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Sample records for detector alignment algorithm

  1. Internal Alignment of the SLD Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.J.; Wickens, F.J.; Su, D.; /SLAC

    2007-12-03

    The tracking resolution and vertex finding capabilities of the SLD experiment depended upon a precise knowledge of the location and orientation of the elements of the SLD pixel vertex detector (VXD3) in 3D space. At the heart of the procedure described here to align the 96 CCDs is the matrix inversion technique of singular value decomposition (SVD). This tool was employed to unfold the detector geometry corrections from the track data in the VXD3. The algorithm was adapted to perform an optimal {chi}{sup 2} minimization by careful treatment of the track hit residual measurement errors. The tracking resolution obtained with the aligned geometry achieved the design performance. Comments are given on how this method could be used for other trackers.

  2. The GEM Detector projective alignment simulation system

    SciTech Connect

    Wuest, C.R.; Belser, F.C.; Holdener, F.R.; Roeben, M.D.; Paradiso, J.A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Ostapchuk, A.; Pier-Amory, J.

    1993-07-09

    Precision position knowledge (< 25 microns RMS) of the GEM Detector muon system at the Superconducting Super Collider Laboratory (SSCL) is an important physics requirement necessary to minimize sagitta error in detecting and tracking high energy muons that are deflected by the magnetic field within the GEM Detector. To validate the concept of the sagitta correction function determined by projective alignment of the muon detectors (Cathode Strip Chambers or CSCs), the basis of the proposed GEM alignment scheme, a facility, called the ``Alignment Test Stand`` (ATS), is being constructed. This system simulates the environment that the CSCs and chamber alignment systems are expected to experience in the GEM Detector, albeit without the 0.8 T magnetic field and radiation environment. The ATS experimental program will allow systematic study and characterization of the projective alignment approach, as well as general mechanical engineering of muon chamber mounting concepts, positioning systems and study of the mechanical behavior of the proposed 6 layer CSCs. The ATS will consist of a stable local coordinate system in which mock-ups of muon chambers (i.e., non-working mechanical analogs, representing the three superlayers of a selected barrel and endcap alignment tower) are implemented, together with a sufficient number of alignment monitors to overdetermine the sagitta correction function, providing a self-consistency check. This paper describes the approach to be used for the alignment of the GEM muon system, the design of the ATS, and the experiments to be conducted using the ATS.

  3. Alignment of the Fermilab D0 Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Babatunde O'Sheg Oshinowo

    2001-07-20

    The Fermilab D0 detector was used for the discovery of the top quark during Run I in 1996. It is currently being upgraded to exploit the physics potential to be presented by the Main Injector and the Tevatron Collider during Run II in the Fall of 2000. Some of the essential elements of this upgrade is the upgrade of the Solenoid Magnet, the Central Fiber Tracker, the Preshower Detectors, the Calorimeter System, and the Muon System. This paper discusses the survey and alignment of the these detectors with emphasis on the Muon detector system. The alignment accuracy is specified as better than 0.5mm. A combination of the Laser Tracker, BETS, and V-STARS systems are used for the survey.

  4. MolAlign: an algorithm for aligning multiple small molecules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chan, Shek Ling

    2017-06-01

    In small molecule drug discovery projects, the receptor structure is not always available. In such cases it is enormously useful to be able to align known ligands in the way they bind in the receptor. Here we shall present an algorithm for the alignment of multiple small molecule ligands. This algorithm takes pre-generated conformers as input, and proposes aligned assemblies of the ligands. The algorithm consists of two stages: the first stage is to perform alignments for each pair of ligands, the second stage makes use of the results from the first stage to build up multiple ligand alignment assemblies using a novel iterative procedure. The scoring functions are improved versions of the one mentioned in our previous work. We have compared our results with some recent publications. While an exact comparison is impossible, it is clear that our algorithm is fast and produces very competitive results.

  5. FOGSAA: Fast Optimal Global Sequence Alignment Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Angana; Bandyopadhyay, Sanghamitra

    2013-04-01

    In this article we propose a Fast Optimal Global Sequence Alignment Algorithm, FOGSAA, which aligns a pair of nucleotide/protein sequences faster than any optimal global alignment method including the widely used Needleman-Wunsch (NW) algorithm. FOGSAA is applicable for all types of sequences, with any scoring scheme, and with or without affine gap penalty. Compared to NW, FOGSAA achieves a time gain of (70-90)% for highly similar nucleotide sequences (> 80% similarity), and (54-70)% for sequences having (30-80)% similarity. For other sequences, it terminates with an approximate score. For protein sequences, the average time gain is between (25-40)%. Compared to three heuristic global alignment methods, the quality of alignment is improved by about 23%-53%. FOGSAA is, in general, suitable for aligning any two sequences defined over a finite alphabet set, where the quality of the global alignment is of supreme importance.

  6. Instability in progressive multiple sequence alignment algorithms.

    PubMed

    Boyce, Kieran; Sievers, Fabian; Higgins, Desmond G

    2015-01-01

    Progressive alignment is the standard approach used to align large numbers of sequences. As with all heuristics, this involves a tradeoff between alignment accuracy and computation time. We examine this tradeoff and find that, because of a loss of information in the early steps of the approach, the alignments generated by the most common multiple sequence alignment programs are inherently unstable, and simply reversing the order of the sequences in the input file will cause a different alignment to be generated. Although this effect is more obvious with larger numbers of sequences, it can also be seen with data sets in the order of one hundred sequences. We also outline the means to determine the number of sequences in a data set beyond which the probability of instability will become more pronounced. This has major ramifications for both the designers of large-scale multiple sequence alignment algorithms, and for the users of these alignments.

  7. New Attitude Sensor Alignment Calibration Algorithms

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hashmall, Joseph A.; Sedlak, Joseph E.; Harman, Richard (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Accurate spacecraft attitudes may only be obtained if the primary attitude sensors are well calibrated. Launch shock, relaxation of gravitational stresses and similar effects often produce large enough alignment shifts so that on-orbit alignment calibration is necessary if attitude accuracy requirements are to be met. A variety of attitude sensor alignment algorithms have been developed to meet the need for on-orbit calibration. Two new algorithms are presented here: ALICAL and ALIQUEST. Each of these has advantages in particular circumstances. ALICAL is an attitude independent algorithm that uses near simultaneous measurements from two or more sensors to produce accurate sensor alignments. For each set of simultaneous observations the attitude is overdetermined. The information content of the extra degrees of freedom can be combined over numerous sets to provide the sensor alignments. ALIQUEST is an attitude dependent algorithm that combines sensor and attitude data into a loss function that has the same mathematical form as the Wahba problem. Alignments can then be determined using any of the algorithms (such as the QUEST quaternion estimator) that have been developed to solve the Wahba problem for attitude. Results from the use of these methods on active missions are presented.

  8. SAGA: sequence alignment by genetic algorithm.

    PubMed Central

    Notredame, C; Higgins, D G

    1996-01-01

    We describe a new approach to multiple sequence alignment using genetic algorithms and an associated software package called SAGA. The method involves evolving a population of alignments in a quasi evolutionary manner and gradually improving the fitness of the population as measured by an objective function which measures multiple alignment quality. SAGA uses an automatic scheduling scheme to control the usage of 22 different operators for combining alignments or mutating them between generations. When used to optimise the well known sums of pairs objective function, SAGA performs better than some of the widely used alternative packages. This is seen with respect to the ability to achieve an optimal solution and with regard to the accuracy of alignment by comparison with reference alignments based on sequences of known tertiary structure. The general attraction of the approach is the ability to optimise any objective function that one can invent. PMID:8628686

  9. Algorithms for Automatic Alignment of Arrays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Oliker, Leonid; Schreiber, Robert; Sheffler, Thomas J.

    1996-01-01

    Aggregate data objects (such as arrays) are distributed across the processor memories when compiling a data-parallel language for a distributed-memory machine. The mapping determines the amount of communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. A common approach is to break the mapping into two stages: an alignment that maps all the objects to an abstract template, followed by a distribution that maps the template to the processors. This paper describes algorithms for solving the various facets of the alignment problem: axis and stride alignment, static and mobile offset alignment, and replication labeling. We show that optimal axis and stride alignment is NP-complete for general program graphs, and give a heuristic method that can explore the space of possible solutions in a number of ways. We show that some of these strategies can give better solutions than a simple greedy approach proposed earlier. We also show how local graph contractions can reduce the size of the problem significantly without changing the best solution. This allows more complex and effective heuristics to be used. We show how to model the static offset alignment problem using linear programming, and we show that loop-dependent mobile offset alignment is sometimes necessary for optimum performance. We describe an algorithm with for determining mobile alignments for objects within do loops. We also identify situations in which replicated alignment is either required by the program itself or can be used to improve performance. We describe an algorithm based on network flow that replicates objects so as to minimize the total amount of broadcast communication in replication.

  10. Metal detector depth estimation algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marble, Jay; McMichael, Ian

    2009-05-01

    This paper looks at depth estimation techniques using electromagnetic induction (EMI) metal detectors. Four algorithms are considered. The first utilizes a vertical gradient sensor configuration. The second is a dual frequency approach. The third makes use of dipole and quadrapole receiver configurations. The fourth looks at coils of different sizes. Each algorithm is described along with its associated sensor. Two figures of merit ultimately define algorithm/sensor performance. The first is the depth of penetration obtainable. (That is, the maximum detection depth obtainable.) This describes the performance of the method to achieve detection of deep targets. The second is the achievable statistical depth resolution. This resolution describes the precision with which depth can be estimated. In this paper depth of penetration and statistical depth resolution are qualitatively determined for each sensor/algorithm. A scientific method is used to make these assessments. A field test was conducted using 2 lanes with emplaced UXO. The first lane contains 155 shells at increasing depths from 0" to 48". The second is more realistic containing objects of varying size. The first lane is used for algorithm training purposes, while the second is used for testing. The metal detectors used in this study are the: Geonics EM61, Geophex GEM5, Minelab STMR II, and the Vallon VMV16.

  11. Two Hybrid Algorithms for Multiple Sequence Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naznin, Farhana; Sarker, Ruhul; Essam, Daryl

    2010-01-01

    In order to design life saving drugs, such as cancer drugs, the design of Protein or DNA structures has to be accurate. These structures depend on Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA). MSA is used to find the accurate structure of Protein and DNA sequences from existing approximately correct sequences. To overcome the overly greedy nature of the well known global progressive alignment method for multiple sequence alignment, we have proposed two different algorithms in this paper; one is using an iterative approach with a progressive alignment method (PAMIM) and the second one is using a genetic algorithm with a progressive alignment method (PAMGA). Both of our methods started with a "kmer" distance table to generate single guide-tree. In the iterative approach, we have introduced two new techniques: the first technique is to generate Guide-trees with randomly selected sequences and the second is of shuffling the sequences inside that tree. The output of the tree is a multiple sequence alignment which has been evaluated by the Sum of Pairs Method (SPM) considering the real value data from PAM250. In our second GA approach, these two techniques are used to generate an initial population and also two different approaches of genetic operators are implemented in crossovers and mutation. To test the performance of our two algorithms, we have compared these with the existing well known methods: T-Coffee, MUSCEL, MAFFT and Probcon, using BAliBase benchmarks. The experimental results show that the first algorithm works well for some situations, where other existing methods face difficulties in obtaining better solutions. The proposed second method works well compared to the existing methods for all situations and it shows better performance over the first one.

  12. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Software alignment of the BESIII main drift chamber using the Kalman Filter method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-Ke; Mao, Ze-Pu; Bian, Jian-Ming; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chen, Shen-Jian; Deng, Zi-Yan; Fu, Cheng-Dong; Gao, Yuan-Ning; He, Kang-Lin; He, Miao; Hua, Chun-Fei; Huang, Bin; Huang, Xing-Tao; Ji, Xiao-Bin; Li, Fei; Li, Hai-Bo; Li, Wei-Dong; Liang, Yu-Tie; Liu, Chun-Xiu; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Suo; Liu, Ying-Jie; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Mao, Ya-Jun; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Pan, Ming-Hua; Pang, Cai-Ying; Ping, Rong-Gang; Qin, Ya-Hong; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Sun, Sheng-Sen; Sun, Yong-Zhao; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wen, Shuo-Pin; Wu, Ling-Hui; Xie, Yu-Guang; Xu, Min; Yan, Liang; You, Zheng-Yun; Yuan, Chang-Zheng; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Bing-Yun; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Yang-Heng; Zhu, Ke-Jun; Zhu, Yong-Sheng; Zhu, Zhi-Li; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2009-03-01

    Software alignment is quite important for a tracking detector to reach its ultimate position accuracy and momentum resolution. We developed a new alignment algorithm for the BESIII Main Drift Chamber using the Kalman Filter method. Two different types of data which are helix tracks and straight tracks are used to test this algorithm, and the results show that the design and implementation is successful.

  13. Comparison of Beam-Based Alignment Algorithms for the ILC

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J.C.; Gibbons, L.; Patterson, J.R.; Rubin, D.L.; Sagan, D.; Tenenbaum, P.; /SLAC

    2006-03-15

    The main linac of the International Linear Collider (ILC) requires more sophisticated alignment techniques than those provided by survey alone. Various Beam-Based Alignment (BBA) algorithms have been proposed to achieve the desired low emittance preservation. Dispersion Free Steering, Ballistic Alignment and the Kubo method are compared. Alignment algorithms are also tested in the presence of an Earth-like stray field.

  14. Alignment of the NOvA Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bending, Sebastian; NOvA Collaboration

    2017-01-01

    NOvA is a long-baseline neutrino oscillation experiment intended to probe the neutrino mass hierarchy and provide constraints on CP violation in the neutrino sector. The experiment consists of a Near Detector at Fermilab and a Far Detector 810 km away at Ash River, Minnesota, both of which receive neutrinos from the NuMI beamline. The misalignment of elements within the detectors contributes to systematic uncertainties in NOvA measurements. A procedure to determine and correct for detector misalignments through the use of cosmic ray muon tracks will be presented.

  15. Alignment methods for the OPERA drift tube detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Büttner, B.; Ebert, J.; Ferber, T.; Göllnitz, C.; Goloubkov, D.; Hagner, C.; Hierholzer, M.; Hollnagel, A.; Lenkeit, J.; Rostovtseva, I.; Schmidt-Parzefall, W.; Wonsak, B.; Zaitsev, Y.

    2014-05-01

    The goal of the OPERA experiment is to give the first direct evidence for neutrino oscillations in the channel νμ→ντ. The OPERA detector is designed to observe the appearance of tau neutrinos in the originally pure muon neutrino CNGS beam. An important part of the magnetic spectrometer is the Precision Tracker (PT), a drift tube detector consisting of 9504 drift tubes. Its main task is the determination of the muon charge and momentum. The alignment strategy for the PT consists of two parts: the hardware measurement by theodolite and the software alignment using long muon tracks. In this paper, the hardware and the software alignment are described, and the track-based alignment methods are explained in detail. Results of the software alignment are presented with a focus on the analysis of cosmic particles.

  16. An Improved Inertial Frame Alignment Algorithm Based on Horizontal Alignment Information for Marine SINS.

    PubMed

    Che, Yanting; Wang, Qiuying; Gao, Wei; Yu, Fei

    2015-10-05

    In this paper, an improved inertial frame alignment algorithm for a marine SINS under mooring conditions is proposed, which significantly improves accuracy. Since the horizontal alignment is easy to complete, and a characteristic of gravity is that its component in the horizontal plane is zero, we use a clever method to improve the conventional inertial alignment algorithm. Firstly, a large misalignment angle model and a dimensionality reduction Gauss-Hermite filter are employed to establish the fine horizontal reference frame. Based on this, the projection of the gravity in the body inertial coordinate frame can be calculated easily. Then, the initial alignment algorithm is accomplished through an inertial frame alignment algorithm. The simulation and experiment results show that the improved initial alignment algorithm performs better than the conventional inertial alignment algorithm, and meets the accuracy requirements of a medium-accuracy marine SINS.

  17. Monitoring of absolute mirror alignment at COMPASS RICH-1 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alexeev, M.; Birsa, R.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Dalla Torre, S.; Denisov, O.; Duic, V.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Gayde, J. Ch.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Panzieri, D.; Pesaro, G.; Polak, J.; Rocco, E.; Sbrizzai, G.; Schiavon, P.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Takekawa, S.; Tessarotto, F.

    2014-12-01

    The gaseous COMPASS RICH-1 detector uses two spherical mirror surfaces, segmented into 116 individual mirrors, to focus the Cherenkov photons onto the detector plane. Any mirror misalignment directly affects the detector resolution. The on-line Continuous Line Alignment and Monitoring (CLAM) photogrammetry-based method has been implemented to measure the alignment of individual mirrors which can be characterized by the center of curvature. The mirror wall reflects a regular grid of retroreflective strips placed inside the detector vessel. Then, the position of each mirror is determined from the image of the grid reflection. The images are collected by four cameras. Any small mirror misalignment results in changes of the grid lines' positions in the image. The accuracy limits of the CLAM method were checked by laser interferometry and are below 0.1 mrad.

  18. Novel hybrid genetic algorithm for progressive multiple sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Afridi, Muhammad Ishaq

    2013-01-01

    The family of evolutionary or genetic algorithms is used in various fields of bioinformatics. Genetic algorithms (GAs) can be used for simultaneous comparison of a large pool of DNA or protein sequences. This article explains how the GA is used in combination with other methods like the progressive multiple sequence alignment strategy to get an optimal multiple sequence alignment (MSA). Optimal MSA get much importance in the field of bioinformatics and some other related disciplines. Evolutionary algorithms evolve and improve their performance. In this optimisation, the initial pair-wise alignment is achieved through a progressive method and then a good objective function is used to select and align more alignments and profiles. Child and subpopulation initialisation is based upon changes in the probability of similarity or the distance matrix of the alignment population. In this genetic algorithm, optimisation of mutation, crossover and migration in the population of candidate solution reflect events of natural organic evolution.

  19. CSA: an efficient algorithm to improve circular DNA multiple alignment.

    PubMed

    Fernandes, Francisco; Pereira, Luísa; Freitas, Ana T

    2009-07-23

    The comparison of homologous sequences from different species is an essential approach to reconstruct the evolutionary history of species and of the genes they harbour in their genomes. Several complete mitochondrial and nuclear genomes are now available, increasing the importance of using multiple sequence alignment algorithms in comparative genomics. MtDNA has long been used in phylogenetic analysis and errors in the alignments can lead to errors in the interpretation of evolutionary information. Although a large number of multiple sequence alignment algorithms have been proposed to date, they all deal with linear DNA and cannot handle directly circular DNA. Researchers interested in aligning circular DNA sequences must first rotate them to the "right" place using an essentially manual process, before they can use multiple sequence alignment tools. In this paper we propose an efficient algorithm that identifies the most interesting region to cut circular genomes in order to improve phylogenetic analysis when using standard multiple sequence alignment algorithms. This algorithm identifies the largest chain of non-repeated longest subsequences common to a set of circular mitochondrial DNA sequences. All the sequences are then rotated and made linear for multiple alignment purposes.To evaluate the effectiveness of this new tool, three different sets of mitochondrial DNA sequences were considered. Other tests considering randomly rotated sequences were also performed. The software package Arlequin was used to evaluate the standard genetic measures of the alignments obtained with and without the use of the CSA algorithm with two well known multiple alignment algorithms, the CLUSTALW and the MAVID tools, and also the visualization tool SinicView. The results show that a circularization and rotation pre-processing step significantly improves the efficiency of public available multiple sequence alignment algorithms when used in the alignment of circular DNA sequences

  20. A simple genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Gondro, C; Kinghorn, B P

    2007-10-05

    Multiple sequence alignment plays an important role in molecular sequence analysis. An alignment is the arrangement of two (pairwise alignment) or more (multiple alignment) sequences of 'residues' (nucleotides or amino acids) that maximizes the similarities between them. Algorithmically, the problem consists of opening and extending gaps in the sequences to maximize an objective function (measurement of similarity). A simple genetic algorithm was developed and implemented in the software MSA-GA. Genetic algorithms, a class of evolutionary algorithms, are well suited for problems of this nature since residues and gaps are discrete units. An evolutionary algorithm cannot compete in terms of speed with progressive alignment methods but it has the advantage of being able to correct for initially misaligned sequences; which is not possible with the progressive method. This was shown using the BaliBase benchmark, where Clustal-W alignments were used to seed the initial population in MSA-GA, improving outcome. Alignment scoring functions still constitute an open field of research, and it is important to develop methods that simplify the testing of new functions. A general evolutionary framework for testing and implementing different scoring functions was developed. The results show that a simple genetic algorithm is capable of optimizing an alignment without the need of the excessively complex operators used in prior study. The clear distinction between objective function and genetic algorithms used in MSA-GA makes extending and/or replacing objective functions a trivial task.

  1. Protein multiple sequence alignment by hybrid bio-inspired algorithms.

    PubMed

    Cutello, Vincenzo; Nicosia, Giuseppe; Pavone, Mario; Prizzi, Igor

    2011-03-01

    This article presents an immune inspired algorithm to tackle the Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) problem. MSA is one of the most important tasks in biological sequence analysis. Although this paper focuses on protein alignments, most of the discussion and methodology may also be applied to DNA alignments. The problem of finding the multiple alignment was investigated in the study by Bonizzoni and Vedova and Wang and Jiang, and proved to be a NP-hard (non-deterministic polynomial-time hard) problem. The presented algorithm, called Immunological Multiple Sequence Alignment Algorithm (IMSA), incorporates two new strategies to create the initial population and specific ad hoc mutation operators. It is based on the 'weighted sum of pairs' as objective function, to evaluate a given candidate alignment. IMSA was tested using both classical benchmarks of BAliBASE (versions 1.0, 2.0 and 3.0), and experimental results indicate that it is comparable with state-of-the-art multiple alignment algorithms, in terms of quality of alignments, weighted Sums-of-Pairs (SP) and Column Score (CS) values. The main novelty of IMSA is its ability to generate more than a single suboptimal alignment, for every MSA instance; this behaviour is due to the stochastic nature of the algorithm and of the populations evolved during the convergence process. This feature will help the decision maker to assess and select a biologically relevant multiple sequence alignment. Finally, the designed algorithm can be used as a local search procedure to properly explore promising alignments of the search space.

  2. An enhanced algorithm for multiple sequence alignment of protein sequences using genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental operations in biological sequence analysis is multiple sequence alignment (MSA). The basic of multiple sequence alignment problems is to determine the most biologically plausible alignments of protein or DNA sequences. In this paper, an alignment method using genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment has been proposed. Two different genetic operators mainly crossover and mutation were defined and implemented with the proposed method in order to know the population evolution and quality of the sequence aligned. The proposed method is assessed with protein benchmark dataset, e.g., BALIBASE, by comparing the obtained results to those obtained with other alignment algorithms, e.g., SAGA, RBT-GA, PRRP, HMMT, SB-PIMA, CLUSTALX, CLUSTAL W, DIALIGN and PILEUP8 etc. Experiments on a wide range of data have shown that the proposed algorithm is much better (it terms of score) than previously proposed algorithms in its ability to achieve high alignment quality.

  3. An enhanced algorithm for multiple sequence alignment of protein sequences using genetic algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Manish

    2015-01-01

    One of the most fundamental operations in biological sequence analysis is multiple sequence alignment (MSA). The basic of multiple sequence alignment problems is to determine the most biologically plausible alignments of protein or DNA sequences. In this paper, an alignment method using genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment has been proposed. Two different genetic operators mainly crossover and mutation were defined and implemented with the proposed method in order to know the population evolution and quality of the sequence aligned. The proposed method is assessed with protein benchmark dataset, e.g., BALIBASE, by comparing the obtained results to those obtained with other alignment algorithms, e.g., SAGA, RBT-GA, PRRP, HMMT, SB-PIMA, CLUSTALX, CLUSTAL W, DIALIGN and PILEUP8 etc. Experiments on a wide range of data have shown that the proposed algorithm is much better (it terms of score) than previously proposed algorithms in its ability to achieve high alignment quality. PMID:27065770

  4. Splign: algorithms for computing spliced alignments with identification of paralogs

    PubMed Central

    Kapustin, Yuri; Souvorov, Alexander; Tatusova, Tatiana; Lipman, David

    2008-01-01

    Background The computation of accurate alignments of cDNA sequences against a genome is at the foundation of modern genome annotation pipelines. Several factors such as presence of paralogs, small exons, non-consensus splice signals, sequencing errors and polymorphic sites pose recognized difficulties to existing spliced alignment algorithms. Results We describe a set of algorithms behind a tool called Splign for computing cDNA-to-Genome alignments. The algorithms include a high-performance preliminary alignment, a compartment identification based on a formally defined model of adjacent duplicated regions, and a refined sequence alignment. In a series of tests, Splign has produced more accurate results than other tools commonly used to compute spliced alignments, in a reasonable amount of time. Conclusion Splign's ability to deal with various issues complicating the spliced alignment problem makes it a helpful tool in eukaryotic genome annotation processes and alternative splicing studies. Its performance is enough to align the largest currently available pools of cDNA data such as the human EST set on a moderate-sized computing cluster in a matter of hours. The duplications identification (compartmentization) algorithm can be used independently in other areas such as the study of pseudogenes. Reviewers This article was reviewed by: Steven Salzberg, Arcady Mushegian and Andrey Mironov (nominated by Mikhail Gelfand). PMID:18495041

  5. Internal Alignment of the SLD Vertex Detector using a Matrix Singular Value Decomposition Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Su, Dong

    2002-01-03

    The tracking resolution and vertex finding capabilities of the SLD experiment depend upon a precise knowledge of the location and orientation of the 96 elements of the SLD pixel vertex detector (VXD3) in 3D space. At the heart of the deterministic procedure described here to align the 96 CCDs is the matrix inversion technique of singular value decomposition (SVD). This tool is employed to unfold the detector geometry corrections from the track hit residual data in the VXD3. The algorithm is adapted to perform an optimal {chi}{sup 2} minimization by careful treatment of the errors and correlations in the residual measurements. The general form of the problems that might be solved with this technique is discussed. The tracking resolution obtained with the aligned geometry is compared with the starting point, based on an optical survey of the CCDs, and is shown to achieve the design performance.

  6. A knowledge-based multiple-sequence alignment algorithm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Ken D; Pan, Yi

    2013-01-01

    A common and cost-effective mechanism to identify the functionalities, structures, or relationships between species is multiple-sequence alignment, in which DNA/RNA/protein sequences are arranged and aligned so that similarities between sequences are clustered together. Correctly identifying and aligning these sequence biological similarities help from unwinding the mystery of species evolution to drug design. We present our knowledge-based multiple sequence alignment (KB-MSA) technique that utilizes the existing knowledge databases such as SWISSPROT, GENBANK, or HOMSTRAD to provide a more realistic and reliable sequence alignment. We also provide a modified version of this algorithm (CB-MSA) that utilizes the sequence consistency information when sequence knowledge databases are not available. Our benchmark tests on BAliBASE, PREFAB, HOMSTRAD, and SABMARK references show accuracy improvements up to 10 percent on twilight data sets against many leading alignment tools such as ISPALIGN, PADT, CLUSTALW, MAFFT, PROBCONS, and T-COFFEE.

  7. TM-align: a protein structure alignment algorithm based on the TM-score

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yang; Skolnick, Jeffrey

    2005-01-01

    We have developed TM-align, a new algorithm to identify the best structural alignment between protein pairs that combines the TM-score rotation matrix and Dynamic Programming (DP). The algorithm is ∼4 times faster than CE and 20 times faster than DALI and SAL. On average, the resulting structure alignments have higher accuracy and coverage than those provided by these most often-used methods. TM-align is applied to an all-against-all structure comparison of 10 515 representative protein chains from the Protein Data Bank (PDB) with a sequence identity cutoff <95%: 1996 distinct folds are found when a TM-score threshold of 0.5 is used. We also use TM-align to match the models predicted by TASSER for solved non-homologous proteins in PDB. For both folded and misfolded models, TM-align can almost always find close structural analogs, with an average root mean square deviation, RMSD, of 3 Å and 87% alignment coverage. Nevertheless, there exists a significant correlation between the correctness of the predicted structure and the structural similarity of the model to the other proteins in the PDB. This correlation could be used to assist in model selection in blind protein structure predictions. The TM-align program is freely downloadable at . PMID:15849316

  8. Align-m--a new algorithm for multiple alignment of highly divergent sequences.

    PubMed

    Van Walle, Ivo; Lasters, Ignace; Wyns, Lode

    2004-06-12

    Multiple alignment of highly divergent sequences is a challenging problem for which available programs tend to show poor performance. Generally, this is due to a scoring function that does not describe biological reality accurately enough or a heuristic that cannot explore solution space efficiently enough. In this respect, we present a new program, Align-m, that uses a non-progressive local approach to guide a global alignment. Two large test sets were used that represent the entire SCOP classification and cover sequence similarities between 0 and 50% identity. Performance was compared with the publicly available algorithms ClustalW, T-Coffee and DiAlign. In general, Align-m has comparable or slightly higher accuracy in terms of correctly aligned residues, especially for distantly related sequences. Importantly, it aligns much fewer residues incorrectly, with average differences of over 15% compared with some of the other algorithms. Align-m and the test sets are available at http://bioinformatics.vub.ac.be

  9. Learning Deep Sharable and Structural Detectors for Face Alignment.

    PubMed

    Liu, Hao; Lu, Jiwen; Feng, Jianjiang; Zhou, Jie

    2017-04-01

    Face alignment aims at localizing multiple facial landmarks for a given facial image, which usually suffers from large variances of diverse facial expressions, aspect ratios and partial occlusions, especially when face images were captured in wild conditions. Conventional face alignment methods extract local features and then directly concatenate these features for global shape regression. Unlike these methods which cannot explicitly model the correlation of neighbouring landmarks and motivated by the fact that individual landmarks are usually correlated, we propose a deep sharable and structural detectors (DSSD) method for face alignment. To achieve this, we firstly develop a structural feature learning method to explicitly exploit the correlation of neighbouring landmarks, which learns to cover semantic information to disambiguate the neighbouring landmarks. Moreover, our model selectively learns a subset of sharable latent tasks across neighbouring landmarks under the paradigm of the multi-task learning framework, so that the redundancy information of the overlapped patches can be efficiently removed. To better improve the performance, we extend our DSSD to a recurrent DSSD (R-DSSD) architecture by integrating with the complementary information from multi-scale perspectives. Experimental results on the widely used benchmark datasets show that our methods achieve very competitive performance compared to the state-of-the-arts.

  10. Genetic algorithms with permutation coding for multiple sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Ben Othman, Mohamed Tahar; Abdel-Azim, Gamil

    2013-08-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is one of the topics of bio informatics that has seriously been researched. It is known as NP-complete problem. It is also considered as one of the most important and daunting tasks in computational biology. Concerning this a wide number of heuristic algorithms have been proposed to find optimal alignment. Among these heuristic algorithms are genetic algorithms (GA). The GA has mainly two major weaknesses: it is time consuming and can cause local minima. One of the significant aspects in the GA process in MSA is to maximize the similarities between sequences by adding and shuffling the gaps of Solution Coding (SC). Several ways for SC have been introduced. One of them is the Permutation Coding (PC). We propose a hybrid algorithm based on genetic algorithms (GAs) with a PC and 2-opt algorithm. The PC helps to code the MSA solution which maximizes the gain of resources, reliability and diversity of GA. The use of the PC opens the area by applying all functions over permutations for MSA. Thus, we suggest an algorithm to calculate the scoring function for multiple alignments based on PC, which is used as fitness function. The time complexity of the GA is reduced by using this algorithm. Our GA is implemented with different selections strategies and different crossovers. The probability of crossover and mutation is set as one strategy. Relevant patents have been probed in the topic.

  11. ParAlign: a parallel sequence alignment algorithm for rapid and sensitive database searches.

    PubMed

    Rognes, T

    2001-04-01

    There is a need for faster and more sensitive algorithms for sequence similarity searching in view of the rapidly increasing amounts of genomic sequence data available. Parallel processing capabilities in the form of the single instruction, multiple data (SIMD) technology are now available in common microprocessors and enable a single microprocessor to perform many operations in parallel. The ParAlign algorithm has been specifically designed to take advantage of this technology. The new algorithm initially exploits parallelism to perform a very rapid computation of the exact optimal ungapped alignment score for all diagonals in the alignment matrix. Then, a novel heuristic is employed to compute an approximate score of a gapped alignment by combining the scores of several diagonals. This approximate score is used to select the most interesting database sequences for a subsequent Smith-Waterman alignment, which is also parallelised. The resulting method represents a substantial improvement compared to existing heuristics. The sensitivity and specificity of ParAlign was found to be as good as Smith-Waterman implementations when the same method for computing the statistical significance of the matches was used. In terms of speed, only the significantly less sensitive NCBI BLAST 2 program was found to outperform the new approach. Online searches are available at http://dna.uio.no/search/

  12. Net2Align: An Algorithm For Pairwise Global Alignment of Biological Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wadhwab, Gulshan; Upadhyayaa, K. C.

    2016-01-01

    The amount of data on molecular interactions is growing at an enormous pace, whereas the progress of methods for analysing this data is still lacking behind. Particularly, in the area of comparative analysis of biological networks, where one wishes to explore the similarity between two biological networks, this holds a potential problem. In consideration that the functionality primarily runs at the network level, it advocates the need for robust comparison methods. In this paper, we describe Net2Align, an algorithm for pairwise global alignment that can perform node-to-node correspondences as well as edge-to-edge correspondences into consideration. The uniqueness of our algorithm is in the fact that it is also able to detect the type of interaction, which is essential in case of directed graphs. The existing algorithm is only able to identify the common nodes but not the common edges. Another striking feature of the algorithm is that it is able to remove duplicate entries in case of variable datasets being aligned. This is achieved through creation of a local database which helps exclude duplicate links. In a pervasive computational study on gene regulatory network, we establish that our algorithm surpasses its counterparts in its results. Net2Align has been implemented in Java 7 and the source code is available as supplementary files. PMID:28356678

  13. A pairwise alignment algorithm which favors clusters of blocks.

    PubMed

    Nédélec, Elodie; Moncion, Thomas; Gassiat, Elisabeth; Bossard, Bruno; Duchateau-Nguyen, Guillemette; Denise, Alain; Termier, Michel

    2005-01-01

    Pairwise sequence alignments aim to decide whether two sequences are related and, if so, to exhibit their related domains. Recent works have pointed out that a significant number of true homologous sequences are missed when using classical comparison algorithms. This is the case when two homologous sequences share several little blocks of homology, too small to lead to a significant score. On the other hand, classical alignment algorithms, when detecting homologies, may fail to recognize all the significant biological signals. The aim of the paper is to give a solution to these two problems. We propose a new scoring method which tends to increase the score of an alignment when "blocks" are detected. This so-called Block-Scoring algorithm, which makes use of dynamic programming, is worth being used as a complementary tool to classical exact alignments methods. We validate our approach by applying it on a large set of biological data. Finally, we give a limit theorem for the score statistics of the algorithm.

  14. LASAGNA: A novel algorithm for transcription factor binding site alignment

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Scientists routinely scan DNA sequences for transcription factor (TF) binding sites (TFBSs). Most of the available tools rely on position-specific scoring matrices (PSSMs) constructed from aligned binding sites. Because of the resolutions of assays used to obtain TFBSs, databases such as TRANSFAC, ORegAnno and PAZAR store unaligned variable-length DNA segments containing binding sites of a TF. These DNA segments need to be aligned to build a PSSM. While the TRANSFAC database provides scoring matrices for TFs, nearly 78% of the TFs in the public release do not have matrices available. As work on TFBS alignment algorithms has been limited, it is highly desirable to have an alignment algorithm tailored to TFBSs. Results We designed a novel algorithm named LASAGNA, which is aware of the lengths of input TFBSs and utilizes position dependence. Results on 189 TFs of 5 species in the TRANSFAC database showed that our method significantly outperformed ClustalW2 and MEME. We further compared a PSSM method dependent on LASAGNA to an alignment-free TFBS search method. Results on 89 TFs whose binding sites can be located in genomes showed that our method is significantly more precise at fixed recall rates. Finally, we described LASAGNA-ChIP, a more sophisticated version for ChIP (Chromatin immunoprecipitation) experiments. Under the one-per-sequence model, it showed comparable performance with MEME in discovering motifs in ChIP-seq peak sequences. Conclusions We conclude that the LASAGNA algorithm is simple and effective in aligning variable-length binding sites. It has been integrated into a user-friendly webtool for TFBS search and visualization called LASAGNA-Search. The tool currently stores precomputed PSSM models for 189 TFs and 133 TFs built from TFBSs in the TRANSFAC Public database (release 7.0) and the ORegAnno database (08Nov10 dump), respectively. The webtool is available at http://biogrid.engr.uconn.edu/lasagna_search/. PMID:23522376

  15. Aligning multiple protein sequences by parallel hybrid genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung Dinh; Yoshihara, Ikuo; Yamamori, Kunihito; Yasunaga, Moritoshi

    2002-01-01

    This paper presents a parallel hybrid genetic algorithm (GA) for solving the sum-of-pairs multiple protein sequence alignment. A new chromosome representation and its corresponding genetic operators are proposed. A multi-population GENITOR-type GA is combined with local search heuristics. It is then extended to run in parallel on a multiprocessor system for speeding up. Experimental results of benchmarks from the BAliBASE show that the proposed method is superior to MSA, OMA, and SAGA methods with regard to quality of solution and running time. It can be used for finding multiple sequence alignment as well as testing cost functions.

  16. Incremental Window-based Protein Sequence Alignment Algorithms

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-03-23

    Huzefa Rangwala and George Karypis March 23, 2006 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No. 0704-0188 Public reporting burden for the collection of... Form 298 (Rev. 8-98) Prescribed by ANSI Std Z39-18 Incremental Window-based Protein Sequence Alignment Algorithms Huzefa Rangwala and George Karypis...Then it per- forms a series of iterations in which it performs the following three steps: First, it extracts from ’ the residue-pair with the highest

  17. Terahertz detectors arrays based on orderly aligned InN nanowires

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xuechen; Liu, Huiqiang; Li, Qiuguo; Chen, Hao; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Sheng; Cheng, Binbin

    2015-01-01

    Nanostructured terahertz detectors employing a single semiconducting nanowire or graphene sheet have recently generated considerable interest as an alternative to existing THz technologies, for their merit on the ease of fabrication and above-room-temperature operation. However, the lack of alignment in nanostructure device hindered their potential toward practical applications. The present work reports ordered terahertz detectors arrays based on neatly aligned InN nanowires. The InN nanostructures (nanowires and nano-necklaces) were achieved by chemical vapor deposition growth, and then InN nanowires were successfully transferred and aligned into micrometer-sized groups by a “transfer-printing” method. Field effect transistors on aligned nanowires were fabricated and tested for terahertz detection purpose. The detector showed good photoresponse as well as low noise level. Besides, dense arrays of such detectors were also fabricated, which rendered a peak responsivity of 1.1 V/W from 7 detectors connected in series. PMID:26289498

  18. Terahertz detectors arrays based on orderly aligned InN nanowires

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xuechen; Liu, Huiqiang; Li, Qiuguo; Chen, Hao; Peng, Rufang; Chu, Sheng; Cheng, Binbin

    2015-08-01

    Nanostructured terahertz detectors employing a single semiconducting nanowire or graphene sheet have recently generated considerable interest as an alternative to existing THz technologies, for their merit on the ease of fabrication and above-room-temperature operation. However, the lack of alignment in nanostructure device hindered their potential toward practical applications. The present work reports ordered terahertz detectors arrays based on neatly aligned InN nanowires. The InN nanostructures (nanowires and nano-necklaces) were achieved by chemical vapor deposition growth, and then InN nanowires were successfully transferred and aligned into micrometer-sized groups by a “transfer-printing” method. Field effect transistors on aligned nanowires were fabricated and tested for terahertz detection purpose. The detector showed good photoresponse as well as low noise level. Besides, dense arrays of such detectors were also fabricated, which rendered a peak responsivity of 1.1 V/W from 7 detectors connected in series.

  19. Median filtering algorithms for multichannel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hovhannisyan, A.; Chilingarian, A.

    2011-05-01

    Particle detectors of worldwide networks are continuously measuring various secondary particle fluxes incident on Earth surface. At the Aragats Space Environmental Center (ASEC), the data of 12 cosmic ray particle detectors with a total of ˜280 measuring channels (count rates of electrons, muons and neutrons channels) are sent each minute via wireless bridges to a MySQL database. These time series are used for the different tasks of off-line physical analysis and for online forewarning services. Usually long time series contain several types of errors (gaps due to failures of high or low voltage power supply, spurious spikes due to radio interferences, abrupt changes of mean values of several channels or/and slowly trends in mean values due to aging of electronics components, etc.). To avoid erroneous physical inference and false alarms of alerting systems we introduce offline and online filters to "purify" multiple time-series. In the presented paper we classify possible mistakes in time series and introduce median filtering algorithms for online and off-line "purification" of multiple time-series.

  20. MICAN : a protein structure alignment algorithm that can handle Multiple-chains, Inverse alignments, Cα only models, Alternative alignments, and Non-sequential alignments

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Protein pairs that have the same secondary structure packing arrangement but have different topologies have attracted much attention in terms of both evolution and physical chemistry of protein structures. Further investigation of such protein relationships would give us a hint as to how proteins can change their fold in the course of evolution, as well as a insight into physico-chemical properties of secondary structure packing. For this purpose, highly accurate sequence order independent structure comparison methods are needed. Results We have developed a novel protein structure alignment algorithm, MICAN (a structure alignment algorithm that can handle Multiple-chain complexes, Inverse direction of secondary structures, Cα only models, Alternative alignments, and Non-sequential alignments). The algorithm was designed so as to identify the best structural alignment between protein pairs by disregarding the connectivity between secondary structure elements (SSE). One of the key feature of the algorithm is utilizing the multiple vector representation for each SSE, which enables us to correctly treat bent or twisted nature of long SSE. We compared MICAN with other 9 publicly available structure alignment programs, using both reference-dependent and reference-independent evaluation methods on a variety of benchmark test sets which include both sequential and non-sequential alignments. We show that MICAN outperforms the other existing methods for reproducing reference alignments of non-sequential test sets. Further, although MICAN does not specialize in sequential structure alignment, it showed the top level performance on the sequential test sets. We also show that MICAN program is the fastest non-sequential structure alignment program among all the programs we examined here. Conclusions MICAN is the fastest and the most accurate program among non-sequential alignment programs we examined here. These results suggest that MICAN is a highly effective tool

  1. MICAN: a protein structure alignment algorithm that can handle Multiple-chains, Inverse alignments, C(α) only models, Alternative alignments, and Non-sequential alignments.

    PubMed

    Minami, Shintaro; Sawada, Kengo; Chikenji, George

    2013-01-18

    Protein pairs that have the same secondary structure packing arrangement but have different topologies have attracted much attention in terms of both evolution and physical chemistry of protein structures. Further investigation of such protein relationships would give us a hint as to how proteins can change their fold in the course of evolution, as well as a insight into physico-chemical properties of secondary structure packing. For this purpose, highly accurate sequence order independent structure comparison methods are needed. We have developed a novel protein structure alignment algorithm, MICAN (a structure alignment algorithm that can handle Multiple-chain complexes, Inverse direction of secondary structures, Cα only models, Alternative alignments, and Non-sequential alignments). The algorithm was designed so as to identify the best structural alignment between protein pairs by disregarding the connectivity between secondary structure elements (SSE). One of the key feature of the algorithm is utilizing the multiple vector representation for each SSE, which enables us to correctly treat bent or twisted nature of long SSE. We compared MICAN with other 9 publicly available structure alignment programs, using both reference-dependent and reference-independent evaluation methods on a variety of benchmark test sets which include both sequential and non-sequential alignments. We show that MICAN outperforms the other existing methods for reproducing reference alignments of non-sequential test sets. Further, although MICAN does not specialize in sequential structure alignment, it showed the top level performance on the sequential test sets. We also show that MICAN program is the fastest non-sequential structure alignment program among all the programs we examined here. MICAN is the fastest and the most accurate program among non-sequential alignment programs we examined here. These results suggest that MICAN is a highly effective tool for automatically detecting non

  2. Vertical decomposition with Genetic Algorithm for Multiple Sequence Alignment.

    PubMed

    Naznin, Farhana; Sarker, Ruhul; Essam, Daryl

    2011-08-25

    Many Bioinformatics studies begin with a multiple sequence alignment as the foundation for their research. This is because multiple sequence alignment can be a useful technique for studying molecular evolution and analyzing sequence structure relationships. In this paper, we have proposed a Vertical Decomposition with Genetic Algorithm (VDGA) for Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA). In VDGA, we divide the sequences vertically into two or more subsequences, and then solve them individually using a guide tree approach. Finally, we combine all the subsequences to generate a new multiple sequence alignment. This technique is applied on the solutions of the initial generation and of each child generation within VDGA. We have used two mechanisms to generate an initial population in this research: the first mechanism is to generate guide trees with randomly selected sequences and the second is shuffling the sequences inside such trees. Two different genetic operators have been implemented with VDGA. To test the performance of our algorithm, we have compared it with existing well-known methods, namely PRRP, CLUSTALX, DIALIGN, HMMT, SB_PIMA, ML_PIMA, MULTALIGN, and PILEUP8, and also other methods, based on Genetic Algorithms (GA), such as SAGA, MSA-GA and RBT-GA, by solving a number of benchmark datasets from BAliBase 2.0. The experimental results showed that the VDGA with three vertical divisions was the most successful variant for most of the test cases in comparison to other divisions considered with VDGA. The experimental results also confirmed that VDGA outperformed the other methods considered in this research.

  3. Vertical decomposition with Genetic Algorithm for Multiple Sequence Alignment

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Many Bioinformatics studies begin with a multiple sequence alignment as the foundation for their research. This is because multiple sequence alignment can be a useful technique for studying molecular evolution and analyzing sequence structure relationships. Results In this paper, we have proposed a Vertical Decomposition with Genetic Algorithm (VDGA) for Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA). In VDGA, we divide the sequences vertically into two or more subsequences, and then solve them individually using a guide tree approach. Finally, we combine all the subsequences to generate a new multiple sequence alignment. This technique is applied on the solutions of the initial generation and of each child generation within VDGA. We have used two mechanisms to generate an initial population in this research: the first mechanism is to generate guide trees with randomly selected sequences and the second is shuffling the sequences inside such trees. Two different genetic operators have been implemented with VDGA. To test the performance of our algorithm, we have compared it with existing well-known methods, namely PRRP, CLUSTALX, DIALIGN, HMMT, SB_PIMA, ML_PIMA, MULTALIGN, and PILEUP8, and also other methods, based on Genetic Algorithms (GA), such as SAGA, MSA-GA and RBT-GA, by solving a number of benchmark datasets from BAliBase 2.0. Conclusions The experimental results showed that the VDGA with three vertical divisions was the most successful variant for most of the test cases in comparison to other divisions considered with VDGA. The experimental results also confirmed that VDGA outperformed the other methods considered in this research. PMID:21867510

  4. Multiple sequence alignment algorithm based on a dispersion graph and ant colony algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weiyang; Liao, Bo; Zhu, Wen; Xiang, Xuyu

    2009-10-01

    In this article, we describe a representation for the processes of multiple sequences alignment (MSA) and used it to solve the problem of MSA. By this representation, we took every possible aligning result into account by defining the representation of gap insertion, the value of heuristic information in every optional path and scoring rule. On the basis of the proposed multidimensional graph, we used the ant colony algorithm to find the better path that denotes a better aligning result. In our article, we proposed the instance of three-dimensional graph and four-dimensional graph and advanced a special ichnographic representation to analyze MSA. It is yet only an experimental software, and we gave an example for finding the best aligning result by three-dimensional graph and ant colony algorithm. Experimental results show that our method can improve the solution quality on MSA benchmarks. Copyright 2009 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Algorithm for Aligning an Array of Receiving Radio Antennas

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogstad, David

    2006-01-01

    A digital-signal-processing algorithm (somewhat arbitrarily) called SUMPLE has been devised as a means of aligning the outputs of multiple receiving radio antennas in a large array for the purpose of receiving a weak signal transmitted by a single distant source. As used here, aligning signifies adjusting the delays and phases of the outputs from the various antennas so that their relatively weak replicas of the desired signal can be added coherently to increase the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) for improved reception, as though one had a single larger antenna. The method was devised to enhance spacecraft-tracking and telemetry operations in NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN); the method could also be useful in such other applications as both satellite and terrestrial radio communications and radio astronomy. Heretofore, most commonly, alignment has been effected by a process that involves correlation of signals in pairs. This approach necessitates the use of a large amount of hardware most notably, the N(N - 1)/2 correlators needed to process signals from all possible pairs of N antennas. Moreover, because the incoming signals typically have low SNRs, the delay and phase adjustments are poorly determined from the pairwise correlations. SUMPLE also involves correlations, but the correlations are not performed in pairs. Instead, in a partly iterative process, each signal is appropriately weighted and then correlated with a composite signal equal to the sum of the other signals (see Figure 1). One benefit of this approach is that only N correlators are needed; in an array of N much greater than 1 antennas, this results in a significant reduction of the amount of hardware. Another benefit is that once the array achieves coherence, the correlation SNR is N - 1 times that of a pair of antennas.

  6. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: BESIII track fitting algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Ji-Ke; Mao, Ze-Pu; Bian, Jian-Ming; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chen, Shen-Jian; Deng, Zi-Yan; Fu, Cheng-Dong; Gao, Yuan-Ning; He, Kang-Lin; He, Miao; Hua, Chun-Fei; Huang, Bin; Huang, Xing-Tao; Ji, Xiao-Bin; Li, Fei; Li, Bai-Bo; Li, Wei-Dong; Liang, Yu-Tie; Liu, Chun-Xiu; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Suo; Liu, Ying-Jie; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Mao, Ya-Jun; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Pan, Ming-Hua; Pang, Cai-Ying; Ping, Rong-Gang; Qin, Ya-Hong; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Sun, Sheng-Sen; Sun, Yong-Zhao; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wen, Shuo-Pin; Wu, Ling-Hui; Xie, Yu-Guang; Xu, Min; Yan, Liang; You, Zheng-Yun; Yuan, Chang-Zheng; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Bing-Yun; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Yang-Heng; Zhu, Ke-Jun; Zhu, Yong-Sheng; Zhu, Zhi-Li; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2009-10-01

    A track fitting algorithm based on the Kalman filter method has been developed for BESIII of BEPCII. The effects of multiple scattering and energy loss when the charged particles go through the detector, non-uniformity of magnetic field (NUMF) and wire sag, etc., have been carefully handled. This algorithm works well and the performance satisfies the physical requirements tested by the simulation data.

  7. Real-time alignment and cali bration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujany, Giulio; Storaci, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb will have a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  8. A review on multiple sequence alignment from the perspective of genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Biswanath; Garai, Gautam

    2017-06-29

    Sequence alignment is an active research area in the field of bioinformatics. It is also a crucial task as it guides many other tasks like phylogenetic analysis, function, and/or structure prediction of biological macromolecules like DNA, RNA, and Protein. Proteins are the building blocks of every living organism. Although protein alignment problem has been studied for several decades, unfortunately, every available method produces alignment results differently for a single alignment problem. Multiple sequence alignment is characterized as a very high computational complex problem. Many stochastic methods, therefore, are considered for improving the accuracy of alignment. Among them, many researchers frequently use Genetic Algorithm. In this study, we have shown different types of the method applied in alignment and the recent trends in the multiobjective genetic algorithm for solving multiple sequence alignment. Many recent studies have demonstrated considerable progress in finding the alignment accuracy. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Novel time-dependent alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector in the LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Peña, J.

    2016-11-01

    ATLAS is a multipurpose experiment at the LHC proton-proton collider. Its physics goals require an unbiased and high resolution measurement of the charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system and the quality of the alignment of its components. For the LHC Run 2, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL) . ATLAS Inner Detector alignment framework has been adapted and upgraded to correct very short time scale movements of the sub-detectors. In particular, a mechanical distortion of the IBL staves up to 20 μm and a vertical displacement of the Pixel detector of ~ 6 μm have been observed during data-taking. The techniques used to correct for these effects and to match the required Inner Detector performance will be presented.

  10. The track finding algorithm of the Belle II vertex detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bilka, Tadeas; Braun, Nils; Casarosa, Giulia; Frost, Oliver; Frühwirth, Rudolf; Hauth, Thomas; Heck, Martin; Kandra, Jakub; Kodys, Peter; Kvasnicka, Peter; Lettenbichler, Jakob; Lück, Thomas; Madlener, Thomas; Metzner, Felix; Nadler, Moritz; Oberhof, Benjamin; Paoloni, Eugenio; Prim, Markus; Ritter, Martin; Schlüter, Tobias; Schnell, Michael; Spruck, Bjoern; Trusov, Viktor; Wagner, Jonas; Wessel, Christian; Ziegler, Michael

    2017-08-01

    The Belle II experiment is a high energy multi purpose particle detector operated at the asymmetric e+e- - collider SuperKEKB in Tsukuba (Japan). In this work we describe the algorithm performing the pattern recognition for inner tracking detector which consists of two layers of pixel detectors and four layers of double sided silicon strip detectors arranged around the interaction region. The track finding algorithm will be used both during the High Level Trigger on-line track reconstruction and during the off-line full reconstruction. It must provide good efficiency down to momenta as low as 50 MeV/c where material effects are sizeable even in an extremely thin detector as the VXD. In addition it has to be able to cope with the high occupancy of the Belle II detectors due to the background. The underlying concept of the track finding algorithm, as well as details of the implementation are outlined. The algorithm is proven to run with good performance on simulated ϒ(4S) → BB¯ events with an efficiency for reconstructing tracks of above 90% over a wide range of momentum.

  11. Alignment of the Near Detector scintillator modules using cosmic ray muons

    SciTech Connect

    Ospanov, Rustem; Lang, Karol; /Texas U.

    2008-05-01

    The authors describe the procedures and the results of the first alignment of the Near Detector. Using 15.5 million cosmic ray muon tracks, collected from October, 2004 through early january, 2005, they derive the effective transverse positions of the calorimeter scintillator modules. The residuals from straight line fits indicate that the current alignment has achieved better than 1 mm precision. They estimate the size of the remaining misalignment and using tracks recorded with a magnetic field test the effect of the magnetic field on the alignment.

  12. A survey of sequence alignment algorithms for next-generation sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Homer, Nils

    2010-01-01

    Rapidly evolving sequencing technologies produce data on an unparalleled scale. A central challenge to the analysis of this data is sequence alignment, whereby sequence reads must be compared to a reference. A wide variety of alignment algorithms and software have been subsequently developed over the past two years. In this article, we will systematically review the current development of these algorithms and introduce their practical applications on different types of experimental data. We come to the conclusion that short-read alignment is no longer the bottleneck of data analyses. We also consider future development of alignment algorithms with respect to emerging long sequence reads and the prospect of cloud computing. PMID:20460430

  13. Photon counting detector array algorithms for deep space optical communications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Srinivasan, Meera; Andrews, Kenneth S.; Farr, William H.; Wong, Andre

    2016-03-01

    For deep-space optical communications systems utilizing an uplink optical beacon, a single-photon-counting detector array on the flight terminal can be used to simultaneously perform uplink tracking and communications as well as accurate downlink pointing at photon-starved (pW=m2) power levels. In this paper, we discuss concepts and algorithms for uplink signal acquisition, tracking, and parameter estimation using a photon-counting camera. Statistical models of detector output data and signal processing algorithms are presented, incorporating realistic effects such as Earth background and detector/readout blocking. Analysis and simulation results are validated against measured laboratory data using state-of-the-art commercial photon-counting detector arrays, demonstrating sub-microradian tracking errors under channel conditions representative of deep space optical links.

  14. A polarized infrared thermal detector made from super-aligned multiwalled carbon nanotube films.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Lin; Zhang, Yuying; Wang, Yang; Liu, Kai; Wang, Zheng; Li, Tianyi; Jiang, Zhe; Shi, Junpeng; Liu, Liang; Li, QunQing; Zhao, Yonggang; Feng, Zhenghe; Fan, Shoushan; Jiang, Kaili

    2011-01-14

    Carbon nanotube (CNT) films, easily drawn from super-aligned CNT arrays with a large area and a good compatibility with semiconductor technology, have been used as light sensitive materials for infrared (IR) detection. A bolometric CNT detector made from one layer of super-aligned CNT film shows a 15.4% resistance change under 10 mW mm(-2) of IR illumination and a fast characteristic response time of 4.4 ms due to its ultra-small heat capacity per unit area in vacuum at room temperature. Besides the power intensity detection, the anisotropic property of the super-aligned CNT films makes them ideal materials to detect the polarization of IR light simultaneously, which provides great potential in infrared imaging polarimetry. Theoretical analyses have been carried out to investigate the influences of CNT film properties on the responsivity and response time of the detector.

  15. Retention Time Alignment of LC/MS Data by a Divide-and-Conquer Algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhongqi

    2012-04-01

    Liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC/MS) has become the method of choice for characterizing complex mixtures. These analyses often involve quantitative comparison of components in multiple samples. To achieve automated sample comparison, the components of interest must be detected and identified, and their retention times aligned and peak areas calculated. This article describes a simple pairwise iterative retention time alignment algorithm, based on the divide-and-conquer approach, for alignment of ion features detected in LC/MS experiments. In this iterative algorithm, ion features in the sample run are first aligned with features in the reference run by applying a single constant shift of retention time. The sample chromatogram is then divided into two shorter chromatograms, which are aligned to the reference chromatogram the same way. Each shorter chromatogram is further divided into even shorter chromatograms. This process continues until each chromatogram is sufficiently narrow so that ion features within it have a similar retention time shift. In six pairwise LC/MS alignment examples containing a total of 6507 confirmed true corresponding feature pairs with retention time shifts up to five peak widths, the algorithm successfully aligned these features with an error rate of 0.2%. The alignment algorithm is demonstrated to be fast, robust, fully automatic, and superior to other algorithms. After alignment and gap-filling of detected ion features, their abundances can be tabulated for direct comparison between samples.

  16. Hohlraum Target Alignment from X-ray Detector Images using Starburst Design Patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Leach, R R; Conder, A; Edwards, O; Kroll, J; Kozioziemski, B; Mapoles, E; McGuigan, D; Wilhelmsen, K

    2010-12-14

    National Ignition Facility (NIF) is a high-energy laser facility comprised of 192 laser beams focused with enough power and precision on a hydrogen-filled spherical, cryogenic target to initiate a fusion reaction. The target container, or hohlraum, must be accurately aligned to an x-ray imaging system to allow careful monitoring of the frozen fuel layer in the target. To achieve alignment, x-ray images are acquired through starburst-shaped windows cut into opposite sides of the hohlraum. When the hohlraum is in alignment, the starburst pattern pairs match nearly exactly and allow a clear view of the ice layer formation on the edge of the target capsule. During the alignment process, x-ray image analysis is applied to determine the direction and magnitude of adjustment required. X-ray detector and source are moved in concert during the alignment process. The automated pointing alignment system described here is both accurate and efficient. In this paper, we describe the control and associated image processing that enables automation of the starburst pointing alignment.

  17. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector and its performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, S.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the LHC, designed to perform high precision studies of B and D hadrons. In Run II of the LHC, a new scheme for the software trigger at LHCb allows splitting the triggering of events in two stages, giving room to perform the detector alignment and calibration in real time. In the novel detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II, data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment constants, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The larger timing budget, available in the trigger, allows us to perform the same track reconstruction online and offline. This enables LHCb to achieve the best reconstruction performance already in the trigger, and allows physics analyses to be performed directly on the data produced by the trigger reconstruction. The novel real-time processing strategy at LHCb is discussed from both the technical and operational point of view. The overall performance of the LHCb detector on the data of Run II is presented as well.

  18. Unsupervised parameter optimization for automated retention time alignment of severely shifted gas chromatographic data using the piecework alignment algorithm.

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Wright, Bob W.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2007-02-02

    First, simulated chromatographic separations with declining retention time precision were used to study the performance of the piecewise retention time alignment algorithm and to demonstrate an unsupervised parameter optimization method. The average correlation coefficient between the first chromatogram and every other chromatogram in the data set was used to optimize the alignment parameters. This correlation method does not require a training set, so it is unsupervised and automated. This frees the user from needing to provide class information and makes the alignment algorithm more generally applicable to classifying completely unknown data sets. For a data set of simulated chromatograms where the average chromatographic peak was shifted past two neighboring peaks between runs, the average correlation coefficient of the raw data was 0.46 ± 0.25. After automated, optimized piecewise alignment, the average correlation coefficient was 0.93 ± 0.02. Additionally, a relative shift metric and principal component analysis (PCA) were used to independently quantify and categorize the alignment performance, respectively. The relative shift metric was defined as four times the standard deviation of a given peak’s retention time in all of the chromatograms, divided by the peak-width-at-base. The raw simulated data sets that were studied contained peaks with average relative shifts ranging between 0.3 and 3.0. Second, a “real” data set of gasoline separations was gathered using three different GC methods to induce severe retention time shifting. In these gasoline separations, retention time precision improved ~8 fold following alignment. Finally, piecewise alignment and the unsupervised correlation optimization method were applied to severely shifted GC separations of reformate distillation fractions. The effect of piecewise alignment on peak heights and peak areas is also reported. Piecewise alignment either did not change the peak height, or caused it to slightly

  19. A memory-efficient algorithm for multiple sequence alignment with constraints.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chin Lung; Huang, Yen Pin

    2005-01-01

    Recently, the concept of the constrained sequence alignment was proposed to incorporate the knowledge of biologists about structures/functionalities/consensuses of their datasets into sequence alignment such that the user-specified residues/nucleotides are aligned together in the computed alignment. The currently developed programs use the so-called progressive approach to efficiently obtain a constrained alignment of several sequences. However, the kernels of these programs, the dynamic programming algorithms for computing an optimal constrained alignment between two sequences, run in (gamman2) memory, where gamma is the number of the constraints and n is the maximum of the lengths of sequences. As a result, such a high memory requirement limits the overall programs to align short sequences only. We adopt the divide-and-conquer approach to design a memory-efficient algorithm for computing an optimal constrained alignment between two sequences, which greatly reduces the memory requirement of the dynamic programming approaches at the expense of a small constant factor in CPU time. This new algorithm consumes only O(alphan) space, where alpha is the sum of the lengths of constraints and usually alpha < n in practical applications. Based on this algorithm, we have developed a memory-efficient tool for multiple sequence alignment with constraints. http://genome.life.nctu.edu.tw/MUSICME.

