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Sample records for detecting focused ultrasound-induced

  1. Photoacoustic detection and optical spectroscopy of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in biologic tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Alhamami, Mosa; Kolios, Michael C.; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-05-15

    Purpose: The aims of this study are: (a) to investigate the capability of photoacoustic (PA) method in detecting high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatments in muscle tissuesin vitro; and (b) to determine the optical properties of HIFU-treated and native tissues in order to assist in the interpretation of the observed contrast in PA detection of HIFU treatments. Methods: A single-element, spherically concaved HIFU transducer with a centre frequency of 1 MHz was utilized to create thermal lesions in chicken breast tissuesin vitro. To investigate the detectability of HIFU treatments photoacoustically, PA detection was performed at 720 and 845 nm on seven HIFU-treated tissue samples. Within each tissue sample, PA signals were acquired from 22 locations equally divided between two regions of interest within two volumes in tissue – a HIFU-treated volume and an untreated volume. Optical spectroscopy was then carried out on 10 HIFU-treated chicken breast specimens in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm, in 1-nm increments, using a spectrophotometer with an integrating sphere attachment. The authors’ optical spectroscopy raw data (total transmittance and diffuse reflectance) were used to obtain the optical absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of HIFU-induced thermal lesions and native tissues by employing the inverse adding-doubling method. The aforementioned interaction coefficients were subsequently used to calculate the effective attenuation coefficient and light penetration depth of HIFU-treated and native tissues in the wavelength range of 500–900 nm. Results: HIFU-treated tissues produced greater PA signals than native tissues at 720 and 845 nm. At 720 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.68 ± 0.25 (mean ± standard error of the mean). At 845 nm, the averaged ratio of the peak-to-peak PA signal amplitude of HIFU-treated tissue to that of native tissue was 3.75

  2. Contrast-Enhanced Ultrasound Imaging for the Detection of Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Ching-Hsiang; Lin, Wun-Hao; Ting, Chien-Yu; Chai, Wen-Yen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li; Yeh, Chih-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be transiently and locally opened by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles (MBs). Various imaging modalities and contrast agents have been used to monitor this process. Unfortunately, direct ultrasound imaging of BBB opening with MBs as contrast agent is not feasible, due to the inability of MBs to penetrate brain parenchyma. However, FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by changes in blood flow and perfusion, suggesting the possibility of perfusion-based ultrasound imaging. Here we evaluated the use of MB destruction-replenishment, which was originally developed for analysis of ultrasound perfusion kinetics, for verifying and quantifying FUS-induced BBB opening. MBs were intravenously injected and the BBB was disrupted by 2 MHz FUS with burst-tone exposure at 0.5-0.7 MPa. A perfusion kinetic map was estimated by MB destruction-replenishment time-intensity curve analysis. Our results showed that the scale and distribution of FUS-induced BBB opening could be determined at high resolution by ultrasound perfusion kinetic analysis. The accuracy and sensitivity of this approach was validated by dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI. Our successful demonstration of ultrasound imaging to monitor FUS-induced BBB opening provides a new approach to assess FUS-dependent brain drug delivery, with the benefit of high temporal resolution and convenient integration with the FUS device. PMID:25161701

  3. Targeted gene delivery to the mouse brain by MRI-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Huang, Qin; Deng, Jinmu; Wang, Feng; Chen, Song; Liu, Yingjiang; Wang, Zhibiao; Wang, Zhigang; Cheng, Yuan

    2012-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the feasibility of targeted gene transfer into central nervous system (CNS) by MRI-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption. Before each sonication, T2-weighted images were obtained to select the target region. Followed by injecting DNA-loaded microbubbles into the tail vein, sonication was performed. The state of local BBB, distribution of plasmid DNA through the opened BBB, the ultrastructural changes of neurons and BDNF expression were detected. The results showed that MRI-guided focused ultrasound (FUS) could accomplish noninvasive, transient, and local BBB disruption, at 1h after sonication, plasmid DNA across the opened BBB had been internalized into the neurons presenting heterogeneous distribution and numerous transparent vesicles were observed in the cytoplasm of the neurons at the sonicated region, suggesting vesicle-mediated endocytosis. At 48 h after sonication, the expressions of exogenous gene pBDNF-EGFP were observed in the cytoplasm of some neurons, and BDNF expressions were markedly enhanced by the combination of ultrasound and pBDNF-EGFP-loaded microbubbles about 20-fold than that of the control group (P<0.01). The method by using MRI-guided FUS to induce the local BBB disruption could accomplish effective targeted exogenous gene transfer in CNS. This technique may provide a new option for the treatment of various CNS diseases.

  4. Microbubble type and distribution dependence of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shutao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Olumolade, Oluyemi; Feshitan, Jameel A; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2014-01-01

    Focused ultrasound, in the presence of microbubbles, has been used non-invasively to induce reversible blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening in both rodents and non-human primates. This study was aimed at identifying the dependence of BBB opening properties on polydisperse microbubble (all clinically approved microbubbles are polydisperse) type and distribution by using a clinically approved ultrasound contrast agent (Definity microbubbles) and in-house prepared polydisperse (IHP) microbubbles in mice. A total of 18 C57 BL/6 mice (n = 3) were used in this study, and each mouse was injected with either Definity or IHP microbubbles via the tail vein. The concentration and size distribution of activated Definity and IHP microbubbles were measured, and the microbubbles were diluted to 6 × 10(8)/mL before injection. Immediately after microbubble administration, mice were subjected to focused ultrasound with the following parameters: frequency = 1.5 MHz, pulse repetition frequency = 10 Hz, 1000 cycles, in situ peak rarefactional acoustic pressures = 0.3, 0.45 and 0.6 MPa for a sonication duration of 60 s. Contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging was used to confirm BBB opening and allowed for image-based analysis. Permeability of the treated region and volume of BBB opening did not significantly differ between the two types of microbubbles (p > 0.05) at peak rarefractional acoustic pressures of 0.45 and 0.6 MPa, whereas IHP microbubbles had significantly higher permeability and opening volume (p < 0.05) at the relatively lower pressure of 0.3 MPa. The results from this study indicate that microbubble type and distribution could have significant effects on focused ultrasound-induced BBB opening at lower pressures, but less important effects at higher pressures, possibly because of the stable cavitation that governs the former. This difference may have become less significant at higher pressures, where inertial cavitation typically occurs.

  5. Quasi-static elastography and its application in investigation of focused ultrasound induced tissue lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bin; Ling, Tao; Shen, Yong; Wang, Yan; Zheng, Hairong; Li, Faqi

    2012-10-01

    Monitoring of Focused Ultrasound (FUS) therapy has always been a key factor for a successful therapy. Although B-mode ultrasound has long been used for monitoring FUS therapy, the gray scale changes can not precisely reflect the lesion formation inside the tissue, while MR thermometry is considered to be too expensive. In this study, elastography had been performed using a commercial ultrasound system to investigate lesions produced by FUS irradiation in vitro. Several motion detection algorithms had been performed to improve the motion detection accuracy in the elastography. The effects of different algorithms on the motion detection accuracy were compared. Experimental results on the FUS induced lesion in swine muscle were introduced. The results indicated that lesions induced by small dosage of FUS inside the tissue can be successfully detected, which has a profound clinical meaning for the monitoring of FUS therapy.

  6. Photoacoustic micro-imaging of focused ultrasound induced blood-brain-barrier opening in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po-Hsun; Hsu, Po-Hung; Liu, Hao-Li; Wang, Churng-Ren Chris; Li, Meng-Lin

    2010-02-01

    Blood brain barrier (BBB) prevents most of the drug from transmitting into the brain tissue and decreases the treatment performance for brain disease. One of the methods to overcome the difficulty of drug delivery is to locally increase the permeability of BBB with high-intensity focused ultrasound. In this study, we have investigated the feasibility of photoacoustic microscopy of focused-ultrasound induced BBB opening in a rat model in vivo with gold nanorods (AuNRs) as a contrast agent. This study takes advantage of the strong near-infrared absorption of AuNRs and their extravasation tendency from BBB opening foci due to their nano-scale size. Before the experiments, craniotomy was performed on rats to provide a path for focused ultrasound beam. Localized BBB opening at the depth of about 3 mm from left cortex of rat brains was achieved by delivering 1.5 MHz focused ultrasound energy into brain tissue in the presence of microbubbles. PEGylated AuNRs with a peak optical absorption at ~800 nm were then intravenously administered. Pre-scan prior to BBB disruption and AuNR injection was taken to mark the signal background. After injection, the distribution of AuNRs in rat brains was monitored up to 2 hours. Experimental results show that imaging AuNRs reveals BBB disruption area in left brains while there are no changes observed in the right brains. From our results, photoacoustic imaging plus AuNRs shows the promise as a novel monitoring strategy in identifying the location and variation of focused-ultrasound BBB-opening in a rat model.

  7. Pulsed Focused Ultrasound Induced Displacements in Confined In Vitro Blood Clots

    PubMed Central

    Wright, Cameron C.; Hynynen, Kullervo; Goertz, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Ultrasound has been shown to potentiate the effects of tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) to improve clot lysis in a range of in vitro and in vivo studies as well as in clinical trials. One possible mechanism of action is acoustic radiation force induced clot displacements. In this study we investigate the temporal and spatial dynamics of clot displacements and strain initiated by focused ultrasound pulses. Displacements were produced by a 1.51 MHz f-number 1 transducer over a range of acoustic powers (1–85 W) in clots constrained within an agar vessel phantom channel. Displacements were tracked during and after a 5.45 ms therapy pulse using a 20 MHz high frequency ultrasound imaging probe. Peak thrombus displacements were found to be linear as a function of acoustic power up to 60 W before leveling off near 128 μm for the highest transmit powers. The time to peak displacement and recovery time of blood clots were largely independent of acoustic powers with measured values near 2 ms. A linear relationship between peak axial strain and transmit power was observed, reaching a peak value of 11% at 35 W. The peak strain occurred ~0.75 mm from the focal zone for all powers investigated in both lateral and axial directions. These results indicate that substantial displacements can be induced by focused ultrasound in confined blood clots, and that the spatial and temporal displacement patterns are complex and highly dependant on exposure conditions, which has implications for future work investigating their link to clot lysis and for developing approaches to exploit these effects. PMID:22194235

  8. High intensity focused ultrasound-induced gene activation in sublethally injured tumor cells in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yunbo; Kon, Takashi; Li, Chuanyuan; Zhong, Pei

    2005-11-01

    Cultured human cervical cancer (HeLa) and rat mammary carcinoma (R3230Ac) cells were transfected with vectors encoding green fluorescent protein (GFP) under the control of hsp70B promoter. Aliquots of 10-μl transfected cells (5×107 cells/ml) were placed in 0.2-ml thin-wall polymerase chain reaction tubes and exposed to 1.1-MHz high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) at a peak negative pressure P-=2.68 MPa. By adjusting the duty cycle of the HIFU transducer, the cell suspensions were heated to a peak temperature from 50 to 70 °C in 1-10 s. Exposure dependent cell viability and gene activation were evaluated. For a 5-s HIFU exposure, cell viability dropped from 95% at 50 °C to 13% at 70 °C. Concomitantly, gene activation in sublethally injured tumor cells increased from 4% at 50 °C to 41% at 70 °C. A similar trend was observed at 60 °C peak temperature as the exposure time increased from 1 to 5 s. Further increase of exposure duration to 10 s led to significantly reduced cell viability and lower overall gene activation in exposed cells. Altogether, maximum HIFU-induced gene activation was achieved at 60 °C in 5 s. Under these experimental conditions, HIFU-induced gene activation was found to be produced primarily by thermal rather than mechanical stresses.

  9. Neuromodulation accompanying focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Chun; Liu, Hao-Li; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Chung-Yin; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2015-10-22

    Burst-mode focused ultrasound (FUS) induces microbubble cavitation in the vasculature and temporarily disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to enable therapeutic agent delivery. However, it remains unclear whether FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by neuromodulation. Here we characterized the functional effects of FUS-induced BBB opening by measuring changes in somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) responses. Rats underwent burst-mode FUS (mechanical index (MI) of 0.3, 0.55 or 0.8) to the forelimb region in the left primary somatosensory cortex to induce BBB opening. Longitudinal measurements were followed for up to 1 week to characterize the temporal dynamics of neuromodulation. We observed that 0.8-MI FUS profoundly suppressed SSEP amplitude and prolonged latency, and this effect lasted 7 days. 0.55-MI FUS resulted in minimal and short-term suppression of SSEP for less than 60 minutes and didn't affect latency. BOLD responses were also suppressed in an MI-dependent manner, mirroring the effect on SSEPs. Furthermore, repetitive delivery of 0.55-MI FUS every 3 days elicited no accumulative effects on SSEPs or tissue integrity. This is the first evidence that FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by reversible changes in neuron responses, and may provide valuable insight toward the development of FUS-induced BBB opening for clinical applications.

  10. Dependence of pulsed focused ultrasound induced thrombolysis on duty cycle and cavitation bubble size distribution.

    PubMed

    Xu, Shanshan; Zong, Yujin; Feng, Yi; Liu, Runna; Liu, Xiaodong; Hu, Yaxin; Han, Shimin; Wan, Mingxi

    2015-01-01

    In this study, we investigated the relationship between the efficiency of pulsed, focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced thrombolysis, the duty cycle (2.3%, 9%, and 18%) and the size distribution of cavitation bubbles. The efficiency of thrombolysis was evaluated through the degree of mechanical fragmentation, namely the number, mass, and size of clot debris particles. First, we found that the total number and mass of clot debris particles were highest when a duty cycle of 9% was used and that the mean diameter of clot debris particles was smallest. Second, we found that the size distribution of cavitation bubbles was mainly centered around the linear resonance radius (2.5μm) of the emission frequency (1.2MHz) of the FUS transducer when a 9% duty cycle was used, while the majority of cavitation bubbles became smaller or larger than the linear resonance radius when a 2.3% or 18% duty cycle was used. In addition, the inertial cavitation dose from the treatment performed at 9% duty cycle was much higher than the dose obtained with the other two duty cycles. The data presented here suggest that there is an optimal duty cycle at which the thrombolysis efficiency and cavitation activity are strongest. They further indicate that using a pulsed FUS may help control the size distribution of cavitation nuclei within an active size range, which we found to be near the linear resonance radius of the emission frequency of the FUS transducer.

  11. Neuromodulation accompanying focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Po-Chun; Liu, Hao-Li; Lai, Hsin-Yi; Lin, Chung-Yin; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Pei, Yu-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Burst-mode focused ultrasound (FUS) induces microbubble cavitation in the vasculature and temporarily disrupts the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to enable therapeutic agent delivery. However, it remains unclear whether FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by neuromodulation. Here we characterized the functional effects of FUS-induced BBB opening by measuring changes in somatosensory evoked potentials (SSEPs) and blood-oxygen-level dependent (BOLD) responses. Rats underwent burst-mode FUS (mechanical index (MI) of 0.3, 0.55 or 0.8) to the forelimb region in the left primary somatosensory cortex to induce BBB opening. Longitudinal measurements were followed for up to 1 week to characterize the temporal dynamics of neuromodulation. We observed that 0.8-MI FUS profoundly suppressed SSEP amplitude and prolonged latency, and this effect lasted 7 days. 0.55-MI FUS resulted in minimal and short-term suppression of SSEP for less than 60 minutes and didn’t affect latency. BOLD responses were also suppressed in an MI-dependent manner, mirroring the effect on SSEPs. Furthermore, repetitive delivery of 0.55-MI FUS every 3 days elicited no accumulative effects on SSEPs or tissue integrity. This is the first evidence that FUS-induced BBB opening is accompanied by reversible changes in neuron responses, and may provide valuable insight toward the development of FUS-induced BBB opening for clinical applications. PMID:26490653

  12. Detection of acoustic cavitation in the heart with microbubble contrast agents in vivo: a mechanism for ultrasound-induced arrhythmias.

    PubMed

    Rota, Claudio; Raeman, Carol H; Child, Sally Z; Dalecki, Diane

    2006-11-01

    Ultrasound fields can produce premature cardiac contractions under appropriate exposure conditions. The pressure threshold for ultrasound-induced premature contractions is significantly lowered when microbubble contrast agents are present in the vasculature. The objective of this study was to measure directly ultrasound-induced cavitation in the murine heart in vivo and correlate the occurrence of cavitation with the production of premature cardiac contractions. A passive cavitation detection technique was used to quantify cavitation activity in the heart. Experiments were performed with anesthetized, adult mice given intravenous injections of either a contrast agent (Optison) or saline. Murine hearts were exposed to ultrasound pulses (200 kHz, 1 ms, 0.1-0.25 MPa). Premature beats were produced in mice injected with Optison and the likelihood of producing a premature beat increased with increasing pressure amplitude. Similarly, cavitation was detected in mice injected with Optison and the amplitude of the passive cavitation detector signal increased with increasing exposure amplitude. Furthermore, there was a direct correlation between the extent of cavitation and the likelihood of ultrasound producing a premature beat. Neither premature beats nor cavitation activity were observed in animals injected with saline and exposed to ultrasound. These results are consistent with acoustic cavitation as a mechanism for this bioeffect.

  13. Lipid microbubbles as a vehicle for targeted drug delivery using focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Sierra, Carlos; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry; Wu, Shih-Ying; Karakatsani, Maria E; Bernal, Manuel; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2017-04-01

    Focused ultrasound in conjunction with lipid microbubbles has fully demonstrated its ability to induce non-invasive, transient, and reversible blood-brain barrier opening. This study was aimed at testing the feasibility of our lipid-coated microbubbles as a vector for targeted drug delivery in the treatment of central nervous system diseases. These microbubbles were labeled with the fluorophore 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. Focused ultrasound targeted mouse brains in vivo in the presence of these microbubbles for trans-blood-brain barrier delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein. This new approach, compared to previously studies of our group, where fluorescently labeled dextrans and microbubbles were co-administered, represents an appreciable improvement in safety outcome and targeted drug delivery. This novel technique allows the delivery of 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein at the region of interest unlike the alternative of systemic exposure. 5-dodecanoylaminfluorescein delivery was assessed by ex vivo fluorescence imaging and by in vivo transcranial passive cavitation detection. Stable and inertial cavitation doses were quantified. The cavitation dose thresholds for estimating, a priori, successful targeted drug delivery were, for the first time, identified with inertial cavitation were concluded to be necessary for successful delivery. The findings presented herein indicate the feasibility and safety of the proposed microbubble-based targeted drug delivery and that, if successful, can be predicted by cavitation detection in vivo.

  14. Permeability dependence study of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening at distinct pressures and microbubble diameters using DCE-MRI.

    PubMed

    Vlachos, Fotios; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Konofagou, Elisa

    2011-09-01

    Blood-brain barrier opening using focused ultrasound and microbubbles has been experimentally established as a noninvasive and localized brain drug delivery technique. In this study, the permeability of the opening is assessed in the murine hippocampus after the application of focused ultrasound at three different acoustic pressures and microbubble sizes. Using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI, the transfer rates were estimated, yielding permeability maps and quantitative K(trans) values for a predefined region of interest. The volume of blood-brain barrier opening according to the K(trans) maps was proportional to both the pressure and the microbubble diameter. A K(trans) plateau of ∼0.05 min(-1) was reached at higher pressures (0.45 and 0.60 MPa) for the larger sized bubbles (4-5 and 6-8 μm), which was on the same order as the K(trans) of the epicranial muscle (no barrier). Smaller bubbles (1-2 μm) yielded significantly lower permeability values. A small percentage (7.5%) of mice showed signs of damage under histological examination, but no correlation with permeability was established. The assessment of the blood-brain barrier permeability properties and their dependence on both the pressure and the microbubble diameter suggests that K(trans) maps may constitute an in vivo tool for the quantification of the efficacy of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

  15. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Singh, Vijay P.; Kim, Kang

    2014-02-01

    Hepatic steatosis or fatty liver disease occurs when lipids accumulate within the liver and can lead to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer and eventual liver failure requiring liver transplant. Conventional brightness mode (B-mode) ultrasound (US) is the most common noninvasive diagnostic imaging modality used to diagnose hepatic steatosis in clinics. However, it is mostly subjective or requires a reference organ such as the kidney or spleen with which to compare. This comparison can be problematic when the reference organ is diseased or absent. The current work presents an alternative approach to noninvasively detecting liver fat content using US-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI). This technique is based on the difference in the change in the speed of sound as a function of temperature between water- and lipid-based tissues. US-TSI was conducted using two system configurations including a mid-frequency scanner with a single linear array transducer (5-14 MHz) for both imaging and heating and a high-frequency (13-24 MHz) small animal imaging system combined with a separate custom-designed US heating transducer array. Fatty livers (n = 10) with high fat content (45.6 ± 11.7%) from an obese mouse model and control livers (n = 10) with low fat content (4.8 ± 2.9%) from wild-type mice were embedded in gelatin. Then, US imaging was performed before and after US induced heating. Heating time periods of ˜3 s and ˜9.2 s were used for the mid-frequency imaging and high-frequency imaging systems, respectively, to induce temperature changes of approximately 1.5 °C. The apparent echo shifts that were induced as a result of sound speed change were estimated using 2D phase-sensitive speckle tracking. Following US-TSI, histology was performed to stain lipids and measure percentage fat in the mouse livers. Thermal strain measurements in fatty livers (-0.065 ± 0.079%) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those measured in control livers (-0.124 ± 0

  16. Detecting hepatic steatosis using ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging: an ex vivo animal study.

    PubMed

    Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ding, Xuan; Dutta, Debaditya; Singh, Vijay P; Kim, Kang

    2014-02-21

    Hepatic steatosis or fatty liver disease occurs when lipids accumulate within the liver and can lead to steatohepatitis, cirrhosis, liver cancer and eventual liver failure requiring liver transplant. Conventional brightness mode (B-mode) ultrasound (US) is the most common noninvasive diagnostic imaging modality used to diagnose hepatic steatosis in clinics. However, it is mostly subjective or requires a reference organ such as the kidney or spleen with which to compare. This comparison can be problematic when the reference organ is diseased or absent. The current work presents an alternative approach to noninvasively detecting liver fat content using US-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI). This technique is based on the difference in the change in the speed of sound as a function of temperature between water- and lipid-based tissues. US-TSI was conducted using two system configurations including a mid-frequency scanner with a single linear array transducer (5-14 MHz) for both imaging and heating and a high-frequency (13-24 MHz) small animal imaging system combined with a separate custom-designed US heating transducer array. Fatty livers (n = 10) with high fat content (45.6 ± 11.7%) from an obese mouse model and control livers (n = 10) with low fat content (4.8 ± 2.9%) from wild-type mice were embedded in gelatin. Then, US imaging was performed before and after US induced heating. Heating time periods of ∼ 3 s and ∼ 9.2 s were used for the mid-frequency imaging and high-frequency imaging systems, respectively, to induce temperature changes of approximately 1.5 °C. The apparent echo shifts that were induced as a result of sound speed change were estimated using 2D phase-sensitive speckle tracking. Following US-TSI, histology was performed to stain lipids and measure percentage fat in the mouse livers. Thermal strain measurements in fatty livers (-0.065 ± 0.079%) were significantly (p < 0.05) higher than those measured in control livers (-0.124 ± 0

  17. Focused ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption to enhance chemotherapeutic drugs (BCNU) delivery for glioblastoma treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Hua, Mu-Yi; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2010-03-01

    Focused ultrasound has been recently found to capable of temporally and reversibly disrupt local blood-brain barrier (BBB) and opens new frontier in delivering varies type of drugs into brain for central nerve system (CNS) disorder treatment. In this study, we aim to investigate the feasibility of delivering 1, 3-bits (2-chloroethyl) -1-nitrosourea (BCNU) to treat glioblastoma in animal models and evaluate whether this approach would gain treatment efficacy. Under the presence of microbubbles administration, a 400-kHz focused ultrasound was employed to deliver burst-tone ultrasonic energy stimulation to disrupt BBB in animal brains transcranially, and in-vivo monitored by magnetic-resonance imaging (MRI). C6-glioma cells were cultured and implanted into Sprague-Dawley rats as the brain-tumor model. BCNU deposited in brain was quantified by using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC), and brain tissues were examined histologically. MRI was employed to longitudinal evaluate the brain tumor treatment including the analysis of tumor progression and animal survival. We confirmed that the focused ultrasound, under the secure ultrasonic energy level, can significantly enhance the BCNU penetration through BBB over 300% than control without cause hemorrhage. Apparent improvement of treatment efficacy achieved by combining focused ultrasound with BCNU delivery, including significant suppression of tumor growth and a prolonged animal survival. This study highly support that this treatment strategy could be clinically-relevant and may help to provide another potential strategy in increasing local chemotherapeutic drugs for brain-tumor treatment.

  18. Focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption enhances the delivery of cytarabine to the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Han-Qing; Lü, Lin; Wang, Feng; Luo, Yun; Lou, Shi-Feng

    2012-12-01

    To investigate the feasibility of using focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles for targeted delivery of cytarabine to the brain. Sprague-Dawly rats (weighing 200-250 g) received focused ultrasound with intravenous injection microbubbles. At 0, 2, 4, 8, and 24 hours (n=5 for each time point) after sonication, animals received intravenous administration of cytarabine at a normal dose of 4 mg/kg body weight. Additional five rats were given with a high dose (50 mg/kg body weight) of cytarabine alone. Blood-brain barrier (BBB) permeability and cerebral cytarabine were determined. FUS in conjunction with microbubbles caused a transient BBB opening. Sonication exposure promoted cytarabine accumulation at the sonicated site. Animals injected with a normal dose of cytarabine 2 hours after sonication had similar concentrations of cerebral cytarabine compared to those with higher cytarabine without sonication. FUS can temporarily open the BBB and thus facilitate the penetration of systemic cytarabine into the brain.

  19. Nakagami imaging for detecting thermal lesions induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound in tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2014-01-01

    High-intensity focused ultrasound induces focalized tissue coagulation by increasing the tissue temperature in a tight focal region. Several methods have been proposed to monitor high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Currently, ultrasound imaging techniques that are clinically used for monitoring high-intensity focused ultrasound treatment are standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging, ultrasound temperature estimation, and elastography-based methods. On the contrary, the efficacy of two-dimensional Nakagami parametric imaging based on the distribution of the ultrasound backscattered signals to quantify properties of soft tissue has recently been evaluated. In this study, ultrasound radio frequency echo signals from ex vivo tissue samples were acquired before and after high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures and then their Nakagami parameter and scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution were estimated. These parameters were used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions. Also, the effects of changing the acoustic power of the high-intensity focused ultrasound transducer on the Nakagami parameters were studied. The results obtained suggest that the Nakagami distribution's scaling and Nakagami parameters can effectively be used to detect high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in tissue ex vivo. These parameters can also be used to understand the degree of change in tissue caused by high-intensity focused ultrasound exposures, which could be interpreted as a measure of degree of variability in scatterer concentration in various parts of the high-intensity focused ultrasound lesion.

  20. Acute effects of focused ultrasound-induced increases in blood-brain barrier permeability on rat microvascular transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    McMahon, Dallan; Bendayan, Reina; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2017-01-01

    Therapeutic treatment options for central nervous system diseases are greatly limited by the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Focused ultrasound (FUS), in conjunction with circulating microbubbles, can be used to induce a targeted and transient increase in BBB permeability, providing a unique approach for the delivery of drugs from the systemic circulation into the brain. While preclinical research has demonstrated the utility of FUS, there remains a large gap in our knowledge regarding the impact of sonication on BBB gene expression. This work is focused on investigating the transcriptional changes in dorsal hippocampal rat microvessels in the acute stages following sonication. Microarray analysis of microvessels was performed at 6 and 24 hrs post-FUS. Expression changes in individual genes and bioinformatic analysis suggests that FUS may induce a transient inflammatory response in microvessels. Increased transcription of proinflammatory cytokine genes appears to be short-lived, largely returning to baseline by 24 hrs. This observation may help to explain some previously observed bioeffects of FUS and may also be a driving force for the angiogenic processes and reduced drug efflux suggested by this work. While further studies are necessary, these results open up intriguing possibilities for novel FUS applications and suggest possible routes for pharmacologically modifying the technique. PMID:28374753

  1. Feasibility of optoacoustic visualization of high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions in live tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chitnis, Parag V.; Brecht, Hans-Peter; Su, Richard; Oraevsky, Alexander A.

    2010-03-01

    A 3-D optoacoustic imaging system was used to visualize thermal lesions produced in vivo using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU). A 7.5-MHz, surgical, focused transducer with a radius of curvature of 35 mm and an aperture diameter of 23 mm was used to generate HIFU. A pulsed laser, which could operate at 755 nm and 1064 nm, was used to illuminate excised tissue and mice using a bifurcated fiber bundle resulting in two wide beams of light. Tomographic images were obtained while the specimens were rotated within a sphere outlined by a concave arc-shaped array of 64 piezo-composite transducers. These images were then combined to reconstruct 3-D volume images (voxel resolution 0.5 mm), which were acquired before and after HIFU exposure. In vivo optoacoustic images acquired at 1064 nm provided visualization of HIFU lesions. The lesion was indicated by a negative optoacoustic contrast. The molecular nature of such contrast may possibly be associated with reduction of the optical absorption due to reduced concentration of blood, tissue dehydration, denaturation of proteins and porphyrins, and reduction of thermoacoustic efficiency in the thermally treated tissue. These preliminary results demonstrate the potential of optoacoustic imaging to assess and monitor the progress of HIFU therapy.

  2. Imaging high-intensity focused ultrasound-induced tissue denaturation by multispectral photoacoustic method: an ex vivo study.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yao; O'Neill, Brian

    2013-03-10

    We present an ex vivo study for the first time, to the best of our knowledge, in multispectral photoacoustic imaging (PAI) of tissue denaturation induced by high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) in this paper. Tissue of bovine muscle was thermally treated in a heated water bath and by HIFU, and then was imaged using a multispectral photoacoustic approach. Light at multiple optical wavelengths between 700 and 900 nm was delivered to the treated bovine muscle tissue to excite the photoacoustic signal. Apparent tissue denaturation has been observed in multispectral photoacoustic images after being treated in a water bath and by HIFU. It is interesting that the denaturation is more striking at shorter optical wavelength photoacoustic images than at longer optical wavelength photoacoustic images. Multispectral photoacoustic images of the tissue denaturation were further analyzed and the photoacoustic spectrums of the denaturized tissue were calculated in this paper. This study suggests that a multispectral PAI approach might be a promising tool to evaluate tissue denaturation induced by HIFU treatment.

  3. Focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening to enhance temozolomide delivery for glioblastoma treatment: a preclinical study.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kuo-Chen; Chu, Po-Chun; Wang, Hay-Yan Jack; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Lu, Yu-Jen; Lee, Pei-Yun; Tseng, I-Chou; Feng, Li-Ying; Hsu, Peng-Wei; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to assess the preclinical therapeutic efficacy of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)-monitored focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) disruption to enhance Temozolomide (TMZ) delivery for improving Glioblastoma Multiforme (GBM) treatment. MRI-monitored FUS with microbubbles was used to transcranially disrupt the BBB in brains of Fisher rats implanted with 9L glioma cells. FUS-BBB opening was spectrophotometrically determined by leakage of dyes into the brain, and TMZ was quantitated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and plasma by LC-MS\\MS. The effects of treatment on tumor progression (by MRI), animal survival and brain tissue histology were investigated. Results demonstrated that FUS-BBB opening increased the local accumulation of dyes in brain parenchyma by 3.8-/2.1-fold in normal/tumor tissues. Compared to TMZ alone, combined FUS treatment increased the TMZ CSF/plasma ratio from 22.7% to 38.6%, reduced the 7-day tumor progression ratio from 24.03 to 5.06, and extended the median survival from 20 to 23 days. In conclusion, this study provided preclinical evidence that FUS BBB-opening increased the local concentration of TMZ to improve the control of tumor progression and animal survival, suggesting its clinical potential for improving current brain tumor treatment.

  4. Permeability assessment of the focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachos, F.; Tung, Y.-S.; Konofagou, E. E.

    2010-09-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles has been shown to successfully open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the mouse brain. In this study, we compute the BBB permeability after opening in vivo. The spatial permeability of the BBB-opened region was assessed using dynamic contrast-enhanced MRI (DCE-MRI). The DCE-MR images were post-processed using the general kinetic model (GKM) and the reference region model (RRM). Permeability maps were generated and the Ktrans values were calculated for a predefined volume of interest in the sonicated and the control area for each mouse. The results demonstrated that Ktrans in the BBB-opened region (0.02 ± 0.0123 for GKM and 0.03 ± 0.0167 min-1 for RRM) was at least two orders of magnitude higher when compared to the contra-lateral (control) side (0 and 8.5 × 10-4 ± 12 × 10-4 min-1, respectively). The permeability values obtained with the two models showed statistically significant agreement and excellent correlation (R2 = 0.97). At histological examination, it was concluded that no macroscopic damage was induced. This study thus constitutes the first permeability assessment of FUS-induced BBB opening using DCE-MRI, supporting the fact that the aforementioned technique may constitute a safe, non-invasive and efficacious drug delivery method.

  5. Microbubble-Size Dependence of Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood–Brain Barrier Opening in Mice In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Choi, James J.; Feshitan, Jameel A.; Baseri, Babak; Wang, Shougang; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Borden, Mark A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of neurological agents is severely limited, because large compounds do not cross the blood–brain barrier (BBB). Focused ultrasound (FUS) sonication in the presence of microbubbles has been shown to temporarily open the BBB, allowing systemically administered agents into the brain. Until now, polydispersed microbubbles (1–10 μm in diameter) were used, and, therefore, the bubble sizes better suited for inducing the opening remain unknown. Here, the FUS-induced BBB opening dependence on microbubble size is investigated. Bubbles at 1–2 and 4–5 μm in diameter were separately size-isolated using differential centrifugation before being systemically administered in mice (n = 28). The BBB opening pressure threshold was identified by varying the peak-rarefactional pressure amplitude. BBB opening was determined by fluorescence enhancement due to systemically administered, fluorescent-tagged, 3-kDa dextran. The identified threshold fell between 0.30 and 0.46 MPa in the case of 1–2 μm bubbles and between 0.15 and 0.30 MPa in the 4–5 μm case. At every pressure studied, the fluorescence was greater with the 4–5 μm than with the 1–2 μm bubbles. At 0.61 MPa, in the 1–2 μm bubble case, the fluorescence amount and area were greater in the thalamus than in the hippocampus. In conclusion, it was determined that the FUS-induced BBB opening was dependent on both the size distribution in the injected microbubble volume and the brain region targeted. PMID:19846365

  6. Microbubble-size dependence of focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening in mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, James J; Feshitan, Jameel A; Baseri, Babak; Wang, Shougang; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Borden, Mark A; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2010-01-01

    The therapeutic efficacy of neurological agents is severely limited, because large compounds do not cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Focused ultrasound (FUS) sonication in the presence of microbubbles has been shown to temporarily open the BBB, allowing systemically administered agents into the brain. Until now, polydispersed microbubbles (1-10 microm in diameter) were used, and, therefore, the bubble sizes better suited for inducing the opening remain unknown. Here, the FUS-induced BBB opening dependence on microbubble size is investigated. Bubbles at 1-2 and 4-5 microm in diameter were separately size-isolated using differential centrifugation before being systemically administered in mice (n = 28). The BBB opening pressure threshold was identified by varying the peak-rarefactional pressure amplitude. BBB opening was determined by fluorescence enhancement due to systemically administered, fluorescent-tagged, 3-kDa dextran. The identified threshold fell between 0.30 and 0.46 MPa in the case of 1-2 microm bubbles and between 0.15 and 0.30 MPa in the 4-5 microm case. At every pressure studied, the fluorescence was greater with the 4-5 mum than with the 1-2 microm bubbles. At 0.61 MPa, in the 1-2 microm bubble case, the fluorescence amount and area were greater in the thalamus than in the hippocampus. In conclusion, it was determined that the FUS-induced BBB opening was dependent on both the size distribution in the injected microbubble volume and the brain region targeted.

  7. Focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening for non-viral, non-invasive, and targeted gene delivery.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Yin; Hsieh, Han-Yi; Pitt, William G; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Tseng, I-Chou; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li

    2015-08-28

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure in the presence of microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and is an emerging technique for non-invasive brain therapeutic agent delivery. Given the potential to deliver large molecules into the CNS via this technique, we propose a reliable strategy to synergistically apply FUS-BBB opening for the non-invasive and targeted delivery of non-viral genes into the CNS for therapeutic purpose. In this study, we developed a gene-liposome system, in which the liposomes are designed to carry plasmid DNA (pDNA, containing luciferase reporter gene) to form a liposomal-plasmid DNA (LpDNA) complex. Pulsed FUS exposure was delivered to induce BBB opening (500-kHz, burst length=10ms, 1% duty cycle, PRF=1Hz). The longitudinal expression of luciferase was quantitated via an in vivo imaging system (IVIS). The reporter gene expression level was confirmed via immunoblotting, and histological staining was used to identify transfected cells via fluorescent microscopy. In a comparison of gene transduction efficiency, the LpDNA system showed better cell transduction than the pDNA system. With longitudinal observation of IVIS monitoring, animals with FUS treatment showed significant promotion of LpDNA release into the CNS and demonstrated enhanced expression of genes upon sonication with FUS-BBB opening, while both the luciferase and GDNF protein expression were successfully measured via Western blotting. The gene expression peak was observed at day 2, and the gene expression level was up to 5-fold higher than that in the untreated hemisphere (compared to a 1-fold increase in the direct-inject positive-control group). The transfection efficiency was also found to be LpDNA dose-dependent, where higher payloads of pDNA resulted in a higher transfection rate. Immunoblotting and histological staining confirmed the expression of reporter genes in glial cells as well as astrocytes. This study suggests that IV administration of LpDNA in

  8. In vivo transcranial cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening in mice.

    PubMed

    Tung, Yao-Sheng; Vlachos, Fotios; Choi, James J; Deffieux, Thomas; Selert, Kirsten; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2010-10-21

    The in vivo cavitation response associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening as induced by transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles was studied in order to better identify the underlying mechanism in its noninvasive application. A cylindrically focused hydrophone, confocal with the FUS transducer, was used as a passive cavitation detector (PCD) to identify the threshold of inertial cavitation (IC) in the presence of Definity® microbubbles (mean diameter range: 1.1-3.3 µm, Lantheus Medical Imaging, MA, USA). A vessel phantom was first used to determine the reliability of the PCD prior to in vivo use. A cerebral blood vessel was simulated by generating a cylindrical channel of 610 µm in diameter inside a polyacrylamide gel and by saturating its volume with microbubbles. The microbubbles were sonicated through an excised mouse skull. Second, the same PCD setup was employed for in vivo noninvasive (i.e. transdermal and transcranial) cavitation detection during BBB opening. After the intravenous administration of Definity® microbubbles, pulsed FUS was applied (frequency: 1.525 or 1.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure: 0.15-0.60 MPa, duty cycle: 20%, PRF: 10 Hz, duration: 1 min with a 30 s interval) to the right hippocampus of twenty-six (n = 26) mice in vivo through intact scalp and skull. T1 and T2-weighted MR images were used to verify the BBB opening. A spectrogram was generated at each pressure in order to detect the IC onset and duration. The threshold of BBB opening was found to be at a 0.30 MPa peak-rarefactional pressure in vivo. Both the phantom and in vivo studies indicated that the IC pressure threshold had a peak-rarefactional amplitude of 0.45 MPa. This indicated that BBB opening may not require IC at or near the threshold. Histological analysis showed that BBB opening could be induced without any cellular damage at 0.30 and 0.45 MPa. In conclusion, the cavitation response could be detected without craniotomy in mice

  9. In vivo transcranial cavitation threshold detection during ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening in mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tung, Yao-Sheng; Vlachos, Fotios; Choi, James J.; Deffieux, Thomas; Selert, Kirsten; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2010-10-01

    The in vivo cavitation response associated with blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening as induced by transcranial focused ultrasound (FUS) in conjunction with microbubbles was studied in order to better identify the underlying mechanism in its noninvasive application. A cylindrically focused hydrophone, confocal with the FUS transducer, was used as a passive cavitation detector (PCD) to identify the threshold of inertial cavitation (IC) in the presence of Definity® microbubbles (mean diameter range: 1.1-3.3 µm, Lantheus Medical Imaging, MA, USA). A vessel phantom was first used to determine the reliability of the PCD prior to in vivo use. A cerebral blood vessel was simulated by generating a cylindrical channel of 610 µm in diameter inside a polyacrylamide gel and by saturating its volume with microbubbles. The microbubbles were sonicated through an excised mouse skull. Second, the same PCD setup was employed for in vivo noninvasive (i.e. transdermal and transcranial) cavitation detection during BBB opening. After the intravenous administration of Definity® microbubbles, pulsed FUS was applied (frequency: 1.525 or 1.5 MHz, peak-rarefactional pressure: 0.15-0.60 MPa, duty cycle: 20%, PRF: 10 Hz, duration: 1 min with a 30 s interval) to the right hippocampus of twenty-six (n = 26) mice in vivo through intact scalp and skull. T1 and T2-weighted MR images were used to verify the BBB opening. A spectrogram was generated at each pressure in order to detect the IC onset and duration. The threshold of BBB opening was found to be at a 0.30 MPa peak-rarefactional pressure in vivo. Both the phantom and in vivo studies indicated that the IC pressure threshold had a peak-rarefactional amplitude of 0.45 MPa. This indicated that BBB opening may not require IC at or near the threshold. Histological analysis showed that BBB opening could be induced without any cellular damage at 0.30 and 0.45 MPa. In conclusion, the cavitation response could be detected without craniotomy in mice

  10. Paramagnetic perfluorocarbon-filled albumin-(Gd-DTPA) microbubbles for the induction of focused-ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening and concurrent MR and ultrasound imaging.

    PubMed

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Liu, Hao-Li; Su, Chia-Hao; Hua, Mu-Yi; Yang, Hung-Wei; Weng, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Po-Hung; Huang, Sheng-Min; Wu, Shih-Yen; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Li, Pai-Chi

    2012-05-07

    This paper presents new albumin-shelled Gd-DTPA microbubbles (MBs) that can concurrently serve as a dual-modality contrast agent for ultrasound (US) imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to assist blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening and detect intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) during focused ultrasound brain drug delivery. Perfluorocarbon-filled albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were prepared with a mean diameter of 2320 nm and concentration of 2.903×10(9) MBs ml(-1) using albumin-(Gd-DTPA) and by sonication with perfluorocarbon (C(3)F(8)) gas. The albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were then centrifuged and the procedure was repeated until the free Gd(3+) ions were eliminated (which were detected by the xylenol orange sodium salt solution). The albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were also characterized and evaluated both in vitro and in vivo by US and MR imaging. Focused US was used with the albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs to induce disruption of the BBB in 18 rats. BBB disruption was confirmed with contrast-enhanced T(1)-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence MR imaging. Heavy T(2)*-weighted 3D fast low-angle shot sequence MR imaging was used to detect ICH. In vitro US imaging experiments showed that albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs can significantly enhance the US contrast in T(1)-, T(2)- and T(2)*-weighted MR images. The r(1) and r(2) relaxivities for Gd-DTPA were 7.69 and 21.35 s(-1)mM(-1), respectively, indicating that the MBs represent a positive contrast agent in T(1)-weighted images. In vivo MR imaging experiments on 18 rats showed that focused US combined with albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs can be used to both induce disruption of the BBB and detect ICH. To compare the signal intensity change between pure BBB opening and BBB opening accompanying ICH, albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MB imaging can provide a ratio of 5.14 with significant difference (p = 0.026), whereas Gd-DTPA imaging only provides a ratio of 2.13 and without significant difference (p = 0.108). The results indicate that albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs have potential as a US/MR dual

  11. Paramagnetic perfluorocarbon-filled albumin-(Gd-DTPA) microbubbles for the induction of focused-ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening and concurrent MR and ultrasound imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Ai-Ho; Liu, Hao-Li; Su, Chia-Hao; Hua, Mu-Yi; Yang, Hung-Wei; Weng, Yu-Ting; Hsu, Po-Hung; Huang, Sheng-Min; Wu, Shih-Yen; Wang, Hsin-Ell; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Li, Pai-Chi

    2012-05-01

    This paper presents new albumin-shelled Gd-DTPA microbubbles (MBs) that can concurrently serve as a dual-modality contrast agent for ultrasound (US) imaging and magnetic resonance (MR) imaging to assist blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening and detect intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) during focused ultrasound brain drug delivery. Perfluorocarbon-filled albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were prepared with a mean diameter of 2320 nm and concentration of 2.903×109 MBs ml-1 using albumin-(Gd-DTPA) and by sonication with perfluorocarbon (C3F8) gas. The albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were then centrifuged and the procedure was repeated until the free Gd3+ ions were eliminated (which were detected by the xylenol orange sodium salt solution). The albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs were also characterized and evaluated both in vitro and in vivo by US and MR imaging. Focused US was used with the albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs to induce disruption of the BBB in 18 rats. BBB disruption was confirmed with contrast-enhanced T1-weighted turbo-spin-echo sequence MR imaging. Heavy T2*-weighted 3D fast low-angle shot sequence MR imaging was used to detect ICH. In vitro US imaging experiments showed that albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs can significantly enhance the US contrast in T1-, T2- and T2*-weighted MR images. The r1 and r2 relaxivities for Gd-DTPA were 7.69 and 21.35 s-1mM-1, respectively, indicating that the MBs represent a positive contrast agent in T1-weighted images. In vivo MR imaging experiments on 18 rats showed that focused US combined with albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs can be used to both induce disruption of the BBB and detect ICH. To compare the signal intensity change between pure BBB opening and BBB opening accompanying ICH, albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MB imaging can provide a ratio of 5.14 with significant difference (p = 0.026), whereas Gd-DTPA imaging only provides a ratio of 2.13 and without significant difference (p = 0.108). The results indicate that albumin-(Gd-DTPA) MBs have potential as a US/MR dual-modality contrast agent for

  12. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-01-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery. PMID:27630037

  13. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-09-01

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery.

  14. Focused Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening: Association with Mechanical Index and Cavitation Index Analyzed by Dynamic Contrast-Enhanced Magnetic-Resonance Imaging.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Kang, Shih-Tsung; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-09-15

    Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles can temporally open the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the cavitation activities of microbubbles play a key role in the BBB-opening process. Previous attempts used contrast-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (CE-MRI) to correlate the mechanical index (MI) with the scale of BBB-opening, but MI only partially gauged acoustic activities, and CE-MRI did not fully explore correlations of pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic behaviors. Recently, the cavitation index (CI) has been derived to serve as an indicator of microbubble-ultrasound stable cavitation, and may also serve as a valid indicator to gauge the level of FUS-induced BBB opening. This study investigates the feasibility of gauging FUS-induced BBB opened level via the two indexes, MI and CI, through dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE)-MRI analysis as well as passive cavitation detection (PCD) analysis. Pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic parameters derived from DCE-MRI were characterized to identify the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. Our results demonstrated that DCE-MRI can successfully access pharmacodynamic/pharmacokinetic BBB-opened behavior, and was highly correlated both with MI and CI, implying the feasibility in using these two indices to gauge the scale of FUS-induced BBB opening. The proposed finding may facilitate the design toward using focused ultrasound as a safe and reliable noninvasive CNS drug delivery.

  15. Noninvasive localized delivery of Herceptin to the mouse brain by MRI-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinoshita, Manabu; McDannold, Nathan; Jolesz, Ferenc A.; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2006-08-01

    Antibody-based anticancer agents are promising chemotherapeutic agents. Among these agents, Herceptin (trastuzumab), a humanized anti-human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2/c-erbB2) monoclonal antibody, has been used successfully in patients with breast cancer. However, in patients with brain metastasis, the blood-brain barrier limits its use, and a different delivery method is needed to treat these patients. Here, we report that Herceptin can be delivered locally and noninvasively into the mouse central nervous system through the blood-brain barrier under image guidance by using an MRI-guided focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier disruption technique. The amount of Herceptin delivered to the target tissue was correlated with the extent of the MRI-monitored barrier opening, making it possible to estimate indirectly the amount of Herceptin delivered. Histological changes attributable to this procedure were minimal. This method may represent a powerful technique for the delivery of macromolecular agents such as antibodies to treat patients with diseases of the central nervous system. brain tumor | microbubble

  16. Pharmacodynamic analysis of magnetic resonance imaging-monitored focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening for drug delivery to brain tumors.

    PubMed

    Chu, Po-Chun; Chai, Wen-Yen; Hsieh, Han-Yi; Wang, Jiun-Jie; Wey, Shiaw-Pyng; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Liu, Hao-Li

    2013-01-01

    Microbubble-enhanced focused ultrasound (FUS) can enhance the delivery of therapeutic agents into the brain for brain tumor treatment. The purpose of this study was to investigate the influence of brain tumor conditions on the distribution and dynamics of small molecule leakage into targeted regions of the brain after FUS-BBB opening. A total of 34 animals were used, and the process was monitored by 7T-MRI. Evans blue (EB) dye as well as Gd-DTPA served as small molecule substitutes for evaluation of drug behavior. EB was quantified spectrophotometrically. Spin-spin (R1) relaxometry and area under curve (AUC) were measured by MRI to quantify Gd-DTPA. We found that FUS-BBB opening provided a more significant increase in permeability with small tumors. In contrast, accumulation was much higher in large tumors, independent of FUS. The AUC values of Gd-DTPA were well correlated with EB delivery, suggesting that Gd-DTPA was a good indicator of total small-molecule accumulation in the target region. The peripheral regions of large tumors exhibited similar dynamics of small-molecule leakage after FUS-BBB opening as small tumors, suggesting that FUS-BBB opening may have the most significant permeability-enhancing effect on tumor peripheral. This study provides useful information toward designing an optimized FUS-BBB opening strategy to deliver small-molecule therapeutic agents into brain tumors.

  17. Gold-nanorod contrast-enhanced photoacoustic micro-imaging of focused-ultrasound induced blood-brain-barrier opening in a rat model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Po-Hsun; Liu, Hao-Li; Hsu, Po-Hung; Lin, Chia-Yu; Chris Wang, Churng-Ren; Chen, Pin-Yuan; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Yen, Tzu-Chen; Li, Meng-Lin

    2012-06-01

    In this study, we develop a novel photoacoustic imaging technique based on gold nanorods (AuNRs) for quantitatively monitoring focused-ultrasound (FUS) induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening in a rat model in vivo. This study takes advantage of the strong near-infrared absorption (peak at ~800 nm) of AuNRs and the extravasation tendency from BBB opening foci due to their nano-scale size to passively label the BBB disruption area. Experimental results show that AuNR contrast-enhanced photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) successfully reveals the spatial distribution and temporal response of BBB disruption area in the rat brains. The quantitative measurement of contrast enhancement has potential to estimate the local concentration of AuNRs and even the dosage of therapeutic molecules when AuNRs are further used as nano-carrier for drug delivery or photothermal therapy. The photoacoustic results also provide complementary information to MRI, being helpful to discover more details about FUS induced BBB opening in small animal models.

  18. Drug delivery to the brain by focused ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption: quantitative evaluation of enhanced permeability of cerebral vasculature using two-photon microscopy.

    PubMed

    Nhan, Tam; Burgess, Alison; Cho, Eunice E; Stefanovic, Bojana; Lilge, Lothar; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2013-11-28

    Reversible and localized blood-brain barrier disruption (BBBD) using focused ultrasound (FUS) in combination with intravascularly administered microbubbles (MBs) has been established as a non-invasive method for drug delivery to the brain. Using two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2 PFM), we imaged the cerebral vasculature during BBBD and observed the extravasation of fluorescent dye in real-time in vivo. We measured the enhanced permeability upon BBBD for both 10 kDa and 70 kDa dextran conjugated Texas Red (TR) at the acoustic pressure range of 0.2-0.8 MPa and found that permeability constants of TR10 kDa and TR70 kDa vary from 0.0006 to 0.0359 min(-1) and from 0.0003 to 0.0231 min(-1), respectively. For both substances, a linear regression was applied on the permeability constant against the acoustic pressure and the slope from best-fit was found to be 0.039 ± 0.005 min(-1)/MPa and 0.018 ± 0.005 min(-1)/MPa, respectively. In addition, the pressure threshold for successfully induced BBBD was confirmed to be 0.4-0.6MPa. Finally, we identified two types of leakage kinetics (fast and slow) that exhibit distinct permeability constants and temporal disruption onsets, as well as demonstrated their correlations with the applied acoustic pressure and vessel diameter. Direct assessment of vascular permeability and insights on its dependency on acoustic pressure, vessel size and leakage kinetics are important for treatment strategies of BBBD-based drug delivery.

  19. Non-invasive, neuron-specific gene therapy by focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening in Parkinson's disease mouse model.

    PubMed

    Lin, Chung-Yin; Hsieh, Han-Yi; Chen, Chiung-Mei; Wu, Shang-Rung; Tsai, Chih-Hung; Huang, Chiung-Yin; Hua, Mu-Yi; Wei, Kuo-Chen; Yeh, Chih-Kuang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-08-10

    Focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced with microbubbles (MBs) is a promising technique for noninvasive opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) to allow targeted delivery of therapeutic substances into the brain and thus the noninvasive delivery of gene vectors for CNS treatment. We have previously demonstrated that a separated gene-carrying liposome and MBs administration plus FUS exposure can deliver genes into the brain, with the successful expression of the reporter gene and glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) gene. In this study, we further modify the delivery system by conjugating gene-carrying liposomes with MBs to improve the GDNF gene-delivery efficiency, and to verify the possibility of using this system to perform treatment in the 1-Methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP)-induced animal disease model. FUS-BBB opening was verified by contrast-enhanced MRI, and GFP gene expression was verified via in vivo imaging system (IVIS). Western blots as well as enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were conducted to measure protein expression, and immunohistochemistry (IHC) was conducted to test the Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-neuron distribution. Dopamine (DA) and its metabolites as well as dopamine active transporter (DAT) were quantitatively analyzed to show dopaminergic neuronal dopamine secretion/activity/metabolism. Motor performance was evaluated by rotarod test weekly. Results demonstrated that the LpDNA-MBs (gene-liposome-MBs) complexes successfully serve as gene carrier and BBB-opening catalyst, and outperformed the separated LpDNA/MBs administration both in terms of gene delivery and expression. TH-positive IHC and measurement of DA and its metabolites DOPAC and HVA confirmed improved neuronal function, and the proposed system also provided the best neuroprotective effect to retard the progression of motor-related behavioral abnormalities. Immunoblotting and histological staining further confirmed the expression of reporter genes in

  20. Automated detection of ocular focus.

    PubMed

    Hunter, David G; Nusz, Kevin J; Gandhi, Nainesh K; Quraishi, Imran H; Gramatikov, Boris I; Guyton, David L

    2004-01-01

    We characterize objectively the state of focus of the human eye, utilizing a bull's eye photodetector to detect the double-pass blur produced from a point source of light. A point fixation source of light illuminates the eye. Fundus-reflected light is focused by the optical system of the eye onto a bull's eye photodetector [consisting of an annulus (A) and a center (C) of approximately equal active area]. To generate focus curves, C/A is measured with a range of trial lenses in the light path. Three human eyes and a model eye are studied. In the model eye, the focus curve showed a sharp peak with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of +/-0.25 D. In human eyes, the ratio C/A was >4 at best focus in all cases, with a FWHM of +/-1 D. The optical apparatus detects ocular focus (as opposed to refractive error) in real time. A device that can assess focus rapidly and objectively will make it possible to perform low-cost, mass screening for focusing problems such as may exist in children at risk for amblyopia.

  1. Magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil's longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multilayer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  2. Magnetoresistive Flux Focusing Eddy Current Flaw Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A giant magnetoresistive flux focusing eddy current device effectively detects deep flaws in thick multilayer conductive materials. The probe uses an excitation coil to induce eddy currents in conducting material perpendicularly oriented to the coil s longitudinal axis. A giant magnetoresistive (GMR) sensor, surrounded by the excitation coil, is used to detect generated fields. Between the excitation coil and GMR sensor is a highly permeable flux focusing lens which magnetically separates the GMR sensor and excitation coil and produces high flux density at the outer edge of the GMR sensor. The use of feedback inside the flux focusing lens enables complete cancellation of the leakage fields at the GMR sensor location and biasing of the GMR sensor to a location of high magnetic field sensitivity. In an alternate embodiment, a permanent magnet is positioned adjacent to the GMR sensor to accomplish the biasing. Experimental results have demonstrated identification of flaws up to 1 cm deep in aluminum alloy structures. To detect deep flaws about circular fasteners or inhomogeneities in thick multi-layer conductive materials, the device is mounted in a hand-held rotating probe assembly that is connected to a computer for system control, data acquisition, processing and storage.

  3. Controlled ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier disruption using passive acoustic emissions monitoring.

    PubMed

    Arvanitis, Costas D; Livingstone, Margaret S; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001) larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R(2) = 0.78). Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology.

  4. Controlled Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Disruption Using Passive Acoustic Emissions Monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Arvanitis, Costas D.; Livingstone, Margaret S.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; McDannold, Nathan

    2012-01-01

    The ability of ultrasonically-induced oscillations of circulating microbubbles to permeabilize vascular barriers such as the blood-brain barrier (BBB) holds great promise for noninvasive targeted drug delivery. A major issue has been a lack of control over the procedure to ensure both safe and effective treatment. Here, we evaluated the use of passively-recorded acoustic emissions as a means to achieve this control. An acoustic emissions monitoring system was constructed and integrated into a clinical transcranial MRI-guided focused ultrasound system. Recordings were analyzed using a spectroscopic method that isolates the acoustic emissions caused by the microbubbles during sonication. This analysis characterized and quantified harmonic oscillations that occur when the BBB is disrupted, and broadband emissions that occur when tissue damage occurs. After validating the system's performance in pilot studies that explored a wide range of exposure levels, the measurements were used to control the ultrasound exposure level during transcranial sonications at 104 volumes over 22 weekly sessions in four macaques. We found that increasing the exposure level until a large harmonic emissions signal was observed was an effective means to ensure BBB disruption without broadband emissions. We had a success rate of 96% in inducing BBB disruption as measured by in contrast-enhanced MRI, and we detected broadband emissions in less than 0.2% of the applied bursts. The magnitude of the harmonic emissions signals was significantly (P<0.001) larger for sonications where BBB disruption was detected, and it correlated with BBB permeabilization as indicated by the magnitude of the MRI signal enhancement after MRI contrast administration (R2 = 0.78). Overall, the results indicate that harmonic emissions can be a used to control focused ultrasound-induced BBB disruption. These results are promising for clinical translation of this technology. PMID:23029240

  5. A Feed-forward Neural Network Algorithm to Detect Thermal Lesions Induced by High Intensity Focused Ultrasound in Tissue.

    PubMed

    Rangraz, Parisa; Behnam, Hamid; Shakhssalim, Naser; Tavakkoli, Jahan

    2012-10-01

    Non-invasive ultrasound surgeries such as high intensity focused ultrasound have been developed to treat tumors or to stop bleeding. In this technique, incorporation of a suitable imaging modality to monitor and control the treatments is essential so several imaging methods such as X-ray, Magnetic resonance imaging and ultrasound imaging have been proposed to monitor the induced thermal lesions. Currently, the only ultrasound imaging technique that is clinically used for monitoring this treatment is standard pulse-echo B-mode ultrasound imaging. This paper describes a novel method for detecting high intensity focused ultrasound-induced thermal lesions using a feed forward neural-network. This study was carried on in vitro animal tissue samples. Backscattered radio frequency signals were acquired in real-time during treatment in order to detect induced thermal lesions. Changes in various tissue properties including tissue's attenuation coefficient, integrated backscatter, scaling parameter of Nakagami distribution, frequency dependent scatterer amplitudes and tissue vibration derived from the backscattered radio frequency data acquired 10 minutes after treatment regarding to before treatment were used in this study. These estimated parameters were used as features of the neural network. Estimated parameters of two sample tissues including two thermal lesions and their segmented B-mode images were used along with the pathological results as training data for the neural network. The results of the study shows that the trained feed forward neural network could effectively detect thermal lesions in vitro. Comparing the estimated size of the thermal lesion (9.6 mm × 8.5 mm) using neural network with the actual size of that from physical examination (10.1 mm × 9 mm) shows that we could detect high intensity focused ultrasound thermal lesions with the difference of 0.5 mm × 0.5 mm.

  6. Feasibility of using Nakagami distribution in evaluating the formation of ultrasound-induced thermal lesions.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Siyuan; Zhou, Fanyu; Wan, Mingxi; Wei, Min; Fu, Quanyou; Wang, Xing; Wang, Supin

    2012-06-01

    The acoustic posterior shadowing effects of bubbles influence the accuracy for defining the location and range of ablated thermal lesions during focused ultrasound surgery when using ultrasonic monitoring imaging. This paper explored the feasibility of using Nakagami distribution to evaluate the ablated region induced by focused ultrasound exposures at different acoustic power levels in transparent tissue-mimicking phantoms. The mean value of the Nakagami parameter m was about 0.5 in the cavitation region and increased to around 1 in the ablated region. Nakagami images were not subject to significant shadowing effects of bubbles. Ultrasound-induced thermal lesions observed in the photos and Nakagami images were overshadowed by bubbles in the B-mode images. The lesion size predicted in the Nakagami images was smaller than that predicted in the photos due to the sub resolvable effect of Nakagami imaging at the interface. This preliminary study on tissue-mimicking phantom suggested that the Nakagami parameter m may have the potential use in evaluating the formation of ultrasound-induced thermal lesion when the shadowing effect of bubbles is strong while the thermal lesion was small. Further studies in vivo and in vitro will be needed to evaluate the potential application.

