Science.gov

Sample records for detector dead time

  1. Dead-time effects in microchannel-plate imaging detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zombeck, Martin V.; Fraser, George W.

    1991-01-01

    The observed counting rates of microchannel plate (MCP) based detectors for high resolution observations of celestial EUV and X-ray sources vary over many orders of magnitude; the counting capability of an individual channel, however, is not high, and is associated with dead-times ranging from 0.1 msec to 1 sec. The dead-time increases with the area illuminated; attention is presently given to laboratory determinations of the count rate characteristics of a MCP detector as a function of illuminated area, and a model is developed for these results' use in the interpretation of space observations.

  2. Effect of Detector Dead Time on the Performance of Optical Direct-Detection Communication Links

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, C.-C.

    1988-01-01

    Avalanche photodiodes (APDs) operating in the Geiger mode can provide a significantly improved single-photon detect ion sensitivity over conventional photodiodes. However, the quenching circuit required to remove the excess charge carriers after each photon event can introduce an undesirable dead time into the detection process. The effect of this detector dead time on the performance of a binary pulse-position-modulted (PPM) channel is studied by analyzing the error probability. It is shown that, when back- ground noise is negligible, the performance of the detector with dead time is similar to that o f a quantum-limited receiver. For systems with increasing background intensities, the error rate of the receiver starts to degrade rapidly with increasing dead time. The power penalty due to detector dead time is also evaluated and shown to depend critically on background intensity as well as dead time. Given the expected background strength in an optical channel, therefore, a constraint must be placed on the bandwidth of the receiver to limit the amount of power penalty due to detector dead time.

  3. YALINA-booster subcritical assembly pulsed-neutron e xperiments: detector dead time and apatial corrections.

    SciTech Connect

    Cao, Y.; Gohar, Y.; Nuclear Engineering Division

    2010-10-11

    In almost every detector counting system, a minimal dead time is required to record two successive events as two separated pulses. Due to the random nature of neutron interactions in the subcritical assembly, there is always some probability that a true neutron event will not be recorded because it occurs too close to the preceding event. These losses may become rather severe for counting systems with high counting rates, and should be corrected before any utilization of the experimental data. This report examines the dead time effects for the pulsed neutron experiments of the YALINA-Booster subcritical assembly. The nonparalyzable model is utilized to correct the experimental data due to dead time. Overall, the reactivity values are increased by 0.19$ and 0.32$ after the spatial corrections for the YALINA-Booster 36% and 21% configurations respectively. The differences of the reactivities obtained with He-3 long or short detectors at the same detector channel diminish after the dead time corrections of the experimental data for the 36% YALINA-Booster configuration. In addition, better agreements between reactivities obtained from different experimental data sets are also observed after the dead time corrections for the 21% YALINA-Booster configuration.

  4. A 65 nm CMOS analog processor with zero dead time for future pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaioni, L.; Braga, D.; Christian, D. C.; Deptuch, G.; Fahim, F.; Nodari, B.; Ratti, L.; Re, V.; Zimmerman, T.

    2017-02-01

    Next generation pixel chips at the High-Luminosity (HL) LHC will be exposed to extremely high levels of radiation and particle rates. In the so-called Phase II upgrade, ATLAS and CMS will need a completely new tracker detector, complying with the very demanding operating conditions and the delivered luminosity (up to 5×1034 cm-2 s-1 in the next decade). This work is concerned with the design of a synchronous analog processor with zero dead time developed in a 65 nm CMOS technology, conceived for pixel detectors at the HL-LHC experiment upgrades. It includes a low noise, fast charge sensitive amplifier featuring a detector leakage compensation circuit, and a compact, single ended comparator that guarantees very good performance in terms of channel-to-channel dispersion of threshold without needing any pixel-level trimming. A flash ADC is exploited for digital conversion immediately after the charge amplifier. A thorough discussion on the design of the charge amplifier and the comparator is provided along with an exhaustive set of simulation results.

  5. Correction for the detector-dead-time effect on the second-order correlation of stationary sub-Poissonian light in a two-detector configuration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ann, Byoung-moo; Song, Younghoon; Kim, Junki; Yang, Daeho; An, Kyungwon

    2015-08-01

    Exact measurement of the second-order correlation function g(2 )(t ) of a light source is essential when investigating the photon statistics and the light generation process of the source. For a stationary single-mode light source, the Mandel Q factor is directly related to g(2 )(0 ) . For a large mean photon number in the mode, the deviation of g(2 )(0 ) from unity is so small that even a tiny error in measuring g(2 )(0 ) would result in an inaccurate Mandel Q . In this work, we address the detector-dead-time effect on g(2 )(0 ) of stationary sub-Poissonian light. It is then found that detector dead time can induce a serious error in g(2 )(0 ) and thus in Mandel Q in those cases even in a two-detector configuration. Utilizing the cavity-QED microlaser, a well-established sub-Poissonian light source, we measured g(2 )(0 ) with two different types of photodetectors with different dead times. We also introduced prolonged dead time by intentionally deleting the photodetection events following a preceding one within a specified time interval. We found that the observed Q of the cavity-QED microlaser was underestimated by 19% with respect to the dead-time-free Q when its mean photon number was about 600. We derived an analytic formula which well explains the behavior of the g(2 )(0 ) as a function of the dead time.

  6. Correction of dead-time and pile-up in a detector array for constant and rapidly varying counting rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero, C.; Cano-Ott, D.; Mendoza, E.; Wright, T.

    2015-03-01

    The effect of dead-time and pile-up in counting experiments may become a significant source of uncertainty if not properly taken into account. Although analytical solutions to this problem have been proposed for simple set-ups with one or two detectors, these are limited when it comes to arrays where time correlation between the detector modules is used, and also in situations of variable counting rates. In this paper we describe the dead-time and pile-up corrections applied to the n_TOF Total Absorption Calorimeter (TAC), a 4π γ-ray detector made of 40 BaF2 modules operating at the CERN n_TOF facility. Our method is based on the simulation of the complete signal detection and event reconstruction processes and can be applied as well in the case of rapidly varying counting rates. The method is discussed in detail and then we present its successful application to the particular case of the measurement of 238U(n, γ) reactions with the TAC detector.

  7. Measurement of the front-end dead-time of the LHCb muon detector and evaluation of its contribution to the muon detection inefficiency

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anderlini, L.; Anelli, M.; Archilli, F.; Auriemma, G.; Baldini, W.; Bencivenni, G.; Bizzeti, A.; Bocci, V.; Bondar, N.; Bonivento, W.; Bochin, B.; Bozzi, C.; Brundu, D.; Cadeddu, S.; Campana, P.; Carboni, G.; Cardini, A.; Carletti, M.; Casu, L.; Chubykin, A.; Ciambrone, P.; Dané, E.; De Simone, P.; Falabella, A.; Felici, G.; Fiore, M.; Fontana, M.; Fresch, P.; Furfaro, E.; Graziani, G.; Kashchuk, A.; Kotriakhova, S.; Lai, A.; Lanfranchi, G.; Loi, A.; Maev, O.; Manca, G.; Martellotti, G.; Neustroev, P.; Oldeman, R. G. C.; Palutan, M.; Passaleva, G.; Penso, G.; Pinci, D.; Polycarpo, E.; Saitta, B.; Santacesaria, R.; Santimaria, M.; Santovetti, E.; Saputi, A.; Sarti, A.; Satriano, C.; Satta, A.; Schmidt, B.; Schneider, T.; Sciascia, B.; Sciubba, A.; Siddi, B. G.; Tellarini, G.; Vacca, C.; Vazquez-Gomez, R.; Vecchi, S.; Veltri, M.; Vorobyev, A.

    2016-04-01

    A method is described which allows to deduce the dead-time of the front-end electronics of the LHCb muon detector from a series of measurements performed at different luminosities at a bunch-crossing rate of 20 MHz. The measured values of the dead-time range from ~ 70 ns to ~ 100 ns. These results allow to estimate the performance of the muon detector at the future bunch-crossing rate of 40 MHz and at higher luminosity.

  8. Conceptual design of the TRACE detector readout using a compact, dead time-less analog memory ASIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aliaga, R. J.; Herrero-Bosch, V.; Capra, S.; Pullia, A.; Dueñas, J. A.; Grassi, L.; Triossi, A.; Domingo-Pardo, C.; Gadea, R.; González, V.; Hüyük, T.; Sanchís, E.; Gadea, A.; Mengoni, D.

    2015-11-01

    The new TRacking Array for light Charged particle Ejectiles (TRACE) detector system requires monitorization and sampling of all pulses in a large number of channels with very strict space and power consumption restrictions for the front-end electronics and cabling. Its readout system is to be based on analog memory ASICs with 64 channels each that sample a 1 μs window of the waveform of any valid pulses at 200 MHz while discarding any other signals and are read out at 50 MHz with external ADC digitization. For this purpose, a new, compact analog memory architecture is described that allows pulse capture with zero dead time in any channel while vastly reducing the total number of storage cells, particularly for large amounts of input channels. This is accomplished by partitioning the typical Switched Capacitor Array structure into two pipelined, asymmetric stages and introducing FIFO queue-like control circuitry for captured data, achieving total independence between the capture and readout operations.

  9. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude.

    PubMed

    Urbain, X; Bech, D; Van Roy, J-P; Géléoc, M; Weber, S J; Huetz, A; Picard, Y J

    2015-02-01

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H3 into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme.

  10. A zero dead-time multi-particle time and position sensitive detector based on correlation between brightness and amplitude

    SciTech Connect

    Urbain, X. Bech, D.; Van Roy, J.-P.; Géléoc, M.; Weber, S. J.

    2015-02-15

    A new multi-particle time and position sensitive detector using only a set of microchannel plates, a waveform digitizer, a phosphor screen, and a CMOS camera is described. The assignment of the timing information, as taken from the microchannel plates by fast digitizing, to the positions, as recorded by the camera, is based on the COrrelation between the BRightness of the phosphor screen spots, defined as their integrated intensity and the Amplitude of the electrical signals (COBRA). Tests performed by observing the dissociation of HeH, the fragmentation of H{sub 3} into two or three fragments, and the photo-double-ionization of Xenon atoms are presented, which illustrate the performances of the COBRA detection scheme.

  11. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy from a pixel array detector with fast dual gating and no readout dead-time

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M.; Grybos, Pawel; Kmon, Piotr; Maj, Piotr; Narayanan, Suresh; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Szczygiel, Robert; Sandy, Alec

    2016-01-01

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8 kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. The potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set by the detector frame rate using dual counters is also discussed. PMID:27140146

  12. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy from a pixel array detector with fast dual gating and no readout dead-time

    DOE PAGES

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M.; Grybos, Pawel; ...

    2016-01-01

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8 kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. As a result, the potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set by the detector frame rate using dual counters is also discussed.

  13. Submillisecond X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy from a pixel array detector with fast dual gating and no readout dead-time

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Qingteng; Dufresne, Eric M.; Grybos, Pawel; Kmon, Piotr; Maj, Piotr; Narayanan, Suresh; Deptuch, Grzegorz W.; Szczygiel, Robert; Sandy, Alec

    2016-01-01

    Small-angle scattering X-ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) studies were performed using a novel photon-counting pixel array detector with dual counters for each pixel. Each counter can be read out independently from the other to ensure there is no readout dead-time between the neighboring frames. A maximum frame rate of 11.8 kHz was achieved. Results on test samples show good agreement with simple diffusion. As a result, the potential of extending the time resolution of XPCS beyond the limit set by the detector frame rate using dual counters is also discussed.

  14. Dead-Time Modifications to Fast Fourier Transform Power Spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, W.; Jahoda, K.; Swank, J. H.; Morgan, E. H.; Giles, A. B.

    1995-08-01

    Time series analysis in X-ray astronomy is complicated by the effects of detector dead time which can cause significant departures of power spectra from those expected from simple Poisson statistics. In this paper we study the effects of both the paralyzable and nonparalyzable dead times on the underlying time series which obeys Poisson counting statistics. We present analytical formulae for the autocorrelation function, auto-covariances, and power spectra, for both kinds of dead time. These formulae, taken as a whole, offer a general qualitative and quantitative framework to further understand the effects of dead time in an X-ray detection and data processing system.

  15. Dead-time compensation for a logarithmic display rate meter

    DOEpatents

    Larson, John A.; Krueger, Frederick P.

    1988-09-20

    An improved circuit is provided for application to a radiation survey meter that uses a detector that is subject to dead time. The circuit compensates for dead time over a wide range of count rates by producing a dead-time pulse for each detected event, a live-time pulse that spans the interval between dead-time pulses, and circuits that average the value of these pulses over time. The logarithm of each of these values is obtained and the logarithms are subtracted to provide a signal that is proportional to a count rate that is corrected for the effects of dead time. The circuit produces a meter indication and is also capable of producing an audible indication of detected events.

  16. Dead-time compensation for a logarithmic display rate meter

    DOEpatents

    Larson, J.A.; Krueger, F.P.

    1987-10-05

    An improved circuit is provided for application to a radiation survey meter that uses a detector that is subject to dead time. The circuit compensates for dead time over a wide range of count rates by producing a dead-time pulse for each detected event, a live-time pulse that spans the interval between dead-time pulses, and circuits that average the value of these pulses over time. The logarithm of each of these values is obtained and the logarithms are subtracted to provide a signal that is proportional to a count rate that is corrected for the effects of dead time. The circuit produces a meter indication and is also capable of producing an audible indication of detected events. 5 figs.

  17. Dead-time Corrected Disdrometer Data

    DOE Data Explorer

    Bartholomew, Mary Jane

    2008-03-05

    Original and dead-time corrected disdrometer results for observations made at SGP and TWP. The correction is based on the technique discussed in Sheppard and Joe, 1994. In addition, these files contain calculated radar reflectivity factor, mean Doppler velocity and attenuation for every measurement for both the original and dead-time corrected data at the following wavelengths: 0.316, 0.856, 3.2, 5, and 10cm (W,K,X,C,S bands). Pavlos Kollias provided the code to do these calculations.

  18. Theory of particle detection and multiplicity counting with dead time effects

    SciTech Connect

    Pal, L.; Pazsit, I.

    2013-07-01

    The subject of this paper is the investigation of the effect of the dead time on the statistics of the particle detection process. A theoretical treatment is provided with the application of the methods of renewal theory. The detector efficiency and various types of the dead time are accounted for. Exact analytical results are derived for the probability distribution functions, the expectations and the variances of the number of detected particles. Explicit solutions are given for a few representative cases. The results should serve for the evaluation of the measurements in view of the dead time correction effects for the higher moments of the detector counts. (authors)

  19. Dead Time of Single Photon Avalanche Diodes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neri, L.; Tudisco, S.; Musumeci, F.; Scordino, A.; Fallica, G.; Mazzillo, M.; Zimbone, M.

    2011-06-01

    Single Photon Avalanche Diode (SPAD) is the new generation of Geiger-Muller counter device developed in semiconductor technology [S. Privitera et al. Sensors Journal, vol 8 Iss. 8 (2008) 4636; S. Tudisco et al. IEEE Sensors Journal vol 8 ISS 7-8 (2008) 1324; S. Cova et al. Applied Optics 35 (1996) 1956]. Physical dead time model and noise production process has been analyzed and their corrections have been performed [S.H. Lee, R.P. Gardner, M. Jae, Nucl. Instr. and Meth. in Phys. Res. B 263 (2007) 46]. We have been able to extract the real amount of incident photon rate up to 10 7cps using a device with 0.97μs total deadtime. We also developed the equation of the noise count rate vs incoming photon rate, supported by Montecarlo simulation and experimental data. We marked the difference between dark rate and noise count rate, and introduced the noise rate inside the hybrid deadtime equation used for SPAD device.

  20. Zero-dead-time operation of interleaved atomic clocks.

    PubMed

    Biedermann, G W; Takase, K; Wu, X; Deslauriers, L; Roy, S; Kasevich, M A

    2013-10-25

    We demonstrate a zero-dead-time operation of atomic clocks. This clock reduces sensitivity to local oscillator noise, integrating as nearly 1/τ whereas a clock with dead time integrates as 1/τ(1/2) under identical conditions. We contend that a similar scheme may be applied to improve the stability of optical clocks.

  1. Dead time correction in coincidence counting of photon pairs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, M. S.; Lee, D.-H.; Lee, J.; Lee, J. Y.; Choi, S.-K.; Park, H. S.

    2008-08-01

    We describe two methods for evaluating the dead time of a time-to-amplitude converter (TAC). The dead time is obtained by measuring either the corresponding time interval in an oscilloscope trace or the relation between the single count rate and the coincidence count rate. Values for the TAC dead time are obtained in the range from 3.4 µs to 14.3 µs for the two methods with respective standard uncertainties of 2.9 × 10-8 s and 3.3 × 10-9 s. The TAC dead time is applied to the calibration of coincidence-counting measurements of optical transmission and photon-heralding efficiency.

  2. Measurement of the dead layer thickness in a p-type point contact germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Hao; Yue, Qian; Li, Yu-Lan; Kang, Ke-Jun; Li, Yuan-Jing; Li, Jin; Lin, Shin-Ted; Liu, Shu-Kui; Ma, Hao; Ma, Jing-Lu; Su, Jian; Tsz-King Wong, Henry; Yang, Li-Tao; Zhao, Wei; Zeng, Zhi

    2016-09-01

    A 994 g mass p-type PCGe detector has been deployed during the first phase of the China Dark matter EXperiment, aiming at direct searches for light weakly interacting massive particles. Measuring the thickness of the dead layer of a p-type germanium detector is an issue of major importance since it determines the fiducial mass of the detector. This work reports a method using an uncollimated 133Ba source to determine the dead layer thickness. The experimental design, data analysis and Monte Carlo simulation processes, as well as the statistical and systematic uncertainties are described. A dead layer thickness of 1.02 mm was obtained based on a comparison between the experimental data and the simulated results. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (10935005, 10945002, 11275107, 11175099)

  3. High-rate dead-time corrections in a general purpose digital pulse processing system.

    PubMed

    Abbene, Leonardo; Gerardi, Gaetano

    2015-09-01

    Dead-time losses are well recognized and studied drawbacks in counting and spectroscopic systems. In this work the abilities on dead-time correction of a real-time digital pulse processing (DPP) system for high-rate high-resolution radiation measurements are presented. The DPP system, through a fast and slow analysis of the output waveform from radiation detectors, is able to perform multi-parameter analysis (arrival time, pulse width, pulse height, pulse shape, etc.) at high input counting rates (ICRs), allowing accurate counting loss corrections even for variable or transient radiations. The fast analysis is used to obtain both the ICR and energy spectra with high throughput, while the slow analysis is used to obtain high-resolution energy spectra. A complete characterization of the counting capabilities, through both theoretical and experimental approaches, was performed. The dead-time modeling, the throughput curves, the experimental time-interval distributions (TIDs) and the counting uncertainty of the recorded events of both the fast and the slow channels, measured with a planar CdTe (cadmium telluride) detector, will be presented. The throughput formula of a series of two types of dead-times is also derived. The results of dead-time corrections, performed through different methods, will be reported and discussed, pointing out the error on ICR estimation and the simplicity of the procedure. Accurate ICR estimations (nonlinearity < 0.5%) were performed by using the time widths and the TIDs (using 10 ns time bin width) of the detected pulses up to 2.2 Mcps. The digital system allows, after a simple parameter setting, different and sophisticated procedures for dead-time correction, traditionally implemented in complex/dedicated systems and time-consuming set-ups.

  4. High-rate dead-time corrections in a general purpose digital pulse processing system

    PubMed Central

    Abbene, Leonardo; Gerardi, Gaetano

    2015-01-01

    Dead-time losses are well recognized and studied drawbacks in counting and spectroscopic systems. In this work the abilities on dead-time correction of a real-time digital pulse processing (DPP) system for high-rate high-resolution radiation measurements are presented. The DPP system, through a fast and slow analysis of the output waveform from radiation detectors, is able to perform multi-parameter analysis (arrival time, pulse width, pulse height, pulse shape, etc.) at high input counting rates (ICRs), allowing accurate counting loss corrections even for variable or transient radiations. The fast analysis is used to obtain both the ICR and energy spectra with high throughput, while the slow analysis is used to obtain high-resolution energy spectra. A complete characterization of the counting capabilities, through both theoretical and experimental approaches, was performed. The dead-time modeling, the throughput curves, the experimental time-interval distributions (TIDs) and the counting uncertainty of the recorded events of both the fast and the slow channels, measured with a planar CdTe (cadmium telluride) detector, will be presented. The throughput formula of a series of two types of dead-times is also derived. The results of dead-time corrections, performed through different methods, will be reported and discussed, pointing out the error on ICR estimation and the simplicity of the procedure. Accurate ICR estimations (nonlinearity < 0.5%) were performed by using the time widths and the TIDs (using 10 ns time bin width) of the detected pulses up to 2.2 Mcps. The digital system allows, after a simple parameter setting, different and sophisticated procedures for dead-time correction, traditionally implemented in complex/dedicated systems and time-consuming set-ups. PMID:26289270

  5. Assessment of three dead detector correction methods for cone-beam computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nelms, David W.; Shukla, Hemant I.; Nixon, Earl; Bayouth, John E.; Flynn, Ryan T.

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: Dead detectors due to manufacturing defects or radiation damage in the electronic portal imaging devices (EPIDs) used for cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) can lead to image degradation and ring artifacts. In this work three dead detector correction methods were assessed using megavoltage CBCT (MVCBCT) as a test system, with the goals of assessing the relative effectiveness of the three methods and establishing the conditions for which they fail. Methods: MVCBCT projections acquired with four linacs at 8 and 60 MU (monitor units) were degraded with varying percentages (2%-95%) of randomly distributed dead single detectors (RDSs), randomly distributed dead detector clusters (RDCs) of 2 mm diameter, and nonrandomly distributed dead detector disks (NRDDs) of varying diameter (4-16 mm). Correction algorithms were bidirectional linear interpolation (BLI), quad-directional linear interpolation (QLI), and a Laplacian solution (LS) method. Correction method failure was defined to occur if ring artifacts were present in the reconstructed phantom images from any linac or if the modulation transfer function (MTF) for any linac dropped below baseline with a p value, calculated with the two sample t test, of less than 0.01. Results: All correction methods failed at the same or lower RDC/RDS percentages and NRDD diameters for the 60 MU as for the 8 MU cases. The LS method tended to outperform or match the BLI and QLI methods. If ring artifacts anywhere in the images were considered unacceptable, the LS method failed for 60 MU at >33% RDS, >2% RDC, and >4 mm NRDD. If ring artifacts within 4 mm longitudinally of the phantom section interfaces were considered acceptable, the LS method failed for 60 MU at >90% RDS, >80% RDC, and >4 mm NRDD. LS failed due to MTF drop for 60 MU at >50% RDS, >25% RDC, and >4 mm NRDD. Conclusions: The LS method is superior to the BLI and QLI methods, and correction algorithm effectiveness decreases as imaging dose increases. All correction

  6. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2015-11-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring "long" data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (˜80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  7. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization.

    PubMed

    Peronio, P; Acconcia, G; Rech, I; Ghioni, M

    2015-11-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring "long" data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  8. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    SciTech Connect

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2015-11-15

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring “long” data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed.

  9. Improving the counting efficiency in time-correlated single photon counting experiments by dead-time optimization

    PubMed Central

    Peronio, P.; Acconcia, G.; Rech, I.; Ghioni, M.

    2015-01-01

    Time-Correlated Single Photon Counting (TCSPC) has been long recognized as the most sensitive method for fluorescence lifetime measurements, but often requiring “long” data acquisition times. This drawback is related to the limited counting capability of the TCSPC technique, due to pile-up and counting loss effects. In recent years, multi-module TCSPC systems have been introduced to overcome this issue. Splitting the light into several detectors connected to independent TCSPC modules proportionally increases the counting capability. Of course, multi-module operation also increases the system cost and can cause space and power supply problems. In this paper, we propose an alternative approach based on a new detector and processing electronics designed to reduce the overall system dead time, thus enabling efficient photon collection at high excitation rate. We present a fast active quenching circuit for single-photon avalanche diodes which features a minimum dead time of 12.4 ns. We also introduce a new Time-to-Amplitude Converter (TAC) able to attain extra-short dead time thanks to the combination of a scalable array of monolithically integrated TACs and a sequential router. The fast TAC (F-TAC) makes it possible to operate the system towards the upper limit of detector count rate capability (∼80 Mcps) with reduced pile-up losses, addressing one of the historic criticisms of TCSPC. Preliminary measurements on the F-TAC are presented and discussed. PMID:26628115

  10. Dead layer on silicon p-i-n diode charged-particle detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Wall, B. L.; Amsbaugh, John F.; Beglarian, A.; Bergmann, T.; Bichsel, H. C.; Bodine, L. I.; Boyd, N. M.; Burritt, Tom H.; Chaoui, Z.; Corona, T. J.; Doe, Peter J.; Enomoto, S.; Harms, F.; Harper, Gregory; Howe, M. A.; Martin, E. L.; Parno, D. S.; Peterson, David; Petzold, Linda; Renschler, R.; Robertson, R. G. H.; Schwarz, J.; Steidl, M.; Van Wechel, T. D.; VanDevender, Brent A.; Wustling, S.; Wierman, K. J.; Wilkerson, J. F.

    2014-04-21

    Abstract Semiconductor detectors in general have a dead layer at their surfaces that is either a result of natural or induced passivation, or is formed during the process of making a contact. Charged particles passing through this region produce ionization that is incompletely collected and recorded, which leads to departures from the ideal in both energy deposition and resolution. The silicon p-i-n diode used in the KATRIN neutrinomass experiment has such a dead layer. We have constructed a detailed Monte Carlo model for the passage of electrons from vacuum into a silicon detector, and compared the measured energy spectra to the predicted ones for a range of energies from 12 to 20 keV. The comparison provides experimental evidence that a substantial fraction of the ionization produced in the "dead" layer evidently escapes by discussion, with 46% being collected in the depletion zone and the balance being neutralized at the contact or by bulk recombination. The most elementary model of a thinner dead layer from which no charge is collected is strongly disfavored.

  11. Coding for Communication Channels with Dead-Time Constraints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moision, Bruce; Hamkins, Jon

    2004-01-01

    Coding schemes have been designed and investigated specifically for optical and electronic data-communication channels in which information is conveyed via pulse-position modulation (PPM) subject to dead-time constraints. These schemes involve the use of error-correcting codes concatenated with codes denoted constrained codes. These codes are decoded using an interactive method. In pulse-position modulation, time is partitioned into frames of Mslots of equal duration. Each frame contains one pulsed slot (all others are non-pulsed). For a given channel, the dead-time constraints are defined as a maximum and a minimum on the allowable time between pulses. For example, if a Q-switched laser is used to transmit the pulses, then the minimum allowable dead time is the time needed to recharge the laser for the next pulse. In the case of bits recorded on a magnetic medium, the minimum allowable time between pulses depends on the recording/playback speed and the minimum distance between pulses needed to prevent interference between adjacent bits during readout. The maximum allowable dead time for a given channel is the maximum time for which it is possible to satisfy the requirement to synchronize slots. In mathematical shorthand, the dead-time constraints for a given channel are represented by the pair of integers (d,k), where d is the minimum allowable number of zeroes between ones and k is the maximum allowable number of zeroes between ones. A system of the type to which the present schemes apply is represented by a binary- input, real-valued-output channel model illustrated in the figure. At the transmitting end, information bits are first encoded by use of an error-correcting code, then further encoded by use of a constrained code. Several constrained codes for channels subject to constraints of (d,infinity) have been investigated theoretically and computationally. The baseline codes chosen for purposes of comparison were simple PPM codes characterized by M-slot PPM

  12. SU-E-I-88: The Effect of System Dead Time On Real-Time Plastic and GOS Based Fiber-Optic Dosimetry Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Hoerner, M; Hintenlang, D

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: A methodology is presented to correct for measurement inaccuracies at high detector count rates using a plastic and GOS scintillation fibers coupled to a photomultiplier tube with digital readout. This system allows temporal acquisition and manipulation of measured data. Methods: The detection system used was a plastic scintillator and a separate gadolinium scintillator, both (0.5 diameter) coupled to an optical fiber with a Hamamatsu photon counter with a built-in microcontroller and digital interface. Count rate performance of the system was evaluated using the nonparalzable detector model. Detector response was investigated across multiple radiation sources including: orthovoltage x-ray system, colbat-60 gamma rays, proton therapy beam, and a diagnostic radiography x-ray tube. The dead time parameter was calculated by measuring the count rate of the system at different exposure rates using a reference detector. Results: The system dead time was evaluated for the following sources of radiation used clinically: diagnostic energy x-rays, cobalt-60 gamma rays, orthovoltage xrays, particle proton accelerator, and megavoltage x-rays. It was found that dead time increased significantly when exposing the detector to sources capable of generating Cerenkov radiation, all of the sources sans the diagnostic x-rays, with increasing prominence at higher photon energies. Percent depth dose curves generated by a dedicated ionization chamber and compared to the detection system demonstrated that correcting for dead time improves accuracy. On most sources, nonparalzable model fit provided an improved system response. Conclusion: Overall, the system dead time was variable across the investigated radiation particles and energies. It was demonstrated that the system response accuracy was greatly improved by correcting for dead time effects. Cerenkov radiation plays a significant role in the increase in the system dead time through transient absorption effects attributed to

  13. Detector response in time-of-flight mass spectrometry at high pulse repetition frequencies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gulcicek, Erol E.; Boyle, James G.

    1993-01-01

    Dead time effects in chevron configured dual microchannel plates (MCPs) are investigated. Response times are determined experimentally for one chevron-configured dual MCP-type detector and two discrete dynode-type electron multipliers with 16 and 23 resistively divided stages. All of these detectors are found to be suitable for time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF MS), yielding 3-6-ns (FWHM) response times triggered on a single ion pulse. It is concluded that, unless there are viable solutions to overcome dead time disadvantages for continuous dynode detectors, suitable discrete dynode detectors for TOF MS appear to have a significant advantage for high repetition rate operation.

  14. Pulse-height defect due to electron interaction in dead layers of Ge/Li/ gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larsen, R. N.; Strauss, M. G.

    1969-01-01

    Study shows the pulse-height degradation of gamma ray spectra in germanium/lithium detectors to be due to electron interaction in the dead layers that exist in all semiconductor detectors. A pulse shape discrimination technique identifies and eliminates these defective pulses.

  15. NO TIME FOR DEAD TIME: TIMING ANALYSIS OF BRIGHT BLACK HOLE BINARIES WITH NuSTAR

    SciTech Connect

    Bachetti, Matteo; Barret, Didier; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Rick; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Fürst, Felix; Tomsick, John; Boggs, Steven E.; Craig, William W.; Schmid, Christian; Christensen, Finn E.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Kara, Erin; Gandhi, Poshak; Hailey, Charles J.; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Miller, Jon M.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Stern, Daniel; Uttley, Phil; and others

    2015-02-20

    Timing of high-count-rate sources with the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission requires specialized analysis techniques. NuSTAR was primarily designed for spectroscopic observations of sources with relatively low count rates rather than for timing analysis of bright objects. The instrumental dead time per event is relatively long (∼2.5 msec) and varies event-to-event by a few percent. The most obvious effect is a distortion of the white noise level in the power density spectrum (PDS) that cannot be easily modeled with standard techniques due to the variable nature of the dead time. In this paper, we show that it is possible to exploit the presence of two completely independent focal planes and use the cospectrum, the real part of the cross PDS, to obtain a good proxy of the white-noise-subtracted PDS. Thereafter, one can use a Monte Carlo approach to estimate the remaining effects of dead time, namely, a frequency-dependent modulation of the variance and a frequency-independent drop of the sensitivity to variability. In this way, most of the standard timing analysis can be performed, albeit with a sacrifice in signal-to-noise ratio relative to what would be achieved using more standard techniques. We apply this technique to NuSTAR observations of the black hole binaries GX 339–4, Cyg X-1, and GRS 1915+105.

  16. No Time for Dead Time: Timing Analysis of Bright Black Hole Binaries with NuSTAR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachetti, Matteo; Harrison, Fiona A.; Cook, Rick; Tomsick, John; Schmid, Christian; Grefenstette, Brian W.; Barret, Didier; Boggs, Steven E.; Christensen, Finn E.; Craig, William W.; Fabian, Andrew C.; Fürst, Felix; Gandhi, Poshak; Hailey, Charles J.; Kara, Erin; Maccarone, Thomas J.; Miller, Jon M.; Pottschmidt, Katja; Stern, Daniel; Uttley, Phil; Walton, Dominic J.; Wilms, Jörn; Zhang, William W.

    2015-02-01

    Timing of high-count-rate sources with the NuSTAR Small Explorer Mission requires specialized analysis techniques. NuSTAR was primarily designed for spectroscopic observations of sources with relatively low count rates rather than for timing analysis of bright objects. The instrumental dead time per event is relatively long (~2.5 msec) and varies event-to-event by a few percent. The most obvious effect is a distortion of the white noise level in the power density spectrum (PDS) that cannot be easily modeled with standard techniques due to the variable nature of the dead time. In this paper, we show that it is possible to exploit the presence of two completely independent focal planes and use the cospectrum, the real part of the cross PDS, to obtain a good proxy of the white-noise-subtracted PDS. Thereafter, one can use a Monte Carlo approach to estimate the remaining effects of dead time, namely, a frequency-dependent modulation of the variance and a frequency-independent drop of the sensitivity to variability. In this way, most of the standard timing analysis can be performed, albeit with a sacrifice in signal-to-noise ratio relative to what would be achieved using more standard techniques. We apply this technique to NuSTAR observations of the black hole binaries GX 339-4, Cyg X-1, and GRS 1915+105.

  17. Re-evaluation of Galileo Energetic Particle Detector data - a correction model and comparison to semiconductor detector dead-layer sensitivity losses using SRIM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee-Payne, Zoe Hannah

    2016-10-01

    The Energetic Particle Detector launched in 1989 on the Galileo satellite took data on the Jovian Particle environment for 8 years before its demise. Over the course of the mission the detectors in the Composition Measurement System (CMS) have visibly decayed with higher mass particles, specifically oxygen and sulphur, reading far lower energies at later epochs. By considering the non-steady accumulation of damage in the detector, as well as the operation of the priority channel data recording system in place on the EPD, an evolving correction can be made. The recalibration significance can be validated using a model of dead layer build-up in semiconductor detectors, based on SRIM results. The final aim is to assign an estimation dead-layer depth during the mission data recordings.

  18. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franck, John M.; Barnes, Ryan P.; Keller, Timothy J.; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power.

  19. Active cancellation - A means to zero dead-time pulse EPR.

    PubMed

    Franck, John M; Barnes, Ryan P; Keller, Timothy J; Kaufmann, Thomas; Han, Songi

    2015-12-01

    The necessary resonator employed in pulse electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) rings after the excitation pulse and creates a finite detector dead-time that ultimately prevents the detection of signal from fast relaxing spin systems, hindering the application of pulse EPR to room temperature measurements of interesting chemical or biological systems. We employ a recently available high bandwidth arbitrary waveform generator (AWG) to produce a cancellation pulse that precisely destructively interferes with the resonant cavity ring-down. We find that we can faithfully detect EPR signal at all times immediately after, as well as during, the excitation pulse. This is a proof of concept study showcasing the capability of AWG pulses to precisely cancel out the resonator ring-down, and allow for the detection of EPR signal during the pulse itself, as well as the dead-time of the resonator. However, the applicability of this approach to conventional EPR experiments is not immediate, as it hinges on either (1) the availability of low-noise microwave sources and amplifiers to produce the necessary power for pulse EPR experiment or (2) the availability of very high conversion factor micro coil resonators that allow for pulse EPR experiments at modest microwave power.

  20. Live-timer method of automatic dead-time correction for precision counting

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Porges, K. G.; Rudnick, S. J.

    1969-01-01

    Automatic correction for dead time losses in nuclear counting experiments is implemented by a simple live timer arrangement in which each counting interval is extended for compensation for the dead time during that interval. this method eliminates repetitious manual calculations, source of error, and dependence upon paralysis shifts.

  1. Long-Time Sustainability of Rossby Wave Instability in Protoplanetary Disks with Dead Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, S.; Li, H.

    2015-10-01

    We have run 2D simulations to investigate the generation and sustainability of Rossby wave instability (RWI) in proto-planetary disks with constant viscosity and for disks with low viscosity regions (dead zone). For the constant viscosity case, the development of RWI requires a low viscosity and life time of the RWI is short. We also find that the vortex, when it migrates, does so much faster than the disk's viscous drift rate. For disks with dead zone case, a much larger viscosity can be used and the RWI vortex can be sustained for a long time, even the life time of the disk, depending on the width and depth of the dead zone. For a narrow dead zone, the vortex depicts a periodic pattern with a period inversely proportional to the viscosity. If the dead-zone width exceeds some threshold, the periodicity of the RWI disappears.

  2. Simulation of Rate-Related (Dead-Time) Losses In Passive Neutron Multiplicity Counting Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Evans, L.G.; Norman, P.I.; Leadbeater, T.W.; Croft, S.; Philips, S.

    2008-07-01

    Passive Neutron Multiplicity Counting (PNMC) based on Multiplicity Shift Register (MSR) electronics (a form of time correlation analysis) is a widely used non-destructive assay technique for quantifying spontaneously fissile materials such as Pu. At high event rates, dead-time losses perturb the count rates with the Singles, Doubles and Triples being increasingly affected. Without correction these perturbations are a major source of inaccuracy in the measured count rates and assay values derived from them. This paper presents the simulation of dead-time losses and investigates the effect of applying different dead-time models on the observed MSR data. Monte Carlo methods have been used to simulate neutron pulse trains for a variety of source intensities and with ideal detection geometry, providing an event by event record of the time distribution of neutron captures within the detection system. The action of the MSR electronics was modelled in software to analyse these pulse trains. Stored pulse trains were perturbed in software to apply the effects of dead-time according to the chosen physical process; for example, the ideal paralysable (extending) and non-paralysable models with an arbitrary dead-time parameter. Results of the simulations demonstrate the change in the observed MSR data when the system dead-time parameter is varied. In addition, the paralysable and non-paralysable models of deadtime are compared. These results form part of a larger study to evaluate existing dead-time corrections and to extend their application to correlated sources. (authors)

  3. A population coding account for systematic variation in saccadic dead time.

    PubMed

    Ludwig, Casimir J H; Mildinhall, John W; Gilchrist, Iain D

    2007-01-01

    During movement programming, there is a point in time at which the movement system is committed to executing an action with certain parameters even though new information may render this action obsolete. For saccades programmed to a visual target this period is termed the dead time. Using a double-step paradigm, we examined potential variability in the dead time with variations in overall saccade latency and spatiotemporal configuration of two sequential targets. In experiment 1, we varied overall saccade latency by manipulating the presence or absence of a central fixation point. Despite a large and robust gap effect, decreasing the saccade latency in this way did not alter the dead time. In experiment 2, we varied the separation between the two targets. The dead time increased with separation up to a point and then leveled off. A stochastic accumulator model of the oculomotor decision mechanism accounts comprehensively for our findings. The model predicts a gap effect through changes in baseline activity without producing variations in the dead time. Variations in dead time with separation between the two target locations are a natural consequence of the population coding assumption in the model.

  4. Examining the impact of external influences on police use of deadly force over time.

    PubMed

    White, Michael D

    2003-02-01

    Prior deadly force research has sought to identify appropriate mechanisms that can effectively control police officers' decisions to use deadly force. However, the relative impact of external discretion control policies on police shooting behavior remains largely unknown. Using data from Philadelphia for a period of more than two decades, this article employs interrupted time-series analysis (ARIMA) to examine the impact of legislation and judicial intervention on use of deadly force by Philadelphia police officers. The article also considers the impact of larger, community-level characteristics on levels of deadly force. Findings produced modest support for the potential effect of external discretion control policies and community-level factors on police shooting behavior but generally suggest that dynamic changes in the internal working environment can outweigh the influence of the external mechanisms.

  5. Corrections for the combined effects of decay and dead time in live-timed counting of short-lived radionuclides.

    PubMed

    Fitzgerald, R

    2016-03-01

    Studies and calibrations of short-lived radionuclides, for example (15)O, are of particular interest in nuclear medicine. Yet counting experiments on such species are vulnerable to an error due to the combined effect of decay and dead time. Separate decay corrections and dead-time corrections do not account for this issue. Usually counting data are decay-corrected to the start time of the count period, or else instead of correcting the count rate, the mid-time of the measurement is used as the reference time. Correction factors are derived for both those methods, considering both extending and non-extending dead time. Series approximations are derived here and the accuracy of those approximations are discussed.

  6. Diamond detectors for the TOTEM timing upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antchev, G.; Aspell, P.; Atanassov, I.; Avati, V.; Baechler, J.; Berardi, V.; Berretti, M.; Bossini, E.; Bottigli, U.; Bozzo, M.; Broulím, P.; Buzzo, A.; Cafagna, F. S.; Catanesi, M. G.; Csanád, M.; Csörgő, T.; Deile, M.; De Leonardis, F.; D'Orazio, A.; Doubek, M.; Eggert, K.; Eremin, V.; Ferro, F.; Fiergolski, A.; Garcia, F.; Georgiev, V.; Giani, S.; Grzanka, L.; Guaragnella, C.; Hammerbauer, J.; Heino, J.; Karev, A.; Kašpar, J.; Kopal, J.; Kundrát, V.; Lami, S.; Latino, G.; Lauhakangas, R.; Linhart, R.; Lokajíček, M. V.; Losurdo, L.; Lo Vetere, M.; Rodríguez, F. Lucas; Lucsanyi, D.; Macrí, M.; Mercadante, A.; Minafra, N.; Minutoli, S.; Naaranoja, T.; Nemes, F.; Niewiadomski, H.; Novak, T.; Oliveri, E.; Oljemark, F.; Oriunno, M.; Österberg, K.; Palazzi, P.; Paločko, L.; Passaro, V.; Peroutka, Z.; Petruzzelli, V.; Politi, T.; Procházka, J.; Prudenzano, F.; Quinto, M.; Radermacher, E.; Radicioni, E.; Ravotti, F.; Robutti, E.; Royon, C.; Ruggiero, G.; Saarikko, H.; Scribano, A.; Smajek, J.; Snoeys, W.; Sziklai, J.; Taylor, C.; Turini, N.; Vacek, V.; Welti, J.; Wyszkowski, P.; Zielinski, K.

    2017-03-01

    This paper describes the design and the performance of the timing detector developed by the TOTEM Collaboration for the Roman Pots (RPs) to measure the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) of the protons produced in central diffractive interactions at the LHC . The measurement of the TOF of the protons allows the determination of the longitudinal position of the proton interaction vertex and its association with one of the vertices reconstructed by the CMS detectors. The TOF detector is based on single crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition (scCVD) diamond plates and is designed to measure the protons TOF with about 50 ps time precision. This upgrade to the TOTEM apparatus will be used in the LHC run 2 and will tag the central diffractive events up to an interaction pileup of about 1. A dedicated fast and low noise electronics for the signal amplification has been developed. The digitization of the diamond signal is performed by sampling the waveform. After introducing the physics studies that will most profit from the addition of these new detectors, we discuss in detail the optimization and the performance of the first TOF detector installed in the LHC in November 2015.

  7. On-line compensation of dead-time and inverter nonlinearity with disturbance voltage observer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Beomseok; Kwon, Jung-Min; Kim, Jaehong

    2014-03-01

    This paper discusses and analyses a simple on-line compensation scheme for dead-time and inverter nonlinearity in the pulse width modulated (PWM) voltage source inverter (VSI). Dead-time effect and voltage drop in switching devices cause nonlinearity between reference and output voltage. In a conventional three-phase six-switch inverter, this nonideal condition adds extraneous harmonics that badly disturb voltage characteristics. In its turn, voltage disturbance causes distortion of the current waveform and degrades performance. In this paper, an on-line dead-time compensation method based on inverse dynamics control is proposed, and it is much simpler than conventional full/reduced order observation methods adopted in dead-time compensation. Disturbance voltages are observed on-line with no additional circuitry or off-line measurements. The observed disturbance voltages are fed back to the voltage reference for compensation. Stability problem of the proposed observer arisen from inverter delay and parameter mismatch was analysed. The proposed method is applied to a surface-mounted permanent-magnet synchronous motor (SPMSM) drive. The effectiveness of the proposed scheme is validated by the experimental results.

  8. The CDF Time of Flight Detector

    SciTech Connect

    S. Cabrera et al.

    2004-01-06

    A new Time of Flight (TOF) detector based on scintillator bars with fine-mesh photomultipliers at both ends has been in operation since 2001 in the CDF experiment. With a design resolution of 100 ps, the TOF can provide separation between K{sup +-} and {pi}{sup +-} in p{bar p} collisions at the 2{omega} level for low momentum, which enhances b flavor tagging capabilities. Because of its very fast response, the TOF is an excellent triggering device, and it is used to trigger on highly ionizing particles, multiple minimum ionizing particles and cosmic rays. Particle identification is achieved by comparing the time-of-flight of the particle measured by the TOF to the time expected for a given mass hypothesis. In order to obtain the resolution necessary for particle ID, optimal calibrations are critical. This paper describes the TOF detector, its calibration procedure, the achieved resolution, the long term operation performances and some of the first results from data analysis using this detector.

  9. Symmetrically biased T/R switches for NMR and MRI with microsecond dead time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brunner, David O.; Furrer, Lukas; Weiger, Markus; Baumberger, Werner; Schmid, Thomas; Reber, Jonas; Dietrich, Benjamin E.; Wilm, Bertram J.; Froidevaux, Romain; Pruessmann, Klaas P.

    2016-02-01

    For direct NMR detection and imaging of compounds with very short coherence life times the dead time between radio-frequency (RF) pulse and reception of the free induction decay (FID) is a major limiting factor. It is typically dominated by the transient and recovery times of currently available transmit-receive (T/R) switches and amplification chains. A novel PIN diode-based T/R switch topology is introduced allowing for fast switching by high bias transient currents but nevertheless producing a very low video leakage signal and insertion loss (0.5 dB). The low transient spike level in conjunction with the high isolation (75 dB) prevent saturation of the preamplifier entirely which consequently does not require time for recovery. Switching between transmission and reception is demonstrated within less than 1 μs in bench tests as well as in acquisitions of FIDs and zero echo time (ZTE) images with bandwidths up to 500 kHz at 7 T. Thereby the 2 kW switch exhibited a rise-time of 350 ns (10-99%) producing however a total video leakage of below 20 mV peak-to-peak and less than -89 dBm in-band. The achieved switching time renders the RF pulse itself the dominant contribution to the dead time in which a coherence cannot be observed, thus making pulsed NMR experiments almost time-optimal even for compounds with very short signal life times.

  10. Symmetrically biased T/R switches for NMR and MRI with microsecond dead time.

    PubMed

    Brunner, David O; Furrer, Lukas; Weiger, Markus; Baumberger, Werner; Schmid, Thomas; Reber, Jonas; Dietrich, Benjamin E; Wilm, Bertram J; Froidevaux, Romain; Pruessmann, Klaas P

    2016-02-01

    For direct NMR detection and imaging of compounds with very short coherence life times the dead time between radio-frequency (RF) pulse and reception of the free induction decay (FID) is a major limiting factor. It is typically dominated by the transient and recovery times of currently available transmit-receive (T/R) switches and amplification chains. A novel PIN diode-based T/R switch topology is introduced allowing for fast switching by high bias transient currents but nevertheless producing a very low video leakage signal and insertion loss (0.5dB). The low transient spike level in conjunction with the high isolation (75dB) prevent saturation of the preamplifier entirely which consequently does not require time for recovery. Switching between transmission and reception is demonstrated within less than 1μs in bench tests as well as in acquisitions of FIDs and zero echo time (ZTE) images with bandwidths up to 500kHz at 7T. Thereby the 2kW switch exhibited a rise-time of 350ns (10-99%) producing however a total video leakage of below 20mV peak-to-peak and less than -89dBm in-band. The achieved switching time renders the RF pulse itself the dominant contribution to the dead time in which a coherence cannot be observed, thus making pulsed NMR experiments almost time-optimal even for compounds with very short signal life times.

  11. Time expanding multihit TDC for the BELLE TOF detector at the KEK B-factory

    SciTech Connect

    Varner, G.; Kichimi, H.; Yamaguchi, H.

    1997-12-31

    Utilizing a time expansion technique, a multihit TDC has been developed for readout of the BELLE TOF detector at the KEK B-Factory. Time digitization consists of three steps: tagging an input signal with respect to a beam collision synchronized reference clock, expansion of this time interval, and readout by a conventional multihit TDC. Using a time expansion factor of 20 and a multihit TDC with a 500 ps LSB, this system provides a precision TOF measurement of 25 ps LSB, {approximately}20 ps resolution, and with a dead time of less than 1 {mu}s.

  12. The TORCH time-of-flight detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harnew, N.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcia, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-07-01

    The TORCH time-of-flight detector is being developed to provide particle identification between 2 and 10 GeV/c momentum over a flight distance of 10 m. TORCH is designed for large-area coverage, up to 30 m2, and has a DIRC-like construction. The goal is to achieve a 15 ps time-of-flight resolution per incident particle by combining arrival times from multiple Cherenkov photons produced within quartz radiator plates of 10 mm thickness. A four-year R&D programme is underway with an industrial partner (Photek, UK) to produce 53×53 mm2 Micro-Channel Plate (MCP) detectors for the TORCH application. The MCP-PMT will provide a timing accuracy of 40 ps per photon and it will have a lifetime of up to at least 5 Ccm-2 of integrated anode charge by utilizing an Atomic Layer Deposition (ALD) coating. The MCP will be read out using charge division with customised electronics incorporating the NINO chipset. Laboratory results on prototype MCPs are presented. The construction of a prototype TORCH module and its simulated performance are also described.

  13. A uniform time trade off method for states better and worse than dead: feasibility study of the 'lead time' approach.

    PubMed

    Devlin, Nancy J; Tsuchiya, Aki; Buckingham, Ken; Tilling, Carl

    2011-03-01

    The way time trade off (TTO) values are elicited for states of health considered 'worse than being dead' has important implications for the mean values used in economic evaluation. Conventional approaches to TTO, as used in the UK's 'MVH' value set, are problematic because they require fundamentally different trade-offs tasks for the valuation of states better and worse than dead. This study aims to refine and test the feasibility of a new approach described by Robinson and Spencer (2006. Health Economics 15: 393-402), and to explore the characteristics of the valuation data it generates. The approach introduces a 'lead time' into the TTO, producing a uniform procedure for generating values either >0 or<0. We used this lead time TTO to value 10 moderate to severe EQ-5D states using a sample of the general public (n=109). We conclude that the approach is feasible for use in valuation studies and appears to overcome the discontinuity in values around 0 evident in conventional methods. However, further research is required to resolve the issue of how to handle participants who 'use up' all lead time; to develop ways of controlling for individual time preferences; and to better understand the implications for valuations of states better than dead.

  14. A new Smith predictor and controller for control of processes with long dead time.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Ibrahim

    2003-01-01

    Good control of processes with long dead time is often achieved using a Smith predictor configuration. Typically a PI or PID controller is used; however, it is shown in this paper that for some situations improved set point and disturbance responses can be obtained if a PI-PD controller is used. Several methods are possible for selecting the parameters of the PI-PD controller but when the plant transfer function has no zeros, the use of the standard forms provides a simple algebraic approach, and also reveals why difficulties may be encountered if a PID controller is used. Some examples are given to show the value of the approach presented.

  15. Real-Time Accumulative Computation Motion Detectors

    PubMed Central

    Fernández-Caballero, Antonio; López, María Teresa; Castillo, José Carlos; Maldonado-Bascón, Saturnino

    2009-01-01

    The neurally inspired accumulative computation (AC) method and its application to motion detection have been introduced in the past years. This paper revisits the fact that many researchers have explored the relationship between neural networks and finite state machines. Indeed, finite state machines constitute the best characterized computational model, whereas artificial neural networks have become a very successful tool for modeling and problem solving. The article shows how to reach real-time performance after using a model described as a finite state machine. This paper introduces two steps towards that direction: (a) A simplification of the general AC method is performed by formally transforming it into a finite state machine. (b) A hardware implementation in FPGA of such a designed AC module, as well as an 8-AC motion detector, providing promising performance results. We also offer two case studies of the use of AC motion detectors in surveillance applications, namely infrared-based people segmentation and color-based people tracking, respectively. PMID:22303161

  16. Simultaneous Analysis of Monovalent Anions and Cations with a Sub-Microliter Dead-Volume Flow-Through Potentiometric Detector for Ion Chromatography.

    PubMed

    Dumanli, Rukiye; Attar, Azade; Erci, Vildan; Isildak, Ibrahim

    2016-04-01

    A microliter dead-volume flow-through cell as a potentiometric detector is described in this article for sensitive, selective and simultaneous detection of common monovalent anions and cations in single column ion chromatography for the first time. The detection cell consisted of less selective anion- and cation-selective composite membrane electrodes together with a solid-state composite matrix reference electrode. The simultaneous separation and sensitive detection of sodium (Na(+)), potassium (K(+)), ammonium (NH4 (+)), chloride (Cl(-)) and nitrate (NO3 (-)) in a single run was achieved by using 98% 1.5 mM MgSO4 and 2% acetonitrile eluent with a mixed-bed ion-exchange separation column without suppressor column system. The separation and simultaneous detection of the anions and cations were completed in 6 min at the eluent flow-rate of 0.8 mL/min. Detection limits, at S/N = 3, were ranged from 0.2 to 1.0 µM for the anions and 0.3 to 3.0 µM for the cations, respectively. The developed method was successfully applied to the simultaneous determination of monovalent anions and cations in several environmental and biological samples.

  17. Fundamental Limits of Scintillation Detector Timing Precision

    PubMed Central

    Derenzo, Stephen E.; Choong, Woon-Seng; Moses, William W.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper we review the primary factors that affect the timing precision of a scintillation detector. Monte Carlo calculations were performed to explore the dependence of the timing precision on the number of photoelectrons, the scintillator decay and rise times, the depth of interaction uncertainty, the time dispersion of the optical photons (modeled as an exponential decay), the photodetector rise time and transit time jitter, the leading-edge trigger level, and electronic noise. The Monte Carlo code was used to estimate the practical limits on the timing precision for an energy deposition of 511 keV in 3 mm × 3 mm × 30 mm Lu2SiO5:Ce and LaBr3:Ce crystals. The calculated timing precisions are consistent with the best experimental literature values. We then calculated the timing precision for 820 cases that sampled scintillator rise times from 0 to 1.0 ns, photon dispersion times from 0 to 0.2 ns, photodetector time jitters from 0 to 0.5 ns fwhm, and A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons per ns decay time. Since the timing precision R was found to depend on A−1/2 more than any other factor, we tabulated the parameter B, where R = BA−1/2. An empirical analytical formula was found that fit the tabulated values of B with an rms deviation of 2.2% of the value of B. The theoretical lower bound of the timing precision was calculated for the example of 0.5 ns rise time, 0.1 ns photon dispersion, and 0.2 ns fwhm photodetector time jitter. The lower bound was at most 15% lower than leading-edge timing discrimination for A from 10 to 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. A timing precision of 8 ps fwhm should be possible for an energy deposition of 511 keV using currently available photodetectors if a theoretically possible scintillator were developed that could produce 10,000 photoelectrons/ns. PMID:24874216

  18. Recipes for high resolution time-of-flight detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Anz, S.J. |; Felter, T.E.; Hess, B.V.; Daley, R.S.; Roberts, M.L.; Williams, R.S.

    1995-01-01

    The authors discuss the dynamics, construction, implementation and benefits of a time-of-flight (TOF) detector with count rates an order of magnitude higher and resolution three to four times better than that obtainable with a surface barrier detector. The propose use of design criteria for a time-of-flight detector is outlined, and the determination of a TOF detector`s total relative timing error and how this value determines the mass resolution are illustrated using a graphical analysis. They present simulation and experimental examples employing light ions and discuss advantages and pitfalls of medium-energy heavy ion TOF spectrometry.

  19. Efficient Bell state analyzer for time-bin qubits with fast-recovery WSi superconducting single photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Valivarthi, R; Lucio-Martinez, I; Rubenok, A; Chan, P; Marsili, F; Verma, V B; Shaw, M D; Stern, J A; Slater, J A; Oblak, D; Nam, S W; Tittel, W

    2014-10-06

    We experimentally demonstrate a high-efficiency Bell state measurement for time-bin qubits that employs two superconducting nanowire single-photon detectors with short dead-times, allowing projections onto two Bell states, |ψ⁻〉 and |ψ⁺〉. Compared to previous implementations for time-bin qubits, this yields an increase in the efficiency of Bell state analysis by a factor of thirty.

  20. Physical response of light-time gravitational wave detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koop, Michael J.; Finn, Lee Samuel

    2014-09-01

    Gravitational wave detectors are typically described as responding to gravitational wave metric perturbations, which are gauge-dependent and—correspondingly—unphysical quantities. This is particularly true for ground-based interferometric detectors, like LIGO, space-based detectors, like LISA and its derivatives, spacecraft Doppler tracking detectors, and pulsar timing array detectors. The description of gravitational waves, and a gravitational wave detector's response, to the unphysical metric perturbation has lead to a proliferation of false analogies and descriptions regarding how these detectors function, and true misunderstandings of the physical character of gravitational waves. Here we provide a fully physical and gauge-invariant description of the response of a wide class of gravitational wave detectors in terms of the Riemann curvature, the physical quantity that describes gravitational phenomena in general relativity. In the limit of high frequency gravitational waves, the Riemann curvature separates into two independent gauge-invariant quantities: a "background" curvature contribution and a "wave" curvature contribution. In this limit the gravitational wave contribution to the detector response reduces to an integral of the gravitational wave contribution of the curvature along the unperturbed photon path between components of the detector. The description presented here provides an unambiguous physical description of what a gravitational wave detector measures and how it operates, a simple means of computing corrections to a detectors response owing to general detector motion, a straightforward way of connecting the results of numerical relativity simulations to gravitational wave detection, and a basis for a general and fully relativistic pulsar timing formula.

  1. Two-degree-of-freedom fractional order-PID controllers design for fractional order processes with dead-time.

    PubMed

    Li, Mingjie; Zhou, Ping; Zhao, Zhicheng; Zhang, Jinggang

    2016-03-01

    Recently, fractional order (FO) processes with dead-time have attracted more and more attention of many researchers in control field, but FO-PID controllers design techniques available for the FO processes with dead-time suffer from lack of direct systematic approaches. In this paper, a simple design and parameters tuning approach of two-degree-of-freedom (2-DOF) FO-PID controller based on internal model control (IMC) is proposed for FO processes with dead-time, conventional one-degree-of-freedom control exhibited the shortcoming of coupling of robustness and dynamic response performance. 2-DOF control can overcome the above weakness which means it realizes decoupling of robustness and dynamic performance from each other. The adjustable parameter η2 of FO-PID controller is directly related to the robustness of closed-loop system, and the analytical expression is given between the maximum sensitivity specification Ms and parameters η2. In addition, according to the dynamic performance requirement of the practical system, the parameters η1 can also be selected easily. By approximating the dead-time term of the process model with the first-order Padé or Taylor series, the expressions for 2-DOF FO-PID controller parameters are derived for three classes of FO processes with dead-time. Moreover, compared with other methods, the proposed method is simple and easy to implement. Finally, the simulation results are given to illustrate the effectiveness of this method.

  2. A PI tuning rule for integrating plus dead time processes with parametric uncertainty.

    PubMed

    Mercader, Pedro; Baños, Alfonso

    2017-03-01

    A novel method to tune a Proportional-Integral (PI) compensator for an integrating plus dead time (IPDT) process, in presence of interval parametric uncertainty, is presented. The design is based on optimization of load disturbance rejection with constraints on the magnitude of the sensitivity and complementary sensitivity functions, that must be satisfied for any element belonging to a set of plants. Instead of solving this problem with a brute force approach (grid the uncertainty set), we prove that this problem can be solved by considering only two plants. That lets us to obtain a tuning rule, after using some approximations. To conclude, some examples will be given in order to elucidate the usefulness of the proposed tuning rule.

  3. Discrimination of shot-noise-driven Poisson processes by external dead time - Application of radioluminescence from glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Saleh, B. E. A.; Tavolacci, J. T.; Teich, M. C.

    1981-01-01

    Ways in which dead time can be used to constructively enhance or diminish the effects of point processes that display bunching in the shot-noise-driven doubly stochastic Poisson point process (SNDP) are discussed. Interrelations between photocount bunching arising in the SNDP and the antibunching character arising from dead-time effects are investigated. It is demonstrated that the dead-time-modified count mean and variance for an arbitrary doubly stochastic Poisson point process can be obtained from the Laplace transform of the single-fold and joint-moment-generating functions for the driving rate process. The theory is in good agreement with experimental values for radioluminescence radiation in fused silica, quartz, and glass, and the process has many applications in pulse, particle, and photon detection.

  4. Design and analysis of modified Smith predictors for self-regulating and non-self regulating processes with dead time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saravanakumar, G.; Wahidabanu, R. S. D.; Nayak, C. G.

    2007-08-01

    A modification of Smith predictor for controlling the higher order processes with integral action ad long dead-time is proposed in this paper. The controller used in this Smith predictor is an Integral-Proportional Derivative controller, where the Integrator is in the forward path and the Proportional and Derivative control are in the feedback, acting on the feedback signal. The main objective of this paper is to design a Dead Time Compensator(DTC), which has minimum tuning parameters, simple controller tuning, robust performance of tuning formulae and to obtain a critically damped system which is as fast as possible in its setpoint and load disturbance rejection performance. The controller in this paper is tuned by an adaptive method. This paper also presents a survey of various dead time compensators and their performance analysis.

  5. Results on diamond timing detector for the TOTEM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bossini, E.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the results and status of our R&D on diamond timing detectors for the TOTEM experiment at CERN. Tests with commercial devices have been done and here reported; the unsatisfactory results push us to design a new detector. We present test beams results and the front-end electronics, critical point of the design. Efficiency studies and timing performance dependence from detector capacitance will be also reported.

  6. Monte Carlo analysis of the influence of germanium dead layer thickness on the HPGe gamma detector experimental efficiency measured by use of extended sources.

    PubMed

    Chham, E; García, F Piñero; El Bardouni, T; Ferro-García, M Angeles; Azahra, M; Benaalilou, K; Krikiz, M; Elyaakoubi, H; El Bakkali, J; Kaddour, M

    2014-09-22

    We have carried out a study to figure out the influence of crystal inactive-layer thickness on gamma spectra measured by an HPGe detector. The thickness of this dead layer (DL) is not known (no information about it was delivered by the manufacturer) due to the existence of a transition zone where photons are increasingly absorbed. To perform this analyses a virtual model of a Canberra HPGe detector was produced with the aid of MCNPX 2.7 code. The main objective of this work is to produce an optimal modeling for our GPGe detector. To this end, the study included the analysis of the total inactive germanium layer thickness and the active volume that are needed in order to obtain the smallest discrepancy between calculated and experimental efficiencies. Calculations and measurements were performed for all of the radionuclides included in a standard calibration gamma cocktail solution. Different geometry sources were used: a Marinelli and two other new sources represented as S(1) and S(2). The former was used for the determination of the active volume, whereas the two latter were used for the determination of the face and lateral DL, respectively. The model was validated by comparing calculated and experimental full energy peak efficiencies in the 50-1900keV energy range. the results show that the insertion of the DL parameter in the modeling is absolutely essential to reproduce the experimental results, and that the thickness of this DL varies from one position to the other on the detector surface.

  7. Alternating iterative regression method for dead time estimation from experimental designs.

    PubMed

    Pous-Torres, S; Torres-Lapasió, J R; Baeza-Baeza, J J; García-Alvarez-Coque, M C

    2009-05-01

    An indirect method for dead time (t (0)) estimation in reversed-phase liquid chromatography, based on a relationship between retention time and organic solvent content, is proposed. The method processes the retention data obtained in experimental designs. In order to get more general validity and enhance the accuracy, the information from several compounds is used altogether in an alternating regression fashion. The method was applied to nitrosamines, alkylbenzenes, phenols, benzene derivatives, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and beta-blockers, among other compounds, chromatographed in a cyano and several C18 columns. A comprehensive validation was carried out by comparing the results with those provided by the injection of markers, the observation of the solvent front and the homologous series method. It was also found that different groups of compounds yielded the same t (0) value with the same column, which was verified in different solvent composition windows. The method allows improved models useful for optimisation or for other purposes, since t (0) can be estimated with the retention data of the target solutes.

  8. R&D on a new type of micropattern gaseous detector: The Fast Timing Micropattern detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbaneo, D.; Abbas, M.; Abbrescia, M.; Akl, M. Abi; Aboamer, O.; Acosta, D.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, W.; Aleksandrov, A.; Altieri, P.; Asawatangtrakuldee, C.; Aspell, P.; Assran, Y.; Awan, I.; Bally, S.; Ban, Y.; Banerjee, S.; Barashko, V.; Barria, P.; Bencze, G.; Beni, N.; Benussi, L.; Bhopatkar, V.; Bianco, S.; Bos, J.; Bouhali, O.; Braghieri, A.; Braibant, S.; Buontempo, S.; Calabria, C.; Caponero, M.; Caputo, C.; Cassese, F.; Castaneda, A.; Cauwenbergh, S.; Cavallo, F. R.; Celik, A.; Choi, M.; Choi, S.; Christiansen, J.; Cimmino, A.; Colafranceschi, S.; Colaleo, A.; Garcia, A. Conde; Czellar, S.; Dabrowski, M. M.; Lentdecker, G. De; Oliveira, R. De; Robertis, G. de; Dildick, S.; Dorney, B.; Endroczi, G.; Errico, F.; Fallavollita, F.; Fenyvesi, A.; Ferry, S.; Furic, I.; Giacomelli, P.; Gilmore, J.; Golovtsov, V.; Guiducci, L.; Guilloux, F.; Gutierrez, A.; Hadjiiska, R. M.; Hauser, J.; Hoepfner, K.; Hohlmann, M.; Hoorani, H.; Iaydjiev, P.; Jeng, Y. G.; Kamon, T.; Karchin, P.; Korytov, A.; Krutelyov, S.; Kumar, A.; Kim, H.; Lee, J.; Lenzi, T.; Litov, L.; Loddo, F.; Madorsky, A.; Maerschalk, T.; Maggi, M.; Magnani, A.; Mal, P. K.; Mandal, K.; Marchioro, A.; Marinov, A.; Majumdar, N.; Merlin, J. A.; Mitselmakher, G.; Mohanty, A. K.; Mohapatra, A.; Molnar, J.; Muhammad, S.; Mukhopadhyay, S.; Naimuddin, M.; Nuzzo, S.; Oliveri, E.; Pant, L. M.; Paolucci, P.; Park, I.; Passeggio, G.; Pavlov, B.; Philipps, B.; Piccolo, D.; Postema, H.; Baranac, A. Puig; Radi, A.; Radogna, R.; Raffone, G.; Ranieri, A.; Rashevski, G.; Ressegotti, M.; Riccardi, C.; Rodozov, M.; Rodrigues, A.; Ropelewski, L.; RoyChowdhury, S.; Ryu, G.; Ryu, M. S.; Safonov, A.; Salva, S.; Saviano, G.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, R.; Shah, A. H.; Shopova, M.; Sturdy, J.; Sultanov, G.; Swain, S. K.; Szillasi, Z.; Talvitie, J.; Tatarinov, A.; Tuuva, T.; Tytgat, M.; Vai, I.; Stenis, M. Van; Venditti, R.; Verhagen, E.; Verwilligen, P.; Vitulo, P.; Volkov, S.; Vorobyev, A.; Wang, D.; Wang, M.; Yang, U.; Yang, Y.; Yonamine, R.; Zaganidis, N.; Zenoni, F.; Zhang, A.

