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Sample records for detecting tamiflu metabolite

  1. Sugar-based synthesis of Tamiflu and its inhibitory effects on cell secretion.

    PubMed

    Ma, Jimei; Zhao, Yanying; Ng, Simon; Zhang, Jing; Zeng, Jing; Than, Aung; Chen, Peng; Liu, Xue-Wei

    2010-04-19

    Tamiflu is currently the most effective drug for the treatment of influenza, but the insufficient supply and side-effects of this drug demand urgent solutions. We present a practical synthesis of Tamiflu by using novel synthetic routes, cheap reagents, and the abundantly available starting material D-glucal. The strategy features a Claisen rearrangement of hexose to obtain the cyclohexene backbone and introduction of diamino groups through tandem intramolecular aziridination and ring opening. In addition, this synthetic protocol allows late-stage functionalization for the flexible synthesis of Tamiflu analogues. By using the synthesized Tamiflu and its active metabolite (oseltamivir carboxylate), we investigated their influences on neuroendocrine PC12 cells in various aspects. It was discovered that oseltamivir carboxylate significantly inhibits the vesicular exocytosis (regulated secretion) of PC12 cells, and suggests a mechanism underlying the Tamiflu side-effects, in particular its possible adverse influences on neurotransmitter release in the central nervous system.

  2. The Tamiflu fiasco and lessons learnt.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Yogendra Kumar; Meenu, Meenakshi; Mohan, Prafull

    2015-01-01

    Oseltamivir (Tamiflu), a neuraminidase inhibitor, was approved for seasonal flu by US Food and Drug Administration in 1999. A number of randomized controlled trials, systematic reviews, and meta-analysis emphasized a favorable efficacy and safety profile. Majority of them were funded by Roche, which also first marketed and promoted this drug. In 2005 and 2009, the looming fear of pandemic flu led to recommendation by prominent regulatory bodies such as World Health Organization (WHO), Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, European Medicines Agency and others for its use in treatment and prophylaxis of influenza, and it's stockpiling as a measure to tide over the crisis. Serious Adverse Events, especially neuropsychiatric events associated with Tamiflu started getting reported leading to a cascade of questions on clinical utility of this drug. A recent Cochrane review and related articles have questioned the risk-benefit ratio of the drug, besides raising doubts about the regulatory decision of approving it. The recommendations for stockpiling the said drug as given by various international organizations viz WHO have also been put to scrutiny. Although many reviewers have labeled the Tamiflu saga as a "costly mistake," the episode leaves us with some important lessons. This article takes a comprehensive relook on the subject, and we proceed to suggest some ways and means to avoid a similar situation in the future. PMID:25821304

  3. Detection and characterization of clostebol sulfate metabolites in Caucasian population.

    PubMed

    Balcells, Georgina; Pozo, Oscar J; Garrostas, Lorena; Esquivel, Argitxu; Matabosch, Xavier; Kotronoulas, Aristotelis; Joglar, Jesús; Ventura, Rosa

    2016-06-01

    Anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) are synthetic testosterone derivatives which undergo extensive metabolism in man. Differences in the excretion of phase II metabolites are strongly associated with inter-individual and inter-ethnic variations. Sulfate metabolites have been described as long-term metabolites for some AAS. Clostebol is the 4-chloro derivative of testosterone and the aim of the present study was the evaluation of clostebol sulfate metabolites in Caucasian population by LC-MS/MS technology. Clostebol was orally administered to four healthy Caucasian male volunteers, and excretion study urines were collected up to 31 days. Several analytical strategies (neutral loss scan, precursor ion scan and selected reaction monitoring acquisitions modes) were applied to detect sulfate metabolites in post-administration samples. Sixteen sulfate metabolites were detected, five of them having detectability times above 10 days (S1a, S2a, S3b, S3g and S4b). Interestingly, metabolite S1a could be detected up to the last collected sample of all excretion studies and it was characterized by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS as 4ξ-chloro-5α-androst-3β-ol-17-one 3β-sulfate. Thus, monitoring of S1a improves the detection time of clostebol misuse with respect to the commonly monitored metabolites, excreted in the glucuronide fraction. Importantly, this new metabolite can be incorporated into recently developed LC-MS/MS screening methods base on the direct detection of phase II metabolites. PMID:27085012

  4. Efficacy of Influenza Vaccination and Tamiflu® Treatment – Comparative Studies with Eurasian Swine Influenza Viruses in Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Duerrwald, Ralf; Schlegel, Michael; Bauer, Katja; Vissiennon, Théophile; Wutzler, Peter; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological developments demonstrated that gene segments of swine influenza A viruses can account for antigenic changes as well as reduced drug susceptibility of pandemic influenza A viruses. This raises questions about the efficacy of preventive measures against swine influenza A viruses. Here, the protective effect of vaccination was compared with that of prophylactic Tamiflu® treatment against two Eurasian swine influenza A viruses. 11-week-old pigs were infected by aerosol nebulisation with high doses of influenza virus A/swine/Potsdam/15/1981 (H1N1/1981, heterologous challenge to H1N1 vaccine strain) and A/swine/Bakum/1832/2000 (H1N2/2000, homologous challenge to H1N2 vaccine strain) in two independent trials. In each trial (i) 10 pigs were vaccinated twice with a trivalent vaccine (RESPIPORC® FLU3; 28 and 7 days before infection), (ii) another 10 pigs received 150 mg/day of Tamiflu® for 5 days starting 12 h before infection, and (iii) 12 virus-infected pigs were left unvaccinated and untreated and served as controls. Both viruses replicated efficiently in porcine respiratory organs causing influenza with fever, dyspnoea, and pneumonia. Tamiflu® treatment as well as vaccination prevented clinical signs and significantly reduced virus shedding. Whereas after homologous challenge with H1N2/2000 no infectious virus in lung and hardly any lung inflammation were detected, the virus titre was not and the lung pathology was only partially reduced in H1N1/1981, heterologous challenged pigs. Tamiflu® application did not affect these study parameters. In conclusion, all tested preventive measures provided protection against disease. Vaccination additionally prevented virus replication and histopathological changes in the lung of homologous challenged pigs. PMID:23630601

  5. Efficacy of influenza vaccination and tamiflu® treatment--comparative studies with Eurasian Swine influenza viruses in pigs.

    PubMed

    Duerrwald, Ralf; Schlegel, Michael; Bauer, Katja; Vissiennon, Théophile; Wutzler, Peter; Schmidtke, Michaela

    2013-01-01

    Recent epidemiological developments demonstrated that gene segments of swine influenza A viruses can account for antigenic changes as well as reduced drug susceptibility of pandemic influenza A viruses. This raises questions about the efficacy of preventive measures against swine influenza A viruses. Here, the protective effect of vaccination was compared with that of prophylactic Tamiflu® treatment against two Eurasian swine influenza A viruses. 11-week-old pigs were infected by aerosol nebulisation with high doses of influenza virus A/swine/Potsdam/15/1981 (H1N1/1981, heterologous challenge to H1N1 vaccine strain) and A/swine/Bakum/1832/2000 (H1N2/2000, homologous challenge to H1N2 vaccine strain) in two independent trials. In each trial (i) 10 pigs were vaccinated twice with a trivalent vaccine (RESPIPORC® FLU3; 28 and 7 days before infection), (ii) another 10 pigs received 150 mg/day of Tamiflu® for 5 days starting 12 h before infection, and (iii) 12 virus-infected pigs were left unvaccinated and untreated and served as controls. Both viruses replicated efficiently in porcine respiratory organs causing influenza with fever, dyspnoea, and pneumonia. Tamiflu® treatment as well as vaccination prevented clinical signs and significantly reduced virus shedding. Whereas after homologous challenge with H1N2/2000 no infectious virus in lung and hardly any lung inflammation were detected, the virus titre was not and the lung pathology was only partially reduced in H1N1/1981, heterologous challenged pigs. Tamiflu® application did not affect these study parameters. In conclusion, all tested preventive measures provided protection against disease. Vaccination additionally prevented virus replication and histopathological changes in the lung of homologous challenged pigs.

  6. Analytical Methods for Secondary Metabolite Detection.

    PubMed

    Taibon, Judith; Strasser, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium brunneum, Beauveria bassiana, and B. brongniartii are widely applied as biological pest control agent in OECD countries. Consequently, their use has to be flanked by a risk management approach, which includes the need to monitor the fate of their relevant toxic metabolites. There are still data gaps claimed by regulatory authorities pending on their identification and quantification of relevant toxins or secondary metabolites. In this chapter, analytical methods are presented allowing the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the relevant toxic B. brongniartii metabolite oosporein and the three M. brunneum relevant destruxin (dtx) derivatives dtx A, dtx B, and dtx E. PMID:27565501

  7. Analytical Methods for Secondary Metabolite Detection.

    PubMed

    Taibon, Judith; Strasser, Hermann

    2016-01-01

    The entomopathogenic fungi Metarhizium brunneum, Beauveria bassiana, and B. brongniartii are widely applied as biological pest control agent in OECD countries. Consequently, their use has to be flanked by a risk management approach, which includes the need to monitor the fate of their relevant toxic metabolites. There are still data gaps claimed by regulatory authorities pending on their identification and quantification of relevant toxins or secondary metabolites. In this chapter, analytical methods are presented allowing the qualitative and quantitative analysis of the relevant toxic B. brongniartii metabolite oosporein and the three M. brunneum relevant destruxin (dtx) derivatives dtx A, dtx B, and dtx E.

  8. Efficient short step synthesis of Corey's tamiflu intermediate.

    PubMed

    Kipassa, Nsiama Tienabe; Okamura, Hiroaki; Kina, Kengo; Hamada, Toshiyuki; Iwagawa, Tetsuo

    2008-03-01

    Corey's tamiflu intermediate was synthesized from a bicyclolactam adduct obtained by base-catalyzed Diels-Alder reaction of N-nosyl-3-hydroxy-2-pyridone with ethyl acrylate. A compound that has the same array of functional groups with the Corey's intermediate was obtained in four steps from the DA adduct in 47% overall yield. The intermediate itself was also prepared efficiently by simply changing the protective group.

  9. Detection and quantification of boscalid and its metabolites in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Jabot, Claire; Daniele, Gaëlle; Giroud, Barbara; Tchamitchian, Sylvie; Belzunces, Luc P; Casabianca, Hervé; Vulliet, Emmanuelle

    2016-08-01

    Boscalid is a new-generation fungicide that has been detected in several bee matrices. The objective of this work was to characterize boscalid metabolites in honeybees based on in vivo experimentation, and next to verify the presence of theses metabolites into honeybees from colonies presenting troubles. A methodology based on complementary mass spectrometric tools, namely ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QToF) or triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQ) was implemented. Honeybees were sprayed with boscalid, at field rate (to induce the metabolization process) and the parent compound with its generated metabolites were then extracted using modified EU-QuEChERS method. The mass characteristics including exact mass, isotopic profile and mass fragments allowed assuming the structure of several metabolites. Some of them were unambiguously identified by comparison with synthesized analytical standards. The metabolites were resulted from hydroxylation and dechlorination of the parent compound as well as the substitution of a chlorine atom with an hydroxyl group. The metabolites were then quantified in bee samples collected from various beehives located in France. Boscalid and three of its metabolites were present in some samples at a level ranged between 0.2 and 36.3 ng/g. PMID:27179242

  10. Detection and quantification of boscalid and its metabolites in honeybees.

    PubMed

    Jabot, Claire; Daniele, Gaëlle; Giroud, Barbara; Tchamitchian, Sylvie; Belzunces, Luc P; Casabianca, Hervé; Vulliet, Emmanuelle

    2016-08-01

    Boscalid is a new-generation fungicide that has been detected in several bee matrices. The objective of this work was to characterize boscalid metabolites in honeybees based on in vivo experimentation, and next to verify the presence of theses metabolites into honeybees from colonies presenting troubles. A methodology based on complementary mass spectrometric tools, namely ultra-high performance liquid chromatography coupled to high-resolution mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QToF) or triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (UHPLC-QqQ) was implemented. Honeybees were sprayed with boscalid, at field rate (to induce the metabolization process) and the parent compound with its generated metabolites were then extracted using modified EU-QuEChERS method. The mass characteristics including exact mass, isotopic profile and mass fragments allowed assuming the structure of several metabolites. Some of them were unambiguously identified by comparison with synthesized analytical standards. The metabolites were resulted from hydroxylation and dechlorination of the parent compound as well as the substitution of a chlorine atom with an hydroxyl group. The metabolites were then quantified in bee samples collected from various beehives located in France. Boscalid and three of its metabolites were present in some samples at a level ranged between 0.2 and 36.3 ng/g.

  11. Systematic Identification of Protein-Metabolite Interactions in Complex Metabolite Mixtures by Ligand-Detected Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Nikolaev, Yaroslav V; Kochanowski, Karl; Link, Hannes; Sauer, Uwe; Allain, Frederic H-T

    2016-05-10

    Protein-metabolite interactions play a vital role in the regulation of numerous cellular processes. Consequently, identifying such interactions is a key prerequisite for understanding cellular regulation. However, the noncovalent nature of the binding between proteins and metabolites has so far hampered the development of methods for systematically mapping protein-metabolite interactions. The few available, largely mass spectrometry-based, approaches are restricted to specific metabolite classes, such as lipids. In this study, we address this issue and show the potential of ligand-detected nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, which is routinely used in drug development, to systematically identify protein-metabolite interactions. As a proof of concept, we selected four well-characterized bacterial and mammalian proteins (AroG, Eno, PfkA, and bovine serum albumin) and identified metabolite binders in complex mixes of up to 33 metabolites. Ligand-detected NMR captured all of the reported protein-metabolite interactions, spanning a full range of physiologically relevant Kd values (low micromolar to low millimolar). We also detected a number of novel interactions, such as promiscuous binding of the negatively charged metabolites citrate, AMP, and ATP, as well as binding of aromatic amino acids to AroG protein. Using in vitro enzyme activity assays, we assessed the functional relevance of these novel interactions in the case of AroG and show that l-tryptophan, l-tyrosine, and l-histidine act as novel inhibitors of AroG activity. Thus, we conclude that ligand-detected NMR is suitable for the systematic identification of functionally relevant protein-metabolite interactions.

  12. Treatments against hair loss may hinder cocaine and metabolites detection.

    PubMed

    Zucchella, Alessandra; Stramesi, Cristiana; Politi, Lucia; Morini, Luca; Polettini, Aldo

    2007-06-01

    Recently, some of the hair samples that we routinely analyse for drugs of abuse did not produce valid results for cocaine and metabolites. A series of very intense interfering peaks with ion fragments common to cocaine (CO), and benzoylecgonine (BE) were found to cover up the "cocaine" region of the chromatogram. In one of these cases the subject declared he had used a lotion containing Minoxidil in order to prevent hair loss. Starting from this observation we found that the interfering peaks belonged to four different TMS derivatives of Minoxidil. Minoxidil interference was further investigated by applying Tricoxidil(®), a Minoxidil solution, to the hair of CO-free volunteers and to a CO-positive hair strand dipped into Tricoxidil. Hair were analysed before and after treatment. In both cases interfering peaks were absent in the chromatograms of untreated hair and appeared in treated hair. In the CO-positive hair detection of CO, BE and internal standard was completely hindered after treatment with Minoxidil. Attempts to separate interfering peaks from CO and metabolites by modifying the temperature programme failed. None of the hair washing methods tested (methanol; dichloromethane; sodium dodecyl sulphate water solution, 1% w/v followed by methanol; phosphate buffer 0.1 M, pH 6 followed by methanol) succeeded in removing Minoxidil interference. However, a simple solution to partially overcome the problem was to dry up the derivatised extract, reconstitute it in methanol (in order to switch back Minoxidil derivatives to the native molecule), and re-inject it: owing to the higher polarity, underivatised Minoxidil does not interfere any more with the chromatography of CO, at the expense of the disappearance of BE and ecgonine methyl ester both producing TMS derivatives. This strategy was applied to four real cases where Minoxidil interference was recognised: in two of these cases CO was detected. The problem of Minoxidil interference on CO detection may be limited

  13. Detection of Nitrobenzodiazepines and Their 7-Amino Metabolites in Oral Fluid.

    PubMed

    Vindenes, Vigdis; Strand, Dag Helge; Koksæter, Paul; Gjerde, Hallvard

    2016-05-01

    Clonazepam, nitrazepam and flunitrazepam are frequently used benzodiazepines, both as prescribed medication and as drugs of abuse. Little is, however, known about how these drugs are excreted in oral fluid. It has been claimed that the parent drugs are more likely to be detected in oral fluid than the 7-amino metabolites. The aim of this study was to investigate whether the parent drugs or the 7-amino metabolites of the nitrobenzodiazepines were most frequently detected in authentic oral fluid samples. Oral fluid samples were collected from patients undergoing opioid maintenance treatment. Cases where clonazepam, nitrazepam, flunitrazepam and/or their metabolites were detected were included. The samples were collected using the Intercept Oral Specimen Collection Device. A cutoff concentration of 1 nM (∼0.3 ng/mL) in oral fluid-buffer mixture was applied for all the substances. A total of 1,001 oral fluid samples were positive for clonazepam and/or 7-aminoclonazepam; both substances were detected in 707 samples, only the parent drug in 64 cases and only the metabolite in 230 cases. For nitrazepam, both substances were detected in 139 samples; only the parent drug in 16 cases and only the metabolite in 56 cases. Flunitrazepam only was not detected in any sample; both substances were detected in one of these cases, and only the metabolite in three cases. This study revealed that 7-amino metabolites were more likely to be detected in oral fluid than the parent drugs. PMID:27013620

  14. Development of A Concise Synthesis of (−)-Oseltamivir (Tamiflu®)

    PubMed Central

    Trost, Barry M.; Zhang, Ting

    2011-01-01

    We report a full account of our work towards the development of an eight-step synthesis of anti-influenza drug (−)-oseltamivir (Tamiflu®) from commercially available starting material. The final synthetic route proceeds with an overall yield of 30 %. Key transformations include a novel palladium-catalyzed asymmetric allylic alkylation reaction (Pd-AAA) as well as a rhodium-catalyzed chemo-, regio-, and stereoselective aziridination reaction. PMID:21365707

  15. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-06-06

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO₂). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO₂ are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences.

  16. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk

    PubMed Central

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography−mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO2). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO2 are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences. PMID:27275838

  17. Detection of Volatile Metabolites of Garlic in Human Breast Milk.

    PubMed

    Scheffler, Laura; Sauermann, Yvonne; Zeh, Gina; Hauf, Katharina; Heinlein, Anja; Sharapa, Constanze; Buettner, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The odor of human breast milk after ingestion of raw garlic at food-relevant concentrations by breastfeeding mothers was investigated for the first time chemo-analytically using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry/olfactometry (GC-MS/O), as well as sensorially using a trained human sensory panel. Sensory evaluation revealed a clear garlic/cabbage-like odor that appeared in breast milk about 2.5 h after consumption of garlic. GC-MS/O analyses confirmed the occurrence of garlic-derived metabolites in breast milk, namely allyl methyl sulfide (AMS), allyl methyl sulfoxide (AMSO) and allyl methyl sulfone (AMSO₂). Of these, only AMS had a garlic-like odor whereas the other two metabolites were odorless. This demonstrates that the odor change in human milk is not related to a direct transfer of garlic odorants, as is currently believed, but rather derives from a single metabolite. The formation of these metabolites is not fully understood, but AMSO and AMSO₂ are most likely formed by the oxidation of AMS in the human body. The excretion rates of these metabolites into breast milk were strongly time-dependent with large inter-individual differences. PMID:27275838

  18. Detection of hepatotoxicity potential with metabolite profiling (metabolomics) of rat plasma.

    PubMed

    Mattes, W; Davis, K; Fabian, E; Greenhaw, J; Herold, M; Looser, R; Mellert, W; Groeters, S; Marxfeld, H; Moeller, N; Montoya-Parra, G; Prokoudine, A; van Ravenzwaay, B; Strauss, V; Walk, T; Kamp, H

    2014-11-01

    While conventional parameters used to detect hepatotoxicity in drug safety assessment studies are generally informative, the need remains for parameters that can detect the potential for hepatotoxicity at lower doses and/or at earlier time points. Previous work has shown that metabolite profiling (metabonomics/metabolomics) can detect signals of potential hepatotoxicity in rats treated with doxorubicin at doses that do not elicit hepatotoxicity as monitored with conventional parameters. The current study extended this observation to the question of whether such signals could be detected in rats treated with compounds that can elicit hepatotoxicity in humans (i.e., drug-induced liver injury, DILI) but have not been reported to do so in rats. Nine compounds were selected on the basis of their known DILI potential, with six other compounds chosen as negative for DILI potential. A database of rat plasma metabolite profiles, MetaMap(®)Tox (developed by metanomics GmbH and BASF SE) was used for both metabolite profiles and mode of action (MoA) metabolite signatures for a number of known toxicities. Eight of the nine compounds with DILI potential elicited metabolite profiles that matched with MoA patterns of various rat liver toxicities, including cholestasis, oxidative stress, acetaminophen-type toxicity and peroxisome proliferation. By contrast, only one of the six non-DILI compounds showed a weak match with rat liver toxicity. These results suggest that metabolite profiling may indeed have promise to detect signals of hepatotoxicity in rats treated with compounds having DILI potential.

  19. Thin-layer chromatographic detection and identification of methaqualone metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Sleeman, H K; Cella, J A; Harvey, J L; Beach, D J

    1975-01-01

    A procedure for detecting methaqualone and identifying methaqualone metabolites in urine by thin-layer chromatography is described and evaluated. Urine is hydrolyzed with HCl or NaIO4, adjusted to pH 9.5, and extracted with chloroform. The chloroform extract is evaporated, reconstituted in methanol, applied to fluorescent silica-gel plates, and developed with ethyl acetate:methanol:ammonium hydroxide (28%) (85:10:5 by vol). Methaqualone use is detected by a pattern of four metabolites, which can be seen under ultraviolet light or are made visible by acidified iodoplatinate reagent. Synthetic methaqualone metabolites are used for identification and to compensate for procedural variables. More than 250 positive urine specimens were correctly identified by this method. Hydrolyzed natural and synthetic metabolites were identical by several criteria.

  20. Detection of driver metabolites in the human liver metabolic network using structural controllability analysis

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Abnormal states in human liver metabolism are major causes of human liver diseases ranging from hepatitis to hepatic tumor. The accumulation in relevant data makes it feasible to derive a large-scale human liver metabolic network (HLMN) and to discover important biological principles or drug-targets based on network analysis. Some studies have shown that interesting biological phenomenon and drug-targets could be discovered by applying structural controllability analysis (which is a newly prevailed concept in networks) to biological networks. The exploration on the connections between structural controllability theory and the HLMN could be used to uncover valuable information on the human liver metabolism from a fresh perspective. Results We applied structural controllability analysis to the HLMN and detected driver metabolites. The driver metabolites tend to have strong ability to influence the states of other metabolites and weak susceptibility to be influenced by the states of others. In addition, the metabolites were classified into three classes: critical, high-frequency and low-frequency driver metabolites. Among the identified 36 critical driver metabolites, 27 metabolites were found to be essential; the high-frequency driver metabolites tend to participate in different metabolic pathways, which are important in regulating the whole metabolic systems. Moreover, we explored some other possible connections between the structural controllability theory and the HLMN, and find that transport reactions and the environment play important roles in the human liver metabolism. Conclusion There are interesting connections between the structural controllability theory and the human liver metabolism: driver metabolites have essential biological functions; the crucial role of extracellular metabolites and transport reactions in controlling the HLMN highlights the importance of the environment in the health of human liver metabolism. PMID:24885538

  1. Detection and characterization of a new metabolite of 17alpha-methyltestosterone.

    PubMed

    Pozo, Oscar J; Van Eenoo, Peter; Deventer, Koen; Lootens, Leen; Van Thuyne, Wim; Parr, Maria K; Schänzer, Wilhelm; Sancho, Juan V; Hernández, Felix; Meuleman, Philip; Leroux-Roels, Geert; Delbeke, Frans T

    2009-11-01

    The misuse of the anabolic steroid methyltestosterone is currently routinely monitored in doping control laboratories by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) of two of its metabolites: 17alpha-methyl-5beta-androstane-3alpha,17beta-diol and 17alpha-methyl-5alpha-androstane-3alpha,17beta-diol. Because of the absence of any easy ionizable moiety, these metabolites are poorly detectable using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) with electrospray ionization (ESI). In this study, the metabolism of methyltestosterone has been reinvestigated by the use of a precursor ion scan method in LC-ESI-MS/MS. Two metabolites have been detected using this method. Both compounds have been confirmed in postadministration urine samples of an urokinase plasminogen activator-severe combined immunodeficiency (uPA-SCID) mouse with humanized liver and were characterized by LC-MS/MS and GC-MS using both quadrupole and time of flight analyzers. From the detailed study of the fragmentation, these metabolites were proposed to be epimethyltestosterone and a dehydrogenated compound. Epimethyltestosterone has previously been described as a minor metabolite, whereas the occurrence of the oxidized metabolite has not been reported. Comparison with the synthesized reference revealed that the structure of the dehydrogenated metabolite is 6-ene-epimethyltestosterone. A selected reaction monitoring method including three transitions for each metabolite has been developed and applied to samples from an excretion study and to samples declared positive after GC-MS analysis. 6-Ene-epimethyltestosterone was found in all samples, showing its applicability in the detection of methyltestosterone misuse.

  2. Detection, synthesis and characterization of metabolites of steroid hormones conjugated with cysteine.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Andreu; Kotronoulas, Aristotelis; Marcos, Josep; Joglar, Jesús; Alfonso, Ignacio; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa; Pozo, Oscar J

    2013-03-01

    The occurrence of several polyunsaturated testosterone related compounds (including 4,6-androstadien-3,17-dione and 4,6-androstadien-17β-ol-3-one) in urine after alkaline treatment of the sample has been recently reported. Although several experiments seem to indicate that they are testosterone metabolites, their origin is still unknown. In this study, it is demonstrated that these metabolites are produced from the degradation of cysteine conjugates. Several testosterone metabolites conjugated with cysteine have been synthesized and characterized by NMR techniques. Their detection in human urine has been performed by LC-MS/MS. The acquisition of several transitions in the SRM mode and the comparison between ion ratios and retention times allowed for the unequivocal confirmation of the presence of cysteine conjugates in urine. The analysis of urine samples collected after testosterone administration confirmed that synthesized cysteine conjugates are testosterone metabolites. The fact that these conjugates result in polyunsaturated compounds in urine after alkaline treatment was demonstrated by fraction collection and alkaline treatment of each fraction. Besides, the presence of these metabolites was also confirmed in human plasma. The formation of these metabolites implies an unreported metabolic biotransformation: 6,7-dehydrogenation as phase I metabolism followed by conjugation with glutathione and subsequent transformation to cysteine conjugates. Finally, the existence of similar metabolites for cortisol and progesterone was also confirmed by LC-MS/MS indicating that the presented metabolic pathway is not exclusively active in androgens, but common to progestagens and glucocorticoids. PMID:23261958

  3. Lateral flow biosensor for multiplex detection of nitrofuran metabolites based on functionalized magnetic beads.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xuewen; Liang, Xiaoling; Dong, Jianghong; Fang, Zhiyuan; Zeng, Lingwen

    2016-09-01

    The use of potential mutagenic nitrofuran antibiotic in food animal production has been banned world-wide. Common methods for nitrofuran detection involve complex extraction procedures. In the present study, magnetic beads functionalized with antibody against nitrofuran derivative were used as both the extraction and color developing media in lateral flow biosensor. Derivatization reagent carboxybenzaldehyde is firstly modified with ractopamine. After reaction with nitrofuran metabolites, the resultant molecule has two functional groups: the metabolite moiety and the ractopamine moiety. Metabolite moiety is captured by the antibody that is coated on magnetic beads. This duplex is then loaded onto biosensor and ractopamine moiety is further captured by the antibody immobilized on the test zone of nitrocellulose membrane. Without tedious organic reagent-based extraction procedure, this biosensor was capable of visually detecting four metabolites simultaneously with a detection limit of 0.1 μg/L. No cross-reactivity was observed in the presence of 50 μg/L interferential components. Graphical abstract Derivatization of nitrofuran metabolites (AHD, AOZ, SEM, or AMOZ) and LFA detection of the derivative products. PMID:27438720

  4. Detection of efaproxiral (RSR13) and its metabolites in equine by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yi, Rong; Sandhu, Jasmeet; Zhao, Sarah; Lam, Geoffrey; Loganathan, Devan; Morrissey, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Efaproxiral (RSR 13) is an experimental synthetic allosteric modifier of haemoglobin (Hb) that acts by increasing the release of oxygen from Hb to the surrounding tissues. It has been shown to increase maximum oxygen uptake (VO(2max)) in a canine skeletal muscle model. The ability to increase maximal muscle oxygen uptake makes efaproxiral a potential performance-enhancing agent and is therefore prohibited by the World Anti-Doping Agency. In this study, a method for the detection and elimination of efaproxiral in equine plasma and urine after a 2.5 g intravenous administration of efaproxiral is described. Post administration plasma and urine samples were collected up to 120 h. Efaproxiral was detected up to 120 h in urine and up to 78 h in plasma. In plasma, the peak concentration was 42 µg/ml and detected at 5 min post administration. In urine, the peak concentration was 2.8 mg/ml and detected at 0-1 h post administration. A validated liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry method was used for the quantitation of efaproxiral in equine plasma and urine. The limit of detection of the method is 0.05 ng/ml in plasma and 0.1 ng/ml in urine. The method is highly sensitive and specific with good precision, accuracy and recovery. The manuscript also describes the systematic identification of efaproxiral metabolites detected in post administration equine urine samples. The metabolites were identified by use of enhanced mass spectra and enhanced product ion scans. Both positive and negative mode ionizations were utilized for metabolite identification and plausible fragmentation pathways were proposed for the phase 1 metabolite identified. In addition to free efaproxiral, one phase 1 metabolite and two phase 2 metabolites were identified in post administration urine. PMID:24446264

  5. Nanomaterial based electrochemical sensors for in vitro detection of small molecule metabolites.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Fei; Wang, Lu; Duan, Hongwei

    2016-01-01

    Small molecule metabolites secreted by pathological processes can act as molecular biomarkers for clinical diagnosis. In vitro detection of the metabolites such as glucose and reactive oxygen species is of great significance for precise screening, monitoring and prognosis of metabolic disorders and relevant diseases such as cancer, and has been under intense research and development in clinical chemistry and molecular diagnostics. In this review, we summarize recent developments in nanomaterial based electrochemical (bio)sensors for in vitro detection of glucose and reactive oxygen species and the progress in utilizing lightweight and flexible electrodes and micro/nanoscale electrodes for flexible and miniaturized sensors.

  6. Analysis of pyrene metabolites in marine snails by liquid chromatography using fluorescence and mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Beach, Daniel G; Quilliam, Michael A; Hellou, Jocelyne

    2009-07-15

    As part of a study of the metabolism of aromatic compounds in marine gastropods, a sensitive and selective method was developed to detect, identify and quantify pyrene (PY) and four of its metabolites in tissues: 1-hydroxypyrene (PYOH), pyrene sulfate (PYOS), pyrene glucuronide (PYOG) and pyrenediol disulfate (PYDS). Liquid chromatography (LC) with fluorescence detection was first used to detect the PY derivatives in the visceral mass of whelks exposed to PYOH. The identification of metabolites was accomplished through a combination of retention time and spectral matching with standards, enzymatic hydrolysis, solid phase extraction and LC coupled with electrospray ionization mass spectrometry. In addition to four known PY derivatives, two novel metabolites were identified as pyrenediol glucuronide sulfate and a second isomer of PYDS. The methanol extraction of metabolites from tissue gave excellent mean recoveries, ranging from 67 to 97%, for the available standards PY, PYOH, PYOS and PYOG spiked in both the muscle and visceral mass of Buccinum spp. The mean recoveries of a surrogate standard, 2-hydroxyfluorene, spiked in all tissue samples were 100% and 95% for visceral and muscle tissue samples, respectively. The method limits of detection for these compounds were all below 0.2 ng/g of wet tissue, low enough to detect metabolites in reference animals. Results from the application of this method to the quantitative analysis of biotransformation products in the visceral mass of the whelk Neptunia lyrata exposed to PYOH contaminated food are also presented. This method will be useful to apply to the analysis of PY metabolites in soft tissues of other animals.

  7. Metabolism of boldione in humans by mass spectrometric techniques: detection of pseudoendogenous metabolites.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Xavier; Curcio, Davide; Colamonici, Cristiana; Molaioni, Francesco; Botrè, Francesco

    2013-01-01

    Boldione is an anabolic androgenic steroid (AAS) related to boldenone, androstenedione, and testosterone bearing two double bonds in C1 and C4 positions. Boldione is rapidly transformed to the well-known AAS boldenone, being both compounds included in the list of prohibited substances and methods published yearly by the World Anti-Doping Agency (WADA). After the administration of boldione to a male volunteer, the already described urinary metabolites of boldenone produced after reduction in C4, oxydoreduction in C3 and C17, and hydroxylation have been detected. In addition, minor new metabolites have been detected and their structure postulated after mass spectrometric analyses. Finally, the reduction of the double bound in C1 produces metabolites identical to the endogenously produced ones. A method based on gas chromatography coupled to isotope ratio mass spectrometry (GC/C/IRMS) after a urine sample purification by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) permitted to confirm the main synthetic like boldione/boldenone metabolite (17β-hydroxy-5β-androst-1-en-3-one) and boldenone at trace levels (< 5 ng/mL) and then to establish its synthetic or endogenous origin, and to determine the exogenous origin of metabolites with the same chemical structure of the endogenous ones. The detection of pseudoendogenous androgens of synthetic origin partially overlapped boldenone and its main metabolite detection, being an additional proof of synthetic steroids misuse. By the use of IRMS, the correct evaluation of the modifications of the steroid profile after the administration of synthetic AAS that could be converted into endogenous like ones is possible. PMID:24259377

  8. [Detection of fungal metabolites showing toxic activity through Artemia salina bioassay].

    PubMed

    González, Ana María; Presa, Maximiliano; Latorre, María Gabriela; Lurá, María Cristina

    2007-03-01

    The aim of this study was to detect toxic metabolites from fungi contaminating food and medicinal herbs by applying the toxicity assay to Artemia salina. According to toxicity percentages, the extracts were classified as nontoxic (NT), slightly toxic (ST), toxic (T) and highly toxic (HT). Those classified as T and HT were assayed for mycotoxins. Only 6 out of 71 strains were found to be T (8.5%) for A. salina. Penicillium brevicompactum Dierckx, isolated from sausages, was found to be HT, mainly due to the presence of ochratoxin A and two other unidentified metabolites. PMID:17592895

  9. Metabolism of hydroxylated and fluorinated benzoates by Syntrophus aciditrophicus and detection of a fluorodiene metabolite.

    PubMed

    Mouttaki, Housna; Nanny, Mark A; McInerney, Michael J

    2009-02-01

    Transformations of 2-hydroxybenzoate and fluorobenzoate isomers were investigated in the strictly anaerobic Syntrophus aciditrophicus to gain insight into the initial steps of the metabolism of aromatic acids. 2-Hydroxybenzoate was metabolized to methane and acetate by S. aciditrophicus and Methanospirillum hungatei cocultures and reduced to cyclohexane carboxylate by pure cultures of S. aciditrophicus when grown in the presence of crotonate. Under both conditions, transient accumulation of benzoate but not phenol was observed, indicating that dehydroxylation occurred prior to ring reduction. Pure cultures of S. aciditrophicus reductively dehalogenated 3-fluorobenzoate with the stoichiometric accumulation of benzoate and fluorine. 3-Fluorobenzoate-degrading cultures produced a metabolite that had a fragmentation pattern almost identical to that of the trimethylsilyl (TMS) derivative of 3-fluorobenzoate but with a mass increase of 2 units. When cells were incubated with deuterated water, this metabolite had a mass increase of 3 or 4 units relative to the TMS derivative of 3-fluorobenzoate. (19)F nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy ((19)F NMR) detected a metabolite in fluorobenzoate-degrading cultures with two double bonds, either 1-carboxyl-3-fluoro-2,6-cyclohexadiene or 1-carboxyl-3-fluoro-3,6-cyclohexadiene. The mass spectral and NMR data are consistent with the addition of two hydrogen or deuterium atoms to 3-fluorobenzoate, forming a 3-fluorocyclohexadiene metabolite. The production of a diene metabolite provides evidence that S. aciditrophicus contains dearomatizing reductase that uses two electrons to dearomatize the aromatic ring. PMID:19114508

  10. Detection of JWH-018 metabolites in smoking mixture post-administration urine.

    PubMed

    Sobolevsky, Tim; Prasolov, Ilya; Rodchenkov, Grigory

    2010-07-15

    Smoking mixtures containing the cannabimimetic indoles may still be available over-the-counter in several countries. Due to the high affinity of these compounds to the cannabinoid receptors, their effective dose is lower than that of the marijuana products resulting in a low concentration of the excreted metabolites accompanied by a higher psychoactive potency. Up to now the in vivo metabolism of the cannabimimetic indoles seems to be insufficiently investigated and no data have been published on an assay of JWH-018 in urine. In this publication the urinary metabolites of JWH-018 are reported. Using gas and liquid chromatography combined with tandem mass spectrometry two main monohydroxylated metabolites were identified in the forensic urine samples. Based on the differences in their electron ionization MS/MS spectra it is supposed that one is formed by hydroxylation of the indole ring whilst the other by hydroxylation of the N-alkyl chain. The main metabolites are almost completely glucuroconjugated, whereas minor ones (N-despentyl hydroxy-, carboxy-, dihydroxy-, and reduced di- and trihydroxy metabolites) were also present in the free fraction. The parent compound was not detected in urine.

  11. Graphene nano-ink biosensor arrays on a microfluidic paper for multiplexed detection of metabolites.

    PubMed

    Labroo, Pratima; Cui, Yue

    2014-02-27

    The development of a miniaturized and low-cost platform for the highly sensitive, selective and rapid detection of multiplexed metabolites is of great interest for healthcare, pharmaceuticals, food science, and environmental monitoring. Graphene is a delicate single-layer, two-dimensional network of carbon atoms with extraordinary electrical sensing capability. Microfluidic paper with printing technique is a low cost matrix. Here, we demonstrated the development of graphene-ink based biosensor arrays on a microfluidic paper for the multiplexed detection of different metabolites, such as glucose, lactate, xanthine and cholesterol. Our results show that the graphene biosensor arrays can detect multiple metabolites on a microfluidic paper sensitively, rapidly and simultaneously. The device exhibits a fast measuring time of less than 2 min, a low detection limit of 0.3 μM, and a dynamic detection range of 0.3-15 μM. The process is simple and inexpensive to operate and requires a low consumption of sample volume. We anticipate that these results could open exciting opportunities for a variety of applications. PMID:24528665

  12. CEST-MRI detects metabolite levels altered by breast cancer cell aggressiveness and chemotherapy response.

    PubMed

    Chan, Kannie W Y; Jiang, Lu; Cheng, Menglin; Wijnen, Jannie P; Liu, Guanshu; Huang, Peng; van Zijl, Peter C M; McMahon, Michael T; Glunde, Kristine

    2016-06-01

    Chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) is an MRI contrast mechanism that detects the exchange of protons from distinct hydroxyl, amine, and amide groups to tissue water through the transfer of signal loss, with repeated exchange enhancing their effective signal. We applied CEST to detect systematically 15 common cellular metabolites in a panel of differentially aggressive human breast cancer cell lines. The highest CEST contrast was generated by creatine, myo-inositol, glutamate, and glycerophosphocholine, whose cellular concentrations decreased with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness. These decreased metabolite concentrations resulted in turn in a decreased CEST profile with increasing breast cancer aggressiveness in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. Treatment of both breast cancer cell lines with the chemotherapy drug doxorubicin resulted in increased metabolic CEST profiles, which correlated with significant increases in creatine, phosphocreatine, and glycerophosphocholine. CEST can detect breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy in water-soluble extracts of breast cell lines. The presented results help shed light on possible contributions from CEST-active metabolites to the CEST contrast produced by breast cancers. The metabolic CEST profile may improve detection sensitivity over conventional MRS, and may have the potential to assess breast cancer aggressiveness and response to chemotherapy non-invasively using MRI if specialized metabolic CEST profile detection can be realized in vivo. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27100284

  13. Methods to Detect Nitric Oxide and its Metabolites in Biological Samples

    PubMed Central

    Bryan, Nathan S.; Grisham, Matthew B.

    2007-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) methodology is a complex and often confusing science and the focus of many debates and discussion concerning NO biochemistry. NO is involved in many physiological processes including regulation of blood pressure, immune response and neural communication. Therefore its accurate detection and quantification is critical to understanding health and disease. Due to the extremely short physiological half life of this gaseous free radical, alternative strategies for the detection of reaction products of NO biochemistry have been developed. The quantification of NO metabolites in biological samples provides valuable information with regards to in vivo NO production, bioavailability and metabolism. Simply sampling a single compartment such as blood or plasma may not always provide an accurate assessment of whole body NO status, particularly in tissues. Therefore, extrapolation of plasma or blood NO status to specific tissues of interest is no longer a valid approach. As a result, methods continue to be developed and validated which allow the detection and quantification of NO and NO-related products/metabolites in multiple compartments of experimental animals in vivo. The methods described in this review is not an exhaustive or comprehensive discussion of all methods available for the detection of NO but rather a description of the most commonly used and practical methods which allow accurate and sensitive quantification of NO products/metabolites in multiple biological matrices under normal physiological conditions. PMID:17664129

  14. Amplified and in situ detection of redox-active metabolite using a biobased redox capacitor.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eunkyoung; Gordonov, Tanya; Bentley, William E; Payne, Gregory F

    2013-02-19

    Redox cycling provides a mechanism to amplify electrochemical signals for analyte detection. Previous studies have shown that diverse mediators/shuttles can engage in redox-cycling reactions with a biobased redox capacitor that is fabricated by grafting redox-active catechols onto a chitosan film. Here, we report that redox cycling with this catechol-chitosan redox capacitor can amplify electrochemical signals for detecting a redox-active bacterial metabolite. Specifically, we studied the redox-active bacterial metabolite pyocyanin that is reported to be a virulence factor and signaling molecule for the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa. We demonstrate that redox cycling can amplify outputs from various electrochemical methods (cyclic voltammetry, chronocoulometry, and differential pulse voltammetry) and can lower the detection limit of pyocyanin to 50 nM. Further, the compatibility of this biobased redox capacitor allows the in situ monitoring of the production of redox-active metabolites (e.g., pyocyanin) during the course of P. aeruginosa cultivation. We anticipate that the amplified output of redox-active virulence factors should permit an earlier detection of life-threatening infections by the opportunistic pathogen P. aeruginosa while the "bio-compatibility" of this measurement approach should facilitate in situ study of the spatiotemporal dynamics of bacterial redox signaling.

  15. Detection and identification of plasma progesterone metabolites in the female Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) using GC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tripp, K M; Dubois, M; Delahaut, P; Verstegen, J P

    2009-08-01

    Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) have relatively low peripheral concentrations of progesterone (P4). The objective of this study was to determine if these relatively low P4 concentrations are associated with a high ratio of progestin metabolites and to document metabolite concentrations from individual blood samples obtained from manatees during diestrus or pregnancy. Metabolites known to exist in elephants-terrestrial manatee relatives-were targeted. These included 5alpha-reduced progestins (5alpha-pregnane-3,20-dione [5alpha-DHP] and 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one [5alpha-P3-OH]) and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17alpha-OHP), which occurs in Asian elephants. An additional, inactive metabolite, 20alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (20alpha-OHP), indicative of P4 overproduction, was also targeted. Progesterone itself was the predominant progestin detected in pregnant and nonpregnant manatee plasma (n = 10) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with tandem quadrupole detectors (GC/MS/MS). Progesterone concentrations in pregnant females varied from early (moderate to high) through mid and late (low) pregnancy. Progesterone concentrations ranged from low to high in nonpregnant, nonlactating females. The most commonly detected metabolite was 5alpha-P3-OH (n = 7), which occurred in pregnant (lower limit of detection [LLOD] to high) and nonpregnant (trace to high) females. The 5alpha-DHP metabolite was also detected in pregnant (LLOD to moderate) and nonpregnant (low) females. The 17alpha-OHP metabolite was not detected in any tested female. The 20alpha-OHP metabolite was detected in one nonpregnant, nonlactating, captive female (LLOD). Metabolites were most prevalent during early pregnancy, concurrent with maximum P4 concentrations. Based on their concentrations in peripheral circulation, we inferred that these metabolites may have, opposite to elephants, a limited physiologic role during luteal, pregnant, and nonpregnant phases in the manatee.

  16. Detection and identification of plasma progesterone metabolites in the female Florida manatee (Trichechus manatus latirostris) using GC/MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Tripp, K M; Dubois, M; Delahaut, P; Verstegen, J P

    2009-08-01

    Florida manatees (Trichechus manatus latirostris) have relatively low peripheral concentrations of progesterone (P4). The objective of this study was to determine if these relatively low P4 concentrations are associated with a high ratio of progestin metabolites and to document metabolite concentrations from individual blood samples obtained from manatees during diestrus or pregnancy. Metabolites known to exist in elephants-terrestrial manatee relatives-were targeted. These included 5alpha-reduced progestins (5alpha-pregnane-3,20-dione [5alpha-DHP] and 3alpha-hydroxy-5alpha-pregnan-20-one [5alpha-P3-OH]) and 17alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (17alpha-OHP), which occurs in Asian elephants. An additional, inactive metabolite, 20alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (20alpha-OHP), indicative of P4 overproduction, was also targeted. Progesterone itself was the predominant progestin detected in pregnant and nonpregnant manatee plasma (n = 10) using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry with tandem quadrupole detectors (GC/MS/MS). Progesterone concentrations in pregnant females varied from early (moderate to high) through mid and late (low) pregnancy. Progesterone concentrations ranged from low to high in nonpregnant, nonlactating females. The most commonly detected metabolite was 5alpha-P3-OH (n = 7), which occurred in pregnant (lower limit of detection [LLOD] to high) and nonpregnant (trace to high) females. The 5alpha-DHP metabolite was also detected in pregnant (LLOD to moderate) and nonpregnant (low) females. The 17alpha-OHP metabolite was not detected in any tested female. The 20alpha-OHP metabolite was detected in one nonpregnant, nonlactating, captive female (LLOD). Metabolites were most prevalent during early pregnancy, concurrent with maximum P4 concentrations. Based on their concentrations in peripheral circulation, we inferred that these metabolites may have, opposite to elephants, a limited physiologic role during luteal, pregnant, and nonpregnant phases in the manatee. PMID

  17. Detection of Pesticides and Pesticide Metabolites Using the Cross Reactivity of Enzyme Immunoassays

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thurman, E.M.; Aga, D.S.

    2001-01-01

    Enzyme immunoassay is an important environmental analysis method that may be used to identify many pesticide analytes in water samples. Because of similarities in chemical structure between various members of a pesticide class, there often may be an unwanted response that is characterized by a percentage of cross reactivity. Also, there may be cross reactivity caused by degradation products of the target analyte that may be present in the sample. In this paper, the concept of cross reactivity caused by degradation products or by nontarget analytes is explored as a tool for identification of metabolites or structurally similar compounds not previously known to be present in water samples. Two examples are examined in this paper from various water quality studies. They are alachlor and its metabolite, alachlor ethane sulfonic acid, and atrazine and its class members, prometryn and propazine. A method for using cross reactivity for the detection of these compounds is explained in this paper.

  18. A fast screening MALDI method for the detection of cocaine and its metabolites in hair.

    PubMed

    Vogliardi, Susanna; Favretto, Donata; Frison, Giampietro; Ferrara, Santo Davide; Seraglia, Roberta; Traldi, Pietro

    2009-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionisation (MALDI) mass spectrometry was used for the rapid detection of cocaine, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene in hair. Different MALDI sample preparation procedures have been tested and the employment of a multi-layer 'graphite-sample-electrosprayed alpha-cyano-4-hydroxycinnamic acid (HCCA)' yielded the best results for standard solutions of the target analytes. The same approach was subsequently applied to hair samples that were known to contain cocaine, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene, as determined by a classical GC-MS method. It was however necessary to extract hair samples by incubating them in methanol/trifluoroacetic acid for a short time (15 min) at 45 degrees C; 1 microl of the obtained supernatant was deposed on a metal surface treated with graphite, and HCCA was electrosprayed on it. This procedure successfully suppressed matrix peaks and was effective in detecting all the target analytes as their protonated species. The results obtained give further confirmation of the effectiveness of the MALDI for detecting drugs and their metabolites in complex biological matrices. The method can be useful as a fast screening procedure to detect the presence of cocaine and metabolites in hair samples. PMID:18698561

  19. Aflatoxin metabolism in humans: detection of metabolites and nucleic acid adducts in urine by affinity chromatography

    SciTech Connect

    Groopman, J.D.; Donahue, P.R.; Zhu, J.Q.; Chen, J.S.; Wogan, G.N.

    1985-10-01

    A high-affinity IgM monoclonal antibody specific for aflatoxins was covalently bound to Sepharose 4B and used as a preparative column to isolate aflatoxin derivatives from the urine of people and experimental animals who had been exposed to the carcinogen environmentally or under laboratory conditions. Aflatoxin levels were quantified by radioimmunoassay and high-performance liquid chromatography after elution from the affinity column. In studies on rats injected with ( UC)aflatoxin B1, the authors identified the major aflatoxin-DNA adduct, 2,3-dihydro-2-(N7-guanyl)-3-hydroxy-aflatoxin B1 (AFB1-N7-Gua), and the oxidative metabolites M1 and P1 as the major aflatoxin species present in the urine. When this methodology was applied to human urine samples obtained from people from the Guangxi Province of China exposed to aflatoxin B1 through dietary contamination, the aflatoxin metabolites detected were also AFB1-N7-Gua and aflatoxins M1 and P1. Therefore, affinity chromatography using a monoclonal antibody represents a useful and rapid technique with which to isolate this carcinogen and its metabolites in biochemical epidemiology and for subsequent quantitative measurements, providing exposure information that can be used for risk assessment.

  20. Removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluent by aerobic biological treatment with steroidal metabolite detection.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Soledad; Vergara, Juan P; Jarpa, Mayra; Hernandez, Victor; Becerra, Jose; Vidal, Gladys

    2016-10-14

    Stigmasterol is a phytosterol contained in Kraft mill effluent that is able to increase over 100% after aerobic biological treatment. This compound can act as an endocrine disrupter as its structure is similar to that of cholesterol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluents treated by a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) with steroidal metabolite detection. The MBBR was operated for 145 days, with a hydraulic retention time of 2 days. Stigmasterol and steroidal metabolites were detected by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector during MBBR operation. The results show that the MBBR removed 87.4% of biological oxygen demand (BOD5), 61.5% of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 24.5% of phenol and 31.5% of lignin, expressed in average values. The MBBR system successfully removed 100% of the stigmasterol contained in the influent (33 µg L(-1)) after 5 weeks of operation. In that case, the organic load rate was 0.343 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). Furthermore, different steroidal compounds (e.g., testosterone propionate, stigmast-4-en-3-one, 5α-pregnan-12-one-20α-hydroxy, 5α-pregnane-3,11,20-trione and 3α-hydroxy-5α-androstane-11,17-dione were detected in the Kraft mill effluent as potential products of phytosterol biotransformation. PMID:27399163

  1. Removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluent by aerobic biological treatment with steroidal metabolite detection.

    PubMed

    Chamorro, Soledad; Vergara, Juan P; Jarpa, Mayra; Hernandez, Victor; Becerra, Jose; Vidal, Gladys

    2016-10-14

    Stigmasterol is a phytosterol contained in Kraft mill effluent that is able to increase over 100% after aerobic biological treatment. This compound can act as an endocrine disrupter as its structure is similar to that of cholesterol. The aim of this study was to evaluate the removal of stigmasterol from Kraft mill effluents treated by a moving bed biofilm reactor (MBBR) with steroidal metabolite detection. The MBBR was operated for 145 days, with a hydraulic retention time of 2 days. Stigmasterol and steroidal metabolites were detected by gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector during MBBR operation. The results show that the MBBR removed 87.4% of biological oxygen demand (BOD5), 61.5% of chemical oxygen demand (COD), 24.5% of phenol and 31.5% of lignin, expressed in average values. The MBBR system successfully removed 100% of the stigmasterol contained in the influent (33 µg L(-1)) after 5 weeks of operation. In that case, the organic load rate was 0.343 kg COD m(-3) d(-1). Furthermore, different steroidal compounds (e.g., testosterone propionate, stigmast-4-en-3-one, 5α-pregnan-12-one-20α-hydroxy, 5α-pregnane-3,11,20-trione and 3α-hydroxy-5α-androstane-11,17-dione were detected in the Kraft mill effluent as potential products of phytosterol biotransformation.

  2. Proton observed phosphorus editing (POPE) for in vivo detection of phospholipid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Wijnen, Jannie P; Klomp, Dennis W J; Nabuurs, Christine I H C; de Graaf, Robin A; van Kalleveen, Irene M L; van der Kemp, Wybe J M; Luijten, Peter R; Kruit, Mark C; Webb, Andrew; Kan, Hermien E; Boer, Vincent O

    2016-09-01

    The purpose of this article was to compare the sensitivity of proton observed phosphorus editing (POPE) with direct (31) P MRS with Ernst angle excitation for (1) H-(31) P coupled metabolites at 7 T. POPE sequences were developed for detecting phosphocholine (PC), phosphoethanolamine (PE), glycerophosphocholine (GPC), and glycerophosphoethanolamine (GPE) on the (1) H channel, thereby using the enhanced sensitivity of the (1) H nuclei over (31) P detection. Five healthy volunteers were examined with POPE and (31) P-MRS. POPE editing showed a more than doubled sensitivity in an ideal phantom experiment as compared with direct (31) P MRS with Ernst angle excitation. In vivo, despite increased relaxation losses, significant gains in signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of 30-40% were shown for PE and GPE + PC levels in the human brain. The SNR of GPC was lower in the POPE measurement compared with the (31) P-MRS measurement. Furthermore, selective narrowband editing on the (31) P channel showed the ability to separate the overlapping GPE and PE signals in the (1) H spectrum. POPE can be used for enhanced detection of (1) H-(31) P coupled metabolites in vivo. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. Meat, the metabolites: an integrated metabolite profiling and lipidomics approach for the detection of the adulteration of beef with pork

    PubMed Central

    Trivedi, Drupad K.; Hollywood, Katherine A.; Rattray, Nicholas J. W.; Ward, Holli; Trivedi, Dakshat K.; Greenwood, Joseph; Ellis, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Adulteration of high quality food products with sub-standard and cheaper grades is a world-wide problem taxing the global economy. Currently, many traditional tests suffer from poor specificity, highly complex outputs and a lack of high-throughput processing. Metabolomics has been successfully used as an accurate discriminatory technique in a number of applications including microbiology, cancer research and environmental studies and certain types of food fraud. In this study, we have developed metabolomics as a technique to assess the adulteration of meat as an improvement on current methods. Different grades of beef mince and pork mince, purchased from a national retail outlet were combined in a number of percentage ratios and analysed using GC-MS and UHPLC-MS. These techniques were chosen because GC-MS enables investigations of metabolites involved in primary metabolism whilst UHPLC-MS using reversed phase chromatography provides information on lipophilic species. With the application of chemometrics and statistical analyses, a panel of differential metabolites were found for identification of each of the two meat types. Additionally, correlation was observed between metabolite content and percentage of fat declared on meat products’ labelling. PMID:26911805

  4. Meat, the metabolites: an integrated metabolite profiling and lipidomics approach for the detection of the adulteration of beef with pork.

    PubMed

    Trivedi, Drupad K; Hollywood, Katherine A; Rattray, Nicholas J W; Ward, Holli; Trivedi, Dakshat K; Greenwood, Joseph; Ellis, David I; Goodacre, Royston

    2016-04-01

    Adulteration of high quality food products with sub-standard and cheaper grades is a world-wide problem taxing the global economy. Currently, many traditional tests suffer from poor specificity, highly complex outputs and a lack of high-throughput processing. Metabolomics has been successfully used as an accurate discriminatory technique in a number of applications including microbiology, cancer research and environmental studies and certain types of food fraud. In this study, we have developed metabolomics as a technique to assess the adulteration of meat as an improvement on current methods. Different grades of beef mince and pork mince, purchased from a national retail outlet were combined in a number of percentage ratios and analysed using GC-MS and UHPLC-MS. These techniques were chosen because GC-MS enables investigations of metabolites involved in primary metabolism whilst UHPLC-MS using reversed phase chromatography provides information on lipophilic species. With the application of chemometrics and statistical analyses, a panel of differential metabolites were found for identification of each of the two meat types. Additionally, correlation was observed between metabolite content and percentage of fat declared on meat products' labelling. PMID:26911805

  5. Development and in silico evaluation of large-scale metabolite identification methods using functional group detection for metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Mitchell, Joshua M; Fan, Teresa W-M; Lane, Andrew N; Moseley, Hunter N B

    2014-01-01

    Large-scale identification of metabolites is key to elucidating and modeling metabolism at the systems level. Advances in metabolomics technologies, particularly ultra-high resolution mass spectrometry (MS) enable comprehensive and rapid analysis of metabolites. However, a significant barrier to meaningful data interpretation is the identification of a wide range of metabolites including unknowns and the determination of their role(s) in various metabolic networks. Chemoselective (CS) probes to tag metabolite functional groups combined with high mass accuracy provide additional structural constraints for metabolite identification and quantification. We have developed a novel algorithm, Chemically Aware Substructure Search (CASS) that efficiently detects functional groups within existing metabolite databases, allowing for combined molecular formula and functional group (from CS tagging) queries to aid in metabolite identification without a priori knowledge. Analysis of the isomeric compounds in both Human Metabolome Database (HMDB) and KEGG Ligand demonstrated a high percentage of isomeric molecular formulae (43 and 28%, respectively), indicating the necessity for techniques such as CS-tagging. Furthermore, these two databases have only moderate overlap in molecular formulae. Thus, it is prudent to use multiple databases in metabolite assignment, since each major metabolite database represents different portions of metabolism within the biosphere. In silico analysis of various CS-tagging strategies under different conditions for adduct formation demonstrate that combined FT-MS derived molecular formulae and CS-tagging can uniquely identify up to 71% of KEGG and 37% of the combined KEGG/HMDB database vs. 41 and 17%, respectively without adduct formation. This difference between database isomer disambiguation highlights the strength of CS-tagging for non-lipid metabolite identification. However, unique identification of complex lipids still needs additional

  6. Detection of banned nitrofuran metabolites in animal plasma samples using UHPLC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Radovnikovic, Anita; Moloney, Mary; Byrne, Paddy; Danaher, Martin

    2011-01-15

    The use of nitrofurans as veterinary drugs in food-producing animals has been banned in the EU since the 1990s. Monitoring programs in the EU are based on the detection of protein-bound metabolites after slaughter. An UHPLC-MS/MS method was developed and validated for pre slaughter determination of four nitrofuran metabolites (AHD, AOZ, SEM, AMOZ) in animal plasma (bovine, ovine, equine and porcine). This method is proposed as an alternative method for on-farm surveillance. Plasma samples were derivatised with 2-nitrobenzaldehyde and subsequently extracted with organic solvent. Extracts were concentrated and then analysed by UHPLC-MS/MS. The method was validated according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC. Inter-species recovery for AHD, AOZ, SEM and AMOZ was 72, 74, 57 and 71%, respectively. Decision limits (CCα) were calculated from within laboratory reproducibility experiments to be 0.070, 0.059, 0.071 and 0.054 μg kg(-1), respectively. In addition, the assay was applied to incurred plasma samples taken from pigs treated with furazolidone. PMID:21185239

  7. Detection of doxorubicin and metabolites in cell extracts and in single cells by capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Adrian B; Gergen, Jamie; Arriaga, Edgar A

    2002-03-25

    Capillary electrophoresis with laser-induced fluorescence detection was used to separate and detect doxorubicin and at least five metabolites from NS-1 cells that were treated with 25 microM doxorubicin for 8 h. Using 10 mM borate, 10 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate (pH 9.3) as separation buffer, the 488-nm argon-ion laser line for fluorescence excitation, and a 635 +/- 27.5 nm bandpass filter for detection, the limit of detection (S/N=3) for doxorubicin is 61 +/- 13 zmol. This low limit of detection allows for the detection of a larger number of metabolites than previously reported. Two extraction procedures were performed: a bulk liquid-liquid extraction and an in-capillary single-cell lysis. While in the bulk liquid-liquid extraction procedure, recovery for doxorubicin range from 50 to 99%, in single cell analysis the recovery is expected to be complete. Furthermore performing lysis of a single cell inside the separation capillary prevents doxorubicin or metabolite loss or degradation during handling. Based on the bulk method the calculated metabolite abundance is in the sub-amol per cell range while it varies from 0.1 to 1.1 fmol per cell in single cell analysis confirming metabolite loss during handling. Each metabolite was found at a level less than 0.1% of the doxorubicin content in either method, suggesting a slow metabolism in the NS-1 cell system or effective removal of metabolites by the cell.

  8. Structural Characterization of Plasma Metabolites Detected via LC-Electrochemical Coulometric Array using LC-UV Fractionation, MS, and NMR

    PubMed Central

    Bird, Susan S.; Sheldon, Diane P.; Gathungu, Rose M.; Vouros, Paul; Kautz, Roger; Matson, Wayne R.; Kristal, Bruce S.

    2012-01-01

    Liquid chromatography (LC) separation combined with electrochemical coulometric array detection (EC), is a sensitive, reproducible, and robust technique that can detect hundreds of redox-active metabolites down to the level of femtograms on column, making it ideal for metabolomics profiling. EC detection cannot, however, structurally characterize unknown metabolites that comprise these profiles. Several aspects of LC-EC methods prevent a direct transfer to other structurally-informative analytical methods, such as LC-MS and NMR. These include system limits of detection, buffer requirements, and detection mechanisms. To address these limitations, we developed a workflow based on the concentration of plasma, metabolite extraction, and offline LC-UV fractionation. Pooled human plasma was used to provide sufficient material necessary for multiple sample concentrations and platform analyses. Offline parallel LC-EC and LC-MS methods were established that correlated standard metabolites between the LC-EC profiling method and the mass spectrometer. Peak retention times (RT) from the LC-MS and LC-EC system were linearly related (r2=0.99); thus LC-MS RTs could be directly predicted from the LC-EC signals. Subsequent offline microcoil-NMR analysis of these collected fractions was used to confirm LC-MS characterizations by providing complementary, structural data. This work provides a validated workflow that is transferrable across multiple platforms and provides the unambiguous structural identifications necessary to move primary mathematically-driven LC-EC biomarker discovery into biological and clinical utility. PMID:23106399

  9. Insights into the Anaerobic Biodegradation Pathway of n-Alkanes in Oil Reservoirs by Detection of Signature Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Bian, Xin-Yu; Maurice Mbadinga, Serge; Liu, Yi-Fan; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Ye, Ru-Qiang; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-01-01

    Anaerobic degradation of alkanes in hydrocarbon-rich environments has been documented and different degradation strategies proposed, of which the most encountered one is fumarate addition mechanism, generating alkylsuccinates as specific biomarkers. However, little is known about the mechanisms of anaerobic degradation of alkanes in oil reservoirs, due to low concentrations of signature metabolites and lack of mass spectral characteristics to allow identification. In this work, we used a multidisciplinary approach combining metabolite profiling and selective gene assays to establish the biodegradation mechanism of alkanes in oil reservoirs. A total of twelve production fluids from three different oil reservoirs were collected and treated with alkali; organic acids were extracted, derivatized with ethanol to form ethyl esters and determined using GC-MS analysis. Collectively, signature metabolite alkylsuccinates of parent compounds from C1 to C8 together with their (putative) downstream metabolites were detected from these samples. Additionally, metabolites indicative of the anaerobic degradation of mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (2-benzylsuccinate, naphthoate, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-naphthoate) were also observed. The detection of alkylsuccinates and genes encoding for alkylsuccinate synthase shows that anaerobic degradation of alkanes via fumarate addition occurs in oil reservoirs. This work provides strong evidence on the in situ anaerobic biodegradation mechanisms of hydrocarbons by fumarate addition. PMID:25966798

  10. Insights into the Anaerobic Biodegradation Pathway of n-Alkanes in Oil Reservoirs by Detection of Signature Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Bian, Xin-Yu; Mbadinga, Serge Maurice; Liu, Yi-Fan; Yang, Shi-Zhong; Liu, Jin-Feng; Ye, Ru-Qiang; Gu, Ji-Dong; Mu, Bo-Zhong

    2015-05-13

    Anaerobic degradation of alkanes in hydrocarbon-rich environments has been documented and different degradation strategies proposed, of which the most encountered one is fumarate addition mechanism, generating alkylsuccinates as specific biomarkers. However, little is known about the mechanisms of anaerobic degradation of alkanes in oil reservoirs, due to low concentrations of signature metabolites and lack of mass spectral characteristics to allow identification. In this work, we used a multidisciplinary approach combining metabolite profiling and selective gene assays to establish the biodegradation mechanism of alkanes in oil reservoirs. A total of twelve production fluids from three different oil reservoirs were collected and treated with alkali; organic acids were extracted, derivatized with ethanol to form ethyl esters and determined using GC-MS analysis. Collectively, signature metabolite alkylsuccinates of parent compounds from C1 to C8 together with their (putative) downstream metabolites were detected from these samples. Additionally, metabolites indicative of the anaerobic degradation of mono- and poly-aromatic hydrocarbons (2-benzylsuccinate, naphthoate, 5,6,7,8-tetrahydro-naphthoate) were also observed. The detection of alkylsuccinates and genes encoding for alkylsuccinate synthase shows that anaerobic degradation of alkanes via fumarate addition occurs in oil reservoirs. This work provides strong evidence on the in situ anaerobic biodegradation mechanisms of hydrocarbons by fumarate addition.

  11. Detection of methamphetamine and its main metabolite in fingermarks by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Xueguo; Yang, Ruiqin; Xu, Yingjian

    2015-03-01

    A sensitive and efficient method applying liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of methamphetamine and its main metabolite in fingermark deposits was described. Using this method, good linear relationship of methamphetamine was obtained in the range of 0.005μg to 0.5μg per cotton swab, the limit of detection was 1.5ng per cotton swab, the limit of quantitation was 5.0ng per cotton swab and the average values of recovery ratios were above 70.1%. Moreover, the influence factors for the detection of methamphetamine in fingermarks, such as kinds of substrates, development methods and extraction methods, were all discussed in details. The results showed that good recovery ratios could be obtained on painted wood and smooth substrates surfaces. Development methods in commercial powder could not influence the quality of examination of exogenous drug in latent fingermark. Furthermore, the results indicated that the method mentioned here could be applied in the analysis of forensic trace evidences and samples obtained in clinically addicted cases. PMID:25576675

  12. Detection of methamphetamine and its main metabolite in fingermarks by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ting; Chen, Xueguo; Yang, Ruiqin; Xu, Yingjian

    2015-03-01

    A sensitive and efficient method applying liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry for the analysis of methamphetamine and its main metabolite in fingermark deposits was described. Using this method, good linear relationship of methamphetamine was obtained in the range of 0.005μg to 0.5μg per cotton swab, the limit of detection was 1.5ng per cotton swab, the limit of quantitation was 5.0ng per cotton swab and the average values of recovery ratios were above 70.1%. Moreover, the influence factors for the detection of methamphetamine in fingermarks, such as kinds of substrates, development methods and extraction methods, were all discussed in details. The results showed that good recovery ratios could be obtained on painted wood and smooth substrates surfaces. Development methods in commercial powder could not influence the quality of examination of exogenous drug in latent fingermark. Furthermore, the results indicated that the method mentioned here could be applied in the analysis of forensic trace evidences and samples obtained in clinically addicted cases.

  13. High-resolution twin-ion metabolite extraction (HiTIME) mass spectrometry: nontargeted detection of unknown drug metabolites by isotope labeling, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry, and automated high-performance computing.

    PubMed

    Leeming, Michael G; Isaac, Andrew P; Pope, Bernard J; Cranswick, Noel; Wright, Christine E; Ziogas, James; O'Hair, Richard A J; Donald, William A

    2015-04-21

    The metabolic fate of a compound can often determine the success of a new drug lead. Thus, significant effort is directed toward identifying the metabolites formed from a given molecule. Here, an automated and nontargeted procedure is introduced for detecting drug metabolites without authentic metabolite standards via the use of stable isotope labeling, liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC/MS), and high-performance computing. LC/MS of blood plasma extracts from rats that were administered a 1:1 mixture of acetaminophen (APAP) and (13)C6-APAP resulted in mass spectra that contained "twin" ions for drug metabolites that were not detected in control spectra (i.e., no APAP administered). Because of the development of a program (high-resolution twin-ion metabolite extraction; HiTIME) that can identify twin-ions in high-resolution mass spectra without centroiding (i.e., reduction of mass spectral peaks to single data points), 9 doublets corresponding to APAP metabolites were identified. This is nearly twice that obtained by use of existing programs that make use of centroiding to reduce computational cost under these conditions with a quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometer. By a manual search for all reported APAP metabolite ions, no additional twin-ion signals were assigned. These data indicate that all the major metabolites of APAP and multiple low-abundance metabolites (e.g., acetaminophen hydroxy- and methoxysulfate) that are rarely reported were detected. This methodology can be used to detect drug metabolites without prior knowledge of their identity. HiTIME is freely available from https://github.com/bjpop/HiTIME .

  14. Detection of main metabolites of XLR-11 and its thermal degradation product in human hepatoma HepaRG cells and human urine.

    PubMed

    Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Kanda, Koji; Yamamuro, Tadashi; Kuwayama, Kenji; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Iwata, Yuko Togawa; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2015-04-01

    The metabolism of (1-(5-fluoropentyl)-1H-indol-3-yl)(2,2,3,3-tetramethylcyclopropyl)methanone (XLR-11), a novel synthetic cannabinoid, was studied using a HepaRG cell culture. The HepaRG cells were incubated with the drug for 48 hours and the metabolites were extracted from the culture medium by liquid-liquid extraction. The extract was analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry to detect the metabolites. N-(5-Hydroxypentyl) metabolite and N-pentanoic acid metabolite were identified in the culture medium of XLR-11, and several other metabolites, presumably formed by oxidation of the first two metabolites and XLR-11, were detected. The extract of an XLR-11 user's urine was also analyzed; however, the metabolites detected in the urine were different from XLR-11 metabolites in the medium. A metabolic experiment with the thermal degradation product of XLR-11, XLR-11 degradant, using HepaRG cells revealed that the urinary metabolites were almost identical to the XLR-11 degradant metabolites. These findings suggest that most of the XLR-11 was degraded by heating when the user smoked the herbal product containing XLR-11.

  15. Detection of metabolites of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) in human urine specimens: 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD, a prevalent metabolite of LSD.

    PubMed

    Poch, G K; Klette, K L; Hallare, D A; Manglicmot, M G; Czarny, R J; McWhorter, L K; Anderson, C J

    1999-03-01

    Seventy-four urine specimens previously found to contain lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) were analyzed by a new procedure for the LSD metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (O-H-LSD) using a Finnigan LC-MS-MS system. This procedure proved to be less complex, shorter to perform and provides cleaner chromatographic characteristics than the method currently utilized by the Navy Drug Screening Laboratories for the extraction of LSD from urine by GC-MS. All of the specimens used in the study screened positive for LSD by radioimmunoassay (Roche Abuscreen). Analysis by GC-MS revealed detectable amounts of LSD in all of the specimens. In addition, isolysergic diethylamide (iso-LSD), a byproduct of LSD synthesis, was quantitated in 64 of the specimens. Utilizing the new LC-MS-MS method, low levels of N-desmethyl-LSD (nor-LSD), another identified LSD metabolite, were detected in some of the specimens. However, all 74 specimens contained O-H-LSD at significantly higher concentrations than LSD, iso-LSD, or nor-LSD alone. The O-H-LSD concentration ranged from 732 to 112 831 pg/ml (mean, 16340 pg/ml) by quantification with an internal standard. The ratio of O-H-LSD to LSD ranged from 1.1 to 778.1 (mean, 42.9). The presence of O-H-LSD at substantially higher concentrations than LSD suggests that the analysis for O-H-LSD as the target analyte by employing LC-MS-MS will provide a much longer window of detection for the use of LSD than the analysis of the parent compound, LSD.

  16. Detection of cocaine and its metabolites in urine using solid phase extraction-ion mobility spectrometry with alternating least squares.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yao; O'Donnell, Ryan M; Harrington, Peter B

    2009-08-10

    A reliable, alternative screening method for detection of cocaine and its metabolites, benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene in urine is demonstrated using solid phase extraction (SPE) coupled with ion mobility spectrometry (IMS). Data analysis with alternating least squares (ALS) is used to model IMS spectral datasets and separate the reactant ion peak from the product ion peaks. IMS has been used as a screening device for drug and explosive detection for many years. It has the advantages of atmospheric pressure operation, simple sample preparation, portability, fast analysis, and high sensitivity when compared to similar methods. Coupling SPE with IMS decreases the detection limits of drug metabolites in urine while removing salts and other polar compounds that suppress ionization during the measurement. The IMS analysis time in this experiment is 20s, much shorter than traditional chromatographic analysis. The application of ALS further increases the sensitivity and selectivity of this method. The detection limits of benzoylecgonine and cocaethylene are 10 ng/mL and 4 ng/mL, respectively. Commercial adulteration of urine specimens does not influence the ability to detect cocaine metabolites after sampling the urine with SPE. This method provides forensic chemists a viable approach for fast and simple drug screening. PMID:19457629

  17. Detection of urinary metabolites common to structurally related 17alpha-alkyl anabolic steroids in horses and application to doping tests in racehorses: methandienone, methandriol, and oxymetholone.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Masayuki; Aramaki, Sugako; Kurosawa, Masahiko; Saito, Koichi; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki

    2008-06-01

    Methandienone, methandriol, and oxymetholone, which are anabolic steroids possessing 17alpha-methyl and 17beta-hydroxy groups, were developed as oral formulations for therapeutic purposes. However, they have been used in racehorses to enhance racing performance. In humans, it has been reported that structurally related anabolic steroids having the 17alpha-methyl and 17beta-hydroxy groups, including 17alpha-methyltestosterone, mestanolone, methandienone, methandriol, and oxymetholone, have metabolites in common. In this study, we found that metabolites common to those of 17alpha-methyltestosterone and mestanolone were detected in horse urine after the administration of oxymetholone, methandienone, and methandriol. Based on analytical data, we confirmed these to be the common metabolites of five structurally related steroids, 17alpha-methyltestosterone, mestanolone, oxymetholone, methandienone, and methandriol. Furthermore, we detected hitherto unknown urinary metabolites of methandriol and oxymetholone in horses. The parent steroid itself was detected in horse urine after the administration of methandriol, other than metabolites common to 17alpha-methyltestosterone and mestanolone. On the other hand, the major metabolite of oxymetholone was mestanolone, aside from metabolites presumed to be the stereoisomers of 2-hydroxymethyl-17alpha-methyl-5alpha-androstan-3,17beta-diol and 2,17alpha-di(hydroxymethyl)-5alpha-androstan-3,17beta-diol. The simultaneous detection of common metabolites and other main metabolites would help us narrow down the candidate-administered steroid for the doping tests in racehorses. PMID:18544225

  18. Determination of Tyrosine and Tryptophan Metabolites in Body Ruids Using Electrochemical Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, Gregory C.; Koch, David D.; Kissinger, Peter T.; Bruntlett, Craig S.; Shoup, Ronald E.

    The amino acids tyrosine and tryptophan are precursors for a number of important physiological compounds. The catecholamines, which are metabolites of tyrosine, serve as neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems. Serotonin, a major metabolite of tryptophan, is a potent neurotransmitter and vasoconstrictor. Without doubt, these compounds have been some of the most intensely studied molecules in the last twenty years. One of the benefits that often accrues from basic biochemical research is clinical data of diagnostic and prognostic significance. In this case, however, the results have been disappointing. In only a few instances has the measurement of metabolites of these two amino acids been shown to have real clinical significance.