  7. Preface to the Focus Issue: Chaos Detection Methods and Predictability

    SciTech Connect

    Gottwald, Georg A.; Skokos, Charalampos

    2014-06-01

    This Focus Issue presents a collection of papers originating from the workshop Methods of Chaos Detection and Predictability: Theory and Applications held at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, June 17–21, 2013. The main aim of this interdisciplinary workshop was to review comprehensively the theory and numerical implementation of the existing methods of chaos detection and predictability, as well as to report recent applications of these techniques to different scientific fields. The collection of twelve papers in this Focus Issue represents the wide range of applications, spanning mathematics, physics, astronomy, particle accelerator physics, meteorology and medical research. This Preface surveys the papers of this Issue.

  8. Preface to the Focus Issue: chaos detection methods and predictability.

    PubMed

    Gottwald, Georg A; Skokos, Charalampos

    2014-06-01

    This Focus Issue presents a collection of papers originating from the workshop Methods of Chaos Detection and Predictability: Theory and Applications held at the Max Planck Institute for the Physics of Complex Systems in Dresden, June 17-21, 2013. The main aim of this interdisciplinary workshop was to review comprehensively the theory and numerical implementation of the existing methods of chaos detection and predictability, as well as to report recent applications of these techniques to different scientific fields. The collection of twelve papers in this Focus Issue represents the wide range of applications, spanning mathematics, physics, astronomy, particle accelerator physics, meteorology and medical research. This Preface surveys the papers of this Issue.

  9. Attention focusing and anomaly detection in systems monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, Richard J.

    1994-01-01

    Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust anomaly detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an anomaly is difficult to come by. In addition, to make the monitoring process efficient, and to avoid the potential for information overload on human operators, attention focusing must also be addressed. When an anomaly occurs, more often than not several sensors are affected, and the partially redundant information they provide can be confusing, particularly in a crisis situation where a response is needed quickly. The focus of this paper is a new technique for attention focusing. The technique involves reasoning about the distance between two frequency distributions, and is used to detect both anomalous system parameters and 'broken' causal dependencies. These two forms of information together isolate the locus of anomalous behavior in the system being monitored.

  10. Electrostrictive limit and focusing effects in pulsed photoacoustic detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heritier, J.-M.

    1983-01-01

    We give an analytical solution in the time and frequency domain for the cylindrical pressure wave generated by a laser pulse traveling in a liquid, which is valid over a wide range of laser beam dimensions and pulse durations. This leads to a simple prediction of the ultimate limitation set by the electrostrictive coupling and an easy analysis of the focusing effects on the photoacoustic signal. Two separate detection schemes were considered and show different behavior.

  11. Low intensity ultrasound induces apoptosis via MPT channel on mitochondrial membrane: Target for regulating cancer therapy or not?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Yi; Wan, Mingxi

    2017-03-01

    To discuss how the mitochondrion is involved in low intensity ultrasound induced apoptosis, HepG2 cells were irradiated by low intensity focused ultrasound (ISPTA = 3W/cm2, 1 min) and then cultured from 3-12 h post irradiation in the study. The morphological alteration was examined by light and fluorescent microscopy respectively. Cell viability and apoptosis were examined by trypan blue staining and flow cytometry with double staining of FITC-labelled Annexin-V/PI. Key proteins responded to irradiation were screened out by sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and shotgun proteomic methods with Agilent 1100 HPLC-Chip-MS technology. Representative apoptotic morphological characteristics and increased percentage of apoptotic cells were achieved. Six important proteins (4 up-regulated and 2 down-regulated) were selected and analyzed. It revealed low intensity focused ultrasound could induce apoptosis in HepG2 cells and the US-induced apoptosis was mitochondria-dependent and caspases-dependent. Moreover, mitochondrial membrane permeability transition (MPT) is related to ultrasound induced apoptosis, but VDAC may be not the main MPT channel. Understanding it could help to assist the cancer therapy by regulating the MPT as the target.

  12. Visualization of ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles using the synchrotron x-ray Analyzer Based Imaging technique.

    PubMed

    Izadifar, Zahra; Belev, George; Izadifar, Mohammad; Izadifar, Zohreh; Chapman, Dean

    2014-12-07

    Observing cavitation bubbles deep within tissue is very difficult. The development of a method for probing cavitation, irrespective of its location in tissues, would improve the efficiency and application of ultrasound in the clinic. A synchrotron x-ray imaging technique, which is capable of detecting cavitation bubbles induced in water by a sonochemistry system, is reported here; this could possibly be extended to the study of therapeutic ultrasound in tissues. The two different x-ray imaging techniques of Analyzer Based Imaging (ABI) and phase contrast imaging (PCI) were examined in order to detect ultrasound induced cavitation bubbles. Cavitation was not observed by PCI, however it was detectable with ABI. Acoustic cavitation was imaged at six different acoustic power levels and six different locations through the acoustic beam in water at a fixed power level. The results indicate the potential utility of this technique for cavitation studies in tissues, but it is time consuming. This may be improved by optimizing the imaging method.

  13. Computer-assisted detection of epileptiform focuses on SPECT images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grzegorczyk, Dawid; Dunin-Wąsowicz, Dorota; Mulawka, Jan J.

    2010-09-01

    Epilepsy is a common nervous system disease often related to consciousness disturbances and muscular spasm which affects about 1% of the human population. Despite major technological advances done in medicine in the last years there was no sufficient progress towards overcoming it. Application of advanced statistical methods and computer image analysis offers the hope for accurate detection and later removal of an epileptiform focuses which are the cause of some types of epilepsy. The aim of this work was to create a computer system that would help to find and diagnose disorders of blood circulation in the brain This may be helpful for the diagnosis of the epileptic seizures onset in the brain.

  14. Rotating flux-focusing eddy current probe for flaw detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks about circular fasteners and other circular inhomogeneities in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil, The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. By rotating the probe in a path around a circular fastener such as a rivet while maintaining a constant distance between the probe and the center of a rivet, the signal due to current flow about the rivet can be held constant. Any further changes in the current distribution, such as due to a fatigue crack at the rivet joint, can be detected as an increase in the output voltage above that due to the flow about the rivet head.

  15. Comparison of ultrasound-induced bioeffects in glass catfish after injection with optison and liquid perflourocarbon droplets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maruvada, Subha; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2003-04-01

    This work is an investigation of ultrasound-induced bioeffects in vivo. Glass catfish were used for these experiments because they are optically transparent. Anaesthetized fish were injected with either optison (OPT) or liquid perflourocarbon droplets (LPD), using microinjection techniques. Shortly after injection, the fish were insonified with one of two single element focused transducers (1.091 MHz and 0.747 MHz). An inverted microscope combined with a digital camera was used to optically monitor ultrasound interaction with the blood vessels in the tail of the fish at 200x magnification. The entire interaction was videotaped and digitized. The fish were insonified at power levels between 1-80 W, which translated into acoustic pressures from 0.45-15 MPa. Sonications were pulsed with burst lengths of 10 ms and 100 ms and a repetition frequency of 1 Hz. The entire length of one sonication at a specific pressure was 20 seconds. The effects of the sonication were analyzed at each pressure level. The ultrasound-induced bioeffects due to OPT and LPD were compared. Threshold values for damage were lower after OPT injection than after LPD injection, especially at lower frequencies.

  16. Complete Inhibition Of Ultrasound Induced Cytolysis In The Presence Of Inertial Cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sostaric, Joe Z.; Miyoshi, Norio; Riesz, Peter; De Graff, William G.; Mitchell, James B.

    2006-05-01

    The investigation of ultrasound for biotechnological applications including non-invasive surgery (HIFU), drug/gene delivery to cells (sonoporation) or through the skin (sonophoresis) and ultrasound assisted bioreactors has focused mainly on the physical effects of ultrasound. The beneficial effects of ultrasound rely on a number of application-dependent mechanisms, and may include tissue heating, acoustic streaming or cavitation. Although acoustic cavitation is necessary in some systems, cavitation bubbles simultaneously result in uncontrollable cell damage and cytolysis. Thus, the development of a number of biotechnological uses of ultrasound has been hampered by the necessity to constrain exposure parameters in order to prevent the occurrence of acoustic cavitation or to at least limit the detrimental effects of cavitation. The current study shows that non-toxic concentrations of specific n-alkyl solutes completely inhibit ultrasound induced cytolysis of in vitro suspensions of human leukemia cells (HL-60). Protection of the whole cell population from cytolysis is achieved even under extreme ultrasound exposure conditions that result in cytolysis of 100 % of the cell population in the absence of the n-alkyl solutes. Furthermore, the n-alkyl solutes did not hinder the process of inertial cavitation. This method may allow utilization of beneficial effects of ultrasound and cavitation while protecting cells from cavitation induced cytolysis and thereby presents new possibilities for ultrasound in medicine and biology.

  17. Graphene via Molecule-Assisted Ultrasound-Induced Liquid-Phase Exfoliation: A Supramolecular Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eredia, Matilde; Ciesielski, Artur; Samorì, Paolo

    2016-12-01

    Graphene is a two-dimensional (2D) material holding unique optical, mechanical, thermal and electrical properties. The combination of these exceptional characteristics makes graphene an ideal model system for fundamental physical and chemical studies as well as technologically ground breaking material for a large range of applications. Graphene can be produced either following a bottom-up or top-down method. The former is based on the formation of covalent networks suitably engineered molecular building blocks undergoing chemical reaction. The latter takes place through the exfoliation of bulk graphite into individual graphene sheets. Among them, ultrasound-induced liquid-phase exfoliation (UILPE) is an appealing method, being very versatile and applicable to different environments and on various substrate types. In this chapter, we describe the recently reported methods to produce graphene via molecule-assisted UILPE of graphite, aiming at the generation of high-quality graphene. In particular, we will focus on the supramolecular approach, which consists in the use of suitably designed organic molecules during the UILPE of graphite. These molecules act as graphene dispersion-stabilizing agents during the exfoliation. This method relying on the joint effect of a solvent and ad hoc molecules to foster the exfoliation of graphite into graphene in liquid environment represents a promising and modular method toward the improvement of the process of UILPE in terms of the concentration and quality of the exfoliated material. Furthermore, exfoliations in aqueous and organic solutions are presented and discussed separately.

  18. The origin of ultrasound-induced friction reduction in microscopic mechanical contacts.

    PubMed

    Hesjedal, Thorsten; Behme, Gerd

    2002-03-01

    We present a study of the origin of ultrasound-induced friction reduction in microscopic mechanical contacts. The effect of friction reduction caused by Rayleigh-type surface acoustic waves (SAWs) is demonstrated for propagating and two-dimensional, standing wave fields using lateral force microscopy (LFM). It is shown that with increasing wave amplitude, friction is completely suppressed. To detect and distinguish between the effect of lateral and vertical surface oscillation components on the cantilever movement, we employed multimode scanning acoustic force microscopy (SAFM). We found that the friction reduction effect is only due to the vertical oscillation component. Because this effect does not appear for purely in-plane polarized Love waves, we concluded that the mechanical diode effect is most probably responsible for the SAW-induced lubrication. This explanation is also supported by vertical and longitudinal SAFM measurements, which show that, in areas where friction is completely suppressed, low frequency vertical cantilever oscillations can still be observed, whereas lateral or torsional oscillations are no longer excited.

  19. Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening

    PubMed Central

    Konofagou, Elisa E.; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Choi, James; Deffieux, Thomas; Baseri, Babak; Vlachos, Fotios

    2014-01-01

    Over 4 million U.S. men and women suffer from Alzheimer's disease; 1 million from Parkinson's disease; 350,000 from multiple sclerosis (MS); and 20,000 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Worldwide, these four diseases account for more than 20 million patients. In addition, aging greatly increases the risk of neurodegenerative disease. Although great progress has been made in recent years toward understanding of these diseases, few effective treatments and no cures are currently available. This is mainly due to the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that allows only 5% of the 7000 small-molecule drugs available to treat only a tiny fraction of these diseases. On the other hand, safe and localized opening of the BBB has been proven to present a significant challenge. Of the methods used for BBB disruption shown to be effective, Focused Ultrasound (FUS), in conjunction with microbubbles, is the only technique that can induce localized BBB opening noninvasively and regionally. FUS may thus have a huge impact in trans-BBB brain drug delivery. The primary objective in this paper is to elucidate the interactions between ultrasound, microbubbles and the local microenvironment during BBB opening with FUS, which are responsible for inducing the BBB disruption. The mechanism of the BBB opening in vivo is monitored through the MRI and passive cavitation detection (PCD), and the safety of BBB disruption is assessed using H&E histology at distinct pressures, pulse lengths and microbubble diameters. It is hereby shown that the BBB can be disrupted safely and transiently under specific acoustic pressures (under 0.45 MPa) and microbubble (diameter under 8 μm) conditions. PMID:22201586

  20. Ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Konofagou, Elisa E; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Choi, James; Deffieux, Thomas; Baseri, Babak; Vlachos, Fotios

    2012-06-01

    Over 4 million U.S. men and women suffer from Alzheimer's disease; 1 million from Parkinson's disease; 350,000 from multiple sclerosis (MS); and 20,000 from amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Worldwide, these four diseases account for more than 20 million patients. In addition, aging greatly increases the risk of neurodegenerative disease. Although great progress has been made in recent years toward understanding of these diseases, few effective treatments and no cures are currently available. This is mainly due to the impermeability of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) that allows only 5% of the 7000 small-molecule drugs available to treat only a tiny fraction of these diseases. On the other hand, safe and localized opening of the BBB has been proven to present a significant challenge. Of the methods used for BBB disruption shown to be effective, Focused Ultrasound (FUS), in conjunction with microbubbles, is the only technique that can induce localized BBB opening noninvasively and regionally. FUS may thus have a huge impact in trans-BBB brain drug delivery. The primary objective in this paper is to elucidate the interactions between ultrasound, microbubbles and the local microenvironment during BBB opening with FUS, which are responsible for inducing the BBB disruption. The mechanism of the BBB opening in vivo is monitored through the MRI and passive cavitation detection (PCD), and the safety of BBB disruption is assessed using H&E histology at distinct pressures, pulse lengths and microbubble diameters. It is hereby shown that the BBB can be disrupted safely and transiently under specific acoustic pressures (under 0.45 MPa) and microbubble (diameter under 8 μm) conditions.

  1. Realigning the Focus of Plagiarism Detection Using "Plagiarismdetect.com"

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sabapathy, Elangkeeran A/L; Rahim, Rozlan Abd; Jusoff, Kamaruzaman

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to examine the extent to which "plagiarismdetect.com," an internet help/tool to detect plagiarism helps academicians tackle the ever-growing problem of plagiarism. Concerned with term papers, essays and most of the time with full-blown research reports, a tool like "plagiarismdetect.com" may…

  2. Ultrasonic Sensitivity of Strain-Insensitive Fiber Bragg Grating Sensors and Evaluation of Ultrasound-Induced Strain

    PubMed Central

    Tsuda, Hiroshi; Kumakura, Kenji; Ogihara, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    In conventional ultrasound detection in structures, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is glued on or embedded in the structure. However, application of strain to the structure can influence the sensitivity of the FBG toward ultrasound and can prevent its effective detection. An FBG can work as a strain-insensitive ultrasound sensor when it is not directly glued to the monitored structure, but is instead applied to a small thin plate to form a mobile sensor. Another possible configuration is to affix an FBG-inscribed optical fiber without the grating section attached to the monitored structure. In the present study, sensitivity to ultrasound propagated through an aluminum plate was compared for a strain-insensitive FBG sensor and an FBG sensor installed in a conventional manner. Strains induced by ultrasound from a piezoelectric transducer and by quasi-acoustic emission of a pencil lead break were also quantitatively evaluated from the response amplitude of the FBG sensor. Experimental results showed that the reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio for ultrasound detection with strain-insensitive FBG sensors, relative to traditionally-installed FBG sensors, was only 6 dB, and the ultrasound-induced strain varied within a range of sub-micron strains. PMID:22163523

  3. Ultrasonic sensitivity of strain-insensitive fiber Bragg grating sensors and evaluation of ultrasound-induced strain.

    PubMed

    Tsuda, Hiroshi; Kumakura, Kenji; Ogihara, Shinji

    2010-01-01

    In conventional ultrasound detection in structures, a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) is glued on or embedded in the structure. However, application of strain to the structure can influence the sensitivity of the FBG toward ultrasound and can prevent its effective detection. An FBG can work as a strain-insensitive ultrasound sensor when it is not directly glued to the monitored structure, but is instead applied to a small thin plate to form a mobile sensor. Another possible configuration is to affix an FBG-inscribed optical fiber without the grating section attached to the monitored structure. In the present study, sensitivity to ultrasound propagated through an aluminum plate was compared for a strain-insensitive FBG sensor and an FBG sensor installed in a conventional manner. Strains induced by ultrasound from a piezoelectric transducer and by quasi-acoustic emission of a pencil lead break were also quantitatively evaluated from the response amplitude of the FBG sensor. Experimental results showed that the reduction in the signal-to-noise ratio for ultrasound detection with strain-insensitive FBG sensors, relative to traditionally-installed FBG sensors, was only 6 dB, and the ultrasound-induced strain varied within a range of sub-micron strains.

  4. Focus detection criterion for refocusing in multi-wavelength digital holography.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li; Mater, Mike; Ni, Jun

    2011-08-01

    The majority of focus detection criteria reported is based on amplitude contrast. Due to phase wrapping, phase contrast was previously reported unsuitable for focus finding tasks. By taking the advantage of multi-wavelength digital holography, we propose a new focus detection criterion based on phase contrast. Experimental results are presented to prove the feasibility of the developed criterion. Possible applications of the developed technology include inspecting machined surfaces in the auto industry.

  5. Ultrasound Induced Fluorescence of Nanoscale Liposome Contrast Agents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qimei; Morgan, Stephen P.; O’Shea, Paul; Mather, Melissa L.

    2016-01-01

    A new imaging contrast agent is reported that provides an increased fluorescent signal upon application of ultrasound (US). Liposomes containing lipids labelled with pyrene were optically excited and the excimer fluorescence emission intensity was detected in the absence and presence of an ultrasound field using an acousto-fluorescence setup. The acousto-fluorescence dynamics of liposomes containing lipids with pyrene labelled on the fatty acid tail group (PyPC) and the head group (PyPE) were compared. An increase in excimer emission intensity following exposure to US was observed for both cases studied. The increased intensity and time constants were found to be different for the PyPC and PyPE systems, and dependent on the applied US pressure and exposure time. The greatest change in fluorescence intensity (130%) and smallest rise time constant (0.33 s) are achieved through the use of PyPC labelled liposomes. The mechanism underlying the observed increase of the excimer emission intensity in PyPC labelled liposomes is proposed to arise from the “wagging” of acyl chains which involves fast response and requires lower US pressure. This is accompanied by increased lipid lateral diffusivity at higher ultrasound pressures, a mechanism that is also active in the PyPE labelled liposomes. PMID:27467748

  6. Ultrasensitive detection of microbial cells using magnetic focus enhanced lateral flow sensors.

    PubMed

    Ren, Wen; Cho, Il-Hoon; Zhou, Zhongwu; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2016-04-07

    We report on an improved lateral flow immunoassay (LFIA) sensor with a magnetic focus for ultrasensitive naked-eye detection of pathogenic microorganisms at a near single cell limit without any pre-enrichment steps, by allowing the magnetic probes to focus the labelled pathogens to the target zone of the LF strip.

  7. Measurement of focused ultrasonic fields based on colour edge detection and curve fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, H.; Chang, S.; Yang, P.; He, L.

    2016-03-01

    This paper utilizes firstly both a scanning device and an optic fiber hydrophone to establish a measurement system, and then proposes the parameter measurement of the focused transducer based on edge detection of the visualized acoustic data and curve fitting. The measurement system consists of a water tank with wedge absorber, stepper motors driver, system controller, a focused transducer, an optic fiber hydrophone and data processing software. On the basis of the visualized processing for the original scanned data, the -3 dB beam width of the focused transducer is calculated using the edge detection of the acoustic visualized image and circle fitting method by minimizing algebraic distance. Experiments on the visualized ultrasound data are implemented to verify the feasibility of the proposed method. The data obtained from the scanning device are utilized to reconstruct acoustic fields, and it is found that the -3 dB beam width of the focused transducer can be predicted accurately.

  8. PageFocus: Using paradata to detect and prevent cheating on online achievement tests.

    PubMed

    Diedenhofen, Birk; Musch, Jochen

    2016-08-29

    Cheating threatens the validity of unproctored online achievement tests. To address this problem, we developed PageFocus, a JavaScript that detects when participants abandon test pages by switching to another window or browser tab. In a first study, we aimed at testing whether PageFocus could detect and prevent cheating. We asked 115 lab and 186 online participants to complete a knowledge test comprising items that were difficult to answer but easy to look up on the Internet. Half of the participants were invited to look up the solutions, which significantly increased their test scores. The PageFocus script detected test takers who abandoned the test page with very high sensitivity and specificity, and successfully reduced cheating by generating a popup message that asked participants not to cheat. In a second study, 510 online participants completed a knowledge test comprising items that could easily be looked up and a reasoning task involving matrices that were impossible to look up. In a first group, a performance-related monetary reward was promised to the top scorers; in a second group, participants took part in a lottery that provided performance-unrelated rewards; and in a third group, no incentive was offered. PageFocus revealed that participants cheated more when performance-related incentives were offered. As expected, however, this effect was limited to items that could easily be looked up. We recommend that PageFocus be routinely employed to detect and prevent cheating on online achievement tests.

  9. Usefulness of MEG magnetometer for spike detection in patients with mesial temporal epileptic focus.

    PubMed

    Enatsu, R; Mikuni, N; Usui, K; Matsubayashi, J; Taki, J; Begum, T; Matsumoto, R; Ikeda, A; Nagamine, T; Fukuyama, H; Hashimoto, N

    2008-07-15

    The present study investigated the sensitivity of magnetoencephalography (MEG) for spikes depending on sensor type in patients with mesial temporal epileptic focus. We recorded MEG in 6 patients with mesial temporal epileptic focus using two sensor types (magnetometer and gradiometer) simultaneously. The number of spikes detected and the corresponding equivalent current dipole (ECD) parameters (distance from the coordinated head center (radius), and dipole moment) were evaluated with respect to sensor type. Among 426 MEG 'consensus spikes' determined by 3 reviewers, 378 spikes satisfied the predetermined criteria for source localization. Comparing ECD parameters, spikes detected by magnetometer alone displayed a smaller radius and larger dipole moment than those detected by gradiometer alone. Spikes estimated in the mesial temporal area were more frequently detected by magnetometer alone (38.5%) than by gradiometer alone (11.5%), whereas spikes in the lateral temporal area were detected less by magnetometer alone (3.7%) than by gradiometer alone (53.9%). The present results suggest that a magnetometer is advantageous for spike detection in patients with mesial temporal epileptic focus. This also implies the higher sensitivity of magnetometer for deep sources.

  10. [Enhancement of reversing drug resistance of K562/A02 cells to adriamycin by ultrasound-induced cavitation].

    PubMed

    Chen, Bao-An; Meng, Qing-Qi; Wu, Wei; Gao, Feng; Shao, Ze-Ye; Ding, Jia-Hua; Gao, Chong; Sun, Xin-Chen; Cheng, Hong-Yan; Sun, Yun-Yu; Wang, Jun; Cheng, Jian; Zhao, Gang; Song, Hui-Hui; Bao, Wen; Ma, Yan; Wang, Xue-Mei

    2008-12-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the effects of low frequency and power ultrasound combined with adriamycin on apoptosis of drug-resistant leukemia cell line K562/A02 in vitro, to find out the parameters of optimal exposure, and to explore the possible mechanism reversing drug-resistance of K562/A02 cells. The K562/A02 cells in logarithmic growth phase were used in experiments. The experiments were divided into 4 groups: group control, group adriamycin (A02) alone, group ultrasound (US) alone and group A02+US. The trypan blue dye exclusion test and MTT assay were used to determine the cell viability; Wright's staining was used to detect the apoptosis; the flow cytometry was used to analyze the drug concentration, and the scanning electron microscopy was used to observe the changes of cell surface. The results showed that the significant differences in cell viability, intracellular adriamycin concentration and changes of cell membrane were found between ultrasound-treated and untreated cells in the presence of various concentration of adriamycin. The exposure to ultrasound at 20 kHZ, 0.25 W/cm2 for 60 seconds could obviously decrease LC50 of adriamycin to K562/A02 cells, while the exposure to ultrasound at 20 kHZ, 0.05 W/cm2 for 60 seconds could kill K562/A02 cells at once. After being treated by low frequency ultrasound, the small holes with diameter about 1-2 microm in the cell surface appeared. The ultrasound increased the adriamycin concentration in the cells, accelerated the formation of apoptotic bodies, and promoted apoptosis of adriamycin-resistant cells. It is concluded that the ultrasound at optimal parameters enhances inhibitory effect of adriamycin on drug-resistant cell line, thereby reverses drug-resistance of drug-resistant cell line through sound-hole effect in tumor cells resulting from ultrasound induced cavitation.

  11. In vitro investigation of ultrasound-induced oxidative stress on human lens epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Rwei, Patrick; Alex Gong, Cihun-Siyong; Luo, Li-Jyuan; Lin, Meng-Bo; Lai, Jui-Yang; Liu, Hao-Li

    2017-01-22

    The effect of ultrasound exposure on human lens epithelial cells (HLE-B3) was investigated in vitro, specifically on the generation of oxidative stress upon ultrasound application using various clinically-relevant settings. In addition to ultrasound-induced heat effects, oxidative stress has been recently proposed as one of the main mechanisms for ultrasound-induced effects on human cells. In this work, the levels of biocompatibility and generation of oxidative stress by exposure of ultrasound to HLE-B3 were evaluated quantitatively and qualitatively by the MTT assay, Live/Dead assay, reactive oxygen species (ROS) and intracellular calcium level. Oxidative stress induction is traditionally achieved through administrations of H2O2 and thus the administration of H2O2 was used as the positive control group for comparison herein. Concerning the administrations of H2O2 are considered invasive and may potentially have side effects, ultrasound as physical stimulation could be a safer and non-invasive method to induce similar oxidative stress environments. The effect of ultrasound on cell viability and induction of oxidative stress increases with ultrasound intensity. The result reveals that the continuous ultrasound has a positive impact on the oxidative stress levels but does negatively on the cell viability, as compared to the pulsed ultrasound. Furthermore, our work demonstrates that the exposure of 58 kPa continuous ultrasound without microbubbles can maintain acceptable cell viability and produce oxidative stress effects similar to the traditional administrations of H2O2. In summary, exposure of ultrasound can generate oxidative stress comparable to traditional administrations of H2O2. The effect of generating oxidative stress is adjustable through ultrasound parameters, including the pulsed or continuous wave, the intensity of ultrasound and addition of microbubbles.

  12. Animal board invited review: precision livestock farming for dairy cows with a focus on oestrus detection.

    PubMed

    Mottram, T

    2016-10-01

    Dairy cows are high value farm animals requiring careful management to achieve the best results. Since the advent of robotic and high throughput milking, the traditional few minutes available for individual human attention daily has disappeared and new automated technologies have been applied to improve monitoring of dairy cow production, nutrition, fertility, health and welfare. Cows milked by robots must meet legal requirements to detect healthy milk. This review focuses on emerging technical approaches in those areas of high cost to the farmer (fertility, metabolic disorders, mastitis, lameness and calving). The availability of low cost tri-axial accelerometers and wireless telemetry has allowed accurate models of behaviour to be developed and sometimes combined with rumination activity detected by acoustic sensors to detect oestrus; other measures (milk and skin temperature, electronic noses, milk yield) have been abandoned. In-line biosensors have been developed to detect markers for ovulation, pregnancy, lactose, mastitis and metabolic changes. Wireless telemetry has been applied to develop boluses for monitoring the rumen pH and temperature to detect metabolic disorders. Udder health requires a multisensing approach due to the varying inflammatory responses collectively described as mastitis. Lameness can be detected by walk over weigh cells, but also by various types of video image analysis and speed measurement. Prediction and detection of calving time is an area of active research mostly focused on behavioural change.

  13. A Distance Measure for Attention Focusing and Anomaly Detection in Systems Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, R.

    1994-01-01

    Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust anomaly detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an anomaly is difficult to come by. In addition, to make the monitoring process efficient, and to avoid the potential for information overload on human operators, attention focusing must also be addressed. When an anomaly occurs, more often than not several sensors are affected, and the partially redundant information they provide can be confusing, particularly in a crisis situation where a response is needed quickly. Previous results on extending traditional anomaly detection techniques are summarized. The focus of this paper is a new technique for attention focusing.

  14. Multi-focus parallel detection of fluorescent molecules at picomolar concentration with photonic nanojets arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghenuche, Petru; de Torres, Juan; Ferrand, Patrick; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-09-01

    Fluorescence sensing and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are powerful methods to detect and characterize single molecules; yet, their use has been restricted by expensive and complex optical apparatus. Here, we present a simple integrated design using a self-assembled bi-dimensional array of microspheres to realize multi-focus parallel detection scheme for FCS. We simultaneously illuminate and collect the fluorescence from several tens of microspheres, which all generate their own photonic nanojet to efficiently excite the molecules and collect the fluorescence emission. Each photonic nanojet contributes to the global detection volume, reaching FCS detection volumes of several tens of femtoliters while preserving the fluorescence excitation and collection efficiencies. The microspheres photonic nanojets array enables FCS experiments at low picomolar concentrations with a drastic reduction in apparatus cost and alignment constraints, ideal for microfluidic chip integration.

  15. Multi-focus parallel detection of fluorescent molecules at picomolar concentration with photonic nanojets arrays

    SciTech Connect

    Ghenuche, Petru; Torres, Juan de; Ferrand, Patrick; Wenger, Jérôme

    2014-09-29

    Fluorescence sensing and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) are powerful methods to detect and characterize single molecules; yet, their use has been restricted by expensive and complex optical apparatus. Here, we present a simple integrated design using a self-assembled bi-dimensional array of microspheres to realize multi-focus parallel detection scheme for FCS. We simultaneously illuminate and collect the fluorescence from several tens of microspheres, which all generate their own photonic nanojet to efficiently excite the molecules and collect the fluorescence emission. Each photonic nanojet contributes to the global detection volume, reaching FCS detection volumes of several tens of femtoliters while preserving the fluorescence excitation and collection efficiencies. The microspheres photonic nanojets array enables FCS experiments at low picomolar concentrations with a drastic reduction in apparatus cost and alignment constraints, ideal for microfluidic chip integration.

  16. Note: Focus error detection device for thermal expansion-recovery microscopy (ThERM).

    PubMed

    Domené, E A; Martínez, O E

    2013-01-01

    An innovative focus error detection method is presented that is only sensitive to surface curvature variations, canceling both thermoreflectance and photodefelection effects. The detection scheme consists of an astigmatic probe laser and a four-quadrant detector. Nonlinear curve fitting of the defocusing signal allows the retrieval of a cutoff frequency, which only depends on the thermal diffusivity of the sample and the pump beam size. Therefore, a straightforward retrieval of the thermal diffusivity of the sample is possible with microscopic lateral resolution and high axial resolution (~100 pm).

  17. Effect of gravitational focusing on annual modulation in dark-matter direct-detection experiments.

    PubMed

    Lee, Samuel K; Lisanti, Mariangela; Peter, Annika H G; Safdi, Benjamin R

    2014-01-10

    The scattering rate in dark-matter direct-detection experiments should modulate annually due to Earth's orbit around the Sun. The rate is typically thought to be extremized around June 1, when the relative velocity of Earth with respect to the dark-matter wind is maximal. We point out that gravitational focusing can alter this modulation phase. Unbound dark-matter particles are focused by the Sun's gravitational potential, affecting their phase-space density in the lab frame. Gravitational focusing can result in a significant overall shift in the annual-modulation phase, which is most relevant for dark matter with low scattering speeds. The induced phase shift for light O(10)  GeV dark matter may also be significant, depending on the threshold energy of the experiment.

  18. Effect of Gravitational Focusing on Annual Modulation in Dark-Matter Direct-Detection Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Samuel K.; Lisanti, Mariangela; Peter, Annika H. G.; Safdi, Benjamin R.

    2014-01-01

    The scattering rate in dark-matter direct-detection experiments should modulate annually due to Earth's orbit around the Sun. The rate is typically thought to be extremized around June 1, when the relative velocity of Earth with respect to the dark-matter wind is maximal. We point out that gravitational focusing can alter this modulation phase. Unbound dark-matter particles are focused by the Sun's gravitational potential, affecting their phase-space density in the lab frame. Gravitational focusing can result in a significant overall shift in the annual-modulation phase, which is most relevant for dark matter with low scattering speeds. The induced phase shift for light O(10) GeV dark matter may also be significant, depending on the threshold energy of the experiment.

  19. Defect detection around rebars in concrete using focused ultrasound and reverse time migration.

    PubMed

    Beniwal, Surendra; Ganguli, Abhijit

    2015-09-01

    Experimental and numerical investigations have been performed to assess the feasibility of damage detection around rebars in concrete using focused ultrasound and a Reverse Time Migration (RTM) based subsurface imaging algorithm. Since concrete is heterogeneous, an unfocused ultrasonic field will be randomly scattered by the aggregates, thereby masking information about damage(s). A focused ultrasonic field, on the other hand, increases the possibility of detection of an anomaly due to enhanced amplitude of the incident field in the focal region. Further, the RTM based reconstruction using scattered focused field data is capable of creating clear images of the inspected region of interest. Since scattering of a focused field by a damaged rebar differs qualitatively from that of an undamaged rebar, distinct images of damaged and undamaged situations are obtained in the RTM generated images. This is demonstrated with both numerical and experimental investigations. The total scattered field, acquired on the surface of the concrete medium, is used as input for the RTM algorithm to generate the subsurface image that helps to identify the damage. The proposed technique, therefore, has some advantage since knowledge about the undamaged scenario for the concrete medium is not necessary to assess its integrity.

  20. Isoelectric focusing and ELISA for detecting adulteration of donkey milk with cow milk.

    PubMed

    Pizzano, Rosa; Salimei, Elisabetta

    2014-06-25

    Donkey milk has been recently revalued intensely due to its nutritional properties. Moreover, donkey milk has been proposed as an effective alternative food for some infants with cow milk allergy. Two fast analytical methods were proposed to detect the fraudulent practice of blending cow milk to donkey milk. Detection of cow αs1-casein bands along the profiles of experimental donkey-cow milk mixtures analyzed by isoelectric focusing was adequate to estimate cow milk used as adulterant of donkey milk starting from 5% (v/v). An ELISA-based method using the antipeptide antibodies raised against the 1-28 sequence stretch of cow β-casein was also developed for an accurate definition of composition of donkey-cow milk mixtures. The presence of cow milk at levels as low as 0.5% (v/v) was detected in donkey-cow milk mixtures prepared at laboratory scale and assayed by ELISA.

  1. Diffraction analysis and evaluation of several focus- and track-error detection schemes for magneto-optical disk systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernacki, Bruce E.; Mansuripur, M.

    1992-01-01

    A commonly used tracking method on pre-grooved magneto-optical (MO) media is the push-pull technique, and the astigmatic method is a popular focus-error detection approach. These two methods are analyzed using DIFFRACT, a general-purpose scalar diffraction modeling program, to observe the effects on the error signals due to focusing lens misalignment, Seidel aberrations, and optical crosstalk (feedthrough) between the focusing and tracking servos. Using the results of the astigmatic/push-pull system as a basis for comparison, a novel focus/track-error detection technique that utilizes a ring toric lens is evaluated as well as the obscuration method (focus error detection only).

  2. Detection of Cracks at Welds in Steel Tubing Using Flux Focusing Electromagnetic Probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Buzz; Fulton, Jim; Nath, Shridhar; Simpson, John; Namkung, Min

    1994-01-01

    The inspection of weldments in critical pressure vessel joints is a major concern in the nuclear power industry. Corrosive environments can speed the fatigue process and access to the critical area is often limited. Eddy current techniques have begun to be used to help overcome these obstacles [1]. As direct contact and couplants are not required, remote areas can be inspected by simply snaking an eddy current coil into the intake tube of the vessel. The drawback of the eddy current method has been the high sensitivity to small changes in the conductivity and permeability of the test piece which are known to vary at weldments [1]. The flaw detection mechanism of the flux focusing electromagnetic probe can help alleviate these difficulties and provide a unique capability for detecting longitudinal fatigue cracks in critical tube structures. The Flux Focusing Electromagnetic Flaw Detector, originally invented for the detection of fatigue and corrosion damage in aluminum plates [2-3], has been adapted for use in testing steel tubing for longitudinal fatigue cracks. The modified design allows for the probe to be placed axisymmetrically into the tubing, inducing eddy currents in the tube wall. The pickup coil of the probe is fixed slightly below the primary windings and is rotated 90 so that its axis is normal to the tube wall. The magnetic flux of the primary coil is focused through the use of ferromagnetic material so that in the absence of fatigue damage there will be no flux linkage with the pickup coil. The presence of a longitudinal fatigue crack will cause the eddy currents induced in the tube wall to flow around the flaw and directly under the pickup coil. The magnetic field associated with these currents will then link the pickup coil and an unambiguous increase in the output voltage of the probe will be measured. The use of the flux focusing electromagnetic probe is especially suited for the detection of flaws originating at or near tube welds. The probe is

  3. Influence of laser beam characteristics and focusing optics on optical laser-induced breakdown detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walther, C.; Hauser, W.

    2009-12-01

    Laser-induced breakdown detection (LIBD) is a well established technique for measuring size and concentration of inorganic colloids in liquids. However, most applications of LIBD are restricted to the measurement of mean sizes, which is problematic in cases of wide colloid size distributions (PSD) as typically is the case in natural systems. Evaluation of PSDs from LIBD is possible but requires detailed control of the power density within the laser focus. In the present work we describe the mathematical treatment how to calculate this power density from the beam characteristics of the light source and the optical properties of the focusing optics. The results are compared to measured spatial distributions of breakdown events of three LIBD setups.

  4. Isoelectric focusing in agarose gel for detection of oligoclonal bands in cerebrospinal and other biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Csako, Gyorgy

    2012-01-01

    Isoelectric focusing (IEF) coupled with immunodetection (immunofixation or immunoblotting) has become the leading technique for the detection and study of oligoclonal bands (OCBs) in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and also is increasingly used in other body fluids such as the tear and serum. Limited commercial availability of precast agarose IEF gels for research and a need for customization prompted reporting a detailed general protocol for the preparation and casting of agarose IEF gel along with sample, control, and isoelectric point marker preparation and carrying out the focusing itself for CSF OCBs. However, the method is readily adaptable to the use of other body fluid specimens and, possibly, research specimens such as culture fluids as well.

  5. Magnetic focusing immunosensor for the detection of Salmonella typhimurium in foods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pivarnik, Philip E.; Cao, He; Letcher, Stephen V.; Pierson, Arthur H.; Rand, Arthur G.

    1999-01-01

    From 1988 through 1992 Salmonellosis accounted for 27% of the total reported foodborne disease outbreaks and 57% of the outbreaks in which the pathogen was identified. The prevalence of Salmonellosis and the new requirements to monitor the organism as a marker in pathogen reduction programs will drive the need for rapid, on-site testing. A compact fiber optic fluorometer using a red diode laser as an excitation source and fiber probes for analyte detection has been constructed and used to measure Salmonella. The organisms were isolated with anti-Salmonella magnetic beads and were labeled with a secondary antibody conjugated to a red fluorescent dye. The response of the system was proportional to the concentration of Salmonella typhimurium from 3.2 X 105 colony forming units (CFU)/ml to 1.6 X 107 CFU/ml. The system was developed to utilize a fiber-optic magnetic focusing problem that attracted the magnetic microspheres to the surface of a sample chamber directly in front of the excitation and emission fibers. The signal obtained from a homogenous suspension of fluorescent magnetic microspheres was 9 to 10 picowatts. After focusing, the signal from the fluorescent labeled magnetic microspheres increased to 200 picowatts, approximately 20 times greater than the homogeneous suspension. The magnetic focusing assay detected 1.59 X 105 colony forming units/ml of Salmonella typhimurium cultured in growth media. The process of magnetic focusing in front of the fibers has the potential to reduce the background fluorescence from unbound secondary antibodies, eliminating several rinsing steps, resulting in a simple rapid assay.

  6. Sequential injection setup for capillary isoelectric focusing combined with MS detection.

    PubMed

    Páger, Csilla; Dörnyei, Agnes; Kilár, Ferenc

    2011-07-01

    Capillary isoelectric focusing in the presence of electroosmosis with sequential injection of carrier ampholytes and sample was found to be suitable for MS detection. The separate injection of the sample and the ampholytes provides good condition to suppress and overcome the undesirable effect of the presence of ampholytes in MS. By the appropriate selection of ampholyte solutions, whose pH range not necessarily covers the pI values of the analytes, the migration of the components can be controlled, and the impact of the ampholytes on MS detection is decreased. The unique applicability of this setup is shown by testing several parameters, such as the application of volatile electrolyte solutions, the type of the ampholytes, the order and the number of the ampholyte and sample zones. Broad and narrow pH range ampholytes were applied in experiments using uncoated capillaries with different lengths for the analyses of substituted nitrophenol dyes to achieve optimal conditions for the MS detection. Although the sample components are not leaving the pH gradient, due to the decrease in the ampholyte concentration at the position of the components, and because the sample components migrate in charged state, the ionisation is more effective for MS detection.

  7. Charge heterogeneity of monoclonal antibodies by multiplexed imaged capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay with chemiluminescence detection.

    PubMed

    Michels, David A; Tu, Andrea W; McElroy, Will; Voehringer, David; Salas-Solano, Oscar

    2012-06-19

    Characterization of charge heterogeneity of recombinant monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) requires high throughput analytical methods to support clone selection and formulation screens. We applied the NanoPro technology to rapidly measure relative charge distribution of mAbs in early stage process development. The NanoPro is a multiplexed capillary-based isoelectric immunoassay with whole-column imaging detection. This assay offers specificity, speed and sensitivity advantages over conventional capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) platforms. After CIEF, charge variants are photochemically immobilized to the wall of a short coated capillary. Once immobilized, mAbs are probed using a secondary anti-IgG conjugated with horseradish peroxidase. After flushing away excess reagents, secondary antibodies bound to their targets are then detected by chemiluminescence upon incubation with peroxidase reactive substrates. Charge heterogeneity as determined by chemiluminescence was similar to that measured by conventional CIEF technology with absorbance detection for purified mAbs and contaminated mAbs derived directly from host cellular extract. Upon method optimization, the automated CIEF immunoassay was applied to several mAbs of varying isoelectric points, demonstrating the suitability of NanoPro as a rugged high-throughput product characterization tool. Furthermore, qualification of detection sensitivity, precision, and dynamic range are reported with discussion of its advantages as an alternative approach to rapidly characterize charge variants during process development of mAbs.

  8. Neuronavigation-guided focused ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening: A preliminary study in swine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hao-Li; Tsai, Hong-Chieh; Lu, Yu-Jen; Wei, Kuo-Chen

    2012-11-01

    FUS-induced BBB opening is a promising technique for noninvasive and local delivery of drugs into the brain. Here we propose the novel use of a neuronavigation system to guide the FUS-induced BBB opening procedure, and investigate its feasibility in vivo in large animals. We developed an interface between the neuronavigator and FUS to allow guidance of the focal energy produced by the FUS transducer. The system was tested in 29 pigs by more than 40 sonication procedures and evaluated by MRI. Gd-DTPA concentration was quantitated in vivo by MRI R1 relaxometry and compared by ICP-OES assay. Brain histology after FUS exposure was investigated by HE and TUNEL staining. Neuronavigation could successfully guide the focal beam with comparable precision to neurosurgical stereotactic procedures (2.3 ± 0.9 mm). FUS pressure of 0.43 MPa resulted in consistent BBB-opening. Neuronavigation-guided BBB-opening increased Gd-DTPA deposition by up to 1.83 mM (140% increase). MR relaxometry demonstrated high correlation to ICP-OES measurements (r2 = 0.822), suggesting that Gd-DTPA deposition can be directly measured by imaging. Neuronavigation could provide sufficient precision for guiding FUS to temporally and locally open the BBB. Gd-DTPA deposition in the brain could be quantified by MR relaxometry, providing a potential tool for the in vivo quantification of therapeutic agents in CNS disease treatment.

  9. Capillary isoelectric focusing of proteins and microorganisms in dynamically modified fused silica with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Růzicka, Filip; Horký, Jaroslav; Holá, Veronika; Slais, Karel

    2006-09-01

    We suggest a method for the reproducible and efficient capillary isoelectric focusing of proteins and microorganisms in the pH gradient 3-10. The method involves the segmental injection of the simple ampholytes, the solution of the selected electrolytes, and the sample mixture of bioanalytes and carrier ampholytes to the fused silica capillaries dynamically modified by poly(ethylene glycol), PEG 4000, which is added to the catholyte, the anolyte and injected solutions. In order to receive the reproducible results, the capillaries were rinsed by the mixture of acetone/ethanol between analyses. For the tracing of the pH gradients the low-molecular-mass pI markers were used. The simple proteins and the mixed cultures of microorganisms, Saccharomyces cerevisiae CCM 8191, Escherichia coli CCM 3954, Candida albicans CCM 8180, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae CCM 6187, Enterococcus faecalis CCM 4224, Staphylococcus epidermidis CCM 4418 and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, were focused and separated by the method suggested. The minimum detectable number of microbial cells was 5x10(2) to 1x10(3) with on-column UV detection at 280 nm.

  10. Flux-focusing eddy current probe and rotating probe method for flaw detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wincheski, Buzz A.; Fulton, James P.; Nath, Shridhar C.; Simpson, John W.; Namkung, Min

    1994-11-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks about circular fasteners and other circular inhomogeneities in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil. The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. By rotating the probe in a path around a circular fastener such as a rivet while maintaining a constant distance between the probe and the center of a rivet, the signal due to current flow about the rivet can be held constant. Any further changes in the current distribution, such as due to a fatigue crack at the rivet joint, can be detected as an increase in the output voltage above that due to the flow about the rivet head.

  11. Detection of sub-horizontal flaws in concrete using the synthetic aperture focusing technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hosseini, Zahra

    Concrete deteriorates over time due to environmental changes and/or poor construction processes which can eventually lead to partial or total failure of a structure. Deterioration in concrete manifests itself in different forms such as: freeze and thaw, chemical attack, surface and internal flaws. Concrete and shotcrete linings are widely used as support systems in underground excavations. Surprisingly, a fragmented, damaged shotcrete support system can actually create a less stable environment than the unsupported rock mass. Detection of internal flaws remains a difficult task as they are not always observable on the surface. Yet, the potential to expand and cause damage to the structure is omnipresent. The focus of this work is to locate and characterize two main and common features in concrete structures, (1) sub-horizontal cracks; (2) rock-concrete interfaces. Traditionally, this has been difficult to detect by currently available NDT methods. To obtain high resolution images of cracks in concrete, an extension of the ultrasonic nondestructive technique known as Synthetic Aperture Focusing Technique (SAFT) has been used. However, in order to achieve our research objective, we developed a modified SAFT code in this work. The results of this study demonstrate that the resolving power of our modified 3D SAFT algorithm can provide an accurate profile of both a rock-concrete interface and/or cracks with angles varying from 5 to 15 degrees within concrete slabs having thicknesses of up to twenty centimetres.

  12. Optical Generation and Detection of High-Frequency Focused Ultrasound and Associated Nonlinear Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baac, Hyoung Won

    In this thesis, optical generation and detection of high-frequency ultrasound are presented. On the generation side, high-efficiency optical transmitters have been devised and developed which can generate high-frequency and high-amplitude pressure. Conventional optoacoustic transmitters have suffered from poor optoacoustic energy conversion efficiency (10-7˜10-8). Therefore, pressure amplitudes were usually weak for long-range imaging (several cm) and too weak to induce any therapeutic effects. Here, far beyond such traditional regime, therapeutic pressure amplitudes of tens of MPa were achieved optoacoustically. First, high-efficiency optoacoustic sources were developed in planar geometries by using carbon nanotubepolymer composites. The planar transmitters could generate 18-fold stronger pressure than thin metallic films used as references, together with providing broadband and high-frequency spectra over 120 MHz. Then, the thin-film transmitters were formed on concave substrates to generate and simultaneously focus the ultrasound. Unprecedented optoacoustic pressure was achieved at lens focus: >50 MPa in positive and >20 MPa in negative peaks. These amplitudes were sufficient to induce strong shock waves and acoustic cavitation. Due to the high-frequency operation, such therapeutic pressure and the induced effects were tightly localized onto focal widths of 75microm in lateral and 400 microm in axial directions, which are an order of magnitude smaller than those of traditional piezoelectric transducers. The shock waves and the cavitation effects were investigated in various ways. High focal gains and short distances for shock formation were suggested as main features. The optoacoustic approach is expected to open numerous opportunities for a broad range of biomedical applications demanding high-accuracy treatment with minimal damage volumes around focal zones. For optical detection of ultrasound, optical microring resonators have been used due to their

  13. Straightforward production of encoded microbeads by Flow Focusing: potential applications for biomolecule detection.

    PubMed

    Gañán-Calvo, A M; Martín-Banderas, L; González-Prieto, R; Rodríguez-Gil, A; Berdún-Alvarez, T; Cebolla, A; Chávez, S; Flores-Mosquera, M

    2006-10-31

    Fluorescently encoded polymeric microparticles are acquiring great importance in the development of simultaneous multianalyte screening assays. We have developed a very versatile and straightforward method for the production of dye-labeled microparticles with a very reproducible size distribution and freely-chosen and discernible fluorescent properties. Our method combines Flow Focusing technology with a solvent evaporation/extraction procedure in a single step, yielding spherical, non-aggregate and non-porous particles. We have designed a multi-coloured bead array which includes the possibility of modifying the surface properties of the microparticles, which offer excellent properties for covalent attachment of biomolecules such as peptides, oligonucleotides, proteins, etc. We also show the potential of the fluorescently labeled microspheres for the detection of biomolecule (peptides and oligonucelotides) interactions using flow cytometry.

  14. Radially Focused Eddy Current Sensor for Detection of Longitudinal Flaws in Metallic Tubes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor); Todhunter, Ronald G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A radially focused eddy current sensor detects longitudinal flaws in a metal tube. A drive coil induces eddy currents within the wall of the metal tube. A pick-up cod is spaced apart from the drive coil along the length of the metal tube. The pick@up coil is positioned with one end thereof lying adjacent the wall of the metal tube such that the pick-up coil's longitudinal axis is perpendicular to the wall of the metal tube. To isolate the pick-up coil from the magnetic flux of the drive coil and the flux from the induced eddy currents. except the eddy currents diverted by a longitudinal flaw. an electrically conducting material high in magnetic permeability surrounds all of the pick-up coil except its one end that is adjacent the walls of the metal tube. The electrically conducting material can extend into and through the drive coil in a coaxial relationship therewith.

  15. Controlled fabrication of nanopores using a direct focused ion beam approach with back face particle detection.

    PubMed

    Patterson, N; Adams, D P; Hodges, V C; Vasile, M J; Michael, J R; Kotula, P G

    2008-06-11

    We report a direct, ion drilling technique that enables the reproducible fabrication and placement of nanopores in membranes of different thickness. Using a 30 keV focused Ga ion beam column combined with an in situ, back face, multi-channelplate particle detector, nanopores are sputtered in Si(3)N(4) and W/Si(3)N(4) to have diameters as small as 12 nm. Transmission electron microscopy shows that focused ion beam-drilled holes are near-conical with the diameter decreasing from entry to exit side. By monitoring the detector signal during ion exposure, the drilled hole width can be minimized such that the exit-side diameter is smaller than the full width at half-maximum of the nominally Gaussian-shaped incident beam. Judicious choice of the beam defining aperture combined with back face particle detection allows for reproducible exit-side hole diameters between 18 and 100 nm. The nanopore direct drilling technique does not require potentially damaging broad area exposure to tailor hole sizes. Moreover, this technique successfully achieves breakthrough despite the effects of varying membrane thickness, redeposition, polycrystalline grain structure, and slight ion beam current fluctuations.

  16. Flexible Integration of Both High Imaging Resolution and High Power Arrays for Ultrasound-Induced Thermal Strain Imaging (US-TSI)

    PubMed Central

    Stephens, Douglas N.; Mahmoud, Ahmed M.; Ding, Xuan; Lucero, Steven; Dutta, Debaditya; Yu, Francois T.H.; Chen, Xucai

    2013-01-01

    Ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI) for carotid artery plaque detection requires both high imaging resolution (<100 μm) and sufficient US induced heating to elevate the tissue temperature (~1-3°C within 1-3 cardiac cycles) in order to produce a noticeable change in sound speed in the targeted tissues. Since the optimization of both imaging and heating in a monolithic array design is particularly expensive and inflexible, a new integrated approach is presented that utilizes independent ultrasound arrays to meet the requirements for this particular application. This work demonstrates a new approach in dual-array construction. A 3D printed manifold was built to support both a high resolution 20 MHz commercial imaging array and 6 custom heating elements operating in the 3.5-4 MHz range. For the application of US-TSI on carotid plaque characterization, the tissue target site is 20 to 30 mm deep, with a typical target volume of 2 mm (elevation) × 8 mm (azimuthal) × 5 mm (depth). The custom heating array performance was fully characterized for two design variants (flat and spherical apertures), and can easily deliver 30 W of total acoustic power to produce intensities greater than 15 W/cm2 in tissue target region. PMID:24297029

  17. Flexible integration of high-imaging-resolution and high-power arrays for ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging (US-TSI).

    PubMed

    Stephens, Douglas N; Mahmoud, Ahmed M; Ding, Xuan; Lucero, Steven; Dutta, Debaditya; Yu, Francois T H; Chen, Xucai; Kim, Kang

    2013-12-01

    Ultrasound-induced thermal strain imaging (USTSI) for carotid artery plaque detection requires both high imaging resolution (<100 μm) and sufficient US-induced heating to elevate the tissue temperature (~1°C to 3°C within 1 to 3 cardiac cycles) to produce a noticeable change in sound speed in the targeted tissues. Because the optimization of both imaging and heating in a monolithic array design is particularly expensive and inflexible, a new integrated approach is presented which utilizes independent ultrasound arrays to meet the requirements for this particular application. This work demonstrates a new approach in dual-array construction. A 3-D printed manifold was built to support both a high-resolution 20 MHz commercial imaging array and 6 custom heating elements operating in the 3.5 to 4 MHz range. For the application of US-TSI in carotid plaque characterization, the tissue target site is 20 to 30 mm deep, with a typical target volume of 2 mm (elevation) × 8 mm (azimuthal) × 5 mm (depth). The custom heating array performance was fully characterized for two design variants (flat and spherical apertures), and can easily deliver 30 W of total acoustic power to produce intensities greater than 15 W/cm(2) in the tissue target region.

  18. Femtomolar concentration detection limit and zeptomole mass detection limit for protein separation by capillary isoelectric focusing and laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Ramsay, Lauren M; Dickerson, Jane A; Dada, Oluwatosin; Dovichi, Norman J

    2009-03-01

    Fluorescence tends to produce the lowest detection limits for most forms of capillary electrophoresis. Two issues have discouraged its use in capillary isoelectric focusing. The first issue is fluorescent labeling of proteins. Most labeling reagents react with lysine residues and convert the cationic residue to a neutral or anionic product. At best, these reagents perturb the isoelectric point of the protein. At worse, they convert each protein into hundreds of different fluorescent products that confound analysis. The second issue is the large background signal generated by impurities within commercial ampholytes. This background signal is particularly strong when excited in the blue portion of the spectrum, which is required by many common fluorescent labeling reagents. This paper addresses these issues. For labeling, we employ Chromeo P540, which is a fluorogenic reagent that converts cationic lysine residues to cationic fluorescent products. The reaction products are excited in the green, which reduces the background signal generated by impurities present within the ampholytes. To further reduce the background signal, we photobleach ampholytes with high-power photodiodes. Photobleaching reduced the noise in the ampholyte blank by an order of magnitude. Isoelectric focusing performed with photobleached pH 3-10 ampholytes produced concentration detection limits of 270 +/- 25 fM and mass detection limits of 150 +/- 15 zmol for Chromeo P540 labeled beta-lactoglobulin. Concentration detection limits were 520 +/- 40 fM and mass detection limits were 310 +/- 30 zmol with pH 4-8 ampholytes. A homogenate was prepared from a Barrett's esophagus cell line and separated by capillary isoelectric focusing, reproducibly generating dozens of peaks. The sample taken for the separation was equal to the labeled protein homogenate from three cells.

  19. Characterization of human papillomavirus by capillary isoelectric focusing with whole-column imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Chao-Ming

    2013-11-01

    CIEF with whole-column imaging detection (WCID) can be a useful tool for the characterization and identification of human papillomavirus (HPV). This article is the initial report of the determination of the pI of HPV by CIEF-WCID method. In this study, components of the assay selected for optimization were ampholytes, additives, methylcellulose concentration, HPV concentration, salt concentration, and focusing time. Then the optimization CIEF-WCID method was validated for HPV 16L1 and HPV 18L1. As a result, a precise method to analyze the pI values of HPVs was achieved with RSD < 1.0%. The HPV peak pattern was reproducible. CIEF-WCID had great potential for HPV quality control, as WCID eliminated the mobilization step required by the conventional single-point detection. In the example, the five HPVs displayed pI values of 8.43 ± 0.06 (n = 10; HPV 6L1), 8.70 ± 0.04 (n = 10; HPV 11L1), 7.94 ± 0.05 (n = 18; HPV 16L1), 7.57 ± 0.04 (n = 18; HPV 18L1), and 8.45 ± 0.05 (n = 10; HPV 58L1). This CIEF-WCID platform could be a powerful analytical tool for characterization, process development support, release testing, and stability study in pharmaceutical industry.

  20. Detection of protein phosphorylation and charge isoforms using vertical one-dimensional isoelectric focusing gels.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Jeffrey C; Peck, Scott C

    2014-01-01

    During many biological responses, changes in protein modifications (e.g., phosphorylation) are often more critical than changes in protein abundance in determining the outcome of cellular responses. These important regulatory changes can alter a protein's location, activity, or binding partners. Monitoring modifications such as phosphorylation is often impeded, or even prevented, because of the need for specialized reagents and equipment that are expensive and/or time-consuming to produce. However, many protein modifications alter the isoelectric point (pI) of a protein. Therefore, we developed a denaturing, one-dimensional isoelectric focusing (IEF) procedure that separates proteins based on their pI to resolve different isoforms, allowing a relatively simple strategy for detecting changes in protein modifications. Although similar results can be achieved by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, the method described here uses a multi-well SDS-PAGE format that allows many more samples to be assayed within a single gel, thereby greatly decreasing both the time and cost needed to assess modifications of a single protein in response many different treatment conditions. To increase the sensitivity of detection, we also optimized a procedure to transfer proteins from these gels to membranes for subsequent immunodetection. This combination of techniques provides the means of interrogating the number and stoichiometry of isoforms from total protein extracts without a priori knowledge of which modification may occur.

  1. Focus, edge detection, and CCD camera characterization for development of an optical overlay calibration standard

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fox, Stephen Harris

    2000-11-01

    In order to ensure continued growth and development, a consortium of IC manufacturers has produced a ``roadmap'' of critical technologies immediately needed, and predicted to be needed, by the industry in the near future. Reduction of critical dimensions (the smallest dimensions of an IC, typically the CMOS gate length) necessitate tighter control over the alignment of one mask (i.e., lithographic) level relative to another. Measurement of the relative alignment of two such masks is known as ``overlay metrology.'' Reference standards for calibration of present and planned overlay metrology tools must be developed for the IC industry to meet their anticipated needs. This work contributes to the development of calibration standards and methods for overlay metrology by consideration and characterization of several aspects of overlay measurement that introduce error into the measurement. Unavoidable variations in the focus response of an overlay tool lead to errors due to coupling of lateral motion of the measuring microscope with its focus motion, and its variation of optical aberrations with focus. We consider various algorithms available for autofocus of an optical microscope. The algorithms have been tested with simulated and real data. We have found that an algorithm's response depends crucially on the material system being investigated. We also determined an optimal algorithm of those tested for use on the NIST optical overlay metrology tool. Detection of feature edges and their positions on the IC are critical to overlay metrology. We investigated various algorithms for edge detection appropriate for the optical overlay metrology tool at the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). Results comparing the performance of the recommended algorithm against various algorithms used in the industry are presented. Length standards are normally calibrated with a scanning photometric stage monitored by laser interferometry. Optical overlay patterns are

  2. Fluorescence-labeled peptides as isoelectric point (pI) markers in capillary isoelectric focusing with fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Shimura, K; Kasai, K

    1995-08-01

    Commercially available peptides, mostly angiotensin derivatives, were labeled at their N-terminal amino group with 5-carboxytetramethylrhodamine succinimidyl ester, to obtain fluorescent pI markers for capillary isoelectric focusing with fluorescence detection. The labeled peptides were purified by reversed-phase chromatography. They were well separated on isoelectric focusing in a polyacrylamide gel slab and their pIs were determined by comigration with protein-pI markers. The fluorescent markers could be detected as sharp peaks in capillary isoelectric focusing with laser-induced fluorescence detection (He-Ne laser, 1 mW, 543.5 nm). The detection limit was found to be around 3 x 10(-12) M (0.8 amol). Tetramethylrhodamine-labeled pea lectin (3 pg) was subjected to capillary isoelectric focusing and the pIs of the fluorescent derivatives of the lectin were determined by using the fluorescence-labeled peptides as pI markers.