    2017-02-01

    This contribution introduces a new type of Micropattern Gaseous Detector, the Fast Timing Micropattern (FTM) detector, utilizing fully Resistive WELL structures. The structure of the prototype will be described in detail and the results of the characterization study performed with an X-ray gun will be presented, together with the first results on time resolution based on data collected with muon/pion test beams.

  9. Afterpulse time spectra of high-speed photon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leskovar, B.

    1985-01-01

    Recent progress of understanding of the afterpulse time spectra of high-speed photon detectors using photoemission and secondary emission processes is reviewed and summarized. Furthermore, the afterpulse time spectra of high-gain conventionally designed and microchannel plate photon detectors was investigated. Specifically, the devices studied included RCA 8850, RCA 8854 and ITT F 4129g photomultipliers. Descriptions are given of the measuring techniques.

  10. Determination of time zero from a charged particle detector

    DOEpatents

    Green, Jesse Andrew [Los Alamos, NM

    2011-03-15

    A method, system and computer program is used to determine a linear track having a good fit to a most likely or expected path of charged particle passing through a charged particle detector having a plurality of drift cells. Hit signals from the charged particle detector are associated with a particular charged particle track. An initial estimate of time zero is made from these hit signals and linear tracks are then fit to drift radii for each particular time-zero estimate. The linear track having the best fit is then searched and selected and errors in fit and tracking parameters computed. The use of large and expensive fast detectors needed to time zero in the charged particle detectors can be avoided by adopting this method and system.

  11. Fast Timing Detector R&D for Forward Proton Detectors at LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Quartz Timing Cherenkov (QUARTIC) detectors were tested at Fermilab Test Beam Facility in order to determine the timing resolution of very forward protons from collisions at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). The active media of the detectors are quartz and sapphire, which are radiation hard and high light-yield materials. These detectors are constructed of 20 L-shaped bars that enable one to differentiate and detect more than one proton from the same LHC bunch crossing. The QUARTIC detectors have a small active area of 4cm2, which is well-matched to the acceptance of the scattered protons. Our experimental results will be presented and further testing of this design is planned.

  12. The diamond time of flight detector of the TOTEM experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berretti, Mirko

    2017-02-01

    This contribution describes the design and the performance of a novel timing detector developed by the TOTEM Collaboration. The detector will be installed inside the TOTEM Roman Pots (RPs) and will measure the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) of the protons produced in the central diffractive (CD) interactions at the LHC. In particular, the measurement of the proton TOF allows the determination of the vertex longitudinal position where the protons are produced, thus allowing the protons association with one of the vertices reconstructed by the CMS detectors. The TOF detector is based on single crystal CVD (scCVD) diamond plates and it is designed in order to measure the protons TOF with 50 ps time resolution. To achieve this performance, a dedicated fast and low noise electronics for the signal amplification has been developed. Indeed, while diamond sensors have lower noise and faster signals than silicon sensors, the amount of charge released in the medium is lower. The digitization of the diamond signal is performed sampling the waveform at 10 GSa/s with the SAMPIC chip. The performance of the first TOF detector installed in the LHC in November 2015 will be reported. An overview of the clock distribution system and of the control system which interfaces the timing detectors to the experiment DAQ is finally given.

  13. The Feynman-Y Statistic in Relation to Shift-Register Neutron Coincidence Counting: Precision and Dead Time

    SciTech Connect

    Croft, Stephen; Santi, Peter A.; Henzlova, Daniela; Hauck, Danielle K.; Favalli, Andrea

    2012-07-13

    The Feynman-Y statistic is a type of autocorrelation analysis. It is defined as the excess variance-to-mean ratio, Y = VMR - 1, of the number count distribution formed by sampling a pulse train using a series of non-overlapping gates. It is a measure of the degree of correlation present on the pulse train with Y = 0 for Poisson data. In the context of neutron coincidence counting we show that the same information can be obtained from the accidentals histogram acquired using the multiplicity shift-register method, which is currently the common autocorrelation technique applied in nuclear safeguards. In the case of multiplicity shift register analysis however, overlapping gates, either triggered by the incoming pulse stream or by a periodic clock, are used. The overlap introduces additional covariance but does not alter the expectation values. In this paper we discuss, for a particular data set, the relative merit of the Feynman and shift-register methods in terms of both precision and dead time correction. Traditionally the Feynman approach is applied with a relatively long gate width compared to the dieaway time. The main reason for this is so that the gate utilization factor can be taken as unity rather than being treated as a system parameter to be determined at characterization/calibration. But because the random trigger interval gate utilization factor is slow to saturate this procedure requires a gate width many times the effective 1/e dieaway time. In the traditional approach this limits the number of gates that can be fitted into a given assay duration. We empirically show that much shorter gates, similar in width to those used in traditional shift register analysis can be used. Because the way in which the correlated information present on the pulse train is extracted is different for the moments based method of Feynman and the various shift register based approaches, the dead time losses are manifested differently for these two approaches. The resulting

  14. Tests and calibration of NIF neutron time of flight detectors.

    PubMed

    Ali, Z A; Glebov, V Yu; Cruz, M; Duffy, T; Stoeckl, C; Roberts, S; Sangster, T C; Tommasini, R; Throop, A; Moran, M; Dauffy, L; Horsefield, C

    2008-10-01

    The National Ignition Facility (NIF) neutron time of flight (NTOF) diagnostic will measure neutron yield and ion temperature in all NIF campaigns in DD, DT, and THD(*) implosions. The NIF NTOF diagnostic is designed to measure neutron yield from 1x10(9) to 2x10(19). The NTOF consists of several detectors of varying sensitivity located on the NIF at about 5 and 20 m from the target. Production, testing, and calibration of the NIF NTOF detectors have begun at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics (LLE). Operational tests of the NTOF detectors were performed on several facilities including the OMEGA laser at LLE and the Titan laser at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Neutron calibrations were carried out on the OMEGA laser. Results of the NTOF detector tests and calibration will be presented.

  15. A new timing detector for the CT-PPS project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arcidiacono, R.

    2017-02-01

    The CT-PPS detector will be installed close to the beam line on both sides of CMS, 200 m downstream the interaction point. This detector will measure forward scattered protons, allowing detailed studies of diffractive hadron physics and Central Exclusive Production. The main components of the CT-PPS detector are a silicon tracking system and a timing system. In this contribution we present the proposal of an innovative solution for the timing system, based on Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD). UFSD are a novel concept of silicon detectors potentially able to obtain the necessary time resolution (∼20 ps on the proton arrival time). The use of UFSD has also other attractive features as its material budget is small and the pixel geometries can be tailored to the precise physics distribution of protons. UFSD prototypes for CT-PPS have been designed by CNM (Barcelona) and FBK (Trento): we will present the status of the sensor productions and of the low-noise front-end electronics currently under development and test.

  16. Detectors and Concepts for sub-100 ps timing with gaseous detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Díaz, D.; Palomo, F. R.; González, J.; Chen, H.

    2017-03-01

    We give a short compendium of the main ongoing detectors and concepts capable of performing accurate sub-100 ps timing at high particle fluxes and on large areas, through technologies based on gaseous media. We briefly discuss the state-of-the-art, technological limitations and prospects, and a new bizarre idea.

  17. Detection and Real Time Spectroscopy of Charged Particles with the TimePix Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granja, Carlos; Jakubek, Jan; Platkevic, Michal; Pospisil, Stanislav; Vykydal, Zdenek

    2010-01-01

    We tested the position—, spectral— and time—resolution capability of the TimePix semiconductor detector together with the USB readout interface and Pixelman control and DAQ software tool for detection and visualization of particles. Event—by—event spectroscopy can be achieved by real time analysis of the characteristic tracks and specific response of different radiation in the pixel detector.

  18. Neutron Bang Time Detector Based on a Light Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Glebov, V Y; Moran, M; Stoeckl, C; Sangster, T C; Cruz, M

    2008-05-08

    A neutron bang time detector consisting of a scintillator, light pipe, photomultiplier tube (PMT), and high-bandwidth oscilloscope has been implemented on the 60-beam, 30-kJ OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Light from the scintillator, located 23 cm from the target, is transmitted outside the target bay through a 9.6-m-long, 2-in.-diam polished stainless steel pipe to the PMT. The PMT signal is recorded by two channels of a 6-GHz, 10-GS/s Tektronix 6604 oscilloscope. The OMEGA optical fiducial pulse train is recorded on the third oscilloscope channel using a fast photodiode to provide the timing reference to the laser. The bang-time detector is absolutely calibrated in time and is able to measure bang time for neutron yields above 1 x 10{sup 9} with accuracy of better than 25 ps.

  19. Evaluation of the time of uncapping and removing dead brood from cells by hygienic and non-hygienic honey bees.

    PubMed

    Palacio, Maria Alejandra; Flores, Jose Manuel; Figini, Emilio; Ruffinengo, Sergio; Escande, Alberto; Bedascarrasbure, Enrique; Rodriguez, Edgardo; Gonçalves, Lionel Segui

    2005-03-31

    Most research on hygienic behavior has recorded the time taken by the colony to remove an experimental amount of dead brood, usually after one or two days. We evaluated the time that hygienic (H) and non-hygienic (NH) honey bees take to uncap and remove dead brood in observation hives after the brood was killed using the pin-killing assay. Four experimental colonies were selected as the extreme cases among 108 original colonies. Thirty brood cells were perforated with a pin in two H and two NH colonies and observations were made after 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, and 24 h. Different stages of uncapping and removing were recorded. Differences in uncapping and removal between H and NH colonies were significant for all comparisons made at the different times after perforation. Using observation hives one obtains a better and faster discrimination between H and NH colonies than in full size colonies. It is possible to differentiate H and NH within a few hours after perforating the cells.

  20. Characterization of a Precision Pulsar Timing Gravitational Wave Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Michael T.

    2017-01-01

    We aim to construct a Galactic-scale detector comprised of an array of pulsars distributed across the sky in an effort to detect low-frequency (nanohertz) gravitational waves. Even without a detection, observations of pulsar timing arrays have allowed us to begin to place impactful astrophysical constraints on dynamical processes occurring during galaxy mergers. Understanding the detector is necessary for improving our sensitivity to gravitational waves and making a detection. Therefore, our goal is to characterize the entire propagation path through the pulsar timing array detector. To do so, we must understand: what intrinsic noise processes occur at the pulsar, what effects the interstellar medium has on pulsed radio emission, and what errors we introduce when measuring the incident electromagnetic radiation at our observatories.In this work, we observed of one of the most spin-stable objects known for 24 hours to understand the fundamental limits of precision pulsar timing. We investigated the effect of non-simultaneous, multi-frequency sampling of pulsar dispersion measures on timing and analyzed the cause of deterministic and stochastic temporal variations seen in dispersion measure time series. We analyzed errors in pulse arrival times and determined the white noise budget for pulsars on the timescale of a single observation. Finally, we measured the excess noise beyond the white noise model in pulsar timing residuals and incorporated our results into a global model over all pulsar populations to improve excess noise scaling relations.

  1. Neutron Bang Time Detector Based on a Light Pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Glebov, V.Yu.; Moran, M.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T.C.; Cruz, M.

    2008-11-13

    A neutron bang time detector consisting of a scintillator, light pipe, photomultiplier tube (PMT), and high-bandwidth oscilloscope has been implemented on the 60-beam, 30 kJ OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester’s Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Light from the scintillator, located 23 cm from the target, is transmitted from the target bay through a 9.6-m-long, 2 in. diameter polished stainless steel pipe to the PMT. The PMT signal is recorded by two channels of a 6 GHz, 10 GS/ s Tektronix 6604 oscilloscope. The OMEGA optical fiducial pulse train is recorded on the third oscilloscope channel using a fast photodiode to provide the timing reference to the laser. This bang time detector is absolutely temporally calibrated and has been demonstrated to measure the bang time for neutron yields above 1 x 10^9 with an accuracy of better than 25 ps.

  2. Neutron bang time detector based on a light pipe

    SciTech Connect

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Cruz, M.; Moran, M.

    2008-10-15

    A neutron bang time detector consisting of a scintillator, light pipe, photomultiplier tube (PMT), and high-bandwidth oscilloscope has been implemented on the 60-beam, 30 kJ OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. Light from the scintillator, located 23 cm from the target, is transmitted from the target bay through a 9.6-m-long, 2 in. diameter polished stainless steel pipe to the PMT. The PMT signal is recorded by two channels of a 6 GHz, 10 GS/s Tektronix 6604 oscilloscope. The OMEGA optical fiducial pulse train is recorded on the third oscilloscope channel using a fast photodiode to provide the timing reference to the laser. This bang time detector is absolutely temporally calibrated and has been demonstrated to measure the bang time for neutron yields above 1x10{sup 9} with an accuracy of better than 25 ps.

  3. Measuring Sulfur Isotope Ratios from Solid Samples with the Sample Analysis at Mars Instrument and the Effects of Dead Time Corrections

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Franz, H. B.; Mahaffy, P. R.; Kasprzak, W.; Lyness, E.; Raaen, E.

    2011-01-01

    The Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM) instrument suite comprises the largest science payload on the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) "Curiosity" rover. SAM will perform chemical and isotopic analysis of volatile compounds from atmospheric and solid samples to address questions pertaining to habitability and geochemical processes on Mars. Sulfur is a key element of interest in this regard, as sulfur compounds have been detected on the Martian surface by both in situ and remote sensing techniques. Their chemical and isotopic composition can belp constrain environmental conditions and mechanisms at the time of formation. A previous study examined the capability of the SAM quadrupole mass spectrometer (QMS) to determine sulfur isotope ratios of SO2 gas from a statistical perspective. Here we discuss the development of a method for determining sulfur isotope ratios with the QMS by sampling SO2 generated from heating of solid sulfate samples in SAM's pyrolysis oven. This analysis, which was performed with the SAM breadboard system, also required development of a novel treatment of the QMS dead time to accommodate the characteristics of an aging detector.

  4. The timing upgrade project of the TOTEM Roman Pots detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berretti, M.

    2016-07-01

    We describe the upgrade project developed by the TOTEM Collaboration to measure the time of flight (TOF) of the protons in the vertical Roman Pot detectors. The physics program that the upgraded system aims to accomplish will be addressed. Simulation studies allowed us to define a geometry of the sensor such that the detection inefficiency due to the pile-up of the particles in the same electrode is low even with a small amount of read-out channels. The measurement of the protons TOF with 50 ps time resolution requires the development of several challenging technological solutions. The arrival time of the protons will be measured by scCVD diamond detectors, for which a dedicated fast and low-noise electronics for the signal amplification has been designed. Indeed, while diamond sensors have the advantage of higher radiation hardness, lower noise and faster signal than silicon sensors, the amount of charge released in the medium is lower. The sampling of the waveform is performed at a rate up to 10 GS/s with the SAMPIC chip. The sampled waveforms are then analysed offline where optimal algorithms can be implemented to reduce the time walk effects. The clock distribution system, based on the Universal Picosecond Timing System developed at GSI, is optimized in order to have a negligible uncertainty on the TOF measurement. Finally an overview of the control system which will interface the timing detectors to the experiment DAQ is given.

  5. Highly parallel SPAD detector for time-resolved lab-on-chip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Benetti, Michele; Iori, Daniele; Pancheri, Lucio; Borghetti, Fausto; Pasquardini, Laura; Lunelli, Lorenzo; Pederzolli, Cecilia; Gonzo, Lorenzo; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Stoppa, David

    2010-05-01

    Fluorescence lifetime detection is widely used in molecular biology to monitor many cell parameters (such as pH, ion concentrations, etc.) and for an early diagnosis of many pathologies. In a typical fluorescence lifetime experiment a pulsed laser is used to excite the fluorescent dyes and the emitted light is revealed by means of high sensitivity detectors, typically: intensified CCD, PMTs or Single-Photon Avalanche Diodes (SPADs).In this contribute we present a SPAD detector module fabricated in a 0.35μm High Voltage CMOS technology to be used within a lab-on-chip system consisting of a micro-reactor array for bioaffinity assays based on fluorescence markers. The detector module, having a total area of 600 x 900 μm2, can be arranged to build a small pixel array to be directly coupled to the micro-reactors. No emission filters are needed, since the ultra-short laser pulse is cut off in the time domain. The module consists of a 10x10-SPAD array, where each SPAD cell is equipped with dedicated active quenching and recharging circuit. Each cell has a pitch of 26μm with a fill factor of 48%. The SPADs have been binned in order to realize a large photosensitive area detector exhibiting a reasonably low dark count rate (DCR) and reduced dead time, as required in a fast measurement system. A memory has also been implemented in order to enable only low DCR SPADs, so that a total DCR of about 100kHz can be achieved for the whole photosensitive area. The digital output generated by the SPAD array is sent to a time-discriminator stage which allows a time-gated detection of the incident light. Two time-windows have been implemented in this architecture. Their time width is controlled by an on-chip digital PLL locked to the external laser clock whereas the width of the time-windows can be set within the range 500ps-10ns with a resolution of 500ps. Photons detected within each time window are then counted by two 10-bits digital counters. Time-interleaved operation has been

  6. Analysis of regional travel time data from the November 1999 dead sea explosions observed in Saudi Arabia

    SciTech Connect

    Rodgers, A; Abdullah, M S; Ar-Rajehi, A; Al-Khalifah, T; Al-Amri, M S; Al-Haddad, M S; Al-Arifi, N

    2000-04-19

    Two large chemical explosions were detonated in the Dead Sea in order to calibrate seismic travel times and improve location accuracy for the International Monitoring System (IMS) to monitor a Comprehensive Nuclear Test-Ban Treaty (CTBT). These explosions provided calibration data for regional seismic networks in the Middle East. In this paper we report analysis of seismic data from these shots as recorded by two seismic networks run by King Saud University (KSU) and King Abdulaziz City for Science and Technology (KACST) in Saudi Arabia. The shots were well observed in the distance range 180-480 km mostly to the south of the Dead Sea in the Gulf of Aqaba region of northwestern Saudi Arabia. An average one-dimensional velocity model for the paths was inferred from the travel times of the regional phases Pn, Pg and Sg. Short-period Sn phases were not observed. The velocity model features a thin crust (crustal thickness 26-30 km) and low velocities (average P-wave velocity 5.8-6.0 km/s), consistent with the extensional tectonics of the region and previous studies.

  7. High-yield bang time detector for the OMEGA laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Stoeckl, C.; Sangster, T. C.; Mileham, C.; Roberts, S.; Lerche, R. A.

    2006-10-01

    A simple, low-cost, high-yield neutron bang time (HYNBT) detector has been developed and implemented on the 60-beam, 30kJ OMEGA Laser Facility at the University of Rochester's Laboratory for Laser Energetics. The HYNBT consists of three chemical-vapor deposition diamond detectors of different sizes and sensitivities placed in a lead-shielded housing. The HYNBT is located in a reentrant tube 50cm from the center of the target chamber. The HYNBT has been temporally cross calibrated against the streak-camera-based neutron temporal diagnostic (NTD) for both D2 and DT implosions. The HYNBT has an internal time resolution better than 20ps and is able to measure bang time for yields above 1010 for DT and 5×1010 for D2 implosions. The implementation of the HYNBT on the National Ignition Facility will be discussed.

  8. A GIS-driven integrated real-time surveillance pilot system for national West Nile virus dead bird surveillance in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Shuai, Jiangping; Buck, Peter; Sockett, Paul; Aramini, Jeff; Pollari, Frank

    2006-01-01

    Background An extensive West Nile virus surveillance program of dead birds, mosquitoes, horses, and human infection has been launched as a result of West Nile virus first being reported in Canada in 2001. Some desktop and web GIS have been applied to West Nile virus dead bird surveillance. There have been urgent needs for a comprehensive GIS services and real-time surveillance. Results A pilot system was developed to integrate real-time surveillance, real-time GIS, and Open GIS technology in order to enhance West Nile virus dead bird surveillance in Canada. Driven and linked by the newly developed real-time web GIS technology, this integrated real-time surveillance system includes conventional real-time web-based surveillance components, integrated real-time GIS components, and integrated Open GIS components. The pilot system identified the major GIS functions and capacities that may be important to public health surveillance. The six web GIS clients provide a wide range of GIS tools for public health surveillance. The pilot system has been serving Canadian national West Nile virus dead bird surveillance since 2005 and is adaptable to serve other disease surveillance. Conclusion This pilot system has streamlined, enriched and enhanced national West Nile virus dead bird surveillance in Canada, improved productivity, and reduced operation cost. Its real-time GIS technology, static map technology, WMS integration, and its integration with non-GIS real-time surveillance system made this pilot system unique in surveillance and public health GIS. PMID:16626490

  9. Time-domain response of the ARIANNA detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barwick, S. W.; Berg, E. C.; Besson, D. Z.; Duffin, T.; Hanson, J. C.; Klein, S. R.; Kleinfelder, S. A.; Piasecki, M.; Ratzlaff, K.; Reed, C.; Roumi, M.; Stezelberger, T.; Tatar, J.; Walker, J.; Young, R.; Zou, L.

    2015-03-01

    The Antarctic Ross Ice Shelf Antenna Neutrino Array (ARIANNA) is a high-energy neutrino detector designed to record the Askaryan electric field signature of cosmogenic neutrino interactions in ice. To understand the inherent radio-frequency (RF) neutrino signature, the time-domain response of the ARIANNA RF receiver must be measured. ARIANNA uses Create CLP5130-2N log-periodic dipole arrays (LPDAs). The associated effective height operator converts incident electric fields to voltage waveforms at the LDPA terminals. The effective height versus time and incident angle was measured, along with the associated response of the ARIANNA RF amplifier. The results are verified by correlating to field measurements in air and ice, using oscilloscopes. Finally, theoretical models for the Askaryan electric field are combined with the detector response to predict the neutrino signature.

  10. Optimizing timing performance of silicon photomultiplier-based scintillation detectors

    PubMed Central

    Yeom, Jung Yeol; Vinke, Ruud

    2013-01-01

    Precise timing resolution is crucial for applications requiring photon time-of-flight (ToF) information such as ToF positron emission tomography (PET). Silicon photomultipliers (SiPM) for PET, with their high output capacitance, are known to require custom preamplifiers to optimize timing performance. In this paper, we describe simple alternative front-end electronics based on a commercial low-noise RF preamplifier and methods that have been implemented to achieve excellent timing resolution. Two radiation detectors with L(Y)SO scintillators coupled to Hamamatsu SiPMs (MPPC S10362–33-050C) and front-end electronics based on an RF amplifier (MAR-3SM+), typically used for wireless applications that require minimal additional circuitry, have been fabricated. These detectors were used to detect annihilation photons from a Ge-68 source and the output signals were subsequently digitized by a high speed oscilloscope for offline processing. A coincident resolving time (CRT) of 147 ± 3 ps FWHM and 186 ± 3 ps FWHM with 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 and with 3 × 3 × 20 mm3 LYSO crystal elements were measured, respectively. With smaller 2 × 2 × 3 mm3 LSO crystals, a CRT of 125 ± 2 ps FWHM was achieved with slight improvement to 121 ± 3 ps at a lower temperature (15°C). Finally, with the 20 mm length crystals, a degradation of timing resolution was observed for annihilation photon interactions that occur close to the photosensor compared to shallow depth-of-interaction (DOI). We conclude that commercial RF amplifiers optimized for noise, besides their ease of use, can produce excellent timing resolution comparable to best reported values acquired with custom readout electronics. On the other hand, as timing performance degrades with increasing photon DOI, a head-on detector configuration will produce better CRT than a side-irradiated setup for longer crystals. PMID:23369872

  11. On oscillation reduction in feedback control for processes with an uncertain dead time and internal-external disturbances.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuqiong; Li, Donghai; Gao, Zhiqiang; Zheng, Qinling

    2015-11-01

    This paper aims to find a practical solution to reduce oscillation on the Smith Predictor (SP) based design with the dead time (DT) uncertainty, making it less sensitive to DT change and more effective in disturbance rejection. First, a conditional feedback mechanism is introduced in SP to reduce the amount of oscillation caused by the model inaccuracies in the DT parameter. Then, to address the oscillation caused by the phase lag in traditional PI controller and uncertain dynamics, this conditional SP is combined with active disturbance rejection control (ADRC), assisted by the knowledge of process dynamics. A practical tuning method is provided for the practicing engineers. The proposed approach is validated in extensive simulation studies with different types of plants and in frequency domain analysis. The simulation results show significant improvements in performance robustness and transient response.

  12. PID controller tuning for the first-order-plus-dead-time process model via Hermite-Biehler theorem.

    PubMed

    Roy, Anindo; Iqbal, Kamran

    2005-07-01

    This paper discusses PID stabilization of a first-order-plus-dead-time (FOPDT) process model using the stability framework of the Hermite-Biehler theorem. The FOPDT model approximates many processes in the chemical and petroleum industries. Using a PID controller and first-order Padé approximation for the transport delay, the Hermite-Biehler theorem allows one to analytically study the stability of the closed-loop system. We derive necessary and sufficient conditions for stability and develop an algorithm for selection of stabilizing feedback gains. The results are given in terms of stability bounds that are functions of plant parameters. Sensitivity and disturbance rejection characteristics of the proposed PID controller are studied. The results are compared with established tuning methods such as Ziegler-Nichols, Cohen-Coon, and internal model control.

  13. Multi-CFD Timing Estimators for PET Block Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Ullisch, Marcus G.; Moses, William W.

    2006-05-05

    In a conventional PET system with block detectors, a timing estimator is created by generating the analog sum of the signals from the four photomultiplier tubes (PMT) in a module and discriminating the sum with a single constant fraction discriminator (CFD). The differences in the propagation time between the PMTs in the module can potentially degrade the timing resolution of the module. While this degradation is probably too small to affect performance in conventional PET imaging, it may impact the timing inaccuracy for time-of-flight PET systems (which have higher timing resolution requirements). Using a separate CFD for each PMT would allow for propagation time differences to be removed through calibration and correction in software. In this paper we investigate and quantify the timing resolution achievable when the signal from each of the 4 PMTs is digitized by a separate CFD. Several methods are explored for both obtaining values for the propagation time differences between the PMTs and combining the four arrival times to form a single timing estimator. We find that the propagation time correction factors are best derived through an exhaustive search, and that the ''weighted average'' method provides the best timing estimator. Using these methods, the timing resolution achieved with 4 CFDs (1052 {+-} 82 ps) is equivalent to the timing resolution with the conventional single CFD setup (1067 {+-} 158 ps).

  14. Single photon detector design features

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Sergey V.; Kurochkin, Vladimir L.; Kurochkin, Yury V.

    2016-12-01

    In the report are discussed the laboratory test results of SPAD detectors with InGaAs / InP avalanche photodiodes, operating in Geiger mode. Device operating in synchronous mode with the dead timer setting for proper working conditions of photodiodes. The report materials will showing the functional block diagram of the detector, real operating signals in the receiver path and clock circuits and main results of measurements. The input signal of the synchronous detector is the clock, which determines the time positions of expected photons arrival. Increasing the clock speed 1-300 MHz or getting more time positions of the time grid, we provide increased capacity for time position code of signals, when QKD information transmitted over the nets. At the same time, the maximum attainable speed of photon reception is limited by diode dead time. Diode quantum noise are minimized by inclusion of a special time interval - dead time 0.1-10 usec, after each received and registered a photon. The lowest attainable value of the dead time is determined as a compromise between transients in electrical circuits, passive avalanche «quenching» circuit and thermal transients cooling crystal diode, after each avalanche pass though photodiode. Achievable time and speed parameters are discussed with specific examples of detectors.

  15. Time-of-flight detector for heavy ion backscattering spectrometry

    SciTech Connect

    Knapp, J.A.; Banks, J.C.; Doyle, B.L.

    1994-04-01

    This report describes the results of a two-year laboratory directed research and development project to explore advanced concepts in Heavy Ion Backscattering Spectrometry (HIBS), undertaken with the goal of extending the sensitivity of this relatively new technique to levels unattainable by any other existing trace element surface analysis. Improvements in sensitivity are required for the application of HIBS to contamination control in the microelectronics industry. Tools with sensitivity approaching 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} are expected to be essential for enabling advanced IC production by the year 2000. During the project the authors developed a new analysis chamber with channeling goniometer and a prototype time-of-flight detector with a demonstrated sensitivity of {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 8} atoms/cm{sup 2} for Au on Si and {approximately} 5 {times} 10{sup 10} for Fe, and sufficient mass resolution to separate contributions from Fe and Cu.

  16. Detectors

    DOEpatents

    Orr, Christopher Henry; Luff, Craig Janson; Dockray, Thomas; Macarthur, Duncan Whittemore; Bounds, John Alan; Allander, Krag

    2002-01-01

    The apparatus and method provide techniques through which both alpha and beta emission determinations can be made simultaneously using a simple detector structure. The technique uses a beta detector covered in an electrically conducting material, the electrically conducting material discharging ions generated by alpha emissions, and as a consequence providing a measure of those alpha emissions. The technique also offers improved mountings for alpha detectors and other forms of detectors against vibration and the consequential effects vibration has on measurement accuracy.

  17. Insufficient differentiation of live and dead Campylobacter jejuni and Listeria monocytogenes cells by ethidium monoazide (EMA) compromises EMA/real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Flekna, Gabriele; Stefanic, Polonca; Wagner, Martin; Smulders, Frans J M; Mozina, Sonja Smole; Hein, Ingeborg

    2007-06-01

    Recently, ethidium monoazide (EMA) has been proposed as a means of reducing the real-time PCR signal originating from free DNA and dead bacterial cells by selectively entering damaged cells and blocking the DNA for PCR amplification via photoactivation. The present study investigated the effect of EMA on viable and dead bacterial cells using real-time PCR, plate count method and microscopy. The foodborne pathogens Campylobacter jejuni and Listeria monocytogenes were used as a Gram-negative and a Gram-positive model organism, respectively. EMA/real-time PCR analysis of heat-treated cultures of C. jejuni and L. monocytogenes containing 2.6x10(5) and 4x10(5) viable and 3x10(6) and 2x10(6) dead cells/ml, respectively, yielded 2x10(3) and 5.2x10(4) bacterial cell equivalents/ml after EMA treatment, thus underestimating the viable cell count in the samples. Similar results were obtained when analyzing late exponential phase cultures of C. jejuni and L. monocytogenes. Inhibition of growth by EMA was observed. It depended on the concentration of the bacterial cells present in the sample and the EMA concentration used (100-1 microg/ml). An EMA concentration at which dead cells would stain brightly and viable cells would not stain at all or would be very pale was not identified, as revealed by comparison with the results of a commercial live/dead stain. The results suggest that EMA influences not only dead but also viable cells of C. jejuni and L. monocytogenes. Thus EMA/real-time PCR is a poor indicator of cell viability.

  18. Dead on Arrival: Adapting Games to Finish at a Given Time or Location

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Öhsen, Arne; Loviscach, Jörn

    Casual and other games often serve as time-killing applications, be it on the commuter train or in the back seat of a shared car. When one arrives at the destination, the game has to be interrupted or aborted, which is annoying or even frustrating. Hence, we propose to continuously adapt the game’s level of difficulty to the estimated remaining time to arrival. This can be preset as a number of minutes or can continuously be estimated from the player’s position in relation to a predefined destination. Our dungeon-style prototype is based on an automated engine for content placement and can also make use of GPS data. We report on preliminary results from user tests.

  19. Intermittent optical frequency measurements to reduce the dead time uncertainty of frequency link

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hachisu, Hidekazu; Ido, Tetsuya

    2015-11-01

    The absolute frequency of the 87Sr lattice clock transition was evaluated with an uncertainty of 1.1 × 10-15 using a frequency link to the international atomic time (TAI). The frequency uncertainty of a hydrogen maser used as a transfer oscillator was reduced by homogeneously distributed intermittent measurement over a five-day grid of TAI. Three sets of four or five days measurements as well as systematic uncertainty of the clock at 8.6 × 10-17 have resulted in an absolute frequency of 87Sr 1S0-3P0 clock transition to be 429 228 004 229 872.85 (47) Hz.

  20. Real-time imaging detectors for portal imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roehrig, Hans; Cheng, Chee-Wai

    1993-12-01

    This paper reviews the status of real-time imaging systems which are used in radiation-therapy for radiotherapy localization and verification. Imaging systems under review include (1) metal- fluorescent screens, optically coupled to video cameras; (2) metal-phosphor screen in direct contact with two-dimensional photo-diode array (flat panel detector); (3) two-dimensional liquid ionization chamber; and (4) linear diode arrays. These systems permit frequent verification during the treatment and have been shown to be very useful. Unfortunately the image quality achieved, while impressive considering the short time the devices have been on the market, is significantly inferior to that which is available from the metal/film combination (port film).

  1. Enumeration of Viable Listeria monocytogenes Cells by Real-Time PCR with Propidium Monoazide and Ethidium Monoazide in the Presence of Dead Cells

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Propidium monoazide (PMA) and ethidium monoazide were used for enumeration of viable Listeria monocytogenes cells in the presence of dead cells. PMA had no antimicrobial effect on L. monocytogenes. Viable cell counts were linearly related to real-time PCR threshold cycle values for PMA-treated cel...

  2. Optical and UV Sensing Sealed Tube Microchannel Plate Imaging Detectors with High Time Resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Tremsin, A.; Hull, J.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.

    2014-09-01

    Microchannel plate (MCP) based imaging, photon time tagging detector sealed tube schemes have a unique set of operational features that enable high time resolution astronomical and remote sensing applications to be addressed. New detectors using the cross strip (XS), cross delay line (XDL), or stripline anode readouts, a wide range of photocathode types, and advanced MCP technologies have been implemented to improve many performance characteristics. A variety of sealed tubes have been developed including 18mm XS readout devices with GaAs and SuperGenII photocathodes, 25mm XDL readout devices with SuperGenII and GaN photocathodes, and 20 x 20 cm sealed tubes with bialkali photocathodes and strip line readout. One key technology that has just become viable is the ability to make MCPs using atomic layer deposition (ALD) techniques. This employs nanofabrication of the active layers of an MCP on a microcapillary array. This technique opens new performance opportunities, including, very large MCP areas (>20cm), very low intrinsic background, lower radiation induced background, much longer overall lifetime and gain stability, and markedly lower outgassing which can improve the sealed tube lifetime and ease of fabrication. The XS readout has been implemented in formats of 22mm, 50mm and 100mm, and uses MCP charge signals detected on two orthogonal layers of conductive fingers to encode event X-Y positions. We have achieved spatial resolution XS detectors better than 25 microns FWHM, with good image linearity while at low gain (<10^6), substantially increasing local counting rate capabilities and the overall tube lifetime. XS tubes with updated electronics can encode event rates of >5 MHz with ~12% dead time and event timing accuracy of ~100ps. XDL sealed tubes in 25mm format demonstrate ~40 micron spatial resolution at up to ~2 MHz event rates, and have been developed with SupergenII visible regime photocathodes. The XDL tubes also achieve ~100 ps time resolution. Most

  3. Real-time self-networking radiation detector apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Edward; Lemley, James; Tsang, Thomas Y.; Milian, Laurence W.

    2007-06-12

    The present invention is for a radiation detector apparatus for detecting radiation sources present in cargo shipments. The invention includes the features of integrating a bubble detector sensitive to neutrons and a GPS system into a miniaturized package that can wirelessly signal the presence of radioactive material in shipping containers. The bubble density would be read out if such indicated a harmful source.

  4. Directional Dark Matter Detector Prototype (Time Projection Chamber)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oliver-Mallory, Kelsey; Garcia-Sciveres, Maurice; Kadyk, John; Lopex-Thibodeaux, Mayra

    2013-04-01

    The time projection chamber is a mature technology that has emerged as a promising candidate for the directional detection of the WIMP particle. In order to utilize this technology in WIMP detection, the operational parameters must be chosen in the non-ideal regime. A prototype WIMP detector with a 10cm field cage, double GEM amplification, and ATLAS FEI3 pixel chip readout was constructed for the purpose of investigating effects of varying gas pressure in different gas mixtures. The rms radii of ionization clusters of photoelectrons caused by X-rays from a Fe-55 source were measured for several gas pressures between 760torr and 99torr in Ar(70)/ CO2(30), CF4, He(80)/Isobutane(20), and He(80)/CF4(20) mixtures. Average radii were determined from distributions of the data for each gas mixture and pressure, and revealed a negative correlation between pressure and radius in Ar(70)/CO2(30) and He(80)/Isobutane(20) mixtures. Investigation of the pressure-radius measurements are in progress using distributions of photoelectron and auger electron practical ranges (Univ. of Pisa) and diffusion, using the Garfield Monte Carlo program.

  5. Testing a new NIF neutron time-of-flight detector with a bibenzyl scintillator on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Glebov, V Yu; Forrest, C; Knauer, J P; Pruyne, A; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C; Caggiano, J A; Carman, M L; Clancy, T J; Hatarik, R; McNaney, J; Zaitseva, N P

    2012-10-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector with a bibenzyl crystal as a scintillator has been designed and manufactured for the National Ignition Facility (NIF). This detector will replace a nTOF20-Spec detector with an oxygenated xylene scintillator currently operational on the NIF to improve the areal-density measurements. In addition to areal density, the bibenzyl detector will measure the D-D and D-T neutron yield and the ion temperature of indirect- and direct-drive-implosion experiments. The design of the bibenzyl detector and results of tests on the OMEGA Laser System are presented.

  6. A method for considering the spatial variations of dead layer thickness in HPGe detectors to improve the FEPE calculation of bulky samples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Modarresi, S. Mohammad; Masoudi, S. Farhad; Karimi, Majid

    2017-01-01

    A method for considering the spatial variation of deal layer (DL) thickness at the lateral and top surfaces of HPGe detectors is proposed. Instead of considering the exact variation of DL thickness at detector surface, the lateral surface is divided into 12 segments, assuming each segments covers 30 degrees of the detector lateral surface and has a different DL thickness. Then, using Am-241 source at 12 positions on lateral surface and also on top surface of a HPGe detector, the nearest DL thickness for each segment can be selected through estimation of Full Energy Peak Efficiency (FEPE). This is the case in both experimental and simulation sides. The proposed detector can be used for FEPE calculation of bulk samples geometries such as Marinelli beaker containers. In order to check the suitability of proposed detector for bulky samples, a Marinelli beaker containing a set of standard radiation source solution with specified activities is considered. The experimental and simulation results of FEPE show good agreement with minimum 2% to maximum 6% relative difference from low (59.5 keV) to high energy (1.33 MeV) gamma ray.

  7. Ultra-violet light-emitting diode calibration system for timing large area scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Naumov, P. Yu; Runtso, M. F.; Naumov, P. P.; Maklyaev, E. F.; Kaplin, V. A.; Fomin, V. S.; Razzhivin, I. S.; Melikyan, Yu A.

    2017-01-01

    Timing large area plastic scintillation detectors are developing for the space gamma-ray telescopes now. For the in-flight calibration of these detectors the use of ultra-violet light-emitting diode, irradiating the 1 m long detector module at the center of its lateral side is suggested. The results of the measurements show the possibility of this calibration system implementation as for amplitude as for timing properties monitoring.

  8. The Dead Sea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    The Dead Sea is the lowest point on Earth at 418 meters below sea level, and also one of the saltiest bodies of water on Earth with a salinity of about 300 parts-per-thousand (nine times greater than ocean salinity). It is located on the border between Jordan and Israel, and is fed by the Jordan River. The Dead Sea is located in the Dead Sea Rift, formed as a result of the Arabian tectonic plate moving northward away from the African Plate. The mineral content of the Dead Sea is significantly different from that of ocean water, consisting of approximately 53% magnesium chloride, 37% potassium chloride and 8% sodium chloride. In the early part of the 20th century, the Dead Sea began to attract interest from chemists who deduced that the Sea was a natural deposit of potash and bromine. From the Dead Sea brine, Israel and Jordan produce 3.8 million tons potash, 200,000 tons elemental bromine, 45,000 tons caustic soda, 25, 000 tons magnesium metal, and sodium chloride. Both countries use extensive salt evaporation pans that have essentially diked the entire southern end of the Dead Sea.

    With its 14 spectral bands from the visible to the thermal infrared wavelength region, and its high spatial resolution of 15 to 90 meters (about 50 to 300 feet), ASTER images Earth to map and monitor the changing surface of our planet.

    ASTER is one of five Earth-observing instruments launched December 18, 1999, on NASA's Terra satellite. The instrument was built by Japan's Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry. A joint U.S./Japan science team is responsible for validation and calibration of the instrument and the data products.

    The broad spectral coverage and high spectral resolution of ASTER provides scientists in numerous disciplines with critical information for surface mapping, and monitoring of dynamic conditions and temporal change. Example applications are: monitoring glacial advances and retreats; monitoring potentially active volcanoes; identifying crop

  9. Risk assessment of false-positive quantitative real-time PCR results in food, due to detection of DNA originating from dead cells.

    PubMed

    Wolffs, Petra; Norling, Börje; Rådström, Peter

    2005-03-01

    Real-time PCR technology is increasingly used for detection and quantification of pathogens in food samples. A main disadvantage of nucleic acid detection is the inability to distinguish between signals originating from viable cells and DNA released from dead cells. In order to gain knowledge concerning risks of false-positive results due to detection of DNA originating from dead cells, quantitative PCR (qPCR) was used to investigate the degradation kinetics of free DNA in four types of meat samples. Results showed that the fastest degradation rate was observed (1 log unit per 0.5 h) in chicken homogenate, whereas the slowest rate was observed in pork rinse (1 log unit per 120.5 h). Overall results indicated that degradation occurred faster in chicken samples than in pork samples and faster at higher temperatures. Based on these results, it was concluded that, especially in pork samples, there is a risk of false-positive PCR results. This was confirmed in a quantitative study on cell death and signal persistence over a period of 28 days, employing three different methods, i.e. viable counts, direct qPCR, and finally floatation, a recently developed discontinuous density centrifugation method, followed by qPCR. Results showed that direct qPCR resulted in an overestimation of up to 10 times of the amount of cells in the samples compared to viable counts, due to detection of DNA from dead cells. However, after using floatation prior to qPCR, results resembled the viable count data. This indicates that by using of floatation as a sample treatment step prior to qPCR, the risk of false-positive PCR results due to detection of dead cells, can be minimized.

  10. A real-time detector system for precise timing of audiovisual stimuli.

    PubMed

    Henelius, Andreas; Jagadeesan, Sharman; Huotilainen, Minna

    2012-01-01

    The successful recording of neurophysiologic signals, such as event-related potentials (ERPs) or event-related magnetic fields (ERFs), relies on precise information of stimulus presentation times. We have developed an accurate and flexible audiovisual sensor solution operating in real-time for on-line use in both auditory and visual ERP and ERF paradigms. The sensor functions independently of the used audio or video stimulus presentation tools or signal acquisition system. The sensor solution consists of two independent sensors; one for sound and one for light. The microcontroller-based audio sensor incorporates a novel approach to the detection of natural sounds such as multipart audio stimuli, using an adjustable dead time. This aids in producing exact markers for complex auditory stimuli and reduces the number of false detections. The analog photosensor circuit detects changes in light intensity on the screen and produces a marker for changes exceeding a threshold. The microcontroller software for the audio sensor is free and open source, allowing other researchers to customise the sensor for use in specific auditory ERP/ERF paradigms. The hardware schematics and software for the audiovisual sensor are freely available from the webpage of the authors' lab.

  11. A direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vecchione, T.; Denes, P.; Jobe, R. K.; Johnson, I. J.; Joseph, J. M.; Li, R. K.; Perazzo, A.; Shen, X.; Wang, X. J.; Weathersby, S. P.; Yang, J.; Zhang, D.

    2017-03-01

    The introduction of direct electron detectors enabled the structural biology revolution of cryogenic electron microscopy. Direct electron detectors are now expected to have a similarly dramatic impact on time-resolved MeV electron microscopy, particularly by enabling both spatial and temporal jitter correction. Here we report on the commissioning of a direct electron detector for time-resolved MeV electron microscopy. The direct electron detector demonstrated MeV single electron sensitivity and is capable of recording megapixel images at 180 Hz. The detector has a 15-bit dynamic range, better than 30-μ m spatial resolution and less than 20 analogue-to-digital converter count RMS pixel noise. The unique capabilities of the direct electron detector and the data analysis required to take advantage of these capabilities are presented. The technical challenges associated with generating and processing large amounts of data are also discussed.

  12. An Efficient, FPGA-Based, Cluster Detection Algorithm Implementation for a Strip Detector Readout System in a Time Projection Chamber Polarimeter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gregory, Kyle J.; Hill, Joanne E. (Editor); Black, J. Kevin; Baumgartner, Wayne H.; Jahoda, Keith

    2016-01-01

    A fundamental challenge in a spaceborne application of a gas-based Time Projection Chamber (TPC) for observation of X-ray polarization is handling the large amount of data collected. The TPC polarimeter described uses the APV-25 Application Specific Integrated Circuit (ASIC) to readout a strip detector. Two dimensional photoelectron track images are created with a time projection technique and used to determine the polarization of the incident X-rays. The detector produces a 128x30 pixel image per photon interaction with each pixel registering 12 bits of collected charge. This creates challenging requirements for data storage and downlink bandwidth with only a modest incidence of photons and can have a significant impact on the overall mission cost. An approach is described for locating and isolating the photoelectron track within the detector image, yielding a much smaller data product, typically between 8x8 pixels and 20x20 pixels. This approach is implemented using a Microsemi RT-ProASIC3-3000 Field-Programmable Gate Array (FPGA), clocked at 20 MHz and utilizing 10.7k logic gates (14% of FPGA), 20 Block RAMs (17% of FPGA), and no external RAM. Results will be presented, demonstrating successful photoelectron track cluster detection with minimal impact to detector dead-time.

  13. Low-noise phase/frequency detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCorkle, J. W.

    1985-09-01

    The purpose of the research reported on in this thesis, is to demonstrate the effectiveness of a new circuit technique proposed by the author to eliminate the dead-zone anomaly in a digital phase/frequency detector. In addition to demonstrating the elimination of the dead zone, a new loop filter is described. The filter takes advantage of the new phase detector circuit technique so as to simultaneously provide both low-level reference sidebands and a lock-up time of one cycle of the reference. Phase detectors are used in control systems to measure the phase of one signal relative to the phase of another signal. Control systems of this type are usually referred to as Phase-Locked-Loops (PLL). Development of phase detectors has occurred because of the PLL application. A new phase detector is described in this paper.

  14. Determining time resolution of microchannel plate detectors for electron time-of-flight spectrometers

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang Qi; Zhao Kun; Chang Zenghu

    2010-07-15

    The temporal resolution of a 40 mm diameter chevron microchannel plate (MCP) detector followed by a constant fraction discriminator and a time-to-digital converter was determined by using the third order harmonic of 25 fs Ti:sapphire laser pulses. The resolution was found to deteriorate from 200 to 300 ps as the total voltage applied on the two MCPs increased from 1600 to 2000 V. This was likely due to a partial saturation of the MCP and/or the constant fraction discriminator working with signals beyond its optimum range of pulse width and shape.

  15. Infrared detector Dewars - Increased LN2 hold time and vacuum jacket life spans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jennings, D. E.; Boyd, W. J.; Blass, W. E.

    1976-01-01

    IR detector Dewars commonly suffer from shorter than desired LN2 hold times and insulation jacket vacuum corruption over relatively short time periods. In an attempt to solve this problem for a 9144 detector Dewar, small 1 liter/s appendage ion pumps were selected for continuous pumping of the vacuum jackets. This procedure extended LN2 hold times from 20 to 60 h and virtually eliminated vacuum jacket corruption. Thus the detector systems are usable continuously over periods of 6 months or more.

  16. Estimate interaction timing in a large volume HgI2 detector using cathode pulse waveforms

    PubMed Central

    Meng, L.J.; He, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents experimental results on the timing resolution achieved with a 5 mm thick HgI2 detector. The timing information was derived based on the cathode pre-amplifier pulse waveform, measured using a digital oscilloscope. The times of interaction were estimated by fitting the measured pulse waveforms to pre-defined waveform models. With this approach, problems related to the conventional leading edge or constant fraction triggering, such as slow charge carrier mobility, pulse shape variation and depth-dependent detector response can be greatly reduced. As a result, we showed a 13 ns timing resolution measured using the 5 mm thick HgI2 detector and a BaF2 coincidence detector with 511 keV full energy events. In this paper, we discuss several waveform models and the results achieved using these models. PMID:28260824

  17. SiPM readout for the SHiP timing detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt, C.; Bezshyiko, I.; Brundler, R.; Serra, N.; Storaci, B.

    2017-02-01

    The SHiP experiment is a new general purpose fixed target experiment proposed at the CERN SPS accelerator. A dedicated beam line in the North Area will be aimed at a fixed target station, followed by a magnetic shield to reduce beam induced background. The experiment will comprise a compact tau neutrino detector and a detector to search for hidden particles. Background rejection is ensured by use of background taggers and a dedicated timing detector. The timing detector will reduce combinatorial di-muon background by requiring incoming particles to be coincident in time within 100 ps. One option for the timing detector consists of columns of horizontal scintillating bars read-out on each end by Silicon Photomultiplier arrays. This study includes characterization of SiPMs from different manufacturers to be used in the timing detector in terms of Current-Voltage behavior, cross-talk probability, dark count rate and single photon timing resolution. Initial results of the time resolution of a EJ-200 scintillating bar read out on both ends by a single SiPM are presented.

  18. [Between science and moral injury--dead human bodies' treatment in anatomy and pathology during early modern times].

    PubMed

    Bauer, Axel W

    2005-01-01

    In this essay the history of anatomy and pathology between the 16th and the 19th century is focused under the two aspects of scientific development and of moral injury. In anatomy, which came along as a special field of theoretical medicine in 16th century, the human corpse was used as a suitable and to an increasing degree legitimate model of the healthy living body. About two hundred years later, even pathology started to be transformed into pathological anatomy. While anatomists were dealing with the structure of the healthy body pathological anatomists were interested in the morbid changes of the human corpse; the pathologist perceived the dead body as a static model of the dynamic pathological process in the living patient. Anatomy came along in the era of Renaissance and Humanism not least because of a close connection between science and the fine arts, whereas its practical relevance during the 16th and the 17th century resulted from a preparatory function for army surgery. The corpses of executed criminals, infanticides, and of unmarried mothers who had died from natural causes were often used for anatomical purposes including public autopsy. Pathological anatomy, however, unfolded its power not until the end of the 18th and the beginning of the 19th century when a new medical institution had been established: the clinic. The physical methods of examination such as percussion and auscultation of the patient's body could now be reviewed by the results of a post-mortem autopsy. The growing influence of pathological anatomy during 19th century medicine was reflected by a modified perception and evaluation of disease: The spatial dimensions of the visible findings received priority to the chronological development of the process of disease with the consequence of a heightened risk of separating the pathological structures from the suffering patient's biographical context. For the gain to scientism pathological anatomy had to tolerate a loss of reality

  19. Note: A timing micro-channel plate detector with backside fast preamplifier

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Wei; Yu, Deyang Lu, Rongchun; Liu, Junliang; Cai, Xiaohong

    2014-03-15

    A timing micro-channel plate detector with a backside double-channel fast preamplifier was developed to avoid distortion during signal propagation from the anode to the preamplifier. The mechanical and electronic structure is described. The detector including its backside preamplifier is tested by a {sup 241}Am α-source and a rise time of ∼2 ns with an output background noise of 4 mV{sub rms} was achieved.

  20. A new neutron time-of-flight detector for fuel-areal-density measurements on OMEGA.

    PubMed

    Glebov, V Yu; Forrest, C J; Marshall, K L; Romanofsky, M; Sangster, T C; Shoup, M J; Stoeckl, C

    2014-11-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector for fuel-areal-density measurements in cryogenic DT implosions was installed on the OMEGA Laser System. The nTOF detector has a cylindrical thin-wall, stainless-steel, 8-in.-diam, 4-in.-thick cavity filled with an oxygenated liquid xylene scintillator. Four gated photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with different gains are used to measure primary DT and D2 neutrons, down-scattered neutrons in nT and nD kinematic edge regions, and to study tertiary neutrons in the same detector. The nTOF detector is located 13.4 m from target chamber center in a well-collimated line of sight. The design details of the nTOF detector, PMT optimization, and test results on OMEGA will be presented.

  1. A new neutron time-of-flight detector for fuel-areal-density measurements on OMEGA

    SciTech Connect

    Glebov, V. Yu. Forrest, C. J.; Marshall, K. L.; Romanofsky, M.; Sangster, T. C.; Shoup, M. J.; Stoeckl, C.

    2014-11-15

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector for fuel-areal-density measurements in cryogenic DT implosions was installed on the OMEGA Laser System. The nTOF detector has a cylindrical thin-wall, stainless-steel, 8-in.-diam, 4-in.-thick cavity filled with an oxygenated liquid xylene scintillator. Four gated photomultiplier tubes (PMTs) with different gains are used to measure primary DT and D{sub 2} neutrons, down-scattered neutrons in nT and nD kinematic edge regions, and to study tertiary neutrons in the same detector. The nTOF detector is located 13.4 m from target chamber center in a well-collimated line of sight. The design details of the nTOF detector, PMT optimization, and test results on OMEGA will be presented.

  2. Reaching time resolution of less than 10 ps with plastic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, J. W.; Sun, B. H.; Tanihata, I.; Terashima, S.; Zhu, L. H.; Enomoto, A.; Nagae, D.; Nishimura, T.; Omika, S.; Ozawa, A.; Takeuchi, Y.; Yamaguchi, T.

    2016-07-01

    Timing-pick up detectors with excellent timing resolutions are essential in many modern nuclear physics experiments. Aiming to develop a Time-Of-Flight system with precision down to about 10 ps, we have made a systematic study of the timing characteristic of TOF detectors, which consist of several combinations of plastic scintillators and photomultiplier tubes. With the conventional electronics, the best timing resolution of about 5.1 ps (σ) has been achieved for detectors with an area size of 3 × 1cm2 . It is found that for data digitalization a combination of TAC and ADC can achieve a better time resolution than the currently available TDC. Simultaneous measurements of both time and pulse height are very valuable for the correction of time-walk effect.

  3. SU-E-I-20: Dead Time Count Loss Compensation in SPECT/CT: Projection Versus Global Correction

    SciTech Connect

    Siman, W; Kappadath, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To compare projection-based versus global correction that compensate for deadtime count loss in SPECT/CT images. Methods: SPECT/CT images of an IEC phantom (2.3GBq 99mTc) with ∼10% deadtime loss containing the 37mm (uptake 3), 28 and 22mm (uptake 6) spheres were acquired using a 2 detector SPECT/CT system with 64 projections/detector and 15 s/projection. The deadtime, Ti and the true count rate, Ni at each projection, i was calculated using the monitor-source method. Deadtime corrected SPECT were reconstructed twice: (1) with projections that were individually-corrected for deadtime-losses; and (2) with original projections with losses and then correcting the reconstructed SPECT images using a scaling factor equal to the inverse of the average fractional loss for 5 projections/detector. For both cases, the SPECT images were reconstructed using OSEM with attenuation and scatter corrections. The two SPECT datasets were assessed by comparing line profiles in xyplane and z-axis, evaluating the count recoveries, and comparing ROI statistics. Higher deadtime losses (up to 50%) were also simulated to the individually corrected projections by multiplying each projection i by exp(-a*Ni*Ti), where a is a scalar. Additionally, deadtime corrections in phantoms with different geometries and deadtime losses were also explored. The same two correction methods were carried for all these data sets. Results: Averaging the deadtime losses in 5 projections/detector suffices to recover >99% of the loss counts in most clinical cases. The line profiles (xyplane and z-axis) and the statistics in the ROIs drawn in the SPECT images corrected using both methods showed agreement within the statistical noise. The count-loss recoveries in the two methods also agree within >99%. Conclusion: The projection-based and the global correction yield visually indistinguishable SPECT images. The global correction based on sparse sampling of projections losses allows for accurate SPECT deadtime

  4. Construction of the optical part of a time-of-flight detector prototype for the AFP detector.

    PubMed

    Nozka, L; Adamczyk, L; Avoni, G; Brandt, A; Buglewicz, P; Cavallaro, E; Chiodini, G; Chytka, L; Ciesla, K; Davis, P M; Dyndal, M; Grinstein, S; Hamal, P; Hrabovsky, M; Janas, K; Jirakova, K; Kocian, M; Komarek, T; Korcyl, K; Lange, J; Mandat, D; Michalek, V; Paz, I Lopez; Northacker, D; Rijssenbeek, M; Seabra, L; Schovanek, P; Staszewski, R; Swierska, P; Sykora, T

    2016-11-28

    We present the construction of the optical part of the ToF (time-of-flight) subdetector prototype for the AFP (ATLAS Forward Proton) detector. The ToF detector in conjunction with a 3D silicon pixel tracker will tag and measure protons originating in central exclusive interactions p + p → p + X + p, where the two outgoing protons are scattered in the very forward directions. The ToF is required to reduce so-called pileup backgrounds that arise from multiple proton interactions in the same bunch crossing at high luminosity. The background can fake the signal of interest, and the extra rejection from the ToF allows the proton tagger to operate at the high luminosity required for measurement of the processes. The prototype detector uses fused silica bars emitting Cherenkov radiation as a relativistic particle passes through it. The emitted Cherenkov photons are detected by a micro-channel plate multi-anode Photomultiplier Tube (MCP-PMT) and processed by fast electronics.

  5. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source

    SciTech Connect

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Kar, S. Ahmed, H.; Green, A.; Alejo, A.; Jung, D.; Krygier, A. G.; Freeman, R. R.; Clarke, R.; Fuchs, J.; Vassura, L.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Roth, M.; Morrison, J. T.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Oliver, M.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-07-15

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil.

  6. Calibration of time of flight detectors using laser-driven neutron source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirfayzi, S. R.; Kar, S.; Ahmed, H.; Krygier, A. G.; Green, A.; Alejo, A.; Clarke, R.; Freeman, R. R.; Fuchs, J.; Jung, D.; Kleinschmidt, A.; Morrison, J. T.; Najmudin, Z.; Nakamura, H.; Norreys, P.; Oliver, M.; Roth, M.; Vassura, L.; Zepf, M.; Borghesi, M.

    2015-07-01

    Calibration of three scintillators (EJ232Q, BC422Q, and EJ410) in a time-of-flight arrangement using a laser drive-neutron source is presented. The three plastic scintillator detectors were calibrated with gamma insensitive bubble detector spectrometers, which were absolutely calibrated over a wide range of neutron energies ranging from sub-MeV to 20 MeV. A typical set of data obtained simultaneously by the detectors is shown, measuring the neutron spectrum emitted from a petawatt laser irradiated thin foil.

  7. Precision blood-leak detector with high long-time stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgiadis, Christos; Kleuver, Wolfram

    1999-11-01

    With this publication a precision blood-leak-detector is presented. The blood-leak-detector is used for recognition of fractures in the dialyzer of a kidney-machine. It has to detect safely a blood flow of ml/min to exclude any risk for the patient. A lot of systems exist for blood-leak-detection. All of them use the same principle. They detect the light absorption in the dialyze fluid. The actual used detectors are inferior to the new developed sensor in resolution and long-time stability. Regular test of the existing systems and high failure rates are responsible for the high maintenance.

  8. Estimation of time resolution for DOI-PET detector using diameter 0.2 mm WLS fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, A.; Ito, H.; Han, S.; Kaneko, N.; Kawai, H.; Kodama, S.; Han, S.; Kamada, K.; Shoji, Y.; Yoshikawa, A.

    2015-07-01

    We are developing the whole-body PET detector with high position resolution (1 mm) and low cost (1 M dollars). Scintillator plates, Wave Length Sifting Fibers and SiPMs are used. In this work, time resolution of our PET detector is estimated. Our detector may also have good time resolution such as a few ps. (authors)

  9. TIME-TAG mode of STIS observations using the MAMA detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sahu, Kailash; Danks, Anthony; Baum, Stefi; Balzano, Vicki; Kraemer, Steve; Kutina, Ray; Sears, William

    1995-04-01

    We summarize the time-tag mode of STIS observations using the MAMA detectors, both in imaging and spectroscopic modes. After a brief outline on the MAMA detector characteristics and the astronomical applications of the time-tag mode, the general philosophy and the details of the data management strategy are described in detail. The GO specifications, and the consequent different modes of data transfer strategy are outlined. Restrictions on maximum data rates, integration times, and BUFFER-TIME requirements are explained. A few cases where the subarray option would be useful are outlined.

  10. Plasma Time in Discriminating Nuclear Recoils in Germanium Detector for Dark Matter Searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Dongming; Barker, D'ann

    2012-10-01

    In the detection of WIMP-induced nuclear recoils with high-purity germanium detectors, CDMS-type bolometers are often used in measuring the ionization yield. For this technology, the detector is operated in the milli-Kelvin temperature range, which requires high priced detectors. Alternative electron/nuclear recoil discrimination using pulse shape has been widely utilized in the energy range of MeV in neutrinoless double-beta decay experiments with germanium detectors. However, the nuclear recoils induced by WIMPs are in the energy range of keV, and their pulse shape difference with electronic recoils in the same energy range has not proven to be visible in a commercially available germanium detector. This paper presents a new idea of using plasma time difference in pulse shape to discriminate nuclear recoils from electronic recoils. We show the plasma time difference as a function of nuclear recoil energy. The technique using plasma time will be discussed with a generic germanium detector.

  11. Versatile, reprogrammable area pixel array detector for time-resolved synchrotron x-ray applications

    SciTech Connect

    Gruner, Sol

    2010-05-01

    The final technical report for DOE grant DE-SC0004079 is presented. The goal of the grant was to perform research, development and application of novel imaging x-ray detectors so as to effectively utilize the high intensity and brightness of the national synchrotron radiation facilities to enable previously unfeasible time-resolved x-ray research. The report summarizes the development of the resultant imaging x-ray detectors. Two types of detector platforms were developed: The first is a detector platform (called a Mixed-Mode Pixel Array Detector, or MM-PAD) that can image continuously at over a thousand images per second while maintaining high efficiency for wide dynamic range signals ranging from 1 to hundreds of millions of x-rays per pixel per image. Research on an even higher dynamic range variant is also described. The second detector platform (called the Keck Pixel Array Detector) is capable of acquiring a burst of x-ray images at a rate of millions of images per second.

  12. Recent detector developments at SINTEF (industrial presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundby Avset, Berit; Evensen, Lars; Uri Jensen, Geir; Mo, Sjur; Kari Schjølberg-Henriksen; Westgaard, Trond

    1998-02-01

    Results from SINTEF's research on radiation hardness of silicon detectors, thin silicon detectors, silicon drift devices, reach-through avalanche photodiodes, and detectors with thin dead layers are presented.

  13. Pulse Rise Time Characterization of a High Pressure Xenon Gamma Detector for use in Resolution Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    TROYER, G.L.

    2000-08-25

    High pressure xenon ionization chamber detectors are possible alternatives to traditional thallium doped sodium iodide (NaI(Tl)) and hyperpure germanium as gamma spectrometers in certain applications. Xenon detectors incorporating a Frisch grid exhibit energy resolutions comparable to cadmium/zinc/telluride (CZT) (e.g. 2% {at} 662keV) but with far greater sensitive volumes. The Frisch grid reduces the position dependence of the anode pulse risetimes, but it also increases the detector vibration sensitivity, anode capacitance, voltage requirements and mechanical complexity. We have been investigating the possibility of eliminating the grid electrode in high-pressure xenon detectors and preserving the high energy resolution using electronic risetime compensation methods. A two-electrode cylindrical high pressure xenon gamma detector coupled to time-to-amplitude conversion electronics was used to characterize the pulse rise time of deposited gamma photons. Time discrimination was used to characterize the pulse rise time versus photo peak position and resolution. These data were collected to investigate the effect of pulse rise time compensation on resolution and efficiency.

  14. Novel time-dependent alignment of the ATLAS Inner Detector in the LHC Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiménez Peña, J.

    2016-11-01

    ATLAS is a multipurpose experiment at the LHC proton-proton collider. Its physics goals require an unbiased and high resolution measurement of the charged particle kinematic parameters. These critically depend on the layout and performance of the tracking system and the quality of the alignment of its components. For the LHC Run 2, the system has been upgraded with the installation of a new pixel layer, the Insertable B-layer (IBL) . ATLAS Inner Detector alignment framework has been adapted and upgraded to correct very short time scale movements of the sub-detectors. In particular, a mechanical distortion of the IBL staves up to 20 μm and a vertical displacement of the Pixel detector of ~ 6 μm have been observed during data-taking. The techniques used to correct for these effects and to match the required Inner Detector performance will be presented.

  15. Parasitic antenna effect in terahertz plasmon detector array for real-time imaging system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Ryu, Min Woo; Rok Kim, Kyung; Han, Seong-Tae

    2015-10-01

    The performance uniformity of each pixel integrated with a patch antenna in a terahertz plasmon detector array is very important in building the large array necessary for a real-time imaging system. We found a parasitic antenna effect in the terahertz plasmon detector whose response is dependent on the position of the detector pixel in the illumination area of the terahertz beam. It was also demonstrated that the parasitic antenna effect is attributed to the physical structure consisting of signal pads, bonding wires, and interconnection lines on a chip and a printed circuit board. Experimental results show that the performance of the detector pixel is determined by the sum of the effects of each parasitic antenna and the on-chip integrated antenna designed to detect signals at the operating frequency. The parasitic antenna effect can be minimized by blocking the interconnections with a metallic shield.

  16. Time Dependent DD Neutrons Measurement Using a Single Crystal Chemical Vapor Deposition Diamond Detector on EAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Tengfei; Peng, Xingyu; Chen, Zhongjing; Hu, Zhimeng; Ge, Lijian; Hu, Liqun; Zhong, Guoqiang; Pu, Neng; Chen, Jinxiang; Fan, Tieshuan

    2016-09-01

    A single crystal chemical vapor deposition (scCVD) diamond detector has been successfully employed for neutron measurements in the EAST (Experimental Advanced Superconducting Tokamak) plasmas. The scCVD diamond detector coated with a 5 μm 6LiF (95% 6Li enriched) layer was placed inside a polyethylene moderator to enhance the detection efficiency. The time-dependent neutron emission from deuteron plasmas during neutral beam injection (NBI) heating was obtained. The measured results are compared with that of fission chamber detectors, which always act as standard neutron flux monitors. The scCVD diamond detector exhibits good reliability, stability and the capability to withstand harsh radiation environments despite its low detection efficiency due to the small active volume. supported by the National Magnetic Confinement Fusion Science Program of China (Nos. 2013GB106004 and 2012GB101003) and National Natural Science Foundation of China (No. 91226102)

  17. Design and robust tuning of control scheme based on the PD controller plus Disturbance Observer and low-order integrating first-order plus dead-time model.