  20. A Novel Approach to Multiple Sequence Alignment Using Multiobjective Evolutionary Algorithm Based on Decomposition.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Huazheng; He, Zhongshi; Jia, Yuanyuan

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a fundamental and key step for implementing other tasks in bioinformatics, such as phylogenetic analyses, identification of conserved motifs and domains, structure prediction, etc. Despite the fact that there are many methods to implement MSA, biologically perfect alignment approaches are not found hitherto. This paper proposes a novel idea to perform MSA, where MSA is treated as a multiobjective optimization problem. A famous multiobjective evolutionary algorithm framework based on decomposition is applied for solving MSA, named MOMSA. In the MOMSA algorithm, we develop a new population initialization method and a novel mutation operator. We compare the performance of MOMSA with several alignment methods based on evolutionary algorithms, including VDGA, GAPAM, and IMSA, and also with state-of-the-art progressive alignment approaches, such as MSAprobs, Probalign, MAFFT, Procons, Clustal omega, T-Coffee, Kalign2, MUSCLE, FSA, Dialign, PRANK, and CLUSTALW. These alignment algorithms are tested on benchmark datasets BAliBASE 2.0 and BAliBASE 3.0. Experimental results show that MOMSA can obtain the significantly better alignments than VDGA, GAPAM on the most of test cases by statistical analyses, produce better alignments than IMSA in terms of TC scores, and also indicate that MOMSA is comparable with the leading progressive alignment approaches in terms of quality of alignments.

  1. Chimeric alignment by dynamic programming: Algorithm and biological uses

    SciTech Connect

    Komatsoulis, G.A.; Waterman, M.S.

    1997-12-01

    A new nearest-neighbor method for detecting chimeric 16S rRNA artifacts generated during PCR amplification from mixed populations has been developed. The method uses dynamic programming to generate an optimal chimeric alignment, defined as the highest scoring alignment between a query and a concatenation of a 5{prime} and a 3{prime} segment from two separate entries from a database of related sequences. Chimeras are detected by studying the scores and form of the chimeric and global sequence alignments. The chimeric alignment method was found to be marginally more effective than k-tuple based nearest-neighbor methods in simulation studies, but its most effective use is in concert with k-tuple methods. 15 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Algorithms to identify detector Compton scatter in PET modules

    SciTech Connect

    Comanor, K.A.; Virador, P.R.G.; Moses, W.W.

    1996-08-01

    Using Monte Carlo simulation, the authors investigate algorithms to identify and correct for detector Compton scatter in hypothetical PET modules with 3 x 3 x 30 mm BGO crystals coupled to individual photosensors. Rather than assume a particular design, they study three classes of detectors: (1) with energy resolution limited by counting statistics, (2) with energy resolution limited by electronic noise, and (3) with depth of interaction (DOI) measurement capability. For the first two classes, selecting the channel with the highest signal as the crystal of interaction yields a 22--25% misidentification fraction (MIF) for all reasonable noise fwhm to signal (N/S) ratios (i.e. < 0.5 at 511 keV). Algorithms that attempt to correctly position events that undergo forward Compton scatter using only energy information can reduce the MIF to 12%, and can be easily realized with counting statistics limited detectors but can only be achieved with very low noise values for noise limited detectors. When using position of interaction to identify forward scatter, a MIF of 12% can be obtained if the detector has good energy and position resolution.

  3. Multiagency Urban Search Experiment Detector and Algorithm Test Bed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, Andrew D.; Garishvili, Irakli; Peplow, Douglas E.; Archer, Daniel E.; Ray, William R.; Swinney, Mathew W.; Willis, Michael J.; Davidson, Gregory G.; Cleveland, Steven L.; Patton, Bruce W.; Hornback, Donald E.; Peltz, James J.; McLean, M. S. Lance; Plionis, Alexander A.; Quiter, Brian J.; Bandstra, Mark S.

    2017-07-01

    In order to provide benchmark data sets for radiation detector and algorithm development, a particle transport test bed has been created using experimental data as model input and validation. A detailed radiation measurement campaign at the Combined Arms Collective Training Facility in Fort Indiantown Gap, PA (FTIG), USA, provides sample background radiation levels for a variety of materials present at the site (including cinder block, gravel, asphalt, and soil) using long dwell high-purity germanium (HPGe) measurements. In addition, detailed light detection and ranging data and ground-truth measurements inform model geometry. This paper describes the collected data and the application of these data to create background and injected source synthetic data for an arbitrary gamma-ray detection system using particle transport model detector response calculations and statistical sampling. In the methodology presented here, HPGe measurements inform model source terms while detector response calculations are validated via long dwell measurements using 2"×4"×16" NaI(Tl) detectors at a variety of measurement points. A collection of responses, along with sampling methods and interpolation, can be used to create data sets to gauge radiation detector and algorithm (including detection, identification, and localization) performance under a variety of scenarios. Data collected at the FTIG site are available for query, filtering, visualization, and download at muse.lbl.gov.

  4. Online processing in the ALICE DAQ The detector algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chapeland, S.; Altini, V.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Costa, F.; Divià, R.; Fuchs, U.; Makhlyueva, I.; Roukoutakis, F.; Schossmaier, K.; Soós, C.; Vande Vyvre, P.; von Haller, B.; ALICE Collaboration

    2010-04-01

    ALICE (A Large Ion Collider Experiment) is the heavy-ion detector designed to study the physics of strongly interacting matter and the quark-gluon plasma at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Some specific calibration tasks are performed regularly for each of the 18 ALICE sub-detectors in order to achieve most accurate physics measurements. These procedures involve events analysis in a wide range of experimental conditions, implicating various trigger types, data throughputs, electronics settings, and algorithms, both during short sub-detector standalone runs and long global physics runs. A framework was designed to collect statistics and compute some of the calibration parameters directly online, using resources of the Data Acquisition System (DAQ), and benefiting from its inherent parallel architecture to process events. This system has been used at the experimental area for one year, and includes more than 30 calibration routines in production. This paper describes the framework architecture and the synchronization mechanisms involved at the level of the Experiment Control System (ECS) of ALICE. The software libraries interfacing detector algorithms (DA) to the online data flow, configuration database, experiment logbook, and offline system are reviewed. The test protocols followed to integrate and validate each sub-detector component are also discussed, including the automatic build system and validation procedures used to ensure a smooth deployment. The offline post-processing and archiving of the DA results is covered in a separate paper.

  5. Multiple sequence alignment using multi-objective based bacterial foraging optimization algorithm.

    PubMed

    Rani, R Ranjani; Ramyachitra, D

    2016-12-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a widespread approach in computational biology and bioinformatics. MSA deals with how the sequences of nucleotides and amino acids are sequenced with possible alignment and minimum number of gaps between them, which directs to the functional, evolutionary and structural relationships among the sequences. Still the computation of MSA is a challenging task to provide an efficient accuracy and statistically significant results of alignments. In this work, the Bacterial Foraging Optimization Algorithm was employed to align the biological sequences which resulted in a non-dominated optimal solution. It employs Multi-objective, such as: Maximization of Similarity, Non-gap percentage, Conserved blocks and Minimization of gap penalty. BAliBASE 3.0 benchmark database was utilized to examine the proposed algorithm against other methods In this paper, two algorithms have been proposed: Hybrid Genetic Algorithm with Artificial Bee Colony (GA-ABC) and Bacterial Foraging Optimization Algorithm. It was found that Hybrid Genetic Algorithm with Artificial Bee Colony performed better than the existing optimization algorithms. But still the conserved blocks were not obtained using GA-ABC. Then BFO was used for the alignment and the conserved blocks were obtained. The proposed Multi-Objective Bacterial Foraging Optimization Algorithm (MO-BFO) was compared with widely used MSA methods Clustal Omega, Kalign, MUSCLE, MAFFT, Genetic Algorithm (GA), Ant Colony Optimization (ACO), Artificial Bee Colony (ABC), Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) and Hybrid Genetic Algorithm with Artificial Bee Colony (GA-ABC). The final results show that the proposed MO-BFO algorithm yields better alignment than most widely used methods.

  6. Reconstruction algorithms for optoacoustic imaging based on fiber optic detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lamela, Horacio; Díaz-Tendero, Gonzalo; Gutiérrez, Rebeca; Gallego, Daniel

    2011-06-01

    Optoacoustic Imaging (OAI), a novel hybrid imaging technology, offers high contrast, molecular specificity and excellent resolution to overcome limitations of the current clinical modalities for detection of solid tumors. The exact time-domain reconstruction formula produces images with excellent resolution but poor contrast. Some approximate time-domain filtered back-projection reconstruction algorithms have also been reported to solve this problem. A wavelet transform implementation filtering can be used to sharpen object boundaries while simultaneously preserving high contrast of the reconstructed objects. In this paper, several algorithms, based on Back Projection (BP) techniques, have been suggested to process OA images in conjunction with signal filtering for ultrasonic point detectors and integral detectors. We apply these techniques first directly to a numerical generated sample image and then to the laserdigitalized image of a tissue phantom, obtaining in both cases the best results in resolution and contrast for a waveletbased filter.

  7. Report on the Power and Detector Stability Measurements for the QC Laser Alignment System

    SciTech Connect

    Myers, Tanya L.; Bonebrake, Christopher A.; Cannon, Bret D.; Suarez, Reynold; Stewart, Timothy L.; Hatchell, Brian K.

    2003-12-15

    This report summarizes the preliminary tests that PNNL has performed to date for the Quantum Cascade (QC) Laser Alignment System that is being developed for the Using Client for a classified application. PNNL is designing, fabricating, assembling, and testing the QC Laser Alignment System and has a subcontract with Maxion Technologies, Inc. for development and production of the QC laser devices to be used in this system. The QC lasers furnished by Maxion will be incorporated into the QC Laser Alignment System by PNNL. The QC Laser Alignment System consists of five Alignment Source Assemblies (ASAs) and a computer control system with graphical user interface (GUI). Each ASA has two QC lasers along with a temperature sensor. The system design also includes an optical detector for each QC laser to measure the output power of the rear facet for additional stabilization. The system will monitor the voltage across the QC laser, the temperature, the current, and the signal from the optical detectors to ensure the system is within the tolerances specified in the System Specifications. The System Specifications require that the relative power between lasers on the same ASA be maintained at {+-}1% and among the lasers on different ASAs at {+-}2.5%. For the tests reported here, we attempted to examine the power stability of the QC laser as well as the variability of the optical detectors to ensure the system will adhere to these specifications. These preliminary tests did not incorporate the actual ASA mounting scheme or the QC lasers that are being fabricated by Maxion to operate at the specified temperature of -50 C. Thus, we expect the performance from these results to differ from the actual results that can be achieved in the QC Laser Alignment System. Current limitations with the mounting scheme created problems with the power stability due to thermal cycling. Short-term power stability where thermal cycling was not a problem showed power fluctuations within the 1

  8. Coarse Alignment Technology on Moving Base for SINS Based on the Improved Quaternion Filter Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Tao; Zhu, Yongyun; Zhou, Feng; Yan, Yaxiong; Tong, Jinwu

    2017-01-01

    Initial alignment of the strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) is intended to determine the initial attitude matrix in a short time with certain accuracy. The alignment accuracy of the quaternion filter algorithm is remarkable, but the convergence rate is slow. To solve this problem, this paper proposes an improved quaternion filter algorithm for faster initial alignment based on the error model of the quaternion filter algorithm. The improved quaternion filter algorithm constructs the K matrix based on the principle of optimal quaternion algorithm, and rebuilds the measurement model by containing acceleration and velocity errors to make the convergence rate faster. A doppler velocity log (DVL) provides the reference velocity for the improved quaternion filter alignment algorithm. In order to demonstrate the performance of the improved quaternion filter algorithm in the field, a turntable experiment and a vehicle test are carried out. The results of the experiments show that the convergence rate of the proposed improved quaternion filter is faster than that of the tradition quaternion filter algorithm. In addition, the improved quaternion filter algorithm also demonstrates advantages in terms of correctness, effectiveness, and practicability. PMID:28629137

  9. A Self-Alignment Algorithm for SINS Based on Gravitational Apparent Motion and Sensor Data Denoising

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yiting; Xu, Xiaosu; Liu, Xixiang; Yao, Yiqing; Wu, Liang; Sun, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Initial alignment is always a key topic and difficult to achieve in an inertial navigation system (INS). In this paper a novel self-initial alignment algorithm is proposed using gravitational apparent motion vectors at three different moments and vector-operation. Simulation and analysis showed that this method easily suffers from the random noise contained in accelerometer measurements which are used to construct apparent motion directly. Aiming to resolve this problem, an online sensor data denoising method based on a Kalman filter is proposed and a novel reconstruction method for apparent motion is designed to avoid the collinearity among vectors participating in the alignment solution. Simulation, turntable tests and vehicle tests indicate that the proposed alignment algorithm can fulfill initial alignment of strapdown INS (SINS) under both static and swinging conditions. The accuracy can either reach or approach the theoretical values determined by sensor precision under static or swinging conditions. PMID:25923932

  10. Protein alignment algorithms with an efficient backtracking routine on multiple GPUs

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Pairwise sequence alignment methods are widely used in biological research. The increasing number of sequences is perceived as one of the upcoming challenges for sequence alignment methods in the nearest future. To overcome this challenge several GPU (Graphics Processing Unit) computing approaches have been proposed lately. These solutions show a great potential of a GPU platform but in most cases address the problem of sequence database scanning and computing only the alignment score whereas the alignment itself is omitted. Thus, the need arose to implement the global and semiglobal Needleman-Wunsch, and Smith-Waterman algorithms with a backtracking procedure which is needed to construct the alignment. Results In this paper we present the solution that performs the alignment of every given sequence pair, which is a required step for progressive multiple sequence alignment methods, as well as for DNA recognition at the DNA assembly stage. Performed tests show that the implementation, with performance up to 6.3 GCUPS on a single GPU for affine gap penalties, is very efficient in comparison to other CPU and GPU-based solutions. Moreover, multiple GPUs support with load balancing makes the application very scalable. Conclusions The article shows that the backtracking procedure of the sequence alignment algorithms may be designed to fit in with the GPU architecture. Therefore, our algorithm, apart from scores, is able to compute pairwise alignments. This opens a wide range of new possibilities, allowing other methods from the area of molecular biology to take advantage of the new computational architecture. Performed tests show that the efficiency of the implementation is excellent. Moreover, the speed of our GPU-based algorithms can be almost linearly increased when using more than one graphics card. PMID:21599912

  11. GreedyPlus: An Algorithm for the Alignment of Interface Interaction Networks.

    PubMed

    Law, Brian; Bader, Gary D

    2015-07-13

    The increasing ease and accuracy of protein-protein interaction detection has resulted in the ability to map the interactomes of multiple species. We now have an opportunity to compare species to better understand how interactomes evolve. As DNA and protein sequence alignment algorithms were required for comparative genomics, network alignment algorithms are required for comparative interactomics. A number of network alignment methods have been developed for protein-protein interaction networks, where proteins are represented as vertices linked by edges if they interact. Recently, protein interactions have been mapped at the level of amino acid positions, which can be represented as an interface-interaction network (IIN), where vertices represent binding sites, such as protein domains and short sequence motifs. However, current algorithms are not designed to align these networks and generally fail to do so in practice. We present a greedy algorithm, GreedyPlus, for IIN alignment, combining data from diverse sources, including network, protein and binding site properties, to identify putative orthologous relationships between interfaces in available worm and yeast data. GreedyPlus is fast and simple, allowing for easy customization of behaviour, yet still capable of generating biologically meaningful network alignments.

  12. GLOBAL PEAK ALIGNMENT FOR COMPREHENSIVE TWO-DIMENSIONAL GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY MASS SPECTROMETRY USING POINT MATCHING ALGORITHMS

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Beichuan; Kim, Seongho; Li, Hengguang; Heath, Elisabeth; Zhang, Xiang

    2016-01-01

    Comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry (GC×GC-MS) has been used to analyze multiple samples in a metabolomics study. However, due to some uncontrollable experimental conditions, such as the differences in temperature or pressure, matrix effects on samples, and stationary phase degradation, there is always a shift of retention times in the two GC columns between samples. In order to correct the retention time shifts in GC×GC-MS, the peak alignment is a crucial data analysis step to recognize the peaks generated by the same metabolite in different samples. Two approaches have been developed for GC×GC-MS data alignment: profile alignment and peak matching alignment. However, these existing alignment methods are all based on a local alignment, resulting that a peak may not be correctly aligned in a dense chromatographic region where many peaks are present in a small region. False alignment will result in false discovery in the downstream statistical analysis. We, therefore, develop a global comparison based peak alignment method using point matching algorithm (PMA-PA) for both homogeneous and heterogeneous data. The developed algorithm PMA-PA first extracts feature points (peaks) in the chromatography and then searches globally the matching peaks in the consecutive chromatography by adopting the projection of rigid and non-rigid transformation. PMA-PA is further applied to two real experimental data sets, showing that PMA-PA is a promising peak alignment algorithm for both homogenous and heterogeneous data in terms of F1 score, although it uses only peak location information. PMID:27650662

  13. Multiple sequence alignment with affine gap by using multi-objective genetic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Mehmet; Sarhan, Abdullah; Alhajj, Reda

    2014-04-01

    Multiple sequence alignment is of central importance to bioinformatics and computational biology. Although a large number of algorithms for computing a multiple sequence alignment have been designed, the efficient computation of highly accurate and statistically significant multiple alignments is still a challenge. In this paper, we propose an efficient method by using multi-objective genetic algorithm (MSAGMOGA) to discover optimal alignments with affine gap in multiple sequence data. The main advantage of our approach is that a large number of tradeoff (i.e., non-dominated) alignments can be obtained by a single run with respect to conflicting objectives: affine gap penalty minimization and similarity and support maximization. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first effort with three objectives in this direction. The proposed method can be applied to any data set with a sequential character. Furthermore, it allows any choice of similarity measures for finding alignments. By analyzing the obtained optimal alignments, the decision maker can understand the tradeoff between the objectives. We compared our method with the three well-known multiple sequence alignment methods, MUSCLE, SAGA and MSA-GA. As the first of them is a progressive method, and the other two are based on evolutionary algorithms. Experiments on the BAliBASE 2.0 database were conducted and the results confirm that MSAGMOGA obtains the results with better accuracy statistical significance compared with the three well-known methods in aligning multiple sequence alignment with affine gap. The proposed method also finds solutions faster than the other evolutionary approaches mentioned above. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Efficient dynamic programming algorithm with prior knowledge for protein β-strand alignment.

    PubMed

    Sabzekar, Mostafa; Naghibzadeh, Mahmoud; Sadri, Javad

    2017-03-21

    One of the main tasks towards the prediction of protein β-sheet structure is to predict the native alignment of β-strands. The alignment of two β-strands defines similar regions that may reflect functional, structural, or evolutionary relationships between them. Therefore, any improvement in β-strands alignment not only reduces the computational search space but also improves β-sheet structure prediction accuracy. To define the alignment scores, previous studies utilized predicted residue-residue contacts (contact maps). However, there are two serious problems using them. First, the precision of contact map prediction techniques, especially for long-range contacts (i.e., β-residues), is still not satisfactory. Second, the residue-residue contact predictors usually utilize general properties of amino acids and disregard the structural features of β-residues. In this paper, we consider β-structure information, which is estimated from protein β-sheet data sets, as alignment scores. However, the predicted contact maps are used as a prior knowledge about residues. They are used for strengthening or weakening the alignment scores in our algorithm. Thus, we can utilize both β-residues and β-structure information in alignment of β-strands. The structure of dynamic programming of the alignment algorithm is changed in order to work with our prior knowledge. Moreover, the Four Russians method is applied to the proposed alignment algorithm in order to reduce the time complexity of the problem. For evaluating the proposed method, we applied it to the state-of-the-art β-sheet structure prediction methods. The experimental results on the BetaSheet916 data set showed significant improvements in the execution time, the accuracy of β-strands' alignment and consequently β-sheet structure prediction accuracy. The results are available at http://conceptsgate.com/BetaSheet.

  15. PALMA: mRNA to genome alignments using large margin algorithms.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Uta; Hepp, Bettina; Ong, Cheng Soon; Rätsch, Gunnar

    2007-08-01

    Despite many years of research on how to properly align sequences in the presence of sequencing errors, alternative splicing and micro-exons, the correct alignment of mRNA sequences to genomic DNA is still a challenging task. We present a novel approach based on large margin learning that combines accurate splice site predictions with common sequence alignment techniques. By solving a convex optimization problem, our algorithm-called PALMA-tunes the parameters of the model such that true alignments score higher than other alignments. We study the accuracy of alignments of mRNAs containing artificially generated micro-exons to genomic DNA. In a carefully designed experiment, we show that our algorithm accurately identifies the intron boundaries as well as boundaries of the optimal local alignment. It outperforms all other methods: for 5702 artificially shortened EST sequences from Caenorhabditis elegans and human, it correctly identifies the intron boundaries in all except two cases. The best other method is a recently proposed method called exalin which misaligns 37 of the sequences. Our method also demonstrates robustness to mutations, insertions and deletions, retaining accuracy even at high noise levels. Datasets for training, evaluation and testing, additional results and a stand-alone alignment tool implemented in C++ and python are available at http://www.fml.mpg.de/raetsch/projects/palma

  16. Centroid Detector Assembly for the AXAF-I Alignment Test System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glenn, Paul

    1995-01-01

    The High Resolution Mirror Assembly (HRMA) of the Advanced X-ray Astrophysics Facility (imaging) (AXAF-I) consists of four nested paraboloids and four nested hyperboloids, all of meter-class size, and all of which are to be assembled and aligned in a special 15 meter tower at Eastman Kodak Company in Rochester, NY. The goals of the alignment are (1) to make the images of the four telescopes coincident; (2) to remove coma from each image individually; and (3) to control and determine the final position of the composite focus. This will be accomplished by the HRMA Aligment Test System (HATS) which is essentially a scanning Hartmann test system. The scanning laser source and the focal plane of the HATS are part of the Centroid Detector Assembly (CDA) which also includes processing electronics and software. In this paper we discuss the design and the measured performance of the CDA.

  17. How to align a new detector and micro shutter inside JWST's Near Infrared Spectrograph (NIRSpec)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    te Plate, Maurice; Rumler, Peter; Jensen, Peter; Eder, Robert; Ehrenwinkler, Ralf; Merkle, Frank; Roedel, Andreas; Speckmaier, Max; Johnson, Thomas E.; Mott, Brent; Snodgrass, Stephen; Gunn, Chris; Ward, Justin

    2016-09-01

    JWST will be the biggest space telescope ever built and it will lead to astounding scientific breakthroughs. The mission will be launched in October 2018 from Kourou, French Guyana by an ESA provided Ariane 5 rocket. NIRSpec, one of the four instruments on board of the mission, recently underwent a major upgrade. New infrared detectors were installed and the Micro Shutter Assembly (MSA) was replaced as well. The rework was necessary because both systems were found to be degrading beyond a level that could be accepted. The installation and "in situ" alignment of these new systems required special techniques and alignment jigs that will be described in this paper. Some first results will be presented as well.

  18. New Position Algorithms for the 3-D CZT Drift Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Budtz-Jørgensen, C.; Kuvvetli, I.

    2017-06-01

    The 3-D position sensitive CZT detector for high-energy astrophysics developed at DTU has been investigated with a digitizer readout system. The 3-D CZT detector is based on the CZT drift-strip detector principle and was fabricated using a REDLEN CZT crystal (20 mm × 20 mm × 5 mm). The detector contains 12 drift cells, each comprising one collecting anode strip with four drift strips, biased such that the electrons are focused and collected by the anode strips. Three-dimensional position determination is achieved using the anode strip signals, the drift-strip signals, and the signals from ten cathode strips. For the characterization work, we used a DAQ system with a 16 channels 250-MHz 14-b digitizer, SIS3316. It allowed us to analyze the pulse shapes of the signals from four detector cells at a time. The 3-D CZT setup was characterized with a finely collimated radioactive source of 137Cs at 662 keV. The analysis required development of novel position determination algorithms which are the subject of this paper. Using the digitizer readout, we demonstrate improved position determination compared to the previous read out system based on analog electronics. Position resolutions of 0.4-mm full width at half maximum (FWHM) in the x-, y-, and z-directions were achieved and the energy resolution was 7.2-keV FWHM at 662 keV. The timing information allows identification of multiple interaction events within one detector cell, e.g., Compton scattering followed by photoelectric absorption. These characteristics are very important for a high-energy spectral-imager suitable for use in advanced Compton telescopes, or as focal detector for new hard X-ray and soft γ-ray focusing telescopes or in polarimeter instrumentation. CZT detectors are attractive for these applications since they offer relatively high-quantum efficiency. From a technical point of view it is advantageous that their cooling requirements are modest.

  19. Binary particle swarm optimization algorithm with mutation for multiple sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Long, Hai-Xia; Xu, Wen-Bo; Sun, Jun

    2009-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is a fundamental and challenging problem in the analysis of biologic sequence. The MSA problem is hard to be solved directly, for it always results in exponential complexity with the scale of the problem. In this paper, we propose mutation-based binary particle swarm optimization (M-BPSO) for MSA solving. In the proposed M-BPSO algorithm, BPSO algorithm is conducted to provide alignments. Thereafter, mutation operator is performed to move out of local optima and speed up convergence. From simulation results of nucleic acid and amino acid sequences, it is shown that the proposed M-BPSO algorithm has superior performance when compared to other existing algorithms. Furthermore, this algorithm can be used quickly and efficiently for smaller and medium size sequences.

  20. A Multithreaded Algorithm for Network Alignment Via Approximate Matching

    SciTech Connect

    Khan, Arif; Gleich, David F.; Pothen, Alex; Halappanavar, Mahantesh

    2012-11-16

    Network alignment is an optimization problem to find the best one-to-one map between the vertices of a pair of graphs that overlaps in as many edges as possible. It is a relaxation of the graph isomorphism problem and is closely related to the subgraph isomorphism problem. The best current approaches are entirely heuristic, and are iterative in nature. They generate real-valued heuristic approximations that must be rounded to find integer solutions. This rounding requires solving a bipartite maximum weight matching problem at each step in order to avoid missing high quality solutions. We investigate substituting a parallel, half-approximation for maximum weight matching instead of an exact computation. Our experiments show that the resulting difference in solution quality is negligible. We demonstrate almost a 20-fold speedup using 40 threads on an 8 processor Intel Xeon E7-8870 system (from 10 minutes to 36 seconds).

  1. Adaptive Waveform Correlation Detectors for Arrays: Algorithms for Autonomous Calibration

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-09-01

    correlation coefficient , or some comparable detection statistic, exceeds a given threshold. Since these methods exploit characteristic details of the full waveform, they provide exquisitely sensitive detectors with far lower detection thresholds than typical short-term average/long-term average (STA/LTA) algorithms. The drawback is that the form of the sought-after signal needs to be known quite accurately a priori, which limits such methods to instances of seismicity whereby a very similar signal has already been observed by every station used. Such instances include

  2. A distributed Canny edge detector: algorithm and FPGA implementation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Qian; Varadarajan, Srenivas; Chakrabarti, Chaitali; Karam, Lina J

    2014-07-01

    The Canny edge detector is one of the most widely used edge detection algorithms due to its superior performance. Unfortunately, not only is it computationally more intensive as compared with other edge detection algorithms, but it also has a higher latency because it is based on frame-level statistics. In this paper, we propose a mechanism to implement the Canny algorithm at the block level without any loss in edge detection performance compared with the original frame-level Canny algorithm. Directly applying the original Canny algorithm at the block-level leads to excessive edges in smooth regions and to loss of significant edges in high-detailed regions since the original Canny computes the high and low thresholds based on the frame-level statistics. To solve this problem, we present a distributed Canny edge detection algorithm that adaptively computes the edge detection thresholds based on the block type and the local distribution of the gradients in the image block. In addition, the new algorithm uses a nonuniform gradient magnitude histogram to compute block-based hysteresis thresholds. The resulting block-based algorithm has a significantly reduced latency and can be easily integrated with other block-based image codecs. It is capable of supporting fast edge detection of images and videos with high resolutions, including full-HD since the latency is now a function of the block size instead of the frame size. In addition, quantitative conformance evaluations and subjective tests show that the edge detection performance of the proposed algorithm is better than the original frame-based algorithm, especially when noise is present in the images. Finally, this algorithm is implemented using a 32 computing engine architecture and is synthesized on the Xilinx Virtex-5 FPGA. The synthesized architecture takes only 0.721 ms (including the SRAM READ/WRITE time and the computation time) to detect edges of 512 × 512 images in the USC SIPI database when clocked at 100

  3. Design of multiple sequence alignment algorithms on parallel, distributed memory supercomputers.

    PubMed

    Church, Philip C; Goscinski, Andrzej; Holt, Kathryn; Inouye, Michael; Ghoting, Amol; Makarychev, Konstantin; Reumann, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    The challenge of comparing two or more genomes that have undergone recombination and substantial amounts of segmental loss and gain has recently been addressed for small numbers of genomes. However, datasets of hundreds of genomes are now common and their sizes will only increase in the future. Multiple sequence alignment of hundreds of genomes remains an intractable problem due to quadratic increases in compute time and memory footprint. To date, most alignment algorithms are designed for commodity clusters without parallelism. Hence, we propose the design of a multiple sequence alignment algorithm on massively parallel, distributed memory supercomputers to enable research into comparative genomics on large data sets. Following the methodology of the sequential progressiveMauve algorithm, we design data structures including sequences and sorted k-mer lists on the IBM Blue Gene/P supercomputer (BG/P). Preliminary results show that we can reduce the memory footprint so that we can potentially align over 250 bacterial genomes on a single BG/P compute node. We verify our results on a dataset of E.coli, Shigella and S.pneumoniae genomes. Our implementation returns results matching those of the original algorithm but in 1/2 the time and with 1/4 the memory footprint for scaffold building. In this study, we have laid the basis for multiple sequence alignment of large-scale datasets on a massively parallel, distributed memory supercomputer, thus enabling comparison of hundreds instead of a few genome sequences within reasonable time.

  4. Very black infrared detector from vertically aligned carbon nanotubes and electric-field poling of lithium tantalate.

    PubMed

    Lehman, John; Sanders, Aric; Hanssen, Leonard; Wilthan, Boris; Zeng, Jinan; Jensen, Christopher

    2010-09-08

    Vertically aligned multiwall carbon nanotubes were grown by water-assisted chemical vapor deposition on a large-area lithium tantalate pyroelectric detector. The processing parameters are nominally identical to those by which others have achieved the "world's darkest substance" on a silicon substrate. The pyroelectric detector material, though a good candidate for such a coating, presents additional challenges and outcomes. After coating, a cycle of heating, electric field poling, and cooling was employed to restore the spontaneous polarization perpendicular to the detector electrodes. The detector responsivity is reported along with imaging as well as visible and infrared reflectance measurements of the detector and a silicon witness sample. We find that the detector responsivity is slightly compromised by the heat of processing and the coating properties are substrate dependent. However, it is possible to achieve nearly ideal values of detector reflectance uniformly less than 0.1% from 400 nm to 4 microm and less than 1% from 4 to 14 microm.

  5. Low complexity interference alignment algorithms for desired signal power maximization problem of MIMO channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Cong; Yang, Yunchuan; Yuan, Yaxiang

    2012-12-01

    In this article, we investigate the interference alignment (IA) solution for a K-user MIMO interference channel. Proper users' precoders and decoders are designed through a desired signal power maximization model with IA conditions as constraints, which forms a complex matrix optimization problem. We propose two low complexity algorithms, both of which apply the Courant penalty function technique to combine the leakage interference and the desired signal power together as the new objective function. The first proposed algorithm is the modified alternating minimization algorithm (MAMA), where each subproblem has closed-form solution with an eigenvalue decomposition. To further reduce algorithm complexity, we propose a hybrid algorithm which consists of two parts. As the first part, the algorithm iterates with Householder transformation to preserve the orthogonality of precoders and decoders. In each iteration, the matrix optimization problem is considered in a sequence of 2D subspaces, which leads to one dimensional optimization subproblems. From any initial point, this algorithm obtains precoders and decoders with low leakage interference in short time. In the second part, to exploit the advantage of MAMA, it continues to iterate to perfectly align the interference from the output point of the first part. Analysis shows that in one iteration generally both proposed two algorithms have lower computational complexity than the existed maximum signal power (MSP) algorithm, and the hybrid algorithm enjoys lower complexity than MAMA. Simulations reveal that both proposed algorithms achieve similar performances as the MSP algorithm with less executing time, and show better performances than the existed alternating minimization algorithm in terms of sum rate. Besides, from the view of convergence rate, simulation results show that the MAMA enjoys fastest speed with respect to a certain sum rate value, while hybrid algorithm converges fastest to eliminate interference.

  6. Compact cryogenic self-aligning fiber-to-detector coupling with losses below one percent.

    PubMed

    Miller, Aaron J; Lita, Adriana E; Calkins, Brice; Vayshenker, Igor; Gruber, Steven M; Nam, Sae Woo

    2011-05-09

    We present a compact packaging technique for coupling light from a single-mode telecommunication fiber to cryogenic single-photon sensitive devices. Our single-photon detectors are superconducting transition-edge sensors (TESs) with a collection area only a factor of a few larger than the area of the fiber core which presents significant challenges to low-loss fiber-to-detector coupling. The coupling method presented here has low loss, cryogenic compatibility, easy and reproducible assembly and low component cost. The system efficiency of the packaged single-photon counting detectors is verified by the "triplet method" of power-source calibration along with the "multiple attenuator" method that produces a calibrated single-photon flux. These calibration techniques, when used in combination with through-wafer imaging and fiber back-reflection measurements, give us confidence that we have achieved coupling losses below 1% for all devices packaged according to the self-alignment method presented in this paper.

  7. Focal plane alignment and detector characterization for the Subaru prime focus spectrograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hart, Murdock; Barkhouser, Robert H.; Carr, Michael; Golebiowski, Mirek; Gunn, James E.; Hope, Stephen C.; Smee, Stephen A.

    2014-07-01

    We describe the infrastructure being developed to align and characterize the detectors for the Subaru Measure- ment of Images and Redshifts (SuMIRe) Prime Focus Spectrograph (PFS). PFS will employ four three-channel spectrographs with an operating wavelength range of 3800 °A to 12600 °A. Each spectrograph will be comprised of two visible channels and one near infrared (NIR) channel, where each channel will use a separate Schmidt camera to image the captured spectra onto their respective detectors. In the visible channels, Hamamatsu 2k × 4k CCDs will be mounted in pairs to create a single 4k × 4k detector, while the NIR channel will use a single Teledyne 4k × 4k H4RG HgCdTe device. The fast f/1.1 optics of the Schmidt cameras will give a shallow depth of focus necessitating an optimization of the focal plane array flatness. The minimum departure from flatness of the focal plane array for the visible channels is set the by the CCD flatness, typically 10 μm peak-to-valley. We will adjust the coplanarity for a pair of CCDs such that the flatness of the array is consistent with the flatness of the detectors themselves. To achieve this we will use an optical non-contact measurement system to measure surface flatness and coplanarity at both ambient and operating temperatures, and use shims to adjust the coplanarity of the CCDs. We will characterize the performance of the detectors for PFS consistent with the scientific goals for the project. To this end we will measure the gain, linearity, full well, quantum efficiency (QE), charge diffusion, charge transfer inefficiency (CTI), and noise properties of these devices. We also desire to better understand the non-linearity of the photon transfer curve for the CCDs, and the charge persistence/reciprocity problems of the HgCdTe devices. To enable the metrology and characterization of these detectors we are building two test cryostats nearly identical in design. The first test cryostat will primarily be used for the

  8. Genetic Algorithm Phase Retrieval for the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rakoczy, John; Steincamp, James; Taylor, Jaime

    2003-01-01

    A reduced surrogate, one point crossover genetic algorithm with random rank-based selection was used successfully to estimate the multiple phases of a segmented optical system modeled on the seven-mirror Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment testbed located at NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center.

  9. BitPAl: a bit-parallel, general integer-scoring sequence alignment algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Loving, Joshua; Hernandez, Yozen; Benson, Gary

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Mapping of high-throughput sequencing data and other bulk sequence comparison applications have motivated a search for high-efficiency sequence alignment algorithms. The bit-parallel approach represents individual cells in an alignment scoring matrix as bits in computer words and emulates the calculation of scores by a series of logic operations composed of AND, OR, XOR, complement, shift and addition. Bit-parallelism has been successfully applied to the longest common subsequence (LCS) and edit-distance problems, producing fast algorithms in practice. Results: We have developed BitPAl, a bit-parallel algorithm for general, integer-scoring global alignment. Integer-scoring schemes assign integer weights for match, mismatch and insertion/deletion. The BitPAl method uses structural properties in the relationship between adjacent scores in the scoring matrix to construct classes of efficient algorithms, each designed for a particular set of weights. In timed tests, we show that BitPAl runs 7–25 times faster than a standard iterative algorithm. Availability and implementation: Source code is freely available for download at http://lobstah.bu.edu/BitPAl/BitPAl.html. BitPAl is implemented in C and runs on all major operating systems. Contact: jloving@bu.edu or yhernand@bu.edu or gbenson@bu.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:25075119

  10. An efficient algorithm for pairwise local alignment of protein interaction networks

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Wenbin; Schmidt, Matthew; Tian, Wenhong; ...

    2015-04-01

    Recently, researchers seeking to understand, modify, and create beneficial traits in organisms have looked for evolutionarily conserved patterns of protein interactions. Their conservation likely means that the proteins of these conserved functional modules are important to the trait's expression. In this paper, we formulate the problem of identifying these conserved patterns as a graph optimization problem, and develop a fast heuristic algorithm for this problem. We compare the performance of our network alignment algorithm to that of the MaWISh algorithm [Koyuturk M, Kim Y, Topkara U, Subramaniam S, Szpankowski W, Grama A, Pairwise alignment of protein interaction networks, J Computmore » Biol 13(2): 182-199, 2006.], which bases its search algorithm on a related decision problem formulation. We find that our algorithm discovers conserved modules with a larger number of proteins in an order of magnitude less time. In conclusion, the protein sets found by our algorithm correspond to known conserved functional modules at comparable precision and recall rates as those produced by the MaWISh algorithm.« less

  11. An efficient algorithm for pairwise local alignment of protein interaction networks

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Wenbin; Schmidt, Matthew; Tian, Wenhong; Samatova, Nagiza F.; Zhang, Shaohong

    2015-04-01

    Recently, researchers seeking to understand, modify, and create beneficial traits in organisms have looked for evolutionarily conserved patterns of protein interactions. Their conservation likely means that the proteins of these conserved functional modules are important to the trait's expression. In this paper, we formulate the problem of identifying these conserved patterns as a graph optimization problem, and develop a fast heuristic algorithm for this problem. We compare the performance of our network alignment algorithm to that of the MaWISh algorithm [Koyuturk M, Kim Y, Topkara U, Subramaniam S, Szpankowski W, Grama A, Pairwise alignment of protein interaction networks, J Comput Biol 13(2): 182-199, 2006.], which bases its search algorithm on a related decision problem formulation. We find that our algorithm discovers conserved modules with a larger number of proteins in an order of magnitude less time. In conclusion, the protein sets found by our algorithm correspond to known conserved functional modules at comparable precision and recall rates as those produced by the MaWISh algorithm.

  12. Review of alignment and SNP calling algorithms for next-generation sequencing data.

    PubMed

    Mielczarek, M; Szyda, J

    2016-02-01

    Application of the massive parallel sequencing technology has become one of the most important issues in life sciences. Therefore, it was crucial to develop bioinformatics tools for next-generation sequencing (NGS) data processing. Currently, two of the most significant tasks include alignment to a reference genome and detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). In many types of genomic analyses, great numbers of reads need to be mapped to the reference genome; therefore, selection of the aligner is an essential step in NGS pipelines. Two main algorithms-suffix tries and hash tables-have been introduced for this purpose. Suffix array-based aligners are memory-efficient and work faster than hash-based aligners, but they are less accurate. In contrast, hash table algorithms tend to be slower, but more sensitive. SNP and genotype callers may also be divided into two main different approaches: heuristic and probabilistic methods. A variety of software has been subsequently developed over the past several years. In this paper, we briefly review the current development of NGS data processing algorithms and present the available software.

  13. A Rapid Convergent Low Complexity Interference Alignment Algorithm for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Lihui; Wu, Zhilu; Ren, Guanghui; Wang, Gangyi; Zhao, Nan

    2015-01-01

    Interference alignment (IA) is a novel technique that can effectively eliminate the interference and approach the sum capacity of wireless sensor networks (WSNs) when the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) is high, by casting the desired signal and interference into different signal subspaces. The traditional alternating minimization interference leakage (AMIL) algorithm for IA shows good performance in high SNR regimes, however, the complexity of the AMIL algorithm increases dramatically as the number of users and antennas increases, posing limits to its applications in the practical systems. In this paper, a novel IA algorithm, called directional quartic optimal (DQO) algorithm, is proposed to minimize the interference leakage with rapid convergence and low complexity. The properties of the AMIL algorithm are investigated, and it is discovered that the difference between the two consecutive iteration results of the AMIL algorithm will approximately point to the convergence solution when the precoding and decoding matrices obtained from the intermediate iterations are sufficiently close to their convergence values. Based on this important property, the proposed DQO algorithm employs the line search procedure so that it can converge to the destination directly. In addition, the optimal step size can be determined analytically by optimizing a quartic function. Numerical results show that the proposed DQO algorithm can suppress the interference leakage more rapidly than the traditional AMIL algorithm, and can achieve the same level of sum rate as that of AMIL algorithm with far less iterations and execution time. PMID:26230697

  14. Experimental Results in the Comparison of Search Algorithms Used with Room Temperature Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Guss, P., Yuan, D., Cutler, M., Beller, D.

    2010-11-01

    Analysis of time sequence data was run for several higher resolution scintillation detectors using a variety of search algorithms, and results were obtained in predicting the relative performance for these detectors, which included a slightly superior performance by CeBr{sub 3}. Analysis of several search algorithms shows that inclusion of the RSPRT methodology can improve sensitivity.

  15. Attitude algorithm and initial alignment method for SINS applied in short-range aircraft

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Rong-Hui; He, Zhao-Cheng; You, Feng; Chen, Bo

    2017-07-01

    This paper presents an attitude solution algorithm based on the Micro-Electro-Mechanical System and quaternion method. We completed the numerical calculation and engineering practice by adopting fourth-order Runge-Kutta algorithm in the digital signal processor. The state space mathematical model of initial alignment in static base was established, and the initial alignment method based on Kalman filter was proposed. Based on the hardware in the loop simulation platform, the short-range flight simulation test and the actual flight test were carried out. The results show that the error of pitch, yaw and roll angle is fast convergent, and the fitting rate between flight simulation and flight test is more than 85%.

  16. Application of a clustering-based peak alignment algorithm to analyze various DNA fingerprinting data.

    PubMed

    Ishii, Satoshi; Kadota, Koji; Senoo, Keishi

    2009-09-01

    DNA fingerprinting analysis such as amplified ribosomal DNA restriction analysis (ARDRA), repetitive extragenic palindromic PCR (rep-PCR), ribosomal intergenic spacer analysis (RISA), and denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE) are frequently used in various fields of microbiology. The major difficulty in DNA fingerprinting data analysis is the alignment of multiple peak sets. We report here an R program for a clustering-based peak alignment algorithm, and its application to analyze various DNA fingerprinting data, such as ARDRA, rep-PCR, RISA, and DGGE data. The results obtained by our clustering algorithm and by BioNumerics software showed high similarity. Since several R packages have been established to statistically analyze various biological data, the distance matrix obtained by our R program can be used for subsequent statistical analyses, some of which were not previously performed but are useful in DNA fingerprinting studies.

  17. Multiple sequence alignment based on combining genetic algorithm with chaotic sequences.

    PubMed

    Gao, C; Wang, B; Zhou, C J; Zhang, Q

    2016-06-24

    In bioinformatics, sequence alignment is one of the most common problems. Multiple sequence alignment is an NP (nondeterministic polynomial time) problem, which requires further study and exploration. The chaos optimization algorithm is a type of chaos theory, and a procedure for combining the genetic algorithm (GA), which uses ergodicity, and inherent randomness of chaotic iteration. It is an efficient method to solve the basic premature phenomenon of the GA. Applying the Logistic map to the GA and using chaotic sequences to carry out the chaotic perturbation can improve the convergence of the basic GA. In addition, the random tournament selection and optimal preservation strategy are used in the GA. Experimental evidence indicates good results for this process.

  18. Exact algorithms for computing pairwise alignments and 3-medians from structure-annotated sequences (extended abstract).

    PubMed

    Evans, P A; Wareham, H T

    2001-01-01

    Given the problem of mutation saturation in ancient molecular sequences, there is great interest in inferring phylogenies from higher-order types of molecular data that change more slowly, such as genomic organization and the secondary and tertiary structures of ribosomal RNA and proteins. In this paper, we define edit distances based on two representations of RNA secondary structure, arc annotation and hierarchical string annotation, and give algorithms for computing these distances on pairs of annotated sequences, aligning pairs of annotated sequences, and computing 3-median annotated sequences from triples of annotated sequences. The 3-median algorithms can be used as part of a well-known iterative heuristic for inferring phylogenies. All given algorithms are adapted from algorithms for computing longest common annotated subsequences of pairs of annotated sequences.

  19. A probabilistic coding based quantum genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Huo, Hongwei; Xie, Qiaoluan; Shen, Xubang; Stojkovic, Vojislav

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents an original Quantum Genetic algorithm for Multiple sequence ALIGNment (QGMALIGN) that combines a genetic algorithm and a quantum algorithm. A quantum probabilistic coding is designed for representing the multiple sequence alignment. A quantum rotation gate as a mutation operator is used to guide the quantum state evolution. Six genetic operators are designed on the coding basis to improve the solution during the evolutionary process. The features of implicit parallelism and state superposition in quantum mechanics and the global search capability of the genetic algorithm are exploited to get efficient computation. A set of well known test cases from BAliBASE2.0 is used as reference to evaluate the efficiency of the QGMALIGN optimization. The QGMALIGN results have been compared with the most popular methods (CLUSTALX, SAGA, DIALIGN, SB_PIMA, and QGMALIGN) results. The QGMALIGN results show that QGMALIGN performs well on the presenting biological data. The addition of genetic operators to the quantum algorithm lowers the cost of overall running time.

  20. A quantum-inspired genetic algorithm based on probabilistic coding for multiple sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Huo, Hong-Wei; Stojkovic, Vojislav; Xie, Qiao-Luan

    2010-02-01

    Quantum parallelism arises from the ability of a quantum memory register to exist in a superposition of base states. Since the number of possible base states is 2(n), where n is the number of qubits in the quantum memory register, one operation on a quantum computer performs what an exponential number of operations on a classical computer performs. The power of quantum algorithms comes from taking advantages of quantum parallelism. Quantum algorithms are exponentially faster than classical algorithms. Genetic optimization algorithms are stochastic search algorithms which are used to search large, nonlinear spaces where expert knowledge is lacking or difficult to encode. QGMALIGN--a probabilistic coding based quantum-inspired genetic algorithm for multiple sequence alignment is presented. A quantum rotation gate as a mutation operator is used to guide the quantum state evolution. Six genetic operators are designed on the coding basis to improve the solution during the evolutionary process. The experimental results show that QGMALIGN can compete with the popular methods, such as CLUSTALX and SAGA, and performs well on the presenting biological data. Moreover, the addition of genetic operators to the quantum-inspired algorithm lowers the cost of overall running time.

  1. Las Vegas algorithms for gene recognition: Suboptimal and error-tolerant spliced alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Sze, Sing-Hoi; Pevzner, P.A.

    1997-12-01

    Recently, Gelfand, Mironov and Pevzner proposed a spliced alignment approach to gene recognition that provides 99% accurate recognition of human gene if a related mammalian protein is available. However, even 99% accurate gene predictions are insufficient for automated sequence annotation in large-scale sequencing projects and therefore have to be complemented by experimental gene verification. 100% accurate gene predictions would lead to a substantial reduction of experimental work on gene identification. Our goal is to develop an algorithm that either predicts an exon assembly with accuracy sufficient for sequence annotation or warns a biologist that the accuracy of a prediction is insufficient and further experimental work is required. We study suboptimal and error-tolerant spliced alignment problems as the first steps towards such an algorithm, and report an algorithm which provides 100% accurate recognition of human genes in 37% of cases (if a related mammalian protein is available). For 52% of genes, the algorithm predicts at least one exon with 100% accuracy. 30 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  2. Phase Retrieval Using a Genetic Algorithm on the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jaime R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center s Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) Testbed was developed to test phase retrieval algorithms and hardware techniques. Individuals working with the facility developed the idea of implementing phase retrieval by breaking the determination of the tip/tilt of each mirror apart from the piston motion (or translation) of each mirror. Presented in this report is an algorithm that determines the optimal phase correction associated only with the piston motion of the mirrors. A description of the Phase Retrieval problem is first presented. The Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) Testbeb is then described. A Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) is necessary to transfer the incoming wavefront (or estimate of phase error) into the spatial frequency domain to compare it with the image. A method for reducing the DFT to seven scalar/matrix multiplications is presented. A genetic algorithm is then used to search for the phase error. The results of this new algorithm on a test problem are presented.

  3. Evaluation of GMI and PMI diffeomorphic-based demons algorithms for aligning PET and CT Images.

    PubMed

    Yang, Juan; Wang, Hongjun; Zhang, You; Yin, Yong

    2015-07-08

    Fusion of anatomic information in computed tomography (CT) and functional information in 18F-FDG positron emission tomography (PET) is crucial for accurate differentiation of tumor from benign masses, designing radiotherapy treatment plan and staging of cancer. Although current PET and CT images can be acquired from combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner, the two acquisitions are scanned separately and take a long time, which may induce potential positional errors in global and local caused by respiratory motion or organ peristalsis. So registration (alignment) of whole-body PET and CT images is a prerequisite for their meaningful fusion. The purpose of this study was to assess the performance of two multimodal registration algorithms for aligning PET and CT images. The proposed gradient of mutual information (GMI)-based demons algorithm, which incorporated the GMI between two images as an external force to facilitate the alignment, was compared with the point-wise mutual information (PMI) diffeomorphic-based demons algorithm whose external force was modified by replacing the image intensity difference in diffeomorphic demons algorithm with the PMI to make it appropriate for multimodal image registration. Eight patients with esophageal cancer(s) were enrolled in this IRB-approved study. Whole-body PET and CT images were acquired from a combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner for each patient. The modified Hausdorff distance (d(MH)) was used to evaluate the registration accuracy of the two algorithms. Of all patients, the mean values and standard deviations (SDs) of d(MH) were 6.65 (± 1.90) voxels and 6.01 (± 1.90) after the GMI-based demons and the PMI diffeomorphic-based demons registration algorithms respectively. Preliminary results on oncological patients showed that the respiratory motion and organ peristalsis in PET/CT esophageal images could not be neglected, although a combined 18F-FDG PET/CT scanner was used for image acquisition. The PMI diffeomorphic-based demons

  4. Alignment, segmentation and 3-D reconstruction of serial sections based on automated algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Weiguo; Tang, Shaojie; Xu, Qiong; Lian, Qin; Wang, Jin; Li, Dichen

    2012-12-01

    A well-defined three-dimensional (3-D) reconstruction of bone-cartilage transitional structures is crucial for the osteochondral restoration. This paper presents an accurate, computationally efficient and fully-automated algorithm for the alignment and segmentation of two-dimensional (2-D) serial to construct the 3-D model of bone-cartilage transitional structures. Entire system includes the following five components: (1) image harvest, (2) image registration, (3) image segmentation, (4) 3-D reconstruction and visualization, and (5) evaluation. A computer program was developed in the environment of Matlab for the automatic alignment and segmentation of serial sections. Automatic alignment algorithm based on the position's cross-correlation of the anatomical characteristic feature points of two sequential sections. A method combining an automatic segmentation and an image threshold processing was applied to capture the regions and structures of interest. SEM micrograph and 3-D model reconstructed directly in digital microscope were used to evaluate the reliability and accuracy of this strategy. The morphology of 3-D model constructed by serial sections is consistent with the results of SEM micrograph and 3-D model of digital microscope.

  5. A memory-efficient dynamic programming algorithm for optimal alignment of a sequence to an RNA secondary structure

    PubMed Central

    2002-01-01

    Background Covariance models (CMs) are probabilistic models of RNA secondary structure, analogous to profile hidden Markov models of linear sequence. The dynamic programming algorithm for aligning a CM to an RNA sequence of length N is O(N3) in memory. This is only practical for small RNAs. Results I describe a divide and conquer variant of the alignment algorithm that is analogous to memory-efficient Myers/Miller dynamic programming algorithms for linear sequence alignment. The new algorithm has an O(N2 log N) memory complexity, at the expense of a small constant factor in time. Conclusions Optimal ribosomal RNA structural alignments that previously required up to 150 GB of memory now require less than 270 MB. PMID:12095421

  6. An algorithm for automatic crystal identification in pixelated scintillation detectors using thin plate splines and Gaussian mixture models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schellenberg, Graham; Stortz, Greg; Goertzen, Andrew L.

    2016-02-01

    A typical positron emission tomography detector is comprised of a scintillator crystal array coupled to a photodetector array or other position sensitive detector. Such detectors using light sharing to read out crystal elements require the creation of a crystal lookup table (CLUT) that maps the detector response to the crystal of interaction based on the x-y position of the event calculated through Anger-type logic. It is vital for system performance that these CLUTs be accurate so that the location of events can be accurately identified and so that crystal-specific corrections, such as energy windowing or time alignment, can be applied. While using manual segmentation of the flood image to create the CLUT is a simple and reliable approach, it is both tedious and time consuming for systems with large numbers of crystal elements. In this work we describe the development of an automated algorithm for CLUT generation that uses a Gaussian mixture model paired with thin plate splines (TPS) to iteratively fit a crystal layout template that includes the crystal numbering pattern. Starting from a region of stability, Gaussians are individually fit to data corresponding to crystal locations while simultaneously updating a TPS for predicting future Gaussian locations at the edge of a region of interest that grows as individual Gaussians converge to crystal locations. The algorithm was tested with flood image data collected from 16 detector modules, each consisting of a 409 crystal dual-layer offset LYSO crystal array readout by a 32 pixel SiPM array. For these detector flood images, depending on user defined input parameters, the algorithm runtime ranged between 17.5-82.5 s per detector on a single core of an Intel i7 processor. The method maintained an accuracy above 99.8% across all tests, with the majority of errors being localized to error prone corner regions. This method can be easily extended for use with other detector types through adjustment of the initial

  7. An algorithm for automatic crystal identification in pixelated scintillation detectors using thin plate splines and Gaussian mixture models.

    PubMed

    Schellenberg, Graham; Stortz, Greg; Goertzen, Andrew L

    2016-02-07

    A typical positron emission tomography detector is comprised of a scintillator crystal array coupled to a photodetector array or other position sensitive detector. Such detectors using light sharing to read out crystal elements require the creation of a crystal lookup table (CLUT) that maps the detector response to the crystal of interaction based on the x-y position of the event calculated through Anger-type logic. It is vital for system performance that these CLUTs be accurate so that the location of events can be accurately identified and so that crystal-specific corrections, such as energy windowing or time alignment, can be applied. While using manual segmentation of the flood image to create the CLUT is a simple and reliable approach, it is both tedious and time consuming for systems with large numbers of crystal elements. In this work we describe the development of an automated algorithm for CLUT generation that uses a Gaussian mixture model paired with thin plate splines (TPS) to iteratively fit a crystal layout template that includes the crystal numbering pattern. Starting from a region of stability, Gaussians are individually fit to data corresponding to crystal locations while simultaneously updating a TPS for predicting future Gaussian locations at the edge of a region of interest that grows as individual Gaussians converge to crystal locations. The algorithm was tested with flood image data collected from 16 detector modules, each consisting of a 409 crystal dual-layer offset LYSO crystal array readout by a 32 pixel SiPM array. For these detector flood images, depending on user defined input parameters, the algorithm runtime ranged between 17.5-82.5 s per detector on a single core of an Intel i7 processor. The method maintained an accuracy above 99.8% across all tests, with the majority of errors being localized to error prone corner regions. This method can be easily extended for use with other detector types through adjustment of the initial

  8. FastDIRC: a fast Monte Carlo and reconstruction algorithm for DIRC detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hardin, J.; Williams, M.

    2016-10-01

    FastDIRC is a novel fast Monte Carlo and reconstruction algorithm for DIRC detectors. A DIRC employs rectangular fused-silica bars both as Cherenkov radiators and as light guides. Cherenkov-photon imaging and time-of-propagation information are utilized by a DIRC to identify charged particles. GEANT4-based DIRC Monte Carlo simulations are extremely CPU intensive. The FastDIRC algorithm permits fully simulating a DIRC detector more than 10 000 times faster than using GEANT4. This facilitates designing a DIRC-reconstruction algorithm that improves the Cherenkov-angle resolution of a DIRC detector by ≈ 30% compared to existing algorithms. FastDIRC also greatly reduces the time required to study competing DIRC-detector designs.

  9. Adaptive Waveform Correlation Detectors for Arrays: Algorithms for Autonomous Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Ringdal, F; Harris, D B; Dodge, D; Gibbons, S J

    2009-07-23

    Waveform correlation detectors compare a signal template with successive windows of a continuous data stream and report a detection when the correlation coefficient, or some comparable detection statistic, exceeds a specified threshold. Since correlation detectors exploit the fine structure of the full waveform, they are exquisitely sensitive when compared to power (STA/LTA) detectors. The drawback of correlation detectors is that they require complete knowledge of the signal to be detected, which limits such methods to instances of seismicity in which a very similar signal has already been observed by every station used. Such instances include earthquake swarms, aftershock sequences, repeating industrial seismicity, and many other forms of controlled explosions. The reduction in the detection threshold is even greater when the techniques are applied to arrays since stacking can be performed on the individual channel correlation traces to achieve significant array gain. In previous years we have characterized the decrease in detection threshold afforded by correlation detection across an array or network when observations of a previous event provide an adequate template for signals from subsequent events located near the calibration event. Last year we examined two related issues: (1) the size of the source region calibration footprint afforded by a master event, and (2) the use of temporally incoherent detectors designed to detect the gross envelope structure of the signal to extend the footprint. In Case 1, results from the PETROBAR-1 marine refraction profile indicated that array correlation gain was usable at inter-source separations out to one or two wavelengths. In Case 2, we found that incoherent detectors developed from a magnitude 6 event near Svalbard were successful at detecting aftershocks where correlation detectors derived from individual aftershocks were not. Incoherent detectors might provide 'seed' events for correlation detectors that then could

  10. Conception and design of a control and monitoring system for the mirror alignment of the CBM RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bendarouach, J.

    2016-08-01

    The Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future Facility for Anti-proton and Ion Research (FAIR) complex will investigate the phase diagram of strongly interacting matter at high baryon density and moderate temperatures created in A+A collisions. For the SIS100 accelerator, the foreseen beam energy will range up to 11 AGeV for the heaviest nuclei. One of the key detector components required for the CBM physics program is the Ring Imaging CHerenkov (RICH) detector, which is developed for efficient and clean electron identification and pion suppression. An important aspect to guarantee a stable operation of the RICH detector is the alignment of the mirrors. A qualitative alignment control procedure for the mirror system has been implemented in the CBM RICH prototype detector and tested under real conditions at the CERN PS/T9 beamline. Collected data and results of image processing are reviewed and discussed. In parallel a quantitative method using recorded data has also been employed to compute mirror displacements of the RICH mirrors. Results based on simulated events and the limits of the method are presented and discussed as well. If mirror misalignment is detected, it can be subsequently included and rectified by correction routines. A first correction routine is presented and a comparison between misaligned, corrected and ideal geometries is shown.

  11. Parallel algorithms for large-scale biological sequence alignment on Xeon-Phi based clusters.

    PubMed

    Lan, Haidong; Chan, Yuandong; Xu, Kai; Schmidt, Bertil; Peng, Shaoliang; Liu, Weiguo

    2016-07-19

    Computing alignments between two or more sequences are common operations frequently performed in computational molecular biology. The continuing growth of biological sequence databases establishes the need for their efficient parallel implementation on modern accelerators. This paper presents new approaches to high performance biological sequence database scanning with the Smith-Waterman algorithm and the first stage of progressive multiple sequence alignment based on the ClustalW heuristic on a Xeon Phi-based compute cluster. Our approach uses a three-level parallelization scheme to take full advantage of the compute power available on this type of architecture; i.e. cluster-level data parallelism, thread-level coarse-grained parallelism, and vector-level fine-grained parallelism. Furthermore, we re-organize the sequence datasets and use Xeon Phi shuffle operations to improve I/O efficiency. Evaluations show that our method achieves a peak overall performance up to 220 GCUPS for scanning real protein sequence databanks on a single node consisting of two Intel E5-2620 CPUs and two Intel Xeon Phi 7110P cards. It also exhibits good scalability in terms of sequence length and size, and number of compute nodes for both database scanning and multiple sequence alignment. Furthermore, the achieved performance is highly competitive in comparison to optimized Xeon Phi and GPU implementations. Our implementation is available at https://github.com/turbo0628/LSDBS-mpi .

