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Sample records for detector-independent vertex reconstruction

  1. RAVE—a Detector-independent vertex reconstruction toolkit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Mitaroff, Winfried; Moser, Fabian

    2007-10-01

    A detector-independent toolkit for vertex reconstruction (RAVE ) is being developed, along with a standalone framework (VERTIGO ) for testing, analyzing and debugging. The core algorithms represent state of the art for geometric vertex finding and fitting by both linear (Kalman filter) and robust estimation methods. Main design goals are ease of use, flexibility for embedding into existing software frameworks, extensibility, and openness. The implementation is based on modern object-oriented techniques, is coded in C++ with interfaces for Java and Python, and follows an open-source approach. A beta release is available. VERTIGO = "vertex reconstruction toolkit and interface to generic objects".

  2. The RAVE/VERTIGO vertex reconstruction toolkit and framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltenberger, W.; Mitaroff, W.; Moser, F.; Pflugfelder, B.; Riedel, H. V.

    2008-07-01

    A detector-independent toolkit for vertex reconstruction (RAVE1) is being developed, along with a standalone framework (VERTIGO2) for testing, analyzing and debugging. The core algorithms represent state-of-the-art for geometric vertex finding and fitting by both linear (Kalman filter) and robust estimation methods. Main design goals are ease of use, flexibility for embedding into existing software frameworks, extensibility, and openness. The implementation is based on modern object-oriented techniques, is coded in C++ with interfaces for Java and Python, and follows an open-source approach. A beta release is available.

  3. DETECTORS AND EXPERIMENTAL METHODS: Decay vertex reconstruction and 3-dimensional lifetime determination at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Min; He, Kang-Lin; Zhang, Zi-Ping; Wang, Yi-Fang; Bian, Jian-Ming; Cao, Guo-Fu; Cao, Xue-Xiang; Chen, Shen-Jian; Deng, Zi-Yan; Fu, Cheng-Dong; Gao, Yuan-Ning; Han, Lei; Han, Shao-Qing; He, Miao; Hu, Ji-Feng; Hu, Xiao-Wei; Huang, Bin; Huang, Xing-Tao; Jia, Lu-Kui; Ji, Xiao-Bin; Li, Hai-Bo; Li, Wei-Dong; Liang, Yu-Tie; Liu, Chun-Xiu; Liu, Huai-Min; Liu, Ying; Liu, Yong; Luo, Tao; Lü, Qi-Wen; Ma, Qiu-Mei; Ma, Xiang; Mao, Ya-Jun; Mao, Ze-Pu; Mo, Xiao-Hu; Ning, Fei-Peng; Ping, Rong-Gang; Qiu, Jin-Fa; Song, Wen-Bo; Sun, Sheng-Sen; Sun, Xiao-Dong; Sun, Yong-Zhao; Tian, Hao-Lai; Wang, Ji-Ke; Wang, Liang-Liang; Wen, Shuo-Pin; Wu, Ling-Hui; Wu, Zhi; Xie, Yu-Guang; Yan, Jie; Yan, Liang; Yao, Jian; Yuan, Chang-Zheng; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Chang-Chun; Zhang, Jian-Yong; Zhang, Lei; Zhang, Xue-Yao; Zhang, Yao; Zheng, Yang-Heng; Zhu, Yong-Sheng; Zou, Jia-Heng

    2009-06-01

    This paper focuses mainly on the vertex reconstruction of resonance particles with a relatively long lifetime such as K0S, Λ, as well as on lifetime measurements using a 3-dimensional fit. The kinematic constraints between the production and decay vertices and the decay vertex fitting algorithm based on the least squares method are both presented. Reconstruction efficiencies including experimental resolutions are discussed. The results and systematic errors are calculated based on a Monte Carlo simulation.

  4. Description and performance of track and primary-vertex reconstruction with the CMS tracker

    SciTech Connect

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-10-16

    A description is provided of the software algorithms developed for the CMS tracker both for reconstructing charged-particle trajectories in proton-proton interactions and for using the resulting tracks to estimate the positions of the LHC luminous region and individual primary-interaction vertices. Despite the very hostile environment at the LHC, the performance obtained with these algorithms is found to be excellent. For tbar t events under typical 2011 pileup conditions, the average track-reconstruction efficiency for promptly-produced charged particles with transverse momenta of pT > 0.9GeV is 94% for pseudorapidities of |η| < 0.9 and 85% for 0.9 < |η| < 2.5. The inefficiency is caused mainly by hadrons that undergo nuclear interactions in the tracker material. For isolated muons, the corresponding efficiencies are essentially 100%. For isolated muons of pT = 100GeV emitted at |η| < 1.4, the resolutions are approximately 2.8% in pT, and respectively, 10μm and 30μm in the transverse and longitudinal impact parameters. The position resolution achieved for reconstructed primary vertices that correspond to interesting pp collisions is 10–12μm in each of the three spatial dimensions. The tracking and vertexing software is fast and flexible, and easily adaptable to other functions, such as fast tracking for the trigger, or dedicated tracking for electrons that takes into account bremsstrahlung.

  5. Description and performance of track and primary-vertex reconstruction with the CMS tracker

    DOE PAGES

    Chatrchyan, Serguei

    2014-10-16

    A description is provided of the software algorithms developed for the CMS tracker both for reconstructing charged-particle trajectories in proton-proton interactions and for using the resulting tracks to estimate the positions of the LHC luminous region and individual primary-interaction vertices. Despite the very hostile environment at the LHC, the performance obtained with these algorithms is found to be excellent. For tbar t events under typical 2011 pileup conditions, the average track-reconstruction efficiency for promptly-produced charged particles with transverse momenta of pT > 0.9GeV is 94% for pseudorapidities of |η| < 0.9 and 85% for 0.9 < |η| < 2.5. Themore » inefficiency is caused mainly by hadrons that undergo nuclear interactions in the tracker material. For isolated muons, the corresponding efficiencies are essentially 100%. For isolated muons of pT = 100GeV emitted at |η| < 1.4, the resolutions are approximately 2.8% in pT, and respectively, 10μm and 30μm in the transverse and longitudinal impact parameters. The position resolution achieved for reconstructed primary vertices that correspond to interesting pp collisions is 10–12μm in each of the three spatial dimensions. The tracking and vertexing software is fast and flexible, and easily adaptable to other functions, such as fast tracking for the trigger, or dedicated tracking for electrons that takes into account bremsstrahlung.« less

  6. Performance of the reconstruction algorithms of the FIRST experiment pixel sensors vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rescigno, R.; Finck, Ch.; Juliani, D.; Spiriti, E.; Baudot, J.; Abou-Haidar, Z.; Agodi, C.; Alvarez, M. A. G.; Aumann, T.; Battistoni, G.; Bocci, A.; Böhlen, T. T.; Boudard, A.; Brunetti, A.; Carpinelli, M.; Cirrone, G. A. P.; Cortes-Giraldo, M. A.; Cuttone, G.; De Napoli, M.; Durante, M.; Gallardo, M. I.; Golosio, B.; Iarocci, E.; Iazzi, F.; Ickert, G.; Introzzi, R.; Krimmer, J.; Kurz, N.; Labalme, M.; Leifels, Y.; Le Fevre, A.; Leray, S.; Marchetto, F.; Monaco, V.; Morone, M. C.; Oliva, P.; Paoloni, A.; Patera, V.; Piersanti, L.; Pleskac, R.; Quesada, J. M.; Randazzo, N.; Romano, F.; Rossi, D.; Rousseau, M.; Sacchi, R.; Sala, P.; Sarti, A.; Scheidenberger, C.; Schuy, C.; Sciubba, A.; Sfienti, C.; Simon, H.; Sipala, V.; Tropea, S.; Vanstalle, M.; Younis, H.

    2014-12-01

    Hadrontherapy treatments use charged particles (e.g. protons and carbon ions) to treat tumors. During a therapeutic treatment with carbon ions, the beam undergoes nuclear fragmentation processes giving rise to significant yields of secondary charged particles. An accurate prediction of these production rates is necessary to estimate precisely the dose deposited into the tumours and the surrounding healthy tissues. Nowadays, a limited set of double differential carbon fragmentation cross-section is available. Experimental data are necessary to benchmark Monte Carlo simulations for their use in hadrontherapy. The purpose of the FIRST experiment is to study nuclear fragmentation processes of ions with kinetic energy in the range from 100 to 1000 MeV/u. Tracks are reconstructed using information from a pixel silicon detector based on the CMOS technology. The performances achieved using this device for hadrontherapy purpose are discussed. For each reconstruction step (clustering, tracking and vertexing), different methods are implemented. The algorithm performances and the accuracy on reconstructed observables are evaluated on the basis of simulated and experimental data.

  7. Java Vertexing Tools

    SciTech Connect

    Strube, Jan; Graf, Norman; /SLAC

    2006-03-03

    This document describes the implementation of the topological vertex finding algorithm ZVTOP within the org.lcsim reconstruction and analysis framework. At the present date, Java vertexing tools allow users to perform topological vertexing on tracks that have been obtained from a Fast MC simulation. An implementation that will be able to handle fully reconstructed events is being designed from the ground up for longevity and maintainability.

  8. The CDF silicon vertex tracker

    SciTech Connect

    A. Cerri et al.

    2000-10-10

    Real time pattern recognition is becoming a key issue in many position sensitive detector applications. The CDF collaboration is building SVT: a specialized electronic device designed to perform real time track reconstruction using the silicon vertex detector (SVX II). This will strongly improve the CDF capability of triggering on events containing b quarks, usually characterized by the presence of a secondary vertex. SVT is designed to reconstruct in real time charged particles trajectories using data coming from the Silicon Vertex detector and the Central Outer Tracker drift chamber. The SVT architecture and algorithm have been specially tuned to minimize processing time without degrading parameter resolution.

  9. Vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Lueth, V.

    1992-07-01

    The purpose of a vertex detector is to measure position and angles of charged particle tracks to sufficient precision so as to be able to separate tracks originating from decay vertices from those produced at the interaction vertex. Such measurements are interesting because they permit the detection of weakly decaying particles with lifetimes down to 10{sup {minus}13} s, among them the {tau} lepton and charm and beauty hadrons. These two lectures are intended to introduce the reader to the different techniques for the detection of secondary vertices that have been developed over the past decades. The first lecture includes a brief introduction to the methods used to detect secondary vertices and to estimate particle lifetimes. It describes the traditional technologies, based on photographic recording in emulsions and on film of bubble chambers, and introduces fast electronic registration of signals derived from scintillating fibers, drift chambers and gaseous micro-strip chambers. The second lecture is devoted to solid state detectors. It begins with a brief introduction into semiconductor devices, and then describes the application of large arrays of strip and pixel diodes for charged particle tracking. These lectures can only serve as an introduction the topic of vertex detectors. Time and space do not allow for an in-depth coverage of many of the interesting aspects of vertex detector design and operation.

  10. Measurement of $B\\bar{B}$ Angular Correlations based on Secondary Vertex Reconstruction at $\\sqrt{s}=7$ TeV

    SciTech Connect

    Khachatryan, Vardan; et al.

    2011-03-01

    A measurement of the angular correlations between beauty and anti-beauty hadrons (B B-bar) produced in pp collisions at a centre-of-mass energy of 7 TeV at the CERN LHC is presented, probing for the first time the region of small angular separation. The B hadrons are identified by the presence of displaced secondary vertices from their decays. The B hadron angular separation is reconstructed from the decay vertices and the primary-interaction vertex. The differential B B-bar production cross section, measured from a data sample collected by CMS and corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 3.1 inverse picobarns, shows that a sizable fraction of the B B-bar pairs are produced with small opening angles. These studies provide a test of QCD and further insight into the dynamics of b b-bar production.

  11. The Mark III vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Adler, J.; Bolton, T.; Bunnell, K.; Cassell, R.; Cheu, E.; Freese, T.; Grab, C.; Mazaheri, G.; Mir, R.; Odian, A.

    1987-07-01

    The design and construction of the new Mark III vertex chamber is described. Initial tests with cosmic rays prove the ability of track reconstruction and yield triplet resolutions below 50 ..mu..m at 3 atm using argon/ethane (50:50). Also performed are studies using a prototype of a pressurized wire vertex chamber with 8 mm diameter straw geometry. Spatial resolution of 35mm was obtained using dimethyl ether (DME) at 1 atm and 30 ..mu..m using argon/ethane (50/50 mixture) at 4 atm. Preliminary studies indicate the DME to adversely affect such materials as aluminized Mylar and Delrin.

  12. Proposal for a CLEO precision vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Fermilab experiment E691 and CERN experiment NA32 have demonstrated the enormous power of precision vertexing for studying heavy quark physics. Nearly all collider experiments now have or are installing precision vertex detectors. This is a proposal for a precision vertex detector for CLEO, which will be the pre-eminent heavy quark experiment for at least the next 5 years. The purpose of a precision vertex detector for CLEO is to enhance the capabilities for isolating B, charm, and tau decays and to make it possible to measure the decay time. The precision vertex detector will also significantly improve strange particle identification and help with the tracking. The installation and use of this detector at CLEO is an important step in developing a vertex detector for an asymmetric B factory and therefore in observing CP violation in B decays. The CLEO environment imposes a number of unique conditions and challenges. The machine will be operating near the {gamma} (4S) in energy. This means that B's are produced with a very small velocity and travel a distance about {1/2} that of the expected vertex position resolution. As a consequence B decay time information will not be useful for most physics. On the other hand, the charm products of B decays have a higher velocity. For the long lived D{sup +} in particular, vertex information can be used to isolate the charm particle on an event-by-event basis. This helps significantly in reconstructing B's. The vertex resolution for D's from B's is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering of the necessarily rather low momentum tracks. As a consequence it is essential to minimize the material, as measured in radiation lengths, in the beam pip and the vertex detector itself. It is also essential to build the beam pipe and detector with the smallest possible radius.

  13. The Mark III vertex chamber and prototype test results

    SciTech Connect

    Grab, C.

    1987-07-01

    A vertex chamber has been constructed for use in the Mark III experiment. The chamber is positioned inside the current main drift chamber and will be used to trigger data collection, to aid in vertex reconstruction, and to improve the momentum resolution. This paper discusses the chamber's construction and performance and tests of the prototype.

  14. The CDF silicon vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect

    B. Ashmanskas; A. Barchiesi; A. Bardi

    2003-06-23

    The CDF experiment's Silicon Vertex Trigger is a system of 150 custom 9U VME boards that reconstructs axial tracks in the CDF silicon strip detector in a 15 {mu}sec pipeline. SVT's 35 {mu}m impact parameter resolution enables CDF's Level 2 trigger to distinguish primary and secondary particles, and hence to collect large samples of hadronic bottom and charm decays. We review some of SVT's key design features. Speed is achieved with custom VLSI pattern recognition, linearized track fitting, pipelining, and parallel processing. Testing and reliability are aided by built-in logic state analysis and test-data sourcing at each board's input and output, a common inter-board data link, and a universal ''Merger'' board for data fan-in/fan-out. Speed and adaptability are enhanced by use of modern FPGAs.

  15. Proposal for a CLEO precision vertex detector. [Progress report, 1991

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-31

    Fermilab experiment E691 and CERN experiment NA32 have demonstrated the enormous power of precision vertexing for studying heavy quark physics. Nearly all collider experiments now have or are installing precision vertex detectors. This is a proposal for a precision vertex detector for CLEO, which will be the pre-eminent heavy quark experiment for at least the next 5 years. The purpose of a precision vertex detector for CLEO is to enhance the capabilities for isolating B, charm, and tau decays and to make it possible to measure the decay time. The precision vertex detector will also significantly improve strange particle identification and help with the tracking. The installation and use of this detector at CLEO is an important step in developing a vertex detector for an asymmetric B factory and therefore in observing CP violation in B decays. The CLEO environment imposes a number of unique conditions and challenges. The machine will be operating near the {gamma} (4S) in energy. This means that B`s are produced with a very small velocity and travel a distance about {1/2} that of the expected vertex position resolution. As a consequence B decay time information will not be useful for most physics. On the other hand, the charm products of B decays have a higher velocity. For the long lived D{sup +} in particular, vertex information can be used to isolate the charm particle on an event-by-event basis. This helps significantly in reconstructing B`s. The vertex resolution for D`s from B`s is limited by multiple Coulomb scattering of the necessarily rather low momentum tracks. As a consequence it is essential to minimize the material, as measured in radiation lengths, in the beam pip and the vertex detector itself. It is also essential to build the beam pipe and detector with the smallest possible radius.

  16. Vertex Detector Cable Considerations

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, William E.; /Fermilab

    2009-02-01

    Vertex detector cable requirements are considered within the context of the SiD concept. Cable material should be limited so that the number of radiation lengths represented is consistent with the material budget. In order to take advantage of the proposed accelerator beam structure and allow cooling by flow of dry gas, 'pulsed power' is assumed. Potential approaches to power distribution, cable paths, and cable design for operation in a 5 T magnetic field are described.

  17. Studies of vertex tracking with SOI pixel sensors for future lepton colliders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Battaglia, Marco; Contarato, Devis; Denes, Peter; Liko, Dietrich; Mattiazzo, Serena; Pantano, Devis

    2012-07-01

    This paper presents a study of vertex tracking with a beam hodoscope consisting of three layers of monolithic pixel sensors in SOI technology on high-resistivity substrate. We study the track extrapolation accuracy, two-track separation and vertex reconstruction accuracy in π- Cu interactions with 150 and 300 GeV/c pions at the CERN SPS. Results are discussed in the context of vertex tracking at future lepton colliders.

  18. Magnetic wormholes and vertex operators

    SciTech Connect

    Singh, H. )

    1994-10-15

    We consider wormhole solutions in 2+1 Euclidean dimensions. A duality transformation is introduced to derive a new action from the magnetic wormhole action of Gupta, Hughes, Preskill, and Wise. The classical solution is presented. The vertex operators corresponding to the wormhole are derived. Conformally coupled scalars and spinors are considered in the wormhole background and the vertex operators are computed.

  19. On Making a Distinguished Vertex Minimum Degree by Vertex Deletion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betzler, Nadja; Bredereck, Robert; Niedermeier, Rolf; Uhlmann, Johannes

    For directed and undirected graphs, we study the problem to make a distinguished vertex the unique minimum-(in)degree vertex through deletion of a minimum number of vertices. The corresponding NP-hard optimization problems are motivated by applications concerning control in elections and social network analysis. Continuing previous work for the directed case, we show that the problem is W[2]-hard when parameterized by the graph's feedback arc set number, whereas it becomes fixed-parameter tractable when combining the parameters "feedback vertex set number" and "number of vertices to delete". For the so far unstudied undirected case, we show that the problem is NP-hard and W[1]-hard when parameterized by the "number of vertices to delete". On the positive side, we show fixed-parameter tractability for several parameterizations measuring tree-likeness, including a vertex-linear problem kernel with respect to the parameter "feedback edge set number". On the contrary, we show a non-existence result concerning polynomial-size problem kernels for the combined parameter "vertex cover number and number of vertices to delete", implying corresponding nonexistence results when replacing vertex cover number by treewidth or feedback vertex set number.

  20. Calculation of track and vertex errors for detector design studies

    SciTech Connect

    Harr, R.

    1995-06-01

    The Kalman Filter technique has come into wide use for charged track reconstruction in high-energy physics experiments. It is also well suited for detector design studies, allowing for the efficient estimation of optimal track covariance matrices without the need of a hit level Monte Carlo simulation. Although much has been published about the Kalman filter equations, there is a lack of previous literature explaining how to implement the equations. In this paper, the operators necessary to implement the Kalman filter equations for two common detector configurations are worked out: a central detector in a uniform solenoidal magnetic field, and a fixed-target detector with no magnetic field in the region of the interactions. With the track covariance matrices in hand, vertex and invariant mass errors are readily calculable. These quantities are particularly interesting for evaluating experiments designed to study weakly decaying particles which give rise to displaced vertices. The optimal vertex errors are obtained via a constrained vertex fit. Solutions are presented to the constrained vertex problem with and without kinematic constraints. Invariant mass errors are obtained via propagation of errors; the use of vertex constrained track parameters is discussed. Many of the derivations are new or previously unpublished.

  1. A neural network z-vertex trigger for Belle II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhaus, S.; Skambraks, S.; Abudinen, F.; Chen, Y.; Feindt, M.; Frühwirth, R.; Heck, M.; Kiesling, C.; Knoll, A.; Paul, S.; Schieck, J.

    2015-05-01

    We present the concept of a track trigger for the Belle II experiment, based on a neural network approach, that is able to reconstruct the z (longitudinal) position of the event vertex within the latency of the first level trigger. The trigger will thus be able to suppress a large fraction of the dominating background from events outside of the interaction region. The trigger uses the drift time information of the hits from the Central Drift Chamber (CDC) of Belle II within narrow cones in polar and azimuthal angle as well as in transverse momentum (sectors), and estimates the z-vertex without explicit track reconstruction. The preprocessing for the track trigger is based on the track information provided by the standard CDC trigger. It takes input from the 2D (r — φ) track finder, adds information from the stereo wires of the CDC, and finds the appropriate sectors in the CDC for each track in a given event. Within each sector, the z-vertex of the associated track is estimated by a specialized neural network, with a continuous output corresponding to the scaled z-vertex. The input values for the neural network are calculated from the wire hits of the CDC.

  2. Locating the neutrino interaction vertex with the help of electronic detectors in the OPERA experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gornushkin, Yu. A.; Dmitrievsky, S. G.; Chukanov, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The OPERA experiment is designed for the direct observation of the appearance of ντ from νμ → ντ oscillation in a νμ beam. A description of the procedure of neutrino interaction vertex localization (Brick Finding) by electronic detectors of a hybrid OPERA setup is presented. The procedure includes muon track and hadronic shower axis reconstruction and a determination of the target bricks with the highest probability to contain the vertex.

  3. Calculus of twisted vertex operators

    PubMed Central

    Lepowsky, J.

    1985-01-01

    Starting from an arbitrary isometry of an arbitrary even lattice, twisted and shifted vertex operators are introduced. Under commutators, these operators provide realizations of twisted affine Lie algebras. This construction, generalizing a number of known ones, is based on a self-contained “calculus.” PMID:16593635

  4. Vertex Models of Epithelial Morphogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Fletcher, Alexander G.; Osterfield, Miriam; Baker, Ruth E.; Shvartsman, Stanislav Y.

    2014-01-01

    The dynamic behavior of epithelial cell sheets plays a central role during numerous developmental processes. Genetic and imaging studies of epithelial morphogenesis in a wide range of organisms have led to increasingly detailed mechanisms of cell sheet dynamics. Computational models offer a useful means by which to investigate and test these mechanisms, and have played a key role in the study of cell-cell interactions. A variety of modeling approaches can be used to simulate the balance of forces within an epithelial sheet. Vertex models are a class of such models that consider cells as individual objects, approximated by two-dimensional polygons representing cellular interfaces, in which each vertex moves in response to forces due to growth, interfacial tension, and pressure within each cell. Vertex models are used to study cellular processes within epithelia, including cell motility, adhesion, mitosis, and delamination. This review summarizes how vertex models have been used to provide insight into developmental processes and highlights current challenges in this area, including progressing these models from two to three dimensions and developing new tools for model validation. PMID:24896108

  5. A Novel Vertex Affinity for Community Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoo, Andy; Sanders, Geoffrey; Henson, Van; Vassilevski, Panayot

    2015-10-05

    We propose a novel vertex affinity measure in this paper. The new vertex affinity quantifies the proximity between two vertices in terms of their clustering strength and is ideal for such graph analytics applications as community detection. We also developed a framework that combines simple graph searches and resistance circuit formulas to compute the vertex affinity efficiently. We study the properties of the new affinity measure empirically in comparison to those of other popular vertex proximity metrics. Our results show that the existing metrics are ill-suited for community detection due to their lack of fundamental properties that are essential for correctly capturing inter- and intra-cluster vertex proximity.

  6. Belle II silicon vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, Ti.; Baroncelli, To.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Enami, K.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Maki, M.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rao, K. K.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Suzuki, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-09-01

    The Belle II experiment at the SuperKEKB collider in Japan is designed to indirectly probe new physics using approximately 50 times the data recorded by its predecessor. An accurate determination of the decay-point position of subatomic particles such as beauty and charm hadrons as well as a precise measurement of low-momentum charged particles will play a key role in this pursuit. These will be accomplished by an inner tracking device comprising two layers of pixelated silicon detector and four layers of silicon vertex detector based on double-sided microstrip sensors. We describe herein the design, prototyping and construction efforts of the Belle-II silicon vertex detector.

  7. STAR Vertex Detector Upgrade Development

    SciTech Connect

    Greiner, Leo C.; Matis, Howard S.; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Vu,Chinh Q.; Wieman, Howard; Szelezniak, Michal; Sun, Xiangming

    2008-01-28

    We report on the development and prototyping efforts undertaken with the goal of producing a micro-vertex detector for the STAR experiment at the RHIC accelerator at BNL. We present the basic detector requirements and show a sensor development path, conceptual mechanical design candidates and readout architecture. Prototyping and beam test results with current generation MimoSTAR-2 sensors and a readout system featuring FPGA based on-the-fly hit finding and data sparsification are also presented.

  8. Refining the shifted topological vertex

    SciTech Connect

    Drissi, L. B.; Jehjouh, H.; Saidi, E. H.

    2009-01-15

    We study aspects of the refining and shifting properties of the 3d MacMahon function C{sub 3}(q) used in topological string theory and BKP hierarchy. We derive the explicit expressions of the shifted topological vertex S{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q) and its refined version T{sub {lambda}}{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}(q,t). These vertices complete results in literature.

  9. CLIC vertex detector R&D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alipour Tehrani, Niloufar

    2016-07-01

    A vertex detector concept is under development for the proposed multi-TeV linear e+e- Compact Linear Collider (CLIC). To perform precision physics measurements in a challenging environment, the CLIC vertex detector pushes the technological requirements to the limits. This paper reviews the requirements for the CLIC vertex detector and gives an overview of recent R&D achievements in the domains of sensor, readout, powering and cooling.

  10. A Preliminary Measurement of Rb using the New SLD Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Coller, A

    2004-01-23

    We report a new measurement of R{sub b} using data obtained during the 1996 SLD run. This measurement uses a double tag technique, where the selection of a b hemisphere is based on the reconstructed mass of the B hadron decay vertex. The method utilizes the 3D vertexing capabilities of SLD's new CCD vertex detector and the small and stable SLC beams to obtain a high b tagging efficiency and purity of 47.9% and 97.6%, respectively. We obtain a preliminary result of R{sub b} = 0.2101 {+-} 0.0034{sub stat.} {+-} 0.0022{sub syst.} {+-} 0.0003{sub R{sub c}} for 1996 data. With our previous measurement from1993-95 data, we obtain a combined preliminary 93-96 result of R{sub b} = 0.2124 {+-} 0.0024{sub stat.} {+-} 0.0017{sub syst.}.

  11. Upgrade of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leflat, A.

    2014-08-01

    The upgrade of the LHCb experiment, planned for 2018, will transform the entire readout to a trigger-less system operating at 40 MHz. All data reduction algorithms will be executed in a high-level software farm, with access to all event information. This will enable the detector to run at luminosities of 1-2 × 1033/cm2/s and probe physics beyond the Standard Model in the heavy sector with unprecedented precision. The upgraded VELO must be low mass, radiation hard and vacuum compatible. It must be capable of fast pattern recognition and track reconstruction and will be required to drive data to the outside world at speeds of up to 2.5 Tbit/s. This challenge is being met with a new Vertex Locator (VELO) design based on hybrid pixel detectors positioned to within 5 mm of the LHC colliding beams. The sensors have 55 × 55 μm square pixels and the VELOPix ASIC which is being developed for the readout is based on the Timepix/Medipix family of chips. The hottest ASIC will have to cope with pixel hit rates of up to 900 MHz. The material budget will be optimised with the use of evaporative CO2 coolant circulating in microchannels within a thin silicon substrate. Microchannel cooling brings many advantages: very efficient heat transfer with almost no temperature gradients across the module, no CTE mismatch with silicon components, and low material contribution. This is a breakthrough technology being developed for LHCb. LHCb is also focussing effort on the construction of a lightweight foil to separate the primary and secondary LHC vacua, the development of high speed cables and radiation qualification of the module. The 40 MHz readout will also bring significant conceptual changes to the way in which the upgrade trigger is operated. Work is in progress to incorporate momentum and impact parameter information into the trigger at the earliest possible stage, using the fast pattern recognition capabilities of the upgraded detector. The current status of the VELO upgrade will

  12. The silicon vertex detector of HERA-B

    SciTech Connect

    Moshous, Basil

    1998-02-01

    HERA-B is an experiment to study CP violation in the B system using an internal target at the DESY HERA proton ring(820 GeV). The main goal is to measure the asymmetry in the 'gold plated' decays of B{sup 0}, B-bar{sup 0}{yields}J/{psi}K{sub s}{sup 0} yielding a measurement of the angle {beta} of the unitarity triangle. From the semileptonic decay channels of the b, b-bar-hadron produced in association with the B{sup 0},B-bar{sup 0} can be used to tag the flavor of the B{sup 0}. The purpose of the Vertex Detector System is to provide the track coordinates for reconstructing the J/{psi}{yields}e{sup +}e{sup -}, {mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} secondary decay vertices and the impact parameters of all tagging particles.

  13. A Study of Topological Vertexing for Heavy Quark Tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, Toshinori

    2001-02-13

    We compare heavy quark tagging and anti-tagging efficiencies for vertex detectors with different inner radii using the topological vertex technique developed at the SLC/SLD experiment. Charm tagging benefits by going to very small inner radii.

  14. Measurement of the B+- lifetime and top quark identification using secondary vertex b-tagging

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartzman, Ariel G

    2004-02-01

    This dissertation presents a preliminary measurement of the B{sup {+-}} lifetime through the full reconstruction of its decay chain, and the identification of top quark production in the electron plus jets channel using the displaced vertex b-tagging method. Its main contribution is the development, implementation and optimization of the Kalman filter algorithm for vertex reconstruction, and of the displaced vertex technique for tagging jets arising from b quark fragmentation, both of which have now become part of the standard D0 reconstruction package. These two algorithms fully exploit the new state-of-the-art tracking detectors, recently installed as part of the Run 2 D0 upgrade project. The analysis is based on data collected during Run 2a at the Fermilab Tevatron p{bar p} Hadron Collider up to April 2003, corresponding to an integrated luminosity of 60 pb{sup -1}. The measured B meson lifetime of {tau} = 1.57 {+-} 0.18 ps is in agreement with the current world average, with a competitive level of precision expected when the full data sample becomes available.

  15. Lifetime tests for MAC vertex chamber

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1986-07-01

    A vertex chamber for MAC was proposed to increase precision in the measurement of the B hadron and tau lepton lifetimes. Thin-walled aluminized mylar drift tubes were used for detector elements. A study of radiation hardness was conducted under the conditions of the proposed design using different gases and different operating conditions. (LEW)

  16. ILC Vertex Tracker R&D

    SciTech Connect

    Battaglia, Marco; Bussat, Jean-Marie; Contarato, Devis; Denes,Peter; Glesener, Lindsay; Greiner, Leo; Hooberman, Benjamin; Shuman,Derek; Tompkins, Lauren; Vu, Chinh; Bisello, Dario; Giubilato, Piero; Pantano, Devis; Costa, Marco; La Rosa, Alessandro; Bolla, Gino; Bortoletto, Daniela; Children, Isaac

    2007-10-01

    This document summarizes past achievements, current activities and future goals of the R&D program aimed at the design, prototyping and characterization of a full detector module, equipped with monolithic pixel sensors, matching the requirements for the Vertex Tracker at the ILC. We provide a plan of activities to obtain a demonstrator multi-layered vertex tracker equipped with sensors matching the ILC requirements and realistic lightweight ladders in FY11, under the assumption that ILC detector proto-collaborations will be choosing technologies and designs for the Vertex Tracker by that time. The R&D program discussed here started at LBNL in 2004, supported by a Laboratory Directed R&D (LDRD) grant and by funding allocated from the core budget of the LBNL Physics Division and from the Department of Physics at UC Berkeley. Subsequently additional funding has been awarded under the NSF-DOE LCRD program and also personnel have become available through collaborative research with other groups. The aim of the R&D program carried out by our collaboration is to provide a well-integrated, inclusive research effort starting from physics requirements for the ILC Vertex Tracker and addressing Si sensor design and characterization, engineered ladder design, module system issues, tracking and vertex performances and beam test validation. The broad scope of this program is made possible by important synergies with existing know-how and concurrent programs both at LBNL and at the other collaborating institutions. In particular, significant overlaps with LHC detector design, SLHC R&D as well as prototyping for the STAR upgrade have been exploited to optimize the cost per deliverable of our program. This activity is carried out as a collaborative effort together with Accelerator and Fusion Research, the Engineering and the Nuclear Science Divisions at LBNL, INFN and the Department of Physics in Padova, Italy, INFN and the Department of Physics in Torino, Italy and the Department

  17. Optimized Vertex Method and Hybrid Reliability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Steven A.; Krishnamurthy, T.; Mason, B. H.

    2002-01-01

    A method of calculating the fuzzy response of a system is presented. This method, called the Optimized Vertex Method (OVM), is based upon the vertex method but requires considerably fewer function evaluations. The method is demonstrated by calculating the response membership function of strain-energy release rate for a bonded joint with a crack. The possibility of failure of the bonded joint was determined over a range of loads. After completing the possibilistic analysis, the possibilistic (fuzzy) membership functions were transformed to probability density functions and the probability of failure of the bonded joint was calculated. This approach is called a possibility-based hybrid reliability assessment. The possibility and probability of failure are presented and compared to a Monte Carlo Simulation (MCS) of the bonded joint.

  18. BTeV level 1 vertex trigger

    SciTech Connect

    Michael H.L.S. Wang

    2001-11-05

    BTeV is a B-physics experiment that expects to begin collecting data at the C0 interaction region of the Fermilab Tevatron in the year 2006. Its primary goal is to achieve unprecedented levels of sensitivity in the study of CP violation, mixing, and rare decays in b and c quark systems. In order to realize this, it will employ a state-of-the-art first-level vertex trigger (Level 1) that will look at every beam crossing to identify detached secondary vertices that provide evidence for heavy quark decays. This talk will briefly describe the BTeV detector and trigger, focus on the software and hardware aspects of the Level 1 vertex trigger, and describe work currently being done in these areas.

  19. Internal Alignment of the SLD Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, D.J.; Wickens, F.J.; Su, D.; /SLAC

    2007-12-03

    The tracking resolution and vertex finding capabilities of the SLD experiment depended upon a precise knowledge of the location and orientation of the elements of the SLD pixel vertex detector (VXD3) in 3D space. At the heart of the procedure described here to align the 96 CCDs is the matrix inversion technique of singular value decomposition (SVD). This tool was employed to unfold the detector geometry corrections from the track data in the VXD3. The algorithm was adapted to perform an optimal {chi}{sup 2} minimization by careful treatment of the track hit residual measurement errors. The tracking resolution obtained with the aligned geometry achieved the design performance. Comments are given on how this method could be used for other trackers.

  20. Nonperturbative study of the four gluon vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Binosi, D.; Ibañez, D.; Papavassiliou, J.

    2014-09-01

    In this paper we study the nonperturbative structure of the SU(3) four-gluon vertex in the Landau gauge, concentrating on contributions quadratic in the metric. We employ an approximation scheme where "one-loop" diagrams are computed using fully dressed gluon and ghost propagators, and tree-level vertices. When a suitable kinematical configuration depending on a single momentum scale p is chosen, only two structures emerge: the tree-level four-gluon vertex, and a tensor orthogonal to it. A detailed numerical analysis reveals that the form factor associated with this latter tensor displays a change of sign (zero-crossing) in the deep infrared, and finally diverges logarithmically. The origin of this characteristic behavior is proven to be entirely due to the masslessness of the ghost propagators forming the corresponding ghost-loop diagram, in close analogy to a similar effect established for the three-gluon vertex. However, in the case at hand, and under the approximations employed, this particular divergence does not affect the form factor proportional to the tree-level tensor, which remains finite in the entire range of momenta, and deviates moderately from its naive tree-level value. It turns out that the kinematic configuration chosen is ideal for carrying out lattice simulations, because it eliminates from the connected Green's function all one-particle reducible contributions, projecting out the genuine one-particle irreducible vertex. Motivated by this possibility, we discuss in detail how a hypothetical lattice measurement of this quantity would compare to the results presented here, and the potential interference from an additional tensorial structure, allowed by Bose symmetry, but not encountered within our scheme.

  1. Spin wave Feynman diagram vertex computation package

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Price, Alexander; Javernick, Philip; Datta, Trinanjan

    Spin wave theory is a well-established theoretical technique that can correctly predict the physical behavior of ordered magnetic states. However, computing the effects of an interacting spin wave theory incorporating magnons involve a laborious by hand derivation of Feynman diagram vertices. The process is tedious and time consuming. Hence, to improve productivity and have another means to check the analytical calculations, we have devised a Feynman Diagram Vertex Computation package. In this talk, we will describe our research group's effort to implement a Mathematica based symbolic Feynman diagram vertex computation package that computes spin wave vertices. Utilizing the non-commutative algebra package NCAlgebra as an add-on to Mathematica, symbolic expressions for the Feynman diagram vertices of a Heisenberg quantum antiferromagnet are obtained. Our existing code reproduces the well-known expressions of a nearest neighbor square lattice Heisenberg model. We also discuss the case of a triangular lattice Heisenberg model where non collinear terms contribute to the vertex interactions.

  2. VXD3: the SLD vertex detector upgrade

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, J. A.; SLD Vertex Detector Upgrade Group

    1996-02-01

    The SLD collaboration has built and installed a new CCD vertex detector (VXD3) incorporating 96 CCDs. Each 13 cm 2 CCD has 3.2 × 10 6 pixels for a total of 3.1 × 10 8 pixels in the detector. This system is an upgrade of the pioneering CCD vertex detector (VXD2) which has operated in SLD since 1992. The CCDs of VXD3 are mounted on beryllium substrates and arranged in three concentric cylinders, providing at least three space point measurements along each track. The resolution of the space points is approximately 5 μm in all three coordinates. The design and construction of VXD3 builds on three years of successful performance of VXD2. Significant improvements are expected with VXD3 in impact parameter resolution (approximately a factor of 2) and acceptance (about 20% additional) through optimized geometry and reduced material. New readout electronics have also been developed for this system. This new vertex detector will be commissioned in January 1996 and should commence running immediately thereafter.

  3. Markov branching in the vertex splitting model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Örn Stefánsson, Sigurdur

    2012-04-01

    We study a special case of the vertex splitting model which is a recent model of randomly growing trees. For any finite maximum vertex degree D, we find a one parameter model, with parameter \\alpha \\in [0,1] which has a so-called Markov branching property. When D=\\infty we find a two parameter model with an additional parameter \\gamma \\in [0,1] which also has this feature. In the case D = 3, the model bears resemblance to Ford's α-model of phylogenetic trees and when D=\\infty it is similar to its generalization, the αγ-model. For α = 0, the model reduces to the well known model of preferential attachment. In the case α > 0, we prove convergence of the finite volume probability measures, generated by the growth rules, to a measure on infinite trees which is concentrated on the set of trees with a single spine. We show that the annealed Hausdorff dimension with respect to the infinite volume measure is 1/α. When γ = 0 the model reduces to a model of growing caterpillar graphs in which case we prove that the Hausdorff dimension is almost surely 1/α and that the spectral dimension is almost surely 2/(1 + α). We comment briefly on the distribution of vertex degrees and correlations between degrees of neighbouring vertices.

  4. Complex growing networks with intrinsic vertex fitness

    SciTech Connect

    Bedogne, C.; Rodgers, G. J.

    2006-10-15

    One of the major questions in complex network research is to identify the range of mechanisms by which a complex network can self organize into a scale-free state. In this paper we investigate the interplay between a fitness linking mechanism and both random and preferential attachment. In our models, each vertex is assigned a fitness x, drawn from a probability distribution {rho}(x). In Model A, at each time step a vertex is added and joined to an existing vertex, selected at random, with probability p and an edge is introduced between vertices with fitnesses x and y, with a rate f(x,y), with probability 1-p. Model B differs from Model A in that, with probability p, edges are added with preferential attachment rather than randomly. The analysis of Model A shows that, for every fixed fitness x, the network's degree distribution decays exponentially. In Model B we recover instead a power-law degree distribution whose exponent depends only on p, and we show how this result can be generalized. The properties of a number of particular networks are examined.