  3. Detection and Modeling of the Tsunami Generated by 2013 Okhotsk Deep Focus Earthquake

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williamson, A.; Newman, A. V.; Okal, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    The May 24, 2013 moment magnitude (MW) 8.3 Sea of Okhotsk deep earthquake is the largest deep focused earthquake on record. This event is the only great (Mw > 8.0) earthquake in the past two decades to rupture at a depth greater than 300 km and is the only deep earthquake to be detected by modern geodetic tools such as DART pressure sensors, continuous GPS, and GRACE. Continuous GPS stations along the Kamchatka Peninsula and Kuril Islands recorded sub-centimeter static displacements including subsidence across the peninsula, inferring a spatially extensive region of uplift within the Sea of Okhotsk likely generating a low-amplitude, but long-wavelength tsunami wave. We use water column height changes recorded at 10 regional DART pressure sensors, to evaluate the detectability and usability of these tsunami sensors in identifying tsunami waves from such deep earthquakes. Of the 10 sites, only 2 were triggered by the event, enabling capture of high-rate (one sample per minute) pressure data. The remaining sites reported at the background rate of 15 minutes per sample. From these sensors we observed sub-centimeter tsunami waves, in general agreement with synthetics computed using normal mode theory, following the framework of Ward (1980). Additionally, despite remaining at the low-frequency background rate, we were able to identify wave periods around 9000 s across multiple DART stations. We will report on our observations of the long-period tsunami waves from these sensors, and our analysis of how they compare to both reported, and our best-fit determination of the Okhotsk earthquake focal mechanism and location.

  4. Evaluation of Ultrasound-Induced Damage to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus by Flow Cytometry and Transmission Electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jiao; Ahn, Juhee; Liu, Donghong; Chen, Shiguo; Ye, Xingqian

    2016-01-01

    As a nonthermal sterilization technique, ultrasound has attracted great interest in the field of food preservation. In this study, flow cytometry and transmission electron microscopy were employed to investigate ultrasound-induced damage to Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. For flow cytometry studies, single staining with propidium iodide (PI) or carboxyfluorescein diacetate (cFDA) revealed that ultrasound treatment caused cell death by compromising membrane integrity, inactivating intracellular esterases, and inhibiting metabolic performance. The results showed that ultrasound damage was independent of initial bacterial concentrations, while the mechanism of cellular damage differed according to the bacterial species. For the Gram-negative bacterium E. coli, ultrasound worked first on the outer membrane rather than the cytoplasmic membrane. Based on the double-staining results, we inferred that ultrasound treatment might be an all-or-nothing process: cells ruptured and disintegrated by ultrasound cannot be revived, which can be considered an advantage of ultrasound over other nonthermal techniques. Transmission electron microscopy studies revealed that the mechanism of ultrasound-induced damage was multitarget inactivation, involving the cell wall, cytoplasmic membrane, and inner structure. Understanding of the irreversible antibacterial action of ultrasound has great significance for its further utilization in the food industry. PMID:26746712

  5. Detection and identification of serum monoclonal immunoglobulin by immunoisoelectric focusing. Limits of sensitivity and use during relapse of multiple myeloma.

    PubMed Central

    Sinclair, D; Kumararatne, D S; Stott, D

    1984-01-01

    The limits of detection of four classes of monoclonal immunoglobulin and free light chain in serum by isoelectric focusing and immunoisoelectric focusing have been determined and the sensitivity of these techniques compared with that obtained using immunoelectrophoresis and zonal electrophoresis with immunofixation. Immunoisoelectric focusing was 10-40 times more sensitive than immunoelectrophoresis and could be used to detect concentrations of monoclonal immunoglobulin that were undetectable by zonal electrophoresis with immunofixation. The relevance of this work in monitoring multiple myeloma during treatment and relapse is discussed. Images PMID:6421894

  6. Detection of thyroglobulin in antithyroglobulin antibody-positive sera by isoelectric focusing.

    PubMed

    Malvoisin, Etienne; Makhloufi, Djamila; Livrozet, Jean-Michel

    2015-07-20

    Circulating antibodies have the potential to interfere with the measurement of thyroglobulin (Tg) in sera of patients. Here, we determined Tg concentration by isoelectric focusing (IEF) on agarose gel using for detection a rabbit antiserum to human Tg termed FLX. Tg was determined in sera of thyroid patients and HIV-infected patients under antiviral therapy. We showed that Tg IEF was not affected by the presence of anti-Tg antibodies (TgAb). Tg concentrations measured by IEF in TgAb-negative sera were in most of the cases, similar to those obtained by IRMA (immunoradiometric assay). However, in 5 of the 96 thyroid patients, and none of the 46 healthy subjects, Tg was undetectable by antiserum FLX and measurable by IRMA. In HIV-infected patients (64 men and 60 women), Tg was not recognized by FLX in 23 men and 9 women and this was related to abnormal CD4. We hypothesize that the decreased binding of FLX to Tg may be the result of conformational change on the Tg molecule, a phenomenon apparently related to immunodeficiency in HIV-infected patients. For thyroid patients, Tg IEF may be very useful for the interpretation of results when Tg measurements by IRMA and automated immunoassays are affected by interferences.

  7. Isoelectric point determination of live polioviruses by capillary isoelectric focusing with whole column imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Thomassen, Yvonne E; van Eikenhorst, Gerco; van der Pol, Leo A; Bakker, Wilfried A M

    2013-06-18

    Using a capillary isoelectric focusing-whole column imaging detection (CIEF-WCID) method, the isoelectric points (pI) of complete intact polioviruses were determined. The polioviruses that were analyzed are the commonly used viruses for the production of inactivated polio vaccines (IPV)-Mahoney (type 1), MEF (type 2), and Saukett (type 3)-as well as for attenuated oral polio vaccines (OPV) and Sabin types 1, 2, and 3. A method for analyzing biological hazardous components (biological safety level 2) was set up for the CIEF-WCID analyzer used. This method is based on closed circuits. The determined pI's were 6.2 for Mahoney, 6.7 for MEF-1, and 5.8 for Saukett. The pI's of Sabin types 1, 2, and 3 viruses were 7.4, 7.2, and 6.3, respectively. Resolution of the virus peaks was shown to be reproducible. Using this adjusted CIEF-WCID technique, the pI of biologically hazardous components like toxins or viruses can be determined, which is beneficial for the development of vaccine production methods among others.

  8. Value Focused Thinking Applications to Supervised Pattern Classification With Extensions to Hyperspectral Anomaly Detection Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-03-26

    HYPERSPECTRAL ANOMALY DETECTION ALGORITHMS THESIS MARCH 2015 David E. Scanland, Captain, USAF AFIT-ENS-MS-15-M-121 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE...PATTERN CLASSIFICATION WITH EXTENSIONS TO HYPERSPECTRAL ANOMALY DETECTION ALGORITHMS THESIS Presented to the Faculty Department of...APPLICATION TO SUPERVISED PATTERN CLASSIFICATION WITH EXTENSIONS TO HYPERSPECTRAL ANOMALY DETECTION ALGORITHMS David E. Scanland, MS Captain, USAF

  9. Capillary isoelectric focusing and fluorometric detection of proteins and microorganisms dynamically modified by poly(ethylene glycol) pyrenebutanoate.

    PubMed

    Horka, Marie; Ruzicka, Filip; Horký, Jaroslav; Holá, Veronika; Slais, Karel

    2006-12-15

    The nonionogenic pyrene-based tenside, poly(ethylene glycol) pyrenebutanoate, was prepared and applied in capillary isoelectric focusing with fluorometric detection. This dye was used here as a buffer additive in capillary isoelectric focusing for a dynamic modification of the sample of proteins and microorganisms. The values of the isoelectric points of the labeled bioanalytes were calculated with use of the fluorescent pI markers and were found comparable with pI of the native compounds. The mixed cultures of proteins and microorganisms, Escherichia coli CCM 3954, Staphylococcus epidermidis CCM 4418, Proteus vulgaris, Enterococcus faecalis CCM 4224, and Stenotrophomonas maltophilia, the strains of the yeast cells, Candida albicans CCM 8180, Candida krusei, Candida parapsilosis, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, and Saccharomyces cerevisiae were reproducibly focused and separated by the suggested technique. Using UV excitation for the on-column fluorometric detection, the minimum detectable amount was down to 10 cells injected on the separation capillary.

  10. Caveolin-1 Mediates Low-Intensity Ultrasound-Induced Apoptosis via Downregulation of Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription 3 Phosphorylation in Laryngeal Carcinoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Ye, Qingsheng; Meng, Cuida; Shen, Yannan; Ji, Jianjun; Wang, Xiaochun; Zhou, Sheng; Jia, Lili; Wang, Yanqun

    2016-09-01

    Low-intensity ultrasound therapy has been found to be a potential tool in the management of malignant tumors in recent years. However, the molecular mechanism underlying low-intensity ultrasound-induced apoptosis is still not clear. In this study, we investigated the effects of low-intensity ultrasound-induced apoptosis in HEp-2 cells. We found that low-intensity ultrasound significantly induced apoptosis, and the expression level of caveolin-1 (Cav-1) was dramatically increased after ultrasound treatment of HEp-2 cells. After inhibiting the expression level of Cav-1 using siRNA transfection, we found that the cellular apoptosis induced by low-intensity ultrasound was significantly suppressed. In addition, inhibition of Cav-1 expression promoted phosphorylation of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), suggesting that the STAT3 signaling pathway was involved in low-intensity ultrasound-induced apoptosis via Cav-1 regulation. Our results indicate that Cav-1/STAT3 signaling pathway may mediate low-intensity ultrasound-induced apoptosis, and this technology could potentially be used clinically for the treatment of cancers.

  11. In-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused with an aerodynamic lens by Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection

    PubMed Central

    Barreda, F.-A.; Nicolas, C.; Sirven, J.-B.; Ouf, F.-X.; Lacour, J.-L.; Robert, E.; Benkoula, S.; Yon, J.; Miron, C.; Sublemontier, O.

    2015-01-01

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection technique (LIBD) was adapted to achieve fast in-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused under vacuum by an aerodynamic lens. The method employs a tightly focused, 21 μm, scanning laser microprobe which generates a local plasma induced by the laser interaction with a single particle. A counting mode optical detection allows the achievement of 2D mappings of the nanoparticle beams with a reduced analysis time thanks to the use of a high repetition rate infrared pulsed laser. As an example, the results obtained with Tryptophan nanoparticles are presented and the advantages of this method over existing ones are discussed. PMID:26498694

  12. In-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused with an aerodynamic lens by Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection.

    PubMed

    Barreda, F-A; Nicolas, C; Sirven, J-B; Ouf, F-X; Lacour, J-L; Robert, E; Benkoula, S; Yon, J; Miron, C; Sublemontier, O

    2015-10-26

    The Laser-Induced Breakdown Detection technique (LIBD) was adapted to achieve fast in-situ characterization of nanoparticle beams focused under vacuum by an aerodynamic lens. The method employs a tightly focused, 21 μm, scanning laser microprobe which generates a local plasma induced by the laser interaction with a single particle. A counting mode optical detection allows the achievement of 2D mappings of the nanoparticle beams with a reduced analysis time thanks to the use of a high repetition rate infrared pulsed laser. As an example, the results obtained with Tryptophan nanoparticles are presented and the advantages of this method over existing ones are discussed.

  13. The use of analytical isoelectric focusing for detection and identification of beta-lactamases.

    PubMed

    Mathew, A; Harris, A M; Marshall, M J; Ross, G W

    1975-05-01

    BETA-Lactamases (EC. 3.5.2.6) from strains of Gram-negative bacteria have been studied using analytical isoelectric focusing. This permits a visual comparison of the patterns of beta-lactamase bands produced by enzymes from different organisms. Purification of crude intracellular preparations is unnecessary and the technique is sufficiently sensitive to demonstrate beta-lactamase in mutants previously reported to lack the enzyme. R that have not been distinguished from one another biochemically or immunologically can be differentiated by isoelectric focusing. Conversely, the enzymes specified by the R factors RTEM, R1 and RGN14, with identical isoelectric focusing patterns have the same biochemical properties. Chromosomal and R-factor-mediated beta-lactamases from single strains have been separated and their identities confirmed by immunoisoelectric focusing. R factor-mediated enzymes gave identical isoelectric focusing patterns irrespective of the host strain. Isoelectric focusing can therefore be used to observe the transfer of beta-lactamases carried by R factors.

  14. A Distance Measure for Attention Focusing and Anaomaly Detection in Systems Monitoring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doyle, R. J.

    1994-01-01

    Any attempt to introduce automation into the monitoring of complex physical systems must start from a robust anomaly detection capability. This task is far from straightforward, for a single definition of what constitutes an anomaly is difficult to come by.

  15. Focus on Linguistic Form in a Collaborative Drama Project: Tokyo Detective Story

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Banks, Sachie

    2014-01-01

    This study explores the effectiveness and challenges of a collaborative drama project conducted in a beginner-level Japanese language university class. The project had two main objectives: firstly, it encouraged students to focus on linguistic elements during the process of writing, examining and editing the scenario, and to embed it in an…

  16. Detection of intrathecal immunoglobulin G synthesis by capillary isoelectric focusing immunoassay in oligoclonal band negative multiple sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Halbgebauer, Steffen; Huss, André; Buttmann, Mathias; Steinacker, Petra; Oeckl, Patrick; Brecht, Isabel; Weishaupt, Andreas; Tumani, Hayrettin; Otto, Markus

    2016-05-01

    Oligoclonal immunoglobulin G bands (OCBs) restricted to the cerebrospinal fluid indicate intrathecal inflammation. Using isoelectric focusing and immunoblotting, they are detected in about 95 % of patients with clinically definite multiple sclerosis (MS). To elucidate whether in the remaining 5 % OCBs are truly absent or alternatively missed due to insufficient sensitivity of the routine measurement, we employed a new, highly sensitive nanoscale method for OCB detection. Capillary isoelectric focusing followed by immunological detection served to analyze OCBs in 33 well-characterized OCB-negative and 10 OCB-positive MS patients as well as in 100 OCB-negative control patients with non-inflammatory neurological diseases and 30 OCB-positive control patients with inflammatory neurological diseases. We detected intrathecal immunoglobulin G production in 10 out of 33 MS patients (30 %), initially diagnosed as being OCB-negative, and in all 10 OCB-positive MS patients, but in only 3 out of 100 non-inflammatory neurological controls (3 %) and in 29 of 30 inflammatory neurological controls (97 %). At least about one-third of MS patients without intrathecal immunoglobulin G synthesis according to standard methods are OCB-positive. Advanced methods for OCB detection may increase the analytical sensitivity for detecting OCB in patients with MS who are OCB-negative according to current routine methods.

  17. Conceptual design and development of GEM based detecting system for tomographic tungsten focused transport monitoring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chernyshova, M.; Czarski, T.; Malinowski, K.; Kowalska-Strzęciwilk, E.; Poźniak, K.; Kasprowicz, G.; Zabołotny, W.; Wojeński, A.; Kolasiński, P.; Mazon, D.; Malard, P.

    2015-10-01

    Implementing tungsten as a plasma facing material in ITER and future fusion reactors will require effective monitoring of not just its level in the plasma but also its distribution. That can be successfully achieved using detectors based on Gas Electron Multiplier (GEM) technology. This work presents the conceptual design of the detecting unit for poloidal tomography to be tested at the WEST project tokamak. The current stage of the development is discussed covering aspects which include detector's spatial dimensions, gas mixtures, window materials and arrangements inside and outside the tokamak ports, details of detector's structure itself and details of the detecting module electronics. It is expected that the detecting unit under development, when implemented, will add to the safe operation of tokamak bringing the creation of sustainable nuclear fusion reactors a step closer. A shorter version of this contribution is due to be published in PoS at: 1st EPS conference on Plasma Diagnostics

  18. Capillary isoelectric focusing--useful tool for detection of the biofilm formation in Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Ruzicka, Filip; Horka, Marie; Hola, Veronika; Votava, Miroslav

    2007-03-01

    The biofilm formation is an important factor of S. epidermidis virulence. Biofilm-positive strains might be clinically more important than biofilm-negative ones. Unlike biofilm-negative staphylococci, biofilm-positive staphylococci are surrounded with an extracellular polysaccharide substance. The presence of this substance on the surface can affect physico-chemical properties of the bacterial cell, including surface charge. 73 S. epidermidis strains were examined for the presence of ica operon, for the ability to form biofilm by Christensen test tube method and for the production of slime by Congo red agar method. Isoelectric points (pI) of these strains were determined by means of Capillary Isoelectric Focusing. The biofilm negative strains focused near pI value 2.3, while the pI values of the biofilm positive strains were near 2.6. Isoelectric point is a useful criterion for the differentiation between biofilm-positive and biofilm-negative S. epidermidis strains.

  19. Single-Fluorophore Detection in Femtoliter Droplets Generated by Flow Focusing.

    PubMed

    Weinmeister, Robert; Freeman, Emma; Eperon, Ian C; Stuart, Alison M; Hudson, Andrew J

    2015-10-27

    Aqueous microdroplets with a volume of a few femtoliters are an ideal sample size for single-molecule fluorescence experiments. In particular, they enable prolonged measurements to be made on individual molecules that can diffuse freely in the surrounding medium. However, the rapid production of monodisperse droplets in a hydrodynamic flow, such as microfluidic flow focusing, will often involve volumes that are typically too large (>0.5 pL) for single-molecule studies. Desired volumes of a few femtoliters, or smaller, can be produced by either tip streaming or step emulsification in a flow-focusing device; however, in both of these methods, the aqueous droplets are dispersed in a large volume of the continuous phase, where individual droplets can diffuse perpendicular to the flow direction, and the monodispersity of droplet size produced by tip streaming is difficult to sustain for more than transient time scales. We show here that the optimized design and fabrication of microfluidic devices with shallow channel depths can result in the reliable production of stable droplets of a few femtoliters at a high rate in the dripping regime of flow focusing. Furthermore, the generated microdroplets are localized in a two-dimensional plane to enable immediate analysis. We have demonstrated the fluorescence monitoring of single molecules of encapsulated green fluorescent protein. The apparatus is straightfoward, inexpensive, and readily assembled within an ordinary laboratory environment.

  20. Serum Protein Markers for the Early Detection of Lung Cancer: A Focus on Autoantibodies.

    PubMed

    Broodman, Ingrid; Lindemans, Jan; van Sten, Jenny; Bischoff, Rainer; Luider, Theo

    2017-01-06

    Lung cancer has the highest mortality rate among cancer patients in the world, in particular because most patients are only diagnosed at an advanced and noncurable stage. Computed tomography (CT) screening on high-risk individuals has shown that early detection could reduce the mortality rate. However, the still high false-positive rate of CT screening may harm healthy individuals because of unnecessary follow-up scans and invasive follow-up procedures. Alternatively, false-negative and indeterminate results may harm patients due to the delayed diagnosis and treatment of lung cancer. Noninvasive biomarkers, complementary to CT screening, could lower the false-positive and false-negative rate of CT screening at baseline and thereby reduce the number of patients that need follow-up and diagnose patients at an earlier stage of lung cancer. Lung cancer tissue generates lung cancer-associated proteins to which the immune system might produce high-affinity autoantibodies. This autoantibody response to tumor-associated antigens starts during early stage lung cancer and may endure over years. Identification of tumor-associated antigens or the corresponding autoantibodies in body fluids as potential noninvasive biomarkers could thus be an effective approach for early detection and monitoring of lung cancer. We provide an overview of differentially expressed protein, antigen, and autoantibody biomarkers that combined with CT imaging might be of clinical use for early detection of lung cancer.

  1. Acousto-optical deflection-based whole channel scanning for microchip isoelectric focusing with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Sanders, J C; Huang, Z; Landers, J P

    2001-12-01

    This paper describes the development of a technique amenable to the separation of proteins on a microchip by isoelectric focusing (IEF) with entire channel scanning laser-induced fluorescence detection using acousto-optical deflection (AOD). The ability to use AOD to scan the portions of or the entire length of an IEF separation channel allows for high-speed analysis since the mobilization step is circumvented with this technique. Employing no moving parts eliminates mechanical noise and, not only is there no loss of resolution, AOD scanning can potentially increase resolution. The ability of AOD to provide ultra-fast scanning rates (kHz timescale) allows for real-time imaging of the focusing process. This is demonstrated with the separation of naturally fluorescent proteins using entire channel (total scanning range of 2.4 cm) AOD-mediated scanning laser-induced fluorescence detection.

  2. Ultrasound-induced hyperthermia for the spatio-temporal control of gene expression in bone repair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher; Padilla, Frédéric; Zhang, Man; Vilaboa, Nuria; Kripfgans, Oliver; Fowlkes, Brian; Franceschi, Renny

    2012-10-01

    Spatial and temporal control over the expression of growth/differentiation factors is of great interest for regeneration of bone, but technologies capable of providing tight and active control over gene expression remain elusive. We propose the use of focused ultrasound for the targeted activation of heat shock-sensitive expression systems in engineered bone. We report in vitro results with cells that express firefly luciferase (fLuc) under the control of a heat shock protein promoter. Cells were embedded in fibrin scaffolds and exposed to focused ultrasound, using a custom 3.3MHz transducer (focal length 4", f-number 1.33", focal dimension 1.2mm lateral FWHM) in CW mode for 2-20 minutes at intensities ISPTA=120-440 W/cm2. The kinetics of ultrasound-mediated activation of the cells was compared with that of strictly thermal activation. Bioluminescence imaging revealed fLuc expression in an area ≥2.5mm in diameter at the position of the ultrasound focus, and the diameter and intensity of the signal increased with the amplitude of the acoustic energy. We also found that ultrasound activated fLuc expression with substantially shorter exposures than thermal activation. Our results demonstrate the potential for focused ultrasound to selectively activate the expression of a gene of interest in an engineered tissue and suggest that focused ultrasound activates the heat shock pathway by a combination of thermal and non-thermal mechanisms.

  3. Ocular side effects of antitubercular drugs - a focus on prevention, early detection and management.

    PubMed

    Kokkada, S B; Barthakur, R; Natarajan, M; Palaian, S; Chhetri, A K; Mishra, P

    2005-01-01

    Given the increasing prevalence of tuberculosis, antitubercular drugs frequently used are also associated with ocular toxicity. Ethambutol is the most commonly implicated drug. It is generally well tolerated, but known to cause optic neuritis, more specifically retro bulbar neuritis causing blurred vision, decreased visual acuity, central scotomas, and loss of red-green color vision. The exact mechanism of toxicity is not understood. Though optic neuritis due to ethmabutol is generally considered to be reversible upon prompt discontinuation of the drug, there are reports of reversible toxicity, particularly in the elderly population. Isoniazid can rarely cause retro bulbar neuritis. Dose relationship is usually not seen. Streptomycin is known to cause pseudo tumorcerebri. Thiacetazone can produce severe cutaneous reactions including Steven Johnson Syndrome affecting the skin and mucosa including conjunctiva. Educating the patients for early detection of the ocular manifestations and regular follow-ups are very essential.

  4. PLLA nanofibrous paper-based plasmonic substrate with tailored hydrophilicity for focusing SERS detection.

    PubMed

    Shao, Jundong; Tong, Liping; Tang, Siying; Guo, Zhinan; Zhang, Han; Li, Penghui; Wang, Huaiyu; Du, Chang; Yu, Xue-Feng

    2015-03-11

    We report a new paper-based surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate platform contributed by a poly(l-lactic acid) (PLLA) nanofibrous paper adsorbed with plasmonic nanostructures, which can circumvent many challenges of the existing SERS substrates. This PLLA nanofibrous paper has three-dimensional porous structure, extremely clean surface with good hydrophobicity (contact angle is as high as 133.4°), and negligible background interference under Raman laser excitation. Due to the strong electrostatic interaction between PLLA nanofiber and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) molecules, the CTAB-coated gold nanorods (GNRs) are efficiently immobilized onto the fibers. Such a hydrophobic paper substrate with locally hydrophilic SERS-active area can confine analyte molecules and prevent the random spreading of molecules. The confinement leads to focusing effect and the GNRs-PLLA SERS substrate is found to be highly sensitive (0.1 nM Rhodamine 6G and malachite green) and exhibit excellent reproducibility (∼8% relative standard deviation (RSD)) and long-term stability. Furthermore, it is also cost-efficient, with simple fabrication methodology, and demonstrates high sample collection efficiency. All of these benefits ensure that this GNRs-PLLA substrate is a really perfect choice for a variety of SERS applications.

  5. Ultrasound-induced cavitation enhances the delivery and therapeutic efficacy of an oncolytic virus in an in vitro model.

    PubMed

    Bazan-Peregrino, Miriam; Arvanitis, Costas D; Rifai, Bassel; Seymour, Leonard W; Coussios, Constantin-C

    2012-01-30

    We investigated whether ultrasound-induced cavitation at 0.5 MHz could improve the extravasation and distribution of a potent breast cancer-selective oncolytic adenovirus, AdEHE2F-Luc, to tumour regions that are remote from blood vessels. We developed a novel tumour-mimicking model consisting of a gel matrix containing human breast cancer cells traversed by a fluid channel simulating a tumour blood vessel, through which the virus and microbubbles could be made to flow. Ultrasonic pressures were chosen to maximize either broadband emissions, associated with inertial cavitation, or ultraharmonic emissions, associated with stable cavitation, while varying duty cycle to keep the total acoustic energy delivered constant for comparison across exposures. None of the exposure conditions tested affected cell viability in the absence of the adenovirus. When AdEHE2F-Luc was delivered via the vessel, inertial cavitation increased transgene expression in tumour cells by up to 200 times. This increase was not observed in the absence of Coxsackie and Adenovirus Receptor cell expression, discounting sonoporation as the mechanism of action. In the presence of inertial cavitation, AdEHE2F-Luc distribution was greatly improved in the matrix surrounding the vessel, particularly in the direction of the ultrasound beam; this enabled AdEHE2F-Luc to kill up to 80% of cancer cells within the ultrasound focal volume in the gel 24 hours after delivery, compared to 0% in the absence of cavitation.

  6. Clearance of albumin following ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening is mediated by glial but not neuronal cells.

    PubMed

    Alonso, Angelika; Reinz, Eileen; Fatar, Marc; Hennerici, Michael G; Meairs, Stephen

    2011-09-09

    Ultrasound-mediated opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB) in the presence of gas-filled microbubbles is a potential strategy for drug delivery across the blood-brain barrier to promote regeneration after ischemic stroke. However, related bioeffects and potential side-effects that could limit a translation into clinical application are poorly understood so far. We therefore examined the clearance of extravasated albumin following ultrasound-mediated BBB opening. Autofluorescence of albumin-bound Evans Blue dye indicated cellular albumin uptake as soon as 30min after insonation (2±0.72 cells/optical field). Cellular albumin uptake increased constantly over 24h (22±3.33 cells/optical field, p<0.05). Initially, the majority of albumin-positive cells were located in the periphery of brain capillaries. Most albumin phagocyting cells stained positive for CD163 and Iba-1, identifying them as activated microglia. Further, a small fraction of albumin-positive cells stained positive for the astroglial markers GFAP/S100B. Some perivascular cells with intracellular albumin were shown to express the endothelial marker protein EN4. Albumin uptaking cells stained negative for the neuronal TubulinIII. Thus, ultrasound-induced BBB opening leads to albumin extravasation which is phagocytized predominantly by activated microglia, astrocytes and endothelial cells. As albumin uptake into neurons has been shown to be neurotoxic, rapid albumin clearance by microglia might prevent neuronal cell death.

  7. Focused upon hybridization: rapid and high sensitivity detection of DNA using isotachophoresis and peptide nucleic acid probes.

    PubMed

    Ostromohov, Nadya; Schwartz, Ortal; Bercovici, Moran

    2015-09-15

    We present a novel assay for rapid and high sensitivity detection of nucleic acids without amplification. Utilizing the neutral backbone of peptide nucleic acids (PNA), our method is based on the design of low electrophoretic mobility PNA probes, which do not focus under isotachophoresis (ITP) unless bound to their target sequence. Thus, background noise associated with free probes is entirely eliminated, significantly improving the signal-to-noise ratio while maintaining a simple single-step assay requiring no amplification steps. We provide a detailed analytical model and experimentally demonstrate the ability to detect targets as short as 17 nucleotides (nt) and a limit of detection of 100 fM with a dynamic range of 5 decades. We also demonstrate that the assay can be successfully implemented for detection of DNA in human serum without loss of signal. The assay requires 15 min to complete, and it could potentially be used in applications where rapid and highly sensitive amplification-free detection of nucleic acids is desired.

  8. Ipsi- and Contralateral Motor Response Using Ultrasound-induced Neurostimulation in Deeply Anesthetized Mice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamimura, Hermes; Wang, Shutao; Chen, Hong; Wang, Qi; Aurup, Christian; Fan, Kathtleen; Carneiro, Antonio; Konofagou, Elisa

    Ultrasound neurostimulation has been proven capable of eliciting motor responses. However, the studies in sedated rodents presented problems with target specificity due to the use of low ultrasound frequencies (<700 kHz). Here, we show that focused ultrasound (FUS) in mega-Hz range was able to evoke motor responses in mice under deep anesthesia. Contralateral movements of the hind limbs were observed when sonications were carried out at +2 mm of Lambda and ±2 mm lateral of midline in three mice. Moreover, stimulating other regions of the somatosensory and cerebellum induced trunk and ipsilateral limb movements in all six mice.

  9. A tissue phantom for visualization and measurement of ultrasound-induced cavitation damage.

    PubMed

    Maxwell, Adam D; Wang, Tzu-Yin; Yuan, Lingqian; Duryea, Alexander P; Xu, Zhen; Cain, Charles A

    2010-12-01

    Many ultrasound studies involve the use of tissue-mimicking materials to research phenomena in vitro and predict in vivo bioeffects. We have developed a tissue phantom to study cavitation-induced damage to tissue. The phantom consists of red blood cells suspended in an agarose hydrogel. The acoustic and mechanical properties of the gel phantom were found to be similar to soft tissue properties. The phantom's response to cavitation was evaluated using histotripsy. Histotripsy causes breakdown of tissue structures by the generation of controlled cavitation using short, focused, high-intensity ultrasound pulses. Histotripsy lesions were generated in the phantom and kidney tissue using a spherically focused 1-MHz transducer generating 15 cycle pulses, at a pulse repetition frequency of 100 Hz with a peak negative pressure of 14 MPa. Damage appeared clearly as increased optical transparency of the phantom due to rupture of individual red blood cells. The morphology of lesions generated in the phantom was very similar to that generated in kidney tissue at both macroscopic and cellular levels. Additionally, lesions in the phantom could be visualized as hypoechoic regions on a B-mode ultrasound image, similar to histotripsy lesions in tissue. High-speed imaging of the optically transparent phantom was used to show that damage coincides with the presence of cavitation. These results indicate that the phantom can accurately mimic the response of soft tissue to cavitation and provide a useful tool for studying damage induced by acoustic cavitation.

  10. Detection of measles, mumps and rubella viruses by immuno-colorimetric assay and its application in focus reduction neutralization tests.

    PubMed

    Vaidya, Sunil R; Kumbhar, Neelakshi S; Bhide, Vandana S

    2014-12-01

    Measles, mumps and rubella are vaccine-preventable diseases; however limited epidemiological data are available from low-income or developing countries. Thus, it is important to investigate the transmission of these viruses in different geographical regions. In this context, a cell culture-based rapid and reliable immuno-colorimetric assay (ICA) was established and its utility studied. Twenty-three measles, six mumps and six rubella virus isolates and three vaccine strains were studied. Detection by ICA was compared with plaque and RT-PCR assays. In addition, ICA was used to detect viruses in throat swabs (n = 24) collected from patients with suspected measles or mumps. Similarly, ICA was used in a focus reduction neutralization test (FRNT) and the results compared with those obtained by a commercial IgG enzyme immuno assay. Measles and mumps virus were detected 2 days post-infection in Vero or Vero-human signaling lymphocytic activation molecule cells, whereas rubella virus was detected 3 days post-infection in Vero cells. The blue stained viral foci were visible by the naked eye or through a magnifying glass. In conclusion, ICA was successfully used on 35 virus isolates, three vaccine strains and clinical specimens collected from suspected cases of measles and mumps. Furthermore, an application of ICA in a neutralization test (i.e., FRNT) was documented; this may be useful for sero-epidemiological, cross-neutralization and pre/post-vaccine studies.

  11. Ultrasound induced bubble clusters and tunnels in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Movahed, Pooya; Kreider, Wayne; Maxwell, Adam D.; Bailey, Michael R.; Freund, Jonathan B.

    2016-11-01

    Soft tissue fractionation induced by acoustic cavitation is desired for non-invasive tissue removal in histotripsy, while being a potential injury mechanism in other therapeutic ultrasound treatments such as lithotripsy. In this work, we investigate the formation of bubble clusters and tunnels in tissue-mimicking agar phantoms by focused ultrasound bursts to inform a class of damage models. Agar phantoms of different stiffness were subjected to a series of multi-cycle ultrasound bursts, using a burst wave lithotripsy (BWL) protocol, and simultaneously imaged at 200 frames per second (1 image per ultrasound burst). Some bubbles become visible in images ( 200 microns) due to the negative pressure ( 7.5 MPa) in the initial bursts, and the number of visible bubbles increases continuously during the subsequent bursts. A Rayleigh-Plesset-type bubble dynamics model, which accounts for viscoelastic confinement of agar gels, is developed. Material fatigue leading to eventual irreversible fracture-like failure in this model is proposed to explain the key observations. In addition to isolated, approximately spherical bubbles, long tunnel-like features are observed, which are seemingly lines of joined bubbles along a possible fracture or defect. The geometry of these tunnel-like features is quantified, and a physical explanation for tunnel formation is proposed in terms of bubble expansion and unstable collapse. This work was supported by NIH NIDDK Grant P01-DK043881.

  12. Optimization of the Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening

    PubMed Central

    Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2012-01-01

    Current treatments of neurological and neurodegenerative diseases are limited due to the lack of a truly non-invasive, transient, and regionally selective brain drug delivery method. The brain is particularly difficult to deliver drugs to because of the blood-brain barrier (BBB). The impermeability of the BBB is due to the tight junctions connecting adjacent endothelial cells and highly regulatory transport systems of the endothelial cell membranes. The main function of the BBB is ion and volume regulation to ensure conditions necessary for proper synaptic and axonal signaling. However, the same permeability properties that keep the brain healthy also constitute the cause of the tremendous obstacles posed in its pharmacological treatment. The BBB prevents most neurologically active drugs from entering the brain and, as a result, has been isolated as the rate-limiting factor in brain drug delivery. Until a solution to the trans-BBB delivery problem is found, treatments of neurological diseases will remain impeded. Over the past decade, methods that combine Focused Ultrasound (FUS) and microbubbles have been shown to offer the unique capability of noninvasively, locally and transiently open the BBB so as to treat central nervous system (CNS) diseases. Four of the main challenges that have been taken on by our group and discussed in this paper are: 1) assess its safety profile, 2) unveil the mechanism by which the BBB opens and closes, 3) control and predict the opened BBB properties and duration of the opening and 4) assess its premise in brain drug delivery. All these challenges will be discussed, findings in both small (mice) and large (non-human primates) animals are shown and finally the clinical potential for this technique is shown. PMID:23382778

  13. Ultrasound-induced thermal therapy of hyperplasia in ringed expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (eptfe) access grafts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Query, Michael Earl

    Hemodialysis vascular access, the interface between a dialysis patient and a dialysis machine, is quite literally the lifeblood of a patient's health. Vascular access dysfunction is the leading cause of hospitalization in hemodialysis patients. The occlusive growth of neointimal hyperplasia (NH) in expanded polytetrafluoroethylene (ePTFE) ringed grafts is the primary cause of failure. To further develop a proposed thermal ultrasound treatment to reduce or prevent NH in arteriovenous vascular grafts, the acoustic properties of ePTFE were studied in water and alcohol solutions. Previous reports of ePTFE acoustic properties are critiqued. It was found that the acoustic transmission and attenuation through ePTFE, and therefore the potential for an ultrasound-based therapy for NH, are heavily dependent on the medium in which the graft is immersed, suggesting that the acoustic properties of implanted grafts will change as grafts mature in vivo. The acoustic impedance and attenuation of water-soaked ePTFE were 0.478 +/- 1.43 x 10-2 MRayl and 1.78 +/- 0.111 Np/cm*MHz, respectively, while the acoustic impedance and attenuation of ePTFE in alcohol were 1.49 +/- 0.149 MRayl and 0.77 +/- 1.1 x 10-2 Np/cm*MHz, respectively. The use of focused ultrasound to heat implanted ringed ePTFE grafts was numerically modeled from 1.35- and 1.443-MHz transducers for in vitro geometries. Power deposition and heating, in turn, differed by an order of magnitude between various graft acoustic properties. Graft rings were predicted to be substantial absorbing and scattering features. In vitro phantom models were constructed: one with and one without thermocouples. At 1 W of acoustic power, the maximum temperature rise was 8˚ C. The thermocouple model containing a water-soaked graft did not experience heating in the far graft wall. The MRTI model confirmed that the graft rings are an absorbing/scattering feature. Heating was not prevented in the presence of water flow through the graft. Water

  14. Characterization of single α-tracks by photoresist detection and AFM analysis-focus on biomedical science and technology.

    PubMed

    Falzone, Nadia; Myhra, Sverre; Chakalova, Radka; Hill, Mark A; Thomson, James; Vallis, Katherine A

    2013-11-07

    The interactions between energetic ions and biological and/or organic target materials have recently attracted theoretical and experimental attention, due to their implications for detector and device technologies, and for therapeutic applications. Most of the attention has focused on detection of the primary ionization tracks, and their effects, while recoil target atom tracks remain largely unexplored. Detection of tracks by a negative tone photoresist (SU-8), followed by standard development, in combination with analysis by atomic force microscopy, shows that both primary and recoil tracks are revealed as conical spikes, and can be characterized at high spatial resolution. The methodology has the potential to provide detailed information about single impact events, which may lead to more effective and informative detector technologies and advanced therapeutic procedures. In comparison with current characterization methods the advantageous features include: greater spatial resolution by an order of magnitude (20 nm); detection of single primary and associated recoil tracks; increased range of fluence (to 2.5 × 10(9) cm(-2)); sensitivity to impacts at grazing angle incidence; and better definition of the lateral interaction volume in target materials.

  15. Investigation of the pH gradient formation and cathodic drift in microchip isoelectric focusing with imaged UV detection.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhongqi; Okabe, Noboru; Arai, Akihiro; Hirokawa, Takeshi

    2010-10-01

    This paper reports the protein analysis by using microchip IEF carried on an automated chip system. We herein focused on two important topics of microchip IEF, the pH gradient and cathodic drift. The computer simulation clarified that the EOF could delay the establishment of pH gradient and move the carrier ampholytes (CAs) to cathode, which probably caused a cathodic drift to happen. After focusing, the peak positions of components in a calibration kit with broad pI were plotted against their pI values to know the actual pH gradient in a microchannel varying time. It was found that the formed pH gradient was stable, not decayed after readily steady state, and migrated to cathode at a rate of 10.0 μm/s that determined by the experimental conditions such as chip material, internal surface coating and field strength. The theoretical pH gradient was parallel with the actual pH gradient, which was demonstrated in two types of microchip with different channel lengths. No compression of pH gradient was observed when 2% w/v hydroxypropyl methyl cellulose was added in sample and electrolytes. The effect of CAs concentration on current and cathodic drift was also explored. With the current automatic chip system, the calculated peak capacity was 23-48, and the minimal pI difference was 0.20-0.42 for the used single channel microchip with the effective length of 40.5 mm. The LOD for the analysis of CA-I and CA-II was around 0.32 μg/mL by using normal imaged UV detection, the detected amount is ca. 0.07 ng.

  16. First molecular detection of Leishmania major within naturally infected Phlebotomus salehi from a zoonotic cutaneous leishmaniasis focus in southern Iran.

    PubMed

    Azizi, K; Fakoorziba, M R; Jalali, M; Moemenbellah-Fard, M D

    2012-03-01

    Human cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) is a major notifiable public health problem in many parts of Iran. It is often caused by the zooflagellate parasite Leishmania major which is mainly transmitted by the bites of female phlebotomine sandflies belonging to the genus Phlebotomus (Diptera: Psychodidae). The annual incidence of CL in Fars province, southern Iran, was about 108-144 in 2007. The leishmanial infections of wild sandflies that may act as vectors were thus investigated at an endemic focus in this province. In all 330 female Phlebotomus sandflies were screened for the detection of Leishmania-specific kinetoplast DNA (kDNA) by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods. A two stage nested PCR protocol was used to establish the identity of Leishmania major species in naturally infected sandflies. The L. major kDNA was detected in 18 (5.5%) individual sandflies which belonged to four different Phlebotomus species (Phlebotomus papatasi, Phlebotomus salehi, Phlebotomus sergenti and P. major group). For the first time, one naturally infected P. salehi specimen contained the kDNA of the protozoan parasite, L. major, with a main band of 560 base pairs identified using the nested PCR method. It seems most likely therefore that P. salehi is potentially a rare sylvatic vector of L. major parasites in parts of this province. This is the first combined morphological and molecular studies of P. salehi in Iran.

  17. In vitro characterization of perfluorocarbon droplets for focused ultrasound therapy.

    PubMed

    Schad, Kelly C; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2010-09-07

    Focused ultrasound therapy can be enhanced with microbubbles by thermal and cavitation effects. However, localization of treatment is difficult as bioeffects can occur outside of the target region. Spatial control of bubbles can be achieved by ultrasound-induced conversion of liquid perfluorocarbon droplets to gas bubbles. This study was undertaken to determine the acoustic parameters for bubble production by droplet conversion and how it depends on the acoustic conditions and droplet physical parameters. Lipid-encapsulated droplets containing dodecafluoropentane were manufactured with sizes ranging from 1.9 to 7.2 microm in diameter and diluted to a concentration of 8 x 10(6) droplets mL(-1). The droplets were sonicated in vitro with a focused ultrasound transducer and varying frequency and exposure under flow conditions through an acoustically transparent vessel. The sonications were 10 ms in duration at frequencies of 0.578, 1.736 and 2.855 MHz. The pressure threshold for droplet conversion was measured with an active transducer operating in pulse-echo mode and simultaneous measurements of broadband acoustic emissions were performed with passive acoustic detection. The results show that droplets cannot be converted at low frequency without broadband emissions occurring. However, the pressure threshold for droplet conversion decreased with increasing frequency, exposure and droplet size. The pressure threshold for broadband emissions was independent of the droplet size and was 2.9, 4.4 and 5.3 MPa for 0.578, 1736 and 2.855 MHz, respectively. In summary, we have demonstrated that droplet conversion is feasible for clinically relevant sized droplets and acoustic exposures.

  18. Rapid Focused Sequencing: A Multiplexed Assay for Simultaneous Detection and Strain Typing of Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis

    PubMed Central

    Zolotova, Anna; Tan, Eugene; Selden, Richard F.

    2013-01-01

    Background The intentional release of Bacillus anthracis in the United States in 2001 has heightened concern about the use of pathogenic microorganisms in bioterrorism attacks. Many of the deadliest bacteria, including the Class A Select Agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis, are highly infectious via the pulmonary route when released in aerosolized form. Hence, rapid, sensitive, and reliable methods for detection of these biothreats and characterization of their potential impact on the exposed population are of critical importance to initiate and support rapid military, public health, and clinical responses. Methodology/Principal Findings We have developed microfluidic multiplexed PCR and sequencing assays based on the simultaneous interrogation of three pathogens per assay and ten loci per pathogen. Microfluidic separation of amplified fluorescently labeled fragments generated characteristic electrophoretic signatures for identification of each agent. The three sets of primers allowed significant strain typing and discrimination from non-pathogenic closely-related species and environmental background strains based on amplicon sizes alone. Furthermore, sequencing of the 10 amplicons per pathogen, termed “Rapid Focused Sequencing,” allowed an even greater degree of strain discrimination and, in some cases, can be used to determine virulence. Both amplification and sequencing assays were performed in microfluidic biochips developed for fast thermal cycling and requiring 7 µL per reaction. The 30-plex sequencing assay resulted in genotypic resolution of 84 representative strains belonging to each of the three biothreat species. Conclusions/Significance The microfluidic multiplexed assays allowed identification and strain differentiation of the biothreat agents Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pestis and clear discrimination from closely-related species and several environmental background strains. The

  19. The automatic use of capillary isoelectric focusing with whole column imaging detection for carbamazepine binding to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Maciążek-Jurczyk, Małgorzata; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2016-08-05

    The binding of the anticonvulsant drug carbamazepine (CBZ) to human serum albumin, both without (dHSA) and in the presence of fatty acids (HSA) was studied in real time by capillary isoelectric focusing with whole column imaging detection (cIEF-WCID). Reaction mixtures at different CBZ:HSA and CBZ:dHSA molar ratios (0:1/25:1) were prepared in phosphate buffer saline (PBS) solution at a physiological pH (7.4), and incubated for 0-72h at 37°C in a water bath. Application of the cIEF-WCID method allowed for observations on the impact of increasing CBZ:serum albumin molar ratios on isoelectric point (pI) shifts, as well as changes in peak area and absorbance, which serve as evidence of structural alterations occurring in the protein in the presence of CBZ. The obtained cIEF-WCID results indicated that the dynamic process of complex formation is not dependent on incubation time. The presented work allowed for recognition of different types of interactions, as well as for the calculation of association constants that demonstrate the stability of the complex. This study was also designed to examine the possible impact of fatty acids (FAs) on protein stability and drug delivery in blood.

  20. Intrinsic Tryptophan Fluorescence in the Detection and Analysis of Proteins: A Focus on Förster Resonance Energy Transfer Techniques

    PubMed Central

    Ghisaidoobe, Amar B. T.; Chung, Sang J.

    2014-01-01

    Förster resonance energy transfer (FRET) occurs when the distance between a donor fluorophore and an acceptor is within 10 nm, and its application often necessitates fluorescent labeling of biological targets. However, covalent modification of biomolecules can inadvertently give rise to conformational and/or functional changes. This review describes the application of intrinsic protein fluorescence, predominantly derived from tryptophan (λEX ∼ 280 nm, λEM ∼ 350 nm), in protein-related research and mainly focuses on label-free FRET techniques. In terms of wavelength and intensity, tryptophan fluorescence is strongly influenced by its (or the protein’s) local environment, which, in addition to fluorescence quenching, has been applied to study protein conformational changes. Intrinsic Förster resonance energy transfer (iFRET), a recently developed technique, utilizes the intrinsic fluorescence of tryptophan in conjunction with target-specific fluorescent probes as FRET donors and acceptors, respectively, for real time detection of native proteins. PMID:25490136

  1. The Dense Plasma Focus Opportunities in Detection of Hidden Objects by Using Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Inspection System (NINIS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V.; Dubrovsky, A.; Karpiński, L.; Miklaszewski, R.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M.; StrzyŻewski, P.; Tomaszewski, K.

    2006-12-01

    Dense Plasma Focus device is proposed for use as a neutron source to generate very powerful pulses of neutrons in the nanosecond (ns) range of its duration. Our devices PF-6, recently put into operation at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion, Warsaw, Poland, and PF-10 belonging to the Institute for Theoretical and Experimental Physics, Moscow, Russia, have energy storages in its capacitor banks 7.4 kJ and 13 kJ as a maximum. Operated with the DPF chambers of a special design they have a current maximum up to ˜760 kA with a quarter period of the discharge equal to 1 microsecond. They generate circa 109 of 2.5-MeV neutrons in one pulse of ≅ 10-ns duration when working with deuterium, what permit to expect 1011 14-MeV neutrons at their operation with DT-mixture. This feature gives a principal possibility to create a "single-shot detection system" for interrogation of hidden objects. It means that all necessary information will be received during a single bright pulse of neutrons having duration in a nanosecond range by means of the time-of-flight technique with a short flight base. It might be a base for the creation of the Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Inspection System (NINIS). These characteristics of the neutron source open a number of opportunities while interrogation time in this case would now depend only on the data-processing system.

  2. Two-dimensional capillary electrophoresis: capillary isoelectric focusing and capillary zone electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Dickerson, Jane A; Ramsay, Lauren M; Dada, Oluwatosin O; Cermak, Nathan; Dovichi, Norman J

    2010-08-01

    CIEF and CZE are coupled with LIF detection to create an ultrasensitive 2-D separation method for proteins. In this method, two capillaries are joined through a buffer-filled interface. Separate power supplies control the potential at the injection end of the first capillary and at the interface; the detector is held at ground potential. Proteins are labeled with the fluorogenic reagent Chromeo P503, which preserves the isoelectric point of the labeled protein. The labeled proteins were mixed with ampholytes and injected into the first-dimension capillary. A focusing step was performed with the injection end of the capillary at high pH and the interface at low pH. To mobilize components, the interface was filled with a high pH buffer, which was compatible with the second-dimension separation. A fraction was transferred to the second-dimension capillary for separation. The process of fraction transfer and second dimension separation was repeated two dozen times. The separation produced a spot capacity of 125.

  3. Ultrasound-Induced Organogel Formation Followed by Thin Film Fabrication via Simple Doctor Blading Technique for Field-Effect Transistor Applications.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jiaju; Wang, Yulong; Shan, Haiquan; Lin, Yiwei; Chen, Qian; Roy, V A L; Xu, Zongxiang

    2016-07-27

    We demonstrate doctor blading technique to fabricate high performance transistors made up of printed small molecular materials. In this regard, we synthesize a new soluble phthalocyanine, tetra-n-butyl peripheral substituted copper(II) phthalocaynine (CuBuPc), that can easily undergo gel formation upon ultrasonic irradiation, leading to the formation of three-dimensional (3D) network composed of one-dimensional (1D) nanofibers structure. Finally, taking the advantage of thixotropic nature of the CuBuPc organogel, we use the doctor blade processing technique that limits the material wastage for the fabrication of transistor devices. Due to the ultrasound induced stronger π-π interaction, the transistor fabricated by doctor blading based on CuBuPc organogel exhibits significant increase in charge carrier mobility in comparison with other solution process techniques, thus paving a way for a simple and economically viable preparation of electronic circuits.

  4. Rapid ultrasound-induced transient-liquid-phase bonding of Al-50Si alloys with Zn interlayer in air for electrical packaging application.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qian; Chen, Xiaoguang; Zhu, Lin; Yan, Jiuchun; Lai, Zhiwei; Zhao, Pizhi; Bao, Juncheng; Lv, Guicai; You, Chen; Zhou, Xiaoyu; Zhang, Jian; Li, Yuntao

    2017-01-01

    Al-50Si alloys were joined by rapid ultrasound-induced transient-liquid-phase bonding method using Zn foil as interlayer at 390°C in air, below the melt point of interlayer. The fracture of oxide films along the edge of Si particles led to contact and inter-diffusion between aluminum substrate and Zn interlayer, and liquefied Zn-Al alloys were developed. The width of Zn-Al alloys gradually decreased with increasing the ultrasonic vibration time due to liquid squeezing out and accelerated diffusion. A stage of isothermal solidification existed, and the completion time was significantly shortened. In the liquid metal, the acoustic streaming and ultrasonic cavitations were induced. As the process developed, much more Si particles, which were particulate-reinforced phases of Al-50Si, gradually migrated to the center of soldering seam. The highest average shear strength of joints reached to 94.2MPa, and the fracture mainly occurred at the base metal.

  5. Detection of nitro-based and peroxide-based explosives by fast polarity-switchable ion mobility spectrometer with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qinghua; Peng, Liying; Jiang, Dandan; Wang, Xin; Wang, Haiyan; Li, Haiyang

    2015-05-29

    Ion mobility spectrometer (IMS) has been widely deployed for on-site detection of explosives. The common nitro-based explosives are usually detected by negative IMS while the emerging peroxide-based explosives are better detected by positive IMS. In this study, a fast polarity-switchable IMS was constructed to detect these two explosive species in a single measurement. As the large traditional Faraday detector would cause a trailing reactant ion peak (RIP), a Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity was developed by reducing the detector radius to 3.3 mm and increasing the voltage difference between aperture grid and its front guard ring to 591 V, which could remove trailing peaks from RIP without loss of signal intensity. This fast polarity-switchable IMS with ion focusing in vicinity of Faraday detector was employed to detect a mixture of 10 ng 2,4,6-trinitrotoluene (TNT) and 50 ng hexamethylene triperoxide diamine (HMTD) by polarity-switching, and the result suggested that [TNT-H](-) and [HMTD+H](+) could be detected in a single measurement. Furthermore, the removal of trailing peaks from RIP by the Faraday detector with ion focusing in vicinity also promised the accurate identification of KClO4, KNO3 and S in common inorganic explosives, whose product ion peaks were fairly adjacent to RIP.

  6. Detection of unlabeled particles in the low micrometer size range using light scattering and hydrodynamic 3D focusing in a microfluidic system.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Guisheng; Jensen, Thomas G; Kutter, Jörg P

    2012-07-01

    In this paper, we describe a microfluidic device composed of integrated microoptical elements and a two-layer microchannel structure for highly sensitive light scattering detection of micro/submicrometer-sized particles. In the two-layer microfluidic system, a sample flow stream is first constrained in the out-of-plane direction into a narrow sheet, and then focused in-plane into a small core region, obtaining on-chip three-dimensional (3D) hydrodynamic focusing. All the microoptical elements, including waveguides, microlens, and fiber-to-waveguide couplers, and the in-plane focusing channels are fabricated in one SU-8 layer by standard photolithography. The channels for out-of-plane focusing are made in a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer by a single cast using a SU-8 master. Numerical and experimental results indicate that the device can realize 3D hydrodynamic focusing reliably over a wide range of Reynolds numbers (0.5 < Re < 20). Polystyrene particles of three sizes (2, 1, and 0.5 μm) were measured in the microfluidic device with integrated optics, demonstrating the feasibility of this approach to detect particles in the low micrometer size range by light scattering detection.

  7. Ion creation, ion focusing, ion/molecule reactions, ion separation, and ion detection in the open air in a small plastic device.

    PubMed

    Baird, Zane; Wei, Pu; Cooks, R Graham

    2015-02-07

    A method is presented in which ions are generated and manipulated in the ambient environment using polymeric electrodes produced with a consumer-grade 3D printer. The ability to focus, separate, react, and detect ions in the ambient environment is demonstrated and the data agree well with simulated ion behaviour.

  8. A pulsed THz imaging system with a line focus and a balanced 1-D detection scheme with two industrial CCD line-scan cameras.

    PubMed

    Wiegand, Christian; Herrmann, Michael; Bachtler, Sebastian; Klier, Jens; Molter, Daniel; Jonuscheit, Joachim; Beigang, René

    2010-03-15

    We present a pulsed THz Imaging System with a line focus intended to speed up measurements. A balanced 1-D detection scheme working with two industrial line-scan cameras is used. The instrument is implemented without the need for an amplified laser system, increasing the industrial applicability. The instrumental characteristics are determined.

  9. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-12-01

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r2  =  0.77) (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r2  =  0.82) (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  <  0.05, safe opening compared to cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r2  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response therefore

  10. Acoustic cavitation-based monitoring of the reversibility and permeability of ultrasound-induced blood-brain barrier opening.

    PubMed

    Sun, Tao; Samiotaki, Gesthimani; Wang, Shutao; Acosta, Camilo; Chen, Cherry C; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-12-07

    Cavitation events seeded by microbubbles have been previously reported to be associated with MR- or fluorescent-contrast enhancement after focused ultrasound (FUS)-induced blood-brain barrier (BBB) opening. However, it is still unknown whether bubble activity can be correlated with the reversibility (the duration of opening and the likelihood of safe reinstatement) and the permeability of opened BBB, which is critical for the clinical translation of using passive cavitation detection to monitor, predict and control the opening. In this study, the dependence of acoustic cavitation on the BBB opening duration, permeability coefficient and histological damage occurrence were thus investigated. Transcranial pulsed FUS at 1.5 MHz in the presence of systemically circulating microbubbles was applied in the mouse hippocampi (n  =  60). The stable and inertial cavitation activities were monitored during sonication. Contrast-enhanced MRI was performed immediately after sonication and every 24 h up to 6 d thereafter, to assess BBB opening, brain tissue permeability and potential edema. Histological evaluations were used to assess the occurrence of neurovascular damages. It was found that stable cavitation was well correlated with: (1) the duration of the BBB opening (r(2)  =  0.77); (2) the permeability of the opened BBB (r(2)  =  0.82); (3) the likelihood of safe opening (P  <  0.05, safe opening compared to cases of damage; P  <  0.0001, no opening compared to safe opening). The inertial cavitation dose was correlated with the resulting BBB permeability (r(2)  =  0.72). Stable cavitation was found to be more reliable than inertial cavitation at assessing the BBB opening within the pressure range used in this study. This study demonstrates that the stable cavitation response during BBB opening holds promise for predicting and controlling the restoration and pharmacokinetics of FUS-opened BBB. The stable cavitation response

  11. High-precision topography measurement through accurate in-focus plane detection with hybrid digital holographic microscope and white light interferometer module.

    PubMed

    Liżewski, Kamil; Tomczewski, Sławomir; Kozacki, Tomasz; Kostencka, Julianna

    2014-04-10

    High-precision topography measurement of micro-objects using interferometric and holographic techniques can be realized provided that the in-focus plane of an imaging system is very accurately determined. Therefore, in this paper we propose an accurate technique for in-focus plane determination, which is based on coherent and incoherent light. The proposed method consists of two major steps. First, a calibration of the imaging system with an amplitude object is performed with a common autofocusing method using coherent illumination, which allows for accurate localization of the in-focus plane position. In the second step, the position of the detected in-focus plane with respect to the imaging system is measured with white light interferometry. The obtained distance is used to accurately adjust a sample with the precision required for the measurement. The experimental validation of the proposed method is given for measurement of high-numerical-aperture microlenses with subwavelength accuracy.

  12. Screening method for linear alkylbenzene sulfonates in sediments based on water Soxhlet extraction assisted by focused microwaves with on-line preconcentration/derivatization/detection.

    PubMed

    Morales-Muñoz, S; Luque-García, J L; de Castro, Luque

    2004-02-13

    A screening method for linear alkylbenzene sulfonates (LAS) in sediments has been developed. Soxhlet extraction with water assisted by focused microwaves provides recoveries better (>90%) than obtained by conventional Soxhlet extraction (70-80%). Coupling of the extractor with an on-line preconcentration/derivatization/detection manifold through a flow injection (FI) interface allows a fully automated screening approach. A yes/no answer can be obtained in less than 2 h (for the whole analytical process), a short time compared with the at least 24 h of Soxhlet extraction (without final detection). Due to the use of water as leaching agent, the proposed method is environmentally friendly.

  13. A new multichannel time reversal focusing method for circumferential Lamb waves and its applications for defect detection in thick-walled pipe with large-diameter.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zenghua; Xu, Qinglong; Gong, Yu; He, Cunfu; Wu, Bin

    2014-09-01

    This paper proposes a new multichannel time reversal focusing (MTRF) method for circumferential Lamb waves which is based on modified time reversal algorithm and applies this method for detecting different kinds of defects in thick-walled pipe with large-diameter. The principle of time reversal of circumferential Lamb waves in pipe is presented along with the influence from multiple guided wave modes and propagation paths. Experimental study is carried out in a thick-walled and large-diameter pipe with three artificial defects, namely two axial notches on its inner and outer surface respectively, and a corrosion-like defect on its outer surface. By using the proposed MTRF method, the multichannel signals focus at the defects, leading to the amplitude improvement of the defect scattered signal. Besides, another energy focus arises in the direct signal due to the partial compensation of dispersion and multimode of circumferential Lamb waves, alongside the multichannel focusing, during MTRF process. By taking the direct focus as a time base, accurate defect localization is implemented. Secondly, a new phenomenon is exhibited in this paper that defect scattered wave packet appears just before the right boundary of truncation window after time reversal, and to which two feasible explanations are given. Moreover, this phenomenon can be used as the theoretical basis in the determination of defect scattered waves in time reversal response signal. At last, in order to detect defects without prior knowing their exact position, a large-range truncation window is used in the proposed method. As a result, the experimental operation of MTRF method is simplified and defect detection and localization are well accomplished.

