.; Zoulim, F.; Vernet, G.

    2006-01-01

    Polymorphisms along the hepatitis B virus (HBV) genome have an impact on disease outcome, sensitivity to antiviral treatment, escape from vaccination, and laboratory diagnosis. We have designed a diagnostic tool based on duplex amplification of the whole HBV genome and a high-density DNA chip designed to detect 245 mutations, 20 deletions, and 2 insertions at 151 positions and to determine the genotype of the virus in serum. Assay performances were evaluated with 170 samples, characterized by determination of viral load and sequencing of the Pol, S, and precore genes and the basal core promoter. One hundred fifty-three samples (90%) could be amplified and analyzed by the chip. Only two samples with more than 103 genome copies/ml could not be analyzed. Genotype had no impact on analytical sensitivity. Reproducibility studies showed no difference between repeats for codon and genotype determination. Genotype determination by sequencing and the chip were concordant in 148 of 151 samples. Twelve thousand one hundred sixty-one codons were analyzed by both techniques. Only 89.4% could be determined by sequencing, and among the remaining 11,335 codons, 92.8% were identical by sequencing and the chip. Failures to identify an amino acid by the chip were mainly due to reduced hybridization efficiency attributed to unexpected polymorphisms. Optimization of the chip-based reagent for the analysis of the HBV genome is ongoing. This first evaluation showed that DNA chip technology can provide important information in relation to the clinical management of chronic hepatitis B. PMID:16891494

  19. In Vitro vs In Silico Detected SNPs for the Development of a Genotyping Array: What Can We Learn from a Non-Model Species?

    PubMed Central

    Lepoittevin, Camille; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; Garnier-Géré, Pauline; Salin, Franck; Cervera, María-Teresa; Vornam, Barbara; Harvengt, Luc; Plomion, Christophe

    2010-01-01

    Background There is considerable interest in the high-throughput discovery and genotyping of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to accelerate genetic mapping and enable association studies. This study provides an assessment of EST-derived and resequencing-derived SNP quality in maritime pine (Pinus pinaster Ait.), a conifer characterized by a huge genome size (∼23.8 Gb/C). Methodology/Principal Findings A 384-SNPs GoldenGate genotyping array was built from i/ 184 SNPs originally detected in a set of 40 re-sequenced candidate genes (in vitro SNPs), chosen on the basis of functionality scores, presence of neighboring polymorphisms, minor allele frequencies and linkage disequilibrium and ii/ 200 SNPs screened from ESTs (in silico SNPs) selected based on the number of ESTs used for SNP detection, the SNP minor allele frequency and the quality of SNP flanking sequences. The global success rate of the assay was 66.9%, and a conversion rate (considering only polymorphic SNPs) of 51% was achieved. In vitro SNPs showed significantly higher genotyping-success and conversion rates than in silico SNPs (+11.5% and +18.5%, respectively). The reproducibility was 100%, and the genotyping error rate very low (0.54%, dropping down to 0.06% when removing four SNPs showing elevated error rates). Conclusions/Significance This study demonstrates that ESTs provide a resource for SNP identification in non-model species, which do not require any additional bench work and little bio-informatics analysis. However, the time and cost benefits of in silico SNPs are counterbalanced by a lower conversion rate than in vitro SNPs. This drawback is acceptable for population-based experiments, but could be dramatic in experiments involving samples from narrow genetic backgrounds. In addition, we showed that both the visual inspection of genotyping clusters and the estimation of a per SNP error rate should help identify markers that are not suitable to the GoldenGate technology in species

  20. Comparison of the f-HPV typing™ and Hybrid Capture II® assays for detection of high-risk HPV genotypes in cervical samples.

    PubMed

    Cañadas, María-Paz; Cirigliano, Vincenzo; Darwich, Laila; Sirera, Guillermo; Coll, Josep; Clotet, Bonaventura; Videla, Sebastian

    2012-07-01

    Human papillomavirus genotyping is being considered in cervical screening programs and for monitoring the effectiveness of HPV vaccination. Both approaches require access to fast, easy and high-throughput technology. The aim of this study was to compare a new commercial assay (f-HPV typing™) with the Hybrid Capture II® (HC2) to detect HPV infection. The F-HPV typing is a multiplex fluorescent PCR method recognizing E6 and E7 regions of 13 high-risk (HR) HPV types, the same set of HR-types targeted HC2 test. A subset of 157 cervical samples was tested with both assays. The percentage of positive HR-HPV DNA samples was 24% (37/155) by HC2 and 33% (49/155) by f-HPV typing. Concordant results were found in 133/155 (overall agreement, 85.8%; Cohen's kappa=0.65). The analytical sensitivity and specificity of f-HPV were 97.6 and 93, respectively. In conclusion, this study shows that the f-HPV assay provides a good alternative to HC2 to detect HPV infection, allowing simple and rapid HPV genotyping and detecting multiple infections.

  1. The Decay of Disease Association with Declining Linkage Disequilibrium: A Fine Mapping Theorem

    PubMed Central

    Maadooliat, Mehdi; Bansal, Naveen K.; Upadhya, Jiblal; Farazi, Manzur R.; Li, Xiang; He, Max M.; Hebbring, Scott J.; Ye, Zhan; Schrodi, Steven J.

    2016-01-01

    Several important and fundamental aspects of disease genetics models have yet to be described. One such property is the relationship of disease association statistics at a marker site closely linked to a disease causing site. A complete description of this two-locus system is of particular importance to experimental efforts to fine map association signals for complex diseases. Here, we present a simple relationship between disease association statistics and the decline of linkage disequilibrium from a causal site. Specifically, the ratio of Chi-square disease association statistics at a marker site and causal site is equivalent to the standard measure of pairwise linkage disequilibrium, r2. A complete derivation of this relationship from a general disease model is shown. Quite interestingly, this relationship holds across all modes of inheritance. Extensive Monte Carlo simulations using a disease genetics model applied to chromosomes subjected to a standard model of recombination are employed to better understand the variation around this fine mapping theorem due to sampling effects. We also use this relationship to provide a framework for estimating properties of a non-interrogated causal site using data at closely linked markers. Lastly, we apply this way of examining association data from high-density genotyping in a large, publicly-available data set investigating extreme BMI. We anticipate that understanding the patterns of disease association decay with declining linkage disequilibrium from a causal site will enable more powerful fine mapping methods and provide new avenues for identifying causal sites/genes from fine-mapping studies. PMID:28018425

  2. Real-time PCR assays for detection of Brucella spp. and the identification of genotype ST27 in bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops truncatus).

    PubMed

    Wu, Qingzhong; McFee, Wayne E; Goldstein, Tracey; Tiller, Rebekah V; Schwacke, Lori

    2014-05-01

    Rapid detection of Brucella spp. in marine mammals is challenging. Microbiologic culture is used for definitive diagnosis of brucellosis, but is time consuming, has low sensitivity and can be hazardous to laboratory personnel. Serological methods can aid in diagnosis, but may not differentiate prior exposure versus current active infection and may cross-react with unrelated Gram-negative bacteria. This study reports a real-time PCR assay for the detection of Brucella spp. and application to screen clinical samples from bottlenose dolphins stranded along the coast of South Carolina, USA. The assay was found to be 100% sensitive for the Brucella strains tested, and the limit of detection was 0.27fg of genomic DNA from Brucella ceti B1/94 per PCR volume. No amplification was detected for the non-Brucella pathogens tested. Brucella DNA was detected in 31% (55/178) of clinical samples tested. These studies indicate that the real-time PCR assay is highly sensitive and specific for the detection of Brucella spp. in bottlenose dolphins. We also developed a second real-time PCR assay for rapid identification of Brucella ST27, a genotype that is associated with human zoonotic infection. Positive results were obtained for Brucella strains which had been identified as ST27 by multilocus sequence typing. No amplification was found for other Brucella strains included in this study. ST27 was identified in 33% (18/54) of Brucella spp. DNA-positive clinical samples. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the use of a real-time PCR assay for identification of Brucella genotype ST27 in marine mammals.

  3. A new pyrosequencing assay for rapid detection and genotyping of Shiga toxin, intimin and O157-specific rfbE genes of Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Goji, Noriko; Mathews, Amit; Huszczynski, George; Laing, Chad R; Gannon, Victor P J; Graham, Morag R; Amoako, Kingsley K

    2015-02-01

    Shiga toxin (stx)-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) contamination in food and water is one of the most recognized concerns and a major financial burden in human hygiene control worldwide. Rapid and highly reliable methods of detecting and identifying STEC causing gastroenteric illnesses are crucial to prevent foodborne outbreaks. A number of tests have been developed and commercialized to detect STEC using molecular microbiology techniques. Most of these are designed to identify virulence factors such as Shiga toxin and intimin as well as E. coli O and H antigen serotype specific genes. In order to screen pathogenic STEC without relying on O:H serotyping, we developed a rapid detection and genotyping assay for STEC virulence genes using a PCR-pyrosequencing application. We adapted the PyroMark Q24 Pyrosequencing platform for subtyping 4 major virulence genes, Shiga toxin 1 and 2 (stx1 and stx2), intimin (eae) and O157-antigen gene cluster target rfbE, using Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) analysis. A total of 224 E. coli strains including isolates from Canadian environment, food and clinical cases were examined. Based on the multiple alignment analysis of 30-80 base nucleotide pyrogram reads, three alleles of the Shiga toxin 1a gene (stx1a) (stx1a-I, stx1a-II, stx1a-III) were identified. Results of the stx1, stx2, eae and rfbE genotyping revealed that each group of O:H serotype shares distinctive characteristics that could be associated with the virulence of each genotype. O157:H7/NM carries stx1a-II (94%), stx2a (82%), λ/γ1-eae (100%) and rfbE type-H7/NM (100%). Whereas isolates of the "Top-6" serotypes (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, O145) had a high incidence of stx1a-I (90%) and stx2a (100%). stx1a-III (60%) was only observed in non Top-7 (Top-6 plus O157) STEC and Shigella spp. The entire assay, from extracting DNA from colonies on a plate to the generation of sequence information, can be completed in 5h. The method of profiling these 4 STEC pathogenic

  4. Detection and genotyping of torque teno virus (TTV) in healthy blood donors and patients infected with HBV or HCV in Qatar.

    PubMed

    AbuOdeh, Raed; Al-Mawlawi, Naema; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A; Bohol, Marie Fe F; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N; Hasan, Haydar A; AbuOdeh, Lamees; Nasrallah, Gheyath K

    2015-07-01

    Torque Teno virus (TTV) has been associated with non A-G hepatitis. The goal of this study was to estimate the infection rates and genotypic characteristics of TTV in the State of Qatar. A total of 644 blood samples representing different nationalities: (i) Qatari (118) and (ii) non-Qatari (526) nationals (mostly from Arab and South Eeast Asia countries) were tested for the presence of TTV DNA by nested PCR. The majority (573) of the blood samples belonged to healthy blood donors, whereas 54 and 53 of the blood samples belonged to patients infected with hepatitis B virus (HBV) and hepatitis C virus (HCV), respectively. The results obtained showed that the TTV infection rates in the healthy blood donors, and those infected with HBV or HCV patients were 81.4, 90.75 and 84.9%, respectively. Significant association between TTV viremia and age, or nationality was observed. Sequence analysis of PCR fragments amplified from the 5'-untranslated region (5'-UTR) of all (531) TTV positive samples showed that 65.5% (348/531) of the PCR fragment sequences were classified into main genogroup 3, followed by main genogroups 5 (24%), 2 (5.8%), and 1 (4.7%). Genogroup 4 was not detected among the our studied subjects. Phylogenetic and pairwise analyses using sequences from TTV viremic samples also showed an overall close similarity to the main genogroup 3. In conclusion, there was no significant difference in the rates of TTV detection among Qataris and non-Qataris and several genotypes, mainly genotype 3, were isolated.

  5. Detection and description of a particular Ostreid herpesvirus 1 genotype associated with massive mortality outbreaks of Pacific oysters, Crassostrea gigas, in France in 2008.

    PubMed

    Segarra, Amélie; Pépin, Jean François; Arzul, Isabelle; Morga, Benjamin; Faury, Nicole; Renault, Tristan

    2010-10-01

    Ostreid herpesvirus 1 (OsHV-1) infections have been reported around the world and are associated with high mortalities of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas). In the summer 2008, abnormal mortality rates ranging from 80% to 100% were reported in France and affected only Pacific oysters. Analyses of oyster samples collected during mortality outbreaks demonstrated a significant detection of OsHV-1 (75% of analysed batches), which appeared stronger than previous years. DNA sequencing based on C and IA regions was carried out on 28 batches of OsHV-1 infected Pacific oysters collected in 2008. Polymorphisms were described in both the C and IA regions and characterized a genotype of OsHV-1 not already reported and termed OsHV-1 microVar. A microsatellite zone present in the C region showed several deletions. Additionally, 44 isolates collected in France and in the USA, from 1995 to 2007 were sequenced and compared to the 2008 sequences. The analyses of 76 sequences showed OsHV-1 microVar detection only in 2008 isolates. These data suggest that OsHV-1 microVar can be assumed as an emergent genotype.

  6. [Detection of a clonal complex with Brucella abortus biovar 2 genotype as founder in B. abortus isolates from Argentina].

    PubMed

    Hollender, Daiana; Conde, Sandra B; Salustio, Eduardo; Samartino, Luis E

    2013-01-01

    Brucella abortus is the causative agent of bovine brucellosis, a worldwide zoonosis. Up to date, eight biovars of B. abortus have been described. In Argentina, biovar 1 is the most frequently isolated. However, biovar 2, which is more pathogenic than biovar 1, is also found. Molecular methods for subtyping isolates are necessary for allowing epidemiological surveillance and control of eradication programs. Due to the genetic homogeneity of the genus Brucella, the development of molecular typing tools has been difficult. The publication of microorganism genomes facilitates the design of this approach. The aim of this work was to employ a Multiple Locus VNTR Analysis (MLVA) scheme for strains from Argentina isolated in our laboratory. From the 56 isolates analyzed, 47 different genotypic profiles were obtained. All the strains typed as biovar 2 showed the same profile. This scheme allowed assigning each isolate to the biovar it belongs to. All the genotypes were related using the goeBURST analysis and biovar 2 was proposed as founder.

  7. Performance assessment of the GenoType MTBDRsl test and DNA sequencing for detection of second-line and ethambutol drug resistance among patients infected with multidrug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Lun; Chi, Ting-Lin; Wu, Mei-Hua; Jou, Ruwen

    2011-07-01

    The GenoType MTBDRsl test and DNA sequencing were used to rapidly detect second-line drug- and ethambutol (EMB)-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The ability of these two assays to detect the presence of mutations associated with resistance to fluoroquinolones (FLQ), aminoglycosides/cyclic peptide (AG/CP), and EMB in the gyrA, rrs, and embB genes (for the GenoType MTBDRsl test) and gyrA, gyrB, rrs, eis, embC, embA, embB, and embR genes (for DNA sequencing) was compared to that of conventional agar proportion drug susceptibility testing (DST). We evaluated 234 multidrug-resistant (MDR) M. tuberculosis isolates. The two molecular methods had high levels of specificity (95.8 to 100%). The sensitivities for FLQ resistance detection for both methods were 85.1%. For AG (kanamycin [KM] and amikacin [AM]) and CP (capreomycin CAP]), the sensitivities of resistance detection using the GenoType MTBDRsl test were 43.2%, 84.2%, and 71.4%, respectively, while with the inclusion of an extra gene, eis, in sequencing, the sensitivity reached 70.3% for detection of KM resistance. The sensitivities of EMB resistance detection were 56.2% and 90.7% with the GenoType MTBDRsl test and sequencing, respectively. We found that the GenoType MTBDRsl test can rapidly detect resistance to FLQ, CAP, and AM. The accuracy of the GenoType MTBDRsl test for the detection of FLQ and AM resistance was comparable to that of conventional DST; however, the test was less accurate for the detection of KM and EMB resistance and demonstrated a poor predictive value for CAP resistance. We recommend including new alleles consisting of the eis promoter and embB genes in molecular analysis. However, conventional DST is necessary to rule out false-negative results from molecular assays.

  8. Detection and phylogenetic characterization of hepatitis E virus genotype 3 in a captive wild boar in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Wiratsudakul, Anuwat; Sariya, Ladawan; Prompiram, Phirom; Tantawet, Siriporn; Suraruangchai, Duangkhamol; Sedwisai, Poonyapat; Sangkachai, Nareerat; Suksai, Parut; Ratanakorn, Parntep

    2012-09-01

    Hepatitis E virus (HEV) was studied in different types of wild boar captive settings in Thailand, including a wildlife breeding research station, zoo, and commercial wild boar farm, which were located in different locations of Thailand. Fifty-one fecal samples were collected and screened for HEV RNA and then analyzed. One sample obtained from a wildlife breeding research station in Ratchaburi province was HEV positive. Phylogenetic characterization revealed that the virus was HEV genotype 3 and belongs to subgroup 3e, which is closely related to HEV recently isolated from domestic pigs and humans in the country. It was hypothesized that HEV is shared among wild boars, domestic pigs, and humans in Thailand.

  9. Quick survey for detection, identification and characterization of Acanthamoeba genotypes from some selected soil and water samples across Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Tanveer, Tania; Hameed, Abdul; Gul, Asma; Matin, Abdul

    2015-01-01

    Acanthamoeba is an opportunistic protozoan pathogen which is widely distributed in nature and plays a pivotal role in ecosystem. Acanthamoeba species may cause blinding keratitis and fatal granulomatous encephalitis involving central nervous system. In this study, we investigated the presence of Acanthamoeba in soil and water resources of Pakistan. Here, Acanthamoeba were recovered on non-nutrient agar plate lawn with E. coli and identified by morphological characteristics of the cyst. Furthermore PCR was performed with genus-specific primers followed by direct sequencing of the PCR product for molecular identification. Overall our PCR and sequencing results confirmed pathogenic genotypes including T4 and T15 from both soil and water samples. This is our first report of Acanthamoeba isolation from both soil and water resources of Pakistan which may serve as a potential treat to human health across the country.

  10. Genotyping-By-Sequencing (GBS) Detects Genetic Structure and Confirms Behavioral QTL in Tame and Aggressive Foxes (Vulpes vulpes).

    PubMed

    Johnson, Jennifer L; Wittgenstein, Helena; Mitchell, Sharon E; Hyma, Katie E; Temnykh, Svetlana V; Kharlamova, Anastasiya V; Gulevich, Rimma G; Vladimirova, Anastasiya V; Fong, Hiu Wa Flora; Acland, Gregory M; Trut, Lyudmila N; Kukekova, Anna V

    2015-01-01

    The silver fox (Vulpes vulpes) offers a novel model for studying the genetics of social behavior and animal domestication. Selection of foxes, separately, for tame and for aggressive behavior has yielded two strains with markedly different, genetically determined, behavioral phenotypes. Tame strain foxes are eager to establish human contact while foxes from the aggressive strain are aggressive and difficult to handle. These strains have been maintained as separate outbred lines for over 40 generations but their genetic structure has not been previously investigated. We applied a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach to provide insights into the genetic composition of these fox populations. Sequence analysis of EcoT22I genomic libraries of tame and aggressive foxes identified 48,294 high quality SNPs. Population structure analysis revealed genetic divergence between the two strains and more diversity in the aggressive strain than in the tame one. Significant differences in allele frequency between the strains were identified for 68 SNPs. Three of these SNPs were located on fox chromosome 14 within an interval of a previously identified behavioral QTL, further supporting the importance of this region for behavior. The GBS SNP data confirmed that significant genetic diversity has been preserved in both fox populations despite many years of selective breeding. Analysis of SNP allele frequencies in the two populations identified several regions of genetic divergence between the tame and aggressive foxes, some of which may represent targets of selection for behavior. The GBS protocol used in this study significantly expanded genomic resources for the fox, and can be adapted for SNP discovery and genotyping in other canid species.

  11. Genotyping-By-Sequencing (GBS) Detects Genetic Structure and Confirms Behavioral QTL in Tame and Aggressive Foxes (Vulpes vulpes)

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Jennifer L.; Wittgenstein, Helena; Mitchell, Sharon E.; Hyma, Katie E.; Temnykh, Svetlana V.; Kharlamova, Anastasiya V.; Gulevich, Rimma G.; Vladimirova, Anastasiya V.; Fong, Hiu Wa Flora; Acland, Gregory M.; Trut, Lyudmila N.; Kukekova, Anna V.

    2015-01-01

    The silver fox (Vulpes vulpes) offers a novel model for studying the genetics of social behavior and animal domestication. Selection of foxes, separately, for tame and for aggressive behavior has yielded two strains with markedly different, genetically determined, behavioral phenotypes. Tame strain foxes are eager to establish human contact while foxes from the aggressive strain are aggressive and difficult to handle. These strains have been maintained as separate outbred lines for over 40 generations but their genetic structure has not been previously investigated. We applied a genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS) approach to provide insights into the genetic composition of these fox populations. Sequence analysis of EcoT22I genomic libraries of tame and aggressive foxes identified 48,294 high quality SNPs. Population structure analysis revealed genetic divergence between the two strains and more diversity in the aggressive strain than in the tame one. Significant differences in allele frequency between the strains were identified for 68 SNPs. Three of these SNPs were located on fox chromosome 14 within an interval of a previously identified behavioral QTL, further supporting the importance of this region for behavior. The GBS SNP data confirmed that significant genetic diversity has been preserved in both fox populations despite many years of selective breeding. Analysis of SNP allele frequencies in the two populations identified several regions of genetic divergence between the tame and aggressive foxes, some of which may represent targets of selection for behavior. The GBS protocol used in this study significantly expanded genomic resources for the fox, and can be adapted for SNP discovery and genotyping in other canid species. PMID:26061395

  12. Molecular epidemiology of rotavirus and norovirus in Ile-Ife, Nigeria: high prevalence of G12P[8] rotavirus strains and detection of a rare norovirus genotype.

    PubMed

    Oluwatoyin Japhet, Margaret; Adeyemi Adesina, Olufisayo; Famurewa, Oladiran; Svensson, Lennart; Nordgren, Johan

    2012-09-01

    Rotavirus (RV) and norovirus (NoV) are considered the most common causes of viral gastroenteritis in children. In this study, the prevalence of RV and NoV infection in 55 children with diarrhea from the rural community Akinlalu in Southwestern Nigeria was investigated using real-time PCR assays. The RV and NoV strains were genotyped by PCR and/or sequencing. RV and NoV infections occurred with a prevalence of 34.5% and 25.5% respectively, with predominance in children <1 year. Most infections occurred during the dry season with increasing prevalence of RV as the dry season progressed (October-January). Infections with RV VP6 subgroup (SG) II were more prevalent (27.3%) than SGI (7.3%). Similarly, NoV genogroup II infections were more common (23.6%) than genogroup I (1.8%). Five children out of 55 (9.1%) were co-infected with both RV and NoV. Notably, G12P[8] was the predominant RV strain (36.8%, n = 7), observed for the first time in Nigeria. The VP7 gene of the G12 strains clustered within lineage III, sharing high nucleotide identity with each other (>99%) indicating introduction in Nigeria from a single donor. Furthermore, a putative novel genotype within genogroup I NoV was detected, which till date has only been reported once in humans. To conclude, a high prevalence of the emerging G12P[8] RV strain was observed for the first time in Nigeria, as well as a putative novel NoV genotype in humans. These results provide new information which can be important for future vaccine evaluations and possible introduction in Nigeria.

  13. Robust methods to detect disease-genotype association in genetic association studies: calculate p-values using exact conditional enumeration instead of simulated permutations or asymptotic approximations.

    PubMed

    Langaas, Mette; Bakke, Øyvind

    2014-12-01

    In genetic association studies, detecting disease-genotype association is a primary goal. We study seven robust test statistics for such association when the underlying genetic model is unknown, for data on disease status (case or control) and genotype (three genotypes of a biallelic genetic marker). In such studies, p-values have predominantly been calculated by asymptotic approximations or by simulated permutations. We consider an exact method, conditional enumeration. When the number of simulated permutations tends to infinity, the permutation p-value approaches the conditional enumeration p-value, but calculating the latter is much more efficient than performing simulated permutations. We have studied case-control sample sizes with 500-5000 cases and 500-15,000 controls, and significance levels from 5 × 10(-8) to 0.05, thus our results are applicable to genetic association studies with only a few genetic markers under study, intermediate follow-up studies, and genome-wide association studies. Our main findings are: (i) If all monotone genetic models are of interest, the best performance in the situations under study is achieved for the robust test statistics based on the maximum over a range of Cochran-Armitage trend tests with different scores and for the constrained likelihood ratio test. (ii) For significance levels below 0.05, for the test statistics under study, asymptotic approximations may give a test size up to 20 times the nominal level, and should therefore be used with caution. (iii) Calculating p-values based on exact conditional enumeration is a powerful, valid and computationally feasible approach, and we advocate its use in genetic association studies.

  14. Evaluation of the detection of 14 high-risk human papillomaviruses with HPV 16 and HPV 18 genotyping for cervical cancer screening

    PubMed Central

    BIAN, MEI-LU; CHENG, JIAO-YING; MA, LI; CONG, XIAO; LIU, JUN; CHEN, YING; CHEN, XI

    2013-01-01

    The American Society for Colposcopy and Cervical Pathology (ASCCP) suggests that women ≥30 years old, with a negative cytopathological test but a positive high-risk (HR) human papillomavirus (HPV) test should undergo HPV 16 and HPV 18 genotyping. If this test is positive, immediate cervical pathology is required. Therefore, the aim of this study was to evaluate the effectiveness and clinical value of testing for 14 HR HPVs with HPV 16 and HPV 18 genotyping for cervical cancer (CC) screening. A total of 424 females from the China-Japan Friendship Hospital were selected and randomly divided into two groups (A and B). All participants underwent two different testing methods: the liquid-based cytology test (LCT) and a HPV DNA test. For the HPV DNA test, participants in group A underwent the hybrid capture II (HC-II) testing method while participants in group B were tested using the quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR; HBRT-H14) method. The sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value for the detection of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) grade II or greater using HBRT-H14 were 96.30, 78.17, 23.21 and 99.68%, respectively. In Group B, compared with other HR HPV types, HPV 16 and HPV 18 infection led to the increased possibility of cervical lesions graded CIN II or higher (8.11 and 51.28%, respectively). A significant difference in the rates of CC and CIN II or higher was observed among women who were i) infected with HPV 16 and/or HPV 18, ii) infected with other HR HPV types and iii) diagnosed as negative for HR HPV infection (χ2=93.976, P=0.0001). In conclusion, HBRT-H14 is applicable for CC screening with the advantage of genotyping for HPV 16 and HPV 18, which may help to improve triage management for women with negative cytology. PMID:24223668

  15. Development of a Multiplex PCR Test with Automated Genotyping Targeting E7 for Detection of Six High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Paes, Eliana Ferreira; de Assis, Angela Maria; Teixeira, Cirbia S Campos; Aoki, Francisco Hideo; Teixeira, Julio Cesar

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is caused by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) and viral detection tests aid in the diagnosis of precursor lesions. In the present study, a molecular test for detection of high-risk HPV DNA, called E7-HPV, was standardized and assessed in samples from women with pre-cancerous lesions. The development of the E7-HPV test for detection and genotyping of six high-risk HPV (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 45 and 52), consisted of evaluating primer quality and adjusting the multiplex PCR conditions. Primer design was based on the E7 region of each HPV, and the fluorochrome 6-FAM was added to PCR primers. Viral detection was performed by capillary electrophoresis in automated sequencer in samples obtained from 60 women (55 with ASC-H/HSIL cytology) from August to September 2013. A non-inferiority analysis was conducted with the cobas HPV test as a reference and following international guidelines for the development of new tests. The two tests had a high concordance rate in HPV16 detection (kappa=0.972), with only one discordant case (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3, negative with cobas and positive for HPV16 by E7-HPV) and complete agreement in HPV18 detection. When comparing detection of all high-risk HPV, three cases were positive with cobas but negative with E7-HPV, and another three cases were negative with cobas but positive with E7-HPV (HPV16, 31 and 52). When we evaluate the cases initially suspected by cytology, the two tests had the same sensitivity in detection CIN2 or worse. In conclusion, the E7-HPV test has satisfactory initial results, and its development can be continued.

  16. High sensitivity, loop-mediated isothermal amplification combined with colorimetric gold-nanoparticle probes for visual detection of high risk human papillomavirus genotypes 16 and 18.

    PubMed

    Kumvongpin, Ratchanida; Jearanaikool, Patcharee; Wilailuckana, Chotechana; Sae-Ung, Nattaya; Prasongdee, Prinya; Daduang, Sakda; Wongsena, Metee; Boonsiri, Patcharee; Kiatpathomchai, Wansika; Swangvaree, Sukumarn Sanersak; Sandee, Alisa; Daduang, Jureerut

    2016-08-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) causes cervical cancer. HPV16 and HPV18 are the most prevalent strains of the virus reported in women worldwide. Loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) is an alternative method for DNA detection under isothermal conditions. However, it results in a turbid amplified product which is not easily detected by the naked eye. This study aimed to develop an improved technique by using gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) attached to a single-stranded DNA probe for the detection of HPV16 and HPV18. Detection of the LAMP product by AuNP color change was compared with detection by visual turbidity. The optimal conditions for this new LAMP-AuNP assay were an incubation time of 20min and a temperature of 65°C. After LAMP amplification was complete, its products were hybridized with the AuNP probe for 5min and then detected by the addition of magnesium salt. The color changed from red to blue as a result of aggregation of the AuNP probe under high ionic strength conditions produced by the addition of the salt. The sensitivity of the LAMP-AuNP assay was greater than the LAMP turbidity assay by up to 10-fold for both HPV genotypes. The LAMP-AuNP assay showed higher sensitivity and ease of visualization than did the LAMP turbidity for the detection of HPV16 and HPV18. Additionally, AuNP-HPV16 and AuNP-HPV18 probes were stable for over 1year. The combination of LAMP and the AuNP-probe colorimetric assay offers a simple, rapid and highly sensitive alternative diagnostic tool for the detection of HPV16 and HPV18 in district hospitals or field studies.

  17. Genotype-based association models of complex diseases to detect gene-gene and gene-environment interactions.

    PubMed

    Lobach, Iryna; Fan, Ruzong; Manga, Prashiela

    A central problem in genetic epidemiology is to identify and rank genetic markers involved in a disease. Complex diseases, such as cancer, hypertension, diabetes, are thought to be caused by an interaction of a panel of genetic factors, that can be identified by markers, which modulate environmental factors. Moreover, the effect of each genetic marker may be small. Hence, the association signal may be missed unless a large sample is considered, or a priori biomedical data are used. Recent advances generated a vast variety of a priori information, including linkage maps and information about gene regulatory dependence assembled into curated pathway databases. We propose a genotype-based approach that takes into account linkage disequilibrium (LD) information between genetic markers that are in moderate LD while modeling gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. A major advantage of our method is that the observed genetic information enters a model directly thus eliminating the need to estimate haplotype-phase. Our approach results in an algorithm that is inexpensive computationally and does not suffer from bias induced by haplotype-phase ambiguity. We investigated our model in a series of simulation experiments and demonstrated that the proposed approach results in estimates that are nearly unbiased and have small variability. We applied our method to the analysis of data from a melanoma case-control study and investigated interaction between a set of pigmentation genes and environmental factors defined by age and gender. Furthermore, an application of our method is demonstrated using a study of Alcohol Dependence.

  18. A sensitive one-step TaqMan amplification approach for detection of rubella virus clade I and II genotypes in clinical samples.

    PubMed

    Claus, C; Bergs, S; Emmrich, N C; Hübschen, J M; Mankertz, A; Liebert, U G

    2017-02-01

    Although teratogenic rubella virus (RV) causes a vaccine-preventable disease, it is still endemic in several countries worldwide. Thus, there is a constant risk of RV importation into non-endemic areas. RV monitoring, especially during measles and Zika virus outbreaks, requires reliable diagnostic tools. For this study, a TaqMan-based one-step reverse transcription-quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay, with the p90 gene as a novel and so far unexplored target for detection of clade I and II genotypes, was developed and evaluated. Automated nucleic acid extraction was carried out. Performance characteristics of the TaqMan RT-qPCR assay were determined for a RV plasmid standard and RNA extracted from virus-infected cell culture supernatants representing clade I and II genotypes. Diagnostic specificity and sensitivity were validated against other RNA and DNA viruses, relevant for RV diagnostic approaches and for RV-positive clinical samples, respectively. The assay is specific and highly sensitive with a limit of detection as low as five to one copies per reaction or 200 infectious virus particles per ml. The coefficients of variation (CV) were specified as intra- (within one run) and inter- (between different runs) assay variation, and calculated based on the standard deviations for the obtained Ct values of the respective samples. Intra- and inter-assay CV values were low, with a maximum of 3.4% and 2.4%, respectively. The assay was shown to be suitable and specific for the analysis of clinical samples. With p90 as a novel target, the highly sensitive and specific TaqMan assay outlined in this study is suitable for RV diagnosis worldwide.

  19. Primary Screening for Cervical Cancer Based on High-Risk Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Detection and HPV 16 and HPV 18 Genotyping, in Comparison to Cytology

    PubMed Central

    Constantinidis, Theocharis; Constantinidis, Theodoros C.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives The objective of the present study is to assess the performance of a high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) DNA test with individual HPV-16/HPV-18 genotyping as a method for primary cervical cancer screening compared with liquid-based cytology (LBC) in a population of Greek women taking part in routine cervical cancer screening. Methods The study, conducted by the “HEllenic Real life Multicentric cErvical Screening” (HERMES) study group, involved the recruitment of 4,009 women, aged 25–55, who took part in routine cervical screening at nine Gynecology Departments in Greece. At first visit cervical specimens were collected for LBC and HPV testing using the Roche Cobas 4800 system. Women found positive for either cytology or HPV were referred for colposcopy, whereas women negative for both tests will be retested after three years. The study is ongoing and the results of the first screening round are reported herein. Results Valid results for cytology and HPV testing were obtained for 3,993 women. The overall prevalence of HR-HPV was 12.7%, of HPV-16 2.7% and of HPV-18 1.4%. Of those referred for colposcopy, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse (CIN2+) was detected in 41 women (1.07%). At the threshold of CIN2+, cytology [atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) or worse] and HPV testing showed a sensitivity of 53.7% and 100% respectively, without change between age groups. Cytology and HPV testing showed specificity of 96.8% and 90.3% respectively, which was increased in older women (≥30) in comparison to younger ones (25–29). Genotyping for HPV16/18 had similar accuracy to cytology for the detection of CIN2+ (sensitivity: 58.5%; specificity 97.5%) as well as for triage to colposcopy (sensitivity: 58.5% vs 53.7% for cytology). Conclusion HPV testing has much better sensitivity than cytology to identify high-grade cervical lesions with slightly lower specificity. HPV testing with individual HPV-16/HPV-18

  20. The National Tay Sachs and Allied Diseases Association.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zeitlin, Paula

    1986-01-01

    The National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association is involved in education, research, and prevention of Tay-Sachs, an inherited metabolic disorder which destroys the central nervous system, and over 30 related disorders. The group features a parent peer group network and a support group for carrier couples. (CL)

  1. National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association, Inc.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1977

    1977-01-01

    Reviewed are the history and organization, purpose and programs, and public services of the National Tay-Sachs and Allied Diseases Association, an organization geared toward eradicating Tay-Sachs disease (a hereditary disorder affecting primarily Jewish infants which generally leads to deterioration and death by the child's fifth year). (SBH)

  2. 59 FR- Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-02-03

    ... Vietnam era and the subsequent development of Hodgkin's disease and porphyria cutanea tarda (PCT). The... consistent with chloracne Hodgkin's disease Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma Porphyria cutanea tarda Soft-tissue... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AG69 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents...

  3. The use of genetic markers for detecting DNA polymorphism, genotype identification and phylogenetic relationships among banana cultivars.

    PubMed

    Venkatachalam, L; Sreedhar, R V; Bhagyalakshmi, N

    2008-06-01

    Genetic variations and relationships among 21 commercially important banana cultivars of South India were evaluated using 50 decamer RAPD primers and 12 ISSR primers. The primers were selected after a preliminary screening of several such primers for their ability to produce clear and reproducible patterns of multiple bands. The analyses resulted in the amplification of totally 641 bands of 200-3100bp, of which 382 bands were polymorphic, corresponding to nearly 60% genetic diversity. The RAPD and ISSR surveys between pairs of 21 cultivars revealed 60.15% and 56.73% of polymorphic bands, respectively. A strong linear relationship was observed between the Resolving power (Rp) of the primer and its ability to distinguish genotypes. Based on these data, a genetic similarity matrix was established and a dendrogram for each set of primers was developed by UPGMA. The genetic similarity coefficients in RAPD analysis ranged from 0.3177 to 0.7818 and in ISSR analysis from 0.1800 to 0.8462. A fingerprinting key was generated where the presence/absence of specific RAPD/ISSR bands were recorded for each cultivar. The presence of a specific RAPD (OPC-5(800)) band was observed for an endemic cultivar--Nanjanagudu Rasabale (NR). The study resulted in the identification and molecular classification of South Indian banana cultivars of which Robusta and Williams are global and others have either limited geographical distribution or purely endemic to South India. A group of eight cultivars was identified that are highly distinct from one another. The members of this group may be useful for generating 2X and 4X breeding populations for further use in breeding secondary triploid hybrids.

  4. Genotype-based association models of complex diseases to detect gene-gene and gene-environment interactions

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ruzong; Manga, Prashiela

    2015-01-01

    A central problem in genetic epidemiology is to identify and rank genetic markers involved in a disease. Complex diseases, such as cancer, hypertension, diabetes, are thought to be caused by an interaction of a panel of genetic factors, that can be identified by markers, which modulate environmental factors. Moreover, the effect of each genetic marker may be small. Hence, the association signal may be missed unless a large sample is considered, or a priori biomedical data are used. Recent advances generated a vast variety of a priori information, including linkage maps and information about gene regulatory dependence assembled into curated pathway databases. We propose a genotype-based approach that takes into account linkage disequilibrium (LD) information between genetic markers that are in moderate LD while modeling gene-gene and gene-environment interactions. A major advantage of our method is that the observed genetic information enters a model directly thus eliminating the need to estimate haplotype-phase. Our approach results in an algorithm that is inexpensive computationally and does not suffer from bias induced by haplotype-phase ambiguity. We investigated our model in a series of simulation experiments and demonstrated that the proposed approach results in estimates that are nearly unbiased and have small variability. We applied our method to the analysis of data from a melanoma case-control study and investigated interaction between a set of pigmentation genes and environmental factors defined by age and gender. Furthermore, an application of our method is demonstrated using a study of Alcohol Dependence. PMID:26191336

  5. Hybrid microarray based on double biomolecular markers of DNA and carbohydrate for simultaneous genotypic and phenotypic detection of cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Shin, Hwa Hui; Seo, Jeong Hyun; Kim, Chang Sup; Hwang, Byeong Hee; Cha, Hyung Joon

    2016-05-15

    Life-threatening diarrheal cholera is usually caused by water or food contaminated with cholera toxin-producing Vibrio cholerae. For the prevention and surveillance of cholera, it is crucial to rapidly and precisely detect and identify the etiological causes, such as V. cholerae and/or its toxin. In the present work, we propose the use of a hybrid double biomolecular marker (DBM) microarray containing 16S rRNA-based DNA capture probe to genotypically identify V. cholerae and GM1 pentasaccharide capture probe to phenotypically detect cholera toxin. We employed a simple sample preparation method to directly obtain genomic DNA and secreted cholera toxin as target materials from bacterial cells. By utilizing the constructed DBM microarray and prepared samples, V. cholerae and cholera toxin were detected successfully, selectively, and simultaneously; the DBM microarray was able to analyze the pathogenicity of the identified V. cholerae regardless of whether the bacteria produces toxin. Therefore, our proposed DBM microarray is a new effective platform for identifying bacteria and analyzing bacterial pathogenicity simultaneously.

  6. PBHMDA: Path-Based Human Microbe-Disease Association Prediction

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Zhi-An; Chen, Xing; Zhu, Zexuan; Liu, Hongsheng; Yan, Gui-Ying; You, Zhu-Hong; Wen, Zhenkun

    2017-01-01

    With the advance of sequencing technology and microbiology, the microorganisms have been found to be closely related to various important human diseases. The increasing identification of human microbe-disease associations offers important insights into the underlying disease mechanism understanding from the perspective of human microbes, which are greatly helpful for investigating pathogenesis, promoting early diagnosis and improving precision medicine. However, the current knowledge in this domain is still limited and far from complete. Here, we present the computational model of Path-Based Human Microbe-Disease Association prediction (PBHMDA) based on the integration of known microbe-disease associations and the Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity for microbes and diseases. A special depth-first search algorithm was implemented to traverse all possible paths between microbes and diseases for inferring the most possible disease-related microbes. As a result, PBHMDA obtained a reliable prediction performance with AUCs (The area under ROC curve) of 0.9169 and 0.8767 in the frameworks of both global and local leave-one-out cross validations, respectively. Based on 5-fold cross validation, average AUCs of 0.9082 ± 0.0061 further demonstrated the efficiency of the proposed model. For the case studies of liver cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, and asthma, 9, 7, and 9 out of predicted microbes in the top 10 have been confirmed by previously published experimental literatures, respectively. We have publicly released the prioritized microbe-disease associations, which may help to select the most potential pairs for further guiding the experimental confirmation. In conclusion, PBHMDA may have potential to boost the discovery of novel microbe-disease associations and aid future research efforts toward microbe involvement in human disease mechanism. The code and data of PBHMDA is freely available at http://www.escience.cn/system/file?fileId=85214. PMID:28275370

  7. PBHMDA: Path-Based Human Microbe-Disease Association Prediction.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zhi-An; Chen, Xing; Zhu, Zexuan; Liu, Hongsheng; Yan, Gui-Ying; You, Zhu-Hong; Wen, Zhenkun

    2017-01-01

    With the advance of sequencing technology and microbiology, the microorganisms have been found to be closely related to various important human diseases. The increasing identification of human microbe-disease associations offers important insights into the underlying disease mechanism understanding from the perspective of human microbes, which are greatly helpful for investigating pathogenesis, promoting early diagnosis and improving precision medicine. However, the current knowledge in this domain is still limited and far from complete. Here, we present the computational model of Path-Based Human Microbe-Disease Association prediction (PBHMDA) based on the integration of known microbe-disease associations and the Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity for microbes and diseases. A special depth-first search algorithm was implemented to traverse all possible paths between microbes and diseases for inferring the most possible disease-related microbes. As a result, PBHMDA obtained a reliable prediction performance with AUCs (The area under ROC curve) of 0.9169 and 0.8767 in the frameworks of both global and local leave-one-out cross validations, respectively. Based on 5-fold cross validation, average AUCs of 0.9082 ± 0.0061 further demonstrated the efficiency of the proposed model. For the case studies of liver cirrhosis, type 1 diabetes, and asthma, 9, 7, and 9 out of predicted microbes in the top 10 have been confirmed by previously published experimental literatures, respectively. We have publicly released the prioritized microbe-disease associations, which may help to select the most potential pairs for further guiding the experimental confirmation. In conclusion, PBHMDA may have potential to boost the discovery of novel microbe-disease associations and aid future research efforts toward microbe involvement in human disease mechanism. The code and data of PBHMDA is freely available at http://www.escience.cn/system/file?fileId=85214.

  8. Inflammatory bowel disease associations with HLA Class II genes

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, R.; Yang, H.; Targan, S.

    1994-09-01

    A PCR-SSOP assay has been used to analyze HLA-Class II DRB1 and DQB1 alleles in 378 Caucasians from a population in Southern California. The data has been analyzed separately for the Ashkenasi Jews and non-Jewish patients (n=286) and controls (n=92). Two common clinical forms of inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) have been studied: ulcerative colitis (UC) and Crohn`s disease (CD). In CD, we observed a susceptible effect with the rare DR1 allele - DRB*0103 [O.R.=4.56; 95% CI (0.96, 42.97); p=0.03]; a trend for an increase in DRB1*0103 was also observed in UC patients. A susceptible effect with DRB1*1502 [O.R.=5.20; 95% CI (1.10, 48.99); p=0.02] was observed in non-Jewish UC patients. This susceptible effect was restricted to UC ANCA-positive (antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies) patients. In addition, a significant association with DRB1*1101-DQB1*0301 [O.R.=9.46; 95% CI (1.30, 413.87); p=0.01] was seen with UC among non-Jewish patients: this haplotype was increased with CD among non-Jewish patients. Two protective haplotypes were detected among CD non-Jewish patients: DRB1*1301-DQB1*0603 [O.R.=0.34; 95% CI (0.09, 1.09); p=0.04], and DRB*0404-DQB1*0302 [O.R.=<0.08; 95% CI (0.0, 0.84); p=0.01]. When the same data were analyzed at the serology level, we observed a positive association in UC with DR2 [O.R.6.77; 95% CI (2.47, 22.95); p=2 x 10{sup -4}], and a positive association in CD with DR1 [O.R.=2.63; 95% CI (1.14, 6.62); p=0.01] consistent with previous reports. Thus, some IBD disease associations appear to be common to both UC and CD, while some are unique to one disease.

  9. Evaluation of detection methods for genetically modified traits in genotypes resistant to European corn borer and herbicides.

    PubMed

    Ma, B L; Subedi, K; Evenson, L; Stewart, G

    2005-01-01

    Detection of genetically modified (GM) traits in corn (Zea mays L.) is urgently needed for preservation of genetic identity and marketing GM products. A laboratory study was conducted to evaluate the efficiency, accuracy, and reliability of different analytical methods to detect GM traits in corn. Samples with known fractions of GM concentrations (Bacillus thuringiensis [Bt], Liberty Link [LL] and stacked [Bt/LL] genes) from commercial seed companies and those derived from yellow kernels in a white corn ear, outcrossed by pollen of neighboring Bt hybrid, were tested by lateral flow quick test kits and by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA)-based test strips purchased from different companies. Liberty Link hybrids are resistant to glufosinate (Liberty or Basta) herbicides, whereas Bt corn is developed for the control of European corn borer (Ostrinia nubilalis). Selected samples of GM concentrations were also tested in a commercial laboratory using DNA-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) test. The results demonstrated that qualitative lateral flow quick tests could detect samples containing 1% or higher Bt and 2% or higher LL concentrations within the recommended time limit of the test. Faint test lines for samples containing 0.5 to 1% Bt or 1 to 2% LL concentrations appeared if samples remained in the test cup overnight. ELISA test strips detected the Bt content semiquantitatively in the range of 0.5 to 2.0%. Grain samples derived from non-Bt corn outcrossed by neighboring Bt pollen had usually lower GM concentrations than commercial GM seed samples. Both ELISA- and DNA-based PCR tests distinguished samples with GM concentrations between 0.1 to 0.5%, but the precision of quantification at this range was very low and results were highly inconsistent.

  10. Design of allele-specific primers and detection of the human ABO genotyping to avoid the pseudopositive problem.

    PubMed

    Yaku, Hidenobu; Yukimasa, Tetsuo; Nakano, Shu-ichi; Sugimoto, Naoki; Oka, Hiroaki

    2008-11-01

    PCR experiments using DNA primers forming mismatch pairing with template lambda DNA at the 3' end were carried out in order to develop allele-specific primers capable of detecting SNP in genomes without generating pseudopositive amplification products, and thus avoiding the so-called pseudopositive problem. Detectable amounts of PCR products were obtained when primers forming a single or two mismatch pairings at the 3' end were used. In particular, 3' terminal A/C or T/C (primer/template) mismatches tended to allow PCR amplification to proceed, resulting in pseudopositive results in many cases. While less PCR product was observed for primers forming three terminal mismatch pairings, target DNA sequences were efficiently amplified by primers forming two mismatch pairings next to the terminal G/C base pairing. These results indicate that selecting a primer having a 3' terminal nucleotide that recognizes the SNP nucleotide and the next two nucleotides that form mismatch pairings with the template sequence can be used as an allele-specific primer that eliminates the pseudopositive problem. Trials with the human ABO genes demonstrated that this primer design is also useful for detecting a single base pair difference in gene sequences with a signal-to-noise ratio of at least 45.