  12. Optical derotator alignment using image-processing algorithm for tracking laser vibrometer measurements of rotating objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, Hossam; Kim, Dongkyu; Jo, Youngjoon; Park, Kyihwan

    2017-06-01

    An optical component called a Dove prism is used to rotate the laser beam of a laser-scanning vibrometer (LSV). This is called a derotator and is used for measuring the vibration of rotating objects. The main advantage of a derotator is that it works independently from an LSV. However, this device requires very specific alignment, in which the axis of the Dove prism must coincide with the rotational axis of the object. If the derotator is misaligned with the rotating object, the results of the vibration measurement are imprecise, owing to the alteration of the laser beam on the surface of the rotating object. In this study, a method is proposed for aligning a derotator with a rotating object through an image-processing algorithm that obtains the trajectory of a landmark attached to the object. After the trajectory of the landmark is mathematically modeled, the amount of derotator misalignment with respect to the object is calculated. The accuracy of the proposed method for aligning the derotator with the rotating object is experimentally tested.

  13. QuickProbs--a fast multiple sequence alignment algorithm designed for graphics processors.

    PubMed

    Gudyś, Adam; Deorowicz, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment is a crucial task in a number of biological analyses like secondary structure prediction, domain searching, phylogeny, etc. MSAProbs is currently the most accurate alignment algorithm, but its effectiveness is obtained at the expense of computational time. In the paper we present QuickProbs, the variant of MSAProbs customised for graphics processors. We selected the two most time consuming stages of MSAProbs to be redesigned for GPU execution: the posterior matrices calculation and the consistency transformation. Experiments on three popular benchmarks (BAliBASE, PREFAB, OXBench-X) on quad-core PC equipped with high-end graphics card show QuickProbs to be 5.7 to 9.7 times faster than original CPU-parallel MSAProbs. Additional tests performed on several protein families from Pfam database give overall speed-up of 6.7. Compared to other algorithms like MAFFT, MUSCLE, or ClustalW, QuickProbs proved to be much more accurate at similar speed. Additionally we introduce a tuned variant of QuickProbs which is significantly more accurate on sets of distantly related sequences than MSAProbs without exceeding its computation time. The GPU part of QuickProbs was implemented in OpenCL, thus the package is suitable for graphics processors produced by all major vendors.

  14. QuickProbs—A Fast Multiple Sequence Alignment Algorithm Designed for Graphics Processors

    PubMed Central

    Gudyś, Adam; Deorowicz, Sebastian

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment is a crucial task in a number of biological analyses like secondary structure prediction, domain searching, phylogeny, etc. MSAProbs is currently the most accurate alignment algorithm, but its effectiveness is obtained at the expense of computational time. In the paper we present QuickProbs, the variant of MSAProbs customised for graphics processors. We selected the two most time consuming stages of MSAProbs to be redesigned for GPU execution: the posterior matrices calculation and the consistency transformation. Experiments on three popular benchmarks (BAliBASE, PREFAB, OXBench-X) on quad-core PC equipped with high-end graphics card show QuickProbs to be 5.7 to 9.7 times faster than original CPU-parallel MSAProbs. Additional tests performed on several protein families from Pfam database give overall speed-up of 6.7. Compared to other algorithms like MAFFT, MUSCLE, or ClustalW, QuickProbs proved to be much more accurate at similar speed. Additionally we introduce a tuned variant of QuickProbs which is significantly more accurate on sets of distantly related sequences than MSAProbs without exceeding its computation time. The GPU part of QuickProbs was implemented in OpenCL, thus the package is suitable for graphics processors produced by all major vendors. PMID:24586435

  15. Deblurring algorithms accounting for the finite detector size in photoacoustic tomography.

    PubMed

    Roitner, Heinz; Haltmeier, Markus; Nuster, Robert; O'Leary, Dianne P; Berer, Thomas; Paltauf, Guenther; Grün, Hubert; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Most reconstruction algorithms for photoacoustic tomography, like back projection or time reversal, work ideally for point-like detectors. For real detectors, which integrate the pressure over their finite size, images reconstructed by these algorithms show some blurring. Iterative reconstruction algorithms using an imaging matrix can take the finite size of real detectors directly into account, but the numerical effort is significantly higher compared to the use of direct algorithms. For spherical or cylindrical detection surfaces, the blurring caused by a finite detector size is proportional to the distance from the rotation center (spin blur) and is equal to the detector size at the detection surface. In this work, we apply deconvolution algorithms to reduce this type of blurring on simulated and on experimental data. Two particular deconvolution methods are compared, which both utilize the fact that a representation of the blurred image in polar coordinates decouples pixels at different radii from the rotation center. Experimental data have been obtained with a flat, rectangular piezoelectric detector measuring signals around a plastisol cylinder containing various small photoacoustic sources with variable distance from the center. Both simulated and experimental results demonstrate a nearly complete elimination of spin blur.

  16. Deblurring algorithms accounting for the finite detector size in photoacoustic tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roitner, Heinz; Haltmeier, Markus; Nuster, Robert; O'Leary, Dianne P.; Berer, Thomas; Paltauf, Guenther; Grün, Hubert; Burgholzer, Peter

    2014-05-01

    Most reconstruction algorithms for photoacoustic tomography, like back projection or time reversal, work ideally for point-like detectors. For real detectors, which integrate the pressure over their finite size, images reconstructed by these algorithms show some blurring. Iterative reconstruction algorithms using an imaging matrix can take the finite size of real detectors directly into account, but the numerical effort is significantly higher compared to the use of direct algorithms. For spherical or cylindrical detection surfaces, the blurring caused by a finite detector size is proportional to the distance from the rotation center (spin blur) and is equal to the detector size at the detection surface. In this work, we apply deconvolution algorithms to reduce this type of blurring on simulated and on experimental data. Two particular deconvolution methods are compared, which both utilize the fact that a representation of the blurred image in polar coordinates decouples pixels at different radii from the rotation center. Experimental data have been obtained with a flat, rectangular piezoelectric detector measuring signals around a plastisol cylinder containing various small photoacoustic sources with variable distance from the center. Both simulated and experimental results demonstrate a nearly complete elimination of spin blur.

  17. A Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Retention Time Alignment Algorithm To Enhance Chemometric Analysis of Comprehensive Two-Dimensional Separation Data

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, Karisa M.; Wood, Lianna F.; Wright, Bob W.; Synovec, Robert E.

    2005-12-01

    A comprehensive two-dimensional (2D) retention time alignment algorithm was developed using a novel indexing scheme. The algorithm is termed comprehensive because it functions to correct the entire chromatogram in both dimensions and it preserves the separation information in both dimensions. Although the algorithm is demonstrated by correcting comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) data, the algorithm is designed to correct shifting in all forms of 2D separations, such as LC x LC, LC x CE, CE x CE, and LC x GC. This 2D alignment algorithm was applied to three different data sets composed of replicate GC x GC separations of (1) three 22-component control mixtures, (2) three gasoline samples, and (3) three diesel samples. The three data sets were collected using slightly different temperature or pressure programs to engender significant retention time shifting in the raw data and then demonstrate subsequent corrections of that shifting upon comprehensive 2D alignment of the data sets. Thirty 12-min GC x GC separations from three 22-component control mixtures were used to evaluate the 2D alignment performance (10 runs/mixture). The average standard deviation of the first column retention time improved 5-fold from 0.020 min (before alignment) to 0.004 min (after alignment). Concurrently, the average standard deviation of second column retention time improved 4-fold from 3.5 ms (before alignment) to 0.8 ms (after alignment). Alignment of the 30 control mixture chromatograms took 20 min. The quantitative integrity of the GC x GC data following 2D alignment was also investigated. The mean integrated signal was determined for all components in the three 22-component mixtures for all 30 replicates. The average percent difference in the integrated signal for each component before and after alignment was 2.6%. Singular value decomposition (SVD) was applied to the 22-component control mixture data before and after alignment to show the restoration of

  18. A comprehensive two-dimensional retention time alignment algorithm to enhance chemometric analysis of comprehensive two-dimensional separation data.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Karisa M; Wood, Lianna F; Wright, Bob W; Synovec, Robert E

    2005-12-01

    A comprehensive two-dimensional (2D) retention time alignment algorithm was developed using a novel indexing scheme. The algorithm is termed comprehensive because it functions to correct the entire chromatogram in both dimensions and it preserves the separation information in both dimensions. Although the algorithm is demonstrated by correcting comprehensive two-dimensional gas chromatography (GC x GC) data, the algorithm is designed to correct shifting in all forms of 2D separations, such as LC x LC, LC x CE, CE x CE, and LC x GC. This 2D alignment algorithm was applied to three different data sets composed of replicate GC x GC separations of (1) three 22-component control mixtures, (2) three gasoline samples, and (3) three diesel samples. The three data sets were collected using slightly different temperature or pressure programs to engender significant retention time shifting in the raw data and then demonstrate subsequent corrections of that shifting upon comprehensive 2D alignment of the data sets. Thirty 12-min GC x GC separations from three 22-component control mixtures were used to evaluate the 2D alignment performance (10 runs/mixture). The average standard deviation of first column retention time improved 5-fold from 0.020 min (before alignment) to 0.004 min (after alignment). Concurrently, the average standard deviation of second column retention time improved 4-fold from 3.5 ms (before alignment) to 0.8 ms (after alignment). Alignment of the 30 control mixture chromatograms took 20 min. The quantitative integrity of the GC x GC data following 2D alignment was also investigated. The mean integrated signal was determined for all components in the three 22-component mixtures for all 30 replicates. The average percent difference in the integrated signal for each component before and after alignment was 2.6%. Singular value decomposition (SVD) was applied to the 22-component control mixture data before and after alignment to show the restoration of

  19. Iterative Most-Likely Point Registration (IMLP): A Robust Algorithm for Computing Optimal Shape Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Billings, Seth D.; Boctor, Emad M.; Taylor, Russell H.

    2015-01-01

    We present a probabilistic registration algorithm that robustly solves the problem of rigid-body alignment between two shapes with high accuracy, by aptly modeling measurement noise in each shape, whether isotropic or anisotropic. For point-cloud shapes, the probabilistic framework additionally enables modeling locally-linear surface regions in the vicinity of each point to further improve registration accuracy. The proposed Iterative Most-Likely Point (IMLP) algorithm is formed as a variant of the popular Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, which iterates between point-correspondence and point-registration steps. IMLP’s probabilistic framework is used to incorporate a generalized noise model into both the correspondence and the registration phases of the algorithm, hence its name as a most-likely point method rather than a closest-point method. To efficiently compute the most-likely correspondences, we devise a novel search strategy based on a principal direction (PD)-tree search. We also propose a new approach to solve the generalized total-least-squares (GTLS) sub-problem of the registration phase, wherein the point correspondences are registered under a generalized noise model. Our GTLS approach has improved accuracy, efficiency, and stability compared to prior methods presented for this problem and offers a straightforward implementation using standard least squares. We evaluate the performance of IMLP relative to a large number of prior algorithms including ICP, a robust variant on ICP, Generalized ICP (GICP), and Coherent Point Drift (CPD), as well as drawing close comparison with the prior anisotropic registration methods of GTLS-ICP and A-ICP. The performance of IMLP is shown to be superior with respect to these algorithms over a wide range of noise conditions, outliers, and misalignments using both mesh and point-cloud representations of various shapes. PMID:25748700

  20. Iterative most-likely point registration (IMLP): a robust algorithm for computing optimal shape alignment.

    PubMed

    Billings, Seth D; Boctor, Emad M; Taylor, Russell H

    2015-01-01

    We present a probabilistic registration algorithm that robustly solves the problem of rigid-body alignment between two shapes with high accuracy, by aptly modeling measurement noise in each shape, whether isotropic or anisotropic. For point-cloud shapes, the probabilistic framework additionally enables modeling locally-linear surface regions in the vicinity of each point to further improve registration accuracy. The proposed Iterative Most-Likely Point (IMLP) algorithm is formed as a variant of the popular Iterative Closest Point (ICP) algorithm, which iterates between point-correspondence and point-registration steps. IMLP's probabilistic framework is used to incorporate a generalized noise model into both the correspondence and the registration phases of the algorithm, hence its name as a most-likely point method rather than a closest-point method. To efficiently compute the most-likely correspondences, we devise a novel search strategy based on a principal direction (PD)-tree search. We also propose a new approach to solve the generalized total-least-squares (GTLS) sub-problem of the registration phase, wherein the point correspondences are registered under a generalized noise model. Our GTLS approach has improved accuracy, efficiency, and stability compared to prior methods presented for this problem and offers a straightforward implementation using standard least squares. We evaluate the performance of IMLP relative to a large number of prior algorithms including ICP, a robust variant on ICP, Generalized ICP (GICP), and Coherent Point Drift (CPD), as well as drawing close comparison with the prior anisotropic registration methods of GTLS-ICP and A-ICP. The performance of IMLP is shown to be superior with respect to these algorithms over a wide range of noise conditions, outliers, and misalignments using both mesh and point-cloud representations of various shapes.

  1. A New Continuous Rotation IMU Alignment Algorithm Based on Stochastic Modeling for Cost Effective North-Finding Applications

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yun; Wu, Wenqi; Jiang, Qingan; Wang, Jinling

    2016-01-01

    Based on stochastic modeling of Coriolis vibration gyros by the Allan variance technique, this paper discusses Angle Random Walk (ARW), Rate Random Walk (RRW) and Markov process gyroscope noises which have significant impacts on the North-finding accuracy. A new continuous rotation alignment algorithm for a Coriolis vibration gyroscope Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) is proposed in this paper, in which the extended observation equations are used for the Kalman filter to enhance the estimation of gyro drift errors, thus improving the north-finding accuracy. Theoretical and numerical comparisons between the proposed algorithm and the traditional ones are presented. The experimental results show that the new continuous rotation alignment algorithm using the extended observation equations in the Kalman filter is more efficient than the traditional two-position alignment method. Using Coriolis vibration gyros with bias instability of 0.1°/h, a north-finding accuracy of 0.1° (1σ) is achieved by the new continuous rotation alignment algorithm, compared with 0.6° (1σ) north-finding accuracy for the two-position alignment and 1° (1σ) for the fixed-position alignment. PMID:27983585

  2. A New Continuous Rotation IMU Alignment Algorithm Based on Stochastic Modeling for Cost Effective North-Finding Applications.

    PubMed

    Li, Yun; Wu, Wenqi; Jiang, Qingan; Wang, Jinling

    2016-12-13

    Based on stochastic modeling of Coriolis vibration gyros by the Allan variance technique, this paper discusses Angle Random Walk (ARW), Rate Random Walk (RRW) and Markov process gyroscope noises which have significant impacts on the North-finding accuracy. A new continuous rotation alignment algorithm for a Coriolis vibration gyroscope Inertial Measurement Unit (IMU) is proposed in this paper, in which the extended observation equations are used for the Kalman filter to enhance the estimation of gyro drift errors, thus improving the north-finding accuracy. Theoretical and numerical comparisons between the proposed algorithm and the traditional ones are presented. The experimental results show that the new continuous rotation alignment algorithm using the extended observation equations in the Kalman filter is more efficient than the traditional two-position alignment method. Using Coriolis vibration gyros with bias instability of 0.1°/h, a north-finding accuracy of 0.1° (1σ) is achieved by the new continuous rotation alignment algorithm, compared with 0.6° (1σ) north-finding accuracy for the two-position alignment and 1° (1σ) for the fixed-position alignment.

  3. Algorithms for calculating detector efficiency normalization coefficients for true coincidences in 3D PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Badawi, R. D.; Lodge, M. A.; Marsden, P. K.

    1998-01-01

    Accurate normalization of lines of response in 3D PET is a prerequisite for quantitative reconstruction. Most current methods are component based, calculating a series of geometric and intrinsic detector efficiency factors. We have reviewed the theory behind several existing algorithms for calculating detector efficiency factors in 2D and 3D PET, and have extended them to create a range of new algorithms. Three of the algorithms described are `fully 3D' in that they make use of data from all detector rings for the calculation of the efficiencies of any one line of response. We have assessed the performance of the new and existing methods using simulated and real data, and have demonstrated that the fully 3D algorithms allow the rapid acquisition of crystal efficiency normalization data using low-activity sources. Such methods enable the use of scatter-free scanning line sources or the use of very short acquisitions of cylindrical sources for routine normalization.

  4. Genetic algorithm based fast alignment method for strap-down inertial navigation system with large azimuth misalignment.

    PubMed

    He, Hongyang; Xu, Jiangning; Qin, Fangjun; Li, Feng

    2015-11-01

    In order to shorten the alignment time and eliminate the small initial misalignment limit for compass alignment of strap-down inertial navigation system (SINS), which is sometimes not easy to satisfy when the ship is moored or anchored, an optimal model based time-varying parameter compass alignment algorithm is proposed in this paper. The contributions of the work presented here are twofold. First, the optimization of compass alignment parameters, which involves a lot of trial-and-error traditionally, is achieved based on genetic algorithm. On this basis, second, the optimal parameter varying model is established by least-square polynomial fitting. Experiments are performed with a navigational grade fiber optical gyroscope SINS, which validate the efficiency of the proposed method.

  5. Prediction of protein function improving sequence remote alignment search by a fuzzy logic algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Antonio; Cedano, Juan; Espadaler, Jordi; Hermoso, Antonio; Piñol, Jaume; Querol, Enrique

    2008-02-01

    The functional annotation of the new protein sequences represents a major drawback for genomic science. The best way to suggest the function of a protein from its sequence is by finding a related one for which biological information is available. Current alignment algorithms display a list of protein sequence stretches presenting significant similarity to different protein targets, ordered by their respective mathematical scores. However, statistical and biological significance do not always coincide, therefore, the rearrangement of the program output according to more biological characteristics than the mathematical scoring would help functional annotation. A new method that predicts the putative function for the protein integrating the results from the PSI-BLAST program and a fuzzy logic algorithm is described. Several protein sequence characteristics have been checked in their ability to rearrange a PSI-BLAST profile according more to their biological functions. Four of them: amino acid content, matched segment length and hydropathic and flexibility profiles positively contributed, upon being integrated by a fuzzy logic algorithm into a program, BYPASS, to the accurate prediction of the function of a protein from its sequence.

  6. Deconvolution algorithms for photoacoustic tomography to reduce blurring caused by finite sized detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgholzer, Peter; Roitner, Heinz; Berer, Thomas; Grün, Hubert; O'Leary, D. P.; Nuster, R.; Paltauf, G.; Haltmeier, M.

    2013-03-01

    Most reconstruction algorithms for photoacoustic tomography, like back-projection or time-reversal, work ideally for point-like detectors. For real detectors, which integrate the pressure over their finite size, it was shown that images reconstructed by back-projection or time-reversal show some blurring. Iterative reconstruction algorithms using an imaging matrix can take the finite size of real detectors directly into account, but the numerical effort is significantly higher compared to the use of direct algorithms. For spherical or cylindrical detection surfaces the blurring caused by a finite detector size is proportional to the distance from the rotation center ("spin blur") and is equal to the detector size at the detection surface. In this work we use deconvolution algorithms to reduce this type of blurring on simulated and on experimental data. Experimental data were obtained on a plastisol cylinder with 6 thin holes filled with an absorbing liquid (OrangeG). The holes were located on a spiral emanating from the center of the cylinder. Data acquisition was done by utilization of a piezoelectric detector which was rotated around the plastisol cylinder.

  7. Alignment procedure for detector integration and characterization of the CaSSIS instrument onboard the TGO mission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Sio, Antonio; Da Deppo, Vania; Gambicorti, Lisa; Gerber, Michael; Ziethe, Ruth; Cremonese, Gabriele; Thomas, Nicolas

    2016-07-01

    The Colour and Stereo Surface Imaging System (CaSSIS) is a high-resolution camera for the ESA ExoMars Trace Gas Orbiter mission launched in March 2016. CaSSIS is capable of acquiring color stereo images of features on the surface of Mars to better understand the processes related to trace gas emission. The optical configuration of CaSSIS is based on a three-mirror anastigmatic off-axis imager with a relay mirror; to attain telecentric features and to maintain compact the design, the relay mirror has power. The University of Bern had the task of detector integration and characterization of CaSSIS focal plane. An OGSE (Optical Ground Support Equipment) characterization facility was set up for this purpose. A pinhole, imaged through an off-axis paraboloidal mirror, is used to produce a collimated beam. In this work, the procedures to align the OGSE and to link together the positions of each optical element will be presented. A global Reference System (RS) has been defined using an optical cube placed on the optical bench (OB) and linked to gravity through its X component; this global RS is used to correlate the alignment of the optical components. The main steps to characterize the position of the object to that of the CaSSIS focal plane have been repeated to guide and to verify the operations performed during the alignment procedures. A calculation system has been designed to work on the optical setup and on the detector simultaneously, and to compute online the new position of the focus plane with respect to the detector. Final results will be shown and discussed.

  8. Genetic Algorithm Phase Retrieval for the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, Jaime; Rakoczy, John; Steincamp, James

    2003-01-01

    Phase retrieval requires calculation of the real-valued phase of the pupil fimction from the image intensity distribution and characteristics of an optical system. Genetic 'algorithms were used to solve two one-dimensional phase retrieval problem. A GA successfully estimated the coefficients of a polynomial expansion of the phase when the number of coefficients was correctly specified. A GA also successfully estimated the multiple p h e s of a segmented optical system analogous to the seven-mirror Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) testbed located at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. The SIBOA testbed was developed to investigate phase retrieval techniques. Tiphilt and piston motions of the mirrors accomplish phase corrections. A constant phase over each mirror can be achieved by an independent tip/tilt correction: the phase Conection term can then be factored out of the Discrete Fourier Tranform (DFT), greatly reducing computations.

  9. A Fast and Scalable Kymograph Alignment Algorithm for Nanochannel-Based Optical DNA Mappings

    PubMed Central

    Noble, Charleston; Nilsson, Adam N.; Freitag, Camilla; Beech, Jason P.; Tegenfeldt, Jonas O.; Ambjörnsson, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Optical mapping by direct visualization of individual DNA molecules, stretched in nanochannels with sequence-specific fluorescent labeling, represents a promising tool for disease diagnostics and genomics. An important challenge for this technique is thermal motion of the DNA as it undergoes imaging; this blurs fluorescent patterns along the DNA and results in information loss. Correcting for this effect (a process referred to as kymograph alignment) is a common preprocessing step in nanochannel-based optical mapping workflows, and we present here a highly efficient algorithm to accomplish this via pattern recognition. We compare our method with the one previous approach, and we find that our method is orders of magnitude faster while producing data of similar quality. We demonstrate proof of principle of our approach on experimental data consisting of melt mapped bacteriophage DNA. PMID:25875920

  10. An adaptive alignment algorithm for quality-controlled label-free LC-MS.

    PubMed

    Sandin, Marianne; Ali, Ashfaq; Hansson, Karin; Månsson, Olle; Andreasson, Erik; Resjö, Svante; Levander, Fredrik

    2013-05-01

    Label-free quantification using precursor-based intensities is a versatile workflow for large-scale proteomics studies. The method however requires extensive computational analysis and is therefore in need of robust quality control during the data mining stage. We present a new label-free data analysis workflow integrated into a multiuser software platform. A novel adaptive alignment algorithm has been developed to minimize the possible systematic bias introduced into the analysis. Parameters are estimated on the fly from the data at hand, producing a user-friendly analysis suite. Quality metrics are output in every step of the analysis as well as actively incorporated into the parameter estimation. We furthermore show the improvement of this system by comprehensive comparison to classical label-free analysis methodology as well as current state-of-the-art software.

  11. An Evolutionary Algorithm to Generate Ellipsoid Detectors for Negative Selection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-21

    Von Zuben [21] have both implemented an AIS using the network immune model. Timmis and Neal [91] applied the model to unsupervised machine learning...and de Castro and Von Zuben [21] applied the model to the problem of clustering and filtering unlabelled numerical data sets. Danger theory is young in...algorithm, clonal selection, is described in the next section. 2.6.1 Clonal Selection. De Castro and Von Zuben produced a clonal selection algorithm

  12. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. L.

    2016-05-17

    On the basis of FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S.B. Andersson, Opt. Exp. 16, 18714 (2008)] three highly-resolved positioning methods were proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function (LRF), the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. The proposed algorithms give an average 0.03-0.08 pixel position error, much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA. Moreover, these characters will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis.

  13. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, C. L.

    2016-05-17

    On the basis of FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S.B. Andersson, Opt. Exp. 16, 18714 (2008)] three highly-resolved positioning methods were proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function (LRF), the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. The proposed algorithms give an average 0.03-0.08 pixel position error, much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA.more » Moreover, these characters will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis.« less

  14. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. L.

    2016-05-15

    Three high-resolution positioning methods based on the FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S. B. Andersson, Opt. Express 16, 18714 (2008)] are proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function, the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. After taking the super-Poissonian photon noise into account, the proposed algorithms give an average of 0.03-0.08 pixel position error much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA. These improvements will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis.

  15. Performance improvements of wavelength-shifting-fiber neutron detectors using high-resolution positioning algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C. L.

    2016-05-17

    On the basis of FluoroBancroft linear-algebraic method [S.B. Andersson, Opt. Exp. 16, 18714 (2008)] three highly-resolved positioning methods were proposed for wavelength-shifting fiber (WLSF) neutron detectors. Using a Gaussian or exponential-decay light-response function (LRF), the non-linear relation of photon-number profiles vs. x-pixels was linearized and neutron positions were determined. The proposed algorithms give an average 0.03-0.08 pixel position error, much smaller than that (0.29 pixel) from a traditional maximum photon algorithm (MPA). The new algorithms result in better detector uniformity, less position misassignment (ghosting), better spatial resolution, and an equivalent or better instrument resolution in powder diffraction than the MPA. Moreover, these characters will facilitate broader applications of WLSF detectors at time-of-flight neutron powder diffraction beamlines, including single-crystal diffraction and texture analysis.

  16. Performance evaluation of Warshall algorithm and dynamic programming for Markov chain in local sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammad Ibrahim; Kamal, Md Sarwar

    2015-03-01

    Markov Chain is very effective in prediction basically in long data set. In DNA sequencing it is always very important to find the existence of certain nucleotides based on the previous history of the data set. We imposed the Chapman Kolmogorov equation to accomplish the task of Markov Chain. Chapman Kolmogorov equation is the key to help the address the proper places of the DNA chain and this is very powerful tools in mathematics as well as in any other prediction based research. It incorporates the score of DNA sequences calculated by various techniques. Our research utilize the fundamentals of Warshall Algorithm (WA) and Dynamic Programming (DP) to measures the score of DNA segments. The outcomes of the experiment are that Warshall Algorithm is good for small DNA sequences on the other hand Dynamic Programming are good for long DNA sequences. On the top of above findings, it is very important to measure the risk factors of local sequencing during the matching of local sequence alignments whatever the length.

  17. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of LHCb detector for Run II and tracking for the upgrade.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quagliani, Renato; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run II. Data collected at the start of the fill is processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. The procedure aims to improve the quality of the online selection and performance stability. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. A similar scheme is planned to be used for Run III foreseen to start in 2020. At that time LHCb will run at an instantaneous luminosity of 2 x 1033 cm-2 s-1 and a fully software based trigger strategy will be used. The new running conditions and the tighter timing constraints in the software trigger (only 13 ms per event are available) represent a big challenge for track reconstruction. The new software based trigger strategy implies a full detector read-out at the collision rate of 40 MHz. High performance and timing constraints are ensured by a new tracking system and a fast and efficient track reconstruction strategy.

  18. Beam-Based Alignment of the NLC Main Linac, Part One: Single-Bunch Comparative Study of Three Algorithms(LCC-0013)

    SciTech Connect

    Tenenbaum, P

    2004-04-20

    We describe the results of a series of simulation studies of beam-based alignment of the NLC main linacs using the program LIAR. Three algorithms for alignment of quadrupoles and girders are considered: the algorithm used in the ZDR, the ZDR algorithm combined with a post-alignment MICADO operation, and an algorithm which requires no steering dipoles but requires twice as many alignment segments per linac as the ZDR algorithm. The third algorithm appears to be the most robust, based on convergence time, required quad mover step sizes, and variation in extracted beam emittance as a function of BNS profile. We also study the effect of structure BPM resolution and ATL misalignments during the alignment process.

  19. Evaluation Of Algorithms For A Squid Detector Neuromagnetic Imaging System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leahy, Richard; Jeffe, Brian; Singh, Manbir; Brechner, Ricardo

    1987-01-01

    The SQUID based biomagnetometer has been widely used to measure the external magnetic field produced by neural activity. In this paper we consider the viability of using this data to reconstruct three dimensional neuromagnetic images (NMI) of an equivalent electrical current distribution within the brain which would produce the measured magnetic field. The fundamental limitations on this mode of imaging are evaluated and possible physical models and mathematical formulations of the problem are proposed. Several algorithms often used in medical image reconstruction are applied to the problem and their performance evaluated. We conclude that the reconstruction problem is highly ill-posed, and that conventional image reconstruction algorithms are inadequate for 3-D NMI. A class of solutions we call 'minimum dipole' is shown to provide more accurate reconstructions of simple current distributions.

  20. MTRAP: pairwise sequence alignment algorithm by a new measure based on transition probability between two consecutive pairs of residues.

    PubMed

    Hara, Toshihide; Sato, Keiko; Ohya, Masanori

    2010-05-08

    Sequence alignment is one of the most important techniques to analyze biological systems. It is also true that the alignment is not complete and we have to develop it to look for more accurate method. In particular, an alignment for homologous sequences with low sequence similarity is not in satisfactory level. Usual methods for aligning protein sequences in recent years use a measure empirically determined. As an example, a measure is usually defined by a combination of two quantities (1) and (2) below: (1) the sum of substitutions between two residue segments, (2) the sum of gap penalties in insertion/deletion region. Such a measure is determined on the assumption that there is no an intersite correlation on the sequences. In this paper, we improve the alignment by taking the correlation of consecutive residues. We introduced a new method of alignment, called MTRAP by introducing a metric defined on compound systems of two sequences. In the benchmark tests by PREFAB 4.0 and HOMSTRAD, our pairwise alignment method gives higher accuracy than other methods such as ClustalW2, TCoffee, MAFFT. Especially for the sequences with sequence identity less than 15%, our method improves the alignment accuracy significantly. Moreover, we also showed that our algorithm works well together with a consistency-based progressive multiple alignment by modifying the TCoffee to use our measure. We indicated that our method leads to a significant increase in alignment accuracy compared with other methods. Our improvement is especially clear in low identity range of sequences. The source code is available at our web page, whose address is found in the section "Availability and requirements".

  1. Human emotion detector based on genetic algorithm using lip features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Terrence; Fetanat, Gholamreza; Homaifar, Abdollah; Tsou, Brian; Mendoza-Schrock, Olga

    2010-04-01

    We predicted human emotion using a Genetic Algorithm (GA) based lip feature extractor from facial images to classify all seven universal emotions of fear, happiness, dislike, surprise, anger, sadness and neutrality. First, we isolated the mouth from the input images using special methods, such as Region of Interest (ROI) acquisition, grayscaling, histogram equalization, filtering, and edge detection. Next, the GA determined the optimal or near optimal ellipse parameters that circumvent and separate the mouth into upper and lower lips. The two ellipses then went through fitness calculation and were followed by training using a database of Japanese women's faces expressing all seven emotions. Finally, our proposed algorithm was tested using a published database consisting of emotions from several persons. The final results were then presented in confusion matrices. Our results showed an accuracy that varies from 20% to 60% for each of the seven emotions. The errors were mainly due to inaccuracies in the classification, and also due to the different expressions in the given emotion database. Detailed analysis of these errors pointed to the limitation of detecting emotion based on the lip features alone. Similar work [1] has been done in the literature for emotion detection in only one person, we have successfully extended our GA based solution to include several subjects.

  2. A multiuser detector based on artificial bee colony algorithm for DS-UWB systems.

    PubMed

    Yin, Zhendong; Liu, Xiaohui; Wu, Zhilu

    2013-01-01

    Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm is an optimization algorithm based on the intelligent behavior of honey bee swarm. The ABC algorithm was developed to solve optimizing numerical problems and revealed premising results in processing time and solution quality. In ABC, a colony of artificial bees search for rich artificial food sources; the optimizing numerical problems are converted to the problem of finding the best parameter which minimizes an objective function. Then, the artificial bees randomly discover a population of initial solutions and then iteratively improve them by employing the behavior: moving towards better solutions by means of a neighbor search mechanism while abandoning poor solutions. In this paper, an efficient multiuser detector based on a suboptimal code mapping multiuser detector and artificial bee colony algorithm (SCM-ABC-MUD) is proposed and implemented in direct-sequence ultra-wideband (DS-UWB) systems under the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel. The simulation results demonstrate that the BER and the near-far effect resistance performances of this proposed algorithm are quite close to those of the optimum multiuser detector (OMD) while its computational complexity is much lower than that of OMD. Furthermore, the BER performance of SCM-ABC-MUD is not sensitive to the number of active users and can obtain a large system capacity.

  3. A Multiuser Detector Based on Artificial Bee Colony Algorithm for DS-UWB Systems

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xiaohui

    2013-01-01

    Artificial Bee Colony (ABC) algorithm is an optimization algorithm based on the intelligent behavior of honey bee swarm. The ABC algorithm was developed to solve optimizing numerical problems and revealed premising results in processing time and solution quality. In ABC, a colony of artificial bees search for rich artificial food sources; the optimizing numerical problems are converted to the problem of finding the best parameter which minimizes an objective function. Then, the artificial bees randomly discover a population of initial solutions and then iteratively improve them by employing the behavior: moving towards better solutions by means of a neighbor search mechanism while abandoning poor solutions. In this paper, an efficient multiuser detector based on a suboptimal code mapping multiuser detector and artificial bee colony algorithm (SCM-ABC-MUD) is proposed and implemented in direct-sequence ultra-wideband (DS-UWB) systems under the additive white Gaussian noise (AWGN) channel. The simulation results demonstrate that the BER and the near-far effect resistance performances of this proposed algorithm are quite close to those of the optimum multiuser detector (OMD) while its computational complexity is much lower than that of OMD. Furthermore, the BER performance of SCM-ABC-MUD is not sensitive to the number of active users and can obtain a large system capacity. PMID:23983638

  4. A simple algorithm for estimation of source-to-detector distance in Compton imaging.

    PubMed

    Rawool-Sullivan, Mohini W; Sullivan, John P; Tornga, Shawn R; Brumby, Steven P

    2008-12-01

    Compton imaging is used to predict the location of gamma-emitting radiation sources. The X and Y coordinates of the source can be obtained using a back-projected image and a two-dimensional peak-finding algorithm. The emphasis of this work is to estimate the source-to-detector distance (Z). The algorithm presented uses the solid angle subtended by the reconstructed image at various source-to-detector distances. This algorithm was validated using both measured data from the prototype Compton imager (PCI) constructed at the Los Alamos National Laboratory and simulated data of the same imager. Results show this method can be applied successfully to estimate Z, and it provides a way of determining Z without prior knowledge of the source location. This method is faster than the methods that employ maximum likelihood method because it is based on simple back projections of Compton scatter data.

  5. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy.

    PubMed

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Kim, Jin Sung; Park, Justin C

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy.

  6. Optimization of Proton CT Detector System and Image Reconstruction Algorithm for On-Line Proton Therapy

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chae Young; Song, Hankyeol; Park, Chan Woo; Chung, Yong Hyun; Park, Justin C.

    2016-01-01

    The purposes of this study were to optimize a proton computed tomography system (pCT) for proton range verification and to confirm the pCT image reconstruction algorithm based on projection images generated with optimized parameters. For this purpose, we developed a new pCT scanner using the Geometry and Tracking (GEANT) 4.9.6 simulation toolkit. GEANT4 simulations were performed to optimize the geometric parameters representing the detector thickness and the distance between the detectors for pCT. The system consisted of four silicon strip detectors for particle tracking and a calorimeter to measure the residual energies of the individual protons. The optimized pCT system design was then adjusted to ensure that the solution to a CS-based convex optimization problem would converge to yield the desired pCT images after a reasonable number of iterative corrections. In particular, we used a total variation-based formulation that has been useful in exploiting prior knowledge about the minimal variations of proton attenuation characteristics in the human body. Examinations performed using our CS algorithm showed that high-quality pCT images could be reconstructed using sets of 72 projections within 20 iterations and without any streaks or noise, which can be caused by under-sampling and proton starvation. Moreover, the images yielded by this CS algorithm were found to be of higher quality than those obtained using other reconstruction algorithms. The optimized pCT scanner system demonstrated the potential to perform high-quality pCT during on-line image-guided proton therapy, without increasing the imaging dose, by applying our CS based proton CT reconstruction algorithm. Further, we make our optimized detector system and CS-based proton CT reconstruction algorithm potentially useful in on-line proton therapy. PMID:27243822

  7. Research on infrared-image denoising algorithm based on the noise analysis of the detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Songtao; Zhou, Xiaodong; Shen, Tongsheng; Han, Yanli

    2005-01-01

    Since the conventional denoising algorithms have not considered the influence of certain concrete detector, they are not very effective to remove various noises contained in the low signal-to-noise ration infrared image. In this paper, a new thinking for infrared image denoising is proposed, which is based on the noise analyses of detector with an example of L model infrared multi-element detector. According to the noise analyses of this detector, the emphasis is placed on how to filter white noise and fractal noise in the preprocessing phase. Wavelet analysis is a good tool for analyzing 1/f process. 1/f process can be viewed as white noise approximately since its wavelet coefficients are stationary and uncorrelated. So if wavelet transform is adopted, the problem of removing white noise and fraction noise is simplified as the only one problem, i.e., removing white noise. To address this problem, a new wavelet domain adaptive wiener filtering algorithm is presented. From the viewpoint of quantitative and qualitative analyses, the filtering effect of our method is compared with those of traditional median filter, mean filter and wavelet thresholding algorithm in detail. The results show that our method can reduce various noises effectively and raise the ratio of signal-to-noise evidently.

  8. ALGORITHMS FOR OPTIMIZATION OF SYSYTEM PERFORMANCE IN LAYERED DETECTION SYSTEMS UNDER DETECTOR COORELATION

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, Thomas W.; Heasler, Patrick G.; Daly, Don S.

    2010-07-15

    Almost all of the "architectures" for radiation detection systems in Department of Energy (DOE) and other USG programs rely on some version of layered detector deployment. Efficacy analyses of layered (or more generally extended) detection systems in many contexts often assume statistical independence among detection events and thus predict monotonically increasing system performance with the addition of detection layers. We show this to be a false conclusion for the ROC curves typical of most current technology gamma detectors, and more generally show that statistical independence is often an unwarranted assumption for systems in which there is ambiguity about the objects to be detected. In such systems, a model of correlation among detection events allows optimization of system algorithms for interpretation of detector signals. These algorithms are framed as optimal discriminant functions in joint signal space, and may be applied to gross counting or spectroscopic detector systems. We have shown how system algorithms derived from this model dramatically improve detection probabilities compared to the standard serial detection operating paradigm for these systems. These results would not surprise anyone who has confronted the problem of correlated errors (or failure rates) in the analogous contexts, but is seems to be largely underappreciated among those analyzing the radiation detection problem – independence is widely assumed and experimental studies typical fail to measure correlation. This situation, if not rectified, will lead to several unfortunate results. Including [1] overconfidence in system efficacy, [2] overinvestment in layers of similar technology, and [3] underinvestment in diversity among detection assets.

  9. A method to align the coordinate system of accelerometers to the axes of a human body: The depitch algorithm.

    PubMed

    Gietzelt, Matthias; Schnabel, Stephan; Wolf, Klaus-Hendrik; Büsching, Felix; Song, Bianying; Rust, Stefan; Marschollek, Michael

    2012-05-01

    One of the key problems in accelerometry based gait analyses is that it may not be possible to attach an accelerometer to the lower trunk so that its axes are perfectly aligned to the axes of the subject. In this paper we will present an algorithm that was designed to virtually align the axes of the accelerometer to the axes of the subject during walking sections. This algorithm is based on a physically reasonable approach and built for measurements in unsupervised settings, where the test persons are applying the sensors by themselves. For evaluation purposes we conducted a study with 6 healthy subjects and measured their gait with a manually aligned and a skewed accelerometer attached to the subject's lower trunk. After applying the algorithm the intra-axis correlation of both sensors was on average 0.89±0.1 with a mean absolute error of 0.05g. We concluded that the algorithm was able to adjust the skewed sensor node virtually to the coordinate system of the subject.

  10. PET/CT alignment calibration with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of PET detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, Qingyang; Ma, Tianyu; Wang, Shi; Liu, Yaqiang; Gu, Yu; Dai, Tiantian

    2016-11-01

    Positron emission tomography/computed tomography (PET/CT) is an important tool for clinical studies and pre-clinical researches which provides both functional and anatomical images. To achieve high quality co-registered PET/CT images, alignment calibration of PET and CT scanner is a critical procedure. The existing methods reported use positron source phantoms imaged both by PET and CT scanner and then derive the transformation matrix from the reconstructed images of the two modalities. In this paper, a novel PET/CT alignment calibration method with a non-radioactive phantom and the intrinsic 176Lu radiation of the PET detector was developed. Firstly, a multi-tungsten-alloy-sphere phantom without positron source was designed and imaged by CT and the PET scanner using intrinsic 176Lu radiation included in LYSO. Secondly, the centroids of the spheres were derived and matched by an automatic program. Lastly, the rotation matrix and the translation vector were calculated by least-square fitting of the centroid data. The proposed method was employed in an animal PET/CT system (InliView-3000) developed in our lab. Experimental results showed that the proposed method achieves high accuracy and is feasible to replace the conventional positron source based methods.

  11. Digital algorithms for parallel pipelined single-detector homodyne fringe counting in laser interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rerucha, Simon; Sarbort, Martin; Hola, Miroslava; Cizek, Martin; Hucl, Vaclav; Cip, Ondrej; Lazar, Josef

    2016-12-01

    The homodyne detection with only a single detector represents a promising approach in the interferometric application which enables a significant reduction of the optical system complexity while preserving the fundamental resolution and dynamic range of the single frequency laser interferometers. We present the design, implementation and analysis of algorithmic methods for computational processing of the single-detector interference signal based on parallel pipelined processing suitable for real time implementation on a programmable hardware platform (e.g. the FPGA - Field Programmable Gate Arrays or the SoC - System on Chip). The algorithmic methods incorporate (a) the single detector signal (sine) scaling, filtering, demodulations and mixing necessary for the second (cosine) quadrature signal reconstruction followed by a conic section projection in Cartesian plane as well as (a) the phase unwrapping together with the goniometric and linear transformations needed for the scale linearization and periodic error correction. The digital computing scheme was designed for bandwidths up to tens of megahertz which would allow to measure the displacements at the velocities around half metre per second. The algorithmic methods were tested in real-time operation with a PC-based reference implementation that employed the advantage pipelined processing by balancing the computational load among multiple processor cores. The results indicate that the algorithmic methods are suitable for a wide range of applications [3] and that they are bringing the fringe counting interferometry closer to the industrial applications due to their optical setup simplicity and robustness, computational stability, scalability and also a cost-effectiveness.

  12. The HERA-B database services. for detector configuration, calibration, alignment, slow control and data classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Amorim, A.; Amaral, Vasco; Marconi, Umberto; Steinbeck, Stefan; Tomé, António; Vagnoni, Vincenzo; Wolters, Helmut; HERA-B Collaboration

    2001-10-01

    The database services for the distributed application environment of the HERA-B experiment are presented. Achieving the required 10 6 trigger reduction implies that all reconstruction, including calibration and alignment procedures, must run online, making extensive usage of the database systems. The associations from the events to the database objects are carefully introduced considering efficiency and flexibility. The challenges of managing the slow control information were addressed by introducing data and update objects used in special processing on dedicated servers. The system integrates the DAQ client/server protocols with customized active database servers and relies on a high-performance database support toolkit. For applications that required complex selection mechanisms, as in the data-quality databases, the relevant data is replicated using a relational database management system.

  13. Analysis of Full Charge Reconstruction Algorithms for X-Ray Pixelated Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.; Carini, G.; Deptuch, G.; Grybos, P.; Hoff, J.; Siddons, P., Maj.; Szczygiel, R.; Trimpl, M.; Yarema, R.; /Fermilab

    2012-05-21

    Existence of the natural diffusive spread of charge carriers on the course of their drift towards collecting electrodes in planar, segmented detectors results in a division of the original cloud of carriers between neighboring channels. This paper presents the analysis of algorithms, implementable with reasonable circuit resources, whose task is to prevent degradation of the detective quantum efficiency in highly granular, digital pixel detectors. The immediate motivation of the work is a photon science application requesting simultaneous timing spectroscopy and 2D position sensitivity. Leading edge discrimination, provided it can be freed from uncertainties associated with the charge sharing, is used for timing the events. Analyzed solutions can naturally be extended to the amplitude spectroscopy with pixel detectors.

  14. Analysis of full charge reconstruction algorithms for x-ray pixelated detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Baumbaugh, A.; Carini, G.; Deptuch, G.; Grybos, P.; Hoff, J.; Siddons, P., Maj.; Szczygiel, R.; Trimpl, M.; Yarema, R.; /Fermilab

    2011-11-01

    Existence of the natural diffusive spread of charge carriers on the course of their drift towards collecting electrodes in planar, segmented detectors results in a division of the original cloud of carriers between neighboring channels. This paper presents the analysis of algorithms, implementable with reasonable circuit resources, whose task is to prevent degradation of the detective quantum efficiency in highly granular, digital pixel detectors. The immediate motivation of the work is a photon science application requesting simultaneous timing spectroscopy and 2D position sensitivity. Leading edge discrimination, provided it can be freed from uncertainties associated with the charge sharing, is used for timing the events. Analyzed solutions can naturally be extended to the amplitude spectroscopy with pixel detectors.

  15. Algorithms for the determination of the time delays of the signal when using unequal detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, B. L.

    1979-01-01

    In treating the recorded results from detectors at different locations in space, the analysis of the time delays of signals is crucial to locating the sources of detected radiation. Because the correlation method requires the manipulation of awkward matrices to evaluate its accuracy, a solution is outlined based on minimizing the sum of the squares of signal deviations, and the algorithms for evaluating the resulting error are presented.

  16. Library Event Matching event classification algorithm for electron neutrino interactions in the NOνA detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Backhouse, C.; Patterson, R. B.

    2015-04-01

    We describe the Library Event Matching classification algorithm implemented for use in the NOνA νμ →νe oscillation measurement. Library Event Matching, developed in a different form by the earlier MINOS experiment, is a powerful approach in which input trial events are compared to a large library of simulated events to find those that best match the input event. A key feature of the algorithm is that the comparisons are based on all the information available in the event, as opposed to higher-level derived quantities. The final event classifier is formed by examining the details of the best-matched library events. We discuss the concept, definition, optimization, and broader applications of the algorithm as implemented here. Library Event Matching is well-suited to the monolithic, segmented detectors of NOνA and thus provides a powerful technique for event discrimination.

  17. Optimizing multiple sequence alignments using a genetic algorithm based on three objectives: structural information, non-gaps percentage and totally conserved columns.

    PubMed

    Ortuño, Francisco M; Valenzuela, Olga; Rojas, Fernando; Pomares, Hector; Florido, Javier P; Urquiza, Jose M; Rojas, Ignacio

    2013-09-01

    Multiple sequence alignments (MSAs) are widely used approaches in bioinformatics to carry out other tasks such as structure predictions, biological function analyses or phylogenetic modeling. However, current tools usually provide partially optimal alignments, as each one is focused on specific biological features. Thus, the same set of sequences can produce different alignments, above all when sequences are less similar. Consequently, researchers and biologists do not agree about which is the most suitable way to evaluate MSAs. Recent evaluations tend to use more complex scores including further biological features. Among them, 3D structures are increasingly being used to evaluate alignments. Because structures are more conserved in proteins than sequences, scores with structural information are better suited to evaluate more distant relationships between sequences. The proposed multiobjective algorithm, based on the non-dominated sorting genetic algorithm, aims to jointly optimize three objectives: STRIKE score, non-gaps percentage and totally conserved columns. It was significantly assessed on the BAliBASE benchmark according to the Kruskal-Wallis test (P < 0.01). This algorithm also outperforms other aligners, such as ClustalW, Multiple Sequence Alignment Genetic Algorithm (MSA-GA), PRRP, DIALIGN, Hidden Markov Model Training (HMMT), Pattern-Induced Multi-sequence Alignment (PIMA), MULTIALIGN, Sequence Alignment Genetic Algorithm (SAGA), PILEUP, Rubber Band Technique Genetic Algorithm (RBT-GA) and Vertical Decomposition Genetic Algorithm (VDGA), according to the Wilcoxon signed-rank test (P < 0.05), whereas it shows results not significantly different to 3D-COFFEE (P > 0.05) with the advantage of being able to use less structures. Structural information is included within the objective function to evaluate more accurately the obtained alignments. The source code is available at http://www.ugr.es/~fortuno/MOSAStrE/MO-SAStrE.zip.

  18. Quadrupole Alignment and Trajectory Correction for Future Linear Colliders: SLC Tests of a Dispersion-Free Steering Algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Assmann, R

    2004-06-08

    The feasibility of future linear colliders depends on achieving very tight alignment and steering tolerances. All proposals (NLC, JLC, CLIC, TESLA and S-BAND) currently require a total emittance growth in the main linac of less than 30-100% [1]. This should be compared with a 100% emittance growth in the much smaller SLC linac [2]. Major advances in alignment and beam steering techniques beyond those used in the SLC are necessary for the next generation of linear colliders. In this paper, we present an experimental study of quadrupole alignment with a dispersion-free steering algorithm. A closely related method (wakefield-free steering) takes into account wakefield effects [3]. However, this method can not be studied at the SLC. The requirements for future linear colliders lead to new and unconventional ideas about alignment and beam steering. For example, no dipole correctors are foreseen for the standard trajectory correction in the NLC [4]; beam steering will be done by moving the quadrupole positions with magnet movers. This illustrates the close symbiosis between alignment, beam steering and beam dynamics that will emerge. It is no longer possible to consider the accelerator alignment as static with only a few surveys and realignments per year. The alignment in future linear colliders will be a dynamic process in which the whole linac, with thousands of beam-line elements, is aligned in a few hours or minutes, while the required accuracy of about 5 pm for the NLC quadrupole alignment [4] is a factor of 20 higher than in existing accelerators. The major task in alignment and steering is the accurate determination of the optimum beam-line position. Ideally one would like all elements to be aligned along a straight line. However, this is not practical. Instead a ''smooth curve'' is acceptable as long as its wavelength is much longer than the betatron wavelength of the accelerated beam. Conventional alignment methods are limited in accuracy by errors in the survey

  19. Recent progress on single photon and positron emission tomography - From detectors to algorithms

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, E.

    1987-02-01

    In the last few years, great efforts have been made to achieve higher sensitivity, higher spatial resolution, better image quality and quantification. In the SPECT, collimators and scanning methods have been improved. 180/sup 0/ sagittal scan is proposed for brain imaging. Practical correction methods for uniform attenuation are compared from a view point of noise propagation. In the PET system, current status of TOF-PET, high resolution PET are reviewed. CsI(Br) scintillator is a candidate of a new PET detector. For stationary PET using discrete detectors, an iterative method is preferable for the image reconstruction, because it does not need to satisfy the conventional sampling requirement for projections. Recent ECT technology tends to be sophisticated both in data acquisition and processing. It needs more powerful and versatile algorithms. Iterative reconstruction methods should be reconsidered as a tool of routine use. The EM algorithm is attractive, but it seems to need a trick to accelerate the convergence. A fast maximum likelihood algorithm is proposed, which can provide satisfactory images by a few iterations.

  20. Development of a SiPM-based PET detector using a digital positioning algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Jin Hyung; Lee, Seung-Jae; An, Su Jung; Kim, Hyun-Il; Chung, Yong Hyun

    2016-05-01

    A decreased number of readout method is investigated here to provide precise pixel information for small-animal positron emission tomography (PET). Small-animal PET consists of eight modules, each being composed of a 3 × 3 array of 2 mm × 2 mm × 20 mm lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO) crystals optically coupled to a 2 × 2 array of 3 mm × 3 mm silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). The number of readout channels is reduced by one-quarter that of the conventional method by applying a simplified pixel-determination algorithm. The performances of the PET system and detector module were evaluated with experimental verifications. In the results, all pixels of the 3 × 3 LYSO array were decoded well, and the performances of the PET detector module were measured.

  1. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  2. Uniformity measurements and new positioning algorithms for wavelength-shifting fiber neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Cai-Lin; Riedel, Richard A

    2014-03-21

    Wavelength-shifting (WLS) fiber scintillator detectors were successfully installed at two neutron powder diffractometers at the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS). But, they have the following second-order disadvantages: (i). they cannot have both high efficiency and images free of ghosting (position misassignment) concomitantly; (ii). the apparent detection efficiency and spatial resolution are not uniform. These issues are related to the diffusion of scintillation photons and the fluctuation in the number of photons (quantum noise) collected by photo-multiplier tubes (PMTs). Therefore, to mitigate these two issues, we developed two statistics-based positioning algorithms, i.e., a centroid algorithm (CEA) and a correlation algorithm (CA). Compared with the generally used maximum-photon algorithm (MPA), CEA eliminates the ghosting with only about a 10% loss in detection efficiency, and provides better uniformity in detection efficiency and intrinsic background. CA can effectively eliminate ghosting too, but the loss of efficiency at the group boundaries of PMTs is large. Our results indicate that both algorithms can reduce the influence of quantum noise on the neutron positioning.

  3. Approximate static condensation algorithm for solving multi-material diffusion problems on meshes non-aligned with material interfaces

    DOE PAGES

    Kikinzon, Evgeny; Kuznetsov, Yuri; Lipnikov, Konstatin; ...

    2017-07-08

    In this study, we describe a new algorithm for solving multi-material diffusion problem when material interfaces are not aligned with the mesh. In this case interface reconstruction methods are used to construct approximate representation of interfaces between materials. They produce so-called multi-material cells, in which materials are represented by material polygons that contain only one material. The reconstructed interface is not continuous between cells. Finally, we suggest the new method for solving multi-material diffusion problems on such meshes and compare its performance with known homogenization methods.

  4. Alignment validation

    SciTech Connect

    ALICE; ATLAS; CMS; LHCb; Golling, Tobias

    2008-09-06

    The four experiments, ALICE, ATLAS, CMS and LHCb are currently under constructionat CERN. They will study the products of proton-proton collisions at the Large Hadron Collider. All experiments are equipped with sophisticated tracking systems, unprecedented in size and complexity. Full exploitation of both the inner detector andthe muon system requires an accurate alignment of all detector elements. Alignmentinformation is deduced from dedicated hardware alignment systems and the reconstruction of charged particles. However, the system is degenerate which means the data is insufficient to constrain all alignment degrees of freedom, so the techniques are prone to converging on wrong geometries. This deficiency necessitates validation and monitoring of the alignment. An exhaustive discussion of means to validate is subject to this document, including examples and plans from all four LHC experiments, as well as other high energy experiments.

  5. Study on optimized algorithm for mileage wheel of magnetic flux leakage detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Y Sun, L.; Li, Y. B.; Wu, Y. T.; Y Xu, Q.; Cai, Y.

    2017-07-01

    Pipeline integrity is significant to safe operation of long-range pipeline. To avoid critical failure of the pipeline, which may lead to great loss of property and life, MFL_PIG is often used to detect the corrosion and leakage of the pipeline. To accurately locate the defects, mileage pulses emitted by the mileage wheel are used to and emit signal to single-chip microcomputer for position. This paper investigates the factors that may affect the precision of mileage wheel, an important part of pipeline corrosion and leakage detector (MFL_PIG), investigate its working principle and present an optimized algorithm for mileage wheel to increase the precision of detection.

  6. Collaborative Research Developing, Testing and Validating Brain Alignment Algorithm using Geometric Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-11-13

    This is the final report by the University of Southern California on a AFSOR grant, part of a joint program with Harvard University (PI, Shing-Tung...the algorithm was the task assigned to Harvard University ). Finally, we were to test and validate the algorithm once it had been developed.

  7. NORSAR Final Scientific Report Adaptive Waveform Correlation Detectors for Arrays: Algorithms for Autonomous Calibration

    SciTech Connect

    Gibbons, S J; Ringdal, F; Harris, D B

    2009-04-16

    Correlation detection is a relatively new approach in seismology that offers significant advantages in increased sensitivity and event screening over standard energy detection algorithms. The basic concept is that a representative event waveform is used as a template (i.e. matched filter) that is correlated against a continuous, possibly multichannel, data stream to detect new occurrences of that same signal. These algorithms are therefore effective at detecting repeating events, such as explosions and aftershocks at a specific location. This final report summarizes the results of a three-year cooperative project undertaken by NORSAR and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The overall objective has been to develop and test a new advanced, automatic approach to seismic detection using waveform correlation. The principal goal is to develop an adaptive processing algorithm. By this we mean that the detector is initiated using a basic set of reference ('master') events to be used in the correlation process, and then an automatic algorithm is applied successively to provide improved performance by extending the set of master events selectively and strategically. These additional master events are generated by an independent, conventional detection system. A periodic analyst review will then be applied to verify the performance and, if necessary, adjust and consolidate the master event set. A primary focus of this project has been the application of waveform correlation techniques to seismic arrays. The basic procedure is to perform correlation on the individual channels, and then stack the correlation traces using zero-delay beam forming. Array methods such as frequency-wavenumber analysis can be applied to this set of correlation traces to help guarantee the validity of detections and lower the detection threshold. In principle, the deployment of correlation detectors against seismically active regions could involve very large numbers of very specific detectors. To

  8. Dynamic programming algorithms for comparing multineuronal spike trains via cost-based metrics and alignments.

    PubMed

    Victor, Jonathan D; Goldberg, David H; Gardner, Daniel

    2007-04-15

    Cost-based metrics formalize notions of distance, or dissimilarity, between two spike trains, and are applicable to single- and multineuronal responses. As such, these metrics have been used to characterize neural variability and neural coding. By examining the structure of an efficient algorithm [Aronov D, 2003. Fast algorithm for the metric-space analysis of simultaneous responses of multiple single neurons. J Neurosci Methods 124(2), 175-79] implementing a metric for multineuronal responses, we determine criteria for its generalization, and identify additional efficiencies that are applicable when related dissimilarity measures are computed in parallel. The generalized algorithm provides the means to test a wide range of coding hypotheses.

  9. Improved algorithm for automated alignment of wafers via optimized features location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parshin, Michael; Zalevsky, Zeev

    2009-10-01

    We present a new fuzzy logic-based approach for automatic optimized features location. The technique is used for improved automatic alignment and classification of silicon wafers and chips that are used in the electronics industry. The proposed automatic image processing approach was realized and experimentally demonstrated in real industrial application with typical wafers. The automatic features location and grading supported the industrial requirements and could replace human expert-based inspection that currently is performed manually.

  10. Nested Containment List (NCList): a new algorithm for accelerating interval query of genome alignment and interval databases.

    PubMed

    Alekseyenko, Alexander V; Lee, Christopher J

    2007-06-01

    The exponential growth of sequence databases poses a major challenge to bioinformatics tools for querying alignment and annotation databases. There is a pressing need for methods for finding overlapping sequence intervals that are highly scalable to database size, query interval size, result size and construction/updating of the interval database. We have developed a new interval database representation, the Nested Containment List (NCList), whose query time is O(n + log N), where N is the database size and n is the size of the result set. In all cases tested, this query algorithm is 5-500-fold faster than other indexing methods tested in this study, such as MySQL multi-column indexing, MySQL binning and R-Tree indexing. We provide performance comparisons both in simulated datasets and real-world genome alignment databases, across a wide range of database sizes and query interval widths. We also present an in-place NCList construction algorithm that yields database construction times that are approximately 100-fold faster than other methods available. The NCList data structure appears to provide a useful foundation for highly scalable interval database applications. NCList data structure is part of Pygr, a bioinformatics graph database library, available at http://sourceforge.net/projects/pygr

  11. Performance Assessment of the Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Imaging Sensor. Part 2; Clustering Algorithm

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mach, Douglas M.; Christian, Hugh J.; Blakeslee, Richard; Boccippio, Dennis J.; Goodman, Steve J.; Boeck, William

    2006-01-01

    We describe the clustering algorithm used by the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS) and the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) for combining the lightning pulse data into events, groups, flashes, and areas. Events are single pixels that exceed the LIS/OTD background level during a single frame (2 ms). Groups are clusters of events that occur within the same frame and in adjacent pixels. Flashes are clusters of groups that occur within 330 ms and either 5.5 km (for LIS) or 16.5 km (for OTD) of each other. Areas are clusters of flashes that occur within 16.5 km of each other. Many investigators are utilizing the LIS/OTD flash data; therefore, we test how variations in the algorithms for the event group and group-flash clustering affect the flash count for a subset of the LIS data. We divided the subset into areas with low (1-3), medium (4-15), high (16-63), and very high (64+) flashes to see how changes in the clustering parameters affect the flash rates in these different sizes of areas. We found that as long as the cluster parameters are within about a factor of two of the current values, the flash counts do not change by more than about 20%. Therefore, the flash clustering algorithm used by the LIS and OTD sensors create flash rates that are relatively insensitive to reasonable variations in the clustering algorithms.