  19. Detection and quantification of residues and metabolites of medicinal products in environmental compartments, food commodities and workplaces. A review.

    PubMed

    Bottoni, Paola; Caroli, Sergio

    2015-03-15

    The toxicological assessment of medicinal products (MPs) and their residues and metabolites in the environment have become a challenging task worldwide. The contamination of environmental compartments, biota, workplace, foodstuff and feedstuff by residues and metabolites of these substances poses a risk to human health which is still far from being fully understood. On the other hand, existing analytical methods not always possess sufficient detection power to quantify residues of MPs at very low concentrations. This review sets forth some of the most significant contributions made in this field over the past decade with a special focus on novel fit-for-purpose analytical approaches for the detection, identification and quantification of these pollutants and the assessment of their noxious potential for human beings and the environment. PMID:25591909

  20. Use of LC-MS/MS for the open detection of steroid metabolites conjugated with glucuronic acid.

    PubMed

    Fabregat, Andreu; Pozo, Oscar J; Marcos, Josep; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa

    2013-05-21

    In humans, conjugation with glucuronic acid is the most important phase II metabolic reaction of steroidal compounds. Glucuronoconjugated metabolites have been conventionally studied by using β-glucuronidase enzymes to release the phase I metabolites. It is well-known that hydrolysis with β-glucuronidase presents some limitations that may result in the underestimation of some conjugates. The aim of the present work was to develop and to evaluate liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) scan methods for the open detection of steroid glucuronides in urine samples. The mass spectrometric behavior of thirteen representative steroid glucuronides, used as model compounds, was studied. Characteristic ionization and collision induced dissociation behaviors were observed depending on the steroid glucuronide structure. Neutral loss (NL of 176, 194, 211, and 229 Da) and precursor ion (PI of m/z 141, 159, and 177, in positive mode and m/z 75, 85, and 113, in negative mode) scan methods were evaluated. The NL scan method was chosen for the open detection of glucuronoconjugated steroids due to its sensitivity and the structural information provided by this method. The application of the NL scan method to urine samples collected after testosterone (T) undecanoate administration revealed the presence of two T metabolites which remain conjugated as glucuronides after an enzymatic hydrolysis of the urine. 3α,6β-Dihydroxy-5α-androstan-17-one (6β-hydroxyandrosterone) glucuronide and 3α,6β-dihydroxy-5β-androstan-17-one (6β-hydroxyetiocholanolone) glucuronide were established as the structures for these metabolites, by comparing the structure of the steroids released after chemical hydrolysis with reference materials. An increase of 50-300-fold of these metabolites after oral administration of T undecanoate was observed, proving that their determination can be useful in the doping control field. Moreover, these results exemplify that significant information

  1. Oxidative stress/reactive metabolite gene expression signature in rat liver detects idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants

    SciTech Connect

    Leone, Angelique; Nie, Alex; Brandon Parker, J.; Sawant, Sharmilee; Piechta, Leigh-Anne; Kelley, Michael F. Mark Kao, L.; Jim Proctor, S.; Verheyen, Geert; Johnson, Mark D.; Lord, Peter G.; McMillian, Michael K.

    2014-03-15

    Previously we reported a gene expression signature in rat liver for detecting a specific type of oxidative stress (OS) related to reactive metabolites (RM). High doses of the drugs disulfiram, ethinyl estradiol and nimesulide were used with another dozen paradigm OS/RM compounds, and three other drugs flutamide, phenacetin and sulindac were identified by this signature. In a second study, antiepileptic drugs were compared for covalent binding and their effects on OS/RM; felbamate, carbamazepine, and phenobarbital produced robust OS/RM gene expression. In the present study, liver RNA samples from drug-treated rats from more recent experiments were examined for statistical fit to the OS/RM signature. Of all 97 drugs examined, in addition to the nine drugs noted above, 19 more were identified as OS/RM-producing compounds—chlorpromazine, clozapine, cyproterone acetate, dantrolene, dipyridamole, glibenclamide, isoniazid, ketoconazole, methapyrilene, naltrexone, nifedipine, sulfamethoxazole, tamoxifen, coumarin, ritonavir, amitriptyline, valproic acid, enalapril, and chloramphenicol. Importantly, all of the OS/RM drugs listed above have been linked to idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity, excepting chloramphenicol, which does not have a package label for hepatotoxicity, but does have a black box warning for idiosyncratic bone marrow suppression. Most of these drugs are not acutely toxic in the rat. The OS/RM signature should be useful to avoid idiosyncratic hepatotoxicity of drug candidates. - Highlights: • 28 of 97 drugs gave a positive OS/RM gene expression signature in rat liver. • The specificity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 98%. • The sensitivity of the signature for human idiosyncratic hepatotoxicants was 75%. • The signature can help eliminate hepatotoxicants from drug development.

  2. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bellin, Daniel L; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K; Levine, Peter M; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E P; Shepard, Kenneth L

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites that are produced by microbial biofilms and can affect their development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. 'Images' over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm(2) area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression.

  3. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms

    PubMed Central

    Bellin, Daniel L.; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Levine, Peter M.; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-01-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites produced by microbial biofilms, which can drastically affect colony development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. “Images” over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify, and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression. PMID:24510163

  4. Abortion after deliberate Arthrotec® addition to food. Mass spectrometric detection of diclofenac, misoprostol acid, and their urinary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Watzer, Bernhard; Lusthof, Klaas J; Schweer, Horst

    2015-07-01

    Arthrotec(®) (AT) is a combination of diclofenac, a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug (NSAID), and misoprostol (MP), a synthetic analogue of prostaglandin E1 (PGE1). MP is a lipophilic methyl ester prodrug. It is readily metabolized to the biologically active misoprostol acid (MPA). During the last few years, medical studies exhibited MP to be an excellent abortive. In this paper, we describe a rare criminal case of MP abortion, initiated by the expectant father. After the abortion, samples of vomit and urine were collected. Systemic exposure to MP is difficult to prove, because both MP and the active metabolite MPA are hardly excreted in urine. Therefore, in addition to routine toxicological analysis, we used slightly modified, well-established liquid and gas chromatographic/tandem mass spectrometric (LC/MS/MS and GC/MS/MS) methods, for the direct and the indirect detection of MPA and its metabolites. In this case, we were able to demonstrate the presence of the major MP metabolites 2,3-dinor-MPA and 2,3,4,5-tetranor-MPA in the urine of the victim. We also detected paracetamol, 3-methoxyparacetamol and diclofenac-glucuronide in the urine. In the vomit of the victim, we detected diclofenac and MPA. These results, combined with the criminal investigations, showed that the accused had mixed MP into the food of his pregnant girlfriend. Finally, these investigations contributed to a confession of the accused.

  5. Integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensor for spatially resolved detection of redox-active metabolites in biofilms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bellin, Daniel L.; Sakhtah, Hassan; Rosenstein, Jacob K.; Levine, Peter M.; Thimot, Jordan; Emmett, Kevin; Dietrich, Lars E. P.; Shepard, Kenneth L.

    2014-02-01

    Despite advances in monitoring spatiotemporal expression patterns of genes and proteins with fluorescent probes, direct detection of metabolites and small molecules remains challenging. A technique for spatially resolved detection of small molecules would benefit the study of redox-active metabolites that are produced by microbial biofilms and can affect their development. Here we present an integrated circuit-based electrochemical sensing platform featuring an array of working electrodes and parallel potentiostat channels. ‘Images’ over a 3.25 × 0.9 mm2 area can be captured with a diffusion-limited spatial resolution of 750 μm. We demonstrate that square wave voltammetry can be used to detect, identify and quantify (for concentrations as low as 2.6 μM) four distinct redox-active metabolites called phenazines. We characterize phenazine production in both wild-type and mutant Pseudomonas aeruginosa PA14 colony biofilms, and find correlations with fluorescent reporter imaging of phenazine biosynthetic gene expression.

  6. Can an immunoassay become a standard technique in detecting oxycodone and its metabolites?

    PubMed

    Abadie, Jude M; Allison, Kim H; Black, David A; Garbin, James; Saxon, Andrew J; Bankson, Daniel D

    2005-01-01

    Opiate toxicology testing is routinely performed in the hospital setting to identify abusers and/or to determine those patients who are not taking prescribed opiate analgesics such as oxycodone. Commercially available assays for opiate detection in urine have decreased sensitivity for oxycodone, which contributes to a high false-negative rate. Functioning as a beta site, our Veterans Affairs hospital evaluated a new enzyme immunoassay, DRI Oxycodone Assay, for its use in the qualitative and semiquantitative detection of oxycodone in urine. We hypothesize that an immunoassay for oxycodone with superior sensitivity and specificity, when compared to the traditional opiate assays, would reduce the need for more expensive and time-consuming confirmatory testing. We used the new liquid homogenous enzyme immunoassay to determine oxycodone results in a total of 148 urine samples from 4 different sample groups. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy was subsequently used to confirm the presence or absence of oxycodone (or its primary metabolite, noroxycodone). We also evaluated within-run, between-run, and linearity studies and conducted a crossover study to establish a cutoff value for oxycodone. In our patient population, we used the new DRI immunoassay to evaluate 17,069 urine samples to estimate oxycodone misuse profiles (patients not taking prescribed oxycodone or taking oxycodone without a prescription) during a 4-month period. The sensitivity and specificity of the new oxycodone immunoassay were 97.7% and 100%, respectively, at the cutoff concentration of 300 ng/mL. The assay linearity was 1,250 ng/mL, and the sensitivity was 10 ng/mL. Within-run precision and between-run coefficient of variation were 2.3% and 1.8%, respectively. None of the 15 compounds that we evaluated for interference had crossover significant enough to produce a positive oxycodone result when using 300 ng/mL as the cutoff value. None of the 17,069 oxycodone immunoassays was followed with a request

  7. Detection of designer steroid methylstenbolone in "nutritional supplement" using gas chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry: elucidation of its urinary metabolites.

    PubMed

    Cavalcanti, Gustavo de Albuquerque; Leal, Felipe Dias; Garrido, Bruno Carius; Padilha, Monica Costa; de Aquino Neto, Francisco Radler

    2013-02-01

    The use of "nutritional supplements" containing unapproved substances has become a regular practice in amateur and professional athletes. This represents a dangerous habit for their health once no data about toxicological or pharmacological effects of these supplements are available. Most of them are freely commercialized online and any person can buy them without medical surveillance. Usually, the steroids intentionally added to the "nutritional supplements" are testosterone analogues with some structural modifications. In this study, the analyzed product was bought online and a new anabolic steroid known as methylstenbolone (2,17α-dimethyl-17β-hydroxy-5α-androst-1-en-3-one) was detected, as described on label. Generally, anabolic steroids are extensively metabolized, thus in-depth knowledge of their metabolism is mandatory for doping control purposes. For this reason, a human excretion study was carried out with four volunteers after a single oral dose to determine the urinary metabolites of the steroid. Urine samples were submitted to enzymatic hydrolysis of glucuconjugated metabolites followed by liquid-liquid extraction and analysis of the trimethylsilyl derivatives by gas chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry. Mass spectrometric data allowed the proposal of two plausible metabolites: 2,17α-dimethyl-16ξ,17β-dihydroxy-5α-androst-1-en-3-one (S1), 2,17α-dimethyl-3α,16ξ,17β-trihydroxy-5α-androst-1-ene (S2). Their electron impact mass spectra are compatible with 16-hydroxylated steroids O-TMS derivatives presenting diagnostic ions such as m/z 231 and m/z 218. These metabolites were detectable after one week post administration while unchanged methylstenbolone was only detectable in a brief period of 45 h.

  8. Detoxification of Atrazine by Endophytic Streptomyces sp. Isolated from Sugarcane and Detection of Nontoxic Metabolite.

    PubMed

    Mesquini, Josiane A; Sawaya, Alexandra C H F; López, Begonã G C; Oliveira, Valéria M; Miyasaka, Natalia R S

    2015-12-01

    Atrazine is still one of the most used agricultural pesticides worldwide and it has been recognized as a major contaminant of surface and ground water. The aims of this research were to isolate an endophytic microorganism from leaves of sugarcane, evaluate its ability to degrade atrazine, and investigate the formation of metabolites. By sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the endophytic isolate atz2 was identified as Streptomyces sp. The reduction in atrazine concentration by Streptomyces sp. atz2 was 98 % and UHPLC-MS/MS analyses showed the appearance of an unknown metabolite observed as m/z 311. Ecotoxicity tests with an aquatic organism, Daphnia similis, confirmed that this metabolite was nontoxic. This mechanism of detoxification of atrazine is different from the ones of other free-living microorganisms that inhabit the soil or rhizosphere. The results show new aspects of atrazine detoxification, highlighting a new role of endophytic bacteria in plants. PMID:26467569

  9. Detoxification of Atrazine by Endophytic Streptomyces sp. Isolated from Sugarcane and Detection of Nontoxic Metabolite.

    PubMed

    Mesquini, Josiane A; Sawaya, Alexandra C H F; López, Begonã G C; Oliveira, Valéria M; Miyasaka, Natalia R S

    2015-12-01

    Atrazine is still one of the most used agricultural pesticides worldwide and it has been recognized as a major contaminant of surface and ground water. The aims of this research were to isolate an endophytic microorganism from leaves of sugarcane, evaluate its ability to degrade atrazine, and investigate the formation of metabolites. By sequencing of the 16S rRNA gene, the endophytic isolate atz2 was identified as Streptomyces sp. The reduction in atrazine concentration by Streptomyces sp. atz2 was 98 % and UHPLC-MS/MS analyses showed the appearance of an unknown metabolite observed as m/z 311. Ecotoxicity tests with an aquatic organism, Daphnia similis, confirmed that this metabolite was nontoxic. This mechanism of detoxification of atrazine is different from the ones of other free-living microorganisms that inhabit the soil or rhizosphere. The results show new aspects of atrazine detoxification, highlighting a new role of endophytic bacteria in plants.

  10. An integrated approach for profiling oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts using liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet detection and triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guiying; Cheng, Zhongzhe; Zhang, Kerong; Jiang, Hongliang; Zhu, Mingshe

    2016-09-10

    The use of liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with triple quadrupole linear ion trap (Qtrap) mass spectrometry (MS) for both quantitative and qualitative analysis in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies is of great interest. Here, a new Qtrap-based analytical methodology for simultaneous detection, structural characterization and semi-quantitation of in vitro oxidative metabolites and glutathione trapped reactive metabolites was reported. In the current study, combined multiple ion monitoring and multiple reaction monitoring were served as surveying scans to trigger product ion spectral acquisition of oxidative metabolites and glutathione adduct, respectively. Then, detection of metabolites and recovery of their MS/MS spectra were accomplished using multiple data mining approaches. Additionally, on-line ultraviolet (UV) detection was employed to determine relative concentrations of major metabolites. Analyses of metabolites of clozapine and nomifensine in rat liver microsomes not only revealed multiple oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts, but also identified their major oxidative metabolism and bioactivation pathways. The results demonstrated that the LC/UV/MS method enabled Qtrap to perform the comprehensive profiling of oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts in vitro. PMID:27497649

  11. An integrated approach for profiling oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts using liquid chromatography coupled with ultraviolet detection and triple quadrupole-linear ion trap mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Chen, Guiying; Cheng, Zhongzhe; Zhang, Kerong; Jiang, Hongliang; Zhu, Mingshe

    2016-09-10

    The use of liquid chromatography (LC) coupled with triple quadrupole linear ion trap (Qtrap) mass spectrometry (MS) for both quantitative and qualitative analysis in drug metabolism and pharmacokinetic studies is of great interest. Here, a new Qtrap-based analytical methodology for simultaneous detection, structural characterization and semi-quantitation of in vitro oxidative metabolites and glutathione trapped reactive metabolites was reported. In the current study, combined multiple ion monitoring and multiple reaction monitoring were served as surveying scans to trigger product ion spectral acquisition of oxidative metabolites and glutathione adduct, respectively. Then, detection of metabolites and recovery of their MS/MS spectra were accomplished using multiple data mining approaches. Additionally, on-line ultraviolet (UV) detection was employed to determine relative concentrations of major metabolites. Analyses of metabolites of clozapine and nomifensine in rat liver microsomes not only revealed multiple oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts, but also identified their major oxidative metabolism and bioactivation pathways. The results demonstrated that the LC/UV/MS method enabled Qtrap to perform the comprehensive profiling of oxidative metabolites and glutathione adducts in vitro.

  12. Isoflavone metabolism in domestic cats (Felis catus): comparison of plasma metabolites detected after ingestion of two different dietary forms of genistein and daidzein.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse-Tedd, K M; Cave, N J; Ugarte, C E; Waldron, L A; Prasain, J K; Arabshahi, A; Barnes, S; Hendriks, W H; Thomas, D G

    2013-03-01

    Some felid diets contain isoflavones but the metabolic capacity of cats toward isoflavones is relatively unknown, despite the understanding that isoflavones have divergent biological potential according to their metabolite end products. The objective of this study was to determine the plasma metabolites detectable in domestic cats after exposure to 2 different dietary forms of isoflavones, either as a soy extract tablet (n = 6) or as part of a dietary matrix (n = 4). Serial blood samples were collected after isoflavone exposure to identify the plasma metabolites of each cat. Genistein was detected in its unconjugated form or as a monosulfate. Daidzein was detected as both a mono- and disulfate as well as in its unconjugated form. Other daidzein metabolites detected included equol mono- and disulfate, dihydrodaidzein, and O-desmethylangolensin. No β-glucuronide metabolites of either isoflavone were detected. Equol was produced in markedly fewer cats after ingestion of a soy extract tablet as a single oral bolus compared with cats consuming an isoflavone-containing diet. The detectable metabolites of the isoflavones, genistein and daidzein, in domestic cat plasma after dietary ingestion has been described in the present study for the first time. The metabolic capacity for isoflavones by domestic cats appears to be efficient, with only minimal proportions of the ingested amount detected in their unconjugated forms. This has implications for the potential of isoflavones to exert physiological activity in the domestic cat when consumed at concentrations representative of typical dietary intake.

  13. Showing Its Colors. Thin-Layer Chromatographic Detection of Cannabinoid Metabolites.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonicamp, Judith M.

    1986-01-01

    Describes a chemistry laboratory experiment in which thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is used to analyze urine specimens containing metabolites of the drug tetrahydro-cannabinol, which comes from the marijuana plant. The materials needed to conduct the experiment are listed, and the procedure and expected results are outlined. (TW)

  14. Determination of cyclophosphamide metabolites by gas chromatography and thermionic specific detection. Interindividual differences in hepatic biotransformation of cyclophosphamide in man in vitro.

    PubMed

    Sessink, P J; Vaes, W H; van den Broek, P H; Noordhoek, J; Bos, R P

    1995-11-17

    Sensitive methods for the determination of the cyclophosphamide metabolites nornitrogen mustard, 4-ketocyclophosphamide and carboxyphosphamide are presented. After liquid-liquid extraction and derivatization, the metabolites are determined by gas chromatography and thermionic specific detection. The methods were used to study the in vitro biotransformation of cyclophosphamide with S-9 liver fractions of human donors. The results show large interindividual differences in the formation of nornitrogen mustard and carboxyphosphamide. 4-Ketocyclophosphamide was not detected.

  15. Detection and mapping of illicit drugs and their metabolites in fingermarks by MALDI MS and compatibility with forensic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groeneveld, G.; de Puit, M.; Bleay, S.; Bradshaw, R.; Francese, S.

    2015-06-01

    Despite the proven capabilities of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS) in laboratory settings, research is still needed to integrate this technique into current forensic fingerprinting practice. Optimised protocols enabling the compatible application of MALDI to developed fingermarks will allow additional intelligence to be gathered around a suspect’s lifestyle and activities prior to the deposition of their fingermarks while committing a crime. The detection and mapping of illicit drugs and metabolites in latent fingermarks would provide intelligence that is beneficial for both police investigations and court cases. This study investigated MALDI MS detection and mapping capabilities for a large range of drugs of abuse and their metabolites in fingermarks; the detection and mapping of a mixture of these drugs in marks, with and without prior development with cyanoacrylate fuming or Vacuum Metal Deposition, was also examined. Our findings indicate the versatility of MALDI technology and its ability to retrieve chemical intelligence either by detecting the compounds investigated or by using their ion signals to reconstruct 2D maps of fingermark ridge details.

  16. Detection and mapping of illicit drugs and their metabolites in fingermarks by MALDI MS and compatibility with forensic techniques.

    PubMed

    Groeneveld, G; de Puit, M; Bleay, S; Bradshaw, R; Francese, S

    2015-01-01

    Despite the proven capabilities of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS) in laboratory settings, research is still needed to integrate this technique into current forensic fingerprinting practice. Optimised protocols enabling the compatible application of MALDI to developed fingermarks will allow additional intelligence to be gathered around a suspect's lifestyle and activities prior to the deposition of their fingermarks while committing a crime. The detection and mapping of illicit drugs and metabolites in latent fingermarks would provide intelligence that is beneficial for both police investigations and court cases. This study investigated MALDI MS detection and mapping capabilities for a large range of drugs of abuse and their metabolites in fingermarks; the detection and mapping of a mixture of these drugs in marks, with and without prior development with cyanoacrylate fuming or Vacuum Metal Deposition, was also examined. Our findings indicate the versatility of MALDI technology and its ability to retrieve chemical intelligence either by detecting the compounds investigated or by using their ion signals to reconstruct 2D maps of fingermark ridge details. PMID:26118853

  17. Detection and mapping of illicit drugs and their metabolites in fingermarks by MALDI MS and compatibility with forensic techniques

    PubMed Central

    Groeneveld, G.; de Puit, M.; Bleay, S.; Bradshaw, R.; Francese, S.

    2015-01-01

    Despite the proven capabilities of Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption Ionisation Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS) in laboratory settings, research is still needed to integrate this technique into current forensic fingerprinting practice. Optimised protocols enabling the compatible application of MALDI to developed fingermarks will allow additional intelligence to be gathered around a suspect’s lifestyle and activities prior to the deposition of their fingermarks while committing a crime. The detection and mapping of illicit drugs and metabolites in latent fingermarks would provide intelligence that is beneficial for both police investigations and court cases. This study investigated MALDI MS detection and mapping capabilities for a large range of drugs of abuse and their metabolites in fingermarks; the detection and mapping of a mixture of these drugs in marks, with and without prior development with cyanoacrylate fuming or Vacuum Metal Deposition, was also examined. Our findings indicate the versatility of MALDI technology and its ability to retrieve chemical intelligence either by detecting the compounds investigated or by using their ion signals to reconstruct 2D maps of fingermark ridge details. PMID:26118853

  18. Advances in Electronic-Nose Technologies for the Detection of Volatile Biomarker Metabolites in the Human Breath

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Alphus D.

    2015-01-01

    Recent advancements in the use of electronic-nose (e-nose) devices to analyze human breath profiles for the presence of specific volatile metabolites, known as biomarkers or chemical bio-indicators of specific human diseases, metabolic disorders and the overall health status of individuals, are providing the potential for new noninvasive tools and techniques useful to point-of-care clinical disease diagnoses. This exciting new area of electronic disease detection and diagnosis promises to yield much faster and earlier detection of human diseases and disorders, allowing earlier, more effective treatments, resulting in more rapid patient recovery from various afflictions. E-nose devices are particularly suited for the field of disease diagnostics, because they are sensitive to a wide range of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) and can effectively distinguish between different complex gaseous mixtures via analysis of electronic aroma sensor-array output profiles of volatile metabolites present in the human breath. This review provides a summary of some recent developments of electronic-nose technologies, particularly involving breath analysis, with the potential for providing many new diagnostic applications for the detection of specific human diseases associated with different organs in the body, detectable from e-nose analyses of aberrant disease-associated VOCs present in air expired from the lungs. PMID:25738426

  19. Efficient approach for the detection and identification of new androgenic metabolites by applying SRM GC-CI-MS/MS: a methandienone case study.

    PubMed

    Polet, Michael; Van Gansbeke, Wim; Van Eenoo, Peter; Deventer, Koen

    2016-07-01

    Identification of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) is a vital issue in doping control and toxicology, and searching for metabolites with longer detection times remains an important task. Recently, a gas chromatography chemical ionization triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (GC-CI-MS/MS) method was introduced, and CI, in comparison with electron ionization (EI), proved to be capable of increasing the sensitivity significantly. In addition, correlations between AAS structure and fragmentation behavior could be revealed. This enables the search for previously unknown but expected metabolites by selection of their predicted transitions. The combination of both factors allows the setup of an efficient approach to search for new metabolites. The approach uses selected reaction monitoring which is inherently more sensitive than full scan or precursor ion scan. Additionally, structural information obtained from the structure specific CI fragmentation pattern facilitates metabolite identification. The procedure was demonstrated by a methandienone case study. Its metabolites have been studied extensively in the past, and this allowed an adequate evaluation of the efficiency of the approach. Thirty three metabolites were detected, including all relevant previously discovered metabolites. In our study, the previously reported long-term metabolite (18-nor-17β-hydroxymethyl,17α-methyl-androst-1,4,13-trien-3-one) could be detected up to 26 days by using GC-CI-MS/MS. The study proves the validity of the approach to search for metabolites of new synthetic AAS and new long-term metabolites of less studied AAS and illustrates the increase in sensitivity by using CI. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27434811

  20. Removal of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and other selected pharmaceuticals from wastewater using a granular bioplastic formulation entrapping propagules of Phanerochaete chrysosporium.

    PubMed

    Accinelli, Cesare; Saccà, Maria Ludovica; Batisson, Isabelle; Fick, Jerker; Mencarelli, Mariangela; Grabic, Roman

    2010-09-01

    The capacity of the ligninolytic fungus Phanerochaete chrysosporium to degrade a wide variety of environmentally persistent xenobiotics has been largely reported in the literature. Beside other factors, one barrier to a wider use of this bioremediation fungus is the availability of effective formulations that ensure easy preparation, handling and application. In this series of laboratory experiments, we evaluated the efficiency of a granular bioplastic formulation entrapping propagules of P. chrysosporium for removal of four selected pharmaceuticals from wastewater samples. Addition of inoculated granules to samples of the wastewater treatment plant of Bologna significantly increased the removal of the antiviral drug oseltamivir (Tamiflu), and the antibiotics, erythromycin, sulfamethoxazol, and ciprofloxacin. Similar effects were also observed in effluent water. Oseltamivir was the most persistent of the four active substances. After 30d of incubation, approximately two times more oseltamivir was removed in bioremediated wastewater than controls. The highest removal efficiency of the bioplastic formulation was observed with the antibiotic ciprofloxacin. Microbiological DNA-based analysis showed that the bioplastic matrix supported the growth of P. chrysosporium, thus facilitating its adaptation to unusual environment such as wastewater.

  1. Photocatalytic degradation of the antiviral drug Tamiflu by UV-A/TiO2: Kinetics and mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wang, Wen-Long; Wu, Qian-Yuan; Wang, Zheng-Ming; Hu, Hong-Ying; Negishi, Nobuaki; Torimura, Masaki

    2015-07-01

    The photocatalytic degradation of the antiviral drug Tamiflu (oseltamivir phosphate, OP) by TiO2 - P25, ST-01 and ATO was investigated in aqueous solution under ultraviolet (UV-A) irradiation. The photocatalysis of OP is well described by pseudo-first-order kinetics with r2>98.0% for all cases. The kinetic constant of P25 with 80% anatase and 20% rutile (0.040 min(-1)) is 4 and 10 times higher than that of ATO and ST-01 with 100% purity of anatase, respectively. We examined the effects of the catalyst loading and initial OP concentration on the photodegradation of OP, and used potassium iodine, isopropanol, and calcium fluorine as radical quenchers to evaluate the contributions of the hydroxyl radical (OH) and photo hole (h+) in the photodegradation. Results confirmed that 80% of the contribution came from the OH species. Although more than 95% of the OP (21 μM) was removed after 80 min of UV-A irradiation with 20 and 100 mg L(-1) P25, the removal efficiencies of total organic carbon (TOC) were only 45.6% and 67.0%, respectively, after 360 min UV-A irradiation. Based on an intermediate analysis by HPLC coupled with a triple quadrupole spectrometer and an ion trap mass spectrometer, typical intermediate species such as hydration derivatives, hydroxyl substitutes and keto-derivatives were identified and possible degradation pathways of OP by P25 were proposed.

  2. Detection of in Vitro Metabolite Formation of Leflunomide: A Fluorescence Dynamics and Electronic Structure Study.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Poornima; Gangopadhyay, Debraj; Mishra, Phool Chand; Mishra, Hirdyesh; Singh, Ranjan K

    2016-04-14

    The metabolic transformation of antirheumatic fluorescent drug leflunomide into its active metabolite teriflunomide through isoxazole ring opening has been monitored in vitro using steady state and time domain fluorescence spectroscopy and density functional theory. During metabolic reaction, absorption of leflunomide split into two bands resembling absorption spectra of teriflunomide. The fluorescence spectra reveal slow conversion of leflunomide to E and Z forms of teriflunomide in aqueous medium, which becomes faster at basic pH. The E form, which is more potent as a drug, becomes more stable with an increase in the basicity of the medium. Both molecules are associated with charge transfer due to twisting in the lowest singlet excited state. Excited state charge transfer followed by proton transfer was also observed in the Z form during the ring opening of leflunomide. Quantum yield and radiative decay rates have been observed to decrease for the metabolite because of an increase in nonradiative decay channels. PMID:27007481

  3. Simultaneous detection of five one-carbon metabolites in plasma using stable isotope dilution liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Adaikalakoteswari, Antonysunil; Webster, Craig; Goljan, Ilona; Saravanan, Ponnusamy

    2016-02-15

    Disturbance in one-carbon (1-C) cycle occurs due to nutritional deficiencies (vitamin B12/folate) or specific genetic polymorphisms. This leads to altered levels of key 1-C metabolites such as SAM (s-adenosyl methionine), SAH (s-adenosyl homocysteine), methionine, homocysteine and MMA (methyl malonic acid). These 1-C metabolites are determinants of cellular methylation potential and epigenetic modifications of DNA which impairs metabolic pathways in several pathological diseases and developmental programming. Though methods were able to measure these analytes only independently, none of the methods detect simultaneously. Therefore we developed a method to measure these five 1-C metabolites in a single run using liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We used stable isotopes dilution LC-MS/MS to measure the 1-C metabolites in human plasma. Blood samples were collected from pregnant women (n=30) at early gestation in the ongoing, multicentre, prospective PRiDE study. Linearity exhibited across the calibration range for all the analytes with the limit of detection (LOD) of 1.005nmol/l for SAM, 0.081nmol/l for SAH, 0.002μmol/l for methionine, 0.046μmol/l for homocysteine and 3.920nmol/l for MMA. The average recovery for SAM was 108%, SAH-110%, methionine-97%, homocysteine-91% and MMA-102%. The inter-assay CV for SAM was 7.3, SAH-5.6%, methionine-3.5%, homocysteine-7.0% and MMA-4.0%. The intra-assay CV for SAM was 8.7%, SAH-4.7%, methionine-5.4%, homocysteine-8.1% and MMA-6.1%. Pregnant women at early gestation with low B12 levels had significantly higher homocysteine, MMA, lower levels of methionine, SAM and SAM:SAH ratio and higher triglycerides. We developed a simple and rapid method to simultaneously quantify 1-C metabolites such as SAM, SAH, methionine, homocysteine and MMA in plasma by stable isotope dilution LC-MS/MS which would be useful to elucidate the epigenetic mechanisms related in the gene-nutrient interactions.

  4. Analysis of mitragynine and metabolites in human urine for detecting the use of the psychoactive plant kratom.

    PubMed

    Le, David; Goggin, Melissa M; Janis, Gregory C

    2012-01-01

    The leaves of the South Asian plant kratom are described as having stimulating effects at low doses, and opiate-like analgesic and euphoric effects at high doses. A long history of use and abuse has led to the classification of kratom as a controlled substance in its native Thailand and other South Asian countries. However, kratom is not controlled in the United States, and the ready availability of kratom has led to its emergence as an herbal drug of abuse. With the growing popularity of kratom, efficient procedures are needed to detect kratom use. In the current study, both ultra-high-performance liquid chromatography and high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry methods have been developed and validated for monitoring the major alkaloids and metabolites found in urine following kratom use. The primary unique alkaloid mitragynine is quantified in human urine from 1.00-500.00 ng/mL using mitraphylline as an internal standard. In addition, two metabolites (5-desmethylmitragynine and 17-desmethyldihydromitragynine) and the related active, alkaloid 7-hydroxy-mitragynine, are simultaneously qualitatively monitored. The presence of analytes are confirmed by an information-dependent acquisition-enhanced product ion procedure generating full fragmentation data used to positively identify detected analytes. The validated method has been utilized for clinical and forensic analyses of urine for the detection of kratom use. PMID:23024321

  5. Differential radial capillary action of ligand assay for high-throughput detection of protein-metabolite interactions.

    PubMed

    Roelofs, Kevin G; Wang, Jingxin; Sintim, Herman O; Lee, Vincent T

    2011-09-13

    Interactions of proteins with low-molecular-weight ligands, such as metabolites, cofactors, and allosteric regulators, are important determinants of metabolism, gene regulation, and cellular homeostasis. Pharmaceuticals often target these interactions to interfere with regulatory pathways. We have developed a rapid, precise, and high-throughput method for quantitatively measuring protein-ligand interactions without the need to purify the protein when performed in cells with low background activity. This method, differential radial capillary action of ligand assay (DRaCALA), is based on the ability of dry nitrocellulose to separate the free ligand from bound protein-ligand complexes. Nitrocellulose sequesters proteins and bound ligand at the site of application, whereas free ligand is mobilized by bulk movement of the solvent through capillary action. We show here that DRaCALA allows detection of specific interactions between three nucleotides and their cognate binding proteins. DRaCALA allows quantitative measurement of the dissociation constant and the dissociation rate. Furthermore, DRaCALA can detect the expression of a cyclic-di-GMP (cdiGMP)-binding protein in whole-cell lysates of Escherichia coli, demonstrating the power of the method to bypass the prerequisite for protein purification. We have used DRaCALA to investigate cdiGMP signaling in 54 bacterial species from 37 genera and 7 eukaryotic species. These studies revealed the presence of potential cdiGMP-binding proteins in 21 species of bacteria, including 4 unsequenced species. The ease of obtaining metabolite-protein interaction data using the DRaCALA assay will facilitate rapid identification of protein-metabolite and protein-pharmaceutical interactions in a systematic and comprehensive approach.

  6. Approach for detecting mutagenicity of biodegraded and ozonated pharmaceuticals, metabolites and transformation products from a drinking water perspective.

    PubMed

    Gartiser, Stefan; Hafner, Christoph; Kronenberger-Schäfer, Kerstin; Happel, Oliver; Trautwein, Christoph; Kümmerer, Klaus

    2012-09-01

    Many pharmaceuticals and related metabolites are not efficiently removed in sewage treatment plants and enter into surface water. There, they might be subject of drinking water abstraction and treatment by ozonation. In this study, a systematic approach for producing and effect-based testing of transformation products (TPs) during the drinking water ozonation process is proposed. For this, two pharmaceutical parent substances, three metabolites and one environmental degradation product were investigated with respect to their biodegradability and fate during drinking water ozonation. The Ames test (TA98, TA100) was used for the identification of mutagenic activity present in the solutions after testing inherent biodegradability and/or after ozonation of the samples. Suspicious results were complemented with the umu test. Due to the low substrate concentration required for ozonation, all ozonated samples were concentrated via solid phase extraction (SPE) before performing the Ames test. With the exception of piracetam, all substances were only incompletely biodegradable, suggesting the formation of stable TPs. Metformin, piracetam and guanylurea could not be removed completely by the ozonation process. We received some evidence that technical TPs are formed by ozonation of metformin and piracetam, whereas all tested metabolites were not detectable by analytical means after ozonation. In the case of guanylurea, one ozonation TP was identified by LC/MS. None of the experiments showed an increase of mutagenic effects in the Ames test. However, the SPE concentration procedure might lead to false-positive results due to the generation of mutagenic artefacts or might lead to false-negative results by missing adequate recovery efficiency. Thus, these investigations should always be accompanied by process blank controls that are carried out along the whole ozonation and SPE procedure. The study presented here is a first attempt to investigate the significance of

  7. The stimulatory effects of caffeine with oseltamivir (Tamiflu) on light-dark behavior and open-field behavior in mice.

    PubMed

    Uchiyama, Hidemori; Toda, Akihisa; Imoto, Masumi; Nishimura, Satoko; Kuroki, Hiroaki; Soeda, Shinji; Shimeno, Hiroshi; Watanabe, Shigenori; Eyanagi, Reiko

    2010-01-22

    Abnormal behaviors and death associated with the use of oseltamivir (Tamiflu) have emerged as a major issue in influenza patients taking the drug. Here, we investigated the mechanisms underlying the effects of oseltamivir on the behavior of mice using light-dark and open-field preference tests. Oseltamivir (75 and 150 mg/kg, intraperitoneally (i.p.)) alone affected neither time spent in the open area in the light-dark preference test nor ambulation in the open-field test at 2h post-injection. However, a non-selective adenosine A(1)/A(2) receptor antagonist, caffeine (10mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir (150 mg/kg, i.p.) increased time spent in the open area in the light-dark preference test. This enhancement was not inhibited by a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, flumazenil (10-20mg/kg, subcutaneously (s.c.)). Enhancement of ambulation in the open-field test was also observed when caffeine (10mg/kg, i.p.) was combined with oseltamivir (150 mg/kg, i.p.). This enhancement was inhibited by a dopamine D(2) receptor antagonist, haloperidol (0.1mg/kg, s.c.). Furthermore, an adenosine A(2) receptor antagonist, SCH58261 (3mg/kg, i.p.) in combination with oseltamivir (150 mg/kg, i.p.) increased ambulation in the open-field test, while an adenosine A(1) receptor antagonist, DPCPX (1-3mg/kg, i.p.) did not. These findings suggest that the actions of oseltamivir may involve the dopamine and adenosine systems. Our findings suggest that due to the interaction between central blockade of adenosine A(2) receptors by caffeine, and oseltamivir-induced behavioral changes, patients being treated with oseltamivir should be closely monitored.

  8. A sensitive GC-EIMS method for simultaneous detection and quantification of JWH-018 and JWH-073 carboxylic acid and hydroxy metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Paul, Buddha D; Bosy, Thomas

    2015-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids, including JWH-018 and JWH-073, belong to a class of aminoalkylindoles (AAIs) that are smoked to produce an effect similar to tetrahydrocannabinol. Compounds in this class are often collectively known as 'Spice'. After ingestion, these compounds are extensively metabolized to their hydroxy and carboxylic acid metabolites. During forensic analysis, detection of these metabolites in urine is an indication of past exposure to the parent compounds. The analytical process involved hydrolysis of conjugated metabolites by glucuronidase, solvent extraction, derivatization by trifluoroacetic anhydride and hexafluoroisopropanol and GC-EIMS detection. Identification of the unknown was based on the criteria of GC retention time within ±2% and mass spectral ion ratio within ±20% of that of a standard. Deuterated internal standards of the carboxylic acid metabolites were used for quantification. The acid (JWH-018-COOH, JWH-073-COOH) and hydroxy (JWH-018-OH, JWH-073-OH) metabolites were linear over the concentration range of 0.1-10 and 0.2-10 ng/mL, respectively, with a correlation coefficient-square, R(2) > 0.999 (N = 5). Extraction recoveries of the metabolites were within 79 and 87%. The method was applied to 17 urine specimens collected as part of a military law enforcement investigation. Nine of the specimens tested positive for one or more of the metabolites. When the procedure was extended to screen other AAI compounds, two of the specimens were found to contain JWH-210, JWH-250 (JWH-302 or JWH-201) and JWH-250 (C4 isomers). The GC-EIMS method presented here was found to be suitable for detecting JWH-018 and JWH-073 metabolites and other AAI compounds in urine.

  9. Liquid Microjunction Surface Sampling Probe Electrospray Mass Spectrometry for Detection of Drugs and Metabolites in Thin Tissue Sections

    SciTech Connect

    Van Berkel, Gary J; Kertesz, Vilmos; Koeplinger, Kenneth A.; Vavek, Marissa; Kong, Ah-Ng Tony

    2008-01-01

    A self-aspirating, liquid micro-junction surface sampling probe/electrospray emitter mass spectrometry system was demonstrated for use in the direct analysis of spotted and dosed drugs and their metabolites in thin tissue sections. Proof-of-principle sampling and analysis directly from tissue without the need for sample preparation was demonstrated first by raster scanning a region on a section of rat liver onto which reserpine was spotted. The mass spectral signal from selected reaction monitoring was used to develop a chemical image of the spotted drug on the tissue. The probe was also used to selectively spot sample areas of sagittal whole mouse body tissue sections that had been dosed orally (90 mg/kg) with R,S-sulforaphane 3 hrs prior to sacrifice. Sulforaphane and its glutathione and N-acetyl cysteine conjugates were monitored with selected reaction monitoring and detected in the stomach and various other tissues from the dosed mouse. No signal for these species was observed in the tissue from a control mouse. The same dosed tissue section was used to illustrate the possibility of obtaining a line scan across the whole body section. In total these results illustrate the potential for rapid screening of the distribution of drugs and metabolites in tissue sections with the micro-liquid junction surface sampling probe/electrospray mass spectrometry approach.

  10. A Computational Drug Metabolite Detection Using the Stable Isotopic Mass-Shift Filtering with High Resolution Mass Spectrometry in Pioglitazone and Flurbiprofen

    PubMed Central

    Uchida, Masashi; Kanazawa, Mitsuhiro; Ogiwara, Atsushi; Sezaki, Hiroshi; Ando, Akihiro; Miyamoto, Yohei

    2013-01-01

    The identification of metabolites in drug discovery is important. At present, radioisotopes and mass spectrometry are both widely used. However, rapid and comprehensive identification is still laborious and difficult. In this study, we developed new analytical software and employed a stable isotope as a tool to identify drug metabolites using mass spectrometry. A deuterium-labeled compound and non-labeled compound were both metabolized in human liver microsomes and analyzed by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS). We computationally aligned two different MS data sets and filtered ions having a specific mass-shift equal to masses of labeled isotopes between those data using our own software. For pioglitazone and flurbiprofen, eight and four metabolites, respectively, were identified with calculations of mass and formulas and chemical structural fragmentation analysis. With high resolution MS, the approach became more accurate. The approach detected two unexpected metabolites in pioglitazone, i.e., the hydroxypropanamide form and the aldehyde hydrolysis form, which other approaches such as metabolite-biotransformation list matching and mass defect filtering could not detect. We demonstrated that the approach using computational alignment and stable isotopic mass-shift filtering has the ability to identify drug metabolites and is useful in drug discovery. PMID:24084721

  11. A computational drug metabolite detection using the stable isotopic mass-shift filtering with high resolution mass spectrometry in pioglitazone and flurbiprofen.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Masashi; Kanazawa, Mitsuhiro; Ogiwara, Atsushi; Sezaki, Hiroshi; Ando, Akihiro; Miyamoto, Yohei

    2013-01-01

    The identification of metabolites in drug discovery is important. At present, radioisotopes and mass spectrometry are both widely used. However, rapid and comprehensive identification is still laborious and difficult. In this study, we developed new analytical software and employed a stable isotope as a tool to identify drug metabolites using mass spectrometry. A deuterium-labeled compound and non-labeled compound were both metabolized in human liver microsomes and analyzed by liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC-TOF-MS). We computationally aligned two different MS data sets and filtered ions having a specific mass-shift equal to masses of labeled isotopes between those data using our own software. For pioglitazone and flurbiprofen, eight and four metabolites, respectively, were identified with calculations of mass and formulas and chemical structural fragmentation analysis. With high resolution MS, the approach became more accurate. The approach detected two unexpected metabolites in pioglitazone, i.e., the hydroxypropanamide form and the aldehyde hydrolysis form, which other approaches such as metabolite-biotransformation list matching and mass defect filtering could not detect. We demonstrated that the approach using computational alignment and stable isotopic mass-shift filtering has the ability to identify drug metabolites and is useful in drug discovery.

  12. Ibuprofen exposure in Lemna gibba L.: Evaluation of growth and phytotoxic indicators, detection of ibuprofen and identification of its metabolites in plant and in the medium.

    PubMed

    Pietrini, F; Di Baccio, D; Aceña, J; Pérez, S; Barceló, D; Zacchini, M

    2015-12-30

    Ibuprofen (IBU) is detected worldwide in water bodies due to the incomplete removal by wastewater treatments. Contrasting results have been reported on the toxicity of IBU on aquatic biomonitor plants such as duckweed, and no data about IBU detection and metabolism in plants has been reported. In this work, the effects of 1 mg L(-1) IBU on Lemna gibba L. were monitored in an 8-day laboratory test. In particular, an increase in frond number (+12%) and multiplication rate (+10%) while no variations in photosynthetic pigment content were observed. Moreover, UPLC-HRMS analysis of the presence of IBU and its metabolites in plants and in the growth medium was performed. The results showed that, besides IBU, 11 IBU metabolites were detected in plants. Among the IBU metabolites, hydroxyl- and dihydroxyl-IBU were found, whereas carboxyl-IBU was undetectable. Interestingly, some IBU metabolites were detected in the plant growth solution at the end of the IBU treatment, while no IBU products were found in the IBU solution without plants, suggesting a role for L. gibba in IBU metabolism. The findings of this work represent an important step for a better evaluation of the effects of IBU and its metabolites in duckweed, with notable implications for the eco-toxicological assessment of IBU in the aquatic ecosystem.

  13. Ibuprofen exposure in Lemna gibba L.: Evaluation of growth and phytotoxic indicators, detection of ibuprofen and identification of its metabolites in plant and in the medium.

    PubMed

    Pietrini, F; Di Baccio, D; Aceña, J; Pérez, S; Barceló, D; Zacchini, M

    2015-12-30

    Ibuprofen (IBU) is detected worldwide in water bodies due to the incomplete removal by wastewater treatments. Contrasting results have been reported on the toxicity of IBU on aquatic biomonitor plants such as duckweed, and no data about IBU detection and metabolism in plants has been reported. In this work, the effects of 1 mg L(-1) IBU on Lemna gibba L. were monitored in an 8-day laboratory test. In particular, an increase in frond number (+12%) and multiplication rate (+10%) while no variations in photosynthetic pigment content were observed. Moreover, UPLC-HRMS analysis of the presence of IBU and its metabolites in plants and in the growth medium was performed. The results showed that, besides IBU, 11 IBU metabolites were detected in plants. Among the IBU metabolites, hydroxyl- and dihydroxyl-IBU were found, whereas carboxyl-IBU was undetectable. Interestingly, some IBU metabolites were detected in the plant growth solution at the end of the IBU treatment, while no IBU products were found in the IBU solution without plants, suggesting a role for L. gibba in IBU metabolism. The findings of this work represent an important step for a better evaluation of the effects of IBU and its metabolites in duckweed, with notable implications for the eco-toxicological assessment of IBU in the aquatic ecosystem. PMID:26184801

  14. Gas chromatography/flame ionisation detection mass spectrometry for the detection of endogenous urine metabolites for metabonomic studies and its use as a complementary tool to nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fancy, Sally-Ann; Beckonert, Olaf; Darbon, Gareth; Yabsley, Warren; Walley, Rosalind; Baker, David; Perkins, George L; Pullen, Frank S; Rumpel, Klaus

    2006-01-01

    Metabonomics is a relatively new field of research in which the total pool of metabolites in body fluids or tissues from different patient groups is subjected to comparative analysis. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy is the technology that is currently most widely used for the analysis of these highly complex metabolite mixtures, and hundreds of metabolites can be detected without any upfront separation. We have investigated in this study whether gas chromatography (GC) separation in combination with flame ionisation detection (FID) and mass spectrometry (MS) detection can be used for metabolite profiling from urine. We show that although GC sample preparation is much more involved than for NMR, hundreds of metabolites can reproducibly be detected and analysed by GC. We show that the data quality is sufficiently high--particularly if appropriate baseline correction and time-warping methods are applied--to allow for data comparison by chemometrics methods. A sample set of urines from eleven healthy human volunteers was analysed independently by GC and NMR, and subsequent chemometrics analysis of the two datasets showed some similar features. As judged by NIST database searches of the GC/MS data some of the major metabolites that are detected by NMR are also visible by GC/MS. Since in contrast to NMR every peak in GC corresponds to a single metabolite, the electron ionisation spectra can be used to quickly identify metabolites of interest if their reference spectra are present in a searchable database. In summary, we show that GC is a method that can be used as a complementary tool to NMR for metabolite profiling of urine samples.

  15. Detection of benzimidazole carbamates and amino metabolites in liver by surface plasmon resonance-biosensor

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Two surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor screening assays were developed and validated to detect 11 benzimidazole carbamate (BZT) and four amino-benzimidazole veterinary drug residues in liver tissue. The assays used polyclonal antibodies, raised in sheep, to detect BZTs and amino-benzimidazole...

  16. Direct Analysis in Real Time-Mass Spectrometry for the Rapid Detection of Metabolites of Aconite Alkaloids in Intestinal Bacteria

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xue; Hou, Guangyue; Xing, Junpeng; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, direct analysis of real time ionization combined with multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry (DART-MSn) was used to investigate the metabolic profile of aconite alkaloids in rat intestinal bacteria. A total of 36 metabolites from three aconite alkaloids were identified by using DART-MSn, and the feasibility of quantitative analysis of these analytes was examined. Key parameters of the DART ion source, such as helium gas temperature and pressure, the source-to-MS distance, and the speed of the autosampler, were optimized to achieve high sensitivity, enhance reproducibility, and reduce the occurrence of fragmentation. The instrument analysis time for one sample can be less than 10 s for this method. Compared with ESI-MS and UPLC-MS, the DART-MS is more efficient for directly detecting metabolic samples, and has the advantage of being a simple, high-speed, high-throughput method.

  17. Direct analysis in real time-mass spectrometry for the rapid detection of metabolites of aconite alkaloids in intestinal bacteria.

    PubMed

    Li, Xue; Hou, Guangyue; Xing, Junpeng; Song, Fengrui; Liu, Zhiqiang; Liu, Shuying

    2014-12-01

    In the present work, direct analysis of real time ionization combined with multi-stage tandem mass spectrometry (DART-MS(n)) was used to investigate the metabolic profile of aconite alkaloids in rat intestinal bacteria. A total of 36 metabolites from three aconite alkaloids were identified by using DART-MS(n), and the feasibility of quantitative analysis of these analytes was examined. Key parameters of the DART ion source, such as helium gas temperature and pressure, the source-to-MS distance, and the speed of the autosampler, were optimized to achieve high sensitivity, enhance reproducibility, and reduce the occurrence of fragmentation. The instrument analysis time for one sample can be less than 10 s for this method. Compared with ESI-MS and UPLC-MS, the DART-MS is more efficient for directly detecting metabolic samples, and has the advantage of being a simple, high-speed, high-throughput method.

  18. Non-invasive detection of 2-hydroxyglutarate and other metabolites in IDH1 mutant glioma patients using magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Pope, Whitney B; Prins, Robert M; Albert Thomas, M; Nagarajan, Rajakumar; Yen, Katharine E; Bittinger, Mark A; Salamon, Noriko; Chou, Arthur P; Yong, William H; Soto, Horacio; Wilson, Neil; Driggers, Edward; Jang, Hyun G; Su, Shinsan M; Schenkein, David P; Lai, Albert; Cloughesy, Timothy F; Kornblum, Harley I; Wu, Hong; Fantin, Valeria R; Liau, Linda M

    2012-03-01

    Mutations of the isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 and 2 genes (IDH1 and IDH2) are commonly found in primary brain cancers. We previously reported that a novel enzymatic activity of these mutations results in the production of the putative oncometabolite, R(-)-2-hydroxyglutarate (2-HG). Here we investigated the ability of magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to detect 2-HG production in order to non-invasively identify patients with IDH1 mutant brain tumors. Patients with intrinsic glial brain tumors (n = 27) underwent structural and spectroscopic magnetic resonance imaging prior to surgery. 2-HG levels from MRS data were quantified using LC-Model software, based upon a simulated spectrum obtained from a GAMMA library added to the existing prior knowledge database. The resected tumors were then analyzed for IDH1 mutational status by genomic DNA sequencing, Ki-67 proliferation index by immunohistochemistry, and concentrations of 2-HG and other metabolites by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). MRS detected elevated 2-HG levels in gliomas with IDH1 mutations compared to those with wild-type IDH1 (P = 0.003). The 2-HG levels measured in vivo with MRS were significantly correlated with those measured ex vivo from the corresponding tumor samples using LC-MS (r (2) = 0.56; P = 0.0001). Compared with wild-type tumors, those with IDH1 mutations had elevated choline (P = 0.01) and decreased glutathione (P = 0.03) on MRS. Among the IDH1 mutated gliomas, quantitative 2-HG values were correlated with the Ki-67 proliferation index of the tumors (r ( 2 ) = 0.59; P = 0.026). In conclusion, water-suppressed proton ((1)H) MRS provides a non-invasive measure of 2-HG in gliomas, and may serve as a potential biomarker for patients with IDH1 mutant brain tumors. In addition to 2-HG, alterations in several other metabolites measured by MRS correlate with IDH1 mutation status.

  19. Detection of volatile metabolites of moulds isolated from a contaminated library.

    PubMed

    Micheluz, Anna; Manente, Sabrina; Rovea, Manuela; Slanzi, Debora; Varese, Giovanna Cristina; Ravagnan, Giampietro; Formenton, Gianmaria

    2016-09-01

    The principal fungal species isolated from a contaminated library environment were tested for their microbial volatile organic compound (MVOC) production ability. Aspergillus creber, A. penicillioides, Cladosporium cladosporioides, Eurotium chevalieri, E. halophilicum, Penicillium brevicompactum and P. chrysogenum were cultivated on suitable culture media inside sample bottles specifically designed and created for direct MVOC injection to a GC-MS instrument. The fungal emissions were monitored over several weeks to detect changes with the aging of the colonies, monitored also by respirometric tests. A total of 55 different MVOCs were detected and isopropyl alcohol, 3-methyl-1-butanol and 2-butanone were the principal compounds in common between the selected fungal species. Moreover, 2,4-dimethylheptane, 1,4-pentadiene, styrene, ethanol, 2-methyl-1-butanol, acetone, furan and 2-methylfuran were the most detected compounds. For the first time, the MVOC production for particular fungal species was detected. The species A. creber, which belongs to the recently revised group Aspergillus section Versicolores, was characterized by the production of ethanol, furan and 1,4-pentadiene. For the xerophilic fungus E. halophilicum, specific production of acetone, 2-butanone and 1,4-pentadiene was detected, supported also by respirometric data. The results demonstrated the potential use of this method for the detection of fungal contamination phenomena inside Cultural Heritage's preservation environments. PMID:27392938

  20. Hair cortisol detection in dairy cattle by using EIA: protocol validation and correlation with faecal cortisol metabolites.

    PubMed

    Tallo-Parra, O; Manteca, X; Sabes-Alsina, M; Carbajal, A; Lopez-Bejar, M

    2015-06-01

    Hair may be a useful matrix to detect cumulative cortisol concentrations in studies of animal welfare and chronic stress. The aim of this study was to validate a protocol for cortisol detection in hair from dairy cattle by enzyme immunoassay (EIA). Seventeen adult Holstein-Friesian dairy cows were used during the milking period. Hair cortisol concentration was assessed in 25-day-old hair samples taken from the frontal region of the head, analysing black and white coloured hair separately. Concentrations of cortisol metabolites were determined in faeces collected twice a week during the same period of time. There was a high correlation between cortisol values in faeces and cortisol in white colour hair samples but such correlation was not significant with the black colour hair samples. The intra- and inter-assay coefficients of variation were 4.9% and 10.6%, respectively. The linearity showed R 2=0.98 and mean percentage error of -10.8 ± 1.55%. The extraction efficiency was 89.0 ± 23.52% and the parallelism test showed similar slopes. Cortisol detection in hair by using EIA seems to be a valid method to represent long-term circulating cortisol levels in dairy cattle.

  1. Detection of benzimidazole carbamates and amino metabolites in liver by surface plasmon resonance-biosensor.

    PubMed

    Keegan, Jemma; O'Kennedy, Richard; Crooks, Steven; Elliott, Christopher; Brandon, David; Danaher, Martin

    2011-08-26

    Two surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor screening assays were developed and validated to detect 11 benzimidazole carbamate (BZT) and four amino-benzimidazole veterinary drug residues in liver tissue. The assays used polyclonal antibodies, raised in sheep, to detect BZTs and amino-benzimidazoles. A modified Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged and Safe (QuEChERS) extraction method was developed to isolate benzimidazole carbamate residues. Liver samples were extracted using an acetonitrile extraction method. BZTs were purified by dispersive solid phase extraction (d-SPE) using C(18) sorbent. Residues of amino-benzimidazoles were effectively cleaned-up using a simple cyclohexane defatting step. The assays were validated in accordance with the performance criteria described in 2002/657/EC. The BZT assay limit of detection was calculated to be 32 μg kg(-1), the detection capability (CCβ) was determined to be 50 μg kg(-1) and the mean recovery of analytes was in the range 77-132%. The amino-benzimidazole assay limit of detection was determined to be 41 μg kg(-1), the CCβ was determined to be 75 μg kg(-1) and analyte recovery was in the range 103-116%. Biosensor assay performance was tested by analysing liver tissue from animals treated with benzimidazole drugs and comparing the results with an ultra high performance liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (UHPLC-MS/MS) confirmatory method. All non-compliant samples were identified using the biosensor assays.

  2. Detection of Amide and Aromatic Proton Resonances of Human Brain Metabolites Using Localized Correlated Spectroscopy Combined with Two Different Water Suppression Schemes.

    PubMed

    Nagarajan, Rajakumar; Ramadan, Saadallah; Thomas, M Albert

    2010-06-15

    The purpose of the study was to demonstrate the J-coupling connectivity network between the amide, aliphatic, and aromatic proton resonances of metabolites in human brain using two-dimensional (2D) localized correlated spectroscopy (L-COSY). Two different global water suppression techniques were combined with L-COSY, one before and another after localizing the volume of interest (VOI). Phantom solutions containing several cerebral metabolites at physiological concentrations were evaluated initially for sequence optimization. Nine healthy volunteers were scanned using a 3T whole body MRI scanner. The VOI for 2D L-COSY was placed in the right occipital white/gray matter region. The 2D cross and diagonal peak volumes were measured for several metabolites such as N-acetyl aspartate (NAA), creatine (Cr), free choline (Ch), glutamate/glutamine (Glx), aspartate (Asp), myo-inositol (mI), GABA, glutathione (GSH), phosphocholine (PCh), phosphoethanolamine (PE), tyrosine (Tyr), lactate (Lac), macromolecules (MM) and homocarnosine (Car). Using the pre-water suppression technique with L-COSY, the above mentioned metabolites were clearly identifiable and the relative ratios of metabolites were calculated. In addition to detecting multitude of aliphatic resonances in the high field region, we have demonstrated that the amide and aromatic resonances can also be detected using 2D L-COSY by pre water suppression more reliably than the post-water suppression. PMID:21546981

  3. Detection and tentative identification of urinary phase I metabolites of phenylacetylindole cannabimimetics JWH-203 and JWH-251, by GC-MS and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Kavanagh, Pierce; Grigoryev, Andrej; Melnik, Alexandra; Savchuk, Sergey; Simonov, Anton; Rozhanets, Vladimir

    2013-09-01

    The synthetic phenylacetylindole cannabimimetics, JWH-203 and JWH-251, have been identified in 'herbal' smoking mixtures following the widespread legislative control of 'first generation' compounds such as JWH-018 and CP47, 497(C8). N-Alkylindole cannabimimetics (including phenylacetylindoles) undergo extensive metabolism and little or none of the parent compounds are found in urine. Utilizing GC-MS and LC-MS/MS, a series of JWH-203 and JWH-251 urinary metabolites have been tentatively identified. These are products of mono- and dihydroxylation, monohydroxylation combined with formation of carbonyl group on the N-pentyl chain, carboxylation of N-pentyl chain and N-dealkylation combined with monohydroxylation. Additionally, trihydroxylated metabolites were detected for JWH-203. No parent compounds were detected. The monohydroxylated metabolites with the hydroxyl group positioned on the N-pentyl chain were the most abundant and were found to be suitable for establishing ingestion of JWH-203 or JWH-250. Maximum urinary concentrations of chain-monohydroxylated metabolites were observed at 2.5-3h (JWH-203) and 6-10h (JWH-251) following ingestion. These metabolites were observed (GC-MS) for to 10 and 8 days (JWH-203 and JWH-251, respectively).

  4. Standardized high-performance liquid chromatography of 182 mycotoxins and other fungal metabolites based on alkylphenone retention indices and UV-VIS spectra (diode array detection).

    PubMed

    Frisvad, J C; Thrane, U

    1987-08-28

    A general standardized method for the analysis of mycotoxins and other fungal secondary metabolites has been developed, based on high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with an alkylphenone retention index and photodiode-array detection combined with thin-layer chromatography (TLC) in two different eluents. Each fungal secondary metabolite is characterized by its bracketed alkylphenone retention time index, its UV-VIS absorption maxima and its retardation factors relative to griseofulvin in two TLC eluents. This system is effective for the comparison of chemotaxonomic data in different laboratories and for a precise identification of fungi based on organic solvent extracts of fungal cultures. All important groups of mycotoxins and other fungal secondary metabolites could be detected in the HPLC system described and data are listed for 182 metabolites. The fungal secondary metabolites separated and characterized include aflatoxin B1, B2, G1 and G2, ochratoxin A, citrinin, penicillin acid, viomellein, penitrem A, patulin, sterigmatocystin, alternariol, tenuazonic acid, trichothecenes, roquefortines, fusarin C, zearalenone, PR-toxin, citreoviridin, viridicatumtoxin, verruculogen, rugulosin, cyclopiazonic acid, penicillin G and many other alkaloids, polyketides and terpenes. PMID:3680432

  5. Detection and Characterization of the Effect of AB-FUBINACA and Its Metabolites in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Hsin-Hung Chen, Michael; Dip, Aybike; Ahmed, Mostafa; Tan, Michael L; Walterscheid, Jeffrey P; Sun, Hua; Teng, Ba-Bie; Mozayani, Ashraf

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids were originally developed by academic and pharmaceutical laboratories with the hope of providing therapeutic relief from the pain of inflammatory and degenerative diseases. However, recreational drug enthusiasts have flushed the market with new strains of these potent drugs that evade detection yet endanger public health and safety. Although many of these drug derivatives were published in the medical literature, others were merely patented without further characterization. AB-FUBINACA is an example of one of the new indazole-carboxamide synthetic cannabinoids introduced in the past year. Even though AB-FUBINACA has become increasingly prominent in forensic drug and toxicology specimens analyses, little is known about the pharmacology of this substance. To study its metabolic fate, we utilized Wistar rats to study the oxidative products of AB-FUBINACA in urine and its effect on gene expressions in liver and heart. Rats were injected with 5 mg/kg of AB-FUBINACA each day for 5 days. Urine samples were collected every day at the same time. On day 5 after treatment, we collected the organs such as liver and heart. The urine samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry, which revealed several putative metabolites and positioning of the hydroxyl addition on the molecule. We used quantitative PCR gene expression array to analyze the hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity on these rats and confirmed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. We identified three genes significantly associated with dysfunction of oxidation and inflammation. Our study reports in vivo metabolites of AB-FUBINACA in urine and its effect on the gene expressions in liver and heart.

  6. In Vivo Detection of Perinatal Brain Metabolite Changes in a Rabbit Model of Intrauterine Growth Restriction (IUGR)

    PubMed Central

    Simões, Rui V.; Muñoz-Moreno, Emma; Carbajo, Rodrigo J.; González-Tendero, Anna; Illa, Miriam; Sanz-Cortés, Magdalena; Pineda-Lucena, Antonio; Gratacós, Eduard

    2015-01-01

    Background Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a risk factor for abnormal neurodevelopment. We studied a rabbit model of IUGR by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and spectroscopy (MRS), to assess in vivo brain structural and metabolic consequences, and identify potential metabolic biomarkers for clinical translation. Methods IUGR was induced in 3 pregnant rabbits at gestational day 25, by 40–50% uteroplacental vessel ligation in one horn; the contralateral horn was used as control. Fetuses were delivered at day 30 and weighted. A total of 6 controls and 5 IUGR pups underwent T2-w MRI and localized proton MRS within the first 8 hours of life, at 7T. Changes in brain tissue volumes and respective contributions to each MRS voxel were estimated by semi-automated registration of MRI images with a digital atlas of the rabbit brain. MRS data were used for: (i) absolute metabolite quantifications, using linear fitting; (ii) local temperature estimations, based on the water chemical shift; and (iii) classification, using spectral pattern analysis. Results Lower birth weight was associated with (i) smaller brain sizes, (ii) slightly lower brain temperatures, and (iii) differential metabolite profile changes in specific regions of the brain parenchyma. Specifically, we found estimated lower levels of aspartate and N-acetylaspartate (NAA) in the cerebral cortex and hippocampus (suggesting neuronal impairment), and higher glycine levels in the striatum (possible marker of brain injury). Our results also suggest that the metabolic changes in cortical regions are more prevalent than those detected in hippocampus and striatum. Conclusions IUGR was associated with brain metabolic changes in vivo, which correlate well with the neurostructural changes and neurodevelopment problems described in IUGR. Metabolic parameters could constitute non invasive biomarkers for the diagnosis and abnormal neurodevelopment of perinatal origin. PMID:26208165

  7. Detection and Characterization of the Effect of AB-FUBINACA and Its Metabolites in a Rat Model.

    PubMed

    Hsin-Hung Chen, Michael; Dip, Aybike; Ahmed, Mostafa; Tan, Michael L; Walterscheid, Jeffrey P; Sun, Hua; Teng, Ba-Bie; Mozayani, Ashraf

    2016-04-01

    Synthetic cannabinoids were originally developed by academic and pharmaceutical laboratories with the hope of providing therapeutic relief from the pain of inflammatory and degenerative diseases. However, recreational drug enthusiasts have flushed the market with new strains of these potent drugs that evade detection yet endanger public health and safety. Although many of these drug derivatives were published in the medical literature, others were merely patented without further characterization. AB-FUBINACA is an example of one of the new indazole-carboxamide synthetic cannabinoids introduced in the past year. Even though AB-FUBINACA has become increasingly prominent in forensic drug and toxicology specimens analyses, little is known about the pharmacology of this substance. To study its metabolic fate, we utilized Wistar rats to study the oxidative products of AB-FUBINACA in urine and its effect on gene expressions in liver and heart. Rats were injected with 5 mg/kg of AB-FUBINACA each day for 5 days. Urine samples were collected every day at the same time. On day 5 after treatment, we collected the organs such as liver and heart. The urine samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry, which revealed several putative metabolites and positioning of the hydroxyl addition on the molecule. We used quantitative PCR gene expression array to analyze the hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity on these rats and confirmed by real-time quantitative RT-PCR. We identified three genes significantly associated with dysfunction of oxidation and inflammation. Our study reports in vivo metabolites of AB-FUBINACA in urine and its effect on the gene expressions in liver and heart. PMID:26517302

  8. Detection and Characterization of the Effect of AB‐FUBINACA and Its Metabolites in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Hsin‐Hung Chen, Michael; Dip, Aybike; Ahmed, Mostafa; Tan, Michael L.; Walterscheid, Jeffrey P.; Sun, Hua

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Synthetic cannabinoids were originally developed by academic and pharmaceutical laboratories with the hope of providing therapeutic relief from the pain of inflammatory and degenerative diseases. However, recreational drug enthusiasts have flushed the market with new strains of these potent drugs that evade detection yet endanger public health and safety. Although many of these drug derivatives were published in the medical literature, others were merely patented without further characterization. AB‐FUBINACA is an example of one of the new indazole‐carboxamide synthetic cannabinoids introduced in the past year. Even though AB‐FUBINACA has become increasingly prominent in forensic drug and toxicology specimens analyses, little is known about the pharmacology of this substance. To study its metabolic fate, we utilized Wistar rats to study the oxidative products of AB‐FUBINACA in urine and its effect on gene expressions in liver and heart. Rats were injected with 5 mg/kg of AB‐FUBINACA each day for 5 days. Urine samples were collected every day at the same time. On day 5 after treatment, we collected the organs such as liver and heart. The urine samples were analyzed by mass spectrometry, which revealed several putative metabolites and positioning of the hydroxyl addition on the molecule. We used quantitative PCR gene expression array to analyze the hepatotoxicity and cardiotoxicity on these rats and confirmed by real‐time quantitative RT‐PCR. We identified three genes significantly associated with dysfunction of oxidation and inflammation. Our study reports in vivo metabolites of AB‐FUBINACA in urine and its effect on the gene expressions in liver and heart. J. Cell. Biochem. 117: 1033–1043, 2016. © 2015 The Authors. Journal of Cellular Biochemistry Published by Wiley Periodicals. Inc. PMID:26517302

  9. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording. PMID:27026651

  10. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience.

    PubMed

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording.

  11. Real-time bilinear rotation decoupling in absorptive mode J-spectroscopy: Detecting low-intensity metabolite peak close to high-intensity metabolite peak with convenience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verma, Ajay; Baishya, Bikash

    2016-05-01

    "Pure shift" NMR spectra display singlet peak per chemical site. Thus, high resolution is offered at the cost of valuable J-coupling information. In the present work, real-time BIRD (BIlinear Rotation Decoupling) is applied to the absorptive-mode 2D J-spectroscopy to provide pure shift spectrum in the direct dimension and J-coupling information in the indirect dimension. Quite often in metabolomics, proton NMR spectra from complex bio-fluids display tremendous signal overlap. Although conventional J-spectroscopy in principle overcomes this problem by separating the multiplet information from chemical shift information, however, only magnitude mode of the experiment is practical, sacrificing much of the potential high resolution that could be achieved. Few J-spectroscopy methods have been reported so far that produce high-resolution pure shift spectrum along with J-coupling information for crowded spectral regions. In the present work, high-quality J-resolved spectrum from important metabolomic mixture such as tissue extract from rat cortex is demonstrated. Many low-intensity metabolite peaks which are obscured by the broad dispersive tails from high-intensity metabolite peaks in regular magnitude mode J-spectrum can be clearly identified in real-time BIRD J-resolved spectrum. The general practice of removing such spectral overlap is tedious and time-consuming as it involves repeated sample preparation to change the pH of the tissue extract sample and subsequent spectra recording.

  12. Chemometrics-enhanced high performance liquid chromatography-ultraviolet detection of bioactive metabolites from phytochemically unknown plants.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Zapata, Radamés; Sánchez-Medina, Alberto; Chan-Bacab, Manuel; García-Sosa, Karlina; Escalante-Erosa, Fabiola; García-Rodríguez, Rosa Virginia; Peña-Rodríguez, Luis Manuel

    2015-11-27

    This work describes the use of Colubrina greggii as a model to investigate the use of chemometric analysis combined with data from a leishmanicidal bioassay, using Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal Projections to Latent Structures (O-PLS), to detect biologically active natural products in crude extracts from plants having little or no phytochemical information. A first analysis of the HPLC-UV profiles of the extract and its semi-purified fractions using both Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Orthogonal Partial Least Squares (O-PLS) indicated that the components at tR 48.2, 48.7, 51.8min correlated with the variation in bioactivity. However, a further O-PLS analysis of the HPLC-UV profiles of fractions obtained through a final semi-preparative HPLC purification showed two components at tR 48.7 and 49.5min which correlated with the variation of the bioactivity in a high performance predictive model, with high determination coefficient, high correlation coefficient values (R(2) and Q(2)=0.99) and a low root mean square error (RMSE=0.018). This study demonstrates that the association of chemometric analysis with bioassay results can be an excellent strategy for the detection and isolation of bioactive metabolites from phytochemically unknown plant crude extracts.

  13. Spectroscopic imaging and spatial localization using adiabatic pulses and applications to detect transmural metabolite distribution in the canine heart.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, P M; Merkle, H; Sublett, E; Hendrich, K; Lew, B; Path, G; From, A H; Bache, R J; Garwood, M; Uğurbil, K

    1989-04-01

    Adiabatic pulses have been employed in spectroscopic imaging and relaxation rate measurements at 4.7 T to demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining spectroscopic data from the complete sensitive volume of a surface coil using the surface coil as a transmitter and receiver. With conventional B1 sensitive pulses, spectroscopic localization or imaging techniques, such as chemical-shift imaging, yield resonance intensities that are distorted severely as a function of space, and maximal signal is detected from a small region within the complete sensitive volume of the coil. With adiabatic pulses, however, this problem is eliminated completely. In addition, a new method of spatial localization is introduced. This method, referred to as FLAX-ISIS, is a derivative of longitudinally modulated Fourier series window and ISIS approaches and utilizes adiabatic inversion and excitation pulses. The method allows construction of localized spectra for multiple regions along the surface coil axis by postacquisition data manipulation of a single set of free induction decays. These techniques were applied to the study of the myocardium using an implanted surface coil in an instrumented closed-chest canine model and in an open-chest preparation. The results demonstrate that one-dimensional techniques are adequate for transmural detection of metabolites provided signal origin is restricted to a column perpendicular to the left ventricle wall. PMID:2755331

  14. Screening for anabolic steroids in sports: analytical strategy based on the detection of phase I and phase II intact urinary metabolites by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Balcells, Georgina; Pozo, Oscar J; Esquivel, Argitxu; Kotronoulas, Aristotelis; Joglar, Jesús; Segura, Jordi; Ventura, Rosa

    2015-04-10

    In order to improve the detection capabilities of anabolic androgenic steroids (AAS) in sports, a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) screening method for the simultaneous detection of AAS phase I and phase II intact urinary metabolites (glucuronides and sulfates) was developed. A total of 36 metabolites (7 unconjugated; 19 glucuronides and 10 sulfates) corresponding to 15 of the most reported AAS were included. Analytes were extracted from urine using C18 cartridges. LC and MS conditions were studied in-depth to determine the most sensitive and selective conditions for each analyte. A selected reaction monitoring method was set up. The optimization of the experimental parameters for 13 metabolites not available as standards was performed using excretion study urines. Extraction recoveries were above 77% for all 23 validated analytes. Intra-day precision was lower than 21%, and LODs were in the range 0.25-4ng/mL for 18 of the 23 analytes. Matrix effect was evaluated using post column infusion and ranged from 92 to 147%. The method was successfully applied to excretion study urines of different exogenous AAS. The suitability of the strategy was demonstrated with methyltestosterone and stanozolol excretion study urines by achieving detection times of 22 and 21 days, respectively. The method is compliant with the World Antidoping Agency requirements for most of the studied compounds. It represents a cost-effective approach that improves the detection capabilities of AAS by increasing the sensitivity for some metabolites and by including recently described phase II long-term metabolites not detectable using the current screening strategy.

  15. Pesticide Exposures to Migrant Farmworkers in Eastern NC: Detection of metabolites in farmworker urine associated with housing violations and camp characteristics

    PubMed Central

    Raymer, J. H.; Studabaker, W.; Gardner, M.; Talton, J.; Quandt, S.A.; Chen, H.; Michael, L. C.; McCombs, M.; Arcury, T.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background The purpose of this paper is to present and evaluate descriptively bivariate associations between urinary metabolites of pesticides and herbicides and migrant camp conditions, violations and personal worker behaviors at home for farmworkers who do not apply pesticides. Methods We studied 183 migrant farmworker camps in eastern North Carolina in 2010. Data and urine samples were collected from 371 men. Predictor measures included violations in six domains of housing regulations and nonviolation characteristics and personal behaviors that might impact urinary metabolites. Results Cockroaches and bathroom violations were predictive of increased exposure to pyrethroids and cyfluthrin/chlorpyrifos, respectively. Changing and storing clothing and shoes in sleeping rooms increased the number of detects for the diazinon metabolite. Conclusions Farmworkers had exposures to multiple chemicals. No single housing domain was identified as critical to mitigating housing-related exposure;specific attention should be paid to changing and storing soiled clothing in sleeping rooms, and insect infestations. PMID:24273087

  16. Determination of chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hostetler, K.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Analytical methods using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) were developed for the analysis of the following chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water: alachlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA); alachlor oxanilic acid; acetochlor ESA; acetochlor oxanilic acid; metolachlor ESA; and metolachlor oxanilic acid. Good precision and accuracy were demonstrated for both the HPLC-DAD and HPLC/MS methods in reagent water, surface water, and ground water. The average HPLC-DAD recoveries of the chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.25, 0.5 and 2.0 ??g/l ranged from 84 to 112%, with relative standard deviations of 18% or less. The average HPLC/MS recoveries of the metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.05, 0.2 and 2.0 ??g/l ranged from 81 to 118%, with relative standard deviations of 20% or less. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for all metabolites using the HPLC-DAD method was 0.20 ??g/l, whereas the LOQ using the HPLC/MS method was at 0.05 ??g/l. These metabolite-determination methods are valuable for acquiring information about water quality and the fate and transport of the parent chloroacetanilide herbicides in water. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  17. Determination of nitrofuran metabolites in shrimp by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a new derivatization reagent.