  11. Genotypic Detection of rpoB and katG Gene Mutations Associated with Rifampicin and Isoniazid Resistance in Mycobacterium Tuberculosis Isolates: A Local Scenario (Kelantan)

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Nurul-Ain; Ismail, Mohd Fazli; Noor, Siti Suraiya MD; Camalxaman, Siti Nazrina

    2016-01-01

    Background Drug resistant tuberculosis (DR-TB) remains a public health issue that is of major concern on a global scale. The characterisation of clinical isolates may provide key information regarding the underlying mechanisms of drug resistance, and helps to augment therapeutic options. This study aims to evaluate the frequency of gene mutations associated with Rifampicin (RIF) and Isoniazid (INH) resistance among nine clinical isolates. Methods A total of nine drug resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis clinical isolates were screened for genetic mutations in rpoB and katusing polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and DNA sequencing. Genotypic analysis was performed to detect the mutations in the sequence of the target genes. Results Our findings reveal that 80% of the isolates possess mutations at codon 119 (His119Tyr) and 135 (Arg135Trp and Ser135Leu) within the rpoB gene; and 70% possess mutations in the katG gene at codon 238 with amino acid change (Leu238Arg). Conclusion Findings from this study provide an overview of the current situation of RIF and INH resistance in a hospital Universiti Sains Malaysia (HUSM) located in Kelantan, Malaysia, which could facilitate molecular-based detection methods of drug-resistant strains. Further information regarding the molecular mechanisms involved in resistance in RR-/MDR-TB should be addressed in the near future. PMID:27540322

  12. PCR based detection of HPV 16 and 18 genotypes in normal oral mucosa of tobacco users and non-users.

    PubMed

    Pattanshetty, S; Kotrashetti, V S; Nayak, R; Bhat, K; Somannavar, P; Babji, D

    2014-08-01

    There is increasing evidence of a causal association between human papillomavirus (HPV) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Several studies have shown that HPV is associated with increased risk of oral cancer independent of exposure to tobacco and alcohol. The association is valid for HPVs 16 and 18, which generally are considered high risk types, because they have been detected in oral dysplastic lesions and cancers. We determined the baseline prevalence of HPVs 16 and 18 in normal oral mucosa of individuals with and without tobacco habit. PCR was used for DNA collected by oral smears to detect HPV 16/18 DNA in normal oral mucosa of 60 healthy individuals who were assigned to two groups of 30 subjects each. One group had a tobacco habit, the other did not. The tobacco user group comprised individuals who were tobacco chewers only. Sixty-five percent of individuals were positive for HPV 16/18 DNA, but HPV 16/18 positivity was less in individuals with tobacco habit than in those without tobacco habit. No significant association was found between the presence of HPVs and gender, age or duration of chewing habit, or between groups with and without a tobacco habit. We propose that HPVs16 and 18 commonly are present in normal oral mucosa and emphasize the importance of distinguishing clinical, subclinical and latent HPV infections when investigating HPVs and OSCC.

  13. HPV Genotypes in High Grade Cervical Lesions and Invasive Cervical Carcinoma as Detected by Two Commercial DNA Assays, North Carolina, 2001–2006

    PubMed Central

    Hariri, Susan; Steinau, Martin; Rinas, Allen; Gargano, Julia W.; Ludema, Christina; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Carter, Alicia L.; Grant, Kathy L.; Bamberg, Melanie; McDermott, James E.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Brewer, Noel T.; Smith, Jennifer S.

    2012-01-01

    Background HPV typing using formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) cervical tissue is used to evaluate HPV vaccine impact, but DNA yield and quality in FFPE specimens can negatively affect test results. This study aimed to evaluate 2 commercial assays for HPV detection and typing using FFPE cervical specimens. Methods Four large North Carolina pathology laboratories provided FFPE specimens from 299 women ages18 and older diagnosed with cervical disease from 2001 to 2006. For each woman, one diagnostic block was selected and unstained serial sections were prepared for DNA typing. Extracts from samples with residual lesion were used to detect and type HPV using parallel and serial testing algorithms with the Linear Array and LiPA HPV genotyping assays. Findings LA and LiPA concordance was 0.61 for detecting any high-risk (HR) and 0.20 for detecting any low-risk (LR) types, with significant differences in marginal proportions for HPV16, 51, 52, and any HR types. Discordant results were most often LiPA-positive, LA-negative. The parallel algorithm yielded the highest prevalence of any HPV type (95.7%). HR type prevalence was similar using parallel (93.1%) and serial (92.1%) approaches. HPV16, 33, and 52 prevalence was slightly lower using the serial algorithm, but the median number of HR types per woman (1) did not differ by algorithm. Using the serial algorithm, HPV DNA was detected in >85% of invasive and >95% of pre-invasive lesions. The most common type was HPV16, followed by 52, 18, 31, 33, and 35; HPV16/18 was detected in 56.5% of specimens. Multiple HPV types were more common in lower grade lesions. Conclusions We developed an efficient algorithm for testing and reporting results of two commercial assays for HPV detection and typing in FFPE specimens, and describe HPV type distribution in pre-invasive and invasive cervical lesions in a state-based sample prior to HPV vaccine introduction. PMID:22479516

  14. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes.

    PubMed

    Yu, Liang; Huang, Jianbin; Ma, Zhixin; Zhang, Jing; Zou, Yapeng; Gao, Lin

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html.

  15. Characterization of Disease-Associated Mutations in Human Transmembrane Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Molnár, János; Szakács, Gergely; Tusnády, Gábor E.

    2016-01-01

    Transmembrane protein coding genes are commonly associated with human diseases. We characterized disease causing mutations and natural polymorphisms in transmembrane proteins by mapping missense genetic variations from the UniProt database on the transmembrane protein topology listed in the Human Transmembrane Proteome database. We found characteristic differences in the spectrum of amino acid changes within transmembrane regions: in the case of disease associated mutations the non-polar to non-polar and non-polar to charged amino acid changes are equally frequent. In contrast, in the case of natural polymorphisms non-polar to charged amino acid changes are rare while non-polar to non-polar changes are common. The majority of disease associated mutations result in glycine to arginine and leucine to proline substitutions. Mutations to positively charged amino acids are more common in the center of the lipid bilayer, where they cause more severe structural and functional anomalies. Our analysis contributes to the better understanding of the effect of disease associated mutations in transmembrane proteins, which can help prioritize genetic variations in personal genomic investigations. PMID:26986070

  16. Inferring drug-disease associations based on known protein complexes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Inferring drug-disease associations is critical in unveiling disease mechanisms, as well as discovering novel functions of available drugs, or drug repositioning. Previous work is primarily based on drug-gene-disease relationship, which throws away many important information since genes execute their functions through interacting others. To overcome this issue, we propose a novel methodology that discover the drug-disease association based on protein complexes. Firstly, the integrated heterogeneous network consisting of drugs, protein complexes, and disease are constructed, where we assign weights to the drug-disease association by using probability. Then, from the tripartite network, we get the indirect weighted relationships between drugs and diseases. The larger the weight, the higher the reliability of the correlation. We apply our method to mental disorders and hypertension, and validate the result by using comparative toxicogenomics database. Our ranked results can be directly reinforced by existing biomedical literature, suggesting that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity. The proposed method offers new insight into drug-disease discovery. Our method is publicly available at http://1.complexdrug.sinaapp.com/Drug_Complex_Disease/Data_Download.html. PMID:26044949

  17. Highly Sensitive Detection and Genotyping of HPV by PCR Multiplex and Luminex Technology in a Cohort of Colombian Women with Abnormal Cytology.

    PubMed

    García, Dabeiba A; Cid-Arregui, Angel; Schmitt, Markus; Castillo, Marcos; Briceño, Ignacio; Aristizábal, Fabio A

    2011-01-01

    Cancer of the uterine cervix (CC) is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. In Colombia, CC is the second most frequent cancer among the entire women population and the first among women aged between 15 and 44 years, with an estimated incidence of 24.9 cases/100,000 inhabitants. The main risk factor is infection with one or more high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types. The aim of this study was to estimate the genotype-specific prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in patients with cervical pathology using the multiplex PCR and Luminex xMAP technology. In addition, we compared genotyping with Luminex xMAP and with Reverse Line Blot (RLB). A cohort of 160 patients participated in the study, of which 25.6% had no cervical lesions, 35% presented cervical intraepithelial neoplasia of grade I (CIN I), 10% CIN II, 20.6% CIN III and 8.8% CC. The most frequent viral types in all lesion grades were HPV16 and HPV18. Infections by a unique virus were less frequent (19.4%) than multiple infections (80.6%). Single infections were found in 22% of women with no cervical lesions, and in 14.3% of CIN I, 18.7% CIN II, 21.2% CIN III and 28.6% of CC. Multiple infections were observed in 78.0% of cervical samples with negative histopathologic diagnosis, and in 85.7% of CIN I, 81.2% CIN II, 78.8% CIN III and 71.4% CC. All samples analyzed with Luminex xMAP were HPV-positive, while we could detect HPV in only 48.8% of cases with RLB. Of the samples positive by both methods, there was a 67.2% correlation in the viral type(s) detected. In conclusion, Luminex suspension array showed a remarkably higher sensitivity compared with RLB. Multiple infections were unexpectedly common, being HPV types 16 and 18 the most prevalent in all histopathologic grades.

  18. A newly developed real-time PCR assay for detection and quantification of Fusarium oxysporum and its use in compatible and incompatible interactions with grafted melon genotypes.

    PubMed

    Haegi, Anita; Catalano, Valentina; Luongo, Laura; Vitale, Salvatore; Scotton, Michele; Ficcadenti, Nadia; Belisario, Alessandra

    2013-08-01

    A reliable and species-specific real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) assay was developed for detection of the complex soilborne anamorphic fungus Fusarium oxysporum. The new primer pair, designed on the translation elongation factor 1-α gene with an amplicon of 142 bp, was highly specific to F. oxysporum without cross reactions with other Fusarium spp. The protocol was applied to grafted melon plants for the detection and quantification of F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis, a devastating pathogen of this cucurbit. Grafting technologies are widely used in melon to confer resistance against new virulent races of F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis, while maintaining the properties of valuable commercial varieties. However, the effects on the vascular pathogen colonization have not been fully investigated. Analyses were performed on 'Charentais-T' (susceptible) and 'Nad-1' (resistant) melon cultivars, both used either as rootstock and scion, and inoculated with F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis race 1 and race 1,2. Pathogen development was compared using qPCR and isolations from stem tissues. Early asymptomatic melon infections were detected with a quantification limit of 1 pg of fungal DNA. The qPCR protocol clearly showed that fungal development was highly affected by host-pathogen interaction (compatible or incompatible) and time (days postinoculation). The principal significant effect (P ≤ 0.01) on fungal development was due to the melon genotype used as rootstock, and this effect had a significant interaction with time and F. oxysporum f. sp. melonis race. In particular, the amount of race 1,2 DNA was significantly higher compared with that estimated for race 1 in the incompatible interaction at 18 days postinoculation. The two fungal races were always present in both the rootstock and scion of grafted plants in either the compatible or incompatible interaction.

  19. Detection and quantification of major toxigenic Microcystis genotypes in Moo-Tan reservoir and associated water treatment plant.

    PubMed

    Yen, Hung-Kai; Lin, Tsair-Fuh; Tseng, I-Cheng

    2012-02-01

    Two molecular methods, denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) and quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) with the Universal ProbeLibrary (UPL) probe, were developed and used for the characterization and quantification of several microcystin producers in Moo-Tan Reservoir (MTR), Taiwan and its associated water treatment plant (Shih-Men Water Treatment Plant, SMWTP). Internal transcribed spacer (ITS) sequence, a highly diversified region between the 16S rRNA and 23S rRNA genes, was used to further identify the isolated strains from MTR and also used in DGGE for the detection of the specific DNA fragments and biomarkers for 11 strains observed in MTR. These ITS-DGGE biomarkers were successfully applied to monitor the community changes of potential toxigenic Microcystis sp. over a period of five years. Two highly specific primers were combined with UPL probes to measure microcystins synthesis gene (mcyB) and phycocyanin intergenic spacer region (cpcB) concentrations in water samples. The copy concentrations of UPL-mcyB and UPL-cpcB correlated well with MC-RR concentrations/water temperature and Microcystis sp. cell numbers in the water samples, respectively. For SMWTP, toxin concentrations were low, but the DGGE bands clearly demonstrated the presence of potential microcystin producers in both water treatment plants and finished water samples. It was demonstrated that toxigenic Microcystis sp. may penetrate through the treatment processes and pose a potential risk to human health in the drinking water systems.

  20. Detection and genotype analysis of Giardia duodenalis from asymptomatic Hungarian inhabitants and comparative findings in three distinct locations.

    PubMed

    Plutzer, Judit; Törökné, Andrea; Szénási, Zsuzsanna; Kucsera, István; Farkas, Kata; Karanis, Panagiotis

    2014-03-01

    The transmission route of giardiasis not yet understood and why some infected individuals remain asymptomatic while others become quite ill. The drinking water quality is supposedly responsible for the prevalence of asymptomatic Giardia duodenalis infections in different areas, therefore asymptomatic giardiasis has been investigated in three water supply areas of Hungary: three hundred stool samples from inhabitants of Budapest, Füzér and Mátrafüred were examined by immunological and molecular methods for the presence of G. duodenalis infections. Individuals were asked to fill out a validated questionnaire at the time of stool collection and the interview covered demographic data, family life, education and travel history.In Budapest and in Mátrafüred in one stool sample G. duodenalis Assemblage A, whereas in Füzér once G. duodenalis Assemblage A, once Assemblage B and twice mixed infection were detected. We found higher prevalence rate of 4% of G. duodenalis infections of asymptomatic people in the village Füzér, where the removal of the Giardia cysts of the drinking water treatment plant was not effective. This study throws a light the need to look into the possibility of other risks of Giardia infections such as water transmission routes. To our knowledge, this is the first study evaluating the prevalence of G. duodenalis infections in asymptomatic persons in Hungary.

  1. Correlation of agar dilution and VITEK2 system for detection of resistance to macrolides, lincosamides and pristinamycin among Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis: association with genotypes.

    PubMed

    Bémer, P; Juvin, M-E; Corvec, S; Ros, A; Drugeon, H

    2005-08-01

    The performance of the VITEK2 system was evaluated against the agar dilution reference procedure for testing susceptibility of Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis to macrolides, lincosamides and streptogramins (MLS). Eighty clinical isolates were selected according to their resistance phenotype and genotype. Results for erythromycin and clindamycin showed 100% agreement; results for lincomycin showed agreement of 78%, with one very major error and 17 minor errors; and results for pristinamycin showed agreement of 46%, with one major error and 43 minor errors. Most isolates resistant to lincomycin and streptogramin A (L SgAr phenotype) were falsely susceptible to lincomycin, and intermediately-resistant or resistant to pristinamycin, with the VITEK2 system. No resistance gene was detected. Most (80%) isolates resistant constitutively to MLS (MLS(r)BC phenotype) were falsely intermediately-resistant to pristinamycin with the VITEK2 system. The erm(A) gene was more common than erm(C) in MLS(r)BC strains. Resistance to pristinamycin alone (SgA SgB PTr phenotype), or associated with either lincomycin resistance (L SgA SgB PTr phenotype) or constitutive MLS(B) resistance (MLS(BC) SgA PTr phenotype), was well-characterised without discordant results. Resistance to pristinamycin was always associated with resistance to streptogramin A, encoded by the vga(A), vga(B), vgb(A) and vat(A) genes in association with the erm(A) or erm(C) genes.

  2. Detection of the Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) in K. pneumoniae Isolated from the Clinical Samples by the Phenotypic and Genotypic Methods

    PubMed Central

    Bina, Masoume; Pournajaf, Abazar; Mirkalantari, Shiva; Talebi, Malihe; Irajian, Gholamreza

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objective: The production of carbapenemases especially Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) is the most important mechanism of enzymatic resistance in isolated Enterobacteriaceae such as K. pneumoniae . The purpose of this study was detected of the carbapenemase producer K. pneumoniae strains with phenotypic and genotypic methods. Method: Out of 800 strains, 270 K. pneumoniae strains (33.7%), were obtained. Antibiotic susceptibility test was performed by disk diffusion method in accordance with CLSI guidelines. Carbapenem resistant strains were identified by the Modified Hodge Test based on CLSI instruction and PCR for surveying the presence of bla -KPC gene. Results: A total 270 K. pneumoniae strains were collected. Antibiotic susceptibility test results showed the highest and lowest resistance was related to piperacillin (60.6%) and carbapenems (14.6%) respectively. 80.5% (33 of 41) isolates were positive by MHT, but all of them (100%) were negative for amplification of the bla -KPC gene in the PCR method. Conclusion: The MHT was an appropriate method for approving carbapenemase production. Moreover, a laboratory could accept the carbapenemase production with PCR method for the bla-KPC gene, which has the additional profit of validating which KPC is present. PMID:26351485

  3. Recombinant expression of the alternate reading frame protein (ARFP) of hepatitis C virus genotype 4a (HCV-4a) and detection of ARFP and anti-ARFP antibodies in HCV-infected patients.

    PubMed

    Shehat, Michael G; Bahey-El-Din, Mohammed; Kassem, Mervat A; Farghaly, Faten A; Abdul-Rahman, Medhat H; Fanaki, Nourhan H

    2015-08-01

    HCV is a single-stranded RNA virus with a single open reading frame (ORF) that is translated into a polyprotein that is then processed to form 10 viral proteins. An additional eleventh viral protein, the alternative reading frame protein (ARFP), was discovered relatively recently. This protein results from a translational frameshift in the core region during the expression of the viral proteins. Recombinant expression of different forms of ARFP was previously done for HCV genotypes 1 and 2, and more recently, genotype 3. However, none of the previous studies addressed the expression of ARFP of HCV genotype 4a, which is responsible for 80 % of HCV infections in the Middle East and Africa. Moreover, the direct detection of the ARFP antigen in HCV-infected patients was never studied before for any HCV genotype. In the present study, recombinant ARFP derived from HCV genotype 4a was successfully expressed in E. coli and purified using metal affinity chromatography. The recombinant ARFP protein and anti-ARFP antibodies were used for detection of ARFP antigen in patients' sera, employing competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) procedures. Furthermore, the recombinant antigen was also used to detect and quantify anti-ARFP antibodies in HCV-infected Egyptian patients at different stages of pegylated interferon/ribavirin therapy, using an ELISA assay. The ARFP antigen was detectable in 69.4 % of RNA-positive sera, indicating that ARFP antigen is produced during the natural course of HCV infection. In addition, significant levels of anti-ARFP antibodies were present in 41 % of the serum samples tested. The important diagnostic value of the recombinant ARFP antigen was also demonstrated.

  4. Molecular detection and genotyping of enteroviruses from CSF samples of patients with suspected sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis from 2012 to 2015 in West Bank, Palestine

    PubMed Central

    Dumaidi, Kamal; Al-Jawabreh, Amer

    2017-01-01

    Background Human enteroviruses (HEVs) are the most frequently reported cause of aseptic meningitis with or without CSF pleocytosis in childhood. Rapid detection and genotype of HEVs is essential to determine the causative agent and variant causing sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis. Aim To investigate the molecular epidemiology of enteroviruses (EVs) among patients with sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis admitted to three major hospitals in West Bank, Palestine from 2012 to 2015. Methods During the study period, 356 CSF samples were collected from patients with sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis. Two RT-nested PCR assays targeting a partial part of 5'UTR for direct diagnosis and the VP1 region for genotyping by sequence analysis of the viral genome were used. Results HEV RNA was detected in 66 of 356 (18.5%) of CSF samples. Age distribution showed that 64% (42/66) were infants (<1 year), 18% were children between 1 and 5 years old, 12% were children between 5 and 10 years old, and 6% were more than 10 years old. Of the 66 EV cases, 12 were successfully genotyped. Five different EV genotypes were identified. All of them belonged to HEV-B species. The study showed that echovirus 6 genotype accounted for 42% of the sequenced cases. The HEV infections in the present study tended to show slight seasonal pattern with more cases occurring during spring and summer, yet still significant numbers were also reported in fall and winter seasons. Conclusion HEV was isolated from a significant number of children with sepsis-like illness and/or aseptic meningitis. In addition, the molecular method utilized for direct diagnosis and genotyping of HEV from CSF revealed that more than one HEV type circulated in the West Bank, Palestine during the study period. PMID:28225788

  5. Lineage shift in Indian strains of Dengue virus serotype-3 (Genotype III), evidenced by detection of lineage IV strains in clinical cases from Kerala

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Local epidemiology of Dengue is defined by the genetic diversity of the circulating Dengue virus (DENV) strains. This important information is not available for the virus strains from most parts of the Indian subcontinent. The present study focused on the genetic diversity of the serotype 3 DENV strains (DENV-3) from India. Results A total of 22 DENV-3 strains identified by reverse-transcription PCR analysis of serum samples from 709 patients were studied. These samples were collected over a period of 4 years (2008–2011) from dengue fever suspected patients from Kerala, a dengue endemic state in South India. Comparison of a 1740bp nucleotide sequence of the viral Capsid-Pre-membrane-Envelope coding region of our strains and previously reported DENV-3 strains from India, South Asia and South America revealed non-synonymous substitutions that were genotype III-specific as well as sporadic. Evidence of positive selection was detected in the I81 amino acid residue of the envelope protein. Out of the 22 samples, three had I81A and 18 had I81V substitutions. In the phylogenetic analysis by maximum likelihood method the strains from Kerala clustered in two different lineages (lineage III and IV) within genotype III clade of DENV-3 strains. The ten strains that belonged to lineage IV had a signature amino acid substitution T219A in the envelope protein. Interestingly, all these strains were found to be closely related to a Singapore strain GU370053 isolated in 2007. Conclusions Our study identifies for the first time the presence of lineage IV strains in the Indian subcontinent. Results indicate the possibility of a recent exotic introduction and also a shift from the existing lineage III strains to lineage IV. Lineage shifts in DENV-3 strains have been attributed to dramatic increase in disease severity in many parts of the world. Hence the present observation could be significant in terms of the clinical severity of future dengue cases in the region. PMID

  6. [Crohn's disease associated with Berger's disease. A rare complication].

    PubMed

    López Barbarín, J M; Lafuente Martínez, P; García Campos, F; Ibarra Peña, B; Díaz de Otazu, R

    1990-10-01

    We report the case of a male patient with Crohn's disease associated with IgA nephropathy. He was treated surgically for the intestinal disorder and then with corticoids and sulfasalazine. Six years after treatment the patient was asymptomatic. As the intestinal situation improved there was concomitant normalization of urinary sediment, maintaining renal function. The fact that the digestive mucosa is one of the body's major sources of secretory IgA may account for the existence of a common for Crohn's disease and certain forms of IgA nephropathy.

  7. Detection of the G3 genotype of Echinococcus granulosus from hydatid cysts of Chilean cattle using COX1 and ND1 mitochondrial markers.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Sandra; Salas, Ana María; Vargas, Alex; Freire, Victoria; Diaz, Eric; Sánchez, Gittith; Venegas, Juan

    2014-01-01

    For a deeper understanding of the phylogenetic relationships of Echinococcus genotypes and species in different intermediate hosts, we analyzed samples from human and bovine hydatid cysts. For this, segments of the cytochrome oxidase (COX1) and NADH dehydrogenase (ND1) mitochondrial genes were used. To obtain sufficient amounts of the ND1 marker to be sequenced properly, a new variant of the PCR assay was implemented. Phylogenetic analysis with both markers showed that most of the analyzed samples correspond to genotype G1. However, a sample from cysts of a bovine lung (Q21), with the COX1 marker, was grouped in a node together with a sample belonging to genotype G3. In the phylogenetic tree obtained with the ND1 marker, this sample was grouped with sequences of genotypes G3, G2, and G4. Analyzing the single nucleotide polymorphic (SNP) sites of both markers, it was observed that the Q21 sequence is almost identical to the G3 sequence and differ in only one SNP from the G2 sequence, and is completely different from G4. These results are noteworthy, since neither G2 nor G3 genotypes have been described previously in Chile, raising the possibility that the G3 genotype is present in these latitudes. This information is highly relevant; it can be employed to uncover additional unknown details of transmission cycles of this important parasite.

  8. Rotavirus genotypes in Belarus, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Semeiko, Galina V; Yermalovich, Marina A; Poliakova, Nadezhda; Mijatovic-Rustempasic, Slavica; Kerin, Tara K; Wasley, Annemarie; Videbaek, Dovile; Gentsch, Jon R; Bowen, Michael D; Samoilovich, Elena O

    2014-12-01

    This study describes group A rotavirus (RVA) genotype prevalence in Belarus from 2008 to 2012. In 2008, data from 3 sites in Belarus (Brest, Mogilev, Minsk) indicated that G4P[8] was the predominant genotype. Data from Minsk (2008-2012) showed that G4P[8] was the predominant RVA genotype in all years except in 2011 when G3P[8] was most frequently detected. Other RVA genotypes common in Europe (G1P[8], G2P[4]) were detected each year of the study. This study reveals the dominance of genotype G4P[8] in Belarus and helps to establish the baseline genotype prevalence prior to RVA vaccine introduction in the country.

  9. Detection of Hepatitis B Virus (HBV) Genotype E Carried—Even in the Presence of High Titers of Anti-HBs Antibodies—by an Argentinean Patient of African Descent Who Had Received Vaccination against HBV

    PubMed Central

    Mathet, Verónica L.; Cuestas, María L.; Ruiz, Vanesa; Minassian, María L.; Rivero, Cintia; Trinks, Julieta; Daleoso, Graciela; León, Liliana M.; Sala, Andrea; Libellara, Beatriz; Corach, Daniel; Oubiña, José R.

    2006-01-01

    Genotype E hepatitis B virus (HBV) was detected in two Argentine sisters exhibiting an African mitochondrial lineage. One of them (who had been vaccinated against HBV) exhibited anti-HBs cocirculating antibodies without HBsAg escape mutants, while her unvaccinated sister showed a D144A HBsAg escape mutant without anti-HBs antibodies. Both sisters carried an unusual L209V substitution within HBsAg. PMID:16954295

  10. Natural antisense transcripts of Alzheimer's disease associated genes.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jin-Hu; Cheng, Hai-Peng; Yu, Long; Zhao, Shouyuan

    2006-04-01

    Natural antisense transcripts (NATs), also named endogenous antisense transcripts, are a class of genes whose role in controlling gene expression is becoming more and more relevant. NATs might play important roles in gene expression and translation regulation. Present work investigated the presence of NATs of Alzheimer's disease associated genes including PRESENILIN1, PRESENILIN2, BACE1, BACE2, APP, APOE, TAU (MAPT), PRION, alpha-SYNUCLEIN (SNCA), NICASTRIN, PEN2, APH1A, APH1B as well as CD147 (BASIGIN), and the results revealed that APP, BACE2, APH1A, TAU, CD147 and alpha-SYNUCLEIN contain natural antisense transcripts. These NATs were characterized according to the sense-antisense overlapping information and potential functional mechanisms were proposed. Present findings provide preliminary but important information about transcription regulation of AD associated genes, which would further our understanding of the gene expression regulation of AD, and also suggest a novel potential strategy for the therapy of AD.

  11. The pathogenesis of Hirschsprung's disease-associated enterocolitis.

    PubMed

    Austin, Kelly Miller

    2012-11-01

    Hirschsprung's disease-associated enterocolitis (HAEC) remains the most life-threatening complication in Hirschsprung disease (HD) patients. The pathogenesis of HAEC has not been determined and many hypotheses regarding the etiology of HAEC have been proposed. These include a possible causal relationship between the abnormal enteric nervous system development in HD and the development of enterocolitis. Based on the complex genetic causes of HD that have been discovered and the resultant heterogeneous group of patients that exists, the causes of HAEC are likely multiple. New insights regarding the relationship of the role of the enteric nervous system and its interaction between intestinal barrier function, innate host immunity, and commensal microflora have been discovered, which may shed light on this perplexing problem. This review presents current known risk factors of HAEC and the proposed theories and supporting evidence for the potential etiologies of HAEC.

  12. Development of an endpoint genotyping assay to detect the Mycoplasma pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene and distinguish the existence of macrolide resistance-associated mutations at position 2063.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Yu; Seto, Junji; Shimotai, Yoshitaka; Ikeda, Tatsuya; Yahagi, Kazue; Mizuta, Katsumi; Matsuzaki, Yoko; Hongo, Seiji

    2016-12-01

    The prevalence of macrolide-resistant Mycoplasma pneumoniae harboring a mutation in the 23S rRNA gene is increasing, and rapid detection assays are needed for clinical management. We developed an endpoint genotyping assay to detect the M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene and determine the existence of macrolide resistance-associated mutations at position 2063 (A2063G, A2063T and A2063C mutations). This A2063B genotyping assay detected more than 50 copies/reaction of the M. pneumoniae gene in every nucleotide mutation at position 2063. Of 42 clinical specimens, 3 were positive without mutation, 6 were positive with the A2063G mutation, and 33 were negative. The results were confirmed using nested PCR with the sequencing of the M. pneumoniae 23S rRNA gene, and a high sensitivity (90%), specificity (100%), and coincidence ratio (kappa coefficient=0.93) were obtained. Therefore, the A2063B genotyping assay is useful for the rapid discrimination of macrolide resistance mutations at position 2063.

  13. Detection and genetic characterization of porcine group A rotaviruses in asymptomatic pigs in smallholder farms in East Africa: predominance of P[8] genotype resembling human strains.

    PubMed

    Amimo, J O; Junga, J O; Ogara, W O; Vlasova, A N; Njahira, M N; Maina, S; Okoth, E A; Bishop, R P; Saif, L J; Djikeng, A

    2015-02-25

    ] strains (Ug-049 and Ug-453) had G5-P[13]-I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T7-E1-H1 while the untypeable strain (Ug-218) had G5-P[?]-I5-R1-C1-M1-A8-N1-T1-E1-H? In conclusion, P[6] and P[8] genotypes detected were genetically closely related to human strains suggesting the possibility of interspecies transmission. Further studies are required to determine the role of RVA in swine enteric disease burden and to determine the genetic/antigenic heterogeneity of the circulating strains for development of accurate diagnostic tools and to implement appropriate prophylaxis programs.

  14. Revealing disease-associated pathways by network integration of untargeted metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Pirhaji, Leila; Milani, Pamela; Leidl, Mathias; Curran, Timothy; Avila-Pacheco, Julian; Clish, Clary B; White, Forest M; Saghatelian, Alan; Fraenkel, Ernest

    2016-09-01

    Uncovering the molecular context of dysregulated metabolites is crucial to understand pathogenic pathways. However, their system-level analysis has been limited owing to challenges in global metabolite identification. Most metabolite features detected by untargeted metabolomics carried out by liquid-chromatography-mass spectrometry cannot be uniquely identified without additional, time-consuming experiments. We report a network-based approach, prize-collecting Steiner forest algorithm for integrative analysis of untargeted metabolomics (PIUMet), that infers molecular pathways and components via integrative analysis of metabolite features, without requiring their identification. We demonstrated PIUMet by analyzing changes in metabolism of sphingolipids, fatty acids and steroids in a Huntington's disease model. Additionally, PIUMet enabled us to elucidate putative identities of altered metabolite features in diseased cells, and infer experimentally undetected, disease-associated metabolites and dysregulated proteins. Finally, we established PIUMet's ability for integrative analysis of untargeted metabolomics data with proteomics data, demonstrating that this approach elicits disease-associated metabolites and proteins that cannot be inferred by individual analysis of these data.

  15. Rapid detection of HCV genotyping 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, 3b and 6a in a single reaction using two-melting temperature codes by a real-time PCR-based assay.

    PubMed

    Athar, Muhammad Ammar; Xu, Ye; Xie, Xiaoting; Xu, Zhenxing; Ahmad, Vakil; Hayder, Zulfiqar; Hussain, Syed Sajid; Liao, Yiqun; Li, Qingge

    2015-09-15

    The genotype of the hepatitis C virus (HCV) is an important indicator for antiviral therapeutic response. We hereby described development of a rapid HCV genotyping approach that enabled the identification of the six most common HCV subtypes of Asia, i.e., 1a, 1b, 2a, 3a, 3b, and 6a, in a single reaction. Using two dual-labeled, self-quenched probes that target the core region of the HCV genome, the exact subtype could be accurately identified by two-melting temperature codes determined from the two respective probes in a real-time PCR assay. Analytical sensitivity studies using armored RNA samples representing each of the six HCV subtypes showed that 5 copies/reaction of HCV RNA could be detected. The assay was evaluated using 244 HCV-positive serum samples and the results were compared with sequencing analysis. Of the 224 samples, subtype 3a (127, 52.3%) was the dominant, followed by 1b (51, 20.9%), 3b (47, 19.3%), 2a (8, 3.3%), 6a (4, 1.6%) and the least was subtype 1a (1, 0.4%). Moreover, 6 (2.5%) mixed infection samples were also detected. These results were fully concordant with sequencing analysis. We concluded that this real-time PCR-based assay could provide a rapid and reliable tool for routine HCV genotyping in most Asian countries.

  16. Inductive matrix completion for predicting gene–disease associations

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Nagarajan; Dhillon, Inderjit S.

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Most existing methods for predicting causal disease genes rely on specific type of evidence, and are therefore limited in terms of applicability. More often than not, the type of evidence available for diseases varies—for example, we may know linked genes, keywords associated with the disease obtained by mining text, or co-occurrence of disease symptoms in patients. Similarly, the type of evidence available for genes varies—for example, specific microarray probes convey information only for certain sets of genes. In this article, we apply a novel matrix-completion method called Inductive Matrix Completion to the problem of predicting gene-disease associations; it combines multiple types of evidence (features) for diseases and genes to learn latent factors that explain the observed gene–disease associations. We construct features from different biological sources such as microarray expression data and disease-related textual data. A crucial advantage of the method is that it is inductive; it can be applied to diseases not seen at training time, unlike traditional matrix-completion approaches and network-based inference methods that are transductive. Results: Comparison with state-of-the-art methods on diseases from the Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) database shows that the proposed approach is substantially better—it has close to one-in-four chance of recovering a true association in the top 100 predictions, compared to the recently proposed Catapult method (second best) that has <15% chance. We demonstrate that the inductive method is particularly effective for a query disease with no previously known gene associations, and for predicting novel genes, i.e. genes that are previously not linked to diseases. Thus the method is capable of predicting novel genes even for well-characterized diseases. We also validate the novelty of predictions by evaluating the method on recently reported OMIM associations and on associations recently

  17. Comparison of SPF10 real-time PCR and conventional PCR in combination with the INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra assay for the detection and typing of human papillomavirus in cervical samples.

    PubMed

    Micalessi, M I; Boulet, G A; Pillet, S; Jacquet, J; Pozzetto, B; Bogers, J J; Bourlet, T

    2013-12-01

    The novel SPF10 real-time PCR assay allows the simultaneous amplification and detection of the HPV target. That way, LiPA analysis of the HPV-negative samples can be avoided, reducing workload and cost. This study aims to evaluate the performance of the SPF10 real-time PCR in combination with the LiPA assay for HPV detection and typing in cervical samples. Thirty-nine cervical samples were subjected to the SPF10 conventional PCR in combination with the LiPA assay. Subsequently, the SPF10 real-time PCR was performed to enable the comparison between the SPF10 conventional and the real-time PCR results. In case of discrepancy, the samples were subjected to the CLART HPV2 assay. As a result, 27 out of 39 samples were identified as HPV-positive by the SPF10 real-time PCR and were genotyped further by the LiPA assay. Twenty samples (74.1%) showed an absolute agreement between the conventional and real-time SPF10 PCR (concordant), three (11.1%) displayed additional or fewer types (compatible), two (7.4%) did not show any similarity between both assays (discordant) and the remaining two (7.4%) were LiPA-negative. The two assays showed an excellent strength of agreement for individual (κ=0.932) and multiple genotype detection (κ=0.834). In conclusion, the two SPF10 PCR methods are comparable. Therefore, the SPF10 real-time PCR with subsequent LiPA could be used for the detection and genotyping of HPV in cervical samples.

  18. Diseases Associated with Defective Responses to DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    O’Driscoll, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Within the last decade, multiple novel congenital human disorders have been described with genetic defects in known and/or novel components of several well-known DNA repair and damage response pathways. Examples include disorders of impaired nucleotide excision repair, DNA double-strand and single-strand break repair, as well as compromised DNA damage-induced signal transduction including phosphorylation and ubiquitination. These conditions further reinforce the importance of multiple genome stability pathways for health and development in humans. Furthermore, these conditions inform our knowledge of the biology of the mechanics of genome stability and in some cases provide potential routes to help exploit these pathways therapeutically. Here, I will review a selection of these exciting findings from the perspective of the disorders themselves, describing how they were identified, how genotype informs phenotype, and how these defects contribute to our growing understanding of genome stability pathways. PMID:23209155

  19. Transformation of QTL genotypic effects to allelic effects

    PubMed Central

    Nagamine, Yoshitaka

    2005-01-01

    The genotypic and allelic effect models are equivalent in terms of QTL detection in a simple additive model, but the QTL allelic model has the advantage of providing direct information for marker-assisted selection. However, the allelic matrix is four times as large as the genotypic IBD matrix, causing computational problems, especially in genome scans examining multiple positions. Transformation from genotypic to allelic effects, after estimating the genotypic effects with a smaller IBD matrix, can solve this problem. Although the validity of transformation from genotypic to allelic effects has been disputed, this work proves that transformation can successfully yield unique allelic effects when genotypic and allelic IBD matrixes exist. PMID:16093016

  20. APOE Genotyping, Cardiovascular Disease

    MedlinePlus

    ... high level of triglycerides in the blood, and atherosclerosis that develops at an early age. APOE genotyping ... and is associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis . People with these genotypes could be predisposed to ...

  1. Brain expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) identifies human disease-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis S; Allen, Mariet; Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Rowley, Christopher N; Nair, Asha A; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n=197, temporal cortex n=202) and with other brain pathologies (non-AD, cerebellar n=177, temporal cortex n=197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ± 100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non-ADs (q<0.05, p=7.70 × 10(-5)-1.67 × 10(-82)). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p=1.85 × 10(-5)-1.70 × 10(-141)). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10(-6)). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9-3.3 fold enrichment (p<10(-6)) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD-risk association (p<10(-3)) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non-CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with functional implications. Our findings

  2. Brain Expression Genome-Wide Association Study (eGWAS) Identifies Human Disease-Associated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V. Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Rowley, Christopher N.; Nair, Asha A.; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G.; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P.; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Younkin, Steven G.; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n = 197, temporal cortex n = 202) and with other brain pathologies (non–AD, cerebellar n = 177, temporal cortex n = 197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ±100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non–ADs (q<0.05, p = 7.70×10−5–1.67×10−82). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p = 1.85×10−5–1.70×10−141). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10−6). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9–3.3 fold enrichment (p<10−6) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD–risk association (p<10−3) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non–CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with

  3. Target SNP selection in complex disease association studies

    PubMed Central

    Wjst, Matthias

    2004-01-01

    Background The massive amount of SNP data stored at public internet sites provides unprecedented access to human genetic variation. Selecting target SNP for disease-gene association studies is currently done more or less randomly as decision rules for the selection of functional relevant SNPs are not available. Results We implemented a computational pipeline that retrieves the genomic sequence of target genes, collects information about sequence variation and selects functional motifs containing SNPs. Motifs being considered are gene promoter, exon-intron structure, AU-rich mRNA elements, transcription factor binding motifs, cryptic and enhancer splice sites together with expression in target tissue. As a case study, 396 genes on chromosome 6p21 in the extended HLA region were selected that contributed nearly 20,000 SNPs. By computer annotation ~2,500 SNPs in functional motifs could be identified. Most of these SNPs are disrupting transcription factor binding sites but only those introducing new sites had a significant depressing effect on SNP allele frequency. Other decision rules concern position within motifs, the validity of SNP database entries, the unique occurrence in the genome and conserved sequence context in other mammalian genomes. Conclusion Only 10% of all gene-based SNPs have sequence-predicted functional relevance making them a primary target for genotyping in association studies. PMID:15248903

  4. 78 FR 54763 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-09-06

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AO32 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents... peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents. This amendment implements a... governing retroactive awards for certain diseases associated with herbicide exposure as required by...

  5. A previously undescribed ostreid herpes virus 1 (OsHV-1) genotype detected in the pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, in Ireland.

    PubMed

    Lynch, S A; Carlsson, J; Reilly, A O; Cotter, E; Culloty, S C

    2012-10-01

    Significant mortalities of the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, have been reported worldwide since the 1950s. The impact these re-occurring mortality events have had on the C. gigas industry has highlighted the necessity to determine the factors that may be causing these mortalities. This study investigated the possible role of ostreid herpes virus (OsHV-1) in C. gigas mortalities over 2 successive summers at 2 study areas in Ireland. A single sample of adult C. gigas, which had been experiencing mortalities at one of the sites was screened. Successive cohorts of C. gigas spat obtained from a hatchery outside Ireland was relayed to both sites in 2003 and in 2004. Spat were screened each year prior to relaying. Samples were collected every 2 weeks and mortality counts were recorded and observed at both sites. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis and subsequent sequencing indicated that a previously undocumented variant genotype of OsHV-1 was present in the single cohort of adult C. gigas and in seed and juveniles at both sites, in both years. Analysis suggests that the Irish OsHV-1 μvar variant genotype is closely related to OsHV-1 μvar, first described in France in 2008.

  6. Flavonoid profile of green asparagus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Fuentes-Alventosa, J M; Jaramillo, S; Rodríguez-Gutiérrez, G; Cermeño, P; Espejo, J A; Jiménez-Araujo, A; Guillén-Bejarano, R; Fernández-Bolaños, J; Rodríguez-Arcos, R

    2008-08-27

    The determination of flavonoid profiles from different genotypes of triguero asparagus and their comparison to those from green asparagus commercial hybrids was the main goal of this study. The samples consisted of 32 commercial hybrids and 65 genotypes from the Huetor-Tajar population variety (triguero). The analysis of individual flavonoids by HPLC-DAD-MS has allowed the determination of eight naturally occurring flavonol derivatives in several genotypes of triguero asparagus. Those compounds included mono-, di-, and triglycosides of three flavonols, that is, quercetin, isorhamnetin, and kaempferol. The detailed analysis of the flavonoid profiles revealed significant differences among the distinct genotypes. These have been classified in three distinct groups as the result of a k-means clustering analysis, two of them containing both commercial hybrids and triguero asparagus and another cluster constituted by 21 genotypes of triguero asparagus, which contain several key flavonol derivatives able to differentiate them. Hence, the triglycosides tentatively identified as quercetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, isorhamnetin-3-rhamnosyl-rutinoside, and isorhamnetin-3-O-glucoside have been detected only in the genotypes grouped in the above-mentioned cluster. On the other hand, the compound tentatively identified as isorhamnetin-3-glucosyl-rutinoside was present in most genotypes of triguero asparagus, whereas it has not been detected in any of the commercial hybrids.

  7. Genotype 3b of human parvovirus B19 detected from hospitalized children with solid malignancies in a North Indian tertiary care hospital.

    PubMed

    Jain, Amita; Jain, Parul; Prakash, Shantanu; Kumar, Archana; Khan, Danish N; Seth, Akansha; Gupta, Shikha; Kant, Ravi

    2016-11-01

    Human parvovirus B19 (B19V) infection is known to cause serious consequences in immuno-compromized individuals. The present cross sectional study was designed to estimate the prevalence and genotype distribution of B19V in children receiving chemotherapy for solid malignancies at a tertiary care hospital in North India during October 2013 to May 2015. Serum samples from all the patients were tested for anti-B19V IgM and IgG antibodies and for B19V-DNA as soon as received. Samples testing positive for B19V-DNA were subjected to viral load estimation and to genotype determination by sequencing. Total 96 children were enrolled of which 9 (9.3%), 32 (33.3%), and 25 (26%) tested positive for anti-B19V IgM, anti-B19V IgG, and B19V-DNA, respectively. The viral load of B19V-DNA positive children ranged from 5.5 × 10(2) to 3.5 × 10(12) copies/ml. Accordingly children were divided into three groups: group I, with acute infection (n = 25); group II, previously exposed (n = 27), and group III, negative for B19V infection or with inappropriate antibody response (n = 44). B19V positivity was significantly associated (P-value < 0.0001) with a history of blood transfusion in the past 6 months, severe anemia (hemoglobin levels <6 gm%) and thrombocytopenia (platelets <150,000/cu.mm.). Sequence analysis of 21 of 25 DNA positive samples showed that all of them were Genotype 3b that clustered into three groups. All the sequences within each cluster were identical. The nucleotide identity of the sequences suggests a nosocomial outbreak of B19V during the study period. Children on chemotherapy for solid tumors should be routinely screened for B19V infection by both serology and PCR. J. Med. Virol. 88:1922-1929, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Detection of 15 novel mutations in 52 children from 40 families with the Marfan or Loeys-Dietz syndrome and phenotype-genotype correlations.

    PubMed

    Pees, C; Michel-Behnke, I; Hagl, M; Laccone, F

    2014-12-01

    We report about 52 pediatric patients of 40 different families with confirmed Marfan syndrome (MFS) in 49 patients and Loeys-Dietz syndrome (LDS) in 3 patients. We found 39 different mutations, 15 of them being novel. Phenotype-genotype correlation in the 49 MFS patients showed that the majority of patients carrying mutations in exons 1-21 had ectopic lens (80%). Patients having mutations in exons 23-32 had a higher probability of aortic root dilation, in 50% even above a z score of 3. We found three children with neonatal MFS form, two of them with novel mutations. Of the three LDS patients, only one presented with the typical phenotype of LDS type 1.

  9. Construction of High Density Sweet Cherry (Prunus avium L.) Linkage Maps Using Microsatellite Markers and SNPs Detected by Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS).

    PubMed

    Guajardo, Verónica; Solís, Simón; Sagredo, Boris; Gainza, Felipe; Muñoz, Carlos; Gasic, Ksenija; Hinrichsen, Patricio

    2015-01-01

    Linkage maps are valuable tools in genetic and genomic studies. For sweet cherry, linkage maps have been constructed using mainly microsatellite markers (SSRs) and, recently, using single nucleotide polymorphism markers (SNPs) from a cherry 6K SNP array. Genotyping-by-sequencing (GBS), a new methodology based on high-throughput sequencing, holds great promise for identification of high number of SNPs and construction of high density linkage maps. In this study, GBS was used to identify SNPs from an intra-specific sweet cherry cross. A total of 8,476 high quality SNPs were selected for mapping. The physical position for each SNP was determined using the peach genome, Peach v1.0, as reference, and a homogeneous distribution of markers along the eight peach scaffolds was obtained. On average, 65.6% of the SNPs were present in genic regions and 49.8% were located in exonic regions. In addition to the SNPs, a group of SSRs was also used for construction of linkage maps. Parental and consensus high density maps were constructed by genotyping 166 siblings from a 'Rainier' x 'Rivedel' (Ra x Ri) cross. Using Ra x Ri population, 462, 489 and 985 markers were mapped into eight linkage groups in 'Rainier', 'Rivedel' and the Ra x Ri map, respectively, with 80% of mapped SNPs located in genic regions. Obtained maps spanned 549.5, 582.6 and 731.3 cM for 'Rainier', 'Rivedel' and consensus maps, respectively, with an average distance of 1.2 cM between adjacent markers for both 'Rainier' and 'Rivedel' maps and of 0.7 cM for Ra x Ri map. High synteny and co-linearity was observed between obtained maps and with Peach v1.0. These new high density linkage maps provide valuable information on the sweet cherry genome, and serve as the basis for identification of QTLs and genes relevant for the breeding of the species.