  12. Breast tomosynthesis using the multiple projection algorithm adapted for stationary detectors.

    PubMed

    Malliori, A; Bliznakova, K; Bliznakov, Z; Cockmartin, L; Bosmans, H; Pallikarakis, N

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study is to investigate the validity of using the Multiple Projection Algorithm (MPA) for Breast Tomosynthesis (BT) using real projection images acquired with phantoms at a clinical setting. The CIRS-BR3D phantom with ranging thicknesses between 3 cm and 6 cm was used for all image quality evaluations. Five sets of measurements were acquired, each comprised of a 2D mammographic image followed by a set of 25 projections within an arc length of 50°. A reconstruction algorithm based on the MPA was adapted for partial isocentric rotation using a stationary detector. For reference purposes, a Back Projection (BP) algorithm was also developed for this geometry. The performance of the algorithms was evaluated, in combination with pre-filtering of the projections, in comparative studies that involved also a comparison between tomosynthesis slices and 2D mammograms. Evaluation of tomosynthesis slices reconstructed with BP and MPA showed close performance for the two algorithms with no considerable differences in feature detection, size and appearance of the background tissue with the MPA running faster the overall process. Pre-filtering of the projections, led to better BT images compared to non-filtering. Increased thickness resulted in limited detection of the features of interest, especially the smaller sized ones. In these cases, the filtered BT slices allowed improved visualization due to removed superimposed tissue compared to the 2D images. The different breast-like slab arrangements in phantoms of the same thickness demonstrated a slight influence on the quality of reconstructed features. The MPA which had been applied previously to reconstruct tomograms from projections acquired at synchrotron facilities, is a time efficient algorithm, and is fully compliant with and can be successfully used in BT clinical systems. Compared to 2D mammography, BT shows advantage in visualizing features of small size and for increased phantom thickness or features

  13. Robust algorithm to locate heart beats from multiple physiological waveforms by individual signal detector voting.

    PubMed

    Galeotti, Loriano; Scully, Christopher G; Vicente, Jose; Johannesen, Lars; Strauss, David G

    2015-08-01

    Alarm fatigue is a top medical device hazard in patient monitoring that could be reduced by merging physiological information from multiple sensors, minimizing the impact of a single sensor failing. We developed a heart beat detection algorithm that utilizes multi-modal physiological signals (e.g. electrocardiogram, blood pressure, stroke volume, photoplethysmogram and electro-encephalogram) by merging the heart beats obtained from signal-specific detectors. We used the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 training set to develop the algorithm, and we refined it with a mix of signals from the multiparameter intelligent monitoring in intensive care (MIMIC II) database and artificially disrupted waveforms. The algorithm had an average sensitivity of 95.67% and positive predictive value (PPV) of 92.28% when applied to the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 200 record training set. On a refined dataset obtained by removing 5 records with arrhythmias and inconsistent reference annotations we obtained an average sensitivity of 97.43% and PPV of 94.17%. Algorithm performance was assessed with the Physionet Challenge 2014 test set that consisted of 200 records (each up to 10 min length) containing multiple physiological signals and reference annotations verified by the PhysioNet/Computing in Cardiology Challenge 2014 organizers. Our algorithm had a sensitivity of 92.74% and PPV of 87.37% computed over all annotated beats, and a record average sensitivity of 91.08%, PPV of 86.96% and an overall score (average of all 4 measures) of 89.53%. Our algorithm is an example of a data fusion approach that can improve patient monitoring and reduce false alarms by reducing the effect of individual signal failures.

  14. A region segmentation based algorithm for building a crystal position lookup table in a scintillation detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hai-Peng; Yun, Ming-Kai; Liu, Shuang-Quan; Fan, Xin; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chai, Pei; Shan, Bao-Ci

    2015-03-01

    In a scintillation detector, scintillation crystals are typically made into a 2-dimensional modular array. The location of incident gamma-ray needs be calibrated due to spatial response nonlinearity. Generally, position histograms-the characteristic flood response of scintillation detectors-are used for position calibration. In this paper, a position calibration method based on a crystal position lookup table which maps the inaccurate location calculated by Anger logic to the exact hitting crystal position has been proposed. Firstly, the position histogram is preprocessed, such as noise reduction and image enhancement. Then the processed position histogram is segmented into disconnected regions, and crystal marking points are labeled by finding the centroids of regions. Finally, crystal boundaries are determined and the crystal position lookup table is generated. The scheme is evaluated by the whole-body positron emission tomography (PET) scanner and breast dedicated single photon emission computed tomography scanner developed by the Institute of High Energy Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences. The results demonstrate that the algorithm is accurate, efficient, robust and applicable to any configurations of scintillation detector. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (81101175) and XIE Jia-Lin Foundation of Institute of High Energy Physics (Y3546360U2)

  15. Remote Evaluation of Rotational Velocity Using a Quadrant Photo-Detector and a DSC Algorithm

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Xiangkai; Zhu, Zhixiong; Chen, Yang

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents an approach to remotely evaluate the rotational velocity of a measured object by using a quadrant photo-detector and a differential subtraction correlation (DSC) algorithm. The rotational velocity of a rotating object is determined by two temporal-delay numbers at the minima of two DSCs that are derived from the four output signals of the quadrant photo-detector, and the sign of the calculated rotational velocity directly represents the rotational direction. The DSC algorithm does not require any multiplication operations. Experimental calculations were performed to confirm the proposed evaluation method. The calculated rotational velocity, including its amplitude and direction, showed good agreement with the given one, which had an amplitude error of ~0.3%, and had over 1100 times the efficiency of the traditional cross-correlation method in the case of data number N > 4800. The confirmations have shown that the remote evaluation of rotational velocity can be done without any circular division disk, and that it has much fewer error sources, making it simple, accurate and effective for remotely evaluating rotational velocity. PMID:27120607

  16. Remote Evaluation of Rotational Velocity Using a Quadrant Photo-Detector and a DSC Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiangkai; Zhu, Zhixiong; Chen, Yang

    2016-04-25

    This paper presents an approach to remotely evaluate the rotational velocity of a measured object by using a quadrant photo-detector and a differential subtraction correlation (DSC) algorithm. The rotational velocity of a rotating object is determined by two temporal-delay numbers at the minima of two DSCs that are derived from the four output signals of the quadrant photo-detector, and the sign of the calculated rotational velocity directly represents the rotational direction. The DSC algorithm does not require any multiplication operations. Experimental calculations were performed to confirm the proposed evaluation method. The calculated rotational velocity, including its amplitude and direction, showed good agreement with the given one, which had an amplitude error of ~0.3%, and had over 1100 times the efficiency of the traditional cross-correlation method in the case of data number N > 4800. The confirmations have shown that the remote evaluation of rotational velocity can be done without any circular division disk, and that it has much fewer error sources, making it simple, accurate and effective for remotely evaluating rotational velocity.

  17. Centroiding algorithms and spatial resolution of photon counting detectors with cross-strip anodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, Anton S.; Vallerga, John V.; Siegmund, Oswald H. W.; Hull, Jeff S.

    2003-12-01

    Significant advances in readout elements of microchannel plate based sensors have led to the development of detectors with less than 10 µm spatial resolution. We have shown that cross strip (XS) anodes have spatial resolution as small as 5 µm FWHM when a simple and fast center of gravity centroiding technique is used. In this paper we investigate the variation of XS anode spatial resolution for several types of centroiding algorithms (N-finger center of gravity, Gaussian, Lorentzian, parabolic and hyperbolic cosine centroiding) and determine the optimum algorithm in terms of spatial resolution and image linearity. We found that for existing 32x32 mm2 cross strip anodes and associated electronics, the best resolution and linearity is achieved with center of gravity centroiding with properly chosen thresholds on the data set. The images of USAF resolution test target obtained with MCP's with 6 µm pores on 7.5 µm centers resolve 71.8 line pairs per mm (Group 6 element 2, with line width of only ~7 µm). Thus the ~7 µm spatial resolution of the detector with cross strip anode is indeed limited now by the size of the MCP pores, while the resolution of XS readout is on the order of only few micrometers FWHM.

  18. Novel 3-axis optical fiber alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas-Almaguer, S.; Guajardo-Gonzalez, Candelario; Betancourt-Ibarra, Francisco; Martinez-Hernandez, Carlos; Selvas, Romeo

    2010-10-01

    This paper presents a 3-Axis enhanced alignment system for optical fiber. The arrangement uses in one of its axis a vision recognition system which employs Canny edge detector and Phase correlation. The other two-axis are aligned by controlling a couple stepper motors through displacement algorithms. The setup uses a commercial multimodal transmitter and receiver, multimode fiber, a digital microscope, three stepping motors and software. This automatic system takes an alignment time of 20 seconds and up to 70% of coupling power efficiency.

  19. Clustering and Differential Alignment Algorithm: Identification of Early Stage Regulators in the Arabidopsis thaliana Iron Deficiency Response

    PubMed Central

    Muhammad, Durreshahwar; Foret, Jessica; Brady, Siobhan M.; Ducoste, Joel J.; Tuck, James; Long, Terri A.; Williams, Cranos

    2015-01-01

    Time course transcriptome datasets are commonly used to predict key gene regulators associated with stress responses and to explore gene functionality. Techniques developed to extract causal relationships between genes from high throughput time course expression data are limited by low signal levels coupled with noise and sparseness in time points. We deal with these limitations by proposing the Cluster and Differential Alignment Algorithm (CDAA). This algorithm was designed to process transcriptome data by first grouping genes based on stages of activity and then using similarities in gene expression to predict influential connections between individual genes. Regulatory relationships are assigned based on pairwise alignment scores generated using the expression patterns of two genes and some inferred delay between the regulator and the observed activity of the target. We applied the CDAA to an iron deficiency time course microarray dataset to identify regulators that influence 7 target transcription factors known to participate in the Arabidopsis thaliana iron deficiency response. The algorithm predicted that 7 regulators previously unlinked to iron homeostasis influence the expression of these known transcription factors. We validated over half of predicted influential relationships using qRT-PCR expression analysis in mutant backgrounds. One predicted regulator-target relationship was shown to be a direct binding interaction according to yeast one-hybrid (Y1H) analysis. These results serve as a proof of concept emphasizing the utility of the CDAA for identifying unknown or missing nodes in regulatory cascades, providing the fundamental knowledge needed for constructing predictive gene regulatory networks. We propose that this tool can be used successfully for similar time course datasets to extract additional information and infer reliable regulatory connections for individual genes. PMID:26317202

  20. Searching protein 3-D structures for optimal structure alignment using intelligent algorithms and data structures.

    PubMed

    Novosád, Tomáš; Snášel, Václav; Abraham, Ajith; Yang, Jack Y

    2010-11-01

    In this paper, we present a novel algorithm for measuring protein similarity based on their 3-D structure (protein tertiary structure). The algorithm used a suffix tree for discovering common parts of main chains of all proteins appearing in the current research collaboratory for structural bioinformatics protein data bank (PDB). By identifying these common parts, we build a vector model and use some classical information retrieval (IR) algorithms based on the vector model to measure the similarity between proteins--all to all protein similarity. For the calculation of protein similarity, we use term frequency × inverse document frequency ( tf × idf ) term weighing schema and cosine similarity measure. The goal of this paper is to introduce new protein similarity metric based on suffix trees and IR methods. Whole current PDB database was used to demonstrate very good time complexity of the algorithm as well as high precision. We have chosen the structural classification of proteins (SCOP) database for verification of the precision of our algorithm because it is maintained primarily by humans. The next success of this paper would be the ability to determine SCOP categories of proteins not included in the latest version of the SCOP database (v. 1.75) with nearly 100% precision.

  1. New Advanced Source Identification Algorithm (ASIA-NEW) for radiation monitors with plastic detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Stavrov, Andrei; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2015-07-01

    Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM) with plastic detectors represent the main instruments used for primary border (customs) radiation control. RPM are widely used because they are simple, reliable, relatively inexpensive and have a high sensitivity. However, experience using the RPM in various countries has revealed the systems have some grave shortcomings. There is a dramatic decrease of the probability of detection of radioactive sources under high suppression of the natural gamma background (radiation control of heavy cargoes, containers and, especially, trains). NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) existing in objects under control trigger the so-called 'nuisance alarms', requiring a secondary inspection for source verification. At a number of sites, the rate of such alarms is so high it significantly complicates the work of customs and border officers. This paper presents a brief description of new variant of algorithm ASIA-New (New Advanced Source Identification Algorithm), which was developed by the authors and based on some experimental test results. It also demonstrates results of different tests and the capability of a new system to overcome the shortcomings stated above. New electronics and ASIA-New enables RPM to detect radioactive sources under a high background suppression (tested at 15-30%) and to verify the detected NORM (KCl) and the artificial isotopes (Co-57, Ba-133 and other). New variant of ASIA is based on physical principles and does not require a lot of special tests to attain statistical data for its parameters. That is why this system can be easily installed into any RPM with plastic detectors. This algorithm was tested for 1,395 passages of different transports (cars, trucks and trailers) without radioactive sources. It also was tested for 4,015 passages of these transports with radioactive sources of different activity (Co-57, Ba-133, Cs-137, Co-60, Ra-226, Th-232) and these sources masked by NORM (K-40) as well. (authors)

  2. Improved event positioning in a gamma ray detector using an iterative position-weighted centre-of-gravity algorithm.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chen-Yi; Goertzen, Andrew L

    2013-07-21

    An iterative position-weighted centre-of-gravity algorithm was developed and tested for positioning events in a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM)-based scintillation detector for positron emission tomography. The algorithm used a Gaussian-based weighting function centred at the current estimate of the event location. The algorithm was applied to the signals from a 4 × 4 array of SiPM detectors that used individual channel readout and a LYSO:Ce scintillator array. Three scintillator array configurations were tested: single layer with 3.17 mm crystal pitch, matched to the SiPM size; single layer with 1.5 mm crystal pitch; and dual layer with 1.67 mm crystal pitch and a ½ crystal offset in the X and Y directions between the two layers. The flood histograms generated by this algorithm were shown to be superior to those generated by the standard centre of gravity. The width of the Gaussian weighting function of the algorithm was optimized for different scintillator array setups. The optimal width of the Gaussian curve was found to depend on the amount of light spread. The algorithm required less than 20 iterations to calculate the position of an event. The rapid convergence of this algorithm will readily allow for implementation on a front-end detector processing field programmable gate array for use in improved real-time event positioning and identification.

  3. Tree Alignment Based on Needleman-Wunsch Algorithm for Sensor Selection in Smart Homes.

    PubMed

    Chua, Sook-Ling; Foo, Lee Kien

    2017-08-18

    Activity recognition in smart homes aims to infer the particular activities of the inhabitant, the aim being to monitor their activities and identify any abnormalities, especially for those living alone. In order for a smart home to support its inhabitant, the recognition system needs to learn from observations acquired through sensors. One question that often arises is which sensors are useful and how many sensors are required to accurately recognise the inhabitant's activities? Many wrapper methods have been proposed and remain one of the popular evaluators for sensor selection due to its superior accuracy performance. However, they are prohibitively slow during the evaluation process and may run into the risk of overfitting due to the extent of the search. Motivated by this characteristic, this paper attempts to reduce the cost of the evaluation process and overfitting through tree alignment. The performance of our method is evaluated on two public datasets obtained in two distinct smart home environments.

  4. Sailfish enables alignment-free isoform quantification from RNA-seq reads using lightweight algorithms

    PubMed Central

    Patro, Rob; Mount, Stephen M.; Kingsford, Carl

    2014-01-01

    We introduce Sailfish, a computational method for quantifying the abundance of previously annotated RNA isoforms from RNA-seq data. Because Sailfish entirely avoids mapping reads, a time-consuming step in all current methods, it provides quantification estimates much faster than do existing approaches (typically 20 times faster) without loss of accuracy. By facilitating frequent reanalysis of data and reducing the need to optimize parameters, Sailfish exemplifies the potential of lightweight algorithms for efficiently processing sequencing reads. PMID:24752080

  5. Sailfish enables alignment-free isoform quantification from RNA-seq reads using lightweight algorithms.

    PubMed

    Patro, Rob; Mount, Stephen M; Kingsford, Carl

    2014-05-01

    We introduce Sailfish, a computational method for quantifying the abundance of previously annotated RNA isoforms from RNA-seq data. Because Sailfish entirely avoids mapping reads, a time-consuming step in all current methods, it provides quantification estimates much faster than do existing approaches (typically 20 times faster) without loss of accuracy. By facilitating frequent reanalysis of data and reducing the need to optimize parameters, Sailfish exemplifies the potential of lightweight algorithms for efficiently processing sequencing reads.

  6. A novel alignment repulsion algorithm for flocking of multi-agent systems based on the number of neighbours per agent

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kahani, R.; Sedigh, A. K.; Mahjani, M. Gh.

    2015-12-01

    In this paper, an energy-based control methodology is proposed to satisfy the Reynolds three rules in a flock of multiple agents. First, a control law is provided that is directly derived from the passivity theorem. In the next step, the Number of Neighbours Alignment/Repulsion algorithm is introduced for a flock of agents which loses the cohesion ability and uniformly joint connectivity condition. With this method, each agent tries to follow the agents which escape its neighbourhood by considering the velocity of escape time and number of neighbours. It is mathematically proved that the motion of multiple agents converges to a rigid and uncrowded flock if the group is jointly connected just for an instant. Moreover, the conditions for collision avoidance are guaranteed during the entire process. Finally, simulation results are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed methodology.

  7. Robust Algorithm for Alignment of Liquid Chromatography-Mass Spectrometry Analyses in an Accurate Mass and Time Tag Data Analysis Pipeline

    SciTech Connect

    Jaitly, Navdeep; Monroe, Matthew E.; Petyuk, Vladislav A.; Clauss, Therese RW; Adkins, Joshua N.; Smith, Richard D.

    2006-11-01

    Liquid chromatography coupled to mass spectrometry (LC-MS) and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS) has become a standard technique for analyzing complex peptide mixtures to determine composition and relative quantity. Several high-throughput proteomics techniques attempt to combine complementary results from multiple LC-MS and LC-MS/MS analyses to provide more comprehensive and accurate results. To effectively collate results from these techniques, variations in mass and elution time measurements between related analyses are corrected by using algorithms designed to align the various types of results: LC-MS/MS vs. LC-MS/MS, LC-MS vs. LC-MS/MS, and LC-MS vs. LC-MS. Described herein are new algorithms referred to collectively as Liquid Chromatography based Mass Spectrometric Warping and Alignment of Retention times of Peptides (LCMSWARP) which use a dynamic elution time warping approach similar to traditional algorithms that correct variation in elution time using piecewise linear functions. LCMSWARP is compared to a linear alignment algorithm that assumes a linear transformation of elution time between analyses. LCMSWARP also corrects for drift in mass measurement accuracies that are often seen in an LC-MS analysis due to factors such as analyzer drift. We also describe the alignment of LC-MS results and provide examples of alignment of analyses from different chromatographic systems to demonstrate more complex transformation functions.

  8. Unfolding neutron energy spectra from foil activation detector measurements with the Gold algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seghour, A.; Seghour, F. Z.

    2001-01-01

    In this work, the Gold algorithm is applied to the unfolding of neutron reactor energy spectra from reaction rates data of multiple foil activation detectors. Such a method, which forms the basis of a developed unfolding computer program called SAYD, has the advantage of not requiring a priori knowledge on the spectrum in the unfolding process. The program SAYD is first illustrated by synthesized reaction rates data calculated using a semi-empirical formulation of a typical intermediate and fast neutron reactor spectrum. The demonstration of the unfolding program SAYD is next achieved using measured reaction rates of the Arkansas Nuclear One power plant (ANO) benchmark spectrum by comparing results of SAYD program with those obtained by STAYNL and MSANDB unfolding codes.

  9. Adaboost face detector based on Joint Integral Histogram and Genetic Algorithms for feature extraction process.

    PubMed

    Jammoussi, Ameni Yangui; Ghribi, Sameh Fakhfakh; Masmoudi, Dorra Sellami

    2014-01-01

    Recently, many classes of objects can be efficiently detected by the way of machine learning techniques. In practice, boosting techniques are among the most widely used machine learning for various reasons. This is mainly due to low false positive rate of the cascade structure offering the possibility to be trained by different classes of object. However, it is especially used for face detection since it is the most popular sub-problem within object detection. The challenges of Adaboost based face detector include the selection of the most relevant features from a large feature set which are considered as weak classifiers. In many scenarios, however, selection of features based on lowering classification errors leads to computation complexity and excess of memory use. In this work, we propose a new method to train an effective detector by discarding redundant weak classifiers while achieving the pre-determined learning objective. To achieve this, on the one hand, we modify AdaBoost training so that the feature selection process is not based any more on the weak learner's training error. This is by incorporating the Genetic Algorithm (GA) on the training process. On the other hand, we make use of the Joint Integral Histogram in order to extract more powerful features. Experimental performance on human faces show that our proposed method requires smaller number of weak classifiers than the conventional learning algorithm, resulting in higher learning and faster classification rates. So, our method outperforms significantly state-of-the-art cascade methods in terms of detection rate and false positive rate and especially in reducing the number of weak classifiers per stage.

  10. Comparison of common homology modeling algorithms: application of user-defined alignments.

    PubMed

    Dolan, Michael A; Noah, James W; Hurt, Darrell

    2012-01-01

    The number of known three-dimensional protein sequences is orders of magnitude higher than the number of known protein structures. This is a result of an increase in large-scale genomic sequencing projects, the inability of proteins to crystallize or crystals to diffract well, or a simple lack of resources. An alternative is to use one of a variety of available homology modeling programs to produce a computational model of a protein. Protein models are produced using information from known protein structures found to be similar. Here, we compare the ability of a number of popular homology modeling programs to produce quality models from user-defined target-template sequence alignments over a range of circumstances including low sequence identity, variable sequence length, and when interfaced with a protein or small molecule. Programs evaluated include Prime, SWISS-MODEL, MOE, MODELLER, ROSETTA, Composer, ORCHESTRAR, and I-TASSER. Proteins to be modeled were chosen to test a range of sequence identities, sequence lengths, and protein motifs and all are of scientific importance. These include HIV-1 protease, kinases, dihydrofolate reductase, a viral capsid protein, and factor Xa among others. For the most part, the programs produce results that are similar. For example, all programs are able to produce reasonable models when sequence identities are >30% and all programs have difficulties producing complete models when sequence identities are lower. However, certain programs fare slightly better than others in certain situations and we attempt to provide insight on this topic.

  11. Adaptive algorithms of position and energy reconstruction in Anger-camera type detectors: experimental data processing in ANTS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morozov, A.; Defendi, I.; Engels, R.; Fraga, F. A. F.; Fraga, M. M. F. R.; Gongadze, A.; Guerard, B.; Jurkovic, M.; Kemmerling, G.; Manzin, G.; Margato, L. M. S.; Niko, H.; Pereira, L.; Petrillo, C.; Peyaud, A.; Piscitelli, F.; Raspino, D.; Rhodes, N. J.; Sacchetti, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.; Solovov, V.; Van Esch, P.; Zeitelhack, K.

    2013-05-01

    The software package ANTS (Anger-camera type Neutron detector: Toolkit for Simulations), developed for simulation of Anger-type gaseous detectors for thermal neutron imaging was extended to include a module for experimental data processing. Data recorded with a sensor array containing up to 100 photomultiplier tubes (PMT) or silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) in a custom configuration can be loaded and the positions and energies of the events can be reconstructed using the Center-of-Gravity, Maximum Likelihood or Least Squares algorithm. A particular strength of the new module is the ability to reconstruct the light response functions and relative gains of the photomultipliers from flood field illumination data using adaptive algorithms. The performance of the module is demonstrated with simulated data generated in ANTS and experimental data recorded with a 19 PMT neutron detector. The package executables are publicly available at http://coimbra.lip.pt/~andrei/

  12. Vectorcardiographic loop alignment for fetal movement detection using the expectation-maximization algorithm and support vector machines.

    PubMed

    Vullings, R; Mischi, M

    2013-01-01

    Reduced fetal movement is an important parameter to assess fetal distress. Currently, no suitable methods are available that can objectively assess fetal movement during pregnancy. Fetal vectorcardiographic (VCG) loop alignment could be such a method. In general, the goal of VCG loop alignment is to correct for motion-induced changes in the VCGs of (multiple) consecutive heartbeats. However, the parameters used for loop alignment also provide information to assess fetal movement. Unfortunately, current methods for VCG loop alignment are not robust against low-quality VCG signals. In this paper, a more robust method for VCG loop alignment is developed that includes a priori information on the loop alignment, yielding a maximum a posteriori loop alignment. Classification, based on movement parameters extracted from the alignment, is subsequently performed using support vector machines, resulting in correct classification of (absence of) fetal movement in about 75% of cases. After additional validation and optimization, this method can possibly be employed for continuous fetal movement monitoring.

  13. Recent Improvements to the Finite-Fault Rupture Detector Algorithm: FinDer II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, D.; Boese, M.; Heaton, T. H.

    2015-12-01

    Constraining the finite-fault rupture extent and azimuth is crucial for accurately estimating ground-motion in large earthquakes. Detecting and modeling finite-fault ruptures in real-time is thus essential to both earthquake early warning (EEW) and rapid emergency response. Following extensive real-time and offline testing, the finite-fault rupture detector algorithm, FinDer (Böse et al., 2012 & 2015), was successfully integrated into the California-wide ShakeAlert EEW demonstration system. Since April 2015, FinDer has been scanning real-time waveform data from approximately 420 strong-motion stations in California for peak ground acceleration (PGA) patterns indicative of earthquakes. FinDer analyzes strong-motion data by comparing spatial images of observed PGA with theoretical templates modeled from empirical ground-motion prediction equations (GMPEs). If the correlation between the observed and theoretical PGA is sufficiently high, a report is sent to ShakeAlert including the estimated centroid position, length, and strike, and their uncertainties, of an ongoing fault rupture. Rupture estimates are continuously updated as new data arrives. As part of a joint effort between USGS Menlo Park, ETH Zurich, and Caltech, we have rewritten FinDer in C++ to obtain a faster and more flexible implementation. One new feature of FinDer II is that multiple contour lines of high-frequency PGA are computed and correlated with templates, allowing the detection of both large earthquakes and much smaller (~ M3.5) events shortly after their nucleation. Unlike previous EEW algorithms, FinDer II thus provides a modeling approach for both small-magnitude point-source and larger-magnitude finite-fault ruptures with consistent error estimates for the entire event magnitude range.

  14. Data Retrieval Algorithms for Validating the Optical Transient Detector and the Lightning Imaging Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.

    2000-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from an Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing, and arrival time of lightning radio emissions. Solutions for the plane (i.e., no earth curvature) are provided that implement all of these measurements. The accuracy of the retrieval method is tested using computer-simulated datasets, and the relative influence of bearing and arrival time data an the outcome of the final solution is formally demonstrated. The algorithm is sufficiently accurate to validate NASA:s Optical Transient Detector and Lightning Imaging Sensor. A quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available is also introduced. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in sc)iirce location, Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. For arbitrary noncollinear network geometries and in the absence of measurement errors, it is shown that the two quadratic roots are equivalent (no source location ambiguity) on the outer sensor baselines. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer-generated datasets, and the results are generally better than those obtained from the three-station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 deg.

  15. Performance of the reconstruction algorithms of the FIRST experiment pixel sensors vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rescigno, R.; Finck, Ch.; Juliani, D.; Spiriti, E.; Baudot, J.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Tropea, S.; Vanstalle, M.; Younis, H.

    2014-12-01

    Hadrontherapy treatments use charged particles (e.g. protons and carbon ions) to treat tumors. During a therapeutic treatment with carbon ions, the beam undergoes nuclear fragmentation processes giving rise to significant yields of secondary charged particles. An accurate prediction of these production rates is necessary to estimate precisely the dose deposited into the tumours and the surrounding healthy tissues. Nowadays, a limited set of double differential carbon fragmentation cross-section is available. Experimental data are necessary to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations for their use in hadrontherapy. The purpose of the FIRST experiment is to study nuclear fragmentation processes of ions with kinetic energy in the range from 100 to 1000 MeV/u. Tracks are reconstructed using information from a pixel silicon detector based on the CMOS technology. The performances achieved using this device for hadrontherapy purpose are discussed. For each reconstruction step (clustering, tracking and vertexing), different methods are implemented. The algorithm performances and the accuracy on reconstructed observables are evaluated on the basis of simulated and experimental data.

  16. Design of an advanced positron emission tomography detector system and algorithms for imaging small animal models of human disease

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foudray, Angela Marie Klohs

    Detecting, quantifying and visualizing biochemical mechanism in a living system without perturbing function is the goal of the instrument and algorithms designed in this thesis. Biochemical mechanisms of cells have long been known to be dependent on the signals they receive from their environment. Studying biological processes of cells in-vitro can vastly distort their function, since you are removing them from their natural chemical signaling environment. Mice have become the biological system of choice for various areas of biomedical research due to their genetic and physiological similarities with humans, the relatively low cost of their care, and their quick breeding cycle. Drug development and efficacy assessment along with disease detection, management, and mechanism research all have benefited from the use of small animal models of human disease. A high resolution, high sensitivity, three-dimensional (3D) positioning positron emission tomography (PET) detector system was designed through device characterization and Monte Carlo simulation. Position-sensitive avalanche photodiodes (PSAPDs) were characterized in various packaging configurations; coupled to various configurations of lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO) scintillation crystals. Forty novelly packaged final design devices were constructed and characterized, each providing characteristics superior to commercially available scintillation detectors used in small animal imaging systems: ˜1mm crystal identification, 14-15% of 511 keV energy resolution, and averaging 1.9 to 5.6 ns coincidence time resolution. A closed-cornered box-shaped detector configuration was found to provide optimal photon sensitivity (˜10.5% in the central plane) using dual LSO-PSAPD scintillation detector modules and Monte Carlo simulation. Standard figures of merit were used to determine optimal system acquisition parameters. A realistic model for constituent devices was developed for understanding the signals reported by the

  17. Comparison of allocation algorithms for unambiguous registration of hits in presence of charge sharing in pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Otfinowski, P.; Maj, P.; Deptuch, G.; Fahim, F.; Hoff, J.

    2017-01-01

    Charge sharing is the fractional collection of the charge cloud generated in a detector by two or more adjacent pixels. It may lead to excessive or inefficient registration of hits comparing to the number of impinging photons depending on how discrimination thresholds are set in typical photon counting pixel detector. The problems are particularly exposed for fine pixel sizes and/or for thick planar detectors. Presence of charge sharing is one of the limiting factors that discourages decreasing sizes of pixels in photon counting mode X-ray radiation imaging systems. Currently, a few different approaches tackling with the charge sharing problem exist (e.g. Medipix3RX, PIXIE, miniVIPIC or PIX45). The general idea is, first, to reconstruct the entire signal from adjacent pixels and, secondly, to allocate the hit to a single pixel. This paper focuses on the latter part of the process, i.e. on a comparison of how different hit allocation algorithms affect the spatial accuracy and false registration vs. missed hit probability. Different hit allocation algorithms were simulated, including standard photon counting (no full signal reconstruction) and the C8P1 algorithm. Also, a novel approach, based on a detection of patterns, with significantly limited analog signal processing, was proposed and characterized.

  18. Study and optimization of positioning algorithms for monolithic PET detectors blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia de Acilu, P.; Sarasola, I.; Canadas, M.; Cuerdo, R.; Rato Mendes, P.; Romero, L.; Willmott, C.

    2012-06-01

    We are developing a PET insert for existing MRI equipment to be used in clinical PET/MR studies of the human brain. The proposed scanner is based on annihilation gamma detection with monolithic blocks of cerium-doped lutetium yttrium orthosilicate (LYSO:Ce) coupled to magnetically-compatible avalanche photodiodes (APD) matrices. The light distribution generated on the LYSO:Ce block provides the impinging position of the 511 keV photons by means of a positioning algorithm. Several positioning methods, from the simplest Anger Logic to more sophisticate supervised-learning Neural Networks (NN), can be implemented to extract the incidence position of gammas directly from the APD signals. Finally, an optimal method based on a two-step Feed-Forward Neural Network has been selected. It allows us to reach a resolution at detector level of 2 mm, and acquire images of point sources using a first BrainPET prototype consisting of two monolithic blocks working in coincidence. Neural networks provide a straightforward positioning of the acquired data once they have been trained, however the training process is usually time-consuming. In order to obtain an efficient positioning method for the complete scanner it was necessary to find a training procedure that reduces the data acquisition and processing time without introducing a noticeable degradation of the spatial resolution. A grouping process and posterior selection of the training data have been done regarding the similitude of the light distribution of events which have one common incident coordinate (transversal or longitudinal). By doing this, the amount of training data can be reduced to about 5% of the initial number with a degradation of spatial resolution lower than 10%.

  19. Spectrum correction algorithm for detectors in airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV based on a ratio processing method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Ye; Tang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Peng; Meng, Jia; Huang, Xi; Wen, Liang-Sheng; Chen, Da

    2015-10-01

    The unmanned aerial vehicle (UAV) radiation monitoring method plays an important role in nuclear accidents emergency. In this research, a spectrum correction algorithm about the UAV airborne radioactivity monitoring equipment NH-UAV was studied to measure the radioactive nuclides within a small area in real time and in a fixed place. The simulation spectra of the high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and the lanthanum bromide (LaBr3) detector in the equipment were obtained using the Monte Carlo technique. Spectrum correction coefficients were calculated after performing ratio processing techniques about the net peak areas between the double detectors on the detection spectrum of the LaBr3 detector according to the accuracy of the detection spectrum of the HPGe detector. The relationship between the spectrum correction coefficient and the size of the source term was also investigated. A good linear relation exists between the spectrum correction coefficient and the corresponding energy (R2=0.9765). The maximum relative deviation from the real condition reduced from 1.65 to 0.035. The spectrum correction method was verified as feasible.

  20. Crater Detection Algorithms Based on Pixel-Difference, Separated-Pixel-Difference, Roberts, Prewitt, Sobel and Frei-Chen Gradient Edge Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novosel, H.; Salamuniccar, G.; Loncaric, S.

    2007-03-01

    Implementations of six different crater detection algorithms based on six different well-known gradient edge detectors are presented. They are analyzed and compared using free-response receiver operating characteristics.

  1. Alignment of the Muon System at the CMS Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Ryan; Perniè, Luca; Pakhotin, Yuriy; Kamon, Teruki; Safonov, Alexei; Brown, Malachi

    2017-01-01

    The muon detectors of the CMS experiment provide fast trigger decisions, muon identifications and muon track measurements. Alignment of the muon detectors is crucial for accurate reconstruction of events with high pT muons that are present in signatures for many new physics scenarios. The muon detector's relative positions and orientations with respect to the inner silicon tracker may be precisely measured using reconstructed tracks propagating from the interaction point. This track-based alignment procedure is capable of aligning individual muon detectors to within 100 microns along sensitive modes. However, weak (insensitive) modes may not be well measured due to the system's design and cause systematic miss-measurements. In this report, we present a new track-based procedure which enables all 6 alignment parameters - 3 positions and 3 rotations for each individual muon detector. The improved algorithm allows for measurement of weak modes and considerably reduced related systematic uncertainties. We describe results of the alignment procedure obtained with 2016 data.

  2. A simple methodology for characterization of germanium coaxial detectors by using Monte Carlo simulation and evolutionary algorithms.

    PubMed

    Guerra, J G; Rubiano, J G; Winter, G; Guerra, A G; Alonso, H; Arnedo, M A; Tejera, A; Gil, J M; Rodríguez, R; Martel, P; Bolivar, J P

    2015-11-01

    The determination in a sample of the activity concentration of a specific radionuclide by gamma spectrometry needs to know the full energy peak efficiency (FEPE) for the energy of interest. The difficulties related to the experimental calibration make it advisable to have alternative methods for FEPE determination, such as the simulation of the transport of photons in the crystal by the Monte Carlo method, which requires an accurate knowledge of the characteristics and geometry of the detector. The characterization process is mainly carried out by Canberra Industries Inc. using proprietary techniques and methodologies developed by that company. It is a costly procedure (due to shipping and to the cost of the process itself) and for some research laboratories an alternative in situ procedure can be very useful. The main goal of this paper is to find an alternative to this costly characterization process, by establishing a method for optimizing the parameters of characterizing the detector, through a computational procedure which could be reproduced at a standard research lab. This method consists in the determination of the detector geometric parameters by using Monte Carlo simulation in parallel with an optimization process, based on evolutionary algorithms, starting from a set of reference FEPEs determined experimentally or computationally. The proposed method has proven to be effective and simple to implement. It provides a set of characterization parameters which it has been successfully validated for different source-detector geometries, and also for a wide range of environmental samples and certified materials. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Evaluation of Origin Ensemble algorithm for image reconstruction for pixelated solid-state detectors with large number of channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Mikhaylova, E.; Chmeissani, M.; Ariño, G.; Calderón, Y.; Ozsahin, I.; Uzun, D.

    2013-04-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated solid-state technology for nuclear medicine applications. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 106). For PET scanners, conventional algorithms like Filtered Back-Projection (FBP) and Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) are straightforward to use and give good results. However, FBP presents difficulties for detectors with limited angular coverage like PEM and Compton gamma cameras, whereas OSEM has an impractically large time and memory consumption for a Compton gamma camera with a large number of channels. In this article, the Origin Ensemble (OE) algorithm is evaluated as an alternative algorithm for image reconstruction. Monte Carlo simulations of the PET design are used to compare the performance of OE, FBP and OSEM in terms of the bias, variance and average mean squared error (MSE) image quality metrics. For the PEM and Compton camera designs, results obtained with OE are presented.

  4. Evaluation of Origin Ensemble algorithm for image reconstruction for pixelated solid-state detectors with large number of channels

    PubMed Central

    Kolstein, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Mikhaylova, E.; Chmeissani, M.; Ariño, G.; Calderón, Y.; Ozsahin, I.; Uzun, D.

    2013-01-01

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated solid-state technology for nuclear medicine applications. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 106). For PET scanners, conventional algorithms like Filtered Back-Projection (FBP) and Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) are straightforward to use and give good results. However, FBP presents difficulties for detectors with limited angular coverage like PEM and Compton gamma cameras, whereas OSEM has an impractically large time and memory consumption for a Compton gamma camera with a large number of channels. In this article, the Origin Ensemble (OE) algorithm is evaluated as an alternative algorithm for image reconstruction. Monte Carlo simulations of the PET design are used to compare the performance of OE, FBP and OSEM in terms of the bias, variance and average mean squared error (MSE) image quality metrics. For the PEM and Compton camera designs, results obtained with OE are presented. PMID:23814604

  5. Evaluation of Origin Ensemble algorithm for image reconstruction for pixelated solid-state detectors with large number of channels.

    PubMed

    Kolstein, M; De Lorenzo, G; Mikhaylova, E; Chmeissani, M; Ariño, G; Calderón, Y; Ozsahin, I; Uzun, D

    2013-04-29

    The Voxel Imaging PET (VIP) Pathfinder project intends to show the advantages of using pixelated solid-state technology for nuclear medicine applications. It proposes designs for Positron Emission Tomography (PET), Positron Emission Mammography (PEM) and Compton gamma camera detectors with a large number of signal channels (of the order of 10(6)). For PET scanners, conventional algorithms like Filtered Back-Projection (FBP) and Ordered Subset Expectation Maximization (OSEM) are straightforward to use and give good results. However, FBP presents difficulties for detectors with limited angular coverage like PEM and Compton gamma cameras, whereas OSEM has an impractically large time and memory consumption for a Compton gamma camera with a large number of channels. In this article, the Origin Ensemble (OE) algorithm is evaluated as an alternative algorithm for image reconstruction. Monte Carlo simulations of the PET design are used to compare the performance of OE, FBP and OSEM in terms of the bias, variance and average mean squared error (MSE) image quality metrics. For the PEM and Compton camera designs, results obtained with OE are presented.

  6. CUDA ClustalW: An efficient parallel algorithm for progressive multiple sequence alignment on Multi-GPUs.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Lin, Yu-Shiang; Lin, Chun-Yuan; Chung, Yeh-Ching; Chung, Yi-Fang

    2015-10-01

    For biological applications, sequence alignment is an important strategy to analyze DNA and protein sequences. Multiple sequence alignment is an essential methodology to study biological data, such as homology modeling, phylogenetic reconstruction and etc. However, multiple sequence alignment is a NP-hard problem. In the past decades, progressive approach has been proposed to successfully align multiple sequences by adopting iterative pairwise alignments. Due to rapid growth of the next generation sequencing technologies, a large number of sequences can be produced in a short period of time. When the problem instance is large, progressive alignment will be time consuming. Parallel computing is a suitable solution for such applications, and GPU is one of the important architectures for contemporary parallel computing researches. Therefore, we proposed a GPU version of ClustalW v2.0.11, called CUDA ClustalW v1.0, in this work. From the experiment results, it can be seen that the CUDA ClustalW v1.0 can achieve more than 33× speedups for overall execution time by comparing to ClustalW v2.0.11.

  7. ChimeRScope: a novel alignment-free algorithm for fusion transcript prediction using paired-end RNA-Seq data.

    PubMed

    Li, You; Heavican, Tayla B; Vellichirammal, Neetha N; Iqbal, Javeed; Guda, Chittibabu

    2017-07-27

    The RNA-Seq technology has revolutionized transcriptome characterization not only by accurately quantifying gene expression, but also by the identification of novel transcripts like chimeric fusion transcripts. The 'fusion' or 'chimeric' transcripts have improved the diagnosis and prognosis of several tumors, and have led to the development of novel therapeutic regimen. The fusion transcript detection is currently accomplished by several software packages, primarily relying on sequence alignment algorithms. The alignment of sequencing reads from fusion transcript loci in cancer genomes can be highly challenging due to the incorrect mapping induced by genomic alterations, thereby limiting the performance of alignment-based fusion transcript detection methods. Here, we developed a novel alignment-free method, ChimeRScope that accurately predicts fusion transcripts based on the gene fingerprint (as k-mers) profiles of the RNA-Seq paired-end reads. Results on published datasets and in-house cancer cell line datasets followed by experimental validations demonstrate that ChimeRScope consistently outperforms other popular methods irrespective of the read lengths and sequencing depth. More importantly, results on our in-house datasets show that ChimeRScope is a better tool that is capable of identifying novel fusion transcripts with potential oncogenic functions. ChimeRScope is accessible as a standalone software at (https://github.com/ChimeRScope/ChimeRScope/wiki) or via the Galaxy web-interface at (https://galaxy.unmc.edu/). © The Author(s) 2017. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  8. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, N.E.

    1988-03-10

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam. 5 figs.

  9. Precision alignment device

    DOEpatents

    Jones, Nelson E.

    1990-01-01

    Apparatus for providing automatic alignment of beam devices having an associated structure for directing, collimating, focusing, reflecting, or otherwise modifying the main beam. A reference laser is attached to the structure enclosing the main beam producing apparatus and produces a reference beam substantially parallel to the main beam. Detector modules containing optical switching devices and optical detectors are positioned in the path of the reference beam and are effective to produce an electrical output indicative of the alignment of the main beam. This electrical output drives servomotor operated adjustment screws to adjust the position of elements of the structure associated with the main beam to maintain alignment of the main beam.

  10. The Pandora multi-algorithm approach to automated pattern recognition in LAr TPC detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marshall, J. S.; Blake, A. S. T.; Thomson, M. A.; Escudero, L.; de Vries, J.; Weston, J.; MicroBooNE collaboration

    2017-09-01

    The development and operation of Liquid Argon Time Projection Chambers (LAr TPCs) for neutrino physics has created a need for new approaches to pattern recognition, in order to fully exploit the superb imaging capabilities offered by this technology. The Pandora Software Development Kit provides functionality to aid the process of designing, implementing and running pattern recognition algorithms. It promotes the use of a multi-algorithm approach to pattern recognition: individual algorithms each address a specific task in a particular topology; a series of many tens of algorithms then carefully builds-up a picture of the event. The input to the Pandora pattern recognition is a list of 2D Hits. The output from the chain of over 70 algorithms is a hierarchy of reconstructed 3D Particles, each with an identified particle type, vertex and direction.

  11. Pulse shape analysis of a two fold clover detector with an EMD based new algorithm: A comparison

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siwal, Davinder; Mandal, S.; Palit, R.; Sethi, J.; Garg, R.; Saha, S.; Prasad, Awadhesh; Chavan, P. B.; Naidu, B. S.; Jadhav, S.; Donthi, R.; Schaffner, H.; Adamczewski-Musch, J.; Kurz, N.; Wollersheim, H. J.; Singh, R.

    2014-03-01

    An investigation of Empirical Mode Decomposition (EMD) based noise filtering algorithm has been carried out on a mirror signal from a two fold germanium clover detector. EMD technique can decompose linear as well as nonlinear and chaotic signals with a precise frequency resolution. It allows to decompose the preamplifier signal (charge pulse) on an event-by-event basis. The filtering algorithm provides the information about the Intrinsic Mode Functions (IMFs) mainly dominated by the noise. It preserves the signal information and separates the overriding noise oscillations from the signals. The identification of noise structure is based on the frequency distributions of different IMFs. The preamplifier noise components which distort the azimuthal co-ordinates information have been extracted on the basis of the correlation between the different IMFs and the mirror signal. The correlation studies have been carried out both in frequency and time domain. The extracted correlation coefficient provides an important information regarding the pulse shape of the γ-ray interaction in the detector. A comparison between the EMD based and state-of-the-art wavelet based denoising techniques has also been made and discussed. It has been observed that the fractional noise strength distribution varies with the position of the collimated gamma-ray source. Above trend has been reproduced by both the denoising techniques.

  12. Modified compensation algorithm of lever-arm effect and flexural deformation for polar shipborne transfer alignment based on improved adaptive Kalman filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tongda; Cheng, Jianhua; Guan, Dongxue; Kang, Yingyao; Zhang, Wei

    2017-09-01

    Due to the lever-arm effect and flexural deformation in the practical application of transfer alignment (TA), the TA performance is decreased. The existing polar TA algorithm only compensates a fixed lever-arm without considering the dynamic lever-arm caused by flexural deformation; traditional non-polar TA algorithms also have some limitations. Thus, the performance of existing compensation algorithms is unsatisfactory. In this paper, a modified compensation algorithm of the lever-arm effect and flexural deformation is proposed to promote the accuracy and speed of the polar TA. On the basis of a dynamic lever-arm model and a noise compensation method for flexural deformation, polar TA equations are derived in grid frames. Based on the velocity-plus-attitude matching method, the filter models of polar TA are designed. An adaptive Kalman filter (AKF) is improved to promote the robustness and accuracy of the system, and then applied to the estimation of the misalignment angles. Simulation and experiment results have demonstrated that the modified compensation algorithm based on the improved AKF for polar TA can effectively compensate the lever-arm effect and flexural deformation, and then improve the accuracy and speed of TA in the polar region.

  13. A lightweight QRS detector for single lead ECG signals using a max-min difference algorithm.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Diptangshu; Zhang, Li; Liu, Chengyu; Chattopadhyay, Samiran; Aslam, Nauman; Lim, Chee Peng

    2017-06-01

    Detection of the R-peak pertaining to the QRS complex of an ECG signal plays an important role for the diagnosis of a patient's heart condition. To accurately identify the QRS locations from the acquired raw ECG signals, we need to handle a number of challenges, which include noise, baseline wander, varying peak amplitudes, and signal abnormality. This research aims to address these challenges by developing an efficient lightweight algorithm for QRS (i.e., R-peak) detection from raw ECG signals. A lightweight real-time sliding window-based Max-Min Difference (MMD) algorithm for QRS detection from Lead II ECG signals is proposed. Targeting to achieve the best trade-off between computational efficiency and detection accuracy, the proposed algorithm consists of five key steps for QRS detection, namely, baseline correction, MMD curve generation, dynamic threshold computation, R-peak detection, and error correction. Five annotated databases from Physionet are used for evaluating the proposed algorithm in R-peak detection. Integrated with a feature extraction technique and a neural network classifier, the proposed ORS detection algorithm has also been extended to undertake normal and abnormal heartbeat detection from ECG signals. The proposed algorithm exhibits a high degree of robustness in QRS detection and achieves an average sensitivity of 99.62% and an average positive predictivity of 99.67%. Its performance compares favorably with those from the existing state-of-the-art models reported in the literature. In regards to normal and abnormal heartbeat detection, the proposed QRS detection algorithm in combination with the feature extraction technique and neural network classifier achieves an overall accuracy rate of 93.44% based on an empirical evaluation using the MIT-BIH Arrhythmia data set with 10-fold cross validation. In comparison with other related studies, the proposed algorithm offers a lightweight adaptive alternative for R-peak detection with good

  14. A complexity-performance-balanced multiuser detector based on artificial fish swarm algorithm for DS-UWB systems in the AWGN and multipath environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Zhendong; Zong, Zhiyuan; Sun, Hongjian; Wu, Zhilu; Yang, Zhutian

    2012-12-01

    In this article, an efficient multiuser detector based on the artificial fish swarm algorithm (AFSA-MUD) is proposed and investigated for direct-sequence ultrawideband systems under different channels: the additive white Gaussian noise channel and the IEEE 802.15.3a multipath channel. From the literature review, the issues that the computational complexity of classical optimum multiuser detection (OMD) rises exponentially with the number of users and the bit error rate (BER) performance of other sub-optimal multiuser detectors is not satisfactory, still need to be solved. This proposed method can make a good tradeoff between complexity and performance through the various behaviors of artificial fishes in the simplified Euclidean solution space, which is constructed by the solutions of some sub-optimal multiuser detectors. Here, these sub-optimal detectors are minimum mean square error detector, decorrelating detector, and successive interference cancellation detector. As a result of this novel scheme, the convergence speed of AFSA-MUD is greatly accelerated and the number of iterations is also significantly reduced. The experimental results demonstrate that the BER performance and the near-far effect resistance of this proposed algorithm are quite close to those of OMD, while its computational complexity is much lower than the traditional OMD. Moreover, as the number of active users increases, the BER performance of AFSA-MUD is almost the same as that of OMD.

  15. Fast parallel tracking algorithm for the muon detector of the CBM experiment at fair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lebedev, A.; Höhne, C.; Kisel, I.; Ososkov, G.

    2010-07-01

    Particle trajectory recognition is an important and challenging task in the Compressed Baryonic Matter (CBM) experiment at the future FAIR accelerator at Darmstadt. The tracking algorithms have to process terabytes of input data produced in particle collisions. Therefore, the speed of the tracking software is extremely important for data analysis. In this contribution, a fast parallel track reconstruction algorithm which uses available features of modern processors is presented. These features comprise a SIMD instruction set (SSE) and multithreading. The first allows one to pack several data items into one register and to operate on all of them in parallel thus achieving more operations per cycle. The second feature enables the routines to exploit all available CPU cores and hardware threads. This parallel version of the tracking algorithm has been compared to the initial serial scalar version which uses a similar approach for tracking. A speed-up factor of 487 was achieved (from 730 to 1.5 ms/event) for a computer with 2 × Intel Core i7 processors at 2.66 GHz.

  16. 'Fixed-axis' magnetic orientation by an amphibian: non-shoreward-directed compass orientation, misdirected homing or positioning a magnetite-based map detector in a consistent alignment relative to the magnetic field?

    PubMed

    Phillips, John B; Borland, S Chris; Freake, Michael J; Brassart, Jacques; Kirschvink, Joseph L

    2002-12-01

    suggestion that homing newts use the light-dependent magnetic compass to align a magnetite-based 'map detector' when obtaining the precise measurements necessary to derive map information from the magnetic field. However, aligning the putative map detector does not explain the fixed-axis response of newts tested under long-wavelength light. Preliminary evidence suggests that, in the absence of reliable directional information from the magnetic compass (caused by the 90 degrees rotation of the response of the magnetic compass under long-wavelength light), newts may resort to a systematic sampling strategy to identify alignment(s) of the map detector that yields reliable magnetic field measurements.

  17. Computational characterization of HPGe detectors usable for a wide variety of source geometries by using Monte Carlo simulation and a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerra, J. G.; Rubiano, J. G.; Winter, G.; Guerra, A. G.; Alonso, H.; Arnedo, M. A.; Tejera, A.; Martel, P.; Bolivar, J. P.

    2017-06-01

    In this work, we have developed a computational methodology for characterizing HPGe detectors by implementing in parallel a multi-objective evolutionary algorithm, together with a Monte Carlo simulation code. The evolutionary algorithm is used for searching the geometrical parameters of a model of detector by minimizing the differences between the efficiencies calculated by Monte Carlo simulation and two reference sets of Full Energy Peak Efficiencies (FEPEs) corresponding to two given sample geometries, a beaker of small diameter laid over the detector window and a beaker of large capacity which wrap the detector. This methodology is a generalization of a previously published work, which was limited to beakers placed over the window of the detector with a diameter equal or smaller than the crystal diameter, so that the crystal mount cap (which surround the lateral surface of the crystal), was not considered in the detector model. The generalization has been accomplished not only by including such a mount cap in the model, but also using multi-objective optimization instead of mono-objective, with the aim of building a model sufficiently accurate for a wider variety of beakers commonly used for the measurement of environmental samples by gamma spectrometry, like for instance, Marinellis, Petris, or any other beaker with a diameter larger than the crystal diameter, for which part of the detected radiation have to pass through the mount cap. The proposed methodology has been applied to an HPGe XtRa detector, providing a model of detector which has been successfully verificated for different source-detector geometries and materials and experimentally validated using CRMs.

  18. Alignability of Optical Interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beech, Russell Scott

    With the continuing drive towards higher speed, density, and functionality in electronics, electrical interconnects become inadequate. Due to optics' high speed and bandwidth, freedom from capacitive loading effects, and freedom from crosstalk, optical interconnects can meet more stringent interconnect requirements. But, an optical interconnect requires additional components, such as an optical source and detector, lenses, holographic elements, etc. Fabrication and assembly of an optical interconnect requires precise alignment of these components. The successful development and deployment of optical interconnects depend on how easily the interconnect components can be aligned and/or how tolerant the interconnect is to misalignments. In this thesis, a method of quantitatively specifying the relative difficulty of properly aligning an optical interconnect is described. Ways of using this theory of alignment to obtain design and packaging guidelines for optical interconnects are examined. The measure of the ease with which an optical interconnect can be aligned, called the alignability, uses the efficiency of power transfer as a measure of alignment quality. The alignability is related to interconnect package design through the overall cost measure, which depends upon various physical parameters of the interconnect, such as the cost of the components and the time required for fabrication and alignment. Through a mutual dependence on detector size, the relationship between an interconnect's alignability and its bandwidth, signal-to-noise ratio, and bit-error -rate is examined. The results indicate that a range of device sizes exists for which given performance threshold values are satisfied. Next, the alignability of integrated planar-optic backplanes is analyzed in detail. The resulting data show that the alignability can be optimized by varying the substrate thickness or the angle of reflection. By including the effects of crosstalk, in a multi-channel backplane, the

  19. A robust TEC depletion detector algorithm for satellite based navigation in Indian zone and depletion analysis for GAGAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dashora, Nirvikar

    2012-07-01

    require an immediate solution to attack this problem. Hence, an alternative approach is chosen in which TEC-depletions are ignored for GIVE estimation. This approach requires further attention to accommodate it in the processing software for a near real time solution for the concerned user in Indian zone. But, nonetheless, as a prime concern, to precluding a particular satellite-link affected by TEC depletion, a reference receiver or user requires an algorithm that can compute the TEC and detect the depletion in TEC in near real time. To answer it, a novel TEC depletion detector algorithm and software has been developed which can be used for any SBAS in India. The algorithm is initially tested for recorded data from ground based dual frequency GPS receivers of GAGAN project. Data from 18-20 stations with 30 second sampling interval was obtained for year 2004 and 2005. The algorithm has been tuned to Indian ionosphere and show a great success in detecting TEC depletions with minimum false alarm. This is because of a specific property of this algorithm that it rejects the smooth fall in TEC in post sunset ionosphere. The depletions in TEC are characterized by a sudden fall and immediate recovery in level of TEC for a given line of sight. Since our algorithm extracts only such signatures and hence minimize the false alarms it may reduce burden on operational systems. We present this algorithm in detail. Another important facet of this algorithm is about its scientific use in automatic analysis of large amount of continuous GPS data. We have analyzed the aforementioned data by a MATLAB based script and obtained significant statistical results. The temporal duration and depth of TEC depletions is obtained for all over Indian region which provide a new insight over the phenomenon called EPBs and TEC depletions.

  20. MP-Align: alignment of metabolic pathways

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Comparing the metabolic pathways of different species is useful for understanding metabolic functions and can help in studying diseases and engineering drugs. Several comparison techniques for metabolic pathways have been introduced in the literature as a first attempt in this direction. The approaches are based on some simplified representation of metabolic pathways and on a related definition of a similarity score (or distance measure) between two pathways. More recent comparative research focuses on alignment techniques that can identify similar parts between pathways. Results We propose a methodology for the pairwise comparison and alignment of metabolic pathways that aims at providing the largest conserved substructure of the pathways under consideration. The proposed methodology has been implemented in a tool called MP-Align, which has been used to perform several validation tests. The results showed that our similarity score makes it possible to discriminate between different domains and to reconstruct a meaningful phylogeny from metabolic data. The results further demonstrate that our alignment algorithm correctly identifies subpathways sharing a common biological function. Conclusion The results of the validation tests performed with MP-Align are encouraging. A comparison with another proposal in the literature showed that our alignment algorithm is particularly well-suited to finding the largest conserved subpathway of the pathways under examination. PMID:24886436

  1. Statistical behavior analysis and precision optimization for the laser stripe center detector based on Steger's algorithm.

    PubMed

    Qi, Li; Zhang, Yixin; Zhang, Xuping; Wang, Shun; Xie, Fei

    2013-06-03

    Triangulation laser range scanning, which has been wildly used in various applications, can reconstruct the 3D geometric of the object with high precision by processing the image of laser stripe. The unbiased line extractor proposed by Steger is one of the most commonly used algorithms in laser stripe center extraction for its precision and robustness. Therefore, it is of great significance to assess the statistical performance of the Steger method when it is applied on laser stripe with Gaussian intensity profile. In this paper, a statistical behavior analysis for the laser stripe center extractor based on Steger method has been carried out. Relationships between center extraction precision, image quality and stripe characteristics have been examined analytically. Optimal scale of Gaussian smoothing kernel can be determined for each laser stripe image to achieve the highest precision according to the derived formula. Flexible three-step noise estimation procedure has been proposed to evaluate the center extraction precision of a typical triangulation laser scanning system by simply referring to the acquired images. The validity of our analysis has been verified by experiments on both artificial and natural images.

  2. Pairwise Sequence Alignment Library

    SciTech Connect

    Jeff Daily, PNNL

    2015-05-20

    Vector extensions, such as SSE, have been part of the x86 CPU since the 1990s, with applications in graphics, signal processing, and scientific applications. Although many algorithms and applications can naturally benefit from automatic vectorization techniques, there are still many that are difficult to vectorize due to their dependence on irregular data structures, dense branch operations, or data dependencies. Sequence alignment, one of the most widely used operations in bioinformatics workflows, has a computational footprint that features complex data dependencies. The trend of widening vector registers adversely affects the state-of-the-art sequence alignment algorithm based on striped data layouts. Therefore, a novel SIMD implementation of a parallel scan-based sequence alignment algorithm that can better exploit wider SIMD units was implemented as part of the Parallel Sequence Alignment Library (parasail). Parasail features: Reference implementations of all known vectorized sequence alignment approaches. Implementations of Smith Waterman (SW), semi-global (SG), and Needleman Wunsch (NW) sequence alignment algorithms. Implementations across all modern CPU instruction sets including AVX2 and KNC. Language interfaces for C/C++ and Python.

  3. ALDF Data Retrieval Algorithms for Validating the Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and the Lightning Imaging Sensor (LIS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Koshak, W. J.; Blakeslee, R. J.; Bailey, J. C.

    1997-01-01

    A linear algebraic solution is provided for the problem of retrieving the location and time of occurrence of lightning ground strikes from in Advanced Lightning Direction Finder (ALDF) network. The ALDF network measures field strength, magnetic bearing, and arrival time of lightning radio emissions and solutions for the plane (i.e.. no Earth curvature) are provided that implement all of these measurements. The accuracy of the retrieval method is tested using computer-simulated data sets and the relative influence of bearing and arrival time data on the outcome of the final solution is formally demonstrated. The algorithm is sufficiently accurate to validate NASA's Optical Transient Detector (OTD) and Lightning Imaging System (LIS). We also introduce a quadratic planar solution that is useful when only three arrival time measurements are available. The algebra of the quadratic root results are examined in detail to clarify what portions of the analysis region lead to fundamental ambiguities in source location. Complex root results are shown to be associated with the presence of measurement errors when the lightning source lies near an outer sensor baseline of the ALDF network. For arbitrary noncollinear network geometries and in the absence of measurement errors, it is shown that the two quadratic roots are equivalent (no source location ambiguity) on the outer sensor baselines. The accuracy of the quadratic planar method is tested with computer-generated data sets and the results are generally better than those obtained from the three station linear planar method when bearing errors are about 2 degrees.