  5. The ZEUS micro-vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiochia, V.; ZEUS MVD Group

    2003-03-01

    During the HERA luminosity shutdown period 2000/2001 the tracking system of the ZEUS experiment has been upgraded with a silicon micro-vertex detector. The barrel part of the detector consists of three layers of single-sided silicon strip detectors, while the forward section is composed of four wheels. In this report we shortly present the assembly procedure and in more details the test beam results on the spatial resolution of half modules. The first results of a cosmic ray test are presented and the radiation monitor system is described.

  6. RESEARCH NOTE FROM COLLABORATION: Adaptive vertex fitting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Waltenberger, Wolfgang; Frühwirth, Rudolf; Vanlaer, Pascal

    2007-12-01

    Vertex fitting frequently has to deal with both mis-associated tracks and mis-measured track errors. A robust, adaptive method is presented that is able to cope with contaminated data. The method is formulated as an iterative re-weighted Kalman filter. Annealing is introduced to avoid local minima in the optimization. For the initialization of the adaptive filter a robust algorithm is presented that turns out to perform well in a wide range of applications. The tuning of the annealing schedule and of the cut-off parameter is described using simulated data from the CMS experiment. Finally, the adaptive property of the method is illustrated in two examples.

  7. Construction of the CDF silicon vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Skarha, J.; Barnett, B.; Boswell, C.; Snider, F.; Spies, A.; Tseng, J.; Vejcik, S.; Carter, H.; Flaugher, B.; Gonzales, B.; Hrycyk, M.; Nelson, C.; Segler, S.; Shaw, T.; Tkaczyk, S.; Turner, K.; Wesson, T.; Carithers, W.; Ely, R.; Haber, C.; Holland, S.; Kleinfelder, S.; Merrick, T.; Schneider, O.; Wester, W.; Wong, M.; Amidei, D.; Derwent, P.; Gold, M.; Matthews, J.; Bacchetta, N.; Bisello, D.; Busetto, G.; Castro, A.; Loreti, M.; Pescara, L.; Bedeschi, F.; Bolognesi, V.; Dell`Agnello, S.; Galeotti, S.; Mariotti, M.; Menzione, A.; Punzi, G.; Raffaelli, F.; Risotri, L.; Tartarelli, F.; Turini, N.; Wenzel, H.; Zetti, F. |; Bailey, M.; Garfinkel, A.; Shaw, N.; Tipton, P.; Watts, G.

    1992-04-01

    Technical details and methods used in constructing the CDF silicon vertex detector are presented. This description includes a discussion of the foam-carbon fiber composite structure used to silicon microstrip detectors and the procedure for achievement of 5 {mu}m detector alignment. The construction of the beryllium barrel structure, which houses the detector assemblies, is also described. In addition, the 10 {mu}m placement accuracy of the detectors in the barrel structure is discussed and the detector cooling and mounting systems are described. 12 refs.

  8. Loop-quantum-gravity vertex amplitude.

    PubMed

    Engle, Jonathan; Pereira, Roberto; Rovelli, Carlo

    2007-10-19

    Spin foam models are hoped to provide the dynamics of loop-quantum gravity. However, the most popular of these, the Barrett-Crane model, does not have the good boundary state space and there are indications that it fails to yield good low-energy n-point functions. We present an alternative dynamics that can be derived as a quantization of a Regge discretization of Euclidean general relativity, where second class constraints are imposed weakly. Its state space matches the SO(3) loop gravity one and it yields an SO(4)-covariant vertex amplitude for Euclidean loop gravity.

  9. 30 years of newest vertex bisection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitchell, William F.

    2016-06-01

    One aspect of adaptive mesh refinement in the finite element method for solving partial differential equations is the method by which elements are refined. In the early 1980's the dominant method for refining triangles was the red-green algorithm of Bank and Sherman. The red refinements are the desired refinements, but will result in an incompatible grid when used alone. The green refinements are used to recover compatibility for stability of the finite element discretization, and are removed before the next adaptive step. Prof. Bob Skeel raised the question as to whether it is possible to perform adaptive refinement of triangles without this complicated patching/unpatching process. As a result, a new triangle refinement method, called newest vertex bisection, was devised as an alternative to red-green refinement in the mid 1980's. The new approach is simpler and maintains compatibility of the grid at all times, avoiding the patching/unpatching of the green refinement. We review the development of the newest vertex bisection method for adaptive refinement, and subsequent extensions of the method.

  10. Drift chamber vertex detectors for SLC/LEP

    SciTech Connect

    Hayes, K.G.

    1987-03-01

    The short but measurable lifetimes of the b and c quarks and the tau lepton have motivated the development of high precision tracking detectors capable of providing information on the decay vertex topology of events containing these particles. This paper reviews the OPAL, L3, and MARK II experiments vertex drift chambers.

  11. Interaction vertex for classical spinning particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rempel, Trevor; Freidel, Laurent

    2016-08-01

    We consider a model of the classical spinning particle in which the coadjoint orbits of the Poincaré group are parametrized by two pairs of canonically conjugate four-vectors, one representing the standard position and momentum variables, and the other encoding the spinning degrees of freedom. This "dual phase space model" is shown to be a consistent theory of both massive and massless particles and allows for coupling to background fields such as electromagnetism. The on-shell action is derived and shown to be a sum of two terms, one associated with motion in spacetime, and the other with motion in "spin space." Interactions between spinning particles are studied, and a necessary and sufficient condition for consistency of a three-point vertex is established.

  12. Performance of the LHCb Vertex Locator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aaij, R.; Affolder, A.; Akiba, K.; Alexander, M.; Ali, S.; Appleby, R. B.; Artuso, M.; Bates, A.; Bay, A.; Behrendt, O.; Benton, J.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bjørnstad, P. M.; Bogdanova, G.; Borghi, S.; Borgia, A.; Bowcock, T. J. V.; van den Brand, J.; Brown, H.; Buytaert, J.; Callot, O.; Carroll, J.; Casse, G.; Collins, P.; De Capua, S.; Doets, M.; Donleavy, S.; Dossett, D.; Dumps, R.; Eckstein, D.; Eklund, L.; Farinelli, C.; Farry, S.; Ferro-Luzzi, M.; Frei, R.; Garofoli, J.; Gersabeck, M.; Gershon, T.; Gong, A.; Gong, H.; Gordon, H.; Haefeli, G.; Harrison, J.; Heijne, V.; Hennessy, K.; Hulsbergen, W.; Huse, T.; Hutchcroft, D.; Jaeger, A.; Jalocha, P.; Jans, E.; John, M.; Keaveney, J.; Ketel, T.; Korolev, M.; Kraan, M.; Laštovička, T.; Lafferty, G.; Latham, T.; Lefeuvre, G.; Leflat, A.; Liles, M.; van Lysebetten, A.; MacGregor, G.; Marinho, F.; McNulty, R.; Merkin, M.; Moran, D.; Mountain, R.; Mous, I.; Mylroie-Smith, J.; Needham, M.; Nikitin, N.; Noor, A.; Oblakowska-Mucha, A.; Papadelis, A.; Pappagallo, M.; Parkes, C.; Patel, G. D.; Rakotomiaramanana, B.; Redford, S.; Reid, M.; Rinnert, K.; Rodrigues, E.; Saavedra, A. F.; Schiller, M.; Schneider, O.; Shears, T.; Silva Coutinho, R.; Smith, N. A.; Szumlak, T.; Thomas, C.; van Tilburg, J.; Tobin, M.; Velthuis, J.; Verlaat, B.; Viret, S.; Volkov, V.; Wallace, C.; Wang, J.; Webber, A.; Whitehead, M.; Zverev, E.

    2014-09-01

    The Vertex Locator (VELO) is a silicon microstrip detector that surrounds the proton-proton interaction region in the LHCb experiment. The performance of the detector during the first years of its physics operation is reviewed. The system is operated in vacuum, uses a bi-phase CO2 cooling system, and the sensors are moved to 7 mm from the LHC beam for physics data taking. The performance and stability of these characteristic features of the detector are described, and details of the material budget are given. The calibration of the timing and the data processing algorithms that are implemented in FPGAs are described. The system performance is fully characterised. The sensors have a signal to noise ratio of approximately 20 and a best hit resolution of 4 μm is achieved at the optimal track angle. The typical detector occupancy for minimum bias events in standard operating conditions in 2011 is around 0.5%, and the detector has less than 1% of faulty strips. The proximity of the detector to the beam means that the inner regions of the n+-on-n sensors have undergone space-charge sign inversion due to radiation damage. The VELO performance parameters that drive the experiment's physics sensitivity are also given. The track finding efficiency of the VELO is typically above 98% and the modules have been aligned to a precision of 1 μm for translations in the plane transverse to the beam. A primary vertex resolution of 13 μm in the transverse plane and 71 μm along the beam axis is achieved for vertices with 25 tracks. An impact parameter resolution of less than 35 μm is achieved for particles with transverse momentum greater than 1 GeV/c.

  13. Locking mechanisms in degree-4 vertex origami structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fang, Hongbin; Li, Suyi; Xu, Jian; Wang, K. W.

    2016-04-01

    Origami has emerged as a potential tool for the design of mechanical metamaterials and metastructures whose novel properties originate from their crease patterns. Most of the attention in origami engineering has focused on the wellknown Miura-Ori, a folded tessellation that is flat-foldable for folded sheet and stacked blocks. This study advances the state of the art and expands the research field to investigate generic degree-4 vertex (4-vertex) origami, with a focus on facet-binding. In order to understand how facet-binding attributes to the mechanical properties of 4-vertex origami structures, geometries of the 4-vertex origami cells are analyzed and analytically expressed. Through repeating and stacking 4-vertex cells, origami sheets and stacked origami blocks can be constructed. Geometry analyses discover four mechanisms that will lead to the self-locking of 4-vertex origami cells, sheets, and stacked blocks: in-cell facet-binding, inlayer facet-binding, inter-layer facet binding, and in-layer and inter-layer facet-bindings. These mechanisms and the predicted self-locking phenomena are verified through 3D simulations and prototype experiments. Finally, this paper briefly introduces the unusual mechanical properties caused by the locking of 4-vertex origami structures. The research reported in this paper could foster a new breed of self-locking structures with various engineering applications.

  14. The formation of a yield-surface vertex in rock

    SciTech Connect

    Olsson, W.A.

    1992-01-01

    Microstructural models of deformation of polycrystalline materials suggest that inelastic deformation leads to the formation of a corner or vertex at the current load point. This vertex can cause the response to non-proportional loading to be more compliant than predicted by the smooth yield-surface idealization. Combined compression-torsion experiments on Tennessee marble indicate that a vertex forms during inelastic flow. An important implication is that strain localization by bifurcation occurs earlier than predicted by bifurcation analysis using isotropic hardening.

  15. A two-level fanout system for the CDF silicon vertex tracker

    SciTech Connect

    A. Bardi et al.

    2001-11-02

    The Fanout system is part of the Silicon Vertex Tracker, a new trigger processor designed to reconstruct charged particle trajectories at Level 2 of the CDF trigger, with a latency of 10 {micro}s and an event rate up to 100 kHz. The core of SVT is organized as 12 identical slices, which process in parallel the data from the 12 independent azimuthal wedges of the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVXII). Each SVT slice links the digitized pulse heights found within one SVXII wedge to the tracks reconstructed by the Level 1 fast track finder (XFT) in the corresponding 30{sup o} angular region of the Central Outer Tracker. Since the XFT tracks are transmitted to SVT as a single data stream, their distribution to the proper SVT slices requires dedicated fanout logic. The Fanout system has been implemented as a multi-board project running on a common 20 MHz clock. Track fanout is performed in two steps by one ''Fanout A'' and two ''Fanout B'' boards. The architecture, design, and implementation of this system are described.

  16. Uncovering the triple omeron vertex from Wilson line formalism

    SciTech Connect

    Chirilli, G. A.; Szymanowski, L.; Wallon, S.

    2011-01-01

    We compute the triple omeron vertex from the Wilson line formalism, including both planar and nonplanar contributions, and get perfect agreement with the result obtained in the Extended Generalized Logarithmic Approximation based on Reggeon calculus.

  17. Vertex functions at finite momentum: Application to antiferromagnetic quantum criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wölfle, Peter; Abrahams, Elihu

    2016-02-01

    We analyze the three-point vertex function that describes the coupling of fermionic particle-hole pairs in a metal to spin or charge fluctuations at nonzero momentum. We consider Ward identities, which connect two-particle vertex functions to the self-energy, in the framework of a Hubbard model. These are derived using conservation laws following from local symmetries. The generators considered are the spin density and particle density. It is shown that at certain antiferromagnetic critical points, where the quasiparticle effective mass is diverging, the vertex function describing the coupling of particle-hole pairs to the spin density Fourier component at the antiferromagnetic wave vector is also divergent. Then we give an explicit calculation of the irreducible vertex function for the case of three-dimensional antiferromagnetic fluctuations, and show that it is proportional to the diverging quasiparticle effective mass.

  18. Efficient variants of the vertex space domain decomposition algorithm

    SciTech Connect

    Chan, T.F.; Shao, J.P. . Dept. of Mathematics); Mathew, T.P. . Dept. of Mathematics)

    1994-11-01

    Several variants of the vertex space algorithm of Smith for two-dimensional elliptic problems are described. The vertex space algorithm is a domain decomposition method based on nonoverlapping subregions, in which the reduced Schur complement system on the interface is solved using a generalized block Jacobi-type preconditioner, with the blocks corresponding to the vertex space, edges, and a coarse grid. Two kinds of approximations are considered for the edge and vertex space subblocks, one based on Fourier approximation, and another based on an algebraic probing technique in which sparse approximations to these subblocks are computed. The motivation is to improve the efficiency of the algorithm without sacrificing the optimal convergence rate. Numerical and theoretical results on the performance of these algorithms, including variants of an algorithm of Bramble, Pasciak, and Schatz are presented.

  19. The Structure of Parafermion Vertex Operator Algebras: General Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Chongying; Wang, Qing

    2010-11-01

    The structure of the parafermion vertex operator algebra associated to an integrable highest weight module for any affine Kac-Moody algebra is studied. In particular, a set of generators for this algebra has been determined.

  20. Linear Time Vertex Partitioning on Massive Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Mell, Peter; Harang, Richard; Gueye, Assane

    2016-01-01

    The problem of optimally removing a set of vertices from a graph to minimize the size of the largest resultant component is known to be NP-complete. Prior work has provided near optimal heuristics with a high time complexity that function on up to hundreds of nodes and less optimal but faster techniques that function on up to thousands of nodes. In this work, we analyze how to perform vertex partitioning on massive graphs of tens of millions of nodes. We use a previously known and very simple heuristic technique: iteratively removing the node of largest degree and all of its edges. This approach has an apparent quadratic complexity since, upon removal of a node and adjoining set of edges, the node degree calculations must be updated prior to choosing the next node. However, we describe a linear time complexity solution using an array whose indices map to node degree and whose values are hash tables indicating the presence or absence of a node at that degree value. This approach also has a linear growth with respect to memory usage which is surprising since we lowered the time complexity from quadratic to linear. We empirically demonstrate linear scalability and linear memory usage on random graphs of up to 15000 nodes. We then demonstrate tractability on massive graphs through execution on a graph with 34 million nodes representing Internet wide router connectivity. PMID:27336059

  1. Dynamical Vertex Approximation for the Hubbard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toschi, Alessandro

    A full understanding of correlated electron systems in the physically relevant situations of three and two dimensions represents a challenge for the contemporary condensed matter theory. However, in the last years considerable progress has been achieved by means of increasingly more powerful quantum many-body algorithms, applied to the basic model for correlated electrons, the Hubbard Hamiltonian. Here, I will review the physics emerging from studies performed with the dynamical vertex approximation, which includes diagrammatic corrections to the local description of the dynamical mean field theory (DMFT). In particular, I will first discuss the phase diagram in three dimensions with a special focus on the commensurate and incommensurate magnetic phases, their (quantum) critical properties, and the impact of fluctuations on electronic lifetimes and spectral functions. In two dimensions, the effects of non-local fluctuations beyond DMFT grow enormously, determining the appearance of a low-temperature insulating behavior for all values of the interaction in the unfrustrated model: Here the prototypical features of the Mott-Hubbard metal-insulator transition, as well as the existence of magnetically ordered phases, are completely overwhelmed by antiferromagnetic fluctuations of exponentially large extension, in accordance with the Mermin-Wagner theorem. Eventually, by a fluctuation diagnostics analysis of cluster DMFT self-energies, the same magnetic fluctuations are identified as responsible for the pseudogap regime in the holed-doped frustrated case, with important implications for the theoretical modeling of the cuprate physics.

  2. Upgrade of the Belle Silicon Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Belle SVD Collaboration

    2010-11-01

    The Belle experiment at KEK (Tsukuba, Japan) was inaugurated in 1999 and has delivered excellent physics results since then, which were, for example, recognized in the Nobel Prize award 2008 to Kobayashi and Masukawa. An overall luminosity of 895 fb -1 has been recorded as of December 2008, and the present system will be running until 1 ab -1 is achieved. After that, a major upgrade is foreseen for both the KEK-B machine and the Belle detector. Already in 2004, the Letter of Intent for KEK Super B Factory was published. Intermediate steps of upgrade were considered for the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD), which performs very well but already got close to its limit regarding the occupancy in the innermost layer and dead time. Eventually it was decided to keep the existing SVD2 system until 1 ab -1 and completely replace the silicon detector as well as its readout system for Super-Belle. The future SVD will be composed of double-sided silicon sensors as the present detector, but equipped with faster readout electronics, namely the APV25 chips originally made for CMS at CERN. Moreover, it will be enlarged by two additional layers and equipped with a double layer of DEPFET pixel detectors surrounding the beam pipe. The silicon sensors will be fabricated from 6 in. wafers (compared to the current 4 in. types) and the readout chain will be completely replaced, including front-end, repeaters and the back-end electronics in the counting house.

  3. The vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.; Boissevain, J.G.; Fox, D.; Hecke, H. van; Jacak, B.V.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Sondheim, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    The conceptual design of the vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration at RHIC is described, including simulations of its expected performance. The design consists of two con- centric layers of single-sided Si strips. The expected performance as a multiplicity detector and in measuring the pseudo-rapidity ({nu}) distribution is discussed as well as the expected vertex finding efficiency and accuracy. Various options which could be used to reduce the cost of the detector are also discussed.

  4. The vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration

    SciTech Connect

    Sullivan, J.P.; Boissevain, J.G.; Fox, D.; van Hecke, H.; Jacak, B.V.; Kapustinsky, J.S.; Leitch, M.J.; McGaughey, P.L.; Moss, J.M.; Sondheim, W.E.

    1991-12-31

    The conceptual design of the vertex detector for the Lepton/Photon Collaboration at RHIC is described, including simulations of its expected performance. The design consists of two concentric layers of single-sided Si strips. The expected performance as a multiplicity detector and in measuring the pseudo-rapidity {eta} distribution is discussed as well as the expected vertex finding efficiency and accuracy. Various options which could be used to reduce the cost of the detector are also discussed.

  5. Hessian and graviton propagator of the proper vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chaharsough Shirazi, Atousa; Engle, Jonathan; Vilensky, Ilya

    2016-10-01

    The proper spin-foam vertex amplitude is obtained from the EPRL vertex by projecting out all but a single gravitational sector, in order to achieve correct semi-classical behavior. In this paper we calculate the gravitational two-point function predicted by the proper spin-foam vertex to lowest order in the vertex expansion. We find the same answer as in the EPRL case in the ‘continuum spectrum’ limit, so that the theory is consistent with the predictions of linearized gravity in the regime of small curvature. The method for calculating the two-point function is similar to that used in prior works: we cast it in terms of an action integral and use stationary phase methods. Thus, the calculation of the Hessian matrix plays a key role. Once the Hessian is calculated, it is used not only to calculate the two-point function, but also to calculate the coefficient appearing in the semi-classical limit of the proper vertex amplitude itself. This coefficient is the effective discrete ‘measure factor’ encoded in the spin-foam model. Through a non-trivial cancellation of different factors, we find that this coefficient is the same as the coefficient in front of the term in the asymptotics of the EPRL vertex corresponding to the selected gravitational sector.

  6. Anomalous pseudoscalar-photon vertex in and out of equilibrium

    SciTech Connect

    Kumar, S. Prem; Boyanovsky, Daniel; Vega, Hector J. de

    2000-03-15

    The anomalous pseudoscalar-photon vertex is studied in real time in and out of equilibrium in a constituent quark model. The goal is to understand the in-medium modifications of this vertex, exploring the possibility of enhanced isospin breaking by electromagnetic effects as well as the formation of neutral pion condensates in a rapid chiral phase transition in peripheral, ultrarelativistic heavy-ion collisions. In equilibrium the effective vertex is afflicted by infrared and pinch singularities that require hard thermal loop and width corrections of the quark propagator. The resumed effective equilibrium vertex vanishes near the chiral transition in the chiral limit. In a strongly out of equilibrium chiral phase transition we find that the chiral condensate drastically modifies the quark propagators and the effective vertex. The ensuing dynamics for the neutral pion results in a potential enhancement of isospin breaking and the formation of {pi}{sup 0} condensates. While the anomaly equation and the axial Ward identity are not modified by the medium in or out of equilibrium, the effective real-time pseudoscalar-photon vertex is sensitive to low energy physics. (c) 2000 The American Physical Society.

  7. Students' Understanding of the Concept of Vertex of Quadratic Functions in Relation to Their Personal Meaning of the Concept of Vertex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Childers, Annie Burns; Vidakovic, Draga

    2014-01-01

    This paper explores sixty-six students' personal meaning and interpretation of the vertex of a quadratic function in relation to their understanding of quadratic functions in two different representations, algebraic and word problem. Several categories emerged from students' personal meaning of the vertex including vertex as maximum or…

  8. The η ' g* g(*) vertex including the η '-meson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ali, A.; Parkhomenko, A. Ya

    2003-10-01

    The η^' g^* g^{(*)} effective vertex function is calculated in the QCD hard-scattering approach, taking into account the η^'-meson mass. We work in the approximation in which only one non-leading Gegenbauer moment for both the quark-antiquark and the gluonic light-cone distribution amplitudes for the η^'-meson is kept. The vertex function with one off-shell gluon is shown to have the form (valid for \\vert q_1^2 \\vert > m_{η^'^2) F_{η^' g^* g} (q_1^2, 0, m_{η^'^2) = m_{η^'^2 H(q_1^2)/(q_1^2 - m_{η^'^2), where H( q 1 2) is a slowly varying function, derived analytically in this paper. The resulting vertex function is in agreement with the phenomenologically inferred form of this vertex obtained from an analysis of the CLEO data on the η^'-meson energy spectrum in the decay Upsilon(1S) to η^' X. We also present an interpolating formula for the vertex function F_{η^' g^* g} (q_1^2, 0, m_{η^'^2) for the space-like region of the virtuality q 1 2, which satisfies the QCD anomaly normalization for on-shell gluons and the perturbative QCD result for the gluon virtuality \\vert q_1^2\\vert gtrsim 2 GeV2.

  9. Genus Ranges of 4-Regular Rigid Vertex Graphs

    PubMed Central

    Buck, Dorothy; Dolzhenko, Egor; Jonoska, Nataša; Saito, Masahico; Valencia, Karin

    2016-01-01

    A rigid vertex of a graph is one that has a prescribed cyclic order of its incident edges. We study orientable genus ranges of 4-regular rigid vertex graphs. The (orientable) genus range is a set of genera values over all orientable surfaces into which a graph is embedded cellularly, and the embeddings of rigid vertex graphs are required to preserve the prescribed cyclic order of incident edges at every vertex. The genus ranges of 4-regular rigid vertex graphs are sets of consecutive integers, and we address two questions: which intervals of integers appear as genus ranges of such graphs, and what types of graphs realize a given genus range. For graphs with 2n vertices (n > 1), we prove that all intervals [a, b] for all a < b ≤ n, and singletons [h, h] for some h ≤ n, are realized as genus ranges. For graphs with 2n − 1 vertices (n ≥ 1), we prove that all intervals [a, b] for all a < b ≤ n except [0, n], and [h, h] for some h ≤ n, are realized as genus ranges. We also provide constructions of graphs that realize these ranges.

  10. An upwind vertex centred Finite Volume solver for Lagrangian solid dynamics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguirre, Miquel; Gil, Antonio J.; Bonet, Javier; Lee, Chun Hean

    2015-11-01

    A vertex centred Jameson-Schmidt-Turkel (JST) finite volume algorithm was recently introduced by the authors (Aguirre et al., 2014 [1]) in the context of fast solid isothermal dynamics. The spatial discretisation scheme was constructed upon a Lagrangian two-field mixed (linear momentum and the deformation gradient) formulation presented as a system of conservation laws [2-4]. In this paper, the formulation is further enhanced by introducing a novel upwind vertex centred finite volume algorithm with three key novelties. First, a conservation law for the volume map is incorporated into the existing two-field system to extend the range of applications towards the incompressibility limit (Gil et al., 2014 [5]). Second, the use of a linearised Riemann solver and reconstruction limiters is derived for the stabilisation of the scheme together with an efficient edge-based implementation. Third, the treatment of thermo-mechanical processes through a Mie-Grüneisen equation of state is incorporated in the proposed formulation. For completeness, the study of the eigenvalue structure of the resulting system of conservation laws is carried out to demonstrate hyperbolicity and obtain the correct time step bounds for non-isothermal processes. A series of numerical examples are presented in order to assess the robustness of the proposed methodology. The overall scheme shows excellent behaviour in shock and bending dominated nearly incompressible scenarios without spurious pressure oscillations, yielding second order of convergence for both velocities and stresses.

  11. Universal vertex-IRF transformation for quantum affine algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Buffenoir, E.; Roche, Ph.; Terras, V.

    2012-10-15

    We construct a universal solution of the generalized coboundary equation in the case of quantum affine algebras, which is an extension of our previous work to U{sub q}(A{sub r}{sup (1)}). This universal solution has a simple Gauss decomposition which is constructed using Sevostyanov's characters of twisted quantum Borel algebras. We show that in the evaluation representations it gives a vertex-face transformation between a vertex type solution and a face type solution of the quantum dynamical Yang-Baxter equation. In particular, in the evaluation representation of U{sub q}(A{sub 1}{sup (1)}), it gives Baxter's well-known transformation between the 8-vertex model and the interaction-round-faces (IRF) height model.

  12. Plethystic vertex operators and boson-fermion correspondences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fauser, Bertfried; Jarvis, Peter D.; King, Ronald C.

    2016-10-01

    We study the algebraic properties of plethystic vertex operators, introduced in (2010 J. Phys. A: Math. Theor. 43 405202), underlying the structure of symmetric functions associated with certain generalized universal character rings of subgroups of the general linear group, defined to stabilize tensors of Young symmetry type characterized by a partition of arbitrary shape π. Here we establish an extension of the well-known boson-fermion correspondence involving Schur functions and their associated (Bernstein) vertex operators: for each π, the modes generated by the plethystic vertex operators and their suitably constructed duals, satisfy the anticommutation relations of a complex Clifford algebra. The combinatorial manipulations underlying the results involve exchange identities exploiting the Hopf-algebraic structure of certain symmetric function series and their plethysms.

  13. Simulations of silicon vertex tracker for star experiment at RHIC

    SciTech Connect

    Odyniec, G.; Cebra, D.; Christie, W.; Naudet, C.; Schroeder, L.; Wilson, W.; Liko, D.; Cramer, J.; Prindle, D.; Trainor, T.; Braithwaite, W.

    1991-12-31

    The first computer simulations to optimize the Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) designed for the STAR experiment at RHIC are presented. The physics goals and the expected complexity of the events at RHIC dictate the design of a tracking system for the STAR experiment. The proposed tracking system will consist of a silicon vertex tracker (SVT) to locate the primary interaction and secondary decay vertices and to improve the momentum resolution, and a time projection chamber (TPC), positioned inside a solenoidal magnet, for continuous tracking.

  14. A vertex drift chamber for the VENUS detector at TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yamada, Y.; Hayashi, K.; Ishihara, N.; Nakamura, S.; Ohama, T.; Sakamoto, H.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Hinode, F.; Narita, Y.; Oyama, T.; Utsumi, M.; Yabuki, F.; Hemmi, Y.; Kurashige, H.; Miyake, K.; Okamoto, A.; Daigo, M.; Tamura, N.

    1993-06-01

    A high-precision drift chamber has been constructed in order to add vertex information to the VENUS detector at the TRISTAN e+e- collider. It is a jet-type drift chamber comprising 12 tilted drift sectors filled with pressurized slow gas. The structure and initial performance are described.

  15. Generalized emptiness formation probability in the six-vertex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomo, F.; Pronko, A. G.; Sportiello, A.

    2016-10-01

    In the six-vertex model with domain wall boundary conditions, the emptiness formation probability is the probability that a rectangular region in the top left corner of the lattice is frozen. We generalize this notion to the case where the frozen region has the shape of a generic Young diagram. We derive here a multiple integral representation for this correlation function.

  16. W. K. H. Panofsky Prize Talk: The Silicon Vertex Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ristori, Luciano

    2009-05-01

    I will discuss the importance of real-time selection of events at a hadron collider, the ideas that led to the conception of the Silicon Vertex Trigger (SVT) and some historical notes on its construction and commissioning. I will also highlight some remarkable results obtained by CDF with the data selected by the SVT.

  17. Vertex detector technology for the SSC (Superconducting Super Collider)

    SciTech Connect

    Skubic, P.; Kalbfleisch, G.; Kaplan, D.; Kuehler, J.; Lambrecht, M. ); Arens, J.; Jernigan, G. . Space Sciences Lab.); Attias, H.; Karchin, P.; Ross, W.; Sinnott, J.; Utku, S. ); Barger, K.; McCliment, E. ); Collins, T.; Kramer, G.; Worley, S. (Hughes Aircraft Co., Carlsbad, C

    1990-12-01

    An overview of a SSC R D program for silicon vertex detector development is presented. The current test program with silicon microstrip and pixel detectors is discussed and selected results of beam tests are presented including measurements of position resolution as a function of angle of incidence. Plans for future tests are also discussed. 10 refs., 4 figs.

  18. Proposed proper Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine vertex amplitude

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Engle, Jonathan

    2013-04-01

    As established in a prior work of the author, the linear simplicity constraints used in the construction of the so-called “new” spin-foam models mix three of the five sectors of Plebanski theory as well as two dynamical orientations, and this is the reason for multiple terms in the asymptotics of the Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine vertex amplitude as calculated by Barrett et al. Specifically, the term equal to the usual exponential of i times the Regge action corresponds to configurations either in sector (II+) with positive orientation or sector (II-) with negative orientation. The presence of the other terms beyond this cause problems in the semiclassical limit of the spin-foam model when considering multiple 4-simplices due to the fact that the different terms for different 4-simplices mix in the semiclassical limit, leading in general to a non-Regge action and hence non-Regge and nongravitational configurations persisting in the semiclassical limit. To correct this problem, we propose to modify the vertex so its asymptotics include only the one term of the form eiSRegge. To do this, an explicit classical discrete condition is derived that isolates the desired gravitational sector corresponding to this one term. This condition is quantized and used to modify the vertex amplitude, yielding what we call the “proper Engle-Pereira-Rovelli-Livine vertex amplitude.” This vertex still depends only on standard SU(2) spin-network data on the boundary, is SU(2) gauge-invariant, and is linear in the boundary state, as required. In addition, the asymptotics now consist in the single desired term of the form eiSRegge, and all degenerate configurations are exponentially suppressed. A natural generalization to the Lorentzian signature is also presented.

  19. Empty versus filled polyhedra: 11 vertex bare germanium clusters.

    PubMed

    Uţă, Matei-Maria; King, Robert Bruce

    2014-04-01

    The structures and energetics of centered 10-vertex Ge@Ge₁₀(z) (z = -4, -2, 0, +2, +4) clusters have been investigated by density functional theory (DFT) for comparison with the previously studied isomeric empty 11-vertex Ge₁₁(z) clusters. For the cationic species (z = +2, +4) such centered Ge@Ge₁₀(z) structures are shown to be energetically competitive (within ∼1 kcal mol⁻¹) to the lowest energy isomeric empty Ge₁₁(z) structures. These Ge@Ge₁₀(z) structures can be derived from the lowest energy empty 10-vertex Ge₁₀(z-4) structures by inserting a Ge⁴⁺ ion in the center. The outer 10-vertex polyhedron in the lowest energy Ge@Ge₁₀²⁺ dication structure is the most spherical D(4d) bicapped square antiprism, which is also the lowest energy structure of the empty Ge₁₀²⁻ dianion, as expected from the Wade-Mingos skeletal electron counting rules. For the tetracationic Ge₁₁⁴⁺ /Ge@Ge₁₀⁴⁺ system the lowest energy centered Ge@Ge₁₀⁴⁺ structure can be obtained by inserting a Ge⁴⁺ ion in the center of a C(3v) deltahedral empty Ge10 cluster. Centered 10-vertex polyhedral Ge@Ge₁₀(z) structures were also found for the neutral (z = 0) and dianionic (z = -2) systems but at significantly higher energies than the lowest energy isomeric empty Ge₁₁(z) structures.

  20. The herpes simplex virus 1 UL17 protein is the second constituent of the capsid vertex-specific component required for DNA packaging and retention.

    PubMed

    Toropova, Katerina; Huffman, Jamie B; Homa, Fred L; Conway, James F

    2011-08-01

    The herpes simplex virus (HSV) UL17 and UL25 minor capsid proteins are essential for DNA packaging. They are thought to comprise a molecule arrayed in five copies around each of the capsid vertices. This molecule was initially termed the "C-capsid-specific component" (CCSC) (B. L. Trus et al., Mol. Cell 26:479-489, 2007), but as we have subsequently observed this feature on reconstructions of A, B, and C capsids, we now refer to it more generally as the "capsid vertex-specific component" (CVSC) (S. K. Cockrell et al., J. Virol. 85:4875-4887, 2011). We previously confirmed that UL25 occupies the vertex-distal region of the CVSC density by visualizing a large UL25-specific tag in reconstructions calculated from cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) images. We have pursued the same strategy to determine the capsid location of the UL17 protein. Recombinant viruses were generated that contained either a small tandem affinity purification (TAP) tag or the green fluorescent protein (GFP) attached to the C terminus of UL17. Purification of the TAP-tagged UL17 or a similarly TAP-tagged UL25 protein clearly demonstrated that the two proteins interact. A cryo-EM reconstruction of capsids containing the UL17-GFP protein reveals that UL17 is the second component of the CVSC and suggests that UL17 interfaces with the other CVSC component, UL25, through its C terminus. The portion of UL17 nearest the vertex appears to be poorly constrained, which may provide flexibility in interacting with tegument proteins or the DNA-packaging machinery at the portal vertex. The exposed locations of the UL17 and UL25 proteins on the HSV-1 capsid exterior suggest that they may be attractive targets for highly specific antivirals.

  1. On the zero crossing of the three-gluon vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Athenodorou, A.; Binosi, D.; Boucaud, Ph.; De Soto, F.; Papavassiliou, J.; Rodríguez-Quintero, J.; Zafeiropoulos, S.

    2016-10-01

    We report on new results on the infrared behavior of the three-gluon vertex in quenched Quantum Chromodynamics, obtained from large-volume lattice simulations. The main focus of our study is the appearance of the characteristic infrared feature known as 'zero crossing', the origin of which is intimately connected with the nonperturbative masslessness of the Faddeev-Popov ghost. The appearance of this effect is clearly visible in one of the two kinematic configurations analyzed, and its theoretical origin is discussed in the framework of Schwinger-Dyson equations. The effective coupling in the momentum subtraction scheme that corresponds to the three-gluon vertex is constructed, revealing the vanishing of the effective interaction at the exact location of the zero crossing.

  2. Vertex Exponents of Two-Colored Extremal Ministrong Digraphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suwilo, Saib

    2011-06-01

    The exponent of a vertex v in a two-colored digraph D(2) is the smallest positive integer h+k such that for each vertex x in D(2) there is a walk of length h+k consisting of h red arcs and k blue arcs. Let D(2) be a primitive two-colored extremalministrong digraphon n vertices. If D(2) has one blue arc, the exponent of the vertices of D(2) lieson the interval [n2-5n+8,n2-3n+1]. If D(2) has two blue arcs, the exponent of the vertices in D(2) lies on the interval [n2-4n+4,n2-n].

  3. Exactly solvable interacting spin-ice vertex model.

    PubMed

    Ferreira, Anderson A; Alcaraz, Francisco C

    2006-07-01

    A special family of solvable five-vertex model is introduced on a square lattice. In addition to the usual nearest-neighbor interactions, the vertices defining the model also interact along one of the diagonals of the lattice. This family of models includes in a special limit the standard six-vertex model. The exact solution of these models is an application of the matrix product ansatz introduced recently and applied successfully in the solution of quantum chains. The phase diagram and the free energy of the models are calculated in the thermodynamic limit. The models exhibit massless phases, and our analytical and numerical analyses indicate that such phases are governed by a conformal field theory with central charge c=1 and continuously varying critical exponents.

  4. Vertex amplitudes in spin foam loop quantum cosmology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Craig, David

    2016-03-01

    We discuss properties of the vertex expansion for homogeneous, isotropic loop quantum cosmological models sourced by a massless, minimally coupled scalar field, which in this model plays the role of an internal matter ``clock''. We show that the vertex expansion, first written down by Ashtekar, Campiglia and Henderson, must be thought of as a short-time expansion in the sense that the amplitude for volume transitions is constrained both by the order of the expansion and by the elapsed scalar field. To calculate the amplitude for significant volume changes or between large differences in the value of the scalar field requires the expansion be evaluated to very high order. This contribution describes work in collaboration with P. Singh.

  5. 3-state Hamiltonians associated to solvable 33-vertex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crampé, N.; Frappat, L.; Ragoucy, E.; Vanicat, M.

    2016-09-01

    Using the nested coordinate Bethe ansatz, we study 3-state Hamiltonians with 33 non-vanishing entries, or 33-vertex models, where only one global charge with degenerate eigenvalues exists and each site possesses three internal degrees of freedom. In the context of Markovian processes, they correspond to diffusing particles with two possible internal states which may be exchanged during the diffusion (transmutation). The first step of the nested coordinate Bethe ansatz is performed providing the eigenvalues in terms of rapidities. We give the constraints ensuring the consistency of the computations. These rapidities also satisfy Bethe equations involving 4 × 4 R-matrices, solutions of the Yang-Baxter equation which implies new constraints on the models. We solve them allowing us to list all the solvable 33-vertex models.

  6. Development of pixel detectors for SSC vertex tracking

    SciTech Connect

    Kramer, G. . Electro-Optical and Data Systems Group); Atlas, E.L.; Augustine, F.; Barken, O.; Collins, T.; Marking, W.L.; Worley, S.; Yacoub, G.Y. ) Shapiro, S.L. ); Arens, J.F.; Jernigan, J.G. . Space Sciences Lab.); Nygren,

    1991-04-01

    A description of hybrid PIN diode arrays and a readout architecture for their use as a vertex detector in the SSC environment is presented. Test results obtained with arrays having 256 {times} 256 pixels, each 30 {mu}m square, are also presented. The development of a custom readout for the SSC will be discussed, which supports a mechanism for time stamping hit pixels, storing their xy coordinates, and storing the analog information within the pixel. The peripheral logic located on the array, permits the selection of those pixels containing interesting data and their coordinates to be selectively read out. This same logic also resolves ambiguous pixel ghost locations and controls the pixel neighbor read out necessary to achieve high spatial resolution. The thermal design of the vertex tracker and the proposed signal processing architecture will also be discussed. 5 refs., 13 figs., 3 tabs.

  7. Vertex detectors: The state of the art and future prospects

    SciTech Connect

    Damerell, C.J.S.