  10. Prevalence of hepatitis viruses in patients with acute hepatitis and characterization of the detected genotype 4 hepatitis E virus sequences in Mongolia.

    PubMed

    Tsatsralt-Od, Bira; Baasanjav, Nachin; Nyamkhuu, Dulmaa; Ohnishi, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Masaharu; Okamoto, Hiroaki

    2016-02-01

    Hepatitis E is considered to be a worldwide public health problem. Although the prevalence of hepatitis E virus (HEV) antibodies in healthy individuals is noted to be 11%, no patients with acute hepatitis E have previously been identified in Mongolia. Three hundred two consecutive patients (183 males and 119 females; median age of 22.0 [Interquartile range: 18.3-25.0] years) who were clinically diagnosed with sporadic acute hepatitis during 2012-2013 in Ulaanbaatar, Mongolia, were studied. By serological and/or molecular approaches, 77 (25.5%), 93 (30.8%), 19 (6.3%), 48 (15.9%), and 12 (4.0%) of the patients were diagnosed with acute hepatitis of types A, B, C, D (superinfection of hepatitis delta virus on a background of chronic hepatitis B virus infection) and E, respectively, while the cause of hepatitis was unknown in the remaining 53 patients (17.5%). The 12 hepatitis E patients had no history of travel abroad in the 3 months before the onset of disease, and lived separately in fixed or movable houses with water supplied via pipe, tank or well, denying transmission from a common water supply. The 12 HEV isolates obtained from the patients showed high nucleotide identities of 99.7-100%, and a representative HEV isolate, MNE13-227, was closest to the Chinese isolates of genotype 4, with the highest identity of 97.3% in the 304-nt ORF2 sequence and 92.1% over the entire genome. The present study revealed the occurrence of autochthonous acute hepatitis E in Mongolia, caused by a monophyletic genotype 4 HEV strain.

  11. Characterization of Antibody Specific for Disease Associated Prion Protein

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-07-01

    Distribution Unlimited 13. ABSTRACT (Maximum 200 Words) Prion diseases are characterized by the presence of the abnormal scrapie isoform of prion protein...areas of Task 2. Our main research findings have been published recently (Zou W, Zheng J, Gray D, Gambetti P, Chen SG. Antibody to DNA detects scrapie ...chemiluminescence. (B) Immunocapture of PrP by OCD4 following incubation with nuclease and salmon DNA. 2 1 I Scrapie -infected hamster BH (2 pi each) was either

  12. Rapid typing of Mannheimia haemolytica major genotypes 1 and 2 using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Loy, John Dustin; Clawson, Michael L

    2017-05-01

    Genotype 2M. haemolytica predominantly associate over genotype 1 with the lungs of cattle with respiratory disease and ICEs containing antimicrobial resistance genes. Distinct protein masses were detected by MALDI-TOF MS between genotype 1 and 2 strains. MALDI-TOF MS could rapidly differentiate genotype 2 strains in veterinary diagnostic laboratories.

  13. Geographic differences and the role of cagA gene in gastroduodenal diseases associated with Helicobacter pylori infection.

    PubMed

    Valmaseda Pérez, T; Gisbert, J P; Pajares García, J M

    2001-07-01

    Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is the major causal agent of gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric cancer. Several bacterium genes seem to be involved in the pathogenicity mechanism. One of them, the cagA gene, has been extensively studied and characterized. In this article we have carried out a study of characteristics and genetic variability of cagA gene in different geographic areas of the world. At the same time, we have summarized several studies that evaluate possible relation of cagA with gastroduodenal diseases associated by H. pylori infection. In our study we found that the presence of the cagA gene has been confirmed in more than 60% H. pylori strains distributed throughout the world. The prevalence of cagA genotype is of 65.4% in gastritis patients, 84.2% in patients with peptic ulcer and 86.5% in those with gastric cancer. It shows a high genetic variability of cagA associated with gastroduodenal diseases that could serve as a virulence marker in H. pylori infected subjects. However, the high prevalence of H. pylori cagA positive strains in some geographic areas does not confirm the strong association between cagA and virulence of strains as described in other countries. Nowadays, cagA gene is considered as a marker for the presence of cag pathogenicity island (cag-PAI) in H. pylori genoma. This region contains several genes that has been involved with the production of cytokines that results in an increased inflammation of host gastric mucosa, but its function is unknown. Probably, others bacterium factors, such as susceptibility host and environmental cofactors could influence in the risk of developing different gastroduodenal diseases associated with H. pylori infection.

  14. A real-time PCR approach based on SPF10 primers and the INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra assay for the detection and typing of human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Micalessi, M I; Boulet, G A; Vorsters, A; De Wit, K; Jannes, G; Mijs, W; Ieven, M; Van Damme, P; Bogers, J J

    2013-01-01

    The SPF10 PCR targets a conserved 65bp region of the HPV L1 gene for broad-spectrum amplification. The LiPA assay allows subsequent genotyping of the HPV amplicons. This study aims to develop a SPF10 real-time PCR to achieve simultaneous amplification and detection of the HPV target. That way, LiPA analysis of the HPV-negative samples can be avoided, reducing workload and cost. The real-time PCR shows an analytical sensitivity of 29.7 copies for HPV 6, 16, 18 and 31 and an HPV-specific melting peak. Thirty-one HPV DNA plasmids were genotyped correctly using the SPF10 real-time PCR in combination with the LiPA. Here, the LiPA assay was performed at an increased hybridisation temperature (49.5°C) in combination with a reduced amplicon volume (1μl) to avoid cross-reactivity. In conclusion, the SPF10 real-time PCR proves to be very sensitive and generates amplicons, which are compatible with the LiPA.

  15. Cutaneous and neurologic disease associated with HTLV-I infection.

    PubMed

    Sharata, H H; Colvin, J H; Fujiwara, K; Goldman, B; Hashimoto, K

    1997-05-01

    Human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-I) is the etiologic agent of HTLV-I associated myelopathy (HAM)/tropical spastic paresis (TSP), and adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL). ATLL has been associated with HTLV-I in the southeastern United States. However, to our knowledge, no case reports of HAM/TSP in association with ATLL occurring in the United States have been described. We describe a 40-year-old black woman with a 10-year history of recalcitrant psoriasiform eruption and erythrodermic flares. Medical history is additionally significant for a 2-year history of HTLV-I-associated myelopathy and lower extremity spastic paresis. Polymerase chain reaction with Southern blot analysis was used to detect HTLV-I proviral genome from frozen skin biopsy specimens and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

  16. Inflammatory bowel disease associated neoplasia: A surgeon’s perspective

    PubMed Central

    Althumairi, Azah A; Lazarev, Mark G; Gearhart, Susan L

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) is associated with increased risk of colorectal cancer (CRC). The risk is known to increase with longer duration of the disease, family history of CRC, and history of primary sclerosing cholangitis. The diagnosis of the neoplastic changes associated with IBD is difficult owing to the heterogeneous endoscopic appearance and inter-observer variability of the pathological diagnosis. Screening and surveillance guidelines have been established which aim for early detection of neoplasia. Several surgical options are available for the treatment of IBD-associated neoplasia. Patients’ morbidities, risk factors for CRC, degree and the extent of neoplasia must be considered in choosing the surgical treatment. A multidisciplinary team including the surgeon, gastroenterologist, pathologist, and the patient who has a clear understanding of the nature of their disease is needed to optimize outcomes. PMID:26811640

  17. SNPranker 2.0: a gene-centric data mining tool for diseases associated SNP prioritization in GWAS

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    . Conclusions Different databases and resources are already available for SNPs annotation, but they do not prioritize or re-score SNPs relying on a-priori biomolecular knowledge. SNPranker 2.0 attempts to fill this gap through a user-friendly integrated web resource. End users, such as researchers in medical genetics and epidemiology, may find in SNPranker 2.0 a new tool for data mining and interpretation able to support SNPs analysis. Possible scenarios are GWAS data re-scoring, SNPs selection for custom genotyping arrays and SNPs/diseases association studies. PMID:23369106

  18. 6 HCV Genotyping 9G Test and its Comparison with VERSANT HCV Genotype 2.0 Assay (LiPA) for the Hepatitis C Virus Genotyping.

    PubMed

    Chantratita, Wasun; Song, Keum-Soo; GunHo, Choi; Pongthanapisith, Viroj; Thongbaiphet, Nipa; Wongtabtim, Garanyuta; Pasomsub, Ekawat; Angkanavin, Kanokwan; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Sonawane, Mukesh Digambar; Warkad, Shrikant Dasharath; Kim, Taisun

    2016-10-25

    In this article, we describe the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test and its evaluation by using clinical samples and plasmid DNA standards. In tests with 981 plasmid DNA standards, the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test showed higher than 92.5% sensitivity and 99.4% specificity. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test was compared with the VERSANT HCV Genotype 2.0 assay (LiPA 2.0) for detection and discrimination of HCV genotypes in clinical samples. The results of both tests were verified by genomic sequencing. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test demonstrated a 100% agreement with the sequencing results, which was higher than LiPA 2.0. These results indicate that the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test can be a reliable, sensitive, and accurate diagnostic tool for the correct identification of HCV genotypes in clinical specimens. 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test can genotype six HCV types in 1 PCR in 30min after PCR amplification. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test, thus provide critical information to physicians and assist them to apply accurate drug regimen for the effective hepatitis C treatment.

  19. 6 HCV genotyping 9G test and its comparison with VERSANT HCV genotype 2.0 assay (LiPA) for the hepatitis C virus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Chantratita, Wasun; Song, Keum-Soo; GunHo, Choi; Pongthanapisith, Viroj; Thongbaiphet, Nipa; Wongtabtim, Garanyuta; Pasomsub, Ekawat; Angkanavin, Kanokwan; Nimse, Satish Balasaheb; Sonawane, Mukesh Digambar; Warkad, Shrikant Dasharath; Kim, Taisun

    2017-01-01

    In this article, we describe the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test and its evaluation by using clinical samples and plasmid DNA standards. In tests with 981 plasmid DNA standards, the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test showed higher than 92.5% sensitivity and 99.4% specificity. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test was compared with the VERSANT HCV Genotype 2.0 assay (LiPA 2.0) for detection and discrimination of HCV genotypes in clinical samples. The results of both tests were verified by genomic sequencing. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test demonstrated a 100% agreement with the sequencing results, which was higher than LiPA 2.0. These results indicate that the 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test can be a reliable, sensitive, and accurate diagnostic tool for the correct identification of HCV genotypes in clinical specimens. 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test can genotype six HCV types in 1 PCR in 30min after PCR amplification. The 6 HCV Genotyping 9G test, thus provide critical information to physicians and assist them to apply accurate drug regimen for the effective hepatitis C treatment.

  20. megasat: automated inference of microsatellite genotypes from sequence data.

    PubMed

    Zhan, Luyao; Paterson, Ian G; Fraser, Bonnie A; Watson, Beth; Bradbury, Ian R; Nadukkalam Ravindran, Praveen; Reznick, David; Beiko, Robert G; Bentzen, Paul

    2017-03-01

    megasat is software that enables genotyping of microsatellite loci using next-generation sequencing data. Microsatellites are amplified in large multiplexes, and then sequenced in pooled amplicons. megasat reads sequence files and automatically scores microsatellite genotypes. It uses fuzzy matches to allow for sequencing errors and applies decision rules to account for amplification artefacts, including nontarget amplification products, replication slippage during PCR (amplification stutter) and differential amplification of alleles. An important feature of megasat is the generation of histograms of the length-frequency distributions of amplification products for each locus and each individual. These histograms, analogous to electropherograms traditionally used to score microsatellite genotypes, enable rapid evaluation and editing of automatically scored genotypes. megasat is written in Perl, runs on Windows, Mac OS X and Linux systems, and includes a simple graphical user interface. We demonstrate megasat using data from guppy, Poecilia reticulata. We genotype 1024 guppies at 43 microsatellites per run on an Illumina MiSeq sequencer. We evaluated the accuracy of automatically called genotypes using two methods, based on pedigree and repeat genotyping data, and obtained estimates of mean genotyping error rates of 0.021 and 0.012. In both estimates, three loci accounted for a disproportionate fraction of genotyping errors; conversely, 26 loci were scored with 0-1 detected error (error rate ≤0.007). Our results show that with appropriate selection of loci, automated genotyping of microsatellite loci can be achieved with very high throughput, low genotyping error and very low genotyping costs.

  1. Economic Burden of Disease-Associated Malnutrition at the State Level

    PubMed Central

    Goates, Scott; Du, Kristy; Braunschweig, Carol A.; Arensberg, Mary Beth

    2016-01-01

    Background Disease-associated malnutrition has been identified as a prevalent condition, particularly for the elderly, which has often been overlooked in the U.S. healthcare system. The state-level burden of community-based disease-associated malnutrition is unknown and there have been limited efforts by state policy makers to identify, quantify, and address malnutrition. The objective of this study was to examine and quantify the state-level economic burden of disease-associated malnutrition. Methods Direct medical costs of disease-associated malnutrition were calculated for 8 diseases: Stroke, Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease, Coronary Heart Failure, Breast Cancer, Dementia, Musculoskeletal Disorders, Depression, and Colorectal Cancer. National disease and malnutrition prevalence rates were estimated for subgroups defined by age, race, and sex using the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey and the National Health Interview Survey. State prevalence of disease-associated malnutrition was estimated by combining national prevalence estimates with states’ demographic data from the U.S. Census. Direct medical cost for each state was estimated as the increased expenditures incurred as a result of malnutrition. Principal Findings Direct medical costs attributable to disease-associated malnutrition vary among states from an annual cost of $36 per capita in Utah to $65 per capita in Washington, D.C. Nationally the annual cost of disease-associated malnutrition is over $15.5 billion. The elderly bear a disproportionate share of this cost on both the state and national level. Conclusions Additional action is needed to reduce the economic impact of disease-associated malnutrition, particularly at the state level. Nutrition may be a cost-effective way to help address high health care costs. PMID:27655372

  2. Diseases associated with asbestos exposure. Diagnostic perspectives in forensic pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Ehrenreich, T.; Selikoff, I.J.

    1983-03-01

    Asbestos, a fibrous mineral, has unique physical and chemical properties, including resistance to heat, acids, and other chemicals; flexibility; and great tensile strength. The fibers subdivide into unit fibrils of molecular dimensions, resulting in a vast mineral surface area which has a direct bearing on its unusual features and its numerous applications. Its biological effects, which include fibrogenesis and carcinogenesis, may be related to the cellular reaction, to its large specific surface, or to the size and shape of the fibers. Its oncogenic action may be multiplied by other carcinogens, principally cigarette smoking. There is clinical, pathologic, and epidemiologic evidence that exposure to asbestos, following a long latent period, constitutes an important health hazard. Direct occupational exposure, followed by a long lapsed period after the initial exposure, is associated with pleural plaques and pleural effusion, pulmonary parenchymal fibrosis (asbestosis), pulmonary carcinoma, pleural and peritoneal mesothelioma, and other neoplasms. Indirect exposure may also entail an increased risk of lung disease or mesothelioma or both. Medicolegal investigation of suspected cases includes a lifetime occupational history, clinical history including smoking habits, radiological findings, clinical evidence of asbestosis, and may require detection of asbestos tissue burden.

  3. Diagnostic Performance of the New Version (v2.0) of GenoType MTBDRsl Assay for Detection of Resistance to Fluoroquinolones and Second-Line Injectable Drugs: a Multicenter Study

    PubMed Central

    Tagliani, Elisa; Cabibbe, Andrea M.; Miotto, Paolo; Borroni, Emanuele; Toro, Juan Carlos; Mansjö, Mikael; Hoffner, Sven; Hillemann, Doris; Zalutskaya, Aksana; Skrahina, Alena

    2015-01-01

    Resistance to fluoroquinolones (FLQ) and second-line injectable drugs (SLID) is steadily increasing, especially in eastern European countries, posing a serious threat to effective tuberculosis (TB) infection control and adequate patient management. The availability of rapid molecular tests for the detection of extensively drug-resistant TB (XDR-TB) is critical in areas with high rates of multidrug-resistant TB (MDR-TB) and XDR-TB and limited conventional drug susceptibility testing (DST) capacity. We conducted a multicenter study to evaluate the performance of the new version (v2.0) of the Genotype MTBDRsl assay compared to phenotypic DST and sequencing on a panel of 228 Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates and 231 smear-positive clinical specimens. The inclusion of probes for the detection of mutations in the eis promoter region in the MTBDRsl v2.0 test resulted in a higher sensitivity for detection of kanamycin resistance for both direct and indirect testing (96% and 95.4%, respectively) than that seen with the original version of the assay, whereas the test sensitivities for detection of FLQ resistance remained unchanged (93% and 83.6% for direct and indirect testing, respectively). Moreover, MTBDRsl v2.0 showed better performance characteristics than v1.0 for the detection of XDR-TB, with high specificity and sensitivities of 81.8% and 80.4% for direct and indirect testing, respectively. MTBDRsl v2.0 thus represents a reliable test for the rapid detection of resistance to second-line drugs and a useful screening tool to guide the initiation of appropriate MDR-TB treatment. PMID:26179309

  4. IRWRLDA: improved random walk with restart for lncRNA-disease association prediction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; You, Zhu-Hong; Yan, Gui-Ying; Gong, Dun-Wei

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, accumulating evidences have shown that the dysregulations of lncRNAs are associated with a wide range of human diseases. It is necessary and feasible to analyze known lncRNA-disease associations, predict potential lncRNA-disease associations, and provide the most possible lncRNA-disease pairs for experimental validation. Considering the limitations of traditional Random Walk with Restart (RWR), the model of Improved Random Walk with Restart for LncRNA-Disease Association prediction (IRWRLDA) was developed to predict novel lncRNA-disease associations by integrating known lncRNA-disease associations, disease semantic similarity, and various lncRNA similarity measures. The novelty of IRWRLDA lies in the incorporation of lncRNA expression similarity and disease semantic similarity to set the initial probability vector of the RWR. Therefore, IRWRLDA could be applied to diseases without any known related lncRNAs. IRWRLDA significantly improved previous classical models with reliable AUCs of 0.7242 and 0.7872 in two known lncRNA-disease association datasets downloaded from the lncRNADisease database, respectively. Further case studies of colon cancer and leukemia were implemented for IRWRLDA and 60% of lncRNAs in the top 10 prediction lists have been confirmed by recent experimental reports. PMID:27517318

  5. HPV genotypes concordance between sex partners.

    PubMed

    Benevolo, M; Mottolese, M; Marandino, F; Carosi, M; Diodoro, M G; Sentinelli, S; Visca, P; Rollo, F; Mariani, L; Vocaturo, G; Sindico, R; Di Giannuario, D; Perrone Donnorso, R; Pellicciotta, M; Vocaturo, A

    2007-12-01

    The HPV genotype concordance in the sexual couples could support the sexual viral transmission of HPV infection. The present study contains a case-report of a stable Italian sex couple harbouring the same five HPV genotypes in their genital samples. The female partner, affected by vulvar condilomatosis, evidenced positivity in her cervicovaginal scraping with high risk HPV DNA Hybrid Capture 2 test and was negative at liquid-based performed Pap Test and at colposcopic examination. The male partner was clinically healthy regarding his external genitalia. In both male and female genital scrapings, the following HPV genotypes were detected by means of a PCR-based assay: 6, 16, 53, 73 and 84. This considerably high genotype concordance does not appear to be casual and supports, in our opinion, the hypothesis that genital HPV types are sexually transmitted agents

  6. No more time to stay 'single' in the detection of Anisakis pegreffii, A. simplex (s. s.) and hybridization events between them: a multi-marker nuclear genotyping approach.

    PubMed

    Mattiucci, S; Acerra, V; Paoletti, M; Cipriani, P; Levsen, A; Webb, S C; Canestrelli, D; Nascetti, G

    2016-07-01

    A multi-marker nuclear genotyping approach was performed on larval and adult specimens of Anisakis spp. (N = 689) collected from fish and cetaceans in allopatric and sympatric areas of the two species Anisakis pegreffii and Anisakis simplex (s. s.), in order to: (1) identify specimens belonging to the parental taxa by using nuclear markers (allozymes loci) and sequence analysis of a new diagnostic nuclear DNA locus (i.e. partial sequence of the EF1 α-1 nDNA region) and (2) recognize hybrid categories. According to the Bayesian clustering algorithms, based on those markers, most of the individuals (N = 678) were identified as the parental species [i.e. A. pegreffii or A. simplex (s. s.)], whereas a smaller portion (N = 11) were recognized as F1 hybrids. Discordant results were obtained when using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphisms (PCR-RFLPs) of the internal transcribed spacer (ITS) ribosomal DNA (rDNA) on the same specimens, which indicated the occurrence of a large number of 'hybrids' both in sympatry and allopatry. These findings raise the question of possible misidentification of specimens belonging to the two parental Anisakis and their hybrid categories derived from the application of that single marker (i.e. PCR-RFLPs analysis of the ITS of rDNA). Finally, Bayesian clustering, using allozymes and EF1 α-1 nDNA markers, has demonstrated that hybridization between A. pegreffii and A. simplex (s. s.) is a contemporary phenomenon in sympatric areas, while no introgressive hybridization takes place between the two species.

  7. Mitochondrial proteome: toward the detection and profiling of disease associated alterations.

    PubMed

    Herrmann, Paul C; Herrmann, E Clifford

    2012-01-01

    Existing at the heart of cellular energy metabolism, the mitochondrion is uniquely positioned to have a major impact on human disease processes. Examples of mitochondrial impact on human pathology abound and include etiologies ranging from inborn errors of metabolism to the site of activity of a variety of toxic compounds. In this review, the unique aspects of the mechanisms related to the mitochondrial proteome are discussed along with an overview of the literature related to mitochondrial proteomic exploration. The review includes discussion of potential areas for exploration and advantages of applying proteomic techniques to the study of mitochondria.

  8. Adaptive clustering and adaptive weighting methods to detect disease associated rare variants.

    PubMed

    Sha, Qiuying; Wang, Shuaicheng; Zhang, Shuanglin

    2013-03-01

    Current statistical methods to test association between rare variants and phenotypes are essentially the group-wise methods that collapse or aggregate all variants in a predefined group into a single variant. Comparing with the variant-by-variant methods, the group-wise methods have their advantages. However, two factors may affect the power of these methods. One is that some of the causal variants may be protective. When both risk and protective variants are presented, it will lose power by collapsing or aggregating all variants because the effects of risk and protective variants will counteract each other. The other is that not all variants in the group are causal; rather, a large proportion is believed to be neutral. When a large proportion of variants are neutral, collapsing or aggregating all variants may not be an optimal solution. We propose two alternative methods, adaptive clustering (AC) method and adaptive weighting (AW) method, aiming to test rare variant association in the presence of neutral and/or protective variants. Both of AC and AW are applicable to quantitative traits as well as qualitative traits. Results of extensive simulation studies show that AC and AW have similar power and both of them have clear advantages from power to computational efficiency comparing with existing group-wise methods and existing data-driven methods that allow neutral and protective variants. We recommend AW method because AW method is computationally more efficient than AC method.

  9. Genotypic and Phenotypic Detection of AmpC β-lactamases in Enterobacter spp. Isolated from a Teaching Hospital in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Mohd Khari, Fatin Izzati; Karunakaran, Rina; Rosli, Roshalina; Tee Tay, Sun

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the occurrence of chromosomal and plasmid-mediated β-lactamases (AmpC) genes in a collection of Malaysian isolates of Enterobacter species. Several phenotypic tests for detection of AmpC production of Enterobacter spp. were evaluated and the agreements between tests were determined. Methods Antimicrobial susceptibility profiles for 117 Enterobacter clinical isolates obtained from the Medical Microbiology Diagnostic Laboratory, University Malaya Medical Centre, Malaysia, from November 2012—February 2014 were determined in accordance to CLSI guidelines. AmpC genes were detected using a multiplex PCR assay targeting the MIR/ACT gene (closely related to chromosomal EBC family gene) and other plasmid-mediated genes, including DHA, MOX, CMY, ACC, and FOX. The AmpC β-lactamase production of the isolates was assessed using cefoxitin disk screening test, D69C AmpC detection set, cefoxitin-cloxacillin double disk synergy test (CC-DDS) and AmpC induction test. Results Among the Enterobacter isolates in this study, 39.3% were resistant to cefotaxime and ceftriaxone and 23.9% were resistant to ceftazidime. Ten (8.5%) of the isolates were resistant to cefepime, and one isolate was resistant to meropenem. Chromosomal EBC family gene was amplified from 36 (47.4%) E. cloacae and three (25%) E. asburiae. A novel blaDHA type plasmid-mediated AmpC gene was identified for the first time from an E. cloacae isolate. AmpC β-lactamase production was detected in 99 (89.2%) of 111 potential AmpC β-lactamase producers (positive in cefoxitin disk screening) using D69C AmpC detection set. The detection rates were lower with CC-DDS (80.2%) and AmpC induction tests (50.5%). There was low agreement between the D69C AmpC detection set and the other two phenotypic tests. Of the 40 isolates with AmpC genes detected in this study, 87.5%, 77.5% and 50.0% of these isolates were positive by the D69C AmpC detection set, CC-DDS and Amp

  10. The presence of disease-associated prion protein in skeletal muscle of cattle infected with classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy.

    PubMed

    Okada, Hiroyuki; Miyazawa, Kohtaro; Fukuda, Shigeo; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Masujin, Kentaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Fujii, Takashi; Fujii, Kei; Kageyama, Soichi; Yoshioka, Miyako; Murayama, Yuichi; Yokoyama, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) in the skeletal muscle of cattle infected with classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (C-BSE). The study was carried out systematically in 12 different muscle samples from 43 (3 field and 40 experimental) cases of C-BSE; however, muscle spindles were not available in many of these cases. Therefore, analysis became restricted to a total of 31 muscles in 23 cattle. Even after this restriction, low levels of PrP(Sc) were detected in the muscle spindles of the masseter, intercostal, triceps brachii, psoas major, quadriceps femoris and semitendinosus muscles from 3 field and 6 experimental clinical-stage cases. The present data indicate that small amounts of PrP(Sc) are detectable by immunohistochemistry in the skeletal muscles of animals terminally affected with C-BSE.

  11. Optimization and application of a custom microarray for the detection and genotyping of E. coli O157:H7 in fresh meat samples

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    DNA microarrays are promising high-throughput tools for multiple pathogen detection. Currently, the performance and cost of this platform has limited its broad application in identifying microbial contaminants in foods. In this study, an optimized custom DNA microarray with flexibility in design and...

  12. Simultaneous detection of changes in protein expression and oxidative modification as function of age and APOE genotype in human APOE-targeted replacement mice

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background The purpose of this study was to improve the current method for detecting differentially-oxidized (carbonyl-modified) proteins by 2D-DIGE, while at the same time determining changes in total protein expression. Protein oxidation is a widely accepted model of aging and...

  13. Comparison of digene hybrid capture 2, GeneMatrix PapilloScreen, and a PCR sequencing assay in detecting high-risk and probable high-risk oncogenic HPV genotypes in specimens from Korean women.

    PubMed

    Bae, Jae-Man; Min, Kyung Tae; Shin, Ji Young; Shin, Soo-Kyung; Kim, Soo Nyung; Lee, Hyo-Pyo; Kim, Soo-Ok; Hong, Sun Pyo

    2014-08-01

    Most cervical cancers are caused by 15 high-risk (HR) and three probable high-risk (pHR) oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV). However, current commercial HR HPV screening test products do not include pHR HPV genotypes. Recently, PapilloScreen has been developed to detect the 15 HR and three pHR HPV types. In this study, we evaluated the concordance levels and clinical performance of Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2), PapilloScreen, and a PCR sequencing assay in detecting HR and pHR HPV. The PapilloScreen (96.8 %) and PCR sequencing assay (96.8 %) demonstrated higher sensitivity than HC2 (80.7 %) for detecting HR and pHR HPV. The three assays showed similar specificities and positive or negative predictive values. The concordance levels were 86.5 % (κ = 0.68) and 86.5 % (κ = 0.67) between HC2 and PapilloScreen and between HC2 and PCR sequencing, respectively. A near-perfect concordance was observed between PapilloScreen and PCR sequencing (97.8 %, κ = 0.95). Overall, the agreement between the three assays suggests that the results obtained by the HC2 assay are more often discordant (12.6 %) than the PCR-based tests. In conclusion, PapilloScreen is highly sensitive for detecting high-grade CIN or cervical cancer. The PapilloScreen assay should be considered an accurate and sensitive method for detecting HR and pHR HPV infections and an epidemiological tool for prevalence studies as well as early diagnosis and intervention in HR and pHR HPV infections.

  14. A one-step duplex rRT-PCR assay for the simultaneous detection of duck hepatitis A virus genotypes 1 and 3.

    PubMed

    Hu, Qin; Zhu, Dekang; Ma, Guangpeng; Cheng, Anchun; Wang, Mingshu; Chen, Shun; Jia, Renyong; Liu, Mafeng; Sun, Kunfeng; Yang, Qiao; Wu, Ying; Chen, Xiaoyue

    2016-10-01

    Duck hepatitis A virus (DHAV) is a highly infectious pathogen that causes significant bleeding lesions in the viscera of ducklings less than 3 weeks old. There are three serotypes of DHAV: serotype 1 (DHAV-1), serotype 2 (DHAV-2) and serotype 3 (DHAV-3). These serotypes have no cross-antigenicity with each other. To establish an rRT-PCR assay for the rapid detection of a mixed infection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3, two pairs of primers and a pair of matching TaqMan probes were designed based on conserved regions of DHAV-1 VP0 and DHAV-3 VP3. Finally, we established a one-step duplex rRT-PCR assay with high specificity and sensitivity for the simultaneous detection of DHAV-1 and DHAV-3. This method showed no cross-antigenicity with the other pathogens tested, including duck plague virus, Muscovy duck parvovirus, Riemerella anatipestifer, and pathogenic E. coli from ducks. Sensitivity tests identified the minimum detection limits of this method as 98 (DHAV-1) and 10 (DHAV-3) copies/reaction. To validate the method, thirty-eight clinical samples and thirty artificially infected samples collected from dead duck embryos were studied. Thirty-seven samples were positive for DHAV-1, seventeen samples were positive for DHAV-3, and fourteen samples were positive for a mixed infection using the duplex rRT-PCR method. The method established in this study is specific, sensitive, convenient and timesaving and is a powerful tool for detecting DHAV-1, DHAV-3, and their mixed infection and for conducting surveys of pandemic virus strains.

  15. Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) Detection: Comparison of Two Molecular Methods (IDI-MRSA PCR Assay and GenoType MRSA Direct PCR Assay) with Three Selective MRSA Agars (MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA) for Use with Infection-Control Swabs▿

    PubMed Central

    van Hal, S. J.; Stark, D.; Lockwood, B.; Marriott, D.; Harkness, J.

    2007-01-01

    Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) is an increasing problem. Rapid detection of MRSA-colonized patients has the potential to limit spread of the organism. We evaluated the sensitivities and specificities of MRSA detection by two molecular methods (IDI-MRSA PCR assay and GenoType MRSA Direct PCR assay) and three selective MRSA agars (MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA), using 205 (101 nasal, 52 groin, and 52 axillary samples) samples from consecutive known MRSA-infected and/or -colonized patients. All detection methods had higher MRSA detection rates for nasal swabs than for axillary and groin swabs. Detection of MRSA by IDI-MRSA was the most sensitive method, independent of the site (94% for nasal samples, 80% for nonnasal samples, and 90% overall). The sensitivities of the GenoType MRSA Direct assay and the MRSA ID, MRSASelect, and CHROMagar MRSA agars with nasal swabs were 70%, 72%, 68%, and 75%, respectively. All detection methods had high specificities (95 to 99%), independent of the swab site. Extended incubation for a further 24 h with selective MRSA agars increased the detection of MRSA, with a corresponding decline in specificity secondary to a significant increase in false-positive results. There was a noticeable difference in test performance of the GenoType MRSA Direct assay in detection of MRSA (28/38 samples [74%]) compared with detection of nonmultiresistant MRSA (17/31 samples [55%]) (susceptible to two or more non-β-lactam antibiotics). This was not observed with selective MRSA agar plates or IDI-MRSA. Although it is more expensive, in addition to rapid turnaround times of 2 to 4 h, IDI-MRSA offers greater detection of MRSA colonization, independent of the swab site, than do conventional selective agars and GenoType MRSA Direct. PMID:17537949

  16. Prediction of MicroRNA-Disease Associations Based on Social Network Analysis Methods.

    PubMed

    Zou, Quan; Li, Jinjin; Hong, Qingqi; Lin, Ziyu; Wu, Yun; Shi, Hua; Ju, Ying

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs constitute an important class of noncoding, single-stranded, ~22 nucleotide long RNA molecules encoded by endogenous genes. They play an important role in regulating gene transcription and the regulation of normal development. MicroRNAs can be associated with disease; however, only a few microRNA-disease associations have been confirmed by traditional experimental approaches. We introduce two methods to predict microRNA-disease association. The first method, KATZ, focuses on integrating the social network analysis method with machine learning and is based on networks derived from known microRNA-disease associations, disease-disease associations, and microRNA-microRNA associations. The other method, CATAPULT, is a supervised machine learning method. We applied the two methods to 242 known microRNA-disease associations and evaluated their performance using leave-one-out cross-validation and 3-fold cross-validation. Experiments proved that our methods outperformed the state-of-the-art methods.

  17. Prediction of MicroRNA-Disease Associations Based on Social Network Analysis Methods

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Quan; Li, Jinjin; Hong, Qingqi; Lin, Ziyu; Wu, Yun; Shi, Hua; Ju, Ying

    2015-01-01

    MicroRNAs constitute an important class of noncoding, single-stranded, ~22 nucleotide long RNA molecules encoded by endogenous genes. They play an important role in regulating gene transcription and the regulation of normal development. MicroRNAs can be associated with disease; however, only a few microRNA-disease associations have been confirmed by traditional experimental approaches. We introduce two methods to predict microRNA-disease association. The first method, KATZ, focuses on integrating the social network analysis method with machine learning and is based on networks derived from known microRNA-disease associations, disease-disease associations, and microRNA-microRNA associations. The other method, CATAPULT, is a supervised machine learning method. We applied the two methods to 242 known microRNA-disease associations and evaluated their performance using leave-one-out cross-validation and 3-fold cross-validation. Experiments proved that our methods outperformed the state-of-the-art methods. PMID:26273645

  18. Inferring drug-disease associations from integration of chemical, genomic and phenotype data using network propagation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background During the last few years, the knowledge of drug, disease phenotype and protein has been rapidly accumulated and more and more scientists have been drawn the attention to inferring drug-disease associations by computational method. Development of an integrated approach for systematic discovering drug-disease associations by those informational data is an important issue. Methods We combine three different networks of drug, genomic and disease phenotype and assign the weights to the edges from available experimental data and knowledge. Given a specific disease, we use our network propagation approach to infer the drug-disease associations. Results We apply prostate cancer and colorectal cancer as our test data. We use the manually curated drug-disease associations from comparative toxicogenomics database to be our benchmark. The ranked results show that our proposed method obtains higher specificity and sensitivity and clearly outperforms previous methods. Our result also show that our method with off-targets information gets higher performance than that with only primary drug targets in both test data. Conclusions We clearly demonstrate the feasibility and benefits of using network-based analyses of chemical, genomic and phenotype data to reveal drug-disease associations. The potential associations inferred by our method provide new perspectives for toxicogenomics and drug reposition evaluation. PMID:24565337

  19. Disease-associated mutation in SRSF2 misregulates splicing by altering RNA-binding affinities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Lieu, Yen K.; Ali, Abdullah M.; Penson, Alex; Reggio, Kathryn S.; Rabadan, Raul; Raza, Azra; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Manley, James L.

    2015-01-01

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) is an RNA-binding protein that plays important roles in splicing of mRNA precursors. SRSF2 mutations are frequently found in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and certain leukemias, but how these mutations affect SRSF2 function has only begun to be examined. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease to introduce the P95H mutation to SRSF2 in K562 leukemia cells, generating an isogenic model so that splicing alterations can be attributed solely to mutant SRSF2. We found that SRSF2 (P95H) misregulates 548 splicing events (<1% of total). Of these events, 374 involved the inclusion of cassette exons, and the inclusion was either increased (206) or decreased (168). We detected a specific motif (UCCA/UG) enriched in the more-included exons and a distinct motif (UGGA/UG) in the more-excluded exons. RNA gel shift assays showed that a mutant SRSF2 derivative bound more tightly than its wild-type counterpart to RNA sites containing UCCAG but bound less tightly to UGGAG sites. Thus in most cases the pattern of exon inclusion or exclusion correlated with stronger or weaker RNA binding, respectively. We further show that the P95H mutation does not affect other functions of SRSF2, i.e., protein–protein interactions with key splicing factors. Our results thus demonstrate that the P95H mutation positively or negatively alters the binding affinity of SRSF2 for cognate RNA sites in target transcripts, leading to misregulation of exon inclusion. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of the disease-associated SRSF2 mutation in splicing regulation and also reveal a group of misspliced mRNA isoforms for potential therapeutic targeting. PMID:26261309

  20. Disease-associated mutation in SRSF2 misregulates splicing by altering RNA-binding affinities.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jian; Lieu, Yen K; Ali, Abdullah M; Penson, Alex; Reggio, Kathryn S; Rabadan, Raul; Raza, Azra; Mukherjee, Siddhartha; Manley, James L

    2015-08-25

    Serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 2 (SRSF2) is an RNA-binding protein that plays important roles in splicing of mRNA precursors. SRSF2 mutations are frequently found in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes and certain leukemias, but how these mutations affect SRSF2 function has only begun to be examined. We used clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)/CRISPR-associated protein-9 nuclease to introduce the P95H mutation to SRSF2 in K562 leukemia cells, generating an isogenic model so that splicing alterations can be attributed solely to mutant SRSF2. We found that SRSF2 (P95H) misregulates 548 splicing events (<1% of total). Of these events, 374 involved the inclusion of cassette exons, and the inclusion was either increased (206) or decreased (168). We detected a specific motif (UCCA/UG) enriched in the more-included exons and a distinct motif (UGGA/UG) in the more-excluded exons. RNA gel shift assays showed that a mutant SRSF2 derivative bound more tightly than its wild-type counterpart to RNA sites containing UCCAG but bound less tightly to UGGAG sites. Thus in most cases the pattern of exon inclusion or exclusion correlated with stronger or weaker RNA binding, respectively. We further show that the P95H mutation does not affect other functions of SRSF2, i.e., protein-protein interactions with key splicing factors. Our results thus demonstrate that the P95H mutation positively or negatively alters the binding affinity of SRSF2 for cognate RNA sites in target transcripts, leading to misregulation of exon inclusion. Our findings shed light on the mechanism of the disease-associated SRSF2 mutation in splicing regulation and also reveal a group of misspliced mRNA isoforms for potential therapeutic targeting.

  1. Detection of Cryptosporidium sp. in two new seal species, Phoca vitulina and Cystophora cristata, and a novel Cryptosporidium genotype in a third seal species, Pagophilus groenlandicus, from the Gulf of Maine.

    PubMed

    Bass, A L; Wallace, C C; Yund, P O; Ford, T E

    2012-04-01

    Data on the geographic distribution and host specificity of Cryptosporidium spp. are critical for developing an understanding of likely transmission patterns in nature. During a molecular-based survey of fecal samples from 293 terrestrial and aquatic animals in Maine, USA, we detected Cryptosporidium sp. in 11 harbor seals (Phoca vitulina), 1 hooded seal (Cystophora cristata), and 1 harp seal (Pagophilus groenlandicus). None of the terrestrial or freshwater mammal fecal samples or bird samples tested positive for Cryptosporidium sp. However, the sequencing results of the small subunit (ssu) rRNA gene indicate that the seals were infected with an undescribed species of Cryptosporidium , previously isolated only from ringed seals (Phoca hispida) in northern Quebec, Canada. In addition, the Cryptosporidium sp. detected in the harp seal is significantly different from the previously observed Cryptosporidium sp. in other seals. We confirmed the genetic distinctiveness of this Cryptosporidium genotype and the identity of the other Cryptosporidium sp. seal ssu rRNA sequences by using data from the 70-kDa heat shock protein gene. Based on phylogenetic reconstructions of both genes, it seems that either Cryptosporidium canis or C. felis are sister species to the seal associated Cryptosporidium spp. Our findings extend the range of " Cryptosporidium sp. seal" well south of the 55th parallel, add other species to the list of seals affected by Cryptosporidium sp., and highlight the presence of unrecognized population and potentially species level variation in Cryptosporidium.

  2. A Genotypic Approach for Detection, Identification, and Characterization of Drug Resistance in Mycobacterium ulcerans in Clinical Samples and Isolates from Ghana

    PubMed Central

    Beissner, Marcus; Awua-Boateng, Nana-Yaa; Thompson, William; Nienhuis, Willemien A.; Klutse, Erasmus; Agbenorku, Pius; Nitschke, Joerg; Herbinger, Karl-Heinz; Siegmund, Vera; Fleischmann, Erna; Adjei, Ohene; Fleischer, Bernhard; van der Werf, Tjip S.; Loscher, Thomas; Bretzel, Gisela

    2010-01-01

    Standardized antimycobacterial therapy is considered the treatment of choice for Buruli ulcer disease. To assess the prevalence of drug resistance among clinical Mycobacterium ulcerans isolates in Ghana, we conducted a sequence-based approach to detect mutations associated with drug resistance. We subjected clinical samples to direct DNA sequencing of rpoB and rpsL genes and compared culture and whole-genome extracts regarding the efficiency of sequence analysis; 99.1% (rpoB) and 100% (rpsL) of the patients harbored M. ulcerans wild type. In one isolate (0.9%), a point mutation of the rpoB gene at codon Ser522 leading to an amino acid change was detected. Culture extracts yielded a significantly higher sequencing efficiency than whole-genome extracts. Our data suggest a low level of drug resistance in Ghana. However, mutations associated with drug resistance do occur and require monitoring. Improved techniques are necessary to enhance the efficiency of sequence analysis of whole-genome extracts. PMID:21036838

  3. Comparative evaluation of novel African swine fever virus (ASF) antibody detection techniques derived from specific ASF viral genotypes with the OIE internationally prescribed serological tests.

    PubMed

    Gallardo, C; Soler, A; Nieto, R; Carrascosa, A L; De Mia, G M; Bishop, R P; Martins, C; Fasina, F O; Couacy-Hymman, E; Heath, L; Pelayo, V; Martín, E; Simón, A; Martín, R; Okurut, A R; Lekolol, I; Okoth, E; Arias, M

    2013-02-22

    The presence of antibodies against African swine fever (ASF), a complex fatal notifiable OIE disease of swine, is always indicative of previous infection, since there is no vaccine that is currently used in the field. The early appearance and subsequent long-term persistence of antibodies combined with cost-effectiveness make antibody detection techniques essential in control programmes. Recent reports appear to indicate that the serological tests recommended by the OIE for ASF monitoring are much less effective in East and Southern Africa where viral genetic and antigenic diversity is the greatest. We report herein an extensive analysis including more than 1000 field and experimental infection sera, in which the OIE recommended tests are compared with antigen-specific ELISAs and immuno-peroxidase staining of cells (IPT). The antibody detection results generated using new antigen-specific tests, developed in this study, which are based on production of antigen fractions generated by infection and virus purification from COS-1 cells, showed strong concordance with the OIE tests. We therefore conclude that the lack of success is not attributable to antigenic polymorphism and may be related to the specific characteristics of the local breeds African pigs.

  4. Increased sample capacity for genotyping and expression profiling by kinetic polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Watson, Robert M; Griaznova, Olga I; Long, Christopher M; Holland, Michael J

    2004-06-01

    We fabricated and evaluated high-throughput kinetic thermal cyclers with 768-reaction capacity for kinetic polymerase chain reaction (kPCR)-based genotyping and kinetic reverse transcription (kRT)-PCR-based transcript quantitation. The system uses dye-based detection with ethidium bromide and a single DNA polymerase-based PCR or RT-PCR assay. Allele-specific detection of the two most common hereditary hemochromotosis mutant alleles, C282Y and H63D, was reliably measured by kPCR using human DNA templates as low as 10 genome equivalents per assay. Transcript profiling was performed for 16 yeast transcripts ranging in intracellular abundance over four orders of magnitude. Standard deviations of the PCR cycle threshold values determined from multiple kRT-PCR assays in three different instruments ranged from 0.11 to 0.97 PCR cycles and were reproducible, transcript specific, and instrument independent. The effects of the sin3, gal11, and snf2 knockout mutations on expression of 385 yeast genes were evaluated by kRT-PCR and compared to published values determined by high-density oligonucleotide array and/or microarray analysis for snf2 and sin3. The 768-reaction kinetic thermalcyclers, each with a capacity for more than a half million assays per year, are well suited to genomics applications such as single nucleotide polymorphism/disease association studies and genomewide transcription profiling where high sensitivity and accuracy are required.

  5. DiMeX: A Text Mining System for Mutation-Disease Association Extraction.

    PubMed

    Mahmood, A S M Ashique; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Mazumder, Raja; Vijay-Shanker, K

    2016-01-01

    The number of published articles describing associations between mutations and diseases is increasing at a fast pace. There is a pressing need to gather such mutation-disease associations into public knowledge bases, but manual curation slows down the growth of such databases. We have addressed this problem by developing a text-mining system (DiMeX) to extract mutation to disease associations from publication abstracts. DiMeX consists of a series of natural language processing modules that preprocess input text and apply syntactic and semantic patterns to extract mutation-disease associations. DiMeX achieves high precision and recall with F-scores of 0.88, 0.91 and 0.89 when evaluated on three different datasets for mutation-disease associations. DiMeX includes a separate component that extracts mutation mentions in text and associates them with genes. This component has been also evaluated on different datasets and shown to achieve state-of-the-art performance. The results indicate that our system outperforms the existing mutation-disease association tools, addressing the low precision problems suffered by most approaches. DiMeX was applied on a large set of abstracts from Medline to extract mutation-disease associations, as well as other relevant information including patient/cohort size and population data. The results are stored in a database that can be queried and downloaded at http://biotm.cis.udel.edu/dimex/. We conclude that this high-throughput text-mining approach has the potential to significantly assist researchers and curators to enrich mutation databases.

  6. DiMeX: A Text Mining System for Mutation-Disease Association Extraction

    PubMed Central

    Mahmood, A. S. M. Ashique; Wu, Tsung-Jung; Mazumder, Raja; Vijay-Shanker, K.