    PubMed

    Matausek, M R; Ribić, A I

    2009-10-01

    This paper presents an effective design and robust tuning method for the control structure based on a series PD controller and a simple Disturbance Observer. All elements of the proposed controller are directly obtained from the low-order Integrating First-Order Plus Dead-Time (IFOPDT) model, used to approximate essential dynamic characteristics of lag-dominant stable, integrating and unstable plants. The structure of the proposed controller is an effective, easy to implement and tune, extension of the series PID controller. For the same robustness, a better disturbance rejection response is obtained by the proposed controller than that of the PID, by adjusting only two parameters with a clear meaning. A comparison with well-tuned PIDs, done by simulations, and the experimental results, obtained on a real thermal power plant, confirm that high performance and robustness are obtained, for dynamic characteristics common to industrial processes.

  18. Development of real time detector for fluorescent particles

    SciTech Connect

    Prevost, C.; Vendel, J.; Seigneur, A.

    1997-08-01

    Aerosols tagged by a fluorescent dye are a worthwhile tool within the framework of ventilation and filtration studies. The detection in real time of a specific particulate tracer allows characterization of ventilation behaviour such as air change rate, the determination of a good or bad mixing zone and transfer coefficient, or the determination of the decontamination factor for High Efficiency Particulate Air (HEPA) filters. Generally, these tests require specific aerosols in order to get rid of the atmospheric aerosol background. Until now the principle of fluorescent aerosol concentration measuring has only allowed an integral response with a time lag by means of sampling on filters and a fluorimetric analysis after specific conditioning of these filters. 5 refs., 13 figs.

  19. Towards a life-time-limited 8-octave-infrared photoconductive germanium detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pavlov, S. G.; Deßmann, N.; Pohl, A.; Abrosimov, N. V.; Mittendorff, M.; Winnerl, S.; Zhukavin, R. Kh; Tsyplenkov, V. V.; Shengurov, D. V.; Shastin, V. N.; Hübers, H.-W.

    2015-10-01

    Ultrafast, ultra-broad-band photoconductive detector based on heavily doped and highly compensated germanium has been demonstrated. Such a material demonstrates optical sensitivity in the more than 8 octaves, in the infrared, from about 2 mm to about 8 μm. The spectral sensitivity peaks up between 2 THz and 2.5 THz and is slowly reduced towards lower and higher frequencies. The life times of free electrons/holes measured by a pump-probe technique approach a few tenths of picoseconds and remain almost independent on the optical input intensity and on the temperature of a detector in the operation range. During operation, a detector is cooled down to liquid helium temperature but has been approved to detect, with a reduced sensitivity, up to liquid nitrogen temperature. The response time is shorter than 200 ps that is significantly faster than previously reported times.

  20. Discriminating cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time using a GEM detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Hui-Yin; Zhao, Sheng-Ying; Wang, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xian-Ming; Qi, Hui-Rong; Zhang, Wei; Wu, Ke-Yan; Hu, Bi-Tao; Zhang, Yi

    2016-08-01

    Gas electron multiplier (GEM) detectors have been used in cosmic muon scattering tomography and neutron imaging over the last decade. In this work, a triple GEM device with an effective readout area of 10 cm × 10 cm is developed, and a method of discriminating between cosmic muons and X-rays based on rise time is tested. The energy resolution of the GEM detector is tested by 55Fe ray source to prove the GEM detector has a good performance. Analysis of the complete signal-cycles allows us to get the rise time and pulse heights. The experiment result indicates that cosmic muons and X-rays can be discriminated with an appropriate rise time threshold. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China (11135002, 11275235, 11405077, 11575073)

  1. Time of flight elastic recoil detection analysis with a position sensitive detector

    SciTech Connect

    Siketic, Zdravko; Radovic, Iva Bogdanovic; Jaksic, Milko; Skukan, Natko

    2010-03-15

    A position sensitive detection system based on the microchannel plate detector has been constructed and installed at the existing time of flight (TOF) spectrometer in order to perform a kinematic correction and improve the surface time/depth resolution of elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) system. The position resolution of the detector has been tested for different types of ions and anode voltages. TOF spectra of recoiled O ions from SiO{sub 2} and F from CaF{sub 2} were collected in coincidence with position sensitive detector signal. Kinematic correction of TOF spectra improved surface time/depth resolution by {approx}20% for our system; however even higher improvements could be obtained in larger solid angle TOF-ERDA systems.

  2. Real-time alignment and cali bration of the LHCb Detector in Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dujany, Giulio; Storaci, Barbara

    2015-12-01

    Stable, precise spatial alignment and PID calibration are necessary to achieve optimal detector performance. During Run2, LHCb will have a new real-time detector alignment and calibration to allow equivalent performance in the online and offline reconstruction to be reached. This offers the opportunity to optimise the event selection by applying stronger constraints, and to use hadronic particle identification at the trigger level. The computing time constraints are met through the use of a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The motivation for a real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector is discussed from the operative and physics performance point of view. Specific challenges of this configuration are discussed, as well as the designed framework and its performance.

  3. Time delay and integration detectors using charge transfer devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCann, D. H.; White, M. H.; Turly, A. P.

    1981-07-01

    An imaging system comprises a multi-channel matrix array of CCD devices wherein a number of sensor cells (pixels) in each channel are subdivided and operated in discrete intercoupled groups of subarrays with a readout CCD shift register terminating each end of the channels. Clock voltages, applied to the subarrays, selectively cause charge signal flow in each subarray in either direction independent of the other subarrays. By selective application of four phase clock voltages, either one, two or all three of the sections subarray sections cause charge signal flow in one direction, while the remainder cause charge signal flow in the opposite direction. This creates a form of selective electronic exposure control which provides an effective variable time delay and integration of three, six or nine sensor cells or integration stages. The device is constructed on a semiconductor sustrate with a buried channel and is adapted for front surface imaging through transparent doped tin oxide gates.

  4. Discrimination of viable and dead Vibrio vulnificus after refrigerated and frozen storage using EMA, sodium deoxycholate and real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jung-Lim; Levin, Robert E

    2009-11-01

    The effect of refrigerated and frozen storage on the viability of Vibrio vulnificus was evaluated using cell suspensions (1x10(8) CFU/ml). Ethidium bromide monoazide (EMA) was utilized to selectively allow real-time (Rti) PCR amplification of target DNA from viable but not dead cells. Bacterial survivors from the EMA Rti-PCR were evaluated by comparison with the plate count assay following different temperature exposures (-20 and 4 degrees C) every 24 h for 72 h. The log CFU values from the EMA Rti-PCR assays were erroneously higher than that from plate counts. DNA amplification was not completely suppressed by EMA treatment of low temperature destroyed cells suggesting that membrane damage was not sufficient to allow effective EMA penetration into the cells. The optimal concentration of sodium deoxycholate (SD) was also determined to enhance discrimination of viable and dead cells following exposure of cells to low temperatures. The use of 0.01% or less of SD did not inhibit the Rti-PCR amplification derived from viable bacterial cells. A rapid decrease of the log CFU was observed with cell suspensions subjected to frozen storage and a slow decline in the log CFU occurred at 4 degrees C. The combination of SD and EMA treatments applied to cells of V. vulnificus held at -20 degrees C and 4 degrees C resulted in a high level of correlation between the log of CFU (plate counts) and the log of the number of viable cells determined from SD+EMA Rti-PCR.

  5. Determination of the event collision time with the ALICE detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adam, J.; Adamová, D.; Aggarwal, M. M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Agnello, M.; Agrawal, N.; Ahammed, Z.; Ahmad, S.; Ahn, S. U.; Aiola, S.; Akindinov, A.; Alam, S. N.; Albuquerque, D. S. D.; Aleksandrov, D.; Alessandro, B.; Alexandre, D.; Alfaro Molina, R.; Alici, A.; Alkin, A.; Alme, J.; Alt, T.; Altinpinar, S.; Altsybeev, I.; Alves Garcia Prado, C.; An, M.; Andrei, C.; Andrews, H. A.; Andronic, A.; Anguelov, V.; Anson, C.; Antičić, T.; Antinori, F.; Antonioli, P.; Anwar, R.; Aphecetche, L.; Appelshäuser, H.; Arcelli, S.; Arnaldi, R.; Arnold, O. W.; Arsene, I. C.; Arslandok, M.; Audurier, B.; Augustinus, A.; Averbeck, R.; Azmi, M. D.; Badalà, A.; Baek, Y. W.; Bagnasco, S.; Bailhache, R.; Bala, R.; Balasubramanian, S.; Baldisseri, A.; Baral, R. C.; Barbano, A. M.; Barbera, R.; Barile, F.; Barnaföldi, G. G.; Barnby, L. S.; Barret, V.; Bartalini, P.; Barth, K.; Bartke, J.; Bartsch, E.; Basile, M.; Bastid, N.; Basu, S.; Bathen, B.; Batigne, G.; Batista Camejo, A.; Batyunya, B.; Batzing, P. C.; Bearden, I. G.; Beck, H.; Bedda, C.; Behera, N. K.; Belikov, I.; Bellini, F.; Bello Martinez, H.; Bellwied, R.; Beltran, L. G. E.; Belyaev, V.; Bencedi, G.; Beole, S.; Bercuci, A.; Berdnikov, Y.; Berenyi, D.; Bertens, R. A.; Berzano, D.; Betev, L.; Bhasin, A.; Bhat, I. R.; Bhati, A. K.; Bhattacharjee, B.; Bhom, J.; Bianchi, L.; Bianchi, N.; Bianchin, C.; Bielčík, J.; Bielčíková, J.; Bilandzic, A.; Biro, G.; Biswas, R.; Biswas, S.; Bjelogrlic, S.; Blair, J. T.; Blau, D.; Blume, C.; Bock, F.; Bogdanov, A.; Boldizsár, L.; Bombara, M.; Bonora, M.; Book, J.; Borel, H.; Borissov, A.; Borri, M.; Botta, E.; Bourjau, C.; Braun-Munzinger, P.; Bregant, M.; Broker, T. A.; Browning, T. A.; Broz, M.; Brucken, E. J.; Bruna, E.; Bruno, G. E.; Budnikov, D.; Buesching, H.; Bufalino, S.; Buhler, P.; Buitron, S. A. I.; Buncic, P.; Busch, O.; Buthelezi, Z.; Butt, J. B.; Buxton, J. T.; Cabala, J.; Caffarri, D.; Caines, H.; Caliva, A.; Calvo Villar, E.; Camerini, P.; Carena, F.; Carena, W.; Carnesecchi, F.; Castillo Castellanos, J.; Castro, A. J.; Casula, E. A. R.; Ceballos Sanchez, C.; Cepila, J.; Cerello, P.; Cerkala, J.; Chang, B.; Chapeland, S.; Chartier, M.; Charvet, J. L.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chattopadhyay, S.; Chauvin, A.; Chelnokov, V.; Cherney, M.; Cheshkov, C.; Cheynis, B.; Chibante Barroso, V.; Chinellato, D. D.; Cho, S.; Chochula, P.; Choi, K.; Chojnacki, M.; Choudhury, S.; Christakoglou, P.; Christensen, C. H.; Christiansen, P.; Chujo, T.; Chung, S. U.; Cicalo, C.; Cifarelli, L.; Cindolo, F.; Cleymans, J.; Colamaria, F.; Colella, D.; Collu, A.; Colocci, M.; Conesa Balbastre, G.; Conesa del Valle, Z.; Connors, M. E.; Contreras, J. G.; Cormier, T. M.; Corrales Morales, Y.; Cortés Maldonado, I.; Cortese, P.; Cosentino, M. R.; Costa, F.; Crkovská, J.; Crochet, P.; Cruz Albino, R.; Cuautle, E.; Cunqueiro, L.; Dahms, T.; Dainese, A.; Danisch, M. C.; Danu, A.; Das, D.; Das, I.; Das, S.; Dash, A.; Dash, S.; De, S.; De Caro, A.; de Cataldo, G.; de Conti, C.; de Cuveland, J.; De Falco, A.; De Gruttola, D.; De Marco, N.; De Pasquale, S.; De Souza, R. D.; Deisting, A.; Deloff, A.; Deplano, C.; Dhankher, P.; Di Bari, D.; Di Mauro, A.; Di Nezza, P.; Di Ruzza, B.; Diaz Corchero, M. A.; Dietel, T.; Dillenseger, P.; Divià, R.; Djuvsland, Ø.; Dobrin, A.; Domenicis Gimenez, D.; Dönigus, B.; Dordic, O.; Drozhzhova, T.; Dubey, A. K.; Dubla, A.; Ducroux, L.; Duggal, A. K.; Dupieux, P.; Ehlers, R. J.; Elia, D.; Endress, E.; Engel, H.; Epple, E.; Erazmus, B.; Erhardt, F.; Espagnon, B.; Esumi, S.; Eulisse, G.; Eum, J.; Evans, D.; Evdokimov, S.; Eyyubova, G.; Fabbietti, L.; Fabris, D.; Faivre, J.; Fantoni, A.; Fasel, M.; Feldkamp, L.; Feliciello, A.; Feofilov, G.; Ferencei, J.; Fernández Téllez, A.; Ferreiro, E. G.; Ferretti, A.; Festanti, A.; Feuillard, V. J. G.; Figiel, J.; Figueredo, M. A. S.; Filchagin, S.; Finogeev, D.; Fionda, F. M.; Fiore, E. M.; Floris, M.; Foertsch, S.; Foka, P.; Fokin, S.; Fragiacomo, E.; Francescon, A.; Francisco, A.; Frankenfeld, U.; Fronze, G. G.; Fuchs, U.; Furget, C.; Furs, A.; Fusco Girard, M.; Gaardhøje, J. J.; Gagliardi, M.; Gago, A. M.; Gajdosova, K.; Gallio, M.; Galvan, C. D.; Gangadharan, D. R.; Ganoti, P.; Gao, C.; Garabatos, C.; Garcia-Solis, E.; Garg, K.; Garg, P.; Gargiulo, C.; Gasik, P.; Gauger, E. F.; Gay Ducati, M. B.; Germain, M.; Ghosh, P.; Ghosh, S. K.; Gianotti, P.; Giubellino, P.; Giubilato, P.; Gladysz-Dziadus, E.; Glässel, P.; Goméz Coral, D. M.; Gomez Ramirez, A.; Gonzalez, A. S.; Gonzalez, V.; González-Zamora, P.; Gorbunov, S.; Görlich, L.; Gotovac, S.; Grabski, V.; Graczykowski, L. K.; Graham, K. L.; Greiner, L.; Grelli, A.; Grigoras, C.; Grigoriev, V.; Grigoryan, A.; Grigoryan, S.; Grion, N.; Gronefeld, J. M.; Grosse-Oetringhaus, J. F.; Grosso, R.; Gruber, L.; Guber, F.; Guernane, R.; Guerzoni, B.; Gulbrandsen, K.; Gunji, T.; Gupta, A.; Gupta, R.; Guzman, I. B.; Haake, R.; Hadjidakis, C.; Hamagaki, H.; Hamar, G.; Hamon, J. C.; Harris, J. W.; Harton, A.; Hatzifotiadou, D.; Hayashi, S.; Heckel, S. T.; Hellbär, E.; Helstrup, H.; Herghelegiu, A.; Herrera Corral, G.; Herrmann, F.; Hess, B. A.; Hetland, K. F.; Hillemanns, H.; Hippolyte, B.; Hladky, J.; Horak, D.; Hosokawa, R.; Hristov, P.; Hughes, C.; Humanic, T. J.; Hussain, N.; Hussain, T.; Hutter, D.; Hwang, D. S.; Ilkaev, R.; Inaba, M.; Ippolitov, M.; Irfan, M.; Isakov, V.; Islam, M. S.; Ivanov, M.; Ivanov, V.; Izucheev, V.; Jacak, B.; Jacazio, N.; Jacobs, P. M.; Jadhav, M. B.; Jadlovska, S.; Jadlovsky, J.; Jahnke, C.; Jakubowska, M. J.; Janik, M. A.; Jayarathna, P. H. S. Y.; Jena, C.; Jena, S.; Jimenez Bustamante, R. T.; Jones, P. G.; Jusko, A.; Kalinak, P.; Kalweit, A.; Kang, J. H.; Kaplin, V.; Kar, S.; Karasu Uysal, A.; Karavichev, O.; Karavicheva, T.; Karayan, L.; Karpechev, E.; Kebschull, U.; Keidel, R.; Keijdener, D. L. D.; Keil, M.; Mohisin Khan, M.; Khan, P.; Khan, S. A.; Khanzadeev, A.; Kharlov, Y.; Khatun, A.; Khuntia, A.; Kileng, B.; Kim, D. W.; Kim, D. J.; Kim, D.; Kim, H.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J.; Kim, M.; Kim, M.; Kim, S.; Kim, T.; Kirsch, S.; Kisel, I.; Kiselev, S.; Kisiel, A.; Kiss, G.; Klay, J. L.; Klein, C.; Klein, J.; Klein-Bösing, C.; Klewin, S.; Kluge, A.; Knichel, M. L.; Knospe, A. G.; Kobdaj, C.; Kofarago, M.; Kollegger, T.; Kolojvari, A.; Kondratiev, V.; Kondratyeva, N.; Kondratyuk, E.; Konevskikh, A.; Kopcik, M.; Kour, M.; Kouzinopoulos, C.; Kovalenko, O.; Kovalenko, V.; Kowalski, M.; Koyithatta Meethaleveedu, G.; Králik, I.; Kravčáková, A.; Krivda, M.; Krizek, F.; Kryshen, E.; Krzewicki, M.; Kubera, A. M.; Kučera, V.; Kuhn, C.; Kuijer, P. G.; Kumar, A.; Kumar, J.; Kumar, L.; Kumar, S.; Kundu, S.; Kurashvili, P.; Kurepin, A.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kuryakin, A.; Kushpil, S.; Kweon, M. J.; Kwon, Y.; La Pointe, S. L.; La Rocca, P.; Lagana Fernandes, C.; Lakomov, I.; Langoy, R.; Lapidus, K.; Lara, C.; Lardeux, A.; Lattuca, A.; Laudi, E.; Lazaridis, L.; Lea, R.; Leardini, L.; Lee, S.; Lehas, F.; Lehner, S.; Lehrbach, J.; Lemmon, R. C.; Lenti, V.; Leogrande, E.; León Monzón, I.; Lévai, P.; Li, S.; Li, X.; Lien, J.; Lietava, R.; Lindal, S.; Lindenstruth, V.; Lippmann, C.; Lisa, M. A.; Ljunggren, H. M.; Llope, W.; Lodato, D. F.; Loenne, P. I.; Loginov, V.; Loizides, C.; Lopez, X.; López Torres, E.; Lowe, A.; Luettig, P.; Lunardon, M.; Luparello, G.; Lupi, M.; Lutz, T. H.; Maevskaya, A.; Mager, M.; Mahajan, S.; Mahmood, S. M.; Maire, A.; Majka, R. D.; Malaev, M.; Maldonado Cervantes, I.; Malinina, L.; Mal'Kevich, D.; Malzacher, P.; Mamonov, A.; Manko, V.; Manso, F.; Manzari, V.; Mao, Y.; Marchisone, M.; Mareš, J.; Margagliotti, G. V.; Margotti, A.; Margutti, J.; Marín, A.; Markert, C.; Marquard, M.; Martin, N. A.; Martinengo, P.; Martínez, M. I.; Martínez García, G.; Martinez Pedreira, M.; Mas, A.; Masciocchi, S.; Masera, M.; Masoni, A.; Mastroserio, A.; Matyja, A.; Mayer, C.; Mazer, J.; Mazzilli, M.; Mazzoni, M. A.; Meddi, F.; Melikyan, Y.; Menchaca-Rocha, A.; Meninno, E.; Mercado Pérez, J.; Meres, M.; Mhlanga, S.; Miake, Y.; Mieskolainen, M. M.; Mikhaylov, K.; Milano, L.; Milosevic, J.; Mischke, A.; Mishra, A. N.; Mishra, T.; Miśkowiec, D.; Mitra, J.; Mitu, C. M.; Mohammadi, N.; Mohanty, B.; Molnar, L.; Montes, E.; Moreira De Godoy, D. A.; Moreno, L. A. P.; Moretto, S.; Morreale, A.; Morsch, A.; Muccifora, V.; Mudnic, E.; Mühlheim, D.; Muhuri, S.; Mukherjee, M.; Mulligan, J. D.; Munhoz, M. G.; Münning, K.; Munzer, R. H.; Murakami, H.; Murray, S.; Musa, L.; Musinsky, J.; Myers, C. J.; Naik, B.; Nair, R.; Nandi, B. K.; Nania, R.; Nappi, E.; Naru, M. U.; Natal da Luz, H.; Nattrass, C.; Navarro, S. R.; Nayak, K.; Nayak, R.; Nayak, T. K.; Nazarenko, S.; Nedosekin, A.; Negrao De Oliveira, R. A.; Nellen, L.; Ng, F.; Nicassio, M.; Niculescu, M.; Niedziela, J.; Nielsen, B. S.; Nikolaev, S.; Nikulin, S.; Nikulin, V.; Noferini, F.; Nomokonov, P.; Nooren, G.; Noris, J. C. C.; Norman, J.; Nyanin, A.; Nystrand, J.; Oeschler, H.; Oh, S.; Ohlson, A.; Okubo, T.; Olah, L.; Oleniacz, J.; Oliveira Da Silva, A. C.; Oliver, M. H.; Onderwaater, J.; Oppedisano, C.; Orava, R.; Oravec, M.; Ortiz Velasquez, A.; Oskarsson, A.; Otwinowski, J.; Oyama, K.; Ozdemir, M.; Pachmayer, Y.; Pacik, V.; Pagano, D.; Pagano, P.; Paić, G.; Pal, S. K.; Palni, P.; Pan, J.; Pandey, A. K.; Papikyan, V.; Pappalardo, G. S.; Pareek, P.; Park, J.; Park, W. J.; Parmar, S.; Passfeld, A.; Paticchio, V.; Patra, R. N.; Paul, B.; Pei, H.; Peitzmann, T.; Peng, X.; Pereira Da Costa, H.; Peresunko, D.; Perez Lezama, E.; Peskov, V.; Pestov, Y.; Petráček, V.; Petrov, V.; Petrovici, M.; Petta, C.; Piano, S.; Pikna, M.; Pillot, P.; Pimentel, L. O. D. L.; Pinazza, O.; Pinsky, L.; Piyarathna, D. B.; Płoskoń, M.; Planinic, M.; Pluta, J.; Pochybova, S.; Podesta-Lerma, P. L. M.; Poghosyan, M. G.; Polichtchouk, B.; Poljak, N.; Poonsawat, W.; Pop, A.; Poppenborg, H.; Porteboeuf-Houssais, S.; Porter, J.; Pospisil, J.; Pozdniakov, V.; Prasad, S. K.; Preghenella, R.; Prino, F.; Pruneau, C. A.; Pshenichnov, I.; Puccio, M.; Puddu, G.; Pujahari, P.; Punin, V.; Putschke, J.; Qvigstad, H.; Rachevski, A.; Raha, S.; Rajput, S.; Rak, J.; Rakotozafindrabe, A.; Ramello, L.; Rami, F.; Rana, D. B.; Raniwala, R.; Raniwala, S.; Räsänen, S. S.; Rascanu, B. T.; Rathee, D.; Ratza, V.; Ravasenga, I.; Read, K. F.; Redlich, K.; Rehman, A.; Reichelt, P.; Reidt, F.; Ren, X.; Renfordt, R.; Reolon, A. R.; Reshetin, A.; Reygers, K.; Riabov, V.; Ricci, R. A.; Richert, T.; Richter, M.; Riedler, P.; Riegler, W.; Riggi, F.; Ristea, C.; Rodríguez Cahuantzi, M.; Røed, K.; Rogochaya, E.; Rohr, D.; Röhrich, D.; Ronchetti, F.; Ronflette, L.; Rosnet, P.; Rossi, A.; Roukoutakis, F.; Roy, A.; Roy, C.; Roy, P.; Rubio Montero, A. J.; Rui, R.; Russo, R.; Ryabinkin, E.; Ryabov, Y.; Rybicki, A.; Saarinen, S.; Sadhu, S.; Sadovsky, S.; Šafařík, K.; Sahlmuller, B.; Sahoo, B.; Sahoo, P.; Sahoo, R.; Sahoo, S.; Sahu, P. K.; Saini, J.; Sakai, S.; Saleh, M. A.; Salzwedel, J.; Sambyal, S.; Samsonov, V.; Sandoval, A.; Sano, M.; Sarkar, D.; Sarkar, N.; Sarma, P.; Sas, M. H. P.; Scapparone, E.; Scarlassara, F.; Scharenberg, R. P.; Schiaua, C.; Schicker, R.; Schmidt, C.; Schmidt, H. R.; Schmidt, M.; Schukraft, J.; Schutz, Y.; Schwarz, K.; Schweda, K.; Scioli, G.; Scomparin, E.; Scott, R.; Šefčík, M.; Seger, J. E.; Sekiguchi, Y.; Sekihata, D.; Selyuzhenkov, I.; Senosi, K.; Senyukov, S.; Serradilla, E.; Sett, P.; Sevcenco, A.; Shabanov, A.; Shabetai, A.; Shadura, O.; Shahoyan, R.; Shangaraev, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, A.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, M.; Sharma, N.; Sheikh, A. I.; Shigaki, K.; Shou, Q.; Shtejer, K.; Sibiriak, Y.; Siddhanta, S.; Sielewicz, K. M.; Siemiarczuk, T.; Silvermyr, D.; Silvestre, C.; Simatovic, G.; Simonetti, G.; Singaraju, R.; Singh, R.; Singhal, V.; Sinha, T.; Sitar, B.; Sitta, M.; Skaali, T. B.; Slupecki, M.; Smirnov, N.; Snellings, R. J. M.; Snellman, T. W.; Song, J.; Song, M.; Song, Z.; Soramel, F.; Sorensen, S.; Sozzi, F.; Spiriti, E.; Sputowska, I.; Srivastava, B. K.; Stachel, J.; Stan, I.; Stankus, P.; Stenlund, E.; Steyn, G.; Stiller, J. H.; Stocco, D.; Strmen, P.; Suaide, A. A. P.; Sugitate, T.; Suire, C.; Suleymanov, M.; Suljic, M.; Sultanov, R.; Šumbera, M.; Sumowidagdo, S.; Suzuki, K.; Swain, S.; Szabo, A.; Szarka, I.; Szczepankiewicz, A.; Szymanski, M.; Tabassam, U.; Takahashi, J.; Tambave, G. J.; Tanaka, N.; Tarhini, M.; Tariq, M.; Tarzila, M. G.; Tauro, A.; Tejeda Muñoz, G.; Telesca, A.; Terasaki, K.; Terrevoli, C.; Teyssier, B.; Thakur, D.; Thomas, D.; Tieulent, R.; Tikhonov, A.; Timmins, A. R.; Toia, A.; Tripathy, S.; Trogolo, S.; Trombetta, G.; Trubnikov, V.; Trzaska, W. H.; Tsuji, T.; Tumkin, A.; Turrisi, R.; Tveter, T. S.; Ullaland, K.; Umaka, E. N.; Uras, A.; Usai, G. L.; Utrobicic, A.; Vala, M.; Van Der Maarel, J.; Van Hoorne, J. W.; van Leeuwen, M.; Vanat, T.; Vande Vyvre, P.; Varga, D.; Vargas, A.; Vargyas, M.; Varma, R.; Vasileiou, M.; Vasiliev, A.; Vauthier, A.; Vázquez Doce, O.; Vechernin, V.; Veen, A. M.; Velure, A.; Vercellin, E.; Vergara Limón, S.; Vernet, R.; Vértesi, R.; Vickovic, L.; Vigolo, S.; Viinikainen, J.; Vilakazi, Z.; Villalobos Baillie, O.; Villatoro Tello, A.; Vinogradov, A.; Vinogradov, L.; Virgili, T.; Vislavicius, V.; Vodopyanov, A.; Völkl, M. A.; Voloshin, K.; Voloshin, S. A.; Volpe, G.; von Haller, B.; Vorobyev, I.; Voscek, D.; Vranic, D.; Vrláková, J.; Wagner, B.; Wagner, J.; Wang, H.; Wang, M.; Watanabe, D.; Watanabe, Y.; Weber, M.; Weber, S. G.; Weiser, D. F.; Wessels, J. P.; Westerhoff, U.; Whitehead, A. M.; Wiechula, J.; Wikne, J.; Wilk, G.; Wilkinson, J.; Willems, G. A.; Williams, M. C. S.; Windelband, B.; Winn, M.; Witt, W. E.; Yalcin, S.; Yang, P.; Yano, S.; Yin, Z.; Yokoyama, H.; Yoo, I.-K.; Yoon, J. H.; Yurchenko, V.; Zaccolo, V.; Zaman, A.; Zampolli, C.; Zanoli, H. J. C.; Zaporozhets, S.; Zardoshti, N.; Zarochentsev, A.; Závada, P.; Zaviyalov, N.; Zbroszczyk, H.; Zhalov, M.; Zhang, H.; Zhang, X.; Zhang, Y.; Zhang, C.; Zhang, Z.; Zhao, C.; Zhigareva, N.; Zhou, D.; Zhou, Y.; Zhou, Z.; Zhu, H.; Zhu, J.; Zichichi, A.; Zimmermann, A.; Zimmermann, M. B.; Zinovjev, G.; Zmeskal, J.

    2017-02-01

    Particle identification is an important feature of the ALICE detector at the LHC. In particular, for particle identification via the time-of-flight technique, the precise determination of the event collision time represents an important ingredient of the quality of the measurement. In this paper, the different methods used for such a measurement in ALICE by means of the T0 and the TOF detectors are reviewed. Efficiencies, resolution and the improvement of the particle identification separation power of the methods used are presented for the different LHC colliding systems (pp, p-Pb and Pb-Pb) during the first period of data taking of LHC (RUN 1).

  6. TOFFEE: a full custom amplifier-comparator chip for timing applications with silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cenna, F.; Cartiglia, N.; Di Francesco, A.; Olave, J.; Da Rocha Rolo, M.; Rivetti, A.; Silva, J. C.; Silva, R.; Varela, J.

    2017-03-01

    We report on the design of a full custom amplifier-comparator readout chip for silicon detectors with internal gain designed for precise timing applications. The ASIC has been developed in UMC 110 nm CMOS technology and is aimed to fulfill the CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) time resolution requirements (~ 30 ps per detector plane). It features LVDS outputs and the signal dynamic range matches the requirements of the High Precision TDC (HPTDC) system. The preliminary measurements results with a test board are included.

  7. A high performance Time-of-Flight detector applied to isochronous mass measurement at CSRe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mei, Bo; Tu, Xiaolin; Wang, Meng; Xu, Hushan; Mao, Ruishi; Hu, Zhengguo; Ma, Xinwen; Yuan, Youjin; Zhang, Xueying; Geng, Peng; Shuai, Peng; Zang, Yongdong; Tang, Shuwen; Ma, Peng; Lu, Wan; Yan, Xinshuai; Xia, Jiawen; Xiao, Guoqing; Guo, Zhongyan; Zhang, Hongbin; Yue, Ke

    2010-12-01

    A high performance Time-of-Flight detector has been designed and constructed for isochronous mass spectrometry at the experimental Cooler Storage Ring (CSRe). The detector has been successfully used in an experiment to measure the masses of the N≈ Z≈33 nuclides near the proton drip-line. Of particular interest is the mass of 65As. A maximum detection efficiency of 70% and a time resolution of 118±8 ps (FWHM) have been achieved in the experiment. The dependence of detection efficiency and signal average pulse height (APH) on atomic number Z has been studied. The potential of APH for Z identification has been discussed.

  8. Real-time violent action detector for elevator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Kentaro; Seki, Makito; Hirai, Takahide; Koichi, Takeuchi; Koichi, Sasakawa

    2005-12-01

    This paper presents a new critical event detection method simplified for an embedded appliance mounted on an elevator car. We first define that the critical event is unusual action such as violent action, counteraction, etc, and introduce the violent action degree(VAD). We use an optical flow based method to analyze the current state of the motion through an ITV(Industrial TeleVision) camera. After motion analysis, we calculate a normalized statistical value, which is the VAD. The statistical value is the multiple of the optical flow direction variance, the optical flow magnitude variance, and optical flow area. Our method calculates the statistical value variance and normalize it by the variance. At last we can detect critical event by thresholding the VAD. Then we implement this method on an embedded appliance. The appliance has an A/D converter with special designed frame buffer, a 400MIPS high performance micro processor, dynamic memory, and some flash ROM. Since we need to process the method 4Hz or faster to keep the detection performance, we shrink the images into 80 by 60 size, adopt the recursive correlation method, and analyze optical flows. The special designed frame buffer enables us for capturing sequencial two images at any time. After that we achieve about 8Hz processing performance on it. Our method detects 80% of critical events where at most 6% of false acception.

  9. Timing performance measurements of Si-PM-based LGSO phoswich detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamamoto, Seiichi; Kobayashi, Takahiro; Okumura, Satoshi; Yeom, Jung Yeol

    2016-06-01

    Since the timing resolution was significantly improved using silicon photomultipliers (Si-PMs) combined with fast scintillators, we expect that phoswich detectors will be used in future TOF-PET systems. However, no practical phoswich detector has been proposed for TOF-PET detectors. We conducted timing performance measurements of phoswich detectors comprised of two types of Ce-doped LGSO scintillators with different decay times coupled to Si-PMs and digitized the output signals using a high bandwidth digital oscilloscope. We prepared three types of LGSOs (LGSO-fast, LGSO-standard, and LGSO-slow) with different Ce concentrations. After measuring the decay time, the energy performance, and the timing performance of each LGSO, we conducted pulse shape analysis and timing resolution measurements for two versions of phoswich LGSOs: LGSO-standard/LGSO-fast and LGSO-slow/LGSO-fast combinations. The pulse shape spectra for a 10-mm-long crystal LGSO-slow/LGSO-fast combination showed good separation of the front and back crystals with a peak-to-valley ratio of 2.0. The timing resolutions for the 20-mm-long crystal LGSO-slow/LGSO-fast combination were ~300 ps FWHM. The timing resolutions for the phoswich LGSOs were slightly inferior than that measured with the individual LGSO fast, but the acquired timing resolution for the phoswich configuration, ~300 ps with a LGSO-slow/LGSO-fast combination, is adequate for TOF-PET systems. We conclude that LGSO phoswich detectors are promising for TOF-DOI-PET systems.

  10. MCP PMT with high time response and linear output current for neutron time-of-flight detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dolotov, A. S.; Konovalov, P. I.; Nurtdinov, R. I.

    2016-09-01

    A microchannel plate (MCP) photomultiplier tube (PMT) with a subnanosecond time response and a high linear output current has been developed. PMT is designed for detection of weak pulses of radiation in UV-, visible and nearer-IR ranges and can be used in neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors in experiments on laser compression of thermonuclear fuel. The results of measurements of MCP PMT main parameters are presented: photocathode spectral sensitivity, gain, maximum linear output current, and time response.

  11. Optical delay encoding for fast timing and detector signal multiplexing in PET

    PubMed Central

    Grant, Alexander M.; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: The large number of detector channels in modern positron emission tomography (PET) scanners poses a challenge in terms of readout electronics complexity. Multiplexing schemes are typically implemented to reduce the number of physical readout channels, but often result in performance degradation. Novel methods of multiplexing in PET must be developed to avoid this data degradation. The preservation of fast timing information is especially important for time-of-flight PET. Methods: A new multiplexing scheme based on encoding detector interaction events with a series of extremely fast overlapping optical pulses with precise delays is demonstrated in this work. Encoding events in this way potentially allows many detector channels to be simultaneously encoded onto a single optical fiber that is then read out by a single digitizer. A two channel silicon photomultiplier-based prototype utilizing this optical delay encoding technique along with dual threshold time-over-threshold is demonstrated. Results: The optical encoding and multiplexing prototype achieves a coincidence time resolution of 160 ps full width at half maximum (FWHM) and an energy resolution of 13.1% FWHM at 511 keV with 3 × 3 × 5 mm3 LYSO crystals. All interaction information for both detectors, including timing, energy, and channel identification, is encoded onto a single optical fiber with little degradation. Conclusions: Optical delay encoding and multiplexing technology could lead to time-of-flight PET scanners with fewer readout channels and simplified data acquisition systems. PMID:26233181

  12. Measurements of timing resolution of ultra-fast silicon detectors with the SAMPIC waveform digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breton, D.; De Cacqueray, V.; Delagnes, E.; Grabas, H.; Maalmi, J.; Minafra, N.; Royon, C.; Saimpert, M.

    2016-11-01

    The SAMpler for PICosecond time (SAMPIC) chip has been designed by a collaboration including CEA/IRFU/SEDI, Saclay and CNRS/LAL/SERDI, Orsay. It benefits from both the quick response of a time to digital converter and the versatility of a waveform digitizer to perform accurate timing measurements. Thanks to the sampled signals, smart algorithms making best use of the pulse shape can be used to improve time resolution. A software framework has been developed to analyse the SAMPIC output data and extract timing information by using either a constant fraction discriminator or a fast cross-correlation algorithm. SAMPIC timing capabilities together with the software framework have been tested using pulses generated by a signal generator or by a silicon detector illuminated by a pulsed infrared laser. Under these ideal experimental conditions, the SAMPIC chip has proven to be capable of timing resolutions down to 4 ps with synthesized signals and 40 ps with silicon detector signals.

  13. Upgrades for the Precision Proton Spectrometer at the LHC: Precision timing and tracking detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gallinaro, Michele

    2017-03-01

    The CMS-TOTEM Precision Proton Spectrometer (CT-PPS) is an approved project to add tracking and timing information at approximately ±210 m from the interaction point around the CMS detector. It is designed to operate at high luminosity with up to 50 interactions per 25 ns bunch crossing to perform measurements of e.g. the quartic gauge couplings and search for rare exclusive processes. During 2016, CT-PPS took data in normal high-luminosity proton-proton LHC collisions. In the coming years, high radiation doses and large multiple-vertex interactions will represent difficult challenges that resemble those of the high-luminosity LHC program. A coordinated effort of detector upgrades with the goal of reaching the physics goals while mitigating the degradation effects is under way. Upgrades to the tracking and timing detectors are discussed.

  14. The MRPC-based ALICE time-of-flight detector: Status andperformance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.; ALICE Collaboration

    2013-04-01

    The large time-of-flight (TOF) array is one of the main detectors devoted to charged hadron identification in the mid-rapidity region of the ALICE experiment at the LHC. It allows separation among pions, kaons and protons up to a few GeV/c, covering the full azimuthal angle and -0.9<η<0.9. The TOF exploits the innovative MRPC technology capable of an intrinsic time resolution better than 50 ps with an efficiency close to 100% and a large operational plateau; the full array consists of 1593 MRPCs covering a cylindrical surface of 141 m2. The TOF detector has been efficiently taking data since the first pp collisions recorded in ALICE in December 2009. In this report, the status of the TOF detector and the performance achieved for both pp and Pb-Pb collisions aredescribed.

  15. Recent technological developments on LGAD and iLGAD detectors for tracking and timing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pellegrini, G.; Baselga, M.; Carulla, M.; Fadeyev, V.; Fernández-Martínez, P.; García, M. Fernández; Flores, D.; Galloway, Z.; Gallrapp, C.; Hidalgo, S.; Liang, Z.; Merlos, A.; Moll, M.; Quirion, D.; Sadrozinski, H.; Stricker, M.; Vila, I.

    2016-09-01

    This paper reports the latest technological development on the Low Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) and introduces a new architecture of these detectors called inverse-LGAD (iLGAD). Both approaches are based on the standard Avalanche Photo Diodes (APD) concept, commonly used in optical and X-ray detection applications, including an internal multiplication of the charge generated by radiation. The multiplication is inherent to the basic n++-p+-p structure, where the doping profile of the p+ layer is optimized to achieve high field and high impact ionization at the junction. The LGAD structures are optimized for applications such as tracking or timing detectors for high energy physics experiments or medical applications where time resolution lower than 30 ps is required. Detailed TCAD device simulations together with the electrical and charge collection measurements are presented through this work.

  16. Time-over-threshold for pulse shape discrimination in a time-of-flight phoswich PET detector.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chen-Ming; Cates, Joshua W; Levin, Craig S

    2017-01-07

    It is well known that a PET detector capable of measuring both photon time-of-flight (TOF) and depth-of-interaction (DOI) improves the image quality and accuracy. Phoswich designs have been realized in PET detectors to measure DOI for more than a decade. However, PET detectors based on phoswich designs put great demand on the readout circuits, which have to differentiate the pulse shape produced by different crystal layers. A simple pulse shape discrimination approach is required to realize the phoswich designs in a clinical PET scanner, which consists of thousands of scintillation crystal elements. In this work, we studied time-over-threshold (ToT) as a pulse shape parameter for DOI. The energy, timing and DOI performance were evaluated for a phoswich detector design comprising [Formula: see text] mm LYSO:Ce crystal optically coupled to [Formula: see text] mm calcium co-doped LSO:Ce,Ca(0.4%) crystal read out by a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). A DOI accuracy of 97.2% has been achieved for photopeak events using the proposed time-over-threshold (ToT) processing. The energy resolution without correction for SiPM non-linearity was [Formula: see text]% and [Formula: see text]% FWHM at 511 keV for LYSO and LSO crystal layers, respectively. The coincidence time resolution for photopeak events ranges from 164.6 ps to 183.1 ps FWHM, depending on the layer combinations. The coincidence time resolution for inter-crystal scatter events ranges from 214.6 ps to 418.3 ps FWHM, depending on the energy windows applied. These results show great promises of using ToT for pulse shape discrimination in a TOF phoswich detector since a ToT measurement can be easily implemented in readout electronics.

  17. Enhanced ν-optical time domain reflectometry using gigahertz sinusoidally gated InGaAs/InP single-photon avalanche detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xuping; Shi, Yuanlei; Shan, Yuanyuan; Sun, Zhenhong; Qiao, Weiyan; Zhang, Yixin

    2016-09-01

    Optical time domain reflectometry (OTDR) is one of the most successful diagnostic tools for nondestructive attenuation measurement of a fiber link. To achieve better sensitivity, spatial resolution, and avoid dead-zone in conversional OTDR, a single-photon detector has been introduced to form the photon-counting OTDR (ν-OTDR). We have proposed a ν-OTDR system using a gigahertz sinusoidally gated InGaAs/InP single-photon avalanche detector (SPAD). Benefiting from the superior performance of a sinusoidal gated SPAD on dark count probability, gating frequency, and gate duration, our ν-OTDR system has achieved a dynamic range (DR) of 33.4 dB with 1 μs probe pulse width after an equivalent measurement time of 51 s. This obtainable DR corresponds to a sensing length over 150 km. Our system has also obtained a spatial resolution of 5 cm at the end of a 5-km standard single-mode fiber. By employing a sinusoidal gating technique, we have improved the ν-OTDR spatial resolution and significantly reduced the measurement time.

  18. Scintillating fiber detectors for precise time and position measurements read out with Si-PMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damyanova, A.; Bravar, A.

    2017-02-01

    We present the development and performance of compact scintillating fiber detectors read out with silicon photo-multipliers (Si-PMs). The compact size, fast response, and insensitivity to magnetic fields make these detectors suitable for a variety of applications where precise tracking and timing information is required. These detectors will be used with different particle beams (electrons, protons, heavy ions) at very high rates. In particular, we present the SciFi tracker/time of flight detector that is being developed for the Mu3e experiment at PSI (search for the lepton flavor violating decay μ → eee at very high rates). We also present the SciFi beam position detectors that will be employed in NA61 at CERN to track the incoming proton and heavy ion beam particles. We are considering different readout scenarios in which (a) each fiber is individually coupled to a single Si-PM photo-sensor and (b) fibers are arranged in columns and coupled to a Si-PM arrays.

  19. Energy and Timing Measurement with Time-Based Detector Readout for PET Applications: Principle and Validation with Discrete Circuit Components.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xishan; Lan, Allan K; Bircher, Chad; Deng, Zhi; Liu, Yinong; Shao, Yiping

    2011-06-11

    A new signal processing method for PET application has been developed, with discrete circuit components to measure energy and timing of a gamma interaction based solely on digital timing processing without using an amplitude-to-digital convertor (ADC) or a constant fraction discriminator (CFD). A single channel discrete component time-based readout (TBR) circuit was implemented in a PC board. Initial circuit functionality and performance evaluations have been conducted. Accuracy and linearity of signal amplitude measurement were excellent, as measured with test pulses. The measured timing accuracy from test pulses reached to less than 300 ps, a value limited mainly by the timing jitter of the prototype electronics circuit. Both suitable energy and coincidence timing resolutions (~18% and ~1.0 ns) have been achieved with 3 × 3 × 20 mm(3) LYSO scintillator and photomultiplier tube-based detectors. With its relatively simple circuit and low cost, TBR is expected to be a suitable front-end signal readout electronics for compact PET or other radiation detectors requiring the reading of a large number of detector channels and demanding high performance for energy and timing measurement.

  20. Energy and Timing Measurement with Time-Based Detector Readout for PET Applications: Principle and Validation with Discrete Circuit Components

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xishan; Lan, Allan K.; Bircher, Chad; Deng, Zhi; Liu, Yinong; Shao, Yiping

    2011-01-01

    A new signal processing method for PET application has been developed, with discrete circuit components to measure energy and timing of a gamma interaction based solely on digital timing processing without using an amplitude-to-digital convertor (ADC) or a constant fraction discriminator (CFD). A single channel discrete component time-based readout (TBR) circuit was implemented in a PC board. Initial circuit functionality and performance evaluations have been conducted. Accuracy and linearity of signal amplitude measurement were excellent, as measured with test pulses. The measured timing accuracy from test pulses reached to less than 300 ps, a value limited mainly by the timing jitter of the prototype electronics circuit. Both suitable energy and coincidence timing resolutions (~18% and ~1.0 ns) have been achieved with 3 × 3 × 20 mm3 LYSO scintillator and photomultiplier tube-based detectors. With its relatively simple circuit and low cost, TBR is expected to be a suitable front-end signal readout electronics for compact PET or other radiation detectors requiring the reading of a large number of detector channels and demanding high performance for energy and timing measurement. PMID:21743761

  1. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of the LHCb detector and its performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borghi, S.

    2017-02-01

    The LHCb detector is a forward spectrometer at the LHC, designed to perform high precision studies of B and D hadrons. In Run II of the LHC, a new scheme for the software trigger at LHCb allows splitting the triggering of events in two stages, giving room to perform the detector alignment and calibration in real time. In the novel detector alignment and calibration strategy for Run II, data collected at the start of the fill are processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment constants, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. This allows identical constants to be used in the online and offline reconstruction, thus improving the correlation between triggered and offline selected events. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. The larger timing budget, available in the trigger, allows us to perform the same track reconstruction online and offline. This enables LHCb to achieve the best reconstruction performance already in the trigger, and allows physics analyses to be performed directly on the data produced by the trigger reconstruction. The novel real-time processing strategy at LHCb is discussed from both the technical and operational point of view. The overall performance of the LHCb detector on the data of Run II is presented as well.

  2. Investigating Aquatic Dead Zones

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Testa, Jeremy; Gurbisz, Cassie; Murray, Laura; Gray, William; Bosch, Jennifer; Burrell, Chris; Kemp, Michael

    2010-01-01

    This article features two engaging high school activities that include current scientific information, data, and authentic case studies. The activities address the physical, biological, and chemical processes that are associated with oxygen-depleted areas, or "dead zones," in aquatic systems. Students can explore these dead zones through both…

  3. Day of the Dead

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dann, Tammy; Murphy, Amy

    2012-01-01

    Foreign Language in Elementary School (FLES) teachers in the West Des Moines schools incorporate the Day of the Dead into the fourth grade curriculum each year. The teachers discuss the Day of the Dead celebration at the Art Center, and many ask for volunteers from fourth grade to participate in the event. Student presentations include a wide…

  4. WE-AB-BRB-09: Real Time In Vivo Scintillating Fiber Array Detector for Medical LINACS

    SciTech Connect

    Knewtson, T; Pokhrel, S; Hernandez-Morales, D; Loyalka, S; Rangaraj, D; Izaguirre, E; Price, S

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: An in vivo transmission scintillation fiber detector was developed to monitor patient treatment in real time for the enhancement of patient safety and treatment accuracy. The detector system is capable of monitoring each pulse from a medical LINAC during treatment to determine the dose delivered as treatment progresses. Methods: The detector system consists of 60 parallel scintillating fibers coupled to fast data processing optoelectronics that can monitor the beam fluence in real time. Each 2.5mm{sup 2} square fiber is aligned with an MLC leaf pair and is long enough to capture a 40cm field. The fibers are embedded within a water equivalent polymer substrate that is secured in the LINAC accessory tray. The fibers are coupled to high speed photosensors and front end amplifiers that filter noise and pass each pulse to a high speed analog-to-digital converter. The system components are capable of detecting pulse repetition times shorter than what is delivered by a medical LINAC to ensure true real time data acquisition. Results: The system was able to capture and record the signal from each linac pulse and display the information in real time with no pulse pile up. It was found that the fiber array attenuates 2.65% of the beam which can easily be compensated for in treatment planning. The fibers responded linearly with dose, are independent of clinical beam energies, and are independent of dose rate. Calibration of the system was performed as a function of beam energy, beam size, dose rate, and monitor units to optimize beam fluence error detection. Conclusion: The detector system presented provides true real time in vivo beam monitoring to enhance patient safety and treatment delivery accuracy. Furthermore, the detector can be used for current patient specific QA.

  5. Calibration of a time-resolved hard-x-ray detector using radioactive sources

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoeckl, C.; Theobald, W.; Regan, S. P.; Romanofsky, M. H.

    2016-11-01

    A four-channel, time-resolved, hard x-ray detector (HXRD) has been operating at the Laboratory for Laser Energetics for more than a decade. The slope temperature of the hot-electron population in direct-drive inertial confinement fusion experiments is inferred by recording the hard x-ray radiation generated in the interaction of the electrons with the target. Measuring the energy deposited by hot electrons requires an absolute calibration of the hard x-ray detector. A novel method to obtain an absolute calibration of the HXRD using single photons from radioactive sources was developed, which uses a thermoelectrically cooled, low-noise, charge-sensitive amplifier.

  6. Optimizing the timing resolution of SiPM sensors for use in TOF-PET detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinke, R.; Löhner, H.; Schaart, D. R.; van Dam, H. T.; Seifert, S.; Beekman, F. J.; Dendooven, P.

    2009-10-01

    We have investigated the timing performance of Hamamatsu Multi-Pixel Photon Counter (MPPC) photosensors in light of their use in time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography detectors. Measurements using picosecond laser pulses show a single photo-electron root-mean-square (RMS) timing resolution down to about 100 ps. In coincidences of 511 keV photons detected with an LYSO crystal coupled to a MPPC and a BaF 2 detector, an optimum FWHM timing resolution of 600 ps was obtained with leading edge time pickoff at the 1-1.5 photo-electron level. By optimizing the LYSO/MPPC coupling, this can be improved by a factor of 2. We further conclude that the use of stored digitized pulses allows great flexibility and efficiency in developing data analysis algorithms.

  7. Real-time control of the beam attenuation with XPAD hybrid pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawiec, A.; Garreau, Y.; Bisou, J.; Hustache, S.; Kanoute, B.; Picca, F.; Renaud, G.; Coati, A.

    2016-12-01

    In order to fully benefit from a beam produced by modern synchrotron light sources, characterised by a wide and continuous energy spectrum, high brightness and a very high intensity, advancement in detector technology has been made over the last decades. However, one of the main limitations of the state-of-the-art counting hybrid pixel detectors is the maximum count-rate that is very often few orders of magnitudes lower than of the incident, reflected or diffracted beam flux. Therefore, direct beam attenuation is mandatory in order to perform the measurements according to the detector's characteristics. In this work we present a major upgrade of a fast attenuation system developed at Synchrotron SOLEIL, which allows for a dynamical change of the beam attenuation as a function of the photon flux received by XPAD S140 photon counting detector. The system performs a cyclic real-time estimation of the flux received by every pixel during acquisition of an image and searches for clusters of at least two pixels that exceed user defined levels of counts/s. The beam attenuation is immediately and automatically changed in order to guarantee that the detector will always operate in its linear range even during a long continuous scan, by acting on the direct attenuators.

  8. Performance comparison of optimal fractional order hybrid fuzzy PID controllers for handling oscillatory fractional order processes with dead time.

    PubMed

    Das, Saptarshi; Pan, Indranil; Das, Shantanu

    2013-07-01

    Fuzzy logic based PID controllers have been studied in this paper, considering several combinations of hybrid controllers by grouping the proportional, integral and derivative actions with fuzzy inferencing in different forms. Fractional order (FO) rate of error signal and FO integral of control signal have been used in the design of a family of decomposed hybrid FO fuzzy PID controllers. The input and output scaling factors (SF) along with the integro-differential operators are tuned with real coded genetic algorithm (GA) to produce optimum closed loop performance by simultaneous consideration of the control loop error index and the control signal. Three different classes of fractional order oscillatory processes with various levels of relative dominance between time constant and time delay have been used to test the comparative merits of the proposed family of hybrid fractional order fuzzy PID controllers. Performance comparison of the different FO fuzzy PID controller structures has been done in terms of optimal set-point tracking, load disturbance rejection and minimal variation of manipulated variable or smaller actuator requirement etc. In addition, multi-objective Non-dominated Sorting Genetic Algorithm (NSGA-II) has been used to study the Pareto optimal trade-offs between the set point tracking and control signal, and the set point tracking and load disturbance performance for each of the controller structure to handle the three different types of processes.

  9. Timing calibration and synchronization of surface and fluorescence detectors of the Pierre Auger Observatory

    SciTech Connect

    Allison, P.; Bellido, J.; Bertou, Xavier; Covault, C.E.; Fick, B.E.; Gemmeke, H.; Kleifges, M.; Mostafa, M.; Menshikov, A.; Meyer, F.; Pryke, C.; Sommers, P.; Vanderpan, E.; Vernotte, F.; Wiencke, L.

    2005-08-01

    Reconstruction of cosmic ray arrival directions for Surface Detectors (SD) and Fluorescence Detectors (FD) of the Pierre Auger Observatory requires accurate timing (25 nanoseconds or better) between measurements at individual detectors and instrument triggers. Timing systems for both SD and FD are based on Motorola Oncore UT+ GPS receivers installed into custom-built time-tagging circuits that are calibrated in the laboratory to a statistical precision of better than 15 ns. We describe timing calibration and synchronization methods applied in the field for both the SD and the FD systems in four areas: (1) checks of timing offsets within the SD using co-located station pairs and timing residuals on reconstructed showers, (2) calibration within the FD using a custom-build LED calibration system, (3) calibration between SD and FD using laser signals fed simultaneously into an SD station and across the FD via the Central Laser Facility (CLF), and (4) studies of synchronization between FD and SD through the analysis of events detected by both systems, called hybrid events. These hybrid events allow for a much more accurate reconstruction of the shower and for relatively tight constraints on timing calibration offsets. We demonstrate that statistical and systematic timing uncertainties have no significant impact on the event reconstruction.

  10. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva

    2015-08-15

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  11. A gas ionisation detector in the axial (Bragg) geometry used for the time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis.

    PubMed

    Siketić, Zdravko; Skukan, Natko; Bogdanović Radović, Iva

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, time-of-flight elastic recoil detection analysis spectrometer with a newly constructed gas ionization detector for energy detection is presented. The detector is designed in the axial (Bragg) geometry with a 3 × 3 array of 50 nm thick Si3N4 membranes as an entrance window. 40 mbar isobutane gas was sufficient to stop a 30 MeV primary iodine beam as well as all recoils in the detector volume. Spectrometer and detector performances were determined showing significant improvement in the mass and energy resolution, respectively, comparing to the spectrometer with a standard silicon particle detector for an energy measurement.

  12. Design and Fabrication of TES Detector Modules for the TIME-Pilot [CII] Intensity Mapping Experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunacek, J.; Bock, J.; Bradford, C. M.; Bumble, B.; Chang, T.-C.; Cheng, Y.-T.; Cooray, A.; Crites, A.; Hailey-Dunsheath, S.; Gong, Y.; Kenyon, M.; Koch, P.; Li, C.-T.; O'Brient, R.; Shirokoff, E.; Shiu, C.; Staniszewski, Z.; Uzgil, B.; Zemcov, M.

    2016-08-01

    We are developing a series of close-packed modular detector arrays for TIME-Pilot, a new mm-wavelength grating spectrometer array that will map the intensity fluctuations of the redshifted 157.7 \\upmu m emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII]) from redshift z ˜ 5 to 9. TIME-Pilot's two banks of 16 parallel-plate waveguide spectrometers (one bank per polarization) will have a spectral range of 183-326 GHz and a resolving power of R ˜ 100. The spectrometers use a curved diffraction grating to disperse and focus the light on a series of output arcs, each sampled by 60 transition edge sensor (TES) bolometers with gold micro-mesh absorbers. These low-noise detectors will be operated from a 250 mK base temperature and are designed to have a background-limited NEP of {˜ }10^{-17} mathrm {W}/mathrm {Hz}^{1/2}. This proceeding presents an overview of the detector design in the context of the TIME-Pilot instrument. Additionally, a prototype detector module produced at the Microdevices Laboratory at JPL is shown.

  13. Optimizing the response time of Ni-based resistive temperature detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Deok Su; Choi, Kyo Sang; Yang, Hee Jun; Ryu, Min Soo; Chae, Ji Sung; Chang, Sung Pil

    2015-04-01

    Resistive temperature detectors (RTDs) are widely used to monitor and control the temperature of work environments due to their higher sensitivity, excellent reliability and stability, and very linear output signal compared to other types of temperature detectors. However, RTDs have some shortcomings, including a slow response time. A nickel-based RTDs were designed, fabricated, and characterized in order to achieve faster response times. We used micromachining processes to analyze devices with different resistor thicknesses, distances between resistor lines, and resistor line widths. The response times of the RTDs were measured to be between 7.5104 and 23.4583 s. From these measurement data, we can conclude that thinner RTDs with larger surface areas show improved response times.

  14. Nanosecond-level time synchronization of autonomous radio detector stations for extensive air showers

    SciTech Connect

    Aab, Alexander

    2016-01-29

    To exploit the full potential of radio measurements of cosmic-ray air showers at MHz frequencies, a detector timing synchronization within 1 ns is needed. Large distributed radio detector arrays such as the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) rely on timing via the Global Positioning System (GPS) for the synchronization of individual detector station clocks. Unfortunately, GPS timing is expected to have an accuracy no better than about 5 ns. In practice, in particular in AERA, the GPS clocks exhibit drifts on the order of tens of ns. We developed a technique to correct for the GPS drifts, and an independent method used for cross-checks that indeed we reach nanosecond-scale timing accuracy by this correction. First, we operate a “beacon transmitter” which emits defined sine waves detected by AERA antennas recorded within the physics data. The relative phasing of these sine waves can be used to correct for GPS clock drifts. In addition to this, we observe radio pulses emitted by commercial airplanes, the position of which we determine in real time from Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcasts intercepted with a software-defined radio. From the known source location and the measured arrival times of the pulses we determine relative timing offsets between radio detector stations. We demonstrate with a combined analysis that the two methods give a consistent timing calibration with an accuracy of 2 ns or better. Consequently, the beacon method alone can be used in the future to continuously determine and correct for GPS clock drifts in each individual event measured by AERA.

  15. Nanosecond-level time synchronization of autonomous radio detector stations for extensive air showers

    DOE PAGES

    Aab, Alexander

    2016-01-29

    To exploit the full potential of radio measurements of cosmic-ray air showers at MHz frequencies, a detector timing synchronization within 1 ns is needed. Large distributed radio detector arrays such as the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) rely on timing via the Global Positioning System (GPS) for the synchronization of individual detector station clocks. Unfortunately, GPS timing is expected to have an accuracy no better than about 5 ns. In practice, in particular in AERA, the GPS clocks exhibit drifts on the order of tens of ns. We developed a technique to correct for the GPS drifts, and an independentmore » method used for cross-checks that indeed we reach nanosecond-scale timing accuracy by this correction. First, we operate a “beacon transmitter” which emits defined sine waves detected by AERA antennas recorded within the physics data. The relative phasing of these sine waves can be used to correct for GPS clock drifts. In addition to this, we observe radio pulses emitted by commercial airplanes, the position of which we determine in real time from Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcasts intercepted with a software-defined radio. From the known source location and the measured arrival times of the pulses we determine relative timing offsets between radio detector stations. We demonstrate with a combined analysis that the two methods give a consistent timing calibration with an accuracy of 2 ns or better. Consequently, the beacon method alone can be used in the future to continuously determine and correct for GPS clock drifts in each individual event measured by AERA.« less

  16. Performance study of the fast timing Cherenkov detector based on a microchannel plate PMT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Finogeev, D. A.; Grigoriev, V. A.; Kaplin, V. A.; Karavichev, O. V.; Karavicheva, T. L.; Konevskikh, A. S.; Kurepin, A. B.; Kurepin, A. N.; Loginov, V. A.; Mayevskaya, A. I.; Melikyan, Yu A.; Morozov, I. V.; Serebryakov, D. V.; Shabanov, A. I.; Slupecki, M.; Tikhonov, A. A.; Trzaska, W. H.

    2017-01-01

    Prototype of the fast timing Cherenkov detector, applicable in high-energy collider experiments, has been developed basing on the modified Planacon XP85012 MCP-PMT and fused silica radiators. We present the reasons and description of the MCP-PMT modification, timing and amplitude characteristics of the prototype including the summary of the detector’s response on particle hits at oblique angles and MCP-PMT performance at high illumination rates.

  17. Nanosecond-level time synchronization of autonomous radio detector stations for extensive air showers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    The Pierre Auger Collaboration

    2016-01-01

    To exploit the full potential of radio measurements of cosmic-ray air showers at MHz frequencies, a detector timing synchronization within 1 ns is needed. Large distributed radio detector arrays such as the Auger Engineering Radio Array (AERA) rely on timing via the Global Positioning System (GPS) for the synchronization of individual detector station clocks. Unfortunately, GPS timing is expected to have an accuracy no better than about 5 ns. In practice, in particular in AERA, the GPS clocks exhibit drifts on the order of tens of ns. We developed a technique to correct for the GPS drifts, and an independent method is used to cross-check that indeed we reach a nanosecond-scale timing accuracy by this correction. First, we operate a ``beacon transmitter'' which emits defined sine waves detected by AERA antennas recorded within the physics data. The relative phasing of these sine waves can be used to correct for GPS clock drifts. In addition to this, we observe radio pulses emitted by commercial airplanes, the position of which we determine in real time from Automatic Dependent Surveillance Broadcasts intercepted with a software-defined radio. From the known source location and the measured arrival times of the pulses we determine relative timing offsets between radio detector stations. We demonstrate with a combined analysis that the two methods give a consistent timing calibration with an accuracy of 2 ns or better. Consequently, the beacon method alone can be used in the future to continuously determine and correct for GPS clock drifts in each individual event measured by AERA.

  18. Exploring challenges to TTO utilities: valuing states worse than dead.

    PubMed

    Robinson, Angela; Spencer, Anne

    2006-04-01

    The conventional time trade off (TTO) method relies on fundamentally different procedures to assess states better than and worse than dead. Arbitrary transformation mechanisms are then applied to worse than dead scores in order to achieve symmetry with those rated as better than dead. We use a 'life profile' approach along with a ranking procedure in order to show how states rated worse than dead may be assessed in exactly the same manner as better than dead scores. We then explore a common issue associated with states worse than dead that has received some attention recently: maximal endurable time. Our results showed that, although the severe health state was commonly rated as worse than dead, there were relatively few respondents that exhibited MET preferences. We discuss the implications of our findings for the use of the TTO method in deriving values for states that are worse than dead.

  19. Software-Based Real-Time Acquisition and Processing of PET Detector Raw Data.

    PubMed

    Goldschmidt, Benjamin; Schug, David; Lerche, Christoph W; Salomon, André; Gebhardt, Pierre; Weissler, Bjoern; Wehner, Jakob; Dueppenbecker, Peter M; Kiessling, Fabian; Schulz, Volkmar

    2016-02-01

    In modern positron emission tomography (PET) readout architectures, the position and energy estimation of scintillation events (singles) and the detection of coincident events (coincidences) are typically carried out on highly integrated, programmable printed circuit boards. The implementation of advanced singles and coincidence processing (SCP) algorithms for these architectures is often limited by the strict constraints of hardware-based data processing. In this paper, we present a software-based data acquisition and processing architecture (DAPA) that offers a high degree of flexibility for advanced SCP algorithms through relaxed real-time constraints and an easily extendible data processing framework. The DAPA is designed to acquire detector raw data from independent (but synchronized) detector modules and process the data for singles and coincidences in real-time using a center-of-gravity (COG)-based, a least-squares (LS)-based, or a maximum-likelihood (ML)-based crystal position and energy estimation approach (CPEEA). To test the DAPA, we adapted it to a preclinical PET detector that outputs detector raw data from 60 independent digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM)-based detector stacks and evaluated it with a [(18)F]-fluorodeoxyglucose-filled hot-rod phantom. The DAPA is highly reliable with less than 0.1% of all detector raw data lost or corrupted. For high validation thresholds (37.1 ± 12.8 photons per pixel) of the dSiPM detector tiles, the DAPA is real time capable up to 55 MBq for the COG-based CPEEA, up to 31 MBq for the LS-based CPEEA, and up to 28 MBq for the ML-based CPEEA. Compared to the COG-based CPEEA, the rods in the image reconstruction of the hot-rod phantom are only slightly better separable and less blurred for the LS- and ML-based CPEEA. While the coincidence time resolution (∼ 500 ps) and energy resolution (∼12.3%) are comparable for all three CPEEA, the system sensitivity is up to 2.5 × higher for the LS- and ML-based CPEEA.

  20. The Belle II imaging Time-of-Propagation (iTOP) detector

    DOE PAGES

    Fast, J.

    2017-02-16

    High precision flavor physics measurements are an essential complement to the direct searches for new physics at the LHC ATLAS and CMS experiments. We will perform these measurements using the upgraded Belle II detector that will take data at the SuperKEKB accelerator. With 40x the luminosity of KEKB, the detector systems must operate efficiently at much higher rates than the original Belle detector. A central element of the upgrade is the barrel particle identification system. Belle II has built and installed an imaging-Time-of-Propagation (iTOP) detector. The iTOP uses quartz optics as Cherenkov radiators. The photons are transported down the quartzmore » bars via total internal reflection with a spherical mirror at the forward end to reflect photons to the backward end where they are imaged onto an array of segmented Micro-Channel Plate Photo-Multiplier Tubes (MCP-PMTs). The system is read out using giga-samples per second waveform sampling Application-Specific Integrated Circuits (ASICs). Furthermore, we used the combined timing and spatial distribution of the photons for each event to determine particle species. This paper provides an overview of the iTOP system.« less

  1. Diamond detectors for time-of-flight measurements in laser-generated plasmas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Margarone, D.; Milani, E.; Verona-Rinati, G.; Prestopino, G.; Tuvè, C.; Potenza, R.; Láska, L.; Krása, J.; Ullschmied, J.

