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Sample records for detecting rich-club ordering

  1. Rich-club and page-club coefficients for directed graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smilkov, Daniel; Kocarev, Ljupco

    2010-06-01

    Rich-club and page-club coefficients and their null models are introduced for directed graphs. Null models allow for a quantitative discussion of the rich-club and page-club phenomena. These coefficients are computed for four directed real-world networks: Arxiv High Energy Physics paper citation network, Web network (released from Google), Citation network among US Patents, and email network from a EU research institution. The results show a high correlation between rich-club and page-club ordering. For journal paper citation network, we identify both rich-club and page-club ordering, showing that “elite” papers are cited by other “elite” papers. Google web network shows partial rich-club and page-club ordering up to some point and then a narrow declining of the corresponding normalized coefficients, indicating the lack of rich-club ordering and the lack of page-club ordering, i.e. high in-degree (PageRank) pages purposely avoid sharing links with other high in-degree (PageRank) pages. For UC patents citation network, we identify page-club and rich-club ordering providing a conclusion that “elite” patents are cited by other “elite” patents. Finally, for email communication network we show lack of both rich-club and page-club ordering. We construct an example of synthetic network showing page-club ordering and the lack of rich-club ordering.

  2. Statistical significance of the rich-club phenomenon in complex networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zhi-Qiang; Zhou, Wei-Xing

    2008-04-01

    We propose that the rich-club phenomenon in complex networks should be defined in the spirit of bootstrapping, in which a null model is adopted to assess the statistical significance of the rich-club detected. Our method can serve as a definition of the rich-club phenomenon and is applied to analyze three real networks and three model networks. The results show significant improvement compared with previously reported results. We report a dilemma with an exceptional example, showing that there does not exist an omnipotent definition for the rich-club phenomenon.

  3. The rich club of the C. elegans neuronal connectome.

    PubMed

    Towlson, Emma K; Vértes, Petra E; Ahnert, Sebastian E; Schafer, William R; Bullmore, Edward T

    2013-04-10

    There is increasing interest in topological analysis of brain networks as complex systems, with researchers often using neuroimaging to represent the large-scale organization of nervous systems without precise cellular resolution. Here we used graph theory to investigate the neuronal connectome of the nematode worm Caenorhabditis elegans, which is defined anatomically at a cellular scale as 2287 synaptic connections between 279 neurons. We identified a small number of highly connected neurons as a rich club (N = 11) interconnected with high efficiency and high connection distance. Rich club neurons comprise almost exclusively the interneurons of the locomotor circuits, with known functional importance for coordinated movement. The rich club neurons are connector hubs, with high betweenness centrality, and many intermodular connections to nodes in different modules. On identifying the shortest topological paths (motifs) between pairs of peripheral neurons, the motifs that are found most frequently traverse the rich club. The rich club neurons are born early in development, before visible movement of the animal and before the main phase of developmental elongation of its body. We conclude that the high wiring cost of the globally integrative rich club of neurons in the C. elegans connectome is justified by the adaptive value of coordinated movement of the animal. The economical trade-off between physical cost and behavioral value of rich club organization in a cellular connectome confirms theoretical expectations and recapitulates comparable results from human neuroimaging on much larger scale networks, suggesting that this may be a general and scale-invariant principle of brain network organization.

  4. Disruption of rich club organisation in cerebral small vessel disease.

    PubMed

    Tuladhar, Anil M; Lawrence, Andrew; Norris, David G; Barrick, Thomas R; Markus, Hugh S; de Leeuw, Frank-Erik

    2017-04-01

    Cerebral small vessel disease (SVD) is an important cause of vascular cognitive impairment. Recent studies have demonstrated that structural connectivity of brain networks in SVD is disrupted. However, little is known about the extent and location of the reduced connectivity in SVD. Here they investigate the rich club organisation-a set of highly connected and interconnected regions-and investigate whether there is preferential rich club disruption in SVD. Diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and cognitive assessment were performed in a discovery sample of SVD patients (n = 115) and healthy control subjects (n = 50). Results were replicated in an independent dataset (49 SVD with confluent WMH cases and 108 SVD controls) with SVD patients having a similar SVD phenotype to that of the discovery cases. Rich club organisation was examined in structural networks derived from DTI followed by deterministic tractography. Structural networks in SVD patients were less dense with lower network strength and efficiency. Reduced connectivity was found in SVD, which was preferentially located in the connectivity between the rich club nodes rather than in the feeder and peripheral connections, a finding confirmed in both datasets. In discovery dataset, lower rich club connectivity was associated with lower scores on psychomotor speed (β = 0.29, P < 0.001) and executive functions (β = 0.20, P = 0.009). These results suggest that SVD is characterized by abnormal connectivity between rich club hubs in SVD and provide evidence that abnormal rich club organisation might contribute to the development of cognitive impairment in SVD. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1751-1766, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Cortical rich club regions can organize state-dependent functional network formation by engaging in oscillatory behavior.

    PubMed

    Senden, Mario; Reuter, Niels; van den Heuvel, Martijn P; Goebel, Rainer; Deco, Gustavo

    2017-02-01

    Cognition is hypothesized to require the globally coordinated, functionally relevant integration of otherwise segregated information processing carried out by specialized brain regions. Studies of the macroscopic connectome as well as recent neuroimaging and neuromodeling research have suggested a densely connected collective of cortical hubs, termed the rich club, to provide a central workspace for such integration. In order for rich club regions to fulfill this role they must dispose of a dynamic mechanism by which they can actively shape networks of brain regions whose information processing needs to be integrated. A potential candidate for such a mechanism comes in the form of oscillations which might be employed to establish communication channels among relevant brain regions. We explore this possibility using an integrative approach combining whole-brain computational modeling with neuroimaging, wherein we investigate the local dynamics model brain regions need to exhibit in order to fit (dynamic) network behavior empirically observed for resting as well as a range of task states. We find that rich club regions largely exhibit oscillations during task performance but not during rest. Furthermore, oscillations exhibited by rich club regions can harmonize a set of asynchronous brain regions thus supporting functional coupling among them. These findings are in line with the hypothesis that the rich club can actively shape integration using oscillations.

  6. Disrupted rich club network in behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia and early-onset Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Daianu, Madelaine; Mezher, Adam; Mendez, Mario F.; Jahanshad, Neda; Jimenez, Elvira E.; Thompson, Paul M.

    2016-01-01

    In network analysis, the so-called ‘rich club’ describes the core areas of the brain that are more densely interconnected among themselves than expected by chance, and has been identified as a fundamental aspect of the human brain connectome. This is the first in-depth diffusion imaging study to investigate the rich club along with other organizational changes in the brain's anatomical network in behavioral frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), and a matched cohort with early-onset Alzheimer's disease (EOAD). Our study sheds light on how bvFTD and EOAD affect connectivity of white matter fiber pathways in the brain, revealing differences and commonalities in the connectome among the dementias. To analyze the breakdown in connectivity, we studied 3 groups: 20 bvFTD, 23 EOAD and 37 healthy elderly controls. All participants were scanned with diffusion-weighted MRI, and based on whole-brain probabilistic tractography and cortical parcellations, we analyzed the rich club of the brain's connectivity network. This revealed distinct patterns of disruption in both forms of dementia. In the connectome, we detected less disruption overall in EOAD than in bvFTD (False Discovery Rate (FDR) critical Pperm=5.7×10−3, 10,000 permutations), with more involvement of richly interconnected areas of the brain (chi-squared PΧ2=1.4×10−4) – predominantly posterior cognitive alterations. In bvFTD, we found a greater spread of disruption including the rich club (FDR critical Pperm=6×10−4), but especially more peripheral alterations (PΧ2=6.5×10−3), particularly in medial frontal areas of the brain, in line with the known behavioral socioemotional deficits seen in these patients. PMID:26678225

  7. Preterm birth alters neonatal, functional rich club organization.

    PubMed

    Scheinost, Dustin; Kwon, Soo Hyun; Shen, Xilin; Lacadie, Cheryl; Schneider, Karen C; Dai, Feng; Ment, Laura R; Constable, R Todd

    2016-07-01

    Alterations in neural networks are associated with the cognitive difficulties of the prematurely born. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging, we analyzed functional connectivity for preterm (PT) and term neonates at term equivalent age. Specifically, we constructed whole-brain networks and examined rich club (RC) organization, a common construct among complex systems where important (or "rich") nodes connect preferentially to other important nodes. Both PT and term neonates showed RC organization with PT neonates exhibiting significantly reduced connections between these RC nodes. Additionally, PT neonates showed evidence of weaker functional segregation. Our results suggest that PT birth is associated with fundamental changes of functional organization in the developing brain.

  8. Rich club neurons dominate Information Transfer in local cortical networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nigam, Sunny; Shimono, Masanori; Sporns, Olaf; Beggs, John

    2015-03-01

    The performance of complex networks depends on how they route their traffic. It is unknown how information is transferred in local cortical networks of hundreds of closely-spaced neurons. To address this, it is necessary to record simultaneously from hundreds of neurons at a spacing that matches typical axonal connection distances, and at a temporal resolution that matches synaptic delays. We used a 512 electrode array (60 μm spacing) to record spontaneous activity at 20 kHz, simultaneously from up to 700 neurons in slice cultures of mouse somatosensory cortex for 1 hr at a time. We used transfer entropy to quantify directed information transfer (IT) between pairs of neurons. We found an approximately lognormal distribution of firing rates as reported in in-vivo. Pairwise information transfer strengths also were nearly lognormally distributed, similar to synaptic strengths. 20% of the neurons accounted for 70% of the total IT coming into, and going out of the network and were defined as rich nodes. These rich nodes were more densely and strongly connected to each other expected by chance, forming a rich club. This highly uneven distribution of IT has implications for the efficiency and robustness of local cortical networks, and gives clues to the plastic processes that shape them. JSPS.

  9. Generative models of rich clubs in Hebbian neuronal networks and large-scale human brain networks

    PubMed Central

    Vértes, Petra E.; Alexander-Bloch, Aaron; Bullmore, Edward T.

    2014-01-01

    Rich clubs arise when nodes that are ‘rich’ in connections also form an elite, densely connected ‘club’. In brain networks, rich clubs incur high physical connection costs but also appear to be especially valuable to brain function. However, little is known about the selection pressures that drive their formation. Here, we take two complementary approaches to this question: firstly we show, using generative modelling, that the emergence of rich clubs in large-scale human brain networks can be driven by an economic trade-off between connection costs and a second, competing topological term. Secondly we show, using simulated neural networks, that Hebbian learning rules also drive the emergence of rich clubs at the microscopic level, and that the prominence of these features increases with learning time. These results suggest that Hebbian learning may provide a neuronal mechanism for the selection of complex features such as rich clubs. The neural networks that we investigate are explicitly Hebbian, and we argue that the topological term in our model of large-scale brain connectivity may represent an analogous connection rule. This putative link between learning and rich clubs is also consistent with predictions that integrative aspects of brain network organization are especially important for adaptive behaviour. PMID:25180309

  10. Age-associated changes in rich-club organisation in autistic and neurotypical human brains

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Takamitsu; Rees, Geraint

    2015-01-01

    Macroscopic structural networks in the human brain have a rich-club architecture comprising both highly inter-connected central regions and sparsely connected peripheral regions. Recent studies show that disruption of this functionally efficient organisation is associated with several psychiatric disorders. However, despite increasing attention to this network property, whether age-associated changes in rich-club organisation occur during human adolescence remains unclear. Here, analysing a publicly shared diffusion tensor imaging dataset, we found that, during adolescence, brains of typically developing (TD) individuals showed increases in rich-club organisation and inferred network functionality, whereas individuals with autism spectrum disorders (ASD) did not. These differences between TD and ASD groups were statistically significant for both structural and functional properties. Moreover, this typical age-related changes in rich-club organisation were characterised by progressive involvement of the right anterior insula. In contrast, in ASD individuals, did not show typical increases in grey matter volume, and this relative anatomical immaturity was correlated with the severity of ASD social symptoms. These results provide evidence that rich-club architecture is one of the bases of functionally efficient brain networks underpinning complex cognitive functions in adult human brains. Furthermore, our findings suggest that immature rich-club organisation might be associated with some neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:26537477

  11. Rich club analysis in the Alzheimer's disease connectome reveals a relatively undisturbed structural core network.

    PubMed

    Daianu, Madelaine; Jahanshad, Neda; Nir, Talia M; Jack, Clifford R; Weiner, Michael W; Bernstein, Matt A; Thompson, Paul M

    2015-08-01

    Diffusion imaging can assess the white matter connections within the brain, revealing how neural pathways break down in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We analyzed 3-Tesla whole-brain diffusion-weighted images from 202 participants scanned by the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative-50 healthy controls, 110 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and 42 AD patients. From whole-brain tractography, we reconstructed structural brain connectivity networks to map connections between cortical regions. We tested whether AD disrupts the "rich club" - a network property where high-degree network nodes are more interconnected than expected by chance. We calculated the rich club properties at a range of degree thresholds, as well as other network topology measures including global degree, clustering coefficient, path length, and efficiency. Network disruptions predominated in the low-degree regions of the connectome in patients, relative to controls. The other metrics also showed alterations, suggesting a distinctive pattern of disruption in AD, less pronounced in MCI, targeting global brain connectivity, and focusing on more remotely connected nodes rather than the central core of the network. AD involves severely reduced structural connectivity; our step-wise rich club coefficients analyze points to disruptions predominantly in the peripheral network components; other modalities of data are needed to know if this indicates impaired communication among non rich club regions. The highly connected core was relatively preserved, offering new evidence on the neural basis of progressive risk for cognitive decline.

  12. Dwelling quietly in the rich club: brain network determinants of slow cortical fluctuations.

    PubMed

    Gollo, Leonardo L; Zalesky, Andrew; Hutchison, R Matthew; van den Heuvel, Martijn; Breakspear, Michael

    2015-05-19

    For more than a century, cerebral cartography has been driven by investigations of structural and morphological properties of the brain across spatial scales and the temporal/functional phenomena that emerge from these underlying features. The next era of brain mapping will be driven by studies that consider both of these components of brain organization simultaneously--elucidating their interactions and dependencies. Using this guiding principle, we explored the origin of slowly fluctuating patterns of synchronization within the topological core of brain regions known as the rich club, implicated in the regulation of mood and introspection. We find that a constellation of densely interconnected regions that constitute the rich club (including the anterior insula, amygdala and precuneus) play a central role in promoting a stable, dynamical core of spontaneous activity in the primate cortex. The slow timescales are well matched to the regulation of internal visceral states, corresponding to the somatic correlates of mood and anxiety. In contrast, the topology of the surrounding 'feeder' cortical regions shows unstable, rapidly fluctuating dynamics likely to be crucial for fast perceptual processes. We discuss these findings in relation to psychiatric disorders and the future of connectomics.

  13. Emergence of Rich-Club Topology and Coordinated Dynamics in Development of Hippocampal Functional Networks In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Charlesworth, Paul; Kitzbichler, Manfred G.; Paulsen, Ole

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies demonstrated that the anatomical network of the human brain shows a “rich-club” organization. This complex topological feature implies that highly connected regions, hubs of the large-scale brain network, are more densely interconnected with each other than expected by chance. Rich-club nodes were traversed by a majority of short paths between peripheral regions, underlining their potential importance for efficient global exchange of information between functionally specialized areas of the brain. Network hubs have also been described at the microscale of brain connectivity (so-called “hub neurons”). Their role in shaping synchronous dynamics and forming microcircuit wiring during development, however, is not yet fully understood. The present study aimed to investigate the role of hubs during network development, using multi-electrode arrays and functional connectivity analysis during spontaneous multi-unit activity (MUA) of dissociated primary mouse hippocampal neurons. Over the first 4 weeks in vitro, functional connectivity significantly increased in strength, density, and size, with mature networks demonstrating a robust modular and small-world topology. As expected by a “rich-get-richer” growth rule of network evolution, MUA graphs were found to form rich-clubs at an early stage in development (14 DIV). Later on, rich-club nodes were a consistent topological feature of MUA graphs, demonstrating high nodal strength, efficiency, and centrality. Rich-club nodes were also found to be crucial for MUA dynamics. They often served as broker of spontaneous activity flow, confirming that hub nodes and rich-clubs may play an important role in coordinating functional dynamics at the microcircuit level. PMID:25855164

  14. Selective vulnerability of Rich Club brain regions is an organizational principle of structural connectivity loss in Huntington's disease.

    PubMed

    McColgan, Peter; Seunarine, Kiran K; Razi, Adeel; Cole, James H; Gregory, Sarah; Durr, Alexandra; Roos, Raymund A C; Stout, Julie C; Landwehrmeyer, Bernhard; Scahill, Rachael I; Clark, Chris A; Rees, Geraint; Tabrizi, Sarah J

    2015-11-01

    Huntington's disease can be predicted many years before symptom onset, and thus makes an ideal model for studying the earliest mechanisms of neurodegeneration. Diffuse patterns of structural connectivity loss occur in the basal ganglia and cortex early in the disease. However, the organizational principles that underlie these changes are unclear. By understanding such principles we can gain insight into the link between the cellular pathology caused by mutant huntingtin and its downstream effect at the macroscopic level. The 'rich club' is a pattern of organization established in healthy human brains, where specific hub 'rich club' brain regions are more highly connected to each other than other brain regions. We hypothesized that selective loss of rich club connectivity might represent an organizing principle underlying the distributed pattern of structural connectivity loss seen in Huntington's disease. To test this hypothesis we performed diffusion tractography and graph theoretical analysis in a pseudo-longitudinal study of 50 premanifest and 38 manifest Huntington's disease participants compared with 47 healthy controls. Consistent with our hypothesis we found that structural connectivity loss selectively affected rich club brain regions in premanifest and manifest Huntington's disease participants compared with controls. We found progressive network changes across controls, premanifest Huntington's disease and manifest Huntington's disease characterized by increased network segregation in the premanifest stage and loss of network integration in manifest disease. These regional and whole brain network differences were highly correlated with cognitive and motor deficits suggesting they have pathophysiological relevance. We also observed greater reductions in the connectivity of brain regions that have higher network traffic and lower clustering of neighbouring regions. This provides a potential mechanism that results in a characteristic pattern of structural

  15. Inferring social status and rich club effects in enterprise communication networks.

    PubMed

    Dong, Yuxiao; Tang, Jie; Chawla, Nitesh V; Lou, Tiancheng; Yang, Yang; Wang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Social status, defined as the relative rank or position that an individual holds in a social hierarchy, is known to be among the most important motivating forces in social behaviors. In this paper, we consider the notion of status from the perspective of a position or title held by a person in an enterprise. We study the intersection of social status and social networks in an enterprise. We study whether enterprise communication logs can help reveal how social interactions and individual status manifest themselves in social networks. To that end, we use two enterprise datasets with three communication channels--voice call, short message, and email--to demonstrate the social-behavioral differences among individuals with different status. We have several interesting findings and based on these findings we also develop a model to predict social status. On the individual level, high-status individuals are more likely to be spanned as structural holes by linking to people in parts of the enterprise networks that are otherwise not well connected to one another. On the community level, the principle of homophily, social balance and clique theory generally indicate a "rich club" maintained by high-status individuals, in the sense that this community is much more connected, balanced and dense. Our model can predict social status of individuals with 93% accuracy.

  16. Structural and functional connectivity of the human brain in autism spectrum disorders and attention-deficit/hyperactivity disorder: A rich club-organization study.

    PubMed

    Ray, Siddharth; Miller, Meghan; Karalunas, Sarah; Robertson, Charles; Grayson, David S; Cary, Robert P; Hawkey, Elizabeth; Painter, Julia G; Kriz, Daniel; Fombonne, Eric; Nigg, Joel T; Fair, Damien A

    2014-12-01

    Attention-deficit/hyperactive disorder (ADHD) and autism spectrum disorders (ASD) are two of the most common and vexing neurodevelopmental disorders among children. Although the two disorders share many behavioral and neuropsychological characteristics, most MRI studies examine only one of the disorders at a time. Using graph theory combined with structural and functional connectivity, we examined the large-scale network organization among three groups of children: a group with ADHD (8-12 years, n = 20), a group with ASD (7-13 years, n = 16), and typically developing controls (TD) (8-12 years, n = 20). We apply the concept of the rich-club organization, whereby central, highly connected hub regions are also highly connected to themselves. We examine the brain into two different network domains: (1) inside a rich-club network phenomena and (2) outside a rich-club network phenomena. The ASD and ADHD groups had markedly different patterns of rich club and non rich-club connections in both functional and structural data. The ASD group exhibited higher connectivity in structural and functional networks but only inside the rich-club networks. These findings were replicated using the autism brain imaging data exchange dataset with ASD (n = 85) and TD (n = 101). The ADHD group exhibited a lower generalized fractional anisotropy and functional connectivity inside the rich-club networks, but a higher number of axonal fibers and correlation coefficient values outside the rich club. Despite some shared biological features and frequent comorbity, these data suggest ADHD and ASD exhibit distinct large-scale connectivity patterns in middle childhood.

  17. Functional complexity emerging from anatomical constraints in the brain: the significance of network modularity and rich-clubs

    PubMed Central

    Zamora-López, Gorka; Chen, Yuhan; Deco, Gustavo; Kringelbach, Morten L.; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-01-01

    The large-scale structural ingredients of the brain and neural connectomes have been identified in recent years. These are, similar to the features found in many other real networks: the arrangement of brain regions into modules and the presence of highly connected regions (hubs) forming rich-clubs. Here, we examine how modules and hubs shape the collective dynamics on networks and we find that both ingredients lead to the emergence of complex dynamics. Comparing the connectomes of C. elegans, cats, macaques and humans to surrogate networks in which either modules or hubs are destroyed, we find that functional complexity always decreases in the perturbed networks. A comparison between simulated and empirically obtained resting-state functional connectivity indicates that the human brain, at rest, lies in a dynamical state that reflects the largest complexity its anatomical connectome can host. Last, we generalise the topology of neural connectomes into a new hierarchical network model that successfully combines modular organisation with rich-club forming hubs. This is achieved by centralising the cross-modular connections through a preferential attachment rule. Our network model hosts more complex dynamics than other hierarchical models widely used as benchmarks. PMID:27917958

  18. Functional complexity emerging from anatomical constraints in the brain: the significance of network modularity and rich-clubs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zamora-López, Gorka; Chen, Yuhan; Deco, Gustavo; Kringelbach, Morten L.; Zhou, Changsong

    2016-12-01

    The large-scale structural ingredients of the brain and neural connectomes have been identified in recent years. These are, similar to the features found in many other real networks: the arrangement of brain regions into modules and the presence of highly connected regions (hubs) forming rich-clubs. Here, we examine how modules and hubs shape the collective dynamics on networks and we find that both ingredients lead to the emergence of complex dynamics. Comparing the connectomes of C. elegans, cats, macaques and humans to surrogate networks in which either modules or hubs are destroyed, we find that functional complexity always decreases in the perturbed networks. A comparison between simulated and empirically obtained resting-state functional connectivity indicates that the human brain, at rest, lies in a dynamical state that reflects the largest complexity its anatomical connectome can host. Last, we generalise the topology of neural connectomes into a new hierarchical network model that successfully combines modular organisation with rich-club forming hubs. This is achieved by centralising the cross-modular connections through a preferential attachment rule. Our network model hosts more complex dynamics than other hierarchical models widely used as benchmarks.

  19. Detecting topological order with ribbon operators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bridgeman, Jacob C.; Flammia, Steven T.; Poulin, David

    2016-11-01

    We introduce a numerical method for identifying topological order in two-dimensional models based on one-dimensional bulk operators. The idea is to identify approximate symmetries supported on thin strips through the bulk that behave as string operators associated to an anyon model. We can express these ribbon operators in a matrix product form and define a cost function that allows us to efficiently optimize over this ansatz class. We test this method on spin models with Abelian topological order by finding ribbon operators for Zd quantum double models with local fields and Ising-like terms. In addition, we identify ribbons in the Abelian phase of Kitaev's honeycomb model which serve as the logical operators of the encoded qubit for the quantum error-correcting code. We further identify the topologically encoded qubit in the quantum compass model, and show that despite this qubit, the model does not support topological order. Finally, we discuss how the method supports generalizations for detecting non-Abelian topological order.

  20. Detection of small target using recursive higher order statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Wang; Sun, Hongyuan; Lei, Zhihui

    2014-02-01

    In this paper, a recursive higher order statistics algorithm is proposed for small target detection in temporal domain. Firstly, the background of image sequence is normalized. Then, the higher order statistics are recursively solved in image sequence to obtain the feature image. Finally, the feature image is segmented with threshold to detect the small target. To validate the algorithm proposed in this paper, five simulated and one semi-simulation image sequences are created. The ROC curves are employed for evaluation of experimental results. Experiment results show that our method is very effective for small target detection.

  1. Probable photographic detection of the natural seventh-order rainbow.

    PubMed

    Edens, Harald E; Können, Gunther P

    2015-02-01

    We present a stacked and contrast-enhanced image comprised of 12 digital photographs that shows a series of color hues in the correct order and location to be part of the seventh-order rainbow. The observation was made on September 22, 2013, near Magdalena in New Mexico (USA). The seventh-order rainbow is located at 64° from the Sun in a region of the sky with little interference from the zero-order glow. The color hues in the image range from red to blue-violet, spanning about 12° in total extent; their locations generally agree with a numerical Debye-series simulation of the seventh-order rainbow. Despite the low color contrast of the seventh-order rainbow, the current observation indicates that it is feasible with current digital-imaging technology to detect this higher-order rainbow in near-ideal atmospheric conditions.

  2. A higher-order-statistics-based approach to face detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunming; Li, Yushan; Wu, Ruihong; Li, Qiuming; Zhuang, Qingde; Zhang, Zhan

    2005-02-01

    A face detection method based on higher order statistics is proposed in this paper. Firstly, the object model and noise model are established to extract moving object from the background according to the fact that higher order statistics is nonsense to Gaussian noise. Secondly, the improved Sobel operator is used to extract the edge image of moving object. And a projection function is used to detect the face in the edge image. Lastly, PCA(Principle Component Analysis) method is used to do face recognition. The performance of the system is evaluated on the real video sequences. It is shown that the proposed method is simple and robust to the detection of human faces in the video sequences.

  3. Detection of Ordered and Chaotic Motion using the Dynamical Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voglis, N.; Contopoulos, G.; Efthymiopoulos, C.

    The dynamical spectra of stretching numbers, helicity, twist, and rotation angles can be used in developing efficient methods for distinguishing between ordered and chaotic motion in dynamical systems. A fast and detailed investigation of phase-space in 2 or 3 degrees of freedom can be obtained by the above methods. In 2 degrees of freedom a combined use of moments of angular dynamical spectra (of the twist and the rotation angles) can determine the main frequencies of an orbit, and detect rotational tori, thin chaotic layers, islands and cantori. In 3 degrees of freedom dynamical spectra can detect chaotic orbits with even extremely small Lyapunov Characteristic Numbers (e.g. 10^(-7)). The method is based on the fact that the dynamical spectra are invariant with respect to the initial orientation of the deviation vector for chaotic orbits, while they are not invariant for ordered orbits.

  4. Detection of Doppler Microembolic Signals Using High Order Statistics

    PubMed Central

    Geryes, Maroun; Hassan, Walid; Mcheick, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Robust detection of the smallest circulating cerebral microemboli is an efficient way of preventing strokes, which is second cause of mortality worldwide. Transcranial Doppler ultrasound is widely considered the most convenient system for the detection of microemboli. The most common standard detection is achieved through the Doppler energy signal and depends on an empirically set constant threshold. On the other hand, in the past few years, higher order statistics have been an extensive field of research as they represent descriptive statistics that can be used to detect signal outliers. In this study, we propose new types of microembolic detectors based on the windowed calculation of the third moment skewness and fourth moment kurtosis of the energy signal. During energy embolus-free periods the distribution of the energy is not altered and the skewness and kurtosis signals do not exhibit any peak values. In the presence of emboli, the energy distribution is distorted and the skewness and kurtosis signals exhibit peaks, corresponding to the latter emboli. Applied on real signals, the detection of microemboli through the skewness and kurtosis signals outperformed the detection through standard methods. The sensitivities and specificities reached 78% and 91% and 80% and 90% for the skewness and kurtosis detectors, respectively. PMID:28096889

  5. Detecting magnetic ordering with atomic size electron probes

    SciTech Connect

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Rusz, Ján; Spiegelberg, Jakob; McGuire, Michael A.; Symons, Christopher T.; Vatsavai, Ranga Raju; Cantoni, Claudia; Lupini, Andrew R.

    2016-05-27

    While magnetism originates at the atomic scale, the existing spectroscopic techniques sensitive to magnetic signals only produce spectra with spatial resolution on a larger scale. However, recently, it has been theoretically argued that atomic size electron probes with customized phase distributions can detect magnetic circular dichroism. Here, we report a direct experimental real-space detection of magnetic circular dichroism in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an atomic size-aberrated electron probe with a customized phase distribution, we reveal the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The novel experimental setup presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution.

  6. Detecting magnetic ordering with atomic size electron probes

    DOE PAGES

    Idrobo, Juan Carlos; Rusz, Ján; Spiegelberg, Jakob; ...

    2016-05-27

    While magnetism originates at the atomic scale, the existing spectroscopic techniques sensitive to magnetic signals only produce spectra with spatial resolution on a larger scale. However, recently, it has been theoretically argued that atomic size electron probes with customized phase distributions can detect magnetic circular dichroism. Here, we report a direct experimental real-space detection of magnetic circular dichroism in aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Using an atomic size-aberrated electron probe with a customized phase distribution, we reveal the checkerboard antiferromagnetic ordering of Mn moments in LaMnAsO by observing a dichroic signal in the Mn L-edge. The novel experimental setupmore » presented here, which can easily be implemented in aberration-corrected STEM, opens new paths for probing dichroic signals in materials with unprecedented spatial resolution.« less

  7. Higher order harmonic detection for exploring nonlinear interactions

    SciTech Connect

    Vasudevan, Rama K; Okatan, M. B.; Rajapaksa, Indrajit; Kim, Yunseok; Marincel, Dan; Trolier-McKinstry, Susan; Jesse, Stephen; Nagarajan, Valanoor; Kalinin, Sergei V

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics underpin a vast array of physical phenomena ranging from interfacial motion to jamming transitions. In many cases, decoupling the contributions of competing or co-existing mechanisms to the system response can be achieved through investigation of higher order harmonics. Here, a method using band excitation scanning probe microscopy to investigate higher order harmonics of the electromechanical response, with nanometer scale spatial resolution is presented. The utility of the technique is demonstrated by probing the first three harmonics of strain for a well-known system, a model Pb(Zr1-xTix)O3 ferroelectric capacitor. It is shown that the second order harmonic response is correlated with the first harmonic response, whereas the third harmonic is not. Additionally, nanoscale measurements of the second harmonic response with field reveal significant deviations from Rayleigh-type models in the form of a much more complicated field dependence than is observed in the spatially averaged data. These results illustrate the versatility of combining proximal probe techniques with nth harmonic detection methods in exploring and decoupling nonlinear dynamics in a wide variety of nanoscale materials.

  8. Detection of temporal order of noise-like luminance functions.

    PubMed

    Snippe, H P; Koenderink, J J

    1994-01-01

    We study the capacities of human observers to time order light sources that emit dynamic noise, identical for the different light sources, except for an adjustable delay. There is a range of temporal delays for which human observers are perfectly able to perform this task, using the direction of the motion percept that is evoked by the stimulus as a cue. An optimal delay between light sources at which the observers are most robust against any deterioration of the stimulus is defined. We claim that optimal delays (15-25 msec) correspond to the time delay of a putative Reichardt correlation mechanism in human motion vision. Contrary to the ability of human observers to sense temporal correlations in noise sequences, observers are totally unable to detect anticorrelation between noise sequences. This inability rules out motion opponency as a viable model for human front-end ("early") motion vision.

  9. Order restricted inference for oscillatory systems for detecting rhythmic signals

    PubMed Central

    Larriba, Yolanda; Rueda, Cristina; Fernández, Miguel A.; Peddada, Shyamal D.

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: Many biological processes, such as cell cycle, circadian clock, menstrual cycles, are governed by oscillatory systems consisting of numerous components that exhibit rhythmic patterns over time. It is not always easy to identify such rhythmic components. For example, it is a challenging problem to identify circadian genes in a given tissue using time-course gene expression data. There is a great potential for misclassifying non-rhythmic as rhythmic genes and vice versa. This has been a problem of considerable interest in recent years. In this article we develop a constrained inference based methodology called Order Restricted Inference for Oscillatory Systems (ORIOS) to detect rhythmic signals. Instead of using mathematical functions (e.g. sinusoidal) to describe shape of rhythmic signals, ORIOS uses mathematical inequalities. Consequently, it is robust and not limited by the biologist's choice of the mathematical model. We studied the performance of ORIOS using simulated as well as real data obtained from mouse liver, pituitary gland and data from NIH3T3, U2OS cell lines. Our results suggest that, for a broad collection of patterns of gene expression, ORIOS has substantially higher power to detect true rhythmic genes in comparison to some popular methods, while also declaring substantially fewer non-rhythmic genes as rhythmic. Availability and Implementation: A user friendly code implemented in R language can be downloaded from http://www.niehs.nih.gov/research/atniehs/labs/bb/staff/peddada/index.cfm. Contact: peddada@niehs.nih.gov PMID:27596593

  10. Efficient List Extension Algorithm Using Multiple Detection Orders for Soft-Output MIMO Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Kilhwan; Jung, Yunho; Lee, Seongjoo; Kim, Jaeseok

    This paper proposes an efficient list extension algorithm for soft-output multiple-input-multiple-output (soft-MIMO) detection. This algorithm extends the list of candidate vectors based on the vector selected by initial detection, in order to solve the empty-set problem, while reducing the number of additional vectors. The additional vectors are obtained from multiple detection orders, from which high-quality soft-output can be generated. Furthermore, a method to reduce the complexity of the determination of the multiple detection orders is described. From simulation results for a 4×4 system with 16- and 64-quadrature amplitude modulations (QAM) and rate 1/2 and 5/6 duo-binary convolutional turbo code (CTC), the soft-MIMO detection to which the proposed list extension was applied showed a performance degradation of less than 0.5dB at bit error rate (BER) of 10-5, compared to that of the soft-output maximum-likelihood detection (soft-MLD) for all code rate and modulation pairs, while the complexity of the proposed list extension was approximately 38% and 17% of that of an existing algorithm with similar performance in a 4×4 system using 16- and 64-QAM, respectively.

  11. Infants' detection of increasing numerical order comes before detection of decreasing number.

    PubMed

    de Hevia, Maria Dolores; Addabbo, Margaret; Nava, Elena; Croci, Emanuela; Girelli, Luisa; Macchi Cassia, Viola

    2017-01-01

    Ordinality is a fundamental aspect of numerical cognition. However, preverbal infants' ability to represent numerical order is poorly understood. In the present study we extended the evidence provided by Macchi Cassia, Picozzi, Girelli, and de Hevia (2012), showing that 4-month-old infants detect ordinal relationships within size-based sequences, to numerical sequences. In three experiments, we showed that at 4months of age infants fail to represent increasing and decreasing numerical order when numerosities differ by a 1:2 ratio (Experiment 1), but they succeed when numerosities differ by a 1:3 ratio (Experiments 2 and 3). Critically, infants showed the same behavioral signature (i.e., asymmetry) described by Macchi Cassia et al. for discrimination of ordinal changes in area: they succeed at detecting increasing but not decreasing order (Experiments 2 and 3). These results support the idea of a common (or at least parallel) development of ordinal representation for the two quantitative dimensions of size and number. Moreover, the finding that the asymmetry signature, previously reported for size-based sequences, extends to numerosity, points to the existence of a common constraint in ordinal magnitude processing in the first months of life. The present findings are discussed in the context of possible evolutionary and developmental sources of the ordinal asymmetry, as well as their implication for other related cognitive abilities.

  12. Incipient Fault Detection Using Higher-Order Statistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-08-01

    109 5.2 Simulated Wear Experiment..................................109 5.2. 1 Experimental Design ... Design .................................... 128 5.3.2 Collected Data.........................................130 5.3.3 Results...detecting crankshaft drill wear (Liu and Wiu, 1990) using thrust force and axial acceleration amplitude signals. Acoustic emission spectrum features and

  13. A computationally efficient order statistics based outlier detection technique for EEG signals.

    PubMed

    Giri, Bapun K; Sarkar, Soumajyoti; Mazumder, Satyaki; Das, Koel

    2015-01-01

    Detecting artifacts in EEG data produced by muscle activity, eye blinks and electrical noise is a common and important problem in EEG applications. We present a novel outlier detection method based on order statistics. We propose a 2 step procedure comprising of detecting noisy EEG channels followed by detection of noisy epochs in the outlier channels. The performance of our method is tested systematically using simulated and real EEG data. Our technique produces significant improvement in detecting EEG artifacts over state-of-the-art outlier detection technique used in EEG applications. The proposed method can serve as a general outlier detection tool for different types of noisy signals.

  14. A High-Order Statistical Tensor Based Algorithm for Anomaly Detection in Hyperspectral Imagery

    PubMed Central

    Geng, Xiurui; Sun, Kang; Ji, Luyan; Zhao, Yongchao

    2014-01-01

    Recently, high-order statistics have received more and more interest in the field of hyperspectral anomaly detection. However, most of the existing high-order statistics based anomaly detection methods require stepwise iterations since they are the direct applications of blind source separation. Moreover, these methods usually produce multiple detection maps rather than a single anomaly distribution image. In this study, we exploit the concept of coskewness tensor and propose a new anomaly detection method, which is called COSD (coskewness detector). COSD does not need iteration and can produce single detection map. The experiments based on both simulated and real hyperspectral data sets verify the effectiveness of our algorithm. PMID:25366706

  15. Detection, discrimination and integration of second-order orientation information in strabismic and anisometropic amblyopia.

    PubMed

    Mansouri, Behzad; Allen, Harriet A; Hess, Robert F

    2005-08-01

    To better understand the nature of the cortical deficit in amblyopia we undertook a systematic investigation of second-order processing in 8 amblyopic and 8 normal observers. We investigated local detection, discrimination and global integration. Our local stimulus consisted of a Gaussian patch of fractal noise multiplied by a 1-d sinusoidal modulator. Our global stimulus consisted of an array of such elements. We revealed second-order detection deficits for stimuli with equi-visible carriers. Orientation discrimination for an isolated second-order patch was comparable in normal and amblyopic eyes. We showed that pure integration of second-order patterns can be normal in amblyopia.

  16. Increasing cognitive load to facilitate lie detection: the benefit of recalling an event in reverse order.

    PubMed

    Vrij, Aldert; Mann, Samantha A; Fisher, Ronald P; Leal, Sharon; Milne, Rebecca; Bull, Ray

    2008-06-01

    In two experiments, we tested the hypotheses that (a) the difference between liars and truth tellers will be greater when interviewees report their stories in reverse order than in chronological order, and (b) instructing interviewees to recall their stories in reverse order will facilitate detecting deception. In Experiment 1, 80 mock suspects told the truth or lied about a staged event and did or did not report their stories in reverse order. The reverse order interviews contained many more cues to deceit than the control interviews. In Experiment 2, 55 police officers watched a selection of the videotaped interviews of Experiment 1 and made veracity judgements. Requesting suspects to convey their stories in reverse order improved police observers' ability to detect deception and did not result in a response bias.

  17. Simulated performance of an order statistic threshold strategy for detection of narrowband signals

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Satorius, E.; Brady, R.; Deich, W.; Gulkis, S.; Olsen, E.

    1988-01-01

    The application of order statistics to signal detection is becoming an increasingly active area of research. This is due to the inherent robustness of rank estimators in the presence of large outliers that would significantly degrade more conventional mean-level-based detection systems. A detection strategy is presented in which the threshold estimate is obtained using order statistics. The performance of this algorithm in the presence of simulated interference and broadband noise is evaluated. In this way, the robustness of the proposed strategy in the presence of the interference can be fully assessed as a function of the interference, noise, and detector parameters.

  18. Higher-order cumulants and spectral kurtosis for early detection of subterranean termites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Rosa, Juan José González; Moreno Muñoz, Antonio

    2008-02-01

    This paper deals with termite detection in non-favorable SNR scenarios via signal processing using higher-order statistics. The results could be extrapolated to all impulse-like insect emissions; the situation involves non-destructive termite detection. Fourth-order cumulants in time and frequency domains enhance the detection and complete the characterization of termite emissions, non-Gaussian in essence. Sliding higher-order cumulants offer distinctive time instances, as a complement to the sliding variance, which only reveal power excesses in the signal; even for low-amplitude impulses. The spectral kurtosis reveals non-Gaussian characteristics (the peakedness of the probability density function) associated to these non-stationary measurements, specially in the near ultrasound frequency band. Contrasted estimators have been used to compute the higher-order statistics. The inedited findings are shown via graphical examples.

  19. Method and apparatus for automatically detecting patterns in digital point-ordered signals

    SciTech Connect

    Brudnoy, D.M.

    1996-12-31

    The present invention is a method and system for detecting a physical feature of a test piece by detecting a pattern in a signal representing data from inspection of the test piece. The pattern is detected by automated additive decomposition of a digital point-ordered signal which represents the data. The present invention can properly handle a non-periodic signal. A physical parameter of the test piece is measured. A digital point-ordered signal representative of the measured physical parameter is generated. The digital point-ordered signal is decomposed into a baseline signal, a background noise signal, and a peaks/troughs signal. The peaks/troughs from the peaks/troughs signal are located and peaks/troughs information indicating the physical feature of the test piece is output.

  20. Method and apparatus for automatically detecting patterns in digital point-ordered signals

    DOEpatents

    Brudnoy, D.M.

    1998-10-20

    The present invention is a method and system for detecting a physical feature of a test piece by detecting a pattern in a signal representing data from inspection of the test piece. The pattern is detected by automated additive decomposition of a digital point-ordered signal which represents the data. The present invention can properly handle a non-periodic signal. A physical parameter of the test piece is measured. A digital point-ordered signal representative of the measured physical parameter is generated. The digital point-ordered signal is decomposed into a baseline signal, a background noise signal, and a peaks/troughs signal. The peaks/troughs from the peaks/troughs signal are located and peaks/troughs information indicating the physical feature of the test piece is output. 14 figs.

  1. Method and apparatus for automatically detecting patterns in digital point-ordered signals

    DOEpatents

    Brudnoy, David M.

    1998-01-01

    The present invention is a method and system for detecting a physical feature of a test piece by detecting a pattern in a signal representing data from inspection of the test piece. The pattern is detected by automated additive decomposition of a digital point-ordered signal which represents the data. The present invention can properly handle a non-periodic signal. A physical parameter of the test piece is measured. A digital point-ordered signal representative of the measured physical parameter is generated. The digital point-ordered signal is decomposed into a baseline signal, a background noise signal, and a peaks/troughs signal. The peaks/troughs from the peaks/troughs signal are located and peaks/troughs information indicating the physical feature of the test piece is output.

  2. Detection of apoptosis through the lipid order of the outer plasma membrane leaflet.

    PubMed

    Darwich, Zeinab; Klymchenko, Andrey S; Kucherak, Oleksandr A; Richert, Ludovic; Mély, Yves

    2012-12-01

    Cell plasma membranes of living cells maintain their asymmetry, so that the outer leaflet presents a large quantity of sphingomyelin, which is critical for formation of ordered lipid domains. Here, a recently developed probe based on Nile Red (NR12S) was applied to monitor changes in the lipid order specifically at the outer leaflet of cell membranes. Important key features of NR12S are its ratiometric response exclusively to lipid order (liquid ordered vs. liquid disordered phase) and not to surface charge, the possibility of using it at very low concentrations (10-20nM) and the very simple staining protocol. Cholesterol extraction, oxidation and sphingomyelin hydrolysis were found to red shift the emission spectrum of NR12S, indicating a decrease in the lipid order at the outer plasma membrane leaflet. Remarkably, apoptosis induced by three different agents (actinomycin D, camptothecin, staurosporine) produced very similar spectroscopic effects, suggesting that apoptosis also significantly decreases the lipid order at this leaflet. The applicability of NR12S to detect apoptosis was further validated by fluorescence microscopy and flow cytometry, using the ratio between the blue and red parts of its emission band. Thus, for the first time, an environment-sensitive probe, sensitive to lipid order, is shown to detect apoptosis, suggesting a new concept in apoptosis sensing.

  3. Background first- and second-order modeling for point target detection.

    PubMed

    Genin, Laure; Champagnat, Frédéric; Le Besnerais, Guy

    2012-11-01

    This paper deals with point target detection in nonstationary backgrounds such as cloud scenes in aerial or satellite imaging. We propose an original spatial detection method based on first- and second-order modeling (i.e., mean and covariance) of local background statistics. We first show that state-of-the-art nonlocal denoising methods can be adapted with minimal effort to yield edge-preserving background mean estimates. These mean estimates lead to very efficient background suppression (BS) detection. However, we propose that BS be followed by a matched filter based on an estimate of the local spatial covariance matrix. The identification of these matrices derives from a robust classification of pixels in classes with homogeneous second-order statistics based on a Gaussian mixture model. The efficiency of the proposed approaches is demonstrated by evaluation on two cloudy sky background databases.

  4. Higher order harmonic detection for exploring nonlinear interactions with nanoscale resolution.

    PubMed

    Vasudevan, R K; Okatan, M Baris; Rajapaksa, I; Kim, Y; Marincel, D; Trolier-McKinstry, S; Jesse, S; Valanoor, N; Kalinin, S V

    2013-01-01

    Nonlinear dynamics underpin a vast array of physical phenomena ranging from interfacial motion to jamming transitions. In many cases, insight into the nonlinear behavior can be gleaned through exploration of higher order harmonics. Here, a method using band excitation scanning probe microscopy (SPM) to investigate higher order harmonics of the electromechanical response, with nanometer scale spatial resolution is presented. The technique is demonstrated by probing the first three harmonics of strain for a Pb(Zr(1-x)Ti(x))O₃ (PZT) ferroelectric capacitor. It is shown that the second order harmonic response is correlated with the first harmonic response, whereas the third harmonic is not. Additionally, measurements of the second harmonic reveal significant deviations from Rayleigh-type models in the form of a much more complicated field dependence than is observed in the spatially averaged data. These results illustrate the versatility of n(th) order harmonic SPM detection methods in exploring nonlinear phenomena in nanoscale materials.