    2016-01-01

    The number of published articles describing associations between mutations and diseases is increasing at a fast pace. There is a pressing need to gather such mutation-disease associations into public knowledge bases, but manual curation slows down the growth of such databases. We have addressed this problem by developing a text-mining system (DiMeX) to extract mutation to disease associations from publication abstracts. DiMeX consists of a series of natural language processing modules that preprocess input text and apply syntactic and semantic patterns to extract mutation-disease associations. DiMeX achieves high precision and recall with F-scores of 0.88, 0.91 and 0.89 when evaluated on three different datasets for mutation-disease associations. DiMeX includes a separate component that extracts mutation mentions in text and associates them with genes. This component has been also evaluated on different datasets and shown to achieve state-of-the-art performance. The results indicate that our system outperforms the existing mutation-disease association tools, addressing the low precision problems suffered by most approaches. DiMeX was applied on a large set of abstracts from Medline to extract mutation-disease associations, as well as other relevant information including patient/cohort size and population data. The results are stored in a database that can be queried and downloaded at http://biotm.cis.udel.edu/dimex/. We conclude that this high-throughput text-mining approach has the potential to significantly assist researchers and curators to enrich mutation databases. PMID:27073839

  7. Genotype III Saint Louis Encephalitis Virus Outbreak, Argentina, 2005

    PubMed Central

    Ré, Viviana; Almirón, Walter R.; Farías, Adrián; Vázquez, Ana; Sanchez-Seco, María Paz; Aguilar, Javier; Spinsanti, Lorena; Konigheim, Brenda; Visintin, Andrés; García, Jorge; Morales, Maria Alejandra; Tenorio, Antonio; Contigiani, Marta

    2006-01-01

    Twenty-six years after it was last detected, Saint Louis encephalitis virus (SLEV) genotype III reemerged in 2005 in Córdoba, Argentina, where it caused an outbreak. Two genotype III SLEV strains were isolated from Culex quinquefasciatus. A 71.43% prevalence for neutralizing antibodies was found in domestic fowl in the homestead of a patient with encephalitis. PMID:17283629

  8. The glutathione-S-transferase Mu 1 null genotype modulates ozone-induced airway inflammation in humans*

    EPA Science Inventory

    Background: The Glutathione-S-Transferase Mu 1 null genotype has been reported to be a risk factor for acute respiratory disease associated with increases in ambient air ozone. Ozone is known to cause an immediate decrease in lung function and increased airway inflammation. Howev...

  9. Genotyping of Coxiella burnetii from domestic ruminants in northern Spain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Information on the genotypic diversity of Coxiella burnetii isolates from infected domestic ruminants in Spain is limited. The aim of this study was to identify the C. burnetii genotypes infecting livestock in Northern Spain and compare them to other European genotypes. A commercial real-time PCR targeting the IS1111a insertion element was used to detect the presence of C. burnetii DNA in domestic ruminants from Spain. Genotypes were determined by a 6-loci Multiple Locus Variable number tandem repeat analysis (MLVA) panel and Multispacer Sequence Typing (MST). Results A total of 45 samples from 4 goat herds (placentas, N = 4), 12 dairy cattle herds (vaginal mucus, individual milk, bulk tank milk, aerosols, N = 20) and 5 sheep flocks (placenta, vaginal swabs, faeces, air samples, dust, N = 21) were included in the study. Samples from goats and sheep were obtained from herds which had suffered abortions suspected to be caused by C. burnetii, whereas cattle samples were obtained from animals with reproductive problems compatible with C. burnetii infection, or consisted of bulk tank milk (BTM) samples from a Q fever surveillance programme. C. burnetii genotypes identified in ruminants from Spain were compared to those detected in other countries. Three MLVA genotypes were found in 4 goat farms, 7 MLVA genotypes were identified in 12 cattle herds and 4 MLVA genotypes were identified in 5 sheep flocks. Clustering of the MLVA genotypes using the minimum spanning tree method showed a high degree of genetic similarity between most MLVA genotypes. Overall 11 different MLVA genotypes were obtained corresponding to 4 different MST genotypes: MST genotype 13, identified in goat, sheep and cattle from Spain; MST genotype 18, only identified in goats; and, MST genotypes 8 and 20, identified in small ruminants and cattle, respectively. All these genotypes had been previously identified in animal and human clinical samples from several European countries, but

  10. Detection and genotypic differentiation of Campylobacter jejuni and Campylobacter coli strains from laying hens by multiplex PCR and fla-typing.

    PubMed

    Müller, Wolfgang; Böhland, Corinna; Methner, Ulrich

    2011-12-01

    In total, 26 Campylobacter (C.) strains, isolated from liver, spleen, caecal or jejunal content of laying hens from different flocks were examined. In these flocks a drop in egg production, an increasing mortality and livers with whitish-grey lesions as post-mortem finding were observed. Suspected Campylobacter colonies were differentiated using a modified m-PCR in 13 Campylobacter jejuni and 13 Campylobacter coli strains. All isolates were characterised by typing of the flaA and flaB gene each with two restriction enzymes. To compare the four different profiles for all strains an artificial "fla-type" was generated. Different and identical fla-types of C. jejuni and C. coli were recovered from both intestinal and extra-intestinal organs of the laying hens and even from individual birds. One significant observation is that some fla-types of C. jejuni or C. coli were detected in intestinal and systemic sites but not all fla-types of both species appeared to be equally able to invade internal organs.

  11. Molecular Assay and Genotyping of Hepatitis C Virus among Infected Egyptian and Saudi Arabian Patients

    PubMed Central

    Farag, Mohamed MS; Sofy, Ahmed R; Mousa, Adel A; Ahmed, Mohamed A; Alganzory, Mohamed R

    2015-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major health problem recognized globally. HCV is a common cause of liver fibrosis that may lead to liver cirrhosis or hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study was to estimate the prevalence of HCV infection and genotyping among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients using different molecular techniques. HCV RNA viral load was assessed by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technology. For HCV genotyping, RT-PCR hybridization fluorescence-based method and reverse hybridization line probe assay (INNO-LiPA) were used. A total of 40 anti-HCV-positive patients with chronic hepatitis C were examined for HCV RNA, genotyping, and different laboratory investigations. In the present study, HCV genotypes 4, mixed 4.1b, and 1 were detected in patients of both countries, while genotype 2 was only detected in Saudi Arabian patients. Genotyping methods for HCV showed no difference in the classification at the genotype level. With regard to HCV subtypes, INNO-LiPA assay was a reliable test in HCV genotyping for the detection of major genotypes and subtypes, while RT-PCR-based assay was a good test at the genotype level only. HCV genotype 4 was found to be the predominant genotype among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. In conclusion, data analysis for detecting and genotyping HCV was an important factor for understanding the epidemiology and treatment strategies of HCV among Egyptian and Saudi Arabian chronic patients. PMID:26512201

  12. Comparison of the novel human papillomavirus 4 auto-capillary electrophoresis test with the hybrid capture 2 assay and with the PCR HPV typing set test in the detection of high-risk HPV including HPV 16 and 18 genotypes in cervical specimens.

    PubMed

    Hong, Jin Hwa; Song, Seung Hun; Kim, Jong Kee; Han, Jeong Hyun; Lee, Jae Kwan

    2009-08-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the novel human papillomavirus (HPV) detection method, the HPV 4 Auto-capillary Electrophoresis (ACE) test with the hybrid capture (HC) 2 assay for the detection of high-risk HPVs. In addition, we compared the HPV 4 ACE test with the polymerase chain reaction HPV Typing Set test for the detection of HPV 16 and HPV 18 genotypes. One hundred ninety-nine cervical swab samples obtained from women with previous abnormal Pap smears were subjected to testing with the three HPV tests. The HPV 4 ACE test and the HC 2 assay showed substantial agreement for detection of high-risk HPVs (85.4%, kappa=0.71). The HPV 4 ACE test also showed substantial agreement with the PCR HPV Typing Set test in the detection of HPV 16 and HP V 18 genotypes (89.9%, kappa=0.65). In correlation with cytologic results, the sensitivities and specificities of the HPV 4 ACE test and HC 2 assay were 92.9% vs. 92.9% and 48.1% vs. 50.8%, respectively, when high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions were regarded as abnormal cytologies. The novel HPV 4 ACE test is a valuable tool for the detection of high-risk HPVs and for genotyping of HPV 16 and HPV 18.

  13. The distribution of hepatitis B virus genotypes in Thailand.

    PubMed

    Louisirirotchanakul, Suda; Olinger, Christophe M; Arunkaewchaemsri, Panida; Poovorawan, Yong; Kanoksinsombat, Chinda; Thongme, Chittima; Sa-Nguanmoo, Pattaratida; Krasae, Sasithorn; Theamboonlert, Apiradee; Oota, Sineenart; Fongsatitkul, Ladda; Puapairoj, Chintana; Promwong, Charuporn; Weber, Bernard

    2012-10-01

    Phylogenetic analysis was performed on hepatitis B virus (HBV) strains obtained from 86 hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) positive donors from Thailand originating throughout the country. Based on the S gene, 87.5% of strains were of genotype C while 10.5% were of genotype B, with all genotype B strains obtained from patients originating from the central or the south Thailand. No genotype B strains were found in the north of Thailand. Surprisingly, one patient was infected with a genotype H strain while another patient was infected with a genotype G strain. Complete genome sequencing and recombination analysis identified the latter as being a genotype G and C2 recombinant with the breakpoint around nucleotide position 700. The origin of the genotype G fragment was not identifiable while the genotype C2 fragment most likely came from strains circulating in Laos or Malaysia. The performance of different HBsAg diagnostic kits and HBV nucleic acid amplification technology (NAT) was evaluated. The genotype H and G/C2 recombination did not interfere with HBV detection.

  14. A Bayesian Approach for Analysis of Whole-Genome Bisulphite Sequencing Data Identifies Disease-Associated Changes in DNA Methylation.

    PubMed

    Rackham, Owen J L; Langley, Sarah R; Oates, Thomas; Vradi, Eleni; Harmston, Nathan; Srivastava, Prashant K; Behmoaras, Jacques; Dellaportas, Petros; Bottolo, Leonardo; Petretto, Enrico

    2017-02-17

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic modification involved in gene regulation whose contribution to disease susceptibility remains to be fully understood. Here, we present a novel Bayesian smoothing approach (called ABBA) to detect differentially methylated regions (DMRs) from whole-genome bisulphite sequencing (WGBS). We also show how this approach can be leveraged to identify disease-associated changes in DNA methylation, suggesting mechanisms through which these alterations might affect disease. From a data modeling perspective, ABBA has the distinctive feature of automatically adapting to different correlation structures in CpG methylation levels across the genome whilst taking into account the distance between CpG sites as a covariate. Our simulation study shows that ABBA has greater power to detect DMRs than existing methods, providing an accurate identification of DMRs in the large majority of simulated cases. To empirically demonstrate the method's efficacy in generating biological hypotheses, we performed WGBS of primary macrophages derived from an experimental rat system of glomerulonephritis and used ABBA to identify >1,000 disease-associated DMRs. Investigation of these DMRs revealed differential DNA methylation localized to a 600bp region in the promoter of the Ifitm3 gene. This was confirmed by ChIP-seq and RNA-seq analyses, showing differential transcription factor binding at the Ifitm3 promoter by JunD (an established determinant of glomerulonephritis) and a consistent change in Ifitm3 expression. Our ABBA analysis allowed us to propose a new role for Ifitm3 in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis via a mechanism involving promoter hypermethylation that is associated with Ifitm3 repression in the rat strain susceptible to glomerulonephritis.

  15. A Bayesian Approach for Analysis of Whole-Genome Bisulfite Sequencing Data Identifies Disease-Associated Changes in DNA Methylation

    PubMed Central

    Rackham, Owen J. L.; Langley, Sarah R.; Oates, Thomas; Vradi, Eleni; Harmston, Nathan; Srivastava, Prashant K.; Behmoaras, Jacques; Dellaportas, Petros; Bottolo, Leonardo; Petretto, Enrico

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation is a key epigenetic modification involved in gene regulation whose contribution to disease susceptibility remains to be fully understood. Here, we present a novel Bayesian smoothing approach (called ABBA) to detect differentially methylated regions (DMRs) from whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS). We also show how this approach can be leveraged to identify disease-associated changes in DNA methylation, suggesting mechanisms through which these alterations might affect disease. From a data modeling perspective, ABBA has the distinctive feature of automatically adapting to different correlation structures in CpG methylation levels across the genome while taking into account the distance between CpG sites as a covariate. Our simulation study shows that ABBA has greater power to detect DMRs than existing methods, providing an accurate identification of DMRs in the large majority of simulated cases. To empirically demonstrate the method’s efficacy in generating biological hypotheses, we performed WGBS of primary macrophages derived from an experimental rat system of glomerulonephritis and used ABBA to identify >1000 disease-associated DMRs. Investigation of these DMRs revealed differential DNA methylation localized to a 600 bp region in the promoter of the Ifitm3 gene. This was confirmed by ChIP-seq and RNA-seq analyses, showing differential transcription factor binding at the Ifitm3 promoter by JunD (an established determinant of glomerulonephritis), and a consistent change in Ifitm3 expression. Our ABBA analysis allowed us to propose a new role for Ifitm3 in the pathogenesis of glomerulonephritis via a mechanism involving promoter hypermethylation that is associated with Ifitm3 repression in the rat strain susceptible to glomerulonephritis. PMID:28213474

  16. Effects of Photo and Genotype-Based Misidentification Error on Estimates of Survival, Detection and State Transition using Multistate Survival Models

    PubMed Central

    Winiarski, Kristopher J.; McGarigal, Kevin

    2016-01-01

    We simulated multistate capture histories (CHs) by varying state survival (ϕ), detection (p) and transition (ψ), number of total capture occasions and releases per capture occasion and then modified these scenarios to mimic false rejection error (FRE), a common misidentification error, resulting from the failure to match samples of the same individual. We then fit a multistate model and estimated accuracy, bias and precision of state-specific ϕ, p and ψ to better understand the effects of FRE on different simulation scenarios. As expected, ϕ, and p, decreased in accuracy with FRE, with lower accuracy when CHs were simulated under a shorter-term study and a lower number of releases per capture occasion (lower sample size). Accuracy of ψ estimates were robust to FRE except in those CH scenarios simulated using low sample size. The effect of FRE on bias was not consistent among parameters and differed by CH scenario. As expected, ϕ was negatively biased with increased FRE (except for the low ϕ low p CH scenario simulated with a low sample size), but we found that the magnitude of bias differed by scenario (high p CH scenarios were more negatively biased). State transition was relatively unbiased, except for the low p CH scenarios simulated with a low sample size, which were positively biased with FRE, and high p CH scenarios simulated with a low sample size. The effect of FRE on precision was not consistent among parameters and differed by scenario and sample size. Precision of ϕ decreased with FRE and was lowest with the low ϕ low p CH scenarios. Precision of p estimates also decreased with FRE under all scenarios, except the low ϕ high p CH scenarios. However, precision of ψ increased with FRE, except for those CH scenarios simulated with a low sample size. Our results demonstrate how FRE leads to loss of accuracy in parameter estimates in a multistate model with the exception of ψ when estimated using an adequate sample size. PMID:26751208

  17. Large-scale prediction of microRNA-disease associations by combinatorial prioritization algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Hua; Chen, Xiaojun; Lu, Lu

    2017-01-01

    Identification of the associations between microRNA molecules and human diseases from large-scale heterogeneous biological data is an important step for understanding the pathogenesis of diseases in microRNA level. However, experimental verification of microRNA-disease associations is expensive and time-consuming. To overcome the drawbacks of conventional experimental methods, we presented a combinatorial prioritization algorithm to predict the microRNA-disease associations. Importantly, our method can be used to predict microRNAs (diseases) associated with the diseases (microRNAs) without the known associated microRNAs (diseases). The predictive performance of our proposed approach was evaluated and verified by the internal cross-validations and external independent validations based on standard association datasets. The results demonstrate that our proposed method achieves the impressive performance for predicting the microRNA-disease association with the Area Under receiver operation characteristic Curve (AUC), 86.93%, which is indeed outperform the previous prediction methods. Particularly, we observed that the ensemble-based method by integrating the predictions of multiple algorithms can give more reliable and robust prediction than the single algorithm, with the AUC score improved to 92.26%. We applied our combinatorial prioritization algorithm to lung neoplasms and breast neoplasms, and revealed their top 30 microRNA candidates, which are in consistent with the published literatures and databases. PMID:28317855

  18. 77 FR 47795 - Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents: Peripheral Neuropathy

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-10

    ... AFFAIRS 38 CFR Part 3 RIN 2900-AO32 Disease Associated With Exposure to Certain Herbicide Agents... connection for acute and sub-acute peripheral neuropathy associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents... associated with exposure to certain herbicide agents. DATES: Comments must be received by VA on or...

  19. Large-scale prediction of microRNA-disease associations by combinatorial prioritization algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Hua; Chen, Xiaojun; Lu, Lu

    2017-03-01

    Identification of the associations between microRNA molecules and human diseases from large-scale heterogeneous biological data is an important step for understanding the pathogenesis of diseases in microRNA level. However, experimental verification of microRNA-disease associations is expensive and time-consuming. To overcome the drawbacks of conventional experimental methods, we presented a combinatorial prioritization algorithm to predict the microRNA-disease associations. Importantly, our method can be used to predict microRNAs (diseases) associated with the diseases (microRNAs) without the known associated microRNAs (diseases). The predictive performance of our proposed approach was evaluated and verified by the internal cross-validations and external independent validations based on standard association datasets. The results demonstrate that our proposed method achieves the impressive performance for predicting the microRNA-disease association with the Area Under receiver operation characteristic Curve (AUC), 86.93%, which is indeed outperform the previous prediction methods. Particularly, we observed that the ensemble-based method by integrating the predictions of multiple algorithms can give more reliable and robust prediction than the single algorithm, with the AUC score improved to 92.26%. We applied our combinatorial prioritization algorithm to lung neoplasms and breast neoplasms, and revealed their top 30 microRNA candidates, which are in consistent with the published literatures and databases.

  20. WBSMDA: Within and Between Score for MiRNA-Disease Association prediction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xing; Yan, Chenggang Clarence; Zhang, Xu; You, Zhu-Hong; Deng, Lixi; Liu, Ying; Zhang, Yongdong; Dai, Qionghai

    2016-01-01

    Increasing evidences have indicated that microRNAs (miRNAs) are functionally associated with the development and progression of various complex human diseases. However, the roles of miRNAs in multiple biological processes or various diseases and their underlying molecular mechanisms still have not been fully understood yet. Predicting potential miRNA-disease associations by integrating various heterogeneous biological datasets is of great significance to the biomedical research. Computational methods could obtain potential miRNA-disease associations in a short time, which significantly reduce the experimental time and cost. Considering the limitations in previous computational methods, we developed the model of Within and Between Score for MiRNA-Disease Association prediction (WBSMDA) to predict potential miRNAs associated with various complex diseases. WBSMDA could be applied to the diseases without any known related miRNAs. The AUC of 0.8031 based on Leave-one-out cross validation has demonstrated its reliable performance. WBSMDA was further applied to Colon Neoplasms, Prostate Neoplasms, and Lymphoma for the identification of their potential related miRNAs. As a result, 90%, 84%, and 80% of predicted miRNA-disease pairs in the top 50 prediction list for these three diseases have been confirmed by recent experimental literatures, respectively. It is anticipated that WBSMDA would be a useful resource for potential miRNA-disease association identification. PMID:26880032

  1. A method for rapid, targeted CNV genotyping identifies rare variants associated with neurocognitive disease.

    PubMed

    Mefford, Heather C; Cooper, Gregory M; Zerr, Troy; Smith, Joshua D; Baker, Carl; Shafer, Neil; Thorland, Erik C; Skinner, Cindy; Schwartz, Charles E; Nickerson, Deborah A; Eichler, Evan E

    2009-09-01

    Copy-number variants (CNVs) are substantial contributors to human disease. A central challenge in CNV-disease association studies is to characterize the pathogenicity of rare and possibly incompletely penetrant events, which requires the accurate detection of rare CNVs in large numbers of individuals. Cost and throughput issues limit our ability to perform these studies. We have adapted the Illumina BeadXpress SNP genotyping assay and developed an algorithm, SNP-Conditional OUTlier detection (SCOUT), to rapidly and accurately detect both rare and common CNVs in large cohorts. This approach is customizable, cost effective, highly parallelized, and largely automated. We applied this method to screen 69 loci in 1105 children with unexplained intellectual disability, identifying pathogenic variants in 3.1% of these individuals and potentially pathogenic variants in an additional 2.3%. We identified seven individuals (0.7%) with a deletion of 16p11.2, which has been previously associated with autism. Our results widen the phenotypic spectrum of these deletions to include intellectual disability without autism. We also detected 1.65-3.4 Mbp duplications at 16p13.11 in 1.1% of affected individuals and 350 kbp deletions at 15q11.2, near the Prader-Willi/Angelman syndrome critical region, in 0.8% of affected individuals. Compared to published CNVs in controls they are significantly (P = 4.7 x 10(-5) and 0.003, respectively) enriched in these children, supporting previously published hypotheses that they are neurocognitive disease risk factors. More generally, this approach offers a previously unavailable balance between customization, cost, and throughput for analysis of CNVs and should prove valuable for targeted CNV detection in both research and diagnostic settings.

  2. Group sequential methods and sample size savings in biomarker-disease association studies.

    PubMed Central

    Aplenc, R; Zhao, H; Rebbeck, T R; Propert, K J

    2003-01-01

    Molecular epidemiological association studies use valuable biosamples and incur costs. Statistical methods for early genotyping termination may conserve biosamples and costs. Group sequential methods (GSM) allow early termination of studies on the basis of interim comparisons. Simulation studies evaluated the application of GSM using data from a case-control study of GST genotypes and prostate cancer. Group sequential boundaries (GSB) were defined in the EAST-2000 software and were evaluated for study termination when early evidence suggested that the null hypothesis of no association between genotype and disease was unlikely to be rejected. Early termination of GSTM1 genotyping, which demonstrated no association with prostate cancer, occurred in >90% of the simulated studies. On average, 36.4% of biosamples were saved from unnecessary genotyping. In contrast, for GSTT1, which demonstrated a positive association, inappropriate termination occurred in only 6.6%. GSM may provide significant cost and sample savings in molecular epidemiology studies. PMID:12663557

  3. Axiom turkey genotyping array

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Axiom®Turkey Genotyping Array interrogates 643,845 probesets on the array, covering 643,845 SNPs. The array development was led by Dr. Julie Long of the USDA-ARS Beltsville Agricultural Research Center under a public-private partnership with Hendrix Genetics, Aviagen, and Affymetrix. The Turk...

  4. Saponin profile of green asparagus genotypes.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Castilla, Sara; Jaramillo-Carmona, Sara; Fuentes-Alventosa, Jose María; Jiménez-Araujo, Ana; Rodríguez-Arcos, Rocío; Cermeño-Sacristán, Pedro; Espejo-Calvo, Juan Antonio; Guillén-Bejarano, Rafael

    2013-11-20

    The main goal of this study was to determine the saponin profiles of different "triguero" asparagus genotypes and to compare them to green asparagus commercial hybrids. The samples consisted of 31 commercial hybrids and 58 genotypes from the Huétor-Tájar (HT) population variety ("triguero"). The saponin analysis by high-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry allowed for the determination of 12 saponins derived from a furostan-type steroidal genin, 4 of which had never been described in the edible part of asparagus. The saponin profile of "triguero" asparagus was a combination of these new saponins and protodioscin. Although protodioscin was the major saponin found in commercial hybrids, some of these 12 saponins were detected as major components in some of the commercial hybrids. The total contents of saponins described in some of these HT genotypes reach values as high as 10-100 times higher than those found in commercial hybrids.

  5. Integration of Multiple Genomic and Phenotype Data to Infer Novel miRNA-Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Meng; Cheng, Liang; Yang, Haixiu; Wang, Jing; Sun, Jie; Wang, Zhenzhen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the development and progression of human diseases. The identification of disease-associated miRNAs will be helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases at the post-transcriptional level. Based on different types of genomic data sources, computational methods for miRNA-disease association prediction have been proposed. However, individual source of genomic data tends to be incomplete and noisy; therefore, the integration of various types of genomic data for inferring reliable miRNA-disease associations is urgently needed. In this study, we present a computational framework, CHNmiRD, for identifying miRNA-disease associations by integrating multiple genomic and phenotype data, including protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology data, experimentally verified miRNA-target relationships, disease phenotype information and known miRNA-disease connections. The performance of CHNmiRD was evaluated by experimentally verified miRNA-disease associations, which achieved an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.834 for 5-fold cross-validation. In particular, CHNmiRD displayed excellent performance for diseases without any known related miRNAs. The results of case studies for three human diseases (glioblastoma, myocardial infarction and type 1 diabetes) showed that all of the top 10 ranked miRNAs having no known associations with these three diseases in existing miRNA-disease databases were directly or indirectly confirmed by our latest literature mining. All these results demonstrated the reliability and efficiency of CHNmiRD, and it is anticipated that CHNmiRD will serve as a powerful bioinformatics method for mining novel disease-related miRNAs and providing a new perspective into molecular mechanisms underlying human diseases at the post-transcriptional level. CHNmiRD is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/CHNmiRD. PMID:26849207

  6. Integration of Multiple Genomic and Phenotype Data to Infer Novel miRNA-Disease Associations.

    PubMed

    Shi, Hongbo; Zhang, Guangde; Zhou, Meng; Cheng, Liang; Yang, Haixiu; Wang, Jing; Sun, Jie; Wang, Zhenzhen

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in the development and progression of human diseases. The identification of disease-associated miRNAs will be helpful for understanding the molecular mechanisms of diseases at the post-transcriptional level. Based on different types of genomic data sources, computational methods for miRNA-disease association prediction have been proposed. However, individual source of genomic data tends to be incomplete and noisy; therefore, the integration of various types of genomic data for inferring reliable miRNA-disease associations is urgently needed. In this study, we present a computational framework, CHNmiRD, for identifying miRNA-disease associations by integrating multiple genomic and phenotype data, including protein-protein interaction data, gene ontology data, experimentally verified miRNA-target relationships, disease phenotype information and known miRNA-disease connections. The performance of CHNmiRD was evaluated by experimentally verified miRNA-disease associations, which achieved an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 0.834 for 5-fold cross-validation. In particular, CHNmiRD displayed excellent performance for diseases without any known related miRNAs. The results of case studies for three human diseases (glioblastoma, myocardial infarction and type 1 diabetes) showed that all of the top 10 ranked miRNAs having no known associations with these three diseases in existing miRNA-disease databases were directly or indirectly confirmed by our latest literature mining. All these results demonstrated the reliability and efficiency of CHNmiRD, and it is anticipated that CHNmiRD will serve as a powerful bioinformatics method for mining novel disease-related miRNAs and providing a new perspective into molecular mechanisms underlying human diseases at the post-transcriptional level. CHNmiRD is freely available at http://www.bio-bigdata.com/CHNmiRD.

  7. Molecular Detection and Identification of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Complex and Four Clinically Important Nontuberculous Mycobacterial Species in Smear-Negative Clinical Samples by the GenoType Mycobacteria Direct Test ▿

    PubMed Central

    Bicmen, Can; Gunduz, Ayriz T.; Coskun, Meral; Senol, Gunes; Cirak, A. Kadri; Ozsoz, Ayse

    2011-01-01

    Although the sensitivity and specificity of nucleic acid amplification assays are high with smear-positive samples, the sensitivity with smear-negative and extrapulmonary samples for the diagnosis of tuberculosis in suspicious tuberculosis cases still remains to be investigated. This study evaluates the performance of the GenoType Mycobacteria Direct (GTMD) test for rapid molecular detection and identification of the Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and four clinically important nontuberculous mycobacteria (M. avium, M. intracellulare, M. kansasii, and M. malmoense) in smear-negative samples. A total of 1,570 samples (1,103 bronchial aspiration, 127 sputum, and 340 extrapulmonary samples) were analyzed. When we evaluated the performance criteria in combination with a positive culture result and/or the clinical outcome of the patients, the overall sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values were found to be 62.4, 99.5, 95.9, and 93.9%, respectively, whereas they were 63.2, 99.4, 95.7, and 92.8%, respectively, for pulmonary samples and 52.9, 100, 100, and 97.6%, respectively, for extrapulmonary samples. Among the culture-positive samples which had Mycobacterium species detectable by the GTMD test, three samples were identified to be M. intracellulare and one sample was identified to be M. avium. However, five M. intracellulare samples and an M. kansasii sample could not be identified by the molecular test and were found to be negative. The GTMD test has been a reliable, practical, and easy tool for rapid diagnosis of smear-negative pulmonary and extrapulmonary tuberculosis so that effective precautions may be taken and appropriate treatment may be initiated. However, the low sensitivity level should be considered in the differentiation of suspected tuberculosis and some other clinical condition until the culture result is found to be negative and a true picture of the clinical outcome is obtained. PMID:21653780

  8. Rapid typing of Mannheimia haemolytica major genotypes 1 and 2 using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Genotype 2 M. haemolytica predominantly associate over genotype 1 with the lungs of cattle with respiratory disease and ICEs containing antimicrobial resistance genes. Distinct protein masses were detected by MALDI-TOF MS between genotype 1 and 2 strains. MALDI-TOF MS could rapidly differentiate ge...

  9. Neuroanatomical distribution of disease-associated prion protein in experimental bovine spongiform encephalopathy in cattle after intracerebral inoculation.

    PubMed

    Fukuda, Shigeo; Onoe, Sadao; Nikaido, Satoshi; Fujii, Kei; Kageyama, Soichi; Iwamaru, Yoshifumi; Imamura, Morikazu; Masujin, Kentaro; Matsuura, Yuichi; Shimizu, Yoshihisa; Kasai, Kazuo; Yoshioka, Miyako; Murayama, Yuichi; Mohri, Shirou; Yokoyama, Takashi; Okada, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    The pathologic disease-associated prion protein (PrP(Sc)) has been shown to be expressed in the central nervous system of Holstein cattle inoculated intracerebrally with 3 sources of classical bovine spongiform encephalopathy (BSE) isolates. Several regions of the brain and spinal cord were analyzed for PrP(Sc) expression by immunohistochemical and Western blotting analyses. Animals euthanized at 10 months post-inoculation (mpi) showed PrP(Sc) deposits in the brainstem and thalamus, but no vacuolation; this suggested that the BSE agent might exhibit area-dependent tropism in the brain. At 16 and 18 mpi, a small amount of vacuolation was detected in the brainstem and thalamus, but not in the cerebral cortices. At 20 to 24 mpi, when clinical symptoms were apparent, heavy PrP(Sc) deposits were evident throughout the brain and spinal cord. The mean time to the appearance of clinical symptoms was 19.7 mpi, and the mean survival time was 22.7 mpi. These findings show that PrP(Sc) accumulation was detected approximately 10 months before the clinical symptoms of BSE became apparent. In addition, the 3 sources of BSE prion induced no detectable differences in the clinical signs, incubation periods, neuroanatomical location of vacuoles, or distribution and pattern of PrP(Sc) depositions in the brain.

  10. Hepatic and Splenic Acoustic Radiation Force Impulse Shear Wave Velocity Elastography in Children with Liver Disease Associated with Cystic Fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Cañas, Teresa; Maciá, Araceli; Muñoz-Codoceo, Rosa Ana; Fontanilla, Teresa; González-Rios, Patricia; Miralles, María; Gómez-Mardones, Gloria

    2015-01-01

    Background. Liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis (CFLD) is the second cause of mortality in these patients. The diagnosis is difficult because none of the available tests are specific enough. Noninvasive elastographic techniques have been proven to be useful to diagnose hepatic fibrosis. Acoustic radiation force impulse (ARFI) imaging is an elastography imaging system. The purpose of the work was to study the utility of liver and spleen ARFI Imaging in the detection of CFLD. Method. 72 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) were studied and received ARFI imaging in the liver and in the spleen. SWV values were compared with the values of 60 healthy controls. Results. Comparing the SWV values of CFLD with the control healthy group, values in the right lobe were higher in patients with CFLD. We found a SWV RHL cut-off value to detect CFLD of 1.27 m/s with a sensitivity of 56.5% and a specificity of 90.5%. CF patients were found to have higher SWC spleen values than the control group. Conclusions. ARFI shear wave elastography in the right hepatic lobe is a noninvasive technique useful to detect CFLD in our sample of patients. Splenic SWV values are higher in CF patients, without any clinical consequence. PMID:26609528

  11. SNP genotyping by heteroduplex analysis.

    PubMed

    Paniego, Norma; Fusari, Corina; Lia, Verónica; Puebla, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Heteroduplex-based genotyping methods have proven to be technologically effective and economically efficient for low- to medium-range throughput single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) determination. In this chapter we describe two protocols that were successfully applied for SNP detection and haplotype analysis of candidate genes in association studies. The protocols involve (1) enzymatic mismatch cleavage with endonuclease CEL1 from celery, associated with fragment separation using capillary electrophoresis (CEL1 cleavage), and (2) differential retention of the homo/heteroduplex DNA molecules under partial denaturing conditions on ion pair reversed-phase liquid chromatography (dHPLC). Both methods are complementary since dHPLC is more versatile than CEL1 cleavage for identifying multiple SNP per target region, and the latter is easily optimized for sequences with fewer SNPs or small insertion/deletion polymorphisms. Besides, CEL1 cleavage is a powerful method to localize the position of the mutation when fragment resolution is done using capillary electrophoresis.

  12. Genotyping of β-globin gene mutations in single lymphocytes: a preliminary study for preimplantation genetic diagnosis of monogenic disorders.

    PubMed

    Durmaz, Burak; Ozkinay, Ferda; Onay, Huseyin; Karaca, Emin; Aydinok, Yesim; Tavmergen, Erol; Vrettou, Christina; Traeger-Synodinos, Jan; Kanavakis, Emmanuel

    2012-01-01

    Hemoglobinopathies, especially β-thalassemia (β-thal), represent an important health burden in Mediterranean countries like Turkey. Some couples prefer the option of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD). However, clinical application of PGD, especially for the monogenic disorders is technically demanding. To ensure reliable results, protocols need to be robust and well standardized. Ideally PGD-PCR (polymerase chain reaction) protocols should be based on multiplex and fluorescent PCR for analysis of the disease-causing mutation(s) along with linked markers across the disease-associated locus. In this study, we aimed to constitute a protocol in single cells involving first round multiplex PCR with primers to amplify the region of the β-globin gene containing the most common mutations. Two microsatellites linked to the β-globin gene cluster (D11S4891, D11S2362) and two unlinked (D13S314, GABRB3) microsatellite markers, were used to rule out allele dropout (ADO) and contamination; followed by nested real-time PCR for genotyping the β-globin mutations. We also investigated the allele frequencies and heterozygote rates of these microsatellites in the Turkish population that have not been reported to date. This protocol was tested in 100 single lymphocytes from heterozygotes with known β-globin mutations. Amplification failure was detected in one lymphocyte (1%) and ADO was observed in two lymphocytes (2%). No contamination was detected. All results were concordant with the genotypes of the patients. Overall, this protocol was demonstrated to be sensitive, accurate, reliable and rapid for the detection of β-globin mutations in single cells and shows potential for the clinical application of PGD for hemoglobinopathies in the Turkish population.

  13. Laboratory Information Management Software for genotyping workflows: applications in high throughput crop genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Jayashree, B; Reddy, Praveen T; Leeladevi, Y; Crouch, Jonathan H; Mahalakshmi, V; Buhariwalla, Hutokshi K; Eshwar, KE; Mace, Emma; Folksterma, Rolf; Senthilvel, S; Varshney, Rajeev K; Seetha, K; Rajalakshmi, R; Prasanth, VP; Chandra, Subhash; Swarupa, L; SriKalyani, P; Hoisington, David A

    2006-01-01

    Background With the advances in DNA sequencer-based technologies, it has become possible to automate several steps of the genotyping process leading to increased throughput. To efficiently handle the large amounts of genotypic data generated and help with quality control, there is a strong need for a software system that can help with the tracking of samples and capture and management of data at different steps of the process. Such systems, while serving to manage the workflow precisely, also encourage good laboratory practice by standardizing protocols, recording and annotating data from every step of the workflow. Results A laboratory information management system (LIMS) has been designed and implemented at the International Crops Research Institute for the Semi-Arid Tropics (ICRISAT) that meets the requirements of a moderately high throughput molecular genotyping facility. The application is designed as modules and is simple to learn and use. The application leads the user through each step of the process from starting an experiment to the storing of output data from the genotype detection step with auto-binning of alleles; thus ensuring that every DNA sample is handled in an identical manner and all the necessary data are captured. The application keeps track of DNA samples and generated data. Data entry into the system is through the use of forms for file uploads. The LIMS provides functions to trace back to the electrophoresis gel files or sample source for any genotypic data and for repeating experiments. The LIMS is being presently used for the capture of high throughput SSR (simple-sequence repeat) genotyping data from the legume (chickpea, groundnut and pigeonpea) and cereal (sorghum and millets) crops of importance in the semi-arid tropics. Conclusion A laboratory information management system is available that has been found useful in the management of microsatellite genotype data in a moderately high throughput genotyping laboratory. The application

  14. Systematic localization of common disease-associated variation in regulatory DNA.

    PubMed

    Maurano, Matthew T; Humbert, Richard; Rynes, Eric; Thurman, Robert E; Haugen, Eric; Wang, Hao; Reynolds, Alex P; Sandstrom, Richard; Qu, Hongzhu; Brody, Jennifer; Shafer, Anthony; Neri, Fidencio; Lee, Kristen; Kutyavin, Tanya; Stehling-Sun, Sandra; Johnson, Audra K; Canfield, Theresa K; Giste, Erika; Diegel, Morgan; Bates, Daniel; Hansen, R Scott; Neph, Shane; Sabo, Peter J; Heimfeld, Shelly; Raubitschek, Antony; Ziegler, Steven; Cotsapas, Chris; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Glass, Ian; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Kaul, Rajinder; Stamatoyannopoulos, John A

    2012-09-07

    Genome-wide association studies have identified many noncoding variants associated with common diseases and traits. We show that these variants are concentrated in regulatory DNA marked by deoxyribonuclease I (DNase I) hypersensitive sites (DHSs). Eighty-eight percent of such DHSs are active during fetal development and are enriched in variants associated with gestational exposure-related phenotypes. We identified distant gene targets for hundreds of variant-containing DHSs that may explain phenotype associations. Disease-associated variants systematically perturb transcription factor recognition sequences, frequently alter allelic chromatin states, and form regulatory networks. We also demonstrated tissue-selective enrichment of more weakly disease-associated variants within DHSs and the de novo identification of pathogenic cell types for Crohn's disease, multiple sclerosis, and an electrocardiogram trait, without prior knowledge of physiological mechanisms. Our results suggest pervasive involvement of regulatory DNA variation in common human disease and provide pathogenic insights into diverse disorders.

  15. Necrolytic acral erythema: a rare skin disease associated with hepatitis C virus infection*

    PubMed Central

    Botelho, Luciane Francisca Fernandes; Enokihara, Milvia Maria Simões e Silva; Enokihara, Mauro Yoshiaki

    2016-01-01

    Necrolytic acral erythema is a rare skin disease associated with hepatitis C virus infection. We report a case of a 31-year-old woman with hepatitis C virus infection and decreased zinc serum level. Physical examination revealed scaly, lichenified plaques, well-demarcated with an erythematous peripheral rim located on the lower limbs. After blood transfusion and oral zinc supplementation the patient presented an improvement of lesions. PMID:27828642

  16. Crohn's Disease Associated with Sweet's Syndrome and Sjögren's Syndrome Treated with Infliximab

    PubMed Central

    Foster, Erina N.; Nguyen, Khanh K.; Sheikh, Rafiq A.; Prindiville, Thomas P.

    2005-01-01

    The association of Crohn's disease (CD) and Sweet's syndrome is rare and the presence of Sjögren's syndrome in Crohn's disease is even rarer, with only three reports found in the literature. We describe two cases of Crohn's disease associated with Sweet's syndrome, one of which is the first case of CD and Sweet's concomitantly associated with Sjögren's syndrome. Both cases responded rapidly to Infliximab therapy with complete resolution of the skin lesions. PMID:16050146

  17. Lombardia GENS: a collaborative registry for monogenic diseases associated with stroke.

    PubMed

    Bersano, Anna; Baron, Pierluigi; Lanfranconi, Silvia; Trobia, Nadia; Sterzi, Roberto; Motto, Cristina; Comi, Giancarlo; Sessa, Maria; Martinelli-Boneschi, Filippo; Micieli, Giuseppe; Ferrarese, Carlo; Santoro, Patrizia; Parati, Eugenio; Boncoraglio, Giorgio; Padovani, Alessandro; Pezzini, Alessandro; Candelise, Livia

    2012-01-01

    The Italian region of Lombardy, with its existing stroke centers and high-technology laboratories, provides a favorable context for studying monogenic diseases associated with stroke. The Lombardia GENS project was set up to create a regional network for the diagnosis of six monogenic diseases associated with stroke: CADASIL, Fabry disease, MELAS, familial and sporadic hemiplegic migraine, hereditary cerebral amyloid angiopathy and Marfan syndrome. The network comprises 36 stroke centers and seven high-technology laboratories, performing molecular analysis. In this context, all stroke/TIA patients fulfilling clinical criteria for monogenic diseases are currently being included in an ongoing study. Demographic, clinical and family data and diagnostic criteria are collected using standardized forms. On the basis of stroke incidence in Lombardy and the reported prevalence of the diseases considered, we expect, during the course of the study, to collect datasets and DNA samples from more than 200 stroke patients suspected of having monogenic diseases. This will allow evaluation of the regional burden and better phenotype characterization of monogenic diseases associated with stroke.

  18. Cell type-selective disease-association of genes under high regulatory load.

    PubMed

    Galhardo, Mafalda; Berninger, Philipp; Nguyen, Thanh-Phuong; Sauter, Thomas; Sinkkonen, Lasse

    2015-10-15

    We previously showed that disease-linked metabolic genes are often under combinatorial regulation. Using the genome-wide ChIP-Seq binding profiles for 93 transcription factors in nine different cell lines, we show that genes under high regulatory load are significantly enriched for disease-association across cell types. We find that transcription factor load correlates with the enhancer load of the genes and thereby allows the identification of genes under high regulatory load by epigenomic mapping of active enhancers. Identification of the high enhancer load genes across 139 samples from 96 different cell and tissue types reveals a consistent enrichment for disease-associated genes in a cell type-selective manner. The underlying genes are not limited to super-enhancer genes and show several types of disease-association evidence beyond genetic variation (such as biomarkers). Interestingly, the high regulatory load genes are involved in more KEGG pathways than expected by chance, exhibit increased betweenness centrality in the interaction network of liver disease genes, and carry longer 3' UTRs with more microRNA (miRNA) binding sites than genes on average, suggesting a role as hubs integrating signals within regulatory networks. In summary, epigenetic mapping of active enhancers presents a promising and unbiased approach for identification of novel disease genes in a cell type-selective manner.

  19. HGIMDA: Heterogeneous graph inference for miRNA-disease association prediction

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xu; You, Zhu-Hong; Huang, Yu-An; Yan, Gui-Ying

    2016-01-01

    Recently, microRNAs (miRNAs) have drawn more and more attentions because accumulating experimental studies have indicated miRNA could play critical roles in multiple biological processes as well as the development and progression of human complex diseases. Using the huge number of known heterogeneous biological datasets to predict potential associations between miRNAs and diseases is an important topic in the field of biology, medicine, and bioinformatics. In this study, considering the limitations in the previous computational methods, we developed the computational model of Heterogeneous Graph Inference for MiRNA-Disease Association prediction (HGIMDA) to uncover potential miRNA-disease associations by integrating miRNA functional similarity, disease semantic similarity, Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity, and experimentally verified miRNA-disease associations into a heterogeneous graph. HGIMDA obtained AUCs of 0.8781 and 0.8077 based on global and local leave-one-out cross validation, respectively. Furthermore, HGIMDA was applied to three important human cancers for performance evaluation. As a result, 90% (Colon Neoplasms), 88% (Esophageal Neoplasms) and 88% (Kidney Neoplasms) of top 50 predicted miRNAs are confirmed by recent experiment reports. Furthermore, HGIMDA could be effectively applied to new diseases and new miRNAs without any known associations, which overcome the important limitations of many previous computational models. PMID:27533456

  20. Cell type-selective disease-association of genes under high regulatory load

    PubMed Central

    Galhardo, Mafalda; Berninger, Philipp; Nguyen, Thanh-Phuong; Sauter, Thomas; Sinkkonen, Lasse

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that disease-linked metabolic genes are often under combinatorial regulation. Using the genome-wide ChIP-Seq binding profiles for 93 transcription factors in nine different cell lines, we show that genes under high regulatory load are significantly enriched for disease-association across cell types. We find that transcription factor load correlates with the enhancer load of the genes and thereby allows the identification of genes under high regulatory load by epigenomic mapping of active enhancers. Identification of the high enhancer load genes across 139 samples from 96 different cell and tissue types reveals a consistent enrichment for disease-associated genes in a cell type-selective manner. The underlying genes are not limited to super-enhancer genes and show several types of disease-association evidence beyond genetic variation (such as biomarkers). Interestingly, the high regulatory load genes are involved in more KEGG pathways than expected by chance, exhibit increased betweenness centrality in the interaction network of liver disease genes, and carry longer 3′ UTRs with more microRNA (miRNA) binding sites than genes on average, suggesting a role as hubs integrating signals within regulatory networks. In summary, epigenetic mapping of active enhancers presents a promising and unbiased approach for identification of novel disease genes in a cell type-selective manner. PMID:26338775

  1. Mercury in Hair Is Inversely Related to Disease Associated Damage in Systemic Lupus Erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Crowe, William; Doherty, Leanne; Watson, Gene; Armstrong, David; Ball, Elisabeth; Magee, Pamela; Allsopp, Philip; Bell, Aubrey; Strain, J. J.; McSorley, Emeir

    2015-01-01

    Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is an autoimmune inflammatory disease, and environmental factors are proposed to exacerbate existing symptoms. One such environmental factor is mercury. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between exposure to mercury (Hg) and disease activity and disease associated damage in Total Hg concentrations in hair and urine were measured in 52 SLE patients. Dental amalgams were quantified. Disease activity was assessed using three indexes including the British Isles Lupus Assessment Group Index (BILAG). Disease associated damage was measured using the Systemic Lupus International Collaborating Clinics/American College of Rheumatology SLICC/ACR Damage Index. Pearson’s correlation identified a significant negative correlation between hair Hg and BILAG (r = −0.323, p = 0.029) and SLICC/ACR (r = −0.377, p = 0.038). Multiple regression analysis identified hair Hg as a significant predictor of disease associated damage as determined by SLICC/ACR (β = −0.366, 95% confidence interval (CI): −1.769, −0.155 p = 0.019). Urinary Hg was not related to disease activity or damage. Fish consumption is the primary route of MeHg exposure in humans and the inverse association of hair Hg with disease activity observed here might be explained by the anti-inflammatory effects of n-3 long chain polyunsaturated fatty acids also found in fish. PMID:26703710

  2. ImmunemiR - a database of prioritized immune miRNA disease associations and its interactome.

    PubMed

    Prabahar, Archana; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2017-01-17

    MicroRNAs are the key regulators of gene expression and their abnormal expression in the immune system may be associated with several human diseases such as inflammation, cancer and autoimmune diseases. Elucidation of microRNA (miRNA) disease association through the interactome will deepen the understanding of its disease mechanisms. In this present study, miRNAs specific to immune related diseases were retrieved from curated databases and literature based on MeSH classification of immune system diseases. In total 245 immune miRNAs associated with 92 OMIM disease categories were identified and they are prioritized to specific immune diseases using random walk ranking algorithm. These data were compiled as ImmunemiR, a database of prioritized immune miRNA disease associations. This database provides both text based annotation information and network visualization of its interactome network. To our knowledge, ImmunemiR is the first available database to provide a comprehensive repository of human immune disease associated miRNAs with network visualization options of its target genes, protein-protein interactions (PPI).

  3. Genotyping and phylogenetic analysis of Acanthamoeba isolates associated with keratitis.

    PubMed

    Risler, Arnaud; Coupat-Goutaland, Bénédicte; Pélandakis, Michel

    2013-11-01

    We examined a partial SSU-rDNA sequence from 20 Acanthamoeba isolates associated with keratitis infections. The phylogenetic tree inferred from this partial sequence allowed to assign isolates to genotypes. Among the 20 isolates examined, 16 were found to be of the T4 genotype, 2 were T3, 1 was a T5, and 1 was a T2, confirming the predominance of T4 in infections. However, the study highlighted other genotypes more rarely associated with infections, particularly the T2 genotype. Our study is the second one to detect that this genotype is associated with keratitis. Additionally, the phylogenetic analyses showed five main emerging clusters, T4/T3/T11, T2/T6, T10/T12/T14, T13/T16, and T7/T8/T9/T17, regularly obtained whichever method was used. A similar branching pattern was found when the full rDNA sequence was investigated.