    CVD mono-crystalline diamond thin films deposited on a doped diamond and aluminum backing were employed as detectors of the radiation emitted from the laser-generated plasma. Laser-matter interactions were obtained by the use of an Nd:Yag repetitive laser at INFN-LNS in Catania operating at 1010 W/cm2 pulse intensity, and a high-power iodine PALS laser in Prague operating at 1015 W/cm2 pulse intensity. Plasmas were obtained by ablating Al, Ta, Au, and CF2 bulk targets. Plasma characterization was carried out using diamond detectors and ion collectors placed at different distances and angles in relation to the position of the ablated target. Photons, electrons, and ions hitting the sensible volume of the detector generate electronhole pairs (loosing 13 eV for a pair), resulting in an arising of the voltage signal at the device electrodes, which is proportional to the deposited energy. Diamond detectors can measure UV, X-rays, electrons, and ions. The time-of-flight (TOF) technique was exploited to separate photon, electron, and particle contributions. Because of the high gap of the diamond band structure (5.48 eV), the detectors are blind to visible and IR light from the plasma, which results in very low background current. The TOF diamond spectra were compared with traditional ion collector spectra using the experimental data obtained from the experiments conducted at the Catania and Prague laboratories. The results indicate that the ion energy resolution of the employed diamond detectors is high and that the fast electrons can be detected from a deconvolution procedure applied to the fast photo-peak. Information about the mean energy of soft X-rays could be obtained by analyzing the fast contribute of the spectra acquired by using different absorber films.

  2. Are children living on dead-end streets more active? Near-home street patterns and school-going children's time spent outdoors in Dhaka, Bangladesh.

    PubMed

    Monsur, Muntazar; Mansur, Mohaimen; Islam, Mohammed Zakiul

    2016-12-06

    This study aimed to investigate relationships between near-home street patterns and children's time spent outdoors (TSO). Participants were 60 (n=60) school-age Dhaka children, 7-11years old (16 girls and 44 boys) selected by a two-phase cluster sampling method. Data were collected from September 2010 to June 2011 by visiting each of 60 children's homes. Children's mean TSOs (in minutes) were reported by parents' face-to-face interviews, and near-home street pattern data were collected by systematic direct observations. The researchers also collected data on seven socio-demographic variables and three neighborhood built-environment variables. A backward selection based multiple linear regression was used to examine association between children's TSO and near-home street patterns. Results (adjusted R(2)=0.66 for weekdays and 0.68 for weekend) suggested that children's TSO were significantly associated with near-home street type: dead-end instead of through streets (28min on weekdays, p<0.01 and 66min on weekend, p<0.01). The width of the street, level of its branching and availability of an open space or playground near the house are also positively associated with TSO. Near-home street features significantly contribute to TSO in school-going children of Dhaka.

  3. Time-zero fission-fragment detector based on low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers

    SciTech Connect

    Assamagan, Ketevi; Baker, O.; Bayatian, G.; Carlini, Roger; Danagoulian, Areg; Eden, Thomas; Egiyan, Kim; Ent, Rolf; Fenker, Howard; Gan, Liping; Gasparian, Ashot; Grigoryan, Hovhannes; Greenwood, Z; Gueye, Paul; Hashimoto, Osamu; Johnston, Kathleen; Keppel, Cynthia; Knyazian, S.; Majewski, Stanislaw; Magaryan, A; Margarian, Yu.; Marikyan, Gagik; Martoff, Charles; Mkrtchyan, Hamlet; PARLAKYAN, L.; Parlakyan, L.; Sato, Ikuro; Sawafta, Reyad; Simicevic, Neven; Tadevosyan, Vardan; Takahashi, Toshiyuki; Tang, Liguang; VARTANYAN, G.; Vulcan, William; Wells, Steven; Wood, Stephen

    1999-05-01

    A time-zero fission fragment (FF) detector, based on the technique of low-pressure multiwire proportional chambers (LPMWPC), has been designed and constructed for the heavy hypernuclear lifetime experiment (E95-002) at Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility. Its characteristics and the method of time-zero reconstruction were investigated using fission fragments from a 252Cf spontaneous fission source. The influence of the ionization energy loss was also studied. It is shown that Heptane, Hexane, and Isobutane gases at a pressure of 1z2Torr are all suitable for such a FF detector. As desired by experiment, a timing resolution of about 200ps (FWHM) for a chamber size of 21z21cm2 was achieved.

  4. Dead Sea Scrolls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    A consortium of researchers from Jet Propulsion Laboratory and three other organizations used charged coupled devices (CCDs) and other imaging enhancement technology to decipher previously unreadable portions of the Dead Sea Scrolls. The technique has potentially important implications for archeology.

  5. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; ...

    2015-05-27

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition,more » comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.« less

  6. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, C. J.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-27

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  7. A method for in situ absolute DD yield calibration of neutron time-of-flight detectors on OMEGA using CR-39-based proton detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Waugh, C. J. Zylstra, A. B.; Frenje, J. A.; Séguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Rosenberg, M. J.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-05-15

    Neutron time of flight (nTOF) detectors are used routinely to measure the absolute DD neutron yield at OMEGA. To check the DD yield calibration of these detectors, originally calibrated using indium activation systems, which in turn were cross-calibrated to NOVA nTOF detectors in the early 1990s, a direct in situ calibration method using CR-39 range filter proton detectors has been successfully developed. By measuring DD neutron and proton yields from a series of exploding pusher implosions at OMEGA, a yield calibration coefficient of 1.09 ± 0.02 (relative to the previous coefficient) was determined for the 3m nTOF detector. In addition, comparison of these and other shots indicates that significant reduction in charged particle flux anisotropies is achieved when bang time occurs significantly (on the order of 500 ps) after the trailing edge of the laser pulse. This is an important observation as the main source of the yield calibration error is due to particle anisotropies caused by field effects. The results indicate that the CR-39-nTOF in situ calibration method can serve as a valuable technique for calibrating and reducing the uncertainty in the DD absolute yield calibration of nTOF detector systems on OMEGA, the National Ignition Facility, and laser megajoule.

  8. Toward a Real-Time In Vivo Dosimetry System Using Plastic Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Archambault, Louis; Briere, Tina M.; Poenisch, Falk; Beaulieu, Luc; Kuban, Deborah A.; Lee, Andrew; Beddar, Sam

    2010-09-01

    Purpose: In the present study, we have presented and validated a plastic scintillation detector (PSD) system designed for real-time multiprobe in vivo measurements. Methods and Materials: The PSDs were built with a dose-sensitive volume of 0.4 mm{sup 3}. The PSDs were assembled into modular detector patches, each containing five closely packed PSDs. Continuous dose readings were performed every 150 ms, with a gap between consecutive readings of <0.3 ms. We first studied the effect of electron multiplication. We then assessed system performance in acrylic and anthropomorphic pelvic phantoms. Results: The PSDs were compatible with clinical rectal balloons and were easily inserted into the anthropomorphic phantom. With an electron multiplication average gain factor of 40, a twofold increase in the signal/noise ratio was observed, making near real-time dosimetry feasible. Under calibration conditions, the PSDs agreed with the ion chamber measurements to 0.08%. Precision, evaluated as a function of the total dose delivered, ranged from 2.3% at 2 cGy to 0.4% at 200 cGy. Conclusion: Real-time PSD measurements are highly accurate and precise. These PSDs can be mounted onto rectal balloons, transforming these clinical devices into in vivo dose detectors without modifying current clinical practice. Real-time monitoring of the dose delivered near the rectum during prostate radiotherapy should help radiation oncologists protect this sensitive normal structure.

  9. Detection efficiency, spatial and timing resolution of thermal and cold neutron counting MCP detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tremsin, A. S.; McPhate, J. B.; Vallerga, J. V.; Siegmund, O. H. W.; Hull, J. S.; Feller, W. B.; Lehmann, E.

    2009-06-01

    Neutron counting detectors with boron or gadolinium doped microchannel plates (MCPs) have very high detection efficiency, spatial and temporal resolution, and have a very low readout noise. In this paper we present the results of both theoretical predictions and experimental evaluations of detection efficiency and spatial resolution measured at cold and thermal neutron beamlines. The quantum detection efficiency of a detector (not fully optimized) was measured to be 43% and 16% for the cold and thermal beamlines, respectively. The experiments also demonstrate that the spatial resolution can be better than 15 μm—highest achievable with the particular MCP pore dimension used in the experiment, although more electronics development is required in order to increase the counting rate capabilities of those <15 μm resolution devices. The timing accuracy of neutron detection is on the scale of few μs and is limited by the neutron absorption depth in the detector. The good agreement between the predicted and measured performance allows the optimization of the detector parameters in order to achieve the highest spatial resolution and detection efficiency in future devices.

  10. The UCSD high energy X-ray timing experiment cosmic ray particle anticoincidence detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hink, P. L.; Rothschild, R. E.; Pelling, M. R.; Macdonald, D. R.; Gruber, D. E.

    1991-01-01

    The HEXTE, part of the X-Ray Timing Explorer (XTE), is designed to make high sensitivity temporal and spectral measurements of X-rays with energies between 15 and 250 keV using NaI/CsI phoswich scintillation counters. To achieve the required sensitivity it is necessary to provide anticoincidence of charged cosmic ray particles incident upon the instrument, some of which interact to produce background X-rays. The proposed cosmic ray particle anticoincidence shield detector for HEXTE uses a novel design based on plastic scintillators and wavelength-shifter bars. It consists of five segments, each with a 7 mm thick plastic scintillator, roughly 50 cm x 50 cm in size, coupled to two wavelength-shifter bars viewed by 1/2 inch photomultiplier tubes. These segments are configured into a five-sided, box-like structure around the main detector system. Results of laboratory testing of a model segment, and calculations of the expected performance of the flight segments and particle anticoincidence detector system are presented to demonstrate that the above anticoincidence detector system satisfies its scientific requirements.

  11. Supernova neutrino physics with xenon dark matter detectors: A timely perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lang, Rafael F.; McCabe, Christopher; Reichard, Shayne; Selvi, Marco; Tamborra, Irene

    2016-11-01

    Dark matter detectors that utilize liquid xenon have now achieved tonne-scale targets, giving them sensitivity to all flavors of supernova neutrinos via coherent elastic neutrino-nucleus scattering. Considering for the first time a realistic detector model, we simulate the expected supernova neutrino signal for different progenitor masses and nuclear equations of state in existing and upcoming dual-phase liquid xenon experiments. We show that the proportional scintillation signal (S2) of a dual-phase detector allows for a clear observation of the neutrino signal and guarantees a particularly low energy threshold, while the backgrounds are rendered negligible during the supernova burst. XENON1T (XENONnT and LZ; DARWIN) experiments will be sensitive to a supernova burst up to 25 (35; 65) kpc from Earth at a significance of more than 5 σ , observing approximately 35 (123; 704) events from a 27 M⊙ supernova progenitor at 10 kpc. Moreover, it will be possible to measure the average neutrino energy of all flavors, to constrain the total explosion energy, and to reconstruct the supernova neutrino light curve. Our results suggest that a large xenon detector such as DARWIN will be competitive with dedicated neutrino telescopes, while providing complementary information that is not otherwise accessible.

  12. Time-over-threshold for pulse shape discrimination in a time-of-flight phoswich PET detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Chen-Ming; Cates, Joshua W.; Levin, Craig S.

    2017-01-01

    It is well known that a PET detector capable of measuring both photon time-of-flight (TOF) and depth-of-interaction (DOI) improves the image quality and accuracy. Phoswich designs have been realized in PET detectors to measure DOI for more than a decade. However, PET detectors based on phoswich designs put great demand on the readout circuits, which have to differentiate the pulse shape produced by different crystal layers. A simple pulse shape discrimination approach is required to realize the phoswich designs in a clinical PET scanner, which consists of thousands of scintillation crystal elements. In this work, we studied time-over-threshold (ToT) as a pulse shape parameter for DOI. The energy, timing and DOI performance were evaluated for a phoswich detector design comprising 3~\\text{mm}× 3~\\text{mm}× 10 mm LYSO:Ce crystal optically coupled to 3~\\text{mm}× 3~\\text{mm}× 10 mm calcium co-doped LSO:Ce,Ca(0.4%) crystal read out by a silicon photomultiplier (SiPM). A DOI accuracy of 97.2% has been achieved for photopeak events using the proposed time-over-threshold (ToT) processing. The energy resolution without correction for SiPM non-linearity was 9.7+/- 0.2 % and 11.3+/- 0.2 % FWHM at 511 keV for LYSO and LSO crystal layers, respectively. The coincidence time resolution for photopeak events ranges from 164.6 ps to 183.1 ps FWHM, depending on the layer combinations. The coincidence time resolution for inter-crystal scatter events ranges from 214.6 ps to 418.3 ps FWHM, depending on the energy windows applied. These results show great promises of using ToT for pulse shape discrimination in a TOF phoswich detector since a ToT measurement can be easily implemented in readout electronics.

  13. Optimization of a multi-ring detector for Ps time of flight measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Noto, L.; Benetti, M.; Mariazzi, S.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Brusa, R. S.

    2013-06-01

    We have designed a multi-ring detector (MRD) based on Bismuth Germanate (BGO) crystals, coupled to Silicon PhotoMultipliers (SiPM) for measuring the Ps time of flight (TOF). The set-up geometry was optimized by Monte Carlo simulations to take into account at different Ps velocities: (i) the background noise due to backscattered positrons, (ii) the crosstalk between adjacent detectors, (iii) the lifetime of Ps decay. Three parameters were defined to evaluate the different configurations and a figure of merit was obtained. This allows the choice of the best set up configuration for measuring Ps emitted with a particular energy range, optimizing the signal to noise ratio and keeping the acquisition time acceptable.

  14. Status and performance of the ALICE MRPC-based Time-Of-Flight detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.

    2012-10-01

    ALICE is the dedicated heavy-ion experiment at the CERN LHC. One of the main detectors devoted to charged hadron identification in the ALICE central barrel is a large Time-Of-Flight (TOF) array; it allows separation among pions, kaons and protons up to a few GeV/c, covering the full azimuthal angle and -0.9 < η < 0.9. The very good performance required for such a system has been achieved by means of the Multigap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) whose intrinsic time resolution is better than 50 ps with an overall efficiency close to 100% and a large operational plateau; the full array consists of 1593 MRPCs covering a cylindrical surface of 141 m2. In this report, the status of the TOF detector and the performance achieved during the 2010 and 2011 data taking periods are reported together with selected physics results obtained with pp and Pb-Pb collisions.

  15. Energy and coincidence time resolution measurements of CdTe detectors for PET.

    PubMed

    Ariño, G; Chmeissani, M; De Lorenzo, G; Puigdengoles, C; Cabruja, E; Calderón, Y; Kolstein, M; Macias-Montero, J G; Martinez, R; Mikhaylova, E; Uzun, D

    2013-02-01

    We report on the characterization of 2 mm thick CdTe diode detector with Schottky contacts to be employed in a novel conceptual design of PET scanner. Results at -8°C with an applied bias voltage of -1000 V/mm show a 1.2% FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV. Coincidence time resolution has been measured by triggering on the preamplifier output signal to improve the timing resolution of the detector. Results at the same bias and temperature conditions show a FWHM of 6 ns with a minimum acceptance energy of 500 keV. These results show that pixelated CdTe Schottky diode is an excellent candidate for the development of next generation nuclear medical imaging devices such as PET, Compton gamma cameras, and especially PET-MRI hybrid systems when used in a magnetic field immune configuration.

  16. Space-borne gravitational-wave detectors as time-delayed differential dynamometers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Congedo, Giuseppe; Dolesi, Rita; Hueller, Mauro; Vitale, Stefano; Weber, William J.

    2013-10-01

    The basic constituent of many space-borne gravitational missions, in particular, for interferometric gravitational-wave detectors, is the so-called “link” made out of a satellite sending an electromagnetic beam to a second satellite. We illustrate how, by measuring the time derivative of the frequency of the received beam, the link behaves as a differential, time-delayed dynamometer in which the effect of gravity is exactly equivalent to an effective differential force applied to the two satellites. We also show that this differential force gives an integrated measurement of curvature along the beam. Finally, we discuss how this approach can be implemented to benefit the data analysis of gravitational-wave detectors.

  17. Energy and coincidence time resolution measurements of CdTe detectors for PET

    PubMed Central

    Ariño, G.; Chmeissani, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Puigdengoles, C.; Cabruja, E.; Calderón, Y.; Kolstein, M.; Macias-Montero, J.G.; Martinez, R.; Mikhaylova, E.; Uzun, D.

    2013-01-01

    We report on the characterization of 2 mm thick CdTe diode detector with Schottky contacts to be employed in a novel conceptual design of PET scanner. Results at −8°C with an applied bias voltage of −1000 V/mm show a 1.2% FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV. Coincidence time resolution has been measured by triggering on the preamplifier output signal to improve the timing resolution of the detector. Results at the same bias and temperature conditions show a FWHM of 6 ns with a minimum acceptance energy of 500 keV. These results show that pixelated CdTe Schottky diode is an excellent candidate for the development of next generation nuclear medical imaging devices such as PET, Compton gamma cameras, and especially PET-MRI hybrid systems when used in a magnetic field immune configuration. PMID:23750177

  18. Energy and coincidence time resolution measurements of CdTe detectors for PET

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ariño, G.; Chmeissani, M.; De Lorenzo, G.; Puigdengoles, C.; Cabruja, E.; Calderón, Y.; Kolstein, M.; Macias-Montero, J. G.; Martinez, R.; Mikhaylova, E.; Uzun, D.

    2013-02-01

    We report on the characterization of 2 mm thick CdTe diode detector with Schottky contacts to be employed in a novel conceptual design of PET scanner. Results at -8°C with an applied bias voltage of -1000 V/mm show a 1.2% FWHM energy resolution at 511 keV. Coincidence time resolution has been measured by triggering on the preamplifier output signal to improve the timing resolution of the detector. Results at the same bias and temperature conditions show a FWHM of 6 ns with a minimum acceptance energy of 500 keV. These results show that pixelated CdTe Schottky diode is an excellent candidate for the development of next generation nuclear medical imaging devices such as PET, Compton gamma cameras, and especially PET-MRI hybrid systems when used in a magnetic field immune configuration.

  19. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    SciTech Connect

    Kalchenko, V V; Kuznetsov, Yu L; Meglinski, I V

    2013-07-31

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions. (laser applications in biology and medicine)

  20. Visualisation of blood and lymphatic vessels with increasing exposure time of the detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kalchenko, V. V.; Kuznetsov, Yu L.; Meglinski, I. V.

    2013-07-01

    We describe the laser speckle contrast method for simultaneous noninvasive imaging of blood and lymphatic vessels of living organisms, based on increasing detector exposure time. In contrast to standard methods of fluorescent angiography, this technique of vascular bed imaging and lymphatic and blood vessel demarcation does not employ toxic fluorescent markers. The method is particularly promising with respect to the physiology of the cardiovascular system under in vivo conditions.

  1. Development and tests of MCP based timing and multiplicity detector for MIPs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feofilov, G.; Kondratev, V.; Stolyarov, O.; Tulina, T.; Valiev, F.; Vinogradov, L.

    2017-01-01

    We present summary of technological developments and tests of the MCP based large area detector aimed at precise timing and charged particles multiplicity measurements. Results obtained in course of these developments of isochronous (simultaneity) precise signal readout, passive summation of 1 ns signals, fast (1 GHz) front-end electronics, miniature vacuum systems, etc. could be potentially interesting for a number of future applications in different fields.

  2. Algorithms for the determination of the time delays of the signal when using unequal detectors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novak, B. L.

    1979-01-01

    In treating the recorded results from detectors at different locations in space, the analysis of the time delays of signals is crucial to locating the sources of detected radiation. Because the correlation method requires the manipulation of awkward matrices to evaluate its accuracy, a solution is outlined based on minimizing the sum of the squares of signal deviations, and the algorithms for evaluating the resulting error are presented.

  3. Precision electronics for a system of custom MCPs in the TORCH Time of Flight detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, R.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros García, A.; Van Dijk, M.

    2017-03-01

    The TORCH detector will provide charged particle pi/K/p identification up to 10 GeV/c, combining Time-of-Flight and Cherenkov techniques to achieve a timing resolution of 70 ps for single photons. Based on a scalable design, a Time-of-Flight electronics readout system has been developed to instrument a novel customized 512-channel Micro Channel Plate (MCP) device. A Gigabit Ethernet-based readout scheme that operates the TORCH demonstration unit consisting of ten such MCPs will be reported. The trigger and clock distribution will also be discussed.

  4. Note: Space qualified photon counting detector for laser time transfer with picosecond precision and stability

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prochazka, Ivan; Kodet, Jan; Blazej, Josef

    2016-05-01

    The laser time transfer link is under construction for the European Space Agency in the frame of Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space. We have developed and tested the flying unit of the photon counting detector optimized for this space mission. The results are summarized in this Note. An extreme challenge was to build a detector package, which is rugged, small and which provides long term detection delay stability on picosecond level. The device passed successfully all the tests required for space missions on the low Earth orbits. The detector is extremely rugged and compact. Its long term detection delay stability is excellent, it is better than ±1 ps/day, in a sense of time deviation it is better than 0.5 ps for averaging times of 2000 s to several hours. The device is capable to operate in a temperature range of -55 °C up to +60 °C, the change of the detection delay with temperature is +0.5 ps/K. The device is ready for integration into the space structure now.

  5. Digitial readout for microwave kinetic inductance detectors and applications in high time resolution astronomy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strader, Matthew James

    This dissertation spans two topics relating to optical to near-infrared astronomical cameras built around Microwave Kinetic Inductance Detectors (MKIDs). The first topic is the development of a digital readout system for 10- to 30-kilopixel arrays of MKIDs. MKIDs are superconducting detectors that can detect individual photons with a wide range of wavelengths with high time resolution (SI{2}{micro s}) and low energy resolution. The advantage of MKIDs over other low temperature detectors with similar capabilities is that it is relatively straightforward to multiplex MKIDs into large arrays. All the complexity of readout is in room temperature electronics. This work discusses the implementation and programming of these electronics. The second part of this work demonstrates the capabilities of the prototype optical and near-infrared MKID instrument with observations of pulsars. Detecting optical pulsations in these objects require high time resolution and low noise. The discovery of a correlation between the brightness of optical pulses from the Crab pulsar and the time of arrival of coincident giant radio pulses is presented. The search for optical pulses from a millisecond pulsar J0337+1715 is discussed along with a new upper limit on the brightness of its optical pulses.

  6. An infrared motion detector system for lossless real-time monitoring of animal preference tests.

    PubMed

    Pogány, A; Heszberger, J; Szurovecz, Zita; Vincze, E; Székely, T

    2014-12-01

    Automated behavioural observations are routinely used in many fields of biology, including ethology, behavioural ecology and physiology. When preferences for certain resources are investigated, the focus is often on simple response variables, such as duration and frequency of visits to choice chambers. Here we present an automated motion detector system that use passive infrared sensors to eliminate many drawbacks of currently existing methods. Signals from the sensors are processed by a custom-built interface, and after unnecessary data is filtered by a computer software, the total time and frequency of the subject's visits to each of the choice chambers are calculated. We validate the detector system by monitoring (using the system) and in the same time video recording mating preferences of zebra finches in a four-way choice apparatus. Manual scoring of the video recordings showed very high consistency with data from the detector system both for time and for frequency of visits. Furthermore, the validation revealed that if we used micro-switches or light barriers, the most commonly applied automatic detection techniques, this would have resulted in approximately 22% less information compared to our lossless system. The system provides a low-cost alternative for monitoring animal movements, and we discuss its further applicability.

  7. The CDFII time-of-flight detector and impact on beauty flavor tagging

    SciTech Connect

    C. Grozis et al.

    2002-12-03

    Following the successful RunI from 1992 to 1996, the CDF detector has undergone a major upgrade [1] for the RunII which begun in March 2001. The approval for the addition of a Time-of-Flight detector was granted in January 1999. The installation of the TOF detector was completed in August 2001 and its data has been included in the CDFII readout since then. The primary physics motivation for TOF is to complement and enhance the particle identification capability provided by the central drift chamber (COT) since it distinguishes K{sup {+-}} and {pi}{sup {+-}} in the momentum region of their cross-over in dE=dX. With an expected time-of-flight resolution of 100 ps, the TOF system will be capable of identifying charged kaons from pions by their flight time difference with at least two standard deviation separation up to kaon momenta of 1.6 GeV/c. Such an addition results in an enhancement of the b flavor identification power, crucial to improve the statistical precision in CP violation and B{sub s} mixing measurements.

  8. Effects of etching time on alpha tracks in Solid state Nuclear Track Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gillmore, Gavin; Wertheim, David; Crust, Simon

    2013-04-01

    Inhalation of radon gas is thought to be the cause of about 1100 lung cancer related deaths each year in the UK (1). Radon concentrations can be monitored using Solid State Nuclear Track Detectors (SSNTDs) as the natural decay of radon results in alpha particles which form tracks in the detectors and these tracks can be etched in order to enable microscopic analysis. We have previously shown that confocal microscopy can be used for 3D visualisation of etched SSNTDs (2, 3). The aim of the study was to examine the effect of etching time on the appearance of alpha tracks in SSNTDs. Six SSNTDs were placed in a chamber with a luminous dial watch for a fixed period. The detectors were etched for between 30 minutes and 4.5 hours using 6M NaOH at a temperature of 90oC. A 'LEXT' OLS4000 confocal laser scanning microscope (Olympus Corporation, Japan) was used to acquire 2D and 3D image datasets of CR-39 plastic SSNTDs. Confocal microscope 3D images were acquired using a x50 or x100 objective lens. Data were saved as images and also spreadsheet files with height measurements. Software was written using MATLAB (The MathWorks Inc., USA) to analyse the height data. Comparing the 30 minute and 4 hour etching time detectors, we observed that there were marked differences in track area; the lower the etching time the smaller the track area. The degree to which etching may prevent visualising adjacent tracks also requires further study as it is possible that etching could result in some tracks being subsumed in other tracks. On the other hand if there is too little etching, track sizes would be reduced and hence could be more difficult to image; thus there is a balance required to obtain suitable measurement accuracy. (1) Gray A, Read S, McGale P and Darby S. Lung cancer deaths from indoor radon and the cost effectiveness and potential of policies to reduce them. BMJ 2009; 338: a3110. (2) Wertheim D, Gillmore G, Brown L, and Petford N. A new method of imaging particle tracks in

  9. Effects of short immersion time and cooling rates of copperizing process to the evolution of microstructures and copper behavior in the dead mild steel

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jatimurti, Wikan; Sutarsis, Cunika, Aprida Ulya

    2017-01-01

    In a dead mild steel with maximum carbon content of 0.15%, carbon does not contribute much to its strength. By adding copper as an alloying element, a balance between strength and ductility could be obtained through grain refining, solid solution, or Cu precipitation. This research aimed to analyse the changes in microstructures and copper behaviour on AISI 1006, including the phases formed, composition, and Cu dispersion. The addition of cooper was done by immersing steel into molten copper or so we called, copperizing using the principles of diffusion. Specimens were cut with 6 × 3 × 0.3 cm measurement then preheated to 900°C and melting the copper at 1100°C. Subsequently, the immersion of the specimens into molten copper varied to 5 and 7 minutes, and also varying the cooling rate to annealing, normalizing, and quenching. A series of test being conduct were optical microscope test, scanning electron microscopy with energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (SEM-EDX), optical emission spectroscopy (OES), and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results showed that the longer the immersion time and slower cooling rate, the more Cu diffused causing smaller grain size with the highest Cu diffused recorded was 0.277% in the copperized AISI 1006 steel with 7 minutes of immersion and was annealed. The grain size reduced to 23041.5404 µm2. The annealed specimens show ferrite phase, the normalized ones show polygonal ferrite phase, while the quenched ones show granular bainite phase. The phase formed is single phase Cu. In addition, the normalized and quenched specimens show that Cu dissolved in Fe crystal forming solid solution.

  10. Detector modules and spectrometers for the TIME-Pilot [CII] intensity mapping experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunacek, Jonathon; Bock, James; Bradford, C. Matt; Bumble, Bruce; Chang, Tzu-Ching; Cheng, Yun-Ting; Cooray, Asantha; Crites, Abigail; Hailey-Dunsheath, Steven; Gong, Yan; Li, Chao-Te; O'Brient, Roger; Shirokoff, Erik; Shiu, Corwin; Sun, Jason; Staniszewski, Zachary; Uzgil, Bade; Zemcov, Michael

    2016-07-01

    This proceeding presents the current TIME-Pilot instrument design and status with a focus on the close-packed modular detector arrays and spectrometers. Results of laboratory tests with prototype detectors and spectrometers are discussed. TIME-Pilot is a new mm-wavelength grating spectrometer array under development that will study the Epoch of Reionization (the period of time when the first stars and galaxies ionized the intergalactic medium) by mapping the fluctuations of the redshifted 157:7 μm emission line of singly ionized carbon ([CII]) from redshift z 5:2 to 8:5. As a tracer of star formation, the [CII] power spectrum can provide information on the sources driving reionization and complements 21 cm data (which traces neutral hydrogen in the intergalactic medium). Intensity mapping provides a measure of the mean [CII] intensity without the need to resolve and detect faint sources individually. We plan to target a 1 degree by 0.35 arcminute field on the sky and a spectral range of 199-305 GHz, producing a spatial-spectral slab which is 140 Mpc by 0.9 Mpc on-end and 1230 Mpc in the redshift direction. With careful removal of intermediate-redshift CO sources, we anticipate a detection of the halo-halo clustering term in the [CII] power spectrum consistent with current models for star formation history in 240 hours on the JCMT. TIME-Pilot will use two stacks of 16 parallel-plate waveguide spectrometers (one stack per polarization) with a resolving power R 100 and a spectral range of 183 to 326 GHz. The range is divided into 60 spectral channels, of which 16 at the band edges on each spectrometer serve as atmospheric monitors. The diffraction gratings are curved to produce a compact instrument, each focusing the diffracted light onto an output arc sampled by the 60 bolometers. The bolometers are built in buttable dies of 8 (low freqeuency) or 12 (high frequency) spectral channels by 8 spatial channels and are mated to the spectrometer stacks. Each detector

  11. On-chip time resolved detection of quantum dot emission using integrated superconducting single photon detectors.

    PubMed

    Reithmaier, G; Lichtmannecker, S; Reichert, T; Hasch, P; Müller, K; Bichler, M; Gross, R; Finley, J J

    2013-01-01

    We report the routing of quantum light emitted by self-assembled InGaAs quantum dots (QDs) into the optical modes of a GaAs ridge waveguide and its efficient detection on-chip via evanescent coupling to NbN superconducting nanowire single photon detectors (SSPDs). The waveguide coupled SSPDs primarily detect QD luminescence, with scattered photons from the excitation laser onto the proximal detector being negligible by comparison. The SSPD detection efficiency from the evanescently coupled waveguide modes is shown to be two orders of magnitude larger when compared with operation under normal incidence illumination, due to the much longer optical interaction length. Furthermore, in-situ time resolved measurements performed using the integrated detector show an average QD spontaneous emission lifetime of 0.95 ns, measured with a timing jitter of only 72 ps. The performance metrics of the SSPD integrated directly onto GaAs nano-photonic hardware confirms the strong potential for on-chip few-photon quantum optics using such semiconductor-superconductor hybrid systems.

  12. USB 3.0 readout and time-walk correction method for Timepix3 detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turecek, D.; Jakubek, J.; Soukup, P.

    2016-12-01

    The hybrid particle counting pixel detectors of Medipix family are well known. In this contribution we present new USB 3.0 based interface AdvaDAQ for Timepix3 detector. The AdvaDAQ interface is designed with a maximal emphasis to the flexibility. It is successor of FitPIX interface developed in IEAP CTU in Prague. Its modular architecture supports all Medipix/Timepix chips and all their different readout modes: Medipix2, Timepix (serial and parallel), Medipix3 and Timepix3. The high bandwidth of USB 3.0 permits readout of 1700 full frames per second with Timepix or 8 channel data acquisition from Timepix3 at frequency of 320 MHz. The control and data acquisition is integrated in a multiplatform PiXet software (MS Windows, Mac OS, Linux). In the second part of the publication a new method for correction of the time-walk effect in Timepix3 is described. Moreover, a fully spectroscopic X-ray imaging with Timepix3 detector operated in the ToT mode (Time-over-Threshold) is presented. It is shown that the AdvaDAQ's readout speed is sufficient to perform spectroscopic measurement at full intensity of radiographic setups equipped with nano- or micro-focus X-ray tubes.

  13. Neutron measurements with Time-Resolved Event-Counting Optical Radiation (TRECOR) detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brandis, M.; Vartsky, D.; Dangendorf, V.; Bromberger, B.; Bar, D.; Goldberg, M. B.; Tittelmeier, K.; Friedman, E.; Czasch, A.; Mardor, I.; Mor, I.; Weierganz, M.

    2012-04-01

    Results are presented from the latest experiment with a new neutron/gamma detector, a Time-Resolved, Event-Counting Optical Radiation (TRECOR) detector. It is composed of a scintillating fiber-screen converter, bending mirror, lens and Event-Counting Image Intensifier (ECII), capable of specifying the position and time-of-flight of each event. TRECOR is designated for a multipurpose integrated system that will detect Special Nuclear Materials (SNM) and explosives in cargo. Explosives are detected by Fast-Neutron Resonance Radiography, and SNM by Dual Discrete-Energy gamma-Radiography. Neutrons and gamma-rays are both produced in the 11B(d,n+γ)12C reaction. The two detection modes can be implemented simultaneously in TRECOR, using two adjacent radiation converters that share a common optical readout. In the present experiment the neutron detection mode was studied, using a plastic scintillator converter. The measurements were performed at the PTB cyclotron, using the 9Be(d,n) neutron spectrum obtained from a thick Be-target at Ed ~ 13 MeV\\@. The basic characteristics of this detector were investigated, including the Contrast Transfer Function (CTF), Point Spread Function (PSF) and elemental discrimination capability.

  14. Fluorescence particle detector for real-time quantification of viable organisms in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luoma, Greg; Cherrier, Pierre P.; Piccioni, Marc; Tanton, Carol; Herz, Steve; DeFreez, Richard K.; Potter, Michael; Girvin, Kenneth L.; Whitney, Ronald

    2002-02-01

    The ability to detect viable organisms in air in real time is important in a number of applications. Detecting high levels of airborne organisms in hospitals can prevent post-operative infections and the spread of diseases. Monitoring levels of airborne viable organisms in pharmaceutical facilities can ensure safe production of drugs or vaccines. Monitoring airborne bacterial levels in meat processing plants can help to prevent contamination of food products. Monitoring the level of airborne organisms in bio-containment facilities can ensure that proper procedures are being followed. Finally, detecting viable organisms in real time is a key to defending against biological agent attacks. This presentation describes the development and performance of a detector, based on fluorescence particle counting technology, where an ultraviolet laser is used to count particles by light scattering and elicit fluorescence from specific biomolecules found only in living organisms. The resulting detector can specifically detect airborne particles containing living organisms from among the large majority of other particles normally present in air. Efforts to develop the core sensor technology, focusing on integrating an UV laser with a specially designed particle-counting cell will be highlighted. The hardware/software used to capture the information from the sensor, provide an alarm in the presence of an unusual biological aerosol content will also be described. Finally, results from experiments to test the performance of the detector will be presented.

  15. The electro-mechanical integration of the NA62 GigaTracker time tagging pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morel, M.; Kluge, A.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Daguin, J.; Fiorini, M.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Mapelli, A.; Marchetto, F.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Perktold, L.; Petagna, P.; Riedler, P.

    2010-12-01

    The NA62 GigaTracker is a low mass time tagging hybrid pixel detector operating in a beam with a particle rate of 750 MHz. It consists of three stations with a sensor size of 60 × 27mm2 containing 18000 pixels, each 300 × 300μm2. The active area is connected to a matrix of 2 × 5 pixel ASICs, which time tag the arrival of the particles with a binning of 100 ps. The detector operates in vacuum at -20 to 0°C and the material budget per station must be below 0.5% X0. Due to the high radiation environment of 2 × 1014 1 MeV neutron equivalent cm-2/yr-1 it is planned to exchange the detector modules regularly. The low material budget, cooling requirements and the request for easy module access has driven the electro-mechanical integration of the GigaTracker, which is presented in this paper.

  16. A generalized description of the time dependent signals in extensive air shower detectors and its applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ave, M.; Roth, M.; Schulz, A.

    2017-02-01

    The expected signal in extensive air shower (EAS) detectors can be predicted with a 10% accuracy by a parameterization that depends on a set of global shower parameters: the energy, the depth of the electromagnetic shower maximum (Xmax) and the overall muon content. By classifying shower particles in four components (muonic, purely electromagnetic, electromagnetic stemming from muon interactions and decay and electromagnetic-from-low-energy hadrons), shower-to-shower fluctuations are minimized. We follow this scheme to propose a model to describe the arrival time distributions of secondary particles as measured with surface detectors in an EAS experiment. This model is then used to reconstruct Xmax in Monte Carlo data sets. As an example, we show that for the case of the Pierre Auger Observatory Xmax can be reconstructed with an accuracy of about 45 g/cm2 at 1019 eV.

  17. Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry using up-conversion single-photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Haiyun; Shangguan, Mingjia; Shentu, Guoliang; Wang, Chong; Qiu, Jiawei; Zheng, Mingyang; Xie, Xiuping; Dou, Xiankang; Zhang, Qiang; Pan, Jian-Wei

    2016-12-01

    A direct-detection Brillouin optical time-domain reflectometry (BOTDR) using an up-conversion photon-counting detector and an all-fiber structure Fabry-Perot scanning interferometer is demonstrated with shot-noise limited performance. Taking advantage of ultra-low noise equivalent power of the up-conversion photon-counting detector and high spectral resolution of the interferometer, the Brillouin spectra along a polarization maintaining fiber (PMF) are analyzed in the optical frequency domain directly. In contrast with heterodyne BOTDR, photon-counting BOTDR has better EM compatibility and faster speed in data processing. In experiments, using peak input power of 20 dBm, temperature profile along a 9 km PMF is retrieved according to the Brillouin shifts, with spatial/temporal resolution of 2 m/15 s. The precision is 0.7 °C at the leading end and 1.2 °C at the trailing end.

  18. Advanced Photon Counting Imaging Detectors with 100ps Timing for Astronomical and Space Sensing Applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; Vallerga, J.; Welsh, B.; Rabin, M.; Bloch, J.

    In recent years EAG has implemented a variety of high-resolution, large format, photon-counting MCP detectors in space instrumentation for satellite FUSE, GALEX, IMAGE, SOHO, HST-COS, rocket, and shuttle payloads. Our scheme of choice has been delay line readouts encoding photon event position centroids, by determination of the difference in arrival time of the event charge at the two ends of a distributed resistive-capacitive (RC) delay line. Our most commonly used delay line configuration is the cross delay line (XDL). In its simplest form the delay-line encoding electronics consists of a fast amplifier for each end of the delay line, followed by time-to-digital converters (TDC's). We have achieved resolutions of < 25 μm in tests over 65 mm x 65 mm (3k x3k resolution elements) with excellent linearity. Using high speed TDC's, we have been able to encode event positions for random photon rates of ~1 MHz, while time tagging events using the MCP output signal to better than 100 ps. The unique ability to record photon X,Y,T high fidelity information has advantages over "frame driven" recording devices for some important applications. For example we have built open face and sealed tube cross delay line detectors used for biological fluorescence lifetime imaging, observation of flare stars, orbital satellites and space debris with the GALEX satellite, and time resolved imaging of the Crab Pulsar with a telescope as small as 1m. Although microchannel plate delay line detectors meet many of the imaging and timing demands of various applications, they have limitations. The relatively high gain (107) reduces lifetime and local counting rate, and the fixed delay (10's of ns) makes multiple simultaneous event recording problematic. To overcome these limitations we have begun development of cross strip readout anodes for microchannel plate detectors. The cross strip (XS) anode is a coarse (~0.5 mm) multi-layer metal and ceramic pattern of crossed fingers on an alumina

  19. Study of timing response and charge spectra of glass based Resistive Plate Chamber detectors for INO-ICAL experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaur, A.; Kumar, A.; Naimuddin, Md.

    2017-03-01

    Resistive Plate chambers (RPCs) are robust and affordable gaseous detectors that combine low cost with excellent timing, good spatial resolution and fast response to the incoming particles. The India Based Neutrino Observatory is an approved project aimed at building a magnetised Iron Calorimeter (ICAL) detector to study Neutrino physics and related issues. The ICAL experiment will utilize about 29000 RPC's as active detector elements, sandwiched between alternate plates of thick iron. The RPC detectors will be used to detect muons produced from the atmospheric neutrinos interaction with an iron target. The spatial information of the muons will be extracted from the two dimensional readout and the hit position in the respective layers. The up going and down going directionality will be obtained using the time stamp of hits in the active detectors. The charge induced by the particle and its behaviour with respect to the applied voltage play a significant role in designing the readout electronics for the detector. In this paper, we present the timing and charge measurement of single gap glass based RPC detectors. We will also report about studies on the dependence of the timing and charge response of these RPC detectors as a function of the gas composition.

  20. The TORCH time-of-flight detector for particle identification and photon vertex association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castillo García, L.; Brook, N.; Cussans, D.; Föhl, K.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros García, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2017-02-01

    TORCH (Time Of internally Reflected CHerenkov light) is a novel time-of-flight detector, designed to provide π /K/p particle identification up to 0~ 1 GeV/c momentum and beyond. To achieve this, a time resolution of ~ 15 ps combining information from 0~ 3 detected photons is required over a 10 m flight path. Large areas can be covered with TORCH, nominally up to 30 m2. One such application is for the LHCb experiment, to complement the particle identification capabilities of its RICH detectors. TORCH has a DIRC-like construction with 10 mm-thick synthetic amorphous fused-silica plates as a radiator. Cherenkov photons propagate by total internal reflection to the plate edges and there are focussed onto an array of position-sensitive photodetectors. Custom-built micro-channel plate photo-multipliers (MCP-PMTs) are being developed in collaboration with industry to provide the lifetime, granularity and time resolution to meet the TORCH specifications. In the present paper, laboratory tests of the MCP-PMTs developed for TORCH and its readout electronics are presented. Test beam measurements of a prototype TORCH detector in a low-momentum mixed beam of pions and protons are highlighted. Time resolutions for individual photons approaching 100 ps is achieved, after correction for dispersion effects in the quartz medium. In addition to the particle identification capabilities, the high-precision timing information that TORCH provides could be used at the high-luminosity LHC to associate high-energy photons with the correct primary interaction vertex amongst the many expected.

  1. Electro-Optic Time-to-Space Converter for Optical Detector Jitter Mitigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Birnbaum, Kevin; Farr, William

    2013-01-01

    A common problem in optical detection is determining the arrival time of a weak optical pulse that may comprise only one to a few photons. Currently, this problem is solved by using a photodetector to convert the optical signal to an electronic signal. The timing of the electrical signal is used to infer the timing of the optical pulse, but error is introduced by random delay between the absorption of the optical pulse and the creation of the electrical one. To eliminate this error, a time-to-space converter separates a sequence of optical pulses and sends them to different photodetectors, depending on their arrival time. The random delay, called jitter, is at least 20 picoseconds for the best detectors capable of detecting the weakest optical pulses, a single photon, and can be as great as 500 picoseconds. This limits the resolution with which the timing of the optical pulse can be measured. The time-to-space converter overcomes this limitation. Generally, the time-to-space converter imparts a time-dependent momentum shift to the incoming optical pulses, followed by an optical system that separates photons of different momenta. As an example, an electro-optic phase modulator can be used to apply longitudinal momentum changes (frequency changes) that vary in time, followed by an optical spectrometer (such as a diffraction grating), which separates photons with different momenta into different paths and directs them to impinge upon an array of photodetectors. The pulse arrival time is then inferred by measuring which photodetector receives the pulse. The use of a time-to-space converter mitigates detector jitter and improves the resolution with which the timing of an optical pulse is determined. Also, the application of the converter enables the demodulation of a pulse position modulated signal (PPM) at higher bandwidths than using previous photodetector technology. This allows the creation of a receiver for a communication system with high bandwidth and high bits

  2. Comparison of Signals from Gravitational Wave Detectors with Instantaneous Time-Frequency Maps

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stroeer, A.; Blackburn, L.; Camp, J.

    2011-01-01

    Gravitational wave astronomy relies on the use of multiple detectors, so that coincident detections may distinguish real signals from instrumental artifacts, and also so that relative timing of signals can provide the sky position of sources. We show that the comparison of instantaneous time-frequency and time-amplitude maps provided by the Hilbert-Huang Transform (HHT) can be used effectively for relative signal timing of common signals, to discriminate between the case of identical coincident signals and random noise coincidences and to provide a classification of signals based on their time-frequency trajectories. The comparison is done with a X(sup 2) goodness-offit method which includes contributions from both the instantaneous amplitude and frequency components of the HHT to match two signals in the time domain. This approach naturally allows the analysis of waveforms with strong frequency modulation.

  3. Exploring the limiting timing resolution for large volume CZT detectors with waveform analysis

    PubMed Central

    Meng, L.J.; He, Z.

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a study for exploring the limiting timing resolution that can be achieved with a large volume 3-D position sensitive CZT detector. The interaction timing information was obtained by fitting the measured cathode waveforms to pre-defined waveform models. We compared the results from using several different waveform models. Timing resolutions, of ~9.5 ns for 511 keV full-energy events and ~11.6 ns for all detected events with energy deposition above 250 keV, were achieved with a detailed modeling of the cathode waveform as a function of interaction location and energy deposition. This detailed modeling also allowed us to derive a theoretical lower bound for the error on estimated interaction timing. Both experimental results and theoretical predications matched well, which indicated that the best timing resolution achievable in the 1 cm3 CZT detector tested is ~10 ns. It is also showed that the correlation between sampled amplitudes in cathode waveforms is an important limiting factor for the achievable timing resolution. PMID:28260808

  4. A model-based, multichannel, real-time capable sawtooth crash detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Brand, H.; de Baar, M. R.; van Berkel, M.; Blanken, T. C.; Felici, F.; Westerhof, E.; Willensdorfer, M.; The ASDEX Upgrade Team; The EUROfusion MST1 Team

    2016-07-01

    Control of the time between sawtooth crashes, necessary for ITER and DEMO, requires real-time detection of the moment of the sawtooth crash. In this paper, estimation of sawtooth crash times is demonstrated using the model-based interacting multiple model (IMM) estimator, based on simplified models for the sawtooth crash. In contrast to previous detectors, this detector uses the spatial extent of the sawtooth crash as detection characteristic. The IMM estimator is tuned and applied to multiple ECE channels at once. A model for the sawtooth crash is introduced, which is used in the IMM algorithm. The IMM algorithm is applied to seven datasets from the ASDEX Upgrade tokamak. Five crash models with different mixing radii are used. All sawtooth crashes that have been identified beforehand by visual inspection of the data, are detected by the algorithm. A few additional detections are made, which upon closer inspection are seen to be sawtooth crashes, which show a partial reconnection. A closer inspection of the detected normal crashes shows that about 42% are not well fitted by any of the full reconnection models and show some characteristics of a partial reconnection. In some case, the measurement time is during the sawtooth crashes, which also results in an incorrect estimate of the mixing radius. For data provided at a sampling rate of 1 kHz, the run time of the IMM estimator is below 1 ms, thereby fulfilling real-time requirements.

  5. Design, construction, characterization and use of a detector to measure time of flight of cosmic rays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araujo, A. C.; Félix, J.

    2016-10-01

    In the study of cosmic rays, measurements of time of flight and momentum have been used to identify incident particles from its physical properties, like mass. In this poster we present the design, construction, characterization, and operation of a detector to measure time of flight of cosmic rays. The device is comprised of three plates of plastic scintillator arranged in vertical straight line, they are coupled to one photomultiplier tube. The analogical output has been connected to a data acquisition system to obtain the number of digital pulses per millisecond. We present preliminary results.

  6. Utilization of Neutron Bang-time CVD diamond detectors at the Z Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chandler, Gordon; Hahn, Kelly; Ruiz, Carlos; Jones, Brent; Gomez, Matthew; Hess, Mark; Harding, Eric; Knapp, Patrick; Bur, James; Torres, Jose; Norris, Edward; Cooper, Gary; Styron, Jedediah; Moy, Ken; McKenna, Ian; Glebov, Vladimir; Fittinghoff, David; May, Mark; Snyder, Lucas

    2016-10-01

    We are utilizing Chemical Vapor Deposited (CVD) Diamond detectors at 2.3 meters on the Z accelerator to infer neutron bang-times from Magnetized Liner Inertial Fusion (MagLIF) sources yielding up to 3e12 DD neutrons and to bound the neutron time history of Deuterium Gas Puff loads producing 5e13 DD neutrons. The current implementation of the diagnostic and initial results will be shown as well as our future plans for the diagnostic. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  7. A TPC (Time Projection Chamber) detector for the study of high multiplicity heavy ion collisions

    SciTech Connect

    Rai, G.; Arthur, A.; Bieser, F.; Harnden, C.W.; Jones, R.; Klienfelder, S.; Lee, K.; Matis, H.S.; Nakamura, M.; McParland, C.; Nesbitt, D.; Odyniec, G.; Olson, D.; Pugh, H.G.; Ritter, H.G.; Symons, T.J.M.; Wieman, H.; Wright, M.; Wright, R. ); Rudge, A. )

    1990-01-01

    The design of a Time Projection Chamber (TPC) detector with complete pad coverage is presented. The TPC will allow the measurements of high multiplicity ({approx} 200 tracks) relativistic nucleus-nucleus collisions initiated with the heaviest, most energetic projectiles available at the LBL BEVALAC accelerator facility. The front end electronics, composed of over 15,000 time sampling channels, will be located on the chamber. The highly integrated, custom designed, electronics and the VME based data acquisition system are described. 10 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Dynamic range extension of SiPM detectors with the time-gated operation.

    PubMed

    Vilella, Eva; Diéguez, Angel

    2014-05-19

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a novel detector technology that has undergone a fast development in the last few years, owing to its single-photon resolution and ultra-fast response time. However, the typical high dark count rates of the sensor may prevent the detection of low intensity radiation fluxes. In this article, the time-gated operation with short active periods in the nanosecond range is proposed as a solution to reduce the number of cells fired due to noise and thus increase the dynamic range. The technique is aimed at application fields that function under a trigger command, such as gated fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy.

  9. Improving the time response of a gamma/neutron liquid detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malone, Robert M.; Buckles, Robert A.; DeYoung, Anemarie; Garza, Irene; Frayer, Daniel K.; Kaufman, Morris I.; Morgan, George L.; Obst, Andrew W.; Rundberg, Robert S.; Tinsley, Jim; Waltman, Tom B.; Yuan, Vincent W.

    2016-09-01

    A pulsed neutron source is used to interrogate a target, producing secondary gammas and neutrons. In order to make good use of the relatively small number of gamma rays that emerge from the system after the neutron flash, our detector system must be both efficient in converting gamma rays to a detectable electronic signal and reasonably large in volume. Isotropic gamma rays are emitted from the target. These signals are converted to light within a large chamber of a liquid scintillator. To provide adequate time-of-flight separation between the gamma and neutron signals, the liquid scintillator is placed meters away from the target under interrogation. An acrylic PMMA (polymethyl methacrylate) light guide directs the emission light from the chamber into a 5-inch-diameter photomultiplier tube. However, this PMMA light guide produces a time delay for much of the light. Illumination design programs count rays traced from the source to a receiver. By including the index of refraction of the different materials that the rays pass through, the optical power at the receiver is calculated. An illumination design program can be used to optimize the optical material geometries to maximize the ray count and/or the receiver power. A macro was written to collect the optical path lengths of the rays and import them into a spreadsheet, where histograms of the time histories of the rays are plotted. This method allows optimization on the time response of different optical detector systems. One liquid scintillator chamber has been filled with a grid of reflective plates to improve its time response. Cylindrical detector geometries are more efficient.

  10. Uncooled antenna-coupled terahertz detectors with 22 μs response time based on BiSb/Sb thermocouples

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huhn, Anna K.; Spickermann, Gunnar; Ihring, Andreas; Schinkel, Uwe; Meyer, Hans-Georg; Haring Bolívar, Peter

    2013-03-01

    We report on fast terahertz detectors based on antenna-coupled BiSb/Sb thermoelements operating at room temperature. A response time of the thermocouples as low as 22 μs and a noise equivalent power of 170 pW/√Hz at 1 kHz modulation frequency is measured in air at room temperature. The integration capability of these mass producible devices enables large-scale detector arrays for real-time terahertz imaging applications. Due to the fast response time, multiplexing of the detectors can be used to reduce the required readout circuits.

  11. New class of neutron detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Czirr, J.B.

    1997-09-01

    An optimized neutron scattering instrument design must include all significant components, including the detector. For example, useful beam intensity is limited by detector dead time; detector pixel size determines the optimum beam diameter, sample size, and sample to detector distance; and detector efficiency vs. wavelength determines the available energy range. As an example of the next generation of detectors that could affect overall instrumentation design, we will describe a new scintillator material that is potentially superior to currently available scintillators. We have grown and tested several small, single crystal scintillators based upon the general class of cerium-activated lithium lanthanide borates. The outstanding characteristic of these materials is the high scintillation efficiency-as much as five times that of Li-glass scintillators. This increase in light output permits the practical use of the exothermic B (n, alpha) reaction for low energy neutron detection. This reaction provides a four-fold increase in capture cross section relative to the Li (n, alpha) reaction, and the intriguing possibility of demanding a charged-particle/gamma ray coincidence to reduce background detection rates. These new materials will be useful in the thermal and epithermal energy ran at reactors and pulsed neutron sources.

  12. A real-time spectrum acquisition system design based on quantum dots-quantum well detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, S. H.; Guo, F. M.

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, we studied the structure characteristics of quantum dots-quantum well photodetector with response wavelength range from 400 nm to 1000 nm. It has the characteristics of high sensitivity, low dark current and the high conductance gain. According to the properties of the quantum dots-quantum well photodetectors, we designed a new type of capacitive transimpedence amplifier (CTIA) readout circuit structure with the advantages of adjustable gain, wide bandwidth and high driving ability. We have implemented the chip packaging between CTIA-CDS structure readout circuit and quantum dots detector and tested the readout response characteristics. According to the timing signals requirements of our readout circuit, we designed a real-time spectral data acquisition system based on FPGA and ARM. Parallel processing mode of programmable devices makes the system has high sensitivity and high transmission rate. In addition, we realized blind pixel compensation and smoothing filter algorithm processing to the real time spectrum data by using C++. Through the fluorescence spectrum measurement of carbon quantum dots and the signal acquisition system and computer software system to realize the collection of the spectrum signal processing and analysis, we verified the excellent characteristics of detector. It meets the design requirements of quantum dot spectrum acquisition system with the characteristics of short integration time, real-time and portability.

  13. Use of a large time-compensated scintillation detector in neutron time-of-flight measurements

    DOEpatents

    Goodman, Charles D.

    1979-01-01

    A scintillator for neutron time-of-flight measurements is positioned at a desired angle with respect to the neutron beam, and as a function of the energy thereof, such that the sum of the transit times of the neutrons and photons in the scintillator are substantially independent of the points of scintillations within the scintillator. Extrapolated zero timing is employed rather than the usual constant fraction timing. As a result, a substantially larger scintillator can be employed that substantially increases the data rate and shortens the experiment time.

  14. A model of spike-timing dependent plasticity: one or two coincidence detectors?

    PubMed

    Karmarkar, Uma R; Buonomano, Dean V

    2002-07-01

    In spike-timing dependent plasticity (STDP), synapses exhibit LTD or LTP depending on the order of activity in the presynaptic and postsynaptic cells. LTP occurs when a single presynaptic spike precedes a postsynaptic one (a positive interspike interval, or ISI), while the reverse order of activity (a negative ISI) produces LTD. A fundamental question is whether the "standard model" of plasticity in which moderate increases in Ca(2+) influx through the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) channels induce LTD and large increases induce LTP, can account for the order and interval sensitivity of STDP. To examine this issue we developed a model that captures postsynaptic Ca(2+) influx dynamics and the associativity of the NMDA receptors. While this model can generate both LTD and LTP, it predicts that LTD will be observed at both negative and positive ISIs. This is because longer and longer positive ISIs induce monotonically decreasing levels of Ca(2+), which eventually fall into the same range that produced LTD at negative ISIs. A second model that incorporated a second coincidence detector in addition to the NMDA receptor generated LTP at positive intervals and LTD only at negative ones. Our findings suggest that a single coincidence detector model based on the standard model of plasticity cannot account for order-specific STDP, and we predict that STDP requires two coincidence detectors.

  15. Note: A large open ratio, time, and position sensitive detector for time of flight measurements in UHV.

    PubMed

    Lupone, S; Damoy, S; Husseen, A; Briand, N; Debiossac, M; Tall, S; Roncin, P

    2015-12-01

    We report on the construction of an UHV compatible 40 mm active diameter detector based on micro channel plates and assembled directly on the feed-throughs of a DN63CF flange. It is based on the charge division technique and uses a standard 2 inch Si wafer as a collector. The front end electronic is placed directly on the air side of the flange allowing excellent immunity to noise and a very good timing signal with reduced ringing. The important aberrations are corrected empirically providing an absolute positioning accuracy of 500 μm while a 150 μm resolution is measured in the center.

  16. Note: A large open ratio, time, and position sensitive detector for time of flight measurements in UHV

    SciTech Connect

    Lupone, S.; Damoy, S.; Husseen, A.; Briand, N.; Debiossac, M.; Tall, S.; Roncin, P.

    2015-12-15

    We report on the construction of an UHV compatible 40 mm active diameter detector based on micro channel plates and assembled directly on the feed-throughs of a DN63CF flange. It is based on the charge division technique and uses a standard 2 inch Si wafer as a collector. The front end electronic is placed directly on the air side of the flange allowing excellent immunity to noise and a very good timing signal with reduced ringing. The important aberrations are corrected empirically providing an absolute positioning accuracy of 500 μm while a 150 μm resolution is measured in the center.

  17. Dead sea water intoxication.

    PubMed

    Levy-Khademi, Floris; Brooks, Rebecca; Maayan, Channa; Tenenbaum, Ariel; Wexler, Isaiah D

    2012-08-01

    Near drowning in the Dead Sea is associated with both respiratory manifestations and severe electrolyte abnormalities. It is often difficult to distinguish between the contributions of sea water aspiration or ingestion to clinical manifestations. We present a unique case of accidental ingestion of a large amount of Dead Sea water through a gastrostomy tube in which a patient with familial dysautonomia presented with severe electrolyte disturbances. Forced diuresis with large amounts of intravenous fluids resulted in clinical and biochemical improvement. Full recovery was achieved after 2 days of treatment.

  18. "Living versus Dead":

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Pratik

    2010-01-01

    Summary The Semple antirabies vaccine was developed by David Semple in India in 1911. Semple introduced a peculiarly British approach within the Pasteurian tradition by using carbolized dead virus. This article studies this unique phase of vaccine research between 1910 and 1935 to show that in the debates and laboratory experiments around the potency and safety of vaccines, categories like "living" and "dead" were often used as ideological and moral denominations. These abstract and ideological debates were crucial in defining the final configuration of the Semple vaccine, the most popular antirabies vaccine used globally, and also in shaping international vaccination policies. PMID:21037397

  19. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Effect of the integrated time of the induced current signal on the position resolution of the RPC detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Jin; Yue, Qian; Li, Yuan-Jing; Cheng, Jian-Ping; Li, Jin; Wang, Yi

    2009-08-01

    A prototype RPC with position resolution less than 1 mm has been produced and studied. Based on this RPC detector, the effect of the width of the integrated FADC time window on the position resolution of a RPC has been studied experimentally and theoretically. The results of theoretical calculation and experimental measurement have shown good agreement.

  20. Monolithic single-photon detectors and time-to-digital converters for picoseconds time-of-flight ranging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, Bojan; Tisa, Simone; Tosi, Alberto; Zappa, Franco

    2011-03-01

    We present a novel "smart-pixel" able to measure and record in-pixel the time delay (photon timing) between a START (e.g. given by laser excitation, cell stimulus, or LIDAR flash) and a STOP (e.g. arrival of the first returning photon from the fluorescence decay signal or back reflection from an object). Such smart-pixel relies of a SPAD detector and a Timeto- Digital Converter monolithically designed and manufactured in the same chip. Many pixels can be laid out in a rows by columns architecture, to give birth to expandable 2D imaging arrays for picoseconds-level single-photon timing applications. Distance measurements, by means of direct TOF detection (used in LIDAR systems) provided by each pixel, can open the way to the fabrication of single-chip 3D ranging arrays for scene reconstruction and intelligent object recognition. We report on the design and characterization of prototype circuits, fabricated in a 0.35 μm standard CMOS technology containing complete conversion channels, "smart-pixel" and ancillary electronics with 20 μm active area diameter SPAD detector and related quenching circuitry. With a 100 MHz reference clock, the TDC provides timeresolution of 10 ps, dynamic range of 160 ns and very high conversion linearity.

  1. Beam test results of a 16 ps timing system based on ultra-fast silicon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cartiglia, N.; Staiano, A.; Sola, V.; Arcidiacono, R.; Cirio, R.; Cenna, F.; Ferrero, M.; Monaco, V.; Mulargia, R.; Obertino, M.; Ravera, F.; Sacchi, R.; Bellora, A.; Durando, S.; Mandurrino, M.; Minafra, N.; Fadeyev, V.; Freeman, P.; Galloway, Z.; Gkougkousis, E.; Grabas, H.; Gruey, B.; Labitan, C. A.; Losakul, R.; Luce, Z.; McKinney-Martinez, F.; Sadrozinski, H. F.-W.; Seiden, A.; Spencer, E.; Wilder, M.; Woods, N.; Zatserklyaniy, A.; Pellegrini, G.; Hidalgo, S.; Carulla, M.; Flores, D.; Merlos, A.; Quirion, D.; Cindro, V.; Kramberger, G.; Mandić, I.; Mikuž, M.; Zavrtanik, M.

    2017-04-01

    In this paper we report on the timing resolution obtained in a beam test with pions of 180 GeV/c momentum at CERN for the first production of 45 μm thick Ultra-Fast Silicon Detectors (UFSD). UFSD are based on the Low-Gain Avalanche Detector (LGAD) design, employing n-on-p silicon sensors with internal charge multiplication due to the presence of a thin, low-resistivity diffusion layer below the junction. The UFSD used in this test had a pad area of 1.7 mm2. The gain was measured to vary between 5 and 70 depending on the sensor bias voltage. The experimental setup included three UFSD and a fast trigger consisting of a quartz bar readout by a SiPM. The timing resolution was determined by doing Gaussian fits to the time-of-flight of the particles between one or more UFSD and the trigger counter. For a single UFSD the resolution was measured to be 34 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, and 27 ps for a bias voltage of 230 V. For the combination of 3 UFSD the timing resolution was 20 ps for a bias voltage of 200 V, and 16 ps for a bias voltage of 230 V.

  2. Standardization of (166m)Ho and 243Am/239Np by live-timed anti-coincidence counting with extending dead time.

    PubMed

    da Silva, C J; Loureiro, J S; Delgado, J U; Poledna, R; Moreira, D S; Iwahara, A; Tauhata, L; da Silva, R L; Lopes, R T

    2012-09-01

    The National Laboratory for Metrology of Ionizing Radiation (LNMRI)/Brazil acquired (166m)Ho and (243)Am/(239)Np solutions from commercial suppliers in order to realize primary standardization and therefore reducing the associated uncertainties. The method used in the standardization was the live-timed 4πβ(LS)-γ(ΝaI(Tl)) anticoincidence counting. The live-timed anticoincidence system is operated since 2006 in LNMRI and is composed of two MTR2 modules donated by Laboratoire National Henri Becquerel (LNE-LNHB)/France. The data acquisition system uses a homemade LabView program and an Excel file for calculus. These systems have been used for primary standardization at LNMRI for many radionuclides and recently took part in the (124)Sb and (177)Lu International Key Comparisons with good performance.

  3. High rate particle tracking and ultra-fast timing with a thin hybrid silicon pixel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, M.; Aglieri Rinella, G.; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Cortina Gil, E.; Cotta Ramusino, A.; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Mapelli, A.; Martin, E.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Perktold, L.; Petagna, P.; Petrucci, F.; Poltorak, K.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Statera, M.; Velghe, B.

    2013-08-01

    The Gigatracker (GTK) is a hybrid silicon pixel detector designed for the NA62 experiment at CERN. The beam spectrometer, made of three GTK stations, has to sustain high and non-uniform particle rate (∼ 1 GHz in total) and measure momentum and angles of each beam track with a combined time resolution of 150 ps. In order to reduce multiple scattering and hadronic interactions of beam particles, the material budget of a single GTK station has been fixed to 0.5% X0. The expected fluence for 100 days of running is 2 ×1014 1 MeV neq /cm2, comparable to the one foreseen in the inner trackers of LHC detectors during 10 years of operation. To comply with these requirements, an efficient and very low-mass (< 0.15 %X0) cooling system is being constructed, using a novel microchannel cooling silicon plate. Two complementary read-out architectures have been produced as small-scale prototypes: one is based on a Time-over-Threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels, while the other makes use of a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC. The read-out ASICs are produced in 130 nm IBM CMOS technology and will be thinned down to 100 μm or less. An overview of the Gigatracker detector system will be presented. Experimental results from laboratory and beam tests of prototype bump-bonded assemblies will be described as well. These results show a time resolution of about 170 ps for single hits from minimum ionizing particles, using 200 μm thick silicon sensors.

  4. A system for accurate and automated injection of hyperpolarized substrate with minimal dead time and scalable volumes over a large range.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Steven; Bucur, Adriana; Port, Michael; Alizadeh, Tooba; Kazan, Samira M; Tozer, Gillian M; Paley, Martyn N J

    2014-02-01

    Over recent years hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization has become an established technique for studying metabolism in vivo in animal models. Temporal signal plots obtained from the injected metabolite and daughter products, e.g. pyruvate and lactate, can be fitted to compartmental models to estimate kinetic rate constants. Modeling and physiological parameter estimation can be made more robust by consistent and reproducible injections through automation. An injection system previously developed by us was limited in the injectable volume to between 0.6 and 2.4ml and injection was delayed due to a required syringe filling step. An improved MR-compatible injector system has been developed that measures the pH of injected substrate, uses flow control to reduce dead volume within the injection cannula and can be operated over a larger volume range. The delay time to injection has been minimized by removing the syringe filling step by use of a peristaltic pump. For 100μl to 10.000ml, the volume range typically used for mice to rabbits, the average delivered volume was 97.8% of the demand volume. The standard deviation of delivered volumes was 7μl for 100μl and 20μl for 10.000ml demand volumes (mean S.D. was 9 ul in this range). In three repeat injections through a fixed 0.96mm O.D. tube the coefficient of variation for the area under the curve was 2%. For in vivo injections of hyperpolarized pyruvate in tumor-bearing rats, signal was first detected in the input femoral vein cannula at 3-4s post-injection trigger signal and at 9-12s in tumor tissue. The pH of the injected pyruvate was 7.1±0.3 (mean±S.D., n=10). For small injection volumes, e.g. less than 100μl, the internal diameter of the tubing contained within the peristaltic pump could be reduced to improve accuracy. Larger injection volumes are limited only by the size of the receiving vessel connected to the pump.

