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Sample records for detecting pathogenic african

  1. Molecular detection of zoonotic tick-borne pathogens from ticks collected from ruminants in four South African provinces

    PubMed Central

    MTSHALI, Khethiwe; KHUMALO, Zamantungwa T. H.; NAKAO, Ryo; GRAB, Dennis J.; SUGIMOTO, Chihiro; THEKISOE, Oriel M. M.

    2015-01-01

    Ticks carry and transmit a remarkable array of pathogens including bacteria, protozoa and viruses, which may be of veterinary and/or of medical significance. With little to no information regarding the presence of tick-borne zoonotic pathogens or their known vectors in southern Africa, the aim of our study was to screen for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Coxiella burnetii, Rickettsia species and Ehrlichia ruminantium in ticks collected and identified from ruminants in the Eastern Cape, Free State, KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga Provinces of South Africa. The most abundant tick species identified in this study were Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi (40%), Rhipicephalus species (35%), Amblyomma hebraeum (10%) and Rhipicephalus decoloratus (14%). A total of 1634 ticks were collected. DNA was extracted, and samples were subjected to PCR amplification and sequencing. The overall infection rates of ticks with the target pathogens in the four Provinces were as follows: A. phagocytophilum, 7%; C. burnetii, 7%; E. ruminantium, 28%; and Rickettsia spp., 27%. The presence of B. burgdorferi could not be confirmed. The findings of this study show that zoonotic pathogens are present in ticks in the studied South African provinces. This information will aid in the epidemiology of tick-borne zoonotic diseases in the country as well as in raising awareness about such diseases in the veterinary, medical and tourism sectors, as they may be the most affected. PMID:26227797

  2. Molecular detection of zoonotic tick-borne pathogens from ticks collected from ruminants in four South African provinces.

    PubMed

    Mtshali, Khethiwe; Khumalo, Zth; Nakao, Ryo; Grab, Dennis J; Sugimoto, Chihiro; Thekisoe, Omm

    2016-01-01

    Ticks carry and transmit a remarkable array of pathogens including bacteria, protozoa and viruses, which may be of veterinary and/or of medical significance. With little to no information regarding the presence of tick-borne zoonotic pathogens or their known vectors in southern Africa, the aim of our study was to screen for Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Borrelia burgdorferi, Coxiella burnetii, Rickettsia species and Ehrlichia ruminantium in ticks collected and identified from ruminants in the Eastern Cape, Free State, KwaZulu-Natal and Mpumalanga Provinces of South Africa. The most abundant tick species identified in this study were Rhipicephalus evertsi evertsi (40%), Rhipicephalus species (35%), Amblyomma hebraeum (10%) and Rhipicephalus decoloratus (14%). A total of 1634 ticks were collected. DNA was extracted, and samples were subjected to PCR amplification and sequencing. The overall infection rates of ticks with the target pathogens in the four Provinces were as follows: A. phagocytophilum, 7%; C. burnetii, 7%; E. ruminantium, 28%; and Rickettsia spp., 27%. The presence of B. burgdorferi could not be confirmed. The findings of this study show that zoonotic pathogens are present in ticks in the studied South African provinces. This information will aid in the epidemiology of tick-borne zoonotic diseases in the country as well as in raising awareness about such diseases in the veterinary, medical and tourism sectors, as they may be the most affected. PMID:26227797

  3. Portable pathogen detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colston, Billy W.; Everett, Matthew; Milanovich, Fred P.; Brown, Steve B.; Vendateswaran, Kodumudi; Simon, Jonathan N.

    2005-06-14

    A portable pathogen detection system that accomplishes on-site multiplex detection of targets in biological samples. The system includes: microbead specific reagents, incubation/mixing chambers, a disposable microbead capture substrate, and an optical measurement and decoding arrangement. The basis of this system is a highly flexible Liquid Array that utilizes optically encoded microbeads as the templates for biological assays. Target biological samples are optically labeled and captured on the microbeads, which are in turn captured on an ordered array or disordered array disposable capture substrate and then optically read.

  4. Rapid Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    David Perlin

    2005-08-14

    Pathogen identification is a crucial first defense against bioterrorism. A major emphasis of our national biodefense strategy is to establish fast, accurate and sensitive assays for diagnosis of infectious diseases agents. Such assays will ensure early and appropriate treatment of infected patients. Rapid diagnostics can also support infection control measures, which monitor and limit the spread of infectious diseases agents. Many select agents are highly transmissible in the early stages of disease, and it is critical to identify infected patients and limit the risk to the remainder of the population and to stem potential panic in the general population. Nucleic acid-based molecular approaches for identification overcome many of the deficiencies associated with conventional culture methods by exploiting both large- and small-scale genomic differences between organisms. PCR-based amplification of highly conserved ribosomal RNA (rRNA) genes, intergenic sequences, and specific toxin genes is currently the most reliable approach for bacterial, fungal and many viral pathogenic agents. When combined with fluorescence-based oligonucleotide detection systems, this approach provides real-time, quantitative, high fidelity analysis capable of single nucleotide allelic discrimination (4). These probe systems offer rapid turn around time (<2 h) and are suitable for high throughput, automated multiplex operations that are critical for clinical diagnostic laboratories. In this pilot program, we have used molecular beacon technology invented at the Public health Research Institute to develop a new generation of molecular probes to rapidly detect important agents of infectious diseases. We have also developed protocols to rapidly extract nucleic acids from a variety of clinical specimen including and blood and tissue to for detection in the molecular assays. This work represented a cooperative research development program between the Kramer-Tyagi/Perlin labs on probe development

  5. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOEpatents

    Siezak, Thomas R.; Gardner, Shea; Torres, Clinton; Vitalis, Elizabeth; Lenhoff, Raymond J.

    2013-01-15

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of agricultural pathogens in a sample. Genomic sequence information from agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay and/or an array assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  6. Multiplex detection of agricultural pathogens

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Mary Teresa; Slezak, Thomas Richard; Messenger, Sharon Lee

    2010-09-14

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of seven agricultural pathogens (BPSV; BHV; BVD; FMDV; BTV; SVD; and VESV) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from 7 agricultural pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  7. Epidemiology and pathogenicity of African bat lyssaviruses.

    PubMed

    Markotter, W; Van Eeden, C; Kuzmin, I V; Rupprecht, C E; Paweska, J T; Swanepoel, R; Fooks, A R; Sabeta, C T; Cliquet, F; Nel, L H

    2008-01-01

    Lyssaviruses belonging to all four known African Lyssavirus genotypes (gts) have been reported and isolated from SouthAfrica over the past few decades. These are: (1) Duvenhage virus (gt4), isolated again in 2006 from a human fatality; (2) Mokola virus (gt3), isolated irregularly, mostly from cats; (3) Lagos bat virus (gt2) continually isolated over the past four years from Epomophorus fruit bats and from incidental terrestrial animals and (4) Rabies virus (gt1) - with two virus biotypes endemic in mongoose and in canid species (mostly domestic dogs, jackals and bat-eared foxes), respectively. Only two of these are associated with bats in Southern Africa, viz. Duvenhage virus and Lagos bat virus (gts 4 and 2). For both these genotypes the authors have embarked on a programme of comparative study of molecular epidemiology. Duvenhage virus nucleoprotein nucleotide sequence analysis indicated a very low nucleotide diversity even though isolates were isolated decades apart. In contrast, individual isolates of Lagos bat virus were found to differ significantly with respectto nucleoprotein gene nucleotide sequence diversity as well as in pathogenicity profiles. PMID:18634494

  8. Multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens

    DOEpatents

    McBride, Mary; Slezak, Thomas; Birch, James M.

    2012-07-31

    Described are kits and methods useful for detection of respiratory pathogens (influenza A (including subtyping capability for H1, H3, H5 and H7 subtypes) influenza B, parainfluenza (type 2), respiratory syncytial virus, and adenovirus) in a sample. Genomic sequence information from the respiratory pathogens was analyzed to identify signature sequences, e.g., polynucleotide sequences useful for confirming the presence or absence of a pathogen in a sample. Primer and probe sets were designed and optimized for use in a PCR based, multiplexed Luminex assay to successfully identify the presence or absence of pathogens in a sample.

  9. APDS: Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Langlois, R G; Brown, S; Burris, L; Colston, B; Jones, L; Makarewicz, T; Mariella, R; Masquelier, D; McBride, M; Milanovich, F; Masarabadi, S; Venkateswaran, K; Marshall, G; Olson, D; Wolcott, D

    2002-02-14

    An early warning system to counter bioterrorism, the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) continuously monitors the environment for the presence of biological pathogens (e.g., anthrax) and once detected, it sounds an alarm much like a smoke detector warns of a fire. Long before September 11, 2001, this system was being developed to protect domestic venues and events including performing arts centers, mass transit systems, major sporting and entertainment events, and other high profile situations in which the public is at risk of becoming a target of bioterrorist attacks. Customizing off-the-shelf components and developing new components, a multidisciplinary team developed APDS, a stand-alone system for rapid, continuous monitoring of multiple airborne biological threat agents in the environment. The completely automated APDS samples the air, prepares fluid samples in-line, and performs two orthogonal tests: immunoassay and nucleic acid detection. When compared to competing technologies, APDS is unprecedented in terms of flexibility and system performance.

  10. Use of cross-reactive serological assays for detecting novel pathogens in wildlife: assessing an appropriate cutoff for henipavirus assays in African bats.

    PubMed

    Peel, Alison J; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Baker, Kate S; Barr, Jennifer A; Crameri, Gary; Hayman, David T S; Feng, Yan-Ru; Broder, Christopher C; Wang, Lin-Fa; Cunningham, Andrew A; Wood, James L N

    2013-11-01

    Reservoir hosts of novel pathogens are often identified or suspected as such on the basis of serological assay results, prior to the isolation of the pathogen itself. Serological assays might therefore be used outside of their original, validated scope in order to infer seroprevalences in reservoir host populations, until such time that specific diagnostic assays can be developed. This is particularly the case in wildlife disease research. The absence of positive and negative control samples and gold standard diagnostic assays presents challenges in determining an appropriate threshold, or 'cutoff', for the assay that enables differentiation between seronegative and seropositive individuals. Here, multiple methods were explored to determine an appropriate cutoff for a multiplexed microsphere assay that is used to detect henipavirus antibody binding in fruit bat plasma. These methods included calculating multiples of 'negative' control assay values, receiver operating characteristic curve analyses, and Bayesian mixture models to assess the distribution of assay outputs for classifying seropositive and seronegative individuals within different age classes. As for any diagnostic assay, the most appropriate cutoff determination method and value selected must be made according to the aims of the study. This study is presented as an example for others where reference samples, and assays that have been characterised previously, are absent. PMID:23835034

  11. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Dzenitis, J M; Makarewicz, A J

    2009-01-13

    We developed, tested, and now operate a civilian biological defense capability that continuously monitors the air for biological threat agents. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS) collects, prepares, reads, analyzes, and reports results of multiplexed immunoassays and multiplexed PCR assays using Luminex{copyright} xMAP technology and flow cytometer. The mission we conduct is particularly demanding: continuous monitoring, multiple threat agents, high sensitivity, challenging environments, and ultimately extremely low false positive rates. Here, we introduce the mission requirements and metrics, show the system engineering and analysis framework, and describe the progress to date including early development and current status.

  12. Real Time Detection of Foodborne Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Velusamy, V.; Arshak, K.; Korostynka, O.; Vaseashta, Ashok; Adley, C.

    Contamination of foods by harmful bacteria by natural events or malicious intent poses a serious threat to public health and safety. This review introduces current technologies in detecting pathogens in food and foodborne illnesses. Causes of foodborne diseases and trends impacting foodborne diseases such as globalization and changes in micro-organisms, human populations, lifestyles, and climates are addressed. In addition, a review of the limitations in detecting pathogens with conventional technologies is presented. Finally, a review of nanostructured and nanomaterials based sensing technologies by pathogen, detection limits, and advantages is described.

  13. Digital PCR for detection of citrus pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus trees are often infected with multiple pathogens of economic importance, especially those with insect or mite vectors. Real-time/quantitative PCR (qPCR) has been used for high-throughput detection and relative quantification of pathogens; however, target reference or standards are required. I...

  14. Waterborne Pathogens: Detection Methods and Challenges

    PubMed Central

    Ramírez-Castillo, Flor Yazmín; Loera-Muro, Abraham; Jacques, Mario; Garneau, Philippe; Avelar-González, Francisco Javier; Harel, Josée; Guerrero-Barrera, Alma Lilián

    2015-01-01

    Waterborne pathogens and related diseases are a major public health concern worldwide, not only by the morbidity and mortality that they cause, but by the high cost that represents their prevention and treatment. These diseases are directly related to environmental deterioration and pollution. Despite the continued efforts to maintain water safety, waterborne outbreaks are still reported globally. Proper assessment of pathogens on water and water quality monitoring are key factors for decision-making regarding water distribution systems’ infrastructure, the choice of best water treatment and prevention waterborne outbreaks. Powerful, sensitive and reproducible diagnostic tools are developed to monitor pathogen contamination in water and be able to detect not only cultivable pathogens but also to detect the occurrence of viable but non-culturable microorganisms as well as the presence of pathogens on biofilms. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) is a helpful tool to evaluate the scenarios for pathogen contamination that involve surveillance, detection methods, analysis and decision-making. This review aims to present a research outlook on waterborne outbreaks that have occurred in recent years. This review also focuses in the main molecular techniques for detection of waterborne pathogens and the use of QMRA approach to protect public health. PMID:26011827

  15. Waterborne pathogens: detection methods and challenges.

    PubMed

    Ramírez-Castillo, Flor Yazmín; Loera-Muro, Abraham; Jacques, Mario; Garneau, Philippe; Avelar-González, Francisco Javier; Harel, Josée; Guerrero-Barrera, Alma Lilián

    2015-01-01

    Waterborne pathogens and related diseases are a major public health concern worldwide, not only by the morbidity and mortality that they cause, but by the high cost that represents their prevention and treatment. These diseases are directly related to environmental deterioration and pollution. Despite the continued efforts to maintain water safety, waterborne outbreaks are still reported globally. Proper assessment of pathogens on water and water quality monitoring are key factors for decision-making regarding water distribution systems' infrastructure, the choice of best water treatment and prevention waterborne outbreaks. Powerful, sensitive and reproducible diagnostic tools are developed to monitor pathogen contamination in water and be able to detect not only cultivable pathogens but also to detect the occurrence of viable but non-culturable microorganisms as well as the presence of pathogens on biofilms. Quantitative microbial risk assessment (QMRA) is a helpful tool to evaluate the scenarios for pathogen contamination that involve surveillance, detection methods, analysis and decision-making. This review aims to present a research outlook on waterborne outbreaks that have occurred in recent years. This review also focuses in the main molecular techniques for detection of waterborne pathogens and the use of QMRA approach to protect public health. PMID:26011827

  16. Tuberculosis Detection by Giant African Pouched Rats

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie; Durgin, Amy; Mahoney, Amanda

    2011-01-01

    In recent years, operant discrimination training procedures have been used to teach giant African pouched rats to detect tuberculosis (TB) in human sputum samples. This article summarizes how the rats are trained and used operationally, as well as their performance in studies published to date. Available data suggest that pouched rats, which can…

  17. Detection of Pathogens Using AFM and SPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaseashta, Ashok

    2005-03-01

    A priori detection of pathogens in food and water has become a subject of paramount importance. Several recent incidents have resulted in the government passing stringent regulations for tolerable amounts of contamination of food products. Identification and/or monitoring of bacterial contamination in food are critical. The conventional methods of pathogen detection require time-consuming steps to arrive disembark at meaningful measurement in a timely manner as the detection time exceeds the time in which perishable food recycles through the food chain distribution. The aim of this presentation is to outline surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) as two methods for fast detect6ion of pathogens. Theoretical basis of SPR and experimental results of SPR and AFM on E. coli O157:H7 and prion are presented.

  18. Detection of enteric pathogens by the nodosome.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2014-03-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein (NOD)1 and NOD2 participate in signaling pathways that detect pathogen-induced processes, such as the presence of peptidoglycan fragments in the host cell cytosol, as danger signals. Recent work suggests that peptidoglycan fragments activate NOD1 indirectly, through activation of the small Rho GTPase Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1). Excessive activation of small Rho GTPases by virulence factors of enteric pathogens also triggers the NOD1 signaling pathway. Many enteric pathogens use virulence factors that alter the activation state of small Rho GTPases, thereby manipulating the host cell cytoskeleton of intestinal epithelial cells to promote bacterial attachment or entry. These data suggest that the NOD1 signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells provides an important sentinel function for detecting 'breaking and entering' by enteric pathogens. PMID:24268520

  19. Detection of enteric pathogens by the nodosome

    PubMed Central

    Keestra, A. Marijke; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2014-01-01

    Nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain protein (NOD)1 and NOD2 participate in signaling pathways that detect pathogen-induced processes, such as the presence of peptidoglycan fragments in the host cell cytosol, as danger signals. Recent work suggests that peptidoglycan fragments activate NOD1 indirectly, through activation of the small Rho GTPase Ras-related C3 botulinum toxin substrate 1 (RAC1). Excessive activation of small Rho GTPases by virulence factors of enteric pathogens also triggers the NOD1 signaling pathway. Many enteric pathogens use virulence factors that alter the activation state of small Rho GTPases, thereby manipulating the host cell cytoskeleton of intestinal epithelial cells to promote bacterial attachment or entry. These data suggest that the NOD1 signaling pathway in intestinal epithelial cells provides an important sentinel function for detecting ‘breaking and entering’ by enteric pathogens. PMID:24268520

  20. Automated Methods for Multiplexed Pathogen Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Straub, Tim M.; Dockendorff, Brian P.; Quinonez-Diaz, Maria D.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Shutthanandan, Janani I.; Tarasevich, Barbara J.; Grate, Jay W.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2005-09-01

    Detection of pathogenic microorganisms in environmental samples is a difficult process. Concentration of the organisms of interest also co-concentrates inhibitors of many end-point detection methods, notably, nucleic acid methods. In addition, sensitive, highly multiplexed pathogen detection continues to be problematic. The primary function of the BEADS (Biodetection Enabling Analyte Delivery System) platform is the automated concentration and purification of target analytes from interfering substances, often present in these samples, via a renewable surface column. In one version of BEADS, automated immunomagnetic separation (IMS) is used to separate cells from their samples. Captured cells are transferred to a flow-through thermal cycler where PCR, using labeled primers, is performed. PCR products are then detected by hybridization to a DNA suspension array. In another version of BEADS, cell lysis is performed, and community RNA is purified and directly labeled. Multiplexed detection is accomplished by direct hybridization of the RNA to a planar microarray. The integrated IMS/PCR version of BEADS can successfully purify and amplify 10 E. coli O157:H7 cells from river water samples. Multiplexed PCR assays for the simultaneous detection of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella, and Shigella on bead suspension arrays was demonstrated for the detection of as few as 100 cells for each organism. Results for the RNA version of BEADS are also showing promising results. Automation yields highly purified RNA, suitable for multiplexed detection on microarrays, with microarray detection specificity equivalent to PCR. Both versions of the BEADS platform show great promise for automated pathogen detection from environmental samples. Highly multiplexed pathogen detection using PCR continues to be problematic, but may be required for trace detection in large volume samples. The RNA approach solves the issues of highly multiplexed PCR and provides ''live vs. dead'' capabilities. However

  1. Statistical methodology for pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Ogliari, Paulo José; de Andrade, Dalton Francisco; Pacheco, Juliano Anderson; Franchin, Paulo Rogério; Batista, Cleide Rosana Vieira

    2007-08-01

    The main goal of the present study was to discuss the application of the McNemar test to the comparison of proportions in dependent samples. Data were analyzed from studies conducted to verify the suitability of replacing a conventional method with a new one for identifying the presence of Salmonella. It is shown that, in most situations, the McNemar test does not provide all the elements required by the microbiologist to make a final decision and that appropriate functions of the proportions need to be considered. Sample sizes suitable to guarantee a test with a high power in the detection of significant differences regarding the problem studied are obtained by simulation. Examples of functions that are of great value to the microbiologist are presented. PMID:17803152

  2. Detection of foodborne pathogens using microarray technology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Assays based on the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) are now accepted methods for rapidly confirming the presence or absence of specific pathogens in foods and other types of samples. Conventional PCR requires the use of agarose gel electrophoresis to detect the PCR product; whereas, real-time PCR c...

  3. Quantitative multiplex detection of pathogen biomarkers

    SciTech Connect

    Mukundan, Harshini; Xie, Hongzhi; Swanson, Basil I; Martinez, Jennifer; Grace, Wynne K

    2014-10-14

    The present invention addresses the simultaneous detection and quantitative measurement of multiple biomolecules, e.g., pathogen biomarkers through either a sandwich assay approach or a lipid insertion approach. The invention can further employ a multichannel, structure with multi-sensor elements per channel.

  4. Quantitative multiplex detection of pathogen biomarkers

    DOEpatents

    Mukundan, Harshini; Xie, Hongzhi; Swanson, Basil I.; Martinez, Jennifer; Grace, Wynne K.

    2016-02-09

    The present invention addresses the simultaneous detection and quantitative measurement of multiple biomolecules, e.g., pathogen biomarkers through either a sandwich assay approach or a lipid insertion approach. The invention can further employ a multichannel, structure with multi-sensor elements per channel.

  5. DETECTION OF PATHOGENS BY FLOURESCENCE SPECTROSCOPY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Abstract This study was performed as a preliminary study for rapid detection of food bone pathogens by fluorescence spectroscopy. E coli, Salmonella and Campylobactor which are the most commonly found in food were used in this study. Bacteria were grown in agar plate and diluted in saline and prepa...

  6. Tracing enteric pathogen contamination in sub-Saharan African groundwater.

    PubMed

    Sorensen, J P R; Lapworth, D J; Read, D S; Nkhuwa, D C W; Bell, R A; Chibesa, M; Chirwa, M; Kabika, J; Liemisa, M; Pedley, S

    2015-12-15

    Quantitative PCR (qPCR) can rapidly screen for an array of faecally-derived bacteria, which can be employed as tracers to understand groundwater vulnerability to faecal contamination. A microbial DNA qPCR array was used to examine 45 bacterial targets, potentially relating to enteric pathogens, in 22 groundwater supplies beneath the city of Kabwe, Zambia in both the dry and subsequent wet season. Thermotolerant (faecal) coliforms, sanitary risks, and tryptophan-like fluorescence, an emerging real-time reagentless faecal indicator, were also concurrently investigated. There was evidence for the presence of enteric bacterial contamination, through the detection of species and group specific 16S rRNA gene fragments, in 72% of supplies where sufficient DNA was available for qPCR analysis. DNA from the opportunistic pathogen Citrobacter freundii was most prevalent (69% analysed samples), with Vibrio cholerae also perennially persistent in groundwater (41% analysed samples). DNA from other species such as Bifidobacterium longum and Arcobacter butzleri was more seasonally transient. Bacterial DNA markers were most common in shallow hand-dug wells in laterite/saprolite implicating rapid subsurface pathways and vulnerability to pollution at the surface. Boreholes into the underlying dolomites were also contaminated beneath the city highlighting that a laterite/saprolite overburden, as occurs across much of sub-Saharan aquifer, does not adequately protect underlying bedrock groundwater resources. Nevertheless, peri-urban boreholes all tested negative establishing there is limited subsurface lateral transport of enteric bacteria outside the city limits. Thermotolerant coliforms were present in 97% of sites contaminated with enteric bacterial DNA markers. Furthermore, tryptophan-like fluorescence was also demonstrated as an effective indicator and was in excess of 1.4μg/L in all contaminated sites. PMID:26363144

  7. Nanotechnologies for pathogen detection: Future alternatives?

    PubMed

    Fournier-Wirth, Chantal; Coste, Joliette

    2010-01-01

    The development of multiplex and flexible tests allowing the simultaneous analysis of pathogens presenting a transfusional risk is a real challenge. Current miniaturized platforms have been particularly marked by microarrays. These microsystems allow the optical detection of hundreds of individual targets simultaneously. However, they suffer from a low sensitivity and their combination with a preliminary target amplification step such as PCR is necessary. The variable level of expression of the infectious genomes of interest and their large diversity complicate multiplex amplification. Finally simultaneous analysis of multiple blood-transmitted agents poses numerous difficulties in diagnosis that remain unresolved by currently available technologies. Until recently, scientific and technological advances for pathogen detection have focused on target amplification and optical detection steps. Today, sample preparation is recognized as a critical area to improve. Nanotechnologies can reach the single-cell or molecular scale and consequently overcome several current technological obstacles. They offer new technological tools for improving sample preparation but also for avoiding target amplification and the current fluorescent labeling. The combination of nano-objects and nano-systems in current technologies offers new possibilities for potential applications in the detection of infectious agents. PMID:20080048

  8. Antibody conjugated graphene nanocomposites for pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sign, Chandan; Sumana, Gajjala

    2016-04-01

    Graphene oxide (GO), due to its excellent electrochemical properties and large surface area, known to be highly suitable material for biosensing application. Here, we report in situ synthesis of silver nanopaticles (AgNPs) onto the GO sheets for the electrochemical detection of Salmonella typhimurium (S.typhimurium). The GO-AgNPs composites have been deposited onto the indium tin oxide (ITO) coated glass substrate by the electrophoretic deposition technique. Carbodiimide coupling (EDC-NHS) has been used for the immobilization of antibodies of Salmonella typhimurium (anti-S.typhimurium) for detection of S.typhimurium. The electron microscopy and UV-visible studies reveal successful synthesis GO-AgNPs composites while FT-IR studies suggest the proper immobilization of anti-S.typhi. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) has been utilized for detection using anti-S.typhi/GOAgNPs/ITO based immunoelectrode as a function of S.typhimurium concentration. The fabricated immunosensor shows improved sensitivity of 33.04 μACFU-1mLcm-2 in a wide detection range of 101 to 106 CFUmL-1. This immunosensor may be utilized for the detection of other food borne pathogens like aflatoxin and E.coli also.

  9. APDS: The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Hindson, B; Makarewicz, A; Setlur, U; Henderer, B; McBride, M; Dzenitis, J

    2004-10-04

    We have developed and tested a fully autonomous pathogen detection system (APDS) capable of continuously monitoring the environment for airborne biological threat agents. The system was developed to provide early warning to civilians in the event of a bioterrorism incident and can be used at high profile events for short-term, intensive monitoring or in major public buildings or transportation nodes for long-term monitoring. The APDS is completely automated, offering continuous aerosol sampling, in-line sample preparation fluidics, multiplexed detection and identification immunoassays, and nucleic-acid based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and detection. Highly multiplexed antibody-based and duplex nucleic acid-based assays are combined to reduce false positives to a very low level, lower reagent costs, and significantly expand the detection capabilities of this biosensor. This article provides an overview of the current design and operation of the APDS. Certain sub-components of the ADPS are described in detail, including the aerosol collector, the automated sample preparation module that performs multiplexed immunoassays with confirmatory PCR, and the data monitoring and communications system. Data obtained from an APDS that operated continuously for seven days in a major U.S. transportation hub is reported.

  10. APDS: the autonomous pathogen detection system.

    PubMed

    Hindson, Benjamin J; Makarewicz, Anthony J; Setlur, Ujwal S; Henderer, Bruce D; McBride, Mary T; Dzenitis, John M

    2005-04-15

    We have developed and tested a fully autonomous pathogen detection system (APDS) capable of continuously monitoring the environment for airborne biological threat agents. The system was developed to provide early warning to civilians in the event of a bioterrorism incident and can be used at high profile events for short-term, intensive monitoring or in major public buildings or transportation nodes for long-term monitoring. The APDS is completely automated, offering continuous aerosol sampling, in-line sample preparation fluidics, multiplexed detection and identification immunoassays, and nucleic acid-based polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification and detection. Highly multiplexed antibody-based and duplex nucleic acid-based assays are combined to reduce false positives to a very low level, lower reagent costs, and significantly expand the detection capabilities of this biosensor. This article provides an overview of the current design and operation of the APDS. Certain sub-components of the ADPS are described in detail, including the aerosol collector, the automated sample preparation module that performs multiplexed immunoassays with confirmatory PCR, and the data monitoring and communications system. Data obtained from an APDS that operated continuously for 7 days in a major U.S. transportation hub is reported. PMID:15741059

  11. Uniform Fluorescent Nanobioprobes for Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Ling-Hong; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Yu, Xu; Xie, Zhixiong; Shi, Yun-Bo; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-01-01

    Manipulating biochemical reactions in living cells to synthesize nanomaterials is an attractive strategy to realize their synthesis that cannot take place in nature. Yeast cells have been skillfully utilized to produce desired nanoparticles through spatiotemporal coupling of intracellular nonrelated biochemical reaction pathways for formation of fluorescent CdSe quantum dots. Here, we have successfully transformed Staphylococcus aureus cells into cellular beacons (fluorescing cells), all of which are highly fluorescent and photostable with perfect uniformity. Importantly, on the basis of such cells, we efficiently fabricated fluorescent nanobioprobes by a specific interaction between the protein A expressed on the S. aureus surface and the Fc fragment domain of antibodies, avoiding the use of other common methods for cell surface modifications, such as molecular covalent connection or more difficult genetic and metabolic engineering. Coupled with immunomagnetic beads, the resulting fluorescent-biotargeting bifunctional cells, i.e., biotargeting cellular beacons, can be employed as nanobioprobes for detection of viruses, bacteria, and tumor cells. With this method, H9N2 AIV can be detected specifically with a limit of 8.94 ng/mL (based on protein content). Furthermore, diverse probes for detection of different pathogens or for other biomedical applications can be easily obtained by simply changing the antibody conjugated to the cell surface. PMID:24779675

  12. Autonomous system for pathogen detection and identification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belgrader, Philip; Benett, William J.; Bergman, Werner; Langlois, Richard G.; Mariella, Raymond P., Jr.; Milanovich, Fred P.; Miles, Robin R.; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi; Long, Gary; Nelson, William

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of this project is to build a prototype instrument that will, running unattended, detect, identify, and quantify BW agents. In order to accomplish this, we have chosen to start with the world's leading, proven assays for pathogens: surface-molecular recognition assays, such as antibody-based assays, implemented on a high-performance, identification (ID)-capable flow cytometer, and the polymerase chain reaction for nucleic-acid based assays. With these assays, we must integrate the capability to: (1) collect samples form aerosols, water, or surface; (2) perform sample preparation prior to the assays; (3) incubate the prepared samples, if necessary, for a period of time; (4) transport the prepared, incubated samples to the assays; (5) perform the assays; (6) interpret and report the result of the assays. Issues such as reliability, sensitivity and accuracy, quantify of consumables, maintenance schedule, etc. must be addressed satisfactorily to the end user. The highest possible sensitivity and specificity of the assay must be combined with no false alarms. Today, we have assays that can, in under 30 minutes, detect and identify simulants for BW agents at concentrations of a few hundred colony- forming units per ml of solution. If the bio-aerosol sampler of this system collects 1000 1/min and concentrates the respirable particles into 1 ml of solution with 70 percent processing efficiency over a period of 5 minutes, then this translates to a detection/ID capability of under 0.1 agent- containing particle/liter of air.

  13. Uniform fluorescent nanobioprobes for pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Ling-Hong; Cui, Ran; Zhang, Zhi-Ling; Yu, Xu; Xie, Zhixiong; Shi, Yun-Bo; Pang, Dai-Wen

    2014-05-27

    Manipulating biochemical reactions in living cells to synthesize nanomaterials is an attractive strategy to realize their synthesis that cannot take place in nature. Yeast cells have been skillfully utilized to produce desired nanoparticles through spatiotemporal coupling of intracellular nonrelated biochemical reaction pathways for formation of fluorescent CdSe quantum dots. Here, we have successfully transformed Staphylococcus aureus cells into cellular beacons (fluorescing cells), all of which are highly fluorescent and photostable with perfect uniformity. Importantly, on the basis of such cells, we efficiently fabricated fluorescent nanobioprobes by a specific interaction between the protein A expressed on the S. aureus surface and the Fc fragment domain of antibodies, avoiding the use of other common methods for cell surface modifications, such as molecular covalent connection or more difficult genetic and metabolic engineering. Coupled with immunomagnetic beads, the resulting fluorescent-biotargeting bifunctional cells, i.e., biotargeting cellular beacons, can be employed as nanobioprobes for detection of viruses, bacteria, and tumor cells. With this method, H9N2 AIV can be detected specifically with a limit of 8.94 ng/mL (based on protein content). Furthermore, diverse probes for detection of different pathogens or for other biomedical applications can be easily obtained by simply changing the antibody conjugated to the cell surface. PMID:24779675

  14. Autonomous system for pathogen detection and identification

    SciTech Connect

    Belgrader, P.; Benett, W.; Bergman, W.; Langlois, R.; Mariella, R.; Milanovich, F.; Miles, R.; Venkateswaran, K.; Long, G.; Nelson, W.

    1998-09-24

    This purpose of this project is to build a prototype instrument that will, running unattended, detect, identify, and quantify BW agents. In order to accomplish this, we have chosen to start with the world' s leading, proven, assays for pathogens: surface-molecular recognition assays, such as antibody-based assays, implemented on a high-performance, identification (ID)-capable flow cytometer, and the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for nucleic-acid based assays. With these assays, we must integrate the capability to: l collect samples from aerosols, water, or surfaces; l perform sample preparation prior to the assays; l incubate the prepared samples, if necessary, for a period of time; l transport the prepared, incubated samples to the assays; l perform the assays; l interpret and report the results of the assays. Issues such as reliability, sensitivity and accuracy, quantity of consumables, maintenance schedule, etc. must be addressed satisfactorily to the end user. The highest possible sensitivity and specificity of the assay must be combined with no false alarms. Today, we have assays that can, in under 30 minutes, detect and identify simulants for BW agents at concentrations of a few hundred colony-forming units per ml of solution. If the bio-aerosol sampler of this system collects 1000 Ymin and concentrates the respirable particles into 1 ml of solution with 70% processing efficiency over a period of 5 minutes, then this translates to a detection/ID capability of under 0.1 agent-containing particle/liter of air.

  15. Foodborne pathogen detection using hyperspectral imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Foodborne pathogens can cause various diseases and even death when humans consume foods contaminated with microbial pathogens. Traditional culture-based direct plating methods are still the “gold standard” for presumptive-positive pathogen screening. Although considerable research has been devoted t...

  16. Microbiology: Detection of Bacterial Pathogens and Their Occurrence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reasoner, Donald J.

    1978-01-01

    Presents a literature review of bacterial pathogens that are related to water pollution, covering publications from 1976-77. This review includes: (1) bacterial pathogens in animals; and (2) detection and identification of waterborne bacterial pathogens. A list of 129 references is also presented. (HM)

  17. The Autonomous Pathogen Detection System (APDS)

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, J; Dzenitis, J

    2004-09-22

    Shaped like a mailbox on wheels, it's been called a bioterrorism ''smoke detector.'' It can be found in transportation hubs such as airports and subways, and it may be coming to a location near you. Formally known as the Autonomous Pathogen Detection System, or APDS, this latest tool in the war on bioterrorism was developed at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory to continuously sniff the air for airborne pathogens and toxins such as anthrax or plague. The APDS is the modern day equivalent of the canaries miners took underground with them to test for deadly carbon dioxide gas. But this canary can test for numerous bacteria, viruses, and toxins simultaneously, report results every hour, and confirm positive samples and guard against false positive results by using two different tests. The fully automated system collects and prepares air samples around the clock, does the analysis, and interprets the results. It requires no servicing or human intervention for an entire week. Unlike its feathered counterpart, when an APDS unit encounters something deadly in the air, that's when it begins singing, quietly. The APDS unit transmits a silent alert and sends detailed data to public health authorities, who can order evacuation and begin treatment of anyone exposed to toxic or biological agents. It is the latest in a series of biodefense detectors developed at DOE/NNSA national laboratories. The manual predecessor to APDS, called BASIS (for Biological Aerosol Sentry and Information System), was developed jointly by Los Alamos and Lawrence Livermore national laboratories. That system was modified to become BioWatch, the Department of Homeland Security's biological urban monitoring program. A related laboratory instrument, the Handheld Advanced Nucleic Acid Analyzer (HANAA), was first tested successfully at LLNL in September 1997. Successful partnering with private industry has been a key factor in the rapid advancement and deployment of biodefense instruments such as these

  18. The distribution of the vectors of African pathogenic trypanosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Ford, J.

    1963-01-01

    The author lists the species, subspecies and races of tsetse fly now recognized in three morphologically distinct groups. The distribution of each group is mapped and described in relation to climate and vegetation, with some indication of the part played by past climates and orogenies in determining the modern pattern. The importance of different species as vectors of human or bovine trypanosomiasis, or both, is noted, and examples are given of the part played by human settlement as a secondary limiting factor. The author suggests that many modern problems of control are the consequences of the recent invasion of the African ecosystem by the outside world. Although there are local exceptions, the broad pattern of Glossina distribution has not been significantly changed by the entomological approach to the trypanosomiasis problem. PMID:13958704

  19. Microarrays/DNA Chips for the Detection of Waterborne Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Vale, Filipa F

    2016-01-01

    DNA microarrays are useful for the simultaneous detection of microorganisms in water samples. Specific probes targeting waterborne pathogens are selected with bioinformatics tools, synthesized and spotted onto a DNA array. Here, the construction of a DNA chip for waterborne pathogen detection is described, including the processes of probe in silico selection, synthesis, validation, and data analysis. PMID:27460375

  20. Multiplex Detection of Plant Pathogens Using a Microsphere Immunoassay Technology

    PubMed Central

    Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Himananto, Orawan; Seepiban, Channarong; Kumpoosiri, Mallika; Warin, Nuchnard; Oplatowska, Michalina; Gajanandana, Oraprapai; Grant, Irene R.; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara; Elliott, Christopher T.

    2013-01-01

    Plant pathogens are a serious problem for seed export, plant disease control and plant quarantine. Rapid and accurate screening tests are urgently required to protect and prevent plant diseases spreading worldwide. A novel multiplex detection method was developed based on microsphere immunoassays to simultaneously detect four important plant pathogens: a fruit blotch bacterium Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac), chilli vein-banding mottle virus (CVbMV, potyvirus), watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, tospovirus serogroup IV) and melon yellow spot virus (MYSV, tospovirus). An antibody for each plant pathogen was linked on a fluorescence-coded magnetic microsphere set which was used to capture corresponding pathogen. The presence of pathogens was detected by R-phycoerythrin (RPE)-labeled antibodies specific to the pathogens. The assay conditions were optimized by identifying appropriate antibody pairs, blocking buffer, concentration of RPE-labeled antibodies and assay time. Once conditions were optimized, the assay was able to detect all four plant pathogens precisely and accurately with substantially higher sensitivity than enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) when spiked in buffer and in healthy watermelon leaf extract. The assay time of the microsphere immunoassay (1 hour) was much shorter than that of ELISA (4 hours). This system was also shown to be capable of detecting the pathogens in naturally infected plant samples and is a major advancement in plant pathogen detection. PMID:23638044

  1. Impedance measurements for detecting pathogens attached to antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S.; Fuller, Christopher K.

    2004-12-28

    The use of impedance measurements to detect the presence of pathogens attached to antibody-coated beads. In a fluidic device antibodies are immobilized on a surface of a patterned interdigitated electrode. Pathogens in a sample fluid streaming past the electrode attach to the immobilized antibodies, which produces a change in impedance between two adjacent electrodes, which impedance change is measured and used to detect the presence of a pathogen. To amplify the signal, beads coated with antibodies are introduced and the beads would stick to the pathogen causing a greater change in impedance between the two adjacent electrodes.

  2. Method for detecting pathogens attached to specific antibodies

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.; Venkateswaran, Kodumudi S.; Fuller, Christopher K.

    2005-01-25

    The use of impedance measurements to detect the presence of pathogens attached to antibody-coated beads. In a fluidic device antibodies are immobilized on a surface of a patterned interdigitated electrode. Pathogens in a sample fluid streaming past the electrode attach to the immobilized antibodies, which produces a change in impedance between two adjacent electrodes, which impedance change is measured and used to detect the presence of a pathogen. To amplify the signal, beads coated with antibodies are introduced and the beads would stick to the pathogen causing a greater change in impedance between the two adjacent electrodes.

  3. Detection and identification of Phoma pathogens of potato.

    PubMed

    A'Hara, Denise

    2015-01-01

    Phoma foveata, Phoma exigua var. exigua, and Phoma eupyrena are fungal pathogens of potato, causing gangrene or pit rot symptoms in tubers, and they are responsible for significant crop losses. Various techniques are available to identify these pathogens in the laboratory. A multiplex Plexor(®) real-time PCR method which can detect and identify these pathogens in a single reaction will be presented. PMID:25981243

  4. Fluorescent labels in biosensors for pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Bianmiao; Yu, Qiaoling; Duan, Yixiang

    2015-03-01

    Infectious diseases caused by pathogens have become a life-threatening problem for millions of people around the world in recent years. Therefore, the need of efficient, fast, low-cost and user-friendly biosensing systems to monitor pathogen has increased enormously in the last few years. This paper presents an overview of different fluorescent labels and the utilization of fluorescence-based biosensor techniques for rapid, direct, sensitive and real-time identification of bacteria. In these biosensors, organic dyes, nanomaterials and rare-earth elements are playing an increasing role in the design of biosensing systems with an interest for applications in bacterial analysis. PMID:23886349

  5. Bio-Functional Au/Si Nanorods for Pathogen Detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Technical Abstract Nanotechnology applications for food safety and biosecurity, especially development of nanoscale sensors for foodborne pathogen measurement are emerging. A novel bio-functional nanosensor for Salmonella detection was developed using hetero-nanorods. The silica nanorods were fabr...

  6. A Review of Membrane-Based Biosensors for Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    van den Hurk, Remko; Evoy, Stephane

    2015-01-01

    Biosensors are of increasing interest for the detection of bacterial pathogens in many applications such as human, animal and plant health, as well as food and water safety. Membranes and membrane-like structures have been integral part of several pathogen detection platforms. Such structures may serve as simple mechanical support, function as a part of the transduction mechanism, may be used to filter out or concentrate pathogens, and may be engineered to specifically house active proteins. This review focuses on membrane materials, their associated biosensing applications, chemical linking procedures, and transduction mechanisms. The sensitivity of membrane biosensors is discussed, and the state of the field is evaluated and summarized. PMID:26083229

  7. Resequencing Pathogen Microarray (RPM) for prospective detection and identification of emergent pathogen strains and variants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tibbetts, Clark; Lichanska, Agnieszka M.; Borsuk, Lisa A.; Weslowski, Brian; Morris, Leah M.; Lorence, Matthew C.; Schafer, Klaus O.; Campos, Joseph; Sene, Mohamadou; Myers, Christopher A.; Faix, Dennis; Blair, Patrick J.; Brown, Jason; Metzgar, David

    2010-04-01

    High-density resequencing microarrays support simultaneous detection and identification of multiple viral and bacterial pathogens. Because detection and identification using RPM is based upon multiple specimen-specific target pathogen gene sequences generated in the individual test, the test results enable both a differential diagnostic analysis and epidemiological tracking of detected pathogen strains and variants from one specimen to the next. The RPM assay enables detection and identification of pathogen sequences that share as little as 80% sequence similarity to prototype target gene sequences represented as detector tiles on the array. This capability enables the RPM to detect and identify previously unknown strains and variants of a detected pathogen, as in sentinel cases associated with an infectious disease outbreak. We illustrate this capability using assay results from testing influenza A virus vaccines configured with strains that were first defined years after the design of the RPM microarray. Results are also presented from RPM-Flu testing of three specimens independently confirmed to the positive for the 2009 Novel H1N1 outbreak strain of influenza virus.

  8. Nano/Micro and Spectroscopic Approaches to Food Pathogen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Il-Hoon; Radadia, Adarsh D.; Farrokhzad, Khashayar; Ximenes, Eduardo; Bae, Euiwon; Singh, Atul K.; Oliver, Haley; Ladisch, Michael; Bhunia, Arun; Applegate, Bruce; Mauer, Lisa; Bashir, Rashid; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-06-01

    Despite continuing research efforts, timely and simple pathogen detection with a high degree of sensitivity and specificity remains an elusive goal. Given the recent explosion of sensor technologies, significant strides have been made in addressing the various nuances of this important global challenge that affects not only the food industry but also human health. In this review, we provide a summary of the various ongoing efforts in pathogen detection and sample preparation in areas related to Fourier transform infrared and Raman spectroscopy, light scattering, phage display, micro/nanodevices, and nanoparticle biosensors. We also discuss the advantages and potential limitations of the detection methods and suggest next steps for further consideration.

  9. Detection of bacterial pathogens in environmental samples using DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Call, Douglas R; Borucki, Monica K; Loge, Frank J

    2003-05-01

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is an important tool for pathogen detection, but historically, it has not been possible to accurately identify PCR products without sequencing, Southern blots, or dot-blots. Microarrays can be coupled with PCR where they serve as a set of parallel dot-blots to enhance product detection and identification. Microarrays are composed of many discretely located probes on a solid substrate such as glass. Each probe is composed of a sequence that is complimentary to a pathogen-specific gene sequence. PCR is used to amplify one or more genes and the products are then hybridized to the array to identify species-specific polymorphism within one or more genes. We illustrate this type of array using 16S rDNA probes suitable for distinguishing between several salmonid pathogens. We also describe the use of microarrays for direct detection of either RNA or DNA without the aid of PCR, although the sensitivity of these systems currently limits their application for pathogen detection. Finally, microarrays can also be used to "fingerprint" bacterial isolates and they can be used to identify diagnostic markers suitable for developing new PCR-based detection assays. We illustrate this type of array for subtyping an important food-borne pathogen, Listeria monocytogenes. PMID:12654494

  10. Innovative applications of bacteriophages in rapid detection and identification of foodborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Relative to traditional microbiological approaches, biosensors are a rapid method for foodborne bacterial pathogen detection. Biosensors function by detecting the interaction of the target pathogen, or pathogen derived molecule, with a biological recognition component which must have sufficient aff...

  11. Point detection of bacterial and viral pathogens using oral samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malamud, Daniel

    2008-04-01

    Oral samples, including saliva, offer an attractive alternative to serum or urine for diagnostic testing. This is particularly true for point-of-use detection systems. The various types of oral samples that have been reported in the literature are presented here along with the wide variety of analytes that have been measured in saliva and other oral samples. The paper focuses on utilizing point-detection of infectious disease agents, and presents work from our group on a rapid test for multiple bacterial and viral pathogens by monitoring a series of targets. It is thus possible in a single oral sample to identify multiple pathogens based on specific antigens, nucleic acids, and host antibodies to those pathogens. The value of such a technology for detecting agents of bioterrorism at remote sites is discussed.

  12. Multimodal plasmonic nanosensor for the detection of pathogenic bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tay, Li-Lin; Hulse, John; Ryan, Shannon; Tanha, Jamshid; Fraser, Jeff; Wu, Xiaohua

    2009-08-01

    Multi-modal sensing scheme significantly improves the detection accuracy but can also introduce extra complexity in the overall design of the sensor. We overcome this difficulty by utilizing the plasmonic properties of metallic nanoparticles. In this study, we will present a simple dual optical sensing mechanism which harvests signals of the resonantly excited metallic nanostructure in the form of surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) and resonant Rayleigh scattering. Silver and gold nanoparticles labeled with appropriate antibodies act as signal transduction units and upon exposure to the targeted pathogen render the targeted species optically active. We demonstrate that detection of a single pathogen cell is easily attainable with the dual detection scheme. Furthermore, we explore the markedly different SERS intensity observed from the use of two very different antibody recognition units during the pathogen labeling process.

  13. Waveguide-Based Biosensors for Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Mukundan, Harshini; Anderson, Aaron S.; Grace, W. Kevin; Grace, Karen M.; Hartman, Nile; Martinez, Jennifer S.; Swanson, Basil I.

    2009-01-01

    Optical phenomena such as fluorescence, phosphorescence, polarization, interference and non-linearity have been extensively used for biosensing applications. Optical waveguides (both planar and fiber-optic) are comprised of a material with high permittivity/high refractive index surrounded on all sides by materials with lower refractive indices, such as a substrate and the media to be sensed. This arrangement allows coupled light to propagate through the high refractive index waveguide by total internal reflection and generates an electromagnetic wave—the evanescent field—whose amplitude decreases exponentially as the distance from the surface increases. Excitation of fluorophores within the evanescent wave allows for sensitive detection while minimizing background fluorescence from complex, “dirty” biological samples. In this review, we will describe the basic principles, advantages and disadvantages of planar optical waveguide-based biodetection technologies. This discussion will include already commercialized technologies (e.g., Corning’s EPIC® Ô, SRU Biosystems’ BIND™, Zeptosense®, etc.) and new technologies that are under research and development. We will also review differing assay approaches for the detection of various biomolecules, as well as the thin-film coatings that are often required for waveguide functionalization and effective detection. Finally, we will discuss reverse-symmetry waveguides, resonant waveguide grating sensors and metal-clad leaky waveguides as alternative signal transducers in optical biosensing. PMID:22346727

  14. Evaluation of coral pathogen growth rates after exposure to atmospheric African dust samples

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lisle, John T.; Garrison, Virginia H.; Gray, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    Laboratory experiments were conducted to assess if exposure to atmospheric African dust stimulates or inhibits the growth of four putative bacterial coral pathogens. Atmospheric dust was collected from a dust-source region (Mali, West Africa) and from Saharan Air Layer masses over downwind sites in the Caribbean [Trinidad and Tobago and St. Croix, U.S. Virgin Islands (USVI)]. Extracts of dust samples were used to dose laboratory-grown cultures of four putative coral pathogens: Aurantimonas coralicida (white plague type II), Serratia marcescens (white pox), Vibrio coralliilyticus, and V. shiloi (bacteria-induced bleaching). Growth of A. coralicida and V. shiloi was slightly stimulated by dust extracts from Mali and USVI, respectively, but unaffected by extracts from the other dust sources. Lag time to the start of log-growth phase was significantly shortened for A. coralicida when dosed with dust extracts from Mali and USVI. Growth of S. marcescens and V. coralliilyticus was neither stimulated nor inhibited by any of the dust extracts. This study demonstrates that constituents from atmospheric dust can alter growth of recognized coral disease pathogens under laboratory conditions.

  15. Fluorescent homogeneous immunosensors for detecting pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Heyduk, Ewa; Heyduk, Tomasz

    2010-01-15

    We developed a straightforward antibody-based assay for rapid homogeneous detection of bacteria. Our sensors utilize antibody recognizing cell-surface epitopes of the target cell. Two samples of the antibody are prepared, each labeled via nanometer size flexible linkers with short complementary oligonucleotides that are modified with fluorochromes that could participate in fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET). The length of the complementary oligonucleotide sequences was designed such that very little annealing occurred in the absence of the target cells. In the presence of the target cells the two labeled antibodies bind to the surface of the cell resulting in a large local concentration of the complementary oligonucleotides that are attached to the antibody. This in turn drives the annealing of the complementary oligonucleotides which brings the fluorescence probes to close proximity producing large FRET signals proportional to the amount of target cells. Long flexible linkers used to attach the oligonucleotides to the antibody enable target-induced oligonucleotide annealing even if the density of surface antigens is only modest. We used Escherichia coli 0157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium to demonstrate that this design produced sensors exhibiting rapid response time, high specificity, and sensitivity in detecting the target bacteria. PMID:19782039

  16. Automated RNA Extraction and Purification for Multiplexed Pathogen Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Bruzek, Amy K.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.

    2005-01-01

    Pathogen detection has become an extremely important part of our nation?s defense in this post 9/11 world where the threat of bioterrorist attacks are a grim reality. When a biological attack takes place, response time is critical. The faster the biothreat is assessed, the faster countermeasures can be put in place to protect the health of the general public. Today some of the most widely used methods for detecting pathogens are either time consuming or not reliable [1]. Therefore, a method that can detect multiple pathogens that is inherently reliable, rapid, automated and field portable is needed. To that end, we are developing automated fluidics systems for the recovery, cleanup, and direct labeling of community RNA from suspect environmental samples. The advantage of using RNA for detection is that there are multiple copies of mRNA in a cell, whereas there are normally only one or two copies of DNA [2]. Because there are multiple copies of mRNA in a cell for highly expressed genes, no amplification of the genetic material may be necessary, and thus rapid and direct detection of only a few cells may be possible [3]. This report outlines the development of both manual and automated methods for the extraction and purification of mRNA. The methods were evaluated using cell lysates from Escherichia coli 25922 (nonpathogenic), Salmonella typhimurium (pathogenic), and Shigella spp (pathogenic). Automated RNA purification was achieved using a custom sequential injection fluidics system consisting of a syringe pump, a multi-port valve and a magnetic capture cell. mRNA was captured using silica coated superparamagnetic beads that were trapped in the tubing by a rare earth magnet. RNA was detected by gel electrophoresis and/or by hybridization of the RNA to microarrays. The versatility of the fluidics systems and the ability to automate these systems allows for quick and easy processing of samples and eliminates the need for an experienced operator.

  17. Recent sensing technologies for pathogen detection in milk: a review.

    PubMed

    Mortari, Alessia; Lorenzelli, Leandro

    2014-10-15

    Quality control utilising Hazard Analysis and Critical Control Points in the dairy industry generates a large volume of samples. The associated costs are significant. The development and application of fast, sensitive and cost effective analytical systems for pathogen detection in milk could aid the industry in the reduction of overheads, find new uses in dairy farming and production precision management and unlock new markets. Recent progress in pathogen sensing technologies for milk analysis, in particular nucleic acid amplification and biosensors, is reviewed here. The importance of representative samples, detection probability and Practical Detection Limit is clarified. Methods for sample pretreatment are discussed in association with the most applicable detection methods. The major findings are summarised and future perspectives are drawn to inspire new ideas in the scientific community. PMID:24768759

  18. AOTF hyperspectral microscope imaging for foodborne pathogenic bacteria detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method, which provides both spatial and spectral information, can be effective for foodborne pathogen detection. The acousto-optic tunable filter (AOTF)-based HMI method can be used to characterize spectral properties of biofilms formed by Salmonella enteritidi...

  19. Hyperspectral Reflectance Imaging for Detecting a Foodborne Pathogen: Campylobacter

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper is concerned with the development of a hyperspectral reflectance imaging technique for detecting and identifying one of the most common foodborne pathogens, Campylobacter. Direct plating using agars is an effective tool for laboratory tests and analyses of microorganisms. The morphology (...

  20. Bio-functional Au/Si Nanrods for Pathogen Detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Nanotechnology applications for food safety and biosecurity, especially development of nanoscale sensors for foodborne pathogen measurement are emerging. A novel bio-functional nanosensor for Salmonella detection was developed using hetero-nanorods. The silica nanorods were fabricated by glancing a...

  1. Multiple Pathogen Detection Using Biosensors: Advancements and Challenges

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Advancements in biosensor research have considerably impacted clinical diagnostics for human health. Efforts in capitalizing on the sensitivity of biosensors for food pathogen detection are evident in the food safety/security research community. For practical application with foods that normally h...

  2. Hyperspectral Imaging for Detecting Pathogens Grown on Agar Plates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper is concerned with the development of a hyperspectral imaging technique for detecting and identifying one of the most common foodborne pathogens, Campylobacter. Direct plating using agars is an effective tool for laboratory tests and analyses of microorganisms. The morphology (size, growth...

  3. Hyperspectral imaging using RGB color for foodborne pathogen detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the latest development of a color vision technique for detecting colonies of foodborne pathogens grown on agar plates with a hyperspectral image classification model that was developed using full hyperspectral data. The hyperspectral classification model depended on reflectance sp...

  4. Rapid detection, characterization, and enrumeration of food-borne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In recent years, there has been much research activity on the development of methodologies that are rapid, accurate, and ultrasensitive for detecting pathogenic microorganisms in food. Rapid methods include immunological systems such as the lateral flow assays and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays...

  5. Laboratory evaluation of pathogenicity of entomogenous nematodes to African tick species.

    PubMed

    Kaaya, G P; Samish, M; Glazer, I

    2000-01-01

    Five strains of entomogenous nematodes, Steinernema carpocapsae strains DD, Mexican, SR, and Heterorhabditis bacteriophora strains 1S5 and HP88, were tested for their pathogenicity to various developmental stages of five African tick species namely; Rhipicephalus appendiculatus, R. evertsi, Amblyomma variegatum, A. gemma, and Boophilus decoloratus. In engorged female R. appendiculatus, all nematodes at a concentration of 1,000 infective juveniles (IJ)/dish, except S. carpocapsae Mexican strain, induced high mortalities (56-100%), whereas in engorged female R. evertsi, only S. carpocapsae DD and H. bacteriophora HP88 induced high mortalities (78% and 56%, respectively). In engorged B. decoloratus, S. carpocapsae DD, Mexican, SR and H. bacteriophora HP88 (100 IJ/dish) induced mortalities of 85%, 65%, 80%, and 100%, respectively. In all cases, except for S. carpocapsae Mexican strain, a higher concentration (5,000 IJ/dish) did not result in higher mortality than occurred with 1,000 IJ/dish. Unfed females and immature stages of ticks were found to be generally resistant to the nematodes. The feasibility of using entomogenous nematodes for biological control of African tick species are briefly discussed. PMID:11193637

  6. Detection of major diarrheagenic bacterial pathogens by multiplex PCR panels.

    PubMed

    Sjöling, Åsa; Sadeghipoorjahromi, Leila; Novak, Daniel; Tobias, Joshua

    2015-03-01

    Diarrheal diseases remain a major threat to the youngest population in low- and middle-income countries. The main bacterial pathogens causing diarrhea are diarrheagenic Escherichia coli (DEC) that consists of enteroaggregative (EAEC), enteropathogenic (EPEC), enterotoxigenic (ETEC), enterohemorrhagic EHEC and enteroinvasive E. coli (EIEC), Salmonella, Shigella spp. (S. dysenteria, S. sonnei, S. flexneri) Campylobacter (C. coli, C. jejuni), Vibrio (V. vulnificus, V. parahaemolyticusm, V. cholerae), Yersinia enterocolitica and Aeromonas hydrophila. The aim of this study was to set up rapid multiplex PCR (mPCR) panels to identify these diarrheagenic pathogens based on their specific virulence genes. Primers against specific target genes were combined into three mPCR panels: one for diarrheal E. coli, one for pathogens causing mainly bloody diarrhea, and the third for the remaining pathogens. The panels were tested against a set of stool samples from Swedish children with diarrhea and controls and the analysis identified bacterial pathogens in 14/54 (26%) of the samples. These results show that our three developed mPCR panels can detect main bacterial diarrheagenic pathogens in clinical samples. PMID:25542594

  7. Portable Microfluidic Integrated Plasmonic Platform for Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Tokel, Onur; Yildiz, Umit Hakan; Inci, Fatih; Durmus, Naside Gozde; Ekiz, Okan Oner; Turker, Burak; Cetin, Can; Rao, Shruthi; Sridhar, Kaushik; Natarajan, Nalini; Shafiee, Hadi; Dana, Aykutlu; Demirci, Utkan

    2015-01-01

    Timely detection of infectious agents is critical in early diagnosis and treatment of infectious diseases. Conventional pathogen detection methods, such as enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), culturing or polymerase chain reaction (PCR) require long assay times, and complex and expensive instruments, which are not adaptable to point-of-care (POC) needs at resource-constrained as well as primary care settings. Therefore, there is an unmet need to develop simple, rapid, and accurate methods for detection of pathogens at the POC. Here, we present a portable, multiplex, inexpensive microfluidic-integrated surface plasmon resonance (SPR) platform that detects and quantifies bacteria, i.e., Escherichia coli (E. coli) and Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) rapidly. The platform presented reliable capture and detection of E. coli at concentrations ranging from ~105 to 3.2 × 107 CFUs/mL in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) and peritoneal dialysis (PD) fluid. The multiplexing and specificity capability of the platform was also tested with S. aureus samples. The presented platform technology could potentially be applicable to capture and detect other pathogens at the POC and primary care settings. PMID:25801042

  8. Bioluminescence Imaging to Detect Late Stage Infection of African Trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Burrell-Saward, Hollie; Ward, Theresa H

    2016-01-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a multi-stage disease that manifests in two stages; an early blood stage and a late stage when the parasite invades the central nervous system (CNS). In vivo study of the late stage has been limited as traditional methodologies require the removal of the brain to determine the presence of the parasites. Bioluminescence imaging is a non-invasive, highly sensitive form of optical imaging that enables the visualization of a luciferase-transfected pathogen in real-time. By using a transfected trypanosome strain that has the ability to produce late stage disease in mice we are able to study the kinetics of a CNS infection in a single animal throughout the course of infection, as well as observe the movement and dissemination of a systemic infection. Here we describe a robust protocol to study CNS infections using a bioluminescence model of African trypanosomiasis, providing real time non-invasive observations which can be further analyzed with optional downstream approaches. PMID:27284970

  9. Application of bacteriophages for detection of foodborne pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Loessner, Martin J

    2014-01-01

    Bacterial contamination of food products presents a challenge for the food industry and poses a high risk for the consumer. Despite increasing awareness and improved hygiene measures, foodborne pathogens remain a threat for public health, and novel methods for detection of these organisms are needed. Bacteriophages represent ideal tools for diagnostic assays because of their high target cell specificity, inherent signal-amplifying properties, easy and inexpensive production, and robustness. Every stage of the phage lytic multiplication cycle, from the initial recognition of the host cell to the final lysis event, may be harnessed in several ways for the purpose of bacterial detection. Besides intact phage particles, phage-derived affinity molecules such as cell wall binding domains and receptor binding proteins can serve for this purpose. This review provides an overview of existing phage-based technologies for detection of foodborne pathogens, and highlights the most recent developments in this field, with particular emphasis on phage-based biosensors. PMID:24533229

  10. Bio-functional Au/Si nanorods for pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Bosoon; Fu, Junxue; Zhao, Yiping; Siragusa, Gregory R.; Cho, Yong-Jin; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Windham, William R.

    2007-09-01

    Nanotechnology applications for food safety and biosecurity, especially development of nanoscale sensors for foodborne pathogen measurement are emerging. A novel bio-functional nanosensor for Salmonella detection was developed using hetero-nanorods. The silica nanorods were fabricated by glancing angle deposition method and the gold was sputtered onto the silica nanorods. Alexa488-succinimide dye was immobilized onto the annealed Si nanorods via the attachment between dye ester and primary amine group supplied by the 3-Aminopropyltriethoxysilane. The anti-Salmonella was conjugated to gold via Dithiobis[succinimidylpropionate] self-assembly monolayer. Due to the high aspect ratio nature of the Si nanorods, hundreds or thousands of dye molecules attached to the Si nanorods produced enhanced fluorescence signal. These biologically functionalized nanorods can be used to detect Salmonella with fluorescent microscopic imaging. This new nanoscale biosensor will be able to detect other foodborne pathogenic bacteria for food safety and security applications.

  11. Multiplexed detection of foodborne pathogens based on magnetic particles.

    PubMed

    Brandão, Delfina; Liébana, Susana; Pividori, María Isabel

    2015-09-25

    This paper addresses the novel approaches for the multiplex detection of food poisoning bacteria, paying closer attention to three of the most common pathogens involved in food outbreaks: Salmonella enterica, Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes. End-point and real-time PCR, classical immunological techniques, biosensors, microarrays and microfluidic platforms, as well as commercial kits for multiplex detection of food pathogens will be reviewed, with special focus on the role of magnetic particles in these approaches. Although the immunomagnetic separation for capturing single bacteria from contaminating microflora and interfering food components has demonstrated to improve the performance on these approaches, the integration of magnetic particles for multiplex detection of bacteria is still in a preliminary stage and requires further studies. PMID:25858812

  12. Trends in udder health and emerging mastitogenic pathogens in South African dairy herds.

    PubMed

    Petzer, I-M; Karzis, J; Watermeyer, J C; van der Schans, T J; van Reenen, R

    2009-03-01

    The aim of this study was to retrospectively analyse the results of milk samples obtained from South African dairy herds during the period 1996 to April 2007 in order to identify possible trends in isolates of microorganisms and their pathogenicity under field conditions. Milk samples were obtained from 7 of the 9 provinces in South Africa where there are low numbers of dairy cows. Although there is scientific limitation to a country wide survey, such as the variation in herd size, management skills, parity, milk yield, milking frequency and other parameters, the size of this database helps to give a fair indication of general udder health in South Africa. Cytology and routine bacteriology were performed on 379,000 milk samples of lactating cows and bacteriology on 11,946 samples from non-lactating cows. According to the results obtained, mastitis did not decrease in South Africa over the test period. The prevalence of mastitis and teat canal infection was lowest in 2002. Mastitis and teat canal infection increased from 2002 to 2006 from 8.1% and 24.1% to 15.4 and 30.0% respectively. The percentage of mastitogenic pathogens isolated from cows over these years also varied. Previously unknown or almost eradicated mastitogenic pathogens such as alphabeta haemolytic Staphylococcus aureus which is thought to be of human origin, Streptococcus agalactiae and Enterococcus canis were responsible for numerous mastitis outbreaks seen in the test samples. Coagulase-negative staphylococci were the most frequently isolated bacteria in milk samples from both lactating and dry cows, followed by Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus agalactiae. Although Staphylococcus aureus remained the principal mastitogenic pathogen in South Africa, owing to its chronic nature and resultant economic losses, most cases of mastitis were caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci. This finding increases the importance of coagulase-negative staphylococci (formerly described as a minor pathogen

  13. Food Microbial Pathogen Detection and Analysis Using DNA Microarray Technologies

    PubMed Central

    Herold, Keith E.

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Culture-based methods used for microbial detection and identification are simple to use, relatively inexpensive, and sensitive. However, culture-based methods are too time-consuming for high-throughput testing and too tedious for analysis of samples with multiple organisms and provide little clinical information regarding the pathogen (e.g., antibiotic resistance genes, virulence factors, or strain subtype). DNA-based methods, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR), overcome some these limitations since they are generally faster and can provide more information than culture-based methods. One limitation of traditional PCR-based methods is that they are normally limited to the analysis of a single pathogen, a small group of related pathogens, or a small number of relevant genes. Microarray technology enables a significant expansion of the capability of DNA-based methods in terms of the number of DNA sequences that can be analyzed simultaneously, enabling molecular identification and characterization of multiple pathogens and many genes in a single array assay. Microarray analysis of microbial pathogens has potential uses in research, food safety, medical, agricultural, regulatory, public health, and industrial settings. In this article, we describe the main technical elements of microarray technology and the application and potential use of DNA microarrays for food microbial analysis. PMID:18673074

  14. Efficient Detection of Pathogenic Leptospires Using 16S Ribosomal RNA

    PubMed Central

    Lindow, Janet; Wunder, Elsio A.; Reis, Mitermayer G.; Usmani-Brown, Sahar; Ledizet, Michel; Ko, Albert; Pal, Utpal

    2015-01-01

    Pathogenic Leptospira species cause a prevalent yet neglected zoonotic disease with mild to life-threatening complications in a variety of susceptible animals and humans. Diagnosis of leptospirosis, which primarily relies on antiquated serotyping methods, is particularly challenging due to presentation of non-specific symptoms shared by other febrile illnesses, often leading to misdiagnosis. Initiation of antimicrobial therapy during early infection to prevent more serious complications of disseminated infection is often not performed because of a lack of efficient diagnostic tests. Here we report that specific regions of leptospiral 16S ribosomal RNA molecules constitute a novel and efficient diagnostic target for PCR-based detection of pathogenic Leptospira serovars. Our diagnostic test using spiked human blood was at least 100-fold more sensitive than corresponding leptospiral DNA-based quantitative PCR assays, targeting the same 16S nucleotide sequence in the RNA and DNA molecules. The sensitivity and specificity of our RNA assay against laboratory-confirmed human leptospirosis clinical samples were 64% and 100%, respectively, which was superior then an established parallel DNA detection assay. Remarkably, we discovered that 16S transcripts remain appreciably stable ex vivo, including untreated and stored human blood samples, further highlighting their use for clinical detection of L. interrogans. Together, these studies underscore a novel utility of RNA targets, specifically 16S rRNA, for development of PCR-based modalities for diagnosis of human leptospirosis, and also may serve as paradigm for detection of additional bacterial pathogens for which early diagnosis is warranted. PMID:26091292

  15. Investigation of magnetic microdiscs for bacterial pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo-Torres, Keisha Y.; Garraud, Nicolas; Arnold, David P.; McLamore, Eric S.

    2016-05-01

    Despite strict regulations to control the presence of human pathogens in our food supply, recent foodborne outbreaks have heightened public concern about food safety and created urgency to improve methods for pathogen detection. Herein we explore a potentially portable, low-cost system that uses magnetic microdiscs for the detection of bacterial pathogens in liquid samples. The system operates by optically measuring the rotational dynamics of suspended magnetic microdiscs functionalized with pathogen-binding aptamers. The soft ferromagnetic (Ni80Fe20) microdiscs exhibit a closed magnetic spin arrangement (i.e. spin vortex) with zero magnetic stray field, leading to no disc agglomeration when in free suspension. With very high surface area for functionalization and volumes 10,000x larger than commonly used superparamagnetic nanoparticles, these 1.5-μm-diameter microdiscs are well suited for tagging, trapping, actuating, or interrogating bacterial targets. This work reports a wafer-level microfabrication process for fabrication of 600 million magnetic microdiscs per substrate and measurement of their rotational dynamics response. Additionally, the biofunctionalization of the microdiscs with DNA aptamers, subsequent binding to E. coli bacteria, and their magnetic manipulation is reported.

  16. Multiplex PCR Tests for Detection of Pathogens Associated with Gastroenteritis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hongwei; Morrison, Scott; Tang, Yi-Wei

    2016-01-01

    Synopsis A wide range of enteric pathogens can cause infectious gastroenteritis. Conventional diagnostic algorithms including culture, biochemical identification, immunoassay and microscopic examination are time consuming and often lack sensitivity and specificity. Advances in molecular technology have as allowed its use as clinical diagnostic tools. Multiplex PCR based testing has made its way to gastroenterology diagnostic arena in recent years. In this article we present a review of recent laboratory developed multiplex PCR tests and current commercial multiplex gastrointestinal pathogen tests. We will focus on two FDA cleared commercial syndromic multiplex tests: Luminex xTAG GPP and Biofire FimArray GI test. These multiplex tests can detect and identify multiple enteric pathogens in one test and provide results within hours. Multiplex PCR tests have shown superior sensitivity to conventional methods for detection of most pathogens. The high negative predictive value of these multiplex tests has led to the suggestion that they be used as screening tools especially in outbreaks. Although the clinical utility and benefit of multiplex PCR test are to be further investigated, implementing these multiplex PCR tests in gastroenterology diagnostic algorithm has the potential to improve diagnosis of infectious gastroenteritis. PMID:26004652

  17. [PCR-based detection of pathogens in clinical rheumatology].

    PubMed

    Ehrenstein, B; Reischl, U

    2016-05-01

    In the differential diagnostics of autoimmune-mediated rheumatic diseases, rheumatologists often have to consider infections (e. g. Lyme arthritis) or reactive diseases (e. g. reactive arthritis after urogenital bacterial infections). Furthermore, infections with an atypical presentation or caused by atypical pathogens (opportunistic infections) can complicate the immunosuppressive therapy of autoimmune diseases. For this purpose not only conventional microbiological culture methods but also PCR-based methods are increasingly being applied for the direct detection of pathogens in clinical specimens. The aim of this overview is to present commonly used PCR methods in the clinical practice of rheumatology and to describe their benefits and limitations compared to culture-based detection methods. PMID:26892924

  18. Microfluidics-based integrated airborne pathogen detection systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Northrup, M. Allen; Alleman-Sposito, Jennifer; Austin, Todd; Devitt, Amy; Fong, Donna; Lin, Phil; Nakao, Brian; Pourahmadi, Farzad; Vinas, Mary; Yuan, Bob

    2006-09-01

    Microfluidic Systems is focused on building microfluidic platforms that interface front-end mesofluidics to handle real world sample volumes for optimal sensitivity coupled to microfluidic circuitry to process small liquid volumes for complex reagent metering, mixing, and biochemical analysis, particularly for pathogens. MFSI is the prime contractor on two programs for the US Department of Homeland Security: BAND (Bioagent Autonomous Networked Detector) and IBADS (Instantaneous Bio-Aerosol Detection System). The goal of BAND is to develop an autonomous system for monitoring the air for known biological agents. This consists of air collection, sample lysis, sample purification, detection of DNA, RNA, and toxins, and a networked interface to report the results. For IBADS, MFSI is developing the confirmatory device which must verify the presence of a pathogen with 5 minutes of an air collector/trigger sounding an alarm. Instrument designs and biological assay results from both BAND and IBADS will be presented.