  4. The tree alignment problem.

    PubMed

    Varón, Andrés; Wheeler, Ward C

    2012-11-09

    The inference of homologies among DNA sequences, that is, positions in multiple genomes that share a common evolutionary origin, is a crucial, yet difficult task facing biologists. Its computational counterpart is known as the multiple sequence alignment problem. There are various criteria and methods available to perform multiple sequence alignments, and among these, the minimization of the overall cost of the alignment on a phylogenetic tree is known in combinatorial optimization as the Tree Alignment Problem. This problem typically occurs as a subproblem of the Generalized Tree Alignment Problem, which looks for the tree with the lowest alignment cost among all possible trees. This is equivalent to the Maximum Parsimony problem when the input sequences are not aligned, that is, when phylogeny and alignments are simultaneously inferred. For large data sets, a popular heuristic is Direct Optimization (DO). DO provides a good tradeoff between speed, scalability, and competitive scores, and is implemented in the computer program POY. All other (competitive) algorithms have greater time complexities compared to DO. Here, we introduce and present experiments a new algorithm Affine-DO to accommodate the indel (alignment gap) models commonly used in phylogenetic analysis of molecular sequence data. Affine-DO has the same time complexity as DO, but is correctly suited for the affine gap edit distance. We demonstrate its performance with more than 330,000 experimental tests. These experiments show that the solutions of Affine-DO are close to the lower bound inferred from a linear programming solution. Moreover, iterating over a solution produced using Affine-DO shows little improvement. Our results show that Affine-DO is likely producing near-optimal solutions, with approximations within 10% for sequences with small divergence, and within 30% for random sequences, for which Affine-DO produced the worst solutions. The Affine-DO algorithm has the necessary scalability and

  5. The tree alignment problem

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The inference of homologies among DNA sequences, that is, positions in multiple genomes that share a common evolutionary origin, is a crucial, yet difficult task facing biologists. Its computational counterpart is known as the multiple sequence alignment problem. There are various criteria and methods available to perform multiple sequence alignments, and among these, the minimization of the overall cost of the alignment on a phylogenetic tree is known in combinatorial optimization as the Tree Alignment Problem. This problem typically occurs as a subproblem of the Generalized Tree Alignment Problem, which looks for the tree with the lowest alignment cost among all possible trees. This is equivalent to the Maximum Parsimony problem when the input sequences are not aligned, that is, when phylogeny and alignments are simultaneously inferred. Results For large data sets, a popular heuristic is Direct Optimization (DO). DO provides a good tradeoff between speed, scalability, and competitive scores, and is implemented in the computer program POY. All other (competitive) algorithms have greater time complexities compared to DO. Here, we introduce and present experiments a new algorithm Affine-DO to accommodate the indel (alignment gap) models commonly used in phylogenetic analysis of molecular sequence data. Affine-DO has the same time complexity as DO, but is correctly suited for the affine gap edit distance. We demonstrate its performance with more than 330,000 experimental tests. These experiments show that the solutions of Affine-DO are close to the lower bound inferred from a linear programming solution. Moreover, iterating over a solution produced using Affine-DO shows little improvement. Conclusions Our results show that Affine-DO is likely producing near-optimal solutions, with approximations within 10% for sequences with small divergence, and within 30% for random sequences, for which Affine-DO produced the worst solutions. The Affine-DO algorithm has

  6. PRALINE: a versatile multiple sequence alignment toolkit.

    PubMed

    Bawono, Punto; Heringa, Jaap

    2014-01-01

    Profile ALIgNmEnt (PRALINE) is a versatile multiple sequence alignment toolkit. In its main alignment protocol, PRALINE follows the global progressive alignment algorithm. It provides various alignment optimization strategies to address the different situations that call for protein multiple sequence alignment: global profile preprocessing, homology-extended alignment, secondary structure-guided alignment, and transmembrane aware alignment. A number of combinations of these strategies are enabled as well. PRALINE is accessible via the online server http://www.ibi.vu.nl/programs/PRALINEwww/. The server facilitates extensive visualization possibilities aiding the interpretation of alignments generated, which can be written out in pdf format for publication purposes. PRALINE also allows the sequences in the alignment to be represented in a dendrogram to show their mutual relationships according to the alignment. The chapter ends with a discussion of various issues occurring in multiple sequence alignment.

  7. Alignment of the MINOS FD

    SciTech Connect

    Becker, B.; Boehnlein, D.; /Fermilab

    2004-11-01

    The results and procedure of the alignment of the MINOS Far Detector are presented. The far detector has independent alignments of SM1 and SM2. The misalignments have an estimated uncertainty of {approx}850 {micro}m for SM1 and {approx}750 {micro}m for SM2. The alignment has as inputs the average rotations of U and V as determined by optical survey and strip positions within modules measured from the module mapper. The output of this is a module-module correction for transverse mis-alignments. These results were verified by examining an independent set of data. These alignment constants on average contribute much less then 1% to the total uncertainty in the transverse strip position.

  8. Quantitative Features of Liver Lesions, Lung Nodules, and Renal Stones at Multi-Detector Row CT Examinations: Dependency on Radiation Dose and Reconstruction Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Solomon, Justin; Mileto, Achille; Nelson, Rendon C; Roy Choudhury, Kingshuk; Samei, Ehsan

    2016-04-01

    To determine if radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm affect the computer-based extraction and analysis of quantitative imaging features in lung nodules, liver lesions, and renal stones at multi-detector row computed tomography (CT). Retrospective analysis of data from a prospective, multicenter, HIPAA-compliant, institutional review board-approved clinical trial was performed by extracting 23 quantitative imaging features (size, shape, attenuation, edge sharpness, pixel value distribution, and texture) of lesions on multi-detector row CT images of 20 adult patients (14 men, six women; mean age, 63 years; range, 38-72 years) referred for known or suspected focal liver lesions, lung nodules, or kidney stones. Data were acquired between September 2011 and April 2012. All multi-detector row CT scans were performed at two different radiation dose levels; images were reconstructed with filtered back projection, adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction, and model-based iterative reconstruction (MBIR) algorithms. A linear mixed-effects model was used to assess the effect of radiation dose and reconstruction algorithm on extracted features. Among the 23 imaging features assessed, radiation dose had a significant effect on five, three, and four of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Adaptive statistical iterative reconstruction had a significant effect on three, one, and one of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). MBIR reconstruction had a significant effect on nine, 11, and 15 of the features for liver lesions, lung nodules, and renal stones, respectively (P < .002 for all comparisons). Of note, the measured size of lung nodules and renal stones with MBIR was significantly different than those for the other two algorithms (P < .002 for all comparisons). Although lesion texture was significantly affected by the

  9. Functional Alignment of Metabolic Networks.

    PubMed

    Mazza, Arnon; Wagner, Allon; Ruppin, Eytan; Sharan, Roded

    2016-05-01

    Network alignment has become a standard tool in comparative biology, allowing the inference of protein function, interaction, and orthology. However, current alignment techniques are based on topological properties of networks and do not take into account their functional implications. Here we propose, for the first time, an algorithm to align two metabolic networks by taking advantage of their coupled metabolic models. These models allow us to assess the functional implications of genes or reactions, captured by the metabolic fluxes that are altered following their deletion from the network. Such implications may spread far beyond the region of the network where the gene or reaction lies. We apply our algorithm to align metabolic networks from various organisms, ranging from bacteria to humans, showing that our alignment can reveal functional orthology relations that are missed by conventional topological alignments.

  10. Multiple sequence alignment based on profile alignment of intermediate sequences.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yue; Sze, Sing-Hoi

    2008-09-01

    Despite considerable efforts, it remains difficult to obtain accurate multiple sequence alignments. By using additional hits from database search of the input sequences, a few strategies have been proposed to significantly improve alignment accuracy, including the construction of profiles from the hits while performing profile alignment, the inclusion of high scoring hits into the input sequences, the use of intermediate sequence search to link distant homologs, and the use of secondary structure information. We develop an algorithm that integrates these strategies to further improve alignment accuracy by modifying the pair-Hidden Markov Model (HMM) approach in ProbCons to incorporate profiles of intermediate sequences from database search and utilize secondary structure predictions as in SPEM. We test our algorithm on a few sets of benchmark multiple alignments, including BAliBASE, HOMSTRAD, PREFAB, and SABmark, and show that it significantly outperforms MAFFT and ProbCons, which are among the best multiple alignment algorithms that do not utilize additional information, and SPEM, which is among the best multiple alignment algorithms that utilize additional hits from database search. The improvement in accuracy over SPEM can be as much as 5-10% when aligning divergent sequences. A software program that implements this approach (ISPAlign) is available at http://faculty.cs.tamu.edu/shsze/ispalign.

  11. Combining many multiple alignments in one improved alignment.

    PubMed

    Bucka-Lassen, K; Caprani, O; Hein, J

    1999-02-01

    The fact that the multiple sequence alignment problem is of high complexity has led to many different heuristic algorithms attempting to find a solution in what would be considered a reasonable amount of computation time and space. Very few of these heuristics produce results that are guaranteed always to lie within a certain distance of an optimal solution (given a measure of quality, e.g. parsimony). Most practical heuristics cannot guarantee this, but nevertheless perform well for certain cases. An alignment, obtained with one of these heuristics and with a bad overall score, is not unusable though, it might contain important information on how substrings should be aligned. This paper presents a method that extracts qualitatively good sub-alignments from a set of multiple alignments and combines these into a new, often improved alignment. The algorithm is implemented as a variant of the traditional dynamic programming technique. An implementation of ComAlign (the algorithm that combines multiple alignments) has been run on several sets of artificially generated sequences and a set of 5S RNA sequences. To assess the quality of the alignments obtained, the results have been compared with the output of MSA 2.1 (Gupta et al., Proceedings of the Sixth Annual Symposium on Combinatorial Pattern Matching, 1995; Kececioglu et al., http://www.techfak.uni-bielefeld. de/bcd/Lectures/kececioglu.html, 1995). In all cases, ComAlign was able to produce a solution with a score comparable to the solution obtained by MSA. The results also show that ComAlign actually does combine parts from different alignments and not just select the best of them. The C source code (a Smalltalk version is being worked on) of ComAlign and the other programs that have been implemented in this context are free and available on WWW (http://www.daimi.au.dk/ õcaprani). klaus@bucka-lassen.dk; jotun@pop.bio.au.dk;ocaprani@daimi.au.dk

  12. Improving pairwise sequence alignment accuracy using near-optimal protein sequence alignments

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background While the pairwise alignments produced by sequence similarity searches are a powerful tool for identifying homologous proteins - proteins that share a common ancestor and a similar structure; pairwise sequence alignments often fail to represent accurately the structural alignments inferred from three-dimensional coordinates. Since sequence alignment algorithms produce optimal alignments, the best structural alignments must reflect suboptimal sequence alignment scores. Thus, we have examined a range of suboptimal sequence alignments and a range of scoring parameters to understand better which sequence alignments are likely to be more structurally accurate. Results We compared near-optimal protein sequence alignments produced by the Zuker algorithm and a set of probabilistic alignments produced by the probA program with structural alignments produced by four different structure alignment algorithms. There is significant overlap between the solution spaces of structural alignments and both the near-optimal sequence alignments produced by commonly used scoring parameters for sequences that share significant sequence similarity (E-values < 10-5) and the ensemble of probA alignments. We constructed a logistic regression model incorporating three input variables derived from sets of near-optimal alignments: robustness, edge frequency, and maximum bits-per-position. A ROC analysis shows that this model more accurately classifies amino acid pairs (edges in the alignment path graph) according to the likelihood of appearance in structural alignments than the robustness score alone. We investigated various trimming protocols for removing incorrect edges from the optimal sequence alignment; the most effective protocol is to remove matches from the semi-global optimal alignment that are outside the boundaries of the local alignment, although trimming according to the model-generated probabilities achieves a similar level of improvement. The model can also be used to

  13. An introduction to the Lagan alignment toolkit.

    PubMed

    Brudno, Michael

    2007-01-01

    The Lagan Toolkit is a software package for comparison of genomic sequences. It includes the CHAOS local alignment program, LAGAN global alignment program for two, or more sequences and Shuffle-LAGAN, a "glocal" alignment method that handles genomic rearrangements in a global alignment framework. The alignment programs included in the Lagan Toolkit have been widely used to compare genomes of many organisms, from bacteria to large mammalian genomes. This chapter provides an overview of the algorithms used by the LAGAN programs to construct genomic alignments, explains how to build alignments using either the standalone program or the web server, and discusses some of the common pitfalls users encounter when using the toolkit.

  14. Performance of algorithms that reconstruct missing transverse momentum in [Formula: see text]= 8 TeV proton-proton collisions in the ATLAS detector.

    PubMed

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    2017-01-01

    The reconstruction and calibration algorithms used to calculate missing transverse momentum ([Formula: see text] ) with the ATLAS detector exploit energy deposits in the calorimeter and tracks reconstructed in the inner detector as well as the muon spectrometer. Various strategies are used to suppress effects arising from additional proton-proton interactions, called pileup, concurrent with the hard-scatter processes. Tracking information is used to distinguish contributions from the pileup interactions using their vertex separation along the beam axis. The performance of the [Formula: see text] reconstruction algorithms, especially with respect to the amount of pileup, is evaluated using data collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 [Formula: see text] during 2012, and results are shown for a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of [Formula: see text]. The simulation and modelling of [Formula: see text]  in events containing a Z boson decaying to two charged leptons (electrons or muons) or a W boson decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino are compared to data. The acceptance for different event topologies, with and without high transverse momentum neutrinos, is shown for a range of threshold criteria for [Formula: see text] , and estimates of the systematic uncertainties in the [Formula: see text]  measurements are presented.

  15. Performance of algorithms that reconstruct missing transverse momentum in $$\\sqrt{s}=8$$ TeV proton–proton collisions in the ATLAS detector

    DOE PAGES

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; ...

    2017-04-13

    The reconstruction and calibration algorithms used to calculate missing transverse momentum (EmissT) with the ATLAS detector exploit energy deposits in the calorimeter and tracks reconstructed in the inner detector as well as the muon spectrometer. Various strategies are used to suppress effects arising from additional proton–proton interactions, called pileup, concurrent with the hard-scatter processes. Tracking information is used to distinguish contributions from the pileup interactions using their vertex separation along the beam axis. The performance of the EmissT reconstruction algorithms, especially with respect to the amount of pileup, is evaluated using data collected in proton–proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energymore » of 8 TeV during 2012, and results are shown for a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3fb–1. The simulation and modelling of EmissT in events containing a Z boson decaying to two charged leptons (electrons or muons) or a W boson decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino are compared to data. The acceptance for different event topologies, with and without high transverse momentum neutrinos, is shown for a range of threshold criteria for EmissT, and estimates of the systematic uncertainties in the EmissT measurements are presented.« less

  16. Performance of algorithms that reconstruct missing transverse momentum in √{s}= 8 TeV proton-proton collisions in the ATLAS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aad, G.; Abbott, B.; Abdallah, J.; Abdinov, O.; Abeloos, B.; Aben, R.; Abolins, M.; AbouZeid, O. S.; Abramowicz, H.; Abreu, H.; Abreu, R.; Abulaiti, Y.; Acharya, B. S.; Adamczyk, L.; Adams, D. L.; Adelman, J.; Adomeit, S.; Adye, T.; Affolder, A. A.; Agatonovic-Jovin, T.; Agricola, J.; Aguilar-Saavedra, J. A.; Ahlen, S. P.; Ahmadov, F.; Aielli, G.; Akerstedt, H.; Åkesson, T. P. A.; Akimov, A. V.; Alberghi, G. L.; Albert, J.; Albrand, S.; Alconada Verzini, M. J.; Aleksa, M.; Aleksandrov, I. N.; Alexa, C.; Alexander, G.; Alexopoulos, T.; Alhroob, M.; Alimonti, G.; Alio, L.; Alison, J.; Alkire, S. P.; Allbrooke, B. M. M.; Allen, B. W.; Allport, P. P.; Aloisio, A.; Alonso, A.; Alonso, F.; Alpigiani, C.; Alvarez Gonzalez, B.; Piqueras, D. Álvarez; Alviggi, M. G.; Amadio, B. T.; Amako, K.; Amaral Coutinho, Y.; Amelung, C.; Amidei, D.; Dos Santos, S. P. Amor; Amorim, A.; Amoroso, S.; Amram, N.; Amundsen, G.; Anastopoulos, C.; Ancu, L. S.; Andari, N.; Andeen, T.; Anders, C. F.; Anders, G.; Anders, J. K.; Anderson, K. J.; Andreazza, A.; Andrei, V.; Angelidakis, S.; Angelozzi, I.; Anger, P.; Angerami, A.; Anghinolfi, F.; Anisenkov, A. V.; Anjos, N.; Annovi, A.; Antonelli, M.; Antonov, A.; Antos, J.; Anulli, F.; Aoki, M.; Aperio Bella, L.; Arabidze, G.; Arai, Y.; Araque, J. P.; Arce, A. T. H.; Arduh, F. A.; Arguin, J.-F.; Argyropoulos, S.; Arik, M.; Armbruster, A. J.; Arnaez, O.; Arnold, H.; Arratia, M.; Arslan, O.; Artamonov, A.; Artoni, G.; Artz, S.; Asai, S.; Asbah, N.; Ashkenazi, A.; Åsman, B.; Asquith, L.; Assamagan, K.; Astalos, R.; Atkinson, M.; Atlay, N. B.; Augsten, K.; Avolio, G.; Axen, B.; Ayoub, M. K.; Azuelos, G.; Baak, M. A.; Baas, A. E.; Baca, M. J.; Bachacou, H.; Bachas, K.; Backes, M.; Backhaus, M.; Bagiacchi, P.; Bagnaia, P.; Bai, Y.; Baines, J. T.; Baker, O. K.; Baldin, E. M.; Balek, P.; Balestri, T.; Balli, F.; Balunas, W. K.; Banas, E.; Banerjee, Sw.; Bannoura, A. A. E.; Barak, L.; Barberio, E. L.; Barberis, D.; Barbero, M.; Barillari, T.; Barklow, T.; Barlow, N.; Barnes, S. L.; Barnett, B. M.; Barnett, R. M.; Barnovska, Z.; Baroncelli, A.; Barone, G.; Barr, A. J.; Barranco Navarro, L.; Barreiro, F.; da Costa, J. Barreiro Guimarães; Bartoldus, R.; Barton, A. E.; Bartos, P.; Basalaev, A.; Bassalat, A.; Basye, A.; Bates, R. L.; Batista, S. J.; Batley, J. R.; Battaglia, M.; Bauce, M.; Bauer, F.; Bawa, H. S.; Beacham, J. B.; Beattie, M. D.; Beau, T.; Beauchemin, P. H.; Beccherle, R.; Bechtle, P.; Beck, H. P.; Becker, K.; Becker, M.; Beckingham, M.; Becot, C.; Beddall, A. J.; Beddall, A.; Bednyakov, V. A.; Bedognetti, M.; Bee, C. P.; Beemster, L. J.; Beermann, T. A.; Begel, M.; Behr, J. K.; Belanger-Champagne, C.; Bella, G.; Bellagamba, L.; Bellerive, A.; Bellomo, M.; Belotskiy, K.; Beltramello, O.; Benary, O.; Benchekroun, D.; Bender, M.; Bendtz, K.; Benekos, N.; Benhammou, Y.; Benhar Noccioli, E.; Benitez Garcia, J. A.; Benjamin, D. P.; Bensinger, J. R.; Bentvelsen, S.; Beresford, L.; Beretta, M.; Berge, D.; Bergeaas Kuutmann, E.; Berger, N.; Berghaus, F.; Beringer, J.; Bernard, C.; Bernard, N. R.; Bernius, C.; Bernlochner, F. U.; Berry, T.; Berta, P.; Bertella, C.; Bertoli, G.; Bertolucci, F.; Bertsche, C.; Bertsche, D.; Besjes, G. J.; Bessidskaia Bylund, O.; Bessner, M.; Besson, N.; Betancourt, C.; Bethke, S.; Bevan, A. J.; Bhimji, W.; Bianchi, R. M.; Bianchini, L.; Bianco, M.; Biebel, O.; Biedermann, D.; Biesuz, N. V.; Biglietti, M.; De Mendizabal, J. Bilbao; Bilokon, H.; Bindi, M.; Binet, S.; Bingul, A.; Bini, C.; Biondi, S.; Bjergaard, D. M.; Black, C. W.; Black, J. E.; Black, K. M.; Blackburn, D.; Blair, R. E.; Blanchard, J.-B.; Blanco, J. E.; Blazek, T.; Bloch, I.; Blocker, C.; Blum, W.; Blumenschein, U.; Blunier, S.; Bobbink, G. J.; Bobrovnikov, V. S.; Bocchetta, S. S.; Bocci, A.; Bock, C.; Boehler, M.; Boerner, D.; Bogaerts, J. A.; Bogavac, D.; Bogdanchikov, A. G.; Bohm, C.; Boisvert, V.; Bold, T.; Boldea, V.; Boldyrev, A. S.; Bomben, M.; Bona, M.; Boonekamp, M.; Borisov, A.; Borissov, G.; Bortfeldt, J.; Bortolotto, V.; Bos, K.; Boscherini, D.; Bosman, M.; Boudreau, J.; Bouffard, J.; Bouhova-Thacker, E. V.; Boumediene, D.; Bourdarios, C.; Bousson, N.; Boutle, S. K.; Boveia, A.; Boyd, J.; Boyko, I. R.; Bracinik, J.; Brandt, A.; Brandt, G.; Brandt, O.; Bratzler, U.; Brau, B.; Brau, J. E.; Braun, H. M.; Breaden Madden, W. D.; Brendlinger, K.; Brennan, A. J.; Brenner, L.; Brenner, R.; Bressler, S.; Bristow, T. M.; Britton, D.; Britzger, D.; Brochu, F. M.; Brock, I.; Brock, R.; Brooijmans, G.; Brooks, T.; Brooks, W. K.; Brosamer, J.; Brost, E.; de Renstrom, P. A. Bruckman; Bruncko, D.; Bruneliere, R.; Bruni, A.; Bruni, G.; Brunt, BH; Bruschi, M.; Bruscino, N.; Bryant, P.; Bryngemark, L.; Buanes, T.; Buat, Q.; Buchholz, P.; Buckley, A. G.; Budagov, I. A.; Buehrer, F.; Bugge, L.; Bugge, M. K.; Bulekov, O.; Bullock, D.; Burckhart, H.; Burdin, S.; Burgard, C. D.; Burghgrave, B.; Burke, S.; Burmeister, I.; Busato, E.; Büscher, D.; Büscher, V.; Bussey, P.; Butler, J. M.; Butt, A. I.; Buttar, C. M.; Butterworth, J. M.; Butti, P.; Buttinger, W.; Buzatu, A.; Buzykaev, A. R.; Cabrera Urbán, S.; Caforio, D.; Cairo, V. M.; Cakir, O.; Calace, N.; Calafiura, P.; Calandri, A.; Calderini, G.; Calfayan, P.; Caloba, L. P.; Calvet, D.; Calvet, S.; Calvet, T. P.; Camacho Toro, R.; Camarda, S.; Camarri, P.; Cameron, D.; Caminal Armadans, R.; Camincher, C.; Campana, S.; Campanelli, M.; Campoverde, A.; Canale, V.; Canepa, A.; Cano Bret, M.; Cantero, J.; Cantrill, R.; Cao, T.; Capeans Garrido, M. D. M.; Caprini, I.; Caprini, M.; Capua, M.; Caputo, R.; Carbone, R. M.; Cardarelli, R.; Cardillo, F.; Carli, I.; Carli, T.; Carlino, G.; Carminati, L.; Caron, S.; Carquin, E.; Carrillo-Montoya, G. D.; Carter, J. R.; Carvalho, J.; Casadei, D.; Casado, M. P.; Casolino, M.; Casper, D. W.; Castaneda-Miranda, E.; Castelli, A.; Castillo Gimenez, V.; Castro, N. F.; Catinaccio, A.; Catmore, J. R.; Cattai, A.; Caudron, J.; Cavaliere, V.; Cavalli, D.; Cavalli-Sforza, M.; Cavasinni, V.; Ceradini, F.; Cerda Alberich, L.; Cerio, B. C.; Cerqueira, A. S.; Cerri, A.; Cerrito, L.; Cerutti, F.; Cerv, M.; Cervelli, A.; Cetin, S. A.; Chafaq, A.; Chakraborty, D.; Chan, Y. L.; Chang, P.; Chapman, J. D.; Charlton, D. G.; Chau, C. C.; Chavez Barajas, C. A.; Che, S.; Cheatham, S.; Chegwidden, A.; Chekanov, S.; Chekulaev, S. V.; Chelkov, G. A.; Chelstowska, M. A.; Chen, C.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Chen, S.; Chen, S.; Chen, X.; Chen, Y.; Cheng, H. C.; Cheng, Y.; Cheplakov, A.; Cheremushkina, E.; El Moursli, R. Cherkaoui; Chernyatin, V.; Cheu, E.; Chevalier, L.; Chiarella, V.; Chiarelli, G.; Chiodini, G.; Chisholm, A. S.; Chislett, R. T.; Chitan, A.; Chizhov, M. V.; Choi, K.; Chouridou, S.; Chow, B. K. B.; Christodoulou, V.; Chromek-Burckhart, D.; Chudoba, J.; Chuinard, A. J.; Chwastowski, J. J.; Chytka, L.; Ciapetti, G.; Ciftci, A. K.; Cinca, D.; Cindro, V.; Cioara, I. A.; Ciocio, A.; Cirotto, F.; Citron, Z. H.; Ciubancan, M.; Clark, A.; Clark, B. L.; Clark, P. J.; Clarke, R. N.; Clement, C.; Coadou, Y.; Cobal, M.; Coccaro, A.; Cochran, J.; Coffey, L.; Colasurdo, L.; Cole, B.; Cole, S.; Colijn, A. P.; Collot, J.; Colombo, T.; Compostella, G.; Conde Muiño, P.; Coniavitis, E.; Connell, S. H.; Connelly, I. A.; Consorti, V.; Constantinescu, S.; Conta, C.; Conti, G.; Conventi, F.; Cooke, M.; Cooper, B. D.; Cooper-Sarkar, A. M.; Cornelissen, T.; Corradi, M.; Corriveau, F.; Corso-Radu, A.; Cortes-Gonzalez, A.; Cortiana, G.; Costa, G.; Costa, M. J.; Costanzo, D.; Cottin, G.; Cowan, G.; Cox, B. E.; Cranmer, K.; Crawley, S. J.; Cree, G.; Crépé-Renaudin, S.; Crescioli, F.; Cribbs, W. A.; Ortuzar, M. Crispin; Cristinziani, M.; Croft, V.; Crosetti, G.; Cuhadar Donszelmann, T.; Cummings, J.; Curatolo, M.; Cúth, J.; Cuthbert, C.; Czirr, H.; Czodrowski, P.; D'Auria, S.; D'Onofrio, M.; De Sousa, M. J. Da Cunha Sargedas; Da Via, C.; Dabrowski, W.; Dafinca, A.; Dai, T.; Dale, O.; Dallaire, F.; Dallapiccola, C.; Dam, M.; Dandoy, J. R.; Dang, N. P.; Daniells, A. C.; Danninger, M.; Dano Hoffmann, M.; Dao, V.; Darbo, G.; Darmora, S.; Dassoulas, J.; Dattagupta, A.; Davey, W.; David, C.; Davidek, T.; Davies, E.; Davies, M.; Davison, P.; Davygora, Y.; Dawe, E.; Dawson, I.; Daya-Ishmukhametova, R. K.; De, K.; de Asmundis, R.; De Benedetti, A.; De Castro, S.; De Cecco, S.; De Groot, N.; de Jong, P.; De la Torre, H.; De Lorenzi, F.; De Pedis, D.; De Salvo, A.; De Sanctis, U.; De Santo, A.; De Regie, J. B. De Vivie; Dearnaley, W. J.; Debbe, R.; Debenedetti, C.; Dedovich, D. V.; Deigaard, I.; Del Peso, J.; Del Prete, T.; Delgove, D.; Deliot, F.; Delitzsch, C. 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T.; Drechsler, E.; Dris, M.; Du, Y.; Duarte-Campderros, J.; Dubreuil, E.; Duchovni, E.; Duckeck, G.; Ducu, O. A.; Duda, D.; Dudarev, A.; Duflot, L.; Duguid, L.; Dührssen, M.; Dunford, M.; Duran Yildiz, H.; Düren, M.; Durglishvili, A.; Duschinger, D.; Dutta, B.; Dyndal, M.; Eckardt, C.; Ecker, K. M.; Edgar, R. C.; Edson, W.; Edwards, N. C.; Eifert, T.; Eigen, G.; Einsweiler, K.; Ekelof, T.; El Kacimi, M.; Ellajosyula, V.; Ellert, M.; Elles, S.; Ellinghaus, F.; Elliot, A. A.; Ellis, N.; Elmsheuser, J.; Elsing, M.; Emeliyanov, D.; Enari, Y.; Endner, O. C.; Endo, M.; Ennis, J. S.; Erdmann, J.; Ereditato, A.; Ernis, G.; Ernst, J.; Ernst, M.; Errede, S.; Ertel, E.; Escalier, M.; Esch, H.; Escobar, C.; Esposito, B.; Etienvre, A. I.; Etzion, E.; Evans, H.; Ezhilov, A.; Fabbri, L.; Facini, G.; Fakhrutdinov, R. M.; Falciano, S.; Falla, R. J.; Faltova, J.; Fang, Y.; Fanti, M.; Farbin, A.; Farilla, A.; Farina, C.; Farooque, T.; Farrell, S.; Farrington, S. 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E.; Pedersen, M.; Pedraza Lopez, S.; Pedro, R.; Peleganchuk, S. V.; Pelikan, D.; Penc, O.; Peng, C.; Peng, H.; Penning, B.; Penwell, J.; Perepelitsa, D. V.; Perez Codina, E.; Perini, L.; Pernegger, H.; Perrella, S.; Peschke, R.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Peters, K.; Peters, R. F. Y.; Petersen, B. A.; Petersen, T. C.; Petit, E.; Petridis, A.; Petridou, C.; Petroff, P.; Petrolo, E.; Petrucci, F.; Pettersson, N. E.; Peyaud, A.; Pezoa, R.; Phillips, P. W.; Piacquadio, G.; Pianori, E.; Picazio, A.; Piccaro, E.; Piccinini, M.; Pickering, M. A.; Piegaia, R.; Pilcher, J. E.; Pilkington, A. D.; Pin, A. W. J.; Pina, J.; Pinamonti, M.; Pinfold, J. L.; Pingel, A.; Pires, S.; Pirumov, H.; Pitt, M.; Pizio, C.; Plazak, L.; Pleier, M.-A.; Pleskot, V.; Plotnikova, E.; Plucinski, P.; Pluth, D.; Poettgen, R.; Poggioli, L.; Pohl, D.; Polesello, G.; Poley, A.; Policicchio, A.; Polifka, R.; Polini, A.; Pollard, C. S.; Polychronakos, V.; Pommès, K.; Pontecorvo, L.; Pope, B. G.; Popeneciu, G. A.; Popovic, D. 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A.; Stillings, J. A.; Stockton, M. C.; Stoebe, M.; Stoicea, G.; Stolte, P.; Stonjek, S.; Stradling, A. R.; Straessner, A.; Stramaglia, M. E.; Strandberg, J.; Strandberg, S.; Strandlie, A.; Strauss, M.; Strizenec, P.; Ströhmer, R.; Strom, D. M.; Stroynowski, R.; Strubig, A.; Stucci, S. A.; Stugu, B.; Styles, N. A.; Su, D.; Su, J.; Subramaniam, R.; Suchek, S.; Sugaya, Y.; Suk, M.; Sulin, V. V.; Sultansoy, S.; Sumida, T.; Sun, S.; Sun, X.; Sundermann, J. E.; Suruliz, K.; Susinno, G.; Sutton, M. R.; Suzuki, S.; Svatos, M.; Swiatlowski, M.; Sykora, I.; Sykora, T.; Ta, D.; Taccini, C.; Tackmann, K.; Taenzer, J.; Taffard, A.; Tafirout, R.; Taiblum, N.; Takai, H.; Takashima, R.; Takeda, H.; Takeshita, T.; Takubo, Y.; Talby, M.; Talyshev, A. A.; Tam, J. Y. C.; Tan, K. G.; Tanaka, J.; Tanaka, R.; Tanaka, S.; Tannenwald, B. B.; Tapia Araya, S.; Tapprogge, S.; Tarem, S.; Tartarelli, G. F.; Tas, P.; Tasevsky, M.; Tashiro, T.; Tassi, E.; Tavares Delgado, A.; Tayalati, Y.; Taylor, A. C.; Taylor, G. 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G.; Williams, H. H.; Williams, S.; Willis, C.; Willocq, S.; Wilson, J. A.; Wingerter-Seez, I.; Winklmeier, F.; Winter, B. T.; Wittgen, M.; Wittkowski, J.; Wollstadt, S. J.; Wolter, M. W.; Wolters, H.; Wosiek, B. K.; Wotschack, J.; Woudstra, M. J.; Wozniak, K. W.; Wu, M.; Wu, M.; Wu, S. L.; Wu, X.; Wu, Y.; Wyatt, T. R.; Wynne, B. M.; Xella, S.; Xu, D.; Xu, L.; Yabsley, B.; Yacoob, S.; Yakabe, R.; Yamaguchi, D.; Yamaguchi, Y.; Yamamoto, A.; Yamamoto, S.; Yamanaka, T.; Yamauchi, K.; Yamazaki, Y.; Yan, Z.; Yang, H.; Yang, H.; Yang, Y.; Yang, Z.; Yao, W.-M.; Yap, Y. C.; Yasu, Y.; Yatsenko, E.; Wong, K. H. Yau; Ye, J.; Ye, S.; Yeletskikh, I.; Yen, A. L.; Yildirim, E.; Yorita, K.; Yoshida, R.; Yoshihara, K.; Young, C.; Young, C. J. S.; Youssef, S.; Yu, D. R.; Yu, J.; Yu, J. M.; Yu, J.; Yuan, L.; Yuen, S. P. Y.; Yusuff, I.; Zabinski, B.; Zaidan, R.; Zaitsev, A. M.; Zakharchuk, N.; Zalieckas, J.; Zaman, A.; Zambito, S.; Zanello, L.; Zanzi, D.; Zeitnitz, C.; Zeman, M.; Zemla, A.; Zeng, J. C.; Zeng, Q.; Zengel, K.; Zenin, O.; Ženiš, T.; Zerwas, D.; Zhang, D.; Zhang, F.; Zhang, G.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, J.; Zhang, L.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, R.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, X.; Zhao, Y.; Zhao, Z.; Zhemchugov, A.; Zhong, J.; Zhou, B.; Zhou, C.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, L.; Zhou, M.; Zhou, N.; Zhu, C. G.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zhu, Y.; Zhuang, X.; Zhukov, K.; Zibell, A.; Zieminska, D.; Zimine, N. I.; Zimmermann, C.; Zimmermann, S.; Zinonos, Z.; Zinser, M.; Ziolkowski, M.; Živković, L.; Zobernig, G.; Zoccoli, A.; zur Nedden, M.; Zurzolo, G.; Zwalinski, L.

    2017-04-01

    The reconstruction and calibration algorithms used to calculate missing transverse momentum (E_{ {T}}^{ {miss}} ) with the ATLAS detector exploit energy deposits in the calorimeter and tracks reconstructed in the inner detector as well as the muon spectrometer. Various strategies are used to suppress effects arising from additional proton-proton interactions, called pileup, concurrent with the hard-scatter processes. Tracking information is used to distinguish contributions from the pileup interactions using their vertex separation along the beam axis. The performance of the E_{ {T}}^{ {miss}} reconstruction algorithms, especially with respect to the amount of pileup, is evaluated using data collected in proton-proton collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 8 {TeV} during 2012, and results are shown for a data sample corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 20.3 fb^{-1}. The simulation and modelling of E_{ {T}}^{ {miss}} in events containing a Z boson decaying to two charged leptons (electrons or muons) or a W boson decaying to a charged lepton and a neutrino are compared to data. The acceptance for different event topologies, with and without high transverse momentum neutrinos, is shown for a range of threshold criteria for E_{ {T}}^{ {miss}} , and estimates of the systematic uncertainties in the E_{ {T}}^{ {miss}} measurements are presented.

  17. Demonstration of Bias-Controlled Algorithmic Tuning of Quantum Dots in a Well (DWELL) MidIR Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    DWELL) MidIR Detectors Woo-Yong Jang, Majeed M. Hayat, Senior Member, IEEE, J . Scott Tyo, Senior Member, IEEE, Ram S. Attaluri, Thomas E. Vandervelde...a member of the International Society for Optical Engineers (SPIE) and the Optical Society of America (OSA). J . Scott Tyo (S’96–M’97–SM’06) received

  18. Multiple sequence alignment with hierarchical clustering.

    PubMed Central

    Corpet, F

    1988-01-01

    An algorithm is presented for the multiple alignment of sequences, either proteins or nucleic acids, that is both accurate and easy to use on microcomputers. The approach is based on the conventional dynamic-programming method of pairwise alignment. Initially, a hierarchical clustering of the sequences is performed using the matrix of the pairwise alignment scores. The closest sequences are aligned creating groups of aligned sequences. Then close groups are aligned until all sequences are aligned in one group. The pairwise alignments included in the multiple alignment form a new matrix that is used to produce a hierarchical clustering. If it is different from the first one, iteration of the process can be performed. The method is illustrated by an example: a global alignment of 39 sequences of cytochrome c. PMID:2849754

  19. Technical Note: Modification of the standard gain correction algorithm to compensate for the number of used reference flat frames in detector performance studies

    SciTech Connect

    Konstantinidis, Anastasios C.; Olivo, Alessandro; Speller, Robert D.

    2011-12-15

    Purpose: The x-ray performance evaluation of digital x-ray detectors is based on the calculation of the modulation transfer function (MTF), the noise power spectrum (NPS), and the resultant detective quantum efficiency (DQE). The flat images used for the extraction of the NPS should not contain any fixed pattern noise (FPN) to avoid contamination from nonstochastic processes. The ''gold standard'' method used for the reduction of the FPN (i.e., the different gain between pixels) in linear x-ray detectors is based on normalization with an average reference flat-field. However, the noise in the corrected image depends on the number of flat frames used for the average flat image. The aim of this study is to modify the standard gain correction algorithm to make it independent on the used reference flat frames. Methods: Many publications suggest the use of 10-16 reference flat frames, while other studies use higher numbers (e.g., 48 frames) to reduce the propagated noise from the average flat image. This study quantifies experimentally the effect of the number of used reference flat frames on the NPS and DQE values and appropriately modifies the gain correction algorithm to compensate for this effect. Results: It is shown that using the suggested gain correction algorithm a minimum number of reference flat frames (i.e., down to one frame) can be used to eliminate the FPN from the raw flat image. This saves computer memory and time during the x-ray performance evaluation. Conclusions: The authors show that the method presented in the study (a) leads to the maximum DQE value that one would have by using the conventional method and very large number of frames and (b) has been compared to an independent gain correction method based on the subtraction of flat-field images, leading to identical DQE values. They believe this provides robust validation of the proposed method.

  20. MUSE optical alignment procedure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Loupias, Magali; Kosmalski, Johan; Anwand, Heiko; Bacon, Roland; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dubois, Jean-Pierre; Dupuy, Christophe; Kelz, Andreas; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Nicklas, Harald; Parès, Laurent; Remillieux, Alban; Seifert, Walter; Valentin, Hervé; Xu, Wenli

    2012-09-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation VLT integral field spectrograph (1x1arcmin² Field of View) developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO), operating in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently assembling and testing MUSE in the Integration Hall of the Observatoire de Lyon for the Preliminary Acceptance in Europe, scheduled for 2013. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic instrument mechanical structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2011, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested independently in each institute. After validations, the systems were shipped to the P.I. institute at Lyon and were assembled in the Integration Hall This paper describes the end-to-end optical alignment procedure of the MUSE instrument. The design strategy, mixing an optical alignment by manufacturing (plug and play approach) and few adjustments on key components, is presented. We depict the alignment method for identifying the optical axis using several references located in pupil and image planes. All tools required to perform the global alignment between each subsystem are described. The success of this alignment approach is demonstrated by the good results for the MUSE image quality. MUSE commissioning at the VLT (Very Large Telescope) is planned for 2013.

  1. Implementation of a Parallel Protein Structure Alignment Service on Cloud

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Che-Lun; Lin, Yaw-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment has become an important strategy by which to identify evolutionary relationships between protein sequences. Several alignment tools are currently available for online comparison of protein structures. In this paper, we propose a parallel protein structure alignment service based on the Hadoop distribution framework. This service includes a protein structure alignment algorithm, a refinement algorithm, and a MapReduce programming model. The refinement algorithm refines the result of alignment. To process vast numbers of protein structures in parallel, the alignment and refinement algorithms are implemented using MapReduce. We analyzed and compared the structure alignments produced by different methods using a dataset randomly selected from the PDB database. The experimental results verify that the proposed algorithm refines the resulting alignments more accurately than existing algorithms. Meanwhile, the computational performance of the proposed service is proportional to the number of processors used in our cloud platform. PMID:23671842

  2. Implementation of a parallel protein structure alignment service on cloud.

    PubMed

    Hung, Che-Lun; Lin, Yaw-Ling

    2013-01-01

    Protein structure alignment has become an important strategy by which to identify evolutionary relationships between protein sequences. Several alignment tools are currently available for online comparison of protein structures. In this paper, we propose a parallel protein structure alignment service based on the Hadoop distribution framework. This service includes a protein structure alignment algorithm, a refinement algorithm, and a MapReduce programming model. The refinement algorithm refines the result of alignment. To process vast numbers of protein structures in parallel, the alignment and refinement algorithms are implemented using MapReduce. We analyzed and compared the structure alignments produced by different methods using a dataset randomly selected from the PDB database. The experimental results verify that the proposed algorithm refines the resulting alignments more accurately than existing algorithms. Meanwhile, the computational performance of the proposed service is proportional to the number of processors used in our cloud platform.

  3. Development of adaptive noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body images in a multi-detector CT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nishimaru, Eiji; Ichikawa, Katsuhiro; Okita, Izumi; Ninomiya, Yuuji; Tomoshige, Yukihiro; Kurokawa, Takehiro; Ono, Yutaka; Nakamura, Yuko; Suzuki, Masayuki

    2008-03-01

    Recently, several kinds of post-processing image filters which reduce the noise of computed tomography (CT) images have been proposed. However, these image filters are mostly for adults. Because these are not very effective in small (< 20 cm) display fields of view (FOV), we cannot use them for pediatric body images (e.g., premature babies and infant children). We have developed a new noise reduction filter algorithm for pediatric body CT images. This algorithm is based on a 3D post-processing in which the output pixel values are calculated by nonlinear interpolation in z-directions on original volumetric-data-sets. This algorithm does not need the in-plane (axial plane) processing, so the spatial resolution does not change. From the phantom studies, our algorithm could reduce SD up to 40% without affecting the spatial resolution of x-y plane and z-axis, and improved the CNR up to 30%. This newly developed filter algorithm will be useful for the diagnosis and radiation dose reduction of the pediatric body CT images.

  4. System impairment compensation in coherent optical communications by using a bio-inspired detector based on artificial neural network and genetic algorithm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Danshi; Zhang, Min; Li, Ze; Song, Chuang; Fu, Meixia; Li, Jin; Chen, Xue

    2017-09-01

    A bio-inspired detector based on the artificial neural network (ANN) and genetic algorithm is proposed in the context of a coherent optical transmission system. The ANN is designed to mitigate 16-quadrature amplitude modulation system impairments, including linear impairment: Gaussian white noise, laser phase noise, in-phase/quadrature component imbalance, and nonlinear impairment: nonlinear phase. Without prior information or heuristic assumptions, the ANN, functioning as a machine learning algorithm, can learn and capture the characteristics of impairments from observed data. Numerical simulations were performed, and dispersion-shifted, dispersion-managed, and dispersion-unmanaged fiber links were investigated. The launch power dynamic range and maximum transmission distance for the bio-inspired method were 2.7 dBm and 240 km greater, respectively, than those of the maximum likelihood estimation algorithm. Moreover, the linewidth tolerance of the bio-inspired technique was 170 kHz greater than that of the k-means method, demonstrating its usability for digital signal processing in coherent systems.

  5. ARYANA: Aligning Reads by Yet Another Approach

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Motivation Although there are many different algorithms and software tools for aligning sequencing reads, fast gapped sequence search is far from solved. Strong interest in fast alignment is best reflected in the $106 prize for the Innocentive competition on aligning a collection of reads to a given database of reference genomes. In addition, de novo assembly of next-generation sequencing long reads requires fast overlap-layout-concensus algorithms which depend on fast and accurate alignment. Contribution We introduce ARYANA, a fast gapped read aligner, developed on the base of BWA indexing infrastructure with a completely new alignment engine that makes it significantly faster than three other aligners: Bowtie2, BWA and SeqAlto, with comparable generality and accuracy. Instead of the time-consuming backtracking procedures for handling mismatches, ARYANA comes with the seed-and-extend algorithmic framework and a significantly improved efficiency by integrating novel algorithmic techniques including dynamic seed selection, bidirectional seed extension, reset-free hash tables, and gap-filling dynamic programming. As the read length increases ARYANA's superiority in terms of speed and alignment rate becomes more evident. This is in perfect harmony with the read length trend as the sequencing technologies evolve. The algorithmic platform of ARYANA makes it easy to develop mission-specific aligners for other applications using ARYANA engine. Availability ARYANA with complete source code can be obtained from http://github.com/aryana-aligner PMID:25252881

  6. ARYANA: Aligning Reads by Yet Another Approach.

    PubMed

    Gholami, Milad; Arbabi, Aryan; Sharifi-Zarchi, Ali; Chitsaz, Hamidreza; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Although there are many different algorithms and software tools for aligning sequencing reads, fast gapped sequence search is far from solved. Strong interest in fast alignment is best reflected in the $10(6) prize for the Innocentive competition on aligning a collection of reads to a given database of reference genomes. In addition, de novo assembly of next-generation sequencing long reads requires fast overlap-layout-concensus algorithms which depend on fast and accurate alignment. We introduce ARYANA, a fast gapped read aligner, developed on the base of BWA indexing infrastructure with a completely new alignment engine that makes it significantly faster than three other aligners: Bowtie2, BWA and SeqAlto, with comparable generality and accuracy. Instead of the time-consuming backtracking procedures for handling mismatches, ARYANA comes with the seed-and-extend algorithmic framework and a significantly improved efficiency by integrating novel algorithmic techniques including dynamic seed selection, bidirectional seed extension, reset-free hash tables, and gap-filling dynamic programming. As the read length increases ARYANA's superiority in terms of speed and alignment rate becomes more evident. This is in perfect harmony with the read length trend as the sequencing technologies evolve. The algorithmic platform of ARYANA makes it easy to develop mission-specific aligners for other applications using ARYANA engine. ARYANA with complete source code can be obtained from http://github.com/aryana-aligner.

  7. Lord-Wingersky Algorithm Version 2.0 for Hierarchical Item Factor Models with Applications in Test Scoring, Scale Alignment, and Model Fit Testing. CRESST Report 830

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cai, Li

    2013-01-01

    Lord and Wingersky's (1984) recursive algorithm for creating summed score based likelihoods and posteriors has a proven track record in unidimensional item response theory (IRT) applications. Extending the recursive algorithm to handle multidimensionality is relatively simple, especially with fixed quadrature because the recursions can be defined…

  8. Using second-order calibration method based on trilinear decomposition algorithms coupled with high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector for determination of quinolones in honey samples.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yong-Jie; Wu, Hai-Long; Shao, Sheng-Zhi; Kang, Chao; Zhao, Juan; Wang, Yu; Zhu, Shao-Hua; Yu, Ru-Qin

    2011-09-15

    A novel strategy that combines the second-order calibration method based on the trilinear decomposition algorithms with high performance liquid chromatography with diode array detector (HPLC-DAD) was developed to mathematically separate the overlapped peaks and to quantify quinolones in honey samples. The HPLC-DAD data were obtained within a short time in isocratic mode. The developed method could be applied to determine 12 quinolones at the same time even in the presence of uncalibrated interfering components in complex background. To access the performance of the proposed strategy for the determination of quinolones in honey samples, the figures of merit were employed. The limits of quantitation for all analytes were within the range 1.2-56.7 μg kg(-1). The work presented in this paper illustrated the suitability and interesting potential of combining second-order calibration method with second-order analytical instrument for multi-residue analysis in honey samples.

  9. Alignment fixture

    DOEpatents

    Bell, Grover C.; Gibson, O. Theodore

    1980-01-01

    A part alignment fixture is provided which may be used for precise variable lateral and tilt alignment relative to the fixture base of various shaped parts. The fixture may be used as a part holder for machining or inspection of parts or alignment of parts during assembly and the like. The fixture includes a precisely machined diameter disc-shaped hub adapted to receive the part to be aligned. The hub is nested in a guide plate which is adapted to carry two oppositely disposed pairs of positioning wedges so that the wedges may be reciprocatively positioned by means of respective micrometer screws. The sloping faces of the wedges contact the hub at respective quadrants of the hub periphery. The lateral position of the hub relative to the guide plate is adjusted by positioning the wedges with the associated micrometer screws. The tilt of the part is adjusted relative to a base plate, to which the guide plate is pivotally connected by means of a holding plate. Two pairs of oppositely disposed wedges are mounted for reciprocative lateral positioning by means of separate micrometer screws between flanges of the guide plate and the base plate. Once the wedges are positioned to achieve the proper tilt of the part or hub on which the part is mounted relative to the base plate, the fixture may be bolted to a machining, inspection, or assembly device.

  10. An Alignment-Free Algorithm in Comparing the Similarity of Protein Sequences Based on Pseudo-Markov Transition Probabilities among Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yushuang; Yang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yi

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a novel alignment-free method for comparing the similarity of protein sequences. We first encode a protein sequence into a 440 dimensional feature vector consisting of a 400 dimensional Pseudo-Markov transition probability vector among the 20 amino acids, a 20 dimensional content ratio vector, and a 20 dimensional position ratio vector of the amino acids in the sequence. By evaluating the Euclidean distances among the representing vectors, we compare the similarity of protein sequences. We then apply this method into the ND5 dataset consisting of the ND5 protein sequences of 9 species, and the F10 and G11 datasets representing two of the xylanases containing glycoside hydrolase families, i.e., families 10 and 11. As a result, our method achieves a correlation coefficient of 0.962 with the canonical protein sequence aligner ClustalW in the ND5 dataset, much higher than those of other 5 popular alignment-free methods. In addition, we successfully separate the xylanases sequences in the F10 family and the G11 family and illustrate that the F10 family is more heat stable than the G11 family, consistent with a few previous studies. Moreover, we prove mathematically an identity equation involving the Pseudo-Markov transition probability vector and the amino acids content ratio vector. PMID:27918587

  11. An Alignment-Free Algorithm in Comparing the Similarity of Protein Sequences Based on Pseudo-Markov Transition Probabilities among Amino Acids.

    PubMed

    Li, Yushuang; Song, Tian; Yang, Jiasheng; Zhang, Yi; Yang, Jialiang

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we have proposed a novel alignment-free method for comparing the similarity of protein sequences. We first encode a protein sequence into a 440 dimensional feature vector consisting of a 400 dimensional Pseudo-Markov transition probability vector among the 20 amino acids, a 20 dimensional content ratio vector, and a 20 dimensional position ratio vector of the amino acids in the sequence. By evaluating the Euclidean distances among the representing vectors, we compare the similarity of protein sequences. We then apply this method into the ND5 dataset consisting of the ND5 protein sequences of 9 species, and the F10 and G11 datasets representing two of the xylanases containing glycoside hydrolase families, i.e., families 10 and 11. As a result, our method achieves a correlation coefficient of 0.962 with the canonical protein sequence aligner ClustalW in the ND5 dataset, much higher than those of other 5 popular alignment-free methods. In addition, we successfully separate the xylanases sequences in the F10 family and the G11 family and illustrate that the F10 family is more heat stable than the G11 family, consistent with a few previous studies. Moreover, we prove mathematically an identity equation involving the Pseudo-Markov transition probability vector and the amino acids content ratio vector.

  12. Reliable automatic alignment of tomographic projection data by passive auto-focus

    SciTech Connect

    Kingston, A.; Sakellariou, A.; Varslot, T.; Myers, G.; Sheppard, A.

    2011-09-15

    Purpose: The authors present a robust algorithm that removes the blurring and double-edge artifacts in high-resolution computed tomography (CT) images that are caused by misaligned scanner components. This alleviates the time-consuming process of physically aligning hardware, which is of particular benefit if components are moved or swapped frequently. Methods: The proposed method uses the experimental data itself for calibration. A parameterized model of the scanner geometry is constructed and the parameters are varied until the sharpest 3D reconstruction is found. The concept is similar to passive auto-focus algorithms of digital optical instruments. The parameters are used to remap the projection data from the physical detector to a virtual aligned detector. This is followed by a standard reconstruction algorithm, namely the Feldkamp algorithm. Feldkamp et al.[J. Opt. Soc. Am. A 1, 612-619 (1984)]. Results: An example implementation is given for a rabbit liver specimen that was collected with a circular trajectory. The optimal parameters were determined in less computation time than that for a full reconstruction. The example serves to demonstrate that (a) sharpness is an appropriate measure for projection alignment, (b) our parameterization is sufficient to characterize misalignments for cone-beam CT, and (c) the procedure determines parameter values with sufficient precision to remove the associated artifacts. Conclusions: The algorithm is fully tested and implemented for regular use at The Australian National University micro-CT facility for both circular and helical trajectories. It can in principle be applied to more general imaging geometries and modalities. It is as robust as manual alignment but more precise since we have quantified the effect of misalignment.

  13. Aligning Greek-English parallel texts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galiotou, Eleni; Koronakis, George; Lazari, Vassiliki

    2015-02-01

    In this paper, we discuss issues concerning the alignment of parallel texts written in languages with different alphabets based on an experiment of aligning texts from the proceedings of the European Parliament in Greek and English. First, we describe our implementation of the k-vec algorithm and its application to the bilingual corpus. Then the output of the algorithm is used as a starting point for an alignment procedure at a sentence level which also takes into account mark-ups of meta-information. The results of the implementation are compared to those of the application of the Church and Gale alignment algorithm on the Europarl corpus. The conclusions of this comparison can give useful insights as for the efficiency of alignment algorithms when applied to the particular bilingual corpus.

  14. Simultaneous Alignment and Folding of Protein Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Waldispühl, Jérôme; O'Donnell, Charles W.; Will, Sebastian; Devadas, Srinivas; Backofen, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Accurate comparative analysis tools for low-homology proteins remains a difficult challenge in computational biology, especially sequence alignment and consensus folding problems. We present partiFold-Align, the first algorithm for simultaneous alignment and consensus folding of unaligned protein sequences; the algorithm's complexity is polynomial in time and space. Algorithmically, partiFold-Align exploits sparsity in the set of super-secondary structure pairings and alignment candidates to achieve an effectively cubic running time for simultaneous pairwise alignment and folding. We demonstrate the efficacy of these techniques on transmembrane β-barrel proteins, an important yet difficult class of proteins with few known three-dimensional structures. Testing against structurally derived sequence alignments, partiFold-Align significantly outperforms state-of-the-art pairwise and multiple sequence alignment tools in the most difficult low-sequence homology case. It also improves secondary structure prediction where current approaches fail. Importantly, partiFold-Align requires no prior training. These general techniques are widely applicable to many more protein families (partiFold-Align is available at http://partifold.csail.mit.edu/). PMID:24766258

  15. Drift Chamber Alignment using Cosmic Rays

    SciTech Connect

    Kotwal, Ashutosh V.; Hays, Christopher P.

    2014-05-07

    The Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) is a general-purpose experimental apparatus with an inner tracking detector for measuring charged particles, surrounded by a calorimeter for measurements of electromagnetic and hadronic showers, and a muon detector system. We present a technique for, and results of, a precise relative alignment of the drift chamber wires of the CDF tracker. This alignment has been an important component of the track momentum calibration, which is the basis for the charged-lepton calibration for the measurement of the W boson mass at CDF.

  16. ALIGNING JIG

    DOEpatents

    Culver, J.S.; Tunnell, W.C.

    1958-08-01

    A jig or device is described for setting or aligning an opening in one member relative to another member or structure, with a predetermined offset, or it may be used for measuring the amount of offset with which the parts have previously been sct. This jig comprises two blocks rabbeted to each other, with means for securing thc upper block to the lower block. The upper block has fingers for contacting one of the members to be a1igmed, the lower block is designed to ride in grooves within the reference member, and calibration marks are provided to determine the amount of offset. This jig is specially designed to align the collimating slits of a mass spectrometer.

  17. Real breakthrough in detection of radioactive sources by portal monitors with plastic detectors and New Advanced Source Identification Algorithm (ASIA-New)

    SciTech Connect

    Stavrov, Andrei; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2015-07-01

    Radiation Portal Monitors (RPM) with plastic detectors represent the main instruments used for primary border (customs) radiation control. RPM are widely used because they are simple, reliable, relatively inexpensive and have a high sensitivity. However, experience using the RPM in various countries has revealed the systems have some grave shortcomings. There is a dramatic decrease of the probability of detection of radioactive sources under high suppression of the natural gamma background (radiation control of heavy cargoes, containers and, especially, trains). NORM (Naturally Occurring Radioactive Material) existing in objects under control trigger the so-called 'nuisance alarms', requiring a secondary inspection for source verification. At a number of sites, the rate of such alarms is so high it significantly complicates the work of customs and border officers. This paper presents a brief description of new variant of algorithm ASIA-New (New Advanced Source Identification Algorithm), which was developed by the Rapiscan company. It also demonstrates results of different tests and the capability of a new system to overcome the shortcomings stated above. New electronics and ASIA-New enables RPM to detect radioactive sources under a high background suppression (tested at 15-30%) and to verify the detected NORM (KCl) and the artificial isotopes (Co- 57, Ba-133 and other). New variant of ASIA is based on physical principles, a phenomenological approach and analysis of some important parameter changes during the vehicle passage through the monitor control area. Thanks to this capability main advantage of new system is that this system can be easily installed into any RPM with plastic detectors. Taking into account that more than 4000 RPM has been installed worldwide their upgrading by ASIA-New may significantly increase probability of detection and verification of radioactive sources even masked by NORM. This algorithm was tested for 1,395 passages of different

  18. FPGA-based algorithms for the new trigger system for the phase 2 upgrade of the CMS drift tubes detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cela-Ruiz, J.-M.

    2017-01-01

    The new luminosity conditions imposed after the LHC upgrade will require a dedicated upgrade of several subdetectors. To cope with the new requirements, CMS drift tubes subdetector electronics will be redesigned in order to achieve the new foreseen response speed. In particular, it is necessary to enhance the first stage of the trigger system (L1A). In this document we present the development of a software algorithm, based on the mean timer paradigm, capable of reconstructing muon trajectories and rejecting spurious signals. It has been initially written in C++ programming language, but designed with its portability to a FPGA VHDL code in mind.

  19. Alignment of Helical Membrane Protein Sequences Using AlignMe

    PubMed Central

    Khafizov, Kamil; Forrest, Lucy R.

    2013-01-01

    Few sequence alignment methods have been designed specifically for integral membrane proteins, even though these important proteins have distinct evolutionary and structural properties that might affect their alignments. Existing approaches typically consider membrane-related information either by using membrane-specific substitution matrices or by assigning distinct penalties for gap creation in transmembrane and non-transmembrane regions. Here, we ask whether favoring matching of predicted transmembrane segments within a standard dynamic programming algorithm can improve the accuracy of pairwise membrane protein sequence alignments. We tested various strategies using a specifically designed program called AlignMe. An updated set of homologous membrane protein structures, called HOMEP2, was used as a reference for optimizing the gap penalties. The best of the membrane-protein optimized approaches were then tested on an independent reference set of membrane protein sequence alignments from the BAliBASE collection. When secondary structure (S) matching was combined with evolutionary information (using a position-specific substitution matrix (P)), in an approach we called AlignMePS, the resultant pairwise alignments were typically among the most accurate over a broad range of sequence similarities when compared to available methods. Matching transmembrane predictions (T), in addition to evolutionary information, and secondary-structure predictions, in an approach called AlignMePST, generally reduces the accuracy of the alignments of closely-related proteins in the BAliBASE set relative to AlignMePS, but may be useful in cases of extremely distantly related proteins for which sequence information is less informative. The open source AlignMe code is available at https://sourceforge.net/projects/alignme/, and at http://www.forrestlab.org, along with an online server and the HOMEP2 data set. PMID:23469223

  20. Image alignment

    DOEpatents

    Dowell, Larry Jonathan

    2014-04-22

    Disclosed is a method and device for aligning at least two digital images. An embodiment may use frequency-domain transforms of small tiles created from each image to identify substantially similar, "distinguishing" features within each of the images, and then align the images together based on the location of the distinguishing features. To accomplish this, an embodiment may create equal sized tile sub-images for each image. A "key" for each tile may be created by performing a frequency-domain transform calculation on each tile. A information-distance difference between each possible pair of tiles on each image may be calculated to identify distinguishing features. From analysis of the information-distance differences of the pairs of tiles, a subset of tiles with high discrimination metrics in relation to other tiles may be located for each image. The subset of distinguishing tiles for each image may then be compared to locate tiles with substantially similar keys and/or information-distance metrics to other tiles of other images. Once similar tiles are located for each image, the images may be aligned in relation to the identified similar tiles.