  5. A system for accurate and automated injection of hyperpolarized substrate with minimal dead time and scalable volumes over a large range☆

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Steven; Bucur, Adriana; Port, Michael; Alizadeh, Tooba; Kazan, Samira M.; Tozer, Gillian M.; Paley, Martyn N.J.

    2014-01-01

    Over recent years hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization has become an established technique for studying metabolism in vivo in animal models. Temporal signal plots obtained from the injected metabolite and daughter products, e.g. pyruvate and lactate, can be fitted to compartmental models to estimate kinetic rate constants. Modeling and physiological parameter estimation can be made more robust by consistent and reproducible injections through automation. An injection system previously developed by us was limited in the injectable volume to between 0.6 and 2.4 ml and injection was delayed due to a required syringe filling step. An improved MR-compatible injector system has been developed that measures the pH of injected substrate, uses flow control to reduce dead volume within the injection cannula and can be operated over a larger volume range. The delay time to injection has been minimized by removing the syringe filling step by use of a peristaltic pump. For 100 μl to 10.000 ml, the volume range typically used for mice to rabbits, the average delivered volume was 97.8% of the demand volume. The standard deviation of delivered volumes was 7 μl for 100 μl and 20 μl for 10.000 ml demand volumes (mean S.D. was 9 ul in this range). In three repeat injections through a fixed 0.96 mm O.D. tube the coefficient of variation for the area under the curve was 2%. For in vivo injections of hyperpolarized pyruvate in tumor-bearing rats, signal was first detected in the input femoral vein cannula at 3–4 s post-injection trigger signal and at 9–12 s in tumor tissue. The pH of the injected pyruvate was 7.1 ± 0.3 (mean ± S.D., n = 10). For small injection volumes, e.g. less than 100 μl, the internal diameter of the tubing contained within the peristaltic pump could be reduced to improve accuracy. Larger injection volumes are limited only by the size of the receiving vessel connected to the pump. PMID:24355621

  6. A system for accurate and automated injection of hyperpolarized substrate with minimal dead time and scalable volumes over a large range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reynolds, Steven; Bucur, Adriana; Port, Michael; Alizadeh, Tooba; Kazan, Samira M.; Tozer, Gillian M.; Paley, Martyn N. J.

    2014-02-01

    Over recent years hyperpolarization by dissolution dynamic nuclear polarization has become an established technique for studying metabolism in vivo in animal models. Temporal signal plots obtained from the injected metabolite and daughter products, e.g. pyruvate and lactate, can be fitted to compartmental models to estimate kinetic rate constants. Modeling and physiological parameter estimation can be made more robust by consistent and reproducible injections through automation. An injection system previously developed by us was limited in the injectable volume to between 0.6 and 2.4 ml and injection was delayed due to a required syringe filling step. An improved MR-compatible injector system has been developed that measures the pH of injected substrate, uses flow control to reduce dead volume within the injection cannula and can be operated over a larger volume range. The delay time to injection has been minimized by removing the syringe filling step by use of a peristaltic pump. For 100 μl to 10.000 ml, the volume range typically used for mice to rabbits, the average delivered volume was 97.8% of the demand volume. The standard deviation of delivered volumes was 7 μl for 100 μl and 20 μl for 10.000 ml demand volumes (mean S.D. was 9 ul in this range). In three repeat injections through a fixed 0.96 mm O.D. tube the coefficient of variation for the area under the curve was 2%. For in vivo injections of hyperpolarized pyruvate in tumor-bearing rats, signal was first detected in the input femoral vein cannula at 3-4 s post-injection trigger signal and at 9-12 s in tumor tissue. The pH of the injected pyruvate was 7.1 ± 0.3 (mean ± S.D., n = 10). For small injection volumes, e.g. less than 100 μl, the internal diameter of the tubing contained within the peristaltic pump could be reduced to improve accuracy. Larger injection volumes are limited only by the size of the receiving vessel connected to the pump.

  7. Large Area Flat Panel Imaging Detectors for Astronomy and Night Time Sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O.; McPhate, J.; Frisch, H.; Elam, J.; Mane, A.; Wagner, R.; Varner, G.

    2013-09-01

    Sealed tube photo-sensing detectors for optical/IR detection have applications in astronomy, nighttime remote reconnaissance, and airborne/space situational awareness. The potential development of large area photon counting, imaging, timing detectors has significance for these applications and a number of other areas (High energy particle detection (RICH), biological single-molecule fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy, neutron imaging, time of flight mass spectroscopy, diffraction imaging). We will present details of progress towards the development of a 20 cm sealed tube optical detector with nanoengineered microchannel plates for photon counting, imaging and sub-ns event time stamping. In the operational scheme of the photodetector incoming light passes through an entrance window and interacts with a semitransparent photocathode on the inside of the window. The photoelectrons emitted are accelerated across a proximity gap and are detected by an MCP pair. The pair of novel borosilicate substrate MCPs are functionalized by atomic layer deposition (ALD), and amplify the signal and the resulting electron cloud is detected by a conductive strip line anode for determination of the event positions and the time of arrival. The physical package is ~ 25 x 25 cm but only 1.5 cm thick. Development of such a device in a square 20 cm format presents challenges: hermetic sealing to a large entrance window, a 20 cm semitransparent photocathode with good efficiency and uniformity, 20 cm MCPs with reasonable cost and performance, robust construction to preserve high vacuum and withstand an atmosphere pressure differential. We will discuss the schemes developed to address these issues and present the results for the first test devices. The novel microchannel plates employing borosilicate micro-capillary arrays provide many performance characteristics typical of conventional MCPs, but have been made in sizes up to 20 cm, have low intrinsic background (0.08 events cm2 s-1) and

  8. Design of Cherenkov bars for the optical part of the time-of-flight detector in Geant4.

    PubMed

    Nozka, L; Brandt, A; Rijssenbeek, M; Sykora, T; Hoffman, T; Griffiths, J; Steffens, J; Hamal, P; Chytka, L; Hrabovsky, M

    2014-11-17

    We present the results of studies devoted to the development and optimization of the optical part of a high precision time-of-flight (TOF) detector for the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This work was motivated by a proposal to use such a detector in conjunction with a silicon detector to tag and measure protons from interactions of the type p + p → p + X + p, where the two outgoing protons are scattered in the very forward directions. The fast timing detector uses fused silica (quartz) bars that emit Cherenkov radiation as a relativistic particle passes through and the emitted Cherenkov photons are detected by, for instance, a micro-channel plate multi-anode Photomultiplier Tube (MCP-PMT). Several possible designs are implemented in Geant4 and studied for timing optimization as a function of the arrival time, and the number of Cherenkov photons reaching the photo-sensor.

  9. TORCH - Cherenkov and Time-of-Flight PID Detector for the LHCb Upgrade at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Föhl, K.; Brook, N.; Castillo García, L.; Conneely, T.; Cussans, D.; Forty, R.; Frei, C.; Gao, R.; Gys, T.; Harnew, N.; Milnes, J.; Piedigrossi, D.; Rademacker, J.; Ros Garcì a, A.; van Dijk, M.

    2016-05-01

    TORCH is a large-area precision time-of-flight detector, based on Cherenkov light production and propagation in a quartz radiator plate, which is read out at its edges. TORCH is proposed for the LHCb experiment at CERN to provide positive particle identification for kaons, and is currently in the Research-and-Development phase. A brief overview of the micro-channel plate photon sensor development, the custom-made electronics, and an introduction to the current test beam activities is given. Optical readout solutions are presented for the potential use of BaBar DIRC bar boxes as part of the TORCH configuration in LHCb.

  10. A silicon photomultiplier readout for time of flight neutron spectroscopy with {gamma}-ray detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Pietropaolo, A.; Gorini, G.; Festa, G.; Andreani, C.; De Pascale, M. P.; Reali, E.; Grazzi, F.; Schooneveld, E. M.

    2009-09-15

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a recently developed photosensor used in particle physics, e.g., for detection of minimum ionizing particles and/or Cherenkov radiation. Its performance is comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes, but with advantages in terms of reduced volume and magnetic field insensitivity. In the present study, the performance of a gamma ray detector made of an yttrium aluminum perovskite scintillation crystal and a SiPM-based readout is assessed for use in time of flight neutron spectroscopy. Measurements performed at the ISIS pulsed neutron source demonstrate the feasibility of {gamma}-detection based on the new device.

  11. Real-time operating system for a multi-laser/multi-detector system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Coles, G.

    1980-01-01

    The laser-one hazard detector system, used on the Rensselaer Mars rover, is reviewed briefly with respect to the hardware subsystems, the operation, and the results obtained. A multidetector scanning system was designed to improve on the original system. Interactive support software was designed and programmed to implement real time control of the rover or platform with the elevation scanning mast. The formats of both the raw data and the post-run data files were selected. In addition, the interface requirements were selected and some initial hardware-software testing was completed.

  12. A silicon photomultiplier readout for time of flight neutron spectroscopy with gamma-ray detectors.

    PubMed

    Pietropaolo, A; Gorini, G; Festa, G; Andreani, C; De Pascale, M P; Reali, E; Grazzi, F; Schooneveld, E M

    2009-09-01

    The silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) is a recently developed photosensor used in particle physics, e.g., for detection of minimum ionizing particles and/or Cherenkov radiation. Its performance is comparable to that of photomultiplier tubes, but with advantages in terms of reduced volume and magnetic field insensitivity. In the present study, the performance of a gamma ray detector made of an yttrium aluminum perovskite scintillation crystal and a SiPM-based readout is assessed for use in time of flight neutron spectroscopy. Measurements performed at the ISIS pulsed neutron source demonstrate the feasibility of gamma-detection based on the new device.

  13. Dynamic Engagement of Human Motion Detectors across Space–Time Coordinates

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Motion detection is a fundamental property of the visual system. The gold standard for studying and understanding this function is the motion energy model. This computational tool relies on spatiotemporally selective filters that capture the change in spatial position over time afforded by moving objects. Although the filters are defined in space–time, their human counterparts have never been studied in their native spatiotemporal space but rather in the corresponding frequency domain. When this frequency description is back-projected to spatiotemporal description, not all characteristics of the underlying process are retained, leaving open the possibility that important properties of human motion detection may have remained unexplored. We derived descriptors of motion detectors in native space–time, and discovered a large unexpected dynamic structure involving a >2× change in detector amplitude over the first ∼100 ms. This property is not predicted by the energy model, generalizes across the visual field, and is robust to adaptation; however, it is silenced by surround inhibition and is contrast dependent. We account for all results by extending the motion energy model to incorporate a small network that supports feedforward spread of activation along the motion trajectory via a simple gain-control circuit. PMID:24948800

  14. Investigating ion-surface collisions with a niobium superconducting tunnel junction detector in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer

    SciTech Connect

    Westmacott, G.; Zhong, F.; Frank, M.; Friedrich, S.; Labov, S.; Benner, W.H.

    1999-12-01

    The performance of an energy sensitive, niobium superconducting tunnel junction detector is investigated by measuring the pulse height produced by impacting molecular and atomic ions at different kinetic energies. Ions are produced by laser resorption and matrix-assisted laser desorption in a time-of-flight mass spectrometer. Results show that the STJ detector pulse height decreases for increasing molecular ion mass, passes through a minimum at around 2000 Da, and the increases with increasing mass of molecular ions above 2000Da. The detector does not show a decline in sensitivity for high mass ions as is observed with microchannel plate ion detectors. These detector plus height measurements are discussed in terms of several physical mechanisms involved in an ion-surface collision.

  15. PMT overshoot study for the JUNO prototype detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luo, Feng-Jiao; Heng, Yue-Kun; Wang, Zhi-Min; Wang, Pei-Liang; Qin, Zhong-Hua; Xu, Mei-Hang; Liao, Dong-Hao; Zhang, Hai-Qiong; Huang, Yong-Bo; Lei, Xiang-Cui; Qian, Sen; Liu, Shu-Lin; Chen, Yuan-Bo; Wang, Yi-Fang

    2016-09-01

    The quality of PMT signals is crucial for large-size and high-precision neutrino experiments, but most of these experiments are affected by the overshoot of PMT signals from the positive HV-single cable scheme. Overshoot affects the trigger, dead time and charge measurement from a detector. For the JUNO prototype detector, we have performed a detailed study and calculation on PMT signal overshoot to control the ratio of overshoot to signal amplitude to ∼1%, with no effect on other PMT parameters. Supported by Strategic Priority Research Program A-JUNO, High Energy Physics Experiment and Detector R&D and National Natural Science Foundation of China

  16. Dead Star Rumbles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Composite of Supernova Remnant Cassiopeia A This Spitzer Space Telescope composite shows the supernova remnant Cassiopeia A (white ball) and surrounding clouds of dust (gray, orange and blue). It consists of two processed images taken one year apart. Dust features that have not changed over time appear gray, while those that have changed are colored blue or orange. Blue represents an earlier time and orange, a later time.

    These observations illustrate that a blast of light from Cassiopeia A is waltzing outward through the dusty skies. This dance, called an 'infrared echo,' began when the remnant erupted about 50 years ago.

    Cassiopeia A is the remnant of a once massive star that died in a violent supernova explosion 325 years ago. It consists of a dead star, called a neutron star, and a surrounding shell of material that was blasted off as the star died. This remnant is located 10,000 light-years away in the northern constellation Cassiopeia.

    An infrared echo is created when a star explodes or erupts, flashing light into surrounding clumps of dust. As the light zips through the dust clumps, it heats them up, causing them to glow successively in infrared, like a chain of Christmas bulbs lighting up one by one. The result is an optical illusion, in which the dust appears to be flying outward at the speed of light. This apparent motion can be seen here by the shift in colored dust clumps.

    Echoes are distinct from supernova shockwaves, which are made up material that is swept up and hurled outward by exploding stars.

    This infrared echo is the largest ever seen, stretching more than 50 light-years away from Cassiopeia A. If viewed from Earth, the entire movie frame would take up the same amount of space as two full moons.

    Hints of an older infrared echo from Cassiopeia A's supernova explosion hundreds of years ago can also be seen.

    The earlier Spitzer image was taken on November 30

  17. The Distribution of Neutron Absorbing Time in the Neutron Detector of the GAMMA-400 Space Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gnezdilov, I. I.; Mukhin, V. I.; Demichev, M. A.

    The neutron detectors (ND) have been designed for the future GAMMA-400 space observatory with 3He-counters and 6LiF/ZnS(Ag) scintillation screens. The ND contribution in the rejection factor for protons in the GAMMA-400 is considered with significantly different number of neutrons generated in the electromagnetic and hadronic cascades. The ND is predominantly made from polyethylene, it has sizes of 100×100×10 cm3. GEANT4 simulation was obtained by the differential distribution of neutron absorbing time as the function of the registration time for different 3He, 6Li concentration. Nomograms were constructed for determining neutrons miscount depending on the number of neutrons crossing the ND and time resolution of the ND. The simulation results showed that the ND with 33 3He-counters detected the neutron fluence 0.23 n/cm2 without neutrons miscount.

  18. Deuterium-tritium neutron yield measurements with the 4.5 m neutron-time-of-flight detectors at NIF.

    PubMed

    Moran, M J; Bond, E J; Clancy, T J; Eckart, M J; Khater, H Y; Glebov, V Yu

    2012-10-01

    The first several campaigns of laser fusion experiments at the National Ignition Facility (NIF) included a family of high-sensitivity scintillator∕photodetector neutron-time-of-flight (nTOF) detectors for measuring deuterium-deuterium (DD) and DT neutron yields. The detectors provided consistent neutron yield (Y(n)) measurements from below 10(9) (DD) to nearly 10(15) (DT). The detectors initially demonstrated detector-to-detector Y(n) precisions better than 5%, but lacked in situ absolute calibrations. Recent experiments at NIF now have provided in situ DT yield calibration data that establish the absolute sensitivity of the 4.5 m differential tissue harmonic imaging (DTHI) detector with an accuracy of ± 10% and precision of ± 1%. The 4.5 m nTOF calibration measurements also have helped to establish improved detector impulse response functions and data analysis methods, which have contributed to improving the accuracy of the Y(n) measurements. These advances have also helped to extend the usefulness of nTOF measurements of ion temperature and downscattered neutron ratio (neutron yield 10-12 MeV divided by yield 13-15 MeV) with other nTOF detectors.

  19. CVD Diamond Detectors for Current Mode Neutron Time-of-Flight Spectroscopy at OMEGA/NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Schmid, G J; Friensehner, A F; Glebov, V Y; Hargrove, D R; Hatchett, S P; Izumi, N; Lerche, R A; Phillips, T W; Sangster, T C; Sibernagel, C; Stoeckl, C

    2001-06-19

    As part of a laser fusion diagnostic development program, we have performed pulsed neutron and pulsed laser tests of a CVD diamond detector manufactured from DIAFILM, a commercial grade of CVD diamond. The laser tests were performed at the short pulse UV laser at Bechtel Nevada in Livermore, CA. The pulsed neutrons were provided by DT capsule implosions at the OMEGA laser fusion facility in Rochester, NY. From these tests, we have determined the impulse response to be 250 ps fwhm for an applied E-field of 500 V/mm. Additionally, we have determined the sensitivity to be 2.8 mA/W at 500 V/mm and 4.5 mA/W at 1000 V/mm (2 to 6x times higher than reported values for natural Type IIa diamond). These detector characteristics allow us to conceive of a neutron time-of-flight current mode spectrometer based on CVD diamond. Such an instrument would sit inside the laser fusion target chamber close to TCC, and would record neutron spectra fast enough such that backscattered neutrons and y rays from the target chamber wall would not be a concern. However, the data we have taken show that the Electromagnetic Pulse (EMP) noise could be a limiting factor in performance. Determining the degree to which this noise can be shielded will be an important subject of future tests.

  20. Using standard calibrated geometries to characterize a coaxial high purity germanium gamma detector for Monte Carlo simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van der Graaf, E. R.; Dendooven, P.; Brandenburg, S.

    2014-06-01

    A detector model optimization procedure based on matching Monte Carlo simulations with measurements for two experimentally calibrated sample geometries which are frequently used in radioactivity measurement laboratories results in relative agreement within 5% between simulated and measured efficiencies for a high purity germanium detector. The optimization procedure indicated that the increase in dead layer thickness is largely responsible for a detector efficiency decrease in time. The optimized detector model allows Monte Carlo efficiency calibration for all other samples of which the geometry and bulk composition is known. The presented method is a competitive and economic alternative to more elaborate detector scanning methods and results in a comparable accuracy.

  1. Using standard calibrated geometries to characterize a coaxial high purity germanium gamma detector for Monte Carlo simulations.

    PubMed

    van der Graaf, E R; Dendooven, P; Brandenburg, S

    2014-06-01

    A detector model optimization procedure based on matching Monte Carlo simulations with measurements for two experimentally calibrated sample geometries which are frequently used in radioactivity measurement laboratories results in relative agreement within 5% between simulated and measured efficiencies for a high purity germanium detector. The optimization procedure indicated that the increase in dead layer thickness is largely responsible for a detector efficiency decrease in time. The optimized detector model allows Monte Carlo efficiency calibration for all other samples of which the geometry and bulk composition is known. The presented method is a competitive and economic alternative to more elaborate detector scanning methods and results in a comparable accuracy.

  2. Using standard calibrated geometries to characterize a coaxial high purity germanium gamma detector for Monte Carlo simulations

    SciTech Connect

    Graaf, E. R. van der Dendooven, P.; Brandenburg, S.

    2014-06-15

    A detector model optimization procedure based on matching Monte Carlo simulations with measurements for two experimentally calibrated sample geometries which are frequently used in radioactivity measurement laboratories results in relative agreement within 5% between simulated and measured efficiencies for a high purity germanium detector. The optimization procedure indicated that the increase in dead layer thickness is largely responsible for a detector efficiency decrease in time. The optimized detector model allows Monte Carlo efficiency calibration for all other samples of which the geometry and bulk composition is known. The presented method is a competitive and economic alternative to more elaborate detector scanning methods and results in a comparable accuracy.

  3. Time resolution of time-of-flight detector based on multiple scintillation counters readout by SiPMs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, P. W.; De Gerone, M.; Gatti, F.; Nishimura, M.; Ootani, W.; Rossella, M.; Shirabe, S.; Uchiyama, Y.

    2016-08-01

    A new timing detector measuring ∼ 50 MeV / c positrons is under development for the MEG II experiment, aiming at a time resolution σt ∼ 30 ps. The resolution is expected to be achieved by measuring each positron time with multiple counters made of plastic scintillator readout by silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs). The purpose of this work is to demonstrate the time resolution for ∼ 50 MeV / c positrons using prototype counters. Counters with dimensions of 90 × 40 × 5mm3 readout by six SiPMs (three on each 40 × 5mm2 plane) were built with SiPMs from Hamamatsu Photonics and AdvanSiD and tested in a positron beam at the DAΦNE Beam Test Facility. The time resolution was found to improve nearly as the square root of the number of counter hits. A time resolution σt = 26.2 ± 1.3 ps was obtained with eight counters with Hamamatsu SiPMs. These results suggest that the design resolution is achievable in the MEG II experiment.

  4. Particle identification with the ALICE Time-Of-Flight detector at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alici, A.

    2014-12-01

    High performance Particle Identification system (PID) is a distinguishing characteristic of the ALICE experiment at the CERN Large Hadron Collider (LHC). Charged particles in the intermediate momentum range are identified in ALICE by the Time-Of-Flight (TOF) detector. The TOF exploits the Multi-gap Resistive Plate Chamber (MRPC) technology, capable of an intrinsic time resolution at the level of few tens of ps with an overall efficiency close to 100% and a large operation plateau. The full system is made of 1593 MRPC chambers with a total area of 141 m2, covering the pseudorapidity interval [-0.9,+0.9] and the full azimuthal angle. The ALICE TOF system has shown very stable operation during the first 3 years of collisions at the LHC. In this paper a summary of the system performance as well as main results with data from collisions will be reported.

  5. A fast preamplifier concept for SiPM-based time-of-flight PET detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huizenga, J.; Seifert, S.; Schreuder, F.; van Dam, H. T.; Dendooven, P.; Löhner, H.; Vinke, R.; Schaart, D. R.

    2012-12-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs) offer high gain and fast response to light, making them interesting for fast timing applications such as time-of-flight (TOF) PET. To fully exploit the potential of these photosensors, dedicated preamplifiers that do not deteriorate the rise time and signal-to-noise ratio are crucial. Challenges include the high sensor capacitance, typically >300 pF for a 3 mm×3 mm SiPM sensor, as well as oscillation issues. Here we present a preamplifier concept based on low noise, high speed transistors, designed for optimum timing performance. The input stage consists of a transimpedance common-base amplifier with a very low input impedance even at high frequencies, which assures a good linearity and avoids that the high detector capacitance affects the amplifier bandwidth. The amplifier has a fast timing output as well as a 'slow' energy output optimized for determining the total charge content of the pulse. The rise time of the amplifier is about 300 ps. The measured coincidence resolving time (CRT) for 511 keV photon pairs using the amplifiers in combination with 3 mm×3 mm SiPMs (Hamamatsu MPPC-S10362-33-050C) coupled to 3 mm×3 mm×5 mm LaBr3:Ce and LYSO:Ce crystals equals 95 ps FWHM and 138 ps FWHM, respectively.

  6. Fusion neutron detector for time-of-flight measurements in z-pinch and plasma focus experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Klir, D.; Kravarik, J.; Kubes, P.; Rezac, K.; Litseva, E.; Tomaszewski, K.; Karpinski, L.; Paduch, M.; Scholz, M.

    2011-03-15

    We have developed and tested sensitive neutron detectors for neutron time-of-flight measurements in z-pinch and plasma focus experiments with neutron emission times in tens of nanoseconds and with neutron yields between 10{sup 6} and 10{sup 12} per one shot. The neutron detectors are composed of a BC-408 fast plastic scintillator and Hamamatsu H1949-51 photomultiplier tube (PMT). During the calibration procedure, a PMT delay was determined for various operating voltages. The temporal resolution of the neutron detector was measured for the most commonly used PMT voltage of 1.4 kV. At the PF-1000 plasma focus, a novel method of the acquisition of a pulse height distribution has been used. This pulse height analysis enabled to determine the single neutron sensitivity for various neutron energies and to calibrate the neutron detector for absolute neutron yields at about 2.45 MeV.

  7. CMOS detector arrays in a virtual 10-kilopixel camera for coherent terahertz real-time imaging.

    PubMed

    Boppel, Sebastian; Lisauskas, Alvydas; Max, Alexander; Krozer, Viktor; Roskos, Hartmut G

    2012-02-15

    We demonstrate the principle applicability of antenna-coupled complementary metal oxide semiconductor (CMOS) field-effect transistor arrays as cameras for real-time coherent imaging at 591.4 GHz. By scanning a few detectors across the image plane, we synthesize a focal-plane array of 100×100 pixels with an active area of 20×20 mm2, which is applied to imaging in transmission and reflection geometries. Individual detector pixels exhibit a voltage conversion loss of 24 dB and a noise figure of 41 dB for 16 μW of the local oscillator (LO) drive. For object illumination, we use a radio-frequency (RF) source with 432 μW at 590 GHz. Coherent detection is realized by quasioptical superposition of the image and the LO beam with 247 μW. At an effective frame rate of 17 Hz, we achieve a maximum dynamic range of 30 dB in the center of the image and more than 20 dB within a disk of 18 mm diameter. The system has been used for surface reconstruction resolving a height difference in the μm range.

  8. Radiation hardness and precision timing study of silicon detectors for the CMS High Granularity Calorimeter (HGC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Currás, Esteban; Fernández, Marcos; Gallrapp, Christian; Gray, Lindsey; Mannelli, Marcello; Meridiani, Paolo; Moll, Michael; Nourbakhsh, Shervin; Scharf, Christian; Silva, Pedro; Steinbrueck, Georg; Fatis, Tommaso Tabarelli de; Vila, Iván

    2017-02-01

    The high luminosity upgraded LHC or Phase-II is expected to increase the instantaneous luminosity by a factor of 10 beyond the LHC's design value, expecting to deliver 250 fb-1 per year for a further 10 years of operation. Under these conditions the performance degradation due to integrated radiation dose will need to be addressed. The CMS collaboration is planning to upgrade the forward calorimeters. The replacement is called the High Granularity Calorimeter (HGC) and it will be realized as a sampling calorimeter with layers of silicon detectors interleaved. The sensors will be realized as pad detectors with sizes of less that ∼1.0 cm2 and an active thickness between 100 and 300 μm depending on the position, respectively, the expected radiation levels. For an integrated luminosity of 3000 fb-1, the electromagnetic calorimetry will sustain integrated doses of 1.5 MGy (150 Mrads) and neutron fluences up to 1016 neq/cm2. A radiation tolerance study after neutron irradiation of 300, 200, and 100 μm n-on-p and p-on-n silicon pads irradiated to fluences up to 1.6×1016 neq/cm2 is presented. The properties of these diodes studied before and after irradiation were leakage current, capacitance, charge collection efficiency, annealing effects and timing capability. The results of these measurements validate these sensors as candidates for the HGC system.

  9. Dead Sea rhodopsins revisited.

    PubMed

    Bodaker, Idan; Suzuki, Marcelino T; Oren, Aharon; Béjà, Oded

    2012-12-01

    The Dead Sea is a unique hypersaline ecosystem with near toxic magnesium levels (∼2 M), dominance of divalent cations and a slightly acidic pH. Previously, we reported a haloarchaeon related to Halobacterium salinarum to dominate in a microbial bloom that developed in 1992 in the upper water layers of the lake following massive freshwater runoff. Whether this clade also dominated an earlier bloom in 1980-1982 cannot be ascertained as no samples for cultivation-independent analysis were preserved. The presence of the light-driven proton pump bacteriorhodopsin was reported in the 1980-1982 bloom of prokaryotes that had developed in the Dead Sea. To test the hypothesis that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping may play a major role in determining what type of haloarchaea may dominate in specific bloom conditions, we compared rhodopsin genes recovered from Dead Sea biomass collected in different periods with genes coding for retinal proteins in isolated haloarchaea. Novel bacteriorhodopsin and sensory rhodopsin genes were found in samples collected in 2007 and 2010. The fact that no rhodopsin genes were recovered from samples collected during the 1992 bloom, which was dominated by a single species, suggests that different clades were present in the 1980-1982 and 1992 blooms, and that bacteriorhodopsin proton pumping did not necessarily play a determinative role in the dominance of specific halophiles in the blooms.

  10. Communicating with the Dead

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtz, Paul

    2000-03-01

    Communicating with dead persons is popular in the new paranatural (paranormal-spiritual) paradigm that has emerged today. This view violates physicalist principles. Scientists have investigated survival questions for over 150 years. Beginning with the Fox sisters in 1848, they have examined reports of apparitions and ghosts, rappings, table turnings, teleportation, levitation, and other alleged physicalist manifestations in séances. Such reports were discredited by uncovering hoaxes by alleged mediums, e.g. Eusapia Palladino (1910s), Marjorie Crandon (1920s), etc. In recent decades there has been a revival of interest in survival with reports of near-death experiences. Skeptics ask: Are such persons clinically dead? Today, channelers such as James Van Praagh, John Edwards, and Sylvia Browne claim to communicate directly with the dead (the "Sixth Sense"). There is no attempt at physical confirmation or independent eyewitness corroboration so essential for scientific inquiry. Subjective claims are uncritically accepted at their face value, though alternative naturalistic explanations can be given for the alleged phenomena.

  11. Research on the recently dead: an historical and ethical examination.

    PubMed

    Tomasini, F

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION AND SOURCES OF DATA: This paper briefly outlines the history of research on the recently dead, before critically exploring 1. In what sense can we harm the dead? 2. What are the justificatory arguments for employing family or parental consent for medical research on dead relatives? AREAS OF AGREEMENT, CONTROVERSY, GROWING POINTS OF INTEREST AND AREAS TIMELY FOR DEVELOPING RESEARCH: The controversy surrounding harm in relation to research on dead bodies largely depends on how dead people are perceived. That is, 1. As Cadavers. 2. As Ante-mortem persons. 3. By Significant others. Controversy over whether we need to have consent from significant others (bereaved relatives) depends on the weight we give to the bereaved and their experience of the dead. Understanding this is timely in developing research and is relevant to the issue of consent around organ donation for transplants.

  12. Barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gruber, L.; Brunner, S. E.; Marton, J.; Orth, H.; Suzuki, K.

    2016-07-01

    The barrel time-of-flight detector for the PANDA experiment at FAIR is foreseen as a Scintillator Tile (SciTil) Hodoscope based on several thousand small plastic scintillator tiles read-out with directly attached Silicon Photomultipliers (SiPMs). The main tasks of the system are an accurate determination of the time origin of particle tracks to avoid event mixing at high collision rates, relative time-of-flight measurements as well as particle identification in the low momentum regime. The main requirements are the use of a minimum material amount and a time resolution of σ < 100 ps. We have performed extensive optimization studies and prototype tests to prove the feasibility of the SciTil design and finalize the R&D phase. In a 2.7 GeV/c proton beam at Forschungszentrum Jülich a time resolution of about 80 ps has been achieved using SiPMs from KETEK and Hamamatsu with an active area of 3 × 3mm2. Employing the Digital Photon Counter from Philips a time resolution of about 30 ps has been reached.

  13. A generic FPGA-based detector readout and real-time image processing board

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarpotdar, Mayuresh; Mathew, Joice; Safonova, Margarita; Murthy, Jayant

    2016-07-01

    For space-based astronomical observations, it is important to have a mechanism to capture the digital output from the standard detector for further on-board analysis and storage. We have developed a generic (application- wise) field-programmable gate array (FPGA) board to interface with an image sensor, a method to generate the clocks required to read the image data from the sensor, and a real-time image processor system (on-chip) which can be used for various image processing tasks. The FPGA board is applied as the image processor board in the Lunar Ultraviolet Cosmic Imager (LUCI) and a star sensor (StarSense) - instruments developed by our group. In this paper, we discuss the various design considerations for this board and its applications in the future balloon and possible space flights.

  14. The effect of dead-timeless silicon strip readout at CDF II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Affolder, A.; Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Goldstein, J.; Hill, C.; Stuart, D.; Volobouev, I.

    2003-03-01

    The Run IIa CDF Silicon Upgrade has recently finished installation. The detector uses revision D of the SVX3 readout IC. This final revision incorporated new features in order to improve the potential of dead-timeless operation. This paper describes measurements of dead-timeless effects on silicon strip readout on the test bench. This paper also describes tests of the dynamic pedestal subtraction circuitry, which is shown to improve greatly the dead-timeless performance of the silicon systems.

  15. Evaluation of a microchannel-plate PMT as a potential timing detector suitable for positron lifetime measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosev, K.; Butterling, M.; Anwand, W.; Cowan, T.; Hartmann, A.; Heidel, K.; Jungmann, M.; Krause-Rehberg, R.; Massarczyk, R.; Schilling, K. D.; Schwengner, R.; Wagner, A.

    2010-12-01

    This paper focuses on the evaluation of a microchannel-plate photomultiplier tube (MCP-PMT) as a candidate detector, suitable for positron lifetime studies. Several properties of MCP-PMTs, such as their fast time response, compact size, low susceptibility to magnetic fields, relatively high gain and the low power consumption make them attractive for positron lifetime spectroscopy. The preliminary tests were performed with a 85001-501 Burle Planacon TM photomultiplier tube assembly. Initial measurements were conducted with a pulsed Picosecond Injection Laser (PiLas) system. The engineering sample of the 85001 exhibits a transit-time-spread (TTS) of 110 ps (FWHM). Further timing experiments showing the suitability of the device as Cherenkov detector are presented. For the first time, a conventional positron lifetime spectrum of a Cz-Si probe measured with a spectrometer, where an MCP-PMT detector is included, has been demonstrated.

  16. A combined time-of-flight and depth-of-interaction detector for total-body positron emission tomography

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Eric; Roncali, Emilie; Kapusta, Maciej; Du, Junwei; Cherry, Simon R.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: In support of a project to build a total-body PET scanner with an axial field-of-view of 2 m, the authors are developing simple, cost-effective block detectors with combined time-of-flight (TOF) and depth-of-interaction (DOI) capabilities. Methods: This work focuses on investigating the potential of phosphor-coated crystals with conventional PMT-based block detector readout to provide DOI information while preserving timing resolution. The authors explored a variety of phosphor-coating configurations with single crystals and crystal arrays. Several pulse shape discrimination techniques were investigated, including decay time, delayed charge integration (DCI), and average signal shapes. Results: Pulse shape discrimination based on DCI provided the lowest DOI positioning error: 2 mm DOI positioning error was obtained with single phosphor-coated crystals while 3–3.5 mm DOI error was measured with the block detector module. Minimal timing resolution degradation was observed with single phosphor-coated crystals compared to uncoated crystals, and a timing resolution of 442 ps was obtained with phosphor-coated crystals in the block detector compared to 404 ps without phosphor coating. Flood maps showed a slight degradation in crystal resolvability with phosphor-coated crystals; however, all crystals could be resolved. Energy resolution was degraded by 3%–7% with phosphor-coated crystals compared to uncoated crystals. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining TOF–DOI capabilities with simple block detector readout using phosphor-coated crystals. PMID:26843254

  17. A combined time-of-flight and depth-of-interaction detector for total-body positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Berg, Eric Roncali, Emilie; Du, Junwei; Cherry, Simon R.; Kapusta, Maciej

    2016-02-15

    Purpose: In support of a project to build a total-body PET scanner with an axial field-of-view of 2 m, the authors are developing simple, cost-effective block detectors with combined time-of-flight (TOF) and depth-of-interaction (DOI) capabilities. Methods: This work focuses on investigating the potential of phosphor-coated crystals with conventional PMT-based block detector readout to provide DOI information while preserving timing resolution. The authors explored a variety of phosphor-coating configurations with single crystals and crystal arrays. Several pulse shape discrimination techniques were investigated, including decay time, delayed charge integration (DCI), and average signal shapes. Results: Pulse shape discrimination based on DCI provided the lowest DOI positioning error: 2 mm DOI positioning error was obtained with single phosphor-coated crystals while 3–3.5 mm DOI error was measured with the block detector module. Minimal timing resolution degradation was observed with single phosphor-coated crystals compared to uncoated crystals, and a timing resolution of 442 ps was obtained with phosphor-coated crystals in the block detector compared to 404 ps without phosphor coating. Flood maps showed a slight degradation in crystal resolvability with phosphor-coated crystals; however, all crystals could be resolved. Energy resolution was degraded by 3%–7% with phosphor-coated crystals compared to uncoated crystals. Conclusions: These results demonstrate the feasibility of obtaining TOF–DOI capabilities with simple block detector readout using phosphor-coated crystals.

  18. First characterization of a digital SiPM based time-of-flight PET detector with 1 mm spatial resolution.

    PubMed

    Seifert, Stefan; van der Lei, Gerben; van Dam, Herman T; Schaart, Dennis R

    2013-05-07

    Monolithic scintillator detectors can offer a combination of spatial resolution, energy resolution, timing performance, depth-of-interaction information, and detection efficiency that make this type of detector a promising candidate for application in clinical, time-of-flight (TOF) positron emission tomography (PET). In such detectors the scintillation light is distributed over a relatively large number of photosensor pixels and the light intensity per pixel can be relatively low. Therefore, monolithic scintillator detectors are expected to benefit from the low readout noise offered by a novel photosensor called the digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM). Here, we present a first experimental characterization of a TOF PET detector comprising a 24 × 24 × 10 mm(3) LSO:Ce,0.2%Ca scintillator read out by a dSiPM array (DPC-6400-44-22) developed by Philips Digital Photon Counting. A spatial resolution of ~1 mm full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) averaged over the entire crystal was obtained (varying from just below 1 mm FWHM in the detector center to ~1.2 mm FWHM close to the edges). Furthermore, the bias in the position estimation at the crystal edges that is typically found in monolithic scintillators is well below 1 mm even in the corners of the crystal.

  19. Development of a large-area CMOS-based detector for real-time x-ray imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Sung Kyn; Park, Sung Kyu; Hwang, Sung Ha; Im, Dong Ak; Kosonen, Jari; Kim, Tae Woo; Yun, Seungman; Kim, Ho Kyung

    2010-04-01

    Complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) active pixel sensors (APSs) with high electrical and optical performances are now being attractive for digital radiography (DR) and dental cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). In this study, we report our prototype CMOS-based detectors capable of real-time imaging. The field-of-view of the detector is 12 × 14.4 cm. The detector employs a CsI:Tl scintillator as an x-ray-to-light converter. The electrical performance of the CMOS APS, such as readout noise and full-well capacity, was evaluated. The x-ray imaging characteristics of the detector were evaluated in terms of characteristic curve, pre-sampling modulation transfer function, noise power spectrum, detective quantum efficiency, and image lag. The overall performance of the detector is demonstrated with phantom images obtained for DR and CBCT applications. The detailed development description and measurement results are addressed. With the results, we suggest that the prototype CMOS-based detector has the potential for CBCT and real-time x-ray imaging applications.

  20. Use of ruthenium dyes for subnanosecond detector fidelity testing in real time transient absorption.

    PubMed

    Byrdin, Martin; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Villette, Sandrine; Espagne, Agathe; Brettel, Klaus

    2009-04-01

    Transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the study of photoreactions on time scales from femtoseconds to seconds. Typically, reactions slower than approximately 1 ns are recorded by the "classical" technique; the reaction is triggered by an excitation flash, and absorption changes accompanying the reaction are recorded in real time using a continuous monitoring light beam and a detection system with sufficiently fast response. The pico- and femtosecond region can be accessed by the more recent "pump-probe" technique, which circumvents the difficulties of real time detection on a subnanosecond time scale. This is paid for by accumulation of an excessively large number of shots to sample the reaction kinetics. Hence, it is of interest to extend the classical real time technique as far as possible to the subnanosecond range. In order to identify and minimize detection artifacts common on a subnanosecond scale, like overshoot, ringing, and signal reflections, rigorous testing is required of how the detection system responds to fast changes of the monitoring light intensity. Here, we introduce a novel method to create standard signals for detector fidelity testing on a time scale from a few picoseconds to tens of nanoseconds. The signals result from polarized measurements of absorption changes upon excitation of ruthenium complexes {[Ru(bpy)(3)](2+) and a less symmetric derivative} by a short laser flash. Two types of signals can be created depending on the polarization of the monitoring light with respect to that of the excitation flash: a fast steplike bleaching at magic angle and a monoexponentially decaying bleaching for parallel polarizations. The lifetime of the decay can be easily varied via temperature and viscosity of the solvent. The method is applied to test the performance of a newly developed real time transient absorption setup with 300 ps time resolution and high sensitivity.

  1. Use of ruthenium dyes for subnanosecond detector fidelity testing in real time transient absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Byrdin, Martin; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Villette, Sandrine; Espagne, Agathe; Brettel, Klaus

    2009-04-15

    Transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the study of photoreactions on time scales from femtoseconds to seconds. Typically, reactions slower than {approx}1 ns are recorded by the ''classical'' technique; the reaction is triggered by an excitation flash, and absorption changes accompanying the reaction are recorded in real time using a continuous monitoring light beam and a detection system with sufficiently fast response. The pico- and femtosecond region can be accessed by the more recent ''pump-probe'' technique, which circumvents the difficulties of real time detection on a subnanosecond time scale. This is paid for by accumulation of an excessively large number of shots to sample the reaction kinetics. Hence, it is of interest to extend the classical real time technique as far as possible to the subnanosecond range. In order to identify and minimize detection artifacts common on a subnanosecond scale, like overshoot, ringing, and signal reflections, rigorous testing is required of how the detection system responds to fast changes of the monitoring light intensity. Here, we introduce a novel method to create standard signals for detector fidelity testing on a time scale from a few picoseconds to tens of nanoseconds. The signals result from polarized measurements of absorption changes upon excitation of ruthenium complexes {l_brace}[Ru(bpy){sub 3}]{sup 2+} and a less symmetric derivative{r_brace} by a short laser flash. Two types of signals can be created depending on the polarization of the monitoring light with respect to that of the excitation flash: a fast steplike bleaching at magic angle and a monoexponentially decaying bleaching for parallel polarizations. The lifetime of the decay can be easily varied via temperature and viscosity of the solvent. The method is applied to test the performance of a newly developed real time transient absorption setup with 300 ps time resolution and high sensitivity.

  2. Use of ruthenium dyes for subnanosecond detector fidelity testing in real time transient absorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Byrdin, Martin; Thiagarajan, Viruthachalam; Villette, Sandrine; Espagne, Agathe; Brettel, Klaus

    2009-04-01

    Transient absorption spectroscopy is a powerful tool for the study of photoreactions on time scales from femtoseconds to seconds. Typically, reactions slower than ˜1 ns are recorded by the "classical" technique; the reaction is triggered by an excitation flash, and absorption changes accompanying the reaction are recorded in real time using a continuous monitoring light beam and a detection system with sufficiently fast response. The pico- and femtosecond region can be accessed by the more recent "pump-probe" technique, which circumvents the difficulties of real time detection on a subnanosecond time scale. This is paid for by accumulation of an excessively large number of shots to sample the reaction kinetics. Hence, it is of interest to extend the classical real time technique as far as possible to the subnanosecond range. In order to identify and minimize detection artifacts common on a subnanosecond scale, like overshoot, ringing, and signal reflections, rigorous testing is required of how the detection system responds to fast changes of the monitoring light intensity. Here, we introduce a novel method to create standard signals for detector fidelity testing on a time scale from a few picoseconds to tens of nanoseconds. The signals result from polarized measurements of absorption changes upon excitation of ruthenium complexes {[Ru(bpy)3]2+ and a less symmetric derivative} by a short laser flash. Two types of signals can be created depending on the polarization of the monitoring light with respect to that of the excitation flash: a fast steplike bleaching at magic angle and a monoexponentially decaying bleaching for parallel polarizations. The lifetime of the decay can be easily varied via temperature and viscosity of the solvent. The method is applied to test the performance of a newly developed real time transient absorption setup with 300 ps time resolution and high sensitivity.

  3. Monte Carlo Simulation Study on the Time Resolution of a PMT-Quadrant-Sharing LSO Detector Block for Time-of-Flight PET.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shitao; Li, Hongdi; Zhang, Yuxuan; Ramirez, Rocio A; Baghaei, Hossain; An, Shaohui; Wang, Chao; Liu, Jiguo; Wong, Wai-Hoi

    2009-01-01

    We developed a detailed Monte Carlo simulation method to study the time resolution of detectors for time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF PET). The process of gamma ray interaction in detectors, scintillation light emission and transport inside the detectors, the photoelectron generation and anode signal generation in the photomultiplier tube (PMT), and the electronics process of discriminator are simulated. We tested this simulation method using published experimental data, and found that it can generate reliable results. Using this method, we simulated the time resolution for a 13 × 13 detector block of 4 × 4 × 20 mm(3) lutetium orthosilicate (LSO) crystals coupled to four 2-inch PMTs using PMT-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technology. We analyzed the effects of several factors, including the number of photoelectrons, light transport, transit time spread (TTS), and the depth of interaction (DOI). The simulation results indicated that system time resolution of 360 ps should be possible with currently available fast PMTs. This simulation method can also be used to simulate the time resolution of other detector design method.

  4. Performance of timing RPC detectors for relativistic ions and design of a time-of-flight detector (iToF) for the R3B-FAIR experiment for fission and spallation reactions

    SciTech Connect

    Casarejos, E.; Ayyad, Y.; Benlliure, J.; Duran, I.; Paradela, C.; Lopez-Lago, M.; Segade, A.; Vilan, J. A.

    2011-07-01

    Resistive-plate-chambers (RPCs) were proposed to be used to build a time-of-flight detector for relativist heavy ions of the R3B-FAIR experiment, as well as other applications. State-of-the-art reaction codes allow for evaluating the requirements of the detector. The specific needs that working with heavy ions impose about material thicknesses are solved with new design concepts. We built prototypes and investigated the behaviour of RPCs tested with relativistic heavy ions. We measured the efficiency and streamer presence for ions with atomic numbers up to 38. Electron beams were used to study the timing capabilities of the prototypes. (authors)

  5. Dead Band Controls Guide.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1978-11-01

    n o m i z e r c on t ro l , damper repair may re quire c onsideration. 2. No tubin g costs are included in the above estima tes . Typically 150 to...guidelines include techniques for estimating construction and maintenance cost , and performing economic analysis for each system . N \\ 0~c...43 Cost Estimate 43 Payback Anal ysis 43 PART I V A P P E N D I C E S A EXAMPLE - COST ESTIMATE OF DEAD BAND RETROFIT 52 B E X A M P L E - P A Y B A

  6. Can the dead be brought into disrepute?

    PubMed

    Masterton, Malin; Hansson, Mats G; Höglund, Anna T; Helgesson, Gert

    2007-01-01

    Queen Christina of Sweden was unconventional in her time, leading to hypotheses on her gender and possible hermaphroditic nature. If genetic analysis can substantiate the latter claim, could this bring the queen into disrepute 300 years after her death? Joan C. Callahan has argued that if a reputation changes, this constitutes a change only in the group of people changing their views and not in the person whose reputation it is. Is this so? This paper analyses what constitutes change and draws out the implications to the reputation of the dead. It is argued that a reputation is a relational property which can go through changes. The change is "real" for the group changing their views on Queen Christina and of a Cambridge kind for the long dead queen herself. Cambridge changes result in new properties being acquired, some of which can be of significance. Although the dead cannot go through any non-relational changes, it is possible for the dead to change properties through Cambridge changes. In this sense changes in reputation do affect the dead, and thus Queen Christina can acquire a new property, in this case possibly a worse reputation.

  7. Travel Time Estimation Using Freeway Point Detector Data Based on Evolving Fuzzy Neural Inference System.

    PubMed

    Tang, Jinjun; Zou, Yajie; Ash, John; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yinhai

    2016-01-01

    Travel time is an important measurement used to evaluate the extent of congestion within road networks. This paper presents a new method to estimate the travel time based on an evolving fuzzy neural inference system. The input variables in the system are traffic flow data (volume, occupancy, and speed) collected from loop detectors located at points both upstream and downstream of a given link, and the output variable is the link travel time. A first order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy rule set is used to complete the inference. For training the evolving fuzzy neural network (EFNN), two learning processes are proposed: (1) a K-means method is employed to partition input samples into different clusters, and a Gaussian fuzzy membership function is designed for each cluster to measure the membership degree of samples to the cluster centers. As the number of input samples increases, the cluster centers are modified and membership functions are also updated; (2) a weighted recursive least squares estimator is used to optimize the parameters of the linear functions in the Takagi-Sugeno type fuzzy rules. Testing datasets consisting of actual and simulated data are used to test the proposed method. Three common criteria including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute relative error (MARE) are utilized to evaluate the estimation performance. Estimation results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the EFNN method through comparison with existing methods including: multiple linear regression (MLR), instantaneous model (IM), linear model (LM), neural network (NN), and cumulative plots (CP).

  8. Performance of the Time Expansion Chamber / Transition Radiation Detector in PHENIX Experiment at RHIC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luiz Silva, Cesar

    2004-10-01

    The Time Expansion Chamber / Transition Radiation Detector (TEC/TRD) in the PHENIX Experiment at RHIC measures ionization losses (dE/dX) and transition radiation from charged particles produced by beam collisions. It is designed to perform tracking and identification for charged particles on very high particle multiplicity environment. The TEC/TRD consists of 24 wire chambers readout on both sides filled with recycled Xe-based gas mixture. This wire chamber configuration, besides providing measurements of ionization losses for charged particles, can absorb X-Ray photons generated by transition radiation from incident particles with γ>1000 crossing fiber radiators placed at the entrance of the chambers. This allows TEC/TRD to distinguish electrons from the huge pion signal produced over a broad momentum range (1GeV/ctimes every collision providing the drift time as an additional variable to determine points for the charged particle's track. In this presentation we will show results on e/π separation for momentum above 1 GeV/c and momentum resolution using TEC/TRD in Au-Au collisions at √s=200 GeV/c and √s=62.4 GeV/c.

  9. Accurate modeling of SiPM detectors coupled to FE electronics for timing performance analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciciriello, F.; Corsi, F.; Licciulli, F.; Marzocca, C.; Matarrese, G.; Del Guerra, A.; Bisogni, M. G.

    2013-08-01

    It has already been shown how the shape of the current pulse produced by a SiPM in response to an incident photon is sensibly affected by the characteristics of the front-end electronics (FEE) used to read out the detector. When the application requires to approach the best theoretical time performance of the detection system, the influence of all the parasitics associated to the coupling SiPM-FEE can play a relevant role and must be adequately modeled. In particular, it has been reported that the shape of the current pulse is affected by the parasitic inductance of the wiring connection between SiPM and FEE. In this contribution, we extend the validity of a previously presented SiPM model to account for the wiring inductance. Various combinations of the main performance parameters of the FEE (input resistance and bandwidth) have been simulated in order to evaluate their influence on the time accuracy of the detection system, when the time pick-off of each single event is extracted by means of a leading edge discriminator (LED) technique.

  10. 78 FR 62354 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Dead Sea Scrolls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-10-18

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times'' Formerly Titled ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times'' ACTION... exhibition ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times.'' The referenced notice was corrected...

  11. 77 FR 64373 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Dead Sea Scrolls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-19

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times,'' Formerly Titled ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times... the exhibition ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times.'' The referenced notice...

  12. 78 FR 16565 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: “The Dead Sea Scrolls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-03-15

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition Determinations: ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times'' Formerly Titled ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times'' ACTION... exhibition ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times.'' The referenced notice was corrected...

  13. 78 FR 24462 - Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition; Determinations: “The Dead Sea Scrolls...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-25

    ... Culturally Significant Objects Imported for Exhibition; Determinations: ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Ancient Times'' Formerly Titled ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times... the exhibition ``The Dead Sea Scrolls: Life and Faith in Biblical Times.'' The referenced notice...

  14. Development of a real-time digital radiography system using a scintillator-type flat-panel detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ikeda, Shigeyuki; Suzuki, Katsumi; Ishikawa, Ken; Okajima, Kenichi

    2001-06-01

    In order to study the advantage and remaining problems of FPD (flat panel detector) for clinical use by the real-time DR (digital radiography) system, we developed a prototype system using a scintillator type FPD and which was compared with previous I.I.-CCD type real-time DR. We replaced the X- ray detector of DR-2000X from I.I.-4M (4 million pixels)-CCD camera to the scintillator type dynamic FPD(7' X 9', 127 micrometers ), which can take both radiographic and fluoroscopic images. We obtained the images of head and stomach phantoms, and discussed about the image quality with medical doctors.

  15. Time-Resolved Imaging of the MALDI Linear-TOF Ion Cloud: Direct Visualization and Exploitation of Ion Optical Phenomena Using a Position- and Time-Sensitive Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ellis, Shane R.; Soltwisch, Jens; Heeren, Ron M. A.

    2014-05-01

    In this study, we describe the implementation of a position- and time-sensitive detection system (Timepix detector) to directly visualize the spatial distributions of the matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization ion cloud in a linear-time-of-flight (MALDI linear-ToF) as it is projected onto the detector surface. These time-resolved images allow direct visualization of m/z-dependent ion focusing effects that occur within the ion source of the instrument. The influence of key parameters, namely extraction voltage ( E V ), pulsed-ion extraction (PIE) delay, and even the matrix-dependent initial ion velocity was investigated and were found to alter the focusing properties of the ion-optical system. Under certain conditions where the spatial focal plane coincides with the detector plane, so-called x-y space focusing could be observed (i.e., the focusing of the ion cloud to a small, well-defined spot on the detector). Such conditions allow for the stigmatic ion imaging of intact proteins for the first time on a commercial linear ToF-MS system. In combination with the ion-optical magnification of the system (~100×), a spatial resolving power of 11-16 μm with a pixel size of 550 nm was recorded within a laser spot diameter of ~125 μm. This study demonstrates both the diagnostic and analytical advantages offered by the Timepix detector in ToF-MS.

  16. Gigahertz-gated InGaAs/InP single-photon detector with detection efficiency exceeding 55% at 1550 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Comandar, L. C.; Fröhlich, B.; Dynes, J. F.; Sharpe, A. W.; Lucamarini, M.; Yuan, Z. L.; Shields, A. J.; Penty, R. V.

    2015-02-28

    We report on a gated single-photon detector based on InGaAs/InP avalanche photodiodes (APDs) with a single-photon detection efficiency exceeding 55% at 1550 nm. Our detector is gated at 1 GHz and employs the self-differencing technique for gate transient suppression. It can operate nearly dead time free, except for the one clock cycle dead time intrinsic to self-differencing, and we demonstrate a count rate of 500 Mcps. We present a careful analysis of the optimal driving conditions of the APD measured with a dead time free detector characterization setup. It is found that a shortened gate width of 360 ps together with an increased driving signal amplitude and operation at higher temperatures leads to improved performance of the detector. We achieve an afterpulse probability of 7% at 50% detection efficiency with dead time free measurement and a record efficiency for InGaAs/InP APDs of 55% at an afterpulse probability of only 10.2% with a moderate dead time of 10 ns.

  17. CVD Diamond Detectors for Current Mode Neutron Time-of-Flight Spectroscopy at OMEGA/NIF

    SciTech Connect

    G. J. Schmid; V. Yu. Glebov; A. V. Friensehner; D. R. Hargrove; S. P. Hatchett; N. Izumi; R. A. Lerche; T. W. Phillips; T. C. Sangster; C. Silbernagel; C. Stoecki

    2001-07-01

    We have performed pulsed neutron and pulsed laser tests of a CVD diamond detector manufactured from DIAFILM, a commercial grade of CVD diamond. The laser tests were performed at the short pulse UV laser at Bechtel Nevada in Livermore, CA. The pulsed neutrons were provided by DT capsule implosions at the OMEGA laser fusion facility in Rochester, NY. From these tests, we have determined the impulse response to be 250 ps fwhm for an applied E-field of 500 V/mm. Additionally, we have determined the sensitivity to be 2.4 mA/W at 500 V/mm and 4.0 mA/W at 1000 V/mm. These values are approximately 2 to 5x times higher than those reported for natural Type IIa diamond at similar E-field and thickness (1mm). These characteristics allow us to conceive of a neutron time-of-flight current mode spectrometer based on CVD diamond. Such an instrument would sit inside the laser fusion target chamber close to target chamber center (TCC), and would record neutron spectra fast enough such that backscattered neutrons and x-rays from the target chamber wall would not be a concern. The acquired neutron spectra could then be used to extract DD fuel areal density from the downscattered secondary to secondary ratio.

  18. High-performance SPAD array detectors for parallel photon timing applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rech, I.; Cuccato, A.; Antonioli, S.; Cammi, C.; Gulinatti, A.; Ghioni, M.

    2012-02-01

    Over the past few years there has been a growing interest in monolithic arrays of single photon avalanche diodes (SPAD) for spatially resolved detection of faint ultrafast optical signals. SPADs implemented in planar technologies offer the typical advantages of microelectronic devices (small size, ruggedness, low voltage, low power, etc.). Furthermore, they have inherently higher photon detection efficiency than PMTs and are able to provide, beside sensitivities down to single-photons, very high acquisition speeds. In order to make SPAD array more and more competitive in time-resolved application it is necessary to face problems like electrical crosstalk between adjacent pixel, moreover all the singlephoton timing electronics with picosecond resolution has to be developed. In this paper we present a new instrument suitable for single-photon imaging applications and made up of 32 timeresolved parallel channels. The 32x1 pixel array that includes SPAD detectors represents the system core, and an embedded data elaboration unit performs on-board data processing for single-photon counting applications. Photontiming information is exported through a custom parallel cable that can be connected to an external multichannel TCSPC system.

  19. Determining the detection thresholds for harbor porpoise clicks of autonomous data loggers, the Timing Porpoise Detectors.

    PubMed

    Verfuß, Ursula K; Dähne, Michael; Gallus, Anja; Jabbusch, Martin; Benke, Harald

    2013-09-01

    Timing Porpoise Detectors (T-PODs, Chelonia Ltd.) are autonomous passive acoustic devices for monitoring odontocetes. They register the time of occurrence and duration of high frequency pulsed sounds as possible odontocetes echolocation clicks. Because of evolution, five T-POD versions exist. Although the manufacturer replaced those by a digital successor, the C-POD, T-PODs are still used, and data from many field studies exist. Characterizing the acoustic properties of T-PODs enables the interpretation of data obtained with different devices. Here, the detection thresholds of different T-POD versions for harbor porpoise clicks were determined. While thresholds among devices were quite variable in the first T-POD generations, they became more standardized in newer versions. Furthermore, the influence of user-controlled settings on the threshold was investigated. From version 3 on, the detection threshold was found to be easily adjustable with version-dependent setting options "minimum intensity" and "sensitivity," enabling the presetting of standard thresholds. In version 4, the setting "click bandwidth" had a strong influence on the detection threshold, while "selectivity" in version 3 and "noise adaptation = ON" or "OFF" in version 4 hardly influenced thresholds obtained in the tank tests. Nevertheless, the latter setting may influence thresholds in a complex acoustic environment like the sea.

  20. Simultaneous real-time visible and infrared video with single-pixel detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Edgar, Matthew. P.; Gibson, Graham M.; Bowman, Richard W.; Sun, Baoqing; Radwell, Neal; Mitchell, Kevin J.; Welsh, Stephen S.; Padgett, Miles J.

    2015-05-01

    Conventional cameras rely upon a pixelated sensor to provide spatial resolution. An alternative approach replaces the sensor with a pixelated transmission mask encoded with a series of binary patterns. Combining knowledge of the series of patterns and the associated filtered intensities, measured by single-pixel detectors, allows an image to be deduced through data inversion. In this work we extend the concept of a ‘single-pixel camera’ to provide continuous real-time video at 10 Hz , simultaneously in the visible and short-wave infrared, using an efficient computer algorithm. We demonstrate our camera for imaging through smoke, through a tinted screen, whilst performing compressive sampling and recovering high-resolution detail by arbitrarily controlling the pixel-binning of the masks. We anticipate real-time single-pixel video cameras to have considerable importance where pixelated sensors are limited, allowing for low-cost, non-visible imaging systems in applications such as night-vision, gas sensing and medical diagnostics.

  1. Fast neutron tomography with real-time pulse-shape discrimination in organic scintillation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joyce, Malcolm J.; Agar, Stewart; Aspinall, Michael D.; Beaumont, Jonathan S.; Colley, Edmund; Colling, Miriam; Dykes, Joseph; Kardasopoulos, Phoevos; Mitton, Katie

    2016-10-01

    A fast neutron tomography system based on the use of real-time pulse-shape discrimination in 7 organic liquid scintillation detectors is described. The system has been tested with a californium-252 source of dose rate 163 μSv/h at 1 m and neutron emission rate of 1.5×107 per second into 4π and a maximum acquisition time of 2 h, to characterize two 100×100×100 mm3 concrete samples. The first of these was a solid sample and the second has a vertical, cylindrical void. The experimental data, supported by simulations with both Monte Carlo methods and MATLAB®, indicate that the presence of the internal cylindrical void, corners and inhomogeneities in the samples can be discerned. The potential for fast neutron assay of this type with the capability to probe hydrogenous features in large low-Z samples is discussed. Neutron tomography of bulk porous samples is achieved that combines effective penetration not possible with thermal neutrons in the absence of beam hardening.

  2. Signal-Conditioning Block of a 1 × 200 CMOS Detector Array for a Terahertz Real-Time Imaging System

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Han, Seong-Tae

    2016-01-01

    A signal conditioning block of a 1 × 200 Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) detector array is proposed to be employed with a real-time 0.2 THz imaging system for inspecting large areas. The plasmonic CMOS detector array whose pixel size including an integrated antenna is comparable to the wavelength of the THz wave for the imaging system, inevitably carries wide pixel-to-pixel variation. To make the variant outputs from the array uniform, the proposed signal conditioning block calibrates the responsivity of each pixel by controlling the gate bias of each detector and the voltage gain of the lock-in amplifiers in the block. The gate bias of each detector is modulated to 1 MHz to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the imaging system via the electrical modulation by the conditioning block. In addition, direct current (DC) offsets of the detectors in the array are cancelled by initializing the output voltage level from the block. Real-time imaging using the proposed signal conditioning block is demonstrated by obtaining images at the rate of 19.2 frame-per-sec of an object moving on the conveyor belt with a scan width of 20 cm and a scan speed of 25 cm/s. PMID:26950128

  3. Signal-Conditioning Block of a 1 × 200 CMOS Detector Array for a Terahertz Real-Time Imaging System.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jong-Ryul; Lee, Woo-Jae; Han, Seong-Tae

    2016-03-02

    A signal conditioning block of a 1 × 200 Complementary Metal-Oxide-Semiconductor (CMOS) detector array is proposed to be employed with a real-time 0.2 THz imaging system for inspecting large areas. The plasmonic CMOS detector array whose pixel size including an integrated antenna is comparable to the wavelength of the THz wave for the imaging system, inevitably carries wide pixel-to-pixel variation. To make the variant outputs from the array uniform, the proposed signal conditioning block calibrates the responsivity of each pixel by controlling the gate bias of each detector and the voltage gain of the lock-in amplifiers in the block. The gate bias of each detector is modulated to 1 MHz to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of the imaging system via the electrical modulation by the conditioning block. In addition, direct current (DC) offsets of the detectors in the array are cancelled by initializing the output voltage level from the block. Real-time imaging using the proposed signal conditioning block is demonstrated by obtaining images at the rate of 19.2 frame-per-sec of an object moving on the conveyor belt with a scan width of 20 cm and a scan speed of 25 cm/s.

  4. Real-time Transient Monitoring With the HAWC Detector: Design and Performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wisher, Ian Gabriel

    Blazars are some of the most energetic environments in the Universe with exceptionally strong non-thermal emission. Since the detection of VHE variability in the blazar Markarian 421, observations of blazars and their VHE variability have been an active field of research. Through long campaigns of observations, blazars have shown variability over timescales that vary from minutes to days across the electromagnetic spectrum from radio to TeV gamma rays. Though rare, the variability can also have extreme outburst events where the flux peaks at several orders of magnitude higher than the quiescent state of the source. These outbursts are interesting not only for constraining the models of acceleration and variability but also as tools to study other physics topics such as the extragalactic background light, intergalactic magnetic field, and Lorentz invariance. Though powerful, the rarity of these events makes studies challenging and motivates additional searches and detections. The High Altitude Water Cherenkov (HAWC) detector is an extensive air shower instrument with a high duty cycle, large field of view, and extraordinary sensitivity to TeV gamma rays. This allows HAWC to perform unbiased monitoring of a large number of different sources for flaring states and catch rare events such as the aforementioned blazar flares. This work presents a search for short timescale flares from known blazars and TeV sources for the first year of HAWC data with the capability to generate alerts in real time. In the course of this work, a variety of new hardware, software, and detection techniques were developed in conjunction with the construction of the HAWC detector. These include hardware development on the design of the main data acquisition system, electronics integrations and testing, design/testing of the online reconstruction system, and design of the electronics for the outrigger extension. Algorithms and methods to detect transients in HAWC time series data were developed

  5. Time-resolved diffuse reflectance measurement carried out on the head of an adult at large source-detector separation.

    PubMed

    Liebert, Adam; Sawosz, Piotr; Kacprzak, Michal; Weigl, Wojciech; Botwicz, Marcin; Maniewski, Roman

    2010-01-01

    Multichannel time-resolved optical monitoring system was constructed for measurements of diffuse reflectance in optically turbid medium at very large source-detector separation up to 9 cm. The system is based on femtosecond TiSa laser and sensitive photomultiplier tube detector. The laser light of 300mW of power was delivered to the surface of the head with the use of an optical fiber. A beam expander was applied in order to distribute the laser light on a large spot which allowed to avoid energetic stimulation of the tissue. The photomultiplier tube detector was positioned directly on the surface of the medium at the distance of 9cm from the center of the source position. In this paper we report results of an in-vivo experiment carried out on the head of an adult healthy volunteer. The time-resolved system was applied during intravenous injection of an optical contrast agent (indocyanine green - ICG) and the distributions of times of flight of photons were successfully acquired showing inflow and washout of the dye to the tissue. Time-courses of the moments of distributions of times of flight of photons are presented and compared with the results obtained simultaneously at shorter source-detector separations (3 cm, 4 cm and 5 cm).

  6. High-dose neutron detector project update

    SciTech Connect

    Menlove, Howard Olsen; Henzlova, Daniela

    2016-08-10

    These are the slides for a progress review meeting by the sponsor. This is an update on the high-dose neutron detector project. In summary, improvements in both boron coating and signal amplification have been achieved; improved boron coating materials and procedures have increased efficiency by ~ 30-40% without the corresponding increase in the detector plate area; low dead-time via thin cell design (~ 4 mm gas gaps) and fast amplifiers; prototype PDT 8” pod has been received and testing is in progress; significant improvements in efficiency and stability have been verified; use commercial PDT 10B design and fabrication to obtain a faster path from the research to practical high-dose neutron detector.