  19. Detection of pathogenic gram negative bacteria using infrared thermography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahiri, B. B.; Divya, M. P.; Bagavathiappan, S.; Thomas, Sabu; Philip, John

    2012-11-01

    Detection of viable bacteria is of prime importance in all fields of microbiology and biotechnology. Conventional methods of enumerating bacteria are often time consuming and labor-intensive. All living organisms generate heat due to metabolic activities and hence, measurement of heat energy is a viable tool for detection and quantification of bacteria. In this article, we employ a non-contact and real time method - infrared thermography (IRT) for measurement of temperature variations in four clinically significant gram negative pathogenic bacteria, viz. Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio mimicus, Proteus mirabilis and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. We observe that, the energy content, defined as the ratio of heat generated by bacterial metabolic activities to the heat lost from the liquid medium to the surrounding, vary linearly with the bacterial concentration in all the four pathogenic bacteria. The amount of energy content observed in different species is attributed to their metabolisms and morphologies that affect the convection velocity and hence heat transport in the medium.

  20. Sample preparation and assay refinements for pathogen detection platforms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Daniel V.; Kearns, Elizabeth A.; Leskinen, Stephaney D.; Magaña, Sonia; Stroot, Joyce M.; Hunter, Dawn M.; Schlemmer, Sarah M.

    2009-02-01

    Food-borne and waterborne microbial pathogens are a potential problem in biowarfare and public health. Such pathogens can affect the health, combat readiness, and effectiveness of the warfighter in a battlefield environment and present potential threats to the civilian population through intentional or natural contamination of food and water. Conventional procedures to detect and identify microbial pathogens in food, water, and other materials can take days to perform and may provide inconclusive information. Research at the University of South Florida's Advanced Biosensors Laboratory (ABL) focuses on development of sample processing procedures and biosensor-based assays for rapid detection of biothreat agents. Rapid processing methods, including use of an automated concentrator of microorganisms in water, have been developed for complex matrix samples including ground beef, apple juice, produce, potable water and recreational water, enabling such samples to be directly tested by biosensor assays for target analytes. Bacillus atrophaeus spores and other bacteria can be concentrated from potable and recreational water at low levels with a dead-end hollow-fiber ultrafiltration concentration system. Target bacteria recovered by these processing procedures can be identified by evanescent wave, fiber optic biosensors or other detection platforms. Fiber optic biosensor assays have been improved to include subsequent PCR analysis and viability determination of captured target bacteria using broth enrichment and/or ATP luminescence.

  1. Detection of pathogenic DNA at the single-molecule level

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yahiatène, Idir; Klamp, Tobias; Schüttpelz, Mark; Sauer, Markus

    2011-03-01

    We demonstrate ultrasensitive detection of pathogenic DNA in a homogeneous assay at the single-molecule level applying two-color coincidence analysis. The target molecule we quantify is a 100 nucleotide long synthetic single-stranded oligonucleotide adapted from Streptococcus pneumoniae, a bacterium causing lower respiratory tract infections. Using spontaneous hybridization of two differently fluorescing Molecular Beacons we demonstrate a detection sensitivity of 100 fM (10-13M) in 30 seconds applying a simple microfluidic device with a 100 μm channel and confocal two-color fluorescence microscopy.

  2. Fluorogenic Substrate Detection of Viable Intracellular and Extracellular Pathogenic Protozoa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jackson, Peter R.; Pappas, Michael G.; Hansen, Brian D.

    1985-01-01

    Viable Leishmania promastigotes and amastigotes were detected by epifluorescence microscopy with fluorescein diacetate being used to mark living parasites and the nucleic acid-binding compound ethidium bromide to stain dead cells. This procedure is superior to other assays because it is faster and detects viable intracellular as well as extracellular Leishmania. Furthermore, destruction of intracellular pathogens by macrophages is more accurately determined with fluorescein diacetate than with other stains. The procedure may have applications in programs to develop drugs and vaccines against protozoa responsible for human and animal disease.

  3. Rapid detection, characterization, and enumeration of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hoorfar, J

    2011-11-01

    As food safety management further develops, microbiological testing will continue to play an important role in assessing whether Food Safety Objectives are achieved. However, traditional microbiological culture-based methods are limited, particularly in their ability to provide timely data. The present review discusses the reasons for the increasing interest in rapid methods, current developments in the field, the research needs, and the future trends. The advent of biotechnology has introduced new technologies that led to the emergence of rapid diagnostic methods and altered food testing practices. Rapid methods are comprised of many different detection technologies, including specialized enzyme substrates, antibodies and DNA, ranging from simple differential plating media to the use of sophisticated instruments. The use of non-invasive sampling techniques for live animals especially came into focus with the 1990s outbreak of bovine spongiform encephalopathy that was linked to the human outbreak of Creutzfeldt Jakob's Disease. Serology is still an important tool in preventing foodborne pathogens to enter the human food supply through meat and milk from animals. One of the primary uses of rapid methods is for fast screening of large number of samples, where most of them are expected to be test-negative, leading to faster product release for sale. This has been the main strength of rapid methods such as real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR). Enrichment PCR, where a primary culture broth is tested in PCR, is the most common approach in rapid testing. Recent reports show that it is possible both to enrich a sample and enumerate by pathogen-specific real-time PCR, if the enrichment time is short. This can be especially useful in situations where food producers ask for the level of pathogen in a contaminated product. Another key issue is automation, where the key drivers are miniaturization and multiple testing, which mean that not only one instrument is flexible

  4. Integrated Detection of Pathogens and Host Biomarkers for Wounds

    SciTech Connect

    Jaing, C

    2012-03-19

    The increasing incidence and complications arising from combat wounds has necessitated a reassessment of methods for effective treatment. Infection, excessive inflammation, and incidence of drug-resistant organisms all contribute toward negative outcomes for afflicted individuals. The organisms and host processes involved in wound progression, however, are incompletely understood. We therefore set out, using our unique technical resources, to construct a profile of combat wounds which did or did not successfully resolve. We employed the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array and identified a number of nosocomial pathogens present in wound samples. Some of these identities corresponded with bacterial isolates previously cultured, while others were not obtained via standard microbiology. Further, we optimized proteomics protocols for the identification of host biomarkers indicative of various stages in wound progression. In combination with our pathogen data, our biomarker discovery efforts will provide a profile corresponding to wound complications, and will assist significantly in treatment of these complex cases.

  5. Flow cytometric detection of pathogenic E. coli in food.

    PubMed

    Raybourne, R B

    2001-05-01

    E. coli O157:H7 is one of the more important food pathogens, andrapid, quantitative methods to evaluate foods for the presence of this pathogen are needed. This unit provides exactly that: a very much simplified flow cytometric assay for detection of E. coli O157:H7 in a well established vehicle of infection, ground beef. The method uses commercially available FITC-conjugated specific antibody to this bacterial serotype. Sample preparation and bacterial enrichment procedures are described. Direct and indirect approaches for quantification of the number of bacteria are given. A key feature of the assay is the reduction in time compared with plate-counting methods; the tradeoff is a slight reduction in sensitivity. Particularly useful is the simultaneous inclusion of a spiked sample to ensure a positive control. In addition, the unit provides hints on sorting the organisms if desired. PMID:18770690

  6. Detection Of Viral And Bacterial Pathogens In Acute Respiratory Infections

    PubMed Central

    Obasi, Chidi N.; Barrett, Bruce; Brown, Roger; Vrtis, Rose; Barlow, Shari; Muller, Daniel; Gern, James

    2013-01-01

    Objectives The role of bacteria in acute respiratory illnesses (ARI) of adults and interactions with viral infections is incompletely understood. This study tested the hypothesis that bacterial co-infection during ARI adds to airway inflammation and illness severity. Methods Two groups of 97 specimens each were randomly selected from multiplex-PCR identified virus-positive and virus-negative nasal specimens obtained from adults with new onset ARI, and 40 control specimens were collected from healthy adults. All specimens were analyzed for Haemophilus influenza(HI), Moraxella catarrhalis(MC) and Streptococcus pneumonia(SP) by quantitative-PCR. General linear models tested for relationships between respiratory pathogens, biomarkers (nasal wash neutrophils and CXCL8), and ARI-severity. Results Nasal specimens from adults with ARIs were more likely to contain bacteria (37% overall; HI=28%, MC=14%, SP=7%) compared to specimens from healthy adults (5% overall; HI=0%, MC=2.5%, SP=2.5%;p<0.001). Among ARI specimens, bacteria were more likely to be detected among virus-negative specimens compared to virus-positive specimens (46% vs. 27%;p=0.0046). The presence of bacteria was significantly associated with increased CXCL8 and neutrophils, but not increased symptoms. Conclusion Pathogenic bacteria were more often detected in virus-negative ARI, and also associated with increased inflammatory biomarkers. These findings suggest the possibility that bacteria may augment virus-induced ARI and contribute to airway inflammation. Summary We tested whether bacterial pathogens were associated with ARI illness and inflammation. Bacteria were detected more often in nasal secretions during ARI, especially in samples without detectable viruses, and were associated with increased airway inflammation, but not increased symptoms. PMID:24211414

  7. Nanoparticles based DNA conjugates for detection of pathogenic microorganisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamdagni, Pragati; Khatri, Poonam; Rana, J. S.

    2016-01-01

    Infectious diseases have been on rise in the recent past. Early diagnosis plays a role as important as proper treatment and prophylaxis. The current practices of detection are time consuming which may result in unnecessary delays in treatment. Advances in nanodiagnostic approaches have been in focus lately. The rising interest and better understanding of nanoparticles have led to opening up of new frontiers in the concerned area. Optical properties of nanoparticles are being exploited to design detection systems that can provide fast, one-step and reliable results. Based on conserved DNA sequences unique to the target organism, the results offer accuracy comparable to conventional tests. Further, visual or spectrophotometric analysis omits the need of costly apparatus for result interpretation. The present review aims at putting together the information on nanoparticles based DNA conjugate systems for detection of pathogenic microorganisms.

  8. [Laboratory methods for detection and identification of biological pathogens].

    PubMed

    Bar-Haim, Erez; Aran, Adi; Marcus, Nir; Finkelstein, Arseny; Amsalem, Yoram; Yehezkeli, Yoav

    2005-05-01

    Laboratory detection and recognition methods of infectious diseases agents have developed markedly in recent years, following the proliferation of nucleic acid and immuno-based detection technologies. The present review summarizes the state of the art in current biorecognition methods: antigenic identification, genetic identification such as PCR, RFLP and FISH, protemics and mass spectrometry. For each method we have specified the technology and qualification required, time to result, specifity and sensitivity, while emphasizing the advantages and disadvantages of using each method for the detection of a given pathogen. Nucleic acid-based detection is more specific and sensitive than immunological-based detection, while the latter is simpler and expected to further development with the improvements in the affinity, specifity and mass production of new immunoglobulins. Protein-based detection methods have an advantage comparing to nucleic acid identification: the presence of the protein approves that the tested gene is functional. Mass spectrometry enables simultaneous detections of multiple proteins and thus holds a promise for new technical developments with a vast array of applications. Most physicians do not practice biodetection technologies in their every day routine, but encounter those terms in their clinical and academic work. The review aims to display basic information in this field in order to enable a common language with basic science specialists. PMID:15931898

  9. Autonomous Pathogen Detection System - FY02 Annual Progress Report

    SciTech Connect

    Colston, B; Brown, S; Burris, K; Elkin, C; Hindson, B; Langlois, R; Masquelier, D; McBride, M; Metz, T; Nasarabadi, S; Makarewicz, T; Milznovich, F; Venkateswaran, K S; Visuri, S

    2002-11-11

    The objective of this project is to design, fabricate and field demonstrate a biological agent detection and identification capability, the Autonomous Pathogen Detector System (APDS). Integrating a flow cytometer and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) detector with sample collection, sample preparation and fluidics will provide a compact, autonomously operating instrument capable of simultaneously detecting multiple pathogens and/or toxins. The APDS will operate in fixed locations, continuously monitoring air samples and automatically reporting the presence of specific biological agents. The APDS will utilize both multiplex immunoassays and nucleic acid assays to provide ''quasi-orthogonal'' multiple agent detection approaches to minimize false positives and increase the reliability of identification. Technical advances across several fronts must occur, however, to realize the full extent of the APDS. The end goal of a commercially available system for civilian biological weapon defense will be accomplished through three progressive generations of APDS instruments. The APDS is targeted for civilian applications in which the public is at high risk of exposure to covert releases of bioagent, such as major subway systems and other transportation terminals, large office complexes and convention centers. APDS is also designed to be part of a monitoring network of sensors integrated with command and control systems for wide-area monitoring of urban areas and major public gatherings. In this latter application there is potential that a fully developed APDS could add value to DoD monitoring architectures.

  10. Detection of pathogenic clostridia in biogas plant wastes.

    PubMed

    Neuhaus, Jürgen; Shehata, Awad A; Krüger, Monika

    2015-01-01

    As the number of biogas plants has grown rapidly in the last decade, the amount of potentially contaminated wastes with pathogenic Clostridium spp. has increased as well. This study reports the results from examining 203 biogas plant wastes (BGWs). The following Clostridium spp. with different frequencies could be isolated via a new enrichment medium (Krüne medium) and detected by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS): Clostridium perfringens (58 %) then Clostridium bifermentans (27 %), Clostridium tertium (23 %) and Clostridium butyricum (19 %), Clostridium cadaveris (15 %), Clostridium parapurificum (6 %), Clostridium glycolicum (5 %), Clostridium baratii (4 %), Clostridium sporogenes (2 %), Clostridium sordellii (1 %) and Clostridium subterminale (0.5 %). The mean most probable number (MPN) count of sulfite reducing bacteria was between 10(3) and 10(4)/mL, and the higher the MPN, the more pathogenic Clostridium spp. were present. Also, real-time PCR was used to be compared with culture method for C. perfringens, C. bifermentans, C. butyricum, C. sporogenes/Clostridium botulinum and C. sordellii. Although real-time PCR was more sensitive than the culture method, both systems improve the recovery rate but in different ways and are useful to determine pathogenic clostridia in biogas plants. In conclusion, BGWs could present a biohazard risk of clostridia for humans and animals. PMID:24984829

  11. New quantitative detection of pathogens in heterogeneous environmental samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eun-Hee; Wang, Xiaofang; Mitchell, Kristi; Chae, Seon-Ha; Son, Ahjeong

    2015-04-01

    Quantum dots and magnetic beads based genomic assay (NanoGene assay) has been developed for sensitive and inhibition resistant gene quantification to achieve in-situ bacteria monitoring in environmental samples. In this study, eaeA gene of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 was quantified. The result demonstrated the excellent sensitivity (i.e., limit of detection: 87 gene copies for dsDNA and 890 zeptomolar for ssDNA) in the presence of nonspecific microbial populations (Kim et al., 2010; 2011a). The feasibility of the developed gene quantification for non-laboratory environment usage (in-situ use) was investigated. Therefore, DNA hybridization was achieved at ambient temperature and minimum agitation, and the analysis was completed within hours. Most importantly, the NanoGene assay demonstrated the resistance to the presence of naturally occurring inhibitors (humic acids, cations) and residual reagents (surfactants, alcohols) from DNA extraction (Kim et al., 2011b). The assay was also applied to humic acids laden soils (7 types of soils with various amount of organic matters) and successfully quantified 105 to 108 CFU of E. coli O157:H7 per gram soil (R2 = 0.99). The results indicate that the presented NanoGene assay is suitable for further development as an in-situ bacteria monitoring method for working with heterogeneous environmental samples (Wang et al., 2013). Another aspect of the method is to transform the NanoGene assay into a portable device that can be used as a pathogenic bacteria detector in environment. The project consisted of the first inline fluidic components development and characterization as well as the first integration effort on a briefcase platform for the in-situ pathogen detection system (IPDS) (Mitchell et al., 2014). Our long term vision is to further miniaturize the briefcase platform implementation of the IPDS and to commercialize the handheld version of the IPDS.

  12. Improved approach to RNA and protein recognition for pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeiler, Brian N.; Bronk, Burt V.; Grossman, Abraham

    2000-07-01

    We are developing (U.S. Air Force, SBIR) a proprietary technology, based on the enzyme Q-beta replicase, to very rapidly detect and identify microorganisms (rRNA), virions (particularly RNA-based), and proteins of interest for pathogen detection. This enzyme is known to amplify a specific RNA signal one billion-fold in less than fifteen minutes at a constant temperature of 37 degree(s)C. RNA probes are made in `halves' that are joined to each other after their terminal ends are brought into proximity mediated by the binding to the target. Only such a full-length molecule can be amplified. We have demonstrated specific examples of recognition of RNA target sequences of interest in species of Bacillus and are investigating methods for overcoming the well-known promiscuity of the enzyme so that this recognition feature can be utilized with confidence, even in the presence of dirty backgrounds.

  13. Humic substances interfere with detection of pathogenic prion protein

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Smith, Christen B.; Booth, Clarissa J.; Wadzinski, Tyler J.; Legname, Giuseppe; Chappell, Rick; Johnson, Christopher J.; Pedersen, Joel A.

    2014-01-01

    Studies examining the persistence of prions (the etiological agent of transmissible spongiform encephalopathies) in soil require accurate quantification of pathogenic prion protein (PrPTSE) extracted from or in the presence of soil particles. Here, we demonstrate that natural organic matter (NOM) in soil impacts PrPTSE detection by immunoblotting. Methods commonly used to extract PrPTSE from soils release substantial amounts of NOM, and NOM inhibited PrPTSE immunoblot signal. The degree of immunoblot interference increased with increasing NOM concentration and decreasing NOM polarity. Humic substances affected immunoblot detection of prion protein from both deer and hamsters. We also establish that after interaction with humic acid, PrPTSE remains infectious to hamsters inoculated intracerebrally, and humic acid appeared to slow disease progression. These results provide evidence for interactions between PrPTSE and humic substances that influence both accurate measurement of PrPTSE in soil and disease transmission.

  14. Hyperspectral imaging for detecting pathogens grown on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung Chul; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Siragusa, Gregory R.; Line, John E.; Park, Bosoon; Windham, William R.

    2007-09-01

    This paper is concerned with the development of a hyperspectral imaging technique for detecting and identifying one of the most common foodborne pathogens, Campylobacter. Direct plating using agars is an effective tool for laboratory tests and analyses of microorganisms. The morphology (size, growth pattern, color, etc.) of colonies grown on agar plates has been widely used to tentatively differentiate organisms. However, it is sometimes difficult to differentiate target organisms like Campylobacters from other contaminants grown together on the same agar plates. A hyperspectral imaging system operating at the visible and near infrared (VNIR) spectral region from 400 nm to 900 nm was set up to measure spectral signatures of 17 different Campylobacter and non-Campylobacter subspecies. Protocols for culturing, imaging samples and for calibrating measured data were developed. The VNIR spectral library of all 17 organisms commonly encountered in poultry was established from calibrated hyperspectral images. A classification algorithm was developed to locate and identify Campylobacters, non-Campylobacter contaminants, and background agars with 99.29% accuracy. This research has a potential to be expanded to detect other pathogens grown on agar media.

  15. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-03-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection.

  16. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-01-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection. PMID:26940532

  17. A liquid-crystal-based DNA biosensor for pathogen detection

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mashooq; Khan, Abdur Rahim; Shin, Jae-Ho; Park, Soo-Young

    2016-01-01

    A liquid-crystal (LC)-filled transmission electron microscopy (TEM) grid cell coated with the cationic surfactant dodecyltrimethylammonium bromide (DTAB), to which a single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid probe (ssDNAprobe) was adsorbed at the LC/aqueous interface (TEMDTAB/DNA), was applied for the highly specific detection of target DNA molecules. The DTAB-coated E7 (used LC mixture) in the TEM grid (TEMDTAB) exhibited a homeotropic orientation, and changed to a planar orientation upon adsorption of the ssDNAprobe. The TEMDTAB/DNA was then exposed to complementary (target) ssDNA, which resulted in a planar-to-homeotropic configurational change of E7 that could be observed through a polarized optical microscope under crossed polarizers. The optimum adsorption density (2 μM) of ssDNAprobe enabled the detection of ≥0.05 nM complementary ssDNA. This TEMDTAB/DNA biosensor could differentiate complementary ssDNA from mismatched ssDNA as well as double-stranded DNA. It also successfully detected the genomic DNAs of the bacterium Erwinia carotovora and the fungi Rhazictonia solani. Owe to the high specificity, sensitivity, and label-free detection, this biosensor may broaden the applications of LC-based biosensors to pathogen detection. PMID:26940532

  18. Detection of Biological Pathogens Using Multiple Wireless Magnetoelastic Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Wen

    A number of recent, high-profile incidences of food-borne illness spreading through the food supply and the use of anthrax by terrorists after the September 11, 2001 attacks have demonstrated the need for new technologies that can rapidly detect the presence of biological pathogens. A bevy of biosensors show excellent detection sensitivity and specificity. However, false positive and false negative signals remain one of the primary reasons that many of these newly developed biosensors have not found application in the marketplace. The research described in this dissertation focuses on developing a free-standing magnetoelastic based bio-sensing system using a pulse method. This method allows fast detection, eliminates the bias magnetic field that is necessary in current methods, makes the system more simply and suitable for in-field detection. This system has two pairs of transformer coils, where a measurement sensor and a control sensor can be put in each pair of coils. The control sensor is used to compensate for environmental variables. The effect of pulse power on the performance of the magnetoelastic sensors in the pulse system is studied. The system is found to have excellent stability, good detection repeatability when used with multiple sensors. This research has investigated and demonstrated a multiple sensors approach. Because it will involve the simultaneous measurement of many sensors, it will significantly reduce problems encountered with false positive indications. The positioning and interference of sensors are investigated. By adding a multi-channel structure to the pulse detection system, the effect of sensor interference is minimized. The result of the repeatability test shows that the standard deviation when measuring three 1 mm magnetoelastic sensors is around 500 Hz, which is smaller than the minimum requirement for actual spores/bacteria detection. Magnetoelastic sensors immobilized with JRB7 phages and E2 phages have been used to specifically

  19. Detection of pathogenic organisms in food, water, and body fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallace, William H.; Henley, Michael V.; Sayler, Gary S.

    2002-06-01

    The construction of specific bioluminescent bacteriophage for detection of pathogenic organism can be developed to overcome interferences in complex matrices such as food, water and body fluids. Detection and identification of bacteria often require several days and frequently weeks by standard methods of isolation, growth and biochemical test. Immunoassay detection often requires the expression of the bacterial toxin, which can lead to non-detection of cells that may express the toxin under conditions different from testing protocols. Immunoassays require production of a specific antibody to the agent for detection and interference by contaminants frequently affects results. PCR based detection may be inhibited by substances in complex matrices. Modified methods of the PCR technique, such as magnetic capture-hybridization PCR (MCH-PCR), appear to improve the technique by removing the DNA products away from the inhibitors. However, the techniques required for PCR-based detection are slow and the procedures require skilled personnel working with labile reagents. Our approach is based on transferring bioluminescence (lux) genes into a selected bacteriophage. Bacteriophages are bacterial viruses that are widespread in nature and often are genus and species specific. This specificity eliminates or reduces false positives in a bacteriophage assay. The phage recognizes a specific receptor molecule on the surface of a susceptible bacterium, attaches and then injects the viral nucleic acid into the cell. The injected viral genome is expressed and then replicated, generating numerous exact copies of the viral genetic material including the lux genes, often resulting in an increase in bioluminescence by several hundred fold.

  20. Detection and characterization of foodborne pathogenic bacteria with hyperspectral microscope imaging

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid detection and identification of pathogenic microorganisms naturally occurring during food processing are important in developing intervention and verification strategies. In the poultry industry, contamination of poultry meat with foodborne pathogens (especially, Salmonella and Campylobacter) ...

  1. Development of an oligonucleotide-based microarray to detect multiple foodborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., Listeria monocytogenes and Campylobacter jejuni are considered important foodborne bacterial pathogens causing the most food-related human illnesses worldwide. Current methods for pathogen detection have limitations in effectively identifying multiple foodb...

  2. Development of an oligonucleotide-based microarray to detect multiple foodborne pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes and Campylobacter jejuni are considered important human pathogens causing the most food-related human illnesses worldwide. Current methods for pathogen detection have limitations in effectively identifying multiple foodborne patho...

  3. Fluorimetric detection of pathogenic bacteria using magnetic carbon dots.

    PubMed

    Bhaisare, Mukesh Lavkush; Gedda, Gangaraju; Khan, M Shahnawaz; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2016-05-12

    A novel and facile approach of pathogenic bacteria detection, which utilizes fluorescent sensing and bacteria capture with Magnetic carbon dots (Mag-CDs), was proposed in this work. Magnetic nanoparticles were synthesized and then decorated with C-dots, and further functionalized with amine groups (chitosan). In this way, bacteria were strongly anchored on the hybrid material Mag-CDs for highly sensitive fluorescent detection. The Mag-CDs were characterized by UV-vis, FT-IR spectra, TEM images, XRD, and EDX. The characterizations validate the fabrication of amine-Mag-CDs and the promising applications of this material. Fluorescence spectroscope and MALDI-MS were used for the detection and identification of bacterial strains, respectively. The limit of detection for Staphylococcus aureus and Escherichia coli was found to be 3 × 10(2) and 3.5 × 10(2) cfu mL(-1), respectively. With these encouraging results, it is expected that it would open revenues for promising applications of Mag-CDs nanomaterial. PMID:27114224

  4. System for rapid detection of antibiotic resistance of airborne pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fortin, M.; Noiseux, I.; Mouslinkina, L.; Vernon, M. L.; Laflamme, C.; Filion, G.; Duchaine, C.; Ho, J.

    2009-05-01

    This project uses function-based detection via a fundamental understanding of the genetic markers of AR to distinguish harmful organisms from innocuous ones. This approach circumvents complex analyses to unravel the taxonomic details of 1399 pathogen species, enormously simplifying detection requirements. Laval Hospital's fast permeabilization strategy enables AR revelation in <1hr. Packaging the AR protocols in liquid-processing cartridges and coupling these to our in-house miniature fiber optic flow cell (FOFC) provides first responders with timely information on-site. INO's FOFC platform consists of a specialty optical fiber through which a hole is transversally bored by laser micromachining. The analyte solution is injected into the hole of the fiber and the particles are detected and counted. The advantage with respect to classic free space FC is that alignment occurs in the fabrication process only and complex excitation and collection optics are replaced by optical fibers. Moreover, we use a sheathless configuration which has the advantage of increase the portability of the system, to reduce excess biohazard material and the need for weekly maintenance. In this paper we present the principle of our FOFC along with a, demonstration of the basic capability of the platform for detection of bacillus cereus spores using permeabilized staining.

  5. AOTF hyperspectral microscopic imaging for foodborne pathogenic bacteria detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Bosoon; Lee, Sangdae; Yoon, Seung-Chul; Sundaram, Jaya; Windham, William R.; Hinton, Arthur, Jr.; Lawrence, Kurt C.

    2011-06-01

    Hyperspectral microscope imaging (HMI) method which provides both spatial and spectral information can be effective for foodborne pathogen detection. The AOTF-based hyperspectral microscope imaging method can be used to characterize spectral properties of biofilm formed by Salmonella enteritidis as well as Escherichia coli. The intensity of spectral imagery and the pattern of spectral distribution varied with system parameters (integration time and gain) of HMI system. The preliminary results demonstrated determination of optimum parameter values of HMI system and the integration time must be no more than 250 ms for quality image acquisition from biofilm formed by S. enteritidis. Among the contiguous spectral imagery between 450 and 800 nm, the intensity of spectral images at 498, 522, 550 and 594 nm were distinctive for biofilm; whereas, the intensity of spectral images at 546 nm was distinctive for E. coli. For more accurate comparison of intensity from spectral images, a calibration protocol, using neutral density filters and multiple exposures, need to be developed to standardize image acquisition. For the identification or classification of unknown food pathogen samples, ground truth regions-of-interest pixels need to be selected for "spectrally pure fingerprints" for the Salmonella and E. coli species.

  6. A fractal analysis of pathogen detection by biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Doke, Atul M.; Sadana, Ajit

    2006-05-01

    A fractal analysis is presented for the detection of pathogens such as Franscisela tularensis, and Yersinia pestis (the bacterium that causes plague) using a CANARY (cellular analysis and notification of antigens risks and yields) biosensor (Rider et al., 2003). In general, the binding and dissociation rate coefficients may be adequately described by either a single- or a dual-fractal analysis. An attempt is made to relate the binding rate coefficient to the degree of heterogeneity (fractal dimension value) present on the biosensor surface. Binding and dissociation rate coefficient values obtained are presented. The kinetics aspects along with the affinity values presented are of interest, and should along with the rate coefficients presented for the binding and the dissociation phase be of significant interest in help designing better biosensors for an application area that is bound to gain increasing importance in the future.

  7. Specific Pathogen Detection Using Bioorthogonal Chemistry and Diagnostic Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Liong, Monty; Fernandez-Suarez, Marta; Issadore, David; Min, Changwook; Tassa, Carlos; Reiner, Thomas; Fortune, Sarah M.; Toner, Mehmet; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2011-01-01

    The development of faster and more sensitive detection methods capable of identifying specific bacterial types and strains has remained a longstanding clinical challenge. Thus to date, the diagnosis of bacterial infections continues to rely on the performance of time-consuming cultures. Here, we demonstrate the use of bioorthogonal chemistry for magnetically labeling specific pathogens to enable their subsequent detection by nuclear magnetic resonance. Antibodies against a bacterial target of interest were first modified with trans-cyclooctene and then coupled to tetrazine-modified magnetic nanoprobes, directly on the bacteria. This labeling method was verified using surface plasmon resonance as well as by using a miniaturized diagnostic magnetic resonance device capable of highly specific detection of Staphylococcus aureus. Compared to other copper-free bioorthogonal chemistries, the cycloaddition reaction described displayed faster kinetics and yielded higher labeling efficiency. Considering the short assay times and the portability of the necessary instrumentation, it is feasible that this approach could be adapted for clinical use in resource-limited settings. PMID:22043803

  8. Fluorescence immunoassay for detecting periodontal bacterial pathogens in plaque.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, L F; Anderson, L; Sandberg, G P; Aeppli, D M; Shelburne, C E

    1991-01-01

    A particle concentration fluorescence immunoassay has been modified into a bacterial concentration fluorescence immunoassay (BCFIA) to rapidly detect periodontopathic bacteria in human plaque samples. The BCFIA utilizes fluorescently tagged monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) directed against the lipopolysaccharide of selected gram-negative plaque bacteria. Microorganisms closely associated with periodontal disease that can be identified in plaque with the BCFIA include Porphyromonas gingivalis, Bacteroides intermedius, Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Eikenella corrodens. Briefly, the procedure involved mixing a patient's plaque sample or other bacterial preparation with a species-specific fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled MAb in a specialized microtiter plate. This mixture was incubated to allow binding of the MAb to its homologous bacteria. The bound and unbound fluorescent tagged MAbs were separated by filtration in the modified microtiter plate, and the total bacterial bound fluorescence was determined with a fluorimeter. The number of a specific bacterial species in a given plaque sample or other bacterial suspension was estimated by reference to a primary standard carried through the BCFIA. The lower detection limit of the BCFIA was 10(3) to 10(4) bacterial cells from single cultures of bacteria or 10(4) bacterial cells in mixed cultures. The coefficient of variation within and between plates for each of the five bacterium-specific MAbs in screening plaque for the periodontal pathogens was less than 10%. These results demonstrate that microbes in plaque can be used as the solid phase in the BCFIA to detect and quantitate MAbs associated with specific bacteria quickly and reliably. PMID:1761686

  9. [Prevention of bacterial risk: pathogen inactivation/detection of bacteria].

    PubMed

    Morel, P; Naegelen, C; Deschaseaux, M; Bardiaux, L

    2013-05-01

    Bacterial contamination of blood products remains the most important infectious risk of blood transfusion in 2013. Platelet concentrates (PC) are in cause in the majority of the transfusion reaction due to bacterial contaminations. A lot of prevention methods have been developed over the last 10 years (pre-donation interview, skin decontamination, diversion of the first 30 mL of the donation, leuko-reduction...), they have focused on limiting the contamination of the donations and prevent the bacterial growth in donations and/or in the blood products. These measures were effective and led to significantly reducing the risk of adverse effects associated with bacterial growth. However, every year there are about six accidents (with a high level of imputability) and one death. The reduction of the bacterial risk remains a priority for the French Blood Establishment (EFS). The procedure for skin disinfection is going to be improved in order to further strengthen this crucial step to avoid the contamination of donation. Methods of pathogen inactivation applied to plasma and PC are available in France and their effectiveness is demonstrated on the bacterial risk. Methods for bacterial detection of PC are used in many countries now. Automated culture is the most common. Alternatives are now available in the form of rapid tests able to analyze the PC just before the delivery and avoid false negatives observed with automated culture. Assessments are under way to confirm these benefits in 2013. PMID:23622837

  10. Methods of detection and characterization of pathogenic Escherichia coli

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic E. coli that cause diarrheal diseases are most often transmitted via contaminated water and foods. Microbiological testing for the presence of pathogenic bacteria in foods is a complex, multi-step process that entails culture enrichment of the food sample, screening the enriched sample w...

  11. DETECTION AND ENUMERATION OF PATHOGENS AND INDICATOR MICROORGANISMS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Pathogenic microorganisms are routinely discharged to collection systems throughout the world along with a myriad of commensal organisms, organic and inorganic wastes. It is not surprising then that the density of any given pathogen is relatively small in relationship to the popu...

  12. Characterization of novel sufraces by FTIR spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy for food pathogen detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Single molecular detection of pathogens and toxins of interest to food safety is within grasp using technology such as Atomic Force Microscopy. Using antibodies or specific aptamers connected to the AFM tip make it possible to detect a pathogen molecule on a surface. However, it also becomes necess...

  13. 9 CFR 113.36 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Detection of pathogens by the chicken... REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.36 Detection of pathogens by the chicken inoculation test. The test for...,000 doses. (b) At least 25 healthy susceptible young chickens, properly identified and obtained...

  14. 9 CFR 113.36 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Detection of pathogens by the chicken... REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.36 Detection of pathogens by the chicken inoculation test. The test for...,000 doses. (b) At least 25 healthy susceptible young chickens, properly identified and obtained...

  15. 9 CFR 113.36 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Detection of pathogens by the chicken... REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.36 Detection of pathogens by the chicken inoculation test. The test for...,000 doses. (b) At least 25 healthy susceptible young chickens, properly identified and obtained...

  16. 9 CFR 113.36 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Detection of pathogens by the chicken... REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.36 Detection of pathogens by the chicken inoculation test. The test for...,000 doses. (b) At least 25 healthy susceptible young chickens, properly identified and obtained...

  17. 9 CFR 113.36 - Detection of pathogens by the chicken inoculation test.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Detection of pathogens by the chicken... REQUIREMENTS Standard Procedures § 113.36 Detection of pathogens by the chicken inoculation test. The test for...,000 doses. (b) At least 25 healthy susceptible young chickens, properly identified and obtained...

  18. LITERATURE REVIEW OF MOLECULAR METHODS FOR SIMULTANEOUS DETECTION OF PATHOGENS IN WATER

    EPA Science Inventory

    This literature search is a review of molecular technologies (qPCR, microarray, microfluidics and lab-on-a-chip) for simultaneous detection of multiple waterborne pathogens in order to understand the state of the technology. The search content focuses on: pathogen detection witho...

  19. Detection and treatment of chemical weapons and/or biological pathogens

    DOEpatents

    Mariella Jr., Raymond P.

    2004-09-07

    A system for detection and treatment of chemical weapons and/or biological pathogens uses a detector system, an electrostatic precipitator or scrubber, a circulation system, and a control. The precipitator or scrubber is activated in response to a signal from the detector upon the detection of chemical weapons and/or biological pathogens.

  20. A microarray approach for simultaneous detection of multiple pathogens in food

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A pathogen detection microarray was developed for simultaneous detection of the four most prominent foodborne pathogens including Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes and Campylobacter jejuni. The approach utilized 14 species-specific gene targets to design a variety...

  1. Erythrophore cell response to food-associated pathogenic bacteria: implications for detection.

    PubMed

    Hutchison, Janine R; Dukovcic, Stephanie R; Dierksen, Karen P; Carlyle, Calvin A; Caldwell, Bruce A; Trempy, Janine E

    2008-09-01

    Cell-based biosensors have been proposed for use as function-based detectors of toxic agents. We report the use of Betta splendens chromatophore cells, specifically erythrophore cells, for detection of food-associated pathogenic bacteria. Evaluation of erythrophore cell response, using Bacillus spp., has revealed that this response can distinguish pathogenic Bacillus cereus from a non-pathogenic B. cereus ΔplcR deletion mutant and a non-pathogenic Bacillus subtilis. Erythrophore cells were exposed to Salmonella enteritidis, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum. Each bacterial pathogen elicited a response from erythrophore cells that was distinguished from the corresponding bacterial growth medium, and this observed response was unique for each bacterial pathogen. These findings suggest that erythrophore cell response has potential for use as a biosensor in the detection and toxicity assessment for food-associated pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21261862

  2. Human pathogenic Cryptosporidium species bioanalytical detection method with single oocyst detection capability.

    PubMed

    Connelly, John T; Nugen, Sam R; Borejsza-Wysocki, Wlodek; Durst, Richard A; Montagna, Richard A; Baeumner, Antje J

    2008-05-01

    A bioanalytical detection method for specific detection of viable human pathogenic Cryptosporidium species, C. parvum, C. hominis, and C. meleagridis is described. Oocysts were isolated from water samples via immunomagnetic separation, and mRNA was extracted with oligo-dT magnetic beads, amplified using nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), and then detected in a nucleic acid hybridization lateral flow assay. The amplified target sequence employed was hsp70 mRNA, production of which is stimulated via a brief heat shock. The described method was capable of detecting one oocyst in 10 μL using flow-cytometer-counted samples. Only viable oocysts were detected, as confirmed using 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole and propidium iodide (DAPI/PI) staining. The detection system was challenged by detecting oocysts in the presence of large numbers of common waterborne microorganisms and packed pellet material filtered from environmental water samples. When the method was compared with EPA Method 1622 for C. parvum detection, highly comparable results were obtained. Since the described detection system yields unambiguous results within 4.5 h, it is an ideal method for monitoring the safety of drinking water. PMID:18311563

  3. Multiplex PCR for the detection of African cassava mosaic virus and East African cassava mosaic Cameroon virus in cassava.

    PubMed

    Alabi, Olufemi J; Kumar, P Lava; Naidu, Rayapati A

    2008-12-01

    A multiplex PCR was developed for simultaneous detection of African cassava mosaic virus (ACMV) and East African cassava mosaic Cameroon virus (EACMCV) in cassava affected with cassava mosaic disease (CMD). One set of three primers consisting of an upstream primer common for both viruses and two down stream virus-specific primers were designed for simultaneous amplification of 368 base pair (bp) and 650 bp DNA fragments specific to the replicase gene of ACMV and EACMCV, respectively. Similarly, a second set of three primers were designed for simultaneous amplification of 540 bp and 655 bp fragments specific to the coat protein gene of EACMCV and ACMV, respectively. Primers that can amplify a 171 bp fragment of the large subunit of ribulose bisphosphate carboxylase oxygenase L were included as an internal control in these assays to determine the reliability of multiplex PCR. A simplified, cost-effective and rapid sample preparation method was adapted in place of the conventional plant DNA extraction procedure for multiplex PCR detection of ACMV and EACMCV. The method was validated using CMD-infected cassava samples obtained from farmers' fields in Nigeria. The multiplex PCR is useful for reliable assessment of the prevalence of CMBs in epidemiological studies and for crop improvement and phytosanitary programs in African countries. PMID:18789974

  4. Canine Detection of the Volatilome: A Review of Implications for Pathogen and Disease Detection

    PubMed Central

    Angle, Craig; Waggoner, Lowell Paul; Ferrando, Arny; Haney, Pamela; Passler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The volatilome is the entire set of volatile organic compounds (VOC) produced by an organism. The accumulation of VOC inside and outside of the body reflects the unique metabolic state of an organism. Scientists are developing technologies to non-invasively detect VOC for the purposes of medical diagnosis, therapeutic monitoring, disease outbreak containment, and disease prevention. Detection dogs are proven to be a valuable real-time mobile detection technology for the detection of VOC related to explosives, narcotics, humans, and many other targets of interests. Little is known about what dogs are detecting when searching for biological targets. It is important to understand where biological VOC originates and how dogs might be able to detect biological targets. This review paper discusses the recent scientific literature involving VOC analysis and postulates potential biological targets for canine detection. Dogs have shown their ability to detect pathogen and disease-specific VOC. Future research will determine if dogs can be employed operationally in hospitals, on borders, in underserved areas, on farms, and in other operational environments to give real-time feedback on the presence of a biological target. PMID:27446935

  5. Canine Detection of the Volatilome: A Review of Implications for Pathogen and Disease Detection.

    PubMed

    Angle, Craig; Waggoner, Lowell Paul; Ferrando, Arny; Haney, Pamela; Passler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The volatilome is the entire set of volatile organic compounds (VOC) produced by an organism. The accumulation of VOC inside and outside of the body reflects the unique metabolic state of an organism. Scientists are developing technologies to non-invasively detect VOC for the purposes of medical diagnosis, therapeutic monitoring, disease outbreak containment, and disease prevention. Detection dogs are proven to be a valuable real-time mobile detection technology for the detection of VOC related to explosives, narcotics, humans, and many other targets of interests. Little is known about what dogs are detecting when searching for biological targets. It is important to understand where biological VOC originates and how dogs might be able to detect biological targets. This review paper discusses the recent scientific literature involving VOC analysis and postulates potential biological targets for canine detection. Dogs have shown their ability to detect pathogen and disease-specific VOC. Future research will determine if dogs can be employed operationally in hospitals, on borders, in underserved areas, on farms, and in other operational environments to give real-time feedback on the presence of a biological target. PMID:27446935

  6. Linkages between early detection and early response to invasive pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Exotic pathogen introductions continue to escalate commensurate with increasing international trade and travel. Discovery of a new disease should be expeditiously followed by delimiting surveys to assess distribution and incidence. Specific, relevant survey protocols are used to ensure reliable data...

  7. Fusarium agapanthi sp. nov, a novel bikaverin and fusarubin-producing leaf and stem spot pathogen of Agapanthus praecox (African lily) from Australia and Italy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This study was conducted to characterize a novel Fusarium species that caused leaf and stem spot on Agapanthus praecox (Agapanthus, African lily) in northern Italy and leaf rot and spot on the same host in Melbourne, Australia. Formally described here as Fusarium agapanthi, this novel pathogen was a...

  8. Pathogenic Variants for Mendelian and Complex Traits in Exomes of 6,517 European and African Americans: Implications for the Return of Incidental Results

    PubMed Central

    Tabor, Holly K.; Auer, Paul L.; Jamal, Seema M.; Chong, Jessica X.; Yu, Joon-Ho; Gordon, Adam S.; Graubert, Timothy A.; O’Donnell, Christopher J.; Rich, Stephen S.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Bamshad, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Exome sequencing (ES) is rapidly being deployed for use in clinical settings despite limited empirical data about the number and types of incidental results (with potential clinical utility) that could be offered for return to an individual. We analyzed deidentified ES data from 6,517 participants (2,204 African Americans and 4,313 European Americans) from the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute Exome Sequencing Project. We characterized the frequencies of pathogenic alleles in genes underlying Mendelian conditions commonly assessed by newborn-screening (NBS, n = 39) programs, genes associated with age-related macular degeneration (ARMD, n = 17), and genes known to influence drug response (PGx, n = 14). From these 70 genes, we identified 10,789 variants and curated them by manual review of OMIM, HGMD, locus-specific databases, or primary literature to a total of 399 validated pathogenic variants. The mean number of risk alleles per individual was 15.3. Every individual had at least five known PGx alleles, 99% of individuals had at least one ARMD risk allele, and 45% of individuals were carriers for at least one pathogenic NBS allele. The carrier burden for severe recessive childhood disorders was 0.57. Our results demonstrate that risk alleles of potential clinical utility for both Mendelian and complex traits are detectable in every individual. These findings highlight the necessity of developing guidelines and policies that consider the return of results to all individuals and underscore the need to develop innovative approaches and tools that enable individuals to exercise their choice about the return of incidental results. PMID:25087612

  9. Pathogen detection in milk samples by ligation detection reaction-mediated universal array method.

    PubMed

    Cremonesi, P; Pisoni, G; Severgnini, M; Consolandi, C; Moroni, P; Raschetti, M; Castiglioni, B

    2009-07-01

    This paper describes a new DNA chip, based on the use of a ligation detection reaction coupled to a universal array, developed to detect and analyze, directly from milk samples, microbial pathogens known to cause bovine, ovine, and caprine mastitis or to be responsible for foodborne intoxication or infection, or both. Probes were designed for the identification of 15 different bacterial groups: Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus agalactiae, nonaureus staphylococci, Streptococcus bovis, Streptococcus equi, Streptococcus canis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus parauberis, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus pyogenes, Mycoplasma spp., Salmonella spp., Bacillus spp., Campylobacter spp., and Escherichia coli and related species. These groups were identified based on the 16S rRNA gene. For microarray validation, 22 strains from the American Type Culture Collection or other culture collections and 50 milk samples were tested. The results demonstrated high specificity, with sensitivity as low as 6 fmol. Moreover, the ligation detection reaction-universal array assay allowed for the identification of Mycoplasma spp. in a few hours, avoiding the long incubation times of traditional microbiological identification methods. The universal array described here is a versatile tool able to identify milk pathogens efficiently and rapidly. PMID:19528580

  10. Engineered nanoconstructs for the multiplexed and sensitive detection of high-risk pathogens.

    PubMed

    Seo, Youngmin; Kim, Ji-eun; Jeong, Yoon; Lee, Kwan Hong; Hwang, Jangsun; Hong, Jongwook; Park, Hansoo; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-01-28

    Many countries categorize the causative agents of severe infectious diseases as high-risk pathogens. Given their extreme infectivity and potential to be used as biological weapons, a rapid and sensitive method for detection of high-risk pathogens (e.g., Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, and Vaccinia virus) is highly desirable. Here, we report the construction of a novel detection platform comprising two units: (1) magnetic beads separately conjugated with multiple capturing antibodies against four different high-risk pathogens for simple and rapid isolation, and (2) genetically engineered apoferritin nanoparticles conjugated with multiple quantum dots and detection antibodies against four different high-risk pathogens for signal amplification. For each high-risk pathogen, we demonstrated at least 10-fold increase in sensitivity compared to traditional lateral flow devices that utilize enzyme-based detection methods. Multiplexed detection of high-risk pathogens in a sample was also successful by using the nanoconstructs harboring the dye molecules with fluorescence at different wavelengths. We ultimately envision the use of this novel nanoprobe detection platform in future applications that require highly sensitive on-site detection of high-risk pathogens. PMID:26462853

  11. Engineered nanoconstructs for the multiplexed and sensitive detection of high-risk pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, Youngmin; Kim, Ji-Eun; Jeong, Yoon; Lee, Kwan Hong; Hwang, Jangsun; Hong, Jongwook; Park, Hansoo; Choi, Jonghoon

    2016-01-01

    Many countries categorize the causative agents of severe infectious diseases as high-risk pathogens. Given their extreme infectivity and potential to be used as biological weapons, a rapid and sensitive method for detection of high-risk pathogens (e.g., Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, and Vaccinia virus) is highly desirable. Here, we report the construction of a novel detection platform comprising two units: (1) magnetic beads separately conjugated with multiple capturing antibodies against four different high-risk pathogens for simple and rapid isolation, and (2) genetically engineered apoferritin nanoparticles conjugated with multiple quantum dots and detection antibodies against four different high-risk pathogens for signal amplification. For each high-risk pathogen, we demonstrated at least 10-fold increase in sensitivity compared to traditional lateral flow devices that utilize enzyme-based detection methods. Multiplexed detection of high-risk pathogens in a sample was also successful by using the nanoconstructs harboring the dye molecules with fluorescence at different wavelengths. We ultimately envision the use of this novel nanoprobe detection platform in future applications that require highly sensitive on-site detection of high-risk pathogens.

  12. Ancient pathogen DNA in archaeological samples detected with a Microbial Detection Array.

    PubMed

    Devault, Alison M; McLoughlin, Kevin; Jaing, Crystal; Gardner, Shea; Porter, Teresita M; Enk, Jacob M; Thissen, James; Allen, Jonathan; Borucki, Monica; DeWitte, Sharon N; Dhody, Anna N; Poinar, Hendrik N

    2014-01-01

    Ancient human remains of paleopathological interest typically contain highly degraded DNA in which pathogenic taxa are often minority components, making sequence-based metagenomic characterization costly. Microarrays may hold a potential solution to these challenges, offering a rapid, affordable, and highly informative snapshot of microbial diversity in complex samples without the lengthy analysis and/or high cost associated with high-throughput sequencing. Their versatility is well established for modern clinical specimens, but they have yet to be applied to ancient remains. Here we report bacterial profiles of archaeological and historical human remains using the Lawrence Livermore Microbial Detection Array (LLMDA). The array successfully identified previously-verified bacterial human pathogens, including Vibrio cholerae (cholera) in a 19th century intestinal specimen and Yersinia pestis ("Black Death" plague) in a medieval tooth, which represented only minute fractions (0.03% and 0.08% alignable high-throughput shotgun sequencing reads) of their respective DNA content. This demonstrates that the LLMDA can identify primary and/or co-infecting bacterial pathogens in ancient samples, thereby serving as a rapid and inexpensive paleopathological screening tool to study health across both space and time. PMID:24603850

  13. Antibody-Based Sensors: Principles, Problems and Potential for Detection of Pathogens and Associated Toxins

    PubMed Central

    Byrne, Barry; Stack, Edwina; Gilmartin, Niamh; O'Kennedy, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Antibody-based sensors permit the rapid and sensitive analysis of a range of pathogens and associated toxins. A critical assessment of the implementation of such formats is provided, with reference to their principles, problems and potential for ‘on-site’ analysis. Particular emphasis is placed on the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens, such as Escherichia coli and Listeria monocytogenes, and additional examples relating to the monitoring of fungal pathogens, viruses, mycotoxins, marine toxins and parasites are also provided. PMID:22408533

  14. Using impedance measurements for detecting pathogens trapped in an electric field

    DOEpatents

    Miles, Robin R.

    2004-07-20

    Impedance measurements between the electrodes in an electric field is utilized to detect the presence of pathogens trapped in the electric field. Since particles trapped in a field using the dielectiphoretic force changes the impedance between the electrodes by changing the dielectric material between the electrodes, the degree of particle trapping can be determined by measuring the impedance. This measurement is used to determine if sufficient pathogen have been collected to analyze further or potentially to identify the pathogen.

  15. A Quantitative Analysis of Complexity of Human Pathogen-Specific CD4 T Cell Responses in Healthy M. tuberculosis Infected South Africans

    PubMed Central

    Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S.; McKinney, Denise M.; Carpenter, Chelsea; Paul, Sinu; Rozot, Virginie; Makgotlho, Edward; Gregg, Yolande; van Rooyen, Michele; Ernst, Joel D.; Hatherill, Mark; Hanekom, Willem A.; Peters, Bjoern; Scriba, Thomas J.; Sette, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    We performed a quantitative analysis of the HLA restriction, antigen and epitope specificity of human pathogen specific responses in healthy individuals infected with M. tuberculosis (Mtb), in a South African cohort as a test case. The results estimate the breadth of T cell responses for the first time in the context of an infection and human population setting. We determined the epitope repertoire of eleven representative Mtb antigens and a large panel of previously defined Mtb epitopes. We estimated that our analytic methods detected 50–75% of the total response in a cohort of 63 individuals. As expected, responses were highly heterogeneous, with responses to a total of 125 epitopes detected. The 66 top epitopes provided 80% coverage of the responses identified in our study. Using a panel of 48 HLA class II-transfected antigen-presenting cells, we determined HLA class II restrictions for 278 epitope/donor recognition events (36% of the total). The majority of epitopes were restricted by multiple HLA alleles, and 380 different epitope/HLA combinations comprised less than 30% of the estimated Mtb-specific response. Our results underline the complexity of human T cell responses at a population level. Efforts to capture and characterize this broad and highly HLA promiscuous Mtb-specific T cell epitope repertoire will require significant peptide multiplexing efforts. We show that a comprehensive “megapool” of Mtb peptides captured a large fraction of the Mtb-specific T cells and can be used to characterize this response. PMID:27409590

  16. Detection of TORCH pathogens in children with congenital cataracts

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Bin; Yang, Yabo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between infection rates with TORCH pathogens including toxoplasma, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus (HSV) I and II and congenital cataracts. In total, the data from 69 children with congenital cataract treated at the Children's Hospital of the Zhejiang University School of Medicine between May 2006 and September 2013 were examined, including the complete serum test results for immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM that target TORCH pathogenic antibodies. These results were compared with the antibody levels of 5,914 children in a control group. Using SPSS 19.0 software, variance equation Levene tests, mean equation t tests, and completely randomized design of four tables χ2 tests were applied. The HSV II IgG positivity rates significantly differed between the cataract and control groups. These results suggested that HSV may be one of the pathogenic viruses that leads to congenital cataracts. PMID:27446337

  17. Validation of real-time PCR assays for bioforensic detection of model plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    James, Mindy; Blagden, Trenna; Moncrief, Ian; Burans, James P; Schneider, Katherine; Fletcher, Jacqueline

    2014-03-01

    The U.S. agricultural sector is vulnerable to intentionally introduced microbial threats because of its wide and open distribution and economic importance. To investigate such events, forensically valid assays for plant pathogen detection are needed. In this work, real-time PCR assays were developed for three model plant pathogens: Pseudomonas syringae pathovar tomato, Xylella fastidiosa, and Wheat streak mosaic virus. Validation included determination of the linearity and range, limit of detection, sensitivity, specificity, and exclusivity of each assay. Additionally, positive control plasmids, distinguishable from native signature by restriction enzyme digestion, were developed to support forensic application of the assays. Each assay displayed linear amplification of target nucleic acid, detected 100 fg or less of target nucleic acid, and was specific to its target pathogen. Results obtained with these model pathogens provide the framework for development and validation of similar assays for other plant pathogens of high consequence. PMID:24261870

  18. Nature-inspired magnetoelastic biosentinels for the detection of pathogenic bacteria in stagnant liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Shin; Chai, Yating; Wikle, Howard C.; Dai, Jing; Hu, Jiajia; Suh, Sang-Jin; Vodyanoy, Vitaly; Chin, Bryan A.

    2015-05-01

    This paper presents an investigation into magnetoelastic (ME) biosentinels that capture and detect low-concentration pathogenic bacteria in stagnant liquids. The ME biosentinels are designed to mimic a variety of white blood cell types, known as the main defensive mechanism in the human body against different pathogenic invaders. The ME biosentinels are composed of a freestanding ME resonator coated with an engineered phage that specifically binds with the pathogens of interest. These biosentinels are ferromagnetic and thus can be moved through a liquid by externally applied magnetic fields. In addition, when a time-varying magnetic field is applied, the ME biosentinels can be placed into mechanical resonance by magnetostriction. As soon as the biosentinels bind with the target pathogen through the phage-based biomolecular recognition, a change in the biosentinel's resonant frequency occurs, and thereby the presence of the target pathogen can be detected. Detection of Bacillus anthracis spores under stagnant flow conditions was demonstrated.

  19. Towards Q-PCR of pathogenic bacteria with improved electrochemical double-tagged genosensing detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A very sensitive assay for the rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria based on electrochemical genosensing has been designed. The assay was performed by the PCR specific amplification of the eaeA gene, related with the pathogenic activity of Escherichia coli O157:H7. The efficiency and selectivity o...

  20. Pathogen detection in produce using applications of immunomagnetic beads and biosensors

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The presence of pathogenic bacteria is of increasing public health concerns. Rapid and sensitive tests to detect pathogens are required to keep the safety of food supply. In this chapter we summarized our previous investigations where we applied immunomagnetic-bead (IMB) capture and various biosen...

  1. Hyperspectral imaging using a color camera and its application for pathogen detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the results of a feasibility study for the development of a hyperspectral image recovery (reconstruction) technique using a RGB color camera and regression analysis in order to detect and classify colonies of foodborne pathogens. The target bacterial pathogens were the six represe...

  2. Detecting storage pathogens by monitoring volatiles in the storage atmosphere

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Pathogenic rot of stored potatoes results in loss of product and decreased tuber quality on an annual basis. The objective of this research project is to determine if measuring the abundance of low molecular weight volatile compounds in the atmosphere of bulk potato storages provides information tha...

  3. Utilization of Molecular Detection Techniques to Find Soybean Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soybeans continue to rise in prominence as a source of feed, food, oil, and renewable energy. Of many factors impacting yield, microbial pathogens alone can cause significant losses in production. Management of soybean diseases and pests involves many approaches including cultural aspects like crop ...

  4. DETECTION AND IDENTIFICATION OF PATHOGENIC CANDIDA SPECIES IN WATER USING FLOW CYTOMETRY COUPLED WITH TAQMAN PCR

    EPA Science Inventory

    As the incidence of human fungal infection increases, the ability to detect and identify pathogenic fungi in potential environmental reservoirs becomes increasingly important for disease control. PCR based assays are widely used for diagnostic purposes, but may be inadequate for...

  5. Detecting the emergence of novel, zoonotic viruses pathogenic to humans

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    RNA viruses, with their high potential for mutation and epidemic spread, are the most common class of pathogens found as new causes of human illness. Despite great advances made in diagnostic technology since the 1950s, the annual rate at which novel virulent viruses have been found has remained at 2–3. Most emerging viruses are zoonoses; they have jumped from mammal or bird hosts to humans. An analysis of virus discovery indicates that the small number of novel viruses discovered annually is an artifact of inadequate surveillance in tropical and subtropical countries, where even established endemic pathogens are often misdiagnosed. Many of the emerging viruses of the future are already infecting humans but remain to be uncovered by a strategy of disease surveillance in selected populations. PMID:25416679

  6. A microfluidic nano-biosensor for the detection of pathogenic Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Kim, Giyoung; Moon, Ji-Hea; Moh, Chang-Yeon; Lim, Jong-guk

    2015-05-15

    Rapid detection of pathogenic Salmonella in food products is extremely important for protecting the public from salmonellosis. The objective of the present study was to explore the feasibility of using a microfluidic nano-biosensor to rapidly detect pathogenic Salmonella. Quantum dot nanoparticles were used to detect Salmonella cells. For selective detection of Salmonella, anti-Salmonella polyclonal antibodies were covalently immobilized onto the quantum dot surface. To separate and concentrate the cells from the sample, superparamagnetic particles and a microfluidic chip were used. A portable fluorometer was developed to measure the fluorescence signal from the quantum dot nanoparticles attached to Salmonella in the samples. The sensitivity for detection of pathogenic Salmonella was evaluated using serially diluted Salmonella Typhimurium in borate buffer and chicken extract. The fluorescence response of the nano-biosensor increased with increasing cell concentration. The detection limit of the sensor was 10(3) CFU/mL Salmonella in both borate buffer and food extract. PMID:25172028

  7. Tick-borne pathogens of potential zoonotic importance in the southern African Region.

    PubMed

    Chitanga, Simbarashe; Gaff, Holly; Mukaratirwa, Samson

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this communication is to provide preliminary information on the tick-borne pathogens of potential zoonotic importance present in southern Africa, mainly focusing on their geographical distribution and host range, and to identify research gaps. The following tick-borne zoonoses have been reported to occur in southern Africa based mainly on case reports: Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever caused by Crimean-Congo haemorrhagic fever virus; ehrlichiosis caused by Ehrlichia ruminantium, Ehrlichia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum; babesiosis caused by Babesia microti; relapsing fever caused by Borrelia duttonii and rickettsioses caused by Rickettsia africae, Rickettsia aeschlimannii and Rickettsia conorii. The epidemiological factors influencing their occurrence are briefly reviewed. PMID:25685942

  8. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations

    PubMed Central

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2015-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases. PMID:25628612

  9. Rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens: principles, applications, advantages and limitations.

    PubMed

    Law, Jodi Woan-Fei; Ab Mutalib, Nurul-Syakima; Chan, Kok-Gan; Lee, Learn-Han

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of foodborne diseases has increased over the years and resulted in major public health problem globally. Foodborne pathogens can be found in various foods and it is important to detect foodborne pathogens to provide safe food supply and to prevent foodborne diseases. The conventional methods used to detect foodborne pathogen are time consuming and laborious. Hence, a variety of methods have been developed for rapid detection of foodborne pathogens as it is required in many food analyses. Rapid detection methods can be categorized into nucleic acid-based, biosensor-based and immunological-based methods. This review emphasizes on the principles and application of recent rapid methods for the detection of foodborne bacterial pathogens. Detection methods included are simple polymerase chain reaction (PCR), multiplex PCR, real-time PCR, nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA), loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and oligonucleotide DNA microarray which classified as nucleic acid-based methods; optical, electrochemical and mass-based biosensors which classified as biosensor-based methods; enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and lateral flow immunoassay which classified as immunological-based methods. In general, rapid detection methods are generally time-efficient, sensitive, specific and labor-saving. The developments of rapid detection methods are vital in prevention and treatment of foodborne diseases. PMID:25628612

  10. Nucleic Acid-based Detection of Bacterial Pathogens Using Integrated Microfluidic Platform Systems

    PubMed Central

    Lui, Clarissa; Cady, Nathaniel C.; Batt, Carl A.

    2009-01-01

    The advent of nucleic acid-based pathogen detection methods offers increased sensitivity and specificity over traditional microbiological techniques, driving the development of portable, integrated biosensors. The miniaturization and automation of integrated detection systems presents a significant advantage for rapid, portable field-based testing. In this review, we highlight current developments and directions in nucleic acid-based micro total analysis systems for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Recent progress in the miniaturization of microfluidic processing steps for cell capture, DNA extraction and purification, polymerase chain reaction, and product detection are detailed. Discussions include strategies and challenges for implementation of an integrated portable platform. PMID:22412335

  11. Meeting current public health needs: optical biosensors for pathogen detection and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Minghui; Sapsford, Kim E.; Sergeev, Nikolay; Sun, Steven; Rasooly, Avraham

    2009-02-01

    Pathogen detection and analysis is critical for medicine, food safety, agriculture, public health and biosecurity. Many current microbial detection approaches are based on century-old culturing methods which, while reliable, are slow, provide relatively little information about the pathogens and are not adaptable to high throughput operations. Optical biodetection represents a potential alternative. Most ELISA and chromatography systems are based on optical methods that are also used for analysis of molecular interactions, such as DNA hybridization and protein-protein interactions (e.g. microarrays or SPR biosensors). Various optical biosensor platforms have been developed that have many of the characteristics essential for modern pathogen molecular analysis including sensitivity, speed of analysis, multi-channel capability, relative simplicity and low cost. Here we provide several examples of the use of optical biosensor technology for pathogen detection and analysis including high throughput DNA microarray analysis, SPR-based rapid direct detection of bacterial toxins, CCD-based fluorescent activity analysis of microbial toxins and a simple ECL-based CCD detection system. However, while effective for molecular analysis, most of these technologies are not as sensitive as traditional culturing methods for detecting microorganisms. There is a need to combine optical biosensors with traditional methods to speed culture-based detection and to provide more information regarding the pathogens.

  12. DETECTION OF PATHOGENS IN DRINKING WATER (SEER 2)

    EPA Science Inventory

    Project investigators developed a polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based technique to detect E. coli 0157:H7 cells in environmental samples using previously reported PCR primers for the specific detection of genes involved in biosynthesis of 0157 polysacchari...

  13. Tandem Mass Spectrometry for the Detection of Plant Pathogenic Fungi and the Effects of Database Composition on Protein Inferences

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Mass spectrometry has shown potential for identifying and detecting plant pathogens. Unlike antibody-based assays like ELISA, mass spectrometry does not require the use of pathogen-specific reagents for the detection of pathogen-specific proteins and peptides. However, the mass spectrometry appro...

  14. An overview of foodborne pathogen detection: in the perspective of biosensors.

    PubMed

    Velusamy, Vijayalakshmi; Arshak, Khalil; Korostynska, Olga; Oliwa, Kamila; Adley, Catherine

    2010-01-01

    Food safety is a global health goal and the foodborne diseases take a major crisis on health. Therefore, detection of microbial pathogens in food is the solution to the prevention and recognition of problems related to health and safety. For this reason, a comprehensive literature survey has been carried out aiming to give an overview in the field of foodborne pathogen detection. Conventional and standard bacterial detection methods such as culture and colony counting methods, immunology-based methods and polymerase chain reaction based methods, may take up to several hours or even a few days to yield an answer. Obviously this is inadequate, and recently many researchers are focusing towards the progress of rapid methods. Although new technologies like biosensors show potential approaches, further research and development is essential before biosensors become a real and reliable choice. New bio-molecular techniques for food pathogen detection are being developed to improve the biosensor characteristics such as sensitivity and selectivity, also which is rapid, reliable, effective and suitable for in situ analysis. This paper not only offers an overview in the area of microbial pathogen detection but it also describes the conventional methods, analytical techniques and recent developments in food pathogen detection, identification and quantification, with an emphasis on biosensors. PMID:20006978

  15. A novel sensitive pathogen detection system based on Microbead Quantum Dot System.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tzong-Yuan; Su, Yi-Yu; Shu, Wei-Hsien; Mercado, Augustus T; Wang, Shi-Kwun; Hsu, Ling-Yi; Tsai, Yow-Fu; Chen, Chung-Yung

    2016-04-15

    A fast and accurate detection system for pathogens can provide immediate measurements for the identification of infectious agents. Therefore, the Microbead Quantum-dots Detection System (MQDS) was developed to identify and measure target DNAs of pathogenic microorganisms and eliminated the need of PCR amplifications. This nanomaterial-based technique can detect different microorganisms by flow cytometry measurements. In MQDS, pathogen specific DNA probes were designed to form a hairpin structure and conjugated on microbeads. In the presence of the complementary target DNA sequence, the probes will compete for binding with the reporter probes but will not interfere with the binding between the probe and internal control DNA. To monitor the binding process by flow cytometry, both the reporter probes and internal control probes were conjugated with Quantum dots that fluoresce at different emission wavelengths using the click reaction. When MQDS was used to detect the pathogens in environmental samples, a high correlation coefficient (R=0.994) for Legionella spp., with a detection limit of 0.1 ng of the extracted DNAs and 10 CFU/test, can be achieved. Thus, this newly developed technique can also be applied to detect other pathogens, particularly viruses and other genetic diseases. PMID:26590701

  16. Flow cytometric analysis to detect pathogens in bacterial cell mixtures using semiconductor quantum dots.

    PubMed

    Hahn, Megan A; Keng, Peter C; Krauss, Todd D

    2008-02-01

    Compared to a common green organic dye, semiconductor quantum dots (QDs) composed of CdSe/ZnS core/shell bioconjugates display brighter fluorescence intensities, lower detection thresholds, and better accuracy in analyzing bacterial cell mixtures composed of pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 and harmless E. coli DH5alpha using flow cytometry. For the same given bacterial mixture, QDs display fluorescence intensity levels that are approximately 1 order of magnitude brighter compared to the analogous experiments that utilize the standard dye fluorescein isothiocyanate. Detection limits are lowest when QDs are used as the fluorophore label for the pathogenic E. coli O157:H7 serotype: limits of 1% O157:H7 in 99% DH5alpha result, corresponding to 106 cells/mL, which is comparable to other developing fluorescence-based techniques for pathogen detection. Finally, utilizing QDs to label E. coli O157:H7 in cell mixtures results in greater accuracy and more closely approaches the ideal fluorophore for pathogen detection using flow cytometry. With their broader absorption spectra and narrower emission spectra than organic dyes, QDs can make vast improvements in the field of flow cytometry, where single-source excitation and simultaneous detection of multicolor species without complicating experimental setups or data analysis is quite advantageous for analyzing heterogeneous cell mixtures, both for prokaryotic pathogen detection and for studies on eukaryotic cell characteristics. PMID:18186615

  17. Lab-on-a-chip modules for detection of highly pathogenic bacteria: from sample preparation to detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Julich, S.; Kopinč, R.; Hlawatsch, N.; Moche, C.; Lapanje, A.; Gärtner, C.; Tomaso, H.

    2014-05-01

    Lab-on-a-chip systems are innovative tools for the detection and identification of microbial pathogens in human and veterinary medicine. The major advantages are small sample volume and a compact design. Several fluidic modules have been developed to transform analytical procedures into miniaturized scale including sampling, sample preparation, target enrichment, and detection procedures. We present evaluation data for single modules that will be integrated in a chip system for the detection of pathogens. A microfluidic chip for purification of nucleic acids was established for cell lysis using magnetic beads. This assay was evaluated with spiked environmental aerosol and swab samples. Bacillus thuringiensis was used as simulant for Bacillus anthracis, which is closely related but non-pathogenic for humans. Stationary PCR and a flow-through PCR chip module were investigated for specific detection of six highly pathogenic bacteria. The conventional PCR assays could be transferred into miniaturized scale using the same temperature/time profile. We could demonstrate that the microfluidic chip modules are suitable for the respective purposes and are promising tools for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Future developments will focus on the integration of these separate modules to an entire lab-on-a-chip system.

  18. Detection of the emerging amphibian pathogens Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis and ranavirus in Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reshetnikov, Andrey N.; Chestnut, Tara E.; Brunner, Jesse L.; Charles, Kaylene M.; Nebergall, Emily E.; Olson, Deanna H.

    2014-01-01

    In a population of the European common toad Bufo bufo from a rural pond in the region of Lake Glubokoe Regional Reserve in Moscow province, Russia, unexplained mass mortality events involving larvae and metamorphs have been observed over a monitoring period of >20 yr. We tested toads from this and a nearby site for the emerging amphibian pathogens Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) and ranavirus (Rv). Both pathogens were detected, and at the rural pond site, with the above-noted losses and decline in toad breeding success, 40% of B. bufo metamorphs were Bd positive, 46% were Rv positive and 20% were co-infected with both pathogens. Toad metamorphs from a neighbouring water body were also Bd and Rv positive (25 and 55%, respectively). This is the first confirmation of these pathogens in Russia. Questions remain as to the origins of these pathogens in Russia and their roles in documented mass mortality events.

  19. Detection of Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria using Bacteriophage Tail Spike Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poshtiban, Somayyeh

    Foodborne infections are worldwide health problem with tremendous social and financial impacts. Efforts are focused on developing accurate and reliable technologies for detection of food contaminations in early stages preferably on-site. This thesis focuses on interfacing engineering and biology by combining phage receptor binding proteins (RBPs) with engineered platforms including microresonator-based biosensors, magnetic particles and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to develop bacterial detection sensors. We used phage RBPs as target specific bioreceptors to develop an enhanced microresonator array for bacterial detection. These resonator beams are optimized to feature a high natural frequency while offer large surface area for capture of bacteria. Theoretical analysis indicates a high mass sensitivity with a threshold for the detection of a single bacterial cell. We used phage RBPs as target specific bioreceptors, and successfully demonstrated the application of these phage RBB-immobilized arrays for specific detection of C. jejuni cells. We also developed a RBP-derivatized magnetic pre-enrichment method as an upstream sample preparation method to improve sensitivity and specificity of PCR for detection of bacterial cells in various food samples. The combination of RBP-based magnetic separation and real-time PCR allowed the detection of small number of bacteria in artificially contaminated food samples without any need for time consuming pre-enrichment step through culturing. We also looked into integration of the RBP-based magnetic separation with PCR onto a single microfluidic lab-on-a-chip to reduce the overall turnaround time.