  14. Side-by-side comparison of disposable microchips with commercial capillary cartridges for application in capillary isoelectric focusing with whole column imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhen; Ou, Junjie; Samy, Razim; Glawdel, Tomasz; Huang, Tiemin; Ren, Carolyn L; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2008-10-01

    Simple-structured, well-functioned disposable poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) microchips were developed for capillary isoelectric focusing with whole column imaging detection (CIEF-WCID). Side-by-side comparison of the developed microchips with well-established commercial capillary cartridges demonstrated that the disposable microchips have comparable performance as well as advantages such as absence of lens effect and possibility of high-aspect-ratio accompanied with a dramatic reduction in cost.

  15. Serum lipidomics profiling using LC-MS and high-energy collisional dissociation fragmentation: focus on triglyceride detection and characterization.

    PubMed

    Bird, Susan S; Marur, Vasant R; Sniatynski, Matthew J; Greenberg, Heather K; Kristal, Bruce S

    2011-09-01

    There is a growing need both clinically and experimentally to improve the characterization of blood lipids. A liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) method, developed for the qualitative and semiquantitative detection of lipids in biological samples and previously validated in mitochondrial samples, was now evaluated for the profiling of serum lipids. Data were acquired using high-resolution, full scan MS and high-energy, collisional dissociation (HCD), all ion fragmentation. The method was designed for efficient separation and detection in both positive and negative ionization mode and evaluated using standards spanning seven lipid classes. Platform performance, related to the identification and characterization of serum triglycerides (TGs), was assessed using extracted ion chromatograms with mass tolerance windows of 5 ppm or less from full scan exact mass measurements determined using SIEVE nondifferential LC-MS analysis software. The platform showed retention time coefficients of variation (CV) of <0.3%, mass accuracy values of <2 ppm error, and peak area CV of <13%, with the majority of that error coming from sample preparation and extraction rather than the LC-MS analysis, and linearity was shown to be over 4 orders of magnitude (r(2) = 0.999) for the standard TG (15:0)(3) spiked into serum. Instrument mass accuracy and precision were critical to the identification of unknown TG species, in part because these parameters enabled us to reduce false positives. In addition to detection and relative quantitation of TGs in serum, TG structures were characterized through the use of alternating HCD scans at different energies to produce diagnostic fragmentations on all ions in the analysis. The lipidomics method was applied to serum samples from 192 rats maintained on diets differing in macronutrient composition. The analysis identified 86 TG species with 81 unique masses that varied over 3.5 orders of magnitude and showed diet-dependency, consistent with

  16. A microfluidic device for label-free detection of Escherichia coli in drinking water using positive dielectrophoretic focusing, capturing, and impedance measurement.

    PubMed

    Kim, Myounggon; Jung, Taekeon; Kim, Youngjin; Lee, Changgeun; Woo, Kyungchul; Seol, Jae Hun; Yang, Sung

    2015-12-15

    While sensors that allow for high-throughput enumeration of microorganisms within drinking water are useful for water quality monitoring, it is particularly challenging to accurately quantify microorganisms that are present in low numbers (<100 CFU/mL) in a high-throughput manner. Negative dielectrophoresis (nDEP) is typically utilized in DEP-based cell focusing methods; however, due to its low conductivity, drinking water cannot be analyzed by this approach. Here, we report a positive DEP (pDEP)-based Escherichia coli detection system that is integrated with a focusing and sensing electrode. By incorporating a passivation layer, we avoided issues with adhesion of E. coli to the electrode, and achieved efficient cell focusing under high flow rate conditions (1500 μL/h). The resulting focused E. coli cells were then trapped on the sensor electrode, resulting in changes in impedance. The proposed system was evaluated using four different E. coli populations (150-1500 CFU/mL). We successfully enumerated populations as low as 300 CFU/mL within 1 min, and the signal variation was 1.13±0.37%. The device introduced in this study provides the basis for the development of portable, highly sensitive microorganism sensors that enable rapid detection of bacteria in drinking water.

  17. Harmonic Motion Imaging for Abdominal Tumor Detection and High-intensity Focused Ultrasound Ablation Monitoring: A Feasibility Study in a Transgenic Mouse Model of Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y.; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F.; Olive, Kenneth P.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2015-01-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiation force-based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess relative tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radiofrequency signals using a 1D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated with a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring. PMID:26415128

  18. Harmonic motion imaging for abdominal tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound ablation monitoring: an in vivo feasibility study in a transgenic mouse model of pancreatic cancer.

    PubMed

    Chen, Hong; Hou, Gary Y; Han, Yang; Payen, Thomas; Palermo, Carmine F; Olive, Kenneth P; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2015-09-01

    Harmonic motion imaging (HMI) is a radiationforce- based elasticity imaging technique that tracks oscillatory tissue displacements induced by sinusoidal ultrasonic radiation force to assess the resulting oscillatory displacement denoting the underlying tissue stiffness. The objective of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of HMI in pancreatic tumor detection and high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) treatment monitoring. The HMI system consisted of a focused ultrasound transducer, which generated sinusoidal radiation force to induce oscillatory tissue motion at 50 Hz, and a diagnostic ultrasound transducer, which detected the axial tissue displacements based on acquired radio-frequency signals using a 1-D cross-correlation algorithm. For pancreatic tumor detection, HMI images were generated for pancreatic tumors in transgenic mice and normal pancreases in wild-type mice. The obtained HMI images showed a high contrast between normal and malignant pancreases with an average peak-to-peak HMI displacement ratio of 3.2. Histological analysis showed that no tissue damage was associated with HMI when it was used for the sole purpose of elasticity imaging. For pancreatic tumor ablation monitoring, the focused ultrasound transducer was operated at a higher acoustic power and longer pulse length than that used in tumor detection to simultaneously induce HIFU thermal ablation and oscillatory tissue displacements, allowing HMI monitoring without interrupting tumor ablation. HMI monitoring of HIFU ablation found significant decreases in the peak-to-peak HMI displacements before and after HIFU ablation with a reduction rate ranging from 15.8% to 57.0%. The formation of thermal lesions after HIFU exposure was confirmed by histological analysis. This study demonstrated the feasibility of HMI in abdominal tumor detection and HIFU ablation monitoring.

  19. PCR-based detection of Leishmania donovani DNA in a stray dog from a visceral Leishmaniasis endemic focus in Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Alam, Mohammad Zahangir; Yasin, Golam; Kato, Hirotomo; Sakurai, Tatsuya; Katakura, Ken

    2013-01-31

    Although Phlebotomus argentipes as the only known vector of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) is zoophilic in nature, VL is considered to be anthroponotic in the Indian subcontinent. Peripheral blood samples from 85 stray dogs were examined for any molecular evidence of Leishmania infection in VL endemic areas of Bangladesh. Parasite DNA was detected in a blood sample from 1 of 85 (1.2%) stray dogs using ITS1-PCR, and PCR sequencing of the rRNA-ITS and cytochrome b gene confirmed that the parasitic DNA was Leishmania donovani. The results support the assumption that dogs are a probable animal reservoir for the Leishmania parasite in Bangladesh. It will be important to investigate the possible epidemiological role of dogs in domestic foci of VL endemic areas in Bangladesh.

  20. Saving cells from ultrasound-induced apoptosis: quantification of cell death and uptake following sonication and effects of targeted calcium chelation

    PubMed Central

    Hutcheson, J.D.; Schlicher, R.K.; Hicks, H.K.; Prausnitz, M.R.

    2010-01-01

    Applications of ultrasound for non-invasive drug and gene delivery have been limited by associated cell death due to sonication. In this study, we sought to quantify the distribution of cellular bioeffects caused by low-frequency ultrasound (24 kHz) and test the hypothesis that Ca2+ chelation after sonication can shift this distribution by saving cells from death by apoptosis. Using flow cytometry, we quantitatively categorized sonicated cells among four populations: (1) cells that appear largely unaffected, (2) cells reversibly permeabilized, (3) cells rendered nonviable during sonication and (4) cells that appear to be viable shortly after sonication, but later undergo apoptosis and die. By monitoring cells for 6 h after ultrasound exposure, we found that up to 15% of intact cells fell into this final category. Those apoptotic cells initially had the highest levels of uptake of a marker compound, calcein; also had highly elevated levels of intracellular Ca2+; and contained an estimated plasma membrane wound radius of 100 – 300 nm. Finally, we showed that chelation of intracellular Ca2+ after sonication reduced apoptosis by up to 44%, thereby providing a strategy to save cells. We conclude that cells can be saved from ultrasound-induced death by appropriate selection of ultrasound conditions and Ca2+ chelation after sonication. PMID:20447754

  1. Geoscientific Applications of Particle Detection and Imaging Techniques withSpecial Focus on the Monitoring Clay Mineral Reactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warr, Laurence N.; Grathoff, Georg H.

    The combined use of focused X-ray, electron, and ion beams offers a diverse range of analytical capabilities for characterizing nanoscale mineral reactions that occur in hydrous environments. Improved image and microanalytical techniques (e.g., electron diffraction and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy), in combination with controlled sample environments, are currently leading to new advances in the understanding of fluid-mineral reactions in the Earth Sciences. One group of minerals playing a key role in the containment of radioactive waste and the underground storage of CO2 is the clay minerals: these small, expandable, and highly adsorbent hydrous phyllosilicates form important low-permeable geological barriers by which waste can be safely deposited. In this article we summarize some of the state-of-the-art particle and imaging techniques employed to predict the behavior of both engineered and natural clay mineral seals in proposed storage sites. Particular attention is given to two types of low-permeability geomaterials: engineered bentonite backfill and natural shale in the subsurface. These materials have contrasting swelling properties and degrees of chemical stability that require detailed analytical study for developing suitable disposal or storage solutions.

  2. First detection of Leishmania infantum DNA in wild caught Phlebotomus papatasi in endemic focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis, South of Iran

    PubMed Central

    Yavar, Rassi; Hadi, Karami; Reza, Abai Mohammad; Mohebali, M; Hasan, Bakshi; Ali, Oshaghi Mohammad; Sina, Rafizadeh; Habib, Bagherpoor Hagigi; Abodolrahim, Hosseini; Manuchehr, Gholami

    2013-01-01

    Objective To identify the vectors and reservoirs of cutaneous leishmaniasis in the endemic focus of Farashband, Fars Province, South of Iran. Methods Sticky papers and Sherman trap were used for collection of sand flies and rodents, respectively. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) of kDNA, ITS1-rDNA were used for identification of Leishmania parasite in sand flies as well as rodents. Results Totally 2 010 sand flies were collected and the species of Phlebotomus papatasi Scopoli was the common specimen in outdoors and indoors places. PCR technique was employed on 130 females of Phlebotomus papatasi. One of them (0.76%) was positive to parasite Leishmania major (L. major) and one specimen (0.76%) was positive to Leishmania infantum. Microscopic investigation on blood smear of the animal reservoirs for amastigote parasites revealed 16 (44%) infected Tatera indica. Infection of them to L. major was confirmed by PCR against kDNA loci of the parasite. Conclusions The results indicated that Phlebotomus papatasi was the dominant species circulating two species of parasites including L. major and Leishmania infantum among human and reservoirs. Furthermore, Tatera indica is the only main host reservoir for maintenance of the parasite source in the area. PMID:24075350

  3. Analysis of global Terrestrial Gamma Ray Flashes distribution and special focus on AGILE detections over South America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabró, Ferran; Montanyà, Joan; Marisaldi, Martino; van der Velde, Oscar A.; Fuschino, Fabio

    2015-03-01

    Global distribution of the Terrestrial Gamma-ray Flashes (TGFs) detected by AGILE and RHESSI for the period from March 2009 to July 2012 has been analysed. A fourth TGF production region has been distinguished over the Pacific. It is confirmed that TGF occurrence follows the Intertropical Convergence Zone (ITCZ) seasonal migration and prefers afternoons. TGF/lightning ratio appears to be lower over America than other regions suggesting that meteorological regional differences are important for the TGF production. Diurnal cycle of TGFs peaks in the afternoon suggesting that Convective Available Potential Energy (CAPE) and convection are important for TGF production. Moreover all AGILE passages over South America in the same period have been analysed to find meteorological preferences for TGF occurrence. In each passage the analysis of Cloud Top Altitude (CTA), CAPE, number of strokes, number of storms and coverage area of clouds with temperatures below -70 °C (Cloud Top Coverage area, CTC) are computed. On average, AGILE has been exposed to 19,100 strokes between each TGF representing ∼68 h of exposure over active storms. High CAPE values, high cloud tops and high stroke occurrence suggest that meteorological conditions conducive to vigorous and electrically active storms are important for TGF production. It is shown that a high number of thunderstorms is preferable for TGF production which may be explained by a greater chance of the presence of a thunderstorm in the best development stage for TGF production. High tropopause altitude seems to be important but not primordial for TGF production.

  4. Attention focusing in a sit-and-wait forager: a spider controls its prey-detection ability in different web sectors by adjusting thread tension.

    PubMed

    Nakata, Kensuke

    2010-01-07

    Focusing attention is a way for animals to search for and to obtain food efficiently. This study examines whether a sit-and-wait forager, the orb-web spider Cyclosa octotuberculata, focuses its attention on limited foraging areas. Video records of foraging activity revealed that the spiders detected prey trapped in the west and east sectors of their web less frequently than prey trapped in the north and south sectors. Comparison of photos of the web hub area with and without spiders present revealed that the spiders pulled radii towards the centre when waiting for prey. Radius pulling is stronger in the north and south web sectors than in the west and east sectors, possibly causing more tension in radii running vertically. Experimental manipulation indicated that the spiders responded to prey quicker when thread tension was increased. The results suggest that C. octotuberculata focus their attention on the web areas above and below the spider by adjusting the tension in web threads; and this causes higher prey detection rates in these areas.

  5. New pediatric vision screener employing polarization-modulated, retinal-birefringence-scanning-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system: opto-mechanical design and operation.

    PubMed

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris I; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David L

    2014-06-01

    Amblyopia ("lazy eye") is a major public health problem, caused by misalignment of the eyes (strabismus) or defocus. If detected early in childhood, there is an excellent response to therapy, yet most children are detected too late to be treated effectively. Commercially available vision screening devices that test for amblyopia's primary causes can detect strabismus only indirectly and inaccurately via assessment of the positions of external light reflections from the cornea, but they cannot detect the anatomical feature of the eyes where fixation actually occurs (the fovea). Our laboratory has been developing technology to detect true foveal fixation, by exploiting the birefringence of the uniquely arranged Henle fibers delineating the fovea using retinal birefringence scanning (RBS), and we recently described a polarization-modulated approach to RBS that enables entirely direct and reliable detection of true foveal fixation, with greatly enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and essentially independent of corneal birefringence (a confounding variable with all polarization-sensitive ophthalmic technology). Here, we describe the design and operation of a new pediatric vision screener that employs polarization-modulated, RBS-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system, and demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach.

  6. New pediatric vision screener employing polarization-modulated, retinal-birefringence-scanning-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system: opto-mechanical design and operation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irsch, Kristina; Gramatikov, Boris I.; Wu, Yi-Kai; Guyton, David L.

    2014-06-01

    Amblyopia ("lazy eye") is a major public health problem, caused by misalignment of the eyes (strabismus) or defocus. If detected early in childhood, there is an excellent response to therapy, yet most children are detected too late to be treated effectively. Commercially available vision screening devices that test for amblyopia's primary causes can detect strabismus only indirectly and inaccurately via assessment of the positions of external light reflections from the cornea, but they cannot detect the anatomical feature of the eyes where fixation actually occurs (the fovea). Our laboratory has been developing technology to detect true foveal fixation, by exploiting the birefringence of the uniquely arranged Henle fibers delineating the fovea using retinal birefringence scanning (RBS), and we recently described a polarization-modulated approach to RBS that enables entirely direct and reliable detection of true foveal fixation, with greatly enhanced signal-to-noise ratio and essentially independent of corneal birefringence (a confounding variable with all polarization-sensitive ophthalmic technology). Here, we describe the design and operation of a new pediatric vision screener that employs polarization-modulated, RBS-based strabismus detection and bull's eye focus detection with an improved target system, and demonstrate the feasibility of this new approach.

  7. Detection of high Leishmania infantum loads in Phlebotomus perniciosus captured in the leishmaniasis focus of southwestern Madrid region (Spain) by real time PCR.

    PubMed

    González, Estela; Álvarez, Ana; Ruiz, Sonia; Molina, Ricardo; Jiménez, Maribel

    2017-03-27

    Since 2010 a human leishmaniasis outbreak has been notified in southwestern Madrid region that still remains active. Entomological surveys have been carried out in the affected area in order to obtain information about species diversity, distribution, and density of sand flies. Moreover, molecular identification of blood meal preferences of sand flies and molecular detection of Leishmania infantum has been performed. In this work, we optimized a real time PCR assay in order to determine parasite loads in unfed and blood-fed Phlebotomus perniciosus female sand flies caught in the focus area. Results showed elevated parasite loads in nearly 70% of the studied positive sand flies. Furthermore, significantly higher parasite loads were observed in females without blood in their guts. In conclusion, high L. infantum loads found in P. perniciosus sand flies from the Madrid focus support the exceptional characteristics of this outbreak.

  8. Remote identification of protrusions and dents on surfaces by terahertz reflectometry with spatial beam filtering and out-of-focus detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hasegawa, Noboru; Löffler, Torsten; Thomson, Mark; Roskos, Hartmut G.

    2003-11-01

    We propose two terahertz reflectometry modalities that are optimized to be sensitive to the curvature of surface features. The first is a dark-field technique that allows the detection of protrusions and dents on surfaces with high sensitivity. It cannot distinguish, however, between convex and concave shapes. This becomes possible with the second technique, which combines out-of-focus imaging with suitable beam filtering. Both methods may be of interest for surface inspection in fabrication environments; for example, for online monitoring during metal processing.

  9. Pharmacokinetics of BPA in gliomas with ultrasound induced blood-brain barrier disruption as measured by microdialysis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng-Yi; Lin, Yi-Li; Chou, Fong-In; Lin, Yu-Chuan; Hsueh Liu, Yen-Wan; Chang, Lun-Wei; Hsieh, Yu-Ling

    2014-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) can be transiently disrupted by focused ultrasound (FUS) in the presence of microbubbles for targeted drug delivery. Previous studies have illustrated the pharmacokinetics of drug delivery across the BBB after sonication using indirect visualization techniques. In this study, we investigated the in vivo extracellular kinetics of boronophenylalanine-fructose (BPA-f) in glioma-bearing rats with FUS-induced BBB disruption by microdialysis. After simultaneous intravenous administration of BPA and FUS exposure, the boron concentration in the treated brains was quantified by inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy. With FUS, the mean peak concentration of BPA-f in the glioma dialysate was 3.6 times greater than without FUS, and the area under the concentration-time curve was 2.1 times greater. This study demonstrates that intracerebral microdialysis can be used to assess local BBB transport profiles of drugs in a sonicated site. Applying microdialysis to the study of metabolism and pharmacokinetics is useful for obtaining selective information within a specific brain site after FUS-induced BBB disruption.

  10. In Vitro Investigation of the Individual Contributions of Ultrasound-Induced Stable and Inertial Cavitation in Targeted Drug Delivery.

    PubMed

    Gourevich, Dana; Volovick, Alexander; Dogadkin, Osnat; Wang, Lijun; Mulvana, Helen; Medan, Yoav; Melzer, Andreas; Cochran, Sandy

    2015-07-01

    Ultrasound-mediated targeted drug delivery is a therapeutic modality under development with the potential to treat cancer. Its ability to produce local hyperthermia and cell poration through cavitation non-invasively makes it a candidate to trigger drug delivery. Hyperthermia offers greater potential for control, particularly with magnetic resonance imaging temperature measurement. However, cavitation may offer reduced treatment times, with real-time measurement of ultrasonic spectra indicating drug dose and treatment success. Here, a clinical magnetic resonance imaging-guided focused ultrasound surgery system was used to study ultrasound-mediated targeted drug delivery in vitro. Drug uptake into breast cancer cells in the vicinity of ultrasound contrast agent was correlated with occurrence and quantity of stable and inertial cavitation, classified according to subharmonic spectra. During stable cavitation, intracellular drug uptake increased by a factor up to 3.2 compared with the control. Reported here are the value of cavitation monitoring with a clinical system and its subsequent employment for dose optimization.

  11. Magnetic Resonance Thermometry at 7T for Real-Time Monitoring and Correction of Ultrasound Induced Mild Hyperthermia

    PubMed Central

    Fite, Brett Z.; Liu, Yu; Kruse, Dustin E.; Caskey, Charles F.; Walton, Jeffrey H.; Lai, Chun-Yen; Mahakian, Lisa M.; Larrat, Benoit; Dumont, Erik; Ferrara, Katherine W.

    2012-01-01

    While Magnetic Resonance Thermometry (MRT) has been extensively utilized for non-invasive temperature measurement, there is limited data on the use of high field (≥7T) scanners for this purpose. MR-guided Focused Ultrasound (MRgFUS) is a promising non-invasive method for localized hyperthermia and drug delivery. MRT based on the temperature sensitivity of the proton resonance frequency (PRF) has been implemented in both a tissue phantom and in vivo in a mouse Met-1 tumor model, using partial parallel imaging (PPI) to speed acquisition. An MRgFUS system capable of delivering a controlled 3D acoustic dose during real time MRT with proportional, integral, and derivative (PID) feedback control was developed and validated. Real-time MRT was validated in a tofu phantom with fluoroptic temperature measurements, and acoustic heating simulations were in good agreement with MR temperature maps. In an in vivo Met-1 mouse tumor, the real-time PID feedback control is capable of maintaining the desired temperature with high accuracy. We found that real time MR control of hyperthermia is feasible at high field, and k-space based PPI techniques may be implemented for increasing temporal resolution while maintaining temperature accuracy on the order of 1°C. PMID:22536396

  12. The Dependence of the Ultrasound-Induced Blood-Brain Barrier Opening Characteristics on Microbubble Size In Vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, James J.; Feshitan, Jameel A.; Wang, Shougang; Tung, Yao-Sheng; Baseri, Babak; Borden, Mark A.; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2009-04-01

    Recent neuropharmaceutical developments have led to potent disease-modifying drugs. In spite of these advancements, most agents cannot traverse the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and deposit in the brain. Focused ultrasound (FUS) with microbubbles has been shown to induce noninvasive, localized, and transient BBB opening. Although promising, safety and efficacy concerns still remain. Previously reported experiments used conventional imaging contrast agents that have a wide size distribution. In this study, we hypothesize that BBB opening characteristics are dependent on bubble diameter. A 25 μl bolus of in-house manufactured, lipid-shelled bubbles with either 1-2 or 4-5 μm diameter ranges was injected intravenously. Pulsed FUS (frequency: 1.5 MHz, peak-negative pressure: 146-607 kPa, duty cycle: 20%, duration: 1-min) was then applied to the left hippocampus of mice (n = 16) in vivo through the intact skin and skull. MRI or fluorescence microscopy was used to determine BBB opening. Contrast-enhanced (Omniscan™; 0.75 mL; molecular weight: 574 Da) MRI (9.4-T) was acquired on multiple days after sonication to determine BBB opening and closing. Fluorescence microscopy was also used to determine the feasibility of delivering large, 3 kDa dextran compounds through the BBB. The BBB opening acoustic pressure threshold for the 4-5μm bubbles was in the 146-304 kPa range while the threshold for the 1-2μm bubbles was higher. In conclusion, FUS-induced BBB opening and closing was shown to be dependent on the bubble diameter indicating the possibility of specifically designing bubbles to enhance this therapeutic application.

  13. Capillary isoelectric focusing of microorganisms in the pH range 2-5 in a dynamically modified FS capillary with UV detection.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Růzicka, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Slais, Karel

    2006-07-01

    The isoelectric points of many microbial cells lie within the pH range spanning from 1.5 to 4.5. In this work, we suggest a CIEF method for the separation of cells according to their isoelectric points in the pH range of 2-5. It includes the segmental injection of the sample pulse composed of the segment of the selected simple ampholytes, the segment of the bioanalytes and the segment of carrier ampholytes into fused silica capillaries dynamically modified by poly(ethylene glycole). This polymer dissolved in the catholyte, in the anolyte and in the injected sample pulse was used for a prevention of the bioanalyte adsorption on the capillary surface and for the reduction of the electroosmotic flow. Between each focusing run, the capillaries were washed with the mixture of acetone/ethanol to achieve the reproducible and efficient CIEF. In order to trace of pH gradients, low-molecular-mass pI markers were used. The mixed cultures of microorganisms, Escherichia coli CCM 3954, Candida albicans CCM 8180, Candida parapsilosis, Candida krusei, Candida glabrata, Candida tropicalis, CCM 8223, Proteus vulgaris, Klebsiela pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus CCM 3953, Streptococcus agalactiae CCM 6187, Enterococcus faecalis CCM 4224 and Staphylococcus epidermidis CCM 4418, were focused and separated by the CIEF method suggested here. This CIEF method enables the separation and detection of the microbes from the mixed cultures within several minutes. The minimum detectable number of microbial cells was less than 10(3).

  14. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-04-07

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

  15. Real-time monitoring of focused ultrasound blood-brain barrier opening via subharmonic acoustic emission detection: implementation of confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric transducers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Chih-Hung; Zhang, Jia-Wei; Liao, Yi-Yi; Liu, Hao-Li

    2016-04-01

    Burst-tone focused ultrasound exposure in the presence of microbubbles has been demonstrated to be effective at inducing temporal and local opening of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), which promises significant clinical potential to deliver therapeutic molecules into the central nervous system (CNS). Traditional contrast-enhanced imaging confirmation after focused ultrasound (FUS) exposure serves as a post-operative indicator of the effectiveness of FUS-BBB opening, however, an indicator that can concurrently report the BBB status and BBB-opening effectiveness is required to provide effective feedback to implement this treatment clinically. In this study, we demonstrate the use of subharmonic acoustic emission detection with implementation on a confocal dual-frequency piezoelectric ceramic structure to perform real-time monitoring of FUS-BBB opening. A confocal dual-frequency (0.55 MHz/1.1 MHz) focused ultrasound transducer was designed. The 1.1 MHz spherically-curved ceramic was employed to deliver FUS exposure to induce BBB-opening, whereas the outer-ring 0.55 MHz ceramic was employed to detect the subharmonic acoustic emissions originating from the target position. In stage-1 experiments, we employed spectral analysis and performed an energy spectrum density (ESD) calculation. An optimized 0.55 MHz ESD level change was shown to effectively discriminate the occurrence of BBB-opening. Wideband acoustic emissions received from 0.55 MHz ceramics were also analyzed to evaluate its correlations with erythrocyte extravasations. In stage-2 real-time monitoring experiments, we applied the predetermined ESD change as a detection threshold in PC-controlled algorithm to predict the FUS exposure intra-operatively. In stage-1 experiment, we showed that subharmonic ESD presents distinguishable dynamics between intact BBB and opened BBB, and therefore a threshold ESD change level (5.5 dB) can be identified for BBB-opening prediction. Using this ESD change threshold detection as a

  16. Isoelectric Focusing of Serum Apolipoprotein C-III as a Sensitive Screening Method for the Detection of O-glycosylation Disturbances.

    PubMed

    Ondrušková, Nina; Honzík, Tomáš; Kytnarová, Jitka; Matoulek, Martin; Zeman, Jiří; Hansíková, Hana

    2015-01-01

    Apolipoprotein C-III (ApoC-III) is a glycoprotein carrying the most common O-linked glycan structure and is abundantly present in serum, what renders it a suitable marker for analysis of O-glycosylation abnormalities. Isoelectric focusing followed by a Western blot of ApoC-III, using PhastSystem™ Electrophoresis System (GE Healthcare), was introduced as a rather simple and rapid method for screening of certain subtypes of inherited glycosylation disorders. The study's aim was to establish this method in our laboratory, what included performing the analysis in a group of 170 healthy individuals to set the reference range of detected relative amounts of sialylated ApoC-III isoforms and to evaluate the gender- and age-dependent differences. A significant relative increase of asialo-ApoC-III with growing age was found. Secondly, we examined serum from patients with selected metabolic disorders and detected minor O-glycosylation changes in diseases such as Prader-Willi syndrome, PGM1 (phosphoglucomutase 1) or MAN1B (class 1B alpha-1,2-mannosidase) deficiency. Our results show that this method allows for a sensitive detection of ApoC-III O-glycosylation status, however this might be modulated by several factors (i.e. nutrition, medication) whose exact role remains to be determined.

  17. MRI-guided targeted blood-brain barrier disruption with focused ultrasound: histological findings in rabbits.

    PubMed

    McDannold, Nathan; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Raymond, Scott; Jolesz, Ferenc A; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2005-11-01

    Focused ultrasound offers a method to disrupt the blood-brain barrier (BBB) noninvasively and reversibly at targeted locations. The purpose of this study was to test the safety of this method by searching for ischemia and apoptosis in areas with BBB disruption induced by pulsed ultrasound in the presence of preformed gas bubbles and by looking for delayed effects up to one month after sonication. Pulsed ultrasound exposures (sonications) were performed in the brains of 24 rabbits under monitoring by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) (ultrasound: frequency = 1.63 MHz, burst length = 100 ms, PRF = 1 Hz, duration = 20 s, pressure amplitude 0.7 to 1.0 MPa). Before sonication, an ultrasound contrast agent (Optison, GE Healthcare, Milwaukee, WI, USA) was injected IV. BBB disruption was confirmed with contrast-enhanced MR images. Whole brain histologic examination was performed using haematoxylin and eosin staining for general histology, vanadium acid fuchsin-toluidine blue staining for ischemic neurons and TUNEL staining for apoptosis. The main effects observed were tiny regions of extravasated red blood cells scattered around the sonicated locations, indicating affected capillaries. Despite these vasculature effects, only a few cells in some of the sonicated areas showed evidence for apoptosis or ischemia. No ischemic or apoptotic regions were detected that would indicate a compromised blood supply was induced by the sonications. No delayed effects were observed either by MRI or histology up to 4 wk after sonication. Ultrasound-induced BBB disruption is possible without inducing substantial vascular damage that would result in ischemic or apoptotic death to neurons. These findings indicate that this method is safe for targeted drug delivery, at least when compared with the currently available invasive methods.

  18. Automated fast extraction of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons from soil by focused microwave-assisted Soxhlet extraction prior to gas chromatography--electron-capture detection.

    PubMed

    Priego-Capote, F; Luque-García, J L; Luque de Castro, M D

    2003-04-25

    An approach for the automated fast extraction of nitrated polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (nitroPAHs) from soil, using a focused microwave-assisted Soxhlet extractor, is proposed. The main factors affecting the extraction efficiency (namely: irradiation power, irradiation time, number of cycles and extractant volume) were optimised by using experimental design methodology. The reduction of the nitro-PAHs to amino-PAHs and the derivatisation of the reduced analytes with heptafluorobutyric anhydride was mandatory prior to the separation-determination step by gas chromatography--electron-capture detection. The proposed approach has allowed the extraction of these pollutants from spiked and "real" contaminated soils with extraction efficiencies similar to those provided by the US Environmental Protection Agency methods 3540-8091, but with a drastic reduction in both the extraction time and sample handling, and using less organic solvent, as 75-85% of it was recycled.

  19. Rapid formation of Ni3Sn4 joints for die attachment of SiC-based high temperature power devices using ultrasound-induced transient liquid phase bonding process.

    PubMed

    Li, Z L; Dong, H J; Song, X G; Zhao, H Y; Feng, J C; Liu, J H; Tian, H; Wang, S J

    2017-05-01

    High melting point Ni3Sn4 joints for the die attachment of SiC-based high temperature power devices was successfully achieved using an ultrasound-induced transient liquid phase (TLP) bonding process within a remarkably short bonding time of 8s. The formed intermetallic joints, which are completely composed of the refined equiaxial Ni3Sn4 grains with the average diameter of 2μm, perform the average shear strength of 26.7MPa. The sonochemical effects of ultrasonic waves dominate the mechanism and kinetics of the rapid formation of Ni3Sn4 joints.

  20. Investigations into ultrasound induced atomization.

    PubMed

    Ramisetty, Kiran A; Pandit, Aniruddha B; Gogate, Parag R

    2013-01-01

    The present work deals with measurements of the droplet size distribution in an ultrasonic atomizer using photographic analysis with an objective of understanding the effect of different equipment parameters such as the operating frequency, power dissipation and the operating parameters such as the flow rate and liquid properties on the droplet size distribution. Mechanistic details about the atomization phenomena have also been established using photographic analysis based on the capture of the growth of the instability and sudden ejection of droplets with high velocity. Velocity of these droplets has been measured by capturing the motion of droplets as streaks. It has been observed that the droplet size decreases with an increase in the frequency of atomizer. Droplet size distribution was found to change from the narrow to wider range with an increase in the intensity of ultrasound. The drop size was found to decrease with an increase in the fluid viscosity. The current work has clearly highlighted the approach for the selection of operating parameters for achieving a desired droplet size distribution using ultrasonic atomization and has also established the controlling mechanisms for the formation of droplet. An empirical correlation for the prediction of the droplet size has been developed based on the liquid and equipment operating properties.

  1. Focused Screening and Treatment (FSAT): a PCR-based strategy to detect malaria parasite carriers and contain drug resistant P. falciparum, Pailin, Cambodia.

    PubMed

    Hoyer, Stefan; Nguon, Sokomar; Kim, Saorin; Habib, Najibullah; Khim, Nimol; Sum, Sarorn; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Bjorge, Steven; Thomson, Andrew; Kheng, Sim; Chea, Nguon; Yok, Sovann; Top, Samphornarann; Ros, Seyha; Sophal, Uth; Thompson, Michelle M; Mellor, Steve; Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Yeang, Chhiang; Yeung, Shunmay; Duong, Socheat; Newman, Robert D; Menard, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in Pailin province, along the border between Thailand and Cambodia, have become resistant to artemisinin derivatives. To better define the epidemiology of P. falciparum populations and to assess the risk of the possible spread of these parasites outside Pailin, a new epidemiological tool named "Focused Screening and Treatment" (FSAT), based on active molecular detection of asymptomatic parasite carriers was introduced in 2010. Cross-sectional malariometric surveys using PCR were carried out in 20 out of 109 villages in Pailin province. Individuals detected as P. falciparum carriers were treated with atovaquone-proguanil combination plus a single dose of primaquine if the patient was non-G6PD deficient. Interviews were conducted to elicit history of cross-border travel that might contribute to the spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites. After directly observed treatment, patients were followed up and re-examined on day 7 and day 28. Among 6931 individuals screened, prevalence of P. falciparum carriers was less than 1%, of whom 96% were asymptomatic. Only 1.6% of the individuals had a travel history or plans to go outside Cambodia, with none of those tested being positive for P. falciparum. Retrospective analysis, using 2010 routine surveillance data, showed significant differences in the prevalence of asymptomatic carriers discovered by FSAT between villages classified as "high risk" and "low risk" based on malaria incidence data. All positive individuals treated and followed-up until day 28 were cured. No mutant-type allele related to atovaquone resistance was found. FSAT is a potentially useful tool to detect, treat and track clusters of asymptomatic carriers of P. falciparum along with providing valuable epidemiological information regarding cross-border movements of potential malaria parasite carriers and parasite gene flow.

  2. Focused Screening and Treatment (FSAT): A PCR-Based Strategy to Detect Malaria Parasite Carriers and Contain Drug Resistant P. falciparum, Pailin, Cambodia

    PubMed Central

    Hoyer, Stefan; Nguon, Sokomar; Kim, Saorin; Habib, Najibullah; Khim, Nimol; Sum, Sarorn; Christophel, Eva-Maria; Bjorge, Steven; Thomson, Andrew; Kheng, Sim; Chea, Nguon; Yok, Sovann; Top, Samphornarann; Ros, Seyha; Sophal, Uth; Thompson, Michelle M.; Mellor, Steve; Ariey, Frédéric; Witkowski, Benoit; Yeang, Chhiang; Yeung, Shunmay; Duong, Socheat; Newman, Robert D.; Menard, Didier

    2012-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that Plasmodium falciparum malaria parasites in Pailin province, along the border between Thailand and Cambodia, have become resistant to artemisinin derivatives. To better define the epidemiology of P. falciparum populations and to assess the risk of the possible spread of these parasites outside Pailin, a new epidemiological tool named “Focused Screening and Treatment” (FSAT), based on active molecular detection of asymptomatic parasite carriers was introduced in 2010. Cross-sectional malariometric surveys using PCR were carried out in 20 out of 109 villages in Pailin province. Individuals detected as P. falciparum carriers were treated with atovaquone-proguanil combination plus a single dose of primaquine if the patient was non-G6PD deficient. Interviews were conducted to elicit history of cross-border travel that might contribute to the spread of artemisinin-resistant parasites. After directly observed treatment, patients were followed up and re-examined on day 7 and day 28. Among 6931 individuals screened, prevalence of P. falciparum carriers was less than 1%, of whom 96% were asymptomatic. Only 1.6% of the individuals had a travel history or plans to go outside Cambodia, with none of those tested being positive for P. falciparum. Retrospective analysis, using 2010 routine surveillance data, showed significant differences in the prevalence of asymptomatic carriers discovered by FSAT between villages classified as “high risk” and “low risk” based on malaria incidence data. All positive individuals treated and followed-up until day 28 were cured. No mutant-type allele related to atovaquone resistance was found. FSAT is a potentially useful tool to detect, treat and track clusters of asymptomatic carriers of P. falciparum along with providing valuable epidemiological information regarding cross-border movements of potential malaria parasite carriers and parasite gene flow. PMID:23049687

  3. Prostatic cancer surveillance following whole-gland high-intensity focused ultrasound: comparison of MRI and prostate-specific antigen for detection of residual or recurrent disease

    PubMed Central

    Punwani, S; Emberton, M; Walkden, M; Sohaib, A; Freeman, A; Ahmed, H; Allen, C; Kirkham, A

    2012-01-01

    Objective This retrospective study compares dynamic contrast-enhanced (DCE) MRI with the serial prostate-specific antigen (PSA) measurement for detection of residual disease following whole-gland high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy of prostate cancer. Methods Patients in whom post-HIFU DCE-MRI was followed within 3 months by ultrasound-guided transrectal biopsy were selected from a local database. 26 patients met the study inclusion criteria. Serial PSA levels following HIFU and post-HIFU follow-up MRI were retrieved for each patient. Three radiologists unaware of other investigative results independently assessed post-HIFU MRI studies for the presence of cancer, scoring on a four-point scale (1, no disease; 2, probably no disease; 3, probably residual disease; and 4, residual disease). Sensitivity, specificity and receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis were performed for each reader, post-HIFU PSA nadir and pre-biopsy PSA level thresholds of >0.2 and >0.5 ng ml−1. Results The sensitivity of DCE-MRI for detection of residual disease for the three readers ranged between 73% and 87%, and the specificity between 73% and 82%. There was good agreement between readers (κ=0.69–0.77). The sensitivity and specificity of PSA thresholds was 60–87% and 73–100%, respectively. The area under the ROC curve was greatest for pre-biopsy PSA (0.95). Conclusion DCE-MRI performed following whole-gland HIFU has similar sensitivity and specificity and ROC performance to serial PSA measurements for detection of residual or recurrent disease. PMID:22253342

  4. An enzyme-linked immuno focus assay for rapid detection and enumeration, and a newborn mouse model for human non-polio enteroviruses associated with acute diarrhea.

    PubMed

    Rao, C Durga; Reddy, Harikrishna; Naidu, Jagadish R; Raghavendra, A; Radhika, N S; Karande, Anjali

    2015-11-01

    We have recently reported significant association of non-polio enteroviruses (NPEVs) with acute and persistent diarrhea (18-21% of total diarrheal cases), and non-diarrheal Increased Frequency of Bowel Movements (IFoBM-ND) (about 29% of the NPEV infections) in children and that the NPEV-associated diarrhea was as significant as rotavirus diarrhea. However, their diarrhea-causing potential is yet to be demonstrated in an animal model system. Since the determination of virus titers by the traditional plaque assay takes 4-7 days, there is a need for development of a rapid method for virus titer determination to facilitate active clinical research on enterovirus-associated diarrhea. The goal of this study is to develop a cell-based rapid detection and enumeration method and to demonstrate the diarrhea-inducing potential of purified and characterized non-polio enteroviruses, which were isolated from diarrheic children. Here we describe generation of monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies against purified strains belonging to different serotypes, and development of an enzyme-linked immuno focus assay (ELIFA) for detection and enumeration of live NPEV particles in clinical and purified virus samples, and a newborn mouse model for NPEV diarrhea. Plaque-purified NPVEs, belonging to different serotypes, isolated from children with diarrhea, were grown in cell culture and purified by isopycnic CsCl density gradient centrifugation. By ELIFA, NPEVs could be detected and enumerated within 12h post-infection. Our results demonstrated that Coxsackievirus B1 (CVB1) and CVB5 strains, isolated from diarrheic children, induced severe diarrhea in orally-inoculated 9-12 day-old mouse pups, fulfilling Koch's postulates. The methods described here would facilitate studies on NPEV-associated gastrointestinal disease.

  5. Performance assessment of HIFU lesion detection by Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU): A 3D finite-element-based framework with experimental validation

    PubMed Central

    Hou, Gary Y.; Luo, Jianwen; Marquet, Fabrice; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan; Konofagou, Elisa E.

    2014-01-01

    Harmonic Motion Imaging for Focused Ultrasound (HMIFU) is a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Its principle is based on Amplitude-modulated (AM) - Harmonic Motion Imaging (HMI), an oscillatory radiation force used for imaging the tissue mechanical response during thermal ablation. In this study, a theoretical framework of HMIFU is presented, comprising a customized nonlinear wave propagation model, a finite-element (FE) analysis module, and an image-formation model. The objective of this study is to develop such a framework in order to 1) assess the fundamental performance of HMIFU in detecting HIFU lesions based on the change in tissue apparent elasticity, i.e., the increasing Young's modulus, and the HIFU lesion size with respect to the HIFU exposure time and 2) validate the simulation findings ex vivo. The same HMI and HMIFU parameters as in the experimental studies were used, i.e., 4.5-MHz HIFU frequency and 25 Hz AM frequency. For a lesion-to-background Young's modulus ratio of 3, 6, and 9, the FE and estimated HMI displacement ratios were equal to 1.83, 3.69, 5.39 and 1.65, 3.19, 4.59, respectively. In experiments, the HMI displacement followed a similar increasing trend of 1.19, 1.28, and 1.78 at 10-s, 20-s, and 30-s HIFU exposure, respectively. In addition, moderate agreement in lesion size growth was also found in both simulations (16.2, 73.1 and 334.7 mm2) and experiments (26.2, 94.2 and 206.2 mm2). Therefore, the feasibility of HMIFU for HIFU lesion detection based on the underlying tissue elasticity changes was verified through the developed theoretical framework, i.e., validation of the fundamental performance of the HMIFU system for lesion detection, localization and quantification, was demonstrated both theoretically and ex vivo. PMID:22036637

  6. Performance assessment of HIFU lesion detection by harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU): a 3-D finite-element-based framework with experimental validation.

    PubMed

    Hou, Gary Y; Luo, Jianwen; Marquet, Fabrice; Maleke, Caroline; Vappou, Jonathan; Konofagou, Elisa E

    2011-12-01

    Harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound (HMIFU) is a novel high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) therapy monitoring method with feasibilities demonstrated in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. Its principle is based on amplitude-modulated (AM) - harmonic motion imaging (HMI), an oscillatory radiation force used for imaging the tissue mechanical response during thermal ablation. In this study, a theoretical framework of HMIFU is presented, comprising a customized nonlinear wave propagation model, a finite-element (FE) analysis module and an image-formation model. The objective of this study is to develop such a framework to (1) assess the fundamental performance of HMIFU in detecting HIFU lesions based on the change in tissue apparent elasticity, i.e., the increasing Young's modulus, and the HIFU lesion size with respect to the HIFU exposure time and (2) validate the simulation findings ex vivo. The same HMI and HMIFU parameters as in the experimental studies were used, i.e., 4.5-MHz HIFU frequency and 25 Hz AM frequency. For a lesion-to-background Young's modulus ratio of 3, 6 and 9, the FE and estimated HMI displacement ratios were equal to 1.83, 3.69 and 5.39 and 1.65, 3.19 and 4.59, respectively. In experiments, the HMI displacement followed a similar increasing trend of 1.19, 1.28 and 1.78 at 10-s, 20-s and 30-s HIFU exposure, respectively. In addition, moderate agreement in lesion size growth was found in both simulations (16.2, 73.1 and 334.7 mm(2)) and experiments (26.2, 94.2 and 206.2 mm(2)). Therefore, the feasibility of HMIFU for HIFU lesion detection based on the underlying tissue elasticity changes was verified through the developed theoretical framework, i.e., validation of the fundamental performance of the HMIFU system for lesion detection, localization and quantification, was demonstrated both theoretically and ex vivo.

  7. Ion focusing

    DOEpatents

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2017-01-17

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  8. Ion focusing

    SciTech Connect

    Cooks, Robert Graham; Baird, Zane; Peng, Wen-Ping

    2015-11-10

    The invention generally relates to apparatuses for focusing ions at or above ambient pressure and methods of use thereof. In certain embodiments, the invention provides an apparatus for focusing ions that includes an electrode having a cavity, at least one inlet within the electrode configured to operatively couple with an ionization source, such that discharge generated by the ionization source is injected into the cavity of the electrode, and an outlet. The cavity in the electrode is shaped such that upon application of voltage to the electrode, ions within the cavity are focused and directed to the outlet, which is positioned such that a proximal end of the outlet receives the focused ions and a distal end of the outlet is open to ambient pressure.

  9. Detection and molecular typing of Leishmania tropica from Phlebotomus sergenti and lesions of cutaneous leishmaniasis in an emerging focus of Morocco

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Cutaneous leishmaniasis is an infectious disease caused by flagellate protozoa of the genus Leishmania. In Morocco, anthroponotic cutaneous leishmaniasis due to Leishmania tropica is considered as a public health problem, but its epidemiology has not been fully elucidated. The main objective of this study was to detect Leishmania infection in the vector, Phlebotomus sergenti and in human skin samples, in the El Hanchane locality, an emerging focus of cutaneous leishmaniasis in central Morocco. Methods A total of 643 sand flies were collected using CDC miniature light traps and identified morphologically. Leishmania species were characterized by ITS1 PCR-RFLP and ITS1-5.8S rRNA gene nested-PCR of samples from 123 females of Phlebotomus sergenti and 7 cutaneous leishmaniasis patients. Results The sand flies collected consisted of 9 species, 7 of which belonged to the genus Phlebotomus and two to the genus Sergentomyia. Phlebotomus sergenti was the most predominant (76.67%). By ITS1 PCR-RFLP Leishmania tropica was found in three Phlebotomus sergenti females and four patients (4/7). Using nested PCR Leishmania tropica was identified in the same three Phlebotomus sergenti females and all the 7 patients. The sequencing of the nested PCR products recognized 7 haplotypes, of which 6 have never been described. Conclusions This is the first molecular detection and identification of Leishmania tropica in human skin samples and Phlebotomus sergenti in support of its vector status in El Hanchane. The finding of seven Leishmania tropica haplotypes underscores heterogeneity of this species at a high level in Morocco. PMID:23890256

  10. Resuscitative Long-Bone Sonography for the Clinician: Usefulness and Pitfalls of Focused Clinical Ultrasound to Detect Long-Bone Fractures During Trauma Resuscitation.

    PubMed

    Al-Kadi, Azzam S; Gillman, Lawrence M; Ball, Chad G; Panebianco, Nova L; Kirkpatrick, Andrew W

    2009-08-01

    Bone has one of the highest acoustic densities (AD) in the human body. Traditionally, bone has been considered to be a hindrance to the use of ultrasound (US), as US waves are reflected by the dense matrix and obscure underlying structures. The intense wave reflection, however, can clearly illustrate the cortical bony anatomy of long bones, making cortical disruption obvious. Ultrasound can be used at the bedside concurrently with the overall trauma resuscitation, and may potentially limit the patient's and treating team's exposure to ionizing radiation, corroborate clinical findings, and augment procedural success. The extended focused assessment with sonography for trauma (EFAST) is an essential tool in the resuscitation of severe torso trauma, frequently demonstrating intra- pericardial and intra-peritoneal fluid, inferring hemo/pneumothoraces, and demonstrating cardiac function. Although it is typically considered as a diagnosis of exclusion, multiple long-bone fractures may be a source of shock and can be quickly confirmed at the bedside with EFAST. Further, the early detection of long-bone fractures can also aid in the early stabilization of severely injured patients. Sonographic evaluation for long-bone fractures may be particularly useful in austere environments where other imaging modalities are limited, such as in the battlefield, developing world, and space. While prospective study has been limited, selected series have demonstrated high accuracy among both physician and para-medical clinicians in detecting long-bone fractures. Pitfalls in this technique include reduced accuracy with the small bones of the hands and feet, as well as great reliance on user experience.

  11. Epithelial focus assay for early detection of carcinogen-altered cells in various organs of rats exposed in situ to N-nitrosoheptamethyleneimine/sup 1,2,3/

    SciTech Connect

    Terzachi, M.; Nettesheim, P.; Yarita, T.; Williams, M.L.

    1981-11-01

    The purpose of these studies was to determine a) whether epithelial cells with altered in vitro growth capacity occur not only after topical application of 7-12-dimethylbenz(a)-anthracene but also after systemic administration of a carcinogenic nitrosamine, and b) whether such cells can be isolated from tissues other than tracheal mucosa. At 3 and 20 weeks following intragastric administration of 150, 300, or 600 mg N-nitrosohepatamethyleneimine (NHMI)/kg, cells were harvested from tracheas, esophagi, and lungs (target tissues for NHMI) of inbred F344 rats and seeded into culture dishes. Normal cells from nonexposed organs produced no proliferative epithelial foci (EF). Of those tracheas sampled 3 weeks following exposure to 150 and 300 mg/kg, 10 and 20%, respectively, contained one or more EF that could be subcultured. Of those tracheas harvested 3 weeks post exposure to 600 mg/kg or 20 weeks post exposure to 150-600 mg/kg, 80-100% contained EF that could be subcultured. Twenty weeks after 600 mg NHMI/kg, the incidence of tracheas harboring cell populations with neoplastic potential (agarose-positive EF) was 80%, whereas the tracheal tumor incidence determined at 24 months was only 29%. Epithelial focus-forming units with various abnormal in vitro growth potentials were also detected in esophagi and lungs of NHMI-exposed rats.

  12. Integration of dialysis membranes into a poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic chip for isoelectric focusing of proteins using whole-channel imaging detection.

    PubMed

    Ou, Junjie; Glawdel, Tomasz; Samy, Razim; Wang, Shuwen; Liu, Zhen; Ren, Carolyn L; Pawliszyn, Janusz

    2008-10-01

    A poly(dimethylsiloxane) microfluidic chip-based cartridge is developed and reported here for protein analysis using isoelectic focusing (IEF)-whole-channel imaging detection (WCID) technology. In this design, commercial dialysis membranes are integrated to separate electrolytes and samples and to reduce undesired pressure-driven flow. Fused-silica capillaries are also incorporated in this design for sample injection and channel surface preconditioning. This structure is equivalent to that of a commercial fused-silica capillary-based cartridge for adapting to an IEF analyzer (iCE280 analyzer) to perform IEF-WCID. The successful integration of dialysis membranes into a microfluidic chip significantly improves IEF repeatability by eliminating undesired pressure-driven hydrodynamics and also makes sample injection much easier than that using the first-generation chip as reported recently. In this study, two microfluidic chips with a 100-microm-high, 100-microm-wide and a 200-microm-high, 50-microm-wide microchannel, respectively, were applied for qualitative and quantitative analysis of proteins. The mixture containing six pI markers with a pH range of 3-10 was successfully separated using IEF-WCID. The pH gradient exhibited a good linearity by plotting the pI value versus peak position, and the correlation coefficient reached 0.9994 and 0.9995 separately for the two chips. The separation of more complicated human hemoglobin control sample containing HbA, HbF, HbS, and HbC was also achieved. Additionally, for the quantitative analysis, a good linearity of IEF peak value versus myoglobin concentration in the range of 20-100 microg/mL was obtained.

  13. Assessment of Intrathecal Free Light Chain Synthesis: Comparison of Different Quantitative Methods with the Detection of Oligoclonal Free Light Chains by Isoelectric Focusing and Affinity-Mediated Immunoblotting

    PubMed Central

    Kušnierová, Pavlína; Švagera, Zdeněk; Všianský, František; Byrtusová, Monika; Hradílek, Pavel; Kurková, Barbora; Zapletalová, Olga; Bartoš, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to compare various methods for free light chain (fLC) quantitation in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum and to determine whether quantitative CSF measurements could reliably predict intrathecal fLC synthesis. In addition, we wished to determine the relationship between free kappa and free lambda light chain concentrations in CSF and serum in various disease groups. Methods We analysed 166 paired CSF and serum samples by at least one of the following methods: turbidimetry (Freelite™, SPAPLUS), nephelometry (N Latex FLC™, BN ProSpec), and two different (commercially available and in-house developed) sandwich ELISAs. The results were compared with oligoclonal fLC detected by affinity-mediated immunoblotting after isoelectric focusing. Results Although the correlations between quantitative methods were good, both proportional and systematic differences were discerned. However, no major differences were observed in the prediction of positive oligoclonal fLC test. Surprisingly, CSF free kappa/free lambda light chain ratios were lower than those in serum in about 75% of samples with negative oligoclonal fLC test. In about a half of patients with multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome, profoundly increased free kappa/free lambda light chain ratios were found in the CSF. Conclusions Our results show that using appropriate method-specific cut-offs, different methods of CSF fLC quantitation can be used for the prediction of intrathecal fLC synthesis. The reason for unexpectedly low free kappa/free lambda light chain ratios in normal CSFs remains to be elucidated. Whereas CSF free kappa light chain concentration is increased in most patients with multiple sclerosis and clinically isolated syndrome, CSF free lambda light chain values show large interindividual variability in these patients and should be investigated further for possible immunopathological and prognostic significance. PMID:27846293

  14. Salient Feature Selection Using Feed-Forward Neural Networks and Signal-to-Noise Ratios with a Focus Toward Network Threat Detection and Classification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-03-27

    Methodologies Applied to Network Threat Detection Author(s) Year Methodology Outcome Panda and Patra [38] 2007 Naïve Bayes Overall detection rate...Technology in Automation, Control and Intelligent Systems (CYBER), Bangkok, 2012. [38] M. Panda and M. R. Patra, "Network Intrusion Detection

  15. Electrophoretic Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, Robert S.

    2001-01-01

    Electrophoretic focusing is a new method of continuous flow electrophoresis that introduces precision flow control to achieve high resolution separations. The electric field is applied perpendicular to an incoming sample lamina and buffer but also perpendicular to the broad faces of the thin rectangular chamber. A uniform fluid cross-flow then enters and exits the separation chamber through the same broad faces which are porous. A balance is achieved by adjusting either the electric field or the cross-flow so the desired sample fraction with its specific migration velocity encounters an opposing flow of the same velocity. Applying an electric field transverse to the incoming sample lamina and opposing this field with a carefully configured buffer flow, a sample constituent can be selected and focused into a narrow stream for subsequent analysis. Monotonically changing either electric field or buffer cross-flow will yield a scan of all constituents of the sample. Stopping the scan increases the collection time for minor constituents to improve their analysis. Using the high voltage gradients and/or cross-flow to rapidly deflect extraneous sample through the porous screens and into either of the side (purge) chambers, the selected sample is focused in the center plane of the separation chamber and collected without contact or interaction with the separation chamber walls. Results will be presented on the separation of a range of materials including dyes, proteins, and monodisperse polystyrene latexes. Sources of sample dispersion inherent in other electrokinetic techniques will be shown to be negligible for a variety of sample concentrations, buffer properties and operating conditions.

  16. Multiple treatments with liposomal doxorubicin and ultrasound-induced disruption of blood-tumor and blood-brain barriers improves outcomes in a rat glioma model

    PubMed Central

    Aryal, Muna; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; Park, Juyoung; McDannold, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    The blood-brain-barrier (BBB) prevents the transport of most anticancer agents to the central nervous system and restricts delivery to infiltrating brain tumors. The heterogeneous vascular permeability in tumor vessels, along with several other factors, creates additional barriers for drug treatment for brain tumors. Focused ultrasound (FUS), when combined with circulating microbubbles, is an emerging noninvasive method to temporarily permeabilize the BBB and the “blood-tumor barrier”. Here, we tested the impact of three weekly sessions of FUS and liposomal doxorubicin (DOX) in 9L rat glioma tumors. Animals that received FUS + DOX (N = 8) had a median survival time that was increased significantly (P < 0.001) compared to animals who received DOX only (N = 6), FUS only (N = 8), or no treatment (N = 7). Median survival for animals that received FUS + DOX was increased by 100% relative to untreated controls, whereas animals who received DOX alone had only a 16% improvement. Animals who received only FUS showed no improvement. No tumor cells were found in histology in 4/8 animals in the FUS + DOX group, and in two animals, only a few tumor cells were detected. Adverse events in the treatment group included skin toxicity, impaired activity, damage to surrounding brain tissue, and tissue loss at the tumor site. In one animal, intratumoral hemorrhage was observed. These events are largely consistent with known side effects of doxorubicin and with an extensive tumor burden. Overall this work demonstrates that multiple sessions using this FUS technique to enhance the delivery of liposomal doxorubicin has a pronounced therapeutic effect in this rat glioma model. PMID:23603615

  17. Theoretical and experimental study on temperature elevation behind ribs caused by weakly focused ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaozhou; Yin, Chang; Gong, Xiufen; Cao, Wenwu

    2010-10-01

    Temperature distribution in tissues behind ribs produced by weakly focused ultrasound had been calculated using Pennes bioheat equation and the validity of the theoretical model was experimentally confirmed in vitro using porcine live. We found that the position of the maximum temperature in tissue is strongly influenced by the distance between the transducer and ribs, while the gap between ribs is the determining factor for the maximum achievable temperature. Within the focal length, when the distance between the transducer and ribs increases, the maximum temperature increases and its position shifts away from the transducer. The rib width has little effect on the position of the maximum temperature but affects the achievable peak temperature. Our results provide useful information for treating liver cancers using ultrasound induced hyperthermia.

  18. Windows of detection of tetrazepam in urine, oral fluid, beard, and hair, with a special focus on drug-facilitated crimes.

    PubMed

    Concheiro, Marta; Villain, Marion; Bouchet, Stéphane; Ludes, Bertrand; López-Rivadulla, Manuel; Kintz, Pascal

    2005-10-01

    Reducing the capacity of a victim to react against sexual assault, coupled with a possible abrupt unconsciousness-inducing effect and ease of administration in spiked drinks, have resulted in the use of sedative agents in cases of drug-facilitated offence. Among these compounds, tetrazepam may impair an individual rapidly. The chances of detecting this substance increase if the most sensitive methods are used and if the biologic matrix that allows the longest possible detection time is available. To document the window of detection of tetrazepam, 50 mg of the drug was administered orally to 2 volunteers, and the following samples were collected: oral fluid (n = 1) over 515 minutes, urine (n = 2) over 236-240 hours, hair (n = 2) 4 weeks after exposure, and beard (n = 1) over 34 days. Tetrazepam was analyzed by LC-MS/MS (Micromass Quattro Micro) after alkalinization and extraction by dichloromethane/diethyl ether in the presence of diazepam-d5, used as internal standard. Reversed-phase separation on an XTerra MS C18 column was achieved in 12 minutes, under gradient conditions. Pseudo-molecular ions selected were m/z 289.2 and 290.2 for tetrazepam and the internal standard (IS), respectively, and the corresponding daughter ions selected were m/z 225.2 and 253.2 for tetrazepam and m/z 154.1 and 198.3 for the IS. Urine tested positive for tetrazepam over 236-240 hours (14-13 ng/mL). Oral fluid tested positive for tetrazepam over 515 minutes (2.5 ng/mL). Tetrazepam was detected in beard over 27 days (6.5 pg/mg). A single tetrazepam dose was detected in hair 4 weeks after intake (123-175 pg/mg). Tetrazepam tested positive over the studied time intervals but would be expected to be detectable for a considerably longer time. Therefore, in cases of drug-facilitated crimes in which tetrazepam is involved, hair and beard analyses can be an important complement to urine analyses to document exposure, particularly if LC-MS/MS is used.

  19. Isoelectric focusing purity criteria and /sup 1/H NMR detectable spectroscopic heterogeneity in the major isolated monomer hemoglobins from Glycera dibranchiata

    SciTech Connect

    Constantinidis, I.; Satterlee, J.D.

    1987-12-01

    Three major monomeric hemoglobins have been isolated from the erythrocytes of Glycera dibranchiata. Their importance to structure-function studies of heme proteins lies in the fact that they have been shown to possess an exceptional amino acid substitution. In these proteins, the E-7 position is occupied by leucine rather than the more common distal histidine. This substitution alters the polarity of the heme ligand binding environment compared to myoglobin. Due to this, the G. dibranchiata monomer hemoglobins are attracting much attention. However, until now no purity criterion has been developed. Here the authors demonstrate that, for all of the Glycera momomer hemoglobins, multiple line patterns are shown on high-voltage isoelectric focusing (IEF) gels. Most of these lines are shown to be a consequence of heme-related phenomena and can be understood on the basis of changes in oxidation and ligation state of the heme iron. The multiple line pattern does not indicate significant impurities in the monomer hemoglobin preparation. The multiple line patterns on IEF gels disappear when gels of the apoproteins alone are focused. Single bands occur in this case for all of the monomer hemoglobins except component II, which displays two bands, one major and one minor. The minor band is found to be a modified apoprotein form. It is sensitive to apoprotein handling prior to focusing and depends upon whether the IEF gel is prefocused or not. From this analysis, IEF is shown to be a valuable purity criterion, and the purity of our monomer hemoglobin component II preparation is 97% one globin. The NMR results show that two types of spectroscopic heterogeneity are also present in component II, and these are unrelated to the protein purity.