  4. Measures of Chronic Conditions and Diseases Associated With Aging in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project

    PubMed Central

    Pham-Kanter, Genevieve; Leitsch, Sara A.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives This paper presents a description of the methods used in the National Social Life, Health, and Aging Project to detect the presence of chronic conditions and diseases associated with aging. It also discusses the validity and distribution of these measures. Methods Markers associated with common chronic diseases and conditions of aging were collected from 3,005 community-dwelling older adults living in the United States, aged 57–85 years, during 2006. Dried blood spots, physical function tests, anthropometric measurements, self-reported history, and self-rated assessments were used to detect the presence of chronic conditions associated with aging or of risk factors associated with the development of chronic diseases. Results The distribution of each measure, disaggregated by age group and gender, is presented. Conclusions This paper describes the methodology used as well as the distribution of each of these measures. In addition, we discuss how the measures used in the study relate to specific chronic diseases and conditions associated with aging and how these measures might be used in social science analyses. PMID:19204070

  5. Flavonoid content and antioxidant capacity of spinach genotypes determined by high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavonoids in different spinach genotypes were separated, identified, and quantified by a high-performance liquid chromatographic method with photodiode array and mass spectrometric detection. The antioxidant capacities of the genotypes were also measured using two antioxidant assays - oxygen radica...

  6. Evidence of occult HCV genotypes in haemophilic individuals with unapparent HCV mixed infections.

    PubMed

    Parodi, C; Culasso, A; Aloisi, N; García, G; Bastón, M; Corti, M; Bianco, R P; Campos, R; Ares, B R; Baré, P

    2008-07-01

    Individuals with haemophilia who received non heat-treated factor concentrates were likely to undergo multiple exposures to the hepatitis C virus (HCV). Therefore, HCV mixed-genotype infections might be more frequent in these patients than in the general population. Their prevalence is extremely variable in similar groups of patients tested by different assays due to the fact that currently available genotyping techniques are not suitable to detect multiple HCV genotypes in a viral population. As an HCV viral reservoir, the peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) might harbor viral variants distinct from the genotypes detected in plasma. We investigated the presence of HCV genotypes in a group of chronically infected haemophilic patients in the PBMC compartment using a non-stimulated cell culture system that allows the detection of the HCV genome in culture supernatants. We compared them to the HCV genotypes found in plasma samples. Cell culture experiments performed with PBMC demonstrated the presence of additional HCV genotypes that were undetected in the corresponding plasma samples with the same genotyping technique. Although mixed infections at HCV genotype level became evident in 5.6% of the patients (16/288), the culture methodology increased the number of HCV infections with multiple genotypes to 62.5% (10/16) (P < 0.0001). Once more, the role of mononuclear cells as HCV viral reservoirs is emphasized. Considering minor strains could influence the outcome of treatment, detection of covert HCV mixed-genotype infections might be essential for choosing the adequate therapeutic regimen.

  7. Human papillomaviruses genotyping in plantar warts.

    PubMed

    de Planell-Mas, Elena; Martínez-Garriga, Blanca; Zalacain, Antonio Jesús; Vinuesa, Teresa; Viñas, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Plantar warts are caused by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and have been associated with several HPV genotypes. However, there are few studies focused exclusively on plantar warts. In this work, we aim to identify the HPV genotypes of plantar warts and explore their relation to demographic and clinical characteristics of patients. A total of 72 patients diagnosed with plantar warts were recruited at the Laser unit at Podiatric Hospital, University of Barcelona, Spain. Inner hyperkeratosis laminar sections of warts were collected and DNA of samples were extracted. Amplification of a conserved region of the HPV L1 gene was performed with the SK-Polymerase chain reaction method. DNA amplicons were sequenced and HPV types identified. The most prevalent genotypes detected among the 105 analyzed plantar warts were HPV-57 (37.1%), HPV-27 (23.8%), HPV-1a (20.9%), HPV-2 (15.2%), and HPV-65 (2.8%). The majority of patients (78%) presented one single plantar wart, whereas multiple warts were detected in 22.2% of patients. One patient with multiple warts presented HPV types from two different genera, suggesting the spread of warts by self-inoculation as well as by de novo infection. No significant differences between the number of warts in toes, midfoot and heel were found. The most prevalent HPV types detected in all areas belonged to the alpha genus. This work provides new insight on plantar warts and their associated HPV genotypes, and evidences the usefulness and reliability of both the sample collection procedure and the PCR method used for HPV detection and typing. J. Med. Virol. 89:902-907, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Source tracking identifies deer and geese as vectors of human-infectious Cryptosporidium genotypes in an urban/suburban watershed.

    PubMed

    Jellison, Kristen L; Lynch, Amy E; Ziemann, Joseph M

    2009-06-15

    This study identified Cryptosporidium genotypes in the Wissahickon watershed from May 2005 to April 2008. We analyzed 129 samples from Wissahickon Creek, 83 effluent samples from wastewater treatment plants (WWTPs), and 240 fecal droppings. Genotyping was based on the hypervariable region of the 18S rRNA gene. Oocysts were detected year-round, independent of wet weather events, in 22% of Wissahickon Creek samples, 5% of WWTP effluents, and 7% of fecal samples. Of the genotypes detected, 67% were human-infectious: 30% C. hominis or C. hominis-like, 12% C. parvum, 14% cervine genotype, 9% skunk genotype, and 1% chipmunk I genotype. Similar genotype profiles were detected in Wissahickon Creek each year, and human-infectious genotypes were detected year-round. Unusual genotypes detected in a deer (a C. hominis-like genotype) and geese (C. hominis-like genotypes, C. parvum, and muskrat genotype I) show that these animals are vectors of human-infectious genotypes in this watershed. Results suggest that deer, geese, and WWTPs are appropriate targets for source water protection in the Wissahickon watershed.

  9. Genotype calling and haplotyping in parent-offspring trios

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei; Li, Bingshan; Zeng, Zhen; Sanna, Serena; Sidore, Carlo; Busonero, Fabio; Kang, Hyun Min; Li, Yun; Abecasis, Gonçalo R.

    2013-01-01

    Emerging sequencing technologies allow common and rare variants to be systematically assayed across the human genome in many individuals. In order to improve variant detection and genotype calling, raw sequence data are typically examined across many individuals. Here, we describe a method for genotype calling in settings where sequence data are available for unrelated individuals and parent-offspring trios and show that modeling trio information can greatly increase the accuracy of inferred genotypes and haplotypes, especially on low to modest depth sequencing data. Our method considers both linkage disequilibrium (LD) patterns and the constraints imposed by family structure when assigning individual genotypes and haplotypes. Using simulations, we show that trios provide higher genotype calling accuracy across the frequency spectrum, both overall and at hard-to-call heterozygous sites. In addition, trios provide greatly improved phasing accuracy—improving the accuracy of downstream analyses (such as genotype imputation) that rely on phased haplotypes. To further evaluate our approach, we analyzed data on the first 508 individuals sequenced by the SardiNIA sequencing project. Our results show that our method reduces the genotyping error rate by 50% compared with analysis using existing methods that ignore family structure. We anticipate our method will facilitate genotype calling and haplotype inference for many ongoing sequencing projects. PMID:23064751

  10. Association of caveolin-1 genotypes with gastric cancer in Taiwan.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chih-Hsueh; Lin, Cheng-Chieh; Tsai, Chia-Wen; Chang, Wen-Shin; Yang, Chuan-Wei; Bau, Da-Tian

    2014-05-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the leading causes of tumor-related death worldwide, for which the prevalence and mortality rates are very high in developed countries. Caveolin-1 (Cav-1) is the main protein in the caveolin family and plays a role in tumorigenesis signaling. The contribution of CAV1 genetic variants to gastric cancer is still largely unknown. In the present study, we aimed to investigate the role of CAV1 genotypes in gastric cancer risk. We recruited 358 gastric patients and 358 cancer-free controls for CAV1 genotyping analysis. Six single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of CAV1, C521A (rs1997623), G14713A (rs3807987), G21985A (12672038), T28608A (rs3757733), T29107A (rs7804372), and G32124A (rs3807992), were genotyped by the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism method. There was a significant difference between the gastric cancer and control groups in the genotypic frequency distribution of the CAV1 G14713A genotypes (p=1.24*10(-5)), with those carrying the A allele having a higher risk for gastric cancer compared to those with the GG genotype (p=0.0001). Our findings suggested that CAV1 genotype may determine the individual susceptibility to gastric cancer, and that the CAV1 G14713A genotype may serve as a novel biomarker for early detection and prediction of gastric cancer.

  11. A Cannabis sativa STR genotype database for Australian seizures: forensic applications and limitations.

    PubMed

    Howard, Christopher; Gilmore, Simon; Robertson, James; Peakall, Rod

    2009-05-01

    A genetic database was established with the aim of documenting the genetic diversity of Cannabis sativa in Australia for future utilization in forensic investigations. The database consisted of genotypes at 10 validated short tandem repeat loci for 510 plants representing drug seizures from across Australia and 57 fiber samples. A total of 106 alleles and 314 different genotypes were detected. All fiber samples exhibited unique genotypes while 55% of the drug samples shared a genotype with one or more samples. Shared genotypes were mostly found within seizures; however, some genotypes were found among seizures. Statistical analysis indicated that genotype sharing was a consequence of clonal propagation rather than a lack of genetic resolution. Thus, the finding of shared genotypes among seizures is likely due to either a common supplier, or direct links among seizures. Notwithstanding the potential intelligence information provided by genetic analysis of C. sativa, our database analysis also reveals some present limitations.

  12. Avian nephritis virus (ANV) on Brazilian chickens farms: circulating genotypes and intra-genotypic diversity.

    PubMed

    Espinoza, Luis Luna; Beserra, Laila A R; Soares, Rodrigo M; Gregori, Fabio

    2016-12-01

    Avian nephritis virus (ANV), which belongs to the family Astroviridae, is associated with different clinical manifestations (including enteric disorders). Despite being frequently found in the avian industry worldwide, information regarding genetic features of these viruses in Brazil is scarce. Therefore, sixty fecal sample pools (5-6 birds of the same flock), representing 60 poultry farms from six Brazilian States, were screened using an astrovirus-specific hemi-nested-PCR assay targeting the conserved ORF1b gene, followed by nucleotide sequencing of amplified products. PCR and phylogenetic analysis confirmed the detection of 21 positive samples to ANV (35 %). In order to investigate the genetic diversity represented by these viruses, amplification, cloning and phylogenetic analysis of the deduced amino acid sequence of ORF2 gene were attempted. Eight samples were successfully cloned (generating 32 clones in total) and sequenced. Based on phylogenetic analysis of ORF2, sequences defined in this study were classified into three genotypes: genotype 5, which has already been described in birds, and two other novel genotypes, tentatively named genotype 8 and 9, all of which occurred in single or mixed infections. Moreover, high intra-genotypic diversity and co-circulation of distinct strains in a same host population were observed. This study revealed the presence of new strains of ANV in Brazilian poultry and their circulation in commercial chicken flocks.

  13. Emergence of Hepatitis B Virus Genotype F in Aligarh Region of North India

    PubMed Central

    Sami, Hiba; Rizvi, Meher; Azam, Mohd; Mukherjee, Rathindra M.; Shukla, Indu; Ajmal, M. R.; Malik, Abida

    2013-01-01

    Introduction. HBV genotypes and subtypes are useful clinical and epidemiological markers. In this study prevalent HBV genotypes were assessed in relation to serological profile and clinical status. Material & Methods. 107 cases of HBV were genotyped. Detailed clinical history was elicited from them. HBsAg, HBeAg, anti-HBs, anti-HBe, and anti-HBc-IgM were assessed. HBV genotyping was performed using Kirschberg's type specific primers (TSP-PCR), heminested PCR, and Naito's monoplex PCR. Nucleotide sequencing was performed. Results. A total of 97 (91%) were genotyped following the methods of Kirschberg et al./Naito et al. Genotype D was by far the most prevalent genotype 91 (85.04%) in this region. A surprising finding was the detection of genotype F in 5 (4.67%) of our patients. Genotype A strangely was observed only in one case. In 85.7% genotype D was associated with moderate to severe liver disease, 43.9% HBeAg, and 18.7% anti-HBc-IgM positivity. Majority of genotype F (80%) was seen in mild to moderate liver disease. It was strongly associated with HBeAg 60% and 20% anti-HBc-IgM positivity. Conclusion. Emergence of genotype F in India merits further study regarding its clinical implications and treatment modalities. Knowledge about HBV genotypes can direct a clinician towards more informed management of HBV patients. PMID:24381592

  14. Enrichment Analysis Identifies Functional MicroRNA-Disease Associations in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Yuan, Dandan; Cui, Xiaomeng; Wang, Yang; Zhao, Yilei; Li, Huiying; Hu, Suangjiu; Chu, Xiaodan; Li, Yan; Li, Qiang; Liu, Qian; Zhu, Wenliang

    2015-01-01

    Substantial evidence has shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) may be causally linked to the occurrence and progression of human diseases. Herein, we conducted an enrichment analysis to identify potential functional miRNA-disease associations (MDAs) in humans by integrating currently known biological data: miRNA-target interactions (MTIs), protein-protein interactions, and gene-disease associations. Two contributing factors to functional miRNA-disease associations were quantitatively considered: the direct effects of miRNA that target disease-related genes, and indirect effects triggered by protein-protein interactions. Ninety-nine miRNAs were scanned for possible functional association with 2223 MeSH-defined human diseases. Each miRNA was experimentally validated to target ≥ 10 mRNA genes. Putative MDAs were identified when at least one MTI was confidently validated for a disease. Overall, 19648 putative MDAs were found, of which 10.0% was experimentally validated. Further results suggest that filtering for miRNAs that target a greater number of disease-related genes (n ≥ 8) can significantly enrich for true MDAs from the set of putative associations (enrichment rate = 60.7%, adjusted hypergeometric p = 2.41×10−91). Considering the indirect effects of miRNAs further elevated the enrichment rate to 72.6%. By using this method, a novel MDA between miR-24 and ovarian cancer was found. Compared with scramble miRNA overexpression of miR-24 was validated to remarkably induce ovarian cancer cells apoptosis. Our study provides novel insight into factors contributing to functional MDAs by integrating large quantities of previously generated biological data, and establishes a feasible method to identify plausible associations with high confidence. PMID:26296081

  15. Analysis of disease-associated objects at the Rat Genome Database.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shur-Jen; Laulederkind, Stanley J F; Hayman, G T; Smith, Jennifer R; Petri, Victoria; Lowry, Timothy F; Nigam, Rajni; Dwinell, Melinda R; Worthey, Elizabeth A; Munzenmaier, Diane H; Shimoyama, Mary; Jacob, Howard J

    2013-01-01

    The Rat Genome Database (RGD) is the premier resource for genetic, genomic and phenotype data for the laboratory rat, Rattus norvegicus. In addition to organizing biological data from rats, the RGD team focuses on manual curation of gene-disease associations for rat, human and mouse. In this work, we have analyzed disease-associated strains, quantitative trait loci (QTL) and genes from rats. These disease objects form the basis for seven disease portals. Among disease portals, the cardiovascular disease and obesity/metabolic syndrome portals have the highest number of rat strains and QTL. These two portals share 398 rat QTL, and these shared QTL are highly concentrated on rat chromosomes 1 and 2. For disease-associated genes, we performed gene ontology (GO) enrichment analysis across portals using RatMine enrichment widgets. Fifteen GO terms, five from each GO aspect, were selected to profile enrichment patterns of each portal. Of the selected biological process (BP) terms, 'regulation of programmed cell death' was the top enriched term across all disease portals except in the obesity/metabolic syndrome portal where 'lipid metabolic process' was the most enriched term. 'Cytosol' and 'nucleus' were common cellular component (CC) annotations for disease genes, but only the cancer portal genes were highly enriched with 'nucleus' annotations. Similar enrichment patterns were observed in a parallel analysis using the DAVID functional annotation tool. The relationship between the preselected 15 GO terms and disease terms was examined reciprocally by retrieving rat genes annotated with these preselected terms. The individual GO term-annotated gene list showed enrichment in physiologically related diseases. For example, the 'regulation of blood pressure' genes were enriched with cardiovascular disease annotations, and the 'lipid metabolic process' genes with obesity annotations. Furthermore, we were able to enhance enrichment of neurological diseases by combining 'G

  16. SNP discovery and genotyping using Genotyping-by-Sequencing in Pekin ducks

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Feng; Cui, Qian-Qian; Hou, Zhuo-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Genomic selection and genome-wide association studies need thousands to millions of SNPs. However, many non-model species do not have reference chips for detecting variation. Our goal was to develop and validate an inexpensive but effective method for detecting SNP variation. Genotyping by sequencing (GBS) can be a highly efficient strategy for genome-wide SNP detection, as an alternative to microarray chips. Here, we developed a GBS protocol for ducks and tested it to genotype 49 Pekin ducks. A total of 169,209 SNPs were identified from all animals, with a mean of 55,920 SNPs per individual. The average SNP density reached 1156 SNPs/MB. In this study, the first application of GBS to ducks, we demonstrate the power and simplicity of this method. GBS can be used for genetic studies in to provide an effective method for genome-wide SNP discovery. PMID:27845353

  17. Comparing Drug-Disease Associations in Clinical Practice Guideline Recommendations and Drug Product Label Indications.

    PubMed

    Leung, Tiffany I; Dumontier, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Clinical practice guidelines (CPGs) and structured product labels (SPLs) are both intended to promote evidence-based medical practices and guide clinicians' prescribing decisions. However, it is unclear how well CPG recommendations about pharmacologic therapies for certain diseases match SPL indications for recommended drugs. In this study, we use publicly available data and text mining methods to examine drug-disease associations in CPG recommendations and SPL treatment indications for 15 common chronic conditions. Preliminary results suggest that there is a mismatch between guideline-recommended pharmacologic therapies and SPL indications. Conflicting or inconsistent recommendations and indications may complicate clinical decision making and implementation or measurement of best practices.

  18. Development of an Electrochemical Sensing Technique for Rapid Genotyping of Hepatitis B Virus

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jinyuan; Weng, Shaohuang; Chen, Qingqiong; Liu, Ailin; Wang, Fengqing; Chen, Jing; Yi, Qiang; Liu, Qicai; Lin, Xinhua

    2014-01-01

    Objective To develop a convenient; sensitive; accurate; and economical technique for genotyping of hepatitis B viruses (HBVs). Methods The mercapto-modified B1; B2; C1; and C2-specific genotyping probes consisted of two probes for each HBV genotype that served as a double verification system. These probes were fixed on the surface of No. 1; 2; 3; and 4 gold electrodes; respectively; via Au-S bonds. Different charge generated by the binding of RuHex to phosphate groups of the DNA backbone before and after hybridization was used for distinguishing the different genotypes. Results During hybridization with genotype B; the charges detected at the No. 1 and 2 electrodes were significantly increased; while the charge at the No. 3 and 4 electrodes did not change significantly. During hybridization with genotype C; the charges detected at No. 3 and 4 electrodes were significantly increased; while the signals remained unchanged at the No. 1 and 2 electrodes. During hybridization with mixed genotypes (B and C); the charges detected at all four electrodes were significantly increased. The linear range of detection was 10−7 to 10−10 mol/L and the sensitivity for detecting mixed B (10%) or C (10%). Conclusions Rapid genotyping of HBVs based on electrochemical sensing is simple, has good specificity; and can greatly reduce the cost. This method can be used for sensitive detection of mixed B and C HBV genotypes. PMID:24658623

  19. Genotype and phylogenetic characterization of hepatitis B virus among multi-ethnic cohort in Hawaii

    PubMed Central

    Sakurai, Mayumi; Sugauchi, Fuminaka; Tsai, Naoky; Suzuki, Seiji; Hasegawa, Izumi; Fujiwara, Kei; Orito, Etsuro; Ueda, Ryuzo; Mizokami, Masashi

    2004-01-01

    AIM: Hepatitis B virus (HBV) genomes in carriers from Hawaii have not been evaluated previously. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the distribution of HBV genotypes and their clinical relevance in Hawaii. METHODS: Genotyping of HBV among 61 multi-ethnic carriers in Hawaii was performed by genetic methods. Three complete genomes and 61 core promoter/precore regions of HBV were sequenced directly. RESULTS: HBV genotype distribution among the 61 carriers was 23.0% for genotype A, 14.7% for genotype B and 62.3% for genotype C. Genotypes A, B and C were obtained from the carriers whose ethnicities were Filipino and Caucasian, Southeast Asian, and various Asian and Micronesian, respectively. All cases of genotype B were composed of recombinant strains with genotype C in the precore plus core region named genotype Ba. HBeAg was detected more frequently in genotype C than in genotype B (68.4% vs 33.3%, P < 0.05) and basal core promoter (BCP) mutation (T1762/A1764) was more frequently found in genotype C than in genotype B. Twelve of the 38 genotype C strains possessed C at nucleotide (nt) position 1858 (C -1858). However there was no significant difference in clinical characteristics between C-1858 and T-1858 variants. Based on complete genome sequences, phylogenetic analysis revealed one patient of Micronesian ethnicity as having C-1858 clustered with two isolates from Polynesia with T-1858. In addition, two strains from Asian ethnicities were clustered with known isolates in carriers from Southeast Asia. CONCLUSION: Genotypes A, B and C are predominant types among multi-ethnic HBV carriers in Hawaii, and distribution of HBV genotypes is dependent on the ethnic background of the carriers in Hawaii. PMID:15259069

  20. [Chronic liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis in the Hospital Alberto Sabogal Sologuren, Lima, Peru: report of a case].

    PubMed

    Ormeño J, Alexis; García D, Cesar; Sumire U, Julia; Asato H, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    Cystic fibrosis (CF) is the most frequent recessive genetic disorder in the caucasian population and is produced by the alteration of electrolyte and water transport in the epithelial cell membrane. Liver disease is a frequent complication towards the end of the first decade of life, being weird its onset, except in patients with a history of meconium ileus. The characteristic liver injury in CF is focal biliary cirrhosis, but fatty infiltration can also be found. The diagnosis is made considering the clinical, laboratory and imaging results having in consideration that the normal liver function tests do not rule out the disease. Ultrasound is the most widely used and can detect the presence of steatosis, stones, fibrosis, cirrhosis, portal hypertension or abnormalities of the biliary tree. There is an also available technique such as computed tomography or magnetic resonance imaging, which allows a morphological study. Important aspects in the treatment are nutritional management, administration of soluble vitamins and the use of ursodeoxycholic acid (UDCA). In cases of advanced cirrhosis, transplantation, isolated or combined with the lung, is an option to consider, with acceptable survival rates. We report the case of an 11 year old patient with a diagnosis of chronic liver disease associated with cystic fibrosis.

  1. Inferring haplotype/disease association by joint use of case-parents trios and case-parent pairs.

    PubMed

    Hu, Yue-Qing; Zhou, Ji-Yuan

    2010-05-01

    Recently interest has been increasing in genetic association studies using several closely linked loci. The HAP-TDT method, which uses case-parents trios is powerful for such a task. However, it is not uncommon in practice that one parent is missing for some reason, such as late onset. The case-parents trios are thus reduced to case-parent pairs. Discarding such data could lead to a severe loss of power. In this paper, we propose the HAP-1-TDT method based on case-parent pairs to detect haplotype/disease association. A permutation-based randomisation technique is devised to assess the significance of the test statistic. Furthermore, the combined statistic HAP-C-TDT is developed to use jointly case-parents trios and case-parent pairs. These test statistics can be applied to either phase-known or phase-unknown data. A number of simulation studies are conducted to investigate the validity of the proposed tests; these studies show that the statistics are robust to population structure. Using several disease genes from the literature, we illustrate that incorporating case-parent pairs into an association study leads to noticeable power gain. Moreover, our simulation results suggest that our method has better size and power than UNPHASED. Finally, in simulated scenarios where there are only a few SNPs and risk is determined by two haplotypes that are complementary or near-complementary, our method has better power than TRIMM.

  2. Identifying human microRNA-disease associations by a new diffusion-based method.

    PubMed

    Liao, Bo; Ding, Sumei; Chen, Haowen; Li, Zejun; Cai, Lijun

    2015-08-01

    Identifying the microRNA-disease relationship is vital for investigating the pathogenesis of various diseases. However, experimental verification of disease-related microRNAs remains considerable challenge to many researchers, particularly for the fact that numerous new microRNAs are discovered every year. As such, development of computational methods for disease-related microRNA prediction has recently gained eminent attention. In this paper, first, we construct a miRNA functional network and a disease similarity network by integrating different information sources. Then, we further introduce a new diffusion-based method (NDBM) to explore global network similarity for miRNA-disease association inference. Even though known miRNA-disease associations in the database are rare, NDBM still achieves an area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 85.62% in the leave-one-out cross-validation in improving the prediction accuracy of previous methods significantly. Moreover, our method is applicable to diseases with no known related miRNAs as well as new miRNAs with unknown target diseases. Some associations who strongly predicted by our method are confirmed by public databases. These superior performances suggest that NDBM could be an effective and important tool for biomedical research.

  3. Multiple major disease-associated clones of Legionella pneumophila have emerged recently and independently.

    PubMed

    David, Sophia; Rusniok, Christophe; Mentasti, Massimo; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Harris, Simon R; Lechat, Pierre; Lees, John; Ginevra, Christophe; Glaser, Philippe; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Underwood, Anthony; Jarraud, Sophie; Harrison, Timothy G; Parkhill, Julian; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-11-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium and the leading cause of Legionnaires' disease. Just five sequence types (ST), from more than 2000 currently described, cause nearly half of disease cases in northwest Europe. Here, we report the sequence and analyses of 364 L. pneumophila genomes, including 337 from the five disease-associated STs and 27 representative of the species diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the five STs have independent origins within a highly diverse species. The number of de novo mutations is extremely low with maximum pairwise single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ranging from 19 (ST47) to 127 (ST1), which suggests emergences within the last century. Isolates sampled geographically far apart differ by only a few SNPs, demonstrating rapid dissemination. These five STs have been recombining recently, leading to a shared pool of allelic variants potentially contributing to their increased disease propensity. The oldest clone, ST1, has spread globally; between 1940 and 2000, four new clones have emerged in Europe, which show long-distance, rapid dispersal. That a large proportion of clinical cases is caused by recently emerged and internationally dispersed clones, linked by convergent evolution, is surprising for an environmental bacterium traditionally considered to be an opportunistic pathogen. To simultaneously explain recent emergence, rapid spread and increased disease association, we hypothesize that these STs have adapted to new man-made environmental niches, which may be linked by human infection and transmission.

  4. Prediction of miRNA-disease associations with a vector space model

    PubMed Central

    Pasquier, Claude; Gardès, Julien

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs play critical roles in many physiological processes. Their dysregulations are also closely related to the development and progression of various human diseases, including cancer. Therefore, identifying new microRNAs that are associated with diseases contributes to a better understanding of pathogenicity mechanisms. MicroRNAs also represent a tremendous opportunity in biotechnology for early diagnosis. To date, several in silico methods have been developed to address the issue of microRNA-disease association prediction. However, these methods have various limitations. In this study, we investigate the hypothesis that information attached to miRNAs and diseases can be revealed by distributional semantics. Our basic approach is to represent distributional information on miRNAs and diseases in a high-dimensional vector space and to define associations between miRNAs and diseases in terms of their vector similarity. Cross validations performed on a dataset of known miRNA-disease associations demonstrate the excellent performance of our method. Moreover, the case study focused on breast cancer confirms the ability of our method to discover new disease-miRNA associations and to identify putative false associations reported in databases. PMID:27246786

  5. Prediction and validation of gene-disease associations using methods inspired by social network analyses.

    PubMed

    Singh-Blom, U Martin; Natarajan, Nagarajan; Tewari, Ambuj; Woods, John O; Dhillon, Inderjit S; Marcotte, Edward M

    2013-01-01

    Correctly identifying associations of genes with diseases has long been a goal in biology. With the emergence of large-scale gene-phenotype association datasets in biology, we can leverage statistical and machine learning methods to help us achieve this goal. In this paper, we present two methods for predicting gene-disease associations based on functional gene associations and gene-phenotype associations in model organisms. The first method, the Katz measure, is motivated from its success in social network link prediction, and is very closely related to some of the recent methods proposed for gene-disease association inference. The second method, called Catapult (Combining dATa Across species using Positive-Unlabeled Learning Techniques), is a supervised machine learning method that uses a biased support vector machine where the features are derived from walks in a heterogeneous gene-trait network. We study the performance of the proposed methods and related state-of-the-art methods using two different evaluation strategies, on two distinct data sets, namely OMIM phenotypes and drug-target interactions. Finally, by measuring the performance of the methods using two different evaluation strategies, we show that even though both methods perform very well, the Katz measure is better at identifying associations between traits and poorly studied genes, whereas Catapult is better suited to correctly identifying gene-trait associations overall [corrected].

  6. Many disease-associated variants of hTERT retain high telomerase enzymatic activity

    PubMed Central

    Zaug, Arthur J.; Crary, Sharon M.; Jesse Fioravanti, Matthew; Campbell, Kristina; Cech, Thomas R.

    2013-01-01

    Mutations in the gene for telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) are associated with diseases including dyskeratosis congenita, aplastic anemia, pulmonary fibrosis and cancer. Understanding the molecular basis of these telomerase-associated diseases requires dependable quantitative measurements of telomerase enzyme activity. Furthermore, recent findings that the human POT1-TPP1 chromosome end-binding protein complex stimulates telomerase activity and processivity provide incentive for testing variant telomerases in the presence of these factors. In the present work, we compare multiple disease-associated hTERT variants reconstituted with the RNA subunit hTR in two systems (rabbit reticulocyte lysates and human cell lines) with respect to telomerase enzymatic activity, processivity and activation by telomere proteins. Surprisingly, many of the previously reported disease-associated hTERT alleles give near-normal telomerase enzyme activity. It is possible that a small deficit in telomerase activity is sufficient to cause telomere shortening over many years. Alternatively, mutations may perturb functions such as the recruitment of telomerase to telomeres, which are essential in vivo but not revealed by simple enzyme assays. PMID:23901009

  7. Kinase inhibitor profiling reveals unexpected opportunities to inhibit disease-associated mutant kinases

    PubMed Central

    Duong-Ly, Krisna C.; Devarajan, Karthik; Liang, Shuguang; Horiuchi, Kurumi Y.; Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching; Peterson, Jeffrey R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Small-molecule kinase inhibitors have typically been designed to inhibit wild-type kinases rather than the mutant forms that frequently arise in diseases such as cancer. Mutations can have serious clinical implications by increasing kinase catalytic activity or conferring therapeutic resistance. To identify opportunities to repurpose inhibitors against disease-associated mutant kinases, we conducted a large-scale functional screen of 183 known kinase inhibitors against 76 recombinant, mutant kinases. The results revealed lead compounds with activity against clinically important mutant kinases including ALK, LRRK2, RET, and EGFR as well as unexpected opportunities for repurposing FDA-approved kinase inhibitors as leads for additional indications. Furthermore, using T674I PDGFRα as an example, we show how single-dose screening data can provide predictive structure-activity data to guide subsequent inhibitor optimization. This study provides a resource for the development of inhibitors against numerous disease-associated mutant kinases and illustrates the potential of unbiased profiling as an approach to compound-centric inhibitor development. PMID:26776524

  8. Multiple major disease-associated clones of Legionella pneumophila have emerged recently and independently

    PubMed Central

    David, Sophia; Rusniok, Christophe; Mentasti, Massimo; Gomez-Valero, Laura; Harris, Simon R.; Lechat, Pierre; Lees, John; Ginevra, Christophe; Glaser, Philippe; Ma, Laurence; Bouchier, Christiane; Underwood, Anthony; Jarraud, Sophie; Harrison, Timothy G.; Parkhill, Julian; Buchrieser, Carmen

    2016-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is an environmental bacterium and the leading cause of Legionnaires’ disease. Just five sequence types (ST), from more than 2000 currently described, cause nearly half of disease cases in northwest Europe. Here, we report the sequence and analyses of 364 L. pneumophila genomes, including 337 from the five disease-associated STs and 27 representative of the species diversity. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that the five STs have independent origins within a highly diverse species. The number of de novo mutations is extremely low with maximum pairwise single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) ranging from 19 (ST47) to 127 (ST1), which suggests emergences within the last century. Isolates sampled geographically far apart differ by only a few SNPs, demonstrating rapid dissemination. These five STs have been recombining recently, leading to a shared pool of allelic variants potentially contributing to their increased disease propensity. The oldest clone, ST1, has spread globally; between 1940 and 2000, four new clones have emerged in Europe, which show long-distance, rapid dispersal. That a large proportion of clinical cases is caused by recently emerged and internationally dispersed clones, linked by convergent evolution, is surprising for an environmental bacterium traditionally considered to be an opportunistic pathogen. To simultaneously explain recent emergence, rapid spread and increased disease association, we hypothesize that these STs have adapted to new man-made environmental niches, which may be linked by human infection and transmission. PMID:27662900

  9. A review of outbreaks of foodborne disease associated with passenger ships: evidence for risk management.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Roisin M.; Cramer, Elaine H.; Mantha, Stacey; Nichols, Gordon; Bartram, Jamie K.; Farber, Jeffrey M.; Benembarek, Peter K.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Foodborne disease outbreaks on ships are of concern because of their potentially serious health consequences for passengers and crew and high costs to the industry. The authors conducted a review of outbreaks of foodborne diseases associated with passenger ships in the framework of a World Health Organization project on setting guidelines for ship sanitation. METHODS: The authors reviewed data on 50 outbreaks of foodborne disease associated with passenger ships. For each outbreak, data on pathogens/toxins, type of ship, factors contributing to outbreaks, mortality and morbidity, and food vehicles were collected. RESULTS: The findings of this review show that the majority of reported outbreaks were associated with cruise ships and that almost 10,000 people were affected. Salmonella spp were most frequently associated with outbreaks. Foodborne outbreaks due to enterotoxigenic E. coli spp, Shigella spp, noroviruses (formally called Norwalk-like viruses), Vibrio spp, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, Cyclospora sp, and Trichinella sp also occurred on ships. Factors associated with the outbreaks reviewed include inadequate temperature control, infected food handlers, contaminated raw ingredients, cross-contamination, inadequate heat treatment, and onshore excursions. Seafood was the most common food vehicle implicated in outbreaks. CONCLUSIONS: Many ship-associated outbreaks could have been prevented if measures had been taken to ensure adequate temperature control, avoidance of cross-contamination, reliable food sources, adequate heat treatment, and exclusion of infected food handlers from work. PMID:15219800

  10. Drosophila Genotype Influences Commensal Bacterial Levels

    PubMed Central

    Shanmugarajah, Niroshan; Buchon, Nicolas; Clark, Andrew G.

    2017-01-01

    Host genotype can influence the composition of the commensal bacterial community in some organisms. Composition, however, is only one parameter describing a microbial community. Here, we test whether a second parameter—abundance of bacteria—is a heritable trait by quantifying the presence of four commensal bacterial strains within 36 gnotobiotic inbred lines of Drosophila melanogaster. We find that D. melanogaster genotype exerts a significant effect on microbial levels within the fly. When introduced as monocultures into axenic flies, three of the four bacterial strains were reliably detected within the fly. The amounts of these different strains are strongly correlated, suggesting that the host regulates commensal bacteria through general, not bacteria-specific, means. While the correlation does not appear to be driven by simple variation in overall gut dimensions, a genetic association study suggests that variation in commensal bacterial load may largely be attributed to physical aspects of host cell growth and development. PMID:28095502

  11. HBV Genotypic Variability in Cuba

    PubMed Central

    Loureiro, Carmen L.; Aguilar, Julio C.; Aguiar, Jorge; Muzio, Verena; Pentón, Eduardo; Garcia, Daymir; Guillen, Gerardo; Pujol, Flor H.

    2015-01-01

    The genetic diversity of HBV in human population is often a reflection of its genetic admixture. The aim of this study was to explore the genotypic diversity of HBV in Cuba. The S genomic region of Cuban HBV isolates was sequenced and for selected isolates the complete genome or precore-core sequence was analyzed. The most frequent genotype was A (167/250, 67%), mainly A2 (149, 60%) but also A1 and one A4. A total of 77 isolates were classified as genotype D (31%), with co-circulation of several subgenotypes (56 D4, 2 D1, 5 D2, 7 D3/6 and 7 D7). Three isolates belonged to genotype E, two to H and one to B3. Complete genome sequence analysis of selected isolates confirmed the phylogenetic analysis performed with the S region. Mutations or polymorphisms in precore region were more common among genotype D compared to genotype A isolates. The HBV genotypic distribution in this Caribbean island correlates with the Y lineage genetic background of the population, where a European and African origin prevails. HBV genotypes E, B3 and H isolates might represent more recent introductions. PMID:25742179

  12. Cross-genotype-specific T-cell responses in acute hepatitis E virus (HEV) infection.

    PubMed

    Gisa, A; Suneetha, P V; Behrendt, P; Pischke, S; Bremer, B; Falk, C S; Manns, M P; Cornberg, M; Wedemeyer, H; Kraft, A R M

    2016-04-01

    Hepatitis E is an inflammatory liver disease caused by infection with the hepatitis E virus (HEV). In tropical regions, HEV is highly endemic and predominantly mediated by HEV genotypes 1 and 2 with >3 million symptomatic cases per year and around 70 000 deaths. In Europe and America, the zoonotic HEV genotypes 3 and 4 have been reported with continues increasing new infections per year. So far, little is known about T-cell responses during acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Therefore, we did a comprehensive study investigating HEV-specific T-cell responses using genotypes 3- and 1-specific overlapping peptides. Additional cytokines and chemokines were measured in the plasma. In four patients, longitudinal studies were performed. Broad functional HEV-specific CD4(+) and CD8(+) T-cell responses were detectable in patients acutely infected with HEV genotype 3. Elevated of pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokine levels during acute HEV infection correlated with ALT levels. Memory HEV-specific T-cell responses were detectable up to >1.5 years upon infection. Importantly, cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses (between genotypes 1 and 3) were measurable in all investigated patients. In conclusion, we could show for the first time HEV-specific T-cell responses during and after acute HEV genotype 3 infection. Our data of cross-genotype HEV-specific T-cell responses might suggest a potential role in cross-genotype-specific protection between HEV genotypes 1 and 3.

  13. Porphyromonas gingivalis Fim-A genotype distribution among Colombians

    PubMed Central

    Jaramillo, Adriana; Parra, Beatriz; Botero, Javier Enrique; Contreras, Adolfo

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Porphyromonas gingivalis is associated with periodontitis and exhibit a wide array of virulence factors, including fimbriae which is encoded by the FimA gene representing six known genotypes. Objetive: To identify FimA genotypes of P. gingivalis in subjects from Cali-Colombia, including the co-infection with Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans, Treponema denticola, and Tannerella forsythia. Methods: Subgingival samples were collected from 151 people exhibiting diverse periodontal condition. The occurrence of P. gingivalis, FimA genotypes and other bacteria was determined by PCR. Results: P. gingivalis was positive in 85 patients. Genotype FimA II was more prevalent without reach significant differences among study groups (54.3%), FimA IV was also prevalent in gingivitis (13.0%). A high correlation (p= 0.000) was found among P. gingivalis, T. denticola, and T. forsythia co-infection. The FimA II genotype correlated with concomitant detection of T. denticola and T. forsythia. Conclusions: Porphyromonas gingivalis was high even in the healthy group at the study population. A trend toward a greater frequency of FimA II genotype in patients with moderate and severe periodontitis was determined. The FimA II genotype was also associated with increased pocket depth, greater loss of attachment level, and patients co-infected with T. denticola and T. forsythia. PMID:26600627

  14. Ovine prion protein genotype frequencies in northwestern China.

    PubMed

    Zhao, C-L; Wu, R; Liu, L; Li, F-D; Zhang, X-L; Wang, C; Wang, F; Diao, X-L; Guan, H-W; Wang, X; Zhou, L

    2012-06-21

    Anti-scrapie breeding programs have been initiated to screen for scrapie-resistant sheep based on ovine prion protein gene (PRNP) genotypes at codons 136, 154 and 171 in many countries, especially European Union member states. However, investigation of sheep PRNP genotypes is limited in China, despite the large number of sheep breeds. We analyzed 432 sheep of five different breeds from farms in northwestern China, using PCR-single-strand conformational polymorphism analysis (PCR-SSCP); the corresponding haplotypes of different PRNP alleles were cloned. PRNP allele genotyping was done by amplification refractory mutation system-PCR (ARMS-PCR), according to the haplotype clones of each PRNP allele. The validity of ARMS-PCR was checked by PCR-SSCP. Another 325 unknown PRNP genotypes of other sheep breeds were analyzed according to the established ARMS-PCR. Genotype frequencies of 757 sheep were analyzed with these two methods to evaluate susceptibility to scrapie in northwestern China. Relevant mutations were also detected at other sites. Both methods were effective for ovine PRNP allele genotyping, and the results of the analysis completely coincided. Scrapie-resistant genotypes were found to be uncommon, indicating a high risk for ovine scrapie in northwest China. In addition to codons 136, 154 and 171, we found numerous new mutations; nearly half of them were previously unreported. These sheep populations have a high degree of polymorphism at the PRNP locus.

  15. Clinical exome sequencing for cerebellar ataxia and spastic paraplegia uncovers novel gene–disease associations and unanticipated rare disorders

    PubMed Central

    van de Warrenburg, Bart P; Schouten, Meyke I; de Bot, Susanne T; Vermeer, Sascha; Meijer, Rowdy; Pennings, Maartje; Gilissen, Christian; Willemsen, Michèl AAP; Scheffer, Hans; Kamsteeg, Erik-Jan

    2016-01-01

    Cerebellar ataxia (CA) and hereditary spastic paraplegia (HSP) are two of the most prevalent motor disorders with extensive locus and allelic heterogeneity. We implemented clinical exome sequencing, followed by filtering data for a ‘movement disorders' gene panel, as a generic test to increase variant detection in 76 patients with these disorders. Segregation analysis or phenotypic re-evaluation was utilized to substantiate findings. Disease-causing variants were identified in 9 of 28 CA patients, and 8 of 48 HSP patients. In addition, possibly disease-causing variants were identified in 1 and 8 of the remaining CA and HSP patients, respectively. In 10 patients with CA, the total disease-causing or possibly disease-causing variants were detected in 8 different genes, whereas 16 HSP patients had such variants in 12 different genes. In the majority of cases, the identified variants were compatible with the patient phenotype. Interestingly, in some patients variants were identified in genes hitherto related to other movement disorders, such as TH variants in two siblings with HSP. In addition, rare disorders were uncovered, for example, a second case of HSP caused by a VCP variant. For some patients, exome sequencing results had implications for treatment, exemplified by the favorable L-DOPA treatment in a patient with HSP due to ATP13A2 variants (Parkinson type 9). Thus, clinical exome sequencing in this cohort of CA and HSP patients suggests broadening of disease spectra, revealed novel gene–disease associations, and uncovered unanticipated rare disorders. In addition, clinical exome sequencing results have shown their value in guiding practical patient management. PMID:27165006

  16. [A Japanese family with familial Alzheimer's disease associated with presenilin 1 mutation: relationship between younger age of onset and ApoE gene polymorphism].

    PubMed

    Marui, Wami; Iseki, Eizo; Sugiyama, Naoya; Matsumura, Takehiko; Suzuki, Kyoko; Odawara, Toshinari; Hino, Hiroaki; Kosaka, Kenji

    2003-04-01

    We previously reported a Japanese family with early-onset familial Alzheimer's disease associated with G 209 R presenilin 1(PS 1) mutation. There have been six patients across three generations in this family. In the present report, we described the clinical course, findings with neuroimaging and results of genetic examination of PS 1 and apolipoprotein E(ApoE) in three of six patients(II-1, III-1 and 2). The clinical course was common to all three patients. Memory disturbance, disorientation, amnestic aphasia, personality changes and perseveration appeared at early stages, whereas Gerstmann's syndrome, myoclonus and general convulsion were recognized at advanced stages. CT disclosed mild brain atrophy in the temporal lobes at early stages and diffuse brain atrophy predominantly in the fronto--temporal lobes at advanced stages. SPECT exhibited hypoperfusion in the fronto-temporal areas at early stages and hypoperfusion in the fronto-temporal and parieto-occipital areas at advanced stages. The age of onset in six patients demonstrated two clusters at age 53-55(I-1, II-1, 2 and 5) and age 46-48(III-1 and 2). PS 1 genotyping demonstrated that the heterozygous exonic missense mutation G 209 R was confirmed in all three patients. Regarding the ApoE genotyping, II-1(mother) was epsilon 3/epsilon 3, whereas III-1 and 2(children) were epsilon 3/epsilon 4. These findings suggest the possibility that there might be a gene dose effect, since the age of onset ranged from 5 to 7 years younger in patients who received epsilon 4 alleles from the father.

  17. Development and use of a multiplex real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction assay for detection and differentiation of Porcine circovirus-2 genotypes 2a and 2b in an epidemiological survey.

    PubMed

    Gagnon, Carl A; del Castillo, Jérome R E; Music, Nedzad; Fontaine, Guy; Harel, Josée; Tremblay, Donald

    2008-09-01

    By the end of 2004, the Canadian swine population had experienced a severe increase in the incidence of Porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD), a problem that was associated with the emergence of a new Porcine circovirus-2 genotype (PCV-2b), previously unrecovered in North America. Thus, it became important to develop a diagnostic tool that could differentiate between the old and new circulating genotypes (PCV-2a and PCV-2b, respectively). Consequently, a multiplex real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction (mrtqPCR) assay that could sensitively and specifically identify and differentiate PCV-2 genotypes was developed. A retrospective epidemiologic survey that used the mrtqPCR assay was performed to determine if cofactors could affect the risk of PCVAD. From 121 PCV-2-positive cases gathered for this study, 4.13%, 92.56%, and 3.31% were positive for PCV-2a, PCV-2b, and both genotypes, respectively. In a data analysis using univariate logistic regressions, the PCVAD-compatible (PCVAD/c) score was significantly associated with the presence of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV), PRRSV viral load, PCV-2 viral load, and PCV-2 immunohistochemistry (IHC) results. Polytomous logistic regression analysis revealed that PCVAD/c score was affected by PCV-2 viral load (P = 0.0161) and IHC (P = 0.0128), but not by the PRRSV variables (P > 0.9), which suggests that mrtqPCR in tissue is a reliable alternative to IHC. Logistic regression analyses revealed that PCV-2 increased the odds ratio of isolating 2 major swine pathogens of the respiratory tract, Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae and Streptococcus suis serotypes 1/2, 1, 2, 3, 4, and 7, which are serotypes commonly associated with clinical diseases.

  18. Genotype Specification Language.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Erin H; Sagawa, Shiori; Weis, James W; Schubert, Max G; Bissell, Michael; Hawthorne, Brian; Reeves, Christopher D; Dean, Jed; Platt, Darren

    2016-06-17

    We describe here the Genotype Specification Language (GSL), a language that facilitates the rapid design of large and complex DNA constructs used to engineer genomes. The GSL compiler implements a high-level language based on traditional genetic notation, as well as a set of low-level DNA manipulation primitives. The language allows facile incorporation of parts from a library of cloned DNA constructs and from the "natural" library of parts in fully sequenced and annotated genomes. GSL was designed to engage genetic engineers in their native language while providing a framework for higher level abstract tooling. To this end we define four language levels, Level 0 (literal DNA sequence) through Level 3, with increasing abstraction of part selection and construction paths. GSL targets an intermediate language based on DNA slices that translates efficiently into a wide range of final output formats, such as FASTA and GenBank, and includes formats that specify instructions and materials such as oligonucleotide primers to allow the physical construction of the GSL designs by individual strain engineers or an automated DNA assembly core facility.