  5. Ship detection in satellite imagery using rank-order greyscale hit-or-miss transforms

    SciTech Connect

    Harvey, Neal R; Porter, Reid B; Theiler, James

    2010-01-01

    Ship detection from satellite imagery is something that has great utility in various communities. Knowing where ships are and their types provides useful intelligence information. However, detecting and recognizing ships is a difficult problem. Existing techniques suffer from too many false-alarms. We describe approaches we have taken in trying to build ship detection algorithms that have reduced false alarms. Our approach uses a version of the grayscale morphological Hit-or-Miss transform. While this is well known and used in its standard form, we use a version in which we use a rank-order selection for the dilation and erosion parts of the transform, instead of the standard maximum and minimum operators. This provides some slack in the fitting that the algorithm employs and provides a method for tuning the algorithm's performance for particular detection problems. We describe our algorithms, show the effect of the rank-order parameter on the algorithm's performance and illustrate the use of this approach for real ship detection problems with panchromatic satellite imagery.

  6. Vapor detection performance of vertically aligned, ordered arrays of silicon nanowires with a porous electrode.

    PubMed

    Field, Christopher R; In, Hyun Jin; Begue, Nathan J; Pehrsson, Pehr E

    2011-06-15

    Vertically aligned, ordered arrays of silicon nanowires capped with a porous top electrode are used to detect gas phase ammonia and nitrogen dioxide in humidified air. The sensors had very fast response times and large signal-to-noise ratios. Calibration curves were created using both an initial slope method and a fixed-time point method. The initial-slope method had a power law dependence that correlates well with concentration, demonstrating a viable alternative for eventual quantitative vapor detection and enabling shorter sampling and regeneration times.

  7. Clinical decision support for atypical orders: detection and warning of atypical medication orders submitted to a computerized provider order entry system.

    PubMed

    Woods, Allie D; Mulherin, David P; Flynn, Allen J; Stevenson, James G; Zimmerman, Christopher R; Chaffee, Bruce W

    2014-01-01

    The specificity of medication-related alerts must be improved to overcome the pernicious effects of alert fatigue. A systematic comparison of new drug orders to historical orders could improve alert specificity and relevance. Using historical order data from a computerized provider order entry system, we alerted physicians to atypical orders during the prescribing of five medications: calcium, clopidogrel, heparin, magnesium, and potassium. The percentage of atypical orders placed for these five medications decreased during the 92 days the alerts were active when compared to the same period in the previous year (from 0.81% to 0.53%; p=0.015). Some atypical orders were appropriate. Fifty of the 68 atypical order alerts were over-ridden (74%). However, the over-ride rate is misleading because 28 of the atypical medication orders (41%) were changed. Atypical order alerts were relatively few, identified problems with frequencies as well as doses, and had a higher specificity than dose check alerts.

  8. First and second-order features for detection of masses in digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samala, Ravi K.; Wei, Jun; Chan, Heang-Ping; Hadjiiski, Lubomir; Cha, Kenny; Helvie, Mark A.

    2016-03-01

    We are developing novel methods for prescreening of mass candidates in computer-aided detection (CAD) system for digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT). With IRB approval and written informed consent, 186 views from 94 breasts were imaged using a GE GEN2 prototype DBT system. The data set was randomly separated into training and test sets by cases. Gradient field convergence features based on first-order features were used to select the initial set of mass candidates. Eigenvalues based on second-order features from the Hessian matrix were extracted for the mass candidate locations in the DBT volume. The features from the first- and second-order analysis form the feature vector that was input to a linear discriminant analysis (LDA) classifier to generate a candidate-likelihood score. The likelihood scores were ranked and the top N candidates were passed onto the subsequent detection steps. The improvement between using only first-order features and the combination of first and second-order features was analyzed using a rank-sensitivity plot. 3D objects were obtained with two-stage 3D clustering followed by active contour segmentation. Morphological, gradient field, and texture features were extracted and feature selection was performed using stepwise feature selection. A combination of LDA and rule-based classifiers was used for FP reduction. The LDA classifier output a masslikelihood score for each object that was used as a decision variable for FROC analysis. At breast-based sensitivities of 70% and 80%, prescreening using first-order and second-order features resulted in 0.7 and 1.0 FPs/DBT.

  9. Damage detection using high order longitudinal guided waves (HOLGW) in the anchorage zone of stayed cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Yong-dong; Jin, Jian; Yang, Feng; Chen, Wei-zhen

    2017-02-01

    High order longitudinal guided waves (HOLGW) are studied for the damage detection in the anchorage zone of stayed cable through the theoretical analysis, numerical simulation and experimental validation. First, based on the theory of elastic wave propagation in cylinder, the dispersion curves of longitudinal modes were obtained and calculated analytically and the high-frequency such as 5MHz corresponding to the higher order longitudinal guided wave modes are identified for the damage detection. Then, the ultrasonic guided waves propagating in a steel wire with or without defects were simulated by using the finite element method and the effects of defect depth and length on the reflection coefficient are studied. Finally, the free wires and a tested cable were studied experimentally. The results show that the finite element method is able to model the high-order guided wave propagation in the steel wire. The agreement between the experiment and theory has demonstrated that the HOLGW is a potential candidate for the damage detection in anchorage zones of stayed-cables.

  10. Approach Detect Sensor System by Second Order Derivative of Laser Irradiation Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Tomohide; Yano, Yoshikazu; Tsuda, Norio; Yamada, Jun

    In recent years, as a result of a large amount of greenhouse gas emission, atmosphere temperature at ground level gradually rises. Therefore the Kyoto Protocol was adopted to solve the matter in 1997. By the energy-saving law amended in 1999, it is advisable that an escalator is controlled to pause during no user. Now a photo-electric sensor is used to control escalator, but a pole to install the sensor is needed. Then, a new type of approach detection sensor using laser diode, CCD camera and CPLD, which can be built-in escalator, has been studied. This sensor can derive the irradiated area of laser beam by simple processing in which the laser beam is irradiated in only the odd field of the interlace video signal. By second order derivative of laser irradiated area, this sensor can detect only the approaching target but can not detect the target which crosses and stands in the sensing area.

  11. Automated feature detection and identification in digital point-ordered signals

    DOEpatents

    Oppenlander, Jane E.; Loomis, Kent C.; Brudnoy, David M.; Levy, Arthur J.

    1998-01-01

    A computer-based automated method to detect and identify features in digital point-ordered signals. The method is used for processing of non-destructive test signals, such as eddy current signals obtained from calibration standards. The signals are first automatically processed to remove noise and to determine a baseline. Next, features are detected in the signals using mathematical morphology filters. Finally, verification of the features is made using an expert system of pattern recognition methods and geometric criteria. The method has the advantage that standard features can be, located without prior knowledge of the number or sequence of the features. Further advantages are that standard features can be differentiated from irrelevant signal features such as noise, and detected features are automatically verified by parameters extracted from the signals. The method proceeds fully automatically without initial operator set-up and without subjective operator feature judgement.

  12. Fission Multiplicity Detection with Temporal Gamma-Neutron Discrimination from Higher-Order Time Correlation Statistics

    SciTech Connect

    Oberer, Richard B.

    2002-10-01

    The current practice of nondestructive assay (NDA) of fissile materials using neutrons is dominated by the 3He detector. This has been the case since the mid 1980s when Fission Multiplicity Detection (FMD) was replaced with thermal well counters and neutron multiplicity counting (NMC). The thermal well counters detect neutrons by neutron capture in the 3He detector subsequent to moderation. The process of detection requires from 30 to 60 μs. As will be explained in Section 3.3 the rate of detecting correlated neutrons (signal) from the same fission are independent of this time but the rate of accidental correlations (noise) are proportional to this time. The well counters are at a distinct disadvantage when there is a large source of uncorrelated neutrons present from (α, n) reactions for example. Plastic scintillating detectors, as were used in FMD, require only about 20 ns to detect neutrons from fission. One thousandth as many accidental coincidences are therefore accumulated. The major problem with the use of fast-plastic scintillation detectors, however, is that both neutrons and gamma rays are detected. The pulses from the two are indistinguishable in these detectors. For this thesis, a new technique was developed to use higher-order time correlation statistics to distinguish combinations of neutron and gamma ray detections in fast-plastic scintillation detectors. A system of analysis to describe these correlations was developed based on simple physical principles. Other sources of correlations from non-fission events are identified and integrated into the analysis developed for fission events. A number of ratios and metric are identified to determine physical properties of the source from the correlations. It is possible to determine both the quantity being measured and detection efficiency from these ratios from a single measurement without a separate calibration. To account for detector dead-time, an alternative analytical technique

  13. An online tacholess order tracking technique based on generalized demodulation for rolling bearing fault detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi; Xu, Guanghua; Luo, Ailing; Liang, Lin; Jiang, Kuosheng

    2016-04-01

    Vibration analysis has been proved to be an effective and powerful tool for the condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rolling bearings. During the past decades, the conventional envelope analysis has been one of the main approaches in vibration signal processing. However, the envelope analysis is based on stationary assumption, thus it is not applicable to the fault diagnosis of bearings under rotating speed variation conditions. This constraint limits the bearing diagnosis in industrial applications. In recent years, order tracking methods based on time-frequency representation have been proposed for bearing fault detection under speed variation operating conditions. However, the methods are only applicable for offline bearing fault detection. Aiming at the shortcomings of the current tacholess order tracking techniques, an online tacholess order tracking method is proposed in this paper. The proposed method is on the basis of extracting the instantaneous tachometer information from the collected vibration signal itself continuously, and resampling the original signal with equal angle increment. The envelope order spectrum is used for bearing fault identification. The effectiveness of the proposed method has been validated by both simulated and experimental bearing vibration signals.

  14. Application of order cyclostationary demodulation to damage detection in a direct-driven wind turbine bearing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Xiaofeng; Bo, Lin; Peng, Chang

    2014-02-01

    This paper presents a method of fault detection and isolation for a direct-driven wind turbine (DWT) bearing. Computed order tracking is employed to convert the non-stationary envelope signal in the time domain into a quasi-stationary signal in the angular domain by even-angle resampling. Cyclostationary demodulation is then utilized to expose the orders related to fault characteristics in the demodulation spectrum. In order to realize the automatic fault diagnosis and emit a stable alarm about bearing damage, the peak value of the demodulation spectrum is scaled and compared to a defined threshold. The significant advantage of the proposed method is the implementation of an automatic algorithm for DWT bearing diagnostics under randomly varying speed and highly alternating load. Practical applications are provided to show that the proposed approach is able to achieve reliable failure warning in the bearing condition monitoring of a DWT.

  15. Detecting sperm whale clicks in the presence of ambient and shipping noise using higher order moments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larue, James P.; Ioup, George E.; Ioup, Juliette W.

    2004-05-01

    The single-receiver detection of various sources using higher order moments is demonstrated. The data for this study come from the Littoral Acoustic Demonstration Center experiment in the northern Gulf of Mexico in the summer of 2001. Results show that in a time-varying environment it may be more meaningful to use non-normalized statistics (e.g., using the fourth central moment rather than the kurtosis). A whale click is detected over a 35-ms window, i.e., with a sampling rate of 11718 samples per second, 40 samples are used to produce a statistic. In the past, energy and related detectors have been used for the single receiver detection of broadband signals produced by whale clicks. The presence of loud shipping noise, which is also broadband, tends to mask the clicks and make their detection difficult. Using short-time statistics may help mitigate this problem. Analysis with fractal exponents will be shown as well. [Research supported by ONR.

  16. Cloud computing for detecting high-order genome-wide epistatic interaction via dynamic clustering

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Backgroud Taking the advan tage of high-throughput single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping technology, large genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been considered to hold promise for unravelling complex relationships between genotype and phenotype. At present, traditional single-locus-based methods are insufficient to detect interactions consisting of multiple-locus, which are broadly existing in complex traits. In addition, statistic tests for high order epistatic interactions with more than 2 SNPs propose computational and analytical challenges because the computation increases exponentially as the cardinality of SNPs combinations gets larger. Results In this paper, we provide a simple, fast and powerful method using dynamic clustering and cloud computing to detect genome-wide multi-locus epistatic interactions. We have constructed systematic experiments to compare powers performance against some recently proposed algorithms, including TEAM, SNPRuler, EDCF and BOOST. Furthermore, we have applied our method on two real GWAS datasets, Age-related macular degeneration (AMD) and Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) datasets, where we find some novel potential disease-related genetic factors which are not shown up in detections of 2-loci epistatic interactions. Conclusions Experimental results on simulated data demonstrate that our method is more powerful than some recently proposed methods on both two- and three-locus disease models. Our method has discovered many novel high-order associations that are significantly enriched in cases from two real GWAS datasets. Moreover, the running time of the cloud implementation for our method on AMD dataset and RA dataset are roughly 2 hours and 50 hours on a cluster with forty small virtual machines for detecting two-locus interactions, respectively. Therefore, we believe that our method is suitable and effective for the full-scale analysis of multiple-locus epistatic interactions in GWAS. PMID:24717145

  17. An Application of Endpoint Detection to Bivariate Data in Tau-Path Order.

    PubMed

    Sampath, Srinath; Verducci, Joseph S

    2014-08-01

    The Fligner and Verducci (1988) multistage model for rankings is modified to create the moving average maximum likelihood estimator (MAMLE), a locally smooth estimator that measures stage-wise agreement between two long ranked lists, and provides a stopping rule for the detection of the endpoint of agreement. An application of this MAMLE stopping rule to bivariate data set in tau-path order (Yu, Verducci and Blower (2011)) is discussed. Data from the National Cancer Institute measuring associations between gene expression and compound potency are studied using this application, providing insights into the length of the relationship between the variables.

  18. Detection of Failure of Machine by Using the Higher Order Correlation Information between Sound and Vibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikuta, Akira; Orimoto, Hisako; Ogawa, Hitoshi

    In this study, a stochastic detection method of failure of machines based on the changing information of not only a linear correlation but also the higher order nonlinear correlation is proposed in a form suitable for on-line signal processing in time domain by using a personal computer, especially in order to find minutely the mutual relationship between sound and vibration emitted from rotational machines. More specifically, a conditional probability hierarchically reflecting various types of correlation information is theoretically derived by introducing an expression on the multi-dimensional probability distribution in orthogonal expansion series form. The effectiveness of the proposed theory is experimentally confirmed by applying it to the observed data emitted from a rotational machine driven by an electric motor.

  19. A reverse order interview does not aid deception detection regarding intentions

    PubMed Central

    Fenn, Elise; McGuire, Mollie; Langben, Sara; Blandón-Gitlin, Iris

    2015-01-01

    Promising recent research suggests that more cognitively demanding interviews improve deception detection accuracy. Would these cognitively demanding techniques work in the same way when discriminating between true and false future intentions? In Experiment 1 participants planned to complete a task, but instead were intercepted and interviewed about their intentions. Participants lied or told the truth, and were subjected to high (reverse order) or low (sequential order) cognitive load interviews. Third-party observers watched these interviews and indicated whether they thought the person was lying or telling the truth. Subjecting participants to a reverse compared to sequential interview increased the misidentification rate and the appearance of cognitive load in truth tellers. People lying about false intentions were not better identified. In Experiment 2, a second set of third-party observers rated behavioral cues. Consistent with Experiment 1, truth tellers, but not liars, exhibited more behaviors associated with lying and fewer behaviors associated with truth telling in the reverse than sequential interview. Together these results suggest that certain cognitively demanding interviews may be less useful when interviewing to detect false intentions. Explaining a true intention while under higher cognitive demand places truth tellers at risk of being misclassified. There may be such a thing as too much cognitive load induced by certain techniques PMID:26379610

  20. Highly ordered graphene-isolated silver nanodot arrays as SERS substrate for detection of urinary nucleosides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Shicai; Jiang, Shouzhen; Hu, Guodong; Wei, Jie; Wang, Li; Zhang, Junye; Li, Qiuju

    2015-11-01

    An efficient surface enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) substrate has been developed based on highly ordered arrays of graphene-isolated Ag nanodot (G/AgND) arrays. By combining the plasmonic activity of AgND arrays and unique physical/chemical properties of graphene, the G/AgND arrays show high performance in terms of sensitivity, signal-to-noise ratio and reproducibility. The SERS signals of R6G are clearly detected even at very low concentration of 10-11M. The maximum deviations of SERS intensities from 20 positions of the SERS substrate are less than 5%. The G/AgND arrays were employed for detection of human urinary nucleosides. The diagnostic algorithms based on principal component analysis achieved a diagnostic sensitivity of 91.1% and specificity of 93.3% for separating cancer from normal samples. This work demonstrates that G/AgND arrays used in Raman spectroscopy could be developed as a smart and promising system for detection and screening of cancers.

  1. The role of envelope beat cues in the detection and discrimination of second-order amplitude modulation (L)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Füllgrabe, Christian; Lorenzi, Christian

    2003-01-01

    The present study extends previous work from Lorenzi et al. [J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 110, 2470-2478 (2001)] by investigating the respective contribution of two temporal cues (fast modulation sideband and slow envelope beat cues) to the detection and discrimination of ``second-order'' sinusoidal amplitude modulation (SAM). Second-order SAM detection and rate discrimination abilities were measured at low beat rates (fm'<=128 Hz) with a ``carrier'' modulation rate fixed at a high value (fm=256 Hz). The second-order SAM data were compared with first-order SAM detection and rate discrimination thresholds measured in similar conditions at rates fm between 1 and 256 Hz. The results showed that (1) through 64 Hz, first- and second-order SAM detection thresholds increased similarly when stimulus duration decreased from 2 s to 250 ms, whereas first-order SAM detection thresholds remained unaffected by changes in duration when fm>=128 Hz, and (2) through 32 Hz, first- and second-order SAM rate discrimination thresholds were similar and substantially lower than first-order SAM rate discrimination thresholds measured at fm>=128 Hz. These data demonstrate that the perception of second-order SAM is mainly based on the slow envelope beat cues. They also suggest a substantial contribution of the slow envelope beat cues appearing at the output of modulation filters tuned to or near fm to the perception of second-order SAM.

  2. Investigation of microcantilever array with ordered nanoporous coatings for selective chemical detection.

    SciTech Connect

    Allendorf, Mark D.; Thornberg, Steven Michael; Lee, J. -H.; Robinson, Alex Lockwood; Hesketh, Peter J.; Greathouse, Jeffery A.; Houk, Ronald J. T.

    2010-03-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the potential for novel nanoporous framework materials (NFM) such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to provide selectivity and sensitivity to a broad range of analytes including explosives, nerve agents, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). NFM are highly ordered, crystalline materials with considerable synthetic flexibility resulting from the presence of both organic and inorganic components within their structure. Detection of chemical weapons of mass destruction (CWMD), explosives, toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) devices, such as microcantilevers and surface acoustic wave sensors, requires the use of recognition layers to impart selectivity. Traditional organic polymers are dense, impeding analyte uptake and slowing sensor response. The nanoporosity and ultrahigh surface areas of NFM enhance transport into and out of the NFM layer, improving response times, and their ordered structure enables structural tuning to impart selectivity. Here we describe experiments and modeling aimed at creating NFM layers tailored to the detection of water vapor, explosives, CWMD, and VOCs, and their integration with the surfaces of MEMS devices. Force field models show that a high degree of chemical selectivity is feasible. For example, using a suite of MOFs it should be possible to select for explosives vs. CWMD, VM vs. GA (nerve agents), and anthracene vs. naphthalene (VOCs). We will also demonstrate the integration of various NFM with the surfaces of MEMS devices and describe new synthetic methods developed to improve the quality of VFM coatings. Finally, MOF-coated MEMS devices show how temperature changes can be tuned to improve response times, selectivity, and sensitivity.

  3. Investigation of microcantilever array with ordered nanoporous coatings for selective chemical detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, J.-H.; Houk, R. T. J.; Robinson, A.; Greathouse, J. A.; Thornberg, S. M.; Allendorf, M. D.; Hesketh, P. J.

    2010-04-01

    In this paper we demonstrate the potential for novel nanoporous framework materials (NFM) such as metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) to provide selectivity and sensitivity to a broad range of analytes including explosives, nerve agents, and volatile organic compounds (VOCs). NFM are highly ordered, crystalline materials with considerable synthetic flexibility resulting from the presence of both organic and inorganic components within their structure. Detection of chemical weapons of mass destruction (CWMD), explosives, toxic industrial chemicals (TICs), and volatile organic compounds (VOCs) using micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) devices, such as microcantilevers and surface acoustic wave sensors, requires the use of recognition layers to impart selectivity. Traditional organic polymers are dense, impeding analyte uptake and slowing sensor response. The nanoporosity and ultrahigh surface areas of NFM enhance transport into and out of the NFM layer, improving response times, and their ordered structure enables structural tuning to impart selectivity. Here we describe experiments and modeling aimed at creating NFM layers tailored to the detection of water vapor, explosives, CWMD, and VOCs, and their integration with the surfaces of MEMS devices. Force field models show that a high degree of chemical selectivity is feasible. For example, using a suite of MOFs it should be possible to select for explosives vs. CWMD, VM vs. GA (nerve agents), and anthracene vs. naphthalene (VOCs). We will also demonstrate the integration of various NFM with the surfaces of MEMS devices and describe new synthetic methods developed to improve the quality of VFM coatings. Finally, MOF-coated MEMS devices show how temperature changes can be tuned to improve response times, selectivity, and sensitivity.

  4. Blind ICA detection based on second-order cone programming for MC-CDMA systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, Chih-Wei; Jou, Shyh-Jye

    2014-12-01

    The multicarrier code division multiple access (MC-CDMA) technique has received considerable interest for its potential application to future wireless communication systems due to its high data rate. A common problem regarding the blind multiuser detectors used in MC-CDMA systems is that they are extremely sensitive to the complex channel environment. Besides, the perturbation of colored noise may negatively affect the performance of the system. In this paper, a new coherent detection method will be proposed, which utilizes the modified fast independent component analysis (FastICA) algorithm, based on approximate negentropy maximization that is subject to the second-order cone programming (SOCP) constraint. The aim of the proposed coherent detection is to provide robustness against small-to-medium channel estimation mismatch (CEM) that may arise from channel frequency response estimation error in the MC-CDMA system, which is modulated by downlink binary phase-shift keying (BPSK) under colored noise. Noncoherent demodulation schemes are preferable to coherent demodulation schemes, as the latter are difficult to implement over time-varying fading channels. Differential phase-shift keying (DPSK) is therefore the natural choice for an alternative modulation scheme. Furthermore, the new blind differential SOCP-based ICA (SOCP-ICA) detection without channel estimation and compensation will be proposed to combat Doppler spread caused by time-varying fading channels in the DPSK-modulated MC-CDMA system under colored noise. In this paper, numerical simulations are used to illustrate the robustness of the proposed blind coherent SOCP-ICA detector against small-to-medium CEM and to emphasize the advantage of the blind differential SOCP-ICA detector in overcoming Doppler spread.

  5. Specific Physician Orders Improve Pain Detection and Pain Reports in Nursing Home Residents: Preliminary Data

    PubMed Central

    Monroe, Todd B.; Misra, Sumathi; Habermann, Ralf C.; Dietrich, Mary S.; Bruehl, Stephen P.; Cowan, Ronald L.; Newhouse, Paul A.; Simmons, Sandra F.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite evidence that many pain nursing home residents is poorly managed, reasons for this poor management remain unanswered. Aims The aim of this study was to determine if specific order sets related to pain assessment would improve pain management in nursing home (NH) residents. Outcomes included observed nurse pain assessment queries and resident reports of pain. Design Pre-test / post-test. Setting 240-bed for-profit nursing home in the mid-southern region of the United States. Subjects 43 nursing home residents capable of self-consent. Methods Medical chart abstraction during a two-week (14-day) period prior to the implementation of specific order sets for pain assessment (intervention) and a two-week (14-day) period following the intervention. Trained research assistants observed medication administration passes and performed subject interviews after each medication pass. One month after intervention implementation, one additional day of observations was conducted to determine data reliability. Results Nurses were observed to ask residents about pain more frequently, and nurses continued to ask about pain at higher rates one month after the intervention was discontinued. The proportion of residents who reported pain also significantly increased in response to increased nurse queries (e.g., “Do you have any pain right now?”), which underscores the importance of nurses directly asking residents about pain. Notably 70% of this long-stay NH population only told the nurses about their pain symptoms when asked directly. Conclusions Findings uncover that using specific pain order sets seems to improve the detection of pain, which should be a routine part of nursing assessment. PMID:26259882

  6. Medical Devices; Immunology and Microbiology Devices; Classification of Autosomal Recessive Carrier Screening Gene Mutation Detection System. Final order.

    PubMed

    2015-10-27

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has classified an autosomal recessive carrier screening gene mutation detection system into class II (special controls). The special controls that apply to this device are identified in this order and will be part of the codified language for the autosomal recessive carrier screening gene mutation detection system classification. The Agency has classified the device into class II (special controls) in order to provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  7. Detection of antiferromagnetic order by cooling atoms in an optical lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Tsung-Lin; Teles, Rafael; Hazzard, Kaden; Hulet, Randall; Rice University Collaboration

    2016-05-01

    We have realized the Fermi-Hubbard model with fermionic 6 Li atoms in a three-dimensional compensated optical lattice. The compensated optical lattice has provided low enough temperatures to produce short-range antiferromagnetic (AF) spin correlations, which we detect via Bragg scattering of light. Previously, we reached temperatures down to 1.4 times that of the AFM phase transition, more than a factor of 2 below temperatures obtained previously in 3D optical lattices with fermions. In order to further reduce the entropy in the compensated lattice, we implement an entropy conduit - which is a single blue detuned laser beam with a waist size smaller than the overall atomic sample size. This repulsive narrow potential provides a conductive metallic path between the low entropy core and the edges of the atomic sample where atoms may be evaporated. In addition, the entropy conduit may store entropy, thus further lowering the entropy in the core. We will report on the status of these efforts to further cool atoms in the optical lattice. Work supported by ARO MURI Grant, NSF and The Welch Foundation.

  8. Detection and Classification of Low Probability of Intercept Radar Signals Using Parallel Filter Arrays and Higher Order Statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taboada, Fernando L.

    2002-09-01

    Low probability of intercept (LPI) is that property of an emitter that because of its low power, wide bandwidth, frequency variability, or other design attributes, makes it difficult to be detected or identified by means of passive intercept devices such as radar warning, electronic support and electronic intelligence receivers. In order to detect LPI radar waveforms new signal processing techniques are required. This thesis first develops a MATLAB toolbox to generate important types of LPI waveforms based on frequency and phase modulation. The power spectral density and the periodic ambiguity function are examined for each waveforms. These signals are then used to test a novel signal processing technique that detects the waveforms parameters and classifies the intercepted signal in various degrees of noise. The technique is based on the use of parallel filter (sub-band) arrays and higher order statistics (third-order cumulant estimator). Each sub-band signal is treated individually and is followed by the third-order estimator in order to suppress any symmetrical noise that might be present. The significance of this technique is that it separates the LPI waveforms in small frequency bands, providing a detailed time-frequency description of the unknown signal. Finally, the resulting output matrix is processed by a feature extraction routine to detect the waveforms parameters. Identification of the signal is based on the modulation parameters detected.

  9. Detection and Classification of Low Probability of Intercept Radar Signals Using Parallel Filter Arrays and Higher Order Statistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-09-01

    Resulting Plots for Different LPI Radar Signals (1) FMCW Table 9 shows a FMCW signal with carrier frequency equal to 1 KHz, sampling frequency equal to...REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Detection and Classification of LPI Radar Signals using Parallel Filter...In order to detect LPI radar waveforms new signal processing techniques are required. This thesis first develops a MATLAB® toolbox to generate

  10. Fourth-order coherent Raman microspectroscopy for detection of material symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashimoto, Mamoru; Kanoh, Hiroto; Niioka, Hirohiko; Araki, Tsutomu

    2014-02-01

    Coherent Raman scattering provides chemical imaging by using molecular vibrational information sensitive to molecular structure. To add another information of martial symmetry, we propose using fourth order coherent Raman scattering for imaging, because the even order nonlinear phenomenon is forbidden for centro-symmetric material. We have developed a multiplex fourth order coherent Raman scattering microscopy system using a femtosecond laser. A narrowband beam of 17 cm-1 bandwidth and a broadband beam generated by a photonic crystal fiber enables to obtain a spectrum of fourth order coherent Raman scattering at once. We demonstrate the fourth order coherent Raman, hyper-Raman and second harmonics of trans-4'-(dimethylamino)-N-methyl-4- stilbazolium tosylate crystal by using the developed microscope.

  11. Detecting High-Order Epistasis in Nonlinear Genotype-Phenotype Maps

    PubMed Central

    Sailer, Zachary R.; Harms, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    High-order epistasis has been observed in many genotype-phenotype maps. These multi-way interactions between mutations may be useful for dissecting complex traits and could have profound implications for evolution. Alternatively, they could be a statistical artifact. High-order epistasis models assume the effects of mutations should add, when they could in fact multiply or combine in some other nonlinear way. A mismatch in the “scale” of the epistasis model and the scale of the underlying map would lead to spurious epistasis. In this article, we develop an approach to estimate the nonlinear scales of arbitrary genotype-phenotype maps. We can then linearize these maps and extract high-order epistasis. We investigated seven experimental genotype-phenotype maps for which high-order epistasis had been reported previously. We find that five of the seven maps exhibited nonlinear scales. Interestingly, even after accounting for nonlinearity, we found statistically significant high-order epistasis in all seven maps. The contributions of high-order epistasis to the total variation ranged from 2.2 to 31.0%, with an average across maps of 12.7%. Our results provide strong evidence for extensive high-order epistasis, even after nonlinear scale is taken into account. Further, we describe a simple method to estimate and account for nonlinearity in genotype-phenotype maps. PMID:28100592

  12. Detecting High-Order Epistasis in Nonlinear Genotype-Phenotype Maps.

    PubMed

    Sailer, Zachary R; Harms, Michael J

    2017-03-01

    High-order epistasis has been observed in many genotype-phenotype maps. These multi-way interactions between mutations may be useful for dissecting complex traits and could have profound implications for evolution. Alternatively, they could be a statistical artifact. High-order epistasis models assume the effects of mutations should add, when they could in fact multiply or combine in some other nonlinear way. A mismatch in the "scale" of the epistasis model and the scale of the underlying map would lead to spurious epistasis. In this article, we develop an approach to estimate the nonlinear scales of arbitrary genotype-phenotype maps. We can then linearize these maps and extract high-order epistasis. We investigated seven experimental genotype-phenotype maps for which high-order epistasis had been reported previously. We find that five of the seven maps exhibited nonlinear scales. Interestingly, even after accounting for nonlinearity, we found statistically significant high-order epistasis in all seven maps. The contributions of high-order epistasis to the total variation ranged from 2.2 to 31.0%, with an average across maps of 12.7%. Our results provide strong evidence for extensive high-order epistasis, even after nonlinear scale is taken into account. Further, we describe a simple method to estimate and account for nonlinearity in genotype-phenotype maps.

  13. Improved design of high order superconducting gradiometer coils for magnetic monopole detection

    SciTech Connect

    Donaldson, G.B.; Bain, R.J.P.

    1984-11-01

    A family of planar superconducting magnetic gradiometers for use as magnetic monopole detectors has recently been proposed. We describe an alternative system which reduces the number of loop crossovers for a two-dimensional Nth order gradiometer from approximately 2/sup 2N/ to N/sup 2/. This system permits much higher order gradiometers to be used, for a given detector area and superconducting quantum interference device input inductance, resulting in improved signal to noise performance. The simplification of design should also minimize the practical difficulties of fabricating high order gradiometers.

  14. Semi-Nonparametric Methods for Detecting Latent Non-Normality: A Fusion of Latent Trait and Ordered Latent Class Modeling

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmitt, J. Eric; Mehta, Paras D.; Aggen, Steven H.; Kubarych, Thomas S.; Neale, Michael C.

    2006-01-01

    Ordered latent class analysis (OLCA) can be used to approximate unidimensional latent distributions. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the method of OLCA in detecting non-normality of an unobserved continuous variable (i.e., a common factor) used to explain the covariation between dichotomous item-level responses. Using simulation,…

  15. An ordered array of hierarchical spheres for surface-enhanced Raman scattering detection of traces of pesticide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Xiaoye; Zheng, Peng; Meng, Guowen; Huang, Qing; Zhu, Chuhong; Han, Fangming; Huang, Zhulin; Li, Zhongbo; Wang, Zhaoming; Wu, Nianqiang

    2016-09-01

    An ordered array of hierarchically-structured core-nanosphere@space-layer@shell-nanoparticles has been fabricated for surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS) detection. To fabricate this hierarchically-structured chip, a long-range ordered array of Au/Ag-nanospheres is first patterned in the nano-bowls on the planar surface of ordered nanoporous anodic titanium oxide template. A ultra-thin alumina middle space-layer is then conformally coated on the Au/Ag-nanospheres, and Ag-nanoparticles are finally deposited on the surface of the alumina space-layer to form an ordered array of Au/Ag-nanosphere@Al2O3-layer@Ag-nanoparticles. Finite-difference time-domain simulation shows that SERS hot spots are created between the neighboring Ag-nanoparticles. The ordered array of hierarchical nanostructures is used as the SERS-substrate for a trial detection of methyl parathion (a pesticide) in water and a limit of detection of 1 nM is reached, indicating its promising potential in rapid monitoring of organic pollutants in aquatic environment.

  16. "Superchiral" Spectroscopy: Detection of Protein Higher Order Hierarchical Structure with Chiral Plasmonic Nanostructures.

    PubMed

    Tullius, Ryan; Karimullah, Affar S; Rodier, Marion; Fitzpatrick, Brian; Gadegaard, Nikolaj; Barron, Laurence D; Rotello, Vincent M; Cooke, Graeme; Lapthorn, Adrian; Kadodwala, Malcolm

    2015-07-08

    Optical spectroscopic methods do not routinely provide information on higher order hierarchical structure (tertiary/quaternary) of biological macromolecules and assemblies. This necessitates the use of time-consuming and material intensive techniques, such as protein crystallography, NMR, and electron microscopy. Here we demonstrate a spectroscopic phenomenon, superchiral polarimetry, which can rapidly characterize ligand-induced changes in protein higher order (tertiary/quaternary) structure at the picogram level, which is undetectable using conventional CD spectroscopy. This is achieved by utilizing the enhanced sensitivity of superchiral evanescent fields to mesoscale chiral structure.

  17. Detecting dynamic signals of ideally ordered nanohole patterned disk media fabricated using nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oshima, Hirotaka; Kikuchi, Hideyuki; Nakao, Hiroshi; Itoh, Ken-ichi; Kamimura, Takuya; Morikawa, Takeshi; Matsumoto, Koji; Umada, Takahiro; Tamura, Hiroaki; Nishio, Kazuyuki; Masuda, Hideki

    2007-07-01

    The authors have fabricated ideally ordered alumina nanohole patterned disk media via anodic oxidation and nanoimprint lithography with a thermoplastic resist. The ordered arrays of alumina nanoholes with 100nm pitch, filled with Co by electrodeposition, were created over a macroscopically large area on a hard-disk substrate using these industrially applicable nanofabrication technologies. Stable flight of a perpendicular magnetic head above the media and perpendicular magnetic anisotropy of the Co nanopillars enable high-speed dynamic magnetic recording and playback. Dynamic periodic signals that matched the nanopillar periodicity were clearly observed after writing bit patterns, showing alternate reversal of magnetization of the nanopillars.

  18. Effective and robust infrared small target detection with the fusion of polydirectional first order derivative images under facet model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Bing; Xin, Yunhong

    2015-03-01

    The robust detection of IR small target acts as one of the key techniques in the infrared search and tracking system (IRSTS). This paper presents a new method of small-target detection which formulates the problem as the detection of Gaussian-like spot. Initially, the amendatory first-order directional derivative (AFODD) based on facet model is applied to get the polydirectional derivative IR images, and the direction information of targets is reserved in these images. Then, the AFODD images are fused together to ensure the robustness and effectiveness of target detection. At last, the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) method is carried out to make targets in the fusion image more prominent, so that they can be extracted out by a simple threshold segmentation. Experiment results show that the presented method performs well even in the IR images with complex backgrounds.

  19. Syndromic Surveillance and Outbreak Detection Using Automated Microbiologic Laboratory Test Order Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-06-15

    Laboratory Test Order Data" Ph.D. Degrees Interdisciplinary -Emerging Infectious Diseases -Molecular & Cell Biology - Neuroscience Departmental...LA MADDALENA 0855 N CLINIC N 1 BMC NAVWPNCEN CHINA LAKE 0212 N CLINIC Y 13 BMC NAVWPNSFAC ST. MAWGAN 1179 N CLINIC N 0 BMC NSA BAHRAIN 1170 N

  20. Application of higher order SVD to vibration-based system identification and damage detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Shu-Hsien; Loh, Chin-Hsiung; Weng, Jian-Huang

    2012-04-01

    Singular value decomposition (SVD) is a powerful linear algebra tool. It is widely used in many different signal processing methods, such principal component analysis (PCA), singular spectrum analysis (SSA), frequency domain decomposition (FDD), subspace identification and stochastic subspace identification method ( SI and SSI ). In each case, the data is arranged appropriately in matrix form and SVD is used to extract the feature of the data set. In this study three different algorithms on signal processing and system identification are proposed: SSA, SSI-COV and SSI-DATA. Based on the extracted subspace and null-space from SVD of data matrix, damage detection algorithms can be developed. The proposed algorithm is used to process the shaking table test data of the 6-story steel frame. Features contained in the vibration data are extracted by the proposed method. Damage detection can then be investigated from the test data of the frame structure through subspace-based and nullspace-based damage indices.

  1. Detection and integration of oscillatory differential equations with initial stepsize, order and method selection

    SciTech Connect

    Gallivan, K. A.

    1980-12-01

    Within any general class of problems there typically exist subclasses possessed of characteristics that can be exploited to create techniques more efficient than general methods applied to these subclasses. Two such subclasses of initial-value problems in ordinary differential equations are stiff and oscillatory problems. Indeed, the subclass of oscillatory problems can be further refined into stiff and nonstiff oscillatory problems. This refinement is discussed in detail. The problem of developing a method of detection for nonstiff and stiff oscillatory behavior in initial-value problems is addressed. For this method of detection a control structure is proposed upon which a production code could be based. An experimental code using this control structure is described, and results of numerical tests are presented. 3 figures.

  2. Detecting Injector Deactivation Failure Modes in Diesel Engines Using Time and Order Domain Approaches

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-01

    Society 2012 2 In 2010, TARDEC conducted diesel engine dynamometer testing on a seven liter diesel engine. As part of the dynamometer test...on an engine dynamometer test stand while seeding one injector fault electronically. The data in Figure 5 illustrates a representative plot over...positioned accelerometer is capable of detecting injector misfire events at this operating condition on the dynamometer test stand. Annual

  3. Detection of Low-order Curves in Images using Biologically-plausible Hardware

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-09-29

    careful to avoid using any architectural components that could not be found in a biological brain, and to substantiate any models with actual neural...with high probability of the microline falling in the center of the square), as opposed to uniform distribution commonly reported in literature. Path...Hebb learning can result in interconnection weights which will detect long straight lines. In this component of the research, we will ask how it is

  4. Detecting memory and structure in human navigation patterns using Markov chain models of varying order.

    PubMed

    Singer, Philipp; Helic, Denis; Taraghi, Behnam; Strohmaier, Markus

    2014-01-01

    One of the most frequently used models for understanding human navigation on the Web is the Markov chain model, where Web pages are represented as states and hyperlinks as probabilities of navigating from one page to another. Predominantly, human navigation on the Web has been thought to satisfy the memoryless Markov property stating that the next page a user visits only depends on her current page and not on previously visited ones. This idea has found its way in numerous applications such as Google's PageRank algorithm and others. Recently, new studies suggested that human navigation may better be modeled using higher order Markov chain models, i.e., the next page depends on a longer history of past clicks. Yet, this finding is preliminary and does not account for the higher complexity of higher order Markov chain models which is why the memoryless model is still widely used. In this work we thoroughly present a diverse array of advanced inference methods for determining the appropriate Markov chain order. We highlight strengths and weaknesses of each method and apply them for investigating memory and structure of human navigation on the Web. Our experiments reveal that the complexity of higher order models grows faster than their utility, and thus we confirm that the memoryless model represents a quite practical model for human navigation on a page level. However, when we expand our analysis to a topical level, where we abstract away from specific page transitions to transitions between topics, we find that the memoryless assumption is violated and specific regularities can be observed. We report results from experiments with two types of navigational datasets (goal-oriented vs. free form) and observe interesting structural differences that make a strong argument for more contextual studies of human navigation in future work.

  5. Detection and measurement of retinal vessels in fundus images using amplitude modified second-order Gaussian filter.

    PubMed

    Gang, Luo; Chutatape, Opas; Krishnan, Shankar M

    2002-02-01

    In this paper, the fitness of estimating vessel profiles with Gaussian function is evaluated and an amplitude-modified second-order Gaussian filter is proposed for the detection and measurement of vessels. Mathematical analysis is given and supported by a simulation and experiments to demonstrate that the vessel width can be measured in linear relationship with the "spreading factor" of the matched filter when the magnitude coefficient of the filter is suitably assigned. The absolute value of vessel diameter can be determined simply by using a precalibrated line, which is typically required since images are always system dependent. The experiment shows that the inclusion of the width measurement in the detection process can improve the performance of matched filter and result in a significant increase in success rate of detection.

  6. Detachable object detection: segmentation and depth ordering from short-baseline video.

    PubMed

    Ayvaci, Alper; Soatto, Stefano

    2012-10-01

    We describe an approach for segmenting a moving image into regions that correspond to surfaces in the scene that are partially surrounded by the medium. It integrates both appearance and motion statistics into a cost functional that is seeded with occluded regions and minimized efficiently by solving a linear programming problem. Where a short observation time is insufficient to determine whether the object is detachable, the results of the minimization can be used to seed a more costly optimization based on a longer sequence of video data. The result is an entirely unsupervised scheme to detect and segment an arbitrary and unknown number of objects. We test our scheme to highlight the potential, as well as limitations, of our approach.

  7. Fold change rank ordering statistics: a new method for detecting differentially expressed genes

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Different methods have been proposed for analyzing differentially expressed (DE) genes in microarray data. Methods based on statistical tests that incorporate expression level variability are used more commonly than those based on fold change (FC). However, FC based results are more reproducible and biologically relevant. Results We propose a new method based on fold change rank ordering statistics (FCROS). We exploit the variation in calculated FC levels using combinatorial pairs of biological conditions in the datasets. A statistic is associated with the ranks of the FC values for each gene, and the resulting probability is used to identify the DE genes within an error level. The FCROS method is deterministic, requires a low computational runtime and also solves the problem of multiple tests which usually arises with microarray datasets. Conclusion We compared the performance of FCROS with those of other methods using synthetic and real microarray datasets. We found that FCROS is well suited for DE gene identification from noisy datasets when compared with existing FC based methods. PMID:24423217

  8. Damage Detection in Flexible Plates through Reduced-Order Modeling and Hybrid Particle-Kalman Filtering.

    PubMed

    Capellari, Giovanni; Azam, Saeed Eftekhar; Mariani, Stefano

    2015-12-22

    Health monitoring of lightweight structures, like thin flexible plates, is of interest in several engineering fields. In this paper, a recursive Bayesian procedure is proposed to monitor the health of such structures through data collected by a network of optimally placed inertial sensors. As a main drawback of standard monitoring procedures is linked to the computational costs, two remedies are jointly considered: first, an order-reduction of the numerical model used to track the structural dynamics, enforced with proper orthogonal decomposition; and, second, an improved particle filter, which features an extended Kalman updating of each evolving particle before the resampling stage. The former remedy can reduce the number of effective degrees-of-freedom of the structural model to a few only (depending on the excitation), whereas the latter one allows to track the evolution of damage and to locate it thanks to an intricate formulation. To assess the effectiveness of the proposed procedure, the case of a plate subject to bending is investigated; it is shown that, when the procedure is appropriately fed by measurements, damage is efficiently and accurately estimated.

  9. Damage Detection in Flexible Plates through Reduced-Order Modeling and Hybrid Particle-Kalman Filtering

    PubMed Central

    Capellari, Giovanni; Eftekhar Azam, Saeed; Mariani, Stefano

    2015-01-01

    Health monitoring of lightweight structures, like thin flexible plates, is of interest in several engineering fields. In this paper, a recursive Bayesian procedure is proposed to monitor the health of such structures through data collected by a network of optimally placed inertial sensors. As a main drawback of standard monitoring procedures is linked to the computational costs, two remedies are jointly considered: first, an order-reduction of the numerical model used to track the structural dynamics, enforced with proper orthogonal decomposition; and, second, an improved particle filter, which features an extended Kalman updating of each evolving particle before the resampling stage. The former remedy can reduce the number of effective degrees-of-freedom of the structural model to a few only (depending on the excitation), whereas the latter one allows to track the evolution of damage and to locate it thanks to an intricate formulation. To assess the effectiveness of the proposed procedure, the case of a plate subject to bending is investigated; it is shown that, when the procedure is appropriately fed by measurements, damage is efficiently and accurately estimated. PMID:26703615

  10. BallotMaps: detecting name bias in alphabetically ordered ballot papers.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jo; Badawood, Donia; Dykes, Jason; Slingsby, Aidan

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between candidates' position on a ballot paper and vote rank is explored in the case of 5000 candidates for the UK 2010 local government elections in the Greater London area. This design study uses hierarchical spatially arranged graphics to represent two locations that affect candidates at very different scales: the geographical areas for which they seek election and the spatial location of their names on the ballot paper. This approach allows the effect of position bias to be assessed; that is, the degree to which the position of a candidate's name on the ballot paper influences the number of votes received by the candidate, and whether this varies geographically. Results show that position bias was significant enough to influence rank order of candidates, and in the case of many marginal electoral wards, to influence who was elected to government. Position bias was observed most strongly for Liberal Democrat candidates but present for all major political parties. Visual analysis of classification of candidate names by ethnicity suggests that this too had an effect on votes received by candidates, in some cases overcoming alphabetic name bias. The results found contradict some earlier research suggesting that alphabetic name bias was not sufficiently significant to affect electoral outcome and add new evidence for the geographic and ethnicity influences on voting behaviour. The visual approach proposed here can be applied to a wider range of electoral data and the patterns identified and hypotheses derived from them could have significant implications for the design of ballot papers and the conduct of fair elections.

  11. Tacholess envelope order analysis and its application to fault detection of rolling element bearings with varying speeds.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Lei, Yaguo

    2013-08-16

    Vibration analysis is an effective tool for the condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings. Conventional diagnostic methods are based on the stationary assumption, thus they are not applicable to the diagnosis of bearings working under varying speed. This constraint limits the bearing diagnosis to the industrial application significantly. In order to extend the conventional diagnostic methods to speed variation cases, a tacholess envelope order analysis technique is proposed in this paper. In the proposed technique, a tacholess order tracking (TLOT) method is first introduced to extract the tachometer information from the vibration signal itself. On this basis, an envelope order spectrum (EOS) is utilized to recover the bearing characteristic frequencies in the order domain. By combining the advantages of TLOT and EOS, the proposed technique is capable of detecting bearing faults under varying speeds, even without the use of a tachometer. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by both simulated signals and real vibration signals collected from locomotive roller bearings with faults on inner race, outer race and rollers, respectively. Analyzed results show that the proposed method could identify different bearing faults effectively and accurately under speed varying conditions.