  7. Dead of night.

    PubMed

    Balter, Leon

    2010-07-01

    Dead of Night, the first psychoanalytic horror film, was produced in England in 1945, immediately after the end of World War II--that is, after the English population had suffered systematic Nazi terror from imminent invasion, incessant aerial bombing, and rocket-bombs. This film continued the prewar format of horror films based on themes of the supernatural and the hubris and excesses of science. However, it introduced psychoanalysis as the science in question. The film is structured on two levels: a genteel English country weekend to which witty and urbane guests have been invited; and five horror stories told by the guests. Psychoanalytic insights into this film structure are used here to explain how the film induces horror in the audience.

  8. Experience using an automated fault location system with a time-of-flight wall detector array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olson, D.; Greiman, W.; Hall, D.; Balaban, D.; Day, C.

    1990-08-01

    We describe the architecture of a general purpose monitoring system and give examples of its use with a 300 element detector array in a relativistic heavy ion experiment. The system has a simple and well defined interface between the detector specific parts of the system and those which are independent of any detector specific features. Tracking simple statistics on the fundamental data items (ADC and TDC values) are sufficient to diagnose the higher level components in the system. The monitoring of on-line beam data provides a sensitive monitor of global parameters of the experiment.

  9. Antipodal neutron time of flight (nToF) detectors more than double their diagnostic value

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilkenny, Joseph; Knauer, James; Caggiano, Joseph; Eckart, Mark; Hatarik, Robert; Munro, David; Sayre, Daniel; Spears, Brian

    2014-10-01

    Moments of the neutron-velocity distribution give unique insights to the quality of an inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosion. The three, 20 m distance nToF detectors on the NIF are being augmented by adding an antipodal detector to each of them. Antipodal pairs of detectors increase the sampling of imploded DT ice but also allow an accurate measurement of the areal density of the odd modes of the compressed ice from the un-scattered yield ratio, and with the two measurements distinguishing center of mass drift velocity from the thermodynamic ion temperature. NNSA Contract Number DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  10. Travel Time Estimation Using Freeway Point Detector Data Based on Evolving Fuzzy Neural Inference System

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Jinjun; Zou, Yajie; Ash, John; Zhang, Shen; Liu, Fang; Wang, Yinhai

    2016-01-01

    Travel time is an important measurement used to evaluate the extent of congestion within road networks. This paper presents a new method to estimate the travel time based on an evolving fuzzy neural inference system. The input variables in the system are traffic flow data (volume, occupancy, and speed) collected from loop detectors located at points both upstream and downstream of a given link, and the output variable is the link travel time. A first order Takagi-Sugeno fuzzy rule set is used to complete the inference. For training the evolving fuzzy neural network (EFNN), two learning processes are proposed: (1) a K-means method is employed to partition input samples into different clusters, and a Gaussian fuzzy membership function is designed for each cluster to measure the membership degree of samples to the cluster centers. As the number of input samples increases, the cluster centers are modified and membership functions are also updated; (2) a weighted recursive least squares estimator is used to optimize the parameters of the linear functions in the Takagi-Sugeno type fuzzy rules. Testing datasets consisting of actual and simulated data are used to test the proposed method. Three common criteria including mean absolute error (MAE), root mean square error (RMSE), and mean absolute relative error (MARE) are utilized to evaluate the estimation performance. Estimation results demonstrate the accuracy and effectiveness of the EFNN method through comparison with existing methods including: multiple linear regression (MLR), instantaneous model (IM), linear model (LM), neural network (NN), and cumulative plots (CP). PMID:26829639

  11. A real-time, nonintrusive trace gas detector based on laser photothermal deflection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Vries, H. S. M.; Dam, N.; van Lieshout, M. R.; Sikkens, C.; Harren, F. J. M.; Reuss, J.

    1995-09-01

    We present the layout and technical details of a trace gas monitor based on photothermal deflection. The operating principle of this instrument, i.e., the deflection of a (weak) probe laser beam by the thermal refractive index gradient induced by trace gas absorption of an intense pump laser beam, allows nonintrusive measurements with good space and time resolution. An intra-cavity CO2 laser is used as the pump beam and a red HeNe laser as the probe. The latter runs perpendicular to the pump beam to optimize spatial resolution. To increase sensitivity, the probe laser is incorporated in a multipass setup. The instrument is demonstrated by the localization of ethylene emission sites on a cherry tomato and by monitoring ammonia production due to nitrogen fixation by cyanobacteria. Both C2H4 and NH3 can be detected at the 1-3 ppb level, at a spatial resolution of 2 mm (along the pump laser)×0.6 mm (perpendicular to it), and a response time of 0.1 s (without background correction) or 15 s (including background correction). Sensitivity can be increased at the expense of spatial resolution, and vice versa. In principle, this instrument is applicable to all those gases possessing a characteristic (``fingerprint'') spectrum in the CO2 laser range. The great advantage of the photothermal deflection technique with respect to other trace gas detection schemes lies in the nonintrusive character of the measurements. There is no need to enclose the sample in a vessel or to suck large volumes of air into the detector; measurements can be performed in open air and in real time. This should prove especially useful where sticky (polar) gases, like H2O, NH3, CH3OH, etc., are to be detected quantitatively. Main applications include air quality monitoring, especially concerning dry deposition rate measurements using the eddy correlation technique, and the study of volatile metabolite emission of biological samples.

  12. A VXIbus based trigger for the CLAS detector at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    Doughty, D.C. Jr.; Englert, J.; Hale, R.; Lemon, S. ); Leung, P. ); Cuevas, C.; Joyce, D. )

    1992-04-01

    This paper discusses a VXIbus based first level triggering system for the CLAS detector at CEBAF which has been designed and prototyped. It uses pipelining and a triple memory lookup to produce a dead-timeless trigger decision with an average latency of 110 ns and a jitter of 20 ns. The VXIbus Extended Start/Stop triggering protocols allow sub-nanosecond time synchronization.

  13. A VXIbus based trigger for the CLAS detector at CEBAF

    SciTech Connect

    D.C. Doughty, Jr.; J. Englert; R. Hale; S. Lemon; P. Leung; C. Cuevas; D. Joyce

    1992-04-01

    A VXIbus based first level triggering system for the CLAS detector at CEBAF has been designed and prototyped. It uses pipelining and a triple memory lookup to produce a dead-timeless trigger decision with an average latency of 110 nS and a jitter of 20 nS. The VXIbus Extended Start/Stop triggering protocols allow sub-nanosecond time synchronization.

  14. Time-domain Response of a Metal Detector to a Target Buried in Soil with Frequency-dependent Magnetic Susceptibility

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-07-06

    The work reported in this paper is a part of on-going studies to clarify how and to what extent soil electromagnetic properties affect the...performance of induction metal detectors widely used in humanitarian demining. This paper studies the specific case of the time-domain response of a small

  15. Low-Timing-Jitter Near-Infrared Single-Photon-Sensitive 16-Channel Intensified-Photodiode Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krainak, Michael A.; Lu, Wei; Yang, Guangning; Sun, Xiaoli; Sykora, Derek; Jurkovic, Mike; Aebi, Verle; Costello, Ken; Burns, Richard

    2011-01-01

    We developed a 16-channel InGaAsP photocathode intensified-photodiode (IPD) detector with 78 ps (1-sigma) timing-jitter, less than 500 ps FWHM impulse response, greater than 15% quantum efficiency at 1064 nm wavelength with 131 kcps dark counts at 15 C.

  16. Enhancement of Real-Time THz Imaging System Based on 320 × 240 Uncooled Microbolometer Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Xing; Wu, Zhiming; Gou, Jun; Liu, Ziji; Wang, Jun; Zheng, Jie; Luo, Zhenfei; Chen, Weiqing; Que, Longcheng; Jiang, Yadong

    2016-10-01

    A real-time terahertz (THz) imaging system was demonstrated based on a 320 × 240 uncooled microbolometer detector combined with a 2.52 THz far-infrared CO2 laser. On the top of micro-bridge structure (35 × 35 μm2), a 10 nm nickel-chromium (NiCr) thin film was deposited to enhance THz absorption, which was fabricated by a combined process of magnetron sputtering and reactive ion etching (RIE). By mechanical simulation using design of experiment (DOE) method, the minimum deformation was optimized to 0.0385 μm, and a measured deformation of 0.097 μm was achieved in the fabrication. The fabricated micro-bridge pixel was used for THz detection, and a responsivity of 1235 V/W was achieved with a noise equivalent power (NEP) of 87.4 pW/Hz1/2. THz imaging of metal gasket covered by label paper, paper clip in an envelope, and watermark of a banknote was demonstrated by a combination of histogram equalization (HE) and linear enhancement algorithm.

  17. Real-Time Data Processing in the muon system of the D0 detector.

    SciTech Connect

    Neeti Parashar et al.

    2001-07-03

    This paper presents a real-time application of the 16-bit fixed point Digital Signal Processors (DSPs), in the Muon System of the D0 detector located at the Fermilab Tevatron, presently the world's highest-energy hadron collider. As part of the Upgrade for a run beginning in the year 2000, the system is required to process data at an input event rate of 10 KHz without incurring significant deadtime in readout. The ADSP21csp01 processor has high I/O bandwidth, single cycle instruction execution and fast task switching support to provide efficient multisignal processing. The processor's internal memory consists of 4K words of Program Memory and 4K words of Data Memory. In addition there is an external memory of 32K words for general event buffering and 16K words of Dual port Memory for input data queuing. This DSP fulfills the requirement of the Muon subdetector systems for data readout. All error handling, buffering, formatting and transferring of the data to the various trigger levels of the data acquisition system is done in software. The algorithms developed for the system complete these tasks in about 20 {micro}s per event.

  18. Predicting crash likelihood and severity on freeways with real-time loop detector data.

    PubMed

    Xu, Chengcheng; Tarko, Andrew P; Wang, Wei; Liu, Pan

    2013-08-01

    Real-time crash risk prediction using traffic data collected from loop detector stations is useful in dynamic safety management systems aimed at improving traffic safety through application of proactive safety countermeasures. The major drawback of most of the existing studies is that they focus on the crash risk without consideration of crash severity. This paper presents an effort to develop a model that predicts the crash likelihood at different levels of severity with a particular focus on severe crashes. The crash data and traffic data used in this study were collected on the I-880 freeway in California, United States. This study considers three levels of crash severity: fatal/incapacitating injury crashes (KA), non-incapacitating/possible injury crashes (BC), and property-damage-only crashes (PDO). The sequential logit model was used to link the likelihood of crash occurrences at different severity levels to various traffic flow characteristics derived from detector data. The elasticity analysis was conducted to evaluate the effect of the traffic flow variables on the likelihood of crash and its severity.The results show that the traffic flow characteristics contributing to crash likelihood were quite different at different levels of severity. The PDO crashes were more likely to occur under congested traffic flow conditions with highly variable speed and frequent lane changes, while the KA and BC crashes were more likely to occur under less congested traffic flow conditions. High speed, coupled with a large speed difference between adjacent lanes under uncongested traffic conditions, was found to increase the likelihood of severe crashes (KA). This study applied the 20-fold cross-validation method to estimate the prediction performance of the developed models. The validation results show that the model's crash prediction performance at each severity level was satisfactory. The findings of this study can be used to predict the probabilities of crash at

  19. Characterization of neutron scatter for the 25-m neutron time of flight detector at the Z Accelerator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Norris, Edward; Hahn, Kelly; Chandler, Gordon; Ruiz, Carlos; Styron, Jedediah; Cooper, Gary; Jones, Brent; Torres, Jose; Spencer, Decker; Nelson, Alan

    2016-10-01

    We are investigating neutron scattering effects using Monte Carlo simulations for neutron time of flight (NTOF) detectors fielded at the Z Accelerator at Sandia National Laboratories. For the radial NTOF detector at 25 m, a large scatter distribution is observed during and after primary DD neutron signals produced during inertial-confinement fusion experiments which obfuscates inference of quantities such as ion temperature, yield, and liner areal density. We present comparisons of measurements with simulation results. We also propose improvements to this line-of-sight. Sandia is sponsored by the U.S. DOE's NNSA under contract DE-AC04-94AL85000.

  20. A technique for verifying the input response function of neutron time-of-flight scintillation detectors using cosmic rays

    SciTech Connect

    Bonura, M. A.; Cooper, G. W.; Nelson, A. J.; Styron, J. D.; Ruiz, C. L. Fehl, D. L.; Chandler, G.; Hahn, K. D.; Torres, J. A.

    2014-11-15

    An accurate interpretation of DD or DT fusion neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) signals from current mode detectors employed at the Z-facility at Sandia National Laboratories requires that the instrument response functions (IRF’s) be deconvolved from the measured nTOF signals. A calibration facility that produces detectable sub-ns radiation pulses is typically used to measure the IRF of such detectors. This work, however, reports on a simple method that utilizes cosmic radiation to measure the IRF of nTOF detectors, operated in pulse-counting mode. The characterizing metrics reported here are the throughput delay and full-width-at-half-maximum. This simple approach yields consistent IRF results with the same detectors calibrated in 2007 at a LINAC bremsstrahlung accelerator (Idaho State University). In particular, the IRF metrics from these two approaches and their dependence on the photomultipliers bias agree to within a few per cent. This information may thus be used to verify if the IRF for a given nTOF detector employed at Z has changed since its original current-mode calibration and warrants re-measurement.

  1. A New Neutron Time-of-Flight Detector for DT Yield and Ion-Temperature Measurements on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glebov, V. Yu.; Forrest, C. J.; Knauer, J. P.; Regan, S. P.; Sangster, T. C.; Stoeckl, C.

    2015-11-01

    A new neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) detector for DT yield and ion-temperature measurements in DT implosions on the OMEGA Laser System was designed, fabricated, tested, and calibrated. The goal of this detector is to provide a second line of sight for DT yield and ion-temperature measurements in the 1 ×1012 to 1014 yield range. The nTOF detector consists of a 40-mm-diam, 20-mm-thick BC-422Q(1%) scintillator coupled with a one-stage Photek PMT-140 photomultiplier tube. To avoid PMT saturation at high yields a neutral density filter ND1 is inserted between the scintillator and PMT. Both the scintillator and PMT are shielded from hard x rays by 5 mm of lead on all sides and 10 mm in the direction of the target. The nTOF detector is located at 15.8 m from target chamber center in the OMEGA Target Bay. The design details and calibration results of this nTOF detector in DT implosions on OMEGA will be presented. This material is based upon work supported by the Department of Energy National Nuclear Security Administration under Award Number DE-NA0001944.

  2. A technique for verifying the input response function of neutron time-of-flight scintillation detectors using cosmic rays.

    PubMed

    Bonura, M A; Ruiz, C L; Fehl, D L; Cooper, G W; Chandler, G; Hahn, K D; Nelson, A J; Styron, J D; Torres, J A

    2014-11-01

    An accurate interpretation of DD or DT fusion neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) signals from current mode detectors employed at the Z-facility at Sandia National Laboratories requires that the instrument response functions (IRF's) be deconvolved from the measured nTOF signals. A calibration facility that produces detectable sub-ns radiation pulses is typically used to measure the IRF of such detectors. This work, however, reports on a simple method that utilizes cosmic radiation to measure the IRF of nTOF detectors, operated in pulse-counting mode. The characterizing metrics reported here are the throughput delay and full-width-at-half-maximum. This simple approach yields consistent IRF results with the same detectors calibrated in 2007 at a LINAC bremsstrahlung accelerator (Idaho State University). In particular, the IRF metrics from these two approaches and their dependence on the photomultipliers bias agree to within a few per cent. This information may thus be used to verify if the IRF for a given nTOF detector employed at Z has changed since its original current-mode calibration and warrants re-measurement.

  3. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging.

    PubMed

    Hack, Erwin; Valzania, Lorenzo; Gäumann, Gregory; Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P; Zolliker, Peter

    2016-02-06

    In terahertz (THz) materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8-14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i) vanadium oxide; (ii) amorphous silicon; (iii) a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv) a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed.

  4. Comparison of Thermal Detector Arrays for Off-Axis THz Holography and Real-Time THz Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Hack, Erwin; Valzania, Lorenzo; Gäumann, Gregory; Shalaby, Mostafa; Hauri, Christoph P.; Zolliker, Peter

    2016-01-01

    In terahertz (THz) materials science, imaging by scanning prevails when low power THz sources are used. However, the application of array detectors operating with high power THz sources is increasingly reported. We compare the imaging properties of four different array detectors that are able to record THz radiation directly. Two micro-bolometer arrays are designed for infrared imaging in the 8–14 μm wavelength range, but are based on different absorber materials (i) vanadium oxide; (ii) amorphous silicon; (iii) a micro-bolometer array optimized for recording THz radiation based on silicon nitride; and (iv) a pyroelectric array detector for THz beam profile measurements. THz wavelengths of 96.5 μm, 118.8 μm, and 393.6 μm from a powerful far infrared laser were used to assess the technical performance in terms of signal to noise ratio, detector response and detectivity. The usefulness of the detectors for beam profiling and digital holography is assessed. Finally, the potential and limitation for real-time digital holography are discussed. PMID:26861341

  5. A technique for verifying the input response function of neutron time-of-flight scintillation detectors using cosmic raysa)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bonura, M. A.; Ruiz, C. L.; Fehl, D. L.; Cooper, G. W.; Chandler, G.; Hahn, K. D.; Nelson, A. J.; Styron, J. D.; Torres, J. A.

    2014-11-01

    An accurate interpretation of DD or DT fusion neutron time-of-flight (nTOF) signals from current mode detectors employed at the Z-facility at Sandia National Laboratories requires that the instrument response functions (IRF's) be deconvolved from the measured nTOF signals. A calibration facility that produces detectable sub-ns radiation pulses is typically used to measure the IRF of such detectors. This work, however, reports on a simple method that utilizes cosmic radiation to measure the IRF of nTOF detectors, operated in pulse-counting mode. The characterizing metrics reported here are the throughput delay and full-width-at-half-maximum. This simple approach yields consistent IRF results with the same detectors calibrated in 2007 at a LINAC bremsstrahlung accelerator (Idaho State University). In particular, the IRF metrics from these two approaches and their dependence on the photomultipliers bias agree to within a few per cent. This information may thus be used to verify if the IRF for a given nTOF detector employed at Z has changed since its original current-mode calibration and warrants re-measurement.

  6. New Life From Dead Trees

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeGraaf, Richard M.

    1978-01-01

    There are numerous bird species that will nest only in dead or dying trees. Current forestry practices include clearing forests of these snags, or dead trees. This practice is driving many species out of the forests. An illustrated example of bird succession in and on a tree is given. (MA)

  7. Analytical calculation of the lower bound on timing resolution for PET scintillation detectors comprising high-aspect-ratio crystal elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cates, Joshua W.; Vinke, Ruud; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-07-01

    Excellent timing resolution is required to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain available from the incorporation of time-of-flight (ToF) information in image reconstruction for positron emission tomography (PET). As the detector’s timing resolution improves, so does SNR, reconstructed image quality, and accuracy. This directly impacts the challenging detection and quantification tasks in the clinic. The recognition of these benefits has spurred efforts within the molecular imaging community to determine to what extent the timing resolution of scintillation detectors can be improved and develop near-term solutions for advancing ToF-PET. Presented in this work, is a method for calculating the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) on timing resolution for scintillation detectors with long crystal elements, where the influence of the variation in optical path length of scintillation light on achievable timing resolution is non-negligible. The presented formalism incorporates an accurate, analytical probability density function (PDF) of optical transit time within the crystal to obtain a purely mathematical expression of the CRLB with high-aspect-ratio (HAR) scintillation detectors. This approach enables the statistical limit on timing resolution performance to be analytically expressed for clinically-relevant PET scintillation detectors without requiring Monte Carlo simulation-generated photon transport time distributions. The analytically calculated optical transport PDF was compared with detailed light transport simulations, and excellent agreement was found between the two. The coincidence timing resolution (CTR) between two 3× 3× 20 mm3 LYSO:Ce crystals coupled to analogue SiPMs was experimentally measured to be 162+/- 1 ps FWHM, approaching the analytically calculated lower bound within 6.5%.

  8. Analytical Calculation of the Lower Bound on Timing Resolution for PET Scintillation Detectors Comprising High-Aspect-Ratio Crystal Elements

    PubMed Central

    Cates, Joshua W.; Vinke, Ruud; Levin, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    Excellent timing resolution is required to enhance the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) gain available from the incorporation of time-of-flight (ToF) information in image reconstruction for positron emission tomography (PET). As the detector’s timing resolution improves, so does SNR, reconstructed image quality, and accuracy. This directly impacts the challenging detection and quantification tasks in the clinic. The recognition of these benefits has spurred efforts within the molecular imaging community to determine to what extent the timing resolution of scintillation detectors can be improved and develop near-term solutions for advancing ToF-PET. Presented in this work, is a method for calculating the Cramér-Rao lower bound (CRLB) on timing resolution for scintillation detectors with long crystal elements, where the influence of the variation in optical path length of scintillation light on achievable timing resolution is non-negligible. The presented formalism incorporates an accurate, analytical probability density function (PDF) of optical transit time within the crystal to obtain a purely mathematical expression of the CRLB with high-aspect-ratio (HAR) scintillation detectors. This approach enables the statistical limit on timing resolution performance to be analytically expressed for clinically-relevant PET scintillation detectors without requiring Monte Carlo simulation-generated photon transport time distributions. The analytically calculated optical transport PDF was compared with detailed light transport simulations, and excellent agreement was found between the two. The coincidence timing resolution (CTR) between two 3×3×20 mm3 LYSO:Ce crystals coupled to analogue SiPMs was experimentally measured to be 162±1 ps FWHM, approaching the analytically calculated lower bound within 6.5%. PMID:26083559

  9. Reevaluating the dead donor rule.

    PubMed

    Collins, Mike

    2010-04-01

    The dead donor rule justifies current practice in organ procurement for transplantation and states that organ donors must be dead prior to donation. The majority of organ donors are diagnosed as having suffered brain death and hence are declared dead by neurological criteria. However, a significant amount of unrest in both the philosophical and the medical literature has surfaced since this practice began forty years ago. I argue that, first, declaring death by neurological criteria is both unreliable and unjustified but further, the ethical principles which themselves justify the dead donor rule are better served by abandoning that rule and instead allowing individuals who have suffered severe and irreversible brain damage to become organ donors, even though they are not yet dead and even though the removal of their organs would be the proximal cause of death.

  10. Real-time scintillation array dosimetry for radiotherapy: The advantages of photomultiplier detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Paul Z. Y.; Suchowerska, Natalka; Abolfathi, Peter; McKenzie, David R.

    2012-04-15

    Purpose: In this paper, a photomultiplier tube (PMT) array dosimetry system has been developed and tested for the real-time readout of multiple scintillation signals from fiber optic dosimeters. It provides array dosimetry with the advantages in sensitivity provided by a PMT, but without the need for a separate PMT for each detector element. Methods: The PMT array system consisted of a multianode PMT, a multichannel data acquisition system, housing and optic fiber connections suitable for clinical use. The reproducibility, channel uniformity, channel crosstalk, acquisition speed, and sensitivity of the PMT array were quantified using a constant light source. Its performance was compared to other readout systems used in scintillation dosimetry. An in vivo HDR brachytherapy treatment was used as an example of a clinical application of the dosimetry system to the measurement of dose at multiple sites in the rectum. The PMT array system was also tested in the pulsed beam of a linear accelerator to test its response speed and its application with two separate methods of Cerenkov background removal. Results: The PMT array dosimetry system was highly reproducible with a measurement uncertainty of 0.13% for a 10 s acquisition period. Optical crosstalk between neighboring channels was accounted for by omitting every second channel. A mathematical procedure was used to account for the crosstalk in next-neighbor channels. The speed and sensitivity of the PMT array system were found be superior to CCD cameras, allowing for measurement of more rapid changes in dose rate. This was further demonstrated by measuring the dose delivered by individual photon pulses of a linear accelerator beam. Conclusions: The PMT array system has advantages over CCD camera-based systems for the readout of scintillation light. It provided a more sensitive, more accurate, and faster response to meet the demands of future developments in treatment delivery.

  11. ON HYDRODYNAMIC MOTIONS IN DEAD ZONES

    SciTech Connect

    Oishi, Jeffrey S.; Mac Low, Mordecai-Mark E-mail: mordecai@amnh.or

    2009-10-20

    We investigate fluid motions near the midplane of vertically stratified accretion disks with highly resistive midplanes. In such disks, the magnetorotational instability drives turbulence in thin layers surrounding a resistive, stable dead zone. The turbulent layers in turn drive motions in the dead zone. We examine the properties of these motions using three-dimensional, stratified, local, shearing-box, non-ideal, magnetohydrodynamical simulations. Although the turbulence in the active zones provides a source of vorticity to the midplane, no evidence for coherent vortices is found in our simulations. It appears that this is because of strong vertical oscillations in the dead zone. By analyzing time series of azimuthally averaged flow quantities, we identify an axisymmetric wave mode particular to models with dead zones. This mode is reduced in amplitude, but not suppressed entirely, by changing the equation of state from isothermal to ideal. These waves are too low frequency to affect sedimentation of dust to the midplane, but may have significance for the gravitational stability of the resulting midplane dust layers.

  12. Development of a pixel sensor with fine space-time resolution based on SOI technology for the ILC vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ono, Shun; Togawa, Manabu; Tsuji, Ryoji; Mori, Teppei; Yamada, Miho; Arai, Yasuo; Tsuboyama, Toru; Hanagaki, Kazunori

    2017-02-01

    We have been developing a new monolithic pixel sensor with silicon-on-insulator (SOI) technology for the International Linear Collider (ILC) vertex detector system. The SOI monolithic pixel detector is realized using standard CMOS circuits fabricated on a fully depleted sensor layer. The new SOI sensor SOFIST can store both the position and timing information of charged particles in each 20×20 μm2 pixel. The position resolution is further improved by the position weighted with the charges spread to multiple pixels. The pixel also records the hit timing with an embedded time-stamp circuit. The sensor chip has column-parallel analog-to-digital conversion (ADC) circuits and zero-suppression logic for high-speed data readout. We are designing and evaluating some prototype sensor chips for optimizing and minimizing the pixel circuit.

  13. Development of a fast pixel array detector for use in microsecond time-resolved x-ray diffraction

    SciTech Connect

    Barna, S.L.; Gruner, S.M.; Shepherd, J.A.

    1995-08-01

    A large-area pixel x-ray detector is being developed to collect eight successive frames of wide dynamic range two-dimensional images at 200kHz rates. Such a detector, in conjunction with a synchrotron radiation x-ray source, will enable time-resolved x-ray studies of proteins and other materials on time scales which have previously been inaccessible. The detector will consist of an array of fully-depleted 150 micron square diodes connected to a CMOS integrated electronics layer with solder bump-bonding. During each framing period, the current resulting from the x-rays stopped in the diodes is integrated in the electronics layer, and then stored in one of eight storage capacitors underneath the pixel. After the last frame, the capacitors are read out at standard data transmission rates. The detector has been designed for a well-depth of at least 10,000 x-rays (at 20keV), and a noise level of one x-ray. Ultimately, the authors intend to construct a detector with over one million pixels (1024 by 1024). They present the results of their development effort and various features of the design. The electronics design is discussed, with special attention to the performance requirements. The choice and design of the detective diodes, as they relate to x-ray stopping power and charge collection, are presented. An analysis of various methods of bump bonding is also presented. Finally, the authors discuss the possible need for a radiation-blocking layer, to be placed between the electronics and the detective layer, and various methods they have pursued in the construction of such a layer.

  14. Gaseous Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titov, Maxim

    Since long time, the compelling scientific goals of future high-energy physics experiments were a driving factor in the development of advanced detector technologies. A true innovation in detector instrumentation concepts came in 1968, with the development of a fully parallel readout for a large array of sensing elements - the Multi-Wire Proportional Chamber (MWPC), which earned Georges Charpak a Nobel prize in physics in 1992. Since that time radiation detection and imaging with fast gaseous detectors, capable of economically covering large detection volumes with low mass budget, have been playing an important role in many fields of physics. Advances in photolithography and microprocessing techniques in the chip industry during the past decade triggered a major transition in the field of gas detectors from wire structures to Micro-Pattern Gas Detector (MPGD) concepts, revolutionizing cell-size limitations for many gas detector applications. The high radiation resistance and excellent spatial and time resolution make them an invaluable tool to confront future detector challenges at the next generation of colliders. The design of the new micro-pattern devices appears suitable for industrial production. Novel structures where MPGDs are directly coupled to the CMOS pixel readout represent an exciting field allowing timing and charge measurements as well as precise spatial information in 3D. Originally developed for the high-energy physics, MPGD applications have expanded to nuclear physics, photon detection, astroparticle and neutrino physics, neutron detection, and medical imaging.

  15. Spectral representation: a core aspect of modelling the response characteristics of time-domain EMI mine detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    West, G. F.; Bailey, R. C.

    2006-05-01

    Most modern EMI mine detectors can detect the very small conductive and/or ferromagnetic parts of typical mines with relative ease. However, they also respond significantly to certain soils that contain lossy ferromagnetic minerals. In some special environments such as ocean beaches, conductivity of the host soil may also cause a response. Characterizing and modelling both the various target response mechanisms and the EMI detectors quantitatively would be relatively straightforward if it were not for the fact that most modern EMI detectors operate in time domain and use different current waveforms and time gates to observe response. Furthermore, much of the information about targets and interferences and even instrumental spectral limitations is observational rather than analytical data. In this paper, we put forward a spectral representation method that can be incorporated into both EMI data gathering and instrument modelling and which facilitates efficient quantitative simulation of arbitrary time- domain detection systems. The methodology and examples of its use are presented. Pure induction response from the ground is modelled with a sum-over-N-elements transfer function in which the kernel elements are single pole, pure damping responses which are log-spaced over the spectral range of interest. Instrument transfer functions can be described with a standard sparse pole and zero representation (located anywhere in the damped frequency half plane), if required. Model fitting techniques employing generalized inversion controls are used to go back and forth between frequency and time domain and the set of model parameters.

  16. Spatial and temporal image characteristics of a real-time large area a-Se x-ray detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tousignant, Olivier; Demers, Yves; Laperriere, Luc; Mani, Habib; Gauthier, Philippe; Leboeuf, Jonathan

    2005-04-01

    Large area, real-time, amorphous selenium (a-Se) based Flat Panel Detectors (FPD) were recently equipped with low noise front end electronics. In full resolution, 14"x14" detectors (FPD14) and 9"x9" detectors (FPD9) show an electronic noise of 1400 electrons. To evaluate the positive impact of such low noise on image quality, a dedicated report on spatial characteristics (MTF, NPS and DQE) covering the low dose range from 0.6 μR to 12 μR per frame, will be presented in the first section of this paper. For one RQA5 beam quality, DQE corrected for lag extrapolated at zero spatial frequency was equal to 0.6 for quantum noise limited exposure and equal to 0.4 for 0.6 μR. Almost no difference was found between 1x1 and 2x2 resolution mode giving the opportunity to 1x1 fluoroscopy. Recent advances to reduce image temporal artifacts such as lag and ghost will make the second part of this paper. It is demonstrated that the most significant contribution to detector lag is coming from the PIN selenium structure. Above electric field of 10 V/μm charges release from traps following one x-ray exposure could not explain selenium lag. Active ghost correction based on deep trapped charge recombination was developed giving good preliminary results in showing no residual ghost for a high dose rate of 33 mR/min.

  17. Who are the Unclaimed Dead?

    PubMed

    Quinet, Kenna; Nunn, Samuel; Ballew, Alfarena

    2016-01-01

    Unclaimed dead are deceased persons with no known next of kin (NoK) or NoK was located but did not claim the deceased. Unclaimed dead in Marion County, Indiana, 2004-2011, are examined. Comparisons are provided of the unclaimed to the claimed dead population and county death patterns. Race, gender, marital status, age, location, manner and cause of death, NoK, and days to disposition are analyzed. The unclaimed dead were disproportionately male, slightly more likely to be Black, younger at death, died from natural causes, had unknown marital status, were equally likely as not to have NoK, did not die in a hospital, and were subject to autopsy. Nearly half the unclaimed had NoK who did not claim the body; the other half had no identifiable NoK. Unclaimed were more likely to have an autopsy and to die from external causes. Most unclaimed were identified by means outside fingerprints or DNA.

  18. Time walk correction for TOF-PET detectors based on a monolithic scintillation crystal coupled to a photosensor array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vinke, R.; Löhner, H.; Schaart, D. R.; van Dam, H. T.; Seifert, S.; Beekman, F. J.; Dendooven, P.

    2010-09-01

    When optimizing the timing performance of a time-of-flight positron emission tomography (TOF-PET) detector based on a monolithic scintillation crystal coupled to a photosensor array, time walk as a function of annihilation photon interaction location inside the crystal needs to be considered. In order to determine the 3D spatial coordinates of the annihilation photon interaction location, a maximum likelihood estimation algorithm was developed, based on a detector characterization by a scan of a 511 keV photon beam across the front and one of the side surfaces of the crystal. The time walk effect was investigated using a 20 mm×20 mm×12 mm LYSO crystal coupled to a fast 4×4 multi-anode photomultiplier tube (MAPMT). In the plane parallel to the photosensor array, a spatial resolution of 2.4 mm FWHM is obtained. In the direction perpendicular to the MAPMT (depth-of-interaction, DOI), the resolution ranges from 2.3 mm FWHM near the MAPMT to 4 mm FWHM at a distance of 10 mm. These resolutions are uncorrected for the ˜1 mm beam diameter. A coincidence timing resolution of 358 ps FWHM is obtained in coincidence with a BaF 2 detector. A time walk depending on the 3D annihilation photon interaction location is observed. Throughout the crystal, the time walk spans a range of 100 ps. Calibration of the time walk vs. interaction location allows an event-by-event correction of the time walk.

  19. Static and Time-Resolved 10-1000 ke V X-Ray Imaging Detector Options for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O; Bell, P; McDonald, J; Park, H; Weber, F; Moody, J; Lowry, M; Stewart, R

    2004-04-15

    High energy (> 10 keV) x-ray self-emission imaging and radiography will be essential components of many NIF High Energy Density Physics experiments. In preparation for such experiments, we have evaluated the pros and cons of various static (x-ray film, bare CCD, and scintillator + CCD) and time-resolved (streaked and gated) 10-1000 keV detectors.

  20. Static and time-resolved 10-1000 keV x-ray imaging detector options for NIF

    SciTech Connect

    Landen, O.L.; Bell, P.M.; McDonald, J.W.; Park, H.-S.; Weber, F.; Moody, J.D.; Lowry, M.E.; Stewart, R.E.

    2004-10-01

    High energy (>10 keV) x-ray self-emission imaging and radiography will be essential components of many NIF high energy density physics experiments. In preparation for such experiments, we have evaluated the pros and cons of various static [x-ray film, bare charge-coupled device (CCD), and scintillator + CCD] and time-resolved (streaked and gated) 10-1000 keV detectors.

  1. Test-beam results of a silicon pixel detector with Time-over-Threshold read-out having ultra-precise time resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aglieri Rinella, G.; Cortina Gil, E.; Fiorini, M.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Albarran, M. E. Martin; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Perktold, L.; Tiuraniem, S.; Velghe, B.

    2015-12-01

    A time-tagging hybrid silicon pixel detector developed for beam tracking in the NA62 experiment has been tested in a dedicated test-beam at CERN with 10 GeV/c hadrons. Measurements include time resolution, detection efficiency and charge sharing between pixels, as well as effects due to bias voltage variations. A time resolution of less than 150 ps has been measured with a 200 μm thick silicon sensor, using an on-pixel amplifier-discriminator and an end-of-column DLL-based time-to-digital converter.

  2. Climate change and dead zones.

    PubMed

    Altieri, Andrew H; Gedan, Keryn B

    2015-04-01

    Estuaries and coastal seas provide valuable ecosystem services but are particularly vulnerable to the co-occurring threats of climate change and oxygen-depleted dead zones. We analyzed the severity of climate change predicted for existing dead zones, and found that 94% of dead zones are in regions that will experience at least a 2 °C temperature increase by the end of the century. We then reviewed how climate change will exacerbate hypoxic conditions through oceanographic, ecological, and physiological processes. We found evidence that suggests numerous climate variables including temperature, ocean acidification, sea-level rise, precipitation, wind, and storm patterns will affect dead zones, and that each of those factors has the potential to act through multiple pathways on both oxygen availability and ecological responses to hypoxia. Given the variety and strength of the mechanisms by which climate change exacerbates hypoxia, and the rates at which climate is changing, we posit that climate change variables are contributing to the dead zone epidemic by acting synergistically with one another and with recognized anthropogenic triggers of hypoxia including eutrophication. This suggests that a multidisciplinary, integrated approach that considers the full range of climate variables is needed to track and potentially reverse the spread of dead zones.

  3. A study of cooling time reduction of interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors using a high-emissivity coating

    SciTech Connect

    Sakakibara, Y.; Yamamoto, K.; Chen, D.; Tokoku, C.; Uchiyama, T.; Ohashi, M.; Kuroda, K.; Kimura, N.; Suzuki, T.; Koike, S.

    2014-01-29

    In interferometric cryogenic gravitational wave detectors, there are plans to cool mirrors and their suspension systems (payloads) in order to reduce thermal noise, that is, one of the fundamental noise sources. Because of the large payload masses (several hundred kg in total) and their thermal isolation, a cooling time of several months is required. Our calculation shows that a high-emissivity coating (e.g. a diamond-like carbon (DLC) coating) can reduce the cooling time effectively by enhancing radiation heat transfer. Here, we have experimentally verified the effect of the DLC coating on the reduction of the cooling time.

  4. Detector Data Simulation and Filtering Strategy for the European Laser Timing (ELT) Experiment On-board ACES

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bamann, Christoph; Schlicht, Anja; Hugentobler, Urs; Pühl, Magdalena

    2015-04-01

    Due to the rapid progress of frequency standards in the optical domain and increasingly demanding applications in metrology and fundamental physics studies, accuracy requirements on frequency and time transfer are continuously increasing. Most present satellite based clock comparison systems work in the microwave domain and are based on GPS and TWSTFT (Two-Way Satellite Time and Frequency Transfer). Recently, systems such as LASSO (LAser Synchronization from a Stationary Orbit) and T2L2 (Time Transfer by Laser Link) promised even better performance in the optical domain. In 2016 the ESA mission ACES (Atomic Clock Ensemble in Space) will bring a new generation of atomic clocks into the microgravity environment of the ISS, which will distribute a stable and accurate time base. In the frame of this mission an optical link called ELT (European Laser Timing) is presently under study, which is subject of our work. The on-board hardware of ELT consists of a corner cube retro-reflector (CCR), a single-photon avalanche diode (SPAD), and an event timer connected to the ACES time scale. The SPAD detects laser pulses fired towards the payload and the CCR reflects these pulses back to the ground station. The detection dates are recorded in the ACES time scale, while the two-way time of flight can be used for precise ranging. Consequently, time transfer and clock analysis can be performed based on data triplets comprising the time of transmission of a laser pulse, its time of reception at the ELT-detector and its time of reception back at the station-detector. We present simulations of these triplets based on simple ISS orbits including preset attitude and accurate Earth orientation data. In addition, we consider experimentally derived detector, reflector, and background noise characteristics as well as simulations of the ACES clocks. The ELT data center, which will be hosted by our institution, will have to extract the data triplets from the large amount of noisy detector dates

  5. Asteroid 'Bites the Dust' Around Dead Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope set its infrared eyes upon the dusty remains of shredded asteroids around several dead stars. This artist's concept illustrates one such dead star, or 'white dwarf,' surrounded by the bits and pieces of a disintegrating asteroid. These observations help astronomers better understand what rocky planets are made of around other stars.

    Asteroids are leftover scraps of planetary material. They form early on in a star's history when planets are forming out of collisions between rocky bodies. When a star like our sun dies, shrinking down to a skeleton of its former self called a white dwarf, its asteroids get jostled about. If one of these asteroids gets too close to the white dwarf, the white dwarf's gravity will chew the asteroid up, leaving a cloud of dust.

    Spitzer's infrared detectors can see these dusty clouds and their various constituents. So far, the telescope has identified silicate minerals in the clouds polluting eight white dwarfs. Because silicates are common in our Earth's crust, the results suggest that planets similar to ours might be common around other stars.

  6. Lighting up a Dead Star's Layers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    This image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows the scattered remains of an exploded star named Cassiopeia A. Spitzer's infrared detectors 'picked' through these remains and found that much of the star's original layering had been preserved.

    In this false-color image, the faint, blue glow surrounding the dead star is material that was energized by a shock wave, called the forward shock, which was created when the star blew up. The forward shock is now located at the outer edge of the blue glow. Stars are also seen in blue. Green, yellow and red primarily represent material that was ejected in the explosion and heated by a slower shock wave, called the reverse shock wave.

    The picture was taken by Spitzer's infrared array camera and is a composite of 3.6-micron light (blue); 4.5-micron light (green); and 8.0-micron light (red).

  7. Silicon Photomultiplier-Based Multi-Channel Gamma Ray Detector Using the Dynamic Time-Over-Threshold Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Y.; Shimazoe, K.; Takahashi, H.

    2016-02-01

    Silicon photomultipliers (SiPMs), which are a relatively new type of photon detector, have received more attention in the fields of nuclear medicine and high-energy physics because of their compactness and high gain up to 106. In this work, a SiPM-based multi-channel gamma ray detector with individual read out based on the dynamic time-over-threshold (dToT) method is implemented and demonstrated as an elemental material for large-area gamma ray imager applications. The detector consists of 64 channels of KETEK SiPM PM6660 (6 × 6 mm2 containing 10,000 micro-cells of 60 × 60 μm2) coupled to an 8 × 8 array of high-energy resolution Gd3(Al,Ga)5O12(Ce) (HR-GAGG) crystals (10 × 10 × 10 mm3) segmented by a 1 mm thick BaSO4 reflector. To produce a digital pulse containing linear energy information, the dToT-based read-out circuit consists of a CR-RC shaping amplifier (2.2 μs) and comparator with a feedback component. By modelling the pulse of the SiPM, the light output, and the CR-RC shaping amplifier, the integral-non-linearity (INL) was numerically calculated in terms of the delay time and the time constant of dynamic threshold movement. The experimental results of the averaged INL and energy resolution were 5.8±1.6% and the full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM) of 7.4±0.9% at 662 keV, respectively. The 64-channel single-mode detector module was successfully implemented, demonstrating potential for its use as an elemental material for large-area gamma ray imaging applications.

  8. A new front-end ASIC for GEM detectors with time and charge measurement capabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ciciriello, F.; Corsi, F.; De Robertis, G.; Felici, G.; Loddo, F.; Marzocca, C.; Matarrese, G.; Ranieri, A.

    2016-07-01

    A 32 channel CMOS front-end ASIC has been designed to read out the GEM detectors intended to be used for beam monitoring in a new proton-therapy facility currently under construction. In order to improve the spatial resolution by exploiting charge centroid algorithms, the analog channels, based on the classic CSA+shaper architecture, are equipped with a peak detector (PD) which works as an analog memory during the read-out phase. The outputs of the PDs are multiplexed towards an integrated 8-bit subranging ADC. An accurate trigger signal marks the arrival of a valid event and is generated by fast-ORing the outputs of 32 voltage discriminators which compare the shaper outputs with a programmable threshold. The digital part of the ASIC manages the read-out of the channels, the A/D conversion and the configuration of the ASIC. A 100 Mbit/s LVDS serial link is used for data communication. The sensitivity of the analog channel is 15 mV/fC and the dynamic range is 80 fC. The simulated ENC is about 650 e- for a detector capacitance of 10 pF. © 2001 Elsevier Science. All rights reserved

  9. Nasal high flow reduces dead space.

    PubMed

    Möller, Winfried; Feng, Sheng; Domanski, Ulrike; Franke, Karl-Josef; Celik, Gülnaz; Bartenstein, Peter; Becker, Sven; Meyer, Gabriele; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Tatkov, Stanislav; Nilius, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies show that nasal high flow (NHF) therapy can support ventilation in patients with acute or chronic respiratory disorders. Clearance of dead space has been suggested as being the key mechanism of respiratory support with NHF therapy. The hypothesis of this study was that NHF in a dose-dependent manner can clear dead space of the upper airways from expired air and decrease rebreathing. The randomized crossover study involved 10 volunteers using scintigraphy with (81m)Krypton ((81m)Kr) gas during a breath-holding maneuver with closed mouth and in 3 nasally breathing tracheotomized patients by volumetric capnography and oximetry through sampling CO2 and O2 in the trachea and measuring the inspired volume with inductance plethysmography following NHF rates of 15, 30, and 45 l/min. The scintigraphy revealed a decrease in (81m)Kr gas clearance half-time with an increase of NHF in the nasal cavities [Pearson's correlation coefficient cc = -0.55, P < 0.01], the pharynx (cc = -0.41, P < 0.01), and the trachea (cc = -0.51, P < 0.01). Clearance rates in nasal cavities derived from time constants and MRI-measured volumes were 40.6 ± 12.3 (SD), 52.5 ± 17.7, and 72.9 ± 21.3 ml/s during NHF (15, 30, and 45 l/min, respectively). Measurement of inspired gases in the trachea showed an NHF-dependent decrease of inspired CO2 that correlated with an increase of inspired O2 (cc = -0.77, P < 0.05). NHF clears the upper airways of expired air, which reduces dead space by a decrease of rebreathing making ventilation more efficient. The dead space clearance is flow and time dependent, and it may extend below the soft palate.

  10. Real-time in vivo rectal wall dosimetry using plastic scintillation detectors for patients with prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Wootton, Landon; Kudchadker, Rajat; Lee, Andrew; Beddar, Sam

    2014-01-01

    We designed and constructed an in vivo dosimetry system using plastic scintillation detectors (PSDs) to monitor dose to the rectal wall in patients undergoing intensity-modulated radiation therapy for prostate cancer. Five patients were enrolled in an Institutional Review Board–approved protocol for twice weekly in vivo dose monitoring with our system, resulting in a total of 142 in vivo dose measurements. PSDs were attached to the surface of endorectal balloons used for prostate immobilization to place the PSDs in contact with the rectal wall. Absorbed dose was measured in real time and the total measured dose was compared with the dose calculated by the treatment planning system on the daily CT image dataset. The mean difference between measured and calculated doses for the entire patient population was −0.4% (standard deviation 2.8%). The mean difference between daily measured and calculated doses for each patient ranged from −3.3% to 3.3% (standard deviation ranged from 5.6% to 7.1% for 4 patients and was 14.0% for the last, for whom optimal positioning of the detector was difficult owing to the patient’s large size). Patients tolerated the detectors well and the treatment workflow was not compromised. Overall, PSDs performed well as in vivo dosimeters, providing excellent accuracy, real-time measurement, and reusability. PMID:24434775

  11. 46 CFR 171.117 - Dead covers.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 7 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dead covers. 171.117 Section 171.117 Shipping COAST... Dead covers. (a) Except as provided in paragraph (b) of this section, each port light with the sill located below the margin line must have a hinged, inside dead cover. (b) The dead cover on a port...

  12. Dead Sea Minerals loaded polymeric nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Dessy, Alberto; Kubowicz, Stephan; Alderighi, Michele; Bartoli, Cristina; Piras, Anna Maria; Schmid, Ruth; Chiellini, Federica

    2011-10-15

    Therapeutic properties of Dead Sea Water (DSW) in the treatment of skin diseases such as atopic dermatitis, psoriasis and photo aging UV damaged skin have been well established. DSW is in fact rich in minerals such as calcium, magnesium, sodium, potassium, zinc and strontium which are known to exploit anti-inflammatory effects and to promote skin barrier recovery. In order to develop a Dead Sea Minerals (DSM) based drug delivery system for topical therapy of skin diseases, polymeric nanoparticles based on Poly (maleic anhydride-alt-butyl vinyl ether) 5% grafted with monomethoxy poly(ethyleneglycol) 2000 MW (PEG) and 95% grafted with 2-methoxyethanol (VAM41-PEG) loaded with DSM were prepared by means of a combined miniemulsion/solvent evaporation process. The resulting nanoparticles were characterized in terms of dimension, morphology, biocompatibility, salt content and release. Cytocompatible spherical nanoparticles possessing an average diameter of about 300 nm, a time controlled drug release profile and a high formulation yield were obtained.

  13. Time-over-threshold readout to enhance the high flux capabilities of single-photon-counting detectors.

    PubMed

    Bergamaschi, Anna; Dinapoli, Roberto; Greiffenberg, Dominic; Henrich, Beat; Johnson, Ian; Mozzanica, Aldo; Radicci, Valeria; Schmitt, Bernd; Shi, Xintian; Stoppani, Laura

    2011-11-01

    The MYTHEN single-photon-counting (SPC) detector has been characterized using the time-over-threshold (ToT) readout method, i.e. measuring the time that the signal produced by the detected X-rays remains above the comparator threshold. In the following it is shown that the ToT readout preserves the sensitivity, dynamic range and capability of background suppression of the SPC mode, while enhancing the count-rate capability, which is the main limitation of state-of-the-art SPC systems.

  14. EIGER detector: application in macromolecular crystallography

    PubMed Central

    Casanas, Arnau; Warshamanage, Rangana; Finke, Aaron D.; Panepucci, Ezequiel; Olieric, Vincent; Nöll, Anne; Tampé, Robert; Brandstetter, Stefan; Förster, Andreas; Mueller, Marcus; Schulze-Briese, Clemens; Bunk, Oliver; Wang, Meitian

    2016-01-01

    The development of single-photon-counting detectors, such as the PILATUS, has been a major recent breakthrough in macromolecular crystallography, enabling noise-free detection and novel data-acquisition modes. The new EIGER detector features a pixel size of 75 × 75 µm, frame rates of up to 3000 Hz and a dead time as low as 3.8 µs. An EIGER 1M and EIGER 16M were tested on Swiss Light Source beamlines X10SA and X06SA for their application in macromolecular crystallography. The combination of fast frame rates and a very short dead time allows high-quality data acquisition in a shorter time. The ultrafine φ-slicing data-collection method is introduced and validated and its application in finding the optimal rotation angle, a suitable rotation speed and a sufficient X-ray dose are presented. An improvement of the data quality up to slicing at one tenth of the mosaicity has been observed, which is much finer than expected based on previous findings. The influence of key data-collection parameters on data quality is discussed. PMID:27599736

  15. Results from the NA62 Gigatracker Prototype: A Low-Mass and sub-ns Time Resolution Silicon Pixel Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorini, M.; Rinella, G. Aglieri; Carassiti, V.; Ceccucci, A.; Gil, E. Cortina; Ramusino, A. Cotta; Dellacasa, G.; Garbolino, S.; Jarron, P.; Kaplon, J.; Kluge, A.; Marchetto, F.; Mapelli, A.; Martin, E.; Mazza, G.; Morel, M.; Noy, M.; Nuessle, G.; Petagna, P.; Petrucci, F.; Perktold, L.; Riedler, P.; Rivetti, A.; Statera, M.; Velghe, B.

    The Gigatracker (GTK) is a hybrid silicon pixel detector developed for NA62, the experiment aimed at studying ultra-rare kaon decays at the CERN SPS. Three GTK stations will provide precise momentum and angular measurements on every track of the high intensity NA62 hadron beam with a time-tagging resolution of 150 ps. Multiple scattering and hadronic interactions of beam particles in the GTK have to be minimized to keep background events at acceptable levels, hence the total material budget is fixed to 0.5% X0 per station. In addition the calculated fluence for 100 days of running is 2×1014 1 MeV neq/cm2, comparable to the one expected for the inner trackers of LHC detectors in 10 years of operation. These requirements pose challenges for the development of an efficient and low-mass cooling system, to be operated in vacuum, and on the thinning of read-out chips to 100 μm or less. The most challenging requirement is represented by the time resolution, which can be achieved by carefully compensating for the discriminator time-walk. For this purpose, two complementary read-out architectures have been designed and produced as small-scale prototypes: the first is based on the use of a Time-over-Threshold circuit followed by a TDC shared by a group of pixels, while the other uses a constant-fraction discriminator followed by an on-pixel TDC. The readout pixel ASICs are produced in 130 nm IBM CMOS technology and bump-bonded to 200 μm thick silicon sensors. The Gigatracker detector system is described with particular emphasis on recent experimental results obtained from laboratory and beam tests of prototype bump-bonded assemblies, which show a time resolution of less than 200 ps for single hits.

  16. Novel real-time alignment and calibration of LHCb detector for Run II and tracking for the upgrade.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quagliani, Renato; LHCb Collaboration

    2016-10-01

    LHCb has introduced a novel real-time detector alignment and calibration strategy for LHC Run II. Data collected at the start of the fill is processed in a few minutes and used to update the alignment, while the calibration constants are evaluated for each run. The procedure aims to improve the quality of the online selection and performance stability. The required computing time constraints are met thanks to a new dedicated framework using the multi-core farm infrastructure for the trigger. A similar scheme is planned to be used for Run III foreseen to start in 2020. At that time LHCb will run at an instantaneous luminosity of 2 x 1033 cm-2 s-1 and a fully software based trigger strategy will be used. The new running conditions and the tighter timing constraints in the software trigger (only 13 ms per event are available) represent a big challenge for track reconstruction. The new software based trigger strategy implies a full detector read-out at the collision rate of 40 MHz. High performance and timing constraints are ensured by a new tracking system and a fast and efficient track reconstruction strategy.

  17. Time and Energy Characterization of a Neutron time of Flight Detector for Re-designing Line of Sight 270 at the Z Pulsed Power Facility.

    SciTech Connect

    Styron, Jedediah D.

    2016-11-01

    This work will focus on the characterization of NTOF detectors fielded on ICF experiments conducted at the Z-experimental facility with emphasis on the MagLif and gas puff campaigns. Three experiments have been proposed. The first experiment will characterize the response of the PMT with respect to the amplitude and width of signals produced by single neutron events. A second experiment will characterize the neutron transit time through the scintillator and the third is to characterize the pulse amplitude for a very specific range of neutron induced charged particle interactions within the scintillator. These experiments will cover incident neutron energies relevant to D-D and D-T fusion reactions. These measurements will be taken as a function of detector bias to cover the entire dynamic range of the detector. Throughout the characterization process, the development of a predictive capability is desired. A new post processing code has been proposed that will calculate a neutron time-of-flight spectrum in units of MeVee. This code will couple the experimentally obtained values and the results obtained with the Monte Carlo code MCNP6. The motivation of this code is to correct for geometry issues when transferring the calibration results from a light lab setting to the Zenvironment. This capability will be used to develop a hypothetical design of LOS270 such that more favorable neutron measurements, requiring less correction, can be made in the future.

  18. The COMPASS RICH-1 detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbon, P.; Alekseev, M.; Angerer, H.; Apollonio, M.; Birsa, R.; Bordalo, P.; Bradamante, F.; Bressan, A.; Busso, L.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Colantoni, M. L.; Costa, S.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dafni, T.; Delagnes, E.; Deschamps, H.; Diaz, V.; Dibiase, N.; Duic, V.; Eyrich, W.; Faso, D.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M., Jr.; Fischer, H.; Gerassimov, S.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Hagemann, R.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Joosten, R.; Ketzer, B.; Königsmann, K.; Kolosov, V. N.; Konorov, I.; Kramer, D.; Kunne, F.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Mann, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Mutter, A.; Nähle, O.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Polak, J.; Rebourgeard, P.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schröder, W.; Silva, L.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Svec, M.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Wollny, H.

    2008-08-01

    The COMPASS experiment at CERN provides hadron identification in a wide momentum range employing a large size gaseous Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH). The presence of large uncorrelated background in the COMPASS environment was limiting the efficiency of COMPASS RICH-1 in the very forward regime. A major upgrade of RICH-1 required a new technique for Cherenkov photon detection at count rates of several 106/s per channel in the central detector part, and a read-out system allowing for trigger rates of up to 100 kHz. To cope with these requirements, the photon detectors of the central region have been replaced with a fast photon detection system described here, while, in the peripheral regions, the existing multi-wire proportional chambers with CsI photo-cathodes have been equipped with a new read-out system based on APV preamplifiers and flash ADC chips. The new system consists of multi-anode photomultiplier tubes (MAPMTs) coupled to individual fused silica lens telescopes, and fast read-out electronics based on the MAD4 amplifier-discriminator and the dead-time free F1 TDC chip. The project was completely designed and implemented in less than two years: The upgraded detector is in operation since the 2006 CERN SPS run. We present the photon detection design, constructive aspects and test studies to characterise the single photon response of the MAPMTs coupled to the read-out system as well as the detector performance based on the 2006 data.

  19. A stretch/compress scheme for a high temporal resolution detector for the magnetic recoil spectrometer time (MRSt)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Hares, J. D.; Wink, C. W.

    2016-11-01

    A time-resolved detector concept for the magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the NIF neutron spectrum is presented. The measurement is challenging due to the time spreading of the recoil protons (or deuterons) as they transit an energy dispersing magnet system. Ions arrive at the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer over an interval of tens of nanoseconds. We seek to measure the time-resolved neutron spectrum with 20 ps precision by manipulating an electron signal derived from the ions. A stretch-compress scheme is employed to remove transit time skewing while simultaneously reducing the bandwidth requirements for signal recording. Simulation results are presented along with design concepts for structures capable of establishing the required electromagnetic fields.

  20. A stretch/compress scheme for a high temporal resolution detector for the magnetic recoil spectrometer time (MRSt)

    DOE PAGES

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Hares, J. D.; ...

    2016-08-02

    Here we present a time-resolved detector concept for the magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the NIF neutron spectrum. The measurement is challenging due to the time spreading of the recoil protons (or deuterons) as they transit an energy dispersing magnet system. Ions arrive at the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer over an interval of tens of nanoseconds. We seek to measure the time-resolved neutron spectrum with 20 ps precision by manipulating an electron signal derived from the ions. A stretch-compress scheme is employed to remove transit time skewing while simultaneously reducing the bandwidth requirements for signal recording.more » Simulation results are presented along with design concepts for structures capable of establishing the required electromagnetic fields.« less

  1. A stretch/compress scheme for a high temporal resolution detector for the magnetic recoil spectrometer time (MRSt)

    SciTech Connect

    Hilsabeck, T. J.; Frenje, J. A.; Hares, J. D.; Wink, C. W.

    2016-08-02

    Here we present a time-resolved detector concept for the magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the NIF neutron spectrum. The measurement is challenging due to the time spreading of the recoil protons (or deuterons) as they transit an energy dispersing magnet system. Ions arrive at the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer over an interval of tens of nanoseconds. We seek to measure the time-resolved neutron spectrum with 20 ps precision by manipulating an electron signal derived from the ions. A stretch-compress scheme is employed to remove transit time skewing while simultaneously reducing the bandwidth requirements for signal recording. Simulation results are presented along with design concepts for structures capable of establishing the required electromagnetic fields.

  2. A stretch/compress scheme for a high temporal resolution detector for the magnetic recoil spectrometer time (MRSt).

    PubMed

    Hilsabeck, T J; Frenje, J A; Hares, J D; Wink, C W

    2016-11-01

    A time-resolved detector concept for the magnetic recoil spectrometer for time-resolved measurements of the NIF neutron spectrum is presented. The measurement is challenging due to the time spreading of the recoil protons (or deuterons) as they transit an energy dispersing magnet system. Ions arrive at the focal plane of the magnetic spectrometer over an interval of tens of nanoseconds. We seek to measure the time-resolved neutron spectrum with 20 ps precision by manipulating an electron signal derived from the ions. A stretch-compress scheme is employed to remove transit time skewing while simultaneously reducing the bandwidth requirements for signal recording. Simulation results are presented along with design concepts for structures capable of establishing the required electromagnetic fields.

  3. Nasal high flow reduces dead space

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Sheng; Domanski, Ulrike; Franke, Karl-Josef; Celik, Gülnaz; Bartenstein, Peter; Becker, Sven; Meyer, Gabriele; Schmid, Otmar; Eickelberg, Oliver; Tatkov, Stanislav; Nilius, Georg

    2017-01-01

    Recent studies show that nasal high flow (NHF) therapy can support ventilation in patients with acute or chronic respiratory disorders. Clearance of dead space has been suggested as being the key mechanism of respiratory support with NHF therapy. The hypothesis of this study was that NHF in a dose-dependent manner can clear dead space of the upper airways from expired air and decrease rebreathing. The randomized crossover study involved 10 volunteers using scintigraphy with 81mKrypton (81mKr) gas during a breath-holding maneuver with closed mouth and in 3 nasally breathing tracheotomized patients by volumetric capnography and oximetry through sampling CO2 and O2 in the trachea and measuring the inspired volume with inductance plethysmography following NHF rates of 15, 30, and 45 l/min. The scintigraphy revealed a decrease in 81mKr gas clearance half-time with an increase of NHF in the nasal cavities [Pearson’s correlation coefficient cc = −0.55, P < 0.01], the pharynx (cc = −0.41, P < 0.01), and the trachea (cc = −0.51, P < 0.01). Clearance rates in nasal cavities derived from time constants and MRI-measured volumes were 40.6 ± 12.3 (SD), 52.5 ± 17.7, and 72.9 ± 21.3 ml/s during NHF (15, 30, and 45 l/min, respectively). Measurement of inspired gases in the trachea showed an NHF-dependent decrease of inspired CO2 that correlated with an increase of inspired O2 (cc = −0.77, P < 0.05). NHF clears the upper airways of expired air, which reduces dead space by a decrease of rebreathing making ventilation more efficient. The dead space clearance is flow and time dependent, and it may extend below the soft palate. NEW & NOTEWORTHY Clearance of expired air in upper airways by nasal high flow (NHF) can be extended below the soft palate and de facto causes a reduction of dead space. Using scintigraphy, the authors found a relationship between NHF, time, and clearance. Direct measurement of CO2 and O2 in the trachea confirmed a reduction of rebreathing, providing

  4. A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight detector response in current mode to inertial confinement fusion experiments (invited)

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, A. J.; Cooper, G. W.; Ruiz, C. L.; Chandler, G. A.; Fehl, D. L.; Hahn, K. D.; Leeper, R. J.; Smelser, R.; Torres, J. A.

    2012-10-15

    A novel method for modeling the neutron time of flight (nTOF) detector response in current mode for inertial confinement fusion experiments has been applied to the on-axis nTOF detectors located in the basement of the Z-Facility. It will be shown that this method can identify sources of neutron scattering, and is useful for predicting detector responses in future experimental configurations, and for identifying potential sources of neutron scattering when experimental set-ups change. This method can also provide insight on how much broadening neutron scattering contributes to the primary signals, which is then subtracted from them. Detector time responses are deconvolved from the signals, allowing a transformation from dN/dt to dN/dE, extracting neutron spectra at each detector location; these spectra are proportional to the absolute yield.

  5. A combined segmented anode gas ionization chamber and time-of-flight detector for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ström, Petter; Petersson, Per; Rubel, Marek; Possnert, Göran

    2016-10-01

    A dedicated detector system for heavy ion elastic recoil detection analysis at the Tandem Laboratory of Uppsala University is presented. Benefits of combining a time-of-flight measurement with a segmented anode gas ionization chamber are demonstrated. The capability of ion species identification is improved with the present system, compared to that obtained when using a single solid state silicon detector for the full ion energy signal. The system enables separation of light elements, up to Neon, based on atomic number while signals from heavy elements such as molybdenum and tungsten are separated based on mass, to a sample depth on the order of 1 μm. The performance of the system is discussed and a selection of material analysis applications is given. Plasma-facing materials from fusion experiments, in particular metal mirrors, are used as a main example for the discussion. Marker experiments using nitrogen-15 or oxygen-18 are specific cases for which the described improved species separation and sensitivity are required. Resilience to radiation damage and significantly improved energy resolution for heavy elements at low energies are additional benefits of the gas ionization chamber over a solid state detector based system.

  6. Time-domain response of a metal detector to a target buried in soil with frequency-dependent magnetic susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Y.

    2006-05-01

    The work reported in this paper is a part of on-going studies to clarify how and to what extent soil electromagnetic properties affect the performance of induction metal detectors widely used in humanitarian demining. This paper studies the specific case of the time-domain response of a small metallic sphere buried in a non-conducting soil half-space with frequency-dependent complex magnetic susceptibility. The sphere is chosen as a simple prototype for the small metal parts in low-metal landmines, while soil with dispersive magnetic susceptibility is a good model for some soils that are known to adversely affect the performance of metal detectors. The included analysis and computations extend previous work which has been done mostly in the frequency domain. Approximate theoretical expressions for weakly magnetic soils are found to fit the experimental data very well, which allowed the estimation of soil model parameters, albeit in an ad hoc manner. Soil signal is found to exceed target signal (due to an aluminum sphere of radius 0.0127 m) in many cases, even for the weakly magnetic Cambodian laterite used in the experiments. How deep a buried target is detected depends on many other factors in addition to the relative strength of soil and target signals. A general statement cannot thus be made regarding detectability of a target in soil based on the presented results. However, computational results complemented with experimental data extend the understanding of the effect that soil has on metal detectors.

  7. A facial mask comprising Dead Sea mud.

    PubMed

    Abu-Jdayil, Basim; Mohameed, Hazim A

    2006-01-01

    Many investigators have proved that Dead Sea salt and mud are useful in treating skin disorders and skin diseases. Therefore, the black mud has been extensively used as a base for the preparation of soaps, creams, and unguents for skin care. This study concerns a facial mask made mainly of Dead Sea mud. The effects of temperature and shearing conditions on the rheological behavior of the facial mask were investigated. The mud facial mask exhibited a shear thinning behavior with a yield stress. It was found that the apparent viscosity of the mask has a strong dependence on the shear rate as well as on the temperature. The facial mask exhibited a maximum yield stress and very shear thinning behavior at 40 degrees C, which is attributed to the gelatinization of the polysaccharide used to stabilize the mud particles. On the other hand, the mud mask exhibited a time-independent behavior at low temperatures and shear rates and changed to a thixotropic behavior upon increasing both the temperature and the shear rate. The shear thinning and thixotropic behaviors have a significant importance in the ability of the facial mask to spread on the skin: the Dead Sea mud mask can break down for easy spreading, and the applied film can gain viscosity instantaneously to resist running. Moreover, particle sedimentation, which in this case would negatively affect consumer acceptance of the product, occurs slowly due to high viscosity at rest conditions.

  8. A diamond detector for inertial confinement fusion X-ray bang-time measurements at the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    MacPhee, A G; Brown, C; Burns, S; Celeste, J; Glenzer, S H; Hey, D; Jones, O S; Landen, O; Mackinnon, A J; Meezan, N; Parker, J; Edgell, D; Glebov, V Y; Kilkenny, J; Kimbrough, J

    2010-11-09

    An instrument has been developed to measure X-ray bang-time for inertial confinement fusion capsules; the time interval between the start of the laser pulse and peak X-ray emission from the fuel core. The instrument comprises chemical vapor deposited polycrystalline diamond photoconductive X-ray detectors with highly ordered pyrolytic graphite X-ray monochromator crystals at the input. Capsule bang-time can be measured in the presence of relatively high thermal and hard X-ray background components due to the selective band pass of the crystals combined with direct and indirect X-ray shielding of the detector elements. A five channel system is being commissioned at the National Ignition Facility at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory for implosion optimization measurements as part of the National Ignition Campaign. Characteristics of the instrument have been measured demonstrating that X-ray bang-time can be measured with {+-} 30ps precision, characterizing the soft X-ray drive to +/- 1eV or 1.5%.