  20. Surface plasmon resonance biosensors for detection of foodborne pathogens and toxins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homola, Jiří; Hegnerová, Kateřina; Vala, Milan

    2009-02-01

    In the last decade surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors have made great strides both in terms of technology and its applications. SPR biosensors have become a central tool for study of molecular interactions and have been widely used for detection of chemical and biological analytes. Food analysis belongs to major areas of potential applications of SPR biosensors. Therefore, numerous SPR biosensors for detection of analytes implicated in food safety (e.g. pathogens, toxins, drug residues, vitamins, hormones, chemical contaminants, and allergens) have been developed. This paper reviews recent developments in the field of SPR biosensors for food safety, in particular, for detection of foodborne pathogens and toxins.

  1. Detection of Multiple Waterborne Pathogens Using Microsequencing Arrays

    EPA Science Inventory

    Aims: A microarray was developed to simultaneously detect Cryptosporidium parvum, Cryptosporidium hominis, Enterococcus faecium, Bacillus anthracis and Francisella tularensis in water. Methods and Results: A DNA microarray was designed to contain probes that specifically dete...

  2. Universal primer PCR with DGGE for rapid detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ji, Niannian; Peng, Bo; Wang, Guizhong; Wang, Sanying; Peng, Xuanxian

    2004-06-01

    A universal primer PCR (UPPCR) combined with denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) was evaluated as a method permitting the rapid detection of pathogens. The results show that this method is efficient at amplifying the conserved regions of bacterial 16S rRNA genes with universal primers and can detect causative bacterial pathogens rapidly. Six species of bacteria from fisheries (Pseudomonas fluorescens, Vibrio anguillarum, Aeromonas hydrophila, Vibrio fluvialis, Providencia rettgeri and Aeromonas sobria) were examined. Our results indicate that the approach we undertook can be adopted not only for axenic bacterial populations but also for mixed communities as well. Furthermore, we were able to achieve the rapid detection of multiple bacteria a single in sample. In addition, UPPCR-DGGE was shown to be better than previously reported UPPCR-single-stranded conformation polymorphism (SSCP)-based methods for the rapid detection of bacterial pathogens. PMID:15134888

  3. Recent Advancements in Nanobioassays and Nanobiosensors for Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Park, Bosoon

    2016-06-01

    Bacterial pathogens are one of the leading causes of food safety incidents and product recalls worldwide. Timely detection and identification of microbial contamination in agricultural and food products is crucial for disease prevention and outbreak investigation. In efforts to improve and/or replace time-consuming and laborious "gold standards" for pathogen detection, numerous alternative rapid methods have been proposed in the past 15 years, with a trend toward incorporating nanotechnology and nanomaterials in food pathogen detection. This article is a review of the use of nanotechnology in various detection and sample preparation techniques and advancements in nanotechnology applications in food matrices. Some practical considerations in nanobioassay design are discussed, and the gaps between research status quo and market demands are identified. PMID:27296612

  4. Towards on-site pathogen detection using antibody-based sensors.

    PubMed

    Skottrup, Peter Durand; Nicolaisen, Mogens; Justesen, Annemarie Fejer

    2008-11-15

    In this paper, the recent progress within biosensors for plant pathogen detection will be reviewed. Bio-recognition layers on sensors can be designed in various ways, however the most popular approach is to immobilise antibodies for specific capture of analytes. Focus will be put on antibody surface-immobilisation strategies as well as the use of antibodies in the widely used sensors, quartz crystal microbalance, surface plasmon resonance and cantilevers. We will describe the available data on antibody-based plant pathogen detection and furthermore use examples from detection of the pathogens Salmonella, Listeria monocytogenes, Streptococcus mutans, Bacillus cereus, Bacillus anthracis, Campylobacter and Escherichia coli. We will touch upon optimal assay design and further discuss the strengths and limitations of current sensor technologies for detection of viruses, bacteria and fungi. PMID:18675543

  5. Bacteriophage Amplification-Coupled Detection and Identification of Bacterial Pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cox, Christopher R.; Voorhees, Kent J.

    Current methods of species-specific bacterial detection and identification are complex, time-consuming, and often require expensive specialized equipment and highly trained personnel. Numerous biochemical and genotypic identification methods have been applied to bacterial characterization, but all rely on tedious microbiological culturing practices and/or costly sequencing protocols which render them impractical for deployment as rapid, cost-effective point-of-care or field detection and identification methods. With a view towards addressing these shortcomings, we have exploited the evolutionarily conserved interactions between a bacteriophage (phage) and its bacterial host to develop species-specific detection methods. Phage amplification-coupled matrix assisted laser desorption time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) was utilized to rapidly detect phage propagation resulting from species-specific in vitro bacterial infection. This novel signal amplification method allowed for bacterial detection and identification in as little as 2 h, and when combined with disulfide bond reduction methods developed in our laboratory to enhance MALDI-TOF-MS resolution, was observed to lower the limit of detection by several orders of magnitude over conventional spectroscopy and phage typing methods. Phage amplification has been combined with lateral flow immunochromatography (LFI) to develop rapid, easy-to-operate, portable, species-specific point-of-care (POC) detection devices. Prototype LFI detectors have been developed and characterized for Yersinia pestis and Bacillus anthracis, the etiologic agents of plague and anthrax, respectively. Comparable sensitivity and rapidity was observed when phage amplification was adapted to a species-specific handheld LFI detector, thus allowing for rapid, simple, POC bacterial detection and identification while eliminating the need for bacterial culturing or DNA isolation and amplification techniques.

  6. Simple and sensitive microbial pathogen detection using a label-free DNA amplification assay.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yuhuan; Zhao, Chuanqi; Yan, Zhengqing; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2016-06-14

    By the combination of quaternized magnetic nanoparticles and a label-free exonuclease III-assisted DNA amplification assay, we report a simple and facile strategy for the convenient and highly sensitive detection of microbial pathogens, with a detection limit of down to 50 cells mL(-1). PMID:27210898

  7. Molecular detection and identification of intimin alleles in pathogenic Escherichia coli by multiplex PCR.

    PubMed

    Reid, S D; Betting, D J; Whittam, T S

    1999-08-01

    A multiplex PCR was designed to detect the eae gene and simultaneously identify specific alleles in pathogenic Escherichia coli. The method was tested on 87 strains representing the diarrheagenic E. coli clones. The results show that the PCR assay accurately detects eae and resolves alleles encoding the alpha, beta, and gamma intimin variants. PMID:10405431

  8. Molecular Detection and Identification of Intimin Alleles in Pathogenic Escherichia coli by Multiplex PCR

    PubMed Central

    Reid, Sean D.; Betting, David J.; Whittam, Thomas S.

    1999-01-01

    A multiplex PCR was designed to detect the eae gene and simultaneously identify specific alleles in pathogenic Escherichia coli. The method was tested on 87 strains representing the diarrheagenic E. coli clones. The results show that the PCR assay accurately detects eae and resolves alleles encoding the α, β, and γ intimin variants. PMID:10405431

  9. High throughput screening strategies and technology platforms for detection of pathogens: An Introduction

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Globally, foodborne pathogens are a major public health concern. In this chapter, we provide a broad description of the problem of food-borne diseases and current and future detection technologies for food safety assurance and prevention of foodborne illnesses. Current detection approaches include s...

  10. Development of a High Throughput Assay for Rapid and Accurate 10-Plex Detection of Citrus Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The need to reliably detect and identify multiple plant pathogens simultaneously, especially in woody perennial hosts, has led to development of new molecular diagnostic approaches. In this study, a Luminex-based system was developed that provided a robust and sensitive test for simultaneous detect...

  11. Biocontrol and Rapid Detection of Food-Borne Pathogens Using Bacteriophages and Endolysins.

    PubMed

    Bai, Jaewoo; Kim, You-Tae; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Ju-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been suggested as natural food preservatives as well as rapid detection materials for food-borne pathogens in various foods. Since Listeria monocytogenes-targeting phage cocktail (ListShield) was approved for applications in foods, numerous phages have been screened and experimentally characterized for phage applications in foods. A single phage and phage cocktail treatments to various foods contaminated with food-borne pathogens including E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Cronobacter sakazakii, and Vibrio spp. revealed that they have great potential to control various food-borne pathogens and may be alternative for conventional food preservatives. In addition, phage-derived endolysins with high host specificity and host lysis activities may be preferred to food applications rather than phages. For rapid detection of food-borne pathogens, cell-wall binding domains (CBDs) from endolysins have been suggested due to their high host-specific binding. Fluorescence-tagged CBDs have been successfully evaluated and suggested to be alternative materials of expensive antibodies for various detection applications. Most recently, reporter phage systems have been developed and tested to confirm their usability and accuracy for specific detection. These systems revealed some advantages like rapid detection of only viable pathogenic cells without interference by food components in a very short reaction time, suggesting that these systems may be suitable for monitoring of pathogens in foods. Consequently, phage is the next-generation biocontrol agent as well as rapid detection tool to confirm and even identify the food-borne pathogens present in various foods. PMID:27092128

  12. Biocontrol and Rapid Detection of Food-Borne Pathogens Using Bacteriophages and Endolysins

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Jaewoo; Kim, You-Tae; Ryu, Sangryeol; Lee, Ju-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    Bacteriophages have been suggested as natural food preservatives as well as rapid detection materials for food-borne pathogens in various foods. Since Listeria monocytogenes-targeting phage cocktail (ListShield) was approved for applications in foods, numerous phages have been screened and experimentally characterized for phage applications in foods. A single phage and phage cocktail treatments to various foods contaminated with food-borne pathogens including E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus, Cronobacter sakazakii, and Vibrio spp. revealed that they have great potential to control various food-borne pathogens and may be alternative for conventional food preservatives. In addition, phage-derived endolysins with high host specificity and host lysis activities may be preferred to food applications rather than phages. For rapid detection of food-borne pathogens, cell-wall binding domains (CBDs) from endolysins have been suggested due to their high host-specific binding. Fluorescence-tagged CBDs have been successfully evaluated and suggested to be alternative materials of expensive antibodies for various detection applications. Most recently, reporter phage systems have been developed and tested to confirm their usability and accuracy for specific detection. These systems revealed some advantages like rapid detection of only viable pathogenic cells without interference by food components in a very short reaction time, suggesting that these systems may be suitable for monitoring of pathogens in foods. Consequently, phage is the next-generation biocontrol agent as well as rapid detection tool to confirm and even identify the food-borne pathogens present in various foods. PMID:27092128

  13. Detection of hepatitis E virus and other livestock-related pathogens in Iowa streams.

    PubMed

    Givens, Carrie E; Kolpin, Dana W; Borchardt, Mark A; Duris, Joseph W; Moorman, Thomas B; Spencer, Susan K

    2016-10-01

    Manure application is a source of pathogens to the environment. Through overland runoff and tile drainage, zoonotic pathogens can contaminate surface water and streambed sediment and could affect both wildlife and human health. This study examined the environmental occurrence of gene markers for livestock-related bacterial, protozoan, and viral pathogens and antibiotic resistance in surface waters within the South Fork Iowa River basin before and after periods of swine manure application on agricultural land. Increased concentrations of indicator bacteria after manure application exceeding Iowa's state bacteria water quality standards suggest that swine manure contributes to diminished water quality and may pose a risk to human health. Additionally, the occurrence of HEV and numerous bacterial pathogen genes for Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Salmonella sp., and Staphylococcus aureus in both manure samples and in corresponding surface water following periods of manure application suggests a potential role for swine in the spreading of zoonotic pathogens to the surrounding environment. During this study, several zoonotic pathogens were detected including Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, Campylobacter jejuni, pathogenic enterococci, and S. aureus; all of which can pose mild to serious health risks to swine, humans, and other wildlife. This research provides the foundational understanding required for future assessment of the risk to environmental health from livestock-related zoonotic pathogen exposures in this region. This information could also be important for maintaining swine herd biosecurity and protecting the health of wildlife near swine facilities. PMID:27318519

  14. Centrifugal loop-mediated isothermal amplification microdevice for rapid, multiplex and colorimetric foodborne pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Jun; Park, Byung Hyun; Jung, Jae Hwan; Choi, Goro; Lee, Doh C; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2016-01-15

    We present a centrifugal microfluidic device which enables multiplex foodborne pathogen identification by loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and colorimetric detection using Eriochrome Black T (EBT). Five identical structures were designed in the centrifugal microfluidic system to perform the genetic analysis of 25 pathogen samples in a high-throughput manner. The sequential loading and aliquoting of the LAMP cocktail, the primer mixtures, and the DNA sample solutions were accomplished by the optimized zigzag-shaped microchannels and RPM control. We targeted three kinds of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium and Vibrio parahaemolyticus) and detected the amplicons of the LAMP reaction by the EBT-mediated colorimetric method. For the limit-of-detection (LOD) test, we carried out the LAMP reaction on a chip with serially diluted DNA templates of E. coli O157:H7, and could observe the color change with 380 copies. The used primer sets in the LAMP reaction were specific only to the genomic DNA of E. coli O157:H7, enabling the on-chip selective, sensitive, and high-throughput pathogen identification with the naked eyes. The entire process was completed in 60min. Since the proposed microsystem does not require any bulky and expensive instrumentation for end-point detection, our microdevice would be adequate for point-of-care (POC) testing with high simplicity and high speed, providing an advanced genetic analysis microsystem for foodborne pathogen detection. PMID:26322592

  15. Molecular Detection of Foodborne Pathogens: A Rapid and Accurate Answer to Food Safety.

    PubMed

    Mangal, Manisha; Bansal, Sangita; Sharma, Satish K; Gupta, Ram K

    2016-07-01

    Food safety is a global health concern. For the prevention and recognition of problems related to health and safety, detection of foodborne pathogen is of utmost importance at all levels of food production chain. For several decades, a lot of research has been targeted at the development of rapid methodology as reducing the time needed to complete pathogen detection tests has been the primary goal of food microbiologists. With the result, food microbiology laboratories now have a wide array of detection methods and automated technologies such as enzyme immunoassay, polymerase chain reaction, and microarrays, which can cut test times considerably. Nucleic acid amplification strategies and advances in amplicon detection methodologies have been the key factors in the progress of molecular microbiology. A comprehensive literature survey has been carried out to give an overview in the field of foodborne pathogen detection. In this paper, we describe the conventional methods, as well as recent developments in food pathogen detection, identification, and quantification, with a major emphasis on molecular detection methods. PMID:25830555

  16. Recent advances in bacteriophage based biosensors for food-borne pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Singh, Amit; Poshtiban, Somayyeh; Evoy, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Foodborne diseases are a major health concern that can have severe impact on society and can add tremendous financial burden to our health care systems. Rapid early detection of food contamination is therefore relevant for the containment of food-borne pathogens. Conventional pathogen detection methods, such as microbiological and biochemical identification are time-consuming and laborious, while immunological or nucleic acid-based techniques require extensive sample preparation and are not amenable to miniaturization for on-site detection. Biosensors have shown tremendous promise to overcome these limitations and are being aggressively studied to provide rapid, reliable and sensitive detection platforms for such applications. Novel biological recognition elements are studied to improve the selectivity and facilitate integration on the transduction platform for sensitive detection. Bacteriophages are one such unique biological entity that show excellent host selectivity and have been actively used as recognition probes for pathogen detection. This review summarizes the extensive literature search on the application of bacteriophages (and recently their receptor binding proteins) as probes for sensitive and selective detection of foodborne pathogens, and critically outlines their advantages and disadvantages over other recognition elements. PMID:23364199

  17. Recent Advances in Bacteriophage Based Biosensors for Food-Borne Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Amit; Poshtiban, Somayyeh; Evoy, Stephane

    2013-01-01

    Foodborne diseases are a major health concern that can have severe impact on society and can add tremendous financial burden to our health care systems. Rapid early detection of food contamination is therefore relevant for the containment of food-borne pathogens. Conventional pathogen detection methods, such as microbiological and biochemical identification are time-consuming and laborious, while immunological or nucleic acid-based techniques require extensive sample preparation and are not amenable to miniaturization for on-site detection. Biosensors have shown tremendous promise to overcome these limitations and are being aggressively studied to provide rapid, reliable and sensitive detection platforms for such applications. Novel biological recognition elements are studied to improve the selectivity and facilitate integration on the transduction platform for sensitive detection. Bacteriophages are one such unique biological entity that show excellent host selectivity and have been actively used as recognition probes for pathogen detection. This review summarizes the extensive literature search on the application of bacteriophages (and recently their receptor binding proteins) as probes for sensitive and selective detection of foodborne pathogens, and critically outlines their advantages and disadvantages over other recognition elements. PMID:23364199

  18. Polymerase Chain Reaction for Detection of Systemic Plant Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This chapter outlines the advances and application of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) since its development in 1984 and its enhancements and applications to detection of viruses, viroids and phytoplasma in pome and stone fruits. PCR is probably the most rapidly and widely adopted technology eve...

  19. Identification of fungal pathogens in a patient with acute myelogenic leukemia using a pathogen detection array technology.

    PubMed

    Banerjee, Sagarika; Peck, Kristen N; Feldman, Michael D; Schuster, Mindy G; Alwine, James C; Robertson, Erle S

    2016-04-01

    Invasive zygomycosis in immunocompromised patients results in a high mortality rate, and early identification is crucial to optimize therapy and to reduce morbidity. However, diagnosing specific species of zygomycetes fungi possess challenge in the clinical laboratories. A need for a rapid and sensitive diagnostic tool for early recognition of a zygomycetes fungus in clinical samples to the species level will lead to prompt and accurate therapy and the PathoChip provides one such platform. We utilized a pathogen array technology referred to as PathoChip, comprised of oligonucleotide probes that can detect all the sequenced viruses as well as known pathogenic bacteria, fungi and parasites and family-specific conserved probes, thus providing a means for detecting previously uncharacterized members of a family. We rapidly identified a zygomycetous fungus, Rhizomucor pusillus, an otherwise challenge for the clinical laboratories, predominantly in a patient with acute myelogenous leukemia. This report highlights the value of PathoChip as a diagnostic tool to identify micro-organisms to the species level, especially for those difficult to identify in most clinical laboratories. It will also help clinicians to obtain a critical snapshot of the infection profile of a patient to plan treatment strategies. PMID:26619325

  20. Detection of pathogens using on-chip electrochemical analysis of PCR amplified DNA molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hodko, Dalibor; Raymer, Lindsay; Herbst, Stephanie M.; Magnuson, James W.; Gaskin, David

    2001-05-01

    The sensitivity and speed of methods for the detection of microorganisms and/or cells need to be constantly improved to provide timely and accurate analysis in large number of important applications. Such applications range from detection of pathogens in drinking water, biological warfare agents, biomedical diagnostics and food industry. The trends toward miniaturization of sensors using microfluidic and nanofluidic on-chip devices will push current detection limits to lower concentrations than what is offered by the present analytical equipment and/or detection kids. Microfluidic devices have been used to perform DNA analysis, polymerase chain reaction analysis, capillary electrophoresis and hybridization to oligonucleotide probes. This paper describes a new approach for the detection of pathogens on contaminated surfaces, which will integrated sampling, concentration and detection of targeted microorganisms.

  1. Development of a Multiplex PCR Method to Detect Fungal Pathogens for Quarantine on Exported Cacti

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Hyun ji; Hong, Seong Won; Kim, Hyun-ju; Kwak, Youn-Sig

    2016-01-01

    Major diseases in grafted cacti have been reported and Fusarium oxysporum, Bipolaris cactivora, Phytophthora spp. and Collectotrichum spp. are known as causal pathogens. These pathogens can lead to plant death after infection. Therefore, some European countries have quarantined imported cacti that are infected with specific fungal pathogens. Consequently, we developed PCR detection methods to identify four quarantined fungal pathogens and reduce export rejection rates of Korean grafted cacti. The pathogen specific primer sets F.oF-F.oR, B.CF-B.CR, P.nF-P.nR, and P.cF-P.CR were tested for F. oxysporum, B. cactivora, P. nicotinae, and P. cactorum, respectively. The F.oF-F.oR primer set was designed from the Fusarium ITS region; the B.CF-B.CR and P.nF-P.nR primers respectively from Bipolaris and Phytophthora ITS1; and the P.cF-P.CR primer set from the Ypt1protein gene region. The quarantine fungal pathogen primer pairs were amplified to the specific number of base pairs in each of the following fungal pathogens: 210-bp (F. oxysporum), 510-bp (B. cactivora), 313-bp (P. nicotinae), and 447-bp (P. cactorum). The detection limit for the mono- and multiplex PCR primer sets was 0.1 ng of template DNA under in vitro conditions. Therefore, each primer set successfully diagnosed contamination of quarantine pathogens in export grafted cacti. Consequently, our methodology is a viable tool to screen contamination of the fungal pathogen in exported grafted cacti. PMID:26889115

  2. Development of a Multiplex PCR Method to Detect Fungal Pathogens for Quarantine on Exported Cacti.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hyun Ji; Hong, Seong Won; Kim, Hyun-Ju; Kwak, Youn-Sig

    2016-02-01

    Major diseases in grafted cacti have been reported and Fusarium oxysporum, Bipolaris cactivora, Phytophthora spp. and Collectotrichum spp. are known as causal pathogens. These pathogens can lead to plant death after infection. Therefore, some European countries have quarantined imported cacti that are infected with specific fungal pathogens. Consequently, we developed PCR detection methods to identify four quarantined fungal pathogens and reduce export rejection rates of Korean grafted cacti. The pathogen specific primer sets F.oF-F.oR, B.CF-B.CR, P.nF-P.nR, and P.cF-P.CR were tested for F. oxysporum, B. cactivora, P. nicotinae, and P. cactorum, respectively. The F.oF-F.oR primer set was designed from the Fusarium ITS region; the B.CF-B.CR and P.nF-P.nR primers respectively from Bipolaris and Phytophthora ITS1; and the P.cF-P.CR primer set from the Ypt1protein gene region. The quarantine fungal pathogen primer pairs were amplified to the specific number of base pairs in each of the following fungal pathogens: 210-bp (F. oxysporum), 510-bp (B. cactivora), 313-bp (P. nicotinae), and 447-bp (P. cactorum). The detection limit for the mono- and multiplex PCR primer sets was 0.1 ng of template DNA under in vitro conditions. Therefore, each primer set successfully diagnosed contamination of quarantine pathogens in export grafted cacti. Consequently, our methodology is a viable tool to screen contamination of the fungal pathogen in exported grafted cacti. PMID:26889115

  3. Diagnosis of Tuberculosis by Trained African Giant Pouched Rats and Confounding Impact of Pathogens and Microflora of the Respiratory Tract

    PubMed Central

    Mgode, Georgies F.; Weetjens, Bart J.; Nawrath, Thorben; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Machang'u, Robert S.; Cohen-Bacrie, Stéphan; Bedotto, Marielle; Drancourt, Michel; Schulz, Stefan

    2012-01-01

    Trained African giant-pouched rats (Cricetomys gambianus) can detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis and show potential for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). However, rats' ability to discriminate between clinical sputum containing other Mycobacterium spp. and nonmycobacterial species of the respiratory tract is unknown. It is also unknown whether nonmycobacterial species produce odor similar to M. tuberculosis and thereby cause the detection of smear-negative sputum. Sputum samples from 289 subjects were analyzed by smear microscopy, culture, and rats. Mycobacterium spp. were isolated on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, and nonmycobacterial species were isolated on four different media. The odor from nonmycobacterial species from smear- and M. tuberculosis culture-negative sputa detected by ≥2 rats (“rat positive”) was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared to the M. tuberculosis odor. Rats detected 45 of 56 confirmed cases of TB, 4 of 5 suspected cases of TB, and 63 of 228 TB-negative subjects (sensitivity, 80.4%; specificity, 72.4%; accuracy, 73.9%; positive predictive value, 41.7%; negative predictive value, 93.8%). A total of 37 (78.7%) of 47 mycobacterial isolates were M. tuberculosis complex, with 75.7% from rat-positive sputa. Ten isolates were nontuberculous mycobacteria, one was M. intracellulare, one was M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and eight were unidentified. Rat-positive sputa with Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus spp., and Enterococcus spp. were associated with TB. Rhodococcus, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, and Candida spp. from rat-positive sputa did not produce M. tuberculosis-specific volatiles (methyl nicotinate, methyl para-anisate, and ortho-phenylanisole). Prevalence of Mycobacterium-related Nocardia and Rhodococcus in smear-negative sputa did not equal that of smear-negative mycobacteria (44.7%), of which 28.6% were rat positive. These findings and the absence of M. tuberculosis

  4. Diagnosis of tuberculosis by trained African giant pouched rats and confounding impact of pathogens and microflora of the respiratory tract.

    PubMed

    Mgode, Georgies F; Weetjens, Bart J; Nawrath, Thorben; Cox, Christophe; Jubitana, Maureen; Machang'u, Robert S; Cohen-Bacrie, Stéphan; Bedotto, Marielle; Drancourt, Michel; Schulz, Stefan; Kaufmann, Stefan H E

    2012-02-01

    Trained African giant-pouched rats (Cricetomys gambianus) can detect Mycobacterium tuberculosis and show potential for the diagnosis of tuberculosis (TB). However, rats' ability to discriminate between clinical sputum containing other Mycobacterium spp. and nonmycobacterial species of the respiratory tract is unknown. It is also unknown whether nonmycobacterial species produce odor similar to M. tuberculosis and thereby cause the detection of smear-negative sputum. Sputum samples from 289 subjects were analyzed by smear microscopy, culture, and rats. Mycobacterium spp. were isolated on Lowenstein-Jensen medium, and nonmycobacterial species were isolated on four different media. The odor from nonmycobacterial species from smear- and M. tuberculosis culture-negative sputa detected by ≥2 rats ("rat positive") was analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and compared to the M. tuberculosis odor. Rats detected 45 of 56 confirmed cases of TB, 4 of 5 suspected cases of TB, and 63 of 228 TB-negative subjects (sensitivity, 80.4%; specificity, 72.4%; accuracy, 73.9%; positive predictive value, 41.7%; negative predictive value, 93.8%). A total of 37 (78.7%) of 47 mycobacterial isolates were M. tuberculosis complex, with 75.7% from rat-positive sputa. Ten isolates were nontuberculous mycobacteria, one was M. intracellulare, one was M. avium subsp. hominissuis, and eight were unidentified. Rat-positive sputa with Moraxella catarrhalis, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus spp., and Enterococcus spp. were associated with TB. Rhodococcus, Nocardia, Streptomyces, Staphylococcus, and Candida spp. from rat-positive sputa did not produce M. tuberculosis-specific volatiles (methyl nicotinate, methyl para-anisate, and ortho-phenylanisole). Prevalence of Mycobacterium-related Nocardia and Rhodococcus in smear-negative sputa did not equal that of smear-negative mycobacteria (44.7%), of which 28.6% were rat positive. These findings and the absence of M. tuberculosis

  5. Using Giant African Pouched Rats ("Cricetomys Gambianus") to Detect Landmines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart J.; Cox, Christophe; Beyene, Negussie W.; Sully, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Within the past decade, giant pouched rats have been used successfully to detect landmines. This manuscript summarizes how these rats are trained and used operationally. The information provided is intended to be of practical value toward strengthening best practices in using "Cricetomys" for humanitarian purposes while simultaneously ensuring the…

  6. Magnetic Barcode Assay for Genetic Detection of Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Liong, Monty; Hoang, Anh N.; Chung, Jaehoon; Gural, Nil; Ford, Christopher B.; Min, Changwook; Shah, Rupal R.; Ahmad, Rushdy; Fernandez-Suarez, Marta; Fortune, Sarah M.; Toner, Mehmet; Lee, Hakho; Weissleder, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    The task of rapidly identifying patients infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB) in resource-constrained environments remains a challenge. A sensitive and robust platform that does not require bacterial isolation or culture is critical in making informed diagnostic and therapeutic decisions. Here we introduce a platform for the detection of nucleic acids based on a magnetic barcoding strategy. PCR-amplified mycobacterial genes are sequence-specifically captured on microspheres, labeled by magnetic nanoprobes, and detected by nuclear magnetic resonance. All components are integrated into a single, small fluidic cartridge for streamlined on-chip operation. We use this platform to detect MTB and identify drug-resistance strains from mechanically processed sputum samples within 2.5 hours. The specificity of the assay is confirmed by a panel of clinically relevant non-MTB bacteria, and the clinical utility is demonstrated by the measurements in MTB-positive patient specimens. Combined with portable systems, the magnetic barcode assay holds promise to become a sensitive, high-throughput, and low-cost platform for point-of-care diagnostics. PMID:23612293

  7. Comparing Luminex NxTAG-Respiratory Pathogen Panel and RespiFinder-22 for multiplex detection of respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Beckmann, Christiane; Hirsch, Hans H

    2016-08-01

    Respiratory tract infection (RTI) involves a variety of viruses and bacteria, which can be conveniently detected by multiplex nucleic acid amplification testing (NAT). To compare the novel Luminex-based NxTAG-Respiratory Pathogen Panel (NxTAG-RPP) with the routine multiplex-ligation-NAT based RespiFinder-22® (RF-22), 282 respiratory specimens including nasopharyngeal swabs (71%), broncho-alveolar lavage (27%), throat swabs, tracheal secretions, and sputum (2%) from 116 children and 155 adults were extracted using a Corbett CAS1200 (Qiagen), and analyzed in parallel by the routine RF-22 and NxTAG-RPP. Concordant results were obtained in 263 (93.3%) cases consisting of concordant positives in 167 (59.2%) and concordant negatives in 96 (34%). Results were discordant in 19 (6.7%) consisting of 15 positive:negative, and 4 negative:positive results by NxTAG-RPP versus RF-22, respectively. Co-infections were observed in 10.3% with NxTAG-RPP and in 5.9% with RF-22. Most additional viral pathogens identified by the NxTAG-RPP involved dual infections with rhinovirus and RSV. Discordant samples were mainly due to low genome signals of Ct less than 36, when retested by QNAT suggesting a higher sensitivity of the NxTAG-RPP, also when detecting multiple infections. Hands-on time after extraction for 24 and 96 samples was 0.25 and <0.5 hr for the NxTAG-RPP, and 2 and 4 hr for the RF-22, respectively. The median turn-around time was 6 hr (range 5-7 hr) for NxTAG-RPP and 12 hr (range 8-16 hr) for RF-22. The NxTAG-RPP showed comparable detection rates for most respiratory pathogens, while hands-on and turn-around time were considerably shorter. The clinical significance of detecting multiple viruses needs further clinical evaluation. J. Med. Virol. 88:1319-1324, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26856438

  8. The development of a real-time PCR to detect pathogenic Leptospira species in kidney tissue.

    PubMed

    Fearnley, C; Wakeley, P R; Gallego-Beltran, J; Dalley, C; Williamson, S; Gaudie, C; Woodward, M J

    2008-08-01

    A LightCycler real-time PCR hybridization probe-based assay that detects a conserved region of the16S rRNA gene of pathogenic but not saprophytic Leptospira species was developed for the rapid detection of pathogenic leptospires directly from processed tissue samples. In addition, a differential PCR specific for saprophytic leptospires and a control PCR targeting the porcine beta-actin gene were developed. To assess the suitability of these PCR methods for diagnosis, a trial was performed on kidneys taken from adult pigs with evidence of leptospiral infection, primarily a history of reproductive disease and serological evidence of exposure to pathogenic leptospires (n=180) and aborted pig foetuses (n=24). Leptospire DNA was detected by the 'pathogenic' specific PCR in 25 tissues (14%) and the control beta-actin PCR was positive in all 204 samples confirming DNA was extracted from all samples. No leptospires were isolated from these samples by culture and no positives were detected with the 'saprophytic' PCR. In a subsidiary experiment, the 'pathogenic' PCR was used to analyse kidney samples from rodents (n=7) collected as part of vermin control in a zoo, with show animals with high microagglutination titres to Leptospira species, and five were positive. Fifteen PCR amplicons from 1 mouse, 2 rat and 14 pig kidney samples, were selected at random from positive PCRs (n=30) and sequenced. Sequence data indicated L. interrogans DNA in the pig and rat samples and L. inadai DNA, which is considered of intermediate pathogenicity, in the mouse sample. The only successful culture was from this mouse kidney and the isolate was confirmed to be L. inadai by classical serology. These data suggest this suite of PCRs is suitable for testing for the presence of pathogenic leptospires in pig herds where abortions and infertility occur and potentially in other animals such as rodents. PMID:17961617

  9. Using Giant African Pouched Rats to Detect Tuberculosis in Human Sputum Samples: 2009 Findings

    PubMed Central

    Poling, Alan; Weetjens, Bart J.; Cox, Christophe; Mgode, Georgies; Jubitana, Maureen; Kazwala, Rudovic; Mfinanga, Godfrey S.; Huis in ‘t Veld, Diana

    2010-01-01

    In 2009, giant African pouched rats trained to detect tuberculosis (TB) evaluated sputum samples from 10,523 patients whose sputum had previously been evaluated by smear microscopy. Microscopists found 13.3% of the patients to be TB-positive. Simulated second-line screening by the rats revealed 620 new TB-positive patients, increasing the case detection rate by 44%. These data suggest that the rats may be useful for TB detection in developing countries, although further research is needed. PMID:21118940

  10. Photoluminescent lateral-flow immunoassay revealed by graphene oxide: highly sensitive paper-based pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Morales-Narváez, Eden; Naghdi, Tina; Zor, Erhan; Merkoçi, Arben

    2015-08-18

    A paper-based lateral flow immunoassay for pathogen detection that avoids the use of secondary antibodies and is revealed by the photoluminescence quenching ability of graphene oxide is reported. Escherichia coli has been selected as a model pathogen. The proposed device is able to display a highly specific and sensitive performance with a limit of detection of 10 CFU mL(-1) in standard buffer and 100 CFU mL(-1) in bottled water and milk. This low-cost disposable and easy-to-use device will prove valuable for portable and automated diagnostics applications. PMID:26205473

  11. A handheld real time thermal cycler for bacterial pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Higgins, James A; Nasarabadi, Shanavaz; Karns, Jeffrey S; Shelton, Daniel R; Cooper, Mary; Gbakima, Aiah; Koopman, Ronald P

    2003-08-15

    The handheld advanced nucleic acid analyzer (HANAA) is a portable real time thermal cycler unit that weighs under 1 kg and uses silicon and platinum-based thermalcycler units to conduct rapid heating and cooling of plastic reaction tubes. Two light emitting diodes (LED) provide greater than 1 mW of electrical power at wavelengths of 490 nm (blue) and 525 nm (green), allowing detection of the dyes FAM and JOE/TAMRA. Results are displayed in real time as bar graphs, and up to three, 4-sample assays can be run on the charge of the 12 V portable battery pack. The HANAA was evaluated for detection of defined Escherichia coli strains, and wild-type colonies isolated from stream water, using PCR for the lac Z and Tir genes. PCR reactions using SYBR Green dye allowed detection of E. coli ATCC 11775 and E. coli O157:H7 cells in under 30 min of assay time; however, background fluorescence associated with dye binding to nonspecific PCR products was present. DNA extracted from three isolates of Bacillus anthracis Ames, linked to a bioterrorism incident in Washington DC in October 2001, were also successfully tested on the HANAA using primers for the vrrA and capA genes. Positive results were observed at 32 and 22 min of assay time, respectively. A TaqMan probe specific to the aroQ gene of Erwinia herbicola was tested on the HANAA and when 500 cells were used as template, positive results were observed after only 7 min of assay time. Background fluorescence associated with the use of the probe was negligible. The HANAA is unique in offering real time PCR in a handheld format suitable for field use; a commercial version of the instrument, offering six reaction chambers, is available as of Fall 2002. PMID:12788554

  12. RCA-Based Biosensor for Electrical and Colorimetric Detection of Pathogen DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Jaepil; Kim, Hyejin; Lee, Dong Jun; Jung, Byung Jun; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-05-01

    For the diagnosis and prevention of diseases, a range of strategies for the detection of pathogens have been developed. In this study, we synthesized the rolling circle amplification (RCA)-based biosensor that enables detection of pathogen DNA in two analytical modes. Only in the presence of the target DNA, the template DNA can be continuously polymerized by simply carrying out RCA, which gives rise to a change of surface structure of Au electrodes and the gap between the electrodes. Electrical signal was generated after introducing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl4) to the DNA-coated biosensor for the improvement of the conductivity of DNA, which indicates that the presence of the pathogen DNA can be detected in an electrical approach. Furthermore, the existence of the target DNA was readily detected by the naked eyes through change in colors of the electrodes from bright yellow to orange-red after RCA reaction. The RCA-based biosensor offers a new platform for monitoring of pathogenic DNA with two different detection modes in one system.

  13. RCA-Based Biosensor for Electrical and Colorimetric Detection of Pathogen DNA.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Jaepil; Kim, Hyejin; Lee, Dong Jun; Jung, Byung Jun; Lee, Jong Bum

    2016-12-01

    For the diagnosis and prevention of diseases, a range of strategies for the detection of pathogens have been developed. In this study, we synthesized the rolling circle amplification (RCA)-based biosensor that enables detection of pathogen DNA in two analytical modes. Only in the presence of the target DNA, the template DNA can be continuously polymerized by simply carrying out RCA, which gives rise to a change of surface structure of Au electrodes and the gap between the electrodes. Electrical signal was generated after introducing hydrogen tetrachloroaurate (HAuCl4) to the DNA-coated biosensor for the improvement of the conductivity of DNA, which indicates that the presence of the pathogen DNA can be detected in an electrical approach. Furthermore, the existence of the target DNA was readily detected by the naked eyes through change in colors of the electrodes from bright yellow to orange-red after RCA reaction. The RCA-based biosensor offers a new platform for monitoring of pathogenic DNA with two different detection modes in one system. PMID:27142880

  14. Simultaneous Detection of Multiple Fish Pathogens Using a Naked-Eye Readable DNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chin-I; Hung, Pei-Hsin; Wu, Chia-Che; Cheng, Ta Chih; Tsai, Jyh-Ming; Lin, King-Jung; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2012-01-01

    We coupled 16S rDNA PCR and DNA hybridization technology to construct a microarray for simultaneous detection and discrimination of eight fish pathogens (Aeromonas hydrophila, Edwardsiella tarda, Flavobacterium columnare, Lactococcus garvieae, Photobacterium damselae, Pseudomonas anguilliseptica, Streptococcus iniae and Vibrio anguillarum) commonly encountered in aquaculture. The array comprised short oligonucleotide probes (30 mer) complementary to the polymorphic regions of 16S rRNA genes for the target pathogens. Targets annealed to the microarray probes were reacted with streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase and nitro blue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3′-indolylphosphate, p-toluidine salt (NBT/BCIP), resulting in blue spots that are easily visualized by the naked eye. Testing was performed against a total of 168 bacterial strains, i.e., 26 representative collection strains, 81 isolates of target fish pathogens, and 61 ecologically or phylogenetically related strains. The results showed that each probe consistently identified its corresponding target strain with 100% specificity. The detection limit of the microarray was estimated to be in the range of 1 pg for genomic DNA and 103 CFU/mL for pure pathogen cultures. These high specificity and sensitivity results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNA microarrays in the diagnostic detection of fish pathogens. PMID:22736973

  15. Simultaneous detection of multiple fish pathogens using a naked-eye readable DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chin-I; Hung, Pei-Hsin; Wu, Chia-Che; Cheng, Ta Chih; Tsai, Jyh-Ming; Lin, King-Jung; Lin, Chung-Yen

    2012-01-01

    We coupled 16S rDNA PCR and DNA hybridization technology to construct a microarray for simultaneous detection and discrimination of eight fish pathogens (Aeromonas hydrophila, Edwardsiella tarda, Flavobacterium columnare, Lactococcus garvieae, Photobacterium damselae, Pseudomonas anguilliseptica, Streptococcus iniae and Vibrio anguillarum) commonly encountered in aquaculture. The array comprised short oligonucleotide probes (30 mer) complementary to the polymorphic regions of 16S rRNA genes for the target pathogens. Targets annealed to the microarray probes were reacted with streptavidin-conjugated alkaline phosphatase and nitro blue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3'-indolylphosphate, p-toluidine salt (NBT/BCIP), resulting in blue spots that are easily visualized by the naked eye. Testing was performed against a total of 168 bacterial strains, i.e., 26 representative collection strains, 81 isolates of target fish pathogens, and 61 ecologically or phylogenetically related strains. The results showed that each probe consistently identified its corresponding target strain with 100% specificity. The detection limit of the microarray was estimated to be in the range of 1 pg for genomic DNA and 10(3) CFU/mL for pure pathogen cultures. These high specificity and sensitivity results demonstrate the feasibility of using DNA microarrays in the diagnostic detection of fish pathogens. PMID:22736973

  16. Detection of pathogens in food using a SERS-based assay in just a few hours

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shende, Chetan; Sengupta, Atanu; Huang, Hermes; Farquharson, Stuart

    2014-05-01

    In 2011 Escherichia, Listeria, and Salmonella species infected over 1.2 million people in the United States, resulting in over 23,000 hospitalizations and 650 deaths. In January 2013 President Obama signed into law the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) Food Safety Modernization Act (FSMA), which requires constant microbial testing of food processing equipment and food to minimize contamination and distribution of food tainted with pathogens. The challenge to preventing distribution and consumption of contaminated foods lies in the fact that just a few bacterial cells can rapidly multiply to millions, reaching infectious doses within a few days. Unfortunately, current methods used to detect these few cells rely on similar growth steps to multiply the cells to the point of detection, which also takes a few days. Consequently, there is a critical need for an analyzer that can rapidly extract and detect foodborne pathogens at 1000 colony forming units per gram of food in 1-2 hours (not days), and with a specificity that differentiates from indigenous microflora, so that false alarms are eliminated. In an effort to meet this need, we have been developing an assay that extracts such pathogens from food, selectively binds these pathogens, and produces surface-enhanced Raman spectra (SERS) when read by a Raman analyzer. Here we present SERS measurements of these pathogens in actual food samples using this assay.

  17. Detection of Microbial Water Quality Indicators and Fecal Waterborne Pathogens in Environmental Waters: A Review of Methods, Applications, and Limitations

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental waters are important reservoirs of pathogenic microorganisms, many of which are of fecal origin. In most cases, the presence of pathogens is determined using surrogate bacterial indicators. In other cases, direct detection of the pathogen in question is required. M...

  18. Bacteriophages for detection and control of bacterial pathogens in food and food-processing environment.

    PubMed

    Brovko, Lubov Y; Anany, Hany; Griffiths, Mansel W

    2012-01-01

    This chapter presents recent advances in bacteriophage research and their application in the area of food safety. Section 1 describes general facts on phage biology that are relevant to their application for control and detection of bacterial pathogens in food and environmental samples. Section 2 summarizes the recently acquired data on application of bacteriophages to control growth of bacterial pathogens and spoilage organisms in food and food-processing environment. Section 3 deals with application of bacteriophages for detection and identification of bacterial pathogens. Advantages of bacteriophage-based methods are presented and their shortcomings are discussed. The chapter is intended for food scientist and food product developers, and people in food inspection and health agencies with the ultimate goal to attract their attention to the new developing technology that has a tremendous potential in providing means for producing wholesome and safe food. PMID:23034118

  19. HIGH SENSITIVE PCR METHOD FOR DETECTION OF PATHOGENIC Leptospira spp. IN PARAFFIN-EMBEDDED TISSUES

    PubMed Central

    Noda, Angel Alberto; Rodríguez, Islay; Rodríguez, Yaindrys; Govín, Anamays; Fernández, Carmen; Obregón, Ana Margarita

    2014-01-01

    This study describes the development and application of a new PCR assay for the specific detection of pathogenic leptospires and its comparison with a previously reported PCR protocol. New primers were designed for PCR optimization and evaluation in artificially-infected paraffin-embedded tissues. PCR was then applied to post-mortem, paraffin-embedded samples, followed by amplicon sequencing. The PCR was more efficient than the reported protocol, allowing the amplification of expected DNA fragment from the artificially infected samples and from 44% of the post-mortem samples. The sequences of PCR amplicons from different patients showed >99% homology with pathogenic leptospires DNA sequences. The applicability of a highly sensitive and specific tool to screen histological specimens for the detection of pathogenic Leptospira spp. would facilitate a better assessment of the prevalence and epidemiology of leptospirosis, which constitutes a health problem in many countries. PMID:25229221

  20. Bacterial and viral pathogens detected in sea turtles stranded along the coast of Tuscany, Italy.

    PubMed

    Fichi, G; Cardeti, G; Cersini, A; Mancusi, C; Guarducci, M; Di Guardo, G; Terracciano, G

    2016-03-15

    During 2014, six loggerhead turtles, Caretta caretta and one green turtle, Chelonia mydas, found stranded on the Tuscany coast of Italy, were examined for the presence of specific bacterial and viral agents, along with their role as carriers of fish and human pathogens. Thirteen different species of bacteria, 10 Gram negative and 3 Gram positive, were identified. Among them, two strains of Vibrio parahaemolyticus and one strain of Lactococcus garviae were recovered and confirmed by specific PCR protocols. No trh and tdh genes were detected in V. parahaemolyticus. The first isolation of L. garviae and the first detection of Betanodavirus in sea turtles indicate the possibility for sea turtles to act as carriers of fish pathogens. Furthermore, the isolation of two strains of V. parahaemolyticus highlights the possible role of these animals in human pathogens' diffusion. PMID:26931392

  1. Innovations in air sampling to detect plant pathogens

    PubMed Central

    West, JS; Kimber, RBE

    2015-01-01

    Many innovations in the development and use of air sampling devices have occurred in plant pathology since the first description of the Hirst spore trap. These include improvements in capture efficiency at relatively high air-volume collection rates, methods to enhance the ease of sample processing with downstream diagnostic methods and even full automation of sampling, diagnosis and wireless reporting of results. Other innovations have been to mount air samplers on mobile platforms such as UAVs and ground vehicles to allow sampling at different altitudes and locations in a short space of time to identify potential sources and population structure. Geographical Information Systems and the application to a network of samplers can allow a greater prediction of airborne inoculum and dispersal dynamics. This field of technology is now developing quickly as novel diagnostic methods allow increasingly rapid and accurate quantifications of airborne species and genetic traits. Sampling and interpretation of results, particularly action-thresholds, is improved by understanding components of air dispersal and dilution processes and can add greater precision in the application of crop protection products as part of integrated pest and disease management decisions. The applications of air samplers are likely to increase, with much greater adoption by growers or industry support workers to aid in crop protection decisions. The same devices are likely to improve information available for detection of allergens causing hay fever and asthma or provide valuable metadata for regional plant disease dynamics. PMID:25745191

  2. Genomic analysis of three African strains of Bacillus anthracis demonstrates that they are part of the clonal expansion of an exclusively pathogenic bacterium.

    PubMed

    Rouli, L; MBengue, M; Robert, C; Ndiaye, M; La Scola, B; Raoult, D

    2014-11-01

    Bacillus anthracis is the causative agent of anthrax and is classified as a 'Category A' biological weapon. Six complete genomes of B. anthracis (A0248, Ames, Ames Ancestor, CDC684, H0491, and Sterne) are currently available. In this report, we add three African strain genomes: Sen2Col2, Sen3 and Gmb1. To study the pan-genome of B. anthracis, we used bioinformatics tools, such as Cluster of Orthologous Groups, and performed phylogenetic analysis. We found that the three African strains contained the pX01 and pX02 plasmids, the nonsense mutation in the plcR gene and the four known prophages. These strains are most similar to the CDC684 strain and belong to the A cluster. We estimated that the B. anthracis pan-genome has 2893 core genes (99% of the genome size) and 85 accessory genes. We validated the hypothesis that B. anthracis has a closed pan-genome and found that the three African strains carry the two plasmids associated with bacterial virulence. The pan-genome nature of B. anthracis confirms its lack of exchange (similar to Clostridium tetani) and supports its exclusively pathogenic role, despite its survival in the environment. Moreover, thanks to the study of the core content single nucleotide polymorphisms, we can see that our three African strains diverged very recently from the other B. anthracis strains. PMID:25566394

  3. Development of an Automated Microfluidic System for DNA Collection, Amplification, and Detection of Pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Hagan, Bethany S.; Bruckner-Lea, Cynthia J.

    2002-12-01

    This project was focused on developing and testing automated routines for a microfluidic Pathogen Detection System. The basic pathogen detection routine has three primary components; cell concentration, DNA amplification, and detection. In cell concentration, magnetic beads are held in a flow cell by an electromagnet. Sample liquid is passed through the flow cell and bacterial cells attach to the beads. These beads are then released into a small volume of fluid and delivered to the peltier device for cell lysis and DNA amplification. The cells are lysed during initial heating in the peltier device, and the released DNA is amplified using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) or strand displacement amplification (SDA). Once amplified, the DNA is then delivered to a laser induced fluorescence detection unit in which the sample is detected. These three components create a flexible platform that can be used for pathogen detection in liquid and sediment samples. Future developments of the system will include on-line DNA detection during DNA amplification and improved capture and release methods for the magnetic beads during cell concentration.

  4. In-situ fluorescent immunomagnetic multiplex detection of foodborne pathogens in very low numbers.

    PubMed

    Cho, Il-Hoon; Mauer, Lisa; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2014-07-15

    Consumption of foods contaminated with pathogenic bacteria is a major public health concern. Foods contain microorganisms, the overwhelming majority of which are nonpathogenic, some are responsible for food spoilage, and some cause serious illness leading to death or a variety of diseases in humans. The key challenge in food safety is to rapidly screen foods to determine the presence of pathogens so that appropriate intervention protocols can be pursued. A simple fluorometric immunological method in combination with a magnetic concentration step was developed for rapid detection of target bacteria with high sensitivity and specificity in less than 2h without enumeration. The method constitutes performing an in-situ immunoassay on a magnetic bead through the formation of a sandwich complex of the target bacteria and the probe (detection antibody-denatured BSA labelled with fluorophores) followed by the release of fluorophores by means of enzymatic digestion with proteinase K. The limit of detection (LOD) was <5 CFU/mL of the tested pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes) in buffer. When the pathogens were inoculated in foods (spinach, chicken, and milk), the LOD was under 5 CFU/mL for E. coli O157:H7, S. typhimurium and L. monocytogenes. Furthermore, the method was highly specific in detecting the target pathogens in a multiplex format. The developed in-situ fluorescent immunomagnetic sensor approach offers distinct advantages because it is rapid, highly sensitive, and easy to use and could therefore be potentially used as a pathogen screening tool. PMID:24583684

  5. Efficiency of Airborne Sample Analysis Platform (ASAP) bioaerosol sampler for pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Anurag; Clark, Elizabeth; McGlothlin, James D; Mittal, Suresh K

    2015-01-01

    The threat of bioterrorism and pandemics has highlighted the urgency for rapid and reliable bioaerosol detection in different environments. Safeguarding against such threats requires continuous sampling of the ambient air for pathogen detection. In this study we investigated the efficacy of the Airborne Sample Analysis Platform (ASAP) 2800 bioaerosol sampler to collect representative samples of air and identify specific viruses suspended as bioaerosols. To test this concept, we aerosolized an innocuous replication-defective bovine adenovirus serotype 3 (BAdV3) in a controlled laboratory environment. The ASAP efficiently trapped the surrogate virus at 5 × 10(3) plaque-forming units (p.f.u.) [2 × 10(5) genome copy equivalent] concentrations or more resulting in the successful detection of the virus using quantitative PCR. These results support the further development of ASAP for bioaerosol pathogen detection. PMID:26074900

  6. Transmutation of Personal Glucose Meters into Portable and Highly Sensitive Microbial Pathogen Detection Platform.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhenzhen; Chen, Zhaowei; Gao, Nan; Ren, Jinsong; Qu, Xiaogang

    2015-10-01

    Herein, for the first time, we presented a simple and general approach by using personal glucose meters (PGM) for portable and ultrasensitive detection of microbial pathogens. Upon addition of pathogenic bacteria, glucoamylase-quaternized magnetic nanoparticles (GA-QMNPS) conjugates were disrupted by the competitive multivalent interactions between bacteria and QMNPS, resulting in the release of GA. After magnetic separation, the free GA could catalyze the hydrolysis of amylose into glucose for quantitative readout by PGM. In such way, PGM was transmuted into a bacterial detection device and extremely low detection limits down to 20 cells mL(-1) was achieved. More importantly, QMNPS could inhibit the growth of the bacteria and destroy its cellular structure, which enabled bacteria detection and inhibition simultaneously. The simplicity, portability, sensitivity and low cost of presented work make it attractive for clinical applications. PMID:26153225

  7. Efficiency of Airborne Sample Analysis Platform (ASAP) bioaerosol sampler for pathogen detection

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Anurag; Clark, Elizabeth; McGlothlin, James D.; Mittal, Suresh K.

    2015-01-01

    The threat of bioterrorism and pandemics has highlighted the urgency for rapid and reliable bioaerosol detection in different environments. Safeguarding against such threats requires continuous sampling of the ambient air for pathogen detection. In this study we investigated the efficacy of the Airborne Sample Analysis Platform (ASAP) 2800 bioaerosol sampler to collect representative samples of air and identify specific viruses suspended as bioaerosols. To test this concept, we aerosolized an innocuous replication-defective bovine adenovirus serotype 3 (BAdV3) in a controlled laboratory environment. The ASAP efficiently trapped the surrogate virus at 5 × 103 plaque-forming units (p.f.u.) [2 × 105 genome copy equivalent] concentrations or more resulting in the successful detection of the virus using quantitative PCR. These results support the further development of ASAP for bioaerosol pathogen detection. PMID:26074900

  8. Development of multiplex PCR assay for simultaneous detection of five bacterial fish pathogens.

    PubMed

    Altinok, Ilhan; Capkin, Erol; Kayis, Sevki

    2008-10-15

    A multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method was designed for the simultaneous detection of the five major fish pathogens, Aeromonas hydrophila, Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, Flavobacterium columnare, Renibacterium salmoninarum, and Yersinia ruckeri. Each of the five pairs of oligonucleotide primers exclusively amplified the targeted gene of the specific microorganism. The detection limits of the multiplex PCR was in the range of 2, 1, 1, 3, and 1CFU for A. hydrophila, A. salmonicida, F. columnare, R. salmoninarum, and Y. ruckeri, respectively. Multiplex PCR did not produce any nonspecific amplification products when tested against 23 related species of bacteria. The multiplex PCR assay was useful for the detection of the bacteria in naturally infected fish. This assay is a sensitive and specific and reproducible diagnostic tool for the simultaneous detection of five pathogenic bacteria that cause disease in fish. Therefore, it could be a useful alternative to the conventional culture based method. PMID:18499358

  9. Preclinical Assessment of a Fully Automated Multiplex PCR Panel for Detection of Central Nervous System Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Hanson, K E; Slechta, E S; Killpack, J A; Heyrend, C; Lunt, T; Daly, J A; Hemmert, A C; Blaschke, A J

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated a multiplexed PCR panel for the detection of 16 bacterial, viral, and fungal pathogens in cerebrospinal fluid. Panel results were compared to routine testing, and discrepancies were resolved by additional nucleic acid amplification tests or sequencing. Overall, the positive and negative agreements across methods were 92.9% and 91.9%, respectively. PMID:26719436

  10. Molecular versus conventional culture for detection of respiratory bacterial pathogens in poultry.

    PubMed

    Ammar, A M; Abd El-Aziz, N K; Abd El Wanis, S; Bakry, N R

    2016-01-01

    Acute respiratory tract infections are leading causes of morbidity in poultry farms allover the world. Six pathogens; Escherichia coli, Mycoplasma gallisepticum, Staphylococcus aureus, Pasteurella multocida, Mannheimia haemolytica and Pseudomonas aeruginosa were involved in respiratory infections in poultry. Herein, conventional identification procedures and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) were applied for detection of the most common respiratory bacterial pathogens in clinical specimens of poultry obtained from 53 Egyptian farms with various respiratory problems and the results were compared statistically. The analyzed data demonstrated a significantly higher rate of detection of the most recovered microorganisms (P<0.05) by PCR comparing to classical culture procedures. Further, multiplex PCR could detect E. coli, M. gallisepticum, S. aureus and Ps. aeruginosa in a single reaction, however, M. haemolytica was reported in a uinplex system. According to PCR results, the most commonly recorded bacterial pathogens in examined poultry farms were E. coli and Ps. aeruginosa (54.71% each), followed by M. haemolylica (35.85%) and M. gallisepticum (20.75%). In conclusion, PCR assay offered an effective alternative to traditional typing methods for the identification and simultaneous detection of the most clinically relevant respiratory pathogens in poultry. PMID:26950451

  11. Food pathogen detection using Ag nanorod-based surface plasmon resonance sensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Food safety is world-wide issue for protecting public health. Many researchers have been working on development of biosensors for pathogenic bacteria detection. However, current biosensing methods and techniques do not meet the requirement of demanding as a biosensor in terms of sensitivity, speci...

  12. Recent Advancements in Nanobioassays and Nanobiosensors for Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria Detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial pathogens are one of the leading causes of food safety incidents and product recalls worldwide. Timely detection and identification of microbial contamination in agricultural and food products is crucial for disease prevention and outbreak investigation. Current gold standards are specific...

  13. Hyperspectral image reconstruction using RGB color for foodborne pathogen detection on agar plates

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper reports the latest development of a color vision technique for detecting colonies of foodborne pathogens grown on agar plates with a hyperspectral image classification model that was developed using full hyperspectral data. The hyperspectral classification model depended on reflectance sp...

  14. Ultrasensitive detection and rapid identification of multiple foodborne pathogens with the naked eyes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Heng; Zhang, Yali; Lin, Yankui; Liang, Tongwen; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Jinfeng; Yue, Zhenfeng; Lv, Jingzhang; Jiang, Qing; Yi, Changqing

    2015-09-15

    In this study, a novel approach for ultrasensitive detection and rapid high-throughput identification of a panel of common foodborne pathogens with the naked eyes is presented. As a proof-of-concept application, a multiple pathogen analysis array is fabricated through immobilizing three specific polyT-capture probes which can respectively recognize rfbE gene (Escherichia coli O157:H7), invA gene (Salmonella enterica), inlA gene (Listeria monocytogenes) on the plastic substrates. PCR has been developed for amplification and labeling target genes of rfbE, invA, inlA with biotin. The biotinated target DNA is then captured onto the surface of plastic strips through specific DNA hybridization. The succeeding staining of biotinated DNA duplexes with avidin-horseradish peroxidise (AV-HRP) and biotinated anti-HRP antibody greatly amplifies the detectable signal through the multiple cycle signal amplification strategy, and thus realizing ultrasensitive and specific detection of the above three pathogens in food samples with the naked eyes. Results showed approximately 5 copies target pathogenic DNA could be detected with the naked eyes. This simple but very efficient colorimetric assay also show excellent anti-interference capability and good stability, and can be readily applied to point-of-care diagnosis. PMID:25909338

  15. Development of a DNA-based microarray for the detection of zoonotic pathogens in rodent species.

    PubMed

    Giles, Timothy; Yon, Lisa; Hannant, Duncan; Barrow, Paul; Abu-Median, Abu-Bakr

    2015-12-01

    The demand for diagnostic tools that allow simultaneous screening of samples for multiple pathogens is increasing because they overcome the limitations of other methods, which can only screen for a single or a few pathogens at a time. Microarrays offer the advantages of being capable to test a large number of samples simultaneously, screening for multiple pathogen types per sample and having comparable sensitivity to existing methods such as PCR. Array design is often considered the most important process in any microarray experiment and can be the deciding factor in the success of a study. There are currently no microarrays for simultaneous detection of rodent-borne pathogens. The aim of this report is to explicate the design, development and evaluation of a microarray platform for use as a screening tool that combines ease of use and rapid identification of a number of rodent-borne pathogens of zoonotic importance. Nucleic acid was amplified by multiplex biotinylation PCR prior to hybridisation onto microarrays. The array sensitivity was comparable to standard PCR, though less sensitive than real-time PCR. The array presented here is a prototype microarray identification system for zoonotic pathogens that can infect rodent species. PMID:26188129

  16. Manipulation of small Rho GTPases is a pathogen-induced process detected by NOD1.

    PubMed

    Keestra, A Marijke; Winter, Maria G; Auburger, Josef J; Frässle, Simon P; Xavier, Mariana N; Winter, Sebastian E; Kim, Anita; Poon, Victor; Ravesloot, Mariëtta M; Waldenmaier, Julian F T; Tsolis, Renée M; Eigenheer, Richard A; Bäumler, Andreas J

    2013-04-11

    Our innate immune system distinguishes microbes from self by detecting conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns. However, these are produced by all microbes, regardless of their pathogenic potential. To distinguish virulent microbes from those with lower disease-causing potential the innate immune system detects conserved pathogen-induced processes, such as the presence of microbial products in the host cytosol, by mechanisms that are not fully resolved. Here we show that NOD1 senses cytosolic microbial products by monitoring the activation state of small Rho GTPases. Activation of RAC1 and CDC42 by bacterial delivery or ectopic expression of SopE, a virulence factor of the enteric pathogen Salmonella, triggered the NOD1 signalling pathway, with consequent RIP2 (also known as RIPK2)-mediated induction of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses. Similarly, activation of the NOD1 signalling pathway by peptidoglycan required RAC1 activity. Furthermore, constitutively active forms of RAC1, CDC42 and RHOA activated the NOD1 signalling pathway. Our data identify the activation of small Rho GTPases as a pathogen-induced process sensed through the NOD1 signalling pathway. PMID:23542589

  17. Simultaneous, specific and real-time detection of biothreat and frequently encountered food-borne pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Woubit, Abdela Salah; Yehualaeshet, Teshome; Habtemariam, Tsegaye; Samuel, Temesgen

    2012-01-01

    The bacterial genera Escherichia, Salmonella, Shigella, Vibrio, Yersinia and Francisella include important food safety and biothreat agents causing food-related and other human illnesses worldwide. We aimed to develop rapid methods with the capability to simultaneously and differentially detect all six pathogens in one run. Our initial experiments to use previously reported sets of primers revealed non-specificity of some of the sequences when tested against a broader array of pathogens, or proved not optimal for simultaneous detection parameters. By extensive mining of the whole genome and protein databases of diverse closely and distantly related bacterial species and strains, we have identified unique genome regions, which we utilized to develop a detection platform. Twelve of the specific genomic targets we have identified to design the primers in F. tularensis ssp. tularensis, F. tularensis ssp. novicida, S. dysentriae, S. typhimurium, V. cholera, Y. pestis, and Y. pseudotuberculosis contained either hypothetical or putative proteins, the functions of which have not been clearly defined. Corresponding primer sets were designed from the target regions for use in real-time PCR assays to detect specific biothreat pathogens at species or strain levels. The primer sets were first tested by in-silico PCR against whole genome sequences of different species, sub-species, or strains and then by in vitro PCR against genomic DNA preparations from 23 strains representing six biothreat agents (E.coli O157:H7 strain EDL 933, Shigella dysentriae, Salmonella typhi, Francisella tularensis ssp. tularensis, Vibrio cholera, and Yersinia pestis) and six foodborne pathogens (Salmonella typhimurium, Salmonella saintpaul, Shigella sonnei, Francisella novicida, Vibrio parahemolytica and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis). Each pathogen was specifically identifiable at the genus and species levels. Sensitivity assays performed using purified DNA showed the lowest detection limit of 640 fg

  18. Detection of hepatitis E virus and other livestock-related pathogens in Iowa streams

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Givens, Carrie E.; Kolpin, Dana W.; Borchardt, Mark A.; Duris, Joseph; Moorman, Thomas B.; Spencer, Susan K.

    2016-01-01

    Manure application is a source of pathogens to the environment. Through overland runoff and tile drainage, zoonotic pathogens can contaminate surface water and streambed sediment and could affect both wildlife and human health. This study examined the environmental occurrence of gene markers for livestock-related bacterial, protozoan, and viral pathogens and antibiotic resistance in surface waters within the South Fork Iowa River basin before and after periods of swine manure application on agricultural land. Increased concentrations of indicator bacteria after manure application exceeding Iowa's state bacteria water quality standards suggest that swine manure contributes to diminished water quality and may pose a risk to human health. Additionally, the occurrence of HEV and numerous bacterial pathogen genes for Escherichia coli, Enterococcus spp., Salmonella sp., and Staphylococcus aureus in both manure samples and in corresponding surface water following periods of manure application suggests a potential role for swine in the spreading of zoonotic pathogens to the surrounding environment. During this study, several zoonotic pathogens were detected including Shiga-toxin producing E. coli, Campylobacter jejuni, pathogenic enterococci, and S. aureus; all of which can pose mild to serious health risks to swine, humans, and other wildlife. This research provides the foundational understanding required for future assessment of the risk to environmental health from livestock-related zoonotic pathogen exposures in this region. This information could also be important for maintaining swine herd biosecurity and protecting the health of wildlife near swine facilities.

  19. Development of a magnetic nanoparticles microarray for simultaneous and simple detection of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Li, Song; Liu, Hongna; Deng, Yan; Lin, Lin; He, Nongyue

    2013-07-01

    Foodborne diseases are a widespread and growing public health problem affecting both developed and developing countries, microbiologically contaminated food and water are the major causes of diarrhoeal diseases. Methods based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and microarrays are rapid and sensitive enough to detect very small quantities of microorganisms, however, the requirement for expensive equipments limits their application. In the present paper, we describe a method based on multiplex PCR and magnetic nanoparticles labelling for simultaneous detection of four major foodborne pathogens, including Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica, Vibrio cholera and Campylobacter jejuni. The process utilizes an oligonucleotide array onto which 5' biotinylated single strand PCR products were hybridized and visualized with streptavidin-coated magnetic nanoparticles (SA-MNPs), the signal from which could be detected by the naked eye, microscope or CCD camera. By employing SA-MNPs as visible labels, the microarray unambiguously distinguished all 4 pathogens with detection sensitivity up to 316 CFU/mL. Due to its high sensitivity, specificity and simple detection procedure, the magnetic bead assay provides a powerful tool for the detection and identification of foodborne pathogens in a modestly equipped laboratory. PMID:23909141

  20. Detection of emerging and re-emerging pathogens in surface waters close to an urban area.

    PubMed

    Marcheggiani, Stefania; D'Ugo, Emilo; Puccinelli, Camilla; Giuseppetti, Roberto; D'Angelo, Anna Maria; Gualerzi, Claudio Orlando; Spurio, Roberto; Medlin, Linda K; Guillebault, Delphine; Baudart-Lenfant, Julia; Weigel, Wilfried; Helmi, Karim; Mancini, Laura

    2015-05-01

    Current knowledge about the spread of pathogens in aquatic environments is scarce probably because bacteria, viruses, algae and their toxins tend to occur at low concentrations in water, making them very difficult to measure directly. The purpose of this study was the development and validation of tools to detect pathogens in freshwater systems close to an urban area. In order to evaluate anthropogenic impacts on water microbiological quality, a phylogenetic microarray was developed in the context of the EU project µAQUA to detect simultaneously numerous pathogens and applied to samples from two different locations close to an urban area located upstream and downstream of Rome in the Tiber River. Furthermore, human enteric viruses were also detected. Fifty liters of water were collected and concentrated using a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration approach. The resultant concentrate was further size-fractionated through a series of decreasing pore size filters. RNA was extracted from pooled filters and hybridized to the newly designed microarray to detect pathogenic bacteria, protozoa and toxic cyanobacteria. Diatoms as indicators of the water quality status, were also included in the microarray to evaluate water quality. The microarray results gave positive signals for bacteria, diatoms, cyanobacteria and protozoa. Cross validation of the microarray was performed using standard microbiological methods for the bacteria. The presence of oral-fecal transmitted human enteric-viruses were detected using q-PCR. Significant concentrations of Salmonella, Clostridium, Campylobacter and Staphylococcus as well as Hepatitis E Virus (HEV), noroviruses GI (NoGGI) and GII (NoGII) and human adenovirus 41 (ADV 41) were found in the Mezzocammino site, whereas lower concentrations of other bacteria and only the ADV41 virus was recovered at the Castel Giubileo site. This study revealed that the pollution level in the Tiber River was considerably higher downstream rather than upstream of

  1. Detection of Emerging and Re-Emerging Pathogens in Surface Waters Close to an Urban Area

    PubMed Central

    Marcheggiani, Stefania; D’Ugo, Emilo; Puccinelli, Camilla; Giuseppetti, Roberto; D’Angelo, Anna Maria; Gualerzi, Claudio Orlando; Spurio, Roberto; Medlin, Linda K.; Guillebault, Delphine; Weigel, Wilfried; Helmi, Karim; Mancini, Laura

    2015-01-01

    Current knowledge about the spread of pathogens in aquatic environments is scarce probably because bacteria, viruses, algae and their toxins tend to occur at low concentrations in water, making them very difficult to measure directly. The purpose of this study was the development and validation of tools to detect pathogens in freshwater systems close to an urban area. In order to evaluate anthropogenic impacts on water microbiological quality, a phylogenetic microarray was developed in the context of the EU project µAQUA to detect simultaneously numerous pathogens and applied to samples from two different locations close to an urban area located upstream and downstream of Rome in the Tiber River. Furthermore, human enteric viruses were also detected. Fifty liters of water were collected and concentrated using a hollow-fiber ultrafiltration approach. The resultant concentrate was further size-fractionated through a series of decreasing pore size filters. RNA was extracted from pooled filters and hybridized to the newly designed microarray to detect pathogenic bacteria, protozoa and toxic cyanobacteria. Diatoms as indicators of the water quality status, were also included in the microarray to evaluate water quality. The microarray results gave positive signals for bacteria, diatoms, cyanobacteria and protozoa. Cross validation of the microarray was performed using standard microbiological methods for the bacteria. The presence of oral-fecal transmitted human enteric-viruses were detected using q-PCR. Significant concentrations of Salmonella, Clostridium, Campylobacter and Staphylococcus as well as Hepatitis E Virus (HEV), noroviruses GI (NoGGI) and GII (NoGII) and human adenovirus 41 (ADV 41) were found in the Mezzocammino site, whereas lower concentrations of other bacteria and only the ADV41 virus was recovered at the Castel Giubileo site. This study revealed that the pollution level in the Tiber River was considerably higher downstream rather than upstream of

  2. The Dust at Altitude Recovery Technology (DART) System was Developed to Recover Plant, Human, and Animal Pathogens in Asian and African Dust Storms over North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schuerger, A. C.; Tench, B.; Nehr, A.; Emmons, T.; Valbuena, F.; Palaia, J.; Sugars, C.