    1997-01-01

    We review the current status of vertex detectors (tracking microscopes for the recognition of charm and bottom particle decays). The reasons why silicon has become the dominant detector medium are explained. Energy loss mechanisms are reviewed, as well as the physics and technology of semiconductor devices, emphasizing the areas of most relevance for detectors. The main design options (microstrips and pixel devices, both CCD`s and APS`s) are discussed, as well as the issue of radiation damage, which probably implies the need to change to detector media beyond silicon for some vertexing applications. Finally, the evolution of key performance parameters over the past 15 years is reviewed, and an attempt is made to extrapolate to the likely performance of detectors working at the energy frontier ten years from now.

  8. Edge union of networks on the same vertex set

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Loe, Chuan Wen; Jeldtoft Jensen, Henrik

    2013-06-01

    Random network generators such as Erdős-Rényi, Watts-Strogatz and Barabási-Albert models are used as models to study real-world networks. Let G1(V, E1) and G2(V, E2) be two such networks on the same vertex set V. This paper studies the degree distribution and clustering coefficient of the resultant networks, G(V, E1∪E2).

  9. Charged Particle Tracking and Vertex Detection Group summary report

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, G.; Meyer, D.

    1984-09-01

    Charged particle tracking is essential in order to investigate the new physics expected at the SSC. The Tracking Group studied radiation damage and rate limitations to tracking devices, vertex detectors, and central tracking. The Group concluded that silicon strips and large wire tracking chambers with small cells can probably survive at the design luminosity of 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/; however, the presently designed electronics for silicon strip vertex detectors can withstand a luminosity of only 10/sup 31/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/. Wire chambers at a radius of less than about 25 cm can withstand a luminosity of less than or equal to 10/sup 32/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ only. Actual tracking and pattern recognition in central tracking chambers at a luminosity of 10/sup 33/ cm/sup -2/ sec/sup -1/ will be very difficult because of multiple interactions within the resolving time of the chambers; detailed simulations are needed in order to decide whether tracking is indeed possible at this luminosity. Scintillating glass fibers are an interesting possibility both for vertex detectors and for central trackers, but much research and development is still needed both on the fibers themselves and on the readout.

  10. Growing self-reconstruction maps.

    PubMed

    do Rêgo, Renata Lúcia Mendonça Ernesto; Araújo, Aluizio Fausto Ribeiro; de Lima Neto, Fernando Buarque

    2010-02-01

    In this paper, we propose a new method for surface reconstruction based on growing self-organizing maps (SOMs), called growing self-reconstruction maps (GSRMs). GSRM is an extension of growing neural gas (GNG) that includes the concept of triangular faces in the learning algorithm and additional conditions in order to include and remove connections, so that it can produce a triangular two-manifold mesh representation of a target object given an unstructured point cloud of its surface. The main modifications concern competitive Hebbian learning (CHL), the vertex insertion operation, and the edge removal mechanism. The method proposed is able to learn the geometry and topology of the surface represented in the point cloud and to generate meshes with different resolutions. Experimental results show that the proposed method can produce models that approximate the shape of an object, including its concave regions, boundaries, and holes, if any. PMID:20007030

  11. Recurrence relations of higher spin BPST vertex operators for open strings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Chih-Hao; Lee, Jen-Chi; Tan, Chung-I.; Yang, Yi

    2013-08-01

    We calculate higher-spin Brower-Polchinski-Strassler-Tan (BPST) vertex operators for an open bosonic string and express these operators in terms of a Kummer function of the second kind. We derive an infinite number of recurrence relations among BPST vertex operators of different string states. These recurrence relations among BPST vertex operators lead to the recurrence relations among Regge string scattering amplitudes discovered recently.

  12. 3D circuit integration for Vertex and other detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Yarema, Ray; /Fermilab

    2007-09-01

    High Energy Physics continues to push the technical boundaries for electronics. There is no area where this is truer than for vertex detectors. Lower mass and power along with higher resolution and radiation tolerance are driving forces. New technologies such as SOI CMOS detectors and three dimensional (3D) integrated circuits offer new opportunities to meet these challenges. The fundamentals for SOI CMOS detectors and 3D integrated circuits are discussed. Examples of each approach for physics applications are presented. Cost issues and ways to reduce development costs are discussed.

  13. The Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector readout chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Bergauer, T.; Frankenberger, A.; Gfall, I.; Irmler, C.; Valentan, M.

    2013-02-01

    The Silicon Vertex Detector of the future Belle II experiment at KEK (Japan) will consist of 6'' double-sided strip sensors. Those are read out by APV25 chips (originally developed for CMS) which are powered by DC/DC converters with low voltages tied to the sensor bias potentials. The signals are transmitted by cable links of about 12 meters. In the back-end, the data are digitized and processed by FADC modules with powerful FPGAs, which are also capable of precisely measuring the hit time of each particle in order to discard off-time background.

  14. Multiplicity distributions from branching equations with constant vertex probabilities

    SciTech Connect

    Durand, B.; Sarcevic, I.

    1987-11-01

    We present multiplicity distributions which are solutions to branching equations, based on the assumption that the shapes and energy dependence of multiplicity distributions are principally determined by hard parton scattering and subsequent branching. We consider the four processes g..-->..gg, q..-->..qg, g..-->..qq-bar, and in a few cases g..-->..ggg. All vertex probabilities for these processes are taken to be constant. In this simple approximation, we find that Koba-Nielsen-Olesen scaling is systemically violated. We compare the properties of branching distributions with the properties of the widely used negative-binomial distribution and of the stochastic approach.

  15. Anomalous ω-Z-γ vertex from hidden local symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harada, Masayasu; Matsuzaki, Shinya; Yamawaki, Koichi

    2011-08-01

    We formulate the general form of the ω-Z-γ vertex in the framework based on the hidden local symmetry, which arises from the gauge-invariant terms for intrinsic parity-odd part of the effective action. Those terms are given as the homogeneous part of the general solution (having free parameters) to the Wess-Zumino anomaly equation and hence are not determined by the anomaly, in sharp contrast to the Harvey-Hill-Hill (HHH) action where the relevant vertex is claimed to be uniquely determined by the anomaly. We show that, even in the framework that HHH was based on, the ω-Z-γ vertex is actually not determined by the anomaly but by the homogeneous (anomaly-free) part of the general solution to the Wess-Zumino anomaly equation having free parameters in the same way as in the hidden local symmetry formulation: The HHH action is just a particular choice of the free parameters in the general solution. We further show that the ω-Z-γ vertex related to the neutrino (ν)-nucleon (N) scattering cross section σ(νN→νN(N')γ) is determined not by the anomaly but by the anomaly-free part of the general solution having free parameters. Nevertheless, we find that the cross section σ(νN→νN(N')γ) is related through the Ward-Takahashi identity to Γ(ω→π0γ) which has the same parameter dependence as that of σ(νN→νN(N')γ) and hence the ratio σ(νN→νN(N')γ)/Γ(ω→π0γ) is fixed independently of these free parameters. Other set of the free parameters of the general solution can be fixed to make the best fit of the ω→π0l+l- process, which substantially differs from the HHH action. This gives a prediction of the cross section σ(νN→νN(N')γ*(l+l-)) to be tested at ν-N collision experiments in the future.

  16. and as Vertex Operator Extensionsof Dual Affine Algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bowcock, P.; Feigin, B. L.; Semikhatov, A. M.; Taormina, A.

    We discover a realisation of the affine Lie superalgebra and of the exceptional affine superalgebra as vertex operator extensions of two algebras with ``dual'' levels (and an auxiliary level-1 algebra). The duality relation between the levels is . We construct the representation of on a sum of tensor products of , , and modules and decompose it into a direct sum over the spectral flow orbit. This decomposition gives rise to character identities, which we also derive. The extension of the construction to is traced to the properties of embeddings into and their relation with the dual pairs. Conversely, we show how the representations are constructed from representations.

  17. Low-Mass Materials and Vertex Detector Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, William E.

    2014-01-01

    Physics requirements set the material budget and the precision and sta bility necessary in low - mass vertex detector sy s tems . Operational considerations, along with physics requirements , set the operating environment to be provided and determine the heat to be removed. Representative materials for fulfilling those requirements are described and properties of the materials are tabulated. A figure of merit is proposed to aid in material selection. Multi - layer structures are examined as a method to allow material to be used effectively, thereby reducing material contributions. Fin ally, comments are made on future directions to be considered in using present materials effectively and in developing new materials.

  18. Vertex Operators Arising from Jacobi-Trudi Identities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Naihuan; Rozhkovskaya, Natasha

    2016-09-01

    We give an interpretation of the boson-fermion correspondence as a direct consequence of the Jacobi-Trudi identity. This viewpoint enables us to construct from a generalized version of the Jacobi-Trudi identity the action of a Clifford algebra on the polynomial algebras that arrive as analogues of the algebra of symmetric functions. A generalized Giambelli identity is also proved to follow from that identity. As applications, we obtain explicit formulas for vertex operators corresponding to characters of the classical Lie algebras, shifted Schur functions, and generalized Schur symmetric functions associated to linear recurrence relations.

  19. Studies for a 10 μs, thin, high resolution CMOS pixel sensor for future vertex detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Voutsinas, G.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Baudot, J.; Bertolone, G.; Brogna, A.; Chon-Sen, N.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Dorokhov, A.; Dozière, G.; Dulinski, W.; Degerli, Y.; De Masi, R.; Deveaux, M.; Gelin, M.; Goffe, M.; Hu-Guo, Ch.; Himmi, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Koziel, M.; Morel, F.; Müntz, C.; Orsini, F.; Santos, C.; Schrader, C.; Specht, M.; Stroth, J.; Valin, I.; Wagner, F. M.; Winter, M.

    2011-06-01

    Future high energy physics (HEP) experiments require detectors with unprecedented performances for track and vertex reconstruction. These requirements call for high precision sensors, with low material budget and short integration time. The development of CMOS sensors for HEP applications was initiated at IPHC Strasbourg more than 10 years ago, motivated by the needs for vertex detectors at the International Linear Collider (ILC) [R. Turchetta et al, NIM A 458 (2001) 677]. Since then several other applications emerged. The first real scale digital CMOS sensor MIMOSA26 equips Flavour Tracker at RHIC, as well as for the microvertex detector of the CBM experiment at FAIR. MIMOSA sensors may also offer attractive performances for the ALICE upgrade at LHC. This paper will demonstrate the substantial performance improvement of CMOS sensors based on a high resistivity epitaxial layer. First studies for integrating the sensors into a detector system will be addressed and finally the way to go to a 10 μs readout sensor will be discussed.

  20. First results with prototype ISIS devices for ILC vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Damerell, C.; Zhang, Z.; Gao, R.; John John, Jaya; Li, Y.; Nomerotski, A.; Holland, A.; Seabroke, G.; Havranek, M.; Stefanov, K.; Kar-Roy, A.; Bell, R.; Burt, D.; Pool, P.

    2010-12-01

    The vertex detectors at the International Linear Collider (ILC) (there will be two of them, one for each of two general purpose detectors) will certainly be built with silicon pixel detectors, either monolithic or perhaps vertically integrated. However, beyond this general statement, there is a wide range of options supported by active R&D programmes all over the world. Pixel-based vertex detectors build on the experience at the SLAC large detector (SLD) operating at the SLAC linear collider (SLC), where a 307 Mpixel detector permitted the highest physics performance at LEP or SLC. For ILC, machine conditions demand much faster readout than at SLC, something like 20 time slices during the 1 ms bunch train. The approach of the image sensor with in-situ storage (ISIS) is unique in offering this capability while avoiding the undesirable requirement of 'pulsed power'. First results from a prototype device that approaches the pixel size of 20 μm square, needed for physics, are reported. The dimensional challenge is met by using a 0.18 μm imaging CMOS process, instead of a conventional CCD process.

  1. Quantum transport in strongly disordered crystals: Electrical conductivity with large negative vertex corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Janiš, Václav; Pokorný, Vladislav

    2012-12-01

    We propose a renormalization scheme of the Kubo formula for the electrical conductivity with multiple backscatterings contributing to the electron-hole irreducible vertex derived from the asymptotic limit to high spatial dimensions. We use this vertex to represent the two-particle Green function via a symmetrized Bethe-Salpeter equation in momentum space. We further utilize the dominance of a pole in the irreducible vertex to an approximate diagonalization of the Bethe-Salpeter equation and a non-perturbative representation of the electron-hole correlation function. The latter function is then used to derive a compact representation for the electrical conductivity at zero temperature without the necessity to evaluate separately the Drude term and vertex corrections. The electrical conductivity calculated in this way remains nonnegative also in the strongly disordered regime where the localization effects become significant and the negative vertex corrections in the standard Kubo formula overweight the Drude term.

  2. Form factors of the spin-1 analogue of the eight-vertex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quano, Yas-Hiro

    2015-12-01

    The twenty-one-vertex model, the spin-1 analogue of the eight-vertex model, is considered on the basis of free-field representations of vertex operators in the 2× 2-fold fusion solid on solid (SOS) model and vertex-face transformation. The tail operators, which translate corner transfer matrices of the twenty-one-vertex model into those of the fusion SOS model, are constructed by using free bosons and fermions for both diagonal and off-diagonal matrix elements with respect to the ground-state sectors. Form factors of any local operators are therefore obtained in terms of multiple integral formulae, in principle. As the simplest example, the two-particle form factor of the spin operator is calculated explicitly.

  3. A high-order vertex-based central ENO finite-volume scheme for three-dimensional compressible flows

    DOE PAGES

    Charest, Marc R.J.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-03-11

    High-order discretization methods offer the potential to reduce the computational cost associated with modeling compressible flows. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate high-order discretizations of conservation laws that do not produce spurious oscillations near discontinuities, especially on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes. A novel, high-order, central essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) finite-volume method that does not have these difficulties is proposed for tetrahedral meshes. The proposed unstructured method is vertex-based, which differs from existing cell-based CENO formulations, and uses a hybrid reconstruction procedure that switches between two different solution representations. It applies a high-order k-exact reconstruction in smooth regions and a limited linearmore » reconstruction when discontinuities are encountered. Both reconstructions use a single, central stencil for all variables, making the application of CENO to arbitrary unstructured meshes relatively straightforward. The new approach was applied to the conservation equations governing compressible flows and assessed in terms of accuracy and computational cost. For all problems considered, which included various function reconstructions and idealized flows, CENO demonstrated excellent reliability and robustness. Up to fifth-order accuracy was achieved in smooth regions and essentially non-oscillatory solutions were obtained near discontinuities. The high-order schemes were also more computationally efficient for high-accuracy solutions, i.e., they took less wall time than the lower-order schemes to achieve a desired level of error. In one particular case, it took a factor of 24 less wall-time to obtain a given level of error with the fourth-order CENO scheme than to obtain the same error with the second-order scheme.« less

  4. A high-order vertex-based central ENO finite-volume scheme for three-dimensional compressible flows

    SciTech Connect

    Charest, Marc R.J.; Canfield, Thomas R.; Morgan, Nathaniel R.; Waltz, Jacob; Wohlbier, John G.

    2015-03-11

    High-order discretization methods offer the potential to reduce the computational cost associated with modeling compressible flows. However, it is difficult to obtain accurate high-order discretizations of conservation laws that do not produce spurious oscillations near discontinuities, especially on multi-dimensional unstructured meshes. A novel, high-order, central essentially non-oscillatory (CENO) finite-volume method that does not have these difficulties is proposed for tetrahedral meshes. The proposed unstructured method is vertex-based, which differs from existing cell-based CENO formulations, and uses a hybrid reconstruction procedure that switches between two different solution representations. It applies a high-order k-exact reconstruction in smooth regions and a limited linear reconstruction when discontinuities are encountered. Both reconstructions use a single, central stencil for all variables, making the application of CENO to arbitrary unstructured meshes relatively straightforward. The new approach was applied to the conservation equations governing compressible flows and assessed in terms of accuracy and computational cost. For all problems considered, which included various function reconstructions and idealized flows, CENO demonstrated excellent reliability and robustness. Up to fifth-order accuracy was achieved in smooth regions and essentially non-oscillatory solutions were obtained near discontinuities. The high-order schemes were also more computationally efficient for high-accuracy solutions, i.e., they took less wall time than the lower-order schemes to achieve a desired level of error. In one particular case, it took a factor of 24 less wall-time to obtain a given level of error with the fourth-order CENO scheme than to obtain the same error with the second-order scheme.

  5. D. phi. vertex drift chamber construction and test results

    SciTech Connect

    Clark, A.R.; Goozen, F.; Grudberg, P.; Klopfenstein, C.; Kerth, L.T.; Loken, S.C.; Oltman, E.; Strovink, M.; Trippe, T.G.

    1991-05-01

    A jet-cell based vertex chamber has been built for the D{O} experiment at Fermilab and operated in a test beam there. Low drift velocity and diffusion properties were achieved using CO{sub 2}(95%)-ethane(5%) at atmospheric pressure. The drift velocity is found to be consistent with (9.74+8.68( E -1.25)) {mu}m/nsec where E is the electric field strength in (kV/cm < E z 1.6 kV/cm.) An intrinsic spatial resolution of 60 {mu}m or better for drift distances greater than 2 mm is measured. The track pair efficiency is estimated to be better than 90% for separations greater than 630 {mu}m. 8 refs., 6 figs., 1 tab.

  6. The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Jeon, H. B.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kang, K. H.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Park, H.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rao, K. K.; Rashevskaya, I.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uozumi, S.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-07-01

    The silicon vertex detector of the Belle II experiment, structured in a lantern shape, consists of four layers of ladders, fabricated from two to five silicon sensors. The APV25 readout ASIC chips are mounted on one side of the ladder to minimize the signal path for reducing the capacitive noise; signals from the sensor backside are transmitted to the chip by bent flexible fan-out circuits. The ladder is assembled using several dedicated jigs. Sensor motion on the jig is minimized by vacuum chucking. The gluing procedure provides such a rigid foundation that later leads to the desired wire bonding performance. The full ladder with electrically functional sensors is consistently completed with a fully developed assembly procedure, and its sensor offsets from the design values are found to be less than 200 μm. The potential functionality of the ladder is also demonstrated by the radioactive source test.

  7. Photoabsorption off nuclei with self-consistent vertex corrections

    SciTech Connect

    Riek, F.; Lutz, M. F. M.; Korpa, C. L.

    2009-08-15

    We study photoproduction off nuclei based on a self-consistent and covariant many-body approach for the pion and isobar propagation in infinite nuclear matter. For the first time the t-channel exchange of an in-medium pion is evaluated in the presence of vertex correction effects consistently. In particular the interference pattern with the s-channel in-medium nucleon and isobar exchange contribution is considered. Electromagnetic gauge invariance is kept as a consequence of various Ward identities obeyed by the computation. Adjusting the set of Migdal parameters to the data set we predict an attractive mass shift for the isobar of about 50 MeV at nuclear saturation density.

  8. Performance of the CLAS12 Silicon Vertex Tracker modules

    SciTech Connect

    Antonioli, Mary Ann; Boiarinov, Serguie; Bonneau, Peter R.; Elouadrhiri, Latifa; Eng, Brian J.; Gotra, Yuri N.; Kurbatov, Evgeny O.; Leffel, Mindy A.; Mandal, Saptarshi; McMullen, Marc E.; Merkin, Mikhail M.; Raydo, Benjamin J.; Teachey, Robert W,; Tucker, Ross J.; Ungaro, Maurizio; Yegneswaran, Amrit S.; Ziegler, Veronique

    2013-12-01

    For the 12 GeV upgrade, the CLAS12 experiment has designed a Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) using single sided microstrip sensors fabricated by Hamamatsu. The sensors have graded angle design to minimize dead areas and a readout pitch of 156{micro}m, with intermediate strip. Double sided SVT module hosts three daisy-chained sensors on each side with a full strip length of 33 cm. There are 512 channels per module read out by four Fermilab Silicon Strip Readout (FSSR2) chips featuring data driven architecture, mounted on a rigid-flex hybrid. Modules are assembled on the barrel using unique cantilevered geometry to minimize the amount of material in the tracking volume. Design and performance of the SVT modules are presented, focusing on results of electrical measurements.

  9. Vertex Sensitivity in the Schwinger-Dyson Equations of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    David J. Wilson, Michael R. Pennington

    2012-01-01

    The nonperturbative gluon and ghost propagators in Landau gauge QCD are obtained using the Schwinger-Dyson equation approach. The propagator equations are solved in Euclidean space using Landau gauge with a range of vertex inputs. Initially we solve for the ghost alone, using a model gluon input, which leads us to favour a finite ghost dressing in the nonperturbative region. In order to then solve the gluon and ghost equations simultaneously, we find that non-trivial vertices are required, particularly for the gluon propagator in the small momentum limit. We focus on the properties of a number vertices and how these differences influence the final solutions. The self-consistent solutions we obtain are all qualitatively similar and contain a mass-like term in the gluon propagator dressing in agreement with related studies, supporting the long-held proposal of Cornwall.

  10. Emergent reduced dimensionality by vertex frustration in artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gilbert, Ian; Lao, Yuyang; Carrasquillo, Isaac; O'Brien, Liam; Watts, Justin D.; Manno, Michael; Leighton, Chris; Scholl, Andreas; Nisoli, Cristiano; Schiffer, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Reducing the dimensionality of a physical system can have a profound effect on its properties, as in the ordering of low-dimensional magnetic materials, phonon dispersion in mercury chain salts, sliding phases, and the electronic states of graphene. Here we explore the emergence of quasi-one-dimensional behaviour in two-dimensional artificial spin ice, a class of lithographically fabricated nanomagnet arrays used to study geometrical frustration. We extend the implementation of artificial spin ice by fabricating a new array geometry, the so-called tetris lattice. We demonstrate that the ground state of the tetris lattice consists of alternating ordered and disordered bands of nanomagnetic moments. The disordered bands can be mapped onto an emergent thermal one-dimensional Ising model. Furthermore, we show that the level of degeneracy associated with these bands dictates the susceptibility of island moments to thermally induced reversals, thus establishing that vertex frustration can reduce the relevant dimensionality of physical behaviour in a magnetic system.

  11. System software design for the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Tkaczyk, S.; Bailey, M.

    1991-11-01

    An automated system for testing and performance evaluation of the CDF Silicon Vertex Detector (SVX) data acquisition electronics is described. The SVX data acquisition chain includes the Fastbus Sequencer and the Rabbit Crate Controller and Digitizers. The Sequencer is a programmable device for which we developed a high level assembly language. Diagnostic, calibration and data acquisition programs have been developed. A distributed software package was developed in order to operate the modules. The package includes programs written in assembly and Fortran languages that are executed concurrently on the SVX Sequencer modules and either a microvax or an SSP. Test software was included to assist technical personnel during the production and maintenance of the modules. Details of the design of different components of the package are reported.

  12. Testing the RRPP vertex of effective Regge action

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuraev, E. A.; Bytev, V. V.; Bakmaev, S.; Antonov, E. N.

    2008-06-01

    We discuss the possibility of checking the vertex with creation of two real gluons in collision of two reggeized ones (RRPP) which can reveal themselves in process of scalar meson production in high energy peripheral nucleon collisions. Numerical estimations of the cross section of a pair of charged pion production for the LHC facility give the value of an order of 10 mb. We also estimate the excess of production of positively charged muons (as a decay of pions) created by cosmic ray proton collisions with the atmosphere gas nuclei to be in reasonable agreement with modern data. The effects of higher orders which reveal themselves as a screening factor are considered in terms of impact parameter representation. We estimate the cross section of pion pair production in central region to fall faster than factorial σn ∼ 1 / (n2 n !).

  13. Performance of the CLAS12 Silicon Vertex Tracker modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antonioli, M. A.; Boiarinov, S.; Bonneau, P.; Elouadrhiri, L.; Eng, B.; Gotra, Y.; Kurbatov, E.; Leffel, M.; Mandal, S.; McMullen, M.; Merkin, M.; Raydo, B.; Teachey, W.; Tucker, R.; Ungaro, M.; Yegneswaran, A.; Ziegler, V.

    2013-12-01

    For the 12 GeV upgrade, the CLAS12 experiment has designed a Silicon Vertex Tracker (SVT) using single sided microstrip sensors fabricated by Hamamatsu. The sensors have graded angle design to minimize dead areas and a readout pitch of 156 μm, with intermediate strip. Double sided SVT module hosts three daisy-chained sensors on each side with a full strip length of 33 cm. There are 512 channels per module read out by four Fermilab Silicon Strip Readout (FSSR2) chips featuring data driven architecture, mounted on a rigid-flex hybrid. Modules are assembled on the barrel using unique cantilevered geometry to minimize the amount of material in the tracking volume. Design and performance of the SVT modules are presented, focusing on results of electrical measurements.

  14. Edge Currents and Vertex Operators for Chern-Simons Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bimonte, G.; Gupta, K. S.; Stern, A.

    We apply elementary canonical methods for the quantization of 2+1 dimensional gravity, where the dynamics is given by E. Witten’s ISO(2, 1) Chern-Simons action. As in a previous work, our approach does not involve choice of gauge or clever manipulations of functional integrals. Instead, we just require the Gauss law constraint for gravity to be first class and also to be everywhere differentiable. When the spatial slice is a disc, the gravitational fields can either be unconstrained or constrained at the boundary of the disc. The unconstrained fields correspond to edge currents which carry a representation of the ISO(2, 1) Kac-Moody algebra. Unitary representations for such an algebra have been found using the method of induced representations. In the case of constrained fields, we can classify all possible boundary conditions. For several different boundary conditions, the field content of the theory reduces precisely to that of 1+1 dimensional gravity theories. We extend the above formalism to include sources. The sources take into account self-interactions. This is done by punching holes in the disc, and erecting an ISO(2, 1) Kac-Moody algebra on the boundary of each hole. If the hole is originally sourceless, a source can be created via the action of a vertex operator V. We give an explicit expression for V. We shall show that when acting on the vacuum state, it creates particles with a discrete mass spectrum. The lowest mass particle induces a cylindrical space-time geometry, while higher mass particles give an n fold covering of the cylinder. The vertex operator therefore creates cylindrical space-time geometries from the vacuum.

  15. CCpi0 Event Reconstruction at MiniBooNE

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, Robert H.; /Colorado U.

    2009-09-01

    We describe the development of a fitter to reconstruct {nu}{sub {mu}} induced Charged-Current single {pi}{sup 0} (CC{pi}{sup 0}) events in an oil Cerenkov detector (CH{sub 2}). These events are fit using a generic muon and two photon extended track hypothesis from a common event vertex. The development of ring finding and particle identification are described. Comparisons between data and Monte Carlo are presented for a few kinematic distributions.

  16. MIRACLE Lab: Track recognition and event track reconstruction in nuclear emulsion chambers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tawfik, A. M.; Ganssauge, E.

    1999-04-01

    This article is a continuation of a previous paper [ E. Ganssauge, A.M. Tawfik, Nucl. Instr. & Meth. A 416 (1998) 136-147] about automation of measurements in nuclear emulsion chambers. Here the image processing, vertex determination, track recognition, and event reconstruction are discussed.

  17. Quark-gluon vertex dressing and meson masses beyond ladder-rainbow truncation

    SciTech Connect

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Thomas, Anthony W.; Tandy, Peter C.

    2007-04-15

    We include a generalized infinite class of quark-gluon vertex dressing diagrams in a study of how dynamics beyond the ladder-rainbow truncation influences the Bethe-Salpeter description of light-quark pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The diagrammatic specification of the vertex is mapped into a corresponding specification of the Bethe-Salpeter kernel, which preserves chiral symmetry. This study adopts the algebraic format afforded by the simple interaction kernel used in previous work on this topic. The new feature of the present work is that in every diagram summed for the vertex and the corresponding Bethe-Salpeter kernel, each quark-gluon vertex is required to be the self-consistent vertex solution. We also adopt from previous work the effective accounting for the role of the explicitly non-Abelian three-gluon coupling in a global manner through one parameter determined from recent lattice-QCD data for the vertex. Within the current model, the more consistent dressed vertex limits the ladder-rainbow truncation error for vector mesons to be never more than 10% as the current quark mass is varied from the u/d region to the b region.

  18. Quark-gluon vertex dressing and meson masses beyond ladder-rainbow truncation

    SciTech Connect

    Hrayr Matevosyan; Anthony Thomas; Peter Tandy

    2007-04-01

    We include a generalized infinite class of quark-gluon vertex dressing diagrams in a study of how dynamics beyond the ladder-rainbow truncation influences the Bethe-Salpeter description of light quark pseudoscalar and vector mesons. The diagrammatic specification of the vertex is mapped into a corresponding specification of the Bethe-Salpeter kernel, which preserves chiral symmetry. This study adopts the algebraic format afforded by the simple interaction kernel used in previous work on this topic. The new feature of the present work is that in every diagram summed for the vertex and the corresponding Bethe-Salpeter kernel, each quark-gluon vertex is required to be the self-consistent vertex solution. We also adopt from previous work the effective accounting for the role of the explicitly non-Abelian three gluon coupling in a global manner through one parameter determined from recent lattice-QCD data for the vertex. With the more consistent vertex used here, the error in ladder-rainbow truncation for vector mesons is never more than 10% as the current quark mass is varied from the u/d region to the b region.

  19. Infrared behavior of the ghost-gluon vertex in Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory

    SciTech Connect

    Schleifenbaum, W.; Maas, A.; Wambach, J.; Alkofer, R.

    2005-07-01

    A semiperturbative calculation of the ghost-gluon vertex in Landau-gauge Yang-Mills theory in four and three Euclidean space-time dimensions is presented. Nonperturbative gluon and ghost propagators are employed, which have previously been calculated from a truncated set of Dyson-Schwinger equations and which are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with corresponding lattice results. Our results for the ghost-gluon vertex show only relatively small deviations from the tree-level one in agreement with recent lattice data. In particular, we do not see any sign for a singular behavior of the ghost-gluon vertex in the infrared.

  20. The MAPS-based vertex detector for the STAR experiment: Lessons learned and performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contin, Giacomo

    2016-09-01

    The PiXeL detector (PXL) of the STAR experiment at RHIC is the first application of the state-of-the-art thin Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) technology in a collider environment. The PXL, together with the Intermediate Silicon Tracker (IST) and the Silicon Strip Detector (SSD), form the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT), which has been designed to improve the vertex resolution and extend the STAR measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain, providing a clean probe for studying the Quark-Gluon Plasma. The two PXL layers are placed at a radius of 2.8 and 8 cm from the beam line, respectively, and is based on ultra-thin high resolution MAPS sensors. The sensor features 20.7 μm pixel pitch, 185.6 μs readout time and 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation. The detector is air-cooled, allowing a global material budget of 0.4% radiation length on the innermost layer. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion allows for fast installation and integration of the pixel sub detector. The HFT took data in Au+Au collisions at 200 GeV during the 2014 RHIC run. Modified during the RHIC shutdown to improve its reliability, material budget, and tracking capabilities, the HFT took data in p+p and p+Au collisions at √sNN=200 GeV in the 2015 RHIC run. In this paper we present detector specifications, experience from the construction and operations, and lessons learned. We also show preliminary results from 2014 Au+Au data analyses, demonstrating the capabilities of charm reconstruction with the HFT.

  1. A spin glass approach to the directed feedback vertex set problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2016-07-01

    A directed graph (digraph) is formed by vertices and arcs (directed edges) from one vertex to another. A feedback vertex set (FVS) is a set of vertices that contains at least one vertex of every directed cycle in this digraph. The directed feedback vertex set problem aims at constructing a FVS of minimum cardinality. This is a fundamental cycle-constrained hard combinatorial optimization problem with wide practical applications. In this paper we construct a spin glass model for the directed FVS problem by converting the global cycle constraints into local arc constraints, and study this model through the replica-symmetric (RS) mean field theory of statistical physics. We then implement a belief propagation-guided decimation (BPD) algorithm for single digraph instances. The BPD algorithm slightly outperforms the simulated annealing algorithm on large random graph instances. The RS mean field results and algorithmic results can be further improved by working on a more restrictive (and more difficult) spin glass model.

  2. Q-Operators for Higher Spin Eight Vertex Models with an Even Number of Sites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takebe, Takashi

    2016-03-01

    We construct the Q-operator for generalised eight vertex models associated to higher spin representations of the Sklyanin algebra, following Baxter's 1973 paper. As an application, we prove the sum rule for the Bethe roots.

  3. G-equivariant {phi}-coordinated quasi modules for quantum vertex algebras

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Haisheng

    2013-05-15

    This is a paper in a series to study quantum vertex algebras and their relations with various quantum algebras. In this paper, we introduce a notion of T-type quantum vertex algebra and a notion of G-equivariant {phi}-coordinated quasi module for a T-type quantum vertex algebra with an automorphism group G. We refine and extend several previous results and we obtain a commutator formula for G-equivariant {phi}-coordinated quasi modules. As an illustrating example, we study a special case of the deformed Virasoro algebra Vir{sub p,q} with q=-1, to which we associate a Clifford vertex superalgebra and its G-equivariant {phi}-coordinated quasi modules.

  4. The quark-gluon vertex in Landau gauge bound-state studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Richard

    2015-05-01

    We present a practical method for the solution of the quark-gluon vertex for use in Bethe-Salpeter and Dyson-Schwinger calculations. The efficient decomposition into the necessary covariants is detailed, with the numerical algorithm outlined for both real and complex Euclidean momenta. A truncation of the quark-gluon vertex, that neglects explicit back-coupling to enable the application to bound-state calculations, is given together with results for the quark propagator and quark-gluon vertex for different quark flavours. The relative impact of the various components of the quark-gluon vertex is highlighted with the flavour dependence of the effective quark-gluon interaction obtained, thus providing insight for the construction of phenomenological models within the rainbow ladder. Finally, we solve the corresponding Green's functions for complex Euclidean momenta as required in future bound-state calculations.

  5. Novel integrated CMOS pixel structures for vertex detectors

    SciTech Connect

    Kleinfelder, Stuart; Bieser, Fred; Chen, Yandong; Gareus, Robin; Matis, Howard S.; Oldenburg, Markus; Retiere, Fabrice; Ritter, Hans Georg; Wieman, Howard H.; Yamamoto, Eugene

    2003-10-29

    Novel CMOS active pixel structures for vertex detector applications have been designed and tested. The overriding goal of this work is to increase the signal to noise ratio of the sensors and readout circuits. A large-area native epitaxial silicon photogate was designed with the aim of increasing the charge collected per struck pixel and to reduce charge diffusion to neighboring pixels. The photogate then transfers the charge to a low capacitance readout node to maintain a high charge to voltage conversion gain. Two techniques for noise reduction are also presented. The first is a per-pixel kT/C noise reduction circuit that produces results similar to traditional correlated double sampling (CDS). It has the advantage of requiring only one read, as compared to two for CDS, and no external storage or subtraction is needed. The technique reduced input-referred temporal noise by a factor of 2.5, to 12.8 e{sup -}. Finally, a column-level active reset technique is explored that suppresses kT/C noise during pixel reset. In tests, noise was reduced by a factor of 7.6 times, to an estimated 5.1 e{sup -} input-referred noise. The technique also dramatically reduces fixed pattern (pedestal) noise, by up to a factor of 21 in our tests. The latter feature may possibly reduce pixel-by-pixel pedestal differences to levels low enough to permit sparse data scan without per-pixel offset corrections.

  6. CDF Run IIb Silicon Vertex Detector DAQ Upgrade

    SciTech Connect

    S. Behari et al.

    2003-12-18

    The CDF particle detector operates in the beamline of the Tevatron proton-antiproton collider at Fermilab, Batavia, IL. The Tevatron is expected to undergo luminosity upgrades (Run IIb) in the future, resulting in a higher number of interactions per beam crossing. To operate in this dense radiation environment, an upgrade of CDF's silicon vertex detector (SVX) subsystem and a corresponding upgrade of its VME-based DAQ system has been explored. Prototypes of all the Run IIb SVX DAQ components have been constructed, assembled into a test stand and operated successfully using an adapted version of CDF's network-capable DAQ software. In addition, a PCI-based DAQ system has been developed as a fast and inexpensive tool for silicon detector and DAQ component testing in the production phase. In this paper they present an overview of the Run IIb silicon DAQ upgrade, emphasizing the new features and improvements incorporated into the constituent VME boards, and discuss a PCI-based DAQ system developed to facilitate production tests.

  7. Real time dynamic behavior of vertex frustrated artificial spin ice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lao, Yuyang; Sklenar, Joseph; Gilbert, Ian; Carrasquilo, Isaac; Scholl, Andreas; Young, Anthony; Nisoli, Cristiano; Schiffer, Peter

    Artificial spin ice systems comprise two dimensional arrays of nanoscale single domain ferromagnets designed to have frustrated interactions among the moments. By decimating islands from the common square artificial spin ice, one can design lattices with so called `vertex frustration'. In such lattices, the geometry prevents all vertices from occupying local ground states simultaneously. Using Photoemission Electron Microscopy (PEEM), we access the real time thermally induced dynamics of the moment behavior in those lattices. Operating at a proper temperature, the moment direction of each island fluctuates with a sufficiently slow frequency that it can be resolvable by acquiring successive PEEM images. We can extract information regarding the collective excitations of the moments and understand how they reflect the frustration of lattice. Supported by the US Department of Energy, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, Materials Science and Engineering Division under Grant No. DE-SC0010778. The work of C.N. was carried out under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at LANL under Contract no. DE-AC52-06NA253962. The ALS is supported by the Director, Office of Science, Office of Basic Energy Sciences, of the US Department of Energy under Contract no. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  8. Capacitively coupled hybrid pixel assemblies for the CLIC vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tehrani, N. Alipour; Arfaoui, S.; Benoit, M.; Dannheim, D.; Dette, K.; Hynds, D.; Kulis, S.; Perić, I.; Petrič, M.; Redford, S.; Sicking, E.; Valerio, P.

    2016-07-01

    The vertex detector at the proposed CLIC multi-TeV linear e+e- collider must have minimal material content and high spatial resolution, combined with accurate time-stamping to cope with the expected high rate of beam-induced backgrounds. One of the options being considered is the use of active sensors implemented in a commercial high-voltage CMOS process, capacitively coupled to hybrid pixel ASICs. A prototype of such an assembly, using two custom designed chips (CCPDv3 as active sensor glued to a CLICpix readout chip), has been characterised both in the lab and in beam tests at the CERN SPS using 120 GeV/c positively charged hadrons. Results of these characterisation studies are presented both for single and dual amplification stages in the active sensor, where efficiencies of greater than 99% have been achieved at -60 V substrate bias, with a single hit resolution of 6.1 μm . Pixel cross-coupling results are also presented, showing the sensitivity to placement precision and planarity of the glue layer.

  9. Fast unmixing of multispectral optoacoustic data with vertex component analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Luís Deán-Ben, X.; Deliolanis, Nikolaos C.; Ntziachristos, Vasilis; Razansky, Daniel

    2014-07-01

    Multispectral optoacoustic tomography enhances the performance of single-wavelength imaging in terms of sensitivity and selectivity in the measurement of the biodistribution of specific chromophores, thus enabling functional and molecular imaging applications. Spectral unmixing algorithms are used to decompose multi-spectral optoacoustic data into a set of images representing distribution of each individual chromophoric component while the particular algorithm employed determines the sensitivity and speed of data visualization. Here we suggest using vertex component analysis (VCA), a method with demonstrated good performance in hyperspectral imaging, as a fast blind unmixing algorithm for multispectral optoacoustic tomography. The performance of the method is subsequently compared with a previously reported blind unmixing procedure in optoacoustic tomography based on a combination of principal component analysis (PCA) and independent component analysis (ICA). As in most practical cases the absorption spectrum of the imaged chromophores and contrast agents are known or can be determined using e.g. a spectrophotometer, we further investigate the so-called semi-blind approach, in which the a priori known spectral profiles are included in a modified version of the algorithm termed constrained VCA. The performance of this approach is also analysed in numerical simulations and experimental measurements. It has been determined that, while the standard version of the VCA algorithm can attain similar sensitivity to the PCA-ICA approach and have a robust and faster performance, using the a priori measured spectral information within the constrained VCA does not generally render improvements in detection sensitivity in experimental optoacoustic measurements.

  10. 19-vertex version of the fully frustrated XY model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knops, Yolanda M. M.; Nienhuis, Bernard; Knops, Hubert J. F.; Blöte, Henk W. J.