  9. Optimized acquisition time for x-ray fluorescence imaging of gold nanoparticles: a preliminary study using photon counting detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Liqiang; Wu, Di; Li, Yuhua; Chen, Wei R.; Zheng, Bin; Liu, Hong

    2016-03-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) is a promising spectroscopic technique to characterize imaging contrast agents with high atomic numbers (Z) such as gold nanoparticles (GNPs) inside small objects. Its utilization for biomedical applications, however, is greatly limited to experimental research due to longer data acquisition time. The objectives of this study are to apply a photon counting detector array for XRF imaging and to determine an optimized XRF data acquisition time, at which the acquired XRF image is of acceptable quality to allow the maximum level of radiation dose reduction. A prototype laboratory XRF imaging configuration consisting of a pencil-beam X-ray and a photon counting detector array (1 × 64 pixels) is employed to acquire the XRF image through exciting the prepared GNP/water solutions. In order to analyze the signal to noise ratio (SNR) improvement versus the increased exposure time, all the XRF photons within the energy range of 63 - 76KeV that include two Kα gold fluorescence peaks are collected for 1s, 2s, 3s, and so on all the way up to 200s. The optimized XRF data acquisition time for imaging different GNP solutions is determined as the moment when the acquired XRF image just reaches a quality with a SNR of 20dB which corresponds to an acceptable image quality.

  10. 6Li foil thermal neutron detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ianakiev, Kiril D; Swinhoe, Martyn T; Favalli, Andrea; Chung, Kiwhan; Macarthur, Duncan W

    2010-01-01

    In this paper we report on the design of a multilayer thermal neutron detector based on {sup 6}Li reactive foil and thin film plastic scintillators. The {sup 6}Li foils have about twice the intrinsic efficiency of {sup 10}B films and about four times higher light output due to a unique combination of high energy of reaction particles, low self absorption, and low ionization density of tritons. The design configuration provides for double sided readout of the lithium foil resulting in a doubling of the efficiency relative to a classical reactive film detector and generating a pulse height distribution with a valley between neutron and gamma signals similar to {sup 3}He tubes. The tens of microns thickness of plastic scintillator limits the energy deposited by gamma rays, which provides the necessary neutron/gamma discrimination. We used MCNPX to model a multilayer Li foil detector design and compared it with the standard HLNCC-II (18 {sup 3}He tubes operated at 4 atm). The preliminary results of the {sup 6}Li configuration show higher efficiency and one third of the die-away time. These properties, combined with the very short dead time of the plastic scintillator, offer the potential of a very high performance detector.

  11. [Parasitic dead-end: update].

    PubMed

    Magnaval, J F

    2006-08-01

    Parasitic dead-ends occur when a parasite is unable to establish a permanent interaction in an unnatural host. Although the likelihood of successful reproduction by the pathogenic agent is nul, parasitic dead-end heralds capture of new parasites and therefore expansion of the host range. Angiostrongyliasis due to A. cantonensis or A. costaricensis, anisakiasis, Ancylostoma caninum infection, gnathostomiasis and sparganosis are undoubtedly emerging zoonoses of particular medical interest. Prevention of these diseases relies on abstinence from eating raw meat from invertebrates or cold-blooded (poikilotherm) vertebrates (e.g. used in exotic dishes). These guidelines must be included in recommendations to travelers.

  12. Study on the increase of inactive germanium layer in a high-purity germanium detector after a long time operation applying MCNP code

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huy, N. Q.; Binh, D. Q.; An, V. X.

    2007-04-01

    This study aims at finding an explanation for the decrease in the efficiency of an HPGe detector and evaluating a change in the detector inactive germanium layer during its operation. Monte Carlo calculations using the MCNP4C2 code were performed to evaluate the detector efficiency for different values of the inactive germanium layer. Comparison of the experimental and calculated data shows that the inactive germanium layer of the detector changed its thickness from 0.35 to 1.16 mm after an operating time of 9 years. Measurements for determining the reduction of the detector efficiency were carried out two times, one after 3 years and another after 9 years of operation. Experimental result shows that the detector efficiency was reduced about 8% in this period. The increase of inactive germanium layer can be considered as the main reason for explaining the reduction of detector efficiency of about 13% at the γ energies from 200 to 1800 keV during 9 years of detector operation, in which 5% for the 3 first years and 8% for the 6 last years.

  13. Picosecond wide-field time-correlated single photon counting fluorescence microscopy with a delay line anode detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirvonen, Liisa M.; Becker, Wolfgang; Milnes, James; Conneely, Thomas; Smietana, Stefan; Le Marois, Alix; Jagutzki, Ottmar; Suhling, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    We perform wide-field time-correlated single photon counting-based fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with a crossed delay line anode image intensifier, where the pulse propagation time yields the photon position. This microchannel plate-based detector was read out with conventional fast timing electronics and mounted on a fluorescence microscope with total internal reflection (TIR) illumination. The picosecond time resolution of this detection system combines low illumination intensity of microwatts with wide-field data collection. This is ideal for fluorescence lifetime imaging of cell membranes using TIR. We show that fluorescence lifetime images of living HeLa cells stained with membrane dye di-4-ANEPPDHQ exhibit a reduced lifetime near the coverslip in TIR compared to epifluorescence FLIM.

  14. Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector.

    PubMed

    Smith, Richard J; Light, Roger A; Sharples, Steve D; Johnston, Nicholas S; Pitter, Mark C; Somekh, Mike G

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

  15. Multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound imaging and spectroscopy with custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor detector

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Richard J.; Light, Roger A.; Johnston, Nicholas S.; Pitter, Mark C.; Somekh, Mike G.; Sharples, Steve D.

    2010-02-15

    This paper presents a multichannel, time-resolved picosecond laser ultrasound system that uses a custom complementary metal-oxide-semiconductor linear array detector. This novel sensor allows parallel phase-sensitive detection of very low contrast modulated signals with performance in each channel comparable to that of a discrete photodiode and a lock-in amplifier. Application of the instrument is demonstrated by parallelizing spatial measurements to produce two-dimensional thickness maps on a layered sample, and spectroscopic parallelization is demonstrated by presenting the measured Brillouin oscillations from a gallium arsenide wafer. This paper demonstrates the significant advantages of our approach to pump probe systems, especially picosecond ultrasonics.

  16. Novel large format sealed tube microchannel plate detectors for Cherenkov timing and imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, O. H. W.; McPhate, J. B.; Vallerga, J. V.; Tremsin, A. S.; Jelinsky, S. R.; Frisch, H. J.; Lappd Collaboration

    2011-05-01

    Large area (20×20 cm 2) sealed tube detectors using novel borosilicate glass microchannel plates, with bialkali photocathodes and strip-line readouts are being developed for Cherenkov light detection. Designs based on conventional sealed tubes with alumina brazed body construction and hot indium seals have been developed. Borosilicate glass substrates with 20 and 40 μm holes have been processed using atomic layer deposition to produce functional microchannel plates. Initial results for these in a 33 mm format show gain, imaging performance, pulse shape and lifetime characteristics that are similar to standard glass microchannel plates. Large area (20×20 cm 2) borosilicate glass substrates with 20 μm pores have also been made.

  17. Groundwater-Lake Interaction in the Dead Sea Area

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiro, Y.; Weinstein, Y.; Starinsky, A.; Yechieli, Y.

    2011-12-01

    The Dead Sea hypersaline water system is unique in terms of its unusual geochemical composition, rapid lake level changes and water composition of the brines discharging along its shoreline. The Dead Sea can be used as a natural lab for studying groundwater-seawater interaction and saline water hydrological circulation along the aquifer-sea boundary. It provides an opportunity to follow the geochemical processes along a flow path from the lake into the aquifer and back into the lake. The lake level has been dropping since the 1960's due to human interference in its water budget, reaching a rate of 1 m/yr in recent years. Saline water circulation in coastal aquifers may be a major process that governs trace element mass balances in coastal areas. This study uses radium isotopes in order to quantify the lake water circulation in the Dead Sea aquifer. There are four naturally-occurring radium isotopes, with half-lives ranging from 3.7 days to 1600 years which are chain products of uranium and thorium isotopes. Radium isotopes are usually enriched in saline groundwater and therefore are good candidates for estimating seawater or hypersaline lake water circulation in the aquifer. Compared to most natural water bodies, the Dead Sea is extremely enriched in radium and barium, where both 226Ra and 228Ra activities and Ba concentration (145, 1-2 dpm/L and 5 mg/L, respectively) are 2-3 orders of magnitude higher than in ocean water, whereas the salinity of the Dead Sea is only 10 times higher. Circulated Dead Sea water in the aquifer contains decreased concentrations of 226Ra (60 dpm/L), Ba (1.5 mg/L), Sr (300 relative to 340 mg/L in the Dead Sea) and Sulfate (250 relative to 392 mg/L). We suggest that the low 226Ra and Ba concentrations are due to precipitation of barite and celestine from the supersaturated Dead Sea water on entering the aquifer. 228Ra and the shorter-lived 224Ra and 223Ra, which have much lower activities in the Dead Sea (up to 1.8, 3 and 0.8 dpm

  18. Detector, collimator and real-time reconstructor for a new scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) prototype

    PubMed Central

    Speidel, Michael A.; Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Raval, Amish N.; Dunkerley, David A. P.; Slagowski, Jordan M.; Kahn, Paul; Ku, Jamie; Funk, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Scanning-beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopy system for low dose cardiac imaging. The use of a narrow scanned x-ray beam in SBDX reduces detected x-ray scatter and improves dose efficiency, however the tight beam collimation also limits the maximum achievable x-ray fluence. To increase the fluence available for imaging, we have constructed a new SBDX prototype with a wider x-ray beam, larger-area detector, and new real-time image reconstructor. Imaging is performed with a scanning source that generates 40,328 narrow overlapping projections from 71 × 71 focal spot positions for every 1/15 s scan period. A high speed 2-mm thick CdTe photon counting detector was constructed with 320×160 elements and 10.6 cm × 5.3 cm area (full readout every 1.28 μs), providing an 86% increase in area over the previous SBDX prototype. A matching multihole collimator was fabricated from layers of tungsten, brass, and lead, and a multi-GPU reconstructor was assembled to reconstruct the stream of captured detector images into full field-of-view images in real time. Thirty-two tomosynthetic planes spaced by 5 mm plus a multiplane composite image are produced for each scan frame. Noise equivalent quanta on the new SBDX prototype measured 63%–71% higher than the previous prototype. X-ray scatter fraction was 3.9–7.8% when imaging 23.3–32.6 cm acrylic phantoms, versus 2.3–4.2% with the previous prototype. Coronary angiographic imaging at 15 frame/s was successfully performed on the new SBDX prototype, with live display of either a multiplane composite or single plane image. PMID:26236071

  19. Extreme flood events in the Dead Sea basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahlborn, Marieke; Ben Dor, Yoav; Schwab, Markus J.; Neugebauer, Ina; Plessen, Birgit; Tjallingii, Rik; Erel, Yigal; Enzel, Yehouda; Brauer, Achim

    2016-04-01

    The Dead Sea is a hypersaline, terminal lake located within the Dead Sea basin at the lowest continental elevation on Earth (~425 m below mean sea level). Extreme hydro-meteorological events in terms of flash floods occur regularly during the wet season in the Dead Sea basin and adjacent mountain ranges. However, little is known about the impact of these extreme floods on the sedimentary dynamics in the Dead Sea and possible links to long-term climate changes. The trilateral research project PALEX (Paleoclimate in the Eastern Mediterranean Region - Levante: Paleohydrology and Extreme Flood Events) was recently initiated within the framework of the DFG priority program 1006 ICDP (International Continental Scientific Drilling Program) to investigate extreme flood events in the Dead Sea basin during the Late Pleistocene and Holocene. Within the ICDP Dead Sea Deep Drilling Project (DSDDP) the ~455 m long sediment core 5017-1 was recovered from the northern Dead Sea basin. Previously published results (Neugebauer et al., 2014, 2015) have demonstrated the occurrence of extreme flood events represented in the sediments as thick graded detrital layers during Late Holocene dry phases. Based on these results we will apply a comprehensive analytical approach including microfacies analyses, μXRF element scanning, and stable isotope geochemistry to different time intervals of core 5017-1. Particularly, we aim to investigate the structure and composition of detrital layers in order to decipher sediment transport mechanisms and the provenance of the flood-triggered sediments. The overarching goal is to establish a high-resolution extreme flood time series for the Dead Sea basin on the basis of a previously established radiocarbon and U-Th chronology (Torfstein et al., 2015; Neugebauer et al., 2014) and to study a possible link between the frequency and magnitude of extreme flood events and the long-term climate trend. Neugebauer I, Brauer A, Schwab MJ, et al. (2014) Lithology of

  20. Real-time envelope cross-correlation detector: application to induced seismicity in the Insheim and Landau deep geothermal reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasterling, Margarete; Wegler, Ulrich; Becker, Jan; Brüstle, Andrea; Bischoff, Monika

    2017-01-01

    We develop and test a real-time envelope cross-correlation detector for use in seismic response plans to mitigate hazard of induced seismicity. The incoming seismological data are cross-correlated in real-time with a set of previously recorded master events. For robustness against small changes in the earthquake source locations or in the focal mechanisms we cross-correlate the envelopes of the seismograms rather than the seismograms themselves. Two sequenced detection conditions are implemented: After passing a single trace cross-correlation condition, a network cross-correlation is calculated taking amplitude ratios between stations into account. Besides detecting the earthquake and assigning it to the respective reservoir, real-time magnitudes are important for seismic response plans. We estimate the magnitudes of induced microseismicity using the relative amplitudes between master event and detected event. The real-time detector is implemented as a SeisComP3 module. We carry out offline and online performance tests using seismic monitoring data of the Insheim and Landau geothermal power plants (Upper Rhine Graben, Germany), also including blasts from a nearby quarry. The comparison of the automatic real-time catalogue with a manually processed catalogue shows, that with the implemented parameters events are always correctly assigned to the respective reservoir (4 km distance between reservoirs) or the quarry (8 km and 10 km distance, respectively, from the reservoirs). The real-time catalogue achieves a magnitude of completeness around 0.0. Four per cent of the events assigned to the Insheim reservoir and zero per cent of the Landau events are misdetections. All wrong detections are local tectonic events, whereas none are caused by seismic noise.

  1. New beam line for time-of-flight medium energy ion scattering with large area position sensitive detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linnarsson, M. K.; Hallén, A.; Åström, J.; Primetzhofer, D.; Legendre, S.; Possnert, G.

    2012-09-01

    A new beam line for medium energy ion mass scattering (MEIS) has been designed and set up at the Ångström laboratory, Uppsala University, Sweden. This MEIS system is based on a time-of-flight (ToF) concept and the electronics for beam chopping relies on a 4 MHz function generator. Repetition rates can be varied between 1 MHz and 63 kHz and pulse widths below 1 ns are typically obtained by including beam bunching. A 6-axis goniometer is used at the target station. Scattering angle and energy of backscattered ions are extracted from a time-resolved and position-sensitive detector. Examples of the performance are given for three kinds of probing ions, 1H+, 4He+, and 11B+. Depth resolution is in the nanometer range and 1 and 2 nm thick Pt layers can easily be resolved. Mass resolution between nearby isotopes can be obtained as illustrated by Ga isotopes in GaAs. Taking advantage of the large size detector, a direct imaging (blocking pattern) of crystal channels are shown for hexagonal, 4H-SiC. The ToF-MEIS system described in this paper is intended for use in semiconductor and thin film areas. For example, depth profiling in the sub nanometer range for device development of contacts and dielectric interfaces. In addition to applied projects, fundamental studies of stopping cross sections in this medium energy range will also be conducted.

  2. Classification of items in a walk-through metal detector using time series of eigenvalues of the polarizability tensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kauppila, Jarmo; Ala-Kleemola, Timo; Vihonen, Juho; Jylhä, Juha; Ruotsalainen, Marja; Järvi, Ari; Visa, Ari

    2009-05-01

    During the last decade, the safety regulations of the airports have been set to a new level. As the number of passengers is constantly increasing, yet effective but quick security control at checkpoints sets great requirements to the 21st century security systems. In this paper, we shall introduce a novel metal detector concept that enables not only to detect but also to classify hidden items, though their orientation and accurate location are unknown. Our new prototype walk-through metal detector generates mutually orthogonal homogeneous magnetic fields so that the measured dipole moments allow classification of even the smallest of the items with high degree of accuracy in real-time. Invariant to different rotations of an object, the classification is based on eigenvalues of the polarizability tensor that incorporate information about the item (size, shape, orientation etc.); as a further novelty, we treat the eigenvalues as time series. In our laboratory settings, no assumptions concerning the typical place, where an item is likely situated, are made. In that case, 90 % of the dangerous and harmless items, including knives, guns, gun parts, belts etc. according to a security organisation, are correctly classified. Made misclassifications are explained by too similar electromagnetic properties of the items in question. The theoretical treatment and simulations are verified via empirical tests conducted using a robotic arm and our prototype system. In the future, the state-of-the-art system is likely to speed-up the security controls significantly with improved safety.

  3. Real time measurements of PM2.5 concentrations and vertical turbulent fluxes using an optical detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donateo, Antonio; Contini, Daniele; Belosi, Franco

    In this work the possibility of measuring real-time concentrations of PM2.5 and the corresponding vertical turbulent fluxes using the optical detector Mie pDR-1200, operating synchronously with an ultrasonic anemometer, is investigated. This detector is known to be sensitive to high values of relative humidity (RH) and a new procedure to correct the effect of RH on concentration measurements is presented. Results of optical measurements have been compared with gravimetric detections of PM2.5 and results show a reasonable correlation between them and an improvement of the agreement when RH-correction is used. Results presented have been collected at two measurement sites that can be representative of urban background environments but in one of them was present an industrial area nearby. Post-processing of data has been performed with the eddy-correlation technique that allows evaluation of vertical turbulent fluxes of PM2.5 as well as sensible heat and momentum fluxes. The turbulent mass fluxes, together with the analysis of real-time concentrations and their correlation with meteorology proved to be an useful tool to infer details about the local aerosol dynamics helping to interpret traditional gravimetric analysis of aerosol that is usually performed on a 24 h basis. Results show that the methodology can be useful in identifying the contribution of local sources like ground level emissions or industrial plumes with respect to the contribution of sources located far away from the measurement site.

  4. New BNL 3D-Trench Electrode Si Detectors for Radiation Hard Detectors for sLHC and for X-ray Applications

    SciTech Connect

    Li Z.

    2011-05-11

    A new international-patent-pending (PCT/US2010/52887) detector type, named here as 3D-Trench electrode Si detectors, is proposed in this work. In this new 3D electrode configuration, one or both types of electrodes are etched as trenches deep into the Si (fully penetrating with SOI or supporting wafer, or non-fully penetrating into 50-90% of the thickness), instead of columns as in the conventional ('standard') 3D electrode Si detectors. With trench etched electrodes, the electric field in the new 3D electrode detectors are well defined without low or zero field regions. Except near both surfaces of the detector, the electric field in the concentric type 3D-Trench electrode Si detectors is nearly radial with little or no angular dependence in the circular and hexangular (concentric-type) pixel cell geometries. In the case of parallel plate 3D trench pixels, the field is nearly linear (like the planar 2D electrode detectors), with simple and well-defined boundary conditions. Since each pixel cell in a 3D-Trench electrode detector is isolated from others by highly doped trenches, it is an electrically independent cell. Therefore, an alternative name 'Independent Coaxial Detector Array', or ICDA, is assigned to an array of 3D-Trench electrode detectors. The electric field in the detector can be reduced by a factor of nearly 10 with an optimal 3D-Trench configuration where the junction is on the surrounding trench side. The full depletion voltage in this optimal configuration can be up to 7 times less than that of a conventional 3D detector, and even a factor of two less than that of a 2D planar detector with a thickness the same as the electrode spacing in the 3D-Trench electrode detector. In the case of non-fully penetrating trench electrodes, the processing is true one-sided with backside being unprocessed. The charge loss due to the dead space associated with the trenches is insignificant as compared to that due to radiation-induced trapping in sLHC environment

  5. The dead donor rule: can it withstand critical scrutiny?

    PubMed

    Miller, Franklin G; Truog, Robert D; Brock, Dan W

    2010-06-01

    Transplantation of vital organs has been premised ethically and legally on "the dead donor rule" (DDR)-the requirement that donors are determined to be dead before these organs are procured. Nevertheless, scholars have argued cogently that donors of vital organs, including those diagnosed as "brain dead" and those declared dead according to cardiopulmonary criteria, are not in fact dead at the time that vital organs are being procured. In this article, we challenge the normative rationale for the DDR by rejecting the underlying premise that it is necessarily wrong for physicians to cause the death of patients and the claim that abandoning this rule would exploit vulnerable patients. We contend that it is ethical to procure vital organs from living patients sustained on life support prior to treatment withdrawal, provided that there is valid consent for both withdrawing treatment and organ donation. However, the conservatism of medical ethics and practical concerns make it doubtful that the DDR will be abandoned in the near future. This leaves the current practice of organ transplantation based on the "moral fiction" that donors are dead when vital organs are procured.

  6. Magnetized Accretion and Dead Zones in Protoplanetary disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Turner, Neal J.; Henning, Thomas; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-07-01

    The edges of magnetically-dead zones in protostellar disks have been proposed as locations where density bumps may arise, trapping planetesimals and helping form planets. Magneto-rotational turbulence in magnetically-active zones provides both accretion of gas on the star and transport of mass to the dead zone. We investigate the location of the magnetically-active regions in a protostellar disk around a solar-type star, varying the parameters like dust-to-gas ratio. The dead zone is in most cases defined by the ambipolar diffusion. In our maps, the dead zone takes a variety of shapes, including a fish-tail pointing away from the star and islands located on and off the midplane. The corresponding accretion rates vary with radius, indicating locations where the surface density will increase over time, and others where it will decrease. We show that density bumps do not readily grow near the dead zone's outer edge, independently of the disk parameters and the dust properties. Instead, the accretion rate peaks at the radius where the gas-phase metals freeze out. This could lead to clearing a valley in the surface density, and to a trap for pebbles located just outside the metal freeze-out line. Here, we provide the fitting formula for the metal line and consider the cojoint impact of metal ans snow lines on the shape of the dead zone.

  7. Efficiency and rate capability studies of the time-of-flight detector for isochronous mass measurements of stored short-lived nuclei with the FRS-ESR facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuzminchuk-Feuerstein, Natalia; Fabian, Benjamin; Diwisch, Marcel; Plaß, Wolfgang R.; Geissel, Hans; Ayet San Andrés, Samuel; Dickel, Timo; Knöbel, Ronja; Scheidenberger, Christoph; Sun, Baohua; Weick, Helmut

    2016-06-01

    A time-of-flight (TOF) detector is used for Isochronous Mass Spectrometry (IMS) with the projectile fragment separator FRS and the heavy-ion storage ring ESR. Exotic nuclei are spatially separated in flight with the FRS at about 70% of the speed of light and are injected into the ESR. The revolution times of the stored ions circulating in the ESR are measured with a thin transmission foil detector. When the ions penetrate the thin detector foil, secondary electrons (SEs) are emitted from the surface and provide the timing information in combination with microchannel plate (MCP) detectors. The isochronous transport of the SEs is performed by perpendicular superimposed electric and magnetic fields. The detection efficiency and the rate capability of the TOF detector have been studied in simulations and experiments. As a result the performance of the TOF detector has been improved substantially: (i) The SE collection efficiency was doubled by use of an optimized set of electric and magnetic field values; now SEs from almost the full area of the foil are transmitted to the MCP detectors. (ii) The rate capability of the TOF detector was improved by a factor of four by the use of MCPs with 5 μm pore size. (iii) With these MCPs and a carbon foil with a reduced thickness of 10 μg/cm2 the number of recorded revolutions in the ESR has been increased by nearly a factor of 10. The number of recorded revolutions determine the precision of the IMS experiments. Heavy-ion measurements were performed with neon ions at 322 MeV/u and uranium fission fragments at about 370 MeV/u. In addition, measurements with an alpha source were performed in the laboratory with a duplicate of the TOF detector.

  8. FAQ: West Nile Virus and Dead Birds

    MedlinePlus

    ... Education Public Service Videos West Nile Virus & Dead Birds Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir On This ... dead bird sightings to local authorities. How do birds get infected with West Nile virus? West Nile ...

  9. MAMA Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowyer, Stuart

    1998-01-01

    Work carried out under this grant led to fundamental discoveries and over one hundred publications in the scientific literature. Fundamental developments in instrumentation were made including all the instrumentation on the EUVE satellite, the invention of a whole new type of grazing instrument spectrometer and the development of fundamentally new photon counting detectors including the Wedge and Strip used on EUVE and many other missions and the Time Delay detector used on OREFUS and FUSE. The Wedge and Strip and Time Delay detectors were developed under this grant for less than two million dollars and have been used in numerous missions most recently for the FUSE mission. In addition, a fundamentally new type of diffuse spectrometer has been developed under this grant which has been used in instrumentation on the MMSAT spacecraft and the Lewis spacecraft. Plans are underway to use this instrumentation on several other missions as well.

  10. Sub-200 ps CRT in monolithic scintillator PET detectors using digital SiPM arrays and maximum likelihood interaction time estimation.

    PubMed

    van Dam, Herman T; Borghi, Giacomo; Seifert, Stefan; Schaart, Dennis R

    2013-05-21

    Digital silicon photomultiplier (dSiPM) arrays have favorable characteristics for application in monolithic scintillator detectors for time-of-flight positron emission tomography (PET). To fully exploit these benefits, a maximum likelihood interaction time estimation (MLITE) method was developed to derive the time of interaction from the multiple time stamps obtained per scintillation event. MLITE was compared to several deterministic methods. Timing measurements were performed with monolithic scintillator detectors based on novel dSiPM arrays and LSO:Ce,0.2%Ca crystals of 16 × 16 × 10 mm(3), 16 × 16 × 20 mm(3), 24 × 24 × 10 mm(3), and 24 × 24 × 20 mm(3). The best coincidence resolving times (CRTs) for pairs of identical detectors were obtained with MLITE and measured 157 ps, 185 ps, 161 ps, and 184 ps full-width-at-half-maximum (FWHM), respectively. For comparison, a small reference detector, consisting of a 3 × 3 × 5 mm(3) LSO:Ce,0.2%Ca crystal coupled to a single pixel of a dSiPM array, was measured to have a CRT as low as 120 ps FWHM. The results of this work indicate that the influence of the optical transport of the scintillation photons on the timing performance of monolithic scintillator detectors can at least partially be corrected for by utilizing the information contained in the spatio-temporal distribution of the collection of time stamps registered per scintillation event.

  11. Transient diffusion in a tube with dead ends.

    PubMed

    Dagdug, Leonardo; Berezhkovskii, Alexander M; Makhnovskii, Yurii A; Zitserman, Vladimir Yu

    2007-12-14

    A particle diffusing in a tube with dead ends, from time to time enters a dead end, spends some time in the dead end, and then comes back to the tube. As a result, the particle spends in the tube only a part of the entire observation time that leads to slowdown of its diffusion along the tube. We study the transient diffusion in a tube with periodic identical dead ends formed by cavities of volume V(cav) connected to the tube by cylindrical channels of length L and radius a, which is assumed to be much smaller than the tube radius R and the distance l between neighboring dead ends. Assuming that the particle initial position is uniformly distributed over the tube, we analyze the monotonic decrease of the particle diffusion coefficient D(t) from its initial value D(0)=D, which characterizes diffusion in the tube without dead ends, to its asymptotic long-time value D(infinity)=D(eff)time of the process as a function of the geometric parameters of the system mentioned above. To check the accuracy of our results, we ran Brownian dynamics simulations and found the mean squared displacement of the particle as a function of time by averaging over 5x10(4) realizations of the particle trajectory. The time-dependent mean squared displacement found in simulations is compared with that obtained by numerically inverting the Laplace transform of the mean squared displacement predicted by the theory, which is given by 2D(s)/s. Comparison shows excellent agreement between the two time dependences that support the approximations used when developing the theory.

  12. Towards a microchannel-based X-ray detector with two-dimensional spatial and time resolution and high dynamic range.

    PubMed

    Adams, Bernhard W; Mane, Anil U; Elam, Jeffrey W; Obaid, Razib; Wetstein, Matthew; Chollet, Matthieu

    2015-09-01

    X-ray detectors that combine two-dimensional spatial resolution with a high time resolution are needed in numerous applications of synchrotron radiation. Most detectors with this combination of capabilities are based on semiconductor technology and are therefore limited in size. Furthermore, the time resolution is often realised through rapid time-gating of the acquisition, followed by a slower readout. Here, a detector technology is realised based on relatively inexpensive microchannel plates that uses GHz waveform sampling for a millimeter-scale spatial resolution and better than 100 ps time resolution. The technology is capable of continuous streaming of time- and location-tagged events at rates greater than 10(7) events per cm(2). Time-gating can be used for improved dynamic range.

  13. Towards a microchannel-based X-ray detector with two-dimensional spatial and time resolution and high dynamic range

    SciTech Connect

    Adams, Bernhard W.; Mane, Anil; Elam, Jeffrey; Obaid, Razib; Wetstein, Matthew J.

    2015-09-01

    X-ray detectors that combine two-dimensional spatial resolution with a high time resolution are needed in numerous applications of synchrotron radiation. Most detectors with this combination of capabilities are based on semiconductor technology and are therefore limited in size. Furthermore, the time resolution is often realised through rapid time-gating of the acquisition, followed by a slower readout. Here, a detector technology is realised based on relatively inexpensive microchannel plates that uses GHz waveform sampling for a millimeter-scale spatial resolution and better than 100 ps time resolution. The technology is capable of continuous streaming of time- and location-tagged events at rates greater than 10(7) events per cm(2). Time-gating can be used for improved dynamic range.

  14. Measurements of the scintillation time constants of inorganic crystals for the development of a triple-Phoswich detector for high-energy X-ray quanta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michelis, Thilo

    1987-04-01

    A setup for the measurement of the rise time distribution of pulses measured by a triple-Phoswich detector that is planned as component of an imaging system of a rotation-modulation telescope (RMT) was built. The principles and characteristics of scintillation crystals, scintillation detectors, and RMT's are outlined. Measurements on CsT(Tl) test crystals show a strong dependence of rise time distribution on Tl-concentration, and a clear dependence on temperature. A system for optimum light collection was developed for a Phoswich detector. The scintillation crystals NaJ(Tl) and CsJ(Na) are very suitable for a strip Phoswich. Proposals for a triple-Phoswich as detector for an RMT are given.

  15. 7 CFR 322.29 - Dead bees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Dead bees. 322.29 Section 322.29 Agriculture..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Importation and Transit of Restricted Articles § 322.29 Dead bees. (a) Dead bees imported into or transiting the United States must...

  16. 7 CFR 322.29 - Dead bees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Dead bees. 322.29 Section 322.29 Agriculture..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Importation and Transit of Restricted Articles § 322.29 Dead bees. (a) Dead bees imported into or transiting the United States must...

  17. 7 CFR 322.29 - Dead bees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Dead bees. 322.29 Section 322.29 Agriculture..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Importation and Transit of Restricted Articles § 322.29 Dead bees. (a) Dead bees imported into or transiting the United States must...

  18. 7 CFR 322.29 - Dead bees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Dead bees. 322.29 Section 322.29 Agriculture..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Importation and Transit of Restricted Articles § 322.29 Dead bees. (a) Dead bees imported into or transiting the United States must...

  19. 7 CFR 322.29 - Dead bees.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 5 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Dead bees. 322.29 Section 322.29 Agriculture..., DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE BEES, BEEKEEPING BYPRODUCTS, AND BEEKEEPING EQUIPMENT Importation and Transit of Restricted Articles § 322.29 Dead bees. (a) Dead bees imported into or transiting the United States must...

  20. 32 CFR 632.4 - Deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 true Deadly force. 632.4 Section 632.4 National... INVESTIGATIONS USE OF FORCE BY PERSONNEL ENGAGED IN LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SECURITY DUTIES § 632.4 Deadly force. (a) Deadly force is destructive physical force directed against a person or persons (e.g., firing a...

  1. 32 CFR 632.4 - Deadly force.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 32 National Defense 4 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Deadly force. 632.4 Section 632.4 National... INVESTIGATIONS USE OF FORCE BY PERSONNEL ENGAGED IN LAW ENFORCEMENT AND SECURITY DUTIES § 632.4 Deadly force. (a) Deadly force is destructive physical force directed against a person or persons (e.g., firing a...

  2. The address in real time data driver card for the MicroMegas detector of the ATLAS muon upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, L.; Polychronakos, V.; Chen, H.; Chen, K.; Xu, H.; Martoiu, S.; Felt, N.; Lazovich, T.

    2017-01-01

    The ART Data Driver Card (ADDC) will be used in the ATLAS muon upgrade to process and transmit the Address in Real Time (ART) signals, which are generated by the front end chip (VMM) to indicate the location of the first above-threshold event. This ART signal is encoded to represent the address of the first threshold-crossing strip for trigger processing and the magnitude information is not included. The ADDC will be installed on the detector with high radiation and magnetic field thus a custom ASIC (ART ASIC) will be used to receive the ART signals from VMM and do the hit-selection processing. Processed data from ART ASIC will be transmitted out of the detector to the trigger processor through fiber connection. To evaluate the performance of the ADDC before the ART ASIC is produced, an FPGA based prototype was built. This prototype includes most of the major components of the ADDC, while a Xilinx Artix-7 FPGA is used to emulate the ART ASIC. The bench test and integration test results of this prototype will also be described.

  3. Comparative analysis of movement characteristics during dead-reckoning-based navigation in humans and rats.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Douglas G; Choudhry, Sarwat; Martin, Megan M

    2006-11-01

    Human and rat movement organization was investigated as they searched for randomly located rewards without access to visual information. Under dark conditions, rats foraged for randomly located food pellets (Experiment 1). Blindfolded humans were instructed to search for an ostensible hidden coin using a metal detector (Experiment 2). After locating the food pellet, rats carried it back to the refuge, and after a designated searching time, humans were instructed to return to the start location. Although both species exhibited a high degree of similarity in searching path movement organization and ability to return to the start location, disruption of human searching path organization was associated with impairments in returning to the start location. These results support the vestibular "gain" account of movement organization during dead-reckoning-based navigation.

  4. Photon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Va`vra, J.

    1995-10-01

    J. Seguinot and T. Ypsilantis have recently described the theory and history of Ring Imaging Cherenkov (RICH) detectors. In this paper, I will expand on these excellent review papers, by covering the various photon detector designs in greater detail, and by including discussion of mistakes made, and detector problems encountered, along the way. Photon detectors are among the most difficult devices used in physics experiments, because they must achieve high efficiency for photon transport and for the detection of single photo-electrons. For gaseous devices, this requires the correct choice of gas gain in order to prevent breakdown and wire aging, together with the use of low noise electronics having the maximum possible amplification. In addition, the detector must be constructed of materials which resist corrosion due to photosensitive materials such as, the detector enclosure must be tightly sealed in order to prevent oxygen leaks, etc. The most critical step is the selection of the photocathode material. Typically, a choice must be made between a solid (CsI) or gaseous photocathode (TMAE, TEA). A conservative approach favors a gaseous photocathode, since it is continuously being replaced by flushing, and permits the photon detectors to be easily serviced (the air sensitive photocathode can be removed at any time). In addition, it can be argued that we now know how to handle TMAE, which, as is generally accepted, is the best photocathode material available as far as quantum efficiency is concerned. However, it is a very fragile molecule, and therefore its use may result in relatively fast wire aging. A possible alternative is TEA, which, in the early days, was rejected because it requires expensive CaF{sub 2} windows, which could be contaminated easily in the region of 8.3 eV and thus lose their UV transmission.

  5. Absolute x-ray and neutron calibration of CVD-diamond-based time-of-flight detectors for the National Ignition Facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenthal, A.; Kabadi, N. V.; Sio, H.; Rinderknecht, H.; Gatu Johnson, M.; Frenje, J. A.; Seguin, F. H.; Petrasso, R. D.; Glebov, V.; Forrest, C.; Knauer, J.

    2016-10-01

    The particle-time-of-flight (pTOF) detector at the National Ignition Facility routinely measures proton and neutron nuclear bang-times in inertial confinement fusion (ICF) implosions. The active detector medium in pTOF is a chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond biased to 250 - 1500 V. This work discusses an absolute measurement of CVD diamond sensitivity to continuous neutrons and x-rays. Although the impulse response of the detector is regularly measured on a diagnostic timing shot, absolute sensitivity of the detector's response to neutrons and x-rays has not been fully established. X-ray, DD-n, and DT-n sources at the MIT HEDP Accelerator Facility provide continuous sources for testing. CVD diamond detectors are also fielded on OMEGA experiments to measure sensitivity to impulse DT-n. Implications for absolute neutron yield measurements at the NIF using pTOF detectors will be discussed. This work was supported in part by the U.S. DoE and LLNL.

  6. Electronic Microchannel Plate Particle Detector Design for a CubeSat Time-of-Flight Reflectron Mass Spectrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pyle, M. L.; Davidson, R.; Swenson, C.; Syrstad, E. A.

    2015-12-01

    Variations of gas density and composition in Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere are key indicators of interactions between different layers of Earth's atmosphere. The nature of interactions between neutral and ion species in the upper atmosphere is an active area of study in Heliophysics and there is much to learn about the dynamic relationship between the ionosphere and neutral thermosphere. Mass Spectrometers are among an array of instruments used to explore Earth's upper atmosphere and other space environments. Normally, these instruments are substantial in size and deployed on larger satellites. Data from these larger instruments generally provides information from a specific point in time at a single location. Studies of atmospheric density and composition with multiple locations for each time point could be performed by CubeSat swarms if proper instrumentation were available to fit CubeSat payload restrictions. The proposed miniaturized time-of-flight (TOF) mass spectrometer (MS) will have a mass resolution and range sufficient for measuring the composition of Earth's thermosphere and ionosphere while operating within the power and space constraints of a CubeSat. The capabilities of this instrument would potentially dramatically reduce the cost of future missions while simultaneously enhancing the science return. The design employs miniaturization of TOF-MS technology, including resolution refinement techniques used for larger instruments and standard concepts for TOF-MS components such as acceleration grids, a Bradbury-Nielsen wire gate, a gridless ion mirror, and microchannel plate detector (MCP). The quality of particle detection is known to have a significant impact on the instrument performance. A signal collector for an MCP detector is being designed to maximize the detection performance and enable the transmission of density and composition data back to Earth.

  7. Electronic fingerprinting of the dead.

    PubMed

    Rutty, G N; Stringer, K; Turk, E E

    2008-01-01

    To date, a number of methods exist for the capture of fingerprints from cadavers that can then be used in isolation as a primary method for the identification of the dead. We report the use of a handheld, mobile wireless unit used in conjunction with a personal digital assistant (PDA) device for the capture of fingerprints from the dead. We also consider a handheld single-digit fingerprint scanner that utilises a USB laptop connection for the electronic capture of cadaveric fingerprints. Both are single-operator units that, if ridge detail is preserved, can collect a 10-set of finger pad prints in approximately 45 and 90 s, respectively. We present our observations on the restrictions as to when such devices can be used with cadavers. We do, however, illustrate that the images are of sufficient quality to allow positive identification from finger pad prints of the dead. With the development of mobile, handheld, biometric, PDA-based units for the police, we hypothesize that, under certain circumstances, devices such as these could be used for the accelerated acquisition of fingerprint identification data with the potential for rapid near-patient identification in the future.

  8. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, H.W.; Cusson, R.Y.; Johnson, R.M.

    1985-02-08

    A microwave detector is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop. The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  9. Microwave detector

    DOEpatents

    Meldner, Heiner W.; Cusson, Ronald Y.; Johnson, Ray M.

    1986-01-01

    A microwave detector (10) is provided for measuring the envelope shape of a microwave pulse comprised of high-frequency oscillations. A biased ferrite (26, 28) produces a magnetization field flux that links a B-dot loop (16, 20). The magnetic field of the microwave pulse participates in the formation of the magnetization field flux. High-frequency insensitive means (18, 22) are provided for measuring electric voltage or current induced in the B-dot loop. The recorded output of the detector is proportional to the time derivative of the square of the envelope shape of the microwave pulse.

  10. Can dead bacterial cells be defined and are genes expressed after cell death?

    PubMed

    Trevors, J T

    2012-07-01

    There is a paucity of knowledge on gene expression in dead bacterial cells. Why would this knowledge be useful? The cells are dead. However, the time duration of gene expression following cell death is often unknown, and possibly in the order of minutes. In addition, it is a challenge to determine if bacterial cells are dead, or viable but non-culturable (VBNC), and what is an agreed upon correct definition of dead bacteria. Cells in the bacterial population or community may die at different rates or times and this complicates both the viability and gene expression analysis. In this article, the definition of dead bacterial cells is discussed and its significance in continued gene expression in cells following death. The definition of living and dead has implications for possible, completely, synthetic bacterial cells that may be capable of growth and division.

  11. Mechanical Modulation of Phonon-Assisted Field Emission in a Silicon Nanomembrane Detector for Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jonghoo; Blick, Robert H.

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission in a free-standing silicon nanomembrane detector for time-of-flight mass spectrometry of proteins. The impacts of ion bombardment on the silicon nanomembrane have been explored in both mechanical and electrical points of view. Locally elevated lattice temperature in the silicon nanomembrane, resulting from the transduction of ion kinetic energy into thermal energy through the ion bombardment, induces not only phonon-assisted field emission but also a mechanical vibration in the silicon nanomembrane. The coupling of these mechanical and electrical phenomenon leads to mechanical modulation of phonon-assisted field emission. The thermal energy relaxation through mechanical vibration in addition to the lateral heat conduction and field emission in the silicon nanomembrane offers effective cooling of the nanomembrane, thereby allowing high resolution mass analysis. PMID:26861329

  12. Fast time-correlated multi-element photon detector and method

    DOEpatents

    Hayden, Carl C.; Chandler, David W.; Luong, A. Khai

    2007-12-18

    Photons emitted from a sample responsive to being excited by laser pulses are directed through a prism onto a photomultiplier tube having several spaced-apart anodes. The prism alters the path of each photon as a function of its wavelength so that the wavelength determines the anode to which the photon is directed. Taps of first and second delay lines that are coupled to respective alternating anodes. When an anode receives the photon, it generates a pulse that propagates through the delay line in opposite directions from its associated tap. A timer determines first and second times from the laser pulse to the pulse reaching the first and second ends of the delay line. The difference between the first and second times corresponds to the wavelength of the emitted photon and the sum of the first and second times corresponds to the emission delay of the emitted photon.

  13. Linear, position-sensitive x-ray detector used for real-time calculations of small-angle scattering parameters with submillisecond resolution

    SciTech Connect

    Borso, C.S.

    1984-01-01

    The advent of high-intensity X-ray synchrotron sources has made possible the measurement of fluctuations in small-angle scattering parameters from typical specimens on a submillisecond time scale in real-time. The fundamental design of any fast detector system optimized for such measurements will incorporate some type of solid state detector array capable of rapid encoding algorithms. A prototype with a self-scanning photodiode array has been designed and tested at beamline 1 to 4 at the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Laboratory (SSRL), and the results indicate that the device will operate at speeds yielding submillisecond temporal resolution in real-time.

  14. Comet 'Bites the Dust' Around Dead Star

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Infrared Spectrometer Graph

    This artist's concept illustrates a comet being torn to shreds around a dead star, or white dwarf, called G29-38. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope observed a cloud of dust around this white dwarf that may have been generated from this type of comet disruption. The findings suggest that a host of other comet survivors may still orbit in this long-dead solar system.

    The white dwarf G29-38 began life as a star that was about three times as massive as our sun. Its death involved the same steps that the sun will ultimately undergo billions of years from now. According to theory, the G29-38 star became brighter and brighter as it aged, until it bloated up into a dying star called a red giant. This red giant was large enough to engulf and evaporate any terrestrial planets like Earth that happened to be in its way. Later, the red giant shed its outer atmosphere, leaving behind a shrunken skeleton of star, called a white dwarf. If the star did host a planetary system, outer planets akin to Jupiter and Neptune and a remote ring of icy comets would remain.

    The Spitzer observations provide observational evidence for this orbiting outpost of comet survivors. Astronomers speculate that one such comet was knocked into the inner regions of G29-38, possibly by an outer planet. As the comet approached very close to the white dwarf, it may have been torn apart by the star's tidal forces. Eventually, all that would be left of the comet is a disk of dust.

    This illustration shows a comet in the process of being pulverized: part of it still exists as a chain of small clumps, while the rest has already spread out into a dusty disk. Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 broke apart in a similar fashion when it plunged into Jupiter in 1994. Evidence for Comets Found in Dead Star's Dust The graph of data, or spectrum, from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope indicates that a dead star, or white dwarf, called G29

  15. Bunch mode specific rate corrections for PILATUS3 detectors

    DOE PAGES

    Trueb, P.; Dejoie, C.; Kobas, M.; ...

    2015-04-09

    PILATUS X-ray detectors are in operation at many synchrotron beamlines around the world. This article reports on the characterization of the new PILATUS3 detector generation at high count rates. As for all counting detectors, the measured intensities have to be corrected for the dead-time of the counting mechanism at high photon fluxes. The large number of different bunch modes at these synchrotrons as well as the wide range of detector settings presents a challenge for providing accurate corrections. To avoid the intricate measurement of the count rate behaviour for every bunch mode, a Monte Carlo simulation of the counting mechanismmore » has been implemented, which is able to predict the corrections for arbitrary bunch modes and a wide range of detector settings. This article compares the simulated results with experimental data acquired at different synchrotrons. It is found that the usage of bunch mode specific corrections based on this simulation improves the accuracy of the measured intensities by up to 40% for high photon rates and highly structured bunch modes. For less structured bunch modes, the instant retrigger technology of PILATUS3 detectors substantially reduces the dependency of the rate correction on the bunch mode. The acquired data also demonstrate that the instant retrigger technology allows for data acquisition up to 15 million photons per second per pixel.« less

  16. Bunch mode specific rate corrections for PILATUS3 detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Trueb, P.; Dejoie, C.; Kobas, M.; Pattison, P.; Peake, D. J.; Radicci, V.; Sobott, B. A.; Walko, D. A.; Broennimann, C.

    2015-04-09

    PILATUS X-ray detectors are in operation at many synchrotron beamlines around the world. This article reports on the characterization of the new PILATUS3 detector generation at high count rates. As for all counting detectors, the measured intensities have to be corrected for the dead-time of the counting mechanism at high photon fluxes. The large number of different bunch modes at these synchrotrons as well as the wide range of detector settings presents a challenge for providing accurate corrections. To avoid the intricate measurement of the count rate behaviour for every bunch mode, a Monte Carlo simulation of the counting mechanism has been implemented, which is able to predict the corrections for arbitrary bunch modes and a wide range of detector settings. This article compares the simulated results with experimental data acquired at different synchrotrons. It is found that the usage of bunch mode specific corrections based on this simulation improves the accuracy of the measured intensities by up to 40% for high photon rates and highly structured bunch modes. For less structured bunch modes, the instant retrigger technology of PILATUS3 detectors substantially reduces the dependency of the rate correction on the bunch mode. The acquired data also demonstrate that the instant retrigger technology allows for data acquisition up to 15 million photons per second per pixel.

  17. Bunch mode specific rate corrections for PILATUS3 detectors

    PubMed Central

    Trueb, P.; Dejoie, C.; Kobas, M.; Pattison, P.; Peake, D. J.; Radicci, V.; Sobott, B. A.; Walko, D. A.; Broennimann, C.

    2015-01-01

    PILATUS X-ray detectors are in operation at many synchrotron beamlines around the world. This article reports on the characterization of the new PILATUS3 detector generation at high count rates. As for all counting detectors, the measured intensities have to be corrected for the dead-time of the counting mechanism at high photon fluxes. The large number of different bunch modes at these synchrotrons as well as the wide range of detector settings presents a challenge for providing accurate corrections. To avoid the intricate measurement of the count rate behaviour for every bunch mode, a Monte Carlo simulation of the counting mechanism has been implemented, which is able to predict the corrections for arbitrary bunch modes and a wide range of detector settings. This article compares the simulated results with experimental data acquired at different synchrotrons. It is found that the usage of bunch mode specific corrections based on this simulation improves the accuracy of the measured intensities by up to 40% for high photon rates and highly structured bunch modes. For less structured bunch modes, the instant retrigger technology of PILATUS3 detectors substantially reduces the dependency of the rate correction on the bunch mode. The acquired data also demonstrate that the instant retrigger technology allows for data acquisition up to 15 million photons per second per pixel. PMID:25931086

  18. Dead cell and side leakage correction for a lead-scintillating fiber electromagnetic calorimeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Cheng; Li, Zu-Hao; Tang, Zhi-Cheng; Basegmez du Pree, Suzan; Zhang, Shao-Wen; Wang, Xue-Qiang; Yang, Min; Chen, Guo-Ming; Chen, He-Sheng

    2016-09-01

    The electromagnetic calorimeter (ECAL) of the Alpha Magnetic Spectrometer (AMS-02) is one of the key detectors for dark matter searches. It measures the energies of electrons, positrons and photons and seperates them from hadrons. Currently, there are 5 dead cells in the ECAL, which affect the reconstructed energy of 4.2% of total events in the ECAL acceptance. When an electromagnetic shower axis is close to the ECAL border, due to the side leakage, the reconstructed energy is affected as well. In this paper, methods for dead cells and side leakage corrections for the ECAL energy reconstruction are presented. For events with the shower axis crossing dead cells, applying dead cell correction improves the difference in the reconstructed energy from 12% to 1%, while for events near the ECAL border, with side leakage correction it is improved from 4% to 1%. Supported by National Natural Science Foundation of China(11220101004)

  19. Development of a scintillation-fiber detector for real-time particle tracking

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lo Presti, D.; Bonanno, D. L.; Longhitano, F.; Pugliatti, C.; Russo, G. V.; Aiello, S.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Giordano, V.; Leonora, E.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Russo, M.; Sipala, V.; Stancampiano, C.; Reito, S.

    2013-04-01

    The prototype of the OFFSET (Optical Fiber Folded Scintillating Extended Tracker) tracker is presented. It exploits a novel system for particle tracking, designed to achieve real-time imaging, large detection areas, and a high spatial resolution especially suitable for use in medical diagnostics. The main results regarding the system architecture have been used as a demonstration of the technique which has been patented by the Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare (INFN). The prototype of this tracker, presented in this paper, has a 20 × 20 cm2 sensitive area, consisting of two crossed ribbons of 500 micron square scintillating fibers. The track position information is extracted in real time in an innovative way, using a reduced number of read-out channels to obtain very large detection area with moderate enough costs and complexity. The performance of the tracker was investigated using beta sources, cosmic rays, and a 62 MeV proton beam.

  20. Experimental studies with two novel silicon detectors for the development of time-of-flight spectrometry of laser-accelerated proton beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Würl, M.; Reinhardt, S.; Rosenfeld, A.; Petasecca, M.; Lerch, M.; Tran, L.; Karsch, S.; Assmann, W.; Schreiber, J.; Parodi, K.

    2017-01-01

    Laser-accelerated proton beams exhibit remarkably different beam characteristics as compared to conventionally accelerated ion beams. About 105 to 107 particles per MeV and msr are accelerated quasi-instantaneously within about 1 ps. The resulting energy spectrum typically shows an exponentially decaying distribution. Our planned approach to determine the energy spectrum of the particles generated in each pulse is to exploit the time-of-flight (TOF) difference of protons with different kinetic energies at 1 m distance from the laser-target interaction. This requires fast and sensitive detectors. We therefore tested two prototype silicon detectors, developed at the Centre for Medical Radiation Physics at the University of Wollongong with a current amplifier, regarding their suitability for TOF-spectrometry in terms of sensitivity and timing properties. For the latter, we illuminated the detectors with short laser pulses, measured the signal current and compared it to the signal of a fast photodiode. The comparison revealed that the timing properties of both prototypes are not yet sufficient for our purpose. In contrast, our results regarding the detectors’ sensitivity are promising. The lowest detectable proton flux at 10 MeV was found to be 25 protons per ns on the detector. With this sensitivity and with a smaller pixelation of the detectors, the timing properties can be improved for new prototypes, making them potential candidates for TOF-spectrometry of laser-accelerated particle beams.

  1. Speaking to the dead: images of the dead in contemporary art.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Mary

    2011-05-01

    In this article I explore works by three artists in which we can see images that relate to bereavement. In the work of the first two, Araya Rasdjarmrearnsook and Andres Serrano, we can see photographic images (still and moving) of human corpses, which have been criticized as morbid and unhealthy. However I argue that it is not in fact images of death or the dead that are problematic but those images which present or evoke evidence of the emotions associated with death, and create a situation where we imagine the circumstances of our own deaths or the death of those we love. Images of the dead are acceptable as long as they do not cause pain to the living, as in a video game fantasy or a fiction, or are seen as other and distant. In the second group of works, by Gustgav Metzger, The Absent Dead: The Surrogate Body, the body is not present either because the death has taken place at a distance, either in time or geographically, or both, and a new site must be created. In this section, I discuss Metzger's auto-destructive art and argue that these works, through their ephemerality, embody a form of 'meaning making' and a possibility of the benefits of grief as described by Parkes.

  2. LGB neutron detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quist, Nicole

    2012-10-01

    The double pulse signature of the Gadolinium Lithium Borate Cerium doped plastic detector suggests its effectiveness for analyzing neutrons while providing gamma ray insensitivity. To better understand this detector, a californium gamma/neutron time of flight facility was constructed in our lab. Reported here are efforts to understand the properties and applications of the LGB detector with regards to neutron spectroscopy.

  3. Real-Time Spatio-Temporal Twice Whitening for MIMO Energy Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Humble, Travis S; Mitra, Pramita; Barhen, Jacob; Schleck, Bryan

    2010-01-01

    While many techniques exist for local spectrum sensing of a primary user, each represents a computationally demanding task to secondary user receivers. In software-defined radio, computational complexity lengthens the time for a cognitive radio to recognize changes in the transmission environment. This complexity is even more significant for spatially multiplexed receivers, e.g., in SIMO and MIMO, where the spatio-temporal data sets grow in size with the number of antennae. Limits on power and space for the processor hardware further constrain SDR performance. In this report, we discuss improvements in spatio-temporal twice whitening (STTW) for real-time local spectrum sensing by demonstrating a form of STTW well suited for MIMO environments. We implement STTW on the Coherent Logix hx3100 processor, a multicore processor intended for low-power, high-throughput software-defined signal processing. These results demonstrate how coupling the novel capabilities of emerging multicore processors with algorithmic advances can enable real-time, software-defined processing of large spatio-temporal data sets.

  4. Measuring space-time fuzziness with high energy γ-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cattaneo, Paolo Walter; Rappoldi, Andrea

    2017-03-01

    There are several suggestions to probe space-time fuzziness (also known as space-time foam) due to the quantum mechanics nature of space-time. These effects are predicted to be very small, being related to the Planck length, so that the only hope to experimentally detect them is to look at particles propagating along cosmological distances. Some phenomenological approaches suggest that photons originating from pointlike sources at cosmological distance experience path length fluctuation that could be detected. Also the direction of flight of such photons may be subject to a dispersion such that the image of a point-like source is blurred and detected as a disk. An experimentally accessible signature may be images of point-like sources larger that the size due to the Point Spread Function of the instrument. This additional broadening should increase with distance and photon energy. Some concrete examples that can be studied with the AGILE and FERMI-LAT γ -ray satellite experiments are discussed.

  5. High rate, fast timing Glass RPC for the high η CMS muon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lagarde, F.; Gouzevitch, M.; Laktineh, I.; Buridon, V.; Chen, X.; Combaret, C.; Eynard, A.; Germani, L.; Grenier, G.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Wang, Y.; Gong, A.; Moreau, N.; de la Taille, C.; Dulucq, F.; Cimmino, A.; Crucy, S.; Fagot, A.; Gul, M.; Rios, A. A. O.; Tytgat, M.; Zaganidis, N.; Aly, S.; Assran, Y.; Radi, A.; Sayed, A.; Singh, G.; Abbrescia, M.; Iaselli, G.; Maggi, M.; Pugliese, G.; Verwilligen, P.; Van Doninck, W.; Colafranceschi, S.; Sharma, A.; Benussi, L.; Bianco, S.; Piccolo, D.; Primavera, F.; Bhatnagar, V.; Kumari, R.; Mehta, A.; Singh, J.; Ahmad, A.; Ahmed, W.; Asghar, H. M. I.; Awan, I. M.; Hoorani, R.; Muhammad, S.; Shahzad, H.; Shah, M. A.; Cho, S. W.; Choi, S. Y.; Hong, B.; Kang, M. H.; Lee, K. S.; Lim, J. H.; Park, S. K.; Kim, M. S.; Carpinteyro Bernardino, S.; Pedraza, I.; Uribe Estrada, C.; Carrillo Moreno, S.; Vazquez Valencia, F.; Pant, L. M.; Buontempo, S.; Cavallo, N.; Esposito, M.; Fabozzi, F.; Lanza, G.; Orso, I.; Lista, L.; Meola, S.; Merola, M.; Paolucci, P.; Thyssen, F.; Braghieri, A.; Magnani, A.; Montagna, P.; Riccardi, C.; Salvini, P.; Vai, I.; Vitulo, P.; Ban, Y.; Qian, S. J.; Choi, M.; Choi, Y.; Goh, J.; Kim, D.; Aleksandrov, A.; Hadjiiska, R.; Iaydjiev, P.; Rodozov, M.; Stoykova, S.; Sultanov, G.; Vutova, M.; Dimitrov, A.; Litov, L.; Pavlov, B.; Petkov, P.; Bagaturia, I.; Lomidze, D.; Avila, C.; Cabrera, A.; Sanabria, J. C.; Crotty, I.; Vaitkus, J.

    2016-09-01

    The HL-LHC phase is designed to increase by an order of magnitude the amount of data to be collected by the LHC experiments. To achieve this goal in a reasonable time scale the instantaneous luminosity would also increase by an order of magnitude up to 6 · 1034 cm-2s-1. The region of the forward muon spectrometer (|η| > 1.6) is not equipped with RPC stations. The increase of the expected particles flux up to 2 kHz/cm2 (including a safety factor 3) motivates the installation of RPC chambers to guarantee redundancy with the CSC chambers already present. The current CMS RPC technology cannot sustain the expected background level. The new technology that will be chosen should have a high rate capability and provide a good spatial and timing resolution. A new generation of Glass-RPC (GRPC) using low-resistivity glass is proposed to equip at least the two most far away of the four high η muon stations of CMS. First the design of small size prototypes and studies of their performance in high-rate particles flux are presented. Then the proposed designs for large size chambers and their fast-timing electronic readout are examined and preliminary results are provided.

  6. Design and testing of an innovative slim-edge termination for silicon radiation detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Povoli, M.; Bagolini, A.; Boscardin, M.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Giacomini, G.; Mattedi, F.; Mendicino, R.; Zorzi, N.

    2013-11-01

    Silicon detectors with reduced or no dead volume along the edges have been attracting a lot of interest in the past few years in many different fields. High Energy Physics (HEP) experiments are demanding this feature to ease the assembly of the innermost tracking layers, where space and material budget are usually a concern. At the same time, other applications like X-Ray imaging, are starting to use matrixes of silicon detectors to cover increasingly larger areas and, in order to do so in a seamless way, minimum edge extension is required. In this paper we report on the design and testing of a new edge termination for silicon 3D detectors able to reduce the edge extension to about 50 μm without increasing the fabrication complexity. In addition, the same edge termination can also be applied to planar detectors with little additional process complexity.

  7. A focal-plane detector for the recoil-mass spectrometer of LNL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrieri, A.; Maron, G.; Montagnoli, G.; Napoli, D. R.; Prete, G.

    1990-12-01

    A focal-plane detector for a recoil-mass spectrometer has been developed. It consists of a 14 × 14 cm 2 position-sensitive parallel-plate avalanche counter backed by a 43 cm long Bragg chamber. Both detectors work in the same gas volume thus reducing the dead layers. The intrinsic resolution of the position detector is ±0.5 mm, and an overall timing resolution of 660 ps FWHM was measured with 5.5 MeV α-particles. The Bragg chamber allows the identification of elements with energy high enough to overcome the Bragg peak: in all cases it allows the separation between the reaction channels and the beam scattering. The detector has already been used with a good reliability in a variety of transfer and fusion experiments at the LNL Recoil Mass Spectrometer.

  8. Enhancement of energy dispersive residual stress analysis by consideration of detector electronic effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denks, I. A.; Genzel, Ch.

    2007-08-01

    The effects of the germanium detector electronics on diffraction line patterns is investigated. It is shown that not only the detector resolution and the throughput but also the energy stability depend on both the specific detector settings and the dead time. For a moderate resolution versus throughput setting a correction function is proposed and applied to the near-surface residual stress analysis of three samples with considerably different stress states. It is demonstrated that without the correction function ghost stresses up to hundreds of MPa in the near-surface region are obtained. The correction procedure is verified by conventional X-ray measurements. In conclusion, the authors strongly suggest quantifying the electronic shifts of any individual detector systems prior to the analysis of residual stresses.

  9. Neural network feature detector for real-time video signal processing.

    PubMed

    Naylor, D; Jones, S; Myers, D; Vincent, J

    1993-12-01

    The application of artificial neural networks to real-time image processing tasks requires the use of dedicated, high performance hardware. A linear array processor called HANNIBAL has been developed which implements the backpropagation neural learning algorithm on-chip. This paper considers the design of a complete neural system which integrates HANNIBAL into an existing image processing environment. The goals for the design of the system have been set partly by the primary application, namely feature recognition, but mainly by the desire for a flexible, high performance hardware tool for the study and evaluation of range of neural image processing applications.

  10. A combined small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering detector for measurements on reactive systems.

    PubMed

    Vallenhag, Linda; Canton, Sophie E; Sondhauss, Peter; Haase, Dörthe; Ossler, Frederik

    2011-08-01

    A detector with high dynamic range designed for combined small- and wide-angle x-ray scattering experiments has been developed. It allows measurements on single events and reactive systems, such as particle formation in flames and evaporation of levitating drops. The detector consists of 26 channels covering a region from 0.5° to 60° and it provides continuous monitoring of the sampled signal without readout dead time. The time resolution for fast single events is about 40 μs and for substances undergoing slower dynamics, the time resolution is set to 0.1 or 1 s with hours of continuous sampling. The detector has been used to measure soot particle formation in a flame, burning magnesium and evaporation of a toluene drop in a levitator. The results show that the detector can be used for many different applications with good outcomes and large potential.

  11. "Dead quasars" in nearby galaxies?

    PubMed

    Rees, M J

    1990-02-16

    The nuclei of some galaxies undergo violent activity, quasars being the most extreme instances of this phenomenon. Such activity is probably short-lived compared to galactic lifetimes, and was most prevalent when the universe was only about one-fifth of its present age. A massive black hole seems the inevitable end point of such activity, and dead quasars should greatly outnumber active ones. In recent years, studies of stellar motions in the cores of several nearby galaxies indicate the presence of central dark masses which could be black holes. This article discusses how such evidence might be corroborated, and the potential implications for our understanding of active galaxies and black holes.

  12. Duplex multiwire proportional x-ray detector for multichord time-resolved soft x-ray and electron temperature measurements on T-10 tokamaka)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sushkov, A. V.; Andreev, V. F.; Kravtsov, D. E.

    2008-10-01

    Compact 64-channel multiwire proportional chamber is successfully used on T-10 and TCV tokamaks as a continuous-current soft x-ray detectors. The duplex multiwire proportional x-ray detector is a new generation of these detectors. It has been designed for simultaneous multichord measurement of plasma soft x-ray emissivity in a two spectral ranges and determination of the electron temperature by the two-absorber method. The detector consists of two identical multiwire proportional chambers filled by 90%Kr+10%CH4 gas mixture at atmospheric pressure. The first multiwire chamber has 64 channels. The second multiwire chamber (installed behind the first one) has 32 channels. Both chambers view the plasma through the one helium-filled slot-hole camera. Thus, the first multiwire chamber serves as an absorber filter for the second one. Such construction of the detector allows us in addition to soft x-ray measurements to provide measurement of the plasma core electron temperature with spatial resolution of about 2cm and a time resolution of less than 50μs. The construction of the detector and experimental results illustrating the potential of the diagnostic are presented.

  13. Security issues of quantum cryptographic systems with imperfect detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burenkov, Viacheslav

    The laws of quantum physics can be used to secure communications between two distant parties in a scheme called quantum key distribution (QKD), even against a technologically unlimited eavesdropper. While the theoretical security of QKD has been proved rigorously, current implementations of QKD are generally insecure. In particular, mathematical models of devices, such as detectors, do not accurately describe their real-life behaviour. Such seemingly insignificant discrepancies can compromise the security of the entire scheme, especially as novel detector technologies are being developed with little regard for potential vulnerabilities. In this thesis, we study how detector imperfections can impact the security of QKD and how to overcome such technological limitations. We first analyze the security of a high-speed QKD system with finite detector dead time tau. We show that the previously reported sifting approaches are not guaranteed to be secure in this regime. More specifically, Eve can induce a basis-dependent detection efficiency at the receiver's end. Modified key sifting schemes that are basis-independent, and thus secure in the presence of dead time and an active eavesdropper, are discussed and compared. It is shown that the maximum key generation rate is 1/(2tau) for passive basis selection, and 1/tau for active basis selection. The security analysis is also extended to the decoy state BB84 protocol. We then study a relatively new type of single-photon detector called the superconducting nanowire single-photon detector (SNSPD), and discover some unexpected behaviour. We report an afterpulsing effect present when the SNSPD is operated in the high bias current regime. In our standard set-up, the afterpulsing is most likely to occur at around 180 ns following a detection event, for both real counts and dark counts. We characterize the afterpulsing behaviour and speculate that it is not due to the SNSPD itself but rather the associated read-out circuit. We also

  14. Monitoring the Dead Sea Region by Multi-Parameter Stations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohsen, A.; Weber, M. H.; Kottmeier, C.; Asch, G.

    2015-12-01

    The Dead Sea Region is an exceptional ecosystem whose seismic activity has influenced all facets of the development, from ground water availability to human evolution. Israelis, Palestinians and Jordanians living in the Dead Sea region are exposed to severe earthquake hazard. Repeatedly large earthquakes (e.g. 1927, magnitude 6.0; (Ambraseys, 2009)) shook the whole Dead Sea region proving that earthquake hazard knows no borders and damaging seismic events can strike anytime. Combined with the high vulnerability of cities in the region and with the enormous concentration of historical values this natural hazard results in an extreme earthquake risk. Thus, an integration of earthquake parameters at all scales (size and time) and their combination with data of infrastructure are needed with the specific aim of providing a state-of-the-art seismic hazard assessment for the Dead Sea region as well as a first quantitative estimate of vulnerability and risk. A strong motivation for our research is the lack of reliable multi-parameter ground-based geophysical information on earthquakes in the Dead Sea region. The proposed set up of a number of observatories with on-line data access will enable to derive the present-day seismicity and deformation pattern in the Dead Sea region. The first multi-parameter stations were installed in Jordan, Israel and Palestine for long-time monitoring. All partners will jointly use these locations. All stations will have an open data policy, with the Deutsches GeoForschungsZentrum (GFZ, Potsdam, Germany) providing the hard and software for real-time data transmission via satellite to Germany, where all partners can access the data via standard data protocols.