  1. Lower bounds on multiple sequence alignment using exact 3-way alignment.

    PubMed

    Colbourn, Charles J; Kumar, Sudhir

    2007-04-30

    Multiple sequence alignment is fundamental. Exponential growth in computation time appears to be inevitable when an optimal alignment is required for many sequences. Exact costs of optimum alignments are therefore rarely computed. Consequently much effort has been invested in algorithms for alignment that are heuristic, or explore a restricted class of solutions. These give an upper bound on the alignment cost, but it is equally important to determine the quality of the solution obtained. In the absence of an optimal alignment with which to compare, lower bounds may be calculated to assess the quality of the alignment. As more effort is invested in improving upper bounds (alignment algorithms), it is therefore important to improve lower bounds as well. Although numerous cost metrics can be used to determine the quality of an alignment, many are based on sum-of-pairs (SP) measures and their generalizations. Two standard and two new methods are considered for using exact 2-way and 3-way alignments to compute lower bounds on total SP alignment cost; one new method fares well with respect to accuracy, while the other reduces the computation time. The first employs exhaustive computation of exact 3-way alignments, while the second employs an efficient heuristic to compute a much smaller number of exact 3-way alignments. Calculating all 3-way alignments exactly and computing their average improves lower bounds on sum of SP cost in v-way alignments. However judicious selection of a subset of all 3-way alignments can yield a further improvement with minimal additional effort. On the other hand, a simple heuristic to select a random subset of 3-way alignments (a random packing) yields accuracy comparable to averaging all 3-way alignments with substantially less computational effort. Calculation of lower bounds on SP cost (and thus the quality of an alignment) can be improved by employing a mixture of 3-way and 2-way alignments.

  2. Steps length error detector algorithm in phase-shifting interferometry using Radon transform as a profile measurement.

    PubMed

    Ramirez-Delreal, Tania A; Mora-Gonzalez, Miguel; Casillas-Rodriguez, Francisco J; Muñoz-Maciel, Jesus; Paz, Marco A

    2017-03-20

    Phase-shifting is one of the most useful methods of phase recovery in digital interferometry in the estimation of small displacements, but miscalibration errors of the phase shifters are very common. In practice, the main problem associated with such errors is related to the response of the phase shifter devices, since they are dependent on mechanical and/or electrical parts. In this work, a novel technique to detect and measure calibration errors in phase-shifting interferometry, when an unexpected phase shift arises, is proposed. The described method uses the Radon transform, first as an automatic-calibrating technique, and then as a profile measuring procedure when analyzing a specific zone of an interferogram. After, once maximum and minimum value parameters have been registered, these can be used to measure calibration errors. Synthetic and real interferograms are included in the testing, which has thrown good approximations for both cases, notwithstanding the interferogram fringe distribution or its phase-shifting steps. Tests have shown that this algorithm is able to measure the deviations of the steps in phase-shifting interferometry. The developed algorithm can also be used as an alternative in the calibration of phase shifter devices.

  3. Progressive multiple sequence alignments from triplets

    PubMed Central

    Kruspe, Matthias; Stadler, Peter F

    2007-01-01

    Background The quality of progressive sequence alignments strongly depends on the accuracy of the individual pairwise alignment steps since gaps that are introduced at one step cannot be removed at later aggregation steps. Adjacent insertions and deletions necessarily appear in arbitrary order in pairwise alignments and hence form an unavoidable source of errors. Research Here we present a modified variant of progressive sequence alignments that addresses both issues. Instead of pairwise alignments we use exact dynamic programming to align sequence or profile triples. This avoids a large fractions of the ambiguities arising in pairwise alignments. In the subsequent aggregation steps we follow the logic of the Neighbor-Net algorithm, which constructs a phylogenetic network by step-wisely replacing triples by pairs instead of combining pairs to singletons. To this end the three-way alignments are subdivided into two partial alignments, at which stage all-gap columns are naturally removed. This alleviates the "once a gap, always a gap" problem of progressive alignment procedures. Conclusion The three-way Neighbor-Net based alignment program aln3nn is shown to compare favorably on both protein sequences and nucleic acids sequences to other progressive alignment tools. In the latter case one easily can include scoring terms that consider secondary structure features. Overall, the quality of resulting alignments in general exceeds that of clustalw or other multiple alignments tools even though our software does not included heuristics for context dependent (mis)match scores. PMID:17631683

  4. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool

    PubMed Central

    Henstock, Peter V.; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow. PMID:27459605

  5. CATO: The Clone Alignment Tool.

    PubMed

    Henstock, Peter V; LaPan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    High-throughput cloning efforts produce large numbers of sequences that need to be aligned, edited, compared with reference sequences, and organized as files and selected clones. Different pieces of software are typically required to perform each of these tasks. We have designed a single piece of software, CATO, the Clone Alignment Tool, that allows a user to align, evaluate, edit, and select clone sequences based on comparisons to reference sequences. The input and output are designed to be compatible with standard data formats, and thus suitable for integration into a clone processing pipeline. CATO provides both sequence alignment and visualizations to facilitate the analysis of cloning experiments. The alignment algorithm matches each of the relevant candidate sequences against each reference sequence. The visualization portion displays three levels of matching: 1) a top-level summary of the top candidate sequences aligned to each reference sequence, 2) a focused alignment view with the nucleotides of matched sequences displayed against one reference sequence, and 3) a pair-wise alignment of a single reference and candidate sequence pair. Users can select the minimum matching criteria for valid clones, edit or swap reference sequences, and export the results to a summary file as part of the high-throughput cloning workflow.

  6. Space dosimetry with the application of a 3D silicon detector telescope: response function and inverse algorithm.

    PubMed

    Pázmándi, Tamás; Deme, Sándor; Láng, Edit

    2006-01-01

    One of the many risks of long-duration space flights is the excessive exposure to cosmic radiation, which has great importance particularly during solar flares and higher sun activity. Monitoring of the cosmic radiation on board space vehicles is carried out on the basis of wide international co-operation. Since space radiation consists mainly of charged heavy particles (protons, alpha and heavier particles), the equivalent dose differs significantly from the absorbed dose. A radiation weighting factor (w(R)) is used to convert absorbed dose (Gy) to equivalent dose (Sv). w(R) is a function of the linear energy transfer of the radiation. Recently used equipment is suitable for measuring certain radiation field parameters changing in space and over time, so a combination of different measurements and calculations is required to characterise the radiation field in terms of dose equivalent. The objectives of this project are to develop and manufacture a three-axis silicon detector telescope, called Tritel, and to develop software for data evaluation of the measured energy deposition spectra. The device will be able to determine absorbed dose and dose equivalent of the space radiation.

  7. Algorithm and implementation of muon trigger and data transmission system for barrel-endcap overlap region of the CMS detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zabolotny, W. M.; Byszuk, A.

    2016-03-01

    The CMS experiment Level-1 trigger system is undergoing an upgrade. In the barrel-endcap transition region, it is necessary to merge data from 3 types of muon detectors—RPC, DT and CSC. The Overlap Muon Track Finder (OMTF) uses the novel approach to concentrate and process those data in a uniform manner to identify muons and their transversal momentum. The paper presents the algorithm and FPGA firmware implementation of the OMTF and its data transmission system in CMS. It is foreseen that the OMTF will be subject to significant changes resulting from optimization which will be done with the aid of physics simulations. Therefore, a special, high-level, parameterized HDL implementation is necessary.

  8. Blasting and Zipping: Sequence Alignment and Mutual Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Orion; Grassberger, Peter; Paczuski, Maya

    2009-03-01

    Alignment of biological sequences such as DNA, RNA or proteins is one of the most widely used tools in computational bioscience. While the accomplishments of sequence alignment algorithms are undeniable the fact remains that these algorithms are based upon heuristic scoring schemes. Therefore, these algorithms do not provide model independent and objective measures for how similar two (or more) sequences actually are. Although information theory provides such a similarity measure - the mutual information (MI) - numerous previous attempts to connect sequence alignment and information have not produced realistic estimates for the MI from a given alignment. We report on a simple and flexible approach to get robust estimates of MI from global alignments. The presented results may help establish MI as a reliable tool for evaluating the quality of global alignments, judging the relative merits of different alignment algorithms, and estimating the significance of specific alignments.

  9. MUSE alignment onto VLT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laurent, Florence; Renault, Edgard; Boudon, Didier; Caillier, Patrick; Daguisé, Eric; Dupuy, Christophe; Jarno, Aurélien; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Migniau, Jean-Emmanuel; Nicklas, Harald; Piqueras, Laure

    2014-07-01

    MUSE (Multi Unit Spectroscopic Explorer) is a second generation Very Large Telescope (VLT) integral field spectrograph developed for the European Southern Observatory (ESO). It combines a 1' x 1' field of view sampled at 0.2 arcsec for its Wide Field Mode (WFM) and a 7.5"x7.5" field of view for its Narrow Field Mode (NFM). Both modes will operate with the improved spatial resolution provided by GALACSI (Ground Atmospheric Layer Adaptive Optics for Spectroscopic Imaging), that will use the VLT deformable secondary mirror and 4 Laser Guide Stars (LGS) foreseen in 2015. MUSE operates in the visible wavelength range (0.465-0.93 μm). A consortium of seven institutes is currently commissioning MUSE in the Very Large Telescope for the Preliminary Acceptance in Chile, scheduled for September, 2014. MUSE is composed of several subsystems which are under the responsibility of each institute. The Fore Optics derotates and anamorphoses the image at the focal plane. A Splitting and Relay Optics feed the 24 identical Integral Field Units (IFU), that are mounted within a large monolithic structure. Each IFU incorporates an image slicer, a fully refractive spectrograph with VPH-grating and a detector system connected to a global vacuum and cryogenic system. During 2012 and 2013, all MUSE subsystems were integrated, aligned and tested to the P.I. institute at Lyon. After successful PAE in September 2013, MUSE instrument was shipped to the Very Large Telescope in Chile where that was aligned and tested in ESO integration hall at Paranal. After, MUSE was directly transported, fully aligned and without any optomechanical dismounting, onto VLT telescope where the first light was overcame the 7th of February, 2014. This paper describes the alignment procedure of the whole MUSE instrument with respect to the Very Large Telescope (VLT). It describes how 6 tons could be move with accuracy better than 0.025mm and less than 0.25 arcmin in order to reach alignment requirements. The success

  10. Projection-Based Volume Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lingbo; Snapp, Robert R.; Ruiz, Teresa; Radermacher, Michael

    2013-01-01

    When heterogeneous samples of macromolecular assemblies are being examined by 3D electron microscopy (3DEM), often multiple reconstructions are obtained. For example, subtomograms of individual particles can be acquired from tomography, or volumes of multiple 2D classes can be obtained by random conical tilt reconstruction. Of these, similar volumes can be averaged to achieve higher resolution. Volume alignment is an essential step before 3D classification and averaging. Here we present a projection-based volume alignment (PBVA) algorithm. We select a set of projections to represent the reference volume and align them to a second volume. Projection alignment is achieved by maximizing the cross-correlation function with respect to rotation and translation parameters. If data are missing, the cross-correlation functions are normalized accordingly. Accurate alignments are obtained by averaging and quadratic interpolation of the cross-correlation maximum. Comparisons of the computation time between PBVA and traditional 3D cross-correlation methods demonstrate that PBVA outperforms the traditional methods. Performance tests were carried out with different signal-to-noise ratios using modeled noise and with different percentages of missing data using a cryo-EM dataset. All tests show that the algorithm is robust and highly accurate. PBVA was applied to align the reconstructions of a subcomplex of the NADH: ubiquinone oxidoreductase (Complex I) from the yeast Yarrowia lipolytica, followed by classification and averaging. PMID:23410725

  11. Joint Bayesian estimation of alignment and phylogeny.

    PubMed

    Redelings, Benjamin D; Suchard, Marc A

    2005-06-01

    We describe a novel model and algorithm for simultaneously estimating multiple molecular sequence alignments and the phylogenetic trees that relate the sequences. Unlike current techniques that base phylogeny estimates on a single estimate of the alignment, we take alignment uncertainty into account by considering all possible alignments. Furthermore, because the alignment and phylogeny are constructed simultaneously, a guide tree is not needed. This sidesteps the problem in which alignments created by progressive alignment are biased toward the guide tree used to generate them. Joint estimation also allows us to model rate variation between sites when estimating the alignment and to use the evidence in shared insertion/deletions (indels) to group sister taxa in the phylogeny. Our indel model makes use of affine gap penalties and considers indels of multiple letters. We make the simplifying assumption that the indel process is identical on all branches. As a result, the probability of a gap is independent of branch length. We use a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) method to sample from the posterior of the joint model, estimating the most probable alignment and tree and their support simultaneously. We describe a new MCMC transition kernel that improves our algorithm's mixing efficiency, allowing the MCMC chains to converge even when started from arbitrary alignments. Our software implementation can estimate alignment uncertainty and we describe a method for summarizing this uncertainty in a single plot.

  12. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Study of BESIII MUC offline software with cosmic-ray data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Yu-Tie; Mao, Ya-Jun; You, Zheng-Yun; Li, Wei-Dong; Bian, Jian-Ming; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chen, Shen-Jian; Deng, Zi-Yan; Fu, Cheng-Dong; Gao, Yuan-Ning; Han, Lei; Han, Shao-Qing; He, Kang-Lin; He, Miao; Hu, Ji-Feng; Hu, Xiao-Wei; Huang, Bin; Huang, Xing-Tao; Jia, Lu-Kui; Ji, Xiao-Bin; Li, Hai-Bo; Liu, Bei-Jiang; Liu, Chun-Xiu; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Ying; Liu, Yong; Luo, Tao; Lu, Qi-Wen; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Mao, Ze-Pu; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Ning, Fei-Peng; Ping, Rong-Gang; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Song, Wen-Bo; Sun, Sheng-Sen; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Sun, Yong-Zhao; Tian, Hao-Lai; Wang, Ji-Ke; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wen, Shuo-Pin; Wu, Ling-Hui; Wu, Zhi; Xie, Yu-Guang; Xu, Min; Yan, Jie; Yan, Liang; Yao, Jian; Yuan, Chang-Zheng; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Yang-Heng; Zhu, Yong-Sheng; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2009-07-01

    Cosmic-ray data of 90 M events have been collected and used for calibration, alignment as well as detector tuning. A special tracking algorithm for the BESIII muon counter is developed and verified with Monte-Carlo simulation and then further confirmed with the cosmic-ray data. The obtained strip resolutions are in good agreement with the design values. A new alignment approach for the BESIII muon counter is confirmed with the cosmic-ray data and proposed to be used in future analysis of experimental data.

  13. Triangular Alignment (TAME). A Tensor-based Approach for Higher-order Network Alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Mohammadi, Shahin; Gleich, David F.; Kolda, Tamara G.; Grama, Ananth

    2015-11-01

    Network alignment is an important tool with extensive applications in comparative interactomics. Traditional approaches aim to simultaneously maximize the number of conserved edges and the underlying similarity of aligned entities. We propose a novel formulation of the network alignment problem that extends topological similarity to higher-order structures and provide a new objective function that maximizes the number of aligned substructures. This objective function corresponds to an integer programming problem, which is NP-hard. Consequently, we approximate this objective function as a surrogate function whose maximization results in a tensor eigenvalue problem. Based on this formulation, we present an algorithm called Triangular AlignMEnt (TAME), which attempts to maximize the number of aligned triangles across networks. We focus on alignment of triangles because of their enrichment in complex networks; however, our formulation and resulting algorithms can be applied to general motifs. Using a case study on the NAPABench dataset, we show that TAME is capable of producing alignments with up to 99% accuracy in terms of aligned nodes. We further evaluate our method by aligning yeast and human interactomes. Our results indicate that TAME outperforms the state-of-art alignment methods both in terms of biological and topological quality of the alignments.

  14. IUS prerelease alignment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Evans, F. A.

    1978-01-01

    Space shuttle orbiter/IUS alignment transfer was evaluated. Although the orbiter alignment accuracy was originally believed to be the major contributor to the overall alignment transfer error, it was shown that orbiter alignment accuracy is not a factor affecting IUS alignment accuracy, if certain procedures are followed. Results are reported of alignment transfer accuracy analysis.

  15. Dual-energy cone-beam CT with a flat-panel detector: Effect of reconstruction algorithm on material classification

    SciTech Connect

    Zbijewski, W. Gang, G. J.; Xu, J.; Wang, A. S.; Stayman, J. W.; Taguchi, K.; Carrino, J. A.; Siewerdsen, J. H.

    2014-02-15

    Purpose: Cone-beam CT (CBCT) with a flat-panel detector (FPD) is finding application in areas such as breast and musculoskeletal imaging, where dual-energy (DE) capabilities offer potential benefit. The authors investigate the accuracy of material classification in DE CBCT using filtered backprojection (FBP) and penalized likelihood (PL) reconstruction and optimize contrast-enhanced DE CBCT of the joints as a function of dose, material concentration, and detail size. Methods: Phantoms consisting of a 15 cm diameter water cylinder with solid calcium inserts (50–200 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter) and solid iodine inserts (2–10 mg/ml, 3–28.4 mm diameter), as well as a cadaveric knee with intra-articular injection of iodine were imaged on a CBCT bench with a Varian 4343 FPD. The low energy (LE) beam was 70 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu), and the high energy (HE) beam was 120 kVp (+0.2 mm Cu, +0.5 mm Ag). Total dose (LE+HE) was varied from 3.1 to 15.6 mGy with equal dose allocation. Image-based DE classification involved a nearest distance classifier in the space of LE versus HE attenuation values. Recognizing the differences in noise between LE and HE beams, the LE and HE data were differentially filtered (in FBP) or regularized (in PL). Both a quadratic (PLQ) and a total-variation penalty (PLTV) were investigated for PL. The performance of DE CBCT material discrimination was quantified in terms of voxelwise specificity, sensitivity, and accuracy. Results: Noise in the HE image was primarily responsible for classification errors within the contrast inserts, whereas noise in the LE image mainly influenced classification in the surrounding water. For inserts of diameter 28.4 mm, DE CBCT reconstructions were optimized to maximize the total combined accuracy across the range of calcium and iodine concentrations, yielding values of ∼88% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼95% for PLTV at 3.1 mGy total dose, increasing to ∼95% for FBP and PLQ, and ∼98% for PLTV at 15.6 mGy total dose. For a

  16. BAYESIAN PROTEIN STRUCTURE ALIGNMENT1

    PubMed Central

    RODRIGUEZ, ABEL; SCHMIDLER, SCOTT C.

    2015-01-01

    The analysis of the three-dimensional structure of proteins is an important topic in molecular biochemistry. Structure plays a critical role in defining the function of proteins and is more strongly conserved than amino acid sequence over evolutionary timescales. A key challenge is the identification and evaluation of structural similarity between proteins; such analysis can aid in understanding the role of newly discovered proteins and help elucidate evolutionary relationships between organisms. Computational biologists have developed many clever algorithmic techniques for comparing protein structures, however, all are based on heuristic optimization criteria, making statistical interpretation somewhat difficult. Here we present a fully probabilistic framework for pairwise structural alignment of proteins. Our approach has several advantages, including the ability to capture alignment uncertainty and to estimate key “gap” parameters which critically affect the quality of the alignment. We show that several existing alignment methods arise as maximum a posteriori estimates under specific choices of prior distributions and error models. Our probabilistic framework is also easily extended to incorporate additional information, which we demonstrate by including primary sequence information to generate simultaneous sequence–structure alignments that can resolve ambiguities obtained using structure alone. This combined model also provides a natural approach for the difficult task of estimating evolutionary distance based on structural alignments. The model is illustrated by comparison with well-established methods on several challenging protein alignment examples. PMID:26925188

  17. Pin-Align: a new dynamic programming approach to align protein-protein interaction networks.

    PubMed

    Amir-Ghiasvand, Farid; Nowzari-Dalini, Abbas; Momenzadeh, Vida

    2014-01-01

    To date, few tools for aligning protein-protein interaction networks have been suggested. These tools typically find conserved interaction patterns using various local or global alignment algorithms. However, the improvement of the speed, scalability, simplification, and accuracy of network alignment tools is still the target of new researches. In this paper, we introduce Pin-Align, a new tool for local alignment of protein-protein interaction networks. Pin-Align accuracy is tested on protein interaction networks from IntAct, DIP, and the Stanford Network Database and the results are compared with other well-known algorithms. It is shown that Pin-Align has higher sensitivity and specificity in terms of KEGG Ortholog groups.

  18. Efficient pairwise RNA structure prediction and alignment using sequence alignment constraints

    PubMed Central

    Dowell, Robin D; Eddy, Sean R

    2006-01-01

    Background We are interested in the problem of predicting secondary structure for small sets of homologous RNAs, by incorporating limited comparative sequence information into an RNA folding model. The Sankoff algorithm for simultaneous RNA folding and alignment is a basis for approaches to this problem. There are two open problems in applying a Sankoff algorithm: development of a good unified scoring system for alignment and folding and development of practical heuristics for dealing with the computational complexity of the algorithm. Results We use probabilistic models (pair stochastic context-free grammars, pairSCFGs) as a unifying framework for scoring pairwise alignment and folding. A constrained version of the pairSCFG structural alignment algorithm was developed which assumes knowledge of a few confidently aligned positions (pins). These pins are selected based on the posterior probabilities of a probabilistic pairwise sequence alignment. Conclusion Pairwise RNA structural alignment improves on structure prediction accuracy relative to single sequence folding. Constraining on alignment is a straightforward method of reducing the runtime and memory requirements of the algorithm. Five practical implementations of the pairwise Sankoff algorithm – this work (Consan), David Mathews' Dynalign, Ian Holmes' Stemloc, Ivo Hofacker's PMcomp, and Jan Gorodkin's FOLDALIGN – have comparable overall performance with different strengths and weaknesses. PMID:16952317

  19. Free-space optical communication alignment system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mariola, M.; Petruccione, F.

    2016-10-01

    Optical communication systems in free space require a coarse and fine alignment system to align the receiver and transmitter. In general a coarse alignment is not entirely accurate to transmit the laser beacon in the exact direction of the visible field of the camera. During this process, some algorithms such as the raster, spiral and raster spiral scan algorithm can be used to find the spot of the laser beacon. Applications that require to transmit data in form of polarization signals, such as quantum cryptography, requires a polarisation bases alignment system to transmit and receive the photons. In this paper we present a fine alignment system using a polarised laser beacon. The system proposed was subdivided into a coarse and fine alignment system. The coarse alignment was implemented by using the GPS to acquire the geographical position of the transmitter, receiver and a reference point. The fine alignment was achieved by using a polarised laser beacon from the receiver to the transmitter and a camera located on the transmitter side. The algorithm presented was capable of excluding the background noise. Furthermore the polarisation of the laser beacon was used to align the polarisation bases of the transmitter and the receiver.

  20. Antares beam-alignment-system performance

    SciTech Connect

    Appert, Q.D.; Bender, S.C.

    1983-01-01

    The beam alignment system for the 24-beam-sector Antares CO/sub 2/ fusion laser automatically aligns more than 200 optical elements. A visible-wavelength alignment technique is employed which uses a telescope/TV system to view point-light sources appropriately located down the beamline. The centroids of the light spots are determined by a video tracker, which generates error signals used by the computer control system to move appropriate mirrors in a closed-loop system. Final touch-up alignment is accomplished by projecting a CO/sub 2/ alignment laser beam through the system and sensing its position at the target location. The techniques and control algorithms employed have resulted in alignment accuracies exceeding design requirements. By employing video processing to determine the centroids of diffraction images and by averaging over multiple TV frames, we achieve alignment accuracies better than 0.1 times system diffraction limits in the presence of air turbulence.

  1. An Accurate Timing Alignment Method with Time-to-Digital Converter Linearity Calibration for High-Resolution TOF PET

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongdi; Wang, Chao; An, Shaohui; Lu, Xingyu; Dong, Yun; Liu, Shitao; Baghaei, Hossain; Zhang, Yuxuan; Ramirez, Rocio; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2015-01-01

    Accurate PET system timing alignment minimizes the coincidence time window and therefore reduces random events and improves image quality. It is also critical for time-of-flight (TOF) image reconstruction. Here, we use a thin annular cylinder (shell) phantom filled with a radioactive source and located axially and centrally in a PET camera for the timing alignment of a TOF PET system. This timing alignment method involves measuring the time differences between the selected coincidence detector pairs, calibrating the differential and integral nonlinearity of the time-to-digital converter (TDC) with the same raw data and deriving the intrinsic time biases for each detector using an iterative algorithm. The raw time bias for each detector is downloaded to the front-end electronics and the residual fine time bias can be applied during the TOF list-mode reconstruction. Our results showed that a timing alignment accuracy of better than ±25 ps can be achieved, and a preliminary timing resolution of 473 ps (full width at half maximum) was measured in our prototype TOF PET/CT system. PMID:26543243

  2. An Accurate Timing Alignment Method with Time-to-Digital Converter Linearity Calibration for High-Resolution TOF PET.

    PubMed

    Li, Hongdi; Wang, Chao; An, Shaohui; Lu, Xingyu; Dong, Yun; Liu, Shitao; Baghaei, Hossain; Zhang, Yuxuan; Ramirez, Rocio; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2015-06-01

    Accurate PET system timing alignment minimizes the coincidence time window and therefore reduces random events and improves image quality. It is also critical for time-of-flight (TOF) image reconstruction. Here, we use a thin annular cylinder (shell) phantom filled with a radioactive source and located axially and centrally in a PET camera for the timing alignment of a TOF PET system. This timing alignment method involves measuring the time differences between the selected coincidence detector pairs, calibrating the differential and integral nonlinearity of the time-to-digital converter (TDC) with the same raw data and deriving the intrinsic time biases for each detector using an iterative algorithm. The raw time bias for each detector is downloaded to the front-end electronics and the residual fine time bias can be applied during the TOF list-mode reconstruction. Our results showed that a timing alignment accuracy of better than ±25 ps can be achieved, and a preliminary timing resolution of 473 ps (full width at half maximum) was measured in our prototype TOF PET/CT system.

  3. TM-Aligner: Multiple sequence alignment tool for transmembrane proteins with reduced time and improved accuracy.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Basharat; Ganai, Nazir A; Andrabi, Syed Mudasir; Shah, Riaz A; Singh, Ashutosh

    2017-10-02

    Membrane proteins plays significant role in living cells. Transmembrane proteins are estimated to constitute approximately 30% of proteins at genomic scale. It has been a difficult task to develop specific alignment tools for transmembrane proteins due to limited number of experimentally validated protein structures. Alignment tools based on homology modeling provide fairly good result by recapitulating 70-80% residues in reference alignment provided all input sequences should have known template structures. However, homology modeling tools took substantial amount of time, thus aligning large numbers of sequences becomes computationally demanding. Here we present TM-Aligner, a new tool for transmembrane protein sequence alignment. TM-Aligner is based on Wu-Manber and dynamic string matching algorithm which has significantly improved its accuracy and speed of multiple sequence alignment. We compared TM-Aligner with prevailing other popular tools and performed benchmarking using three separate reference sets, BaliBASE3.0 reference set7 of alpha-helical transmembrane proteins, structure based alignment of transmembrane proteins from Pfam database and structure alignment from GPCRDB. Benchmarking against reference datasets indicated that TM-Aligner is more advanced method having least turnaround time with significant improvements over the most accurate methods such as PROMALS, MAFFT, TM-Coffee, Kalign, ClustalW, Muscle and PRALINE. TM-Aligner is freely available through http://lms.snu.edu.in/TM-Aligner/ .

  4. Inexact Local Alignment Search over Suffix Arrays.

    PubMed

    Ghodsi, Mohammadreza; Pop, Mihai

    2009-11-01

    We describe an algorithm for finding approximate seeds for DNA homology searches. In contrast to previous algorithms that use exact or spaced seeds, our approximate seeds may contain insertions and deletions. We present a generalized heuristic for finding such seeds efficiently and prove that the heuristic does not affect sensitivity. We show how to adapt this algorithm to work over the memory efficient suffix array with provably minimal overhead in running time.We demonstrate the effectiveness of our algorithm on two tasks: whole genome alignment of bacteria and alignment of the DNA sequences of 177 genes that are orthologous in human and mouse. We show our algorithm achieves better sensitivity and uses less memory than other commonly used local alignment tools.

  5. The alignment-distribution graph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Implementing a data-parallel language such as Fortran 90 on a distributed-memory parallel computer requires distributing aggregate data objects (such as arrays) among the memory modules attached to the processors. The mapping of objects to the machine determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. We present a program representation called the alignment distribution graph that makes these communication requirements explicit. We describe the details of the representation, show how to model communication cost in this framework, and outline several algorithms for determining object mappings that approximately minimize residual communication.

  6. The alignment-distribution graph

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chatterjee, Siddhartha; Gilbert, John R.; Schreiber, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Implementing a data-parallel language such as Fortran 90 on a distributed-memory parallel computer requires distributing aggregate data objects (such as arrays) among the memory modules attached to the processors. The mapping of objects to the machine determines the amount of residual communication needed to bring operands of parallel operations into alignment with each other. We present a program representation called the alignment-distribution graph that makes these communication requirements explicit. We describe the details of the representation, show how to model communication cost in this framework, and outline several algorithms for determining object mappings that approximately minimize residual communication.

  7. Multiple whole-genome alignments without a reference organism.

    PubMed

    Dubchak, Inna; Poliakov, Alexander; Kislyuk, Andrey; Brudno, Michael

    2009-04-01

    Multiple sequence alignments have become one of the most commonly used resources in genomics research. Most algorithms for multiple alignment of whole genomes rely either on a reference genome, against which all of the other sequences are laid out, or require a one-to-one mapping between the nucleotides of the genomes, preventing the alignment of recently duplicated regions. Both approaches have drawbacks for whole-genome comparisons. In this paper we present a novel symmetric alignment algorithm. The resulting alignments not only represent all of the genomes equally well, but also include all relevant duplications that occurred since the divergence from the last common ancestor. Our algorithm, implemented as a part of the VISTA Genome Pipeline (VGP), was used to align seven vertebrate and six Drosophila genomes. The resulting whole-genome alignments demonstrate a higher sensitivity and specificity than the pairwise alignments previously available through the VGP and have higher exon alignment accuracy than comparable public whole-genome alignments. Of the multiple alignment methods tested, ours performed the best at aligning genes from multigene families-perhaps the most challenging test for whole-genome alignments. Our whole-genome multiple alignments are available through the VISTA Browser at http://genome.lbl.gov/vista/index.shtml.

  8. Multiple Whole Genome Alignments Without a Reference Organism

    SciTech Connect

    Dubchak, Inna; Poliakov, Alexander; Kislyuk, Andrey; Brudno, Michael

    2009-01-16

    Multiple sequence alignments have become one of the most commonly used resources in genomics research. Most algorithms for multiple alignment of whole genomes rely either on a reference genome, against which all of the other sequences are laid out, or require a one-to-one mapping between the nucleotides of the genomes, preventing the alignment of recently duplicated regions. Both approaches have drawbacks for whole-genome comparisons. In this paper we present a novel symmetric alignment algorithm. The resulting alignments not only represent all of the genomes equally well, but also include all relevant duplications that occurred since the divergence from the last common ancestor. Our algorithm, implemented as a part of the VISTA Genome Pipeline (VGP), was used to align seven vertebrate and sixDrosophila genomes. The resulting whole-genome alignments demonstrate a higher sensitivity and specificity than the pairwise alignments previously available through the VGP and have higher exon alignment accuracy than comparable public whole-genome alignments. Of the multiple alignment methods tested, ours performed the best at aligning genes from multigene families?perhaps the most challenging test for whole-genome alignments. Our whole-genome multiple alignments are available through the VISTA Browser at http://genome.lbl.gov/vista/index.shtml.

  9. Probabilistic sequence alignment of stratigraphic records

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Luan; Khider, Deborah; Lisiecki, Lorraine E.; Lawrence, Charles E.

    2014-10-01

    The assessment of age uncertainty in stratigraphically aligned records is a pressing need in paleoceanographic research. The alignment of ocean sediment cores is used to develop mutually consistent age models for climate proxies and is often based on the δ18O of calcite from benthic foraminifera, which records a global ice volume and deep water temperature signal. To date, δ18O alignment has been performed by manual, qualitative comparison or by deterministic algorithms. Here we present a hidden Markov model (HMM) probabilistic algorithm to find 95% confidence bands for δ18O alignment. This model considers the probability of every possible alignment based on its fit to the δ18O data and transition probabilities for sedimentation rate changes obtained from radiocarbon-based estimates for 37 cores. Uncertainty is assessed using a stochastic back trace recursion to sample alignments in exact proportion to their probability. We applied the algorithm to align 35 late Pleistocene records to a global benthic δ18O stack and found that the mean width of 95% confidence intervals varies between 3 and 23 kyr depending on the resolution and noisiness of the record's δ18O signal. Confidence bands within individual cores also vary greatly, ranging from ~0 to >40 kyr. These alignment uncertainty estimates will allow researchers to examine the robustness of their conclusions, including the statistical evaluation of lead-lag relationships between events observed in different cores.

  10. MAGNA: Maximizing Accuracy in Global Network Alignment.

    PubMed

    Saraph, Vikram; Milenković, Tijana

    2014-10-15

    Biological network alignment aims to identify similar regions between networks of different species. Existing methods compute node similarities to rapidly identify from possible alignments the high-scoring alignments with respect to the overall node similarity. But, the accuracy of the alignments is then evaluated with some other measure that is different than the node similarity used to construct the alignments. Typically, one measures the amount of conserved edges. Thus, the existing methods align similar nodes between networks hoping to conserve many edges (after the alignment is constructed!). Instead, we introduce MAGNA to directly 'optimize' edge conservation while the alignment is constructed, without decreasing the quality of node mapping. MAGNA uses a genetic algorithm and our novel function for 'crossover' of two 'parent' alignments into a superior 'child' alignment to simulate a 'population' of alignments that 'evolves' over time; the 'fittest' alignments survive and proceed to the next 'generation', until the alignment accuracy cannot be optimized further. While we optimize our new and superior measure of the amount of conserved edges, MAGNA can optimize any alignment accuracy measure, including a combined measure of both node and edge conservation. In systematic evaluations against state-of-the-art methods (IsoRank, MI-GRAAL and GHOST), on both synthetic networks and real-world biological data, MAGNA outperforms all of the existing methods, in terms of both node and edge conservation as well as both topological and biological alignment accuracy. Software: http://nd.edu/∼cone/MAGNA CONTACT: : tmilenko@nd.edu Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  11. Some aspects of SR beamline alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaponov, Yu. A.; Cerenius, Y.; Nygaard, J.; Ursby, T.; Larsson, K.

    2011-09-01

    Based on the Synchrotron Radiation (SR) beamline optical element-by-element alignment with analysis of the alignment results an optimized beamline alignment algorithm has been designed and developed. The alignment procedures have been designed and developed for the MAX-lab I911-4 fixed energy beamline. It has been shown that the intermediate information received during the monochromator alignment stage can be used for the correction of both monochromator and mirror without the next stages of alignment of mirror, slits, sample holder, etc. Such an optimization of the beamline alignment procedures decreases the time necessary for the alignment and becomes useful and helpful in the case of any instability of the beamline optical elements, storage ring electron orbit or the wiggler insertion device, which could result in the instability of angular and positional parameters of the SR beam. A general purpose software package for manual, semi-automatic and automatic SR beamline alignment has been designed and developed using the developed algorithm. The TANGO control system is used as the middle-ware between the stand-alone beamline control applications BLTools, BPMonitor and the beamline equipment.

  12. Towards optimal alignment of protein structure distance matrices.

    PubMed

    Wohlers, Inken; Domingues, Francisco S; Klau, Gunnar W

    2010-09-15

    Structural alignments of proteins are important for identification of structural similarities, homology detection and functional annotation. The structural alignment problem is well studied and computationally difficult. Many different scoring schemes for structural similarity as well as many algorithms for finding high-scoring alignments have been proposed. Algorithms using contact map overlap (CMO) as scoring function are currently the only practical algorithms able to compute provably optimal alignments. We propose a new mathematical model for the alignment of inter-residue distance matrices, building upon previous work on maximum CMO. Our model includes all elements needed to emulate various scoring schemes for the alignment of protein distance matrices. The algorithm that we use to compute alignments is practical only for sparse distance matrices. Therefore, we propose a more effective scoring function, which uses a distance threshold and only positive structural scores. We show that even under these restrictions our approach is in terms of alignment accuracy competitive with state-of-the-art structural alignment algorithms, whereas it additionally either proves the optimality of an alignment or returns bounds on the optimal score. Our novel method is freely available and constitutes an important promising step towards truly provably optimal structural alignments of proteins. An executable of our program PAUL is available at http://planet-lisa.net/.

  13. SUMONA: A supervised method for optimizing network alignment.

    PubMed

    Tuncay, Erhun Giray; Can, Tolga

    2016-08-01

    This study focuses on improving the multi-objective memetic algorithm for protein-protein interaction (PPI) network alignment, Optimizing Network Aligner - OptNetAlign, via integration with other existing network alignment methods such as SPINAL, NETAL and HubAlign. The output of this algorithm is an elite set of aligned networks all of which are optimal with respect to multiple user-defined criteria. However, OptNetAlign is an unsupervised genetic algorithm that initiates its search with completely random solutions and it requires substantial running times to generate an elite set of solutions that have high scores with respect to the given criteria. In order to improve running time, the search space of the algorithm can be narrowed down by focusing on remarkably qualified alignments and trying to optimize the most desired criteria on a more limited set of solutions. The method presented in this study improves OptNetAlign in a supervised fashion by utilizing the alignment results of different network alignment algorithms with varying parameters that depend upon user preferences. Therefore, the user can prioritize certain objectives upon others and achieve better running time performance while optimizing the secondary objectives. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. GASSST: global alignment short sequence search tool.

    PubMed

    Rizk, Guillaume; Lavenier, Dominique

    2010-10-15

    The rapid development of next-generation sequencing technologies able to produce huge amounts of sequence data is leading to a wide range of new applications. This triggers the need for fast and accurate alignment software. Common techniques often restrict indels in the alignment to improve speed, whereas more flexible aligners are too slow for large-scale applications. Moreover, many current aligners are becoming inefficient as generated reads grow ever larger. Our goal with our new aligner GASSST (Global Alignment Short Sequence Search Tool) is thus 2-fold-achieving high performance with no restrictions on the number of indels with a design that is still effective on long reads. We propose a new efficient filtering step that discards most alignments coming from the seed phase before they are checked by the costly dynamic programming algorithm. We use a carefully designed series of filters of increasing complexity and efficiency to quickly eliminate most candidate alignments in a wide range of configurations. The main filter uses a precomputed table containing the alignment score of short four base words aligned against each other. This table is reused several times by a new algorithm designed to approximate the score of the full dynamic programming algorithm. We compare the performance of GASSST against BWA, BFAST, SSAHA2 and PASS. We found that GASSST achieves high sensitivity in a wide range of configurations and faster overall execution time than other state-of-the-art aligners. GASSST is distributed under the CeCILL software license at http://www.irisa.fr/symbiose/projects/gassst/ guillaume.rizk@irisa.fr; dominique.lavenier@irisa.fr Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  15. GASSST: global alignment short sequence search tool

    PubMed Central

    Rizk, Guillaume; Lavenier, Dominique

    2010-01-01

    Motivation: The rapid development of next-generation sequencing technologies able to produce huge amounts of sequence data is leading to a wide range of new applications. This triggers the need for fast and accurate alignment software. Common techniques often restrict indels in the alignment to improve speed, whereas more flexible aligners are too slow for large-scale applications. Moreover, many current aligners are becoming inefficient as generated reads grow ever larger. Our goal with our new aligner GASSST (Global Alignment Short Sequence Search Tool) is thus 2-fold—achieving high performance with no restrictions on the number of indels with a design that is still effective on long reads. Results: We propose a new efficient filtering step that discards most alignments coming from the seed phase before they are checked by the costly dynamic programming algorithm. We use a carefully designed series of filters of increasing complexity and efficiency to quickly eliminate most candidate alignments in a wide range of configurations. The main filter uses a precomputed table containing the alignment score of short four base words aligned against each other. This table is reused several times by a new algorithm designed to approximate the score of the full dynamic programming algorithm. We compare the performance of GASSST against BWA, BFAST, SSAHA2 and PASS. We found that GASSST achieves high sensitivity in a wide range of configurations and faster overall execution time than other state-of-the-art aligners. Availability: GASSST is distributed under the CeCILL software license at http://www.irisa.fr/symbiose/projects/gassst/ Contact: guillaume.rizk@irisa.fr; dominique.lavenier@irisa.fr Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:20739310

  16. Bayesian coestimation of phylogeny and sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Lunter, Gerton; Miklós, István; Drummond, Alexei; Jensen, Jens Ledet; Hein, Jotun

    2005-04-01

    Two central problems in computational biology are the determination of the alignment and phylogeny of a set of biological sequences. The traditional approach to this problem is to first build a multiple alignment of these sequences, followed by a phylogenetic reconstruction step based on this multiple alignment. However, alignment and phylogenetic inference are fundamentally interdependent, and ignoring this fact leads to biased and overconfident estimations. Whether the main interest be in sequence alignment or phylogeny, a major goal of computational biology is the co-estimation of both. We developed a fully Bayesian Markov chain Monte Carlo method for coestimating phylogeny and sequence alignment, under the Thorne-Kishino-Felsenstein model of substitution and single nucleotide insertion-deletion (indel) events. In our earlier work, we introduced a novel and efficient algorithm, termed the "indel peeling algorithm", which includes indels as phylogenetically informative evolutionary events, and resembles Felsenstein's peeling algorithm for substitutions on a phylogenetic tree. For a fixed alignment, our extension analytically integrates out both substitution and indel events within a proper statistical model, without the need for data augmentation at internal tree nodes, allowing for efficient sampling of tree topologies and edge lengths. To additionally sample multiple alignments, we here introduce an efficient partial Metropolized independence sampler for alignments, and combine these two algorithms into a fully Bayesian co-estimation procedure for the alignment and phylogeny problem. Our approach results in estimates for the posterior distribution of evolutionary rate parameters, for the maximum a-posteriori (MAP) phylogenetic tree, and for the posterior decoding alignment. Estimates for the evolutionary tree and multiple alignment are augmented with confidence estimates for each node height and alignment column. Our results indicate that the patterns in

  17. Constructing Aligned Assessments Using Automated Test Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Andrew; Polikoff, Morgan S.; Barghaus, Katherine M.; Yang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    We describe an innovative automated test construction algorithm for building aligned achievement tests. By incorporating the algorithm into the test construction process, along with other test construction procedures for building reliable and unbiased assessments, the result is much more valid tests than result from current test construction…

  18. Constructing Aligned Assessments Using Automated Test Construction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Andrew; Polikoff, Morgan S.; Barghaus, Katherine M.; Yang, Rui

    2013-01-01

    We describe an innovative automated test construction algorithm for building aligned achievement tests. By incorporating the algorithm into the test construction process, along with other test construction procedures for building reliable and unbiased assessments, the result is much more valid tests than result from current test construction…

  19. Meta-Alignment with Crumble and Prune: Partitioning very large alignment problems for performance and parallelization

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Continuing research into the global multiple sequence alignment problem has resulted in more sophisticated and principled alignment methods. Unfortunately these new algorithms often require large amounts of time and memory to run, making it nearly impossible to run these algorithms on large datasets. As a solution, we present two general methods, Crumble and Prune, for breaking a phylogenetic alignment problem into smaller, more tractable sub-problems. We call Crumble and Prune meta-alignment methods because they use existing alignment algorithms and can be used with many current alignment programs. Crumble breaks long alignment problems into shorter sub-problems. Prune divides the phylogenetic tree into a collection of smaller trees to reduce the number of sequences in each alignment problem. These methods are orthogonal: they can be applied together to provide better scaling in terms of sequence length and in sequence depth. Both methods partition the problem such that many of the sub-problems can be solved independently. The results are then combined to form a solution to the full alignment problem. Results Crumble and Prune each provide a significant performance improvement with little loss of accuracy. In some cases, a gain in accuracy was observed. Crumble and Prune were tested on real and simulated data. Furthermore, we have implemented a system called Job-tree that allows hierarchical sub-problems to be solved in parallel on a compute cluster, significantly shortening the run-time. Conclusions These methods enabled us to solve gigabase alignment problems. These methods could enable a new generation of biologically realistic alignment algorithms to be applied to real world, large scale alignment problems. PMID:21569267

  20. A novel approach to multiple sequence alignment using hadoop data grids.

    PubMed

    Sudha Sadasivam, G; Baktavatchalam, G

    2010-01-01

    Multiple alignment of protein sequences helps to determine evolutionary linkage and to predict molecular structures. The factors to be considered while aligning multiple sequences are speed and accuracy of alignment. Although dynamic programming algorithms produce accurate alignments, they are computation intensive. In this paper we propose a time efficient approach to sequence alignment that also produces quality alignment. The dynamic nature of the algorithm coupled with data and computational parallelism of hadoop data grids improves the accuracy and speed of sequence alignment. The principle of block splitting in hadoop coupled with its scalability facilitates alignment of very large sequences.

  1. Computing posterior probabilities for score-based alignments using ppALIGN.

    PubMed

    Wolfsheimer, Stefan; Hartmann, Alexander; Rabus, Ralf; Nuel, Gregory

    2012-05-16

    Score-based pairwise alignments are widely used in bioinformatics in particular with molecular database search tools, such as the BLAST family. Due to sophisticated heuristics, such algorithms are usually fast but the underlying scoring model unfortunately lacks a statistical description of the reliability of the reported alignments. In particular, close to gaps, in low-score or low-complexity regions, a huge number of alternative alignments arise which results in a decrease of the certainty of the alignment. ppALIGN is a software package that uses hidden Markov Model techniques to compute position-wise reliability of score-based pairwise alignments of DNA or protein sequences. The design of the model allows for a direct connection between the scoring function and the parameters of the probabilistic model. For this reason it is suitable to analyze the outcomes of popular score based aligners and search tools without having to choose a complicated set of parameters. By contrast, our program only requires the classical score parameters (the scoring function and gap costs). The package comes along with a library written in C++, a standalone program for user defined alignments (ppALIGN) and another program (ppBLAST) which can process a complete result set of BLAST. The main algorithms essentially exhibit a linear time complexity (in the alignment lengths), and they are hence suitable for on-line computations. We have also included alternative decoding algorithms to provide alternative alignments. ppALIGN is a fast program/library that helps detect and quantify questionable regions in pairwise alignments. Due to its structure, the input/output interface it can to be connected to other post-processing tools. Empirically, we illustrate its usefulness in terms of correctly predicted reliable regions for sequences generated using the ROSE model for sequence evolution, and identify sensor-specific regions in the denitrifying betaproteobacterium Aromatoleum aromaticum.

  2. Sequence alignment with tandem duplication

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, G.

    1997-12-01

    Algorithm development for comparing and aligning biological sequences has, until recently, been based on the SI model of mutational events which assumes that modification of sequences proceeds through any of the operations of substitution, insertion or deletion (the latter two collectively termed indels). While this model has worked farily well, it has long been apparent that other mutational events occur. In this paper, we introduce a new model, the DSI model which includes another common mutational event, tandem duplication. Tandem duplication produces tandem repeats which are common in DNA, making up perhaps 10% of the human genome. They are responsible for some human diseases and may serve a multitude of functions in DNA regulation and evolution. Using the DSI model, we develop new exact and heuristic algorithms for comparing and aligning DNA sequences when they contain tandem repeats. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Energy calibration and gain correction of pixelated spectroscopic x-ray detectors using correlation optimised warping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egan, C. K.; Scuffham, J. W.; Veale, M. C.; Wilson, M. D.; Seller, P.; Cernik, R. J.

    2017-01-01

    We describe the implementation of a reliable, robust and flexible gain correction and energy calibration algorithm for pixelated spectroscopic x-ray detectors. This algorithm uses a data processing method known as correlation optimised warping which aligns shifted datasets by means of a segmental linear stretching and compression of the spectral data in order to best correlate with a reference spectrum. We found the algorithm to be very robust against low-count spectroscopy, and was reliable in a range of different spectroscopic applications. Analysis of the integrated spectrum over all pixels for a Cerium K-alpha x-ray emission (at 34.72 keV) yielded a peak width of 2.45 keV before alignment and 1.11 keV after alignment. This compares favourably with the best in class pixel peak width of 0.76 keV and the mean peak width for all pixels of 1.00 keV. We also found the algorithm to be more user friendly than other peak-search algorithms because there is less external input. A key advantage of this algorithm is that it requires no prior knowledge of the input spectral characteristics, shape or quality of the data. This therefore lends itself to being useful for in-line processing and potentially removes the need for a separate calibration standard (e.g. a radioactive source). This algorithm can be used for any system that simultaneously collects large numbers of spectral data—including multi-element detectors.

  4. Sparse alignment for robust tensor learning.

    PubMed

    Lai, Zhihui; Wong, Wai Keung; Xu, Yong; Zhao, Cairong; Sun, Mingming

    2014-10-01

    Multilinear/tensor extensions of manifold learning based algorithms have been widely used in computer vision and pattern recognition. This paper first provides a systematic analysis of the multilinear extensions for the most popular methods by using alignment techniques, thereby obtaining a general tensor alignment framework. From this framework, it is easy to show that the manifold learning based tensor learning methods are intrinsically different from the alignment techniques. Based on the alignment framework, a robust tensor learning method called sparse tensor alignment (STA) is then proposed for unsupervised tensor feature extraction. Different from the existing tensor learning methods, L1- and L2-norms are introduced to enhance the robustness in the alignment step of the STA. The advantage of the proposed technique is that the difficulty in selecting the size of the local neighborhood can be avoided in the manifold learning based tensor feature extraction algorithms. Although STA is an unsupervised learning method, the sparsity encodes the discriminative information in the alignment step and provides the robustness of STA. Extensive experiments on the well-known image databases as well as action and hand gesture databases by encoding object images as tensors demonstrate that the proposed STA algorithm gives the most competitive performance when compared with the tensor-based unsupervised learning methods.

  5. Cavity alignment using fringe scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinkunaite, Laura Paulina; Kawabe, Keita; Landry, Michael

    2017-01-01

    LIGO employs two 4-km long Fabry-Pérot arm cavities, which need to be aligned in order for an interferometer to be locked on a TEM00 mode. Once the cavity is locked, alignment signals can be derived from wave-front sensors which measure the TEM01 mode content. However, the alignment state is not always good enough for locking on TEM00. Even when this is the case, the alignment can be evaluated using a free swinging cavity, that shows flashes when higher-order modes become resonant. By moving test masses, small changes are made to the mirror orientation, and hence the TEM00 mode can be optimized iteratively. Currently, this is a manual procedure, and thus it is very time-consuming. Therefore, this project is aimed to study another possible way to lock the cavity on the TEM00 mode. Misalignment information can also be extracted from the power of the higher-order modes transmitted through the cavity. This talk will present an algorithm for this alternative and faster way to derive the alignment state of the arm cavities. Supported by APS FIP, NSF, and Caltech SFP.

  6. Reduction of artifacts caused by orthopedic hardware in the spine in spectral detector CT examinations using virtual monoenergetic image reconstructions and metal-artifact-reduction algorithms.

    PubMed

    Große Hokamp, Nils; Neuhaus, V; Abdullayev, N; Laukamp, K; Lennartz, S; Mpotsaris, A; Borggrefe, J

    2017-09-21

    Aim of this study was to assess the artifact reduction in patients with orthopedic hardware in the spine as provided by (1) metal-artifact-reduction algorithms (O-MAR) and (2) virtual monoenergetic images (MonoE) as provided by spectral detector CT (SDCT) compared to conventional iterative reconstruction (CI). In all, 28 consecutive patients with orthopedic hardware in the spine who underwent SDCT-examinations were included. CI, O-MAR and MonoE (40-200 keV) images were reconstructed. Attenuation (HU) and noise (SD) were measured in order to calculate signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of paravertebral muscle and spinal canal. Subjective image quality was assessed by two radiologists in terms of image quality and extent of artifact reduction. O-MAR and high-keV MonoE showed significant decrease of hypodense artifacts in terms of higher attenuation as compared to CI (CI vs O-MAR, 200 keV MonoE: -396.5HU vs. -115.2HU, -48.1HU; both p ≤ 0.001). Further, artifacts as depicted by noise were reduced in O-MAR and high-keV MonoE as compared to CI in (1) paravertebral muscle and (2) spinal canal-CI vs. O-MAR/200 keV: (1) 34.7 ± 19.0 HU vs. 26.4 ± 14.4 HU, p ≤ 0.05/27.4 ± 16.1, n.s.; (2) 103.4 ± 61.3 HU vs. 72.6 ± 62.6 HU/60.9 ± 40.1 HU, both p ≤ 0.001. Subjectively both O-MAR and high-keV images yielded an artifact reduction in up to 24/28 patients. Both, O-MAR and high-keV MonoE reconstructions as provided by SDCT lead to objective and subjective artifact reduction, thus the combination of O-MAR and MonoE seems promising for further reduction.

  7. Self-aligning spatial filter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haniff, Tariq M.; Hu, Albert K.; Green, Evan D.

    1994-07-01

    In this paper we describe a prototype self-aligning spatial filter (SASF). We present studies of the design and the results of fabrication prior to the final processing step. The SASF consists of an electrostatically actuated platform on which an optical spatial filter (pinhole) has been fabricated. The pinhole is in the center of a four quadrant split-cell photodetector, which serves as the alignment gauge for the system. When a focused beam at the pinhole is aligned, all four detectors sense the same optical current. In future devices, this information from the photodetectors will be fed back to the electrostatic actuation system to push the platform and align the beam. The electrostatic actuators are formed from the parallel walls of vertical side- wall capacitors built between the silicon bulk and the movable platform. Electrical signal paths in the integrated system used diffused interconnects, while the photodetectors are simply reverse-biased p+n diodes. Fabrication techniques are similar to surface micromachining, except that a wafer bonding step is used to create single crystal structures.

  8. Hardware accelerator for genomic sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Chiang, Jason; Studniberg, Michael; Shaw, Jack; Seto, Shaw; Truong, Kevin

    2006-01-01

    To infer homology and subsequently gene function, the Smith-Waterman algorithm is used to find the optimal local alignment between two sequences. When searching sequence databases that may contain billions of sequences, this algorithm becomes computationally expensive. Consequently, in this paper, we focused on accelerating the Smith-Waterman algorithm by modifying the computationally repeated portion of the algorithm by FPGA hardware custom instructions. These simple modifications accelerated the algorithm runtime by an average of 287% compared to the pure software implementation. Therefore, further design of FPGA accelerated hardware offers a promising direction to seeking runtime improvement of genomic database searching.

  9. Construction of the CDF silicon vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Skarha, J.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Snider, F.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S. ); Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Gonzales, B.; Hrycyk, M.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T. ); Carithers, W.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester

    1992-04-01

    Technical details and methods used in constructing the CDF silicon vertex detector are presented. This description includes a discussion of the foam-carbon fiber composite structure used to silicon microstrip detectors and the procedure for achievement of 5 {mu}m detector alignment. The construction of the beryllium barrel structure, which houses the detector assemblies, is also described. In addition, the 10 {mu}m placement accuracy of the detectors in the barrel structure is discussed and the detector cooling and mounting systems are described. 12 refs.

  10. Global multiple protein-protein interaction network alignment by combining pairwise network alignments

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background A wealth of protein interaction data has become available in recent years, creating an urgent need for powerful analysis techniques. In this context, the problem of finding biologically meaningful correspondences between different protein-protein interaction networks (PPIN) is of particular interest. The PPIN of a species can be compared with that of other species through the process of PPIN alignment. Such an alignment can provide insight into basic problems like species evolution and network component function determination, as well as translational problems such as target identification and elucidation of mechanisms of disease spread. Furthermore, multiple PPINs can be aligned simultaneously, expanding the analytical implications of the result. While there are several pairwise network alignment algorithms, few methods are capable of multiple network alignment. Results We propose SMAL, a MNA algorithm based on the philosophy of scaffold-based alignment. SMAL is capable of converting results from any global pairwise alignment algorithms into a MNA in linear time. Using this method, we have built multiple network alignments based on combining pairwise alignments from a number of publicly available (pairwise) network aligners. We tested SMAL using PPINs of eight species derived from the IntAct repository and employed a number of measures to evaluate performance. Additionally, as part of our experimental investigations, we compared the effectiveness of SMAL while aligning up to eight input PPINs, and examined the effect of scaffold network choice on the alignments. Conclusions A key advantage of SMAL lies in its ability to create MNAs through the use of pairwise network aligners for which native MNA implementations do not exist. Experiments indicate that the performance of SMAL was comparable to that of the native MNA implementation of established methods such as IsoRankN and SMETANA. However, in terms of computational time, SMAL was significantly faster

  11. Automatic Word Alignment

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-02-18

    for each of the paired units includes forming a first alignment of units of the first language to units of the second language, and forming a second...alignment of units of the second language to units of the first language . The alignment parameters include a first set of parameters for forming an...alignment from the first language to the second language and a second set of parameters for forming an align­ ment from the second language to the

  12. Heuristics for multiobjective multiple sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Abbasi, Maryam; Paquete, Luís; Pereira, Francisco B

    2016-07-15

    Aligning multiple sequences arises in many tasks in Bioinformatics. However, the alignments produced by the current software packages are highly dependent on the parameters setting, such as the relative importance of opening gaps with respect to the increase of similarity. Choosing only one parameter setting may provide an undesirable bias in further steps of the analysis and give too simplistic interpretations. In this work, we reformulate multiple sequence alignment from a multiobjective point of view. The goal is to generate several sequence alignments that represent a trade-off between maximizing the substitution score and minimizing the number of indels/gaps in the sum-of-pairs score function. This trade-off gives to the practitioner further information about the similarity of the sequences, from which she could analyse and choose the most plausible alignment. We introduce several heuristic approaches, based on local search procedures, that compute a set of sequence alignments, which are representative of the trade-off between the two objectives (substitution score and indels). Several algorithm design options are discussed and analysed, with particular emphasis on the influence of the starting alignment and neighborhood search definitions on the overall performance. A perturbation technique is proposed to improve the local search, which provides a wide range of high-quality alignments. The proposed approach is tested experimentally on a wide range of instances. We performed several experiments with sequences obtained from the benchmark database BAliBASE 3.0. To evaluate the quality of the results, we calculate the hypervolume indicator of the set of score vectors returned by the algorithms. The results obtained allow us to identify reasonably good choices of parameters for our approach. Further, we compared our method in terms of correctly aligned pairs ratio and columns correctly aligned ratio with respect to reference alignments. Experimental results show

  13. Calibration and Alignment.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grassotti, Christopher; Iskenderian, Haig; Hoffman, Ross N.

    1999-06-01

    Discrepancies between estimates of rainfall from ground-based radar and satellite observing systems can be attributed to either calibration differences or to geolocation and sampling differences. These latter include differences due to radar or satellite misregistration, differences in observation times, or variations in instrument and retrieval algorithm sensitivities. A new methodology has been developed and tested for integrating radar- and satellite-based estimates of precipitation using a feature calibration and alignment (FCA) technique. The parameters describing the calibration and alignment are found using a variational approach, and are composed of displacement and amplitude adjustments to the satellite rainfall retrievals, which minimize the differences with respect to the radar data and satisfy additional smoothness and magnitude constraints. In this approach the amplitude component represents a calibration of the satellite estimate to the radar, whereas the displacement components correct temporal and/or geolocation differences between the radar and satellite data.The method has been tested on a number of cases of the NASA WetNet PIP-2 dataset. These data consist of coincident estimates of rainfall by ground-based radar and the DMSP SSM/I. Sensitivity tests were conducted to tune the parameters of the algorithm. Results indicate the effectiveness of the technique in minimizing the discrepancies between radar and satellite observations of rainfall for a variety of rainfall events ranging from midlatitude frontal precipitation to heavy convection associated with a tropical cyclone (Hurricane Andrew). A remaining issue to be resolved is the incorporation of knowledge about location dependencies in the errors of the radar and microwave estimates.Once the satellite data have been adjusted to match the radar observations, the two independent estimates (radar and adjusted SSM/I rain rates) may be blended to improve the overall depiction of the rainfall event

  14. Aligning parallel arrays to reduce communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sheffler, Thomas J.; Schreiber, Robert; Gilbert, John R.; Chatterjee, Siddhartha

    1994-01-01

    Axis and stride alignment is an important optimization in compiling data-parallel programs for distributed-memory machines. We previously developed an optimal algorithm for aligning array expressions. Here, we examine alignment for more general program graphs. We show that optimal alignment is NP-complete in this setting, so we study heuristic methods. This paper makes two contributions. First, we show how local graph transformations can reduce the size of the problem significantly without changing the best solution. This allows more complex and effective heuristics to be used. Second, we give a heuristic that can explore the space of possible solutions in a number of ways. We show that some of these strategies can give better solutions than a simple greedy approach proposed earlier. Our algorithms have been implemented; we present experimental results showing their effect on the performance of some example programs running on the CM-5.

  15. Clustering algorithm studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graf, Norman A.

    2001-07-01

    An object-oriented framework for undertaking clustering algorithm studies has been developed. We present here the definitions for the abstract Cells and Clusters as well as the interface for the algorithm. We intend to use this framework to investigate the interplay between various clustering algorithms and the resulting jet reconstruction efficiency and energy resolutions to assist in the design of the calorimeter detector.

  16. webPRANK: a phylogeny-aware multiple sequence aligner with interactive alignment browser.