    1994-07-01

    We investigate a 19-vertex version of the two-dimensional fully frustrated XY (FFXY) model. We construct Yang-Baxter equations for this model and show that there is no solution. Therefore we have chosen a numerical approach based on the transfer matrix. The results show that a coupled XY Ising model is in the same universality class as the FFXY model. We find that the phase coupling over an Ising wall is irrelevant at criticality. This leads to a correction of earlier determinations of the dimension x*h,Is of the Ising disorder operator. We find x*h,Is=0.123(5) and a conformal anomaly c=1.55(5). These results are consistent with the hypothesis that the FFXY model behaves as a superposition of an Ising model and an XY model. However, the dimensions associated with the energy, xt=0.77(3), and with the XY magnetization xh,XY~=0.17, refute this hypothesis.

  11. NLO vertex for a forward jet plus a rapidity gap at high energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hentschinski, Martin; Madrigal Martínez, José Daniel; Murdaca, Beatrice; Vera, Agustín Sabio

    2015-04-01

    We present the calculation of the forward jet vertex associated to a rapidity gap (coupling of a hard pomeron to the jet) in the BFKL formalism at next-to-leading order (NLO). Real emission contributions are computed via Lipatov's effective action. The NLO jet vertex turns out to be finite within collinear factorization and allows, together with the NLO non-forward gluon Green's function, to perform NLO studies of jet production in diffractive events (e.g. Mueller-Tang dijets).

  12. Structural information content of networks: graph entropy based on local vertex functionals.

    PubMed

    Dehmer, Matthias; Emmert-Streib, Frank

    2008-04-01

    In this paper we define the structural information content of graphs as their corresponding graph entropy. This definition is based on local vertex functionals obtained by calculating j-spheres via the algorithm of Dijkstra. We prove that the graph entropy and, hence, the local vertex functionals can be computed with polynomial time complexity enabling the application of our measure for large graphs. In this paper we present numerical results for the graph entropy of chemical graphs and discuss resulting properties. PMID:18243802

  13. Hubble Space Telescope secondary mirror vertex radius/conic constant test

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parks, Robert

    1991-01-01

    The Hubble Space Telescope backup secondary mirror was tested to determine the vertex radius and conic constant. Three completely independent tests (to the same procedure) were performed. Similar measurements in the three tests were highly consistent. The values obtained for the vertex radius and conic constant were the nominal design values within the error bars associated with the tests. Visual examination of the interferometric data did not show any measurable zonal figure error in the secondary mirror.

  14. Screenings and vertex operators of quantum superalgebra U{sub q}(sl-caret(N|1))

    SciTech Connect

    Kojima, Takeo

    2012-08-15

    We construct the screening currents of the quantum superalgebra U{sub q}(sl-caret(N|1)) for an arbitrary level k{ne}-N+ 1. We show that these screening currents commute with the superalgebra modulo total difference. We propose bosonizations of the vertex operators by using the screening currents. We check that these vertex operators are the intertwiners among the Fock-Wakimoto representation and the typical representation for rank N Less-Than-Or-Slanted-Equal-To 4.

  15. Constructing scalar-photon three point vertex in massless quenched scalar QED

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernández-Rangel, L. Albino; Bashir, Adnan; Gutiérrez-Guerrero, L. X.; Concha-Sánchez, Y.

    2016-03-01

    Nonperturbative studies of Schwinger-Dyson equations require their infinite, coupled tower to be truncated in order to reduce them to a practically solvable set. In this connection, a physically acceptable Ansatz for the three point vertex is the most favorite choice. Scalar quantum electrodynamics (sQED) provides a simple and neat platform to address this problem. The most general form of the three point scalar-photon vertex can be expressed in terms of only two independent form factors, a longitudinal and a transverse one. Ball and Chiu have demonstrated that the longitudinal vertex is fixed by requiring the Ward-Fradkin-Green-Takahashi identity while the transverse vertex remains undetermined. In massless quenched sQED, we construct the transverse part of the nonperturbative scalar-photon vertex. This construction (i) ensures multiplicative renormalizability of the scalar propagator in keeping with the Landau-Khalatnikov-Fradkin transformations, (ii) has the same transformation properties as the bare vertex under charge conjugation, parity and time reversal, (iii) has no kinematic singularities and (iv) reproduces the one-loop asymptotic result in the weak coupling regime of the theory.

  16. Vertex dynamics in multi-soliton solutions of Kadomtsev-Petviashvili II equation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zarmi, Yair

    2014-06-01

    A functional of the solution of the Kadomtsev-Petviashvili II equation maps multi-soliton solutions onto systems of vertices—structures that are localized around soliton junctions. A solution with one junction is mapped onto a single vertex, which emulates a free, spatially extended, particle. In solutions with several junctions, each junction is mapped onto a vertex. Moving in the x-y plane, the vertices collide, coalesce upon collision and then split up. When well separated, they emulate free particles. Multi-soliton solutions, whose structure does not change under space-time inversion as |t| → ∞, are mapped onto vertex systems that undergo elastic collisions. Solutions, whose structure does change, are mapped onto systems that undergo inelastic collisions. The inelastic vertex collisions generated from the infinite family of (M,1) solutions (M external solitons, (M - 2) Y-shaped soliton junctions, M ⩾ 4) play a unique role: the only definition of vertex mass consistent with momentum conservation in these collisions is the spatial integral of the vertex profile. This definition ensures, in addition, that, in these collisions, the total mass and kinetic energy due to the motion in the y-direction are conserved. In general, the kinetic energy due to the motion in the x-direction is not conserved in these collisions.

  17. TECHNICAL DESIGN REPORT OF THE FORWARD SILICON VERTEX (FVTX)

    SciTech Connect

    PHENIX EXPERIMENT; OBRIEN,E.; PAK, R.; DREES, K.A.

    2007-08-01

    The main goal of the RHIC heavy ion program is the discovery of the novel ultra-hot high-density state of matter predicted by the fundamental theory of strong interactions and created in collisions of heavy nuclei, the Quark-Gluon Plasma (QGP). From measurements of the large elliptic flow of light mesons and baryons and their large suppression at high transverse momentum pT that have been made at RHIC, there is evidence that new degrees of freedom, characteristic of a deconfined QCD medium, drive the dynamics of nucleus-nucleus collisions. It has been recognized, however, that the potential of light quarks and gluons to characterize the properties of the QGP medium is limited and the next phase of the RHIC program calls for the precise determination of its density, temperature, opacity and viscosity using qualitatively new probes, such as heavy quarks. We propose the construction of two Forward Silicon Vertex Trackers (FVTX) for the PHENIX experiment that will directly identify and distinguish charm and beauty decays within the acceptance of the muon spectrometers. The FVTX will provide this essential coverage over a range of forward and backward rapidities (1.2 < |y| < 2.4)--a rapidity range coverage which not only brings significantly larger acceptance to PHENIX but which is critical for separating cold nuclear matter effects from QGP effects and is critical for measuring the proton spin contributions over a significant fraction of the kinematic range of interest. In addition, the FVTX will provide greatly reduced background and improved mass resolution for dimuon events, culminating in the first measurements of the {upsilon}{prime} and Drell-Yan at RHIC. These same heavy flavor and dimuon measurements in p+p collisions will allow us to place significant constraints on the gluon and sea quark contributions to the proton's spin and to make fundamentally new tests of the Sivers function universality.

  18. NH3-promoted ligand lability in eleven-vertex rhodathiaboranes.

    PubMed

    Calvo, Beatriz; Roy, Beatriz; Macías, Ramón; Artigas, Maria Jose; Lahoz, Fernando J; Oro, Luis A

    2014-12-01

    The reaction of the 11-vertex rhodathiaborane, [8,8-(PPh3)2-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (1), with NH3 affords inmediately the adduct, [8,8,8-(NH3)(PPh3)2-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (4). The NH3-Rh interaction induces the labilization of the PPh3 ligands leading to the dissociation product, [8,8-(NH3)(PPh3)-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (5), which can then react with another molecule of NH3 to give [8,8,8-(NH3)2(PPh3)-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (6). These clusters have been characterized in situ by multielement NMR spectroscopy at different temeperatures. The variable temperature behavior of the system demonstrates that the intermediates 4-6 are in equilibrium, involving ligand exchange processes. On the basis of low intensity signals present in the (1)H NMR spectra of the reaction mixture, some species are tentatively proposed to be the bis- and tris-NH3 ligated clusters, [8,8-(NH3)2-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (7) and [8,8,8-(NH3)3-nido-8,7-RhSB9H10] (8). After evaporation of the solvent and the excess of NH3, the system containing species 4-8 regenerates the starting reactant, 1, thus closing a stoichiometric cycle of ammonia addition and loss. After 40 h at room temperature, the reaction of 1 with NH3 gives the hydridorhodathiaborane, [8,8,8-(H)(PPh3)2-nido-8,7-RhSB9H9] (2), as a single product. The reported rhodathiaboranes show reversible H3N-promoted ligand lability, which implies weak Rh-N interactions, leading to a rare case of metal complexes that circumvent "classical" Werner chemistry.

  19. The MAPS based PXL vertex detector for the STAR experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Contin, G.; Anderssen, E.; Greiner, L.; Schambach, J.; Silber, J.; Stezelberger, T.; Sun, X.; Szelezniak, M.; Vu, C.; Wieman, H.; Woodmansee, S.

    2015-03-01

    The Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was installed in the STAR experiment for the 2014 heavy ion run of RHIC. Designed to improve the vertex resolution and extend the measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain, the HFT is composed of three different silicon detectors based on CMOS monolithic active pixels (MAPS), pads and strips respectively, arranged in four concentric cylinders close to the STAR interaction point. The two innermost HFT layers are placed at a radius of 2.7 and 8 cm from the beam line, respectively, and accommodate 400 ultra-thin (50 μ m) high resolution MAPS sensors arranged in 10-sensor ladders to cover a total silicon area of 0.16 m2. Each sensor includes a pixel array of 928 rows and 960 columns with a 20.7 μ m pixel pitch, providing a sensitive area of ~ 3.8 cm2. The architecture is based on a column parallel readout with amplification and correlated double sampling inside each pixel. Each column is terminated with a high precision discriminator, is read out in a rolling shutter mode and the output is processed through an integrated zero suppression logic. The results are stored in two SRAM with ping-pong arrangement for a continuous readout. The sensor features 185.6 μ s readout time and 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation. The detector is air-cooled, allowing a global material budget as low as 0.39% on the inner layer. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion enables effective installation and integration of the pixel layers within an 8 hour shift during the on-going STAR run.In addition to a detailed description of the detector characteristics, the experience of the first months of data taking will be presented in this paper, with a particular focus on sensor threshold calibration, latch-up protection procedures and general system operations aimed at stabilizing the running conditions. Issues faced during the 2014 run will be discussed together with the implemented solutions. A preliminary analysis of the detector performance

  20. A Vertex Model of Drosophila Ventral Furrow Formation

    PubMed Central

    Spahn, Philipp; Reuter, Rolf

    2013-01-01

    Ventral furrow formation in Drosophila is an outstanding model system to study the mechanisms involved in large-scale tissue rearrangements. Ventral cells accumulate myosin at their apical sides and, while being tightly coupled to each other via apical adherens junctions, execute actomyosin contractions that lead to reduction of their apical cell surface. Thereby, a band of constricted cells along the ventral epithelium emerges which will form a tissue indentation along the ventral midline (the ventral furrow). Here we adopt a 2D vertex model to simulate ventral furrow formation in a surface view allowing easy comparison with confocal live-recordings. We show that in order to reproduce furrow morphology seen in vivo, a gradient of contractility must be assumed in the ventral epithelium which renders cells more contractile the closer they lie to the ventral midline. The model predicts previous experimental findings, such as the gain of eccentric morphology of constricting cells and an incremental fashion of apical cell area reduction. Analysis of the model suggests that this incremental area reduction is caused by the dynamical interplay of cell elasticity and stochastic contractility as well as by the opposing forces from contracting neighbour cells. We underpin results from the model through in vivo analysis of ventral furrow formation in wildtype and twi mutant embryos. Our results show that ventral furrow formation can be accomplished as a “tug-of-war” between stochastically contracting, mechanically coupled cells and may require less rigorous regulation than previously thought. Summary For the developmental biologist it is a fascinating question how cells can coordinate major tissue movements during embryonic development. The so-called ventral furrow of the Drosophila embryo is a well-studied example of such a process when cells from a ventral band, spanning nearly the entire length of the embryo, undergo dramatic shape change by contracting their tips and

  1. Design and performance of the SLD Vertex Detector, a 120 Mpixel tracking system

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, G.D.; Cotton, R.; Damerell, C.J.S.

    1992-03-01

    This paper describes the design, construction, and initial operation of the SLD Vertex Detector, the first device to employ charge coupled devices (CCDs) on a large scale in a high energy physics experiment. The Vertex Detector comprises 480 CCDs, with a total of 120 Mpixels. Each pixel functions as an independent particle detecting element, providing space point measurements of charged particle tracks with a typical precision of 5 {mu}m in each co-ordinate. The CCDs are arranged in four concentric cylinders just outside the beam pipe which surrounds the e{sup +}e{sup {minus}} collision point of the SLAC Linear Collider (SLC). The Vertex Detector is a powerful tool for distinguishing secondary vertex tracks, produced by decay in flight of heavy flavour hadrons or tau leptons, from tracks produced at the primary event vertex. Because the colliding beam environment imposes severe constraints on the design of such a detector, a six year R&D programme was needed to develop solutions to a number of problems. The requirements include a low-mass structure (to minimise multiple scattering) both for mechanical support and to provide signal paths for the CCDS; operation at low temperature with a high degree of mechanical stability; and relatively high speed CCD readout, signal processing, and data sparsification. The lessons learned through the long R&D period should be useful for the construction of large arrays of CCDs or smart pixel devices in the future, in a number of areas of science and technology.

  2. Development of vertexing and lifetime triggers and a study of Bs mixing using hadronic decays at D0

    SciTech Connect

    Barnes, Christopher P.

    2005-03-01

    The D0 detector underwent a major upgrade to maximize its ability to fully exploit Run II at the Fermilab Tevatron, the world's highest energy collider. The upgrade included a completely new central tracking system with an outer scintillating fiber tracker and an inner silicon vertex detector all within a 2T superconducting solenoid. This thesis describes the development of high level trigger algorithms including vertexing, impact parameter significance and invariant mass, that utilize tracks from these detectors. One of the main physics goals of Run II is the observation of Bs oscillations. This measurement, which cannot be performed at the B factories, will significantly constrain the ''unitarity triangle'' associated with Cp violation and so probe the Standard Model of particle physics. Furthermore this is an interesting measurement as the study of mixing in meson systems has a long history for revealing new physics. The second part of this thesis presents a study of the hadronic decay Bs → Dsπ. This important mode provides the best proper time resolution for Bs mixing and is reconstructed for the first time at D0. Projections on the sensitivity to Bs oscillations are then presented.

  3. Vertex evoked potentials in a rating-scale detection task: Relation to signal probability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Squires, N. K.; Hillyard, S. A.

    1974-01-01

    Vertex evoked potentials were recorded from human subjects performing in an auditory detection task with rating scale responses. Three values of a priori probability of signal presentation were tested. The amplitudes of the N1 and P3 components of the vertex potential associated with correct detections of the signal were found to be systematically related to the strictness of the response criterion and independent of variations in a priori signal probability. No similar evoked potential components were found associated with signal absent judgements (misses and correct rejections) regardless of the confidence level of the judgement or signal probability. These results strongly support the contention that the form of the vertex evoked response is closely correlated with the subject's psychophysical decision regarding the presence or absence of a threshold level signal.

  4. Detecting Corresponding Vertex Pairs between Planar Tessellation Datasets with Agglomerative Hierarchical Cell-Set Matching

    PubMed Central

    Huh, Yong; Yu, Kiyun; Park, Woojin

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to detect corresponding vertex pairs between planar tessellation datasets. Applying an agglomerative hierarchical co-clustering, the method finds geometrically corresponding cell-set pairs from which corresponding vertex pairs are detected. Then, the map transformation is performed with the vertex pairs. Since these pairs are independently detected for each corresponding cell-set pairs, the method presents improved matching performance regardless of locally uneven positional discrepancies between dataset. The proposed method was applied to complicated synthetic cell datasets assumed as a cadastral map and a topographical map, and showed an improved result with the F-measures of 0.84 comparing to a previous matching method with the F-measure of 0.48. PMID:27348229

  5. Application of laser differential confocal technique in back vertex power measurement for phoropters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Fei; Li, Lin; Ding, Xiang; Liu, Wenli

    2012-10-01

    A phoropter is one of the most popular ophthalmic instruments used in optometry and the back vertex power (BVP) is one of the most important parameters to evaluate the refraction characteristics of a phoropter. In this paper, a new laser differential confocal vertex-power measurement method which takes advantage of outstanding focusing ability of laser differential confocal (LDC) system is proposed for measuring the BVP of phoropters. A vertex power measurement system is built up. Experimental results are presented and some influence factor is analyzed. It is demonstrated that the method based on LDC technique has higher measurement precision and stronger environmental anti-interference capability compared to existing methods. Theoretical analysis and experimental results indicate that the measurement error of the method is about 0.02m-1.

  6. Detecting Corresponding Vertex Pairs between Planar Tessellation Datasets with Agglomerative Hierarchical Cell-Set Matching.

    PubMed

    Huh, Yong; Yu, Kiyun; Park, Woojin

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes a method to detect corresponding vertex pairs between planar tessellation datasets. Applying an agglomerative hierarchical co-clustering, the method finds geometrically corresponding cell-set pairs from which corresponding vertex pairs are detected. Then, the map transformation is performed with the vertex pairs. Since these pairs are independently detected for each corresponding cell-set pairs, the method presents improved matching performance regardless of locally uneven positional discrepancies between dataset. The proposed method was applied to complicated synthetic cell datasets assumed as a cadastral map and a topographical map, and showed an improved result with the F-measures of 0.84 comparing to a previous matching method with the F-measure of 0.48. PMID:27348229

  7. Vertex displacements for acausal particles: testing the Lee-Wick standard model at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Álvarez, Ezequiel; Da Rold, Leandro; Schat, Carlos; Szynkman, Alejandro

    2009-10-01

    We propose to search for wrong displaced vertices, where decay products of the secondary vertex move towards the primary vertex instead of away from it, as a signature for microscopic violation of causality. We analyze in detail the leptonic sector of the recently proposed Lee-Wick Standard Model, which provides a well motivated framework to study acausal effects. We find that, assuming Minimal Flavor Violation, the Lee-Wick partners of the electron, tilde le and tilde e, can produce measurable wrong vertices at the LHC, the most promising channel being qbar qlongrightarrowblte_ltelongrightarrowe+e-jjjj. A Monte-Carlo simulation using MadGraph/MadEvent suggests that for Mllesssim450 GeV the measurement of these acausal vertex displacements should be accessible in the LHC era.

  8. Running coupling from the four-gluon vertex in Landau gauge Yang-Mills theory

    SciTech Connect

    Kellermann, Christian; Fischer, Christian S.

    2008-07-15

    We consider the running coupling from the four-gluon vertex in Landau gauge, SU(N{sub c}) Yang-Mills theory as given by a combination of dressing functions of the vertex and the gluon propagator. We determine these functions numerically from a coupled set of Dyson-Schwinger equations. We reproduce asymptotic freedom in the ultraviolet momentum region and find a coupling of order one at mid-momenta. In the infrared we find a nontrivial (i.e. nonzero) fixed point which is 3 orders of magnitude smaller than the corresponding fixed point in the coupling of the ghost-gluon vertex. This result explains why the Dyson-Schwinger and the functional renormalization group equations for the two point functions can agree in the infrared, although their structure is quite different. Our findings also support Zwanziger's notion of an infrared effective theory driven by the Faddeev-Popov determinant.

  9. Free Bosonic Vertex Operator Algebras on Genus Two Riemann Surfaces I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mason, Geoffrey; Tuite, Michael P.

    2010-12-01

    We define the partition and n-point functions for a vertex operator algebra on a genus two Riemann surface formed by sewing two tori together. We obtain closed formulas for the genus two partition function for the Heisenberg free bosonic string and for any pair of simple Heisenberg modules. We prove that the partition function is holomorphic in the sewing parameters on a given suitable domain and describe its modular properties for the Heisenberg and lattice vertex operator algebras and a continuous orbifolding of the rank two fermion vertex operator super algebra. We compute the genus two Heisenberg vector n-point function and show that the Virasoro vector one point function satisfies a genus two Ward identity for these theories.

  10. Orbifold Construction of Holomorphic Vertex Operator Algebras Associated to Inner Automorphisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Ching Hung; Shimakura, Hiroki

    2016-03-01

    In this article, we construct three new holomorphic vertex operator algebras of central charge 24 using the {Z}2-orbifold construction associated to inner automorphisms. Their weight one subspaces have the Lie algebra structures D 7,3 A 3,1 G 2,1, E 7,3 A 5,1, and {A_{8,3}A_{2,1}^2}. In addition, we discuss the constructions of holomorphic vertex operator algebras with Lie algebras A 5,6 C 2,3 A 1,2 and {D_{6,5}A_{1,1}^2} from holomorphic vertex operator algebras with Lie algebras C 5,3 G 2,2 A 1,1 and {A_{4,5}^2}, respectively.

  11. The Vertex Version of Weighted Wiener Number for Bicyclic Molecular Structures.

    PubMed

    Gao, Wei; Wang, Weifan

    2015-01-01

    Graphs are used to model chemical compounds and drugs. In the graphs, each vertex represents an atom of molecule and edges between the corresponding vertices are used to represent covalent bounds between atoms. We call such a graph, which is derived from a chemical compound, a molecular graph. Evidence shows that the vertex-weighted Wiener number, which is defined over this molecular graph, is strongly correlated to both the melting point and boiling point of the compounds. In this paper, we report the extremal vertex-weighted Wiener number of bicyclic molecular graph in terms of molecular structural analysis and graph transformations. The promising prospects of the application for the chemical and pharmacy engineering are illustrated by theoretical results achieved in this paper. PMID:26640513

  12. The Vertex Version of Weighted Wiener Number for Bicyclic Molecular Structures

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Wei; Wang, Weifan

    2015-01-01

    Graphs are used to model chemical compounds and drugs. In the graphs, each vertex represents an atom of molecule and edges between the corresponding vertices are used to represent covalent bounds between atoms. We call such a graph, which is derived from a chemical compound, a molecular graph. Evidence shows that the vertex-weighted Wiener number, which is defined over this molecular graph, is strongly correlated to both the melting point and boiling point of the compounds. In this paper, we report the extremal vertex-weighted Wiener number of bicyclic molecular graph in terms of molecular structural analysis and graph transformations. The promising prospects of the application for the chemical and pharmacy engineering are illustrated by theoretical results achieved in this paper. PMID:26640513

  13. Migdal's theorem and electron-phonon vertex corrections in Dirac materials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roy, Bitan; Sau, Jay D.; Das Sarma, S.

    2014-04-01

    Migdal's theorem plays a central role in the physics of electron-phonon interactions in metals and semiconductors, and has been extensively studied theoretically for parabolic band electronic systems in three-, two-, and one-dimensional systems over the last fifty years. In the current work, we theoretically study the relevance of Migdal's theorem in graphene and Weyl semimetals which are examples of 2D and 3D Dirac materials, respectively, with linear and chiral band dispersion. Our work also applies to 2D and 3D topological insulator systems. In Fermi liquids, the renormalization of the electron-phonon vertex scales as the ratio of sound (vs) to Fermi (vF) velocity, which is typically a small quantity. In two- and three-dimensional quasirelativistic systems, such as undoped graphene and Weyl semimetals, the one loop electron-phonon vertex renormalization, which also scales as η =vs/vF as η →0, is, however, enhanced by an ultraviolet logarithmic divergent correction, arising from the linear, chiral Dirac band dispersion. Such enhancement of the electron-phonon vertex can be significantly softened due to the logarithmic increment of the Fermi velocity, arising from the long range Coulomb interaction, and therefore, the electron-phonon vertex correction does not have a logarithmic divergence at low energy. Otherwise, the Coulomb interaction does not lead to any additional renormalization of the electron-phonon vertex. Therefore, electron-phonon vertex corrections in two- and three-dimensional Dirac fermionic systems scale as vs/vF0, where vF0 is the bare Fermi velocity, and small when vs≪vF0. These results, although explicitly derived for the intrinsic undoped systems, should hold even when the chemical potential is tuned away from the Dirac points.

  14. Project Reconstruct.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Helisek, Harriet; Pratt, Donald

    1994-01-01

    Presents a project in which students monitor their use of trash, input and analyze information via a database and computerized graphs, and "reconstruct" extinct or endangered animals from recyclable materials. The activity was done with second-grade students over a period of three to four weeks. (PR)

  15. Vaginal reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lesavoy, M.A.

    1985-05-01

    Vaginal reconstruction can be an uncomplicated and straightforward procedure when attention to detail is maintained. The Abbe-McIndoe procedure of lining the neovaginal canal with split-thickness skin grafts has become standard. The use of the inflatable Heyer-Schulte vaginal stent provides comfort to the patient and ease to the surgeon in maintaining approximation of the skin graft. For large vaginal and perineal defects, myocutaneous flaps such as the gracilis island have been extremely useful for correction of radiation-damaged tissue of the perineum or for the reconstruction of large ablative defects. Minimal morbidity and scarring ensue because the donor site can be closed primarily. With all vaginal reconstruction, a compliant patient is a necessity. The patient must wear a vaginal obturator for a minimum of 3 to 6 months postoperatively and is encouraged to use intercourse as an excellent obturator. In general, vaginal reconstruction can be an extremely gratifying procedure for both the functional and emotional well-being of patients.

  16. Arctic Curves of the Six-Vertex Model on Generic Domains: The Tangent Method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colomo, F.; Sportiello, A.

    2016-09-01

    We revisit the problem of determining the Arctic curve in the six-vertex model with domain wall boundary conditions. We describe an alternative method, by which we recover the previously conjectured analytic expression in the square domain. We adapt the method to work for a large class of domains, and for other models exhibiting limit shape phenomena. We study in detail some examples, and derive, in particular, the Arctic curve of the six-vertex model in a triangoloid domain at the ice point.

  17. Development and testing of novel stripixel detectors for the silicon vertex tracker at PHENIX

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haegemann, C.; Hoeferkamp, M.; Fields, D. E.; Zimmerman, A.; Turner, J.; Malik, M.; Edans, L.

    2005-12-01

    As a part of the upgrades for the PHENIX detector at RHIC,a silicon vertex tracking detector is planned. This detector will consist of two pixel layers followed by two strip-pixel layers in the barrel region,an d four mini-strip layers in the endcap region. As a part of the development phase of the vertex detector, we have set up three sensor testing facilities at Brookhaven National Laboratory, at State University of New York, Stonybrook, and at University of New Mexico to characterize the preproduction sensors, and develop our testing and quality assurance plans. Preliminary results from these test are presented here.

  18. The monodromy matrix in the F-basis for arbitrary six-vertex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martins, M. J.; Zuparic, M.

    2011-10-01

    We present the expressions for the monodromy matrix elements of the six-vertex model in the F-basis for arbitrary Boltzmann weights. The results rely solely on the property of unitarity and Yang-Baxter relations, avoiding any specific parameterization of the weights. This allows us to write complete algebraic expressions for the inner products and the underlying domain wall partition functions in the case of arbitrary rapidities. We then apply our results for the trigonometric six-vertex model in the presence of inhomogeneous electric fields and obtain a determinant formula for the respective on-shell scalar products.

  19. NLO vertex for a forward jet plus a rapidity gap at high energies

    SciTech Connect

    Hentschinski, Martin; Madrigal Martínez, José Daniel; Murdaca, Beatrice; Vera, Agustín Sabio

    2015-04-10

    We present the calculation of the forward jet vertex associated to a rapidity gap (coupling of a hard pomeron to the jet) in the BFKL formalism at next-to-leading order (NLO). Real emission contributions are computed via Lipatov’s effective action. The NLO jet vertex turns out to be finite within collinear factorization and allows, together with the NLO non-forward gluon Green’s function, to perform NLO studies of jet production in diffractive events (e.g. Mueller-Tang dijets)

  20. Consequences Of Fully Dressing Quark-Gluon Vertex Function With Two-Point Gluon Lines

    SciTech Connect

    Hrayr Matevosyan; Anthony Thomas; Peter Tandy

    2007-06-18

    We extend recent studies of the effects of quark-gluon vertex dressing upon the solutions of the Dyson-Schwinger equation for the quark propagator. A momentum delta function is used to represent the dominant infrared strength of the effective gluon propagator so that the resulting integral equations become algebraic. The guark-gluon vertex is constructed from the complete set of diagrams involving only 2-point gluon lines. The additional diagrams, including those with crossed gluon lines, are shown to make an important contribution to the DSE solutions for the quark propagator, because of their large color factors and the rapid growth in their number.

  1. Vertex Stimulation as a Control Site for Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation: A Concurrent TMS/fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Jung, JeYoung; Bungert, Andreas; Bowtell, Richard; Jackson, Stephen R.

    2016-01-01

    Background A common control condition for transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) studies is to apply stimulation at the vertex. An assumption of vertex stimulation is that it has relatively little influence over on-going brain processes involved in most experimental tasks, however there has been little attempt to measure neural changes linked to vertex TMS. Here we directly test this assumption by using a concurrent TMS/fMRI paradigm in which we investigate fMRI blood-oxygenation-level-dependent (BOLD) signal changes across the whole brain linked to vertex stimulation. Methods Thirty-two healthy participants to part in this study. Twenty-one were stimulated at the vertex, at 120% of resting motor threshold (RMT), with short bursts of 1 Hz TMS, while functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) BOLD images were acquired. As a control condition, we delivered TMS pulses over the left primary motor cortex using identical parameters to 11 other participants. Results Vertex stimulation did not evoke increased BOLD activation at the stimulated site. By contrast we observed widespread BOLD deactivations across the brain, including regions within the default mode network (DMN). To examine the effects of vertex stimulation a functional connectivity analysis was conducted. Conclusion The results demonstrated that stimulating the vertex with suprathreshold TMS reduced neural activity in brain regions related to the DMN but did not influence the functional connectivity of this network. Our findings provide brain imaging evidence in support of the use of vertex simulation as a control condition in TMS but confirm that vertex TMS induces regional widespread decreases in BOLD activation. PMID:26508284

  2. A direct digital control of the temperature for the VENUS vertex chamber at TRISTAN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohama, T.; Ishihara, N.; Utsumi, M.; Yamada, Y.

    1994-12-01

    A trial to introduce a DDC (direct digital control) system has been carried out in order to stabilize the temperature of the VENUS vertex chamber so as to obtain a spatial resolution of better than 50 μm. The temperature is controlled to within 0.1°C in the gas near to the chamber endplates.

  3. Spin-glass phase transitions and minimum energy of the random feedback vertex set problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Shao-Meng; Zeng, Ying; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2016-08-01

    A feedback vertex set (FVS) of an undirected graph contains vertices from every cycle of this graph. Constructing a FVS of sufficiently small cardinality is very difficult in the worst cases, but for random graphs this problem can be efficiently solved by converting it into an appropriate spin-glass model [H.-J. Zhou, Eur. Phys. J. B 86, 455 (2013), 10.1140/epjb/e2013-40690-1]. In the present work we study the spin-glass phase transitions and the minimum energy density of the random FVS problem by the first-step replica-symmetry-breaking (1RSB) mean-field theory. For both regular random graphs and Erdös-Rényi graphs, we determine the inverse temperature βl at which the replica-symmetric mean-field theory loses its local stability, the inverse temperature βd of the dynamical (clustering) phase transition, and the inverse temperature βs of the static (condensation) phase transition. These critical inverse temperatures all change with the mean vertex degree in a nonmonotonic way, and βd is distinct from βs for regular random graphs of vertex degrees K >60 , while βd are identical to βs for Erdös-Rényi graphs at least up to mean vertex degree c =512 . We then derive the zero-temperature limit of the 1RSB theory and use it to compute the minimum FVS cardinality.

  4. Silicon drift devices for track and vertex detection at the SSC

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Kraner, H.; Li, Z.; Ng, C.; Radeka, V.; Rehak, P.; Rescia, S. ); Clark, J.; Henderson, S.; Hsu, L.; Oliver, J.; Wilson, R. ); Clemen, M.; Humanic, T.; Kraus, D.; Vilkelis, G.; Yu, B. ); McDonald, K.; Lu, C.; Wall, M. ); Vacchi, A. ); Bert

    1990-01-01

    We report on the recent progress in the study of Semiconductor Drift (Memory) Detectors intended for an inner tracking and vertexing system for the SSC. The systematic studies and the calibration of the existing detectors and the simulated performance in the actual SSC environment are highlighted. 5 refs., 22 figs., 1 tab.

  5. SPY: A monitoring system for the silicon vertex detector of CDF

    SciTech Connect

    Bedeschi, F.; Galeotti, S.; Gherarducci, F.; Mariotti, M.; Morsani, F.; Passuello, D.; Tartarelli, F.; Grieco, G.M.; Nelson, C.; Tkaczyk, S.; Harber, C.; Ristori, L.; Bailey, M.; Sciacca, G.F.; Turini, N.; Cei, M.

    1993-12-01

    The authors describe the basic principles and the fundamentals of the design of the system of monitoring the CDF silicon vertex detector. Also described are some results and possible future developments of this promising way of checking complex detectors with high amount of channels.

  6. Spin-glass phase transitions and minimum energy of the random feedback vertex set problem.

    PubMed

    Qin, Shao-Meng; Zeng, Ying; Zhou, Hai-Jun

    2016-08-01

    A feedback vertex set (FVS) of an undirected graph contains vertices from every cycle of this graph. Constructing a FVS of sufficiently small cardinality is very difficult in the worst cases, but for random graphs this problem can be efficiently solved by converting it into an appropriate spin-glass model [H.-J. Zhou, Eur. Phys. J. B 86, 455 (2013)EPJBFY1434-602810.1140/epjb/e2013-40690-1]. In the present work we study the spin-glass phase transitions and the minimum energy density of the random FVS problem by the first-step replica-symmetry-breaking (1RSB) mean-field theory. For both regular random graphs and Erdös-Rényi graphs, we determine the inverse temperature β_{l} at which the replica-symmetric mean-field theory loses its local stability, the inverse temperature β_{d} of the dynamical (clustering) phase transition, and the inverse temperature β_{s} of the static (condensation) phase transition. These critical inverse temperatures all change with the mean vertex degree in a nonmonotonic way, and β_{d} is distinct from β_{s} for regular random graphs of vertex degrees K>60, while β_{d} are identical to β_{s} for Erdös-Rényi graphs at least up to mean vertex degree c=512. We then derive the zero-temperature limit of the 1RSB theory and use it to compute the minimum FVS cardinality. PMID:27627285

  7. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 1: Effects of stimulus delivery rate

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    Enhancement of the auditory vertex potentials with selective attention to dichotically presented tone pips was found to be critically sensitive to the range of inter-stimulus intervals in use. Only at the shortest intervals was a clear-cut enhancement of the latency component to stimuli observed for the attended ear.

  8. Conformal symmetry and differential regularization of the three-gluon vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Daniel Z.; Grignani, Gianluca; Johnson, Kenneth; Rius, Nuria

    1992-08-01

    The conformal symmetry of the QCD Lagrangian for massless quarks is broken both by renormalization effects and the gauge fixing procedure. Renormalized primitive divergent amplitudes have the property that their form away from the overall coincident point singularity is fully determined by the bare Lagrangian, and scale dependence is restricted to δ-functions at the singularity. If gauge fixing could be ignored, one would expect these amplitudes to be conformal invariant for non-coincident points. We find that the one-loop three-gluon vertex function Г μvp(x, y, z) is conformal invariant in this sense, if calculated in the background field formalism using the Feynman gauge for internal gluons. It is not vet clear why the expected breaking due to gauge fixing is absent. The conformal property implies that the gluon, ghost, and quark loop contributions to Г μvp are each purely numerical combinations of two universal conformal tensors Dμvp( x, y, z) and Cμvp( x, y, z) whose explicit form is given in the text. Only Dμvp has an ultraviolet divergence, although Cμvp requires a careful definition to resolve the expected ambiguity of a formally linearly divergent quantity. Regularization is straightforward and leads to a renormalized vertex function which satisfies the required Ward identity, and from which the beta function is easily obtained. Exact conformal invariance is broken in higher-loop orders, but we outline a speculative scenario in which the perturbative structure of the vertex function is determined from a conformal invariant primitive core by interplay of the renormalization group equation and Ward identities. Other results which are relevant to the conformal property include the following: (1) An analytic calculation shows that the linear deviation from the Feynman gauge is not conformal invariant, and a separate computation using symbolic manipulation confirms that among Dμbμ background gauges, only the Feynman gauge is conformal invariant. (2

  9. Application of an Electron-Tube Technique to the VENUS Vertex Chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohama, Taro

    2001-09-01

    This paper presents a new method to design and analyze drift chambers which are commonly used in high-energy physics experiments. The method is based on an analogy of the electron-tube theory; in particular, it treats the drift chamber with a grid wire plane as a “triode ion tube” filled with a gas. This method provides an analytical way in which to calculate the potential and/or charge of electrodes (wires) and the electric fields between them. The method also gives a semianalytic means to derive “X-T” relations in a chamber, and to calculate expected signal forms. This method has been developed specifically for designing a vertex chamber installed in the VENUS detector at the TRISTAN e+e- collider. The anode signal forms actually obtained by the VENUS vertex chamber are found to agree well with the predictions by this method.

  10. Static transport properties of random alloys: Vertex corrections in conserving approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turek, I.

    2016-06-01

    The theoretical formulation and numerical evaluation of the vertex corrections in multiorbital techniques of theories of electronic properties of random alloys are analyzed. It is shown that current approaches to static transport properties within the so-called conserving approximations lead to the inversion of a singular matrix as a direct consequence of the Ward identity relating the vertex corrections to one-particle self-energies. We propose a simple removal of the singularity for quantities (operators) with vanishing average values for electron states at the Fermi energy, such as the velocity or the spin torque; the proposed scheme is worked out in detail in the self-consistent Born approximation and the coherent-potential approximation. Applications involve calculations of the residual resistivity for various random alloys, including spin-polarized and relativistic systems, treated on an ab initio level, with particular attention paid to the role of different symmetries (inversion of space and time).

  11. Genus Two Partition and Correlation Functions for Fermionic Vertex Operator Superalgebras I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tuite, Michael P.; Zuevsky, Alexander

    2011-09-01

    We define the partition and n-point correlation functions for a vertex operator superalgebra on a genus two Riemann surface formed by sewing two tori together. For the free fermion vertex operator superalgebra we obtain a closed formula for the genus two continuous orbifold partition function in terms of an infinite dimensional determinant with entries arising from torus Szegő kernels. We prove that the partition function is holomorphic in the sewing parameters on a given suitable domain and describe its modular properties. Using the bosonized formalism, a new genus two Jacobi product identity is described for the Riemann theta series. We compute and discuss the modular properties of the generating function for all n-point functions in terms of a genus two Szegő kernel determinant. We also show that the Virasoro vector one point function satisfies a genus two Ward identity.

  12. Numerical Study of the Ghost-Ghost-Gluon Vertex on the Lattice

    SciTech Connect

    Mihara, A.; Cucchieri, A.; Mendes, T.

    2004-12-02

    It is well known that, in Landau gauge, the renormalization function of the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex Z-tilde1 (p2) is finite and constant, at least to all orders of perturbation theory. On the other hand, a direct non-perturbative verification of this result using numerical simulations of lattice QCD is still missing. Here we present a preliminary numerical study of the ghost-ghost-gluon vertex and of its corresponding renormalization function using Monte Carlo simulations in SU(2) lattice Landau gauge. Data were obtained in 4 dimensions for lattice couplings {beta} = 2.2, 2.3, 2.4 and lattice sides N = 4, 8, 16.

  13. Toward a Solution of the Edwards Equation for the Vertex Function of Quantum Electrodynamics in the Region of Large Momenta

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agamalieva, L. A.; Gadjiev, S. A.; Jafarov, R. G.