  15. The Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Bergauer, T.; Dolejschi, P.; Frankenberger, A.; Gfall, I.; Irmler, C.; Obermayer, T.; Onuki, Y.; Smiljic, D.; Tsuboyama, T.; Valentan, M.

    The KEKB factory (Tsukuba, Japan) has been shut down in mid-2010 after reaching a total integrated luminosity of 1ab-1. Recently, the work on an upgrade of the collider (SuperKEKB), aiming at an ultimate luminosity of 8×1035 cm-2s-1, has started. This is 40 times the peak value of the previous system and thus also requires a redesign of the Belle detector (leading to Belle II), especially its Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD), which surrounds the beam pipe. Similar to its predecessor, the future Belle II SVD will again consist of four layers of double-sided silicon strip sensors (DSSD), but at higher radii. Moreover, a double-layer PiXel Detector (PXD) will complement the SVD as the innermost sensing device. All DSSDs will be made from 6" silicon wafers and read out by APV25 chips, which were originally developed for the CMS experiment. That system was proven to meet the requirements for Belle II in matters of occupancy and dead time. Since the KEKB factory operates at relatively low energy, material inside the active volume has to be minimized in order to reduce multiple scattering. This can be achieved by the Origami chip-on-sensor concept, including a very light-weight mechanical support structure made from carbon fiber reinforced Airex foam. Moreover, CO2 cooling for the front-end chips will ensure high efficiency at minimum material budget.

  16. High rate, fast timing Glass RPC for the high η CMS muon detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouzevitch, M.; Lagarde, F.; Laktineh, I.; Buridon, V.; Chen, X.; Combaret, C.; Eynard, A.; Germani, L.; Grenier, G.; Mathez, H.; Mirabito, L.; Petrukhin, A.; Steen, A.; Tromeur, W.; Wang, Y.; Gong, A.; Moreau, N.; Taille, C. de la; Dulucq, F.

    2017-02-01

    The HL-LHC phase is designed to increase by an order of magnitude the amount of data to be collected by the LHC experiments. To achieve this goal in a reasonable time scale the instantaneous luminosity would also increase by an order of magnitude up to 6 ·1034cm-2s-1 . The region of the forward muon spectrometer (| η | > 1.6) is not equipped with RPC stations. The increase of the expected particles rate up to 2 kHz/cm2 (including a safety factor 3) motivates the installation of RPC chambers to guarantee redundancy with the CSC chambers already present. The actual RPC technology of CMS cannot sustain the expected background level. A new generation Glass-RPC (GRPC) using low resistivity glass (LR) is proposed to equip at least the two most far away of the four high eta muon stations of CMS Butler et al. (2015). The design of small size prototypes and the studies of their performances under high rate particles flux is presented.

  17. Time-of-Flight Detector System with Low Background Performance for the IBEX-lo Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moebius, E.; Kucharek, H.; Granoff, M.; King, B.; Longworth, S.; Saul, L.; Fuselier, S.; Hertzberg, E.; Livi, S.; Paschalidis, N.; Schlemm, C.; Scheer, J.; Wurz, P.; Wieser, M.

    2006-12-01

    Over the course of the IBEX Mission the IBEX-lo sensor will provide images of energetic neutral H atoms (ENA) from the termination shock in the energy range 10 2000 eV as well as the directional flow distribution of interstellar neutral O in spring and fall. The sensor combines a mechanical collimator to restrict the detectable arrival directions, an atom to negative ion conversion surface, an electrostatic analyzer, post-acceleration of up to 20 keV, and time-of-flight (TOF) mass analysis. In this combination the TOF system provides the necessary mass separation to distinguish different species and effective background suppression through coincidence detection techniques. Because the flux of the heliospheric ENAs is very low and generates rather low count rates a triple coincidence system is used with secondary electrons produced in two consecutive carbon foils, followed by the final detection of the ions in a micro-channelplate. These three signals are combined into three independent TOF measurements. A flight-like engineering test unit of the IBEX-lo TOF subsystem has been built and tested. Meanwhile the flight model of the sensor is in fabrication. It will be shown that the combination of several TOF measurements provides very effective means to suppress background and to identify minor species, whose fluxes are several orders of magnitude below the main species. Results from the testing of the engineering unit will be discussed in the light of the IBEX science objectives.

  18. Can dead zones create structures like a transition disk?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinilla, Paola; Flock, Mario; Ovelar, Maria de Juan; Birnstiel, Til

    2016-12-01

    Context. Regions of low ionisation where the activity of the magneto-rotational instability is suppressed, the so-called dead zones, have been suggested to explain gaps and asymmetries of transition disks. Dead zones are therefore a potential cause for the observational signatures of transition disks without requiring the presence of embedded planets. Aims: We investigate the gas and dust evolution simultaneously assuming simplified prescriptions for a dead zone and a magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) wind acting on the disk. We explore whether the resulting gas and dust distribution can create signatures similar to those observed in transition disks. Methods: We imposed a dead zone and/or an MHD wind in the radial evolution of gas and dust in protoplanetary disks. For the dust evolution, we included the transport, growth, and fragmentation of dust particles. To compare with observations, we produced synthetic images in scattered optical light and in thermal emission at mm wavelengths. Results: In all models with a dead zone, a bump in the gas surface density is produced that is able to efficiently trap large particles (≳ 1 mm) at the outer edge of the dead zone. The gas bump reaches an amplitude of a factor of 5, which can be enhanced by the presence of an MHD wind that removes mass from the inner disk. While our 1D simulations suggest that such a structure can be present only for 1 Myr, the structure may be maintained for a longer time when more realistic 2D/3D simulations are performed. In the synthetic images, gap-like low-emission regions are seen at scattered light and in thermal emission at mm wavelengths, as previously predicted in the case of planet-disk interaction. Conclusions: Main signatures of transition disks can be reproduced by assuming a dead zone in the disk, such as gap-like structure in scattered light and millimetre continuum emission, and a lower gas surface density within the dead zone. Previous studies showed that the Rossby wave instability can

  19. Doppler effect reduction based on time-domain interpolation resampling for wayside acoustic defective bearing detector system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Fang; He, Qingbo; Kong, Fanrang; Liu, Yongbin

    2014-06-01

    In the wayside Acoustic Defective Bearing Detector (ADBD) system, the recorded acoustic signal will be severely distorted by the Doppler effect because of the high moving speed of the railway vehicle, which is a barrier that would badly reduce the effectiveness of online defect detection. This paper proposes a simple and effective method, called time-domain interpolation resampling (TIR), to remove the Doppler effect embedded in the acoustic signal. The TIR is conducted in three steps. First, the time vector for resampling is calculated according to the kinematic analysis. Second, the amplitude of the distorted signal is demodulated. Third, the distorted signal is re-sampled using spline interpolation. In this method, both the spectrum structure and the amplitudes of the distorted signal can be restored. The effectiveness of TIR is verified by means of simulation studies and train roller bearing experiments with various types of defects. It is also compared to an existing Doppler effect reduction method that is based on the instantaneous frequency estimation using Hilbert transform. Results indicate that the proposed TIR method has the superior performance in removing the Doppler effect, and can be well implemented to Doppler effect reduction for the ADBD system.

  20. The dynamic time-over-threshold method for multi-channel APD based gamma-ray detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orita, T.; Shimazoe, K.; Takahashi, H.

    2015-03-01

    t- Recent advances in manufacturing technology have enabled the use of multi-channel pixelated detectors in gamma-ray imaging applications. When obtaining gamma-ray measurements, it is important to obtain pulse height information in order to avoid unnecessary events such as scattering. However, as the number of channels increases, more electronics are needed to process each channel's signal, and the corresponding increases in circuit size and power consumption can result in practical problems. The time-over-threshold (ToT) method, which has recently become popular in the medical field, is a signal processing technique that can effectively avoid such problems. However, ToT suffers from poor linearity and its dynamic range is limited. We therefore propose a new ToT technique called the dynamic time-over-threshold (dToT) method [4]. A new signal processing system using dToT and CR-RC shaping demonstrated much better linearity than that of a conventional ToT. Using a test circuit with a new Gd3Al2Ga3O12 (GAGG) scintillator and an avalanche photodiode, the pulse height spectra of 137Cs and 22Na sources were measured with high linearity. Based on these results, we designed a new application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for this multi-channel dToT system, measured the spectra of a 22Na source, and investigated the linearity of the system.

  1. Development of CT and 3D-CT Using Flat Panel Detector Based Real-Time Digital Radiography System

    SciTech Connect

    Ravindran, V. R.; Sreelakshmi, C.; Vibin

    2008-09-26

    The application of Digital Radiography in the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of space vehicle components is a recent development in India. A Real-time DR system based on amorphous silicon Flat Panel Detector has been developed for the NDE of solid rocket motors at Rocket Propellant Plant of VSSC in a few years back. The technique has been successfully established for the nondestructive evaluation of solid rocket motors. The DR images recorded for a few solid rocket specimens are presented in the paper. The Real-time DR system is capable of generating sufficient digital X-ray image data with object rotation for the CT image reconstruction. In this paper the indigenous development of CT imaging based on the Realtime DR system for solid rocket motor is presented. Studies are also carried out to generate 3D-CT image from a set of adjacent CT images of the rocket motor. The capability of revealing the spatial location and characterisation of defect is demonstrated by the CT and 3D-CT images generated.

  2. Gravitational-Wave Tests of General Relativity with Ground-Based Detectors and Pulsar-Timing Arrays.

    PubMed

    Yunes, Nicolás; Siemens, Xavier

    2013-01-01

    This review is focused on tests of Einstein's theory of general relativity with gravitational waves that are detectable by ground-based interferometers and pulsar-timing experiments. Einstein's theory has been greatly constrained in the quasi-linear, quasi-stationary regime, where gravity is weak and velocities are small. Gravitational waves will allow us to probe a complimentary, yet previously unexplored regime: the non-linear and dynamical strong-field regime. Such a regime is, for example, applicable to compact binaries coalescing, where characteristic velocities can reach fifty percent the speed of light and gravitational fields are large and dynamical. This review begins with the theoretical basis and the predicted gravitational-wave observables of modified gravity theories. The review continues with a brief description of the detectors, including both gravitational-wave interferometers and pulsar-timing arrays, leading to a discussion of the data analysis formalism that is applicable for such tests. The review ends with a discussion of gravitational-wave tests for compact binary systems.

  3. Development of CT and 3D-CT Using Flat Panel Detector Based Real-Time Digital Radiography System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ravindran, V. R.; Sreelakshmi, C.; Vibin, Vibin

    2008-09-01

    The application of Digital Radiography in the Nondestructive Evaluation (NDE) of space vehicle components is a recent development in India. A Real-time DR system based on amorphous silicon Flat Panel Detector has been developed for the NDE of solid rocket motors at Rocket Propellant Plant of VSSC in a few years back. The technique has been successfully established for the nondestructive evaluation of solid rocket motors. The DR images recorded for a few solid rocket specimens are presented in the paper. The Real-time DR system is capable of generating sufficient digital X-ray image data with object rotation for the CT image reconstruction. In this paper the indigenous development of CT imaging based on the Realtime DR system for solid rocket motor is presented. Studies are also carried out to generate 3D-CT image from a set of adjacent CT images of the rocket motor. The capability of revealing the spatial location and characterisation of defect is demonstrated by the CT and 3D-CT images generated.

  4. High performance diagnostics for Time-Of-Flight and X ray measurements in laser produced plasmas, based on fast diamond detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Angelis, R.; Consoli, F.; Verona, C.; Di Giorgio, G.; Andreoli, P.; Cristofari, G.; Cipriani, M.; Ingenito, F.; Marinelli, M.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2016-12-01

    The paper reports about the use of single-crystal Chemical Vapour Deposited (CVD) diamonds as radiation detectors in laser-matter interaction experiments on the ABC laser in ENEA - Frascati. The detectors have been designed and realized by University of Tor Vergata - Rome. The interdigital configuration and the new design of the bias-tee voltage supply units guarantee a fast time response. The detectors are sensitive to soft-X photons and to particles. A remarkable immunity to electromagnetic noise, associated with the laser-target interaction, makes them especially useful for the measurements of the time of flight of fast particles. A novel diamond assembly has been tested in plasmas generated by the ABC laser in the nanosecond regime at intensities I=1013÷ 14 W/cm2, where contributions from X rays, fast electrons and ions could be observed.

  5. Vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10{sup {minus}13} s, among them the {tau} lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation.

  6. Gastric emptying of indigestible tablets in relation to composition and time of ingestion of meals studied by metal detector.

    PubMed

    Ewe, K; Press, A G; Bollen, S; Schuhn, I

    1991-02-01

    Enteric-coated tablets leave the stomach mainly during the interdigestive phase. Composition as well as time of ingestion of meals may influence their gastric emptying considerably. In 12 normal volunteers gastric emptying of a plastic tablet with a metal core was followed by a metal detector in relation to different compositions and various times of ingestion of meals. With an empty stomach and after ingestion of 250 ml water, the mean time for gastric emptying of the tablet was 38 +/- 11 min (mean +/- SEM) and 38 +/- 8 min. Two hundred fifty milliliters of milk (652 kJ) and a formula diet (1000 kJ) delayed gastric emptying time to 128 +/- 14 and 152 +/- 6 min, respectively (P less than 0.05). Breakfast (2200 kJ) further retarded gastric emptying compared with both liquids to 249 +/- 24 min (P less than 0.05). There was a close correlation between nutritive density and gastric emptying of the tablet (r = 0.92; P less than 0.001). Main meals also delayed gastric emptying of tablets when compared to empty stomach (P less than 0.05). A snack after breakfast further delayed gastric emptying from 201 +/- 10 to 278 +/- 19 min (P less than 0.05). The largest delay was observed following ingestion of breakfast, lunch, dinner, and additional snacks (509 +/- 220 min). We conclude that the delay of gastric emptying of enteric-coated tablets by food is related to its nutritive density and eating habits. The gastric emptying of an enteric coated tablet that is ingested early in the morning may be delayed until late at night when several meals and snacks are ingested during the day, leading to unwanted alterations in bioavailability and to possible adverse effects.

  7. Duplex unwinding with DEAD-box proteins.

    PubMed

    Jankowsky, Eckhard; Putnam, Andrea

    2010-01-01

    DEAD-box proteins, which comprise the largest helicase family, are involved in virtually all aspects of RNA metabolism. DEAD-box proteins catalyze diverse ATP-driven functions including the unwinding of RNA secondary structures. In contrast to many well-studied DNA and viral RNA helicases, DEAD-box proteins do not rely on translocation on one of the nucleic acid strands for duplex unwinding, but directly load onto helical regions and then locally pry the strands apart in an ATP-dependent fashion. In this chapter, we outline substrate design and unwinding protocols for DEAD-box proteins and focus on the quantitative evaluation of their unwinding activity.

  8. SU-E-T-458: Determining Threshold-Of-Failure for Dead Pixel Rows in EPID-Based Dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Gersh, J; Wiant, D

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A pixel correction map is applied to all EPID-based applications on the TrueBeam (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA). When dead pixels are detected, an interpolative smoothing algorithm is applied using neighboring-pixel information to supplement missing-pixel information. The vendor suggests that when the number of dead pixels exceeds 70,000, the panel should be replaced. It is common for entire detector rows to be dead, as well as their neighboring rows. Approximately 70 rows can be dead before the panel reaches this threshold. This study determines the number of neighboring dead-pixel rows that would create a large enough deviation in measured fluence to cause failures in portal dosimetry (PD). Methods: Four clinical two-arc VMAT plans were generated using Eclipse's AXB algorithm and PD plans were created using the PDIP algorithm. These plans were chosen to represent those commonly encountered in the clinic: prostate, lung, abdomen, and neck treatments. During each iteration of this study, an increasing number of dead-pixel rows are artificially applied to the correction map and a fluence QA is performed using the EPID (corrected with this map). To provide a worst-case-scenario, the dead-pixel rows are chosen so that they present artifacts in the highfluence region of the field. Results: For all eight arc-fields deemed acceptable via a 3%/3mm gamma analysis (pass rate greater than 99%), VMAT QA yielded identical results with a 5 pixel-width dead zone. When 10 dead lines were present, half of the fields had pass rates below the 99% pass rate. With increasing dead rows, the pass rates were reduced substantially. Conclusion: While the vendor still suggests to request service at the point where 70,000 dead rows are measured (as recommended by the vendor), the authors suggest that service should be requested when there are greater than 5 consecutive dead rows.

  9. On the time response of background obtained in γ-ray spectroscopy experiments using LaBr3(Ce) detectors with different shielding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Régis, J.-M.; Dannhoff, M.; Jolie, J.; Müller-Gatermann, C.; Saed-Samii, N.

    2016-03-01

    Employing the γ-γ fast-timing technique with LaBr3(Ce) scintillator detectors allows the direct determination of lifetimes of nuclear excited states with a lower limit of about 5 ps. This limit is increased as soon as background is present in the coincidence spectra underneath the full-energy peaks of the γ-γ cascade. Our aim was to identify the components of the γ-ray background by systematic γ-γ fast-timing measurements using different types of γ shielding within a large γ-ray spectrometer. The energy dependent physical zero-time response was measured using background-free full-energy peak events from the 152Eu γ-ray source. This is compared with the time response of the (Compton-) background distribution as obtained using the prompt 60Co γ-ray source. The time response of the typical Compton background is about 15 ps faster than the time response of background-free full-energy peak events. Below about 500 keV, a second type of background contributes by the detection of Compton-scattered γ rays generated in the materials of the spectrometer around the detector. Due to the additional time-of-flight of the Compton-scattered γ rays, this low-energy background is largely delayed. Compared with a bare cylindrical 1.5 in . × 1.5 in . LaBr3(Ce) detector, the BGO-shielded detector in the Compton-suppression mode improves the peak-to-total ratio by a factor of 1.66(5), while the Pb-shielded detector only slightly reduces the low-energy background.

  10. Occurrence of organohalogens at the Dead Sea Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tubbesing, Christoph; Kotte, Karsten; Keppler, Frank; Krause, Torsten; Bahlmann, Enno; Schöler, Heinfried

    2013-04-01

    Most arid and semi-arid regions are characterized by evaporites, which are assured sources for volatile organohalogens (VOX) [1]. These compounds play an important role in tropospheric and stratospheric chemistry. The Dead Sea between Israel and Jordan is the world's most famous and biggest all-season water covered salt lake. In both countries chemical plants like the Dead Sea Works and the Arab Potash Company are located at the southern part of the Dead Sea and mine various elements such as bromine and magnesium. Conveying sea water through constructed evaporation pans multifarious salts are enriched and precipitated. In contrast, the Northern basin and main part of the Dead Sea has remained almost untouched by industrial salt production. Its fresh water supply from the Jordan River is constantly decreasing, leading to further increased salinity. During a HALOPROC campaign (Natural Halogenation Processes in the Environment) we collected various samples including air, soils, sediments, halophytic plants, ground- and seawater from the Northern and Southern basin of the Israeli side of the Dead Sea. These samples were investigated for the occurrence of halocarbons using different analytical techniques. Most samples were analyzed for volatile organohalogens such as haloalkanes using gas chromatography- mass spectrometry (GC-MS). Interestingly, there is a strong enrichment of trihalomethanes (THM), especially all chlorinated and brominated ones and also the iodinated compound dichloroiodomethane were found in the Southern basin. In addition, volatile organic carbons (VOC) such as ethene and some other alkenes were analyzed by a gas chromatography-flame ionisation detector (GC-FID) to obtain further information about potential precursors of halogenated compounds. Halophytic plants were investigated for their potential to release chloromethane and bromomethane but also for their stable carbon and hydrogen isotope composition. For this purpose, a plant chamber was

  11. Time differential 57Fe Mössbauer spectrometer with unique 4π YAP:Ce 122.06 keV gamma-photon detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Novak, Petr; Pechousek, Jiri; Prochazka, Vit; Navarik, Jakub; Kouril, Lukas; Kohout, Pavel; Vrba, Vlastimil; Machala, Libor

    2016-10-01

    This paper presents a conceptually new design of the 57Fe Time Differential Mössbauer Spectrometer (TDMS) with the gamma-photon detector optimized for registration of a radiation emitted in a maximum solid angle. A high detection efficiency of 80% in 4π region was achieved for 122.06 keV photons emitted from 57Co source. Detector parameters have been optimized for the use in the Time Differential Mössbauer Spectroscopy where the high time resolution in range of 176-200 ns is highly required. Technical concept of the TDMS is based on the virtual instrumentation technique and uses fast digital oscilloscope. Performance and detector utilization have been clarified by decreasing the Mössbauer spectral line-width of K2MgFe(CN)6 reference sample from 0.33 mm/s (integral mode) to 0.23 mm/s (time differential mode). This report also describes characterization and utilization of the detector together with additional electronic blocks and two-channel fast data-acquisition system construction.

  12. Particle impact location detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auer, S. O.

    1974-01-01

    Detector includes delay lines connected to each detector surface strip. When several particles strike different strips simultaneously, pulses generated by each strip are time delayed by certain intervals. Delay time for each strip is known. By observing time delay in pulse, it is possible to locate strip that is struck by particle.

  13. A high count rate one-dimensional position sensitive detector and a data acquisition system for time resolved X-ray scattering studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pernot, P.; Kahn, R.; Fourme, R.; Leboucher, P.; Million, G.; Santiard, J. C.; Charpak, G.

    1982-10-01

    A curved multiwire proportional drift chamber has been built as a general purpose instrument for X-ray scattering and X-ray diffraction experiments with synchrotron radiation. This parallax-free one-dimensional linear position sensitive detector has a parallel readout with a double hit logic. The data acquisition system, installed as a part of the D11 camera at LURE-DCI, is designed to perform time slicing and cyclic experiments; it has been used with either the fast multiwire chamber or a standard position sensitive detector with delay line readout.

  14. Magnetized Accretion and Dead Zones in Protostellar Disks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Turner, Neal J.; Henning, Thomas; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-03-01

    The edges of magnetically dead zones in protostellar disks have been proposed as locations where density bumps may arise, trapping planetesimals and helping form planets. Magneto-rotational turbulence in magnetically active zones provides both accretion of gas on the star and transport of mass to the dead zone. We investigate the location of the magnetically active regions in a protostellar disk around a solar-type star, varying the disk temperature, surface density profile, and dust-to-gas ratio. We also consider stellar masses between 0.4 and 2 M ⊙, with corresponding adjustments in the disk mass and temperature. The dead zone's size and shape are found using the Elsasser number criterion with conductivities including the contributions from ions, electrons, and charged fractal dust aggregates. The charged species' abundances are found using the approach proposed by Okuzumi. The dead zone is in most cases defined by the ambipolar diffusion. In our maps, the dead zone takes a variety of shapes, including a fish tail pointing away from the star and islands located on and off the midplane. The corresponding accretion rates vary with radius, indicating locations where the surface density will increase over time, and others where it will decrease. We show that density bumps do not readily grow near the dead zone's outer edge, independently of the disk parameters and the dust properties. Instead, the accretion rate peaks at the radius where the gas-phase metals freeze out. This could lead to clearing a valley in the surface density, and to a trap for pebbles located just outside the metal freezeout line.

  15. MAGNETIZED ACCRETION AND DEAD ZONES IN PROTOSTELLAR DISKS

    SciTech Connect

    Dzyurkevich, Natalia; Henning, Thomas; Turner, Neal J.; Kley, Wilhelm

    2013-03-10

    The edges of magnetically dead zones in protostellar disks have been proposed as locations where density bumps may arise, trapping planetesimals and helping form planets. Magneto-rotational turbulence in magnetically active zones provides both accretion of gas on the star and transport of mass to the dead zone. We investigate the location of the magnetically active regions in a protostellar disk around a solar-type star, varying the disk temperature, surface density profile, and dust-to-gas ratio. We also consider stellar masses between 0.4 and 2 M{sub Sun }, with corresponding adjustments in the disk mass and temperature. The dead zone's size and shape are found using the Elsasser number criterion with conductivities including the contributions from ions, electrons, and charged fractal dust aggregates. The charged species' abundances are found using the approach proposed by Okuzumi. The dead zone is in most cases defined by the ambipolar diffusion. In our maps, the dead zone takes a variety of shapes, including a fish tail pointing away from the star and islands located on and off the midplane. The corresponding accretion rates vary with radius, indicating locations where the surface density will increase over time, and others where it will decrease. We show that density bumps do not readily grow near the dead zone's outer edge, independently of the disk parameters and the dust properties. Instead, the accretion rate peaks at the radius where the gas-phase metals freeze out. This could lead to clearing a valley in the surface density, and to a trap for pebbles located just outside the metal freezeout line.

  16. Computer-assisted area detector masking.

    PubMed

    Wright, Christopher J; Zhou, Xiao Dong

    2017-03-01

    Area detectors have become the predominant type of detector for the rapid acquisition of X-ray diffraction, small-angle scattering and total scattering. These detectors record the scattering for a large area, giving each shot good statistical significance to the resulting scattered intensity I(Q) pattern. However, many of these detectors have pixel level defects, which cause error in the resulting one-dimensional patterns. In this work, new software to automatically find and mask these dead pixels and other defects is presented. This algorithm is benchmarked with both ideal simulated and experimental datasets.

  17. A micron resolution optical scanner for characterization of silicon detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Shukla, R. A.; Dugad, S. R. Gopal, A. V.; Gupta, S. K.; Prabhu, S. S.; Garde, C. S.

    2014-02-15

    The emergence of high position resolution (∼10 μm) silicon detectors in recent times have highlighted the urgent need for the development of new automated optical scanners of micron level resolution suited for characterizing microscopic features of these detectors. More specifically, for the newly developed silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) that are compact, possessing excellent photon detection efficiency with gain comparable to photo-multiplier tube. In a short time, since their invention the SiPMs are already being widely used in several high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments as the photon readout element. The SiPM is a high quantum efficiency, multi-pixel photon counting detector with fast timing and high gain. The presence of a wide variety of photo sensitive silicon detectors with high spatial resolution requires their performance evaluation to be carried out by photon beams of very compact spot size. We have designed a high resolution optical scanner that provides a monochromatic focused beam on a target plane. The transverse size of the beam was measured by the knife-edge method to be 1.7 μm at 1 − σ level. Since the beam size was an order of magnitude smaller than the typical feature size of silicon detectors, this optical scanner can be used for selective excitation of these detectors. The design and operational details of the optical scanner, high precision programmed movement of target plane (0.1 μm) integrated with general purpose data acquisition system developed for recording static and transient response photo sensitive silicon detector are reported in this paper. Entire functionality of scanner is validated by using it for selective excitation of individual pixels in a SiPM and identifying response of active and dead regions within SiPM. Results from these studies are presented in this paper.

  18. A micron resolution optical scanner for characterization of silicon detectors.

    PubMed

    Shukla, R A; Dugad, S R; Garde, C S; Gopal, A V; Gupta, S K; Prabhu, S S

    2014-02-01

    The emergence of high position resolution (∼10 μm) silicon detectors in recent times have highlighted the urgent need for the development of new automated optical scanners of micron level resolution suited for characterizing microscopic features of these detectors. More specifically, for the newly developed silicon photo-multipliers (SiPM) that are compact, possessing excellent photon detection efficiency with gain comparable to photo-multiplier tube. In a short time, since their invention the SiPMs are already being widely used in several high-energy physics and astrophysics experiments as the photon readout element. The SiPM is a high quantum efficiency, multi-pixel photon counting detector with fast timing and high gain. The presence of a wide variety of photo sensitive silicon detectors with high spatial resolution requires their performance evaluation to be carried out by photon beams of very compact spot size. We have designed a high resolution optical scanner that provides a monochromatic focused beam on a target plane. The transverse size of the beam was measured by the knife-edge method to be 1.7 μm at 1 - σ level. Since the beam size was an order of magnitude smaller than the typical feature size of silicon detectors, this optical scanner can be used for selective excitation of these detectors. The design and operational details of the optical scanner, high precision programmed movement of target plane (0.1 μm) integrated with general purpose data acquisition system developed for recording static and transient response photo sensitive silicon detector are reported in this paper. Entire functionality of scanner is validated by using it for selective excitation of individual pixels in a SiPM and identifying response of active and dead regions within SiPM. Results from these studies are presented in this paper.

  19. More Dead than Dead: Perceptions of Persons in the Persistent Vegetative State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gray, Kurt; Knickman, T. Anne; Wegner, Daniel M.

    2011-01-01

    Patients in persistent vegetative state (PVS) may be biologically alive, but these experiments indicate that people see PVS as a state curiously more dead than dead. Experiment 1 found that PVS patients were perceived to have less mental capacity than the dead. Experiment 2 explained this effect as an outgrowth of afterlife beliefs, and the…

  20. Functionality Based Detection of Airborne Engineered Nanoparticles in Quasi Real Time: A New Type of Detector and a New Metric

    PubMed Central

    Neubauer, Nicole

    2013-01-01

    A new type of detector which we call the Catalytic Activity Aerosol Monitor (CAAM) was investigated towards its capability to detect traces of commonly used industrial catalysts in ambient air in quasi real time. Its metric is defined as the catalytic activity concentration (CAC) expressed per volume of sampled workplace air. We thus propose a new metric which expresses the presence of nanoparticles in terms of their functionality - in this case a functionality of potential relevance for damaging effects - rather than their number, surface, or mass concentration in workplace air. The CAAM samples a few micrograms of known or anticipated airborne catalyst material onto a filter first and then initiates a chemical reaction which is specific to that catalyst. The concentration of specific gases is recorded using an IR sensor, thereby giving the desired catalytic activity. Due to a miniaturization effort, the laboratory prototype is compact and portable. Sensitivity and linearity of the CAAM response were investigated with catalytically active palladium and nickel nano-aerosols of known mass concentration and precisely adjustable primary particle size in the range of 3–30nm. With the miniature IR sensor, the smallest detectable particle mass was found to be in the range of a few micrograms, giving estimated sampling times on the order of minutes for workplace aerosol concentrations typically reported in the literature. Tests were also performed in the presence of inert background aerosols of SiO2, TiO2, and Al2O3. It was found that the active material is detectable via its catalytic activity even when the particles are attached to a non-active background aerosol. PMID:23504803

  1. Development of capacitive multiplexing circuit for SiPM-based time-of-flight (TOF) PET detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Hyeok-Jun; Choi, Yong; Hu, Wei; Yan, Jianhua; Jung, Jin Ho

    2017-04-01

    There has been great interest in developing a time-of-flight (TOF) PET to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of PET image relative to that of non-TOF PET. Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays have attracted attention for use as a fast TOF PET photosensor. Since numerous SiPM arrays are needed to construct a modern human PET, a multiplexing method providing both good timing performance and high channel reduction capability is required to develop a SiPM-based TOF PET. The purpose of this study was to develop a capacitive multiplexing circuit for the SiPM-based TOF PET. The proposed multiplexing circuit was evaluated by measuring the coincidence resolving time (CRT) and the energy resolution as a function of the overvoltage using three different capacitor values of 15, 30, and 51 pF. A flood histogram was also obtained and quantitatively assessed. Experiments were performed using a 4× 4 array of 3× 3 mm2 SiPMs. Regarding the capacitor values, the multiplexing circuit using a smaller capacitor value showed the best timing performance. On the other hand, the energy resolution and flood histogram quality of the multiplexing circuit deteriorated as the capacitor value became smaller. The proposed circuit was able to achieve a CRT of 260+/- 4 ps FWHM and an energy resolution of 17.1 % with a pair of 2× 2× 20 mm3 LYSO crystals using a capacitor value of 30 pF at an overvoltage of 3.0 V. It was also possible to clearly resolve a 6× 6 array of LYSO crystals in the flood histogram using the multiplexing circuit. The experiment results indicate that the proposed capacitive multiplexing circuit is useful to obtain an excellent timing performance and a crystal-resolving capability in the flood histogram with a minimal degradation of the energy resolution, as well as to reduce the number of the readout channels of the SiPM-based TOF PET detector.

  2. Development of capacitive multiplexing circuit for SiPM-based time-of-flight (TOF) PET detector.

    PubMed

    Choe, Hyeok-Jun; Choi, Yong; Hu, Wei; Yan, Jianhua; Ho Jung, Jin

    2017-04-07

    There has been great interest in developing a time-of-flight (TOF) PET to improve the signal-to-noise ratio of PET image relative to that of non-TOF PET. Silicon photomultiplier (SiPM) arrays have attracted attention for use as a fast TOF PET photosensor. Since numerous SiPM arrays are needed to construct a modern human PET, a multiplexing method providing both good timing performance and high channel reduction capability is required to develop a SiPM-based TOF PET. The purpose of this study was to develop a capacitive multiplexing circuit for the SiPM-based TOF PET. The proposed multiplexing circuit was evaluated by measuring the coincidence resolving time (CRT) and the energy resolution as a function of the overvoltage using three different capacitor values of 15, 30, and 51 pF. A flood histogram was also obtained and quantitatively assessed. Experiments were performed using a [Formula: see text] array of [Formula: see text] mm(2) SiPMs. Regarding the capacitor values, the multiplexing circuit using a smaller capacitor value showed the best timing performance. On the other hand, the energy resolution and flood histogram quality of the multiplexing circuit deteriorated as the capacitor value became smaller. The proposed circuit was able to achieve a CRT of [Formula: see text] ps FWHM and an energy resolution of 17.1[Formula: see text] with a pair of [Formula: see text] mm(3) LYSO crystals using a capacitor value of 30 pF at an overvoltage of 3.0 V. It was also possible to clearly resolve a [Formula: see text] array of LYSO crystals in the flood histogram using the multiplexing circuit. The experiment results indicate that the proposed capacitive multiplexing circuit is useful to obtain an excellent timing performance and a crystal-resolving capability in the flood histogram with a minimal degradation of the energy resolution, as well as to reduce the number of the readout channels of the SiPM-based TOF PET detector.

  3. Infrared detectors and test technology of cryogenic camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Xiaole; Liu, Xingxin; Xing, Mailing; Ling, Long

    2016-10-01

    Cryogenic camera which is widely used in deep space detection cools down optical system and support structure by cryogenic refrigeration technology, thereby improving the sensitivity. Discussing the characteristics and design points of infrared detector combined with camera's characteristics. At the same time, cryogenic background test systems of chip and detector assembly are established. Chip test system is based on variable cryogenic and multilayer Dewar, and assembly test system is based on target and background simulator in the thermal vacuum environment. The core of test is to establish cryogenic background. Non-uniformity, ratio of dead pixels and noise of test result are given finally. The establishment of test system supports for the design and calculation of infrared systems.

  4. There's Life in Those Dead Logs!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biggs, Devin; Miller, Todd; Hall, Dee

    2006-01-01

    Although it is unspectacular in appearance, dead wood is one of the most ecologically important resources in forests. Fallen logs, dead standing trees, stumps, and even cavities in live trees fulfill a wide range of roles. Prominent among these is that they provide habitat for many organisms, especially insects. Fourth-grade students at Fox…

  5. 42 CFR 71.55 - Dead bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dead bodies. 71.55 Section 71.55 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING FOREIGN QUARANTINE Importations § 71.55 Dead bodies. The remains of a person who died of a communicable...

  6. 49 CFR 236.798 - Section, dead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Section, dead. 236.798 Section 236.798 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Section, dead. A section of track, either within a track circuit or between two track circuits, the...

  7. 49 CFR 236.798 - Section, dead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Section, dead. 236.798 Section 236.798 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Section, dead. A section of track, either within a track circuit or between two track circuits, the...

  8. 49 CFR 236.798 - Section, dead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Section, dead. 236.798 Section 236.798 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Section, dead. A section of track, either within a track circuit or between two track circuits, the...

  9. 49 CFR 236.798 - Section, dead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Section, dead. 236.798 Section 236.798 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Section, dead. A section of track, either within a track circuit or between two track circuits, the...

  10. 42 CFR 71.55 - Dead bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dead bodies. 71.55 Section 71.55 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING FOREIGN QUARANTINE Importations § 71.55 Dead bodies. The remains of a person who died of a communicable...

  11. 42 CFR 71.55 - Dead bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dead bodies. 71.55 Section 71.55 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING FOREIGN QUARANTINE Importations § 71.55 Dead bodies. The remains of a person who died of a communicable...

  12. 42 CFR 71.55 - Dead bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dead bodies. 71.55 Section 71.55 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING FOREIGN QUARANTINE Importations § 71.55 Dead bodies. The remains of a person who died of a communicable...

  13. 49 CFR 236.798 - Section, dead.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Section, dead. 236.798 Section 236.798 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION... Section, dead. A section of track, either within a track circuit or between two track circuits, the...

  14. 42 CFR 71.55 - Dead bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 42 Public Health 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dead bodies. 71.55 Section 71.55 Public Health PUBLIC HEALTH SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES QUARANTINE, INSPECTION, LICENSING FOREIGN QUARANTINE Importations § 71.55 Dead bodies. The remains of a person who died of a communicable...

  15. The focusing DIRC: An innovative PID detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borsato, M.; Arnaud, N.; Dey, B.; Nishimura, K.; Leith, D. W. G. S.; Roberts, D.; Ratcliff, B.; Va'vra, J.; Varner, G. S.

    2013-12-01

    The FDIRC (Focusing Detector of Internally Reflected Cherenkov light) is a new concept of PID (Particle IDentification) detector aimed at separating kaons from pions up to a few GeV/c. It is the successor of the BABAR DIRC and benefits from the knowledge accumulated with a first FDIRC prototype built and operated at SLAC. The FDIRC is intended to be used in an environment with a luminosity 100 times higher than for BABAR and Belle. Backgrounds will be higher as well; yet, the FDIRC has been designed to perform at least as well as the BABAR DIRC. The main improvement is a complete redesign of the photon camera, moving from a huge tank of ultra-pure water to much smaller focusing cameras with solid fused-silica optics. Furthermore, the detection chain will be 10 times faster than in BABAR to reject more background and to measure more accurately Cherenkov angles. This is achieved using H-8500 MaPMTs and a new front-end electronics (FEE) with significantly improved timing precision, higher hit rate capability, and small dead time. A full-scale FDIRC prototype covering 1/12th of the barrel azimuth is installed at SLAC and has just started recording cosmic-ray data. In this paper, we summarize the FDIRC design, present the status of the prototype test at SLAC and review the ongoing work to analyse the data.

  16. Feasibility of real time dual-energy imaging based on a flat panel detector for coronary artery calcium quantification.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tong; Ducote, Justin L; Wong, Jerry T; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-06-01

    The feasibility of a real-time dual-energy imaging technique with dynamic filtration using a flat panel detector for quantifying coronary arterial calcium was evaluated. In this technique, the x-ray beam was switched at 15 Hz between 60 kVp and 120 kVp with the 120 kVp beam having an additional 0.8 mm silver filter. The performance of the dynamic filtration technique was compared with a static filtration technique (4 mm Al+0.2 mm Cu for both beams). The ability to quantify calcium mass was evaluated using calcified arterial vessel phantoms with 20-230 mg of hydroxylapatite. The vessel phantoms were imaged over a Lucite phantom and then an anthropomorphic chest phantom. The total thickness of Lucite phantom ranges from 13.5-26.5 cm to simulate patient thickness of 16-32 cm. The calcium mass was measured using a densitometric technique. The effective dose to patient was estimated from the measured entrance exposure. The effects of patient thickness on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), effective dose, and the precision of calcium mass quantification (i.e., the frame to frame variability) were studied. The effects of misregistration artifacts were also measured by shifting the vessel phantoms manually between low- and high-energy images. The results show that, with the same detector signal level, the dynamic filtration technique produced 70% higher calcium contrast-to-noise ratio with only 4% increase in patient dose as compared to the static filtration technique. At the same time, x-ray tube loading increased by 30% with dynamic filtration. The minimum detectability of calcium with anatomical background was measured to be 34 mg of hydroxyapatite. The precision in calcium mass measurement, determined from 16 repeated dual-energy images, ranges from 13 mg to 41 mg when the patient thickness increased from 16 to 32 cm. The CNR was found to decrease with the patient thickness linearly at a rate of (-7%/cm). The anatomic background produced measurement root-mean-square (RMS

  17. Feasibility of real time dual-energy imaging based on a flat panel detector for coronary artery calcium quantification

    SciTech Connect

    Xu Tong; Ducote, Justin L.; Wong, Jerry T.; Molloi, Sabee

    2006-06-15

    The feasibility of a real-time dual-energy imaging technique with dynamic filtration using a flat panel detector for quantifying coronary arterial calcium was evaluated. In this technique, the x-ray beam was switched at 15 Hz between 60 kVp and 120 kVp with the 120 kVp beam having an additional 0.8 mm silver filter. The performance of the dynamic filtration technique was compared with a static filtration technique (4 mm Al+0.2 mm Cu for both beams). The ability to quantify calcium mass was evaluated using calcified arterial vessel phantoms with 20-230 mg of hydroxylapatite. The vessel phantoms were imaged over a Lucite phantom and then an anthropomorphic chest phantom. The total thickness of Lucite phantom ranges from 13.5-26.5 cm to simulate patient thickness of 16-32 cm. The calcium mass was measured using a densitometric technique. The effective dose to patient was estimated from the measured entrance exposure. The effects of patient thickness on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR), effective dose, and the precision of calcium mass quantification (i.e., the frame to frame variability) were studied. The effects of misregistration artifacts were also measured by shifting the vessel phantoms manually between low- and high-energy images. The results show that, with the same detector signal level, the dynamic filtration technique produced 70% higher calcium contrast-to-noise ratio with only 4% increase in patient dose as compared to the static filtration technique. At the same time, x-ray tube loading increased by 30% with dynamic filtration. The minimum detectability of calcium with anatomical background was measured to be 34 mg of hydroxyapatite. The precision in calcium mass measurement, determined from 16 repeated dual-energy images, ranges from 13 mg to 41 mg when the patient thickness increased from 16 to 32 cm. The CNR was found to decrease with the patient thickness linearly at a rate of (-7%/cm). The anatomic background produced measurement root-mean-square (RMS

  18. The SVX3D integrated circuit for dead-timeless silicon strip readout

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia-Sciveres, M.; Milgrome, O.; Zimmerman, T.; Volobouev, I.; Ely, R. P.; Connolly, A.; Fish, D.; Affolder, T.; Sill, A.

    1999-10-01

    The revision D of the SVX3 readout IC has been fabricated in the Honeywell radiation-hard 0.8 μm bulk CMOS process, for instrumenting 712,704 silicon strips in the upgrade to the Collider Detector at Fermilab. This final revision incorporates new features and changes to the original architecture that were added to meet the goal of dead-timeless operation. This paper describes the features central to dead-timeless operation, and presents test data for un-irradiated and irradiated SVX3D chips.

  19. 49 CFR 236.55 - Dead section; maximum length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Dead section; maximum length. 236.55 Section 236... Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.55 Dead section; maximum length. Where dead section exceeds 35... over such dead section is less than 35 feet, the maximum length of the dead section shall not...

  20. 49 CFR 236.55 - Dead section; maximum length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Dead section; maximum length. 236.55 Section 236... Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.55 Dead section; maximum length. Where dead section exceeds 35... over such dead section is less than 35 feet, the maximum length of the dead section shall not...

  1. 49 CFR 236.55 - Dead section; maximum length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Dead section; maximum length. 236.55 Section 236... Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.55 Dead section; maximum length. Where dead section exceeds 35... over such dead section is less than 35 feet, the maximum length of the dead section shall not...

  2. 49 CFR 236.55 - Dead section; maximum length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Dead section; maximum length. 236.55 Section 236... Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.55 Dead section; maximum length. Where dead section exceeds 35... over such dead section is less than 35 feet, the maximum length of the dead section shall not...

  3. 49 CFR 236.55 - Dead section; maximum length.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Dead section; maximum length. 236.55 Section 236... Instructions: All Systems Track Circuits § 236.55 Dead section; maximum length. Where dead section exceeds 35... over such dead section is less than 35 feet, the maximum length of the dead section shall not...

  4. Digital radiography: Present detectors and future developments

    SciTech Connect

    Perez-Mendez, V.

    1990-08-01

    Present detectors for digital radiography are of two classes: real time detectors and storage (non real time) types. Present real time detectors consist of image intensifier tubes with an internal cesium iodide layer x-ray converter. Non real time detectors involve linear sweep arrays or storage detectors such as film. Future detectors discussed here can be of both types utilizing new technologies such as hydrogenated amorphous silicon photodiode arrays coupled to thin film transistor arrays. 17 refs., 10 figs.

  5. Raising the Dead without a Red Sea-Dead Sea project? Hydro-economics and governance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, D. E.

    2011-04-01

    Seven decades of extractions have dramatically reduced Jordan River flows, lowered the Dead Sea level, opened sink holes, and caused other environmental problems. The fix Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinians propose would build an expensive multipurpose conveyance project from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea that would also generate hydropower and desalinate water. This paper compares the Red-Dead project to alternatives that may also raise the Dead Sea level. Hydro-economic model results for the Jordan-Israel-Palestinian inter-tied water systems show two restoration alternatives are more economically viable than the proposed Red-Dead project. Many decentralized new supply, wastewater reuse, conveyance, conservation, and leak reduction projects and programs in each country can together increase economic benefits and reliably deliver up to 900 MCM yr-1 to the Dead Sea. Similarly, a smaller Red-Dead project that only generates hydropower can deliver large flows to the Dead Sea when the sale price of generated electricity is sufficiently high. However, for all restoration options, net benefits fall and water scarcity rises as flows to the Dead Sea increase. This finding suggests (i) each country has no individual incentive to return water to the Dead Sea, and (ii) outside institutions that seek to raise the Dead must also offer countries direct incentives to deliver water to the Sea besides building the countries new infrastructure.

  6. Raising the dead without a Red Sea-Dead Sea canal? Hydro-economics and governance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenberg, D. E.

    2010-12-01

    Seven decades of extractions have dramatically reduced Jordan River flows, lowered the Dead Sea level, opened sink holes, and caused other environmental problems. The fix Jordan, Israel, and the Palestinians propose would build an expensive multipurpose canal from the Red Sea to the Dead Sea that would also generate hydropower and desalinated water. This paper compares the Red-Dead project to alternatives that may also raise the Dead Sea level. Hydro-economic model results for the Jordan-Israel-Palestinian inter-tied water systems show two restoration alternatives are more economically viable than the proposed Red-Dead project. Many decentralized new supply, wastewater reuse, conveyance, conservation, and leak reduction projects and programs in each country can together increase economic benefits and reliably deliver up to 900 MCM/year to the Dead Sea. Similarly, a smaller Red-Dead project that only generates hydropower can deliver large flows to the Dead Sea when the sale price of generated electricity is sufficiently high. However, for all restoration options, net benefits fall and water scarcity rises as flows to the Dead Sea increase. This finding suggests (i) each country has no individual incentive to return water to the Dead Sea, and (ii) outside institutions that seek to raise the Dead must also offer countries direct incentives to deliver water to the Sea besides building the countries new infrastructure.

  7. Real-time 3D millimeter wave imaging based FMCW using GGD focal plane array as detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levanon, Assaf; Rozban, Daniel; Kopeika, Natan S.; Yitzhaky, Yitzhak; Abramovich, Amir

    2014-03-01

    Millimeter wave (MMW) imaging systems are required for applications in medicine, communications, homeland security, and space technology. This is because there is no known ionization hazard for biological tissue, and atmospheric attenuation in this range of the spectrum is relatively low. The lack of inexpensive room temperature imaging systems makes it difficult to give a suitable MMW system for many of the above applications. 3D MMW imaging system based on chirp radar was studied previously using a scanning imaging system of a single detector. The system presented here proposes to employ a chirp radar method with a Glow Discharge Detector (GDD) Focal Plane Array (FPA) of plasma based detectors. Each point on the object corresponds to a point in the image and includes the distance information. This will enable 3D MMW imaging. The radar system requires that the millimeter wave detector (GDD) will be able to operate as a heterodyne detector. Since the source of radiation is a frequency modulated continuous wave (FMCW), the detected signal as a result of heterodyne detection gives the object's depth information according to value of difference frequency, in addition to the reflectance of the image. In this work we experimentally demonstrate the feasibility of implementing an imaging system based on radar principles and FPA of GDD devices. This imaging system is shown to be capable of imaging objects from distances of at least 10 meters.

  8. Large aperture at low cost three-dimensional time-of-flight range sensor using scanning micromirrors and synchronous detector switching.

    PubMed

    Bogatscher, Siegwart; Streck, Andreas; Fox, Maik; Meinzer, Sebastian; Heussner, Nico; Stork, Wilhelm

    2014-03-10

    In this article the problem of achieving fast scanning of a time-of-flight range sensor with a large optical receiver aperture at low system cost is targeted. The presented approach to solve this problem consists of a micromirror-based transmitter unit and a receiver unit consisting of a large aperture lens system with a small field of view and a detector array. A concept, which is called synchronous detector switching, is applied to the detector array. Thereby electronic steering of the small receiver field of view is possible. The overall approach is compared to alternative approaches, and the underlying concept of synchronous detector switching is demonstrated experimentally in an implementation of a three-dimensional time-of-flight range sensor. It is theoretically shown that the presented concept is potentially cheaper than the alternative approaches for applications with a field of view of less than 60×60°. After a discussion of the strengths and limitations of the approach, its effect on broader scientific issues is outlined.

  9. Neutrino Detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    von Feilitzsch, Franz; Lanfranchi, Jean-Côme; Wurm, Michael

    The neutrino was postulated by Wolfgang Pauli in the early 1930s, but could only be detected for the first time in the 1950s. Ever since scientists all around the world have worked on the detection and understanding of this particle which so scarcely interacts with matter. Depending on the origin and nature of the neutrino, various types of experiments have been developed and operated. In this entry, we will review neutrino detectors in terms of neutrino energy and associated detection technique as well as the scientific outcome of some selected examples. After a brief historical introduction, the detection of low-energy neutrinos originating from nuclear reactors or from the Earth is used to illustrate the principles and difficulties which are encountered in detecting neutrinos. In the context of solar neutrino spectroscopy, where the neutrino is used as a probe for astrophysics, three different types of neutrino detectors are presented - water Čerenkov, radiochemical, and liquid-scintillator detectors. Moving to higher neutrino energies, we discuss neutrinos produced by astrophysical sources and from accelerators. The entry concludes with an overview of a selection of future neutrino experiments and their scientific goals.

  10. A time-based front-end ASIC for the silicon micro strip sensors of the bar PANDA Micro Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pietro, V.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.; Riccardi, A.; Ritman, J.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Stockmanns, T.; Zambanini, A.

    2016-03-01

    The bar PANDA (Antiproton Annihilation at Darmstadt) experiment foresees many detectors for tracking, particle identification and calorimetry. Among them, the innermost is the MVD (Micro Vertex Detector) responsible for a precise tracking and the reconstruction of secondary vertices. This detector will be built from both hybrid pixel (two inner barrels and six forward disks) and double-sided micro strip (two outer barrels and outer rim of the last two disks) silicon sensors. A time-based approach has been chosen for the readout ASIC of the strip sensors. The PASTA (bar PANDA Strip ASIC) chip aims at high resolution time-stamping and charge information through the Time over Threshold (ToT) technique. It benefits from a Time to Digital Converter (TDC) allowing a time bin width down to 50 ps. The analog front-end was designed to serve both n-type and p-type strips and the performed simulations show remarkable performances in terms of linearity and electronic noise. The TDC consists of an analog interpolator, a digital local controller, and a digital global controller as the common back-end for all of the 64 channels.

  11. Dead Zones in LX-17 and PBX 9502

    SciTech Connect

    Souers, P C; Andreski, H G; Batteux, J; Bratton, B; Cabacungan, C; Cook, III, C F; Fletcher, S; Garza, R; Grimsley, D; Handly, J; Hernandez, A; McMaster, P; Molitoris, J D; Palmer, R; Prindiville, J; Rodriguez, J; Schneberk, D; Wong, B; Vitello, P

    2005-09-06

    Pin and X-ray corner-turning data have been taken on ambient LX-17 and PBX 9052, and the results are listed in tables as an aid to future modeling. The results have been modeled at 4 zones/mm with a reactive flow approach that varies the burn rate as a function of pressure. A single rate format is used to simulate failure and detonation in different pressure regimes. A pressure cut-off must also be reached to initiate the burn. Corner-turning and failure are modeled using an intermediate pressure rate region, and detonation occurs at high pressure. The TATB booster is also modeled using reactive flow, and X-ray tomography is used to partition the ram-pressed hemisphere into five different density regions. The model reasonably fits the bare corner-turning experiment but predicts a smaller dead zone with steel confinement, in contradiction with experiment. The same model also calculates the confined and unconfined cylinder detonation velocities and predicts the failure of the unconfined cylinder at 3.75 mm radius. The PBX 9502 shows a smaller dead zone than LX-17. An old experiment that showed a large apparent dead zone in Comp B was repeated with X-ray transmission and no dead zone was seen. This confirms the idea that a variable burn rate is the key to modeling. The model also produces initiation delays, which are shorter than those found in time-to-detonation.

  12. Use of the drift-time method to measure the electron lifetime in long-drift-length CdZnTe detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bolotnikov, A. E.; Camarda, G. S.; Chen, E.; Gul, R.; Dedic, V.; De Geronimo, G.; Fried, J.; Hossain, A.; MacKenzie, J. M.; Ocampo, L.; Sellin, P.; Taherion, S.; Vernon, E.; Yang, G.; El-Hanany, U.; James, R. B.

    2016-09-01

    The traditional method for electron lifetime measurements of CdZnTe (CZT) detectors relies on using the Hecht equation. The procedure involves measuring the dependence of the detector response on the applied bias to evaluate the μτ product, which in turn can be converted into the carrier lifetime. Despite general acceptance of this technique, which is very convenient for comparative testing of different CZT materials, the assumption of a constant electric field inside a detector is unjustified. In the Hecht equation, this assumption means that the drift time would be a linear function of the distance. This condition is not fulfilled in practice at low applied biases, where the Hecht equation is most sensitive to the μτ product. As a result, researchers usually take measurements at relatively high biases, which work well in the case of the low μτ-product material, <10-3 cm2/V, but give significantly underestimated values for the case of high μτ-product crystals. In this work, we applied the drift-time method to measure the electron lifetimes in long-drift-length (4 cm) standard-grade CZT detectors produced by the Redlen Technologies. We found that the electron μτ product of tested crystals is in the range 0.1-0.2 cm2/V, which is an order of the magnitude higher than any value previously reported for a CZT material. In comparison, using the Hecht equation fitting, we obtained μτ = 2.3 × 10-2 cm2/V for a 2-mm thin planar detector fabricated from the same CZT material.

  13. Detection of Large Ions in Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry: Effects of Ion Mass and Acceleration Voltage on Microchannel Plate Detector Response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M.

    2014-08-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector. Here, the response of an MCP detector as a function of ion mass and acceleration voltage is characterized, for singly charged peptide/protein ions ranging from 1 to 290 kDa in mass, and for acceleration voltages from 5 to 25 kV. A nondestructive inductive charge detector (ICD) employed in parallel with MCP detection provides a reliable reference signal to allow accurate calibration of the MCP response. MCP detection efficiencies were very close to unity for smaller ions at high acceleration voltages (e.g., angiotensin, 1046.5 Da, at 25 kV acceleration voltage), but decreased to ~11% for the largest ions examined (immunoglobulin G (IgG) dimer, 290 kDa) even at the highest acceleration voltage employed (25 kV). The secondary electron yield γ (average number of electrons produced per ion collision) is found to be proportional to mv3.1 (m: ion mass, v: ion velocity) over the entire mass range examined, and inversely proportional to the square root of m in TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that although MCP detectors indeed offer superlative performance in the detection of smaller peptide/protein species, their performance does fall off substantially for larger proteins, particularly under conditions of low acceleration voltage.

  14. Detection of large ions in time-of-flight mass spectrometry: effects of ion mass and acceleration voltage on microchannel plate detector response.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ranran; Li, Qiyao; Smith, Lloyd M

    2014-08-01

    In time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS), ion detection is typically accomplished by the generation and amplification of secondary electrons produced by ions colliding with a microchannel plate (MCP) detector. Here, the response of an MCP detector as a function of ion mass and acceleration voltage is characterized, for singly charged peptide/protein ions ranging from 1 to 290 kDa in mass, and for acceleration voltages from 5 to 25 kV. A nondestructive inductive charge detector (ICD) employed in parallel with MCP detection provides a reliable reference signal to allow accurate calibration of the MCP response. MCP detection efficiencies were very close to unity for smaller ions at high acceleration voltages (e.g., angiotensin, 1046.5 Da, at 25 kV acceleration voltage), but decreased to ~11% for the largest ions examined (immunoglobulin G (IgG) dimer, 290 kDa) even at the highest acceleration voltage employed (25 kV). The secondary electron yield γ (average number of electrons produced per ion collision) is found to be proportional to mv(3.1) (m: ion mass, v: ion velocity) over the entire mass range examined, and inversely proportional to the square root of m in TOF-MS analysis. The results indicate that although MCP detectors indeed offer superlative performance in the detection of smaller peptide/protein species, their performance does fall off substantially for larger proteins, particularly under conditions of low acceleration voltage.

  15. X-ray Characterization of a Multichannel Smart-Pixel Array Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Ross, Steve; Haji-Sheikh, Michael; Huntington, Andrew; Kline, David; Lee, Adam; Li, Yuelin; Rhee, Jehyuk; Tarpley, Mary; Walko, Donald A.; Westberg, Gregg; Williams, George; Zou, Haifeng; Landahl, Eric

    2016-01-01

    The Voxtel VX-798 is a prototype X-ray pixel array detector (PAD) featuring a silicon sensor photodiode array of 48 x 48 pixels, each 130 mu m x 130 mu m x 520 mu m thick, coupled to a CMOS readout application specific integrated circuit (ASIC). The first synchrotron X-ray characterization of this detector is presented, and its ability to selectively count individual X-rays within two independent arrival time windows, a programmable energy range, and localized to a single pixel is demonstrated. During our first trial run at Argonne National Laboratory's Advance Photon Source, the detector achieved a 60 ns gating time and 700 eV full width at half-maximum energy resolution in agreement with design parameters. Each pixel of the PAD holds two independent digital counters, and the discriminator for X-ray energy features both an upper and lower threshold to window the energy of interest discarding unwanted background. This smart-pixel technology allows energy and time resolution to be set and optimized in software. It is found that the detector linearity follows an isolated dead-time model, implying that megahertz count rates should be possible in each pixel. Measurement of the line and point spread functions showed negligible spatial blurring. When combined with the timing structure of the synchrotron storage ring, it is demonstrated that the area detector can perform both picosecond time-resolved X-ray diffraction and fluorescence spectroscopy measurements.

  16. A Minor Modification of Leading Edge Discriminator Circuitry with a Delay Line for Baseline Restoration of Scintillation Detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Izumi, N

    2003-05-27

    Multi-channel neutron time-of-flight detector arrays LaNSA, T-ion, Medusa, and Mandala, have been used for neutron spectroscopy in inertial confinement fusion experiments. These multi-channel neutron detector arrays consist of many identical scintillation detectors (842 {approx} 1024 channel), data acquisition electronics (discriminators, time-to digital converters, and controller). Each detector element is operated in neutron counting mode. Time-of-flight of individual detected neutrons are recorded by time to digital converters. The energy of each detected neutrons is determined from its time-of-flight. The accurate time measurement ({Delta}t {approx} 0.5 ns) and straightforward statistical features of the data obtained with these systems provides good integrity and reliability. The elements detector used in these systems are organic scintillators coupled with photo multiplier tubes. A scintillation detector operated in particle-counting mode requires finite recovery time after each detection event. The recovery time is determined by the time responses of scintillators, photo multiplier tubes, and the dead times of following discriminators and time-to digital converters. The harsh gamma ray background environment of fast ignitor experiments requires detectors that have fast recovery times. In high intensity laser experiments (I > 10{sup 19} W/cm{sup 2}), strong gamma ray bursts are produced by relativistic laser plasma interactions. Prior to the neutron signal, these strong gamma ray bursts hit the detectors and interfere with the detection of following neutron signals. In these situations, the recovery time of the system after preceding gamma ray bursts is determined mainly by the base line shift of the PMT signal (due to slower decay components of scintillators ''after glow''). Discriminators cannot detect following signal pulses until the proceeding burst decays below its threshold voltage. The base line shift caused by the after glow prolongs the recovery

  17. Induction spectrometry using an ultrafast hollow-cored toroidal-coil (HTC) detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arbelo, Yunieski; Bleiner, Davide

    2017-02-01

    Ultrafast photoelectron and photoion spectroscopy (as well as their combination known as "coincidence spectroscopy") utilizes detectors based on different electron multipliers such as microchannel plates or single-channel electron multipliers. These detectors have a few important limitations such as fast-signal distortion (low pass operation), mutually exclusive positive or negative mode, dead time, and requirement of trigger. A high-pass induction detector, based on a hollow-cored toroidal coil, was developed that overcomes the above-mentioned limitations. The frequency-dispersive response and linearity of different configurations were analyzed. It is shown that the response is enhanced for ultrafast electron signals, dependent on construction parameters, thus offering response flexibility by design. Kinetic energy distributions of pseudospark-induced electron pulses are characterized in order to validate the capabilities in real applications.

  18. Fast photon detection for the COMPASS RICH detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbon, P.; Alekseev, M.; Angerer, H.; Apollonio, M.; Birsa, R.; Bordalo, P.; Bradainante, F.; Bressan, A.; Busso, L.; Chiosso, M.; Ciliberti, P.; Colantoni, M. L.; Costa, S.; Dalla Torre, S.; Dafni, T.; Delagnes, E.; Deschamps, H.; Diaz, V.; Dibiase, N.; Duic, V.; Eyrich, W.; Faso, D.; Ferrero, A.; Finger, M.; Finger, M.; Fischer, H.; Gerassimov, S.; Giorgi, M.; Gobbo, B.; Hagemann, R.; von Harrach, D.; Heinsius, F. H.; Joosten, R.; Ketzer, B.; Königsmann, K.; Kolosov, V. N.; Konorov, I.; Kramer, D.; Kunne, F.; Lehmann, A.; Levorato, S.; Maggiora, A.; Magnon, A.; Mann, A.; Martin, A.; Menon, G.; Mutter, A.; Nähle, O.; Nerling, F.; Neyret, D.; Pagano, P.; Panebianco, S.; Panzieri, D.; Paul, S.; Pesaro, G.; Polak, J.; Rebourgeard, P.; Robinet, F.; Rocco, E.; Schiavon, P.; Schill, C.; Schröder, W.; Silva, L.; Slunecka, M.; Sozzi, F.; Steiger, L.; Sulc, M.; Svec, M.; Tessarotto, F.; Teufel, A.; Wollny, H.

    2007-10-01

    Particle identification at high rates is a central aspect of many present and future experiments in high-energy particle physics. The COMPASS experiment at the SPS accelerator at CERN uses a large scale Ring Imaging CHerenkov detector (RICH) to identify pions, kaons and protons in a wide momentum range. For the data taking in 2006, the COMPASS RICH has been upgraded in the central photon detection area (25% of the surface) with a new technology to detect Cherenkov photons at very high count rates of several 10s per channel and a new dead-time free read-out system, which allows trigger rates up to 100 kHz. The Cherenkov photons are detected by an array of 576 visible and ultra-violet sensitive multi-anode photomultipliers with 16 channels each. Lens telescopes of fused silica lenses have been designed and built to focus the Cherenkov photons onto the individual photomultipliers. The read-out electronics of the PMTs is based on the MAD4 amplifier-discriminator chip and the dead-time free high resolution F1-TDC. The 120 ps time resolution of the digital card guarantees negligible background from uncorrelated physical events. In the outer part of the detector, where the particle rates are lower, the present multi-wire proportional chambers (MWPC) with Cesium Iodide photo-cathodes have been upgraded with a new read-out electronic system based on the APV preamplifier and shaper ASIC with analog pipeline and sampling ADCs. The project was fully designed and implemented in the period November 2004 until May 2006. The upgraded detector showed an excellent performance during the 2006 data taking: the number of detected Cherenkov photons per ring was increased from 14 to above 60 at saturation. The time resolution was improved from about 3 microseconds to about one nanosecond which allows an excellent suppression of the background photons from uncorrelated events.

  19. Cryogenic detectors based on superconducting transition-edge sensors for time-energy-resolved single-photon counters and for dark matter searches

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cabrera, B.; Clarke, R.; Miller, A.; Nam, S. W.; Romani, R.; Saab, T.; Young, B.

    2000-05-01

    We present the recent progress using transition-edge sensors (TES) for cryogenic particle detectors. First, by directly absorbing photons in tungsten TES devices, an instrument has been made which time stamps (0.1μs) and energy resolves (0.15 eV FWHM) each photon at rates up to 10 kHz. Observations of the Crab pulsar are the first broad spectrum infrared through full optical and time resolved on any astronomical object. Second, in the CDMS (cryogenic dark matter search) experiment looking for WIMPs, large crystals of silicon and germanium are instrumented with QET (quasiparticle-trap-assisted electrothermal-feedback transition-edge sensors) phonon sensors which provide the recoil energy and location in /x,y and /z for each event. Together with an ionization readout, these detectors provide powerful discrimination capabilities against known backgrounds and they are now probing new regions for WIMP dark matter.

  20. Water input requirements of the rapidly shrinking Dead Sea.

    PubMed

    Abu Ghazleh, Shahrazad; Hartmann, Jens; Jansen, Nils; Kempe, Stephan

    2009-05-01

    The deepest point on Earth, the Dead Sea level, has been dropping alarmingly since 1978 by 0.7 m/a on average due to the accelerating water consumption in the Jordan catchment and stood in 2008 at 420 m below sea level. In this study, a terrain model of the surface area and water volume of the Dead Sea was developed from the Shuttle Radar Topography Mission data using ArcGIS. The model shows that the lake shrinks on average by 4 km(2)/a in area and by 0.47 km(3)/a in volume, amounting to a cumulative loss of 14 km(3) in the last 30 years. The receding level leaves almost annually erosional terraces, recorded here for the first time by Differential Global Positioning System field surveys. The terrace altitudes were correlated among the different profiles and dated to specific years of the lake level regression, illustrating the tight correlation between the morphology of the terrace sequence and the receding lake level. Our volume-level model described here and previous work on groundwater inflow suggest that the projected Dead Sea-Red Sea channel or the Mediterranean-Dead Sea channel must have a carrying capacity of >0.9 km(3)/a in order to slowly re-fill the lake to its former level and to create a sustainable system of electricity generation and freshwater production by desalinization. Moreover, such a channel will maintain tourism and potash industry on both sides of the Dead Sea and reduce the natural hazard caused by the recession.