    PubMed

    Du, Na-Na; Chen, Ming-Ming; Sheng, Liang-Quan; Chen, Shui-Sheng; Xu, Hua-Jie; Liu, Zhao-Di; Song, Chong-Fu; Qiao, Rui

    2014-01-31

    A high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) method for the simultaneous determination of total nitrofuran metabolite residues (furazolidone, furaltadone, nitrofurantoin, and nitrofurazone) in shrimp was developed. The method involves the acid hydrolysis of protein-bound metabolites, followed by the derivatization of the freed metabolites with the new fluorescent derivatization reagent 2-hydroxy-1-naphthaldehyde (HN) and subsequent liquid-liquid extraction (LLE). Separation is achieved on a YMC-Pack Polymer C18 column under alkaline conditions, and the high fluorescence intensity of the derivatives at an emission wavelength Em=463nm (Ex=395nm) enables, for the first time, their simultaneous determination in shrimp at concentrations as low as 1μg/kg by HPLC-FLD. The method was validated using blank shrimp fortified with all four metabolites at 0.5, 1.0 and 2.0μg/kg. Recoveries were >87% with relative standard deviations of <8.1% for all four metabolites. Furthermore, the results obtained by HPLC-FLD were in very good agreement with those obtained by LC-MS/MS analysis.

  18. The Tamiflu saga continues: will our conduct change after the publication of the latest systematic review on benefits and harms of oseltamivir?

    PubMed

    Bachelet, Vivienne C

    2014-05-20

    In 2013, we wrote about the harm, waste and deception stemming from conducts adopted by the pharmaceutical industry, by concealing raw data and Clinical Study Reports (CSRs) from the regulator’s view when requesting the marketing patent. We described the case of Tamiflu (Roche), a drug that has been widely used in our population and profusely prescribed by physicians. Health authorities, entailing a great cost for the countries in the region, have also purchased it. In this editorial, we will show how the idea of using antivirals for prophylaxis and treatment of influenza took hold, starting from the first enthusiastic recommendations up to the systematic review published last month in the BMJ.

  19. Competitive Immunoassays for Simultaneous Detection of Metabolites and Proteins Using Micromosaic Patterning

    PubMed Central

    Murphy, Brian M.; He, Xinya; Dandy, David; Henry, Charles S.

    2010-01-01

    New high-throughput immunoassay methods for rapid point-of-care diagnostic applications represent an unmet need and current focus of numerous innovative methods. We report a new micromosaic competitive immunoassay developed for the analysis of the thyroid hormone thyroxine (T4), inflammation biomarker C-reactive protein (CRP), and the oxidative damage marker 3-nitrotyrosine (BSA–3NT) on a silicon nitride substrate. To demonstrate the versatility of the method, both direct and indirect format competitive immunoassays were developed and could be applied simultaneously for single samples. Signals from standard solutions were fit to a logistic equation, allowing simultaneous detection of T4 (7.7–257.2 nM), CRP (0.3–4.2 µg/mL), and BSA–3NT (0.03–22.3 µg/mL). Total assay time including sample introduction, washing, and fluorescence measurement was less than 45 min. Dissociation constants for affinity pairs in the system have been estimated using regression. This proof-of-concept experiment shows that both small and macromolecular biomarkers can be quantified from a single sample using the method and suggests that groups of clinically related analytes may be analyzed by competitive micromosaic immunoassay techniques. PMID:18092765

  20. An immunoassay for the detection of triclosan-O-glucuronide, a primary human urinary metabolite of triclosan.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Anupama; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-09-01

    Triclosan-O-glucuronide (TCSG) is one of the primary urinary metabolites of the antibacterial compound triclosan or TCS that is found in many personal care products and consumer goods. We have developed a competitive, indirect heterologous ELISA for the detection of the target TCSG in urine. Such an ELISA for TCSG could be developed as a useful tool to measure this important biomarker of human exposure to TCS. Immunogens were prepared by conjugating TCSG to thyroglobulin, via heterobifunctional cross-linkers AEDP or 3-[(2-aminoethyl)dithio] propionic acid•hydrochloride and TFCS or N-[ε-trifluoroacetylcaproyloxy]succinimide ester. The coating antigen was prepared by the direct conjugation of TCSG to bovine serum albumin. Antibodies raised in rabbits 2619, 2621 (immunogen TCSG-AEDP-Thy), and 2623 (immunogen TCSG-TFCS-Thy), and the coating antigen were screened and characterized to determine their optimal concentrations. The optimized ELISA, developed with antibody 2621, gave an IC50 value of 2.85 ng/mL, with the linear range (IC20-IC80) determined to be 2.6-24.8 ng/mL. Selectivity of the assay was assessed by measuring cross-reactivity of antibody 2621 to related congeners such as the aglycone TCS, triclosan-O-sulfate, triclocarban, a polybrominated diphenyl ether derivative, and 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol glucuronide. There was virtually no recognition by antibody 2621 to any of these cross-reactants. Graphical Abstract Urinary biomarker analysis of triclosan glucuronide. PMID:26255293

  1. An immunoassay for the detection of triclosan-O-glucuronide, a primary human urinary metabolite of triclosan.

    PubMed

    Ranganathan, Anupama; Gee, Shirley J; Hammock, Bruce D

    2015-09-01

    Triclosan-O-glucuronide (TCSG) is one of the primary urinary metabolites of the antibacterial compound triclosan or TCS that is found in many personal care products and consumer goods. We have developed a competitive, indirect heterologous ELISA for the detection of the target TCSG in urine. Such an ELISA for TCSG could be developed as a useful tool to measure this important biomarker of human exposure to TCS. Immunogens were prepared by conjugating TCSG to thyroglobulin, via heterobifunctional cross-linkers AEDP or 3-[(2-aminoethyl)dithio] propionic acid•hydrochloride and TFCS or N-[ε-trifluoroacetylcaproyloxy]succinimide ester. The coating antigen was prepared by the direct conjugation of TCSG to bovine serum albumin. Antibodies raised in rabbits 2619, 2621 (immunogen TCSG-AEDP-Thy), and 2623 (immunogen TCSG-TFCS-Thy), and the coating antigen were screened and characterized to determine their optimal concentrations. The optimized ELISA, developed with antibody 2621, gave an IC50 value of 2.85 ng/mL, with the linear range (IC20-IC80) determined to be 2.6-24.8 ng/mL. Selectivity of the assay was assessed by measuring cross-reactivity of antibody 2621 to related congeners such as the aglycone TCS, triclosan-O-sulfate, triclocarban, a polybrominated diphenyl ether derivative, and 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol glucuronide. There was virtually no recognition by antibody 2621 to any of these cross-reactants. Graphical Abstract Urinary biomarker analysis of triclosan glucuronide.

  2. An immunoassay for the detection of triclosan-O-glucuronide, a primary human urinary metabolite of triclosan

    PubMed Central

    Ranganathan, Anupama; Gee, Shirley J.; Hammock, Bruce D.

    2015-01-01

    Triclosan-O-glucuronide (TCSG) is one of the primary urinary metabolites of the antibacterial compound triclosan or TCS that is found in many personal care products and consumer goods. We have developed a competitive, indirect heterologous ELISA for the detection of the target TCSG in urine. Such an ELISA for TCSG could be developed as a useful tool to measure this important biomarker of human exposure to TCS. Immunogens were prepared by conjugating TCSG to thyroglobulin, via heterobifunctional cross-linkers AEDP or 3-[(2-aminoethyl)dithio] propionic acid•hydrochloride and TFCS or N-[ε-trifluoroacetylcaproyloxy]succinimide ester. The coating antigen was prepared by the direct conjugation of TCSG to bovine serum albumin. Antibodies raised in rabbits 2619, 2621 (immunogen TCSG-AEDP-Thy) and 2623 (immunogen TCSG-TFCS-Thy) and the coating antigen were screened and characterized to determine their optimal concentrations. The optimized ELISA, developed with antibody 2621, gave an IC50 value of 2.85 ng/mL, with the linear range (IC20 – IC80) determined to be 2.6 – 24.8 ng/mL. Selectivity of the assay was assessed by measuring cross-reactivity of antibody 2621 to related congeners such as the aglycone TCS, triclosan-O-sulfate, triclocarban, a polybrominated diphenyl ether derivative and 3-phenoxybenzyl alcohol glucuronide. There was virtually no recognition by antibody 2621 to any of these cross-reactants. PMID:26255293

  3. Detection Times of Carboxylic Acid Metabolites of the Synthetic Cannabinoids JWH-018 and JWH-073 in Human Urine.

    PubMed

    Hegstad, Solfrid; Westin, Andreas A; Spigset, Olav

    2015-05-01

    Over the past years, use of synthetic cannabinoids has become increasingly popular. To draw the right conclusions regarding new intake of these substances in situations of repeated urinary drug testing, knowledge of their elimination rate in urine is essential. We report data from consecutive urine specimens from five subjects after ingestion of synthetic cannabinoids. Urinary concentrations of the carboxylic acid metabolites JWH-018-COOH and JWH-073-COOH were measured by ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS-MS) with a limit of quantification of 0.1 ng/mL. In these subjects, specimens remained positive over a period of 20-43 (mean 27) days for JWH-018-COOH and over a period of 11-25 (mean 19) days for JWH-073-COOH. Detection times were shorter for subjects that appeared to have ingested only one, or a few, doses prior to urine collection in the study. Creatinine-normalized concentrations (CN-concentrations) slowly declined throughout the follow-up period in all subjects, suggesting that no new intake had taken place during this period. Mean elimination half-lives in urine were 14.0 (range 4.4-23.8) days for CN-JWH-018-COOH and 9.3 (range 3.6-16.8) days for CN-JWH-073-COOH. These data show that urine specimens could be positive for JWH-018-COOH for more than 6 weeks and JWH-073-COOH for more than 3 weeks after ingestion. However, such long detection periods require a low limit of quantification.

  4. Determination of loratadine and its active metabolite in human plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Vlase, Laurian; Imre, Silvia; Muntean, Dana; Leucuta, Sorin E

    2007-07-27

    A new sensitive and selective liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) method for quantification of loratadine (LOR) and its active metabolite descarboethoxyloratadine (DSL) in human plasma was validated. After addition of the internal standard, metoclopramide, the human plasma samples (0.3 ml) were precipitated using acetonitrile (0.75 ml) and the centrifuged supernatants were partially evaporated under nitrogen at 37 degrees C at approximately 0.3 ml volume. The LOR, DSL and internal standard were separated on a reversed phase column (Zorbax SB-C18, 100 mmx3.0 mm i.d., 3.5 microm) under isocratic conditions using a mobile phase of an 8:92(v/v) mixture of acetonitrile and 0.4% (v/v) formic acid in water. The flow rate was 1 ml/min and the column temperature 45 degrees C. The detection of LOR, DSL and internal standard was in MRM mode using an ion trap mass spectrometer with electrospray positive ionisation. The ion transitions were monitored as follows: 383-->337 for LOR, 311-->(259+294+282) for DSL and 300-->226.8 for internal standard. Calibration curves were generated over the range of 0.52-52.3 ng/ml for both LOR and DSL with values for coefficient of determination greater than 0.994 by using a weighted (1/y) quadratic regression. The lower limits of quantification were established at 0.52 ng/ml LOR and DSL, respectively, with an accuracy and precision less than 20%. Both analytes demonstrated good short-term, long-term, post-preparative and freeze-thaw stability. Besides its simplicity, the sample treatment allows obtaining a very good recovery of both analytes, around 100%. The validated LC/MS/MS method has been applied to a pharmacokinetic study of loratadine tablets on healthy volunteers.

  5. Enantioselective determination of metoprolol and its metabolites in human urine high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-FLD) and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Baranowska, Irena; Adolf, Weronika; Magiera, Sylwia

    2015-11-01

    A sensitive, stereoselective assay using solid phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with fluorescence detection (FLD) was developed and validated for the analysis of enantiomers of metoprolol and its metabolites (α-hydroxymetoprolol, O-desmethylmetoprolol). Chiral separation was achieved using a CHIRALCEL OD-RH column, packed with cellulose tris-(3,5-dimethylphenyl-carbamate) stationary phase, employing a mobile phase composed by a mixture of 0.2% diethylamine in water and acetonitrile in gradient elution mode. Linear calibration curves were obtained over the range of 0.025-2.0μg/mL (R(2)>0.994) in urine for both enantiomers of metoprolol and its metabolites with quantitation limit of 0.025μg/mL. Intra and inter-day precision and accuracy were below 15% for both metoprolol and metabolites enantiomers. The recovery of enantiomer of metoprolol and its metabolite was greater than 68.0%, utilizing a SPE procedure. The method was tested with urine quality control samples and human urine fractions after administration of 50mg rac-metoprolol.

  6. Rapid determination of letrozole, citalopram and their metabolites by high performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence detection in urine: Method validation and application to real samples.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, J; Castañeda, G; Muñoz, L

    2013-01-15

    This work reports the validation of a high precision and accuracy method for the simultaneous determination of letrozole, citalopram and their metabolites in urine by high performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Dilution (urine:mobile phase, 1:2, v/v) was the only sample preparation step. The separation was carried out in a Kromasil C(18) (150mm×4.6mm) column, and the mobile phase was phosphate buffer 80mM (pH 3.0) and acetonitrile (65:35, v/v) at a flow rate of 1.0mL/min. The analytes were detected at 295nm after excitation at 230nm. Linearity was observed in the range of 1.0-1000ng/mL for letrozole and its metabolite and 2.5-1000ng/mL for citalopram and their metabolites, with limits of detection and quantification between 0.09-1.0 and 0.27-1.65ng/mL, respectively. The precisions were satisfactory with RSDs between 0.17 and 5.71%. The accuracy was studied by spiking three urines from healthy female volunteers, and the recoveries were from 85 to 103%. The method was applied to urine samples from women under treatment for breast cancer and depression diseases. PMID:23262245

  7. Electrochemical detection of DNA damage induced by acrylamide and its metabolite at the graphene-ionic liquid-Nafion modified pyrolytic graphite electrode.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Yanyan; Qu, Xiangjin; Dong, Jing; Ai, Shiyun; Han, Ruixia

    2011-06-15

    A new electrochemical biosensor for directly detecting DNA damage induced by acrylamide (AA) and its metabolite was presented in this work. The graphene-ionic liquid-Nafion modified pyrolytic graphite electrode (PGE) was prepared, and then horseradish peroxidase (HRP) and natural double-stranded DNA were alternately assembled on the modified electrode by the layer-by-layer method. The PGE/graphene-ionic liquid-Nafion and the construction of the (HRP/DNA)(n) film were characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. With the guanine signal in DNA as an indicator, the damage of DNA was detected by differential pulse voltammetry after PGE/graphene-ionic liquid-Nafion/(HRP/DNA)(n) was incubated in AA solution or AA+H(2)O(2) solution at 37°C. This method provides a new model to mimic and directly detect DNA damage induced by chemical pollutants and their metabolites in vitro. The results indicated that, in the presence of H(2)O(2), HRP was activated and catalyzed the transformation of AA to glycidamide, which could form DNA adducts and induce more serious damage of DNA than AA. In order to further verify these results, UV-vis spectrophotometry was also used to investigate DNA damage induced by AA and its metabolites in solution and the similar results were obtained.

  8. Monitoring in Situ Anaerobic Alkylbenzene Biodegradation Based on Mass Spectrometric Detection of Unique Metabolites or Real-Time PCR Detection of a Catabolic Gene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beller, H. R.; Kane, S. R.

    2002-12-01

    Monitored natural attenuation (MNA) can be a cost-effective and viable approach for remediation of hydrocarbon-contaminated groundwater. However, regulatory acceptance of the approach is often contingent on monitoring that can convincingly demonstrate the role of microbial degradation. Recent advances in anaerobic hydrocarbon biochemistry, analytical chemistry, and molecular biology have fostered the development of powerful new techniques that can be applied to MNA of BTEX (benzene, toluene, ethylbenzene, and xylenes). Here we report two independent methods that have been developed to monitor in situ, anaerobic biodegradation of toluene and xylenes. A method has been developed for rapid, sensitive, and highly selective detection of distinctive indicators of anaerobic alkylbenzene metabolism. The target metabolites, benzylsuccinic acid (BS) and methylbenzylsuccinic acid (MeBS) isomers, have no known sources other than anaerobic toluene or xylene degradation; thus, their mere presence in groundwater provides definitive evidence of in situ metabolism. The method, which involves small sample size (<1 mL) and no extraction/concentration steps, relies on isotope dilution liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with selected reaction monitoring. Detection limits for benzylsuccinates were determined to be ca. 0.3 μg/L and accuracy and precision were favorable in a groundwater matrix. The LC/MS/MS method was used to characterize geographic and temporal distributions of benzylsuccinates in an anaerobic, hydrocarbon-contaminated aquifer. BS was never detected and MeBS isomers were detected in the three wells with the highest concentrations of BTEX; MeBS concentrations ranged from <0.3 to 205 μg/L. A strong linear correlation was found between concentrations of total MeBS isomers and their parent compounds, xylenes. A monitoring method based on real-time Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) analysis has been developed to specifically quantify populations of

  9. 'Dilute-and-shoot' RSLC-MS-MS method for fast detection of nerve and vesicant chemical warfare agent metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Igor; Braun, Arcady; Stavrianidi, Andrey; Baygildiev, Timur; Shpigun, Oleg; Oreshkin, Dmitry; Rybalchenko, Igor

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive screening method based on fast liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (RSLC-MS-MS) has shown the feasibility of separation and detection of low concentration β-lyase metabolites of sulfur mustard and of nerve agent phosphonic acids in urine. The analysis of these compounds is of interest because they are specific metabolites of the chemical warfare agents (CWAs), sulfur mustard (HD), sarin (GB), soman (GD), VX and Russian VX (RVX). The 'dilute-and-shoot' RSLC-MS-MS method provides a sensitive and direct approach for determining CWA exposure in non-extracted non-derivatized samples from urine. Chromatographic separation of the metabolites was achieved using a reverse phase column with gradient mobile phases consisting of 0.5% formic acid in water and acetonitrile. Identification and quantification of species were achieved using electrospray ionization-tandem mass-spectrometry monitoring two precursor-to-product ion transitions for each compound. The method demonstrates linearity over at least two orders of magnitude and had detection limits of 0.5 ng/mL in urine.

  10. Mechanisms of cutaneous vesication: Detection of sulfur mustard bis(2-chloroethyl) sulfide and metabolites after topical application in the isolated perfused

    SciTech Connect

    Spoo, J.W.; Monteiro-Rivier, N.A.; Riviere, J.E.

    1995-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop an assay to study the flux of sulfur mustard (HD) through the skin and determine if metabolites are formed due to the epidermal metabolism of HD after topical exposure of the isolated perfused porcine skin flap (IPPSF) to 14C-HD. Four IPPSFs were topically dosed with 2.85 mg of 14C-HD in ethanol. Venous perfusate samples were collected and added to a 34% solution of NaCI and snap-frozen to inhibit the metabolism of RD until time for assay. Perfusate samples were extracted using a solid-phase extraction cartridge with ethyl acetate and then assayed using gas chromatography. Two of the 4 IPPSFs showed detectable levels of RD in the venous perfusate 15 min after dosing, with 1 of these 2 IPPSFs showing detectable levels of RD in the perfusate 2 hours after dosing. All 4 IPPSFs had no more than 3 metabolites of RD appearing in the perfusate throughout the 2 hr experiment, with one of those metabolites identified as thiodiglycol. These experiments showed that little, if any, RD appears in the venous perfusate intact after percutaneous absorption and that epidermal metabolism of RD does occur to a significant degree in the IPPSF.

  11. 'Dilute-and-shoot' RSLC-MS-MS method for fast detection of nerve and vesicant chemical warfare agent metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Rodin, Igor; Braun, Arcady; Stavrianidi, Andrey; Baygildiev, Timur; Shpigun, Oleg; Oreshkin, Dmitry; Rybalchenko, Igor

    2015-01-01

    A sensitive screening method based on fast liquid chromatography tandem mass-spectrometry (RSLC-MS-MS) has shown the feasibility of separation and detection of low concentration β-lyase metabolites of sulfur mustard and of nerve agent phosphonic acids in urine. The analysis of these compounds is of interest because they are specific metabolites of the chemical warfare agents (CWAs), sulfur mustard (HD), sarin (GB), soman (GD), VX and Russian VX (RVX). The 'dilute-and-shoot' RSLC-MS-MS method provides a sensitive and direct approach for determining CWA exposure in non-extracted non-derivatized samples from urine. Chromatographic separation of the metabolites was achieved using a reverse phase column with gradient mobile phases consisting of 0.5% formic acid in water and acetonitrile. Identification and quantification of species were achieved using electrospray ionization-tandem mass-spectrometry monitoring two precursor-to-product ion transitions for each compound. The method demonstrates linearity over at least two orders of magnitude and had detection limits of 0.5 ng/mL in urine. PMID:25326204

  12. High temperature liquid chromatography hyphenated with ESI-MS and ICP-MS detection for the structural characterization and quantification of halogen containing drug metabolites.

    PubMed

    de Vlieger, Jon S B; Giezen, Mark J N; Falck, David; Tump, Cornelis; van Heuveln, Fred; Giera, Martin; Kool, Jeroen; Lingeman, Henk; Wieling, Jaap; Honing, Maarten; Irth, Hubertus; Niessen, Wilfried M A

    2011-07-18

    In this paper we describe the hyphenation of high temperature liquid chromatography with ICP-MS and ESI-MS for the characterization of halogen containing drug metabolites. The use of temperature gradients up to 200°C enabled the separation of metabolites with low organic modifier content. This specific property allowed the use of detection methods that suffer from (significant) changes in analyte response factors as a function of the organic modifier content such as ICP-MS. Metabolites of two kinase inhibitors (SB-203580-Iodo and MAPK inhibitor VIII) produced by bacterial cytochrome P450 BM3 mutants and human liver microsomes were identified based on high resolution MS(n) data. Quantification was done using their normalized and elemental specific response in the ICP-MS. The importance of these kinds of quantification strategies is stressed by the observation that the difference of the position of one oxygen atom in a structure can greatly affect its response in ESI-MS and UV detection.

  13. Combined derivatization and high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence and ultraviolet detection for simultaneous analysis of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite in human pancreatic juice samples.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, Giuseppe; Selvaggi, Federico; Sulpizio, Sara; Bassi, Claudio; Carlucci, Maura; Cotellese, Roberto; Ferrone, Vincenzo; Innocenti, Paolo; Locatelli, Marcello

    2015-06-01

    A simple and sensitive method based on the combination of derivatization and high-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet and fluorimetric detection was developed for the simultaneous determination of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite in human pancreatic juice samples. Parameters of the derivatization procedure affecting extraction efficiency were optimized. The developed method was validated according to the International Conference on Harmonization guidelines. The calibration curves were linear over a range of 0.1-15 µg/mL for octreotide and 0.20-15 µg/mL for gabexate mesylate metabolite. Derivatized products of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite were separated on a Luna C18 column (4.6 × 250 mm; 5 µm particle size) using a gradient with a run time of 36 min, without further purification. The limits of detection were 0.025 and 0.05, respectively, for octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite. This paper reports the validation of a quantitative high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-fluorescence (HPLC-PDA-FL) method for the simultaneous analysis of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite in pancreatic juice by protein precipitation using zinc sulfate-methanol-acetonitrile containing the derivatizing reagent, 4-fluoro-7-nitro-[2,1,3]-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F). Derivatized products of octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite were separated on a Luna C18 column (4.6 × 250 mm; 5 µm particle size) using a gradient with a run time of 36 min, without further purification. The method was validated over the concentration ranges 0.1-15 and 0.2-15 µg/mL for octreotide and gabexate mesylate metabolite, respectively, in human pancreatic juice. Biphalin and methyl-p-hydroxybenzoate were used as the internal standards. This method was successfully utilized to support clinical studies in humans. The results from assay validations show that the method is selective, sensitive and robust. The limit

  14. A high-resolution 2D J-resolved NMR detection technique for metabolite analyses of biological samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yuqing; Zhang, Zhiyong; Chen, Hao; Feng, Jianghua; Cai, Shuhui; Chen, Zhong

    2015-02-01

    NMR spectroscopy is a commonly used technique for metabolite analyses. Due to the observed macroscopic magnetic susceptibility in biological tissues, current NMR acquisitions in measurements of biological tissues are generally performed on tissue extracts using liquid NMR or on tissues using magic-angle spinning techniques. In this study, we propose an NMR method to achieve high-resolution J-resolved information for metabolite analyses directly from intact biological samples. A dramatic improvement in spectral resolution is evident in our contrastive demonstrations on a sample of pig brain tissue. Metabolite analyses for a postmortem fish from fresh to decayed statuses are presented to further reveal the capability of the proposed method. This method is a previously-unreported high-resolution 2D J-resolved spectroscopy for biological applications without specialised hardware requirements or complicated sample pretreatments. It provides a significant contribution to metabolite analyses of biological samples, and may be potentially applicable to in vivo samples. Furthermore, this method also can be applied to measurements of semisolid and viscous samples.

  15. Screening procedure for detection of diuretics and uricosurics and/or their metabolites in human urine using gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after extractive methylation.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Jochen; Bierl, Anabelle; Peters, Frank T; Maurer, Hans H

    2005-08-01

    A gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS)-based screening procedure was developed for the detection of diuretics, uricosurics, and/or their metabolites in human urine after extractive methylation. Phase-transfer catalyst remaining in the organic phase was removed by solid-phase extraction on a diol phase. The compounds were separated by GC and identified by MS in the full-scan mode. The possible presence of the following drugs and/or their metabolites could be indicated using mass chromatography with the given ions: m/z 267, 352, 353, 355, 386, and 392 for thiazide diuretics bemetizide, bendroflumethiazide, butizide, chlorothiazide, cyclopenthiazide, cyclothiazide, hydrochlorothiazide, metolazone, polythiazide, and for canrenoic acid and spironolactone; m/z 77, 81, 181, 261, 270, 295, 406, and 438 for loop diuretics bumetanide, ethacrynic acid, furosemide, piretanide, torasemide, as well as the uricosurics benzbromarone, probenecid, and sulfinpyrazone; m/z 84, 85, 111, 112, 135, 161, 249, 253, 289, and 363 for the other diuretics acetazolamide, carzenide, chlorthalidone, clopamide, diclofenamide, etozoline, indapamide, mefruside, tienilic acid, and xipamide. The identity of positive signals in such mass chromatograms was confirmed by comparison of the peaks underlying full mass spectra with reference spectra. This method allowed the detection of the abovementioned drugs and/or their metabolites in human urine samples, except torasemide. The limits of detection ranged from 0.001 to 5 mg/L in the full-scan mode. Recoveries of selected diuretics and uricosurics, representing the different chemical classes, ranged from 46% to 99% with coefficients of variation of less than 21%. After ingestion of the lowest therapeutic doses, furosemide was detectable in urine samples for 67 hours, hydrochlorothiazide for 48 hours, and spironolactone for 52 hours (via its target analyte canrenone). The procedure described here is part of a systematic toxicological analysis

  16. Analysis of cocaine and two metabolites in dried blood spots by liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection: a novel test for cocaine and alcohol intake.

    PubMed

    Mercolini, Laura; Mandrioli, Roberto; Gerra, Gilberto; Raggi, Maria Augusta

    2010-11-12

    An original HPLC method coupled to spectrofluorimetric detection is presented for the simultaneous analysis in dried blood spots (DBS) of cocaine and two important metabolites, namely benzoylecgonine (its main metabolite) and cocaethylene (the active metabolite formed in the presence of ethanol). The chromatographic analysis was carried out on a C8 column, using a mobile phase containing phosphate buffer (pH 3.0)-acetonitrile (85:15, v/v). Native analyte fluorescence was monitored at 315 nm while exciting at 230 nm. A fast and feasible sample pre-treatment was implemented by solvent extraction, obtaining good extraction yields (>91%) and satisfactory precision values (RSD<4.8%). The method was successfully applied to DBS samples collected from some cocaine users, both with and without concomitant ethanol intake. The results were in good agreement with those obtained from plasma samples subjected to an original solid-phase extraction procedure on C8 cartridges. The method has demonstrated to be suitable for the monitoring of cocaine/ethanol use by means of DBS or plasma testing. Assays are in progress to apply this method on the street, for the control of subjects suspected of driving under the influence of psychotropic substances. PMID:20934184

  17. An environmental risk assessment for oseltamivir (Tamiflu) for sewage works and surface waters under seasonal-influenza- and pandemic-use conditions.

    PubMed

    Straub, Jürg Oliver

    2009-09-01

    In the event of an influenza pandemic, anti-viral medications such as oseltamivir (Tamiflu) are expected to be used in high amounts over a duration of several weeks. Oseltamivir has been predicted to reach high concentrations in surface waters and sewage works. New oseltamivir environmental fate and toxicity studies permit an environmental risk assessment (ERA) under seasonal- and pandemic-use scenarios. The environmental fate data for sewage works (no removal), surface waters (no significant degradation), and water/sediment systems (>50% primary degradation in 100 days) were used for the derivation of new predicted environmental concentrations (PECs) for western Europe and the River Lee catchment in the UK. Existing worst-case PECs for western Europe, the River Lee catchment in the UK and the Lower Colorado basin in the USA under pandemic conditions (< or =98.1 microg/L for surface waters, < or =348 microg/L for sewage works) were also considered for the ERA. PECs were compared with predicted no-effect concentrations (PNECs) based on new chronic ecotoxicity data (no observed effect concentration for algae, daphnia, and fish > or =1 mg/L). Based on all PEC/PNEC risk ratios, no significant risk is evident to surface waters or sewage works during both regular seasonal-use and high pandemic-use of oseltamivir. PMID:19560203

  18. Effects of Water Models on Binding Affinity: Evidence from All-Atom Simulation of Binding of Tamiflu to A/H5N1 Neuraminidase

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Trang Truc; Viet, Man Hoang

    2014-01-01

    The influence of water models SPC, SPC/E, TIP3P, and TIP4P on ligand binding affinity is examined by calculating the binding free energy ΔGbind of oseltamivir carboxylate (Tamiflu) to the wild type of glycoprotein neuraminidase from the pandemic A/H5N1 virus. ΔGbind is estimated by the Molecular Mechanic-Poisson Boltzmann Surface Area method and all-atom simulations with different combinations of these aqueous models and four force fields AMBER99SB, CHARMM27, GROMOS96 43a1, and OPLS-AA/L. It is shown that there is no correlation between the binding free energy and the water density in the binding pocket in CHARMM. However, for three remaining force fields ΔGbind decays with increase of water density. SPC/E provides the lowest binding free energy for any force field, while the water effect is the most pronounced in CHARMM. In agreement with the popular GROMACS recommendation, the binding score obtained by combinations of AMBER-TIP3P, OPLS-TIP4P, and GROMOS-SPC is the most relevant to the experiments. For wild-type neuraminidase we have found that SPC is more suitable for CHARMM than TIP3P recommended by GROMACS for studying ligand binding. However, our study for three of its mutants reveals that TIP3P is presumably the best choice for CHARMM. PMID:24672329

  19. Comparison of the Microgenics CEDIA heroin metabolite (6-AM) and the Roche Abuscreen ONLINE opiate immunoassays for the detection of heroin use in forensic urine samples.

    PubMed

    Holler, Justin M; Bosy, Thomas Z; Klette, Kevin L; Wiegand, Russel; Jemionek, John; Jacobs, Aaron

    2004-09-01

    Current Department of Defense (DoD) and Department of Health and Human Services (HHS) procedures for the detection of heroin abuse by testing urine utilize an initial opiate (codeine/morphine) immunoassay (IA) screen followed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) confirmation of 6-acetylmorphine (6-AM), if the morphine concentration is above established cutoff. An alternative to the current opiates screen for heroin abuse is the direct IA for the metabolite of heroin, 6-acetylmorphine. In this regard, the performance of the Microgenics CEDIA heroin metabolite (6-AM) screening reagent was assessed. This evaluation was conducted on the P module of a Hitachi Modular automated IA analyzer calibrated using 6-AM at 10 ng/mL. Reproducibility, linearity, accuracy, sensitivity, and interferences associated with use of the 6-AM IA reagent were evaluated. The IA reagent precision (percent coefficient of variation (%CV)) around each of seven standards was less than 0.63%, with a linearity (r(2)) value of 0.9951. A total of 37,713 active duty service members' urine samples were analyzed simultaneously using the CEDIA heroin metabolite (6-AM) reagent and the Roche Abuscreen ONLINE opiate reagent to evaluate both the prevalence rate of 6-AM in the demographic group and the sensitivity and specificity of the reagents for the detection of heroin use. Of the 37,713 samples tested using the CEDIA heroin metabolite (6-AM) reagent, three samples screened positive at the DoD and HHS cutoff of 10 ng/mL. One of the three samples confirmed positive for 6-AM by GC-MS above the cutoff of 10 ng/mL, the two remaining samples confirmed negative for 6-AM at a GC-MS limit of detection (LOD) of 2.1 ng/mL. In contrast, the Roche Abuscreen ONLINE opiate IA produced 74 opiate-positive results for codeine/morphine, with 6 of the 74 specimens confirming positive for morphine above the DoD cutoff concentration of 4000 ng/mL (8% DoD morphine confirmation rate), only one of the 74 opiate

  20. Rapid and sensitive detection of fipronil and its metabolites in edible oils by solid-phase extraction based on humic acid bonded silica combined with gas chromatography with electron capture detection.

    PubMed

    Peng, Xi-Tian; Li, Yu-Nan; Xia, Hong; Peng, Li-Jun; Feng, Yu-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Solid-phase extraction based on humic acid bonded silica followed by gas chromatography with electron capture detection was developed to determine fipronil and its metabolites in edible oil. To achieve the best extraction performance, we systematically investigated a series of solid-phase extraction parameters. Under the optimized conditions, the method was validated according to linearity, recovery, and precision. Good linearities were obtained with R(2) more than 0.9996 for all analytes. The limits of detection were between 0.3 and 0.5 ng/g, and the recoveries ranged from 83.1 to 104.0% at three spiked concentrations with intra- and interday relative standard deviation values less than 8.7%. Finally, the proposed method was applied to determine fipronil and its metabolites in 11 edible oil samples taken from Wuhan markets. Fipronil was detectable in four samples with concentrations ranging from 3.0 to 5.2 ng/g. In China, the maximum residue limits of fipronil in some vegetables and maize are 20 and 100 ng/g (GB/T 2763-2014), respectively. The residues of fipronil and its metabolites in commercial edible oils might exhibit some potential threat to human health as a result of high consumption of edible oil as part of daily intake. PMID:27280701

  1. Multi-residue enantiomeric analysis of human and veterinary pharmaceuticals and their metabolites in environmental samples by chiral liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Camacho-Muñoz, Dolores; Kasprzyk-Hordern, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Enantiomeric profiling of chiral pharmacologically active compounds (PACs) in the environment has hardly been investigated. This manuscript describes, for the first time, a multi-residue enantioselective method for the analysis of human and veterinary chiral PACs and their main metabolites from different therapeutic groups in complex environmental samples such as wastewater and river water. Several analytes targeted in this paper have not been analysed in the environment at enantiomeric level before. These are aminorex, carboxyibuprofen, carprofen, cephalexin, 3-N-dechloroethylifosfamide, 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine, dihydroketoprofen, fenoprofen, fexofenadine, flurbiprofen, 2-hydroxyibuprofen, ifosfamide, indoprofen, mandelic acid, 2-phenylpropionic acid, praziquantel and tetramisole. The method is based on chiral liquid chromatography utilising a chiral α1-acid glycoprotein column and tandem mass spectrometry detection. Excellent chromatographic separation of enantiomers (Rs≥1.0) was achieved for chloramphenicol, fexofenadine, ifosfamide, naproxen, tetramisole, ibuprofen and their metabolites: aminorex and dihydroketoprofen (three of four enantiomers), and partial separation (Rs = 0.7-1.0) was achieved for ketoprofen, praziquantel and the following metabolites: 3-N-dechloroethylifosfamide and 10,11-dihydro-10-hydroxycarbamazepine. The overall performance of the method was satisfactory for most of the compounds targeted. Method detection limits were at low nanogram per litre for surface water and effluent wastewater. Method intra-day precision was on average under 20% and sample pre-concentration using solid phase extraction yielded recoveries >70% for most of the analytes. This novel, selective and sensitive method has been applied for the quantification of chiral PACs in surface water and effluent wastewater providing excellent enantioresolution of multicomponent mixtures in complex environmental samples. It will help with better understanding

  2. Metabolite identification of a radiotracer by electrochemistry coupled to liquid chromatography with mass spectrometric and radioactivity detection.

    PubMed

    Baumann, Anne; Faust, Andreas; Law, Marylin P; Kuhlmann, Michael T; Kopka, Klaus; Schäfers, Michael; Karst, Uwe

    2011-07-01

    Radioligands, which specifically bind to a receptor or enzyme (target), enable molecular imaging of the target expression by positron emission tomography (PET). One very promising PET tracer is (S)-1-(4-(2-[(18)F]-fluoroethoxy)benzyl)-5-[1-(2-methoxymethylpyrrolidinyl)sulfonyl]isatin (isatin), a caspase-3 inhibitor, which has been developed at the University Hospital of Münster to image cell death (apoptosis). The translation of this novel tracer from preclinical evaluation to clinical examinations requires biodistribution studies, which characterize the pharmakodynamics and metabolic fate of the compound. This information is used to further optimize the radioligands and to interpret radioactive signals from tissues upon injection of the radioligand in vivo with respect to their specificity. The analysis of the metabolism of radioligands is hampered by the low amount of the compound being typically injected (nano/picomolar amount per injection). In the present study, electrochemistry (EC) is applied to elucidate the oxidative metabolism pathway of the radiotracer. Previous studies have demonstrated that EC can be utilized as a complementary tool to conventional in vitro approaches in drug metabolism studies. Thereby, potential oxidative metabolites of the isatin are determined by EC coupled to electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (EC/ESI-MS). Moreover, using EC/liquid chromatography (LC) and ESI-ion trap MS(n), structural elucidation of the oxidation products is performed. Comparatively to EC, in vitro metabolism studies with rat liver microsomes are conducted. Finally, the developed LC/ESI-MS method is applied to determine metabolites in body fluids and cell extracts from in vivo studies with the nonradioactive ((19)F) and radioactive isatin ((18)F). On the basis of the electrochemically generated oxidation products of the radioligand, the major radioactive metabolite occurring in vivo was successfully identified.

  3. Solid phase extraction with silicon dioxide microsphere adsorbents in combination with gas chromatography-electron capture detection for the determination of DDT and its metabolites in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Wu, Wei; Xie, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) microspheres without special modification to enrich dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its main metabolites, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-2,2-dichloroethylene (p,p'-DDD) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) in combination with gas chromatography-electron-capture detection. The experimental results indicated that an excellent linear relationship between the recoveries and the concentrations of DDT and its main metabolites was obtained in the range of 0.2-30 ng mL(-1) and the correlation coefficients were in the range of 99.96-99.99%. The detection limits based on the ratio of signal to the baseline noise (S/N = 3) were 2.2, 2.9, 3.8 and 4.1 ng L(-1) for p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT, and p,p'-DDE, respectively. The precisions of the proposed method were all below 10% (n = 6). Four real water samples were utilized for validation of the proposed method, and satisfactory spiked recoveries in the range of 72.4-112.9% were achieved. These results demonstrated that the developed method was a simple, sensitive, and robust analytical method for the monitoring of pollutants in the environment. PMID:23356340

  4. Determination of herbicides and its metabolite in soil and water samples by capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence detection using microwave-assisted derivatization.

    PubMed

    Cao, Liwei; Deng, Tao; Liang, Siliu; Tan, Xiaofang; Meng, Jianxin

    2014-01-01

    Methods were developed to determine glufosinate (GLUF), glyphosate (GLYP) and its metabolite, aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) by capillary electrophoresis-laser induced fluorescence detection using 5-(4,6-dichlorotriazinylamino) fluorescein (DTAF) and fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) as the derivatizing reagents. To accelerate the labeling speed, a microwave-assisted derivatization method was adopted. The derivatizing reaction time was reduced to 180 and 150 s for DTAF and FITC, whose reaction time for conventional labeling was 50 min and 5 h, respectively. The optimum separation conditions for derivatives were as follows: a back ground electrolyte (BGE) of 30 mmol L(-1) sodium tetraborate containing 15 mmol L(-1) brij-35, hydrodynamic injection 15 s and a 10 kV separation voltage. Under these conditions, the LODs (S/N = 3) for DTAF derivatives were 0.32, 0.19 and 0.15 nmol L(-1) for GLUF, GLYP, and AMPA, respectively. The LODs (S/N = 3) for FITC derivatives were 2.60, 3.88 and 2.42 nmol L(-1) for GLUF, GLYP, and AMPA, respectively. The applicability of the developed method was demonstrated by the detection of the above herbicides and metabolite in water and soil samples.

  5. Solid phase extraction with silicon dioxide microsphere adsorbents in combination with gas chromatography-electron capture detection for the determination of DDT and its metabolites in water samples.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qingxiang; Wu, Wei; Xie, Guohong

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of silicon dioxide (SiO(2)) microspheres without special modification to enrich dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT) and its main metabolites, p,p'-dichlorodiphenyl-2,2-dichloroethylene (p,p'-DDD) and p,p'-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (DDE) in combination with gas chromatography-electron-capture detection. The experimental results indicated that an excellent linear relationship between the recoveries and the concentrations of DDT and its main metabolites was obtained in the range of 0.2-30 ng mL(-1) and the correlation coefficients were in the range of 99.96-99.99%. The detection limits based on the ratio of signal to the baseline noise (S/N = 3) were 2.2, 2.9, 3.8 and 4.1 ng L(-1) for p,p'-DDD, p,p'-DDT, o,p'-DDT, and p,p'-DDE, respectively. The precisions of the proposed method were all below 10% (n = 6). Four real water samples were utilized for validation of the proposed method, and satisfactory spiked recoveries in the range of 72.4-112.9% were achieved. These results demonstrated that the developed method was a simple, sensitive, and robust analytical method for the monitoring of pollutants in the environment.

  6. Simultaneous analysis of acetaminophen, p-aminophenol and aspirin metabolites by hydrophilic interaction and strong anion exchange capillary liquid chromatography coupled to amperometric detection.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Minmin; Wu, Yimin; Lu, Lanxiang; Ding, Kang; Tang, Fengxiang; Lin, Zian; Wu, Xiaoping

    2011-08-01

    A simple and sensitive method has been developed for the simultaneous determination of polar nonsteroidal pharmaceuticals and metabolites, including acetaminophen, p-aminophenol and several aspirin metabolites (salicylic acid, gentisic acid, salicyluric acid and 2,3-dihydroxybenzoic acid), by capillary liquid chromatography with amperometric detection. Using a capillary monolithic column with mixed mode stationary phases and a mobile phase composed of acetonitrile and Tris buffer, rapid separation of six polar analytes was achieved within 8 min, and a hydrophilic interaction and strong anion exchange separation mechanism were exhibited. Method detection limits of six analytes ranged from 10 to 50 ng/mL. In terms of precision, the intra- and interday relative standard deviation values in all analytes never exceeded 3.1% for migration time and 8.9% for peak areas, respectively. This method provided a simple, rapid and cost-effective approach for the analysis of polar pharmaceuticals. The applicability of the method in pharmacokinetics was verified by spiking human serum samples with the compounds and analyzing the recoveries. PMID:21644253

  7. Subtype-associated metabolite differences in the temporal lobe in schizophrenia detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Fukuzako, H; Kodama, S; Fukuzako, T; Yamada, K; Doi, W; Sato, D; Takigawa, M

    1999-11-01

    Brain imaging studies have indicated that the medial temporal lobe functions aberrantly in schizophrenic patients. Both diagnostic subtype and gender may affect functional and morphologic abnormalities in this region. We investigated subtype- and gender-associated differences in metabolites in the left medial temporal lobe in 40 medicated schizophrenic patients by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy and compared findings with those in 40 healthy control subjects. Peaks corresponding to N-acetylaspartate (NAA), choline-containing compounds (Cho), creatine-phosphocreatine (Cr), and inositol were measured. Schizophrenic patients showed a decrease in the NAA/Cr ratio in the left medial temporal lobe, and patients with the disorganized subtype of illness showed significantly lower NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr ratios than those with paranoid schizophrenia. The NAA/Cr ratio in patients with the undifferentiated subtype also was significantly lower than in the paranoid subtype. No significant associations were observed between metabolite ratios and clinical symptom scores, age at onset of illness, or gender. These findings suggest that patients with the disorganized and undifferentiated subtypes have greater impairments in neuronal integrity or function in the left medial temporal lobe than patients with other subtypes of schizophrenia.

  8. New synthesis and characterization of (+)-lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) derivatives and the development of a microparticle-based immunoassay for the detection of LSD and its metabolites.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Goc-Szkutnicka, K; McNally, A J; Pilcher, I; Polakowski, S; Vitone, S; Wu, R S; Salamone, S J

    1997-01-01

    In this paper are reported the synthesis and characterization of three LSD derivatives. On the basis of several analytical characterization studies, the most stable derivative has been selected and a procedure to covalently link the derivative to polystyrene microparticles through a carrier protein has been developed. In addition, two new LSD immunogens have been synthesized and characterized, and from these immunogens antibodies that recognize not only LSD but also several major LSD metabolites have been generated. Using the selected derivative and antibody, a homogeneous microparticle-based immunoassay has been developed for the detection of LSD in human urine with the required sensitivity and specificity for an effective screening assay. The performance of this LSD OnLine assay has been evaluated using the criteria of precision, cross-reactivity, correlation to the Abuscreen LSD RIA and GC/MS/MS, assay specificity, and limit of detection.

  9. In vivo metabolism study of rhubarb decoction in rat using high-performance liquid chromatography with UV photodiode-array and mass-spectrometric detection: a strategy for systematic analysis of metabolites from traditional Chinese medicines in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Song, Rui; Xu, Lei; Xu, Fengguo; Li, Zhe; Dong, Haijuan; Tian, Yuan; Zhang, Zunjian

    2010-11-01

    High-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection (HPLC-DAD) and tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) was used for separation and identification of metabolites in rat urine, bile and plasma after oral administration of rhubarb decoction. Based on the proposed strategy, 91 of the 113 potential metabolites were tentatively identified or characterized. Besides anthraquinones metabolites, gallic acid, (-)-epicatechin and (+)-catechin metabolites were also detected and characterized in these biological samples. Our results indicated that glucuronidation and sulfation were the main metabolic pathways of anthraquinones, while methylation, glucuronidation and sulfation were the main metabolic pathways of gallic acid, (-)-epicatechin and (+)-catechin. Phase I reactions (e.g., hydroxylation and reduction) played a relatively minor role compared to phase II reactions in metabolism of phenolic compounds of rhubarb decoction. The identification and structure elucidation of these metabolites provided essential data for further pharmacological and clinical studies of rhubarb and related preparations. Moreover, the results of the present investigations clearly indicated the relevance and usefulness of the combination of chromatographic, spectrophotometric, and mass-spectrometric analysis to detect and identify metabolites.

  10. Analytical Methodologies for Detection of Gamma-Valerolactone, Delta-Valerolactone, Acephate and Azinphos Methyl and Their Associated Metabolites in Complex Biological Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, E.; Clark, R.; Grant, K.; Campbell, J.; Hoppe, E.

    2005-01-01

    Non-invasive biomonitoring for chemicals of interest in law enforcement and similar monitoring of pesticides, together with their metabolites, can not only save money but can lead to faster medical attention for individuals exposed to these chemicals. This study describes methods developed for the analysis of gamma-valerolactone (GVL), delta-valerolactone (DVL), acephate, and azinphos methyl in saliva and serum. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) operated in the negative and positive ion mode and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were used to analyze GVL and DVL. Although both analytical techniques worked well, lower detection limits were obtained with GC/MS. The lactones and their corresponding sodium salts were spiked into both saliva and serum. The lactones were isolated from saliva or serum using newly developed extraction techniques and then subsequently analyzed using GC/MS. The sodium salts of the lactones are nonvolatile and require derivatization prior to analysis by this method. N-methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) was ultimately selected as the reagent for derivatization because the acidic conditions required for reactions with diazomethane caused the salts to undergo intramolecular cyclization to the corresponding lactones. In vitro studies were conducted using rat liver microsomes to determine other metabolites associated with these compounds. Azinphos methyl and acephate are classified as organophosphate pesticides, and are known to be cholinesterase inhibitors in humans and insects, causing neurotoxicity. For this reason they have both exposure and environmental impact implications. These compounds were spiked into serum and saliva and prepared for analysis by GC/MS. Continuation of this research would include analysis by GC/MS under positive ion mode to determine the parent ions of the unknown metabolites. Further research is planned through an in vivo analysis of the lactones and pesticides. These

  11. Postmortem distribution of flunitrazepam and its metabolite 7-aminoflunitrazepam in body fluids and solid tissues in an autopsy case: Usefulness of bile for their detection.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Koutaro; Wurita, Amin; Minakata, Kayoko; Gonmori, Kunio; Nozawa, Hideki; Yamagishi, Itaru; Watanabe, Kanako; Suzuki, Osamu

    2015-09-01

    We experienced an autopsy case of a woman in her 70s, in which the direct cause of her death was judged as asphyxia due to the occlusion of food in the trachea. The postmortem interval was estimated at about 2days. The specimens dealt with were femoral vein blood, right heart blood, left heart blood, bile, brain, lung, heart muscle, liver, spleen, kidney, pancreas, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue. By tentative drug screening, we found a high concentration of 7-aminoflunitrazepam in the femoral vein blood, which lead us to examine the postmortem distribution of flunitrazepam and its metabolite 7-aminoflunitrazepam in her body fluids and solid tissues. The extraction of flunitrazepam, 7-aminoflunitrazepam and internal standard nimetazepam was performed by a modified QuEChERS method, followed by the analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. Because this study included various kinds of human matrices with quite different properties, we used the standard additional method to overcome the matrix effects. The concentration of 7-aminoflunitrazepam were generally much higher than those of the parent drug flunitrazepam for most specimens except for the adipose tissue, showing that flunitrazepam is readily metabolized to its 7-amino metabolite after absorption into the body both antemortem and postmortem. The outstandingly highest concentration of 7-animoflunitrazepam was found in the bile, followed by the kidney, pancreas, left heart blood, spleen and liver. Although a majority of flunitrazepam was converted to 7-aminoflunitrazepam, the flunitrazepam concentration was highest in the pancreas, followed by the spleen, bile, left heart blood, and brain. In contrast to the results on synthetic cannabinoids, the levels of flunitrazepam and 7-animoflunitrazepam in the adipose tissue were relatively low. The present study showed that the bile may be a useful specimen for detection of unchanged benzodiazepines/their metabolites to be collected at autopsy. PMID

  12. Analytical Methodologies for Detection of Gamma-valerolactone, Delta-valerolactone, Acephate, and Azinphos Methyl and their Associated Metabolites in Complex Biological Matrices

    SciTech Connect

    Zink, Erika M.; Clark, Ryan J.; Grant, Karen E.; Campbell, James A.; Hoppe, Eric W.

    2005-01-01

    Non-invasive biomonitoring for chemicals of interest in law enforcement and similar monitoring of pesticides together with their metabolites can not only save money but can lead to faster medical attention for individuals exposed to these chemicals. This study describes methods developed for the analysis of gamma-valerolactone (GVL), delta-valerolactone (DVL), acephate, and azinphos methyl in saliva and serum. Liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (LC/MS) operated in the negative ion mode and in the positive ion mode and gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) were used to analyze GVL and DVL. Although both analytical techniques worked well, lower detection limits were obtained with GC/MS. The lactones and their corresponding sodium salts were spiked into both saliva and serum. The lactones were isolated from saliva or serum using newly developed extraction techniques and then subsequently analyzed using GC/MS. The sodium salts of the lactones are nonvolatile and require derivatization prior to analysis by this method. N-methyl-N-(t-butyldimethylsilyl)-trifluoroacetamide (MTBSTFA) was ultimately selected as the reagent for derivatization because the acidic conditions required for reactions with diazomethane caused the salts to undergo intramolecular cyclization to the corresponding lactones. In vitro studies were conducted using rat liver microsomes to determine other metabolites associated with these compounds. Azinphos methyl and acephate are classified as organophosphate pesticides, and are known to be cholinesterase inhibitors in humans and insects, causing neurotoxicity. For this reason they have both exposure and environmental impact implications. These compounds were spiked into serum and saliva and prepared for analysis by GC/MS. Continuation of this research would include analysis by GC/MS under positive ion mode to determine the parent ions of the unknown metabolites. Further research is planned through an in vivo analysis of the lactones and

  13. Rapid determination of methadone and its major metabolite in biological fluids by gas-liquid chromatography with thermionic detection for maintenance treatment of opiate addicts.

    PubMed

    Chikhi-Chorfi, N; Pham-Huy, C; Galons, H; Manuel, N; Lowenstein, W; Warnet, J M; Claude, J R

    1998-11-01

    A rapid gas-liquid chromatographic assay is developed for the quantification of methadone (Mtd) and its major metabolite, 2-ethylidene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), in biological fluids of opiate addicts. After alkaline extraction from samples with lidocaine hydrochloride as internal standard, Mtd and EDDP are separated on SP-2250 column at 220 degrees C and detected with a thermionic detector. The chromatographic time is about 6 min. The relative standard deviations (R.S.D.) of Mtd and EDDP standards are between 1.5 and 5.5%. Most drugs of abuse (morphine, codeine, narcotine, cocaine, benzoylecgonine, cocaethylene, dextropropoxyphene etc) are shown not to interfere with this technique. The method has been applied to study the levels of Mtd and EDDP metabolite in serum, saliva and urine of patients under maintenance treatment for opiate dependence. EDDP levels were found higher than those of Mtd in urine samples from four treated patients, but lower in serum and undetectable in saliva. However, Mtd concentrations were higher in saliva than in serum.

  14. Determination of urinary 4,4'-methylenedianiline and its acetylated metabolites by solid-phase extraction and HPLC analysis with UV and electrochemical detection.

    PubMed

    Robert, A; Ducos, P; Francin, J M

    1995-01-01

    An analytical procedure based on solid-phase extraction and high-performance liquid chromatography using both ultraviolet and electrochemical detection was developed to determine, without derivatization, stable urinary forms of 4,4'-methylenedianiline (MDA) and of its acetylated metabolites at the micrograms/l level, in post-shift urine from 63 exposed workers. The determination of MDA, N-acetyl MDA (MAMDA) and N,N'-diacetyl MDA (DAMDA) was achieved on the non-hydrolysed urine samples, and that of total MDA on urine samples after alkaline hydrolysis. It was necessary to protect urine samples with sulfamic acid in order to stabilize amines and to improve the precision and accuracy of the analyses. Under these conditions, unstable labile conjugates were determined as their parent stable amine. The distribution of total MDA, MDA, MAMDA and DAMDA was assessed in 116 urine samples. Their relative concentrations (arithmetic means) were found to be in the following order: total MDA > MAMDA > MDA > DAMDA. While MAMDA represented more than 50% of total MDA, MDA and DAMDA were lower than 15% and 3% respectively. Acetylation of MDA, described as a possible pathway of detoxication, is confirmed to be an important metabolization route in humans, essentially through the monoacetylated metabolite. However, the individual ratio MAMDA/total MDA was found to vary widely (roughly from 0% to 100%). PMID:8847112

  15. Selective observation of biologically important 15N-labeled metabolites in isolated rat brain and liver by 1H-detected multiple-quantum-coherence spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanamori, Keiko; Ross, Brian D.; Parivar, Farhad

    Four cerebral metabolites of importance in neurotransmission, serotonin, L-tryptophan, L-glutamine, and N-acetyl- L-aspartate, and two hepatic urea-cycle intermediates, citrulline and urea, were found to be observable by 1H- 15N heteronuclear multiple-quantum-coherence (HMQC) spectroscopy in aqueous solution at physiological pH and temperature, through the protons spin-coupled to their indole, amide, or ureido nitrogen. Their 1H chemical shifts were well dispersed over a 5-10 ppm region while the 1J 15N- 1H values were 87-99 Hz. For [γ- 15N]glutamine, a 50- to 100-fold increase in sensitivity over direct 15N detection was achieved, in contrast to a 2-fold increase by the polarization-transfer method. In the isolated brain of portacaval-shunted rats, the amide protons of biologically 15N-enriched [γ- 15N]glutamine were observed in 2 min of acquisition, with suppression of proton signals from all other cerebral metabolites. In isolated liver of 15N-enriched control rats, [ 15NIurea protons were observed in 16 min. The HMQC method is likely to be effective for the in vivo study of cerebral and hepatic nitrogen metabolism.

  16. Terbium-macrocycle complexes as chemical sensors: detection of an aspirin metabolite in urine using a salicylurate-specific receptor site.

    PubMed

    Esplin, Taran L; Cable, Morgan L; Gray, Harry B; Ponce, Adrian

    2010-05-17

    Salicylurate (SU) is the major metabolite in urine of acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin) and can be used as a metric to monitor aspirin pharmacokinetics and as an indicator of appendicitis, anemia, and liver disease. Detection in urine and plasma currently requires solvent extraction or other sample handling prior to analysis. We present a simple method to quantify SU in urine via chelation to a terbium binary complex with the macrocycle 1,4,7,10-tetraazacyclododecane-1,7-bisacetate (DO2A). Binding of SU to form the [Tb(DO2A)(SU)](-) ternary complex triggers intense luminescence under UV excitation due to an absorbance-energy transfer-emission mechanism. Here we report characterization of the [Tb(DO2A)(SU)](-) ternary complex and application of this sensitized lanthanide luminescence method to quantify SU in urine samples following a low-dose aspirin regimen.

  17. Simultaneous determination of two human urinary metabolites of N,N-dimethylformamide using gas chromatography-thermionic sensitive detection with mass spectrometric confirmation.

    PubMed

    Käfferlein, H U; Angerer, J

    1999-11-12

    Two human urinary metabolites of the industrial solvent N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF), N-hydroxymethyl-N-methylformamide (HMMF) and N-acetyl-S-(N-methylcarbamoyl)cysteine (AMCC), were assayed using a new analytical method (gas chromatography and thermionic sensitive detection). Clean-up of urine samples includes a liquid-liquid extraction step followed by a solid-phase extraction step to separate HMMF and AMCC from other urine components. During clean-up, AMCC is converted into ethyl-N-methylcarbamate (EMC), and during gas chromatography, HMMF is degraded in the injector to N-methylformamide (NMF). All the validation data necessary for a quantitative procedure are given. The method was applied to urine samples from workers exposed to DMF and from the general population. The results were confirmed by mass spectrometric determination. For this purpose a further liquid-liquid extraction step was introduced in the clean-up procedure. Background levels of AMCC in the general population were identified.

  18. Use of Fluorinated Compounds To Detect Aromatic Metabolites from m-Cresol in a Methanogenic Consortium: Evidence for a Demethylation Reaction

    PubMed Central

    Londry, Kathleen L.; Fedorak, Phillip M.

    1993-01-01

    Anaerobic sewage sludge was used to enrich a methanogenic m-cresol-degrading consortium. 6-Fluoro-3-methylphenol was synthesized and added to subcultures of the consortium with m-cresol. This caused the accumulation of 4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid. In a separate experiment, the addition of 3-fluorobenzoic acid caused the transient accumulation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid. Inhibition with bromoethanesulfonic acid caused the accumulation of benzoic acid. Thus, the proposed degradation pathway was m-cresol → 4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid → 4-hydroxybenzoic acid → benzoic acid. The m-cresol-degrading consortium was able to convert exogenous 4-hydroxybenzoic acid and benzoic acid to methane. In addition, for each metabolite of m-cresol identified, the corresponding fluorinated metabolite was detected, giving the following sequence: 6-fluoro-3-methylphenol → 5-fluoro-4-hydroxy-2-methylbenzoic acid → 3-fluoro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid → 3-fluorobenzoic acid. The second step in each of these pathways is a novel demethylation which was rate limiting. This demethylation reaction would likely facilitate the transformation of the methyl group to methane, which is consistent with the results of a previous study that showed that the methyl carbon of m-[methyl-14C]cresol was recovered predominantly as [14C]methane (D. J. Roberts, P. M. Fedorak, and S. E. Hrudey, Can. J. Microbiol. 33:335-338, 1987). The final aromatic compound in the proposed route for m-cresol metabolism was benzoic acid, and its detection in these cultures merges the pathway for the methanogenic degradation of m-cresol with those for the anaerobic metabolism of many phenols. PMID:16348996

  19. [High throuput analysis of organophosphorus pesticide residues and their metabolites in animal original foods by dual gas chromatography-dual pulse flame photometric detection].

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixin; Li, Heli; Miao, Hong; Zeng, Fangang; Li, Ruifeng; Chen, Huijing; Zhao, Yunfeng; Wu, Yongning

    2011-10-01

    A method was established for the quantitative determination of 54 organophosphorus pesticide residues and their metabolites in foods of animal origin by dual gas chromatography-dual pulse flame photometric detection. Homogenized samples were extracted with acetone and methylene chloride, and cleaned-up by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The response of each analyte showed a good linearity with a correlation coefficient not less than 0. 99. The recovery experiments were performed by a blank sample spiked at low, medium and high fortification levels. The recoveries for beef, mutton, pork, chicken were in the range of 50. 5% -128. 1% with the relative standard deviations (n = 6) of 1. 1% -25. 5%, which demonstrated the good precision and accuracy of the present method. The limits of detection for the analytes were in the range of 0. 001 -0. 170 mg/kg, and the limits of quantification were in the range of 0. 002 -0. 455 mg/kg. Animal food samples collected from markets such as meat, liver and kidney were analyzed, and the residues of dichlorovos and disulfoton-sulfoxide were found in the some samples. The established method is sensitive and selective enough to detect organophosphorus pesticide residues in animal foods. PMID:22268359

  20. High-performance liquid chromatographic method with amperometric detection employing boron-doped diamond electrode for the determination of sildenafil, vardenafil and their main metabolites in plasma.

    PubMed

    Bartošová, Zdenka; Jirovský, David; Horna, Aleš

    2011-11-01

    A simple, fast and sensitive HPLC method with electrochemical detection employing boron-doped diamond electrode (BDD) for the determination of sildenafil (Viagra™), vardenafil (Levitra™) and their main metabolites, N-desmethyl sildenafil and N-desethyl vardenafil in human plasma is presented. The assay involved drug extraction by tert-butyl methyl ether and isocratic reversed-phase liquid chromatography with amperometric detection. Complete separation of all analytes was achieved within 12 min. The mobile phase consisted of 20mM sodium dihydrogen phosphate with 40 mM sodium perchlorate/acetonitrile (70:30, v/v), pH 3.5. The electrode working potential was +1520 mV (vs. Pd/H(2)). Calibration curves were linear over the concentration range of 10-400 ng mL(-1). Phloretin was used as an internal standard. The limits of detection (LOD) and quantification (LOQ) for the studied analytes were within the range of 2-4 ng mL(-1) and 7.0-13.4 ng mL(-1), respectively. The developed method was applied to human plasma samples spiked with analytes at therapeutic concentrations. The study confirms the method's suitability for both pharmacokinetic studies and therapeutic monitoring.

  1. Volatile Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Rowan, Daryl D.

    2011-01-01

    Volatile organic compounds (volatiles) comprise a chemically diverse class of low molecular weight organic compounds having an appreciable vapor pressure under ambient conditions. Volatiles produced by plants attract pollinators and seed dispersers, and provide defense against pests and pathogens. For insects, volatiles may act as pheromones directing social behavior or as cues for finding hosts or prey. For humans, volatiles are important as flavorants and as possible disease biomarkers. The marine environment is also a major source of halogenated and sulfur-containing volatiles which participate in the global cycling of these elements. While volatile analysis commonly measures a rather restricted set of analytes, the diverse and extreme physical properties of volatiles provide unique analytical challenges. Volatiles constitute only a small proportion of the total number of metabolites produced by living organisms, however, because of their roles as signaling molecules (semiochemicals) both within and between organisms, accurately measuring and determining the roles of these compounds is crucial to an integrated understanding of living systems. This review summarizes recent developments in volatile research from a metabolomics perspective with a focus on the role of recent technical innovation in developing new areas of volatile research and expanding the range of ecological interactions which may be mediated by volatile organic metabolites. PMID:24957243

  2. Time-course measurements of caffeine and its metabolites extracted from fingertips after coffee intake: a preliminary study for the detection of drugs from fingerprints.

    PubMed

    Kuwayama, Kenji; Tsujikawa, Kenji; Miyaguchi, Hajime; Kanamori, Tatsuyuki; Iwata, Yuko T; Inoue, Hiroyuki

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether an ingested drug and its metabolites could be detected in the subject's fingerprints. Caffeine (CF) was chosen as the model drug. Three healthy subjects were asked to consume a cup of coffee (ca. 100 mL) containing 80 micro micro mg CF as the total dose, which is the normal amount in one cup of coffee. After washing hands with water to remove external contaminants, each subject pressed the index fingertip to a collecting matrix just before consuming the test cup of coffee, and then again pressed the index fingertip to the collecting matrix after 1, 3, 5, and 7 h. The time curve of the amounts of CF and its metabolites-theobromine (TB), paraxanthine (PX), and theophylline (TP)-in fingerprints and blood was determined using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS). A filter paper wetted with water (50 μL) was an efficient collecting matrix for extracting the analytes from the fingertip. With optimized sample preparation and LC/MS conditions, the total operating time, from taking the fingerprints to obtaining the analytical result, was approximately 10 min. The lower limits of quantification for CF, TB, PX, and TP were 0.5, 5, 0.5, and 5 ng/fingerprint, respectively. The amount of CF or PX determined in fingerprints obtained over 7 h after coffee intake was significantly greater than the amount determined in fingerprints taken before drinking coffee. Fingerprints were a more efficient source for drug testing than other biological samples, such as blood and sweat, because the procedures for sampling and extracting the drugs were simpler and took less time. The method could be used to prove drug intake in criminal investigations.

  3. FISH BILIARY POLYCYCLIC AROMATIC HYDROCARBON METABOLITES ESTIMATED BY FIXED-WAVELENGTH FLUORESCENCE: COMPARISON WITH HPLC-FLUORESCENT DETECTION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Fixed wavelength fluorescence (FF) was compared to high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection (HPLC-F) as an estimation of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) exposure to fish. Two excitation/emission wavelength pairs were used to measure naphthalene- an...

  4. Analytical Method for the Determination of Atrazine and Its Dealkylated Chlorotriazine Metabolites in Urine by Gas Chromatography/Mass Selective Detection.

    PubMed

    Bodalbhai; Yokley; Cheung

    1998-01-19

    A multiresidue method is reported for the determination of atrazine and its chloro dealkylated metabolites in urine. Urine samples were subjected to a protein precipitation procedure followed by further purification using strong anion exchange and silica solid-phase extraction columns. Final analysis was accomplished using gas chromatography/mass selective detection in the selected ion monitoring mode. The limits of detection were 0.050 ng injected for 2,4-diamino-6-chloro-s-triazine (G-28273) and 0.025 ng injected for 2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine (atrazine), 2-amino-4-chloro-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine (G-30033), and 2-amino-4-chloro-6-(ethylamino)-s-triazine (G-28279). The limits of quantification were 1.0 ppb for atrazine and G-30033 and 2.0 ppb for G-28279 and G-28273. The mean procedural recoveries obtained during the method validation were 115, 113, 112, and 97% and the standard deviations were 10.6, 10.2, 9.5, and 16.1% for atrazine, G-30033, G-28279, and G-28273, respectively. Additional recovery data were obtained during a worker exposure study and during an outside ruggedness trial. All studies were conducted under U.S. EPA FIFRA Good Laboratory Practice Standards 40 CFR 160.

  5. Analytical method for the determination of atrazine and its dealkylated chlorotriazine metabolites in water using gas chromatography/mass selective detection.

    PubMed

    Yokley, R A; Cheung, M W

    2000-10-01

    A multiresidue method is reported for the determination of atrazine and its dealkylated chlorotriazine metabolites in water. Water samples are buffered to pH 10 and partitioned in ethyl acetate. Final analysis is accomplished using gas chromatography/mass selective detection (GC/MSD) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The limit of detection (LOD) is 0.050 ng and the limit of quantification (LOQ) is 0.10 ppb for 2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine (atrazine), 2-amino-4-chloro-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine (G-30033), 2-amino-4-chloro-6-(ethylamino)-s-triazine (G-28279), and 2, 4-diamino-6-chloro-s-triazine (G-28273). The mean procedural recoveries were 90, 92, 98, and 85% and the standard deviations were 12, 13, 16, and 20% for atrazine, G-30033, G-28279, and G-28273, respectively (n = 30). The study was conducted under U.S. EPA FIFRA Good Laboratory Practice Guidelines 40 CFR 160 for method validation. The reported procedure accounts for residues of G-28273 in water that are not included in EPA Method 507.

  6. Analytical method for the determination of atrazine and its dealkylated chlorotriazine metabolites in water using gas chromatography/mass selective detection.

    PubMed

    Yokley, R A; Cheung, M W

    2000-10-01

    A multiresidue method is reported for the determination of atrazine and its dealkylated chlorotriazine metabolites in water. Water samples are buffered to pH 10 and partitioned in ethyl acetate. Final analysis is accomplished using gas chromatography/mass selective detection (GC/MSD) in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. The limit of detection (LOD) is 0.050 ng and the limit of quantification (LOQ) is 0.10 ppb for 2-chloro-4-(ethylamino)-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine (atrazine), 2-amino-4-chloro-6-(isopropylamino)-s-triazine (G-30033), 2-amino-4-chloro-6-(ethylamino)-s-triazine (G-28279), and 2, 4-diamino-6-chloro-s-triazine (G-28273). The mean procedural recoveries were 90, 92, 98, and 85% and the standard deviations were 12, 13, 16, and 20% for atrazine, G-30033, G-28279, and G-28273, respectively (n = 30). The study was conducted under U.S. EPA FIFRA Good Laboratory Practice Guidelines 40 CFR 160 for method validation. The reported procedure accounts for residues of G-28273 in water that are not included in EPA Method 507. PMID:11052690

  7. Simultaneous determination of nicotinic acid and its four metabolites in rat plasma using high performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometric detection (LC/MS/MS).

    PubMed

    Szafarz, Malgorzata; Lomnicka, Magdalena; Sternak, Magdalena; Chlopicki, Stefan; Szymura-Oleksiak, Joanna

    2010-04-01

    A sensitive and specific liquid chromatography electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous quantitation of nicotinic acid (NicA) and its metabolites nicotinamide (NA), 1-methylnicotinamide (MNA), 1-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide (M2PY) and 1-methyl-4-pyridone-5-carboxamide (M4PY) in rat plasma has been developed and validated. As an internal standard, 6-chloronicotinamide was used. The samples (100 microL) were subjected to deproteinization with acetonitrile (200 microL) and then, after centrifugation, 150 microL of the supernatant was transferred into conical vial and evaporated. Dry residue was reconstituted in 100 microL of the ACN/water (10:90, v/v) mixture. Chromatography was performed on a Waters Spherisorb 5 microm CNRP 4.6 x 150 mm analytical column with gradient elution using a mobile phase containing acetonitrile and water with 0.1% of formic acid. The full separation of all compounds was achieved within 15 min of analysis. Detection was performed by an Applied Biosystems MDS Sciex API 2000 triple quadrupole mass spectrometer set at unit resolution. The mass spectrometer was operated in the selected reactions monitoring mode (SRM), monitoring the transition of the protonated molecular ions m/z 153-110 for M2PY, 153-136 for M4PY, 124-80 for NicA, 123-80 for NA and 137-94 for MNA. The mass spectrometric conditions were optimized for each compound by continuously infusing the standard solution at the rate of 5 microL/min using a Harvard infusion pump. Electrospray ionization (ESI) was used for ion production. The instrument was coupled to an Agilent 1100 LC system. The precision and accuracy for both intra- and inter-day determination of all analytes ranged from 1.3% to 13.3% and from 94.43% to 110.88%. No significant matrix effect (ME) was observed. Stability of compounds was established in a battery of stability studies, i.e. bench-top, autosampler and long-term storage stability as well as freeze/thaw cycles. The method

  8. Validation of the Immunalysis microplate ELISA for the detection of buprenorphine and its metabolite norbuprenorphine in urine.

    PubMed

    Miller, Eleanor I; Torrance, Hazel J; Oliver, John S

    2006-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to validate the Immunalysis Buprenorphine Microplate enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of buprenorphine in urine samples. Sixty-nine urine samples were obtained from volunteers on the Subutex treatment program and from routine samples submitted to the laboratory for buprenorphine testing. For ELISA analysis, samples were diluted 1:10 with K(2)HPO(4) (0.1M, pH 7.0). The limit of detection was calculated as 0.5 ng/mL buprenorphine. The intra-assay and interday precision was 3.8% (n = 10) and 8.6% (n = 50) respectively at 1 ng/mL buprenorphine. At a low concentration of norbuprenorphine (1 ng/mL), the immunoassay demonstrated a cross-reactivity of 78%. A higher cross-reactivity of 116% was observed at a higher concentration of norbuprenorphine (10 ng/mL). Dihydrocodeine, codeine, tramadol, morphine, propoxyphene, methadone, and EDDP were tested at concentrations of 10 ng/mL and 10,000 ng/mL and demonstrated no cross-reactivity with the assay. For liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS-MS), deuterated internal standard mixture, 1M acetate buffer (pH 5.0), and b-glucuronidase were added to the standards and samples, which were then incubated for 3 h at 60 degrees C. After incubation, 3 mL K(2)HPO(4) (0.1M, pH 6.0) was added and the pH altered to pH 6.0 using 1M KOH. Buprenorphine and norbuprenorphine were subsequently extracted by solid-phase. Twenty-one samples were confirmed positive and 48 samples were confirmed negative by LC-MS-MS. Using a cut-off value of 0.5 ng/mL buprenorphine, the immunoassay demonstrated a sensitivity and specificity of 100%. PMID:16620543

  9. Methods of analysis by the U.S. Geological Survey Organic Geochemistry Research Group; determination of chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Zimmerman, L.R.; Hostetler, K.A.; Thurman, E.M.

    2000-01-01

    Analytical methods using high-performance liquid chromatography-diode array detection (HPLC-DAD) and high-performance liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry (HPLC/MS) were developed for the analysis of the following chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites in water: acetochlor ethanesulfonic acid (ESA), acetochlor oxanilic acid (OXA), alachlor ESA, alachlor OXA, metolachlor ESA, and metolachlor OXA. Good precision and accuracy were demonstrated for both the HPLC-DAD and HPLC/MS methods in reagent water, surface water, and ground water. The mean HPLC-DAD recoveries of the chloroacetanilide herbicide metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.25, 0.50, and 2.0 mg/L (micrograms per liter) ranged from 84 to 112 percent, with relative standard deviations of 18 percent or less. The mean HPLC/MS recoveries of the metabolites from water samples spiked at 0.05, 0.20, and 2.0 mg/L ranged from 81 to 125 percent, with relative standard deviations of 20 percent or less. The limit of quantitation (LOQ) for all metabolites using the HPLC-DAD method was 0.20 mg/L, whereas the LOQ using the HPLC/MS method was 0.05 mg/L. These metabolite-determination methods are valuable for acquiring information about water quality and the fate and transport of the parent chloroacetanilide herbicides in water.