    2016-03-01

    An asymptotic expression for the vertex function in the region of large momenta in quantum electrodynamics is investigated in the ladder approximation. To formulate a calculational model in the ladder approximation, an iterative scheme has been used to solve the Schwinger-Dyson equation in the formalism of a bilocal source of fields. For the chirally symmetric leading approximation, the Edwards equation for the electron-positron-photon vertex has been obtained in the case of arbitrary values of the photon momentum. Our primary task is to develop a method to solve the vertex equation in the region of large momenta. Nontrivial behavior of the vertex function in the deeply inelastic region of momenta has been revealed.

  14. SVX II a silicon vertex detector for run II of the tevatron

    SciTech Connect

    Bortoletto, D.

    1994-11-01

    A microstrip silicon detector SVX II has been proposed for the upgrade of the vertex detector of the CDF experiment to be installed for run II of the Tevatron in 1998. Three barrels of four layers of double sided detectors will cover the interaction region. The requirement of the silicon tracker and the specification of the sensors are discussed together with the proposed R&D to verify the performance of the prototypes detectors produced by Sintef, Micron and Hamamatsu.

  15. N-string, g-loop vertex for the bosonic string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Vecchia, P.; Hornfeck, K.; Frau, M.; Lerda, A.; Sciuto, S.

    1988-06-01

    We construct the N-string, g-loop vertex VN, g for the orbital degrees of freedom of the bosonic string in terms of the first abelian differentials, the period matrix and the prime form. We also build the | g> vacuum recently discussed by many people in the framework of an operator formalism on an arbitrary Riemann surface; our expression also contains the measure that takes into account the ghost contribution.

  16. Pole expansion of the deuteron vertex function constrained by modern data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Locher, M. P.; Švarc, A.

    1984-02-01

    Invariant multipole expansions for the dp n vertex function of the type introduced by Gourdin et al. are reexamined. Modern and precise values for all the static deuteron properties are imposed and the electric and magnetic form factors of the deuteron are fitted. A good fit of the data requires three poles for the S state and three poles for the D state with only four free parameters.

  17. Charm and beauty lifetime measurements with the MARK II vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Jaros, J.A.

    1983-10-01

    We have measured the lifetime of the D/sup 0/ meson and the average lifetime of b-flavored hadrons with the MARK II vertex detector at PEP. We find tau/sub D/sup 0// = (4.0 +- 1.4/1.1 +- 1.0) x 10/sup -13/ sec and tau/sub b/ = (12.0 +- 4.5/3.6 +- 3.0 x 10/sup -13/ sec. 11 references.

  18. Hadronic jet-vertex association in a high-luminosity environment at the LHC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, David

    2008-04-01

    The LHC physics program will ultimately probe not only the highest energies ever produced in the laboratory but also the most numerous and frequent collisions between hadronic particles ever. These particle luminosities, much above the current Tevatron values, will produce hadronic jets from simultaneous uncorrelated proton-proton collisions in unprecedented numbers, thus introducing challenges for jet identification and association with the primary collision vertices, jet energy measurements and missing energy resolution. We continue work first introduced by the Tevatron experiments to combine tracking information with calorimeter jets in order to disentangle this jet background. Using an algorithm which assigns a jet-vertex association probability, jet selection is shown to be insensitive to the contributions from these ``pile-up'' collisions, which is essential for the many physics analyses dependent on event jet multiplicity. Furthermore, jet-by-jet multiple interaction energy corrections are now possible and improvements to the primary vertex identification from jet-vertex association are gained for several interesting physics processes.

  19. Towards an ab-initio treatment of nonlocal electronic correlations with dynamical vertex approximation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galler, Anna; Gunacker, Patrik; Tomczak, Jan; Thunström, Patrik; Held, Karsten

    Recently, approaches such as the dynamical vertex approximation (D ΓA) or the dual-fermion method have been developed. These diagrammatic approaches are going beyond dynamical mean field theory (DMFT) by including nonlocal electronic correlations on all length scales as well as the local DMFT correlations. Here we present our efforts to extend the D ΓA methodology to ab-initio materials calculations (ab-initio D ΓA). Our approach is a unifying framework which includes both GW and DMFT-type of diagrams, but also important nonlocal correlations beyond, e.g. nonlocal spin fluctuations. In our multi-band implementation we are using a worm sampling technique within continuous-time quantum Monte Carlo in the hybridization expansion to obtain the DMFT vertex, from which we construct the reducible vertex function using the two particle-hole ladders. As a first application we show results for transition metal oxides. Support by the ERC project AbinitioDGA (306447) is acknowledged.

  20. Lambda: A Mathematica package for operator product expansions in vertex algebras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekstrand, Joel

    2011-02-01

    We give an introduction to the Mathematica package Lambda, designed for calculating λ-brackets in both vertex algebras, and in SUSY vertex algebras. This is equivalent to calculating operator product expansions in two-dimensional conformal field theory. The syntax of λ-brackets is reviewed, and some simple examples are shown, both in component notation, and in N=1 superfield notation. Program summaryProgram title: Lambda Catalogue identifier: AEHF_v1_0 Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/summaries/AEHF_v1_0.html Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University, Belfast, N. Ireland Licensing provisions: GNU General Public License No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 18 087 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 131 812 Distribution format: tar.gz Programming language: Mathematica Computer: See specifications for running Mathematica V7 or above. Operating system: See specifications for running Mathematica V7 or above. RAM: Varies greatly depending on calculation to be performed. Classification: 4.2, 5, 11.1. Nature of problem: Calculate operator product expansions (OPEs) of composite fields in 2d conformal field theory. Solution method: Implementation of the algebraic formulation of OPEs given by vertex algebras, and especially by λ-brackets. Running time: Varies greatly depending on calculation requested. The example notebook provided takes about 3 s to run.

  1. Improvements to ATLAS track reconstruction for Run II

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cairo, Valentina Maria Martina

    2016-07-01

    Run II of the LHC will provide new challenges to track and vertex reconstruction with higher energies, denser jets and higher rates. A major change to the Inner Detector layout during the shutdown period has been the installation of the Insertable B-Layer, a fourth pixel layer located at a radius of 33 mm. This contribution discusses improvements to track reconstruction developed during the two year shutdown of the LHC. These include novel techniques developed to improve the performance in the dense cores of jets, optimisation for the expected conditions, and a big software campaign which lead to more than a factor of three decrease in the CPU time needed to process each recorded event.

  2. Design and construction of a Vertex Chamber and measurement of the average B-Hadron lifetime

    SciTech Connect

    Nelson, H.N.

    1987-10-01

    Four parameters describe the mixing of the three quark generations in the Standard Model of the weak charged current interaction. These four parameters are experimental inputs to the model. A measurement of the mean lifetime of hadrons containing b-quarks, or B-Hadrons, constrains the magnitudes of two of these parameters. Measurement of the B-Hadron lifetime requires a device that can measure the locations of the stable particles that result from B-Hadron decay. This device must function reliably in an inaccessible location, and survive high radiation levels. We describe the design and construction of such a device, a gaseous drift chamber. Tubes of 6.9 mm diameter, having aluminized mylar walls of 100 ..mu..m thickness are utilized in this Vertex Chamber. It achieves a spatial resolution of 45 ..mu..m, and a resolution in extrapolation to the B-Hadron decay location of 87 ..mu..m. Its inner layer is 4.6 cm from e/sup +/e/sup -/ colliding beams. The Vertex Chamber is situated within the MAC detector at PEP. We have analyzed botht he 94 pb/sup -1/ of integrated luminosity accumulated at ..sqrt..s = 29 GeV with the Vertex Chamber in place as well as the 210 pb/sup -1/ accumulated previously. We require a lepton with large momentum transverse to the event thrust axis to obtain a sample of events enriched in B-Hadron decays. The distribution of signed impact parameters of all tracks in these events is used to measure the B-Hadron flight distance, and hence lifetime. 106 refs., 79 figs., 20 tabs.

  3. LOGISTIC NETWORK REGRESSION FOR SCALABLE ANALYSIS OF NETWORKS WITH JOINT EDGE/VERTEX DYNAMICS

    PubMed Central

    Almquist, Zack W.; Butts, Carter T.

    2015-01-01

    Change in group size and composition has long been an important area of research in the social sciences. Similarly, interest in interaction dynamics has a long history in sociology and social psychology. However, the effects of endogenous group change on interaction dynamics are a surprisingly understudied area. One way to explore these relationships is through social network models. Network dynamics may be viewed as a process of change in the edge structure of a network, in the vertex set on which edges are defined, or in both simultaneously. Although early studies of such processes were primarily descriptive, recent work on this topic has increasingly turned to formal statistical models. Although showing great promise, many of these modern dynamic models are computationally intensive and scale very poorly in the size of the network under study and/or the number of time points considered. Likewise, currently used models focus on edge dynamics, with little support for endogenously changing vertex sets. Here, the authors show how an existing approach based on logistic network regression can be extended to serve as a highly scalable framework for modeling large networks with dynamic vertex sets. The authors place this approach within a general dynamic exponential family (exponential-family random graph modeling) context, clarifying the assumptions underlying the framework (and providing a clear path for extensions), and they show how model assessment methods for cross-sectional networks can be extended to the dynamic case. Finally, the authors illustrate this approach on a classic data set involving interactions among windsurfers on a California beach. PMID:26120218

  4. Maximum-Path Leaves Relative to Vertices and the Vertex One Center of a Spanning Tree: An Enumeration and Analysis of Configurations

    SciTech Connect

    Dowell, L.J.

    1998-10-01

    This paper enumerates the configurations of a pair of vertices (one of which is a leaf) relative to the unique vertex one center and the leaf of greatest path length from this center in a spanning tree of a graph. From this enumeration, it demonstrates that the vertex one center is between the vertex and the leaf of greatest path length from the vertex for every such pair of vertices. Using this result this paper develops an algorithm for the optimal reconfiguration of a tree infrastructure required to recover from the failure of a network element.

  5. Effective temperature in an interacting, externally driven, vertex system: theory and experiment on artificial spin ice

    SciTech Connect

    Nisoli, Cristiano; Li, Jiie; Ke, Xianglin; Lammert, Paul E; Schiffer, Peter; Crespi, Vincent H

    2009-01-01

    Frustrated arrays of interacting single-domain nanomagnets provide important model systems for statistical mechanics, because they map closely onto well-studied vertex models and are amenable to direct imaging and custom engineering. Although these systems are manifestly athermal, they demonstrate that the statistical properties of both hexagonal and square lattices can be described by an effective temperature based on the magnetostatic energy of the arrays. This temperature has predictive power for the moment configurations and is intimately related to how the moments are driven by an oscillating external field.

  6. An investigation of cell centered and cell vertex multigrid schemes for the Navier-Stokes equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radespiel, R.; Swanson, R. C.

    1989-01-01

    Two efficient and robust finite-volume multigrid schemes for solving the Navier-Stokes equations are investigated. These schemes employ either a cell centered or a cell vertex discretization technique. An explicit Runge-Kutta algorithm is used to advance the solution in time. Acceleration techniques are applied to obtain faster steady-state convergence. Accuracy and convergence of the schemes are examined. Computational results for transonic airfoil flows are essentially the same, even for a coarse mesh. Both schemes exhibit good convergence rates for a broad range of artificial dissipation coefficients.

  7. TGV32: A 32-channel preamplifier chip for the multiplicity vertex detector at PHENIX

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Ericson, M.N.; Frank, S.S.

    1997-12-31

    The TGV32, a 32-channel preamplifier-multiplicity discriminator chip for the Multiplicity Vertex Detector (MVD) at PHENIX, is a unique silicon preamplifier in that it provides both an analog output for storage in an analog memory and a weighted summed-current output for conversion to a channel multiplicity count. The architecture and test results of the chip are presented. Details about the design of the preamplifier, discriminator, and programmable digital-analog converters (DACs) performance as well as the process variations are presented. The chip is fabricated in a 1.2-{micro}m, n-well, CMOS process.

  8. Domino tilings and the six-vertex model at its free-fermion point

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Patrik L.; Spohn, Herbert

    2006-08-01

    At the free-fermion point, the six-vertex model with domain wall boundary conditions (DWBC) can be related to the Aztec diamond, a domino tiling problem. We study the mapping on the level of complete statistics for general domains and boundary conditions. This is obtained by associating with both models a set of non-intersecting lines in the Lindström-Gessel-Viennot (LGV) scheme. One of the consequences for DWBC is that the boundaries of the ordered phases are described by the Airy process in the thermodynamic limit.

  9. Neuromagnetic source reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Lewis, P.S.; Mosher, J.C.; Leahy, R.M.

    1994-12-31

    In neuromagnetic source reconstruction, a functional map of neural activity is constructed from noninvasive magnetoencephalographic (MEG) measurements. The overall reconstruction problem is under-determined, so some form of source modeling must be applied. We review the two main classes of reconstruction techniques-parametric current dipole models and nonparametric distributed source reconstructions. Current dipole reconstructions use a physically plausible source model, but are limited to cases in which the neural currents are expected to be highly sparse and localized. Distributed source reconstructions can be applied to a wider variety of cases, but must incorporate an implicit source, model in order to arrive at a single reconstruction. We examine distributed source reconstruction in a Bayesian framework to highlight the implicit nonphysical Gaussian assumptions of minimum norm based reconstruction algorithms. We conclude with a brief discussion of alternative non-Gaussian approachs.

  10. Nipple and areola reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Hutcheson, H A; Bostwick, J

    1989-01-01

    Nipple-areola reconstruction is an integral part of breast reconstruction. Optimum results are usually obtained when nipple-areola reconstruction is staged after the breast mound has attained its final shape and is well vascularized. The use of intradermal tattoo allows the use of a variety of nonpigmented donor sites. Women report that reconstruction of the nipple-areola enhances their overall satisfaction with breast reconstruction. The knowledgeable and skilled nurse is a valuable member of the professional team during this final phase of breast reconstruction. PMID:2479039

  11. Symmetry classes of alternating sign matrices in a nineteen-vertex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hagendorf, Christian; Morin-Duchesne, Alexi

    2016-05-01

    The nineteen-vertex model of Fateev and Zamolodchikov on a periodic lattice with an anti-diagonal twist is investigated. Its inhomogeneous transfer matrix is shown to have a simple eigenvalue, with the corresponding eigenstate displaying intriguing combinatorial features. Similar results were previously found for the same model with a diagonal twist. The eigenstate for the anti-diagonal twist is explicitly constructed using the quantum separation of variables technique. A number of sum rules and special components are computed and expressed in terms of Kuperberg’s determinants for partition functions of the inhomogeneous six-vertex model. The computations of some components of the special eigenstate for the diagonal twist are also presented. In the homogeneous limit, the special eigenstates become eigenvectors of the Hamiltonians of the integrable spin-one XXZ chain with twisted boundary conditions. Their sum rules and special components for both twists are expressed in terms of generating functions arising in the weighted enumeration of various symmetry classes of alternating sign matrices (ASMs). These include half-turn symmetric ASMs, quarter-turn symmetric ASMs, vertically symmetric ASMs, vertically and horizontally perverse ASMs and double U-turn ASMs. As side results, new determinant and pfaffian formulas for the weighted enumeration of various symmetry classes of alternating sign matrices are obtained.

  12. Further results for the two-loop Lcc vertex in the Landau gauge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetic, Gorazd; Kondrashuk, Igor

    2008-02-01

    In the previous paper hep-th/0604112 we calculated the first of the five planar two-loop diagrams for the Lcc vertex of the general non-Abelian Yang-Mills theory, the vertex which allows us in principle to obtain all other vertices via the Slavnov-Taylor identity. The integrand of this first diagram has a simple Lorentz structure. In this letter we present the result for the second diagram, whose integrand has a complicated Lorentz structure. The calculation is performed in the D-dimensional Euclidean position space. We initially perform one of the two integrations in the position space and then reduce the Lorentz structure to D-dimensional scalar single integrals. Some of the latter are then calculated by the uniqueness method, others by the Gegenbauer polynomial technique. The result is independent of the ultraviolet and the infrared scale. It is expressed in terms of the squares of spacetime intervals between points of the effective fields in the position space—it includes simple powers of these intervals, as well as logarithms and polylogarithms thereof, with some of the latter appearing within the Davydychev integral J(1, 1, 1). Concerning the rest of diagrams, we present the result for the contributions correponding to third, fourth and fifth diagrams without giving the details of calculation. The full result for the Lcc correlator of the effective action at the planar two-loop level is written explicitly for maximally supersymmetric Yang-Mills theory.

  13. Design of the cooling systems for the multiplicity and vertex detector

    SciTech Connect

    Bernardin, J.D.; Cunningham, R.

    1997-11-01

    The PHENIX experiment at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) at Brookhaven National Laboratory is being constructed to investigate a phase of matter termed the quark-gluon plasma. The plasma will be produced through the collision of two heavy ions. The multiplicity and vertex detector (MVD) located in the center of PHENIX will characterize the events, determine the collision point, and act as a central trigger. This report presents the final mechanical designs of the cooling systems for the Multiplicity and Vertex Detector (MVD). In particular, the design procedure and layouts are discussed for two different air cooling systems for the multichip modules and MVD enclosure, and a liquid cooling system for the low dropout voltage regulators. First of all, experimental prototype cooling system test results used to drive the final mechanical designs are summarized and discussed. Next, the cooling system requirements and design calculation for the various subsystem components are presented along with detailed lists of supply vendors, components, and costs. Finally, safety measures incorporated in the final mechanical design and operation procedures for each of the subsystems are detailed.

  14. Vertex-element models for anisotropic growth of elongated plant organs

    PubMed Central

    Fozard, John A.; Lucas, Mikaël; King, John R.; Jensen, Oliver E.

    2013-01-01

    New tools are required to address the challenge of relating plant hormone levels, hormone responses, wall biochemistry and wall mechanical properties to organ-scale growth. Current vertex-based models (applied in other contexts) can be unsuitable for simulating the growth of elongated organs such as roots because of the large aspect ratio of the cells, and these models fail to capture the mechanical properties of cell walls in sufficient detail. We describe a vertex-element model which resolves individual cells and includes anisotropic non-linear viscoelastic mechanical properties of cell walls and cell division whilst still being computationally efficient. We show that detailed consideration of the cell walls in the plane of a 2D simulation is necessary when cells have large aspect ratio, such as those in the root elongation zone of Arabidopsis thaliana, in order to avoid anomalous transverse swelling. We explore how differences in the mechanical properties of cells across an organ can result in bending and how cellulose microfibril orientation affects macroscale growth. We also demonstrate that the model can be used to simulate growth on realistic geometries, for example that of the primary root apex, using moderate computational resources. The model shows how macroscopic root shape can be sensitive to fine-scale cellular geometries. PMID:23847638

  15. On vertex algebra representations of the Schrödinger-Virasoro Lie algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unterberger, Jérémie

    2009-12-01

    The Schrödinger-Virasoro Lie algebra sv is an extension of the Virasoro Lie algebra by a nilpotent Lie algebra formed with a bosonic current of weight 3/2 and a bosonic current of weight 1. It is also a natural infinite-dimensional extension of the Schrödinger Lie algebra, which — leaving aside the invariance under time-translation — has been proved to be a symmetry algebra for many statistical physics models undergoing a dynamics with dynamical exponent z=2. We define in this article general Schrödinger-Virasoro primary fields by analogy with conformal field theory, characterized by a 'spin' index and a (non-relativistic) mass, and construct vertex algebra representations of sv out of a charged symplectic boson and a free boson and its associated vertex operators. We also compute two- and three-point functions of still conjectural massive fields that are defined by an analytic continuation with respect to a formal parameter.

  16. Multifractal cross-correlation effects in two-variable time series of complex network vertex observables

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    OświÈ©cimka, Paweł; Livi, Lorenzo; DroŻdŻ, Stanisław

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the scaling of the cross-correlations calculated for two-variable time series containing vertex properties in the context of complex networks. Time series of such observables are obtained by means of stationary, unbiased random walks. We consider three vertex properties that provide, respectively, short-, medium-, and long-range information regarding the topological role of vertices in a given network. In order to reveal the relation between these quantities, we applied the multifractal cross-correlation analysis technique, which provides information about the nonlinear effects in coupling of time series. We show that the considered network models are characterized by unique multifractal properties of the cross-correlation. In particular, it is possible to distinguish between Erdös-Rényi, Barabási-Albert, and Watts-Strogatz networks on the basis of fractal cross-correlation. Moreover, the analysis of protein contact networks reveals characteristics shared with both scale-free and small-world models.

  17. A vertically integrated pixel readout device for the Vertex Detector at the International Linear Collider

    SciTech Connect

    Deptuch, Grzegorz; Christian, David; Hoff, James; Lipton, Ronald; Shenai, Alpana; Trimpl, Marcel; Yarema, Raymond; Zimmerman, Tom; /Fermilab

    2008-12-01

    3D-Integrated Circuit technology enables higher densities of electronic circuitry per unit area without the use of nanoscale processes. It is advantageous for mixed mode design with precise analog circuitry because processes with conservative feature sizes typically present lower process dispersions and tolerate higher power supply voltages, resulting in larger separation of a signal from the noise floor. Heterogeneous wafers (different foundries or different process families) may be combined with some 3D integration methods, leading to the optimization of each tier in the 3D stack. Tracking and vertexing in future High-Energy Physics (HEP) experiments involves construction of detectors composed of up to a few billions of channels. Readout electronics must record the position and time of each measurement with the highest achievable precision. This paper reviews a prototype of the first 3D readout chip for HEP, designed for a vertex detector at the International Linear Collider. The prototype features 20 x 20 {micro}m{sup 2} pixels, laid out in an array of 64 x 64 elements and was fabricated in a 3-tier 0.18 {micro}m Fully Depleted SOI CMOS process at MIT-Lincoln Laboratory. The tests showed correct functional operation of the structure. The chip performs a zero-suppressed readout. Successive submissions are planned in a commercial 3D bulk 0.13 {micro}m CMOS process to overcome some of the disadvantages of an FDSOI process.

  18. Measurement of the B+ and B0 Lifetimes using Topological Vertexing at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.

    2004-01-29

    The lifetimes of B{sup +} and B{sup 0} mesons have been measured using a sample of 200,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays collected by the SLD experiment at the SLC between 1993 and 1996. The analysis is an improvement of the inclusive topological measurement recently reported and includes the 50,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays collected in 1996 with the SLD upgrade vertex detector. A high statistics sample of 12841 (7942) charged (neutral) vertices with good charge purity is obtained. The charge purity is enhanced by using the vertex mass, the SLC electron beam polarization (63% for 1993 and 77% for 1994-6) and an opposite hemisphere jet charge technique. Lifetime fits for the full data sample yield: {tau}{sub B{sup +}} = 1.698 {+-} 0.040(stat) {+-} 0.046(syst) ps, {tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = 1.581 {+-} 0.043(stat) {+-} 0.061(syst) ps, {tau}{sub B{sup +}}/{tau}{sub B{sup 0}} = 1.072 {+-} {sub 0.049}{sup 0.052}(stat) {+-} 0.038(syst).

  19. Estimating Vertex Measures in Social Networks by Sampling Completions of RDS Trees

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Bilal; Dombrowski, Kirk; Curtis, Ric; Wendel, Travis

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a new method for obtaining network properties from incomplete data sets. Problems associated with missing data represent well-known stumbling blocks in Social Network Analysis. The method of “estimating connectivity from spanning tree completions” (ECSTC) is specifically designed to address situations where only spanning tree(s) of a network are known, such as those obtained through respondent driven sampling (RDS). Using repeated random completions derived from degree information, this method forgoes the usual step of trying to obtain final edge or vertex rosters, and instead aims to estimate network-centric properties of vertices probabilistically from the spanning trees themselves. In this paper, we discuss the problem of missing data and describe the protocols of our completion method, and finally the results of an experiment where ECSTC was used to estimate graph dependent vertex properties from spanning trees sampled from a graph whose characteristics were known ahead of time. The results show that ECSTC methods hold more promise for obtaining network-centric properties of individuals from a limited set of data than researchers may have previously assumed. Such an approach represents a break with past strategies of working with missing data which have mainly sought means to complete the graph, rather than ECSTC's approach, which is to estimate network properties themselves without deciding on the final edge set. PMID:25838988

  20. Event Reconstruction for Many-core Architectures using Java

    SciTech Connect

    Graf, Norman A.; /SLAC

    2012-04-19

    Although Moore's Law remains technically valid, the performance enhancements in computing which traditionally resulted from increased CPU speeds ended years ago. Chip manufacturers have chosen to increase the number of core CPUs per chip instead of increasing clock speed. Unfortunately, these extra CPUs do not automatically result in improvements in simulation or reconstruction times. To take advantage of this extra computing power requires changing how software is written. Event reconstruction is globally serial, in the sense that raw data has to be unpacked first, channels have to be clustered to produce hits before those hits are identified as belonging to a track or shower, tracks have to be found and fit before they are vertexed, etc. However, many of the individual procedures along the reconstruction chain are intrinsically independent and are perfect candidates for optimization using multi-core architecture. Threading is perhaps the simplest approach to parallelizing a program and Java includes a powerful threading facility built into the language. We have developed a fast and flexible reconstruction package (org.lcsim) written in Java that has been used for numerous physics and detector optimization studies. In this paper we present the results of our studies on optimizing the performance of this toolkit using multiple threads on many-core architectures.

  1. A time-based front-end ASIC for the silicon micro strip sensors of the bar PANDA Micro Vertex Detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Di Pietro, V.; Brinkmann, K.-Th.; Riccardi, A.; Ritman, J.; Rivetti, A.; Rolo, M. D.; Stockmanns, T.; Zambanini, A.

    2016-03-01

    The bar PANDA (Antiproton Annihilation at Darmstadt) experiment foresees many detectors for tracking, particle identification and calorimetry. Among them, the innermost is the MVD (Micro Vertex Detector) responsible for a precise tracking and the reconstruction of secondary vertices. This detector will be built from both hybrid pixel (two inner barrels and six forward disks) and double-sided micro strip (two outer barrels and outer rim of the last two disks) silicon sensors. A time-based approach has been chosen for the readout ASIC of the strip sensors. The PASTA (bar PANDA Strip ASIC) chip aims at high resolution time-stamping and charge information through the Time over Threshold (ToT) technique. It benefits from a Time to Digital Converter (TDC) allowing a time bin width down to 50 ps. The analog front-end was designed to serve both n-type and p-type strips and the performed simulations show remarkable performances in terms of linearity and electronic noise. The TDC consists of an analog interpolator, a digital local controller, and a digital global controller as the common back-end for all of the 64 channels.

  2. The quark-gluon vertex in Landau gauge QCD: Its role in dynamical chiral symmetry breaking and quark confinement

    SciTech Connect

    Alkofer, Reinhard; Fischer, Christian S. Llanes-Estrada, Felipe J.; Schwenzer, Kai

    2009-01-15

    The infrared behavior of the quark-gluon vertex of quenched Landau gauge QCD is studied by analyzing its Dyson-Schwinger equation. Building on previously obtained results for Green functions in the Yang-Mills sector, we analytically derive the existence of power-law infrared singularities for this vertex. We establish that dynamical chiral symmetry breaking leads to the self-consistent generation of components of the quark-gluon vertex forbidden when chiral symmetry is forced to stay in the Wigner-Weyl mode. In the latter case the running strong coupling assumes an infrared fixed point. If chiral symmetry is broken, either dynamically or explicitly, the running coupling is infrared divergent. Based on a truncation for the quark-gluon vertex Dyson-Schwinger equation which respects the analytically determined infrared behavior, numerical results for the coupled system of the quark propagator and vertex Dyson-Schwinger equation are presented. The resulting quark mass function as well as the vertex function show only a very weak dependence on the current quark mass in the deep infrared. From this we infer by an analysis of the quark-quark scattering kernel a linearly rising quark potential with an almost mass independent string tension in the case of broken chiral symmetry. Enforcing chiral symmetry does lead to a Coulomb type potential. Therefore, we conclude that chiral symmetry breaking and confinement are closely related. Furthermore, we discuss aspects of confinement as the absence of long-range van der Waals forces and Casimir scaling. An examination of experimental data for quarkonia provides further evidence for the viability of the presented mechanism for quark confinement in the Landau gauge.

  3. Breast Reconstruction after Mastectomy

    PubMed Central

    Schmauss, Daniel; Machens, Hans-Günther; Harder, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Breast cancer is the leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. Its surgical approach has become less and less mutilating in the last decades. However, the overall number of breast reconstructions has significantly increased lately. Nowadays, breast reconstruction should be individualized at its best, first of all taking into consideration not only the oncological aspects of the tumor, neo-/adjuvant treatment, and genetic predisposition, but also its timing (immediate versus delayed breast reconstruction), as well as the patient’s condition and wish. This article gives an overview over the various possibilities of breast reconstruction, including implant- and expander-based reconstruction, flap-based reconstruction (vascularized autologous tissue), the combination of implant and flap, reconstruction using non-vascularized autologous fat, as well as refinement surgery after breast reconstruction. PMID:26835456

  4. A Measurement of the production cross section of t$\\bar{t}$ in p$\\bar{p}$ collisions at √s = 1.96 TeV using secondary vertex b-tagging.

    SciTech Connect

    Bachacou, Henri

    2004-12-01

    A measurement of the t$\\bar{t}$ pair production cross section is presented using 162 pb -1 of data collected by the CDF experiment during Run II at the Tevatron. t$\\bar{t}$} events in the lepton+jets channel are isolated by identifying electrons and muons, reconstructing jets and transverse missing energy, and identifying b jets with a secondary vertex tagging algorithm. The efficiency of the algorithm is measured in a control sample using a novel technique that is less dependent on the simulation. For a top quark mass of 175 GeV/c2 , a cross section of σt$\\bar{t}$ = 5.6$+1.2\\atop{-1.1}$(stat.)$+0.9\\atop{-0.6}$(syst.)pb is measured.

  5. Reoperative midface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Acero, Julio; García, Eloy

    2011-02-01

    Reoperative reconstruction of the midface is a challenging issue because of the complexity of this region and the severity of the aesthetic and functional sequela related to the absence or failure of a primary reconstruction. The different situations that can lead to the indication of a reoperative reconstructive procedure after previous oncologic ablative procedures in the midface are reviewed. Surgical techniques, anatomic problems, and limitations affecting the reoperative reconstruction in this region of the head and neck are discussed.

  6. [Breast reconstruction after mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Ho Quoc, C; Delay, E

    2013-02-01

    The mutilating surgery for breast cancer causes deep somatic and psychological sequelae. Breast reconstruction can mitigate these effects and permit the patient to help rebuild their lives. The purpose of this paper is to focus on breast reconstruction techniques and on factors involved in breast reconstruction. The methods of breast reconstruction are presented: objectives, indications, different techniques, operative risks, and long-term monitoring. Many different techniques can now allow breast reconstruction in most patients. Clinical cases are also presented in order to understand the results we expect from a breast reconstruction. Breast reconstruction provides many benefits for patients in terms of rehabilitation, wellness, and quality of life. In our mind, breast reconstruction should be considered more as an opportunity and a positive choice (the patient can decide to do it), than as an obligation (that the patient would suffer). The consultation with the surgeon who will perform the reconstruction is an important step to give all necessary informations. It is really important that the patient could speak again with him before undergoing reconstruction, if she has any doubt. The quality of information given by medical doctors is essential to the success of psychological intervention. This article was written in a simple, and understandable way to help gynecologists giving the best information to their patients. It is maybe also possible to let them a copy of this article, which would enable them to have a written support and would facilitate future consultation with the surgeon who will perform the reconstruction.

  7. Form factor of the B meson off-shell for the vertex B{sub s}*BK

    SciTech Connect

    Cerqueira, A. Jr.; Bracco, M. E.

    2010-11-12

    In this work we evaluate the coupling constant and the form factor for the vertex B{sub s}*BK using the QCD Sum Rules. In this case we consider the B meson off shell. The only theoretical evaluation for the coupling constant was made using the Heavy Hadron Chiral Perturbation Theory (HHChPT) and we made comparison with this result.

  8. Interacting dimers on the honeycomb lattice: an exact solution of the five-vertex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, H. Y.; Wu, F. Y.; Kunz, H.; Kim, D.

    1996-02-01

    The problem of close-packed dimers on the honeycomb lattice was solved by Kasteleyn in 1963. Here we extend the solution to include interactions between neighboring dimers in two spatial lattice directions. The solution is obtained by using the method of Bethe ansatz and by converting the dimer problem into a five-vertex problem. The complete phase diagram is obtained and it is found that a new frozen phase, in which the attracting dimers prevail, arises when the interaction is attractive. For repulsive dimer interactions a new first-order line separating two frozen phases occurs. The transitions are continuous and the critical behavior in the disorder regime is found to be the same as in the case of noninteracting dimers characterized by a specific heat exponent α = {1}/{2}.

  9. Nuclear vertex constants and asymptotic normalization coefficients for the tritium nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Babenko, V. A.; Petrov, N. M.

    2009-12-15

    The properties of the nuclear vertex constant for virtual triton decay to a deuteron and a neutron (T {sup {yields}} d + n) are investigated along with the properties of the asymptotic normalization coefficient defined for the triton wave function and related to this constant. These quantities are calculated numerically on the basis of an equation that relates the asymptotic normalization coefficient to the triton effective radius {rho}{sub T}, which was introduced in the present study. The values of G{sub T}{sup 2} = 1.244(68) fm and C{sub T}{sup 2} = 2.958(162) found from our calculations are in good agreement with experimental and theoretical estimates obtained for these quantities in other studies. Physical properties of the triton virtual state are also discussed.

  10. Vertex potentials evoked during auditory signal detection - Relation to decision criteria

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Squires, K. C.; Hillyard, S. A.; Lindsay, P. H.

    1973-01-01

    Vertex potentials were recorded from eight subjects performing in an auditory threshold detection task with rating scale responses. The amplitudes and latencies of both the N1 and the late positive (P3) components were found to vary systematically with the criterion level of the decision. These changes in the waveshape of the N1 component were comparable to those produced by varying the signal intensity in a passive condition, but the late positive component in the active task was not similarly related to the passively evoked P2 component. It was suggested that the N1 and P3 components represent distinctive aspects of the decision process, with N1 signifying the quantity of signal information received and P3 reflecting the certainty of the decision based upon that information.

  11. tbW vertex in the littlest Higgs model with T parity

    SciTech Connect

    Penunuri, F.; Larios, F.

    2009-01-01

    A study of the effective tbW vertex is done in the littlest Higgs model with T parity that includes the one-loop induced weak dipole coefficient f{sub 2R}. The top's width and the W-boson helicity in the t{yields}bW{sup +} decay as well as the t-channel and the s-channel modes of single top quark production at the LHC are then obtained for the tbW coupling. Our calculation is done in the Feynman-'t Hooft gauge, and we provide details of the analysis, like exact formulas (to all orders of the expansion variable v/f) of masses and mixing angles of all of the particles involved. Also, a complete and exact diagonalization (and normalization) of the scalar sector of the model is made.

  12. Vertex intrinsic fitness: how to produce arbitrary scale-free networks.

    PubMed

    Servedio, Vito D P; Caldarelli, Guido; Buttà, Paolo

    2004-11-01

    We study a recent model of random networks based on the presence of an intrinsic character of the vertices called fitness. The vertex fitnesses are drawn from a given probability distribution density. The edges between pairs of vertices are drawn according to a linking probability function depending on the fitnesses of the two vertices involved. We study here different choices for the probability distribution densities and the linking functions. We find that, irrespective of the particular choices, the generation of scale-free networks is straightforward. We then derive the general conditions under which scale-free behavior appears. This model could then represent a possible explanation for the ubiquity and robustness of such structures. PMID:15600711

  13. Software Development for the Commissioning of the Jefferson Lab Hall B Silicon Vertex Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruger, Justin; Ziegler, Veronique; Gotra, Yuri; Gavalian, Gagik

    2015-04-01

    One of the new additions to Hall B at the Thomas Jefferson National Accelerator Facility is a Silicon Vertex Tracker system that includes 4 regions with 10, 14, 18, 24 sectors of double-sided modules. Recently, the SVT hardware group has completed construction and installation of regions one and two on a cosmic ray test stand. This test setup will be used to preform the first cosmic ray efficiency analysis of the SVT with the availability of 8 measurement layers. In order to study efficiency and module performance, a set of software packages had to be written to decode, analyze and provide feedback on the output from data acquisition. This talk will provide an overview of the software validation suite designed and developed for Hall B and a report on its current utilization for SVT cosmic data analysis.

  14. A bonding study toward the quality assurance of Belle-II silicon vertex detector modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, K. H.; Jeon, H. B.; Park, H.; Uozumi, S.; Adamczyk, K.; Aihara, H.; Angelini, C.; Aziz, T.; Babu, V.; Bacher, S.; Bahinipati, S.; Barberio, E.; Baroncelli, T.; Basith, A. K.; Batignani, G.; Bauer, A.; Behera, P. K.; Bergauer, T.; Bettarini, S.; Bhuyan, B.; Bilka, T.; Bosi, F.; Bosisio, L.; Bozek, A.; Buchsteiner, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Červenkov, D.; Chendvankar, S. R.; Dash, N.; Divekar, S. T.; Doležal, Z.; Dutta, D.; Forti, F.; Friedl, M.; Hara, K.; Higuchi, T.; Horiguchi, T.; Irmler, C.; Ishikawa, A.; Joo, C. W.; Kandra, J.; Kato, E.; Kawasaki, T.; Kodyš, P.; Kohriki, T.; Koike, S.; Kolwalkar, M. M.; Kvasnička, P.; Lanceri, L.; Lettenbicher, J.; Mammini, P.; Mayekar, S. N.; Mohanty, G. B.; Mohanty, S.; Morii, T.; Nakamura, K. R.; Natkaniec, Z.; Negishi, K.; Nisar, N. K.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Paladino, A.; Paoloni, E.; Pilo, F.; Profeti, A.; Rao, K. K.; Rashevskaia, I.; Rizzo, G.; Rozanska, M.; Sandilya, S.; Sasaki, J.; Sato, N.; Schultschik, S.; Schwanda, C.; Seino, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Stypula, J.; Tanaka, S.; Tanida, K.; Taylor, G. N.; Thalmeier, R.; Thomas, R.; Tsuboyama, T.; Urquijo, P.; Vitale, L.; Volpi, M.; Watanuki, S.; Watson, I. J.; Webb, J.; Wiechczynski, J.; Williams, S.; Würkner, B.; Yamamoto, H.; Yin, H.; Yoshinobu, T.

    2016-09-01

    A silicon vertex detector (SVD) for the Belle-II experiment comprises four layers of double-sided silicon strip detectors (DSSDs), assembled in a ladder-like structure. Each ladder module of the outermost SVD layer has four rectangular and one trapezoidal DSSDs supported by two carbon-fiber ribs. In order to achieve a good signal-to-noise ratio and minimize material budget, a novel chip-on-sensor "Origami" method has been employed for the three rectangular sensors that are sandwiched between the backward rectangular and forward (slanted) trapezoidal sensors. This paper describes the bonding procedures developed for making electrical connections between sensors and signal fan-out flex circuits (i.e., pitch adapters), and between pitch adapters and readout chips as well as the results in terms of the achieved bonding quality and pull force.

  15. Selective attention and the auditory vertex potential. 2: Effects of signal intensity and masking noise

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schwent, V. L.; Hillyard, S. A.; Galambos, R.

    1975-01-01

    A randomized sequence of tone bursts was delivered to subjects at short inter-stimulus intervals with the tones originating from one of three spatially and frequency specific channels. The subject's task was to count the tones in one of the three channels at a time, ignoring the other two, and press a button after each tenth tone. In different conditions, tones were given at high and low intensities and with or without a background white noise to mask the tones. The N sub 1 component of the auditory vertex potential was found to be larger in response to attended channel tones in relation to unattended tones. This selective enhancement of N sub 1 was minimal for loud tones presented without noise and increased markedly for the lower tone intensity and in noise added conditions.

  16. A bottom collider vertex detector design, Monte-Carlo simulation and analysis package

    SciTech Connect

    Lebrun, P.