  20. Molecular Detection of Leishmania in Phlebotomine Sand Flies (Diptera: Psychodidae) from a Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Focus at Xakriabá Indigenous Reserve, Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Rêgo, Felipe Dutra; Rugani, Jeronimo Marteleto Nunes; Shimabukuro, Paloma Helena Fernandes; Tonelli, Gabriel Barbosa; Quaresma, Patrícia Flávia; Gontijo, Célia Maria Ferreira

    2015-01-01

    Autochthonous cases of American cutaneous leishmaniasis (ACL) have been reported since 2001 in the Xakriabá Indigenous Reserve located in the municipality of São João das Missões in northern Minas Gerais state, Brazil. In order to study the presence of Leishmania DNA in phlebotomine sand flies, six entomological collections were carried out from July 2008 through July 2009, using 40 light traps placed in peridomicile areas of 20 randomly selected houses. From October 2011 through August 2012, another six collections were carried out with 20 light traps distributed among four trails (five traps per trail) selected for a previous study of wild and synanthropic hosts of Leishmania. A total of 4,760 phlebotomine specimens were collected belonging to ten genera and twenty-three species. Single female specimens or pools with up to ten specimens of the same locality, species and date, for Leishmania detection by molecular methods. Species identification of parasites was performed with ITS1 PCR-RFLP using HaeIII enzyme and genetic sequencing for SSU rRNA target. The presence of Leishmania DNA was detected in eleven samples from peridomicile areas: Lu. longipalpis (two), Nyssomyia intermedia (four), Lu. renei (two), Lu. ischnacantha, Micropygomyia goiana and Evandromyia lenti (one pool of each specie). The presence of Leishmania DNA was detected in twelve samples from among the trails: Martinsmyia minasensis (six), Ny. intermedia (three), Mi. peresi (two) and Ev. lenti (one). The presence of Leishmania infantum DNA in Lu. longipalpis and Leishmania braziliensis DNA in Ny. intermediasupport the epidemiological importance of these species of sand flies in the cycle of visceral and cutaneous leishmaniasis, respectively. The results also found other species associated with Leishmania DNA, such as Mt. minasensis and Ev. lenti, which may participate in a wild and/or synanthropic cycle of Leishmania transmission in the studied area. PMID:25853254

  1. Investigation into the use of smartphone as a machine vision device for engineering metrology and flaw detection, with focus on drilling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Razdan, Vikram; Bateman, Richard

    2015-05-01

    This study investigates the use of a Smartphone and its camera vision capabilities in Engineering metrology and flaw detection, with a view to develop a low cost alternative to Machine vision systems which are out of range for small scale manufacturers. A Smartphone has to provide a similar level of accuracy as Machine Vision devices like Smart cameras. The objective set out was to develop an App on an Android Smartphone, incorporating advanced Computer vision algorithms written in java code. The App could then be used for recording measurements of Twist Drill bits and hole geometry, and analysing the results for accuracy. A detailed literature review was carried out for in-depth study of Machine vision systems and their capabilities, including a comparison between the HTC One X Android Smartphone and the Teledyne Dalsa BOA Smart camera. A review of the existing metrology Apps in the market was also undertaken. In addition, the drilling operation was evaluated to establish key measurement parameters of a twist Drill bit, especially flank wear and diameter. The methodology covers software development of the Android App, including the use of image processing algorithms like Gaussian Blur, Sobel and Canny available from OpenCV software library, as well as designing and developing the experimental set-up for carrying out the measurements. The results obtained from the experimental set-up were analysed for geometry of Twist Drill bits and holes, including diametrical measurements and flaw detection. The results show that Smartphones like the HTC One X have the processing power and the camera capability to carry out metrological tasks, although dimensional accuracy achievable from the Smartphone App is below the level provided by Machine vision devices like Smart cameras. A Smartphone with mechanical attachments, capable of image processing and having a reasonable level of accuracy in dimensional measurement, has the potential to become a handy low-cost Machine vision

  2. Synthesis of grafted phosphorylcholine polymer layers as specific recognition ligands for C-reactive protein focused on grafting density and thickness to achieve highly sensitive detection.

    PubMed

    Kamon, Yuri; Kitayama, Yukiya; Itakura, Akiko N; Fukazawa, Kyoko; Ishihara, Kazuhiko; Takeuchi, Toshifumi

    2015-04-21

    We studied the effects of layer thickness and grafting density of poly(2-methacryloyloxyethyl phosphorylcholine) (PMPC) thin layers as specific ligands for the highly sensitive binding of C-reactive protein (CRP). PMPC layer thickness was controlled by surface-initiated activators generated by electron transfer for atom transfer radical polymerization (AGET ATRP). PMPC grafting density was controlled by utilizing mixed self-assembled monolayers with different incorporation ratios of the bis[2-(2-bromoisobutyryloxy)undecyl] disulfide ATRP initiator, as modulated by altering the feed molar ratio with (11-mercaptoundecyl)tetra(ethylene glycol). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ellipsometry measurements were used to characterize the modified surfaces. PMPC grafting densities were estimated from polymer thickness and the molecular weight obtained from sacrificial initiator during surface-initiated AGET ATRP. The effects of thickness and grafting density of the obtained PMPC layers on CRP binding performance were investigated using surface plasmon resonance employing a 10 mM Tris-HCl running buffer containing 140 mM NaCl and 2 mM CaCl2 (pH 7.4). Furthermore, the non-specific binding properties of the obtained layers were investigated using human serum albumin (HSA) as a reference protein. The PMPC layer which has 4.6 nm of thickness and 1.27 chains per nm(2) of grafting density showed highly sensitive CRP detection (limit of detection: 4.4 ng mL(-1)) with low non-specific HSA adsorption, which was improved 10 times than our previous report of 50 ng mL(-1).

  3. Spatiotemporal drug delivery using laser-generated-focused ultrasound system

    PubMed Central

    Di, Jin; Kim, Jinwook; Hu, Quanyin; Jiang, Xiaoning; Gu, Zhen

    2016-01-01

    Laser-generated-focused ultrasound (LGFU) holds promise for the high-precision ultrasound therapy owing to its tight focal spot, broad frequency band, and stable excitation with minimal ultrasound-induced heating. We here report the development of the LGFU as a stimulus for promoted drug release from microgels integrated with drug-loaded polymeric nanoparticles. The pulsed waves of ultrasound, generated by a carbon black/polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)-photoacoustic lens, were introduced to trigger the drug release from alginate microgels encapsulated with drug-loaded poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) nanoparticles. We demonstrated the antibacterial capability of this drug delivery system against Escherichia coli by the disk diffusion method, and antitumor efficacy toward the HeLa cell-derived tumor spheroids in vitro. This novel LGFU-responsive drug delivery system provides a simple and remote approach to precisely control the release of therapeutics in a spatiotemporal manner and potentially suppress detrimental effects to the surrounding tissue, such as thermal ablation. PMID:26299506

  4. Chromosome-Directed PCR-Based Detection and Quantification of Bacillus cereus Group Members with Focus on B. thuringiensis Serovar israelensis Active against Nematoceran Larvae.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Salome; Hendriksen, Niels B; Melin, Petter; Lundström, Jan O; Sundh, Ingvar

    2015-08-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis is a wide-spread soil bacterium affiliated with the B. cereus group (Bcg) and is widely used in biocontrol products applied against mosquito and black fly larvae. For monitoring and quantification of applied B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and its effect on indigenous B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg assemblages, efficient and reliable tools are essential. The abundance and properties of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains in the environment traditionally have been investigated with cultivation-dependent techniques, which are hampered by low sensitivity and the morphological similarity between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Currently available PCR-based detection and quantification tools target markers located on plasmids. In this study, a new cultivation-independent PCR-based method for efficient and specific quantification of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg is presented, utilizing two sets of PCR primers targeting the bacterial chromosome. Sequence database searches and empirical tests performed on target and nontarget species, as well as on bulk soil DNA samples, demonstrated that this diagnostic tool is specific for B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg. The method will be useful for comparisons of Bcg and B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis abundances in the same samples. Moreover, the effect of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis-based insecticide application on the total Bcg assemblages, including indigenous populations, can be investigated. This type of information is valuable in risk assessment and policy making for use of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis in the environment.

  5. Chromosome-Directed PCR-Based Detection and Quantification of Bacillus cereus Group Members with Focus on B. thuringiensis Serovar israelensis Active against Nematoceran Larvae

    PubMed Central

    Hendriksen, Niels B.; Melin, Petter; Lundström, Jan O.; Sundh, Ingvar

    2015-01-01

    Bacillus thuringiensis serovar israelensis is a wide-spread soil bacterium affiliated with the B. cereus group (Bcg) and is widely used in biocontrol products applied against mosquito and black fly larvae. For monitoring and quantification of applied B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and its effect on indigenous B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg assemblages, efficient and reliable tools are essential. The abundance and properties of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis strains in the environment traditionally have been investigated with cultivation-dependent techniques, which are hampered by low sensitivity and the morphological similarity between B. cereus and B. thuringiensis. Currently available PCR-based detection and quantification tools target markers located on plasmids. In this study, a new cultivation-independent PCR-based method for efficient and specific quantification of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg is presented, utilizing two sets of PCR primers targeting the bacterial chromosome. Sequence database searches and empirical tests performed on target and nontarget species, as well as on bulk soil DNA samples, demonstrated that this diagnostic tool is specific for B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis and Bcg. The method will be useful for comparisons of Bcg and B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis abundances in the same samples. Moreover, the effect of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis-based insecticide application on the total Bcg assemblages, including indigenous populations, can be investigated. This type of information is valuable in risk assessment and policy making for use of B. thuringiensis serovar israelensis in the environment. PMID:25979887

  6. Phlebotomus sergenti in a Cutaneous Leishmaniasis Focus in Azilal Province (High Atlas, Morocco): Molecular Detection and Genotyping of Leishmania tropica, and Feeding Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Ajaoud, Malika; Es-Sette, Nargys; Charrel, Rémi N; Laamrani-Idrissi, Abderahmane; Nhammi, Haddou; Riyad, Myriam; Lemrani, Meryem

    2015-01-01

    Background Phlebotomus (Paraphlebotomus) sergenti is at least one of the confirmed vectors for the transmission of cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania tropica and distributed widely in Morocco. This form of leishmaniasis is considered largely as anthroponotic, although dogs were found infected with Leishmania tropica, suggestive of zoonosis in some rural areas. Methodology and Findings This survey aimed at (i) studying the presence of Leishmania in field caught Phlebotomus sergenti, (ii) investigating genetic diversity within Leishmania tropica and (iii) identifying the host-blood feeding preferences of Phlebotomus sergenti. A total of 4,407 sand flies were collected in three rural areas of Azilal province, using CDC miniature light traps. Samples collected were found to consist of 13 species: Phlebotomus spp. and 3 Sergentomyia spp. The most abundant species was Phlebotomus sergenti, accounting for 45.75 % of the total. 965 female Phlebotomus sergenti were screened for the presence of Leishmania by ITS1-PCR-RFLP, giving a positive rate of 5.7% (55/965), all being identified as Leishmania tropica. Nucleotide heterogeneity of PCR-amplified ITS1-5.8S rRNA gene-ITS2 was noted. Analyses of 31 sequences obtained segregated them into 16 haplotypes, of which 7 contain superimposed peaks at certain nucleotide positions, suggestive of heterozygosity. Phlebotomus sergenti collected were found to feed on a large variety of vertebrate hosts, as determined by Cytochrome b sequencing of the DNA from the blood meals of 64 engorged females. Conclusion Our findings supported the notion that Phlebotomus sergenti is the primary vector of Leishmania tropica in this focus, and that the latter is genetically very heterogeneous. Furthermore, our results might be suggestive of a certain level of heterozygosity in Leishmania tropica population. This finding, as well as the feeding of the vectors on different animals are of interest for further investigation. PMID:25826399

  7. A dense plasma focus-based neutron source for a single-shot detection of illicit materials and explosives by a nanosecond neutron pulse

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gribkov, V. A.; Latyshev, S. V.; Miklaszewski, R. A.; Chernyshova, M.; Drozdowicz, K.; Wiącek, U.; Tomaszewski, K.; Lemeshko, B. D.

    2010-03-01

    Recent progress in a single-pulse Nanosecond Impulse Neutron Investigation System (NINIS) intended for interrogation of hidden objects by means of measuring elastically scattered neutrons is presented in this paper. The method uses very bright neutron pulses having duration of the order of 10 ns only, which are generated by dense plasma focus (DPF) devices filled with pure deuterium or DT mixture as a working gas. The small size occupied by the neutron bunch in space, number of neutrons per pulse and mono-chromaticity (ΔE/E~1%) of the neutron spectrum provides the opportunity to use a time-of-flight (TOF) technique with flying bases of about a few metres. In our researches we used DPF devices having bank energy in the range 2-7 kJ. The devices generate a neutron yield of the level of 108-109 2.45 MeV and 1010-1011 14 MeV neutrons per pulse with pulse duration ~10-20 ns. TOF base in the tests was 2.2-18.5 m. We have demonstrated the possibility of registering of neutrons scattered by the substances under investigation—1 litre bottles with methanol (CH3OH), phosphoric (H2PO4) and nitric (HNO3) acids as well as a long object—a 1 m gas tank filled with deuterium at high pressure. It is shown that the above mentioned short TOF bases and relatively low neutron yields are enough to distinguish different elements' nuclei composing the substance under interrogation and to characterize the geometry of lengthy objects in some cases. The wavelet technique was employed to 'clean' the experimental data registered. The advantages and restrictions of the proposed and tested NINIS technique in comparison with other methods are discussed.

  8. Molecular Phylogeny of the Lactuca Alliance (Cichorieae Subtribe Lactucinae, Asteraceae) with Focus on Their Chinese Centre of Diversity Detects Potential Events of Reticulation and Chloroplast Capture

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ze-Huan; Peng, Hua; Kilian, Norbert

    2013-01-01

    The first comprehensive molecular phylogenetic reconstruction of the Cichorieae subtribe Lactucinae is provided. Sequences for two datasets, one of the nuclear rDNA ITS region, the other of five concatenated non-coding chloroplast DNA markers including the petD region and the psbA-trnH, 5′trnL(UAA)-trnF, rpl32-trnL(UAG) and trnQ(UUG)-5′rps16 spacers, were, with few exceptions, newly generated for 130 samples of 78 species. The sampling spans the entire subtribe Lactucinae while focusing on its Chinese centre of diversity; more than 3/4 of the Chinese Lactucinae species are represented. The nuclear and plastid phylogenies inferred from the two independent datasets show various hard topological incongruences. They concern the internal topology of major lineages, in one case the placement of taxa in major lineages, the relationships between major lineages and even the circumscription of the subtribe, indicating potential events of ancient as well as of more recent reticulation and chloroplast capture in the evolution of the subtribe. The core of the subtribe is clearly monophyletic, consisting of the six lineages, Cicerbita, Cicerbita II, Lactuca, Melanoseris, Notoseris and Paraprenanthes. The Faberia lineage and the monospecific Prenanthes purpurea lineage are part of a monophyletic subtribe Lactucinae only in the nuclear or plastid phylogeny, respectively. Morphological and karyological support for their placement is considered. In the light of the molecular phylogenetic reconstruction and of additional morphological data, the conflicting taxonomies of the Chinese Lactuca alliance are discussed and it is concluded that the major lineages revealed are best treated at generic rank. An improved species level taxonomy of the Chinese Lactucinae is outlined; new synonymies and some new combinations are provided. PMID:24376566

  9. Ewing Sarcoma With ERG Gene Rearrangements: A Molecular Study Focusing on the Prevalence of FUS-ERG and Common Pitfalls in Detecting EWSR1-ERG Fusions by FISH

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Sonja; Deniz, Kemal; Sung, Yun-Shao; Zhang, Lei; Dry, Sarah; Antonescu, Cristina R.

    2016-01-01

    The genetics of Ewing sarcoma (ES) are characterized by a canonical fusion involving EWSR1 gene and a member of the ETS family of transcription factors, such as FLI1 and ERG. In fact, ERG gene rearrangements represent the second most common molecular alteration, with EWSR1-ERG being identified in 5–10% of cases, while only a handful of reports document a FUS-ERG fusion. In this study, we focus on ES with ERG gene abnormalities, specifically to investigate the prevalence and clinicopathologic features of FUS-ERG fusions in a large cohort of small blue round cell tumors (SBRCTs) and compare to the eight reported FUS-positive ES. Among the 85 SBRCTs tested, seven (8.2%) cases harbored FUS gene rearrangements; six fused to ERG and one with FEV. During this investigation we came across a number of ERG-rearranged ES lacking both EWSR1 and FUS abnormalities by FISH. In one case, RNA sequencing identified an EWSR1-ERG transcript despite the negative EWSR1 rearrangements by FISH. Additional 3-color FISH fusion assay demonstrated the fusion of EWSR1 and ERG signals in all four cases negative for break-apart EWSR1 FISH. These results emphasize a potential pitfall of relying on EWSR1 FISH assay alone for diagnosis of ES. In cases with classic morphology and/or strong CD99 and ERG immunoreactivity, additional molecular testing should be applied, such as ERG FISH or RT-PCR/next generation sequencing, for a more definitive diagnosis. Although our study group is small, there were no differences noted between the clinical, morphologic features and immunoprofile of the different subsets of ERG-rearranged SBRCTs. PMID:26690869

  10. Capillary Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markuszewski, Michał J.; Bujak, Renata; Daghir, Emilia

    Capillary isoelectric focusing (CIEF) is a widespread technique for the analysis of peptides and proteins in biological samples. CIEF is used to separate mixtures of compounds on the basis of differences in their isoelectric point. Aspects of sample preparation, capillary selection, zone mobilization procedures as well as various detection modes used have been described and discussed. Moreover CIEF, coupled to various types of detection techniques (MALDI or LIF), has increasingly been applied to the analysis of variety different high-molecular compounds. CIEF is considered as a highly specific analytical method which may be routinely used in the separation of rare hemoglobin variants. In addition, the application of CIEF in proteomic field have been discussed on the examples of analyses of glycoproteins and immunoglobins due to the meaning in clinical diagnostic.

  11. Ultrasound-induced membrane lipid peroxidation and cell damage of Escherichia coli in the presence of non-woven TiO2 fabrics.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Mohammad Mizanur; Ninomiya, Kazuaki; Ogino, Chiaki; Shimizu, Nobuaki

    2010-04-01

    A non-woven titanium dioxide (TiO(2)) fabric was applied to disinfection by ultrasound (US) irradiation, and the disinfection efficiency and lipid peroxidation of Escherichia coli (E. coli) cell membrane were evaluated to investigate the killing process. The addition of non-woven TiO(2) fabric enhanced hydroxyl (OH) radical generation and disinfection efficiency. Judging from the disinfection experiments using glutathione or t-butanol as a radical scavenger, the OH radical played a major role in cell killing in sonodynamic disinfection with non-woven TiO(2) fabric. Moreover, to understand the detailed killing process, damage to cell membrane was also evaluated using a diphenyl-1-pyrenylphosphine (DPPP) fluorescent probe, which detects the membrane's lipid peroxidation. The addition of non-woven TiO(2) fabric aggravated this peroxidation. This aggravation was caused by the OH radical according to an assay using a radical scavenger. From these results, it was concluded that non-woven TiO(2) fabric as a sonocatalyst promoted peroxidation of the polyunsaturated phospholipid component of the lipid membrane initially and induced a major disorder in the E. coli cell membrane under US irradiation.

  12. Difference frequency magneto-acousto-electrical tomography (DF-MAET): application of ultrasound-induced radiation force to imaging electrical current density.

    PubMed

    Renzhiglova, Elena; Ivantsiv, Vitaliy; Xu, Yuan

    2010-11-01

    Magneto-acousto-electrical tomography (MAET) is a potential imaging modality which can provide high-spatial-resolution images of the impedance of conductive media. In MAET, the impedance is reconstructed from the mapped current density distribution J(ab)(r) that would exist in a sample if a current/voltage source were to be applied through measurement electrodes a and b. To map J(ab)(r) without applying a current/voltage source, the sample is placed in a static magnetic field and a focused ultrasonic pulse is directed to a point r to generate a point-like dipole source via the Lorentz force mechanism. The MAET voltage U(ab), which is directly proportional to J(ab)(r), is measured through electrodes a and b for each scanning point. To reconstruct the electrical impedance, we need to map the current density distribution at every point inside the sample. However, with the MAET experimental setup reported in our previous paper on MAET, the MAET signal from a homogenous interior of the sample is undetectable because of the spatially-oscillating nature of the ultrasound field inside the sample. In this paper, we propose to use dual-frequency ultrasound to generate the MAET signal at the difference frequency through the ultrasound radiation force mechanism. The dynamic radiation force causes vibrations inside the sample (and consequently, generates the electric field) with a wavelength much larger than the dimension of the sample along the transducer's axis. Therefore, the MAET signal caused by the radiation force will not be canceled out. We create a dynamic radiation force by applying an amplitude-modulated signal with a modulation frequency fm of several kilohertz and a carrier frequency f(0) of 2.25 MHz to drive the transducer. The dependence of the DF-MAET signal in experiments on the modulation frequency and on the density of the sample agrees with the prediction based on the radiation force mechanism. The spatial resolution of DF-MAET is also studied to verify the

  13. Evaluation of permeability, doxorubicin delivery, and drug retention in a rat brain tumor model after ultrasound-induced blood-tumor barrier disruption.

    PubMed

    Park, Juyoung; Aryal, Muna; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Zhang, Yong-Zhi; McDannold, Nathan

    2017-03-28

    Drug delivery in brain tumors is challenging because of the presence of blood-brain barrier (BBB) and the blood-tumor barrier (BTB). Focused ultrasound (FUS) combined with microbubbles can enhance the permeability of the BTB in brain tumors, as well as disrupting the BBB in the surrounding tissue. In this study, dynamic contrast-enhanced Magnetic Resonance Imaging (DCE-MRI) was used to characterize FUS-induced permeability changes in a rat glioma model and in the normal brain and to investigate the relationship between these changes and the resulting concentration of the chemotherapy agent doxorubicin (DOX). 9L gliosarcoma cells were implanted in both hemispheres in male rats. At day 10-12 after implantation, FUS-induced BTB disruption using 690kHz ultrasound and Definity microbubbles was performed in one of the tumors and in a normal brain region in each animal. After FUS, DOX was administered at a dose of 5.67mg/kg. The resulting DOX concentration was measured via fluorometry at 1 or 24h after FUS. The transfer coefficient Ktrans describing extravasation of the MRI contrast agent Gd-DTPA was significantly increased in both the sonicated tumors and in the normal brain tissue (P<0.001) between the two DCE-MRI acquisitions obtained before and after FUS, while no significant difference was found in the controls (non-sonicated tumor/normal brain tissue). DOX concentrations were also significantly larger than controls in both the sonicated tumors and in the normal tissue volumes at 1 and 24h after sonication. The DOX concentrations were significantly larger (P<0.01) in the control tumors harvested 1h after FUS than in those harvested at 24h, when the tumor concentrations were not significantly different than in the non-sonicated normal brain. In contrast, there was no significant difference in the DOX concentrations between the tumors harvested at 1 and 24h after FUS or in the concentrations measured in the brain at these time points. The transfer coefficient Ktrans

  14. Usefulness of the rK39-Immunochromatographic Test, Direct Agglutination Test, and Leishmanin Skin Test for Detecting Asymptomatic Leishmania Infection in Children in a New Visceral Leishmaniasis Focus in Amhara State, Ethiopia

    PubMed Central

    Gadisa, Endalamaw; Custodio, Estefanía; Cañavate, Carmen; Sordo, Luis; Abebe, Zelalem; Nieto, Javier; Chicharro, Carmen; Aseffa, Abraham; Yamuah, Lawrence; Engers, Howard; Moreno, Javier; Cruz, Israel

    2012-01-01

    In areas where visceral leishmaniasis is anthroponotic, asymptomatically infected patients may play a role in transmission. Additionally, the number of asymptomatic patients in a disease-endemic area will also provide information on transmission dynamics. Libo Kemkem and Fogera districts (Amhara State, Ethiopia) are now considered newly established areas to which visceral leishmaniasis is endemic. In selected villages in these districts, we conducted a study to assess the usefulness of different approaches to estimate the asymptomatic infection rate. Of 605 participants, the rK39 immunochromatographic test was able to detect asymptomatic infection in 1.5% (9 of 605), direct agglutination test in 5.3% (32 of 605), and leishmanin skin test in 5.6% (33 of 589); the combined use of serologic methods and leishmanin skin test enabled detecting asymptomatic infection in 10.1% (61 of 605). We conclude that the best option to detect asymptomatic infection in this new visceral leishmaniasis–endemic focus is the combined use of the direct agglutination test and the leishmanin skin test. PMID:22556076

  15. "Only" and Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vallduvi, Enric

    The relationship of the word "only," one of a class of words known as scalar particles, focus adverbs, focus inducers, or focus-sensitive particles, with the "focus" of the sentence is examined. It is suggested, based on analysis of discourse structure, that this "association with focus" is not an inherent property of…

  16. Use of stationary focused ultrasound fields for characterization of tissue and localized tissue ablation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Winey, Brian Andrew

    Ultrasound-induced blood stasis has been observed for more than 30 years. The physical understanding of the phenomenon has not been fully explored. Analytical descriptions of the acoustic interaction with spheres in suspension have been derived but the physical implications and limitations have not been demonstrated. The analytical expressions will be tested against physical observations using numerical simulations. The simulations will begin with stationary spheres and continue with the inclusion of moving spheres and a moving suspending fluid. To date, experimental observations of acoustically induced blood stasis have been either in vitro or invasive. We demonstrate ultrasound-induced blood stasis in murine normal leg muscle versus tumor-bearing legs, observed through noninvasive measurements of optical spectroscopy, and discuss possible diagnostic uses for this effect of ultrasound. We derive the optimal optical wavelengths for measuring the effects of the ultrasound at small source detector separations. Using optical oximetry performed at the optimal wavelengths, we demonstrate that effects of ultrasound can be used to differentiate tumor from normal leg muscle tissue in mice. To provide a statistical analysis of the experiments, we propose a novel diagnostic algorithm that quantitatively differentiates tumor from nontumor with maximum specificity 0.83, maximum sensitivity 0.79, and area under receiver-operating-characteristics curve 0.90. Ultrasound has long been known to cause tissue heating when applied in high intensities. More recently, interest has arisen in the area of High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) for localized tissue heating effects, specifically thermal ablation. All present techniques employ focused traveling high intensity acoustic waves to create a region of elevated temperature. Such high intensity traveling waves can be damaging to normal tissue in the vicinity of the focal region, and have demonstrated surface burns and caused

  17. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields: A combined measurement and modeling approach

    PubMed Central

    Canney, Michael S.; Bailey, Michael R.; Crum, Lawrence A.; Khokhlova, Vera A.; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A.

    2008-01-01

    Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields is important both for the accurate prediction of ultrasound induced bioeffects in tissues and for the development of regulatory standards for clinical HIFU devices. In this paper, a method to determine HIFU field parameters at and around the focus is proposed. Nonlinear pressure waveforms were measured and modeled in water and in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom for a 2 MHz transducer with an aperture and focal length of 4.4 cm. Measurements were performed with a fiber optic probe hydrophone at intensity levels up to 24 000 W∕cm2. The inputs to a Khokhlov–Zabolotskaya–Kuznetsov-type numerical model were determined based on experimental low amplitude beam plots. Strongly asymmetric waveforms with peak positive pressures up to 80 MPa and peak negative pressures up to 15 MPa were obtained both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements agreed well; however, when steep shocks were present in the waveform at focal intensity levels higher than 6000 W∕cm2, lower values of the peak positive pressure were observed in the measured waveforms. This underrepresentation was attributed mainly to the limited hydrophone bandwidth of 100 MHz. It is shown that a combination of measurements and modeling is necessary to enable accurate characterization of HIFU fields. PMID:19062878

  18. Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound fields: a combined measurement and modeling approach.

    PubMed

    Canney, Michael S; Bailey, Michael R; Crum, Lawrence A; Khokhlova, Vera A; Sapozhnikov, Oleg A

    2008-10-01

    Acoustic characterization of high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) fields is important both for the accurate prediction of ultrasound induced bioeffects in tissues and for the development of regulatory standards for clinical HIFU devices. In this paper, a method to determine HIFU field parameters at and around the focus is proposed. Nonlinear pressure waveforms were measured and modeled in water and in a tissue-mimicking gel phantom for a 2 MHz transducer with an aperture and focal length of 4.4 cm. Measurements were performed with a fiber optic probe hydrophone at intensity levels up to 24,000 W/cm(2). The inputs to a Khokhlov-Zabolotskaya-Kuznetsov-type numerical model were determined based on experimental low amplitude beam plots. Strongly asymmetric waveforms with peak positive pressures up to 80 MPa and peak negative pressures up to 15 MPa were obtained both numerically and experimentally. Numerical simulations and experimental measurements agreed well; however, when steep shocks were present in the waveform at focal intensity levels higher than 6000 W/cm(2), lower values of the peak positive pressure were observed in the measured waveforms. This underrepresentation was attributed mainly to the limited hydrophone bandwidth of 100 MHz. It is shown that a combination of measurements and modeling is necessary to enable accurate characterization of HIFU fields.

  19. Focus Curriculum Manual; A Focus Dissemination Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Human Resource Associates, Inc., Hastings, Minn.

    This training manual is for use in preparing staff members to use the Focus Model, which is a "school within a school" for disaffected high school students. The material is designed to be used as a resource aid following participation in an in-service workshop. Information is presented to help implement a contracting system to establish…

  20. Focus Intonation in Bengali

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hasan, Md. Kamrul

    2015-01-01

    This work attempts to investigate the role of prosody in the syntax of focus in Bangla. The aim of this study is to show the intonation pattern of Bangla in emphasis and focus. In order to do that, the author has looked at the pattern of focus without-i/o as well as with the same. Do they really pose any different focus intonation pattern from…

  1. Alternating phase focused linacs

    DOEpatents

    Swenson, Donald A.

    1980-01-01

    A heavy particle linear accelerator employing rf fields for transverse and ongitudinal focusing as well as acceleration. Drift tube length and gap positions in a standing wave drift tube loaded structure are arranged so that particles are subject to acceleration and succession of focusing and defocusing forces which contain the beam without additional magnetic or electric focusing fields.

  2. Microfabricated particle focusing device

    DOEpatents

    Ravula, Surendra K.; Arrington, Christian L.; Sigman, Jennifer K.; Branch, Darren W.; Brener, Igal; Clem, Paul G.; James, Conrad D.; Hill, Martyn; Boltryk, Rosemary June

    2013-04-23

    A microfabricated particle focusing device comprises an acoustic portion to preconcentrate particles over large spatial dimensions into particle streams and a dielectrophoretic portion for finer particle focusing into single-file columns. The device can be used for high throughput assays for which it is necessary to isolate and investigate small bundles of particles and single particles.

  3. FOCUS: Sustainable Mathematics Successes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mireles, Selina V.; Acee, Taylor W.; Gerber, Lindsey N.

    2014-01-01

    The FOCUS (Fundamentals of Conceptual Understanding and Success) Co-Requisite Model Intervention (FOCUS Intervention) for College Algebra was developed as part of the Developmental Education Demonstration Projects (DEDP) in Texas. The program was designed to use multiple services, courses, and best practices to support student completion of a…

  4. Focus, 2000-2001.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focus, 2001

    2001-01-01

    These three issues of 2000-2001 "Focus" present a collection of papers focusing on issues related to poverty. The first issue discusses child support enforcement policy and low-income families, highlighting such issues as fragile families and child wellbeing; low-income families and the child support enforcement system; child support…

  5. High intensity focused ultrasound technology, its scope and applications in therapy and drug delivery.

    PubMed

    Phenix, Christopher Peter; Togtema, Melissa; Pichardo, Samuel; Zehbe, Ingeborg; Curiel, Laura

    2014-01-01

    Ultrasonography is a safe, inexpensive and wide-spread diagnostic tool capable of producing real-time non-invasive images without significant biological effects. However, the propagation of higher energy, intensity and frequency ultrasound waves through living tissues can induce thermal, mechanical and chemical effects useful for a variety of therapeutic applications. With the recent development of clinically approved High Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU) systems, therapeutic ultrasound is now a medical reality. Indeed, HIFU has been used for the thermal ablation of pathological lesions; localized, minimally invasive ultrasound-mediated drug delivery through the transient formation of pores on cell membranes; the temporary disruption of skin and the blood brain barrier; the ultrasound induced break-down of blood clots; and the targeted release of drugs using ultrasound and temperature sensitive drug carriers. This review seeks to engage the pharmaceutical research community by providing an overview on the biological effects of ultrasound as well as highlighting important therapeutic applications, current deficiencies and future directions.

  6. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology

    PubMed Central

    Silverman, Ronald H

    2016-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via ciliodestruction), tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities. PMID:27757007

  7. Focused ultrasound in ophthalmology.

    PubMed

    Silverman, Ronald H

    2016-01-01

    The use of focused ultrasound to obtain diagnostically significant information about the eye goes back to the 1950s. This review describes the historical and technological development of ophthalmic ultrasound and its clinical application and impact. Ultrasound, like light, can be focused, which is crucial for formation of high-resolution, diagnostically useful images. Focused, single-element, mechanically scanned transducers are most common in ophthalmology. Specially designed transducers have been used to generate focused, high-intensity ultrasound that through thermal effects has been used to treat glaucoma (via ciliodestruction), tumors, and other pathologies. Linear and annular transducer arrays offer synthetic focusing in which precise timing of the excitation of independently addressable array elements allows formation of a converging wavefront to create a focus at one or more programmable depths. Most recently, linear array-based plane-wave ultrasound, in which the array emits an unfocused wavefront and focusing is performed solely on received data, has been demonstrated for imaging ocular anatomy and blood flow. While the history of ophthalmic ultrasound extends back over half-a-century, new and powerful technologic advances continue to be made, offering the prospect of novel diagnostic capabilities.

  8. Flat Focusing Mirror

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Y. C.; Kicas, S.; Trull, J.; Peckus, M.; Cojocaru, C.; Vilaseca, R.; Drazdys, R.; Staliunas, K.

    2014-01-01

    The control of spatial propagation properties of narrow light beams such as divergence, focusing or imaging are main objectives in optics and photonics. In this letter, we propose and demonstrate experimentally a flat focusing mirror, based on an especially designed dielectric structure without any optical axis. More generally, it also enables imaging any light pattern in reflection. The flat focusing mirror with a transversal invariance can largely increase the applicability of structured photonic materials for light beam propagation control in small-dimension photonic circuits. PMID:25228358

  9. Facility Focus: Food Service.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    College Planning & Management, 2002

    2002-01-01

    Describes the Hawthorn Court Community Center at Iowa State University, Ames, and the HUB-Robeson Center at Pennsylvania State University. Focuses on the food service offered in these new student-life buildings. Includes photographs. (EV)

  10. Focusing corner cube

    DOEpatents

    Monjes, J.A.

    1985-09-12

    This invention retortreflects and focuses a beam of light. The invention comprises a modified corner cube reflector wherein one reflective surface is planar, a second reflective surface is spherical, and the third reflective surface may be planar or convex cylindrical.

  11. Inertial Focusing in Microfluidics

    PubMed Central

    Martel, Joseph M.; Toner, Mehmet

    2015-01-01

    When Segré and Silberberg in 1961 witnessed particles in a laminar pipe flow congregating at an annulus in the pipe, scientists were perplexed and spent decades learning why such behavior occurred, finally understanding that it was caused by previously unknown forces on particles in an inertial flow. The advent of microfluidics opened a new realm of possibilities for inertial focusing in the processing of biological fluids and cellular suspensions and created a field that is now rapidly expanding. Over the past five years, inertial focusing has enabled high-throughput, simple, and precise manipulation of bodily fluids for a myriad of applications in point-of-care and clinical diagnostics. This review describes the theoretical developments that have made the field of inertial focusing what it is today and presents the key applications that will make inertial focusing a mainstream technology in the future. PMID:24905880

  12. Inertial focusing in microfluidics.

    PubMed

    Martel, Joseph M; Toner, Mehmet

    2014-07-11

    When Segré and Silberberg in 1961 witnessed particles in a laminar pipe flow congregating at an annulus in the pipe, scientists were perplexed and spent decades learning why such behavior occurred, finally understanding that it was caused by previously unknown forces on particles in an inertial flow. The advent of microfluidics opened a new realm of possibilities for inertial focusing in the processing of biological fluids and cellular suspensions and created a field that is now rapidly expanding. Over the past five years, inertial focusing has enabled high-throughput, simple, and precise manipulation of bodily fluids for a myriad of applications in point-of-care and clinical diagnostics. This review describes the theoretical developments that have made the field of inertial focusing what it is today and presents the key applications that will make inertial focusing a mainstream technology in the future.

  13. Final focus nomenclature

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.

    1986-08-08

    The formal names and common names for all devices in the final focus system of the SLC are listed. The formal names consist of a device type designator, microprocessor designator, and a four-digit unit number. (LEW)

  14. Final focus test beam

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-03-01

    This report discusses the following: the Final Focus Test Beam Project; optical design; magnets; instrumentation; magnetic measurement and BPM calibration; mechanical alignment and stabilization; vacuum system; power supplies; control system; radiation shielding and personnel protection; infrastructure; and administration.

  15. Electron beam focusing system

    SciTech Connect

    Dikansky, N.; Nagaitsev, S.; Parkhomchuk, V.

    1997-09-01

    The high energy electron cooling requires a very cold electron beam. Thus, the electron beam focusing system is very important for the performance of electron cooling. A system with and without longitudinal magnetic field is presented for discussion. Interaction of electron beam with the vacuum chamber as well as with the background ions and stored antiprotons can cause the coherent electron beam instabilities. Focusing system requirements needed to suppress these instabilities are presented.

  16. High harmonics focusing undulator

    SciTech Connect

    Varfolomeev, A.A.; Hairetdinov, A.H.; Smirnov, A.V.; Khlebnikov, A.S.

    1995-12-31

    It was shown in our previous work that there exist a possibility to enhance significantly the {open_quote}natural{close_quote} focusing properties of the hybrid undulator. Here we analyze the actual undulator configurations which could provide such field structure. Numerical simulations using 2D code PANDIRA were carried out and the enhanced focusing properties of the undulator were demonstrated. The obtained results provide the solution for the beam transport in a very long (short wavelength) undulator schemes.

  17. New NLC Final Focus

    SciTech Connect

    Raimondi, P.

    2004-10-11

    A novel design of the Final Focus has recently been proposed [1] and has been adopted now for the Next Linear Collider [2]. This new design has fewer optical elements and is much shorter, nonetheless achieving better chromatic properties. In this paper, the new final focus system is briefly discussed stressing one particular characteristic of the new design--its multi TeV energy reach.

  18. Plutonium focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this new approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to the creation of specific Focus Areas. These organizations were designed to focus the scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on the major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The Focus Area approach provides the framework for intersite cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major Focus Areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50, now called the Office of Science and Technology), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (EM-66) followed the structure already in place in EM-50 and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). The following information outlines the scope and mission of the EM, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  19. New molecular identifiers for Simulium limbatum and Simulium incrustatum s.l. and the detection of genetic substructure with potential implications for onchocerciasis epidemiology in the Amazonia focus of Brazil.

    PubMed

    Conceição, Priscila A; Crainey, James L; Almeida, Tatiana P; Shelley, Anthony J; Luz, Sergio L B

    2013-08-01

    The Amazonia onchocerciasis focus of southern Venezuela and northern Brazil is the larger of the two remaining Latin American onchocerciasis foci where disease transmission still occurs and is often regarded as the most challenging of all the Latin American foci to eliminate onchocerciasis. The site is home to a population of over 20,000 semi-nomadic, hunter-gatherer Yanomami people and is made-up of a mosaic of rainforest and savannah ecologies, which are influenced by the area's undulating terrain and rich geological diversity. At least six blackfly vectors have been implicated in onchocerciasis transmission in this focus; however, because of the difficulty in their routine identification the relative importance of each has been obscured. Simulium limbatum and Simulium incrustatum s.l. have both been recorded as vectors in the Amazonia focus, but they are difficult to discriminate morphologically and thus the ecological range of these species, and indeed the presence of S. limbatum in the Amazonia focus at all, have remained controversial. In the work described here, we report 15 S. incrustatum s.l. CO1 sequences and 27 S. limbatum sequences obtained from field-caught adult female blackflies collected from forest and savannah localities, inside and just outside the Amazonia focus. Phylogenetic analysis with the sequences generated in this study, showed that both the S. limbatum and the S. incrustatum s.l. CO1 sequences obtained (even from specimens living in sympatry) all fell into discrete species-specific bootstrap-supported monophyletic groups and thus confirmed the utility of the CO1 gene for identifying both these species inside the Amazonia focus. As the S. limbatum-exclusive cluster included CO1 sequences obtained from forest-caught and morphologically identified specimens these results provide the clearest evidence yet of the presence of S. limbatum inside the Amazonia focus. The question, however, of whether S. limbatum is actually a vector in the focus

  20. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasmonics FOCUS ON PLASMONICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozhevolnyi, Sergey; García-Vidal, Francisco

    2008-10-01

    Plasmonics is an emerging field in optics dealing with the so-called surface plasmons whose extraordinary properties are being both analyzed from a fundamental point of view and exploited for numerous technological applications. Surface plasmons associated with surface electron density oscillations decorating metal-dielectric interfaces were discovered by Rufus Ritchie in the 1950s. Since the seventies, the subwavelength confinement of electromagnetic fields as well as their enhancement inherent to the surface plasmon excitation has been widely used for spectroscopic purposes. Recent advances in nano-fabrication, characterization and modelling techniques have allowed unique properties of these surface electromagnetic modes to be explored with respect to subwavelength field localization and waveguiding, opening the path to truly nanoscale plasmonic optical devices. This area of investigation also has interesting links with research on photonic band gap materials and the field of optical metamaterials. Nowadays, plasmonics can be seen as a mature interdisciplinary area of research in which scientists coming from different backgrounds (chemistry, physics, optics and engineering) strive to discover and exploit new and exciting phenomena associated with surface plasmons. The already made and forthcoming discoveries will have impacts in many fields of science and technology, including not only photonics and materials science but also computation, biology and medicine, among others. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is intended to cover all the aforementioned capabilities of surface plasmons by presenting a current overview of state-of-the-art advances achieved by the leading groups in this field of research. The below list of articles represents the first contributions to the collection and further additions will appear soon. Focus on Plasmonics Contents Nanoantenna array-induced fluorescence enhancement and reduced lifetimes Reuben M Bakker, Vladimir P Drachev

  1. NICMOS focus monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Glenn

    1997-07-01

    This proposal is used to determine and monitor the optimal focus and tilt settings for all three NICMOS cameras. It is derived from SM2/NIC 7041, but is structurally quite a bit different. This proposal is built to run NIC1/2 focus sweeps on a weekly basis, and NIC3 focus sweeps twice a week during SMOV {following the "interim" runs of the 7150}. 7043 will run for as long as it is deemed necessary to keep track of the camera focii and to monitor the dewar anomaly. After the discussion on 20/3/96, this proposal is written to run 4 complete 1-week iterations starting 3 days after the last run of the 7150 {NICMOS COARSE OPTICAL ALIGNMENT, PART 2}.

  2. Sagittal focusing Laue monochromator

    DOEpatents

    Zhong; Zhong , Hanson; Jonathan , Hastings; Jerome , Kao; Chi-Chang , Lenhard; Anthony , Siddons; David Peter , Zhong; Hui

    2009-03-24

    An x-ray focusing device generally includes a slide pivotable about a pivot point defined at a forward end thereof, a rail unit fixed with respect to the pivotable slide, a forward crystal for focusing x-rays disposed at the forward end of the pivotable slide and a rearward crystal for focusing x-rays movably coupled to the pivotable slide and the fixed rail unit at a distance rearward from the forward crystal. The forward and rearward crystals define reciprocal angles of incidence with respect to the pivot point, wherein pivoting of the slide about the pivot point changes the incidence angles of the forward and rearward crystals while simultaneously changing the distance between the forward and rearward crystals.

  3. Decontamination & decommissioning focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    In January 1994, the US Department of Energy Office of Environmental Management (DOE EM) formally introduced its new approach to managing DOE`s environmental research and technology development activities. The goal of the new approach is to conduct research and development in critical areas of interest to DOE, utilizing the best talent in the Department and in the national science community. To facilitate this solutions-oriented approach, the Office of Science and Technology (EM-50, formerly the Office of Technology Development) formed five Focus AReas to stimulate the required basic research, development, and demonstration efforts to seek new, innovative cleanup methods. In February 1995, EM-50 selected the DOE Morgantown Energy Technology Center (METC) to lead implementation of one of these Focus Areas: the Decontamination and Decommissioning (D & D) Focus Area.

  4. [Focused musculoskeletal sonography].

    PubMed

    Horn, Rudolf

    2015-09-16

    Even in emergent situations, focused musculoskeletal sonography must not be overlooked. It has a place in traumatology no less valuable than its place in internal medicine. It can be used to identify traumatic joint effusions, occult fractures and fissures, joint inflammation, muscle and tendon rupture; it can differentiate soft tissue swelling, locate a foreign body, or identify the location of fractures. Focused ultrasound should be performed by the attending physician directly at the patient’s bedside, in order to answer these specific questions.

  5. Electrolysis and isoelectric focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Y. S.; Lui, Roger; Yu, Xun

    1994-01-01

    This paper consists of two parts. In the first part, the authors prove the existence of steady-state solutions for a three-species electrolyte. The species are subject to both dissociation-association reactions inside the electrolyte and electrochemical reactions at the boundary electrodes. This is a common occurrence in electrolysis. In the second part, the authors investigate how to use this model to describe isoelectric focusing, which is a common technique used to separate large protein molecules. In particular, the isoelectric focusing point for a particular type of protein molecule is calculated using formal perturbation analysis.

  6. Focus on Bilingual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayo, Donald S., Ed.

    1982-01-01

    This collection of essays focuses on issues in bilingual education. First, Elizabeth Flynn examines different kinds of bilingual programs; efforts made towards cultural pluralism in a number of countries; national benefits to be derived from bilingualism; the needs of American ethnic groups, new immigrants, and foreign students; and the pros and…

  7. Focus on First Graders.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Shari S.

    The result of a collaboration between the El Paso, Texas, school district and community agencies, the Focus on First Graders program provides early intervention and prevention using a comprehensive approach to providing a variety of services at the school to at-risk first graders from low income families. Teachers and parents were surveyed to…

  8. ENC Focus Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Thorson, Annette, Ed.

    The mission of the Eisenhower National Clearinghouse (ENC) is to identify effective curriculum resources, create high-quality professional development materials, and disseminate useful information and products to improve K-12 mathematics and science teaching and learning. This issue of "ENC Focus" contains articles related to mathematics teaching…

  9. Homework. Focus On

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rahal, Michelle Layer

    2010-01-01

    Homework has been an integral part of the educational system for over 100 years. What likely began as simple memorization tasks has evolved into complex projects and sparked an increasingly heated debate over the purpose and value of homework assignments. This "Focus On" examines the purpose of homework, how to create homework that has value,…

  10. Focus on Basics, 1997.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Focus on Basics, 1997

    1997-01-01

    Together, these four newsletters contain 36 articles devoted to adult literacy research and practice and the relationship between them. The following articles are included: "A Productive Partnership" (Richard J. Murnane, Bob Bickerton); "Welcome to 'Focus on Basics'" (Barbara Garner); "Applying Research on the Last Frontier" (Karen Backlund, Kathy…

  11. Focus on Grandparents.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy, Linda; Della Corte, Suzanne

    1990-01-01

    Following the birth of a handicapped child, both parent and grandparent experience similar feelings of consternation, shock, and grief. The grandparents' reaction is double, however, as they suffer not only for the newborn but for their own child's pain as well. This article focuses on dealing with grief and its stages, including numbness, denial,…

  12. Focus on Phase Electives.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Victor H., Ed.

    1976-01-01

    In this thematic issue, articles focus on the use of phase electives in the English classroom. Discussions include "Death in the Classroom,""Soapbox Operas in the English Classroom,""Language and History in Phase-Elective Programs,""Phase Electives and the Problem of Composition," and "Phase Electives and College Preparation.""Phase Electives Are…

  13. Focus on Distance Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grenzky, Janet; Maitland, Christine

    2001-01-01

    As a followup to a survey of distance education faculty, the National Education Association conducted two 3-hour focus groups with 12 higher education faculty members in June 2000. The purpose of the groups was to gain more understanding of the complexity of feelings and opinions expressed in a telephone survey conducted in March 2000. The…

  14. Focusing on the Invisible

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Haley, Tim R.

    2008-01-01

    This article seeks to answer the question of whether or not the design and development of an educational laboratory really changes when the focus is on nanotechnology. It explores current laboratory building trends and the added considerations for building a nanotechnology laboratory. The author leaves the reader with additional points to consider…

  15. Focus: International Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lynch, Gerald J.; Watts, Michael W.; Wentworth, Donald R.

    The "Focus" series, part of the National Council on Economic Education's (NCEE) EconomicsAmerica program, uses economics to enhance learning in subjects such as history, geography, civics, and personal finance, as well as economics. Activities are interactive, reflecting the belief that students learn best through active, highly…

  16. Young Children. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on educational, cognitive, and brain research with implications for early childhood educators, including those who work with limited-English-proficient, minority, and economically disadvantaged children. "Coming to Grips with Reading Instruction at the Early Grades" (Christie L. Goodman)…

  17. Focus on Godard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Royal S., Ed.

    This Film Focus series presents selected information about the respected and controversial French filmmaker Jean-Luc Godard and his films. Information is documented through reports of interviews, reviews, essays, and commentaries. Included are filmographies of Godard's films, beginning in 1954 and continuing through 1972. Also, there is a selected…

  18. A FOCUS On Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, Susan

    1998-01-01

    William McKinley Middle School in Cedar Rapids, Iowa, has a parent volunteer program called FOCUS that targets average students who are not doing well academically. Program goals are to improve students' organizational skills, help them complete homework assignments, and reteach and preview lessons to increase understanding, so that students will…

  19. Focusing laser scanner

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Callen, W. R.; Weaver, J. E.

    1979-01-01

    Economical laser scanner assembled from commercially available components, modulates and scans focused laser beam over area up to 5.1 by 5.1 cm. Scanner gives resolution comparable to that of conventional television. Device is highly applicable to area of analog and digital storage and retrieval.

  20. Focus on Refugees. Transcript.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandel, Sarah; And Others

    This is the transcript of the "Focus on Refugees," proqram conducted by the Overseas Development Council. Remarks from the following participants are included: (1) Sarah Brandel, Associate Fellow at the Overseas Development Council; (2) Gary Perkins, Chief of Mission of the Washington Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees…

  1. Youth Leadership. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on motivating young people to learn by providing leadership opportunities in school. "Coca-Cola Valued Youth Program: Assessing Progress" (Josie Danini Supik) examines the program's success. This program, which trains high-risk middle and high school students as tutors of younger children, has dramatically…

  2. Policy Update. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on the drastic revision of the Texas education code undertaken during the 1995 state legislative session. "Education Policy Reform: Key Points for Districts" (Albert Cortez, Mikki Symonds) outlines critical issues in the legislation that have an impact on educational quality: charter schools exempt from state…

  3. Equity. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on equity in children's literature, public funding for private schools, women in educational fields, female dropouts, and the relationship between school violence and family and community violence. "Violence in Our Schools" (Bradley Scott) explores reasons for school violence (media violence, isolation from…

  4. Focusing educational initiatives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, George K.

    1990-01-01

    The United States will soon be facing a critical shortage of aerospace scientists and engineers. To address this problem, Space Grant Colleges can assist in focusing interest in existing educational initiatives and in creating new educational opportunities, particularly for women and underrepresented minorities.

  5. Education Policy. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on educational policy in the Texas legislature in relation to student retention, Internet access, and sexual harassment. "1999 Texas Legislative Session--End of an Era?" (Albert Cortez, Maria Robledo Montecel) examines educational equity issues facing legislators: school funding,…

  6. School Reform. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue addresses school reform, focusing on accountability, attrition, public-supported private education, equitable education, and schoolwide reform. "School-Student Performance and Accountability" (Jose A. Cardenas) discusses what constitutes good performance in school; the shifting emphasis among the input, output, and…

  7. Bilingual Education. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on instructional practices, evaluation, and the state of bilingual education. "Effective Implementation of Bilingual Programs: Reflections from the Field" (Abelardo Villarreal, Adela Solis) describes the key characteristics of successful bilingual programs: vision and goals; program leadership; linkage to central…

  8. Instructional Technology. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on implementing instructional technology in ways that benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Cruising the Web with English Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green) presents three scenarios using the World…

  9. Theme: Focus on Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Connors, James J.; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Includes "The More Things Change..." (Connors); "Students--Bored of Education?" (Earle); "Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow" (Wesch et al.); "Attitude and the Value of Environment" (Foster); "Fins, Feathers and Fur" (Crank); "Greenhouse as a Focus for Agriscience" (Hurst); and "Agricultural and Environmental Education at Milton Hershey School"…

  10. Immigrant Education. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This newsletter includes five articles on immigrant education that focus on successful school programs and educational policy issues. In "Immigrant Education from the Administrators' Perspective" (Pam McCollum, Juanita Garcia), three principals of south Texas secondary schools with successful immigrant programs discuss their views on the…

  11. Lifelong Learning. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1995

    1995-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on the need for adult literacy programs, as well as recent innovations in literacy education. "Adult Literacy and Leadership: Current Innovations" (Aurelio M. Montemayor) describes an adult literacy outreach program in Texas, and discusses the importance of family literacy for parents' involvement in their…

  12. [Focus: Family Communication].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barnes, Richard E., Ed.

    1977-01-01

    This issue of the "Journal of the Wisconsin Communication Association" focuses on family communication and contains the following articles: "Marital Typologies: An Alternative Approach to the Study of Communication in Enduring Relations" by Mary Anne Fitzpatrick, "Intimate Communication and the Family" by Marilyn D. LaCourt, and "A Study in…

  13. Neocortical focus: experimental view.

    PubMed

    Timofeev, Igor; Chauvette, Sylvain; Soltani, Sara

    2014-01-01

    All brain normal or pathological activities occur in one of the states of vigilance: wake, slow-wave sleep, or REM sleep. Neocortical seizures preferentially occur during slow-wave sleep. We provide a description of neuronal behavior and mechanisms mediating such a behavior within neocortex taking place in natural states of vigilance as well as during seizures pointing to similarities and differences exhibited during sleep and seizures. A concept of epileptic focus is described using a model of cortical undercut, because in that model, the borders of the focus are well defined. In this model, as in other models of acquired epilepsy, the main factor altering excitability is deafferentation, which upregulates neuronal excitability that promotes generation of seizures. Periods of disfacilitation recorded during slow-wave sleep further upregulate neuronal excitability. It appears that the state of neurons and neuronal network in the epileptic focus produced by deafferentation are such that seizures cannot be generated there. Instead, seizures always start around the perimeter of the undercut cortex. Therefore, we define these areas as the seizure focus. In this zone, neuronal connectivity and excitability are moderately enhanced, lowering the threshold for seizure generation.

  14. Focus on the President.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Optometric Education, 1996

    1996-01-01

    In an interview, the incoming president of the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry (ASCO), Thomas L. Lewis, discusses his goals for the association, the challenges facing optometric education in the next decade, cooperation between ASCO and other professional organizations in optometry, his mentors in the profession, his focus as a…

  15. Focus on the President.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Optometric Education, 2000

    2000-01-01

    An interview with the new president of the Association of Schools and Colleges of Optometry, John Schoessler, considers issues the president wishes to focus on during his presidency, changes in optometry students over the years, people who influenced his educational ideas, and research currently being conducted at Ohio State University College of…

  16. Focus: DNA probes

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1986-11-01

    Progress in the development of DNA probes for the identification and quantitation of specific genetic sequences in biological samples is reviewed. Current research efforts in the development of DNA probes for the diagnosis of a wide variety of bacterial, viral, and other infectious diseases, such as herpes simplex and cytomegalovirus, and inherited genetic diseases such as cystic fibrosis and sickle cell anemia are discussed. Progress in development of DNA probe assays for cancer diagnosis, detection of Salmonella food poisoning, tissue typing (detection of histocompatibility antigens), mutagen screening, and animal diseases, among other applications is included.

  17. Quantum focusing conjecture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bousso, Raphael; Fisher, Zachary; Leichenauer, Stefan; Wall, Aron C.

    2016-03-01

    We propose a universal inequality that unifies the Bousso bound with the classical focusing theorem. Given a surface σ that need not lie on a horizon, we define a finite generalized entropy Sgen as the area of σ in Planck units, plus the von Neumann entropy of its exterior. Given a null congruence N orthogonal to σ , the rate of change of Sgen per unit area defines a quantum expansion. We conjecture that the quantum expansion cannot increase along N . This extends the notion of universal focusing to cases where quantum matter may violate the null energy condition. Integrating the conjecture yields a precise version of the Strominger-Thompson quantum Bousso bound. Applied to locally parallel light-rays, the conjecture implies a novel inequality, the quantum null energy condition, a lower bound on the stress tensor in terms of the second derivative of the von Neumann entropy. We sketch a proof of the latter relation in quantum field theory.

  18. Focused ion beam system

    SciTech Connect

    Leung, K.; Gough, R.A.; Ji, Q.; Lee, Y.Y.

    1999-08-31

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 {mu}m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 m or less. 13 figs.

  19. Focused Bessel beams

    SciTech Connect

    Adamson, P V

    2000-04-30

    The diffraction broadening of a focused beam with a Bessel amplitude distribution is examined. Calculations are reported not only of the traditional differential characteristics (radial distributions of the electric-energy densities and of the axial total electromagnetic energy flux in the beam), but also of integral quantities characterising the degree of transverse localisation of the radiation in a tube of specified radius within the beam. It is shown that in a large-aperture Bessel beam only a very small fraction of the total beam power is concentrated in its central core and that a focal point is also observed on intense focusing of the Bessel beam. This spot is not in the geometric-optical focal plane but is displaced from the latter by a certain distance. (laser applications and other topics in quantum electronics)

  20. Focused ion beam system

    DOEpatents

    Leung, Ka-Ngo; Gough, Richard A.; Ji, Qing; Lee, Yung-Hee Yvette

    1999-01-01

    A focused ion beam (FIB) system produces a final beam spot size down to 0.1 .mu.m or less and an ion beam output current on the order of microamps. The FIB system increases ion source brightness by properly configuring the first (plasma) and second (extraction) electrodes. The first electrode is configured to have a high aperture diameter to electrode thickness aspect ratio. Additional accelerator and focusing electrodes are used to produce the final beam. As few as five electrodes can be used, providing a very compact FIB system with a length down to only 20 mm. Multibeamlet arrangements with a single ion source can be produced to increase throughput. The FIB system can be used for nanolithography and doping applications for fabrication of semiconductor devices with minimum feature sizes of 0.1 .mu.m or less.

  1. Focused on Robert E

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the microscopic imager on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, shows a geological feature dubbed 'Robert E.' Light from the top is illuminating the feature, which is located within the rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. Several images, each showing a different part of 'Robert E' in good focus, were merged to produce this view. The area in this image, taken on Sol 15 of the Opportunity mission, is 2.2 centimeters (0.8 inches) across.

  2. Dense Plasma Focus Modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Hui; Li, Shengtai; Jungman, Gerard; Hayes-Sterbenz, Anna Catherine

    2016-08-31

    The mechanisms for pinch formation in Dense Plasma Focus (DPF) devices, with the generation of high-energy ions beams and subsequent neutron production over a relatively short distance, are not fully understood. Here we report on high-fidelity 2D and 3D numerical magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations using the LA-COMPASS code to study the pinch formation dynamics and its associated instabilities and neutron production.

  3. Subsurface contaminants focus area

    SciTech Connect

    1996-08-01

    The US Department of Enregy (DOE) Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is developing technologies to address environmental problems associated with hazardous and radioactive contaminants in soil and groundwater that exist throughout the DOE complex, including radionuclides, heavy metals; and dense non-aqueous phase liquids (DNAPLs). More than 5,700 known DOE groundwater plumes have contaminated over 600 billion gallons of water and 200 million cubic meters of soil. Migration of these plumes threatens local and regional water sources, and in some cases has already adversely impacted off-site rsources. In addition, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is responsible for supplying technologies for the remediation of numerous landfills at DOE facilities. These landfills are estimated to contain over 3 million cubic meters of radioactive and hazardous buried Technology developed within this specialty area will provide efective methods to contain contaminant plumes and new or alternative technologies for development of in situ technologies to minimize waste disposal costs and potential worker exposure by treating plumes in place. While addressing contaminant plumes emanating from DOE landfills, the Subsurface Contaminants Focus Area is also working to develop new or alternative technologies for the in situ stabilization, and nonintrusive characterization of these disposal sites.