  12. Tacholess Envelope Order Analysis and Its Application to Fault Detection of Rolling Element Bearings with Varying Speeds

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Lei, Yaguo

    2013-01-01

    Vibration analysis is an effective tool for the condition monitoring and fault diagnosis of rolling element bearings. Conventional diagnostic methods are based on the stationary assumption, thus they are not applicable to the diagnosis of bearings working under varying speed. This constraint limits the bearing diagnosis to the industrial application significantly. In order to extend the conventional diagnostic methods to speed variation cases, a tacholess envelope order analysis technique is proposed in this paper. In the proposed technique, a tacholess order tracking (TLOT) method is first introduced to extract the tachometer information from the vibration signal itself. On this basis, an envelope order spectrum (EOS) is utilized to recover the bearing characteristic frequencies in the order domain. By combining the advantages of TLOT and EOS, the proposed technique is capable of detecting bearing faults under varying speeds, even without the use of a tachometer. The effectiveness of the proposed method is demonstrated by both simulated signals and real vibration signals collected from locomotive roller bearings with faults on inner race, outer race and rollers, respectively. Analyzed results show that the proposed method could identify different bearing faults effectively and accurately under speed varying conditions. PMID:23959244

  13. Detection of venous needle dislodgement during haemodialysis using fractional order shape index ratio and fuzzy colour relation analysis

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Wei-Ling; Kan, Chung-Dann; Wu, Ming-Jui; Mai, Yi-Chen

    2015-01-01

    Venous needle dislodgement (VND) is a life-threatening complication during haemodialysis (HD) treatment. When VND occurs, it only takes a few minutes for blood loss in an adult patient. According to the ANNA (American Nephrology Nurses’ Association) VND survey reports, VND is a concerning issue for the nephrology nurses/staff and patients. To ensure HD care and an effective treatment environment, this Letter proposes a combination of fractional order shape index ratio (SIR) and fuzzy colour relation analysis (CRA) to detect VND. If the venous needle drops out, clinical examinations show that both heart pulses and pressure wave variations have a low correlation at the venous anatomic site. Therefore, fractional order SIR is used to quantify the differences in transverse vibration pressures (TVPs) between the normal condition and meter reading. Linear regression shows that the fractional order SIR has a high correlation with the TVP variation. Fuzzy CRA is designed in a simple and visual message manner to identify the risk levels. A worst-case study demonstrated that the proposed model can be used for VND detection in clinical applications. PMID:26713159

  14. Measurement of the second-order nonlinear susceptibility of collagen using polarization modulation and phase-sensitive detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoller, Patrick C.; Kim, Beop-Min; Rubenchik, Alexander M.; Reiser, Karen M.; Da Silva, Luiz B.

    2001-05-01

    The measurement of the second order nonlinear susceptibility of collagen in various biological tissues has potential applications in the detection of structural changes which are related to different pathological conditions. We investigate second harmonic generation in a rat-tail tendon, a highly organized collagen structure consisting of parallel fibers. Using an electro-optic modulator and a quarter-wave plate, we modulate the linear polarization of an ultra-short pulse laser beam that is used to measure second harmonic generation in a confocal microscopy setup. Phase-sensitive detection of the generated signal, coupled with a simple model of the collagen protein structures, allows us to measure a parameter (gamma) related to nonlinear susceptibility and to determine the relative orientation of the structures. Our preliminary results indicate that it may be possible to use this parameter to characterize the structure.

  15. Measurement of the Second Order Non-linear Susceptibility of Collagen using Polarization Modulation and Phase-sensitive Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Stoller, P; Kim, B-M; Rubenchik, A M; Reiser, K M; Da Silva, L B

    2001-03-03

    The measurement of the second order nonlinear susceptibility of collagen in various biological tissues has potential applications in the detection of structural changes which are related to different pathological conditions. We investigate second harmonic generation in rat-tail tendon, a highly organized collagen structure consisting of parallel fibers. Using an electro-optic modulator and a quarter-wave plate, we modulate the linear polarization of an ultra-short pulse laser beam that is used to measure second harmonic generation (SHG) in a confocal microscopy setup. Phase-sensitive detection of the generated signal, coupled with a simple model of the collagen protein structures, allows us to measure a parameter {gamma} related to nonlinear susceptibility and to determine the relative orientation of the structures. Our preliminary results indicate that it may be possible to use this parameter to characterize the structure.

  16. Multi-Fault Detection of Rolling Element Bearings under Harsh Working Condition Using IMF-Based Adaptive Envelope Order Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Li, Xuejun

    2014-01-01

    When operating under harsh condition (e.g., time-varying speed and load, large shocks), the vibration signals of rolling element bearings are always manifested as low signal noise ratio, non-stationary statistical parameters, which cause difficulties for current diagnostic methods. As such, an IMF-based adaptive envelope order analysis (IMF-AEOA) is proposed for bearing fault detection under such conditions. This approach is established through combining the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), envelope order tracking and fault sensitive analysis. In this scheme, EEMD provides an effective way to adaptively decompose the raw vibration signal into IMFs with different frequency bands. The envelope order tracking is further employed to transform the envelope of each IMF to angular domain to eliminate the spectral smearing induced by speed variation, which makes the bearing characteristic frequencies more clear and discernible in the envelope order spectrum. Finally, a fault sensitive matrix is established to select the optimal IMF containing the richest diagnostic information for final decision making. The effectiveness of IMF-AEOA is validated by simulated signal and experimental data from locomotive bearings. The result shows that IMF-AEOA could accurately identify both single and multiple faults of bearing even under time-varying rotating speed and large extraneous shocks. PMID:25353982

  17. Multi-fault detection of rolling element bearings under harsh working condition using IMF-based adaptive envelope order analysis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Ming; Lin, Jing; Xu, Xiaoqiang; Li, Xuejun

    2014-10-28

    When operating under harsh condition (e.g., time-varying speed and load, large shocks), the vibration signals of rolling element bearings are always manifested as low signal noise ratio, non-stationary statistical parameters, which cause difficulties for current diagnostic methods. As such, an IMF-based adaptive envelope order analysis (IMF-AEOA) is proposed for bearing fault detection under such conditions. This approach is established through combining the ensemble empirical mode decomposition (EEMD), envelope order tracking and fault sensitive analysis. In this scheme, EEMD provides an effective way to adaptively decompose the raw vibration signal into IMFs with different frequency bands. The envelope order tracking is further employed to transform the envelope of each IMF to angular domain to eliminate the spectral smearing induced by speed variation, which makes the bearing characteristic frequencies more clear and discernible in the envelope order spectrum. Finally, a fault sensitive matrix is established to select the optimal IMF containing the richest diagnostic information for final decision making. The effectiveness of IMF-AEOA is validated by simulated signal and experimental data from locomotive bearings. The result shows that IMF-AEOA could accurately identify both single and multiple faults of bearing even under time-varying rotating speed and large extraneous shocks.

  18. Experimental detection of high-order or fractional orbital angular momentum of light based on a robust mode converter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jie; Zhang, Wuhong; Chen, Lixiang

    2016-03-01

    Based on our constructed robust π/2 mode converter, we report a concise yet high-efficient experiment to realize the detection of both high-order and fractional orbital angular momentum (OAM). The π/2 mode converter that consists of a pair of cylindrical lens is actually not new. However, our experiment shows clearly its excellent robustness, as we have detected the high-order OAM numbers up to ℓ = 100 carried by standard Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) modes. The observed patterns of two-dimensional optical lattices indicate that the radial index p of LG beams can be straightforwardly inferred as well. The versatility of the converter is also manifested by input modified LG beams carrying tunable fractional OAM, where we observe the output lattices exhibiting an interesting evolvement from Hermite-Gaussian mode HG m , 0 to its adjacent HG m + 1 , 0 . Numeric simulations based on OAM eigen-mode decomposition support the experimental results. Our demonstration has potential in both classical and quantum information applications where high OAM modes are needed.

  19. Statistical analysis of water-quality data containing multiple detection limits: S-language software for regression on order statistics

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lee, L.; Helsel, D.

    2005-01-01

    Trace contaminants in water, including metals and organics, often are measured at sufficiently low concentrations to be reported only as values below the instrument detection limit. Interpretation of these "less thans" is complicated when multiple detection limits occur. Statistical methods for multiply censored, or multiple-detection limit, datasets have been developed for medical and industrial statistics, and can be employed to estimate summary statistics or model the distributions of trace-level environmental data. We describe S-language-based software tools that perform robust linear regression on order statistics (ROS). The ROS method has been evaluated as one of the most reliable procedures for developing summary statistics of multiply censored data. It is applicable to any dataset that has 0 to 80% of its values censored. These tools are a part of a software library, or add-on package, for the R environment for statistical computing. This library can be used to generate ROS models and associated summary statistics, plot modeled distributions, and predict exceedance probabilities of water-quality standards. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Simultaneous monitoring of first-order polarization mode dispersion and chromatic dispersion based on RF power detection technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Lanlan; Xu, Huizhen; Wu, Jian

    2014-04-01

    We propose a novel technique for independent and simultaneous monitoring of first-order polarization mode dispersion (PMD) and chromatic dispersion (CD). For PMD monitoring, radio frequency (RF) power is detected after asymmetric filtering by a band-stop filter (BSF). The RF tone power ratio (PR) of the double sideband (DSB) to the single sideband (SSB) signal components is utilized for CD monitoring. We discuss the performance for 80 Gb/s NRZ-DQPSK signal by simulation. Simultaneous monitoring of 246.7 ps/nm CD with a 22.3 dB dynamic range (DR) and 50 ps differential group delay (DGD) with a 42.7 dB DR can be realized at 10 GHz detection band. When only CD is monitored, the detection frequency can be further decreased to 5 GHz, where the monitoring range (MR) is 356 ps/nm and DR is 30.5 dB. The influences of other parameters, such as the BSF offset, the bandwidths of BSF and electrical-band-pass-filter (EBPF), the filter shape, and the modulation rate and format, are investigated in the paper.

  1. Ultrasensitive electrochemical immunosensor based on orderly oriented conductive wires for the detection of human monocyte chemotactic protein-1 in serum.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuliang; He, Junlin; Xia, Chunyong; Gao, Liuliu; Yu, Chao

    2015-08-15

    For the first time, a simple, ultrasensitive and label-free electrochemical monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) immunosensor based on orderly oriented conductive wires has been developed. A conductive wire, which is similar to an electron-conducting tunnel, was designed with Au nanoparticles (AuNPs) joined to Au@Pt core-shell microspheres via a cysteamine (CA) crosslinker. To enhance the sensitivity of the immunosensor, Au nanoparticles were electrodeposited onto the gold electrode, and CA was self-assembled via strong Au-S covalent bonds, providing an appropriate surface and promoting electron transfer. Next, Au@Pt core-shell microspheres with large surface area were grafted onto the modified electrode to immobilize more MCP-1 antibodies. MCP-1 is an initiating factor and biomarker of atherosclerotic diseases. Under optimal experimental conditions, differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) current changes were used to detect MCP-1 with a broad linear range of 0.09-360 pg mL(-1) and a low detection limit of 0.03 pg mL(-1) (S/N=3). The proposed immunosensor exhibited good selectivity, reproducibility and reusability. When applied to spiked serum samples, the data for the developed immunosensor were in agreement with an enzyme linked immunosorbent assay, suggesting that the electrochemical immunosensor would be suitable for practical detection.

  2. Artifact Free and Detection Profile Independent Higher Order Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy for Microsecond Resolved Kinetics. 2. Mixtures and Reactions.

    PubMed

    Abdollah-Nia, Farshad; Gelfand, Martin P; Van Orden, Alan K

    2017-02-09

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a primary tool in the time-resolved analysis of non-reacting or reacting molecules in solution, based on fluorescence intensity fluctuations. However, conventional FCS alone is insufficient for complete determination of reaction or mixture parameters. In an accompanying article, a technique for computation of artifact-free higher-order correlations with microsecond time resolution was described. Here, we demonstrate applications of the technique to analyze systems of fast and slow reactions. As an example of slow- or non-reacting systems, the technique is applied to resolve two-component mixtures of labeled oligonucleotides. Next, the protonation reaction of fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) in phosphate buffer is analyzed as an example of fast reactions (relaxation time <1 μs ). By reference to an (apparent) non-reacting system, the simple factorized form of cumulant-based higher-order correlations is exploited to remove the dependence on the molecular detection function (MDF). Therefore, there is no need to model and characterize the experimental MDF, and the precision and the accuracy of the technique are enhanced. It is verified that higher-order correlation analysis enables complete and simultaneous determination of number and brightness parameters of mixing or reacting molecules, the reaction relaxation time, and forward and reverse reaction rates.

  3. Detecting ordered small molecule drug aggregates in live macrophages: a multi-parameter microscope image data acquisition and analysis strategy

    PubMed Central

    Rzeczycki, Phillip; Yoon, Gi Sang; Keswani, Rahul K.; Sud, Sudha; Stringer, Kathleen A.; Rosania, Gus R.

    2017-01-01

    Following prolonged administration, certain orally bioavailable but poorly soluble small molecule drugs are prone to precipitate out and form crystal-like drug inclusions (CLDIs) within the cells of living organisms. In this research, we present a quantitative multi-parameter imaging platform for measuring the fluorescence and polarization diattenuation signals of cells harboring intracellular CLDIs. To validate the imaging system, the FDA-approved drug clofazimine (CFZ) was used as a model compound. Our results demonstrated that a quantitative multi-parameter microscopy image analysis platform can be used to study drug sequestering macrophages, and to detect the formation of ordered molecular aggregates formed by poorly soluble small molecule drugs in animals. PMID:28270989

  4. Novel Ordered Stepped-Wedge Cluster Trial Designs for Detecting Ebola Vaccine Efficacy Using a Spatially Structured Mathematical Model

    PubMed Central

    Diakite, Ibrahim; Mooring, Eric Q.; Velásquez, Gustavo E.; Murray, Megan B.

    2016-01-01

    Background During the 2014 Ebola virus disease (EVD) outbreak, policy-makers were confronted with difficult decisions on how best to test the efficacy of EVD vaccines. On one hand, many were reluctant to withhold a vaccine that might prevent a fatal disease from study participants randomized to a control arm. On the other, regulatory bodies called for rigorous placebo-controlled trials to permit direct measurement of vaccine efficacy prior to approval of the products. A stepped-wedge cluster study (SWCT) was proposed as an alternative to a more traditional randomized controlled vaccine trial to address these concerns. Here, we propose novel “ordered stepped-wedge cluster trial” (OSWCT) designs to further mitigate tradeoffs between ethical concerns, logistics, and statistical rigor. Methodology/Principal Findings We constructed a spatially structured mathematical model of the EVD outbreak in Sierra Leone. We used the output of this model to simulate and compare a series of stepped-wedge cluster vaccine studies. Our model reproduced the observed order of first case occurrence within districts of Sierra Leone. Depending on the infection risk within the trial population and the trial start dates, the statistical power to detect a vaccine efficacy of 90% varied from 14% to 32% for standard SWCT, and from 67% to 91% for OSWCTs for an alpha error of 5%. The model’s projection of first case occurrence was robust to changes in disease natural history parameters. Conclusions/Significance Ordering clusters in a step-wedge trial based on the cluster’s underlying risk of infection as predicted by a spatial model can increase the statistical power of a SWCT. In the event of another hemorrhagic fever outbreak, implementation of our proposed OSWCT designs could improve statistical power when a step-wedge study is desirable based on either ethical concerns or logistical constraints. PMID:27509037

  5. Ordered-subsets linkage analysis detects novel Alzheimer disease loci on chromosomes 2q34 and 15q22.

    PubMed

    Scott, William K; Hauser, Elizabeth R; Schmechel, Donald E; Welsh-Bohmer, Kathleen A; Small, Gary W; Roses, Allen D; Saunders, Ann M; Gilbert, John R; Vance, Jeffery M; Haines, Jonathan L; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A

    2003-11-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a complex disorder characterized by a wide range, within and between families, of ages at onset of symptoms. Consideration of age at onset as a covariate in genetic-linkage studies may reduce genetic heterogeneity and increase statistical power. Ordered-subsets analysis includes continuous covariates in linkage analysis by rank ordering families by a covariate and summing LOD scores to find a subset giving a significantly increased LOD score relative to the overall sample. We have analyzed data from 336 markers in 437 multiplex (>/=2 sampled individuals with AD) families included in a recent genomic screen for AD loci. To identify genetic heterogeneity by age at onset, families were ordered by increasing and decreasing mean and minimum ages at onset. Chromosomewide significance of increases in the LOD score in subsets relative to the overall sample was assessed by permutation. A statistically significant increase in the nonparametric multipoint LOD score was observed on chromosome 2q34, with a peak LOD score of 3.2 at D2S2944 (P=.008) in 31 families with a minimum age at onset between 50 and 60 years. The LOD score in the chromosome 9p region previously linked to AD increased to 4.6 at D9S741 (P=.01) in 334 families with minimum age at onset between 60 and 75 years. LOD scores were also significantly increased on chromosome 15q22: a peak LOD score of 2.8 (P=.0004) was detected at D15S1507 (60 cM) in 38 families with minimum age at onset >/=79 years, and a peak LOD score of 3.1 (P=.0006) was obtained at D15S153 (62 cM) in 43 families with mean age at onset >80 years. Thirty-one families were contained in both 15q22 subsets, indicating that these results are likely detecting the same locus. There is little overlap in these subsets, underscoring the utility of age at onset as a marker of genetic heterogeneity. These results indicate that linkage to chromosome 9p is strongest in late-onset AD and that regions on chromosome 2q34 and 15q22 are

  6. Comparing the effectiveness of chronic water column tests with the crustaceans Hyalella azteca (order: Amphipoda) and Ceriodaphnia dubia (order: Cladocera) in detecting toxicity of current-use insecticides.

    PubMed

    Deanovic, Linda A; Markiewicz, Dan; Stillway, Marie; Fong, Stephanie; Werner, Inge

    2013-03-01

    Standard U.S. Environmental Protection Agency laboratory tests are used to monitor water column toxicity in U.S. surface waters. The water flea Ceriodaphnia dubia is among the most sensitive test species for detecting insecticide toxicity in freshwater environments.Its usefulness is limited, however, when water conductivity exceeds 2,000 µS/cm (approximately 1 ppt salinity) and test effectiveness is insufficient. Water column toxicity tests using the euryhaline amphipod Hyalella azteca could complement C. dubia tests; however, standard chronic protocols do not exist. The present study compares the effectiveness of two water column toxicity tests in detecting the toxicity of two organophosphate (OP) and two pyrethroid insecticides: the short-term chronic C. dubia test, which measures mortality and fecundity, and a 10-d H. azteca test, which measures mortality and growth. Sensitivity was evaluated by comparing effect data, and end point variability was evaluated by comparing minimum significant differences. Tests were performed in synthetic water and filtered ambient water to quantify the influence of water matrix on effect concentrations. The H. azteca test detected pyrethroid toxicity far more effectively, while the C. dubia test was more sensitive to OPs. Among endpoints, H. azteca mortality was most robust. The results demonstrate that the H. azteca test is preferable when conductivity of water samples is 2,000 to 10,000 µS/cm or if contaminants of concern include pyrethroid insecticides.

  7. Using a low-order model to detect and characterize intense vortices in multiple-Doppler radar data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Potvin, Corey Keith

    A new multiple-Doppler radar analysis technique is presented for the objective detection and characterization of intense vortices. The technique consists of fitting radial wind data from two or more radars to a simple analytical model of a vortex and its near-environment. The model combines a uniform flow, linear shear flow, linear divergence flow (all of which comprise a broadscale flow), and modified combined Rankine vortex. The vortex and its environment are allowed to translate. A cost-function accounting for the discrepancy between the model and observed radial winds is evaluated over space and time so that observations can be used at the actual times and locations they were acquired. The parameters in the low-order model are determined by minimizing this cost function. The development of the method is initially guided by emulated radial velocity observations of analytical vortices. A high-resolution Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) simulation of a supercellular tornado is then used to generate more realistic pseudo-observations. Finally, the technique is tested using real dual-Doppler tornado and mesocyclone observations from a variety of radar platforms including Weather Surveillance Radar - 1988 Doppler (WSR-88D), Terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR), Shared Mobile Atmospheric Research and Teaching Radar (SMART-R), and Doppler on Wheels (DOW). The technique shows skill in detecting intense vortices and, when the vortex is well-resolved, in retrieving key model parameters including vortex location, translational velocity, radius and maximum tangential wind speed. In cases where the vortex is not well-resolved, additional vortex characteristics computed from the retrieved model parameters and verified against radial velocity observations can still provide useful information about vortex size and strength.

  8. Measuring violations of general relativity from single gravitational wave detection by nonspinning binary systems: Higher-order asymptotic analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tso, Rhondale; Zanolin, Michele

    2016-06-01

    A frequentist asymptotic expansion method for error estimation is employed for a network of gravitational wave detectors to assess the amount of information that can be extracted from gravitational wave observations. Mathematically we derive lower bounds in the errors that any parameter estimator will have in the absence of prior knowledge to distinguish between the post-Einsteinian (ppE) description of coalescing binary systems and that of general relativity. When such errors are smaller than the parameter value, there is a possibility to detect these violations from general relativity (GR). A parameter space with inclusion of dominant dephasing ppE parameters (β ,b ) is used for a study of first- and second-order (co)variance expansions, focusing on the inspiral stage of a nonspinning binary system of zero eccentricity detectible through Advanced LIGO and Advanced Virgo. Our procedure is an improvement of the Cramér-Rao lower bound. When Bayesian errors are lower than our bound it means that they depend critically on the priors. The analysis indicates the possibility of constraining deviations from GR in inspiral signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) (ρ ˜15 - 17 ) regimes that are achievable in upcoming scientific runs (GW150914 had an inspiral SNR ˜12 ). The errors on β also increase errors of other parameters such as the chirp mass M and symmetric mass ratio η . Application is done to existing alternative theories of gravity, which include modified dispersion relation of the waveform; nonspinning models of quadratic modified gravity; and dipole gravitational radiation (i.e., Brans-Dicke-type) modifications.

  9. Event detection and sub-state discovery from biomolecular simulations using higher-order statistics: application to enzyme adenylate kinase.

    PubMed

    Ramanathan, Arvind; Savol, Andrej J; Agarwal, Pratul K; Chennubhotla, Chakra S

    2012-11-01

    Biomolecular simulations at millisecond and longer time-scales can provide vital insights into functional mechanisms. Because post-simulation analyses of such large trajectory datasets can be a limiting factor in obtaining biological insights, there is an emerging need to identify key dynamical events and relating these events to the biological function online, that is, as simulations are progressing. Recently, we have introduced a novel computational technique, quasi-anharmonic analysis (QAA) (Ramanathan et al., PLoS One 2011;6:e15827), for partitioning the conformational landscape into a hierarchy of functionally relevant sub-states. The unique capabilities of QAA are enabled by exploiting anharmonicity in the form of fourth-order statistics for characterizing atomic fluctuations. In this article, we extend QAA for analyzing long time-scale simulations online. In particular, we present HOST4MD--a higher-order statistical toolbox for molecular dynamics simulations, which (1) identifies key dynamical events as simulations are in progress, (2) explores potential sub-states, and (3) identifies conformational transitions that enable the protein to access those sub-states. We demonstrate HOST4MD on microsecond timescale simulations of the enzyme adenylate kinase in its apo state. HOST4MD identifies several conformational events in these simulations, revealing how the intrinsic coupling between the three subdomains (LID, CORE, and NMP) changes during the simulations. Further, it also identifies an inherent asymmetry in the opening/closing of the two binding sites. We anticipate that HOST4MD will provide a powerful and extensible framework for detecting biophysically relevant conformational coordinates from long time-scale simulations.

  10. Inferring Social Status and Rich Club Effects in Enterprise Communication Networks

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yuxiao; Tang, Jie; Chawla, Nitesh V.; Lou, Tiancheng; Yang, Yang; Wang, Bai

    2015-01-01

    Social status, defined as the relative rank or position that an individual holds in a social hierarchy, is known to be among the most important motivating forces in social behaviors. In this paper, we consider the notion of status from the perspective of a position or title held by a person in an enterprise. We study the intersection of social status and social networks in an enterprise. We study whether enterprise communication logs can help reveal how social interactions and individual status manifest themselves in social networks. To that end, we use two enterprise datasets with three communication channels — voice call, short message, and email — to demonstrate the social-behavioral differences among individuals with different status. We have several interesting findings and based on these findings we also develop a model to predict social status. On the individual level, high-status individuals are more likely to be spanned as structural holes by linking to people in parts of the enterprise networks that are otherwise not well connected to one another. On the community level, the principle of homophily, social balance and clique theory generally indicate a “rich club” maintained by high-status individuals, in the sense that this community is much more connected, balanced and dense. Our model can predict social status of individuals with 93% accuracy. PMID:25822343

  11. Detection of 1st- and 2nd-order temporal-envelope cues in a patient with left superior cortical damage.

    PubMed

    Füllgrabe, Christian; Maillet, Didier; Moroni, Christine; Belin, Catherine; Lorenzi, Christian

    2004-06-01

    This psychophysical study explores the extent to which the auditory cortex is necessary for various aspects of temporal-envelope perception, that is, perception of the slow temporal modulations in amplitude known to be crucial for sound identification. The ability to detect 1st- and 2nd-order sinusoidal amplitude modulation (AM) is evaluated in a single patient showing left-hemisphere damage encroaching the primary and secondary auditory cortices. Here, 1st- and 2nd-order AM refer to (1) sinusoidal variation in the amplitude of a 2 kHz pure tone, and (2) sinusoidal variation in the depth of a 64 Hz AM applied to the 2 kHz pure tone, respectively. The results replicate previous findings by showing that damage to the left auditory cortex results in a selective deficit in auditory sensitivity to the lowest 1St-order AM (i.e., 1st-order AM frequencies < 16 Hz). Moreover, a dissociation is apparent between the ability to detect 1st- and 2nd-order temporal-envelope cues. The patient shows poorer than normal ability to detect 2nd-order AM at low frequencies ranging from 4-23 Hz, but normal ability to detect the high (64 Hz) 1st-order AM carrying these 2nd-order modulations. This result indicates that damage to the left primary and secondary auditory cortices affects the ability to detect temporal variations in the local properties of sounds(such as AM depth). It is also consistent with the idea that, as in vision, central nonlinear mechanisms are involved in the computation of such local (or 2nd-order) temporal properties.

  12. Massively Parallel Rogue Cell Detection Using Serial Time-Encoded Amplified Microscopy of Inertially Ordered Cells in High-Throughput Flow

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-08-01

    TITLE: Massively Parallel Rogue Cell Detection Using Serial Time- Encoded Amplified Microscopy of Inertially Ordered Cells in High- Throughput Flow ...5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Encoded Amplified Microscopy of Inertially Ordered Cells in High-Throughput Flow 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-10-1-0519...for blur flee imaging of breast cancer cells and blood cells in flow with and without microparticle labels to EpCAM on the cell surfaces. 2

  13. High-order adaptive optics requirements for direct detection of extrasolar planets: Application to the SPHERE instrument.

    PubMed

    Fusco, T; Rousset, G; Sauvage, J-F; Petit, C; Beuzit, J-L; Dohlen, K; Mouillet, D; Charton, J; Nicolle, M; Kasper, M; Baudoz, P; Puget, P

    2006-08-21

    The detection of extrasolar planets implies an extremely high-contrast, long-exposure imaging capability at near infrared and probably visible wavelengths. We present here the core of any Planet Finder instrument, that is, the extreme adaptive optics (XAO) subsystem. The level of AO correction directly impacts the exposure time required for planet detection. In addition, the capacity of the AO system to calibrate all the instrument static defects ultimately limits detectivity. Hence, the extreme AO system has to adjust for the perturbations induced by the atmospheric turbulence, as well as for the internal aberrations of the instrument itself. We propose a feasibility study for an extreme AO system in the frame of the SPHERE (Spectro-Polarimetry High-contrast Exoplanet Research) instrument, which is currently under design and should equip one of the four VLT 8-m telescopes in 2010.

  14. Application of exonuclease III-aided target recycling in flow cytometry: DNA detection sensitivity enhanced by orders of magnitude.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jie; Paulsen, Ian T; Jin, Dayong

    2013-09-03

    DNA-functionalized microspheres in conjugation with flow cytometry detection are widely used for high-throughput nucleic acid assays. Although such assays are rapid and capable of simultaneous analysis of multiple nucleic acid analytes in a single test, the intrinsic limitation in sensitivity remains challenging. Here we report a simple, highly sensitive, and reproducible method based on Exonuclease III-aided target recycling technique applied for DNA quantification in flow cytometry. By loading a high density of Cy5-labeled probe DNA on microspheres (15 μm), we achieved hitherto unreported DNA detection limit of 3.2 pM in flow cytometry bead assay, enhancing the sensitivity by a factor of over 56.8 compared to the conventional direct hybridization bead assay. Furthermore, we evaluated multiplexing capability by simultaneous detections of two target DNAs with FAM and Cy5 reporter conjugated probes. Therefore, the novel Exonuclease III-amplified flow cytometry bead assay has great potential for the rapid, sensitive, and accurate detection and quantification of nucleic acids in clinical diagnosis and biomedical research.

  15. Imaging in turbid media: a transmission detector gives 2-3 order of magnitude enhanced sensitivity compared to epi-detection schemes.

    PubMed

    Dvornikov, Alexander; Gratton, Enrico

    2016-09-01

    Imaging depth in turbid media by two-photon fluorescence microscopy depends on the ability of the optical system to detect weak fluorescence signals. We have shown that use of a wide area detector in transmission geometry allows increasing imaging depth in turbid media due to efficient photon collection. Compared to the conventional epi-detection scheme used in most commercial microscopes, the transmission detector was found to be 2-3 orders of magnitude more sensitive when used for in depth imaging in scattering samples simulating brain optical properties.

  16. Imaging in turbid media: a transmission detector gives 2-3 order of magnitude enhanced sensitivity compared to epi-detection schemes

    PubMed Central

    Dvornikov, Alexander; Gratton, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Imaging depth in turbid media by two-photon fluorescence microscopy depends on the ability of the optical system to detect weak fluorescence signals. We have shown that use of a wide area detector in transmission geometry allows increasing imaging depth in turbid media due to efficient photon collection. Compared to the conventional epi-detection scheme used in most commercial microscopes, the transmission detector was found to be 2–3 orders of magnitude more sensitive when used for in depth imaging in scattering samples simulating brain optical properties. PMID:27699135

  17. First order magnetic transition in single crystal CaFe2As2 detected by 75As NMR

    SciTech Connect

    Baek, Seung Ho; Curro, Nicholas J

    2008-01-01

    We report {sup 75}As Nuclear Magnetic Resonance data in a single crystal of CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2}. The Knight shift, the electric field gradient, and the spin lattice relaxation rate are strongly temperature dependent in the paramagnetic state, and change discontinuously at the structural transition temperature, T{sub S} = T{sub N} = 167 K. Immediately below, the NMR spectra reveal an internal field at the As site associated with the presence of a commensurate magnetic order. These results indicate that the structural and magnetic transitions in CaFe{sub 2}As{sub 2} are first order and strongly coupled, and that the electron density in the FeAs plane is highly sensitive to the out-of-plane structure.

  18. Design and validation of an oligonucleotide probe for the detection of protozoa from the order Trichomonadida using chromogenic in situ hybridization.

    PubMed

    Mostegl, Meike Marissa; Richter, Barbara; Nedorost, Nora; Maderner, Anton; Dinhopl, Nora; Kulda, Jaroslav; Liebhart, Dieter; Hess, Michael; Weissenböck, Herbert

    2010-07-15

    Infections with protozoal parasites of the order Trichomonadida are often observed in veterinary medicine. Based on the trichomonad species involved these infections are either asymptomatic or can lead to sometimes serious disease. To further study protozoal agents of the order Trichomonadida the establishment of a method to detect trichomonads directly in the tissue, allowing parasite-lesion correlation, is necessary. Here we describe the design and evaluation of an oligonucleotide probe for chromogenic in situ hybridization, theoretically allowing detection of all hitherto known members of the order Trichomonadida. The probe was designed on a region of the 18S ribosomal RNA gene homologue for all representatives of the order Trichomonadida available in the GenBank. Functionality of the probe was proven using protozoal cultures containing different trichomonads (Monocercomonas colubrorum, Hypotrichomonas acosta, Pentatrichomonas hominis, Trichomitus batrachorum, Trichomonas gallinae, Tetratrichomonas gallinarum, Tritrichomonas foetus, and Tritrichomonas augusta). Furthermore, three different tissue sections containing either T. gallinae, T. foetus or Histomonas meleagridis were tested positive. Additionally, to rule out cross-reactivity of the probe a large number of different pathogenic protozoal agents, fungi, bacteria and viruses were tested and gave negative results. The probe presented here can be considered an important tool for diagnosis of all to date described relevant protozoal parasites of the order Trichomonadida in tissue samples.

  19. The liquid-ordered phase in sphingomyelincholesterol membranes as detected by the discrimination by oxygen transport (DOT) method.

    PubMed

    Wisniewska, Anna; Subczynski, Witold K

    2008-01-01

    Membranes made from binary mixtures of egg sphingomyelin (ESM) and cholesterol were investigated using conventional and saturation-recovery EPR observations of the 5-doxylstearic acid spin label (5-SASL). The effects of cholesterol on membrane order and the oxygen transport parameter (bimolecular collision rate of molecular oxygen with the nitroxide spin label) were monitored at the depth of the fifth carbon in fluid- and gel-phase ESM membranes. The saturation-recovery EPR discrimination by oxygen transport (DOT) method allowed the discrimination of the liquid-ordered (l(o)), liquid-disordered (l(d)), and solid-ordered (s(o)) phases because the bimolecular collision rates of the molecular oxygen with the nitroxide spin label differ in these phases. Additionally, oxygen collision rates (the oxygen transport parameter) were obtained in coexisting phases without the need for their separation, which provides information about the internal dynamics of each phase. The addition of cholesterol causes a dramatic decrease in the oxygen transport parameter around the nitroxide moiety of 5-SASL in the l(o) phase, which at 50 mol% cholesterol becomes approximately 5 times smaller than in the pure ESM membrane in the l(d) phase, and approximately 2 times smaller than in the pure ESM membrane in the s(o) phase. The overall change in the oxygen transport parameter is as large as approximately 20-fold. Conventional EPR spectra show that 5-SASL is maximally immobilized at the phase boundary between regions with coexisting l(d) and l(o) phases or s(o) and l(o) phases and the region with a single l(o) phase. The obtained results allowed for the construction of a phase diagram for the ESM-cholesterol membrane.

  20. Routine meconium screening versus drug screening per physician order: detecting the true incidence of drug-exposed infants.

    PubMed

    Zenewicz, D; Kuhn, P J

    1998-01-01

    National statistics indicate that 11% of newborns are exposed to drugs of abuse in utero (Chasnoff, Burns, Schnoll, & Burns, 1985). From July through November of 1993, 0.2% (1/583) of infants in our hospital screened positive for exposure to drugs of abuse in utero, by blood and urine screens collected per physician's order. During the same 4 months in 1995, 0.2% (1/574) screened positive. In contrast, from July through November 1994, all newborns born at our institution were screened for in utero drug exposure using meconium samples; approximately 4.5% (22/493) were positive. Meconium screening of all infants, not just those per physician order, produced a dramatic increase in positive drug results. Of great concern in this study was that only two of the 22 mothers identified as having drug-screen positive babies during the 1994 meconium screening agreed to use rehabilitative services. This highlights the necessity of intervention through early educational programs stressing prevention.

  1. Order Parameters and Algorithmic Approaches for Detection and Demarcation of Interfaces in Hydrate-Fluid and Ice-Fluid Systems.

    PubMed

    Sæthre, Bjørn Steen; Hoffmann, Alex C; van der Spoel, David

    2014-12-09

    Some aspects of the use of order parameter fields in molecular dynamics simulations to delimit solid phases containing water, namely ice and hydrate, in both hydrophilic and hydrophobic fluids are examined; this includes the influences of rectangular meshes and of filtering on the quality of these parameters. Three order parameters are studied: the mass density, ρ; an angular tetrahedrality measure, Sg (Chau and Hardwick, Mol. Phys. 1998, 93, 511); and the water-dimer dihedral angle, F4 (Rodger et al. Fluid Phase Equilib. 1996, 116, 326). The parameters are studied to find their ability to distinguish between bulk phases, their consistency in different environments, their noise susceptibility, and their ability to demarcate the interface region. Spatial sampling and filtering are covered in detail, and some temporal features are illustrated by using autocorrelation maps. The parameters are employed to determine the position of interfaces as functions of time and, with the capillary wave fluctuation method (Hoyt et al. Phys. Rev. Lett. 2001, 86, 5530; Math. Comput. Simul. 2010, 80, 1382), to estimate solid-fluid interfacial stiffnesses, with partial success for the hydrophilic/hydrophobic-type interfaces.

  2. Detection of symmetry-protected topological order in AKLT states by exact evaluation of the strange correlator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wierschem, K.; Beach, K. S. D.

    2016-06-01

    The strange correlator [Phys. Rev. Lett. 112, 247202 (2014), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.112.247202] has been proposed as a measure of symmetry protected topological order in one- and two-dimensional systems. It takes the form of a spin-spin correlation function, computed as a mixed overlap between the state of interest and a trivial local product state. We demonstrate that it can be computed exactly (asymptotically, in the Monte Carlo sense) for various Affleck-Kennedy-Lieb-Tasaki states by direct evaluation of the wave function within the valence bond loop gas framework. We present results for lattices with chain, square, honeycomb, cube, diamond, and hyperhoneycomb geometries. In each case, the spin quantum number S is varied such that 2 S (the number of valence bonds emerging from each site) achieves various integer multiples of the lattice coordination number. We introduce the concept of strange correlator loop winding number and point to its utility in testing for the presence of symmetry protected topological order.

  3. Detecting and correcting for family size differences in the study of sexual orientation and fraternal birth order.

    PubMed

    Blanchard, Ray

    2014-07-01

    The term "fraternal birth order effect" denotes a statistical relation most commonly expressed in one of two ways: Older brothers increase the odds of homosexuality in later born males or, alternatively, homosexual men tend to have more older brothers than do heterosexual men. The demonstrability of this effect depends partly on the adequate matching of the homosexual and heterosexual study groups with respect to mean family size. If the homosexual group has too many siblings, relative to the heterosexual group, the homosexual group will tend to show the expected excess of older brothers but may also show an excess of other sibling-types (most likely older sisters); if the homosexual group has too few siblings, it will tend not to show a difference in number of older brothers but instead may show a deficiency of other sibling-types (most likely younger brothers and younger sisters). In the first part of this article, these consequences are illustrated with deliberately mismatched groups selected from archived data sets. In the second part, two slightly different methods for transforming raw sibling data are presented. These are intended to produce family-size-corrected variables for each of the four original sibling parameters (older brothers, older sisters, younger brothers, and younger sisters). Both versions are shown to render the fraternal birth order effect observable in the deliberately mismatched groups. In the third part of the article, fraternal birth order studies published in the last 5 years were surveyed for failures to find a statistically significant excess of older brothers for the homosexual group. Two such studies were found in the nine examined. In both cases, the collective findings for older sisters, younger brothers, and younger sisters suggested that the mean family size of the homosexual groups was smaller than that of the heterosexual comparison groups. Furthermore, the individual findings for the four classes of siblings resembled those

  4. Detection of gear wear on the 757/767 internal drive generator using higher order spectral analysis and wavelets

    SciTech Connect

    Allgood, G.O.; Van Hoy, B.W.; Ayers, C.W.

    1997-01-01

    The 757/767 internal drive generator (IDG), which provides 400 Hz/120 volt ac power to the aircraft cabin experiences failures due to seizure of the scavenger drive pump and/or axial gears on the main drive shaft of the unit. These generators are an integral part of the aircraft`s engines sitting outboard, inside the engine cowling. The seizure of gears represents a significant loss with gear replacement estimated at $17,000 and unit replacement costs at $250,000. One of the U.S. commercial airline companies engaged Oak Ridge National Laboratory in a brief study to determine if a methodology could be developed to interrogate and diagnose gear wear with the ultimate goal of deploying an instrument for test stand and flight line use. Through a structured analysis it was determined that accelerometers mapped with higher order spectral analysis (HOSA) and/or wavelets could provide an analytic approach and basis for a diagnostic sensor/system capable of assessing IDG gear wear on the aircraft or the test stand.

  5. Detection of Single-Domain Co2FeAl Nanoparticles Using First-Order Reversal Curve Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alikhanzadeh-Arani, Sima; Almasi-Kashi, Mohammad; Pezeshki-Nejad, Zahra; Ramazani, Abdolali; Salavati-Niasari, Masoud

    2016-10-01

    Half-Heusler nanostructures of Co2FeAl alloys, synthesized via coprecipitation route, were found to contain both hard- and soft-phases magnetic grains, mapped using first-order reversal curves (FORCs) diagrams. The obtained results confirmed that these powders are highly interacting as a single-domain magnetizing system. A significant dependence of the morphology and particle size on the annealing rate was represented by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and high-resolution TEM images. The presence of the strong magnetizing interaction between the nanoparticles led to the formation of chain-like structure stabilized by PVP polymer. By increasing the annealing rate from 278.15 K/min to 288.15 K/min (5 °C/min to 15 °C/min), the grain shape changed from long nanochain to nonuniform agglomerated grains. Additionally, the magnetic characteristics of the prepared alloys were found to be affected by tuning the annealing rate.

  6. Simultaneous even- and third-order distortion suppression in a microwave photonic link based on orthogonal polarization modulation, balanced detection, and optical sideband filtering.

    PubMed

    Han, Xiuyou; Chen, Xiang; Yao, Jianping

    2016-06-27

    A microwave photonic link (MPL) with simultaneous suppression of the even-order and third-order distortions using a polarization modulator (PolM), an optical bandpass filter (OBPF), and a balanced photodetector (BPD) is proposed and experimentally demonstrated. The even-order distortions are suppressed by utilizing orthogonal polarization modulation based on the PolM and balanced differential detection based on the BPD. The third-order distortions (IMD3) are suppressed by optimizing the spectral response of the OBPF with an optimal power ratio between the optical carrier and the sidebands of the phase-modulated signals from the PolM. Since the suppression of the IMD3 is achieved when the MPL is optimized for even-order distortion suppression, the proposed MPL can operate with simultaneous suppression of the even-order and third-order distortions. The proposed MPL is analyzed theoretically and is verified by an experiment. For a two-tone RF signal of f1 = 10 GHz and f2 = 19.95 GHz, the spurious-free dynamic range (SFDR2) is enhanced by 23.4 dB for the second harmonic (2f1), and 29.1 and 27.6 dB for the second intermodulation (f2-f1 and f1 + f2), as compared with a conventional MPL. For a two-tone RF signal of f1 = 9.95 GHz and f2 = 10 GHz, the SFDR3 is increased by 13.1 dB as compared with a conventional MPL.

  7. Detection of Methamphetamine and Morphine in Urine and Saliva Using Excitation-Emission Matrix Fluorescence and a Second-Order Calibration Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, B. Y.; Ye, Y.; Liao, L. C.

    2016-07-01

    A new method was developed to determine the methamphetamine and morphine concentrations in urine and saliva based on excitation-emission matrix fluorescence coupled to a second-order calibration algorithm. In the case of single-drug abuse, the results showed that the average recoveries of methamphetamine and morphine were 95.3 and 96.7% in urine samples, respectively, and 98.1 and 106.2% in saliva samples, respectively. The relative errors were all below 5%. The simultaneous determination of methamphetamine and morphine in urine using two second-order algorithms was also investigated. Satisfactory results were obtained with a self-weighted alternating trilinear decomposition algorithm. The root-mean-square errors of the predictions were 0.540 and 0.0382 μg/mL for methamphetamine and morphine, respectively. The limits of detection of the proposed methods were very low and sufficient for studying methamphetamine and morphine in urine.

  8. A new modeling strategy for third-order fast high-performance liquid chromatographic data with fluorescence detection. Quantitation of fluoroquinolones in water samples.

    PubMed

    Alcaráz, Mirta R; Bortolato, Santiago A; Goicoechea, Héctor C; Olivieri, Alejandro C

    2015-03-01

    Matrix augmentation is regularly employed in extended multivariate curve resolution-alternating least-squares (MCR-ALS), as applied to analytical calibration based on second- and third-order data. However, this highly useful concept has almost no correspondence in parallel factor analysis (PARAFAC) of third-order data. In the present work, we propose a strategy to process third-order chromatographic data with matrix fluorescence detection, based on an Augmented PARAFAC model. The latter involves decomposition of a three-way data array augmented along the elution time mode with data for the calibration samples and for each of the test samples. A set of excitation-emission fluorescence matrices, measured at different chromatographic elution times for drinking water samples, containing three fluoroquinolones and uncalibrated interferences, were evaluated using this approach. Augmented PARAFAC exploits the second-order advantage, even in the presence of significant changes in chromatographic profiles from run to run. The obtained relative errors of prediction were ca. 10 % for ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, and danofloxacin, with a significant enhancement in analytical figures of merit in comparison with previous reports. The results are compared with those furnished by MCR-ALS.

  9. Easy and cheap fabrication of ordered pyramidal-shaped plasmonic substrates for detection and quantitative analysis using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Leordean, Cosmin; Gabudean, Ana-Maria; Canpean, Valentin; Astilean, Simion

    2013-09-07

    In this work we present a simple approach for the fabrication of periodically ordered pyramidal-shaped metallic nanostructures and demonstrate their efficiency as SERS active substrates. Our method for the fabrication of the plasmonic substrate is based on nanoimprint lithography and exploits the thermal properties of two classes of polymers, thermoplastics and hydrogels. During the heating process the thermoplastic polymers will start to melt whereas the hydrogel polymers will form a solid due to the evaporation of water molecules adsorbed during the dissolving process. Using this approach we fabricate highly ordered pyramidal-shaped nanostructures using the texture of a commercial DVD as the initial mold. This technique represents a low-cost alternative to the classical lithography techniques, allowing the fabrication over large areas (~cm(2)) of periodically ordered nanostructures in a controlled and reproducible manner. The SERS efficiency of the fabricated substrate is demonstrated through the detection of urea molecules found in the fingerprint. In addition, due to the periodicity of the pyramidal-shaped structures, the fabricated substrate can be successfully employed to correlate the intensity of the specific SERS peak of urea with the molecules concentration, offering thus the possibility of developing a quantitative SERS renal sensor.