    2014-12-01

    Dust emanates year-round from Africa and Asia and impacts air quality in North America. Asian dust plumes deliver up to 64 million tonnes of dust over the NW of the USA, and African dust storms deliver over 50 million tonnes of dust over Florida each year. Several recent studies have demonstrated that human and plant pathogens from Asian [1] African [2] aerosols can be transported to N. America in naturally occurring dust storms. What is unknown is whether these 'presumptive pathogens' impact human, plant, or animal health in the USA. In order to initiate a long-term monitoring program of pathogens in Asian and African dust plumes, we have developed a dust collection system called DART (Dust at Altitude Recovery Technology) (figure). The DART dust sampler can be mounted on a F104 Starfighter jet (figure) and a T6 Texan propeller driven airplane (not shown), and was test flown over FL in Dec. 2013 on the F104 and on the T6 in the summer of 2014. The DART system utilizes a high-volume pump to pass air through 6 separate filtration units where both aerosols and microbial cells are captured. The filtration systems exhibit flow rates from 25-142 L/min depending on the pore size and brand of filters used. Flow rates are directly correlated to increased air speed, and are inversely correlated to increased altitude. Filtration units can be turned on and off individually as required for specific science flight objectives. The DART dust sampler has performed nominally up to 7600 m, 0.92 Mach, and 3.5 +G's. During initial test flights in Dec. 2013, 5 of 8 genera of fungi recovered from the lower atmosphere over FL contained plant pathogens including species in the genera: Acremonium, Aspergillus, Cladosporium, Curvularia, and Fusarium. Numbers of recovered fungi, but not bacteria, increased significantly when 5 or 10 µm filters were used in the DART system compared to filter pore sizes ≤ 1.2 µm. Future sampling programs for both Asian and African dust events will be

  3. Fully automated and colorimetric foodborne pathogen detection on an integrated centrifugal microfluidic device.

    PubMed

    Oh, Seung Jun; Park, Byung Hyun; Choi, Goro; Seo, Ji Hyun; Jung, Jae Hwan; Choi, Jong Seob; Kim, Do Hyun; Seo, Tae Seok

    2016-05-21

    This work describes fully automated and colorimetric foodborne pathogen detection on an integrated centrifugal microfluidic device, which is called a lab-on-a-disc. All the processes for molecular diagnostics including DNA extraction and purification, DNA amplification and amplicon detection were integrated on a single disc. Silica microbeads incorporated in the disc enabled extraction and purification of bacterial genomic DNA from bacteria-contaminated milk samples. We targeted four kinds of foodborne pathogens (Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes) and performed loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) to amplify the specific genes of the targets. Colorimetric detection mediated by a metal indicator confirmed the results of the LAMP reactions with the colour change of the LAMP mixtures from purple to sky blue. The whole process was conducted in an automated manner using the lab-on-a-disc and a miniaturized rotary instrument equipped with three heating blocks. We demonstrated that a milk sample contaminated with foodborne pathogens can be automatically analysed on the centrifugal disc even at the 10 bacterial cell level in 65 min. The simplicity and portability of the proposed microdevice would provide an advanced platform for point-of-care diagnostics of foodborne pathogens, where prompt confirmation of food quality is needed. PMID:27112702

  4. [Molecular techniques for detection and identification of pathogens in food: advantages and limitations].

    PubMed

    Palomino-Camargo, Carolina; González-Muñoz, Yuniesky

    2014-01-01

    Foodborne diseases, caused by pathogenic microorganisms, are a major public health problem worldwide. Microbiological methods commonly used in the detection of these foodborne pathogens are laborious and time consuming. This situation, coupled with the demand for immediate results and with technological advances, has led to the development of a wide range of rapid methods in recent decades. On this basis, this review describes the advantages and limitations of the main molecular methods used in detection and identification of foodborne pathogens. To this end, we considered how recent the information was published, the objective analysis of the topic and its scope. Recent literature reports a significant number of alternative, sensitive and selective molecular techniques for detection, enumeration and identification of pathogenic microorganisms in food. Polymerase chain reaction (PCR) is the most popular platform, while high performance sequencing is emerging as a technique of wide applicability for the future. However, even with all the advantages of these new methodologies, their limitations should not be overlooked. For example, molecular methods are not standardized protocols, which hinders its use in some cases. For this reason, hard work should be done to overcome these limitations and improve the application of these techniques in complex matrices such as food systems. PMID:25418655

  5. Can Handheld Thermal Imaging Technology Improve Detection of Poachers in African Bushveldt?

    PubMed Central

    Dandy, Shantelle; Stubbs, Hannah; MacTavish, Dougal; MacTavish, Lynne

    2015-01-01

    Illegal hunting (poaching) is a global threat to wildlife. Anti-poaching initiatives are making increasing use of technology, such as infrared thermography (IRT), to support traditional foot and vehicle patrols. To date, the effectiveness of IRT for poacher location has not been tested under field conditions, where thermal signatures are often complex. Here, we test the hypothesis that IRT will increase the distance over which a poacher hiding in African scrub bushveldt can be detected relative to a conventional flashlight. We also test whether any increase in effectiveness is related to the cost and complexity of the equipment by comparing comparatively expensive (22000 USD) and relatively inexpensive (2000 USD) IRT devices. To test these hypotheses we employ a controlled, fully randomised, double-blind procedure to find a poacher in nocturnal field conditions in African bushveldt. Each of our 27 volunteer observers walked three times along a pathway using one detection technology on each pass in randomised order. They searched a prescribed search area of bushveldt within which the target was hiding. Hiding locations were pre-determined, randomised, and changed with each pass. Distances of first detection and positive detection were noted. All technologies could be used to detect the target. Average first detection distance for flashlight was 37.3m, improving by 19.8m to 57.1m using LIRT and by a further 11.2m to 68.3m using HIRT. Although detection distances were significantly greater for both IRTs compared to flashlight, there was no significant difference between LIRT and HIRT. False detection rates were low and there was no significant association between technology and accuracy of detection. Although IRT technology should ideally be tested in the specific environment intended before significant investment is made, we conclude that IRT technology is promising for anti-poaching patrols and that for this purpose low cost IRT units are as effective as units ten

  6. Can Handheld Thermal Imaging Technology Improve Detection of Poachers in African Bushveldt?

    PubMed

    Hart, Adam G; Rolfe, Richard N; Dandy, Shantelle; Stubbs, Hannah; MacTavish, Dougal; MacTavish, Lynne; Goodenough, Anne E

    2015-01-01

    Illegal hunting (poaching) is a global threat to wildlife. Anti-poaching initiatives are making increasing use of technology, such as infrared thermography (IRT), to support traditional foot and vehicle patrols. To date, the effectiveness of IRT for poacher location has not been tested under field conditions, where thermal signatures are often complex. Here, we test the hypothesis that IRT will increase the distance over which a poacher hiding in African scrub bushveldt can be detected relative to a conventional flashlight. We also test whether any increase in effectiveness is related to the cost and complexity of the equipment by comparing comparatively expensive (22,000 USD) and relatively inexpensive (2000 USD) IRT devices. To test these hypotheses we employ a controlled, fully randomised, double-blind procedure to find a poacher in nocturnal field conditions in African bushveldt. Each of our 27 volunteer observers walked three times along a pathway using one detection technology on each pass in randomised order. They searched a prescribed search area of bushveldt within which the target was hiding. Hiding locations were pre-determined, randomised, and changed with each pass. Distances of first detection and positive detection were noted. All technologies could be used to detect the target. Average first detection distance for flashlight was 37.3 m, improving by 19.8 m to 57.1 m using LIRT and by a further 11.2m to 68.3m using HIRT. Although detection distances were significantly greater for both IRTs compared to flashlight, there was no significant difference between LIRT and HIRT. False detection rates were low and there was no significant association between technology and accuracy of detection. Although IRT technology should ideally be tested in the specific environment intended before significant investment is made, we conclude that IRT technology is promising for anti-poaching patrols and that for this purpose low cost IRT units are as effective as units

  7. Commercially Available Rapid Methods for Detection of Selected Food-borne Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Valderrama, Wladir B; Dudley, Edward G; Doores, Stephanie; Cutter, Catherine N

    2016-07-01

    Generally, the enumeration and isolation of food-borne pathogens is performed using culture-dependent methods. These methods are sensitive, inexpensive, and provide both qualitative and quantitative assessment of the microorganisms present in a sample, but these are time-consuming. For this reason, researchers are developing new techniques that allow detection of food pathogens in shorter period of time. This review identifies commercially available methods for rapid detection and quantification of Listeria monocytogenes, Salmonella spp., Staphylococcus aureus, and Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in food samples. Three categories are discussed: immunologically based methods, nucleic acid-based assays, and biosensors. This review describes the basic mechanism and capabilities of each method, discusses the difficulties of choosing the most convenient method, and provides an overview of the future challenges for the technology for rapid detection of microorganisms. PMID:25749054

  8. Rapid Detection and Identification of a Pathogen's DNA Using Phi29 DNA Polymerase

    SciTech Connect

    Xu, Y.; Dunn, J.; Gao, S.; Bruno, J. F.; Luft, B. J.

    2008-10-31

    Zoonotic pathogens including those transmitted by insect vectors are some of the most deadly of all infectious diseases known to mankind. A number of these agents have been further weaponized and are widely recognized as being potentially significant biothreat agents. We describe a novel method based on multiply-primed rolling circle in vitro amplification for profiling genomic DNAs to permit rapid, cultivation-free differential detection and identification of circular plasmids in infectious agents. Using Phi29 DNA polymerase and a two-step priming reaction we could reproducibly detect and characterize by DNA sequencing circular DNA from Borrelia burgdorferi B31 in DNA samples containing as little as 25 pg of Borrelia DNA amongst a vast excess of human DNA. This simple technology can ultimately be adapted as a sensitive method to detect specific DNA from both known and unknown pathogens in a wide variety of complex environments.

  9. High-Throughput Biosensors for Multiplexed Food-Borne Pathogen Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehring, Andrew G.; Tu, Shu-I.

    2011-07-01

    Incidental contamination of foods by pathogenic bacteria and/or their toxins is a serious threat to public health and the global economy. The presence of food-borne pathogens and toxins must be rapidly determined at various stages of food production, processing, and distribution. Producers, processors, regulators, retailers, and public health professionals need simple and cost-effective methods to detect different species or serotypes of bacteria and associated toxins in large numbers of food samples. This review addresses the desire to replace traditional microbiological plate culture with more timely and less cumbersome rapid, biosensor-based methods. Emphasis focuses on high-throughput, multiplexed techniques that allow for simultaneous testing of numerous samples, in rapid succession, for multiple food-borne analytes (primarily pathogenic bacteria and/or toxins).

  10. Selective Detection of Live Pathogens via Surface-Confined Electric Field Perturbation on Interdigitated Silicon Transducers

    PubMed Central

    de la Rica, Roberto; Baldi, Antonio; Fernández-Sánchez, César; Matsui, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Detection of physical changes of cells is emerging as a new diagnostic approach to determine their phenotypical features. One of such changes is related to their viability; live (viable) cells are more voluminous than the dead ones, and monitoring this parameter in tissue cells becomes essential in fields such as drug discovery and hazard evaluation. In the area of pathogen detection, an analytical system capable of specifically detecting viable cells with the simple sample preparation and detection process would be highly desirable since live microorganisms can rapidly increase their numbers even at extremely low concentration and become a severe health risk. However, current sensing strategies cannot clearly determine the viability of cells, and hence they are susceptible to false-positive signals from harmless dead pathogens. Here we developed a robust electronic immunoassay that uses a pair of polycrystalline silicon interdigitated electrodes for the rapid detection of pathogens with high specificity for live cells. After bacterial cells were specifically anchored to the surface of the antibody-modified electrode, the characteristic geometry of the transducer enables the selective detection of viable cells with a limit of detection of 3 × 102 cfu/mL and an incubation time of only 1 h. The CMOS compatible fabrication process of the chip along with the label-free, reagentless electronic detection and the easy electrode regeneration to recycle for another impedance measurement make this approach an excellent candidate for oncoming economical in-field viable-cell detection systems, fully integrable with sophisticated signal processing circuits. PMID:19334738

  11. Fluorescent Protein Nanowire-Mediated Protein Microarrays for Multiplexed and Highly Sensitive Pathogen Detection.

    PubMed

    Men, Dong; Zhou, Juan; Li, Wei; Leng, Yan; Chen, Xinwen; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Xian-En

    2016-07-13

    Protein microarrays are powerful tools for high-throughput and simultaneous detection of different target molecules in complex biological samples. However, the sensitivity of conventional fluorescence-labeling protein detection methods is limited by the availability of signal molecules for binding to the target molecule. Here, we built a multifunctional fluorescent protein nanowire (FNw) by harnessing self-assembly of yeast amyloid protein. The FNw integrated a large number of fluorescent molecules, thereby enhancing the fluorescent signal output in target detection. The FNw was then combined with protein microarray technology to detect proteins derived from two pathogens, including influenza virus (hemagglutinin 1, HA1) and human immunodeficiency virus (p24 and gp120). The resulting detection sensitivity achieved a 100-fold improvement over a commercially available detection reagent. PMID:27315221

  12. Progress in rapid detection and identification of unknown human and agricultural pathogens

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, T; Holzrichter, J F; Milanovich, F P

    1999-08-13

    The medical industry is driving pathogen detection technology from its present characteristics of $50/sample, 100 sample capability systems, with several day time responses, having several percent error rates in reported outcomes. The systems described above are capable of providing samples at < $5/test, managing several million samples, < 1-hour cycle times, (or just minutes in some cases) and < 0.1% error rates. Because of their importance to the medical and agricultural communities, all ''important'' pathogens will have detection kits available (within air transport times, anywhere in the world) by 2020, and the most well known pathogens will have kits available within a few years. Many are available now. Because of the importance of the food supply to modern nations, these technologies will be employed everywhere in this industry. For example, the United States imports 30 B tons of food a year, but inspects < 1%. Portable inspection systems will make it possible to test for dangerous pathogens in feed lots, food processing plants, markets, and points of use. Outbreaks of animal or plant disease will be immediately detectable using field instrumentation, and more complex samples can be sent to central testing laboratories where more sophisticated test systems will be available. Unusual pathogens either naturally or purposefully selected or developed, will require special attention because there is not a commercial economic driver for the development of detection systems and curative agents. Their development, and production for sufficient availability, will require significant investments by the world community. The strategy and costs for developing vaccines or curative drugs will be very expensive and will need special attention. However it is important that attention be directed to these problems because such attention has a strong deterrent effect on potential developers or users. The capacity to use the full information content contained in pathogen systems

  13. FISHing for bacteria in food--a promising tool for the reliable detection of pathogenic bacteria?

    PubMed

    Rohde, Alexander; Hammerl, Jens Andre; Appel, Bernd; Dieckmann, Ralf; Al Dahouk, Sascha

    2015-04-01

    Foodborne pathogens cause millions of infections every year and are responsible for considerable economic losses worldwide. The current gold standard for the detection of bacterial pathogens in food is still the conventional cultivation following standardized and generally accepted protocols. However, these methods are time-consuming and do not provide fast information about food contaminations and thus are limited in their ability to protect consumers in time from potential microbial hazards. Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) represents a rapid and highly specific technique for whole-cell detection. This review aims to summarize the current data on FISH-testing for the detection of pathogenic bacteria in different food matrices and to evaluate its suitability for the implementation in routine testing. In this context, the use of FISH in different matrices and their pretreatment will be presented, the sensitivity and specificity of FISH tests will be considered and the need for automation shall be discussed as well as the use of technological improvements to overcome current hurdles for a broad application in monitoring food safety. In addition, the overall economical feasibility will be assessed in a rough calculation of costs, and strengths and weaknesses of FISH are considered in comparison with traditional and well-established detection methods. PMID:25475309

  14. Low-cost, real-time, continuous flow PCR system for pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Carballo, B Leticia; McGuiness, Ian; McBeth, Christine; Kalashnikov, Maxim; Borrós, Salvador; Sharon, Andre; Sauer-Budge, Alexis F

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, we present a portable and low cost point-of-care (POC) PCR system for quantitative detection of pathogens. Our system is based on continuous flow PCR which maintains fixed temperatures zones and pushes the PCR solution between two heated areas allowing for faster heat transfer and as a result, a faster PCR. The PCR system is built around a 46.0 mm × 30.9 mm × 0.4 mm disposable thermoplastic chip. In order to make the single-use chip economically viable, it was manufactured by hot embossing and was designed to be compatible with roll-to-roll embossing for large scale production. The prototype instrumentation surrounding the chip includes two heaters, thermal sensors, and an optical system. The optical system allows for pathogen detection via real time fluorescence measurements. FAM probes were used as fluorescent reporters of the amplicons generated during the PCR. To demonstrate the function of the chip, two infectious bacteria targets were selected: Chlamydia trachomatis and Escherichia coli O157:H7. For both bacteria, the limit of detection of the system was determined, PCR efficiencies were calculated, and different flow velocities were tested. We have demonstrated successful detection for these two bacterial pathogens highlighting the versatility and broad utility of our portable, low-cost, and rapid PCR diagnostic device. PMID:26995085

  15. In-situ detection of multiple pathogenic bacteria on food surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Yating; Horikawa, Shin; Hu, Jiajia; Chen, I.-Hsuan; Hu, Jing; Barbaree, James M.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2015-05-01

    Real-time in-situ detection of pathogenic bacteria on fresh food surfaces was accomplished with phage-based magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors. The ME biosensor is constructed of a small rectangular strip of ME material that is coated with a biomolecular recognition element (phage, antibodies or proteins, etc.) that is specific to the target pathogen. This mass-sensitive ME biosensor is wirelessly actuated into mechanical resonance by an externally applied time-varying magnetic field. When the biosensor binds with target bacteria, the mass of the sensor increases, resulting in a decrease in the sensor's resonant frequency. In order to compensate for nonspecific binding, control biosensors without phage were used in this experiment. In previous research, the biosensors were measured one by one. However, the simultaneous measurement of multiple sensors was accomplished in this research, and promises to greatly shorten the analysis time for bacterial detection. Additionally, the use of multiple biosensors enables the possibility of simultaneous detection of different pathogenic bacteria. This paper presents results of experiments in which multiple phage-based ME biosensors were simultaneously monitored. The E2 phage and JRB7 phage from a landscape phage library served as the bio-recognition element that have the capability of binding specifically with Salmonella typhimurium and B. anthracis spores, respectively. Real-time in-situ detection of Salmonella typhimurium and B. anthracis spores on food surfaces are presented.

  16. An Improved Detection and Quantification Method for the Coral Pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Bryan; Muirhead, Andrew; Bazanella, Monika; Huete-Stauffer, Carla; Vezzulli, Luigi; Bourne, David G.

    2013-01-01

    DNA- and RNA-based PCR and reverse-transcription real-time PCR assays were developed for diagnostic detection of the vcpA zinc-metalloprotease implicated in the virulence of the coral pathogen Vibrio coralliilyticus. Both PCR methods were highly specific for V. coralliilyticus and failed to amplify strains of closely-related Vibrio species. The assays correctly detected all globally occurring V. coralliilyticus isolates including a newly-described isolate [TAV24] infecting gorgonians in the Mediterranean Sea and highlighted those isolates that had been potentially misidentified, in particular V. tubiashii strains ATCC 19105 and RE22, historically described as important oyster pathogens. The real-time assay is sensitive, detecting 10 gene copies and the relationships between gene copy number and cycle threshold (CT) were highly linear (R2≥99.7). The real-time assay was also not affected by interference from non-target DNA. These assays are useful for rapid detection of V. coralliilyticus and monitoring of virulence levels in environmental samples, allowing for implementation of timely management steps to limit and possibly prevent losses due to V. coralliilyticus infection, as well as furthering investigations of factors affecting pathogenesis of this important marine pathogen. PMID:24339968

  17. Electrochemical Biosensor for Rapid and Sensitive Detection of Magnetically Extracted Bacterial Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Setterington, Emma B.; Alocilja, Evangelyn C.

    2012-01-01

    Biological defense and security applications demand rapid, sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens. This work presents a novel qualitative electrochemical detection technique which is applied to two representative bacterial pathogens, Bacillus cereus (as a surrogate for B. anthracis) and Escherichia coli O157:H7, resulting in detection limits of 40 CFU/mL and 6 CFU/mL, respectively, from pure culture. Cyclic voltammetry is combined with immunomagnetic separation in a rapid method requiring approximately 1 h for presumptive positive/negative results. An immunofunctionalized magnetic/polyaniline core/shell nano-particle (c/sNP) is employed to extract target cells from the sample solution and magnetically position them on a screen-printed carbon electrode (SPCE) sensor. The presence of target cells significantly inhibits current flow between the electrically active c/sNPs and SPCE. This method has the potential to be adapted for a wide variety of target organisms and sample matrices, and to become a fully portable system for routine monitoring or emergency detection of bacterial pathogens. PMID:25585629

  18. Biosensors and bio-based methods for the separation and detection of foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Bhunia, Arun K

    2008-01-01

    The safety of our food supply is always a major concern to consumers, food producers, and regulatory agencies. A safer food supply improves consumer confidence and brings economic stability. The safety of foods from farm-to-fork through the supply chain continuum must be established to protect consumers from debilitating, sometimes fatal episodes of pathogen outbreaks. The implementation of preventive strategies like hazard analysis critical control points (HACCP) assures safety but its full utility will not be realized unless supportive tools are fully developed. Rapid, sensitive, and accurate detection methods are such essential tools that, when integrated with HACCP, will improve safety of products. Traditional microbiological methods are powerful, error-proof, and dependable but these lengthy, cumbersome methods are often ineffective because they are not compatible with the speed at which the products are manufactured and the short shelf life of products. Automation in detection methods is highly desirable, but is not achievable with traditional methods. Therefore, biosensor-based tools offer the most promising solutions and address some of the modern-day needs for fast and sensitive detection of pathogens in real time or near real time. The application of several biosensor tools belonging to the categories of optical, electrochemical, and mass-based tools for detection of foodborne pathogens is reviewed in this chapter. Ironically, geometric growth in biosensor technology is fueled by the imminent threat of bioterrorism through food, water, and air and by the funding through various governmental agencies. PMID:18291303

  19. Molecular detection of avian pathogens in poultry red mite (Dermanyssus gallinae) collected in chicken farms.

    PubMed

    Huong, Chu Thi Thanh; Murano, Takako; Uno, Yukiko; Usui, Tatsufumi; Yamaguchi, Tsuyoshi

    2014-12-01

    Poultry red mite (PRM, Dermanyssus gallinae) is a blood-sucking ectoparasite as well as a possible vector of several avian pathogens. In this study, to define the role of PRM in the prevalence of avian infectious agents, we used polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to check for the presence of seven pathogens: Avipox virus (APV), Fowl Adenovirus (FAdV), Marek's disease virus (MDV), Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae (ER), Salmonella enterica (SE), Mycoplasma synoviae (MS) and Mycoplasma gallisepticum (MG). A total of 159 PRM samples collected between 2004 and 2012 from 142 chicken farms in 38 prefectures in Japan were examined. APV DNA was detected in 22 samples (13.8%), 19 of which were wild-type APV. 16S ribosomal RNA (16S rRNA) of MS was detected in 15 samples (9.4%), and the mgc2 gene of MG was detected in 2 samples (1.3%). Eight of 15 MS 16S rRNA sequences differed from the vaccine sequence, indicating they were wild-type strains, while both of the MG mgc2 gene sequences detected were identical to the vaccine sequences. Of these avian pathogen-positive mite samples, three were positive for both wild-types of APV and MS. On the other hand, the DNAs of ER, SE, FAdV and MDV were not detected in any samples. These findings indicated that PRM can harbor the wild-type pathogens and might play a role as a vector in spreading these diseases in farms. PMID:25649939

  20. Rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria by volatile organic compound (VOC) analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senecal, Andre G.; Magnone, Joshua; Yeomans, Walter; Powers, Edmund M.

    2002-02-01

    Developments in rapid detection technologies have made countless improvements over the years. However, because of the limited sample that these technologies can process in a single run, the chance of capturing and identifying a small amount of pathogens is difficult. The problem is further magnified by the natural random distribution of pathogens in foods. Methods to simplify pathogenic detection through the identification of bacteria specific VOC were studied. E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium were grown on selected agar medium to model protein, and carbohydrate based foods. Pathogenic and common spoilage bacteria (Pseudomonas and Morexella) were screened for unique VOC production. Bacteria were grown on agar slants in closed vials. Headspace sampling was performed at intervals up to 24 hours using Solid Phase Micro-Extraction (SPME) techniques followed by GC/MS analysis. Development of unique volatiles was followed to establish sensitivity of detection. E. coli produced VOC not found in either Trypticase Soy Yeast (TSY) agar blanks or spoilage organism samples were - indole, 1-decanol, and 2-nonanone. Salmonella specific VOC grown on TSY were 3-methyl-1-butanol, dimethyl sulfide, 2-undecanol, 2-pentadecanol and 1-octanol. Trials on potato dextrose agar (PDA) slants indicated VOC specific for E. coli and Salmonella when compared to PDA blanks and Pseudomonas samples. However, these VOC peaks were similar for both pathogens. Morexella did not grow on PDA slants. Work will continue with model growth mediums at various temperatures, and mixed flora inoculums. As well as, VOC production based on the dynamics of bacterial growth.

  1. A novel microbial source tracking microarray for pathogen detection and fecal source identification in environmental systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Harwood, Valerie J; Nayak, Bina; Staley, Christopher; Sadowsky, Michael J; Weidhaas, Jennifer

    2015-06-16

    Pathogen detection and the identification of fecal contamination sources are challenging in environmental waters. Factors including pathogen diversity and ubiquity of fecal indicator bacteria hamper risk assessment and remediation of contamination sources. A custom microarray targeting pathogens (viruses, bacteria, protozoa), microbial source tracking (MST) markers, and antibiotic resistance genes was tested against DNA obtained from whole genome amplification (WGA) of RNA and DNA from sewage and animal (avian, cattle, poultry, and swine) feces. Perfect and mismatch probes established the specificity of the microarray in sewage, and fluorescence decrease of positive probes over a 1:10 dilution series demonstrated semiquantitative measurement. Pathogens, including norovirus, Campylobacter fetus, Helicobacter pylori, Salmonella enterica, and Giardia lamblia were detected in sewage, as well as MST markers and resistance genes to aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, and tetracycline. Sensitivity (percentage true positives) of MST results in sewage and animal waste samples (21-33%) was lower than specificity (83-90%, percentage of true negatives). Next generation DNA sequencing revealed two dominant bacterial families that were common to all sample types: Ruminococcaceae and Lachnospiraceae. Five dominant phyla and 15 dominant families comprised 97% and 74%, respectively, of sequences from all fecal sources. Phyla and families not represented on the microarray are possible candidates for inclusion in subsequent array designs. PMID:25970344

  2. Manipulation of small Rho GTPases is a pathogen-induced process detected by Nod1

    PubMed Central

    Keestra, A. Marijke; Winter, Maria G.; Auburger, Josef J.; Fräßle, Simon P.; Xavier, Mariana N.; Winter, Sebastian E.; Kim, Anita; Poon, Victor; Ravesloot, Mariëtta M.; Waldenmaier, Julian; Tsolis, Renée M.; Eigenheer, Richard A.; Bäumler, Andreas J.

    2013-01-01

    Our innate immune system distinguishes microbes from self by detecting conserved pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) 1. However, all microbes produce PAMPs, regardless of their pathogenic potential. To distinguish virulent microbes from ones with lower disease-causing potential the innate immune system detects conserved pathogen-induced processes 2, such as the presence of microbial products in the host cytosol, by mechanisms that are not fully resolved. Here we show that Nod1 senses cytosolic microbial products by monitoring the activation state of small Rho GTPases. Activation of Rac1 and Cdc42 by bacterial delivery or ectopic expression of a Salmonella virulence factor, SopE, triggered the Nod1 signaling pathway with consequent Rip2-mediated induction of NF-κB-dependent inflammatory responses. Similarly, activation of the Nod1 signaling pathway by peptidoglycan required Rac1 activity. Furthermore, constitutively active forms of Rac1, Cdc42 and RhoA activated the Nod1 signaling pathway. Our data identify activation of small Rho GTPases as a pathogen-induced process sensed through the Nod1 signaling pathway (Fig. S1). PMID:23542589

  3. Phage-protease-peptide: a novel trifecta enabling multiplex detection of viable bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Alcaine, S D; Tilton, L; Serrano, M A C; Wang, M; Vachet, R W; Nugen, S R

    2015-10-01

    Bacteriophages represent rapid, readily targeted, and easily produced molecular probes for the detection of bacterial pathogens. Molecular biology techniques have allowed researchers to make significant advances in the bioengineering of bacteriophage to further improve speed and sensitivity of detection. Despite their host specificity, bacteriophages have not been meaningfully leveraged in multiplex detection of bacterial pathogens. We propose a proof-of-principal phage-based scheme to enable multiplex detection. Our scheme involves bioengineering bacteriophage to carry a gene for a specific protease, which is expressed during infection of the target cell. Upon lysis, the protease is released to cleave a reporter peptide, and the signal detected. Here we demonstrate the successful (i) modification of T7 bacteriophage to carry tobacco etch virus (TEV) protease; (ii) expression of TEV protease by Escherichia coli following infection by our modified T7, an average of 2000 units of protease per phage are produced during infection; and (iii) proof-of-principle detection of E. coli in 3 h after a primary enrichment via TEV protease activity using a fluorescent peptide and using a designed target peptide for matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry analysis (MALDI-TOF MS) analysis. This proof-of-principle can be translated to other phage-protease-peptide combinations to enable multiplex bacterial detection and readily adopted on multiple platforms, like MALDI-TOF MS or fluorescent readers, commonly found in labs. PMID:26245682

  4. Detection of Pathogenic Viruses in Sewage Provided Early Warnings of Hepatitis A Virus and Norovirus Outbreaks

    PubMed Central

    Hellmér, Maria; Paxéus, Nicklas; Magnius, Lars; Enache, Lucica; Arnholm, Birgitta; Johansson, Annette; Bergström, Tomas

    2014-01-01

    Most persons infected with enterically transmitted viruses shed large amounts of virus in feces for days or weeks, both before and after onset of symptoms. Therefore, viruses causing gastroenteritis may be detected in wastewater, even if only a few persons are infected. In this study, the presence of eight pathogenic viruses (norovirus, astrovirus, rotavirus, adenovirus, Aichi virus, parechovirus, hepatitis A virus [HAV], and hepatitis E virus) was investigated in sewage to explore whether their identification could be used as an early warning of outbreaks. Samples of the untreated sewage were collected in proportion to flow at Ryaverket, Gothenburg, Sweden. Daily samples collected during every second week between January and May 2013 were pooled and analyzed for detection of viruses by concentration through adsorption to milk proteins and PCR. The largest amount of noroviruses was detected in sewage 2 to 3 weeks before most patients were diagnosed with this infection in Gothenburg. The other viruses were detected at lower levels. HAV was detected between weeks 5 and 13, and partial sequencing of the structural VP1protein identified three different strains. Two strains were involved in an ongoing outbreak in Scandinavia and were also identified in samples from patients with acute hepatitis A in Gothenburg during spring of 2013. The third strain was unique and was not detected in any patient sample. The method used may thus be a tool to detect incipient outbreaks of these viruses and provide early warning before the causative pathogens have been recognized in health care. PMID:25172863

  5. Detection of African horse sickness virus in Culicoides imicola pools using RT-qPCR.

    PubMed

    de Waal, Tania; Liebenberg, Danica; Venter, Gert J; Mienie, Charlotte Ms; van Hamburg, Huib

    2016-06-01

    African horse sickness (AHS) is an infectious, non-contagious arthropod-borne disease of equids, caused by the African horse sickness virus (AHSV), an orbivirus of the Reoviridae family. It is endemic in sub-Saharan Africa and thought to be the most lethal viral disease of horses. This study focused on detection of AHSV in Culicoides imicola (Diptera: Ceratopogonidae) pools by the application of a RT-qPCR. Midges were fed on AHSV-infected blood. A single blood-engorged female was allocated to pools of unfed nulliparous female midges. Pool sizes varied from 1 to 200. RNA was extracted and prepared for RT-qPCR. The virus was successfully detected and the optimal pool size for the limit of detection of the virus was determined at a range between 1 to 25. Results from this investigation highlight the need for a standardized protocol for AHSV investigation in Culicoides midges especially for comparison among different studies and for the determination of infection rate. PMID:27232141

  6. Modeling and simulation of DNA flow in a microfluidic-based pathogen detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Trebotich, D; Miller, G H

    2005-01-31

    We present simulation results from a new computational model of DNA flow in microfluidic devices. This work is important because computational models are needed to design miniaturized biomedical devices that are becoming the state-of-the-art in many significant applications including pathogen detection as well as continuous monitoring and drug delivery. Currently advanced algorithms in design tools are non-existent but necessary to understand the complex fluid and polymer dynamics involved in biological flow at small scales. Our model is based on a fully coupled fluid-particle numerical algorithm with both stochastic and deterministic components in a bead-rod polymer representation. We have applied this work to DNA extraction configurations in a microfluidic PCR chamber used in a pathogen detection system. We demonstrate our method on the test problem of flow of a single DNA molecule in a 2D packed array microchannel. We are also investigating mechanisms for molecular ''sticking'' using short range forces.

  7. Detection and Characterization of Cancer Cells and Pathogenic Bacteria Using Aptamer-Based Nano-Conjugates

    PubMed Central

    Gedi, Vinayakumar; Kim, Young-Pil

    2014-01-01

    Detection and characterization of cells using aptamers and aptamer-conjugated nanoprobes has evolved a great deal over the past few decades. This evolution has been driven by the easy selection of aptamers via in vitro cell-SELEX, permitting sensitive discrimination between target and normal cells, which includes pathogenic prokaryotic and cancerous eukaryotic cells. Additionally, when the aptamer-based strategies are used in conjunction with nanomaterials, there is the potential for cell targeting and therapeutic effects with improved specificity and sensitivity. Here we review recent advances in aptamer-based nano-conjugates and their applications for detecting cancer cells and pathogenic bacteria. The multidisciplinary research utilized in this field will play an increasingly significant role in clinical medicine and drug discovery. PMID:25268922

  8. Enzymatic Polymerization on DNA Modified Gold Nanowire for Label-Free Detection of Pathogen DNA

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Jaepil; Kim, Hyejin; Lee, Jong Bum

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a label-free biosensor for the detection of single-stranded pathogen DNA through the target-enhanced gelation between gold nanowires (AuNW) and the primer DNAs branched on AuNW. The target DNA enables circularization of the linear DNA template, and the primer DNA is elongated continuously via rolling circle amplification. As a result, in the presence of the target DNA, a macroscopic hydrogel was fabricated by the entanglement of the elongated DNA with AuNWs as a scaffold fiber for effective gelation. In contrast, very small separate particles were generated in the absence of the target DNA. This label-free biosensor might be a promising tool for the detection of pathogen DNAs without any devices for further analysis. Moreover, the biosensor based on the weaving of AuNW and DNAs suggests a novel direction for the applications of AuNWs in biological engineering. PMID:26084045

  9. Multiplex pathogen detection based on spatially addressable microarrays of barcoded resins.

    PubMed

    Blais, David R; Alvarez-Puebla, Ramon A; Bravo-Vasquez, Juan P; Fenniri, Hicham; Pezacki, John Paul

    2008-07-01

    Suspension microsphere immunoassays are rapidly gaining recognition in antigen identification and infectious disease biodetection due to their simplicity, versatility and high-throughput multiplex screening. We demonstrate a multiplex assay based on antibody-functionalized barcoded resins (BCRs) to identify pathogen antigens in complex biological fluids. The binding event of a particular antibody on given bead (fluorescence) and the identification of the specific pathogen agent (vibrational fingerprint of the bead) can be achieved in a dispersive Raman system by exciting the sample with two different laser lines. Anthrax protective antigen, Franciscella tularensis lipopolysaccharide and CD14 antigens were accurately identified and quantified in tetraplex assays with a detection limit of 1 ng/mL. The rapid, versatile and simple analysis enabled by the BCRs demonstrates their potential for multiplex antigen detection and identification in a reconfigurable microarray format. PMID:18566958

  10. Microbial Diagnostic Microarrays for the Detection and Typing of Food- and Water-Borne (Bacterial) Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Kostić, Tanja; Sessitsch, Angela

    2011-01-01

    Reliable and sensitive pathogen detection in clinical and environmental (including food and water) samples is of greatest importance for public health. Standard microbiological methods have several limitations and improved alternatives are needed. Most important requirements for reliable analysis include: (i) specificity; (ii) sensitivity; (iii) multiplexing potential; (iv) robustness; (v) speed; (vi) automation potential; and (vii) low cost. Microarray technology can, through its very nature, fulfill many of these requirements directly and the remaining challenges have been tackled. In this review, we attempt to compare performance characteristics of the microbial diagnostic microarrays developed for the detection and typing of food and water pathogens, and discuss limitations, points still to be addressed and issues specific for the analysis of food, water and environmental samples.

  11. [Progress in research of detection assay for pathogens causing community acquirerd pneumonia].

    PubMed

    Jiang, L X; Ren, H Y; Zhou, H J; Chen, Y; Shao, Z J; Qin, T

    2016-07-01

    Community-acquired pneumonia(CAP)is a common respiratory infectious disease. The etiologic diagnosis of CAP remains an uneasy task. Early etiologic diagnosis is critical for proper treatment and might improve the prognosis. So, it is important to identify pathogens causing CAP in early time and accurate way with sensitive and effective method. This paper summarizes the recent progress in the research of the detection assay for CAP. PMID:27453123

  12. Evaluation of New bioMérieux Chromogenic CPS Media for Detection of Urinary Tract Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Rigaill, Josselin; Verhoeven, Paul O.; Mahinc, Caroline; Jeraiby, Mohamed; Grattard, Florence; Fonsale, Nathalie; Carricajo, Anne

    2015-01-01

    Four chromogenic media were compared for their ability to detect urinary tract pathogens in 299 urine specimens, of which 175 were found positive, allowing the growth of 279 microorganisms. After 18 to 24 h of incubation, the CPS ID4, CPSE, CPSO (bioMérieux), and UriSelect4 (Bio-Rad) media showed sensitivities of 97.1%, 99.3%, 99.6%, and 99.6%, respectively. PMID:25994162

  13. Flow-enhanced detection of biological pathogens using piezoelectric microcantilever arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, John-Paul

    The piezoelectric microcantilever sensor (PEMS) is an all-electrical resonant oscillator biosensor system capable of in-situ and label-free detection. With various insulation and antibody immobilization schemes, it is well-suited for sensitive, specific pathogen detection applications with limits of detection on the order of relevant lethal infectious dosages. Initial PEMS implementation demonstrated biodetection of just 36 total Bacillus anthracis (BA) spores in 0.8 ml of liquid. However, concerns of cross reactivity between the antibody and closely related species of the target pathogens casts doubts on the usefulness of antibody-based assays in terms of the specificity of detection. The goal of this thesis is to develop the PEMS as a method for in-situ, label-free, pathogen detection with better limits of detection than current antibody-based methods as well as high sensitivity and specificity, by exploring PEMS array detection and engineered fluidics specificity augmentation. Experimentation in an 8 mm wide channel revealed that optimal discriminatory detection of BA spores among close cousins (B. cereus (BC), thuringiensis (BT) and subtilis (BS)) was achieved at 14 ml/min. At this flow rate, the detection signals of BC, BT, and BS all fell to within the noise level of the sensor, while that of BA was still nearly optimal. Thus, it was deduced that the interaction forces of BC, BT, and BS were 100 pN. Implementation of array sensing systems enabled real-time, redundant biosensor assays and concurrent background determination by a reference PEMS. Consequentially, successful real-time detection of 10 BA spores/ml was achieved, and single Cryptosporidium parvum (CP) oocyst detection at 0.1 oocysts/ml was accomplished with step-wise resonance frequency shifts of 290 Hz and signal to noise ratios (SNR) greater than 5. In a 19 mm wide flow channel, optimal single oocyst detection efficiency was achieved at 2 ml/min. Optimal discrimination of CP from C. muris (CM

  14. Development of Multiplex PCR for Simultaneous Detection of Three Pathogenic Shigella Species

    PubMed Central

    RANJBAR, Reza; AFSHAR, Davoud; MEHRABI TAVANA, Ali; NAJAFI, Ali; POURALI, Fatemeh; SAFIRI, Zahra; SOROURI ZANJANI, Rahim; JONAIDI JAFARI, Nematollah

    2014-01-01

    Background: Shigella species are among the common causes of bacterial diarrhoeal diseases. Traditional detection methods are time-consuming resulting in delay in treatment and control of Shigella infections thus there is a need to develop molecular methods for rapid and simultaneous detection of Shigella spp. In this study a rapid multiplex PCR were developed for simultaneous detection of three pathogenic Shigella species. Methods: For detection of Shigella spp., a pair of primers was used to replicate a chromosomal sequence. Three other sets of primers were also designed to amplify the target genes of three most common species of Shigella in Iran including S. sonnei, S. flexneri and S. boydii. The multiplex PCR assay was optimized for simultaneous detection and differentiation of three pathogenic Shigella species. The assay specificity was investigated by testing different strains of Shigella and other additional strains belonging to non Shigella species, but responsible for foodborne diseases. Results: The Shigella genus specific PCR yielded the expected DNA band of 159 bp in all tested strains belonging to four Shigella species. The standard and multiplex PCR assays also produced the expected fragments of 248 bp, 503 bp, and 314 bp, for S. boydii, S. sonnei and S. flexneri, respectively. Each species-specific primer pair did not show any cross-reactivity. Conclusion: Both standard and multiplex PCR protocols had a good specificity. They can provide a valuable tool for the rapid and simultaneous detection and differentiation of three most prevalent Shigella species in Iran. PMID:26171358

  15. A microfluidic platform with integrated arrays for immunologic assays for biological pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Richard; Becker, Holger; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Julich, Sandra; Miethe, Peter; Moche, Christian; Schattschneider, Sebastian; Tomaso, Herbert; Gärtner, Claudia

    2014-05-01

    The ability to integrate complete assays on a microfluidic chip helps to greatly simplify instrument requirements and allows the use of lab-on-a-chip technology in the field. A core application for such field-portable systems is the detection of pathogens in a CBRN scenario such as permanent monitoring of airborne pathogens, e.g. in subway stations or hospitals etc. An immunological assay was chosen as method for the pathogen identification. The conceptual approach was its realization as a lab-on-a-chip system, enabling an easy handling of the sample in an automated manner. The immunological detection takes place on an antibody array directly implemented in the microfluidic network. Different immobilization strategies will be presented showing the performance of the system. Central elements of the disposable microfluidic device like fluidic interface, turning valves, liquid introduction and waste storage, as well as the architecture of measurement and control fluidic network, will be introduced. Overall process times of about 30 minutes were achieved and assays for the detection of Francisella tularensis and Yersinia pestis are presented. An important feature of the integrated lab-on-a-chip approach is that all waste liquids remain on-chip and contamination risks can be avoided.

  16. Fish chromatophores as cytosensors in a microscale device: detection of environmental toxins and bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chaplen, Frank W R; Upson, Rosalyn H; Mcfadden, Philip N; Kolodziej, Wojtek

    2002-02-01

    Fish chromatophores from Betta splendens are used as the cytosensor element in the development of a portable microscale device capable of detecting certain environmental toxins and bacterial pathogens by monitoring changes in pigment granule distribution. The adaptation of chromatophores to a microscale environment has required the development of enabling technologies to produce miniaturized culture chambers, to integrate microfluidics for sample delivery, to miniaturize image capture, and to design new statistical methods for image analyses. Betta splendens chromatophores were selected as the cytosensor element because of their moderate size, their toleration of close contact, and most importantly, for their responses to a broad range of chemicals and pathogenic bacteria. A miniaturized culture chamber has been designed that supports chromatophore viability for as long as 3 months, and that can be easily transported without damage to the cells. New statistical methods for image analyses have been developed that increase sensitivity and also decrease the time required for detection of significant changes in pigment granule distribution. Betta chromatophores have been tested for their responses to selected pathogenic bacteria and chemical agents. We discuss in detail the aggregation of pigment granules seen when chromatophores are incubated with Bacillus cereus, a common cause of food poisoning. Also described are the more subtle responses of chromatophores to a class of environmental chemical toxins, polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons. We show that the chromatophores are able to detect the presence of certain polynuclear aromatic hydrocarbons at concentrations lower than the Environment Protection Agency (EPA) 550.1 standards. PMID:11841070

  17. Simultaneous Detection of Five Pathogens from Cerebrospinal Fluid Specimens Using Luminex Technology

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Linfu; Wu, Rui; Shi, Xiaodan; Feng, Dongyun; Feng, Guodong; Yang, Yining; Dai, Wen; Bian, Ting; Liu, Tingting; He, Ying; Shi, Ming; Zhao, Gang

    2016-01-01

    Early diagnosis and treatment are crucial for the outcome of central nervous system (CNS) infections. In this study, we developed a multiplex PCR-Luminex assay for the simultaneous detection of five major pathogens, including Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Cryptococcus neoformans, Streptococcus pneumoniae, and herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2, which frequently cause CNS infections. Through the hybridization reaction between multiplex PCR-amplified targets and oligonucleotide “anti-TAG” sequences, we found that the PCR-Luminex assay could detect as low as 101–102 copies of synthetic pathogen DNAs. Furthermore, 163 cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) specimens from patients with suspected CNS infections were used to evaluate the efficiency of this multiplex PCR-Luminex method. Compared with Ziehl-Neelsen stain, this assay showed a high diagnostic accuracy for tuberculosis meningitis (sensitivity, 90.7% and specificity, 99.1%). For cryptococcal meningitis, the sensitivity and specificity were 92% and 97.1%, respectively, compared with the May Grunwald Giemsa (MGG) stain. For herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 encephalitis, the sensitivities were 80.8% and 100%, and the specificities were 94.2% and 99%, respectively, compared with Enzyme Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA) assays. Taken together, this multiplex PCR-Luminex assay showed potential efficiency for the simultaneous detection of five pathogens and may be a promising supplement to conventional methods for diagnosing CNS infections. PMID:26861363

  18. Biosensors as innovative tools for the detection of food borne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Arora, Pooja; Sindhu, Annu; Dilbaghi, Neeraj; Chaudhury, Ashok

    2011-10-15

    The wholesomeness of food is the real proviso for healthy life. Food freed from microbial and chemical cross-contaminations adds on to its hygienic and nutritive value. Infectious diseases spreading every day through food have become a life-threatening problem for millions of people around the world. Food or food products are the potent transmitting agent of more than 250 known diseases. So far only in the United States, 76 million cases of food-borne illness, 32,500 cases of hospitalization and 5000 cases per annum of mortality are recognized. Health expert's estimate that the yearly cost of all the food borne diseases is approximately $5-6 billion. There is therefore, is an urgent need for the development of rapid, competent, and reliable methods for direct detection and identification of foodborne brown pathogens. In this overview, we have concentrated specifically on microbe-based biosensing methods such as optical, surface plasmon resonance (SPR), amperometric, potentiometric, whole-cell, electrochemical, impedimetric, piezoelectric for the rapid detection of food borne pathogens. Furthermore, we have focused our attention on the discussion of principal concepts, applications, and examples from analyte to the configuration of potential biosensors that have been achieved up until now to detect potential foodborne pathogens. The article presents foreseeable future trends in biosensor research activities for paving the way for fresh and healthy food proposal. PMID:21763122

  19. Application of oligonucleotide array technology for the rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria of foodborne infections.

    PubMed

    Hong, Bang-Xing; Jiang, Li-Fang; Hu, Yu-Shan; Fang, Dan-Yun; Guo, Hui-Yu

    2004-09-01

    A rapid and accurate method for detection for common pathogenic bacteria in foodborne infections was established by using oligonucleotide array technology. Nylon membrane was used as the array support. A mutation region of the 23S rRNA gene was selected as the discrimination target from 14 species (genera) of bacteria causing foodborne infections and two unrelated bacterial species. A pair of universal primers was designed for PCR amplification of the 23S rRNA gene. Twenty-one species (genera)-specific oligonucleotide detection probes were synthesized and spotted onto the nylon membranes. The 23S rRNA gene amplification products of 14 species of pathogenic bacteria were hybridized to the oligonucleotide array. Hybridization results were analyzed with digoxigenin-linked enzyme reaction. Results indicated that nine species of pathogenic bacteria (Escherichia coli, Campylobacter jejuni, Shigella dysenteriae, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Proteus vulgaris, Bacillus cereus, Listeria monocytogenes and Clostridium botulinum) showed high sensitivity and specificity for the oligonucleotide array. Two other species (Salmonella enterica and Yersinia enterocolitica) gave weak cross-reaction with E. coli, but the reaction did not affect their detection. After redesigning the probes, positive hybridization results were obtained with Staphylococcus aureus, but not with Clostridium perfringens and Streptococcus pyogenes. The oligonucleotide array can also be applied to samples collected in clinical settings of foodborne infections. The superiority of oligonucleotide array over other tests lies on its rapidity, accuracy and efficiency in the diagnosis, treatment and control of foodborne infections. PMID:15279944

  20. Detection of enteric pathogens in Turkey flocks affected with severe enteritis, in Brazil.

    PubMed

    Moura-Alvarez, Joelma; Nuñez, Luis F N; Astolfi-Ferreira, Claudete S; Knöbl, Terezinha; Chacón, Jorge L; Moreno, Andrea M; Jones, Richard C; Ferreira, Antonio J Piantino

    2014-08-01

    Twenty-two flocks of turkeys affected by enteric problems, with ages between 10 and 104 days and located in the Southern region of Brazil, were surveyed for turkey by PCR for turkey astrovirus type 2 (TAstV-2), turkey coronavirus (TCoV), hemorrhagic enteritis virus (HEV), rotavirus, reovirus, Salmonella spp., and Lawsonia intracellularis (Li) infections. Eleven profiles of pathogen combination were observed. The most frequently encountered pathogen combinations were TCoV-Li, followed by TCoV-TAstV-2-Li, TCoV-TastV-2. Only TCoV was detected as the sole pathogen in three flocks. Eight and 19 flocks of the 22 were positive for TAstV-2 and TCoV, respectively. Six were positive for Salmonella spp. and L. intracellularis was detected in 12 turkey flocks. Reovirus and HEV were not detected in this survey. These results throw new light on the multiple etiology of enteritis in turkeys. The implications of these findings and their correlation with the clinical signs are comprehensively discussed, illustrating the complexity of the enteric diseases. PMID:24817479

  1. Self-propelled, phage-based magnetoelastic biosentinels for detection of pathogens in liquid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Shin; Zhao, Ruiting; Chai, Yating; Wikle, Howard C.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents the concept of self-propelled magnetoelastic (ME) biosentinels that seek out and capture pathogenic bacteria in stagnant liquids. These biosentinels are composed of a free-standing, asymmetric-shaped ME resonator coated with a filamentous landscape phage that specifically binds with a pathogen of interest. When a time-varying magnetic pulse is applied, the ME biosentinels can be placed into mechanical resonance by magnetostriction. The resultant asymmetric vibration then generates a net force on the surroundings and hence generates autonomous motion in the liquid. As soon as the biosentinels find and bind with the target pathogen through the phage-based biomolecular recognition, a change in the biosentinel's resonant frequency occurs, and thereby the presence of the target pathogen can be detected. In order to actuate the ME biosentinels into mechanical resonance of a desired mode, modal analysis using the three-dimensional finite element method was performed. In addition, the design of a magnetic chamber that can control the orientation and/or translation of a biosentinel is discussed.

  2. Bacteria Murmur: Application of an Acoustic Biosensor for Plant Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Dimopoulou, Anastasia; Glynos, Paraskevas; Gizeli, Electra

    2015-01-01

    A multi-targeting protocol for the detection of three of the most important bacterial phytopathogens, based on their scientific and economic importance, was developed using an acoustic biosensor (the Quartz Crystal Microbalance) for DNA detection. Acoustic detection was based on a novel approach where DNA amplicons were monitored and discriminated based on their length rather than mass. Experiments were performed during real time monitoring of analyte binding and in a direct manner, i.e. without the use of labels for enhancing signal transduction. The proposed protocol improves time processing by circumventing gel electrophoresis and can be incorporated as a routine detection method in a diagnostic lab or an automated lab-on-a-chip system for plant pathogen diagnostics. PMID:26177507

  3. [Real-time PCR kits for the detection of the African Swine Fever virus].

    PubMed

    Latyshev, O E; Eliseeva, O V; Grebennikova, T V; Verkhovskiĭ, O A; Tsibezov, V V; Chernykh, O Iu; Dzhailidi, G A; Aliper, T I

    2014-01-01

    The results obtained using the diagnostic kit based on real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect the DNA of the African Swine Fever in the pathological material, as well as in the culture fluid, are presented. A high sensitivity and specificity for detection of the DNA in the organs and tissues of animals was shown to be useful for detection in the European Union referentiality reagent kits for DNA detection by real time PCR of ASFV. More rapid and effective method of DNA extraction using columns mini spin Quick gDNA(TM) MiniPrep was suggested and compared to the method of DNA isolation on the inorganic sorbent. High correlation of the results of the DNA detection of ASFV by real-time PCR and antigen detection results ASFV by competitive ELISA obtained with the ELISA SEROTEST/INGEZIM COMRAC PPA was demonstrated. The kit can be used in the veterinary services for effective monitoring of ASFV to contain, eliminate and prevent further spread of the disease. PMID:25895212

  4. Simultaneous detection of Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 and its antibiotic resistance genes from seafood.

    PubMed

    Deekshit, Vijaya Kumar; Kumar, Ballamoole Krishna; Rai, Praveen; Rohit, Anusha; Karunasagar, Indrani

    2013-06-01

    Salmonella enterica serovars are virulent pathogens of humans and animals with many strains possessing multiple drug resistance traits. They have been found to carry resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol, florfenicol, streptomycin, sulfonamides, and tetracycline (ACSSuT-resistant). A rapid and sensitive multiplex PCR (mPCR)-based assay was developed for the detection of Salmonella serovars from seafood. Six sets of primers which are one primer pair targeting Salmonella specific gene invA (284 bp), two Salmonella pathogenicity island 2 (SPI-2) genes ssaT (780 bp) and sseF (888 bp) and three antibiotic resistance genes floR (198 bp), sul1 (425 bp), tetG (550 bp) were used for the study. The specificity and sensitivity of the assay were tested by spiking shrimp/fish/clam homogenate with viable cells of Salmonella. This assay allows for the cost effective and reliable detection of pathogenic Salmonella enterica from seafood. The mPCR developed in the present study proved to be a potent analytical tool for the rapid identification of multidrug-resistant Salmonella serovars from seafood. PMID:23545447

  5. PATHOGEN DETECTION IN SOURCE AND DRINKING WATER: A COMMUNITY BASED APPROACH TO EXPOSURE ASSESSMENT ON THE CROW RESERVATION

    EPA Science Inventory

    This project will give a more complete understanding of the microbial ecology, composition, and distribution of pathogens in water and biofilms and will develop new strategies for detection and management of pathogens in drinking water systems. This multifaceted approach will...

  6. Development and application of an oligonucleotide microarray and real-time quantitative PCR for detection of wastewater bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dae-Young; Lauder, Heather; Cruwys, Heather; Falletta, Patricia; Beaudette, Lee A

    2008-07-15

    Conventional microbial water quality test methods are well known for their technical limitations, such as lack of direct pathogen detection capacity and low throughput capability. The microarray assay has recently emerged as a promising alternative for environmental pathogen monitoring. In this study, bacterial pathogens were detected in municipal wastewater using a microarray equipped with short oligonucleotide probes targeting 16S rRNA sequences. To date, 62 probes have been designed against 38 species, 4 genera, and 1 family of pathogens. The detection sensitivity of the microarray for a waterborne pathogen Aeromonas hydrophila was determined to be approximately 1.0% of the total DNA, or approximately 10(3)A. hydrophila cells per sample. The efficacy of the DNA microarray was verified in a parallel study where pathogen genes and E. coli cells were enumerated using real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) and standard membrane filter techniques, respectively. The microarray and qPCR successfully detected multiple wastewater pathogen species at different stages of the disinfection process (i.e. secondary effluents vs. disinfected final effluents) and at two treatment plants employing different disinfection methods (i.e. chlorination vs. UV irradiation). This result demonstrates the effectiveness of the DNA microarray as a semi-quantitative, high throughput pathogen monitoring tool for municipal wastewater. PMID:18423816

  7. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, Mark T.

    2001-03-13

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, and analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: 1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, 2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and 3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  8. Nucleic Acid-Based Detection and Identification of Bacterial and Fungal Plant Pathogens - Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Kingsley, Mark T

    2001-03-13

    The threat to American interests from terrorists is not limited to attacks against humans. Terrorists might seek to inflict damage to the U.S. economy by attacking our agricultural sector. Infection of commodity crops by bacterial or fungal crop pathogens could adversely impact U.S. agriculture, either directly from damage to crops or indirectly from damage to our ability to export crops suspected of contamination. Recognizing a terrorist attack against U.S. agriculture, to be able to prosecute the terrorists, is among the responsibilities of the members of Hazardous Material Response Unit (HMRU) of the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI). Nucleic acid analysis of plant pathogen strains by the use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification techniques is a powerful method for determining the exact identity of pathogens, as well as their possible region of origin. This type of analysis, however, requires that PCR assays be developed specific to each particular pathogen strain, an d analysis protocols developed that are specific to the particular instrument used for detection. The objectives of the work described here were threefold: (1) to assess the potential terrorist threat to U.S. agricultural crops, (2) to determine whether suitable assays exist to monitor that threat, and (3) where assays are needed for priority plant pathogen threats, to modify or develop those assays for use by specialists at the HMRU. The assessment of potential threat to U.S. commodity crops and the availability of assays for those threats were described in detail in the Technical Requirements Document (9) and will be summarized in this report. This report addresses development of specific assays identified in the Technical Requirements Document, and offers recommendations for future development to ensure that HMRU specialists will be prepared with the PCR assays they need to protect against the threat of economic terrorism.

  9. Ultrarapid detection of pathogenic bacteria using a 3D immunomagnetic flow assay.

    PubMed

    Lee, Wonjae; Kwon, Donghoon; Chung, Boram; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Au, Anthony; Folch, Albert; Jeon, Sangmin

    2014-07-01

    We developed a novel 3D immunomagnetic flow assay for the rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria in a large-volume food sample. Antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle clusters (AbMNCs) were magnetically immobilized on the surfaces of a 3D-printed cylindrical microchannel. The injection of a Salmonella-spiked sample solution into the microchannel produced instant binding between the AbMNCs and the Salmonella bacteria due to their efficient collisions. Nearly perfect capture of the AbMNCs and AbMNCs-Salmonella complexes was achieved under a high flow rate by stacking permanent magnets with spacers inside the cylindrical separator to maximize the magnetic force. The concentration of the bacteria in solution was determined using ATP luminescence measurements. The detection limit was better than 10 cfu/mL, and the overall assay time, including the binding, rinsing, and detection steps for a 10 mL sample took less than 3 min. To our knowledge, the 3D immunomagnetic flow assay described here provides the fastest high-sensitivity, high-capacity method for the detection of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24856003

  10. Ultrarapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria Using a 3D Immunomagnetic Flow Assay

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Wonjae; Kwon, Donghoon; Chung, Boram; Jung, Gyoo Yeol; Au, Anthony; Folch, Albert; Jeon, Sangmin

    2015-01-01

    We developed a novel 3D immunomagnetic flow assay for the rapid detection of pathogenic bacteria in a large-volume food sample. Antibody-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle clusters (AbMNCs) were magnetically immobilized on the surfaces of a 3D-printed cylindrical microchannel. The injection of a Salmonella-spiked sample solution into the microchannel produced instant binding between the AbMNCs and the Salmonella bacteria due to their efficient collisions. Nearly perfect capture of the AbMNCs and AbMNCs-Salmonella complexes was achieved under a high flow rate by stacking permanent magnets with spacers inside the cylindrical separator to maximize the magnetic force. The concentration of the bacteria in solution was determined using ATP luminescence measurements. The detection limit was better than 10 cfu/mL, and the overall assay time, including the binding, rinsing, and detection steps for a 10 mL sample took less than 3 min. To our knowledge, the 3D immunomagnetic flow assay described here provides the fastest high-sensitivity, high-capacity method for the detection of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:24856003

  11. New Trends in Impedimetric Biosensors for the Detection of Foodborne Pathogenic Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yixian; Ye, Zunzhong; Ying, Yibin

    2012-01-01

    The development of a rapid, sensitive, specific method for the foodborne pathogenic bacteria detection is of great importance to ensure food safety and security. In recent years impedimetric biosensors which integrate biological recognition technology and impedance have gained widespread application in the field of bacteria detection. This paper presents an overview on the progress and application of impedimetric biosensors for detection of foodborne pathogenic bacteria, particularly the new trends in the past few years, including the new specific bio-recognition elements such as bacteriophage and lectin, the use of nanomaterials and microfluidics techniques. The applications of these new materials or techniques have provided unprecedented opportunities for the development of high-performance impedance bacteria biosensors. The significant developments of impedimetric biosensors for bacteria detection in the last five years have been reviewed according to the classification of with or without specific bio-recognition element. In addition, some microfluidics systems, which were used in the construction of impedimetric biosensors to improve analytical performance, are introduced in this review. PMID:22737018

  12. Pressed Paper-Based Dipstick for Detection of Foodborne Pathogens with Multistep Reactions.

    PubMed

    Park, Juhwan; Shin, Joong Ho; Park, Je-Kyun

    2016-04-01

    This paper presents a pressed paper-based dipstick that enables detection of foodborne pathogens with multistep reactions by exploiting the delayed fluid flow and channel partition formation on nitrocellulose (NC) membrane. Fluid behaviors are easily modified by controlling the amount of pressure and the position of pressed region on the NC membrane. Detection region of the dipstick is optimized by controlling flow rate and delayed time based on Darcy's law. All the reagents required for assay are dried on the NC membrane and they are sequentially rehydrated at the prepartitioned regions when the device is dipped into sample solution. In this manner, multistep reactions can be facilitated by one-step dipping of the dipstick into the sample solution. As a proof of concept, we performed detection of two fatal foodborne pathogens (e.g., Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella typhimurium) with signal enhancement. In addition, we expanded the utilization of channel partitions by developing a pressed paper-based dipstick into dual detection format. PMID:26977712

  13. Simultaneous detection of multiple lower genital tract pathogens by an impedimetric immunochip.

    PubMed

    Chiriacò, Maria Serena; Primiceri, Elisabetta; De Feo, Francesco; Montanaro, Alessandro; Monteduro, Anna Grazia; Tinelli, Andrea; Megha, Marcella; Carati, Davide; Maruccio, Giuseppe

    2016-05-15

    Lower genital tract infections caused by both sexually and not-sexually transmitted pathogens in women are a key public health priority worldwide, especially in developing countries. Since standard analyses are time-consuming, appropriate therapeutic intervention is often neglected or delayed. Lab-on-chips and biosensors open new perspectives and offer innovative tools to simplify the diagnosis by medical staff, especially in countries with inadequate resources. Here we report a biosensing platform based on Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) that allows multiplexed detection of Candida albicans, Streptococcus agalactiae and Chlamydia trachomatis with a single biochip, enabling a quick screening thanks to the presence of different immobilized antibodies, each specific for one of the different target pathogens. PMID:26686917

  14. A Multiplex Polymerase Chain Reaction Microarray Assay to Detect Bioterror Pathogens in Blood

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Keiko; Peredelchuk, Michael; Zhu, Xiangyang; Arena, Roberto; Volokhov, Dmitri; Selvapandiyan, Angamuthu; Stabler, Katie; Mellquist-Riemenschneider, Jenny; Chizhikov, Vladimir; Kaplan, Gerardo; Nakhasi, Hira; Duncan, Robert

    2005-01-01

    Heightened concern about the dangers of bioterrorism requires that measures be developed to ensure the safety of the blood supply. Multiplex detection of such agents using a blood-screening DNA microarray is a sensitive and specific method to screen simultaneously for a number of suspected agents. We have developed and optimized a multiplex polymerase chain reaction microarray assay to screen blood for three potential bioterror bacterial pathogens and a human ribosomal RNA gene internal control. The analytical sensitivity of the assay was demonstrated to be 50 colony-forming units/ml for Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis (surrogate for Yersinia pestis). The absence of any false-positives demonstrated high analytical specificity. Screening B. anthracis-infected mouse blood samples and uninfected controls demonstrated effectiveness and specificity in a preclinical application. This study represents proof of the concept of microarray technology to screen simultaneously for multiple bioterror pathogens in blood samples. PMID:16237218

  15. Rapid and High-Throughput Detection of Highly Pathogenic Bacteria by Ibis PLEX-ID Technology

    PubMed Central

    Jacob, Daniela; Sauer, Uschi; Housley, Roberta; Washington, Cicely; Sannes-Lowery, Kristin; Ecker, David J.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Grunow, Roland

    2012-01-01

    In this manuscript, we describe the identification of highly pathogenic bacteria using an assay coupling biothreat group-specific PCR with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (PCR/ESI-MS) run on an Ibis PLEX-ID high-throughput platform. The biothreat cluster assay identifies most of the potential bioterrorism-relevant microorganisms including Bacillus anthracis, Francisella tularensis, Yersinia pestis, Burkholderia mallei and pseudomallei, Brucella species, and Coxiella burnetii. DNA from 45 different reference materials with different formulations and different concentrations were chosen and sent to a service screening laboratory that uses the PCR/ESI-MS platform to provide a microbial identification service. The standard reference materials were produced out of a repository built up in the framework of the EU funded project “Establishment of Quality Assurances for Detection of Highly Pathogenic Bacteria of Potential Bioterrorism Risk” (EQADeBa). All samples were correctly identified at least to the genus level. PMID:22768173

  16. Real-Time PCR Method for Detection of Pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica in Food▿

    PubMed Central

    Lambertz, S. Thisted; Nilsson, C.; Hallanvuo, S.; Lindblad, M.

    2008-01-01

    The current methods for the detection of pathogenic Yersinia enterocolitica bacteria in food are time consuming and inefficient. Therefore, we have developed and evaluated in-house a TaqMan probe-based real-time PCR method for the detection of this pathogen. The complete method comprises overnight enrichment, DNA extraction, and real-time PCR amplification. Also included in the method is an internal amplification control. The selected primer-probe set was designed to use a 163-bp amplicon from the chromosomally located gene ail (attachment and invasion locus). The selectivity of the PCR method was tested with a diverse range (n = 152) of related and unrelated strains, and no false-negative or false-positive PCR results were obtained. The sensitivity of the PCR amplification was 85 fg purified genomic DNA, equivalent to 10 cells per PCR tube. Following the enrichment of 10 g of various food samples (milk, minced beef, cold-smoked sausage, fish, and carrots), the sensitivity ranged from 0.5 to 55 CFU Y. enterocolitica. Good precision, robustness, and efficiency of the PCR amplification were also established. In addition, the method was tested on naturally contaminated food; in all, 18 out of 125 samples were positive for the ail gene. Since no conventional culture method could be used as a reference method, the PCR products amplified from these samples were positively verified by using conventional PCR and sequencing of the amplicons. A rapid and specific real-time PCR method for the detection of pathogenic Y. enterocolitica bacteria in food, as presented here, provides a superior alternative to the currently available detection methods and makes it possible to identify the foods at risk for Y. enterocolitica contamination. PMID:18708521

  17. Coliform detection in cheese is associated with specific cheese characteristics, but no association was found with pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Trmčić, A; Chauhan, K; Kent, D J; Ralyea, R D; Martin, N H; Boor, K J; Wiedmann, M

    2016-08-01

    Coliform detection in finished products, including cheese, has traditionally been used to indicate whether a given product has been manufactured under unsanitary conditions. As our understanding of the diversity of coliforms has improved, it is necessary to assess whether coliforms are a good indicator organism and whether coliform detection in cheese is associated with the presence of pathogens. The objective of this study was (1) to evaluate cheese available on the market for presence of coliforms and key pathogens, and (2) to characterize the coliforms present to assess their likely sources and public health relevance. A total of 273 cheese samples were tested for presence of coliforms and for Salmonella, Staphylococcus aureus, Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli, Listeria monocytogenes, and other Listeria species. Among all tested cheese samples, 27% (75/273) tested positive for coliforms in concentrations >10cfu/g. Pasteurization, pH, water activity, milk type, and rind type were factors significantly associated with detection of coliforms in cheese; for example, a higher coliform prevalence was detected in raw milk cheeses (42% with >10cfu/g) compared with pasteurized milk cheese (21%). For cheese samples contaminated with coliforms, only water activity was significantly associated with coliform concentration. Coliforms isolated from cheese samples were classified into 13 different genera, including the environmental coliform genera Hafnia, Raoultella, and Serratia, which represent the 3 genera most frequently isolated across all cheeses. Escherichia, Hafnia, and Enterobacter were significantly more common among raw milk cheeses. Based on sequencing of the housekeeping gene clpX, most Escherichia isolates were confirmed as members of fecal commensal clades of E. coli. All cheese samples tested negative for Salmonella, Staph. aureus, and Shiga toxin-producing E. coli. Listeria spp. were found in 12 cheese samples, including 5 samples positive for L

  18. Multiplexed lateral flow microarray assay for detection of citrus pathogens Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri

    DOEpatents

    Cary; R. Bruce; Stubben, Christopher J.

    2011-03-22

    The invention provides highly sensitive and specific assays for the major citrus pathogens Xylella fastidiosa and Xanthomonas axonopodis, including a field deployable multiplexed assay capable of rapidly assaying for both pathogens simultaneously. The assays are directed at particular gene targets derived from pathogenic strains that specifically cause the major citrus diseases of citrus variegated chlorosis (Xylella fastidiosa 9a5c) and citrus canker (Xanthomonas axonopodis pv citri). The citrus pathogen assays of the invention offer femtomole sensitivity, excellent linear dynamic range, and rapid and specific detection.

  19. Detection and prevention of highly pathogenic avian influenza in communities with high poultry disease burdens.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Carol J; Byarugaba, Denis; Mbuthia, Paul; Aning, George; Sourou, Sabi; Bunn, David A; Msoffe, Peter L

    2010-03-01

    The implementation of strategies to detect, prevent, and control highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) in developing countries presents several challenges, one of which is the presence of other diseases in poultry populations. Training workshops in developing countries using the Avian Flu School have revealed that in areas with heavy Newcastle disease burdens, smallholder poultry keepers do not recognize HPAI as an immediate threat. We have developed a strategy to address the more proximal needs and priorities of communities with free-ranging poultry flocks as a means to create value in poultry, and thus to improve disease detection and prevention overall. To this end, we have created the Poultry Health and Well-Being for Development project, which trains graduate veterinarians and paraprofessionals in poultry disease diagnosis, control, and treatment. These trainees then serve their local communities to improve poultry health and to implement disease detection and management programs. PMID:20521727

  20. Salvage microbiology: opportunities and challenges in the detection of bacterial pathogens following initiation of antimicrobial treatment

    PubMed Central

    Farrell, John J.; Hujer, Andrea M.; Sampath, Rangarajan; Bonomo, Robert A.