  4. Asking questions with focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; Xu, Yi

    2004-05-01

    This study investigates how different interrogative meanings interact with focus in determining the overall F0 profile of a question. We recorded eight native speakers of Mandarin producing statements, yes-no questions with and without a question particle, wh questions, incredulous questions, and confirmation questions. In each sentence, either the initial, medial, final, or no word was focused. The tonal components of the sentences are all high, all rising, all low, or all falling. F0 contours were extracted by measuring every complete vocal period in the initial, medial, and final disyllabic words in each sentence. Preliminary results show that in both statements and questions, the pitch range of the focused words is expanded and that of the postfocus words suppressed (compressed and lowered). However, postfocus pitch-range suppression seems less extensive in questions than in statements, and in some question types than in others. Finally, an extra F0 rise is often observed in the final syllable of a question unless the syllable is the question particle which has the neutral tone. This is indicative of a high or rising boundary tone associated with the interrogative meaning, which seems to be superimposed on the tone of the sentence-final syllable. [Work supported by NIDCD DC03902.

  5. Focus on 'Rue Legendre'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Annotated image of PIA04196 Focus on 'Rue Legendre'

    Spirit used its microscopic imager to take this mosaic of the rock 'Haussmann' on martian day, or sol, 563 (August 3, 2005). The specific target is nicknamed 'Rue Legendre.' The rounded nature of the pebbles indicates that they were eroded on the surface before being embedded into the Haussmann rock. The size of the larger of the two pebbles is approximately 3 centimeters (1.2 inches). The rock probably formed from impact ejecta, consistent with other rocks Spirit discovered during its climb to the summit of 'Husband Hill.'

  6. Dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device

    DOEpatents

    James, Conrad D.; Galambos, Paul C.; Derzon, Mark S.

    2010-05-11

    A dielectrophoretic columnar focusing device uses interdigitated microelectrodes to provide a spatially non-uniform electric field in a fluid that generates a dipole within particles in the fluid. The electric field causes the particles to either be attracted to or repelled from regions where the electric field gradient is large, depending on whether the particles are more or less polarizable than the fluid. The particles can thereby be forced into well defined stable paths along the interdigitated microelectrodes. The device can be used for flow cytometry, particle control, and other process applications, including cell counting or other types of particle counting, and for separations in material control.

  7. Transverse field focused system

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, Oscar A.

    1986-01-01

    A transverse field focused (TFF) system for transport or acceleration of an intense sheet beam of negative ions in which a serial arrangement of a plurality of pairs of concentric cylindrical-arc electrodes is provided. Acceleration of the sheet beam can be achieved by progressively increasing the mean electrode voltage of successive electrode pairs. Because the beam is curved by the electrodes, the system can be designed to transport the beam through a maze passage which is baffled to prevent line of sight therethrough. Edge containment of the beam can be achieved by shaping the side edges of the electrodes to produce an electric force vector directed inwardly from the electrode edges.

  8. Focused crossed Andreev reflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haugen, H.; Brataas, A.; Waintal, X.; Bauer, G. E. W.

    2011-03-01

    We consider non-local transport mediated by Andreev reflection in a two-dimensional electron gas (2DEG) connected to one superconducting and two normal metal terminals. A robust scheme is presented for observing crossed Andreev reflection (CAR) between the normal metal terminals based on electron focusing by weak perpendicular magnetic fields. At slightly elevated temperatures the CAR signature can be easily distinguished from a background of quantum interference fluctuations. The CAR-induced entanglement between electrons can be switched on and off over large distances by the magnetic field.

  9. Isoelectric focusing in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.; Egen, N. B.; Mosher, R. A.; Twitty, G. E.

    1982-01-01

    The potential of space electrophoresis is conditioned by the fact that all electrophoretic techniques require the suppression of gravity-caused convection. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) is a powerful variant of electrophoresis, in which amphoteric substances are separated in a pH gradient according to their isoelectric points. A new apparatus for large scale IEF, utilizing a recycling principle, has been developed. In the ground-based prototype, laminar flow is provided by a series of parallel filter elements. The operation of the apparatus is monitored by an automated array of pH and ultraviolet absorption sensors under control of a desk-top computer. The apparatus has proven to be useful for the purification of a variety of enzymes, snake venom proteins, peptide hormones, and other biologicals, including interferon produced by genetic engineering techniques. In planning for a possible space apparatus, a crucial question regarding electroosmosis needs to be addressed To solve this problem, simple focusing test modules are planned for inclusion in an early Shuttle flight.

  10. Flux focusing eddy current probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Simpson, John W. (Inventor); Clendenin, C. Gerald (Inventor); Fulton, James P. (Inventor); Wincheski, Russell A. (Inventor); Todhunter, Ronald G. (Inventor); Namkung, Min (Inventor); Nath, Shridhar C. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A flux-focusing electromagnetic sensor which uses a ferromagnetic flux-focusing lens simplifies inspections and increases detectability of fatigue cracks and material loss in high conductivity material. The unique feature of the device is the ferrous shield isolating a high-turn pick-up coil from an excitation coil. The use of the magnetic shield is shown to produce a null voltage output across the receiving coil in the presence of an unflawed sample. A redistribution of the current flow in the sample caused by the presence of flaws, however, eliminates the shielding condition and a large output voltage is produced, yielding a clear unambiguous flaw signal. The maximum sensor output is obtained when positioned symmetrically above the crack. Hence, by obtaining the position of the maximum sensor output, it is possible to track the fault and locate the area surrounding its tip. The accuracy of tip location is enhanced by two unique features of the sensor; a very high signal-to-noise ratio of the probe's output which results in an extremely smooth signal peak across the fault, and a rapidly decaying sensor output outside a small area surrounding the crack tip which enables the region for searching to be clearly defined. Under low frequency operation, material thinning due to corrosion damage causes an incomplete shielding of the pick-up coil. The low frequency output voltage of the probe is therefore a direct indicator of the thickness of the test sample.

  11. Alliance-focused training.

    PubMed

    Eubanks-Carter, Catherine; Muran, J Christopher; Safran, Jeremy D

    2015-06-01

    Alliance-focused training (AFT) aims to increase therapists' ability to recognize, tolerate, and negotiate alliance ruptures by increasing the therapeutic skills of self-awareness, affect regulation, and interpersonal sensitivity. In AFT, therapists are encouraged to draw on these skills when metacommunicating about ruptures with patients. In this article, we present the 3 main supervisory tasks of AFT: videotape analysis of rupture moments, awareness-oriented role-plays, and mindfulness training. We describe the theoretical and empirical support for each supervisory task, provide examples based on actual supervision sessions, and present feedback about the usefulness of the techniques from trainees in our program. We also note some of the challenges involved in conducting AFT and the importance of maintaining a strong supervisory alliance when using this training approach.

  12. Focus on granular segregation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daniels, Karen E.; Schröter, Matthias

    2013-03-01

    Ordinary fluids mix themselves through thermal motions, or can be even more efficiently mixed by stirring. In contrast, granular materials such as sand often unmix when they are stirred, shaken or sheared. This granular segregation is both a practical means to separate materials in industry, and a persistent challenge to uniformly mixing them. While segregation phenomena are ubiquitous, a large number of different mechanisms have been identified and the underlying physics remains the subject of much inquiry. Particle size, shape, density and even surface roughness can play significant roles. The aim of this focus issue is to provide a snapshot of the current state of the science, covering a wide range of packing densities and driving mechanisms, from thermal-like dilute systems to dense flows.

  13. Focus awards 2002.

    PubMed

    Davis, Naomi

    2003-03-22

    The dental team at Zetland House Clinic are a particularly innovative group. As a result of their parent hospital being the first to complete a whole organization clinical governance programme run by the NHS Modernization Agency, they were consequently the first dental team to do so. Now the clinic is a better place to work where the staff are proud of their clinic and the work that they do. The changes that resulted through their experiences of the program have benefited the patients and staff alike, and was such a success story that they have been taken as an example for the Modernisation Agency website to illustrate good practice in clinical governance. These changes and the way they approached their involvement in the program also earned the Zetland House team a place on the finalist list of the 2002 Focus Awards.

  14. Focusing on customer service.

    PubMed

    1996-01-01

    This booklet is devoted to a consideration of how good customer service in family planning programs can generate demand for products and services, bring customers back, and reduce costs. Customer service is defined as increasing client satisfaction through continuous concern for client preferences, staff accountability to clients, and respect for the rights of clients. Issues discussed include the introduction of a customer service approach and gaining staff commitment. The experience of PROSALUD in Bolivia in recruiting appropriate staff, supervising staff, soliciting client feedback, and marketing services is offered as an example of a successful customer service approach. The key customer service functions are described as 1) establishing a welcoming atmosphere, 2) streamlining client flow, 3) personalizing client services, and 4) organizing and providing clear information to clients. The role of the manager in developing procedures is explored, and the COPE (Client-Oriented Provider-Efficient) process is presented as a good way to begin to make improvements. Techniques in staff training in customer service include brainstorming, role playing, using case studies (examples of which are provided), and engaging in practice sessions. Training also leads to the development of effective customer service attitudes, and the differences between these and organizational/staff-focused attitudes are illustrated in a chart. The use of communication skills (asking open-ended questions, helping clients express their concerns, engaging in active listening, and handling difficult situations) is considered. Good recovery skills are important when things go wrong. Gathering and using client feedback is the next topic considered. This involves identifying, recording, and discussing customer service issues as well as taking action on these issues and evaluating the results. The booklet ends by providing a sample of customer service indicators, considering the maintenance of a

  15. Detection of polypeptides and amylase isoenzyme modifications related to malting quality during malting process of barley by two-dimensional electrophoresis and isoelectric focusing with immobilized pH gradients.

    PubMed

    Görg, A; Postel, W; Weiss, W

    1992-01-01

    Two cultivars ("Alexis" and "Lenka") of contrasting final attenuation values were malted, and the protein and amylase isoenzyme composition, as well as the change in protein and amylase isoenzyme composition during malting, was investigated by two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of total proteins, and isoelectric focusing of amylase isoenzymes, respectively. Isoelectric focusing demonstrated that significant differences exist between the amylase isoenzyme patterns of the two cultivars, suggesting a correlation between the presence of certain amylase isoenzyme bands and final attenuation. This finding was confirmed by analysis of 36 barley cultivars with a wide range of quality. It was shown that all cultivars which are of low or, at best, moderate final attenuation values exhibit the amylase band "B" (isoelectric point approximately 6.8), whereas those cultivars which are predominantly of high malting grade do not possess this "B" isoenzyme band, but exhibit the pronounced "A" isoenzyme band (isoelectric point approximately 6.5) instead, suggesting that these isoenzymes (which we suppose to be beta-amylases) can be utilized to predict the final attenuation values of unknown barley samples or new lines. However, "final attenuation" is a complex function. Preliminary results of two-dimensional gel electrophoresis indicate that other factors, such as total amount of amylases, or a 19 kDa A hordein-like polypeptide, which was degraded faster in the low malting grade cultivar "Lenka", may also have a role in determining quality.

  16. Focusing on flu

    PubMed Central

    Short, Mary B; Middleman, Amy B

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: To describe adolescents' perspectives regarding the use of school-located immunization programs (SLIP) for influenza vaccination. More importantly, adolescents were asked what factors would make them more or less likely to use a SLIP offering influenza vaccine. Results: Participants were generally found to be knowledgeable about influenza and to have positive attitudes toward receiving the vaccine via SLIP. Students were more willing to participate in a SLIP if it were low cost or free, less time-consuming than going to a doctor, and if they felt they could trust vaccinators. Overall, high school and middle school students ranked the benefits of SLIP similarly to each other. Methods: Focus groups using nominal group method were conducted with middle and high school students in a large, urban school district. Responses were recorded by each school, and then, responses were ranked across all participating schools for each question. Conclusions: A wide range of issues are important to middle and high school students when considering participation in SLIPs including convenience, public health benefits, trust in the program, program safety, and sanitary issues. Further research will be needed regarding the generalizability of these findings to larger populations of students. PMID:24018398

  17. White Light Focusing Mirror

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Eric; Lyndaker, Aaron; Deyhim, Alex; Sullivan, Michael; Chance, Mark; Abel, Don; Toomey, John; Hulbert, Steven

    2007-01-01

    The NSLS X28C white-light beamline is being outfitted with a focusing mirror in order to increase, as well as control, the x-ray intensity at the sample position. The new mirror is a 50 mm × 100 mm × 1100 mm single crystal silicon cylindrical 43.1mm radius substrate bendable to a toroid from infinite to 1200 m radius. The unique feature of this mirror system is the dual use of Indalloy 51 as both a mechanism for heat transfer and a buoyant support to negate the effects of gravity. The benefit of the liquid metal support is the ability to correct for minor slope errors that take the form of a parabola. A bobber mechanism is employed to displace the fluid under the mirror +/- 1.5 mm. This allows RMS slope error correction on the order of 2 urad. The unique mounting of the mirror ensures the contributions to slope error from errant mechanical stresses due to machining tolerances are virtually non-existent. After correction, the surface figure error (measured minus ideal) is <= 0.5 urad rms.

  18. Detection of virulence factors of Escherichia coli focused on prevalence of EAST1 toxin in stool of diarrheic and non-diarrheic piglets and presence of adhesion involving virulence factors in astA positive strains.

    PubMed

    Zajacova, Zuzana Sramkova; Konstantinova, Lucie; Alexa, Pavel

    2012-01-27

    Between 2005 and 2009, a total of 800 Escherichia coli strains isolated from piglets with diarrhea were tested for the presence of enteroaggregative heat-stable enterotoxin EAST1, heat-labile (LT) and heat-stable enterotoxins (STa) and shigatoxin (Stx2e) by PCR with the purpose of investigating the present distribution of virulence factors on swine farms in the Czech Republic. The isolates were analyzed for their O-serogroup, fimbrial (K88, K99, 987P, F41, F18) and nonfimbrial adhesins (adhesin involved in diffuse adherence AIDA and porcine attaching and effacing-associated factor PAA). The detection rates of ETEC and STEC isolates were 36.5% and 7.75%, respectively, which implies that ETEC play the major role in E. coli infections in Czech herds. Generally, the most common serotype was O149:K88 which possessed genetic determinants for LT and EAST1. None of the tested E. coli isolates was positive for genes K99, 987P and F41. It was shown that out of 800 E. coli strains isolated from pigs, 277 were EAST1 positive and 74% from the latter were identified as ETEC. Of the fimbrial adhesins, K88 and F18 were commonly detected. Over 80% of K88/EAST1 positive strains possessed the gene for paa. We detected no EAE isolate positive for fimbrial adhesins or PAA and AIDA. The AIDA was more often associated with F18 than with K88. The gene astA was also identified among E. coli isolates of non-diarrheic piglets. We tested rectal swab samples collected from apparently healthy piglets on three farms. On all farms, E. coli astA positive strains (26.66%, 90.00% and 46.66% astA positive animals) were isolated. Our results showed a significantly higher prevalence of astA positive E. coli isolates among apparently healthy piglets in comparison with diarrheic piglets. The question remains as to what is the role of the astA gene in the pathogenesis of porcine colibacillosis and as a virulence factor.

  19. EDITORIAL: Focus on Graphene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peres, N. M. R.; Ribeiro, Ricardo M.

    2009-09-01

    Graphene physics is currently one of the most active research areas in condensed matter physics. Countless theoretical and experimental studies have already been performed, targeting electronic, magnetic, thermal, optical, structural and vibrational properties. Also, studies that modify pristine graphene, aiming at finding new physics and possible new applications, have been considered. These include patterning nanoribbons and quantum dots, exposing graphene's surface to different chemical species, studying multilayer systems, and inducing strain and curvature (modifying in this way graphene's electronic properties). This focus issue includes many of the latest developments on graphene research. Focus on Graphene Contents Electronic properties of graphene and graphene nanoribbons with 'pseudo-Rashba' spin-orbit coupling Tobias Stauber and John Schliemann Strained graphene: tight-binding and density functional calculations R M Ribeiro, Vitor M Pereira, N M R Peres, P R Briddon and A H Castro Neto The effect of sublattice symmetry breaking on the electronic properties of doped graphene A Qaiumzadeh and R Asgari Interfaces within graphene nanoribbons J Wurm, M Wimmer, I Adagideli, K Richter and H U Baranger Weak localization and transport gap in graphene antidot lattices J Eroms and D Weiss Electronic properties of graphene antidot lattices J A Fürst, J G Pedersen, C Flindt, N A Mortensen, M Brandbyge, T G Pedersen and A-P Jauho Splitting of critical energies in the n=0 Landau level of graphene Ana L C Pereira Double-gated graphene-based devices S Russo, M F Craciun, M Yamamoto, S Tarucha and A F Morpurgo Pinning and switching of magnetic moments in bilayer graphene Eduardo V Castro, M P López-Sancho and M A H Vozmediano Electronic transport properties of graphene nanoribbons Katsunori Wakabayashi, Yositake Takane, Masayuki Yamamoto and Manfred Sigrist Many-body effects on out-of-plane phonons in graphene J González and E Perfetto Graphene zigzag ribbons, square

  20. Prostate Focused Ultrasound Therapy.

    PubMed

    Chapelon, Jean-Yves; Rouvière, Olivier; Crouzet, Sébastien; Gelet, Albert

    2016-01-01

    The tremendous progress in engineering and computing power coupled with ultrasound transducer technology and imaging modalities over the past 20 years have encouraged a revival of clinical interest in ultrasound therapy, mainly in High-Intensity Focused Ultrasound (HIFU). So far, the most extensive results from HIFU obtained in urology involve transrectal prostate ablation, which appears to be an effective therapeutic alternative for patients with malignant prostate tumors. Prostate cancer (PCa) is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in men. Several treatment options with different therapeutic approaches exist, including HIFU for localized PCa that has been in use for over 15 years. Since the early 2000s, two systems have been marketed for this application, and other devices are currently in clinical trials. HIFU treatment can be used either alone or in combination with (before- or after-) external beam radiotherapy (EBRT) (before or after HIFU) and can be repeated multiple times. HIFU treatment is performed under real-time monitoring with ultrasound or guided by MRI. Two indications are validated today: Primary care treatment and EBRT failure. The results of HIFU for primary care treatment are similar to standard conformal EBRT, even though no randomized comparative studies have been performed and no 10-year follow up data is yet available for HIFU. Salvage HIFU after EBRT failure is increasing with oncological outcomes, similar to those achieved with surgery but with the advantage of fewer adverse effects. HIFU is an evolving technology perfectly adapted for focal treatment. Thus, HIFU focal therapy is another pathway that must be explored when considering the accuracy and reliability for PCa mapping techniques. HIFU would be particularly suited for such a therapy since it is clear that HIFU outcomes and toxicity are relative to the volume of prostate treated.

  1. Stress wave focusing transducers

    SciTech Connect

    Visuri, S.R., LLNL

    1998-05-15

    Conversion of laser radiation to mechanical energy is the fundamental process behind many medical laser procedures, particularly those involving tissue destruction and removal. Stress waves can be generated with laser radiation in several ways: creation of a plasma and subsequent launch of a shock wave, thermoelastic expansion of the target tissue, vapor bubble collapse, and ablation recoil. Thermoelastic generation of stress waves generally requires short laser pulse durations and high energy density. Thermoelastic stress waves can be formed when the laser pulse duration is shorter than the acoustic transit time of the material: {tau}{sub c} = d/c{sub s} where d = absorption depth or spot diameter, whichever is smaller, and c{sub s} = sound speed in the material. The stress wave due to thermoelastic expansion travels at the sound speed (approximately 1500 m/s in tissue) and leaves the site of irradiation well before subsequent thermal events can be initiated. These stress waves, often evolving into shock waves, can be used to disrupt tissue. Shock waves are used in ophthalmology to perform intraocular microsurgery and photodisruptive procedures as well as in lithotripsy to fragment stones. We have explored a variety of transducers that can efficiently convert optical to mechanical energy. One such class of transducers allows a shock wave to be focused within a material such that the stress magnitude can be greatly increased compared to conventional geometries. Some transducer tips could be made to operate regardless of the absorption properties of the ambient media. The size and nature of the devices enable easy delivery, potentially minimally-invasive procedures, and precise tissue- targeting while limiting thermal loading. The transducer tips may have applications in lithotripsy, ophthalmology, drug delivery, and cardiology.

  2. Cable Diagnostic Focused Initiative

    SciTech Connect

    Hartlein, R.A.; Hampton, R.N.

    2010-12-30

    This report summarizes an extensive effort made to understand how to effectively use the various diagnostic technologies to establish the condition of medium voltage underground cable circuits. These circuits make up an extensive portion of the electric delivery infrastructure in the United States. Much of this infrastructure is old and experiencing unacceptable failure rates. By deploying efficient diagnostic testing programs, electric utilities can replace or repair circuits that are about to fail, providing an optimal approach to improving electric system reliability. This is an intrinsically complex topic. Underground cable systems are not homogeneous. Cable circuits often contain multiple branches with different cable designs and a range of insulation materials. In addition, each insulation material ages differently as a function of time, temperature and operating environment. To complicate matters further, there are a wide variety of diagnostic technologies available for assessing the condition of cable circuits with a diversity of claims about the effectiveness of each approach. As a result, the benefits of deploying cable diagnostic testing programs have been difficult to establish, leading many utilities to avoid the their use altogether. This project was designed to help address these issues. The information provided is the result of a collaborative effort between Georgia Tech NEETRAC staff, Georgia Tech academic faculty, electric utility industry participants, as well as cable system diagnostic testing service providers and test equipment providers. Report topics include: •How cable systems age and fail, •The various technologies available for detecting potential failure sites, •The advantages and disadvantages of different diagnostic technologies, •Different approaches for utilities to employ cable system diagnostics. The primary deliverables of this project are this report, a Cable Diagnostic Handbook (a subset of this report) and an online

  3. A study on the flip angle for an optimal T1-weighted image based on the 3D-THRIVE MRI technique: Focusing on the detection of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Kyung-Rae; Goo, Eun-Hoe; Lee, Jae-Seung; Chung, Woon-Kwan; Kim, Young-Jae

    2014-04-01

    This study examined the optimal flip angle (FA) for a T1-weighted image in the detection of a hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A 3D-T1-weighted high-resolution isotropic volume examination (THRIVE) technique was used to determine the dependence of the signal to noise ratio (SNR) and the contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR) on the change in FA. This study targeted 40 liver cancer patients (25 men and 15 women aged 50 to 70 years with a mean age of 60.32 ± 6.2 years) who visited this hospital to undergo an abdominal MRI examination from January to June 2013. A 3.0 Tesla MRI machine (Philips, Medical System, Achieva) and a MRI receiver coil for data reception with a 16-channel multicoil were used in this study. The THRIVE (repetition time (TR): 8.1 ms, echo time (TE): 3.7 ms, matrix: 172 × 172, slice thickness: 4 mm, gap: 2 mm, field of view (FOV): 350 mm, and band width (BW): 380.1 Hz) technique was applied as a pulse sequence. The time required for the examination was 19 seconds, and the breath-hold technique was used. Axial images were obtained at five FAs: 5, 10, 15, 20 and 25°. The signal intensities of the liver, the lesion and the background noise were measured based on the acquired images before the SNR and the CNR were calculated. To evaluate the image at the FA, we used SPSS for Windows ver. 17.0 to conduct a one-way ANOVA test. A Bonferroni test was conducted as a post-hoc test. The SNRs of the hemorrhagic HCC in the 3D-THRIVE technique were 35.50 ± 4.12, 97.00 ± 10.24, 66.09 ± 7.29, 53.84 ± 5.43, and 42.92 ± 5.11 for FAs of 5, 10, 15, 20, and 25°, respectively (p = 0.0430), whereas the corresponding CNRs were 30.50 ± 3.84, 43.00 ± 5.42, 36.54 ± 4.09, 32.30 ± 2.79, and 31.69 ± 3.21 (p = 0.0003). At a small FA of 10, the SNR and the CNR showed the highest values. As the FA was increased, the SNR and the CNR values showed a decreasing tendency. In conclusion, the optimal T1-weighted image FA should be set to 10° to detect a HCC by using the 3D

  4. The design of aerial camera focusing mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Changchang; Yang, Hongtao; Niu, Haijun

    2015-10-01

    In order to ensure the imaging resolution of aerial camera and compensating defocusing caused by the changing of atmospheric temperature, pressure, oblique photographing distance and other environmental factor [1,2], and to meeting the overall design requirements of the camera for the lower mass and smaller size , the linear focusing mechanism is designed. Through the target surface support, the target surface component is connected with focusing driving mechanism. Make use of precision ball screws, focusing mechanism transforms the input rotary motion of motor into linear motion of the focal plane assembly. Then combined with the form of linear guide restraint movement, the magnetic encoder is adopted to detect the response of displacement. And the closed loop control is adopted to realize accurate focusing. This paper illustrated the design scheme for a focusing mechanism and analyzed its error sources. It has the advantages of light friction and simple transmission chain and reducing the transmission error effectively. And this paper also analyses the target surface by finite element analysis and lightweight design. Proving that the precision of focusing mechanism can achieve higher than 3um, and the focusing range is +/-2mm.

  5. Isoelectric focusing of proteins and peptides

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egen, N.

    1979-01-01

    Egg-white solution was chosen as the reference solution in order to assess the effects of operational parameters (voltage, flow rate, ampholine pH range and concentration, and protein concentration) of the RIEF apparatus on protein resolution. Topics of discussion include: (1) comparison of RIEF apparatus to conventional IEF techniques (column and PAG) with respect to resolution and throughput; (2) peptide and protein separation (AHF, Thymosin - Fraction 5, vasoactive peptide, L-asparaginase and ACP); and (3) detection of peptides - dansyl derivatives of amino acids and peptides, post-focusing fluorescent labeling of amino acids, peptides and proteins, and ampholine extraction from focused gels.

  6. Dual focus diffractive optical element with extended depth of focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uno, Katsuhiro; Shimizu, Isao

    2014-09-01

    A dual focus property and an extended depth of focus were verified by a new type of diffractive lens displaying on liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) devices. This type of lens is useful to read information on multilayer optical discs and tilted discs. The radial undulation of the phase groove on the diffractive lens gave the dual focus nature. The focal extension was performed by combining the dual focus lens with the axilens that was invented for expanding the depth of focus. The number of undulations did not affect the intensity along the optical axis but the central spot of the diffraction pattern.

  7. Focusators for laser-branding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doskolovich, L. L.; Kazanskiy, N. L.; Kharitonov, S. I.; Uspleniev, G. V.

    A new method is investigated for synthesis of computer-generated optical elements: focusators that are able to focus the radial-symmetrical laser beam into complex focal contours, in particular into alphanumeric symbols. The method is based on decomposition of the focal contour into segments of straight lines and semi-circles, following corresponding spacing out of the focusator on elementary segments (concentric rings or sectors) and solution of the inverse task of focusing from focusator segments into corresponding elements of the focal contour. The results of numerical computing of the field from synthesized focusators into the letters are presented. The theoretical efficiency of the focusators discussed is no less than 85%. The amplitude masks and the results of operational studies of synthesized focusators are presented.

  8. Microflow cytometers with integrated hydrodynamic focusing.

    PubMed

    Frankowski, Marcin; Theisen, Janko; Kummrow, Andreas; Simon, Peter; Ragusch, Hülya; Bock, Nicole; Schmidt, Martin; Neukammer, Jörg

    2013-04-09

    This study demonstrates the suitability of microfluidic structures for high throughput blood cell analysis. The microfluidic chips exploit fully integrated hydrodynamic focusing based on two different concepts: Two-stage cascade focusing and spin focusing (vortex) principle. The sample--A suspension of micro particles or blood cells--is injected into a sheath fluid streaming at a substantially higher flow rate, which assures positioning of the particles in the center of the flow channel. Particle velocities of a few m/s are achieved as required for high throughput blood cell analysis. The stability of hydrodynamic particle positioning was evaluated by measuring the pulse heights distributions of fluorescence signals from calibration beads. Quantitative assessment based on coefficient of variation for the fluorescence intensity distributions resulted in a value of about 3% determined for the micro-device exploiting cascade hydrodynamic focusing. For the spin focusing approach similar values were achieved for sample flow rates being 1.5 times lower. Our results indicate that the performances of both variants of hydrodynamic focusing suit for blood cell differentiation and counting. The potential of the micro flow cytometer is demonstrated by detecting immunologically labeled CD3 positive and CD4 positive T-lymphocytes in blood.

  9. Introduction to Focus Issue: Lagrangian Coherent Structures.

    PubMed

    Peacock, Thomas; Dabiri, John

    2010-03-01

    The topic of Lagrangian coherent structures (LCS) has been a rapidly growing area of research in nonlinear dynamics for almost a decade. It provides a means to rigorously define and detect transport barriers in dynamical systems with arbitrary time dependence and has a wealth of applications, particularly to fluid flow problems. Here, we give a short introduction to the topic of LCS and review the new work presented in this Focus Issue.

  10. Focus vernier for optical lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arnold, William H.; Barouch, Eytan; Hollerbach, Uwe; Orszag, Steven A.

    1993-08-01

    As the depth of focus of optical steppers grows smaller, it becomes more important to determine the position of best focus accurately and quickly. This paper describes the use of phase-shifted mask technology to form a focus vernier: a phase pattern on the stepper reticle which, when imaged in resist, can give both the magnitude and the direction of the focus error. In this, the focus vernier structure is analogous to 3overlay verniers. Thus the determination of focus error can be treated as an alignment problem in the z-axis. This technique is an improvement on previous schemes for the determination of best focus from resist images as it can indicate both the magnitude of the error and its direction in a single exposure.

  11. Power Evaluation of Focused Cluster Tests.

    PubMed

    Puett, Rc; Lawson, Ab; Clark, Ab; Hebert, Jr; Kulldorff, M

    2010-09-01

    Many statistical tests have been developed to assess the significance of clusters of disease located around known sources of environmental contaminants, also known as focused disease clusters. The majority of focused-cluster tests were designed to detect a particular spatial pattern of clustering, one in which the disease cluster centers around the pollution source and declines in a radial fashion with distance. However, other spatial patterns of environmentally related disease clusters are likely given that the spatial dispersion patterns of environmental contaminants, and thus human exposure, depend on a number of factors (i.e., meteorology and topography). For this study, data were simulated with five different spatial patterns of disease clusters, reflecting potential pollutant dispersion scenarios: 1) a radial effect decreasing with increasing distance, 2) a radial effect with a defined peak and decreasing with distance, 3) a simple angular effect, 4) an angular effect decreasing with increasing distance and 5) an angular effect with a defined peak and decreasing with distance. The power to detect each type of spatially distributed disease cluster was evaluated using Stone's Maximum Likelihood Ratio Test, Tango's Focused Test, Bithell's Linear Risk Score Test, and variations of the Lawson-Waller Score Test. Study findings underscore the importance of considering environmental contaminant dispersion patterns, particularly directional effects, with respect to focused-cluster test selection in cluster investigations. The effect of extra variation in risk also is considered, although its effect is not substantial in terms of the power of tests.

  12. Focus Groups Help To Focus the Marketing Strategy.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashar, Hanna; Lane, Maureen

    1996-01-01

    A university-based degree completion program for adults conducted focus group research to refine market positioning and promotion. Focus groups averaged five current students and recent graduates who reflected, demographically, the current student population. Results gave insight into reasons for selecting the university, aspects of the program…

  13. Use of ionic liquid aggregates of 1-hexadecyl-3-butyl imidazolium bromide in a focused-microwave assisted extraction method followed by high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet and fluorescence detection to determine the 15+1 EU priority PAHs in toasted cereals ("gofios").

    PubMed

    Germán-Hernández, Mónica; Pino, Verónica; Anderson, Jared L; Afonso, Ana M

    2011-08-15

    A focused-microwave assisted extraction method using aggregates of the ionic liquid (IL) 1-hexadecyl-3-butylimidazolium bromide (HDBIm-Br) followed by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection and single-channel fluorescence detection (FLD) has been developed for the determination of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in toasted cereals ("gofios") of different nature (wheat, barley, rye, and maize corn) from the Canary Islands, Spain. The optimized HPLC-UV-vis/single-channel FLD method takes 40 min for the chromatographic run with limits of detection varying between 0.02 and 4.01 ng mL(-1) for the fluorescent PAHs from the European Union (EU) priority list in foods, and 20.5 ng mL(-1) for the non-fluorescent PAH cyclopenta[c,d]pyrene (CPP). The optimized microwave step presented extractions recoveries ranging from 70.1 to 109% and precision values lower than 12.6% (as relative standard deviation), using an extraction time of 14 min. The extraction method also utilizes low amounts of sample (0.1g), and low amounts of IL (77 mg), avoiding completely the use of organic solvents.

  14. Combination of high-intensity focused ultrasound irradiation and hydroxyapatite nanoparticle injection to injure normal goat liver tissue in vivo without costal bone incision.

    PubMed

    Liu, L; Xiao, Z; Xiao, Y; Wang, Z; Li, F; Li, M; Peng, X

    2014-10-20

    The aims of this study were to evaluate the in vivo safety of intravenous nano-hydroxyapatite (nano-HA), to explore how nano-HA might influence the effects of high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) on normal liver tissue, and to investigate whether intravenous nano-HA could enhance HIFU for hepatocellular carcinoma ablation in a goat model. The present study, for the first time, indicated that the delivery of abundant nano-HA into the body over short periods of time could be assembled by the hepatic reticuloendothelial system, subsequently leading to a rapid rise of ultrasound-induced overheating, and ultimately resulting in enlargement of the coagulation necrotic area for ablated hepatocellular carcinoma in goats both in vivo and ex vivo. On the other hand, therapeutic doses of nano-HA were much lower than the lethal dose, and consequently presented transient and mild abnormalities of hepatic enzymes and renal function during the first 24 h after nano-HA injection. These results suggested that the combined application of nano-HA and HIFU is potentially a more effective alternative option compared to surgery for hepatocellular carcinoma local ablation in a safe and feasible manner.

  15. Inertial Focusing of Microparticles in Curvilinear Microchannels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Özbey, Arzu; Karimzadehkhouei, Mehrdad; Akgönül, Sarp; Gozuacik, Devrim; Koşar, Ali

    2016-12-01

    A passive, continuous and size-dependent focusing technique enabled by “inertial microfluidics”, which takes advantage of hydrodynamic forces, is implemented in this study to focus microparticles. The objective is to analyse the decoupling effects of inertial forces and Dean drag forces on microparticles of different sizes in curvilinear microchannels with inner radius of 800 μm and curvature angle of 280°, which have not been considered in the literature related to inertial microfluidics. This fundamental approach gives insight into the underlying physics of particle dynamics and offers continuous, high-throughput, label-free and parallelizable size-based particle separation. Our design allows the same footprint to be occupied as straight channels, which makes parallelization possible with optical detection integration. This feature is also useful for ultrahigh-throughput applications such as flow cytometers with the advantages of reduced cost and size. The focusing behaviour of 20, 15 and 10 μm fluorescent polystyrene microparticles was examined for different channel Reynolds numbers. Lateral and vertical particle migrations and the equilibrium positions of these particles were investigated in detail, which may lead to the design of novel microfluidic devices with high efficiency and high throughput for particle separation, rapid detection and diagnosis of circulating tumour cells with reduced cost.

  16. Inertial Focusing of Microparticles in Curvilinear Microchannels

    PubMed Central

    Özbey, Arzu; Karimzadehkhouei, Mehrdad; Akgönül, Sarp; Gozuacik, Devrim; Koşar, Ali

    2016-01-01

    A passive, continuous and size-dependent focusing technique enabled by “inertial microfluidics”, which takes advantage of hydrodynamic forces, is implemented in this study to focus microparticles. The objective is to analyse the decoupling effects of inertial forces and Dean drag forces on microparticles of different sizes in curvilinear microchannels with inner radius of 800 μm and curvature angle of 280°, which have not been considered in the literature related to inertial microfluidics. This fundamental approach gives insight into the underlying physics of particle dynamics and offers continuous, high-throughput, label-free and parallelizable size-based particle separation. Our design allows the same footprint to be occupied as straight channels, which makes parallelization possible with optical detection integration. This feature is also useful for ultrahigh-throughput applications such as flow cytometers with the advantages of reduced cost and size. The focusing behaviour of 20, 15 and 10 μm fluorescent polystyrene microparticles was examined for different channel Reynolds numbers. Lateral and vertical particle migrations and the equilibrium positions of these particles were investigated in detail, which may lead to the design of novel microfluidic devices with high efficiency and high throughput for particle separation, rapid detection and diagnosis of circulating tumour cells with reduced cost. PMID:27991494

  17. Ultrasonic inspection apparatus and method using a focused wave device

    DOEpatents

    Gieske, John H.; Roach, Dennis P.; Walkington, Phillip D.

    2001-01-01

    An ultrasonic pulse echo inspection apparatus and method for detecting structural failures. A focus lens is coupled to the transducer to focus the ultrasonic signal on an area to be inspected and a stop is placed in the focus lens to block selected ultrasonic waves. Other waves are not blocked and are transmitted through the structure to arrive at interfaces therein concurrently to produce an echo response with significantly less distortion.

  18. Plutonium focus area: Technology summary

    SciTech Connect

    1996-03-01

    To ensure research and development programs focus on the most pressing environmental restoration and waste management problems at the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), the Assistant Secretary for the Office of Environmental Management (EM) established a working group in August 1993 to implement a new approach to research and technology development. As part of this approach, EM developed a management structure and principles that led to creation of specific focus areas. These organizations were designed to focus scientific and technical talent throughout DOE and the national scientific community on major environmental restoration and waste management problems facing DOE. The focus area approach provides the framework for inter-site cooperation and leveraging of resources on common problems. After the original establishment of five major focus areas within the Office of Technology Development (EM-50), the Nuclear Materials Stabilization Task Group (NMSTG, EM-66) followed EM-50`s structure and chartered the Plutonium Focus Area (PFA). NMSTG`s charter to the PFA, described in detail later in this book, plays a major role in meeting the EM-66 commitments to the Defense Nuclear Facilities Safety Board (DNFSB). The PFA is a new program for FY96 and as such, the primary focus of revision 0 of this Technology Summary is an introduction to the Focus Area; its history, development, and management structure, including summaries of selected technologies being developed. Revision 1 to the Plutonium Focus Area Technology Summary is slated to include details on all technologies being developed, and is currently planned for release in August 1996. The following report outlines the scope and mission of the Office of Environmental Management, EM-60, and EM-66 organizations as related to the PFA organizational structure.

  19. EDITORIAL: Focus on Quantum Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabitz, Herschel

    2009-10-01

    represent two-photon power spectra of arbitrarily and adaptively shaped broadband laser pulses M A Montgomery and N H Damrauer Accurate and efficient implementation of the von Neumann representation for laser pulses with discrete and finite spectra Frank Dimler, Susanne Fechner, Alexander Rodenberg, Tobias Brixner and David J Tannor Coherent strong-field control of multiple states by a single chirped femtosecond laser pulse M Krug, T Bayer, M Wollenhaupt, C Sarpe-Tudoran, T Baumert, S S Ivanov and N V Vitanov Quantum-state measurement of ionic Rydberg wavepackets X Zhang and R R Jones On the paradigm of coherent control: the phase-dependent light-matter interaction in the shaping window Tiago Buckup, Jurgen Hauer and Marcus Motzkus Use of the spatial phase of a focused laser beam to yield mechanistic information about photo-induced chemical reactions V J Barge, Z Hu and R J Gordon Coherent control of multiple vibrational excitations for optimal detection S D McGrane, R J Scharff, M Greenfield and D S Moore Mode selectivity with polarization shaping in the mid-IR David B Strasfeld, Chris T Middleton and Martin T Zanni Laser-guided relativistic quantum dynamics Chengpu Liu, Markus C Kohler, Karen Z Hatsagortsyan, Carsten Muller and Christoph H Keitel Continuous quantum error correction as classical hybrid control Hideo Mabuchi Quantum filter reduction for measurement-feedback control via unsupervised manifold learning Anne E B Nielsen, Asa S Hopkins and Hideo Mabuchi Control of the temporal profile of the local electromagnetic field near metallic nanostructures Ilya Grigorenko and Anatoly Efimov Laser-assisted molecular orientation in gaseous media: new possibilities and applications Dmitry V Zhdanov and Victor N Zadkov Optimization of laser field-free orientation of a state-selected NO molecular sample Arnaud Rouzee, Arjan Gijsbertsen, Omair Ghafur, Ofer M Shir, Thomas Back, Steven Stolte and Marc J J Vrakking Controlling the sense of molecular rotation Sharly Fleischer

  20. FOCUSing on Innovative Solar Technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Rohlfing, Eric; Holman, Zak, Angel, Roger

    2016-03-02

    Many of ARPA-E’s technology programs seek to break down silos and build new technological communities around a specific energy challenge. In this video, ARPA-E’s Deputy Director for Technology Eric Rohlfing, discusses how the Full-Spectrum Optimized Conversion and Utilization of Sunlight (FOCUS) program is bringing together the photovoltaic (PV) and concentrated solar power (CSP) communities to develop hybrid solar energy systems. This video features interviews with innovators from the FOCUS project team made up by Arizona State University and the University of Arizona, and showcases how the FOCUS program is combining.

  1. FOCUSing on Innovative Solar Technologies

    ScienceCinema

    Rohlfing, Eric; Holman, Zak, Angel, Roger

    2016-07-12

    Many of ARPA-E’s technology programs seek to break down silos and build new technological communities around a specific energy challenge. In this video, ARPA-E’s Deputy Director for Technology Eric Rohlfing, discusses how the Full-Spectrum Optimized Conversion and Utilization of Sunlight (FOCUS) program is bringing together the photovoltaic (PV) and concentrated solar power (CSP) communities to develop hybrid solar energy systems. This video features interviews with innovators from the FOCUS project team made up by Arizona State University and the University of Arizona, and showcases how the FOCUS program is combining.

  2. Compact electron beam focusing column

    SciTech Connect

    Persaud, Arun; Leung, Ka-Ngo; Reijonen, Jani

    2001-07-13

    A novel design for an electron beam focusing column has been developed at LBNL. The design is based on a low-energy spread multicusp plasma source which is used as a cathode for electron beam production. The focusing column is 10 mm in length. The electron beam is focused by means of electrostatic fields. The column is designed for a maximum voltage of 50 kV. Simulations of the electron trajectories have been performed by using the 2-D simulation code IGUN and EGUN. The electron temperature has also been incorporated into the simulations. The electron beam simulations, column design and fabrication will be discussed in this presentation.

  3. Understanding ultrasound induced sonoporation: definitions and underlying mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Lentacker, I; De Cock, I; Deckers, R; De Smedt, S C; Moonen, C T W

    2014-06-01

    In the past two decades, research has underlined the potential of ultrasound and microbubbles to enhance drug delivery. However, there is less consensus on the biophysical and biological mechanisms leading to this enhanced delivery. Sonoporation, i.e. the formation of temporary pores in the cell membrane, as well as enhanced endocytosis is reported. Because of the variety of ultrasound settings used and corresponding microbubble behavior, a clear overview is missing. Therefore, in this review, the mechanisms contributing to sonoporation are categorized according to three ultrasound settings: i) low intensity ultrasound leading to stable cavitation of microbubbles, ii) high intensity ultrasound leading to inertial cavitation with microbubble collapse, and iii) ultrasound application in the absence of microbubbles. Using low intensity ultrasound, the endocytotic uptake of several drugs could be stimulated, while short but intense ultrasound pulses can be applied to induce pore formation and the direct cytoplasmic uptake of drugs. Ultrasound intensities may be adapted to create pore sizes correlating with drug size. Small molecules are able to diffuse passively through small pores created by low intensity ultrasound treatment. However, delivery of larger drugs such as nanoparticles and gene complexes, will require higher ultrasound intensities in order to allow direct cytoplasmic entry.

  4. Ultrasound-induced inertial cavitation from gas-stabilizing nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Kwan, J J; Graham, S; Myers, R; Carlisle, R; Stride, E; Coussios, C C

    2015-08-01

    The understanding of cavitation from nanoparticles has been hindered by the inability to control nanobubble size. We present a method to manufacture nanoparticles with a tunable single hemispherical depression (nanocups) of mean diameter 90, 260, or 650 nm entrapping a nanobubble. A modified Rayleigh-Plesset crevice model predicts the inertial cavitation threshold as a function of cavity size and frequency, and is verified experimentally. The ability to tune cavitation nanonuclei and predict their behavior will be useful for applications ranging from cancer therapy to ultrasonic cleaning.

  5. Damage mechanisms for ultrasound-induced cavitation in tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warnez, M.; Vlaisavljevich, E.; Xu, Z.; Johnsen, E.

    2017-03-01

    In a variety of biomedical applications, cavitation occurs in soft tissue. Although significant amounts of research have been performed on cavitation in water, bubble dynamics, and related bioeffects remain poorly understood. We use numerical simulations of spherical bubble dynamics in soft tissue to assess the extent to which viscoelasticity affects "known" and introduces "new" damage mechanisms. We find that deviatoric stresses - although not an important damage mechanism in water - are significantly enhanced and could be an important bioeffect mechanism in tissue. Both the viscoelastic properties and the nonlinear, large-collapse radius contribute to stress amplification in the surroundings. In addition, temperatures in the surrounding medium increase more in the Zener tissue than in water, due to viscous heating.

  6. Ultrasound-Induced New Cellular Mechanism Involved in Drug Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Hassan, Mariame A.; Furusawa, Yukihiro; Minemura, Masami; Rapoport, Natalya; Sugiyama, Toshiro; Kondo, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    The acoustic effects in a biological milieu offer several scenarios for the reversal of multidrug resistance. In this study, we have observed higher sensitivity of doxorubicin-resistant uterine sarcoma MES-SA/DX5 cells to ultrasound exposure compared to its parent counterpart MES-SA cells; however, the results showed that the acoustic irradiation was genotoxic and could promote neotic division in exposed cells that was more pronounced in the resistant variant. The neotic progeny, imaged microscopically 24 hr post sonication, could contribute in modulating the final cell survival when an apoptotic dose of doxorubicin was combined with ultrasound applied either simultaneously or sequentially in dual-treatment protocols. Depending on the time and order of application of ultrasound and doxorubicin in combination treatments, there was either desensitization of the parent cells or sensitization of the resistant cells to doxorubicin action. PMID:23284614

  7. Ultrasound induced green solvent extraction of oil from oleaginous seeds.

    PubMed

    Sicaire, Anne-Gaëlle; Vian, Maryline Abert; Fine, Frédéric; Carré, Patrick; Tostain, Sylvain; Chemat, Farid

    2016-07-01

    Ultrasound-assisted extraction of rapeseed oil was investigated and compared with conventional extraction for energy efficiency, throughput time, extraction yield, cleanness, processing cost and product quality. A multivariate study enabled us to define optimal parameters (7.7 W/cm(2) for ultrasonic power intensity, 40 °C for processing temperature, and a solid/liquid ratio of 1/15) for ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil from oilseeds to maximize lipid yield while reducing solvent consumption and extraction time using response surface methodology (RSM) with a three-variable central composite design (CCD). A significant difference in oil quality was noted under the conditions of the initial ultrasound extraction, which was later avoided using ultrasound in the absence of oxygen. Three concepts of multistage cross-current extraction were investigated and compared: conventional multistage maceration, ultrasound-assisted maceration and a combination, to assess the positive impact of using ultrasound on the seed oil extraction process. The study concludes that ultrasound-assisted extraction of oil is likely to reduce both economic and ecological impacts of the process in the fat and oil industry.

  8. Isoelectric focusing in a drop.

    PubMed

    Weiss, Noah G; Hayes, Mark A; Garcia, Antonio A; Ansari, Rafat R

    2011-01-04

    A novel approach to molecular separations is investigated using a technique termed droplet-based isoelectric focusing. Drops are manipulated discretely on a superhydrophobic surface, subjected to low voltages for isoelectric focusing, and split-resulting in a preparative separation. A universal indicator dye demonstrates the generation of stable, reversible pH gradients (3-10) in ampholyte buffers, and these gradients lead to protein focusing within the drop length. Focusing was visually characterized, spectroscopically verified, and assessed quantitatively by noninvasive light scattering measurements. It was found to correlate with a quantitative model based on 1D steady-state theory. This work illustrates that molecular separations can be deployed within a single open drop, and the differential fractions can be separated into new discrete liquid elements.

  9. Focusing light through living tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vellekoop, I. M.; Aegerter, C. M.

    2010-02-01

    Tissues such as skin, fat or cuticle are non-transparent because inhomogeneities in the tissue scatter light. We demonstrate experimentally that light can be focused through turbid layers of living tissue, in spite of scattering. Our method is based on the fact that coherent light forms an interference pattern, even after hundreds of scattering events. By spatially shaping the wavefront of the incident laser beam, this interference pattern was modified to make the scattered light converge to a focus. In contrast to earlier experiments, where light was focused through solid objects, we focused light through living pupae of Drosophila melanogaster. We discuss a dynamic wavefront shaping algorithm that follows changes due to microscopic movements of scattering particles in real time. We relate the performance of the algorithm to the measured timescale of the changes in the speckle pattern and analyze our experiment in the light of Laser Doppler flowmetry. Applications in particle tracking, imaging, and optical manipulation are discussed.

  10. Diffusiophoretic Focusing of Suspended Colloids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Nan; Nery-Azevedo, Rodrigo; Abdel-Fattah, Amr I.; Squires, Todd M.

    2016-12-01

    Using a microfluidic system to impose and maintain controlled, steady-state multicomponent p H and electrolyte gradients, we present systems where the diffusiophoretic migration of suspended colloids leads them to focus at a particular position, even in steady-state gradients. We show that naively superpositing effects of each gradient may seem conceptually and qualitatively reasonable, yet is invalid due to the coupled transport of these multicomponent electrolytes. In fact, reformulating the classic theories in terms of the flux of each species (rather than local gradients) reveals rather stringent conditions that are necessary for diffusiophoretic focusing in steady gradients. Either particle surface properties must change as a function of local composition in solution (akin to isoelectric focusing in electrophoresis), or chemical reactions must occur between electrolyte species, for such focusing to be possible. The generality of these findings provides a conceptual picture for understanding, predicting, or designing diffusiophoretic systems.

  11. Focusing on Contact Lens Safety

    MedlinePlus

    ... Consumers Home For Consumers Consumer Updates Focusing on Contact Lens Safety Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... substantial consumer injury. Back to top Types of Contact Lenses General categories Soft contact lenses. These are ...

  12. Simulations of neutralized final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Welch, D.R.; Rose, D.V.; Genoni, T.C.; Yu, S.S.; Barnard, J.J.

    2005-01-18

    In order to drive an inertial fusion target or study high energy density physics with heavy ion beams, the beam radius must be focused to < 3 mm and the pulse length must be compressed to < 10 ns. The conventional scheme for temporal pulse compression makes use of an increasing ion velocity to compress the beam as it drifts and beam space charge to stagnate the compression before final focus. Beam compression in a neutralizing plasma does not require stagnation of the compression, enabling a more robust method. The final pulse shape at the target can be programmed by an applied velocity tilt. In this paper, neutralized drift compression is investigated. The sensitivity of the compression and focusing to beam momentum spread, plasma, and magnetic field conditions is studied with realistic driver examples. Using the 3D particle-in-cell code, we examine issues associated with self-field generation, stability, and vacuum-neutralized transport transition and focusing.

  13. Wolter Optics for Neutron Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mildner, D. F. R.; Gubarev, M. V.

    2010-01-01

    Focusing optics based on Wolter optical geometries developed for x-ray grazing incidence beams can be designed for neutron beams. Wolter optics are formed by grazing incidence reflections from two concentric conic sections (for example, a paraboloid and a hyperboloid). This has transformed observational X-ray astronomy by increasing the sensitivity by many orders of magnitude for research in astrophysics and cosmology. To increase the collection area, many reflecting mirrors of different diameters are nested with a common focal plane. These mirrors are fabricated using nickel-electroformed replication techniques. We apply these ideas to neutron focusing using nickel mirrors. We show an initial test of a conical mirror using a beam of cold neutrons. key words: electroformed nickel replication, focusing optics, grazing angle incidence, mirror reflection, neutron focusing, Wolter optics

  14. Oculometer focus and mirror control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guy, W. J.

    1982-01-01

    An automatic focusing system designed around an ultrasonic range measurement is described. Besides maintaining the focus, subject distance is a by-product which could lighten the NOVA computational effort. An automatic head tracking unit is also discussed. It is intended to reduce the search time required when track is lost. An X-Y ultrasonic measurement is also made in this design to control the deflection mirrors.

  15. Focusing of bistatic SAR data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bia, Pietro; Ricci, Nicola; Zonno, Mariantonietta; Nico, Giovanni; Catalao, Joao; Tesauro, Manlio

    2014-10-01

    The problems of simulation of bistatic SAR raw data and focusing are studied. A discrete target simulator is described. The simulator introduces the scene topography and compute the integration time of general bistatic configurations providing a means to derived maps of the range and azimuth spatial resolutions. The problem of focusing of bistatic SAR data acquired in a translational-invariant bistatic configuration is studied by deriving the bistatic Point Target Reference spectrum and presenting an analytical solution for its stationary points.

  16. AXAF SIM focus mechanism study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tananbaum, H. D.; Whitbeck, E.

    1994-02-01

    The design requirements and initial design concept for the AXAF-I Science Instrument Module (SIM) were reviewed at Ball on September 29, 1993. The concept design SIM focus mechanism utilizes a planetary gearset, with redundant motors, to drive a large ring (called 'main housing bearing') via a spur gearset. This large drive ring actuates three tangent bar links (called 'push rods'), which in turn actuate three levers (called 'pin levers'). Each of the three pin levers rotates an 'eccentric pin,' which in turn moves the base of a bipod flexure in both the radial (normal to optical axis) and axial (focus along optical axis) directions. Three bipod flexures are employed, equally spaced at 120 degrees apart, the base of each being translated in the two directions as described above. A focus adjustment is made by rotating the drive ring, which drives the push rods and therefore the pin levers, which in turn rotate the eccentric pins, finally imparting the two motions to the base of each of the bipod flexures. The axial translation (focus adjustment) of the focused structure is the sum of the direct axial motion plus axial motion which comes from uniformly squeezing the three bipod bases radially inward. SAO documented the following concerns regarding the focus mechanism in memo WAP-FY94-001, dated October 7, 1993: (1) The focus adjustment depends, in large part, on the structural properties (stiffnesses and end fixities) of the bipod flexures, push rods, pin levers and eccentric pins. If these properties are not matched very well, then lateral translations as well as unwanted rotations of the focussed structure will accompany focus motion. In addition, the stackup of linkage tolerances and any nonuniform wear in the linkages will result in the same unwanted motions. Thermal gradients will also affect these motions. At the review Ball did not present supporting analyses to support their choice of this design concept. (2) The proposed 'primary' method of measuring focus

  17. Focus cues affect perceived depth

    PubMed Central

    Watt, Simon J.; Akeley, Kurt; Ernst, Marc O.; Banks, Martin S.

    2007-01-01

    Depth information from focus cues—accommodation and the gradient of retinal blur—is typically incorrect in three-dimensional (3-D) displays because the light comes from a planar display surface. If the visual system incorporates information from focus cues into its calculation of 3-D scene parameters, this could cause distortions in perceived depth even when the 2-D retinal images are geometrically correct. In Experiment 1 we measured the direct contribution of focus cues to perceived slant by varying independently the physical slant of the display surface and the slant of a simulated surface specified by binocular disparity (binocular viewing) or perspective/texture (monocular viewing). In the binocular condition, slant estimates were unaffected by display slant. In the monocular condition, display slant had a systematic effect on slant estimates. Estimates were consistent with a weighted average of slant from focus cues and slant from disparity/texture, where the cue weights are determined by the reliability of each cue. In Experiment 2, we examined whether focus cues also have an indirect effect on perceived slant via the distance estimate used in disparity scaling. We varied independently the simulated distance and the focal distance to a disparity-defined 3-D stimulus. Perceived slant was systematically affected by changes in focal distance. Accordingly, depth constancy (with respect to simulated distance) was significantly reduced when focal distance was held constant compared to when it varied appropriately with the simulated distance to the stimulus. The results of both experiments show that focus cues can contribute to estimates of 3-D scene parameters. Inappropriate focus cues in typical 3-D displays may therefore contribute to distortions in perceived space. PMID:16441189

  18. EDITORIAL: Focus on Gravitational Lensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Bhuvnesh

    2007-11-01

    progressed rapidly. That cosmic shear is now regarded as a key element of major missions aimed at probing dark energy is a feat of scientific persuasion—a decade ago not many believed it was realistic to even detect this tiny shear signal, let alone measure it with the percent-level accuracy needed to advance dark energy measurements. If weak lensing measurements deliver on their promise, then, in combination with other imaging and spectroscopic probes, they may well impact fundamental physics and cosmology. For example they may find evidence for an evolving dark energy component or signatures of departures from general relativity. These exciting prospects rest on new optical surveys planned for the next five years which will image a thousand square degrees or more of the sky to redshifts ~1 (compared to about a hundred square degrees imaged currently). Further, through photometric redshifts based on galaxy colors, lensing tomography methods will be applied to learn about the three-dimensional distribution of dark matter. Lensing measurements in other wavelengths, such as planned 21-cm surveys and CMB lensing, would add valuable diversity to measurement techniques. The case for the next generation optical surveys from the ground and space is compelling as well: they will produce another order of magnitude in data quantity and deliver images with minimal distortions due to the atmosphere and telescope optics. The coming decade therefore has the potential for exciting discoveries in gravitational lensing. Focus on Gravitational Lensing Contents A Bayesian approach to strong lensing modelling of galaxy clusters E Jullo, J-P Kneib, M Limousin, Á Elíasdóttir, P J Marshall and T Verdugo Probing dark energy with cluster counts and cosmic shear power spectra: including the full covariance Masahiro Takada and Sarah Bridle How robust are the constraints on cosmology and galaxy evolution from the lens-redshift test? Pedro R Capelo and Priyamvada Natarajan Dark energy constraints

  19. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    DOEpatents

    Botts, Thomas E.; Powell, James R.; Lenard, Roger

    1986-01-01

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting rgy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  20. Magnetically focused liquid drop radiator

    DOEpatents

    Botts, T.E.; Powell, J.R.; Lenard, R.

    1984-12-10

    A magnetically focused liquid drop radiator for application in rejecting energy from a spacecraft, characterized by a magnetizable liquid or slurry disposed in operative relationship within the liquid droplet generator and its fluid delivery system, in combination with magnetic means disposed in operative relationship around a liquid droplet collector of the LDR. The magnetic means are effective to focus streams of droplets directed from the generator toward the collector, thereby to assure that essentially all of the droplets are directed into the collector, even though some of the streams may be misdirected as they leave the generator. The magnetic focusing means is also effective to suppress splashing of liquid when the droplets impinge on the collector.

  1. Speeding chemical reactions by focusing.

    PubMed

    Lacasta, A M; Ramírez-Piscina, L; Sancho, J M; Lindenberg, K

    2013-04-14

    We present numerical results for a chemical reaction of colloidal particles which are transported by a laminar fluid and are focused by periodic obstacles in such a way that the two components are well mixed and consequently the chemical reaction is speeded up. The roles of the various system parameters (diffusion coefficients, reaction rate, and obstacles sizes) are studied. We show that focusing speeds up the reaction from the diffusion limited rate ∼t(-1/2) to very close to the perfect mixing rate, ∼t(-1).

  2. Speeding chemical reactions by focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lacasta, A. M.; Ramírez-Piscina, L.; Sancho, J. M.; Lindenberg, K.

    2013-04-01

    We present numerical results for a chemical reaction of colloidal particles which are transported by a laminar fluid and are focused by periodic obstacles in such a way that the two components are well mixed and consequently the chemical reaction is speeded up. The roles of the various system parameters (diffusion coefficients, reaction rate, and obstacles sizes) are studied. We show that focusing speeds up the reaction from the diffusion limited rate ˜t-1/2 to very close to the perfect mixing rate, ˜t-1.