  10. Electrochemical X-ray fluorescence spectroscopy for trace heavy metal analysis: enhancing X-ray fluorescence detection capabilities by four orders of magnitude.

    PubMed

    Hutton, Laura A; O'Neil, Glen D; Read, Tania L; Ayres, Zoë J; Newton, Mark E; Macpherson, Julie V

    2014-05-06

    The development of a novel analytical technique, electrochemical X-ray fluorescence (EC-XRF), is described and applied to the quantitative detection of heavy metals in solution, achieving sub-ppb limits of detection (LOD). In EC-XRF, electrochemical preconcentration of a species of interest onto the target electrode is achieved here by cathodic electrodeposition. Unambiguous elemental identification and quantification of metal concentration is then made using XRF. This simple electrochemical preconcentration step improves the LOD of energy dispersive XRF by over 4 orders of magnitude (for similar sample preparation time scales). Large area free-standing boron doped diamond grown using microwave plasma chemical vapor deposition techniques is found to be ideal as the electrode material for both electrodeposition and XRF due to its wide solvent window, transparency to the XRF beam, and ability to be produced in mechanically robust freestanding thin film form. During electrodeposition it is possible to vary both the deposition potential (Edep) and deposition time (tdep). For the metals Cu(2+) and Pb(2+) the highest detection sensitivities were found for Edep = -1.75 V and tdep (=) 4000 s with LODs of 0.05 and 0.04 ppb achieved, respectively. In mixed Cu(2+)/Pb(2+) solutions, EC-XRF shows that Cu(2+) deposition is unimpeded by Pb(2+), across a broad concentration range, but this is only true for Pb(2+) when both metals are present at low concentrations (10 nM), boding well for trace level measurements. In a dual mixed metal solution, EC-XRF can also be employed to either selectively deposit the metal which has the most positive formal reduction potential, E(0), or exhaustively deplete it from solution, enabling uninhibited detection of the metal with the more negative E(0).

  11. From poloidal to toroidal: Detection of a well-ordered magnetic field in the high-mass protocluster G35.2–0.74 N

    SciTech Connect

    Qiu, Keping; Zhang, Qizhou; Menten, Karl M.; Liu, Hauyu B.; Tang, Ya-Wen

    2013-12-20

    We report the detection of an ordered magnetic field threading a cluster-forming clump in the molecular cloud G35.2–0.74 using Submillimeter Array observations of polarized dust emission. We resolve the morphology of the magnetic field in the plane of sky and detect a great turn of 90° in the field direction: over the northern part of the clump, where a velocity gradient is evident, the magnetic field is aligned along the long axis of the clump, whereas in the southern part, where the velocity structure appears relatively uniform, the field is aligned perpendicular to the clump. Taking into account early single-disk data, we suggest that the clump forms as its parent cloud collapses more along the magnetic field. The northern part of the clump carries over angular momentum from the cloud, forming a fast rotating system, and the magnetic field is pulled into a toroidal configuration. In contrast, the southern part is not significantly rotating and retains a poloidal field. A statistical analysis of the observed polarization dispersion yields a field strength of ∼1 mG. Detailed calculations support our hypothesis of a rotationally twisted magnetic field in the northern part. The observations suggest that the magnetic field may play a critical role in the formation of the dense clump, while in its further dynamical evolution, rotation and turbulence can also be important. In addition, our observations provide evidence for a wide-angle outflow driven from a strongly rotating region whose magnetic field is largely toroidal.

  12. A multiple receiver - multiple transmitter VLF high-order differential analysis evaluation network for near real-time detection and discrimination of seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skeberis, Christos; Zaharis, Zaharias; Xenos, Thomas; Spatalas, Spyridon; Stratakis, Dimitrios; Maggipinto, Tommaso; Biagi, Pier francesco

    2016-04-01

    This study provides an evaluation of the application of high-order differential analysis on VLF signals on a multiple-receiver multiple-transmitter network. This application provides a method for near-real-time detection of disturbances that can be attributed to seismic-ionospheric precursor phenomena and can discriminate disturbances that could be classified as false positives and thus should be attributed to other geomagnetic influences. VLF data acquired in Thessaloniki, Greece (40.59N, 22,78E) Herakleion, Greece (35.31N, 25.10E), Nicosia, Cyprus (35.17N, 33.35E), Italy (42.42N, 13.08E) and transmitted by the VLF station in Tavolara, Italy (ICV station 40.923N, 9.731E) and the station in Keflavik, Iceland (ICE 64.02N, 22.57W) from January 2015 to January 2016 were used for the purpose of this paper. The receivers have been developed by Elettronika Srl and are part of the International Network for Frontier Research on Earthquake Precursors (INFREP). The process applied for this study has been further developed and is based on differential analysis. The signals undergo transformation using an enhanced version of the Hilbert Huang Transform, and relevant spectra are produced. On the product of this process, differential analysis is applied. Finally, the method produces the correlation coefficient of signals that are on the same path over an earthquake epicenter in order to highlight disturbances, and on the opposite can make comparisons with unrelated transmitted signals of different paths to eliminate disturbances that are not localized to the area of interest. This improvement provides a simple method of noise cancellation to signals that would otherwise be considered as false positives. A further evaluation of the method is provided with the presentation and discussion of sample results. The method seems to be a robust tool of analysis of VLF signals and also an automatic detection tool with built-in noise cancellation of outside disturbances.

  13. Fast chromatographic method for the determination of dyes in beverages by using high performance liquid chromatography--diode array detection data and second order algorithms.

    PubMed

    Culzoni, María J; Schenone, Agustina V; Llamas, Natalia E; Garrido, Mariano; Di Nezio, Maria S; Band, Beatriz S Fernández; Goicoechea, Héctor C

    2009-10-16

    A fast chromatographic methodology is presented for the analysis of three synthetic dyes in non-alcoholic beverages: amaranth (E123), sunset yellow FCF (E110) and tartrazine (E102). Seven soft drinks (purchased from a local supermarket) were homogenized, filtered and injected into the chromatographic system. Second order data were obtained by a rapid LC separation and DAD detection. A comparative study of the performance of two second order algorithms (MCR-ALS and U-PLS/RBL) applied to model the data, is presented. Interestingly, the data present time shift between different chromatograms and cannot be conveniently corrected to determine the above-mentioned dyes in beverage samples. This fact originates the lack of trilinearity that cannot be conveniently pre-processed and can hardly be modelled by using U-PLS/RBL algorithm. On the contrary, MCR-ALS has shown to be an excellent tool for modelling this kind of data allowing to reach acceptable figures of merit. Recovery values ranged between 97% and 105% when analyzing artificial and real samples were indicative of the good performance of the method. In contrast with the complete separation, which consumes 10 mL of methanol and 3 mL of 0.08 mol L(-1) ammonium acetate, the proposed fast chromatography method requires only 0.46 mL of methanol and 1.54 mL of 0.08 mol L(-1) ammonium acetate. Consequently, analysis time could be reduced up to 14.2% of the necessary time to perform the complete separation allowing saving both solvents and time, which are related to a reduction of both the costs per analysis and environmental impact.

  14. Toward Higher-Order Mass Detection: Influence of an Adsorbate’s Rotational Inertia and Eccentricity on the Resonant Response of a Bernoulli-Euler Cantilever Beam

    PubMed Central

    Heinrich, Stephen M.; Dufour, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    In this paper a new theoretical model is derived, the results of which permit a detailed examination of how the resonant characteristics of a cantilever are influenced by a particle (adsorbate) attached at an arbitrary position along the beam’s length. Unlike most previous work, the particle need not be small in mass or dimension relative to the beam, and the adsorbate’s geometric characteristics are incorporated into the model via its rotational inertia and eccentricity relative to the beam axis. For the special case in which the adsorbate’s (translational) mass is indeed small, an analytical solution is obtained for the particle-induced resonant frequency shift of an arbitrary flexural mode, including the effects of rotational inertia and eccentricity. This solution is shown to possess the exact first-order behavior in the normalized particle mass and represents a generalization of analytical solutions derived by others in earlier studies. The results suggest the potential for “higher-order” nanobeam-based mass detection methods by which the multi-mode frequency response reflects not only the adsorbate’s mass but also important geometric data related to its size, shape, or orientation (i.e., the mass distribution), thus resulting in more highly discriminatory techniques for discrete-mass sensing. PMID:26610493

  15. Higher-order statistical moments and a procedure that detects potentially anomalous years as two alternative methods describing alterations in continuous environmental data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Arismendi, Ivan; Johnson, Sherri L.; Dunham, Jason

    2015-01-01

    Statistics of central tendency and dispersion may not capture relevant or desired characteristics of the distribution of continuous phenomena and, thus, they may not adequately describe temporal patterns of change. Here, we present two methodological approaches that can help to identify temporal changes in environmental regimes. First, we use higher-order statistical moments (skewness and kurtosis) to examine potential changes of empirical distributions at decadal extents. Second, we adapt a statistical procedure combining a non-metric multidimensional scaling technique and higher density region plots to detect potentially anomalous years. We illustrate the use of these approaches by examining long-term stream temperature data from minimally and highly human-influenced streams. In particular, we contrast predictions about thermal regime responses to changing climates and human-related water uses. Using these methods, we effectively diagnose years with unusual thermal variability and patterns in variability through time, as well as spatial variability linked to regional and local factors that influence stream temperature. Our findings highlight the complexity of responses of thermal regimes of streams and reveal their differential vulnerability to climate warming and human-related water uses. The two approaches presented here can be applied with a variety of other continuous phenomena to address historical changes, extreme events, and their associated ecological responses.

  16. Surface modification with multiphilic ligands at detectable well defined active positions of nano-object of giant wheel shaped molybdenum blue showing third-order nonlinear optical properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lijuan; Li, Yuhao; Zhou, Yunshan

    2010-04-01

    The reaction of an aqueous solution of sodium molybdate with L-tyrosine in the presence of reducing agent results in the formation of a new compound of the formula of Na 8Co 3[Mo VI126 Mo V28O 462H 14(H 2O) 46(HOC 6H 4CH 2CH( NH3+)COO -) 12]·ca. 200H 2O. The compound contains nanosized ring-shaped clusters with tyrosine ligands possessing different types of functional groups (one -CO 2, one -NH3+ and one -ArOH) coordinated through the carboxylate groups at the active sites of the inner cavity. Importantly, the result demonstrates that not only active sites/areas of the cluster surface under a specified condition can be directly monitored and detected but also novel type surfaces within the cavity of a nano-structured ring-shaped cluster can be generated simultaneously. The nonlinear optical properties of the new cluster are studied using the well-known Z-scan technique at a wavelength of 532 nm with laser pulse duration of 18 ps. The results show that the new cluster exhibits interesting self-focusing nonlinear optical response with the real and imaginary parts of the third-order nonlinear optical susceptibility χ(3) being 1.069 × 10 -13(esu) and 2.529 × 10 -15(esu), respectively, which may find application in material science.

  17. Scanning nonlinear dielectric microscopy observation of accumulated charges in metal-SiO2-SiN-SiO2-Si flash memory by detecting higher-order nonlinear permittivity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Honda, Koichiro; Cho, Yasuo

    2012-12-01

    Using scanning nonlinear dielectric microscopy with high-sensitivity capacitance variation detection capability, we succeeded in the high-resolution visualization of accumulated charges in metal-SiO2-SiN-SiO2-Si flash memory by detecting the higher-order (2-4 order) nonlinear permittivity. The obtained image contrast can be interpreted using a higher-order differential coefficient (dnC/dVn) of a quasi-static C-V curve of the SiO2-SiN-SiO2-Si interface capacitance as a function of externally applied voltage. Moreover, by using a higher-order nonlinear image, the charge concentration resolution can be improved. Thus, improved resolution of the spatial charge distribution is expected through improvement of the concentration resolution by the imaging of higher-order nonlinear dielectric terms.

  18. Order Up

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gibeault, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Change orders. The words can turn the stomachs of administrators. Horror stories about change orders create fear and distrust among school officials, designers and builders. Can change orders be avoided? If car manufacturers can produce millions of intricately designed vehicles, why can't the same quality control be achieved on a construction…

  19. Detection of Counter-Changing Contrast: Second-Order Apparent Motion Without Postrectification Motion-Energy Analysis or Salience Mapping/Feature Tracking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gilroy, Lee A.; Hock, Howard S.

    2004-01-01

    The perception of 2nd-order, texture-contrast-defined motion was studied for apparent-motion stimuli composed of a pair of spatially displaced, simultaneously visible checkerboards. It was found that background-relative, counter-changing contrast provided the informational basis for the perception of 2nd-order apparent motion; motion began where…

  20. Do intermediate- and higher-order principal components contain useful information to detect subtle changes in lower extremity biomechanics during running?

    PubMed

    Phinyomark, Angkoon; Hettinga, Blayne A; Osis, Sean; Ferber, Reed

    2015-12-01

    Recently, a principal component analysis (PCA) approach has been used to provide insight into running pathomechanics. However, researchers often account for nearly all of the variance from the original data using only the first few, or lower-order principal components (PCs), which are often associated with the most dominant movement patterns. In contrast, intermediate- and higher-order PCs are generally associated with subtle movement patterns and may contain valuable information about between-group variation and specific test conditions. Few investigations have evaluated the utility of intermediate- and higher-order PCs based on observational cross-sectional analyses of different cohorts, and no prior studies have evaluated longitudinal changes in an intervention study. This study was designed to test the utility of intermediate- and higher-order PCs in identifying differences in running patterns between different groups based on three-dimensional bilateral lower-limb kinematics. The results reveal that differences between sex- and age-groups of 128 runners were observed in the lower- and intermediate-order PCs scores (p<0.05) while differences between baseline and following a 6-week muscle strengthening program for 24 runners with patellofemoral pain were observed in the higher-order PCs scores (p<0.05), which exhibited a moderate correlation with self-reported pain scores (r=-0.43; p<0.05).

  1. Artifact-Free and Detection-Profile-Independent Higher-Order Fluorescence Correlation Spectroscopy for Microsecond-Resolved Kinetics. 1. Multidetector and Sub-Binning Approach.

    PubMed

    Abdollah-Nia, Farshad; Gelfand, Martin P; Van Orden, Alan

    2017-03-10

    Fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS) is a powerful tool in the time-resolved analysis of nonreacting or reacting molecules in solution, based on fluorescence intensity fluctuations. However, conventional (second-order) FCS alone is insufficient to measure all parameters needed to describe a reaction or mixture, including concentrations, fluorescence brightnesses, and forward and reverse rate constants. For this purpose, correlations of higher powers of fluorescence intensity fluctuations can be calculated to yield additional information from the single-photon data stream collected in an FCS experiment. To describe systems of diffusing and reacting molecules, considering cumulants of fluorescence intensity results in simple expressions in which the reaction and diffusion parts factorize. The computation of higher-order correlations in experiments is hindered by shot-noise and common detector artifacts, the effects of which become worse with increasing order. In this article, we introduce a technique to calculate artifact-free higher-order correlation functions with improved time resolution, and without any need for modeling and calibration of detector artifacts. The technique is formulated for general multidetector experiments and verified in both two-detector and single-detector configurations. Good signal-to-noise ratio is achieved down to 1 μs in correlation curves up to order (2, 2). This capability makes possible a variety of new measurements including multicomponent analysis and fast reaction kinetics, as demonstrated in a companion article (10.1021/acs.jpcb.7b00408).

  2. Enhancement of fluorescence detection in chromatographic methods by computer analysis of second order data. Progress report, August 1, 1990--October 1, 1993

    SciTech Connect

    Rutan, S.C.

    1993-12-31

    Two types of experiments were studied during the course of this project. The first was liquid chromatographic separation of polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) followed by detection with full-spectrum fluorescence spectroscopy using anintensified diode array detector. Methods such as generalized rank annihilation and adaptive Kalman filtering were developed and evaluated. The second was the use of a thin-layer chromatographic or planar electrophoretic separation of analytes (amino acids or enzymes). The analytes are then reacted with a reagent or enzyme substrate; the reaction is followed by fluorescence intensity vs time and migration distance, and kinetic analysis is used to quantify the component species.

  3. Detection of short range order in SiO2 thin-films by grazing-incidence wide and small-angle X-ray scattering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nagata, Kohki; Ogura, Atsushi; Hirosawa, Ichiro; Suwa, Tomoyuki; Teramoto, Akinobu; Ohmi, Tadahiro

    2016-04-01

    The effects of the fabrication process conditions on the microstructure of silicon dioxide thin films of <10 nm thickness are presented. The microstructure was investigated using grazing-incidence wide and small-angle X-ray scattering methods with synchrotron radiation. The combination of a high brilliance light source and grazing incident configuration enabled the observation of very weak diffuse X-ray scattering from SiO2 thin films. The results revealed different microstructures, which were dependent on oxidizing species or temperature. The micro-level properties differed from bulk properties reported in the previous literature. It was indicated that these differences originate from inner stress. The detailed structure in an amorphous thin film was not revealed owing to detection difficulties.

  4. cgpCaVEManWrapper: Simple Execution of CaVEMan in Order to Detect Somatic Single Nucleotide Variants in NGS Data.

    PubMed

    Jones, David; Raine, Keiran M; Davies, Helen; Tarpey, Patrick S; Butler, Adam P; Teague, Jon W; Nik-Zainal, Serena; Campbell, Peter J

    2016-12-08

    CaVEMan is an expectation maximization-based somatic substitution-detection algorithm that is written in C. The algorithm analyzes sequence data from a test sample, such as a tumor relative to a reference normal sample from the same patient and the reference genome. It performs a comparative analysis of the tumor and normal sample to derive a probabilistic estimate for putative somatic substitutions. When combined with a set of validated post-hoc filters, CaVEMan generates a set of somatic substitution calls with high recall and positive predictive value. Here we provide instructions for using a wrapper script called cgpCaVEManWrapper, which runs the CaVEMan algorithm and additional downstream post-hoc filters. We describe both a simple one-shot run of cgpCaVEManWrapper and a more in-depth implementation suited to large-scale compute farms. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  5. Magnetodielectric detection of magnetic quadrupole order in Ba(TiO)Cu4(PO4)4 with Cu4O12 square cupolas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kimura, K.; Babkevich, P.; Sera, M.; Toyoda, M.; Yamauchi, K.; Tucker, G. S.; Martius, J.; Fennell, T.; Manuel, P.; Khalyavin, D. D.; Johnson, R. D.; Nakano, T.; Nozue, Y.; Rønnow, H. M.; Kimura, T.

    2016-10-01

    In vortex-like spin arrangements, multiple spins can combine into emergent multipole moments. Such multipole moments have broken space-inversion and time-reversal symmetries, and can therefore exhibit linear magnetoelectric (ME) activity. Three types of such multipole moments are known: toroidal; monopole; and quadrupole moments. So far, however, the ME activity of these multipole moments has only been established experimentally for the toroidal moment. Here we propose a magnetic square cupola cluster, in which four corner-sharing square-coordinated metal-ligand fragments form a noncoplanar buckled structure, as a promising structural unit that carries an ME-active multipole moment. We substantiate this idea by observing clear magnetodielectric signals associated with an antiferroic ME-active magnetic quadrupole order in the real material Ba(TiO)Cu4(PO4)4. The present result serves as a useful guide for exploring and designing new ME-active materials based on vortex-like spin arrangements.

  6. Enhanced detection sensitivity of higher-order vibrational modes of gold nanodisks on top of a GaN nanorod array through localized surface plasmons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Szu-Chi; Wei, Pei-Kuen; Hsiao, Hui-Hsin; Mante, Pierre-Adrien; Huang, Yu-Ru; Chen, I.-Ju; Chang, Hung-Chun; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-11-01

    We report a method that enables the excitation of localized surface plasmons (LSPs) in a gold nanodisk array by placing each nanodisk on top of a GaN nanorod. When the rod length was much longer than the plasmon penetration depth inside the nanorod, the plasmonic field was found to be localized, and coupling between neighboring gold nanodisks was eliminated. The interaction between LSPs and acoustic vibrations in gold nanodisks was then investigated. Owing to the strong localization of the plasmonic field, weak, higher-order vibrational modes of gold nanodisk could be optically observed. Furthermore, such an LSP-based acoustic sensor could be operated at any angle of incident light. Our study not only provides an approach to excite LSPs in high-density metallic arrays, but also opens one of the possible solutions for the development of highly sensitive sub-terahertz hypersonic sensors with high angle tolerance of incident light.

  7. Magnetodielectric detection of magnetic quadrupole order in Ba(TiO)Cu4(PO4)4 with Cu4O12 square cupolas

    PubMed Central

    Kimura, K.; Babkevich, P.; Sera, M.; Toyoda, M.; Yamauchi, K.; Tucker, G. S.; Martius, J.; Fennell, T.; Manuel, P.; Khalyavin, D. D.; Johnson, R. D.; Nakano, T.; Nozue, Y.; Rønnow, H. M.; Kimura, T.

    2016-01-01

    In vortex-like spin arrangements, multiple spins can combine into emergent multipole moments. Such multipole moments have broken space-inversion and time-reversal symmetries, and can therefore exhibit linear magnetoelectric (ME) activity. Three types of such multipole moments are known: toroidal; monopole; and quadrupole moments. So far, however, the ME activity of these multipole moments has only been established experimentally for the toroidal moment. Here we propose a magnetic square cupola cluster, in which four corner-sharing square-coordinated metal-ligand fragments form a noncoplanar buckled structure, as a promising structural unit that carries an ME-active multipole moment. We substantiate this idea by observing clear magnetodielectric signals associated with an antiferroic ME-active magnetic quadrupole order in the real material Ba(TiO)Cu4(PO4)4. The present result serves as a useful guide for exploring and designing new ME-active materials based on vortex-like spin arrangements. PMID:27698426

  8. Assessment of five different guideline indication criteria for spirometry, including modified GOLD criteria, in order to detect COPD: data from 5,315 subjects in the PLATINO study

    PubMed Central

    Luize, Ana P; Menezes, Ana Maria B; Perez-Padilla, Rogelio; Muiño, Adriana; López, Maria Victorina; Valdivia, Gonzalo; Lisboa, Carmem; Montes de Oca, Maria; Tálamo, Carlos; Celli, Bartolomé; Nascimento, Oliver A; Gazzotti, Mariana R; Jardim, José R

    2014-01-01

    Background: Spirometry is the gold standard for diagnosing chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Although there are a number of different guideline criteria for deciding who should be selected for spirometric screening, to date it is not known which criteria are the best based on sensitivity and specificity. Aims: Firstly, to evaluate the proportion of subjects in the PLATINO Study that would be recommended for spirometry testing according to Global initiative for Obstructive Lung Disease (GOLD)-modified, American College of Chest Physicians (ACCP), National Lung Health Education Program (NLHEP), GOLD and American Thoracic Society/European Respiratory Society (ATS/ERS) criteria. Secondly, we aimed to compare the sensitivity, specificity, and positive predictive and negative predictive values, of these five different criteria. Methods: Data from the PLATINO study included information on respiratory symptoms, smoking and previous spirometry testing. The GOLD-modified spirometry indication criteria are based on three positive answers out of five questions: the presence of cough, phlegm in the morning, dyspnoea, age over 40 years and smoking status. Results: Data from 5,315 subjects were reviewed. Fewer people had an indication for spirometry (41.3%) according to the GOLD-modified criteria, and more people had an indication for spirometry (80.4%) by the GOLD and ATS/ERS criteria. A low percentage had previously had spirometry performed: GOLD-modified (14.5%); ACCP (13.2%); NLHEP (12.6%); and GOLD and ATS/ERS (12.3%). The GOLD-modified criteria showed the least sensitivity (54.9) and the highest specificity (61.0) for detecting COPD, whereas GOLD and ATS/ERS criteria showed the highest sensitivity (87.9) and the least specificity (20.8). Conclusion: There is a considerable difference in the indication for spirometry according to the five different guideline criteria. The GOLD-modified criteria recruit less people with the greatest sum of sensitivity and

  9. Multichannel Detection Using Higher-Order Statistics

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-02-01

    RedxboIn Prolec (0704-0188)., 5Whas* r DC 205Mc 1. AGENCY USE ONLY (Leava Blank) (2- REPORT DATE a REPORT TYPE AND DATES COVERED I February 1995 Final...5200.1- R , Information Security Program Regulation. For unclassified limited documents, destroy by any method that will prevent disclosure of contents...e fof ev •e s-ructruon seacig edstir data sowces, .g-herhg ard r -ntw the data needed a-d cyr•e wi te,, e,,e-ag thec cdob of Hanrnston Serd co-rTrws

  10. Linear and Angolar Moment of a general spherical TEM and DEM beam radio wave detection with a quadratic order system processor in state of art technology implementation: a three axis sensors array quadratic order correlator for the 21cm radiation radio detection coming from Early Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romano, Francesco; Trifiletti, Alessandro; Cimmino, Rosario F.

    2016-07-01

    The paper focuses on an innovative spherical wave beam quadratic order processor, HSCS-1. It is an IP, Coulob Gauge based, to directly mesure, ∀t and in any single P ∀P (along the propagation axis too) the quadratic order Poynting Vector, with both the complex Linear Momentum (LiM) and Angolar Momentum (AnM) contributions, as well as the mutual quadratic order coherence function of any total or pseudo monochromatic observed beam wave. The focoused spherical quadratic order method, directly mesure the spherical complex OAM (time and propagation axsis invariant) which is composed by the observed beam wave modes. Such solenoidal energy modes, becomes relevant to mesure far distance (as exemple: distance greater than billions of light years away) sources radiations. Furthermore, HSCS-1 contemporary and directly measure the mutual (spatial as well as temporal) complex coherence of any general complex divergent or not strictly TEM (as example: TEM+DEM) observed radiations. Tipically TEM+DEM radiations are characterized by N=LPM+1 complex wave beam modes. N is the number of considered EM fields modes, as great as requested; N and L are integer, which values are internal to a closed interval [0; ∞] P and M are integer, which values are internal to a closed interval [1; ∞] n=0,1,…,N is the mode or beam channel index; with l=0, 1,…,L; p= 1,…, P; and m = 1,…,M; n=l=0 is the fundamental mode index). Here are considered only the wave beam modes which satisfy the related Helmoltz monochromatic wave equation soluctions. As well known in Physics, only adopting a quadratic order energy processor it is possible ∀t to contemporary and directely mesure in P, ∀P(θ Φ z) and ∀(P-P0), both the proper P0 position and quantity of motion (proper space time variations), or by a Fourier Transformation to contemporary and directely mesure proper phase and frequency spectrum variations, of the observed general radiation source.

  11. Chemometrics-enhanced high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection strategy for simultaneous determination of eight co-eluted compounds in ten kinds of Chinese teas using second-order calibration method based on alternating trilinear decomposition algorithm.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiao-Li; Wu, Hai-Long; Gu, Hui-Wen; Zhang, Xiao-Hua; Sun, Yan-Mei; Hu, Yong; Liu, Lu; Rong, Qi-Ming; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2014-10-17

    In this work, an attractive chemometrics-enhanced high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) strategy was proposed for simultaneous and fast determination of eight co-eluted compounds including gallic acid, caffeine and six catechins in ten kinds of Chinese teas by using second-order calibration method based on alternating trilinear decomposition (ATLD) algorithm. This new strategy proved to be a useful tool for handling the co-eluted peaks, uncalibrated interferences and baseline drifts existing in the process of chromatographic separation, which benefited from the "second-order advantages", making the determination of gallic acid, caffeine and six catechins in tea infusions within 8 min under a simple mobile phase condition. The average recoveries of the analytes on two selected tea samples ranged from 91.7 to 103.1% with standard deviations (SD) ranged from 1.9 to 11.9%. Figures of merit including sensitivity (SEN), selectivity (SEL), root-mean-square error of prediction (RMSEP) and limit of detection (LOD) have been calculated to validate the accuracy of the proposed method. To further confirm the reliability of the method, a multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) method based on LC-MS/MS was employed for comparison and the obtained results of both methods were consistent with each other. Furthermore, as a universal strategy, this new proposed analytical method was applied for the determination of gallic acid, caffeine and catechins in several other kinds of Chinese teas, including different levels and varieties. Finally, based on the quantitative results, principal component analysis (PCA) was used to conduct a cluster analysis for these Chinese teas. The green tea, Oolong tea and Pu-erh raw tea samples were classified successfully. All results demonstrated that the proposed method is accurate, sensitive, fast, universal and ideal for the rapid, routine analysis and discrimination of gallic acid, caffeine and catechins in Chinese tea

  12. Quantitative analysis of triazine herbicides in environmental samples by using high performance liquid chromatography and diode array detection combined with second-order calibration based on an alternating penalty trilinear decomposition algorithm.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuan-Na; Wu, Hai-Long; Qing, Xiang-Dong; Li, Quan; Li, Shu-Fang; Fu, Hai-Yan; Yu, Yong-Jie; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2010-09-23

    A novel application of second-order calibration method based on an alternating penalty trilinear decomposition (APTLD) algorithm is presented to treat the data from high performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD). The method makes it possible to accurately and reliably analyze atrazine (ATR), ametryn (AME) and prometryne (PRO) contents in soil, river sediment and wastewater samples. Satisfactory results are obtained although the elution and spectral profiles of the analytes are heavily overlapped with the background in environmental samples. The obtained average recoveries for ATR, AME and PRO are 99.7±1.5, 98.4±4.7 and 97.0±4.4% in soil samples, 100.1±3.2, 100.7±3.4 and 96.4±3.8% in river sediment samples, and 100.1±3.5, 101.8±4.2 and 101.4±3.6% in wastewater samples, respectively. Furthermore, the accuracy and precision of the proposed method are evaluated with the elliptical joint confidence region (EJCR) test. It lights a new avenue to determine quantitatively herbicides in environmental samples with a simple pretreatment procedure and provides the scientific basis for an improved environment management through a better understanding of the wastewater-soil-river sediment system as a whole.

  13. Sensitivity improvement of a sandwich-type ELISA immunosensor for the detection of different prostate-specific antigen isoforms in human serum using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and an ordered and hierarchically organized interfacial supramolecular architecture.

    PubMed

    Gutiérrez-Zúñiga, Gabriela Guadalupe; Hernández-López, José Luis

    2016-01-01

    A gold millielectrode (GME) functionalized with a mixed (16-MHA + EG3SH) self-assembled monolayer (SAM) was used to fabricate an indirect enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) immunosensor for the sensitive detection of prostate-specific antigen (PSA), a prostate cancer (PCa) biomarker, in human serum samples. To address and minimize the issue of non-specific protein adsorption, an organic matrix (amine-PEG3-biotin/avidin) was assembled on the previously functionalized electrode surface to build up an ordered and hierarchically organized interfacial supramolecular architecture: Au/16-MHA/EG3SH/amine-PEG3-biotin/avidin. The electrode was then exposed to serum samples at different concentrations of a sandwich-type immunocomplex molecule ((Btn)Ab-AgPSA-(HRP)Ab), and its interfacial properties were characterized using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). Calibration curves for polarization resistance (RP) and capacitance (1/C) vs. total and free PSA concentrations were obtained and their analytical quality parameters were determined. This approach was compared with results obtained from a commercially available ELISA immunosensor. The results obtained in this work showed that the proposed immunosensor can be successfully applied to analyze serum samples of patients representative of the Mexican population.

  14. Variable Order and Distributed Order Fractional Operators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lorenzo, Carl F.; Hartley, Tom T.

    2002-01-01

    Many physical processes appear to exhibit fractional order behavior that may vary with time or space. The continuum of order in the fractional calculus allows the order of the fractional operator to be considered as a variable. This paper develops the concept of variable and distributed order fractional operators. Definitions based on the Riemann-Liouville definitions are introduced and behavior of the operators is studied. Several time domain definitions that assign different arguments to the order q in the Riemann-Liouville definition are introduced. For each of these definitions various characteristics are determined. These include: time invariance of the operator, operator initialization, physical realization, linearity, operational transforms. and memory characteristics of the defining kernels. A measure (m2) for memory retentiveness of the order history is introduced. A generalized linear argument for the order q allows the concept of "tailored" variable order fractional operators whose a, memory may be chosen for a particular application. Memory retentiveness (m2) and order dynamic behavior are investigated and applications are shown. The concept of distributed order operators where the order of the time based operator depends on an additional independent (spatial) variable is also forwarded. Several definitions and their Laplace transforms are developed, analysis methods with these operators are demonstrated, and examples shown. Finally operators of multivariable and distributed order are defined in their various applications are outlined.

  15. Localization protected quantum order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nandkishore, Rahul

    2015-03-01

    Many body localization occurs in isolated quantum systems, usually with strong disorder, and is marked by absence of dissipation, absence of thermal equilibration, and a memory of the initial conditions that survives in local observables for arbitrarily long times. The many body localized regime is a non-equilibrium, strongly disordered, non-self averaging regime that presents a new frontier for quantum statistical mechanics. In this talk, I point out that there exists a vast zoo of correlated many body localized states of matter, which may be classified using familiar notions of spontaneous symmetry breaking and topological order. I will point out that in the many body localized regime, spontaneous symmetry breaking can occur even at high energy densities in one dimensional systems, and topological order can occur even without a bulk gap. I will also discuss the phenomenology of imperfectly isolated many body localized systems, which are weakly coupled to a heat bath. I will conclude with a brief discussion of how these phenomena may best be detected in experiments. Collaborators: David Huse, S.L. Sondhi, Arijeet Pal, Vadim Oganesyan, A.C. Potter, Sarang Gopalakrishnan, S. Johri, R.N. Bhatt.

  16. Multiple order common path spectrometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Newbury, Amy B. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    The present invention relates to a dispersive spectrometer. The spectrometer allows detection of multiple orders of light on a single focal plane array by splitting the orders spatially using a dichroic assembly. A conventional dispersion mechanism such as a defraction grating disperses the light spectrally. As a result, multiple wavelength orders can be imaged on a single focal plane array of limited spectral extent, doubling (or more) the number of spectral channels as compared to a conventional spectrometer. In addition, this is achieved in a common path device.

  17. Order Theoretical Semantic Recommendation

    SciTech Connect

    Joslyn, Cliff A.; Hogan, Emilie A.; Paulson, Patrick R.; Peterson, Elena S.; Stephan, Eric G.; Thomas, Dennis G.

    2013-07-23

    Mathematical concepts of order and ordering relations play multiple roles in semantic technologies. Discrete totally ordered data characterize both input streams and top-k rank-ordered recommendations and query output, while temporal attributes establish numerical total orders, either over time points or in the more complex case of startend temporal intervals. But also of note are the fully partially ordered data, including both lattices and non-lattices, which actually dominate the semantic strcuture of ontological systems. Scalar semantic similarities over partially-ordered semantic data are traditionally used to return rank-ordered recommendations, but these require complementation with true metrics available over partially ordered sets. In this paper we report on our work in the foundations of partial order measurement in ontologies, with application to top-k semantic recommendation in workflows.

  18. Minimal Orderings Revisited

    SciTech Connect

    Peyton, B.W.

    1999-07-01

    When minimum orderings proved too difficult to deal with, Rose, Tarjan, and Leuker instead studied minimal orderings and how to compute them (Algorithmic aspects of vertex elimination on graphs, SIAM J. Comput., 5:266-283, 1976). This paper introduces an algorithm that is capable of computing much better minimal orderings much more efficiently than the algorithm in Rose et al. The new insight is a way to use certain structures and concepts from modern sparse Cholesky solvers to re-express one of the basic results in Rose et al. The new algorithm begins with any initial ordering and then refines it until a minimal ordering is obtained. it is simple to obtain high-quality low-cost minimal orderings by using fill-reducing heuristic orderings as initial orderings for the algorithm. We examine several such initial orderings in some detail.

  19. First-order inflation

    SciTech Connect

    Kolb, E.W. Chicago Univ., IL . Enrico Fermi Inst.)

    1990-09-01

    In the original proposal, inflation occurred in the process of a strongly first-order phase transition. This model was soon demonstrated to be fatally flawed. Subsequent models for inflation involved phase transitions that were second-order, or perhaps weakly first-order; some even involved no phase transition at all. Recently the possibility of inflation during a strongly first-order phase transition has been revived. In this talk I will discuss some models for first-order inflation, and emphasize unique signatures that result in inflation is realized in a first-order transition. Before discussing first-order inflation, I will briefly review some of the history of inflation to demonstrate how first-order inflation differs from other models. 58 refs., 3 figs.

  20. ASDC Ordering Tool

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2017-02-08

    ... Ordering requires login , searching does not. Projects by science discipline: Aerosols | Clouds | Radiation Budget ... Tropospheric Composition | Field Campaigns All projects Details:  ASDC Ordering Tool ...

  1. Medical devices; immunology and microbiology devices; classification of nucleic acid-based devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex and the genetic mutations associated with antibiotic resistance. Final order.

    PubMed

    2014-10-22

    The Food and Drug Administration (FDA) is classifying nucleic acid-based in vitro diagnostic devices for the detection of Mycobacterium tuberculosis complex (MTB-complex) and the genetic mutations associated with MTB-complex antibiotic resistance in respiratory specimens devices into class II (special controls). The Agency is classifying the device into class II (special controls) because special controls, in addition to general controls, will provide a reasonable assurance of safety and effectiveness of the device.

  2. Characterizing limit order prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Withanawasam, R. M.; Whigham, P. A.; Crack, Timothy Falcon

    2013-11-01

    A computational model of a limit order book is used to study the effect of different limit order distribution offsets. Reference prices such as same side/contra side best market prices and last traded price are considered in combination with different price offset distributions. We show that when characterizing limit order prices, varying the offset distribution only produces different behavior when the reference price is the contra side best price. Irrespective of the underlying mechanisms used in computing the limit order prices, the shape of the price graph and the behavior of the average order book profile distribution are strikingly similar in all the considered reference prices/offset distributions. This implies that existing averaging methods can cancel variabilities in limit order book shape/attributes and may be misleading.

  3. Multiple ordering in magnetite.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cullen, J. R.; Callen, E. R.

    1973-01-01

    Results of a self-consistent band calculation of the ground-state energy and charge orderings based on a tight-binding scheme in magnetite are presented. They show that below a critical (about 2.2) value of the ratio of interatomic Coulomb energy to bandwidth the lowest energy state has no order. Between this critical value and 2.5, the preferred state is multiply ordered.

  4. Narcissism and birth order.

    PubMed

    Eyring, W E; Sobelman, S

    1996-04-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to clarify the relationship between birth-order position and the development of narcissism, while refining research and theory. The relationship between birth-order status and narcissism was examined with a sample of 79 undergraduate students (55 women and 24 men). These subjects were placed in one of the four following birth-order categories of firstborn, second-born, last-born, and only children. These categories were chosen given their significance in Adlerian theory. Each subject completed the Narcissistic Personality Inventory and a demographic inventory. Based on psychodynamic theory, it was hypothesized that firstborn children were expected to score highest, but statistical significance was not found for an association between narcissism and birth order. Further research is urged to investigate personality theory as it relates to parenting style and birth order.

  5. ASDC Order Tools

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2012-04-17

    ... users to search our data holdings without logging in to the system. The user, however, must log in before ordering the data. ... Cavity Radiometer Irradiance Monitor II (ACRIM II) Total Solar Irradiance Data Global Tropospheric Experiment (GTE) data (Selected ...

  6. Court Ordered Desegregation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reber, Sarah J.

    2005-01-01

    The effect of the court ordered desegregation plans, on trends in segregation and white flight, are estimated. The effect of availability of school districts and other factors on the white flight across districts is also mentioned.

  7. Visual perception of order-disorder transition

    PubMed Central

    Katkov, Mikhail; Harris, Hila; Sagi, Dov

    2015-01-01

    Our experience with the natural world, as composed of ordered entities, implies that perception captures relationships between image parts. For instance, regularities in the visual scene are rapidly identified by our visual system. Defining the regularities that govern perception is a basic, unresolved issue in neuroscience. Mathematically, perfect regularities are represented by symmetry (perfect order). The transition from ordered configurations to completely random ones has been extensively studied in statistical physics, where the amount of order is characterized by a symmetry-specific order parameter. Here we applied tools from statistical physics to study order detection in humans. Different sets of visual textures, parameterized by the thermodynamic temperature in the Boltzmann distribution, were designed. We investigated how much order is required in a visual texture for it to be discriminated from random noise. The performance of human observers was compared to Ideal and Order observers (based on the order parameter). The results indicated a high consistency in performance across human observers, much below that of the Ideal observer, but well-approximated by the Order observer. Overall, we provide a novel quantitative paradigm to address order perception. Our findings, based on this paradigm, suggest that the statistical physics formalism of order captures regularities to which the human visual system is sensitive. An additional analysis revealed that some order perception properties are captured by traditional texture discrimination models according to which discrimination is based on integrated energy within maps of oriented linear filters. PMID:26113826

  8. Optical method of atomic ordering estimation

    SciTech Connect

    Prutskij, T.; Attolini, G.

    2013-12-04

    It is well known that within metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (MOVPE) grown semiconductor III-V ternary alloys atomically ordered regions are spontaneously formed during the epitaxial growth. This ordering leads to bandgap reduction and to valence bands splitting, and therefore to anisotropy of the photoluminescence (PL) emission polarization. The same phenomenon occurs within quaternary semiconductor alloys. While the ordering in ternary alloys is widely studied, for quaternaries there have been only a few detailed experimental studies of it, probably because of the absence of appropriate methods of its detection. Here we propose an optical method to reveal atomic ordering within quaternary alloys by measuring the PL emission polarization.

  9. Arguments from Developmental Order

    PubMed Central

    Stöckle-Schobel, Richard

    2016-01-01

    In this article1, I investigate a special type of argument regarding the role of development in theorizing about psychological processes and cognitive capacities. Among the issues that developmental psychologists study, discovering the ontogenetic trajectory of mechanisms or capacities underpinning our cognitive functions ranks highly. The order in which functions are developed or capacities are acquired is a matter of debate between competing psychological theories, and also philosophical conceptions of the mind – getting the role and the significance of the different steps in this order right could be seen as an important virtue of such theories. Thus, a special kind of strategy in arguments between competing philosophical or psychological theories is using developmental order in arguing for or against a given psychological claim. In this article, I will introduce an analysis of arguments from developmental order, which come in two general types: arguments emphasizing the importance of the early cognitive processes and arguments emphasizing the late cognitive processes. I will discuss their role in one of the central tools for evaluating scientific theories, namely in making inferences to the best explanation. I will argue that appeal to developmental order is, by itself, an insufficient criterion for theory choice and has to be part of an argument based on other core explanatory or empirical virtues. I will end by proposing a more concerted study of philosophical issues concerning (cognitive) development, and I will present some topics that also pertain to a full-fledged ‘philosophy of development.’ PMID:27242648

  10. Concomitant Ordering and Symmetry Lowering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boo, William O. J.; Mattern, Daniell L.

    2008-01-01

    Examples of concomitant ordering include magnetic ordering, Jahn-Teller cooperative ordering, electronic ordering, ionic ordering, and ordering of partially-filled sites. Concomitant ordering sets in when a crystal is cooled and always lowers the degree of symmetry of the crystal. Concomitant ordering concepts can also be productively applied to…

  11. Spatially ordered treemaps.

    PubMed

    Wood, Jo; Dykes, Jason

    2008-01-01

    Existing treemap layout algorithms suffer to some extent from poor or inconsistent mappings between data order and visual ordering in their representation, reducing their cognitive plausibility. While attempts have been made to quantify this mismatch, and algorithms proposed to minimize inconsistency, solutions provided tend to concentrate on one-dimensional ordering. We propose extensions to the existing squarified layout algorithm that exploit the two-dimensional arrangement of treemap nodes more effectively. Our proposed spatial squarified layout algorithm provides a more consistent arrangement of nodes while maintaining low aspect ratios. It is suitable for the arrangement of data with a geographic component and can be used to create tessellated cartograms for geovisualization. Locational consistency is measured and visualized and a number of layout algorithms are compared. CIELab color space and displacement vector overlays are used to assess and emphasize the spatial layout of treemap nodes. A case study involving locations of tagged photographs in the Flickr database is described.

  12. Mobile physician order entry.

    PubMed

    Ying, Alan

    2003-01-01

    Because both computerized physician order entry (CPOE) systems and mobile technologies such as handheld devices have the potential to greatly impact the industry's future, IT vendors, hospitals, and clinicians are simply merging them into a logical convergence--"CPOE on a handheld"--with an expectation of full functionality on all platforms: computer workstations, rolling laptops, tablet PCs, and handheld devices. For these trends to succeed together, however, this expectation must be revised to establish a distinct category--mobile physician order entry (MPOE)--that is different from CPOE in form, function, and implementation.

  13. Court-ordered caesareans.

    PubMed

    Prochaska, Elizabeth; Lomri, Sara

    2014-11-01

    Court-ordered caesarean sections are in the news after a number of recent legal decisions authorising surgery for women who lack mental capacity to consent. The decisions have not always been based on good evidence and they raise serious concerns about the protection of the rights of mentally ill women. The authors explain the legal process and question the wisdom of recent judgements.

  14. Land and World Order.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mische, Patricia, Ed.; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The papers in this publication discuss the land and how what happens to the land affects us. The publication is one in a series of monographs that examine the linkages between local and global concerns and explore alternative world futures. Examples of topics discussed in the papers follow. The paper "Land and World Order" examines…

  15. Education and World Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Phillip W.

    2007-01-01

    The impact on educational analysis of mainstream international relations (IR) theories is yet to realize its full potential. The problem of education in relation to the construction of world order is considered in relation to core developments in IR theory since the Second World War. In particular, the global architecture of education is seen as a…

  16. Birth Order Debate Resolved?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajonc, R. B.

    2001-01-01

    Critiques Rodgers et al.'s June 2000 research on the relation between birth order and intelligence, which suggests that it is a methodological illusion. Explains how the intellectual environment and the teaching function (whereby older children tutor younger ones) contribute to the growth of intellectual maturity, the first negatively and the…

  17. The Birth Order Puzzle.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zajonc, R. B.; And Others

    1979-01-01

    Discusses the controversy of the relationship between birth order and intellectual performance through a detailed evaluation of the confluence model which assumes that the rate of intellectual growth is a function of the intellectual environment within the family and associated with the special circumstances of last children. (CM)

  18. Pansedik: Ordering Creative Chaos.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Austin, Barbara L.

    1998-01-01

    Presents a case study for use in business communication classes to help students understand and learn both the context and the strategies for communication with business and management. Deals with a new human resource director's attempt to bring order to an organization and software developers' concerns over their work being hindered. Includes two…

  19. Order Division Automated System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kniemeyer, Justin M.; And Others

    This publication was prepared by the Order Division Automation Project staff to fulfill the Library of Congress' requirement to document all automation efforts. The report was originally intended for internal use only and not for distribution outside the Library. It is now felt that the library community at-large may have an interest in the…

  20. Order Lepidoptera Linnaeus, 1758.

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Based on two recent molecular analyses, augmented by the discovery of several published or unpublished novel morphological synapomorphies, a new classification is proposed for the order Lepidoptera. The new classification is more consistent with our growing knowledge of the phylogeny of the group an...