    2015-01-01

    Broad-range 16S ribosomal RNA gene PCR coupled with Sanger sequencing was originally employed by soil scientists and was subsequently adapted for clinical applications. PCR coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry has also progressed from initial applications in the detection of organisms from environmental samples into the clinical realm and has demonstrated promise in detection of pathogens in clinical specimens obtained from patients with suspected infection but negative cultures. We review studies of multiplex PCR, 16S ribosomal RNA gene PCR and sequencing and PCR coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for detection of bacteria in specimens that were obtained from patients during or after administration of antibiotic treatment, and examine the role of each for assisting in antimicrobial treatment and stewardship efforts. Following an exploration of the available data in this field we discuss the opportunities that the preliminary investigations reveal, as well as the challenges faced with implementation of these strategies in clinical practice. PMID:25523281

  1. Evaluation of Luminex xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel Assay for Detection of Multiple Diarrheal Pathogens in Fecal Samples in Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Duong, Vu Thuy; Phat, Voong Vinh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Dung, Tran Thi Ngoc; Trung, Pham Duc; Minh, Pham Van; Tu, Le Thi Phuong; Campbell, James I; Le Phuc, Hoang; Ha, Ton Thi Thanh; Ngoc, Nguyen Minh; Huong, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Tam, Pham Thi Thanh; Huong, Dang Thao; Xang, Nguyen Van; Dong, Nguyen; Phuong, Le Thi; Hung, Nguyen Van; Phu, Bui Duc; Phuc, Tran My; Thwaites, Guy E; Vi, Lu Lan; Rabaa, Maia A; Thompson, Corinne N; Baker, Stephen

    2016-04-01

    Diarrheal disease is a complex syndrome that remains a leading cause of global childhood morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of enteric pathogens in a timely and precise manner is important for making treatment decisions and informing public health policy, but accurate diagnosis is a major challenge in industrializing countries. Multiplex molecular diagnostic techniques may represent a significant improvement over classical approaches. We evaluated the Luminex xTAG gastrointestinal pathogen panel (GPP) assay for the detection of common enteric bacterial and viral pathogens in Vietnam. Microbiological culture and real-time PCR were used as gold standards. The tests were performed on 479 stool samples collected from people admitted to the hospital for diarrheal disease throughout Vietnam. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for the xTAG GPP for the seven principal diarrheal etiologies. The sensitivity and specificity for the xTAG GPP were >88% for Shigellaspp.,Campylobacterspp., rotavirus, norovirus genotype 1/2 (GI/GII), and adenovirus compared to those of microbiological culture and/or real-time PCR. However, the specificity was low (∼60%) for Salmonella species. Additionally, a number of important pathogens that are not identified in routine hospital procedures in this setting, such as Cryptosporidiumspp. and Clostridium difficile, were detected with the GPP. The use of the Luminex xTAG GPP for the detection of enteric pathogens in settings, like Vietnam, would dramatically improve the diagnostic accuracy and capacity of hospital laboratories, allowing for timely and appropriate therapy decisions and a wider understanding of the epidemiology of pathogens associated with severe diarrheal disease in low-resource settings. PMID:26865681

  2. Evaluation of Luminex xTAG Gastrointestinal Pathogen Panel Assay for Detection of Multiple Diarrheal Pathogens in Fecal Samples in Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    Duong, Vu Thuy; Phat, Voong Vinh; Tuyen, Ha Thanh; Dung, Tran Thi Ngoc; Trung, Pham Duc; Minh, Pham Van; Tu, Le Thi Phuong; Campbell, James I.; Le Phuc, Hoang; Ha, Ton Thi Thanh; Ngoc, Nguyen Minh; Huong, Nguyen Thi Thanh; Tam, Pham Thi Thanh; Huong, Dang Thao; Xang, Nguyen Van; Dong, Nguyen; Phuong, Le Thi; Hung, Nguyen Van; Phu, Bui Duc; Phuc, Tran My; Thwaites, Guy E.; Vi, Lu Lan; Rabaa, Maia A.; Baker, Stephen

    2016-01-01

    Diarrheal disease is a complex syndrome that remains a leading cause of global childhood morbidity and mortality. The diagnosis of enteric pathogens in a timely and precise manner is important for making treatment decisions and informing public health policy, but accurate diagnosis is a major challenge in industrializing countries. Multiplex molecular diagnostic techniques may represent a significant improvement over classical approaches. We evaluated the Luminex xTAG gastrointestinal pathogen panel (GPP) assay for the detection of common enteric bacterial and viral pathogens in Vietnam. Microbiological culture and real-time PCR were used as gold standards. The tests were performed on 479 stool samples collected from people admitted to the hospital for diarrheal disease throughout Vietnam. Sensitivity and specificity were calculated for the xTAG GPP for the seven principal diarrheal etiologies. The sensitivity and specificity for the xTAG GPP were >88% for Shigella spp., Campylobacter spp., rotavirus, norovirus genotype 1/2 (GI/GII), and adenovirus compared to those of microbiological culture and/or real-time PCR. However, the specificity was low (∼60%) for Salmonella species. Additionally, a number of important pathogens that are not identified in routine hospital procedures in this setting, such as Cryptosporidium spp. and Clostridium difficile, were detected with the GPP. The use of the Luminex xTAG GPP for the detection of enteric pathogens in settings, like Vietnam, would dramatically improve the diagnostic accuracy and capacity of hospital laboratories, allowing for timely and appropriate therapy decisions and a wider understanding of the epidemiology of pathogens associated with severe diarrheal disease in low-resource settings. PMID:26865681

  3. Development of a rapid detection system for opportunistic pathogenic Cronobacter spp. in powdered milk products.

    PubMed

    Zimmermann, Jennifer; Schmidt, Herbert; Loessner, Martin J; Weiss, Agnes

    2014-09-01

    Certain species of the genus Cronobacter are considered opportunistic pathogens, but their detection in milk products according to ISO/TS 22964 may take up to six days. The aim of this study was to develop a fast and sensitive PCR-based detection system for these species including enrichment, DNA-isolation and detection by real-time PCR, using the outer membrane protein gene ompA as a target. The assay was successfully validated using type strains of the genus Cronobacter, as well as 18 strains of closely related genera as controls. A total of 40 Cronobacter spp. food isolates yielded positive results, while the food matrix itself did not influence the PCR reaction. An equal detection limit as achieved with the ISO/TS 22964 method was established in this study, when 0.01 CFU Cronobacter sakazakii DSM 4485(T) per gram powdered infant formula were successfully detected after 28 days of storage at ambient temperature. In comparison to the ISO/TS 22964 method, the method described here has an equal detection limit, but offers a specific detection at the genus level in an analysis time of 24 h. PMID:24929712

  4. Assessment of an extraction protocol to detect the major mastitis-causing pathogens in bovine milk.

    PubMed

    Cressier, B; Bissonnette, N

    2011-05-01

    Despite all efforts to control its spread, mastitis remains the most costly disease for dairy farmers worldwide. One key component of better control of this disease is identification of the causative bacterial agent during udder infections in cows. Mastitis is complex, however, given the diversity of pathogens that must be identified. Development of a rapid and efficient bacterial species identification tool is thus necessary. This study was conducted to demonstrate the feasibility of bacterial DNA extraction for the automated molecular detection of major mastitis-causing pathogens directly in milk samples to complement traditional microbiological identification. Extraction and detection procedures were designed and optimized to achieve detection in a respectable time frame, at a reasonable cost, and with a high throughput capacity. The following species were identified: Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus agalactiae, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, and Klebsiella spp. (including Klebsiella oxytoca and Klebsiella pneumoniae). The detection procedure includes specific genomic DNA amplification by multiplex PCR for each species, separation by capillary electrophoresis, and laser-assisted automated detection. The specificity of the primers was assessed with a panel of bacteria representing mastitis-negative control species. The extraction protocol comprised multiple steps, starting with centrifugation for fat removal, followed by heating in the presence of a cation exchange resin to trap divalent ions. The analytical sensitivity was 100 cfu/mL for milk samples spiked with Staph. aureus, Strep. dysgalactiae, and E. coli, with a tendency for K. pneumoniae. The detection limit was 500 cfu/mL for Strep. uberis and Strep. agalactiae. The overall diagnostic sensitivity (95.4%) and specificity (97.3%) were determined in a double-blind randomized assay by processing 172 clinical milk samples with microbiological characterization as the

  5. Light-emission-based biosensor for detection of food pathogens: a review

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singh, Ashutosh; Singh, Rakesh K.; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2001-03-01

    Rapid detection, identification and enumeration of pathogenic microorganisms is highly important to the food industry to address the food safety concerns. Biosensors are devices that promise to achieve these objectives, these analytical devices can accurately and selectively estimate the levels of foodborne pathogens. The most widely applied biosensors are based on the optical properties like absorption, fluorescence, reflection, refraction, dispersion etc. This review is done to provide an overview of optic based biosensor and their application in the area of food safety. Working principles of Surface plasmon resonance , resonant mirror and fiber optic based biosensor are described in the article. Resonant mirror based biosensor has been used for the estimation of S. aureus, it was proven selective for the strain being tested (Cowan-1). The sensitivity of the assay was increased by using colloidal-gold conjugates in sandwich assay format. An integrated fiber optic based biosensor is used for detection of Salmonella typhimurium reducing the detection time to 30 min. Fiber optic based biosensors offer advantage of compactness, flexibility , resistance to electrical noise and small probe size.

  6. Direct Detection of Cylindrocarpon destructans, Root Rot Pathogen of Ginseng by Nested PCR from Soil Samples.

    PubMed

    Jang, Chang Soon; Lim, Jin Ha; Seo, Mun Won; Song, Jeong Young; Kim, Hong Gi

    2010-03-01

    We have successfully applied the nested PCR to detect Cylindrocarpon destructans, a major pathogen causing root rot disease from ginseng seedlings in our former study. The PCR assay, in this study, was used to detect the pathogen from soils. The nested PCR using internal transcribed spacer (ITS) 1, 4 primer set and Dest 1, 4 primer set maintained the specificity in soils containing various microorganisms. For a soil DNA extraction method targeting chlamydospores, when several cell wall disrupting methods were tested, the combination of lyophilization and grinding with glass beads, which broke almost all the chlamydospores, was the strongest. The DNA extraction method which was completed based on the above was simple and time-saving because of exclusion of unnecessary stages, and efficient to apply in soils. As three ginseng fields whose histories were known were analyzed, the PCR assay resulted as our expectation derived from the field information. The direct PCR method will be utilized as a reliable and rapid tool for detecting and monitoring C. destructans in ginseng fields. PMID:23956622

  7. A Pathogenic Mosaic TP53 Mutation in Two Germ Layers Detected by Next Generation Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Richard D.; Side, Lucy; Hubank, Mike; West, Rebecca; Pearson, Katie; Sebire, Neil; Tarpey, Patrick; Futreal, Andrew; Brooks, Tony; Stratton, Michael R.; Anderson, John

    2014-01-01

    Background Li-Fraumeni syndrome is caused by germline TP53 mutations and is clinically characterized by a predisposition to a range of cancers, most commonly sarcoma, brain tumours and leukemia. Pathogenic mosaic TP53 mutations have only rarely been described. Methods and Findings We describe a 2 years old child presenting with three separate cancers over a 6 month period; two soft tissue mesenchymal tumors and an aggressive metastatic neuroblastoma. As conventional testing of blood DNA by Sanger sequencing for mutations in TP53, ALK, and SDH was negative, whole exome sequencing of the blood DNA of the patient and both parents was performed to screen more widely for cancer predisposing mutations. In the patient's but not the parents' DNA we found a c.743 G>A, p.Arg248Gln (CCDS11118.1) TP53 mutation in 3–20% of sequencing reads, a level that would not generally be detectable by Sanger sequencing. Homozygosity for this mutation was detected in all tumor samples analyzed, and germline mosaicism was demonstrated by analysis of the child's newborn blood spot DNA. The occurrence of separate tumors derived from different germ layers suggests that this de novo mutation occurred early in embryogenesis, prior to gastrulation. Conclusion The case demonstrates pathogenic mosaicim, detected by next generation deep sequencing, that arose in the early stages of embryogenesis. PMID:24810334

  8. Label-Free Detection and Discrimination of Bacterial Pathogens Based on Hemin Recognition.

    PubMed

    Maltais, Thora R; Adak, Avijit K; Younis, Waleed; Seleem, Mohamed N; Wei, Alexander

    2016-07-20

    Hemin linked to hexa(ethylene glycol)bishydrazide was patterned by inkjet printing into periodic microarrays, and evaluated for their ability to capture bacterial pathogens expressing various hemin receptors. Bacterial adhesion was imaged under darkfield conditions with Fourier analysis, supporting a label-free method of pathogen detection. Hemin microarrays were screened against a panel of 16 bacteria and found capable of capturing multiple species, some with limits of detection as low as 10(3) cfu/mL. Several Gram-positive strains including Staphylococcus aureus and Bacillus anthracis also exhibited rapid adhesion, enabling pattern recognition within minutes of exposure. This can be attributed to differences in hemin acquisition systems: aggressively adherent bacteria express cell-surface hemin receptors (CSHRs) that enable direct hemin binding and uptake, whereas other types of bacteria including most Gram-negative strains rely on the secretion and recapture of soluble proteins (hemophores) for hemin acquisition, with consequently longer times for ligand binding and detection. PMID:27337653

  9. Detection methods for milk pathogenic bacteria by loop-mediated isothermal amplification.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wentao; Song, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingxin; Li, Zhen; Ji, Mingjiang; Li, Yufeng

    2014-12-01

    Milk is a common food, which is consumed all over the world. It is an important source of calcium. Meanwhile, it provides abundant protein, minerals and vitamins. However, pathogenic bacteria which exist in milk not only causes nutrition loss, but also produces toxins which may cause diarrhea, food poisoning, and even death. In order to control the microbial level of raw milk and eliminate the contamination of materials, this assay applied loop-mediated isothermal amplification to explore a new way to detect enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) in raw milk. The best reaction condition in detecting ETEC from raw milk was confirmed to be: 0.016 μM each of forward outer primer (primer F3) and backward outer primer (primer B3), 0.128 μM each of forward inner primer (primer FIP) and backward inner primer (primer BIP), 0.45 μM deoxy-ribonucleoside triphosphate (dNTPs), 2IU Bst DNA polymerase large fragment and template DNA were incubated at 63°C for 60 min. LAMP was proved to be specific, rapid and sensitive in detecting pathogenic bacteria which exist in milk. PMID:25641177

  10. Laser diagnostic technology for early detection of pathogen infestation in orange fruits

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giubileo, Gianfranco; Lai, Antonella; Piccinelli, Delinda; Puiu, Adriana

    2010-11-01

    Due to an increased expectation of food products that respect high quality and safety standards, there is a need for the growth of accurate, fast, objective and non-destructive technologies for quality determination of food and agricultural products. For this purpose, a diagnostic system based on laser photoacoustic spectroscopy (LPAS) was developed at ENEA Frascati Molecular Spectroscopy Laboratory (Italy). In the design of the photoacoustic detector, particular emphasis was placed in attaining a high sensitivity in detecting ethylene (ET) down to sub-parts per billion level (minimum detectable concentration 0.2 ppb). This was required due to the necessity to monitor and follow up ET production at a single fruit scale. ET is normally synthesised in very low amounts by healthy citrus fruits; however stress conditions such as pathogen attack may induce a substantial increase in the synthesised ET. In the present paper, the comparison between the ET emitted by healthy oranges ( Citrus sinensis L. Osbeck) cv Navel and by Phytophthora citrophthora infested Navel orange fruits are reported. The obtained results show a well evident increase in ET emission from the infested fruit with respect to the healthy one, even 24 h after the inoculation with the pathogen; at that time the tissue necrosis was not yet visible, and the fruit was also not yet damaged. The possibility to perform a real time non-destructive detection of ET traces makes the LPAS a powerful tool for monitoring the healthy state of the citrus fruits.

  11. Establishment and Application of a Visual DNA Microarray for the Detection of Food-borne Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Li, Yongjin

    2016-01-01

    The accurate detection and identification of food-borne pathogenic microorganisms is critical for food safety nowadays. In the present work, a visual DNA microarray was established and applied to detect pathogens commonly found in food, including Salmonella enterica, Shigella flexneri, E. coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in food samples. Multiplex PCR (mPCR) was employed to simultaneously amplify specific gene fragments, fimY for Salmonella, ipaH for Shigella, iap for L. monocytogenes and ECs2841 for E. coli O157:H7, respectively. Biotinylated PCR amplicons annealed to the microarray probes were then reacted with a streptavidin-alkaline phosphatase conjugate and nitro blue tetrazolium/5-bromo-4-chloro-3'-indolylphosphate, p-toluidine salt (NBT/BCIP); the positive results were easily visualized as blue dots formatted on the microarray surface. The performance of a DNA microarray was tested against 14 representative collection strains and mock-contamination food samples. The combination of mPCR and a visual micro-plate chip specifically and sensitively detected Salmonella enterica, Shigella flexneri, E. coli O157:H7 and Listeria monocytogenes in standard strains and food matrices with a sensitivity of ∼10(2) CFU/mL of bacterial culture. Thus, the developed method is advantageous because of its high throughput, cost-effectiveness and ease of use. PMID:26860568

  12. Simultaneous aptasensor for multiplex pathogenic bacteria detection based on multicolor upconversion nanoparticles labels.

    PubMed

    Wu, Shijia; Duan, Nuo; Shi, Zhao; Fang, Congcong; Wang, Zhouping

    2014-03-18

    A highly sensitive and specific multiplex method for the simultaneous detection of three pathogenic bacteria was fabricated using multicolor upconversion nanoparticles (UCNPs) as luminescence labels coupled with aptamers as the molecular recognition elements. Multicolor UCNPs were synthesized via doping with various rare-earth ions to obtain well-separated emission peaks. The aptamer sequences were selected using the systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) strategy for Staphylococcus aureus, Vibrio parahemolyticus, and Salmonella typhimurium. When applied in this method, aptamers can be used for the specific recognition of the bacteria from complex mixtures, including those found in real food matrixes. Aptamers and multicolor UCNPs were employed to selectively capture and simultaneously quantify the three target bacteria on the basis of the independent peaks. Under optimal conditions, the correlation between the concentration of three bacteria and the luminescence signal was found to be linear from 50-10(6) cfu mL(-1). Improved by the magnetic separation and concentration effect of Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles, the limits of detection of the developed method were found to be 25, 10, and 15 cfu mL(-1) for S. aureus, V. parahemolyticus, and S. typhimurium, respectively. The capability of the bioassay in real food samples was also investigated, and the results were consistent with experimental results obtained from plate-counting methods. This proposed method for the detection of various pathogenic bacteria based on multicolor UCNPs has great potential in the application of food safety and multiplex nanosensors. PMID:24568625

  13. Exploration of Simple Analytical Approaches for Rapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Salma Rahman

    2005-12-17

    Many of the current methods for pathogenic bacterial detection require long sample-preparation and analysis time, as well as complex instrumentation. This dissertation explores simple analytical approaches (e.g., flow cytometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy) that may be applied towards ideal requirements of a microbial detection system, through method and instrumentation development, and by the creation and characterization of immunosensing platforms. This dissertation is organized into six sections. In the general Introduction section a literature review on several of the key aspects of this work is presented. First, different approaches for detection of pathogenic bacteria will be reviewed, with a comparison of the relative strengths and weaknesses of each approach, A general overview regarding diffuse reflectance spectroscopy is then presented. Next, the structure and function of self-assembled monolayers (SAMs) formed from organosulfur molecules at gold and micrometer and sub-micrometer patterning of biomolecules using SAMs will be discussed. This section is followed by four research chapters, presented as separate manuscripts. Chapter 1 describes the efforts and challenges towards the creation of imunosensing platforms that exploit the flexibility and structural stability of SAMs of thiols at gold. 1H, 1H, 2H, 2H-perfluorodecyl-1-thiol SAM (PFDT) and dithio-bis(succinimidyl propionate)-(DSP)-derived SAMs were used to construct the platform. Chapter 2 describes the characterization of the PFDT- and DSP-derived SAMs, and the architectures formed when it is coupled to antibodies as well as target bacteria. These studies used infrared reflection spectroscopy (IRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and electrochemical quartz crystal microbalance (EQCM), Chapter 3 presents a new sensitive, and portable diffuse reflection based technique for the rapid identification and quantification of pathogenic bacteria. Chapter 4 reports research efforts in the

  14. A microfluidic-based hybrid SPR/molecular imaging biosensor for the multiplexed detection of foodborne pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordan, Michael D.; Grafton, Meggie M. G.; Acharya, Ghanashyam; Reece, Lisa M.; Aronson, Arthur I.; Park, Kinam; Leary, James F.

    2009-02-01

    It is important to screen our food supply for pathogen contaminations. Current methods to screen for bacterial contamination involve using costly reagents such as antibodies or PCR reagents or time-costly growth in cultures. There is need for portable, real-time, multiplex pathogen detection technology that can predict the safety of food where it is produced or distributed. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR) imaging is a sensitive, label-free method that can detect the binding of an analyte to a surface due to changes in refractive index that occur upon binding. It can be used for label-free detection of the presence of potential pathogens. Simultaneous fluorescence molecular imaging on the other side of the biochip can be used to ascertain pathogen status or functional state which may affect its potential danger to humans or animals. We are designing and testing hybrid microfluidic biochips to detect multiple pathogens using a combination of SPRI and fluorescence imaging. The device consists of an array of gold spots, each functionalized with a peptide targeting a specific pathogen. This peptide biosensor array is enclosed by a PDMS microfluidic flow chamber that delivers a magnetically concentrated sample to be tested. An SPR image is taken from the bottom of the biochip. Image analysis is used to quantify the amount of pathogen (both live and dead) bound to each spot. Since PDMS is very transmissive to visible light, an epi-fluorescence image is taken from the top of the biochip. Fluorescence imaging determines the live:dead ratio of each pathogen using an inexpensive SYTO 9(R)-Propidium Iodide assay. The volume of sample that the biochip can analyze is small, so possible pathogens are pre-concentrated using immunomagnetic separation. Functionalized magnetic particles are bound to pathogens present in the sample, and a magnet is used to separate them from the bulk fluid.

  15. Detection of termites and other insects consumed by African great apes using molecular fecal analysis.

    PubMed

    Hamad, Ibrahim; Delaporte, Eric; Raoult, Didier; Bittar, Fadi

    2014-01-01

    The consumption of insects by apes has previously been reported based on direct observations and/or trail signs in feces. However, DNA-based diet analyses may have the potential to reveal trophic links for these wild species. Herein, we analyzed the insect-diet diversity of 9 feces obtained from three species of African great apes, gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla), chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and bonobo (Pan paniscus), using two mitochondrial amplifications for arthropods. A total of 1056 clones were sequenced for Cyt-b and COI gene libraries, which contained 50 and 56 operational taxonomic units (OTUs), respectively. BLAST research revealed that the OTUs belonged to 32 families from 5 orders (Diptera, Isoptera, Lepidoptera, Coleoptera, and Orthoptera). While ants were not detected by this method, the consumption of flies, beetles, moths, mosquitoes and termites was evident in these samples. Our findings indicate that molecular techniques can be used to analyze insect food items in wild animals. PMID:24675424

  16. Quantitative Molecular Detection of 19 Major Pathogens in the Interdental Biofilm of Periodontally Healthy Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Carrouel, Florence; Viennot, Stéphane; Santamaria, Julie; Veber, Philippe; Bourgeois, Denis

    2016-01-01

    pathogen in adult periodontal disease, represents 8.08% of the 19 bacteria analyzed. P. gingivalis was detected in 19% of healthy subjects and represents 0.02% of the interdental biofilm. T. forsythensis and T. denticola (0.02 and 0.04% of the interdental biofilm) were detected in 93 and 49% of healthy subjects, respectively. The effective presence of periodontal pathogens is a strong indicator of the need to develop new methods for disrupting interdental biofilm in daily oral hygiene. PMID:27313576

  17. Quantitative Molecular Detection of 19 Major Pathogens in the Interdental Biofilm of Periodontally Healthy Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Carrouel, Florence; Viennot, Stéphane; Santamaria, Julie; Veber, Philippe; Bourgeois, Denis

    2016-01-01

    pathogen in adult periodontal disease, represents 8.08% of the 19 bacteria analyzed. P. gingivalis was detected in 19% of healthy subjects and represents 0.02% of the interdental biofilm. T. forsythensis and T. denticola (0.02 and 0.04% of the interdental biofilm) were detected in 93 and 49% of healthy subjects, respectively. The effective presence of periodontal pathogens is a strong indicator of the need to develop new methods for disrupting interdental biofilm in daily oral hygiene. PMID:27313576

  18. Detection of bacterial aggregation in cell suspensions treated with pathogenic bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The early interaction between plant cells and pathogenic bacteria were studied using tobacco cell suspensions treated with pathogenic and nonpathogenic Pseudomonas species. Previous studies of this system have documented that interactions with pathogens that cause a hypersensitive response on whole...

  19. Hyperspectral imaging using a color camera and its application for pathogen detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung-Chul; Shin, Tae-Sung; Heitschmidt, Gerald W.; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Park, Bosoon; Gamble, Gary

    2015-02-01

    This paper reports the results of a feasibility study for the development of a hyperspectral image recovery (reconstruction) technique using a RGB color camera and regression analysis in order to detect and classify colonies of foodborne pathogens. The target bacterial pathogens were the six representative non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) grown in Petri dishes of Rainbow agar. The purpose of the feasibility study was to evaluate whether a DSLR camera (Nikon D700) could be used to predict hyperspectral images in the wavelength range from 400 to 1,000 nm and even to predict the types of pathogens using a hyperspectral STEC classification algorithm that was previously developed. Unlike many other studies using color charts with known and noise-free spectra for training reconstruction models, this work used hyperspectral and color images, separately measured by a hyperspectral imaging spectrometer and the DSLR color camera. The color images were calibrated (i.e. normalized) to relative reflectance, subsampled and spatially registered to match with counterpart pixels in hyperspectral images that were also calibrated to relative reflectance. Polynomial multivariate least-squares regression (PMLR) was previously developed with simulated color images. In this study, partial least squares regression (PLSR) was also evaluated as a spectral recovery technique to minimize multicollinearity and overfitting. The two spectral recovery models (PMLR and PLSR) and their parameters were evaluated by cross-validation. The QR decomposition was used to find a numerically more stable solution of the regression equation. The preliminary results showed that PLSR was more effective especially with higher order polynomial regressions than PMLR. The best classification accuracy measured with an independent test set was about 90%. The results suggest the potential of cost-effective color imaging using hyperspectral image

  20. Surface plasmon resonance biosensors for detection of pathogenic microorganisms: strategies to secure food and environmental safety.

    PubMed

    Bergwerff, Aldert A; van Knapen, Frans

    2006-01-01

    This review describes the exploitation of exclusively optical surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensors for the direct and indirect detection of pathogenic microorganisms in food chains and the environment. Direct detection is, in most cases, facilitated by the use of defined monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies raised against (a part of) the target pathogenic microorganisms. The antibodies were immobilized to a solid phase of the sensor to capture the microbe from the sample. Alternatively, antibodies were used in an inhibition-like assay involving incubation with the target organism prior to analysis of nonbound antibodies. The free immunoglobins were screened on a sensor surface coated with either purified antigens or with Fc or Fab binding antibodies. Discussed examples of these approaches are the determination of Escherichia coli O1 57:H7, Salmonella spp., and Listeria monocytogenes. Another direct detection strategy involved SPR analysis of polymerase chain reaction products of Shiga toxin-2 genes reporting the presence of E. coli O157:H7 in human stool. Metabolic products have been exploited as biomarkers for the presence of a microbial agent, such as enterotoxin B and a virulence factor for the occurrence of Staphylococcus aureus and Streptococcus suis, respectively. Indirect detection, on the other hand, is performed by analysis of a humoral immune response of the infected animal or human. By immobilization of specific antigenic structures, infections with Herpes simplex and human immunodeficiency viruses, Salmonella and Treponema pallidum bacteria, and Schistosoma spp. parasites were revealed using human, avian, and porcine sera and avian eggs. Bound antibodies were easily isotyped using an SPR biosensor to reveal the infection history of the individual. Discussed studies show the recent recognition of the suitability of this type of instrument for (rapid) detection of health-threatening microbes to food and environmental microbial safety. PMID:16792081

  1. High-throughput real-time electrochemical monitoring of LAMP for pathogenic bacteria detection.

    PubMed

    Safavieh, Mohammadali; Ahmed, Minhaz Uddin; Ng, Andy; Zourob, Mohammed

    2014-08-15

    One of the significant challenges in healthcare is the development of point-of-care (POC) diagnostics. POC diagnostics require low-cost devices that offer portability, simplicity in operation and the ability for high-throughput and quantitative analysis. Here, we present a novel roll-to-roll ribbon fluid-handling device for electrochemical real-time monitoring of nucleic acid (NA) amplification and bacteria detection. The device rendered loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) and real-time electrochemical detection based on the interaction between LAMP amplicon and the redox-reactive osmium complex. We have shown the detection of 30CFU/ml of Escherichia coli (in the range between 30 and 3×10(7)CFU/ml) and 200CFU/ml of Staphylococcus aureus (in the range of 200-2×10(5)CFU/ml) cultured samples in both real-time and end point detection. This device can be used for the detection of various Gram-negative and a number of Gram-positive bacterial pathogens with high sensitivity and specificity in a high-throughput format. Using a roll-to-roll cassette approach, we could detect 12 samples in one assay. Since the LAMP and electrochemical analysis are implemented within sealed flexible biochips, time-consuming processing steps are not required and the risk of contamination is significantly reduced. PMID:24632135

  2. First Detection of Antibodies Against African Swine Fever Virus in Faeces Samples.

    PubMed

    Nieto-Pelegrín, E; Rivera-Arroyo, B; Sánchez-Vizcaíno, J M

    2015-12-01

    African swine fever (ASF) is a viral, highly lethal haemorrhagic disease of swine with no available vaccine or effective treatment. Introduction of ASF into a country triggers immediate restriction measures that cause significant economic losses and threatens spread to neighbouring countries. Wild boar populations have been recently assigned an essential role in the spread of African swine fever virus (ASFV) to European countries. Therefore, effective surveillance and monitoring of wild boar populations is required, but sampling wild boar is logistically challenging and expensive. This study assessed the feasibility of detecting antibodies against ASFV in faeces for later implementation in surveillance and control programmes. Two groups of pigs were experimentally infected with an attenuated ASFV isolate Ken05, and blood, oral fluid and faecal samples were tested for the presence of viral DNA using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) to monitor infection progress. Faecal samples were analysed using two indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) based on semipurified viral protein (vp) 72 or purified recombinant vp30 expressed in mammalian cells. Faecal samples from 9 of 10 pigs with non-haemorrhagic diarrhoea tested positive for antibodies against ASFV using the two ELISA tests that showed a positive correlation. The serum sample results from the two indirect ELISAs were compared against results from the reference ELISA technique and the immunoperoxidase test. Our findings indicate the feasibility of faecal sampling for detecting anti-ASFV antibodies, which may provide a practical non-invasive alternative for sampling wild boar populations. In conclusion, the application of these ELISA tests to faecal field samples could be particularly useful to screen for the presence of ASF in field conditions. PMID:26431943

  3. Detection of Tick-Borne Pathogens in the Korean Water Deer (Hydropotes inermis argyropus) from Jeonbuk Province, Korea.

    PubMed

    Seong, Giyong; Han, Yu-Jung; Oh, Sung-Suck; Chae, Joon-Seok; Yu, Do-Hyeon; Park, Jinho; Park, Bae-Keun; Yoo, Jae-Gyu; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2015-10-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tick-borne pathogens in the Korean water deer (Hydropotes inermis argyropus). Pathogens were identified using PCR which included Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, and Theileria. Rickettsia was not detected, whereas Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Theileria infections were detected in 4, 2, and 8 animals, respectively. The most prevalent pathogen was Theileria. Of the 8 Theileria-positive animals, 2 were mixed-infected with 3 pathogens (Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Theileria) and another 2 animals showed mixed-infection with 2 pathogens (Anaplasma and Theileria). Sequencing analysis was used to verify the PCR results. The pathogens found in this study were identified as Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia canis, and Theileria sp. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report identifying these 3 pathogens in the Korean water deer. Our results suggest that the Korean water deer may serve as a major reservoir for these tick-borne pathogens, leading to spread of tick-borne diseases to domestic animals, livestock, and humans. Further studies are needed to investigate their roles in this respect. PMID:26537046

  4. Detection of Tick-Borne Pathogens in the Korean Water Deer (Hydropotes inermis argyropus) from Jeonbuk Province, Korea

    PubMed Central

    Seong, Giyong; Han, Yu-Jung; Oh, Sung-Suck; Chae, Joon-Seok; Yu, Do-Hyeon; Park, Jinho; Park, Bae-Keun; Yoo, Jae-Gyu; Choi, Kyoung-Seong

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the prevalence of tick-borne pathogens in the Korean water deer (Hydropotes inermis argyropus). Pathogens were identified using PCR which included Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, Rickettsia, and Theileria. Rickettsia was not detected, whereas Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Theileria infections were detected in 4, 2, and 8 animals, respectively. The most prevalent pathogen was Theileria. Of the 8 Theileria-positive animals, 2 were mixed-infected with 3 pathogens (Anaplasma, Ehrlichia, and Theileria) and another 2 animals showed mixed-infection with 2 pathogens (Anaplasma and Theileria). Sequencing analysis was used to verify the PCR results. The pathogens found in this study were identified as Anaplasma phagocytophilum, Ehrlichia canis, and Theileria sp. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report identifying these 3 pathogens in the Korean water deer. Our results suggest that the Korean water deer may serve as a major reservoir for these tick-borne pathogens, leading to spread of tick-borne diseases to domestic animals, livestock, and humans. Further studies are needed to investigate their roles in this respect. PMID:26537046

  5. Biosensors based on modularly designed synthetic peptides for recognition, detection and live/dead differentiation of pathogenic bacteria.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiaobo; Marrakchi, Mouna; Xu, Dawei; Dong, He; Andreescu, Silvana

    2016-06-15

    Rapid and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens is critical for assessing public health, food and environmental safety. We report the use of modularly designed and site-specifically oriented synthetic antimicrobial peptides (sAMPs) as novel recognition agents enabling detection and quantification of bacterial pathogens. The oriented assembly of the synthetic peptides on electrode surfaces through an engineered cysteine residue coupled with impedimetric detection facilitated rapid and sensitive detection of bacterial pathogens with a detection limit of 10(2)CFU/mL for four bacterial strains including Escherichia coli (E. coli), Pseudomonas aeruginosa (P. aeruginosa), Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and Staphylococcus epidermidis (S. epidermidis). The approach enabled differentiation between live and dead bacteria. The fabrication of the sAMPs functionalized surface and the importance of the sAMPs orientation for providing optimum recognition and detection ability against pathogens are discussed. The proposed methodology provides a universal platform for the detection of bacterial pathogens based on engineered peptides, as alternative to the most commonly used immunological and gene based assays. The method can also be used to fabricate antimicrobial coatings and surfaces for inactivation and screening of viable bacteria. PMID:26802747

  6. Molecular Detection of 10 of the Most Unwanted Alien Forest Pathogens in Canada Using Real-Time PCR

    PubMed Central

    Lamarche, Josyanne; Potvin, Amélie; Pelletier, Gervais; Stewart, Don; Feau, Nicolas; Alayon, Dario I. O.; Dale, Angela L.; Coelho, Aaron; Uzunovic, Adnan; Bilodeau, Guillaume J.; Brière, Stephan C.; Hamelin, Richard C.; Tanguay, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Invasive alien tree pathogens can cause significant economic losses as well as large-scale damage to natural ecosystems. Early detection to prevent their establishment and spread is an important approach used by several national plant protection organizations (NPPOs). Molecular detection tools targeting 10 of the most unwanted alien forest pathogens in Canada were developed as part of the TAIGA project (http://taigaforesthealth.com/). Forest pathogens were selected following an independent prioritization. Specific TaqMan real-time PCR detection assays were designed to function under homogeneous conditions so that they may be used in 96- or 384-well plate format arrays for high-throughput testing of large numbers of samples against multiple targets. Assays were validated for 1) specificity, 2) sensitivity, 3) precision, and 4) robustness on environmental samples. All assays were highly specific when evaluated against a panel of pure cultures of target and phylogenetically closely-related species. Sensitivity, evaluated by assessing the limit of detection (with a threshold of 95% of positive samples), was found to be between one and ten target gene region copies. Precision or repeatability of each assay revealed a mean coefficient of variation of 3.4%. All assays successfully allowed detection of target pathogen on positive environmental samples, without any non-specific amplification. These molecular detection tools will allow for rapid and reliable detection of 10 of the most unwanted alien forest pathogens in Canada. PMID:26274489

  7. Molecular Detection of 10 of the Most Unwanted Alien Forest Pathogens in Canada Using Real-Time PCR.

    PubMed

    Lamarche, Josyanne; Potvin, Amélie; Pelletier, Gervais; Stewart, Don; Feau, Nicolas; Alayon, Dario I O; Dale, Angela L; Coelho, Aaron; Uzunovic, Adnan; Bilodeau, Guillaume J; Brière, Stephan C; Hamelin, Richard C; Tanguay, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    Invasive alien tree pathogens can cause significant economic losses as well as large-scale damage to natural ecosystems. Early detection to prevent their establishment and spread is an important approach used by several national plant protection organizations (NPPOs). Molecular detection tools targeting 10 of the most unwanted alien forest pathogens in Canada were developed as part of the TAIGA project (http://taigaforesthealth.com/). Forest pathogens were selected following an independent prioritization. Specific TaqMan real-time PCR detection assays were designed to function under homogeneous conditions so that they may be used in 96- or 384-well plate format arrays for high-throughput testing of large numbers of samples against multiple targets. Assays were validated for 1) specificity, 2) sensitivity, 3) precision, and 4) robustness on environmental samples. All assays were highly specific when evaluated against a panel of pure cultures of target and phylogenetically closely-related species. Sensitivity, evaluated by assessing the limit of detection (with a threshold of 95% of positive samples), was found to be between one and ten target gene region copies. Precision or repeatability of each assay revealed a mean coefficient of variation of 3.4%. All assays successfully allowed detection of target pathogen on positive environmental samples, without any non-specific amplification. These molecular detection tools will allow for rapid and reliable detection of 10 of the most unwanted alien forest pathogens in Canada. PMID:26274489

  8. Pathogenic chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, but not B. salamandrivorans, detected on eastern hellbenders.

    PubMed

    Bales, Emma K; Hyman, Oliver J; Loudon, Andrew H; Harris, Reid N; Lipps, Gregory; Chapman, Eric; Roblee, Kenneth; Kleopfer, John D; Terrell, Kimberly A

    2015-01-01

    Recent worldwide declines and extinctions of amphibian populations have been attributed to chytridiomycosis, a disease caused by the pathogenic fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd). Until recently, Bd was thought to be the only Batrachochytrium species that infects amphibians; however a newly described species, Batrachochytrium salamandrivorans (Bs), is linked to die-offs in European fire salamanders (Salamandra salamandra). Little is known about the distribution, host range, or origin of Bs. In this study, we surveyed populations of an aquatic salamander that is declining in the United States, the eastern hellbender (Cryptobranchus alleganiensis alleganiensis), for the presence of Bs and Bd. Skin swabs were collected from a total of 91 individuals in New York, Pennsylvania, Ohio, and Virginia, and tested for both pathogens using duplex qPCR. Bs was not detected in any samples, suggesting it was not present in these hellbender populations (0% prevalence, 95% confidence intervals of 0.0-0.04). Bd was found on 22 hellbenders (24% prevalence, 95% confidence intervals of 0.16 ≤ 0.24 ≤ 0.34), representing all four states. All positive samples had low loads of Bd zoospores (12.7 ± 4.9 S.E.M. genome equivalents) compared to other Bd susceptible species. More research is needed to determine the impact of Batrachochytrium infection on hellbender fitness and population viability. In particular, understanding how hellbenders limit Bd infection intensity in an aquatic environment may yield important insights for amphibian conservation. This study is among the first to evaluate the distribution of Bs in the United States, and is consistent with another, which failed to detect Bs in the U.S. Knowledge about the distribution, host-range, and origin of Bs may help control the spread of this pathogen, especially to regions of high salamander diversity, such as the eastern United States. PMID:25695636

  9. Phage-based platforms for the clinical detection of human bacterial pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Schofield, David A.; Sharp, Natasha J.; Westwater, Caroline

    2012-01-01

    Bacteriophages (phages) have been utilized for decades as a means for uniquely identifying their target bacteria. Due to their inherent natural specificity, ease of use, and straightforward production, phage possess a number of desirable attributes which makes them particularly suited as bacterial detectors. As a result, extensive research has been conducted into the development of phage, or phage-derived products to expedite the detection of human pathogens. However, very few phage-based diagnostics have transitioned from the research lab into a clinical diagnostic tool. Herein we review the phage-based platforms that are currently used for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Yersinia pestis, Bacillus anthracis and Staphylococcus aureus in the clinical field. We briefly describe the disease, the current diagnostic options, and the role phage diagnostics play in identifying the cause of infection, and determining antibiotic susceptibility. PMID:23050221

  10. Rapid and Selective Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria in Bloodstream Infections with Aptamer-Based Recognition.

    PubMed

    Shen, Haijing; Wang, Jie; Liu, Haoyang; Li, Zhihao; Jiang, Fenglei; Wang, Fu-Bing; Yuan, Quan

    2016-08-01

    Sepsis and bacteremia are life-threatening clinical syndromes associated with significant patient morbidity and mortality. Rapid and sensitive detection of pathogenic bacteria is the key to improve patient survival rates. Herein, we have rationally constructed a simple aptamer-based capture platform to shorten the time needed for confirmation of bacterial bloodstream infection in clinical blood samples. This capture platform is made of a mesoporous TiO2-coated magnetic nanoparticle and is modified with target aptamer. It features excellent bacterial enrichment efficiency of about 80% even at low bacterial concentrations (10-2000 CFU mL(-1)). More importantly, the bacteria can be enriched within 2 h, and the time for bacterial identification is effectively shortened in comparison to the "gold standard" in clinical diagnosis of bloodstream infection. The aptamer-based capture platform may pave a way for the detection of biomarkers and find potential applications in disease diagnosis. PMID:27411775

  11. The amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis detected in a community of stream and wetland amphibians

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Grant, E.H.C.; Bailey, L.L.; Ware, J.L.; Duncan, K.C.

    2008-01-01

    The amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis, responsible for the potentially fatal amphibian disease chytridiomycosis, is known to occur in a large and ever increasing number of amphibian populations around the world. However, sampling has been biased towards stream- and wetland-breeding anurans, with little attention paid to stream-associated salamanders. We sampled three frog and three salamander species in the Chesapeake and Ohio Canal National Historic Park, Maryland, by swabbing animals for PCR analysis to detect DNA of B. dendrobatidis. Using PCR, we detected B. dendrobatidis DNA in both stream and wetland amphibians, and report here the first occurrence of the pathogen in two species of stream-associated salamanders. Future research should focus on mechanisms within habitats that may affect persistence and dissemination of B. dendrobatidis among stream-associated salamanders.

  12. Detection of food-borne pathogens with DNA arrays on disk.

    PubMed

    Arnandis-Chover, T; Morais, S; Tortajada-Genaro, L A; Puchades, R; Maquieira, Á; Berganza, J; Olabarria, G

    2012-11-15

    A DNA oligonucleotide array for duplex pathogen detection on a DVD platform is developed. The assay involves hybridization of PCR products and optical detection using compact disc technology. Different DNA array constructions for attachment of synthetic oligonucleotides on to DVD surface are evaluated, finding that streptavidin-biotin coupling method yielded the highest sensitivity in combination with enzymatic signal amplification. Issues of importance for the DNA array construction such immobilized probes design, PCR product labeling strategy and composition of the hybridization buffer were addressed. The methodology was proved scoring single nucleotide polymorphisms with high selectivity. The assay capability was also demonstrated by the identification of two pathogenic microorganisms in powder milk samples. In fifty minutes, the DVD-array system identifies Salmonella spp. and Cronobacter spp. (previously named Enterobacter sakazakii) precise and simultaneously with a sensitivity of 10(0) and 10(2) cfu/mL, respectively, in infant milk. Results were in good agreement with those obtained by quantitative real-time PCR. PMID:23158341

  13. Pathogen enrichment device (PED) enables one-step growth, enrichment and separation of pathogen from food matrices for detection using bioanalytical platforms.

    PubMed

    Hahm, Byoung-Kwon; Kim, Hyochin; Singh, Atul K; Bhunia, Arun K

    2015-10-01

    The bottleneck for accurate detection of foodborne pathogens is separation of target analytes from complex food matrices. Currently used sample preparation methods are cumbersome, arduous and lengthy; thus, a user-friendly system is desirable. A hand-held sample preparation system designated pathogen enrichment device (PED) was built that contains a growth chamber, filters, and an ion exchange cartridge to deliver bacteria directly onto the detection platforms. Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica and Listeria monocytogenes were used as model pathogens. Spinach, ground beef, hotdogs, and eggs were used as model foods to evaluate PED performance, and results were compared with traditional bag enrichment method. Bacterial cells were inoculated at 1, 10, and 100 CFU/g of the sample and enriched in PED using appropriate pathogen-specific selective enrichment broths. The bacterial cell counts in both PED and stomacher-bag were comparable and the pH in PED-recovered cell suspension was close to neutral whereas the pH of cell suspension in the stomacher-bag was slightly acidic. The bacterial recovery from the PED was 79-100% and was directly detected by lateral-flow immunoassay (LFIA), quantitative PCR (qPCR) and light scattering sensor with sample-to-result time of 8-24h with a detection limit of 1CFU/g. In qPCR, the amplified PCR products appeared in 4-5 cycles earlier with PED-enriched cultures compared to the cultures enriched in stomacher-bag. The hand-held PED proved to be a one-step procedure for enrichment and recovery of homogenous particle-free bacterial cells for detection using immunological, molecular or biosensor-based platforms. PMID:26211638

  14. Depletion of Human DNA in Spiked Clinical Specimens for Improvement of Sensitivity of Pathogen Detection by Next-Generation Sequencing.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mohammad R; Rawat, Arun; Tang, Patrick; Jithesh, Puthen V; Thomas, Eva; Tan, Rusung; Tilley, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Next-generation sequencing (NGS) technology has shown promise for the detection of human pathogens from clinical samples. However, one of the major obstacles to the use of NGS in diagnostic microbiology is the low ratio of pathogen DNA to human DNA in most clinical specimens. In this study, we aimed to develop a specimen-processing protocol to remove human DNA and enrich specimens for bacterial and viral DNA for shotgun metagenomic sequencing. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and nasopharyngeal aspirate (NPA) specimens, spiked with control bacterial and viral pathogens, were processed using either a commercially available kit (MolYsis) or various detergents followed by DNase prior to the extraction of DNA. Relative quantities of human DNA and pathogen DNA were determined by real-time PCR. The MolYsis kit did not improve the pathogen-to-human DNA ratio, but significant reductions (>95%;P< 0.001) in human DNA with minimal effect on pathogen DNA were achieved in samples that were treated with 0.025% saponin, a nonionic surfactant. Specimen preprocessing significantly decreased NGS reads mapped to the human genome (P< 0.05) and improved the sensitivity of pathogen detection (P< 0.01), with a 20- to 650-fold increase in the ratio of microbial reads to human reads. Preprocessing also permitted the detection of pathogens that were undetectable in the unprocessed samples. Our results demonstrate a simple method for the reduction of background human DNA for metagenomic detection for a broad range of pathogens in clinical samples. PMID:26763966

  15. Differential efficiency among DNA extraction methods influences detection of the amphibian pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis.

    PubMed

    Bletz, M C; Rebollar, E A; Harris, R N

    2015-02-10

    Chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungal pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), is responsible for massive declines and extinctions of amphibians worldwide. The most common method for detecting Bd is quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR). qPCR is a highly sensitive detection technique, but its ability to determine the presence and accurately quantify the amount of Bd is also contingent on the efficiency of the DNA extraction method used prior to PCR. Using qPCR, we compared the extraction efficiency of 3 different extraction methods commonly used for Bd detection across a range of zoospore quantities: PrepMan Ultra Reagent, Qiagen DNeasy Blood and Tissue Kit, and Mobio PowerSoil DNA Isolation Kit. We show that not all extraction methods led to successful detection of Bd for the low zoospore quantities and that there was variation in the estimated zoospore equivalents among the methods, which demonstrates that these methods have different extraction efficiencies. These results highlight the importance of considering the extraction method when comparing across studies. The Qiagen DNeasy kit had the highest efficiency. We also show that replicated estimates of less than 1 zoospore can result from known zoospore concentrations; therefore, such results should be considered when obtained from field data. Additionally, we discuss the implications of our findings for interpreting previous studies and for conducting future Bd surveys. It is imperative to use the most efficient DNA extraction method in tandem with the highly sensitive qPCR technique in order to accurately diagnose the presence of Bd as well as other pathogens. PMID:25667331

  16. Simultaneous Detection of Marine Fish Pathogens by Using Multiplex PCR and a DNA Microarray

    PubMed Central

    González, Santiago F.; Krug, Melissa J.; Nielsen, Michael E.; Santos, Ysabel; Call, Douglas R.

    2004-01-01

    We coupled multiplex PCR and a DNA microarray to construct an assay suitable for the simultaneous detection of five important marine fish pathogens (Vibrio vulnificus, Listonella anguillarum, Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus). The array was composed of nine short oligonucleotide probes (25-mer) complementary to seven chromosomal loci (cyt, rpoN, gyrB, toxR, ureC, dly, and vapA) and two plasmid-borne loci (fatA and A.sal). Nine primer sets were designed to amplify short fragments of these loci (100 to 177 bp) in a multiplex PCR. PCR products were subsequently labeled by nick translation and hybridized to the microarray. All strains of the five target species (n = 1 to 21) hybridized to at least one species-specific probe. Assay sensitivities ranged from 100% for seven probes to 83 and 67% for the two remaining probes. Multiplex PCR did not produce any nonspecific amplification products when tested against 23 related species of bacteria (n = 40 strains; 100% specificity). Using purified genomic DNA, we were able to detect PCR products with <20 fg of genomic DNA per reaction (equivalent to four or five cells), and the array was at least fourfold more sensitive than agarose gel electrophoresis for detecting PCR products. In addition, our method allowed the tentative identification of virulent strains of L. anguillarum serotype O1 based on the presence of the fatA gene (67% sensitivity and 100% specificity). This assay is a sensitive and specific tool for the simultaneous detection of multiple pathogenic bacteria that cause disease in fish and humans. PMID:15070982

  17. Evaluation of use of a new chromogenic agar in detection of urinary tract pathogens.

    PubMed

    Samra, Z; Heifetz, M; Talmor, J; Bain, E; Bahar, J

    1998-04-01

    CHROMagar Orientation, a new chromogenic medium, was evaluated for the detection and differentiation of gram-positive and gram-negative pathogenic microorganisms in 900 urine samples from hospitalized patients. Performance characteristics of the medium were evaluated in comparison to those of 5% sheep blood and MacConkey agars by direct inoculation of the urine samples on the three media. Four gram-negative and two gram-positive strains as well as one yeast control strain from the American Type Culture Collection were used to ensure quality control. CHROMagar Orientation succeeded in detecting all the urine pathogens that were detected by the reference media, including gram-negative bacilli, staphylococci, streptococci, and yeasts. Colony color and morphology on CHROMagar Orientation accurately differentiated Escherichia coli, Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Acinetobacter spp. Owing to the similarity in the pigmentation produced by Klebsiella, Enterobacter, and Citrobacter isolates, the medium failed to distinguish among them; however, these isolates were easily recognized as coliforms because of their metallic blue coloration. Staphylococci were clearly perceptible: S. aureus and S. epidermidis grow in regular-size colonies that range from opaque white to yellowish, and S. saprophyticus produces opaque pink colonies. All streptococcus strains, including those from groups B and C, were detected. They grow as undifferentiated flat dry diffused colonies, and additional tests were required for identification. Enterococci were easily discriminated by their strong turquoise pigmentation and their typical growth on the agar's surface. Yeast grow in typical creamy wet convex colonies. The accuracy of antibiotic susceptibility determinations according to standard methods was also tested by picking isolates directly from CHROMagar Orientation. The results showed excellent correlation with those obtained with microorganisms picked from

  18. Method for detection of a few pathogenic bacteria and determination of live versus dead cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horikawa, Shin; Chen, I.-Hsuan; Du, Songtao; Liu, Yuzhe; Wikle, Howard C.; Suh, Sang-Jin; Barbaree, James M.; Chin, Bryan A.

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents a method for detection of a few pathogenic bacteria and determination of live versus dead cells. The method combines wireless phage-coated magnetoelastic (ME) biosensors and a surface-scanning dectector, enabling real-time monitoring of the growth of specific bacteria in a nutrient broth. The ME biosensor used in this investigation is composed of a strip-shaped ME resonator upon which an engineered bacteriophage is coated to capture a pathogen of interest. E2 phage with high binding affinity for Salmonella Typhimurium was used as a model study. The specificity of E2 phage has been reported to be 1 in 105 background bacteria. The phage-coated ME biosensors were first exposed to a low-concentration Salmonella suspension to capture roughly 300 cells on the sensor surface. When the growth of Salmonella in the broth occurs, the mass of the biosensor increases, which results in a decrease in the biosensor's resonant frequency. Monitoring of this mass- induced resonant frequency change allows for real-time detection of the presence of Salmonella. Detection of a few bacteria is also possible by growing them to a sufficient number. The surface-scanning detector was used to measure resonant frequency changes of 25 biosensors sequentially in an automated manner as a function of time. This methodology offers direct, real-time detection, quantification, and viability determination of specific bacteria. The rate of the sensor's resonant frequency change was found to be largely dependent on the number of initially bound cells and the efficiency of cell growth.

  19. Simultaneous detection of marine fish pathogens by using multiplex PCR and a DNA microarray.

    PubMed

    González, Santiago F; Krug, Melissa J; Nielsen, Michael E; Santos, Ysabel; Call, Douglas R

    2004-04-01

    We coupled multiplex PCR and a DNA microarray to construct an assay suitable for the simultaneous detection of five important marine fish pathogens (Vibrio vulnificus, Listonella anguillarum, Photobacterium damselae subsp. damselae, Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida, and Vibrio parahaemolyticus). The array was composed of nine short oligonucleotide probes (25-mer) complementary to seven chromosomal loci (cyt, rpoN, gyrB, toxR, ureC, dly, and vapA) and two plasmid-borne loci (fatA and A.sal). Nine primer sets were designed to amplify short fragments of these loci (100 to 177 bp) in a multiplex PCR. PCR products were subsequently labeled by nick translation and hybridized to the microarray. All strains of the five target species (n = 1 to 21) hybridized to at least one species-specific probe. Assay sensitivities ranged from 100% for seven probes to 83 and 67% for the two remaining probes. Multiplex PCR did not produce any nonspecific amplification products when tested against 23 related species of bacteria (n = 40 strains; 100% specificity). Using purified genomic DNA, we were able to detect PCR products with < 20 fg of genomic DNA per reaction (equivalent to four or five cells), and the array was at least fourfold more sensitive than agarose gel electrophoresis for detecting PCR products. In addition, our method allowed the tentative identification of virulent strains of L. anguillarum serotype O1 based on the presence of the fatA gene (67% sensitivity and 100% specificity). This assay is a sensitive and specific tool for the simultaneous detection of multiple pathogenic bacteria that cause disease in fish and humans. PMID:15070982

  20. A Method Detection Limit for Bacillus anthracis Spores in Water Using an Automated Waterborne Pathogen Concentrator.

    PubMed

    Humrighouse, Ben; Pemberton, Adin; Gallardo, Vicente; Lindquist, H D Alan; LaBudde, Robert

    2015-01-01

    The method detection limit (MDL, 99% chance of detecting a positive result in a single replicate), as per the United States Code of Federal Regulations, was determined for a protocol using an ultrafiltration based automated waterborne pathogen concentration device. Bacillus anthracis Sterne strain spores were seeded at low levels into 100 L reagent water samples. Suspect colonies were confirmed through morphological, chemical, and genetic tests. Samples of 100 L (n=14) of reagent water were seeded with five B. anthracis CFUs each. To confirm the estimated detection limit, a second set (n=19) of 100 L reagent water samples were seeded at a higher level (7 CFUs). The second estimate of the MDL could not be pooled with the first, due to significant difference in variance. A third trial (n=7) seeded with 10 CFUs produced an estimate of the MDL that could be pooled with the higher previous estimate. Another trial consisting of eight 100 L samples of tap water were seeded with approximately 7 CFUs. Recovery in these samples was not significantly different from the pooled MDL. Theoretically a concentration of 4.6 spores/100 L would be required for detection 95% of the time, based on a Poisson distribution. The calculated pooled MDL, based on experimental data was approximately 6 B. anthracis CFU/100 L (95% confidence interval 4.8 to 8.4). Detection at this level was achieved in municipal water samples. PMID:26268983

  1. Rapid Detection of Pathogenic Bacteria from Fresh Produce by Filtration and Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Xiaomeng; Han, Caiqin; Chen, Jing; Huang, Yao-Wen; Zhao, Yiping

    2016-04-01

    The detection of Salmonella Poona from cantaloupe cubes and E. coli O157:H7 from lettuce has been explored by using a filtration method and surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) based on vancomycin-functionalized silver nanorod array substrates. It is found that with a two-step filtration process, the limit of detection (LOD) of Salmonella Poona from cantaloupe cubes can be as low as 100 CFU/mL in less than 4 h, whereas the chlorophyll in the lettuce causes severe SERS spectral interference. To improve the LOD of lettuce, a three-step filtration method with a hydrophobic filter is proposed. The hydrophobic filter can effectively eliminate the interferences from chlorophyll and achieve a LOD of 1000 CFU/mL detection of E. coli O157:H7 from lettuce samples within 5 h. With the low LODs and rapid detection time, the SERS biosensing platform has demonstrated its potential as a rapid, simple, and inexpensive means for pathogenic bacteria detection from fresh produce.

  2. Development of a Recombinase Polymerase Amplification Assay for the Detection of Pathogenic Leptospira

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Ahmed; van der Linden, Hans; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.

    2014-01-01

    Detection of leptospires based on DNA amplification techniques is essential for the early diagnosis of leptospirosis when anti-Leptospira antibodies are below the detection limit of most serological tests. In middle and low income countries where leptospirosis is endemic, routine implementation of real-time PCR is financially and technically challenging due to the requirement of expensive thermocycler equipment. In this study we report the development and evaluation of a novel isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification assay (RPA) for detection of pathogenic Leptospira based on TwistAmp chemistry. RPA enabled the detection of less than two genome copies per reaction. Retrospective evaluation revealed a high diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity and specificity of 94.7% and 97.7%, respectively) compared to culturing as the reference standard. RPA presents a powerful tool for the early diagnosis of leptospirosis in humans and in animals. Furthermore, it enables the detection of the causative agent in reservoirs and environment, and as such is a valuable adjunct to current tools for surveillance and early outbreak warning. PMID:24814943

  3. Compact USB-powered mobile ELISA-based pathogen detection: design and implementation challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Starodubov, Dmitry; Asanbaeva, Anya; Berezhnyy, Ihor; Chao, Chung-Yen; Koziol, Richard; Miller, David; Patton, Edward; Trehan, Sushma; Ulmer, Chris

    2011-05-01

    Physical Optics Corporation (POC) presents a novel Mobile ELISA-based Pathogen Detection system that is based on a disposable microfluidic chip for multiple-threat detection and a highly sensitive portable microfluidic fluorescence measurement unit that also controls the flow of samples and reagents through the microfluidic channels of the chip. The fluorescence detection subsystem is composed of a commercial 635-nm diode laser, an avalanche photodiode (APD) that measures fluorescence, and three filtering mirrors that provide more than 100 dB of excitation line suppression in the signal detection channel. Special techniques to suppress the fluorescence and scattering background allow optimizing the dynamic range for a compact package. Concentrations below 100 ng/mL can be reliably identified. The entire instrument is powered using a USB port of a notebook PC and operates as a plug-and-play human-interface device, resulting in a truly peripheral biosensor. The operation of the system is fully automated, with minimal user intervention through the detection process. The resolved challenges of the design and implementation are presented in detail in this publication.

  4. Direct and sensitive detection of a pathogenic protozoan, Toxoplasma gondii, by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed Central

    Burg, J L; Grover, C M; Pouletty, P; Boothroyd, J C

    1989-01-01

    We applied the polymerase chain reaction to detection of the pathogenic protozoan Toxoplasma gondii based on our identification of a 35-fold-repetitive gene (the B1 gene) as a target. Using this procedure, we were able to amplify and detect the DNA of a single organism directly from a crude cell lysate. This level of sensitivity also allowed us to detect the B1 gene from purified DNA samples containing as few as 10 parasites in the presence of 100,000 human leukocytes. This is representative of the maximal cellular infiltration (10(5)/ml) in 1 ml of cerebrospinal fluid obtained from patients with toxoplasmic encephalitis. The B1 gene is present and conserved in all six T. gondii strains tested to date, including two isolates from patients with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome. No signal was detected by using this assay and DNAs from a variety of other organisms, including several which might be found in the central nervous system of an immunocompromised host. This combination of sensitivity and specificity should make detection of the B1 gene based on polymerase chain reaction amplification a very useful method for diagnosis of toxoplasmosis both in immunocompromised hosts and in congenitally infected fetuses. Images PMID:2768467

  5. Development of a recombinase polymerase amplification assay for the detection of pathogenic Leptospira.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Ahmed; van der Linden, Hans; Hartskeerl, Rudy A

    2014-05-01

    Detection of leptospires based on DNA amplification techniques is essential for the early diagnosis of leptospirosis when anti-Leptospira antibodies are below the detection limit of most serological tests. In middle and low income countries where leptospirosis is endemic, routine implementation of real-time PCR is financially and technically challenging due to the requirement of expensive thermocycler equipment. In this study we report the development and evaluation of a novel isothermal recombinase polymerase amplification assay (RPA) for detection of pathogenic Leptospira based on TwistAmp chemistry. RPA enabled the detection of less than two genome copies per reaction. Retrospective evaluation revealed a high diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity and specificity of 94.7% and 97.7%, respectively) compared to culturing as the reference standard. RPA presents a powerful tool for the early diagnosis of leptospirosis in humans and in animals. Furthermore, it enables the detection of the causative agent in reservoirs and environment, and as such is a valuable adjunct to current tools for surveillance and early outbreak warning. PMID:24814943

  6. Monitoring invasive pathogens in plant nurseries for early-detection and to minimise the probability of escape.

    PubMed

    Alonso Chavez, Vasthi; Parnell, Stephen; VAN DEN Bosch, Frank

    2016-10-21

    The global increase in the movement of plant products in recent years has triggered an increase in the number of introduced plant pathogens. Plant nurseries importing material from abroad may play an important role in the introduction and spread of diseases such as ash dieback and sudden oak death which are thought to have been introduced through trade. The economic, environmental and social costs associated with the spread of invasive pathogens become considerably larger as the incidence of the pathogen increases. To control the movement of pathogens across the plant trade network it is crucial to develop monitoring programmes at key points of the network such as plant nurseries. By detecting the introduction of invasive pathogens at low incidence, the control and eradication of an epidemic is more likely to be successful. Equally, knowing the likelihood of having sold infected plants once a disease has been detected in a nursery can help designing tracing plans to control the onward spread of the disease. Here, we develop an epidemiological model to detect and track the movement of an invasive plant pathogen into and from a plant nursery. Using statistical methods, we predict the epidemic incidence given that a detection of the pathogen has occurred for the first time, considering that the epidemic has an asymptomatic period between infection and symptom development. Equally, we calculate the probability of having sold at least one infected plant during the period previous to the first disease detection. This analysis can aid stakeholder decisions to determine, when the pathogen is first discovered in a nursery, the need of tracking the disease to other points in the plant trade network in order to control the epidemic. We apply our method to high profile recent introductions including ash dieback and sudden oak death in the UK and citrus canker and Huanglongbing disease in Florida. These results provide new insight for the design of monitoring strategies at key

  7. Detection of Bacteroidales fecal indicators and the zoonotic pathogens E. coli 0157:H7, salmonella, and campylobacter in river water.

    PubMed

    Walters, Sarah P; Gannon, Victor P J; Field, Katharine G

    2007-03-15

    Bacteroidales host-specific PCR offers a rapid method of diagnosing fecal pollution in water and identifying sources of input. To assess human health risks from exposure to fecal pathogens, however, Bacteroidales markers should be detectable when pathogens are present. To determine if Bacteroidales general, human-, ruminant-, and swine-specific markers correlate with certain fecal pathogens, we conducted a retrospective study on water samples for which the presence of E. coli O157:H7, Salmonella spp., and Campylobacter spp. had been determined. We found a positive relationship between detection of the Bacteroidales general fecal marker and presence of the pathogens. Detection of ruminant-specific markers predicted E. coli O157: H7 occurrence. There was a significant increase in the likelihood of detecting Salmonella when a ruminant marker was present, and Campylobacter spp. when human markers were present. For pathogens such as E. coli O157: H7 that are strongly associated with particular hosts, Bacteroidales host-specific markers can estimate the likelihood of pathogen occurrence, enabling more accurate health risk assessments. PMID:17410775

  8. Field-deployable colorimetric biosensor system for the rapid detection of pathogenic organisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duy, Janice

    The rapid identification of pathogenic organisms is necessary for recognizing and managing human and environmental health risks. Numerous detection schemes are available, but most are difficult to employ in non-laboratory settings due to their need for bulky, specialized equipment, multiple reagents, or highly trained personnel. To address this problem, a rapid, field-compatible biosensor system based on the colorimetric detection of nucleic acid hybrids was developed. Peptide nucleic acid (PNA) probes were used to capture ribosomal RNA sequences from environmental samples. Non-target nucleic acids, including single-base mismatches flanked by adenines and uracils, were removed with a micrococcal nuclease digestion step. Matched PNA-RNA hybrids remained intact and were indicated by the cyanine dye DiSC2(5). PNA-containing duplexes function as templates for the aggregation of DiSC2(5), visualized as a change in solution color from blue to purple. This transition can be measured as an increase in the solution absorbance at 540 nm (dye aggregate) at the expense of the dye monomer peak at 650 nm. These concomitant spectral changes were used to calculate a "hybridization signal" using the ratio A aggregate/Amonomer ≈ A540/A650. Testing with pathogenic environmental samples was accomplished using two model organisms: the harmful algal bloom-causing dinoflagellate Alexandrium species, and the potato wart disease-causing fungus Synchytrium endobioticum. In both cases, the colorimetric approach was able to distinguish the targets with sensitivities rivaling those of established techniques, but with the advantages of decreased hands-on time and cost. Assay fieldability was tested with a portable colorimeter designed to quantify the dye-indicated hybridization signal and assembled from commercially available components. Side-by-side testing revealed no difference in the sensing performance of the colorimeter compared to a laboratory spectrophotometer (Pearson's r=0

  9. First Detection of Mycobacteria in African Rodents and Insectivores, Using Stratified Pool Screening▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Durnez, Lies; Eddyani, Miriam; Mgode, Georgies F.; Katakweba, Abdul; Katholi, Charles R.; Machang'u, Robert R.; Kazwala, Rudovik R.; Portaels, Françoise; Leirs, Herwig

    2008-01-01

    With the rising number of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS in developing countries, the control of mycobacteria is of growing importance. Previous studies have shown that rodents and insectivores are carriers of mycobacteria. However, it is not clear how widespread mycobacteria are in these animals and what their role is in spreading them. Therefore, the prevalence of mycobacteria in rodents and insectivores was studied in and around Morogoro, Tanzania. Live rodents were trapped, with three types of live traps, in three habitats. Pieces of organs were pooled per habitat, species, and organ type (stratified pooling); these sample pools were examined for the presence of mycobacteria by PCR, microscopy, and culture methods. The mycobacterial isolates were identified using phenotypic techniques and sequencing. In total, 708 small mammals were collected, 31 of which were shrews. By pool prevalence estimation, 2.65% of the animals were carriers of mycobacteria, with a higher prevalence in the urban areas and in Cricetomys gambianus and the insectivore Crocidura hirta. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (Mycobacterium chimaera, M. intracellulare, M. arupense, M. parascrofulaceum, and Mycobacterium spp.) were isolated from C. gambianus, Mastomys natalensis, and C. hirta. This study is the first to report findings of mycobacteria in African rodents and insectivores and the first in mycobacterial ecology to estimate the prevalence of mycobacteria after stratified pool screening. The fact that small mammals in urban areas carry more mycobacteria than those in the fields and that potentially pathogenic mycobacteria were isolated identifies a risk for other animals and humans, especially HIV/AIDS patients, that have a weakened immune system. PMID:18065608

  10. First detection of mycobacteria in African rodents and insectivores, using stratified pool screening.

    PubMed

    Durnez, Lies; Eddyani, Miriam; Mgode, Georgies F; Katakweba, Abdul; Katholi, Charles R; Machang'u, Robert R; Kazwala, Rudovik R; Portaels, Françoise; Leirs, Herwig

    2008-02-01

    With the rising number of patients with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)/AIDS in developing countries, the control of mycobacteria is of growing importance. Previous studies have shown that rodents and insectivores are carriers of mycobacteria. However, it is not clear how widespread mycobacteria are in these animals and what their role is in spreading them. Therefore, the prevalence of mycobacteria in rodents and insectivores was studied in and around Morogoro, Tanzania. Live rodents were trapped, with three types of live traps, in three habitats. Pieces of organs were pooled per habitat, species, and organ type (stratified pooling); these sample pools were examined for the presence of mycobacteria by PCR, microscopy, and culture methods. The mycobacterial isolates were identified using phenotypic techniques and sequencing. In total, 708 small mammals were collected, 31 of which were shrews. By pool prevalence estimation, 2.65% of the animals were carriers of mycobacteria, with a higher prevalence in the urban areas and in Cricetomys gambianus and the insectivore Crocidura hirta. Nontuberculous mycobacteria (Mycobacterium chimaera, M. intracellulare, M. arupense, M. parascrofulaceum, and Mycobacterium spp.) were isolated from C. gambianus, Mastomys natalensis, and C. hirta. This study is the first to report findings of mycobacteria in African rodents and insectivores and the first in mycobacterial ecology to estimate the prevalence of mycobacteria after stratified pool screening. The fact that small mammals in urban areas carry more mycobacteria than those in the fields and that potentially pathogenic mycobacteria were isolated identifies a risk for other animals and humans, especially HIV/AIDS patients, that have a weakened immune system. PMID:18065608

  11. A simple extraction procedure for efficient routine detection of pathogenic bacteria in plant material by polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Llop, P; Caruso, P; Cubero, J; Morente, C; López, M M

    1999-07-01

    A simple and rapid method for extracting DNA from plants based on the use of an extraction buffer and precipitation with isopropanol was assayed to see its usefulness in detecting pathogenic bacteria in plant material. The method was compared with a phenol-chloroform standard procedure obtaining higher sensitivity levels of detection. The protocol developed was efficient for detecting a Gram-positive bacterium, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. sepedonicus and several Gram-negative pathogenic bacteria (Ralstonia solanacearum, Erwinia amylovora, Xanthomonas axonopodis pv. citri) with a sensitivity of 10(2)-10(3) cfu/ml in spiked samples. It was also efficient to specifically identify such bacteria in naturally infected plant material. This procedure is proposed as a routine tool for detection of plant pathogenic bacteria, as well as in environmental microbiology and biotechnology studies. PMID:10395461

  12. Development of a real-time PCR for the detection of pathogenic Leptospira spp. in California sea lions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Rapid detection of pathogenic Leptospira spp. in marine mammals is challenging: microbiological culture can take 3-6 months and has low sensitivity, immunohistochemical staining of kidney to detect leptospires is invasive and time consuming, and serological methods, such as the microscopic agglutina...

  13. Preponderance of toxigenic Escherichia coli in stool pathogens correlates with toxin detection in accessible drinking-water sources.

    PubMed

    Igbokwe, H; Bhattacharyya, S; Gradus, S; Khubbar, M; Griswold, D; Navidad, J; Igwilo, C; Masson-Meyers, D; Azenabor, A A

    2015-02-01

    Since early detection of pathogens and their virulence factors contribute to intervention and control strategies, we assessed the enteropathogens in diarrhoea disease and investigated the link between toxigenic strains of Escherichia coli from stool and drinking-water sources; and determined the expression of toxin genes by antibiotic-resistant E. coli in Lagos, Nigeria. This was compared with isolates from diarrhoeal stool and water from Wisconsin, USA. The new Luminex xTAG GPP (Gastroplex) technique and conventional real-time PCR were used to profile enteric pathogens and E. coli toxin gene isolates, respectively. Results showed the pathogen profile of stool and indicated a relationship between E. coli toxin genes in water and stool from Lagos which was absent in Wisconsin isolates. The Gastroplex technique was efficient for multiple enteric pathogens and toxin gene detection. The co-existence of antibiotic resistance with enteroinvasive E. coli toxin genes suggests an additional prognostic burden on patients. PMID:24787554

  14. [Selective detection of viable pathogenic bacteria in water using reverse transcription quantitative PCR].