  10. Identification of fungal metabolites from inside Gallus gallus domesticus eggshells by non-invasively detecting volatile organic compounds (VOCs).

    PubMed

    Cumeras, Raquel; Aksenov, Alexander A; Pasamontes, Alberto; Fung, Alexander G; Cianchetta, Amanda N; Doan, Hung; Davis, R Michael; Davis, Cristina E

    2016-09-01

    The natural porosity of eggshells allows hen eggs to become contaminated with microbes from the nesting material and environment. Those microorganisms can later proliferate due to the humid ambient conditions while stored in refrigerators, causing a potential health hazard to the consumer. The microbes' volatile organic compounds (mVOCs) are released by both fungi and bacteria. We studied mVOCs produced by aging eggs likely contaminated by fungi and fresh eggs using the non-invasive detection method of gas-phase sampling of volatiles followed by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry (GC/MS) analysis. Two different fungal species (Cladosporium macrocarpum and Botrytis cinerea) and two different bacteria species (Stenotrophomas rhizophila and Pseudomonas argentinensis) were identified inside the studied eggs. Two compounds believed to originate from the fungi themselves were identified. One fungus-specific compound was found in both egg and the fungi: trichloromethane. Graphical abstract Trichloromethane is a potential biomarker of fungal contamination of eggs. PMID:27457106

  11. Gas chromatographic method using nitrogen-phosphorus detection for the measurement of tramadol and its O-desmethyl metabolite in plasma and brain tissue of mice and rats.

    PubMed

    Tao, Q; Stone, D J; Borenstein, M R; Jean-Bart, V; Codd, E E; Coogan, T P; Desai-Krieger, D; Liao, S; Raffa, R B

    2001-11-01

    A method that allows the measurement of plasma and brain levels of the centrally-acting analgesic tramadol and its major metabolite (O-desmethyl tramadol) in mice and rats was developed using gas chromatography equipped with nitrogen-phosphorus detection (GC-NPD). Plasma samples were extracted with methyl tert.-butyl ether (MTBE) and were injected directly into the GC system. Brain tissue homogenates were precipitated with methanol, the resulting supernatant was dried then acidified with hydrochloric acid. The aqueous solution was washed with MTBE twice, alkalinized, and extracted with MTBE. The MTBE layer was dried, reconstituted and injected into the GC system. The GC assay used a DB-1 capillary column with an oven temperature ramp (135 to 179 degrees C at 4 degrees C/min). Dextromethorphan was used as the internal standard. The calibration curves for tramadol and O-desmethyl tramadol in plasma and brain tissue were linear in the range of 10 to 10000 ng/ml (plasma) and ng/g (brain). Assay accuracy and precision of back calculated standards were within +/- 15%. PMID:11710575

  12. Detection of metabolite induction in fungal co-cultures on solid media by high-throughput differential ultra-high pressure liquid chromatography-time-of-flight mass spectrometry fingerprinting.

    PubMed

    Bertrand, Samuel; Schumpp, Olivier; Bohni, Nadine; Bujard, Alban; Azzollini, Antonio; Monod, Michel; Gindro, Katia; Wolfender, Jean-Luc

    2013-05-31

    Access to new biological sources is a key element of natural product research. A particularly large number of biologically active molecules have been found to originate from microorganisms. Very recently, the use of fungal co-culture to activate the silent genes involved in metabolite biosynthesis was found to be a successful method for the induction of new compounds. However, the detection and identification of the induced metabolites in the confrontation zone where fungi interact remain very challenging. To tackle this issue, a high-throughput UHPLC-TOF-MS-based metabolomic approach has been developed for the screening of fungal co-cultures in solid media at the petri dish level. The metabolites that were overexpressed because of fungal interactions were highlighted by comparing the LC-MS data obtained from the co-cultures and their corresponding mono-cultures. This comparison was achieved by subjecting automatically generated peak lists to statistical treatments. This strategy has been applied to more than 600 co-culture experiments that mainly involved fungal strains from the Fusarium genera, although experiments were also completed with a selection of several other filamentous fungi. This strategy was found to provide satisfactory repeatability and was used to detect the biomarkers of fungal induction in a large panel of filamentous fungi. This study demonstrates that co-culture results in consistent induction of potentially new metabolites.

  13. Characterizing protein modifications by reactive metabolites using magnetic bead bioreactors and LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Li, Dandan; Fu, You-Jun; Rusling, James F

    2015-03-18

    We report here label-free metabolite-protein adduct detection and identification employing magnetic beads coated with metabolic enzymes as bioreactors to generate metabolites and possible metabolite-protein adducts for analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

  14. [To the question of the optimization of methods for detection of vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane, and their metabolites in biological fluids in workers involved in production of polyvinyl chloride].

    PubMed

    Zhurba, O M; Alekseenko, A N

    2014-01-01

    There is considered the improvement of methodological approaches to the gas chromatographic methods- of the detection of vinyl chloride and 1,2-dichloroethane and their metabolites--chloroethanol and monochloroacetic acid in biological fluids. There were evaluated such metrological characteristics of methods, as repeatability, interlaboratoty precision, relevance and accuracy. The value of relative expanded uncertainty does not exceed 30%. There are reported optimal regimes of gas chromatographic analysis, conditions for sample preparation. The results of the contents ofthese chemical compounds and their metabolites in biological fluids from persons working in contact with chlorinated hydrocarbons are presented These techniques can be used for the detection ofthe fact of exposure to toxic substances, assessment of the level of exposure and biomonitoring.

  15. Automated analysis of oxidative metabolites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Furner, R. L. (Inventor)

    1974-01-01

    An automated system for the study of drug metabolism is described. The system monitors the oxidative metabolites of aromatic amines and of compounds which produce formaldehyde on oxidative dealkylation. It includes color developing compositions suitable for detecting hyroxylated aromatic amines and formaldehyde.

  16. High-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method for simultaneous detection of ochratoxin A and relative metabolites in Aspergillus species and dried vine fruits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaoxu; Li, Jingming; Cheng, Zhan; Zhou, Ziying; Ma, Liyan

    2016-08-01

    A simple, sensitive and reliable quantification and identification method was developed for simultaneous analysis of ochratoxin A (OTA) and its related metabolites ochratoxin alpha (OTα), ochratoxin B (OTB) and mellein. The method was assessed by spiking analytes into blank culture media and dried vine fruits. Performance was tested in terms of accuracy, selectivity and repeatability. The method involves an ultrasonic extraction step for culture samples using methanol aqueous solution (7:3, v/v); the mycotoxin is quantified by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrospray ionisation and triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-ESI-MS/MS). The recoveries were 74.5-108.8%, with relative standard deviations (RSDs) of 0.4-8.4% for fungal culture. The limits of detection (LODs) were in the range of 0.03-0.87 μg l(-)(1), and the limits of quantification (LOQs) ranged from 0.07 to 2.90 μg l(-)(1). In addition, the extraction solutions and clean-up columns were optimised specifically for dried vine fruit samples to improve the performance of the method. Methanol-1% sodium bicarbonate extraction solution (6:4, v/v) was determined to be the most efficient. Solid-phase extraction (SPE) was performed as a clean-up step prior to HPLC-MS/MS analysis to reduce matrix effects. Recoveries ranged from 80.1% to 110.8%. RSDs ranged from 0.1% to 3.6%. LODs and LOQs ranged from 0.06 to 0.40 μg kg(-)(1) and from 0.19 to 1.20 μg kg(-)(1), respectively. The analytical method was established and used to identify and quantify OTA and related compounds from Aspergillus carbonarius and Aspergillus ochraceus in cultures and dried vine fruits. The results showed that A. carbonarius produced OTα, OTB and OTA, whereas A. ochraceus produced OTB, OTA and mellein after 7 days of cultivation. Of 30 commercial samples analysed, 10 were contaminated with ochratoxins; OTB, OTα and mellein were also detected in different samples. PMID:27442910

  17. Metabolite profiling of licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) from different locations using comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography coupled to diode array and tandem mass spectrometry detection.

    PubMed

    Montero, Lidia; Ibáñez, Elena; Russo, Mariateresa; di Sanzo, Rosa; Rastrelli, Luca; Piccinelli, Anna Lisa; Celano, Rita; Cifuentes, Alejandro; Herrero, Miguel

    2016-03-24

    Profiling of the main metabolites from several licorice (Glycyrrhiza glabra) samples collected at different locations is carried out in this work by using comprehensive two-dimensional liquid chromatography (LC × LC) coupled to diode array (DAD) and mass spectrometry (MS) detectors. The optimized method was based on the application of a HILIC-based separation in the first dimension combined with fast RP-based second dimension separation. This set-up was shown to possess powerful separation capabilities allowing separating as much as 89 different metabolites in a single sample. Identification and grouping of metabolites according to their chemical class were achieved using the DAD, MS and MS/MS data. Triterpene saponins were the most abundant metabolites followed by glycosylated flavanones and chalcones, whereas glycyrrhizic acid, as expected, was confirmed as the main component in all the studied samples. LC × LC-DAD-MS/MS was able to resolve these complex licorice samples providing with specific metabolite profiles to the different licorice samples depending on their geographical origin. Namely, from 19 to 50 specific compounds were exclusively determined in the 2D-chromatograms from the different licorice samples depending on their geographical origin, which can be used as a typical pattern that could potentially be related to their geographical location and authentication.

  18. Gas chromatography-electron capture detection determination of Dacthal and its di-acid metabolite in soil after ultrasound-assisted extraction and in situ focused microwave-assisted derivatization.

    PubMed

    Caballo-López, A; Luque de Castro, M D

    2006-09-01

    A quantitative method for the determination of Dacthal and its di-acid metabolite in soil has been developed by coupling ultrasound-assisted extraction and microwave-assisted derivatization of the analytes prior to gas chromatography-electron capture detection for individual separation and measurement. The main factors affecting both extraction efficiency and derivatization were optimized by experimental design methodology. The proposed approach allows extraction of these pollutants from spiked sediment and soil with efficiencies similar to those provided by the reference method but with a drastic reduction of both the extraction and derivatization times. The repeatability of the analyses, expressed as RSD, of Dacthal and its di-acid metabolite was 4.6% and 5.4%, respectively; meanwhile, the RSD for within-laboratory reproducibility was 8.7% and 9.2%, respectively.

  19. Secondary metabolite profiles of leaves of healthy and huanglongbing-infected orange (Citrus sinensis L.) seedlings measured by HPLC-fluorescence detection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Leaves of greenhouse-grown ‘Hamlin’ and ‘Valencia’ orange (Citrus sinensis L.) seedlings were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography in a study of the progression of changes in secondary metabolite profiles resulting from infection by Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas), the Huanglo...

  20. Screening and analysis of the multiple absorbed bioactive components and metabolites of Baihe Zhimu Tang by the metabolic fingerprinting technique and liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Kunming; Cai, Hao; Liu, Xiao; Lu, Tulin; Fang, Qianbo; Yao, Zhongqing; Xu, Zisheng; Cai, Baochang

    2011-01-01

    Background: Baihe Zhimu Tang (BZT) is a widely used traditional Chinese medicinal formula in treating various diseases; however, its active components have remained unknown. Materials and Methods: Based on the metabolic fingerprinting technique and liquid chromatography/diode array detection-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LC/DAD-ESI-MS), a method for rapid screening and analysis of the multiple absorbed bioactive components and metabolites of an oral solution of Baihe Zhimu Tang (BZT) in rabbit plasma, urine and feces after oral administration of BZT was developed. Results: The results obtained from a comprehensive comparative analysis of the fingerprints of the BZT and its metabolic fingerprints in rabbit biological samples indicated that 19 components in the BZT were absorbed into the rabbit's body. Both of them were tentatively identified from their MS and UV spectra and retention behaviors by comparing the results with the reported literature. In addition, only six components were found in the metabolic fingerprints, which suggested that they might be metabolites of some components in the BZT. Conclusion: The findings demonstrated that the proposed method could be used to rapidly and simultaneously analyze and screen the multiple absorbed bioactive constituents and metabolites in a formula of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) by comparing and contrasting the chromatographic fingerprints with its metabolic fingerprints. This is very important not only for the pharmaceutical discovery process and the quality control of crude drugs, but also for explaining the curative mechanism of TCMs. PMID:21969787

  1. Detection of normal aging effects on human brain metabolite concentrations and microstructure with whole brain MR spectroscopic imaging and quantitative MR imaging

    PubMed Central

    Eylers, Vanessa V.; Maudsley, Andrew A.; Bronzlik, Paul; Dellani, Paulo R.; Lanfermann, Heinrich; Ding, Xiao-Qi

    2015-01-01

    Background and purpose Whole brain 1H-MR spectroscopic imaging (wbMRSI) was used in combination with quantitative MRI (qMRI) to study the effects of normal aging on healthy human brain metabolites and microstructure. Materials and Methods Sixty healthy volunteers aged 21 to 70 years were studied. Brain maps of the metabolites NAA, Cr, and Cho, and the tissue irreversible and reversible transverse relaxation times, T2 and T2′, were derived from the datasets. The relative metabolite concentrations [NAA], [tCr] and [Cho] as well as the values of relaxation times were measured with ROIs placed within frontal and parietal WM, centrum semiovale (CSO), splenium of the corpus callosum (SCC), hand motor area (HK), occipital GM, putamen, thalamus, pons ventral/dorsal (BSv/BSd), cerebellar white matter (CbWM) and posterior lobe (CbGM). Linear regression analysis and Pearson’s correlation tests were used to analyze the data. Results Aging resulted in decreased [NAA] in occipital GM, putamen, SCC, and BSv, and decreased [tCr] in BSd and putamen. [Cho] did not change significantly in selected brain regions. T2 increased in CbWM and decreased in SCC with aging, while the T2′ decreased in the occipital GM, HK, putamen, and increased in the SCC. Correlations were found between [NAA] and T2′ in occipital GM and putamen and between [tCr] and T2′ in the putamen. Conclusion The effects of normal aging on brain metabolites and microstructure are regional dependent. Correlations between both processes are evident in the gray matter. The obtained data could be used as references for future studies on patients. PMID:26564440

  2. Urinary excretion pattern of methaqualone metabolites in man.

    PubMed

    Ericsson, O; Danielsson, B

    1977-01-01

    A method based on selected ion monitoring for determination of five monohydroxy metabolites of methaqualone in urine has been worked out. By means of this method the time course of metabolite excretion was studied in three healthy volunteers receiving an oral therapeutic dose of methaqualone. In all subjects the main monohydroxy metabolite was conjugated 4'-hydroxymethaqualone, but the relative importance of the five metabolites showed intersubject variation. Metabolite excretion was still going on, when urine sampling was discontinued after 70 hr. Only small amounts (less than 1% of the dose during 70 hr) of unmetabolized methaqualone were excreted. On the other hand, it was confirmed that methaqualone-N1-oxide is an important metabolite. The presence of a hydroxy methoxy metabolite of methaqualone, very probably 4'-hydroxy-5'-methoxymethaqualone, as a minor metabolite was established by comparison with authentic, synthetic material. 8-Hydroxymethaqualone and 2-nitrobenz-o-toluidide, reported by other groups, could not be detected.

  3. Characterization of flavonoid metabolites in rat plasma, urine, and feces after oral administration of Semen Ziziphi Spinosae extract by HPLC-diode-array detection (DAD) and ion-trap mass spectrometry (MS(n)).

    PubMed

    Bao, Kang-De; Li, Ping; Qi, Lian-Wen; Li, Hui-Jun; Yi, Ling; Wang, Wei; Wang, Ya-Qiong

    2009-02-01

    A highly specific and sensitive method using high performance liquid chromatography coupled with diode-array detection and ion-trap mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-MS(n)) was developed for study of the constituents of flavonoid extract of jujube seeds and the metabolites in rat plasma, urine, and feces samples after oral administration of flavonoid extract of jujube seeds. Two major flavonoids (spinosin and 6'''-feruloylspinosin) with content >60% in the flavonoid extract of jujube seeds were detected and confirmed by comparison with the reference standards. Furthermore, five metabolic components in plasma, seven in urine, and four in feces were detected and elucidated. The scientific and plausible biotransformation pathways of the main components in flavonoid extract of jujube seeds were also proposed, together with presentation of clues for potential bioactive mechanisms. This convenient HPLC-DAD-MS(n) method could be used to identify the chemical components of flavonoid extract of jujube seeds as well as their metabolites, and to reveal their possible metabolic mechanism of action in vivo. PMID:19182403

  4. Quantification of Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Plants are a rich source of secondary metabolites that have medicinal and aromatic properties. Secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, iridoids and phenolics generally produced by plants for their defence mechanisms have been implicated in the therapeutic properties of most medicinal plants. Hence, quantification of these metabolites will aid to discover new and effective drugs from plant sources and also to scientifically validate the existing traditional practices. Quantification of large group of phytochemicals such as phenolics and flavonoids is quantified in this context.

  5. Novel and sensitive reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography method with electrochemical detection for the simultaneous and fast determination of eight biogenic amines and metabolites in human brain tissue.

    PubMed

    Van Dam, Debby; Vermeiren, Yannick; Aerts, Tony; De Deyn, Peter Paul

    2014-08-01

    A fast and simple RP-HPLC method with electrochemical detection (ECD) and ion pair chromatography was developed, optimized and validated in order to simultaneously determine eight different biogenic amines and metabolites in post-mortem human brain tissue in a single-run analytical approach. The compounds of interest are the indolamine serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT), the catecholamines dopamine (DA) and (nor)epinephrine ((N)E), as well as their respective metabolites, i.e. 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC) and homovanillic acid (HVA), 5-hydroxy-3-indoleacetic acid (5-HIAA) and 3-methoxy-4-hydroxyphenylglycol (MHPG). A two-level fractional factorial experimental design was applied to study the effect of five experimental factors (i.e. the ion-pair counter concentration, the level of organic modifier, the pH of the mobile phase, the temperature of the column, and the voltage setting of the detector) on the chromatographic behaviour. The cross effect between the five quantitative factors and the capacity and separation factors of the analytes were then analysed using a Standard Least Squares model. The optimized method was fully validated according to the requirements of SFSTP (Société Française des Sciences et Techniques Pharmaceutiques). Our human brain tissue sample preparation procedure is straightforward and relatively short, which allows samples to be loaded onto the HPLC system within approximately 4h. Additionally, a high sample throughput was achieved after optimization due to a total runtime of maximally 40min per sample. The conditions and settings of the HPLC system were found to be accurate with high intra and inter-assay repeatability, recovery and accuracy rates. The robust analytical method results in very low detection limits and good separation for all of the eight biogenic amines and metabolites in this complex mixture of biological analytes.

  6. Validation of a novel in vitro assay using ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) to detect and quantify hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-99 in rat liver microsomes.

    PubMed

    Erratico, Claudio A; Szeitz, András; Bandiera, Stelvio M

    2010-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop and validate an ultra performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (UPLC/MS) method to investigate the hepatic oxidative metabolism of 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99), a widely used flame retardant and ubiquitous environmental contaminant. Hydroxylated metabolites were extracted using liquid-to-liquid extraction, resolved on a C18 column with gradient elution and detected by mass spectrometry in single ion recording mode using electrospray negative ionization. The assay was validated for linearity, accuracy, precision, limit of quantification, range and recovery. Calibration curves were linear (R2 > or = 0.98) over a concentration range of 0.010-1.0 microM for 4-OH-2,2',3,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (4-OH-BDE-90), 5'-OH-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (5'-OH-BDE-99) and 6'-OH-2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (6'-OH-BDE-99), and a concentration range of 0.0625-12.5 microM for 2,4,5-tribromophenol (2,4,5-TBP). Inter- and intra-day accuracy values ranged from -2.0% to 6.0% and from -7.7% to 7.3%, respectively, and inter- and intra-day precision values ranged from 2.0% to 8.5% and from 2.2% to 8.6% (n=6), respectively. The limits of quantification were 0.010 microM for 4-OH-BDE-90, 5'-OH-BDE-99 and 6'-OH-BDE-99, and 0.0625 microM for 2,4,5-TBP. Recovery values ranged between 85 and 100% for the four analytes. The validated analytical method was applied to identify and quantify hydroxy BDE-99 metabolites formed in vitro. Incubation of BDE-99 with rat liver microsomes yielded 4-OH-BDE-90 and 6'-OH-BDE-99 as major metabolites and 5'-OH-BDE-99 and 2,4,5-TBP as minor metabolites. To our knowledge, this is the first validated UPLC/MS method to quantify hydroxylated metabolites of PBDEs without the need of derivatization. PMID:20451473

  7. Identification of Epoxide-Derived Metabolite(s) of Benzbromarone.

    PubMed

    Wang, Kai; Wang, Hui; Peng, Ying; Zheng, Jiang

    2016-04-01

    Benzbromarone (BBR) is a benzofuran derivative that has been quite useful for the treatment of gout; however, it was withdrawn from European markets in 2003 because of reported serious incidents of drug-induced liver injury. BBR-induced hepatotoxicity has been suggested to be associated with the formation of a quinone intermediate. The present study reported epoxide-derived intermediate(s) of BBR. An N-acetylcysteine (NAC) conjugate derived from epoxide metabolite(s) was detected in both microsomal incubations of BBR and urine samples of mice treated with BBR. The NAC conjugate was identified as 6-NAC BBR. Ketoconazole suppressed the bioactivation of BBR to the epoxide intermediate(s), and the CYP3A subfamily was the primary enzyme responsible for the formation of the epoxide(s). The present study provided new information on metabolic activation of BBR. PMID:26792818

  8. Blood styrene and urinary metabolites in styrene polymerisation.

    PubMed Central

    Wolff, M S; Lorimer, W V; Lilis, R; Selikoff, I J

    1978-01-01

    The results of the analysis of blood and urine samples for styrene and its metabolites in 491 workers in a styrene polymerisation plant in the United States are reported. The levels of exposure to styrene were estimated to be less than 10 ppm, but nevertheless styrene and metabolites were detectable in more than 50% of workers in polymerisation jobs, within 4 h of exposure. Workers involved in the manufacture and purification of styrene from ethyl benzene also had detectable blood styrene and urinary metabolites in 83% of recently exposed subjects. The relationship between styrene in blood and in subcutaneous fat and urinary metabolites as pharmacokinetic variables is discussed. PMID:737139

  9. Familial resemblance for serum metabolite concentrations.

    PubMed

    Draisma, Harmen H M; Beekman, Marian; Pool, René; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Adamski, Jerzy; Prehn, Cornelia; Vaarhorst, Anika A M; de Craen, Anton J M; Willemsen, Gonneke; Slagboom, P Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I

    2013-10-01

    Metabolomics is the comprehensive study of metabolites, which are the substrates, intermediate, and end products of cellular metabolism. The heritability of the concentrations of circulating metabolites bears relevance for evaluating their suitability as biomarkers for disease. We report aspects of familial resemblance for the concentrations in human serum of more than 100 metabolites, measured using a targeted metabolomics platform. Age- and sex-corrected monozygotic twin correlations, midparent-offspring regression coefficients, and spouse correlations in subjects from two independent cohorts (Netherlands Twin Register and Leiden Longevity Study) were estimated for each metabolite. In the Netherlands Twin Register subjects, who were largely fasting, we found significant monozygotic twin correlations for 121 out of 123 metabolites. Heritability was confirmed by midparent-offspring regression. For most detected metabolites, the correlations between spouses were considerably lower than those between twins, indicating a contribution of genetic effects to familial resemblance. Remarkably high heritability was observed for free carnitine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.66), for the amino acids serine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.77) and threonine (monozygotic twin correlation 0.64), and for phosphatidylcholine acyl-alkyl C40:3 (monozygotic twin correlation 0.77). For octenoylcarnitine, a consistent point estimate of approximately 0.50 was found for the spouse correlations in the two cohorts as well as for the monozygotic twin correlation, suggesting that familiality for this metabolite is explained by shared environment. We conclude that for the majority of metabolites targeted by the used metabolomics platform, the familial resemblance of serum concentrations is largely genetic. Our results contribute to the knowledge of the heritability of fasting serum metabolite concentrations, which is relevant for biomarker research. PMID:23985338

  10. The positive effects of high-frequency right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on memory, correlated with increases in brain metabolites detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jun; Jin, Guixing; Lei, Licun; Wang, Lan; Du, Yaqiang; Wang, Xueyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on memory, and its correlation with levels of hippocampal brain metabolites detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients. Materials and methods In this randomized, double-blind sham-controlled trial, alcohol-dependent patients were enrolled and randomized into two groups: the experimental group (rTMS, 10 Hz, on right DLPFC, 20 sessions) and the control group (sham stimulation). Memory function was assessed using Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R) and Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT-R) before and after treatment. 1H-MRS was used to detect the levels of N-acetyl aspartic acid (NAA), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr) in bilateral hippocampi before and after treatment. Results Thirty-eight patients (18 in the experimental group and 20 in the control group) were included in the analyses. The experimental group showed significantly greater changes in HVLT-R, BVMT-R, NAA/Cr, and Cho/Cr after rTMS from baseline than the control group. The percentage change in BVMT-R and HVLT-R correlated with the percentage change in NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr in the right brain. Conclusion High-frequency right DLPFC rTMS was associated with improvement in memory dysfunction, which is correlated with levels of hippocampal brain metabolites detected by 1H-MRS in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients. PMID:27695332

  11. The positive effects of high-frequency right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation on memory, correlated with increases in brain metabolites detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Jun; Jin, Guixing; Lei, Licun; Wang, Lan; Du, Yaqiang; Wang, Xueyi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of right dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC) repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on memory, and its correlation with levels of hippocampal brain metabolites detected by proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients. Materials and methods In this randomized, double-blind sham-controlled trial, alcohol-dependent patients were enrolled and randomized into two groups: the experimental group (rTMS, 10 Hz, on right DLPFC, 20 sessions) and the control group (sham stimulation). Memory function was assessed using Hopkins Verbal Learning Test-Revised (HVLT-R) and Brief Visuospatial Memory Test-Revised (BVMT-R) before and after treatment. 1H-MRS was used to detect the levels of N-acetyl aspartic acid (NAA), choline (Cho), and creatine (Cr) in bilateral hippocampi before and after treatment. Results Thirty-eight patients (18 in the experimental group and 20 in the control group) were included in the analyses. The experimental group showed significantly greater changes in HVLT-R, BVMT-R, NAA/Cr, and Cho/Cr after rTMS from baseline than the control group. The percentage change in BVMT-R and HVLT-R correlated with the percentage change in NAA/Cr and Cho/Cr in the right brain. Conclusion High-frequency right DLPFC rTMS was associated with improvement in memory dysfunction, which is correlated with levels of hippocampal brain metabolites detected by 1H-MRS in recently detoxified alcohol-dependent patients.

  12. Screening procedure for detection of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs and their metabolites in urine as part of a systematic toxicological analysis procedure for acidic drugs and poisons by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after extractive methylation.

    PubMed

    Maurer, H H; Tauvel, F X; Kraemer, T

    2001-01-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are widely used as analgesic and anti-rheumatic drugs, and they are often misused. A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric (GC-MS) screening procedure was developed for their detection in urine as part of a systematic toxicological analysis procedure for acidic drugs and poisons after extractive methylation. The compounds were separated by capillary GC and identified by computerized MS in the full-scan mode. Using mass chromatography with the ions m/z 119, 135, 139, 152, 165, 229, 244, 266, 272, and 326, the possible presence of NSAIDs and their metabolites could be indicated. The identity of positive signals in such mass chromatograms was confirmed by comparison of the peaks underlying full mass spectra with the reference spectra recorded during this study. This method allowed the detection of therapeutic concentrations of acemetacin, acetaminophen (paracetamol), acetylsalicylic acid, diclofenac, diflunisal, etodolac, fenbufen, fenoprofen, flufenamic acid, flurbiprofen, ibuprofen, indometacin, kebuzone, ketoprofen, lonazolac, meclofenamic acid, mefenamic acid, mofebutazone, naproxen, niflumic acid, phenylbutazone, suxibuzone, tiaprofenic acid, tolfenamic acid, and tolmetin in urine samples. The overall recoveries of the different NSAIDs ranged between 50 and 80% with coefficients of variation of less than 15% (n = 5), and the limits of detection of the different NSAIDs were between 10 and 50 ng/mL (S/N = 3) in the full-scan mode. Extractive methylation has proved to be a versatile method for STA of various acidic drugs, poisons, and their metabolites in urine. It has also successfully been used for plasma analysis.

  13. The profiling and identification of the metabolites of 8-prenylkaempferol and a study on their distribution in rats by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection combined with electrospray ionization ion trap time-of-flight multistage mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ma, Li-Man; Xu, Feng; Li, Feng-Chun; Wang, Jing-Zhe; Shang, Ming-Ying; Liu, Guang-Xue; Cai, Shao-Qing

    2016-02-01

    8-Prenylkaempferol is a prenylflavonoid that has various bioactivities and benefits for human health. A high-performance liquid chromatography with a diode array detector combined with electrospray ionization ion trap time-of-flight multistage mass spectrometry (HPLC-DAD-ESI-IT-TOF-MS(n) ) method was established to profile and identify the metabolites of 8-prenylkaempferol in rat in vivo and in vitro, and to study the distribution of these metabolites in rats for the first time. A total of 38 metabolites were detected and tentatively identified, 30 of which were identified as new compounds. The new in vivo metabolic reactions in rats of prenylflavonoids of isomerization, polymerization, sulfation, amino acid conjugation, vitamin C conjugation and other known metabolic reactions were found in the metabolism of 8-prenylkaempferol. The numbers of detected metabolites in feces, urine, plasma, small intestine, stomach, kidneys, liver, heart, lungs, spleen and hepatic S9 fraction were 31, 19, 1, 20, 13, 8, 7, 3, 3, 1 and 11, respectively. This indicated that small intestine and stomach were the major organs in which the 8-prenylkaempferol metabolites were distributed. Furthermore, 16 metabolites were determined to have bioactivities based on the literature and 'PharmMapper' analysis. These findings are useful for better comprehension of the effective forms, target organs and pharmacological actions of 8-prenylkaempferol. Moreover, they provide a reference for the study of the metabolism and distribution of prenylflavonoid aglycone compounds.

  14. Quantification of Secondary Metabolites.

    PubMed

    2016-01-01

    Plants are a rich source of secondary metabolites that have medicinal and aromatic properties. Secondary metabolites such as alkaloids, iridoids and phenolics generally produced by plants for their defence mechanisms have been implicated in the therapeutic properties of most medicinal plants. Hence, quantification of these metabolites will aid to discover new and effective drugs from plant sources and also to scientifically validate the existing traditional practices. Quantification of large group of phytochemicals such as phenolics and flavonoids is quantified in this context. PMID:26939265

  15. Enhanced metabolite generation

    DOEpatents

    Chidambaram, Devicharan

    2012-03-27

    The present invention relates to the enhanced production of metabolites by a process whereby a carbon source is oxidized with a fermentative microbe in a compartment having a portal. An electron acceptor is added to the compartment to assist the microbe in the removal of excess electrons. The electron acceptor accepts electrons from the microbe after oxidation of the carbon source. Other transfers of electrons can take place to enhance the production of the metabolite, such as acids, biofuels or brewed beverages.

  16. Prediction of response factors for gas chromatography with flame ionization detection: Algorithm improvement, extension to silylated compounds, and application to the quantification of metabolites

    PubMed Central

    de Saint Laumer, Jean‐Yves; Leocata, Sabine; Tissot, Emeline; Baroux, Lucie; Kampf, David M.; Merle, Philippe; Boschung, Alain; Seyfried, Markus

    2015-01-01

    We previously showed that the relative response factors of volatile compounds were predictable from either combustion enthalpies or their molecular formulae only 1. We now extend this prediction to silylated derivatives by adding an increment in the ab initio calculation of combustion enthalpies. The accuracy of the experimental relative response factors database was also improved and its population increased to 490 values. In particular, more brominated compounds were measured, and their prediction accuracy was improved by adding a correction factor in the algorithm. The correlation coefficient between predicted and measured values increased from 0.936 to 0.972, leading to a mean prediction accuracy of ± 6%. Thus, 93% of the relative response factors values were predicted with an accuracy of better than ± 10%. The capabilities of the extended algorithm are exemplified by (i) the quick and accurate quantification of hydroxylated metabolites resulting from a biodegradation test after silylation and prediction of their relative response factors, without having the reference substances available; and (ii) the rapid purity determinations of volatile compounds. This study confirms that Gas chromatography with a flame ionization detector and using predicted relative response factors is one of the few techniques that enables quantification of volatile compounds without calibrating the instrument with the pure reference substance. PMID:26179324

  17. Sensitive determination of 4-(4-bromophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidine, a metabolite of bromperidol, in rat plasma by HPLC with fluorescence detection after pre-column derivatization using 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole.

    PubMed

    Higashi, Yasuhiko; Nakamura, Shota; Fujii, Youichi

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the level of 4-(4-bromophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidine (BPHP), a bromperidol (BRO) metabolite, in rat plasma by HPLC with fluorescence detection after pre-column derivatization using 4-fluoro-7-nitro-2,1,3-benzoxadiazole (NBD-F). After basic extraction of the samples with benzene, derivatization with NBD-F was conducted in borate buffer (pH 8.0) at 60 degrees C for 3 min. Mexiletine was utilized through the procedure as an internal standard (IS). Retention times of the BPHP and IS derivatives were 7.7 and 11.5 min, respectively. The regression equation for BPHP showed good linearity in the range of 0.01-1 mg/ml with the detection limit of 0.003 microg/ml. The coefficient of variation was less than 12.0%. The recovery was satisfactory. This method was applied for a pharmacokinetic study of BPHP in comparison with 4-(4-chlorophenyl)-4-hydroxypiperidine (CPHP), the corresponding haloperidol (HAL) metabolite, in rats. The ratio of the area under the plasma concentration curve (AUC) after p.o. administration of BPHP to the AUC after i.p. administration of BPHP (46%) was lower than that of CPHP (56%), indicating that intestinal absorption of BPHP is lower than that of CPHP. The ratio of BRO metabolism to BPHP (48%) was 1.8-fold higher than that of HAL metabolism to CPHP (27%); the ratio was estimated as (AUCp.o.,A-->B/AUCp.o.,B)x100, where AUCp.o.,A-->B is the AUC value of BPHP or CPHP after p.o. administration of BRO or HAL, and AUCp.o.,B is the AUC of BPHP or CPHP after administration of BPHP or CPHP, respectively. Our method provides a sensitive procedure for determination of BPHP in rat plasma and is suitable for pharmacokinetic studies of BPHP after BRO administration. PMID:17142985

  18. Radioimmunoassay of methaqualone and its monohydroxy metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Berman, A R; McGrath, J P; Permisohn, R C; Cella, J A

    1975-12-01

    A commercial radioimmunoassay kit was evaluated for efficacy in detecting methaqualone or its metabolites in urine of persons receiving this drug. The drug and its unconjugated 3'- and 4'-monohydroxy metabolites could be detected equally well. The unconjugated alpha-monohydroxy metabolite was about 80% as reactive and the unconjugated 6-monohydroxy metabolite reacted only very weakly. Quantitation of the conjugated metabolites was less sensitive than of unconjugated. Nineteen urine specimens which reacted positively to radioimmunoassay and which thin-layer chromatography had shown to contain methaqualone and its metabolites were also examined by gas-liquid chromatography. Those specimens that reacted strongly to radioimmunoassay contained high concentrations of the drug or its metabolites. In the specimens examined by gas-liquid chromatography, the apparent concentrations of the metabolites were generally higher than those of the drug itself. Methaqualone in combination with its unconjugated metabolites reacted additively with the radioimmunoassay, resembling the same concentration of parent drug alone. Detection limits were between 10-200 mug/liter.

  19. Prediction of Estrogenic Bioactivity of Environmental Chemical Metabolites.

    PubMed

    Pinto, Caroline L; Mansouri, Kamel; Judson, Richard; Browne, Patience

    2016-09-19

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) Endocrine Disruptor Screening Program (EDSP) is using in vitro data generated from ToxCast/Tox21 high-throughput screening assays to assess the endocrine activity of environmental chemicals. Considering that in vitro assays may have limited metabolic capacity, inactive chemicals that are biotransformed into metabolites with endocrine bioactivity may be missed for further screening and testing. Therefore, there is a value in developing novel approaches to account for metabolism and endocrine activity of both parent chemicals and their associated metabolites. We used commercially available software to predict metabolites of 50 parent compounds, out of which 38 chemicals are known to have estrogenic metabolites, and 12 compounds and their metabolites are negative for estrogenic activity. Three ER QSAR models were used to determine potential estrogen bioactivity of the parent compounds and predicted metabolites, the outputs of the models were averaged, and the chemicals were then ranked based on the total estrogenicity of the parent chemical and metabolites. The metabolite prediction software correctly identified known estrogenic metabolites for 26 out of 27 parent chemicals with associated metabolite data, and 39 out of 46 estrogenic metabolites were predicted as potential biotransformation products derived from the parent chemical. The QSAR models estimated stronger estrogenic activity for the majority of the known estrogenic metabolites compared to their parent chemicals. Finally, the three models identified a similar set of parent compounds as top ranked chemicals based on the estrogenicity of putative metabolites. This proposed in silico approach is an inexpensive and rapid strategy for the detection of chemicals with estrogenic metabolites and may reduce potential false negative results from in vitro assays. PMID:27509301

  20. Quantitative determination of regorafenib and its two major metabolites in human plasma with high-performance liquid chromatography and ultraviolet detection.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Kazuma; Miura, Masatomo; Shibata, Hiroyuki

    2016-10-01

    A simple, highly sensitive and specific high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method was developed for the simultaneous quantitation of regorafenib, N-oxidemetabolite (M-2) and the desmethyl N-oxide metabolite (M-5) in human plasma. Regorafenib, M-2, M-5 and the internal standard sorafenib were separated using a mobile phase of 0.5% KH2 PO4 (pH 3.5)-acetonitrile (30:70, v/v), on a Capcell PAK MG II column at a flow rate of 0.5 mL/min and measurement at UV 260 nm. The lower limits of quantification for regorafenib, M-2 and M-5 were 10 ng/mL for each analyte. A procedure using solid-phase extraction required only a small amount of plasma (100 μL) for one analysis while providing high extraction recovery (>81% for all compounds) and good selectivity. Coefficients of variation for intra- and inter-day assays were <12.2% for regorafenib, <12.3% for M-2 and <15.1% for M-5. Accuracies for intra- and inter-day assays were <9.4% for regorafenib, <8.0% for M-2 and <12.8% for M-5 over a linear range from 10 to 10,000 ng/mL. This HPLC assay is suitable for clinical pharmacokinetic studies of regorafenib. The present HPLC method is currently in use for our observational studies of patients under treatment. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  1. Detection of reactive metabolites using isotope-labeled glutathione trapping and simultaneous neutral loss and precursor ion scanning with ultra-high-pressure liquid chromatography triple quadruple mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ke; Huang, Lingyi; van Breemen, Richard B

    2015-04-01

    Metabolic activation of drugs to electrophilic species is responsible for over 60% of black box warnings and drug withdrawals from the market place in the United States. Reactive metabolite trapping using glutathione (GSH) and analysis using high-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS/MS) or HPLC with high resolution mass spectrometry (mass defect filtering) have enabled screening for metabolic activation to become routine during drug development. However, current MS-based approaches cannot detect all GSH conjugates present in complex mixtures, especially those present in extracts of botanical dietary supplements. To overcome these limitations, a fast triple quadrupole mass spectrometer-based approach was developed that can detect positively and negatively charged GSH conjugates in a single analysis without the need for advanced knowledge of the elemental compositions of potential conjugates and while avoiding false positives. This approach utilized UHPLC instead of HPLC to shorten separation time and enhance sensitivity, incorporated stable-isotope labeled GSH to avoid false positives, and used fast polarity switching electrospray MS/MS to detect GSH conjugates that form positive and/or negative ions. The general new method was then used to test the licorice dietary supplement Glycyrrhiza glabra, which was found to form multiple GSH conjugates upon metabolic activation. Among the GSH conjugates found in the licorice assay were conjugates with isoliquiritigenin and glabridin, which is an irreversible inhibitor of cytochrome P450 enzymes.

  2. Determination of 49 organophosphorus pesticide residues and their metabolites in fish, egg, and milk by dual gas chromatography-dual pulse flame photometric detection with gel permeation chromatography cleanup.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lixin; Li, Heli; Zeng, Fangang; Liu, Yinping; Li, Ruifeng; Chen, Huijing; Zhao, Yunfeng; Miao, Hong; Wu, Yongning

    2012-02-29

    A new method for the quantitative determination of 49 kinds of organophosphorus pesticide residues and their metabolites in fish, egg, and milk by dual gas chromatography-dual pulse flame photometric detection was developed. Homogenized samples were extracted with acetone and methylene chloride (1 + 1, v/v), and then the extracts were cleaned up by gel permeation chromatography (GPC). The response of each organophosphorus pesticide showed a good linearity with its concentration; the linearity correlation was not less than 0.99. The detection limits (S/N = 3) of pesticides were in the range of 0.001-0.025 mg kg⁻¹. The recovery experiments were performed by blank sample spiked at low, medium, and high fortification levels. The recoveries for fish, egg, and milk were 50.9-142.2, 53.3-137.2, and 50.3-139.4% with relative standard deviations (RSD, n = 6) of 2.3-24.9, 4.3-26.7, and 2.8-32.2%, respectively. The method was applied to detect organophosphorus pesticides in samples collected from the market, and satisfactory results were obtained. This quantitative method was highly sensitive and exact and could be applied to the accurate determination of organophosphorus contaminants in fish, egg, and milk. PMID:22300587

  3. Mexiletine metabolites: a review.

    PubMed

    Catalano, Alessia; Carocci, Alessia; Sinicropi, Maria Stefania

    2015-01-01

    Mexiletine belongs to class IB antiarrhythmic drugs and it is still considered a drug of choice for treating myotonias. However some patients do not respond to mexiletine or have significant side effects limiting its use; thus, alternatives to this drug should be envisaged. Mexiletine is extensive metabolized in humans via phase I and phase II reactions. Only a small fraction (about 10%) of the dose of mexiletine administered is recovered without modifications in urine. Although in the past decades Mex metabolites were reported to be devoid of biological activity, recent studies seem to deny this assertion. Actually, several hydroxylated metabolites showed pharmacological activity similar to that of Mex, thus contributing to its clinical profile. Purpose of this review is to summarize all the studies proposed till now about mexiletine metabolites, regarding structureactivity relationship studies as well as synthetic strategies. Biological and analytical studies will be also reported. PMID:25723511

  4. Maternal and Infant Urinary Phthalate Metabolite Concentrations: Are They Related?

    PubMed Central

    Sathyanarayana, S; Calafat, Antonia Maria; Liu, Fan; Swan, Shanna Helen

    2008-01-01

    Background Phthalates are synthetic chemicals that are ubiquitous in our society and may have adverse health effects in humans. Detectable concentrations of phthalate metabolites have been found in adults and children, but no studies have examined the relationship between maternal and infant phthalate metabolite concentrations. Objective We investigated the relationship between maternal and infant urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations. Methods We measured nine phthalate metabolites in urine samples from 210 mother/infant pairs collected on the same study visit day (1999–2005) and obtained demographic history from questionnaires. Using multivariate linear regression analyses, we examined the degree to which maternal urine phthalate metabolite concentration predicted infant phthalate metabolite concentration. All analyses were adjusted for infant age, creatinine concentration, and race. Results Correlation coefficients between phthalate metabolite concentrations in the urine of mothers and their infants were generally low but increased with decreasing age of infant. In multivariate analyses, mother’s phthalate metabolite concentrations were significantly associated with infants’ concentrations for six phthalate metabolites: monobenzyl phthalate, monoethyl phthalate, monoisobutyl phthalate, and three metabolites of di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate: mono(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate, mono(2-ethyl-5-hydroxy-hexyl) phthalate and mono(2-ethyl-5-oxo-hexyl) phthalate (p-values for all coefficients <0.05). Discussion Mother’s urine phthalate metabolite concentration is significantly associated with infant urine phthalate metabolite concentration for six phthalate metabolites. It is plausible that shared exposures to phthalates in the immediate surrounding environment accounted for these relationships, but other unidentified sources may also contribute to infants’ phthalate exposures. This study indicates the importance of further identifying infant phthalate exposures

  5. Determination of two oxy-pyrimidine metabolites of diazinon in urine by gas chromatography/mass selective detection and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Yokley, R A; Shen, N; Cheung, M W

    2000-01-01

    An analytical method was developed for the determination in urine of 2 metabolites of diazinon: 6-methyl-2-(1-methylethyl)-4(1H)-pyrimidinone (G-27550) and 2-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-6-methyl-4(1H)-pyrimidinone (GS-31144). Two of the urine sample preparation procedures presented rely on gas chromatography/mass selective detection (GC/MSD) in the selected ion monitoring mode for determination of G-27550. For fast sample preparation and a limit of quantitation (LOQ) of 1.0 ppb, urine samples were purified by using ENV+ solid-phase extraction (SPE) columns. For analyte confirmation at an LOQ of 0.50 ppb, classical liquid/liquid partitioning was used before further purification in a silica SPE column. An SPE sample preparation procedure and liquid chromatography/electrospray ionization/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry (LC/ESI/MS/MS) were used for both G-27550 and GS-31144. The limit of detection was 0.01 ng for G-27550 with GC/MSD, and 0.016 ng when LC/ESI/MS/MS was used for both G-27550 and GS-31144. The LOQ was 0.50 ppb for G-27550 when GC/MSD and the partitioning/SPE sample preparation procedure were used, and 1.0 ppb for the SPE only sample preparation procedure. The LOQ was 1.0 ppb for both analytes when LC/ESI/MS/MS was used. PMID:11048865

  6. Sensitive determination of three aconitum alkaloids and their metabolites in human plasma by matrix solid-phase dispersion with vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and HPLC with diode array detection.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiaozhong; Li, Xuwen; Li, Lanjie; Li, Min; Liu, Ying; Wu, Qian; Li, Peng; Jin, Yongri

    2016-05-01

    A simple and sensitive method for determination of three aconitum alkaloids and their metabolites in human plasma was developed using matrix solid-phase dispersion combined with vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction and high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detection. The plasma sample was directly purified by matrix solid-phase dispersion and the eluate obtained was concentrated and further clarified by vortex-assisted dispersive liquid-liquid microextraction. Some important parameters affecting the extraction efficiency, such as type and amount of dispersing sorbent, type and volume of elution solvent, type and volume of extraction solvent, salt concentration as well as sample solution pH, were investigated in detail. Under optimal conditions, the proposed method has good repeatability and reproducibility with intraday and interday relative standard deviations lower than 5.44 and 5.75%, respectively. The recoveries of the aconitum alkaloids ranged from 73.81 to 101.82%, and the detection limits were achieved within the range of 1.6-2.1 ng/mL. The proposed method offered the advantages of good applicability, sensitivity, simplicity, and feasibility, which makes it suitable for the determination of trace amounts of aconitum alkaloids in human plasma samples.

  7. TNT metabolites in animal tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Shugart, L.R.; Griest, W.H.; Tan, E.; Guzman, C.; Caton, J.E.; Ho, C.-H.; Tomkins, B.A.

    1991-06-01

    Analyses for TNT and nine potential metabolites (TNT-related compounds) were made in deer, rabbit, and quail tissues (muscle and liver) taken from the Alabama Army Ammunition Plant (AAAP), Childersburg, Alabama. The listed TNT-related compounds are 2,4,6- trinitrotoluene (parent compound); 2,4-diamino-6-nitrotoluene; 2,6-diamino-4-nitrotoluene; 2-amino-4,6-dinitrotoluene; 4-amino-2,6- dinitrotoluene; 2,4,6-trinitrobenzyl alcohol; 2,4,6-trinitrobenzoic acid; 1,3,5-trinitrobenzene; 4-hydroxylamino-2,6-dinitrotoluene; and 2,6,2',6'-tetranitro-4,4'-azoxytoluene. The procedure for extraction of these compounds from animal tissue required homogenization in acetonitrile, and subsequent partitioning into chloroform. Quantitative determination of extracted compounds was obtained by chromatographic separation on a mixed-mode HPLC column in which the phase bonded to the silica surface contained both a C18 (reversed-phase function) and a secondary amine (anion exchange function) incorporated into a single ligand. A ternary mobile phase gradient containing pH 5.1 phosphate buffer, methanol, and acetonitrile was used in separation. An experimental verification of the metabolism of TNT and the detection (or absence) of the selected metabolites was performed in mice subacutely dosed with 100 milligrams per kilogram of ({sup 14}C)-TNT. These studies show that the TNT-related compounds of concern do accumulate in muscle and liver tissue of the mouse under the experimental conditions imposed, but at concentrations below the 1.2 ppM level. However, products other than TNT and free metabolites may be accumulating since some ({sup 14}C) was found to be nonextractable. 13 refs., 5 figs., 6 tabs.

  8. Profiling the reactive metabolites of xenobiotics using metabolomic technologies.

    PubMed

    Li, Feng; Lu, Jie; Ma, Xiaochao

    2011-05-16

    A predominant pathway of xenobiotic-induced toxicity is initiated by bioactivation. Characterizing reactive intermediates will provide information on the structure of reactive species, thereby defining a potential bioactivation mechanism. Because most reactive metabolites are not stable, it is difficult to detect them directly. Reactive metabolites can form adducts with trapping reagents, such as glutathione, which makes the reactive metabolites detectable. However, it is challenging to "fish" these adducts out from a complex biological matrix, especially for adducts generated via uncommon metabolic pathways. In this regard, we developed a novel approach based upon metabolomic technologies to screen trapped reactive metabolites. The bioactivation of pulegone, acetaminophen, and clozapine were reexamined by using this metabolomic approach. In all these cases, a large number of trapped reactive metabolites were readily identified. These data indicate that this metabolomic approach is an efficient tool to profile xenobiotic bioactivation.

  9. Secondary metabolites from Ganoderma.

    PubMed

    Baby, Sabulal; Johnson, Anil John; Govindan, Balaji

    2015-06-01

    Ganoderma is a genus of medicinal mushrooms. This review deals with secondary metabolites isolated from Ganoderma and their biological significance. Phytochemical studies over the last 40years led to the isolation of 431 secondary metabolites from various Ganoderma species. The major secondary compounds isolated are (a) C30 lanostanes (ganoderic acids), (b) C30 lanostanes (aldehydes, alcohols, esters, glycosides, lactones, ketones), (c) C27 lanostanes (lucidenic acids), (d) C27 lanostanes (alcohols, lactones, esters), (e) C24, C25 lanostanes (f) C30 pentacyclic triterpenes, (g) meroterpenoids, (h) farnesyl hydroquinones (meroterpenoids), (i) C15 sesquiterpenoids, (j) steroids, (k) alkaloids, (l) prenyl hydroquinone (m) benzofurans, (n) benzopyran-4-one derivatives and (o) benzenoid derivatives. Ganoderma lucidum is the species extensively studied for its secondary metabolites and biological activities. Ganoderma applanatum, Ganoderma colossum, Ganoderma sinense, Ganoderma cochlear, Ganoderma tsugae, Ganoderma amboinense, Ganoderma orbiforme, Ganoderma resinaceum, Ganoderma hainanense, Ganoderma concinna, Ganoderma pfeifferi, Ganoderma neo-japonicum, Ganoderma tropicum, Ganoderma australe, Ganoderma carnosum, Ganoderma fornicatum, Ganoderma lipsiense (synonym G. applanatum), Ganoderma mastoporum, Ganoderma theaecolum, Ganoderma boninense, Ganoderma capense and Ganoderma annulare are the other Ganoderma species subjected to phytochemical studies. Further phytochemical studies on Ganoderma could lead to the discovery of hitherto unknown biologically active secondary metabolites.

  10. Human nails metabolite analysis: A rapid and simple method for quantification of uric acid in human fingernail by high-performance liquid chromatography with UV-detection.

    PubMed

    Li, Xi-Ling; Li, Gao; Jiang, Ying-Zi; Kang, Dongzhou; Jin, Cheng Hua; Shi, Qing; Jin, Toufeng; Inoue, Koichi; Todoroki, Kenichiro; Toyo'oka, Toshimasa; Min, Jun Zhe

    2015-10-01

    A rapid and simple analytical method for the quantification of uric acid (UA) in human fingernails by high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with ultraviolet (UV) detection is described. UA was extracted from human fingernail samples at 90°C for 20min, then separated on an Inertsil ODS-2 column (250×4.6mm I.D., 5.0μm, GL Sciences) by isocratic elution using methanol: 74mM phosphate buffer (pH 2.2) 2:98 (v/v). An UV detector was used to monitor at 284nm. The results indicated that under optimized measurement conditions results were achieved within 8.0min, and a good linearity was achieved from the calibration curves (r(2)>0.9999) in the range of 1.0-10000ng; the limit of detection (S/N=3) was 2.0pg, the inter-day and intra-day assay precisions were all less than 0.46% and the mean recoveries (%) of the uric acid spiked in the human fingernail were 101.95%. The amounts of UA in the fingernails of healthy volunteers were determined.

  11. Characterizing Protein Modifications by Reactive Metabolites using Magnetic Bead Bioreactors and LC-MS/MS

    PubMed Central

    Li, Dandan; Fu, You-Jun; Rusling, James F.

    2015-01-01

    We report here label-free metabolite-protein adduct detection and identification employing magnetic beads coated with metabolic enzymes as bioreactors to generate metabolites and possible metabolite-protein adducts for analysis by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. PMID:25693065

  12. Determination of caffeine and caffeine-related metabolites in ephedra-containing standard reference materials using liquid chromatography with absorbance detection and tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Jeanice B; Sharpless, Katherine E; Mitvalsky, Staci; Roman, Mark; Yen, James; Satterfield, Mary B

    2007-01-01

    The concentrations of caffeine and caffeine-related compounds in 2 ephedra-containing reference materials have been determined by 3 independent methods with measurements performed by the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) and a collaborating laboratory. Results from the 3 methods were used for value assignment of caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline in these Standard Reference Materials (SRMs). The methods used at NIST to determine the concentration levels of caffeine, theobromine, and theophylline in SRM 3243 Ephedra-Containing Solid Oral Dosage Form and SRM 3244 Ephedra-Containing Protein Powder used reversed-phase liquid chromatography with absorbance detection and tandem mass spectrometry. These reference materials are part of the first suite in a series of NIST SRMs that provide concentration values for multiple components in dietary supplements. These SRMs are primarily intended for method validation and for use as control materials to support the analysis of dietary supplements and similar materials.

  13. Detection of T-2 mycotoxin metabolites in urines of exposed rats. Comparison of a potentially fieldable kit with a laboratory assay. Interim report

    SciTech Connect

    Hewetson, J.F.; Wannemacher, R.W.; Hawley, R.J.

    1988-03-09

    Rapid methods to detect toxin exposure have been a concern of the Army since the reported use of T-2 mycotoxin as a biological warfare agent in Southeast Asia and Afghanistan. T-2 toxin was included in an exploratory development program of rapid identification systems for biological agents sponsored by the United States Army Medical Materiel Development Activity. Reported here is evidence of T-2W exposure in urines collected up to 2 weeks after rats were exposed to a sublethal dose of T-2 toxin. A laboratory radioimmunoassay (RIA) using polyclonal antibody was used to assay the urines for HT-2 or T-2 tetraol. The sensitivity of the RIA for HT-2 was 5 ng/ml and 50 ng/ml for T-2 tetraol. Some of the urines were assayed in parallel with a potentially fieldable enzyme-linked immunoassay (ELISA) developed for T-2 with a monoclonal antibody that cross reacts with HT-2.

  14. High fat diet leads to changes in metabolite patterns in pig plasma, fecal, and urine samples detected by a ultra-high performance liquid chromatography tandem with high resolution mass spectrometry metabolomic study

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Non-targeted metabolite profiling can identify robust biological markers of dietary exposure that can lead to a better understanding of causal interactions between diet and health. In this study, pigs were used as an animal model to develop an efficient procedure to discover metabolites in biolog...

  15. The quantitative spectrum of inositol phosphate metabolites in avian erythrocytes, analysed by proton n.m.r. and h.p.l.c. with direct isomer detection.

    PubMed Central

    Radenberg, T; Scholz, P; Bergmann, G; Mayr, G W

    1989-01-01

    The spectrum of inositol phosphate isomers present in avian erythrocytes was investigated in qualitative and quantitative terms. Inositol phosphates were isolated in micromolar quantities from turkey blood by anion-exchange chromatography on Q-Sepharose and subjected to proton n.m.r. and h.p.l.c. analysis. We employed a h.p.l.c. technique with a novel, recently described complexometric post-column detection system, called 'metal-dye detection' [Mayr (1988) Biochem. J. 254, 585-591], which enabled us to identify non-radioactively labelled inositol phosphate isomers and to determine their masses. The results indicate that avian erythrocytes contain the same inositol phosphate isomers as mammalian cells. Denoted by the 'lowest-locant rule' [NC-IUB Recommendations (1988) Biochem. J. 258, 1-2] irrespective of true enantiomerism, these are Ins(1,4)P2, Ins(1,6)P2, Ins(1,3,4)P3, Ins(1,4,5)P3, Ins(1,3,4,5)P4, Ins(1,3,4,6)P4, Ins(1,4,5,6)P4, Ins(1,3,4,5,6)P5, and InsP6. Furthermore, we identified two inositol trisphosphate isomers hitherto not described for mammalian cells, namely Ins(1,5,6)P3 and Ins(2,4,5)P3. The possible position of these two isomers in inositol phosphate metabolism and implications resulting from absolute abundances of inositol phosphates are discussed. PMID:2604720

  16. Metabolite profiling of wheat (Triticum aestivum L.) phloem exudate

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Biofortification of staple crops with essential micronutrients relies on the efficient, long distance transport of nutrients to the developing seed. The main route of this transport in common wheat (Triticum aestivum) is via the phloem, but due to the reactive nature of some essential micronutrients (specifically Fe and Zn), they need to form ligands with metabolites for transport within the phloem. Current methods available in collecting phloem exudate allows for small volumes (μL or nL) to be collected which limits the breadth of metabolite analysis. We present a technical advance in the measurement of 79 metabolites in as little as 19.5 nL of phloem exudate. This was achieved by using mass spectrometry based, metabolomic techniques. Results Using gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC-MS), 79 metabolites were detected in wheat phloem. Of these, 53 were identified with respect to their chemistry and 26 were classified as unknowns. Using the ratio of ion area for each metabolite to the total ion area for all metabolites, 39 showed significant changes in metabolite profile with a change in wheat reproductive maturity, from 8–12 to 17–21 days after anthesis. Of these, 21 were shown to increase and 18 decreased as the plant matured. An amine group derivitisation method coupled with liquid chromatography MS (LC-MS) based metabolomics was able to quantify 26 metabolites and semi-quantitative data was available for a further 3 metabolites. Conclusions This study demonstrates that it is possible to determine metabolite profiles from extremely small volumes of phloem exudate and that this method can be used to determine variability within the metabolite profile of phloem that has occurred with changes in maturity. This is also believed to be the first report of the presence of the important metal complexing metabolite, nicotianamine in the phloem of wheat. PMID:25143779

  17. Microalgal metabolites: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y

    1996-01-01

    Occurrence of secondary metabolites in microalgae (protoctista) is discussed with respect to the phylogenic or taxonomic relationships of organisms. Biosynthetic mechanisms of certain metabolites such as paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins and polyether toxins are also discussed, and genetic aspects of the secondary metabolite production as well.

  18. Microalgal metabolites: a new perspective.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Y

    1996-01-01

    Occurrence of secondary metabolites in microalgae (protoctista) is discussed with respect to the phylogenic or taxonomic relationships of organisms. Biosynthetic mechanisms of certain metabolites such as paralytic shellfish poisoning toxins and polyether toxins are also discussed, and genetic aspects of the secondary metabolite production as well. PMID:8905087

  19. Identification of stable and reactive metabolite(s) of nelfinavir in human liver microsomes and rCYP3A4.

    PubMed

    Jhajra, Shalu; Singh, Saranjit

    2016-01-25

    The present study was performed to detect trace level stable and reactive metabolites of nelfinavir in human liver microsomes and rCYP3A4. Initially, chromatographic and MS parameters were optimized and fragmentation pattern of the drug was delineated. The structures of metabolites were then elucidated by comparison of their MS/MS fragmentation patterns with the drug. A total of thirty nine stable metabolites were formed, of which twelve were established to be monohydroxylated, eighteen dihydroxy, two dehydrogenated, and one each a diquinone, keto, carboxylic, N-deacylated, dealkylated, oxo and dehydro monohydroxyl metabolite. Previously, a biotransformation product with hydroxylation at tert-butyl group of nelfinavir is reported as an active metabolite of the drug. In our case, ortho-diquinone and N-oxide metabolites were detected, which are known to be reactive in nature. However, these metabolites did not show any interaction with nucleophiles, possibly due to steric hindrance at the site of interface.

  20. Analysis of selected herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water of the United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Scribner, E.A.; Thurman, E.M.; Zimmerman, L.R.

    2000-01-01

    One of the primary goals of the US Geological Survey (USGS) Laboratory in Lawrence, Kansas, is to develop analytical methods for the analysis of herbicide metabolites in surface and ground water that are vital to the study of herbicide fate and degradation pathways in the environment. Methods to measure metabolite concentrations from three major classes of herbicides - triazine, chloroacetanilide and phenyl-urea - have been developed. Methods for triazine metabolite detection cover nine compounds: six compounds are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry; one is detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection; and eight are detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Two metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides - ethane sulfonic acid and oxanilic acid - are detected by high-performance liquid chromatography with diode-array detection and liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry. Alachlor ethane sulfonic acid also has been detected by solid-phase extraction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Six phenylurea metabolites are all detected by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry; four of the six metabolites also are detected by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. Additionally, surveys of herbicides and their metabolites in surface water, ground water, lakes, reservoirs, and rainfall have been conducted through the USGS laboratory in Lawrence. These surveys have been useful in determining herbicide and metabolite occurrence and temporal distribution and have shown that metabolites may be useful in evaluation of non-point-source contamination. Copyright (C) 2000 Elsevier Science B.V.

  1. Metabolite Damage and Metabolite Damage Control in Plants.

    PubMed

    Hanson, Andrew D; Henry, Christopher S; Fiehn, Oliver; de Crécy-Lagard, Valérie

    2016-04-29

    It is increasingly clear that (a) many metabolites undergo spontaneous or enzyme-catalyzed side reactions in vivo, (b) the damaged metabolites formed by these reactions can be harmful, and (c) organisms have biochemical systems that limit the buildup of damaged metabolites. These damage-control systems either return a damaged molecule to its pristine state (metabolite repair) or convert harmful molecules to harmless ones (damage preemption). Because all organisms share a core set of metabolites that suffer the same chemical and enzymatic damage reactions, certain damage-control systems are widely conserved across the kingdoms of life. Relatively few damage reactions and damage-control systems are well known. Uncovering new damage reactions and identifying the corresponding damaged metabolites, damage-control genes, and enzymes demands a coordinated mix of chemistry, metabolomics, cheminformatics, biochemistry, and comparative genomics. This review illustrates the above points using examples from plants, which are at least as prone to metabolite damage as other organisms. PMID:26667673

  2. Detection of three herbicide, and one metabolite, residues in brown rice and rice straw using various versions of the QuEChERS method and liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young-Jun; Rahman, Md Musfiqur; Abd El-Aty, A M; Choi, Jeong-Heui; Chung, Hyung Suk; Kim, Sung-Woo; Abdel-Aty, Azza M; Shin, Ho-Chul; Shim, Jae-Han

    2016-11-01

    A single-run analytical method was developed to analyze the three herbicides azimsulfuron, bensulfuron-methyl, and mesotrione and its metabolite (4-methylsulfonyl-2-nitrobenzoic acid (MNBA)) in brown rice and rice straw using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS). Samples extracted using various versions of Quick, Easy, Cheap, Effective, Rugged, and Safe "QuEChERS" (original unbuffered, acetate (AOAC), and citrate (EN) buffered) methods gave poor recoveries of all the tested analytes in both matrices. The extraction efficiency was improved when primary-secondary amine (PSA) sorbent was removed from the purification step, with the best recovery being achieved for EN-QuEChERS, which was subsequently used throughout the study. Overall, a determination coefficients (R(2))⩾0.995 was achieved at matrix-matched calibration curves at various concentration ranges. The recovery rates at three fortification levels (limit of quantification (LOQ), 1/2 maximum residue limit (1/2MRL), and MRL) ranged from 78 to 114.5, with relative standard deviations (RSDs)<18% for all the tested analytes in both matrices. The LOQs for all herbicides were lower than the MRL set by the Ministry of Food and Drug Safety (MFDS), Republic of Korea. Field trials with the recommended, or double the recommended dose, revealed that the herbicides can safely be applied to rice, as no residues were detected in the harvested samples at 110days. PMID:27211669

  3. Pressurized liquid extraction for the determination of cannabinoids and metabolites in hair: Detection of cut-off values by high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Camilla; Simeoni, Maria Chiara; Vannutelli, Gabriele; Gregori, Adolfo; Ripani, Luigi; Sergi, Manuel; Compagnone, Dario; Curini, Roberta

    2015-08-01

    Hair analysis has become a routine procedure in most forensic laboratories since this alternative matrix presents clear advantages over classical matrices; particularly wider time window, non-invasive sampling and good stability of the analytes over time. There are, however, some major challenges for the analysis of cannabinoids in hair, mainly related to the low concentrations of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), that is the major metabolite. In this study a fast, accurate and sensitive method for the determination of cannabinol, cannabidiol, THC and THC-COOH in hair has been developed. The extraction of analytes from hair (50mg) is based on an automated pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) using water modified with the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate as eluent phase. PLE extract is then cleaned up by SPE using polymeric reversed phase cartridges Strata XL before the injection in the HPLC-HRMS/MS system. Chromatographic conditions obtained with a fused-core column allowed a good separation of the analytes in less than 4min. The whole procedure has been validated according to SWGTOX guidelines. The LLOQs obtained for THC-COOH and the other analytes were respectively 0.1 and 2pg/mg. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first LC-MS/MS based method that allows the detection of THC-COOH in hair at values lower than the cut-off.

  4. Development and validation of a multiresidue method for the simultaneous determination of organophosphorus insecticides and their toxic metabolites in sugarcane juice and refined sugar by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection.

    PubMed

    Ramasubramanian, Thirumalaiandi; Paramasivam, Mariappan

    2016-06-01

    A multiresidue method has been developed and validated for the simultaneous determination of organophosphorus insecticides and their toxic metabolites in sugarcane juice and refined sugar by gas chromatography with flame photometric detection. Limits of quantification of the method varied between 0.007 and 0.01 μg/g. Ethyl acetate based extraction followed by dispersive solid-phase extraction cleanup with primary secondary amine yielded internationally acceptable recoveries of acephate, chlorpyrifos, dichlorvos, monocrotophos, malathion, malaoxon, phorate, phorate-sulfoxide, phorate-oxon, phorate-sulfone, and quinalphos from selected matrices. The recoveries of target analytes from cane juice were 75.55 ± 0.5-102.57 ± 4.2, 77.45 ± 4.7-103.33 ± 3.3, and 80.55 ± 6.6-105.82 ± 9.8% at 0.01, 0.02, and 0.1 μg/g levels of fortification, respectively. The recoveries from cane sugar were 73.24 ± 3.5-104.47 ± 1.9, 75.23 ± 1.5-116.10 ± 3.7, and 70.75 ± 5.7-110.15 ± 2.7%, respectively at 0.01, 0.02, and 0.1 μg/g levels of fortification. Matrix effect and measurement uncertainty were within the permissible limit (less than 20%) as prescribed for pesticide residue analysis. PMID:27061678

  5. Multiresidue Screening Method for Detection of Benzimidazoles and their Metabolites in Liver and Muscle by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography: Method Development and Validation According to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC

    PubMed Central

    Prearo, Marino; Stella, Paola; Ostorero, Federica; Abete, Maria Cesarina

    2014-01-01

    The use of veterinary drugs may cause the presence of residues in food of animal origin if appropriate withdrawal periods are not respected. A high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method has been developed for the simultaneous detection of 11 benzimidazole residues, including metabolites – albendazole, albendazole sulphoxide, albendazole sulphone, fenbendazole, fenbendazole sulphoxide (oxfendazole), fenbendazole sulphone, flubendazole, mebendazole, oxibendazole, thiabendazole, 5-hydroxythiabendazole – in bovine, ovine, equine, swine, rabbit and poultry liver and in bovine, swine and fish muscle. After extraction with a dicloromethane/acetonitrile solution (35/65 v/v) containing 5% ammonium hydroxide, the solvent was evaporated to dryness, the residue was dissolved in HCl 0.1 M, defatted with hexane, purified on a strong cation exchange solid-phase extraction cartridge and analysed in HPLC with diode array and fluorescence detectors. The method was validated as screening qualitative method evaluating, according to Commission Decision 2002/657/EC criteria, specificity, CCβ and β error at cut off level of 25 μg/kg and ruggedness. PMID:27800310

  6. Pressurized liquid extraction for the determination of cannabinoids and metabolites in hair: Detection of cut-off values by high performance liquid chromatography-high resolution tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Montesano, Camilla; Simeoni, Maria Chiara; Vannutelli, Gabriele; Gregori, Adolfo; Ripani, Luigi; Sergi, Manuel; Compagnone, Dario; Curini, Roberta

    2015-08-01

    Hair analysis has become a routine procedure in most forensic laboratories since this alternative matrix presents clear advantages over classical matrices; particularly wider time window, non-invasive sampling and good stability of the analytes over time. There are, however, some major challenges for the analysis of cannabinoids in hair, mainly related to the low concentrations of 11-nor-9-carboxy-Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC-COOH), that is the major metabolite. In this study a fast, accurate and sensitive method for the determination of cannabinol, cannabidiol, THC and THC-COOH in hair has been developed. The extraction of analytes from hair (50mg) is based on an automated pressurized liquid extraction (PLE) using water modified with the surfactant sodium dodecyl sulphate as eluent phase. PLE extract is then cleaned up by SPE using polymeric reversed phase cartridges Strata XL before the injection in the HPLC-HRMS/MS system. Chromatographic conditions obtained with a fused-core column allowed a good separation of the analytes in less than 4min. The whole procedure has been validated according to SWGTOX guidelines. The LLOQs obtained for THC-COOH and the other analytes were respectively 0.1 and 2pg/mg. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first LC-MS/MS based method that allows the detection of THC-COOH in hair at values lower than the cut-off. PMID:26118805

  7. Metabolic activation of 1,2-dibromo-3-chloropropane to mutagenic metabolites: detection and mechanism of formation of (Z)- and (E)-2-chloro-3-(bromomethyl)oxirane.

    PubMed

    Pearson, P G; Omichinski, J G; Myers, T G; Søderlund, E J; Dybing, E; Nelson, S D

    1990-01-01

    1,2-Dibromo-3-chloropropane (DBCP), a haloalkane nematocide and soil fumigant, is metabolically activated to chemically reactive species that are direct-acting mutagens in a Salmonella typhimurium TA 100 test system. Studies in vitro with rat liver microsomes indicated that oxidation at carbon 3 resulted in the formation of an unstable gem-chlorohydrin that rearranged with elimination of hydrogen bromide to form (Z)-2-chloro-3-(bromomethyl)oxirane [(Z)-CBPO] and (E)-2-chloro-3-(bromomethyl)oxirane [(E)-CBPO]. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) with positive ion chemical ionization (CI) was employed to identify (Z)-CBPO and (E)-CBPO by comparison of characteristic fragment ions in their CI mass spectra with those observed for authentic standards. Quantitative GC-MS methodology was exploited to quantitate the rate of formation of (Z)-CBPO and (E)-CBPO from DBCP and analogues of DBCP specifically deuterated at carbon 1 and carbon 3. The rate of formation of Z- and E-isomers of CBPO was 31 and 33 pmol/(min.mg of protein), respectively, from DBCP; substitution with deuterium at carbon 1 increased the rate of epoxide formation by 50%, whereas CBPO formation could not be detected from a substrate labeled with deuterium at carbon 3. Both epoxides were directly acting mutagens to S. typhimurium TA 100. (Z)-CBPO caused approximately twice as many his+ revertants/nmol compared to (E)-CBPO. Oxidation at carbon 2 of DBCP resulted in the formation of a bifunctional alkylating agent, 1-bromo-3-chloroacetone, presumably via the intermediacy of an unstable gem-bromohydrin.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2133097

  8. Determination of organophosphorus pesticides and metabolites in cereal-based baby foods and wheat flour by means of ultrasound-assisted extraction and hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction prior to gas chromatography with nitrogen phosphorus detection.

    PubMed

    González-Curbelo, Miguel Ángel; Hernández-Borges, Javier; Borges-Miquel, Teresa María; Rodríguez-Delgado, Miguel Ángel

    2013-10-25

    A new method based on hollow-fiber liquid-phase microextraction (HF-LPME) has been developed for the determination of a group of organophosphorus pesticides, including some of their metabolites, in two commercial cereal-based baby foods and one wheat flour prior to gas chromatography-nitrogen phosphorus detection. Samples were first extracted by ultrasound-assisted extraction with acetonitrile (ACN) containing 1.25% (v/v) of formic acid. After evaporation and reconstitution in Milli-Q water, the HF-LPME procedure, using 1-octanol as extraction solvent, was applied followed by a desorption step in ACN, which clearly improved the performance of the technique. The effects of sample pH, ionic strength, stirring rate, extraction temperature and time as well as the desorption procedure were investigated. Under the optimum conditions that involved the extraction of the analytes from 10 mL of the water reconstituted extract at pH 7.0 containing 5% (w/v) of NaCl for 45 min at 960 rpm, the method was validated in terms of linearity, precision and accuracy. The limits of detection (LODs) were between 0.29 and 3.20 μg/kg. The extraction of Milli-Q water, as an example of the applicability of the procedure to aqueous samples, allowed achieving LODs in the range 0.01-0.04 μg/L. Such values, together with the ones achieved for the rest of the samples, are below or equal to the maximum residue limits specified by the European Union. PMID:23809845

  9. NMR identification of endogenous metabolites interacting with fatted and non-fatted human serum albumin in blood plasma: Fatty acids influence the HSA-metabolite interaction.