  1. Order, topology and preference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sertel, M. R.

    1971-01-01

    Some standard order-related and topological notions, facts, and methods are brought to bear on central topics in the theory of preference and the theory of optimization. Consequences of connectivity are considered, especially from the viewpoint of normally preordered spaces. Examples are given showing how the theory of preference, or utility theory, can be applied to social analysis.

  2. Reduced Order Podolsky Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thibes, Ronaldo

    2017-02-01

    We perform the canonical and path integral quantizations of a lower-order derivatives model describing Podolsky's generalized electrodynamics. The physical content of the model shows an auxiliary massive vector field coupled to the usual electromagnetic field. The equivalence with Podolsky's original model is studied at classical and quantum levels. Concerning the dynamical time evolution, we obtain a theory with two first-class and two second-class constraints in phase space. We calculate explicitly the corresponding Dirac brackets involving both vector fields. We use the Senjanovic procedure to implement the second-class constraints and the Batalin-Fradkin-Vilkovisky path integral quantization scheme to deal with the symmetries generated by the first-class constraints. The physical interpretation of the results turns out to be simpler due to the reduced derivatives order permeating the equations of motion, Dirac brackets and effective action.

  3. Hierarchical partial order ranking.

    PubMed

    Carlsen, Lars

    2008-09-01

    Assessing the potential impact on environmental and human health from the production and use of chemicals or from polluted sites involves a multi-criteria evaluation scheme. A priori several parameters are to address, e.g., production tonnage, specific release scenarios, geographical and site-specific factors in addition to various substance dependent parameters. Further socio-economic factors may be taken into consideration. The number of parameters to be included may well appear to be prohibitive for developing a sensible model. The study introduces hierarchical partial order ranking (HPOR) that remedies this problem. By HPOR the original parameters are initially grouped based on their mutual connection and a set of meta-descriptors is derived representing the ranking corresponding to the single groups of descriptors, respectively. A second partial order ranking is carried out based on the meta-descriptors, the final ranking being disclosed though average ranks. An illustrative example on the prioritization of polluted sites is given.

  4. Second order gauge theory

    SciTech Connect

    Cuzinatto, R.R. . E-mail: rodrigo@ift.unesp.br; Melo, C.A.M. de . E-mail: cassius.anderson@gmail.com; Pompeia, P.J. . E-mail: pompeia@ift.unesp.br

    2007-05-15

    A gauge theory of second order in the derivatives of the auxiliary field is constructed following Utiyama's program. A novel field strength G = {partial_derivative}F + fAF arises besides the one of the first order treatment, F = {partial_derivative}A - {partial_derivative}A + fAA. The associated conserved current is obtained. It has a new feature: topological terms are determined from local invariance requirements. Podolsky Generalized Eletrodynamics is derived as a particular case in which the Lagrangian of the gauge field is L {sub P} {proportional_to} G {sup 2}. In this application the photon mass is estimated. The SU (N) infrared regime is analysed by means of Alekseev-Arbuzov-Baikov's Lagrangian.

  5. Magnetic order in ?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crook, M. R.; Coles, B. R.; Ritter, C.; Cywinski, R.

    1996-10-01

    Neutron powder diffraction has been used to study the evolution of magnetic order with increasing Zr substitution in the C14 Laves phase compounds 0953-8984/8/41/022/img8. For compounds with x = 0.3 and x = 0.4 we find a simple antiferromagnetic structure, similar to that reported for isostructural 0953-8984/8/41/022/img9. In this structure the Fe moments at the 6h sites are aligned along the c-axis, ferromagnetically coupled within the a - b plane, with adjacent planes antiferromagnetically coupled. This spin structure results in a cancellation of the molecular field at the interplanar 2a sites, and the Fe atoms at these sites carry no ordered moment. The neutron diffraction measurements on 0953-8984/8/41/022/img10 compounds in the composition range 0953-8984/8/41/022/img11 provide evidence of a low-temperature spin-canted structure in which the antiferromagnetic structure described above is modified by the appearance of a basal-plane ferromagnetic component which in turn leads to a small ordered Fe moment at the 2a site. The temperature dependence of the staggered magnetization in the antiferromagnetic state of the x = 0.4 compounds is found to closely follow the form 0953-8984/8/41/022/img12, as predicted for weak itinerant antiferromagnets by SCR spin-fluctuation theory.

  6. Competing Orders and Anomalies

    PubMed Central

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-01-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation “laws” could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the ’t Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed. PMID:27499184

  7. Competing Orders and Anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-01

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation “laws” could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the ’t Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  8. Competing Orders and Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Moon, Eun-Gook

    2016-08-08

    A conservation law is one of the most fundamental properties in nature, but a certain class of conservation "laws" could be spoiled by intrinsic quantum mechanical effects, so-called quantum anomalies. Profound properties of the anomalies have deepened our understanding in quantum many body systems. Here, we investigate quantum anomaly effects in quantum phase transitions between competing orders and striking consequences of their presence. We explicitly calculate topological nature of anomalies of non-linear sigma models (NLSMs) with the Wess-Zumino-Witten (WZW) terms. The non-perturbative nature is directly related with the 't Hooft anomaly matching condition: anomalies are conserved in renormalization group flow. By applying the matching condition, we show massless excitations are enforced by the anomalies in a whole phase diagram in sharp contrast to the case of the Landau-Ginzburg-Wilson theory which only has massive excitations in symmetric phases. Furthermore, we find non-perturbative criteria to characterize quantum phase transitions between competing orders. For example, in 4D, we show the two competing order parameter theories, CP(1) and the NLSM with WZW, describe different universality class. Physical realizations and experimental implication of the anomalies are also discussed.

  9. Fauna Europaea - Orthopteroid orders.

    PubMed

    Heller, Klaus-Gerhard; Bohn, Horst; Haas, Fabian; Willemse, Fer; de Jong, Yde

    2016-01-01

    Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant European terrestrial and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (west of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. The "Orthopteroid orders" is one of the 58 Fauna Europaea major taxonomic groups. It contains series of mostly well-known insect orders: Embiodea (webspinners), Dermaptera (earwigs), Phasmatodea (walking sticks), Orthoptera s.s. (grasshoppers, crickets, bush-crickets) and Dictyoptera with the suborders Mantodea (mantids), Blattaria (cockroaches) and Isoptera (termites). For the Orthopteroid orders, data from 35 families containing 1,371 species are included in this paper.

  10. The most relevant human brain regions for functional connectivity: Evidence for a dynamical workspace of binding nodes from whole-brain computational modelling.

    PubMed

    Deco, Gustavo; Van Hartevelt, Tim J; Fernandes, Henrique M; Stevner, Angus; Kringelbach, Morten L

    2017-02-01

    In order to promote survival through flexible cognition and goal-directed behaviour, the brain has to optimize segregation and integration of information into coherent, distributed dynamical states. Certain organizational features of the brain have been proposed to be essential to facilitate cognitive flexibility, especially hub regions in the so-called rich club which show dense interconnectivity. These structural hubs have been suggested to be vital for integration and segregation of information. Yet, this has not been evaluated in terms of resulting functional temporal dynamics. A complementary measure covering the temporal aspects of functional connectivity could thus bring new insights into a more complete picture of the integrative nature of brain networks. Here, we use causal whole-brain computational modelling to determine the functional dynamical significance of the rich club and compare this to a new measure of the most functionally relevant brain regions for binding information over time ("dynamical workspace of binding nodes"). We found that removal of the iteratively generated workspace of binding nodes impacts significantly more on measures of integration and encoding of information capability than the removal of the rich club regions. While the rich club procedure produced almost half of the binding nodes, the remaining nodes have low degree yet still play a significant role in the workspace essential for binding information over time and as such goes beyond a description of the structural backbone.

  11. Higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs.

    PubMed

    Gansch, Roman; Kalchmair, Stefan; Detz, Hermann; Andrews, Aaron M; Klang, Pavel; Schrenk, Werner; Strasser, Gottfried

    2011-08-15

    We present a detailed investigation of higher order modes in photonic crystal slabs. In such structures the resonances exhibit a blue-shift compared to an ideal two-dimensional photonic crystal, which depends on the order of the slab mode and the polarization. By fabricating a series of photonic crystal slab photo detecting devices, with varying ratios of slab thickness to photonic crystal lattice constant, we are able to distinguish between 0th and 1st order slab modes as well as the polarization from the shift of resonances in the photocurrent spectra. This method complements the photonic band structure mapping technique for characterization of photonic crystal slabs.

  12. Triclinic Fluid Order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chattham, Nattaporn; Korblova, Eva; Shao, Renfan; Walba, David M.; Maclennan, Joseph E.; Clark, Noel A.

    2010-02-01

    Among the condensed phases, those of lowest point group symmetry are the triclinic crystals, which have only the identity element or the identity and inversion elements. Such low symmetry is stabilized by the specificity of molecular interaction, which is weakened with increasing disorder, so that known phases with fluid degrees of freedom are more symmetric. Here we report triclinic order, appearing as a broken symmetry in a single, isolated, fluid smectic liquid crystal layer freely suspended in air, showing that none of its principal dielectric axes lies either normal or parallel to the layer plane.

  13. Triclinic fluid order.

    PubMed

    Chattham, Nattaporn; Korblova, Eva; Shao, Renfan; Walba, David M; Maclennan, Joseph E; Clark, Noel A

    2010-02-12

    Among the condensed phases, those of lowest point group symmetry are the triclinic crystals, which have only the identity element or the identity and inversion elements. Such low symmetry is stabilized by the specificity of molecular interaction, which is weakened with increasing disorder, so that known phases with fluid degrees of freedom are more symmetric. Here we report triclinic order, appearing as a broken symmetry in a single, isolated, fluid smectic liquid crystal layer freely suspended in air, showing that none of its principal dielectric axes lies either normal or parallel to the layer plane.

  14. Fractional order junctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machado, J. Tenreiro

    2015-01-01

    Gottfried Leibniz generalized the derivation and integration, extending the operators from integer up to real, or even complex, orders. It is presently recognized that the resulting models capture long term memory effects difficult to describe by classical tools. Leon Chua generalized the set of lumped electrical elements that provide the building blocks in mathematical models. His proposal of the memristor and of higher order elements broadened the scope of variables and relationships embedded in the development of models. This paper follows the two directions and proposes a new logical step, by generalizing the concept of junction. Classical junctions interconnect system elements using simple algebraic restrictions. Nevertheless, this simplistic approach may be misleading in the presence of unexpected dynamical phenomena and requires including additional "parasitic" elements. The novel γ -junction includes, as special cases, the standard series and parallel connections and allows a new degree of freedom when building models. The proposal motivates the search for experimental and real world manifestations of the abstract conjectures.

  15. Order and Containment in Concurrent System Design

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2000-01-01

    determined at compile time. How the source code of a program is written determines what the containment constraints will be. Order constraints between...searching existing data sources , gathering and maintaining the data needed, and completing and reviewing the collection of information. Send...38 2.2.3 Conservative Compile Time Deadlock Detection . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 2.2.4 Communication Semantics

  16. Periodicity of high-order neural functions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kellaway, P.; Borda, R. P.; Frost, J. D.; Carrie, J. R. G.; Coats, A. C.

    1973-01-01

    The results of recent studies on higher order, integrative processes in the central nervous system are reported. Attempts were made to determine whether these processes exhibit any ongoing rhythmicity which might manifest itself in alterations of attention and alertness. Experiments were also designed to determine if a periodicity approximating that of the REM could be detected in various parameters of brain electrical activity.

  17. Energy Efficient Signal Detection for Army Applications Based on Ordering

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-01

    2011/09/03 17:30:50 33 Zhemin Xu, Sana Sfar, Rick Blum. Receive antenna selection for closely-spaced antennas with mutual coupling, IEEE Transactions on...on Image Processing (07 2010) 2010/07/26 20:19:48 21 Zhemin Xu, Sana Sfar, Rick S. Blum. submitted manuscript: Receive Antenna Selection for Closely...Processing, Vol. 58, Issue 3, Part 1, pp. 1440-1445, 2010. 7. Zhemin Xu, Sana Sfar, Rick S. Blum, ``Receive Antenna Selection for Closely-Spaced Antennas

  18. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuping; Frasconi, Marco; Liu, Wei-Guang; Sun, Junling; Wu, Yilei; Nassar, Majed S; Botros, Youssry Y; Goddard, William A; Wasielewski, Michael R; Stoddart, J Fraser

    2016-02-24

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components-namely oligoviologens-in which different numbers of 4,4'-bipyridinium (BIPY(2+)) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT(4+)) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY(•+) radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne-azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers.

  19. Oligorotaxane Radicals under Orders

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    A strategy for creating foldameric oligorotaxanes composed of only positively charged components is reported. Threadlike components—namely oligoviologens—in which different numbers of 4,4′-bipyridinium (BIPY2+) subunits are linked by p-xylylene bridges, are shown to be capable of being threaded by cyclobis(paraquat-p-phenylene) (CBPQT4+) rings following the introduction of radical-pairing interactions under reducing conditions. UV/vis/NIR spectroscopic and electrochemical investigations suggest that the reduced oligopseudorotaxanes fold into highly ordered secondary structures as a result of the formation of BIPY•+ radical cation pairs. Furthermore, by installing bulky stoppers at each end of the oligopseudorotaxanes by means of Cu-free alkyne–azide cycloadditions, their analogous oligorotaxanes, which retain the same stoichiometries as their progenitors, can be prepared. Solution-state studies of the oligorotaxanes indicate that their mechanically interlocked structures lead to the enforced interactions between the dumbbell and ring components, allowing them to fold (contract) in their reduced states and unfold (expand) in their fully oxidized states as a result of Coulombic repulsions. This electrochemically controlled reversible folding and unfolding process, during which the oligorotaxanes experience length contractions and expansions, is reminiscent of the mechanisms of actuation associated with muscle fibers. PMID:27163033

  20. Order in Spontaneous Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Maye, Alexander; Hsieh, Chih-hao; Sugihara, George; Brembs, Björn

    2007-01-01

    Brains are usually described as input/output systems: they transform sensory input into motor output. However, the motor output of brains (behavior) is notoriously variable, even under identical sensory conditions. The question of whether this behavioral variability merely reflects residual deviations due to extrinsic random noise in such otherwise deterministic systems or an intrinsic, adaptive indeterminacy trait is central for the basic understanding of brain function. Instead of random noise, we find a fractal order (resembling Lévy flights) in the temporal structure of spontaneous flight maneuvers in tethered Drosophila fruit flies. Lévy-like probabilistic behavior patterns are evolutionarily conserved, suggesting a general neural mechanism underlying spontaneous behavior. Drosophila can produce these patterns endogenously, without any external cues. The fly's behavior is controlled by brain circuits which operate as a nonlinear system with unstable dynamics far from equilibrium. These findings suggest that both general models of brain function and autonomous agents ought to include biologically relevant nonlinear, endogenous behavior-initiating mechanisms if they strive to realistically simulate biological brains or out-compete other agents. PMID:17505542

  1. Detecting Exoplanets using Bayesian Object Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feroz, Farhan

    2015-08-01

    Detecting objects from noisy data-sets is common practice in astrophysics. Object detection presents a particular challenge in terms of statistical inference, not only because of its multi-modal nature but also because it combines both the parameter estimation (for characterizing objects) and model selection problems (in order to quantify the detection). Bayesian inference provides a mathematically rigorous solution to this problem by calculating marginal posterior probabilities of models with different number of sources, but the use of this method in astrophysics has been hampered by the computational cost of evaluating the Bayesian evidence. Nonetheless, Bayesian model selection has the potential to improve the interpretation of existing observational data. I will discuss several Bayesian approaches to object detection problems, both in terms of their theoretical framework and also the practical details about carrying out the computation. I will also describe some recent applications of these methods in the detection of exoplanets.

  2. 48 CFR 53.216-1 - Delivery orders and orders under basic ordering agreements (OF 347).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 48 Federal Acquisition Regulations System 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Delivery orders and orders under basic ordering agreements (OF 347). 53.216-1 Section 53.216-1 Federal Acquisition Regulations System FEDERAL ACQUISITION REGULATION (CONTINUED) CLAUSES AND FORMS FORMS Prescription of Forms 53.216-1 Delivery orders and orders under...

  3. Topology in Ordered Phases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tanda, Satoshi; Matsuyama, Toyoki; Oda, Migaku; Asano, Yasuhiro; Yakubo, Kousuke

    2006-08-01

    .]. Nanofibers of hydrogen storage alloy / I. Saita ... [et al.]. Synthesis of stable icosahedral quasicrystals in Zn-Sc based alloys and their magnetic properties / S. Kashimoto and T. Ishimasa. One-armed spiral wave excited by eam pressure in accretion disks in Be/X-Ray binaries / K. Hayasaki and A. T. Okazaki -- IV. Topological defects and excitations. Topological excitations in the ground state of charge density wave systems / P. Monceau. Soliton transport in nanoscale charge-density-wave systems / K. Inagaki, T. Toshima and S. Tanda. Topological defects in triplet superconductors UPt3, Sr[symbol]RuO[symbol], etc. / K. Maki ... [et al.]. Microscopic structure of vortices in type II superconductors / K. Machida ... [et al.]. Microscopic neutron investigation of the Abrikosov state of high-temperature superconductors / J. Mesot. Energy dissipation at nano-scale topological defects of high-Tc superconductors: microwave study / A. Maeda. Pressure induced topological phase transition in the heavy Fermion compound CeAl[symbol] / H. Miyagawa ... [et al.]. Explanation for the unusual orientation of LSCO square vortex lattice in terms of nodal superconductivity / M. Oda. Local electronic states in Bi[symbol]Sr[symbol]CaCu[symbol]O[symbol] / A. Hashimoto ... [et al.] -- V. Topology in quantum phenomena. Topological vortex formation in a Bose-Einstein condensate of alkali-metal atoms / M. Nakahara. Quantum phase transition of [symbol]He confined in nano-porous media / K. Shirahama, K. Yamamoto and Y. Shibayama. A new mean-field theory for Bose-Einstein condensates / T. Kita. Spin current in topological cristals / Y. Asano. Antiferromagnetic defects in non-magnetic hidden order of the heavy-electron system URu[symbol]Si[symbol] / H. Amitsuka, K. Tenya and M. Yokoyama. Magnetic-field dependences of thermodynamic quantities in the vortex state of Type-II superconductors / K. Watanabe, T. Kita and M. Arai. Three-magnon-mediated nuclear spin relaxation in quantum ferrimagnets of topological

  4. Protective orders: questions and conundrums.

    PubMed

    Logan, T K; Shannon, Lisa; Walker, Robert; Faragher, Teri Marie

    2006-07-01

    Current media portrayal of protective orders is often negative, focusing on weaknesses in how protective orders are obtained and enforced. This review of research findings on protective orders examines issues and suggests areas in need of future research to clarify and improve public policy. More specifically, this review has five main objectives: (a) to provide background information about partner violence and the need for protective orders; (b) to describe what protective orders are, how many women obtain them, and the advantages and disadvantages of obtaining protective orders; (c) to examine characteristics of women who seek protective orders; (d) to explore research on whether protective orders actually increase women's safety; and (e) to highlight opportunities and gaps in the practice and research literature regarding the use of protective orders for women with violent partners or ex-partners.

  5. Order-fractal transitions in abstract paintings

    SciTech Connect

    Calleja, E.M. de la; Cervantes, F.; Calleja, J. de la

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we determined the degree of order for 22 Jackson Pollock paintings using the Hausdorff–Besicovitch fractal dimension. Based on the maximum value of each multi-fractal spectrum, the artworks were classified according to the year in which they were painted. It has been reported that Pollock’s paintings are fractal and that this feature was more evident in his later works. However, our results show that the fractal dimension of these paintings ranges among values close to two. We characterize this behavior as a fractal-order transition. Based on the study of disorder-order transition in physical systems, we interpreted the fractal-order transition via the dark paint strokes in Pollock’s paintings as structured lines that follow a power law measured by the fractal dimension. We determined self-similarity in specific paintings, thereby demonstrating an important dependence on the scale of observations. We also characterized the fractal spectrum for the painting entitled Teri’s Find. We obtained similar spectra for Teri’s Find and Number 5, thereby suggesting that the fractal dimension cannot be rejected completely as a quantitative parameter for authenticating these artworks. -- Highlights: •We determined the degree of order in Jackson Pollock paintings using the Hausdorff–Besicovitch dimension. •We detected a fractal-order transition from Pollock’s paintings between 1947 and 1951. •We suggest that Jackson Pollock could have painted Teri’s Find.

  6. Olson Order of Quantum Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dvurečenskij, Anatolij

    2016-11-01

    M.P. Olson, Proc. Am. Math. Soc. 28, 537-544 (1971) showed that the system of effect operators of the Hilbert space can be ordered by the so-called spectral order such that the system of effect operators is a complete lattice. Using his ideas, we introduce a partial order, called the Olson order, on the set of bounded observables of a complete lattice effect algebra. We show that the set of bounded observables is a Dedekind complete lattice.

  7. Do-not-resuscitate order

    MedlinePlus

    ... order; DNR; DNR order; Advance care directive - DNR; Health care agent - DNR; Health care proxy - DNR; End-of-life - DNR; Living will - ... medical order written by a doctor. It instructs health care providers not to do cardiopulmonary resuscitation (CPR) if ...

  8. Ordered delinquency: the "effects" of birth order on delinquency.

    PubMed

    Cundiff, Patrick R

    2013-08-01

    Juvenile delinquency has long been associated with birth order in popular culture. While images of the middle child acting out for attention or the rebellious youngest child readily spring to mind, little research has attempted to explain why. Drawing from Adlerian birth order theory and Sulloway's born-to-rebel hypothesis, I examine the relationship between birth order and a variety of delinquent outcomes during adolescence. Following some recent research on birth order and intelligence, I use new methods that allow for the examination of between-individual and within-family differences to better address the potential spurious relationship. My findings suggest that contrary to popular belief, the relationship between birth order and delinquency is spurious. Specifically, I find that birth order effects on delinquency are spurious and largely products of the analytic methods used in previous tests of the relationship. The implications of this finding are discussed.

  9. Fault detection and isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bernath, Greg

    1994-01-01

    In order for a current satellite-based navigation system (such as the Global Positioning System, GPS) to meet integrity requirements, there must be a way of detecting erroneous measurements, without help from outside the system. This process is called Fault Detection and Isolation (FDI). Fault detection requires at least one redundant measurement, and can be done with a parity space algorithm. The best way around the fault isolation problem is not necessarily isolating the bad measurement, but finding a new combination of measurements which excludes it.

  10. A reduction of order two for infinite-order Lagrangians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaén, X.; Llosa, J.; Molina, A.

    1986-10-01

    Given a Lagrangian system depending on the position derivatives of any order, and assuming that certain conditions are satisfied, a second-order differential system is obtained such that its solutions also satisfy the Euler equations derived from the original Lagrangian. A generalization of the singular Lagrangian formalism permits a reduction of order keeping the canonical formalism in sight. Finally, the general results obtained in the first part of the paper are applied to Wheeler-Feynman electrodynamics for two charged point particles up to order 1/c4.

  11. 7 CFR 1221.18 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.18 Order. Order...

  12. 7 CFR 1221.18 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.18 Order. Order...

  13. 7 CFR 1221.18 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.18 Order. Order...

  14. 7 CFR 1221.18 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.18 Order. Order...

  15. 7 CFR 1221.18 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE SORGHUM PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Sorghum Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1221.18 Order. Order...

  16. 7 CFR 1216.16 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.16 Order. Order...

  17. 7 CFR 1216.16 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.16 Order. Order...

  18. 7 CFR 1216.16 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.16 Order. Order...

  19. 7 CFR 1216.16 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.16 Order. Order...

  20. 7 CFR 1216.16 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PEANUT PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Peanut Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1216.16 Order. Order...

  1. 7 CFR 1280.113 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE LAMB PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Lamb Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1280.113 Order. Order means...

  2. Detective Scientist

    NASA Video Gallery

    NASA has many detectives looking for clues to solve a mystery, like "science detective" Monsi Roman. She is making sure the water and air on board the International Space Station are safe for the a...

  3. Higher-order uncertainty relations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wünsche, A.

    2006-07-01

    Using the non-negativity of Gram determinants of arbitrary order, we derive higher-order uncertainty relations for the symmetric uncertainty matrices of corresponding order n?>?2 to n Hermitean operators (n?=?2 is the usual case). The special cases of third-order and fourth-order uncertainty relations are considered in detail. The obtained third-order uncertainty relations are applied to the Lie groups SU(1,1) with three Hermitean basis operators (K1,K2,K0) and SU(2) with three Hermitean basis operators (J1,J2,J3) where, in particular, the group-coherent states of Perelomov type and of Barut Girardello type for SU(1,1) and the spin or atomic coherent states for SU(2) are investigated. The uncertainty relations for the determinant of the third-order uncertainty matrix are satisfied with the equality sign for coherent states and this determinant becomes vanishing for the Perelomov type of coherent states for SU(1,1) and SU(2). As an example of the application of fourth-order uncertainty relations, we consider the canonical operators (Q1,P1,Q2,P2) of two boson modes and the corresponding uncertainty matrix formed by the operators of the corresponding mean deviations, taking into account the correlations between the two modes. In two mathematical appendices, we prove the non-negativity of the determinant of correlation matrices of arbitrary order and clarify the principal structure of higher-order uncertainty relations.

  4. 40 CFR 305.27 - Accelerated order, order to dismiss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) ADMINISTRATIVE HEARING PROCEDURES FOR CLAIMS AGAINST THE SUPERFUND... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Accelerated order, order to dismiss. 305.27 Section 305.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  5. 40 CFR 305.27 - Accelerated order, order to dismiss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) ADMINISTRATIVE HEARING PROCEDURES FOR CLAIMS AGAINST THE SUPERFUND... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Accelerated order, order to dismiss. 305.27 Section 305.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  6. 40 CFR 305.27 - Accelerated order, order to dismiss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) ADMINISTRATIVE HEARING PROCEDURES FOR CLAIMS AGAINST THE SUPERFUND... 40 Protection of Environment 29 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Accelerated order, order to dismiss. 305.27 Section 305.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  7. 40 CFR 305.27 - Accelerated order, order to dismiss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) ADMINISTRATIVE HEARING PROCEDURES FOR CLAIMS AGAINST THE SUPERFUND... 40 Protection of Environment 27 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Accelerated order, order to dismiss. 305.27 Section 305.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  8. 40 CFR 305.27 - Accelerated order, order to dismiss.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., AND LIABILITY ACT (CERCLA) ADMINISTRATIVE HEARING PROCEDURES FOR CLAIMS AGAINST THE SUPERFUND... 40 Protection of Environment 28 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Accelerated order, order to dismiss. 305.27 Section 305.27 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED)...

  9. Ordering within Moral Orders to Manage Classroom Trouble

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doherty, Catherine; McGregor, Rowena; Shield, Paul

    2016-01-01

    This paper demonstrates how classroom trouble warranting teacher intervention can stem from transgressions in different layers of the complex moral order regulating classroom interactions. The paper builds from Durkheim's treatment of schooling as the institution responsible for the inculcation of a shared moral order, Bernstein's distinction…

  10. Counterbalancing for Serial Order Carryover Effects in Experimental Condition Orders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brooks, Joseph L.

    2012-01-01

    Reactions of neural, psychological, and social systems are rarely, if ever, independent of previous inputs and states. The potential for serial order carryover effects from one condition to the next in a sequence of experimental trials makes counterbalancing of condition order an essential part of experimental design. Here, a method is proposed…

  11. Surface melting of electronic order.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilkins, S. B.; Liu, X.; Wakabayashi, Y.; Kim, J.-W.; Ryan, P. J.; Mitchell, J. F.; Hill, J. P.

    2011-01-01

    We report temperature-dependent surface x-ray scattering studies of the orbital ordered surface in La{sub 0.5}Sr{sub 1.5}MnO{sub 4}. We find that as the bulk ordering temperature is approached from below the thickness of the interface between the electronically ordered and electronically disordered regions at the surface grows, though the bulk correlation length remains unchanged. Close to the transition, the surface is so rough that there is no well-defined electronic surface, despite the presence of bulk electronic order. That is, the electronic ordering at the surface has melted. Above the bulk transition, long-range ordering in the bulk is destroyed but finite-sized isotropic fluctuations persist, with a correlation length roughly equal to that of the low-temperature in-plane surface correlation length.

  12. Birth order among homosexual men.

    PubMed

    Zucker, Kenneth J; Blanchard, Ray; Siegelman, Marvin

    2003-02-01

    Nicolosi and Byrd in 2002 summarized empirical research on birth order and sexual orientation in men, which research has documented that homosexual men have a later birth order than heterosexual men. They did not, however, note a more refined analysis of an earlier null finding by Siegelman. This 1998 reanalysis by Blanchard, Zucker, Siegelman, Dickey, and Klassen also confirmed the later birth order of homosexual men.

  13. Time ordering in atomic collisions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGuire, J. H.; Godunov, A. L.; Shakov, Kh Kh; Kaplan, L.; Burin, A.; Uskov, D.

    2007-06-01

    Time ordering constrains interactions to occur in increasing (or decreasing) order. This places a constraint on the time evolution of the system and can lead to correlations in time of different particles in a few/many body system. Unlike overall time reversal, time ordering is not a conserved symmetry of the atomic system. A number of examples of observable effects of time ordering are presented. A convenient way to describe time ordering is to define the limit of no time ordering by replacing the instantaneous interaction by its time average. This is similar to the way in which spatial correlation is defined. Like spatial correlation, time ordering is usually formulated in the interaction representation. The effects of time ordering can differ in different representations. In energy space, conjugate to time space, time ordering is imposed as the i ɛ term in the Greens' function that corresponds to an initial condition (usually incoming plane waves and outgoing scattered waves). This permits off-energy-shell (energy non- conserving) fluctuations during the collision consistent with the Uncertainty Principle.

  14. Orientational order in disordered superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Toner, J. )

    1991-05-13

    Orientational order in weakly pinned Abrikosov flux lattices is studied, taking into account two heretofore neglected effects: dislocations and orientational couplings to the underlying lattice. Without orientational couplings, arbitrarily weak pinning destroys long-ranged orientational order for all spatial dimensions {ital d}{lt}4. Orientational couplings stabilize long-ranged orientational order. For fields along an axis of {ital fourfold} symmetry, {ital sixfold} (hexatic) orientational order is described by a random-field Ising model, and so does not occur in {ital d}=2 (thin films) but does in {ital d}=3 (bulk).

  15. Fluorescent Detection of Flaws.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    In a method for detecting flaws in the surface of a workpiece, initially microcapsules containing a fluorescent dye are deposited on the surface...After removal of excess microcapsules from the surface in order to reduce background fluorescence, the surface is visually inspected under ultraviolet

  16. Test ordering by GP trainees

    PubMed Central

    Morgan, Simon; Morgan, Andy; Kerr, Rohan; Tapley, Amanda; Magin, Parker

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective To assess the effectiveness of an educational intervention on test-ordering attitudes and intended practice of GP trainees, and any associations between changes in test ordering and trainee characteristics. Design Preworkshop and postworkshop survey of attitudes to test ordering, intended test-ordering practices for 3 clinical scenarios (fatigue, screening, and shoulder pain), and tolerance for uncertainty. Setting Three Australian regional general practice training providers. Participants General practice trainees (N = 167). Intervention A 2-hour workshop session and an online module. Main outcome measures Proportion of trainees who agreed with attitudinal statements before and after the workshop; proportion of trainees who would order tests, mean number of tests ordered, and number of appropriate and inappropriate tests ordered for each scenario before and after the workshop. Results Of 167 trainees, 132 (79.0%) completed both the preworkshop and postworkshop questionnaires. A total of 122 trainees attended the workshop. At baseline, 88.6% thought that tests can harm patients, 84.8% believed overtesting was a problem, 72.0% felt pressured by patients, 52.3% believed that tests would reassure patients, and 50.8% thought that they were less likely to be sued if they ordered tests. There were desirable changes in all attitudes after the workshop. Before the workshop, the mean number of tests that trainees would have ordered was 4.4, 4.8, and 1.5 for the fatigue, screening, and shoulder pain scenarios, respectively. After the workshop there were decreases in the mean number of both appropriate tests (decrease of 0.94) and inappropriate tests (decrease of 0.24) in the fatigue scenario; there was no change in the mean number of appropriate tests and a decrease in inappropriate tests (decrease of 0.76) in the screening scenario; and there was an increase in the proportion of trainees who would appropriately not order tests in the shoulder pain

  17. Constructing higher-order hydrodynamics: The third order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grozdanov, Sašo; Kaplis, Nikolaos

    2016-03-01

    Hydrodynamics can be formulated as the gradient expansion of conserved currents in terms of the fundamental fields describing the near-equilibrium fluid flow. In the relativistic case, the Navier-Stokes equations follow from the conservation of the stress-energy tensor to first order in derivatives. In this paper, we go beyond the presently understood second-order hydrodynamics and discuss the systematization of obtaining the hydrodynamic expansion to an arbitrarily high order. As an example of the algorithm that we present, we fully classify the gradient expansion at third order for neutral fluids in four dimensions, thus finding the most general next-to-leading-order corrections to the relativistic Navier-Stokes equations in curved space-time. In doing so, we list 20 new transport coefficient candidates in the conformal case and 68 in the nonconformal case. As we do not consider any constraints that could potentially arise from the local entropy current analysis, this is the maximal possible set of neutral third-order transport coefficients. To investigate the physical implications of these new transport coefficients, we obtain the third-order corrections to the linear dispersion relations that describe the propagation of diffusion and sound waves in relativistic fluids. We also compute the corrections to the scalar (spin-2) two-point correlation function of the third-order stress-energy tensor. Furthermore, as an example of a nonlinear hydrodynamic flow, we calculate the third-order corrections to the energy density of a boost-invariant Bjorken flow. Finally, we apply our field theoretic results to the N =4 supersymmetric Yang-Mills fluid at infinite 't Hooft coupling and an infinite number of colors to find the values of five new linear combinations of the conformal transport coefficients.

  18. High-Order/Low-Order methods for ocean modeling

    SciTech Connect

    Newman, Christopher; Womeldorff, Geoff; Chacón, Luis; Knoll, Dana A.

    2015-06-01

    We examine a High Order/Low Order (HOLO) approach for a z-level ocean model and show that the traditional semi-implicit and split-explicit methods, as well as a recent preconditioning strategy, can easily be cast in the framework of HOLO methods. The HOLO formulation admits an implicit-explicit method that is algorithmically scalable and second-order accurate, allowing timesteps much larger than the barotropic time scale. We demonstrate how HOLO approaches, in particular the implicit-explicit method, can provide a solid route for ocean simulation to heterogeneous computing and exascale environments.

  19. Problem Order Implications for Learning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Nan; Cohen, William W.; Koedinger, Kenneth R.

    2013-01-01

    The order of problems presented to students is an important variable that affects learning effectiveness. Previous studies have shown that solving problems in a blocked order, in which all problems of one type are completed before the student is switched to the next problem type, results in less effective performance than does solving the problems…

  20. Second-order temporal modulation transfer functions.

    PubMed

    Lorenzi, C; Soares, C; Vonner, T

    2001-08-01

    Detection thresholds were measured for a sinusoidal modulation applied to the modulation depth of a sinusoidally amplitude-modulated (SAM) white noise carrier as a function of the frequency of the modulation applied to the modulation depth (referred to as f'm). The SAM noise acted therefore as a "carrier" stimulus of frequency fm, and sinusoidal modulation of the SAM-noise modulation depth generated two additional components in the modulation spectrum: fm-f'm and fm+f'm. The tracking variable was the modulation depth of the sinusoidal variation applied to the "carrier" modulation depth. The resulting "second-order" temporal modulation transfer functions (TMTFs) measured on four listeners for "carrier" modulation frequencies fm of 16, 64, and 256 Hz display a low-pass segment followed by a plateau. This indicates that sensitivity to fluctuations in the strength of amplitude modulation is best for fluctuation rates f'm below about 2-4 Hz when using broadband noise carriers. Measurements of masked modulation detection thresholds for the lower and upper modulation sideband suggest that this capacity is possibly related to the detection of a beat in the sound's temporal envelope. The results appear qualitatively consistent with the predictions of an envelope detector model consisting of a low-pass filtering stage followed by a decision stage. Unlike listeners' performance, a modulation filterbank model using Q values > or = 2 should predict that second-order modulation detection thresholds should decrease at high values of f'm due to the spectral resolution of the modulation sidebands (in the modulation domain). This suggests that, if such modulation filters do exist, their selectivity is poor. In the latter case, the Q value of modulation filters would have to be less than 2. This estimate of modulation filter selectivity is consistent with the results of a previous study using a modulation-masking paradigm [S. D. Ewert and T. Dau, J. Acoust. Soc. Am. 108, 1181

  1. Systems with Higher-order Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Achiam, Yaakov; Kaplan, Arkady; Seimetz, Matthias

    The chapter covers concepts, systems aspects, and key components for higher-order modulation. The introductory section presents relevant variants of higher-order modulation formats and includes coherent detection and coherent optical orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing as well. The next section is devoted to system configurations with particular emphasis on transmitter structures and receiver concepts, whereas the subsequent chapter focuses on key components. Included are LiNbO3-based quadrature modulators, integrated coherent receivers, in particular 90° hybrids, ranging from new concepts to proven implementations. A treatment of integrated balanced four-branch receivers ranges from theoretical analysis to the presentation of commercially available devices. The chapter concludes with a discussion of system trends and expected future developments.

  2. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E.B.

    1993-05-11

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  3. Convex hull test for ordered categorical data.

    PubMed

    Berger, V W; Permutt, T; Ivanova, A

    1998-12-01

    When testing for stochastic order in ordered 2 x J contingency tables, it is common to select the cutoff required to declare significance so as to ensure that the size of the test is exactly alpha conditionally on the margins. It is valid, however, to use the margins to select not only the cutoff but also the form of the test. Linear rank tests, which are locally most powerful and frequently used in practice, suffer from the drawback that they may have power as low as zero to detect some alternatives of interest when the margins satisfy certain conditions. The Smirnov and convex hull tests are shown, through exact conditional power calculations and simulations, to avoid this drawback. The convex hull test is also admissible and palindromic invariant and minimizes the required significance level to have limiting power of one as the alternative moves away from the null in any direction.

  4. Linear Response Function of Bond-Order

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Nayuta; Mitsuta, Yuki; Okumura, Mitsutaka; Yamanaka, Shusuke

    2016-01-01

    We present the linear response function of bond-orders (LRF-BO) based on a real space integration scheme for molecular systems. As in the case of the LRF of density, the LRF-BO is defined as the response of the bond order of the molecule for the virtual perturbation. Our calculations show that the LRF-BO enables us not only to detect inductive and resonating effects of conjugating systems, but also to predict pKa values on substitution groups via linear relationships between the Hammett constants and the LRF-BO values for meta- and para-substituted benzoic acids. More importantly, the LRF-BO values for the O-H bonds strongly depend on the sites to which the virtual perturbation is applied, implying that the LRF-BO values include essential information about reaction mechanism of the acid-dissociation of substituted benzoic acids. PMID:27792148

  5. Ordered transport and identification of particles

    DOEpatents

    Shera, E. Brooks

    1993-01-01

    A method and apparatus are provided for application of electrical field gradients to induce particle velocities to enable particle sequence and identification information to be obtained. Particle sequence is maintained by providing electroosmotic flow for an electrolytic solution in a particle transport tube. The transport tube and electrolytic solution are selected to provide an electroosmotic radius of >100 so that a plug flow profile is obtained for the electrolytic solution in the transport tube. Thus, particles are maintained in the same order in which they are introduced in the transport tube. When the particles also have known electrophoretic velocities, the field gradients introduce an electrophoretic velocity component onto the electroosmotic velocity. The time that the particles pass selected locations along the transport tube may then be detected and the electrophoretic velocity component calculated for particle identification. One particular application is the ordered transport and identification of labeled nucleotides sequentially cleaved from a strand of DNA.

  6. Operon Gene Order Is Optimized for Ordered Protein Complex Assembly.

    PubMed

    Wells, Jonathan N; Bergendahl, L Therese; Marsh, Joseph A

    2016-02-02

    The assembly of heteromeric protein complexes is an inherently stochastic process in which multiple genes are expressed separately into proteins, which must then somehow find each other within the cell. Here, we considered one of the ways by which prokaryotic organisms have attempted to maximize the efficiency of protein complex assembly: the organization of subunit-encoding genes into operons. Using structure-based assembly predictions, we show that operon gene order has been optimized to match the order in which protein subunits assemble. Exceptions to this are almost entirely highly expressed proteins for which assembly is less stochastic and for which precisely ordered translation offers less benefit. Overall, these results show that ordered protein complex assembly pathways are of significant biological importance and represent a major evolutionary constraint on operon gene organization.

  7. 7 CFR 1208.14 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROCESSED RASPBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Processed Raspberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1208.14 Order. Order means the Processed Raspberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order....

  8. 7 CFR 1208.14 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE PROCESSED RASPBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Processed Raspberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1208.14 Order. Order means the Processed Raspberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order....

  9. Tailed bacteriophages: the order caudovirales.

    PubMed

    Ackermann, H W

    1998-01-01

    Tailed bacteriophages have a common origin and constitute an order with three families, named Caudovirales. Their structured tail is unique. Tailed phages share a series of high-level taxonomic properties and show many facultative features that are unique or rare in viruses, for example, tail appendages and unusual bases. They share with other viruses, especially herpesviruses, elements of morphogenesis and life-style that are attributed to convergent evolution. Tailed phages present three types of lysogeny, exemplified by phages lambda, Mu, and P1. Lysogeny appears as a secondary property acquired by horizontal gene transfer. Amino acid sequence alignments (notably of DNA polymerases, integrases, and peptidoglycan hydrolases) indicate frequent events of horizontal gene transfer in tailed phages. Common capsid and tail proteins have not been detected. Tailed phages possibly evolved from small protein shells with a few genes sufficient for some basal level of productive infection. This early stage can no longer be traced. At one point, this precursor phage became perfected. Some of its features were perfect enough to be transmitted until today. It is tempting to list major present-day properties of tailed phages in the past tense to construct a tentative history of these viruses: 1. Tailed phages originated in the early Precambrian, long before eukaryotes and their viruses. 2. The ur-tailed phage, already a quite evolved virus, had an icosahedral head of about 60 nm in diameter and a long non-contractile tail with sixfold symmetry. The capsid contained a single molecule of dsDNA of about 50 kb, and the tail was probably provided with a fixation apparatus. Head and tail were held together by a connector. a. The particle contained no lipids, was heavier than most viruses to come, and had a high DNA content proportional to its capsid size (about 50%). b. Most of its DNA coded for structural proteins. Morphopoietic genes clustered at one end of the genome, with head

  10. Complex higher order derivative theories

    SciTech Connect

    Margalli, Carlos A.; Vergara, J. David

    2012-08-24

    In this work is considered a complex scalar field theory with higher order derivative terms and interactions. A procedure is developed to quantize consistently this system avoiding the presence of negative norm states. In order to achieve this goal the original real scalar high order field theory is extended to a complex space attaching a complex total derivative to the theory. Next, by imposing reality conditions the complex theory is mapped to a pair of interacting real scalar field theories without the presence of higher derivative terms.

  11. 7 CFR 1218.12 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.12 Order....

  12. 7 CFR 1218.12 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.12 Order....

  13. 7 CFR 1218.12 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.12 Order....

  14. 7 CFR 1218.12 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.12 Order....

  15. 7 CFR 1218.12 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BLUEBERRY PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Blueberry Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1218.12 Order....

  16. 7 CFR 1206.13 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.13 Order. Order means an...

  17. 7 CFR 1206.13 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.13 Order. Order means an...

  18. 7 CFR 1206.13 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.13 Order. Order means an...

  19. 7 CFR 1206.13 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.13 Order. Order means an...

  20. 7 CFR 1206.13 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE MANGO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Mango Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1206.13 Order. Order means an...

  1. Testing Consent Order for Octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This rule announces that EPA has signed an enforceable testing consent order with six manufacturers of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (OMCTS; CAS No. 556-67—2, who have agreed to perform certain chemical fate and environmental effects tests with OMCTS.

  2. Order, Chaos and All That!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glasser, L.

    1989-01-01

    The evolution of ideas about the concept of chaos is surveyed. Discussed are chaos in deterministic, dynamic systems; order in dissipative systems; and thermodynamics and irreversibility. Included are logistic and bifurcation maps to illustrate points made in the discussion. (CW)

  3. Second-order quasinormal mode of the Schwarzschild black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, Hiroyuki; Ioka, Kunihito

    2007-10-01

    We formulate and calculate the second-order quasinormal modes (QNMs) of a Schwarzschild black hole (BH). Gravitational waves (GW) from a distorted BH, the so-called ringdowns, are well understood as QNMs in general relativity. Since QNMs from binary BH mergers will be detected with a high signal-to-noise ratio by GW detectors, it is also possible to detect the second perturbative order of QNMs, generated by nonlinear gravitational interaction near the BH. In the BH perturbation approach, we derive the master Zerilli equation for the metric perturbation to second order and explicitly regularize it at the horizon and spatial infinity. We numerically solve the second-order Zerilli equation by implementing the modified Leaver continued fraction method. The second-order QNM frequencies are found to be twice the first-order ones, and the GW amplitude is up to ˜10% that of the first order for the binary BH mergers. Since the second-order QNMs always exist, we can use their detections (i) to test the nonlinearity of general relativity, in particular, the no-hair theorem, (ii) to remove fake events in the data analysis of QNM GWs, and (iii) to measure the distance to the BH.

  4. The concept of bond order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elliott, Robert J.; Richards, W. Graham

    A method for obtaining precise charge densities in defined regions of space from ab initio molecular wavefunctions is employed to place the concept of bond order on a firm theoretical footing. The bond orders obtained for carbon—carbon bonds in a range of organic compounds are assessed: those for buta-1,3-diene confirm that it consists of essentially localised double and single bonds.

  5. Complete normal ordering 1: Foundations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, John; Mavromatos, Nick E.; Skliros, Dimitri P.