  19. [Determination of hepatitis C virus genotype distribution in Mersin province, Turkey].

    PubMed

    Tezcan, Seda; Ulger, Mahmut; Aslan, Gönül; Yaraş, Serkan; Altıntaş, Engin; Sezgin, Orhan; Emekdaş, Gürol; Gürer Giray, Burcu; Sungur, Mehmet Ali

    2013-04-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) is a member of the Flaviviridae family and the RNA genome e x hibit high genetic heterogeneity. Six major genotypes were phylogenetically determined and each genotype contains different subtypes. The distribution of HCV genotypes varies geographically throughout the world. Determination of viral genotype has great importance in the selection of antiviral therapy, treatment duration and monitoring the response to treatment. The aim of this study was to determine the distribution of HCV genotypes in Mersin province located at the Southern part of Turkey. A total of 236 patients (137 females, 99 males; mean age: 53.28 ± 14.99 years) with chronic HCV infection who were admitted to Mersin University Hospital Microbiology Laboratory during March 2010-May 2012 period were included in the study. The patients were anti-HCV (ELISA; Abbott Laboratories, USA) and HCV-RNA (Cobas TaqMan 48, Roche Diagnostic, USA) positive. HCV genotype analysis was determined by using a commercial LiPA kit (Line Probe Assay; AMPLIQUALITY HCV-TS; AB Analitica, Italy) based on the reverse hybridization of amplification products of viral 5'-UTR region. Out of the 236 patients, genotype 1b was observed in 84.7% (n= 200), genotype 3a in 4.2% (n= 10), genotype 1 in 3.8% (n= 9), genotype 1a/1b in 2.1% (n= 5), genotype 4a in 2% (n= 2), genotype 1a in 1.7% (n= 4), genotype 2b in 1.3% (n= 3), genotype 2 in 0.4% (n= 1), genotype 2a/2c in 0.4% (n= 1) and genotype 6 in 0.4% (n= 1). In the cases infected with genotype 1b, statistically significant differences were detected between gender distribution with the mean serum ALT (46.14 IU/L in females, 63.9 IU/L in males; p= 0.029) and HCV-RNA (634 x 103 IU/L in females, 20 x 105 IU/L in males; p= 0.005) levels. This was the first study that reflected the distribution of HCV genotypes in southern Turkey region. Genotype 1b, associated with poor prognosis and which had the highest prevalence in Turkey, was also determined as the most common

  20. Discovering disease-disease associations by fusing systems-level molecular data.

    PubMed

    Žitnik, Marinka; Janjić, Vuk; Larminie, Chris; Zupan, Blaž; Pržulj, Nataša

    2013-11-15

    The advent of genome-scale genetic and genomic studies allows new insight into disease classification. Recently, a shift was made from linking diseases simply based on their shared genes towards systems-level integration of molecular data. Here, we aim to find relationships between diseases based on evidence from fusing all available molecular interaction and ontology data. We propose a multi-level hierarchy of disease classes that significantly overlaps with existing disease classification. In it, we find 14 disease-disease associations currently not present in Disease Ontology and provide evidence for their relationships through comorbidity data and literature curation. Interestingly, even though the number of known human genetic interactions is currently very small, we find they are the most important predictor of a link between diseases. Finally, we show that omission of any one of the included data sources reduces prediction quality, further highlighting the importance in the paradigm shift towards systems-level data fusion.

  1. Chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus: impact on quality of life and current management challenges

    PubMed Central

    Shirazian, Shayan; Aina, Olufemi; Park, Youngjun; Chowdhury, Nawsheen; Leger, Kathleen; Hou, Linle; Miyawaki, Nobuyuki; Mathur, Vandana S

    2017-01-01

    Chronic kidney disease-associated pruritus (CKD-aP) is a distressing, often overlooked condition in patients with CKD and end-stage renal disease. It affects ~40% of patients with end-stage renal disease and has been associated with poor quality of life, poor sleep, depression, and mortality. Prevalence estimates vary based on the instruments used to diagnose CKD-aP, and standardized diagnostic instruments are sorely needed. Treatment studies have often yielded conflicting results. This is likely related to studies that are limited by small sample size, flawed designs, and nonstandardized diagnostic instruments. Several large well-designed treatment trials have recently been completed and may soon influence CKD-aP management. PMID:28176969

  2. Complete genome sequence of Colocasia bobone disease-associated virus, a putative cytorhabdovirus infecting taro.

    PubMed

    Higgins, Colleen M; Bejerman, Nicolas; Li, Ming; James, Anthony P; Dietzgen, Ralf G; Pearson, Michael N; Revill, Peter A; Harding, Robert M

    2016-03-01

    We report the first genome sequence of a Colocasia bobone disease-associated virus (CBDaV) derived from bobone-affected taro [Colocasia esculenta L. Schott] from Solomon Islands. The negative-strand RNA genome is 12,193 nt long, with six major open reading frames (ORFs) with the arrangement 3'-N-P-P3-M-G-L-5'. Typical of all rhabdoviruses, the 3' leader and 5' trailer sequences show complementarity to each other. Phylogenetic analysis indicated that CBDaV is a member of the genus Cytorhabdovirus, supporting previous reports of virus particles within the cytoplasm of bobone-infected taro cells. The availability of the CBDaV genome sequence now makes it possible to assess the role of this virus in bobone, and possibly alomae disease of taro and confirm that this sequence is that of Colocasia bobone disease virus (CBDV).

  3. An Update on the Streptococcus bovis Group: Classification, Identification, and Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Dekker, John P.

    2016-01-01

    The Streptococcus bovis group has undergone significant taxonomic changes over the past 2 decades with the advent of new identification methods with higher discriminatory power. Although the current classification system is not yet embraced by all researchers in the field and debate remains over the performance of molecular techniques for identification to the species level within the group, important disease associations for several members of the group have been clarified. Here, we provide a brief overview of the history of the S. bovis group, an outline of the currently accepted classification scheme, a review of associated clinical syndromes, and a summary of the performance and diagnostic accuracy of currently available identification methods. PMID:26912760

  4. The Rh protein family: gene evolution, membrane biology, and disease association.

    PubMed

    Huang, Cheng-Han; Ye, Mao

    2010-04-01

    The Rh (Rhesus) genes encode a family of conserved proteins that share a structural fold of 12 transmembrane helices with members of the major facilitator superfamily. Interest in this family has arisen from the discovery of Rh factor's involvement in hemolytic disease in the fetus and newborn, and of its homologs widely expressed in epithelial tissues. The Rh factor and Rh-associated glycoprotein (RhAG), with epithelial cousins RhBG and RhCG, form four subgroups conferring upon vertebrates a genealogical commonality. The past decade has heralded significant advances in understanding the phylogenetics, allelic diversity, crystal structure, and biological function of Rh proteins. This review describes recent progress on this family and the molecular insights gleaned from its gene evolution, membrane biology, and disease association. The focus is on its long evolutionary history and surprising structural conservation from prokaryotes to humans, pointing to the importance of its functional role, related to but distinct from ammonium transport proteins.

  5. Burden of disease associated with human cytomegalovirus and prospects for elimination by universal immunisation.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Paul D

    2012-10-01

    Cytomegalovirus is the most frequent cause of intrauterine infection and the commonest infectious agent to affect allograft recipients, yet the virus is acknowledged rarely as an occupational hazard for women of childbearing age or as a nosocomial infection. The potential role of cytomegalovirus in hastening the death of patients with AIDS, elderly people, individuals admitted to intensive-care units, and the general population is not emphasised. Development of vaccines against this important human pathogen has been delayed by reluctance to initiate proof-of-concept studies, but after recent trials, protection is a distinct possibility. Cytomegalovirus deserves to be eliminated from selected populations by means of universal immunisation as soon as suitable vaccines become licensed. This action should control disease in neonates and transplant recipients and could provide substantial additional benefits if other disease associations prove to be causal.

  6. Tight junctions in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Landy, Jonathan; Ronde, Emma; English, Nick; Clark, Sue K; Hart, Ailsa L; Knight, Stella C; Ciclitira, Paul J; Al-Hassi, Hafid Omar

    2016-01-01

    Inflammatory bowel diseases are characterised by inflammation that compromises the integrity of the epithelial barrier. The intestinal epithelium is not only a static barrier but has evolved complex mechanisms to control and regulate bacterial interactions with the mucosal surface. Apical tight junction proteins are critical in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function and control of paracellular permeability. The characterisation of alterations in tight junction proteins as key players in epithelial barrier function in inflammatory bowel diseases is rapidly enhancing our understanding of critical mechanisms in disease pathogenesis as well as novel therapeutic opportunities. Here we give an overview of recent literature focusing on the role of tight junction proteins, in particular claudins, in inflammatory bowel diseases and inflammatory bowel disease associated colorectal cancer. PMID:27003989

  7. Ulcerative enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordellii in quail.

    PubMed

    Crespo, Rocio; Franca, Monique; Shivaprasad, H L

    2013-09-01

    A natural outbreak of ulcerative enteritis-like disease associated with Clostridium sordellii was diagnosed in two commercial quail flocks. Clinical signs in the quail included anorexia, weakness, and increased mortality in the flocks. Lesions in the intestine were characterized by ulcers covered with fibrinonecrotic exudate in the small intestine and occasional hemorrhages. There were also multifocal pale areas of necrosis in the liver. Clostridium sordellii was isolated from the intestine and liver. A retrospective study of avian cases submitted to the California Animal Health and Food Safety Laboratories revealed that C. sordellii had been isolated in 45 avian submissions, most commonly in chickens and turkeys. In most of these cases the birds were diagnosed with necrotic enteritis, with or without hepatitis. Clostridium sordellii has occasionally been associated with gangrenous dermatitis in poultry, but this is the first report of enteritis in an avian species.

  8. Incomplete Kawasaki disease associated with complicated Streptococcus pyogenes pneumonia: A case report.

    PubMed

    Leahy, Timothy Ronan; Cohen, Eyal; Allen, Upton D

    2012-01-01

    A three-year-old boy presented with community-acquired pneumonia complicated by empyema. Streptococcus pyogenes (group A streptococcus) was identified on culture of the pleural fluid. The patient improved with antibiotic therapy and drainage of the empyema. During his convalescence, the patient developed persistent fever, lethargy and anorexia. His inflammatory markers were elevated, and repeat cultures were negative. Although the patient had none of the classical mucocutaneous features of Kawasaki disease, an echocardiogram was performed, which revealed coronary artery dilation. The patient was diagnosed with incomplete Kawasaki disease and treated with intravenous immunoglobulin and high-dose acetylsalicylic acid. The fever subsided within 48 h. To the authors' knowledge, the present report is the first report of Kawasaki disease associated with complicated S pyogenes pneumonia. It emphasizes the importance of considering incomplete Kawasaki disease among children with persistent fever, the role of echocardiography in diagnosis, and the potential link between Kawasaki disease and superantigen-producing organisms such as S pyogenes.

  9. Retinal Diseases Associated with Oxidative Stress and the Effects of a Free Radical Scavenger (Edaravone)

    PubMed Central

    Hara, Hideaki

    2017-01-01

    Oxidative stress plays a pivotal role in developing and accelerating retinal diseases including age-related macular degeneration (AMD), glaucoma, diabetic retinopathy (DR), and retinal vein occlusion (RVO). An excess amount of reactive oxygen species (ROS) can lead to functional and morphological impairments in retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), endothelial cells, and retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Here we demonstrate that edaravone, a free radical scavenger, decreased apoptotic cell death, oxidative damage to DNA and lipids, and angiogenesis through inhibiting JNK and p38 MAPK pathways in AMD, glaucoma, DR, and RVO animal models. These data suggest that the therapeutic strategy for targeting oxidative stress may be important for the treatment of these ocular diseases, and edaravone may be useful for treating retinal diseases associated with oxidative stress. PMID:28194256

  10. A prioritization analysis of disease association by data-mining of functional annotation of human genes.

    PubMed

    Taniya, Takayuki; Tanaka, Susumu; Yamaguchi-Kabata, Yumi; Hanaoka, Hideki; Yamasaki, Chisato; Maekawa, Harutoshi; Barrero, Roberto A; Lenhard, Boris; Datta, Milton W; Shimoyama, Mary; Bumgarner, Roger; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Hopkinson, Ian; Jia, Libin; Hide, Winston; Auffray, Charles; Minoshima, Shinsei; Imanishi, Tadashi; Gojobori, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Complex diseases result from contributions of multiple genes that act in concert through pathways. Here we present a method to prioritize novel candidates of disease-susceptibility genes depending on the biological similarities to the known disease-related genes. The extent of disease-susceptibility of a gene is prioritized by analyzing seven features of human genes captured in H-InvDB. Taking rheumatoid arthritis (RA) and prostate cancer (PC) as two examples, we evaluated the efficiency of our method. Highly scored genes obtained included TNFSF12 and OSM as candidate disease genes for RA and PC, respectively. Subsequent characterization of these genes based upon an extensive literature survey reinforced the validity of these highly scored genes as possible disease-susceptibility genes. Our approach, Prioritization ANalysis of Disease Association (PANDA), is an efficient and cost-effective method to narrow down a large set of genes into smaller subsets that are most likely to be involved in the disease pathogenesis.

  11. Effector CD4+ T cell expression signatures and immune-mediated disease associated genes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wei; Ferguson, John; Ng, Sok Meng; Hui, Ken; Goh, Gerald; Lin, Aiping; Esplugues, Enric; Flavell, Richard A; Abraham, Clara; Zhao, Hongyu; Cho, Judy H

    2012-01-01

    Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) in immune-mediated diseases have identified over 150 associated genomic loci. Many of these loci play a role in T cell responses, and regulation of T cell differentiation plays a critical role in immune-mediated diseases; however, the relationship between implicated disease loci and T cell differentiation is incompletely understood. To further address this relationship, we examined differential gene expression in naïve human CD4+ T cells, as well as in in vitro differentiated Th1, memory Th17-negative and Th17-enriched CD4+ T cells subsets using microarray and RNASeq. We observed a marked enrichment for increased expression in memory CD4+ compared to naïve CD4+ T cells of genes contained among immune-mediated disease loci. Within memory T cells, expression of disease-associated genes was typically increased in Th17-enriched compared to Th17-negative cells. Utilizing RNASeq and promoter methylation studies, we identified a differential regulation pattern for genes solely expressed in Th17 cells (IL17A and CCL20) compared to genes expressed in both Th17 and Th1 cells (IL23R and IL12RB2), where high levels of promoter methylation are correlated to near zero RNASeq levels for IL17A and CCL20. These findings have implications for human Th17 celI plasticity and for the regulation of Th17-Th1 expression signatures. Importantly, utilizing RNASeq we found an abundant isoform of IL23R terminating before the transmembrane domain that was enriched in Th17 cells. In addition to molecular resolution, we find that RNASeq provides significantly improved power to define differential gene expression and identify alternative gene variants relative to microarray analysis. The comprehensive integration of differential gene expression between cell subsets with disease-association signals, and functional pathways provides insight into disease pathogenesis.

  12. An Integrated Data Driven Approach to Drug Repositioning Using Gene-Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Mullen, Joseph; Cockell, Simon J.; Woollard, Peter; Wipat, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Drug development is both increasing in cost whilst decreasing in productivity. There is a general acceptance that the current paradigm of R&D needs to change. One alternative approach is drug repositioning. With target-based approaches utilised heavily in the field of drug discovery, it becomes increasingly necessary to have a systematic method to rank gene-disease associations. Although methods already exist to collect, integrate and score these associations, they are often not a reliable reflection of expert knowledge. Furthermore, the amount of data available in all areas covered by bioinformatics is increasing dramatically year on year. It thus makes sense to move away from more generalised hypothesis driven approaches to research to one that allows data to generate their own hypothesis. We introduce an integrated, data driven approach to drug repositioning. We first apply a Bayesian statistics approach to rank 309,885 gene-disease associations using existing knowledge. Ranked associations are then integrated with other biological data to produce a semantically-rich drug discovery network. Using this network, we show how our approach identifies diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) to be an area of interest. CNS disorders are identified due to the low numbers of such disorders that currently have marketed treatments, in comparison to other therapeutic areas. We then systematically mine our network for semantic subgraphs that allow us to infer drug-disease relations that are not captured in the network. We identify and rank 275,934 drug-disease has_indication associations after filtering those that are more likely to be side effects, whilst commenting on the top ranked associations in more detail. The dataset has been created in Neo4j and is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/ncl-intbio/genediseaserepositioning along with a Java implementation of the searching algorithm. PMID:27196054

  13. An Integrated Data Driven Approach to Drug Repositioning Using Gene-Disease Associations.

    PubMed

    Mullen, Joseph; Cockell, Simon J; Woollard, Peter; Wipat, Anil

    2016-01-01

    Drug development is both increasing in cost whilst decreasing in productivity. There is a general acceptance that the current paradigm of R&D needs to change. One alternative approach is drug repositioning. With target-based approaches utilised heavily in the field of drug discovery, it becomes increasingly necessary to have a systematic method to rank gene-disease associations. Although methods already exist to collect, integrate and score these associations, they are often not a reliable reflection of expert knowledge. Furthermore, the amount of data available in all areas covered by bioinformatics is increasing dramatically year on year. It thus makes sense to move away from more generalised hypothesis driven approaches to research to one that allows data to generate their own hypothesis. We introduce an integrated, data driven approach to drug repositioning. We first apply a Bayesian statistics approach to rank 309,885 gene-disease associations using existing knowledge. Ranked associations are then integrated with other biological data to produce a semantically-rich drug discovery network. Using this network, we show how our approach identifies diseases of the central nervous system (CNS) to be an area of interest. CNS disorders are identified due to the low numbers of such disorders that currently have marketed treatments, in comparison to other therapeutic areas. We then systematically mine our network for semantic subgraphs that allow us to infer drug-disease relations that are not captured in the network. We identify and rank 275,934 drug-disease has_indication associations after filtering those that are more likely to be side effects, whilst commenting on the top ranked associations in more detail. The dataset has been created in Neo4j and is available for download at https://bitbucket.org/ncl-intbio/genediseaserepositioning along with a Java implementation of the searching algorithm.

  14. A review of outbreaks of waterborne disease associated with ships: evidence for risk management.

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Roisin M.; Bartram, Jamie K.; Cramer, Elaine H.; Mantha, Stacey; Nichols, Gordon; Suraj, Rohini; Todd, Ewen C. D.

    2004-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The organization of water supply to and on ships differs considerably from that of water supply on land. Risks of contamination can arise from source water at the port or during loading, storage, or distribution on the ship. The purpose of this article is to review documented outbreaks of waterborne diseases associated with passenger, cargo, fishing, and naval ships to identify contributing factors so that similar outbreaks can be prevented in the future. METHODS: The authors reviewed 21 reported outbreaks of waterborne diseases associated with ships. For each outbreak, data on pathogens/toxins, type of ship, factors contributing to outbreaks, mortality and morbidity, and remedial action are presented. RESULTS: The findings of this review show that the majority of reported outbreaks were associated with passenger ships and that more than 6,400 people were affected. Waterborne outbreaks due to Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli, noroviruses, Salmonella spp, Shigella sp, Cryptosporidium sp, and Giardia lamblia occurred on ships. Enterotoxigenic E. coli was the pathogen most frequently associated with outbreaks. One outbreak of chemical water poisoning also occurred on a ship. Risk factors included contaminated port water, inadequate treatment, improper loading techniques, poor design and maintenance of storage tanks, ingress of contamination during repair and maintenance, cross-connections, back siphonage, and insufficient residual disinfectant. CONCLUSIONS: Waterborne disease outbreaks on ships can be prevented. The factors contributing to outbreaks emphasize the need for hygienic handling of water along the supply chain from source to consumption. A comprehensive approach to water safety on ships is essential. This may be achieved by the adoption of Water Safety Plans that cover design, construction, operation, and routine inspection and maintenance. PMID:15219801

  15. Tissue persistence of parvovirus B19 genotypes in asymptomatic persons.

    PubMed

    Corcioli, Fabiana; Zakrzewska, Krystyna; Rinieri, Alessio; Fanci, Rosa; Innocenti, Massimo; Civinini, Roberto; De Giorgi, Vincenzo; Di Lollo, Simonetta; Azzi, Alberta

    2008-11-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) can persist in immunocompetent symptomatic and non-symptomatic individuals, as demonstrated by the finding of viral DNA in different tissues, in absence of viremia and of anti-B19V IgM. The spread and the nature of this phenomenon have not been clearly determined. In order to investigate the frequency of persistence and the tissue distribution of the three genotypes of B19V, the viral load of the persistent virus and its expression in the affected tissues, 139 tissue samples and 102 sera from 139 asymptomatic individuals have been analyzed by consensus PCRs and genotype specific PCRs for B19V detection and genotyping. Viral load was measured by real time PCR and viral mRNAs were detected by RT-PCR. Altogether, 51% individuals carried B19V DNA, more frequently in solid tissues (65%) than in bone marrow (20%). Genotype 1 was found in 28% tissue samples, genotype 2 in 68% and genotype 3 in 3% only. Viral load ranged from less then 10 copies to 7 x 10(4) copies per 10(6) cells, with the exception of two samples of myocardium with about 10(6) copies per 10(6) cells. mRNA of capsid proteins was present in two bone marrow samples only. In conclusion, in asymptomatic individuals B19V persistence is more common in solid tissues than in bone marrow, and genotype 2 persists more frequently than genotype 1. The results suggest that the virus persists without replicating, at sub-immunogenic levels.

  16. Genotypes and prevalence of HPV single and multiple concurrent infections in women with HSIL.

    PubMed

    Beca, Francisco; Pinheiro, Jorge; Rios, Elisabete; Pontes, Patricia; Amendoeira, Isabel

    2014-11-01

    The contribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) types to the carcinogenesis of cervical cancer has been established for a long time. However, the role of phylogenetically related and rare variants remains uncertain, as well as the influence of concurrent multiple HPV genotypes infection. We aimed at studying the prevalence of several HPV genotypes infecting women with single versus concurrent multiple HPV genotypes infection with a HSIL diagnosis in a cervical cytology. We conducted a cross-sectional study using Thin-Prep(®) liquid-based cervical cytology specimens with the diagnosis of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL), in which HPV genotype was sequentially tested. Genotypes were determined with a PapilloCheck(®) system, a DNA-Chip for the type-specific identification of 18 high-risk and six low-risk types of HPV. Of the total study population, 176 cases had a diagnosis of HSIL and positive HPV genotyping result, being HPV16 the most prevalent genotype (48.86%; 95%CI: 41.58-56.19) followed by HPV31 (14.20%; 95%CI: 9.75-20.18). Concurrent multiple HPV genotypes were detected in 36.93% (95%CI: 30.15-44.27) of the patients. The prevalence of the 10 most common HPV genotypes detected varied significantly according to the presence of single vs. concurrent multiple HPV genotypes (P = 0.022). Moreover, women with concurrent multiple HPV genotypes were on average 3.53 (95%CI: 0.43-6.64) years younger than women with single genotype infection. Our results suggest that women with multiple genotype HPV infection differ in terms of age and distribution of the most prevalent HPV genotypes. Additionally, we provide further evidence of the predominance of HPV16 in HSIL lesions of the uterine cervix.

  17. Identification of new sub-genotypes of virulent Newcastle disease virus with potential panzootic features.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patti J; Haddas, Ruth; Simanov, Luba; Lublin, Avishay; Rehmani, Shafqat Fatima; Wajid, Abdul; Bibi, Tasra; Khan, Taseer Ahmad; Yaqub, Tahir; Setiyaningsih, Surachmi; Afonso, Claudio L

    2015-01-01

    Virulent Newcastle disease virus (NDV) isolates from new sub-genotypes within genotype VII are rapidly spreading through Asia and the Middle East causing outbreaks of Newcastle disease (ND) characterized by significant illness and mortality in poultry, suggesting the existence of a fifth panzootic. These viruses, which belong to the new sub-genotypes VIIh and VIIi, have epizootic characteristics and do not appear to have originated directly from other genotype VII NDV isolates that are currently circulating elsewhere, but are related to the present and past Indonesian NDV viruses isolated from wild birds since the 80s. Viruses from sub-genotype VIIh were isolated in Indonesia (2009-2010), Malaysia (2011), China (2011), and Cambodia (2011-2012) and are closely related to the Indonesian NDV isolated in 2007, APMV1/Chicken/Karangasem, Indonesia (Bali-01)/2007. Since 2011 and during 2012 highly related NDV isolates from sub-genotype VIIi have been isolated from poultry production facilities and occasionally from pet birds, throughout Indonesia, Pakistan and Israel. In Pakistan, the viruses of sub-genotype VIIi have replaced NDV isolates of genotype XIII, which were commonly isolated in 2009-2011, and they have become the predominant sub-genotype causing ND outbreaks since 2012. In a similar fashion, the numbers of viruses of sub-genotype VIIi isolated in Israel increased in 2012, and isolates from this sub-genotype are now found more frequently than viruses from the previously predominant sub-genotypes VIId and VIIb, from 2009 to 2012. All NDV isolates of sub-genotype VIIi are approximately 99% identical to each other and are more closely related to Indonesian viruses isolated from 1983 through 1990 than to those of genotype VII, still circulating in the region. Similarly, in addition to the Pakistani NDV isolates of the original genotype XIII (now called sub-genotype XIIIa), there is an additional sub-genotype (XIIIb) that was initially detected in India and Iran

  18. In utero transmission and tissue distribution of chronic wasting disease-associated prions in free-ranging Rocky Mountain elk.

    PubMed

    Selariu, Anca; Powers, Jenny G; Nalls, Amy; Brandhuber, Monica; Mayfield, Amber; Fullaway, Stephenie; Wyckoff, Christy A; Goldmann, Wilfred; Zabel, Mark M; Wild, Margaret A; Hoover, Edward A; Mathiason, Candace K

    2015-11-01

    The presence of disease-associated prions in tissues and bodily fluids of chronic wasting disease (CWD)-infected cervids has received much investigation, yet little is known about mother-to-offspring transmission of CWD. Our previous work demonstrated that mother-to-offspring transmission is efficient in an experimental setting. To address the question of relevance in a naturally exposed free-ranging population, we assessed maternal and fetal tissues derived from 19 elk dam-calf pairs collected from free-ranging Rocky Mountain elk from north-central Colorado, a known CWD endemic region. Conventional immunohistochemistry identified three of 19 CWD-positive dams, whereas a more sensitive assay [serial protein misfolding cyclic amplification (sPMCA)] detected CWD prion seeding activity (PrPCWD) in 15 of 19 dams. PrPCWD distribution in tissues was widespread, and included the central nervous system (CNS), lymphoreticular system, and reproductive, secretory, excretory and adipose tissues. Interestingly, five of 15 sPMCA-positive dams showed no evidence of PrPCWD in either CNS or lymphoreticular system, sites typically assessed in diagnosing CWD. Analysis of fetal tissues harvested from the 15 sPMCA-positive dams revealed PrPCWD in 80 % of fetuses (12 of 15), regardless of gestational stage. These findings demonstrated that PrPCWD is more abundant in peripheral tissues of CWD-exposed elk than current diagnostic methods suggest, and that transmission of prions from mother to offspring may contribute to the efficient transmission of CWD in naturally exposed cervid populations.

  19. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing and Characterization of Powdery Mildew Disease-Associated Allelic Variation in Melon

    PubMed Central

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Kim, Hoy-Taek; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Veerappan, Karpagam; Park, Jong-In; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most common fungal diseases in the world. This disease frequently affects melon (Cucumis melo L.) and other Cucurbitaceous family crops in both open field and greenhouse cultivation. One of the goals of genomics is to identify the polymorphic loci responsible for variation in phenotypic traits. In this study, powdery mildew disease assessment scores were calculated for four melon accessions, ‘SCNU1154’, ‘Edisto47’, ‘MR-1’, and ‘PMR5’. To investigate the genetic variation of these accessions, whole genome re-sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. A total of 754,759,704 quality-filtered reads were generated, with an average of 82.64% coverage relative to the reference genome. Comparisons of the sequences for the melon accessions revealed around 7.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 1.9 million InDels, and 182,398 putative structural variations (SVs). Functional enrichment analysis of detected variations classified them into biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories. Further, a disease-associated QTL map was constructed for 390 SNPs and 45 InDels identified as related to defense-response genes. Among them 112 SNPs and 12 InDels were observed in powdery mildew responsive chromosomes. Accordingly, this whole genome re-sequencing study identified SNPs and InDels associated with defense genes that will serve as candidate polymorphisms in the search for sources of resistance against powdery mildew disease and could accelerate marker-assisted breeding in melon. PMID:27311063

  20. Whole Genome Re-Sequencing and Characterization of Powdery Mildew Disease-Associated Allelic Variation in Melon.

    PubMed

    Natarajan, Sathishkumar; Kim, Hoy-Taek; Thamilarasan, Senthil Kumar; Veerappan, Karpagam; Park, Jong-In; Nou, Ill-Sup

    2016-01-01

    Powdery mildew is one of the most common fungal diseases in the world. This disease frequently affects melon (Cucumis melo L.) and other Cucurbitaceous family crops in both open field and greenhouse cultivation. One of the goals of genomics is to identify the polymorphic loci responsible for variation in phenotypic traits. In this study, powdery mildew disease assessment scores were calculated for four melon accessions, 'SCNU1154', 'Edisto47', 'MR-1', and 'PMR5'. To investigate the genetic variation of these accessions, whole genome re-sequencing using the Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform was performed. A total of 754,759,704 quality-filtered reads were generated, with an average of 82.64% coverage relative to the reference genome. Comparisons of the sequences for the melon accessions revealed around 7.4 million single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 1.9 million InDels, and 182,398 putative structural variations (SVs). Functional enrichment analysis of detected variations classified them into biological process, cellular component and molecular function categories. Further, a disease-associated QTL map was constructed for 390 SNPs and 45 InDels identified as related to defense-response genes. Among them 112 SNPs and 12 InDels were observed in powdery mildew responsive chromosomes. Accordingly, this whole genome re-sequencing study identified SNPs and InDels associated with defense genes that will serve as candidate polymorphisms in the search for sources of resistance against powdery mildew disease and could accelerate marker-assisted breeding in melon.

  1. Dynamics of Theileria orientalis genotype population in cattle in a year-round grazing system.

    PubMed

    Masatani, Tatsunori; Yoshihara, Shunpei; Matsubara, Atsuko; Gotoh, Takafumi; Takahashi, Hideyuki; Tanaka, Tetsuya; Andoh, Masako; Endo, Yasuyuki; Matsuo, Tomohide

    2016-03-01

    Theirelia orientalis is a tick-borne haemoprotozoan parasite, and infection with this parasite is one of the most important diseases for grazing cattle. Co-infection of cattle with different genotypes of T. orientalis often occurs. In this study, we investigated the temporal dynamics of genotypes in cattle in a year-round grazing system in Japan. Genotype-specific PCR assays to determine major piroplasm surface protein (MPSP) genotypes (types 1 to 5) of T. orientalis were performed by using time-course blood samples collected from grazing cattle and ticks in a pasture. All 20 cattle investigated in this study were infected with T. orientalis. By using genotype-specific PCR, we detected the combination of genotypes of T. orientalis (types 1 to 5) from each cattle. These multiple genotypes of T. orientalis were also confirmed in ticks. Notably, each genotype of T. orientalis in cattle was temporally detected from cattle and more variable genotypes were found in summer. The observed temporal dynamics of the MPSP genotypes of T. orientalis in cattle could be explained by host immunity against the parasites or genetic recombination of parasite in ticks.

  2. A Smartphone-Based Genotyping Method for Hepatitis B Virus at Point-of-Care Settings.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Huiqin; Wu, Di; Song, Liuwei; Yuan, Quan; Ge, Shengxiang; Min, Xiaoping; Xia, Ningshao; Qian, Shizhi; Qiu, Xianbo

    2017-04-01

    We reported a rapid, convenient, and easy-to-use genotyping method for hepatitis B virus (HBV) based on the smartphone at point-of-care (POC) settings. To perform HBV genotyping especially for genotypes A, B, C, and D, a smartphone is used to image and analyze a one-step immunoassay lateral flow strip functionalized with genotype-specific monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) on multiple capture lines. A light-emitting diode (LED) positioned on the top of the lateral flow strip is used to shine the multiple capture lines for excitation. Fluorescence detection is obtained with a smartphone whose camera is used to take the fluorescent images. An intelligent algorithm is developed to first identify each capture line from the fluorescent image and then determine the HBV genotype based on a genotyping model. Based on the pattern of the detection signal from different samples, a custom HBV genotyping model is developed. Custom application software running on a smartphone is developed with Java to collect and analyze the fluorescent image, display the genotyping result, and transmit it if necessary. Compared with the existing methods with nucleic acid analysis, more convenient, instant, and efficient HBV genotyping with significantly lower cost and a simpler procedure can be obtained with the developed smartphone POC HBV genotyping method.

  3. mRNA-based detection of rare CFTR mutations improves genetic diagnosis of cystic fibrosis in populations with high genetic heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Felício, V; Ramalho, A S; Igreja, S; Amaral, M D

    2017-03-01

    Even with advent of next generation sequencing complete sequencing of large disease-associated genes and intronic regions is economically not feasible. This is the case of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR), the gene responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF). Yet, to confirm a CF diagnosis, proof of CFTR dysfunction needs to be obtained, namely by the identification of two disease-causing mutations. Moreover, with the advent of mutation-based therapies, genotyping is an essential tool for CF disease management. There is, however, still an unmet need to genotype CF patients by fast, comprehensive and cost-effective approaches, especially in populations with high genetic heterogeneity (and low p.F508del incidence), where CF is now emerging with new diagnosis dilemmas (Brazil, Asia, etc). Herein, we report an innovative mRNA-based approach to identify CFTR mutations in the complete coding and intronic regions. We applied this protocol to genotype individuals with a suspicion of CF and only one or no CFTR mutations identified by routine methods. It successfully detected multiple intronic mutations unlikely to be detected by CFTR exon sequencing. We conclude that this is a rapid, robust and inexpensive method to detect any CFTR coding/intronic mutation (including rare ones) that can be easily used either as primary approach or after routine DNA analysis.

  4. Rapid detection of functional gene polymorphisms of TLRs and IL-17 using high resolution melting analysis

    PubMed Central

    Teräsjärvi, Johanna; Hakanen, Antti; Korppi, Matti; Nuolivirta, Kirsi; Gröndahl-Yli-Hannuksela, Kirsi; Mertsola, Jussi; Peltola, Ville; He, Qiushui

    2017-01-01

    Genetic variations in toll-like receptors (TLRs) and IL-17A have been widely connected to different diseases. Associations between susceptibility and resistance to different infections and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in TLR1 to TLR4 and IL17A have been found. In this study, we aimed to develop a rapid and high throughput method to detect functional SNPs of above mentioned proteins. The following most studied and clinically important SNPs: TLR1 (rs5743618), TLR2 (rs5743708), TLR3 (rs3775291), TLR4 (rs4986790) and IL17 (rs2275913) were tested. High resolution melting analysis (HRMA) based on real-time PCR combined with melting analysis of a saturating double stranded-DNA binding dye was developed and used. The obtained results were compared to the “standard” sequencing method. A total of 113 DNA samples with known genotypes were included. The HRMA method correctly identified all genotypes of these five SNPs. Co-efficient values of variation of intra- and inter-run precision repeatability ranged from 0.04 to 0.23%. The determined limit of qualification for testing samples was from 0.5 to 8.0 ng/μl. The identical genotyping result was obtained from the same sample with these concentrations. Compared to “standard” sequencing methods HRMA is cost-effective, rapid and simple. All the five SNPs can be analyzed separately or in combination. PMID:28148965

  5. Measles surveillance in Taiwan, 2012-2014: Changing epidemiology, immune response, and circulating genotypes.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Wen-Yueh; Wang, Hsiao-Chi; Wu, Ho-Sheng; Liu, Ming-Tsan

    2016-05-01

    In Taiwan, although the coverage rate of two doses of measles-containing vaccine has been maintained at over 95% since 2001, measles outbreaks occurred in 2002, 2009, and 2011. The present study reports that 43 cases were confirmed by laboratory testing in Taiwan in 2012-2014 and that adults have emerged as one of groups susceptible to measles virus (MV) infection, who may have discrepant humoral immune reactions--indicated by the level of IgM and IgG antibodies compared to a naïve, susceptible measles case. Thirty-seven of 43 cases confirmed by RT-PCR were further characterized by genotyping. In Taiwan, genotype H1 was the major strain in circulation prior to 2010, while D9 was the most frequently detected MV genotype between 2010 and 2011. The genotyping data collected between 2012 and 2014 revealed that H1 rebounded in 2012 after an absence in 2011 and was imported from China and Vietnam. In 2014, genotype B3 first appeared in Taiwan following import from the Philippines and became the most frequently detected strain. Genotype D8, linked to importation from various countries, including India, Indonesia, Thailand, and Vietnam, showed sequence divergence. D9 was imported from Malaysia in 2014. The MV genotypes detected in Taiwan reflected the genotypes of circulating endemic measles strains in neighboring countries. A significant rise in the number of measles cases and in measles with genotypes imported from surrounding countries indicated that measles resurged in Asia in 2014.

  6. Molecular epidemiology of TT virus (TTV) and characterization of two novel TTV genotypes in Indonesia.

    PubMed

    Muljono, D H; Nishizawa, T; Tsuda, F; Takahashi, M; Okamoto, H

    2001-07-01

    The prevalence of TT virus (TTV) DNA among 244 healthy individuals in 23 cities on 12 islands in Indonesia was determined by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with primers derived from the coding region (N22), which can detect TTV DNA of genotypes 1-6. By N22 PCR, TTV DNA was detected in 102 (42%) individuals. The amplified PCR products were molecularly cloned and three clones each were subjected to sequence analysis. Three hundred one (98%) of the 306 TTV clones were classified into genotype 1, 2 or 3, and none into genotypes 4-6. The remaining five clones from two individuals (Kt-08 and Kt-10) on Kutai, Kalimantan Island, differed by >30% from known TTV isolates of all 21 genotypes and were tentatively classified into genotypes 22 and 23, respectively. Using primers specific for the new TTV genotype 22 or 23, TTV genotype 22 was detected significantly more frequently in Kutai than in the other 22 cities (41% vs. 5%, P < 0.001). TTV genotype 23 was restricted to Kutai (17% vs. 0%, P < 0.001), suggesting the indigenous nature of this genotype. Analysis of two TTV isolates (Kt-08F and Kt-10F) demonstrated the extreme diversity of TTV and the preservation of the genomic organization and transcription profile.

  7. A new simple method for improving QTL mapping under selective genotyping.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hsin-I; Ho, Hsiang-An; Kao, Chen-Hung

    2014-12-01

    The selective genotyping approach, where only individuals from the high and low extremes of the trait distribution are selected for genotyping and the remaining individuals are not genotyped, has been known as a cost-saving strategy to reduce genotyping work and can still maintain nearly equivalent efficiency to complete genotyping in QTL mapping. We propose a novel and simple statistical method based on the normal mixture model for selective genotyping when both genotyped and ungenotyped individuals are fitted in the model for QTL analysis. Compared to the existing methods, the main feature of our model is that we first provide a simple way for obtaining the distribution of QTL genotypes for the ungenotyped individuals and then use it, rather than the population distribution of QTL genotypes as in the existing methods, to fit the ungenotyped individuals in model construction. Another feature is that the proposed method is developed on the basis of a multiple-QTL model and has a simple estimation procedure similar to that for complete genotyping. As a result, the proposed method has the ability to provide better QTL resolution, analyze QTL epistasis, and tackle multiple QTL problem under selective genotyping. In addition, a truncated normal mixture model based on a multiple-QTL model is developed when only the genotyped individuals are considered in the analysis, so that the two different types of models can be compared and investigated in selective genotyping. The issue in determining threshold values for selective genotyping in QTL mapping is also discussed. Simulation studies are performed to evaluate the proposed methods, compare the different models, and study the QTL mapping properties in selective genotyping. The results show that the proposed method can provide greater QTL detection power and facilitate QTL mapping for selective genotyping. Also, selective genotyping using larger genotyping proportions may provide roughly equivalent power to complete

  8. Rapid replacement of prevailing genotype of human respiratory syncytial virus by genotype ON1 in Beijing, 2012-2014.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guanglin; Zhu, Runan; Deng, Jie; Zhao, Linqing; Sun, Yu; Wang, Fang; Qian, Yuan

    2015-07-01

    Human respiratory syncytial virus (HRSV) is the most common viral pathogen causing lower respiratory infections in infants and young children worldwide. HRSV ON1 genotype in subgroup A with a characteristic of a 72 nucleotide duplication in the second highly variable region of attachment glycoprotein gene, has been reported in some countries since it was first detected in clinical samples collected in Canada in 2010. In this study, 557 HRSV antigen-positive nasopharyngeal aspirates were randomly selected during 2012/2013 to 2013/2014 HRSV seasons in Beijing for subgroup typing and for ON1 genotype screening by using a PCR based method developed for easily identifying genotype ON1 out of strains of subtype A. It was found that subgroup B was dominant in the 2012/2013 season and sudden shift of subgroup dominance from B to A and rapid replacement of previously prevailing NA1 genotype by ON1 genotype occurred in the 2013/2014 season. Reversible amino acid replacement in the G protein gene was found in a new branch of ON1 genotype. The evolutionary rate of the 351 global ON1 sequences was estimated to 7.34 × 10(-3) nucleotide substitutions per site per year (95% highest probability density intervals, HPD, 5.71 × 10(-3) to 9.04 × 10(-3)), with the time of most recent common ancestor dating back to June 2009.

  9. Is incidence of multiple HPV genotypes rising in genital infections?

    PubMed

    Sohrabi, Amir; Hajia, Masoud; Jamali, Firouzeh; Kharazi, Faranak

    2017-02-16

    Frequency of cervical cancer related to Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) has increased remarkably in less-developed countries. Hence, applying capable diagnostic methods is urgently needed, as is having a therapeutic strategy as an effective step for cervical cancer prevention. The aim of this study was to investigate the prevalence of various multi-type HPV infection patterns and their possible rising incidence in women with genital infections. This descriptive study was conducted on women who attended referral clinical laboratories in Tehran for genital infections from January 2012 until December 2013. A total of 1387 archival cervical scraping and lesion specimens were collected from referred women. HPV genotyping was performed using approved HPV commercial diagnostic technologies with either INNO-LiPA HPV or Geno Array Test kits. HPV was positive in 563 cases (40.59%) with mean age of 32.35±9.96. Single, multiple HPV genotypes and untypable cases were detected in 398 (70.69%), 160 (28.42%) and 5 (0.89%) cases, respectively. Multiple HPV infections were detected in 92 (57.5%), 42 (26.2%), 17 (10.6%) and 9 (5.7%) cases as two, three, four and five or more genotypes, respectively. The prevalence of 32 HPV genotypes was determined one by one. Seventeen HPV genotypes were identified in 95.78% of all positive infections. Five dominant genotypes, HPV6, 16, 53, 11 and 31, were identified in a total of 52.35%of the HPV positive cases. In the present study, we were able to evaluate the rate of multiple HPV types in genital infections. Nevertheless, it is necessary to evaluate the role of the dominant HPV low-risk types and the new probably high-risk genotypes, such as HPV53, in the increasing incidences of genital infections.

  10. Diseases Associated With Exposure to Contaminants in the Water Supply at Camp Lejeune. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2017-01-13

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) amends its adjudication regulations regarding presumptive service connection, adding certain diseases associated with contaminants present in the base water supply at U.S. Marine Corps Base Camp Lejeune (Camp Lejeune), North Carolina, from August 1, 1953, to December 31, 1987. This final rule establishes that veterans, former reservists, and former National Guard members, who served at Camp Lejeune for no less than 30 days (consecutive or nonconsecutive) during this period, and who have been diagnosed with any of eight associated diseases, are presumed to have incurred or aggravated the disease in service for purposes of entitlement to VA benefits. In addition, this final rule establishes a presumption that these individuals were disabled during the relevant period of service for purposes of establishing active military service for benefits purposes. Under this presumption, affected former reservists and National Guard members have veteran status for purposes of entitlement to some VA benefits. This amendment implements a decision by the Secretary of Veterans Affairs that service connection on a presumptive basis is warranted for claimants who served at Camp Lejeune during the relevant period and for the requisite amount of time and later develop certain diseases.

  11. Effective diagnosis of genetic disease by computational phenotype analysis of the disease-associated genome

    PubMed Central

    Zemojtel, Tomasz; Köhler, Sebastian; Mackenroth, Luisa; Jäger, Marten; Hecht, Jochen; Krawitz, Peter; Graul-Neumann, Luitgard; Doelken, Sandra; Ehmke, Nadja; Spielmann, Malte; Øien, Nancy Christine; Schweiger, Michal R.; Krüger, Ulrike; Frommer, Götz; Fischer, Björn; Kornak, Uwe; Flöttmann, Ricarda; Ardeshirdavani, Amin; Moreau, Yves; Lewis, Suzanna E.; Haendel, Melissa; Smedley, Damian; Horn, Denise; Mundlos, Stefan; Robinson, Peter N.

    2015-01-01

    Less than half of patients with suspected genetic disease receive a molecular diagnosis. We have therefore integrated next-generation sequencing (NGS), bioinformatics, and clinical data into an effective diagnostic workflow. We used variants in the 2741 established Mendelian disease genes [the disease-associated genome (DAG)] to develop a targeted enrichment DAG panel (7.1 Mb), which achieves a coverage of 20-fold or better for 98% of bases. Furthermore, we established a computational method [Phenotypic Interpretation of eXomes (PhenIX)] that evaluated and ranked variants based on pathogenicity and semantic similarity of patients’ phenotype described by Human Phenotype Ontology (HPO) terms to those of 3991 Mendelian diseases. In computer simulations, ranking genes based on the variant score put the true gene in first place less than 5% of the time; PhenIX placed the correct gene in first place more than 86% of the time. In a retrospective test of PhenIX on 52 patients with previously identified mutations and known diagnoses, the correct gene achieved a mean rank of 2.1. In a prospective study on 40 individuals without a diagnosis, PhenIX analysis enabled a diagnosis in 11 cases (28%, at a mean rank of 2.4). Thus, the NGS of the DAG followed by phenotype-driven bioinformatic analysis allows quick and effective differential diagnostics in medical genetics. PMID:25186178

  12. The Neuropsychiatric Disease-Associated Gene cacna1c Mediates Survival of Young Hippocampal Neurons123

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Anni S.; Kabir, Zeeba D.; Knobbe, Whitney; Orr, Madeline; Burgdorf, Caitlin; Huntington, Paula; McDaniel, Latisha; Britt, Jeremiah K.; Hoffmann, Franz; Brat, Daniel J.; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M.