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Wen; Li, Dan; Wu, Shu-Xu; He, Miao; Yang, Tian

    2012-11-01

    A reverse transcription q quantitative PCR (RT-qPCR) assay method was established, which can quantify the copy numbers of RNA in pathogenic bacteria of E. coli and Enterococcus faecium. The results showed that cDNA was generated with the RT-PCR reagents, target gene was quantified with the qPCR, the copy numbers of RNA were stable at about 1 copies x CFU(-1) for E. coli and 7.98 x 10(2) copies x CFU(-1) for Enterococcus faecium respectively during the stationary grow phase for the both indicator bacteria [E. coli (6-18 h) and Enterococcus faecium (10-38 h)]. The established RT-qPCR method can quantify the numbers of viable bacteria through detecting bacterial RNA targets. Through detecting the heat-treated E. coli and Enterococcus faecium by three methods (culture method, qPCR, RT-qPCR), we found that the qPCR and RT-qPCR can distinguish 1.43 lg copy non-viable E. coli and 2.5 lg copy non-viable Enterococcus faecium. These results indicated that the established methods could effectively distinguish viable bacteria from non-viable bacteria. Finally we used this method to evaluate the real effluents of the secondary sedimentation of wastewater treatment plant (WWTP), the results showed that the correlation coefficients (R2) between RT-qPCR and culture method were 0.930 (E. coli) and 0.948 (Enterococcus faecium), and this established RT-PCR method can rapidly detect viable pathogenic bacteria in genuine waters. PMID:23323443

  15. Antibody array in a multiwell plate format for the sensitive and multiplexed detection of important plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Himananto, Orawan; Seepiban, Channarong; Kumpoosiri, Mallika; Warin, Nuchnard; Gajanandana, Oraprapai; Elliott, Christopher T; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2014-07-15

    The global seed market is considered to be an important industry with a total value of $10,543 million US dollars in 2012. Because plant pathogens such as bacteria and viruses cause a significant economic loss to both producers and exporters, the seed export industry urgently requires rapid, sensitive, and inexpensive testing for the pathogens to prevent disease spreading worldwide. This study developed an antibody array in a multiwell plate format to simultaneously detect four crucial plant pathogens, namely, a bacterial fruit blotch bacterium Acidovorax avenae subsp. citrulli (Aac), Chilli veinal mottle virus (ChiVMV, potyvirus), Watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV, tospovirus serogroup IV), and Melon yellow spot virus (MYSV, tospovirus). The capture antibodies specific to the pathogens were immobilized on each well at preassigned positions by an automatic microarrayer. The antibodies on the arrays specifically captured the corresponding pathogens present in the sample extracts. The presence of pathogens bound on the capture antibodies was subsequently detected by a cocktail of fluorescently conjugated secondary antibodies. The limits of detection of the developed antibody array for the detection of Aac, ChiVMV, WSMoV, and MYSV were 5 × 10(5) CFU/mL, 30 ng/mL, 1000 ng/mL, and 160 ng/mL, respectively, which were very similar to those of the conventional ELISA method. The antibody array in a multiwell plate format accurately detected plant pathogens in single and multiple detections. Moreover, this format enables easy handling of the assay at a higher speed of operation. PMID:24945525

  16. Sensitivity and specificity of histology for diagnoses of four common pathogens and detection of nontarget pathogens in adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in fresh water.

    PubMed

    Kent, Michael L; Benda, Susan; St-Hilaire, Sophie; Schreck, Carl B

    2013-05-01

    Histology is often underutilized in aquatic animal disease screening and diagnostics. The agreement between histological classifications of infection and results using diagnostic testing from the American Fisheries Society's Blue Book was conducted with 4 common salmon pathogens: Aeromonas salmonicida, Renibacterium salmoninarum, Ceratomyxa shasta, and Nanophyetus salmincola. Adult Chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) in Oregon were evaluated, and agreement between tests was calculated. Live and dead (both pre- and postspawning) salmon were collected from the Willamette River, Oregon, its tributaries, the Willamette Hatchery, and after holding in cool, pathogen-free water during maturation at Oregon State University. Sensitivity and specificity of histology compared to Blue Book methods for all fish, live fish only, and dead (pre- and postspawned combined) fish only were, respectively, as follows: A. salmonicida (n = 105): specificity 87.5%, 87.5%, 87.5% and sensitivity 38.6%, 14.8%, 60.0%; R. salmoninarum (n = 111): specificity 91.9%, 85.7%, 97.7% and sensitivity 16.0%, 7.1%, 27.2%; C. shasta (n = 136): specificity 56.0%, 63.3%, 28.6% and sensitivity 83.3%, 86.2%, 71.4%; N. salmincola (n = 228): specificity 68.2%, 66.7%, not possible to calculate for dead fish and sensitivity 83.5%, 80.5%, 87.3%. The specificity was good for bacterial pathogens. This was not the case for C. shasta, likely due to detection of presporogenic forms only by histology. Sensitivity of histology for bacterial pathogens was low with the exception of dead fish with A. salmonicida. Kappa analysis for agreement between Blue Book and histology methods was poor to moderate. However, histological observations revealed the presence of other pathogens that would not be detected by other methods. PMID:23536613

  17. Dual-excitation upconverting nanoparticle and quantum dot aptasensor for multiplexed food pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Kurt, Hasan; Yüce, Meral; Hussain, Babar; Budak, Hikmet

    2016-07-15

    In this report, a dual-excitation sensing method was developed using aptamer-functionalized quantum dots and upconverting nanoparticles, exhibiting Stokes and anti-Stokes type excitation profiles, respectively. Conjugation of the aptamer-functionalized luminescent nanoparticles with the magnetic beads, comprising short DNA sequences that were partially complementary to the aptamer sequences, enabled facile separation of the analyte-free conjugates for fluorescent measurement. UV-Visible spectroscopy, Circular Dichroism spectroscopy, Dynamic Light Scattering and Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis techniques were used to characterize the aptamer probes developed. The target-specific luminescent conjugates were applied for multiplex detection of model food pathogens, Salmonella typhimurium, and Staphylococcus aureus, in which the fluorescent emission spectra were obtained under UV excitation at 325nm for quantum dots and NIR excitation at 980nm for upconverting nanoparticles, respectively. The dual-excitation strategy was aimed to minimize cross-talk between the luminescent signals for multiplexed detection, and yielded limit of detection values of 16 and 28cfumL(-1) for Staphylococcus aureus, and Salmonella typhimurium, respectively. By employing a greater number of quantum dots and upconverting nanoparticles with non-overlapping fluorescent emissions, the proposed methodology might be exploited further to detect several analytes, simultaneously. PMID:26971274

  18. A cellulose-based bioassay for the colorimetric detection of pathogen DNA.

    PubMed

    Saikrishnan, Deepika; Goyal, Madhu; Rossiter, Sharon; Kukol, Andreas

    2014-12-01

    Cellulose-paper-based colorimetric bioassays may be used at the point of sampling without sophisticated equipment. This study reports the development of a colorimetric bioassay based on cellulose that can detect pathogen DNA. The detection was based on covalently attached single-stranded DNA probes and visual analysis. A cellulose surface functionalized with tosyl groups was prepared by the N,N-dimethylacetamide-lithium chloride method. Tosylation of cellulose was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and elemental analysis. Sulfhydryl-modified oligonucleotide probes complementary to a segment of the DNA sequence IS6110 of Mycobacterium tuberculosis were covalently immobilized on the tosylated cellulose. On hybridization of biotin-labelled DNA oligonucleotides with these probes, a colorimetric signal was obtained with streptavidin-conjugated horseradish peroxidase catalysing the oxidation of tetramethylbenzamidine by H2O2. The colour intensity was significantly reduced when the bioassay was subjected to DNA oligonucleotide of randomized base composition. Initial experiments have shown a sensitivity of 0.1 μM. A high probe immobilization efficiency (more than 90 %) was observed with a detection limit of 0.1 μM, corresponding to an absolute amount of 10 pmol. The detection of M. tuberculosis DNA was demonstrated using this technique coupled with PCR for biotinylation of the DNA. This work shows the potential use of tosylated cellulose as the basis for point-of-sampling bioassays. PMID:25354892

  19. Detection of pathogenic Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis using water filtration, animal and bait testing.

    PubMed

    Wimsatt, Jeffrey; Feldman, Sanford H; Heffron, Meghan; Hammond, Meagan; Ruehling, Margaret P Roth; Grayson, Kristine L; Mitchell, Joseph C

    2014-01-01

    The pathogen Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) can be challenging to detect at endangered amphibian reintroduction sites. Pre-release Bd detection can be confounded by imperfect animal sampling and the absence of animals. In Study 1, we used historical Bd-positive sites, to concurrently evaluate water filtrates and mouth bar (tadpoles) or skin swab (caudates) samples for Bd using molecular beacon realtime PCR. In Study 2, during a natural outbreak, we used PCR to detect Bd from zoospore-attracting keratin baits (three avian, three snake species). In Study 1, no captured animals (n=116) exhibited clinical signs, although 10.6% were positive, representing three of seven species sampled. In contrast, 5.4% of water filters (n=56) were Bd-positive. In Study 2, after short incubation times, a single duck down feather tested Bd-positive. In conclusion, Bd was detected in asymptomatic amphibians and water filtrate at two sites, and from water only, at two other sites. With continued refinement, semi-quantitative Bd water filtrate screening could better define zoospore-specific disease risk, allowing better characterization of the free-living phase of the organism's life cycle. Finally, these results suggest wild aquatic birds (e.g., waterfowl) should be systematically explored as a means of Bd spread. Since large numbers of aquatic birds migrate, even low Bd transfer rates could be a significant means for disease dissemination. PMID:25231013

  20. Enteric bacterial pathogen detection in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) is associated with coastal urbanization and freshwater runoff

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Melissa A.; Byrne, Barbara A.; Jang, Spencer S.; Dodd, Erin M.; Dorfmeier, Elene; Harris, Michael D.; Ames, Jack; Paradies, David; Worcester, Karen; Jessup, David A.; Miller, Woutrina A.

    2009-01-01

    Although protected for nearly a century, California’s sea otters have been slow to recover, in part due to exposure to fecally-associated protozoal pathogens like Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona. However, potential impacts from exposure to fecal bacteria have not been systematically explored. Using selective media, we examined feces from live and dead sea otters from California for specific enteric bacterial pathogens (Campylobacter, Salmonella, Clostridium perfringens, C. difficile and Escherichia coli O157:H7), and pathogens endemic to the marine environment (Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus and Plesiomonas shigelloides). We evaluated statistical associations between detection of these pathogens in otter feces and demographic or environmental risk factors for otter exposure, and found that dead otters were more likely to test positive for C. perfringens, Campylobacter and V. parahaemolyticus than were live otters. Otters from more urbanized coastlines and areas with high freshwater runoff (near outflows of rivers or streams) were more likely to test positive for one or more of these bacterial pathogens. Other risk factors for bacterial detection in otters included male gender and fecal samples collected during the rainy season when surface runoff is maximal. Similar risk factors were reported in prior studies of pathogen exposure for California otters and their invertebrate prey, suggesting that land-sea transfer and/or facilitation of pathogen survival in degraded coastal marine habitat may be impacting sea otter recovery. Because otters and humans share many of the same foods, our findings may also have implications for human health. PMID:19720009

  1. Enteric bacterial pathogen detection in southern sea otters (Enhydra lutris nereis) is associated with coastal urbanization and freshwater runoff.

    PubMed

    Miller, Melissa A; Byrne, Barbara A; Jang, Spencer S; Dodd, Erin M; Dorfmeier, Elene; Harris, Michael D; Ames, Jack; Paradies, David; Worcester, Karen; Jessup, David A; Miller, Woutrina A

    2010-01-01

    Although protected for nearly a century, California's sea otters have been slow to recover, in part due to exposure to fecally-associated protozoal pathogens like Toxoplasma gondii and Sarcocystis neurona. However, potential impacts from exposure to fecal bacteria have not been systematically explored. Using selective media, we examined feces from live and dead sea otters from California for specific enteric bacterial pathogens (Campylobacter, Salmonella, Clostridium perfringens, C. difficile and Escherichia coli O157:H7), and pathogens endemic to the marine environment (Vibrio cholerae, V. parahaemolyticus and Plesiomonas shigelloides). We evaluated statistical associations between detection of these pathogens in otter feces and demographic or environmental risk factors for otter exposure, and found that dead otters were more likely to test positive for C. perfringens, Campylobacter and V. parahaemolyticus than were live otters. Otters from more urbanized coastlines and areas with high freshwater runoff (near outflows of rivers or streams) were more likely to test positive for one or more of these bacterial pathogens. Other risk factors for bacterial detection in otters included male gender and fecal samples collected during the rainy season when surface runoff is maximal. Similar risk factors were reported in prior studies of pathogen exposure for California otters and their invertebrate prey, suggesting that land-sea transfer and/or facilitation of pathogen survival in degraded coastal marine habitat may be impacting sea otter recovery. Because otters and humans share many of the same foods, our findings may also have implications for human health. PMID:19720009

  2. Real time RT-PCR assays for detection and typing of African horse sickness virus.

    PubMed

    Bachanek-Bankowska, Katarzyna; Maan, Sushila; Castillo-Olivares, Javier; Manning, Nicola M; Maan, Narender Singh; Potgieter, Abraham C; Di Nardo, Antonello; Sutton, Geoff; Batten, Carrie; Mertens, Peter P C

    2014-01-01

    Although African horse sickness (AHS) can cause up to 95% mortality in horses, naïve animals can be protected by vaccination against the homologous AHSV serotype. Genome segment 2 (Seg-2) encodes outer capsid protein VP2, the most variable of the AHSV proteins. VP2 is also a primary target for AHSV specific neutralising antibodies, and consequently determines the identity of the nine AHSV serotypes. In contrast VP1 (the viral polymerase) and VP3 (the sub-core shell protein), encoded by Seg-1 and Seg-3 respectively, are highly conserved, representing virus species/orbivirus-serogroup-specific antigens. We report development and evaluation of real-time RT-PCR assays targeting AHSV Seg-1 or Seg-3, that can detect any AHSV type (virus species/serogroup-specific assays), as well as type-specific assays targeting Seg-2 of the nine AHSV serotypes. These assays were evaluated using isolates of different AHSV serotypes and other closely related orbiviruses, from the 'Orbivirus Reference Collection' (ORC) at The Pirbright Institute. The assays were shown to be AHSV virus-species-specific, or type-specific (as designed) and can be used for rapid, sensitive and reliable detection and identification (typing) of AHSV RNA in infected blood, tissue samples, homogenised Culicoides, or tissue culture supernatant. None of the assays amplified cDNAs from closely related heterologous orbiviruses, or from uninfected host animals or cell cultures. PMID:24721971

  3. A DNA tool for early detection of vaginal dysbiosis in African women.

    PubMed

    Jespers, Vicky; Crucitti, Tania; van de Wijgert, Janneke; Vaneechoutte, Mario; Delany-Moretlwe, Sinead; Mwaura, Mary; Agabe, Stephen; Menten, Joris

    2016-01-01

    A next-generation diagnostic tool for bacterial vaginosis, consisting of quantitative and/or qualitative molecular criteria, has not yet been identified. The optimal diagnostic tool should not only diagnose bacterial vaginosis in diverse populations, but should also detect early signs of transition to dysbiosis. We evaluated a tool based on log10-transformed qPCR data for Lactobacillus crispatus, Lactobacillus iners, Lactobacillus jensenii, Lactobacillus gasseri, Lactobacillus vaginalis, Lactobacillus genus, Atopobium vaginae and Gardnerella vaginalis in vaginal specimens of 426 African women to detect dysbiosis and predict transition to dysbiosis. G. vaginalis (p = 0.204) and A. vaginae (p = 0.001) were more commonly present in women who evolved to an intermediate (Nugent 4-6) or bacterial vaginosis score (Nugent 7-10) compared to women who continued to have a normal Nugent score. The combination of G. vaginalis, A. vaginae and Lactobacillus genus counts performed best for diagnostic accuracy for bacterial vaginosis--sensitivity 93.4% and specificity 83.6%; and for predictive accuracy for bacterial vaginosis--sensitivity 79% and specificity 52%. L. crispatus combinations did not perform well. We conclude that a triple-G. vaginalis-A. vaginae-Lactobacillus genus-qPCR tool holds promise for research in sub-Saharan Africa or when developed as a next-generation clinical diagnostic modality for bacterial vaginosis, ideally engineered as a rapid assay. PMID:26577657

  4. CT-Guided Biopsy in Suspected Spondylodiscitis – The Association of Paravertebral Inflammation with Microbial Pathogen Detection

    PubMed Central

    Spira, Daniel; Germann, Thomas; Lehner, Burkhard; Hemmer, Stefan; Akbar, Michael; Jesser, Jessica; Weber, Marc-André; Rehnitz, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Objectives To search for imaging characteristics distinguishing patients with successful from those with futile microbiological pathogen detection by CT-guided biopsy in suspected spondylodiscitis. Methods 34 consecutive patients with suspected spondylodiscitis underwent CT-guided biopsy for pathogen detection. MR-images were assessed for inflammatory infiltration of disks, adjacent vertebrae, epidural and paravertebral space. CT-images were reviewed for arrosion of adjacent end plates and reduced disk height. Biopsy samples were sent for microbiological examination in 34/34 patients, and for additional histological analysis in 28/34 patients. Results Paravertebral infiltration was present in all 10/10 patients with positive microbiology and occurred in only 12/24 patients with negative microbiology, resulting in a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 50% for pathogen detection. Despite its limited sensitivities, epidural infiltration and paravertebral abscesses showed considerably higher specificities of 83.3% and 90.9%, respectively. Paravertebral infiltration was more extensive in patients with positive as compared to negative microbiology (p = 0.002). Even though sensitivities for pathogen detection were also high in case of vertebral and disk infiltration, or end plate arrosion, specificities remained below 10%. Conclusions Inflammatory infiltration of the paravertebral space indicated successful pathogen detection by CT-guided biopsy. Specificity was increased by the additional occurrence of epidural infiltration or paravertebral abscesses. PMID:26727377

  5. Recent advances in diagnosing pathogenic equine gastrointestinal helminths: the challenge of prepatent detection.

    PubMed

    Andersen, U V; Howe, D K; Olsen, S N; Nielsen, M K

    2013-02-18

    Parasites infecting horses are ubiquitous and clinically important across the world. The major parasitic threats to equine health are cyathostomins, Parascaris equorum, Anoplocephala perfoliata, and Strongylus vulgaris. Increasing levels of anthelmintic resistance reported world wide in equine parasites have led to recommendations of constructing sustainable parasite control programmes based on systematic surveillance of parasite levels. Regulations at the European Union level now make anthelmintics available on prescription-only basis and disallow prophylactic treatment. This emphasizes the needs for reliable and practical diagnostic tools for detection of major parasites infecting equines. The current, widely used coprological techniques are important and useful, but they do have considerable limitations as they are incapable of diagnosing the pathogenic migrating stages. Species-specific molecular assays have been developed for diagnosing patent infections with 21 cyathostomin species, A. perfoliata, and S. vulgaris, but none of these have found use in practice. An antibody-directed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) has been developed, validated and made commercially available for diagnosing A. perfoliata infection, but interpretation is complicated by the fact that horses not harbouring tapeworms can maintain elevated antibody titres. Recent work with a coproantigen ELISA has shown promise for reliable detection of current A. perfoliata infection. Perhaps most remarkable is the fact that the pathogenic larval stages of cyathostomins and large strongyles cannot be detected by any of the available diagnostics. With the lengthy prepatency periods characterizing these parasites, there is a huge need for developing such assays. The recent identification of a possible diagnostic marker for encysted cyathostomins holds great promise, and could become very useful in clinical practice. Several attempts have been made to construct assays for diagnosing the highly

  6. A Comparison between Transcriptome Sequencing and 16S Metagenomics for Detection of Bacterial Pathogens in Wildlife

    PubMed Central

    Razzauti, Maria; Galan, Maxime; Bernard, Maria; Maman, Sarah; Klopp, Christophe; Charbonnel, Nathalie; Vayssier-Taussat, Muriel; Eloit, Marc; Cosson, Jean-François

    2015-01-01

    Background Rodents are major reservoirs of pathogens responsible for numerous zoonotic diseases in humans and livestock. Assessing their microbial diversity at both the individual and population level is crucial for monitoring endemic infections and revealing microbial association patterns within reservoirs. Recently, NGS approaches have been employed to characterize microbial communities of different ecosystems. Yet, their relative efficacy has not been assessed. Here, we compared two NGS approaches, RNA-Sequencing (RNA-Seq) and 16S-metagenomics, assessing their ability to survey neglected zoonotic bacteria in rodent populations. Methodology/Principal Findings We first extracted nucleic acids from the spleens of 190 voles collected in France. RNA extracts were pooled, randomly retro-transcribed, then RNA-Seq was performed using HiSeq. Assembled bacterial sequences were assigned to the closest taxon registered in GenBank. DNA extracts were analyzed via a 16S-metagenomics approach using two sequencers: the 454 GS-FLX and the MiSeq. The V4 region of the gene coding for 16S rRNA was amplified for each sample using barcoded universal primers. Amplicons were multiplexed and processed on the distinct sequencers. The resulting datasets were de-multiplexed, and each read was processed through a pipeline to be taxonomically classified using the Ribosomal Database Project. Altogether, 45 pathogenic bacterial genera were detected. The bacteria identified by RNA-Seq were comparable to those detected by 16S-metagenomics approach processed with MiSeq (16S-MiSeq). In contrast, 21 of these pathogens went unnoticed when the 16S-metagenomics approach was processed via 454-pyrosequencing (16S-454). In addition, the 16S-metagenomics approaches revealed a high level of coinfection in bank voles. Conclusions/Significance We concluded that RNA-Seq and 16S-MiSeq are equally sensitive in detecting bacteria. Although only the 16S-MiSeq method enabled identification of bacteria in each

  7. The design of a microfluidic biochip for the rapid, multiplexed detection of foodborne pathogens by surface plasmon resonance imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zordan, Michael D.; Grafton, Meggie M. G.; Park, Kinam; Leary, James F.

    2010-02-01

    The rapid detection of foodborne pathogens is increasingly important due to the rising occurrence of contaminated food supplies. We have previously demonstrated the design of a hybrid optical device that has the capability to perform realtime surface plasmon resonance (SPR) and epi-fluorescence imaging. We now present the design of a microfluidic biochip consisting of a two-dimensional array of functionalized gold spots. The spots on the array have been functionalized with capture peptides that specifically bind E. coli O157:H7 or Salmonella enterica. This array is enclosed by a PDMS microfluidic flow cell. A magnetically pre-concentrated sample is injected into the biochip, and whole pathogens will bind to the capture array. The previously constructed optical device is being used to detect the presence and identity of captured pathogens using SPR imaging. This detection occurs in a label-free manner, and does not require the culture of bacterial samples. Molecular imaging can also be performed using the epi-fluorescence capabilities of the device to determine pathogen state, or to validate the identity of the captured pathogens using fluorescently labeled antibodies. We demonstrate the real-time screening of a sample for the presence of E. coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica. Additionally the mechanical properties of the microfluidic flow cell will be assessed. The effect of these properties on pathogen capture will be examined.

  8. Development of a multiplex PCR assay to detect gastroenteric pathogens in the feces of Mexican children.

    PubMed

    Tolentino-Ruiz, R; Montoya-Varela, D; García-Espitia, M; Salas-Benito, M; Gutiérrez-Escolano, A; Gómez-García, C; Figueroa-Arredondo, P; Salas-Benito, J; De Nova-Ocampo, M

    2012-10-01

    Acute gastroenteritis (AGE) is a major cause of childhood morbidity and mortality worldwide; the etiology of AGE includes viruses, bacteria, and parasites. A multiplex PCR assay to simultaneously identify human Astrovirus (HAstV), Calicivirus (HuCVs), Entamoeba histolytica (E. histolytica), and enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC) in stool samples is described. A total of 103 samples were individually analyzed by ELISA (enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays) and RT-PCR/PCR. HAstV and HuCVs were detected in four out of 103 samples (3.8 %) by RT-PCR, but ELISAs found only one sample as positive for HuCVs (2.5 %). E. histolytica was identified in two out of 19 samples (10.5 %) and EIEC in 13 out of 20 samples (70 %) by PCR, and all PCR products were sequenced to verify their identities. Our multiplex PCR results demonstrate the simultaneous amplification of different pathogens such as HAstV, EIEC, and E. histolytica in the same reaction, though the HuCVs signal was weak in every replicate. Regardless, this multiplex PCR protocol represents a novel tool for the identification of distinct pathogens and may provide support for the diagnosis of AGE in children. PMID:22711331

  9. On-chip quantitative detection of pathogen genes by autonomous microfluidic PCR platform.

    PubMed

    Tachibana, Hiroaki; Saito, Masato; Shibuya, Shogo; Tsuji, Koji; Miyagawa, Nobuyuki; Yamanaka, Keiichiro; Tamiya, Eiichi

    2015-12-15

    Polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based genetic testing has become a routine part of clinical diagnoses and food testing. In these fields, rapid, easy-to-use, and cost-efficient PCR chips are expected to be appeared for providing such testing on-site. In this study, a new autonomous disposable plastic microfluidic PCR chip was created, and was utilized for quantitative detection of pathogenic microorganisms. To control the capillary flow of the following solution in the PCR microchannel, a driving microchannel was newly designed behind the PCR microchannel. This allowed the effective PCR by simply dropping the PCR solution onto the inlet without any external pumps. In order to achieve disposability, injection-molded cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) of a cost-competitive plastic was used for the PCR chip. We discovered that coating the microchannel walls with non-ionic surfactant produced a suitable hydrophilic surface for driving the capillary flow through the 1250-mm long microchannel. As a result, quantitative real-time PCR with the lowest initial concentration of human, Escherichia coli (E. coli), and pathogenic E. coli O157 genomic DNA of 4, 0.0019, 0.031 pg/μl, respectively, was successfully achieved in less than 18 min. Our results indicate that the platform presented in this study provided a rapid, easy-to-use, and low-cost real-time PCR system that could be potentially used for on-site gene testing. PMID:26210470

  10. Phage-based surface plasmon resonance strategies for the detection of pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawil, Nancy

    We start by reviewing the basic principles and recent advances in biosensing technologies using optical, electrochemical and acoustic platforms for phage-based diagnostics. Although much notable work has been done, a low cost, specific, sensitive optical method for detecting low concentrations of pathogens, in a few minutes, has not been established. We conclude from the limited body of work on the subject that improving immobilization strategies and finding more suitable phage recognition elements would allow for a more sensitive approach. Our aim was to better describe the attachment process of MRSA specific phages on gold surfaces, and the subsequent biodetection of their bacterial hosts by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). With the knowledge that the adsorption characteristics of thiol-containing molecules are necessary for applications involving the attachment of recognition elements to a functionalized surface, we start by providing comparative details on the kinetics of self-assembly of L-cysteine and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) monolayers on gold using SPR[1]. Our purpose, in carrying out these measurements was to establish each molecule's validity and applicability as a linker element for use in biosensing. We find that monolayer formation, for both L-cysteine and MUA, is described by the Langmuir isotherm at low concentrations only. For L-cysteine, both the amine and thiol groups contribute to the initial attachment of the molecule, followed by the replacement of the amine-gold complexes initially formed with more stable thiol-gold complexes. The reorganization of L-cysteine creates more space on the gold surface, and the zwitterionic form of the molecule permits the physisorption of a second layer through electrostatic interactions. On the other hand, MUA deposits randomly onto the surface of gold as a SAM and slowly reorganizes into a denser, vertical state. Surface plasmon resonance was then used for the real-time monitoring of the attachment of

  11. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for detection of aquatic animal pathogens in a diagnostic laboratory setting

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Purcell, Maureen K.; Getchell, Rodman G.; McClure, Carol A.; Weber, S.E.; Garver, Kyle A.

    2011-01-01

    Real-time, or quantitative, polymerase chain reaction (qPCR) is quickly supplanting other molecular methods for detecting the nucleic acids of human and other animal pathogens owing to the speed and robustness of the technology. As the aquatic animal health community moves toward implementing national diagnostic testing schemes, it will need to evaluate how qPCR technology should be employed. This review outlines the basic principles of qPCR technology, considerations for assay development, standards and controls, assay performance, diagnostic validation, implementation in the diagnostic laboratory, and quality assurance and control measures. These factors are fundamental for ensuring the validity of qPCR assay results obtained in the diagnostic laboratory setting.

  12. Antibody-based magneto-elastic biosensors: potential devices for detection of pathogens and associated toxins.

    PubMed

    Menti, C; Henriques, J A P; Missell, F P; Roesch-Ely, M

    2016-07-01

    This work describes the design and development process of an immunosensor. The creation of such devices goes through various steps, which complement each other, and choosing an efficient immobilization method that binds to a specific target is essential to achieve satisfactory diagnostic results. In this perspective, the emphasis here is on developing biosensors based on binding antigens/antibodies on particular surfaces of magneto-elastic sensors. Different aspects leading to the improvement of these sensors, such as the antibody structure, the chemical functionalization of the surface, and cross-linking antibody reticulation were summarized and discussed. This paper deals with the progress of magneto-elastic immunosensors to detect bacterial pathogens and associated toxins. Biologically modified surface characterization methods are further considered. Thus, research opportunities and trends of future development in these areas are finally discussed. PMID:27245676

  13. Optimization of PMA-PCR Protocol for Viability Detection of Pathogens

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mikkelson, Brian J.; Lee, Christine M.; Ponce, Adrian

    2011-01-01

    This presented study demonstrates the need that PMA-PCR can be used to capture the loss of viability of a sample that is much more specific and time-efficient than alternative methods. This protocol is particularly useful in scenarios in which sterilization treatments may inactivate organisms but not degrade their DNA. The use of a PCR-based method of pathogen detection without first inactivating the DNA of nonviable cells will potentially lead to false positives. The loss of culturability, by heat-killing, did not prevent amplified PCR products, which supports the use of PMA to prevent amplification and differentiate between viable and dead cells. PMA was shown to inhibit the amplification of DNA by PCR in vegetative cells that had been heat-killed.

  14. Implementation of microfluidic sandwich ELISA for superior detection of plant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Thaitrong, Numrin; Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Himananto, Orawan; Seepiban, Channarong; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2013-01-01

    Rapid and economical screening of plant pathogens is a high-priority need in the seed industry. Crop quality control and disease surveillance demand early and accurate detection in addition to robustness, scalability, and cost efficiency typically required for selective breeding and certification programs. Compared to conventional bench-top detection techniques routinely employed, a microfluidic-based approach offers unique benefits to address these needs simultaneously. To our knowledge, this work reports the first attempt to perform microfluidic sandwich ELISA for Acidovorax citrulli (Ac), watermelon silver mottle virus (WSMoV), and melon yellow spot virus (MYSV) screening. The immunoassay occurs on the surface of a reaction chamber represented by a microfluidic channel. The capillary force within the microchannel draws a reagent into the reaction chamber as well as facilitates assay incubation. Because the underlying pad automatically absorbs excess fluid, the only operation required is sequential loading of buffers/reagents. Buffer selection, antibody concentrations, and sample loading scheme were optimized for each pathogen. Assay optimization reveals that the 20-folds lower sample volume demanded by the microchannel structure outweighs the 2- to 4-folds higher antibody concentrations required, resulting in overall 5-10 folds of reagent savings. In addition to cutting the assay time by more than 50%, the new platform offers 65% cost savings from less reagent consumption and labor cost. Our study also shows 12.5-, 2-, and 4-fold improvement in assay sensitivity for Ac, WSMoV, and MYSV, respectively. Practical feasibility is demonstrated using 19 real plant samples. Given a standard 96-well plate format, the developed assay is compatible with commercial fluorescent plate readers and readily amendable to robotic liquid handling systems for completely hand-free assay automation. PMID:24376668

  15. Comparison of individual and pooled sampling methods for detecting bacterial pathogens of fish

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mumford, Sonia; Patterson, Chris; Evered, J.; Brunson, Ray; Levine, J.; Winton, J.

    2005-01-01

    Examination of finfish populations for viral and bacterial pathogens is an important component of fish disease control programs worldwide. Two methods are commonly used for collecting tissue samples for bacteriological culture, the currently accepted standards for detection of bacterial fish pathogens. The method specified in the Office International des Epizooties Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals permits combining renal and splenic tissues from as many as 5 fish into pooled samples. The American Fisheries Society (AFS) Blue Book/US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Inspection Manual specifies the use of a bacteriological loop for collecting samples from the kidney of individual fish. An alternative would be to more fully utilize the pooled samples taken for virology. If implemented, this approach would provide substantial savings in labor and materials. To compare the relative performance of the AFS/USFWS method and this alternative approach, cultures of Yersinia ruckeri were used to establish low-level infections in groups of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that were sampled by both methods. Yersinia ruckeri was cultured from 22 of 37 groups by at least 1 method. The loop method yielded 18 positive groups, with 1 group positive in the loop samples but negative in the pooled samples. The pooled samples produced 21 positive groups, with 4 groups positive in the pooled samples but negative in the loop samples. There was statistically significant agreement (Spearman coefficient 0.80, P < 0.001) in the relative ability of the 2 sampling methods to permit detection of low-level bacterial infections of rainbow trout.

  16. [Development of molecular detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria using miniaturized microfluidic devices].

    PubMed

    Iván, Kristóf; Maráz, Anna

    2015-12-20

    Detection and identification of food-borne pathogenic bacteria are key points for the assurance of microbiological food safety. Traditional culture-based methods are more and more replaced by or supplemented with nucleic acid based molecular techniques, targeting specific (preferably virulence) genes in the genomes. Internationally validated DNA amplification - most frequently real-time polymerase chain reaction - methods are applied by the food microbiological testing laboratories for routine analysis, which will result not only in shortening the time for results but they also improve the performance characteristics (e.g. sensitivity, specificity) of the methods. Beside numerous advantages of the polymerase chain reaction based techniques for routine microbiological analysis certain drawbacks have to be mentioned, such as the high cost of the equipment and reagents, as well as the risk of contamination of the laboratory environment by the polymerase chain reaction amplicons, which require construction of an isolated laboratory system. Lab-on-a-chip systems can integrate most of these laboratory processes within a miniaturized device that delivers the same specificity and reliability as the standard protocols. The benefits of miniaturized devices are: simple - often automated - use, small overall size, portability, sterility due to single use possibility. These miniaturized rapid diagnostic tests are being researched and developed at the best research centers around the globe implementing various sample preparation and molecular DNA amplification methods on-chip. In parallel, the aim of the authors' research is to develop microfluidic Lab-on-a-chip devices for the detection and identification of food-borne pathogenic bacteria. PMID:26654545

  17. Comparison of individual and pooled sampling methods for detecting bacterial pathogens of fish.

    PubMed

    Mumford, Sonia; Patterson, Chris; Evered, Joy; Brunson, Ray; Levine, Jay; Winton, Jim

    2005-07-01

    Examination of finfish populations for viral and bacterial pathogens is an important component of fish disease control programs worldwide. Two methods are commonly used for collecting tissue samples for bacteriological culture, the currently accepted standards for detection of bacterial fish pathogens. The method specified in the Office International des Epizooties Manual of Diagnostic Tests for Aquatic Animals permits combining renal and splenic tissues from as many as 5 fish into pooled samples. The American Fisheries Society (AFS) Blue Book/US Fish and Wildlife Service (USFWS) Inspection Manual specifies the use of a bacteriological loop for collecting samples from the kidney of individual fish. An alternative would be to more fully utilize the pooled samples taken for virology. If implemented, this approach would provide substantial savings in labor and materials. To compare the relative performance of the AFS/USFWS method and this alternative approach, cultures of Yersinia ruckeri were used to establish low-level infections in groups of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) that were sampled by both methods. Yersinia ruckeri was cultured from 22 of 37 groups by at least 1 method. The loop method yielded 18 positive groups, with 1 group positive in the loop samples but negative in the pooled samples. The pooled samples produced 21 positive groups, with 4 groups positive in the pooled samples but negative in the loop samples. There was statistically significant agreement (Spearman coefficient 0.80, P < 0.001) in the relative ability of the 2 sampling methods to permit detection of low-level bacterial infections of rainbow trout. PMID:16130986

  18. Automated processing integrated with a microflow cytometer for pathogen detection in clinical matrices

    PubMed Central

    Golden, J.P.; Verbarg, J.; Howell, P.B.; Shriver-Lake, L.C.; Ligler, F.S.

    2012-01-01

    A spinning magnetic trap (MagTrap) for automated sample processing was integrated with a microflow cytometer capable of simultaneously detecting multiple targets to provide an automated sample-to-answer diagnosis in 40 min. After target capture on fluorescently coded magnetic microspheres, the magnetic trap automatically concentrated the fluorescently coded microspheres, separated the captured target from the sample matrix, and exposed the bound target sequentially to biotinylated tracer molecules and streptavidin-labeled phycoerythrin. The concentrated microspheres were then hydrodynamically focused in a microflow cytometer capable of 4-color analysis (two wavelengths for microsphere identification, one for light scatter to discriminate single microspheres and one for phycoerythrin bound to the target). A three-fold decrease in sample preparation time and an improved detection limit, independent of target preconcentration, was demonstrated for detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 using the MagTrap as compared to manual processing. Simultaneous analysis of positive and negative controls, along with the assay reagents specific for the target, was used to obtain dose–response curves, demonstrating the potential for quantification of pathogen load in buffer and serum. PMID:22960010

  19. Detection of anthrax and other pathogens using a unique liquid array technology.

    PubMed

    Schweighardt, Andrew J; Battaglia, Amanda; Wallace, Margaret M

    2014-01-01

    A bead-based liquid hybridization assay, Luminex(®) 100™, was used to identify four pathogenic bacteria, Bacillus anthracis, Clostridium botulinum, Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis, and Yersinia pestis, and several close relatives. Hybridization between PCR-amplified target sequences and probe sequences (located within the 23S ribosomal RNA gene rrl and the genes related to the toxicity of each bacterium) was detected in single-probe or multiple-probe assays, depending on the organism. The lower limits of detection (LLDs) for the probes ranged from 0.1 to 10 ng. Sensitivity was improved using lambda exonuclease to digest the noncomplementary target strand. All contributors in 33 binary, ternary, and quaternary mixtures in which all components were present in a 1:1 ratio were identified with an 80% success rate. Twenty-eight binary mixtures in which the two components were combined in various ratios were further studied. All target sequences were detected, even when the minor component was overshadowed by a tenfold excess of the major component. PMID:24147813

  20. Automated processing integrated with a microflow cytometer for pathogen detection in clinical matrices.

    PubMed

    Golden, J P; Verbarg, J; Howell, P B; Shriver-Lake, L C; Ligler, F S

    2013-02-15

    A spinning magnetic trap (MagTrap) for automated sample processing was integrated with a microflow cytometer capable of simultaneously detecting multiple targets to provide an automated sample-to-answer diagnosis in 40 min. After target capture on fluorescently coded magnetic microspheres, the magnetic trap automatically concentrated the fluorescently coded microspheres, separated the captured target from the sample matrix, and exposed the bound target sequentially to biotinylated tracer molecules and streptavidin-labeled phycoerythrin. The concentrated microspheres were then hydrodynamically focused in a microflow cytometer capable of 4-color analysis (two wavelengths for microsphere identification, one for light scatter to discriminate single microspheres and one for phycoerythrin bound to the target). A three-fold decrease in sample preparation time and an improved detection limit, independent of target preconcentration, was demonstrated for detection of Escherichia coli 0157:H7 using the MagTrap as compared to manual processing. Simultaneous analysis of positive and negative controls, along with the assay reagents specific for the target, was used to obtain dose-response curves, demonstrating the potential for quantification of pathogen load in buffer and serum. PMID:22960010

  1. Hyperspectral image reconstruction using RGB color for foodborne pathogen detection on agar plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoon, Seung-Chul; Shin, Tae-Sung; Park, Bosoon; Lawrence, Kurt C.; Heitschmidt, Gerald W.

    2014-03-01

    This paper reports the latest development of a color vision technique for detecting colonies of foodborne pathogens grown on agar plates with a hyperspectral image classification model that was developed using full hyperspectral data. The hyperspectral classification model depended on reflectance spectra measured in the visible and near-infrared spectral range from 400 and 1,000 nm (473 narrow spectral bands). Multivariate regression methods were used to estimate and predict hyperspectral data from RGB color values. The six representative non-O157 Shiga-toxin producing Eschetichia coli (STEC) serogroups (O26, O45, O103, O111, O121, and O145) were grown on Rainbow agar plates. A line-scan pushbroom hyperspectral image sensor was used to scan 36 agar plates grown with pure STEC colonies at each plate. The 36 hyperspectral images of the agar plates were divided in half to create training and test sets. The mean Rsquared value for hyperspectral image estimation was about 0.98 in the spectral range between 400 and 700 nm for linear, quadratic and cubic polynomial regression models and the detection accuracy of the hyperspectral image classification model with the principal component analysis and k-nearest neighbors for the test set was up to 92% (99% with the original hyperspectral images). Thus, the results of the study suggested that color-based detection may be viable as a multispectral imaging solution without much loss of prediction accuracy compared to hyperspectral imaging.

  2. Real-Time PCR Methods for Detection of Foodborne Bacterial Pathogens in Meat and Meat Products

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernández, Marta; Hansen, Flemming; Cook, Nigel; Rodríguez-Lázaro, David

    As a consequence of the potential hazards posed by the presence of microbial pathogens, microbiological quality control programmes are being increasingly applied throughout the meat production chain in order to minimize the risk of infection for the consumer. Classical microbiological methods to detect the presence of microorganisms, involving enrichment and isolation of presumptive colonies of bacteria on solid media, and final confirmation by biochemical and/or serological identification, although remaining the approach of choice in routine analytical laboratories, can be laborious and time consuming. The adoption of molecular techniques in microbial diagnostics has become a promising alternative approach, as they possess inherent advantages such as shorter time to results, excellent detection limits, specificity and potential for automation. Several molecular detection techniques have been devised in the last two decades, such as nucleic acid sequence-based amplification (NASBA) (Cook, 2003; Rodriguez-Lazaro, Hernandez, D’Agostino, & Cook, 2006) and loop-mediated isothermal amplification (Notomi et al., 2000), but the one which has undergone the most extensive development as a practical food analytical tool is the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) (Hoorfar & Cook, 2003; Malorny, Tassios, et al., 2003).

  3. Assessing the performance of methods to detect and quantify African dust in airborne particulates.

    PubMed

    Viana, Mar; Salvador, Pedro; Artíñano, Begoña; Querol, Xavier; Alastuey, Andrés; Pey, Jorge; Latz, Achim J; Cabañas, Mercè; Moreno, Teresa; García dos Santos, Saúl; Herce, María Dolores; Diez Hernández, Pablo; Romero García, Dolores; Fernández-Patier, Rosalía

    2010-12-01

    African dust (AD) contributions to particulate matter (PM) levels may be reported by Member States to the European Commission during justification of exceedances of the daily limit value (DLV). However, the detection and subsequent quantification of the AD contribution to PM levels is complex, and only two measurement-based methods are available in the literature: the Spanish-Portuguese reference method (SPR), and the Tel Aviv University method (TAU). In the present study, both methods were assessed. The SPR method was more conservative in the detection of episodes (71 days identified as AD by SPR, vs 81 by TAU), as it is less affected by interferences with local dust sources. The mean annual contribution of AD was lower with the TAU method than with SPR (2.7 vs 3.5 ± 1.5 μg/m(3)). The SPR and TAU AD time series were correlated with daily aluminum levels (a known tracer of AD), as well as with an AD source identified by the Positive Matrix Factorization (PMF) receptor model. Higher r(2) values were obtained with the SPR method than with TAU in both cases (r(2) = 0.72 vs 0.56, y = 0.05x vs y = 0.06x with aluminum levels; r(2)=0.79 vs 0.43, y = 0.8x vs y = 0.4x with the PMF source). We conclude that the SPR method is more adequate from an EU policy perspective (justification of DLV exceedances) due to the fact that it is more conservative than the TAU method. Based on our results, the TAU method requires adaptation of the thresholds in the algorithm to refine detection of low-impact episodes and avoid misclassification of local events as AD. PMID:21049991

  4. Development of a bead-based suspension array for the detection of pathogens in acute respiratory tract infections.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu-Sheng; Li, Hong-Ru; Zhang, Wei; Hua, Zhi-Dan; Lin, Xiao-Hong; Lin, Meng-Qing; Huang, Wen-Sen; Huang, Li-Ping; Yu, Xiao-Li; Xu, Neng-Luan; Lin, Ming; Xie, Bao-Song; Shen, Xiao-Na; Xie, Jian-Feng; Wang, Yi; Huang, Meng; Wu, Yan-An; Hu, Xin-Lan

    2016-08-01

    We developed a high-throughput bead-based suspension array for simultaneous detection of 20 respiratory tract pathogens in clinical specimens. Pathogen-specific genes were amplified and hybridized to probes coupled to carboxyl-encoded microspheres. Fluorescence intensities generated via the binding of phycoerythrin-conjugated streptavidin with biotin-labeled targets were measured by the Luminex 100 bead-based suspension array system. The bead-based suspension array detected bacteria in a significantly higher number of samples compared to the conventional culture. There was no significant difference in the detection rate of atypical pathogensatypical pathogens or viruses between the bead-based suspension array and real-time PCR. This technology can play a significant role in screening patients with pneumonia. PMID:27190247

  5. Association of targeted multiplex PCR with resequencing microarray for the detection of multiple respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Shen, Hongwei; Zhu, Bingqing; Wang, Shulian; Mo, Haolian; Wang, Ji; Li, Jin; Zhang, Chen; Zeng, Huashu; Guan, Li; Shi, Weixian; Zhang, Yong; Ma, Xuejun

    2015-01-01

    A large number of viral and bacterial organisms are responsible for community-acquired pneumonia (CAP) which contributes to substantial burden on health management. A new resequencing microarray (RPM-IVDC1) associated with targeted multiplex PCR was recently developed and validated for multiple respiratory viruses detection and discrimination. In this study, we evaluated the capability of RPM-IVDC1 for simultaneous identification of multiple viral and bacterial organisms. The nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) of 110 consecutive CAP patients, aged from 1 month to 96 years old, were collected from five distinct general hospitals in Beijing during 1-year period. The samples were subjected to the RPM-IVDC1 established protocol as compared to a real-time PCR (qRT-PCR), which was used as standard. The results of virus detection were consistent with those previously described. A total of 37 of Streptococcus pneumoniae, 14 of Haemophilus influenzae, 10 of Mycoplasma pneumoniae, two of Klebsiella pneumoniae and one of Moraxella catarrhalis were detected by RPM-IVDC1. The sensitivities and specificities were compared with those of qRT-PCR for S. pneumoniae (100, 100%, respectively), H. influenzae (92.3, 97.9%, respectively), M. pneumoniae (69.2, 99.0%, respectively), K. pneumoniae (100, 100%, respectively), and M. catarrhalis (100, 100%, respectively). Additional 22 of Streptococcus spp., 24 of Haemophilus spp. and 16 of Neisseria spp. were identified. In addition, methicillin-resistant and carbapenemases allele were also found in nine of Staphylococcus spp. and one of K. pneumoniae, respectively. These results demonstrated the capability of RPM-IVDC1 for simultaneous detection of broad-spectrum respiratory pathogens in complex backgrounds and the advantage of accessing to the actual sequences, showing great potential use of epidemic outbreak investigation. The detection results should be carefully interpreted when introducing this technique in the clinical diagnostics. PMID

  6. Four plant defensins from an indigenous South African Brassicaceae species display divergent activities against two test pathogens despite high sequence similarity in the encoding genes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Plant defensins are an important component of the innate defence system of plants where they form protective antimicrobial barriers between tissue types of plant organs as well as around seeds. These peptides also have other activities that are important for agricultural applications as well as the medical sector. Amongst the numerous plant peptides isolated from a variety of plant species, a significant number of promising defensins have been isolated from Brassicaceae species. Here we report on the isolation and characterization of four defensins from Heliophila coronopifolia, a native South African Brassicaceae species. Results Four defensin genes (Hc-AFP1-4) were isolated with a homology based PCR strategy. Analysis of the deduced amino acid sequences showed that the peptides were 72% similar and grouped closest to defensins isolated from other Brassicaceae species. The Hc-AFP1 and 3 peptides shared high homology (94%) and formed a unique grouping in the Brassicaceae defensins, whereas Hc-AFP2 and 4 formed a second homology grouping with defensins from Arabidopsis and Raphanus. Homology modelling showed that the few amino acids that differed between the four peptides had an effect on the surface properties of the defensins, specifically in the alpha-helix and the loop connecting the second and third beta-strands. These areas are implicated in determining differential activities of defensins. Comparing the activities after recombinant production of the peptides, Hc-AFP2 and 4 had IC50 values of 5-20 μg ml-1 against two test pathogens, whereas Hc-AFP1 and 3 were less active. The activity against Botrytis cinerea was associated with membrane permeabilization, hyper-branching, biomass reduction and even lytic activity. In contrast, only Hc-AFP2 and 4 caused membrane permeabilization and severe hyper-branching against the wilting pathogen Fusarium solani, while Hc-AFP1 and 3 had a mild morphogenetic effect on the fungus, without any indication of

  7. A species independent universal bio-detection microarray for pathogen forensics and phylogenetic classification of unknown microorganisms

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The ability to differentiate a bioterrorist attack or an accidental release of a research pathogen from a naturally occurring pandemic or disease event is crucial to the safety and security of this nation by enabling an appropriate and rapid response. It is critical in samples from an infected patient, the environment, or a laboratory to quickly and accurately identify the precise pathogen including natural or engineered variants and to classify new pathogens in relation to those that are known. Current approaches for pathogen detection rely on prior genomic sequence information. Given the enormous spectrum of genetic possibilities, a field deployable, robust technology, such as a universal (any species) microarray has near-term potential to address these needs. Results A new and comprehensive sequence-independent array (Universal Bio-Signature Detection Array) was designed with approximately 373,000 probes. The main feature of this array is that the probes are computationally derived and sequence independent. There is one probe for each possible 9-mer sequence, thus 49 (262,144) probes. Each genome hybridized on this array has a unique pattern of signal intensities corresponding to each of these probes. These signal intensities were used to generate an un-biased cluster analysis of signal intensity hybridization patterns that can easily distinguish species into accepted and known phylogenomic relationships. Within limits, the array is highly sensitive and is able to detect synthetically mixed pathogens. Examples of unique hybridization signal intensity patterns are presented for different Brucella species as well as relevant host species and other pathogens. These results demonstrate the utility of the UBDA array as a diagnostic tool in pathogen forensics. Conclusions This pathogen detection system is fast, accurate and can be applied to any species. Hybridization patterns are unique to a specific genome and these can be used to decipher the identity of

  8. Bat trait, genetic and pathogen data from large-scale investigations of African fruit bats, Eidolon helvum.

    PubMed

    Peel, Alison J; Baker, Kate S; Hayman, David T S; Suu-Ire, Richard; Breed, Andrew C; Gembu, Guy-Crispin; Lembo, Tiziana; Fernández-Loras, Andrés; Sargan, David R; Fooks, Anthony R; Cunningham, Andrew A; Wood, James L N

    2016-01-01

    Bats, including African straw-coloured fruit bats (Eidolon helvum), have been highlighted as reservoirs of many recently emerged zoonotic viruses. This common, widespread and ecologically important species was the focus of longitudinal and continent-wide studies of the epidemiological and ecology of Lagos bat virus, henipaviruses and Achimota viruses. Here we present a spatial, morphological, demographic, genetic and serological dataset encompassing 2827 bats from nine countries over an 8-year period. Genetic data comprises cytochrome b mitochondrial sequences (n=608) and microsatellite genotypes from 18 loci (n=544). Tooth-cementum analyses (n=316) allowed derivation of rare age-specific serologic data for a lyssavirus, a henipavirus and two rubulaviruses. This dataset contributes a substantial volume of data on the ecology of E. helvum and its viruses and will be valuable for a wide range of studies, including viral transmission dynamic modelling in age-structured populations, investigation of seasonal reproductive asynchrony in wide-ranging species, ecological niche modelling, inference of island colonisation history, exploration of relationships between island and body size, and various spatial analyses of demographic, morphometric or serological data. PMID:27479120

  9. Bat trait, genetic and pathogen data from large-scale investigations of African fruit bats, Eidolon helvum

    PubMed Central

    Peel, Alison J.; Baker, Kate S.; Hayman, David T. S.; Suu-Ire, Richard; Breed, Andrew C.; Gembu, Guy-Crispin; Lembo, Tiziana; Fernández-Loras, Andrés; Sargan, David R.; Fooks, Anthony R.; Cunningham, Andrew A.; Wood, James L. N.

    2016-01-01

    Bats, including African straw-coloured fruit bats (Eidolon helvum), have been highlighted as reservoirs of many recently emerged zoonotic viruses. This common, widespread and ecologically important species was the focus of longitudinal and continent-wide studies of the epidemiological and ecology of Lagos bat virus, henipaviruses and Achimota viruses. Here we present a spatial, morphological, demographic, genetic and serological dataset encompassing 2827 bats from nine countries over an 8-year period. Genetic data comprises cytochrome b mitochondrial sequences (n=608) and microsatellite genotypes from 18 loci (n=544). Tooth-cementum analyses (n=316) allowed derivation of rare age-specific serologic data for a lyssavirus, a henipavirus and two rubulaviruses. This dataset contributes a substantial volume of data on the ecology of E. helvum and its viruses and will be valuable for a wide range of studies, including viral transmission dynamic modelling in age-structured populations, investigation of seasonal reproductive asynchrony in wide-ranging species, ecological niche modelling, inference of island colonisation history, exploration of relationships between island and body size, and various spatial analyses of demographic, morphometric or serological data. PMID:27479120

  10. [The Advances in the Contamination and Detection of Foodborne Pathogen Noroviruses in Fresh Produce].

    PubMed

    Xie, Yajing; Liu, Xianjin

    2015-11-01

    This article reviewed the researches proceeding on the contamination and detection of the foodborne pathogen noroviruses (NoVs) in fresh produce, which involved the NoVs contaminations in fresh produce, the special attachment of NoVs in fresh produce, the NoVs outbreaks associated with fresh produce and the NoVs detection in fresh produce. There had been an increase in reported infectious disease risks associated with the consumptions of fresh produce for recent 30 years. Because the NoVs, as a primary cause of viral gastroenteritis thoughout the world, were highly contagious, had a low infectious dose, and were persistent in the environment. And also the methods for NoVs detection in food had significantly developed over the last 15 years. Currently NoVs were the most common pathogen accounting for 40% of outbreaks associated with fresh produce (i. e., fruits and vegetables). Data from outbreaks investigations verified fresh produce as the high risk food products for NoVs. The fresh produce were typically eaten raw with no thermal processing, can be contaminated at any step during production and processing from faecally polluted water and fertilizers, the poor hygiene practices by food handlers and the cross-contamination. The attachment of NoVs to the fresh produce was due to the physio-chemical factors of virus protein coat, the special attachment to different fresh produce, and the possibility for internalization of NoVs. It might provide answers to why those high risk foods were more frequently implicated (i. e., lettuce and raspberries). According to the data of foodborne NoVs outbreaks which were associated with fresh produce from EU countries and the USA, the outbreaks in EU countries were mainly associated with NoVs contaminated raspberries and lettuce, while in USA which were associated with NoVs contaminated lettuce. Unfortunately, there were no NoVs detection methods for fresh produce or the data of foodborne NoVs outbreaks which were associated with

  11. RAPID METHODS FOR DETECTION OF NON-ENTERIC PATHOGENS IN RECREATIONAL WATERS

    EPA Science Inventory

    Current microbial indicators of pathogen occurrence in various water media that EPA either regulates or provides health criteria for have been demonstrated to have deficiencies in providing an accurate assessment of pathogen occurrence. One reason is that current indicators are ...

  12. High-throughput DNA microarray detection of pathogenic bacteria in shallow well groundwater in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal.

    PubMed

    Inoue, Daisuke; Hinoura, Takuji; Suzuki, Noriko; Pang, Junqin; Malla, Rabin; Shrestha, Sadhana; Chapagain, Saroj Kumar; Matsuzawa, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Takashi; Tanaka, Yasuhiro; Ike, Michihiko; Nishida, Kei; Sei, Kazunari

    2015-01-01

    Because of heavy dependence on groundwater for drinking water and other domestic use, microbial contamination of groundwater is a serious problem in the Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. This study investigated comprehensively the occurrence of pathogenic bacteria in shallow well groundwater in the Kathmandu Valley by applying DNA microarray analysis targeting 941 pathogenic bacterial species/groups. Water quality measurements found significant coliform (fecal) contamination in 10 of the 11 investigated groundwater samples and significant nitrogen contamination in some samples. The results of DNA microarray analysis revealed the presence of 1-37 pathogen species/groups, including 1-27 biosafety level 2 ones, in 9 of the 11 groundwater samples. While the detected pathogens included several feces- and animal-related ones, those belonging to Legionella and Arthrobacter, which were considered not to be directly associated with feces, were detected prevalently. This study could provide a rough picture of overall pathogenic bacterial contamination in the Kathmandu Valley, and demonstrated the usefulness of DNA microarray analysis as a comprehensive screening tool of a wide variety of pathogenic bacteria. PMID:25146188

  13. Development of multiplex serological assay for the detection of human African trypanosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Nzou, Samson Muuo; Fujii, Yoshito; Miura, Masashi; Mwau, Matilu; Mwangi, Anne Wanjiru; Itoh, Makoto; Salam, Md Abdus; Hamano, Shinjiro; Hirayama, Kenji; Kaneko, Satoshi

    2016-04-01

    Human African trypanosomiasis (HAT) is a disease caused by Kinetoplastid infection. Serological tests are useful for epidemiological surveillance. The aim of this study was to develop a multiplex serological assay for HAT to assess the diagnostic value of selected HAT antigens for sero-epidemiological surveillance. We cloned loci encoding eight antigens from Trypanosoma brucei gambiense, expressed the genes in bacterial systems, and purified the resulting proteins. Antigens were subjected to Luminex multiplex assays using sera from HAT and VL patients to assess the antigens' immunodiagnostic potential. Among T. b. gambiense antigens, the 64-kDa and 65-kDa invariant surface glycoproteins (ISGs) and flagellar calcium binding protein (FCaBP) had high sensitivity for sera from T. b. gambiense patients, yielding AUC values of 0.871, 0.737 and 0.858 respectively in receiver operating characteristics (ROC) analysis. The ISG64, ISG65, and FCaBP antigens were partially cross-reactive to sera from Trypanosoma brucei rhodesiense patients. The GM6 antigen was cross-reactive to sera from T. b. rhodesiense patients as well as to sera from VL patients. Furthermore, heterogeneous antibody responses to each individual HAT antigen were observed. Testing for multiple HAT antigens in the same panel allowed specific and sensitive detection. Our results demonstrate the utility of applying multiplex assays for development and evaluation of HAT antigens for use in sero-epidemiological surveillance. PMID:26519611

  14. Detection of hepatitis E virus and other livestock-related pathogens in Iowa streams

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Manure application is a major source of pathogens to the environment. Through overland runoff and tile drainage, these pathogens contaminate surface water and stream bed sediment. Some of these pathogens are zoonotic that can potentially affect both animal and human health. This study examined the p...

  15. Impedance Biosensing to detect food allergens, endocrine disrupting chemicals, and food pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Radhakrishnan, Rajeswaran

    Electrochemical impedance biosensors can be viewed as an AC electroanalytical method for the analyte detection in the fields of biomedicine, environmental monitoring, and food and agriculture, amongst others. The most common format for AC impedance biosensing involves surface immobilization of an antibody, receptor protein, DNA strand, or other species capable of bio-recognition, and AC impedance detection of the binding event. Technological application of AC impedance biosensors has been hindered by several obstacles, including the more complex circuitry required for AC relative to DC electrochemistry, chemical and physical interference arising from non-specific adsorption, and the stability and reproducibility of protein immobilization. One focus of these PhD studies is on methods to reduce or compensate for non-specific adsorption, including sample dilution, site blocking with BSA, and the use of control electrodes onto which reference antibodies are immobilized. Examples that will be presented include impedance detection of food pathogens, such as Listeria monocytogenes, using a mouse monoclonal antibody immobilized onto an Au electrode. This yields detection limits of 5 CFU/ml and 4 CFU/ml for ideal solutions and filtered tomato extract, respectively. Control experiments with an Au electrode onto which a mouse monoclonal antibody to GAPDH is immobilized demonstrate that non-specific adsorption is insignificant for the system and methodology studied here. Control experiments with Salmonella enterica demonstrate no cross-reactivity to this food pathogen. In addition, Detection of two endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDC), norfluoxetine and BDE-47, is reported here by impedance biosensing, with a detection limit of 8.5 and 1.3 ng/ml for norfluoxetine and BDE-47, respectively. Additional research has focused on alternative substrates and linker chemistries for protein immobilization, including the use of degenerate (highly doped) Si and bidendate thiol monolayer

  16. Magnetic-optical nanohybrids for targeted detection, separation, and photothermal ablation of drug-resistant pathogens.

    PubMed

    Ondera, Thomas J; Hamme, Ashton T

    2015-12-01

    A rapid, sensitive and quantitative immunoassay for the targeted detection and decontamination of E. coli based on Fe3O4 magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and plasmonic popcorn-shaped gold nanostructure attached single-walled carbon nanotubes (AuNP@SWCNT) is presented. The MNPs were synthesized as the support for a monoclonal antibody (mAb@MNP). E. coli (49979) was captured and rapidly preconcentrated from the sample with the mAb@MNP, followed by binding with Raman-tagged concanavalin A-AuNP@SWCNTs (Con A-AuNP@SWCNTs) as detector nanoprobes. A Raman tag 5,5'-dithiobis-(2-nitrobenzoic acid) (DTNB) generated a Raman signal upon 670 nm laser excitation enabling the detection and quantification of E. coli concentration with a limit of detection of 10(2) CFU mL(-1) and a linear logarithmic response range of 1.0 × 10(2) to 1.0 × 10(7) CFU mL(-1). The mAb@MNP could remove more than 98% of E. coli (initial concentration of 1.3 × 10(4) CFU mL(-1)) from water. The potential of the immunoassay to detect E. coli bacteria in real water samples was investigated and the results were compared with the experimental results from the classical count method. There was no statistically significant difference between the two methods (p > 0.05). Furthermore, the MNP/AuNP@SWCNT hybrid system exhibits an enhanced photothermal killing effect. The sandwich-like immunoassay possesses potential for rapid bioanalysis and the simultaneous biosensing of multiple pathogenic agents. PMID:26469636

  17. Multilocus ISSR Markers Reveal Two Major Genetic Groups in Spanish and South African Populations of the Grapevine Fungal Pathogen Cadophora luteo-olivacea

    PubMed Central

    Gramaje, David; León, Maela; Santana, Marcela; Crous, Pedro W.; Armengol, Josep

    2014-01-01

    Cadophora luteo-olivacea is a lesser-known fungal trunk pathogen of grapevine which has been recently isolated from vines showing decline symptoms in grape growing regions worldwide. In this study, 80 C. luteo-olivacea isolates (65 from Spain and 15 from South Africa) were studied. Inter-simple-sequence repeat-polymerase chain reaction (ISSR-PCR) generated 55 polymorphic loci from four ISSR primers selected from an initial screen of 13 ISSR primers. The ISSR markers revealed 40 multilocus genotypes (MLGs) in the global population. Minimum spanning network analysis showed that the MLGs from South Africa clustered around the most frequent genotype, while the genotypes from Spain were distributed all across the network. Principal component analysis and dendrograms based on genetic distance and bootstrapping identified two highly differentiated genetic clusters in the Spanish and South African C. luteo-olivacea populations, with no intermediate genotypes between these clusters. Movement within the Spanish provinces may have occurred repeatedly given the frequent retrieval of the same genotype in distant locations. The results obtained in this study provide new insights into the population genetic structure of C. luteo-olivacea in Spain and highlights the need to produce healthy and quality planting material in grapevine nurseries to avoid the spread of this fungus throughout different grape growing regions. PMID:25310345

  18. Comparison of the detection of periodontal pathogens in bacteraemia after tooth brushing by culture and molecular techniques

    PubMed Central

    Figuero, Elena; González, Itziar; O´Connor, Ana; Diz, Pedro; Álvarez, Maximiliano; Herrera, David; Sanz, Mariano

    2016-01-01

    Background The prevalence and amounts of periodontal pathogens detected in bacteraemia samples after tooth brushing-induced by means of four diagnostic technique, three based on culture and one in a molecular-based technique, have been compared in this study. Material and Methods Blood samples were collected from thirty-six subjects with different periodontal status (17 were healthy, 10 with gingivitis and 9 with periodontitis) at baseline and 2 minutes after tooth brushing. Each sample was analyzed by three culture-based methods [direct anaerobic culturing (DAC), hemo-culture (BACTEC), and lysis-centrifugation (LC)] and one molecular-based technique [quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR)]. With culture any bacterial isolate was detected and quantified, while with qPCR only Porphyromonas gingivalis and Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans were detected and quantified. Descriptive analyses, ANOVA and Chi-squared tests, were performed. Results Neither BACTEC nor qPCR detected any type of bacteria in the blood samples. Only LC (2.7%) and DAC (8.3%) detected bacteraemia, although not in the same patients. Fusobacterium nucleatum was the most frequently detected bacterial species. Conclusions The disparity in the results when the same samples were analyzed with four different microbiological detection methods highlights the need for a proper validation of the methodology to detect periodontal pathogens in bacteraemia samples, mainly when the presence of periodontal pathogens in blood samples after tooth brushing was very seldom. Key words:Bacteraemia, periodontitis, culture, PCR, tooth brushing. PMID:26946197

  19. Validation of a high-throughput immunobead array technique for multiplex detection of three foodborne pathogens in chicken products.

    PubMed

    Charlermroj, Ratthaphol; Makornwattana, Manlika; Grant, Irene R; Elliott, Christopher T; Karoonuthaisiri, Nitsara

    2016-05-01

    This study rigorously evaluated a previously developed immunobead array method to simultaneously detect three important foodborne pathogens, Campylobacter jejuni, Listeria monocytogenes, and Salmonella spp., for its actual application in routine food testing. Due to the limitation of the detection limit of the developed method, an enrichment step was included in this study by using Campylobacter Enrichment Broth for C. jejuni and Universal Pre-enrichment Broth for L. monocytogenes and Salmonella spp.. The findings showed that the immunobead array method was capable of detecting as low as 1CFU of the pathogens spiked in the culture media after being cultured for 24h for all three pathogens. The immunobead array method was further evaluated for its pathogen detection capabilities in ready-to-eat (RTE) and ready-to-cook (RTC) chicken samples and proven to be able to detect as low as 1CFU of the pathogens spiked in the food samples after being cultured for 24h in the case of Salmonella spp., and L. monocytogenes and 48 h in the case of C. jejuni. The method was subsequently validated with three types of chicken products (RTE, n=30; RTC, n=20; raw chicken, n=20) and was found to give the same results as the conventional plating method. Our findings demonstrated that the previously developed immunobead array method could be used for actual food testing with minimal enrichment period of only 52 h, whereas the conventional ISO protocols for the same pathogens take 90-144 h. The immunobead array was therefore an inexpensive, rapid and simple method for the food testing. PMID:26950032

  20. Duplex real-time SYBR green PCR assays for detection of 17 species of food- or waterborne pathogens in stools.

    PubMed

    Fukushima, Hiroshi; Tsunomori, Yoshie; Seki, Ryotaro

    2003-11-01

    A duplex real-time SYBR Green LightCycler PCR (LC-PCR) assay with DNA extraction using the QIAamp DNA Stool Mini kit was evaluated with regard to detection of 8 of 17 species of food- or waterborne pathogens in five stool specimens in 2 h or less. The protocol used the same LC-PCR with 20 pairs of specific primers. The products formed were identified based on a melting point temperature (T(m)) curve analysis. The 17 species of food- or waterborne pathogens examined were enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, enteropathogenic E. coli, enterohemorrhagic E. coli, enterotoxigenic E. coli, enteroaggregative E. coli, Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Yersinia enterocolitica, Yersinia pseudotuberculosis, Campylobacter jejuni, Vibrio cholerae, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, Vibrio vulnificus, Aeromonas spp., Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium perfringens, and Bacillus cereus. No interference with the LC-PCR assay was observed when stool specimens were artificially inoculated with each bacterial species. The detection levels were approximately 10(5) food- or waterborne pathogenic bacteria per g of stool. The protocol for processing stool specimens for less than 10(4) food- or waterborne pathogenic bacteria per g of stool requires an overnight enrichment step to achieve adequate sensitivity. However, the rapid amplification and reliable detection of specific genes of greater than 10(5) food- or waterborne pathogenic bacteria per g in samples should facilitate the diagnosis and management of food- or waterborne outbreaks. PMID:14605150

  1. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R; Barany, Francis; Soper, Steven A

    2012-09-21

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft(3)). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic

  2. Vaginal microbicides: detecting toxicities in vivo that paradoxically increase pathogen transmission

    PubMed Central

    Cone, Richard A; Hoen, Timothy; Wong, XiXi; Abusuwwa, Raed; Anderson, Deborah J; Moench, Thomas R

    2006-01-01

    Background Microbicides must protect against STD pathogens without causing unacceptable toxic effects. Microbicides based on nonoxynol-9 (N9) and other detergents disrupt sperm, HSV and HIV membranes, and these agents are effective contraceptives. But paradoxically N9 fails to protect women against HIV and other STD pathogens, most likely because it causes toxic effects that increase susceptibility. The mouse HSV-2 vaginal transmission model reported here: (a) Directly tests for toxic effects that increase susceptibility to HSV-2, (b) Determines in vivo whether a microbicide can protect against HSV-2 transmission without causing toxicities that increase susceptibility, and (c) Identifies those toxic effects that best correlate with the increased HSV susceptibility. Methods Susceptibility was evaluated in progestin-treated mice by delivering a low-dose viral inoculum (0.1 ID50) at various times after delivering the candidate microbicide to detect whether the candidate increased the fraction of mice infected. Ten agents were tested – five detergents: nonionic (N9), cationic (benzalkonium chloride, BZK), anionic (sodium dodecylsulfate, SDS), the pair of detergents in C31G (C14AO and C16B); one surface active agent (chlorhexidine); two non-detergents (BufferGel®, and sulfonated polystyrene, SPS); and HEC placebo gel (hydroxyethylcellulose). Toxic effects were evaluated by histology, uptake of a 'dead cell' dye, colposcopy, enumeration of vaginal macrophages, and measurement of inflammatory cytokines. Results A single dose of N9 protected against HSV-2 for a few minutes but then rapidly increased susceptibility, which reached maximum at 12 hours. When applied at the minimal concentration needed for brief partial protection, all five detergents caused a subsequent increase in susceptibility at 12 hours of ~20–30-fold. Surprisingly, colposcopy failed to detect visible signs of the N9 toxic effect that increased susceptibility at 12 hours. Toxic effects that occurred

  3. Rapid Sample Processing for Detection of Food-Borne Pathogens via Cross-Flow Microfiltration

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xuan; Ximenes, Eduardo; Amalaradjou, Mary Anne Roshni; Vibbert, Hunter B.; Foster, Kirk; Jones, Jim; Liu, Xingya; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2013-01-01

    This paper reports an approach to enable rapid concentration and recovery of bacterial cells from aqueous chicken homogenates as a preanalytical step of detection. This approach includes biochemical pretreatment and prefiltration of food samples and development of an automated cell concentration instrument based on cross-flow microfiltration. A polysulfone hollow-fiber membrane module having a nominal pore size of 0.2 μm constitutes the core of the cell concentration instrument. The aqueous chicken homogenate samples were circulated within the cross-flow system achieving 500- to 1,000-fold concentration of inoculated Salmonella enterica serovar Enteritidis and naturally occurring microbiota with 70% recovery of viable cells as determined by plate counting and quantitative PCR (qPCR) within 35 to 45 min. These steps enabled 10 CFU/ml microorganisms in chicken homogenates or 102 CFU/g chicken to be quantified. Cleaning and sterilizing the instrument and membrane module by stepwise hydraulic and chemical cleaning (sodium hydroxide and ethanol) enabled reuse of the membrane 15 times before replacement. This approach begins to address the critical need for the food industry for detecting food pathogens within 6 h or less. PMID:24014538

  4. Surface Generated Acoustic Wave Biosensors for the Detection of Pathogens: A Review

    PubMed Central

    Rocha-Gaso, María-Isabel; March-Iborra, Carmen; Montoya-Baides, Ángel; Arnau-Vives, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    This review presents a deep insight into the Surface Generated Acoustic Wave (SGAW) technology for biosensing applications, based on more than 40 years of technological and scientific developments. In the last 20 years, SGAWs have been attracting the attention of the biochemical scientific community, due to the fact that some of these devices - Shear Horizontal Surface Acoustic Wave (SH-SAW), Surface Transverse Wave (STW), Love Wave (LW), Flexural Plate Wave (FPW), Shear Horizontal Acoustic Plate Mode (SH-APM) and Layered Guided Acoustic Plate Mode (LG-APM) - have demonstrated a high sensitivity in the detection of biorelevant molecules in liquid media. In addition, complementary efforts to improve the sensing films have been done during these years. All these developments have been made with the aim of achieving, in a future, a highly sensitive, low cost, small size, multi-channel, portable, reliable and commercially established SGAW biosensor. A setup with these features could significantly contribute to future developments in the health, food and environmental industries. The second purpose of this work is to describe the state-of-the-art of SGAW biosensors for the detection of pathogens, being this topic an issue of extremely importance for the human health. Finally, the review discuses the commercial availability, trends and future challenges of the SGAW biosensors for such applications. PMID:22346725

  5. Detection of Foodborne Pathogens and Mycotoxins in Eggs and Chicken Feeds from Farms to Retail Markets.

    PubMed

    Lee, Minhwa; Seo, Dong Joo; Jeon, Su Been; Ok, Hyun Ee; Jung, Hyelee; Choi, Changsun; Chun, Hyang Sook

    2016-01-01

    Contamination by foodborne pathogens and mycotoxins was examined in 475 eggs and 20 feed samples collected from three egg layer farms, three egg-processing units, and five retail markets in Korea. Microbial contamination with Salmonella species, Escherichia coli, and Arcobacter species was examined by bacterial culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The contamination levels of aflatoxins, ochratoxins, and zearalenone in eggs and chicken feeds were simultaneously analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection after the post-derivatization. While E. coli was isolated from 9.1% of eggs, Salmonella species were not isolated. Arcobacter species were detected in 0.8% of eggs collected from egg layers by PCR only. While aflatoxins, ochratoxins, and zearalenone were found in 100%, 100%, and 85% of chicken feeds, their contamination levels were below the maximum acceptable levels (1.86, 2.24, and 147.53 μg/kg, respectively). However, no eggs were contaminated with aflatoxins, ochratoxins, or zearalenone. Therefore, the risk of contamination by mycotoxins and microbes in eggs and chicken feeds is considered negligible and unlikely to pose a threat to human health. PMID:27621686

  6. Colorimetric detection of pathogenic bacteria using platinum-coated magnetic nanoparticle clusters and magnetophoretic chromatography.