    2016-08-01

    We introduce a new prescription for quantising scalar field theories (in generic spacetime dimension and background) perturbatively around a true minimum of the full quantum effective action, which is to 'complete normal order' the bare action of interest. When the true vacuum of the theory is located at zero field value, the key property of this prescription is the automatic cancellation, to any finite order in perturbation theory, of all tadpole and, more generally, all 'cephalopod' Feynman diagrams. The latter are connected diagrams that can be disconnected into two pieces by cutting one internal vertex, with either one or both pieces free from external lines. In addition, this procedure of 'complete normal ordering' (which is an extension of the standard field theory definition of normal ordering) reduces by a substantial factor the number of Feynman diagrams to be calculated at any given loop order. We illustrate explicitly the complete normal ordering procedure and the cancellation of cephalopod diagrams in scalar field theories with non-derivative interactions, and by using a point splitting 'trick' we extend this result to theories with derivative interactions, such as those appearing as non-linear σ-models in the world-sheet formulation of string theory. We focus here on theories with trivial vacua, generalising the discussion to non-trivial vacua in a follow-up paper.

  6. Exploring intertwined orders in cuprate superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tranquada, John M.

    2015-03-01

    The concept of intertwined orders has been introduced to describe the cooperative relationship between antiferromagnetic spin correlations and electron (or hole) pair correlations that develop in copper-oxide superconductors. This contrasts with systems in which, for example, charge-density-wave (CDW) order competes for Fermi surface area with superconductivity. La2-xBaxCuO4 with x=0.125 provides an example in which the ordering of spin stripes coincides with the onset of two-dimensional superconducting correlations. The apparent frustration of the interlayer Josephson coupling has motivated the concept of the pair-density-wave superconductor, a state that theoretical calculations show to be energetically competitive with the uniform d-wave superconductor. Even at x=0.095, where there is robust superconductivity below 32 K in zero field, the coexistence of strong, low-energy, incommensurate spin excitations implies a spatially modulated and intertwined pair wave function. Recent observations of CDW order in YBa2Cu3O6+x and other cuprate families have raised interesting questions regarding the general role of charge modulations and the relation to superconductivity. While there are differences in the doping dependence of the modulation wave vectors in YBa2Cu3O6+x and La2-xBaxCuO4, the maximum ordering strength is peaked at the hole concentration of 1/8 in both cases. There are also possible connections with the quantum oscillations that have been detected about the same hole concentration but at high magnetic fields. Resolving these relationships remains a research challenge.

  7. Exploring intertwined orders in cuprate superconductors

    DOE PAGES

    Tranquada, John M.

    2014-11-22

    In this study, the concept of intertwined orders has been introduced to describe the cooperative relationship between antiferromagnetic spin correlations and electron (or hole) pair correlations that develop in copper-oxide superconductors. This contrasts with systems in which, for example, charge-density-wave (CDW) order competes for Fermi surface area with superconductivity. La2-xBaxCuO4 with x = 0.125 provides an example in which the ordering of spin stripes coincides with the onset of two-dimensional superconducting correlations. The apparent frustration of the interlayer Josephson coupling has motivated the concept of the pair-density-wave superconductor, a state that theoretical calculations show to be energetically competitive with themore » uniform d-wave superconductor. Even at x = 0.095, where there is robust superconductivity below 32 K in zero field, the coexistence of strong, low-energy, incommensurate spin excitations implies a spatially modulated and intertwined pair wave function. Recent observations of CDW order in YBa2Cu3O6+x and other cuprate families have raised interesting questions regarding the general role of charge modulations and the relation to superconductivity. While there are differences in the doping dependence of the modulation wave vectors in YBa2Cu3O6+x and La2-xBaxCuO4, the maximum ordering strength is peaked at the hole concentration of 1/8 in both cases. There are also possible connections with the quantum oscillations that have been detected about the same hole concentration but at high magnetic fields. Resolving these relationships remains a research challenge.« less

  8. Exploring intertwined orders in cuprate superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Tranquada, John M.

    2014-11-22

    In this study, the concept of intertwined orders has been introduced to describe the cooperative relationship between antiferromagnetic spin correlations and electron (or hole) pair correlations that develop in copper-oxide superconductors. This contrasts with systems in which, for example, charge-density-wave (CDW) order competes for Fermi surface area with superconductivity. La2-xBaxCuO4 with x = 0.125 provides an example in which the ordering of spin stripes coincides with the onset of two-dimensional superconducting correlations. The apparent frustration of the interlayer Josephson coupling has motivated the concept of the pair-density-wave superconductor, a state that theoretical calculations show to be energetically competitive with the uniform d-wave superconductor. Even at x = 0.095, where there is robust superconductivity below 32 K in zero field, the coexistence of strong, low-energy, incommensurate spin excitations implies a spatially modulated and intertwined pair wave function. Recent observations of CDW order in YBa2Cu3O6+x and other cuprate families have raised interesting questions regarding the general role of charge modulations and the relation to superconductivity. While there are differences in the doping dependence of the modulation wave vectors in YBa2Cu3O6+x and La2-xBaxCuO4, the maximum ordering strength is peaked at the hole concentration of 1/8 in both cases. There are also possible connections with the quantum oscillations that have been detected about the same hole concentration but at high magnetic fields. Resolving these relationships remains a research challenge.

  9. Reduced Order Modeling in General Relativity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiglio, Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Reduced Order Modeling is an emerging yet fast developing filed in gravitational wave physics. The main goals are to enable fast modeling and parameter estimation of any detected signal, along with rapid matched filtering detecting. I will focus on the first two. Some accomplishments include being able to replace, with essentially no lost of physical accuracy, the original models with surrogate ones (which are not effective ones, that is, they do not simplify the physics but go on a very different track, exploiting the particulars of the waveform family under consideration and state of the art dimensional reduction techniques) which are very fast to evaluate. For example, for EOB models they are at least around 3 orders of magnitude faster than solving the original equations, with physically equivalent results. For numerical simulations the speedup is at least 11 orders of magnitude. For parameter estimation our current numbers are about bringing ~100 days for a single SPA inspiral binary neutron star Bayesian parameter estimation analysis to under a day. More recently, it has been shown that the full precessing problem for, say, 200 cycles, can be represented, through some new ideas, by a remarkably compact set of carefully chosen reduced basis waveforms (~10-100, depending on the accuracy requirements). I will highlight what I personally believe are the challenges to face next in this subarea of GW physics and where efforts should be directed. This talk will summarize work in collaboration with: Harbir Antil (GMU), Jonathan Blackman (Caltech), Priscila Canizares (IoA, Cambridge, UK), Sarah Caudill (UWM), Jonathan Gair (IoA. Cambridge. UK), Scott Field (UMD), Chad R. Galley (Caltech), Frank Herrmann (Germany), Han Hestahven (EPFL, Switzerland), Jason Kaye (Brown, Stanford & Courant). Evan Ochsner (UWM), Ricardo Nochetto (UMD), Vivien Raymond (LIGO, Caltech), Rory Smith (LIGO, Caltech) Bela Ssilagyi (Caltech) and MT (UMD & Caltech).

  10. Exercise order in resistance training.

    PubMed

    Simão, Roberto; de Salles, Belmiro Freitas; Figueiredo, Tiago; Dias, Ingrid; Willardson, Jeffrey M

    2012-03-01

    Resistance training (RT) is now an integral component of a well rounded exercise programme. For a correct training prescription, it is of the utmost importance to understand the interaction among training variables, such as the load, volume, rest interval between sets and exercises, frequency of sessions, exercise modality, repetition velocity and, finally, exercise order. Sports medicine research has indicated that exercise order is an important variable that affects both acute responses and chronic adaptations to RT programmes. Therefore, the purpose of this review was to analyse and discuss exercise order with relevance to acute responses (e.g. repetition performance) and also the expression of chronic adaptable characteristics (e.g. maximal strength and hypertrophy). To accomplish this purpose, the Scielo, Science Citation Index, National Library of Medicine, MEDLINE, Scopus, SPORTDiscus™ and CINAHL® databases were accessed to locate previously conducted original scientific investigations. The studies reviewed examined both acute responses and chronic adaptations with exercise order as the experimental variable. Generally, with relevance to acute responses, a key finding was that exercise order affects repetition performance over multiple sets, indicating that the total repetitions, and thus the volume, is greater when an exercise is placed at the beginning of an RT session, regardless of the relative amount of muscle mass involved. The pre-exhaustion method might not be an effective technique to increase the extent of neuromuscular recruitment for larger muscle groups (e.g. pectoralis major for the bench press) when preceded by a single-joint movement (e.g. pec-deck fly). With relevance to localized muscular endurance performance, oxygen consumption and ratings of perceived exertion, the limited amount of research conducted thus far indicates that exercise order does not appear to impact the acute expression of these variables. In terms of chronic

  11. Multiscale high-order/low-order (HOLO) algorithms and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chacón, L.; Chen, G.; Knoll, D. A.; Newman, C.; Park, H.; Taitano, W.; Willert, J. A.; Womeldorff, G.

    2017-02-01

    We review the state of the art in the formulation, implementation, and performance of so-called high-order/low-order (HOLO) algorithms for challenging multiscale problems. HOLO algorithms attempt to couple one or several high-complexity physical models (the high-order model, HO) with low-complexity ones (the low-order model, LO). The primary goal of HOLO algorithms is to achieve nonlinear convergence between HO and LO components while minimizing memory footprint and managing the computational complexity in a practical manner. Key to the HOLO approach is the use of the LO representations to address temporal stiffness, effectively accelerating the convergence of the HO/LO coupled system. The HOLO approach is broadly underpinned by the concept of nonlinear elimination, which enables segregation of the HO and LO components in ways that can effectively use heterogeneous architectures. The accuracy and efficiency benefits of HOLO algorithms are demonstrated with specific applications to radiation transport, gas dynamics, plasmas (both Eulerian and Lagrangian formulations), and ocean modeling. Across this broad application spectrum, HOLO algorithms achieve significant accuracy improvements at a fraction of the cost compared to conventional approaches. It follows that HOLO algorithms hold significant potential for high-fidelity system scale multiscale simulations leveraging exascale computing.

  12. A Law of Order: Word Order Change in Classical Aztec

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steele, Susan M.

    1976-01-01

    The verb in Classical Aztec is slowly moving from the end of the sentence to the beginning due to the attraction of sentence initial modal particles to the verb. Not only the function but also the position of elements should be examined to account for word-order change. (SCC)

  13. Crystal nucleation as the ordering of multiple order parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russo, John; Tanaka, Hajime

    2016-12-01

    Nucleation is an activated process in which the system has to overcome a free energy barrier in order for a first-order phase transition between the metastable and the stable phases to take place. In the liquid-to-solid transition, the process occurs between phases of different symmetry, and it is thus inherently a multi-dimensional process, in which all symmetries are broken at the transition. In this Focus Article, we consider some recent studies which highlight the multi-dimensional nature of the nucleation process. Even for a single-component system, the formation of solid crystals from the metastable melt involves fluctuations of two (or more) order parameters, often associated with the decoupling of positional and orientational symmetry breaking. In other words, we need at least two order parameters to describe the free-energy of a system including its liquid and crystalline states. This decoupling occurs naturally for asymmetric particles or directional interactions, focusing here on the case of water, but we will show that it also affects spherically symmetric interacting particles, such as the hard-sphere system. We will show how the treatment of nucleation as a multi-dimensional process has shed new light on the process of polymorph selection, on the effect of external fields on the nucleation process and on glass-forming ability.

  14. Order in a multidimensional system.

    PubMed

    Frieden, B Roy; Gatenby, Robert A

    2011-07-01

    We show that any convex K-dimensional system has a level of order R that is proportional to its level of Fisher information I. The proportionality constant is 1/8 the square of the longest chord connecting two surface points of the system. This result follows solely from the requirement that R decrease under small perturbations caused by a coarse graining of the system. The form for R is generally unitless, allowing the order for different phenomena, or different representations (e.g., using time vs frequency) of a given phenomenom, to be compared objectively. Order R is also invariant to uniform magnification of the system. The monotonic contraction properties of R and I define an arrow of time and imply that they are entropies, in addition to their usual status as informations. This also removes the need for data, and therefore an observer, in derivations of nonparticipatory phenomena that utilize I. Simple graphical examples of the new order measure show that it measures as well the level of "complexity" in the system. Finally, an application to cell growth during enforced distortion shows that a single hydrocarbon chain can be distorted into a membrane having equal order or complexity. Such membranes are prime constituents of living cells.

  15. Radiation detection system

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Melvin A.; Davies, Terence J.; Morton, III, John R.

    1976-01-01

    A radiation detection system which utilizes the generation of Cerenkov light in and the transmission of that light longitudinally through fiber optic wave guides in order to transmit intelligence relating to the radiation to a remote location. The wave guides are aligned with respect to charged particle radiation so that the Cerenkov light, which is generated at an angle to the radiation, is accepted by the fiber for transmission therethrough. The Cerenkov radiation is detected, recorded, and analyzed at the other end of the fiber.

  16. Portable pathogen detection system

    DOEpatents

    Colston, Billy W.; Everett, Matthew; Milanovich, Fred P.; Brown, Steve B.; Vendateswaran, Kodumudi; Simon, Jonathan N.

    2005-06-14

    A portable pathogen detection system that accomplishes on-site multiplex detection of targets in biological samples. The system includes: microbead specific reagents, incubation/mixing chambers, a disposable microbead capture substrate, and an optical measurement and decoding arrangement. The basis of this system is a highly flexible Liquid Array that utilizes optically encoded microbeads as the templates for biological assays. Target biological samples are optically labeled and captured on the microbeads, which are in turn captured on an ordered array or disordered array disposable capture substrate and then optically read.

  17. Determining Reduced Order Models for Optimal Stochastic Reduced Order Models

    SciTech Connect

    Bonney, Matthew S.; Brake, Matthew R.W.

    2015-08-01

    The use of parameterized reduced order models(PROMs) within the stochastic reduced order model (SROM) framework is a logical progression for both methods. In this report, five different parameterized reduced order models are selected and critiqued against the other models along with truth model for the example of the Brake-Reuss beam. The models are: a Taylor series using finite difference, a proper orthogonal decomposition of the the output, a Craig-Bampton representation of the model, a method that uses Hyper-Dual numbers to determine the sensitivities, and a Meta-Model method that uses the Hyper-Dual results and constructs a polynomial curve to better represent the output data. The methods are compared against a parameter sweep and a distribution propagation where the first four statistical moments are used as a comparison. Each method produces very accurate results with the Craig-Bampton reduction having the least accurate results. The models are also compared based on time requirements for the evaluation of each model where the Meta- Model requires the least amount of time for computation by a significant amount. Each of the five models provided accurate results in a reasonable time frame. The determination of which model to use is dependent on the availability of the high-fidelity model and how many evaluations can be performed. Analysis of the output distribution is examined by using a large Monte-Carlo simulation along with a reduced simulation using Latin Hypercube and the stochastic reduced order model sampling technique. Both techniques produced accurate results. The stochastic reduced order modeling technique produced less error when compared to an exhaustive sampling for the majority of methods.

  18. Tree reconstruction from partial orders

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, S.K. ); Warnow, T.J. )

    1993-01-01

    The problem of constructing trees given a matrix of interleaf distances is motivated by applications in computational evolutionary biology and linguistics. The general problem is to find an edge-weighted tree which most closely approximates the distance matrix. Although the construction problem is easy when the tree exactly fits the distance matrix, optimization problems under all popular criteria are either known or conjectured to be NP-complete. In this paper we consider the related problem where we are given a partial order on the pairwise distances, and wish to construct (if possible) an edge-weighted tree realizing the partial order. In particular we are interested in partial orders which arise from experiments on triples of species, which determine either a linear ordering of the three pairwise distances (called Total Order Model or TOM experiments) or only the pair(s) of minimum distance apart (called Partial Order Model or POM experiments). The POM and TOM experimental model is inspired by the model proposed by Kannan, Lawler, and Warnow for constructing trees from experiments which determine the rooted topology for any triple of species. We examine issues of construction of trees and consistency of TOM and POM experiments, where the trees may either be weighted or unweighted. Using these experiments to construct unweighted trees without nodes of degree two is motivated by a similar problem studied by Winkler, called the Discrete Metric Realization problem, which he showed to be strongly NP-hard. We have the following results: Determining consistency of a set of TOM or POM experiments is NP-Complete whether the tree is weighted or constrained to be unweighted and without degree two nodes. We can construct unweighted trees without degree two nodes from TOM experiments in optimal O(n[sup 3]) time and from POM experiments in O(n[sup 4]) time.

  19. Tree reconstruction from partial orders

    SciTech Connect

    Kannan, S.K.; Warnow, T.J.

    1993-03-01

    The problem of constructing trees given a matrix of interleaf distances is motivated by applications in computational evolutionary biology and linguistics. The general problem is to find an edge-weighted tree which most closely approximates the distance matrix. Although the construction problem is easy when the tree exactly fits the distance matrix, optimization problems under all popular criteria are either known or conjectured to be NP-complete. In this paper we consider the related problem where we are given a partial order on the pairwise distances, and wish to construct (if possible) an edge-weighted tree realizing the partial order. In particular we are interested in partial orders which arise from experiments on triples of species, which determine either a linear ordering of the three pairwise distances (called Total Order Model or TOM experiments) or only the pair(s) of minimum distance apart (called Partial Order Model or POM experiments). The POM and TOM experimental model is inspired by the model proposed by Kannan, Lawler, and Warnow for constructing trees from experiments which determine the rooted topology for any triple of species. We examine issues of construction of trees and consistency of TOM and POM experiments, where the trees may either be weighted or unweighted. Using these experiments to construct unweighted trees without nodes of degree two is motivated by a similar problem studied by Winkler, called the Discrete Metric Realization problem, which he showed to be strongly NP-hard. We have the following results: Determining consistency of a set of TOM or POM experiments is NP-Complete whether the tree is weighted or constrained to be unweighted and without degree two nodes. We can construct unweighted trees without degree two nodes from TOM experiments in optimal O(n{sup 3}) time and from POM experiments in O(n{sup 4}) time.

  20. Risk attitudes and birth order.

    PubMed

    Krause, Philipp; Heindl, Johannes; Jung, Andreas; Langguth, Berthold; Hajak, Göran; Sand, Philipp G

    2014-07-01

    Risk attitudes play important roles in health behavior and everyday decision making. It is unclear, however, whether these attitudes can be predicted from birth order. We investigated 200 mostly male volunteers from two distinct settings. After correcting for multiple comparisons, for the number of siblings and for confounding by gender, ordinal position predicted perception of health-related risks among participants in extreme sports (p < .01). However, the direction of the effect contradicted Adlerian theory. Except for alcohol consumption, these findings extended to self-reported risk behavior. Together, the data call for a cautious stand on the impact of birth order on risk attitudes.

  1. Ordering Multiple Soft Gluon Emissions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ángeles Martínez, René; Forshaw, Jeffrey R.; Seymour, Michael H.

    2016-05-01

    We present an expression for the QCD amplitude for a general hard scattering process with any number of soft gluon emissions, to one-loop accuracy. The amplitude is written in two different but equivalent ways: as a product of operators ordered in dipole transverse momentum and as a product of loop-expanded currents. We hope that these results will help in the development of an all-orders algorithm for multiple emissions that includes the full color structure and both the real and imaginary contributions to the amplitude.

  2. Suffix Ordering and Morphological Processing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plag, Ingo; Baayen, Harald

    2009-01-01

    There is a long-standing debate about the principles constraining the combinatorial properties of suffixes. Hay 2002 and Hay & Plag 2004 proposed a model in which suffixes can be ordered along a hierarchy of processing complexity. We show that this model generalizes to a larger set of suffixes, and we provide independent evidence supporting the…

  3. Spatial Processes in Linear Ordering

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    von Hecker, Ulrich; Klauer, Karl Christoph; Wolf, Lukas; Fazilat-Pour, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    Memory performance in linear order reasoning tasks (A > B, B > C, C > D, etc.) shows quicker, and more accurate responses to queries on wider (AD) than narrower (AB) pairs on a hypothetical linear mental model (A -- B -- C -- D). While indicative of an analogue representation, research so far did not provide positive evidence for spatial…

  4. Moral Order and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howard, Thomas

    1980-01-01

    Argues that a society without reverence for myths and history inevitably falls prone to chaos and evil, pointing to abortion, Andy Warhol's celebrity, and Woodstock as evidence of this disintegration of society. Proposes that humanities education expose students to human experience based on some awesome and fixed moral order. (AYC)

  5. Questioning the Order of Operations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dupree, Kami M.

    2016-01-01

    For decades, students have been encouraged to use "Please Excuse My Dear Aunt Sally" as a means of learning the order of operations. Teachers unfamiliar with the Aunt Sally mnemonic are perhaps more familiar with a mnemonic such as PEMDAS. Each mnemonic is intended to convey "parentheses, exponents, multiplication, division,…

  6. Order Statistics and Nonparametric Statistics.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-26

    Topics investigated include the following: Probability that a fuze will fire; moving order statistics; distribution theory and properties of the...problem posed by an Army Scientist: A fuze will fire when at least n-i (or n-2) of n detonators function within time span t. What is the probability of

  7. Geometric aspects of ordering phenomena

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cugliandolo, Leticia F.

    2017-01-01

    A macroscopic system prepared in a disordered phase and quenched across a second-order phase transition into an ordered phase undergoes a coarsening process whereby it orders locally in one of the equilibrium states. The study of the evolution of the morphology of the ordered structures in two dimensions has recently unveiled two interesting and generic features. On the one hand, the dynamics first approach a critical percolating state via the growth of a new lengthscale and satisfying scaling properties with respect to it. The time needed to reach the critical percolating state diverges with the system size, though more weakly than the equilibration time. On the other hand, once the critical percolating structures established, the geometrical and statistical properties at larger scales than the one established by the usual dynamic growing length remain the ones of critical percolation. These observations are common to different microscopic dynamics (single spin flip, local and non-local spin exchange, voter) in pure or weakly disordered systems. We discuss these results and we refer to the relevant publications for details. xml:lang="fr"

  8. Nanoparticle Order through Entropic Confinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Ren; Lee, Bongjoon; Stafford, Christopher; Douglas, Jack; Bockstaller, Michael; Karim, Alamgir

    As has been addressed in colloidal science, visual order transitions can be achieved with entropy contributions alone. Herein, entropy-driven ordering of nanoparticle (NP) structures is generated where entropy increase and visual order are achieved simultaneously. We study an ``athermal'' NP-polymer blends where NPs are densely grafted with polymer brush of the same chemical composition as the polymer matrix. Visual order of the NPs is induced by geometrically confining the thin film blends with meso-scale topographic patterns. When the residual layer thickness of the patterned blend films approaches the nanoparticle dimension, exclusive segregation of NPs to less confining imprinted mesa region occurs. This preferential segregation of NPs, defined by partition coefficient K = 0, is attributed to purely entropic penalty, where K denotes the particle density ratio at highly confined residual layer to that at mesa region. We further demonstrate K is fully tunable and even invertible with increasing matrix chain dimension. The associated entropic free energy change (ΔF = - ln K) is calculated to explain NP segregation preference. Accordingly, variation of residual layer thickness and polymer matrix molecule size can both affect NP distribution among patterned thick and thin regions.

  9. Weighted order statistic classifiers with large rank-order margin.

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, R. B.; Hush, D. R.; Theiler, J. P.; Gokhale, M.

    2003-01-01

    We describe how Stack Filters and Weighted Order Statistic function classes can be used for classification problems. This leads to a new design criteria for linear classifiers when inputs are binary-valued and weights are positive . We present a rank-based measure of margin that can be directly optimized as a standard linear program and investigate its effect on generalization error with experiment. Our approach can robustly combine large numbers of base hypothesis and easily implement known priors through regularization.

  10. Symbols of a cosmic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madjid, F. Hadi; Myers, John M.

    2016-10-01

    The world runs on networks over which signals communicate sequences of symbols, e.g. numerals. Examining both engineered and natural communications networks reveals an unsuspected order that depends on contact with an unpredictable entity. This order has three roots. The first is a proof within quantum theory that no evidence can ever determine its explanation, so that an agent choosing an explanation must do so unpredictably. The second root is the showing that clocks that step computers do not "tell time" but serve as self-adjusting symbol-handling agents that regulate "logically synchronized" motion in response to unpredictable disturbances. Such a clock-agent has a certain independence as well as the capacity to communicate via unpredictable symbols with other clock-agents and to adjust its own tick rate in response to that communication. The third root is the noticing of unpredictable symbol exchange in natural systems, including the transmission of symbols found in molecular biology. We introduce a symbol-handling agent as a role played in some cases by a person, for example a physicist who chooses an explanation of given experimental outcomes, and in other cases by some other biological entity, and in still other cases by an inanimate device, such as a computer-based detector used in physical measurements. While we forbear to try to explain the propensity of agents at all levels from cells to civilizations to form and operate networks of logically synchronized symbol-handling agents, we point to this propensity as an overlooked cosmic order, an order structured by the unpredictability ensuing from the proof. Appreciating the cosmic order leads to a conception of agency that replaces volition by unpredictability and reconceives the notion of objectivity in a way that makes a place for agency in the world as described by physics. Some specific implications for physics are outlined.

  11. Inductive monopole detector employing planar high order superconducting gradiometer coils

    SciTech Connect

    Tesche, C.D.; Chi, C.C.; Tsuei, C.C.; Chaudhari, P.

    1983-08-15

    The characteristics and performance of a family of high-order planar gradiometer detectors for inductive detection of magnetic monopoles are discussed. Conventional superconducting magnetometers used for monopole detection must be operated in an extremely stable, low field environment. This places a severe restriction on the cross-sectional area of such detectors. However, planar gradiometer detectors permit the use of relatively large area detectors in coincidence without requiring a corresponding increase in the stability of the ambient field.

  12. Second-order spatial correlation in the far-field: Comparing entangled and classical light sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Erfeng; Liu, Weitao; Lin, Huizu; Chen, Pingxing

    2016-02-01

    We consider second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light in the far-field. The quantum theory of second-order spatial correlation is analyzed, and the role of photon statistics and detection mode in the second-order spatial correlation are discussed. Meanwhile, the difference of second-order spatial correlation with entangled and classical light sources is deduced.

  13. Rational ordering of serum electrolytes: development of clinical criteria.

    PubMed

    Lowe, R A; Wood, A B; Burney, R E; Mackenzie, J R

    1987-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the frequency of electrolyte abnormalities in emergency department patients, to assess the proportion of these abnormalities affecting patient outcome, and to develop a set of clinical criteria to allow selective ordering of serum electrolytes. The ordering physicians completed questionnaires describing the clinical presentations of 1,031 patients on whom electrolytes were requested. For every patient with abnormal electrolyte values, the chart was reviewed to ascertain whether this was a clinically significant electrolyte abnormality (CSEA). The clinicians' responses to the questionnaires were used to construct a clinical criteria set predictive of CSEAs. Five hundred forty-five patients (52.9%) had one or more abnormal electrolytes, but only 161 patients (15.6%) had CSEAs. A set of ten clinical criteria detected 159 of 161 CSEAs (98.8% sensitivity) and would have avoided the ordering of electrolytes in 262 cases (29.9% specificity). At a cost to the patient of $20 per set of electrolytes ordered, detection of 159 CSEAs using the clinical criteria would cost $96.73 per CSEA detected. Detection of the additional two CSEAs by ordering electrolytes on all patients in the series would cost an additional $5,240. If the accuracy of these clinical criteria is confirmed in other settings, they may be useful guidelines for reducing laboratory charges without compromising patient care.

  14. Perturbative gadgets at arbitrary orders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jordan, Stephen P.; Farhi, Edward

    2008-06-01

    Adiabatic quantum algorithms are often most easily formulated using many-body interactions. However, experimentally available interactions are generally two-body. In 2004, Kempe, Kitaev, and Regev introduced perturbative gadgets, by which arbitrary three-body effective interactions can be obtained using Hamiltonians consisting only of two-body interactions. These three-body effective interactions arise from the third order in perturbation theory. Since their introduction, perturbative gadgets have become a standard tool in the theory of quantum computation. Here we construct generalized gadgets so that one can directly obtain arbitrary k -body effective interactions from two-body Hamiltonians. These effective interactions arise from the k th order in perturbation theory.

  15. Energy Ordering of Molecular Orbitals

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Orbitals are invaluable in providing a model of bonding in molecules or between molecules and surfaces. Most present-day methods in computational chemistry begin by calculating the molecular orbitals of the system. To what extent have these mathematical objects analogues in the real world? To shed light on this intriguing question, we employ a photoemission tomography study on monolayers of 3,4,9,10-perylene-tetracarboxylic acid dianhydride (PTCDA) grown on three Ag surfaces. The characteristic photoelectron angular distribution enables us to assign individual molecular orbitals to the emission features. When comparing the resulting energy positions to density functional calculations, we observe deviations in the energy ordering. By performing complete active space calculations (CASSCF), we can explain the experimentally observed orbital ordering, suggesting the importance of static electron correlation beyond a (semi)local approximation. On the other hand, our results also show reality and robustness of the orbital concept, thereby making molecular orbitals accessible to experimental observations. PMID:27935313

  16. Recent advances in ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1994-12-31

    Ordered intermetallic alloys based on aluminides and silicides offer many advantages for structural use at high temperatures in hostile environments. Attractive properties include excellent oxidation and corrosion resistance, light weight, and superior strength at high temperatures. The major concern for structural use of intermetallics was their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. For the past 10 years, considerable effort was devoted to R&D of ordered intermetallic alloys, and progress has been made on understanding intrinsic and extrinsic factors controlling brittle fracture in intermetallic alloys based on aluminides and silicides. Parallel effort on alloy design has led to the development of a number of ductile and strong intermetallic alloys based on Ni{sub 3}Al, NiAl, Fe{sub 3}Al, FeAl, Ti{sub 3}Al, and TiAl systems for structural applications.

  17. Digital first order hold circuit

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Fred N. (Inventor); Wensley, Gerald J. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    There is provided a digitally controlled first order hold circuit and waveform synthesizer for digitally controlling the representation of a function over an approximation interval. In accordance with the operation of the invention, the first order hold circuit and waveform generator receives a digital data input signal which contains initial condition data, up/down data, and slope data for the approximation interval. The initial condition data is loaded into an up/down counter which is incremented using counting data at a rate depending on the value of the slope data and in a direction depending on the value of the up-down data. In order to minimize delays arising from data acquistion, two frequency synthesizer circuits are provided such that one frequency synthesizer provides counting data while the other frequency synthesizer receives slope data. During alternating intervals, the other frequency synthesizer circuit provides counting data while the other circuit receives slope data. In addition, long length data input signals covering a plurality of approximation intervals are provided to reduce the demands on a main system central processing unit.

  18. 7 CFR 1214.12 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHRISTMAS TREE PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Christmas Tree Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions §...

  19. 7 CFR 1214.12 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHRISTMAS TREE PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Christmas Tree Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions §...

  20. 7 CFR 1214.12 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE CHRISTMAS TREE PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION ORDER Christmas Tree Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions §...

  1. Arteriosclerosis Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    The Veterans Administration Hospital used computer image-processing techniques to detect arteriosclerosis. Originally developed by Goddard Space Flight Center engineers to enhance spacecraft pictures, this device replaced the previous testing for this disease which was extremely painful and time consuming. With this instrument, computer detected edges are shown along with an estimate of location of pre-arteriosclerosis vessel wall. The difference between the two represents the relative amount of disease in the blood vessel. Instrumentation will be expanded again in 1976 to analyze the coronary arteries and the blood vessels of the retina.

  2. Fingerprint detection

    DOEpatents

    Saunders, George C.

    1992-01-01

    A method for detection and visualization of latent fingerprints is provided and includes contacting a substrate containing a latent print thereon with a colloidal metal composition for time sufficient to allow reaction of said colloidal metal composition with said latent print, and preserving or recording the observable print. Further, the method for detection and visualization of latent fingerprints can include contacting the metal composition-latent print reaction product with a secondary metal-containing solution for time sufficient to allow precipitation of said secondary metal thereby enhancing the visibility of the latent print, and preserving or recording the observable print.

  3. 39 CFR 952.28 - Orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... shall cause notice of the order to be published in the Postal Bulletin and cause the order to be... place the order into effect. (b) If an order is issued which requires the Respondent to cease and...

  4. Detection device

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Jay E.

    1984-01-01

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber, (2) a central chamber, and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  5. Detection device

    DOEpatents

    Smith, J.E.

    1981-02-27

    The present invention is directed to a detection device comprising: (1) an entrance chamber; (2) a central chamber; and (3) an exit chamber. The central chamber includes an ionizing gas, anode, and means for connecting the anode with an external power supply and pulse counter.

  6. Detection Apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Anderson, H L

    1950-12-05

    This invention concerns a sensitive apparatus for detecting and counting neutrons, particularly neutrons liberated in an alpha, neutron reaction. The apparatus includes an improved ionization chamber structure together with an improved combination alpha-particle source and holder for the material under test.

  7. Animal Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mulvey, Bridget; Warnock, Carly

    2015-01-01

    During a two-week inquiry-based 5E learning cycle unit, children made observations and inferences to guide their explorations of animal traits and habitats (Bybee 2014). The children became "animal detectives" by studying a live-feed webcam and digital images of wolves in their natural habitat, reading books and online sources about…

  8. History Detectives

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fuchs, John

    2006-01-01

    Teachers often play a mistaken notion of lecturing their students about the importance of the past rather than allowing students to discover for themselves the significance of past events. In this article, the author talks about the "detective" strategy he used which strengthens the critical thinking and analyzing skills of his students in their…

  9. Dynamics analysis of fractional order Yu-Wang system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhalekar, Sachin

    2013-10-01

    Fractional order version of a dynamical system introduced by Yu and Wang (Engineering, Technology & Applied Science Research, 2, (2012) 209-215) is discussed in this article. The basic dynamical properties of the system are studied. Minimum effective dimension 0.942329 for the existence of chaos in the proposed system is obtained using the analytical result. For chaos detection, we have calculated maximum Lyapunov exponents for various values of fractional order. Feedback control method is then used to control chaos in the system. Further, the system is synchronized with itself and with fractional order financial system using active control technique. Modified Adams-Bashforth-Moulton algorithm is used for numerical simulations.

  10. Higher-order figure discrimination in fly and human vision.

    PubMed

    Aptekar, Jacob W; Frye, Mark A

    2013-08-19

    Visually-guided animals rely on their ability to stabilize the panorama and simultaneously track salient objects, or figures, that are distinct from the background in order to avoid predators, pursue food resources and mates, and navigate spatially. Visual figures are distinguished by luminance signals that produce coherent motion cues as well as more enigmatic 'higher-order' statistical features. Figure discrimination is thus a complex form of motion vision requiring specialized neural processing. In this minireview, we will highlight recent advances in understanding the perceptual, behavioral, and neurophysiological basis of higher-order figure detection in flies, much of which is grounded in the historical perspective and mechanistic underpinnings of human psychophysics.

  11. Aquifer Denitrification: Is it a Zero-Order or First-Order Reaction?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Korom, S. F.

    2007-12-01

    Results from a network of 16 in situ mesocosms (ISMs) used to study aquifer denitrification at 5 sites in North Dakota and 4 sites in Minnesota (with 2 more installations planned for Iowa) are considered. At the Elk Valley aquifer (EVA) site in northeastern North Dakota, denitrification rates from six denitrification experiments were all better modeled as zero-order (0.16 +/- 0.05 mg nitrate-N/L/day), as determined by squared values of the linear correlation coefficient. Denitrification experiments at the other sites showed that denitrification was either below detection (< 0.01 mg nitrate-N/L/day) or was better modeled as a first-order reaction (0.00021/day to 0.0020/day), although squared values of the linear correlation coefficients for both rate models were nearly equal for some of the experiments. Not only were denitrification rates at the EVA site highest compared to the other sites in the ISM network, but sediment concentrations of electron donors at the EVA site were also greatest [ferrous iron about 0.3%, inorganic S (as pyrite) about 0.4%, organic C about 0.4%, weight basis]. These observations support the Michaelis- Menten model for reaction rates, which indicates that reaction rates will be zero-order when the substrate (electron donor) is abundant and first-order when the substrate availability is limited.

  12. A first order Tsallis theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferri, Gustavo L.; Plastino, Angel; Rocca, Mario C.; Zamora, Dario J.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate first-order approximations to both (i) Tsallis' entropy Sq and (ii) the Sq-MaxEnt solution (called q-exponential functions eq). We use an approximation/expansion for q very close to unity. It is shown that the functions arising from the procedure (ii) are the MaxEnt solutions to the entropy emerging from (i). Our present treatment is motivated by the fact it is FREE of the poles that, for classic quadratic Hamiltonians, appear in Tsallis' approach, as demonstrated in [A. Plastimo, M.C. Rocca, Europhys. Lett. 104, 60003 (2013)]. Additionally, we show that our treatment is compatible with extant date on the ozone layer.

  13. Crystalline order on the paraboloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giomi, Luca; Bowick, Mark

    2006-03-01

    We describe an experimental and theoretical investigation of crystalline order on a two-dimensional paraboloid. In contrast to the sphere, the paraboloid exhibits both variable Gaussian curvature and a boundary. Both these features must be treated for a thorough theoretical understanding. A macroscopic model of a parabolic crystal can be obtained in the laboratory by assembling a single layer of soap bubbles on the surface of a rotating liquid, thus extending the classic work of Bragg and Nye on planar arrays of soap bubbles.

  14. Temperature differential detection device

    DOEpatents

    Girling, Peter M.

    1986-01-01

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions.

  15. Temperature differential detection device

    DOEpatents

    Girling, P.M.

    1986-04-22

    A temperature differential detection device for detecting the temperature differential between predetermined portions of a container wall is disclosed as comprising a Wheatstone bridge circuit for detecting resistance imbalance with a first circuit branch having a first elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a predetermined portion of the container wall, a second circuit branch having a second elongated wire element mounted in thermal contact with a second predetermined portion of a container wall with the wire elements having a predetermined temperature-resistant coefficient, an indicator interconnected between the first and second branches remote from the container wall for detecting and indicating resistance imbalance between the first and second wire elements, and connector leads for electrically connecting the wire elements to the remote indicator in order to maintain the respective resistance value relationship between the first and second wire elements. The indicator is calibrated to indicate the detected resistance imbalance in terms of a temperature differential between the first and second wall portions. 2 figs.

  16. Holographic particle detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowen, Theodore

    1988-01-01

    The feasibility was studied of developing a novel particle track detector based on the detection of 1p-1s emission radiation from electron bubbles in liquid helium. The principles, design, construction, and initial testing of the detection system have been described in previous reports. The main obstacle encountered was the construction of the liquid-helium tight infrared windows. Despite numerous efforts in testing and redesigning the windows, the problem of window leakage at low temperature persisted. Due to limited time and resources, attention was switched to investigating the possibility of using room-temperature liquid as the detection medium. A possible mechanism was the detection of de-excitation radiation emitted from localized electrons in common liquids where electrons exhibit low mobilities, as suggested in the previous report. The purity of the liquid is critical in this method as the dissolved impurities (such as oxygen), even in trace amounts, will act as scavengers of electrons. Another mechanism is discussed whereby the formation of the superoxide ions by electron scavenging behavior of dissolved oxygen is exploited to detect the track of ionizing particles. An experiment to measure the ionization current produced in a liquid by a pulsed X-ray beam in order to study propertiies of the ions is also reported.

  17. Fauna Europaea – Orthopteroid orders

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Horst; Haas, Fabian; Willemse, Fer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Fauna Europaea provides a public web-service with an index of scientific names (including important synonyms) of all extant European terrestrial and freshwater animals, their geographical distribution at the level of countries and major islands (west of the Urals and excluding the Caucasus region), and some additional information. The Fauna Europaea project comprises about 230,000 taxonomic names, including 130,000 accepted species and 14,000 accepted subspecies, which is much more than the originally projected number of 100,000 species. Fauna Europaea represents a huge effort by more than 400 contributing specialists throughout Europe and is a unique (standard) reference suitable for many users in science, government, industry, nature conservation and education. The “Orthopteroid orders“ is one of the 58 Fauna Europaea major taxonomic groups. It contains series of mostly well-known insect orders: Embiodea (webspinners), Dermaptera (earwigs), Phasmatodea (walking sticks), Orthoptera s.s. (grasshoppers, crickets, bush-crickets) and Dictyoptera with the suborders Mantodea (mantids), Blattaria (cockroaches) and Isoptera (termites). For the Orthopteroid orders, data from 35 families containing 1,371 species are included in this paper. PMID:27660531

  18. Quantum dots in aperiodic order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hörnquist, Michael; Ouchterlony, Thomas

    1998-12-01

    We study numerically with a Green-function technique one-dimensional arrays of quantum dots with two different models. The arrays are ordered according to the Fibonacci, the Thue-Morse, and the Rudin-Shapiro sequences. As a comparison, results from a periodically ordered chain and also from a random chain are included. The focus is on how the conductance (calculated within the Landauer-Büttiker formalism) depends on the Fermi level. In the first model, we find that in some cases rather small systems (≈60 dots) behave in the same manner as very large systems (>16,000 dots) and this makes it possible in these cases to interpret our results for the small systems in terms of the spectral properties of the infinite systems. In particular, we find that it is possible to see some consequences of the singular continuous spectra that some of the systems possess, at least for temperatures up to 100 mK. In the second model, we study the phenomenon ohmic addition, i.e. when the resistances of the constrictions add up to the total resistance. It results that of the systems studied, it is only the Rudin-Shapiro system that has this behaviour for large structures, while the resistances of the Fibonacci and the Thue-Morse systems might reach a limiting value (as a periodic system does).

  19. Biocatalytic induction of supramolecular order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirst, Andrew R.; Roy, Sangita; Arora, Meenakshi; Das, Apurba K.; Hodson, Nigel; Murray, Paul; Marshall, Stephen; Javid, Nadeem; Sefcik, Jan; Boekhoven, Job; van Esch, Jan H.; Santabarbara, Stefano; Hunt, Neil T.; Ulijn, Rein V.

    2010-12-01

    Supramolecular gels, which demonstrate tunable functionalities, have attracted much interest in a range of areas, including healthcare, environmental protection and energy-related technologies. Preparing these materials in a reliable manner is challenging, with an increased level of kinetic defects observed at higher self-assembly rates. Here, by combining biocatalysis and molecular self-assembly, we have shown the ability to more quickly access higher-ordered structures. By simply increasing enzyme concentration, supramolecular order expressed at molecular, nano- and micro-levels is dramatically enhanced, and, importantly, the gelator concentrations remain identical. Amphiphile molecules were prepared by attaching an aromatic moiety to a dipeptide backbone capped with a methyl ester. Their self-assembly was induced by an enzyme that hydrolysed the ester. Different enzyme concentrations altered the catalytic activity and size of the enzyme clusters, affecting their mobility. This allowed structurally diverse materials that represent local minima in the free energy landscape to be accessed based on a single gelator structure.

  20. Electrophysiological correlates of change detection.

    PubMed

    Eimer, Martin; Mazza, Veronica

    2005-05-01

    To identify electrophysiological correlates of change detection, event-related brain potentials (ERPs) were recorded while participants monitored displays containing four faces in order to detect a face identity change across successive displays. Successful change detection was mirrored by an N2pc component at posterior electrodes contralateral to the side of a change, suggesting close links between conscious change detection and attention. ERPs on undetected-change trials differed from detected-change and no-change trials. We suggest that short-latency ERP differences between these trial types reflect trial-by-trial fluctuations in advance task preparation, whereas differences in the P3 time range are due to variations in the duration of perceptual and decision-related processing. Overall, these findings demonstrate that ERPs are a useful tool for dissociating processes underlying change blindness and change detection.

  1. Treatment of Spurious Detections in Gaia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garralda, N.; Fabricius, C.; Castaneda, J.; Portell, J.; Clotet, M.; González-Vidal, J. J.; Torra, J.

    2017-03-01

    Gaia is a space instrument that observes some 50 million point like sources per day in an autonomous way, using a rapid on-board detection software. The detection uses two sets of CCD, with a first detection followed by an explicit confirmation in order to remove detections due to e.g. cosmic rays. Nevertheless, false positives, detections of non-existing sources, or spurious detections, are frequent. A detection classifier algorithm is used to identify the spurious observations to prevent them from entering processing stages, where they would be added as new sources in the Gaia source list. Different types of spurious detections have being identified, e.g. detections located at the diffraction spikes of a bright source, false detections due to background noise or due to cosmic rays. A big effort has been put into identifying the different types and develop a model for the detection classification.

  2. Higher-order intersections in low-dimensional topology

    PubMed Central

    Conant, Jim; Schneiderman, Rob; Teichner, Peter

    2011-01-01

    We show how to measure the failure of the Whitney move in dimension 4 by constructing higher-order intersection invariants of Whitney towers built from iterated Whitney disks on immersed surfaces in 4-manifolds. For Whitney towers on immersed disks in the 4-ball, we identify some of these new invariants with previously known link invariants such as Milnor, Sato–Levine, and Arf invariants. We also define higher-order Sato–Levine and Arf invariants and show that these invariants detect the obstructions to framing a twisted Whitney tower. Together with Milnor invariants, these higher-order invariants are shown to classify the existence of (twisted) Whitney towers of increasing order in the 4-ball. A conjecture regarding the nontriviality of the higher-order Arf invariants is formulated, and related implications for filtrations of string links and 3-dimensional homology cylinders are described. PMID:21518909

  3. Multi-mode heterodyned 5th-order infrared spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leger, Joel D.; Varner, Clyde; Rubtsov, Igor V.

    2016-10-01

    Fifth-order multidimensional infrared spectroscopy with heterodyned detection was carried out in the three-beam dual-frequency configuration. Numerous 5th-order cross peaks were detected for the 4-azidobutyrate-N-hydroxysuccinimide ester compound in solution involving several vibrational modes ranging in frequency from 1045 to 2100 cm-1. Cross peaks involving overtones (2X/Z) and combination bands (XY/Z) among the tags, modes X and Y excited by the first two mid-IR laser pulses, and the reporter, modes Z excited by the third laser pulse, were acquired and the factors affecting the amplitude of 5th-order cross peaks are discussed. The 5th-order cross peaks were detected among modes that are spatially close (a few bonds apart) as well as for modes spatially separated by ca. 12 Å (eight bonds apart). In both cases, the waiting time dependences for the 3rd and 5th order cross peaks were found to be different. In particular, the waiting time at which the cross-peak maximum is reached, the decay time, and the value of a plateau at large waiting times were all differing strongly. The differences are explained by reduced sensitivity of the 5th-order signals to modes coupled weakly to the reporter mode and different relaxation dynamics involving overtone state of the tag. The ability of the 5th-order peaks to single out the modes coupled strongly to the reporter can help identifying specific energy relaxation and transport pathways, which will be useful for understanding energy transport dynamics in molecules. The absorptive 5th-order cross peaks were constructed which report on three-point correlation functions. It is shown that in addition to the triple-frequency correlation functions, a correlation of the frequencies with the mode coupling (anharmonicity) can be naturally measured by the 5th-order spectroscopy. The current limit for detecting 5th-order signals was estimated at the level of 1 × 10-3 in reduced anharmonicity, which is determined by the corresponding two

  4. Lightning Detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Lightning causes an estimated $50 million annually in damages to power lines, transformers and other electric utility equipment. Lightning strikes are not yet predictable, but U.S. East Coast Lightning Detection Network (LDN) is providing utilities and other clients data on lightning characteristics, flash frequency and location, and the general direction in which lightning associated storms are heading. Monitoring stations are equipped with direction finding antennas that detect lightning strikes reaching the ground by measuring fluctuations in the magnetic field. Stations relay strike information to SUNY-Albany-LDN operations center which is manned around the clock. Computers process data, count strikes, spot their locations, and note other characteristics of lightning, LDN's data is beamed to a satellite for broadcast to client's receiving stations. By utilizing real-time lightning strike information, managers are now more able to effectively manage their resources. This reduces outage time for utility customers.