    PubMed

    Jupin, Marc; Michiels, Paul J; Girard, Frederic C; Spraul, Manfred; Wijmenga, Sybren S

    2013-03-01

    Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters on body biochemistry. Thanks to technical developments metabolic profiling of body fluids, such as blood plasma, by for instance NMR has in the past decade become increasingly accurate enabling successful clinical diagnostics. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is the main plasma protein (∼60% of all plasma protein) and responsible for the transport of endogenous (e.g. fatty acids) and exogenous metabolites, which it achieves thanks to its multiple binding sites and its flexibility. HSA has been extensively studied with regard to its binding of drugs (exogenous metabolites), but only to a lesser extent with regard to its binding of endogenous (non-fatty acid) metabolites. To obtain correct NMR measured metabolic profiles of blood plasma and/or potentially extract information on HSA and fatty acids content, it is necessary to characterize these endogenous metabolite/plasma protein interactions. Here, we investigate these metabolite-HSA interactions in blood plasma and blood plasma mimics. The latter contain the roughly twenty metabolites routinely detected by NMR (also most abundant) in normal relative concentrations with fatted or non-fatted HSA added or not. First, we find that chemical shift changes are small and seen only for a few of the metabolites. In contrast, a significant number of the metabolites display reduced resonance integrals and reduced free concentrations in the presence of HSA or fatted HSA. For slow-exchange (or strong) interactions, NMR resonance integrals report the free metabolite concentration, while for fast exchange (weak binding) the chemical shift reports on the binding. Hence, these metabolites bind strongly to HSA and/or fatted HSA, but to a limited degree because for most metabolites their concentration is smaller than the HSA concentration. Most interestingly, fatty acids decrease the metabolite-HSA binding quite significantly for most of the interacting metabolites. We further find

  10. NMR identification of endogenous metabolites interacting with fatted and non-fatted human serum albumin in blood plasma: Fatty acids influence the HSA-metabolite interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jupin, Marc; Michiels, Paul J.; Girard, Frederic C.; Spraul, Manfred; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2013-03-01

    Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters on body biochemistry. Thanks to technical developments metabolic profiling of body fluids, such as blood plasma, by for instance NMR has in the past decade become increasingly accurate enabling successful clinical diagnostics. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is the main plasma protein (˜60% of all plasma protein) and responsible for the transport of endogenous (e.g. fatty acids) and exogenous metabolites, which it achieves thanks to its multiple binding sites and its flexibility. HSA has been extensively studied with regard to its binding of drugs (exogenous metabolites), but only to a lesser extent with regard to its binding of endogenous (non-fatty acid) metabolites. To obtain correct NMR measured metabolic profiles of blood plasma and/or potentially extract information on HSA and fatty acids content, it is necessary to characterize these endogenous metabolite/plasma protein interactions. Here, we investigate these metabolite-HSA interactions in blood plasma and blood plasma mimics. The latter contain the roughly twenty metabolites routinely detected by NMR (also most abundant) in normal relative concentrations with fatted or non-fatted HSA added or not. First, we find that chemical shift changes are small and seen only for a few of the metabolites. In contrast, a significant number of the metabolites display reduced resonance integrals and reduced free concentrations in the presence of HSA or fatted HSA. For slow-exchange (or strong) interactions, NMR resonance integrals report the free metabolite concentration, while for fast exchange (weak binding) the chemical shift reports on the binding. Hence, these metabolites bind strongly to HSA and/or fatted HSA, but to a limited degree because for most metabolites their concentration is smaller than the HSA concentration. Most interestingly, fatty acids decrease the metabolite-HSA binding quite significantly for most of the interacting metabolites. We further find

  11. Mutagenicity of dimethylated metabolites of inorganic arsenics.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, K; Ohba, H; Hasegawa, A; Sawamura, R; Okada, S

    1989-10-01

    The genotoxic effects of dimethylarsinic acid (DMAA), one of the main metabolites of inorganic arsenics in mammals, and its further metabolites were investigated using Escherichia coli B tester strains. When H/r30R (wild-type; Exc+Rec+) and Hs30R (uvrA-; Exc-Rec+) cells were incubated with DMAA for 3 h in liquid NB medium, many more revertants appeared in sealed tubes than in the control, but this was not the case in unsealed tubes, suggesting that volatile metabolites of DMAA caused the mutagenesis. By gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS), dimethylarsine and trimethylarsine, known to be volatile metabolites in microorganisms, were detected in the gas phase of DMAA-added tester strain cell suspensions in sealed tubes. Among these arsines, dimethylarsine was mutagenic in WP2 (wild-type; Exc+Rec+) and WP2uvrA (uvrA-; Exc-Rec+), while trimethylarsine was not. The mutagenesis induced by dimethylarsine required oxygen gas in the assay system; the number of revertants markedly increased in an oxygen-replaced system and diminished in a nitrogen-replaced one. These results suggest that the reaction product(s) between dimethylarsine and molecular oxygen is responsible for the mutagenesis. The significance of this mutagenesis in the genetoxic action of inorganic arsenics is discussed.

  12. Variability of Non-Polar Secondary Metabolites in the Red Alga Portieria

    PubMed Central

    Payo, Dioli Ann; Colo, Joannamel; Calumpong, Hilconida; de Clerck, Olivier

    2011-01-01

    Possible sources of variation in non-polar secondary metabolites of Portieria hornemannii, sampled from two distinct regions in the Philippines (Batanes and Visayas), resulting from different life-history stages, presence of cryptic species, and/or spatiotemporal factors, were investigated. PCA analyses demonstrated secondary metabolite variation between, as well as within, five cryptic Batanes species. Intraspecific variation was even more pronounced in the three cryptic Visayas species, which included samples from six sites. Neither species groupings, nor spatial or temporal based patterns, were observed in the PCA analysis, however, intraspecific variation in secondary metabolites was detected between life-history stages. Male gametophytes (102 metabolites detected) were strongly discriminated from the two other stages, whilst female gametophyte (202 metabolites detected) and tetrasporophyte (106 metabolites detected) samples were partially discriminated. These results suggest that life-history driven variations, and possibly other microscale factors, may influence the variation within Portieria species. PMID:22163195

  13. Characterization and tissue distribution of conjugated metabolites of pyrene in the rat

    PubMed Central

    SAENGTIENCHAI, Aksorn; IKENAKA, Yoshinori; DARWISH, Wageh Sobhy; NAKAYAMA, Shouta M.M.; MIZUKAWA, Hazuki; ISHIZUKA, Mayumi

    2015-01-01

    Pyrene (PY) is a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) that is often used as a biomarker for human and wildlife exposure to PAHs. As the metabolites of PAHs, similar to their parent compounds, pose public health risks, it is necessary to study their characteristics and tissue-specific distribution. The present study was performed to experimentally characterize PY metabolites and analyze the tissue-specific distribution of the conjugated metabolites after oral administration of PY to rats. PY metabolites, such as pyrenediol-disulfate (PYdiol-diS), pyrenediol-sulfate (PYdiol-S), pyrene-1-sufate (PYOS), pyrene-1-glucuronide (PYOG) and 1-hydroxypyrene (PYOH), were detected in rat urine. Although glucuronide conjugate was the predominant metabolite, the metabolite composition varied among tissues. Interestingly, the proportion of PYOH was high in the large intestine. Furthermore, PYOH was the only PY metabolite detected in feces. PMID:26028020

  14. Functional Genomics of Novel Secondary Metabolites from Diverse Cyanobacteria Using Untargeted Metabolomics

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Richard; Ivanova, Natalia N.; Jose, Nick; Garcia-Pichel, Ferran; Kyrpides, Nikos C.; Gugger, Muriel; Northen, Trent R.

    2013-01-01

    Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics has become a powerful tool for the detection of metabolites in complex biological systems and for the identification of novel metabolites. We previously identified a number of unexpected metabolites in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus sp. PCC 7002, such as histidine betaine, its derivatives and several unusual oligosaccharides. To test for the presence of these compounds and to assess the diversity of small polar metabolites in other cyanobacteria, we profiled cell extracts of nine strains representing much of the morphological and evolutionary diversification of this phylum. Spectral features in raw metabolite profiles obtained by normal phase liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (MS) were manually curated so that chemical formulae of metabolites could be assigned. For putative identification, retention times and MS/MS spectra were cross-referenced with those of standards or available sprectral library records. Overall, we detected 264 distinct metabolites. These included indeed different betaines, oligosaccharides as well as additional unidentified metabolites with chemical formulae not present in databases of metabolism. Some of these metabolites were detected only in a single strain, but some were present in more than one. Genomic interrogation of the strains revealed that generally, presence of a given metabolite corresponded well with the presence of its biosynthetic genes, if known. Our results show the potential of combining metabolite profiling and genomics for the identification of novel biosynthetic genes. PMID:24084783

  15. The Disposition of Oxycodone and Metabolite in Human Hair.

    PubMed

    Reisfield, Gary M; Jones, Joseph T

    2015-01-01

    The disposition of oxycodone (OC) and metabolites in hair remains poorly characterized. We present a case involving a pharmacist in an impaired professionals' monitoring program in whom hair testing yielded OC on two occasions. On both occasions, his hair was negative for the oxymorphone (OM) metabolite at the cutoff concentration of 100 pg/mg. He claimed that, absent the detection of metabolite, the OC necessarily represented external contamination. This prompted a review of the laboratory's OC-positive hair results for the quarter April-June 2014. Overall, 466 specimens contained OC, with a mean (median) concentration of 2,375 (1,060) pg/mg. Of these OC-positive specimens, only 47 (10%) contained detectable OM. When OC was present at or below the mean (median) concentration, only 2.2% (1.3%) of specimens were OM-positive. In the setting of OC administration, the detection of OM in hair is unlikely at a cutoff concentration of 100 pg/mg. More consistent demonstration of OC metabolite(s) in hair will require the validation of methods to detect OM at lower concentrations and/or methods to detect noroxycodone.

  16. Development of competitive immunoassays to hydroxyl containing fungicide metabolites.

    PubMed

    Gough, Kevin C; Jarvis, Shila; Maddison, Ben C

    2011-01-01

    This paper describes the isolation of monoclonal antibodies and the development of competitive immunoassays to pesticide metabolites of the fungicides imazalil, carbendazim and thiabendazole. The metabolite specific hydroxyl residues were used as the reactive group with which to link the metabolite to the carrier proteins Keyhole Limpet Haemocyanin (KLH) and Bovine Serum Albumin (BSA). In each case immune responses in mice were raised and monoclonal antibodies were produced. Antibodies were developed into competitive ELISAs to the appropriate metabolite. The antibody raised to a metabolite of imazalil was optimised into a competitive ELISA format which had an assay IC50 of 7.5 μg/L and a limit of detection (LOD) of 1.1 μg/L. A single antibody isolated against the metabolite of carbendazim had assay IC50s of 3.2 and 2.7 μg/L for the metabolites of carbendazim and thiabendazole respectively with an LOD of 0.38 μg/L for both. These sensitive immunoassays may have application in the monitoring of human exposure to these fungicide residues either by occupational or non-occupational routes.

  17. Identification and Structural Characterization of Three New Metabolites of Bupropion in Humans.

    PubMed

    Sager, Jennifer E; Choiniere, John R; Chang, Justine; Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa; Nelson, Wendel L; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-08-11

    Bupropion is a widely used antidepressant and the recommended CYP2B6 probe drug. However, current understanding of bupropion elimination pathways is limited. Bupropion has three active circulating metabolites, OH-bupropion, threohydrobupropion, and erythrohydrobupropion, but together with bupropion these metabolites and their conjugates in urine represent only 23% of the dose, and the majority of the elimination pathways of bupropion result in uncharacterized metabolites. The aim of this study was to determine the structures of the uncharacterized bupropion metabolites using human clinical samples and in vitro incubations. Three new metabolites, 4'-OH-bupropion, erythro-4'-OH-hydrobupropion, and threo-4'-OH-hydrobupropion, were detected in human liver microsome incubations and were isolated from human urine. The structures of the metabolites were confirmed via comparison of UV absorbance, NMR spectra, and mass spectral data to those of the synthesized standards. In total, these metabolites represented 24% of the drug related material excreted in urine. PMID:27660681

  18. Identification and Structural Characterization of Three New Metabolites of Bupropion in Humans.

    PubMed

    Sager, Jennifer E; Choiniere, John R; Chang, Justine; Stephenson-Famy, Alyssa; Nelson, Wendel L; Isoherranen, Nina

    2016-08-11

    Bupropion is a widely used antidepressant and the recommended CYP2B6 probe drug. However, current understanding of bupropion elimination pathways is limited. Bupropion has three active circulating metabolites, OH-bupropion, threohydrobupropion, and erythrohydrobupropion, but together with bupropion these metabolites and their conjugates in urine represent only 23% of the dose, and the majority of the elimination pathways of bupropion result in uncharacterized metabolites. The aim of this study was to determine the structures of the uncharacterized bupropion metabolites using human clinical samples and in vitro incubations. Three new metabolites, 4'-OH-bupropion, erythro-4'-OH-hydrobupropion, and threo-4'-OH-hydrobupropion, were detected in human liver microsome incubations and were isolated from human urine. The structures of the metabolites were confirmed via comparison of UV absorbance, NMR spectra, and mass spectral data to those of the synthesized standards. In total, these metabolites represented 24% of the drug related material excreted in urine.

  19. Methaqualone metabolites in human urine after therapeutic doses.

    PubMed

    Kazyak, L; Kelley, J A; Cella, J A; Droege, R E; Hilpert, L R; Permisohn, R C

    1977-11-01

    We measured five principal metabolites of methaqualone in the urine of seven volunteers after single and multiple doses of the drug. Urine, collected for up to 72 hours after the last dose, was analyzed for methaqualone and its principal metabolites by high-resolution capillary-column gas chromatography. The major biotransformation of methaqualone under therapeutic conditions occurred through benzylic and para-hydroxylation of the o-tolyl moiety. Methaqualone itself was present in concentrations of no more than 1 mg/liter, if it could be detected at all. The observed physiological effects ant total urinary excretion of metabolites reflected the cumulative nature of the parent drug when it was administered in multiple doses. No clear relationship was found between appearance of a specific metabolite and time after ingestion of the drug, although higher amounts of 2-methyl-3-(2'-hydroxymethylphenyl)-4(3H)-quinazolinone were noted in those individuals who tolerated the drug less well.

  20. Gas chromatography with pulsed flame photometric detection multiresidue method for organophosphate pesticide and metabolite residues at the parts-per-billion level in representatives commodities of fruits and vegetable crop groups.

    PubMed

    Podhorniak, L V; Negron, J F; Griffith, F D

    2001-01-01

    A gas chromatographic method with a pulsed flame photometric detector (P-FPD) is presented for the analysis of 28 parent organophosphate (OP) pesticides and their OP metabolites. A total of 57 organophosphates were analyzed in 10 representative fruit and vegetable crop groups. The method is based on a judicious selection of known procedures from FDA sources such as the Pesticide Analytical Manual and Laboratory Information Bulletins, combined in a manner to recover the OPs and their metabolite(s) at the part-per-billion (ppb) level. The method uses an acetone extraction with either miniaturized Hydromatrix column partitioning or alternately a miniaturized methylene dichloride liquid-liquid partitioning, followed by solid-phase extraction (SPE) cleanup with graphitized carbon black (GCB) and PSA cartridges. Determination of residues is by programmed temperature capillary column gas chromatography fitted with a P-FPD set in the phosphorus mode. The method is designed so that a set of samples can be prepared in 1 working day for overnight instrumental analysis. The recovery data indicates that a daily column-cutting procedure used in combination with the SPE extract cleanup effectively reduces matrix enhancement at the ppb level for many organophosphates. The OPs most susceptible to elevated recoveries around or greater than 150%, based on peak area calculations, were trichlorfon, phosmet, and the metabolites of dimethoate, fenamiphos, fenthion, and phorate. PMID:11417651

  1. Monitoring of urinary metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 in legal cases.

    PubMed

    Jang, Moonhee; Yang, Wonkyung; Choi, Hyeyoung; Chang, Hyejin; Lee, Sooyeun; Kim, Eunmi; Chung, Heesun

    2013-09-10

    Due to their cannabis-like effects, synthetic cannabinoids have attracted much public attention since 2008. Thus, elucidation of the metabolic pattern and the detection of the intake of these drugs have been of major concern. In order to suggest appropriate urinary biomarkers to prove JWH-018 or JWH-073 intake, we selected the major metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073, namely (ω)-, (ω-1)-hydroxy, carboxy and 6-hydroxyindole metabolites, and validated a method for the quantification of these metabolites using solid-phase extraction based on LC-MS/MS analysis. Authentic urine specimens obtained from drug offenders were screened via a synthetic cannabinoid ELISA kit and were analyzed by LC-MS/MS for confirmation. Twenty-one out of a total of 52 samples (40%) were found positive for at least one metabolite of JWH-018 or JWH-073. N-pentyl hydroxy metabolites of JWH-018 and carboxy metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073 were detected in all positive samples. However, the rest of the metabolites were either not detected or only a small amount of them were found. A considerable variation was observed in the concentration ratio of (ω) and (ω-1)-hydroxy metabolites of JWH-018. Based on the results, it may have some pitfalls to determine the ingestion of specific synthetic cannabinoids by detecting a few metabolites, considering the continuous emergence of structurally related synthetic cannabinoids. Thus, use of synthetic cannabinoids should be proven carefully through comprehensive investigation of analytical results of biological specimens.

  2. Synthesis Of Labeled Metabolites

    DOEpatents

    Martinez, Rodolfo A.; Silks, III, Louis A.; Unkefer, Clifford J.; Atcher, Robert

    2004-03-23

    The present invention is directed to labeled compounds, for example, isotopically enriched mustard gas metabolites including: [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1-[[2-(methylsulfinyl)ethyl]sulfonyl]-2-(methylthio); [1,1',2,2'-.sup.13 C.sub.4 ]ethane, 1,1'-sulfonylbis[2-(methylsulfinyl)]; and, 2,2'-sulfinylbis([1,2-.sup.13 C.sub.2 ]ethanol of the general formula ##STR1## where Q.sup.1 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone (--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), at least one C* is .sup.13 C, X is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen and deuterium, and Z is selected from the group consisting of hydroxide (--OH), and --Q.sup.2 --R where Q.sup.2 is selected from the group consisting of sulfide (--S--), sulfone(--S(O)--), sulfoxide (--S(O.sub.2)--) and oxide (--O--), and R is selected from the group consisting of hydrogen, a C.sub.1 to C.sub.4 lower alkyl, and amino acid moieties, with the proviso that when Z is a hydroxide and Q.sup.1 is a sulfide, then at least one X is deuterium.

  3. Rethinking cycad metabolite research.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Laura R; Marler, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Cycads are among the most ancient of extant Spermatophytes, and are known for their numerous pharmacologically active compounds. One compound in particular, β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), has been implicated as the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinson dementia complex (ALS/PDC) on Guam. Previous studies allege that BMAA is produced exclusively by cyanobacteria, and is transferred to cycads through the symbiotic relationship between these cyanobacteria and the roots of cycads. We recently published data showing that Cycas micronesica seedlings grown without endophytic cyanobacteria do in fact increase in BMAA, invalidating the foundation of the BMAA hypothesis. We use this example to suggest that the frenzy centered on BMAA and other single putative toxins has hindered progress. The long list of cycad-specific compounds may have important roles in signaling or communication, but these possibilities have been neglected during decades of attempts to force single metabolites into a supposed anti-herbivory function. We propose that an unbiased, comprehensive approach may be a more appropriate means of proceeding with cycad biochemistry research. PMID:21509189

  4. Rethinking cycad metabolite research.

    PubMed

    Snyder, Laura R; Marler, Thomas E

    2011-01-01

    Cycads are among the most ancient of extant Spermatophytes, and are known for their numerous pharmacologically active compounds. One compound in particular, β-methylamino-L-alanine (BMAA), has been implicated as the cause of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis/Parkinson dementia complex (ALS/PDC) on Guam. Previous studies allege that BMAA is produced exclusively by cyanobacteria, and is transferred to cycads through the symbiotic relationship between these cyanobacteria and the roots of cycads. We recently published data showing that Cycas micronesica seedlings grown without endophytic cyanobacteria do in fact increase in BMAA, invalidating the foundation of the BMAA hypothesis. We use this example to suggest that the frenzy centered on BMAA and other single putative toxins has hindered progress. The long list of cycad-specific compounds may have important roles in signaling or communication, but these possibilities have been neglected during decades of attempts to force single metabolites into a supposed anti-herbivory function. We propose that an unbiased, comprehensive approach may be a more appropriate means of proceeding with cycad biochemistry research.

  5. Spatio-temporal distribution and natural variation of metabolites in citrus fruits.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shouchuang; Tu, Hong; Wan, Jian; Chen, Wei; Liu, Xianqing; Luo, Jie; Xu, Juan; Zhang, Hongyan

    2016-05-15

    To study the natural variation and spatio-temporal accumulation of citrus metabolites, liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS) based metabolome analysis was performed on four fruit tissues (flavedo, albedo, segment membrane and juice sacs) and different Citrus species (lemon, pummelo and grapefruit, sweet orange and mandarin). Using a non-targeted metabolomics approach, more than 2000 metabolite signals were detected, from which more than 54 metabolites, including amino acids, flavonoids and limonoids, were identified/annotated. Differential accumulation patterns of both primary metabolites and secondary metabolites in various tissues and species were revealed by our study. Further investigation indicated that flavedo accumulates more flavonoids while juice sacs contain more amino acids. Besides this, cluster analysis based on the levels of metabolites detected in 47 individual Citrus accessions clearly grouped them into four distinct clusters: pummelos and grapefruits, lemons, sweet oranges and mandarins, while the cluster of pummelos and grapefruits lay distinctly apart from the other three species.

  6. The metabolite profiling of coastal coccolithophorid species Pleurochrysis carterae (Haptophyta)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chengxu; Luo, Jie; Ye, Yangfang; Yan, Xiaojun; Liu, Baoning; Wen, Xin

    2016-07-01

    Pleurochrysis carterae is a calcified coccolithophorid species that usually blooms in the coastal area and causes aquaculture losses. The cellular calcification, blooming and many other critical species specific eco-physiological processes are closely related to various metabolic pathways. The purpose of this study is to apply the unbiased and non-destructive method of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) to detect the unknown holistic metabolite of P. carterae. The results show that NMR spectroscopic method is practical in the analysis of metabolites of phytoplankton. The metabolome of P. carterae was dominated by 26 metabolites involved in a number of different primary and secondary metabolic pathways. Organic acids and their derivatives, amino acids, sugars, nucleic aides were mainly detected. The abundant metabolites are that closely related to the process of cellular osmotic adjustment, which possibly reflect the active ability of P. carterae to adapt to the versatile coastal niche. DMSP (dimethylsulphoniopropionate) was the most dominant metabolite in P. carterae, up to 2.065±0.278 mg/g lyophilized cells, followed by glutamate and lactose, the contents were 0.349±0.035 and 0.301±0.073 mg/g lyophilized cells respectively. Other metabolites that had the content ranged between 0.1-0.2 mg/g lyophilized cells were alanine, isethionate and arabinose. Amino acid (valine, phenylalanine, isoleucine, tyrosine), organic acid salts (lactate, succinate), scyllitol and uracil had content ranged from 0.01 to below 0.1 mg/g lyophilized cells. Trigonelline, fumarate and formate were detected in very low content (only thousandths of 1 mg per gram of lyophilized cells or below). Our results of the holistic metabolites of P. carterae are the basic references for the further studies when multiple problems will be addressed to this notorious blooming calcifying species.

  7. Development of a new high-performance liquid chromatography method with diode array and electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry detection for the metabolite fingerprinting of bioactive compounds in Humulus lupulus L.

    PubMed

    Prencipe, Francesco Pio; Brighenti, Virginia; Rodolfi, Margherita; Mongelli, Andrea; dall'Asta, Chiara; Ganino, Tommaso; Bruni, Renato; Pellati, Federica

    2014-07-01

    The study was aimed at developing a new analytical method for the metabolite fingerprinting of bioactive compounds in Humulus lupulus L. (hop), together with a simple extraction procedure. Different extraction techniques, including maceration, heat reflux extraction (HRE), ultrasound-assisted extraction (UAE) and microwave-assisted extraction (MAE), were compared in order to obtain a high yield of the target analytes. Dynamic maceration for 30min with MeOH-HCOOH (99:1, v/v) as the extraction solvent provided the best result in terms of recovery of secondary metabolites. The analysis of hop constituents, including prenylflavonoids and prenylphloroglucinols (bitter acids), was carried out by means of HPLC-UV/DAD, HPLC-ESI-MS and MS(2), using an ion trap mass analyzer. An Ascentis Express C18 column (150mm×3.0mm I.D., 2.7μm) was used for the HPLC analysis, with a mobile phase composed of 0.25% formic acid in both water and acetonitrile, under gradient elution. The method validation was performed to show compliance with ICH guidelines. The validated technique was successfully applied to the phytochemical analysis of ten commercial cultivars and twenty-three wild Italian hop genotypes, thus demonstrating to be a reliable and useful tool for the comprehensive multi-component analysis of hop secondary metabolites.

  8. Is oseltamivir (Tamiflu) safe? Re-examining the Tamiflu 'ado' from Japan.

    PubMed

    Okamoto, Etsuji

    2010-02-01

    Reports that oseltamivir causes abnormal behaviors in influenza patients and, thereby, increases the risk of injuries or death alerted the world. Such reports came almost exclusively from Japan, which consumes more than 75% of the world supply, even before the novel influenza pandemic started. The Japanese government will not revoke its warning issued in March 2007 against the use of oseltamivir in teenagers despite the accumulating evidence that such abnormal behaviors are part of generic symptoms of influenza-like delirium and not attributable to certain drugs. The author analyzes the background of the 'ado' by compiling the various sources of information, some of which have not been readily available to the international audience and explains why Japan is incapable of producing firm evidence to draw a definite conclusion. The author also alarms the potential risk of sudden death related to oseltamivir and foresees how the problem may be solved in the future. PMID:20121561

  9. Exploring antagonistic metabolites of established biocontrol agent of marine origin.

    PubMed

    Rane, Makarand Ramesh; Sarode, Prashant Diwakar; Chaudhari, Bhushan Liladhar; Chincholkar, Sudhir Bhaskarrao

    2008-12-01

    Biocontrol ability of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ID 4365, a biocontrol agent of groundnut phytopathogens from marine origin, was previously attributed to the production of pyoverdin type of siderophores. However, pyoverdin-rich supernatants of this organism showed better antifungal activity compared to equivalent amount of purified pyoverdin indicating presence of undetected metabolite(s) in pyoverdin rich supernatants. On the basis of observation that antagonistic activity was iron-dependent and iron-independent, an attempt was made to detect the presence of additional metabolites. In addition to pyoverdin, strain produced additional siderophores, viz. pyochelin and salicylic acid. Two broad spectrum antifungal compounds, viz. pyocyanin and phenazine-1-carboxylic acid, were detected, characterized, and activity against phytopathogens was demonstrated. Iron- and phosphate-dependent co-production of siderophores and phenazines was confirmed. Strain showed additional features like production of hydrogen cyanide, indol-3-acetic acid, and phosphate solubilization. PMID:18626581

  10. Identification of novel metoclopramide metabolites in humans: in vitro and in vivo studies.

    PubMed

    Argikar, Upendra A; Gomez, Javier; Ung, Din; Parkman, Henry P; Nagar, Swati

    2010-08-01

    Metoclopramide (MCP) is frequently used to treat gastroparesis. Previous studies have documented MCP metabolism, but systematic structural identification of metabolites has not been performed. The aim of this study was to better understand MCP metabolism in humans. For examination of in vivo metabolism, a single oral 20-mg MCP dose was administered to eight healthy male volunteers, followed by complete urine collection over 24 h. In vitro incubations were performed in human liver microsomes (HLM) to characterize metabolism via cytochromes P450 and UDP-glucuronosyltransferases and in human liver cytosol for metabolism via sulfotransferases. Urine and subcellular incubations were analyzed for MCP metabolites on a mass spectrometer with accurate mass measurement capability. Five MCP metabolites were detected in vivo, and five additional metabolites were detected in vitro. The five metabolites of MCP identified both in vitro and in vivo were an N-O-glucuronide (M1), an N-sulfate (M2), a des-ethyl metabolite (M3), a hydroxylated metabolite (M4), and an oxidative deaminated metabolite (M5). To our knowledge, metabolites M1 and M4 have not been reported previously. M2 urinary levels varied 22-fold and M3 levels varied 16-fold among eight subjects. In vitro studies in HLM revealed the following additional metabolites: two ether glucuronides (M6 and M8), possibly on the phenyl ring after oxidation, an N-glucuronide (M7), a carbamic acid (M9), and a nitro metabolite (M10). Metabolites M6 to M10 have not been reported previously. In conclusion, this study describes the identification of MCP metabolites in vivo and in vitro in humans. PMID:20423954

  11. Clinical Pharmacokinetics of Alamifovir and Its Metabolites

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Clark; Abu-Raddad, Eyas; Golor, Georg; Watanabe, Hikari; Sasaki, Akira; Yeo, Kwee Poo; Soon, Danny; Sinha, Vikram P.; Flanagan, Shawn D.; He, Minxia M.; Wise, Stephen D.

    2005-01-01

    Alamifovir, a purine nucleotide analogue prodrug, and its hydrolyzed derivatives have shown preclincal efficacy activity against wild-type and lamivudine-resistant hepatitis B virus. Two studies were conducted to examine the single- and multiple-dose alamifovir pharmacokinetics after oral administration in healthy males. In study 1, subjects were given single doses (0.2 to 80 mg), with a subset receiving 20 mg in a fed state. Study 2 subjects were dosed with 2.5 to 15 mg twice daily for 15 days. Plasma samples were collected over 72 h in study 1 and over 24 h on days 1 and 15 in study 2. Concentrations of alamifovir and its major metabolites were determined using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry methods. The data were analyzed using a noncompartmental technique. Although alamifovir was rapidly absorbed, there was limited systemic exposure due to its rapid hydrolysis and formation of at least three metabolites, suggesting that alamifovir acts as a prodrug. The major metabolites detected were 602074 and 602076, with 602075 detectable only in higher-dose groups. Maximum 602074 plasma concentration was achieved at approximately 0.5 h (Tmax) and declined with a 1- to 2-h terminal half-life (t1/2). Maximum concentrations of 602076 (Cmax) averaged 10% of the 602074 Cmax and reached Tmax in 2.5 h with a 4-h t1/2. Food appeared to decrease the extent of absorption of the compound. Multiple dosing resulted in minimal accumulation, and the concentrations following multiple doses could be predicted using the single-dose data. Alamifovir was well tolerated and the pharmacokinetics were characterized in these studies. PMID:15855501

  12. Mass spectrometry-based metabolomics, analysis of metabolite-protein interactions, and imaging.

    PubMed

    Lee, Do Yup; Bowen, Benjamin P; Northen, Trent R

    2010-08-01

    Our understanding of biology has been greatly improved through recent developments in mass spectrometry, which is providing detailed information on protein and metabolite composition as well as protein-metabolite interactions. The high sensitivity and resolution of mass spectrometry achieved with liquid or gas chromatography allows for detection and quantification of hundreds to thousands of molecules in a single measurement. Where homogenization-based sample preparation and extraction methods result in a loss of spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging technologies provide the in situ distribution profiles of metabolites and proteins within tissues. Mass spectrometry-based analysis of metabolite abundance, protein-metabolite interactions, and spatial distribution of compounds facilitates the high-throughput screening of biochemical reactions, the reconstruction of metabolic networks, biomarker discovery, determination of tissue compositions, and functional annotation of both proteins and metabolites.

  13. Mass spectrometry–based metabolomics, analysis of metabolite-protein interactions, and imaging

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Do Yup; Bowen, Benjamin P.; Northen, Trent R.

    2010-01-01

    Our understanding of biology has been greatly improved through recent developments in mass spectrometry, which is providing detailed information on protein and metabolite composition as well as protein-metabolite interactions. The high sensitivity and resolution of mass spectrometry achieved with liquid or gas chromatography allows for detection and quantification of hundreds to thousands of molecules in a single measurement. Where homogenization-based sample preparation and extraction methods result in a loss of spatial information, mass spectrometry imaging technologies provide the in situ distribution profiles of metabolites and proteins within tissues. Mass spectrometry–based analysis of metabolite abundance, protein-metabolite interactions, and spatial distribution of compounds facilitates the high-throughput screening of biochemical reactions, the reconstruction of metabolic networks, biomarker discovery, determination of tissue compositions, and functional annotation of both proteins and metabolites. PMID:20701590

  14. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Identification of New Sulfonic Acid Metabolites of Chloroacetanilide Herbicides

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, M.D.; Walters, F.H.; Aga, D.S.; Thurman, E.M.; Larive, C.K.

    1997-01-01

    The detection of the sulfonic acid metabolites of the chloroacetanilide herbicides acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, propachlor, and, more recently, metolachlor in surface and ground water suggests that a common mechanism for dechlorination exists via the glutathione conjugation pathway. The identification of these herbicides and their metabolites is important due to growing public awareness and concern about pesticide levels in drinking water. Although these herbicides are regulated, little is known about the fate of their metabolites in soil. The sulfonic acid metabolites were synthesized by reaction of the parent compounds with an excess of sodium sulfite. Acetochlor, alachlor, butachlor, metolachlor, and propachlor and their sulfonic acid metabolites were studied by nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and fast atom bombardment mass spectrometry. This paper provides a direct method for the preparation and characterization of these compounds that will be useful in the analysis and study of chloracetanilide herbicides and their metabolites.

  15. Determination of AM-2201 metabolites in urine and comparison with JWH-018 abuse.

    PubMed

    Jang, Moonhee; Yang, Wonkyung; Shin, Ilchung; Choi, Hyeyoung; Chang, Hyejin; Kim, Eunmi

    2014-03-01

    With respect to the continuous emergence of new synthetic cannabinoids on the market since 2008, evaluation of the metabolism of these compounds and the development of analytical methods for the detection of these drugs including their respective metabolites in biological fluids have become essential. Other than JWH-018 or JWH-073, AM-2201 is one of the frequently identified synthetic cannabinoids in Korea. Recently, in our laboratory, several JWH-018 metabolites have been detected in some urine samples obtained from subjects who were arrested for the possession of herbal mixtures containing only AM-2201 or from those who confessed AM-2201 abuse. In the present study, we identified major urinary metabolites of AM-2201 and several metabolites of JWH-018, i.e., N-5-hydroxylated and carboxylated metabolites from rats administered AM-2201 and found that the metabolic profile in rats was similar to those in human subjects in this study. Analytical results of the urine samples from suspects who had a considerable possibility of AM-2201 or JWH-018 intake were also compared to distinguish between AM-2201 and JWH-018 abuse. The presence of 6-indole hydroxylated metabolites of each drug and N-4-hydroxy metabolite of AM-2201 was found to contribute to the decisive differences in the metabolic patterns of the two drugs. In addition, the concentration ratio of the N-(5-hydroxypentyl) metabolite to the N-(4-hydroxypentyl) metabolite of JWH-018 may be used as a criterion to differentiate between AM-2201 and JWH-018 abuse.

  16. Determination of XLR-11 and its metabolites in hair by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Park, Meejung; Yeon, Seonghoon; Lee, Jaesin; In, Sangwhan

    2015-10-10

    Analysis of drugs in hair is often used as a routine method to obtain detailed information about drug ingestion. However, few studies have been conducted on disposition of synthetic cannabinoids including cyclopropylindoles (UR-144 and XLR-11) and their metabolites in hair. XLR-11 has been widely abused in South Korea recently. Identification of metabolites in hair can be an important proof of synthetic cannabinoids use because it can exclude the possibility of passive smoke exposure. In this study, we described a quantitative analytical method of XLR-11 and its metabolites (UR-144, UR-144 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite, UR-144 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite, UR-144 N-pentanoic acid metabolite and XLR-11 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite) in hair by liquid chromatography with ESI-MS/MS. The target analytes were extracted with methanol from washed and cut hair samples and the extracts were evaporated, filtered and analyzed by LC-MS/MS with electrospray ion source in positive-ionization mode. JWH-018-d9 and JWH-018 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite-d5 were used as internal standards. Chromatographic separation was completed within 15 min. No interferences were detected in 10 blank hair samples. In intra- and inter-assay precision and accuracy study, CV (%) and bias (%) were below 12. The limit of detection (LOD) was 0.1∼2 pg/mg and the limit of quantification (LOQ) was 0.2-2 pg/mg, respectively. The validation results proved that the method was selective, accurate and precise with acceptable linearity within calibration range. No significant variation was observed by different sources of matrices. This method was applied to hair samples from 14 individual suspects of XLR-11 use. In this result, XLR-11, UR-144, UR-144 N-5-hydroxypentyl metabolite and UR-144 N-pentanoic acid metabolite, XLR-11 N-4-hydroxypentyl metabolite were detected. The concentration of XLR-11 as a parent drug was much higher than other metabolites. UR-144 N-5-hydroxy metabolite and UR-144 N-pentanoic acid

  17. The detection and characterization of analgesics and anti-inflammatory drugs on high performance thin-layer chromatography plates using tandem mass spectrometry: application to drugs and metabolites in urine.

    PubMed

    Morden, W; Wilson, I D

    1996-01-01

    The application of tandem mass spectrometry to the analysis and identification of analgesics and non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs such as paracetamol, ibuprofen and indomethacin following thin-layer chromatography (TLC) is described. TLC was combined successfully with mass spectrometry and with tandem mass spectrometry using silica gel and diol-bonded silica gel high performance TLC plates. The diol-bonded phase was found to be superior for use with biological samples and enabled the identification of paracetamol, ibuprofen and salicylhippuric acid (the major metabolite of acetylsalicylic acid) in human urine extracts following normal therapeutic doses.

  18. Toxicological significance of dihydrodiol metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, M.T.

    1982-01-01

    Dihydrodiols are often found as the major organic-extractable metabolites of various olefinic or aromatic xenobiotics in many biological samples. Studies on the chemistry of dihydrodiol metabolites have provided insight into the pharmacokinetic behavior and the mode of action of the parent compound. The toxicology of dihydrodiol is more complex than what can be deduced solely on the basis of diminished bioavailability of the epoxide precursor, and the increased hydrophilicity associated with the dihydrodiol moiety. Dihydrodiols can be intrinsically toxic and may even represent metabolically activated species. Some of the dihydrodiol metabolites may still retain sufficient lipophilic character to serve again as substrates for microsomal oxygenases. Because of the tremendous chemical and biological diversity that existed among the various dihydrodiols, more mechanistic studies are needed to examine the toxicological properties of these compounds. It may be premature to conclude dihydrodiol formation as purely a detoxification route for xenobioties.

  19. High-resolution mass spectrometry elucidates metabonate (false metabolite) formation from alkylamine drugs during in vitro metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Barbara, Joanna E; Kazmi, Faraz; Muranjan, Seema; Toren, Paul C; Parkinson, Andrew

    2012-10-01

    In vitro metabolite profiling and characterization experiments are widely employed in early drug development to support safety studies. Samples from incubations of investigational drugs with liver microsomes or hepatocytes are commonly analyzed by liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry for detection and structural elucidation of metabolites. Advanced mass spectrometers with accurate mass capabilities are becoming increasingly popular for characterization of drugs and metabolites, spurring changes in the routine workflows applied. In the present study, using a generic full-scan high-resolution data acquisition approach with a time-of-flight mass spectrometer combined with postacquisition data mining, we detected and characterized metabonates (false metabolites) in microsomal incubations of several alkylamine drugs. If a targeted approach to mass spectrometric detection (without full-scan acquisition and appropriate data mining) were employed, the metabonates may not have been detected, hence their formation underappreciated. In the absence of accurate mass data, the metabonate formation would have been incorrectly characterized because the detected metabonates manifested as direct cyanide-trapped conjugates or as cyanide-trapped metabolites formed from the parent drugs by the addition of 14 Da, the mass shift commonly associated with oxidation to yield a carbonyl. This study demonstrates that high-resolution mass spectrometry and the associated workflow is very useful for the detection and characterization of unpredicted sample components and that accurate mass data were critical to assignment of the correct metabonate structures. In addition, for drugs containing an alkylamine moiety, the results suggest that multiple negative controls and chemical trapping agents may be necessary to correctly interpret the results of in vitro experiments.

  20. Pesticide Urinary Metabolite Levels of Children in Eastern North Carolina Farmworker Households

    PubMed Central

    Arcury, Thomas A.; Grzywacz, Joseph G.; Barr, Dana B.; Tapia, Janeth; Chen, Haiying; Quandt, Sara A.

    2007-01-01

    Background In this investigation we documented the pesticide urinary metabolite levels of farmworker children in North Carolina, determined the number of different metabolites detected for each child, and delineated risk factors associated with the number of metabolites. Methods Urine samples were collected from 60 Latino farmworker children 1–6 years of age (34 female, 26 male). Interviews were completed by their mothers in Spanish. We analyzed urine samples for 14 pesticide metabolites, including the organophosphate pesticides chlorpyrifos, coumaphos, diazinon, isazaphos, malathion, pirimiphos, and parathion and its methyl counterpart; a common metabolite of at least 18 pyrethroid insecticides; the repellent DEET; and the herbicides 2,4,5-trichlorphenoxyacetic acid, 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid, acetochlor, atrazine, and metolachlor. Predictors included measures of paraoccupational, residential, and environmental exposure, child characteristics, and mother characteristics. Results Thirteen metabolites were present in the urine samples. Organophosphate pesticide metabolites were detected in a substantial proportion of children, particularly metabolites of parathion/methyl parathion (90.0%; geometric mean 1.00 μg/L), chlorpyrifos/chlorpyrifos methyl (83.3%; geometric mean 1.92 μg/L), and diazinon (55.0%; geometric mean 10.56 μg/L). The number of metabolites detected ranged from 0 to 7, with a mode of 4 detected (28.3%). Boys, children living in rented housing, and children with mothers working part-time had more metabolites detected. Conclusions Children in farmworker homes experience multiple sources of pesticide exposure. Pesticides may remain in their environments for long periods. Environmental and occupational health changes are needed to address these exposures. Research is needed with more precise measures of exposure and on the health effects of concurrent exposure to multiple pesticides. PMID:17687456

  1. Cocaine and metabolites by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Snozek, Christine L H; Bjergum, Matthew W; Langman, Loralie J

    2012-01-01

    Abuse of the stimulant cocaine (COC) is a common problem in the United States and elsewhere. The drug can be used either as the powder or as the free base (crack COC), and causes feelings of alertness and euphoria; both forms of COC are powerfully addictive. The assay described here is designed to detect and quantitate parent COC, its major metabolite benzoylecgonine, and a selection of metabolites that can provide specific information about sample validity (m-hydroxybenzoylecgonine), potential toxicity (norcocaine), route of administration (anhydroecgonine methyl ester), and co-utilization with ethanol (cocaethylene). PMID:22767110

  2. Multiresidue determination of pesticides and pesticide metabolites in soil

    SciTech Connect

    Mogadati, P.S.; Rosen, J.D.

    1995-12-31

    Methods for the multiresidue extraction, cleanup and GC/MS determination of 142 pesticides and pesticide metabolites in soil have been developed. The use of solid phase extraction cartridges makes it possible to clean up the soil sufficiently so that the equivalent of 40 mg. soil may be injected onto the GC capillary column without overloading or harming the column. Combining this clean-up method with chemical ionization ion trap detection allowed for very low limits of detection.

  3. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers.

    PubMed

    Berk, Sara A; McGettrick, Julie R; Hansen, Warren K; Breuner, Creagh W

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT.

  4. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers.

    PubMed

    Berk, Sara A; McGettrick, Julie R; Hansen, Warren K; Breuner, Creagh W

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT. PMID:27335650

  5. Methodological considerations for measuring glucocorticoid metabolites in feathers

    PubMed Central

    Berk, Sara A.; McGettrick, Julie R.; Hansen, Warren K.; Breuner, Creagh W.

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, researchers have begun to use corticosteroid metabolites in feathers (fCORT) as a metric of stress physiology in birds. However, there remain substantial questions about how to measure fCORT most accurately. Notably, small samples contain artificially high amounts of fCORT per millimetre of feather (the small sample artefact). Furthermore, it appears that fCORT is correlated with circulating plasma corticosterone only when levels are artificially elevated by the use of corticosterone implants. Here, we used several approaches to address current methodological issues with the measurement of fCORT. First, we verified that the small sample artefact exists across species and feather types. Second, we attempted to correct for this effect by increasing the amount of methanol relative to the amount of feather during extraction. We consistently detected more fCORT per millimetre or per milligram of feather in small samples than in large samples even when we adjusted methanol:feather concentrations. We also used high-performance liquid chromatography to identify hormone metabolites present in feathers and measured the reactivity of these metabolites against the most commonly used antibody for measuring fCORT. We verified that our antibody is mainly identifying corticosterone (CORT) in feathers, but other metabolites have significant cross-reactivity. Lastly, we measured faecal glucocorticoid metabolites in house sparrows and correlated these measurements with corticosteroid metabolites deposited in concurrently grown feathers; we found no correlation between faecal glucocorticoid metabolites and fCORT. We suggest that researchers should be cautious in their interpretation of fCORT in wild birds and should seek alternative validation methods to examine species-specific relationships between environmental challenges and fCORT. PMID:27335650

  6. Reactive Arrays of Colorimetric Sensors for Metabolite and Steroid Identification.

    PubMed

    Batres, Gary; Jones, Talia; Johnke, Hannah; Wilson, Mark; Holmes, Andrea E; Sikich, Sharmin

    2014-12-31

    The work described herein examines a rapid mix-and-measure method called DETECHIP suitable for screening of steroids and metabolites. The addition of steroids and metabolites to reactive arrays of colorimetric sensors generated characteristic color "fingerprints" that were used to identify the analyte. A color analysis tool was used to identify the analyte pool that now includes biologically relevant analytes. The mix-and-measure arrays allowed the detection of disease metabolites, orotic acid and argininosuccinic acid; and the steroids androsterone, 1,4-androstadiene, testosterone, stanozolol, and estrone. The steroid 1,4-androstadiene was also detected by this method while dissolved in synthetic urine. Some of the steroids, such as androstadiene, stanozolol, and androsterone were co-dissolved with (2-hydroxypropyl)-β-cyclodextrin in order to increase solubility in aqueous buffered solutions. The colorimetric arrays do not intend to eliminate ELISA or mass spectroscopy based screening, but to possibly provide an alternative analytical detection method for steroids and metabolites. PMID:25019034

  7. MetDIA: Targeted Metabolite Extraction of Multiplexed MS/MS Spectra Generated by Data-Independent Acquisition.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Cai, Yuping; Guo, Yuan; Chen, Fangfang; Zhu, Zheng-Jiang

    2016-09-01

    With recent advances in mass spectrometry, there is an increased interest in data-independent acquisition (DIA) techniques for metabolomics. With DIA technique, all metabolite ions are sequentially selected and isolated using a wide window to generate multiplexed MS/MS spectra. Therefore, DIA strategy enables a continuous and unbiased acquisition of all metabolites and increases the data dimensionality, but presents a challenge to data analysis due to the loss of the direct link between precursor ion and fragment ions. However, very few DIA data processing methods are developed for metabolomics application. Here, we developed a new DIA data analysis approach, namely, MetDIA, for targeted extraction of metabolites from multiplexed MS/MS spectra generated using DIA technique. MetDIA approach considers each metabolite in the spectral library as an analysis target. Ion chromatograms for each metabolite (both precursor ion and fragment ions) and MS(2) spectra are readily detected, extracted, and scored for metabolite identification, referred as metabolite-centric identification. A minimum metabolite-centric identification score responsible for 1% false positive rate of identification is determined as 0.8 using fully (13)C labeled biological extracts. Finally, the comparisons of our MetDIA method with data-dependent acquisition (DDA) method demonstrated that MetDIA could significantly detect more metabolites in biological samples, and is more accurate and sensitive for metabolite identifications. The MetDIA program and the metabolite spectral library is freely available on the Internet.

  8. Pesticides in ground water: Do atrazine metabolites matter?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Liu, S.; Yen, S.T.; Kolpin, D.W.

    1996-01-01

    Atrazine and atrazine-residue (atrazine + two metabolites - deethylatrazine and deisopropylatrazine) concentrations were examined to determine if consideration of these atrazine metabolites substantially adds to our understanding of the distribution of this pesticide in groundwater of the midcontinental United States. The mean of atrazine.residue concentrations was 53 percent greater than that of atrazine alone for those observations above the detection limit (> 0.05 μg/l). Furthermore, a censored regression analysis using atrazine-residue concentrations revealed significant factors not identified when only atrazine concentrations were used. Thus, knowledge of concentrations of these atrazine metabolites is required to obtain a true estimation of risk of using these aquifers as sources for drinking water, and such knowledge also provides information that ultimately may be important for future management policies designed to reduce atrazine concentrations in ground water.

  9. Supercritical fluid chromatography/mass spectrometry in metabolite analysis.

    PubMed

    Taguchi, Kaori; Fukusaki, Eiichiro; Bamba, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Supercritical fluid chromatography (SFC) owes many of its advantages to the properties of supercritical CO2, which possesses benefits as mobile phase. SFC has recently gained attention as a separation technique because it can be utilized for not only non-polar but also polar compound analysis. In addition, MS is widely adopted for SFC, and the options for MS are equivalent to liquid chromatography. Sensitive and selective detection is crucial in metabolite analysis. The SFC/MS system can be an alternative approach to liquid chromatography, as can metabolite analysis using packed-column SFC in biosamples. In this review we cover the fundamentals of SFC in combination with MS, and discuss the results of metabolite analysis using SFC/MS.

  10. Primary expectations of secondary metabolites

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Plant secondary metabolites (e.g., phenolics) are important for human health, in addition to the organoleptic properties they impart to fresh and processed foods. Consumer expectations such as appearance, taste, or texture influence their purchasing decisions. Thorough identification of phenolic com...

  11. CHARACTERIZATION OF METABOLITES IN SMALL FISH BIOFLUIDS AND TISSUES BY NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy has been utilized for assessing ecotoxicity in small fish models by means of metabolomics. Two fundamental challenges of NMR-based metabolomics are the detection limit and characterization of metabolites (or NMR resonance assignments...

  12. Toxicity of fluoranthene and its biodegradation metabolites to aquatic organisms.

    PubMed

    Sepic, Ester; Bricelj, Mihael; Leskovsek, Hermina

    2003-08-01

    The toxicity of nine stable products of the biodegradation of fluoranthene with the pure bacterial strain Pasteurella sp. IFA was studied. For their quantification, an improved analytical procedure with two-step liquid-liquid extraction, derivatisation and gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric detection was used. Growth inhibition and immobility tests for fluoranthene and its metabolites were carried out using algae (Scenedesmus subspicatus), bacteria (Pseudomonas putida) and crustaceans (Daphnia magna and Thamnocephalus platyurus). Tests using the alga S. subspicatus revealed that with the exception of 9-hydroxyfluorene, which was only four times less toxic than fluoranthene, all the other metabolites were 37 to approximately 3000 times less toxic than the parent material. P. putida cells were resistant to fluoranthene and its primary metabolites, but were inhibited by low molecular weight intermediates, especially benzoic acid. Fluoranthene was not toxic to T. Platyurus, but was toxic to D. magna. Its primary metabolites (including 9-fluorenone and 9-hydroxyfluorene) were toxic to D. magna, and a low molecular weight metabolite (2-carboxybenzaldehyde) was highly toxic to T. platyurus. PMID:12820993

  13. Concurrent quantification of tryptophan and its major metabolites.

    PubMed

    Lesniak, Wojciech G; Jyoti, Amar; Mishra, Manoj K; Louissaint, Nicolette; Romero, Roberto; Chugani, Diane C; Kannan, Sujatha; Kannan, Rangaramanujam M

    2013-12-15

    An imbalance in tryptophan (TRP) metabolites is associated with several neurological and inflammatory disorders. Therefore, analytical methods allowing for simultaneous quantification of TRP and its major metabolites would be highly desirable, and may be valuable as potential biomarkers. We have developed a HPLC method for concurrent quantitative determination of tryptophan, serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid, kynurenine, and kynurenic acid in tissue and fluids. The method utilizes the intrinsic spectroscopic properties of TRP and its metabolites that enable UV absorbance and fluorescence detection by HPLC, without additional labeling. The origin of the peaks related to analytes of interest was confirmed by UV-Vis spectral patterns using a PDA detector and mass spectrometry. The developed methods were validated in rabbit fetal brain and amniotic fluid at gestational day 29. Results are in excellent agreement with those reported in the literature for the same regions. This method allows for rapid quantification of tryptophan and four of its major metabolites concurrently. A change in the relative ratios of these metabolites can provide important insights in predicting the presence and progression of neuroinflammation in disorders such as cerebral palsy, autism, multiple sclerosis, Alzheimer disease, and schizophrenia. PMID:24036037

  14. Nontargeted Modification-Specific Metabolomics Investigation of Glycosylated Secondary Metabolites in Tea (Camellia sinensis L.) Based on Liquid Chromatography-High-Resolution Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Dai, Weidong; Tan, Junfeng; Lu, Meiling; Xie, Dongchao; Li, Pengliang; Lv, Haipeng; Zhu, Yin; Guo, Li; Zhang, Yue; Peng, Qunhua; Lin, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    Glycosylation on small molecular metabolites modulates a series of biological events in plants. However, a large number of glycosides have not been discovered and investigated using -omics approaches. Here, a general strategy named "nontargeted modification-specific metabolomics" was applied to map the glycosylation of metabolites. The key aspect of this method is to adopt in-source collision-induced dissociation to dissociate the glycosylated metabolite, causing a characteristic neutral loss pattern, which acts as an indicator for the glycosylation identification. In an exemplary application in green teas, 120 glucosylated/galactosylated, 38 rhamnosylated, 21 rutinosylated, and 23 primeverosylated metabolites were detected simultaneously. Among them, 61 glycosylated metabolites were putatively identified according to current tea metabolite databases. Thanks to the annotations of glycosyl moieties in advance, the method aids metabolite identifications. An additional 40 novel glycosylated metabolites were tentatively elucidated. This work provides a feasible strategy to discover and identify novel glycosylated metabolites in plants. PMID:27541009

  15. Bile metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in European eels Anguilla anguilla from United Kingdom estuaries.

    PubMed

    Ruddock, P J; Bird, D J; McEvoy, J; Peters, L D

    2003-01-01

    A total of 94 European eels (Anguilla anguilla) were collected from five estuaries in the UK. The deconjugated metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) in the bile of the eels were separated using HPLC. Six PAH metabolites were identified: 1-hydroxy (1-OH) metabolites of phenanthrene, pyrene and chrysene; and the 1-OH, 3-OH and 7,8 dihydrodiol metabolites of benzo[a]pyrene (BaP). The mean concentration of the six metabolites was greatest in eels from the Tyne (49 microM) followed by the Wear (33 microM), Tees (19 microM), Thames (4 microM) and Severn (2 microM) estuaries. Although 1-OH pyrene was always the dominant compound, there were significant differences (P<0.05) between sites and between estuaries for some metabolites. Normalising the molar concentration of the bile metabolites to the bile biliverdin absorbance reduced sample variation. When the metabolites identified were each expressed as a percentage of the total detected, the metabolite profile was characteristic for each estuary.

  16. Intracellular Metabolite Pool Changes in Response to Nutrient Depletion Induced Metabolic Switching in Streptomyces coelicolor.

    PubMed

    Wentzel, Alexander; Sletta, Havard; Ellingsen, Trond E; Bruheim, Per

    2012-02-17

    A metabolite profiling study of the antibiotic producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) has been performed. The aim of this study was to monitor intracellular metabolite pool changes occurring as strains of S. coelicolor react to nutrient depletion with metabolic re-modeling, so-called metabolic switching, and transition from growth to secondary metabolite production phase. Two different culture media were applied, providing depletion of the key nutrients phosphate and L-glutamate, respectively, as the triggers for metabolic switching. Targeted GC-MS and LC-MS methods were employed to quantify important primary metabolite groups like amino acids, organic acids, sugar phosphates and other phosphorylated metabolites, and nucleotides in time-course samples withdrawn from fully-controlled batch fermentations. A general decline, starting already in the early growth phase, was observed for nucleotide pools and phosphorylated metabolite pools for both the phosphate and glutamate limited cultures. The change in amino acid and organic acid pools were more scattered, especially in the phosphate limited situation while a general decrease in amino acid and non-amino organic acid pools was observed in the L-glutamate limited situation. A phoP deletion mutant showed basically the same metabolite pool changes as the wild-type strain M145 when cultivated on phosphate limited medium. This implies that the inactivation of the phoP gene has only little effect on the detected metabolite levels in the cell. The energy charge was found to be relatively constant during growth, transition and secondary metabolite production phase. The results of this study and the employed targeted metabolite profiling methodology are directly relevant for the evaluation of precursor metabolite and energy supply for both natural and heterologous production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor.

  17. Intracellular Metabolite Pool Changes in Response to Nutrient Depletion Induced Metabolic Switching in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Wentzel, Alexander; Sletta, Havard; Consortium, Stream; Ellingsen, Trond E.; Bruheim, Per

    2012-01-01

    A metabolite profiling study of the antibiotic producing bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor A3(2) has been performed. The aim of this study was to monitor intracellular metabolite pool changes occurring as strains of S. coelicolor react to nutrient depletion with metabolic re-modeling, so-called metabolic switching, and transition from growth to secondary metabolite production phase. Two different culture media were applied, providing depletion of the key nutrients phosphate and L-glutamate, respectively, as the triggers for metabolic switching. Targeted GC-MS and LC-MS methods were employed to quantify important primary metabolite groups like amino acids, organic acids, sugar phosphates and other phosphorylated metabolites, and nucleotides in time-course samples withdrawn from fully-controlled batch fermentations. A general decline, starting already in the early growth phase, was observed for nucleotide pools and phosphorylated metabolite pools for both the phosphate and glutamate limited cultures. The change in amino acid and organic acid pools were more scattered, especially in the phosphate limited situation while a general decrease in amino acid and non-amino organic acid pools was observed in the L-glutamate limited situation. A phoP deletion mutant showed basically the same metabolite pool changes as the wild-type strain M145 when cultivated on phosphate limited medium. This implies that the inactivation of the phoP gene has only little effect on the detected metabolite levels in the cell. The energy charge was found to be relatively constant during growth, transition and secondary metabolite production phase. The results of this study and the employed targeted metabolite profiling methodology are directly relevant for the evaluation of precursor metabolite and energy supply for both natural and heterologous production of secondary metabolites in S. coelicolor. PMID:24957373

  18. Extending metabolome coverage for untargeted metabolite profiling of adherent cultured hepatic cells.

    PubMed

    García-Cañaveras, Juan Carlos; López, Silvia; Castell, José Vicente; Donato, M Teresa; Lahoz, Agustín

    2016-02-01

    MS-based metabolite profiling of adherent mammalian cells comprises several challenging steps such as metabolism quenching, cell detachment, cell disruption, metabolome extraction, and metabolite measurement. In LC-MS, the final metabolome coverage is strongly determined by the separation technique and the MS conditions used. Human liver-derived cell line HepG2 was chosen as adherent mammalian cell model to evaluate the performance of several commonly used procedures in both sample processing and LC-MS analysis. In a first phase, metabolite extraction and sample analysis were optimized in a combined manner. To this end, the extraction abilities of five different solvents (or combinations) were assessed by comparing the number and the levels of the metabolites comprised in each extract. Three different chromatographic methods were selected for metabolites separation. A HILIC-based method which was set to specifically separate polar metabolites and two RP-based methods focused on lipidome and wide-ranging metabolite detection, respectively. With regard to metabolite measurement, a Q-ToF instrument operating in both ESI (+) and ESI (-) was used for unbiased extract analysis. Once metabolite extraction and analysis conditions were set up, the influence of cell harvesting on metabolome coverage was also evaluated. Therefore, different protocols for cell detachment (trypsinization or scraping) and metabolism quenching were compared. This study confirmed the inconvenience of trypsinization as a harvesting technique, and the importance of using complementary extraction solvents to extend metabolome coverage, minimizing interferences and maximizing detection, thanks to the use of dedicated analytical conditions through the combination of HILIC and RP separations. The proposed workflow allowed the detection of over 300 identified metabolites from highly polar compounds to a wide range of lipids.

  19. Tear metabolite changes in keratoconus

    PubMed Central

    Karamichos, D; Zieske, JD; Sejersen, H; Sarker-Nag, A; Asara, John M; Hjortdal, J

    2015-01-01

    While efforts have been made over the years, the exact cause of keratoconus (KC) remains unknown. The aim of this study was to identify alterations in endogenous metabolites in the tears of KC patients compared with age-matched healthy subjects. Three groups were tested: 1) Age-matched controls with no eye disease (N=15), 2) KC – patients wearing Rigid Gas permeable lenses (N=16), and 3) KC – No Correction (N=14). All samples were processed for metabolomics analysis using LC-MS/MS. We identified a total of 296 different metabolites of which >40 were significantly regulated between groups. Glycolysis and gluconeogenesis had significant changes, such as 3-phosphoglycerate and 1,3 diphopshateglycerate. As a result the citric acid cycle (TCA) was also affected with notable changes in Isocitrate, aconitate, malate, and acetylphosphate, up regulated in Group 2 and/or 3. Urea cycle was also affected, especially in Group 3 where ornithine and aspartate were up-regulated by at least 3 fold. The oxidation state was also severely affected. Groups 2 and 3 were under severe oxidative stress causing multiple metabolites to be regulated when compared to Group 1. Group 2 and 3, both showed significant down regulation in GSH-to-GSSG ratio when compared to Group 1. Another indicator of oxidative stress, the ratio of lactate – pyruvate was also affected with Groups 2 and 3 showing at least a 2-fold up regulation. Overall, our data indicate that levels of metabolites related to urea cycle, TCA cycle and oxidative stress are highly altered in KC patients. PMID:25579606

  20. Two metabolites from Aspergillus flavipes.

    PubMed

    Clark, A M; Hufford, C D; Robertson, L W

    1977-01-01

    Two novel fungal metabolites, N-benzoyl-L-phenylalaninol (1a) and asperphenamate (2) were isolated from the culture filtrate and mycelium of Aspergillus flavipes ATCC 11013. N-benzoyl-L-phenylalaninol was identified by direct comparison with an authentic sample. The structure of asperphenamate is proposed as (S)-N-benzoyl-phenylalanine-(S)-2-benzamido-3-phenyl propyl ester, based on chemical and spectroscopic evidence. PMID:875642

  1. Tracing fungi secondary metabolites in Brazil nuts using LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Freitas-Silva, Otniel; de Lourdes, Maria; de Souza, Mendes; Venãncio, Armando

    2011-08-01

    This screening aimed to evaluate quantitatively the occurrence of fungal metabolites in Brazil nuts. Nuts were collected from Agroforest production areas in Amazon basin region. A total of 235 mycotoxins (including the most prominent ones) was screened by a multi-mycotoxin method based on HPLC-MS/MS. The recovery of metabolites by the method was between 56 and 136%. Fifteen mycotoxins were detected and quantified, in at least one sample; namely, aflatoxins (AFB(1), AFB(2), AFG(1), and AFM(1)), sterigmatocystin, methyl-sterigmatocystin, kojic acid, citrinin, cyclosporin A, cyclosporin C, cyclosporin D, cyclosporin H, rugulosin, alternariol-methylether and emodin. This is the first study dealing with the detection of the latter nine metabolites in Brazil nuts. Alternariol-methylether (from 0.75 to 3.2 µg/kg) was the only metabolite detected in all analyzed samples. PMID:21722090

  2. Volatile metabolites from indoor molds grown on media containing wood constituents.

    PubMed

    Wilkins, Ken; Larsen, Kjeld; Simkus, Mirella

    2003-01-01

    Since volatile mold metabolites are used for the detection of mold growth in buildings, it was interesting to determine whether different indoor mold species show different affinity for the major components of wood, a common building material. Growth and volatile metabolites were studied when Aspergillus versicolor, Penicillium chrysogenum, and P. palitans were grown on laboratory substrates containing the major wood constituents cellulose, xylan and lignin. Microbial volatile organic compounds (MVOCs) were characterized by thermal desorption/gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. Growth and volatile metabolites varied considerably and there appeared to be complementary substrate specificities for P. chrysogenum, and P. palitans grown on cellulose and xylan. The failure of A. versicolor to produce characteristic MVOCs when grown on media containing wood constituents suggests that systems using volatile metabolites to detect microbial growth in buildings may be fundamentally unreliable for the detection of this species.

  3. Different profiles of quercetin metabolites in rat plasma: comparison of two administration methods.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yoshichika; Saito, Satomi; Nishikawa, Tomomi; Ishisaka, Akari; Murota, Kaeko; Terao, Junji

    2009-03-23

    The bioavailability of polyphenols in human and rodents has been discussed regarding their biological activity. We found different metabolite profiles of quercetin in rat plasma between two administration procedures. A single intragastric administration (50 mg/kg) resulted in the appearance of a variety of metabolites in the plasma, whereas only a major fraction was detected by free access (1% quercetin). The methylated/non-methylated metabolites ratio was much higher in the free access group. Mass spectrometric analyses showed that the fraction from free access contained highly conjugated quercetin metabolites such as sulfo-glucuronides of quercetin and methylquercetin. The metabolite profile of human plasma after an intake of onion was similar to that with intragastric administration in rats. In vitro oxidation of human low-density lipoprotein showed that methylation of the catechol moiety of quercetin significantly attenuated the antioxidative activity. These results might provide information about the bioavailability of quercetin when conducting animal experiments. PMID:19270373

  4. Different profiles of quercetin metabolites in rat plasma: comparison of two administration methods.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Yoshichika; Saito, Satomi; Nishikawa, Tomomi; Ishisaka, Akari; Murota, Kaeko; Terao, Junji

    2009-03-23

    The bioavailability of polyphenols in human and rodents has been discussed regarding their biological activity. We found different metabolite profiles of quercetin in rat plasma between two administration procedures. A single intragastric administration (50 mg/kg) resulted in the appearance of a variety of metabolites in the plasma, whereas only a major fraction was detected by free access (1% quercetin). The methylated/non-methylated metabolites ratio was much higher in the free access group. Mass spectrometric analyses showed that the fraction from free access contained highly conjugated quercetin metabolites such as sulfo-glucuronides of quercetin and methylquercetin. The metabolite profile of human plasma after an intake of onion was similar to that with intragastric administration in rats. In vitro oxidation of human low-density lipoprotein showed that methylation of the catechol moiety of quercetin significantly attenuated the antioxidative activity. These results might provide information about the bioavailability of quercetin when conducting animal experiments.

  5. The effects of GA and ABA treatments on metabolite profile of germinating barley.

    PubMed

    Huang, Yuqing; Cai, Shengguan; Ye, Lingzhen; Hu, Hongliang; Li, Chengdao; Zhang, Guoping

    2016-02-01

    Sugar degradation during grain germination is important for malt quality. In malting industry, gibberellin (GA) is frequently used for improvement of malting quality. In this study, the changes of metabolite profiles and starch-degrading enzymes during grain germination, and as affected by GA and abscisic acid (ABA) were investigated using two wild barley accessions XZ72 and XZ95. Totally fifty-two metabolites with known structures were detected and the change of metabolite during germination was time- and genotype dependent. Sugars and amino acids were the most dramatically changed compounds. Addition of GA enhanced the activities of starch-degrading enzymes, and increased most metabolites, especially sugars and amino acids, whereas ABA had the opposite effect. The effect varied with the barley accessions. The current study is the first attempt in investigating the effect of hormones on metabolite profiles in germinating barley grain, being helpful for identifying the factors affecting barley germination or malt quality. PMID:26304431

  6. Characterization of retinoyl beta-glucuronide as a minor metabolite of retinoic acid in bile.

    PubMed Central

    Zile, M H; Schnoes, H K; DeLuca, H F

    1980-01-01

    Several metabolites detected in the bile of rats given radioactive retinoic acid were separated by liquid/gel partition chromatography and purified by high-pressure liquid chromatography. One of these metabolites was found to be sensitive to beta-D-glucuronidase, yielding both 13-cis- and all-trans-retinoic acid. It had the characteristic ultraviolet absorption spectrum of retinoic acid esters. Trimethylsilyl ether and acetyl derivatives of the methylated metabolite were prepared and examined by mass spectrometry. The resulting mass spectra established the structure to be retinoyl beta-glucuronide. Retinoyl glucuronide was rapidly excreted into the bile: the excretion was complete by 12 hr after the administration of retinoic acid. At this time the metabolite represented 12% of bile radioactivity (10% of dose). These observations confirm the existence of retinoyl glucuronide but demonstrate that it represents only one of several retinoic acid metabolites in bile. PMID:6932017

  7. Metabolite

    MedlinePlus

    Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC. Cellular responses to stress and toxic insults: Adaptation, injury, and death. In: Kumar V, Abbas AK, Aster JC, eds. Robbins and Cotran Pathologic Basis of Disease . 9th ed. Philadelphia, PA: ...

  8. Can we predict the intracellular metabolic state of a cell based on extracellular metabolite data?

    PubMed

    Granucci, Ninna; Pinu, Farhana R; Han, Ting-Li; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of extracellular metabolites presents many technical advantages over the analysis of intracellular compounds, which made this approach very popular in recent years as a high-throughput tool to assess the metabolic state of microbial cells. However, very little effort has been made to determine the actual relationship between intracellular and extracellular metabolite levels. The secretion of intracellular metabolites has been traditionally interpreted as a consequence of an intracellular metabolic overflow, which is based on the premise that for a metabolite to be secreted, it must be over-produced inside the cell. Therefore, we expect to find a secreted metabolite at increased levels inside the cells. Here we present a time-series metabolomics study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing on a glucose-limited chemostat with parallel measurements of intra- and extracellular metabolites. Although most of the extracellular metabolites were also detected in the intracellular samples and showed a typical metabolic overflow behaviour, we demonstrate that the secretion of many metabolites could not be explained by the metabolic overflow theory. PMID:26400772

  9. Monitoring of propofol and its metabolite during total intravenous anesthesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elizarov, A. Yu.; Ershov, T. D.; Levshankov, A. I.

    2011-12-01

    Intravenous hypnotic propofol and its metabolite are detected in real time during total intravenous anesthesia by an electron ionization mass spectrometer. The mass spectrometer is connected directly to the breathing circuit of an apparatus for inhalational anesthesia. Ratios between the propofol concentrations in expired air and blood serum are measured. It is concluded that real-time noninvasive monitoring of the propofol concentration in blood using electron ionization mass spectrometry is feasible.

  10. Metabolites identification of bioactive licorice compounds in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Qian, Yi; Wang, Qing; Yang, Yan-Fang; Ji, Shuai; Song, Wei; Qiao, Xue; Guo, De-An; Liang, Hong; Ye, Min

    2015-11-10

    Licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis Fisch.) is one of the most popular herbal medicines worldwide. This study aims to identify the metabolites of seven representative bioactive licorice compounds in rats. These compounds include 22β-acetoxyl glycyrrhizin (1), licoflavonol (2), licoricidin (3), licoisoflavanone (4), isoglycycoumarin (5), semilicoisoflavone B (6), and 3-methoxy-9-hydroxy-pterocarpan (7). After oral administration of 250mg/kg of 1 or 40mg/kg of 2-7 to rats, a total of 16, 43 and 31 metabolites were detected in the plasma, urine and fecal samples, respectively. The metabolites were characterized by HPLC/DAD/ESI-MS(n) and LC/IT-TOF-MS analyses. Particularly, two metabolites of 1 were unambiguously identified by comparing with reference standards, and 22β-acetoxyl glycyrrhizin-6″-methyl ester (1-M2) is a new compound. Compound 1 could be readily hydrolyzed to eliminate the glucuronic acid residue. The phenolic compounds (4-7) mainly undertook phase II metabolism (glucuronidation or sulfation). Most phenolic compounds with an isoprenyl group (chain or cyclized, 2-5) could also undertake hydroxylation reaction. This is the first study on in vivo metabolism of these licorice compounds.

  11. Screening botanical extracts for quinoid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B M; Bolton, J L; van Breemen, R B

    2001-11-01

    Botanical dietary supplements represent a significant share of the growing market for alternative medicine in the USA, where current regulations do not require assessment of their safety. To help ensure the safety of such products, an in vitro assay using pulsed ultrafiltration and LC-MS-MS has been developed to screen botanical extracts for the formation of electrophilic and potentially toxic quinoid species upon bioactivation by hepatic cytochromes P450. Rat liver microsomes were trapped in a flow-through chamber by an ultrafiltration membrane, and samples containing botanical extracts, GSH and NADP(H), were flow-injected into the chamber. Botanical compounds that were metabolized to reactive intermediates formed stable GSH adducts mimicking a common in vivo detoxification pathway. If present in the ultrafiltrate, GSH conjugates were detected using LC-MS-MS with precursor ion scanning followed by additional characterization using product ion scanning and comparison to standard compounds. As expected, no GSH adducts of reactive metabolites were found in extracts of Trifolium pratense L. (red clover), which are under investigation as botanical dietary supplements for the management of menopause. However, extracts of Sassafras albidum (Nutt.) Nees (sassafras), Symphytum officinale L. (comfrey), and Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary), all of which are known to contain compounds that are either carcinogenic or toxic to mammals, produced GSH adducts during this screening assay. Several compounds that formed GSH conjugates including novel metabolites of rosmarinic acid were identified using database searching and additional LC-MS-MS studies. This assay should be useful as a preliminary toxicity screen during the development of botanical dietary supplements. A positive test suggests that additional toxicological studies are warranted before human consumption of a botanical product.

  12. Screening botanical extracts for quinoid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Johnson, B M; Bolton, J L; van Breemen, R B

    2001-11-01

    Botanical dietary supplements represent a significant share of the growing market for alternative medicine in the USA, where current regulations do not require assessment of their safety. To help ensure the safety of such products, an in vitro assay using pulsed ultrafiltration and LC-MS-MS has been developed to screen botanical extracts for the formation of electrophilic and potentially toxic quinoid species upon bioactivation by hepatic cytochromes P450. Rat liver microsomes were trapped in a flow-through chamber by an ultrafiltration membrane, and samples containing botanical extracts, GSH and NADP(H), were flow-injected into the chamber. Botanical compounds that were metabolized to reactive intermediates formed stable GSH adducts mimicking a common in vivo detoxification pathway. If present in the ultrafiltrate, GSH conjugates were detected using LC-MS-MS with precursor ion scanning followed by additional characterization using product ion scanning and comparison to standard compounds. As expected, no GSH adducts of reactive metabolites were found in extracts of Trifolium pratense L. (red clover), which are under investigation as botanical dietary supplements for the management of menopause. However, extracts of Sassafras albidum (Nutt.) Nees (sassafras), Symphytum officinale L. (comfrey), and Rosmarinus officinalis L. (rosemary), all of which are known to contain compounds that are either carcinogenic or toxic to mammals, produced GSH adducts during this screening assay. Several compounds that formed GSH conjugates including novel metabolites of rosmarinic acid were identified using database searching and additional LC-MS-MS studies. This assay should be useful as a preliminary toxicity screen during the development of botanical dietary supplements. A positive test suggests that additional toxicological studies are warranted before human consumption of a botanical product. PMID:11712913

  13. Phthalate metabolites in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) from Mediterranean coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Fourgous, C; Chevreuil, M; Alliot, F; Amilhat, E; Faliex, E; Paris-Palacios, S; Teil, M J; Goutte, A

    2016-11-01

    The levels and fate of phthalate metabolites have been poorly evaluated in fish, despite their potential ecotoxicological impacts. The present study aims to characterize the levels of phthalate metabolites in muscle tissue of yellow eels (Anguilla anguilla) from two coastal Mediterranean lagoons, during three sampling periods. Nine phthalate metabolites were detected in >70% of the samples. Slightly higher levels of phthalate metabolites were detected in March and June compared to October, suggesting possible seasonal variations in environmental release and/or phthalate metabolization process by eels. The large sample size (N=117) made it possible to explore correlations between phthalate metabolites' levels and individual parameters, such as body length, age, body condition and hepatic histo-pathologies. Body length and estimated age poorly correlated with phthalate metabolites, suggesting that eels did not accumulate phthalates during growth, contrary to persistent compounds. Eels presented different grades of hepatic fibrosis and lipidosis. A negative correlation was found between the severity of these pathologies in the liver and the sum of phthalate metabolites levels, supporting the hypothesis that eels with damaged liver are less able to metabolize xenobiotics. PMID:27412480

  14. Seed metabolomic study reveals significant metabolite variations and correlations among different soybean cultivars.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hong; Rao, Jun; Shi, Jianxin; Hu, Chaoyang; Cheng, Fang; Wilson, Zoe A; Zhang, Dabing; Quan, Sheng

    2014-09-01

    Soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr.] is one of the world's major crops, and soybean seeds are a rich and important resource for proteins and oils. While "omics" studies, such as genomics, transcriptomics, and proteomics, have been widely applied in soybean molecular research, fewer metabolomic studies have been conducted for large-scale detection of low molecular weight metabolites, especially in soybean seeds. In this study, we investigated the seed metabolomes of 29 common soybean cultivars through combined gas chromatography-mass spectrometry and ultra-performance liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry. One hundred sixty-nine named metabolites were identified and subsequently used to construct a metabolic network of mature soybean seed. Among the 169 detected metabolites, 104 were found to be significantly variable in their levels across tested cultivars. Metabolite markers that could be used to distinguish genetically related soybean cultivars were also identified, and metabolite-metabolite correlation analysis revealed some significant associations within the same or among different metabolite groups. Findings from this work may potentially provide the basis for further studies on both soybean seed metabolism and metabolic engineering to improve soybean seed quality and yield.

  15. Phthalate metabolites in the European eel (Anguilla anguilla) from Mediterranean coastal lagoons.

    PubMed

    Fourgous, C; Chevreuil, M; Alliot, F; Amilhat, E; Faliex, E; Paris-Palacios, S; Teil, M J; Goutte, A

    2016-11-01

    The levels and fate of phthalate metabolites have been poorly evaluated in fish, despite their potential ecotoxicological impacts. The present study aims to characterize the levels of phthalate metabolites in muscle tissue of yellow eels (Anguilla anguilla) from two coastal Mediterranean lagoons, during three sampling periods. Nine phthalate metabolites were detected in >70% of the samples. Slightly higher levels of phthalate metabolites were detected in March and June compared to October, suggesting possible seasonal variations in environmental release and/or phthalate metabolization process by eels. The large sample size (N=117) made it possible to explore correlations between phthalate metabolites' levels and individual parameters, such as body length, age, body condition and hepatic histo-pathologies. Body length and estimated age poorly correlated with phthalate metabolites, suggesting that eels did not accumulate phthalates during growth, contrary to persistent compounds. Eels presented different grades of hepatic fibrosis and lipidosis. A negative correlation was found between the severity of these pathologies in the liver and the sum of phthalate metabolites levels, supporting the hypothesis that eels with damaged liver are less able to metabolize xenobiotics.