    PubMed

    Löytynoja, Ari; Goldman, Nick

    2010-11-26

    Phylogeny-aware progressive alignment has been found to perform well in phylogenetic alignment benchmarks and to produce superior alignments for the inference of selection on codon sequences. Its implementation in the PRANK alignment program package also allows modelling of complex evolutionary processes and inference of posterior probabilities for sequence sites evolving under each distinct scenario, either simultaneously with the alignment of sequences or as a post-processing step for an existing alignment. This has led to software with many advanced features, and users may find it difficult to generate optimal alignments, visualise the full information in their alignment results, or post-process these results, e.g. by objectively selecting subsets of alignment sites. We have created a web server called webPRANK that provides an easy-to-use interface to the PRANK phylogeny-aware alignment algorithm. The webPRANK server supports the alignment of DNA, protein and codon sequences as well as protein-translated alignment of cDNAs, and includes built-in structure models for the alignment of genomic sequences. The resulting alignments can be exported in various formats widely used in evolutionary sequence analyses. The webPRANK server also includes a powerful web-based alignment browser for the visualisation and post-processing of the results in the context of a cladogram relating the sequences, allowing (e.g.) removal of alignment columns with low posterior reliability. In addition to de novo alignments, webPRANK can be used for the inference of ancestral sequences with phylogenetically realistic gap patterns, and for the annotation and post-processing of existing alignments. The webPRANK server is freely available on the web at http://tinyurl.com/webprank . The webPRANK server incorporates phylogeny-aware multiple sequence alignment, visualisation and post-processing in an easy-to-use web interface. It widens the user base of phylogeny-aware multiple sequence

  17. Alignment method for spectrograms of DNA sequences.

    PubMed

    Bucur, Anca; van Leeuwen, Jasper; Dimitrova, Nevenka; Mittal, Chetan

    2010-01-01

    DNA spectrograms express the periodicities of each of the four nucleotides A, T, C, and G in one or several genomic sequences to be analyzed. DNA spectral analysis can be applied to systematically investigate DNA patterns, which may correspond to relevant biological features. As opposed to looking at nucleotide sequences, spectrogram analysis may detect structural characteristics in very long sequences that are not identifiable by sequence alignment. Alignment of DNA spectrograms can be used to facilitate analysis of very long sequences or entire genomes at different resolutions. Standard clustering algorithms have been used in spectral analysis to find strong patterns in spectra. However, as they use a global distance metric, these algorithms can only detect strong patterns coexisting in several frequencies. In this paper, we propose a new method and several algorithms for aligning spectra suitable for efficient spectral analysis and allowing for the easy detection of strong patterns in both single frequencies and multiple frequencies.

  18. DALIX: optimal DALI protein structure alignment.

    PubMed

    Wohlers, Inken; Andonov, Rumen; Klau, Gunnar W

    2013-01-01

    We present a mathematical model and exact algorithm for optimally aligning protein structures using the DALI scoring model. This scoring model is based on comparing the interresidue distance matrices of proteins and is used in the popular DALI software tool, a heuristic method for protein structure alignment. Our model and algorithm extend an integer linear programming approach that has been previously applied for the related, but simpler, contact map overlap problem. To this end, we introduce a novel type of constraint that handles negative score values and relax it in a Lagrangian fashion. The new algorithm, which we call DALIX, is applicable to any distance matrix-based scoring scheme. We also review options that allow to consider fewer pairs of interresidue distances explicitly because their large number hinders the optimization process. Using four known data sets of varying structural similarity, we compute many provably score-optimal DALI alignments. This allowed, for the first time, to evaluate the DALI heuristic in sound mathematical terms. The results indicate that DALI usually computes optimal or close to optimal alignments. However, we detect a subset of small proteins for which DALI fails to generate any significant alignment, although such alignments do exist.

  19. Characterization of trabecular bone plate-rod microarchitecture using multirow detector CT and the tensor scale: Algorithms, validation, and applications to pilot human studies

    PubMed Central

    Saha, Punam K.; Liu, Yinxiao; Chen, Cheng; Jin, Dakai; Letuchy, Elena M.; Xu, Ziyue; Amelon, Ryan E.; Burns, Trudy L.; Torner, James C.; Levy, Steven M.; Calarge, Chadi A.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Osteoporosis is a common bone disease associated with increased risk of low-trauma fractures leading to substantial morbidity, mortality, and financial costs. Clinically, osteoporosis is defined by low bone mineral density (BMD); however, increasing evidence suggests that trabecular bone (TB) microarchitectural quality is an important determinant of bone strength and fracture risk. A tensor scale based algorithm for in vivo characterization of TB plate-rod microarchitecture at the distal tibia using multirow detector CT (MD-CT) imaging is presented and its performance and applications are examined. Methods: The tensor scale characterizes individual TB on the continuum between a perfect plate and a perfect rod and computes their orientation using optimal ellipsoidal representation of local structures. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using computer-generated phantom images at a resolution and signal-to-noise ratio achievable in vivo. The robustness of the method was examined in terms of stability across a wide range of voxel sizes, repeat scan reproducibility, and correlation between TB measures derived by imaging human ankle specimens under ex vivo and in vivo conditions. Finally, the application of the method was evaluated in pilot human studies involving healthy young-adult volunteers (age: 19 to 21 yr; 51 females and 46 males) and patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (age: 19 to 21 yr; six males and six females). Results: An error of (3.2% ± 2.0%) (mean ± SD), computed as deviation from known measures of TB plate-width, was observed for computer-generated phantoms. An intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.95 was observed for tensor scale TB measures in repeat MD-CT scans where the measures were averaged over a small volume of interest of 1.05 mm diameter with limited smoothing effects. The method was found to be highly stable at different voxel sizes with an error of (2.29% ± 1.56%) at an in vivo voxel size

  20. Characterization of trabecular bone plate-rod microarchitecture using multirow detector CT and the tensor scale: Algorithms, validation, and applications to pilot human studies.

    PubMed

    Saha, Punam K; Liu, Yinxiao; Chen, Cheng; Jin, Dakai; Letuchy, Elena M; Xu, Ziyue; Amelon, Ryan E; Burns, Trudy L; Torner, James C; Levy, Steven M; Calarge, Chadi A

    2015-09-01

    Osteoporosis is a common bone disease associated with increased risk of low-trauma fractures leading to substantial morbidity, mortality, and financial costs. Clinically, osteoporosis is defined by low bone mineral density (BMD); however, increasing evidence suggests that trabecular bone (TB) microarchitectural quality is an important determinant of bone strength and fracture risk. A tensor scale based algorithm for in vivo characterization of TB plate-rod microarchitecture at the distal tibia using multirow detector CT (MD-CT) imaging is presented and its performance and applications are examined. The tensor scale characterizes individual TB on the continuum between a perfect plate and a perfect rod and computes their orientation using optimal ellipsoidal representation of local structures. The accuracy of the method was evaluated using computer-generated phantom images at a resolution and signal-to-noise ratio achievable in vivo. The robustness of the method was examined in terms of stability across a wide range of voxel sizes, repeat scan reproducibility, and correlation between TB measures derived by imaging human ankle specimens under ex vivo and in vivo conditions. Finally, the application of the method was evaluated in pilot human studies involving healthy young-adult volunteers (age: 19 to 21 yr; 51 females and 46 males) and patients treated with selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) (age: 19 to 21 yr; six males and six females). An error of (3.2% ± 2.0%) (mean ± SD), computed as deviation from known measures of TB plate-width, was observed for computer-generated phantoms. An intraclass correlation coefficient of 0.95 was observed for tensor scale TB measures in repeat MD-CT scans where the measures were averaged over a small volume of interest of 1.05 mm diameter with limited smoothing effects. The method was found to be highly stable at different voxel sizes with an error of (2.29% ± 1.56%) at an in vivo voxel size as compared to the original

  1. Spacecraft Alignment Determination and Control for Dual Spacecraft Precision Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Philip C.; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Shah, Neerav

    2017-01-01

    Many proposed formation flying missions seek to advance the state of the art in spacecraft science imaging by utilizing precision dual spacecraft formation flying to enable a virtual space telescope. Using precision dual spacecraft alignment, very long focal lengths can be achieved by locating the optics on one spacecraft and the detector on the other. Proposed science missions include astrophysics concepts with spacecraft separations from 1000 km to 25,000 km, such as the Milli-Arc-Second Structure Imager (MASSIM) and the New Worlds Observer, and Heliophysics concepts for solar coronagraphs and X-ray imaging with smaller separations (50m 500m). All of these proposed missions require advances in guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) for precision formation flying. In particular, very precise astrometric alignment control and estimation is required for precise inertial pointing of the virtual space telescope to enable science imaging orders of magnitude better than can be achieved with conventional single spacecraft instruments. This work develops design architectures, algorithms, and performance analysis of proposed GNC systems for precision dual spacecraft astrometric alignment. These systems employ a variety of GNC sensors and actuators, including laser-based alignment and ranging systems, optical imaging sensors (e.g. guide star telescope), inertial measurement units (IMU), as well as micro-thruster and precision stabilized platforms. A comprehensive GNC performance analysis is given for Heliophysics dual spacecraft PFF imaging mission concept.

  2. Spacecraft Alignment Determination and Control for Dual Spacecraft Precision Formation Flying

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Calhoun, Philip; Novo-Gradac, Anne-Marie; Shah, Neerav

    2017-01-01

    Many proposed formation flying missions seek to advance the state of the art in spacecraft science imaging by utilizing precision dual spacecraft formation flying to enable a virtual space telescope. Using precision dual spacecraft alignment, very long focal lengths can be achieved by locating the optics on one spacecraft and the detector on the other. Proposed science missions include astrophysics concepts with spacecraft separations from 1000 km to 25,000 km, such as the Milli-Arc-Second Structure Imager (MASSIM) and the New Worlds Observer, and Heliophysics concepts for solar coronagraphs and X-ray imaging with smaller separations (50m-500m). All of these proposed missions require advances in guidance, navigation, and control (GNC) for precision formation flying. In particular, very precise astrometric alignment control and estimation is required for precise inertial pointing of the virtual space telescope to enable science imaging orders of magnitude better than can be achieved with conventional single spacecraft instruments. This work develops design architectures, algorithms, and performance analysis of proposed GNC systems for precision dual spacecraft astrometric alignment. These systems employ a variety of GNC sensors and actuators, including laser-based alignment and ranging systems, optical imaging sensors (e.g. guide star telescope), inertial measurement units (IMU), as well as microthruster and precision stabilized platforms. A comprehensive GNC performance analysis is given for Heliophysics dual spacecraft PFF imaging mission concept.

  3. High quality protein sequence alignment by combining structural profile prediction and profile alignment using SABERTOOTH

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Protein alignments are an essential tool for many bioinformatics analyses. While sequence alignments are accurate for proteins of high sequence similarity, they become unreliable as they approach the so-called 'twilight zone' where sequence similarity gets indistinguishable from random. For such distant pairs, structure alignment is of much better quality. Nevertheless, sequence alignment is the only choice in the majority of cases where structural data is not available. This situation demands development of methods that extend the applicability of accurate sequence alignment to distantly related proteins. Results We develop a sequence alignment method that combines the prediction of a structural profile based on the protein's sequence with the alignment of that profile using our recently published alignment tool SABERTOOTH. In particular, we predict the contact vector of protein structures using an artificial neural network based on position-specific scoring matrices generated by PSI-BLAST and align these predicted contact vectors. The resulting sequence alignments are assessed using two different tests: First, we assess the alignment quality by measuring the derived structural similarity for cases in which structures are available. In a second test, we quantify the ability of the significance score of the alignments to recognize structural and evolutionary relationships. As a benchmark we use a representative set of the SCOP (structural classification of proteins) database, with similarities ranging from closely related proteins at SCOP family level, to very distantly related proteins at SCOP fold level. Comparing these results with some prominent sequence alignment tools, we find that SABERTOOTH produces sequence alignments of better quality than those of Clustal W, T-Coffee, MUSCLE, and PSI-BLAST. HHpred, one of the most sophisticated and computationally expensive tools available, outperforms our alignment algorithm at family and superfamily levels

  4. Detector Mount Design for IGRINS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jae Sok; Park, Chan; Cha, Sang-Mok; Yuk, In-Soo; Park, Kwijong; Kim, Kang-Min; Chun, Moo-Young; Ko, Kyeongyeon; Oh, Heeyoung; Jeong, Ueejeong; Nah, Jakyoung; Lee, Hanshin; Jaffe, Daniel T.

    2014-06-01

    The Immersion Grating Infrared Spectrometer (IGRINS) is a near-infrared wide-band high-resolution spectrograph jointly developed by the Korea Astronomy and Space Science Institute and the University of Texas at Austin. IGRINS employs three HAWAII-2RG Focal Plane Array (H2RG FPA) detectors. We present the design and fabrication of the detector mount for the H2RG detector. The detector mount consists of a detector housing, an ASIC housing, a Field Flattener Lens (FFL) mount, and a support base frame. The detector and the ASIC housing should be kept at 65 K and the support base frame at 130 K. Therefore they are thermally isolated by the support made of GFRP material. The detector mount is designed so that it has features of fine adjusting the position of the detector surface in the optical axis and of fine adjusting yaw and pitch angles in order to utilize as an optical system alignment compensator. We optimized the structural stability and thermal characteristics of the mount design using computer-aided 3D modeling and finite element analysis. Based on the structural and thermal analysis, the designed detector mount meets an optical stability tolerance and system thermal requirements. Actual detector mount fabricated based on the design has been installed into the IGRINS cryostat and successfully passed a vacuum test and a cold test.

  5. An Efficient, FPGA-Based, Cluster Detection Algorithm Implementation for a Strip Detector Readout System in a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E. (Editor); Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photoelectron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  6. GridPix detectors - introduction and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, J.; Bilevych, Y.; Desch, K.; Krieger, C.; Lupberger, M.

    2017-02-01

    GridPix detectors are a new kind of detectors combining a high density pixelized readout ASIC with a Micromegas gas amplification stage. Because of the alignment of mesh holes and pixels, a high efficiency for detecting and separating single primary electrons is reached. This feature leads to excellent spatial and energy resolutions as demonstrated by several different setups.

  7. SWAMP+: multiple subsequence alignment using associative massive parallelism

    SciTech Connect

    Steinfadt, Shannon Irene; Baker, Johnnie W

    2010-10-18

    A new parallel algorithm SWAMP+ incorporates the Smith-Waterman sequence alignment on an associative parallel model known as ASC. It is a highly sensitive parallel approach that expands traditional pairwise sequence alignment. This is the first parallel algorithm to provide multiple non-overlapping, non-intersecting subsequence alignments with the accuracy of Smith-Waterman. The efficient algorithm provides multiple alignments similar to BLAST while creating a better workflow for the end users. The parallel portions of the code run in O(m+n) time using m processors. When m = n, the algorithmic analysis becomes O(n) with a coefficient of two, yielding a linear speedup. Implementation of the algorithm on the SIMD ClearSpeed CSX620 confirms this theoretical linear speedup with real timings.

  8. A novel partial sequence alignment tool for finding large deletions.

    PubMed

    Aruk, Taner; Ustek, Duran; Kursun, Olcay

    2012-01-01

    Finding large deletions in genome sequences has become increasingly more useful in bioinformatics, such as in clinical research and diagnosis. Although there are a number of publically available next generation sequencing mapping and sequence alignment programs, these software packages do not correctly align fragments containing deletions larger than one kb. We present a fast alignment software package, BinaryPartialAlign, that can be used by wet lab scientists to find long structural variations in their experiments. For BinaryPartialAlign, we make use of the Smith-Waterman (SW) algorithm with a binary-search-based approach for alignment with large gaps that we called partial alignment. BinaryPartialAlign implementation is compared with other straight-forward applications of SW. Simulation results on mtDNA fragments demonstrate the effectiveness (runtime and accuracy) of the proposed method.

  9. Aligning graphs and finding substructures by a cavity approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradde, S.; Braunstein, A.; Mahmoudi, H.; Tria, F.; Weigt, M.; Zecchina, R.

    2010-02-01

    We introduce a new distributed algorithm for aligning graphs or finding substructures within a given graph. It is based on the cavity method and is used to study the maximum-clique and the graph-alignment problems in random graphs. The algorithm allows to analyze large graphs and may find applications in fields such as computational biology. As a proof of concept we use our algorithm to align the similarity graphs of two interacting protein families involved in bacterial signal transduction, and to predict actually interacting protein partners between these families.

  10. Ontology Alignment Repair through Modularization and Confidence-Based Heuristics.

    PubMed

    Santos, Emanuel; Faria, Daniel; Pesquita, Catia; Couto, Francisco M

    2015-01-01

    Ontology Matching aims at identifying a set of semantic correspondences, called an alignment, between related ontologies. In recent years, there has been a growing interest in efficient and effective matching methods for large ontologies. However, alignments produced for large ontologies are often logically incoherent. It was only recently that the use of repair techniques to improve the coherence of ontology alignments began to be explored. This paper presents a novel modularization technique for ontology alignment repair which extracts fragments of the input ontologies that only contain the necessary classes and relations to resolve all detectable incoherences. The paper presents also an alignment repair algorithm that uses a global repair strategy to minimize both the degree of incoherence and the number of mappings removed from the alignment, while overcoming the scalability problem by employing the proposed modularization technique. Our evaluation shows that our modularization technique produces significantly small fragments of the ontologies and that our repair algorithm produces more complete alignments than other current alignment repair systems, while obtaining an equivalent degree of incoherence. Additionally, we also present a variant of our repair algorithm that makes use of the confidence values of the mappings to improve alignment repair. Our repair algorithm was implemented as part of AgreementMakerLight, a free and open-source ontology matching system.

  11. Subminiature infrared detector translation stage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Alan D.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes a precision subminiature three-axis translation stage used in the GOES Sounder to provide positional adjustment of 12 cooled infrared detectors. Four separate translation stages and detectors are packaged into a detector mechanism which has an overall size of 0.850 x 1.230 x 0.600 inches. Each translation stage is capable of + or - 0.015 inch motion in the X and Y axes and +0.050/-0.025 inch motion in the Z axis with a sensitivity of 0.0002 inches. The function of the detector translation stage allows real time detector signal peaking during Sounder alignment. The translation stage operates in a cryogenic environment under a 10 to the -6th torr vacuum.

  12. Girder Alignment Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Zackary; Ruland, Robert; LeCocq, Catherine; Lundahl, Eric; Levashov, Yurii; Reese, Ed; Rago, Carl; Poling, Ben; Schafer, Donald; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; Wienands, Uli; /SLAC

    2010-11-18

    The girders for the LCLS undulator system contain components which must be aligned with high accuracy relative to each other. The alignment is one of the last steps before the girders go into the tunnel, so the alignment must be done efficiently, on a tight schedule. This note documents the alignment plan which includes efficiency and high accuracy. The motivation for girder alignment involves the following considerations. Using beam based alignment, the girder position will be adjusted until the beam goes through the center of the quadrupole and beam finder wire. For the machine to work properly, the undulator axis must be on this line and the center of the undulator beam pipe must be on this line. The physics reasons for the undulator axis and undulator beam pipe axis to be centered on the beam are different, but the alignment tolerance for both are similar. In addition, the beam position monitor must be centered on the beam to preserve its calibration. Thus, the undulator, undulator beam pipe, quadrupole, beam finder wire, and beam position monitor axes must all be aligned to a common line. All relative alignments are equally important, not just, for example, between quadrupole and undulator. We begin by making the common axis the nominal beam axis in the girder coordinate system. All components will be initially aligned to this axis. A more accurate alignment will then position the components relative to each other, without incorporating the girder itself.

  13. RADIATION DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Wilson, H.N.; Glass, F.M.

    1960-05-10

    A radiation detector of the type is described wherein a condenser is directly connected to the electrodes for the purpose of performing the dual function of a guard ring and to provide capacitance coupling for resetting the detector system.

  14. FRESCO: flexible alignment with rectangle scoring schemes.

    PubMed

    Dalca, A V; Brudno, M

    2008-01-01

    While the popular DNA sequence alignment tools incorporate powerful heuristics to allow for fast and accurate alignment of DNA, most of them still optimize the classical Needleman Wunsch scoring scheme. The development of novel scoring schemes is often hampered by the difficulty of finding an optimizing algorithm for each non-trivial scheme. In this paper we define the broad class of rectangle scoring schemes, and describe an algorithm and tool that can align two sequences with an arbitrary rectangle scoring scheme in polynomial time. Rectangle scoring schemes encompass some of the popular alignment scoring metrics currently in use, as well as many other functions. We investigate a novel scoring function based on minimizing the expected number of random diagonals observed with the given scores and show that it rivals the LAGAN and Clustal-W aligners, without using any biological or evolutionary parameters. The FRESCO program, freely available at http://compbio.cs.toronto.edu/fresco, gives bioinformatics researchers the ability to quickly compare the performance of other complex scoring formulas without having to implement new algorithms to optimize them.

  15. Multiple network alignment on quantum computers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daskin, Anmer; Grama, Ananth; Kais, Sabre

    2014-12-01

    Comparative analyses of graph-structured datasets underly diverse problems. Examples of these problems include identification of conserved functional components (biochemical interactions) across species, structural similarity of large biomolecules, and recurring patterns of interactions in social networks. A large class of such analyses methods quantify the topological similarity of nodes across networks. The resulting correspondence of nodes across networks, also called node alignment, can be used to identify invariant subgraphs across the input graphs. Given graphs as input, alignment algorithms use topological information to assign a similarity score to each -tuple of nodes, with elements (nodes) drawn from each of the input graphs. Nodes are considered similar if their neighbors are also similar. An alternate, equivalent view of these network alignment algorithms is to consider the Kronecker product of the input graphs and to identify high-ranked nodes in the Kronecker product graph. Conventional methods such as PageRank and HITS (Hypertext-Induced Topic Selection) can be used for this purpose. These methods typically require computation of the principal eigenvector of a suitably modified Kronecker product matrix of the input graphs. We adopt this alternate view of the problem to address the problem of multiple network alignment. Using the phase estimation algorithm, we show that the multiple network alignment problem can be efficiently solved on quantum computers. We characterize the accuracy and performance of our method and show that it can deliver exponential speedups over conventional (non-quantum) methods.

  16. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization.

    PubMed

    Volpe, F; Austin, M E; Campbell, G; Deterly, T

    2012-10-01

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1-7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase.

  17. Oblique electron-cyclotron-emission radial and phase detector of rotating magnetic islands applied to alignment and modulation of electron-cyclotron-current-drive for neoclassical tearing mode stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Volpe, F.; Austin, M. E.; Campbell, G.; Deterly, T.

    2012-10-15

    A two channel oblique electron cyclotron emission (ECE) radiometer was installed on the DIII-D tokamak and interfaced to four gyrotrons. Oblique ECE was used to toroidally and radially localize rotating magnetic islands and so assist their electron cyclotron current drive (ECCD) stabilization. In particular, after manipulations operated by the interfacing analogue circuit, the oblique ECE signals directly modulated the current drive in synch with the island rotation and in phase with the island O-point, for a more efficient stabilization. Apart from the different toroidal location, the diagnostic view is identical to the ECCD launch direction, which greatly simplified the real-time use of the signals. In fact, a simple toroidal extrapolation was sufficient to lock the modulation to the O-point phase. This was accomplished by a specially designed phase shifter of nearly flat response over the 1-7 kHz range. Moreover, correlation analysis of two channels slightly above and below the ECCD frequency allowed checking the radial alignment to the island, based on the fact that for satisfactory alignment the two signals are out of phase.

  18. Spacecraft alignment estimation. [for onboard sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shuster, Malcolm D.; Bierman, Gerald J.

    1988-01-01

    A numerically well-behaved factorized methodology is developed for estimating spacecraft sensor alignments from prelaunch and inflight data without the need to compute the spacecraft attitude or angular velocity. Such a methodology permits the estimation of sensor alignments (or other biases) in a framework free of unknown dynamical variables. In actual mission implementation such an algorithm is usually better behaved than one that must compute sensor alignments simultaneously with the spacecraft attitude, for example by means of a Kalman filter. In particular, such a methodology is less sensitive to data dropouts of long duration, and the derived measurement used in the attitude-independent algorithm usually makes data checking and editing of outliers much simpler than would be the case in the filter.

  19. Compton imaging with a highly-segmented, position-sensitive HPGe detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbach, T.; Hirsch, R.; Reiter, P.; Birkenbach, B.; Bruyneel, B.; Eberth, J.; Gernhäuser, R.; Hess, H.; Lewandowski, L.; Maier, L.; Schlarb, M.; Weiler, B.; Winkel, M.

    2017-02-01

    A Compton camera based on a highly-segmented high-purity germanium (HPGe) detector and a double-sided silicon-strip detector (DSSD) was developed, tested, and put into operation; the origin of γ radiation was determined successfully. The Compton camera is operated in two different modes. Coincidences from Compton-scattered γ-ray events between DSSD and HPGe detector allow for best angular resolution; while the high-efficiency mode takes advantage of the position sensitivity of the highly-segmented HPGe detector. In this mode the setup is sensitive to the whole 4π solid angle. The interaction-point positions in the 36-fold segmented large-volume HPGe detector are determined by pulse-shape analysis (PSA) of all HPGe detector signals. Imaging algorithms were developed for each mode and successfully implemented. The angular resolution sensitively depends on parameters such as geometry, selected multiplicity and interaction-point distances. Best results were obtained taking into account the crosstalk properties, the time alignment of the signals and the distance metric for the PSA for both operation modes. An angular resolution between 13.8° and 19.1°, depending on the minimal interaction-point distance for the high-efficiency mode at an energy of 1275 keV, was achieved. In the coincidence mode, an increased angular resolution of 4.6° was determined for the same γ-ray energy.

  20. Metabolic network alignment in large scale by network compression.

    PubMed

    Ay, Ferhat; Dang, Michael; Kahveci, Tamer

    2012-03-21

    Metabolic network alignment is a system scale comparative analysis that discovers important similarities and differences across different metabolisms and organisms. Although the problem of aligning metabolic networks has been considered in the past, the computational complexity of the existing solutions has so far limited their use to moderately sized networks. In this paper, we address the problem of aligning two metabolic networks, particularly when both of them are too large to be dealt with using existing methods. We develop a generic framework that can significantly improve the scale of the networks that can be aligned in practical time. Our framework has three major phases, namely the compression phase, the alignment phase and the refinement phase. For the first phase, we develop an algorithm which transforms the given networks to a compressed domain where they are summarized using fewer nodes, termed supernodes, and interactions. In the second phase, we carry out the alignment in the compressed domain using an existing network alignment method as our base algorithm. This alignment results in supernode mappings in the compressed domain, each of which are smaller instances of network alignment problem. In the third phase, we solve each of the instances using the base alignment algorithm to refine the alignment results. We provide a user defined parameter to control the number of compression levels which generally determines the tradeoff between the quality of the alignment versus how fast the algorithm runs. Our experiments on the networks from KEGG pathway database demonstrate that the compression method we propose reduces the sizes of metabolic networks by almost half at each compression level which provides an expected speedup of more than an order of magnitude. We also observe that the alignments obtained by only one level of compression capture the original alignment results with high accuracy. Together, these suggest that our framework results in

  1. Approximate protein structural alignment in polynomial time

    PubMed Central

    Kolodny, Rachel; Linial, Nathan

    2004-01-01

    Alignment of protein structures is a fundamental task in computational molecular biology. Good structural alignments can help detect distant evolutionary relationships that are hard or impossible to discern from protein sequences alone. Here, we study the structural alignment problem as a family of optimization problems and develop an approximate polynomial-time algorithm to solve them. For a commonly used scoring function, the algorithm runs in O(n10/ε6) time, for globular protein of length n, and it detects alignments that score within an additive error of ε from all optima. Thus, we prove that this task is computationally feasible, although the method that we introduce is too slow to be a useful everyday tool. We argue that such approximate solutions are, in fact, of greater interest than exact ones because of the noisy nature of experimentally determined protein coordinates. The measurement of similarity between a pair of protein structures used by our algorithm involves the Euclidean distance between the structures (appropriately rigidly transformed). We show that an alternative approach, which relies on internal distance matrices, must incorporate sophisticated geometric ingredients if it is to guarantee optimality and run in polynomial time. We use these observations to visualize the scoring function for several real instances of the problem. Our investigations yield insights on the computational complexity of protein alignment under various scoring functions. These insights can be used in the design of scoring functions for which the optimum can be approximated efficiently and perhaps in the development of efficient algorithms for the multiple structural alignment problem. PMID:15304646

  2. Alignment methods: strategies, challenges, benchmarking, and comparative overview.

    PubMed

    Löytynoja, Ari

    2012-01-01

    Comparative evolutionary analyses of molecular sequences are solely based on the identities and differences detected between homologous characters. Errors in this homology statement, that is errors in the alignment of the sequences, are likely to lead to errors in the downstream analyses. Sequence alignment and phylogenetic inference are tightly connected and many popular alignment programs use the phylogeny to divide the alignment problem into smaller tasks. They then neglect the phylogenetic tree, however, and produce alignments that are not evolutionarily meaningful. The use of phylogeny-aware methods reduces the error but the resulting alignments, with evolutionarily correct representation of homology, can challenge the existing practices and methods for viewing and visualising the sequences. The inter-dependency of alignment and phylogeny can be resolved by joint estimation of the two; methods based on statistical models allow for inferring the alignment parameters from the data and correctly take into account the uncertainty of the solution but remain computationally challenging. Widely used alignment methods are based on heuristic algorithms and unlikely to find globally optimal solutions. The whole concept of one correct alignment for the sequences is questionable, however, as there typically exist vast numbers of alternative, roughly equally good alignments that should also be considered. This uncertainty is hidden by many popular alignment programs and is rarely correctly taken into account in the downstream analyses. The quest for finding and improving the alignment solution is complicated by the lack of suitable measures of alignment goodness. The difficulty of comparing alternative solutions also affects benchmarks of alignment methods and the results strongly depend on the measure used. As the effects of alignment error cannot be predicted, comparing the alignments' performance in downstream analyses is recommended.

  3. Incorporating Linguistic Information to Statistical Word-Level Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cendejas, Eduardo; Barceló, Grettel; Gelbukh, Alexander; Sidorov, Grigori

    Parallel texts are enriched by alignment algorithms, thus establishing a relationship between the structures of the implied languages. Depending on the alignment level, the enrichment can be performed on paragraphs, sentences or words, of the expressed content in the source language and its translation. There are two main approaches to perform word-level alignment: statistical or linguistic. Due to the dissimilar grammar rules the languages have, the statistical algorithms usually give lower precision. That is why the development of this type of algorithms is generally aimed at a specific language pair using linguistic techniques. A hybrid alignment system based on the combination of the two traditional approaches is presented in this paper. It provides user-friendly configuration and is adaptable to the computational environment. The system uses linguistic resources and procedures such as identification of cognates, morphological information, syntactic trees, dictionaries, and semantic domains. We show that the system outperforms existing algorithms.

  4. Chunk Alignment for Corpus-Based Machine Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae Dong

    2011-01-01

    Since sub-sentential alignment is critically important to the translation quality of an Example-Based Machine Translation (EBMT) system, which operates by finding and combining phrase-level matches against the training examples, we developed a new alignment algorithm for the purpose of improving the EBMT system's performance. This new…

  5. Chunk Alignment for Corpus-Based Machine Translation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kim, Jae Dong

    2011-01-01

    Since sub-sentential alignment is critically important to the translation quality of an Example-Based Machine Translation (EBMT) system, which operates by finding and combining phrase-level matches against the training examples, we developed a new alignment algorithm for the purpose of improving the EBMT system's performance. This new…

  6. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš E-mail: zvlah@stanford.edu

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used 'nonlinear alignment model,' finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the 'GI' term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  7. Tidal alignment of galaxies

    SciTech Connect

    Blazek, Jonathan; Vlah, Zvonimir; Seljak, Uroš

    2015-08-01

    We develop an analytic model for galaxy intrinsic alignments (IA) based on the theory of tidal alignment. We calculate all relevant nonlinear corrections at one-loop order, including effects from nonlinear density evolution, galaxy biasing, and source density weighting. Contributions from density weighting are found to be particularly important and lead to bias dependence of the IA amplitude, even on large scales. This effect may be responsible for much of the luminosity dependence in IA observations. The increase in IA amplitude for more highly biased galaxies reflects their locations in regions with large tidal fields. We also consider the impact of smoothing the tidal field on halo scales. We compare the performance of this consistent nonlinear model in describing the observed alignment of luminous red galaxies with the linear model as well as the frequently used "nonlinear alignment model," finding a significant improvement on small and intermediate scales. We also show that the cross-correlation between density and IA (the "GI" term) can be effectively separated into source alignment and source clustering, and we accurately model the observed alignment down to the one-halo regime using the tidal field from the fully nonlinear halo-matter cross correlation. Inside the one-halo regime, the average alignment of galaxies with density tracers no longer follows the tidal alignment prediction, likely reflecting nonlinear processes that must be considered when modeling IA on these scales. Finally, we discuss tidal alignment in the context of cosmic shear measurements.

  8. Measurement of the Inclusive Jet Cross Section using the k(T) algorithm in p anti-p collisions at s**(1/2) = 1.96-TeV with the CDF II Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Abulencia, A.; Adelman, J.; Affolder, Anthony Allen; Akimoto, T.; Albrow, Michael G.; Ambrose, D.; Amerio, S.; Amidei, Dante E.; Anastassov, A.; Anikeev, Konstantin; Annovi, A.; /Frascati /Comenius U.

    2007-01-01

    The authors report on measurements of the inclusive jet production cross section as a function of the jet transverse momentum in p{bar p} collisions at {radical}s = 1.96 TeV, using the k{sub T} algorithm and a data sample corresponding to 1.0 fb{sup -1} collected with the Collider Detector at Fermilab in Run II. The measurements are carried out in five different jet rapidity regions with |y{sup jet}| < 2.1 and transverse momentum in the range 54 < p{sub T}{sup jet} < 700 GeV/c. Next-to-leading order perturbative QCD predictions are in good agreement with the measured cross sections.

  9. Refining multiple sequence alignments with conserved core regions

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Saikat; Lanczycki, Christopher J.; Panchenko, Anna R.; Przytycka, Teresa M.; Thiessen, Paul A.; Bryant, Stephen H.

    2006-01-01

    Accurate multiple sequence alignments of proteins are very important to several areas of computational biology and provide an understanding of phylogenetic history of domain families, their identification and classification. This article presents a new algorithm, REFINER, that refines a multiple sequence alignment by iterative realignment of its individual sequences with the predetermined conserved core (block) model of a protein family. Realignment of each sequence can correct misalignments between a given sequence and the rest of the profile and at the same time preserves the family's overall block model. Large-scale benchmarking studies showed a noticeable improvement of alignment after refinement. This can be inferred from the increased alignment score and enhanced sensitivity for database searching using the sequence profiles derived from refined alignments compared with the original alignments. A standalone version of the program is available by ftp distribution () and will be incorporated into the next release of the Cn3D structure/alignment viewer. PMID:16707662

  10. Response microcantilever thermal detector

    SciTech Connect

    Cunningham, Joseph P.; Rajic, Slobodan; Datskos, Panagiotis G.; Evans III, Boyd M.

    2004-10-19

    A "folded leg" thermal detector microcantilever constructed of a substrate with at least one leg interposed between a fixed end and a deflective end, each leg having at least three essentially parallel leg segments interconnected on alternate opposing ends and aligned in a serpentine pattern with only the first leg segment attached to the fixed end and only the last leg segment attached to the deflective end. Alternate leg segment are coated on the pentalever with coating applied to the top of the first, third, and fifth leg segments of each leg and to the bottom of the second and fourth leg segments of each leg.

  11. Electromyography-based seizure detector: Preliminary results comparing a generalized tonic-clonic seizure detection algorithm to video-EEG recordings.

    PubMed

    Szabó, Charles Ákos; Morgan, Lola C; Karkar, Kameel M; Leary, Linda D; Lie, Octavian V; Girouard, Michael; Cavazos, José E

    2015-09-01

    Automatic detection of generalized tonic-clonic seizures (GTCS) will facilitate patient monitoring and early intervention to prevent comorbidities, recurrent seizures, or death. Brain Sentinel (San Antonio, Texas, USA) developed a seizure-detection algorithm evaluating surface electromyography (sEMG) signals during GTCS. This study aims to validate the seizure-detection algorithm using inpatient video-electroencephalography (EEG) monitoring. sEMG was recorded unilaterally from the biceps/triceps muscles in 33 patients (17white/16 male) with a mean age of 40 (range 14-64) years who were admitted for video-EEG monitoring. Maximum voluntary biceps contraction was measured in each patient to set up the baseline physiologic muscle threshold. The raw EMG signal was recorded using conventional amplifiers, sampling at 1,024 Hz and filtered with a 60 Hz noise detection algorithm before it was processed with three band-pass filters at pass frequencies of 3-40, 130-240, and 300-400 Hz. A seizure-detection algorithm utilizing Hotelling's T-squared power analysis of compound muscle action potentials was used to identify GTCS and correlated with video-EEG recordings. In 1,399 h of continuous recording, there were 196 epileptic seizures (21 GTCS, 96 myoclonic, 28 tonic, 12 absence, and 42 focal seizures with or without loss of awareness) and 4 nonepileptic spells. During retrospective, offline evaluation of sEMG from the biceps alone, the algorithm detected 20 GTCS (95%) in 11 patients, averaging within 20 s of electroclinical onset of generalized tonic activity, as identified by video-EEG monitoring. Only one false-positive detection occurred during the postictal period following a GTCS, but false alarms were not triggered by other seizure types or spells. Brain Sentinel's seizure detection algorithm demonstrated excellent sensitivity and specificity for identifying GTCS recorded in an epilepsy monitoring unit. Further studies are needed in larger patient groups, including

  12. Stable glow discharge detector

    DOEpatents

    Koo, Jackson C.; Yu, Conrad M.

    2004-05-18

    A highly sensitive electronic ion cell for the measurement of trace elements in He carrier gas which involves glow discharge. A constant wave (CW) stable glow discharge detector which is controlled through a biased resistor, can detect the change of electron density caused by impurities in the He carrier gas by many orders of magnitude larger than that caused by direct ionization or electron capture. The stable glow discharge detector utilizes a floating pseudo-electrode to form a probe in or near the plasma and a solid rod electrode. By using this probe, the large variation of electron density due to trace amounts of impurities can be directly measured. The solid rod electrode provides greater stability and thus easier alignment.

  13. A New Analytic Alignment Method for a SINS.

    PubMed

    Tan, Caiming; Zhu, Xinhua; Su, Yan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhiqiang; Gu, Dongbing

    2015-11-04

    Analytic alignment is a type of self-alignment for a Strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) that is based solely on two non-collinear vectors, which are the gravity and rotational velocity vectors of the Earth at a stationary base on the ground. The attitude of the SINS with respect to the Earth can be obtained directly using the TRIAD algorithm given two vector measurements. For a traditional analytic coarse alignment, all six outputs from the inertial measurement unit (IMU) are used to compute the attitude. In this study, a novel analytic alignment method called selective alignment is presented. This method uses only three outputs of the IMU and a few properties from the remaining outputs such as the sign and the approximate value to calculate the attitude. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the validity of this method, and the precision of yaw is improved using the selective alignment method compared to the traditional analytic coarse alignment method in the vehicle experiment. The selective alignment principle provides an accurate relationship between the outputs and the attitude of the SINS relative to the Earth for a stationary base, and it is an extension of the TRIAD algorithm. The selective alignment approach has potential uses in applications such as self-alignment, fault detection, and self-calibration.

  14. A New Analytic Alignment Method for a SINS

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Caiming; Zhu, Xinhua; Su, Yan; Wang, Yu; Wu, Zhiqiang; Gu, Dongbing

    2015-01-01

    Analytic alignment is a type of self-alignment for a Strapdown inertial navigation system (SINS) that is based solely on two non-collinear vectors, which are the gravity and rotational velocity vectors of the Earth at a stationary base on the ground. The attitude of the SINS with respect to the Earth can be obtained directly using the TRIAD algorithm given two vector measurements. For a traditional analytic coarse alignment, all six outputs from the inertial measurement unit (IMU) are used to compute the attitude. In this study, a novel analytic alignment method called selective alignment is presented. This method uses only three outputs of the IMU and a few properties from the remaining outputs such as the sign and the approximate value to calculate the attitude. Simulations and experimental results demonstrate the validity of this method, and the precision of yaw is improved using the selective alignment method compared to the traditional analytic coarse alignment method in the vehicle experiment. The selective alignment principle provides an accurate relationship between the outputs and the attitude of the SINS relative to the Earth for a stationary base, and it is an extension of the TRIAD algorithm. The selective alignment approach has potential uses in applications such as self-alignment, fault detection, and self-calibration. PMID:26556353

  15. An alignment confidence score capturing robustness to guide tree uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Penn, Osnat; Privman, Eyal; Landan, Giddy; Graur, Dan; Pupko, Tal

    2010-08-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is the basis for a wide range of comparative sequence analyses from molecular phylogenetics to 3D structure prediction. Sophisticated algorithms have been developed for sequence alignment, but in practice, many errors can be expected and extensive portions of the MSA are unreliable. Hence, it is imperative to understand and characterize the various sources of errors in MSAs and to quantify site-specific alignment confidence. In this paper, we show that uncertainties in the guide tree used by progressive alignment methods are a major source of alignment uncertainty. We use this insight to develop a novel method for quantifying the robustness of each alignment column to guide tree uncertainty. We build on the widely used bootstrap method for perturbing the phylogenetic tree. Specifically, we generate a collection of trees and use each as a guide tree in the alignment algorithm, thus producing a set of MSAs. We next test the consistency of every column of the MSA obtained from the unperturbed guide tree with respect to the set of MSAs. We name this measure the "GUIDe tree based AligNment ConfidencE" (GUIDANCE) score. Using the Benchmark Alignment data BASE benchmark as well as simulation studies, we show that GUIDANCE scores accurately identify errors in MSAs. Additionally, we compare our results with the previously published Heads-or-Tails score and show that the GUIDANCE score is a better predictor of unreliably aligned regions.

  16. Smoke Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    In the photo, Fire Chief Jay Stout of Safety Harbor, Florida, is explaining to young Richard Davis the workings of the Honeywell smoke and fire detector which probably saved Richard's life and that of his teen-age brother. Alerted by the detector's warning, the pair were able to escape their burning home. The detector in the Davis home was one of 1,500 installed in Safety Harbor residences in a cooperative program conducted by the city and Honeywell Inc.

  17. ORFEUS alignment concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graue, R.; Kampf, D.; Rippel, H.; Witte, G.

    1991-09-01

    The alignment concept of ORFEUS, a short-term scientific space payload scheduled for launching by the STS in January 1993, is discussed. ORFEUS comprises two alternatively operating spectrometers (Echelle and Rowland) implemented in a CFC telescope with a 4-m tube length and an aperture of 1000 mm. The lightweight primary mirror has a focal length of 2426 mm. In order to achieve the required spectrometric high telescope resolution in the UV range (40-125 nm), a sophisticated alignment concept was developed. The centering of the alignment diaphragm (diameter: 15 microns) in the focus of the primary mirror has to be provided in the vertical tube position by means of an autocollimation telescope. The spectrometers have to be integrated into the horizontal telescope aligned within a special antigravity device to reduce optical surface deformations and to ensure the optical performance of the primary. The alignment of all optical components is to be performed in the visible spectral range.

  18. Mango: multiple alignment with N gapped oligos.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zefeng; Lin, Hao; Li, Ming

    2008-06-01

    Multiple sequence alignment is a classical and challenging task. The problem is NP-hard. The full dynamic programming takes too much time. The progressive alignment heuristics adopted by most state-of-the-art works suffer from the "once a gap, always a gap" phenomenon. Is there a radically new way to do multiple sequence alignment? In this paper, we introduce a novel and orthogonal multiple sequence alignment method, using both multiple optimized spaced seeds and new algorithms to handle these seeds efficiently. Our new algorithm processes information of all sequences as a whole and tries to build the alignment vertically, avoiding problems caused by the popular progressive approaches. Because the optimized spaced seeds have proved significantly more sensitive than the consecutive k-mers, the new approach promises to be more accurate and reliable. To validate our new approach, we have implemented MANGO: Multiple Alignment with N Gapped Oligos. Experiments were carried out on large 16S RNA benchmarks, showing that MANGO compares favorably, in both accuracy and speed, against state-of-the-art multiple sequence alignment methods, including ClustalW 1.83, MUSCLE 3.6, MAFFT 5.861, ProbConsRNA 1.11, Dialign 2.2.1, DIALIGN-T 0.2.1, T-Coffee 4.85, POA 2.0, and Kalign 2.0. We have further demonstrated the scalability of MANGO on very large datasets of repeat elements. MANGO can be downloaded at http://www.bioinfo.org.cn/mango/ and is free for academic usage.

  19. FlexSnap: Flexible Non-sequential Protein Structure Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Saeed; Zaki, Mohammed J.; Bystroff, Chris

    Proteins have evolved subject to energetic selection pressure for stability and flexibility. Structural similarity between proteins which have gone through conformational changes can be captured effectively if flexibility is considered. Topologically unrelated proteins that preserve secondary structure packing interactions can be detected if both flexibility and sequence permutations are considered. We propose the FlexSnap algorithm for flexible non-topological protein structural alignment. The effectiveness of FlexSnap is demonstrated by measuring the agreement of its alignments with manually curated non-sequential structural alignments. FlexSnap showed competitive results against state-of-the-art algorithms, like DALI, SARF2, MultiProt, FlexProt, and FATCAT.

  20. Accurate multiple network alignment through context-sensitive random walk

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Comparative network analysis can provide an effective means of analyzing large-scale biological networks and gaining novel insights into their structure and organization. Global network alignment aims to predict the best overall mapping between a given set of biological networks, thereby identifying important similarities as well as differences among the networks. It has been shown that network alignment methods can be used to detect pathways or network modules that are conserved across different networks. Until now, a number of network alignment algorithms have been proposed based on different formulations and approaches, many of them focusing on pairwise alignment. Results In this work, we propose a novel multiple network alignment algorithm based on a context-sensitive random walk model. The random walker employed in the proposed algorithm switches between two different modes, namely, an individual walk on a single network and a simultaneous walk on two networks. The switching decision is made in a context-sensitive manner by examining the current neighborhood, which is effective for quantitatively estimating the degree of correspondence between nodes that belong to different networks, in a manner that sensibly integrates node similarity and topological similarity. The resulting node correspondence scores are then used to predict the maximum expected accuracy (MEA) alignment of the given networks. Conclusions Performance evaluation based on synthetic networks as well as real protein-protein interaction networks shows that the proposed algorithm can construct more accurate multiple network alignments compared to other leading methods. PMID:25707987

  1. Fire Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    An early warning fire detection sensor developed for NASA's Space Shuttle Orbiter is being evaluated as a possible hazard prevention system for mining operations. The incipient Fire Detector represents an advancement over commercially available smoke detectors in that it senses and signals the presence of a fire condition before the appearance of flame and smoke, offering an extra margin of safety.

  2. Metal Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harrington-Lueker, Donna

    1992-01-01

    Schools that count on metal detectors to stem the flow of weapons into the schools create a false sense of security. Recommendations include investing in personnel rather than hardware, cultivating the confidence of law-abiding students, and enforcing discipline. Metal detectors can be quite effective at afterschool events. (MLF)

  3. Vapor Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waddell, H. M.; Garrard, G. C.; Houston, D. W.

    1982-01-01

    Detector eliminates need for removing covers to take samples. Detector is canister consisting of screw-in base and clear plastic tube that contains two colors of silica gel. Monoethylhydrazine and nitrogen tetroxide vapors are visually monitored with canister containing color-changing gels.

  4. Improving the Arabidopsis genome annotation using maximal transcript alignment assemblies.

    PubMed

    Haas, Brian J; Delcher, Arthur L; Mount, Stephen M; Wortman, Jennifer R; Smith, Roger K; Hannick, Linda I; Maiti, Rama; Ronning, Catherine M; Rusch, Douglas B; Town, Christopher D; Salzberg, Steven L; White, Owen

    2003-10-01

    The spliced alignment of expressed sequence data to genomic sequence has proven a key tool in the comprehensive annotation of genes in eukaryotic genomes. A novel algorithm was developed to assemble clusters of overlapping transcript alignments (ESTs and full-length cDNAs) into maximal alignment assemblies, thereby comprehensively incorporating all available transcript data and capturing subtle splicing variations. Complete and partial gene structures identified by this method were used to improve The Institute for Genomic Research Arabidopsis genome annotation (TIGR release v.4.0). The alignment assemblies permitted the automated modeling of several novel genes and >1000 alternative splicing variations as well as updates (including UTR annotations) to nearly half of the approximately 27 000 annotated protein coding genes. The algorithm of the Program to Assemble Spliced Alignments (PASA) tool is described, as well as the results of automated updates to Arabidopsis gene annotations.

  5. Influence of the motion correction algorithm on the quality and interpretability of images of single-source 64-detector coronary CT angiography among patients grouped by heart rate.

    PubMed

    Machida, Haruhiko; Lin, Xiao-Zhu; Fukui, Rika; Shen, Yun; Suzuki, Shigeru; Tanaka, Isao; Ishikawa, Takuya; Tate, Etsuko; Ueno, Eiko

    2015-02-01

    We retrospectively investigated the effect of the motion correction algorithm (MCA) on image quality and interpretability by heart rate (HR) in coronary CT angiography (CCTA). For 105 patients (6 HR groups) undergoing CCTA, 2 readers independently graded the image quality of the 4 major coronary arteries reconstructed with and without MCA at diastole with HR ≤64 bpm and at systole and diastole ≥65 bpm using a 5-point scale. For each HR group and cardiac phase, we compared per-vessel and per-segment image quality using Wilcoxon signed rank test and percentages of interpretable image quality (scores 3-5) among without MCA at diastole with HR ≤64 bpm, as a reference, with MCA at diastole ≤69 bpm and at systole 70-79 bpm using the chi-square test. The motion correction algorithm reconstruction provided similar or better image quality and interpretability in all groups, with 96-100 % per-vessel (P = 0.008 for the right coronary artery; otherwise, P > 0.05) and 99 % per-segment interpretable image quality (P = 0.0002) at diastole with HR ≤69 bpm and at systole 70-79 bpm compared to the reference (88-100 and 97 %, respectively). MCA reconstruction preserved image quality and interpretability of CCTA with HR ≤79 bpm.

  6. Regular Language Constrained Sequence Alignment Revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kucherov, Gregory; Pinhas, Tamar; Ziv-Ukelson, Michal

    Imposing constraints in the form of a finite automaton or a regular expression is an effective way to incorporate additional a priori knowledge into sequence alignment procedures. With this motivation, Arslan [1] introduced the Regular Language Constrained Sequence Alignment Problem and proposed an O(n 2 t 4) time and O(n 2 t 2) space algorithm for solving it, where n is the length of the input strings and t is the number of states in the non-deterministic automaton, which is given as input. Chung et al. [2] proposed a faster O(n 2 t 3) time algorithm for the same problem. In this paper, we further speed up the algorithms for Regular Language Constrained Sequence Alignment by reducing their worst case time complexity bound to O(n 2 t 3/logt). This is done by establishing an optimal bound on the size of Straight-Line Programs solving the maxima computation subproblem of the basic dynamic programming algorithm. We also study another solution based on a Steiner Tree computation. While it does not improve the run time complexity in the worst case, our simulations show that both approaches are efficient in practice, especially when the input automata are dense.

  7. Hybrid vehicle motor alignment

    DOEpatents

    Levin, Michael Benjamin

    2001-07-03

    A rotor of an electric motor for a motor vehicle is aligned to an axis of rotation for a crankshaft of an internal combustion engine having an internal combustion engine and an electric motor. A locator is provided on the crankshaft, a piloting tool is located radially by the first locator to the crankshaft. A stator of the electric motor is aligned to a second locator provided on the piloting tool. The stator is secured to the engine block. The rotor is aligned to the crankshaft and secured thereto.

  8. ReformAlign: improved multiple sequence alignments using a profile-based meta-alignment approach.

    PubMed

    Lyras, Dimitrios P; Metzler, Dirk

    2014-08-07

    Obtaining an accurate sequence alignment is fundamental for consistently analyzing biological data. Although this problem may be efficiently solved when only two sequences are considered, the exact inference of the optimal alignment easily gets computationally intractable for the multiple sequence alignment case. To cope with the high computational expenses, approximate heuristic methods have been proposed that address the problem indirectly by progressively aligning the sequences in pairs according to their relatedness. These methods however are not flexible to change the alignment of an already aligned group of sequences in the view of new data, resulting thus in compromises on the quality of the deriving alignment. In this paper we present ReformAlign, a novel meta-alignment approach that may significantly improve on the quality of the deriving alignments from popular aligners. We call ReformAlign a meta-aligner as it requires an initial alignment, for which a variety of alignment programs can be used. The main idea behind ReformAlign is quite straightforward: at first, an existing alignment is used to construct a standard profile which summarizes the initial alignment and then all sequences are individually re-aligned against the formed profile. From each sequence-profile comparison, the alignment of each sequence against the profile is recorded and the final alignment is indirectly inferred by merging all the individual sub-alignments into a unified set. The employment of ReformAlign may often result in alignments which are significantly more accurate than the starting alignments. We evaluated the effect of ReformAlign on the generated alignments from ten leading alignment methods using real data of variable size and sequence identity. The experimental results suggest that the proposed meta-aligner approach may often lead to statistically significant more accurate alignments. Furthermore, we show that ReformAlign results in more substantial improvement in

  9. Optimizing a global alignment of protein interaction networks

    PubMed Central

    Chindelevitch, Leonid; Ma, Cheng-Yu; Liao, Chung-Shou; Berger, Bonnie

    2013-01-01

    Motivation: The global alignment of protein interaction networks is a widely studied problem. It is an important first step in understanding the relationship between the proteins in different species and identifying functional orthologs. Furthermore, it can provide useful insights into the species’ evolution. Results: We propose a novel algorithm, PISwap, for optimizing global pairwise alignments of protein interaction networks, based on a local optimization heuristic that has previously demonstrated its effectiveness for a variety of other intractable problems. PISwap can begin with different types of network alignment approaches and then iteratively adjust the initial alignments by incorporating network topology information, trading it off for sequence information. In practice, our algorithm efficiently refines other well-studied alignment techniques with almost no additional time cost. We also show the robustness of the algorithm to noise in protein interaction data. In addition, the flexible nature of this algorithm makes it suitable for different applications of network alignment. This algorithm can yield interesting insights into the evolutionary dynamics of related species. Availability: Our software is freely available for non-commercial purposes from our Web site, http://piswap.csail.mit.edu/. Contact: bab@csail.mit.edu or csliao@ie.nthu.edu.tw Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24048352

  10. Recursions for statistical multiple alignment

    PubMed Central

    Hein, Jotun; Jensen, Jens Ledet; Pedersen, Christian N. S.

    2003-01-01

    Algorithms are presented that allow the calculation of the probability of a set of sequences related by a binary tree that have evolved according to the Thorne–Kishino–Felsenstein model for a fixed set of parameters. The algorithms are based on a Markov chain generating sequences and their alignment at nodes in a tree. Depending on whether the complete realization of this Markov chain is decomposed into the first transition and the rest of the realization or the last transition and the first part of the realization, two kinds of recursions are obtained that are computationally similar but probabilistically different. The running time of the algorithms is \\documentclass[12pt]{minimal} \\usepackage{amsmath} \\usepackage{wasysym} \\usepackage{amsfonts} \\usepackage{amssymb} \\usepackage{amsbsy} \\usepackage{mathrsfs} \\setlength{\\oddsidemargin}{-69pt} \\begin{document} \\begin{equation*}O({\\Pi}_{i}^{d}=1~L_{i})\\end{equation*}\\end{document}, where Li is the length of the ith observed sequences and d is the number of sequences. An alternative recursion is also formulated that uses only a Markov chain involving the inner nodes of a tree. PMID:14657378

  11. Alignment of tactical tropo antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bradley, Philip A.

    1986-07-01

    Alignment problems of parabolic reflector antennas for troposcatter radio communications are analyzed. Defects of previous alignment techniques are delineated and a new technique for automatic antenna alignment is presented.

  12. The effectiveness of detector combinations.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhenghao; Gong, Weiguo; Nee, A Y C; Ong, S K

    2009-04-27

    In this paper, the performance improvement benefiting from the combination of local feature detectors for image matching and registration is evaluated. Possible combinations of five types of representative interest point detectors and region detectors are integrated into the testing framework. The performance is compared using the number of correspondences and the repeatability rate, as well as an original evaluation criterion named the Reconstruction Similarity (RS), which reflects not only the number of matches, but also the degree of matching error. It is observed that the combination of DoG extremum and MSCR outperforms any single detectors and other detector combinations in most cases. Furthermore, MDSS, a hybrid algorithm for accurate image matching, is proposed. Compared with standard SIFT and GLOH, its average RS rate exceeds more than 3.56%, and takes up even less computational time.

  13. Alignment of CEBAF cryomodules

    SciTech Connect

    Schneider, W.J.; Bisognano, J.J.; Fischer, J.

    1993-06-01

    CEBAF, the Continuous Electron Beam Accelerator Facility, when completed, will house a 4 GeV recirculating accelerator. Each of the accelerator`s two linacs contains 160 superconducting radio frequency (SRF) 1497 MHz niobium cavities in 20 cryomodules. Alignments of the cavities within the cryomodule with respect to beam axis is critical to achieving the optimum accelerator performance. This paper discusses the rationale for the current specification on cavity mechanical alignment: 2 mrad (rms) applied to the 0.5 m active length cavities. We describe the tooling that was developed to achieve the tolerance at the time of cavity pair assembly, to preserve and integrate alignment during cryomodule assembly, and to translate alignment to appropriate installation in the beam line.

  14. Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  15. MSACompro: improving multiple protein sequence alignment by predicted structural features.

    PubMed

    Deng, Xin; Cheng, Jianlin

    2014-01-01

    Multiple Sequence Alignment (MSA) is an essential tool in protein structure modeling, gene and protein function prediction, DNA motif recognition, phylogenetic analysis, and many other bioinformatics tasks. Therefore, improving the accuracy of multiple sequence alignment is an important long-term objective in bioinformatics. We designed and developed a new method MSACompro to incorporate predicted secondary structure, relative solvent accessibility, and residue-residue contact information into the currently most accurate posterior probability-based MSA methods to improve the accuracy of multiple sequence alignments. Different from the multiple sequence alignment methods that use the tertiary structure information of some sequences, our method uses the structural information purely predicted from sequences. In this chapter, we first introduce some background and related techniques in the field of multiple sequence alignment. Then, we describe the detailed algorithm of MSACompro. Finally, we show that integrating predicted protein structural information improved the multiple sequence alignment accuracy.

  16. Identifying subset errors in multiple sequence alignments.

    PubMed

    Roy, Aparna; Taddese, Bruck; Vohra, Shabana; Thimmaraju, Phani K; Illingworth, Christopher J R; Simpson, Lisa M; Mukherjee, Keya; Reynolds, Christopher A; Chintapalli, Sree V

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) accuracy is important, but there is no widely accepted method of judging the accuracy that different alignment algorithms give. We present a simple approach to detecting two types of error, namely block shifts and the misplacement of residues within a gap. Given a MSA, subsets of very similar sequences are generated through the use of a redundancy filter, typically using a 70-90% sequence identity cut-off. Subsets thus produced are typically small and degenerate, and errors can be easily detected even by manual examination. The errors, albeit minor, are inevitably associated with gaps in the alignment, and so the procedure is particularly relevant to homology modelling of protein loop regions. The usefulness of the approach is illustrated in the context of the universal but little known [K/R]KLH motif that occurs in intracellular loop 1 of G protein coupled receptors (GPCR); other issues relevant to GPCR modelling are also discussed.

  17. Fair evaluation of global network aligners.

    PubMed

    Crawford, Joseph; Sun, Yihan; Milenković, Tijana

    2015-01-01

    Analogous to genomic sequence alignment, biological network alignment identifies conserved regions between networks of different species. Then, function can be transferred from well- to poorly-annotated species between aligned network regions. Network alignment typically encompasses two algorithmic components: node cost function (NCF), which measures similarities between nodes in different networks, and alignment strategy (AS), which uses these similarities to rapidly identify high-scoring alignments. Different methods use both different NCFs and different ASs. Thus, it is unclear whether the superiority of a method comes from its NCF, its AS, or both. We already showed on state-of-the-art methods, MI-GRAAL and IsoRankN, that combining NCF of one method and AS of another method can give a new superior method. Here, we evaluate MI-GRAAL against a newer approach, GHOST, by mixing-and-matching the methods' NCFs and ASs to potentially further improve alignment quality. While doing so, we approach important questions that have not been asked systematically thus far. First, we ask how much of the NCF information should come from protein sequence data compared to network topology data. Existing methods determine this parameter more-less arbitrarily, which could affect alignment quality. Second, when topological information is used in NCF, we ask how large the size of the neighborhoods of the compared nodes should be. Existing methods assume that the larger the neighborhood size, the better. Our findings are as follows. MI-GRAAL's NCF is superior to GHOST's NCF, while the performance of the methods' ASs is data-dependent. Thus, for data on which GHOST's AS is superior to MI-GRAAL's AS, the combination of MI-GRAAL's NCF and GHOST's AS represents a new superior method. Also, which amount of sequence information is used within NCF does not affect alignment quality, while the inclusion of topological information is crucial for producing good alignments. Finally, larger

  18. STRAL: progressive alignment of non-coding RNA using base pairing probability vectors in quadratic time.

    PubMed

    Dalli, Deniz; Wilm, Andreas; Mainz, Indra; Steger, Gerhard

    2006-07-01

    Alignment of RNA has a wide range of applications, for example in phylogeny inference, consensus structure prediction and homology searches. Yet aligning structural or non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) correctly is notoriously difficult as these RNA sequences may evolve by compensatory mutations, which maintain base pairing but destroy sequence homology. Ideally, alignment programs would take RNA structure into account. The Sankoff algorithm for the simultaneous solution of RNA structure prediction and RNA sequence alignment was proposed 20 years ago but suffers from its exponential complexity. A number of programs implement lightweight versions of the Sankoff algorithm by restricting its application to a limited type of structure and/or only pairwise alignment. Thus, despite recent advances, the proper alignment of multiple structural RNA sequences remains a problem. Here we present StrAl, a heuristic method for alignment of ncRNA that reduces sequence-structure alignment to a two-dimensional problem similar to standard multiple sequence alignment. The scoring function takes into account sequence similarity as well as up- and downstream pairing probability. To test the robustness of the algorithm and the performance of the program, we scored alignments produced by StrAl against a large set of published reference alignments. The quality of alignments predicted by StrAl is far better than that obtained by standard sequence alignment programs, especially when sequence homologies drop below approximately 65%; nevertheless StrAl's runtime is comparable to that of ClustalW.