  5. Dependency Ordering of Atomic Observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cīrulis, Jānis

    2015-12-01

    The notion of atomic observable was introduced by S.Gudder for effect test spaces in 1997. In this paper an observable is a σ-homomorphism from the Borel algebra on a line to some logic. Roughly, an observable on a logic is atomic, if it is completely determined by its restriction to one-element subsets of its point spectrum. In particular, every discrete observable is atomic. We study some elementary properties of such observables, and discuss a possible notion of functional dependency between them. Algebraically, a dependency is a certain preorder relation on the set of all atomic observables, which induces an order relation on the set of all maximal orthogonal subsets of the logic. Several properties, as well as characteristics in terms of the underlying logic, of these relations are stated.

  6. Recent advances in ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.

    1992-12-31

    This paper briefly summarizes recent advances in intermetallic research and development. Ordered intermetallics based on aluminides and silicides possess attractive properties for structural applications at elevated temperatures in hostile environments; however, brittle fracture and poor fracture resistance limit their use as engineering materials in many cases. In recent years, considerable efforts have been devoted to the study of the brittle fracture behavior of intermetallic alloys; as a result, both intrinsic and extrinsic factors governing brittle fracture have been identified. Recent advances in first-principles calculations and atomistic simulations further help us in understanding atomic bonding, dislocation configuration, and alloying effects in intermetallics. The basic understanding has led to the development of nickel, iron, and titanium aluminide alloys with improved mechanical and metallurgical properties for structural use. Industrial interest in ductile intermetallic alloys is high, and several examples of industrial involvement are mentioned.

  7. Discourse on order vs. disorder

    PubMed Central

    Annila, Arto; Baverstock, Keith

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The second law of thermodynamics is on one hand understood to account for irrevocable flow of energy from the top down, on the other hand it is seen to imply irreversible increase of disorder. This tension between the 2 stances is resolved in favor of the free energy consumption when entropy is derived from the statistical mechanics of open systems. The change in entropy is shown to map directly to the decrease in free energy without any connotation attached to disorder. Increase of disorder, just as order, is found to be merely a consequence of free energy consumption. The erroneous association of disorder with entropy stems from an unwarranted assumption that a system could undergo changes of state without concomitant dissipation, i.e., a change in energy. PMID:27574534

  8. Thermodynamics of Intragenic Nucleosome Ordering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chevereau, G.; Palmeira, L.; Thermes, C.; Arneodo, A.; Vaillant, C.

    2009-10-01

    The nucleosome ordering observed in vivo along yeast genes is described by a thermodynamical model of nonuniform fluid of 1D hard rods confined by two excluding energy barriers at gene extremities. For interbarrier distances L≲1.5kbp, nucleosomes equilibrate into a crystal-like configuration with a nucleosome repeat length (NRL) L/ñ165bp, where n is the number of regularly positioned nucleosomes. We also observe “bistable” genes with a fuzzy chromatin resulting from a statistical mixing of two crystal states, one with an expanded chromatin (NRL ˜L/n) and the other with a compact one (NRL ˜L/(n+1)). By means of single nucleosome switching, bistable genes may drastically alter their expression level as suggested by their higher transcriptional plasticity. These results enlighten the role of the intragenic chromatin on gene expression regulation.

  9. Deriving Laws from Ordering Relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.

    2003-01-01

    It took much effort in the early days of non-Euclidean geometry to break away from the mindset that all spaces are flat and that two distinct parallel lines do not cross. Up to that point, all that was known was Euclidean geometry, and it was difficult to imagine anything else. We have suffered a similar handicap brought on by the enormous relevance of Boolean algebra to the problems of our age-logic and set theory. Previously, I demonstrated that the algebra of questions is not Boolean, but rather is described by the free distributive algebra. To get to this stage took much effort, as many obstacles-most self-placed-had to be overcome. As Boolean algebras were all I had ever known, it was almost impossible for me to imagine working with an algebra where elements do not have complements. With this realization, it became very clear that the sum and product rules of probability theory at the most basic level had absolutely nothing to do with the Boolean algebra of logical statements. Instead, a measure of degree of inclusion can be invented for many different partially ordered sets, and the sum and product rules fall out of the associativity and distributivity of the algebra. To reinforce this very important idea, this paper will go over how these constructions are made, while focusing on the underlying assumptions. I will derive the sum and product rules for a distributive lattice in general and demonstrate how this leads to probability theory on the Boolean lattice and is related to the calculus of quantum mechanical amplitudes on the partially ordered set of experimental setups. I will also discuss the rules that can be derived from modular lattices and their relevance to the cross-ratio of projective geometry.

  10. Sight laser detection modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lecocq, Christophe; Deshors, Gilles; Lado-Bordowsky, Olga; Meyzonnette, Jean-Louis

    2003-08-01

    Since Sarajevo's sadly famous events (sniper alley), the military tried and hoped to detect snipers before they hit. The principle of the detection is based on the 'cat's eyes' effect according to which the light emitted by the system and incident on the sniper's sight reflects backward in the direction of the source. The system is thus composed of a laser emitter and a CCD array detector. Already existing equipment has been tested in operations and they present too low a probability of detection for the false alarm rate we want to reach. In order to specify equipment characteristics to industrials, it has been necessary to develop a sight laser detector model. The model presented here takes into account all the various elements of the system, from the laser emission to the CCD detection, and atmospheric propagation (ie attenuation and turbulence). The signal and noise probability density functions are calculated by combining the different elementary probability density functions encountered on the double-pass propagation. This Matlab coded model gives the probability of detection of the system for given geometrical (monostatic or bistatic) and electronic characteristics of the system and for a given probability of false alarms. In addition to this, measurements in the field made it possible to validate the budget link of the model and improve it. Those measurements also permitted to underline the importance of the target optical signature, namely its Laser Cross Section. The most significant parameters necessary to the validation of the model are measured. This study allows us to answer the question 'why is the probability of detection of existing systems too low and how could we increase it's efficiency?'

  11. Higher order turbulence closure models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Amano, Ryoichi S.; Chai, John C.; Chen, Jau-Der

    1988-01-01

    Theoretical models are developed and numerical studies conducted on various types of flows including both elliptic and parabolic. The purpose of this study is to find better higher order closure models for the computations of complex flows. This report summarizes three new achievements: (1) completion of the Reynolds-stress closure by developing a new pressure-strain correlation; (2) development of a parabolic code to compute jets and wakes; and, (3) application to a flow through a 180 deg turnaround duct by adopting a boundary fitted coordinate system. In the above mentioned models near-wall models are developed for pressure-strain correlation and third-moment, and incorporated into the transport equations. This addition improved the results considerably and is recommended for future computations. A new parabolic code to solve shear flows without coordinate tranformations is developed and incorporated in this study. This code uses the structure of the finite volume method to solve the governing equations implicitly. The code was validated with the experimental results available in the literature.

  12. Order-constrained linear optimization.

    PubMed

    Tidwell, Joe W; Dougherty, Michael R; Chrabaszcz, Jeffrey S; Thomas, Rick P

    2017-02-27

    Despite the fact that data and theories in the social, behavioural, and health sciences are often represented on an ordinal scale, there has been relatively little emphasis on modelling ordinal properties. The most common analytic framework used in psychological science is the general linear model, whose variants include ANOVA, MANOVA, and ordinary linear regression. While these methods are designed to provide the best fit to the metric properties of the data, they are not designed to maximally model ordinal properties. In this paper, we develop an order-constrained linear least-squares (OCLO) optimization algorithm that maximizes the linear least-squares fit to the data conditional on maximizing the ordinal fit based on Kendall's τ. The algorithm builds on the maximum rank correlation estimator (Han, 1987, Journal of Econometrics, 35, 303) and the general monotone model (Dougherty & Thomas, 2012, Psychological Review, 119, 321). Analyses of simulated data indicate that when modelling data that adhere to the assumptions of ordinary least squares, OCLO shows minimal bias, little increase in variance, and almost no loss in out-of-sample predictive accuracy. In contrast, under conditions in which data include a small number of extreme scores (fat-tailed distributions), OCLO shows less bias and variance, and substantially better out-of-sample predictive accuracy, even when the outliers are removed. We show that the advantages of OCLO over ordinary least squares in predicting new observations hold across a variety of scenarios in which researchers must decide to retain or eliminate extreme scores when fitting data.

  13. Liquid crystalline order in mucus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Viney, C.; Huber, A. E.; Verdugo, P.

    1993-01-01

    Mucus plays an exceptionally wide range of important biological roles. It operates as a protective, exchange, and transport medium in the digestive, respiratory, and reproductive systems of humans and other vertebrates. Mucus is a polymer hydrogel. It is secreted as discrete packages (secretory granules) by specialized secretory cells. Mucus hydrogel is stored in a condensed state inside the secretory granules. Depending upon the architecture of their constituent macromolecules and on the composition of the solvent, polymer gels can form liquid crystalline microstructures, with orientational order being exhibited over optically resolvable distances. Individual mucin molecules consist of alternating rigid segments (heavily glycosylated; hydrophilic) and flexible segments (nonglycosylated; hydrophobic). Polymer molecules consisting of rigid units linked by flexible spacers are frequently associated with liquid crystalline behavior, which again raises the possibility that mucus could form anisotropic fluid phases. Suggestions that mucins may be self-associating in dilute solution have previously been challenged on the basis of sedimentation-equilibrium studies performed on mucus in which potential sites of association were competitively blocked with inhibitors. However, the formation of stable liquid crystalline phases does not depend on the existence of inter- or intramolecular associations; these phases can form on the basis of steric considerations alone.

  14. Dislocation sources in ordered intermetallics

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, M.H.; Appel, F.; Wagner, R.; Mecking, H.

    1996-09-01

    An overview on the current understanding of dislocation sources and multiplication mechanisms is made for ordered intermetallic alloys of the L1{sub 2}, B2, and D0{sub 19} structures. In L1{sub 2} alloys, a large disparity of edge/screw segments in their relative mobility reduces the efficiency of a Frank-Read Type multiplication mechanism. In Fe-40%Al of the B2 structure, a variety of dislocation sources are available for <111> slip, including ones resulting from condensation of thermal vacancies. In NiAl with the relatively high APB energy, <100> dislocations may result from the dislocation decomposition reactions, the prismatic punching out from inclusion particles, and/or steps and coated layers of the surface. Internal interfaces often provide sites for dislocation multiplication, e.g., grain boundaries, sub-boundaries in Ni{sub 3}Ga, NiAl and Ti{sub 3}Al, and antiphase domain boundaries in Ti{sub 3}Al. As for the crack tip as a dislocation source, extended SISFs trailed by super-Shockley partials emanating form the cracks in Ni{sub 3}Al and Co{sub 3}Ti are discussed in view of a possible toughening mechanism.

  15. Interior order expands minerals management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richman, Barbara T.

    In a surprise move on May 10, Secretary of the Interior James G. Watt ordered the consolidation of all leasing and resource management functions for the outer continental shelf (OCS) into the Minerals Management Service (MMS). Among those programs shifted to MMS are ‘all functions in direct support of the OCS program’ in the Geologic Division and in the Office of the Assistant Director for Resource Programs of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), including oil and gas resources, energy-related hazards, and marine geology investigations. It is unclear whether research associated with the OCS leasing functions will be considered ‘direct support’ and what will happen to the research if it is so considered.Also to be shuttled to MMS are the oil-spill trajectory functions of the Office of Earth Sciences Applications and all the functions of the Office of Policy Analysis relating to the OCS that had been transferred from the Department of Energy as a result of the Interior and Related Agencies Appropriations Act.

  16. Advanced ordered intermetallic alloy deployment

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, C.T.; Maziasz, P.J.; Easton, D.S.

    1997-04-01

    The need for high-strength, high-temperature, and light-weight materials for structural applications has generated a great deal of interest in ordered intermetallic alloys, particularly in {gamma}-based titanium aluminides {gamma}-based TiAl alloys offer an attractive mix of low density ({approximately}4g/cm{sup 3}), good creep resistance, and high-temperature strength and oxidation resistance. For rotating or high-speed components. TiAl also has a high damping coefficient which minimizes vibrations and noise. These alloys generally contain two phases. {alpha}{sub 2} (DO{sub 19} structure) and {gamma} (L 1{sub 0}), at temperatures below 1120{degrees}C, the euticoid temperature. The mechanical properties of TiAl-based alloys are sensitive to both alloy compositions and microstructure. Depending on heat-treatment and thermomechanical processing, microstructures with near equiaxed {gamma}, a duplex structure (a mix of the {gamma} and {alpha}{sub 2} phases) can be developed in TiAl alloys containing 45 to 50 at. % Al. The major concern for structural use of TiAl alloys is their low ductility and poor fracture resistance at ambient temperatures. The purpose of this project is to improve the fracture toughness of TiAl-based alloys by controlling alloy composition, microstructure and thermomechanical treatment. This work is expected to lead to the development of TiAl alloys with significantly improved fracture toughness and tensile ductility for structural use.

  17. Deriving Laws from Ordering Relations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Knuth, Kevin H.

    2004-01-01

    The effect of Richard T. Cox's contribution to probability theory was to generalize Boolean implication among logical statements to degrees of implication, which are manipulated using rules derived from consistency with Boolean algebra. These rules are known as the sum rule, the product rule and Bayes Theorem, and the measure resulting from this generalization is probability. In this paper, I will describe how Cox s technique can be further generalized to include other algebras and hence other problems in science and mathematics. The result is a methodology that can be used to generalize an algebra to a calculus by relying on consistency with order theory to derive the laws of the calculus. My goals are to clear up the mysteries as to why the same basic structure found in probability theory appears in other contexts, to better understand the foundations of probability theory, and to extend these ideas to other areas by developing new mathematics and new physics. The relevance of this methodology will be demonstrated using examples from probability theory, number theory, geometry, information theory, and quantum mechanics.

  18. Ordering in classical Coulombic systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffer, J. P.

    1998-01-22

    The author discusses the properties of classical Coulombic matter at low temperatures. It has been well known for some time [1,2] that infinite Coulombic matter will crystallize in body-centered cubic form when the quantity {Lambda} (the dimensionless ratio of the average two-particle Coulomb energy to the kinetic energy per particle) is larger than {approximately}175. But the systems of such particles that have been produced in the laboratory in ion traps, or ion beams, are finite with surfaces defined by the boundary conditions that have to be satisfied. This results in ion clouds with sharply defined curved surfaces, and interior structures that show up as a set of concentric layers that are parallel to the outer surface. The ordering does not appear to be cubic, but the charges on each shell exhibit a ''hexatic'' pattern of equilateral triangles that is the characteristic of liquid crystals. The curvature of the surfaces prevents the structures on successive shells from interlocking in any simple fashion. This class of structures was first found in simulations [3] and later in experiments [4].

  19. Scaling exponents for ordered maxima

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Lemons, N. W.

    2015-12-22

    We study extreme value statistics of multiple sequences of random variables. For each sequence with N variables, independently drawn from the same distribution, the running maximum is defined as the largest variable to date. We compare the running maxima of m independent sequences and investigate the probability SN that the maxima are perfectly ordered, that is, the running maximum of the first sequence is always larger than that of the second sequence, which is always larger than the running maximum of the third sequence, and so on. The probability SN is universal: it does not depend on the distribution from which the random variables are drawn. For two sequences, SN~N–1/2, and in general, the decay is algebraic, SN~N–σm, for large N. We analytically obtain the exponent σ3≅1.302931 as root of a transcendental equation. Moreover, the exponents σm grow with m, and we show that σm~m for large m.

  20. Scaling exponents for ordered maxima

    DOE PAGES

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.; Lemons, N. W.

    2015-12-22

    We study extreme value statistics of multiple sequences of random variables. For each sequence with N variables, independently drawn from the same distribution, the running maximum is defined as the largest variable to date. We compare the running maxima of m independent sequences and investigate the probability SN that the maxima are perfectly ordered, that is, the running maximum of the first sequence is always larger than that of the second sequence, which is always larger than the running maximum of the third sequence, and so on. The probability SN is universal: it does not depend on the distribution frommore » which the random variables are drawn. For two sequences, SN~N–1/2, and in general, the decay is algebraic, SN~N–σm, for large N. We analytically obtain the exponent σ3≅1.302931 as root of a transcendental equation. Moreover, the exponents σm grow with m, and we show that σm~m for large m.« less

  1. Spectroscopic detection

    DOEpatents

    Woskov, Paul P.; Hadidi, Kamal

    2003-01-01

    In embodiments, spectroscopic monitor monitors modulated light signals to detect low levels of contaminants and other compounds in the presence of background interference. The monitor uses a spectrometer that includes a transmissive modulator capable of causing different frequency ranges to move onto and off of the detector. The different ranges can include those with the desired signal and those selected to subtract background contributions from those with the desired signal. Embodiments of the system are particularly useful for monitoring metal concentrations in combustion effluent.

  2. Edge Detection,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-09-01

    PROJECT. T ASK0 Artificial Inteligence Laboratory AREA It WORK UNIT NUMBERS V 545 Technology Square ( Cambridge, HA 02139 I I* CONTOOL1LIN@4OFFICE NAME...ARD-A1t62 62 EDGE DETECTION(U) NASSACNUSETTS INST OF TECH CAMBRIDGE 1/1 ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE LAB E C HILDRETH SEP 85 AI-M-8 N99SI4-8S-C-6595...used to carry out this analysis. cce~iO a N) ’.~" D LI’BL. P p ------------ Sj. t i MASSACHUSETTS INSTITUTE OF TECHNOLOGY i ARTIFICIAL INTELLIGENCE

  3. Detecting Extrasolar Planets Directly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guenther, E. W.; Neuhäuser, R.; Huélamo, N.; Ott, T.; Brandner, W.; Alves, J.; Comerón, F.; Eckart, A.; Hatzes, A.

    Up to now, all extrasolar planets have been found by means of indirect methods. Direct detection of planets orbiting even the nearest stars seems at first glance to be impossible with present day equipment, because of the enormous difference in brightness between the star and the planet, and the small angular separation between them. However, young planets which are still in the contraction phase of evolution are comparatively bright in the infrared, and since many of the extrasolar planets detected have excentric orbits, where they are most of the time at a relatively large distance from the stars, the prospect of detecting young planets directly is much better. In fact, it is principle be possible to detect an extrasolar giant planet, if the planet is younger than 100 millon years, and if the distance is less than 100 pc. Three years ago we thus have embarked on a survey to observe more than one-hundred young, nearby stars in the near infrared. In this talk, we will review the status of the survey. In order to find out whether these stars have additionally a planet at a small distance from the star, we also carried out sensitive radial velocity observation of a subsample using an iodine-cell and the Echelle spectrograph of the Alfred-Jensch Telescope in Tautenburg.

  4. Solar neutrino detection

    SciTech Connect

    Miramonti, Lino

    2009-04-30

    More than 40 years ago, neutrinos where conceived as a way to test the validity of the solar models which tell us that stars are powered by nuclear fusion reactions. The first measurement of the neutrino flux, in 1968 in the Homestake mine in South Dakota, detected only one third of the expected value, originating what has been known as the Solar Neutrino Problem. Different experiments were built in order to understand the origin of this discrepancy. Now we know that neutrinos undergo oscillation phenomenon changing their nature traveling from the core of the Sun to our detectors. In the work the 40 year long saga of the neutrino detection is presented; from the first proposals to test the solar models to last real time measurements of the low energy part of the neutrino spectrum.

  5. Mycotoxins detection by chromatography.

    PubMed

    Felicio, Joana D; Freitas, Tatiana E; Rossi, Maria H; Gonçalez, Edlayne

    2011-09-01

    Mycotoxins are metabolites and toxic substances produced by certain filamentous fungi that frequently contaminate food and agriculture commodities and it may cause disease in animals or humans. The toxigenic fungi are responsible for mycotoxin production in food that belongs to mainly three genera: Aspergillus, Penicillium and Fusarium. The contamination of food by mycotoxins is difficult to control in addition, causing economic impacts on public health, so their identification and quantifications are very necessary. Various analytical methods are developed for the detection and quantification of mycotoxins in order to control the residual contents of these toxins. Among them there is a widely used chromatography. This paper reports some chromatographic methods for the detection and quantification of mycotoxins described in patents and scientific articles.

  6. Wake Signature Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spedding, Geoffrey R.

    2014-01-01

    An accumulated body of quantitative evidence shows that bluff-body wakes in stably stratified environments have an unusual degree of coherence and organization, so characteristic geometries such as arrays of alternating-signed vortices have very long lifetimes, as measured in units of buoyancy timescales, or in the downstream distance scaled by a body length. The combination of pattern geometry and persistence renders the detection of these wakes possible in principle. It now appears that identifiable signatures can be found from many disparate sources: Islands, fish, and plankton all have been noted to generate features that can be detected by climate modelers, hopeful navigators in open oceans, or hungry predators. The various types of wakes are reviewed with notes on why their signatures are important and to whom. A general theory of wake pattern formation is lacking and would have to span many orders of magnitude in Reynolds number.

  7. Anisotropy-Tuned Magnetic Order in Pyrochlore Iridates.

    PubMed

    Lefrançois, E; Simonet, V; Ballou, R; Lhotel, E; Hadj-Azzem, A; Kodjikian, S; Lejay, P; Manuel, P; Khalyavin, D; Chapon, L C

    2015-06-19

    The magnetic behavior of polycrystalline samples of Er(2)Ir(2)O(7) and Tb(2)Ir(2)O(7) pyrochlores is studied by magnetization measurements and neutron diffraction. Both compounds undergo a magnetic transition at 140 and 130 K, respectively, associated with an ordering of the Ir sublattice, signaled by thermomagnetic hysteresis. In Tb(2)Ir(2)O(7), we show that the Ir molecular field leads the Tb magnetic moments to order below 40 K in the all-in-all-out magnetic arrangement. No sign of magnetic long-range order on the Er sublattice is evidenced in Er(2)Ir(2)O(7) down to 0.6 K where a spin freezing is detected. These contrasting behaviors result from the competition between the Ir molecular field and the different single-ion anisotropy of the rare-earth elements on which it is acting. Additionally, this strongly supports the all-in-all-out iridium magnetic order.

  8. Anisotropy-Tuned Magnetic Order in Pyrochlore Iridates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lefrançois, E.; Simonet, V.; Ballou, R.; Lhotel, E.; Hadj-Azzem, A.; Kodjikian, S.; Lejay, P.; Manuel, P.; Khalyavin, D.; Chapon, L. C.

    2015-06-01

    The magnetic behavior of polycrystalline samples of Er2Ir2O7 and Tb2Ir2O7 pyrochlores is studied by magnetization measurements and neutron diffraction. Both compounds undergo a magnetic transition at 140 and 130 K, respectively, associated with an ordering of the Ir sublattice, signaled by thermomagnetic hysteresis. In Tb2Ir2O7 , we show that the Ir molecular field leads the Tb magnetic moments to order below 40 K in the all-in-all-out magnetic arrangement. No sign of magnetic long-range order on the Er sublattice is evidenced in Er2Ir2O7 down to 0.6 K where a spin freezing is detected. These contrasting behaviors result from the competition between the Ir molecular field and the different single-ion anisotropy of the rare-earth elements on which it is acting. Additionally, this strongly supports the all-in-all-out iridium magnetic order.

  9. 7 CFR 1219.17 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1219.17...

  10. 7 CFR 1219.17 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1219.17...

  11. 7 CFR 1219.17 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1219.17...

  12. 7 CFR 1219.17 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1219.17...

  13. 7 CFR 1219.17 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HASS AVOCADO PROMOTION, RESEARCH, AND INFORMATION Hass Avocado Promotion, Research, and Information Order Definitions § 1219.17...

  14. Detecting Falling Snow from Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jackson, Gail Skofronick; Johnson, Ben; Munchak, Joe

    2012-01-01

    There is an increased interest in detecting and estimating the amount of falling snow reaching the Earth's surface in order to fully capture the atmospheric water cycle. An initial step toward global spaceborne falling snow algorithms includes determining the thresholds of detection for various active and passive sensor channel configurations, snow event cloud structures and microphysics, snowflake particle electromagnetic properties, and surface types. In this work, cloud resolving model simulations of a lake effect and synoptic snow event were used to determine the minimum amount of snow (threshold) that could be detected by the following instruments: the W -band radar of CloudSat, Global Precipitation Measurement (GPM) Dual-frequency Precipitation Radar (DPR) Ku and Ka band, and the GPM Microwave Imager (GMI) channels from 10 to 183 plus or minus 7 GHz. Eleven different snowflake shapes were used to compute radar reflectivities and passive brightness temperatures. Notable results include: (1) the W-Band radar has detection thresholds more than an order of magnitude lower than the future GPM sensors, (2) the cloud structure macrophysics influences the thresholds of detection for passive channels, (3) the snowflake microphysics plays a large role in the detection threshold for active and passive instruments, (4) with reasonable assumptions, "the passive 166 GHz channel has detection threshold values comparable to the GPM DPR Ku and Ka band radars with approximately 0.05 g per cubic meter detected at the surface, or an approximately 0.5-1 millimeter per hr. melted snow rate (equivalent to 0.5-2 centimeters per hr. solid fluffy snowflake rate). With detection levels of falling snow known, we can focus current and future retrieval efforts on detectable storms and concentrate advances on achievable results. We will also have an understanding of the light snowfall events missed by the sensors and not captured in the global estimates.

  15. 17 CFR 201.141 - Orders and decisions: Service of orders instituting proceedings and other orders and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION RULES OF PRACTICE Rules of Practice General Rules § 201.141 Orders and decisions: Service of orders instituting proceedings and other orders... country. (v) In stop order proceedings. Notwithstanding any other provision of paragraph (a)(2) of...

  16. Smoke detection

    DOEpatents

    Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A.; Frank, Steven Shane

    2015-10-27

    Various apparatus and methods for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method of training a classifier for a smoke detector comprises inputting sensor data from a plurality of tests into a processor. The sensor data is processed to generate derived signal data corresponding to the test data for respective tests. The derived signal data is assigned into categories comprising at least one fire group and at least one non-fire group. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) training is performed by the processor. The derived signal data and the assigned categories for the derived signal data are inputs to the LDA training. The output of the LDA training is stored in a computer readable medium, such as in a smoke detector that uses LDA to determine, based on the training, whether present conditions indicate the existence of a fire.

  17. Smoke detection

    DOEpatents

    Warmack, Robert J. Bruce; Wolf, Dennis A.; Frank, Steven Shane

    2016-09-06

    Various apparatus and methods for smoke detection are disclosed. In one embodiment, a method of training a classifier for a smoke detector comprises inputting sensor data from a plurality of tests into a processor. The sensor data is processed to generate derived signal data corresponding to the test data for respective tests. The derived signal data is assigned into categories comprising at least one fire group and at least one non-fire group. Linear discriminant analysis (LDA) training is performed by the processor. The derived signal data and the assigned categories for the derived signal data are inputs to the LDA training. The output of the LDA training is stored in a computer readable medium, such as in a smoke detector that uses LDA to determine, based on the training, whether present conditions indicate the existence of a fire.

  18. Radon detection

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, D.W.; Allander, K.S.; Bounds, J.A.

    1994-01-25

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element is described. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding. 3 figures.

  19. Radon detection

    DOEpatents

    MacArthur, Duncan W.; Allander, Krag S.; Bounds, John A.

    1994-01-01

    A detector for atmospheric radon using a long range alpha detector as its sensing element. An electrostatic filter removes ions from ambient air, while allowing radon atoms to pass into a decay cavity. Here, radon atoms are allowed to decay, creating air ions. These air ions are drawn by a fan through a second electrostatic filter which can be activated or deactivated, and into the long range alpha detector. With the second electrostatic filter activated, no air ions are allowed to pass, and the signal output from the long range alpha detector consists of only the electronic background. With the second electrostatic filter deactivated, air ions and cosmic rays will be detected. The cosmic ray contribution can be minimized by shielding.

  20. 3 CFR 13516 - Executive Order 13516 of October 28, 2009. Amending Executive Order 13462

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... functions under this order.” (f) by substituting “section 1.6(c) of Executive Order 12333, as amended” for... 3 The President 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Executive Order 13516 of October 28, 2009. Amending Executive Order 13462 13516 Order 13516 Presidential Documents Executive Orders Executive Order 13516...

  1. Solar multi-conjugate adaptive optics based on high order ground layer adaptive optics and low order high altitude correction.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lanqiang; Guo, Youming; Rao, Changhui

    2017-02-20

    Multi-conjugate adaptive optics (MCAO) is the most promising technique currently developed to enlarge the corrected field of view of adaptive optics for astronomy. In this paper, we propose a new configuration of solar MCAO based on high order ground layer adaptive optics and low order high altitude correction, which result in a homogeneous correction effect in the whole field of view. An individual high order multiple direction Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor is employed in the configuration to detect the ground layer turbulence for low altitude correction. Furthermore, the other low order multiple direction Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor supplies the wavefront information caused by high layers' turbulence through atmospheric tomography for high altitude correction. Simulation results based on the system design at the 1-meter New Vacuum Solar Telescope show that the correction uniform of the new scheme is obviously improved compared to conventional solar MCAO configuration.

  2. String order and symmetries in quantum spin lattices.

    PubMed

    Pérez-García, D; Wolf, M M; Sanz, M; Verstraete, F; Cirac, J I

    2008-04-25

    We show that the existence of string order in a given quantum state is intimately related to the presence of a local symmetry by proving that both concepts are equivalent within the framework of finitely correlated states. Once this connection is established, we provide a complete characterization of local symmetries in these states. The results allow us to understand in a straightforward way many of the properties of string order parameters, like their robustness or fragility under perturbations and their typical disappearance beyond strictly one-dimensional lattices. We propose and discuss an alternative definition, ideally suited for detecting phase transitions, and generalizations to two and more spatial dimensions.

  3. 6 CFR 27.300 - Orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Orders. 27.300 Section 27.300 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.300 Orders. (a) Orders Generally. When the Assistant Secretary determines...

  4. 40 CFR 91.604 - Test orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... location at which engines must be selected, and the procedure by which engines of the specified family must... EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Regulations § 91.604 Test orders... test order. (c) Information included in test order. (1) The test order will specify the engine...

  5. 6 CFR 27.300 - Orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Orders. 27.300 Section 27.300 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.300 Orders. (a) Orders Generally. When the Assistant Secretary determines...

  6. 6 CFR 27.300 - Orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Orders. 27.300 Section 27.300 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.300 Orders. (a) Orders Generally. When the Assistant Secretary determines...

  7. 6 CFR 27.300 - Orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 6 Domestic Security 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Orders. 27.300 Section 27.300 Domestic Security DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY, OFFICE OF THE SECRETARY CHEMICAL FACILITY ANTI-TERRORISM STANDARDS Orders and Adjudications § 27.300 Orders. (a) Orders Generally. When the Assistant Secretary determines...

  8. 40 CFR 90.503 - Test orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test orders. 90.503 Section 90.503....503 Test orders. (a) The Administrator shall require any testing under this subpart by means of a test order addressed to the manufacturer. (b) The test order will be signed by the Assistant...

  9. 7 CFR 1212.15 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HONEY PACKERS AND IMPORTERS RESEARCH, PROMOTION, CONSUMER EDUCATION AND INDUSTRY INFORMATION ORDER Honey Packers and Importers Research, Promotion, Consumer Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1212.15 Order. “Order” means the...

  10. 40 CFR 89.503 - Test orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Test orders. 89.503 Section 89.503... Test orders. (a) A test order addressed to the manufacturer is required for any testing under this subpart. (b) The test order is signed by the Assistant Administrator for Air and Radiation or his or...

  11. 40 CFR 89.503 - Test orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test orders. 89.503 Section 89.503... Test orders. (a) A test order addressed to the manufacturer is required for any testing under this subpart. (b) The test order is signed by the Assistant Administrator for Air and Radiation or his or...

  12. 40 CFR 90.503 - Test orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Test orders. 90.503 Section 90.503....503 Test orders. (a) The Administrator shall require any testing under this subpart by means of a test order addressed to the manufacturer. (b) The test order will be signed by the Assistant...

  13. 21 CFR 1303.37 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Final order. 1303.37 Section 1303.37 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE QUOTAS Hearings § 1303.37 Final order. As... the order is based. The order shall specify the date on which it shall take effect. The...

  14. 21 CFR 1303.37 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final order. 1303.37 Section 1303.37 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE QUOTAS Hearings § 1303.37 Final order. As... the order is based. The order shall specify the date on which it shall take effect. The...

  15. 7 CFR 1212.15 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HONEY PACKERS AND IMPORTERS RESEARCH, PROMOTION, CONSUMER EDUCATION AND INDUSTRY INFORMATION ORDER Honey Packers and Importers Research, Promotion, Consumer Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1212.15 Order. “Order” means the...

  16. 7 CFR 1212.15 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HONEY PACKERS AND IMPORTERS RESEARCH, PROMOTION, CONSUMER EDUCATION AND INDUSTRY INFORMATION ORDER Honey Packers and Importers Research, Promotion, Consumer Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1212.15 Order. “Order” means the...

  17. 7 CFR 1212.15 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... AND ORDERS; MISCELLANEOUS COMMODITIES), DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE HONEY PACKERS AND IMPORTERS RESEARCH, PROMOTION, CONSUMER EDUCATION AND INDUSTRY INFORMATION ORDER Honey Packers and Importers Research, Promotion, Consumer Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1212.15 Order. “Order” means the...

  18. 10 CFR 218.11 - Supply orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Supply orders. 218.11 Section 218.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION Supply Orders § 218.11 Supply orders. (a) A...) The DOE shall serve a copy of the supply order on the firm directed to act as stated therein. (c)...

  19. 10 CFR 218.11 - Supply orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Supply orders. 218.11 Section 218.11 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY OIL STANDBY MANDATORY INTERNATIONAL OIL ALLOCATION Supply Orders § 218.11 Supply orders. (a) A...) The DOE shall serve a copy of the supply order on the firm directed to act as stated therein. (c)...

  20. 7 CFR 927.102 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... and Regulations Definitions § 927.102 Order. Order means Marketing Order No. 927, as amended (§§ 927.1... 7 Agriculture 8 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Order. 927.102 Section 927.102 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (Marketing Agreements...

  1. High-order synchronization of hair cell bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, Michael; Molzon, Adrian; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji-Wook; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2016-12-01

    Auditory and vestibular hair cell bundles exhibit active mechanical oscillations at natural frequencies that are typically lower than the detection range of the corresponding end organs. We explore how these noisy nonlinear oscillators mode-lock to frequencies higher than their internal clocks. A nanomagnetic technique is used to stimulate the bundles without an imposed mechanical load. The evoked response shows regimes of high-order mode-locking. Exploring a broad range of stimulus frequencies and intensities, we observe regions of high-order synchronization, analogous to Arnold Tongues in dynamical systems literature. Significant areas of overlap occur between synchronization regimes, with the bundle intermittently flickering between different winding numbers. We demonstrate how an ensemble of these noisy spontaneous oscillators could be entrained to efficiently detect signals significantly above the characteristic frequencies of the individual cells.

  2. High-order synchronization of hair cell bundles

    PubMed Central

    Levy, Michael; Molzon, Adrian; Lee, Jae-Hyun; Kim, Ji-wook; Cheon, Jinwoo; Bozovic, Dolores

    2016-01-01

    Auditory and vestibular hair cell bundles exhibit active mechanical oscillations at natural frequencies that are typically lower than the detection range of the corresponding end organs. We explore how these noisy nonlinear oscillators mode-lock to frequencies higher than their internal clocks. A nanomagnetic technique is used to stimulate the bundles without an imposed mechanical load. The evoked response shows regimes of high-order mode-locking. Exploring a broad range of stimulus frequencies and intensities, we observe regions of high-order synchronization, analogous to Arnold Tongues in dynamical systems literature. Significant areas of overlap occur between synchronization regimes, with the bundle intermittently flickering between different winding numbers. We demonstrate how an ensemble of these noisy spontaneous oscillators could be entrained to efficiently detect signals significantly above the characteristic frequencies of the individual cells. PMID:27974743

  3. Extrasolar planet detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korechoff, R. P.; Diner, D. J.; Tubbs, E. F.; Gaiser, S. L.

    1994-01-01

    This paper discusses the concept of extrasolar planet detection using a large-aperture infared imaging telescope. Coronagraphic stellar apodization techniques are less efficient at infrared wavelengths compared to the visible, as a result of practical limitations on aperture dimensions, thus necessitating additional starlight suppression to make planet detection feasible in this spectral domain. We have been investigating the use of rotational shearing interferometry to provide up to three orders of magnitude of starlight suppression over broad spectral bandwidths. We present a theoretical analysis of the system performance requirements needed to make this a viable instrument for planet detection, including specifications on the interferometer design and telescope aperture characteristics. The concept of using rotational shearing interferometry as a wavefront error detector, thus providing a signal that can be used to adaptively correct the wavefront, will be discussed. We also present the status of laboratory studies of on-axis source suppression using a recently constructed rotational shearing interferometer that currently operates in the visible.

  4. Analysis Of Electronic Medication Orders With Large Overdoses

    PubMed Central

    Kirkendall, E.S.; Kouril, M.; Minich, T.; Spooner, SA.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background Users of electronic health record (EHR) systems frequently prescribe doses outside recommended dose ranges, and tend to ignore the alerts that result. Since some of these dosing errors are the result of system design flaws, analysis of large overdoses can lead to the discovery of needed system changes. Objectives To develop database techniques for detecting and extracting large overdose orders from our EHR. To identify and characterize users’ responses to these large overdoses. To identify possible causes of large-overdose errors and to mitigate them. Methods We constructed a data mart of medication-order and dosing-alert data from a quaternary pediatric hospital from June 2011 to May 2013. The data mart was used along with a test version of the EHR to explain how orders were processed and alerts were generated for large (>500%) and extreme (>10,000%) overdoses. User response was characterized by the dosing alert salience rate, which expresses the proportion of time users take corrective action. Results We constructed an advanced analytic framework based on workflow analysis and order simulation, and evaluated all 5,402,504 medication orders placed within the 2 year timeframe as well as 2,232,492 dose alerts associated with some of the orders. 8% of orders generated a visible alert, with ¼ of these related to overdosing. Alerts presented to trainees had higher salience rates than those presented to senior colleagues. Salience rates were low, varying between 4–10%, and were lower with larger overdoses. Extreme overdoses fell into eight causal categories, each with a system design mitigation. Conclusions Novel analytic systems are required to accurately understand prescriber behavior and interactions with medication-dosing CDS. We described a novel analytic system that can detect apparent large overdoses (≥500%) and explain the sociotechnical factors that drove the error. Some of these large overdoses can be mitigated by system changes. EHR

  5. GeneOrder3.0: Software for comparing the order of genes in pairs of small bacterial genomes

    PubMed Central

    Celamkoti, Srikanth; Kundeti, Sashidhara; Purkayastha, Anjan; Mazumder, Raja; Buck, Charles; Seto, Donald

    2004-01-01

    Background An increasing number of whole viral and bacterial genomes are being sequenced and deposited in public databases. In parallel to the mounting interest in whole genomes, the number of whole genome analyses software tools is also increasing. GeneOrder was originally developed to provide an analysis of genes between two genomes, allowing visualization of gene order and synteny comparisons of any small genomes. It was originally developed for comparing virus, mitochondrion and chloroplast genomes. This is now extended to small bacterial genomes of sizes less than 2 Mb. Results GeneOrder3.0 has been developed and validated successfully on several small bacterial genomes (ca. 580 kb to 1.83 Mb) archived in the NCBI GenBank database. It is an updated web-based "on-the-fly" computational tool allowing gene order and synteny comparisons of any two small bacterial genomes. Analyses of several bacterial genomes show that a large amount of gene and genome re-arrangement occurs, as seen with earlier DNA software tools. This can be displayed at the protein level using GeneOrder3.0. Whole genome alignments of genes are presented in both a table and a dot plot. This allows the detection of evolutionary more distant relationships since protein sequences are more conserved than DNA sequences. Conclusions GeneOrder3.0 allows researchers to perform comparative analysis of gene order and synteny in genomes of sizes up to 2 Mb "on-the-fly." Availability: and . PMID:15128433

  6. Ordered macroporous bimetallic nanostructures: design, characterization, and applications.

    PubMed

    Lu, Lehui; Eychmüller, Alexander

    2008-02-01

    different types of ordered bimetallic nanostructures with hierarchical porosity by using a general template technique. The applications of the resulting nanostructures in catalysis and as substrates for SERS are described. Taking the ordered porous Au/Pt nanostructures as examples for applications as catalysts, the experimental results show that both the ordered hollow Au/Pt nanostructure and the ordered macroporous Au/Pt nanostructure exhibit high catalytic ability due to their special structural characteristics, and their catalytic activity is component-dependent. As for SERS applications, primary experimental results show that these ordered macroporous Au/Ag nanostructured films are highly desirable for detection of DNA bases by the SERS technique in terms of a high Raman intensity enhancement, good stability, and reproducibility, suggesting that these nanostructures may find applications in the rapid detection of DNA and DNA fragments.

  7. Optimizing restriction fragment fingerprinting methods for ordering large genomic libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Branscomb, E.; Slezak, T.; Pae, R.; Carrano, A.V. ); Galas, D.; Waterman, M. )

    1990-01-01

    The authors present a statistical analysis of the problem of ordering large genomic cloned libraries through overlap detection based on restriction fingerprinting. Such ordering projects involve a large investment of effort involving many repetitious experiments. Their primary purpose here is to provide methods of maximizing the efficiency of such efforts. To this end, they adopt a statistical approach that uses the likelihood ratio as a statistic to detect overlap. The main advantages of this approach are that (1) it allows the relatively straightforward incorporation of the observed statistical properties of the data; (2) it permits the efficiency of a particular experimental method for detecting overlap to be quantitatively defined so that alternative experimental designs may be compared and optimized; and (3) it yields a direct estimate of the probability that any two library members overlap. This estimate is a critical tool for the accurate, automatic assembly of overlapping sets of fragments into islands called contigs.' These contigs must subsequently be connected by other methods to provide an ordered set of overlapping fragments covering the entire genome.

  8. Order Amidst Chaos of Star's Explosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of Order Amidst Chaos of Star's Explosion

    This artist's animation shows the explosion of a massive star, the remains of which are named Cassiopeia A. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope found evidence that the star exploded with some degree of order, preserving chunks of its onion-like layers as it blasted apart.

    Cassiopeia A is what is known as a supernova remnant. The original star, about 15 to 20 times more massive than our sun, died in a cataclysmic 'supernova' explosion viewable from Earth about 340 years ago. The remnant is located 10,000 light-years away in the constellation Cassiopeia.

    The movie begins by showing the star before it died, when its layers of elements (shown in different colors) were stacked neatly, with the heaviest at the core and the lightest at the top. The star is then shown blasting to smithereens. Spitzer found evidence that the star's original layers were preserved, flinging outward in all directions, but not at the same speeds. In other words, some chunks of the star sped outward faster than others, as illustrated by the animation.

    The movie ends with an actual picture of Cassiopeia A taken by Spitzer. The colored layers containing different elements are seen next to each other because they traveled at different speeds.

    The infrared observatory was able to see the tossed-out layers because they light up upon ramming into a 'reverse' shock wave created in the aftermath of the explosion. When a massive star explodes, it creates two types of shock waves. The forward shock wave darts out quickest, and, in the case of Cassiopeia A, is now traveling at supersonic speeds up to 7,500 kilometers per second (4,600 miles/second). The reverse shock wave is produced when the forward shock wave slams into a shell of surrounding material expelled before the star died. It tags along behind the forward shock wave at slightly slower speeds.

    Chunks

  9. 76 FR 18244 - Public Land Order No. 7760; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6839; Alaska

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-01

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7760; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6839; Alaska AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6839, which modified Public Land Order No. 2344, as amended,...

  10. 3 CFR 13644 - Executive Order 13644 of May 21, 2013. Amendment to Executive Order 13639

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 3 The President 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Executive Order 13644 of May 21, 2013. Amendment to Executive Order 13639 13644 Order 13644 Presidential Documents Executive Orders Executive Order 13644 of May 21, 2013 EO 13644 Amendment to Executive Order 13639 By the authority vested in me as President...

  11. 76 FR 61737 - Public Land Order No. 7782; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6880; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7782; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6880; Oregon AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6880, as corrected by Public Land Order...

  12. 78 FR 22281 - Public Land Order No. 7811; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6960; WY.

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7811; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6960; WY. AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6960, as corrected by Public Land Order No....

  13. "Detecting people"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arneth, A.; Pugh, T.; Krause, A.; Bayer, A.; Lindeskog, M.

    2015-12-01

    Land-use change (LUC) is known to significantly affect biogeochemical cycles as well as surface energy partitioning - with important implications, ranging from understanding present-day measurements, to simulations of climate change and impacts on ecosystems, to assessments of the mitigation potential of land-based mitigation policies on ecosystems. When connecting observations of surface-atmosphere interactions and modelling at different scales, two important issues in this context are: legacy effects (e.g., to what degree and for how long does past LUC at a given location affect vegetation structure, CO2 fluxes and carbon pools), and sub-grid variability of the land-use change per se (e.g., whether bi-directional information about changes are taken into consideration). Both are important when bridging between scales (in time and in space) to enhance long-term observation networks. This contribution to the session will be very much from a process-based modelling perspective. Using a second generation dynamic global vegetation model we will show how different land-use histories impact vegetation and soil recovery (carbon pool-size, fluxes) differently, depending on the type of previous land-use, its length, and on the type of biome. We also study the difference between "gross" and "net" LUC accounting for simulated carbon cycling. Two important aspects, considering the session's objectives, are: 1) When establishing and developing observation networks, land-use history is key information for the interpretation of measured fluxes and needs to be collected and made available;, 2) Observation networks that "operate" solely in the natural science domain need to increasingly seek cooperation with socio-economic observations (such as land-use change, land management) in order to gain better understanding of coupled socio-ecological systems.