    PubMed

    Kwon, Donghoon; Lee, Sanghee; Ahn, Myung Mo; Kang, In Seok; Park, Ki-Hwan; Jeon, Sangmin

    2015-07-01

    A colorimetric method that uses platinum-coated magnetic nanoparticle clusters (Pt/MNCs) and magnetophoretic chromatography is developed to detect pathogenic bacteria. Half-fragments of monoclonal Escherichia coli O157:H7 (EC) antibodies were functionalized to Pt/MNCs and used to capture E. coli bacteria in milk. After magnetic separation of free Pt/MNCs and Pt/MNC-EC complexes from the milk, a precision pipette was used to imbibe the E. coli-containing solution, then a viscous polyethylene glycol solution. Due to difference in viscosities, the solutions separate into two liquid layers inside the pipette tip. The Pt/MNC-EC complexes were separated from the free Pt/MNCs by applying an external magnetic field, then added to a tetramethylbenzidine (TMB) solution. Catalytic oxidation of TMB by Pt produced color changes of the solution, which enabled identification of the presence of 10 cfu mL(-1) E. coli bacteria with the naked eye. The total assay time including separation, binding and detection was 30 min. PMID:26088777

  7. Detection of Goss's Wilt Pathogen Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis in Maize by Loop-Mediated Amplification.

    PubMed

    Yasuhara-Bell, Jarred; de Silva, Asoka; Heuchelin, Scott A; Chaky, Jennifer L; Alvarez, Anne M

    2016-03-01

    The Goss's wilt pathogen, Clavibacter michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, can cause considerable losses in maize (Zea mays) production. Diagnosis of Goss's wilt currently is based on symptomology and identification of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, following isolation on a semiselective medium and/or serological testing. In an effort to provide a more efficient identification method, a loop-mediated amplification (LAMP) assay was developed to detect the tripartite ATP-independent periplasmic (TRAP)-type C4-dicarboxylate transport system large permease component and tested using strains of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis, all other C. michiganensis subspecies and several genera of nontarget bacteria. Only strains of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis reacted positively with the LAMP assay. The LAMP assay was then used to identify bacterial isolates from diseased maize. 16S rDNA and dnaA sequence analyses were used to confirm the identity of the maize isolates and validate assay specificity. The Cmm ImmunoStrip assay was included as a presumptive identification test of C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis at the species level. The Cmn-LAMP assay was further tested using symptomatic leaf tissue. The Cmn-LAMP assay was run in a hand-held real-time monitoring device (SMART-DART) and performed equally to in-lab quantitative polymerase chain reaction equipment. The Cmn-LAMP assay accurately identified C. michiganensis subsp. nebraskensis and has potential as a field test. The targeted sequence also has potential application in other molecular detection platforms. PMID:26595113

  8. Detection of Foodborne Pathogens and Mycotoxins in Eggs and Chicken Feeds from Farms to Retail Markets

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Minhwa; Seo, Dong Joo; Jeon, Su Been; Ok, Hyun Ee; Jung, Hyelee; Choi, Changsun; Chun, Hyang Sook

    2016-01-01

    Contamination by foodborne pathogens and mycotoxins was examined in 475 eggs and 20 feed samples collected from three egg layer farms, three egg-processing units, and five retail markets in Korea. Microbial contamination with Salmonella species, Escherichia coli, and Arcobacter species was examined by bacterial culture and multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The contamination levels of aflatoxins, ochratoxins, and zearalenone in eggs and chicken feeds were simultaneously analyzed with high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with fluorescence detection after the post-derivatization. While E. coli was isolated from 9.1% of eggs, Salmonella species were not isolated. Arcobacter species were detected in 0.8% of eggs collected from egg layers by PCR only. While aflatoxins, ochratoxins, and zearalenone were found in 100%, 100%, and 85% of chicken feeds, their contamination levels were below the maximum acceptable levels (1.86, 2.24, and 147.53 μg/kg, respectively). However, no eggs were contaminated with aflatoxins, ochratoxins, or zearalenone. Therefore, the risk of contamination by mycotoxins and microbes in eggs and chicken feeds is considered negligible and unlikely to pose a threat to human health. PMID:27621686

  9. Specific and sensitive detection of the conifer pathogen Gremmeniella abietina by nested PCR

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Qing-Yin; Hansson, Per; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2005-01-01

    Background Gremmeniella abietina (Lagerb.) Morelet is an ascomycete fungus that causes stem canker and shoot dieback in many conifer species. The fungus is widespread and causes severe damage to forest plantations in Europe, North America and Asia. To facilitate early diagnosis and improve measures to control the spread of the disease, rapid, specific and sensitive detection methods for G. abietina in conifer hosts are needed. Results We designed two pairs of specific primers for G. abietina based on the 18S rDNA sequence variation pattern. These primers were validated against a wide range of fungi and 14 potential conifer hosts. Based on these specific primers, two nested PCR systems were developed. The first system employed universal fungal primers to enrich the fungal DNA targets in the first round, followed by a second round selective amplification of the pathogen. The other system employed G. abietina-specific primers in both PCR steps. Both approaches can detect the presence of G. abietina in composite samples with high sensitivity, as little as 7.5 fg G. abietina DNA in the host genomic background. Conclusion The methods described here are rapid and can be applied directly to a wide range of conifer species, without the need for fungal isolation and cultivation. Therefore, it represents a promising alternative to disease inspection in forest nurseries, plantations and quarantine control facilities. PMID:16280082

  10. Human pathogenic microsporidia detection in agricultural samples: method development and assessment.

    PubMed

    Kahler, Amy M; Thurston-Enriquez, Jeanette A

    2007-02-01

    A detection method was developed and assessed for the sensitive recovery of microsporidia from livestock fecal and manure-impacted environmental samples. Sensitive recovery of microsporidia was achieved when samples were subjected to 1) purification by sucrose floatation, 2) DNA extraction using the Qiagen QIAamp DNA Stool Mini Kit, 3) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis using generic primers for microsporidia, and 4) DNA sequence analysis to identify which microsporidia were present in each sample. Livestock fecal and wastewater samples were inoculated with 1,000 and 100 Encephalitozoon intestinalis spores/g or ml of feces or wastewater. For cattle wastewater, ten of ten replicates were positive by PCR at concentrations of 1,000 spores/ml, and two of ten replicates were positive at concentrations of 100 spores/ml. For swine wastewater, ten of ten replicates were positive at concentrations of 1,000 spores/ml, and four of ten replicates were positive at concentrations of 100 spores/ml. For cattle feces, three of ten replicates were positive at the concentration of 1,000 spores/g. Several environmental samples were screened using this method, with two of 34 samples positive for human pathogenic microsporidia. To our knowledge, this is the first report of Encephalitozoon cuniculi detection in swine feces and wastewater. PMID:17058113

  11. Autoantibodies in movement and psychiatric disorders: updated concepts in detection methods, pathogenicity, and CNS entry.

    PubMed

    Sinmaz, Nese; Amatoury, Mazen; Merheb, Vera; Ramanathan, Sudarshini; Dale, Russell C; Brilot, Fabienne

    2015-09-01

    In recent years, autoantibodies to proteins or receptors expressed on the surface of neurons have been detected in movement and psychiatric disorders. These autoantibodies can assist in better recognition of clinical syndromes and offer novel treatment opportunities via immunotherapies, potentially leading to improved patient outcome. In this review, we describe several autoimmune syndromes associated with movement and psychiatric disorders, including anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor encephalitis, basal ganglia encephalitis, Sydenham chorea, and autoantibody-associated psychosis and schizophrenia. However, rather than focusing on clinical aspects of these diseases, as they have been reviewed in detail elsewhere, we mainly focus on the scientific aspects of the different methodologies for detecting antibodies, with an emphasis on the current gold standard in the field, the cell-based assay, and on issues related to the use of live versus permeabilized cells. We also reflect on the implications associated with the choice of patient serum and cerebrospinal fluid for antibody testing, on the mechanism of antibody entry into the central nervous system through the blood-brain barrier, and the essential issue of antibody pathogenicity. PMID:26083906

  12. Pyrosequencing detects human and animal pathogenic taxa in the grapevine endosphere

    PubMed Central

    Yousaf, Sohail; Bulgari, Daniela; Bergna, Alessandro; Pancher, Michael; Quaglino, Fabio; Casati, Paola; Campisano, Andrea

    2014-01-01

    Generally, plants are not considered as hosts for human and animal pathogens (HAP). The recent produce-associated outbreaks of food-borne diseases have drawn attention toward significant deficiencies in our understanding of the ecology of HAP, and their potential for interkingdom transfer. To examine the association of microorganisms classified as HAP with plants, we surveyed the presence and distribution of HAP bacterial taxa (henceforth HAPT, for brevity's sake) in the endosphere of grapevine (Vitis vinifera L.) both in the plant stems and leaves. An enrichment protocol was used on leaves to detect taxa with very low abundance in undisturbed tissues. We used pyrosequencing and phylogenetic analyses of the 16S rDNA gene. We identified several HAPT, and focused on four genera (Propionibacterium, Staphylococcus, Clostridium, and Burkholderia). The majority of the bacterial sequences in the genus Propionibacterium, from grapevine leaf and stem, were identified as P. acnes. Clostridia were detected in leaves and stems, but their number was much higher in leaves after enrichment. HAPT were indentified both in leaves and wood of grapevines. This depicts the ability of these taxa to be internalized within plant tissues and maintain their population levels in a variety of environments. Our analysis highlighted the presence of HAPT in the grapevine endosphere and unexpected occurrence of these bacterial taxa in this atypical environment. PMID:25071740

  13. Prevalence and Characteristics of Enteric Pathogens Detected in Diarrhoeic and Non-Diarrhoeic Foals in Trinidad

    PubMed Central

    Harris, Robin; Sankar, Kerri; Small, Julie-Anne; Suepaul, Rod; Stewart-Johnson, Alva; Adesiyun, Abiodun

    2012-01-01

    The study determined the relative importance of Escherichia coli, E. coli O157, Salmonella spp., Clostridium spp., rotavirus, Cryptosporidium spp., and Strongyloides westeri in foal (diarrhoeic and non-diarrhoeic) available for sampling during the foaling season of 2010 and determined their sensitivity to antimicrobial agents. A cross-sectional study was conducted on 164 foals (9 diarrhoeic and 155 non-diarrhoeic) from 15 farms in Trinidad. Isolation and detection of enteric pathogens followed standard methods, and the antibiograms of E. coli and Salmonella spp. were determined using the disc diffusion method. All organisms investigated were detected except E. coli O157. A high prevalence of E. coli (85.0%), Cryptosporidium spp. (64.8%), Strongyloides westeri (35.7%) was seen, but the prevalence was comparatively low for Clostridium spp. (12.9%), Salmonella spp. (4.4%) and rotavirus (2.1%). Only Salmonella spp. was isolated at a statistically significantly (P < 0.05; χ2) higher frequency from diarrhoeic (25.0%) than non-diarrhoeic (4.0%) foals. Amongst E. coli isolates, the frequency of resistance was higher in isolates from diarrhoeic compared with non-diarrhoeic foals but the difference was only statistically significant (P < 0.05; χ2) for tetracycline. All isolates of Salmonella spp. were sensitive to streptomycin and sulphamethoxazole/trimethoprim, a finding that may have therapeutic significance. PMID:22792513

  14. Use of Metagenomic Shotgun Sequencing Technology To Detect Foodborne Pathogens within the Microbiome of the Beef Production Chain

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Xiang; Noyes, Noelle R.; Doster, Enrique; Martin, Jennifer N.; Linke, Lyndsey M.; Magnuson, Roberta J.; Yang, Hua; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Woerner, Dale R.; Jones, Kenneth L.; Ruiz, Jaime; Boucher, Christina; Morley, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Foodborne illnesses associated with pathogenic bacteria are a global public health and economic challenge. The diversity of microorganisms (pathogenic and nonpathogenic) that exists within the food and meat industries complicates efforts to understand pathogen ecology. Further, little is known about the interaction of pathogens within the microbiome throughout the meat production chain. Here, a metagenomic approach and shotgun sequencing technology were used as tools to detect pathogenic bacteria in environmental samples collected from the same groups of cattle at different longitudinal processing steps of the beef production chain: cattle entry to feedlot, exit from feedlot, cattle transport trucks, abattoir holding pens, and the end of the fabrication system. The log read counts classified as pathogens per million reads for Salmonella enterica, Listeria monocytogenes, Escherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium spp. (C. botulinum and C. perfringens), and Campylobacter spp. (C. jejuni, C. coli, and C. fetus) decreased over subsequential processing steps. Furthermore, the normalized read counts for S. enterica, E. coli, and C. botulinum were greater in the final product than at the feedlots, indicating that the proportion of these bacteria increased (the effect on absolute numbers was unknown) within the remaining microbiome. From an ecological perspective, data indicated that shotgun metagenomics can be used to evaluate not only the microbiome but also shifts in pathogen populations during beef production. Nonetheless, there were several challenges in this analysis approach, one of the main ones being the identification of the specific pathogen from which the sequence reads originated, which makes this approach impractical for use in pathogen identification for regulatory and confirmation purposes. PMID:26873315

  15. Use of Metagenomic Shotgun Sequencing Technology To Detect Foodborne Pathogens within the Microbiome of the Beef Production Chain.

    PubMed

    Yang, Xiang; Noyes, Noelle R; Doster, Enrique; Martin, Jennifer N; Linke, Lyndsey M; Magnuson, Roberta J; Yang, Hua; Geornaras, Ifigenia; Woerner, Dale R; Jones, Kenneth L; Ruiz, Jaime; Boucher, Christina; Morley, Paul S; Belk, Keith E

    2016-04-01

    Foodborne illnesses associated with pathogenic bacteria are a global public health and economic challenge. The diversity of microorganisms (pathogenic and nonpathogenic) that exists within the food and meat industries complicates efforts to understand pathogen ecology. Further, little is known about the interaction of pathogens within the microbiome throughout the meat production chain. Here, a metagenomic approach and shotgun sequencing technology were used as tools to detect pathogenic bacteria in environmental samples collected from the same groups of cattle at different longitudinal processing steps of the beef production chain: cattle entry to feedlot, exit from feedlot, cattle transport trucks, abattoir holding pens, and the end of the fabrication system. The log read counts classified as pathogens per million reads for Salmonella enterica,Listeria monocytogenes,Escherichia coli,Staphylococcus aureus, Clostridium spp. (C. botulinum and C. perfringens), and Campylobacter spp. (C. jejuni,C. coli, and C. fetus) decreased over subsequential processing steps. Furthermore, the normalized read counts for S. enterica,E. coli, and C. botulinumwere greater in the final product than at the feedlots, indicating that the proportion of these bacteria increased (the effect on absolute numbers was unknown) within the remaining microbiome. From an ecological perspective, data indicated that shotgun metagenomics can be used to evaluate not only the microbiome but also shifts in pathogen populations during beef production. Nonetheless, there were several challenges in this analysis approach, one of the main ones being the identification of the specific pathogen from which the sequence reads originated, which makes this approach impractical for use in pathogen identification for regulatory and confirmation purposes. PMID:26873315

  16. Detection of virulence-associated genes in pathogenic and commensal avian Escherichia coli isolates.

    PubMed

    Paixão, A C; Ferreira, A C; Fontes, M; Themudo, P; Albuquerque, T; Soares, M C; Fevereiro, M; Martins, L; Corrêa de Sá, M I

    2016-07-01

    Poultry colibacillosis due to Avian Pathogenic Escherichia coli (APEC) is responsible for several extra-intestinal pathological conditions, leading to serious economic damage in poultry production. The most commonly associated pathologies are airsacculitis, colisepticemia, and cellulitis in broiler chickens, and salpingitis and peritonitis in broiler breeders. In this work a total of 66 strains isolated from dead broiler breeders affected with colibacillosis and 61 strains from healthy broilers were studied. Strains from broiler breeders were typified with serogroups O2, O18, and O78, which are mainly associated with disease. The serogroup O78 was the most prevalent (58%). All the strains were checked for the presence of 11 virulence genes: 1) arginine succinyltransferase A (astA); ii) E.coli hemeutilization protein A (chuA); iii) colicin V A/B (cvaA/B); iv) fimbriae mannose-binding type 1 (fimC); v) ferric yersiniabactin uptake A (fyuA); vi) iron-repressible high-molecular-weight proteins 2 (irp2); vii) increased serum survival (iss); viii) iron-uptake systems of E.coli D (iucD); ix) pielonefritis associated to pili C (papC); x) temperature sensitive haemaglutinin (tsh), and xi) vacuolating autotransporter toxin (vat), by Multiplex-PCR. The results showed that all genes are present in both commensal and pathogenic E. coli strains. The iron uptake-related genes and the serum survival gene were more prevalent among APEC. The adhesin genes, except tsh, and the toxin genes, except astA, were also more prevalent among APEC isolates. Except for astA and tsh, APEC strains harbored the majority of the virulence-associated genes studied and fimC was the most prevalent gene, detected in 96.97 and 88.52% of APEC and AFEC strains, respectively. Possession of more than one iron transport system seems to play an important role on APEC survival. PMID:26976911

  17. Detection, fate and inactivation of pathogenic norovirus employing settlement and UV treatment in wastewater treatment facilities.

    PubMed

    Barrett, M; Fitzhenry, K; O'Flaherty, V; Dore, W; Keaveney, S; Cormican, M; Rowan, N; Clifford, E

    2016-10-15

    It is accepted that discharged wastewaters can be a significant source of pathogenic viruses in receiving water bodies contributing to pollution and may in turn enter the human food chain and pose a risk to human health, thus norovirus (NoV) is often a predominant cause of gastroenteritis globally. Working with NoV poses particular challenges as it cannot be readily identified and detection by molecular methods does not assess infectivity. It has been proposed that the infectivity of NoV may be modelled through the use of an alternative virus; F-specific RNA (FRNA) bacteriophages; GA genotype and other FRNA bacteriophages have been used as a surrogate in studies of NoV inactivation. This study investigated the efficiency of novel pulsed ultraviolet irradiation and low pressure ultraviolet irradiation as a potential pathogen inactivation system for NoV and FRNA bacteriophage (GA) in secondary treated wastewaters. The role of UV dose and the impact of suspended solids concentration on removal efficiency were also examined. The study also investigated the role of settlement processes in wastewater treatment plants in removing NoV. While NoV inactivation could not be determined it was found that at a maximum UV dose of 6.9J/cm(2) (6900mJ/cm(2)) an average 2.4 log removal of FRNA bacteriophage (GA) was observed; indicating the potential need for high UV doses to remove NoV if FRNA bacteriophage prove a suitable indicator for NoV. The study found that increasing concentrations of suspended solids impacted on PUV efficiency however, it appears the extent of the impact may be site specific. Furthermore, the study found that settlement processes can play a significant role in the removal of FRNA bacteriophage, thus potentially NoV. PMID:27350093

  18. Multicentric study in five African countries of antibiotic susceptibility for three main pathogens: Streptococcus pneumoniae, Staphylococcus aureus, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    PubMed

    Zerouali, Khalid; Ramdani-Bouguessa, Nadjia; Boye, Cheikh; Hammami, Adnane

    2016-08-01

    Antibiotic resistance is a growing clinical and epidemiological problem. We report on the antibiotic susceptibility of three pathogens isolated from patients in Algeria, Egypt, Morocco, Senegal, and Tunisia during 2010-2011. In total, 218 Streptococcus pneumoniae, 428 Staphylococcus aureus, and 414 Pseudomonas aeruginosa strains were collected. S. pneumoniae resistance was noted against penicillin (30.2%), erythromycin (27.4%), cefpodoxime (19.1%), amoxicillin (12.0%), cefotaxime (7.4%), and levofloxacin (3.2%). All the strains were teicoplanin susceptible. Staphylococcus aureus methicillin resistance differed between countries, from 5.0% in Senegal to 62.7% in Egypt. Levofloxacin resistance was low in all countries, and the highest rate (in Egypt) was still only 13.6% for intermediate and resistant strains combined. Most strains were susceptible to fosfomycin (99.3%) and pristinamycin (94.2%). P. aeruginosa resistance was found against levofloxacin (30.4%), ciprofloxacin (29.9%), tobramycin (19.7%), ceftazidime (19.2%), and imipenem (17.9%), but not colistin. Antibiotic susceptibility varied widely between countries, with resistance typically most prevalent in Egypt. PMID:25363146

  19. Direct Detection and Differentiation of Pathogenic Leptospira Species Using a Multi-Gene Targeted Real Time PCR Approach

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Ana Sofia; Costa, Pedro; Rocha, Teresa; Amaro, Ana; Vieira, Maria Luísa; Ahmed, Ahmed; Thompson, Gertrude; Hartskeerl, Rudy A.; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a growing public and veterinary health concern caused by pathogenic species of Leptospira. Rapid and reliable laboratory tests for the direct detection of leptospiral infections in animals are in high demand not only to improve diagnosis but also for understanding the epidemiology of the disease. In this work we describe a novel and simple TaqMan-based multi-gene targeted real-time PCR approach able to detect and differentiate Leptospira interrogans, L. kirschneri, L. borgpeteresenii and L. noguchii, which constitute the veterinary most relevant pathogenic species of Leptospira. The method uses sets of species-specific probes, and respective flanking primers, designed from ompL1 and secY gene sequences. To monitor the presence of inhibitors, a duplex amplification assay targeting both the mammal β-actin and the leptospiral lipL32 genes was implemented. The analytical sensitivity of all primer and probe sets was estimated to be <10 genome equivalents (GE) in the reaction mixture. Application of the amplification reactions on genomic DNA from a variety of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leptospira strains and other non-related bacteria revealed a 100% analytical specificity. Additionally, pathogenic leptospires were successfully detected in five out of 29 tissue samples from animals (Mus spp., Rattus spp., Dolichotis patagonum and Sus domesticus). Two samples were infected with L. borgpetersenii, two with L. interrogans and one with L. kirschneri. The possibility to detect and identify these pathogenic agents to the species level in domestic and wildlife animals reinforces the diagnostic information and will enhance our understanding of the epidemiology of leptopirosis. PMID:25398140

  20. Direct detection and differentiation of pathogenic Leptospira species using a multi-gene targeted real time PCR approach.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Ana Sofia; Costa, Pedro; Rocha, Teresa; Amaro, Ana; Vieira, Maria Luísa; Ahmed, Ahmed; Thompson, Gertrude; Hartskeerl, Rudy A; Inácio, João

    2014-01-01

    Leptospirosis is a growing public and veterinary health concern caused by pathogenic species of Leptospira. Rapid and reliable laboratory tests for the direct detection of leptospiral infections in animals are in high demand not only to improve diagnosis but also for understanding the epidemiology of the disease. In this work we describe a novel and simple TaqMan-based multi-gene targeted real-time PCR approach able to detect and differentiate Leptospira interrogans, L. kirschneri, L. borgpeteresenii and L. noguchii, which constitute the veterinary most relevant pathogenic species of Leptospira. The method uses sets of species-specific probes, and respective flanking primers, designed from ompL1 and secY gene sequences. To monitor the presence of inhibitors, a duplex amplification assay targeting both the mammal β-actin and the leptospiral lipL32 genes was implemented. The analytical sensitivity of all primer and probe sets was estimated to be <10 genome equivalents (GE) in the reaction mixture. Application of the amplification reactions on genomic DNA from a variety of pathogenic and non-pathogenic Leptospira strains and other non-related bacteria revealed a 100% analytical specificity. Additionally, pathogenic leptospires were successfully detected in five out of 29 tissue samples from animals (Mus spp., Rattus spp., Dolichotis patagonum and Sus domesticus). Two samples were infected with L. borgpetersenii, two with L. interrogans and one with L. kirschneri. The possibility to detect and identify these pathogenic agents to the species level in domestic and wildlife animals reinforces the diagnostic information and will enhance our understanding of the epidemiology of leptopirosis. PMID:25398140

  1. Nodeomics: Pathogen Detection in Vertebrate Lymph Nodes Using Meta-Transcriptomics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wittekindt, Nicola E.; Padhi, Abinash; Schuster, Stephan C.; Qi, Ji; Zhao, Fangqing; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Kasson, Lindsay R.; Packard, Michael; Cross, Paul C.; Poss, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing emergence of human infections originating from wildlife highlights the need for better knowledge of the microbial community in wildlife species where traditional diagnostic approaches are limited. Here we evaluate the microbial biota in healthy mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) by analyses of lymph node meta-transcriptomes. cDNA libraries from five individuals and two pools of samples were prepared from retropharyngeal lymph node RNA enriched for polyadenylated RNA and sequenced using Roche-454 Life Sciences technology. Protein-coding and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences were taxonomically profiled using protein and rRNA specific databases. Representatives of all bacterial phyla were detected in the seven libraries based on protein-coding transcripts indicating that viable microbiota were present in lymph nodes. Residents of skin and rumen, and those ubiquitous in mule deer habitat dominated classifiable bacterial species. Based on detection of both rRNA and protein-coding transcripts, we identified two new proteobacterial species; a Helicobacter closely related to Helicobacter cetorum in the Helicobacter pylori/Helicobacter acinonychis complex and an Acinetobacter related to Acinetobacter schindleri. Among viruses, a novel gamma retrovirus and other members of the Poxviridae and Retroviridae were identified. We additionally evaluated bacterial diversity by amplicon sequencing the hypervariable V6 region of 16S rRNA and demonstrate that overall taxonomic diversity is higher with the meta-transcriptomic approach. These data provide the most complete picture to date of the microbial diversity within a wildlife host. Our research advances the use of meta-transcriptomics to study microbiota in wildlife tissues, which will facilitate detection of novel organisms with pathogenic potential to human and animals.

  2. Detecting marine hazardous substances and organisms: sensors for pollutants, toxins, and pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, O.; Busch, J. A.; Cembella, A. D.; Daly, K. L.; Engelbrektsson, J.; Hannides, A. K.; Schmidt, H.

    2009-05-01

    Marine environments are influenced by a wide diversity of anthropogenic and natural substances and organisms that may have adverse effects on human health and ecosystems. Real-time measurements of pollutants, toxins, and pathogens across a range of spatial scales are required to adequately monitor these hazards, manage the consequences, and to understand the processes governing their magnitude and distribution. Significant technological advancements have been made in recent years for the detection and analysis of such marine hazards. In particular, sensors deployed on a variety of mobile and fixed-point observing platforms provide a valuable means to assess hazards. In this review, we present state-of-the-art of sensor technology for the detection of harmful substances and organisms in the ocean. Sensors are classified by their adaptability to various platforms, addressing large, intermediate, or small areal scales. Current gaps and future demands are identified with an indication of the urgent need for new sensors to detect marine hazards at all scales in autonomous real-time mode. Progress in sensor technology is expected to depend on the development of small-scale sensor technologies with a high sensitivity and specificity towards target analytes or organisms. However, deployable systems must comply with platform requirements as these interconnect the three areal scales. Future developments will include the integration of existing methods into complex and operational sensing systems for a comprehensive strategy for long-term monitoring. The combination of sensor techniques on all scales will remain crucial for the demand of large spatial and temporal coverage.

  3. Detecting marine hazardous substances and organisms: sensors for pollutants, toxins, and pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zielinski, O.; Busch, J. A.; Cembella, A. D.; Daly, K. L.; Engelbrektsson, J.; Hannides, A. K.; Schmidt, H.

    2009-09-01

    Marine environments are influenced by a wide diversity of anthropogenic and natural substances and organisms that may have adverse effects on human health and ecosystems. Real-time measurements of pollutants, toxins, and pathogens across a range of spatial scales are required to adequately monitor these hazards, manage the consequences, and to understand the processes governing their magnitude and distribution. Significant technological advancements have been made in recent years for the detection and analysis of such marine hazards. In particular, sensors deployed on a variety of mobile and fixed-point observing platforms provide a valuable means to assess hazards. In this review, we present state-of-the-art of sensor technology for the detection of harmful substances and organisms in the ocean. Sensors are classified by their adaptability to various platforms, addressing large, intermediate, or small areal scales. Current gaps and future demands are identified with an indication of the urgent need for new sensors to detect marine hazards at all scales in autonomous real-time mode. Progress in sensor technology is expected to depend on the development of small-scale sensor technologies with a high sensitivity and specificity towards target analytes or organisms. However, deployable systems must comply with platform requirements as these interconnect the three areal scales. Future developments will include the integration of existing methods into complex and operational sensing systems for a comprehensive strategy for long-term monitoring. The combination of sensor techniques on all scales will remain crucial for the demand of large spatial and temporal coverage.

  4. A Multiplexed Diagnostic Platform for Point-of-Care Pathogen Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Regan, J F; Letant, S E; Adams, K L; Mahnke, R C; Nguyen, N T; Dzenitis, J M; Hindson, B J; Hadley, D R; Makarewicz, T J; Henderer, B D; Breneman, J W; Tammero, L F; Ortiz, J I; Derlet, R W; Cohen, S; Colston, W W; McBride, M T; Birch, J M

    2008-02-04

    We developed an automated point-of-care diagnostic instrument that is capable of analyzing nasal swab samples for the presence of respiratory diseases. This robust instrument, called FluIDx, performs autonomous multiplexed RT-PCR reactions that are analyzed by microsphere xMAP technology. We evaluated the performance of FluIDx, in comparison rapid tests specific for influenza and respiratory syncytial virus, in a clinical study performed at the UC Davis Medical Center. The clinical study included samples positive for RSV (n = 71), influenza A (n = 16), influenza B (n = 4), adenovirus (n = 5), parainfluenza virus (n = 2), and 44 negative samples, according to a composite reference method. FluIDx and the rapid tests detected 85.9% and 62.0% of the RSV positive samples, respectively. Similar sensitivities were recorded for the influenza B samples; whereas the influenza A samples were poorly detected, likely due to the utilization of an influenza A signature that did not accurately match currently circulating influenza A strains. Data for all pathogens were compiled and indicate that FluIDx is more sensitive than the rapid tests, detecting 74.2% (95% C.I. of 64.7-81.9%) of the positive samples in comparison to 53.6% (95% C.I. of 43.7-63.2%) for the rapid tests. The higher sensitivity of FluIDx was partially offset by a lower specificity, 77.3% versus 100.0%. Overall, these data suggest automated flow-through PCR-based instruments that perform multiplexed assays can successfully screen clinical samples for infectious diseases.

  5. Nodeomics: Pathogen Detection in Vertebrate Lymph Nodes Using Meta-Transcriptomics

    PubMed Central

    Wittekindt, Nicola E.; Padhi, Abinash; Schuster, Stephan C.; Qi, Ji; Zhao, Fangqing; Tomsho, Lynn P.; Kasson, Lindsay R.; Packard, Michael; Cross, Paul; Poss, Mary

    2010-01-01

    The ongoing emergence of human infections originating from wildlife highlights the need for better knowledge of the microbial community in wildlife species where traditional diagnostic approaches are limited. Here we evaluate the microbial biota in healthy mule deer (Odocoileus hemionus) by analyses of lymph node meta-transcriptomes. cDNA libraries from five individuals and two pools of samples were prepared from retropharyngeal lymph node RNA enriched for polyadenylated RNA and sequenced using Roche-454 Life Sciences technology. Protein-coding and 16S ribosomal RNA (rRNA) sequences were taxonomically profiled using protein and rRNA specific databases. Representatives of all bacterial phyla were detected in the seven libraries based on protein-coding transcripts indicating that viable microbiota were present in lymph nodes. Residents of skin and rumen, and those ubiquitous in mule deer habitat dominated classifiable bacterial species. Based on detection of both rRNA and protein-coding transcripts, we identified two new proteobacterial species; a Helicobacter closely related to Helicobacter cetorum in the Helicobacter pylori/Helicobacter acinonychis complex and an Acinetobacter related to Acinetobacter schindleri. Among viruses, a novel gamma retrovirus and other members of the Poxviridae and Retroviridae were identified. We additionally evaluated bacterial diversity by amplicon sequencing the hypervariable V6 region of 16S rRNA and demonstrate that overall taxonomic diversity is higher with the meta-transcriptomic approach. These data provide the most complete picture to date of the microbial diversity within a wildlife host. Our research advances the use of meta-transcriptomics to study microbiota in wildlife tissues, which will facilitate detection of novel organisms with pathogenic potential to human and animals. PMID:20976145

  6. Novel genomic tools for specific and real-time detection of biothreat and frequently encountered foodborne pathogens.

    PubMed

    Woubit, Abdela; Yehualaeshet, Teshome; Habtemariam, Tsegaye; Samuel, Temesgen

    2012-04-01

    The bacterial genera Escherichia, Salmonella, Shigella, Vibrio, Yersinia, and Francisella include important food safety and biothreat agents. By extensive mining of the whole genome and protein databases of diverse, closely and distantly related bacterial species and strains, we have identified novel genome regions, which we utilized to develop a rapid detection platform for these pathogens. The specific genomic targets we have identified to design the primers in Francisella tularensis subsp. tularensis, F. tularensis subsp. novicida, Shigella dysenteriae, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, Vibrio cholerae, Yersinia pestis, and Yersinia pseudotuberculosis contained either known genes or putative proteins. Primer sets were designed from the target regions for use in real-time PCR assays to detect specific biothreat pathogens at species or strain levels. The primer sets were first tested by in silico PCR against whole-genome sequences of different species, subspecies, or strains and then by in vitro PCR against genomic DNA preparations from 23 strains representing six biothreat agents (Escherichia coli O157:H7 strain EDL 933, Shigella dysenteriae, S. enterica serovar Typhi, F. tularensis subsp. tularensis, V. cholerae, and Y. pestis) and six foodborne pathogens (Salmonella Typhimurium, Salmonella Saintpaul, Shigella sonnei, F. tularensis subsp. novicida, Vibrio parahaemolyticus, and Y. pseudotuberculosis). Each pathogen was specifically identifiable at the genus and species levels. Sensitivity assays performed with purified DNA showed the lowest detection limit of 128 fg of DNA/μl for F. tularensis subsp. tularensis. A preliminary test to detect Shigella organisms in a milk matrix also enabled the detection of 6 to 60 CFU/ml. These new tools could ultimately be used to develop platforms to simultaneously detect these pathogens. PMID:22488053

  7. Phage-based surface plasmon resonance strategies for the detection of pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawil, Nancy

    We start by reviewing the basic principles and recent advances in biosensing technologies using optical, electrochemical and acoustic platforms for phage-based diagnostics. Although much notable work has been done, a low cost, specific, sensitive optical method for detecting low concentrations of pathogens, in a few minutes, has not been established. We conclude from the limited body of work on the subject that improving immobilization strategies and finding more suitable phage recognition elements would allow for a more sensitive approach. Our aim was to better describe the attachment process of MRSA specific phages on gold surfaces, and the subsequent biodetection of their bacterial hosts by surface plasmon resonance (SPR). With the knowledge that the adsorption characteristics of thiol-containing molecules are necessary for applications involving the attachment of recognition elements to a functionalized surface, we start by providing comparative details on the kinetics of self-assembly of L-cysteine and 11-mercaptoundecanoic acid (MUA) monolayers on gold using SPR[1]. Our purpose, in carrying out these measurements was to establish each molecule's validity and applicability as a linker element for use in biosensing. We find that monolayer formation, for both L-cysteine and MUA, is described by the Langmuir isotherm at low concentrations only. For L-cysteine, both the amine and thiol groups contribute to the initial attachment of the molecule, followed by the replacement of the amine-gold complexes initially formed with more stable thiol-gold complexes. The reorganization of L-cysteine creates more space on the gold surface, and the zwitterionic form of the molecule permits the physisorption of a second layer through electrostatic interactions. On the other hand, MUA deposits randomly onto the surface of gold as a SAM and slowly reorganizes into a denser, vertical state. Surface plasmon resonance was then used for the real-time monitoring of the attachment of

  8. Microfluidic Biosensor Array with Integrated Poly(2,7-Carbazole)/Fullerene-Based Photodiodes for Rapid Multiplexed Detection of Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Nuno Miguel Matos; Dong, Tao

    2013-01-01

    A multiplexed microfluidic biosensor made of poly(methylmethacrylate) (PMMA) was integrated into an array of organic blend heterojunction photodiodes (OPDs) for chemiluminescent detection of pathogens. Waterborne Escherichia coli O157:H7, Campylobacter jejuni and adenovirus were targeted in the PMMA chip, and detection of captured pathogens was conducted by poly(2,7-carbazole)/fullerene OPDs which showed a responsivity over 0.20 A/W at 425 nm. The limits of chemiluminescent detection were 5 × 105 cells/mL for E. coli, 1 × 105 cells/mL for C. jejuni, and 1 × 10−8 mg/mL for adenovirus. Parallel analysis for all three analytes in less than 35 min was demonstrated. Further recovery tests illustrated the potential of the integrated biosensor for detecting bacteria in real water samples. PMID:24287522

  9. Simultaneous Detection of Bacterial Fish Pathogens, Edwardsiella ictaluri, Flavobacterium columnnare and Aeromonas Hydrophila by Multiplex-PCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edwardsiella ictaluri, Flavobacterium columnare and Aeromonas hydrophila are three major bacterial pathogens of fish that cause diseases with significant economic impact on the aquaculture industry world-wide. Rapid detection of multiple infections with these bacteria in the same host is important f...

  10. A Reliable and Inexpensive Method of Nucleic Acid Extraction for the PCR-Based Detection of Diverse Plant Pathogens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A reliable extraction method is described for the preparation of total nucleic acids from several plant genera for subsequent detection of plant pathogens by PCR-based techniques. By the combined use of a modified CTAB (cetyltrimethylammonium bromide) extraction protocol and a semi-automatic homogen...

  11. Point of care nucleic acid detection of viable pathogenic bacteria with isothermal RNA amplification based paper biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Hongxing; Xing, Da; Zhou, Xiaoming

    2014-09-01

    Food-borne pathogens such as Listeria monocytogenes have been recognized as a major cause of human infections worldwide, leading to substantial health problems. Food-borne pathogen identification needs to be simpler, cheaper and more reliable than the current traditional methods. Here, we have constructed a low-cost paper biosensor for the detection of viable pathogenic bacteria with the naked eye. In this study, an effective isothermal amplification method was used to amplify the hlyA mRNA gene, a specific RNA marker in Listeria monocytogenes. The amplification products were applied to the paper biosensor to perform a visual test, in which endpoint detection was performed using sandwich hybridization assays. When the RNA products migrated along the paper biosensor by capillary action, the gold nanoparticles accumulated at the designated Test line and Control line. Under optimized experimental conditions, as little as 0.5 pg/μL genomic RNA from Listeria monocytogenes could be detected. The whole assay process, including RNA extraction, amplification, and visualization, can be completed within several hours. The developed method is suitable for point-of-care applications to detect food-borne pathogens, as it can effectively overcome the false-positive results caused by amplifying nonviable Listeria monocytogenes.

  12. Determining the 95% limit of detection for waterborne pathogen analyses from primary concentration to qPCR

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The limit of detection (LOD) for qPCR-based analyses is not consistently defined or determined in studies on waterborne pathogens. Moreover, the LODs reported often reflect the qPCR assay rather than the entire sample process. Our objective was to develop a method to determine the 95% LOD (lowest co...

  13. Assay platforms for the rapid detection of viral pathogens by the ultrahigh sensitivity monitoring of antigen-antibody binding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The drive for early disease detection and growing threat of bioterrorism has markedly amplified the demand for ultrasensitive, high-speed diagnostic tests for viral pathogens. This presentation describes innovations in the development of platforms and readout methodologies that potentially address d...

  14. ROBUST PIEZOELECTRIC-EXCITED MILLIMETER-SIZED CANTILEVER SENSORS FOR DETECTING PATHOGENS IN DRINKING WATER AT 1 CELL/LITER

    EPA Science Inventory

    The goal of proposed research is to develop antibody-immobilized piezoelectric-excited millimeter-sized mechanically robust cantilever (PEMC) sensors for detecting pathogenic agents (PA) such as Cryptosporidium and Giardia and others in drinking water sys...

  15. Early-detection surveillance for an emerging plant pathogen: a rule of thumb to predict prevalence at first discovery

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Emerging plant pathogens are a significant problem in conservation, forestry and food security. Surveillance is often instigated in an attempt to detect an invading epidemic before it gets out of control. Yet in practice many epidemics are not discovered until already at a high incidence. This is ...

  16. Detection of a pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) in an African hedgehog (Atelerix arbiventris) with suspected wobbly hedgehog syndrome (WHS).

    PubMed

    Madarame, Hiroo; Ogihara, Kikumi; Kimura, Moe; Nagai, Makoto; Omatsu, Tsutomu; Ochiai, Hideharu; Mizutani, Tetsyuya

    2014-09-17

    A pneumonia virus of mice (PVM) from an African hedgehog (Atelerix arbiventris) with suspected wobbly hedgehog syndrome (WHS) was detected and genetically characterized. The affected hedgehog had a nonsuppurative encephalitis with vacuolization of the white matter, and the brain samples yielded RNA reads highly homogeneous to PVM strain 15 (96.5% of full genomic sequence homology by analysis of next generation sequencing). PVM antigen was also detected in the brain and the lungs immunohistochemically. A PVM was strongly suggested as a causative agent of encephalitis of a hedgehog with suspected WHS. This is a first report of PVM infection in hedgehogs. PMID:25129384

  17. Integrated microfluidic system with automatic sampling for permanent molecular and antigen-based detection of CBRNE-related pathogens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Holger; Schattschneider, Sebastian; Klemm, Richard; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Gärtner, Claudia

    2015-03-01

    The continuous monitoring of the environment for lethal pathogens is a central task in the field of biothreat detection. Typical scenarios involve air-sampling in locations such as public transport systems or large public events and a subsequent analysis of the samples by a portable instrument. Lab-on-a-chip technologies are one of the promising technological candidates for such a system. We have developed an integrated microfluidic system with automatic sampling for the detection of CBRNE-related pathogens. The chip contains a two-pronged analysis strategy, on the one hand an immunological track using antibodies immobilized on a frit and a subsequent photometric detection, on the other hand a molecular biology approach using continuous-flow PCR with a fluorescence end-point detection. The cartridge contains two-component molded rotary valve to allow active fluid control and switching between channels. The accompanying instrument contains all elements for fluidic and valve actuation, thermal control, as well as the two detection modalities. Reagents are stored in dedicated reagent packs which are connected directly to the cartridge. With this system, we have been able to demonstrate the detection of a variety of pathogen species.

  18. Extraction-Free, Filter-Based Template Preparation for Rapid and Sensitive PCR Detection of Pathogenic Parasitic Protozoa

    PubMed Central

    Orlandi, Palmer A.; Lampel, Keith A.

    2000-01-01

    Within the last several years, the protozoan parasites Cyclospora cayetanensis, Cryptosporidium parvum, and microsporidia have become recognized as important, rapidly emerging human pathogens in immunocompromised and immunocompetent individuals. Since the early 1990s, many of the reported outbreaks of enteric illness caused by these microorganisms have been attributed to food- and water-borne contamination. Many inherent obstacles affect the success of current surveillance and detection methods used to monitor and control levels of contamination by these pathogens. Unlike methods that incorporate preenrichment for easier and unambiguous identification of bacterial pathogens, similar methods for the detection of parasitic protozoa either are not currently available or cannot be performed in a timely manner. We have developed an extraction-free, filter-based protocol to prepare DNA templates for use in PCR to identify C. cayetanensis and C. parvum oocysts and microsporidia spores. This method requires only minimal preparation to partially purify and concentrate isolates prior to filter application. DNA template preparation is rapid, efficient, and reproducible. As few as 3 to 10 parasites could be detected by PCR from direct application to the filters. In studies, as few 10 to 50 Encephalitozoon intestinalis spores could be detected when seeded in a 100-μl stool sample and 10 to 30 C. cayetanensis oocysts could be detected per 100 g of fresh raspberries. This protocol can easily be adapted to detect parasites from a wide variety of food, clinical, and environmental samples and can be used in multiplex PCR applications. PMID:10834988

  19. Non-protein coding RNA-based genosensor with quantum dots as electrochemical labels for attomolar detection of multiple pathogens.

    PubMed

    Vijian, Dinesh; Chinni, Suresh V; Yin, Lee Su; Lertanantawong, Benchaporn; Surareungchai, Werasak

    2016-03-15

    The ability of a diagnostic test to detect multiple pathogens simultaneously is useful to obtain meaningful information for clinical treatment and preventive measures. We report a highly sensitive and specific electrochemical biosensor assay for simultaneous detection of three gene targets using quantum dots (QDs). The targets are novel non-protein coding RNA (npcRNA) sequences of Vibrio cholerae, Salmonella sp. and Shigella sp., which cause diarrheal diseases. QDs (PbS, CdS, ZnS) were synthesized and functionalized with DNA probes that were specific to each pathogen. Electrochemical detection of QDs was performed using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). The QDs gave distinct peaks at 0.5 V (PbS), 0.75 V (CdS) and 1.1 V (ZnS). There was no interference in signal response when all three QDs were mixed and detected simultaneously. The detection limits of single and multiplex assays with linear targets and PCR products were in the attomolar ranges. The high assay sensitivity, in combination with specific npcRNA sequences as novel diagnostic targets, makes it a viable tool for detecting pathogens from food, environment and clinical samples. PMID:26513287

  20. A model system for pathogen detection using a two-component bacteriophage/bioluminescent signal amplification assay

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bright, Nathan G.; Carroll, Richard J.; Applegate, Bruce M.

    2004-03-01

    Microbial contamination has become a mounting concern the last decade due to an increased emphasis of minimally processed food products specifically produce, and the recognition of foodborne pathogens such as Campylobacter jejuni, Escherichia coli O157:H7, and Listeria monocytogenes. This research investigates a detection approach utilizing bacteriophage pathogen specificity coupled with a bacterial bioluminescent bioreporter utilizing the quorum sensing molecule from Vibrio fischeri, N-(3-oxohexanoyl)-homoserine lactone (3-oxo-C6-HSL). The 3-oxo-C6-HSL molecules diffuse out of the target cell after infection and induce bioluminescence from a population of 3-oxo-C6-HSL bioreporters (ROLux). E. coli phage M13, a well-characterized bacteriophage, offers a model system testing the use of bacteriophage for pathogen detection through cell-to-cell communication via a LuxR/3-oxo-C6-HSL system. Simulated temperate phage assays tested functionality of the ROLux reporter and production of 3-oxo-C6-HSL by various test strains. These assays showed detection limits of 102cfu after 24 hours in a varietry of detection formats. Assays incorporating the bacteriophage M13-luxI with the ROLux reporter and a known population of target cells were subsequently developed and have shown consistent detection limits of 105cfu target organisms. Measurable light response from high concentrations of target cells was almost immediate, suggesting an enrichment step to further improve detection limits and reduce assay time.

  1. Rapid detection of food pathogens using RNA aptamers-immobilized slide.

    PubMed

    Maeng, Jin-Soo; Kim, Namsoo; Kim, Chong-Tai; Han, Seung Ryul; Lee, Young Ju; Lee, Seong-Wook; Lee, Myung-Hyun; Cho, Yong-Jin

    2012-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop a simple and rapid detection system for foodborne bacteria, which consisted of an optical microscope and its slide chip with artificial antibodies, or RNA aptamers. From an RNA pool, three each RNA aptamers were built by the method of SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) for components of cell wall, LPS (lipopolysaccharide) from E. coli O157:H7, teichoic acid from Staphylococcus aureus and a cell membrane protein of OmpC from Salmonella typhimurium, respectively. These aptamers were hybridized with thiol-conjugated 16 dT-linker molecules in order to be immobilized on silver surface which was, in advance, fabricated on glass slide, using a spin-coating method. To confirm that each aptamers retained its specific binding activities to their antigenic live bacteria, microscopic view of bound cells immobilized on silver film were observed. Furthermore, we observed the fluorescence-emitting bacteria-aptamer complex immobilized on silver film after adding RNA aptamers hybridized with fluorophore, FAM-conjugated 16 dT-linker molecules. As a result, the RNA aptamers-immobilized slide system developed in this study was a useful new tool to rapidly monitor individual food pathogens. PMID:22966534

  2. Next-generation DNA in pathogen detection, surveillance, and CLIA-waivable diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benner, Steven A.; Kim, Hyo-Joong; Merritt, Kristen B.; Yang, Zunyi; McLendon, D. C.; Hoshika, Shuichi; Hutter, Daniel

    2015-05-01

    Assays that target DNA and RNA (xNA) are regarded as the "gold standards" in pathogen detection, surveillance, and diagnostics. However, they are often considered inappropriate for use at points-of-sampling and in low resource environments. This paper discusses innovations created by scientists at the FfAME and Firebird that promise to change this. The first is an artificially expanded genetic information system (AEGIS), a species of DNA having eight nucleotide "letters" added to the four found naturally in DNA. AEGIS nucleobases pair with geometries similar to standard Watson- Crick pairs, but with hydrogen bonding patterns different from (and orthogonal to) patterns that join the A:T and G:C pairs. Thus, AEGIS DNA allows xNA capture and amplification to have very high specificity and very low noise. A second innovation is a self-avoiding molecular recognition system (SAMRS). SAMRS is a species of DNA that behaves the opposite of AEGIS; SAMRS oligonucleotides bind with Watson-Crick complementarity to natural DNA, but not to other SAMRS oligonucleotides. A third innovation is a molecule beacon design that signals the presence of a target xNA even in complex biological mixtures. A fourth innovation is isothermal amplification of xNA targets, without PCR instruments or the skills needed to interpret their output. Here, levels of detection are as few as 30 molecules. Finally, we offer a sample preparation architecture that, as its very first step, sterilizes a sample, rendering it non-hazardous to inexperienced users. It then allows complete xNA capture and CLIA-waivable amplification.

  3. Evaluation of BBL CHROMagar orientation medium for detection and presumptive identification of urinary tract pathogens.

    PubMed Central

    Hengstler, K A; Hammann, R; Fahr, A M

    1997-01-01

    The microbiological performance of BBL CHROMagar Orientation medium and CPS ID2 agar was compared to that of Columbia agar with 5% sheep blood and MacConkey agar without crystal violet for the enumeration and presumptive identification of bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections. Of a total of 658 clinical urine specimens, 118 specimens yielded no growth, 402 specimens yielded growth with cell counts of > or = 10(5) CFU/ml, and 138 specimens yielded growth with cell counts of < 10(5) CFU/ml. Of the specimens with cell counts of > or = 10(5) CFU/ml, 163 were pure cultures and 239 were mixed cultures. A total of 266 Escherichia coli organisms were isolated on both chromogenic media, 260 were isolated on blood agar, and 248 were isolated on MacConkey agar. One strain (0.4%) failed to develop the expected pink color on CHROMagar Orientation medium, and 23 strains (8.7%) failed to develop the expected pink color on CPS ID2 agar. Enterococci (CHROMagar Orientation medium, n = 266; CPS ID2 agar, n = 265) produced small blue-green colonies on both chromogenic media. Fifty of the mixed cultures contained enterococci that were detected only on the chromogenic media. The Klebsiella-Enterobacter-Serratia (KES) and the Proteus-Morganella-Providencia (PMP) groups could be identified on both chromogenic media. Of 66 isolates of the KES group, 63 grew with the expected color on CHROMagar Orientation medium and 58 of 64 isolates grew with the expected color on CPS ID2 agar. Other microorganisms required further identification. The use of chromogenic medium formulations offers a time-saving method for the reliable detection, enumeration, and presumptive identification of urinary tract pathogens. One of the greatest advantages of these media is the easy recognition of mixed cultures. PMID:9350731

  4. Comparative evaluation of two commercial multiplex panels for detection of gastrointestinal pathogens by use of clinical stool specimens.

    PubMed

    Khare, Reeti; Espy, Mark J; Cebelinski, Elizabeth; Boxrud, David; Sloan, Lynne M; Cunningham, Scott A; Pritt, Bobbi S; Patel, Robin; Binnicker, Matthew J

    2014-10-01

    The detection of pathogens associated with gastrointestinal disease may be important in certain patient populations, such as immunocompromised hosts, the critically ill, or individuals with prolonged disease that is refractory to treatment. In this study, we evaluated two commercially available multiplex panels (the FilmArray gastrointestinal [GI] panel [BioFire Diagnostics, Salt Lake City, UT] and the Luminex xTag gastrointestinal pathogen panel [GPP] [Luminex Corporation, Toronto, Canada]) using Cary-Blair stool samples (n = 500) submitted to our laboratory for routine GI testing (e.g., culture, antigen testing, microscopy, and individual real-time PCR). At the time of this study, the prototype (non-FDA-cleared) FilmArray GI panel targeted 23 pathogens (14 bacterial, 5 viral, and 4 parasitic), and testing of 200 μl of Cary-Blair stool was recommended. In contrast, the Luminex GPP assay was FDA cleared for the detection of 11 pathogens (7 bacterial, 2 viral, and 2 parasitic), but had the capacity to identify 4 additional pathogens using a research-use-only protocol. Importantly, the Luminex assay was FDA cleared for 100 μl raw stool; however, 100 μl Cary-Blair stool was tested by the Luminex assay in this study. Among 230 prospectively collected samples, routine testing was positive for one or more GI pathogens in 19 (8.3%) samples, compared to 76 (33.0%) by the FilmArray and 69 (30.3%) by the Luminex assay. Clostridium difficile (12.6 to 13.9% prevalence) and norovirus genogroup I (GI)/GII (5.7 to 13.9% prevalence) were two of the pathogens most commonly detected by both assays among prospective samples. Sapovirus was also commonly detected (5.7% positive rate) by the FilmArray assay. Among 270 additional previously characterized samples, both multiplex panels demonstrated high sensitivity (>90%) for the majority of targets, with the exception of several pathogens, notably Aeromonas sp. (23.8%) by FilmArray and Yersinia enterocolitica (48.1%) by the Luminex

  5. Comparative Evaluation of Two Commercial Multiplex Panels for Detection of Gastrointestinal Pathogens by Use of Clinical Stool Specimens

    PubMed Central

    Khare, Reeti; Espy, Mark J.; Cebelinski, Elizabeth; Boxrud, David; Sloan, Lynne M.; Cunningham, Scott A.; Pritt, Bobbi S.; Patel, Robin

    2014-01-01

    The detection of pathogens associated with gastrointestinal disease may be important in certain patient populations, such as immunocompromised hosts, the critically ill, or individuals with prolonged disease that is refractory to treatment. In this study, we evaluated two commercially available multiplex panels (the FilmArray gastrointestinal [GI] panel [BioFire Diagnostics, Salt Lake City, UT] and the Luminex xTag gastrointestinal pathogen panel [GPP] [Luminex Corporation, Toronto, Canada]) using Cary-Blair stool samples (n = 500) submitted to our laboratory for routine GI testing (e.g., culture, antigen testing, microscopy, and individual real-time PCR). At the time of this study, the prototype (non-FDA-cleared) FilmArray GI panel targeted 23 pathogens (14 bacterial, 5 viral, and 4 parasitic), and testing of 200 μl of Cary-Blair stool was recommended. In contrast, the Luminex GPP assay was FDA cleared for the detection of 11 pathogens (7 bacterial, 2 viral, and 2 parasitic), but had the capacity to identify 4 additional pathogens using a research-use-only protocol. Importantly, the Luminex assay was FDA cleared for 100 μl raw stool; however, 100 μl Cary-Blair stool was tested by the Luminex assay in this study. Among 230 prospectively collected samples, routine testing was positive for one or more GI pathogens in 19 (8.3%) samples, compared to 76 (33.0%) by the FilmArray and 69 (30.3%) by the Luminex assay. Clostridium difficile (12.6 to 13.9% prevalence) and norovirus genogroup I (GI)/GII (5.7 to 13.9% prevalence) were two of the pathogens most commonly detected by both assays among prospective samples. Sapovirus was also commonly detected (5.7% positive rate) by the FilmArray assay. Among 270 additional previously characterized samples, both multiplex panels demonstrated high sensitivity (>90%) for the majority of targets, with the exception of several pathogens, notably Aeromonas sp. (23.8%) by FilmArray and Yersinia enterocolitica (48.1%) by the Luminex

  6. DNA Extraction Method Affects the Detection of a Fungal Pathogen in Formalin-Fixed Specimens Using qPCR.

    PubMed

    Adams, Andrea J; LaBonte, John P; Ball, Morgan L; Richards-Hrdlicka, Kathryn L; Toothman, Mary H; Briggs, Cheryl J

    2015-01-01

    Museum collections provide indispensable repositories for obtaining information about the historical presence of disease in wildlife populations. The pathogenic amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has played a significant role in global amphibian declines, and examining preserved specimens for Bd can improve our understanding of its emergence and spread. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) enables Bd detection with minimal disturbance to amphibian skin and is significantly more sensitive to detecting Bd than histology; therefore, developing effective qPCR methodologies for detecting Bd DNA in formalin-fixed specimens can provide an efficient and effective approach to examining historical Bd emergence and prevalence. Techniques for detecting Bd in museum specimens have not been evaluated for their effectiveness in control specimens that mimic the conditions of animals most likely to be encountered in museums, including those with low pathogen loads. We used American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) of known infection status to evaluate the success of qPCR to detect Bd in formalin-fixed specimens after three years of ethanol storage. Our objectives were to compare the most commonly used DNA extraction method for Bd (PrepMan, PM) to Macherey-Nagel DNA FFPE (MN), test optimizations for Bd detection with PM, and provide recommendations for maximizing Bd detection. We found that successful detection is relatively high (80-90%) when Bd loads before formalin fixation are high, regardless of the extraction method used; however, at lower infection levels, detection probabilities were significantly reduced. The MN DNA extraction method increased Bd detection by as much as 50% at moderate infection levels. Our results indicate that, for animals characterized by lower pathogen loads (i.e., those most commonly encountered in museum collections), current methods may underestimate the proportion of Bd-infected amphibians. Those extracting DNA from archived museum

  7. DNA Extraction Method Affects the Detection of a Fungal Pathogen in Formalin-Fixed Specimens Using qPCR

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Andrea J.; LaBonte, John P.; Ball, Morgan L.; Richards-Hrdlicka, Kathryn L.; Toothman, Mary H.; Briggs, Cheryl J.

    2015-01-01

    Museum collections provide indispensable repositories for obtaining information about the historical presence of disease in wildlife populations. The pathogenic amphibian chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd) has played a significant role in global amphibian declines, and examining preserved specimens for Bd can improve our understanding of its emergence and spread. Quantitative PCR (qPCR) enables Bd detection with minimal disturbance to amphibian skin and is significantly more sensitive to detecting Bd than histology; therefore, developing effective qPCR methodologies for detecting Bd DNA in formalin-fixed specimens can provide an efficient and effective approach to examining historical Bd emergence and prevalence. Techniques for detecting Bd in museum specimens have not been evaluated for their effectiveness in control specimens that mimic the conditions of animals most likely to be encountered in museums, including those with low pathogen loads. We used American bullfrogs (Lithobates catesbeianus) of known infection status to evaluate the success of qPCR to detect Bd in formalin-fixed specimens after three years of ethanol storage. Our objectives were to compare the most commonly used DNA extraction method for Bd (PrepMan, PM) to Macherey-Nagel DNA FFPE (MN), test optimizations for Bd detection with PM, and provide recommendations for maximizing Bd detection. We found that successful detection is relatively high (80–90%) when Bd loads before formalin fixation are high, regardless of the extraction method used; however, at lower infection levels, detection probabilities were significantly reduced. The MN DNA extraction method increased Bd detection by as much as 50% at moderate infection levels. Our results indicate that, for animals characterized by lower pathogen loads (i.e., those most commonly encountered in museum collections), current methods may underestimate the proportion of Bd-infected amphibians. Those extracting DNA from archived museum

  8. A microfluidic droplet digital PCR for simultaneous detection of pathogenic Escherichia coli O157 and Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xiaojun; Jing, Fengxiang; Li, Gang; Fan, Xiaoyun; Jia, Chunping; Zhou, Hongbo; Jin, Qinghui; Zhao, Jianlong

    2015-12-15

    Sensitive and rapid identification of pathogenic bacterial is extremely important due to the serious threat of pathogens to human health. In this study, we demonstrate the simultaneous and sensitive detection of pathogenic Escherichia coli O157 and Listeria monocytogenes using a novel duplex droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) platform. The ddPCR platform, which uses a mineral oil-saturated polydimethylsiloxane (OSP) chip to overcome the problem of droplet evaporation, integrates the functions of droplet generation, on-chip amplification and end-point fluorescence readout. Simultaneous detection of two kinds of bacterial is achieved by the design of differentially labeled TaqMan-MGB fluorescent probes. Compared with a quantitative real-time PCR approach, the OSP chip-based duplex ddPCR platform exhibits high sensitivity, which is at the level of single molecule resolution without significant cross-assay interference. Moreover, the applicability of the proposed method is also evaluated in artificially contaminated drinking water sample, which displays a low detection limit down to 10 CFU/mL for both pathogenic bacterial within 2 h. PMID:26226346

  9. Widespread detection of highly pathogenic H5 influenza viruses in wild birds from the Pacific Flyway of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bevins, S.N.; Dusek, Robert J.; White, C. LeAnn; Gidlewski, Thomas; Bodenstein, B.; Mansfield, Kristin G.; DeBruyn, Paul; Kraege, Donald K.; Rowan, E.L.; Gillin, Colin; Thomas, B.; Chandler, S.; Baroch, J.; Schmit, B.; Grady, M. J.; Miller, R. S.; Drew, M.L.; Stopak, S.; Zscheile, B.; Bennett, J.; Sengl, J.; Brady, Caroline; Ip, Hon S.; Spackman, Erica; Killian, M. L.; Torchetti, Mia Kim; Sleeman, Jonathan M.; DeLiberto, T.J.

    2016-01-01

    A novel highly pathogenic avian influenza virus belonging to the H5 clade 2.3.4.4 variant viruses was detected in North America in late 2014. Motivated by the identification of these viruses in domestic poultry in Canada, an intensive study was initiated to conduct highly pathogenic avian influenza surveillance in wild birds in the Pacific Flyway of the United States. A total of 4,729 hunter-harvested wild birds were sampled and highly pathogenic avian influenza virus was detected in 1.3% (n = 63). Three H5 clade 2.3.4.4 subtypes were isolated from wild birds, H5N2, H5N8, and H5N1, representing the wholly Eurasian lineage H5N8 and two novel reassortant viruses. Testing of 150 additional wild birds during avian morbidity and mortality investigations in Washington yielded 10 (6.7%) additional highly pathogenic avian influenza isolates (H5N8 = 3 and H5N2 = 7). The geographically widespread detection of these viruses in apparently healthy wild waterfowl suggest that the H5 clade 2.3.4.4 variant viruses may behave similarly in this taxonomic group whereby many waterfowl species are susceptible to infection but do not demonstrate obvious clinical disease. Despite these findings in wild waterfowl, mortality has been documented for some wild bird species and losses in US domestic poultry during the first half of 2015 were unprecedented.

  10. Development of a DNA Microarray-Based Assay for the Detection of Sugar Beet Root Rot Pathogens.

    PubMed

    Liebe, Sebastian; Christ, Daniela S; Ehricht, Ralf; Varrelmann, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Sugar beet root rot diseases that occur during the cropping season or in storage are accompanied by high yield losses and a severe reduction of processing quality. The vast diversity of microorganism species involved in rot development requires molecular tools allowing simultaneous identification of many different targets. Therefore, a new microarray technology (ArrayTube) was applied in this study to improve diagnosis of sugar beet root rot diseases. Based on three marker genes (internal transcribed spacer, translation elongation factor 1 alpha, and 16S ribosomal DNA), 42 well-performing probes enabled the identification of prevalent field pathogens (e.g., Aphanomyces cochlioides), storage pathogens (e.g., Botrytis cinerea), and ubiquitous spoilage fungi (e.g., Penicillium expansum). All probes were proven for specificity with pure cultures from 73 microorganism species as well as for in planta detection of their target species using inoculated sugar beet tissue. Microarray-based identification of root rot pathogens in diseased field beets was successfully confirmed by classical detection methods. The high discriminatory potential was proven by Fusarium species differentiation based on a single nucleotide polymorphism. The results demonstrate that the ArrayTube constitute an innovative tool allowing a rapid and reliable detection of plant pathogens particularly when multiple microorganism species are present. PMID:26524545

  11. Widespread detection of highly pathogenic H5 influenza viruses in wild birds from the Pacific Flyway of the United States

    PubMed Central

    Bevins, S. N.; Dusek, R. J.; White, C. L.; Gidlewski, T.; Bodenstein, B.; Mansfield, K. G.; DeBruyn, P.; Kraege, D.; Rowan, E.; Gillin, C.; Thomas, B.; Chandler, S.; Baroch, J.; Schmit, B.; Grady, M. J.; Miller, R. S.; Drew, M. L.; Stopak, S.; Zscheile, B.; Bennett, J.; Sengl, J.; Brady, Caroline; Ip, H. S.; Spackman, E.; Killian, M. L.; Torchetti, M. K.; Sleeman, J. M.; Deliberto, T. J.

    2016-01-01

    A novel highly pathogenic avian influenza virus belonging to the H5 clade 2.3.4.4 variant viruses was detected in North America in late 2014. Motivated by the identification of these viruses in domestic poultry in Canada, an intensive study was initiated to conduct highly pathogenic avian influenza surveillance in wild birds in the Pacific Flyway of the United States. A total of 4,729 hunter-harvested wild birds were sampled and highly pathogenic avian influenza virus was detected in 1.3% (n = 63). Three H5 clade 2.3.4.4 subtypes were isolated from wild birds, H5N2, H5N8, and H5N1, representing the wholly Eurasian lineage H5N8 and two novel reassortant viruses. Testing of 150 additional wild birds during avian morbidity and mortality investigations in Washington yielded 10 (6.7%) additional highly pathogenic avian influenza isolates (H5N8 = 3 and H5N2 = 7). The geographically widespread detection of these viruses in apparently healthy wild waterfowl suggest that the H5 clade 2.3.4.4 variant viruses may behave similarly in this taxonomic group whereby many waterfowl species are susceptible to infection but do not demonstrate obvious clinical disease. Despite these findings in wild waterfowl, mortality has been documented for some wild bird species and losses in US domestic poultry during the first half of 2015 were unprecedented. PMID:27381241

  12. Widespread detection of highly pathogenic H5 influenza viruses in wild birds from the Pacific Flyway of the United States.

    PubMed

    Bevins, S N; Dusek, R J; White, C L; Gidlewski, T; Bodenstein, B; Mansfield, K G; DeBruyn, P; Kraege, D; Rowan, E; Gillin, C; Thomas, B; Chandler, S; Baroch, J; Schmit, B; Grady, M J; Miller, R S; Drew, M L; Stopak, S; Zscheile, B; Bennett, J; Sengl, J; Brady, Caroline; Ip, H S; Spackman, E; Killian, M L; Torchetti, M K; Sleeman, J M; Deliberto, T J

    2016-01-01

    A novel highly pathogenic avian influenza virus belonging to the H5 clade 2.3.4.4 variant viruses was detected in North America in late 2014. Motivated by the identification of these viruses in domestic poultry in Canada, an intensive study was initiated to conduct highly pathogenic avian influenza surveillance in wild birds in the Pacific Flyway of the United States. A total of 4,729 hunter-harvested wild birds were sampled and highly pathogenic avian influenza virus was detected in 1.3% (n = 63). Three H5 clade 2.3.4.4 subtypes were isolated from wild birds, H5N2, H5N8, and H5N1, representing the wholly Eurasian lineage H5N8 and two novel reassortant viruses. Testing of 150 additional wild birds during avian morbidity and mortality investigations in Washington yielded 10 (6.7%) additional highly pathogenic avian influenza isolates (H5N8 = 3 and H5N2 = 7). The geographically widespread detection of these viruses in apparently healthy wild waterfowl suggest that the H5 clade 2.3.4.4 variant viruses may behave similarly in this taxonomic group whereby many waterfowl species are susceptible to infection but do not demonstrate obvious clinical disease. Despite these findings in wild waterfowl, mortality has been documented for some wild bird species and losses in US domestic poultry during the first half of 2015 were unprecedented. PMID:27381241

  13. Towards understanding the presence/absence of Human African Trypanosomosis in a focus of Côte d'Ivoire: a spatial analysis of the pathogenic system

    PubMed Central

    Courtin, Fabrice; Jamonneau, Vincent; Oké, Emmanuel; Coulibaly, Bamoro; Oswald, Yohan; Dupont, Sophie; Cuny, Gérard; Doumenge, Jean-Pierre; Solano, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Background This study aimed at identifying factors influencing the development of Human African Trypanosomosis (HAT, or sleeping sickness) in the focus of Bonon, located in the mesophile forest of Côte d'Ivoire. A previous study mapping the main daytime activity sites of 96 patients revealed an important disparity between the area south of the town- where all the patients lived- and the area north of the town, apparently free of disease. In order to explain this disparity, we carried out a spatial analysis of the key components of the pathogenic system, i.e. the human host, the tsetse vector and the trypanosomes in their environment using a geographic information system (GIS). Results This approach at the scale of a HAT focus enabled us to identify spatial patterns which linked to the transmission and the dissemination of this disease. The history of human settlement (with the rural northern area exploited much earlier than the southern one) appears to be a major factor which determines the land use pattern, which itself may account for differences found in vector densities (tsetse were found six times more abundant in the southern rural area than in the northern). Vector density, according to the human and environmental context in which it is found (here an intense mobility between the town of Bonon and the rural areas), may explain the observed spatial differences in HAT prevalence. Conclusion This work demonstrates the role of GIS analyses of key components of the pathogenic system in providing a better understanding of transmission and dissemination of HAT. Moreover, following the identification of the most active transmission areas, and of an area unfavourable to HAT transmission, this study more precisely delineates the boundaries of the Bonon focus. As a follow-up, targeted tsetse control activities starting north of Bonon (with few chances of reinvasion due to very low densities) going south, and additional medical surveys in the south will be proposed to

  14. The fire ant (Hymenoptera: Formicidae) pathogen, Vairimorpha invictae (Microsporidia: Burenellidae), not detected in Florida

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surveys were conducted to search specifically for the microsporidian pathogen Vairimorpha. invictae in red imported fire ants, Solenopsis invicta, in the U.S. This pathogen is associated with colony decline and reductions in fire ant populations in S. America and is considered to be a promising bio...