  16. In Vivo and Real-time Monitoring of Secondary Metabolites of Living Organisms by Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Bin; Wang, Lei; Ye, Wen-Cai; Yao, Zhong-Ping

    2013-07-01

    Secondary metabolites are compounds that are important for the survival and propagation of animals and plants. Our current understanding on the roles and secretion mechanism of secondary metabolites is limited by the existing techniques that typically cannot provide transient and dynamic information about the metabolic processes. In this manuscript, by detecting venoms secreted by living scorpion and toad upon attack and variation of alkaloids in living Catharanthus roseus upon stimulation, which represent three different sampling methods for living organisms, we demonstrated that in vivo and real-time monitoring of secondary metabolites released from living animals and plants could be readily achieved by using field-induced direct ionization mass spectrometry.

  17. Carcinogens as Frameshift Mutagens: Metabolites and Derivatives of 2-Acetylaminofluorene and Other Aromatic Amine Carcinogens

    PubMed Central

    Ames, Bruce N.; Gurney, E. G.; Miller, James A.; Bartsch, H.

    1972-01-01

    Several carcinogenic metabolites of the carcinogen 2-acetyl-aminofluorene, especially 2-nitrosofluorene and N-hydroxy-2-aminofluorene, are potent frameshift mutagens for Salmonella typhimurium. 2-Nitrosonaphthalene, 2-nitrosophenanthrene, 4-nitroso-trans-stilbene, 4-nitrosobiphenyl, and 4-nitrosoazobenzene, all of which are metabolites or likely metabolites of carcinogenic aromatic amines, are also potent frameshift mutagens. These compounds may be frameshift mutagens of the class that intercalates into DNA and then reacts covalently with the DNA; various ultimate carcinogens may be of this type. The utility of a set of bacterial strains for detecting carcinogens as mutagens is shown. PMID:4564203

  18. An integrated strategy for in vivo metabolite profiling using high-resolution mass spectrometry based data processing techniques.

    PubMed

    Guo, Jian; Zhang, Minli; Elmore, Charles S; Vishwanathan, Karthick

    2013-05-30

    An ongoing challenge of drug metabolite profiling is to detect and identify unknown or low-level metabolites in complex biological matrices. Here we present a generic strategy for metabolite detection using multiple accurate-mass-based data processing tools via the analysis of rat samples of two model drug candidates, AZD6280 and AZ12488024. First, the function of isotopic pattern recognition was proved to be highly effective in the detection of metabolites derived from [(14)C]-AZD6280 that possesses a distinct isotopic pattern. The metabolites revealed using this approach were in excellent qualitative correlation to those observed in radiochromatograms. Second, the effectiveness of accurate mass based untargeted data mining tools such as background subtraction, mass defect filtering, or a data mining package (MZmine) used for metabolomic analysis in detection of metabolites of [(14)C]-AZ12488024 in rat urine, feces, bile and plasma samples was examined and a total of 33 metabolites of AZ12488024 were detected. Among them, at least 16 metabolites were only detected by the aid of the data mining packages and not via radiochromatograms. New metabolic pathways such as S-oxidation and thiomethylation reactions occurring on the thiazole ring were proposed based on the processed data. The results of these experiments also demonstrated that accurate mass-based mass defect filtering (MDF) and data mining techniques used in metabolomics are complementary and can be valuable tools for delineating low-level metabolites in complex matrices. Furthermore, the application of distinct multiple data-mining algorithms in parallel, or in tandem, can be effective for rapidly profiling in vivo drug metabolites.

  19. Novel rapid liquid chromatography tandem masspectrometry method for vemurafenib and metabolites in human plasma, including metabolite concentrations at steady state.

    PubMed

    Vikingsson, Svante; Strömqvist, Malin; Svedberg, Anna; Hansson, Johan; Höiom, Veronica; Gréen, Henrik

    2016-08-01

    A novel, rapid and sensitive liquid chromatography tandem-mass spectrometry method for quantification of vemurafenib in human plasma, that also for the first time allows for metabolite semi-quantification, was developed and validated to support clinical trials and therapeutic drug monitoring. Vemurafenib was analysed by precipitation with methanol followed by a 1.9 min isocratic liquid chromatography tandem masspectrometry analysis using an Acquity BEH C18 column with methanol and formic acid using isotope labelled internal standards. Analytes were detected in multireaction monitoring mode on a Xevo TQ. Semi-quantification of vemurafenib metabolites was performed using the same analytical system and sample preparation with gradient elution. The vemurafenib method was successfully validated in the range 0.5-100 μg/mL according to international guidelines. The metabolite method was partially validated owing to the lack of commercially available reference materials. For the first time concentration levels at steady state for melanoma patients treated with vemurafenib is presented. The low abundance of vemurafenib metabolites suggests that they lack clinical significance. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  20. Metabolite diversity in the plant pathogen Alternaria brassicicola: factors affecting production of brassicicolin A, depudecin, phomapyrone A and other metabolites.

    PubMed

    Pedras, M Soledade C; Park, Myung Ryeol

    2015-01-01

    A systematic investigation of the metabolites of Alternaria brassicicola produced under various culture conditions is reported. The phytotoxin brassicicolin A is produced in significantly larger amounts in potato dextrose broth than in minimal medium cultures. In general an increase in the incubation temperature of cultures 23-30 C increases the production of brassicicolin A but decreases depudecin production. Reducing or eliminating nitrate from culture media or adding ammonium chloride increases the production of brassicicolin A at 30 C, depudecin at 23 C and α-acetylorcinol at either temperature, suggesting that nitrogen represses their biosynthesis. Siderophores are detected in cultures of A. brassicicola containing low and high ferric ion concentrations. The metabolites α-acetylorcinol and tyrosol are isolated for the first time from cultures of A. brassicicola, and α-acetylorcinol is synthesized in four steps and 36% overall yield. Only brassicicolin A and no other isolated metabolites, including depudecin and phomapyrone A, display phytotoxicity on leaves of Brassica species (up to 5.0 mM). Epigenetic modifiers, 5-azacitidin (5-AZA), suberoylanilide hydroxamic acid (SAHA) and suberoyl bis-hydroxamic acid (SBHA) do not affect the metabolite profiles of liquid cultures of this fungal pathogen.

  1. Aspirin metabolites are GPR35 agonists.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huayun; Fang, Ye

    2012-07-01

    Aspirin is widely used as an anti-inflammatory, anti-platelet, anti-pyretic, and cancer-preventive agent; however, the molecular mode of action is unlikely due entirely to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases. Here, we report the agonist activity of several aspirin metabolites at GPR35, a poorly characterized orphan G protein-coupled receptor. 2,3,5-Trihydroxybenzoic acid, an aspirin catabolite, was found to be the most potent GPR35 agonist among aspirin metabolites. Salicyluric acid, the main metabolite of aspirin, was also active. These results suggest that the GPR35 agonist activity of certain aspirin metabolites may contribute to the clinical features of aspirin. PMID:22526472

  2. Untargeted MS-based small metabolite identification from the plant leaves and stems of Impatiens balsamina.

    PubMed

    Chua, Lee Suan

    2016-09-01

    The identification of plant metabolites is very important for the understanding of plant physiology including plant growth, development and defense mechanism, particularly for herbal medicinal plants. The metabolite profile could possibly be used for future drug discovery since the pharmacological activities of the indigenous herbs have been proven for centuries. An untargeted mass spectrometric approach was used to identify metabolites from the leaves and stems of Impatiens balsamina using LC-DAD-MS/MS. The putative compounds are mostly from the groups of phenolic, organic and amino acids which are essential for plant growth and as intermediates for other compounds. Alanine appeared to be the main amino acid in the plant because many alanine derived metabolites were detected. There are also several secondary metabolites from the groups of benzopyrones, benzofuranones, naphthoquinones, alkaloids and flavonoids. The widely reported bioactive components such as kaempferol, quercetin and their glycosylated, lawsone and its derivatives were detected in this study. The results also revealed that aqueous methanol could extract flavonoids better than water, and mostly, flavonoids were detected from the leaf samples. The score plots of component analysis show that there is a minor variance in the metabolite profiles of water and aqueous methanolic extracts with 21.5 and 30.5% of the total variance for the first principal component at the positive and negative ion modes, respectively. PMID:27135814

  3. Untargeted MS-based small metabolite identification from the plant leaves and stems of Impatiens balsamina.

    PubMed

    Chua, Lee Suan

    2016-09-01

    The identification of plant metabolites is very important for the understanding of plant physiology including plant growth, development and defense mechanism, particularly for herbal medicinal plants. The metabolite profile could possibly be used for future drug discovery since the pharmacological activities of the indigenous herbs have been proven for centuries. An untargeted mass spectrometric approach was used to identify metabolites from the leaves and stems of Impatiens balsamina using LC-DAD-MS/MS. The putative compounds are mostly from the groups of phenolic, organic and amino acids which are essential for plant growth and as intermediates for other compounds. Alanine appeared to be the main amino acid in the plant because many alanine derived metabolites were detected. There are also several secondary metabolites from the groups of benzopyrones, benzofuranones, naphthoquinones, alkaloids and flavonoids. The widely reported bioactive components such as kaempferol, quercetin and their glycosylated, lawsone and its derivatives were detected in this study. The results also revealed that aqueous methanol could extract flavonoids better than water, and mostly, flavonoids were detected from the leaf samples. The score plots of component analysis show that there is a minor variance in the metabolite profiles of water and aqueous methanolic extracts with 21.5 and 30.5% of the total variance for the first principal component at the positive and negative ion modes, respectively.

  4. Stable isotope coded derivatizing reagents as internal standards in metabolite profiling.

    PubMed

    Bruheim, Per; Kvitvang, Hans Fredrik Nyvold; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2013-06-28

    Gas chromatography (GC) and liquid chromatography (LC) coupled to mass spectrometric (MS) detection have become the two main techniques for the analysis of metabolite pools (i.e. Metabolomics). These technologies are especially suited for Metabolite Profiling analysis of various metabolite groups due to high separation capabilities of the chromatographs and high sensitivity of the mass analysers. The trend in quantitative Metabolite Profiling is to add more metabolites and metabolite groups in a single method. This should not be done by compromising the analytical precision. Mass spectrometric detection comes with certain limitations, especially in the quantitative aspects as standards are needed for conversion of ion abundance to concentration and ionization efficiencies are directly dependent on eluent conditions. This calls for novel strategies to counteract all variables that can influence the quantitative precision. Usually, internal standards are used to correct any technical variation. For quantitation of single or just a few analytes this can be executed with spiking isotopically labeled standards. However, for more comprehensive analytical tasks, e.g. profiling tens or hundreds of analytes simultaneously, this strategy becomes expensive and in many cases isotopically labeled standards are not available. An alternative is to introduce a derivatizing step where the sample is derivatized with naturally labeled reagent, while a standard solution is separately derivatized with isotopically labeled reagent and spiked into the sample solution prior to analysis. This strategy, named isotope coded derivatization - ICD, is attractive in the emerging field of quantitative Metabolite Profiling where current protocols can easily comprise over hundred metabolites. This review provides an overview of isotopically labeled derivatizing reagents that have been developed for important metabolite groups with the aim to improve analytical performance and precision.

  5. Synchronous fluorometric measurement of metabolites of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the bile of brown bullhead

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, E.L.C.; Cormier, S.M. . Environmental Monitoring Systems Lab.); Racine, R.N.

    1994-05-01

    A synchronous fluorescent spectroscopy (SFS) method was developed to measure pyrene-type metabolites in the bile of brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus) and to estimate the exposure of fish to PAHs in four Lake Erie tributaries collected in the spring and fall of 1990 and 1991. For comparison, fish biliary benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) metabolites were also measured by HPLC/fluorescent detection (HPLC/F). Both methods showed that concentrations of biliary PAH metabolites of fish collected in polluted rivers were significantly higher than those collected from reference rivers. Concentrations biliary metabolites of fish caught in the Black River were five to 20 times greater than those collected in Old Woman Creek by SFS and three to five times greater by HPLC/F. Fish from the Cuyahoga River had four to 24 times more biliary PAH metabolites than fish from Old Woman Creek, measured by SFS, and five to 10 times more, measured by HPLC/F. Brown bullhead from the Toussaint River had fewer PAH metabolites than fish from Old Woman Creek. Correlation analyses of the two sets of data obtained by SFS and HPLC/F showed significance by both Pearson's sample correlation and Spearman's rank correlation. This study indicates that pyrene-type metabolites determined by SFS can be used to estimate B[a]P-type metabolites in fish bile. SFS appears to be a highly sensitive method for detecting PAH metabolites and, because of its simplicity, a cost-efficient method for screening large numbers of samples for exposure to PAHs in fish.

  6. Bioanalytical methods for determination of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites: a review.

    PubMed

    Teunissen, S F; Rosing, H; Schinkel, A H; Schellens, J H M; Beijnen, J H

    2010-12-17

    The selective estrogen receptor modulator tamoxifen is used in the treatment of early and advanced breast cancer and in selected cases for breast cancer prevention in high-risk subjects. The cytochrome P450 enzyme system and flavin-containing monooxygenase are responsible for the extensive metabolism of tamoxifen into several phase I metabolites that vary in toxicity and potencies towards estrogen receptor (ER) alpha and ER beta. An extensive overview of publications on the determination of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites in biological samples is presented. In these publications techniques were used such as capillary electrophoresis, liquid, gas and thin layer chromatography coupled with various detection techniques (mass spectrometry, ultraviolet or fluorescence detection, liquid scintillation counting and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy). A trend is seen towards the use of liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS). State-of-the-art LC-MS equipment allowed for identification of unknown metabolites and quantification of known metabolites reaching lower limit of quantification levels in the sub pg mL(-1) range. Although tamoxifen is also metabolized into phase II metabolites, the number of publications reporting on phase II metabolism of tamoxifen is scarce. Therefore the focus of this review is on phase I metabolites of tamoxifen. We conclude that in the past decades tamoxifen metabolism has been studied extensively and numerous metabolites have been identified. Assays have been developed for both the identification and quantification of tamoxifen and its metabolites in an array of biological samples. This review can be used as a resource for method transfer and development of analytical methods used to support pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies of tamoxifen and its phase I metabolites. PMID:21094378

  7. Metabolomic profiling of anionic metabolites by capillary electrophoresis mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Soga, Tomoyoshi; Igarashi, Kaori; Ito, Chiharu; Mizobuchi, Katsuo; Zimmermann, Hans-Peter; Tomita, Masaru

    2009-08-01

    We describe a sheath flow capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectrometry (CE-TOFMS) method in the negative mode using a platinum electrospray ionization (ESI) spray needle, which allows the comprehensive analysis of anionic metabolites. The material of the spray needle had significant effect on the measurement of anions. A stainless steel spray needle was oxidized and corroded at the anodic electrode due to electrolysis. The precipitation of iron oxides (rust) plugged the capillary outlet, resulting in shortened capillary lifetime. Many anionic metabolites also formed complexes with the iron oxides or migrating nickel ion, which was also generated by electrolysis and moved toward the cathode (the capillary inlet). The metal-anion complex formation significantly reduced detection sensitivity of the anionic compounds. The use of a platinum ESI needle prevented both oxidation of the metals and needle corrosion. Sensitivity using the platinum needle increased from several- to 63-fold, with the largest improvements for anions exhibiting high metal chelating properties such as carboxylic acids, nucleotides, and coenzyme A compounds. The detection limits for most anions were between 0.03 and 0.87 micromol/L (0.8 and 24 fmol) at a signal-to-noise ratio of 3. This method is quantitative, sensitive, and robust, and its utility was demonstrated by the analysis of the metabolites in the central metabolic pathways extracted from mouse liver. PMID:19522513

  8. Synthetic cannabinoids: analysis and metabolites.

    PubMed

    Elsohly, Mahmoud A; Gul, Waseem; Wanas, Amira S; Radwan, Mohamed M

    2014-02-27

    Cannabimimetics (commonly referred to as synthetic cannabinoids), a group of compounds encompassing a wide range of chemical structures, have been developed by scientists with the hope of achieving selectivity toward one or the other of the cannabinoid receptors CB1 and CB2. The goal was to have compounds that could possess high therapeutic activity without many side effects. However, underground laboratories have used the information generated by the scientific community to develop these compounds for illicit use as marijuana substitutes. This chapter reviews the different classes of these "synthetic cannabinoids" with particular emphasis on the methods used for their identification in the herbal products with which they are mixed and identification of their metabolites in biological specimens.

  9. Atrazine and its metabolites as indicators of stream-aquifer interaction in Kansas, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Townsend, M.A.; Young, D.P.

    2000-01-01

    A survey of atrazine and its metabolites in Kansas ground water indicated that ground-water quality was impacted by stream-aquifer interaction between rivers in the Kansas River basin and their adjacent alluvial aquifers. Atrazine was detected in 19 of the 78 samples. The most common metabolite, deethylatrazine, was detected in 25 samples, 18 of which also had atrazine. The deethylatrazine/atrazine ratio (DAR) of < 1.0 indicates rapid movement of agricultural chemicals to ground water. In this study, 12 of 18 samples had DAR values < 1.0, suggesting rapid recharge to the aquifers. Hydroxyatrazine is seldom detected in ground water. In this study hydroxyatrazine was detected primarily in wells sited in alluvium of rivers. These rivers contain atrazine in varying concentrations. Results of the study suggest that stream-aquifer interaction is a process contributing to the presence of both atrazine and its metabolites in ground water in these areas.A survey of atrazine and its metabolites in Kansas ground water indicated that ground water quality was impacted by stream-aquifer interaction between rivers in the Kansas River basin and their adjacent alluvial aquifers. Atrazine was detected in 19 of the 78 samples. The most common metabolite, deethylatrazine, was detected in 25 samples, 18 of which also had atrazine. The deethylatrazine/attrazine ratio (DAR) of < 1.0 indicates rapid movement of agricultural chemicals to ground water. In this study, 12 of 18 samples had DAR values < 1.0, suggesting rapid recharge to the aquifers. Hydroxyatrazine is seldom detected in ground water. In this study hydroxyatrazine was detected primarily in wells sited in alluvium of rivers. These rivers contain atrazine in varying concentration. Results of the study suggest that stream-aquifer interaction is a process contributing to the presence of both attrazine and its metabolites in ground water in these areas.

  10. Gas chromatography – mass spectrometry of JWH-018 metabolites in urine samples with direct comparison to analytical standards

    PubMed Central

    Emerson, Beth; Durham, Bill; Gidden, Jennifer; Lay, Jackson O.

    2013-01-01

    JWH-018 (1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole) is one of numerous potential aminoalkylindoles contained in products marketed as ‘K2’ or ‘Spice’. Investigation of the urinary metabolites from consumption of these compounds is important because they are banned in the United States and many European countries. An efficient extraction procedure and gas chromatography – mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method were developed for detection of ‘K2’ metabolites in urine from individuals suspected of using these products. Analytical standards were used to elucidate the structure-specific mass spectral fragmentations and retention properties to confirm proposed identifications and support quantitative studies. A procedure for the synthesis of one of these metabolites (5-hydroxypentyl JWH-018) was also developed. Results are comparable to existing LC-MS/MS methods, with the same primary metabolites detected. The specific metabolite hydrolysis products include 4-hydroxpentyl, 5-hydroxypentyl, and N-pentanoic acid derivatives. PMID:23683902

  11. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry of JWH-018 metabolites in urine samples with direct comparison to analytical standards.

    PubMed

    Emerson, Beth; Durham, Bill; Gidden, Jennifer; Lay, Jackson O

    2013-06-10

    JWH-018 (1-pentyl-3-(1-naphthoyl)indole) is one of numerous potential aminoalkylindoles contained in products marketed as 'K2' or 'Spice'. Investigation of the urinary metabolites from consumption of these compounds is important because they are banned in the United States and many European countries. An efficient extraction procedure and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) method were developed for detection of 'K2' metabolites in urine from individuals suspected of using these products. Analytical standards were used to elucidate the structure-specific mass spectral fragmentations and retention properties to confirm proposed identifications and support quantitative studies. A procedure for the synthesis of one of these metabolites (5-hydroxypentyl JWH-018) was also developed. Results are comparable to existing LC-MS/MS methods, with the same primary metabolites detected. The specific metabolite hydrolysis products include 4-hydroxpentyl, 5-hydroxypentyl, and N-pentanoic acid derivatives.

  12. Structure elucidation and identification of a common metabolite for naphthoylindole-based synthetic cannabinoids using LC-TOF and comparison to a synthetic reference standard.

    PubMed

    Lovett, Dennis P; Yanes, Enrique G; Herbelin, Travis W; Knoerzer, Timm A; Levisky, Joseph A

    2013-03-10

    The identification of a predominate metabolite found in urine specimens which test positive for naphthoylindole-based synthetic cannabinoids is reported. The presence of this new metabolite was detected at the Air Force Drug Testing Lab Investigations Division during screening analysis for metabolites of JWH-018 and JWH-073, because it shares the same MRM transitions as the JWH-073 N-(3-hydroxybutyl) metabolite. However, the detected peak is chromatographically distinguished from other metabolites due to differences in retention time. This metabolite appears to be a common metabolite for select naphthoylindole-based synthetic cannabinoids that could potentially be used as a common biomarker for their qualitative and quantitative analyses. The new metabolite has been successfully identified as 3-(3-(1-naphthoyl)-1H-indol-1-yl) propanoic acid (1, JWH 072 N-propanoic acid metabolite, Fig. 1) by using various mass spectrometric and liquid chromatographic techniques as well as chemical derivatization. The metabolite identity was confirmed through the comparison of authentic positive urine and a chemically synthesized metabolite standard. Both materials shared the same chromatographic retention time on two separate chromatographic systems, mass fragmentation pattern and exact mass. Full characterization of the synthetic reference material and intermediates by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, IR and HRMS was also conducted.

  13. Electrochemical generation of selegiline metabolites coupled to mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Mielczarek, Przemyslaw; Smoluch, Marek; Kotlinska, Jolanta H; Labuz, Krzysztof; Gotszalk, Teodor; Babij, Michal; Suder, Piotr; Silberring, Jerzy

    2015-04-10

    The metabolic pathways of selegiline (a drug used for the treatment of early-stage Parkinson's disease) were analyzed by electrochemical oxidation with application of the flow electrochemical cell consisting of three electrodes (ROXY™, Antec, the Netherlands). Two types of working electrodes were applied: glassy carbon (GC) and boron-doped diamond (BDD). The potential applied at working electrode and composition of the solvent were optimized for the best conditions for oxidation and identification processes. All products were directly analyzed on-line by mass spectrometry. For further characterization of electrochemical oxidation products, the novel approach involving reversed phase chromatography linked to mass spectrometry with dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI-MS) was used. In this manuscript, we report a novel technique for simulation of drug metabolism by electrochemical system (EC) connected to liquid chromatography (LC) and dielectric barrier discharge ionization (DBDI) mass spectrometry (MS) for direct on-line detection of electrochemical oxidation products. Here, we linked LC/DBDI-MS system with an electrochemical flow cell in order to study metabolic pathways via identification of drug metabolites generated electrochemically. The DBDI source has never been used before for identification of psychoactive metabolites generated in an electrochemical flow cell. Our knowledge on the biological background of xenobiotics metabolism and its influence on human body is constantly increasing, but still many mechanisms are not explained. Nowadays, metabolism of pharmaceuticals is mainly studied using liver cells prepared from animals or humans. Cytochrome P450, present in microsomes, is primarily responsible for oxidative metabolism of xenobiotics. It was also shown, that breakdown of popular medicines may be successfully simulated by electrochemistry under appropriate conditions. The presented experiments allow for comparison of these two entirely

  14. Identification of Microbial Metabolites Elevating Vitamin Contents in Barley Seeds.

    PubMed

    Yousaf, Anam; Qadir, Abdul; Anjum, Tehmina; Ahmad, Aqeel

    2015-08-19

    The current investigation analyzes metabolites of Acetobacter aceti to explore chemical compounds responsible for the induction of vitamins in barley seeds. A bioactivity guided assay of bacterial extracts and chromatographic analyses of barley produce revealed 13 chemical compounds, which were subjected to principal component analysis (PCA). PCA determined four chemical compounds (i.e., quinolinic acid, pyridoxic acid, p-aminobenzoate, and α-oxobutanoic acid) highly associated with increased quantities of vitamins. Further experimentations confirmed that quinolinic acid and p-aminobenzoate were the most efficient vitamin inducers. The results indicated chloroform/ethanol (4:1) as the best solvent system for the extraction of active compounds from crude metabolites of A. aceti. Significant quantities of mevalonic acid were detected in the extracted fraction, indicating the possible induction of the isoprenoid pathway. Altogether, the current investigation broadens the frontiers in plant-microbe interaction.

  15. Fractionation of the secondary metabolites of orange (Citrus sinensis L.) leaves by fast centrifugal partition chromatography

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    There is interest in the detection of changes in secondary metabolites in orange leaves in response to citrus greening disease. Conventional HPLC analysis readily provides detection of major phenolic compounds, but further, more detailed chromatographic analyses show many more compounds, to an exten...

  16. Identification of alcohol-dependent clopidogrel metabolites using conventional liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Zhe-Yi; Laizure, S. Casey; Herring, Vanessa L.; Parker, Robert B.

    2014-01-01

    RATIONALE Clopidogrel (CLO) is a prodrug used to prevent ischemic events in patients undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention or with myocardial infarction. A previous study found ethyl clopidogrel (ECLO) is formed by transesterification of CLO when incubated with alcohol in human liver microsomes. We hypothesize that ECLO will be subject to further metabolism and developed an assay to identify its metabolites. METHODS A liquid chromatography/triple quadrupole mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) method was developed to identify metabolites of ECLO. According to the predicted metabolic pathway of ECLO, precursor–product ion pairs were used to screen the possible metabolites of ECLO in human liver S9 fractions. Subsequently, the detected metabolites were characterized by the results of product ion scan. RESULTS In the presence of alcohol, CLO was tranesterified to ECLO, which was further oxidized to form ethylated 2-oxo-clopidogrel and several ethylated thiol metabolites including the ethylated form of the H4 active metabolite. CONCLUSIONS The ECLO formed by transesterification with alcohol is subject to metabolism by CYP450 enzymes producing ethylated forms of 2-oxo-clopidogrel and the active H4 thiol metabolite. PMID:24760569

  17. Quantification of Water-Soluble Metabolites in Medicinal Mushrooms Using Proton NMR Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lo, Yu-Chang; Chien, Shih-Chang; Mishchuk, Darya O; Slupsky, Carolyn M; Mau, Jeng-Leun

    2016-01-01

    The water-soluble metabolites in 5 mushrooms were identified and quantified using proton nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and software for targeted metabolite detection and quantification. In total, 35 compounds were found in Agaricus brasiliensis, 25 in Taiwanofungus camphoratus, 23 in Ganoderma lucidum (Taiwan) and Lentinus edodes, and 16 in G. lucidum (China). Total amounts of all identified metabolites in A. brasiliensis, T. camphoratus, G. lucidum, G. lucidum (China), and L. edodes were 149,950.51, 12,834.18, 9,549.09, 2,788.41, and 111,726.51 mg/kg dry weight, respectively. These metabolites were categorized into 4 groups: free amino acids and derivatives, carbohydrates, carboxylic acids, and nucleosides. Carbohydrates were the most abundant metabolites among all 4 groups, with mannitol having the highest concentration among all analyzed metabolites (848-94,104 mg/kg dry weight). Principal components analysis (PCA) showed obvious distinction among the metabolites of the 5 different kinds of mushrooms analyzed in this study. Thus PCA could provide an optional analytical way of identifying and recognizing the compositions of flavor products. Furthermore, the results of this study demonstrate that NMRbased metabolomics is a powerful tool for differentiating between various medicinal mushrooms. PMID:27649603

  18. Update on hydrocodone metabolites in rats and dogs aided with a semi-automatic software for metabolite identification Mass-MetaSite.

    PubMed

    Li, Austin C; Chovan, James P; Yu, Erya; Zamora, Ismael

    2013-04-01

    1. There has been a lack of in vivo metabolite profiling update of hydrocodone since the original report on species differences was published in 1978. As such, the mechanism for its analgesic activity in different species has been ambiguous. To address safety concern from regulatory agencies, hydrocodone metabolite profiles in rats and dogs are updated herein aided by a newly developed software, Mass-MetaSite. 2. Samples collected from rats and dogs dosed orally with hydrocodone were analyzed with reversed phase liquid chromatography coupled with LTQ-Orbitrap. The exact mass measurement data collected with data-dependent acquisition methodology were analyzed both traditionally, using Xcalibur Qual Browser and MetWorks, and by Mass-MetaSite. 3. Profiling of hydrocodone metabolites in rat and dog plasma reflected previously reported species differences in circulating metabolites. While hydrocodone mainly underwent O-demethylation and ketone reduction in rats forming hydromorphone and reduced hydromorphone, which were then subsequently cleared via glucuronide conjugation, hydrocodone in dogs was cleared predominantly by N-demethylation and N-oxidation. 4. Given the success ratio of metabolite detection offered by Mass-MetaSite, the software will be able to aid chemists in early identification of drug metabolites from complex biomatrices.

  19. Complicating factors in safety testing of drug metabolites: Kinetic differences between generated and preformed metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Prueksaritanont, Thomayant . E-mail: thomayant_prueksaritanont@merck.com; Lin, Jiunn H.; Baillie, Thomas A.

    2006-12-01

    This paper aims to provide a scientifically based perspective on issues surrounding the proposed toxicology testing of synthetic drug metabolites as a means of ensuring adequate nonclinical safety evaluation of drug candidates that generate metabolites considered either to be unique to humans or are present at much higher levels in humans than in preclinical species. We put forward a number of theoretical considerations and present several specific examples where the kinetic behavior of a preformed metabolite given to animals or humans differs from that of the corresponding metabolite generated endogenously from its parent. The potential ramifications of this phenomenon are that the results of toxicity testing of the preformed metabolite may be misleading and fail to characterize the true toxicological contribution of the metabolite when formed from the parent. It is anticipated that such complications would be evident in situations where (a) differences exist in the accumulation of the preformed versus generated metabolites in specific tissues, and (b) the metabolite undergoes sequential metabolism to a downstream product that is toxic, leading to differences in tissue-specific toxicity. Owing to the complex nature of this subject, there is a need to treat drug metabolite issues in safety assessment on a case-by-case basis, in which a knowledge of metabolite kinetics is employed to validate experimental paradigms that entail administration of preformed metabolites to animal models.

  20. A new paradigm for known metabolite identification in metabonomics/metabolomics: metabolite identification efficiency.

    PubMed

    Everett, Jeremy R

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm is proposed for assessing confidence in the identification of known metabolites in metabonomics studies using NMR spectroscopy approaches. This new paradigm is based upon the analysis of the amount of metabolite identification information retrieved from NMR spectra relative to the molecular size of the metabolite. Several new indices are proposed including: metabolite identification efficiency (MIE) and metabolite identification carbon efficiency (MICE), both of which can be easily calculated. These indices, together with some guidelines, can be used to provide a better indication of known metabolite identification confidence in metabonomics studies than existing methods. Since known metabolite identification in untargeted metabonomics studies is one of the key bottlenecks facing the science currently, it is hoped that these concepts based on molecular spectroscopic informatics, will find utility in the field.

  1. A New Paradigm for Known Metabolite Identification in Metabonomics/Metabolomics: Metabolite Identification Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Everett, Jeremy R.

    2015-01-01

    A new paradigm is proposed for assessing confidence in the identification of known metabolites in metabonomics studies using NMR spectroscopy approaches. This new paradigm is based upon the analysis of the amount of metabolite identification information retrieved from NMR spectra relative to the molecular size of the metabolite. Several new indices are proposed including: metabolite identification efficiency (MIE) and metabolite identification carbon efficiency (MICE), both of which can be easily calculated. These indices, together with some guidelines, can be used to provide a better indication of known metabolite identification confidence in metabonomics studies than existing methods. Since known metabolite identification in untargeted metabonomics studies is one of the key bottlenecks facing the science currently, it is hoped that these concepts based on molecular spectroscopic informatics, will find utility in the field. PMID:25750701

  2. A new sulphate metabolite as a long-term marker of metandienone misuse.

    PubMed

    Gómez, C; Pozo, O J; Garrostas, L; Segura, J; Ventura, R

    2013-12-11

    Metandienone is one of the most frequently detected anabolic androgenic steroids in sports drug testing. Metandienone misuse is commonly detected by monitoring different metabolites excreted free or conjugated with glucuronic acid using gas chromatography mass spectrometry (GC-MS) and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) after hydrolysis with β-glucuronidase and liquid-liquid extraction. It is known that several metabolites are the result of the formation of sulphate conjugates in C17, which are converted to their 17-epimers in urine. Therefore, sulphation is an important phase II metabolic pathway of metandienone that has not been comprehensively studied. The aim of this work was to evaluate the sulphate fraction of metandienone metabolism by LC-MS/MS. Seven sulphate metabolites were detected after the analysis of excretion study samples by applying different neutral loss scan, precursor ion scan and SRM methods. One of the metabolites (M1) was identified and characterised by GC-MS/MS and LC-MS/MS as 18-nor-17β-hydroxymethyl-17α-methylandrost-1,4,13-triene-3-one sulphate. M1 could be detected up to 26 days after the administration of a single dose of metandienone (5 mg), thus improving the period in which the misuse can be reported with respect to the last long-term metandienone metabolite described (18-nor-17β-hydroxymethyl-17α-methylandrost-1,4,13-triene-3-one excreted in the glucuronide fraction). PMID:24055830

  3. PAH Metabolites in Bile of European Eel (Anguilla anguilla) from Morocco.

    PubMed

    Wariaghli, Fatima; Kammann, Ulrike; Hanel, Reinhold; Yahyaoui, Ahmed

    2015-12-01

    Environmental pollution of fish with organic contaminants is a topic of rising attention in Morocco. Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAH) are prominent organic contaminants which are rapidly metabolized in fish. Their metabolites are accumulated in the bile fluid and can be used to assess PAH exposure. The two PAH metabolites 1-hydroxypyrene and 1-hydroxyphenanthrene were quantified in European eels (Anguilla anguilla) from two Moroccan river systems by high-performance liquid chromatography with fluorescence detection. Mean values ranged from 52 to 210 ng/mL 1-hydroxypyrene and from 61 to 73 ng/mL 1-hydroxyphenanthrene. The overall concentrations of PAH metabolites in eel from Morocco appeared moderate compared to eel from European rivers and coastal sites. The present study provides first information on concentrations of PAH metabolites in fish from Morocco.

  4. Determination of tryptophan and tryptophan metabolites in grape must and wine.

    PubMed

    Hoenicke, K; Simat, T J; Steinhart, H; Christoph, N; Köhler, H J; Schwab, A

    1999-01-01

    Tryptophan (Trp) and its metabolites, especially indole-3-acetic acid (IAA), are considered as potential precursors of 2-aminoacetophenone (AAP), an aroma compound which causes the "untypical aging off-flavor" (UTA) in Vitis vinifera white wines. In this study RP-HPLC with fluorescence detection was used for the qualitative and quantitative analysis of Trp and Trp-metabolites in 39 grapes, 22 grape musts and 16 wines, to which different viticultural conditions (ripeness, pruning, strip of leaves, soil condition) have been applied. A sensitive and selective determination was achieved after solid phase extraction using an anion exchange material. Only traces of Trp-metabolites could be determined in the examined grapes and grape musts, but their amounts increased significantly during fermentation, whereas the amount of Trp decreased. Different viticultural measures, besides the time of grape harvest, showed no significant influences on the amount of Trp and Trp-metabolites.

  5. A guide to the identification of metabolites in NMR-based metabonomics/metabolomics experiments

    PubMed Central

    Dona, Anthony C.; Kyriakides, Michael; Scott, Flora; Shephard, Elizabeth A.; Varshavi, Dorsa; Veselkov, Kirill; Everett, Jeremy R.

    2016-01-01

    Metabonomics/metabolomics is an important science for the understanding of biological systems and the prediction of their behaviour, through the profiling of metabolites. Two technologies are routinely used in order to analyse metabolite profiles in biological fluids: nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy and mass spectrometry (MS), the latter typically with hyphenation to a chromatography system such as liquid chromatography (LC), in a configuration known as LC–MS. With both NMR and MS-based detection technologies, the identification of the metabolites in the biological sample remains a significant obstacle and bottleneck. This article provides guidance on methods for metabolite identification in biological fluids using NMR spectroscopy, and is illustrated with examples from recent studies on mice. PMID:27087910

  6. The metabolism of biphenyl. V. Phenolic metabolites in some marine organisms.

    PubMed

    Meyer, T; Bakke, T

    1977-02-01

    The phenolic metabolites of biphenyl in the crustacean Cirolana borealis LILJEBORG (ISOPODA), the gastropod Buccinum undatum L and the ophiuroid Ophiocomina nigra ABILDGAARD have been analysed qualitatively and semi-quantitatively as trimethylsilyl (TMS) ethers by combined gas chromatography/mass spectrometry and gas chromatography, respectively. The findings demonstrate the in vivo metabolic capacity of these organisms to convert biphenyl into its hydroxylated derivatives. Thus, 2-hydroxybiphenyl is the most prominent metabolite detected in all these experiments, which also showed that minor amounts of the 4-hydroxy and 4,4'-dihydroxy metabolites are formed. Metabolites of biphenyl origin are found both in the sea water from the aquaria and in the tissue of the respective marine organisms. The experiments, moreover, indicate a slow metabolism of biphenyl in C. borealis, B. undatum and O. nigra, between which no qualitative metabolic differences are found.

  7. Human hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-99 are glucuronidated and sulfated in vitro.

    PubMed

    Erratico, Claudio; Zheng, Xiaobo; Ryden, Andreas; Marsh, Goran; Maho, Walid; Covaci, Adrian

    2015-07-16

    Polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs) were used worldwide as additive flame retardants and are classified as persistent, bioaccumulable and toxic environmental pollutants. In humans, the hydroxylated metabolites of 2,2',4,4'-tetrabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-47) and 2,2',4,4',5-pentabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-99) formed in vitro have also been detected in vivo. To further characterize the metabolism of BDE-47 and BDE-99 and to identify candidate markers for monitoring the human exposure to PBDEs using non-invasive approaches, glucuronidation and sulfation of hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-99 were investigated using human liver microsomes and cytoplasm, respectively. The formed Phase II metabolites were analyzed by liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry using a novel approach to develop analytical methods in absence of authentic standards. All available standards for hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-99 were glucuronidated and sulfated, showing that glucuronidation and sulfation are part of the metabolism pathway of BDE-47 and BDE-99 in vitro. The major glucuronidated and sulfated analogs of hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-47 were (a) 2,4-DBP-Gluc and 5-Gluc-BDE-47, and (b) 2'-Sulf-BDE-28, 4-Sulf-BDE-42 and 3-Sulf-BDE-47, respectively. The major glucuronidated and sulfated analogs of hydroxylated metabolites of BDE-99 were (a) 2,4,5-TBP-Gluc and 6'-Gluc-BDE-99, and (b) 3'-Sulf-BDE-99 and 5'-Sulf-BDE-99, respectively. Apparent Km values associated with the formation of sulfated metabolites of BDE-47 and BDE-99 were ten times lower than those of the corresponding glucuronidated metabolites, suggesting that sulfated rather than glucuronidated metabolites of OH-PBDEs might be used as markers of human exposure to PBDEs using a non-invasive approach based on urine sample collection. PMID:25956475

  8. Widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in 24 Minnesota rivers and wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Writer, Jeffrey H; Ferrer, Imma; Barber, Larry B; Thurman, E Michael

    2013-09-01

    Concentrations of 17 neuro-active pharmaceuticals and their major metabolites (bupropion, hydroxy-bupropion, erythro-hydrobupropion, threo-hydrobupropion, carbamazepine, 10,11,-dihydro-10,11,-dihydroxycarbamazepine, 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine, citalopram, N-desmethyl-citalopram, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, 2-N-glucuronide-lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine), were measured in treated wastewater and receiving surface waters from 24 locations across Minnesota, USA. The analysis of upstream and downstream sampling sites indicated that the wastewater treatment plants were the major source of the neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites in surface waters of Minnesota. Concentrations of parent compound and the associated metabolite varied substantially between treatment plants (concentrations±standard deviation of the parent compound relative to its major metabolite) as illustrated by the following examples; bupropion and hydrobupropion 700±1000 ng L(-1), 2100±1700 ng L(-1), carbamazepine and 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine 480±380 ng L(-1), 360±400 ng L(-1), venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine 1400±1300 ng L(-1), 1800±2300 ng L(-1). Metabolites of the neuro-active compounds were commonly found at higher or comparable concentrations to the parent compounds in wastewater effluent and the receiving surface water. Neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites were detected only sporadically in samples upstream from the effluent outfall. Metabolite to parent ratios were used to evaluate transformation, and we determined that ratios in wastewater were much lower than those reported in urine, indicating that the metabolites are relatively more labile than the parent compounds in the treatment plants and in receiving waters. The widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in Minnesota effluents and surface waters indicate that this is likely a global environmental issue

  9. Highly sensitive simultaneous quantification of estrogenic tamoxifen metabolites and steroid hormones by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Johänning, Janina; Heinkele, Georg; Precht, Jana C; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eichelbaum, Michel; Schwab, Matthias; Schroth, Werner; Mürdter, Thomas E

    2015-09-01

    Tamoxifen is a mainstay in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and is metabolized to more than 30 different compounds. Little is known about in vivo concentrations of estrogenic metabolites E-metabolite E, Z-metabolite E, and bisphenol and their relevance for tamoxifen efficacy. Therefore, we developed a highly sensitive HPLC-ESI-MS/MS quantification method for tamoxifen metabolites bisphenol, E-metabolite E, and Z-metabolite E as well as for the sex steroid hormones estradiol, estrone, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone. Plasma samples were subjected to protein precipitation followed by solid phase extraction. Upon derivatization with 3-[(N-succinimide-1-yl)oxycarbonyl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide, all analytes were separated on a sub-2-μm column with a gradient of acetonitrile in water with 0.1 % of formic acid. Analytes were detected on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer with positive electrospray ionization in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. Our method demonstrated high sensitivity, accuracy, and precision. The lower limits of quantification were 12, 8, and 25 pM for bisphenol, E-metabolite E, and Z-metabolite E, respectively, and 4 pM for estradiol and estrogen, 50 pM for testosterone and androstenedione, and 25 pM for progesterone. The method was applied to plasma samples of postmenopausal patients taken at baseline and under tamoxifen therapy. Graphical Abstract Sample preparation and derivatization for highly sensitive quantification of estrogenic tamoxifen metabolites and steroid hormones by HPLC-MS/MS.

  10. Fecal cortisol metabolite analysis for noninvasive monitoring of adrenocortical function in the cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus).

    PubMed

    Terio, K A; Citino, S B; Brown, J L

    1999-12-01

    A radioimmunoassay was validated for quantifying excreted cortisol metabolites in cheetah (Acinonyx jubatus) feces. High-performance liquid chromatography analysis indicated that immunoreactivity was associated with a water-soluble metabolite in fecal extracts from males and females. None of the immunoreactivity corresponded with free cortisol or corticosterone but rather was associated with a more polar, unidentified metabolite. To determine the biologic relevance of excreted immunoreactive cortisol metabolites, cheetahs were exposed to a variety of situations anticipated to increase cortisol secretion. First, to assess acute changes in adrenal activity, adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH; 400 IU i.m.) was administered to two adult males and two adult females. Pre-ACTH baseline serum cortisol and fecal cortisol metabolite concentrations varied among individuals. Serum cortisol concentrations were elevated above baseline within 10 min of ACTH injection, followed by corresponding increases in fecal cortisol metabolite concentrations (690-4,194% above baseline) 48 hr later in three of four cheetahs. In the fourth cheetah, a smaller increase (334% above baseline) in fecal cortisol metabolite excretion was observed 96 hr after ACTH injection. Seven cheetah females also were subjected to a variety of potentially stressful manipulations, including immobilization, translocation, and introduction to a male to assess the ability of this technique to detect physiologic changes in adrenal activity. Increased fecal corticoid metabolite excretion was observed 24-72 hr after exposure to these exogenous stressors. Results indicate that adrenocortical activity can be monitored noninvasively in the cheetah through analysis of these metabolites. This technique could be valuable for evaluating, and thus optimizing, environmental and management conditions and for investigating the role of stress in disease pathogenesis and the usually poor reproductive performance of this species in

  11. Widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in 24 Minnesota rivers and wastewaters.

    PubMed

    Writer, Jeffrey H; Ferrer, Imma; Barber, Larry B; Thurman, E Michael

    2013-09-01

    Concentrations of 17 neuro-active pharmaceuticals and their major metabolites (bupropion, hydroxy-bupropion, erythro-hydrobupropion, threo-hydrobupropion, carbamazepine, 10,11,-dihydro-10,11,-dihydroxycarbamazepine, 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine, citalopram, N-desmethyl-citalopram, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, 2-N-glucuronide-lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine), were measured in treated wastewater and receiving surface waters from 24 locations across Minnesota, USA. The analysis of upstream and downstream sampling sites indicated that the wastewater treatment plants were the major source of the neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites in surface waters of Minnesota. Concentrations of parent compound and the associated metabolite varied substantially between treatment plants (concentrations±standard deviation of the parent compound relative to its major metabolite) as illustrated by the following examples; bupropion and hydrobupropion 700±1000 ng L(-1), 2100±1700 ng L(-1), carbamazepine and 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine 480±380 ng L(-1), 360±400 ng L(-1), venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine 1400±1300 ng L(-1), 1800±2300 ng L(-1). Metabolites of the neuro-active compounds were commonly found at higher or comparable concentrations to the parent compounds in wastewater effluent and the receiving surface water. Neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites were detected only sporadically in samples upstream from the effluent outfall. Metabolite to parent ratios were used to evaluate transformation, and we determined that ratios in wastewater were much lower than those reported in urine, indicating that the metabolites are relatively more labile than the parent compounds in the treatment plants and in receiving waters. The widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in Minnesota effluents and surface waters indicate that this is likely a global environmental issue

  12. Temperament type specific metabolite profiles of the prefrontal cortex and serum in cattle.

    PubMed

    Brand, Bodo; Hadlich, Frieder; Brandt, Bettina; Schauer, Nicolas; Graunke, Katharina L; Langbein, Jan; Repsilber, Dirk; Ponsuksili, Siriluk; Schwerin, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade the number of studies investigating temperament in farm animals has increased greatly because temperament has been shown not only to affect handling but also reproduction, health and economically important production traits. However, molecular pathways underlying temperament and molecular pathways linking temperament to production traits, health and reproduction have yet to be studied in full detail. Here we report the results of metabolite profiling of the prefrontal cortex and serum of cattle with distinct temperament types that were performed to further explore their molecular divergence in the response to the slaughter procedure and to identify new targets for further research of cattle temperament. By performing an untargeted comprehensive metabolite profiling, 627 and 1097 metabolite features comprising 235 and 328 metabolites could be detected in the prefrontal cortex and serum, respectively. In total, 54 prefrontal cortex and 51 serum metabolite features were indicated to have a high relevance in the classification of temperament types by a sparse partial least square discriminant analysis. A clear discrimination between fearful/neophobic-alert, interested-stressed, subdued/uninterested-calm and outgoing/neophilic-alert temperament types could be observed based on the abundance of the identified relevant prefrontal cortex and serum metabolites. Metabolites with high relevance in the classification of temperament types revealed that the main differences between temperament types in the response to the slaughter procedure were related to the abundance of glycerophospholipids, fatty acyls and sterol lipids. Differences in the abundance of metabolites related to C21 steroid metabolism and oxidative stress indicated that the differences in the metabolite profiles of the four extreme temperament types could be the result of a temperament type specific regulation of molecular pathways that are known to be involved in the stress and fear response.

  13. Highly sensitive simultaneous quantification of estrogenic tamoxifen metabolites and steroid hormones by LC-MS/MS.

    PubMed

    Johänning, Janina; Heinkele, Georg; Precht, Jana C; Brauch, Hiltrud; Eichelbaum, Michel; Schwab, Matthias; Schroth, Werner; Mürdter, Thomas E

    2015-09-01

    Tamoxifen is a mainstay in the treatment of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer and is metabolized to more than 30 different compounds. Little is known about in vivo concentrations of estrogenic metabolites E-metabolite E, Z-metabolite E, and bisphenol and their relevance for tamoxifen efficacy. Therefore, we developed a highly sensitive HPLC-ESI-MS/MS quantification method for tamoxifen metabolites bisphenol, E-metabolite E, and Z-metabolite E as well as for the sex steroid hormones estradiol, estrone, testosterone, androstenedione, and progesterone. Plasma samples were subjected to protein precipitation followed by solid phase extraction. Upon derivatization with 3-[(N-succinimide-1-yl)oxycarbonyl]-1-methylpyridinium iodide, all analytes were separated on a sub-2-μm column with a gradient of acetonitrile in water with 0.1 % of formic acid. Analytes were detected on a triple-quadrupole mass spectrometer with positive electrospray ionization in the multiple reaction monitoring mode. Our method demonstrated high sensitivity, accuracy, and precision. The lower limits of quantification were 12, 8, and 25 pM for bisphenol, E-metabolite E, and Z-metabolite E, respectively, and 4 pM for estradiol and estrogen, 50 pM for testosterone and androstenedione, and 25 pM for progesterone. The method was applied to plasma samples of postmenopausal patients taken at baseline and under tamoxifen therapy. Graphical Abstract Sample preparation and derivatization for highly sensitive quantification of estrogenic tamoxifen metabolites and steroid hormones by HPLC-MS/MS. PMID:26206706

  14. Temperament Type Specific Metabolite Profiles of the Prefrontal Cortex and Serum in Cattle

    PubMed Central

    Brand, Bodo; Hadlich, Frieder; Brandt, Bettina; Schauer, Nicolas; Graunke, Katharina L.; Langbein, Jan; Repsilber, Dirk; Ponsuksili, Siriluk; Schwerin, Manfred

    2015-01-01

    In the past decade the number of studies investigating temperament in farm animals has increased greatly because temperament has been shown not only to affect handling but also reproduction, health and economically important production traits. However, molecular pathways underlying temperament and molecular pathways linking temperament to production traits, health and reproduction have yet to be studied in full detail. Here we report the results of metabolite profiling of the prefrontal cortex and serum of cattle with distinct temperament types that were performed to further explore their molecular divergence in the response to the slaughter procedure and to identify new targets for further research of cattle temperament. By performing an untargeted comprehensive metabolite profiling, 627 and 1097 metabolite features comprising 235 and 328 metabolites could be detected in the prefrontal cortex and serum, respectively. In total, 54 prefrontal cortex and 51 serum metabolite features were indicated to have a high relevance in the classification of temperament types by a sparse partial least square discriminant analysis. A clear discrimination between fearful/neophobic-alert, interested-stressed, subdued/uninterested-calm and outgoing/neophilic-alert temperament types could be observed based on the abundance of the identified relevant prefrontal cortex and serum metabolites. Metabolites with high relevance in the classification of temperament types revealed that the main differences between temperament types in the response to the slaughter procedure were related to the abundance of glycerophospholipids, fatty acyls and sterol lipids. Differences in the abundance of metabolites related to C21 steroid metabolism and oxidative stress indicated that the differences in the metabolite profiles of the four extreme temperament types could be the result of a temperament type specific regulation of molecular pathways that are known to be involved in the stress and fear response

  15. Accuracy investigation of phthalate metabolite standards.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Éric; Leblanc, Alain; Simard, Yves; Thellen, Claude

    2012-05-01

    Phthalates are ubiquitous compounds whose metabolites are usually determined in urine for biomonitoring studies. Following suspect and unexplained results from our laboratory in an external quality-assessment scheme, we investigated the accuracy of all phthalate metabolite standards in our possession by comparing them with those of several suppliers. Our findings suggest that commercial phthalate metabolite certified solutions are not always accurate and that lot-to-lot discrepancies significantly affect the accuracy of the results obtained with several of these standards. These observations indicate that the reliability of the results obtained from different lots of standards is not equal, which reduces the possibility of intra-laboratory and inter-laboratory comparisons of results. However, agreements of accuracy have been observed for a majority of neat standards obtained from different suppliers, which indicates that a solution to this issue is available. Data accuracy of phthalate metabolites should be of concern for laboratories performing phthalate metabolite analysis because of the standards used. The results of our investigation are presented from the perspective that laboratories performing phthalate metabolite analysis can obtain accurate and comparable results in the future. Our findings will contribute to improving the quality of future phthalate metabolite analyses and will affect the interpretation of past results.

  16. Application of mass spectrometry for metabolite identification.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shuguang; Chowdhury, Swapan K; Alton, Kevin B

    2006-06-01

    Metabolism studies play a pivotal role in drug discovery and development. Characterization of metabolic "hot-spots" as well as reactive and pharmacologically active metabolites is critical to designing new drug candidates with improved metabolic stability, toxicological profile and efficacy. Metabolite identification in the preclinical species used for safety evaluation is required in order to determine whether human metabolites have been adequately tested during non-clinical safety assessment. From an instrumental standpoint, high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) coupled with mass spectrometry (MS) dominates all analytical tools used for metabolite identification. The general strategies employed for metabolite identification in both drug discovery and drug development settings together with sample preparation techniques are reviewed herein. These include a discussion of the various ionization methods, mass analyzers, and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) techniques that are used for structural characterization in a modern drug metabolism laboratory. Mass spectrometry-based techniques, such as stable isotope labeling, on-line H/D exchange, accurate mass measurement to enhance metabolite identification and recent improvements in data acquisition and processing for accelerating metabolite identification are also described. Rounding out this review, we offer additional thoughts about the potential of alternative and less frequently used techniques such as LC-NMR/MS, CRIMS and ICPMS. PMID:16787159

  17. Discriminating precursors of common fragments for large-scale metabolite profiling by triple quadrupole mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Nikolskiy, Igor; Siuzdak, Gary; Patti, Gary J.

    2015-01-01

    Motivation: The goal of large-scale metabolite profiling is to compare the relative concentrations of as many metabolites extracted from biological samples as possible. This is typically accomplished by measuring the abundances of thousands of ions with high-resolution and high mass accuracy mass spectrometers. Although the data from these instruments provide a comprehensive fingerprint of each sample, identifying the structures of the thousands of detected ions is still challenging and time intensive. An alternative, less-comprehensive approach is to use triple quadrupole (QqQ) mass spectrometry to analyze predetermined sets of metabolites (typically fewer than several hundred). This is done using authentic standards to develop QqQ experiments that specifically detect only the targeted metabolites, with the advantage that the need for ion identification after profiling is eliminated. Results: Here, we propose a framework to extend the application of QqQ mass spectrometers to large-scale metabolite profiling. We aim to provide a foundation for designing QqQ multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) experiments for each of the 82 696 metabolites in the METLIN metabolite database. First, we identify common fragmentation products from the experimental fragmentation data in METLIN. Then, we model the likelihoods of each precursor structure in METLIN producing each common fragmentation product. With these likelihood estimates, we select ensembles of common fragmentation products that minimize our uncertainty about metabolite identities. We demonstrate encouraging performance and, based on our results, we suggest how our method can be integrated with future work to develop large-scale MRM experiments. Availability and implementation: Our predictions, Supplementary results, and the code for estimating likelihoods and selecting ensembles of fragmentation reactions are made available on the lab website at http://pattilab.wustl.edu/FragPred. Contact: gjpattij

  18. Quantitation of the niacin metabolites 1-methylnicotinamide and l-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide in random spot urine samples, by ion-pairing reverse-phase HPLC with UV detection, and the implications for the use of spot urine samples in the assessment of niacin status.

    PubMed

    Creeke, Paul I; Seal, Andrew J

    2005-03-25

    A simple ion-pairing reverse-phase HPLC method, with UV diode array detection, was developed and validated for quantitation of the urinary niacin metabolites 1-methylnicotinamide and l-methyl-2-pyridone-5-carboxamide in a single run. Urine samples were purified using a polymer-based mixed mode anion exchange reverse-phase cartridge. Analysis was performed on a reverse-phase C18 column, using a methanol gradient elution system, containing phosphate buffer pH 7.0, 1-heptanesulphonic acid as the ion-pairing agent and trimethylamine as a modifier. The assay was applied to the measurement of the niacin status of two subjects using spot urine samples. The samples were collected over 4 consecutive days and at four time points during 1 day. Status, expressed as the concentration ratios (2-PYR or 1-MN)/creatinine and 2-PYR/l-MN, varied within and between days and was least for fasting samples. This work illustrates the potential of spot urine sampling for niacin status assessment, but highlights the need for further validation prior to its use in field nutritional surveys.

  19. NMR metabolomics profiling of blood plasma mimics shows that medium- and long-chain fatty acids differently release metabolites from human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jupin, M.; Michiels, P. J.; Girard, F. C.; Spraul, M.; Wijmenga, S. S.

    2014-02-01

    Metabolite profiling by NMR of body fluids is increasingly used to successfully differentiate patients from healthy individuals. Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters of body biochemistry. However, in blood plasma the NMR-detected free-metabolite concentrations are also strongly affected by interactions with the abundant plasma proteins, which have as of yet not been considered much in metabolic profiling. We previously reported that many of the common NMR-detected metabolites in blood plasma bind to human serum albumin (HSA) and many are released by fatty acids present in fatted HSA. HSA is the most abundant plasma protein and main transporter of endogenous and exogenous metabolites. Here, we show by NMR how the two most common fatty acids (FAs) in blood plasma - the long-chain FA, stearate (C18:0) and medium-chain FA, myristate (C14:0) - affect metabolite-HSA interaction. Of the set of 18 common NMR-detected metabolites, many are released by stearate and/or myristate, lactate appearing the most strongly affected. Myristate, but not stearate, reduces HSA-binding of phenylalanine and pyruvate. Citrate signals were NMR invisible in the presence of HSA. Only at high myristate-HSA mole ratios 11:1, is citrate sufficiently released to be detected. Finally, we find that limited dilution of blood-plasma mimics releases HSA-bound metabolites, a finding confirmed in real blood plasma samples. Based on these findings, we provide recommendations for NMR experiments for quantitative metabolite profiling.

  20. Secondary metabolites from Rubiaceae species.

    PubMed

    Martins, Daiane; Nunez, Cecilia Veronica

    2015-07-22

    This study describes some characteristics of the Rubiaceae family pertaining to the occurrence and distribution of secondary metabolites in the main genera of this family. It reports the review of phytochemical studies addressing all species of Rubiaceae, published between 1990 and 2014. Iridoids, anthraquinones, triterpenes, indole alkaloids as well as other varying alkaloid subclasses, have shown to be the most common. These compounds have been mostly isolated from the genera Uncaria, Psychotria, Hedyotis, Ophiorrhiza and Morinda. The occurrence and distribution of iridoids, alkaloids and anthraquinones point out their chemotaxonomic correlation among tribes and subfamilies. From an evolutionary point of view, Rubioideae is the most ancient subfamily, followed by Ixoroideae and finally Cinchonoideae. The chemical biosynthetic pathway, which is not so specific in Rubioideae, can explain this and large amounts of both iridoids and indole alkaloids are produced. In Ixoroideae, the most active biosysthetic pathway is the one that produces iridoids; while in Cinchonoideae, it produces indole alkaloids together with other alkaloids. The chemical biosynthetic pathway now supports this botanical conclusion.

  1. Metabolism and metabolites of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs)

    PubMed Central

    Grimm, FA; Hu, D; Kania-Korwel, I; Lehmler, HJ; Ludewig, G; Hornbuckle, KC; Duffel, MW; Bergman, A; Robertson, LW

    2015-01-01

    The metabolism of polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) is complex and has an impact on toxicity and thereby assessment of PCB risks. A large number of reactive and stable metabolites are formed in the processes of biotransformation in biota in general and in humans in particular. The aim of this document is to provide an overview of PCB metabolism and to identify metabolites of concern and their occurrence. Emphasis is given to mammalian metabolism of PCBs and their hydroxyl, methylsulfonyl, and sulfated metabolites, especially those that persist in human blood. Potential intracellular targets and health risks are also discussed. PMID:25629923

  2. Methodology for the analysis of fenbendazole and its metabolites in plasma, urine, feces, and tissue homogenates.

    PubMed

    Barker, S A; Hsieh, L C; Short, C R

    1986-05-15

    New methodology for the extraction and analysis of the anthelmintic fenbendazole and its metabolites from plasma, urine, liver homogenates, and feces from several animal species is presented. Quantitation of fenbendazole and its metabolites was conducted by high-pressure liquid chromatography using ultraviolet detection at 290 nm. The combined extraction and analysis procedures give excellent recoveries in all of the different biological matrices examined. High specificity, low limits of detection, and excellent linearity, accuracy, and inter- and intrasample variability were also obtained. The study of fenbendazole pharmacokinetics in vitro and in vivo should be greatly enhanced through the utilization of these methods.

  3. Two-dimensional liquid chromatography/mass spectrometry/mass spectrometry separation of water-soluble metabolites.

    PubMed

    Fairchild, Jacob N; Horvath, Krisztian; Gooding, Jessica R; Campagna, Shawn R; Guiochon, Georges

    2010-12-24

    Off-line two-dimensional liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry detection (2D-LC/MS-MS) was used to separate a set of metabolomic species. Water-soluble metabolites were extracted from Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisae cultures and were immediately analyzed using strong cation exchange (SCX)-hydrophilic interaction chromatography (HILIC). Metabolite mixtures are well-suited for multidimensional chromatography as the range of components varies widely with respect to polarity and chemical makeup. Some currently used methods employ two different separations for the detection of positively and negatively ionized metabolites by mass spectrometry. Here we developed a single set of chromatographic conditions for both ionization modes and were able to detect a total of 141 extracted metabolite species, with an overall peak capacity of ca. 2500. We show that a single two-dimensional separation method is sufficient and practical when a pair or more of unidimensional separations are used in metabolomics. PMID:21094946

  4. The profiling and identification of the metabolites of (+)-catechin and study on their distribution in rats by HPLC-DAD-ESI-IT-TOF-MS(n) technique.

    PubMed

    Liang, Jing; Xu, Feng; Zhang, Ya-Zhou; Zang, Xin-Yu; Wang, Dan; Shang, Ming-Ying; Wang, Xuan; Chui, De-Hua; Cai, Shao-Qing

    2014-03-01

    (+)-Catechin, a potential beneficial compound to human health, is widely distributed in plants and foods. A high-performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector and combined with electrospray ionization ion trap time-of-flight multistage mass spectrometry method was applied to profile and identify the metabolites of (+)-catechin in rats and to study the distribution of these metabolites in rat organs for the first time. In total, 51 phase II metabolites (44 new) and three phase I metabolites were tentatively identified, comprising 16 (+)-catechin conjugates, 14 diarylpropan-2-ol metabolites, 6 phenyl valerolactone metabolites and 18 aromatic acid metabolites. Further, 19 phase II metabolites were new compounds. The in vivo metabolic reactions of (+)-catechin in rats were found to be ring-cleavage, sulfation, glucuronidation, methylation, dehydroxylation and dehydrogenation. The numbers of detected metabolites in urine, plasma, small intestine, kidney, liver, lung, heart, brain and spleen were 53, 23, 27, 9, 7, 5, 3, 2 and 1, respectively. This indicated that small intestine, kidney and liver were the major organs for the distribution of (+)-catechin metabolites. In addition, eight metabolites were found to possess bioactivities according to literature. These results are very helpful for better comprehension of the in vivo metabolism of (+)-catechin and its pharmacological actions, and also can give strong indications on the effective forms of (+)-catechin in vivo. PMID:24105958

  5. Disposition of xenobiotic chemicals and metabolites in marine organisms

    SciTech Connect

    Varanasi, U.; Stein, J.E. )

    1991-01-01

    Studies with several bottom fish species from urban waterways show that of the identified xenobiotic chemicals in bottom sediments, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the most strongly associated with the prevalence of liver lesions, including neoplasms. Accordingly, there is concern about the transfer of contaminants, such as PAHs, from aquatic species to humans. Because PAHs exert their toxicity only after being biotransformed, increasing attention has been focused on the ability of aquatic organisms to metabolize these chemicals. Overall, the results of both laboratory and field studies show that generally low levels of a few low molecular weight PAHs may be present in edible tissue of fish from contaminated areas and that high molecular weight PAHs, such as the carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene, will rarely be detected because of extensive metabolism. Additionally, the results from a few studies suggest that even though interactions between xenobiotics can affect both biochemical and physiological systems to alter the disposition of PAHs in fish, these interactions do not markedly change the relative proportions of metabolites to parent PAH in tissues. Thus, these studies clearly demonstrate that to obtain some insight into the questions of whether there is any risk to human health from consuming fish and crustaceans from urban areas, techniques must be developed that measure metabolites of carcinogens, such as PAHs, in edible tissue. Initial attempts may focus on semiquantitative methods that permit rapid assessment of the level of metabolites in edible tissues of fish and crustaceans from many urban areas. Based on information from such screening studies, further refinement in methodology leading to identification of specific compounds may be needed because certain metabolites may not be as toxic or carcinogenic as others.

  6. Sol-gel SELEX circumventing chemical conjugation of low molecular weight metabolites discovers aptamers selective to xanthine.

    PubMed

    Bae, Hyunjung; Ren, Shuo; Kang, Jeehye; Kim, Minjung; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Jin, Moonsoo M; Min, Irene M; Kim, Soyoun

    2013-12-01

    Sensitive detection of the metabolites indicative of a particular disease contributes to improved therapy outcomes. Developing binding reagents for detection of low molecular weight metabolites is hampered by the difficulty with immobilization of targets through appropriate covalent chemical linkage while ensuring that selected reagents retain specificity to unmodified metabolites. To circumvent chemical modification of targets, we employed sol-gel droplets deposited onto a porous silicon chip to entrap a purine metabolite, xanthine, which was found at lower levels in urine samples from patients with non-Hodgkin lymphoma. By sol-gel SELEX (systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment) against xanthine, specific aptamers (KD ∼ 10 μM) with sensitivity of detection at as low as 1 μM were isolated, which bound to other purine metabolites at more than 100-fold lower affinity. In contrast, we failed to isolate xanthine-specific aptamers when SELEX was performed against xanthine covalently linked to polymer resin. This study demonstrates that the sol-gel platform for entrapping low molecular weight metabolites without chemical modifications can be utilized for SELEX to discover aptamers against clinical metabolite markers for diagnosis application.

  7. LC-MS/MS-based metabolites of Eurycoma longifolia (Tongkat Ali) in Malaysia (Perak and Pahang).

    PubMed

    Chua, Lee Suan; Amin, Nor Amaiza Mohd; Neo, Jason Chun Hong; Lee, Ting Hun; Lee, Chew Tin; Sarmidi, Mohamad Roji; Aziz, Ramlan Abdul

    2011-12-15

    A number of three LC-MS/MS hybrid systems (QTof, TripleTof and QTrap) has been used to profile small metabolites (m/z 100-1000) and to detect the targeted metabolites such as quassinoids, alkaloids, triterpene and biphenylneolignans from the aqueous extracts of Eurycoma longifolia. The metabolite profiles of small molecules showed four significant clusters in the principle component analysis for the aqueous extracts of E. longifolia, which had been collected from different geographical terrains (Perak and Pahang) and processed at different extraction temperatures (35°C and 100°C). A small peptide of leucine (m/z 679) and a new hydroxyl methyl β-carboline propionic acid have been identified to differentiate E. longifolia extracts that prepared at 35°C and 100°C, respectively. From the targeted metabolites identification, it was found that 3,4ɛ-dihydroeurycomanone (quassinoids) and eurylene (squalene-type triterpene) could only be detected in the Pahang extract, whereas canthin-6-one-3N-oxide could only be detected in the Perak extract. Overall, quassinoids were present in the highest concentration, particularly eurycomanone and its derivatives compared to the other groups of metabolites. However, the concentration of canthin-6-one and β-carboline alkaloids was significantly increased when the roots of the plant samples were extracted at 100°C. PMID:22119436

  8. Trichoderma secondary metabolites that affect plant metabolism.

    PubMed

    Vinale, Francesco; Sivasithamparam, Krishnapillai; Ghisalberti, Emilio L; Ruocco, Michelina; Wood, Sheridan; Lorito, Matteo

    2012-11-01

    Recently, there have been many exciting new developments relating to the use of Trichoderma spp. as agents for biocontrol of pathogens and as plant growth promoters. Several mechanisms have been proposed to explain the positive effects of these microorganisms on the plant host. One factor that contributes to their beneficial biological activities is related to the wide variety of metabolites that they produce. These metabolites have been found not only to directly inhibit the growth and pathogenic activities of the parasites, but also to increase disease resistance by triggering the system of defence in the plant host. In addition, these metabolites are also capable of enhancing plant growth, which enables the plant to counteract the disease with compensatory vegetative growth by the augmented production of root and shoot systems. This review takes into account the Trichoderma secondary metabolites that affect plant metabolism and that may play an important role in the complex interactions of this biocontrol agent with the plant and pathogens.

  9. Isoprenoid and metabolite profiling of plant trichomes.

    PubMed

    Balcke, Gerd U; Bennewitz, Stefan; Zabel, Sebastian; Tissier, Alain

    2014-01-01

    Plant glandular trichomes are specialized secretory structures located on the surface of the aerial parts of plants with large biosynthetic capacity, often with terpenoids as output molecules. The collection of plant trichomes requires a method to separate trichomes from leaf epidermal tissues. For metabolite profiling, trichome tissue needs to be rapidly quenched in order to maintain the indigenous state of intracellular intermediates. Appropriate extraction and chromatographic separation methods must be available, which address the wide-ranging polarity of metabolites. In this chapter, a protocol for trichome harvest using a frozen paint brush is presented. A work flow for broad-range metabolite profiling using LC-MS(2) analysis is described, which is applicable to assess very hydrophilic isoprenoid precursors as well as more hydrophobic metabolites from trichomes and other plant tissues. PMID:24777798

  10. Cellular toxicity of nicotinamide metabolites.

    PubMed

    Rutkowski, Bolesław; Rutkowski, Przemysław; Słomińska, Ewa; Smolenski, Ryszard T; Swierczyński, Julian

    2012-01-01

    There are almost 100 different substances called uremic toxins. Nicotinamide derivatives are known as new family of uremic toxins. These uremic compounds play a role in an increased oxidative stress and disturbances in cellular repair processes by inhibiting poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase activity. New members of this family were discovered and described. Their toxic properties were a subject of recent studies. This study evaluated the concentration of 4-pyridone-3-carboxamid-1-β-ribonucleoside-triphosphate (4PYTP) and 4-pyridone-3-carboxamid-1-β-ribonucleoside-monophosphate (4PYMP) in erythrocytes of patients with chronic renal failure. Serum and red blood cells were collected from chronic renal failure patients on conservative treatment, those treated with hemodialysis, and at different times from those who underwent kidney transplantation. Healthy volunteers served as a control group. Nicotinamide metabolites were determined using liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry based on originally discovered and described method. Three novel compounds were described: 4-pyridone-3-carboxamid-1-β-ribonucleoside (4PYR), 4PYMP, and 4PYTP. 4PYR concentration was elevated in the serum, whereas 4PYMP and 4PYTP concentrations were augmented in erythrocytes of dialysis patients. Interestingly, concentrations of these compounds were less elevated during the treatment with erythropoietin-stimulating agents (ESAs). After successful kidney transplantation, concentrations of 4PYR and 4PYMP normalized according to the graft function, whereas that of 4PYTP was still elevated. During the incubation of erythrocytes in the presence of 4PYR, concentration of 4PYMP rose very rapidly while that of 4PYTP increased slowly. Therefore, we hypothesized that 4PYR, as a toxic compound, was actively absorbed by erythrocytes and metabolized to the 4PYMP and 4PYTP, which may interfere with function and life span of these cells. PMID:22200423

  11. Blood metabolites during basketball competitions.

    PubMed

    Ben Abdelkrim, Nidhal; Castagna, Carlo; El Fazaa, Saloua; Tabka, Zouhaier; El Ati, Jalila

    2009-05-01

    This study examined basketball game blood hormonal and metabolite responses in 38 (8 guards, 18 forwards, and 12 centers) male national elite-junior players (age, 18.2 +/- 0.5 years; height, 1.89 +/- 0.1 m; body mass, 80.3 +/- 6.7 kg; body fat, 8.2 +/- 5.6%; maximum oxygen uptake Vo2max], 52.8 +/- 2.4 mlxkgxmin). At the moment of the investigation, players had 8 +/- 1.6 years of competitive experience. Blood samples were collected at the beginning, at halftime, and at fulltime of 6 junior competitive games (Tunisian under 19 basketball championship). Game intensity was assessed monitoring heart rates (HR). During the game, players attained 93 +/- 2% of maximal HR. Triglycerides (TG) and free fatty acids (FFA) concentrations significantly increased during the game, most markedly so in the second half. Postgame TG and FFA concentrations were significantly (p < 0.05 and p < 0.001, respectively) lower for guards (1.48 +/- 0.22 and 0.88 +/- 0.14 mmolxL, respectively) than for centers (1.88 +/- 0.30 and 1.08 +/- 0.09 mmolxL, respectively). Plasma glucose significantly increased at halftime (from 4.05 +/- 1.27 to 5.98 +/- 0.88 mmolxL; p < 0.001) but decreased in the second half. Serum insulin (INS) progressively decreased for all players during the game, whereas serum cortisol increased at the end of the first half (from 333 +/- 129 to 487 +/- 209 nmolxL; p < 0.001) to remain increased throughout the second half.Basketball game demands seem to induce significant metabolic-hormonal changes on players. Higher values of HR and glycemia were observed in the first half, but a more important increase of lipolytic variables was recorded in the second half. Changes in metabolic markers are role-dependent.

  12. Flux balance analysis accounting for metabolite dilution.

    PubMed

    Benyamini, Tomer; Folger, Ori; Ruppin, Eytan; Shlomi, Tomer

    2010-01-01

    Flux balance analysis is a common method for predicting steady-state flux distributions within metabolic networks, accounting for the growth demand for the synthesis of a predefined set of essential biomass precursors. Ignoring the growth demand for the synthesis of intermediate metabolites required for balancing their dilution leads flux balance analysis to false predictions in some cases. Here, we present metabolite dilution flux balance analysis, which addresses this problem, resulting in improved metabolic phenotype predictions. PMID:20398381

  13. The significance of lichens and their metabolites.

    PubMed

    Huneck, S

    1999-12-01

    Lichens, symbiontic organisms of fungi and algae, synthesize numerous metabolites, the "lichen substances," which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic, and terpenic compounds. Lichens and their metabolites have a manifold biological activity: antiviral, antibiotic, antitumor, allergenic, plant growth inhibitory, antiherbivore, and enzyme inhibitory. Usnic acid, a very active lichen substance is used in pharmaceutical preparations. Large amounts of Pseudevernia furfuracea and Evernia prunastri are processed in the perfume industry, and some lichens are sensitive reagents for the evaluation of air pollution.

  14. The Significance of Lichens and Their Metabolites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huneck, S.

    Lichens, symbiontic organisms of fungi and algae, synthesize numerous metabolites, the "lichen substances," which comprise aliphatic, cycloaliphatic, aromatic, and terpenic compounds. Lichens and their metabolites have a manifold biological activity: antiviral, antibiotic, antitumor, allergenic, plant growth inhibitory, antiherbivore, and enzyme inhibitory. Usnic acid, a very active lichen substance is used in pharmaceutical preparations. Large amounts of Pseudevernia furfuracea and Evernia prunastri are processed in the perfume industry, and some lichens are sensitive reagents for the evaluation of air pollution.