  3. Theme: Focus on Vocabulary Skills.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jund, Suzanne, Ed.

    1979-01-01

    The eight articles in this journal issue focus on vocabulary skills. The topics covered are semantic feature analysis, the use of highway survival terms in a vocabulary list, making vocabulary interesting to secondary students, word lists, the use of newspapers in creating vocabulary lists, six strategies underlying effective vocabulary programs,…

  4. Organizing for Schooling. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This newsletter focuses on schoolwide approaches to issues of major concern to educators, from the perspective of providing equal education for all children. "Supporting School Improvement in Reading through Professional Development" (Rogelio Lopez del Bosque, Abelardo Villarreal) describes a professional development program that…

  5. How the Human Eye Focuses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koretz, Jane F.; Handelman, George H.

    1988-01-01

    Describes the decline in people's ability to focus their eyes as their age increases. Discusses probable causes of this effect including changes in the eye's geometry and biochemistry. Diagrammatically illustrates age related changes in the lens of the human eye. (CW)

  6. Where's the Focus on Racism?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canada, Benjamin O.

    1995-01-01

    America still refuses to deal with racism's effects on a child's character development. The "Focus on the Family" agenda must become part of the school's agenda, but it cannot be based on one religion's teachings, as Linda Page suggests ("A Conservative Christian View on Values," this issue). Public schools must teach the facts…

  7. Zoonotic Focus of Plague, Algeria

    PubMed Central

    Bitam, Idir; Baziz, Belkacem; Rolain, Jean-Marc; Belkaid, Miloud

    2006-01-01

    After an outbreak of human plague, 95 Xenopsylla cheopis fleas from Algeria were tested for Yersinia pestis with PCR methods. Nine fleas were definitively confirmed to be infected with Y. pestis biovar orientalis. Our results demonstrate the persistence of a zoonotic focus of Y. pestis in Algeria. PMID:17326957

  8. World History. Focus on Economics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Caldwell, Jean; Clark, James; Herscher, Walter

    This book opens with an exploration of the first economic revolution, which set the stage for the dramatic unfolding of the role economics has played in world history. The lessons focus on two topics: (1) why some economies grew and prospered while others remained stagnant or declined; and (2) what causes people to make choices that help or hinder…

  9. Math Fair: Focus on Fractions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mokashi, Neelima A.

    2009-01-01

    This article depicts the rewarding experience of creating mathematical environments for kindergarten and elementary students by focusing on one of the most important and often difficult-to-grasp concepts (fractions) through play methods incorporated into a math fair. The basic concept of a math fair is threefold: (1) to create preplanned,…

  10. Brief therapy: focused solution development.

    PubMed

    De Shazer, S; Berg, I K; Lipchik, E; Nunnally, E; Molnar, A; Gingerich, W; Weiner-Davis, M

    1986-06-01

    This article describes the form of brief therapy developed at the Brief Family Therapy Center. We have chosen a title similar to Weakland, Fisch, Watzlawick, and Bodin's classic paper, "Brief Therapy: Focused Problem Resolution" (20) to emphasize our view that there is a conceptual relationship and a developmental connection between the points of view expressed in the two papers.

  11. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, M.A.; Boyers, D.G.; Pincus, C.I.; Maccagno, P.

    1990-08-21

    Disclosed is an intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator. 8 figs.

  12. Focused X-ray source

    DOEpatents

    Piestrup, Melvin A.; Boyers, David G.; Pincus, Cary I.; Maccagno, Pierre

    1990-01-01

    An intense, relatively inexpensive X-ray source (as compared to a synchrotron emitter) for technological, scientific, and spectroscopic purposes. A conical radiation pattern produced by a single foil or stack of foils is focused by optics to increase the intensity of the radiation at a distance from the conical radiator.

  13. Technology for Education. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1998

    1998-01-01

    This theme issue includes five articles that focus on technology for education to benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Coca-Cola Valued Youth Program Students Meet Peers Via Video Conference" (Linda Cantu, Leticia Lopez-De La Garza) describes how at-risk…

  14. Staying in School. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on issues related to high Texas dropout rates among Hispanic and other minority group students and on dropout prevention strategies. "School Finance Inequities Mean Schools Are Not Ready To Teach" (Maria Robledo Montecel) deplores the recent Texas Supreme Court ruling that state educational funding is…

  15. Standards and Assessment. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This newsletter includes three articles, two of which focus on standards for student evaluation and for admission to higher education. "A Measuring Stick for Standards and TEKS: Meeting the Needs of Second Language Learners" (Laura Chris Green, Adela Solis) examines beliefs embodied in the notion of standards; defines content,…

  16. Evaluating Pragmatics-Focused Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crandall, Elizabeth; Basturkmen, Helen

    2004-01-01

    Learners often find the area of pragmatics (that is, using speech acts such as requesting, inviting, and complimenting) problematic. Teachers are urged to teach pragmatic aspects of language, and make use of authentic samples of spoken discourse to do so. However, information about the effectiveness of pragmatics-focused instruction of this nature…

  17. Law-Focused Education: Iowa.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    University of Northern Iowa, Cedar Falls. Malcolm Price Lab. School.

    This law-focused resource booklet is intended to help secondary level students learn about the civil law portion of Iowa's judicial system. The materials are designed to help students understand how to deal with conflict in a peaceful and orderly manner and how to cope with decision making in personal law situations as related to the family, the…

  18. Teaching and Learning. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1997

    1997-01-01

    This theme issue includes four articles that focus on teaching and learning strategies to benefit all students, including limited-English-proficient, minority, economically disadvantaged, and at-risk students. "Would You Read Me a Story?: In Search of Reading Strategies That Work for the Early Childhood Classroom" (Hilaria Bauer)…

  19. FOREWORD: Focus on Advanced Ceramics Focus on Advanced Ceramics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohashi, Naoki

    2011-06-01

    Much research has been devoted recently to developing technologies for renewable energy and improving the efficiency of the processes and devices used in industry and everyday life. Efficient solutions have been found using novel materials such as platinum and palladium-based catalysts for car exhaust systems, samarium-cobalt and neodymium-iron-boron permanent magnets for electrical motors, and so on. However, their realization has resulted in an increasing demand for rare elements and in their deficit, the development of new materials based on more abundant elements and new functionalities of traditional materials. Moreover, increasing environmental and health concerns demand substitution of toxic or hazardous substances with nature-friendly alternatives. In this context, this focus issue on advanced ceramics aims to review current trends in ceramics science and technology. It is related to the International Conference on Science and Technology of Advanced Ceramics (STAC) held annually to discuss the emerging issues in the field of ceramics. An important direction of ceramic science is the collaboration between experimental and theoretical sciences. Recent developments in density functional theory and computer technology have enabled the prediction of physical and chemical properties of ceramics, thereby assisting the design of new materials. Therefore, this focus issue includes articles devoted to theory and advanced characterization techniques. As mentioned above, the potential shortage of rare elements is becoming critical to the industry and has resulted in a Japanese government initiative called the 'Ubiquitous Element Strategy'. This focus issue also includes articles related to this strategy and to the associated topics of energy conversion, such as phosphors for high-efficiency lighting and photocatalysts for solar-energy harvesting. We hope that this focus issue will provide a timely overview of current trends and problems in ceramics science and

  20. Algorithms for Labeling Focus Regions.

    PubMed

    Fink, M; Haunert, Jan-Henrik; Schulz, A; Spoerhase, J; Wolff, A

    2012-12-01

    In this paper, we investigate the problem of labeling point sites in focus regions of maps or diagrams. This problem occurs, for example, when the user of a mapping service wants to see the names of restaurants or other POIs in a crowded downtown area but keep the overview over a larger area. Our approach is to place the labels at the boundary of the focus region and connect each site with its label by a linear connection, which is called a leader. In this way, we move labels from the focus region to the less valuable context region surrounding it. In order to make the leader layout well readable, we present algorithms that rule out crossings between leaders and optimize other characteristics such as total leader length and distance between labels. This yields a new variant of the boundary labeling problem, which has been studied in the literature. Other than in traditional boundary labeling, where leaders are usually schematized polylines, we focus on leaders that are either straight-line segments or Bezier curves. Further, we present algorithms that, given the sites, find a position of the focus region that optimizes the above characteristics. We also consider a variant of the problem where we have more sites than space for labels. In this situation, we assume that the sites are prioritized by the user. Alternatively, we take a new facility-location perspective which yields a clustering of the sites. We label one representative of each cluster. If the user wishes, we apply our approach to the sites within a cluster, giving details on demand.

  1. Detecting spatial regimes in ecosystems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Research on early warning indicators has generally focused on assessing temporal transitions with limited application of these methods to detecting spatial regimes. Traditional spatial boundary detection procedures that result in ecoregion maps are typically based on ecological ...

  2. EDITORIAL: Focus on terahertz plasmonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rahm, Marco; Nahata, Ajay; Akalin, Tahsin; Beruete, Miguel; Sorolla, Mario

    2015-10-01

    Plasmonics is one of the growing fields in modern photonics that has garnered increasing interest over the last few years. In this focus issue, the specific challenges concerning terahertz plasmonics have been addressed and most recent advances in this specific field have been highlighted. The articles demonstrate the diversity and the opportunities of this rich field by covering a variety of topics ranging from the propagation of surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) on artificially structures surfaces, 2D manipulation of surface plasmons and SPPs, plasmonic focusing, plasmonic high-Q resonators for sensing applications, plasmonically enhanced terahertz antennas to terahertz field manipulation by use of plasmonic structures. The articles substantiate the impact of plasmonics and its great innovative potential for terahertz technology. In memory of Professor Mario Sorolla Ayza.

  3. Editor's Comment on Focus Issues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberly, J. H.

    1998-01-01

    Focus Issues have been a key ingredient of Optics Express in the first six months, as every reader will have noticed. They are new to OSA journals, an innovation by Optics Express that was invented more or less out of thin air. I thought it would be useful to write a few paragraphs about them, since they are so new and still not familiar to most members of the optics community.

  4. Focusing, Sustaining, and Switching Attention

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-09-12

    scene analysis 16. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION OF: U a. REPORT u b. ABSTRACT u c. THIS PAGE u 17. LIMITATION OF ABSTRACT uu 18. NUMBER OF...humans can communicate in complex acoustic scenes , we must understand the dynamics of focusing, sustaining, and switching selective auditory ...many of whom deal with complex acoustic scenes full of competing sources (where selective auditory attention is challenging in the best of

  5. Focused Mission High Speed Combatant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2003-05-09

    hull types to determine which hull type best meets the requirements for the Focused Mission High Speed Combatant. The first step in the analysis...MAPC, uses parametric models and scaling to create high level designs of various hull types. The inputs are desired speed , range, payload, sea state...reached 10 SWATH vessels exhibit superior seakeeping at near zero speed compared to other hull forms 5 Assumes 2 equal-sized GE Gas Turbines 11

  6. Nozzles for Focusing Aerosol Particles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    control number. PLEASE DO NOT RETURN YOUR FORM TO THE ABOVE ADDRESS. 1. REPORT DATE ( DD -MM-YYYY) October 2009 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES...Figures Figure 1. The design of the first-generation aerodynamic focusing nozzle for aerosol particles used for SPFS and TAOS instrument prototypes...Some nozzles were fabricated in aluminum and some in steel. It has been used for SPFS and TAOS measurement technologies both in the laboratory and

  7. Physical Demands Study - Focus Groups

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-26

    BFV CAT FAASV FS3 GLPS HEl-T IOTV JAQ LLDR LRAS3 MK19 MOPMS MOS NCO SME TOW TRADOC USARIEM LIST OF ACRONYMS Armored Knight...Army Research Institute of Environmental Medicine v AKV APOBS BFV CAT FAASV FS3 GLPS HEl-T IOTV JAQ LLDR LRAS3 MK19 MOP MS MOS NCO...the Carrier Ammunition Track ( CAT ) task. Soldiers in the senior enlisted’ 138 focus group reported the most frequently performed tasks in training

  8. Focused electron beam in pyroelectric electron probe microanalyzer.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Susumu; Imanishi, Akira; Kawai, Jun

    2013-07-01

    We report a method to focus the electron beam generated using a pyroelectric crystal. An electron beam with a spot size of 100 μm was achieved by applying an electrical field to an electroconductive needle tip set on a pyroelectric crystal. When the focused electron beam bombarded a sample, characteristic X-rays of the sample were only detected due to the production of an electric field between the needle tip and the sample.

  9. Beam dynamics in the SLC final focus system

    SciTech Connect

    Bambade, P.S.

    1987-06-01

    The SLC luminosity is reached by colliding beams focused to about 2 ..mu..m transverse sizes. The Final Focus System (FFS) must enable, beyond its basic optical design, the detection and correction of errors accumulated in the system. In this paper, after summarizing the design, we review the sensitivity to such errors and the ability to correct them. The overall tuning strategy involves three phases: single beam spot minimization, steering the beams in collision and luminosity optimization with beam-beam effects.

  10. The quest for customer focus.

    PubMed

    Gulati, Ranjay; Oldroyd, James B

    2005-04-01

    Companies have poured enormous amounts of money into customer relationship management, but in many cases the investment hasn't really paid off. That's because getting closer to customers isn't about building an information technology system. It's a learning journey-one that unfolds over four stages, requiring people and business units to coordinate in progressively more sophisticated ways. The journey begins with the creation of a companywide repository containing each interaction a customer has with the company, organized not by product, purchase, or location, but by customer. Communal coordination is what's called for at this stage, as each group contributes its information to the data pool separately from the others and then taps into it as needed. In the second stage, one-way serial coordination from centralized IT through analytical units and out to the operating units allows companies to go beyond just assembling data to drawing inferences. In stage three, companies shift their focus from past relationships to future behavior. Through symbiotic coordination, information flows back and forth between central analytic units and various organizational units like marketing, sales, and operations, as together they seek answers to questions like "How can we prevent customers from switching to a competitor?" and "Who would be most likely to buy a new product in the future"? In stage four, firms begin to move past discrete, formal initiatives and, through integral coordination, bring an increasingly sophisticated understanding oftheir customers to bear in all day-to-day operations. Skipping stages denies organizations the sure foundation they need to build a lasting customer-focused mind-set. Those that recognize this will invest their customer relationship dollars much more wisely-and will see their customer-focusing efforts pay offon the bottom line.

  11. A focused bibliography on robotics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mergler, H. W.

    1983-08-01

    The present bibliography focuses on eight robotics-related topics believed by the author to be of special interest to researchers in the field of industrial electronics: robots, sensors, kinematics, dynamics, control systems, actuators, vision, economics, and robot applications. This literature search was conducted through the 1970-present COMPENDEX data base, which provides world-wide coverage of nearly 3500 journals, conference proceedings and reports, and the 1969-1981 INSPEC data base, which is the largest for the English language in the fields of physics, electrotechnology, computers, and control.

  12. Rotating apparatus for isoelectric focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, Milan (Inventor)

    1986-01-01

    This disclosure is directed to an isoelectric focusing apparatus, wherein stabilization of the fluid containing the isolated proteins is achieved by carrying out the separation in a rotating cylinder with the separation cavity of the cylinder being segmented by means of filter elements. The filter elements are constituted of a material offering some degree of resistance to fluid convection, but allowing relatively free and unhindered passage of current and transport of proteins. The combined effect of segmentation and rotation has been found to be superior to either segmentation or rotation alone in maintaining the stability of the migrated fractions.

  13. Multiperspective Focus+Context Visualization.

    PubMed

    Wu, Meng-Lin; Popescu, Voicu

    2016-05-01

    Occlusions are a severe bottleneck for the visualization of large and complex datasets. Conventional images only show dataset elements to which there is a direct line of sight, which significantly limits the information bandwidth of the visualization. Multiperspective visualization is a powerful approach for alleviating occlusions to show more than what is visible from a single viewpoint. However, constructing and rendering multiperspective visualizations is challenging. We present a framework for designing multiperspective focus+context visualizations with great flexibility by manipulating the underlying camera model. The focus region viewpoint is adapted to alleviate occlusions. The framework supports multiperspective visualization in three scenarios. In a first scenario, the viewpoint is altered independently for individual image regions to avoid occlusions. In a second scenario, conventional input images are connected into a multiperspective image. In a third scenario, one or several data subsets of interest (i.e., targets) are visualized where they would be seen in the absence of occluders, as the user navigates or the targets move. The multiperspective images are rendered at interactive rates, leveraging the camera model's fast projection operation. We demonstrate the framework on terrain, urban, and molecular biology geometric datasets, as well as on volume rendered density datasets.

  14. Future focus for professional development.

    PubMed

    Roberts, Nicole K; Coplit, Lisa D

    2013-01-01

    Professional development has evolved from individually focused sabbaticals and professional leaves to institutionally focused programs with an interest in developing faculty members' ability to teach in various environments as well as to succeed in the many endeavors they undertake. We address various issues related to professional development in the medical school arena. Professional development in medical school takes place in a context where faculty are stretched to engage in research and service not only for their own sake but also to financially support their institutions. This obligates professional developers to acknowledge and address the environments in which teaching faculty work, and to use approaches to professional development that honor the time and efforts of teaching faculty. These approaches may be brief interventions that make use of principles of education, and may include online offerings. Professional development will be most effective when professional developers acknowledge that most faculty members aspire to excellence in teaching, but they do so in an environment that pushes them to address competing concerns. Offering professional development opportunities that fit within the workplace environment, take little time, and build upon faculty's existing knowledge will assist in enhancing faculty success.

  15. Development of a Focusing DIRC

    SciTech Connect

    Benitez, J.; Bedajanek, I.; Leith, D.W.G.S.; Mazaheri, G.; Ratcliff, B.; Suzuki, K.; Schwiening, J.; Uher, J.; Va'vra, J.; /SLAC

    2006-12-12

    Benefiting from the recent introduction of new fast vacuum-based photon detectors with a transit time spread of {sigma}{sub TTS} {approx} 30-150 ps, we are developing a novel RICH detector capable of correcting the chromatic error through good time measurements; we believe that this is the first time such a technique has been demonstrated. We have built and successfully tested a particle identification detector called ''Focusing DIRC''. The concept of the prototype is based on the BaBar DIRC, with several important improvements: (a) much faster pixelated photon detectors based on Burle MCP-PMTs and Hamamatsu MaPMTs, (b) a focusing mirror which allows the photon detector to be smaller and less sensitive to background in future applications, (c) electronics allowing the measurement of single photon timing to better than {sigma} {approx} 100-200ps, which allows a correction of the chromatic error. The detector was tested in a SLAC 10GeV/c electron test beam. This detector concept could be used for particle identification at Super B-factory, ILC, GlueX, Panda, etc.

  16. Focus on the Rashba effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bihlmayer, G.; Rader, O.; Winkler, R.

    2015-05-01

    The Rashba effect, discovered in 1959, continues to supply fertile ground for fundamental research and applications. It provided the basis for the proposal of the spin transistor by Datta and Das in 1990, which has largely inspired the broad and dynamic field of spintronics. More recent developments include new materials for the Rashba effect such as metal surfaces, interfaces and bulk materials. It has also given rise to new phenomena such as spin currents and the spin Hall effect, including its quantized version, which has led to the very active field of topological insulators. The Rashba effect plays a crucial role in yet more exotic fields of physics such as the search for Majorana fermions at semiconductor-superconductor interfaces and the interaction of ultracold atomic Bose and Fermi gases. Advances in our understanding of Rashba-type spin-orbit couplings, both qualitatively and quantitatively, can be obtained in many different ways. This focus issue brings together the wide range of research activities on Rashba physics to further promote the development of our physical pictures and concepts in this field. The present Editorial gives a brief account on the history of the Rashba effect including material that was previously not easily accessible before summarizing the key results of the present focus issue as a guidance to the reader.

  17. The focusing DIRC: An innovative PID detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsato, M.; Arnaud, N.; Dey, B.; Nishimura, K.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Roberts, D.; Ratcliff, B.; Va'vra, J.; Varner, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    The FDIRC (Focusing Detector of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) is a new concept of PID (Particle IDentification) detector aimed at separating kaons from pions up to a few GeV/c. It is the successor of the BABAR DIRC and benefits from the knowledge accumulated with a first FDIRC prototype built and operated at SLAC. The FDIRC is intended to be used in an environment with a luminosity 100 times higher than for BABAR and Belle. Backgrounds will be higher as well; yet, the FDIRC has been designed to perform at least as well as the BABAR DIRC. The main improvement is a complete redesign of the photon camera, moving from a huge tank of ultra-pure water to much smaller focusing cameras with solid fused-silica optics. Furthermore, the detection chain will be 10 times faster than in BABAR to reject more background and to measure more accurately Cherenkov angles. This is achieved using H-8500 MaPMTs and a new front-end electronics (FEE) with significantly improved timing precision, higher hit rate capability, and small dead time. A full-scale FDIRC prototype covering 1/12th of the barrel azimuth is installed at SLAC and has just started recording cosmic-ray data. In this paper, we summarize the FDIRC design, present the status of the prototype test at SLAC and review the ongoing work to analyse the data.

  18. Targeted therapy using nanotechnology: focus on cancer

    PubMed Central

    Sanna, Vanna; Pala, Nicolino; Sechi, Mario

    2014-01-01

    Recent advances in nanotechnology and biotechnology have contributed to the development of engineered nanoscale materials as innovative prototypes to be used for biomedical applications and optimized therapy. Due to their unique features, including a large surface area, structural properties, and a long circulation time in blood compared with small molecules, a plethora of nanomaterials has been developed, with the potential to revolutionize the diagnosis and treatment of several diseases, in particular by improving the sensitivity and recognition ability of imaging contrast agents and by selectively directing bioactive agents to biological targets. Focusing on cancer, promising nanoprototypes have been designed to overcome the lack of specificity of conventional chemotherapeutic agents, as well as for early detection of precancerous and malignant lesions. However, several obstacles, including difficulty in achieving the optimal combination of physicochemical parameters for tumor targeting, evading particle clearance mechanisms, and controlling drug release, prevent the translation of nanomedicines into therapy. In spite of this, recent efforts have been focused on developing functionalized nanoparticles for delivery of therapeutic agents to specific molecular targets overexpressed on different cancer cells. In particular, the combination of targeted and controlled-release polymer nanotechnologies has resulted in a new programmable nanotherapeutic formulation of docetaxel, namely BIND-014, which recently entered Phase II clinical testing for patients with solid tumors. BIND-014 has been developed to overcome the limitations facing delivery of nanoparticles to many neoplasms, and represents a validated example of targeted nanosystems with the optimal biophysicochemical properties needed for successful tumor eradication. PMID:24531078

  19. Enhancement of focusing properties by interfering spatial bending beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Hui; Xu, Yongzheng; Qu, Yu; Zhang, Bin; Wang, Li; Zhang, Zhongyue

    2016-12-01

    In this study, two slits were designed symmetrically on a metal film to excite surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs), and two groups of parallel dielectric rectangles were designed over a metal film to convert the SPPs into double mirror-symmetric spatial bending beams. The high-energy far-field focused beams were achieved by interfering double mirror-symmetric spatial bending beams using the finite-element method The focusing properties of the proposed structure are enhanced compared with the conventional metal grating structures. Furthermore, the effects of the structural parameters on the focusing properties were investigated Results show that the focusing properties of the proposed structure rely on the structural parameters of dielectric rectangles and on the distance between the dielectric rectangles and the metal film. The position of the focusing spot relies on the distance between two slits. These findings can be applied in the fields of biology imaging, nanolithography, optical data storage and photo-biomedical detection.

  20. Focusing X-Ray Telescopes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Dell, Stephen; Brissenden, Roger; Davis, William; Elsner, Ronald; Elvis, Martin; Freeman, Mark; Gaetz, Terrance; Gorenstein, Paul; Gubarev, Mikhall; Jerlus, Diab; Juda, Michael; Kolodziejczak, Jeffrey; Murray, Stephen; Petre, Robert; Podgorski, William; Ramsey, Brian; Reid, Paul; Saha, Timo; Wolk, Scott; Troller-McKinstry, Susan; Weisskopf, Martin; Wilke, Rudeger; Zhang, William

    2010-01-01

    During the half-century history of x-ray astronomy, focusing x-ray telescopes, through increased effective area and finer angular resolution, have improved sensitivity by 8 orders of magnitude. Here, we review previous and current x-ray-telescope missions. Next, we describe the planned next-generation x-ray-astronomy facility, the International X-ray Observatory (IXO). We conclude with an overview of a concept for the next next-generation facility, Generation X. Its scientific objectives will require very large areas (about 10,000 sq m) of highly-nested, lightweight grazing-incidence mirrors, with exceptional (about 0.1-arcsec) resolution. Achieving this angular resolution with lightweight mirrors will likely require on-orbit adjustment of alignment and figure.

  1. Clustering instability of focused swimmers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lauga, Eric; Nadal, Francois

    2016-12-01

    One of the hallmarks of active matter is its rich nonlinear dynamics and instabilities. Recent numerical simulations of phototactic algae showed that a thin jet of swimmers, obtained from hydrodynamic focusing inside a Poiseuille flow, was unstable to longitudinal perturbations with swimmers dynamically clustering (Jibuti L. et al., Phys. Rev. E, 90, (2014) 063019). As a simple starting point to understand these instabilities, we consider in this paper an initially homogeneous one-dimensional line of aligned swimmers moving along the same direction, and characterise its instability using both a continuum framework and a discrete approach. In both cases, we show that hydrodynamic interactions between the swimmers lead to instabilities in density for which we compute the growth rate analytically. Lines of pusher-type swimmers are predicted to remain stable while lines of pullers (such as flagellated algae) are predicted to always be unstable.

  2. Hormone Purification by Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1985-01-01

    Various ground-based research approaches are being applied to a more definitive evaluation of the natures and degrees of electroosmosis effects on the separation capabilities of the Isoelectric Focusing (IEF) process. A primary instrumental system for this work involves rotationally stabilized, horizontal electrophoretic columns specially adapted for the IEF process. Representative adaptations include segmentation, baffles/screens, and surface coatings. Comparative performance and development testing are pursued against the type of column or cell established as an engineering model. Previously developed computer simulation capabilities are used to predict low-gravity behavior patterns and performance for IEF apparatus geometries of direct project interest. Three existing mathematical models plus potential new routines for particular aspects of simulating instrument fluid patterns with varied wall electroosmosis influences are being exercised.

  3. Controllable Planar Optical Focusing System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Arbabi, Amir (Inventor); Faraon, Andrei (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    An optical device has a first metasurface disposed over a substrate. A high-contrast pattern of the first metasurface is operable for modifying, over a first phase profile, a phase front of an incident light beam. A second metasurface, is disposed over a plane parallel to the first metasurface with a second high-contrast pattern and operable for shaping, over a second phase profile, the modified phase front of the incident light beam into a converging spherical phase front. A spacer layer, in which the modified phase front of the incident light beam diffracts, is disposed in a controllably changeable separation between the first and second metasurfaces. Controllably changing the separation between the first and the second metasurfaces by a first distance correspondingly changes the position of the focus point of the converging spherical phase front by a second distance significantly greater than the first distance.

  4. Rotating Apparatus for Isoelectric Focusing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bier, M.

    1986-01-01

    Remixing of separated fractions prevented. Improved isoelectric focusing apparatus helps to prevent electro-osmosis and convection, both of which cause remixing of separated fractions. Fractionating column segmented and rotated about horizontal axis: Only combined effects of both features fully effective in making good separations. Improved apparatus slowly rotated continuously or rocked (at rotational amplitude of at least 180 degrees) about its horizontal axis so average gravitational vector experienced by fluid is zero and convection is therefore suppressed. Electro-osmosis suppressed and convection further suppressed by separating column into disklike compartments along its length with filters. Experiments have shown dimensions of apparatus not critical. Typical compartment and column volumes are 2 and 40 ml, respectively. Rotation speeds lie between 3 and 30 rpm.

  5. Random focusing of tsunami waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Degueldre, Henri; Metzger, Jakob J.; Geisel, Theo; Fleischmann, Ragnar

    2016-03-01

    Tsunamis exhibit surprisingly strong height fluctuations. An in-depth understanding of the mechanisms that lead to these variations in wave height is a prerequisite for reliable tsunami forecasting. It is known, for example, that the presence of large underwater islands or the shape of the tsunami source can affect the wave heights. Here we show that the consecutive effect of even tiny fluctuations in the profile of the ocean floor (the bathymetry) can cause unexpectedly strong fluctuations in the wave height of tsunamis, with maxima several times higher than the average wave height. A novel approach combining stochastic caustic theory and shallow water wave dynamics allows us to determine the typical propagation distance at which the strongly focused waves appear. We demonstrate that owing to this mechanism the small errors present in bathymetry measurements can lead to drastic variations in predicted tsunami heights. Our results show that a precise knowledge of the ocean's bathymetry is absolutely indispensable for reliable tsunami forecasts.

  6. Non-focusing active warhead

    DOEpatents

    Hornig, Howard C.

    1998-01-01

    A non-nuclear, non-focusing, active warhead that comprises a high explosive charge contained within a casing of reactive metal. When the high explosive is detonated, the reactive metal is dispersed and reacts with the air, which significantly increases the explosive yield of the warhead. The active warhead produces therefore much higher blast effects with significantly reduced weight compared to conventional munitions. The warhead is highly effective against such targets as aircraft which typically have thin fuselages, for example. The explosiveness of this warhead can be enhanced further by elevating the temperature and therefore the reactivity of the reactive metal before or during the explosion. New methods of enhancing the reactivity of the metal are also taught.

  7. Non-focusing active warhead

    DOEpatents

    Hornig, H.C.

    1998-12-22

    A non-nuclear, non-focusing, active warhead that comprises a high explosive charge contained within a casing of reactive metal is disclosed. When the high explosive is detonated, the reactive metal is dispersed and reacts with the air, which significantly increases the explosive yield of the warhead. The active warhead produces therefore much higher blast effects with significantly reduced weight compared to conventional munitions. The warhead is highly effective against such targets as aircraft which typically have thin fuselages, for example. The explosiveness of this warhead can be enhanced further by elevating the temperature and therefore the reactivity of the reactive metal before or during the explosion. New methods of enhancing the reactivity of the metal are also taught. 4 figs.

  8. Focus on integrated quantum optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Jeremy; Patton, Brian; Sasaki, Masahide; Vučković, Jelena

    2013-03-01

    A key goal of research into quantum information processing is the development of technologies that are scaleable in complexity while allowing the mass manufacture of devices that promise transformative effects on information science. The demonstration that integrated photonics circuits could be made to perform operations that exploit the quantum nature of the photon has turned them into leading candidates for practical quantum information processing technologies. To fully achieve their promise, however, requires research from diverse fields. This focus issue provides a snapshot of some of the areas in which key advances have been made. We are grateful for the contributions from leading teams based around the globe and hope that the degree of progress being made in a challenging and exciting field is apparent from the papers published here.

  9. Focus on Nivolumab in NSCLC

    PubMed Central

    Cortinovis, Diego L.; Canova, Stefania; Abbate, Marida; Colonese, Francesca; Bidoli, Paolo

    2016-01-01

    Immunotherapy is changing the treatment of non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). The PD-1 inhibitor nivolumab has demonstrated meaningful results in terms of efficacy with a good safety profile. The novel approach to treating NSCLC using immunotherapy still has unsolved questions and challenging issues. The main doubts regarding the optimal selection of the patient are the role of this drug in first line of treatment, the individualization of the correct methodology of radiologic assessment and efficacy analysis, the best management of immune-mediated adverse events, and how to overcome the immunoresistance. The aim of this review is to analyze literature data on nivolumab in lung cancer with a focus on critical aspects related to the drug in terms of safety, the use in clinical practice, and possible placement in the treatment algorithm. PMID:28018902

  10. Applications of isoelectric focusing in forensic serology.

    PubMed

    Murch, R S; Budowle, B

    1986-07-01

    The typing of certain polymorphic proteins present in human body fluids is an important aspect of the analysis of serological evidence. This is particularly true when dealing with evidence related to violent criminal activity such as homocide, assault, or rape. Until recently, the routine analysis of the genetic polymorphisms of interest relied upon conventional electrophoretic techniques such as horizontal starch or agarose slab gel or both, cellulose acetate, and vertical polyacrylamide gradient gel methods. These techniques adequately separate a limited number of common variants. In some cases, these methods are still those of choice. However, as a result of the nature of the conventional approach, problems with time required for analysis, resolution, diffusion of bands, sensitivity of protein detection, and cost are often encountered. Isoelectric focusing (IEF) offers an effective alternative to conventional electrophoresis for genetic marker typing. This method exploits the isoelectric point of allelic products rather than charge-to-mass ratio in a particular pH environment. The advantages of employing IEF include: reduction of time of analysis, increased resolution of protein bands, the possibility of subtyping existing phenotypes, increased sensitivity of detection, the counteraction of diffusion effects, and reduced cost per sample.

  11. EDITORIAL: Focus on Cloud Physics FOCUS ON CLOUD PHYSICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Falkovich, Gregory; Malinowski, Szymon P.

    2008-07-01

    Cloud physics has for a long time been an important segment of atmospheric science. It is common knowledge that clouds are crucial for our understanding of weather and climate. Clouds are also interesting by themselves (not to mention that they are beautiful). Complexity is hidden behind the common picture of these beautiful and interesting objects. The typical school textbook definition that a cloud is 'a set of droplets or particles suspended in the atmosphere' is not adequate. Clouds are complicated phenomena in which dynamics, turbulence, microphysics, thermodynamics and radiative transfer interact on a wide range of scales, from sub-micron to kilometres. Some of these interactions are subtle and others are more straightforward. Large and small-scale motions lead to activation of cloud condensation nuclei, condensational growth and collisions; small changes in composition and concentration of atmospheric aerosol lead to significant differences in radiative properties of the clouds and influence rainfall formation. It is justified to look at a cloud as a composite, nonlinear system which involves many interactions and feedback. This system is actively linked into a web of atmospheric, oceanic and even cosmic interactions. Due to the complexity of the cloud system, present-day descriptions of clouds suffer from simplifications, inadequate parameterizations, and omissions. Sometimes the most fundamental physics hidden behind these simplifications and parameterizations is not known, and a wide scope of view can sometimes prevent a 'microscopic', deep insight into the detail. Only the expertise offered by scientists focused on particular elementary processes involved in this complicated pattern of interactions allows us to shape elements of the puzzle from which a general picture of clouds can be created. To be useful, every element of the puzzle must be shaped precisely. This often creates problems in communication between the sciences responsible for shaping

  12. Focus on quantum Einstein gravity Focus on quantum Einstein gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ambjorn, Jan; Reuter, Martin; Saueressig, Frank

    2012-09-01

    The gravitational asymptotic safety program summarizes the attempts to construct a consistent and predictive quantum theory of gravity within Wilson's generalized framework of renormalization. Its key ingredient is a non-Gaussian fixed point of the renormalization group flow which controls the behavior of the theory at trans-Planckian energies and renders gravity safe from unphysical divergences. Provided that the fixed point comes with a finite number of ultraviolet-attractive (relevant) directions, this construction gives rise to a consistent quantum field theory which is as predictive as an ordinary, perturbatively renormalizable one. This opens up the exciting possibility of establishing quantum Einstein gravity as a fundamental theory of gravity, without introducing supersymmetry or extra dimensions, and solely based on quantization techniques that are known to work well for the other fundamental forces of nature. While the idea of gravity being asymptotically safe was proposed by Steven Weinberg more than 30 years ago [1], the technical tools for investigating this scenario only emerged during the last decade. Here a key role is played by the exact functional renormalization group equation for gravity, which allows the construction of non-perturbative approximate solutions for the RG-flow of the gravitational couplings. Most remarkably, all solutions constructed to date exhibit a suitable non-Gaussian fixed point, lending strong support to the asymptotic safety conjecture. Moreover, the functional renormalization group also provides indications that the central idea of a non-Gaussian fixed point providing a safe ultraviolet completion also carries over to more realistic scenarios where gravity is coupled to a suitable matter sector like the standard model. These theoretical successes also triggered a wealth of studies focusing on the consequences of asymptotic safety in a wide range of phenomenological applications covering the physics of black holes, early

  13. Knowledge focus via software agents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Henager, Donald E.

    2001-09-01

    The essence of military Command and Control (C2) is making knowledge intensive decisions in a limited amount of time using uncertain, incorrect, or outdated information. It is essential to provide tools to decision-makers that provide: * Management of friendly forces by treating the "friendly resources as a system". * Rapid assessment of effects of military actions againt the "enemy as a system". * Assessment of how an enemy should, can, and could react to friendly military activities. Software agents in the form of mission agents, target agents, maintenance agents, and logistics agents can meet this information challenge. The role of each agent is to know all the details about its assigned mission, target, maintenance, or logistics entity. The Mission Agent would fight for mission resources based on the mission priority and analyze the effect that a proposed mission's results would have on the enemy. The Target Agent (TA) communicates with other targets to determine its role in the system of targets. A system of TAs would be able to inform a planner or analyst of the status of a system of targets, the effect of that status, adn the effect of attacks on that system. The system of TAs would also be able to analyze possible enemy reactions to attack by determining ways to minimize the effect of attack, such as rerouting traffic or using deception. The Maintenance Agent would scheudle maintenance events and notify the maintenance unit. The Logistics Agent would manage shipment and delivery of supplies to maintain appropriate levels of weapons, fuel and spare parts. The central idea underlying this case of software agents is knowledge focus. Software agents are createad automatically to focus their attention on individual real-world entities (e.g., missions, targets) and view the world from that entities perspective. The agent autonomously monitors the entity, identifies problems/opportunities, formulates solutions, and informs the decision-maker. The agent must be

  14. Parent Leadership and Family Involvement (Special Focus).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wolf, Kathy Goetz, Ed.; Lalley, Jacqueline, Ed.

    1999-01-01

    This "Special Focus" issue of "America's Family Support Magazine," focuses on parent leadership and family involvement. Articles pertaining to this focus include: (1) "Forging Equal Partnerships" (Ahsan); (2) "Who Best Represents the Voice of Parents?" (Foster); (3) "Parent Leadership Training…

  15. Focused Ultrasound Surgery for Uterine Fibroids

    MedlinePlus

    Focused ultrasound surgery for uterine fibroids Overview By Mayo Clinic Staff Focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) is a noninvasive treatment option for ... whether you're a good candidate for focused ultrasound surgery, your doctor may perform a pelvic magnetic ...

  16. Multiple focused EMAT designs for improved surface breaking defect characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thring, C. B.; Fan, Y.; Edwards, R. S.

    2017-02-01

    Ultrasonic Rayleigh waves can be employed for the detection of surface breaking defects such as rolling contact fatigue and stress corrosion cracking. Electromagnetic Acoustic Transducers (EMATs) are well suited to this technique as they can directly generate Rayleigh waves within the sample without the requirement for wedges, and they are robust and inexpensive compared to laser ultrasonics. Three different EMAT coil types have been developed, and these are compared to assess their ability to detect and characterize small (down to 0.5 mm depth, 1 mm diameter) surface breaking defects in aluminium. These designs are: a pair of linear meander coils used in a pseudo-pulse-echo mode, a pair of focused meander coils also used in pseudo-pulse-echo mode, and a pair of focused racetrack coils used in pitch-catch mode. The linear meander coils are able to detect most of the defects tested, but have a much lower signal to noise ratio and give limited sizing information. The focused meander coils and the focused racetrack coils can detect all defects tested, but have the advantage that they can also characterize the defect sizes on the sample surface, and have a stronger sensitivity at their focal point. Measurements using all three EMAT designs are presented and compared for high resolution imaging of surface-breaking defects.

  17. Focus issue introduction: nonlinear photonics.

    PubMed

    Akhmediev, Nail; Rottwitt, Karsten

    2012-11-19

    It is now 23 years since the first Topical Meeting "Nonlinear Guided Wave Phenomena" (Houston, TX, February 2-4, 1989) has been organised by George Stegeman and Allan Boardman with support of the Optical Society of America. These series of the OSA conferences known as NLGW, continued under the name "Nonlinear Photonics" starting from 2007. The latest one, in Colorado Springs in June 17-21, 2012 has been a great success despite the fierce fires advancing around the city at the time of the conference. This Focus issue is a collection of several papers presented at the conference with extended content submitted to Optics Express. Although this collection is small in comparison to the total number of papers presented at the conference, it gives a flavor of the topics considered at the meeting. It is also worthy to mention here that the next meeting "Nonlinear Photonics" is planned to be held in Barcelona - one of the main European centers on this subject.

  18. Findings: LANL outsourcing focus groups

    SciTech Connect

    Jannotta, M.J.; McCabe, V.B.

    1996-12-31

    In March 1996, a series of 24 3-hour dialog focus groups were held with randomly selected Laboratory employees and contractors to gain their perceptions regarding potentials and problems for privatization and consolidation. A secondary goal was to educate and inform the workforce about potentials and issues in privatization and consolidation. Two hundred and thirty-six participants engaged in a learning session and structured input exercises resulting in 2,768 usable comments. Comments were categorized using standard qualitative methods; resulting categories included positive and negative comments on four models (consolidation, spin offs, outsourcing, and corporate partnering) and implications for the workforce, the Laboratory, and the local economy. Categories were in the areas of increasing/decreasing jobs, expertise, opportunity/salary/benefits, quality/efficiency, and effect on the local area and economy. An additional concern was losing Laboratory culture and history. Data were gathered and categorized on employee opinion regarding elements of successful transition to the four models, and issues emerged in the areas of terms and conditions of employment; communication; involvement; sound business planning; ethics and fairness; community infrastructure. From the aggregated opinion of the participants, it is recommended that decision-makers: Plan using sound business principles and continually communicate plans to the workforce; Respect workforce investments in the Laboratory; Tell the workforce exactly what is going on at all times; Understand that economic growth in Northern New Mexico is not universally viewed as positive; and Establish dialog with stakeholders on growth issues.

  19. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents <;A article="1367-2630/5/1/117">Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau

  20. EDITORIAL: Focus on Carbon Nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2003-09-01

    The study of carbon nanotubes, since their discovery by Iijima in 1991, has become a full research field with significant contributions from all areas of research in solid-state and molecular physics and also from chemistry. This Focus Issue in New Journal of Physics reflects this active research, and presents articles detailing significant advances in the production of carbon nanotubes, the study of their mechanical and vibrational properties, electronic properties and optical transitions, and electrical and transport properties. Fundamental research, both theoretical and experimental, represents part of this progress. The potential applications of nanotubes will rely on the progress made in understanding their fundamental physics and chemistry, as presented here. We believe this Focus Issue will be an excellent guide for both beginners and experts in the research field of carbon nanotubes. It has been a great pleasure to edit the many excellent contributions from Europe, Japan, and the US, as well from a number of other countries, and to witness the remarkable effort put into the manuscripts by the contributors. We thank all the authors and referees involved in the process. In particular, we would like to express our gratitude to Alexander Bradshaw, who invited us put together this Focus Issue, and to Tim Smith and the New Journal of Physics staff for their extremely efficient handling of the manuscripts. Focus on Carbon Nanotubes Contents Transport theory of carbon nanotube Y junctions R Egger, B Trauzettel, S Chen and F Siano The tubular conical helix of graphitic boron nitride F F Xu, Y Bando and D Golberg Formation pathways for single-wall carbon nanotube multiterminal junctions Inna Ponomareva, Leonid A Chernozatonskii, Antonis N Andriotis and Madhu Menon Synthesis and manipulation of carbon nanotubes J W Seo, E Couteau, P Umek, K Hernadi, P Marcoux, B Lukic, Cs Mikó, M Milas, R Gaál and L Forró Transitional behaviour in the transformation from active end

  1. SIAM Workshop: Focus on Diversity

    SciTech Connect

    2000-07-12

    The Fourth SlAM Graduate Student Focus on Diversity workshop was held on July 12, 2000 at the Westin Rio Mar Hotel in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico. The Department of Energy provided partial support for this event. The day-long workshop consisted of several different activities. The meeting opened with a discussion of some data collected by the American Mathematical Society on Ph.D.'s awarded in the U.S. to citizens and non-citizens, further classified as blacks, latinos, asians and native americans. The activity continued with nine technical talks by underrepresented minority graduate students, informal luncheon and pizza breaks to foster social interaction, and an evening forum chaired by Dr. Richard Tapia (Rice University) in which issues related to the participation of minorities in national meetings and proposal writing where discussed. These sessions were open to the entire SIAM community and served to highlight the progress, achievements, and aspirations of the workshop participants. The students attended as well the three SlAM plenary talks during the day and the community lecture in the evening. The activity had a lively participation of students and representatives from various academic institutions and sponsoring agencies. In particular, we had the participation of 24 undergraduate students from the Mathematics REU program of the University of Puerto Rico at Humacao.

  2. Patient satisfaction: focusing on "excellent".

    PubMed

    Otani, Koichiro; Waterman, Brian; Faulkner, Kelly M; Boslaugh, Sarah; Burroughs, Thomas E; Dunagan, W Claiborne

    2009-01-01

    In an emerging competitive market such as healthcare, managers should focus on achieving excellent ratings to distinguish their organization from others. When it comes to customer loyalty, "excellent" has a different meaning. Customers who are merely satisfied often do not come back. The purpose of this study was to find out what influences adult patients to rate their overall experience as "excellent." The study used patient satisfaction data collected from one major academic hospital and four community hospitals. After conducting a multiple logistic regression analysis, certain attributes were shown to be more likely than others to influence patients to rate their experiences as excellent. The study revealed that staff care is the most influential attribute, followed by nursing care. These two attributes are distinctively stronger drivers of overall satisfaction than are the other attributes studied (i.e., physician care, admission process, room, and food). Staff care and nursing care are under the control of healthcare managers. If improvements are needed, they can be accomplished through training programs such as total quality management or continuous quality improvement, through which staff employees and nurses learn to be sensitive to patients' needs. Satisfying patients' needs is the first step toward having loyal patients, so hospitals that strive to ensure their patients are completely satisfied are more likely to prosper.

  3. In vivo acoustic and photoacoustic focusing of circulating cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Viegas, Mark G.; Malinsky, Taras I.; Melerzanov, Alexander V.; Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-03-01

    In vivo flow cytometry using vessels as natural tubes with native cell flows has revolutionized the study of rare circulating tumor cells in a complex blood background. However, the presence of many blood cells in the detection volume makes it difficult to count each cell in this volume. We introduce method for manipulation of circulating cells in vivo with the use of gradient acoustic forces induced by ultrasound and photoacoustic waves. In a murine model, we demonstrated cell trapping, redirecting and focusing in blood and lymph flow into a tight stream, noninvasive wall-free transportation of blood, and the potential for photoacoustic detection of sickle cells without labeling and of leukocytes targeted by functionalized nanoparticles. Integration of cell focusing with intravital imaging methods may provide a versatile biological tool for single-cell analysis in circulation, with a focus on in vivo needleless blood tests, and preclinical studies of human diseases in animal models.

  4. In vivo acoustic and photoacoustic focusing of circulating cells

    PubMed Central

    Galanzha, Ekaterina I.; Viegas, Mark G.; Malinsky, Taras I.; Melerzanov, Alexander V.; Juratli, Mazen A.; Sarimollaoglu, Mustafa; Nedosekin, Dmitry A.; Zharov, Vladimir P.

    2016-01-01

    In vivo flow cytometry using vessels as natural tubes with native cell flows has revolutionized the study of rare circulating tumor cells in a complex blood background. However, the presence of many blood cells in the detection volume makes it difficult to count each cell in this volume. We introduce method for manipulation of circulating cells in vivo with the use of gradient acoustic forces induced by ultrasound and photoacoustic waves. In a murine model, we demonstrated cell trapping, redirecting and focusing in blood and lymph flow into a tight stream, noninvasive wall-free transportation of blood, and the potential for photoacoustic detection of sickle cells without labeling and of leukocytes targeted by functionalized nanoparticles. Integration of cell focusing with intravital imaging methods may provide a versatile biological tool for single-cell analysis in circulation, with a focus on in vivo needleless blood tests, and preclinical studies of human diseases in animal models. PMID:26979811

  5. Aerosol beam-focus laser-induced plasma spectrometer device

    DOEpatents

    Cheng, Meng-Dawn

    2002-01-01

    An apparatus for detecting elements in an aerosol includes an aerosol beam focuser for concentrating aerosol into an aerosol beam; a laser for directing a laser beam into the aerosol beam to form a plasma; a detection device that detects a wavelength of a light emission caused by the formation of the plasma. The detection device can be a spectrometer having at least one grating and a gated intensified charge-coupled device. The apparatus may also include a processor that correlates the wavelength of the light emission caused by the formation of the plasma with an identity of an element that corresponds to the wavelength. Furthermore, the apparatus can also include an aerosol generator for forming an aerosol beam from bulk materials. A method for detecting elements in an aerosol is also disclosed.

  6. Molecular collisions coming into focus.

    PubMed

    Onvlee, Jolijn; Vogels, Sjoerd N; von Zastrow, Alexander; Parker, David H; van de Meerakker, Sebastiaan Y T

    2014-08-14

    The Stark deceleration method exploits the concepts of charged particle accelerator physics to produce beams of neutral polar molecules with an almost perfect quantum state purity, a tunable velocity and a narrow velocity distribution. These monochromatic molecular beams offer interesting perspectives for precise studies of molecular scattering processes, in particular when used in conjunction with state-of-the-art laser-based detection techniques such as velocity map imaging. Here, we describe crossed beam scattering experiments in which the Stark deceleration method is combined with the velocity map imaging technique. The narrow velocity spread of Stark-decelerated molecular beams results in scattering images with unprecedented velocity and angular resolution. We demonstrate this by resolving quantum diffraction oscillations in state-to-state inelastic differential scattering cross sections for collisions between NO radicals and rare gas atoms. We describe the future prospects of this "best-of-two-worlds" combination, ranging from scattering studies at low collision energies to bimolecular scattering using two decelerators, and discuss the challenges that lie ahead to achieve these goals.

  7. Focusing on Cause or Cure?

    PubMed Central

    Milner, Lauren C.; Cho, Mildred K.

    2013-01-01

    Background Biomedical research is influenced by many factors, including the involvement of stakeholder groups invested in research outcomes. Stakeholder involvement in research efforts raise questions of justice as their specific interests and motivations play a role in directing research resources that ultimately produce knowledge shaping how different conditions (and affected individuals) are understood and treated by society. This issue is highly relevant to child psychiatry research where diagnostic criteria and treatment strategies are often controversial. Biological similarities and stakeholder differences between attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorder (ASD) provide an opportunity to explore this issue by comparing research foci and stakeholder involvement in these conditions. Methods A subset of ADHD and ASD research articles published between 1970-2010 were randomly selected from the PubMed database and coded for research focus, funding source(s), and author-reported conflicts of interest (COIs). Chi-square analyses were performed to identify differences between and within ADHD and ASD research across time. Results The proportion of ADHD research dedicated to basic, description, and treatment research was roughly similar and remained stable over time, while ASD research showed a significant increase in basic research over the past decade. Government was the primary research funder for both conditions, but for-profit funders were a notable presence in ADHD research, while joint-funding efforts between non-profit and government funders were a notable presence in ASD research. Lastly, COIs were noted more frequently in ADHD than in ASD research. Conclusions Our study shows significant differences in research foci and funding sources between the conditions, and identifies the specific involvement of for-profit and non-profit groups in ADHD and ASD, respectively. Our findings highlight the relationship between stakeholders

  8. Fredholm's equations for subwavelength focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velázquez-Arcos, J. M.

    2012-10-01

    Subwavelength focusing (SF) is a very useful tool that can be carried out with the use of left hand materials for optics that involve the range of the microwaves. Many recent works have described a successful alternative procedure using time reversal methods. The advantage is that we do not need devices which require the complicated manufacture of left-hand materials; nevertheless, the theoretical mathematical bases are far from complete because before now we lacked an adequate easy-to-apply frame. In this work we give, for a broad class of discrete systems, a solid support for the theory of electromagnetic SF that can be applied to communications and nanotechnology. The very central procedure is the development of vector-matrix formalism (VMF) based on exploiting both the inhomogeneous and homogeneous Fredholm's integral equations in cases where the last two kinds of integral equations are applied to some selected discrete systems. To this end, we first establish a generalized Newmann series for the Fourier transform of the Green's function in the inhomogeneous Fredholm's equation of the problem. Then we go from an integral operator equation to a vector-matrix algebraic one. In this way we explore the inhomogeneous case and later on also the very interesting one about the homogeneous equation. Thus, on the one hand we can relate in a simple manner the arriving electromagnetic signals with those at their sources and we can use them to perform a SF. On the other hand, we analyze the homogeneous version of the equations, finding resonant solutions that have analogous properties to their counterparts in quantum mechanical scattering, that can be used in a proposed very powerful way in communications. Also we recover quantum mechanical operator relations that are identical for classical electromagnetics. Finally, we prove two theorems that formalize the relation between the theory of Fredholm's integral equations and the VMF we present here.

  9. EDITORIAL: Focus on Molecular Electronics FOCUS ON MOLECULAR ELECTRONICS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scheer, Elke; Reineker, Peter

    2008-06-01

    The notion 'molecular electronics' has been used more frequently since the 1970s and summarizes a series of physical phenomena and ideas for their application in connection with organic molecules, oligomers, polymers, organic aggregates and solids. The properties studied in this field were connected to optical and electrical phenomena, such as optical absorption, fluorescence, nonlinear optics, energy transport, charge transfer, electrical conductance, and electron and nuclear spin-resonance. The final goal was and is to build devices which can compete or surpass some aspects of inorganic semiconductor devices. For example, on the basis of organic molecules there exist rectifiers, transistors, molecular wires, organic light emitting diodes, elements for photovoltaics, and displays. With respect to applications, one aspect of the organic materials is their broad variability and the lower effort and costs for their processability. The step from microstructures to the investigation of nanostructures is a big challenge also in this field and has lead to what nowadays is called molecular electronics in its narrow sense. In this field the subjects of the studies are often single molecules, e.g. single molecule optical spectroscopy, electrical conductance, i.e. charge transport through a single molecule, the influence of vibrational degrees of freedom, etc. A challenge here is to provide the techniques for addressing in a reproducible way the molecular scale. In another approach small molecular ensembles are studied in order to avoid artefacts from particular contact situations. The recent development of the field is presented in [1-8]. In this Focus Issue we present new results in the field of 'molecular electronics', both in its broad and specialized sense. One of the basic questions is the distribution of the energy levels responsible for optical absorption on the one hand and for the transport of charge on the other. A still unanswered question is whether the Wannier

  10. EDITORIAL: Focus on Plasma Medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morfill, G. E.; Kong, M. G.; Zimmermann, J. L.

    2009-11-01

    'Plasma Healthcare' is an emerging interdisciplinary research topic of rapidly growing importance, exploring considerable opportunities at the interface of plasma physics, chemistry and engineering with life sciences. Some of the scientific discoveries reported so far have already demonstrated clear benefits for healthcare in areas of medicine, food safety, environmental hygiene, and cosmetics. Examples include ongoing studies of prion inactivation, chronic wound treatment and plasma-mediated cancer therapy. Current research ranges from basic physical processes, plasma chemical design, to the interaction of plasmas with (i) eukaryotic (mammalian) cells; (ii) prokaryotic (bacteria) cells, viruses, spores and fungi; (iii) DNA, lipids, proteins and cell membranes; and (iv) living human, animal and plant tissues in the presence of biofluids. Of diverse interests in this new field is the need for hospital disinfection, in particular with respect to the alarming increase in bacterial resistance to antibiotics, the concomitant needs in private practices, nursing homes etc, the applications in personal hygiene—and the enticing possibility to 'design' plasmas as possible pharmaceutical products, employing ionic as well as molecular agents for medical treatment. The 'delivery' of the reactive plasma agents occurs at the gaseous level, which means that there is no need for a carrier medium and access to the treatment surface is optimal. This focus issue provides a close look at the current state of the art in Plasma Medicine with a number of forefront research articles as well as an introductory review. Focus on Plasma Medicine Contents Application of epifluorescence scanning for monitoring the efficacy of protein removal by RF gas-plasma decontamination Helen C Baxter, Patricia R Richardson, Gaynor A Campbell, Valeri I Kovalev, Robert Maier, James S Barton, Anita C Jones, Greg DeLarge, Mark Casey and Robert L Baxter Inactivation factors of spore-forming bacteria using low

  11. Antipodal focusing of seismic waves observed with the USArray.

    PubMed

    Retailleau, L; Shapiro, N M; Guilbert, J; Campillo, M; Roux, P

    2014-11-01

    We present an analysis of the Mw = 5.3 earthquake that occurred in the Southeast Indian Ridge on 2010 February 11 using USArray data. The epicentre of this event is antipodal to the USArray, providing us with an opportunity to observe in details the antipodal focusing of seismic waves in space and time. We compare the observed signals with synthetic seismograms computed for a spherically symmetric earth model (PREM). A beamforming analysis is performed over the different seismic phases detected at antipodal distances. Direct spatial snapshots of the signals and the beamforming results show that the focusing is well predicted for the first P-wave phases such as PKP or PP. However, converted phases (SKSP, PPS) show a deviation of the energy focusing to the south, likely caused by the Earth's heterogeneity. Focusing of multiple S-wave phases strongly deteriorates and is barely observable.

  12. Hydrodynamic focusing of conducting fluids for conductivity-based biosensors.

    PubMed

    Nasir, Mansoor; Ateya, Daniel A; Burk, Diana; Golden, Joel P; Ligler, Frances S

    2010-02-15

    Hydrodynamic focusing of a conducting fluid by a non-conducting fluid to form a constricted current path between two sensing electrodes is implemented in order to enhance the sensitivity of a 4-electrode conductance-based biosensor. The sensor has a simple two-inlet T-junction design and performs four-point conductivity measurements to detect particles immobilized between the sensing electrode pair. Computational simulations conducted in conjunction with experimental flow studies using confocal microscopy show that a flat profile for the focused layer is dependent on the Reynolds number for the chosen flow parameters. The results also indicate that a flat focused layer is desirable for both increased sensitivity as well as surface-binding efficiency. Proof of concept for conductance measurements in a hydrodynamically focused conducting fluid was demonstrated with entrapped magnetic beads.

  13. Antipodal focusing of seismic waves observed with the USArray

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retailleau, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; Guilbert, J.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.

    2014-11-01

    We present an analysis of the Mw = 5.3 earthquake that occurred in the Southeast Indian Ridge on 2010 February 11 using USArray data. The epicentre of this event is antipodal to the USArray, providing us with an opportunity to observe in details the antipodal focusing of seismic waves in space and time. We compare the observed signals with synthetic seismograms computed for a spherically symmetric earth model (PREM). A beamforming analysis is performed over the different seismic phases detected at antipodal distances. Direct spatial snapshots of the signals and the beamforming results show that the focusing is well predicted for the first P-wave phases such as PKP or PP. However, converted phases (SKSP, PPS) show a deviation of the energy focusing to the south, likely caused by the Earth's heterogeneity. Focusing of multiple S-wave phases strongly deteriorates and is barely observable.

  14. Antipodal focusing of seismic waves observed with the USArray

    PubMed Central

    Retailleau, L.; Shapiro, N. M.; Guilbert, J.; Campillo, M.; Roux, P.

    2014-01-01

    We present an analysis of the Mw = 5.3 earthquake that occurred in the Southeast Indian Ridge on 2010 February 11 using USArray data. The epicentre of this event is antipodal to the USArray, providing us with an opportunity to observe in details the antipodal focusing of seismic waves in space and time. We compare the observed signals with synthetic seismograms computed for a spherically symmetric earth model (PREM). A beamforming analysis is performed over the different seismic phases detected at antipodal distances. Direct spatial snapshots of the signals and the beamforming results show that the focusing is well predicted for the first P-wave phases such as PKP or PP. However, converted phases (SKSP, PPS) show a deviation of the energy focusing to the south, likely caused by the Earth's heterogeneity. Focusing of multiple S-wave phases strongly deteriorates and is barely observable. PMID:26074723

  15. EDITORIAL: Focus on Attosecond Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bandrauk, André D.; Krausz, Ferenc; Starace, Anthony F.

    2008-02-01

    future involve using overdense plasmas. Electronic processes on sub-atomic spatio-temporal scales are the basis of chemical physics, atomic, molecular, and optical physics, materials science, and even some life science processes. Research in these areas using the new attosecond tools will advance together with the ability to control electrons themselves. Indeed, we expect that developments will advance in a way that is similar to advances that have occurred on the femtosecond time scale, in which much previous experimental and theoretical work on the interaction of coherent light sources has led to the development of means for 'coherent control' of nuclear motion in molecules. This focus issue of New Journal of Physics is centered on experimental and theoretical advances in the development of new methodologies and tools for electron control on the attosecond time scale. Topics such as the efficient generation of harmonics; the generation of attosecond pulses, including those having only a few cycles and those produced from overdense plasmas; the description of various nonlinear, nonperturbative laser-matter interactions, including many-electron effects and few-cycle pulse effects; the analysis of ultrashort propagation effects in atomic and molecular media; and the development of inversion methods for electron tomography, as well as many other topics, are addressed in the current focus issue dedicated to the new field of 'Attosecond Physics'. Focus on Attosecond Physics Contents Observing the attosecond dynamics of nuclear wavepackets in molecules by using high harmonic generation in mixed gases Tsuneto Kanai, Eiji J Takahashi, Yasuo Nabekawa and Katsumi Midorikawa Core-polarization effects in molecular high harmonic generation G Jordan and A Scrinzi Interferometric autocorrelation of an attosecond pulse train calculated using feasible formulae Y Nabekawa and K Midorikawa Attosecond pulse generation from aligned molecules—dynamics and propagation in H2+ E Lorin, S

  16. SAR change detection MTI

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scarborough, Steven; Lemanski, Christopher; Nichols, Howard; Owirka, Gregory; Minardi, Michael; Hale, Todd

    2006-05-01

    This paper examines the theory, application, and results of using single-channel synthetic aperture radar (SAR) data with Moving Reference Processing (MRP) to focus and geolocate moving targets. Moving targets within a standard SAR imaging scene are defocused, displaced, or completely missing in the final image. Building on previous research at AFRL, the SAR-MRP method focuses and geolocates moving targets by reprocessing the SAR data to focus the movers rather than the stationary clutter. SAR change detection is used so that target detection and focusing is performed more robustly. In the cases where moving target returns possess the same range versus slow-time histories, a geolocation ambiguity results. This ambiguity can be resolved in a number of ways. This paper concludes by applying the SAR-MRP method to high-frequency radar measurements from persistent continuous-dwell SAR observations of a moving target.