    1990-10-01

    A detailed simulation of the BCD vertex detector is underway. Specifications and global design issues are briefly reviewed. The BCD design based on double sided strip detector is described in more detail. The GEANT3-based Monte-Carlo program and the analysis package used to estimate detector performance are discussed in detail. The current status of the expected resolution and signal to noise ratio for the golden'' CP violating mode B{sub d} {yields} {pi}{sup +}{pi}{sup {minus}} is presented. These calculations have been done at FNAL energy ({radical}s = 2.0 TeV). Emphasis is placed on design issues, analysis techniques and related software rather than physics potentials. 20 refs., 46 figs.

  17. Assembly procedure for the silicon pixel ladder for PHENIX silicon vertex tracker.

    SciTech Connect

    Onuki, Y.; PHENIX Collaboration, et al.

    2009-05-08

    The silicon vertex tracker (VTX) will be installed in the summer of 2010 to enhance the physics capabilities of the Pioneering High Energy Nuclear Interaction eXperiment (PHENIX) experiment at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The VTX consists of two types of silicon detectors: a pixel detector and a strip detector. The pixel detector consists of 30 pixel ladders placed on the two inner cylindrical layers of the VTX. The ladders are required to be assembled with high precision, however, they should be assembled in both cost and time efficient manner. We have developed an assembly bench for the ladder with several assembly fixtures and a quality assurance (Q/A) system using a 3D measurement machine. We have also developed an assembly procedure for the ladder, including a method for dispensing adhesive uniformly and encapsulation of bonding wires. The developed procedures were adopted in the assembly of the first pixel ladder and satisfy the requirements.

  18. Direct Measurement of Ab and Ac Using Vertex/Kaon Charge Tags at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.

    2004-10-13

    Exploiting the manipulation of the SLC electron-beam polarization, we present precise direct measurements of the parity violation parameters A{sub c} and A{sub b} in the Z boson-c quark and Z boson-b quark coupling. Quark/antiquark discrimination is accomplished via a unique algorithm that takes advantage of the precise SLD CCD vertex detector, employing the net charge of displaced vertices as well as the charge of kaons that emanate from those vertices. From the 1996-98 sample of 400,000 Z decays, produced with an average beam polarization of 73.4%, we find A{sub c} = 0.673 {+-} 0.029(stat.) {+-} 0.023(syst.) and A{sub b} = 0.919 {+-} 0.018(stat.) {+-} 0.017(syst.).

  19. A combinatorial interpretation of the free-fermion condition of the six-vertex model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brak, R.; Owczarek, A.

    1999-05-01

    The free-fermion condition of the six-vertex model provides a five-parameter sub-manifold on which the Bethe ansatz equations for the wavenumbers that enter into the eigenfunctions of the transfer matrices of the model decouple, hence allowing explicit solutions. Such conditions arose originally in early field-theoretic S-matrix approaches. Here we provide a combinatorial explanation for the condition in terms of a generalized Gessel-Viennot involution. By doing so we extend the use of the Gessel-Viennot theorem, originally devised for non-intersecting walks only, to a special weighted type of intersecting walk, and hence express the partition function of N such walks starting and finishing at fixed endpoints in terms of the single-walk partition functions.

  20. Lattice twist operators and vertex operators in sine-Gordon theory in one dimension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Masaaki; Voit, Johannes

    2002-04-01

    In one dimension, the exponential position operators introduced in a theory of polarization are identified with the twist operators appearing in the Lieb-Schultz-Mattis argument, and their finite-size expectation values z(q)L measure the overlap between the q-fold degenerate ground state and an excited state. Insulators are characterized by z∞≠0, and different states are distinguished by the sign of zL. We identify zL with ground-state expectation values of vertex operators in the sine-Gordon model. This allows an accurate detection of quantum phase transitions in the universality classes of the Gaussian and the SU(2)1 Wess-Zumino-Novikov-Witten models. We apply this theory to the half-filled extended Hubbard model and obtain agreement with the level-crossing method.

  1. Fusion Construction of the Vertex Operators in Higher Level Representation of the Elliptic Quantum Group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Konno, Hitoshi

    2002-11-01

    After a short summary on the elliptic quantum group {B}q,λ (widehat {scr {sl}}2) and the elliptic algebra Uq,p(widehat {sl}2), we present a free field representation of the Drinfeld currents and the vertex operators (VO's) in the level k. We especially demonstrate a construction of the higher spin type I VO's by fusing the spin 1/2 type I VO's and fix a rule of attaching the screening current S(z) associated with the g-deformed Zk-parafermion theory. As a result we get a free field representation of the higher spin type I VO's which commutation relation by the fused Boltzmann weight coefficients is manifest.

  2. Vertex intrinsic fitness: How to produce arbitrary scale-free networks

    SciTech Connect

    Servedio, Vito D.P.; Caldarelli, Guido; Butta, Paolo

    2004-11-01

    We study a recent model of random networks based on the presence of an intrinsic character of the vertices called fitness. The vertex fitnesses are drawn from a given probability distribution density. The edges between pairs of vertices are drawn according to a linking probability function depending on the fitnesses of the two vertices involved. We study here different choices for the probability distribution densities and the linking functions. We find that, irrespective of the particular choices, the generation of scale-free networks is straightforward. We then derive the general conditions under which scale-free behavior appears. This model could then represent a possible explanation for the ubiquity and robustness of such structures.

  3. Five-vertex Archimedean surface tessellation by lanthanide-directed molecular self-assembly

    PubMed Central

    Écija, David; Urgel, José I.; Papageorgiou, Anthoula C.; Joshi, Sushobhan; Auwärter, Willi; Seitsonen, Ari P.; Klyatskaya, Svetlana; Ruben, Mario; Fischer, Sybille; Vijayaraghavan, Saranyan; Reichert, Joachim; Barth, Johannes V.

    2013-01-01

    The tessellation of the Euclidean plane by regular polygons has been contemplated since ancient times and presents intriguing aspects embracing mathematics, art, and crystallography. Significant efforts were devoted to engineer specific 2D interfacial tessellations at the molecular level, but periodic patterns with distinct five-vertex motifs remained elusive. Here, we report a direct scanning tunneling microscopy investigation on the cerium-directed assembly of linear polyphenyl molecular linkers with terminal carbonitrile groups on a smooth Ag(111) noble-metal surface. We demonstrate the spontaneous formation of fivefold Ce–ligand coordination motifs, which are planar and flexible, such that vertices connecting simultaneously trigonal and square polygons can be expressed. By tuning the concentration and the stoichiometric ratio of rare-earth metal centers to ligands, a hierarchic assembly with dodecameric units and a surface-confined metal–organic coordination network yielding the semiregular Archimedean snub square tiling could be fabricated. PMID:23576764

  4. Design and performance of beam test electronics for the PHENIX Multiplicity Vertex Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Britton, C.L. Jr.; Bryan, W.L.; Emery, M.S.

    1996-12-31

    The system architecture and test results of the custom circuits and beam test system for the Multiplicity-Vertex Detector (MVD) for the PHENIX detector collaboration at the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC) are presented in this paper. The final detector per-channel signal processing chain will consist of a preamplifier-gain stage, a current-mode summed multiplicity discriminator, a 64-deep analog memory (simultaneous read-write), a post-memory analog correlator, and a 10-bit 5 {mu}s ADC. The Heap Manager provides all timing control, data buffering, and data formatting for a single 256-channel multi-chip module (MCM). Each chip set is partitioned into 32-channel sets. Beam test (16-cell deep memory) performance for the various blocks will be presented as well as the ionizing radiation damage performance of the 1.2 {mu} n-well CMOS process used for preamplifier fabrication.

  5. Vertex-Atom-Dependent Rectification in Triangular h-BNC/Triangular Graphene Heterojunctions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Lihua; Zhao, Jianguo; Zhang, Zizhen; Ding, Bingjun; Guo, Yong

    2016-08-01

    First-principles calculations have shown dramatically unexpected rectifying regularities in particular heterojunction configurations with triangular hexagonal boron-nitride-carbon ( h-BNC) and triangular graphene (TG) sandwiched between two armchair graphene nanoribbon electrodes. When the triangular h-BNC and TG are linked by vertex atoms of nitrogen and carbon (boron and carbon), forward (reverse) rectifying performance can be observed. Moreover, for a certain linking mode, the larger the elemental proportion p (where p = N_{{{boron}} + {{nitrogen}}} /N_{{{boron}} + {{nitrogen}} + {{carbon}}} ) in the h-BNC, the larger the ratio for forward (reverse) rectification. A mechanism for these rectification behaviors is suggested. The findings provide insights into control of rectification behaviors in TG-based nanodevices.

  6. Proposal for Research and Development: Vertexing, Tracking, and Data Acquisition for the Bottom Collider Detector

    SciTech Connect

    Castro, H.; Gomez, B.; Rivera, F.; Sanabria, J.-C.; Yager, P.; Barsotti, E.; Bowden, M.; Childress, S.; Lebrun, P.; Morfin, J.; Roberts, L.A.; /Fermilab /Florida U. /Houston U. /IIT /Iowa U. /Northeastern U. /Northern Illinois U. /Ohio State U. /Oklahoma U. /Pennsylvania U.

    1989-01-01

    The authors propose a program of research and development into the detector systems needed for a B-physics experiment at the Fermilab p-{bar p} Collider. The initial emphasis is on the critical issues of vertexting, tracking, and data acquisition in the high-multiplicity, high-rate collider environment. R and D for the particle-identification systems (RICH counters, TRD's, and EM calorimeter) will be covered in a subsequent proposal. To help focus their efforts in a timely manner, they propose the first phase of the R and D should culminate in a system test at the C0 collider intersect during the 1990-1991 run: a small fraction of the eventual vertex detector would be used to demonstrate that secondary-decay vertices can be found at a hadron collider. The proposed budget for the r and D program is $800k in 1989, $1.5M in 1990, and $1.6M in 1991.

  7. Generalized nonequilibrium vertex correction method in coherent medium theory for quantum transport simulation of disordered nanoelectronics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, Jiawei; Ke, Youqi

    2016-07-01

    Electron transport properties of nanoelectronics can be significantly influenced by the inevitable and randomly distributed impurities/defects. For theoretical simulation of disordered nanoscale electronics, one is interested in both the configurationally averaged transport property and its statistical fluctuation that tells device-to-device variability induced by disorder. However, due to the lack of an effective method to do disorder averaging under the nonequilibrium condition, the important effects of disorders on electron transport remain largely unexplored or poorly understood. In this work, we report a general formalism of Green's function based nonequilibrium effective medium theory to calculate the disordered nanoelectronics. In this method, based on a generalized coherent potential approximation for the Keldysh nonequilibrium Green's function, we developed a generalized nonequilibrium vertex correction method to calculate the average of a two-Keldysh-Green's-function correlator. We obtain nine nonequilibrium vertex correction terms, as a complete family, to express the average of any two-Green's-function correlator and find they can be solved by a set of linear equations. As an important result, the averaged nonequilibrium density matrix, averaged current, disorder-induced current fluctuation, and averaged shot noise, which involve different two-Green's-function correlators, can all be derived and computed in an effective and unified way. To test the general applicability of this method, we applied it to compute the transmission coefficient and its fluctuation with a square-lattice tight-binding model and compared with the exact results and other previously proposed approximations. Our results show very good agreement with the exact results for a wide range of disorder concentrations and energies. In addition, to incorporate with density functional theory to realize first-principles quantum transport simulation, we have also derived a general form of

  8. A MAPS Based Micro-Vertex Detector for the STAR Experiment

    SciTech Connect

    Schambach, Joachim; Anderssen, Eric; Contin, Giacomo; Greiner, Leo; Silber, Joe; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Sun, Xiangming; Szelezniak, Michal; Videbaek, Flemming; Vu, Chinh; Wieman, Howard; Woodmansee, Sam

    2015-06-18

    For the 2014 heavy ion run of RHIC a new micro-vertex detector called the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was installed in the STAR experiment. The HFT consists of three detector subsystems with various silicon technologies arranged in 4 approximately concentric cylinders close to the STAR interaction point designed to improve the STAR detector’s vertex resolution and extend its measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain. The two innermost HFT layers are placed at radii of 2.8 cm and 8 cm from the beam line. These layers are constructed with 400 high resolution sensors based on CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensor (MAPS) technology arranged in 10-sensor ladders mounted on 10 thin carbon fiber sectors to cover a total silicon area of 0.16 m2. Each sensor of this PiXeL (“PXL”) sub-detector combines a pixel array of 928 rows and 960 columns with a 20.7 μm pixel pitch together with front-end electronics and zero-suppression circuitry in one silicon die providing a sensitive area of ~3.8 cm2. This sensor architecture features 185.6 μs readout time and 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation. This low power dissipation allows the PXL detector to be air-cooled, and with the sensors thinned down to 50 μm results in a global material budget of only 0.4% radiation length per layer. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion allows us to effectively install and integrate the PXL sub-detector within a 12 hour period during an on-going multi-month data taking period. The detector requirements, architecture and design, as well as the performance after installation, are presented in this paper.

  9. A MAPS Based Micro-Vertex Detector for the STAR Experiment

    DOE PAGES

    Schambach, Joachim; Anderssen, Eric; Contin, Giacomo; Greiner, Leo; Silber, Joe; Stezelberger, Thorsten; Sun, Xiangming; Szelezniak, Michal; Videbaek, Flemming; Vu, Chinh; et al

    2015-06-18

    For the 2014 heavy ion run of RHIC a new micro-vertex detector called the Heavy Flavor Tracker (HFT) was installed in the STAR experiment. The HFT consists of three detector subsystems with various silicon technologies arranged in 4 approximately concentric cylinders close to the STAR interaction point designed to improve the STAR detector’s vertex resolution and extend its measurement capabilities in the heavy flavor domain. The two innermost HFT layers are placed at radii of 2.8 cm and 8 cm from the beam line. These layers are constructed with 400 high resolution sensors based on CMOS Monolithic Active Pixel Sensormore » (MAPS) technology arranged in 10-sensor ladders mounted on 10 thin carbon fiber sectors to cover a total silicon area of 0.16 m2. Each sensor of this PiXeL (“PXL”) sub-detector combines a pixel array of 928 rows and 960 columns with a 20.7 μm pixel pitch together with front-end electronics and zero-suppression circuitry in one silicon die providing a sensitive area of ~3.8 cm2. This sensor architecture features 185.6 μs readout time and 170 mW/cm2 power dissipation. This low power dissipation allows the PXL detector to be air-cooled, and with the sensors thinned down to 50 μm results in a global material budget of only 0.4% radiation length per layer. A novel mechanical approach to detector insertion allows us to effectively install and integrate the PXL sub-detector within a 12 hour period during an on-going multi-month data taking period. The detector requirements, architecture and design, as well as the performance after installation, are presented in this paper.« less

  10. Impact of nonlocal correlations over different energy scales: A dynamical vertex approximation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rohringer, G.; Toschi, A.

    2016-09-01

    In this paper, we investigate how nonlocal correlations affect, selectively, the physics of correlated electrons over different energy scales, from the Fermi level to the band edges. This goal is achieved by applying a diagrammatic extension of dynamical mean field theory (DMFT), the dynamical vertex approximation (D Γ A ), to study several spectral and thermodynamic properties of the unfrustrated Hubbard model in two and three dimensions. Specifically, we focus first on the low-energy regime by computing the electronic scattering rate and the quasiparticle mass renormalization for decreasing temperatures at a fixed interaction strength. This way, we obtain a precise characterization of the several steps through which the Fermi-liquid physics is progressively destroyed by nonlocal correlations. Our study is then extended to a broader energy range, by analyzing the temperature behavior of the kinetic and potential energy, as well as of the corresponding energy distribution functions. Our findings allow us to identify a smooth but definite evolution of the nature of nonlocal correlations by increasing interaction: They either increase or decrease the kinetic energy w.r.t. DMFT depending on the interaction strength being weak or strong, respectively. This reflects the corresponding evolution of the ground state from a nesting-driven (Slater) to a superexchange-driven (Heisenberg) antiferromagnet (AF), whose fingerprints are, thus, recognizable in the spatial correlations of the paramagnetic phase. Finally, a critical analysis of our numerical results of the potential energy at the largest interaction allows us to identify possible procedures to improve the ladder-based algorithms adopted in the dynamical vertex approximation.

  11. A combined crystal plasticity and graph-based vertex model of dynamic recrystallization at large deformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellbin, Y.; Hallberg, H.; Ristinmaa, M.

    2015-06-01

    A mesoscale model of microstructure evolution is formulated in the present work by combining a crystal plasticity model with a graph-based vertex algorithm. This provides a versatile formulation capable of capturing finite-strain deformations, development of texture and microstructure evolution through recrystallization. The crystal plasticity model is employed in a finite element setting and allows tracing of stored energy build-up in the polycrystal microstructure and concurrent reorientation of the crystal lattices in the grains. This influences the progression of recrystallization as nucleation occurs at sites with sufficient stored energy and since the grain boundary mobility and energy is allowed to vary with crystallographic misorientation across the boundaries. The proposed graph-based vertex model describes the topological changes to the grain microstructure and keeps track of the grain inter-connectivity. Through homogenization, the macroscopic material response is also obtained. By the proposed modeling approach, grain structure evolution at large deformations as well as texture development are captured. This is in contrast to most other models of recrystallization which are usually limited by assumptions of one or the other of these factors. In simulation examples, the model is in the present study shown to capture the salient features of dynamic recrystallization, including the effects of varying initial grain size and strain rate on the transitions between single-peak and multiple-peak oscillating flow stress behavior. Also the development of recrystallization texture and the influence of different assumptions on orientation of recrystallization nuclei are investigated. Further, recrystallization kinetics are discussed and compared to classical JMAK theory. To promote computational efficiency, the polycrystal plasticity algorithm is parallelized through a GPU implementation that was recently proposed by the authors.

  12. Analytical reconstruction formula for one-dimensional Compton camera

    SciTech Connect

    Basko, R.; Zeng, G.L.; Gullberg, G.T.

    1996-12-31

    The Compton camera has been proposed as an alternative to the Anger camera in SPECT. The advantage of the Compton camera is its high geometric efficiency due to electronic collimation. The Compton camera collects projections that are integrals over cone surfaces. Although some progress has been made toward image reconstruction from cone projections, at present no filtered backprojection algorithm exists. This paper investigates a simpler 2D version of the imaging problem. An analytical formula is developed for 2D reconstruction from data acquired by a 1D Compton camera that consists of two linear detectors, one behind the other. Coincidence photon detection allows the localization of the 2D source distribution to two lines in the shape of a {open_quotes}V{close_quotes} with the vertex on the front detector. A set of {open_quotes}V{close_quotes} projection data can be divided into subsets whose elements can be viewed as line-integrals of the original image added with its mirrored shear transformation. If the detector has infinite extent, reconstruction of the original image is possible using data from only one such subset. Computer simulations were performed to verify the newly developed algorithm.

  13. Head and neck reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Prabha

    2013-01-01

    Whatever is excisable, is reconstructable! “You excise, we will reconstruct” are the confident words of reconstructive surgeons today. Reconstruction with multiple flaps has become routine. Radial artery (FRAF), Antero lateral thigh (ALT) and Fibula osteo cutaneous flap (FFOCF) are three most popular free flaps which can reconstruct any defect with excellent asthetics and performance. Radial Artery provides thin, pliable innervated skin; ALT large amount of skin & bulk; and FFOCF strong 22 to 25 centimetres of bone and reliable skin paddle. Free flap survival has gone to 98% in most of the renouned institutes and is an established escalator in management of defects. PMID:24501464

  14. Flexor pulley reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Dy, Christopher J; Daluiski, Aaron

    2013-05-01

    Flexor pulley reconstruction is a challenging surgery. Injuries often occur after traumatic lacerations or forceful extension applied to an acutely flexed finger. Surgical treatment is reserved for patients with multiple closed pulley ruptures, persistent pain, or dysfunction after attempted nonoperative management of a single pulley rupture, or during concurrent or staged flexor tendon repair or reconstruction. If the pulley cannot be repaired primarily, pulley reconstruction can be performed using graft woven into remnant pulley rim or looping graft around the phalanx. Regardless of the reconstructive technique, the surgeon should emulate the length, tension, and glide of the native pulley. PMID:23660059

  15. PROPOSAL FOR A SILICON VERTEX TRACKER (VTX) FOR THE PHENIX EXPERIMENT.

    SciTech Connect

    AKIBA,Y.

    2004-03-30

    We propose the construction of a Silicon Vertex Tracker (VTX) for the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. The VTX will substantially enhance the physics capabilities of the PHENIX central arm spectrometers. Our prime motivation is to provide precision measurements of heavy-quark production (charm and beauty) in A+A, p(d)+A, and polarized p+p collisions. These are key measurements for the future RHIC program, both for the heavy ion program as it moves from the discovery phase towards detailed investigation of the properties of the dense nuclear medium created in heavy ion collisions, and for the exploration of the nucleon spin-structure functions. In addition, the VTX will also considerably improve other measurements with PHENIX. The main physics topics addressed by the VTX are: (1) Hot and dense strongly interacting matter--Potential enhancement of charm production; Open beauty production; Flavor dependence of jet quenching and QCD energy loss; Accurate charm reference for quarkonium; Thermal dilepton radiation; High p{sub T} phenomena with light flavors above 10-15 GeV/c in p{sub T}; and Upsilon spectroscopy in the e{sup +}e{sup -} decay channel. (2) Gluon spin structure of the nucleon--{Delta}G/G with charm; {Delta}G/G with beauty; and x dependence of {Delta}G/G with {gamma}-jet correlations. (3) Nucleon structure in nuclei--Gluon shadowing over broad x-range. With the present PHENIX detector, heavy-quark production has been measured indirectly through the observation of single electrons. These measurements are inherently limited in accuracy by systematic uncertainties resulting from the large electron background from Dalitz decays and photon conversions. In particular, the statistical nature of the analysis does not allow for a model-independent separation of the charm and beauty contributions. The VTX detector will provide vertex tracking with a resolution of <50 {micro}m over a large coverage both in rapidity (|{eta}| < 1.2) and in azimuthal angle ({Delta}{phi} {approx

  16. Silicon Vertex Tracker for PHENIX Upgrade at RICH: Capabilities and Detector Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nouicer, R.

    From the wealth of data obtained from the first three years of RHIC operation, the four RHIC experiments, BRAHMS, PHENIX, PHOBOS and STAR, have concluded that a high density partonic matter is formed at central Au+Au collisions at sNN = 200 GeV. The research focus now shifts from initial discovery to a detailed exploration of partonic matter. Particles carrying heavy flavor, i.e. charm or beauty quarks, are powerful tool for study the properties of the hot and dense medium created in high-energy nuclear collisions at RHIC. At the relatively low transverse momentum region, the collective motion of the heavy flavor will be a sensitive signal for the thermalization of light flavors. They also allow to probe the spin structure of the proton in a new and precise way. An upgrade of RHIC (RHIC-II) is intended for the second half of the decade, with a luminosity increase to about 20-40 times the design value of 8 × 10^26 cm-2 s-1 for Au+Au, and 2 × 10^32 cm-2 s-1 for polarized proton beams. The PHENIX collaboration plans to upgrade its experiment to exploit with an enhanced detector new physics then in reach. For this purpose, we are constructing the Silicon Vertex Tracker (VTX). The VTX detector will provide us the tool to measure new physics observables that are not accessible at the present RHIC or available only with very limited accuracy. These include a precise determination of the charm production cross section, transverse momentum spectra at high-pT region for particles carrying beauty quarks as well the detection of recoil jets in direct photon production. The VTX detector consists of four layers of barrel detectors located in the region of pseudorapidity |η| < 1.2 and covers almost 2π azimuthal angle. The pseudorapidity, η, is defined as η = -ln[tan(θ/2)], where θ is the emission angle relative to the beam axis. The inner two silicon barrels consists of silicon pixel sensors and their technology is the ALICE1LHCb sensor-readout hybrid, which was developed

  17. Education for Reconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phillips, David; And Others

    This report describes the main questions that various international agencies must address in order to reconstruct education in countries that have experienced crisis. "Crisis" is defined as war, natural disaster, and extreme political and economic upheaval. Many of the problems of educational reconstruction with which the Allies contended in…

  18. Posterolateral knee reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Djian, P

    2015-02-01

    Injury to the cruciate ligaments of the knee commonly occurs in association with posterolateral instability, which can cause severe functional disability including varus, posterior translation, and external rotational instability. Failure to diagnose and treat an injury of the posterolateral corner in a patient who has a tear of the cruciate ligament can also result in the failure of the reconstructed cruciate ligament. There seems to be a consensus of opinion that injury to the posterolateral corner, whether isolated or combined, is best treated by reconstructing the posterolateral corner along with the coexisting cruciate ligament injury, if combined. Commonly proposed methods of reconstructing the posterolateral corner have focused on the reconstruction of the popliteus, the popliteofibular ligament, and the lateral collateral ligament. The aim of this conference is to describe the posterolateral corner reconstruction technique and to provide an algorithm of treatment. PMID:25596981

  19. Picometer Level Modeling of a Shared Vertex Double Corner Cube in the Space Interferometry Mission Kite Testbed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuan, Gary M.; Dekens, Frank G.

    2006-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) is a microarcsecond interferometric space telescope that requires picometer level precision measurements of its truss and interferometer baselines. Single-gauge metrology errors due to non-ideal physical characteristics of corner cubes reduce the angular measurement capability of the science instrument. Specifically, the non-common vertex error (NCVE) of a shared vertex, double corner cube introduces micrometer level single-gauge errors in addition to errors due to dihedral angles and reflection phase shifts. A modified SIM Kite Testbed containing an articulating double corner cube is modeled and the results are compared to the experimental testbed data. The results confirm modeling capability and viability of calibration techniques.

  20. Two-parameter quantum affine algebra of type G{sub 2}{sup (1)}, Drinfeld realization and vertex representation

    SciTech Connect

    Gao, Yun; Hu, Naihong; Zhang, Honglian

    2015-01-15

    In this paper, we define the two-parameter quantum affine algebra for type G{sub 2}{sup (1)} and give the (r, s)-Drinfeld realization of U{sub r,s}(G{sub 2}{sup (1)}), as well as establish and prove its Drinfeld isomorphism. We construct and verify explicitly the level-one vertex representation of two-parameter quantum affine algebra U{sub r,s}(G{sub 2}{sup (1)}), which also supports an evidence in nontwisted type G{sub 2}{sup (1)} for the uniform defining approach via the two-parameter τ-invariant generating functions proposed in Hu and Zhang [Generating functions with τ-invariance and vertex representations of two-parameter quantum affine algebras U{sub r,s}(g{sup ^}): Simply laced cases e-print http://arxiv.org/abs/1401.4925 ].

  1. Vertex function for the coupling of an electron with intramolecular phonons: Exact results in the antiadiabatic limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takada, Yasutami; Higuchi, Takatoshi

    1995-11-01

    The Green's-function techniques, especially the one developed in the preceding paper [Takada, Phys. Rev. B 52, 12 708 (1995)], are employed to calculate the electron-phonon vertex part as well as the electronic self-energy exactly on both real- and imaginary-frequency axes in the electron-phonon Holstein model with the on-site Coulomb repulsion in the limit in which the intramolecular phonon energy ω0 is much larger than the electronic bandwidth. The rigorous vertex part is found to diverge at the frequencies at which an electron is locked by such local phonons with an infinitely strong effective coupling. Characteristic frequencies of this divergence, which are not equal to multiples of ω0, are calculated as a function of the electron-phonon bare coupling constant. Our results for the self-energy are checked successfully with the exact ones obtained by the Lang-Firsov canonical transformation.

  2. Gamma electron vertex imaging and application to beam range verification in proton therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Hyeong Kim, Chan; Hyung Park, Jin; Seo, Hee; Rim Lee, Han

    2012-02-15

    Purpose: This paper describes a new gamma-ray imaging method, ''gamma electron vertex imaging (GEVI)'', which can be used for precise beam range verification in proton therapy. Methods: In GEVI imaging, the high-energy gammas from a source or nuclear interactions are first converted, by Compton scattering, to electrons, which subsequently are traced by hodoscopes to determine the location of the gamma source or the vertices of the nuclear interactions. The performance of GEVI imaging for use in-beam range verification was evaluated by Monte Carlo simulations employing geant4 equipped with the QGSP{sub B}IC{sub H}P physics package. Results: Our simulation results show that GEVI imaging can determine the proton beam range very accurately, within 2-3 mm of error, even without any sophisticated analysis. The results were obtained under simplified conditions of monoenergetic pencil beams stopped in a homogeneous phantom and on the basis of the obtained results it is expected to achieve submillimeter accuracy in proton beam range measurement. Conclusions: If future experimental work confirms the simulated results presented in this paper, the use of GEVI imaging is expected to have a great potential in increasing the accuracy of proton beam range verification in a patient, resulting in significant improvement of treatment effectiveness by enabling tight conformation of radiation dose to the tumor volume and patient safety.

  3. The vertex-positive scalp potential evoked by faces and by objects.

    PubMed

    Jeffreys, D A; Tukmachi, E S

    1992-01-01

    The influence of stimulus form on the scalp-recorded "vertex positive peak" (VPP) evoked by images of faces (Jeffreys 1989a) was studied in seven subjects. In separate experiments, we recorded the responses to 2D images of: (1) many different depictions of human faces; (2) the heads of several different species; (3) many familiar non-face objects; and (4) stimuli where the configuration of objects were modified to produce an "illusory" or "non-contextual" subjective impression of a face. The results showed that every facial representation, including the "illusory" stimuli, and most of the non-face objects, evoked a VPP of corresponding form and scalp distribution. The object-evoked VPPs, however, were always smaller and usually later than those evoked by the faces. VPPs of longer latency but often comparable amplitude were also recorded for impoverished compared to well-defined facial representations; and for most non-human compared to human faces. Very consistent responses were recorded to repeated presentations of the same stimulus for the same subject, but there was considerable variation in latency as well as amplitude (but not form) of the VPP evoked under identical experimental conditions for different subjects. These response properties of the VPP, suggest that its underlying physiological generators are sensitive to basic configural properties of the visual stimulus; and also the face- and object-related information are processed in the same brain area(s), although not necessarily by the same physiological mechanisms. PMID:1459236

  4. Vertex-connectivity in periodic graphs and underlying nets of crystal structures.

    PubMed

    Eon, Jean Guillaume

    2016-05-01

    Periodic nets used to describe the combinatorial topology of crystal structures have been required to be 3-connected by some authors. A graph is n-connected when deletion of less than n vertices does not disconnect it. n-Connected graphs are a fortiari n-coordinated but the converse is not true. This article presents an analysis of vertex-connectivity in periodic graphs characterized through their labelled quotient graph (LQG) and applied to a definition of underlying nets of crystal structures. It is shown that LQGs of p-periodic graphs (p ≥ 2) that are 1-connected or 2-connected, but not 3-connected, are contractible in the sense that they display, respectively, singletons or pairs of vertices separating dangling or linker components with zero net voltage over every cycle. The contraction operation that substitutes vertices and edges, respectively, for dangling components and linkers yields a 3-connected graph with the same periodicity. 1-Periodic graphs can be analysed in the same way through their LQGs but the result may not be 3-connected. It is claimed that long-range topological properties of periodic graphs are respected by contraction so that contracted graphs can represent topological classes of crystal structures, be they rods, layers or three-dimensional frameworks. PMID:27126114

  5. Graphical method for deriving an effective interaction with a new vertex function

    SciTech Connect

    Suzuki, K.; Okamoto, R.; Kumagai, H.; Fujii, S.

    2011-02-15

    Introducing a new vertex function, Z(E), of an energy variable E, we derive a new equation for the effective interaction. The equation is obtained by replacing the Q box in the Krenciglowa-Kuo (KK) method with Z(E). This new approach can be viewed as an extension of the KK method. We show that this equation can be solved both in iterative and noniterative ways. We observe that the iteration procedure with Z(E) brings about fast convergence compared to the usual KK method. It is shown that, as in the KK approach, the procedure of calculating the effective interaction can be reduced to determining the true eigenvalues of the original Hamiltonian H and they can be obtained as the positions of intersections of graphs generated from Z(E). We find that this graphical method yields always precise results and reproduces any of the true eigenvalues of H. The calculation in the present approach can be made regardless of overlaps with the model space and energy differences between unperturbed energies and the eigenvalues of H. We find also that Z(E) is a well-behaved function of E and has no singularity. These characteristics of the present approach ensure stability in actual calculations and would be helpful to resolve some difficulties due to the presence of poles in the Q box. Performing test calculations, we verify numerically theoretical predictions made in the present approach.

  6. Readout, first- and second-level triggers of the new Belle silicon vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friedl, M.; Abe, R.; Abe, T.; Aihara, H.; Asano, Y.; Aso, T.; Bakich, A.; Browder, T.; Chang, M. C.; Chao, Y.; Chen, K. F.; Chidzik, S.; Dalseno, J.; Dowd, R.; Dragic, J.; Everton, C. W.; Fernholz, R.; Fujii, H.; Gao, Z. W.; Gordon, A.; Guo, Y. N.; Haba, J.; Hara, K.; Hara, T.; Harada, Y.; Haruyama, T.; Hasuko, K.; Hayashi, K.; Hazumi, M.; Heenan, E. M.; Higuchi, T.; Hirai, H.; Hitomi, N.; Igarashi, A.; Igarashi, Y.; Ikeda, H.; Ishino, H.; Itoh, K.; Iwaida, S.; Kaneko, J.; Kapusta, P.; Karawatzki, R.; Kasami, K.; Kawai, H.; Kawasaki, T.; Kibayashi, A.; Koike, S.; Korpar, S.; Križan, P.; Kurashiro, H.; Kusaka, A.; Lesiak, T.; Limosani, A.; Lin, W. C.; Marlow, D.; Matsumoto, H.; Mikami, Y.; Miyake, H.; Moloney, G. R.; Mori, T.; Nakadaira, T.; Nakano, Y.; Natkaniec, Z.; Nozaki, S.; Ohkubo, R.; Ohno, F.; Okuno, S.; Onuki, Y.; Ostrowicz, W.; Ozaki, H.; Peak, L.; Pernicka, M.; Rosen, M.; Rozanska, M.; Sato, N.; Schmid, S.; Shibata, T.; Stamen, R.; Stanič, S.; Steininger, H.; Sumisawa, K.; Suzuki, J.; Tajima, H.; Tajima, O.; Takahashi, K.; Takasaki, F.; Tamura, N.; Tanaka, M.; Taylor, G. N.; Terazaki, H.; Tomura, T.; Trabelsi, K.; Trischuk, W.; Tsuboyama, T.; Uchida, K.; Ueno, K.; Ueno, K.; Uozaki, N.; Ushiroda, Y.; Vahsen, S.; Varner, G.; Varvell, K.; Velikzhanin, Y. S.; Wang, C. C.; Wang, M. Z.; Watanabe, M.; Watanabe, Y.; Yamada, Y.; Yamamoto, H.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamashita, Y.; Yamauchi, M.; Yanai, H.; Yang, R.; Yasu, Y.; Yokoyama, M.; Ziegler, T.; Žontar, D.

    2004-12-01

    A major upgrade of the Silicon Vertex Detector (SVD 2.0) of the Belle experiment at the KEKB factory was installed along with new front-end and back-end electronics systems during the summer shutdown period in 2003 to cope with higher particle rates, improve the track resolution and meet the increasing requirements of radiation tolerance. The SVD 2.0 detector modules are read out by VA1TA chips which provide "fast or" (hit) signals that are combined by the back-end FADCTF modules to coarse, but immediate level 0 track trigger signals at rates of several tens of a kHz. Moreover, the digitized detector signals are compared to threshold lookup tables in the FADCTFs to pass on hit information on a single strip basis to the subsequent level 1.5 trigger system, which reduces the rate below the kHz range. Both FADCTF and level 1.5 electronics make use of parallel real-time processing in Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs), while further data acquisition and event building is done by PC farms running Linux. The new readout system hardware is described and the first results obtained with cosmics are shown.

  7. Recent developments on CMOS MAPS for the SuperB Silicon Vertex Tracker

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rizzo, G.; Comott, D.; Manghisoni, M.; Re, V.; Traversi, G.; Fabbri, L.; Gabrielli, A.; Giorgi, F.; Pellegrini, G.; Sbarra, C.; Semprini-Cesari, N.; Valentinetti, S.; Villa, M.; Zoccoli, A.; Berra, A.; Lietti, D.; Prest, M.; Bevan, A.; Wilson, F.; Beck, G.; Morris, J.; Gannaway, F.; Cenci, R.; Bombelli, L.; Citterio, M.; Coelli, S.; Fiorini, C.; Liberali, V.; Monti, M.; Nasri, B.; Neri, N.; Palombo, F.; Stabile, A.; Balestri, G.; Batignani, G.; Bernardelli, A.; Bettarini, S.; Bosi, F.; Casarosa, G.; Ceccanti, M.; Forti, F.; Giorgi, M. A.; Lusiani, A.; Mammini, P.; Morsani, F.; Oberhof, B.; Paoloni, E.; Perez, A.; Petragnani, G.; Profeti, A.; Soldani, A.; Walsh, J.; Chrzaszcz, M.; Gaioni, L.; Manazza, A.; Quartieri, E.; Ratti, L.; Zucca, S.; Alampi, G.; Cotto, G.; Gamba, D.; Zambito, S.; Dalla Betta, G.-F.; Fontana, G.; Pancheri, L.; Povoli, M.; Verzellesi, G.; Bomben, M.; Bosisio, L.; Cristaudo, P.; Lanceri, L.; Liberti, B.; Rashevskaya, I.; Stella, C.; Vitale, L.

    2013-08-01

    In the design of the Silicon Vertex Tracker for the high luminosity SuperB collider, very challenging requirements are set by physics and background conditions on its innermost Layer0: small radius (about 1.5 cm), resolution of 10 - 15 μm in both coordinates, low material budget < 1 %X0, and the ability to withstand a background hit rate of several tens of MHz /cm2. Thanks to an intense R&D program the development of Deep NWell CMOS MAPS (with the ST Microelectronics 130 nm process) has reached a good level of maturity and allowed for the first time the implementation of thin CMOS sensors with similar functionalities as in hybrid pixels, such as pixel-level sparsification and fast time stamping. Further MAPS performance improvements are currently under investigation with two different approaches: the INMAPS CMOS process, featuring a quadruple well and a high resistivity substrate, and 3D CMOS MAPS, realized with vertical integration technology. In both cases specific features of the processes chosen can improve charge collection efficiency, with respect to a standard DNW MAPS design, and allow to implement a more complex in-pixel logic in order to develop a faster readout architecture. Prototypes of MAPS matrix, suitable for application in the SuperB Layer0, have been realized with the INMAPS 180 nm process and the 130 nm Chartered/Tezzaron 3D process and results of their characterization will be presented in this paper.

  8. A CMOS pixel sensor prototype for the outer layers of linear collider vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, C.; Himmi, A.; Dorokhov, A.; Hu, Y.

    2015-01-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) expresses a stringent requirement for high precision vertex detectors (VXD). CMOS pixel sensors (CPS) have been considered as an option for the VXD of the International Large Detector (ILD), one of the detector concepts proposed for the ILC. MIMOSA-31 developed at IPHC-Strasbourg is the first CPS integrated with 4-bit column-level ADC for the outer layers of the VXD, adapted to an original concept minimizing the power consumption. It is composed of a matrix of 64 rows and 48 columns. The pixel concept combines in-pixel amplification with a correlated double sampling (CDS) operation in order to reduce the temporal noise and fixed pattern noise (FPN). At the bottom of the pixel array, each column is terminated with a self-triggered analog-to-digital converter (ADC). The ADC design was optimized for power saving at a sampling frequency of 6.25 MS/s. The prototype chip is fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS technology. This paper presents the details of the prototype chip and its test results.

  9. PROPOSAL FOR A SILICON VERTEX TRACKER (VTX) FOR THE PHENIX EXPERIMENT

    SciTech Connect

    AKIBA,Y.