  15. Secondary metabolites in bryophytes: an ecological aspect.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chun-Feng; Lou, Hong-Xiang

    2009-03-01

    Bryophytes frequently grow in an unfavorable environment as the earliest land plants, and inevitably biosynthesize secondary metabolites against biotic or abiotic stress. They not only defend against the plant competition, microbial attack, and insect or animal predation, but also function in UV protection, drought tolerance, and freezing survival. This review covers the ecological aspect of secondary metabolites in bryophytes and is taxonomically presented according to the ecological significances.

  16. Flux balance analysis accounting for metabolite dilution.

    PubMed

    Benyamini, Tomer; Folger, Ori; Ruppin, Eytan; Shlomi, Tomer

    2010-01-01

    Flux balance analysis is a common method for predicting steady-state flux distributions within metabolic networks, accounting for the growth demand for the synthesis of a predefined set of essential biomass precursors. Ignoring the growth demand for the synthesis of intermediate metabolites required for balancing their dilution leads flux balance analysis to false predictions in some cases. Here, we present metabolite dilution flux balance analysis, which addresses this problem, resulting in improved metabolic phenotype predictions.

  17. Quantitation of drug metabolites in the absence of pure metabolite standards by high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a chemiluminescence nitrogen detector and mass spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Deng, Yuzhong; Wu, Jing-Tao; Zhang, Hongwei; Olah, Timothy V

    2004-01-01

    Quantitative information on drug metabolites with pharmacological or toxicological activities is of great interest during the drug discovery and development process. Because the analyte response with mass spectrometry can change significantly due to small variations in chemical structure, pure standards are required to construct standard curves for quantitation. However, for most programs at the discovery stage, pure metabolite standards are not available. In this work, an evaluation was conducted using a chemiluminescent nitrogen detector (CLND) as a calibrator to obtain the response factor ratio on a mass spectrometer generated from a metabolite and its parent compound in biological fluids. Using the response factor ratio obtained from the CLND, the metabolite could be quantified with the liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) response obtained from the parent drug's standard curve. For this evaluation, oxazepam and temazepam were chosen as a 'drug/metabolite' pair. Temazepam was treated as the methylated metabolite of oxazepam. A spiked dog urine sample with a known concentration of oxazepam and unknown concentration of temazepam was injected onto the HPLC system and detected by both the CLND and MS/MS. Taking advantage of the equimolar response feature of the CLND, a response factor ratio between temazepam and oxazepam on the mass spectrometer was obtained by comparing the peak areas generated on the CLND and the mass spectrometer. From this ratio, temazepam was quantified using the oxazepam standard curve. The difference between the concentration of temazepam obtained from the reconstructed standard curve and the concentration obtained directly from a real temazepam standard curve was within 13% except the least concentrated standard (31%). This methodology has been successfully applied to measure quantities of the metabolite of a proprietary compound in a dog pharmacokinetic (PK) study.

  18. Modules of co-regulated metabolites in turmeric (Curcuma longa) rhizome suggest the existence of biosynthetic modules in plant specialized metabolism.

    PubMed

    Xie, Zhengzhi; Ma, Xiaoqiang; Gang, David R

    2009-01-01

    Turmeric is an excellent example of a plant that produces large numbers of metabolites from diverse metabolic pathways or networks. It is hypothesized that these metabolic pathways or networks contain biosynthetic modules, which lead to the formation of metabolite modules-groups of metabolites whose production is co-regulated and biosynthetically linked. To test whether such co-regulated metabolite modules do exist in this plant, metabolic profiling analysis was performed on turmeric rhizome samples that were collected from 16 different growth and development treatments, which had significant impacts on the levels of 249 volatile and non-volatile metabolites that were detected. Importantly, one of the many co-regulated metabolite modules that were indeed readily detected in this analysis contained the three major curcuminoids, whereas many other structurally related diarylheptanoids belonged to separate metabolite modules, as did groups of terpenoids. The existence of these co-regulated metabolite modules supported the hypothesis that the 3-methoxyl groups on the aromatic rings of the curcuminoids are formed before the formation of the heptanoid backbone during the biosynthesis of curcumin and also suggested the involvement of multiple polyketide synthases with different substrate selectivities in the formation of the array of diarylheptanoids detected in turmeric. Similar conclusions about terpenoid biosynthesis could also be made. Thus, discovery and analysis of metabolite modules can be a powerful predictive tool in efforts to understand metabolism in plants.

  19. Metabolism of methyleugenol in liver microsomes and primary hepatocytes: pattern of metabolites, cytotoxicity, and DNA-adduct formation.

    PubMed

    Cartus, Alexander T; Herrmann, Kristin; Weishaupt, Lucas W; Merz, Karl-Heinz; Engst, Wolfram; Glatt, Hansruedi; Schrenk, Dieter

    2012-09-01

    Methyleugenol (1) is a constituent of many foods, in particular of herbal spices, and is used as flavoring agent in foodstuffs and as fragrance in cosmetics. 1 has been found to be carcinogenic in rodents, its metabolite, 1-hydroxymethyleugenol (2) acting as proximate DNA-binding carcinogen. We incubated 1 with liver microsomes of rat, bovine, and human origin. We found 2, 3-hydroxymethylisoeugenol (3), and 6-hydroxymethyleugenol (4) as major metabolites, and 1-oxomethyleugenol (5), 3-oxomethylisoeugenol (6), eugenol (9), chavibetol (11), and (RS)-2,3-dihydroxy-2,3-dihydromethyleugenol (7) as minor metabolites. Methyleugenol-2,3-epoxide (8), probably the precursor of 7, could not be detected. Incubations with synthetic metabolites were applied in order to uncover metabolic pathways. Incubations with primary rat hepatocytes revealed mainly nonconjugated 2 and conjugated 4, and minor amounts of partly conjugated 7 and conjugated 9 + 11. The "reactive metabolites" 3, 5, 6, and 8 were not detectable, possibly due to rapid reaction with cellular macromolecules. The highest cytotoxicity (resazurin reduction assay and lactate dehydrogenase leakage assay) was observed for the main metabolite 2 and its secondary metabolite 5 with EC(50) values of 50 and 10 µM, respectively. Deoxyadenosine or deoxyguanosine adducts were formed by incubating 1 or metabolites with rat hepatocytes. The rank order of adduct formation was 2 > 1 > 3 > 6, whereas 4, 5, and 8 were inactive. In conclusion, we present a virtually complete pattern of microsomal (rat, bovine, and human) and hepatocellular (rat) metabolites of 1 suggesting the formation of several reactive metabolites possibly involved in carcinogenicity, organ toxicity, and immune reactions.

  20. Bacterial dynamics and metabolite changes in solid-state acetic acid fermentation of Shanxi aged vinegar.

    PubMed

    Li, Sha; Li, Pan; Liu, Xiong; Luo, Lixin; Lin, Weifeng

    2016-05-01

    Solid-state acetic acid fermentation (AAF), a natural or semi-controlled fermentation process driven by reproducible microbial communities, is an important technique to produce traditional Chinese cereal vinegars. Highly complex microbial communities and metabolites are involved in traditional Chinese solid-state AAF, but the association between microbiota and metabolites during this process are still poorly understood. In this study, we performed amplicon 16S rRNA gene sequencing on the Illumina MiSeq platform, PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis, and metabolite analysis to trace the bacterial dynamics and metabolite changes under AAF process. A succession of bacterial assemblages was observed during the AAF process. Lactobacillales dominated all the stages. However, Acetobacter species in Rhodospirillales were considerably accelerated during AAF until the end of fermentation. Quantitative PCR results indicated that the biomass of total bacteria showed a "system microbe self-domestication" process in the first 3 days, and then peaked at the seventh day before gradually decreasing until the end of AAF. Moreover, a total of 88 metabolites, including 8 organic acids, 16 free amino acids, and 66 aroma compounds were detected during AAF. Principal component analysis and cluster analyses revealed the high correlation between the dynamics of bacterial community and metabolites.

  1. Metabolomics reveals significant variations in metabolites and correlations regarding the maturation of walnuts (Juglans regia L.)

    PubMed Central

    Rao, Guodong; Sui, Jinkai

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The content of walnut metabolites is related to its nutritive value and physiological characteristics, however, comprehensive information concerning the metabolome of walnut kernels is limited. In this study we analyzed the metabolites of walnut kernels at five developmental stages from filling to ripening using GC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics; of a total 252 peaks identified, 85 metabolites were positively identified. Further statistical analysis revealed that these 85 metabolites covered different types of metabolism pathways. PCA scores revealed that the metabolic compositions of the embryo are different at each stage, while the metabolic composition of the endotesta could not be significantly separated into distinct groups. Additionally, 7225 metabolite-metabolite correlations were detected in walnut kernel by a Pearson correlation coefficient approach; during screening of the calculated correlations, 463 and 1047 were determined to be significant with r2≥0.49 and had a false discovery rate (FDR) ≤0.05 in endotesta and embryo, respectively. This work provides the first comprehensive metabolomic study of walnut kernels and reveals that most of the carbohydrate and protein-derived carbon was transferred into other compounds, such as fatty acids, during the maturation of walnuts, which may potentially provide the basis for further studies on walnut kernel metabolism. PMID:27215321

  2. Elucidation of Drug Metabolite Structural Isomers Using Molecular Modeling Coupled with Ion Mobility Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Reading, Eamonn; Munoz-Muriedas, Jordi; Roberts, Andrew D; Dear, Gordon J; Robinson, Carol V; Beaumont, Claire

    2016-02-16

    Ion mobility-mass spectrometry (IM-MS) in combination with molecular modeling offers the potential for small molecule structural isomer identification by measurement of their gas phase collision cross sections (CCSs). Successful application of this approach to drug metabolite identification would facilitate resource reduction, including animal usage, and may benefit other areas of pharmaceutical structural characterization including impurity profiling and degradation chemistry. However, the conformational behavior of drug molecules and their metabolites in the gas phase is poorly understood. Here the gas phase conformational space of drug and drug-like molecules has been investigated as well as the influence of protonation and adduct formation on the conformations of drug metabolite structural isomers. The use of CCSs, measured from IM-MS and molecular modeling information, for the structural identification of drug metabolites has also been critically assessed. Detection of structural isomers of drug metabolites using IM-MS is demonstrated and, in addition, a molecular modeling approach has been developed offering rapid conformational searching and energy assessment of candidate structures which agree with experimental CCSs. Here it is illustrated that isomers must possess markedly dissimilar CCS values for structural differentiation, the existence and extent of CCS differences being ionization state and molecule dependent. The results present that IM-MS and molecular modeling can inform on the identity of drug metabolites and highlight the limitations of this approach in differentiating structural isomers. PMID:26752623

  3. Changes in cerebral metabolites in obstructive sleep apnea: a systemic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yunyan; Fu, Yiqun; Xu, Huajun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is associated with changes in cerebral metabolites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Several studies have used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to detect variations in cerebral metabolites; however, the results have been inconsistent. This meta-analysis summarizes the differences in cerebral metabolites between patients with OSA and controls. Two electronic databases, PubMed and Embase, were searched for articles (published before March 31, 2016) describing studies that used MRS to evaluate the cerebral metabolite changes. The overall effects were measured using the weighted mean difference with a 95% confidence interval. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were used to explore the sources of between-study heterogeneity and the stability of the results. Publication bias was also evaluated. Thirteen studies were ultimately included. In the hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine ratio was lower in patients with OSA. In the frontal lobe, only the NAA/choline ratio was lower in patients with OSA. Cerebral metabolites are significantly altered in the hippocampus in patients with OSA. Further clinical studies are needed to explore the underlying mechanisms between OSA and the changes in cerebral metabolites in the brain. PMID:27349417

  4. Piceatannol and its metabolite, isorhapontigenin, induce SIRT1 expression in THP-1 human monocytic cell line.

    PubMed

    Kawakami, Shinpei; Kinoshita, Yosuke; Maruki-Uchida, Hiroko; Yanae, Koji; Sai, Masahiko; Ito, Tatsuhiko

    2014-11-01

    Piceatannol is a phytochemical that is present in large amounts in passion fruit (Passiflora edulis) seeds, and is an analog of resveratrol. Recently, the absorption and metabolism of piceatannol were investigated in rats, and isorhapontigenin, O-methyl piceatannol, was detected as a piceatannol metabolite in rat plasma. To elucidate the function of piceatannol and its metabolites, we investigated the expression of sirtuin 1 (SIRT1) in THP-1 monocytic cells after treatment with piceatannol and its metabolites, and compared their effects with those of resveratrol and its metabolites. Piceatannol and resveratrol upregulated the expression levels of SIRT1 mRNA and SIRT1 protein. An extract of passion fruit seeds, which contained high levels of piceatannol, also upregulated SIRT1 mRNA expression. As for the metabolites, isorhapontigenin upregulated SIRT1 mRNA expression, whereas resveratrol glucuronides and sulfate did not affect SIRT1 expression. These findings indicate that after intake of piceatannol, not only piceatannol itself, but also its metabolite, isorhapontigenin, contributed to the upregulation of SIRT1 expression. PMID:25360511

  5. Integrating Multiple Analytical Datasets to Compare Metabolite Profiles of Mouse Colonic-Cecal Contents and Feces

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Huawei; Grapov, Dmitry; Jackson, Matthew I.; Fahrmann, Johannes; Fiehn, Oliver; Combs, Gerald F.

    2015-01-01

    The pattern of metabolites produced by the gut microbiome comprises a phenotype indicative of the means by which that microbiome affects the gut. We characterized that phenotype in mice by conducting metabolomic analyses of the colonic-cecal contents, comparing that to the metabolite patterns of feces in order to determine the suitability of fecal specimens as proxies for assessing the metabolic impact of the gut microbiome. We detected a total of 270 low molecular weight metabolites in colonic-cecal contents and feces by gas chromatograph, time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography, quadrapole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF). Of that number, 251 (93%) were present in both types of specimen, representing almost all known biochemical pathways related to the amino acid, carbohydrate, energy, lipid, membrane transport, nucleotide, genetic information processing, and cancer-related metabolism. A total of 115 metabolites differed significantly in relative abundance between both colonic-cecal contents and feces. These data comprise the first characterization of relationships among metabolites present in the colonic-cecal contents and feces in a healthy mouse model, and shows that feces can be a useful proxy for assessing the pattern of metabolites to which the colonic mucosum is exposed. PMID:26378591

  6. Integrating Multiple Analytical Datasets to Compare Metabolite Profiles of Mouse Colonic-Cecal Contents and Feces.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Huawei; Grapov, Dmitry; Jackson, Matthew I; Fahrmann, Johannes; Fiehn, Oliver; Combs, Gerald F

    2015-09-11

    The pattern of metabolites produced by the gut microbiome comprises a phenotype indicative of the means by which that microbiome affects the gut. We characterized that phenotype in mice by conducting metabolomic analyses of the colonic-cecal contents, comparing that to the metabolite patterns of feces in order to determine the suitability of fecal specimens as proxies for assessing the metabolic impact of the gut microbiome. We detected a total of 270 low molecular weight metabolites in colonic-cecal contents and feces by gas chromatograph, time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF) and ultra-high performance liquid chromatography, quadrapole time-of-flight mass spectrometry (UPLC-Q-TOF). Of that number, 251 (93%) were present in both types of specimen, representing almost all known biochemical pathways related to the amino acid, carbohydrate, energy, lipid, membrane transport, nucleotide, genetic information processing, and cancer-related metabolism. A total of 115 metabolites differed significantly in relative abundance between both colonic-cecal contents and feces. These data comprise the first characterization of relationships among metabolites present in the colonic-cecal contents and feces in a healthy mouse model, and shows that feces can be a useful proxy for assessing the pattern of metabolites to which the colonic mucosum is exposed.

  7. Genome-wide association study identifies novel genetic variants contributing to variation in blood metabolite levels

    PubMed Central

    Kobl, Michael; Jansen, Rick; Petersen, Ann-Kristin; Vaarhorst, Anika A.M.; Yet, Idil; Haller, Toomas; Demirkan, Ayşe; Esko, Tõnu; Zhu, Gu; Böhringer, Stefan; Beekman, Marian; van Klinken, Jan Bert; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Prehn, Cornelia; Adamski, Jerzy; de Craen, Anton J.M.; van Leeuwen, Elisabeth M.; Amin, Najaf; Dharuri, Harish; Westra, Harm-Jan; Franke, Lude; de Geus, Eco J.C.; Hottenga, Jouke Jan; Willemsen, Gonneke; Henders, Anjali K.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Nyholt, Dale R.; Whitfield, John B.; Penninx, Brenda W.; Spector, Tim D.; Metspalu, Andres; Slagboom, P. Eline; van Dijk, Ko Willems; ‘t Hoen, Peter A.C.; Strauch, Konstantin; Martin, Nicholas G.; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Illig, Thomas; Bell, Jordana T.; Mangino, Massimo; Suhre, Karsten; McCarthy, Mark I.; Gieger, Christian; Isaacs, Aaron; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Boomsma, Dorret I.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolites are small molecules involved in cellular metabolism, which can be detected in biological samples using metabolomic techniques. Here we present the results of genome-wide association and meta-analyses for variation in the blood serum levels of 129 metabolites as measured by the Biocrates metabolomic platform. In a discovery sample of 7,478 individuals of European descent, we find 4,068 genome- and metabolome-wide significant (Z-test, P < 1.09 × 10−9) associations between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and metabolites, involving 59 independent SNPs and 85 metabolites. Five of the fifty-nine independent SNPs are new for serum metabolite levels, and were followed-up for replication in an independent sample (N=1,182). The novel SNPs are located in or near genes encoding metabolite transporter proteins or enzymes (SLC22A16, ARG1, AGPS and ACSL1) that have demonstrated biomedical or pharmaceutical importance. The further characterization of genetic influences on metabolic phenotypes is important for progress in biological and medical research. PMID:26068415

  8. Metabolomics reveals significant variations in metabolites and correlations regarding the maturation of walnuts (Juglans regia L.).

    PubMed

    Rao, Guodong; Sui, Jinkai; Zhang, Jianguo

    2016-06-15

    The content of walnut metabolites is related to its nutritive value and physiological characteristics, however, comprehensive information concerning the metabolome of walnut kernels is limited. In this study we analyzed the metabolites of walnut kernels at five developmental stages from filling to ripening using GC-MS-based untargeted metabolomics; of a total 252 peaks identified, 85 metabolites were positively identified. Further statistical analysis revealed that these 85 metabolites covered different types of metabolism pathways. PCA scores revealed that the metabolic compositions of the embryo are different at each stage, while the metabolic composition of the endotesta could not be significantly separated into distinct groups. Additionally, 7225 metabolite-metabolite correlations were detected in walnut kernel by a Pearson correlation coefficient approach; during screening of the calculated correlations, 463 and 1047 were determined to be significant with r(2)≥0.49 and had a false discovery rate (FDR) ≤0.05 in endotesta and embryo, respectively. This work provides the first comprehensive metabolomic study of walnut kernels and reveals that most of the carbohydrate and protein-derived carbon was transferred into other compounds, such as fatty acids, during the maturation of walnuts, which may potentially provide the basis for further studies on walnut kernel metabolism.

  9. Changes in cerebral metabolites in obstructive sleep apnea: a systemic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Yunyan; Fu, Yiqun; Xu, Huajun; Guan, Jian; Yi, Hongliang; Yin, Shankai

    2016-01-01

    Cognitive impairment is associated with changes in cerebral metabolites in patients with obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). Several studies have used magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS) to detect variations in cerebral metabolites; however, the results have been inconsistent. This meta-analysis summarizes the differences in cerebral metabolites between patients with OSA and controls. Two electronic databases, PubMed and Embase, were searched for articles (published before March 31, 2016) describing studies that used MRS to evaluate the cerebral metabolite changes. The overall effects were measured using the weighted mean difference with a 95% confidence interval. Subgroup analysis and sensitivity analysis were used to explore the sources of between-study heterogeneity and the stability of the results. Publication bias was also evaluated. Thirteen studies were ultimately included. In the hippocampus, the N-acetylaspartate (NAA)/creatine ratio was lower in patients with OSA. In the frontal lobe, only the NAA/choline ratio was lower in patients with OSA. Cerebral metabolites are significantly altered in the hippocampus in patients with OSA. Further clinical studies are needed to explore the underlying mechanisms between OSA and the changes in cerebral metabolites in the brain. PMID:27349417

  10. MSM, an Efficient Workflow for Metabolite Identification Using Hybrid Linear Ion Trap Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Robert; Huang, Yingying; Schwartz, Jae C.; Chen, Yan; Carlson, Timothy J.; Ma, Ji

    2012-05-01

    Identification of drug metabolites can often yield important information regarding clearance mechanism, pharmacologic activity, or toxicity for drug candidate molecules. Additionally, the identification of metabolites can provide beneficial structure-activity insight to help guide lead optimization efforts towards molecules with optimal metabolic profiles. There are challenges associated with detecting and identifying metabolites in the presence of complex biological matrices, and new LC-MS technologies have been developed to meet these challenges. In this report, we describe the development of an experimental approach that applies unique features of the hybrid linear ion trap Orbitrap mass spectrometer to streamline in vitro and in vivo metabolite identification experiments. The approach, referred to as MSM, utilizes multiple collision cells, dissociation methods, mass analyzers, and detectors. With multiple scan types and different dissociation modes built into one experimental method, along with flexible post-acquisition analysis options, the MSM workflow offers an attractive option to fast and reliable identification of metabolites in different kinds of in vitro and in vivo samples. The MSM workflow was successfully applied to metabolite identification analysis of verapamil in both in vitro rat hepatocyte incubations and in vivo rat bile samples.

  11. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and degradates. Information which shows the existence of any metabolite or degradate of a pesticide product...

  12. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and degradates. Information which shows the existence of any metabolite or degradate of a pesticide product...

  13. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and degradates. Information which shows the existence of any metabolite or degradate of a pesticide product...

  14. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and degradates. Information which shows the existence of any metabolite or degradate of a pesticide product...

  15. 40 CFR 159.179 - Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Metabolites, degradates, contaminants.../Benefit Information § 159.179 Metabolites, degradates, contaminants, and impurities. (a) Metabolites and degradates. Information which shows the existence of any metabolite or degradate of a pesticide product...

  16. Volatile Metabolites of Pathogens: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Bos, Lieuwe D. J.; Sterk, Peter J.; Schultz, Marcus J.

    2013-01-01

    Ideally, invading bacteria are detected as early as possible in critically ill patients: the strain of morbific pathogens is identified rapidly, and antimicrobial sensitivity is known well before the start of new antimicrobial therapy. Bacteria have a distinct metabolism, part of which results in the production of bacteria-specific volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which might be used for diagnostic purposes. Volatile metabolites can be investigated directly in exhaled air, allowing for noninvasive monitoring. The aim of this review is to provide an overview of VOCs produced by the six most abundant and pathogenic bacteria in sepsis, including Staphylococcus aureus, Streptococcus pneumoniae, Enterococcus faecalis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Escherichia coli. Such VOCs could be used as biological markers in the diagnostic approach of critically ill patients. A systematic review of existing literature revealed 31 articles. All six bacteria of interest produce isopentanol, formaldehyde, methyl mercaptan, and trimethylamine. Since humans do not produce these VOCs, they could serve as biological markers for presence of these pathogens. The following volatile biomarkers were found for identification of specific strains: isovaleric acid and 2-methyl-butanal for Staphylococcus aureus; 1-undecene, 2,4-dimethyl-1-heptane, 2-butanone, 4-methyl-quinazoline, hydrogen cyanide, and methyl thiocyanide for Pseudomonas aeruginosa; and methanol, pentanol, ethyl acetate, and indole for Escherichia coli. Notably, several factors that may effect VOC production were not controlled for, including used culture media, bacterial growth phase, and genomic variation within bacterial strains. In conclusion, VOCs produced by bacteria may serve as biological markers for their presence. Goal-targeted studies should be performed to identify potential sets of volatile biological markers and evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of these markers in critically ill patients. PMID

  17. High-performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry analysis of plant metabolites in brassicaceae.

    PubMed

    De Vos, Ric C H; Schipper, Bert; Hall, Robert D

    2012-01-01

    The Brassicaceae family comprises a variety of plant species that are of high economic importance as -vegetables or industrial crops. This includes crops such as Brassica rapa (turnip, Bok Choi), B. oleracea (cabbages, broccoli, cauliflower, etc.), and B. napus (oil seed rape), and also includes the famous genetic model of plant research, Arabidopsis thaliana (thale cress). Brassicaceae plants contain a large variety of interesting secondary metabolites, including glucosinolates, hydroxycinnamic acids, and flavonoids. These metabolites are also of particular importance due to their proposed positive effects on human health. Next to these well-known groups of phytochemicals, many more metabolites are of course also present in crude extracts prepared from Brassica and Arabidopsis plant material.High-pressure liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (HPLC-MS), especially if combined with a high mass resolution instrument such as a QTOF MS, is a powerful approach to separate, detect, and annotate metabolites present in crude aqueous-alcohol plant extracts. Using an essentially unbiased procedure that takes into account all metabolite mass signals from the raw data files, detailed information on the relative abundance of hundreds of both known and, as yet, unknown semipolar metabolites can be obtained. These comprehensive metabolomics data can then be used to, for instance, identify genetic markers regulating metabolic composition, determine effects of (a)biotic stress or specific growth conditions, or establish metabolite changes occurring upon food processing or storage.This chapter describes in detail a procedure for preparing crude extracts and performing comprehensive HPLC-QTOF MS-based profiling of semi-polar metabolites in Brassicaceae plant material. Compounds present in the extract can be (partially or completely) annotated based on their accurate mass, their MS/MS fragments and on other specific chemical characteristics such as retention time and UV

  18. The networks of human gut microbe-metabolite associations are different between health and irritable bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Shankar, Vijay; Homer, Daniel; Rigsbee, Laura; Khamis, Harry J; Michail, Sonia; Raymer, Michael; Reo, Nicholas V; Paliy, Oleg

    2015-08-01

    The goal of this study was to determine if fecal metabolite and microbiota profiles can serve as biomarkers of human intestinal diseases, and to uncover possible gut microbe-metabolite associations. We employed proton nuclear magnetic resonance to measure fecal metabolites of healthy children and those diagnosed with diarrhea-predominant irritable bowel syndrome (IBS-D). Metabolite levels were associated with fecal microbial abundances. Using several ordination techniques, healthy and irritable bowel syndrome (IBS) samples could be distinguished based on the metabolite profiles of fecal samples, and such partitioning was congruent with the microbiota-based sample separation. Measurements of individual metabolites indicated that the intestinal environment in IBS-D was characterized by increased proteolysis, incomplete anaerobic fermentation and possible change in methane production. By correlating metabolite levels with abundances of microbial genera, a number of statistically significant metabolite-genus associations were detected in stools of healthy children. No such associations were evident for IBS children. This finding complemented the previously observed reduction in the number of microbe-microbe associations in the distal gut of the same cohort of IBS-D children.

  19. Novel and Distinct Metabolites Identified Following a Single Oral Dose of α- or γ-Hexabromocyclododecane in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Szabo, David T.; Huwe, Janice; Diliberto, Janet; Birnbaum, Linda S.

    2013-01-01

    The metabolism of α- and γ-hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) was investigated in adult C57BL/6 female mice. α- or γ-[14C]HBCD (3 mg/kg bw) was orally administered with subsequent urine and feces collection for 4 consecutive days; a separate group of mice were dosed and sacrificed 3 hours post-exposure to investigate tissue metabolite levels. Extractable and non-extractable HBCD metabolites were quantitated in liver, blood, fat, brain, bile, urine and feces and characterized by LC/MS (ESI-). Metabolites identified were distinct between the two stereoisomers. In mice exposed to α-HBCD, four hydroxylated metabolites were detected in fecal extracts, and one of these metabolite isomers was consistently characterized in liver, brain, and adipose tissue extracts. In contrast, mice exposed to γ-HBCD contained multiple isomers of monohydroxy-pentabromocyclododecene, dihydroxy-pentabromocyclododecene, and dihydroxy-pentabromocyclododecadiene in the feces while only a single monohydroxy-pentabromocyclododecane metabolite was measured in liver and adipose tissue. Both stereoisomers were transformed to metabolites which formed covalent bonds to proteins and/or lipids in the gut as evidenced by high fecal non-extractables. Although the potential toxicity of these free and bound metabolites remains to be determined, the presence of distinct metabolic products from the two main HBCD stereoisomers should allow biomarkers to be selected that may aid in characterizing sources of HBCD exposure. PMID:23171393

  20. KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity Database for retrieving the relationships between metabolites and biological activities.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Yukiko; Afendi, Farit Mochamad; Parvin, Aziza Kawsar; Ono, Naoaki; Tanaka, Ken; Hirai Morita, Aki; Sato, Tetsuo; Sugiura, Tadao; Altaf-Ul-Amin, Md; Kanaya, Shigehiko

    2014-01-01

    Databases (DBs) are required by various omics fields because the volume of molecular biology data is increasing rapidly. In this study, we provide instructions for users and describe the current status of our metabolite activity DB. To facilitate a comprehensive understanding of the interactions between the metabolites of organisms and the chemical-level contribution of metabolites to human health, we constructed a metabolite activity DB known as the KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB. It comprises 9,584 triplet relationships (metabolite-biological activity-target species), including 2,356 metabolites, 140 activity categories, 2,963 specific descriptions of biological activities and 778 target species. Approximately 46% of the activities described in the DB are related to chemical ecology, most of which are attributed to antimicrobial agents and plant growth regulators. The majority of the metabolites with antimicrobial activities are flavonoids and phenylpropanoids. The metabolites with plant growth regulatory effects include plant hormones. Over half of the DB contents are related to human health care and medicine. The five largest groups are toxins, anticancer agents, nervous system agents, cardiovascular agents and non-therapeutic agents, such as flavors and fragrances. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB is integrated within the KNApSAcK Family DBs to facilitate further systematized research in various omics fields, especially metabolomics, nutrigenomics and foodomics. The KNApSAcK Metabolite Activity DB could also be utilized for developing novel drugs and materials, as well as for identifying viable drug resources and other useful compounds.

  1. Diclofenac toxicity in human intestine ex vivo is not related to the formation of intestinal metabolites.

    PubMed

    Niu, Xiaoyu; de Graaf, Inge A M; Langelaar-Makkinje, Miriam; Horvatovich, Peter; Groothuis, Geny M M

    2015-01-01

    The use of diclofenac (DCF), a nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drug, is associated with a high prevalence of gastrointestinal side effects. In vivo studies in rodents suggested that reactive metabolites of DCF produced by the liver or the intestine might be responsible for this toxicity. In the present study, precision-cut intestinal slices (PCIS) prepared from the jejunum of 18 human donors were used as an ex vivo model to investigate whether DCF intestinal metabolites are responsible for its intestinal toxicity in man. PCIS were incubated with a concentration range of DCF (0-600 µM) up to 24 h. DCF (≥400 µM) caused direct toxicity to the intestine as demonstrated by ATP depletion, morphological damage, caspase 3 activation, and lactate dehydrogenase leakage. Three main metabolites produced by PCIS (4'-hydroxy DCF, 5-hydroxy DCF, and DCF acyl glucuronide) were detected by HPLC. Protein adducts were detected by immunohistochemical staining and showed correlation with the intestinal metabolites. DCF induced similar toxicity to each of the samples regardless of the variation in metabolism among them. Less metabolites were produced by slices incubated with 400 µM DCF than with 100 µM DCF. The addition of the metabolic inhibitors such as ketoconazole, cimetidine, or borneol decreased the metabolite formation but increased the toxicity. The results suggest that DCF can induce intestinal toxicity in human PCIS directly at therapeutically relevant concentrations, independent of the reactive metabolites 4'-OH DCF, 5-OH DCF, or diclofenac acylglucuronide produced by the liver or formed in the intestine.

  2. Degradation of chloroacetanilide herbicides: The prevalence of sulfonic and oxanilic acid metabolites in Iowa groundwaters and surface waters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kalkhoff, S.J.; Kolpin, D.W.; Thurman, E.M.; Ferrer, I.; Barcelo, D.

    1998-01-01

    Water samples were collected from 88 municipal wells throughout Iowa during the summer and were collected monthly at 12 stream sites in eastern Iowa from March to December 1996 to study the occurrence of the sulfonic and oxanilic metabolites of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor. The sulfonic and oxanilic metabolites were present in almost 75% of the groundwater samples and were generally present from 3 to 45 times more frequently than their parent compounds. In groundwater, the median value of the summed concentrations of acetochlor, alachlor, and metolachlor was less than 0.05 μg/L, and the median value of the summed concentrations of the six metabolites was 1.2 μg/L. All surface water samples contained at least one detectable metabolite compound. Individual metabolites were detected from 2 to over 100 times more frequently than the parent compounds. In surface water, the median value of the summed concentrations of the three parent compounds was 0.13 μg/L, and the median value of the summed concentrations of the six metabolites was 6.4 μg/L. These data demonstrate the importance of analyzing both parent compounds and metabolites to more fully understand the environmental fate and transport of herbicides in the hydrologic system.

  3. Multifaceted Investigation of Metabolites During Nitrogen Fixation in Medicago via High Resolution MALDI-MS Imaging and ESI-MS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemperline, Erin; Jayaraman, Dhileepkumar; Maeda, Junko; Ané, Jean-Michel; Li, Lingjun

    2015-01-01

    Legumes have developed the unique ability to establish a symbiotic relationship with soil bacteria known as rhizobia. This interaction results in the formation of root nodules in which rhizobia thrive and reduce atmospheric dinitrogen into plant-usable ammonium through biological nitrogen fixation (BNF). Owing to the availability of genetic information for both of the symbiotic partners, the Medicago truncatula- Sinorhizobium meliloti association is an excellent model for examining the BNF process. Although metabolites are important in this symbiotic association, few studies have investigated the array of metabolites that influence this process. Of these studies, most target only a few specific metabolites, the roles of which are either well known or are part of a well-characterized metabolic pathway. Here, we used a multifaceted mass spectrometric (MS) approach to detect and identify the key metabolites that are present during BNF using the Medicago truncatula- Sinorhizobium meliloti association as the model system. High mass accuracy and high resolution matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) and electrospray ionization (ESI) Orbitrap instruments were used in this study and provide complementary results for more in-depth characterization of the nitrogen-fixation process. We used well-characterized plant and bacterial mutants to highlight differences between the metabolites that are present in functional versus nonfunctional nodules. Our study highlights the benefits of using a combination of mass spectrometric techniques to detect differences in metabolite composition and the distributions of these metabolites in plant biology.

  4. Identification of signatory secondary metabolites during mycoparasitism of Rhizoctonia solani by Stachybotrys elegans.

    PubMed

    Chamoun, Rony; Aliferis, Konstantinos A; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-01-01

    Stachybotrys elegans is able to parasitize the fungal plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-3 following a complex and intimate interaction, which, among others, includes the production of cell wall-degrading enzymes, intracellular colonization, and expression of pathogenic process encoding genes. However, information on the metabolome level is non-existent during mycoparasitism. Here, we performed a direct-infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) metabolomics analysis using an LTQ Orbitrap analyzer in order to detect changes in the profiles of induced secondary metabolites of both partners during this mycoparasitic interaction 4 and 5 days following its establishment. The diketopiperazine(s) (DKPs) cyclo(S-Pro-S-Leu)/cyclo(S-Pro-S-Ile), ethyl 2-phenylacetate, and 3-nitro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid were detected as the primary response of Rhizoctonia 4 days following dual-culturing with Stachybotrys, whereas only the latter metabolite was up-regulated 1 day later. On the other hand, trichothecenes and atranones were mycoparasite-derived metabolites identified during mycoparasitism 4 and 5 days following dual-culturing. All the above secondary metabolites are known to exhibit bioactivity, including fungitoxicity, and represent key elements that determine the outcome of the interaction being studied. Results could be further exploited in programs for the evaluation of the bioactivity of these metabolites per se or their chemical analogs, and/or genetic engineering programs to obtain more efficient mycoparasite strains with improved efficacy and toxicological profiles.

  5. Identification of signatory secondary metabolites during mycoparasitism of Rhizoctonia solani by Stachybotrys elegans

    PubMed Central

    Chamoun, Rony; Aliferis, Konstantinos A.; Jabaji, Suha

    2015-01-01

    Stachybotrys elegans is able to parasitize the fungal plant pathogen Rhizoctonia solani AG-3 following a complex and intimate interaction, which, among others, includes the production of cell wall-degrading enzymes, intracellular colonization, and expression of pathogenic process encoding genes. However, information on the metabolome level is non-existent during mycoparasitism. Here, we performed a direct-infusion mass spectrometry (DIMS) metabolomics analysis using an LTQ Orbitrap analyzer in order to detect changes in the profiles of induced secondary metabolites of both partners during this mycoparasitic interaction 4 and 5 days following its establishment. The diketopiperazine(s) (DKPs) cyclo(S-Pro-S-Leu)/cyclo(S-Pro-S-Ile), ethyl 2-phenylacetate, and 3-nitro-4-hydroxybenzoic acid were detected as the primary response of Rhizoctonia 4 days following dual-culturing with Stachybotrys, whereas only the latter metabolite was up-regulated 1 day later. On the other hand, trichothecenes and atranones were mycoparasite-derived metabolites identified during mycoparasitism 4 and 5 days following dual-culturing. All the above secondary metabolites are known to exhibit bioactivity, including fungitoxicity, and represent key elements that determine the outcome of the interaction being studied. Results could be further exploited in programs for the evaluation of the bioactivity of these metabolites per se or their chemical analogs, and/or genetic engineering programs to obtain more efficient mycoparasite strains with improved efficacy and toxicological profiles. PMID:25972848

  6. [Secondary Metabolites from Marine Microorganisms. I. Secondary Metabolites from Marine Actinomycetes].

    PubMed

    Orlova, T I; Bulgakova, V G; Polin, A N

    2015-01-01

    Review represents data on new active metabolites isolated from marine actinomycetes published in 2007 to 2014. Marine actinomycetes are an unlimited source of novel secondary metabolites with various biological activities. Among them there are antibiotics, anticancer compounds, inhibitors of biochemical processes.

  7. Reference range levels of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons in the US population by measurement of urinary monohydroxy metabolites

    SciTech Connect

    Grainger, James . E-mail: jag2@cdc.gov; Huang, Wenlin; Patterson, Donald G.; Turner, Wayman E.; Pirkle, James; Caudill, Samuel P.; Wang, Richard Y.; Needham, Larry L.; Sampson, Eric J.

    2006-03-15

    We developed a gas chromatography isotope-dilution high-resolution mass spectrometry (GC/Id-HRMS) method for measuring 14 polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites representing seven parent PAHs in 3 mL of urine at low parts-per-trillion levels. PAH levels were determined in urine samples collected in 1999 and 2000 from approximately 2400 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, and, for the first time, reference range values were calculated for these metabolites in the US population. Using this GC/ID-HRMS method, we found detectable concentrations for monohydroxy metabolite isomers of fluorene, phenanthrene, fluoranthene, pyrene, and chrysene, benzo[c]phenanthrene, and benz[a]anthracene. Some monohydroxy metabolite isomers of benzo[c]phenanthrene, chrysene, and benz[a]anthracene exhibited low detection frequencies that did not allow for geometric mean calculations. Our study results enabled us to establish a reference range for the targeted PAHs in the general US population.

  8. Metabolites of the phenylurea herbicides chlorotoluron, diuron, isoproturon and linuron produced by the soil fungus Mortierella sp.

    PubMed

    Badawi, Nora; Rønhede, Stig; Olsson, Stefan; Kragelund, Birthe B; Johnsen, Anders H; Jacobsen, Ole Stig; Aamand, Jens

    2009-10-01

    Phenylurea herbicides are used worldwide, and often pollute surface- and groundwater in concentrations exceeding the limit value for drinking water (0.1 microg l(-1)). Bacteria degrade phenylurea herbicides by successive N-dealkylation to substituted aniline products. Little is known about the corresponding fungal pathways, however. We here report degradation of chlorotoluron, diuron, isoproturon and linuron by the soil fungus Mortierella sp. Gr4. Degradation was fastest with linuron and resulted in successively dealkylated metabolites and 3,4-dichloroaniline. A major new metabolite was detected that has not yet been fully identified. Thin layer chromatography and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy indicate that it is a non-aromatic diol. Degradation of isoproturon, chlorotoluron and diuron involved successive N-demethylation and, in the case of isoproturon and chlorotoluron, additional hydroxylation. A new hydroxylated isoproturon metabolite was detected. The study thus shows that the fungal pathways differ from the bacterial pathways and yield new metabolites of possible environmental concern. PMID:19464778

  9. Human in vivo phosphate metabolite imaging with 31P NMR.

    PubMed

    Bottomley, P A; Charles, H C; Roemer, P B; Flamig, D; Engeseth, H; Edelstein, W A; Mueller, O M

    1988-07-01

    Phosphorus (31P) spectroscopic images showing the distribution of high-energy phosphate metabolites in the human brain have been obtained at 1.5 T in scan times of 8.5 to 34 min at 27 and 64 cm3 spatial resolution using pulsed phase-encoding gradient magnetic fields and three-dimensional Fourier transform (3DFT) techniques. Data were acquired as free induction decays with a quadrature volume NMR detection coil of a truncated geometry designed to optimize the signal-to-noise ratio on the coil axis on the assumption that the sample noise represents the dominant noise source, and self-shielded magnetic field gradient coils to minimize eddy-current effects. The images permit comparison of metabolic data acquired simultaneously from different locations in the brain, as well as metabolite quantification by inclusion of a vial containing a standard of known 31P concentration in the image array. Values for the NMR visible adenosine triphosphate in three individuals were about 3 mM of tissue. The ratio of NMR detectable phosphocreatine to ATP in brain was 1.15 +/- 0.17 SD in these experiments. Potential sources of random and systematic error in these and other 31P measurements are identified.

  10. Exploring the transport of plant metabolites using positron emitting radiotracers

    PubMed Central

    Kiser, Matthew R.; Reid, Chantal D.; Crowell, Alexander S.; Phillips, Richard P.; Howell, Calvin R.

    2008-01-01

    Short-lived positron-emitting radiotracer techniques provide time-dependent data that are critical for developing models of metabolite transport and resource distribution in plants and their microenvironments. Until recently these techniques were applied to measure radiotracer accumulation in coarse regions along transport pathways. The recent application of positron emission tomography (PET) techniques to plant research allows for detailed quantification of real-time metabolite dynamics on previously unexplored spatial scales. PET provides dynamic information with millimeter-scale resolution on labeled carbon, nitrogen, and water transport over a small plant-size field of view. Because details at the millimeter scale may not be required for all regions of interest, hybrid detection systems that combine high-resolution imaging with other radiotracer counting technologies offer the versatility needed to pursue wide-ranging plant physiological and ecological research. In this perspective we describe a recently developed hybrid detection system at Duke University that provides researchers with the flexibility required to carry out measurements of the dynamic responses of whole plants to environmental change using short-lived radiotracers. Following a brief historical development of radiotracer applications to plant research, the role of radiotracers is presented in the context of various applications at the leaf to the whole-plant level that integrates cellular and subcellular signals and∕or controls. PMID:19404430

  11. Metabolites are key to understanding health effects of wine polyphenolics.

    PubMed

    Forester, Sarah C; Waterhouse, Andrew L

    2009-09-01

    Phenolic compounds in grapes and wine are grouped within the following major classes: stilbenes, phenolic acids, ellagitannins, flavan-3-ols, anthocyanins, flavonols, and proanthocyanidins. Consumption of foods containing phenolic substances has been linked to beneficial effects toward chronic diseases such as coronary heart disease and colorectal cancer. However, such correlations need to be supported by in vivo testing and bioavailability studies are the first step in establishing cause and effect. Class members from all phenolic groups can be glucuronidated, sulfated, and/or methylated and detected at low concentrations in the bloodstream and in urine. But the majority of phenolic compounds from grapes and wine are metabolized in the gastrointestinal tract, where they are broken down by gut microflora. This typically involves deglycosylation, followed by breakdown of ring structures to produce phenolic acids and aldehydes. These metabolites can be detected in bloodstream, urine, and fecal samples by using sophisticated instrumentation methods for quantitation and identification at low concentrations. The health effects related to grape and wine consumption may well be due to these poorly understood phenolic acid metabolites. This review discusses the known metabolism of each major class of wine and grape phenolics, the means to measure them, and ideas for future investigations. PMID:19640966

  12. Pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites of marine actinobacteria.

    PubMed

    Manivasagan, Panchanathan; Venkatesan, Jayachandran; Sivakumar, Kannan; Kim, Se-Kwon

    2014-04-01

    Marine actinobacteria are one of the most efficient groups of secondary metabolite producers and are very important from an industrial point of view. Many representatives of the order Actinomycetales are prolific producers of thousands of biologically active secondary metabolites. Actinobacteria from terrestrial sources have been studied and screened since the 1950s, for many important antibiotics, anticancer, antitumor and immunosuppressive agents. However, frequent rediscovery of the same compounds from the terrestrial actinobacteria has made them less attractive for screening programs in the recent years. At the same time, actinobacteria isolated from the marine environment have currently received considerable attention due to the structural diversity and unique biological activities of their secondary metabolites. They are efficient producers of new secondary metabolites that show a range of biological activities including antibacterial, antifungal, anticancer, antitumor, cytotoxic, cytostatic, anti-inflammatory, anti-parasitic, anti-malaria, antiviral, antioxidant, anti-angiogenesis, etc. In this review, an evaluation is made on the current status of research on marine actinobacteria yielding pharmaceutically active secondary metabolites. Bioactive compounds from marine actinobacteria possess distinct chemical structures that may form the basis for synthesis of new drugs that could be used to combat resistant pathogens. With the increasing advancement in science and technology, there would be a greater demand for new bioactive compounds synthesized by actinobacteria from various marine sources in future.

  13. Improved metabolite profile smoothing for flux estimation.

    PubMed

    Dromms, Robert A; Styczynski, Mark P

    2015-09-01

    As genome-scale metabolic models become more sophisticated and dynamic, one significant challenge in using these models is to effectively integrate increasingly prevalent systems-scale metabolite profiling data into them. One common data processing step when integrating metabolite data is to smooth experimental time course measurements: the smoothed profiles can be used to estimate metabolite accumulation (derivatives), and thus the flux distribution of the metabolic model. However, this smoothing step is susceptible to the (often significant) noise in experimental measurements, limiting the accuracy of downstream model predictions. Here, we present several improvements to current approaches for smoothing metabolite time course data using defined functions. First, we use a biologically-inspired mathematical model function taken from transcriptional profiling and clustering literature that captures the dynamics of many biologically relevant transient processes. We demonstrate that it is competitive with, and often superior to, previously described fitting schemas, and may serve as an effective single option for data smoothing in metabolic flux applications. We also implement a resampling-based approach to buffer out sensitivity to specific data sets and allow for more accurate fitting of noisy data. We found that this method, as well as the addition of parameter space constraints, yielded improved estimates of concentrations and derivatives (fluxes) in previously described fitting functions. These methods have the potential to improve the accuracy of existing and future dynamic metabolic models by allowing for the more effective integration of metabolite profiling data.

  14. Secondary metabolites in fungus-plant interactions

    PubMed Central

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Holb, Imre J.; Pócsi, István

    2015-01-01

    Fungi and plants are rich sources of thousands of secondary metabolites. The genetically coded possibilities for secondary metabolite production, the stimuli of the production, and the special phytotoxins basically determine the microscopic fungi-host plant interactions and the pathogenic lifestyle of fungi. The review introduces plant secondary metabolites usually with antifungal effect as well as the importance of signaling molecules in induced systemic resistance and systemic acquired resistance processes. The review also concerns the mimicking of plant effector molecules like auxins, gibberellins and abscisic acid by fungal secondary metabolites that modulate plant growth or even can subvert the plant defense responses such as programmed cell death to gain nutrients for fungal growth and colonization. It also looks through the special secondary metabolite production and host selective toxins of some significant fungal pathogens and the plant response in form of phytoalexin production. New results coming from genome and transcriptional analyses in context of selected fungal pathogens and their hosts are also discussed. PMID:26300892

  15. Recent Advances in Mass Spectrometry for the Identification of Neuro-chemicals and their Metabolites in Biofluids

    PubMed Central

    Kailasa, Suresh Kumar; Wu, Hui-Fen

    2013-01-01

    Recently, mass spectrometric related techniques have been widely applied for the identification and quantification of neurochemicals and their metabolites in biofluids. This article presents an overview of mass spectrometric techniques applied in the detection of neurological substances and their metabolites from biological samples. In addition, the advances of chromatographic methods (LC, GC and CE) coupled with mass spectrometric techniques for analysis of neurochemicals in pharmaceutical and biological samples are also discussed. PMID:24381533

  16. Qualitative profiling and quantification of neonicotinoid metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taira, Kumiko; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Aoyama, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    Neonicotinoid pesticides have been widely applied for the production of fruits and vegetables, and occasionally detected in conventionally grown produce. Thus oral exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides may exist in the general population; however, neonicotinoid metabolites in human body fluids have not been investigated comprehensively. The purpose of this study is the qualitative profiling and quantitative analysis of neonicotinoid metabolites in the human spot urine by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Human urine samples were collected from three patients suspected of subacute exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides. A qualitative profiling of urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) with a database of nominal molecular weights of 57 known metabolites of three neonicotinoid pesticides (acetamiprid, Imidacloprid, and clothianidin), as well as the parent compounds. Then a quantitative analysis of selected urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with a standard pesticide and metabolite, which were detected by the qualitative profiling. The result of qualitative profiling showed that seven metabolites, i.e. an acetamiprid metabolite, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid; three Imidacloprid metabolites, 5-hydroxy-Imidacloprid, 4,5-dihydroxy-imidacloprid, 4,5-dehydro-Imidacloprid; a common metabolite of acetamiprid and Imidacloprid, N-(6-chloronicotinoyl)-glycine; and two clothianidin metabolites, N-desmethyl-clothianidin, N-(2-(methylsulfanyl)thiazole-5-carboxyl)-glycine, as well as acetamiprid, were detected in the urine of three cases. The result of the quantitative analysis showed N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was determined in the urine of one case, which had been collected on the first visit, at a concentration of 3.2 ng/mL. This is the first report on the qualitative and quantitative detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the human

  17. Qualitative Profiling and Quantification of Neonicotinoid Metabolites in Human Urine by Liquid Chromatography Coupled with Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Taira, Kumiko; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Aoyama, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    Neonicotinoid pesticides have been widely applied for the production of fruits and vegetables, and occasionally detected in conventionally grown produce. Thus oral exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides may exist in the general population; however, neonicotinoid metabolites in human body fluids have not been investigated comprehensively. The purpose of this study is the qualitative profiling and quantitative analysis of neonicotinoid metabolites in the human spot urine by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Human urine samples were collected from three patients suspected of subacute exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides. A qualitative profiling of urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) with a database of nominal molecular weights of 57 known metabolites of three neonicotinoid pesticides (acetamiprid, Imidacloprid, and clothianidin), as well as the parent compounds. Then a quantitative analysis of selected urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with a standard pesticide and metabolite, which were detected by the qualitative profiling. The result of qualitative profiling showed that seven metabolites, i.e. an acetamiprid metabolite, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid; three Imidacloprid metabolites, 5-hydroxy-Imidacloprid, 4,5-dihydroxy-imidacloprid, 4,5-dehydro-Imidacloprid; a common metabolite of acetamiprid and Imidacloprid, N-(6-chloronicotinoyl)-glycine; and two clothianidin metabolites, N-desmethyl-clothianidin, N-(2-(methylsulfanyl)thiazole-5-carboxyl)-glycine, as well as acetamiprid, were detected in the urine of three cases. The result of the quantitative analysis showed N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was determined in the urine of one case, which had been collected on the first visit, at a concentration of 3.2 ng/mL. This is the first report on the qualitative and quantitative detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the human

  18. Qualitative profiling and quantification of neonicotinoid metabolites in human urine by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Taira, Kumiko; Fujioka, Kazutoshi; Aoyama, Yoshiko

    2013-01-01

    Neonicotinoid pesticides have been widely applied for the production of fruits and vegetables, and occasionally detected in conventionally grown produce. Thus oral exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides may exist in the general population; however, neonicotinoid metabolites in human body fluids have not been investigated comprehensively. The purpose of this study is the qualitative profiling and quantitative analysis of neonicotinoid metabolites in the human spot urine by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS). Human urine samples were collected from three patients suspected of subacute exposure to neonicotinoid pesticides. A qualitative profiling of urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/time-of-flight mass spectrometry (LC/TOFMS) with a database of nominal molecular weights of 57 known metabolites of three neonicotinoid pesticides (acetamiprid, Imidacloprid, and clothianidin), as well as the parent compounds. Then a quantitative analysis of selected urinary metabolites was performed using liquid chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry (LC/MS/MS) with a standard pesticide and metabolite, which were detected by the qualitative profiling. The result of qualitative profiling showed that seven metabolites, i.e. an acetamiprid metabolite, N-desmethyl-acetamiprid; three Imidacloprid metabolites, 5-hydroxy-Imidacloprid, 4,5-dihydroxy-imidacloprid, 4,5-dehydro-Imidacloprid; a common metabolite of acetamiprid and Imidacloprid, N-(6-chloronicotinoyl)-glycine; and two clothianidin metabolites, N-desmethyl-clothianidin, N-(2-(methylsulfanyl)thiazole-5-carboxyl)-glycine, as well as acetamiprid, were detected in the urine of three cases. The result of the quantitative analysis showed N-desmethyl-acetamiprid was determined in the urine of one case, which had been collected on the first visit, at a concentration of 3.2 ng/mL. This is the first report on the qualitative and quantitative detection of N-desmethyl-acetamiprid in the human

  19. Metabolites of synthetic cannabinoids in hair--proof of consumption or false friends for interpretation?

    PubMed

    Franz, Florian; Angerer, Verena; Hermanns-Clausen, Maren; Auwärter, Volker; Moosmann, Bjoern

    2016-05-01

    The detection of drug metabolites in hair is widely accepted as a proof for systemic uptake of the drug, unless the metabolites can be formed as artefacts. However, regarding synthetic cannabinoids, not much is known about mechanisms of incorporation into hair. For a correct interpretation concerning hair findings of these compounds and their metabolites, it is necessary to identify the different routes of incorporation and to assess their contribution to analytical findings. This study presents the results of the LC-ESI-MS/MS analysis of an authentic hair sample taken from a patient with a known history of heavy consumption of synthetic cannabinoids. In the authentic hair sample, 5F-PB-22 and AB-CHMINACA as well as their main metabolites 5F-PB-22 3-carboxyindole, PB-22 5-OH-pentyl, and AB-CHMINACA valine were detected in all segments, comprising segments grown in a time period where the substances had not been distributed on the 'legal high' market. To enable interpretation of the results regarding the distribution of the detected analytes along the hair shaft, the stability of 5F-PB-22 and AB-CHMINACA in hair matrix and under thermal stress was assessed. The stability tests revealed that the three 'metabolites' are also formed in externally contaminated hair after storage of the samples under different conditions. In addition, 5F-PB-22 3-carboxyindole and AB-CHMINACA valine were identified as degradation products in smoke condensate. Therefore, interpretation of 'metabolite' findings of compounds comprising chemically labile amide/ester bonds or 5-fluoro-pentyl side chains should be carried out with utmost care, taking into account the different mechanisms of formation and incorporation into hair.

  20. [Secondary fungal metabolites (mycotoxins) in lichens of different taxonomic groups].

    PubMed

    Burkin, A A; Kononenko, G P

    2014-01-01

    Secondary fungal metabolites (mycotoxins) in 22 lichen species of the families Parmeliaceae, Nephromataceae, Umbilicariaceae, Ramalinaceae, Cladoniaceae, Peltigeraceae, and Teloschistaceae were identified determined by enzyme immunoassay enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The following mycotoxins were identified found in these lichens in a broad concentration range with a frequency of 70-100%: sterigmatocystin (7-2090 ng/g), alternariol (20-6460 ng/g), and emodin (45-94500 ng/g). Mycophenolic acid frequently occurred in 19 lichen species; citrinin, in 17 species; diacetoxyscirpenol, in 11 species; cyclopiazonic acid, in 10 species; and zearalenone, in 9 species. PR toxin was regularly detected in three lichen species; deoxynivalenol, fumonisins, and ochratoxin A, in two species; and T-2 toxin and ergot alkaloids, in one species. Aflatoxin B1 was detected in only six species with a frequency of 2-42%, whereas roridin A was identified present in 10% of Hypogymnia physodes samples.

  1. Monitoring microbial metabolites using an inductively coupled resonance circuit

    PubMed Central

    Karnaushenko, Daniil; Baraban, Larysa; Ye, Dan; Uguz, Ilke; Mendes, Rafael G.; Rümmeli, Mark H.; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Makarov, Denys

    2015-01-01

    We present a new approach to monitor microbial population dynamics in emulsion droplets via changes in metabolite composition, using an inductively coupled LC resonance circuit. The signal measured by such resonance detector provides information on the magnetic field interaction with the bacterial culture, which is complementary to the information accessible by other detection means, based on electric field interaction, i.e. capacitive or resistive, as well as optical techniques. Several charge-related factors, including pH and ammonia concentrations, were identified as possible contributors to the characteristic of resonance detector profile. The setup enables probing the ionic byproducts of microbial metabolic activity at later stages of cell growth, where conventional optical detection methods have no discriminating power. PMID:26264183

  2. Monitoring microbial metabolites using an inductively coupled resonance circuit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karnaushenko, Daniil; Baraban, Larysa; Ye, Dan; Uguz, Ilke; Mendes, Rafael G.; Rümmeli, Mark H.; de Visser, J. Arjan G. M.; Schmidt, Oliver G.; Cuniberti, Gianaurelio; Makarov, Denys

    2015-08-01

    We present a new approach to monitor microbial population dynamics in emulsion droplets via changes in metabolite composition, using an inductively coupled LC resonance circuit. The signal measured by such resonance detector provides information on the magnetic field interaction with the bacterial culture, which is complementary to the information accessible by other detection means, based on electric field interaction, i.e. capacitive or resistive, as well as optical techniques. Several charge-related factors, including pH and ammonia concentrations, were identified as possible contributors to the characteristic of resonance detector profile. The setup enables probing the ionic byproducts of microbial metabolic activity at later stages of cell growth, where conventional optical detection methods have no discriminating power.

  3. Analysis of cocaine and metabolites in hair: validation and application of measurement of hydroxycocaine metabolites as evidence of cocaine ingestion.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Michael; Cheng, Chen-Chih; Chao, Oscar; Hill, Virginia; Matsui, Paul

    2016-03-01

    An LC/MS/MS method to identify and quantitate in hair the minor metabolites of cocaine-meta-, para-, and ortho-hydroxy cocaine-was developed and validated. Analysis was performed on a triple quadrupole ABSciex API 3000 MS equipped with an atmospheric pressure ionization source via an IonSpray (ESI). For LC, a series 200 micro binary pump with a Perkin Elmer Model 200 autosampler was used. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.02 ng/10 mg hair, with linearity from 0.02 to 10 ng/10 mg hair. Concentrations of the para isomer in extensively washed hair samples were in the range of 1-2 % of the cocaine in the sample, while the concentrations of the ortho form were considerably less. The method was used to analyze large numbers of samples from two populations: workplace and criminal justice. In vitro experiments to determine if deodorants or peroxide-containing cosmetic treatments could result in the presence of these metabolites in hair showed that this does not occur with extensively washed hair. Presence of hydroxycocaines, when detected after aggressive washing of the hair samples, provides a valuable additional indicator of ingestion of cocaine rather than mere environmental exposure.

  4. Analysis of cocaine and metabolites in hair: validation and application of measurement of hydroxycocaine metabolites as evidence of cocaine ingestion.

    PubMed

    Schaffer, Michael; Cheng, Chen-Chih; Chao, Oscar; Hill, Virginia; Matsui, Paul

    2016-03-01

    An LC/MS/MS method to identify and quantitate in hair the minor metabolites of cocaine-meta-, para-, and ortho-hydroxy cocaine-was developed and validated. Analysis was performed on a triple quadrupole ABSciex API 3000 MS equipped with an atmospheric pressure ionization source via an IonSpray (ESI). For LC, a series 200 micro binary pump with a Perkin Elmer Model 200 autosampler was used. The limit of detection (LOD) and limit of quantification (LOQ) were 0.02 ng/10 mg hair, with linearity from 0.02 to 10 ng/10 mg hair. Concentrations of the para isomer in extensively washed hair samples were in the range of 1-2 % of the cocaine in the sample, while the concentrations of the ortho form were considerably less. The method was used to analyze large numbers of samples from two populations: workplace and criminal justice. In vitro experiments to determine if deodorants or peroxide-containing cosmetic treatments could result in the presence of these metabolites in hair showed that this does not occur with extensively washed hair. Presence of hydroxycocaines, when detected after aggressive washing of the hair samples, provides a valuable additional indicator of ingestion of cocaine rather than mere environmental exposure. PMID:26873203

  5. Simvastatin (SV) metabolites in mouse tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Duncan, C.A.; Vickers, S. )

    1990-02-26

    SV, a semisynthetic analog of lovastatin, is hydrolyzed in vivo to its hydroxy acid (SVA), a potent inhibitor of HMG CoA reductase (HR). Thus SV lowers plasma cholesterol. SV is a substrate for mixed function oxidases whereas SVA undergoes lactonization and {beta}-oxidation. Male CD-1 mice were dosed orally with a combination of ({sup 14}C)SV and ({sup 3}H)SVA at 25 mg/kg of each, bled and killed at 0.5, 2 and 4 hours. Labeled SV, SVA, 6{prime}exomethylene SV (I), 6{prime}CH{sub 2}OH-SV (II), 6{prime}COOH-SV (III) and a {beta}-oxidized metabolite (IV) were assayed in liver, bile, kidneys, testes and plasma by RIDA. Levels of potential and active HR inhibitors in liver were 10 to 40 fold higher than in other tissues. II and III, in which the configuration at 6{prime} is inverted, may be 2 metabolites of I. Metabolites I-III are inhibitors of HR in their hydroxy acid forms. Qualitatively ({sup 14}C)SV and ({sup 3}H)SVA were metabolized similarly (consistent with their proposed interconversion). However {sup 3}H-SVA, I-III (including hydroxy acid forms) achieved higher concentrations than corresponding {sup 14}C compounds (except in gall bladder bile). Major radioactive metabolites in liver were II-IV (including hydroxy acid forms). These metabolites have also been reported in rat tissues. In bile a large fraction of either label was unidentified polar metabolites. The presence of IV indicated that mice (like rats) are not good models for SV metabolism in man.

  6. Automated software-guided identification of new buspirone metabolites using capillary LC coupled to ion trap and TOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Fandiño, Anabel S; Nägele, Edgar; Perkins, Patrick D

    2006-02-01

    The identification and structure elucidation of drug metabolites is one of the main objectives in in vitro ADME studies. Typical modern methodologies involve incubation of the drug with subcellular fractions to simulate metabolism followed by LC-MS/MS or LC-MS(n) analysis and chemometric approaches for the extraction of the metabolites. The objective of this work was the software-guided identification and structure elucidation of major and minor buspirone metabolites using capillary LC as a separation technique and ion trap MS(n) as well as electrospray ionization orthogonal acceleration time-of-flight (ESI oaTOF) mass spectrometry as detection techniques. Buspirone mainly underwent hydroxylation, dihydroxylation and N-oxidation in S9 fractions in the presence of phase I co-factors and the corresponding glucuronides were detected in the presence of phase II co-factors. The use of automated ion trap MS/MS data-dependent acquisition combined with a chemometric tool allowed the detection of five small chromatographic peaks of unexpected metabolites that co-eluted with the larger chromatographic peaks of expected metabolites. Using automatic assignment of ion trap MS/MS fragments as well as accurate mass measurements from an ESI oaTOF mass spectrometer, possible structures were postulated for these metabolites that were previously not reported in the literature.

  7. Quantitative determination of de-conjugated chrysene metabolites in fish bile by HPLC-fluorescence and GC--MS.

    PubMed

    Jonsson, Grete; Taban, Ingrid C; Jørgensen, Kåre B; Sundt, Rolf C

    2004-02-01

    Two analytical methods have been evaluated for quantitative determination of de-conjugated chrysene metabolites in fish bile. High performance liquid chromatography-fluorescence (HPLC-F) and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC--MS) were compared regarding instrumental and overall limits of detection (LOD) as well as recoveries for the following nine chrysene compounds: 1-, 2,- 3-, 4- and 6-hydroxychrysene (1-, 2-, 3-, 4- and 6-OH-chr), 1,2-dihydroxy-1,2-dihydrochrysene (1,2-DHD-chr), 3,4-dihydroxy-3,4-dihydrochrysene (3,4-DHD-chr), 5,6-dihydroxy-5,6-dihydrochrysene (5,6-DHD-chr) and chrysene. Instrumental LODs were comparable for the two methods whereas the overall LOD was better for HPLC-F. Recoveries varied per chrysene compound for both HPLC-F (62-107%) and GC-MS (48-124%). In vivo formed chrysene metabolites were studied in the bile of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) exposed to chrysene (1 mg/kg) via intra-peritoneal (i.p.) and inter-muscular (i.m.) injection. Total amounts of chrysene metabolites were three times higher in i.p. compared to i.m. exposed cod bile, but the relative distribution of determined metabolites was very similar. 1,2-DHD-chr was the most prominent metabolite in de-conjugated bile and constituted more than 88% of the total chrysene metabolites. Additional chrysene metabolites formed were 3,4-DHD-chr and 1-, 2-, 3- and 4-OH-chr. K-region chrysene metabolites (oxidation at carbons 5 and 6) were not detected and seem to be a less favoured biotransformation route. The two methods were applied and evaluated for analysis of chrysene metabolites in two bile reference materials (BCR 720 and 721) and a limited number of field exposed cods.

  8. [Treatment of leprosy by human metabolites].

    PubMed

    Mester de Parajd, L; Mester de Parajd, M

    1986-01-01

    We are interested for other human metabolites than desoxyfructo-serotonin (DFS), showing antileprosy activity. This is the case of desoxyfructo-5-hydroxytryptophan and of some liposoluble derivatives of DFS. The time of resorption and penetration into M. leprae infected tissue, is very different for these metabolites. For this reason the simultaneous application of these compounds may represent some advantage in the treatment of multibacillar form of leprosy. The use of DFS together with the antileprosy diet "NAL" have the supplementary advantage to stabilize the DFS level in the serum during the treatment. PMID:3105224

  9. Disposition of xenobiotic chemicals and metabolites in marine organisms.

    PubMed Central

    Varanasi, U; Stein, J E

    1991-01-01

    Studies with several bottom fish species from urban waterways show that of the identified xenobiotic chemicals in bottom sediments, polycylic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are the most strongly associated with the prevalence of liver lesions, including neoplasms. Accordingly, there is concern about the transfer of contaminants, such as PAHs, from aquatic species to humans. Because PAHs exert their toxicity only after being biotransformed, increasing attention has been focused on the ability of aquatic organisms to metabolize these chemicals. Overall, the results of both laboratory and field studies show that generally low levels (nanograms per gram wet weight) of a few low molecular weight PAHs may be present in edible tissue of fish from contaminated areas and that high molecular weight PAHs, such as the carcinogen benzo(a)pyrene, will rarely be detected because of extensive metabolism. Additionally, the results from a few studies suggest that even though interactions between xenobiotics can affect both biochemical and physiological systems to alter the disposition of PAHs in fish, these interactions do not markedly change the relative proportions of metabolites to parent PAH in tissues. Thus, these studies clearly demonstrate that to obtain some insight into the questions of whether there is any risk to human health from consuming fish and crustaceans from urban areas, techniques must be developed that measure metabolites of carcinogens, such as PAHs, in edible tissue. Initial attempts may focus on semiquantitative methods that permit rapid assessment of the level of metabolites in edible tissues of fish and crustaceans from many urban areas.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images FIGURE 4. FIGURE 4. FIGURE 4. PMID:2050086

  10. Measurement of Blood Thiamine Metabolites for Alzheimer's Disease Diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Pan, Xiaoli; Fei, Guoqiang; Lu, Jingwen; Jin, Lirong; Pan, Shumei; Chen, Zhichun; Wang, Changpeng; Sang, Shaoming; Liu, Huimin; Hu, Weihong; Zhang, Hua; Wang, Hui; Wang, Zhiliang; Tan, Qiong; Qin, Yan; Zhang, Qunying; Xie, Xueping; Ji, Yong; Cui, Donghong; Gu, Xiaohua; Xu, Jun; Yu, Yuguo; Zhong, Chunjiu

    2015-01-01

    Background Brain glucose hypometabolism is an invariant feature and has significant diagnostic value for Alzheimer's disease. Thiamine diphosphate (TDP) is a critical coenzyme for glucose metabolism and significantly reduced in brain and blood samples of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Aims To explore the diagnostic value of the measurement of blood thiamine metabolites for AD. Methods Blood TDP, thiamine monophosphate, and thiamine levels were detected using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). The study included the exploration and validation phases. In the exploration phase, the samples of 338 control subjects and 43 AD patients were utilized to establish the models for AD diagnosis assayed by receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, including the variable γ that represents the best combination of thiamine metabolites and age to predict the possibility of AD. In the validation phase, the values of models were further tested for AD diagnosis using samples of 861 control subjects, 81 AD patients, 70 vascular dementia patients, and 13 frontotemporal dementia patients. Results TDP and the γ exhibited significant and consistent values for AD diagnosis in both exploration and validation phases. TDP had 0.843 and 0.837 of the areas under ROC curve (AUCs), 77.4% and 81.5% of sensitivities, and 78.1% and 77.2% of specificities respectively in the exploration and validation phases. The γ had 0.938 and 0.910 of AUCs, 81.4% and 80.2% of sensitivities, and 90.5% and 87.2% of specificities respectively in the exploration and validation phases. TDP and the γ can effectively distinguish AD from vascular dementia (64.3% for TDP, 67.1% for γ) and frontotemporal dementia (84.6% for TDP, 100.0% for γ). Interpretation. The measurement of blood thiamine metabolites by HPLC is an ideal diagnostic test for AD with inexpensive, easy to perform, noninvasive merits. PMID:26870826

  11. Enantioselective renal excretion of albendazole metabolites in patients with neurocysticercosis.

    PubMed

    Lanchote, V L; Takayanagui, O M; Mateus, F H

    2004-10-01

    The present study investigates the urinary excretion of the enantiomers of (+)- and (-)-albendazole sulfoxide (ASOX) and albendazole sulfone (ASON) in 12 patients with neurocysticercosis treated with albendazole for 8 days (7.5 mg/kg/12 h). Serial blood samples (0-12 h) and urine (three periods of 8 h) were collected after administration of the last dose of albendazole. Plasma and urine (+)-ASOX, (-)-ASOX, and ASON metabolites were determined by HPLC using a chiral phase column (Chiralpak AD) with fluorescence detection. The pharmacokinetic parameters (P < 0.05) for (+)-ASOX, (-)-ASOX, and ASON metabolites are reported as means (95% CI); amount excreted (Ae) = 3.19 (1.53-4.85) vs. 0.72 (0.41-1.04) vs. 0.08 (0.03-0.13) mg; plasma concentration-time area under the curve, AUC(0-24) = 3.56 (0.93-6.18) vs. 0.60 (0.12-1.08) vs. 0.38 (0.20-0.55) microg x h/ml, and renal clearance Cl(R) = 1.20 (0.66-1.73) vs. 2.72 (0.39-5.05) vs. 0.25 (0.13-0.37) l/h. Sulfone formation capacity, expressed as the Ae ratio ASON/ASOX + ASON, was 2.21 (1.43-2.99). These data point to enantioselectivity in the renal excretion of ASOX as a complementary mechanism to the metabolism responsible for the plasma accumulation of (+)-ASOX. The results also suggest that the metabolite ASON is partially eliminated as a reaction product of the subsequent metabolism.

  12. Presence and fate of carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and seven of their metabolites at wastewater treatment plants.