  15. Molecular approaches to detecting and discriminating among prions, a class of pathogenic molecules(Abstract)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Prions (PrPSc)are the pathogens that cause a set of fatal neurological diseases that include scrapie and chronic wasting disease (CWD). They are composed solely of protein and unlike viral, bacterial, or fungal pathogens, the information necessary to convert the normal cellular prion protein (PrPC) ...

  16. Optical Imaging of Paramagnetic Bead-DNA Aggregation Inhibition Allows for Low Copy Number Detection of Infectious Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A.; Borba, Juliane C.; Shafagati, Nazly; Luzader, Deborah; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kendall, Melissa M.; Feldman, Sanford H.; Landers, James P.

    2015-01-01

    DNA-paramagnetic silica bead aggregation in a rotating magnetic field facilitates the quantification of DNA with femtogram sensitivity, but yields no sequence-specific information. Here we provide an original description of aggregation inhibition for the detection of DNA and RNA in a sequence-specific manner following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The fragments generated via LAMP fail to induce chaotrope-mediated bead aggregation; however, due to their ability to passivate the bead surface, they effectively inhibit bead aggregation by longer ‘trigger’ DNA. We demonstrate the utility of aggregation inhibition as a method for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens with sensitivity that approaches single copies of the target. We successfully use this methodology for the detection of notable food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica, as well as Rift Valley fever virus, a weaponizable virus of national security concern. We also show the concentration dependence of aggregation inhibition, suggesting the potential for quantification of target nucleic acid in clinical and environmental samples. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly detect infectious pathogens by utilizing a cell phone and custom-written application (App), making this novel detection modality fully portable for point-of-care use. PMID:26068926

  17. Optical Imaging of Paramagnetic Bead-DNA Aggregation Inhibition Allows for Low Copy Number Detection of Infectious Pathogens.

    PubMed

    DuVall, Jacquelyn A; Borba, Juliane C; Shafagati, Nazly; Luzader, Deborah; Shukla, Nishant; Li, Jingyi; Kehn-Hall, Kylene; Kendall, Melissa M; Feldman, Sanford H; Landers, James P

    2015-01-01

    DNA-paramagnetic silica bead aggregation in a rotating magnetic field facilitates the quantification of DNA with femtogram sensitivity, but yields no sequence-specific information. Here we provide an original description of aggregation inhibition for the detection of DNA and RNA in a sequence-specific manner following loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP). The fragments generated via LAMP fail to induce chaotrope-mediated bead aggregation; however, due to their ability to passivate the bead surface, they effectively inhibit bead aggregation by longer 'trigger' DNA. We demonstrate the utility of aggregation inhibition as a method for the detection of bacterial and viral pathogens with sensitivity that approaches single copies of the target. We successfully use this methodology for the detection of notable food-borne pathogens Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Salmonella enterica, as well as Rift Valley fever virus, a weaponizable virus of national security concern. We also show the concentration dependence of aggregation inhibition, suggesting the potential for quantification of target nucleic acid in clinical and environmental samples. Lastly, we demonstrate the ability to rapidly detect infectious pathogens by utilizing a cell phone and custom-written application (App), making this novel detection modality fully portable for point-of-care use. PMID:26068926

  18. A comparison of in-house real-time LAMP assays with a commercial assay for the detection of pathogenic bacteria

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Molecular detection of bacterial pathogens based on LAMP methods is a faster and simpler approach than conventional culture methods. Although different LAMP-based methods for pathogenic bacterial detection are available, a systematic comparison of these different LAMP assays has not been performed. ...

  19. Clinical Evaluation of the New High-Throughput Luminex NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel Assay for Multiplex Respiratory Pathogen Detection.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jonathan H K; Lam, Ho-Yin; Yip, Cyril C Y; Wong, Sally C Y; Chan, Jasper F W; Ma, Edmond S K; Cheng, Vincent C C; Tang, Bone S F; Yuen, Kwok-Yung

    2016-07-01

    A broad range of viral and bacterial pathogens can cause acute respiratory tract infection. For rapid detection of a broad respiratory pathogen spectrum, multiplex real-time PCR is ideal. This study evaluated the performance of the new Luminex NxTAG Respiratory Pathogen Panel (NxTAG-RPP) in comparison with the BioFire FilmArray Respiratory Panel (FA-RP) or singleplex real-time PCR as reference. A total of 284 clinical respiratory specimens and 3 influenza A/H7N9 viral culture samples were tested. All clinical specimens were processed and analyzed in parallel using NxTAG-RPP and the reference standard method. The H7N9 viral culture samples were tested using NxTAG-RPP only. Overall, the NxTAG-RPP demonstrated ≥93% sensitivity and specificity for all respiratory targets except human coronavirus OC43 (HCoV-OC43) and HCoV-HKU1. The H7N9 virus was detected by the influenza A virus matrix gene target, while other influenza A virus subtyping gene targets in the panel remained negative. Complete concordance between NxTAG-RPP and FA-RP was observed in 98.8% (318/322) of positive results (kappa = 0.92). Substantial agreement was found for most respiratory targets, but significant differences were observed in human metapneumovirus (P = 0.001) and parainfluenza virus type 3 (P = 0.031). NxTAG-RPP has a higher sample throughput than FA-RP (96 samples versus 1 sample per run) while the turnaround times for NxTAG-RPP and FA-RP were 5 h (up to 96 samples) and 1 h (for one sample), respectively. Overall, NxTAG-RPP demonstrated good diagnostic performance for most respiratory pathogens. The high sample throughput with reasonable turnaround time of this new assay makes it a suitable multiplex platform for routine screening of respiratory specimens in hospital-based laboratories. PMID:27122380

  20. Detection of viral and bacterial pathogens in hospitalized children with acute respiratory illnesses, Chongqing, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Wei, Lan; Liu, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Ai; Liu, En-Mei; Wo, Yin; Cowling, Benjamin J; Cao, Wu-Chun

    2015-04-01

    Acute respiratory infections (ARIs) cause large disease burden each year. The codetection of viral and bacterial pathogens is quite common; however, the significance for clinical severity remains controversial. We aimed to identify viruses and bacteria in hospitalized children with ARI and the impact of mixed detections.Hospitalized children with ARI aged ≤16 were recruited from 2009 to 2013 at the Children's Hospital of Chongqing Medical University, Chongqing, China. Nasopharyngeal aspirates (NPAs) were collected for detection of common respiratory viruses by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) or PCR. Bacteria were isolated from NPAs by routine culture methods. Detection and codetection frequencies and clinical features and severity were compared.Of the 3181 hospitalized children, 2375 (74.7%) were detected with ≥1 virus and 707 (22.2%) with ≥1 bacteria, 901 (28.3%) with ≥2 viruses, 57 (1.8%) with ≥2 bacteria, and 542 (17.0%) with both virus and bacteria. The most frequently detected were Streptococcus pneumoniae, respiratory syncytial virus, parainfluenza virus, and influenza virus. Clinical characteristics were similar among different pathogen infections for older group (≥6 years old), with some significant difference for the younger. Cases with any codetection were more likely to present with fever; those with ≥2 virus detections had higher prevalence of cough; cases with virus and bacteria codetection were more likely to have cough and sputum. No significant difference in the risk of pneumonia, severe pneumonia, and intensive care unit admission were found for any codetection than monodetection.There was a high codetection rate of common respiratory pathogens among hospitalized pediatric ARI cases, with fever as a significant predictor. Cases with codetection showed no significant difference in severity than those with single pathogens. PMID:25906103

  1. Detecting Sex-Biased Gene Flow in African-Americans through the Analysis of Intra- and Inter-Population Variation at Mitochondrial DNA and Y- Chromosome Microsatellites

    PubMed Central

    Battaggia, C; Anagnostou, P; Bosch, I; Brisighelli, F; Destro-Bisol, G; Capocasa, M

    2012-01-01

    This study reports on variations at the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) hypervariable region 1 (HVR-1) and at seven Y-chromosome microsatellites in an African-American population sample from Chicago, IL, USA. Our results support the hypothesis that the population studied had undergone a European male-biased gene flow. We show that comparisons of intra-and inter-population diversity parameters between African-Americans, Europeans and Africans may help detect sex-biased gene flow, providing a complement to quantitative methods to estimate genetic admixture. PMID:24052726

  2. Rapid pathogen detection by lateral-flow immunochromatographic assay with gold nanoparticle-assisted enzyme signal amplification.

    PubMed

    Cho, Il-Hoon; Bhunia, Arun; Irudayaraj, Joseph

    2015-08-01

    To date most LF-ICA format for pathogen detection is based on generating color signals from gold nanoparticle (AuNP) tracers that are perceivable by naked eye but often these methods exhibit sensitivity lower than those associated with the conventional enzyme-based immunological methods or mandated by the regulatory guidelines. By developing AuNP avidin-biotin constructs in which a number of enzymes can be labeled we report on an enhanced LF-ICA system to detect pathogens at very low levels. With this approach we show that as low as 100 CFU/mL of Escherichia coli O157:H7 can be detected, indicating that the limit of detection can be increased by about 1000-fold due to our signal amplification approach. In addition, extensive cross-reactivity experiments were conducted (19 different organisms were used) to test and successfully validate the specificity of the assay. Semi-quantitative analysis can be performed using signal intensities which were correlated with the target pathogen concentrations for calibration by image processing. PMID:25955290

  3. Molecular detection and treatment of tick-borne pathogens in domestic dogs in Khon Kaen, northeastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Laummaunwai, Porntip; Sriraj, Pranee; Aukkanimart, Ratchadawan; Boonmars, Thidarut; Boonjaraspinyo, Sirintip; Sangmaneedet, Somboon; Potchimplee, Prapasara; Khianman, Parin; Maleewong, Wanchai

    2014-09-01

    We determined the prevalence of tick-borne pathogens in domestic dogs using microscopy and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques. A total of 303 EDTA blood samples were collected from domestic dogs in Khon Kaen Province, Thailand, in May 2013. Microscopic observation of Giemsa-stained smears and molecular diagnosis using conventional PCR were performed. Infected dogs were treated with imidocarb dipropionate, a combination of imidocarb dipropionate and doxycycline, or doxycycline alone. Seventy-one (23.4%) out of 303 dogs were positive for DNA of tick-borne pathogens. Of the 303 animals, 13.2% and 1.3% were positive for a single infection with Babesia spp or Ehrlichia canis, respec- tively using microscopy; whereas 19.5% and 3.0% were positive using the PCR technique. Co-infection with Babesia spp and E. canis was observed in 0.7%, and coinfection with Hepatozoon canis and E. canis in 0.3%. Infected dogs were treated with the assigned drugs, and elimination of the pathogens was demonstrated by microscopy and PCR. The results indicated that while both microscopic and PCR diagnostic techniques were useful for tick-borne pathogen detection, PCR was more effective. Imidocarb dipropionate and doxycycline were found to be effective for treatment of babesiosis and ehrlichiosis, respectively. The present study suggests that the PCR technique has high sensitivity and specificity for Babesia and Ehrlichia diagnosis as well as for detection of Babesia spp, E. canis and H. canis DNA in EDTA blood specimens. PMID:25417519

  4. Detection of east/central/south African genotype of chikungunya virus in Myanmar, 2010.

    PubMed

    Tun, Mya Myat Ngwe; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Inoue, Shingo; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Aoki, Kotaro; Kyaw, Aung Kyaw; Myint, Tin; Tar, Thi; Maung, Kay Thwe Thwe; Hayasaka, Daisuke; Morita, Kouichi

    2014-08-01

    In 2010, chikungunya virus of the East Central South African genotype was isolated from 4 children in Myanmyar who had dengue-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the E1 gene revealed that the isolates were closely related to isolates from China, Thailand, and Malaysia that harbor the A226V mutation in this gene. PMID:25062511

  5. Detection of East/Central/South African Genotype of Chikungunya Virus in Myanmar, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Tun, Mya Myat Ngwe; Thant, Kyaw Zin; Inoue, Shingo; Nabeshima, Takeshi; Aoki, Kotaro; Kyaw, Aung Kyaw; Myint, Tin; Tar, Thi; Maung, Kay Thwe Thwe; Hayasaka, Daisuke

    2014-01-01

    In 2010, chikungunya virus of the East Central South African genotype was isolated from 4 children in Myanmyar who had dengue-like symptoms. Phylogenetic analysis of the E1 gene revealed that the isolates were closely related to isolates from China, Thailand, and Malaysia that harbor the A226V mutation in this gene. PMID:25062511

  6. Multiplex polymerase chain reaction for the detection and differentiation of avian influenza viruses and other poultry respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Rashid, S; Naeem, K; Ahmed, Z; Saddique, N; Abbas, M A; Malik, S A

    2009-12-01

    A multiplex reverse transcription-PCR (mRT-PCR) was developed and standardized for the detection of type A influenza viruses, avian influenza virus (AIV) subtype H7, H9, and H5 hemagglutinin gene with simultaneous detection of 3 other poultry respiratory pathogens, Newcastle disease virus (NDV), infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), and infectious laryngotracheitis virus (ILTV). Seven sets of specific oligonucleotide primers were used in this study for the M gene of AIV and hemagglutinin gene of subtypes H7, H9, and H5 of AIV. Three sets of other specific oligonucleotide primers were used for the detection of avian respiratory pathogens other than AIV. The mRT-PCR DNA products were visualized by agarose gel electrophoresis and consisted of DNA fragments of 1,023 bp for M gene of AIV, 149 bp for IBV, 320 bp for NDV, and 647 bp for ILTV. The second set of primers used for m-RT-PCR of H7N3, H9N2, and H5N1 provided DNA products of 300 bp for H7, 456 bp for H5, and 808 bp for H9. The mRT-PCR products for the third format consisted of DNA fragments of 149 bp for IBV, 320 bp for NDV, 647 bp for ILTV, 300 bp for H7, 456 bp for H5, and 808 bp for H9. The sensitivity and specificity of mRT-PCR was determined and the test was found to be sensitive and specific for the detection of AIV and other poultry respiratory pathogens. In this present study, multiplex PCR technique has been developed to simultaneously detect and differentiate the 3 most important subtypes of AIV along with the 3 most common avian respiratory pathogens prevalent in poultry in Pakistan. Therefore, a mRT-PCR that can rapidly differentiate between these pathogens will be very important for the control of disease transmission in poultry and in humans, along with the identification of 3 of the most common respiratory pathogens often seen as mixed infections in poultry, and hence economic losses will be reduced in poultry. PMID:19903950

  7. DETECTING AND MITIGATING THE ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT OF FECAL PATHOGENS ORIGINATING FROM CONFINED ANIMAL FEEDING OPERATIONS: REVIEW

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report presents a review of literature regarding the potential impact of fecal pathogens originating from animal agriculture in the United States. Livestock production and dairy operations continue their trend toward larger and more concentrated facilities. These operations ...

  8. REAL-TIME PCR DETECTION OF THREE HUMAN-PATHOGENIC SPECIES FROM THE MICROSPORIDIAL GENUS ENCEPHALITOZOON

    EPA Science Inventory

    Three microsporidial species from the genus Encephalitozoon, E. hellem, E. cuniculi and E. intestinalis, have emerged as important opportunistic pathogens of humans affecting organ transplant recipients, AIDS patients, and other immunocompromised patients. Even though these thre...

  9. Single-Digit Pathogen and Attomolar Detection with the Naked Eye Using Liposome-Amplified Plasmonic Immunoassay.

    PubMed

    Bui, Minh-Phuong Ngoc; Ahmed, Snober; Abbas, Abdennour

    2015-09-01

    We introduce an enzyme-free plasmonic immunoassay with a binary (all-or-none) response. The presence of a single pathogen in the sample results in a chemical cascade reaction leading to a large red to dark-blue colorimetric shift visible to the naked eye. The immediate and amplified response is initiated by a triggered breakdown of cysteine-loaded nanoliposomes and subsequent aggregation of plasmonic gold nanoparticles. Our approach enabled visual detection of a single-digit live pathogen of Salmonella, Listeria, and E. coli O157 in water and food samples. Furthermore, the assay allowed a naked-eye detection of target antibody concentrations as low as 6.7 attomolar (600 molecules in 150 μL); six orders of magnitude lower than conventional enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). PMID:26308387

  10. Rapid and sensitive detection of an intracellular pathogen in human peripheral leukocytes with hybridizing magnetic relaxation nanosensors.

    PubMed

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Boukhriss, Hamza; Santra, Santimukul; Naser, Saleh A; Perez, J Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections are still a major global healthcare problem. The quick and sensitive detection of pathogens responsible for these infections would facilitate correct diagnosis of the disease and expedite treatment. Of major importance are intracellular slow-growing pathogens that reside within peripheral leukocytes, evading recognition by the immune system and detection by traditional culture methods. Herein, we report the use of hybridizing magnetic nanosensors (hMRS) for the detection of an intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The hMRS are designed to bind to a unique genomic sequence found in the MAP genome, causing significant changes in the sample's magnetic resonance signal. Clinically relevant samples, including tissue and blood, were screened with hMRS and results were compared with traditional PCR analysis. Within less than an hour, the hMRS identified MAP-positive samples in a library of laboratory cultures, clinical isolates, blood and homogenized tissues. Comparison of the hMRS with culture methods in terms of prediction of disease state revealed that the hMRS outperformed established culture methods, while being significantly faster (1 hour vs 12 weeks). Additionally, using a single instrument and one nanoparticle preparation we were able to detect the intracellular bacterial target in clinical samples at the genomic and epitope levels. Overall, since the nanoparticles are robust in diverse environmental settings and substantially more affordable than PCR enzymes, the potential clinical and field-based use of hMRS in the multiplexed identification of microbial pathogens and other disease-related biomarkers via a single, deployable instrument in clinical and complex environmental samples is foreseen. PMID:22496916

  11. High-throughput detection of food-borne pathogenic bacteria using oligonucleotide microarray with quantum dots as fluorescent labels.

    PubMed

    Huang, Aihua; Qiu, Zhigang; Jin, Min; Shen, Zhiqiang; Chen, Zhaoli; Wang, Xinwei; Li, Jun-Wen

    2014-08-18

    Bacterial pathogens are mostly responsible for food-borne diseases, and there is still substantial room for improvement in the effective detection of these organisms. In the present study, we explored a new method to detect target pathogens easily and rapidly with high sensitivity and specificity. This method uses an oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots as fluorescent labels. Oligonucleotide probes targeting the 16SrRNA gene were synthesized to create an oligonucleotide microarray. The PCR products labeled with biotin were subsequently hybridized using an oligonucleotide microarray. Following incubation with CdSe/ZnS quantum dots coated with streptavidin, fluorescent signals were detected with a PerkinElmer Gx Microarray Scanner. The results clearly showed specific hybridization profiles corresponding to the bacterial species assessed. Two hundred and sixteen strains of food-borne bacterial pathogens, including standard strains and isolated strains from food samples, were used to test the specificity, stability, and sensitivity of the microarray system. We found that the oligonucleotide microarray combined with quantum dots used as fluorescent labels can successfully discriminate the bacterial organisms at the genera or species level, with high specificity and stability as well as a sensitivity of 10 colony forming units (CFU)/mL of pure culture. We further tested 105 mock-contaminated food samples and achieved consistent results as those obtained from traditional biochemical methods. Together, these results indicate that the quantum dot-based oligonucleotide microarray has the potential to be a powerful tool in the detection and identification of pathogenic bacteria in foods. PMID:24927399

  12. Evaluation of the California mastitis test to detect an intramammary infection with a major pathogen in early lactation dairy cows.

    PubMed

    Dingwell, Randy T; Leslie, Ken E; Schukken, Ynte H; Sargeant, Jan M; Timms, Leo L

    2003-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the California mastitis test (CMT) to detect an intramammary infection caused by a major mastitis pathogen in early lactation cows. The gold standard used for comparison was bacteriological culture of single milk samples. The sensitivity (82.4%) and specificity (80.6%) of a positive CMT were highest on the 4th day of lactation. PMID:12757133

  13. Evaluation of the California mastitis test to detect an intramammary infection with a major pathogen in early lactation dairy cows

    PubMed Central

    Dingwell, Randy T.; Leslie, Ken E.; Schukken, Ynte H.; Sargeant, Jan M.; Timms, Leo L.

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of the California mastitis test (CMT) to detect an intramammary infection caused by a major mastitis pathogen in early lactation cows. The gold standard used for comparison was bacteriological culture of single milk samples. The sensitivity (82.4%) and specificity (80.6%) of a positive CMT were highest on the 4th day of lactation. PMID:12757133

  14. Rapid and Sensitive Detection of an Intracellular Pathogen in Human Peripheral Leukocytes with Hybridizing Magnetic Relaxation Nanosensors

    PubMed Central

    Kaittanis, Charalambos; Boukhriss, Hamza; Santra, Santimukul; Naser, Saleh A.; Perez, J. Manuel

    2012-01-01

    Bacterial infections are still a major global healthcare problem. The quick and sensitive detection of pathogens responsible for these infections would facilitate correct diagnosis of the disease and expedite treatment. Of major importance are intracellular slow-growing pathogens that reside within peripheral leukocytes, evading recognition by the immune system and detection by traditional culture methods. Herein, we report the use of hybridizing magnetic nanosensors (hMRS) for the detection of an intracellular pathogen, Mycobacterium avium spp. paratuberculosis (MAP). The hMRS are designed to bind to a unique genomic sequence found in the MAP genome, causing significant changes in the sample’s magnetic resonance signal. Clinically relevant samples, including tissue and blood, were screened with hMRS and results were compared with traditional PCR analysis. Within less than an hour, the hMRS identified MAP-positive samples in a library of laboratory cultures, clinical isolates, blood and homogenized tissues. Comparison of the hMRS with culture methods in terms of prediction of disease state revealed that the hMRS outperformed established culture methods, while being significantly faster (1 hour vs 12 weeks). Additionally, using a single instrument and one nanoparticle preparation we were able to detect the intracellular bacterial target in clinical samples at the genomic and epitope levels. Overall, since the nanoparticles are robust in diverse environmental settings and substantially more affordable than PCR enzymes, the potential clinical and field-based use of hMRS in the multiplexed identification of microbial pathogens and other disease-related biomarkers via a single, deployable instrument in clinical and complex environmental samples is foreseen. PMID:22496916

  15. Highly sensitive detection of a bio-threat pathogen by gold nanoparticle-based oligonucleotide-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Seo, Sang-Hwan; Lee, Young-Ran; Ho Jeon, Jun; Hwang, Yi-Rang; Park, Pil-Gu; Ahn, Dae-Ro; Han, Ki-Cheol; Rhie, Gi-Eun; Hong, Kee-Jong

    2015-02-15

    Francisella (F.) tularensis causes the zoonotic disease tularemia and categorized as one of the highest-priority biological agents. The sensing approaches utilized by conventional detection methods, including enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), are not sensitive enough to identify an infectious dose of this high-risk pathogen due to its low infective dose. As an attempt to detect F. tularensis with high sensitivity, we utilized the highly sensitive immunoassay system named gold nanoparticle-based oligonucleotide-linked immunosorbent assay (GNP-OLISA) which uses antibody-gold nanoparticles conjugated with DNA strands as a signal generator and RNA oligonucleotides appended with a fluorophore as a quencher for signal amplification. We modified the GNP-OLISA for the detection F. tularensis to utilize one antibody for both the capture of the target and for signal generation instead of using two different antibodies, which are usually employed to construct the antibody sandwich in the ELISA. The GNP-OLISA showed 37-fold higher sensitivity compared with ELISA and generated very consistent detection results in the sera. In addition, the detection specificity was not affected by the presence of non-target bacteria, suggesting that GNP-OLISA can be used as a sensitive detection platform for monitoring high-risk pathogens thereby overcoming the limit of the conventional assay system. PMID:25194798

  16. Development of a DNA macroarray for simultaneous detection of multiple foodborne pathogenic bacteria in fresh chicken meat.

    PubMed

    Kupradit, Chanida; Rodtong, Sureelak; Ketudat-Cairns, Mariena

    2013-12-01

    A DNA macroarray was developed to provide the ability to detect multiple foodborne pathogens in fresh chicken meat. Probes targeted to the 16S rRNA and genus- and species-specific genes, including fimY, ipaH, prfA, and uspA, were selected for the specific detection of Salmonella spp., Shigella spp., Listeria monocytogenes, and Escherichia coli, respectively. The combination of target gene amplification by PCR and a DNA macroarray in our system was able to distinguish all target bacteria from pure cultures with a detection sensitivity of 10⁵ c.f.u. ml⁻¹. The DNA macroarray was also applied to 10 fresh chicken meat samples. The assay validation demonstrated that by combining the enrichment steps for the target bacteria and the DNA macroarray, all 4 target bacteria could be detected simultaneously from the fresh chicken samples. The sensitivity of L. monocytogenes and Shigella boydii detection in the fresh chicken samples was at least 10 and 3 c.f.u. of the initial contamination in 25 g samples, respectively. The advantages of our developed protocol are high accuracy and time reduction when compared to conventional culture. The macroarray developed in our investigation was cost effective compared to modern oligonucleotide microarray techniques because there was no expensive equipment required for the detection of multiple foodborne pathogens. PMID:23754709

  17. An optical biosensor for detection of pathogen biomarkers from Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli in ground beef samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamoureux, Loreen; Adams, Peter; Banisadr, Afsheen; Stromberg, Zachary; Graves, Steven; Montano, Gabriel; Moxley, Rodney; Mukundan, Harshini

    2014-03-01

    Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) poses a serious threat to human health through the consumption of contaminated food products, particularly beef and produce. Early detection in the food chain, and discrimination from other non-pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli), is critical to preventing human outbreaks, and meeting current agricultural screening standards. These pathogens often present in low concentrations in contaminated samples, making discriminatory detection difficult without the use of costly, time-consuming methods (e.g. culture). Using multiple signal transduction schemes (including novel optical methods designed for amphiphiles), specific recognition antibodies, and a waveguide-based optical biosensor developed at Los Alamos National Laboratory, we have developed ultrasensitive detection methods for lipopolysaccharides (LPS), and protein biomarkers (Shiga toxin) of STEC in complex samples (e.g. beef lysates). Waveguides functionalized with phospholipid bilayers were used to pull down amphiphilic LPS, using methods (membrane insertion) developed by our team. The assay format exploits the amphiphilic biochemistry of lipoglycans, and allows for rapid, sensitive detection with a single fluorescent reporter. We have used a combination of biophysical methods (atomic force and fluorescence microscopy) to characterize the interaction of amphiphiles with lipid bilayers, to efficiently design these assays. Sandwich immunoassays were used for detection of protein toxins. Biomarkers were spiked into homogenated ground beef samples to determine performance and limit of detection. Future work will focus on the development of discriminatory antibodies for STEC serotypes, and using quantum dots as the fluorescence reporter to enable multiplex screening of biomarkers.

  18. Sensitive Real-Time PCR Detection of Pathogenic Leptospira spp. and a Comparison of Nucleic Acid Amplification Methods for the Diagnosis of Leptospirosis

    PubMed Central

    Waggoner, Jesse J.; Balassiano, Ilana; Abeynayake, Janaki; Sahoo, Malaya K.; Mohamed-Hadley, Alisha; Liu, Yuanyuan; Vital-Brazil, Juliana Magalhães; Pinsky, Benjamin A.

    2014-01-01

    Background Bacteria of the genus Leptospira, the causative agents of leptospirosis, are categorized into pathogenic and non-pathogenic species. However, the benefit of using a clinical diagnostic that is specific for pathogenic species remains unclear. In this study, we present the development of a real-time PCR (rtPCR) for the detection of pathogenic Leptospira (the pathogenic rtPCR), and we perform a comparison of the pathogenic rtPCR with a published assay that detects all Leptospira species [the undifferentiated febrile illness (UFI) assay] and a reference 16S Leptospira rtPCR, which was originally designed to detect pathogenic species. Methodology/Principal Findings For the pathogenic rtPCR, a new hydrolysis probe was designed for use with primers from the UFI assay, which targets the 16S gene. The pathogenic rtPCR detected Leptospira DNA in 37/37 cultured isolates from 5 pathogenic and one intermediate species. Two strains of the non-pathogenic L. biflexa produced no signal. Clinical samples from 65 patients with suspected leptospirosis were then tested using the pathogenic rtPCR and a reference Leptospira 16S rtPCR. All 65 samples had tested positive for Leptospira using the UFI assay; 62 (95.4%) samples tested positive using the pathogenic rtPCR (p = 0.24). Only 24 (36.9%) samples tested positive in the reference 16S rtPCR (p<0.0001 for comparison with the pathogenic rtPCR and UFI assays). Amplicon sequencing confirmed the detection of pathogenic Leptospira species in 49/50 cases, including 3 cases that were only detected using the UFI assay. Conclusions/Significance The pathogenic rtPCR displayed similar sensitivity to the UFI assay when testing clinical specimens with no difference in specificity. Both assays proved significantly more sensitive than a real-time molecular test used for comparison. Future studies are needed to investigate the clinical and epidemiologic significance of more sensitive Leptospira detection using these tests. PMID:25379890

  19. Sonication cultures of explanted components as an add-on test to routinely conducted microbiological diagnostics improve pathogen detection.

    PubMed

    Holinka, Johannes; Bauer, Leonhard; Hirschl, Alexander M; Graninger, Wolfgang; Windhager, Reinhard; Presterl, Elisabeth

    2011-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to improve the pathogen detection in prosthetic joint infections, particularly to evaluate the feasibility of the sonication culture method in the clinical routine. Explanted components of all patients with presumptive prosthetic or implant infection were sonicated separately in sterile containers to dislodge the adherent bacteria from the surfaces and cultured. The results of sonication culture were compared to the conventional tissue culture. We investigated 60 consecutive patients with loosening of the prostheses or implants Forty patients had septic and 20 aseptic loosening (24 knee prostheses, 21 hip prostheses, 6 mega-prostheses, 2 shoulder prostheses, 6 osteosynthesis, 1 spinal instrumentation). The sensitivity of sonication fluid culture was 83.3%, of single positive tissue culture was 72.2% and 61.1% when two or more cultures yielded the same microorganism. In patients receiving antibiotic therapy the sensitivity was 65.9%, 57.5%, and 42.5%, respectively. Pathogens detected in a single tissue culture as well as in sonication culture yielded a significantly higher rate of prosthetic infection than conventional tissue culture alone (p = 0.008), even in patients receiving continuous antibiotic therapy before explantation (p = 0.016). The sonication method represents an essential add-on in pathogen detection compared to conventional tissue culture. PMID:21337398

  20. Application of real-time quantitative PCR for the detection of selected bacterial pathogens during municipal wastewater treatment.

    PubMed

    Shannon, K E; Lee, D-Y; Trevors, J T; Beaudette, L A

    2007-08-15

    Bacteria were detected at five stages of municipal wastewater treatment using TaqMan(R) real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR). Thirteen probe and primer sets were tested for diverse pathogens that may be present in wastewater, including Aeromonas hydrophila, Bacillus cereus, Clostridium perfringens, Enterococcus faecalis, Escherichia coli, E. coli O157:H7, Helicobacter pylori, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Legionella pneumophila, Listeria monocytogenes, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Salmonella sp., and Staphylococcus aureus. The sensitivity of the assay was 100 fg of genomic DNA (=22 gene copies), based on a standard curve generated using A. hydrophila purified DNA. Samples from five stages of wastewater treatment were collected, including raw wastewater, primary effluents, mixed liquor, waste activated sludge and final effluents. In duplicate samples, E. coli, K. pneumoniae, C. perfringens and E. faecalis were detected throughout the wastewater process, and their numbers decreased by 3.52-3.98, 4.23-4.33, 3.15-3.39, and 3.24 orders of magnitude respectively, between the raw wastewater and final effluent stage. This qPCR method was effective for the detection of pathogens in wastewater and confirmed that the risk of exposure to pathogens in the wastewater discharge was well within the Environment Canada guidelines. PMID:17462712

  1. Evaluation of Giant African Pouched Rats for Detection of Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Patients from a High-Endemic Setting

    PubMed Central

    Reither, Klaus; Jugheli, Levan; Glass, Tracy R.; Sasamalo, Mohamed; Mhimbira, Francis A.; Weetjens, Bart J.; Cox, Christophe; Edwards, Timothy L.; Mulder, Christiaan; Beyene, Negussie W.; Mahoney, Amanda

    2015-01-01

    Background This study established evidence about the diagnostic performance of trained giant African pouched rats for detecting Mycobacterium tuberculosis in sputum of well-characterised patients with presumptive tuberculosis (TB) in a high-burden setting. Methods The TB detection rats were evaluated using sputum samples of patients with presumptive TB enrolled in two prospective cohort studies in Bagamoyo, Tanzania. The patients were characterised by sputum smear microscopy and culture, including subsequent antigen or molecular confirmation of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and by clinical data at enrolment and for at least 5-months of follow-up to determine the reference standard. Seven trained giant African pouched rats were used for the detection of TB in the sputum samples after shipment to the APOPO project in Morogoro, Tanzania. Results Of 469 eligible patients, 109 (23.2%) were culture-positive for Mycobacterium tuberculosis and 128 (27.3%) were non-TB controls with sustained recovery after 5 months without anti-TB treatment. The HIV prevalence was 46%. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve of the seven rats for the detection of culture-positive pulmonary tuberculosis was 0.72 (95% CI 0.66–0.78). An optimal threshold could be defined at ≥2 indications by rats in either sample with a corresponding sensitivity of 56.9% (95% CI 47.0–66.3), specificity of 80.5% (95% CI 72.5–86.9), positive and negative predictive value of 71.3% (95% CI 60.6–80.5) and 68.7% (95% CI 60.6–76.0), and an accuracy for TB diagnosis of 69.6%. The diagnostic performance was negatively influenced by low burden of bacilli, and independent of the HIV status. Conclusion Giant African pouched rats have potential for detection of tuberculosis in sputum samples. However, the diagnostic performance characteristics of TB detection rats do not currently meet the requirements for high-priority, rapid sputum-based TB diagnostics as defined by the World Health

  2. Detection of Zoonotic Pathogens and Characterization of Novel Viruses Carried by Commensal Rattus norvegicus in New York City

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Meera; Firth, Matthew A.; Williams, Simon H.; Frye, Matthew J.; Simmonds, Peter; Conte, Juliette M.; Ng, James; Garcia, Joel; Bhuva, Nishit P.; Lee, Bohyun; Che, Xiaoyu; Quan, Phenix-Lan; Lipkin, W. Ian

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Norway rats (Rattus norvegicus) are globally distributed and concentrate in urban environments, where they live and feed in closer proximity to human populations than most other mammals. Despite the potential role of rats as reservoirs of zoonotic diseases, the microbial diversity present in urban rat populations remains unexplored. In this study, we used targeted molecular assays to detect known bacterial, viral, and protozoan human pathogens and unbiased high-throughput sequencing to identify novel viruses related to agents of human disease in commensal Norway rats in New York City. We found that these rats are infected with bacterial pathogens known to cause acute or mild gastroenteritis in people, including atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli, Clostridium difficile, and Salmonella enterica, as well as infectious agents that have been associated with undifferentiated febrile illnesses, including Bartonella spp., Streptobacillus moniliformis, Leptospira interrogans, and Seoul hantavirus. We also identified a wide range of known and novel viruses from groups that contain important human pathogens, including sapoviruses, cardioviruses, kobuviruses, parechoviruses, rotaviruses, and hepaciviruses. The two novel hepaciviruses discovered in this study replicate in the liver of Norway rats and may have utility in establishing a small animal model of human hepatitis C virus infection. The results of this study demonstrate the diversity of microbes carried by commensal rodent species and highlight the need for improved pathogen surveillance and disease monitoring in urban environments. PMID:25316698

  3. Characterization of Pathogenic Escherichia coli in River Water by Simultaneous Detection and Sequencing of 14 Virulence Genes.

    PubMed

    Gomi, Ryota; Matsuda, Tomonari; Fujimori, Yuji; Harada, Hidenori; Matsui, Yasuto; Yoneda, Minoru

    2015-06-01

    The occurrence of pathogenic Escherichia coli in environmental waters increases the risk of waterborne disease. In this study, 14 virulence genes in 669 E. coli isolates (549 isolates from the Yamato River in Japan, and 30 isolates from each of the following hosts: humans, cows, pigs, and chickens) were simultaneously quantified by multiplex PCR and dual index sequencing to determine the prevalence of potentially pathogenic E. coli. Among the 549 environmental isolates, 64 (12%) were classified as extraintestinal pathogenic E. coli (ExPEC) while eight (1.5%) were classified as intestinal pathogenic E. coli (InPEC). Only ExPEC-associated genes were detected in human isolates and pig isolates, and 11 (37%) and five (17%) isolates were classified as ExPEC, respectively. A high proportion (63%) of cow isolates possessed Shiga-toxin genes (stx1 or stx2) and they were classified as Shiga toxin-producing E. coli (STEC) or enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC). Among the chicken isolates, 14 (47%) possessed iutA, which is an ExPEC-associated gene. This method can determine the sequences as well as the presence/absence of virulence genes. By comparing the sequences of virulence genes, we determined that sequences of iutA were different among sources and may be useful for discriminating isolates, although further studies including larger numbers of isolates are needed. Results indicate that humans are a likely source of ExPEC strains in the river. PMID:25919763

  4. Characterization of ISR region and development of a PCR assay for rapid detection of the fish pathogen Tenacibaculum soleae.

    PubMed

    López, Jose R; Hamman-Khalifa, Abdel M; Navas, José I; de la Herran, Roberto

    2011-11-01

    The aims of this work were to characterize the 16S-23S internal spacer region of the fish pathogen Tenacibaculum soleae and to develop a PCR assay for its identification and detection. All T. soleae strains tested displayed a single internal spacer region class, containing tRNA(I) (le) and tRNA(A) (la) genes; nevertheless, a considerable intraspecific heterogeneity was observed. However, this region proved to be useful for differentiation of T. soleae from related and non-related species. Species-specific primers were designed targeting the 16S rRNA gene and the internal spacer region region, yielding a 1555-bp fragment. Detection limit was of 1 pg DNA per reaction (< 30 bacterial cells) when using pure cultures. The detection level in the presence of DNA from fish or other bacteria was lower; however, 10 pg were detected at a target/background ratio of 1 : 10(5) . The PCR assay proved to be more sensitive than agar cultivation for the detection of T. soleae from naturally diseased fish, offering a useful tool for diagnosis and for understanding the epidemiology of this pathogen. PMID:22092820

  5. Micro-Nano-Bio Diagnostic System for Food Pathogen Detection Revolutionizes Food Safety Management & Protects Consumers Health.

    PubMed

    Gogolides, Evangelos; Tserepi, Angeliki; Jobst, Gerhard; Friedt, Jean-Michel; Rabus, David; Dupuy, Bruno; Bilkova, Zuzana; Descroix, Stephanie; Viovy, Jean-Louis; Papadakis, George; Gizeli, Electra

    2016-01-01

    The development of integrated, fast and affordable platforms for pathogen detection is an emerging area where a multidisciplinary approach is necessary for designing microsystems employing miniaturized devices; these new technologies promise a significant advancement of the current state of analytical testing leading to improved healthcare. In this work, the development of a lab-on-chip microsystem platform for the genetic analysis of Salmonella in milk samples is presented. The heart of the platform is an acoustic detection biochip, integrated with a microfluidic module. This detection platform is combined with a micro-processor, which, alongside with magnetic beads technology and a DNA micro-amplification module, are responsible for performing sample pre-treatment, bacteria lysis, nucleic acid purification and amplification. Automated, multiscale manipulation of fluids in complex microchannel networks is combined with novel sensing principles developed by some of the partners. This system is expected to have a significant impact in food-pathogen detection by providing for the first time an integrated detection test for Salmonella screening in a very short time. Finally, thanks to the low cost and compact technologies involved, the proposed set-up is expected to provide a competitive analytical platform for direct application in field settings. PMID:27225555

  6. Simultaneous Detection of Six Diarrhea-Causing Bacterial Pathogens with an In-House PCR-Luminex Assay

    PubMed Central

    Gratz, Jean; Maro, Athanasia; Kumburu, Happy; Kibiki, Gibson; Taniuchi, Mami; Howlader, Arif Mahmud; Sobuz, Shihab U.; Haque, Rashidul; Talukder, Kaisar A.; Qureshi, Shahida; Zaidi, Anita; Haverstick, Doris M.; Houpt, Eric R.

    2012-01-01

    Diarrhea can be caused by a range of pathogens, including several bacteria. Conventional diagnostic methods, such as culture, biochemical tests, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), are laborious. We developed a 7-plex PCR-Luminex assay to simultaneously screen for several of the major diarrhea-causing bacteria directly in fecal specimens, including pathogenic Aeromonas, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Salmonella, Shigella, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), Vibrio, and Yersinia. We included an extrinsic control to verify extraction and amplification. The assay was first validated with reference strains or isolates and exhibited a limit of detection of 103 to 105 CFU/g of stool for each pathogen as well as quantitative detection up to 109 CFU/g. A total of 205 clinical fecal specimens from individuals with diarrhea, previously cultured for enteric pathogens and tested for Campylobacter by ELISA, were evaluated. Using these predicate methods as standards, sensitivities and specificities of the PCR-Luminex assay were 89% and 94% for Aeromonas, 89% and 93% for Campylobacter, 96% and 95% for Salmonella, 94% and 94% for Shigella, 92% and 97% for Vibrio, and 100% and 100% for Yersinia, respectively. All discrepant results were further examined by singleplex real-time PCR assays targeting different gene regions, which revealed 89% (55/62 results) concordance with the PCR-Luminex assay. The fluorescent signals obtained with this approach exhibited a statistically significant correlation with the cycle threshold (CT) values from the cognate real-time PCR assays (P < 0.05). This multiplex PCR-Luminex assay enables sensitive, specific, and quantitative detection of the major bacterial causes of gastroenteritis. PMID:22075596

  7. Simultaneous detection of six diarrhea-causing bacterial pathogens with an in-house PCR-luminex assay.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jie; Gratz, Jean; Maro, Athanasia; Kumburu, Happy; Kibiki, Gibson; Taniuchi, Mami; Howlader, Arif Mahmud; Sobuz, Shihab U; Haque, Rashidul; Talukder, Kaisar A; Qureshi, Shahida; Zaidi, Anita; Haverstick, Doris M; Houpt, Eric R

    2012-01-01

    Diarrhea can be caused by a range of pathogens, including several bacteria. Conventional diagnostic methods, such as culture, biochemical tests, and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), are laborious. We developed a 7-plex PCR-Luminex assay to simultaneously screen for several of the major diarrhea-causing bacteria directly in fecal specimens, including pathogenic Aeromonas, Campylobacter jejuni, Campylobacter coli, Salmonella, Shigella, enteroinvasive Escherichia coli (EIEC), Vibrio, and Yersinia. We included an extrinsic control to verify extraction and amplification. The assay was first validated with reference strains or isolates and exhibited a limit of detection of 10(3) to 10(5) CFU/g of stool for each pathogen as well as quantitative detection up to 10(9) CFU/g. A total of 205 clinical fecal specimens from individuals with diarrhea, previously cultured for enteric pathogens and tested for Campylobacter by ELISA, were evaluated. Using these predicate methods as standards, sensitivities and specificities of the PCR-Luminex assay were 89% and 94% for Aeromonas, 89% and 93% for Campylobacter, 96% and 95% for Salmonella, 94% and 94% for Shigella, 92% and 97% for Vibrio, and 100% and 100% for Yersinia, respectively. All discrepant results were further examined by singleplex real-time PCR assays targeting different gene regions, which revealed 89% (55/62 results) concordance with the PCR-Luminex assay. The fluorescent signals obtained with this approach exhibited a statistically significant correlation with the cycle threshold (C(T)) values from the cognate real-time PCR assays (P < 0.05). This multiplex PCR-Luminex assay enables sensitive, specific, and quantitative detection of the major bacterial causes of gastroenteritis. PMID:22075596

  8. Development of a versatile lab-on-a-chip enzyme assay platform for pathogen detection in CBRNE scenarios

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klemm, Richard; Schattschneider, Sebastian; Jahn, Tobias; Hlawatsch, Nadine; Julich, Sandra; Becker, Holger; Gärtner, Claudia

    2013-05-01

    The ability to integrate complete assays on a microfluidic chip helps to greatly simplify instrument requirements and allows the use of lab-on-a-chip technology in the field. A core application for such field-portable systems is the detection of pathogens in a CBRNE scenario such as permanent monitoring of airborne pathogens, e.g. in metro stations or hospitals etc. As one assay methodology for the pathogen identification, enzymatic assays were chosen. In order evaluate different detection strategies, the realized on-chip enzyme assay module has been designed as a general platform chip. In all application cases, the assays are based on immobilized probes located in microfluidic channels. Therefore a microfluidic chip was realized containing a set of three individually addressable channels, not only for detection of the sample itself also to have a set of references for a quantitative analysis. It furthermore includes two turning valves and a waste container for clear and sealed storage of potential pathogenic liquids to avoid contamination of the environment. All liquids remain in the chip and can be disposed of in proper way subsequently to the analysis. The chip design includes four inlet ports consisting of one sample port (Luer interface) and three mini Luer interfaces for fluidic support of e.g. washing buffer, substrate and enzyme solution. The sample can be applied via a special, sealable sampling vessel with integrated female Luer interface. Thereby also pre-anaytical contamination of the environment can be provided. Other reagents that are required for analysis will be stored off chip.

  9. NAIPs: building an innate immune barrier against bacterial pathogens. NAIPs function as sensors that initiate innate immunity by detection of bacterial proteins in the host cell cytosol.

    PubMed

    Kofoed, Eric M; Vance, Russell E

    2012-07-01

    The innate immune system of mammals encodes several families of immune detector proteins that monitor the cytosol for signs of pathogen invasion. One important but poorly understood family of cytosolic immunosurveillance proteins is the NLR (nucleotide-binding domain, leucine-rich repeat containing) proteins. Recent work has demonstrated that one subfamily of NLRs, the NAIPs (NLR family, apoptosis inhibitory proteins), are activated by specific interaction with bacterial ligands, such as flagellin. NAIP activation leads to assembly of a large multiprotein complex called the inflammasome, which initiates innate immune responses by activation of the Caspase-1 protease. NAIPs therefore appear to detect pathogen molecules via a simple and direct receptor-ligand mechanism. Interestingly, other NLR family members appear to detect pathogens indirectly, perhaps by responding to host cell "stress" caused by the pathogen. Thus, the NLR family may have evolved surprisingly diverse mechanisms for detecting pathogens. PMID:22513803

  10. DEVELOPMENT AND APPLICATION OF AN eDNA METHOD TO DETECT AND QUANTIFY A PATHOGENIC PARASITE IN AQUATIC ECOSYSTEMS

    PubMed Central

    Huver, J. R.; Koprivnikar, J.; Johnson, P. T. J.; Whyard, S.

    2015-01-01

    Approaches based on organismal DNA found in the environment (eDNA) have become increasingly utilized for ecological studies and biodiversity inventories as an alternative to traditional field survey methods. Such DNA-based techniques have been largely used to establish the presence of free-living organisms, but have much potential for detecting and quantifying infectious agents in the environment, which are necessary to evaluate disease risk. We developed an eDNA method to examine the distribution and abundance of the trematode Ribeiroia ondatrae, a pathogenic parasite known to cause malformations in North American amphibians. In addition to comparing this eDNA approach to classical host necropsy, we examined the detectability of R. ondatrae in water samples subject to different degradation conditions (time and temperature). Our test exhibited high specificity and sensitivity to R. ondatrae, capable of detecting as little as 14 fg of this parasite’s DNA (1/2500th of a single infectious stage) from field water samples. Compared to our results from amphibian host necropsy, quantitative PCR was ∼ 90% concordant with respect to R. ondatrae detection from 15 field sites and was also a significant predictor of host infection abundance. DNA was still detectable in lab samples after 21 days at 25 °C, indicating that our method is robust to field conditions. By comparing the advantages and disadvantages of eDNA versus traditional survey methods for determining pathogen presence and abundance in the field, we found that the lower costs and effort associated with eDNA approaches provide many advantages. The development of alternative tools is critical for disease ecology as wildlife management and conservation efforts require reliable establishment and monitoring of pathogens. PMID:26380540

  11. LAMP detection assays for boxwood blight pathogens: A comparative genomics approach

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Demers, Jill E.; Veltri, Daniel; Marra, Robert E.; Crouch, Jo Anne

    2016-05-20

    Rapid and accurate molecular diagnostic tools are critical to efforts to minimize the impact and spread of emergent pathogens. The identification of diagnostic markers for novel pathogens presents several challenges, especially in the absence of information about population diversity and where genetic resources are limited. The objective of this study was to use comparative genomics datasets to find unique target regions suitable for the diagnosis of two fungal species causing a newly emergent blight disease of boxwood. Candidate marker regions for loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays were identified from draft genomes of Calonectria henricotiae and C. pseudonaviculata, as well asmore » three related species not associated with this disease. To increase the probability of identifying unique targets, we used three approaches to mine genome datasets, based on (i) unique regions, (ii) polymorphisms, and (iii) presence/absence of regions across datasets. From a pool of candidate markers, we demonstrate LAMP assay specificity by testing related fungal species, common boxwood pathogens, and environmental samples containing 445 diverse fungal taxa. In conclusion, this comparative-genomics-based approach to the development of LAMP diagnostic assays is the first of its kind for fungi and could be easily applied to diagnostic marker development for other newly emergent plant pathogens.« less

  12. The potential for early and rapid pathogen detection within poultry processing through hyperspectral microscopy

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The acquisition of hyperspectral microscopic images containing both spatial and spectral data has shown potential for the early and rapid optical classification of foodborne pathogens. A hyperspectral microscope with a metal halide light source and acousto-optical tunable filter (AOTF) collects 89 ...

  13. LAMP Detection Assays for Boxwood Blight Pathogens: A Comparative Genomics Approach.

    PubMed

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Demers, Jill E; Veltri, Daniel; Marra, Robert E; Crouch, Jo Anne

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and accurate molecular diagnostic tools are critical to efforts to minimize the impact and spread of emergent pathogens. The identification of diagnostic markers for novel pathogens presents several challenges, especially in the absence of information about population diversity and where genetic resources are limited. The objective of this study was to use comparative genomics datasets to find unique target regions suitable for the diagnosis of two fungal species causing a newly emergent blight disease of boxwood. Candidate marker regions for loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays were identified from draft genomes of Calonectria henricotiae and C. pseudonaviculata, as well as three related species not associated with this disease. To increase the probability of identifying unique targets, we used three approaches to mine genome datasets, based on (i) unique regions, (ii) polymorphisms, and (iii) presence/absence of regions across datasets. From a pool of candidate markers, we demonstrate LAMP assay specificity by testing related fungal species, common boxwood pathogens, and environmental samples containing 445 diverse fungal taxa. This comparative-genomics-based approach to the development of LAMP diagnostic assays is the first of its kind for fungi and could be easily applied to diagnostic marker development for other newly emergent plant pathogens. PMID:27199028

  14. Serum and egg yolk antibody detection in chickens infected with low pathogenicity avian influenza virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Surveillance for low pathogenicity avian influenza virus (LPAIV) infections has primarily relied on labor intensive collection and serological testing of serum, but for many poultry diseases, easier to collect yolk samples have replaced serum for surveillance testing. A time course LPAIV infection s...

  15. DEVELOPMENT OF A BIOMARKER SYSTEM FOR DETECTING EXPOSURE TO WATERBORNE VIRAL PATHOGENS

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA has published a drinking water contaminant candidate list (CCL) that includes waterborne pathogens and chemicals that may be considered for regulation at a future date. For each contaminant on the CCL, the Agency will need sufficient data to conduct analyses on the extent of...

  16. Application of a multiplex immunoassay for detection of salivary antibody responses to selected potentially waterborne pathogens

    EPA Science Inventory

    Although this work was reviewed by EPA and approved for publication, it may not necessarily reflect official Agency policy. Pathogen-specific antibodies in saliva can be used as bioindicators of recent or ongoing infection. Because collection of saliva is easy and painless, i...

  17. In Silico Detection of Virulence Gene Homologues in the Human Pathogen Sphingomonas Spp.

    PubMed Central

    Saeb, Amr TM; David, Satish Kumar; Al-Brahim, Hissa

    2014-01-01

    There is an ongoing debate about the clinical significance of Sphingomonas paucimobilis as a virulent bacterial pathogen. In the present study, we investigated the presence of different virulence factors and genes in Sphingomonas bacteria. We utilized phylogenetic, comparative genomics and bioinformatics analysis to investigate the potentiality of Sphingomonas bacteria as virulent pathogenic bacteria. The 16S ribosomal RNA gene (16S rDNA) phylogenetic tree showed that the closest bacterial taxon to Sphingomonas is Brucella with a bootstrap value of 87 followed by Helicobacter, Campylobacter, Pseudomonas, and then Legionella. Sphingomonas shared no virulence factors with Helicobacter or Campylobacter, despite their close phylogenic relationship. In spite of the phylogenetic divergence between Sphingomonas and Pseudomonas, they shared many major virulence factors, such as adherence, antiphagocytosis, iron uptake, proteases, and quorum sensing. In conclusion, Sphingomonas spp. contains several major virulence factors resembling Pseudomonas sp., Legionella sp., Brucella sp., and Bordetella sp. virulence factors. Similarity of virulence factors did not match phylogenetic relationships. These findings suggest horizontal gene transfer of virulence factors rather than sharing a common pathogenic ancestor. Sphingomonas spp. is potential virulent bacterial pathogen. PMID:25574122

  18. Widespread occurrence of diverse human pathogenic types of the fungus Fusarium detected in plumbing drains

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    It has been proposed that plumbing systems might serve as a significant environmental reservoir of human pathogenic isolates of Fusarium. We tested this hypothesis by performing the first extensive multilocus sequence typing (MLST) survey of plumbing drain-associated Fusarium isolates, and comparing...

  19. Increased detection sensitivity of HLB pathogen by targeting a multi-copy gene

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Citrus huanglongbing (HLB, yellow shoot disease) is a highly destructive disease in citrus production worldwide. “Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus” is the pathogen of HLB based on strong evidence linking this bacterium with the disease. A single incidence of HLB has been reported in California. Alt...

  20. LAMP Detection Assays for Boxwood Blight Pathogens: A Comparative Genomics Approach

    PubMed Central

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Demers, Jill E.; Veltri, Daniel; Marra, Robert E.; Crouch, Jo Anne

    2016-01-01

    Rapid and accurate molecular diagnostic tools are critical to efforts to minimize the impact and spread of emergent pathogens. The identification of diagnostic markers for novel pathogens presents several challenges, especially in the absence of information about population diversity and where genetic resources are limited. The objective of this study was to use comparative genomics datasets to find unique target regions suitable for the diagnosis of two fungal species causing a newly emergent blight disease of boxwood. Candidate marker regions for loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assays were identified from draft genomes of Calonectria henricotiae and C. pseudonaviculata, as well as three related species not associated with this disease. To increase the probability of identifying unique targets, we used three approaches to mine genome datasets, based on (i) unique regions, (ii) polymorphisms, and (iii) presence/absence of regions across datasets. From a pool of candidate markers, we demonstrate LAMP assay specificity by testing related fungal species, common boxwood pathogens, and environmental samples containing 445 diverse fungal taxa. This comparative-genomics-based approach to the development of LAMP diagnostic assays is the first of its kind for fungi and could be easily applied to diagnostic marker development for other newly emergent plant pathogens. PMID:27199028

  1. Capacity building efforts and perceptions for wildlife surveillance to detect zoonotic pathogens: comparing stakeholder perspectives

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The capacity to conduct zoonotic pathogen surveillance in wildlife is critical for the recognition and identification of emerging health threats. The PREDICT project, a component of United States Agency for International Development’s Emerging Pandemic Threats program, has introduced capacity building efforts to increase zoonotic pathogen surveillance in wildlife in global ‘hot spot’ regions where zoonotic disease emergence is likely to occur. Understanding priorities, challenges, and opportunities from the perspectives of the stakeholders is a key component of any successful capacity building program. Methods A survey was administered to wildlife officials and to PREDICT-implementing in-country project scientists in 16 participating countries in order to identify similarities and differences in perspectives between the groups regarding capacity needs for zoonotic pathogen surveillance in wildlife. Results Both stakeholder groups identified some human-animal interfaces (i.e. areas of high contact between wildlife and humans with the potential risk for disease transmission), such as hunting and markets, as important for ongoing targeting of wildlife surveillance. Similarly, findings regarding challenges across stakeholder groups showed some agreement in that a lack of sustainable funding across regions was the greatest challenge for conducting wildlife surveillance for zoonotic pathogens (wildlife officials: 96% and project scientists: 81%). However, the opportunity for improving zoonotic pathogen surveillance capacity identified most frequently by wildlife officials as important was increasing communication or coordination among agencies, sectors, or regions (100% of wildlife officials), whereas the most frequent opportunities identified as important by project scientists were increasing human capacity, increasing laboratory capacity, and the growing interest or awareness regarding wildlife disease or surveillance programs (all identified by 69% of

  2. Development of a LAMP assay for rapid detection of different intimin variants of attaching and effacing microbial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Xue-han, Zhang; Qing, Ye; Ya-dong, Liu; Bin, Li; Renata, Ivanek; Kong-wang, He

    2013-11-01

    Intimin harboured by pathogenic Escherichia coli (E. coli) strains is a key virulence factor involved in host cell adherence and colonization. Twenty-seven intimin-encoding E. coli attaching and effacing (eae) gene variants have been reported according to their 3' binding domain sequences. In our study, we developed a specific and sensitive loop-mediated isothermal amplification (LAMP) assay to detect all known intimin variants. Four primers specific for six regions of eae genes were designed using online software. The eae-LAMP assay was highly specific and detected all 27 tested eae variants; no cross-reactions were observed with genes from enterotoxigenic E. coli (ETEC), E. coli BL21, Salmonella, Shigella, Listeria monocytogenes, or Streptococcus suis type 2 (SS2). With the lowest detection limit of approximately 10 copies per reaction the eae-LAMP assay was 100 times more sensitive than conventional PCR. These results, and the results of tests involving food and faecal samples artificially contaminated with E. coli O157 : H7 (eaeγ+), show that the eae-LAMP assay is a simple, rapid, sensitive and specific tool for detecting intimin variants from pathogenic strains of E. coli. The eae-LAMP assay has great potential for wider applications, not only in the laboratory but also in the field setting, as it does not require specialized equipment. PMID:23893919

  3. Molecular detection of emerging tick-borne pathogens in Vojvodina, Serbia.

    PubMed

    Potkonjak, Aleksandar; Gutiérrez, Ricardo; Savić, Sara; Vračar, Vuk; Nachum-Biala, Yaarit; Jurišić, Aleksandar; Kleinerman, Gabriela; Rojas, Alicia; Petrović, Aleksandra; Baneth, Gad; Harrus, Shimon

    2016-02-01

    Ticks play an important role in disease transmission globally due to their capability to serve as vectors for human and animal pathogens. The Republic of Serbia is an endemic area for a large number of tick-borne diseases. However, current knowledge on these diseases in Serbia is limited. The aim of this study was to investigate the presence of new emerging tick-borne pathogens in ticks collected from dogs and the vegetation from different parts of Vojvodina, Serbia. A total of 187 ticks, including 124 Rhipicephalus sanguineus, 45 Ixodes ricinus and 18 Dermacentor reticulatus were collected from dogs. In addition, 26 questing I. ricinus ticks were collected from the vegetation, using the flagging method, from 4 different localities in Vojvodina, Serbia. DNA was extracted from each tick individually and samples were tested by either conventional or real-time PCR assays for the presence of Rickettsia spp.-DNA (gltA and ompA gene fragments), Ehrlichia/Anaplasma spp.-DNA (16S rRNA gene fragment) and Hepatozoon spp./Babesia spp.-DNA (18S rRNA gene fragment). In addition, all I. ricinus DNA samples were tested for Bartonella spp.-DNA (ITS locus) by real-time PCR. In this study, the presence of novel emerging tick-borne pathogens including Rickettsia raoultii, Rickettsia massiliae, Babesia venatorum, Babesia microti, Hepatozoon canis and Candidatus Neoehrlichia mikurensis was identified for the first time in Serbia. Our findings also confirmed the presence of Rickettsia monacensis, Babesia canis and Anaplasma phagocytophilum in ticks from Serbia. The findings of the current study highlight the great diversity of tick-borne pathogens of human and animal importance in Serbia. Physicians, public health workers and veterinarians should increase alertness to the presence of these tick-borne pathogens in this country. PMID:26565929

  4. Determining the 95% limit of detection for waterborne pathogen analyses from primary concentration to qPCR.

    PubMed

    Stokdyk, Joel P; Firnstahl, Aaron D; Spencer, Susan K; Burch, Tucker R; Borchardt, Mark A

    2016-06-01

    The limit of detection (LOD) for qPCR-based analyses is not consistently defined or determined in studies on waterborne pathogens. Moreover, the LODs reported often reflect the qPCR assay alone rather than the entire sample process. Our objective was to develop an approach to determine the 95% LOD (lowest concentration at which 95% of positive samples are detected) for the entire process of waterborne pathogen detection. We began by spiking the lowest concentration that was consistently positive at the qPCR step (based on its standard curve) into each procedural step working backwards (i.e., extraction, secondary concentration, primary concentration), which established a concentration that was detectable following losses of the pathogen from processing. Using the fraction of positive replicates (n = 10) at this concentration, we selected and analyzed a second, and then third, concentration. If the fraction of positive replicates equaled 1 or 0 for two concentrations, we selected another. We calculated the LOD using probit analysis. To demonstrate our approach we determined the 95% LOD for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, adenovirus 41, and vaccine-derived poliovirus Sabin 3, which were 11, 12, and 6 genomic copies (gc) per reaction (rxn), respectively (equivalent to 1.3, 1.5, and 4.0 gc L(-1) assuming the 1500 L tap-water sample volume prescribed in EPA Method 1615). This approach limited the number of analyses required and was amenable to testing multiple genetic targets simultaneously (i.e., spiking a single sample with multiple microorganisms). An LOD determined this way can facilitate study design, guide the number of required technical replicates, aid method evaluation, and inform data interpretation. PMID:27023926

  5. Determining the 95% limit of detection for waterborne pathogen analyses from primary concentration to qPCR

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Stokdyk, Joel P.; Firnstahl, Aaron; Spencer, Susan K.; Burch, Tucker R; Borchardt, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    The limit of detection (LOD) for qPCR-based analyses is not consistently defined or determined in studies on waterborne pathogens. Moreover, the LODs reported often reflect the qPCR assay alone rather than the entire sample process. Our objective was to develop an approach to determine the 95% LOD (lowest concentration at which 95% of positive samples are detected) for the entire process of waterborne pathogen detection. We began by spiking the lowest concentration that was consistently positive at the qPCR step (based on its standard curve) into each procedural step working backwards (i.e., extraction, secondary concentration, primary concentration), which established a concentration that was detectable following losses of the pathogen from processing. Using the fraction of positive replicates (n = 10) at this concentration, we selected and analyzed a second, and then third, concentration. If the fraction of positive replicates equaled 1 or 0 for two concentrations, we selected another. We calculated the LOD using probit analysis. To demonstrate our approach we determined the 95% LOD for Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium, adenovirus 41, and vaccine-derived poliovirus Sabin 3, which were 11, 12, and 6 genomic copies (gc) per reaction (rxn), respectively (equivalent to 1.3, 1.5, and 4.0 gc L−1 assuming the 1500 L tap-water sample volume prescribed in EPA Method 1615). This approach limited the number of analyses required and was amenable to testing multiple genetic targets simultaneously (i.e., spiking a single sample with multiple microorganisms). An LOD determined this way can facilitate study design, guide the number of required technical replicates, aid method evaluation, and inform data interpretation.

  6. Ultrafiltration and Microarray for Detection of Microbial Source Tracking Marker and Pathogen Genes in Riverine and Marine Systems.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiang; Harwood, Valerie J; Nayak, Bina; Weidhaas, Jennifer L

    2016-03-01

    Pathogen identification and microbial source tracking (MST) to identify sources of fecal pollution improve evaluation of water quality. They contribute to improved assessment of human health risks and remediation of pollution sources. An MST microarray was used to simultaneously detect genes for multiple pathogens and indicators of fecal pollution in freshwater, marine water, sewage-contaminated freshwater and marine water, and treated wastewater. Dead-end ultrafiltration (DEUF) was used to concentrate organisms from water samples, yielding a recovery efficiency of >95% for Escherichia coli and human polyomavirus. Whole-genome amplification (WGA) increased gene copies from ultrafiltered samples and increased the sensitivity of the microarray. Viruses (adenovirus, bocavirus, hepatitis A virus, and human polyomaviruses) were detected in sewage-contaminated samples. Pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila, Shigella flexneri, and Campylobacter fetus were detected along with genes conferring resistance to aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, and tetracycline. Nonmetric dimensional analysis of MST marker genes grouped sewage-spiked freshwater and marine samples with sewage and apart from other fecal sources. The sensitivity (percent true positives) of the microarray probes for gene targets anticipated in sewage was 51 to 57% and was lower than the specificity (percent true negatives; 79 to 81%). A linear relationship between gene copies determined by quantitative PCR and microarray fluorescence was found, indicating the semiquantitative nature of the MST microarray. These results indicate that ultrafiltration coupled with WGA provides sufficient nucleic acids for detection of viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and antibiotic resistance genes by the microarray in applications ranging from beach monitoring to risk assessment. PMID:26729716

  7. Ultrafiltration and Microarray for Detection of Microbial Source Tracking Marker and Pathogen Genes in Riverine and Marine Systems

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xiang; Harwood, Valerie J.; Nayak, Bina

    2016-01-01

    Pathogen identification and microbial source tracking (MST) to identify sources of fecal pollution improve evaluation of water quality. They contribute to improved assessment of human health risks and remediation of pollution sources. An MST microarray was used to simultaneously detect genes for multiple pathogens and indicators of fecal pollution in freshwater, marine water, sewage-contaminated freshwater and marine water, and treated wastewater. Dead-end ultrafiltration (DEUF) was used to concentrate organisms from water samples, yielding a recovery efficiency of >95% for Escherichia coli and human polyomavirus. Whole-genome amplification (WGA) increased gene copies from ultrafiltered samples and increased the sensitivity of the microarray. Viruses (adenovirus, bocavirus, hepatitis A virus, and human polyomaviruses) were detected in sewage-contaminated samples. Pathogens such as Legionella pneumophila, Shigella flexneri, and Campylobacter fetus were detected along with genes conferring resistance to aminoglycosides, beta-lactams, and tetracycline. Nonmetric dimensional analysis of MST marker genes grouped sewage-spiked freshwater and marine samples with sewage and apart from other fecal sources. The sensitivity (percent true positives) of the microarray probes for gene targets anticipated in sewage was 51 to 57% and was lower than the specificity (percent true negatives; 79 to 81%). A linear relationship between gene copies determined by quantitative PCR and microarray fluorescence was found, indicating the semiquantitative nature of the MST microarray. These results indicate that ultrafiltration coupled with WGA provides sufficient nucleic acids for detection of viruses, bacteria, protozoa, and antibiotic resistance genes by the microarray in applications ranging from beach monitoring to risk assessment. PMID:26729716

  8. Detection of HPV and co-infecting pathogens in healthy Italian women by multiplex real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Camporiondo, Maria Pia; Farchi, Francesca; Ciccozzi, Massimo; Denaro, Aurelia; Gallone, Domenica; Maracchioni, Fabio; Favalli, Cartesio; Ciotti, Marco

    2016-01-01

    Several pathogens can be transmitted sexually and are an important cause of morbidity among sexually active women. The aim of the study was to detect the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV), Chlamydia trachomatis (CT), Neisseria gonorrhoeae (NG), Trichomonas vaginalis (TV), Mycoplasma hominis (MH), Mycoplasma genitalium (MG), Ureaplasma urealyticum (UU), and Ureaplasma parvum (UP) in a group of 309 healthy women enrolled at the San Camillo - Forlanini hospital of Rome by using two multiplex real-time PCR assays based on TOCE® technology. The women's ages ranged from 34 to 60 years, median 49 [IQR 45-54]. Of the 309 women tested, HPV DNA was detected in 77/309 (24.9%) patients. Of these, 44 (14.2%) harboured a single infection while 33 (10.7%) were infected by multiple genotypes. Prevalence of HPV infection was highest among females aged 40-50 years (15.2%). Of the other pathogens sought, CT, MG and NG were not detected while positive results were found for MH (12/309, 3.9%), TV (4/309, 1.3%), UP (89/309, 28.8%) and UU (14/309, 4.5%). Co-infections were as follows: 5 MH/HPV, 4 TV/HPV, 34 UP/HPV and 9 UU/HPV. In HPV-positive women, the probability of being infected by UP and UU was 2.5 (p=0.00045) and 6 fold higher (p=0.0016) than in HPV-negative women. The study supports the use of multiplex real-time PCR assays in a routine diagnostic setting. The high sensitivity and specificity of these assays along with the simultaneous detection of the most common sexually transmitted pathogens confers an advantage with respect to more obsolete methods reducing costs and time to diagnosis. PMID:27031891

  9. Reverse Transcription-PCR–Electrospray Ionization Mass Spectrometry for Rapid Detection of Biothreat and Common Respiratory Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Jeng, Kevin; Rothman, Richard; Yang, Samuel; Won, Helen; Peterson, Stephen; Hsieh, Yu-Hsiang; Masek, Billie Jo; Carroll, Karen C.; Gaydos, Charlotte A.

    2013-01-01

    Electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (ESI-MS) analysis of reverse transcription (RT)-PCR amplicons from human respiratory samples allows for broad pathogen identification approximately 8 h after collection. We investigated the performance characteristics of a high-throughput RT-PCR-coupled ESI-MS assay for distinguishing biothreat (BT) agents from common bacterial, fungal, and viral respiratory pathogens in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid specimens from subjects with suspected respiratory infections. In a retrospective case series, 202 BAL fluid specimens were collected at the Johns Hopkins Hospital between August 2010 and February 2011 from patients with suspected acute respiratory infections. Samples were processed using standard bacterial, viral, and fungal testing in the clinical microbiology laboratory as part of routine care and then were blindly spiked with either water or nucleic acids from BT organisms (Bacillus anthracis, Yersinia pestis, Francisella tularensis, Brucella spp., Burkholderia spp., and Rickettsia prowazekii) and tested by RT-PCR–ESI-MS. The sensitivities and specificities of RT-PCR–ESI-MS versus standard clinical methods were as follows: for mock BT DNA, 98.5% sensitivity (95% confidence interval [CI], 94.2 to 99.7%) and 100% specificity (95% CI, 93.1 to 100.0%); for bacterial pathogens, 81.8% sensitivity (95% CI, 74.3 to 87.6%) and 73.6% specificity (95% CI, 64.2 to 81.4%); for viral pathogens, 93.3% sensitivity (95% CI, 66.0 to 99.7%) and 97.3% specificity (95% CI, 89.7 to 99.5%); for fungal pathogens, 42.6% sensitivity (95% CI, 29.5 to 56.7%) and 97.8% specificity (95% CI, 91.8 to 99.6%). Our data suggest that RT-PCR–ESI-MS is a useful adjunct to standard culture protocols for rapid detection of both BT and common respiratory pathogens; further study is required for assay validation, especially for fungal detection, and potential implementation. PMID:23903543

  10. Reverse transcription-PCR-electrospray ionization mass spectrometry for rapid detection of biothreat and common respiratory pathogens.

    PubMed

    Jeng, Kevin; Hardick, Justin; Rothman, Richard; Yang, Samuel; Won, Helen; Peters