    2004-10-01

    We propose the construction of a Silicon Vertex Tracker (VTX) for the PHENIX experiment at RHIC. The VTX will substantially enhance the physics capabilities of the PHENIX central arm spectrometers. Our prime motivation is to provide precision measurements of heavy-quark production (charm and beauty) in A+A, p(d)+A, and polarized p+p collisions. These are key measurements for the future RHIC program, both for the heavy ion program as it moves from the discovery phase towards detailed investigation of the properties of the dense nuclear medium created in heavy ion collisions, and for the exploration of the nucleon spin-structure functions. In addition, the VTX will also considerably improve other measurements with PHENIX. The main physics topics addressed by the VTX are: (1) Hot and dense strongly interacting matter--(a) Potential enhancement of charm production, (b) Open beauty production, (c) Flavor dependence of jet quenching and QCD energy loss, (d) Accurate charm reference for quarkonium, (e) Thermal dilepton radiation, (f) High p{sub T} phenomena with light flavors above 10-15 GeV/c in p{sub T}, and (g) Upsilon spectroscopy in the e{sup +}e{sup -} decay channel. (2) Gluon spin structure of the nucleon--(a) {Delta}G/G with charm, (b) {Delta}G/G with beauty, and (c) x dependence of {Delta}G/G with {gamma}-jet correlations. (3) Nucleon structure in nuclei--Gluon shadowing over broad x-range.

  10. Statistical approaches to nonstationary EEGs for the detection of slow vertex responses.

    PubMed

    Fujikake, M; Ninomija, S P; Fujita, H

    1989-06-01

    A slow vertex response (SVR) is an electric auditory evoked response used for an objective hearing power test. One of the aims of an objective hearing power test is to find infants whose hearing is less than that of normal infants. Early medical treatment is important for infants with a loss of hearing so that they do not have retarded growth. To measure SVRs, we generally use the averaged summation method of an electroencephalogram (EEG), because the signal-to-noise ratio (SVR to EEG and etc.) is very poor. To increase the reliability and stability of measured SVRs, and at the same time, to make the burden of testing light, it is necessary to device an effective measurement method of SVR. Two factors must be considered: (1) SVR waveforms change following the changes of EEGs caused by sleeping and (2) EEGs are considered as nonstationary data in prolonged measurement. In this paper, five statistical methods are used on two different models; a stationary model and a nonstationary model. Through the comparison of waves obtained by each method, we will clarify the statistical characteristics of the original data (EEGs including SVRs), and consider the conditions that effect the measurement method of an SVR. PMID:2794816

  11. Vertex Movement for Mission Status Graphics: A Polar-Star Display

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trujillo, Anna

    2002-01-01

    Humans are traditionally bad monitors, especially over long periods of time on reliable systems, and they are being called upon to do this more and more as systems become further automated. Because of this, there is a need to find a way to display the monitoring information to the human operator in such a way that he can notice pertinent deviations in a timely manner. One possible solution is to use polar-star displays that will show deviations from normal in a more salient manner. A polar-star display uses a polygon's vertices to report values. An important question arises, though, of how the vertices should move. This experiment investigated two particular issues of how the vertices should move: (1) whether the movement of the vertices should be continuous or discrete and (2) whether the parameters that made up each vertex should always move in one direction regardless of parameter sign or move in both directions indicating parameter sign. The results indicate that relative movement direction is best. Subjects performed better with this movement type and they subjectively preferred it to the absolute movement direction. As for movement type, no strong preferences were shown.

  12. Measurement of the Non-common Vertex Error of a Double Corner Cube

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Azizi, Alireza; Marcin, Martin; Moore, Douglas; Moser, Steve; Negron, John; Paek, Eung-Gi; Ryan, Daniel; Abramovici, Alex; Best, Paul; Crossfield, Ian; Nemati, Bijan; Neville, Tim; Platt, B.; Wayne, Leonard

    2006-01-01

    The Space Interferometry Mission (SIM) requires the control of the optical path of each interferometer with picometer accuracy. Laser metrology gauges are used to measure the path lengths to the fiiducial corner cubes at the siderostats. Due to the geometry of SIM a single corner cube does not have sufficient acceptance angle to work with all the gauges. Therefore SIM employs a double corner cube. Current fabrication methods are in fact not capable of producing such a double corner cube with vertices having sufficient commonality. The plan for SIM is to measure the non-commonalty of the vertices and correct for the error in orbit. SIM requires that the non-common vertex error (NCVE) of the double corner cube to be less than 6 (mu)m. The required accuracy for the knowledge of the NCVE is less than 1 (mu)m. This paper explains a method of measuring non-common vertices of a brassboard double corner cube with sub-micron accuracy. The results of such a measurement will be presented.

  13. Systematic approach to leptogenesis in nonequilibrium QFT: Vertex contribution to the CP-violating parameter

    SciTech Connect

    Garny, M.; Hohenegger, A.; Kartavtsev, A.; Lindner, M.

    2009-12-15

    The generation of a baryon asymmetry via leptogenesis is usually studied by means of classical kinetic equations whose applicability to processes in the hot and expanding early universe is questionable. The approximations implied by the state-of-the-art description can be tested in a first-principle approach based on nonequilibrium field theory techniques. Here, we apply the Schwinger-Keldysh/Kadanoff-Baym formalism to a simple toy model of leptogenesis. We find that, within the toy model, medium effects increase the vertex contribution to the CP-violating parameter. At high temperatures it is a few times larger than in vacuum and asymptotically reaches the vacuum value as the temperature decreases. Contrary to the results obtained earlier in the framework of thermal field theory, the corrections are only linear in the particle number densities. An important feature of the Kadanoff-Baym formalism is that it is free of the double-counting problem, i.e. no need for real intermediate state subtraction arises. In particular, this means that the structure of the equations automatically ensures that the asymmetry vanishes in equilibrium. These results give a first glimpse into a number of new and interesting effects that can be studied in the framework of nonequilibrium field theory.

  14. Mode and modulation characteristics for microsquare lasers with a vertex output waveguide

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Heng; Huang, YongZhen; Yang, YueDe; Zou, LingXiu; Xiao, JinLong; Xiao, ZhiXiong

    2015-11-01

    The mode and high-speed modulation characteristics are investigated for a microsquare laser with a side length of 16 μm and a 2-μm-wide output waveguide connected to one vertex. The longitudinal and transverse mode characteristics are analyzed by numerical simulation and light ray model, and compared with the lasing spectra for the microsquare laser. Up to the fifth transverse mode is observed clearly from the lasing spectra. Single mode operation with the side mode suppression ratio of 41 dB is realized at the injection current of 24 mA, and the maximum output power of 0.53 (0.18) mW coupled into the multiple (single) mode fiber is obtained at the current of 35 mA, for the microsquare laser at the temperature of 288 K. Furthermore, a flat small-signal modulation response is reached with the 3-dB bandwidth of 16.2 GHz and the resonant peak of 3.6 dB at the bias current of 34 mA. The K-factor of 0.22 ns is obtained by fitting the damping factor versus the resonant frequency, which implies a maximum intrinsic 3-dB bandwidth of 40 GHz.

  15. Controllability and observability analysis for vertex domination centrality in directed networks

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Bingbo; Gao, Lin; Gao, Yong; Deng, Yue; Wang, Yu

    2014-01-01

    Topological centrality is a significant measure for characterising the relative importance of a node in a complex network. For directed networks that model dynamic processes, however, it is of more practical importance to quantify a vertex's ability to dominate (control or observe) the state of other vertices. In this paper, based on the determination of controllable and observable subspaces under the global minimum-cost condition, we introduce a novel direction-specific index, domination centrality, to assess the intervention capabilities of vertices in a directed network. Statistical studies demonstrate that the domination centrality is, to a great extent, encoded by the underlying network's degree distribution and that most network positions through which one can intervene in a system are vertices with high domination centrality rather than network hubs. To analyse the interaction and functional dependence between vertices when they are used to dominate a network, we define the domination similarity and detect significant functional modules in glossary and metabolic networks through clustering analysis. The experimental results provide strong evidence that our indices are effective and practical in accurately depicting the structure of directed networks. PMID:24954137

  16. Bacterial microcompartment shells of diverse functional types possess pentameric vertex proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wheatley, Nicole M; Gidaniyan, Soheil D; Liu, Yuxi; Cascio, Duilio; Yeates, Todd O

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial microcompartments (MCPs) are large proteinaceous structures comprised of a roughly icosahedral shell and a series of encapsulated enzymes. MCPs carrying out three different metabolic functions have been characterized in some detail, while gene expression and bioinformatics studies have implicated other types, including one believed to perform glycyl radical-based metabolism of 1,2-propanediol (Grp). Here we report the crystal structure of a protein (GrpN), which is presumed to be part of the shell of a Grp-type MCP in Rhodospirillum rubrum F11. GrpN is homologous to a family of proteins (EutN/PduN/CcmL/CsoS4) whose members have been implicated in forming the vertices of MCP shells. Consistent with that notion, the crystal structure of GrpN revealed a pentameric assembly. That observation revived an outstanding question about the oligomeric state of this protein family: pentameric forms (for CcmL and CsoS4A) and a hexameric form (for EutN) had both been observed in previous crystal structures. To clarify these confounding observations, we revisited the case of EutN. We developed a molecular biology-based method for accurately determining the number of subunits in homo-oligomeric proteins, and found unequivocally that EutN is a pentamer in solution. Based on these convergent findings, we propose the name bacterial microcompartment vertex for this special family of MCP shell proteins. PMID:23456886

  17. Controllability and observability analysis for vertex domination centrality in directed networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bingbo; Gao, Lin; Gao, Yong; Deng, Yue; Wang, Yu

    2014-06-01

    Topological centrality is a significant measure for characterising the relative importance of a node in a complex network. For directed networks that model dynamic processes, however, it is of more practical importance to quantify a vertex's ability to dominate (control or observe) the state of other vertices. In this paper, based on the determination of controllable and observable subspaces under the global minimum-cost condition, we introduce a novel direction-specific index, domination centrality, to assess the intervention capabilities of vertices in a directed network. Statistical studies demonstrate that the domination centrality is, to a great extent, encoded by the underlying network's degree distribution and that most network positions through which one can intervene in a system are vertices with high domination centrality rather than network hubs. To analyse the interaction and functional dependence between vertices when they are used to dominate a network, we define the domination similarity and detect significant functional modules in glossary and metabolic networks through clustering analysis. The experimental results provide strong evidence that our indices are effective and practical in accurately depicting the structure of directed networks.

  18. Modeling one-mode projection of bipartite networks by tagging vertex information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qiao, Jian; Meng, Ying-Ying; Chen, Hsinchun; Huang, Hong-Qiao; Li, Guo-Ying

    2016-09-01

    Traditional one-mode projection models are less informative than their original bipartite networks. Hence, using such models cannot control the projection's structure freely. We proposed a new method for modeling the one-mode projection of bipartite networks, which thoroughly breaks through the limitations of the available one-mode projecting methods by tagging the vertex information of bipartite networks in their one-mode projections. We designed a one-mode collaboration network model by using the method presented in this paper. The simulation results show that our model matches three real networks very well and outperforms the available collaboration network models significantly, which reflects the idea that our method is ideal for modeling one-mode projection models of bipartite graphs and that our one-mode collaboration network model captures the crucial mechanisms of the three real systems. Our study reveals that size growth, individual aging, random collaboration, preferential collaboration, transitivity collaboration and multi-round collaboration are the crucial mechanisms of collaboration networks, and the lack of some of the crucial mechanisms is the main reason that the other available models do not perform as well as ours.

  19. Towards a 10 μs, thin and high resolution pixelated CMOS sensor system for future vertex detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Masi, R.; Amar-Youcef, S.; Baudot, J.; Bertolone, G.; Brogna, A.; Chon-Sen, N.; Claus, G.; Colledani, C.; Degerli, Y.; Deveaux, M.; Dorokhov, A.; Doziére, G.; Dulinski, W.; Gelin, M.; Goffe, M.; Fontaine, J. C.; Hu-Guo, Ch.; Himmi, A.; Jaaskelainen, K.; Koziel, M.; Morel, F.; Müntz, C.; Orsini, F.; Santos, C.; Schrader, C.; Specht, M.; Stroth, J.; Valin, I.; Voutsinas, G.; Wagner, F. M.; Winter, M.

    2011-02-01

    The physics goals of many high energy experiments require a precise determination of decay vertices, imposing severe constraints on vertex detectors (readout speed, granularity, material budget,…). The IPHC-IRFU collaboration developed a sensor architecture to comply with these requirements. The first full scale CMOS sensor was realised and equips the reference planes of the EUDET beam telescope. Its architecture is being adapted to the needs of the STAR (RHIC) and CBM (FAIR) experiments. It is a promising candidate for the ILC experiments and the ALICE detector upgrade (LHC). A substantial improvement to the CMOS sensor performances, especially in terms of radiation hardness, should come from a new fabrication technology with depleted sensitive volume. A prototype sensor was fabricated to explore the benefits of the technology. The crucial system integration issue is also currently being addressed. In 2009 the PLUME collaboration was set up to investigate the feasibility and performances of a light double sided ladder equipped with CMOS sensors, aimed primarily for the ILC vertex detector but also of interest for other applications such as the CBM vertex detector.

  20. Keyhole Flap Nipple Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Joseph I; Cash, Camille G; Iman, Al-Haj; Spiegel, Aldona J; Cronin, Ernest D

    2016-05-01

    Nipple-areola reconstruction is often one of the final but most challenging aspects of breast reconstruction. However, it is an integral and important component of breast reconstruction because it transforms the mound into a breast. We performed 133 nipple-areola reconstructions during a period of 4 years. Of these reconstructions, 76 of 133 nipple-areola complexes were reconstructed using the keyhole flap technique. The tissue used for the keyhole dermoadipose flap technique include transverse rectus abdominus myocutaneous flaps (60/76), latissimus dorsi flaps (15/76), or mastectomy skin flaps after tissue expanders (1/76). The average patient follow-up was 17 months. The design of the flap is based on a keyhole configuration. The base of the flap determines the width of the future nipple, whereas the length of the flap determines the projection. We try to match the projection of the contralateral nipple if present. The keyhole flap is simple to construct yet reliable. It provides good symmetry and projection and avoids the creation of new scars. The areola is then tattooed approximately 3 months after the nipple reconstruction. PMID:27579228

  1. Acromioclavicular Joint Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Scillia, Anthony J; Cain, E Lyle

    2015-12-01

    Our technique for acromioclavicular joint reconstruction provides a variation on coracoclavicular ligament reconstruction to also include acromioclavicular ligament reconstruction. An oblique acromial tunnel is drilled, and the medial limb of the gracilis graft, after being crossed and passed beneath the coracoid and through the clavicle, is passed through this acromial tunnel and sutured to the trapezoid graft limb after appropriate tensioning. Tenodesis screws are not placed in the bone tunnels to avoid graft fraying, and initial forces on the graft are offloaded with braided absorbable sutures passed around the clavicle. PMID:27284528

  2. Advances in Tracheal Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Salna, Michael; Waddell, Thomas K.; Hofer, Stefan O.

    2014-01-01

    Summary: A recent revival of global interest for reconstruction of long-segment tracheal defects, which represents one of the most interesting and complex problems in head and neck and thoracic reconstructive surgery, has been witnessed. The trachea functions as a conduit for air, and its subunits including the epithelial layer, hyaline cartilage, and segmental blood supply make it particularly challenging to reconstruct. A myriad of attempts at replacing the trachea have been described. These along with the anatomy, indications, and approaches including microsurgical tracheal reconstruction will be reviewed. Novel techniques such as tissue-engineering approaches will also be discussed. Multiple attempts at replacing the trachea with synthetic scaffolds have been met with failure. The main lesson learned from such failures is that the trachea must not be treated as a “simple tube.” Understanding the anatomy, developmental biology, physiology, and diseases affecting the trachea are required for solving this problem. PMID:25426361

  3. Overview of Image Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Marr, R. B.

    1980-04-01

    Image reconstruction (or computerized tomography, etc.) is any process whereby a function, f, on Rn is estimated from empirical data pertaining to its integrals, ∫f(x) dx, for some collection of hyperplanes of dimension k < n. The paper begins with background information on how image reconstruction problems have arisen in practice, and describes some of the application areas of past or current interest; these include radioastronomy, optics, radiology and nuclear medicine, electron microscopy, acoustical imaging, geophysical tomography, nondestructive testing, and NMR zeugmatography. Then the various reconstruction algorithms are discussed in five classes: summation, or simple back-projection; convolution, or filtered back-projection; Fourier and other functional transforms; orthogonal function series expansion; and iterative methods. Certain more technical mathematical aspects of image reconstruction are considered from the standpoint of uniqueness, consistency, and stability of solution. The paper concludes by presenting certain open problems. 73 references. (RWR)

  4. Breast Reconstruction After Mastectomy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Women who have autologous tissue reconstruction may need physical therapy to help them make up for weakness experienced ... 127(1):15–22. [PubMed Abstract] Monteiro M. Physical therapy implications following the TRAM procedure. Physical Therapy. 1997; ...

  5. Reconstruction of Mandibular Defects

    PubMed Central

    Chim, Harvey; Salgado, Christopher J.; Mardini, Samir; Chen, Hung-Chi

    2010-01-01

    Defects requiring reconstruction in the mandible are commonly encountered and may result from resection of benign or malignant lesions, trauma, or osteoradionecrosis. Mandibular defects can be classified according to location and extent, as well as involvement of mucosa, skin, and tongue. Vascularized bone flaps, in general, provide the best functional and aesthetic outcome, with the fibula flap remaining the gold standard for mandible reconstruction. In this review, we discuss classification and approach to reconstruction of mandibular defects. We also elaborate upon four commonly used free osteocutaneous flaps, inclusive of fibula, iliac crest, scapula, and radial forearm. Finally, we discuss indications and use of osseointegrated implants as well as recent advances in mandibular reconstruction. PMID:22550439

  6. Breast Reconstruction and Prosthesis

    MedlinePlus

    ... feel of the breast after a mastectomy. A plastic surgeon can do it at the same time ... want breast reconstruction. • Have you talked with your plastic surgeon about your options? You may not be ...

  7. LHCb Vertex Locator: Performance and radiation damage in LHC Run 1 and preparation for Run 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szumlak, T.; Obła˛kowska-Mucha, A.

    2016-07-01

    LHCb is a dedicated experiment to study New Physics in the decays of heavy hadrons at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN. Heavy hadrons are identified through their flight distance in the Vertex Locator (VELO). The VELO comprises 42 modules made of two n+-on-n 300 μm thick half-disc silicon sensors with R- and Φ-measuring micro-strips. In order to allow retracting the detector, the VELO is installed as two movable halves containing 21 modules each. The detectors are operated in a secondary vacuum and are cooled by a bi-phase CO2 cooling system. During data taking in LHC Run 1 the LHCb VELO has operated with an extremely high efficiency and excellent performance. The track finding efficiency is typically greater than 98%. An impact parameter resolution of less than 35 μm is achieved for particles with transverse momentum greater than 1 GeV/c. An overview of all important performance parameters will be given. The VELO sensors have received a large and non-uniform radiation dose of up to 1.2 ×1014 1 MeV neutron equivalent cm-2 during the first LHC run. Silicon type-inversion has been observed in regions close to the interaction point. The preparations for LHC Run 2 are well under way and the VELO has already recorded tracks from injection line tests. The current status and plans for new operational procedures addressing the non-uniform radiation damage are shortly discussed.

  8. Coracoclavicular Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Qi; Hsueh, Pei-ling; Chen, Yun-feng

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Operative intervention is recommended for complete acromioclavicular (AC) joint dislocation to restore AC stability, but the best operative technique is still controversial. Twelve fresh-frozen male cadaveric shoulders (average age, 62.8 ± 7.8 years) were equally divided into endobutton versus the modified Weaver-Dunn groups. Each potted scapula and clavicle was fixed in a custom made jig to allow translation and load to failure testing using a Zwick BZ2.5/TS1S material testing machine (Zwick/Roell Co, Germany). A systematic review of 21 studies evaluating reconstructive methods for coracoclavicular or AC joints using a cadaveric model was also performed. From our biomechanical study, after ligament reconstruction, the triple endobutton technique demonstrated superior, anterior, and posterior displacements similar to that of the intact state (P > 0.05). In the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction group, however, there was significantly greater anterior (P < 0.001) and posterior (P = 0.003) translation after ligament reconstruction. In addition, there was no significant difference after reconstruction between failure load of the triple endobutton group and that of the intact state (686.88 vs 684.9 N, P > 0.05), whereas the failure load after the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction was decreased compared with the intact state (171.64 vs 640.86 N, P < 0.001). From our systematic review of 21 studies, which involved comparison of the modified Weaver-Dunn technique with other methods, the majority showed that the modified Weaver-Dunn procedure had significantly (P < .05) greater laxity than other methods including the endobutton technique. The triple endobutton reconstruction proved superior to the modified Weaver-Dunn technique in restoration of AC joint stability and strength. Triple endobutton reconstruction of the coracoclavicular ligament is superior to the modified Weaver-Dunn reconstruction in controlling both superior and

  9. Augmented Likelihood Image Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Stille, Maik; Kleine, Matthias; Hägele, Julian; Barkhausen, Jörg; Buzug, Thorsten M

    2016-01-01

    The presence of high-density objects remains an open problem in medical CT imaging. Data of projections passing through objects of high density, such as metal implants, are dominated by noise and are highly affected by beam hardening and scatter. Reconstructed images become less diagnostically conclusive because of pronounced artifacts that manifest as dark and bright streaks. A new reconstruction algorithm is proposed with the aim to reduce these artifacts by incorporating information about shape and known attenuation coefficients of a metal implant. Image reconstruction is considered as a variational optimization problem. The afore-mentioned prior knowledge is introduced in terms of equality constraints. An augmented Lagrangian approach is adapted in order to minimize the associated log-likelihood function for transmission CT. During iterations, temporally appearing artifacts are reduced with a bilateral filter and new projection values are calculated, which are used later on for the reconstruction. A detailed evaluation in cooperation with radiologists is performed on software and hardware phantoms, as well as on clinically relevant patient data of subjects with various metal implants. Results show that the proposed reconstruction algorithm is able to outperform contemporary metal artifact reduction methods such as normalized metal artifact reduction.

  10. Reconstruction in Warfare Injuries.

    PubMed

    Langer, V

    2010-10-01

    Traumatic injuries, especially in the combat setting, stress the surgical team that may be sited in a remote forward area, battling against paucity of time, resources and infrastructure. The lone surgeon may be faced with the arduous challenge of saving life. There is seldom thought given to reconstruction in this high-pressure situation. If the patient survives, morbidity for want of reconstruction can be severe and quality of life can suffer significantly. Reconstruction after 3 to 5 days is fraught with complications and usually does compromise outcome in the post-operative phase. The reconstructive surgeon should be involved early in the management as he can provide coverage for large soft tissue defects after aggressive debridement with panache. If the patient is haemodynamically stable, he should be transferred urgently, preferrably by air, to a higher centre with multi-specialty care, especially being equipped with an orthopaedic and trauma reconstructive surgeon. It has been proved beyond doubt that the healing improves significantly and there is marked decrease in morbidity if coverage of wounds is provided early, before colonized wounds get infected. PMID:27365741

  11. Lateral Abdominal Wall Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Baumann, Donald P.; Butler, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lateral abdominal wall (LAW) defects can manifest as a flank hernias, myofascial laxity/bulges, or full-thickness defects. These defects are quite different from those in the anterior abdominal wall defects and the complexity and limited surgical options make repairing the LAW a challenge for the reconstructive surgeon. LAW reconstruction requires an understanding of the anatomy, physiologic forces, and the impact of deinnervation injury to design and perform successful reconstructions of hernia, bulge, and full-thickness defects. Reconstructive strategies must be tailored to address the inguinal ligament, retroperitoneum, chest wall, and diaphragm. Operative technique must focus on stabilization of the LAW to nonyielding points of fixation at the anatomic borders of the LAW far beyond the musculofascial borders of the defect itself. Thus, hernias, bulges, and full-thickness defects are approached in a similar fashion. Mesh reinforcement is uniformly required in lateral abdominal wall reconstruction. Inlay mesh placement with overlying myofascial coverage is preferred as a first-line option as is the case in anterior abdominal wall reconstruction. However, interposition bridging repairs are often performed as the surrounding myofascial tissue precludes a dual layered closure. The decision to place bioprosthetic or prosthetic mesh depends on surgeon preference, patient comorbidities, and clinical factors of the repair. Regardless of mesh type, the overlying soft tissue must provide stable cutaneous coverage and obliteration of dead space. In cases where the fasciocutaneous flaps surrounding the defect are inadequate for closure, regional pedicled flaps or free flaps are recruited to achieve stable soft tissue coverage. PMID:23372458

  12. Adaptive iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bruder, H.; Raupach, R.; Sunnegardh, J.; Sedlmair, M.; Stierstorfer, K.; Flohr, T.

    2011-03-01

    It is well known that, in CT reconstruction, Maximum A Posteriori (MAP) reconstruction based on a Poisson noise model can be well approximated by Penalized Weighted Least Square (PWLS) minimization based on a data dependent Gaussian noise model. We study minimization of the PWLS objective function using the Gradient Descent (GD) method, and show that if an exact inverse of the forward projector exists, the PWLS GD update equation can be translated into an update equation which entirely operates in the image domain. In case of non-linear regularization and arbitrary noise model this means that a non-linear image filter must exist which solves the optimization problem. In the general case of non-linear regularization and arbitrary noise model, the analytical computation is not trivial and might lead to image filters which are computationally very expensive. We introduce a new iteration scheme in image space, based on a regularization filter with an anisotropic noise model. Basically, this approximates the statistical data weighting and regularization in PWLS reconstruction. If needed, e.g. for compensation of the non-exactness of backprojector, the image-based regularization loop can be preceded by a raw data based loop without regularization and statistical data weighting. We call this combined iterative reconstruction scheme Adaptive Iterative Reconstruction (AIR). It will be shown that in terms of low-contrast visibility, sharpness-to-noise and contrast-to-noise ratio, PWLS and AIR reconstruction are similar to a high degree of accuracy. In clinical images the noise texture of AIR is also superior to the more artificial texture of PWLS.

  13. Anatomic Posterolateral Corner Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Serra Cruz, Raphael; Mitchell, Justin J; Dean, Chase S; Chahla, Jorge; Moatshe, Gilbert; LaPrade, Robert F

    2016-06-01

    Posterolateral corner injuries represent a complex injury pattern, with damage to important coronal and rotatory stabilizers of the knee. These lesions commonly occur in association with other ligament injuries, making decisions regarding treatment challenging. Grade III posterolateral corner injuries result in significant instability and have poor outcomes when treated nonoperatively. As a result, reconstruction is advocated. A thorough knowledge of the anatomy is essential for surgical treatment of this pathology. The following technical note provides a diagnostic approach, postoperative management, and details of a technique for anatomic reconstruction of the 3 main static stabilizers of the posterolateral corner of the knee. PMID:27656379

  14. Reconstruction of the trachea

    PubMed Central

    Grillo, Hermes C.

    1973-01-01

    Grillo, H. C. (1973).Thorax, 28, 667-679. Reconstruction of the trachea. Experience in 100 consecutive cases. Anatomic mobilization of the trachea permits resection of one-half or more with primary anastomosis. An anterior approach by a cervical or cervicomediastinal route utilizes cervical flexion to devolve the larynx and tracheal mobilization with preservation of the lateral blood supply. The transthoracic route is employed for lower tracheal lesions. Over 100 tracheal resections have been done using these methods of direct reconstruction. Eighty-four patients suffered from benign strictures, 79 resulting from intubation injuries. Eleven primary tracheal tumours and five secondary tumours are included. The majority of lesions following intubation occurred at the level of the cuff. It was possible to repair 78 of the 84 stenotic lesions through a cervical or cervicomediastinal approach. Seventy-three of the 84 patients with inflammatory lesions obtained an excellent or good functional and anatomic result. Nine of 11 patients with primary neoplasms who underwent reconstruction are alive and without known disease. There were five early postoperative deaths in these 100 consecutive patients who underwent tracheal reconstruction. Images PMID:4362789

  15. Breast reconstruction - natural tissue

    MedlinePlus

    ... muscle flap; TRAM; Latissimus muscle flap with a breast implant; DIEP flap; DIEAP flap; Gluteal free flap; ... If you are having breast reconstruction at the same time as mastectomy, the surgeon may do either of the following: Skin-sparing mastectomy. This means ...

  16. Reconstructing Community History

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shields, Amy

    2004-01-01

    History is alive and well in Lebanon, Missouri. Students in this small town in the southwest region of the state went above and beyond the community's expectations on this special project. This article describes this historical journey which began when students in a summer mural class reconstructed a mural that was originally created by a…

  17. Recrystallization and texture evolution during hot rolling of copper, studied by a multiscale model combining crystal plasticity and vertex models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellbin, Y.; Hallberg, H.; Ristinmaa, M.

    2016-10-01

    A multiscale modeling framework, combining a graph-based vertex model of microstructure evolution with a GPU-parallelized crystal plasticity model, was recently proposed by the authors. Considering hot rolling of copper, the full capabilities of the model are demonstrated in the present work. The polycrystal plasticity model captures the plastic response and the texture evolution during materials processing while the vertex model provides central features of grain structure evolution through dynamic recrystallization, such as nucleation and growth of individual crystals. The multiscale model makes it possible to obtain information regarding grain size and texture development throughout the workpiece, capturing the effects of recrystallization and heterogeneous microstructure evolution. Recognizing that recrystallization is a highly temperature dependent phenomenon, simulations are performed at different process temperatures. The results show that the proposed modeling framework is capable of simultaneously capturing central aspects of material behavior at both the meso- and macrolevel. Detailed investigation of the evolution of texture, grain size distribution and plastic deformation during the different processing conditions are performed, using the proposed model. The results show a strong texture development, but almost no recrystallization, for the lower of the investigated temperatures, while at higher temperatures an increased recrystallization is shown to weaken the development of a typical rolling texture. The simulations also show the influence of the shear deformation close to the rolling surface on both texture development and recrystallization.

  18. Preparing for Breast Reconstruction Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... after breast reconstruction surgery Preparing for breast reconstruction surgery Your surgeon can help you know what to ... The plan for follow-up Costs Understanding your surgery costs Health insurance policies often cover most or ...

  19. Channeled spectropolarimetry using iterative reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dennis J.; LaCasse, Charles F.; Craven, Julia M.

    2016-05-01

    Channeled spectropolarimeters (CSP) measure the polarization state of light as a function of wavelength. Conventional Fourier reconstruction suffers from noise, assumes the channels are band-limited, and requires uniformly spaced samples. To address these problems, we propose an iterative reconstruction algorithm. We develop a mathematical model of CSP measurements and minimize a cost function based on this model. We simulate a measured spectrum using example Stokes parameters, from which we compare conventional Fourier reconstruction and iterative reconstruction. Importantly, our iterative approach can reconstruct signals that contain more bandwidth, an advancement over Fourier reconstruction. Our results also show that iterative reconstruction mitigates noise effects, processes non-uniformly spaced samples without interpolation, and more faithfully recovers the ground truth Stokes parameters. This work offers a significant improvement to Fourier reconstruction for channeled spectropolarimetry.

  20. Stochastic reconstruction of sandstones

    PubMed

    Manwart; Torquato; Hilfer

    2000-07-01

    A simulated annealing algorithm is employed to generate a stochastic model for a Berea sandstone and a Fontainebleau sandstone, with each a prescribed two-point probability function, lineal-path function, and "pore size" distribution function, respectively. We find that the temperature decrease of the annealing has to be rather quick to yield isotropic and percolating configurations. A comparison of simple morphological quantities indicates good agreement between the reconstructions and the original sandstones. Also, the mean survival time of a random walker in the pore space is reproduced with good accuracy. However, a more detailed investigation by means of local porosity theory shows that there may be significant differences of the geometrical connectivity between the reconstructed and the experimental samples.

  1. LOFAR sparse image reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garsden, H.; Girard, J. N.; Starck, J. L.; Corbel, S.; Tasse, C.; Woiselle, A.; McKean, J. P.; van Amesfoort, A. S.; Anderson, J.; Avruch, I. M.; Beck, R.; Bentum, M. J.; Best, P.; Breitling, F.; Broderick, J.; Brüggen, M.; Butcher, H. R.; Ciardi, B.; de Gasperin, F.; de Geus, E.; de Vos, M.; Duscha, S.; Eislöffel, J.; Engels, D.; Falcke, H.; Fallows, R. A.; Fender, R.; Ferrari, C.; Frieswijk, W.; Garrett, M. A.; Grießmeier, J.; Gunst, A. W.; Hassall, T. E.; Heald, G.; Hoeft, M.; Hörandel, J.; van der Horst, A.; Juette, E.; Karastergiou, A.; Kondratiev, V. I.; Kramer, M.; Kuniyoshi, M.; Kuper, G.; Mann, G.; Markoff, S.; McFadden, R.; McKay-Bukowski, D.; Mulcahy, D. D.; Munk, H.; Norden, M. J.; Orru, E.; Paas, H.; Pandey-Pommier, M.; Pandey, V. N.; Pietka, G.; Pizzo, R.; Polatidis, A. G.; Renting, A.; Röttgering, H.; Rowlinson, A.; Schwarz, D.; Sluman, J.; Smirnov, O.; Stappers, B. W.; Steinmetz, M.; Stewart, A.; Swinbank, J.; Tagger, M.; Tang, Y.; Tasse, C.; Thoudam, S.; Toribio, C.; Vermeulen, R.; Vocks, C.; van Weeren, R. J.; Wijnholds, S. J.; Wise, M. W.; Wucknitz, O.; Yatawatta, S.; Zarka, P.; Zensus, A.

    2015-03-01

    Context. The LOw Frequency ARray (LOFAR) radio telescope is a giant digital phased array interferometer with multiple antennas distributed in Europe. It provides discrete sets of Fourier components of the sky brightness. Recovering the original brightness distribution with aperture synthesis forms an inverse problem that can be solved by various deconvolution and minimization methods. Aims: Recent papers have established a clear link between the discrete nature of radio interferometry measurement and the "compressed sensing" (CS) theory, which supports sparse reconstruction methods to form an image from the measured visibilities. Empowered by proximal theory, CS offers a sound framework for efficient global minimization and sparse data representation using fast algorithms. Combined with instrumental direction-dependent effects (DDE) in the scope of a real instrument, we developed and validated a new method based on this framework. Methods: We implemented a sparse reconstruction method in the standard LOFAR imaging tool and compared the photometric and resolution performance of this new imager with that of CLEAN-based methods (CLEAN and MS-CLEAN) with simulated and real LOFAR data. Results: We show that i) sparse reconstruction performs as well as CLEAN in recovering the flux of point sources; ii) performs much better on extended objects (the root mean square error is reduced by a factor of up to 10); and iii) provides a solution with an effective angular resolution 2-3 times better than the CLEAN images. Conclusions: Sparse recovery gives a correct photometry on high dynamic and wide-field images and improved realistic structures of extended sources (of simulated and real LOFAR datasets). This sparse reconstruction method is compatible with modern interferometric imagers that handle DDE corrections (A- and W-projections) required for current and future instruments such as LOFAR and SKA.

  2. Kinky tomographic reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.; Bilisoly, R.L.

    1996-05-01

    We address the issue of how to make decisions about the degree of smoothness demanded of a flexible contour used to model the boundary of a 2D object. We demonstrate the use of a Bayesian approach to set the strength of the smoothness prior for a tomographic reconstruction problem. The Akaike Information Criterion is used to determine whether to allow a kink in the contour.

  3. A regional method for craniofacial reconstruction based on coordinate adjustments and a new fusion strategy.

    PubMed

    Deng, Qingqiong; Zhou, Mingquan; Wu, Zhongke; Shui, Wuyang; Ji, Yuan; Wang, Xingce; Liu, Ching Yiu Jessica; Huang, Youliang; Jiang, Haiyan

    2016-02-01

    Craniofacial reconstruction recreates a facial outlook from the cranium based on the relationship between the face and the skull to assist identification. But craniofacial structures are very complex, and this relationship is not the same in different craniofacial regions. Several regional methods have recently been proposed, these methods segmented the face and skull into regions, and the relationship of each region is then learned independently, after that, facial regions for a given skull are estimated and finally glued together to generate a face. Most of these regional methods use vertex coordinates to represent the regions, and they define a uniform coordinate system for all of the regions. Consequently, the inconsistence in the positions of regions between different individuals is not eliminated before learning the relationships between the face and skull regions, and this reduces the accuracy of the craniofacial reconstruction. In order to solve this problem, an improved regional method is proposed in this paper involving two types of coordinate adjustments. One is the global coordinate adjustment performed on the skulls and faces with the purpose to eliminate the inconsistence of position and pose of the heads; the other is the local coordinate adjustment performed on the skull and face regions with the purpose to eliminate the inconsistence of position of these regions. After these two coordinate adjustments, partial least squares regression (PLSR) is used to estimate the relationship between the face region and the skull region. In order to obtain a more accurate reconstruction, a new fusion strategy is also proposed in the paper to maintain the reconstructed feature regions when gluing the facial regions together. This is based on the observation that the feature regions usually have less reconstruction errors compared to rest of the face. The results demonstrate that the coordinate adjustments and the new fusion strategy can significantly improve the

  4. The PandaRoot framework for simulation, reconstruction and analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spataro, Stefano; PANDA Collaboration

    2011-12-01

    The PANDA experiment at the future facility FAIR will study anti-proton proton and anti-proton nucleus collisions in a beam momentum range from 2 GeV/c up to 15 GeV/c. The PandaRoot framework is part of the FairRoot project, a common software framework for the future FAIR experiments, and is currently used to simulate detector performances and to evaluate different detector concepts. It is based on the packages ROOT and Virtual MonteCarlo with Geant3 and Geant4. Different reconstruction algorithms for tracking and particle identification are under development and optimization, in order to achieve the performance requirements of the experiment. In the central tracker a first track fit is performed using a conformal map transformation based on a helix assumption, then the track is used as input for a Kalman Filter (package genfit), using GEANE as track follower. The track is then correlated to the pid detectors (e.g. Cerenkov detectors, EM Calorimeter or Muon Chambers) to evaluate a global particle identification probability, using a Bayesian approach or multivariate methods. Further implemented packages in PandaRoot are: the analysis tools framework Rho, the kinematic fitter package for vertex and mass constraint fits, and a fast simulation code based upon parametrized detector responses. PandaRoot was also tested on an Alien-based GRID infrastructure. The contribution will report about the status of PandaRoot and show some example results for analysis of physics benchmark channels.

  5. Increasing Stability and Activity of Core-Shell Catalysts by Preferential Segregation of Oxide on Edges and Vertexes: Oxygen Reduction on Ti-Au@Pt/C

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, J.; Wu, L.; Kuttiyiel, K.; Goodman, K. R.; Zhang, C.; Zhu, Y.; Vukmirovic, M. B.; White, M. G.; Sasaki, K.; Adzic, R. R.