    PubMed

    Leclercq, Marie; Mathieu, Olivier; Gomez, Elena; Casellas, Claude; Fenet, Hélène; Hillaire-Buys, Dominique

    2009-04-01

    Many pharmaceuticals are excreted in wastewater as parent substances or metabolites subsequent to therapeutic or diagnostic application in medical care. This includes the antiepileptic carbamazepine, which is not removed during conventional wastewater treatment and was found to be ubiquitous in the aquatic environment. Some carbamazepine metabolites have also been found in treated wastewater, but only five of them have been studied to date. However, at least 30 carbamazepine metabolites have been identified in humans, including some pharmacologically active or genotoxic compounds. Oxcarbazepine, an antiepileptic which is increasingly used, generates metabolites common to those of carbamazepine. The present work focuses on the presence of carbamazepine, oxcarbazepine, and seven of their metabolites (carbamazepine-10,11-epoxide, 10-hydroxy-10,11-dihydrocarbamazepine, 10,11-dihydro-10,11-trans-dihydroxycarbamazepine, 2-hydroxy-carbamazepine, iminostilbene, acridine, and acridone) at three different treatment plants (conventional activated sludge, trickling filter, and stabilization ponds) selected in France. The main aim of this work was to identify selected compounds in wastewater after therapeutic use and to measure concentrations in influents and effluents at the three wastewater treatment plants. Except for iminostilbene, all of these compounds were detected in wastewater. The metabolite common to carbamazepine and oxcarbazepine, i.e., 10,11-dihydro-10,11-trans-dihydroxycarbamazepine, was detected at a higher concentration than the parent substances in wastewater. The presence of parent molecules was noted in inlet and outlet water samples. Carbamazepine, as expected, was not removed by conventional activated sludge treatment. Nevertheless, in a wastewater treatment plant with a 78-day hydraulic retention time, a 73% decrease in carbamazepine concentration was observed. For the first time, oxcarbazepine was found in environmental samples. A decrease in

  13. Manual therapy ameliorates delayed-onset muscle soreness and alters muscle metabolites in rats.

    PubMed

    Urakawa, Susumu; Takamoto, Kouichi; Nakamura, Tomoya; Sakai, Shigekazu; Matsuda, Teru; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-02-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) can be induced by lengthening contraction (LC); it can be characterized by tenderness and movement-related pain in the exercised muscle. Manual therapy (MT), including compression of exercised muscles, is widely used as physical rehabilitation to reduce pain and promote functional recovery. Although MT is beneficial for reducing musculoskeletal pain (i.e. DOMS), the physiological mechanisms of MT remain unclear. In the present study, we first developed an animal model of MT in DOMS; LC was applied to the rat gastrocnemius muscle under anesthesia, which induced mechanical hyperalgesia 2-4 days after LC. MT (manual compression) ameliorated mechanical hyperalgesia. Then, we used capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (CE-TOFMS) to investigate early effects of MT on the metabolite profiles of the muscle experiencing DOMS. The rats were divided into the following three groups; (1) normal controls, (2) rats with LC application (LC group), and (3) rats undergoing MT after LC (LC + MT group). According to the CE-TOFMS analysis, a total of 171 metabolites were detected among the three groups, and 19 of these metabolites were significant among the groups. Furthermore, the concentrations of eight metabolites, including branched-chain amino acids, carnitine, and malic acid, were significantly different between the LC + MT and LC groups. The results suggest that MT significantly altered metabolite profiles in DOMS. According to our findings and previous data regarding metabolites in mitochondrial metabolism, the ameliorative effects of MT might be mediated partly through alterations in metabolites associated with mitochondrial respiration. PMID:25713324

  14. Manual therapy ameliorates delayed-onset muscle soreness and alters muscle metabolites in rats

    PubMed Central

    Urakawa, Susumu; Takamoto, Kouichi; Nakamura, Tomoya; Sakai, Shigekazu; Matsuda, Teru; Taguchi, Toru; Mizumura, Kazue; Ono, Taketoshi; Nishijo, Hisao

    2015-01-01

    Delayed-onset muscle soreness (DOMS) can be induced by lengthening contraction (LC); it can be characterized by tenderness and movement-related pain in the exercised muscle. Manual therapy (MT), including compression of exercised muscles, is widely used as physical rehabilitation to reduce pain and promote functional recovery. Although MT is beneficial for reducing musculoskeletal pain (i.e. DOMS), the physiological mechanisms of MT remain unclear. In the present study, we first developed an animal model of MT in DOMS; LC was applied to the rat gastrocnemius muscle under anesthesia, which induced mechanical hyperalgesia 2–4 days after LC. MT (manual compression) ameliorated mechanical hyperalgesia. Then, we used capillary electrophoresis time-of-flight mass spectroscopy (CE-TOFMS) to investigate early effects of MT on the metabolite profiles of the muscle experiencing DOMS. The rats were divided into the following three groups; (1) normal controls, (2) rats with LC application (LC group), and (3) rats undergoing MT after LC (LC + MT group). According to the CE-TOFMS analysis, a total of 171 metabolites were detected among the three groups, and 19 of these metabolites were significant among the groups. Furthermore, the concentrations of eight metabolites, including branched-chain amino acids, carnitine, and malic acid, were significantly different between the LC + MT and LC groups. The results suggest that MT significantly altered metabolite profiles in DOMS. According to our findings and previous data regarding metabolites in mitochondrial metabolism, the ameliorative effects of MT might be mediated partly through alterations in metabolites associated with mitochondrial respiration. PMID:25713324

  15. Urinary Metabolites of Organophosphate and Pyrethroid Pesticides and Behavioral Problems in Canadian Children

    PubMed Central

    Oulhote, Youssef

    2013-01-01

    Background: Exposure to organophosphate pesticides has been associated with neurobehavioral deficits in children, although data on low levels of exposure experienced by the general population are sparse. Pyrethroids are insecticides rapidly gaining popularity, and epidemiological evidence on their potential effects is lacking. Objective: We examined the association between exposure to organophosphate and pyrethroid pesticides, indicated by urinary metabolites, and parentally reported behavioral problems in children. Methods: We used data on children 6–11 years of age from the Canadian Health Measures Survey (2007–2009). We used logistic regressions to estimate odds ratios (ORs) for high scores on the Strengths and Difficulties Questionnaire (SDQ), which may indicate behavioral problems, in association with concentrations of pyrethroid and organophosphate metabolites in the urine of 779 children, adjusting for covariates (sex, age, race/ethnicity, income, parental education, blood lead levels, maternal smoking during pregnancy, and others). Results: At least one urinary metabolite for organophosphates was detected in 91% of children, and for pyrethroids in 97% of children. Organophosphate metabolites were not significantly associated with high SDQ scores. The pyrethroid metabolite cis-DCCA [3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylycyclopropane carboxylic acid] was significantly associated with high scores for total difficulties on the SDQ (OR for a 10-fold increase = 2.0; 95% CI: 1.1, 3.6), and there was a nonsignificant association with trans-DCCA (OR = 1.6; 95% CI: 0.9, 3.0). Conclusion: In contrast with previous studies, we did not observe an association between exposure to organophosphate pesticides and behavioral scores in children. However, some pyrethroid urinary metabolites were associated with a high level of parent-reported behavioral problems. Longitudinal studies should be conducted on the potential risks of pyrethroids. Citation: Oulhote Y, Bouchard MF

  16. Urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to capture and captivity in the cane toad (Rhinella marina).

    PubMed

    Narayan, Edward J; Cockrem, John F; Hero, Jean-Marc

    2011-09-01

    Urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to capture have recently been shown for the first time in amphibians, and in the present study urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to capture and to confinement in captivity were measured in adult cane toads (Rhinella marina) in Queensland, Australia. An adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) challenge was used to provide a biological validation for urinary corticosterone metabolite concentrations measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Urinary corticosterone metabolite increased 1-2 days after ACTH but not saline injection and then returned to initial values, indicating that the RIA could detect changes in corticosterone secretion in toads. Urinary corticosterone metabolite responses to short-term capture and restraint in plastic bags were first apparent 2h after capture of wild toads. Toads held communally in captivity for 5 days had elevated urinary corticosterone metabolite concentrations. Mean corticosterone concentrations declined significantly after a further 7 days in individual housing chambers. There was no sex difference in urinary corticosterone metabolite responses of toads to ACTH challenge, short-term capture or captivity. The relative amount of variation in the mean corticosterone responses was quantified by calculating coefficients of variation (CV) for each mean corticosterone response. Mean corticosterone at 0 min was more variable for captive toads than wild toads. Furthermore, initial corticosterone concentrations (0 min) were more variable than concentrations during the ACTH challenge, short-term capture and captivity. There was little change in the amount of variation of mean corticosterone levels between male and female toads with increasing time in captivity (12-29 days). This study has shown individual corticosterone responses of amphibians for the first-time, and has provided a novel method for quantifying the relative amount of variation in amphibian corticosterone responses.

  17. Determination of cilostazol and its metabolites in human urine by high performance liquid chromatography.

    PubMed

    Tata, P N; Fu, C H; Bramer, S L

    2001-01-01

    A high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) method with ultraviolet detection for the simultaneous quantification of cilostazol, and its known metabolites in human urine was developed and validated. Cilostazol, its metabolites and the internal standard OPC-3930 (structural analogue of cilostazol) were extracted from human urine using liquid-liquid extraction with chloroform. The organic extract was then evaporated and the residue was reconstituted in 8% acetonitrile in ammonium acetate buffer (pH 6.5). The reconstituted solution was injected onto an HPLC system and was subjected to reverse-phase HPLC on a 5-microm ODS column. A gradient mobile phase with different percentages of acetonitrile in acetate buffer (pH 6.5) was used for the resolution of analytes. Cilostazol, its metabolites and the internal standard were well resolved at baseline with adequate resolution from constituents of human urine. The lower limit of quantification was 100 ng/ml for cilostazol and all metabolites. The method was validated for a linear range of 100-3000 ng/ml for all the metabolites and cilostazol. The overall accuracy (% relative recovery) of this method ranged from 86.1 to 116.8% for all the analytes with overall precision (%CV) being 0.8-19.7%. The long-term stability of clinical urine samples was established for at least 3 months at -20 degrees C in a storage freezer. During validation, calibration curves had correlation coefficients greater than or equal to 0.995 for cilostazol and the seven tested metabolites. The method was successfully used for the analysis of cilostazol and its metabolites in urine samples from clinical studies, demonstrating the reliability and robustness of the method.

  18. HPLC Determination and MS Confirmation of Malachite Green, Gentian Violet, and Their Leuco Metabolites in Catfish Muscle

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Residues of malachite green (MG), gentian violet (GV), and their leuco metabolites in catfish muscle were individually determined by HPLC using visible and fluorescence detectors. This detection scheme obviated a PbO2 column that converts leuco forms to chromatic forms for visible detection, thus el...

  19. Chemosensation of bacterial secondary metabolites modulates neuroendocrine signaling and behavior of C. elegans.

    PubMed

    Meisel, Joshua D; Panda, Oishika; Mahanti, Parag; Schroeder, Frank C; Kim, Dennis H

    2014-10-01

    Discrimination between pathogenic and beneficial microbes is essential for host organism immunity and homeostasis. Here, we show that chemosensory detection of two secondary metabolites produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates a neuroendocrine signaling pathway that promotes avoidance behavior in the simple animal host Caenorhabditis elegans. Secondary metabolites phenazine-1-carboxamide and pyochelin activate a G-protein-signaling pathway in the ASJ chemosensory neuron pair that induces expression of the neuromodulator DAF-7/TGF-β. DAF-7, in turn, activates a canonical TGF-β signaling pathway in adjacent interneurons to modulate aerotaxis behavior and promote avoidance of pathogenic P. aeruginosa. Our data provide a chemical, genetic, and neuronal basis for how the behavior and physiology of a simple animal host can be modified by the microbial environment and suggest that secondary metabolites produced by microbes may provide environmental cues that contribute to pathogen recognition and host survival. PMID:25303524

  20. Metabolites profiling of Chrysanthemum pacificum Nakai parts using UPLC-PDA-MS coupled to chemometrics.

    PubMed

    Farag, Nermeen F; Farag, Mohamed A; Abdelrahman, Enas H; Azzam, Shadia M; El-Kashoury, El-Sayeda A

    2015-01-01

    Methanol-soluble constituents from the flowers, non-flowering aerial parts and roots of Chrysanthemum pacificum Nakai were analysed via high resolution UPLC-PDA-qTOF-MS followed by chemometrics. Forty-seven chromatographic peaks belonging to various metabolite classes were detected. Most metabolite classes showed qualitative and quantitative differences across parts, with luteolin conjugates being mostly enriched in flowers whereas non-flowering aerial parts contained mostly quercetin and methoxylated flavone conjugates. Root sample ranked the lowest for all flavones and dicaffeoylquinic acids. In contrast, 1,5-di-caffeoylquinic acid levels were found at high levels in flowers and aerial parts reaching 3145 and 1390 μg/g, respectively, suggesting that C. pacificum could serve as a natural resource of this well-recognised anti-hepatotoxic phenolic. Principal component analysis was further used for organs classification in an untargeted manner. This study provides the first map of secondary metabolites distribution in C. pacificum Nakai organs.

  1. The determination of quizalofop-p-tefuryl, Pantera, and metabolites in soils using GC/MSD

    SciTech Connect

    Parkins, M.D.; Bruns, G.

    1995-12-01

    A published procedure for the analysis of herbicides in soil and sediment was adapted for determining residues of Pantera, quizalofop-p-tefuryl, and its metabolites. Soil is extracted by shaking with a solvent mixture of acetone/0.05N HCL, followed by 0.1 N KOH. The extracts are combined, acidified and then partitioned with methylene chloride. The organic phase is concentrated to 1.0 mL. One half the sample is reacted with diazomethane and analyzed for parent compound and the methyl derivative of the acid metabolite, quizalofop, by GC/MSD with no further workup. The other half is reacted with diazomethane using an elevated temperature, to form volatile methyl derivatives of the metabolites; chlorohydroxyquinoxaline, and chloroquinoxaline phenol. Recoveries were determined at 0.02 ppm, the level of detection, and at 0.20 ppm. The average recovery value for all analytes was greater than 90%.

  2. Chemosensation of Bacterial Secondary Metabolites Modulates Neuroendocrine Signaling and Behavior of C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Meisel, Joshua D.; Panda, Oishika; Mahanti, Parag; Schroeder, Frank C.; Kim, Dennis H.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Discrimination among pathogenic and beneficial microbes is essential for host organism immunity and homeostasis. Here, we show that chemosensory detection of two secondary metabolites produced by Pseudomonas aeruginosa modulates a neuroendocrine signaling pathway that promotes avoidance behavior in the simple animal host Caenorhabditis elegans. Secondary metabolites phenazine-1-carboxamide and pyochelin activate a G protein-signaling pathway in the ASJ chemosensory neuron pair that induces expression of the neuromodulator DAF-7/TGF-β. DAF-7, in turn, activates a canonical TGF-β signaling pathway in adjacent interneurons to modulate aerotaxis behavior and promote avoidance of pathogenic P. aeruginosa. Our data provide a chemical, genetic, and neuronal basis for how the behavior and physiology of a simple animal host can be modified by the microbial environment, and suggest that secondary metabolites produced by microbes may provide environmental cues that contribute to pathogen recognition and host survival. PMID:25303524

  3. Utilizing DART Mass Spectrometry to Pinpoint Halogenated Metabolites from a Marine Invertebrate-Derived Fungus

    PubMed Central

    Watts, Katharine R.; Loveridge, Steven T.; Tenney, Karen; Media, Joseph; Valeriote, Frederick A.; Crews, Phillip

    2011-01-01

    Prenylated indole alkaloids are a diverse group of fungal secondary metabolites and represent an important biosynthetic class. In this study we have identified new halogenated prenyl-indole alkaloids from an invertebrate-derived Malbranchea graminicola strain. Using Direct Analysis in Real Time (DART) Mass Spectrometry, these compounds were initially detected from spores of the fungus grown on agar plates, without the need for any organic extraction. Subsequently, the metabolites were isolated from liquid culture in artificial seawater. The structures of two novel chlorinated metabolites, named (−)-spiromalbramide and (+)-isomalbrancheamide B, provide additional insights into the assembly of the malbrancheamide compound family. Remarkably, two new brominated analogs, (+)-malbrancheamide C and (+)-isomalbrancheamide C, were produced by enriching the growth medium with bromine salts. PMID:21682275

  4. Microbial metabolism part 13 metabolites of hesperetin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The fungal culture, Mucor ramannianus (ATCC 2628) transformed hesperitin to four metabolites: 4'-methoxy -5, 7, 8, 3'-tetrahydroxyflavanone (8-hydroxyhesperetin), 5, 7, 3', 4'-tetrahydroxyflavanone (eriodictyol), 4'-methoxy-5, 3'-dihydroxyflavanone 7-sulfate (hesperetin 7-sulfate) and 5, 7, 3'-tri...

  5. Serum albumin complexation of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Wiktor; Porebski, Grzegorz; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Roterman, Irena

    2009-06-01

    One possible origin of the type I hypersensitivity reaction is reaction of drugs such as acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolites being complexed with human serum albumin. Albumin, being transporting molecule abundant in blood plasma is able to bind large array of ligands varying from small single carbon particles to long hydrophobic tailed lipidic acids (e.g. myristic acid). This non specificity is possible because of multi domain scaffold and large flexibility of inter-domain loops, which results in serious reorientation of domains. Hypothesis that acetylsalicylic acid metabolites may play indirect role in activation of allergic reaction has been tested. Binding of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites in intra-domain space causes significant increase of liability of domains IIIA and IIIB. One of metabolites, salicyluric acid, once is bound causes distortion and partial unfolding of helices in domains IA, IIB and IIIB. Changed are both directions and amplitude of relative motions as well as intra-domain distances. In result albumin is able to cross-link of adjacent IgE receptors which subsequently starts allergic reaction.

  6. Serum albumin complexation of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites.

    PubMed

    Jurkowski, Wiktor; Porebski, Grzegorz; Obtułowicz, Krystyna; Roterman, Irena

    2009-06-01

    One possible origin of the type I hypersensitivity reaction is reaction of drugs such as acetylsalicylic acid and its metabolites being complexed with human serum albumin. Albumin, being transporting molecule abundant in blood plasma is able to bind large array of ligands varying from small single carbon particles to long hydrophobic tailed lipidic acids (e.g. myristic acid). This non specificity is possible because of multi domain scaffold and large flexibility of inter-domain loops, which results in serious reorientation of domains. Hypothesis that acetylsalicylic acid metabolites may play indirect role in activation of allergic reaction has been tested. Binding of acetylsalicylic acid metabolites in intra-domain space causes significant increase of liability of domains IIIA and IIIB. One of metabolites, salicyluric acid, once is bound causes distortion and partial unfolding of helices in domains IA, IIB and IIIB. Changed are both directions and amplitude of relative motions as well as intra-domain distances. In result albumin is able to cross-link of adjacent IgE receptors which subsequently starts allergic reaction. PMID:19689242

  7. Aspirin-triggered metabolites of EFAs.

    PubMed

    Makriyannis, Alexandros; Nikas, Spyros P

    2011-10-28

    Aspirin triggers the biosynthesis of oxygenated metabolites from arachidonic, eicosapentaenoic, and docosahexaenoic (DHA) acids. In a preceding issue, Serhan et al. (2011) describe a novel aspirin-triggered DHA pathway for the biosynthesis of a potent anti-inflammatory and proresolving molecule. PMID:22035788

  8. Eleven microbial metabolites of 6-hydroxyflavanone

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    6-Hydroxyflavanone (1) when fermented with fungal culture Cunninghamella blakesleeana (ATCC 8688a) yielded flavanone 6-O-ß-D-glucopyranoside (2), flavanone 6-sulfate (3), and 6-hydroxyflavanone 7-sulfate (4). Aspergillus alliaceus (ATCC 10060) also transformed 1 to metabolite 3 as well as 4'-hydrox...

  9. [Synthesis of metabolites and enantiomers of prolintane].

    PubMed

    Rücker, G; Neugebauer, M; Zhong, D

    1992-01-01

    The synthesis of 15 possible metabolites of prolintane (1) (Katovit) which is used in the treatment of blood pressure disregulations is described. Furthermore, the preparation of the enantiomers of 1 is reported, starting with R-(+)- and S-(-)-phenylalaninol respectively. PMID:1605711

  10. Tentative identification of in vitro metabolites of 5-APDB, a synthetic benzofuran, by LC-Q/TOF-MS.

    PubMed

    Park, Jong Suk; Rehman, Shaheed Ur; Kim, In Sook; Choi, Min Sun; Lee, Jae Sin; In, Sanghwan; Yoo, Hye Hyun

    2016-10-15

    5-(2-Aminopropyl)-2,3-dihydrobenzofuran (5-APDB) is a designer drug of phenethylamine and amphetamine class. In this study, the in vitro metabolism of 5-APDB was investigated in rat and human liver microsomes and human hepatocytes to characterize its metabolites. 5-APDB was incubated with microsomes or hepatocytes, and the reaction mixture was analyzed using liquid chromatography-quadrupole time-of-flight with tandem mass spectrometry (LC-Q/TOF-MS). 5-APDB was metabolized to yield three metabolites (M1, M2 and M3). These metabolites were structurally characterized on the basis of accurate mass analysis and MS/MS fragmentation patterns. Metabolite M1 and M2 were identified as hydroxylated metabolites in the benzofuran moiety; M3 was a reduced metabolite which may be generated from M1 or M2 via dehydration. These results provide evidence for the in vivo 5-APDB metabolism, and would be forensically useful for the detection of 5-APDB and its metabolites in biological samples.

  11. Metabolite profiling of RCS-4, a novel synthetic cannabinoid designer drug, using human hepatocyte metabolism and TOF-MS

    PubMed Central

    Gandhi, Adarsh S; Zhu, Mingshe; Pang, Shaokun; Wohlfarth, Ariane; Scheidweiler, Karl B; Huestis, Marilyn A

    2014-01-01

    Background Since 2009, scheduling legislation of synthetic cannabinoids prompted new compound emergence to circumvent legal restrictions. 2-(4-methoxyphenyl)-1-(1-pentyl-indol-3-yl)methanone (RCS-4) is a potent cannabinoid receptor agonist sold in herbal smoking blends. Absence of parent synthetic cannabinoids in urine suggests the importance of metabolite identification for detecting RCS-4 consumption in clinical and forensic investigations. Materials & methods & Results With 1 h human hepatocyte incubation and TOF high-resolution MS, we identified 18 RCS-4 metabolites, many not yet reported. Most metabolites were hydroxylated with or without demethylation, carboxylation and dealkylation followed by glucuronidation. One additional sulfated metabolite was also observed. O-demethylation was the most common biotransformation and generated the major metabolite. Conclusion For the first time, we present a metabolic scheme of RCS-4 obtained from human hepatocytes, including Phase I and II metabolites. Metabolite structural information and associated high-resolution mass spectra can be employed for developing clinical and forensic laboratory RCS-4 urine screening methods. PMID:25046048

  12. Effects of primary metabolites of organophosphate flame retardants on transcriptional activity via human nuclear receptors.

    PubMed

    Kojima, Hiroyuki; Takeuchi, Shinji; Van den Eede, Nele; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-03-14

    Organophosphate flame retardants (OPFRs) have been used in a wide variety of applications and detected in several environmental matrices, including indoor air and dust. Continuous human exposure to these chemicals is of growing concern. In this study, the agonistic and/or antagonistic activities of 12 primary OPFR-metabolites against ten human nuclear receptors were examined using cell-based transcriptional assays, and compared to those of their parent compounds. As a result, 3-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate and 4-hydroxylphenyl diphenyl phosphate showed more potent estrogen receptor α (ERα) and ERβ agonistic activity than did their parent, triphenyl phosphate (TPHP). In addition, these hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites also showed ERβ antagonistic activity at higher concentrations and exhibited pregnane X receptor (PXR) agonistic activity as well as androgen receptor (AR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR) antagonistic activities at similar levels to those of TPHP. Bis(2-butoxyethyl) 3'-hydroxy-2-butoxyethyl phosphate and 2-hydroxyethyl bis(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate act as PXR agonists at similar levels to their parent, tris(2-butoxyethyl) phosphate. On the other hand, seven diester OPFR-metabolites and 1-hydroxy-2-propyl bis(1-chloro-2-propyl) phosphate did not show any receptor activity. Taken together, these results suggest that hydroxylated TPHP-metabolites show increased estrogenicity compared to the parent compound, whereas the diester OPFR-metabolites may have limited nuclear receptor activity compared to their parent triester OPFRs.

  13. Fecal estradiol and progesterone metabolite levels in the three-toed sloth (Bradypus variegatus).

    PubMed

    Mühlbauer, M; Duarte, D P F; Gilmore, D P; Costa, C P da

    2006-02-01

    The present study was carried out to assess the possibility of measuring fecal steroid hormone metabolites as a noninvasive technique for monitoring reproductive function in the three-toed sloth, Bradypus variegatus. Levels of the estradiol (E2) and progesterone (P4) metabolites were measured by radioimmunoassay in fecal samples collected over 12 weeks from 4 captive female B. variegatus sloths. The validation of the radioimmunoassay for evaluation of fecal steroid metabolites was carried out by collecting 10 blood samples on the same day as defecation. There was a significant direct correlation between the plasma and fecal E2 and P4 levels (P < 0.05, Pearson's test), thereby validating this noninvasive technique for the study of the estrous cycle in these animals. Ovulation was detected in two sloths (SL03 and SL04) whose E2 levels reached 2237.43 and 6713.26 pg/g wet feces weight, respectively, for over four weeks, followed by an increase in P4 metabolites reaching 33.54 and 3242.68 ng/g wet feces weight, respectively. Interestingly, SL04, which presented higher levels of E2 and P4 metabolites, later gave birth to a healthy baby sloth. The results obtained indicate that this is a reliable technique for recording gonadal steroid secretion and thereby reproduction in sloths.

  14. Modulation of the cellular content of metabolites in adipocytes by insulin.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuhang; Tomonaga, Shozo; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-03-15

    Although the insulin-mediated cell signaling pathway has been extensively examined, changes in the cellular content of metabolites currently remain unclear. We herein examined metabolite contents in 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with insulin using a metabolomic analysis. Fifty-four compounds were detected, and the contents of metabolites from the citric acid cycle increased in response to the insulin treatment for 4 h, which was sensitive to U0126 and LY294002, inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase, respectively. The cellular contents of fumaric acid and malic acid were increased more by insulin than those of citric acid and succinic acid. Time-course changes in metabolites from the citric acid cycle exhibited oscillations with a 2-h cycle. A metabolic pathway analysis also indicated that insulin affected the metabolism of alanine, aspartate and glutamate, as well as that of arginine and proline. The contents of free amino acids were slightly decreased by the insulin treatment, while the co-treatment with U0126 and LY294002 abrogated these insulin-mediated decreases. The present study revealed the unexpected accumulation of citric acid cycle metabolites in adipocytes by insulin. Our results indicate the usefulness of metabolomic analyses for obtaining a more comprehensive understanding of the regulation of metabolic pathways in cell-culture systems.

  15. Identification and distribution of four metabolites of geniposide in rats with adjuvant arthritis.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian; Wu, Hong; Dai, Miao-Miao; Li, Hui; Chen, Jin-Yun; Hu, Shun-Li

    2014-09-01

    Geniposide (GE), also called Jasminoidin, is the major active ingredient of Gardenia jasminoides Ellis (GJ) fruit, which has long been used in traditional Chinese medicine (TCM). Growing evidences suggested that GE has a great potentiality for treating rheumatoid arthritis (RA). However, GE is rapidly metabolized, and we know little about its availability or metabolites in tissues. To elucidate the distribution of GE and its metabolites in tissues, three groups of adjuvant arthritis (AA) rats were given GE (33, 66 and 120 mg/kg) from days 18 to 24, and the biotransformation of GE in plasma, liver, spleen, synovium, urine and mesenteric lymph node (MLN) of rats was investigated by a novel approach named Information-Dependent Acquisition (IDA)-Mediated LC-MS/MS method. As a result, GE and its four major metabolites were detected as follows: GE, G1, G2 in plasma; GE, G2 in MLNs; only GE in liver and synovium; GE, G2, G3 and G4 in spleen; and GE, G1, G2 and G4 in urine. In total four metabolites (G1-G4) involved in the in vivo metabolism processes were identified. The results of this work have demonstrated the IDA-Mediated LC-MS/MS could screen rapidly and reliably the characterization of metabolites from iridoid compounds. PMID:24910002

  16. Biliary PAH metabolites and the hepatosomatic index of brown bullheads from Lake Erie tributaries

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Yang, X.; Baumann, P.C.

    2006-01-01

    In studies designed to investigate the environmental exposure of fish in Lake Erie tributaries, a benthic fish, the brown bullhead (Ameiurus nebulosus), was collected from the industrially contaminated Detroit River, Ottawa River, Black River, Cuyahoga River-harbor and -upstream, Ashtabula River, Buffalo River, and Niagara River, and the non-industrialized Old Woman Creek during 1997-2000. Biliary benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P)- and naphthalene (NAPH)-type metabolites and the hepatosomatic index (HSI) were measured in fish and compared between different sites. Fish from all of the contaminated sites except Niagara River had significantly higher concentrations of both types of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) metabolites than fish from the Old Woman Creek. Concentrations of PAH metabolites in bile of fish were positively associated with concentrations of PAHs in sediments, supporting the use of bile metabolites as a measure of PAH exposure. Relatively low concentrations of PAHs detected in fish bile and sediments of the Niagara River, which had undergone extensive remediation, suggested a lowered PAH exposure for fish at this site. No apparent trend was observed in HSI between the industrialized and non-industrialized sites. This study demonstrates that biliary PAH metabolites are an effective indicator of exposure of fish to PAHs. However, because factors other than contamination could also affect the liver size of wild fish, HSI alone may be not a reliable biomarker for assessing contaminant stress. ?? 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Sex, stress and social status: patterns in fecal testosterone and glucocorticoid metabolites in male Ethiopian wolves.

    PubMed

    van Kesteren, Freya; Sillero-Zubiri, Claudio; Millar, Robert; Argaw, Kifle; Macdonald, David W; Paris, Monique

    2012-10-01

    Ethiopian wolves, Canis simensis, live in large multi-male family packs, where males are philopatric and do not disperse. Within a pack, mating and breeding is largely monopolized by the dominant male and female, although extra-pack copulations are common, and subordinate males may sire pups in neighboring packs. Regardless of paternity, all males in a pack help rear the pups. We non-invasively studied patterns in fecal testosterone and glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations using radioimmunoassays of fecal samples collected from nine wild male Ethiopian wolves between August 2007 and February 2008. We tested the predictions of the Challenge Hypothesis, namely that fecal testosterone metabolite concentrations would be higher during the annual mating season, which is the portion of the reproductive cycle when mating and increased aggression typically occur, and lower when there were pups in the pack for which to care. Contrary to the predictions of the Challenge Hypothesis, we did not detect patterns in fecal testosterone metabolite concentrations associated with reproductive stage during our study period. Similarly, we found no patterns associated with reproductive stage in male fecal glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations. Dominant males had higher average fecal testosterone and glucocorticoid metabolite concentrations than did subordinates, which may be related to higher rates of aggression and mate guarding in dominant males of group-living canids, a pattern also reported in African wild dogs, Lycaon pictus. PMID:22841807

  18. Isolation and identification of major metabolites of tixocortol pivalate in human urine.

    PubMed

    Chanoine, F; Grenot, C; Sellier, N; Barrett, W E; Thompson, R M; Fentiman, A F; Nixon, J R; Goyer, R; Junien, J L

    1987-01-01

    The metabolism of tixocortol pivalate (PIVALONE), an anti-inflammatory steroid without systemic glucocorticoid effects, has been investigated in man. The analysis was conducted using urine samples collected from two volunteers who had received a 2-g oral dose of 14C-tixocortol pivalate as an oral suspension. Metabolites were purified and isolated from urine by normal phase HPLC, and structural identification was achieved by desorption chemical ionization/NH3 and electron impact/direct line introduction mass spectrometry. Unchanged tixocortol pivalate was not detected in urine; all metabolites were sulfo- and glucurono-conjugates. Metabolites were identified in the neutral steroid fraction obtained after hydrolysis of conjugates. Metabolic transformations in common with cortisol were reduction of the 3-keto, delta 4 system, reduction of the C-20 carbonyl group, oxidation of the C-11 alcohol, and cleavage of the side chain at C-17. Specific metabolic pathways involving the C-21 thiol ester function were transformations into methylthio, methylsulfinyl and methylsulfonyl derivatives, and a reductive cleavage of the C-21-S bond leading to 21-methyl structures. Since none of these metabolites had binding affinity for glucocorticoid receptors in vitro, fast and extensive transformation of tixocortol pivalate into inactive metabolites provides an explanation for the large dissociation between the topical and systemic activities of this drug.

  19. Metabolites identification of glycycoumarin, a major bioactive coumarin from licorice in rats.

    PubMed

    Wang, Qi; Qiao, Xue; Liu, Chun-fang; Ji, Shuai; Feng, Lin-Min; Qian, Yi; Guo, De-An; Ye, Min

    2014-09-01

    Glycycoumarin is a major bioactive coumarin of licorice (Glycyrrhiza uralensis), one of the most popular herbal medicines worldwide. In this work, the metabolism of glycycoumarin in rats was investigated. After oral administration of 40mg/kg glycycoumarin, 4 and 10 metabolites were respectively detected in rats plasma and urine samples by liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (LC/MS). These metabolites were tentatively characterized by analyzing their tandem mass spectra and high-resolution mass spectra, and the structures of glucuronides were confirmed by β-glucuronidase hydrolysis. Glycycoumarin mainly undertakes hydroxylation and glucuronidation metabolism, accompanied by hydrogenation and dehydrogenation as minor reactions. Two hydroxylated metabolites, 4''-hydroxyl glycycoumarin and 5''-hydroxyl glycycoumarin, were obtained by microbial transformation of Syncephalastrum racemosum AS 3.264, and their structures were fully identified by 1D and 2D NMR. Both metabolites are new compounds. Furthermore, they were proved to be catalyzed by P450 enzymes by rat liver microsomes incubation experiments. Finally, a metabolic pathway of glycycoumarin in rats was proposed. This is the first systematic study on metabolites identification of glycycoumarin.

  20. Modulation of the cellular content of metabolites in adipocytes by insulin.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Yuhang; Tomonaga, Shozo; Matsui, Tohru; Funaba, Masayuki

    2016-03-15

    Although the insulin-mediated cell signaling pathway has been extensively examined, changes in the cellular content of metabolites currently remain unclear. We herein examined metabolite contents in 3T3-L1 adipocytes treated with insulin using a metabolomic analysis. Fifty-four compounds were detected, and the contents of metabolites from the citric acid cycle increased in response to the insulin treatment for 4 h, which was sensitive to U0126 and LY294002, inhibitors for mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1 and phosphoinositide 3-kinase, respectively. The cellular contents of fumaric acid and malic acid were increased more by insulin than those of citric acid and succinic acid. Time-course changes in metabolites from the citric acid cycle exhibited oscillations with a 2-h cycle. A metabolic pathway analysis also indicated that insulin affected the metabolism of alanine, aspartate and glutamate, as well as that of arginine and proline. The contents of free amino acids were slightly decreased by the insulin treatment, while the co-treatment with U0126 and LY294002 abrogated these insulin-mediated decreases. The present study revealed the unexpected accumulation of citric acid cycle metabolites in adipocytes by insulin. Our results indicate the usefulness of metabolomic analyses for obtaining a more comprehensive understanding of the regulation of metabolic pathways in cell-culture systems. PMID:26811873

  1. Application of dried blood spot cards to determine olive oil phenols (hydroxytyrosol metabolites) in human blood.

    PubMed

    de Las Hazas, María Carmen López; Motilva, Maria José; Piñol, Carme; Macià, Alba

    2016-10-01

    In this study, a fast and simple blood sampling and sample pre-treatment method based on the use of the dried blood spot (DBS) cards and ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled to tandem mass spectrometry (UPLC-MS/MS) for the quantification of olive oil phenolic metabolites in human blood was developed and validated. After validation, the method was applied to determine hydroxytyrosol metabolites in human blood samples after the acute intake of an olive oil phenolic extract. Using the FTA DMPK-A DBS card under optimum conditions, with 20µL as the blood solution volume, 100µL of methanol/Milli-Q water (50/50, v/v) as the extraction solvent and 7 disks punched out from the card, the main hydroxytyrosol metabolites (hydroxytyrosol-3-O-sulphate and hydroxytyrosol acetate sulphate) were identified and quantified. The developed methodology allowed detecting and quantifying the generated metabolites at low μM levels. The proposed method is a significant improvement over existing methods to determine phenolic metabolites circulating in blood and plasma samples, thus making blood sampling possible with the volunteer pricking their own finger, and the subsequent storage of the blood in the DBS cards prior to chromatographic analysis. PMID:27474297

  2. Evaluation of commercial immunoassays for cross-reactivity to clenbuterol stereoisomers and bovine metabolites.

    PubMed

    Shelver, W L; Smith, D J

    2000-10-01

    Several commercially available immunoassay kits have been developed to detect the beta-adrenergic agonist clenbuterol HCl. Technical materials supplied with the kits do not generally report cross-reactivity with clenbuterol metabolites. Use of such kits to quantitate clenbuterol might lead to an overestimation of parent drug if metabolites were present. The objective of this study was to measure the cross-reactivity of clenbuterol metabolites with several commercially available clenbuterol immunoassays. Three clenbuterol-glucuronide conjugates, clenbuterol-sulphamate, 4-amino-3,5-dichloro-hippuric acid (clenbuterol-hippurate), and purified clenbuterol-stereoisomers were tested for cross-reactivity. The clenbuterol-sulphamate metabolite showed significant cross-reactivity (42-77%), but clenbuterol-hippurate showed very little competition (< 0.2%) towards clenbuterol. Clenbuterol-glucuronides had little (0.1-1.6%) cross-reactivity. In addition, (R)-, (S)-, and racemic clenbuterol were used to determine the stereospecificity of the kits. Both (R)- and (S)-clenbuterol competed for binding in two of the kits, however, in one kit the (S)-clenbuterol stereoisomer had an affinity 100 times greater than the (R)-stereoisomer. The presence of significant quantities of the sulphamate metabolite of clenbuterol in a biological matrix would cause an overestimation of the amount of parent clenbuterol. This study illustrates the inherent problems of using unvalidated immunoassays for quantitation purposes. PMID:11103267

  3. Spatio-Temporal Metabolite Profiling of the Barley Germination Process by MALDI MS Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gorzolka, Karin; Kölling, Jan; Nattkemper, Tim W; Niehaus, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    MALDI mass spectrometry imaging was performed to localize metabolites during the first seven days of the barley germination. Up to 100 mass signals were detected of which 85 signals were identified as 48 different metabolites with highly tissue-specific localizations. Oligosaccharides were observed in the endosperm and in parts of the developed embryo. Lipids in the endosperm co-localized in dependency on their fatty acid compositions with changes in the distributions of diacyl phosphatidylcholines during germination. 26 potentially antifungal hordatines were detected in the embryo with tissue-specific localizations of their glycosylated, hydroxylated, and O-methylated derivates. In order to reveal spatio-temporal patterns in local metabolite compositions, multiple MSI data sets from a time series were analyzed in one batch. This requires a new preprocessing strategy to achieve comparability between data sets as well as a new strategy for unsupervised clustering. The resulting spatial segmentation for each time point sample is visualized in an interactive cluster map and enables simultaneous interactive exploration of all time points. Using this new analysis approach and visualization tool germination-dependent developments of metabolite patterns with single MS position accuracy were discovered. This is the first study that presents metabolite profiling of a cereals' germination process over time by MALDI MSI with the identification of a large number of peaks of agronomically and industrially important compounds such as oligosaccharides, lipids and antifungal agents. Their detailed localization as well as the MS cluster analyses for on-tissue metabolite profile mapping revealed important information for the understanding of the germination process, which is of high scientific interest.

  4. Spatio-Temporal Metabolite Profiling of the Barley Germination Process by MALDI MS Imaging.

    PubMed

    Gorzolka, Karin; Kölling, Jan; Nattkemper, Tim W; Niehaus, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    MALDI mass spectrometry imaging was performed to localize metabolites during the first seven days of the barley germination. Up to 100 mass signals were detected of which 85 signals were identified as 48 different metabolites with highly tissue-specific localizations. Oligosaccharides were observed in the endosperm and in parts of the developed embryo. Lipids in the endosperm co-localized in dependency on their fatty acid compositions with changes in the distributions of diacyl phosphatidylcholines during germination. 26 potentially antifungal hordatines were detected in the embryo with tissue-specific localizations of their glycosylated, hydroxylated, and O-methylated derivates. In order to reveal spatio-temporal patterns in local metabolite compositions, multiple MSI data sets from a time series were analyzed in one batch. This requires a new preprocessing strategy to achieve comparability between data sets as well as a new strategy for unsupervised clustering. The resulting spatial segmentation for each time point sample is visualized in an interactive cluster map and enables simultaneous interactive exploration of all time points. Using this new analysis approach and visualization tool germination-dependent developments of metabolite patterns with single MS position accuracy were discovered. This is the first study that presents metabolite profiling of a cereals' germination process over time by MALDI MSI with the identification of a large number of peaks of agronomically and industrially important compounds such as oligosaccharides, lipids and antifungal agents. Their detailed localization as well as the MS cluster analyses for on-tissue metabolite profile mapping revealed important information for the understanding of the germination process, which is of high scientific interest. PMID:26938880

  5. Spatio-Temporal Metabolite Profiling of the Barley Germination Process by MALDI MS Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Gorzolka, Karin; Kölling, Jan; Nattkemper, Tim W.; Niehaus, Karsten

    2016-01-01

    MALDI mass spectrometry imaging was performed to localize metabolites during the first seven days of the barley germination. Up to 100 mass signals were detected of which 85 signals were identified as 48 different metabolites with highly tissue-specific localizations. Oligosaccharides were observed in the endosperm and in parts of the developed embryo. Lipids in the endosperm co-localized in dependency on their fatty acid compositions with changes in the distributions of diacyl phosphatidylcholines during germination. 26 potentially antifungal hordatines were detected in the embryo with tissue-specific localizations of their glycosylated, hydroxylated, and O-methylated derivates. In order to reveal spatio-temporal patterns in local metabolite compositions, multiple MSI data sets from a time series were analyzed in one batch. This requires a new preprocessing strategy to achieve comparability between data sets as well as a new strategy for unsupervised clustering. The resulting spatial segmentation for each time point sample is visualized in an interactive cluster map and enables simultaneous interactive exploration of all time points. Using this new analysis approach and visualization tool germination-dependent developments of metabolite patterns with single MS position accuracy were discovered. This is the first study that presents metabolite profiling of a cereals’ germination process over time by MALDI MSI with the identification of a large number of peaks of agronomically and industrially important compounds such as oligosaccharides, lipids and antifungal agents. Their detailed localization as well as the MS cluster analyses for on-tissue metabolite profile mapping revealed important information for the understanding of the germination process, which is of high scientific interest. PMID:26938880

  6. Profiles of metabolites and gene expression in rats with chemically induced hepatic necrosis.

    PubMed

    Heijne, Wilbert H M; Lamers, Robert-Jan A N; van Bladeren, Peter J; Groten, John P; van Nesselrooij, Joop H J; van Ommen, Ben

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated whether integrated analysis of transcriptomics and metabolomics data increased the sensitivity of detection and provided new insight in the mechanisms of hepatotoxicity. Metabolite levels in plasma or urine were analyzed in relation to changes in hepatic gene expression in rats that received bromobenzene to induce acute hepatic centrilobular necrosis. Bromobenzene-induced lesions were only observed after treatment with the highest of 3 dose levels. Multivariate statistical analysis showed that metabolite profiles of blood plasma were largely different from controls when the rats were treated with bromobenzene, also at doses that did not elicit histopathological changes. Changes in levels of genes and metabolites were related to the degree of necrosis, providing putative novel markers of hepatotoxicity. Levels of endogenous metabolites like alanine, lactate, tyrosine and dimethylglycine differed in plasma from treated and control rats. The metabolite profiles of urine were found to be reflective of the exposure levels. This integrated analysis of hepatic transcriptomics and plasma metabolomics was able to more sensitively detect changes related to hepatotoxicity and discover novel markers. The relation between gene expression and metabolite levels was explored and additional insight in the role of various biological pathways in bromobenzene-induced hepatic necrosis was obtained, including the involvement of apoptosis and changes in glycolysis and amino acid metabolism. The complete Table 2 is available as a supplemental file online at http://taylorandfrancis.metapress.com/openurlasp?genre=journal&issn=0192-6233. To access the file, click on the issue link for 33(4), then select this article. A download option appears at the bottom of this abstract. In order to access the full article online, you must either have an individual subscription or a member subscription accessed through www.toxpath.org. PMID:16036859

  7. Deposition of JWH-018, JWH-073 and their metabolites in hair and effect of hair pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jihyun; In, Sanghwan; Park, Yuran; Park, Meejung; Kim, Eunmi; Lee, Sooyeun

    2013-12-01

    Analysis of drugs in hair is often used as a routine method to obtain detailed information about drug ingestion. However, few studies have been conducted on deposition of synthetic cannabinoids and metabolites in hair. The first purpose of this study was to establish and validate an analytical method for detection of JWH-018, JWH-073, and their metabolites in hair, by use of UHPLC-MS-MS, for forensic application. The second purpose was to investigate the distribution of synthetic cannabinoids metabolites in hair and the effect of hair pigmentation, by use of an animal model. For this, JWH-073 was chosen as a representative synthetic cannabinoid. Finally, the developed method was applied to hair samples from 18 individuals suspected of synthetic cannabinoids use. JWH-018, JWH-073, and their metabolites were extracted from hair with methanol. The extract was then filtered and analyzed by UHPLC-MS-MS with an electrospray ion source in positive-ionization mode. Validation proved the method was selective, sensitive, accurate, and precise, with acceptable linearity within the calibration ranges. No significant variations were observed when different sources of both human and rat hair were used. The animal study demonstrated that JWH-073 N-COOH M was the major metabolite of JWH-073 in rat hair, and hair pigmentation did not have a significant effect on incorporation of JWH-073 and its metabolites into hair. In the analysis of 18 authentic hair samples, only JWH-018, JWH-018 N-5-OH M, and JWH-073 were detected, with wide variation in concentrations.

  8. Pesticides and their metabolites in wells of Suffolk County, New York, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Phillips, Patrick J.; Eckhardt, D.A.; Terracciano, S.A.; Rosenmann, Larry

    1999-01-01

    Five insecticide residues and 20 herbicide residues were detected in water samples collected from 50 shallow wells screened in the surficial sand and gravel aquifer in Suffolk County, Long Island in areas with known or suspected residues. Laboratory analytical methods with extremely low detection limits - from 0.001 to 0.2 ?g/L (micrograms per liter) - were used to analyze the samples for 60 pesticide residues. Forty-four of the samples contained at least one pesticide residue, and some samples contained as many as 11 different pesticides or pesticide metabolites. Only four water- quality standards were exceeded in the samples collected in this study. Dieldrin exceeded the New York State Class GA standard (0.004 ?g/L) in samples from eight wells. The Federal and New York State Maximum Contaminant Level for simazine (4 ?g/L) was exceeded in samples from two wells, and the State Class GA standard for simazine (0.5 ?g/L) was exceeded in samples from six wells. Federal water-quality standards have not been established for many of the compounds detected in this study, including herbicide metabolites. Maximum concentrations of four herbicide metabolites -metolachlor ESA (ethanesulfonic acid), metolachlor OA (oxanilic acid), and the alachlor metabolites alachlor ESA and alachlor OA -exceeded 20 ?g/L. The maximum concentration of one herbicide (tebuthiuron) exceeded 10 ?g/L, and the maximum concentration of three herbicides (simazine, metolachlor, and atrazine) and one herbicide metabolite (deisopropylatrazine) ranged from 1 to 10 ?g/L. The herbicide metolachlor, which is used on potato fields in Suffolk County, and its metabolites (metolachlor ESA and metolachlor OA) were most frequently detected in samples from agricultural areas. The herbicides simazine and tebuthiuron, which were used in utility rights-of-way, and the simazine metabolite deisopropylatrazine were detected at concentrations greater than 0.05 ?g/L most frequently in samples from residential and mixed land

  9. Metabolites of tobacco smoking and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Cross, Amanda J; Boca, Simina; Freedman, Neal D; Caporaso, Neil E; Huang, Wen-Yi; Sinha, Rashmi; Sampson, Joshua N; Moore, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is not strictly considered a tobacco-related malignancy, but modest associations have emerged from large meta-analyses. Most studies, however, use self-reported data, which are subject to misclassification. Biomarkers of tobacco exposure may reduce misclassification and provide insight into metabolic variability that potentially influences carcinogenesis. Our aim was to identify metabolites that represent smoking habits and individual variation in tobacco metabolism, and investigate their association with colorectal cancer. In a nested case-control study of 255 colorectal cancers and 254 matched controls identified in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial, baseline serum was used to identify metabolites by ultra-high-performance liquid-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, as well as gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression. Self-reported current smoking was associated with serum cotinine, O-cresol sulfate and hydroxycotinine. Self-reported current smoking of any tobacco (OR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.02-3.54) and current cigarette smoking (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 0.75-3.04) were associated with elevated colorectal cancer risks, although the latter was not statistically significant. Individuals with detectable levels of hydroxycotinine had an increased colorectal cancer risk compared with those with undetectable levels (OR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.33-5.40). Although those with detectable levels of cotinine had a suggestive elevated risk of this malignancy (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 0.98-3.33), those with detectable levels of O-cresol sulfate did not (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.57-2.37). Biomarkers capturing smoking behavior and metabolic variation exhibit stronger associations with colorectal cancer than self-report, providing additional evidence for a role for tobacco in this malignancy.

  10. Metabolites of tobacco smoking and colorectal cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Cross, Amanda J; Boca, Simina; Freedman, Neal D; Caporaso, Neil E; Huang, Wen-Yi; Sinha, Rashmi; Sampson, Joshua N; Moore, Steven C

    2014-07-01

    Colorectal cancer is not strictly considered a tobacco-related malignancy, but modest associations have emerged from large meta-analyses. Most studies, however, use self-reported data, which are subject to misclassification. Biomarkers of tobacco exposure may reduce misclassification and provide insight into metabolic variability that potentially influences carcinogenesis. Our aim was to identify metabolites that represent smoking habits and individual variation in tobacco metabolism, and investigate their association with colorectal cancer. In a nested case-control study of 255 colorectal cancers and 254 matched controls identified in the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal and Ovarian cancer screening trial, baseline serum was used to identify metabolites by ultra-high-performance liquid-phase chromatography and mass spectrometry, as well as gas chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry. Odds ratios (OR) and 95% confidence intervals (CI) were estimated by logistic regression. Self-reported current smoking was associated with serum cotinine, O-cresol sulfate and hydroxycotinine. Self-reported current smoking of any tobacco (OR = 1.90, 95% CI: 1.02-3.54) and current cigarette smoking (OR = 1.51, 95% CI: 0.75-3.04) were associated with elevated colorectal cancer risks, although the latter was not statistically significant. Individuals with detectable levels of hydroxycotinine had an increased colorectal cancer risk compared with those with undetectable levels (OR = 2.68, 95% CI: 1.33-5.40). Although those with detectable levels of cotinine had a suggestive elevated risk of this malignancy (OR = 1.81, 95% CI: 0.98-3.33), those with detectable levels of O-cresol sulfate did not (OR = 1.16, 95% CI: 0.57-2.37). Biomarkers capturing smoking behavior and metabolic variation exhibit stronger associations with colorectal cancer than self-report, providing additional evidence for a role for tobacco in this malignancy. PMID:24648381

  11. Metabolites of saxitoxin analogues in bivalves contaminated by Gymnodinium catenatum.

    PubMed

    Vale, Paulo

    2010-01-01

    Bivalve metabolites of saxitoxin analogues, not present in microalgae, were recently described as an important toxin fraction in mussels contaminated by Alexandrium tamarense. These possess very low fluorescence, and require mass spectrometry detection. HILIC-MS was implemented to look for these metabolites in bivalves contaminated during Gymnodinium catenatum blooms at the Portuguese coast. The presence of M1 was tentatively identified in several bivalves, ranging from estuarine (Mytilus galloprovinciallis, Cerastoderma edule and Ruditapes decussatus) to oceanic habitat (Donax trunculus and Ensis spp.). It was hypothesized that M1 could contribute to an important fraction of the profile of STX analogues. M1 was more abundant in estuarine bivalves that retain longer PSP toxins, in the following order: mussels>cockles>clams. These data highlight that the study by fluorimetry alone of the carbamoyl, N-sulfocarbamoyl, and decarbamoyl families is manifestly insufficient to fully understand toxin dynamics in bivalves feeding on G. catenatum without a proper study of hydroxybenzoate and hydroxylated M-toxins.

  12. Persistence of DDT and its metabolites in a farm pond

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bridges, W.R.; Kallman, B.J.; Andrews, A.K.

    1963-01-01

    A farm pond near Morrison, Colorado, was treated with 0.02 p.p.m. of DDT in June 1961. The persistence and distribution of the insecticide in materials sampled from the aquatic environment were studied until November 1962. Detectable amounts of DDT were not found in the water after 3 weeks. Residues in the mud had declined within 8 weeks after the treatment to levels not significantly higher than pre-treatment levels, but a sample of vegetation still contained relatively high levels of residues. From this time until the second summer, sufficient vegetation was not present to provide a sample for chemical analysis. A new crop of vegetation sampled 1 year after the treatment contained residues approximating pre-treatment levels. Fish accumulated 3 to 4 p.p.m. of DDT and its metabolites within 1 month after the treatment. The residue levels slowly declined after this, but when the study was terminated, 2 to 3 p.p.m. of the metabolites DDD and DDE still remained in the fish. The highest residue levels measured in crayfish were about one-half of those found in fish. Some mortality of the more susceptible fish and invertebrates occurred as a result of the DDT treatment; however, severe adverse effects were not demonstrated.

  13. Discovering the secondary metabolite potential encoded within Entomopathogenic Fungi

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This article discusses the secondary metabolite potential of the insect pathogens Metarhizium and Beauveria, including a bioinformatics analysis of secondary metabolite genes for which no products are yet identified....

  14. METLIN: MS/MS metabolite data from the MAGGIE Project

    DOE Data Explorer

    METLIN is a metabolite database for metabolomics containing over 50,000 structures, it also represents a data management system designed to assist in a broad array of metabolite research and metabolite identification by providing public access to its repository of current and comprehensive MS/MS metabolite data. An annotated list of known metabolites and their mass, chemical formula, and structure are available on the METLIN website. Each metabolite is conveniently linked to outside resources such as the the Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) for further reference and inquiry. MS/MS data is also available on many of the metabolites. The list is expanding continuously as more metabolite information is being deposited and discovered. [from http://metlin.scripps.edu/] Metlin is a component of the MAGGIE Project. MAGGIE is funded by the DOE Genomics: GTL and is an acronym for "Molecular Assemblies, Genes, and Genomics Integrated Efficiently."

  15. The relevance of "non-relevant metabolites" from plant protection products (PPPs) for drinking water: the German view.

    PubMed

    Dieter, Hermann H

    2010-03-01

    "Non-relevant metabolites" are those degradation products of plant protection products (PPPs), which are devoid of the targeted toxicities of the PPP and devoid of genotoxicity. Most often, "non-relevant metabolites" have a high affinity to the aquatic environment, are very mobile within this environment, and, usually, are also persistent. Therefore, from the point of drinking water hygiene, they must be characterized as "relevant for drinking water" like many other hydrophilic/polar environmental contaminants of different origins. "Non-relevant metabolites" may therefore penetrate to water sources used for abstraction of drinking water and may thus ultimately be present in drinking water. The presence of "non-relevant metabolites" and similar trace compounds in the water cycle may endanger drinking water quality on a long-term scale. During oxidative drinking water treatment, "non-relevant metabolites" may also serve as the starting material for toxicologically relevant transformation products similar to processes observed by drinking water disinfection with chlorine. This hypothesis was recently confirmed by the detection of the formation of N-nitroso-dimethylamine from ozone and dimethylsulfamide, a "non-relevant metabolite" of the fungicide tolylfluanide. In order to keep drinking water preferably free of "non-relevant metabolites", the German drinking water advisory board of the Federal Ministry of Health supports limiting their penetration into raw and drinking water to the functionally (agriculturally) unavoidable extent. On this background, the German Federal Environment Agency (UBA) recently has recommended two health related indication values (HRIV) to assess "non-relevant metabolites" from the view of drinking water hygiene. Considering the sometimes incomplete toxicological data base for some "non-relevant metabolites", HRIV also have the role of health related precautionary values. Depending on the completeness and quality of the toxicological

  16. The relevance of "non-relevant metabolites" from plant protection products (PPPs) for drinking water: the German view.

    PubMed

    Dieter, Hermann H

    2010-03-01

    "Non-relevant metabolites" are those degradation products of plant protection products (PPPs), which are devoid of the targeted toxicities of the PPP and devoid of genotoxicity. Most often, "non-relevant metabolites" have a high affinity to the aquatic environment, are very mobile within this environment, and, usually, are also persistent. Therefore, from the point of drinking water hygiene, they must be characterized as "relevant for drinking water" like many other hydrophilic/polar environmental contaminants of different origins. "Non-relevant metabolites" may therefore penetrate to water sources used for abstraction of drinking water and may thus ultimately be present in drinking water. The presence of "non-relevant metabolites" and similar trace compounds in the water cycle may endanger drinking water quality on a long-term scale. During oxidative drinking water treatment, "non-relevant metabolites" may also serve as the starting material for toxicologically relevant transformation products similar to processes observed by drinking water disinfection with chlorine. This hypothesis was recently confirmed by the detection of the formation of N-nitroso-dimethylamine from ozone and dimethylsulfamide, a "non-relevant metabolite" of the fungicide tolylfluanide. In order to keep drinking water preferably free of "non-relevant metabolites", the German drinking water advisory board of the Federal Ministry of Health supports limiting their penetration into raw and drinking water to the functionally (agriculturally) unavoidable extent. On this background, the German Federal Environment Agency (UBA) recently has recommended two health related indication values (HRIV) to assess "non-relevant metabolites" from the view of drinking water hygiene. Considering the sometimes incomplete toxicological data base for some "non-relevant metabolites", HRIV also have the role of health related precautionary values. Depending on the completeness and quality of the toxicological

  17. Multi-residue monitoring for the simultaneous determination of five nitrofurans (furazolidone, furaltadone, nitrofurazone, nitrofurantoine, nifursol) in poultry muscle tissue through the detection of their five major metabolites (AOZ, AMOZ, SEM, AHD, DNSAH) by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry--in-house validation in line with Commission Decision 657/2002/EC.

    PubMed

    Verdon, Eric; Couedor, Pierrick; Sanders, Pascal

    2007-03-14

    Following the ban of four nitrofurans in the mid-90s (furazolidone, furaltadone, nitrofurantoine, nitrofurazone), the nifursol, a veterinary drug from the nitrofuran class of antibacterials which has been used prophylactically as feed additive for treating turkeys against histomoniasis (blackhead disease) was also declared in Annex IV of the European Union Directive no. 90/2377/EC in 2002 according to the Regulation no. 1756/2002/EC. As for the four other nitrofurans, nifursol disappears from tissues within a few days after treatment of food-producing animals. But toxic metabolites are still present for longer periods (several weeks or even months). The major metabolite that can readily be monitored in the tissues following nifursol abuse is the 3,5-dinitro-salicylic acid hydrazine (DNSAH). This article displays some improvements and the revalidation of the analytical method by liquid chromatography coupled to electrospray tandem mass spectrometry (LC-esiMS/MS) already in use in our laboratory for monitoring nitrofuran metabolites but also including the nifursol metabolite at the confirmatory minimum required performance level (MRPL) of 1 microg kg(-1). The validation is applied both to artificially and to naturally incurred turkey muscle. PMID:17386733

  18. Metabolite Analysis and Histology on the Exact Same Tissue: Comprehensive Metabolomic Profiling and Metabolic Classification of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Huan, Tao; Troyer, Dean A.; Li, Liang

    2016-01-01

    We report a method of metabolomic profiling of intact tissue based on molecular preservation by extraction and fixation (mPREF) and high-performance chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). mPREF extracts metabolites by aqueous methanol from tissue biopsies without altering tissue architecture and thus conventional histology can be performed on the same tissue. In a proof-of-principle study, we applied dansylation LC-MS to profile the amine/phenol submetabolome of prostate needle biopsies from 25 patient samples derived from 16 subjects. 2900 metabolites were consistently detected in more than 50% of the samples. This unprecedented coverage allowed us to identify significant metabolites for differentiating tumor and normal tissues. The panel of significant metabolites was refined using 36 additional samples from 18 subjects. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis showed area-under-the-curve (AUC) of 0.896 with sensitivity of 84.6% and specificity of 83.3% using 7 metabolites. A blind study of 24 additional validation samples gave a specificity of 90.9% at the same sensitivity of 84.6%. The mPREF extraction can be readily implemented into the existing clinical workflow. Our method of combining mPREF with CIL LC-MS offers a powerful and convenient means of performing histopathology and discovering or detecting metabolite biomarkers in the same tissue biopsy. PMID:27578275

  19. Metabolite Analysis and Histology on the Exact Same Tissue: Comprehensive Metabolomic Profiling and Metabolic Classification of Prostate Cancer.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tao; Troyer, Dean A; Li, Liang

    2016-01-01

    We report a method of metabolomic profiling of intact tissue based on molecular preservation by extraction and fixation (mPREF) and high-performance chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography mass spectrometry (LC-MS). mPREF extracts metabolites by aqueous methanol from tissue biopsies without altering tissue architecture and thus conventional histology can be performed on the same tissue. In a proof-of-principle study, we applied dansylation LC-MS to profile the amine/phenol submetabolome of prostate needle biopsies from 25 patient samples derived from 16 subjects. 2900 metabolites were consistently detected in more than 50% of the samples. This unprecedented coverage allowed us to identify significant metabolites for differentiating tumor and normal tissues. The panel of significant metabolites was refined using 36 additional samples from 18 subjects. Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis showed area-under-the-curve (AUC) of 0.896 with sensitivity of 84.6% and specificity of 83.3% using 7 metabolites. A blind study of 24 additional validation samples gave a specificity of 90.9% at the same sensitivity of 84.6%. The mPREF extraction can be readily implemented into the existing clinical workflow. Our method of combining mPREF with CIL LC-MS offers a powerful and convenient means of performing histopathology and discovering or detecting metabolite biomarkers in the same tissue biopsy. PMID:27578275

  20. DnsID in MyCompoundID for rapid identification of dansylated amine- and phenol-containing metabolites in LC-MS-based metabolomics.

    PubMed

    Huan, Tao; Wu, Yiman; Tang, Chenqu; Lin, Guohui; Li, Liang

    2015-10-01

    High-performance chemical isotope labeling (CIL) liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS) is an enabling technology based on rational design of labeling reagents to target a class of metabolites sharing the same functional group (e.g., all the amine-containing metabolites or the amine submetabolome) to provide concomitant improvements in metabolite separation, detection, and quantification. However, identification of labeled metabolites remains to be an analytical challenge. In this work, we describe a library of labeled standards and a search method for metabolite identification in CIL LC-MS. The current library consists of 273 unique metabolites, mainly amines and phenols that are individually labeled by dansylation (Dns). Some of them produced more than one Dns-derivative (isomers or multiple labeled products), resulting in a total of 315 dansyl compounds in the library. These metabolites cover 42 metabolic pathways, allowing the possibility of probing their changes in metabolomics studies. Each labeled metabolite contains three searchable parameters: molecular ion mass, MS/MS spectrum, and retention time (RT). To overcome RT variations caused by experimental conditions used, we have developed a calibration method to normalize RTs of labeled metabolites using a mixture of RT calibrants. A search program, DnsID, has been developed in www.MyCompoundID.org for automated identification of dansyl labeled metabolites in a sample based on matching one or more of the three parameters with those of the library standards. Using human urine as an example, we illustrate the workflow and analytical performance of this method for metabolite identification. This freely accessible resource is expandable by adding more amine and phenol standards in the future. In addition, the same strategy should be applicable for developing other labeled standards libraries to cover different classes of metabolites for comprehensive metabolomics using CIL LC-MS.

  1. Large-Scale Metabolite Analysis of Standards and Human Serum by Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry from Silicon Nanopost Arrays.

    PubMed

    Korte, Andrew R; Stopka, Sylwia A; Morris, Nicholas; Razunguzwa, Trust; Vertes, Akos

    2016-09-20

    The unique challenges presented by metabolomics have driven the development of new mass spectrometry (MS)-based techniques for small molecule analysis. We have previously demonstrated silicon nanopost arrays (NAPA) to be an effective substrate for laser desorption ionization (LDI) of small molecules for MS. However, the utility of NAPA-LDI-MS for a wide range of metabolite classes has not been investigated. Here we apply NAPA-LDI-MS to the large-scale acquisition of high-resolution mass spectra and tandem mass spectra from a collection of metabolite standards covering a range of compound classes including amino acids, nucleotides, carbohydrates, xenobiotics, lipids, and other classes. In untargeted analysis of metabolite standard mixtures, detection was achieved for 374 compounds and useful MS/MS spectra were obtained for 287 compounds, without individual optimization of ionization or fragmentation conditions. Metabolite detection was evaluated in the context of 31 metabolic pathways, and NAPA-LDI-MS was found to provide detection for 63% of investigated pathway metabolites. Individual, targeted analysis of the 20 common amino acids provided detection of 100% of the investigated compounds, demonstrating that improved coverage is possible through optimization and targeting of individual analytes or analyte classes. In direct analysis of aqueous and organic extracts from human serum samples, spectral features were assigned to a total of 108 small metabolites and lipids. Glucose and amino acids were quantitated within their physiological concentration ranges. The broad coverage demonstrated by this large-scale screening experiment opens the door for use of NAPA-LDI-MS in numerous metabolite analysis applications.

  2. Development of the first metabolite-based LC-MS(n) urine drug screening procedure-exemplified for antidepressants.

    PubMed

    Wissenbach, Dirk K; Meyer, Markus R; Remane, Daniela; Weber, Armin A; Maurer, Hans H

    2011-04-01

    In contrast to GC-MS libraries, currently available LC-MS libraries for toxicological detection contain besides parent drugs only some main metabolites limiting their applicability for urine screening. Therefore, a metabolite-based LC-MS(n) screening procedure was developed and exemplified for antidepressants. The library was built up with MS(2) and MS(3) wideband spectra using an LXQ linear ion trap with electrospray ionization in the positive mode and full-scan information-dependent acquisition. Pure substance spectra were recorded in methanolic solution and metabolite spectra in urine from rats after administration of the corresponding drugs. After identification, the metabolite spectra were added to the library. Various drugs and metabolites could be sufficiently separated. Recovery, process efficiency, matrix effects, and limits of detection for selected drugs were determined using protein precipitation. Automatic data evaluation was performed using ToxID and SmileMS software. The library consists of over 700 parent compounds including 45 antidepressants, over 1,600 metabolites, and artifacts. Protein precipitation led to sufficient results for sample preparation. ToxID and SmileMS were both suitable for target screening with some pros and cons. In our study, only SmileMS was suitable for untargeted screening being not limited to precursor selection. The LC-MS(n) method was suitable for urine screening as exemplified for antidepressants. It also allowed detecting unknown compounds based on known fragment structures. As ion suppression can never be excluded, it is advantageous to have several targets per drug. Furthermore, the detection of metabolites confirms the body passage. The presented LC-MS(n) method complements established GC-MS or LC-MS procedures in the authors' lab. PMID:21079926

  3. Wastewater analysis to monitor use of caffeine and nicotine and evaluation of their metabolites as biomarkers for population size assessment.

    PubMed

    Senta, Ivan; Gracia-Lor, Emma; Borsotti, Andrea; Zuccato, Ettore; Castiglioni, Sara

    2015-05-01

    The use of caffeine, nicotine and some major metabolites was investigated by wastewater analysis in 13 sewage treatment plants (STPs) across Italy, and their suitability was tested as qualitative and quantitative biomarkers for assessing population size and dynamics. A specific analytical method based on mass spectrometry was developed and validated in raw urban wastewater, and included two caffeine metabolites, 1-methylxanthine and 7-methylxanthine, never reported in wastewater before. All these compounds were found widely at the μg/L level. Mass loads, calculated by multiplying concentrations by the wastewater daily flow rate and normalized to the population served by each plant, were used to compare the profiles from different cities. Some regional differences were observed in the mass loads, especially for nicotine metabolites, which were significantly higher in the south than in the center and north of Italy, reflecting smoking prevalences from population surveys. There were no significant weekly trends, although the mean mass loads of caffeine and its metabolites were slightly lower during the weekend. Most caffeine and nicotine metabolites fulfilled the requirements for an ideal biomarker for the assessment of population size, i.e. being easily detectable in wastewater, stable in sewage and during sampling, and reflecting human metabolism. Nicotine metabolites were tested as quantitative biomarkers to estimate population size and the results agreed well with census data. Caffeine and its metabolites were confirmed as good qualitative biomarkers, but additional information is needed on the caffeine metabolism in relation to the multiple sources of its main metabolites. This exploratory study opens the way to the routine use of nicotine metabolites for estimating population size and dynamics.

  4. Non-peptide metabolites from the genus Bacillus.

    PubMed

    Hamdache, Ahlem; Lamarti, Ahmed; Aleu, Josefina; Collado, Isidro G

    2011-04-25

    Bacillus species produce a number of non-peptide metabolites that display a broad spectrum of activity and structurally diverse bioactive chemical structures. Biosynthetic, biological, and structural studies of these metabolites isolated from Bacillus species are reviewed. This contribution also includes a detailed study of the activity of the metabolites described, especially their role in biological control mechanisms.

  5. Identification and characterization of in vivo metabolites of asulacrine using advanced mass spectrophotometry technique in combination with improved data mining strategy.

    PubMed

    Afzal, Attia; Zhong, Yunxi; Sarfraz, Muhammad; Peng, Ying; Sheng, Longsheng; Wu, Zimei; Sun, Jianguo; Wang, Guangji

    2016-04-29

    Asulacrine (ASL) is a broad-spectrum, antitumor drug whose data are promising for the treatment of breast and lung cancers; however, a high incidence of phlebitis hampered its further development. Phlebitis is associated with generation of reactive species. Asulacrine donates electrons and produces oxidative stress in chemical reactions. It was expected that ASL would actively metabolize to oxidized products through reactive intermediates and produce more products in vivo than reported and thus cause phlebitis. A comprehensive study was planned to investigate in vivo metabolism of ASL, using high-resolution mass spectrometry LC/IT-TOF MS in positive mode. Metabolites were detected by different software by applying annotated detection strategy. The possible metabolites and their product ions were simultaneously detected by segmented data acquisition to get accurate mass values. Segmented data acquisition improved signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio, which was helpful to detect metabolites and their fragments even when present in trace amounts. A total of 21 metabolites were detected in gender-based biological fluids and characterized by comparing their accurate mass values, fragmentation patterns, and relative retention times with that of ASL. Among previously reported glucuronosylation metabolites, some oxidation, hydroxylation, carboxylation, demethylation, hydrogenation, glutamination, and acetylcysteine conjugation were detected for the first time. Twenty metabolites were tentatively identified by using the annotated strategy for data acquisition and post-data mining.

  6. Widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in 24 Minnesota rivers and wastewaters

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Writer, Jeffrey; Ferrer, Imma; Barber, Larry B.; Thurman, E. Michael

    2013-01-01

    Concentrations of 17 neuro-active pharmaceuticals and their major metabolites (bupropion, hydroxy-bupropion, erythro-hydrobupropion, threo-hydrobupropion, carbamazepine, 10,11,-dihydro-10,11,-dihydroxycarbamazepine, 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine, citalopram, N-desmethyl-citalopram, fluoxetine, norfluoxetine, gabapentin, lamotrigine, 2-N-glucuronide-lamotrigine, oxcarbazepine, venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine), were measured in treated wastewater and receiving surface waters from 24 locations across Minnesota, USA. The analysis of upstream and downstream sampling sites indicated that the wastewater treatment plants were the major source of the neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites in surface waters of Minnesota. Concentrations of parent compound and the associated metabolite varied substantially between treatment plants (concentrations ± standard deviation of the parent compound relative to its major metabolite) as illustrated by the following examples; bupropion and hydrobupropion 700 ± 1000 ng L−1, 2100 ± 1700 ng L−1, carbamazepine and 10-hydroxy-carbamazepine 480 ± 380 ng L−1, 360 ± 400 ng L−1, venlafaxine and O-desmethyl-venlafaxine 1400 ± 1300 ng L−1, 1800 ± 2300 ng L−1. Metabolites of the neuro-active compounds were commonly found at higher or comparable concentrations to the parent compounds in wastewater effluent and the receiving surface water. Neuro-active pharmaceuticals and associated metabolites were detected only sporadically in samples upstream from the effluent outfall. Metabolite to parent ratios were used to evaluate transformation, and we determined that ratios in wastewater were much lower than those reported in urine, indicating that the metabolites are relatively more labile than the parent compounds in the treatment plants and in receiving waters. The widespread occurrence of neuro-active pharmaceuticals and metabolites in Minnesota effluents and surface waters indicate that

  7. Rapidly improved determination of metabolites from biological data sets using the high-efficient TransOmics tool.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Aihua; Zhou, Xiaohang; Zhao, Hongwei; Guan, Yu; Zou, Shiyu; Zhou, Shiyu; Yan, Guang-li; Ma, Chung Wah; Ma, Zhonghua; Liu, Qi; Wang, Xijun

    2014-08-01

    Metabolomics is a new approach based on the systematic study of the full complement of metabolites in a biological sample. Extracting biomedical information from large datasets is of considerable complexity. Furthermore, the traditional method of assessing metabolomics data is not only time-consuming but it is often subjective work. Here we used sensitive ultra-performance LC-ESI/Q-TOF high-definition mass spectrometry (UPLC-ESI-Q-TOF-MS) in positive ion mode coupled with a new developed software program TransOmics for widely untargeted metabolomics, which incorporates novel nonlinear alignment, deconvolution, matched filtration, peak detection, and peak matching to characterize metabolites as a case study. The TransOmics method can facilitate prioritization of the data and greatly increase the probability of identifying metabolites related to the phenotype of interest. By this means, 17 urinary differential metabolites were identified (less than 10 min) involving the key metabolic pathways including tyrosine metabolism, glutathione metabolism, phenylalanine metabolism, ascorbate and aldarate metabolism, arginine and proline metabolism, and so forth. Metabolite identification has also been significantly improved, using the correlation peak patterns in contrast to a reference metabolite panel. It can detect and identify metabolites automatically and remove background noise, and also provides a user-friendly graphical interface to apply principal component analyses, correlation analysis and compound statistics. This investigation illustrates that metabolomics combined with the proposed bioinformatic approach (based on TransOmics) is important to elucidate the developing biomarkers and the physiological mechanism of disease, and has opened the door for the development of a new genre of metabolite identification methods. PMID:24889752

  8. Identification of in vitro metabolites of ethylphenidate by liquid chromatography coupled to quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Negreira, Noelia; Erratico, Claudio; van Nuijs, Alexander L N; Covaci, Adrian

    2016-01-01

    Ethylphenidate is a new potent synthetic psychoactive drug, structurally related to methylphenidate. Using human liver microsomes and cytosol, we have investigated for the first time the Phase-I and Phase-II in vitro metabolism of ethylphenidate. The structure of the metabolites was elucidated by hybrid quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Overall, seven Phase-I, but no Phase-II metabolites were detected. Ethylphenidate underwent hydroxylation forming two primary mono-hydroxylated metabolites and, subsequently, dehydration and ring opening with an additional hydroxylation, forming secondary metabolites. The involvement of different human cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes in the formation of ethylphenidate metabolites was investigated using a panel of human recombinant CYPs (rCYPs). rCYP2C19 was the most active recombinant enzyme involved in the formation of all seven ethylphenidate metabolites detected, although other rCYPs (rCYP1A2, rCYP2B6, rCYPC9, rCYP2D6, and rCYP3A4, but not rCYP2E1) played a role in the metabolism of ethylphenidate. All metabolites identified in the present study can be considered as potential specific biomarkers of ethylphenidate in toxicological studies. Additionally, ritalinic acid and methylphenidate were formed by non-enzymatic hydrolysis and trans-esterification, and, therefore, they cannot be considered as (oxidative) metabolites of ethylphenidate. The presence of methylphenidate and ritalinic acid cannot be exclusively associated to the use of ethylphenidate, since methylphenidate is a drug itself and ritanilic acid can be formed from both ethylphenidate and methylphenidate. PMID:26454340

  9. Serum and urine concentrations of flunitrazepam and metabolites, after a single oral dose, by immunoassay and GC-MS.

    PubMed

    Snyder, H; Schwenzer, K S; Pearlman, R; McNally, A J; Tsilimidos, M; Salamone, S J; Brenneisen, R; ElSohly, M A; Feng, S

    2001-01-01

    A clinical study was conducted to assess the ability of commercially available immunoassays to detect flunitrazepam (FNP) in plasma and urine samples and to compare the results with those obtained by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC-MS). The clinical study consisted of four individuals (two male and two female) who had taken a single 2-mg dose of FNP. Serum was collected over a 48-h period and urine was collected over a 72-h period. The serum and urine samples were analyzed by the COBAS INTEGRA Serum Benzodiazepines assay (SBENZ), the TDx serum and urine Benzodiazepines assay, and GC-MS. The GC-MS procedure was developed for analysis of FNP and metabolites in plasma and urine using an acid hydrolysis step resulting in the formation of specific benzophenones corresponding to FNP and its metabolites. The relative sensitivities of the assays for the detection of FNP and metabolites in serum and urine were GC-MS > SBENZ > TDx. The immunoassay results for serum samples showed peak concentrations of FNP metabolites at 8 h after FNP ingestion for three individuals and at about 1 h for the fourth individual. The GC-MS, SBENZ, and TDx urine immunoassays detected drug above the stated limit of detection (LOD) in 44, 41, and 35 serial FNP urine samples, respectively. FNP metabolites were detected in urine samples with all three assays for up to 72 h after a 2-mg dose. The improved detection rate with the SBENZ assay as compared to the TDx assay is likely explained by its higher cross-reactivity with the major metabolite, 7-amino-flunitrazepam (7-amino-FNP), and its lower LOD.

  10. Expanded separation technique for chlorophyll metabolites in Oriental tobacco leaf using non aqueous reversed phase chromatography.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Naoyuki

    2011-08-26

    An improved separation method for chlorophyll metabolites in Oriental tobacco leaf was developed. While Oriental leaf still gives the green color even after the curing process, little attention has been paid to the detailed composition of the remaining green pigments. This study aimed to identify the green pigments using non aqueous reversed phase chromatography (NARPC). To this end, liquid chromatograph (LC) equipped with a photo diode array detector (DAD) and an atmospheric pressure chemical ionization/mass spectrometer (APCI/MSD) was selected, because it is useful for detecting low polar non-volatile compounds giving green color such as pheophytin a. Identification was based on the wavelength spectrum, mass spectrum and retention time, comparing the analytes in Oriental leaf with the commercially available and synthesized components. Consequently, several chlorophyll metabolites such as hydroxypheophytin a, solanesyl pheophorbide a and solanesyl hydroxypheophorbide a were newly identified, in addition to typical green pigments such as chlorophyll a and pheophytin a. Chlorophyll metabolites bound to solanesol were considered the tobacco specific components. NARPC expanded the number of detectable low polar chlorophyll metabolites in Oriental tobacco leaf. PMID:21782189

  11. Metabolomic analysis of Ocotea odorifera cell cultures: a model protocol for acquiring metabolite data.

    PubMed

    Maraschin, Marcelo; Dias, Paulo Fernando; Pedrotti, Enio Luiz; Nunes, Hiliana; Morais, Hiliana Nunes Ferreira; Viana, Ana Maria; Wood, Karl Vernon

    2009-01-01

    Metabolomics constitutes a quantitative and qualitative survey of the whole metabolites of an organism as well as a tissue, reflecting the genome and proteome of a sample as analyzed. Advanced analytical spectroscopic and chromatographic techniques are used along with uni- or multivariate statistical data analysis, rapidly identifying up- or down-regulated metabolites in complex matrices. In this chapter, protocols for the analysis of target compounds (protocol I) and metabolomics (protocol