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations in CACNA1C, which encodes the Cav1.2 subunit of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), are associated with multiple forms of neuropsychiatric disease that manifest high anxiety in patients. In parallel, mice harboring forebrain-specific conditional knockout of cacna1c (forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO) display unusually high anxiety-like behavior. LTCCs in general, including the Cav1.3 subunit, have been shown to mediate differentiation of neural precursor cells (NPCs). However, it has not previously been determined whether Cav1.2 affects postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo. Here, we show that forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice exhibit enhanced cell death of young hippocampal neurons, with no change in NPC proliferation, hippocampal size, dentate gyrus thickness, or corticosterone levels compared with wild-type littermates. These mice also exhibit deficits in brain levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and Cre recombinase-mediated knockdown of adult hippocampal Cav1.2 recapitulates the deficit in young hippocampal neurons survival. Treatment of forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice with the neuroprotective agent P7C3-A20 restored the net magnitude of postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis to wild-type levels without ameliorating their deficit in BDNF expression. The role of Cav1.2 in young hippocampal neurons survival may provide new approaches for understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease associated with aberrations in CACNA1C. Visual Abstract PMID:27066530

  13. Factors regulating immunoglobulin production by normal and disease-associated plasma cells.

    PubMed

    Jackson, David A; Elsawa, Sherine F

    2015-01-21

    Immunoglobulins are molecules produced by activated B cells and plasma cells in response to exposure to antigens. Upon antigen exposure, these molecules are secreted allowing the immune system to recognize and effectively respond to a myriad of pathogens. Immunoglobulin or antibody secreting cells are the mature form of B lymphocytes, which during their development undergo gene rearrangements and selection in the bone marrow ultimately leading to the generation of B cells, each expressing a single antigen-specific receptor/immunoglobulin molecule. Each individual immunoglobulin molecule has an affinity for a unique motif, or epitope, found on a given antigen. When presented with an antigen, activated B cells differentiate into either plasma cells (which secrete large amounts of antibody that is specific for the inducing antigen), or memory B cells (which are long-lived and elicit a stronger and faster response if the host is re-exposed to the same antigen). The secreted form of immunoglobulin, when bound to an antigen, serves as an effector molecule that directs other cells of the immune system to facilitate the neutralization of soluble antigen or the eradication of the antigen-expressing pathogen. This review will focus on the regulation of secreted immunoglobulin by long-lived normal or disease-associated plasma. Specifically, the focus will be on signaling and transcriptional events that regulate the development and homeostasis of long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells.

  14. Factors Regulating Immunoglobulin Production by Normal and Disease-Associated Plasma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, David A.; Elsawa, Sherine F.

    2015-01-01

    Immunoglobulins are molecules produced by activated B cells and plasma cells in response to exposure to antigens. Upon antigen exposure, these molecules are secreted allowing the immune system to recognize and effectively respond to a myriad of pathogens. Immunoglobulin or antibody secreting cells are the mature form of B lymphocytes, which during their development undergo gene rearrangements and selection in the bone marrow ultimately leading to the generation of B cells, each expressing a single antigen-specific receptor/immunoglobulin molecule. Each individual immunoglobulin molecule has an affinity for a unique motif, or epitope, found on a given antigen. When presented with an antigen, activated B cells differentiate into either plasma cells (which secrete large amounts of antibody that is specific for the inducing antigen), or memory B cells (which are long-lived and elicit a stronger and faster response if the host is re-exposed to the same antigen). The secreted form of immunoglobulin, when bound to an antigen, serves as an effector molecule that directs other cells of the immune system to facilitate the neutralization of soluble antigen or the eradication of the antigen-expressing pathogen. This review will focus on the regulation of secreted immunoglobulin by long-lived normal or disease-associated plasma cells. Specifically, the focus will be on signaling and transcriptional events that regulate the development and homeostasis of long-lived immunoglobulin secreting plasma cells. PMID:25615546

  15. Glomeruloid hemangioma. A distinctive cutaneous lesion of multicentric Castleman's disease associated with POEMS syndrome.

    PubMed

    Chan, J K; Fletcher, C D; Hicklin, G A; Rosai, J

    1990-11-01

    A histologically distinctive cutaneous hemangioma occurring in two patients with biopsy-proven multicentric Castleman's disease associated with POEMS (polyneuropathy, organomegaly, endocrinopathy, M-protein, skin changes) syndrome are reported. The lesions were multiple, and appeared as red to purple papules over the trunk and proximal limbs. Microscopically, ecstatic dermal vascular spaces were seen filled with aggregates of capillaries, resulting in structures reminiscent of renal glomeruli. Interspersed between the blood-filled capillary loops were plump "stromal" cells possessing clear vacuoles and periodic acid-schiff-positive eosinophilic globules. These cells had the immunohistochemical profile of endothelial cells (positivity for factor VIII-related antigen, and negativity for leukocyte common antigen, macrophage marker, and muscle-specific actin), and probably represented immature elements that had accumulated immunoglobulins and other proteinaceous material from the circulation. Because vascular lesions may appear before the full-blown POEMS syndrome develops, we suggest careful evaluation and follow-up of all patients presenting with glomeruloid hemangioma or cherry-type capillary hemangioma with focal glomeruloid features for potential development of this syndrome.

  16. A case study on the identification of confounding factors for gene disease association analysis.

    PubMed

    Han, Bin; Xie, Ruifei; Wu, Shixiu; Li, Lihua; Zhu, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Variation in the expression of genes arises from a variety of sources. It is important to remove sources of variation between arrays of non-biological origin. Non-biological variation, caused by lurking confounding factors, usually attracts little attention, although it may substantially influence the expression profile of genes. In this study, we proposed a method which is able to identify the potential confounding factors and highlight the non-biological variations. We also developed methods and statistical tests to study the confounding factors and their influence on the homogeneity of microarray data, gene selection, and disease classification. We explored an ovarian cancer gene expression profile and showed that data batches and arraying conditions are two confounding factors. Their influence on the homogeneity of data, gene selection, and disease classification are statistically analyzed. Experiments showed that after normalization, their influences were removed. Comparative studies further showed that the data became more homogeneous and the classification quality was improved. This research demonstrated that identifying and reducing the impact of confounding factors is paramount in making sense of gene-disease association analysis.

  17. The Neuropsychiatric Disease-Associated Gene cacna1c Mediates Survival of Young Hippocampal Neurons.

    PubMed

    Lee, Anni S; De Jesús-Cortés, Héctor; Kabir, Zeeba D; Knobbe, Whitney; Orr, Madeline; Burgdorf, Caitlin; Huntington, Paula; McDaniel, Latisha; Britt, Jeremiah K; Hoffmann, Franz; Brat, Daniel J; Rajadhyaksha, Anjali M; Pieper, Andrew A

    2016-01-01

    Genetic variations in CACNA1C, which encodes the Cav1.2 subunit of L-type calcium channels (LTCCs), are associated with multiple forms of neuropsychiatric disease that manifest high anxiety in patients. In parallel, mice harboring forebrain-specific conditional knockout of cacna1c (forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO) display unusually high anxiety-like behavior. LTCCs in general, including the Cav1.3 subunit, have been shown to mediate differentiation of neural precursor cells (NPCs). However, it has not previously been determined whether Cav1.2 affects postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis in vivo. Here, we show that forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice exhibit enhanced cell death of young hippocampal neurons, with no change in NPC proliferation, hippocampal size, dentate gyrus thickness, or corticosterone levels compared with wild-type littermates. These mice also exhibit deficits in brain levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), and Cre recombinase-mediated knockdown of adult hippocampal Cav1.2 recapitulates the deficit in young hippocampal neurons survival. Treatment of forebrain-Cav1.2 cKO mice with the neuroprotective agent P7C3-A20 restored the net magnitude of postnatal hippocampal neurogenesis to wild-type levels without ameliorating their deficit in BDNF expression. The role of Cav1.2 in young hippocampal neurons survival may provide new approaches for understanding and treating neuropsychiatric disease associated with aberrations in CACNA1C. Visual Abstract.

  18. Percutaneous Management of Occlusive Arterial Disease Associated with Vasculitis: A Single Center Experience

    SciTech Connect

    Both, M.; Jahnke, T.; Reinhold-Keller, E.; Reuter, M.; Grimm, J.; Biederer, J.; Brossmann, J.; Gross, W.L.; Heller, M.; Mueller-Huelsbeck, S.

    2003-02-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and effectiveness of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty for occlusive arterial disease associated with vasculitis. Eleven patients(10 women, 1 man; ages 35-82 years) with the diagnosis of vasculitis of the large vessels underwent interventional treatment during intraarterial angiography. The causes included giant cell arteritis(n = 8) and Takayasu arteritis (n = 3).Thirty-three occlusive lesions (including brachiocephalic and renalarteries, and arteries of upper and lower extremities) were treated with balloon angioplasty and/or stent placement. Follow-up included clinical examination, angiography, and color duplex ultrasound.Technical success was 100% (25/25) for stenoses and 50% (4/8) for occlusive lesions, representing all lesions combined from different anatomic locations. Dissection (n = 3) and arterial rupture with retroperitoneal hematoma (n = 1) was found in three patients. During follow-up (mean 12 months), restenoses(n = 8) and re-restenoses (n = 1)occurred in 8 vascular areas. Three of these lesions were treated with repeated PTA (n = 4). The cumulative primary clinical success rate was 67.6%, cumulative secondary success rate 74.4%, and cumulative tertiary success rate 75.9%. Interventional therapy in systemic vasculitis provides promising results in technical success rates and followup. Angioplasty may result in arterial injury, but the rate of complications is low.

  19. Inhaled Pollutants: The Molecular Scene behind Respiratory and Systemic Diseases Associated with Ultrafine Particulate Matter

    PubMed Central

    Traboulsi, Hussein; Guerrina, Necola; Iu, Matthew; Maysinger, Dusica; Ariya, Parisa; Baglole, Carolyn J.

    2017-01-01

    Air pollution of anthropogenic origin is largely from the combustion of biomass (e.g., wood), fossil fuels (e.g., cars and trucks), incinerators, landfills, agricultural activities and tobacco smoke. Air pollution is a complex mixture that varies in space and time, and contains hundreds of compounds including volatile organic compounds (e.g., benzene), metals, sulphur and nitrogen oxides, ozone and particulate matter (PM). PM0.1 (ultrafine particles (UFP)), those particles with a diameter less than 100 nm (includes nanoparticles (NP)) are considered especially dangerous to human health and may contribute significantly to the development of numerous respiratory and cardiovascular diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) and atherosclerosis. Some of the pathogenic mechanisms through which PM0.1 may contribute to chronic disease is their ability to induce inflammation, oxidative stress and cell death by molecular mechanisms that include transcription factors such as nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) and nuclear factor (erythroid-derived 2)-like 2 (Nrf2). Epigenetic mechanisms including non-coding RNA (ncRNA) may also contribute towards the development of chronic disease associated with exposure to PM0.1. This paper highlights emerging molecular concepts associated with inhalational exposure to PM0.1 and their ability to contribute to chronic respiratory and systemic disease. PMID:28125025

  20. Ribosome profiling reveals features of normal and disease-associated mitochondrial translation.

    PubMed

    Rooijers, Koos; Loayza-Puch, Fabricio; Nijtmans, Leo G; Agami, Reuven

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria are essential cellular organelles for generation of energy and their dysfunction may cause diabetes, Parkinson's disease and multi-systemic failure marked by failure to thrive, gastrointestinal problems, lactic acidosis and early lethality. Disease-associated mitochondrial mutations often affect components of the mitochondrial translation machinery. Here we perform ribosome profiling to measure mitochondrial translation at nucleotide resolution. Using a protocol optimized for the retrieval of mitochondrial ribosome protected fragments (RPFs) we show that the size distribution of wild-type mitochondrial RPFs follows a bimodal distribution peaking at 27 and 33 nucleotides, which is distinct from the 30-nucleotide peak of nuclear RPFs. Their cross-correlation suggests generation of mitochondrial RPFs during ribosome progression. In contrast, RPFs from patient-derived mitochondria mutated in tRNA-Tryptophan are centered on tryptophan codons and reduced downstream, indicating ribosome stalling. Intriguingly, long RPFs are enriched in mutated mitochondria, suggesting they characterize stalled ribosomes. Our findings provide the first model for translation in wild-type and disease-triggering mitochondria.

  1. Ribosome profiling reveals features of normal and disease-associated mitochondrial translation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooijers, Koos; Loayza-Puch, Fabricio; Nijtmans, Leo G.; Agami, Reuven

    2013-12-01

    Mitochondria are essential cellular organelles for generation of energy and their dysfunction may cause diabetes, Parkinson’s disease and multi-systemic failure marked by failure to thrive, gastrointestinal problems, lactic acidosis and early lethality. Disease-associated mitochondrial mutations often affect components of the mitochondrial translation machinery. Here we perform ribosome profiling to measure mitochondrial translation at nucleotide resolution. Using a protocol optimized for the retrieval of mitochondrial ribosome protected fragments (RPFs) we show that the size distribution of wild-type mitochondrial RPFs follows a bimodal distribution peaking at 27 and 33 nucleotides, which is distinct from the 30-nucleotide peak of nuclear RPFs. Their cross-correlation suggests generation of mitochondrial RPFs during ribosome progression. In contrast, RPFs from patient-derived mitochondria mutated in tRNA-Tryptophan are centered on tryptophan codons and reduced downstream, indicating ribosome stalling. Intriguingly, long RPFs are enriched in mutated mitochondria, suggesting they characterize stalled ribosomes. Our findings provide the first model for translation in wild-type and disease-triggering mitochondria.

  2. Super-enhancers delineate disease-associated regulatory nodes in T cells.

    PubMed

    Vahedi, Golnaz; Kanno, Yuka; Furumoto, Yasuko; Jiang, Kan; Parker, Stephen C J; Erdos, Michael R; Davis, Sean R; Roychoudhuri, Rahul; Restifo, Nicholas P; Gadina, Massimo; Tang, Zhonghui; Ruan, Yijun; Collins, Francis S; Sartorelli, Vittorio; O'Shea, John J

    2015-04-23

    Enhancers regulate spatiotemporal gene expression and impart cell-specific transcriptional outputs that drive cell identity. Super-enhancers (SEs), also known as stretch-enhancers, are a subset of enhancers especially important for genes associated with cell identity and genetic risk of disease. CD4(+) T cells are critical for host defence and autoimmunity. Here we analysed maps of mouse T-cell SEs as a non-biased means of identifying key regulatory nodes involved in cell specification. We found that cytokines and cytokine receptors were the dominant class of genes exhibiting SE architecture in T cells. Nonetheless, the locus encoding Bach2, a key negative regulator of effector differentiation, emerged as the most prominent T-cell SE, revealing a network in which SE-associated genes critical for T-cell biology are repressed by BACH2. Disease-associated single-nucleotide polymorphisms for immune-mediated disorders, including rheumatoid arthritis, were highly enriched for T-cell SEs versus typical enhancers or SEs in other cell lineages. Intriguingly, treatment of T cells with the Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitor tofacitinib disproportionately altered the expression of rheumatoid arthritis risk genes with SE structures. Together, these results indicate that genes with SE architecture in T cells encompass a variety of cytokines and cytokine receptors but are controlled by a 'guardian' transcription factor, itself endowed with an SE. Thus, enumeration of SEs allows the unbiased determination of key regulatory nodes in T cells, which are preferentially modulated by pharmacological intervention.

  3. Recombination affects accumulation of damaging and disease-associated mutations in human populations.

    PubMed

    Hussin, Julie G; Hodgkinson, Alan; Idaghdour, Youssef; Grenier, Jean-Christophe; Goulet, Jean-Philippe; Gbeha, Elias; Hip-Ki, Elodie; Awadalla, Philip

    2015-04-01

    Many decades of theory have demonstrated that, in non-recombining systems, slightly deleterious mutations accumulate non-reversibly, potentially driving the extinction of many asexual species. Non-recombining chromosomes in sexual organisms are thought to have degenerated in a similar fashion; however, it is not clear the extent to which damaging mutations accumulate along chromosomes with highly variable rates of crossing over. Using high-coverage sequencing data from over 1,400 individuals in the 1000 Genomes and CARTaGENE projects, we show that recombination rate modulates the distribution of putatively deleterious variants across the entire human genome. Exons in regions of low recombination are significantly enriched for deleterious and disease-associated variants, a signature varying in strength across worldwide human populations with different demographic histories. Regions with low recombination rates are enriched for highly conserved genes with essential cellular functions and show an excess of mutations with demonstrated effects on health, a phenomenon likely affecting disease susceptibility in humans.

  4. Translational attenuation differentially alters the fate of disease-associated fibulin proteins

    PubMed Central

    Hulleman, John D.; Balch, William E.; Kelly, Jeffery W.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in fibulin proteins that cause cellular secretion deficiencies are linked to a variety of diseases, ranging from retinopathies to cutis laxa (CL). One secretion-deficient fibulin mutant, R345W fibulin-3, causes the macular dystrophy malattia leventinese by increased endoplasmic reticulum retention and/or extracellular misfolding. Herein, we report that small-molecule activation of the PERK arm of the unfolded protein response partially rescues R345W secretion deficiencies through translational attenuation mediated by eIF2α phosphorylation. Enhanced mutant fibulin-3 secretion can also be achieved by activation of a PERK-independent eIF2α kinase through arsenite treatment and is independent of activating transcription factor 4 signaling and protein translation. However, this translational attenuation strategy was unsuccessful for enhancing the secretion deficiencies of fibulin-5 mutants associated with age-related macular degeneration or CL. While lowered growth temperature enhanced the secretion of mutants associated with CL (C217R and S227P), these effects were not mediated through translational attenuation. In stark contrast to the situation with fibulin-3, protein translation was required for efficient wild-type and mutant fibulin-5 secretion. These data suggest that alteration of specific cellular signaling pathways and proteostasis network components can differentially influence fibulin fate, a hypothesis that could be exploited as a therapy for fibulin-related diseases.—Hulleman, J. D., Balch, W. E., Kelly, J. W. Translational attenuation differentially alters the fate of disease-associated fibulin proteins. PMID:22872678

  5. Association of Ocular Toxoplasmosis with Type I Toxoplasma gondii Strains: Direct Genotyping from Peripheral Blood Samples▿

    PubMed Central

    Switaj, Karolina; Master, Adam; Borkowski, Piotr Karol; Skrzypczak, Magdalena; Wojciechowicz, Jacek; Zaborowski, Piotr

    2006-01-01

    Toxoplasma gondii strains were genotyped directly from blood samples of patients with ocular toxoplasmosis. Analysis of nontranscribed spacer 2 revealed that all detected strains belonged to type I, suggesting an association of ocular toxoplasmosis with this type. The method shows the usefulness of blood samples for genotyping in ocular toxoplasmosis. PMID:17005742

  6. Five years investigation of female and male genotypes in Périgord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) revealed contrasted reproduction strategies.

    PubMed

    De la Varga, Herminia; Le Tacon, François; Lagoguet, Mélanie; Todesco, Flora; Varga, Torda; Miquel, Igor; Barry-Etienne, Dominique; Robin, Christophe; Halkett, Fabien; Martin, Francis; Murat, Claude

    2017-03-29

    The Périgord black truffle (Tuber melanosporum Vittad.) is a heterothallic ascomycete that establishes ectomycorrhizal symbiosis with trees and shrubs. Small-scale genetic structures of female genotypes in truffle orchards are known, but it has not yet been studied in male genotypes. In this study, our aim was to characterize the small-scale genetic structure of both male and female genotypes over five years in an orchard to better understand the T. melanosporum sexual reproduction strategy, male genotype dynamics, and origins. Two-hundred forty-one ascocarps, 475 ectomycorrhizas, and 20 soil cores were harvested and genotyped using microsatellites and mating type genes. Isolation by distance analysis revealed pronounced small-scale genetic structures for both female and male genotypes. The genotypic diversity was higher for male than female genotypes with numerous small size genotypes suggesting an important turnover due to ascospore recruitment. Larger and perennial female and male genotypes were also detected. Only three genotypes (1.5%) were found as both female and male genotypes (hermaphrodites) while most were detected only as female or male genotype (dioecy). Our results suggest that germinating ascospores act as male genotypes, but we also proposed that soil mycelium could be a reservoir of male genotypes. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  7. HBV genotypes prevalence, precore and basal core mutants in Morocco.

    PubMed

    Baha, Warda; Ennaji, My Mustapha; Lazar, Fatiha; Melloul, Marouane; El Fahime, Elmostafa; El Malki, Abdelouahad; Bennani, Abdelouaheb

    2012-08-01

    The study of hepatitis B virus (HBV) genomic heterogeneity has become a major issue in investigations aimed at understanding the relationship between HBV mutants and the wide spectrum of clinical and pathological conditions associated with HBV infection. The objective of the current study was to find out the pattern of HBV genotypes circulating in Morocco and to investigate the precore (PC) and basal core promoter (BCP) mutants' status in Moroccan chronic hepatitis B patients. Viral genotypes were determined in 221 chronic carriers using INNO-LiPA HBV assay and hemi-nested PCR. Phylogenetic analysis was performed in 70 samples, and multiplex PCR method was used to confirm some genotyping results. PC and CP mutants were determined using Inno-Lipa. All isolates were successfully genotyped. The genotype distribution was D in 90.45% of cases, A (5.9%), E (1 case), and mixed genotypes (5 A/D and 2 D/F) in 3.17% patients. HBV carried in the HBV/D samples could be assigned to D7 (63.3%), D1 (32.7%) and 2% of strains to each D4 and D5, all HBV/A belonged to A2 subgenotype and HBV/E strain could not be sub-genotyped. In 70 studied strains, HBV mutants were detected in 88.6% of cases; PC mutants were detected in (40%) of patients and 21.5% present a mixture of wild type and G1896A mutation. BCP mutants were observed in 65.7% of cases, 22.9% were found to have the T1762/1764A double mutation, 18.6% had A1762/1764T mutation and 22.9% of patients showed the A1762T/G1764A double mutation with either A1762T/G1764T mutation. Co-infection by PC and BCP mutants was detected in 52.9% of cases. Movement from place to place most likely shapes the observed genotype distribution and consequent prevalence of genotypes other than A2 or D7 in this population. High circulation of PC and BCP mutants is common in chronic hepatitis B infection in Morocco.

  8. Newcastle disease: evolution of genotypes and the related diagnostic challenges.

    PubMed

    Miller, Patti J; Decanini, Eduardo Lucio; Afonso, Claudio L

    2010-01-01

    Since the discovery of Newcastle disease virus (NDV) in 1926, nine genotypes of class I viruses and ten of class II have been identified, representing a diverse and continually evolving group of viruses. The emergence of new virulent genotypes from global epizootics and the year-to-year changes observed in the genomic sequence of NDV of low and high virulence implies that distinct genotypes of NDV are simultaneously evolving at different geographic locations across the globe. This vast genomic diversity may be favored by the large variety of avian species susceptible to NDV infection and by the availability of highly mobile wild bird reservoirs. The genomic diversity of NDV increases the possibility of diagnostic failures, resulting in unidentified infections. Constant epidemiological surveillance and pro-active characterization of circulating strains are needed to ensure that the immunological and PCR reagents are effective in identifying NDV circulating worldwide. For example, in the United States, the widely used real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RRT-PCR) matrix gene assay for the identification of NDV often fails to detect low virulence APMV-1 from waterfowl, while the RRT-PCR fusion gene assay, used to identify virulent isolates, often fails to detect certain virulent NDV genotypes. A new matrix-polymerase multiplex test that detects most of the viruses currently circulating worldwide and a modified fusion test for the identification of virulent pigeon viruses circulating in the U.S. and Europe have recently been developed. For newly isolated viruses with unknown sequences, recently developed random priming sequencing methods need to be incorporated into the diagnostic arsenal. In addition, the current system of classifying NDV into genotypes or lineages is inadequate. Here, we review the molecular epidemiology and recent diagnostic problems related to viral evolution of NDV and explain why a new system, based on objective criteria, is

  9. HMDD v2.0: a database for experimentally supported human microRNA and disease associations.

    PubMed

    Li, Yang; Qiu, Chengxiang; Tu, Jian; Geng, Bin; Yang, Jichun; Jiang, Tianzi; Cui, Qinghua

    2014-01-01

    The Human microRNA Disease Database (HMDD; available via the Web site at http://cmbi.bjmu.edu.cn/hmdd and http://202.38.126.151/hmdd/tools/hmdd2.html) is a collection of experimentally supported human microRNA (miRNA) and disease associations. Here, we describe the HMDD v2.0 update that presented several novel options for users to facilitate exploration of the data in the database. In the updated database, miRNA-disease association data were annotated in more details. For example, miRNA-disease association data from genetics, epigenetics, circulating miRNAs and miRNA-target interactions were integrated into the database. In addition, HMDD v2.0 presented more data that were generated based on concepts derived from the miRNA-disease association data, including disease spectrum width of miRNAs and miRNA spectrum width of human diseases. Moreover, we provided users a link to download all the data in the HMDD v2.0 and a link to submit novel data into the database. Meanwhile, we also maintained the old version of HMDD. By keeping data sets up-to-date, HMDD should continue to serve as a valuable resource for investigating the roles of miRNAs in human disease.

  10. Occluded Cigarette Smoke Causing Localized Chloracne Like Comedones (Podium) Skin Diseases Associated with Agent Orange and Other Organochlorines

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-05-20

    This document contains an ethical review and approval, from the Department of the Air Force Air Education and Training Command, for a poster ... presentation entitled Skin Diseases Associated with Agent Orange and Other Organochlorines and a podium presentation entitled Occluded Cigarette Smoke Causing Localized Chloracne Like Comedones.

  11. Constructing lncRNA functional similarity network based on lncRNA-disease associations and disease semantic similarity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Xing; Yan, Chenggang Clarence; Luo, Cai; Ji, Wen; Zhang, Yongdong; Dai, Qionghai

    2015-06-10

    Increasing evidence has indicated that plenty of lncRNAs play important roles in many critical biological processes. Developing powerful computational models to construct lncRNA functional similarity network based on heterogeneous biological datasets is one of the most important and popular topics in the fields of both lncRNAs and complex diseases. Functional similarity network construction could benefit the model development for both lncRNA function inference and lncRNA-disease association identification. However, little effort has been attempted to analysis and calculate lncRNA functional similarity on a large scale. In this study, based on the assumption that functionally similar lncRNAs tend to be associated with similar diseases, we developed two novel lncRNA functional similarity calculation models (LNCSIM). LNCSIM was evaluated by introducing similarity scores into the model of Laplacian Regularized Least Squares for LncRNA-Disease Association (LRLSLDA) for lncRNA-disease association prediction. As a result, new predictive models improved the performance of LRLSLDA in the leave-one-out cross validation of various known lncRNA-disease associations datasets. Furthermore, some of the predictive results for colorectal cancer and lung cancer were verified by independent biological experimental studies. It is anticipated that LNCSIM could be a useful and important biological tool for human disease diagnosis, treatment, and prevention.

  12. Isolated Endobronchial Mycobacterium avium Disease Associated with Lobar Atelectasis in an Immunocompetent Young Adult: A Case Report and Literature Review.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hye In; Kim, Ji Won; Kim, Jun Young; Kim, Young Nam; Kim, Jin Hae; Jeong, Byeong-Ho; Chung, Myung Jin; Koh, Won-Jung

    2015-10-01

    The prevalence of lung diseases caused by nontuberculous mycobacteria (NTM) is increasing worldwide. Unlike pulmonary tuberculosis, endobronchial NTM diseases are very rare with the majority of cases reported in patients with human immunodeficiency virus infection and acquired immune deficiency syndrome. We reported a rare case of endobronchial Mycobacterium avium disease associated with lobar atelectasis in a young immunocompetent patient and reviewed the relevant iterature.

  13. Discrepancy between Hepatitis C Virus Genotypes and NS4-Based Serotypes: Association with Their Subgenomic Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Win, Nan Nwe; Nakamoto, Shingo; Kanda, Tatsuo; Takahashi, Hiroki; Takahashi-Nakaguchi, Azusa; Yasui, Shin; Nakamura, Masato; Wu, Shuang; Imazeki, Fumio; Mikami, Shigeru; Yokosuka, Osamu; Gonoi, Tohru; Shirasawa, Hiroshi

    2017-01-01

    Determination of hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes plays an important role in the direct-acting agent era. Discrepancies between HCV genotyping and serotyping assays are occasionally observed. Eighteen samples with discrepant results between genotyping and serotyping methods were analyzed. HCV serotyping and genotyping were based on the HCV nonstructural 4 (NS4) region and 5′-untranslated region (5′-UTR), respectively. HCV core and NS4 regions were chosen to be sequenced and were compared with the genotyping and serotyping results. Deep sequencing was also performed for the corresponding HCV NS4 regions. Seventeen out of 18 discrepant samples could be sequenced by the Sanger method. Both HCV core and NS4 sequences were concordant with that of genotyping in the 5′-UTR in all 17 samples. In cloning analysis of the HCV NS4 region, there were several amino acid variations, but each sequence was much closer to the peptide with the same genotype. Deep sequencing revealed that minor clones with different subgenotypes existed in two of the 17 samples. Genotyping by genome amplification showed high consistency, while several false reactions were detected by serotyping. The deep sequencing method also provides accurate genotyping results and may be useful for analyzing discrepant cases. HCV genotyping should be correctly determined before antiviral treatment. PMID:28106726

  14. High resolution melt analysis (HRMA); a viable alternative to agarose gel electrophoresis for mouse genotyping.

    PubMed

    Thomsen, Nicole; Ali, Radiya G; Ahmed, Jehangir N; Arkell, Ruth M

    2012-01-01

    Most mouse genetics laboratories maintain mouse strains that require genotyping in order to identify the genetically modified animals. The plethora of mutagenesis strategies and publicly available mouse alleles means that any one laboratory may maintain alleles with random or targeted insertions of orthologous or unrelated sequences as well as random or targeted deletions and point mutants. Many experiments require that different strains be cross bred conferring the need to genotype progeny at more than one locus. In contrast to the range of new technologies for mouse mutagenesis, genotyping methods have remained relatively static with alleles typically discriminated by agarose gel electrophoresis of PCR products. This requires a large amount of researcher time. Additionally it is susceptible to contamination of future genotyping experiments because it requires that tubes containing PCR products be opened for analysis. Progress has been made with the genotyping of mouse point mutants because a range of new high-throughput techniques have been developed for the detection of Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms. Some of these techniques are suitable for genotyping point mutants but do not detect insertion or deletion alleles. Ideally, mouse genetics laboratories would use a single, high-throughput platform that enables closed-tube analysis to genotype the entire range of possible insertion and deletion alleles and point mutants. Here we show that High Resolution Melt Analysis meets these criteria, it is suitable for closed-tube genotyping of all allele types and current genotyping assays can be converted to this technology with little or no effort.

  15. Campylobacter coli pulsed field gel electrophoresis genotypic diversity among sows and piglets in a farrowing barn.

    PubMed

    Hume, Michael E; Droleskey, Robert E; Sheffield, Cynthia L; Harvey, Roger B

    2002-08-01

    Genotypes of Campylobacter coli isolates from feces of three sows and rectal swabs of 17 piglets were examined by pulsed field gel electrophoresis (PFGE). All of the animals originated from a single farrowing barn of a farrow-to-finish swine operation. Five Campylobacter colonies were picked from a single agar plate for each sample after broth enrichment and growth on Campy-Cefex agar. Genotypes were examined by PFGE after genomic DNA digestion with SmaI and SacII restriction endonucleases. Twenty SmaI genotypes and 12 SacII genotypes were detected among 99 Campylobacter coli isolates. There was no pattern of shared genotypes between sows and their respective piglets, nor between littermates. Results indicate that a high number of Campylobacter genotypes may coexist in related pigs from a single housing facility.

  16. Molecular characterization and similarity relationships among apricot ( Prunus armeniaca L.) genotypes using simple sequence repeats.

    PubMed

    Hormaza, J.I.

    2002-02-01

    A collection of 48 apricot genotypes, originated from diverse geographic areas, have been screened with 37 SSR primer pairs developed in different species of Prunus in order to identify and characterize the genotypes and establish their genetic relations. Thirty one of those primer pairs resulted in correct amplifications and 20 produced polymorphic repeatable amplification patterns with the 48 genotypes studied. A total of 82 alleles were detected for the 20 loci. All the genotypes studied could be unequivocally distinguished with the combination of SSRs used. The results obtained evidence for the cross-species transportability of microsatellite sequences, allowing the discrimination among different genotypes of a given fruit-tree species with sequences developed in other species. UPGMA cluster analysis of the similarity data grouped the genotypes studied according to their geographic origin and/or their pedigree information.

  17. Atypical Toxoplasma gondii genotype in feral cats from the Fernando de Noronha Island, northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Melo, R P B; Almeida, J C; Lima, D C V; Pedrosa, C M; Magalhães, F J R; Alcântara, A M; Barros, L D; Vieira, R F C; Garcia, J L; Mota, R A

    2016-07-15

    Toxoplasma gondii isolates from Brazil have a different phenotypic and genotypic pattern, with predominance of virulent isolates and recombinant genotypes, compared to the North Hemisphere. Considering that a new T. gondii genotype, non-pathogenic to mice, was previously identified from free-range chickens from the Fernando de Noronha Island, Brazil, this study aimed to identify genotypes of this parasite in tissue samples of feral cats (Felis catus) from this Brazilian Island. Anti-T. gondii IgG antibodies were detected in 18/31 (58%) feral cats. Two non-virulent T. gondii isolates were obtained by mouse bioassay. Genotyping was performed by PCR-RFLP using 10 genetic markers (SAG1, SAG2, SAG3, BTUB, GRA6, c22-8, c29-2, PK1, L358 and Apico) and an atypical strain of T. gondii (ToxoDB #146) was identified. This is the first report of this genotype in feral cats.

  18. Population samples and genotyping technology.

    PubMed

    Mack, S J; Sanchez-Mazas, A; Single, R M; Meyer, D; Hill, J; Dron, H A; Jani, A J; Thomson, G; Erlich, H A

    2007-04-01

    The 14th International HLA (human leukocyte antigen) Immunogenetics Workshop (14th-IHIWS) Biostatistics and Anthropology/Human Genetic Diversity project continues the population sampling, genotype data generation, and biostatistic analyses of the 13th International Histocompatibility Workshop Anthropology/Human Genetic Diversity Component, with the overall goal of further characterizing global HLA allele and haplotype diversity and better describing the relationships between major histocompatibility complex diversity, geography, linguistics, and population history. Since the 13th Workshop, new investigators have and continue to be recruited to the project and new high-resolution class I and class II genotype data are being generated for 112 population samples from around the world.

  19. Genotype imputation via matrix completion

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Eric C.; Zhou, Hua; Chen, Gary K.; Del Vecchyo, Diego Ortega; Lange, Kenneth

    2013-01-01

    Most current genotype imputation methods are model-based and computationally intensive, taking days to impute one chromosome pair on 1000 people. We describe an efficient genotype imputation method based on matrix completion. Our matrix completion method is implemented in MATLAB and tested on real data from HapMap 3, simulated pedigree data, and simulated low-coverage sequencing data derived from the 1000 Genomes Project. Compared with leading imputation programs, the matrix completion algorithm embodied in our program MENDEL-IMPUTE achieves comparable imputation accuracy while reducing run times significantly. Implementation in a lower-level language such as Fortran or C is apt to further improve computational efficiency. PMID:23233546

  20. Strain-Level Differences in Porphyrin Production and Regulation in Propionibacterium acnes Elucidate Disease Associations

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Tremylla; Kang, Dezhi; Barnard, Emma

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Propionibacterium acnes is an important skin commensal, but it is also considered a pathogenic factor in several diseases including acne vulgaris, the most common skin disease. While previous studies have revealed P. acnes strain-level differences in health and disease associations, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain unknown. Recently, we demonstrated that vitamin B12 supplementation increases P. acnes production of porphyrins, a group of proinflammatory metabolites important in acne development (D. Kang, B. Shi, M. C. Erfe, N. Craft, and H. Li, Sci. Transl. Med. 7:293ra103, 2015, doi:10.1126/scitranslmed.aab2009). In this study, we compared the porphyrin production and regulation of multiple P. acnes strains. We revealed that acne-associated type IA-2 strains inherently produced significantly higher levels of porphyrins, which were further enhanced by vitamin B12 supplementation. On the other hand, health-associated type II strains produced low levels of porphyrins and did not respond to vitamin B12. Using a small-molecule substrate and inhibitor, we demonstrated that porphyrin biosynthesis was modulated at the metabolic level. We identified a repressor gene (deoR) of porphyrin biosynthesis that was carried in all health-associated type II strains, but not in acne-associated type IA-2 strains. The expression of deoR suggests additional regulation of porphyrin production at the transcriptional level in health-associated strains. Our findings provide one potential molecular mechanism for the different contributions of P. acnes strains to skin health and disease and support the role of vitamin B12 in acne pathogenesis. Our study emphasizes the importance of understanding the role of the commensal microbial community in health and disease at the strain level and suggests potential utility of health-associated P. acnes strains in acne treatment. IMPORTANCE Propionibacterium acnes is a dominant bacterium residing on skin, and it has been thought

  1. Degradation of the disease-associated prion protein by a serine protease from lichens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Bennett, James P.; Biro, S.M.; Duque-Velasquez, J. C.; Rodriguez, Cynthia M.; Bessen, R.A.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2011-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrPTSE), the probable etiological agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), is resistant to degradation and can persist in the environment. Lichens, mutualistic symbioses containing fungi, algae, bacteria and occasionally cyanobacteria, are ubiquitous in the environment and have evolved unique biological activities allowing their survival in challenging ecological niches. We investigated PrPTSE inactivation by lichens and found acetone extracts of three lichen species (Parmelia sulcata, Cladonia rangiferina and Lobaria pulmonaria) have the ability to degrade prion protein (PrP) from TSE-infected hamsters, mice and deer. Immunoblots measuring PrP levels and protein misfolding cyclic amplification indicated at least two logs of reductions in PrPTSE. Degradative activity was not found in closely related lichen species or in algae or a cyanobacterium that inhabit lichens. Degradation was blocked by Pefabloc SC, a serine protease inhibitor, but not inhibitors of other proteases or enzymes. Additionally, we found that PrP levels in PrPTSE-enriched preps or infected brain homogenates are also reduced following exposure to freshly-collected P. sulcata or an aqueous extract of the lichen. Our findings indicate that these lichen extracts efficiently degrade PrPTSE and suggest that some lichens could have potential to inactivate TSE infectivity on the landscape or be a source for agents to degrade prions. Further work to clone and characterize the protease, assess its effect on TSE infectivity and determine which organism or organisms present in lichens produce or influence the protease activity is warranted.

  2. Degradation of the disease-associated prion protein by a serine protease from lichens.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.J.; Bennett, J.P.; Biro, S.M.; Duque-Velasquez, J. C.; Rodriguez, C.M.; Bessen, R.A.; Rocke, T.E.

    2011-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrPTSE), the probable etiological agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), is resistant to degradation and can persist in the environment. Lichens, mutualistic symbioses containing fungi, algae, bacteria and occasionally cyanobacteria, are ubiquitous in the environment and have evolved unique biological activities allowing their survival in challenging ecological niches. We investigated PrPTSE inactivation by lichens and found acetone extracts of three lichen species (Parmelia sulcata, Cladonia rangiferina and Lobaria pulmonaria) have the ability to degrade prion protein (PrP) from TSE-infected hamsters, mice and deer. Immunoblots measuring PrP levels and protein misfolding cyclic amplification indicated at least two logs of reductions in PrPTSE. Degradative activity was not found in closely related lichen species or in algae or a cyanobacterium that inhabit lichens. Degradation was blocked by Pefabloc SC, a serine protease inhibitor, but not inhibitors of other proteases or enzymes. Additionally, we found that PrP levels in PrPTSE-enriched preps or infected brain homogenates are also reduced following exposure to freshly-collected P. sulcata or an aqueous extract of the lichen. Our findings indicate that these lichen extracts efficiently degrade PrPTSE and suggest that some lichens could have potential to inactivate TSE infectivity on the landscape or be a source for agents to degrade prions. Further work to clone and characterize the protease, assess its effect on TSE infectivity and determine which organism or organisms present in lichens produce or influence the protease activity is warranted.

  3. Degradation of the disease-associated prion protein by a serine protease from lichens

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.J.; Bennett, J.P.; Biro, S.M.; Duque-Velasquez, J.C.; Rodriguez, C.M.; Bessen, R.A.; Rocke, T.E.; Bartz, Jason C.

    2011-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrP(TSE)), the probable etiological agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), is resistant to degradation and can persist in the environment. Lichens, mutualistic symbioses containing fungi, algae, bacteria and occasionally cyanobacteria, are ubiquitous in the environment and have evolved unique biological activities allowing their survival in challenging ecological niches. We investigated PrP(TSE) inactivation by lichens and found acetone extracts of three lichen species (Parmelia sulcata, Cladonia rangiferina and Lobaria pulmonaria) have the ability to degrade prion protein (PrP) from TSE-infected hamsters, mice and deer. Immunoblots measuring PrP levels and protein misfolding cyclic amplification indicated at least two logs of reductions in PrP(TSE). Degradative activity was not found in closely related lichen species or in algae or a cyanobacterium that inhabit lichens. Degradation was blocked by Pefabloc SC, a serine protease inhibitor, but not inhibitors of other proteases or enzymes. Additionally, we found that PrP levels in PrP(TSE)-enriched preps or infected brain homogenates are also reduced following exposure to freshly-collected P. sulcata or an aqueous extract of the lichen. Our findings indicate that these lichen extracts efficiently degrade PrP(TSE) and suggest that some lichens could have potential to inactivate TSE infectivity on the landscape or be a source for agents to degrade prions. Further work to clone and characterize the protease, assess its effect on TSE infectivity and determine which organism or organisms present in lichens produce or influence the protease activity is warranted.

  4. Neurotoxicity of the Parkinson Disease-Associated Pesticide Ziram Is Synuclein-Dependent in Zebrafish Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Lulla, Aaron; Barnhill, Lisa; Bitan, Gal; Ivanova, Magdalena I.; Nguyen, Binh; O’Donnell, Kelley; Stahl, Mark C.; Yamashiro, Chase; Klärner, Frank-Gerrit; Schrader, Thomas; Sagasti, Alvaro; Bronstein, Jeff M.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Exposure to the commonly used dithiocarbamate (DTC) pesticides is associated with an increased risk of developing Parkinson disease (PD), although the mechanisms by which they exert their toxicity are not completely understood. Objective: We studied the mechanisms of ziram’s (a DTC fungicide) neurotoxicity in vivo. Methods: Zebrafish (ZF) embryos were utilized to determine ziram’s effects on behavior, neuronal toxicity, and the role of synuclein in its toxicity. Results: Nanomolar-range concentrations of ziram caused selective loss of dopaminergic (DA) neurons and impaired swimming behavior. Because ziram increases α-synuclein (α-syn) concentrations in rat primary neuronal cultures, we investigated the effect of ziram on ZF γ-synuclein 1 (γ1). ZF express 3 synuclein isoforms, and ZF γ1 appears to be the closest functional homologue to α-syn. We found that recombinant ZF γ1 formed fibrils in vitro, and overexpression of ZF γ1 in ZF embryos led to the formation of neuronal aggregates and neurotoxicity in a manner similar to that of α-syn. Importantly, knockdown of ZF γ1 with morpholinos and disruption of oligomers with the molecular tweezer CLR01 prevented ziram’s DA toxicity. Conclusions: These data show that ziram is selectively toxic to DA neurons in vivo, and this toxicity is synuclein-dependent. These findings have important implications for understanding the mechanisms by which pesticides may cause PD. Citation: Lulla A, Barnhill L, Bitan G, Ivanova MI, Nguyen B, O’Donnell K, Stahl MC, Yamashiro C, Klärner FG, Schrader T, Sagasti A, Bronstein JM. 2016. Neurotoxicity of the Parkinson disease-associated pesticide ziram is synuclein-dependent in zebrafish embryos. Environ Health Perspect 124:1766–1775; http://dx.doi.org/10.1289/EHP141 PMID:27301718

  5. Degradation of the disease-associated prion protein by a serine protease from lichens.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Christopher J; Bennett, James P; Biro, Steven M; Duque-Velasquez, Juan Camilo; Rodriguez, Cynthia M; Bessen, Richard A; Rocke, Tonie E

    2011-05-11

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrP(TSE)), the probable etiological agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), is resistant to degradation and can persist in the environment. Lichens, mutualistic symbioses containing fungi, algae, bacteria and occasionally cyanobacteria, are ubiquitous in the environment and have evolved unique biological activities allowing their survival in challenging ecological niches. We investigated PrP(TSE) inactivation by lichens and found acetone extracts of three lichen species (Parmelia sulcata, Cladonia rangiferina and Lobaria pulmonaria) have the ability to degrade prion protein (PrP) from TSE-infected hamsters, mice and deer. Immunoblots measuring PrP levels and protein misfolding cyclic amplification indicated at least two logs of reductions in PrP(TSE). Degradative activity was not found in closely related lichen species or in algae or a cyanobacterium that inhabit lichens. Degradation was blocked by Pefabloc SC, a serine protease inhibitor, but not inhibitors of other proteases or enzymes. Additionally, we found that PrP levels in PrP(TSE)-enriched preps or infected brain homogenates are also reduced following exposure to freshly-collected P. sulcata or an aqueous extract of the lichen. Our findings indicate that these lichen extracts efficiently degrade PrP(TSE) and suggest that some lichens could have potential to inactivate TSE infectivity on the landscape or be a source for agents to degrade prions. Further work to clone and characterize the protease, assess its effect on TSE infectivity and determine which organism or organisms present in lichens produce or influence the protease activity is warranted.

  6. HDL-S1P: cardiovascular functions, disease-associated alterations, and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Levkau, Bodo

    2015-01-01

    Sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) is a bioactive sphingolipid contained in High-density lipoproteins (HDL) and has drawn considerable attention in the lipoprotein field as numerous studies have demonstrated its contribution to several functions inherent to HDL. Some of them are partly and some entirely due to the S1P contained in HDL (HDL-S1P). Despite the presence of over 1000 different lipids in HDL, S1P stands out as it possesses its own cell surface receptors through which it exercises key physiological functions. Most of the S1P in human plasma is associated with HDL, and the amount of HDL-S1P influences the quality and quantity of HDL-dependent functions. The main binding partner of S1P in HDL is apolipoprotein M but others may also exist particularly under conditions of acute S1P elevations. HDL not only exercise functions through their S1P content but have also an impact on genuine S1P signaling by influencing S1P bioactivity and receptor presentation. HDL-S1P content is altered in human diseases such as atherosclerosis, coronary artery disease, myocardial infarction, renal insufficiency and diabetes mellitus. Low HDL-S1P has also been linked to impaired HDL functions associated with these disorders. Although the pathophysiological and molecular reasons for such disease-associated shifts in HDL-S1P are little understood, there have been successful approaches to circumvent their adverse implications by pharmacologically increasing HDL-S1P as means to improve HDL function. This mini-review will cover the current understanding of the contribution of HDL-S1P to physiological HDL function, its alteration in disease and ways for its restoration to correct HDL dysfunction.

  7. Scoring multiple features to predict drug disease associations using information fusion and aggregation.

    PubMed

    Moghadam, H; Rahgozar, M; Gharaghani, S

    2016-08-01

    Prediction of drug-disease associations is one of the current fields in drug repositioning that has turned into a challenging topic in pharmaceutical science. Several available computational methods use network-based and machine learning approaches to reposition old drugs for new indications. However, they often ignore features of drugs and diseases as well as the priority and importance of each feature, relation, or interactions between features and the degree of uncertainty. When predicting unknown drug-disease interactions there are diverse data sources and multiple features available that can provide more accurate and reliable results. This information can be collectively mined using data fusion methods and aggregation operators. Therefore, we can use the feature fusion method to make high-level features. We have proposed a computational method named scored mean kernel fusion (SMKF), which uses a new method to score the average aggregation operator called scored mean. To predict novel drug indications, this method systematically combines multiple features related to drugs or diseases at two levels: the drug-drug level and the drug-disease level. The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of drug and disease features as well as data fusion to predict drug-disease interactions. The method was validated against a well-established drug-disease gold-standard dataset. When compared with the available methods, our proposed method outperformed them and competed well in performance with area under cover (AUC) of 0.91, F-measure of 84.9% and Matthews correlation coefficient of 70.31%.