  14. 40 CFR 24.02 - Issuance of initial orders; definition of final orders and orders on consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Issuance of initial orders; definition of final orders and orders on consent. 24.02 Section 24.02 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...'s right to request a hearing with respect to any issue of material fact or the appropriateness...

  15. 40 CFR 24.02 - Issuance of initial orders; definition of final orders and orders on consent.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Issuance of initial orders; definition of final orders and orders on consent. 24.02 Section 24.02 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL...'s right to request a hearing with respect to any issue of material fact or the appropriateness...

  16. Second-order focusing parallel electron energy magnetic sector analyzer designs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khursheed, Anjam

    2011-07-01

    This paper presents parallel magnetic sector analyzer designs that are predicted to have second-order or better focusing properties. Simulation results indicate that by reducing the gap between excitation plates in a compact parallel energy magnetic sector box design, second-order focusing regions in the detected energy spectrum can be obtained. A method for combining a first-order focusing magnetic box sector unit with a larger magnet sector unit is also presented in which, the field strength varies relatively slowly. Simulations predict that using a combination of such magnetic sector units, focusing properties better than second order can be achieved for most of the detected energy range.

  17. Mixed results in the safety performance of computerized physician order entry.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Jane; Welebob, Emily; Bates, David W; Lipsitz, Stuart; Classen, David C

    2010-04-01

    Computerized physician order entry is a required feature for hospitals seeking to demonstrate meaningful use of electronic medical record systems and qualify for federal financial incentives. A national sample of sixty-two hospitals voluntarily used a simulation tool designed to assess how well safety decision support worked when applied to medication orders in computerized order entry. The simulation detected only 53 percent of the medication orders that would have resulted in fatalities and 10-82 percent of the test orders that would have caused serious adverse drug events. It is important to ascertain whether actual implementations of computerized physician order entry are achieving goals such as improved patient safety.

  18. Acoustic detection of manatee vocalizations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niezrecki, Christopher; Phillips, Richard; Meyer, Michael; Beusse, Diedrich O.

    2003-09-01

    The West Indian manatee (trichechus manatus latirostris) has become endangered partly because of a growing number of collisions with boats. A system to warn boaters of the presence of manatees, that can signal to boaters that manatees are present in the immediate vicinity, could potentially reduce these boat collisions. In order to identify the presence of manatees, acoustic methods are employed. Within this paper, three different detection algorithms are used to detect the calls of the West Indian manatee. The detection systems are tested in the laboratory using simulated manatee vocalizations from an audio compact disk. The detection method that provides the best overall performance is able to correctly identify ~96% of the manatee vocalizations. However, the system also results in a false alarm rate of ~16%. The results of this work may ultimately lead to the development of a manatee warning system that can warn boaters of the presence of manatees.

  19. Tensor Spectral Clustering for Partitioning Higher-order Network Structures

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Austin R.; Gleich, David F.; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-01-01

    Spectral graph theory-based methods represent an important class of tools for studying the structure of networks. Spectral methods are based on a first-order Markov chain derived from a random walk on the graph and thus they cannot take advantage of important higher-order network substructures such as triangles, cycles, and feed-forward loops. Here we propose a Tensor Spectral Clustering (TSC) algorithm that allows for modeling higher-order network structures in a graph partitioning framework. Our TSC algorithm allows the user to specify which higher-order network structures (cycles, feed-forward loops, etc.) should be preserved by the network clustering. Higher-order network structures of interest are represented using a tensor, which we then partition by developing a multilinear spectral method. Our framework can be applied to discovering layered flows in networks as well as graph anomaly detection, which we illustrate on synthetic networks. In directed networks, a higher-order structure of particular interest is the directed 3-cycle, which captures feedback loops in networks. We demonstrate that our TSC algorithm produces large partitions that cut fewer directed 3-cycles than standard spectral clustering algorithms. PMID:27812399

  20. Tensor Spectral Clustering for Partitioning Higher-order Network Structures.

    PubMed

    Benson, Austin R; Gleich, David F; Leskovec, Jure

    2015-01-01

    Spectral graph theory-based methods represent an important class of tools for studying the structure of networks. Spectral methods are based on a first-order Markov chain derived from a random walk on the graph and thus they cannot take advantage of important higher-order network substructures such as triangles, cycles, and feed-forward loops. Here we propose a Tensor Spectral Clustering (TSC) algorithm that allows for modeling higher-order network structures in a graph partitioning framework. Our TSC algorithm allows the user to specify which higher-order network structures (cycles, feed-forward loops, etc.) should be preserved by the network clustering. Higher-order network structures of interest are represented using a tensor, which we then partition by developing a multilinear spectral method. Our framework can be applied to discovering layered flows in networks as well as graph anomaly detection, which we illustrate on synthetic networks. In directed networks, a higher-order structure of particular interest is the directed 3-cycle, which captures feedback loops in networks. We demonstrate that our TSC algorithm produces large partitions that cut fewer directed 3-cycles than standard spectral clustering algorithms.

  1. Spatiotemporal clustering and temporal order in the excitable BZ reaction.

    PubMed

    Hastings, Harold M; Sobel, Sabrina G; Lemus, Arely; Yuen, Fiona; Peralta, Catalina; Cammalleri, Carolyn; Chabrel, Johan; Chaterpaul, Stephen; Frank, Claudia; Hilaire, Christian; Lang, Daniel; Ravinovitch, Daniel; Zaharakis, Alex

    2005-08-08

    The prototype experimental example of "spontaneous" pattern formation in an unstirred chemical medium is the oscillatory Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction: target patterns of outward-moving concentric rings are readily observed when the reaction is run in a thin layer in a Petri dish. In many experimental runs, new target centers appeared to form closer to pre-existing target centers than expected in a randomized model. Here we describe a simple direct test for the presence of temporal order in the spatiotemporal dynamics of target nucleation, and apply this test to detect significant temporal order in target formation in the ferroin-catalyzed BZ reaction. We also describe how mixing heterogeneity can generate temporal order, even in the absence of heterogeneous physical nucleating centers.

  2. 36 CFR 261.50 - Orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... in Areas Designated by Order § 261.50 Orders. (a) The Chief, each Regional Forester, each Experiment... Forester, each Experiment Station Director, the Administrator of the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit...

  3. 36 CFR 261.50 - Orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... in Areas Designated by Order § 261.50 Orders. (a) The Chief, each Regional Forester, each Experiment... Forester, each Experiment Station Director, the Administrator of the Lake Tahoe Basin Management Unit...

  4. How do I order MISR data?

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2016-02-19

    ... Center Atmospheric Science Data Center (ASDC). A MISR Order and Customization Tool is available that enables users to order and customize data in a single interface. Some features are non-consecutive path ...

  5. 19 CFR 4.74 - Transportation orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 19 Customs Duties 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Transportation orders. 4.74 Section 4.74 Customs... VESSELS IN FOREIGN AND DOMESTIC TRADES Foreign Clearances § 4.74 Transportation orders. Clearance shall... voyage would be in violation of any provision of any transportation order, regulation, or...

  6. 28 CFR 2.58 - Prior orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Prior orders. 2.58 Section 2.58 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.58 Prior orders. Any order...

  7. 28 CFR 2.58 - Prior orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Prior orders. 2.58 Section 2.58 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.58 Prior orders. Any order...

  8. 28 CFR 2.58 - Prior orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Prior orders. 2.58 Section 2.58 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.58 Prior orders. Any order...

  9. 28 CFR 2.58 - Prior orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Prior orders. 2.58 Section 2.58 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.58 Prior orders. Any order...

  10. 20 CFR 655.121 - Job orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Job orders. 655.121 Section 655.121 Employees... United States (H-2A Workers) Prefiling Procedures § 655.121 Job orders. (a) Area of intended employment... job order, Form ETA-790, to the SWA serving the area of intended employment for intrastate...

  11. 46 CFR Sec. 7 - Job order numbering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Job order numbering. Sec. 7 Section 7 Shipping MARITIME... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 7 Job order numbering. (a) The NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract number shall be inserted in every job order and supplemental...

  12. 20 CFR 655.121 - Job orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Job orders. 655.121 Section 655.121 Employees... United States (H-2A Workers) Prefiling Procedures § 655.121 Job orders. (a) Area of intended employment... job order, Form ETA-790, to the SWA serving the area of intended employment for intrastate...

  13. 46 CFR Sec. 7 - Job order numbering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Job order numbering. Sec. 7 Section 7 Shipping MARITIME... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 7 Job order numbering. (a) The NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract number shall be inserted in every job order and supplemental...

  14. 46 CFR Sec. 7 - Job order numbering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Job order numbering. Sec. 7 Section 7 Shipping MARITIME... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 7 Job order numbering. (a) The NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract number shall be inserted in every job order and supplemental...

  15. 46 CFR Sec. 7 - Job order numbering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Job order numbering. Sec. 7 Section 7 Shipping MARITIME... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 7 Job order numbering. (a) The NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract number shall be inserted in every job order and supplemental...

  16. 20 CFR 655.121 - Job orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Job orders. 655.121 Section 655.121 Employees... United States (H-2A Workers) Prefiling Procedures § 655.121 Job orders. (a) Area of intended employment... job order, Form ETA-790, to the SWA serving the area of intended employment for intrastate...

  17. 20 CFR 655.121 - Job orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 20 Employees' Benefits 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Job orders. 655.121 Section 655.121 Employees... United States (H-2A Workers) Prefiling Procedures § 655.121 Job orders. (a) Area of intended employment... job order, Form ETA-790, to the SWA serving the area of intended employment for intrastate...

  18. 46 CFR Sec. 7 - Job order numbering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 8 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Job order numbering. Sec. 7 Section 7 Shipping MARITIME... REPAIRS UNDER NATIONAL SHIPPING AUTHORITY MASTER LUMP SUM REPAIR CONTRACT-NSA-LUMPSUMREP Sec. 7 Job order numbering. (a) The NSA-LUMPSUMREP Contract number shall be inserted in every job order and supplemental...

  19. 48 CFR 16.505 - Ordering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... Treasury Offset Program (TOP). (b) Orders under multiple award contracts—(1) Fair opportunity. (i) The... requirements for a bundled contract when the order meets the definition of “bundled contract” (see 2.101(b)). (8) In accordance with section 1427(b) of Public Law 108-136, orders placed under...

  20. 32 CFR 726.6 - Travel orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Travel orders. 726.6 Section 726.6 National... MENTALLY INCOMPETENT MEMBERS OF THE NAVAL SERVICE § 726.6 Travel orders. The Chief of Naval Personnel or the Deputy Commandant, Manpower & Reserve Affairs, may issue travel orders to a member to...

  1. 32 CFR 726.6 - Travel orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Travel orders. 726.6 Section 726.6 National... MENTALLY INCOMPETENT MEMBERS OF THE NAVAL SERVICE § 726.6 Travel orders. The Chief of Naval Personnel or the Deputy Commandant, Manpower & Reserve Affairs, may issue travel orders to a member to...

  2. 32 CFR 726.6 - Travel orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Travel orders. 726.6 Section 726.6 National... MENTALLY INCOMPETENT MEMBERS OF THE NAVAL SERVICE § 726.6 Travel orders. The Chief of Naval Personnel or the Deputy Commandant, Manpower & Reserve Affairs, may issue travel orders to a member to...

  3. 32 CFR 726.6 - Travel orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Travel orders. 726.6 Section 726.6 National... MENTALLY INCOMPETENT MEMBERS OF THE NAVAL SERVICE § 726.6 Travel orders. The Chief of Naval Personnel or the Deputy Commandant, Manpower & Reserve Affairs, may issue travel orders to a member to...

  4. 32 CFR 726.6 - Travel orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 5 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Travel orders. 726.6 Section 726.6 National... MENTALLY INCOMPETENT MEMBERS OF THE NAVAL SERVICE § 726.6 Travel orders. The Chief of Naval Personnel or the Deputy Commandant, Manpower & Reserve Affairs, may issue travel orders to a member to...

  5. 1 CFR 8.2 - Orderly development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Orderly development. 8.2 Section 8.2 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS § 8.2 Orderly development. To assure orderly development of the Code of...

  6. 1 CFR 8.2 - Orderly development.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 1 General Provisions 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Orderly development. 8.2 Section 8.2 General Provisions ADMINISTRATIVE COMMITTEE OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER SPECIAL EDITIONS OF THE FEDERAL REGISTER CODE OF FEDERAL REGULATIONS § 8.2 Orderly development. To assure orderly development of the Code of...

  7. Abel's Theorem Simplifies Reduction of Order

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, William R.

    2011-01-01

    We give an alternative to the standard method of reduction or order, in which one uses one solution of a homogeneous, linear, second order differential equation to find a second, linearly independent solution. Our method, based on Abel's Theorem, is shorter, less complex and extends to higher order equations.

  8. 47 CFR 1.1415 - Other orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 47 Telecommunication 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Other orders. 1.1415 Section 1.1415 Telecommunication FEDERAL COMMUNICATIONS COMMISSION GENERAL PRACTICE AND PROCEDURE Pole Attachment Complaint Procedures § 1.1415 Other orders. The Commission may issue such other orders and so conduct its...

  9. 40 CFR 91.604 - Test orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Test orders. 91.604 Section 91.604... EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Regulations § 91.604 Test orders. (a) A test order addressed to the manufacturer is required for any testing under this subpart....

  10. 40 CFR 22.31 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CONSOLIDATED RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING... order is effective 45 days after the initial decision is served on the parties. (c) Payment of a civil... 30 days after the effective date of the final order unless otherwise ordered. Payment shall be...

  11. 40 CFR 22.31 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CONSOLIDATED RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING... order is effective 45 days after the initial decision is served on the parties. (c) Payment of a civil... 30 days after the effective date of the final order unless otherwise ordered. Payment shall be...

  12. 40 CFR 22.31 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY GENERAL CONSOLIDATED RULES OF PRACTICE GOVERNING... order is effective 45 days after the initial decision is served on the parties. (c) Payment of a civil... 30 days after the effective date of the final order unless otherwise ordered. Payment shall be...

  13. 10 CFR 820.32 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Final order. 820.32 Section 820.32 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY PROCEDURAL RULES FOR DOE NUCLEAR ACTIVITIES Enforcement Process § 820.32 Final order. (a) Effect of Initial Decision. The Initial Decision shall be deemed filed as a Final Order thirty days...

  14. 40 CFR 91.604 - Test orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 20 2014-07-01 2013-07-01 true Test orders. 91.604 Section 91.604... EMISSIONS FROM MARINE SPARK-IGNITION ENGINES Selective Enforcement Auditing Regulations § 91.604 Test orders. (a) A test order addressed to the manufacturer is required for any testing under this subpart....

  15. Methodology, Birth Order, Intelligence, and Personality.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Michalski, Richard L.; Shackelford, Todd K.

    2001-01-01

    Critiques recent research on the effects of birth order on intelligence and personality, which found that the between-family design revealed that birth order negatively related to intelligence, while the within-family design revealed that birth order was unrelated to intelligence. Suggests that it may not be intelligence that co-varies with birth…

  16. 10 CFR 490.602 - Special orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Special orders. 490.602 Section 490.602 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.602 Special orders. (a) DOE may require by general or special orders that any person— (1) File,...

  17. 10 CFR 490.602 - Special orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Special orders. 490.602 Section 490.602 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.602 Special orders. (a) DOE may require by general or special orders that any person— (1) File,...

  18. 10 CFR 490.602 - Special orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Special orders. 490.602 Section 490.602 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.602 Special orders. (a) DOE may require by general or special orders that any person— (1) File,...

  19. 10 CFR 490.602 - Special orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Special orders. 490.602 Section 490.602 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.602 Special orders. (a) DOE may require by general or special orders that any person— (1) File,...

  20. 10 CFR 490.602 - Special orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Special orders. 490.602 Section 490.602 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ALTERNATIVE FUEL TRANSPORTATION PROGRAM Investigations and Enforcement § 490.602 Special orders. (a) DOE may require by general or special orders that any person— (1) File,...

  1. 39 CFR 952.28 - Orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Respondent it shall be incorporated in the record of the proceeding. The Recorder shall cause notice of the order to be published in the Postal Bulletin and cause the order to be transmitted to such postmasters... effect. (b) If an order is issued which requires Respondent to cease and desist from using...

  2. 39 CFR 952.28 - Orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Respondent it shall be incorporated in the record of the proceeding. The Recorder shall cause notice of the order to be published in the Postal Bulletin and cause the order to be transmitted to such postmasters... effect. (b) If an order is issued which requires Respondent to cease and desist from using...

  3. 21 CFR 1301.46 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Final order. 1301.46 Section 1301.46 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE REGISTRATION OF MANUFACTURERS, DISTRIBUTORS... which the order is based. The order shall specify the date on which it shall take effect....

  4. 21 CFR 1301.46 - Final order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 9 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Final order. 1301.46 Section 1301.46 Food and Drugs DRUG ENFORCEMENT ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE REGISTRATION OF MANUFACTURERS, DISTRIBUTORS... which the order is based. The order shall specify the date on which it shall take effect....

  5. 48 CFR 2416.505 - Ordering.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... contract price or any other terms and conditions is necessary. (b)(5) The departmental competition advocate... Contracting Officer shall be the ordering official for all task orders when the price or cost, or any other... official when orders are to be placed on a firm fixed-price basis, the prices of the specific services...

  6. Higher-Order Superposition for Dependent Types,

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    Proofs for Higher-Order Rewrite Systems, J. Heering, K. Meinke , B. Moller, T. Nipkow ed., Higher Order Algebra, Logic and Term Rewriting, Lect. Notes in...Heering, K. Meinke , B. Moller, T. Nipkow ed., Higher Order Algebra, Logic and Term Rewriting, Lect. Notes in Comp. Sci., Vol 816, Springer Verlag, 1994, pp. 305-325

  7. MISR EOS Validation Site Data Ordering

    Atmospheric Science Data Center

    2013-04-02

    ... EOS Validation data files are orderable through the  MISR Order Tool . Log in to the MISR Order Tool Select product(s) ... be subset for the chosen site. You can further customize your files by following instructions in the interface. ...

  8. 7 CFR 1212.15 - Order.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) AGRICULTURAL MARKETING SERVICE (MARKETING AGREEMENTS..., PROMOTION, CONSUMER EDUCATION AND INDUSTRY INFORMATION ORDER Honey Packers and Importers Research, Promotion, Consumer Education, and Industry Information Order Definitions § 1212.15 Order. “Order” means the...

  9. 28 CFR 2.58 - Prior orders.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 28 Judicial Administration 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Prior orders. 2.58 Section 2.58 Judicial Administration DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE PAROLE, RELEASE, SUPERVISION AND RECOMMITMENT OF PRISONERS, YOUTH OFFENDERS, AND JUVENILE DELINQUENTS United States Code Prisoners and Parolees § 2.58 Prior orders. Any order...

  10. An Analysis of Second-Order Autoshaping

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ward-Robinson, Jasper

    2004-01-01

    Three mechanisms can explain second-order conditioning: (1) The second-order conditioned stimulus (CS2) could activate a representation of the first-order conditioned stimulus (CS1), thereby provoking the conditioned response (CR); The CS2 could enter into an excitatory association with either (2) the representation governing the CR, or (3) with a…

  11. Simplified fringe order correction for absolute phase maps recovered with multiple-spatial-frequency fringe projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Yi; Peng, Kai; Lu, Lei; Zhong, Kai; Zhu, Ziqi

    2017-02-01

    Various kinds of fringe order errors may occur in the absolute phase maps recovered with multi-spatial-frequency fringe projections. In existing methods, multiple successive pixels corrupted by fringe order errors are detected and corrected pixel-by-pixel with repeating searches, which is inefficient for applications. To improve the efficiency of multiple successive fringe order corrections, in this paper we propose a method to simplify the error detection and correction by the stepwise increasing property of fringe order. In the proposed method, the numbers of pixels in each step are estimated to find the possible true fringe order values, repeating the search in detecting multiple successive errors can be avoided for efficient error correction. The effectiveness of our proposed method is validated by experimental results.

  12. The role of order in distributed programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birman, Kenneth P.; Marzullo, Keith

    1989-01-01

    The role of order in building distributed systems is discussed. It is the belief that a principle of event ordering underlies the wide range of operating systems mechanisms that were put forward for building robust distributed software. Stated concisely, this principle achieves correct distributed behavior by ordering classes of distributed events that conflict with one another. By focusing on order, simplified descriptions can be obtained and convincingly correct solutions to problems that might otherwise have looked extremely complex. Moreover, it is observed that there are a limited number of ways to obtain order, and that the choice made impacts greatly on performance.

  13. Thermographic Detection of separated Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dollinger, C.; Balaresque, N.; Schaffarczyk, A. P.; Fischer, A.

    2016-09-01

    Thermographic wind tunnel measurements, both on a cylinder as well as on a 2D airfoil, were performed at various Reynolds numbers in order to evaluate the possibility of detecting and visualizing separated flow areas. A new approach by acquiring a series of thermographic images and applying a spatial-temporal statistical analysis allows improving both the resolution and the information content of the thermographic images. Separated flow regions become visible and laminar/turbulent transitions can be detected more accurately. The knowledge about possibly present stall cells can be used to confirm two-dimensional flow conditions and support the development of more effective and silent rotorblades.

  14. Partially ordered state of ice XV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komatsu, K.; Noritake, F.; Machida, S.; Sano-Furukawa, A.; Hattori, T.; Yamane, R.; Kagi, H.

    2016-07-01

    Most ice polymorphs have order-disorder “pairs” in terms of hydrogen positions, which contributes to the rich variety of ice polymorphs; in fact, three recently discovered polymorphs— ices XIII, XIV, and XV—are ordered counter forms to already identified disordered phases. Despite the considerable effort to understand order-disorder transition in ice crystals, there is an inconsistency among the various experiments and calculations for ice XV, the ordered counter form of ice VI, i.e., neutron diffraction observations suggest antiferroelectrically ordered structures, which disagree with dielectric measurement and theoretical studies, implying ferroelectrically ordered structures. Here we investigate in-situ neutron diffraction measurements and density functional theory calculations to revisit the structure and stability of ice XV. We find that none of the completely ordered configurations are particular favored; instead, partially ordered states are established as a mixture of ordered domains in disordered ice VI. This scenario in which several kinds of ordered configuration coexist dispels the contradictions in previous studies. It means that the order-disorder pairs in ice polymorphs are not one-to-one correspondent pairs but rather have one-to-n correspondence, where there are n possible configurations at finite temperature.

  15. 76 FR 38207 - Public Land Order No. 7771; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6865; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-29

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7771; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6865; Oregon AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6865 for an additional 20-year period....

  16. 76 FR 28241 - Public Land Order No. 7766; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6856; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7766; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6856; Oregon AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6856 for an additional 20-year period....

  17. 77 FR 58864 - Public Land Order No. 7800; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6947; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-24

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7800; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6947; Oregon AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6947 for an additional 20-year period....

  18. 76 FR 76179 - Public Land Order No. 7785; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6912; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-06

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7785; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6912; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6912 for an additional 20-year period. This extension...

  19. 76 FR 61738 - Public Land Order No. 7781; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6881; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7781; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6881; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6881 for an additional 20-year period....

  20. 77 FR 33235 - Public Land Order No. 7791; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6928; Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7791; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6928; Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public land order. SUMMARY: This Order extends the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6928 for an additional 20-year period. This extension...

  1. 76 FR 62831 - Public Land Order No. 7784; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6886; Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-11

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7784; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6886; Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6886 for an additional 20-year period....

  2. 76 FR 31977 - Public Land Order No. 7768; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6861; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-02

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7768; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6861; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6861 for an additional 20-year period. This extension...

  3. 76 FR 28241 - Public Land Order No. 7767; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6857; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-05-16

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7767; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6857; Oregon AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6857 for an additional 20-year period....

  4. 78 FR 22281 - Public Land Order No. 7810; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6963; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-15

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7810; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6963; Oregon AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6963, as amended, for an additional...

  5. 77 FR 66479 - Public Land Order No. 7805; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6952; WA

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-11-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7805; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6952; WA AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6952 as corrected by Public Land Order No. 6962, for...

  6. 77 FR 47665 - Public Land Order No. 7794; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6941; Utah

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-08-09

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7794; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6941; Utah AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6941 for an additional 20-year period....

  7. 78 FR 12084 - Public Land Order No. 7808; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6965; AK

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-02-21

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7808; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6965; AK AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the withdrawal created by Public Land Order (PLO) No. 6965 for an additional 20-year period. This extension...

  8. 76 FR 12131 - Public Land Order No. 7759; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6833; Washington

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7759; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6833; Washington AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public land order. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6833 for an additional 20-year period....

  9. 75 FR 57061 - Public Land Order No. 7748; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6797; Wyoming

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-17

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7748; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6797; Wyoming AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public land order. SUMMARY: This order extends the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6797 for an additional 20-year period. This extension...

  10. 76 FR 59736 - Public Land Order No. 7778; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6876; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-09-27

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7778; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6876; Oregon AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6876 for an additional 20-year period....

  11. 78 FR 40498 - Public Land Order No. 7817; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6986; Oregon

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-05

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7817; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6986; Oregon AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public land order. SUMMARY: This order extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6986, which was issued effective July 1,...

  12. 75 FR 63856 - Public Land Order No. 7753; Extension of Public Land Order No. 7464; Montana

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-18

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7753; Extension of Public Land Order No. 7464; Montana AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order further extends the duration of the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 7464 for an additional...

  13. 75 FR 77658 - Public Land Order No. 7754; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6818, Nevada

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-12-13

    ... Bureau of Land Management Public Land Order No. 7754; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6818, Nevada AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public Land Order. SUMMARY: This order extends the withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6818 for an additional 20-year period. This extension...

  14. 75 FR 443 - Public Land Order No. 7738; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6760, Nevada

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-05

    ...-50818; 10-08807; MO:4500011433; TAS:14X1109] Public Land Order No. 7738; Extension of Public Land Order No. 6760, Nevada AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Public land order. SUMMARY: This order extends a withdrawal created by Public Land Order No. 6760 for an additional 20-year...

  15. MULTIMOMENT RADIO TRANSIENT DETECTION

    SciTech Connect

    Spitler, L. G.; Cordes, J. M.; Chatterjee, S.; Stone, J.

    2012-04-01

    We present a multimoment technique for signal classification and apply it to the detection of fast radio transients in incoherently dedispersed data. Specifically, we define a spectral modulation index in terms of the fractional variation in intensity across a spectrum. A signal whose intensity is distributed evenly across the entire band has a lower modulation index than a spectrum whose intensity is localized in a single channel. We are interested in broadband pulses and use the modulation index to excise narrowband radio frequency interference by applying a modulation index threshold above which candidate events are removed. The technique is tested both with simulations and using data from known sources of radio pulses (RRAT J1928+15 and giant pulses from the Crab pulsar). The method is generalized to coherent dedispersion, image cubes, and astrophysical narrowband signals that are steady in time. We suggest that the modulation index, along with other statistics using higher order moments, should be incorporated into signal detection pipelines to characterize and classify signals.

  16. Surgical force detection probe

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tcheng, Ping; Roberts, Paul; Scott, Charles; Prass, Richard

    1991-01-01

    The development progress of a precision electro-mechanical instrument which allows the detection and documentation of the forces and moment applied to human tissue during surgery (under actual operation room conditions), is reported. The pen-shaped prototype probe which measures 1/2 inch in diameter and 7 inches in length was fabricated using an aerodynamic balance. The aerodynamic balance, a standard wind tunnel force and moment sensing transducer, measures the forces and the moments transmitted through the surgeon's hand to the human tissue during surgery. The prototype probe which was fabricated as a development tool was tested successfully. The final version of the surgical force detection probe will be designed based on additional laboratory tests in order to establish the full scale loads. It is expected that the final product will require a simplified aerodynamic balance with two or three force components and one moment component with lighter full scale loads. A signal conditioner was fabricated to process and display the outputs from the prototype probe. This unit will be interfaced with a PC-based data system to provide automatic data acquisition, data processing, and graphics display. The expected overall accuracy of the probe is better than one percent full scale.

  17. Control of Initialized Fractional-Order Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartly, Tom T.; Lorenzo, Carl F.

    2002-01-01

    Due to the importance of historical effects in fractional-order systems, this paper presents a general fractional-order control theory that includes the time-varying initialization response. Previous studies have not properly accounted for these historical effects. The initialization response, along with the forced response, for fractional-order systems is determined. Stability properties of fractional-order systems are presented in the complex Airplane, which is a transformation of the s-plane. Time responses are discussed with respect to pole positions in the complex Airplane and frequency response behavior is included. A fractional-order vector space representation, which is a generalization of the state space concept, is presented including the initialization response. Control methods for vector representations of initialized fractional-order systems are shown. Nyquist, root-locus, and other input-output control methods are adapted to the control of fractional-order systems. Finally, the fractional-order differintegral is generalized to continuous order-distributions that have the possibility of including a continuum of fractional orders in a system element.

  18. Order Parameters for Two-Dimensional Networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaatz, Forrest; Bultheel, Adhemar; Egami, Takeshi

    2007-10-01

    We derive methods that explain how to quantify the amount of order in ``ordered'' and ``highly ordered'' porous arrays. Ordered arrays from bee honeycomb and several from the general field of nanoscience are compared. Accurate measures of the order in porous arrays are made using the discrete pair distribution function (PDF) and the Debye-Waller Factor (DWF) from 2-D discrete Fourier transforms calculated from the real-space data using MATLAB routines. An order parameter, OP3, is defined from the PDF to evaluate the total order in a given array such that an ideal network has the value of 1. When we compare PDFs of man-made arrays with that of our honeycomb we find OP3=0.399 for the honeycomb and OP3=0.572 for man's best hexagonal array. The DWF also scales with this order parameter with the least disorder from a computer-generated hexagonal array and the most disorder from a random array. An ideal hexagonal array normalizes a two-dimensional Fourier transform from which a Debye-Waller parameter is derived which describes the disorder in the arrays. An order parameter S, defined by the DWF, takes values from [0, 1] and for the analyzed man-made array is 0.90, while for the honeycomb it is 0.65. This presentation describes methods to quantify the order found in these arrays.

  19. Two variants of minimum discarded fill ordering

    SciTech Connect

    D'Azevedo, E.F. ); Forsyth, P.A.; Tang, Wei-Pai . Dept. of Computer Science)

    1991-01-01

    It is well known that the ordering of the unknowns can have a significant effect on the convergence of Preconditioned Conjugate Gradient (PCG) methods. There has been considerable experimental work on the effects of ordering for regular finite difference problems. In many cases, good results have been obtained with preconditioners based on diagonal, spiral or natural row orderings. However, for finite element problems having unstructured grids or grids generated by a local refinement approach, it is difficult to define many of the orderings for more regular problems. A recently proposed Minimum Discarded Fill (MDF) ordering technique is effective in finding high quality Incomplete LU (ILU) preconditioners, especially for problems arising from unstructured finite element grids. Testing indicates this algorithm can identify a rather complicated physical structure in an anisotropic problem and orders the unknowns in the preferred'' direction. The MDF technique may be viewed as the numerical analogue of the minimum deficiency algorithm in sparse matrix technology. At any stage of the partial elimination, the MDF technique chooses the next pivot node so as to minimize the amount of discarded fill. In this work, two efficient variants of the MDF technique are explored to produce cost-effective high-order ILU preconditioners. The Threshold MDF orderings combine MDF ideas with drop tolerance techniques to identify the sparsity pattern in the ILU preconditioners. These techniques identify an ordering that encourages fast decay of the entries in the ILU factorization. The Minimum Update Matrix (MUM) ordering technique is a simplification of the MDF ordering and is closely related to the minimum degree algorithm. The MUM ordering is especially for large problems arising from Navier-Stokes problems. Some interesting pictures of the orderings are presented using a visualization tool. 22 refs., 4 figs., 7 tabs.

  20. ProCARs: Progressive Reconstruction of Ancestral Gene Orders

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background In the context of ancestral gene order reconstruction from extant genomes, there exist two main computational approaches: rearrangement-based, and homology-based methods. The rearrangement-based methods consist in minimizing a total rearrangement distance on the branches of a species tree. The homology-based methods consist in the detection of a set of potential ancestral contiguity features, followed by the assembling of these features into Contiguous Ancestral Regions (CARs). Results In this paper, we present a new homology-based method that uses a progressive approach for both the detection and the assembling of ancestral contiguity features into CARs. The method is based on detecting a set of potential ancestral adjacencies iteratively using the current set of CARs at each step, and constructing CARs progressively using a 2-phase assembling method. Conclusion We show the usefulness of the method through a reconstruction of the boreoeutherian ancestral gene order, and a comparison with three other homology-based methods: AnGeS, InferCARs and GapAdj. The program, written in Python, and the dataset used in this paper are available at http://bioinfo.lifl.fr/procars/. PMID:26040958

  1. Non-Gaussianity from self-ordering scalar fields

    SciTech Connect

    Figueroa, Daniel G.; Kamionkowski, Marc

    2010-06-15

    The Universe may harbor relics of the post-inflationary epoch in the form of a network of self-ordered scalar fields. Such fossils, while consistent with current cosmological data at trace levels, may leave too weak an imprint on the cosmic microwave background and the large-scale distribution of matter to allow for direct detection. The non-Gaussian statistics of the density perturbations induced by these fields, however, permit a direct means to probe for these relics. Here we calculate the bispectrum that arises in models of self-ordered scalar fields. We find a compact analytic expression for the bispectrum, evaluate it numerically, and provide a simple approximation that may be useful for data analysis. The bispectrum is largest for triangles that are aligned (have edges k{sub 1{approx_equal}}2k{sub 2{approx_equal}}2k{sub 3}) as opposed to the local-model bispectrum, which peaks for squeezed triangles (k{sub 1{approx_equal}}k{sub 2}>>k{sub 3}), and the equilateral bispectrum, which peaks at k{sub 1{approx_equal}}k{sub 2{approx_equal}}k{sub 3}. We estimate that this non-Gaussianity should be detectable by the Planck satellite if the contribution from self-ordering scalar fields to primordial perturbations is near the current upper limit.

  2. Higher-order organization of complex networks

    PubMed Central

    Benson, Austin R.; Gleich, David F.; Leskovec, Jure

    2016-01-01

    Networks are a fundamental tool for understanding and modeling complex systems in physics, biology, neuroscience, engineering, and social science. Many networks are known to exhibit rich, lower-order connectivity patterns that can be captured at the level of individual nodes and edges. However, higher-order organization of complex networks—at the level of small network subgraphs—remains largely unknown. Here, we develop a generalized framework for clustering networks on the basis of higher-order connectivity patterns. This framework provides mathematical guarantees on the optimality of obtained clusters and scales to networks with billions of edges. The framework reveals higher-order organization in a number of networks, including information propagation units in neuronal networks and hub structure in transportation networks. Results show that networks exhibit rich higher-order organizational structures that are exposed by clustering based on higher-order connectivity patterns. PMID:27387949

  3. Asymmetric magnon excitation by spontaneous toroidal ordering

    SciTech Connect

    Hayami, Satoru; Kusunose, Hiroaki; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-04-12

    The effects of spontaneous toroidal ordering on magnetic excitation are theoretically investigated for a localized spin model that includes a staggered Dzyaloshinsky–Moriya interaction and anisotropic exchange interactions, which arise from the antisymmetric spin–orbit coupling and the multiorbital correlation effect. We show that the model exhibits a Néel-type antiferromagnetic order, which simultaneously accompanies a ferroic toroidal order. We find that the occurrence of toroidal order modulates the magnon dispersion in an asymmetric way with respect to the wave number: a toroidal dipole order on the zigzag chain leads to a band-bottom shift, while a toroidal octupole order on the honeycomb lattice gives rise to a valley splitting. These asymmetric magnon excitations could be a source of unusual magnetic responses, such as nonreciprocal magnon transport. A variety of modulations are discussed while changing the lattice and magnetic symmetries. Furthermore, the implications regarding candidate materials for asymmetric magnon excitations are presented.

  4. Horizon thermodynamics in fourth-order gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Meng-Sen

    2017-03-01

    In the framework of horizon thermodynamics, the field equations of Einstein gravity and some other second-order gravities can be rewritten as the thermodynamic identity: dE = TdS - PdV. However, in order to construct the horizon thermodynamics in higher-order gravity, we have to simplify the field equations firstly. In this paper, we study the fourth-order gravity and convert it to second-order gravity via a so-called ;Legendre transformation; at the cost of introducing two other fields besides the metric field. With this simplified theory, we implement the conventional procedure in the construction of the horizon thermodynamics in 3 and 4 dimensional spacetime. We find that the field equations in the fourth-order gravity can also be written as the thermodynamic identity. Moreover, we can use this approach to derive the same black hole mass as that by other methods.

  5. Ordering structured populations in multiplayer cooperation games

    PubMed Central

    Peña, Jorge; Wu, Bin; Traulsen, Arne

    2016-01-01

    Spatial structure greatly affects the evolution of cooperation. While in two-player games the condition for cooperation to evolve depends on a single structure coefficient, in multiplayer games the condition might depend on several structure coefficients, making it difficult to compare different population structures. We propose a solution to this issue by introducing two simple ways of ordering population structures: the containment order and the volume order. If population structure is greater than population structure in the containment or the volume order, then can be considered a stronger promoter of cooperation. We provide conditions for establishing the containment order, give general results on the volume order, and illustrate our theory by comparing different models of spatial games and associated update rules. Our results hold for a large class of population structures and can be easily applied to specific cases once the structure coefficients have been calculated or estimated. PMID:26819335

  6. Variable-order fuzzy fractional PID controller.

    PubMed

    Liu, Lu; Pan, Feng; Xue, Dingyu

    2015-03-01

    In this paper, a new tuning method of variable-order fractional fuzzy PID controller (VOFFLC) is proposed for a class of fractional-order and integer-order control plants. Fuzzy logic control (FLC) could easily deal with parameter variations of control system, but the fractional-order parameters are unable to change through this way and it has confined the effectiveness of FLC. Therefore, an attempt is made in this paper to allow all the five parameters of fractional-order PID controller vary along with the transformation of system structure as the outputs of FLC, and the influence of fractional orders λ and μ on control systems has been investigated to make the fuzzy rules for VOFFLC. Four simulation results of different plants are shown to verify the availability of the proposed control strategy.

  7. Hanle detection for optical clocks.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaogang; Zhang, Shengnan; Pan, Duo; Chen, Peipei; Xue, Xiaobo; Zhuang, Wei; Chen, Jingbiao

    2015-01-01

    Considering the strong inhomogeneous spatial polarization and intensity distribution of spontaneous decay fluorescence due to the Hanle effect, we propose and demonstrate a universe Hanle detection configuration of electron-shelving method for optical clocks. Experimental results from Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard with electron-shelving method show that a designed Hanle detection geometry with optimized magnetic field direction, detection laser beam propagation and polarization direction, and detector position can improve the fluorescence collection rate by more than one order of magnitude comparing with that of inefficient geometry. With the fixed 423 nm fluorescence, the improved 657 nm optical frequency standard signal intensity is presented. The potential application of the Hanle detection geometry designed for facilitating the fluorescence collection for optical lattice clock with a limited solid angle of the fluorescence collection has been discussed. The Hanle detection geometry is also effective for ion detection in ion optical clock and quantum information experiments. Besides, a cylinder fluorescence collection structure is designed to increase the solid angle of the fluorescence collection in Ca atomic beam optical frequency standard.

  8. Seismic data fusion anomaly detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrity, Kyle; Blasch, Erik; Alford, Mark; Ezekiel, Soundararajan; Ferris, David

    2014-06-01

    Detecting anomalies in non-stationary signals has valuable applications in many fields including medicine and meteorology. These include uses such as identifying possible heart conditions from an Electrocardiography (ECG) signals or predicting earthquakes via seismographic data. Over the many choices of anomaly detection algorithms, it is important to compare possible methods. In this paper, we examine and compare two approaches to anomaly detection and see how data fusion methods may improve performance. The first approach involves using an artificial neural network (ANN) to detect anomalies in a wavelet de-noised signal. The other method uses a perspective neural network (PNN) to analyze an arbitrary number of "perspectives" or transformations of the observed signal for anomalies. Possible perspectives may include wavelet de-noising, Fourier transform, peak-filtering, etc.. In order to evaluate these techniques via signal fusion metrics, we must apply signal preprocessing techniques such as de-noising methods to the original signal and then use a neural network to find anomalies in the generated signal. From this secondary result it is possible to use data fusion techniques that can be evaluated via existing data fusion metrics for single and multiple perspectives. The result will show which anomaly detection method, according to the metrics, is better suited overall for anomaly detection applications. The method used in this study could be applied to compare other signal processing algorithms.

  9. 17 CFR 201.141 - Orders and decisions: Service of orders instituting proceedings and other orders and decisions.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... on each person named in the order as a party. The Secretary may direct an interested division to... securities dealer, investment adviser, investment company or transfer agent by sending a copy of the order... in a foreign country. Notice of a proceeding to a person in a foreign country may be made by...

  10. High-Order Methods For Wave Propagation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    typically combined with high-order explicit time-integration methods such as the multi-stage Runge - Kutta procedure. In addition to the spatial and temporal... methods include both an explicit Runge - Kutta fourth- order temporally accurate scheme as well as an implicit, approximately factored Beam-Warming scheme of...12]. 3.2.3 Time Integration The equations are integrated in time with the classical fourth-order four-stage Runge - Kutta method . With R denoting the

  11. Two-dimensional order and disorder thermofields

    SciTech Connect

    Belvedere, L. V.

    2006-11-15

    The main objective of this paper was to obtain the two-dimensional order and disorder thermal operators using the Thermofield Bosonization formalism. We show that the general property of the two-dimensional world according with the bosonized Fermi field at zero temperature can be constructed as a product of an order and a disorder variables which satisfy a dual field algebra holds at finite temperature. The general correlation functions of the order and disorder thermofields are obtained.

  12. Quasi-Fibonacci Numbers of Order 11

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wituła, Roman; Słota, Damian

    2007-08-01

    In this paper we introduce and investigate the so-called quasi-Fibonacci numbers of order 11 . These numbers are defined by five conjugate recurrence equations of order five. We study some relations and identities concerning these numbers. We present some applications to the decomposition of some polynomials. Many of the identities presented here are the generalizations of the identities characteristic for general recurrence sequences of order three given by Rabinowitz.

  13. Feedback and efficiency in limit order markets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Challet, Damien

    2008-06-01

    A consistency criterion for price impact functions in limit order markets is proposed that prohibits chain arbitrage exploitation. Both the bid-ask spread and the feedback of sequential market orders of the same kind onto both sides of the order book are essential to ensure consistency at the smallest time scale. All the stocks investigated in Paris Stock Exchange have consistent price impact functions.

  14. An overview of task order 10

    SciTech Connect

    Rousculp, Christopher L

    2011-01-12

    Task Order 10 formalizes a collaboration in high explosive pulsed power (HEPP) experiments between LANL and VNIIEF. The focus is the VNIIEF disk explosive magnetic generator (DEMG) technology. The task order outlines a sequence of tasks and deliverables culminating in an experiment which takes place in the US utilizing US explosives and a Russian DEMG. This talk summarizes task order 10. It gives a brief history and present status in terms of the proposed high pressure EOS experiment (ALT-3).

  15. Exact significance test for Markov order

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pethel, S. D.; Hahs, D. W.

    2014-02-01

    We describe an exact significance test of the null hypothesis that a Markov chain is nth order. The procedure utilizes surrogate data to yield an exact test statistic distribution valid for any sample size. Surrogate data are generated using a novel algorithm that guarantees, per shot, a uniform sampling from the set of sequences that exactly match the nth order properties of the observed data. Using the test, the Markov order of Tel Aviv rainfall data is examined.

  16. Order-memory and association-memory.

    PubMed

    Caplan, Jeremy B

    2015-09-01

    Two highly studied memory functions are memory for associations (items presented in pairs, such as SALT-PEPPER) and memory for order (a list of items whose order matters, such as a telephone number). Order- and association-memory are at the root of many forms of behaviour, from wayfinding, to language, to remembering people's names. Most researchers have investigated memory for order separately from memory for associations. Exceptions to this, associative-chaining models build an ordered list from associations between pairs of items, quite literally understanding association- and order-memory together. Alternatively, positional-coding models have been used to explain order-memory as a completely distinct function from association-memory. Both classes of model have found empirical support and both have faced serious challenges. I argue that models that combine both associative chaining and positional coding are needed. One such hybrid model, which relies on brain-activity rhythms, is promising, but remains to be tested rigourously. I consider two relatively understudied memory behaviours that demand a combination of order- and association-information: memory for the order of items within associations (is it William James or James William?) and judgments of relative order (who left the party earlier, Hermann or William?). Findings from these underexplored procedures are already difficult to reconcile with existing association-memory and order-memory models. Further work with such intermediate experimental paradigms has the potential to provide powerful findings to constrain and guide models into the future, with the aim of explaining a large range of memory functions, encompassing both association- and order-memory.

  17. CMS memo OKs use of standing orders.

    PubMed

    2008-12-01

    The Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) has reversed course and clarified the use of standing orders in a manner that is much more favorable to EDs. Initiation of standing orders or protocols no longer requires prior authorization by a physician. Documentation still is required, and it must be entered into the medical record, but it can be entered following implementation of the standing order. Nurses can administer drugs if approved by protocol and if it is within their nursing scope of practice.

  18. Second Order Behavior of Pattern Search

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-01-01

    KKT ) first-order necessary conditions for optimality . Audet and Dennis [7] add... KKT first-order necessary conditions for optimality . Corollary 3.6. Under Assumption A1, if f is strictly differentiable at a limit point x̂ of a...there are two equiv- alent formulations for the classical Karush-Kuhn-Tucker ( KKT ) first-order necessary conditions for optimality , one of which

  19. Detection and localization of satellites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bautista Aranda, Manuel

    The surveillance of orbital space is conducted in order to (1) detect military activities, (2) keep a tally of active and 'dead' satellites, launch vehicle upper stages, explosion debris, etc., and (3) prevent collisions with active satellites, as well as anticipate the exact timing of satellite reentries. An account is presently given of the complex system of optical- and radar-sensor space surveillance conducted by agencies of the U.S. government.

  20. Smart accelerometer. [vibration damage detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bozeman, Richard J., Jr. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    The invention discloses methods and apparatus for detecting vibrations from machines which indicate an impending malfunction for the purpose of preventing additional damage and allowing for an orderly shutdown or a change in mode of operation. The method and apparatus is especially suited for reliable operation in providing thruster control data concerning unstable vibration in an electrical environment which is typically noisy and in which unrecognized ground loops may exist.