  17. Focused electron beam induced deposition: A perspective

    PubMed Central

    Porrati, Fabrizio; Schwalb, Christian; Winhold, Marcel; Sachser, Roland; Dukic, Maja; Adams, Jonathan; Fantner, Georg

    2012-01-01

    -sensing and the detection of small, inhomogeneous magnetic fields by employing nanogranular FEBID structures are highlighted. Conclusion: FEBID has now reached a state of maturity that allows a shift of the focus towards the development of new application fields, be it in basic research or applied. This is shown for selected examples in the present review. At the same time, when seen from a broader perspective, FEBID still has to live up to the original idea of providing a tool for electron-controlled chemistry on the nanometer scale. This has to be understood in the sense that, by providing a suitable environment during the FEBID process, the outcome of the electron-induced reactions can be steered in a controlled way towards yielding the desired composition of the products. The development of a FEBID-specialized surface chemistry is mostly still in its infancy. Next to application development, it is this aspect that will likely be a guiding light for the future development of the field of focused electron beam induced deposition. PMID:23019557

  18. In-line-focus monitoring technique using lens aberration effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Tomohiko; Sawano, Toshio; Yao, Teruyoshi; Kobayashi, Katsuyoshi; Asai, Satoru

    2005-05-01

    Process windows have become narrower as nano-processing technology has advanced. The semiconductor industry, faced with this situation, has had to impose extremely severe tool controls. Above all, with the advent of 90-nm device production, demand has arisen for strict levels of control that exceed the machine specifications of ArF exposure systems. Consequently, high-accuracy focus control and focus monitoring techniques for production wafers will be necessary in order for this to be achieved for practical use. Focus monitoring techniques that measure pattern placement errors and resist features using special reticle and mark have recently been proposed. Unfortunately, these techniques have several disadvantages. They are unable to identify the direction of a focus error, and there are limits on the illumination conditions. Furthermore, they require the use of a reticle that is more expensive than normal and they suffer from a low level of measurement accuracy. To solve these problems, the authors examined methods of focus control and focus error measurement for production wafers that utilize the lens aberration of the exposure tool system. The authors call this method FMLA (focus monitoring using lens aberration). In general, astigmatism causes a difference in the optimum focal point between the horizontal and vertical patterns in the same image plane. If a focus error occurs, regardless of the reason, a critical dimension (CD) difference arises between the sparse horizontal and vertical lines. In addition, this CD difference decreases or increases monotonously with the defocus value. That is to say, it is possible to estimate the focus errors to measure the vertical and horizontal line CD formed by exposure tool with astigmatism. In this paper, the authors examined the FMLA technique using astigmatism. First, focus monitoring accuracy was investigated. Using normal scholar type simulation, FMLA was able to detect a 32.3-nm focus error when 10-mλ astigmatism was

  19. Possibilities for focusing ultrasonic fields - A survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schlengermann, U.

    1986-05-01

    Focusing techniques for ultrasound devices used in NDE are examined in a review of recent experimental investigations and application reports. The advantages of focused sound fields are outlined (including increased sensitivity, lateral resolution, and S/N and improved reflector scanning); the characteristics of the focused field are reviewed; the fundamental principles of curved-crystal, lens, curved-reflector, zone-plate, and phase-plate focusing are explained; and their practical adaptation in NDE problems (by changing delay path, changing lenses, or switching annular arrays) is described. Consideration is given to geometric and technical limitations on focusing applicability and to the optimization of focusing. Diagrams and drawings are provided.

  20. Hydrodynamic focusing--a versatile tool.

    PubMed

    Golden, Joel P; Justin, Gusphyl A; Nasir, Mansoor; Ligler, Frances S

    2012-01-01

    The control of hydrodynamic focusing in a microchannel has inspired new approaches for microfluidic mixing, separations, sensors, cell analysis, and microfabrication. Achieving a flat interface between the focusing and focused fluids is dependent on Reynolds number and device geometry, and many hydrodynamic focusing systems can benefit from this understanding. For applications where a specific cross-sectional shape is desired for the focused flow, advection generated by grooved structures in the channel walls can be used to define the shape of the focused flow. Relative flow rates of the focused flow and focusing streams can be manipulated to control the cross-sectional area of the focused flows. This paper discusses the principles for defining the shape of the interface between the focused and focusing fluids and provides examples from our lab that use hydrodynamic focusing for impedance-based sensors, flow cytometry, and microfabrication to illustrate the breadth of opportunities for introducing new capabilities into microfluidic systems. We evaluate each example for the advantages and limitations integral to utilization of hydrodynamic focusing for that particular application.

  1. Focus on Communication: NIH Research to Results

    MedlinePlus

    ... Current Issue Past Issues Special Section: Focus on Communication NIH Research to Results Past Issues / Fall 2008 ... grew new hair cells. Read More "Focus on Communication" Articles Living with Hearing Loss / Anatomy of the ...

  2. A focused strategic plan for outcomes evaluation.

    PubMed

    Stonestreet, J S; Prevost, S S

    1997-09-01

    This article describes how organizations devise strategic directions. The process of focused strategic or hoshin planning is introduced and reviewed. This model illustrates how a nursing department planned a focused strategic direction for outcomes evaluation. This discussion includes the dedication of resources, the focusing of research priorities and a summary of the outcomes evaluation program, and the method used for implementation of the priorities. Finally, benefits of both the focused planning process and the outcomes evaluation program are discussed.

  3. Parallel encoding of focus and interrogative meaning in Mandarin intonation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Fang; Xu, Yi

    2005-01-01

    Despite much research, disagreements abound regarding the detailed characteristics of question intonation in different languages or even in the same language. The present study investigates question intonation in Mandarin by also considering the role of focus that is frequently ignored in previous research. In experiment 1, native speakers of Mandarin produced statements, yes/no questions, particle questions, wh-questions, rhetorical questions and confirmation questions with narrow focus on the initial, medial or final word of the sentence, or on none of the words. Detailed F(0) contour analyses showed that focus generated the same pitch range modification in questions as in statements, i.e., expanding the pitch range of the focused word, suppressing (compressing and lowering) that of the post-focus words, but leaving that of the pre-focus words largely unaffected. When the effects of focus (as well as other functions also potentially present) were controlled by subtracting statement F(0) contours from those of the corresponding yes/no questions, the resulting difference curves resembled exponential or even double-exponential functions. Further F(0) analyses also revealed an interaction between focus and interrogative meaning in the form of a boost to the pitch raising by the question start-ing from the focused word. Finally, subtle differences in the amount of pitch raising were also observed among different types of questions, especially at the sentence-final position. Experiment 2 investigated whether listeners could detect both focus and question in the same utterance. Results showed that listeners could identify both in most cases, indicating that F(0) variations related to the two functions could be simultaneously transmitted. Meanwhile, the lowest identification rates were found for neutral focus in questions and for statements with final focus. In both cases, the confusions seemed to arise from the competing F(0) adjustments by interrogative meaning and

  4. Techniques For Focusing In Zone Electrophoresis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sharnez, Rizwan; Twitty, Garland E.; Sammons, David W.

    1994-01-01

    In two techniques for focusing in zone electrophoresis, force of applied electrical field in each charged particle balanced by restoring force of electro-osmosis. Two techniques: velocity-gradient focusing (VGF), suitable for rectangular electrophoresis chambers; and field-gradient focusing (FGF), suitable for step-shaped electrophoresis chambers.

  5. Automatic section thickness determination using an absolute gradient focus function.

    PubMed

    Elozory, D T; Kramer, K A; Chaudhuri, B; Bonam, O P; Goldgof, D B; Hall, L O; Mouton, P R

    2012-12-01

    Quantitative analysis of microstructures using computerized stereology systems is an essential tool in many disciplines of bioscience research. Section thickness determination in current nonautomated approaches requires manual location of upper and lower surfaces of tissue sections. In contrast to conventional autofocus functions that locate the optimally focused optical plane using the global maximum on a focus curve, this study identified by two sharp 'knees' on the focus curve as the transition from unfocused to focused optical planes. Analysis of 14 grey-scale focus functions showed, the thresholded absolute gradient function, was best for finding detectable bends that closely correspond to the bounding optical planes at the upper and lower tissue surfaces. Modifications to this function generated four novel functions that outperformed the original. The 'modified absolute gradient count' function outperformed all others with an average error of 0.56 μm on a test set of images similar to the training set; and, an average error of 0.39 μm on a test set comprised of images captured from a different case, that is, different staining methods on a different brain region from a different subject rat. We describe a novel algorithm that allows for automatic section thickness determination based on just out-of-focus planes, a prerequisite for fully automatic computerized stereology.

  6. Optimal ultrasonic array focusing in attenuative media.

    PubMed

    Ganguli, A; Gao, R X; Liang, K; Jundt, J

    2011-12-01

    This paper presents a parametric study on the efficiency of ultrasound focusing in an attenuative medium, using phased arrays. Specifically, an analytical model of ultrasound wave focusing in a homogeneous, isotropic and attenuative fluid with point sources is presented. Calculations based on the model have shown that in an attenuative medium, an optimum frequency exists for the best focusing performance for a particular size of aperture and focal distance. The effect of different f numbers on the focusing performance in the attenuative medium is further investigated. The information obtained from the analytical model provides insights into the design and installation of a phased transducer array for energy efficient wave focusing.

  7. Acoustic focusing by metal circular ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Jian-Ping; Sun, Hong-Xiang

    2015-02-01

    We report an exotic acoustic focusing effect through a simple brass circular ring structure immersed in water. The acoustic waves can be focused on a prefect point at the centre of the ring structure. This exotic acoustic focusing phenomenon arises from the intrinsic modes in the ring structure at some special eigenfrequencies, which is essentially distinct from the previous studies originating from the negative refraction. The focusing effect is closely related to the size and shape of the ring structure. Interesting applications of the focusing mechanism in black box detectors in the sea and medical ultrasound treatment are further discussed.

  8. Probing nonperturbative QED with optimally focused laser pulses.

    PubMed

    Gonoskov, A; Gonoskov, I; Harvey, C; Ilderton, A; Kim, A; Marklund, M; Mourou, G; Sergeev, A

    2013-08-09

    We study nonperturbative pair production in intense, focused laser fields called e-dipole pulses. We address the conditions required, such as the quality of the vacuum, for reaching high intensities without initiating beam-depleting cascades, the number of pairs which can be created, and experimental detection of the created pairs. We find that e-dipole pulses offer an optimal method of investigating nonperturbative QED.

  9. Radiation Reaction in a Bent Focusing System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhirong; Chen, Pisin; Ruth, Ronald D.

    1996-05-01

    We have shown that in a straight, continuous focusing channel the radiation reaction is different from that in a bending magnet. Quantum excitation to the transverse action is absent in this focusing system, and the radiation damping is faster in the transverse direction than in the longitudinal one. In this talk we study the effect of radiation in a combined-function system, where both focusing and bending fields are present. In one case where the bending dominates over the focusing, we recover the result of standard synchrotron radiation damping in storage rings. In the other case where the focusing dominates over the bending, we find that the lack of quantum excitation and the asymmetric damping found in a straight focusing channel still hold. In addition, the possibility of designing a focusing-dominated damping ring to demonstrate and apply this effect is discussed.

  10. Dynamic-focusing microscope objective for optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja; Rolland, Jannick

    2007-01-01

    Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is a novel optical imaging technique that has assumed significant importance in bio-medical imaging in the last two decades because it is non-invasive and provides accurate, high resolution images of three dimensional cross-sections of body tissue, exceeding the capabilities of the current predominant imaging technique - ultrasound. In this paper, the application of high resolution OCT, known as optical coherence microscopy (OCM) is investigated for in vivo detection of abnormal skin pathology for the early diagnosis of cancer. A main challenge in OCM is maintaining invariant resolution throughout the sample. The technology presented is based on a dynamic focusing microscope imaging probe conceived for skin imaging and the detection of abnormalities in the epithelium. A novel method for dynamic focusing in the biological sample is presented using variable-focus lens technology to obtain three dimensional images with invariant resolution throughout the cross-section and depth of the sample is presented and discussed. A low coherence broadband source centered at near IR wavelengths is used to illuminate the sample. The design, analysis and predicted performance of the dynamic focusing microscope objective designed for dynamic three dimensional imaging at 5μm resolution for the chosen broadband spectrum is presented.

  11. Second-order focusing parallel electron energy magnetic sector analyzer designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khursheed, Anjam

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents parallel magnetic sector analyzer designs that are predicted to have second-order or better focusing properties. Simulation results indicate that by reducing the gap between excitation plates in a compact parallel energy magnetic sector box design, second-order focusing regions in the detected energy spectrum can be obtained. A method for combining a first-order focusing magnetic box sector unit with a larger magnet sector unit is also presented in which, the field strength varies relatively slowly. Simulations predict that using a combination of such magnetic sector units, focusing properties better than second order can be achieved for most of the detected energy range.

  12. Auto-focusing method for remote gaze tracking camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Won Oh; Lee, Hyeon Chang; Cho, Chul Woo; Gwon, Su Yeong; Park, Kang Ryoung; Lee, Heekyung; Cha, Jihun

    2012-06-01

    Gaze tracking determines what a user is looking at; the key challenge is to obtain well-focused eye images. This is not easy because the human eye is very small, whereas the required resolution of the image should be large enough for accurate detection of the pupil center. In addition, capturing a user's eye image by a remote gaze tracking system within a large working volume at a long Z distance requires a panning/tilting mechanism with a zoom lens, which makes it more difficult to acquire focused eye images. To solve this problem, a new auto-focusing method for remote gaze tracking is proposed. The proposed approach is novel in the following four ways: First, it is the first research on an auto-focusing method for a remote gaze tracking system. Second by using user-dependent calibration at initial stage, the weakness of the previous methods that use facial width in captured image to estimate Z distance between a user and camera, wherein each person has the individual variation of facial width, is solved. Third, the parameters of the modeled formula for estimating the Z distance are adaptively updated using the least squares regression method. Therefore, the focus becomes more accurate over time. Fourth, the relationship between the parameters and the face width is fitted locally according to the Z distance instead of by global fitting, which can enhance the accuracy of Z distance estimation. The results of an experiment with 10,000 images of 10 persons showed that the mean absolute error between the ground-truth Z distance measured by a Polhemus Patriot device and that estimated by the proposed method was 4.84 cm. A total of 95.61% of the images obtained by the proposed method were focused and could be used for gaze detection.

  13. Partial focusing by indefinite complementary metamaterials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Qiang; Liu, Ruopeng; Mock, Jack J.; Cui, Tie Jun; Smith, David R.

    2008-09-01

    We have experimentally realized a two-dimensional partial focusing within a planar waveguide using complementary indefinite metamaterials. When the electric fields emitted from the dipole are TE polarized, the focusing condition requires negative magnetic response in the propagation direction of the waveguide, which can be achieved by the complementary electric resonator (CELC) structures. We have carefully designed the experimental configurations and the dimensions for the CELC structures. The experimental result is consistent with the theoretical prediction, which validates the partial focusing phenomenon.

  14. Needs of Non-Energy Focused Contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Liakus, C.

    2012-12-01

    To better understand the informational needs of non-energy focused contractors, including what information they need to motivate them to become energy-focused, the BARA team studied the type of information provided by the national programs, trade associations, and manufacturers that were researched for the related technical report: Effective Communication of Energy Efficiency. While that report focused on the delivery method, format, and strategy of the information, this study examines the content being put forward.

  15. Needs of Non Energy-Focused Contractors

    SciTech Connect

    Liaukus, C.

    2012-12-01

    To better understand the informational needs of non energy-focused contractors, including what information they need to motivate them to become energy-focused, the BARA team studied the type of information provided by the national programs, trade associations, and manufacturers that were researched for the related technical report: Effective Communication of Energy Efficiency. While that report focused on the delivery method, format, and strategy of the information, this study examines the content being put forward.

  16. Unstable resonators with a distributed focusing gain.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, T R

    1994-08-20

    The geometrical optics approximation is used to form a model of axisymmetric unstable resonators having distributed focus, gain, and loss. A tapered reflectivity feedback mirror is included. The rate equations for propagation through the focusing gain medium are derived. A unique grid is found for propagation without interpolation along eigenrays in each direction. Numerical examples show the effects of distributed gain and focus on the axial and transverse intensity distributions.

  17. FEMP Focus: 2011 Volume 20 Issue 1

    SciTech Connect

    2011-04-05

    Department of Energy (DOE); Federal Energy Management Program; FEMP Focus Newsletter; December 2010; Alternative Financing, Guidance Documents, Recovery Act Technical Assistance, Training, Energy Awareness

  18. Automatic focusing system of BSST in Antarctic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Peng-Yi; Liu, Jia-Jing; Zhang, Guang-yu; Wang, Jian

    2015-10-01

    Automatic focusing (AF) technology plays an important role in modern astronomical telescopes. Based on the focusing requirement of BSST (Bright Star Survey Telescope) in Antarctic, an AF system is set up. In this design, functions in OpenCV is used to find stars, the algorithm of area, HFD or FWHM are used to degree the focus metric by choosing. Curve fitting method is used to find focus position as the method of camera moving. All these design are suitable for unattended small telescope.

  19. [The notion of task in focus groups].

    PubMed

    Dall'Agnol, Clarice Maria; de Magalhães, Ana Maria Müller; Mano, Gustavo Caetano de Mattos; Olschowsky, Agnes; da Silva, Flávia Pacheco

    2012-03-01

    The aim of this paper is to revisit the concept of task in light of Pichon-Riviére's referential and to discuss its application in research with focus groups. Focus groups are understood as a research technique which proposes to investigate a topic in depth, allowing the construction of new ideas and answers on the subject in focus. The presuppositions of operative groups were used to support the research practice with focus groups. In these, the notion of task has a key strategic position from which it seeks to intervene in society through dialogue and collective construction, unlike simple data collecting

  20. Low voltage operation of plasma focus.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Rohit; Sharma, S K; Banerjee, P; Das, R; Deb, P; Prabahar, T; Das, B K; Adhikary, B; Shyam, A

    2010-08-01

    Plasma foci of compact sizes and operating with low energies (from tens of joules to few hundred joules) have found application in recent years and have attracted plasma-physics scientists and engineers for research in this direction. We are presenting a low energy and miniature plasma focus which operates from a capacitor bank of 8.4 muF capacity, charged at 4.2-4.3 kV and delivering approximately 52 kA peak current at approximately 60 nH calculated circuit inductance. The total circuit inductance includes the plasma focus inductance. The reported plasma focus operates at the lowest voltage among all reported plasma foci so far. Moreover the cost of capacitor bank used for plasma focus is nearly 20 U.S. dollars making it very cheap. At low voltage operation of plasma focus, the initial breakdown mechanism becomes important for operation of plasma focus. The quartz glass tube is used as insulator and breakdown initiation is done on its surface. The total energy of the plasma focus is approximately 75 J. The plasma focus system is made compact and the switching of capacitor bank energy is done by manual operating switch. The focus is operated with hydrogen and deuterium filled at 1-2 mbar.

  1. Status of the STIS Instrument Focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Proffitt, Charles R.; Monroe, TalaWanda; Dressel, Linda

    2017-01-01

    The Space Telescope Imaging Spectrograph needs to bring images to a good focus at its aperture plane and three detectors, for each of several optical paths. We discuss various ways of measuring the evolution of the focus over time for both the aperture plane and for a variety of imaging and spectroscopic modes. Evidence suggests that between 2013 and 2015 the best focus of STIS relative to the HST best focus, based on WFC3/UVIS and ACS/WFC monitoring, shifted by the equivalent of 3 microns of HST secondary motion, resulting in a decrease in the average small aperture throughput. We discuss the implications of this change for STIS observations.

  2. Sentence-Level Rewriting Detection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Fan; Litman, Diane

    2014-01-01

    Writers usually need iterations of revisions and edits during their writings. To better understand the process of rewriting, we need to know what has changed be-tween the revisions. Prior work mainly focuses on detecting corrections within sentences, which is at the level of words or phrases. This paper proposes to detect revision changes at the…

  3. Attentional Focus Effects in Balance Acrobats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wulf, Gabriele

    2008-01-01

    Performing and learning motor skills has been shown to be enhanced if the performer adopts an external relative to internal focus (or no focus) of attention (Wulf, 2007). The present study examined the generalizability of this effect to top-level performers (balance acrobats). Participants performed a balance task (standing on an inflated rubber…

  4. Teaching Focus Group Interviewing: Benefits and Challenges

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    George, Molly

    2013-01-01

    Focus group interviewing is widely used by academic and applied researchers. Given the popularity and strengths of this method, it is surprising how rarely focus group interviewing is taught in the undergraduate classroom and how few resources exist to support instructors who wish to train students to use this technique. This article fills the gap…

  5. Focus Groups with Linguistically Marginalized Populations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pardi, Marco M.

    The focus group method has rapidly gained credibility among researchers in many fields, including public health researchers. The increased use of focus groups by public health researchers has underscored the demonstrable need for the capacity to apply this method of research among populations with limited abilities in or cultural resistance to…

  6. Peer Led Focus Groups and Young People

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murray, Cathy

    2006-01-01

    Peer led focus groups, a qualitative social science research method, and their use with young people are examined. The paper outlines three developments that have contributed to their emergence, namely: traditional focus groups, peer education and participatory research. Drawing on a study in progress, the advantages and challenges associated with…

  7. Focused force angioplasty Theory and application

    SciTech Connect

    Solar, Ronald J.; Ischinger, Thomas A

    2003-03-01

    Focused force angioplasty is a technique in which the forces resulting from inflating an angioplasty balloon in a stenosis are concentrated and focused at one or more locations within the stenosis. While the technique has been shown to be useful in resolving resistant stenoses, its real value may be in minimizing the vascular trauma associated with balloon angioplasty and subsequently improving the outcome.

  8. 3D Printed Terahertz Focusing Grating Couplers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jahn, David; Weidenbach, Marcel; Lehr, Jannik; Becker, Leonard; Beltrán-Mejía, Felipe; Busch, Stefan F.; Balzer, Jan C.; Koch, Martin

    2017-02-01

    We have designed, constructed and characterized a grating that focuses electromagnetic radiation at specific frequencies out of a dielectric waveguide. A simple theoretical model predicts the focusing behaviour of these chirped gratings, along with numerical results that support our assumptions and improved the grating geometry. The leaky waveguide was 3D printed and characterized at 120 GHz demonstrating its potential for manipulating terahertz waves.

  9. [Solution focused brief therapy in psychiatric practice].

    PubMed

    Bakker, J M; Bannink, F P

    2008-01-01

    Solution focused brief therapy (SFBT) is a form of psychotherapy that reinforces clients' strengths and focuses on what clients want to replace their problems with. Research shows that SFBT is beneficial and cost-effective and makes the psychiatrist's work more satisfying. It can be used as primary psychotherapy, for instance during crisis intervention, or even as an addition to pharmacotherapy.

  10. Inclusive Focus Particles in English and Korean

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kang, Sang-gu

    2011-01-01

    When discussing focus particles, it has been common practice to rely on the dichotomy of inclusive vs. exclusive particles, "a la" Konig (1991). Inclusive focus particles are often further divided into scalar particles, such as "also", "too", and "either", and non-scalar particles, such as "even". In this thesis, I advance a comparative analysis…

  11. Conducting the Computer-Mediated Focus Group.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saban, Kenneth A.

    The growing popularity of focus group measurements can be traced to any one of four factors: (1) the economics associated with focus groups; (2) the speed at which data can now be collected; (3) the need to understand customer motivations; and (4) the desire to improve subsequent qualitative research activities and programs. Market researchers are…

  12. Identifying Information Focuses in Listening Comprehension

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Hong-yan

    2011-01-01

    The study explains the process of learners' listening comprehension within Halliday's information theory in functional grammar, including the skills of identifying focuses while listening in college English teaching. Identifying information focuses in listening is proved to improve the students' communicative listening ability by the means of a…

  13. How I Learned to Conduct Focus Groups

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Rio-Roberts, Maribel

    2011-01-01

    The use of focus groups may provide researchers with important insights into research questions via participant discussion and interaction. As a human services practitioner and researcher, I became interested in learning how to conduct focus groups in order to apply these steps to my research and gain valuable insights about the human experience…

  14. Focus on Form: A Critical Review

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ellis, Rod

    2016-01-01

    "Focus on form" (FonF) is a central construct in task-based language teaching. The term was first introduced by Michael Long to refer to an approach where learners' attention is attracted to linguistic forms as they engage in the performance of tasks. It contrasts with a structure-based approach--"focus on forms" (FonFs)--where…

  15. Plasma lenses for focusing relativistic electron beams

    SciTech Connect

    Govil, R.; Wheeler, S.; Leemans, W.

    1997-04-01

    The next generation of colliders require tightly focused beams with high luminosity. To focus charged particle beams for such applications, a plasma focusing scheme has been proposed. Plasma lenses can be overdense (plasma density, n{sub p} much greater than electron beam density, n{sub b}) or underdense (n{sub p} less than 2 n{sub b}). In overdense lenses the space-charge force of the electron beam is canceled by the plasma and the remaining magnetic force causes the electron beam to self-pinch. The focusing gradient is nonlinear, resulting in spherical aberrations. In underdense lenses, the self-forces of the electron beam cancel, allowing the plasma ions to focus the beam. Although for a given beam density, a uniform underdense lens produces smaller focusing gradients than an overdense lens, it produces better beam quality since the focusing is done by plasma ions. The underdense lens can be improved by tapering the density of the plasma for optimal focusing. The underdense lens performance can be enhanced further by producing adiabatic plasma lenses to avoid the Oide limit on spot size due to synchrotron radiation by the electron beam. The plasma lens experiment at the Beam Test Facility (BTF) is designed to study the properties of plasma lenses in both overdense and underdense regimes. In particular, important issues such as electron beam matching, time response of the lens, lens aberrations and shot-to-shot reproducibility are being investigated.

  16. ION BEAM FOCUSING MEANS FOR CALUTRON

    DOEpatents

    Backus, J.G.

    1959-06-01

    An ion beam focusing arrangement for calutrons is described. It provides a virtual focus of origin for the ion beam so that the ions may be withdrawn from an arc plasma of considerable width providing greater beam current and accuracy. (T.R.H.)

  17. On FOCUS: Photographs and Writings by Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Strohmeyer, Beatriz; McGrail, Loren

    Project FOCUS is aimed at enhancing literacy education for non-native speakers of English through the use of photography. It was offered as an elective course within a family literacy program for Hispanic adults. This collection of writings and photographs originated in the program. The collection begins with an overview of Project FOCUS, personal…

  18. Lifelong Learning and Leadership. IDRA Focus.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    IDRA Newsletter, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This theme issue focuses on programs that promote lifelong learning through literacy education, parent empowerment, or parent leadership training. "Adult Literacy Outreach Innovations: Porque Significa Tanto" (Christie L. Goodman) describes a Texas outreach project that focuses on raising public awareness about adult education and…

  19. Final focus systems for linear colliders

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.A.

    1987-11-01

    The final focus system of a linear collider must perform two primary functions, it must focus the two opposing beams so that their transverse dimensions at the interaction point are small enough to yield acceptable luminosity, and it must steer the beams together to maintain collisions. In addition, the final focus system must transport the outgoing beams to a location where they can be recycled or safely dumped. Elementary optical considerations for linear collider final focus systems are discussed, followed by chromatic aberrations. The design of the final focus system of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC) is described. Tuning and diagnostics and steering to collision are discussed. Most of the examples illustrating the concepts covered are drawn from the SLC, but the principles and conclusions are said to be generally applicable to other linear collider designs as well. 26 refs., 17 figs. (LEW)

  20. A universal symmetry detection algorithm.

    PubMed

    Maurer, Peter M

    2015-01-01

    Research on symmetry detection focuses on identifying and detecting new types of symmetry. The paper presents an algorithm that is capable of detecting any type of permutation-based symmetry, including many types for which there are no existing algorithms. General symmetry detection is library-based, but symmetries that can be parameterized, (i.e. total, partial, rotational, and dihedral symmetry), can be detected without using libraries. In many cases it is faster than existing techniques. Furthermore, it is simpler than most existing techniques, and can easily be incorporated into existing software. The algorithm can also be used with virtually any type of matrix-based symmetry, including conjugate symmetry.

  1. Improvement of focus accuracy on processed wafer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higashibata, Satomi; Komine, Nobuhiro; Fukuhara, Kazuya; Koike, Takashi; Kato, Yoshimitsu; Hashimoto, Kohji

    2013-04-01

    As feature size shrinkage in semiconductor device progress, process fluctuation, especially focus strongly affects device performance. Because focus control is an ongoing challenge in optical lithography, various studies have sought for improving focus monitoring and control. Focus errors are due to wafers, exposure tools, reticles, QCs, and so on. Few studies are performed to minimize the measurement errors of auto focus (AF) sensors of exposure tool, especially when processed wafers are exposed. With current focus measurement techniques, the phase shift grating (PSG) focus monitor 1) has been already proposed and its basic principle is that the intensity of the diffraction light of the mask pattern is made asymmetric by arranging a π/2 phase shift area on a reticle. The resist pattern exposed at the defocus position is shifted on the wafer and shifted pattern can be easily measured using an overlay inspection tool. However, it is difficult to measure shifted pattern for the pattern on the processed wafer because of interruptions caused by other patterns in the underlayer. In this paper, we therefore propose "SEM-PSG" technique, where the shift of the PSG resist mark is measured by employing critical dimension-scanning electron microscope (CD-SEM) to measure the focus error on the processed wafer. First, we evaluate the accuracy of SEM-PSG technique. Second, by applying the SEM-PSG technique and feeding the results back to the exposure, we evaluate the focus accuracy on processed wafers. By applying SEM-PSG feedback, the focus accuracy on the processed wafer was improved from 40 to 29 nm in 3σ.

  2. Detective Scientist

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA has many detectives looking for clues to solve a mystery, like "science detective" Monsi Roman. She is making sure the water and air on board the International Space Station are safe for the a...

  3. Prostate focused ultrasound focal therapy--imaging for the future.

    PubMed

    Rouvière, Olivier; Gelet, Albert; Crouzet, Sébastien; Chapelon, Jean-Yves

    2012-12-01

    Treatment of prostate cancer using high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) focal therapy will become a reliable treatment option only if several conditions are fulfilled. These conditions concern patient selection, assessment of the tumour location and aggressiveness, evaluation of target tissue destruction, and detection of local recurrence or appearance of new tumours. Regarding patient selection, standard transrectal biopsies are not accurate enough and, although perineal template biopsies can detect tumours, they are invasive, expensive procedures, and there is a risk of incidental detection of insignificant cancers. In turn, multiparametric MRI is accurate for detecting and localizing high-grade (Gleason score ≥7) cancers and may provide non-invasive assessment of tumour aggressiveness. Moreover, contrast-enhanced imaging-ultrasonography or MRI-can assess post-HIFU tissue destruction and provide accurate detection of tumour recurrence, which is a key element for follow up. This Perspectives article will assess whether our current methods for cancer diagnosis, tissue targeting, and treatment follow up are accurate enough to allow the design of robust HIFU focal therapy protocols.

  4. Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Vann, C.S.

    1993-08-31

    A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a Cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the Cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the Cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a Cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

  5. Laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device

    DOEpatents

    Vann, Charles S.

    1993-01-01

    A laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device permits the focus of a single focal point of different frequency laser beams emanating from the same source point. In particular it allows the focusing of laser beam originating from the same laser device but having differing intensities so that a low intensity beam will not convert to a higher frequency when passing through a conversion crystal associated with the laser generating device. The laser focus compensating sensing and imaging device uses a cassegrain system to fold the lower frequency, low intensity beam back upon itself so that it will focus at the same focal point as a high intensity beam. An angular tilt compensating lens is mounted about the secondary mirror of the cassegrain system to assist in alignment. In addition cameras or CCD's are mounted with the primary mirror to sense the focused image. A convex lens is positioned co-axial with the cassegrain system on the side of the primary mirror distal of the secondary for use in aligning a target with the laser beam. A first alternate embodiment includes a cassegrain system using a series of shutters and an internally mounted dichroic mirror. A second alternate embodiment uses two laser focus compensating sensing and imaging devices for aligning a moving tool with a work piece.

  6. Deep-Focusing Time-Distance Helioseismology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duvall, T. L., Jr.; Jensen, J. M.; Kosovichev, A. G.; Birch, A. C.; Fisher, Richard R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Much progress has been made by measuring the travel times of solar acoustic waves from a central surface location to points at equal arc distance away. Depth information is obtained from the range of arc distances examined, with the larger distances revealing the deeper layers. This method we will call surface-focusing, as the common point, or focus, is at the surface. To obtain a clearer picture of the subsurface region, it would, no doubt, be better to focus on points below the surface. Our first attempt to do this used the ray theory to pick surface location pairs that would focus on a particular subsurface point. This is not the ideal procedure, as Born approximation kernels suggest that this focus should have zero sensitivity to sound speed inhomogeneities. However, the sensitivity is concentrated below the surface in a much better way than the old surface-focusing method, and so we expect the deep-focusing method to be more sensitive. A large sunspot group was studied by both methods. Inversions based on both methods will be compared.

  7. Focusing on moving targets through scattering samples

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Edward Haojiang; Ruan, Haowen; Yang, Changhuei; Judkewitz, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Focusing light through scattering media has been a longstanding goal of biomedical optics. While wavefront shaping and optical time-reversal techniques can in principle be used to focus light across scattering media, achieving this within a scattering medium with a noninvasive and efficient reference beacon, or guide star, remains an important challenge. Here, we show optical time-reversal focusing using a new technique termed Time Reversal by Analysis of Changing wavefronts from Kinetic targets (TRACK). By taking the difference between time-varying scattering fields caused by a moving object and applying optical time reversal, light can be focused back to the location previously occupied by the object. We demonstrate this approach with discretely moved objects as well as with particles in an aqueous flow, and obtain a focal peak-to-background strength of 204 in our demonstration experiments. We further demonstrate that the generated focus can be used to noninvasively count particles in a flow-cytometry configuration—even when the particles are hidden behind a strong diffuser. By achieving optical time reversal and focusing noninvasively without any external guide stars, using just the intrinsic characteristics of the sample, this work paves the way to a range of scattering media imaging applications, including underwater and atmospheric focusing as well as noninvasive in vivo flow cytometry. PMID:25621302

  8. Focus-of-attention for human activity recognition from UAVs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burghouts, G. J.; van Eekeren, A. W. M.; Dijk, J.

    2014-10-01

    This paper presents a system to extract metadata about human activities from full-motion video recorded from a UAV. The pipeline consists of these components: tracking, motion features, representation of the tracks in terms of their motion features, and classification of each track as one of the human activities of interest. We consider these activities: walk, run, throw, dig, wave. Our contribution is that we show how a robust system can be constructed for human activity recognition from UAVs, and that focus-of-attention is needed. We find that tracking and human detection are essential for robust human activity recognition from UAVs. Without tracking, the human activity recognition deteriorates. The combination of tracking and human detection is needed to focus the attention on the relevant tracks. The best performing system includes tracking, human detection and a per-track analysis of the five human activities. This system achieves an average accuracy of 93%. A graphical user interface is proposed to aid the operator or analyst during the task of retrieving the relevant parts of video that contain particular human activities. Our demo is available on YouTube.

  9. Regulatory focus and attitudes to migrants.

    PubMed

    Whelan, Jennifer; Laham, Simon M; Peters, Kim; Boldero, Jennifer; Kashima, Yoshihisa

    2010-06-01

    In two studies we examined the role of two regulatory foci (i.e., prevention and promotion) in predicting Australian's attitudes to different types of migrants. According to regulatory focus theory, promotion-focused self-regulation is concerned with nurturance and accomplishment needs and involves the pursuit of wishes and aspirations. As such, it results in sensitivity to positive outcomes and to relative pleasure from gains. On the other hand, prevention-focused self-regulation is concerned with security needs and is directed at meeting duties and obligations. As such, it results in sensitivity to negative outcome and relative pain from losses. In Study 1, as predicted, the extent of promotion focus (i.e., a concern with accomplishment and the pursuit of ideals) predicted more positive attitudes to culturally similar and economically beneficial migrants, whereas the extent of prevention focus (i.e., concern with security and meeting obligations) predicted more negative attitudes to migrants who are culturally dissimilar. In Study 2 we replicated and extended these findings, showing that the extent of promotion focus and a lack of concern with threats predicted positive attitudes to both culturally similar and economically beneficial migrants, which, in the case of the latter group, was mediated by a focus on the benefits these migrants provide. In the case of culturally dissimilar migrants, the extent of promotion focus and a concern with gains predicted more positive attitudes. However, for economically less beneficial migrants, neither the extent of promotion nor prevention focus was a predictor. Only lower concerns with threat predicted more positive attitudes to this migrant group. The results are discussed with respect to other determinants of attitudes to migrants and the implications for migration and asylum-seeker policy.

  10. Line-focus concentrating collector program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dugan, V. L.

    1980-01-01

    The Line-Focus Concentrating Collector Program has emphasized the development and dissemination of concentrating solar technology in which the reflected sunlight is focused onto a linear or line receiver. Although a number of different types of line-focus concentrators were developed, the parabolic trough has gained the widest acceptance and utilization within the industrial and applications sectors. The trough is best applied for application scenarios which require temperatures between 140 and 600 F. Another concept, the bowl, is investigated for applications which may require temperatures in the range between 600 and 1200 F. Current technology emphases are upon the reduction of system installation cost and the implementation of production oriented engineering.

  11. Focused ion beam source method and apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Pellin, Michael J.; Lykke, Keith R.; Lill, Thorsten B.

    2000-01-01

    A focused ion beam having a cross section of submicron diameter, a high ion current, and a narrow energy range is generated from a target comprised of particle source material by laser ablation. The method involves directing a laser beam having a cross section of critical diameter onto the target, producing a cloud of laser ablated particles having unique characteristics, and extracting and focusing a charged particle beam from the laser ablated cloud. The method is especially suited for producing focused ion beams for semiconductor device analysis and modification.

  12. Aerodynamic Focusing Of High-Density Aerosols

    SciTech Connect

    Ruiz, D. E.; Fisch, Nathaniel

    2014-02-24

    High-density micron-sized particle aerosols might form the basis for a number of applications in which a material target with a particular shape might be quickly ionized to form a cylindrical or sheet shaped plasma. A simple experimental device was built in order to study the properties of high-density aerosol focusing for 1 m silica spheres. Preliminary results recover previous findings on aerodynamic focusing at low densities. At higher densities, it is demonstrated that the focusing properties change in a way which is consistent with a density dependent Stokes number.

  13. An auto-focusing system for white light microscopic measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Ming; Deka, Juti Rani; Chen, Pei Jung; Chen, Yu Kuan; Cui, Changcai

    2008-12-01

    With the rapid development of semiconductor technology the demand for high resolution measuring system is evolving at an ever-increasing pace. Microscope was initially used to detect the defect by connecting charge couple device (CCD) as an auxiliary device. In general, for microscopic measurement human eyes are used to focus on the sample. The adjustment depends on the operator's astute measurement ability, which affected the repeatability and accuracy of the readings. There is a need of high-speed microscope auto focusing system for industrial applications. The present investigation describes about the development of an autofocus system to carry out microscopic measurement more precisely and accurately with less time. The measurement system consists of a light source, two beam splitters, a movable sample stage and a Mirau's interferometer, a photo-detector and 8051 microcontroller (MCU89C51). The light reflected from the sample surface interferes with the light reflected from the reference and produce an interference pattern, which is imaged onto a CCD array. In the setup developed for the autofocus one extra beam splitter is placed in the path of interfered beam to the CCD. The beam splitter is placed at equal distances from the CCD and the photodetector. The focus position is determined from the voltage developed in the photo-detector due to the movement of sample stage of the microscope. The maximum voltage that obtained at the focus position is confirmed with the CCD image. Microcontroller is used to stop the controller at the focus position immediately once the sample stage reaches it. Software is developed to locate the maximum intensity position. The design may autofocus the interferometer within 4mm distance in 1 second. The auto-focusing not only provides enhanced repeatability and accuracy of the results at a faster rate but also minimizes operator involvement.

  14. Development of the fast astigmatic auto-focus microscope system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hsu, Wei-Yao; Lee, Chien-Shing; Chen, Po-Jui; Chen, Nien-Tsu; Chen, Fong-Zhi; Yu, Zong-Ru; Kuo, Ching-Hsiang; Hwang, Chi-Hung

    2009-04-01

    In this paper, a fast auto-focus microscope system was developed based on the astigmatic method. A collimated infrared laser beam was employed in the infinite-corrected microscope optical axis by the beam splitter and reflected by the sample surface. By embedding an astigmatic lens in the system, the reflected laser beam has different focal lengths in the sagittal and tangential planes. As the microscope's relative distance varies, the reflected laser beam shape also varies and can be detected by an embedded four-quadrant photodiode, i.e., the focus error signal (FES) can be found. Then, a fast auto-focus system can be realized by converting the FES to the microscope's defocus distance. We designed an astigmatic auto-focus system for a 20× objective lens with a ±50 µm working range, and this system could also be used for 10× and 5× objectives with ±200 µm and ±800 µm working ranges, respectively.

  15. Improved 3D cellular imaging by multispectral focus assessment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Tong; Xiong, Yizhi; Chung, Alice P.; Wachman, Elliot S.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2005-03-01

    Biological specimens are three-dimensional structures. However, when capturing their images through a microscope, there is only one plane in the field of view that is in focus, and out-of-focus portions of the specimen affect image quality in the in-focus plane. It is well-established that the microscope"s point spread function (PSF) can be used for blur quantitation, for the restoration of real images. However, this is an ill-posed problem, with no unique solution and with high computational complexity. In this work, instead of estimating and using the PSF, we studied focus quantitation in multi-spectral image sets. A gradient map we designed was used to evaluate the sharpness degree of each pixel, in order to identify blurred areas not to be considered. Experiments with realistic multi-spectral Pap smear images showed that measurement of their sharp gradients can provide depth information roughly comparable to human perception (through a microscope), while avoiding PSF estimation. Spectrum and morphometrics-based statistical analysis for abnormal cell detection can then be implemented in an image database where the axial structure has been refined.

  16. Quantification of resolution for a dynamic focusing OCM microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murali, Supraja; Lee, Kye-Sung; Meemon, Panomsak; Kuhn, William P.; Thompson, Kevin P.; Rolland, Jannick P.

    2009-02-01

    Achieving high lateral resolution still remains a challenge for in vivo Optical Coherence Microscopy (OCM) biological imaging. While to address this challenge, the numerical aperture (NA) of the microscope objective in the sample arm of the OCM interferometer may be increased, it introduces trade-offs in terms of loss in the depth of focus over which lateral resolution can still be maintained. As a critical step to offset this problem, we recently presented the optical system design of a dynamic focusing (DF) optical coherence microscope with a built-in liquid lens for re-focusing through the sample depth with no moving parts at in vivo speeds. We present experimental measurements of the modulation transfer function (MTF) acquired from the fabricated research prototype. The measurements were obtained though the edge detection method as a function of the voltage applied and at various positions in the field of view (FOV) within a 2mm cubic sample. Results demonstrate a resolution of 2 µm across the voltage range and the FOV, which validates the expectation by design of a quasi-invariant resolution of less than 3μm over a 2mm×2mm lateral cross-section across the 2mm depth of skin-equivalent tissue. Images of a tadpole sample acquired with the probe at different focal depths are also shown to demonstrate gain in resolution with focusing through different depth zones.

  17. Digital Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection system with dynamic focusing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hwang, J. S.; Shin, H. J.; Song, S. J.; Song, T. K.

    2000-05-01

    Enhancement of the ultrasonic flaw detection and characterization is expected through the development of a high performance PAULI (Phased Array Ultrasonic Inspection) system which can provide high resolution two-dimensional (sector scan: S-scan) images. The high-resolution S-scan image renders inspection results more readable compared to the conventional A-scan and B-scan results. Therefore, it can improve inspection efficiency and reliability. In this study, the ultrasonic imaging technologies developed in medical applications were adapted to develop a digital PAULI system for nondestructive testing. To provide real-time S-scan images, the PAULI system uses 64 independent transceiver channels controlled by proper delay laws for steering and focusing the ultrasound beams along each scan lines. The PAULI system employs a novel dynamic receive focusing technique in order to optimize the lateral resolution by focusing the ultrasound wave at all imaging points. The dynamic receive focusing is achieved in real-time by digital signal processing methods. The feasibility of PAULI system is demonstrated for the NDE of steel structures.

  18. Three-dimensional hydrodynamic focusing in a microfluidic Coulter counter.

    PubMed

    Scott, R; Sethu, P; Harnett, C K

    2008-04-01

    Electrical impedance-based particle detection or Coulter counting, offers a lab-on-chip compatible method for flow cytometry. Developments in this area will produce devices with greater portability, lower cost, and lower power requirements than fluorescence-based flow cytometry. Because conventional Coulter apertures are prone to clogging, hydrodynamic focusing improves the device by creating fluid-walled channels with variable width to increase sensitivity without the associated risk of blocking the channel. We describe a device that focuses the sample in three dimensions, creating a narrow sample stream on the floor of the channel for close interaction with sensing electrodes. The key to this design is a stepped outlet channel fabricated in a single layer with soft lithography. In contrast to previous impedance-based designs, the new design requires minimal alignment with the substrate. Three-dimensional focusing maximizes the sensitivity of the device to cell-size particles within much larger channels. Impedance-based particle sensing experiments within this device show an increase in percentage conductivity change by a factor of 2.5 over devices that only focus the sample in the horizontal direction.

  19. Focusing Internet Searches for World Music Resources

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mishra, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    Discusses the importance of focusing Internet searches for world music resources. Importance of teaching about music from various cultures; Benefits of identifying a characteristic instrument by name or stylistic terms; Types of music web sites.

  20. Focus Meetings for Pesticide Registration Review

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Focus meetings with affected registrants and possibly other stakeholders are based around the information needs identified by the EPA chemical review team and management for consideration during our registration reevaluation of a pesticide.

  1. A focus on shape coexistence in nuclei

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wood, J. L.; Heyde, K.

    2016-02-01

    The present collection of articles focuses on new directions and developments under the title of shape coexistence in nuclei, following our 2011 Reviews of Modern Physics article (K Heyde and J L Wood).

  2. Focus Issue: Autophagy as hero and villain.

    PubMed

    Wong, Wei

    2017-02-28

    This Focus Issue explores autophagic responses to stress in cardiometabolic disease, reveals how autophagy limits pathological hypertrophy in the heart, and describes how autophagy itself can regulate transcriptional responses to stress.

  3. Apparatus for focusing flowing gas streams

    DOEpatents

    Nogar, N.S.; Keller, R.A.

    1985-05-20

    Apparatus for focusing gas streams. The principle of hydrodynamic focusing is applied to flowing gas streams in order to provide sample concentration for improved photon and sample utilization in resonance ionization mass spectrometric analysis. In a concentric nozzle system, gas samples introduced from the inner nozzle into the converging section of the outer nozzle are focused to streams 50-250-..mu..m in diameter. In some cases diameters of approximately 100-..mu..m are maintained over distances of several centimeters downstream from the exit orifice of the outer nozzle. The sheath gas employed has been observed to further provide a protective covering around the flowing gas sample, thereby isolating the flowing gas sample from possible unwanted reactions with nearby surfaces. A single nozzle variation of the apparatus for achieving hydrodynamic focusing of gas samples is also described.

  4. Social Work Intervention Focused on Transitions

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-12-19

    Study Focus: 30-day Rehospitalizations Among At-risk Older Adults Randomized to a Social Work-driven Care Transitions Intervention; Heart Disease; Diabetes; Hypertension; Cancer; Depression; Asthma; Chronic Heart Failure; Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease; Stroke

  5. NAS Forums Focus on National Science Topics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1973

    1973-01-01

    A series of public meetings designed to focus on complex and persistent problems of national importance involving science has been launched. Topics such as drugs, energy, and natural disasters are included. (DF)

  6. Magnetic multi-lens focusing optical system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trejbal, Z.; Bejšovec, V.; S̆tursa, J.; Hanc̆l, P.

    1996-02-01

    A magnetic focusing system called B-channel is introduced. Three methods of ion optical calculation are presented and a comparison with experimental results is shown. The properties of B-channel are discussed in comparison with a classical solenoid.

  7. Direct observation of light focusing by single photoreceptor cell nuclei.

    PubMed

    Błaszczak, Zuzanna; Kreysing, Moritz; Guck, Jochen

    2014-05-05

    The vertebrate retina is inverted with respect to its optical function, which requires light to pass through the entire tissue prior to detection. The last significant barrier for photons to overcome is the outer nuclear layer formed by photoreceptor cell (PRC) nuclei. Here we experimentally characterise the optical properties of PRC nuclei using bright-field defocusing microscopy to capture near-field intensity distributions behind individual nuclei. We find that some nuclei efficiently focus incident light confirming earlier predictions based on comparative studies of chromatin organisation in nocturnal and diurnal mammals. The emergence of light focusing during the development of mouse nuclei highlights the acquired nature of the observed lens-like behaviour. Optical characterisation of these nuclei is an important first step towards an improved understanding of how light transmission through the retina is influenced by its constituents.

  8. Superconducting quadrupoles for the SLC final focus

    SciTech Connect

    Erickson, R.; Fieguth, T.; Murray, J.J.

    1987-01-01

    The final focus system of the SLC will be upgraded by replacing the final quadrupoles with higher gradient superconducting magnets positioned closer to the interaction point. The parameters of the new system have been chosen to be compatible with the experimental detectors with a minimum of changes to other final focus components. These parameter choices are discussed along with the expected improvement in SLC performance.

  9. Molecular focusing and alignment with plasmon fields.

    PubMed

    Artamonov, Maxim; Seideman, Tamar

    2010-12-08

    We show the possibility of simultaneously aligning molecules and focusing their center-of-mass motion near a metal nanoparticle in the field intensity gradient created by the surface plasmon enhancement of incident light. The rotational motion is described quantum mechanically while the translation is treated classically. The effects of the nanoparticle shape on the alignment and focusing are explored. Our results carry interesting implications to the field of molecular nanoplasmonics and suggest several potential applications in nanochemistry.

  10. Tight focusing of an asymmetric Bessel beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kotlyar, Victor V.; Stafeev, Sergey S.; Porfirev, Alexey P.

    2015-12-01

    Tight focusing of a linearly polarized asymmetric Bessel beam, which has a topological charge n=3 and a crescent shape, was investigated numerically and experimentally. Using the Debye formulae, it was shown that the aplanatic lens of numerical aperture NA=0.9 forms a crescent in the focal plane. Experimentally, an asymmetric Bessel beam was formed by a spatial light modulator and focused by an immersive lens (NA=1.25). The crescent was also formed in the focal plane.

  11. Two-axis sagittal focusing monochromator

    SciTech Connect

    Haas, Edwin G; Stelmach, Christopher; Zhong, Zhong

    2014-05-13

    An x-ray focusing device and method for adjustably focusing x-rays in two orthogonal directions simultaneously. The device and method can be operated remotely using two pairs of orthogonal benders mounted on a rigid, open frame such that x-rays may pass through the opening in the frame. The added x-ray flux allows significantly higher brightness from the same x-ray source.

  12. Focus-distance-controlled 3D TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Nobuaki; Kim, Kyung-tae; Son, Jung-Young; Murata, Tatsuya; Orima, Takatoshi

    1996-09-01

    There is a phenomenon that a 3D image appears in proportion to a focus distance when something is watched through a convex lens. An adjustable focus lens which can control the focus distance of the convex lens is contrived and applied to 3D TV. We can watch 3D TV without eyeglasses. The 3D TV image meets the NTSC standard. A parallax data and a focus data about the image can be accommodated at the same time. A continuous image method realizes much wider views. An anti 3D image effect can be avoided by using this method. At present, an analysis of proto-type lens and experiment are being carried out. As a result, a phantom effect and a viewing area can be improved. It is possible to watch the 3D TV at any distance. Distance data are triangulated by two cameras. A plan of AVI photo type using ten thousand lenses is discussed. This method is compared with four major conventional methods. As a result, it is revealed that this method can make the efficient use of Integral Photography and Varifocal type method. In the case of Integral Photography, a miniaturization of this system is possible. But it is difficult to get actual focus. In the case of varifocal type method, there is no problem with focusing, but the miniaturization is impossible. The theory investigated in this paper makes it possible to solve these problems.

  13. Focus-distance-controlled 3D TV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanagisawa, Nobuaki; Kim, Kyung-tae; Son, Jung-Young; Murata, Tatsuya; Orima, Takatoshi

    1997-05-01

    There is a phenomenon that a 3D image appears in proportion to a focus distance when something is watched through a convex lens. An adjustable focus lens which can control the focus distance of the convex lens is contrived and applied to 3D TV. We can watch 3D TV without eyeglasses. The 3D TV image meets the NTSC standard. A parallax data and a focus data about the image can be accommodated at the same time. A continuous image method realizes much wider views. An anti 3D image effect can be avoided by using this method. At present, an analysis of proto-type lens and experiment are being carried out. As a result, a phantom effect and a viewing area can be improved. It is possible to watch the 3D TV at any distance. Distance data are triangulated by two cameras. A plan of AVI proto type using ten thousands lenses is discussed. This method is compared with four major conventional methods. As a result, it is revealed that this method can make the efficient use of integral photography and varifocal type method. In the case of integral photography, a miniaturization of this system is possible. But it is difficult to get actual focus. In the case of varifocal type method, there is no problem with focusing, but the miniaturization is impossible. The theory investigated in this paper makes it possible to solve these problems.

  14. Applications of on-product diffraction-based focus metrology in logic high volume manufacturing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Noyes, Ben F.; Mokaberi, Babak; Bolton, David; Li, Chen; Palande, Ashwin; Park, Kevin; Noot, Marc; Kea, Marc

    2016-03-01

    The integration of on-product diffraction-based focus (DBF) capability into the majority of immersion lithography layers in leading edge logic manufacturing has enabled new applications targeted towards improving cycle time and yield. A CD-based detection method is the process of record (POR) for excursion detection. The drawback of this method is increased cycle time and limited sampling due to CD-SEM metrology capacity constraints. The DBFbased method allows the addition of focus metrology samples to the existing overlay measurements on the integrated metrology (IM) system. The result enables the addition of measured focus to the SPC system, allowing a faster excursion detection method. For focus targeting, the current method involves using a dedicated focus-exposure matrix (FEM) on all scanners, resulting in lengthy analysis times and uncertainty in the best focus. The DBF method allows the measurement to occur on the IM system, on a regular production wafer, and at the same time as the exposure. This results in a cycle time gain as well as a less subjective determination of best focus. A third application aims to use the novel onproduct focus metrology data in order to apply per-exposure focus corrections to the scanner. These corrections are particularly effective at the edge of the wafer, where systematic layer-dependent effects can be removed using DBFbased scanner feedback. This paper will discuss the development of a methodology to accomplish each of these applications in a high-volume production environment. The new focus metrology method, sampling schemes, feedback mechanisms and analysis methods lead to improved focus control, as well as earlier detection of failures.

  15. Fraud Detection in Healthcare

    SciTech Connect

    Chandola, Varun; Schryver, Jack C; Sukumar, Sreenivas R

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the problem of fraud detection in healthcare in this chapter. Given the recent scrutiny of the ineciencies in the US healthcare system, identifying fraud has been on the forefront of the eorts towards reducing the healthcare costs. In this chapter we will focus on understanding the issue of healthcare fraud in detail, and review methods that have been proposed in the literature to combat this issue using data driven approach.

  16. Efficacy of Child-Focused and Parent-Focused Interventions in a Child Anxiety Prevention Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Simon, Ellin; Bogels, Susan Maria; Voncken, Jannie Marisol

    2011-01-01

    This study examined anxiety development in median- (n = 74) and high-anxious children (n = 183) aged 8-13, the effect of parent- and child-focused preventive interventions on child/parental anxiety, and the effect of parental anxiety on child anxiety. High-anxious children were randomized into a parent-focused (n = 69), child-focused (n = 58) or…

  17. Localized harmonic motion imaging for focused ultrasound surgery targeting.

    PubMed

    Curiel, Laura; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2011-08-01

    Recently, an in vivo real-time ultrasound-based monitoring technique that uses localized harmonic motion (LHM) to detect changes in tissues during focused ultrasound surgery (FUS) has been proposed to control the exposure. This technique can potentially be used as well for targeting imaging. In the present study, we evaluated the potential of using LHM to detect changes in stiffness and the feasibility of using it for imaging purposes in phantoms and in vivo tumor detection. A single-element FUS transducer (80 mm focal length, 100 mm diameter, 1.485 MHz) was used for inducing a localized harmonic motion and a separate ultrasound diagnostic transducer excited by a pulser/receiver (5 kHz PRF, 5 MHz) was used to track motion. The motion was estimated using cross-correlation techniques on the acquired radio-frequency (RF) signal. Silicon phantom studies were performed to determine the size of inclusion that was possible to detect using this technique. Inclusions were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude and it was possible to depict inclusions as small as 4 mm. The amplitude of the induced LHM was always lower at the inclusions compared with the one obtained at the surroundings. Ten New Zealand rabbits had VX2 tumors implanted on their thighs and LHM was induced and measured at the tumor region. Tumors (as small as 10 mm in length and 4 mm in width) were discerned from the surroundings as a reduction on LHM amplitude.

  18. Altered Glycosylation in Tumours Focused to Cancer Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Peracaula, Rosa; Barrabés, Sílvia; Sarrats, Ariadna; Rudd, Pauline M.; de Llorens, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    The lack of specific and sensitive tumour markers for early detection of cancer is driving a search for new approaches that could identify biomarkers. Markers are needed to alert clinicians at the early stages of tumourogenesis, before the cancer has metastasized, when the therapeutic drugs are more effective. Most tumour markers currently used in clinics are serum glycoproteins, frequently highly glycosylated mucins. Typically, the disease marker is the protein and not the glycan moiety of the corresponding glycoprotein or mucin. The increasing knowledge of the role of glycans in cancer suggests that further studies may assist both in determining their role in every step of tumour progression, and in the design of new therapeutic and diagnosic approaches. Detection of the altered glycans in serum tumour glycoproteins could be a way to achieve specificity in tumour detection. In this review, we focus on the glycan changes of two serum glycoproteins, prostate specific antigen - currently used as a tumour marker of prostate cancer - and human pancreatic ribonuclease in pancreatic adenocarcinoma. The detection of glycan changes, associated with subsets of glycoforms in serum glycoproteins that are specific to the tumour situation, could be the basis for developing more specific biomarkers. PMID:19126965

  19. (Aerodynamic focusing of particles and heavy molecules)

    SciTech Connect

    de la Mora, J.F.

    1990-01-08

    By accelerating a gas containing suspended particles or large molecules through a converging nozzle, the suspended species may be focused and therefore used to write fine lines on a surface. Our objective was to study the limits on how narrow this focal region could be as a function of particle size. We find that, for monodisperse particles with masses m{sub p} some 3.6 {times} 10{sup 5} times larger than the molecular mass m of the carrier gas (diameters above some 100{angstrom}), there is no fundamental obstacle to directly write submicron features. However, this conclusion has been verified experimentally only with particles larger than 0.1 {mu}m. Experimental, theoretical and numerical studies on the defocusing role of Brownian motion for very small particles or heavy molecules have shown that high resolution (purely aerodynamic) focusing is impossible with volatile molecules whose masses are typically smaller than 1000 Dalton. For these, the minimal focal diameter after optimization appears to be 5{radical}(m/m{sub p}) times the nozzle diameter d{sub n}. But combinations of focused lasers and aerodynamic focusing appear as promising for direct writing with molecular precursors. Theoretical and numerical schemes capable of predicting the evolution of the focusing beam, including Brownian motion effects, have been developed, although further numerical work would be desirable. 11 refs.

  20. Fundamentals of inertial focusing in microchannels.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jian; Papautsky, Ian

    2013-03-21

    Inertial microfluidics has been attracting considerable interest in recent years due to immensely promising applications in cell biology. Despite the intense attention, the primary focus has been on development of inertial microfluidic devices with less emphasis paid to elucidation of the inertial focusing mechanics. The incomplete understanding, and sometimes confusing experimental results that indicate a different number of focusing positions in square or rectangular microchannels under similar flow conditions, have led to poor guidelines and difficulties in design of inertial microfluidic systems. In this work, we describe and experimentally validate a two-stage model inertial focusing in microchannels. Our analysis and experimental results show that not only the well-accepted shear-induced and wall-induced lift forces act on particles within flow causing equilibration near microchannel sidewalls, but the rotation-induced lift force influences the position of these equilibria. In addition, for the first time, we experimentally measure lift coefficients, which previously could only be obtained from numerical simulations. More importantly, insights offered by our two-stage model of inertial focusing are broadly applicable to cross-sectional geometries beyond rectangular. With elucidation of the equilibration mechanism, we envision better guidelines for the inertial microfluidics community, ultimately leading to improved performance and broader acceptance of the inertial microfluidic devices in a wide range of applications, from filtration to cell separations.