  8. Decoding the disease-associated proteins encoded in the human chromosome 4.

    PubMed

    Chen, Lien-Chin; Liu, Mei-Ying; Hsiao, Yung-Chin; Choong, Wai-Kok; Wu, Hsin-Yi; Hsu, Wen-Lian; Liao, Pao-Chi; Sung, Ting-Yi; Tsai, Shih-Feng; Yu, Jau-Song; Chen, Yu-Ju

    2013-01-04

    Chromosome 4 is the fourth largest chromosome, containing approximately 191 megabases (~6.4% of the human genome) with 757 protein-coding genes. A number of marker genes for many diseases have been found in this chromosome, including genetic diseases (e.g., hepatocellular carcinoma) and biomedical research (cardiac system, aging, metabolic disorders, immune system, cancer and stem cell) related genes (e.g., oncogenes, growth factors). As a pilot study for the chromosome 4-centric human proteome project (Chr 4-HPP), we present here a systematic analysis of the disease association, protein isoforms, coding single nucleotide polymorphisms of these 757 protein-coding genes and their experimental evidence at the protein level. We also describe how the findings from the chromosome 4 project might be used to drive the biomarker discovery and validation study in disease-oriented projects, using the examples of secretomic and membrane proteomic approaches in cancer research. By integrating with cancer cell secretomes and several other existing databases in the public domain, we identified 141 chromosome 4-encoded proteins as cancer cell-secretable/shedable proteins. Additionally, we also identified 54 chromosome 4-encoded proteins that have been classified as cancer-associated proteins with successful selected or multiple reaction monitoring (SRM/MRM) assays developed. From literature annotation and topology analysis, 271 proteins were recognized as membrane proteins while 27.9% of the 757 proteins do not have any experimental evidence at the protein-level. In summary, the analysis revealed that the chromosome 4 is a rich resource for cancer-associated proteins for biomarker verification projects and for drug target discovery projects.

  9. Degradation of the Disease-Associated Prion Protein by a Serine Protease from Lichens

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Christopher J.; Bennett, James P.; Biro, Steven M.; Duque-Velasquez, Juan Camilo; Rodriguez, Cynthia M.; Bessen, Richard A.; Rocke, Tonie E.

    2011-01-01

    The disease-associated prion protein (PrPTSE), the probable etiological agent of the transmissible spongiform encephalopathies (TSEs), is resistant to degradation and can persist in the environment. Lichens, mutualistic symbioses containing fungi, algae, bacteria and occasionally cyanobacteria, are ubiquitous in the environment and have evolved unique biological activities allowing their survival in challenging ecological niches. We investigated PrPTSE inactivation by lichens and found acetone extracts of three lichen species (Parmelia sulcata, Cladonia rangiferina and Lobaria pulmonaria) have the ability to degrade prion protein (PrP) from TSE-infected hamsters, mice and deer. Immunoblots measuring PrP levels and protein misfolding cyclic amplification indicated at least two logs of reductions in PrPTSE. Degradative activity was not found in closely related lichen species or in algae or a cyanobacterium that inhabit lichens. Degradation was blocked by Pefabloc SC, a serine protease inhibitor, but not inhibitors of other proteases or enzymes. Additionally, we found that PrP levels in PrPTSE-enriched preps or infected brain homogenates are also reduced following exposure to freshly-collected P. sulcata or an aqueous extract of the lichen. Our findings indicate that these lichen extracts efficiently degrade PrPTSE and suggest that some lichens could have potential to inactivate TSE infectivity on the landscape or be a source for agents to degrade prions. Further work to clone and characterize the protease, assess its effect on TSE infectivity and determine which organism or organisms present in lichens produce or influence the protease activity is warranted. PMID:21589935

  10. Two-temperature LATE-PCR endpoint genotyping

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez, J Aquiles; Abramowitz, Jessica D; Salk, Jesse J; Reis, Arthur H; Rice, John E; Pierce, Kenneth E; Wangh, Lawrence J

    2006-01-01

    Background In conventional PCR, total amplicon yield becomes independent of starting template number as amplification reaches plateau and varies significantly among replicate reactions. This paper describes a strategy for reconfiguring PCR so that the signal intensity of a single fluorescent detection probe after PCR thermal cycling reflects genomic composition. The resulting method corrects for product yield variations among replicate amplification reactions, permits resolution of homozygous and heterozygous genotypes based on endpoint fluorescence signal intensities, and readily identifies imbalanced allele ratios equivalent to those arising from gene/chromosomal duplications. Furthermore, the use of only a single colored probe for genotyping enhances the multiplex detection capacity of the assay. Results Two-Temperature LATE-PCR endpoint genotyping combines Linear-After-The-Exponential (LATE)-PCR (an advanced form of asymmetric PCR that efficiently generates single-stranded DNA) and mismatch-tolerant probes capable of detecting allele-specific targets at high temperature and total single-stranded amplicons at a lower temperature in the same reaction. The method is demonstrated here for genotyping single-nucleotide alleles of the human HEXA gene responsible for Tay-Sachs disease and for genotyping SNP alleles near the human p53 tumor suppressor gene. In each case, the final probe signals were normalized against total single-stranded DNA generated in the same reaction. Normalization reduces the coefficient of variation among replicates from 17.22% to as little as 2.78% and permits endpoint genotyping with >99.7% accuracy. These assays are robust because they are consistent over a wide range of input DNA concentrations and give the same results regardless of how many cycles of linear amplification have elapsed. The method is also sufficiently powerful to distinguish between samples with a 1:1 ratio of two alleles from samples comprised of 2:1 and 1:2 ratios of the

  11. Using Hamming Distance as Information for SNP-Sets Clustering and Testing in Disease Association Studies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Charlotte; Kao, Wen-Hsin; Hsiao, Chuhsing Kate

    2015-01-01

    The availability of high-throughput genomic data has led to several challenges in recent genetic association studies, including the large number of genetic variants that must be considered and the computational complexity in statistical analyses. Tackling these problems with a marker-set study such as SNP-set analysis can be an efficient solution. To construct SNP-sets, we first propose a clustering algorithm, which employs Hamming distance to measure the similarity between strings of SNP genotypes and evaluates whether the given SNPs or SNP-sets should be clustered. A dendrogram can then be constructed based on such distance measure, and the number of clusters can be determined. With the resulting SNP-sets, we next develop an association test HDAT to examine susceptibility to the disease of interest. This proposed test assesses, based on Hamming distance, whether the similarity between a diseased and a normal individual differs from the similarity between two individuals of the same disease status. In our proposed methodology, only genotype information is needed. No inference of haplotypes is required, and SNPs under consideration do not need to locate in nearby regions. The proposed clustering algorithm and association test are illustrated with applications and simulation studies. As compared with other existing methods, the clustering algorithm is faster and better at identifying sets containing SNPs exerting a similar effect. In addition, the simulation studies demonstrated that the proposed test works well for SNP-sets containing a large proportion of neutral SNPs. Furthermore, employing the clustering algorithm before testing a large set of data improves the knowledge in confining the genetic regions for susceptible genetic markers.

  12. Genotype networks in metabolic reaction spaces

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A metabolic genotype comprises all chemical reactions an organism can catalyze via enzymes encoded in its genome. A genotype is viable in a given environment if it is capable of producing all biomass components the organism needs to survive and reproduce. Previous work has focused on the properties of individual genotypes while little is known about how genome-scale metabolic networks with a given function can vary in their reaction content. Results We here characterize spaces of such genotypes. Specifically, we study metabolic genotypes whose phenotype is viability in minimal chemical environments that differ in their sole carbon sources. We show that regardless of the number of reactions in a metabolic genotype, the genotypes of a given phenotype typically form vast, connected, and unstructured sets -- genotype networks -- that nearly span the whole of genotype space. The robustness of metabolic phenotypes to random reaction removal in such spaces has a narrow distribution with a high mean. Different carbon sources differ in the number of metabolic genotypes in their genotype network; this number decreases as a genotype is required to be viable on increasing numbers of carbon sources, but much less than if metabolic reactions were used independently across different chemical environments. Conclusions Our work shows that phenotype-preserving genotype networks have generic organizational properties and that these properties are insensitive to the number of reactions in metabolic genotypes. PMID:20302636

  13. PBMDA: A novel and effective path-based computational model for miRNA-disease association prediction.

    PubMed

    You, Zhu-Hong; Huang, Zhi-An; Zhu, Zexuan; Yan, Gui-Ying; Li, Zheng-Wei; Wen, Zhenkun; Chen, Xing

    2017-03-24

    In the recent few years, an increasing number of studies have shown that microRNAs (miRNAs) play critical roles in many fundamental and important biological processes. As one of pathogenetic factors, the molecular mechanisms underlying human complex diseases still have not been completely understood from the perspective of miRNA. Predicting potential miRNA-disease associations makes important contributions to understanding the pathogenesis of diseases, developing new drugs, and formulating individualized diagnosis and treatment for diverse human complex diseases. Instead of only depending on expensive and time-consuming biological experiments, computational prediction models are effective by predicting potential miRNA-disease associations, prioritizing candidate miRNAs for the investigated diseases, and selecting those miRNAs with higher association probabilities for further experimental validation. In this study, Path-Based MiRNA-Disease Association (PBMDA) prediction model was proposed by integrating known human miRNA-disease associations, miRNA functional similarity, disease semantic similarity, and Gaussian interaction profile kernel similarity for miRNAs and diseases. This model constructed a heterogeneous graph consisting of three interlinked sub-graphs and further adopted depth-first search algorithm to infer potential miRNA-disease associations. As a result, PBMDA achieved reliable performance in the frameworks of both local and global LOOCV (AUCs of 0.8341 and 0.9169, respectively) and 5-fold cross validation (average AUC of 0.9172). In the cases studies of three important human diseases, 88% (Esophageal Neoplasms), 88% (Kidney Neoplasms) and 90% (Colon Neoplasms) of top-50 predicted miRNAs have been manually confirmed by previous experimental reports from literatures. Through the comparison performance between PBMDA and other previous models in case studies, the reliable performance also demonstrates that PBMDA could serve as a powerful computational tool

  14. Transforming Microbial Genotyping: A Robotic Pipeline for Genotyping Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Velayudhan, Vimalkumar; Murphy, Ronan A.; Achtman, Mark

    2012-01-01

    Microbial genotyping increasingly deals with large numbers of samples, and data are commonly evaluated by unstructured approaches, such as spread-sheets. The efficiency, reliability and throughput of genotyping would benefit from the automation of manual manipulations within the context of sophisticated data storage. We developed a medium- throughput genotyping pipeline for MultiLocus Sequence Typing (MLST) of bacterial pathogens. This pipeline was implemented through a combination of four automated liquid handling systems, a Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) consisting of a variety of dedicated commercial operating systems and programs, including a Sample Management System, plus numerous Python scripts. All tubes and microwell racks were bar-coded and their locations and status were recorded in the LIMS. We also created a hierarchical set of items that could be used to represent bacterial species, their products and experiments. The LIMS allowed reliable, semi-automated, traceable bacterial genotyping from initial single colony isolation and sub-cultivation through DNA extraction and normalization to PCRs, sequencing and MLST sequence trace evaluation. We also describe robotic sequencing to facilitate cherrypicking of sequence dropouts. This pipeline is user-friendly, with a throughput of 96 strains within 10 working days at a total cost of < €25 per strain. Since developing this pipeline, >200,000 items were processed by two to three people. Our sophisticated automated pipeline can be implemented by a small microbiology group without extensive external support, and provides a general framework for semi-automated bacterial genotyping of large numbers of samples at low cost. PMID:23144721

  15. Clinical and Serological Variation between Patients Infected with Different Hepatitis B Virus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Kidd-Ljunggren, Karin; Myhre, Erling; Bläckberg, Jonas

    2004-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) has eight genotypes which have distinct geographical distributions. Studies comparing differences in the clinical outcomes of infections caused by strains with genotype-related variations in the HBV genome have largely compared genotypes B and C and genotypes A and D but not all four genotypes. The present study included 196 HBV-infected patients attending an infectious diseases outpatient clinic in Sweden. The age and geographic origin, liver function, HBeAg and anti-HBe status, and the presence or absence of HBV DNA were analyzed for each patient. HBV DNA was detected in 144 patients, and the HBV genotype and the core promoter and precore sequences were determined for the isolates from 101 of these patients. Among the patients who might be considered most likely to be nonviremic, namely, anti-HBe-positive HBV carriers with normal alanine aminotransferase (ALT) levels, 65% had detectable HBV DNA and were thus viremic. Among the viremic patients, HBeAg-positive patients were more likely to have elevated ALT levels than anti-HBe-positive patients. HBV genotypes A to F were represented in the study, and their distributions coincided accurately with the origin of the patient. A significantly higher number of genotype D-infected patients were anti-HBe positive and had elevated ALT levels (42% of genotype D-infected patients but 0% of patients infected with genotypes B and C). Genotype D strains with mutations in the core promoter and precore regions were significantly correlated with elevated ALT levels in the patients. The differences were not age related. Therefore, in this large-scale cross-sectional study, genotype D appears to be associated with more active disease. PMID:15583320

  16. Genotyping of cutaneous melanoma.

    PubMed

    Glitza, Isabella C; Davies, Michael A

    2014-09-01

    Until recently, treatment options for patients with metastatic melanoma were very limited. This landscape has evolved dramatically since the discovery of activating mutations in the BRAF gene in ~45% of cutaneous melanomas. Vemurafenib, dabrafenib, and trametinib have all received regulatory approval for the treatment of metastatic melanoma patients with a BRAF(V600) mutation. Based on the necessity to document the presence of a BRAF(V600) mutation to prescribe these agents, molecular testing is now the standard of care in this disease. However, the options and rationale for testing are evolving rapidly due to an improved understanding of the molecular drivers and heterogeneity of melanoma. Such testing may identify rational combinatorial approaches to prevent or overcome resistance for the approved BRAF inhibitors. In addition, new clinical strategies have been identified for a number of other molecular changes that are detected in this disease, including somatic changes in NRAS, PTEN, CDKN2A, and c-KIT, among others. This review summarizes the current understanding of the genetic landscape of mutations in melanoma, their associations with clinicopathological features, and their implications for clinical testing and treatment.

  17. Hepatitis C virus genotypes in north eastern Algeria: A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Rouabhia, Samir; Sadelaoud, Mourad; Chaabna-Mokrane, Karima; Toumi, Wided; Abenavoli, Ludovico

    2013-01-01

    AIM: To determine the frequency of various hepatitis C virus (HCV) genotypes present in patients from north eastern Algeria. METHODS: This is a retrospective cross-sectional study of 435 HCV infected patients from northeast Algeria, detected in the Sadelaoud laboratory and diagnosed between January 2010 and December 2012. The patients were diagnosed with HCV infection in their local hospitals and referred to be assessed for HCV genotype before the antiviral treatment. Demographic information (sex, age and address), genotype, subtype and viral load were retrieved from the patient medical records. The serum samples were tested by the type-specific genotyping assay. RESULTS: The majority of the patients (82.5%) were from the central part of the examined region (P = 0.002). The mean age of the patients studied was 53.6 ± 11.5 years. HCV genotype 1 was the most frequent (88.7%), followed by genotypes 2 (8.5%), 4 (1.1%), 3 (0.9%) and 5 (0.2%). Genotype 6 was not detected in these patients. Mixed infection across the HCV subtypes was detected in twenty patients (4.6%). The genotype distribution was related to age and region. Genotype 1 was significantly less frequent in the ≥ 60 age group than in the younger age group (OR = 0.2; 95%CI: 0.1-0.5, P < 0.001). Furthermore, genotype 1 was more frequent in the central part of the examined region than elsewhere (P < 0.01). CONCLUSION: The HCV genotype (type 1b was dominant) distribution in Algeria is different from those in other northern countries of Africa. PMID:23898373

  18. Genotyping with TaqMAMA.

    PubMed

    Li, Baohui; Kadura, Ibrahim; Fu, Dong-Jing; Watson, David E

    2004-02-01

    TaqMAMA combines the quantitative strengths of TaqMan with the allele-specific PCR of MAMA. In this article we develop TaqMAMA as a technique for screening human DNA samples for known genetic polymorphisms. In the first set of experiments, plasmids that model all types of genetic polymorphisms were used to understand the relationship between TaqMAMA primer/template mismatches and their strength of allelic discrimination. These data can be used to improve allelic discrimination of other primer extension genotyping methodologies through directed use of nucleotide mismatches. We used the data to derive a guide for TaqMAMA primer design and DNA strand selection for TaqMAMA genotyping assays. The guide was then used to develop assays for 11 known and novel human genetic polymorphisms. Genotypes were assigned quickly and accurately in all cases. TaqMAMA genotyping assays require minimal development time, have a high probability of success, produce reliable data that are straightforward to analyze, and are very cost-competitive.

  19. Noninvasive genotyping of common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) by fingernail PCR.

    PubMed

    Takabayashi, Shuji; Katoh, Hideki

    2015-07-01

    The common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a New World primate that is a useful model for medical studies. In this study, we report a convenient, reliable, and noninvasive procedure to genotype a living common marmoset by using fingernails. This method was used to successfully genotype DNA by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) PCR without prior purification, by using the KOD FX PCR enzyme kit. Additionally, there is no sample contamination from hematopoietic chimera derived from fused placenta in utero. We compared chimeric levels between various tissues in females with male littermates using quantitative fluorescent (QF)-PCR to prepare a reliable DNA source for genetic analyses, such as genotyping, gene mapping, or genomic sequencing. The chimerism detected appeared to be restricted to lymphatic tissues, such as bone marrow, thymus, spleen, lymph nodes and blood cells. As a result, DNA from fingernails with the quick is the best DNA source for genetic research in living marmosets.

  20. Bridging the Gap between Genotype and Phenotype via Network Approaches

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yoo-Ah; Przytycka, Teresa M.

    2013-01-01

    In the last few years we have witnessed tremendous progress in detecting associations between genetic variations and complex traits. While genome-wide association studies have been able to discover genomic regions that may influence many common human diseases, these discoveries created an urgent need for methods that extend the knowledge of genotype-phenotype relationships to the level of the molecular mechanisms behind them. To address this emerging need, computational approaches increasingly utilize a pathway-centric perspective. These new methods often utilize known or predicted interactions between genes and/or gene products. In this review, we survey recently developed network based methods that attempt to bridge the genotype-phenotype gap. We note that although these methods help narrow the gap between genotype and phenotype relationships, these approaches alone cannot provide the precise details of underlying mechanisms and current research is still far from closing the gap. PMID:23755063

  1. Sources of Hepatitis E Virus Genotype 3 in the Netherlands

    PubMed Central

    Lodder, Willemijn J.; Lodder-Verschoor, Froukje; van den Berg, Harold H.J.L.; Vennema, Harry; Duizer, Erwin; Koopmans, Marion; de Roda Husman, Ana Maria

    2009-01-01

    Non–travel-related hepatitis E virus (HEV) genotype 3 infections in persons in the Netherlands may have a zoonotic, foodborne, or water-borne origin. Possible reservoirs for HEV transmission by water, food, and animals were studied. HEV genotype 3/open reading frame 2 sequences were detected in 53% of pig farms, 4% of wild boar feces, and 17% of surface water samples. HEV sequences grouped within 4 genotype 3 clusters, of which 1 is so far unique to the Netherlands. The 2 largest clusters contained 35% and 43% of the animal and environmental sequences and 75% and 6%, respectively, of human HEV sequences obtained from a study on Dutch hepatitis E patients. This finding suggests that infection risk may be also dependent on transmission routes other than the ones currently studied. Besides the route of exposure, virus characteristics may be an important determinant for HEV disease in humans. PMID:19239749

  2. Prevalence of bovine dermatophilosis and disease-associated alleles in zebu Goudali cattle and their Italian Simmental crosses ranching in the western highland plateau savannah of Cameroon.

    PubMed

    Ojong, Bessong Willington; Saccà, Elena; Bessong, Pascal; Piasentier, Edi

    2016-10-01

    Abundance of native pastures makes Cameroon's western highland savannah (WHS) a hotspot for low-input beef-type cattle. Dumbo Ranch is central to cattle seed stock multiplication in WHS and holds that Dermatophilus congolensis infection undermines production. The bovine BoLA-DRB3 has been variously demonstrated as the principal gene of the major histocompatibility locus associated with immunity and resistance to dermatophilosis in cattle. We studied the profile of dermatophilosis prevalence in zebu Goudali (G) and its Simmental composite, SimGoud (SG), at Dumbo Ranch and determined the distribution of a dermatophilosis-associated susceptibility allele of the BoLA-DRB3 gene by allele-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We recorded a 42 % prevalence of dermatophilosis in the studied cohort (337 animals). Dermatophilosis was more common in older cattle than in cattle ≤36 months (p ≤ 0.05). G was more affected compared to SG, because of the prevalence of the disease in the oldest animals and the age distribution of the experimental subjects. No susceptible homozygote was observed. About 85 and 15 % of the cohort carried the homozygous resistant and heterozygous condition, respectively. This genotype distribution was not affected by cattle type. The study confirms the presence of dermatophilosis among G and SG cattle in WHS. However, there was no correlation between the presence of the disease-associated susceptible allele considered and clinical manifestation. Screening for this dermatophilosis resistance-associated allele of BoLA-DRB3 gene appeared not useful for selection of G and SG in WHS.

  3. Short communication: Plasma levels of vitamin D in HIV patients initiating antiretroviral therapy do not predict immune restoration disease associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Price, Patricia; Haddow, Lewis J; Affandi, Jacquita; Agarwal, Upasna; Easterbrook, Philippa J; Elliott, Julian; French, Martyn; Kumar, Manoj; Moosa, Mahomed-Yunus S; Oliver, Benjamin; Singh, Sarman; Sola, Marcelo; Saphonn, Vonthanak; Vun, Mean Chhi

    2012-10-01

    Immune restoration disease associated with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (TB IRD) is clinically important among HIV patients commencing antiretroviral therapy in countries where tuberculosis is endemic. Vitamin D affects dendritic cell and T cell function and the antimicrobial activity of monocytes. Plasma levels of vitamin D and polymorphisms in the vitamin D receptor may affect tuberculosis, and HIV infection associates with vitamin D deficiency. Here we assess whether plasma vitamin D levels may predict TB IRD. Samples were available from prospective studies of TB IRD in Cambodia (26 cases), India (19 cases), and South Africa (29 cases). IRD cases and controls from each site were similar in age and baseline CD4(+) T cell count. Plasma samples were assessed using 25(OH) vitamin D immunoassay plates. DNA samples were available from a subset of patients and were genotyped for the VDR FokI (F/f) [C/T, rs10735810] SNP. When data from each cohort were pooled to assess ethnic/geographic differences, 25(OH)D levels were higher in Cambodian than Indian or South African patients (p<0.0001) and higher in South African than Indian patients (p<0.0001). TB IRD was not associated with differences in levels of 25(OH)D in any cohort (p=0.36-0.82), irrespective of the patients' prior TB diagnoses/treatment. Carriage of the minor allele of VDR FokI (F/f) was marginally associated with TB IRD in Indian patients (p=0.06) with no association in Cambodians. Neither plasma levels of vitamin D nor the vitamin D allele will usefully predict TB IRD in diverse populations from TB endemic regions.

  4. Development of SNP-genotyping arrays in two shellfish species.

    PubMed

    Lapègue, S; Harrang, E; Heurtebise, S; Flahauw, E; Donnadieu, C; Gayral, P; Ballenghien, M; Genestout, L; Barbotte, L; Mahla, R; Haffray, P; Klopp, C

    2014-07-01

    Use of SNPs has been favoured due to their abundance in plant and animal genomes, accompanied by the falling cost and rising throughput capacity for detection and genotyping. Here, we present in vitro (obtained from targeted sequencing) and in silico discovery of SNPs, and the design of medium-throughput genotyping arrays for two oyster species, the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, and European flat oyster, Ostrea edulis. Two sets of 384 SNP markers were designed for two Illumina GoldenGate arrays and genotyped on more than 1000 samples for each species. In each case, oyster samples were obtained from wild and selected populations and from three-generation families segregating for traits of interest in aquaculture. The rate of successfully genotyped polymorphic SNPs was about 60% for each species. Effects of SNP origin and quality on genotyping success (Illumina functionality Score) were analysed and compared with other model and nonmodel species. Furthermore, a simulation was made based on a subset of the C. gigas SNP array with a minor allele frequency of 0.3 and typical crosses used in shellfish hatcheries. This simulation indicated that at least 150 markers were needed to perform an accurate parental assignment. Such panels might provide valuable tools to improve our understanding of the connectivity between wild (and selected) populations and could contribute to future selective breeding programmes.

  5. Novel genotype of Tritrichomonas foetus from cattle in Southern Africa.

    PubMed

    Casteriano, Andrea; Molini, Umberto; Kandjumbwa, Kornelia; Khaiseb, Siegfried; Frey, Caroline F; Šlapeta, Jan

    2016-12-01

    Bovine trichomonosis caused by Tritrichomonas foetus is a significant reproductive disease of cattle. Preputial samples were collected using sheath washing technique in bulls in Namibia. Thirty-six trichomonad cultures were characterized using the TaqMan-probe commercial real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) diagnostic assay (VetMAX™-Gold Trich Detection Kit) and CYBR real-time PCR assay based on TFR3/4 primers. Diagnostic real-time PCRs and DNA sequencing of the internal transcribed region confirmed presence of T. foetus in 35 out of 36 samples. Multilocus genotyping using cysteine proteases (CP1, CP2, CP4, CP5, CP6, CP7, CP8, CP9) and malate dehydrogenase (MDH1) gene sequences demonstrate that the T. foetus in Namibia are genetically distinct from those characterized elsewhere. We report the discovery of a novel genotype of T. foetus in Namibian cattle, distinct from other T. foetus genotypes in Europe, South and North America and Australia. We suggest recognition of a 'Southern African' genotype of T. foetus. Identification of the new genotype of T. foetus demonstrates the need for wider global sampling to fully understand the diversity and origin of T. foetus causing disease in cattle or cats.

  6. High prevalences of infection with Giardia intestinalis genotype B among children in urban and rural areas of Argentina

    PubMed Central

    Molina, N; Minvielle, M; Grenóvero, S; Salomón, C; Basualdo, J

    2011-01-01

    The protozoan parasite most frequently associated with diarrhoea worldwide is Giardia intestinalis. In 2005, a study was initiated to identify the genotypes of this parasite infecting children in the Argentinian provinces of Buenos Aires, Mendoza and Chaco, and to explore the associations between the genotype detected in a child, the characteristics of the child’s household and the child’s clinical presentation. Overall, 998 children (504 boys and 494 girls) aged between 2–14 years, with or without symptoms, were enrolled. The G. intestinalis in 94 of the 117 stool samples found positive for the parasite by microscopy were successfully genotyped by PCR. Seventy-seven of the children were found to be infected with genotype B only and 14 with genotype AII only, three children being found to have mixed (AII and B) infections. Only genotype B was detected in children from rural areas (P<0·05) and most Giardia detected in children from households with a piped water supply were also of this genotype (P<0·05). The other household characteristics investigated (quality of building, history of flooding, type of sanitation, level of overcrowding, and presence/absence of pet dogs) had no significant effect on the genotype distribution. Children infected with genotype AII were significantly younger than those infected with genotype B (P<0·05) and there was a significant positive association between infection with genotype B and abdominal pain (P<0·05). Diarrhoea was not, however, found to be significantly associated with genotype-AII or genotype-B infection. This is the first published report on the Giardia genotypes circulating in the provinces of Mendoza and Chaco. The results indicate the importance of asymptomatic children in the transmission of Giardia among the young. PMID:21871166

  7. Insomnia and Sleepiness in Parkinson Disease: Associations with Symptoms and Comorbidities

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seockhoon; Bohnen, Nicolaas I.; Albin, Roger L.; Frey, Kirk A.; Müller, Martijn L. T. M.; Chervin, Ronald D.

    2013-01-01

    . Insomnia and sleepiness in Parkinson disease: associations with symptoms and comorbidities. J Clin Sleep Med 2013;9(11):1131-1137. PMID:24235893

  8. Characterization of Connective Tissue Disease-Associated Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension From REVEAL

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Juliana; Parsons, Lori; Hassoun, Paul M.; McGoon, Michael; Badesch, David B.; Miller, Dave P.; Nicolls, Mark R.; Zamanian, Roham T.

    2010-01-01

    Background: REVEAL (the Registry to Evaluate Early and Long-term Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension Disease Management) is the largest US cohort of patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) confirmed by right-sided heart catheterization (RHC), providing a more comprehensive subgroup characterization than previously possible. We used REVEAL to analyze the clinical features of patients with connective tissue disease-associated PAH (CTD-APAH). Methods: All newly and previously diagnosed patients with World Health Organization (WHO) group 1 PAH meeting RHC criteria at 54 US centers were consecutively enrolled. Cross-sectional and 1-year mortality and hospitalization analyses from time of enrollment compared CTD-APAH to idiopathic disease and systemic sclerosis (SSc) to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD), and rheumatoid arthritis (RA). Results: Compared with patients with idiopathic disease (n = 1,251), patients with CTD-APAH (n = 641) had better hemodynamics and favorable right ventricular echocardiographic findings but a higher prevalence of pericardial effusions, lower 6-min walk distance (300.5 ± 118.0 vs 329.4 ± 134.7 m, P = .01), higher B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels (432.8 ± 789.1 vs 245.6 ± 427.2 pg/mL, P < .0001), and lower diffusing capacity of carbon monoxide (Dlco) (44.9% ± 18.0% vs 63.6% ± 22.1% predicted, P < .0001). One-year survival and freedom from hospitalization were lower in the CTD-APAH group (86% vs 93%, P < .0001; 67% vs 73%, P = .03). Compared with patients with SSc-APAH (n = 399), those with other CTDs (SLE, n = 110; MCTD, n = 52; RA, n = 28) had similar hemodynamics; however, patients with SSc-APAH had the highest BNP levels (552.2 ± 977.8 pg/mL), lowest Dlco (41.2% ± 16.3% predicted), and poorest 1-year survival (82% vs 94% in SLE-APAH, 88% in MCTD-APAH, and 96% in RA-APAH). Conclusions: Patients with SSc-APAH demonstrate a unique phenotype with the highest BNP levels, lowest Dlco

  9. Genotype × genotype interactions between the toxic cyanobacterium Microcystis and its grazer, the waterflea Daphnia

    PubMed Central

    Lemaire, Veerle; Brusciotti, Silvia; van Gremberghe, Ineke; Vyverman, Wim; Vanoverbeke, Joost; De Meester, Luc

    2012-01-01

    Toxic algal blooms are an important problem worldwide. The literature on toxic cyanobacteria blooms in inland waters reports widely divergent results on whether zooplankton can control cyanobacteria blooms or cyanobacteria suppress zooplankton by their toxins. Here we test whether this may be due to genotype × genotype interactions, in which interactions between the large-bodied and efficient grazer Daphnia and the widespread cyanobacterium Microcystis are not only dependent on Microcystis strain or Daphnia genotype but are specific to genotype × genotype combinations. We show that genotype × genotype interactions are important in explaining mortality in short-time exposures of Daphnia to Microcystis. These genotype × genotype interactions may result in local coadaptation and a geographic mosaic of coevolution. Genotype × genotype interactions can explain why the literature on zooplankton–cyanobacteria interactions is seemingly inconsistent, and provide hope that zooplankton can contribute to the suppression of cyanobacteria blooms in restoration projects. PMID:25568039

  10. Toward High-Throughput Genotyping: Dynamic and Automatic Software for Manipulating Large-Scale Genotype Data Using Fluorescently Labeled Dinucleotide Markers

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jin-Long; Deng, Hongyi; Lai, Dong-Bing; Xu, Fuhua; Chen, Jian; Gao, Guimin; Recker, Robert R.; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2001-01-01

    To efficiently manipulate large amounts of genotype data generated with fluorescently labeled dinucleotide markers, we developed a Microsoft Access database management system, named GenoDB. GenoDB offers several advantages. First, it accommodates the dynamic nature of the accumulations of genotype data during the genotyping process; some data need to be confirmed or replaced by repeat lab procedures. By using GenoDB, the raw genotype data can be imported easily and continuously and incorporated into the database during the genotyping process that may continue over an extended period of time in large projects. Second, almost all of the procedures are automatic, including autocomparison of the raw data read by different technicians from the same gel, autoadjustment among the allele fragment-size data from cross-runs or cross-platforms, autobinning of alleles, and autocompilation of genotype data for suitable programs to perform inheritance check in pedigrees. Third, GenoDB provides functions to track electrophoresis gel files to locate gel or sample sources for any resultant genotype data, which is extremely helpful for double-checking consistency of raw and final data and for directing repeat experiments. In addition, the user-friendly graphic interface of GenoDB renders processing of large amounts of data much less labor-intensive. Furthermore, GenoDB has built-in mechanisms to detect some genotyping errors and to assess the quality of genotype data that then are summarized in the statistic reports automatically generated by GenoDB. The GenoDB can easily handle >500,000 genotype data entries, a number more than sufficient for typical whole-genome linkage studies. The modules and programs we developed for the GenoDB can be extended to other database platforms, such as Microsoft SQL server, if the capability to handle still greater quantities of genotype data simultaneously is desired. PMID:11435414

  11. Liquid biopsy genotyping in lung cancer: ready for clinical utility?

    PubMed

    Huang, Wei-Lun; Chen, Yi-Lin; Yang, Szu-Chun; Ho, Chung-Liang; Wei, Fang; Wong, David T; Su, Wu-Chou; Lin, Chien-Chung

    2017-01-12

    Liquid biopsy is a blood test that detects evidence of cancer cells or tumor DNA in the circulation. Despite complicated collection methods and the requirement for technique-dependent platforms, it has generated substantial interest due, in part, to its potential to detect driver oncogenes such as epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) mutants in lung cancer. This technology is advancing rapidly and is being incorporated into numerous EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor (EGFR-TKI) development programs. It appears ready for integration into clinical care. Recent studies have demonstrated that biological fluids such as saliva and urine can also be used for detecting EGFR mutant DNA through application other user-friendly techniques. This review focuses on the clinical application of liquid biopsies to lung cancer genotyping, including EGFR and other targets of genotype-directed therapy and compares multiple platforms used for liquid biopsy.

  12. A new genotype of border disease virus with implications for molecular diagnostics.

    PubMed

    Peletto, Simone; Caruso, Claudio; Cerutti, Francesco; Modesto, Paola; Zoppi, Simona; Dondo, Alessandro; Acutis, Pier Luigi; Masoero, Loretta

    2016-02-01

    Border disease virus (BDV) is a (+) single-stranded RNA pestivirus affecting mainly sheep and goats worldwide. Genetic typing of BDV has led to the identification of at least seven major genotypes. This study reports the detection of a BDV strain from a goat in northwestern Italy during routine investigations. Sequence analysis revealed mutations in the 5'-UTR of the virus with implications for BDV molecular diagnostics. Moreover, subsequent phylogenetic analysis based on the combined 5'-UTR and Npro/partial C genes, showed divergence from known BDV genotypes, revealing the detection of a novel pestivirus group, for which we propose the name BDV genotype 8.

  13. Efficient genomewide selection of PCA-correlated tSNPs for genotype imputation.

    PubMed

    Javed, Asif; Drineas, Petros; Mahoney, Michael W; Paschou, Peristera

    2011-11-01

    The linkage disequilibrium structure of the human genome allows identification of small sets of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) (tSNPs) that efficiently represent dense sets of markers. This structure can be translated into linear algebraic terms as evidenced by the well documented principal components analysis (PCA)-based methods. Here we apply, for the first time, PCA-based methodology for efficient genomewide tSNP selection; and explore the linear algebraic structure of the human genome. Our algorithm divides the genome into contiguous nonoverlapping windows of high linear structure. Coupling this novel window definition with a PCA-based tSNP selection method, we analyze 2.5 million SNPs from the HapMap phase 2 dataset. We show that 10-25% of these SNPs suffice to predict the remaining genotypes with over 95% accuracy. A comparison with other popular methods in the ENCODE regions indicates significant genotyping savings. We evaluate the portability of genome-wide tSNPs across a diverse set of populations (HapMap phase 3 dataset). Interestingly, African populations are good reference populations for the rest of the world. Finally, we demonstrate the applicability of our approach in a real genome-wide disease association study. The chosen tSNP panels can be used toward genotype imputation using either a simple regression-based algorithm or more sophisticated genotype imputation methods.

  14. Motor impulsivity in Parkinson disease: associations with COMT and DRD2 polymorphisms.

    PubMed

    Ziegler, David A; Ashourian, Paymon; Wonderlick, Julien S; Sarokhan, Alison K; Prelec, Drazen; Scherzer, Clemens R; Corkin, Suzanne

    2014-06-01

    Parkinson disease (PD) is an age-related degenerative disease of the brain, characterized by motor, cognitive, and psychiatric symptoms. Neurologists and neuroscientists now understand that several symptoms of the disease, including hallucinations and impulse control behaviors, stem from the dopaminergic medications used to control the motor aspects of PD. Converging evidence from animals and humans suggests that individual differences in the genes that affect the dopamine system influence the response of PD patients to dopaminergic medication. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that patients taking dopamine replacement therapy who carry candidate alleles that increase dopamine signaling, exhibit greater amounts of motor impulsivity. We examined the relation between inhibitory ability (measured by the Stop Signal Task) and polymorphisms of COMT Val158Met and DRD2 C957T in patients with idiopathic PD. On the Stop Signal Task, carriers of COMT Val/Met and Met/Met genotypes were more impulsive than Val/Val carriers, but we did not find a link between DRD2 polymorphisms and inhibitory ability. These results support the hypothesis that the Met allele of COMT confers an increased risk for behavioral impulsivity in PD patients, whereas DRD2 polymorphisms appear to be less important in determining whether PD patients exhibit a dopamine overdose in the form of motor impulsivity.

  15. EXCEPTIONAL AGGRESSIVENESS OF CEREBRAL CAVERNOUS MALFORMATION DISEASE ASSOCIATED WITH PDCD10 MUTATIONS

    PubMed Central

    Rebeiz, Tania; Stockton, Rebecca A.; McDonald, David A.; Mikati, Abdul Ghani; Zhang, Lingjiao; Austin, Cecilia; Akers, Amy L.; Gallione, Carol J.; Rorrer, Autumn; Gunel, Murat; Min, Wang; De Souza, Jorge Marcondes; Lee, Connie

    2014-01-01

    Purpose The phenotypic manifestations of cerebral cavernous malformation (CCM) disease caused by rare PDCD10 mutations have not been systematically examined, and a mechanistic link to Rho kinase (ROCK) mediated hyperpermeability, a potential therapeutic target, has not been established. Methods We analyze PDCD10-siRNA treated endothelial cells for stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability. ROCK activity is assessed in CCM lesions. Brain permeability and CCM lesion burden is quantified, and clinical manifestations are assessed in prospectively enrolled subjects with PDCD10 mutations. Results We determine that PDCD10 protein suppresses endothelial stress fibers, ROCK activity and permeability in vitro. Pdcd10 heterozygous mice have greater lesion burden than other Ccm genotypes. We demonstrate robust ROCK activity in murine and human CCM vasculature, and increased brain vascular permeability in humans with PDCD10 mutation. Clinical phenotype is exceptionally aggressive compared to the more common KRIT1 and CCM2 familial and sporadic CCM, with greater lesion burden and more frequent hemorrhages earlier in life. We first report other phenotypic features including scoliosis, cognitive disability and skin lesions, unrelated to lesion burden or bleeding. Conclusion These findings define a unique CCM disease with exceptional aggressiveness, and they inform preclinical therapeutic testing, clinical counseling and the design of trials. PMID:25122144

  16. Genotype matching in a parasitoid-host genotypic food web: an approach for measuring effects of environmental change.

    PubMed

    Lavandero, Blas; Tylianakis, Jason M

    2013-01-01

    Food webs typically quantify interactions between species, whereas evolution operates through the success of alleles within populations of a single species. To bridge this gap, we quantify genotypic interaction networks among individuals of a single specialized parasitoid species and its obligate to cyclically parthenogenetic aphid host along a climatic gradient. As a case study for the kinds of questions genotype food webs could be used to answer, we show that genetically similar parasitoids became more likely to attack genetically similar hosts in warmer sites (i.e. there was network-wide congruence between the within-species shared allelic distance of the parasitoid and that of its host). Narrowing of host-genotype-niche breadth by parasitoids could reduce resilience of the network to changes in host genetic structure or invasion by novel host genotypes and inhibit biological control. Thus, our approach can be easily used to detect changes to sub-species-level food webs, which may have important ecological and evolutionary implications, such as promoting host-race specialization or the accelerated loss of functional diversity following extinctions of closely related genotypes.

  17. Invasive genotypes are opportunistic specialists not general purpose genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Drown, Devin M; Levri, Edward P; Dybdahl, Mark F

    2011-01-01

    It is not clear which forms of plasticity in fitness-related traits are associated with invasive species. On one hand, it may be better to have a robust performance across environments. On the other, it may be beneficial to take advantage of limited favorable conditions. We chose to study a worldwide invasive species, Potamopyrgus antipodarum, and compare the plasticity of life-history traits of a sample of invasive genotypes to a sample of ancestral-range genotypes. We examined the responses to salinity in this freshwater snail because it varies spatially and temporally in the introduced range and contributes to variation in fitness in our system. We used a recently developed statistical method that quantifies aspects of differences in the shape among reaction norms. We found that the invasive lineages survived and reproduced with an increased probability at the higher salinities, and were superior to ancestral-range lineages in only two traits related to reproduction. Moreover, we found that in terms of traits related to growth, the invasive lineages have a performance optimum that is shifted to higher salinities than the ancestral-range lineages as well as having a narrower niche breadth. Contrary to the prediction of the general purpose genotype hypothesis, we found that invasive lineages tended to be opportunistic specialists. PMID:25567958

  18. Performance of the GenoType MTBDRplus assay (v2.0) and a new extended GenoType MTBDRsl assay (v2.0) for the molecular detection of multi- and extensively drug-resistant Mycobacterium tuberculosis on isolates primarily from Lithuania.

    PubMed

    Bang, Didi; Andersen, Siri Rytcher; Vasiliauskienė, Edita; Rasmussen, Erik Michael

    2016-12-01

    The emergence of extensively drug-resistant tuberculosis (XDR-TB) hampers infection control. To assess the performance of an extended rapid novel molecular analysis for the detection of resistance conferring mutations to fluoroquinolones (gyrA, gyrB genes) and aminoglycosides/cyclic peptides (16S rRNA rrs gene, eis promotor region) compared to phenotypic susceptibility and sequencing, 43 multidrug-resistant (MDR) and 10 susceptible clinical isolates were analyzed. Results were compared to a previous version. Molecular rifampin (rpoB gene) and isoniazid (katG gene, inhA promotor region) resistance was also analyzed. XDR-TB was confirmed in 13 (30%) MDR isolates. Molecular resistance was detected in 91% ofloxacin-, 83% aminoglycoside/cyclic peptide- and 100% kanamycin-resistant isolates. In conclusion, the novel assay is a useful supplement to phenotypic susceptibility testing in determining the presence of XDR-TB. Molecular kanamycin resistance detection was immensely improved compared to the previous version. Aminoglycoside/cyclic peptide susceptible isolates revealed eis promotor region resistance in 29%, reflecting low-level kanamycin susceptibility challenges.

  19. 3Disease Browser: A Web server for integrating 3D genome and disease-associated chromosome rearrangement data

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ruifeng; Liu, Yifang; Li, Tingting; Li, Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Chromosomal rearrangement (CR) events have been implicated in many tumor and non-tumor human diseases. CR events lead to their associated diseases by disrupting gene and protein structures. Also, they can lead to diseases through changes in chromosomal 3D structure and gene expression. In this study, we search for CR-associated diseases potentially caused by chromosomal 3D structure alteration by integrating Hi-C and ChIP-seq data. Our algorithm rediscovers experimentally verified disease-associated CRs (polydactyly diseases) that alter gene expression by disrupting chromosome 3D structure. Interestingly, we find that intellectual disability may be a candidate disease caused by 3D chromosome structure alteration. We also develop a Web server (3Disease Browser, http://3dgb.cbi.pku.edu.cn/disease/) for integrating and visualizing disease-associated CR events and chromosomal 3D structure. PMID:27734896

  20. Hepatitis B Virus Genotype C Prevails Among Chronic Carriers of the Virus in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Bae, Si Hyun; Yoon, Seung Kew; Jang, Jeong Won; Kim, Chang Wook; Nam, Soon Woo; Choi, Jong Young; Kim, Boo Sung; Park, Young Min; Suzuki, Seiji; Sugauchi, Fuminaka

    2005-01-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is one of the major causative agents of chronic liver diseases in Korea. HBV has been classified into 8 genotypes by a divergence of >8% in the entire genomic sequence, and have distinct geographic distributions. There are limited data on the relevance between HBV genotypes and clinical outcomes in Korea. To investigate the clinical feature relating to HBV genotype in Korea, a total 120 serum samples with HBsAg (65 from Seoul and 55 from the other city in Korea) were obtained from each 30 chronic HBV carriers with asymptomatic carrier (ASC), chronic hepatitis (CH), liver cirrhosis (LC) and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). HBV genotype was determined by either enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) using monoclonal antibodies against genotype-specific epitopes in the preS2-region or the direct sequencing of small S gene. HBV genotypes were determined in 105 (87.5%) of 120 samples. HBV genotype C was identified in all HBV carriers with ASC, CH, LC, and HCC. Genotypes A, B, D, E, F and G were not detected in any of them. Genotype C HBV prevails predominantly among chronic carriers of the virus in Korea, irrespective of their clinical stages of liver disease and geographic origin. PMID:16224156

  1. Development of a monoclonal antibody against viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) genotype IVa.

    PubMed

    Ito, T; Olesen, N J; Skall, H F; Sano, M; Kurita, J; Nakajima, K; Iida, T

    2010-02-24

    The viral haemorrhagic septicaemia virus (VHSV) comprises 4 major genotypes and a number of subtypes with, in most cases, distinct geographical distribution. A quick and simple detection method that can discriminate the different genotypes is desirable for a quick and more efficient prevention of the spread of genotypes to new geographical areas. A monoclonal antibody (MAb) against VHSV genotype IVa was produced, with the aim of providing a simple method of discriminating this genotype from the other VHSV genotypes (I, II, III and IVb). Balb/c mice were injected with purified VHSV-JF00Ehil (genotype IVa) from diseased farmed Japanese flounder. Ten hybridoma clones secreting monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) against VHSV were established. One of these, MAb VHS-10, reacted only with genotype IVa in indirect fluorescent antibody technique (IFAT) and ELISA. Using cell cultures that were transfected with each of the viral protein genes, it was shown that the MAb VHS-10 recognizes a nonlinear genotype IVa-specific epitope on the VHSV N-protein.

  2. Pharmacogenomics of platinum-based chemotherapy response in NSCLC: a genotyping study and a pooled analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Juan; Wang, Zhan; Zou, Ting; Cui, Jiajia; Yin, Jiye; Zheng, Wei; Jiang, Wuzhong; Zhou, Honghao; Liu, Zhaoqian

    2016-01-01

    Published data showed inconsistent results about associations of extensively studied polymorphisms with platinum-based chemotherapy response. Our study aimed to provide reliable conclusions of these associations by detecting genotypes of the SNPs in a larger sample size and summarizing a comprehensive pooled analysis. 13 SNPs in 8 genes were genotyped in 1024 NSCLC patients by SequenomMassARRAY. 39 published studies and our study were included in meta-analysis. Patients with GA or GG genotypes of XRCC1 G1196 had better response than AA genotype carriers (Genotyping study: OR = 0.72, 95%CI: 0.53-0.96, P = 0.028; Meta-analysis: OR = 0.74, 95%CI: 0.62-0.89, P = 0.001). Patients carrying CT or TT genotypes of XRCC1 C580T could be more sensitive to platinum-based chemotherapy compared to patients with CC genotype (OR = 0.54, 95%CI: 0.37-0.80, P = 0.002). CC genotype of XRCC3 C18067T carriers showed more resistance to platinum-based chemotherapy when compared to those with CT or TT genotypes (OR = 0.69, 95%CI: 0.52-0.91, P = 0.009). Our study indicated that XRCC1 G1196A/C580T and XRCC3 C18067T should be paid attention for personalized platinum-