  19. Reconstruction of three-dimensional molecular structure from diffraction of laser-aligned molecules

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Makhija, Varun; Kumarappan, Vinod; Centurion, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Diffraction from laser-aligned molecules has been proposed as a method for determining 3-D molecular structures in the gas phase. However, existing structural retrieval algorithms are limited by the imperfect alignment in experiments and the rotational averaging in 1-D alignment. Here, we demonstrate a two-step reconstruction comprising a genetic algorithm that corrects for the imperfect alignment followed by an iterative phase retrieval method in cylindrical coordinates. The algorithm was tested with simulated diffraction patterns. We show that the full 3-D structure of trifluorotoluene, an asymmetric-top molecule, can be reconstructed with atomic resolution. PMID:26798781

  20. PDV Probe Alignment Technique

    SciTech Connect

    Whitworth, T L; May, C M; Strand, O T

    2007-10-26

    This alignment technique was developed while performing heterodyne velocimetry measurements at LLNL. There are a few minor items needed, such as a white card with aperture in center, visible alignment laser, IR back reflection meter, and a microscope to view the bridge surface. The work was performed on KCP flyers that were 6 and 8 mils wide. The probes used were Oz Optics manufactured with focal distances of 42mm and 26mm. Both probes provide a spot size of approximately 80?m at 1550nm. The 42mm probes were specified to provide an internal back reflection of -35 to -40dB, and the probe back reflections were measured to be -37dB and -33dB. The 26mm probes were specified as -30dB and both measured -30.5dB. The probe is initially aligned normal to the flyer/bridge surface. This provides a very high return signal, up to -2dB, due to the bridge reflectivity. A white card with a hole in the center as an aperture can be used to check the reflected beam position relative to the probe and launch beam, and the alignment laser spot centered on the bridge, see Figure 1 and Figure 2. The IR back reflection meter is used to measure the dB return from the probe and surface, and a white card or similar object is inserted between the probe and surface to block surface reflection. It may take several iterations between the visible alignment laser and the IR back reflection meter to complete this alignment procedure. Once aligned normal to the surface, the probe should be tilted to position the visible alignment beam as shown in Figure 3, and the flyer should be translated in the X and Y axis to reposition the alignment beam onto the flyer as shown in Figure 4. This tilting of the probe minimizes the amount of light from the bridge reflection into the fiber within the probe while maintaining the alignment as near normal to the flyer surface as possible. When the back reflection is measured after the tilt adjustment, the level should be about -3dB to -6dB higher than the probes

  1. Fast and sensitive multiple alignment of large genomic sequences

    PubMed Central

    Brudno, Michael; Chapman, Michael; Göttgens, Berthold; Batzoglou, Serafim; Morgenstern, Burkhard

    2003-01-01

    Background Genomic sequence alignment is a powerful method for genome analysis and annotation, as alignments are routinely used to identify functional sites such as genes or regulatory elements. With a growing number of partially or completely sequenced genomes, multiple alignment is playing an increasingly important role in these studies. In recent years, various tools for pair-wise and multiple genomic alignment have been proposed. Some of them are extremely fast, but often efficiency is achieved at the expense of sensitivity. One way of combining speed and sensitivity is to use an anchored-alignment approach. In a first step, a fast search program identifies a chain of strong local sequence similarities. In a second step, regions between these anchor points are aligned using a slower but more accurate method. Results Herein, we present CHAOS, a novel algorithm for rapid identification of chains of local pair-wise sequence similarities. Local alignments calculated by CHAOS are used as anchor points to improve the running time of DIALIGN, a slow but sensitive multiple-alignment tool. We show that this way, the running time of DIALIGN can be reduced by more than 95% for BAC-sized and longer sequences, without affecting the quality of the resulting alignments. We apply our approach to a set of five genomic sequences around the stem-cell-leukemia (SCL) gene and demonstrate that exons and small regulatory elements can be identified by our multiple-alignment procedure. Conclusion We conclude that the novel CHAOS local alignment tool is an effective way to significantly speed up global alignment tools such as DIALIGN without reducing the alignment quality. We likewise demonstrate that the DIALIGN/CHAOS combination is able to accurately align short regulatory sequences in distant orthologues. PMID:14693042

  2. Accurate multiple sequence-structure alignment of RNA sequences using combinatorial optimization.

    PubMed

    Bauer, Markus; Klau, Gunnar W; Reinert, Knut

    2007-07-27

    The discovery of functional non-coding RNA sequences has led to an increasing interest in algorithms related to RNA analysis. Traditional sequence alignment algorithms, however, fail at computing reliable alignments of low-homology RNA sequences. The spatial conformation of RNA sequences largely determines their function, and therefore RNA alignment algorithms have to take structural information into account. We present a graph-based representation for sequence-structure alignments, which we model as an integer linear program (ILP). We sketch how we compute an optimal or near-optimal solution to the ILP using methods from combinatorial optimization, and present results on a recently published benchmark set for RNA alignments. The implementation of our algorithm yields better alignments in terms of two published scores than the other programs that we tested: This is especially the case with an increasing number of input sequences. Our program LARA is freely available for academic purposes from http://www.planet-lisa.net.

  3. Alignment of Short Reads: A Crucial Step for Application of Next-Generation Sequencing Data in Precision Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Hao; Meehan, Joe; Tong, Weida; Hong, Huixiao

    2015-01-01

    Precision medicine or personalized medicine has been proposed as a modernized and promising medical strategy. Genetic variants of patients are the key information for implementation of precision medicine. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) is an emerging technology for deciphering genetic variants. Alignment of raw reads to a reference genome is one of the key steps in NGS data analysis. Many algorithms have been developed for alignment of short read sequences since 2008. Users have to make a decision on which alignment algorithm to use in their studies. Selection of the right alignment algorithm determines not only the alignment algorithm but also the set of suitable parameters to be used by the algorithm. Understanding these algorithms helps in selecting the appropriate alignment algorithm for different applications in precision medicine. Here, we review current available algorithms and their major strategies such as seed-and-extend and q-gram filter. We also discuss the challenges in current alignment algorithms, including alignment in multiple repeated regions, long reads alignment and alignment facilitated with known genetic variants. PMID:26610555

  4. Curriculum Alignment Research Suggests that Alignment Can Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, David

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum alignment research has developed showing the relationship among three alignment categories: the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum and the written curriculum. Each pair (for example, the taught and the written curriculum) shows a positive impact for aligning those results. Following this, alignment results from the Third…

  5. Curriculum Alignment Research Suggests that Alignment Can Improve Student Achievement

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Squires, David

    2012-01-01

    Curriculum alignment research has developed showing the relationship among three alignment categories: the taught curriculum, the tested curriculum and the written curriculum. Each pair (for example, the taught and the written curriculum) shows a positive impact for aligning those results. Following this, alignment results from the Third…

  6. MS Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Koppenaal, David W.; Barinaga, Charles J.; Denton, M Bonner B.; Sperline, Roger P.; Hieftje, Gary M.; Schilling, G. D.; Andrade, Francisco J.; Barnes IV., James H.

    2005-11-01

    Good eyesight is often taken for granted, a situation that everyone appreciates once vision begins to fade with age. New eyeglasses or contact lenses are traditional ways to improve vision, but recent new technology, i.e. LASIK laser eye surgery, provides a new and exciting means for marked vision restoration and improvement. In mass spectrometry, detectors are the 'eyes' of the MS instrument. These 'eyes' have also been taken for granted. New detectors and new technologies are likewise needed to correct, improve, and extend ion detection and hence, our 'chemical vision'. The purpose of this report is to review and assess current MS detector technology and to provide a glimpse towards future detector technologies. It is hoped that the report will also serve to motivate interest, prompt ideas, and inspire new visions for ion detection research.

  7. QUADRUPOLE BEAM-BASED ALIGNMENT AT RHIC.

    SciTech Connect

    NIEDZIELA, J.; MONTAG, C.; SATOGATA, T.

    2005-05-16

    Successful implementation of a beam-based alignment algorithm, tailored to different types of quadrupoles at RHIC, provides significant benefits to machine operations for heavy ions and polarized protons. This algorithm was used to calibrate beam position monitor centers relative to interaction region quadrupoles to maximize aperture. This approach was also used to determine the optimal orbit through transition jump quadrupoles to minimize orbit changes during the transition jump for heavy ion acceleration. This paper provides background discussion and results from first measurements during the RHIC 2005 run.

  8. Improved pen alignment for bidirectional printing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Edgar; Allebach, Jan P.; Pizlo, Zygmunt

    2006-01-01

    The quality of the prints produced by an inkjet printer is highly dependent on the characteristics of the dots produced by the inkjet pens. While some literature discusses metrics for the objective evaluation of print quality, few of the efforts have combined automated quality tests with subjective assessment. We develop an algorithm for analyzing printed dots and study the effects of the dot characteristics on the perceived print alignment. We establish the perceptual preferences of human observers via a set of psychophysical experiments.

  9. Proposed technique for vertical alignment of a crane's cable

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gera, J., Jr.

    1969-01-01

    Proposed vertical alignment technique senses the attitude of a cranes cable and displays any deviation from the vertical. The system consists of a detector assembly fixed to the boom and a display scope located in the cabin. It has potential application with either fixed-boom cranes or gantries.

  10. Effect of panel alignment and surface finish on bond strength

    SciTech Connect

    Wouters, J.M.; Doe, P.J.; Baker, W.E.

    1991-10-01

    The flexural strength of bonded acrylic is tested as a function of panel alignment and bond surface finish. Bond strength was shown to be highly dependent on both parameters with only a narrow range of values yielding a high strength bond. This study was performed for the heavy water-containing acrylic vessel for the Sudbury Neutrino Observatory detector.

  11. M2Align: parallel multiple sequence alignment with a multi-objective metaheuristic.

    PubMed

    Zambrano-Vega, Cristian; Nebro, Antonio J; García-Nieto, José; Aldana-Montes, José F

    2017-10-01

    Multiple sequence alignment (MSA) is an NP-complete optimization problem found in computational biology, where the time complexity of finding an optimal alignment raises exponentially along with the number of sequences and their lengths. Additionally, to assess the quality of a MSA, a number of objectives can be taken into account, such as maximizing the sum-of-pairs, maximizing the totally conserved columns, minimizing the number of gaps, or maximizing structural information based scores such as STRIKE. An approach to deal with MSA problems is to use multi-objective metaheuristics, which are non-exact stochastic optimization methods that can produce high quality solutions to complex problems having two or more objectives to be optimized at the same time. Our motivation is to provide a multi-objective metaheuristic for MSA that can run in parallel taking advantage of multi-core-based computers. The software tool we propose, called M2Align (Multi-objective Multiple Sequence Alignment), is a parallel and more efficient version of the three-objective optimizer for sequence alignments MO-SAStrE, able of reducing the algorithm computing time by exploiting the computing capabilities of common multi-core CPU clusters. Our performance evaluation over datasets of the benchmark BAliBASE (v3.0) shows that significant time reductions can be achieved by using up to 20 cores. Even in sequential executions, M2Align is faster than MO-SAStrE, thanks to the encoding method used for the alignments. M2Align is an open source project hosted in GitHub, where the source code and sample datasets can be freely obtained: https://github.com/KhaosResearch/M2Align. antonio@lcc.uma.es. Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online.

  12. Accelerating large-scale protein structure alignments with graphics processing units.

    PubMed

    Pang, Bin; Zhao, Nan; Becchi, Michela; Korkin, Dmitry; Shyu, Chi-Ren

    2012-02-22

    Large-scale protein structure alignment, an indispensable tool to structural bioinformatics, poses a tremendous challenge on computational resources. To ensure structure alignment accuracy and efficiency, efforts have been made to parallelize traditional alignment algorithms in grid environments. However, these solutions are costly and of limited accessibility. Others trade alignment quality for speedup by using high-level characteristics of structure fragments for structure comparisons. We present ppsAlign, a parallel protein structure Alignment framework designed and optimized to exploit the parallelism of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). As a general-purpose GPU platform, ppsAlign could take many concurrent methods, such as TM-align and Fr-TM-align, into the parallelized algorithm design. We evaluated ppsAlign on an NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU card, and compared it with existing software solutions running on an AMD dual-core CPU. We observed a 36-fold speedup over TM-align, a 65-fold speedup over Fr-TM-align, and a 40-fold speedup over MAMMOTH. ppsAlign is a high-performance protein structure alignment tool designed to tackle the computational complexity issues from protein structural data. The solution presented in this paper allows large-scale structure comparisons to be performed using massive parallel computing power of GPU.

  13. Accelerating large-scale protein structure alignments with graphics processing units

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Large-scale protein structure alignment, an indispensable tool to structural bioinformatics, poses a tremendous challenge on computational resources. To ensure structure alignment accuracy and efficiency, efforts have been made to parallelize traditional alignment algorithms in grid environments. However, these solutions are costly and of limited accessibility. Others trade alignment quality for speedup by using high-level characteristics of structure fragments for structure comparisons. Findings We present ppsAlign, a parallel protein structure Alignment framework designed and optimized to exploit the parallelism of Graphics Processing Units (GPUs). As a general-purpose GPU platform, ppsAlign could take many concurrent methods, such as TM-align and Fr-TM-align, into the parallelized algorithm design. We evaluated ppsAlign on an NVIDIA Tesla C2050 GPU card, and compared it with existing software solutions running on an AMD dual-core CPU. We observed a 36-fold speedup over TM-align, a 65-fold speedup over Fr-TM-align, and a 40-fold speedup over MAMMOTH. Conclusions ppsAlign is a high-performance protein structure alignment tool designed to tackle the computational complexity issues from protein structural data. The solution presented in this paper allows large-scale structure comparisons to be performed using massive parallel computing power of GPU. PMID:22357132

  14. Iterative refinement of structure-based sequence alignments by Seed Extension

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Changhoon; Tai, Chin-Hsien; Lee, Byungkook

    2009-01-01

    Background Accurate sequence alignment is required in many bioinformatics applications but, when sequence similarity is low, it is difficult to obtain accurate alignments based on sequence similarity alone. The accuracy improves when the structures are available, but current structure-based sequence alignment procedures still mis-align substantial numbers of residues. In order to correct such errors, we previously explored the possibility of replacing the residue-based dynamic programming algorithm in structure alignment procedures with the Seed Extension algorithm, which does not use a gap penalty. Here, we describe a new procedure called RSE (Refinement with Seed Extension) that iteratively refines a structure-based sequence alignment. Results RSE uses SE (Seed Extension) in its core, which is an algorithm that we reported recently for obtaining a sequence alignment from two superimposed structures. The RSE procedure was evaluated by comparing the correctly aligned fractions of residues before and after the refinement of the structure-based sequence alignments produced by popular programs. CE, DaliLite, FAST, LOCK2, MATRAS, MATT, TM-align, SHEBA and VAST were included in this analysis and the NCBI's CDD root node set was used as the reference alignments. RSE improved the average accuracy of sequence alignments for all programs tested when no shift error was allowed. The amount of improvement varied depending on the program. The average improvements were small for DaliLite and MATRAS but about 5% for CE and VAST. More substantial improvements have been seen in many individual cases. The additional computation times required for the refinements were negligible compared to the times taken by the structure alignment programs. Conclusion RSE is a computationally inexpensive way of improving the accuracy of a structure-based sequence alignment. It can be used as a standalone procedure following a regular structure-based sequence alignment or to replace the traditional

  15. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  16. Optics Alignment Panel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schroeder, Daniel J.

    1992-01-01

    The Optics Alignment Panel (OAP) was commissioned by the HST Science Working Group to determine the optimum alignment of the OTA optics. The goal was to find the position of the secondary mirror (SM) for which there is no coma or astigmatism in the camera images due to misaligned optics, either tilt or decenter. The despace position was reviewed of the SM and the optimum focus was sought. The results of these efforts are as follows: (1) the best estimate of the aligned position of the SM in the notation of HDOS is (DZ,DY,TZ,TY) = (+248 microns, +8 microns, +53 arcsec, -79 arcsec), and (2) the best focus, defined to be that despace which maximizes the fractional energy at 486 nm in a 0.1 arcsec radius of a stellar image, is 12.2 mm beyond paraxial focus. The data leading to these conclusions, and the estimated uncertainties in the final results, are presented.

  17. Multiple Sequence Alignment.

    PubMed

    Bawono, Punto; Dijkstra, Maurits; Pirovano, Walter; Feenstra, Anton; Abeln, Sanne; Heringa, Jaap

    2017-01-01

    The increasing importance of Next Generation Sequencing (NGS) techniques has highlighted the key role of multiple sequence alignment (MSA) in comparative structure and function analysis of biological sequences. MSA often leads to fundamental biological insight into sequence-structure-function relationships of nucleotide or protein sequence families. Significant advances have been achieved in this field, and many useful tools have been developed for constructing alignments, although many biological and methodological issues are still open. This chapter first provides some background information and considerations associated with MSA techniques, concentrating on the alignment of protein sequences. Then, a practical overview of currently available methods and a description of their specific advantages and limitations are given, to serve as a helpful guide or starting point for researchers who aim to construct a reliable MSA.

  18. Improved docking alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    Improved techniques are provided for the alignment of two objects. The present invention is particularly suited for 3-D translation and 3-D rotational alignment of objects in outer space. A camera is affixed to one object, such as a remote manipulator arm of the spacecraft, while the planar reflective surface is affixed to the other object, such as a grapple fixture. A monitor displays in real-time images from the camera such that the monitor displays both the reflected image of the camera and visible marking on the planar reflective surface when the objects are in proper alignment. The monitor may thus be viewed by the operator and the arm manipulated so that the reflective surface is perpendicular to the optical axis of the camera, the roll of the reflective surface is at a selected angle with respect to the camera, and the camera is spaced a pre-selected distance from the reflective surface.

  19. Whole-genome alignment.

    PubMed

    Dewey, Colin N

    2012-01-01

    Whole-genome alignment (WGA) is the prediction of evolutionary relationships at the nucleotide level between two or more genomes. It combines aspects of both colinear sequence alignment and gene orthology prediction, and is typically more challenging to address than either of these tasks due to the size and complexity of whole genomes. Despite the difficulty of this problem, numerous methods have been developed for its solution because WGAs are valuable for genome-wide analyses, such as phylogenetic inference, genome annotation, and function prediction. In this chapter, we discuss the meaning and significance of WGA and present an overview of the methods that address it. We also examine the problem of evaluating whole-genome aligners and offer a set of methodological challenges that need to be tackled in order to make the most effective use of our rapidly growing databases of whole genomes.

  20. Magnetically Aligned Supramolecular Hydrogels

    PubMed Central

    Wallace, Matthew; Cardoso, Andre Zamith; Frith, William J; Iggo, Jonathan A; Adams, Dave J

    2014-01-01

    The magnetic-field-induced alignment of the fibrillar structures present in an aqueous solution of a dipeptide gelator, and the subsequent retention of this alignment upon transformation to a hydrogel upon the addition of CaCl2 or upon a reduction in solution pH is reported. Utilising the switchable nature of the magnetic field coupled with the slow diffusion of CaCl2, it is possible to precisely control the extent of anisotropy across a hydrogel, something that is generally very difficult to do using alternative methods. The approach is readily extended to other compounds that form viscous solutions at high pH. It is expected that this work will greatly expand the utility of such low-molecular-weight gelators (LMWG) in areas where alignment is key. PMID:25345918

  1. Reflection Spectromicroscopy for the Design of Nanopillar Optical Antenna Detectors

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-29

    aligned nanohole array (Fig. 1(b)). The photodetector active area is comprised of a 40 μm 40 μm nanopillar array. Reflection spectrometry is a simple...600 nm. (b) Fabricated detector with self-aligned nanohole array fabricated through tilted metal deposition. Scale bar, 200 nm. Fig. 2 (a

  2. PILOT optical alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Longval, Y.; Mot, B.; Ade, P.; André, Y.; Aumont, J.; Baustista, L.; Bernard, J.-Ph.; Bray, N.; de Bernardis, P.; Boulade, O.; Bousquet, F.; Bouzit, M.; Buttice, V.; Caillat, A.; Charra, M.; Chaigneau, M.; Crane, B.; Crussaire, J.-P.; Douchin, F.; Doumayrou, E.; Dubois, J.-P.; Engel, C.; Etcheto, P.; Gélot, P.; Griffin, M.; Foenard, G.; Grabarnik, S.; Hargrave, P..; Hughes, A.; Laureijs, R.; Lepennec, Y.; Leriche, B.; Maestre, S.; Maffei, B.; Martignac, J.; Marty, C.; Marty, W.; Masi, S.; Mirc, F.; Misawa, R.; Montel, J.; Montier, L.; Narbonne, J.; Nicot, J.-M.; Pajot, F.; Parot, G.; Pérot, E.; Pimentao, J.; Pisano, G.; Ponthieu, N.; Ristorcelli, I.; Rodriguez, L.; Roudil, G.; Salatino, M.; Savini, G.; Simonella, O.; Saccoccio, M.; Tapie, P.; Tauber, J.; Torre, J.-P.; Tucker, C.

    2016-07-01

    PILOT is a balloon-borne astronomy experiment designed to study the polarization of dust emission in the diffuse interstellar medium in our Galaxy at wavelengths 240 μm with an angular resolution about two arcminutes. Pilot optics is composed an off-axis Gregorian type telescope and a refractive re-imager system. All optical elements, except the primary mirror, are in a cryostat cooled to 3K. We combined the optical, 3D dimensional measurement methods and thermo-elastic modeling to perform the optical alignment. The talk describes the system analysis, the alignment procedure, and finally the performances obtained during the first flight in September 2015.

  3. RHIC survey and alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Karl, F.X.; Anderson, R.R.; Goldman, M.A.; Hemmer, F.M.; Kazmark, D. Jr.; Mroczkowski, T.T.; Roecklien, J.C.

    1993-07-01

    The Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider consists of two interlaced plane rings, a pair of mirror-symmetric beam injection arcs, a spatially curved beam transfer line from the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron, and a collection of precisely positioned and aligned magnets, on appropriately positioned support stands, threaded on those arcs. RHIC geometry is defined by six beam crossing points exactly in a plane, lying precising at the vertices of a regular hexagon of specified size position and orientation of this hexagon are defined geodetically. Survey control and alignment procedures, currently in use to construct RHIC, are described.

  4. Variable Reference Alignment: an improved peak alignment protocol for NMR spectral data with large inter-sample variation

    PubMed Central

    MacKinnon, Neil; Ge, Wencheng; Khan, Amjad P.; Somashekar, Bagganahalli S.; Tripathi, Pratima; Siddiqui, Javed; Wei, John T.; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Rajendiran, Thekkelnaycke M.; Ramamoorthy, Ayyalusamy

    2012-01-01

    In an effort to address the variable correspondence problem across large sample cohorts common in metabolomic/metabonomic studies, we have developed a pre-alignment protocol that aims to generate spectral segments sharing a common target spectrum. Under the assumption that a single reference spectrum will not correctly represent all spectra of a data set, the goal of this approach is to perform local alignment corrections on spectral regions which share a common ‘most similar’ spectrum. A natural beneficial outcome of this procedure is the automatic definition of spectral segments, a feature that is not common to all alignment methods. This protocol is shown to specifically improve the quality of alignment in 1H NMR data sets exhibiting large inter-sample compositional variation (e.g. pH, ionic strength). As a proof-of-principle demonstration, we have utilized two recently developed alignment algorithms specific to NMR data, recursive segment-wise peak alignment and interval correlated shifting and applied them to two data sets comprised of 15 aqueous cell line extract and 20 human urine 1H NMR profiles. Application of this protocol represents a fundamental shift from current alignment methodologies that seek to correct misalignments utilizing a single representative spectrum, with the added benefit that it can be appended to any alignment algorithm. PMID:22616856

  5. Pyroelectric detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haller, Eugene E.; Beeman, Jeffrey; Hansen, William L.; Hubbard, G. Scott; Mcmurray, Robert E., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The multi-agency, long-term Global Change programs, and specifically NASA's Earth Observing system, will require some new and advanced photon detector technology which must be specifically tailored for long-term stability, broad spectral range, cooling constraints, and other parameters. Whereas MCT and GaAs alloy based photovoltaic detectors and detector arrays reach most impressive results to wavelengths as long as 12 microns when cooled to below 70 K, other materials, such as ferroelectrics and pyroelectrics, appear to offer special opportunities beyond 12 microns and above 70 K. These materials have found very broad use in a wide variety of room temperature applications. Little is known about these classes of materials at sub-room temperatures and no photon detector results have been reported. From the limited information available, researchers conclude that the room temperature values of D asterisk greater than or equal to 10(exp 9) cm Hz(exp 1/2)/W may be improved by one to two orders of magnitude upon cooling to temperatures around 70 K. Improvements of up to one order of magnitude appear feasible for temperatures achievable by passive cooling. The flat detector response over a wavelength range reaching from the visible to beyond 50 microns, which is an intrinsic advantage of bolometric devices, makes for easy calibration. The fact that these materials have been developed for reduced temperature applications makes ferro- and pyroelectric materials most attractive candidates for serious exploration.

  6. Intruder Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1978-01-01

    The shadowy prowler is attempting a break-in, unaware that his presence has already been detected and reported by the device in the lower left corner of the photo. It is part of a three-element ntruder Detecti on System developed by NASA's Ames Research Center from technology acquired in the Apollo lunar exploration program. Apollo astronauts left behind on the moon small portable seismic (shock) detectors to record subsurface vibrations and transmit to Earth data on the moon's density and thickness. A similar seismic detector is the key component of the lntruder Detection System. Encased in a stainless steel tube, the detector is implanted in the ground outside the facility being protected-home, bank, industrial or other facilities. The vibration-sensing detector picks up the footstep of anyone within a preset range. The detector is connected by cable to the transmitter, which relays the warning to a portable radio receiver. The radio alerts plant guards or home occupants by emitting an audible tone burst for each footstep.

  7. Alignment of trans-tibial prostheses based on roll-over shape principles.

    PubMed

    Hansen, A H; Meier, M R; Sam, M; Childress, D S; Edwards, M L

    2003-08-01

    The authors examined the roll-over shape alignment hypothesis, which states that prosthetic feet are aligned by matching their roll-over shapes with an "ideal" shape. The "ideal" shape was considered to be the roll-over shape of the able-bodied foot-ankle system. An alignment algorithm and computational alignment system were developed to set trans-tibial alignments based on this hypothesis. Three prosthetic feet with considerably different roll-over shapes were either aligned using the alignment system or not aligned (i.e. used previous foot's alignment), and then were aligned by a team of prosthetists. No significant differences were found between roll-over shapes aligned by the computational alignment system and those based on standard clinical techniques (p = 0.944). Significant differences were found between the "no alignment" shapes and the prosthetist alignment shapes (p = 0.006), and between the "no alignment" shapes and the computational alignment system shapes (p = 0.024). The results of the experiment support the hypothesis that the goal of alignment is to match the prosthetic foot's roll-over shape, as closely as possible, with an "ideal" shape. The hypothesis is also supported by its ability to explain the results of previous studies. Using an "ideal" roll-over shape or surface as a goal for prosthetic alignment could lead to a priori alignment, eliminating the need for alignment hardware in some cases. Being able to build the alignment into a prosthesis without special hardware could be beneficial in low-income countries and in the fabrication of lightweight prostheses for the elderly.

  8. PHASE DETECTOR

    DOEpatents

    Kippenhan, D.O.

    1959-09-01

    A phase detector circuit is described for use at very high frequencies of the order of 50 megacycles. The detector circuit includes a pair of rectifiers inverted relative to each other. One voltage to be compared is applied to the two rectifiers in phase opposition and the other voltage to be compared is commonly applied to the two rectifiers. The two result:ng d-c voltages derived from the rectifiers are combined in phase opposition to produce a single d-c voltage having amplitude and polarity characteristics dependent upon the phase relation between the signals to be compared. Principal novelty resides in the employment of a half-wave transmission line to derive the phase opposing signals from the first voltage to be compared for application to the two rectifiers in place of the transformer commonly utilized for such purpose in phase detector circuits for operation at lower frequency.

  9. MAMA Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    Work carried out under this grant led to fundamental discoveries and over one hundred publications in the scientific literature. Fundamental developments in instrumentation were made including all the instrumentation on the EUVE satellite, the invention of a whole new type of grazing instrument spectrometer and the development of fundamentally new photon counting detectors including the Wedge and Strip used on EUVE and many other missions and the Time Delay detector used on OREFUS and FUSE. The Wedge and Strip and Time Delay detectors were developed under this grant for less than two million dollars and have been used in numerous missions most recently for the FUSE mission. In addition, a fundamentally new type of diffuse spectrometer has been developed under this grant which has been used in instrumentation on the MMSAT spacecraft and the Lewis spacecraft. Plans are underway to use this instrumentation on several other missions as well.

  10. Curriculum Alignment: Establishing Coherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gagné, Philippe; Dumont, Laurence; Brunet, Sabine; Boucher, Geneviève

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we present a step-by-step guide to implement a curricular alignment project, directed at professional development and student support, and developed in a higher education French as a second language department. We outline best practices and preliminary results from our experience and provide ways to adapt our experience to other…

  11. Aligned-or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Jo Ellen; Koppal, Mary

    2015-01-01

    When state leaders and national partners in the development of the Next Generation Science Standards met to consider implementation strategies, states and school districts wanted to know which materials were aligned to the new standards. The answer from the developers was short but not sweet: You won't find much now, and it's going to…

  12. Aligning brains and minds

    PubMed Central

    Tong, Frank

    2012-01-01

    In this issue of Neuron, Haxby and colleagues describe a new method for aligning functional brain activity patterns across participants. Their study demonstrates that objects are similarly represented across different brains, allowing for reliable classification of one person’s brain activity based on another’s. PMID:22017984

  13. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  14. Precision Antenna Alignment Procedure.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    Precise azimuthal alignment of troposcatter system antennas is achieved by centering on the great circle, the combined pattern of intercepting beams...from two troposcatter antennas. The combined antenna pattern is determined to be centered on and symmetric about the great circle when the Doppler

  15. Optically Aligned Drill Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Adderholdt, Bruce M.

    1994-01-01

    Precise drill press equipped with rotary-indexing microscope. Microscope and drill exchange places when turret rotated. Microscope axis first aligned over future hole, then rotated out of way so drill axis assumes its precise position. New procedure takes less time to locate drilling positions and produces more accurate results. Apparatus adapted to such other machine tools as milling and measuring machines.

  16. Aligned-or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roseman, Jo Ellen; Koppal, Mary

    2015-01-01

    When state leaders and national partners in the development of the Next Generation Science Standards met to consider implementation strategies, states and school districts wanted to know which materials were aligned to the new standards. The answer from the developers was short but not sweet: You won't find much now, and it's going to…

  17. Hydrogen detector

    DOEpatents

    Kanegae, Naomichi; Ikemoto, Ichiro

    1980-01-01

    A hydrogen detector of the type in which the interior of the detector is partitioned by a metal membrane into a fluid section and a vacuum section. Two units of the metal membrane are provided and vacuum pipes are provided independently in connection to the respective units of the metal membrane. One of the vacuum pipes is connected to a vacuum gauge for static equilibrium operation while the other vacuum pipe is connected to an ion pump or a set of an ion pump and a vacuum gauge both designed for dynamic equilibrium operation.

  18. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  19. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  20. Microwave detector

    SciTech Connect

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1986-12-02

    A detector is described for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations, the detector comprising: a B-dot loop linking the magnetic field of the microwave pulse; a biased ferrite, that produces a magnetization field flux that links the B-dot loop. The ferrite is positioned within the B-dot loop so that the magnetic field of the microwave pulse interacts with the ferrite and thereby participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux; and high-frequency insensitive means for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop.

  1. Silicon Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadrozinski, Hartmut

    2014-03-01

    The use of silicon detectors has experienced an exponential growth in accelerator and space based experiments, similar to trends in the semiconductor industry as a whole, usually paraphrased as ``Moore's Law.'' Some of the essentials for this phenomenon will be presented, together with examples of the exciting science results which it enabled. With the establishment of a ``semiconductor culture'' in universities and laboratories around the world, an increased understanding of the sensors results in thinner, faster, more radiation-resistant detectors, spawning an amazing wealth of new technologies and applications, which will be the main subject of the presentation.

  2. Multiple sequence alignment accuracy and evolutionary distance estimation.

    PubMed

    Rosenberg, Michael S

    2005-11-23

    Sequence alignment is a common tool in bioinformatics and comparative genomics. It is generally assumed that multiple sequence alignment yields better results than pair wise sequence alignment, but this assumption has rarely been tested, and never with the control provided by simulation analysis. This study used sequence simulation to examine the gain in accuracy of adding a third sequence to a pair wise alignment, particularly concentrating on how the phylogenetic position of the additional sequence relative to the first pair changes the accuracy of the initial pair's alignment as well as their estimated evolutionary distance. The maximal gain in alignment accuracy was found not when the third sequence is directly intermediate between the initial two sequences, but rather when it perfectly subdivides the branch leading from the root of the tree to one of the original sequences (making it half as close to one sequence as the other). Evolutionary distance estimation in the multiple alignment framework, however, is largely unrelated to alignment accuracy and rather is dependent on the position of the third sequence; the closer the branch leading to the third sequence is to the root of the tree, the larger the estimated distance between the first two sequences. The bias in distance estimation appears to be a direct result of the standard greedy progressive algorithm used by many multiple alignment methods. These results have implications for choosing new taxa and genomes to sequence when resources are limited.

  3. Parallel sequence alignment in limited space.

    PubMed

    Grice, J A; Hughey, R; Speck, D

    1995-01-01

    Sequence comparison with affine gap costs is a problem that is readily parallelizable on simple single-instruction, multiple-data stream (SIMD) parallel processors using only constant space per processing element. Unfortunately, the twin problem of sequence alignment, finding the optimal character-by-character correspondence between two sequences, is more complicated. While the innovative O(n2)-time and O(n)-space serial algorithm has been parallelized for multiple-instruction, multiple-data stream (MIMD) computers with only a communication-time slowdown, typically O(log n), it is not suitable for hardware-efficient SIMD parallel processors with only local communication. This paper proposes several methods of computing sequence alignments with limited memory per processing element. The algorithms are also well-suited to serial implementation. The simpler algorithms feature, for an arbitrary integer L, a factor of L slowdown in exchange for reducing space requirements from O(n) to O(L square root of n) per processing element. Using this result, we describe an O(n log n) parallel time algorithm that requires O(log n) space per processing element on O(n) SIMD processing elements with only a mesh or linear interconnection network.

  4. Variability in static alignment and kinematics for kinematically aligned TKA.

    PubMed

    Theodore, Willy; Twiggs, Joshua; Kolos, Elizabeth; Roe, Justin; Fritsch, Brett; Dickison, David; Liu, David; Salmon, Lucy; Miles, Brad; Howell, Stephen

    2017-08-01

    Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) significantly improves pain and restores a considerable degree of function. However, improvements are needed to increase patient satisfaction and restore kinematics to allow more physically demanding activities that active patients consider important. The aim of our study was to compare the alignment and motion of kinematically and mechanically aligned TKAs. A patient specific musculoskeletal computer simulation was used to compare the tibio-femoral and patello-femoral kinematics between mechanically aligned and kinematically aligned TKA in 20 patients. When kinematically aligned, femoral components on average resulted in more valgus alignment to the mechanical axis and internally rotated to surgical transepicondylar axis whereas tibia component on average resulted in more varus alignment to the mechanical axis and internally rotated to tibial AP rotational axis. With kinematic alignment, tibio-femoral motion displayed greater tibial external rotation and lateral femoral flexion facet centre (FFC) translation with knee flexion than mechanical aligned TKA. At the patellofemoral joint, patella lateral shift of kinematically aligned TKA plateaued after 20 to 30° flexion while in mechanically aligned TKA it decreased continuously through the whole range of motion. Kinematic alignment resulted in greater variation than mechanical alignment for all tibio-femoral and patello-femoral motion. Kinematic alignment places TKA components patient specific alignment which depends on the preoperative state of the knee resulting in greater variation in kinematics. The use of computational models has the potential to predict which alignment based on native alignment, kinematic or mechanical, could improve knee function for patient's undergoing TKA. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Automation of the targeting and reflective alignment concept

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redfield, Robin C.

    1992-01-01

    The automated alignment system, described herein, employs a reflective, passive (requiring no power) target and includes a PC-based imaging system and one camera mounted on a six degree of freedom robot manipulator. The system detects and corrects for manipulator misalignment in three translational and three rotational directions by employing the Targeting and Reflective Alignment Concept (TRAC), which simplifies alignment by decoupling translational and rotational alignment control. The concept uses information on the camera and the target's relative position based on video feedback from the camera. These relative positions are converted into alignment errors and minimized by motions of the robot. The system is robust to exogenous lighting by virtue of a subtraction algorithm which enables the camera to only see the target. These capabilities are realized with relatively minimal complexity and expense.

  6. Vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10{sup {minus}13} s, among them the {tau} lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation.

  7. A generic geometric calibration method for tomographic imaging systems with flat-panel detectors--a detailed implementation guide.

    PubMed

    Li, Xinhua; Da, Zhang; Liu, Bob

    2010-07-01

    To present a generic geometric calibration method for tomographic imaging systems with flat-panel detectors in a very detailed manner, in the aim to provide a useful tool to the public domain. The method is based on a projection matrix which represents a mapping from 3D object coordinate system to 2D projection image plane. The projection matrix can be determined experimentally through the imaging of a phantom of known marker geometry. Accurate implementation was accomplished through direct computation algorithms, including a novel ellipse fitting using singular value decomposition and data normalization. Benefits of the method include: (1) It is capable of being applied to systems of different scan trajectories, source-detector alignments, and detector orientations; (2) projection matrices can be utilized in image reconstructions or in the extraction of explicit geometrical parameters; and (3) the method imposes minimal limits on the design of calibration phantom. C++ programs that calculate projection matrices and extract geometric parameters from them are also provided. For validation, the calibration method was applied to the computer simulation of a cone-beam CT system, as well as to three tomosynthesis prototypes of different source-detector movement patterns: Source and detector rotating synchronizedly; source rotating and detector wobbling; and source rotating and detector staying stationary. Projection matrices were computed on a view by view basis. Geometric parameters extracted from projection matrices were consistent with actual settings. Images were reconstructed by directly using projection matrices, and were compared to virtual Shepp-Logan image for CT simulation and to central projection images of CIRS breast phantoms for tomosynthesis prototypes. They showed no obvious distortion or blurring, indicating the high quality of geometric calibration results. When the computed central ray offsets were perturbed with Gaussian noises of 1 pixel standard

  8. Speeding up Batch Alignment of Large Ontologies Using MapReduce.

    PubMed

    Thayasivam, Uthayasanker; Doshi, Prashant

    2013-09-01

    Real-world ontologies tend to be very large with several containing thousands of entities. Increasingly, ontologies are hosted in repositories, which often compute the alignment between the ontologies. As new ontologies are submitted or ontologies are updated, their alignment with others must be quickly computed. Therefore, aligning several pairs of ontologies quickly becomes a challenge for these repositories. We project this problem as one of batch alignment and show how it may be approached using the distributed computing paradigm of MapReduce. Our approach allows any alignment algorithm to be utilized on a MapReduce architecture. Experiments using four representative alignment algorithms demonstrate flexible and significant speedup of batch alignment of large ontology pairs using MapReduce.

  9. ASCONA: Rapid Detection and Alignment of Protein Binding Site Conformations.

    PubMed

    Bietz, Stefan; Rarey, Matthias

    2015-08-24

    The usage of conformational ensembles constitutes a widespread technique for the consideration of protein flexibility in computational biology. When experimental structures are applied for this purpose, alignment techniques are usually required in dealing with structural deviations and annotation inconsistencies. Moreover, many application scenarios focus on protein ligand binding sites. Here, we introduce our new alignment algorithm ASCONA that has been specially geared to the problem of aligning multiple conformations of sequentially similar binding sites. Intense efforts have been directed to an accurate detection of highly flexible backbone deviations, multiple binding site matches within a single structure, and a reliable, but at the same time highly efficient, search algorithm. In contrast, most available alignment methods rather target other issues, e.g., the global alignment of distantly related proteins that share structurally conserved regions. For conformational ensembles, this might not only result in an overhead of computation time but could also affect the achieved accuracy, especially for more complicated cases as highly flexible proteins. ASCONA was evaluated on a test set containing 1107 structures of 65 diverse proteins. In all cases, ASCONA was able to correctly align the binding site at an average alignment computation time of 4 ms per target. Furthermore, no false positive matches were observed when searching the same query sites in the structures of other proteins. ASCONA proved to cope with highly deviating backbone structures and to tolerate structural gaps and moderate mutation rates. ASCONA is available free of charge for academic use at http://www.zbh.uni-hamburg.de/ascona .

  10. MANGO: a new approach to multiple sequence alignment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zefeng; Lin, Hao; Li, Ming

    2007-01-01

    Multiple sequence alignment is a classical and challenging task for biological sequence analysis. The problem is NP-hard. The full dynamic programming takes too much time. The progressive alignment heuristics adopted by most state of the art multiple sequence alignment programs suffer from the 'once a gap, always a gap' phenomenon. Is there a radically new way to do multiple sequence alignment? This paper introduces a novel and orthogonal multiple sequence alignment method, using multiple optimized spaced seeds and new algorithms to handle these seeds efficiently. Our new algorithm processes information of all sequences as a whole, avoiding problems caused by the popular progressive approaches. Because the optimized spaced seeds are provably significantly more sensitive than the consecutive k-mers, the new approach promises to be more accurate and reliable. To validate our new approach, we have implemented MANGO: Multiple Alignment with N Gapped Oligos. Experiments were carried out on large 16S RNA benchmarks showing that MANGO compares favorably, in both accuracy and speed, against state-of-art multiple sequence alignment methods, including ClustalW 1.83, MUSCLE 3.6, MAFFT 5.861, Prob-ConsRNA 1.11, Dialign 2.2.1, DIALIGN-T 0.2.1, T-Coffee 4.85, POA 2.0 and Kalign 2.0.

  11. Ultra-high-precision alignment technology for lens manufacturing used for high-end optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffner, Sebastian; Sure, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    This article describes the progress in the area of modern centration technology by using digital image processing. This work is motivated by the continuously increasing demand for high-end optics. During the last years the surface lens quality has been continuously improved. Today the image quality is more determined by the manufacturing tolerances for the mechanical interface which is responsible for decenter and tilt of the lenses respectively the subgroups. Some of the aberrations are directly linked to the decenter of the lenses, Coma for example. Hence it is necessary to realize the subgroups with tolerances below lpm. To determine the decenter of a lens an auto collimation telescope is used to image the reflex of the lens surfaces onto a detector, commonly a half covert photodiode. Rotating the lens generates a sinusoidal signal, which is evaluated by a lock-in amplifier to drive two actuators to adjust the alignment chuck. Typical internal reflections caused by stray light for example disturb the current procedure in such a way that it is impossible to get a stable alignment process. Digital image processing allows us to fix these problems with image recognition. We will demonstrate how a modified auto collimation telescope in combination with the developed software algorithms made the manufacturing process more accurate, faster and useable for a broad spectrum of lenses. It has been proofed by some thousand diverse lenses that with these new technique subgroups can be centered within 0.25μm.

  12. Alignement automatise de fibres optiques amorces monomodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    St-Amant, Yves

    Cette these jette les bases necessaires au developpement d'algorithmes a base de modele pour l'automatisation de l'alignement de fibres amorces monomodes. A partir de la methode de l'integrale de recouvrement et de deux solutions approximatives existantes, un modele analytique d'efficacite de couplage optique permettant d'estimer la puissance transmise entre un composant et une fibre amorce monomode est d'abord formule. Avec celui-ci, sept proprietes pouvant etre utiles au developpement d'algorithmes a base de modele sont ensuite identifiees et validees. Enfin, a l'aide de ces proprietes, une strategie d'alignement a base de modele est developpee et validee experimentalement. Les resultats obtenus demontrent clairement la repetitivite, la robustesse, la precision et la rapidite de la strategie proposee. Ils demontrent aussi qu'il est possible de realiser un alignement complet sans l'utilisation de systemes auxiliaires tels des systemes de vision, des cameras infrarouges, des capteurs de contact ou des systemes de fixation hautement precis.

  13. Computer-assisted area detector masking.

    PubMed

    Wright, Christopher J; Zhou, Xiao Dong

    2017-03-01

    Area detectors have become the predominant type of detector for the rapid acquisition of X-ray diffraction, small-angle scattering and total scattering. These detectors record the scattering for a large area, giving each shot good statistical significance to the resulting scattered intensity I(Q) pattern. However, many of these detectors have pixel level defects, which cause error in the resulting one-dimensional patterns. In this work, new software to automatically find and mask these dead pixels and other defects is presented. This algorithm is benchmarked with both ideal simulated and experimental datasets.

  14. Quasiparticle Level Alignment for Photocatalytic Interfaces

    SciTech Connect

    Migani, Annapaola; Mowbray, Duncan J.; Zhao, Jin; Petek, Hrvoje; Rubio, Angel

    2014-05-13

    Electronic level alignment at the interface between an adsorbed molecular layer and a semiconducting substrate determines the activity and efficiency of many photocatalytic materials. Standard density functional theory (DFT)-based methods have proven unable to provide a quantitative description of this level alignment. This requires a proper treatment of the anisotropic screening, necessitating the use of quasiparticle (QP) techniques. However, the computational complexity of QP algorithms has meant a quantitative description of interfacial levels has remained elusive. We provide a systematic study of a prototypical interface, bare and methanol-covered rutile TiO2(110) surfaces, to determine the type of many-body theory required to obtain an accurate description of the level alignment. This is accomplished via a direct comparison with metastable impact electron spectroscopy (MIES), ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy (UPS), and two-photon photoemission (2PP) spectroscopy. We consider GGA DFT, hybrid DFT, and G0W0, scQPGW1, scQPGW0, and scQPGW QP calculations. Our results demonstrate that G0W0, or our recently introduced scQPGW1 approach, are required to obtain the correct alignment of both the highest occupied and lowest unoccupied interfacial molecular levels (HOMO/LUMO). These calculations set a new standard in the interpretation of electronic structure probe experiments of complex organic molecule/semiconductor interfaces.

  15. Aligned genomic data compression via improved modeling.

    PubMed

    Ochoa, Idoia; Hernaez, Mikel; Weissman, Tsachy

    2014-12-01

    With the release of the latest Next-Generation Sequencing (NGS) machine, the HiSeq X by Illumina, the cost of sequencing the whole genome of a human is expected to drop to a mere $1000. This milestone in sequencing history marks the era of affordable sequencing of individuals and opens the doors to personalized medicine. In accord, unprecedented volumes of genomic data will require storage for processing. There will be dire need not only of compressing aligned data, but also of generating compressed files that can be fed directly to downstream applications to facilitate the analysis of and inference on the data. Several approaches to this challenge have been proposed in the literature; however, focus thus far has been on the low coverage regime and most of the suggested compressors are not based on effective modeling of the data. We demonstrate the benefit of data modeling for compressing aligned reads. Specifically, we show that, by working with data models designed for the aligned data, we can improve considerably over the best compression ratio achieved by previously proposed algorithms. Our results indicate that the pareto-optimal barrier for compression rate and speed claimed by Bonfield and Mahoney (2013) [Bonfield JK and Mahoneys MV, Compression of FASTQ and SAM format sequencing data, PLOS ONE, 8(3):e59190, 2013.] does not apply for high coverage aligned data. Furthermore, our improved compression ratio is achieved by splitting the data in a manner conducive to operations in the compressed domain by downstream applications.

  16. Inflation by alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Burgess, C.P.; Roest, Diederik

    2015-06-08

    Pseudo-Goldstone bosons (pGBs) can provide technically natural inflatons, as has been comparatively well-explored in the simplest axion examples. Although inflationary success requires trans-Planckian decay constants, f≳M{sub p}, several mechanisms have been proposed to obtain this, relying on (mis-)alignments between potential and kinetic energies in multiple-field models. We extend these mechanisms to a broader class of inflationary models, including in particular the exponential potentials that arise for pGB potentials based on noncompact groups (and so which might apply to moduli in an extra-dimensional setting). The resulting potentials provide natural large-field inflationary models and can predict a larger primordial tensor signal than is true for simpler single-field versions of these models. In so doing we provide a unified treatment of several alignment mechanisms, showing how each emerges as a limit of the more general setup.

  17. Alignment reference device

    DOEpatents

    Patton, Gail Y.; Torgerson, Darrel D.

    1987-01-01

    An alignment reference device provides a collimated laser beam that minimizes angular deviations therein. A laser beam source outputs the beam into a single mode optical fiber. The output end of the optical fiber acts as a source of radiant energy and is positioned at the focal point of a lens system where the focal point is positioned within the lens. The output beam reflects off a mirror back to the lens that produces a collimated beam.

  18. Nuclear reactor alignment plate configuration

    SciTech Connect

    Altman, David A; Forsyth, David R; Smith, Richard E; Singleton, Norman R

    2014-01-28

    An alignment plate that is attached to a core barrel of a pressurized water reactor and fits within slots within a top plate of a lower core shroud and upper core plate to maintain lateral alignment of the reactor internals. The alignment plate is connected to the core barrel through two vertically-spaced dowel pins that extend from the outside surface of the core barrel through a reinforcement pad and into corresponding holes in the alignment plate. Additionally, threaded fasteners are inserted around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad and into the alignment plate to further secure the alignment plate to the core barrel. A fillet weld also is deposited around the perimeter of the reinforcement pad. To accomodate thermal growth between the alignment plate and the core barrel, a gap is left above, below and at both sides of one of the dowel pins in the alignment plate holes through with the dowel pins pass.

  19. Orbit IMU alignment: Error analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corson, R. W.

    1980-01-01

    A comprehensive accuracy analysis of orbit inertial measurement unit (IMU) alignments using the shuttle star trackers was completed and the results are presented. Monte Carlo techniques were used in a computer simulation of the IMU alignment hardware and software systems to: (1) determine the expected Space Transportation System 1 Flight (STS-1) manual mode IMU alignment accuracy; (2) investigate the accuracy of alignments in later shuttle flights when the automatic mode of star acquisition may be used; and (3) verify that an analytical model previously used for estimating the alignment error is a valid model. The analysis results do not differ significantly from expectations. The standard deviation in the IMU alignment error for STS-1 alignments was determined to the 68 arc seconds per axis. This corresponds to a 99.7% probability that the magnitude of the total alignment error is less than 258 arc seconds.

  20. Dynamic Alignment at SLS

    SciTech Connect

    Ruland, Robert E.

    2003-04-23

    The relative alignment of components in the storage ring of the Swiss Light Source (SLS) is guaranteed by mechanical means. The magnets are rigidly fixed to 48 girders by means of alignment rails with tolerances of less than {+-}15 {micro}m. The bending magnets, supported by 3 point ball bearings, overlap adjacent girders and thus establish virtual train links between the girders, located near the bending magnet centres. Keeping the distortion of the storage ring geometry within a tolerance of {+-}100 {micro}m in order to guarantee sufficient dynamic apertures, requires continuous monitoring and correction of the girder locations. Two monitoring systems for the horizontal and the vertical direction will be installed to measure displacements of the train link between girders, which are due to ground settings and temperature effects: The hydrostatic levelling system (HLS) gives an absolute vertical reference, while the horizontal positioning system (HPS), which employs low cost linear encoders with sub-micron resolution, measures relative horizontal movements. The girder mover system based on five DC motors per girder allows a dynamic realignment of the storage ring within a working window of more than {+-}1 mm for girder translations and {+-}1 mrad for rotations. We will describe both monitoring systems (HLS and HPS) as well as the applied correction scheme based on the girder movers. We also show simulations indicating that beam based girder alignment takes care of most of the static closed orbit correction.

  1. Multiple protein structure alignment.

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, W. R.; Flores, T. P.; Orengo, C. A.

    1994-01-01

    A method was developed to compare protein structures and to combine them into a multiple structure consensus. Previous methods of multiple structure comparison have only concatenated pairwise alignments or produced a consensus structure by averaging coordinate sets. The current method is a fusion of the fast structure comparison program SSAP and the multiple sequence alignment program MULTAL. As in MULTAL, structures are progressively combined, producing intermediate consensus structures that are compared directly to each other and all remaining single structures. This leads to a hierarchic "condensation," continually evaluated in the light of the emerging conserved core regions. Following the SSAP approach, all interatomic vectors were retained with well-conserved regions distinguished by coherent vector bundles (the structural equivalent of a conserved sequence position). Each bundle of vectors is summarized by a resultant, whereas vector coherence is captured in an error term, which is the only distinction between conserved and variable positions. Resultant vectors are used directly in the comparison, which is weighted by their error values, giving greater importance to the matching of conserved positions. The resultant vectors and their errors can also be used directly in molecular modeling. Applications of the method were assessed by the quality of the resulting sequence alignments, phylogenetic tree construction, and databank scanning with the consensus. Visual assessment of the structural superpositions and consensus structure for various well-characterized families confirmed that the consensus had identified a reasonable core. PMID:7849601

  2. Docking alignment system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Monford, Leo G. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    Improved techniques are provided for alignment of two objects. The present invention is particularly suited for three-dimensional translation and three-dimensional rotational alignment of objects in outer space. A camera 18 is fixedly mounted to one object, such as a remote manipulator arm 10 of the spacecraft, while the planar reflective surface 30 is fixed to the other object, such as a grapple fixture 20. A monitor 50 displays in real-time images from the camera, such that the monitor displays both the reflected image of the camera and visible markings on the planar reflective surface when the objects are in proper alignment. The monitor may thus be viewed by the operator and the arm 10 manipulated so that the reflective surface is perpendicular to the optical axis of the camera, the roll of the reflective surface is at a selected angle with respect to the camera, and the camera is spaced a pre-selected distance from the reflective surface.

  3. Understanding Beam Alignment in a Coherent Lidar System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Prasad, Narasimha S.; Roychoudhari, Chandrasekhar

    2015-01-01

    Optical beam alignment in a coherent lidar (or ladar) receiver system plays a critical role in optimizing its performance. Optical alignment in a coherent lidar system dictates the wavefront curvature (phase front) and Poynting vector) matching of the local oscillator beam with the incoming receiver beam on a detector. However, this alignment is often not easy to achieve and is rarely perfect. Furthermore, optical fibers are being increasingly used in coherent lidar system receivers for transporting radiation to achieve architectural elegance. Single mode fibers also require stringent mode matching for efficient light coupling. The detector response characteristics vary with the misalignment of the two pointing vectors. Misalignment can lead to increase in DC current. Also, a lens in front of the detector may exasperate phase front and Poynting vector mismatch. Non-Interaction of Waves, or the NIW property indicates the light beams do not interfere by themselves in the absence of detecting dipoles. In this paper, we will analyze the extent of misalignment on the detector specifications using pointing vectors of mixing beams in light of the NIW property.

  4. Detection of Extensive Cosmic Air Showers by Small Scintillation Detectors with Wavelength-Shifting Fibres

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiola, Salvatore; La Rocca, Paola; Riggi, Francesco; Riggi, Simone

    2012-01-01

    A set of three small scintillation detectors was employed to measure correlated events due to the passage of cosmic muons originating from extensive air showers. The coincidence rate between (any) two detectors was extracted as a function of their relative distance. The difference between the arrival times in three non-aligned detectors was used…

  5. Plastic neutron detectors.

    SciTech Connect

    Wilson, Tiffany M.S; King, Michael J.; Doty, F. Patrick

    2008-12-01

    This work demonstrated the feasibility and limitations of semiconducting {pi}-conjugated organic polymers for fast neutron detection via n-p elastic scattering. Charge collection in conjugated polymers in the family of substituted poly(p-phenylene vinylene)s (PPV) was evaluated using band-edge laser and proton beam ionization. These semiconducting materials can have high H/C ratio, wide bandgap, high resistivity and high dielectric strength, allowing high field operation with low leakage current and capacitance noise. The materials can also be solution cast, allowing possible low-cost radiation detector fabrication and scale-up. However, improvements in charge collection efficiency are necessary in order to achieve single particle detection with a reasonable sensitivity. The work examined processing variables, additives and environmental effects. Proton beam exposure was used to verify particle sensitivity and radiation hardness to a total exposure of approximately 1 MRAD. Conductivity exhibited sensitivity to temperature and humidity. The effects of molecular ordering were investigated in stretched films, and FTIR was used to quantify the order in films using the Hermans orientation function. The photoconductive response approximately doubled for stretch-aligned films with the stretch direction parallel to the electric field direction, when compared to as-cast films. The response was decreased when the stretch direction was orthogonal to the electric field. Stretch-aligned films also exhibited a significant sensitivity to the polarization of the laser excitation, whereas drop-cast films showed none, indicating improved mobility along the backbone, but poor {pi}-overlap in the orthogonal direction. Drop-cast composites of PPV with substituted fullerenes showed approximately a two order of magnitude increase in photoresponse, nearly independent of nanoparticle concentration. Interestingly, stretch-aligned composite films showed a substantial decrease in

  6. PicXAA-R: Efficient structural alignment of multiple RNA sequences using a greedy approach

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Accurate and efficient structural alignment of non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) has grasped more and more attentions as recent studies unveiled the significance of ncRNAs in living organisms. While the Sankoff style structural alignment algorithms cannot efficiently serve for multiple sequences, mostly progressive schemes are used to reduce the complexity. However, this idea tends to propagate the early stage errors throughout the entire process, thereby degrading the quality of the final alignment. For multiple protein sequence alignment, we have recently proposed PicXAA which constructs an accurate alignment in a non-progressive fashion. Results Here, we propose PicXAA-R as an extension to PicXAA for greedy structural alignment of ncRNAs. PicXAA-R efficiently grasps both folding information within each sequence and local similarities between sequences. It uses a set of probabilistic consistency transformations to improve the posterior base-pairing and base alignment probabilities using the information of all sequences in the alignment. Using a graph-based scheme, we greedily build up the structural alignment from sequence regions with high base-pairing and base alignment probabilities. Conclusions Several experiments on datasets with different characteristics confirm that PicXAA-R is one of the fastest algorithms for structural alignment of multiple RNAs and it consistently yields accurate alignment results, especially for datasets with locally similar sequences. PicXAA-R source code is freely available at: http://www.ece.tamu.edu/~bjyoon/picxaa/. PMID:21342569

  7. Sigma: multiple alignment of weakly-conserved non-coding DNA sequence.

    PubMed

    Siddharthan, Rahul

    2006-03-16

    Existing tools for multiple-sequence alignment focus on aligning protein sequence or protein-coding DNA sequence, and are often based on extensions to Needleman-Wunsch-like pairwise alignment methods. We introduce a new tool, Sigma, with a new algorithm and scoring scheme designed specifically for non-coding DNA sequence. This problem acquires importance with the increasing number of published sequences of closely-related species. In particular, studies of gene regulation seek to take advantage of comparative genomics, and recent algorithms for finding regulatory sites in phylogenetically-related intergenic sequence require alignment as a preprocessing step. Much can also be learned about evolution from intergenic DNA, which tends to evolve faster than coding DNA. Sigma uses a strategy of seeking the best possible gapless local alignments (a strategy earlier used by DiAlign), at each step making the best possible alignment consistent with existing alignments, and scores the significance of the alignment based on the lengths of the aligned fragments and a background model which may be supplied or estimated from an auxiliary file of intergenic DNA. Comparative tests of sigma with five earlier algorithms on synthetic data generated to mimic real data show excellent performance, with Sigma balancing high "sensitivity" (more bases aligned) with effective filtering of "incorrect" alignments. With real data, while "correctness" can't be directly quantified for the alignment, running the PhyloGibbs motif finder on pre-aligned sequence suggests that Sigma's alignments are superior. By taking into account the peculiarities of non-coding DNA, Sigma fills a gap in the toolbox of bioinformatics.

  8. Method for alignment of microwires

    DOEpatents

    Beardslee, Joseph A.; Lewis, Nathan S.; Sadtler, Bryce

    2017-01-24

    A method of aligning microwires includes modifying the microwires so they are more responsive to a magnetic field. The method also includes using a magnetic field so as to magnetically align the microwires. The method can further include capturing the microwires in a solid support structure that retains the longitudinal alignment of the microwires when the magnetic field is not applied to the microwires.

  9. Alignment as a Teacher Variable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Andrew C.; Smithson, John; Blank, Rolf; Zeidner, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of the procedures developed by Porter and colleagues (Porter, 2002), other methods of defining and measuring alignment are essentially limited to alignment between tests and standards. Porter's procedures have been generalized to investigating the alignment between content standards, tests, textbooks, and even classroom…

  10. Alignment as a Teacher Variable

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Porter, Andrew C.; Smithson, John; Blank, Rolf; Zeidner, Timothy

    2007-01-01

    With the exception of the procedures developed by Porter and colleagues (Porter, 2002), other methods of defining and measuring alignment are essentially limited to alignment between tests and standards. Porter's procedures have been generalized to investigating the alignment between content standards, tests, textbooks, and even classroom…