    2016-06-30

    We describe a new class of core-shell nanoparticle catalysts having edges and vertexes covered by refractory metal oxide that preferentially segregates onto these catalyst sites. The monolayer shell is deposited on the oxidefree core atoms. The oxide on edges and vertexes induces high catalyst’s stability and activity. The catalyst and synthesis are exemplified by fabrication of Au nanoparticles doped by Ti atoms that segregate as oxide onto low–coordination sites of edges and vertexes. Pt monolayer shell deposited on Au sites has the mass and specific activities for the oxygen reduction reaction about 13 and 5 times higher than those ofmore » commercial Pt/C catalysts. The durability tests show no activity loss after 10000 potential cycles from 0.6 to 1.0V. The superior activity and durability of the Ti-Au@Pt catalyst originate from protective Ti oxide located at the most dissolution-prone edge and vertex sites, and Au-supported active and stable Pt shell.« less

  6. Similar Response Patterns to 5%Topical Minoxidil Foam in Frontal and Vertex Scalp of Men with Androgenetic Alopecia: A Microarray Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Mirmirani, P.; Consolo, M.; Oyetakin-White, P.; Baron, E.; Leahy, P.; Karnik, P.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background There are regional variations in scalp hair miniaturization seen in androgenetic alopecia (AGA). Use of topical minoxidil can lead to reversal of miniaturization in the vertex scalp. However, its effects on other scalp regions are less well studied. Methods A placebo controlled double-blinded prospective pilot study of minoxidil topical foam 5% (MTF) vs placebo was conducted in sixteen healthy men ages 18-49 with Hamilton-Norwood type IV-V thinning. The subjects were asked to apply the treatment (active drug or placebo) to the scalp twice daily for eight weeks. Stereotactic scalp photographs were taken at the baseline and final visits to monitor global hair growth. Scalp biopsies were done at the leading edge of hair loss from the frontal and vertex scalp before and after treatment with MTF and placebo and microarray analysis was done using the Affymetrix GeneChip HG U133 Plus 2.0. Results Global stereotactic photographs showed that MTF induced hair growth in both the frontal and vertex scalp of AGA patients. Regional differences in gene expression profiles were observed before treatment. However, MTF treatment induced the expression of hair keratin associated genes and decreased the expression of epidermal differentiation complex (EDC) and inflammatory genes in both scalp regions. Conclusions These data suggest that MTF is effective in the treatment of both the frontal and vertex scalp of AGA patients. PMID:25204361

  7. Spin-Fluctuation-Driven Nematic Charge-Density Wave in Cuprate Superconductors: Impact of Aslamazov-Larkin Vertex Corrections.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Youichi; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2015-06-26

    We present a microscopic derivation of the nematic charge-density wave (CDW) formation in cuprate superconductors based on the three-orbital d-p Hubbard model by introducing the vertex correction (VC) into the charge susceptibility. The CDW instability at q=(Δ(FS),0), (0,Δ(FS)) appears when the spin fluctuations are strong, due to the strong charge-spin interference represented by the VC. Here, Δ(FS) is the wave number between the neighboring hot spots. The obtained spin-fluctuation-driven CDW is expressed as the "intra-unit-cell orbital order" accompanied by the charge transfer between the neighboring atomic orbitals, which is actually observed by the scanning tunneling microscope measurements. We predict that the cuprate CDW and the nematic orbital order in Fe-based superconductors are closely related spin-fluctuation-driven phenomena. PMID:26197139

  8. Characterisation of a radiation hard front-end chip for the vertex detector of the LHCb experiment at CERN

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Bakel, N.; Baumeister, D.; van Beuzekom, M.; Bulten, H. J.; Feuerstack-Raible, M.; Jans, E.; Ketel, T.; Klous, S.; Löchner, S.; Sexauer, E.; Smale, N.; Snoek, H.; Trunk, U.; Verkooijen, H.

    2003-08-01

    The Beetle is a 128 channel analog pipelined readout chip which is intended for use in the silicon vertex locator (VELO) of the LHCb experiment at CERN. The Beetle chip is specially designed to withstand high radiation doses. Two Beetle1.1 chips bonded to a silicon strip detector have been tested with minimum ionizing particles. The main goal was to measure the signal-to-noise (S/N) ratio of the Beetle1.1 connected to a prototype VELO detector. Furthermore we investigated the general behaviour of the Beetle1.1. In this note we present the chip architecture, the measured (S/N) numbers as well as some characteristics (e.g. risetime, spillover) of the Beetle1.1 chip. Results from a total ionizing dose irradiation test are reported.

  9. Spin-Fluctuation-Driven Nematic Charge-Density Wave in Cuprate Superconductors: Impact of Aslamazov-Larkin Vertex Corrections.

    PubMed

    Yamakawa, Youichi; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2015-06-26

    We present a microscopic derivation of the nematic charge-density wave (CDW) formation in cuprate superconductors based on the three-orbital d-p Hubbard model by introducing the vertex correction (VC) into the charge susceptibility. The CDW instability at q=(Δ(FS),0), (0,Δ(FS)) appears when the spin fluctuations are strong, due to the strong charge-spin interference represented by the VC. Here, Δ(FS) is the wave number between the neighboring hot spots. The obtained spin-fluctuation-driven CDW is expressed as the "intra-unit-cell orbital order" accompanied by the charge transfer between the neighboring atomic orbitals, which is actually observed by the scanning tunneling microscope measurements. We predict that the cuprate CDW and the nematic orbital order in Fe-based superconductors are closely related spin-fluctuation-driven phenomena.

  10. GOSSIP: A vertex detector combining a thin gas layer as signal generator with a CMOS readout pixel array

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, M.; Heijne, E. H. M.; Llopart, X.; Colas, P.; Giganon, A.; Giomataris, Y.; Chefdeville, M.; Colijn, A. P.; Fornaini, A.; van der Graaf, H.; Kluit, P.; Timmermans, J.; Visschers, J. L.; Schmitz, J.

    2006-05-01

    A small TPC has been read out by means of a Medipix2 chip as direct anode. A Micromegas foil was placed 50 μm above the chip, and electron multiplication occurred in the gap. With a He/isobutane 80/20 mixture, gas multiplication factors up to tens of thousands were achieved, resulting in an efficiency for detecting single electrons of better than 90%. With this new readout technology for gas-filled detectors we recorded many image frames containing 2D images with tracks from cosmic muons. Along these tracks, electron clusters were observed, as well as δ-rays. With a gas layer thickness of only 1 mm, the device could be applied as vertex detector, outperforming all Si-based detectors.

  11. Evolutionary tree reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cheeseman, Peter; Kanefsky, Bob

    1990-01-01

    It is described how Minimum Description Length (MDL) can be applied to the problem of DNA and protein evolutionary tree reconstruction. If there is a set of mutations that transform a common ancestor into a set of the known sequences, and this description is shorter than the information to encode the known sequences directly, then strong evidence for an evolutionary relationship has been found. A heuristic algorithm is described that searches for the simplest tree (smallest MDL) that finds close to optimal trees on the test data. Various ways of extending the MDL theory to more complex evolutionary relationships are discussed.

  12. Reconstructing the Antikythera Mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freeth, Tony

    The Antikythera Mechanism is a geared astronomical calculating machine from ancient Greece. The extraordinary nature of this device has become even more apparent in recent years as a result of research under the aegis of the Antikythera Mechanism Research Project (AMRP) - an international collaboration of scientists, historians, museum staff, engineers, and imaging specialists. Though many questions still remain, we may now be close to reconstructing the complete machine. As a technological artifact, it is unique in the ancient world. Its brilliant design conception means that it is a landmark in the history of science and technology.

  13. Photometric Lunar Surface Reconstruction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nefian, Ara V.; Alexandrov, Oleg; Morattlo, Zachary; Kim, Taemin; Beyer, Ross A.

    2013-01-01

    Accurate photometric reconstruction of the Lunar surface is important in the context of upcoming NASA robotic missions to the Moon and in giving a more accurate understanding of the Lunar soil composition. This paper describes a novel approach for joint estimation of Lunar albedo, camera exposure time, and photometric parameters that utilizes an accurate Lunar-Lambertian reflectance model and previously derived Lunar topography of the area visualized during the Apollo missions. The method introduced here is used in creating the largest Lunar albedo map (16% of the Lunar surface) at the resolution of 10 meters/pixel.

  14. Biomaterials for craniofacial reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Neumann, Andreas; Kevenhoerster, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Biomaterials for reconstruction of bony defects of the skull comprise of osteosynthetic materials applied after osteotomies or traumatic fractures and materials to fill bony defects which result from malformation, trauma or tumor resections. Other applications concern functional augmentations for dental implants or aesthetic augmentations in the facial region. For ostheosynthesis, mini- and microplates made from titanium alloys provide major advantages concerning biocompatibility, stability and individual fitting to the implant bed. The necessity of removing asymptomatic plates and screws after fracture healing is still a controversial issue. Risks and costs of secondary surgery for removal face a low rate of complications (due to corrosion products) when the material remains in situ. Resorbable osteosynthesis systems have similar mechanical stability and are especially useful in the growing skull. The huge variety of biomaterials for the reconstruction of bony defects makes it difficult to decide which material is adequate for which indication and for which site. The optimal biomaterial that meets every requirement (e.g. biocompatibility, stability, intraoperative fitting, product safety, low costs etc.) does not exist. The different material types are (autogenic) bone and many alloplastics such as metals (mainly titanium), ceramics, plastics and composites. Future developments aim to improve physical and biological properties, especially regarding surface interactions. To date, tissue engineered bone is far from routine clinical application. PMID:22073101

  15. Parallel ptychographic reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Nashed, Youssef S. G.; Vine, David J.; Peterka, Tom; Deng, Junjing; Ross, Rob; Jacobsen, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Ptychography is an imaging method whereby a coherent beam is scanned across an object, and an image is obtained by iterative phasing of the set of diffraction patterns. It is able to be used to image extended objects at a resolution limited by scattering strength of the object and detector geometry, rather than at an optics-imposed limit. As technical advances allow larger fields to be imaged, computational challenges arise for reconstructing the correspondingly larger data volumes, yet at the same time there is also a need to deliver reconstructed images immediately so that one can evaluate the next steps to take in an experiment. Here we present a parallel method for real-time ptychographic phase retrieval. It uses a hybrid parallel strategy to divide the computation between multiple graphics processing units (GPUs) and then employs novel techniques to merge sub-datasets into a single complex phase and amplitude image. Results are shown on a simulated specimen and a real dataset from an X-ray experiment conducted at a synchrotron light source. PMID:25607174

  16. Synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Litzenberg, Dale W.; Hadley, Scott W.; Tyagi, Neelam; Balter, James M.; Ten Haken, Randall K.; Chetty, Indrin J.

    2007-01-15

    Variations in target volume position between and during treatment fractions can lead to measurable differences in the dose distribution delivered to each patient. Current methods to estimate the ongoing cumulative delivered dose distribution make idealized assumptions about individual patient motion based on average motions observed in a population of patients. In the delivery of intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) with a multi-leaf collimator (MLC), errors are introduced in both the implementation and delivery processes. In addition, target motion and MLC motion can lead to dosimetric errors from interplay effects. All of these effects may be of clinical importance. Here we present a method to compute delivered dose distributions for each treatment beam and fraction, which explicitly incorporates synchronized real-time patient motion data and real-time fluence and machine configuration data. This synchronized dynamic dose reconstruction method properly accounts for the two primary classes of errors that arise from delivering IMRT with an MLC: (a) Interplay errors between target volume motion and MLC motion, and (b) Implementation errors, such as dropped segments, dose over/under shoot, faulty leaf motors, tongue-and-groove effect, rounded leaf ends, and communications delays. These reconstructed dose fractions can then be combined to produce high-quality determinations of the dose distribution actually received to date, from which individualized adaptive treatment strategies can be determined.

  17. Stereoscopic liver surface reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Karwan, Adam; Rudnicki, Jerzy; Wróblewski, Tadeusz

    2012-01-01

    The paper presents a practical approach to measuring liver motion, both respiratory and laparoscopic, with a tool guided in the operating room. The presented method is based on standard operating room equipment, i.e. rigid laparoscopic cameras and a single incision laparoscopic surgery trocar. The triangulation algorithm is used and stereo correspondence points are marked manually by two independent experts. To calibrate the cameras two perpendicular chessboards, a pinhole camera model and a Tsai algorithm are used. The data set consists of twelve real liver surgery video sequences: ten open surgery and two laparoscopic, gathered from different patients. The setup equipment and methodology are presented. The proposed evaluation method based on both calibration points of the chessboard reconstruction and measurements made by the Polaris Vicra tracking system are used as a reference system. In the analysis stage we focused on two specific goals, measuring respiration and laparoscopic tool guided liver motions. We have presented separate examples for left and right liver lobes. It is possible to reconstruct liver motion using the SILS trocar. Our approach was made without additional position or movement sensors. Diffusion of cameras and laser for distance measurement seems to be less practical for in vivo laparoscopic data, but we do not exclude exploring such sensors in further research. PMID:23256023

  18. Reconstruction in Fourier space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burden, A.; Percival, W. J.; Howlett, C.

    2015-10-01

    We present a fast iterative fast Fourier transform (FFT) based reconstruction algorithm that allows for non-parallel redshift-space distortions (RSDs). We test our algorithm on both N-body dark matter simulations and mock distributions of galaxies designed to replicate galaxy survey conditions. We compare solenoidal and irrotational components of the redshift distortion and show that an approximation of this distortion leads to a better estimate of the real-space potential (and therefore faster convergence) than ignoring the RSD when estimating the displacement field. Our iterative reconstruction scheme converges in two iterations for the mock samples corresponding to Baryon Oscillation Spectroscopic Survey CMASS Data Release 11 when we start with an approximation of the RSD. The scheme takes six iterations when the initial estimate, measured from the redshift-space overdensity, has no RSD correction. Slower convergence would be expected for surveys covering a larger angle on the sky. We show that this FFT based method provides a better estimate of the real-space displacement field than a configuration space method that uses finite difference routines to compute the potential for the same grid resolution. Finally, we show that a lognormal transform of the overdensity, used as a proxy for the linear overdensity, is beneficial in estimating the full displacement field from a dense sample of tracers. However, the lognormal transform of the overdensity does not perform well when estimating the displacements from sparser simulations with a more realistic galaxy density.

  19. Exercises in PET Image Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nix, Oliver

    These exercises are complementary to the theoretical lectures about positron emission tomography (PET) image reconstruction. They aim at providing some hands on experience in PET image reconstruction and focus on demonstrating the different data preprocessing steps and reconstruction algorithms needed to obtain high quality PET images. Normalisation, geometric-, attenuation- and scatter correction are introduced. To explain the necessity of those some basics about PET scanner hardware, data acquisition and organisation are reviewed. During the course the students use a software application based on the STIR (software for tomographic image reconstruction) library 1,2 which allows them to dynamically select or deselect corrections and reconstruction methods as well as to modify their most important parameters. Following the guided tutorial, the students get an impression on the effect the individual data precorrections have on image quality and what happens if they are forgotten. Several data sets in sinogram format are provided, such as line source data, Jaszczak phantom data sets with high and low statistics and NEMA whole body phantom data. The two most frequently used reconstruction algorithms in PET image reconstruction, filtered back projection (FBP) and the iterative OSEM (ordered subset expectation maximation) approach are used to reconstruct images. The exercise should help the students gaining an understanding what the reasons for inferior image quality and artefacts are and how to improve quality by a clever choice of reconstruction parameters.

  20. Monitoring the data quality of the real-time event reconstruction in the ALICE High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austrheim Erdal, Hege; Richther, Matthias; Szostak, Artur; Toia, Alberica

    2012-12-01

    ALICE is a dedicated heavy ion experiment at the CERN LHC. The ALICE High Level Trigger was designed to select events with desirable physics properties. Data from several of the major subdetectors in ALICE are processed by the HLT for real-time event reconstruction, for instance the Inner Tracking System, the Time Projection Chamber, the electromagnetc calorimeters, the Transition Radiation Detector and the muon spectrometer. The HLT reconstructs events in real-time and thus provides input for trigger algorithms. It is necessary to monitor the quality of the reconstruction where one focuses on track and event properties. Also, HLT implemented data compression for the TPC during the heavy ion data taking in 2011 to reduce the data rate from the ALICE detector. The key for the data compression is to store clusters (spacepoints) calculated by HLT rather than storing raw data. It is thus very important to monitor the cluster finder performance as a way to monitor the data compression. The data monitoring is divided into two stages. The first stage is performed during data taking. A part of the HLT production chain is dedicated to performing online monitoring and facilities are available in the HLT production cluster to have real-time access to the reconstructed events in the ALICE control room. This includes track and event properties, and in addition, this facility gives a way to display a small fraction of the reconstructed events in an online display. The second part of the monitoring is performed after the data has been transferred to permanent storage. After a post-process of the real-time reconstructed data, one can look in more detail at the cluster finder performance, the quality of the reconstruction of tracks, vertices and vertex position. The monitoring solution is presented in detail, with special attention to the heavy ion data taking of 2011.

  1. Metrological digital audio reconstruction

    DOEpatents

    Fadeyev; Vitaliy , Haber; Carl

    2004-02-19

    Audio information stored in the undulations of grooves in a medium such as a phonograph record may be reconstructed, with little or no contact, by measuring the groove shape using precision metrology methods coupled with digital image processing and numerical analysis. The effects of damage, wear, and contamination may be compensated, in many cases, through image processing and analysis methods. The speed and data handling capacity of available computing hardware make this approach practical. Two examples used a general purpose optical metrology system to study a 50 year old 78 r.p.m. phonograph record and a commercial confocal scanning probe to study a 1920's celluloid Edison cylinder. Comparisons are presented with stylus playback of the samples and with a digitally re-mastered version of an original magnetic recording. There is also a more extensive implementation of this approach, with dedicated hardware and software.

  2. Reconstructing the Alcatraz escape

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baart, F.; Hoes, O.; Hut, R.; Donchyts, G.; van Leeuwen, E.

    2014-12-01

    In the night of June 12, 1962 three inmates used a raft made of raincoatsto escaped the ultimate maximum security prison island Alcatraz in SanFrancisco, United States. History is unclear about what happened tothe escapees. At what time did they step into the water, did theysurvive, if so, where did they reach land? The fate of the escapees has been the subject of much debate: did theymake landfall on Angel Island, or did the current sweep them out ofthe bay and into the cold pacific ocean? In this presentation, we try to shed light on this historic case using avisualization of a high-resolution hydrodynamic simulation of the San Francisco Bay, combined with historical tidal records. By reconstructing the hydrodynamic conditions and using a particle based simulation of the escapees we show possible scenarios. The interactive model is visualized using both a 3D photorealistic and web based visualization. The "Escape from Alcatraz" scenario demonstrates the capabilities of the 3Di platform. This platform is normally used for overland flooding (1D/2D). The model engine uses a quad tree structure, resulting in an order of magnitude speedup. The subgrid approach takes detailed bathymetry information into account. The inter-model variability is tested by comparing the results with the DFlow Flexible Mesh (DFlowFM) San Francisco Bay model. Interactivity is implemented by converting the models from static programs to interactive libraries, adhering to the Basic ModelInterface (BMI). Interactive models are more suitable for answeringexploratory research questions such as this reconstruction effort. Although these hydrodynamic simulations only provide circumstantialevidence for solving the mystery of what happened during the foggy darknight of June 12, 1962, it can be used as a guidance and provides aninteresting testcase to apply interactive modelling.

  3. Reconstruction of an ablated breast.

    PubMed

    Scarfì, A; Ordemann, K; Hüter, J

    1986-01-01

    It is the aim of the reconstruction of an ablated breast to repair the woman's integrity. The technique of this operation, according to Bomert, is the sliding of a flap of skin in the case of a horizontal breast scar. For the reconstruction, a silicone prosthesis is implanted which in most cases is prepectoral.

  4. Reconstruction of Skull Base Defects.

    PubMed

    Klatt-Cromwell, Cristine N; Thorp, Brian D; Del Signore, Anthony G; Ebert, Charles S; Ewend, Matthew G; Zanation, Adam M

    2016-02-01

    "Endoscopic endonasal skull base surgery has dramatically changed and expanded over recent years due to significant advancements in instrumentation, techniques, and anatomic understanding. With these advances, the need for more robust skull base reconstructive techniques was vital. In this article, reconstructive options ranging from acellular grafts to vascular flaps are described, including the strengths, weaknesses, and common uses."

  5. Predicting success in ACL reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Shalvoy, Robert M

    2014-11-03

    Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) injury and ACL reconstruction is common in the United States. However, when compared to the standards of other orthopedics procedures today, ACL reconstruction is NOT predictably successful in restoring patients to their pre-injury state. Only 60-70% of reconstructed patients resume their previous level of activity and many patients experience some degree of osteoarthritis. The reasons for such limitations of success are many. A recent renewal of interest in the many variables affecting ACL reconstruction and the understanding of the varying needs of patients with ACL injury holds promise for improving success even today as well as ultimately providing a normal knee for patients after ACL reconstruction.

  6. Nasal Reconstruction: Extending the Limits

    PubMed Central

    Corsten, Marcus; Haack, Sebastian; Gubisch, Wolfgang M.; Fischer, Helmut

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Reconstructing the 3-dimensional structure of the nose requires the maintenance of its aesthetic form and function. Restoration of the correct dimension, projection, skin quality, symmetrical contour, and function remains problematic. Consequently, modern approaches of nasal reconstruction aim at rebuilding the units rather than just covering the defect. However, revising or redoing a failed or insufficient reconstruction remains very challenging and requires experience and creativity. Here, we present a very particular case with a male patient, who underwent 37 operations elsewhere and presented with a failed nasal reconstruction. We describe and illustrate the complex steps of the nasal rereconstruction, including the reconstruction of the forehead donor site, surgical delay procedures for lining, and the coverage with a third paramedian forehead flap. PMID:27536483

  7. Nasal Reconstruction: Extending the Limits.

    PubMed

    Rezaeian, Farid; Corsten, Marcus; Haack, Sebastian; Gubisch, Wolfgang M; Fischer, Helmut

    2016-07-01

    Reconstructing the 3-dimensional structure of the nose requires the maintenance of its aesthetic form and function. Restoration of the correct dimension, projection, skin quality, symmetrical contour, and function remains problematic. Consequently, modern approaches of nasal reconstruction aim at rebuilding the units rather than just covering the defect. However, revising or redoing a failed or insufficient reconstruction remains very challenging and requires experience and creativity. Here, we present a very particular case with a male patient, who underwent 37 operations elsewhere and presented with a failed nasal reconstruction. We describe and illustrate the complex steps of the nasal rereconstruction, including the reconstruction of the forehead donor site, surgical delay procedures for lining, and the coverage with a third paramedian forehead flap. PMID:27536483

  8. Convex accelerated maximum entropy reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Worley, Bradley

    2016-04-01

    Maximum entropy (MaxEnt) spectral reconstruction methods provide a powerful framework for spectral estimation of nonuniformly sampled datasets. Many methods exist within this framework, usually defined based on the magnitude of a Lagrange multiplier in the MaxEnt objective function. An algorithm is presented here that utilizes accelerated first-order convex optimization techniques to rapidly and reliably reconstruct nonuniformly sampled NMR datasets using the principle of maximum entropy. This algorithm - called CAMERA for Convex Accelerated Maximum Entropy Reconstruction Algorithm - is a new approach to spectral reconstruction that exhibits fast, tunable convergence in both constant-aim and constant-lambda modes. A high-performance, open source NMR data processing tool is described that implements CAMERA, and brief comparisons to existing reconstruction methods are made on several example spectra.

  9. Reconstructive challenges in war wounds

    PubMed Central

    Bhandari, Prem Singh; Maurya, Sanjay; Mukherjee, Mrinal Kanti

    2012-01-01

    War wounds are devastating with extensive soft tissue and osseous destruction and heavy contamination. War casualties generally reach the reconstructive surgery centre after a delayed period due to additional injuries to the vital organs. This delay in their transfer to a tertiary care centre is responsible for progressive deterioration in wound conditions. In the prevailing circumstances, a majority of war wounds undergo delayed reconstruction, after a series of debridements. In the recent military conflicts, hydrosurgery jet debridement and negative pressure wound therapy have been successfully used in the preparation of war wounds. In war injuries, due to a heavy casualty load, a faster and reliable method of reconstruction is aimed at. Pedicle flaps in extremities provide rapid and reliable cover in extremity wounds. Large complex defects can be reconstructed using microvascular free flaps in a single stage. This article highlights the peculiarities and the challenges encountered in the reconstruction of these ghastly wounds. PMID:23162233

  10. Evidence-Based ACL Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E. Carlos

    2015-01-01

    There is controversy in the literature regarding a number of topics related to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this article is to answer the following questions: 1) Bone-patellar tendon-bone reconstruction (BPTB-R) or hamstrimg reconstruction (H-R); 2) Double bundle or single bundle; 3) Allograft or authograft; 4) Early or late reconstruction; 5) Rate of return to sports after ACL reconstruction; 6) Rate of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction. A Cochrane Library and PubMed (MEDLINE) search of systematic reviews and meta-analysis related to ACL reconstruction was performed. The key words were: ACL reconstruction, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The main criteria for selection were that the articles were systematic reviews and meta-analyses focused on the aforementioned questions. Sixty-nine articles were found, but only 26 were selected and reviewed because they had a high grade (I-II) of evidence. BPTB-R was associated with better postoperative knee stability but with a higher rate of morbidity. However, the results of both procedures in terms of functional outcome in the long-term were similar. The double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique showed better outcomes in rotational laxity, although functional recovery was similar between single-bundle and double-bundle. Autograft yielded better results than allograft. There was no difference between early and delayed reconstruction. 82% of patients were able to return to some kind of sport participation. 28% of patients presented radiological signs of osteoarthritis with a follow-up of minimum 10 years. PMID:25692162

  11. Blob-enhanced reconstruction technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castrillo, Giusy; Cafiero, Gioacchino; Discetti, Stefano; Astarita, Tommaso

    2016-09-01

    A method to enhance the quality of the tomographic reconstruction and, consequently, the 3D velocity measurement accuracy, is presented. The technique is based on integrating information on the objects to be reconstructed within the algebraic reconstruction process. A first guess intensity distribution is produced with a standard algebraic method, then the distribution is rebuilt as a sum of Gaussian blobs, based on location, intensity and size of agglomerates of light intensity surrounding local maxima. The blobs substitution regularizes the particle shape allowing a reduction of the particles discretization errors and of their elongation in the depth direction. The performances of the blob-enhanced reconstruction technique (BERT) are assessed with a 3D synthetic experiment. The results have been compared with those obtained by applying the standard camera simultaneous multiplicative reconstruction technique (CSMART) to the same volume. Several blob-enhanced reconstruction processes, both substituting the blobs at the end of the CSMART algorithm and during the iterations (i.e. using the blob-enhanced reconstruction as predictor for the following iterations), have been tested. The results confirm the enhancement in the velocity measurements accuracy, demonstrating a reduction of the bias error due to the ghost particles. The improvement is more remarkable at the largest tested seeding densities. Additionally, using the blobs distributions as a predictor enables further improvement of the convergence of the reconstruction algorithm, with the improvement being more considerable when substituting the blobs more than once during the process. The BERT process is also applied to multi resolution (MR) CSMART reconstructions, permitting simultaneously to achieve remarkable improvements in the flow field measurements and to benefit from the reduction in computational time due to the MR approach. Finally, BERT is also tested on experimental data, obtaining an increase of the

  12. Revision Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Wilde, Jeffrey; Bedi, Asheesh; Altchek, David W.

    2014-01-01

    Context: Reconstruction of the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of the most common surgical procedures, with more than 200,000 ACL tears occurring annually. Although primary ACL reconstruction is a successful operation, success rates still range from 75% to 97%. Consequently, several thousand revision ACL reconstructions are performed annually and are unfortunately associated with inferior clinical outcomes when compared with primary reconstructions. Evidence Acquisition: Data were obtained from peer-reviewed literature through a search of the PubMed database (1988-2013) as well as from textbook chapters and surgical technique papers. Study Design: Clinical review. Level of Evidence: Level 4. Results: The clinical outcomes after revision ACL reconstruction are largely based on level IV case series. Much of the existing literature is heterogenous with regard to patient populations, primary and revision surgical techniques, concomitant ligamentous injuries, and additional procedures performed at the time of the revision, which limits generalizability. Nevertheless, there is a general consensus that the outcomes for revision ACL reconstruction are inferior to primary reconstruction. Conclusion: Excellent results can be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability but are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction. A staged approach with autograft reconstruction is recommended in any circumstance in which a single-stage approach results in suboptimal graft selection, tunnel position, graft fixation, or biological milieu for tendon-bone healing. Strength-of-Recommendation Taxonomy (SORT): Good results may still be achieved with regard to graft stability, return to play, and functional knee instability, but results are generally inferior to primary ACL reconstruction: Level B. PMID:25364483

  13. Evidence-Based ACL Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Merchan, E Carlos

    2015-01-01

    There is controversy in the literature regarding a number of topics related to anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The purpose of this article is to answer the following questions: 1) Bone-patellar tendon-bone reconstruction (BPTB-R) or hamstrimg reconstruction (H-R); 2) Double bundle or single bundle; 3) Allograft or authograft; 4) Early or late reconstruction; 5) Rate of return to sports after ACL reconstruction; 6) Rate of osteoarthritis after ACL reconstruction. A Cochrane Library and PubMed (MEDLINE) search of systematic reviews and meta-analysis related to ACL reconstruction was performed. The key words were: ACL reconstruction, systematic reviews and meta-analysis. The main criteria for selection were that the articles were systematic reviews and meta-analyses focused on the aforementioned questions. Sixty-nine articles were found, but only 26 were selected and reviewed because they had a high grade (I-II) of evidence. BPTB-R was associated with better postoperative knee stability but with a higher rate of morbidity. However, the results of both procedures in terms of functional outcome in the long-term were similar. The double-bundle ACL reconstruction technique showed better outcomes in rotational laxity, although functional recovery was similar between single-bundle and double-bundle. Autograft yielded better results than allograft. There was no difference between early and delayed reconstruction. 82% of patients were able to return to some kind of sport participation. 28% of patients presented radiological signs of osteoarthritis with a follow-up of minimum 10 years. PMID:25692162

  14. Porcelain three-dimensional shape reconstruction and its color reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiaoyang; Wu, Haibin; Yang, Xue; Yu, Shuang; Wang, Beiyi; Chen, Deyun

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, structured light three-dimensional measurement technology was used to reconstruct the porcelain shape, and further more the porcelain color was reconstructed. So the accurate reconstruction of the shape and color of porcelain was realized. Our shape measurement installation drawing is given. Because the porcelain surface is color complex and highly reflective, the binary Gray code encoding is used to reduce the influence of the porcelain surface. The color camera was employed to obtain the color of the porcelain surface. Then, the comprehensive reconstruction of the shape and color was realized in Java3D runtime environment. In the reconstruction process, the space point by point coloration method is proposed and achieved. Our coloration method ensures the pixel corresponding accuracy in both of shape and color aspects. The porcelain surface shape and color reconstruction experimental results completed by proposed method and our installation, show that: the depth range is 860 ˜ 980mm, the relative error of the shape measurement is less than 0.1%, the reconstructed color of the porcelain surface is real, refined and subtle, and has the same visual effect as the measured surface.

  15. Anterior Cruciate Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Arcuri, Francisco; Barclay, Fernando; Nacul, Ivan

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: The most recent advances in ACL reconstruction try to reproduce the anatomic femoral and tibial footprints as close as possible. Creating independent tunnels would allow an optimal of the entry point and the femoral tunnel obliquity, and together with an adequate reamer diameter they wouldreproduce with greater certainty the anatomy. Objective: To compare the radiographic parameters of the femoral and tibial tunnel positions in two groups of patients, one operated with a transtibial and other with transportal anatomic techniques. Materials and Methods: From December 2012 to December 2013, 59 patients with a primary ACL reconstruction divided in two groups, a trans tibial technique (TT), 19 patients, and an transportal one (TP) with 40 patients were prospectively evaluated with AP and lateral X-rays. The femoral tunnel angle, the insertion site with respect of the Blumensaat line, the trans osseous distance, the tibial tunnel position as a percentage of the tibial plateau in the AP and lateral views. And finally the tibial tunnel angle in the AP and Lateral views. Results: The femoral tunnel angle was in the TP group of 45,92º and in the TT one 24,53º, p 0,002. The insertion site percentage of the Blumensaat line was of 20,96 in TP and 20,74 in the TT, p 0,681.Trans osseous distance was in the TP of 3,43 cm and in the TT of 4,79 cm, p <0,000. The tibial tunnel position as a percentage in the AP tibial plateau was of 44,35 in TP and of 40,80 TT with a p of 0,076. The tibial tunnel position as a percentage of the lateral tibial plateau was of 28,70 in TP and 34,53 in TT with a p 0,367. Tibial tunnel angle in the AP was of 73,48º in TP and 62,81 in TT with a p of 0,002, and in the lateral plateau of 114,69º in TP and 112,79º in TT with a p of 0,427. Conclusion: It is possible to create tibial and femoral tunnel in optimal positions but not equal between both groups. Creating independent tunnels allow a more anterior and vertical tibial tunnel

  16. Effects of a dressed quark-gluon vertex in vector heavy-light mesons and theory average of the Bc* meson mass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gómez-Rocha, M.; Hilger, T.; Krassnigg, A.

    2016-04-01

    We extend earlier investigations of heavy-light pseudoscalar mesons to the vector case, using a simple model in the context of the Dyson-Schwinger-Bethe-Salpeter approach. We investigate the effects of a dressed quark-gluon vertex in a systematic fashion and illustrate and attempt to quantify corrections beyond the phenomenologically very useful and successful rainbow-ladder truncation. In particular we investigate the dressed quark-photon vertex in such a setup and make a prediction for the experimentally as yet unknown mass of the Bc* , which we obtain at 6.334 GeV well in line with predictions from other approaches. Furthermore, we combine a comprehensive set of results from the theoretical literature. The theoretical average for the mass of the Bc* meson is 6.336 ±0.002 GeV .

  17. Synthesis and structure of [Na11(OtBu)10(OH)]: 1H NMR shift of a hydroxide ion encapsulated in a 21-vertex alcoholate cage.

    PubMed

    Geier, Jens; Grützmacher, Hansjörg

    2003-12-01

    [Na11(OtBu)10(OH)], a hydroxide enclosing 21-vertex cage compound, was found to crystallize from mixtures of sodium tert.butanolate with sodium hydroxide. Its structure can be derived from the known (NaOtBu)6-hexaprismane by replacing one butanolate unit with OH- and capping the latter with five additional units of NaOtBu. The hydroxide shows a signal at -3.21 ppm in the 1H NMR spectrum.

  18. Functional renormalization group study of orbital fluctuation mediated superconductivity: Impact of the electron-boson coupling vertex corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tazai, Rina; Yamakawa, Youichi; Tsuchiizu, Masahisa; Kontani, Hiroshi

    2016-09-01

    In various multiorbital systems, the emergence of the orbital fluctuations and their role on the pairing mechanism attract increasing attention. To achieve deep understanding on these issues, we perform a functional renormalization group (fRG) study for the two-orbital Hubbard model. The vertex corrections for the electron-boson coupling (U -VC), which are dropped in the Migdal-Eliashberg gap equation, are obtained by solving the RG equation. We reveal that the dressed electron-boson coupling for the charge channel Ûeffc becomes much larger than the bare Coulomb interaction Û 0 due to the U -VC in the presence of moderate spin fluctuations. For this reason, the attractive pairing interaction due to the charge or orbital fluctuations is enlarged by the factor (Ûeffc/Û0) 2≫1 . In contrast, the spin fluctuation pairing interaction is suppressed by the spin-channel U -VC, because of the relation Ûeffs≪Û 0 . The present study demonstrates that the orbital or charge fluctuation pairing mechanism can be realized in various multiorbital systems thanks to the U -VC, such as in Fe-based superconductors.

  19. Mixed-hybrid and vertex-discontinuous-Galerkin finite element modeling of multiphase compositional flow on 3D unstructured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moortgat, Joachim; Firoozabadi, Abbas

    2016-06-01

    Problems of interest in hydrogeology and hydrocarbon resources involve complex heterogeneous geological formations. Such domains are most accurately represented in reservoir simulations by unstructured computational grids. Finite element methods accurately describe flow on unstructured meshes with complex geometries, and their flexible formulation allows implementation on different grid types. In this work, we consider for the first time the challenging problem of fully compositional three-phase flow in 3D unstructured grids, discretized by any combination of tetrahedra, prisms, and hexahedra. We employ a mass conserving mixed hybrid finite element (MHFE) method to solve for the pressure and flux fields. The transport equations are approximated with a higher-order vertex-based discontinuous Galerkin (DG) discretization. We show that this approach outperforms a face-based implementation of the same polynomial order. These methods are well suited for heterogeneous and fractured reservoirs, because they provide globally continuous pressure and flux fields, while allowing for sharp discontinuities in compositions and saturations. The higher-order accuracy improves the modeling of strongly non-linear flow, such as gravitational and viscous fingering. We review the literature on unstructured reservoir simulation models, and present many examples that consider gravity depletion, water flooding, and gas injection in oil saturated reservoirs. We study convergence rates, mesh sensitivity, and demonstrate the wide applicability of our chosen finite element methods for challenging multiphase flow problems in geometrically complex subsurface media.

  20. Power and area efficient 4-bit column-level ADC in a CMOS pixel sensor for the ILD vertex detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, L.; Morel, F.; Hu-Guo, Ch; Hu, Y.

    2013-01-01

    A 48 × 64 pixels prototype CMOS pixel sensor (CPS) integrated with 4-bit column-level, self triggered ADCs for the outer layers of the ILD vertex detector (VTX) was developed and fabricated in a 0.35 μm CMOS process with a pixel pitch of 35 μm. The pixel concept combines in-pixel amplification with a correlated double sampling (CDS) operation. The ADCs accommodating the pixel read out in a rolling shutter mode complete the conversion by performing a multi-bit/step approximation. The design was optimised for power saving at sampling frequency. The prototype sensor is currently at the stage of being started testing and evaluation. So what is described is based on post simulation results rather than test data. This 4-bit ADC dissipates, at a 3-V supply and 6.25-MS/s sampling rate, 486 μW in its inactive mode, which is by far the most frequent. This value rises to 714 μW in case of the active mode. Its footprint amounts to 35 × 545 μm2.

  1. High-luminosity primary vertex selection in top-quark studies using the Collider Detector at Fermilab

    SciTech Connect

    Buzatu, Adrian; /McGill U.

    2006-08-01

    Improving our ability to identify the top quark pair (t{bar t}) primary vertex (PV) on an event-by-event basis is essential for many analyses in the lepton-plus-jets channel performed by the Collider Detector at Fermilab (CDF) Collaboration. We compare the algorithm currently used by CDF (A1) with another algorithm (A2) using Monte Carlo simulation at high instantaneous luminosities. We confirm that A1 is more efficient than A2 at selecting the t{bar t} PV at all PV multiplicities, both with efficiencies larger than 99%. Event selection rejects events with a distance larger than 5 cm along the proton beam between the t{bar t} PV and the charged lepton. We find flat distributions for the signal over background significance of this cut for all cut values larger than 1 cm, for all PV multiplicities and for both algorithms. We conclude that any cut value larger than 1 cm is acceptable for both algorithms under the Tevatron's expected instantaneous luminosity improvements.

  2. Association between Maternal Pelvis Height and Intrapartum Foetal Head Moulding in Ugandan Mothers with Spontaneous Vertex Deliveries

    PubMed Central

    Luboga, Samuel Abilemech; Luboobi, Livingstone; Mirembe, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Introduction. In Sub-Saharan Africa, excessive foetal head moulding is commonly associated with cephalopelvic disproportion and obstructed labour. This study set out to determine the associations of maternal pelvis height and maternal height with intrapartum foetal head moulding. Methods. This was a multisite secondary analysis of maternal birth records of mothers with singleton pregnancies ending in a spontaneous vertex delivery. A summary of the details of the pregnancy and delivery records were reviewed and analysed using multilevel logistic regression respect to foetal head moulding. The alpha level was set at P < 0.05. Results. 412 records were obtained, of which 108/385 (28%) observed foetal head moulding. There was a significant reduction in risk of foetal head moulding with increasing maternal height (Adj. IRR 0.97, P = 0.05), maternal pelvis height (Adj. IRR 0.88, P < 0.01), and raptured membranes (Adj. IRR 0.10, P < 0.01). There was a significant increased risk of foetal head moulding with increasing birth weight (Adj. IRR 1.90, P < 0.01) and duration of monitored active labour (Adj. IRR 1.21, P < 0.01) in the final model. Conclusion. This study showed that increasing maternal height and maternal pelvis height were associated with a significant reduction in intrapartum foetal head moulding. PMID:27034678

  3. A Full Multi-Grid Method for the Solution of the Cell Vertex Finite Volume Cauchy-Riemann Equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Borzi, A.; Morton, K. W.; Sueli, E.; Vanmaele, M.

    1996-01-01

    The system of inhomogeneous Cauchy-Riemann equations defined on a square domain and subject to Dirichlet boundary conditions is considered. This problem is discretised by using the cell vertex finite volume method on quadrilateral meshes. The resulting algebraic problem is overdetermined and the solution is defined in a least squares sense. By this approach a consistent algebraic problem is obtained which differs from the original one by O(h(exp 2)) perturbations of the right-hand side. A suitable cell-based convergent smoothing iteration is presented which is naturally linked to the least squares formulation. Hence, a standard multi-grid algorithm is reported which combines the given smoother and cell-based transfer operators. Some remarkable reduction properties of these operators are shown. A full multi-grid method is discussed which solves the discrete problem to the level of truncation error by employing one multi-grid cycle at each current level of discretisation. Experiments and applications of the full multi-grid scheme are presented.

  4. Orthotopic neobladder reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Dwayne T. S.; Lawrentschuk, Nathan

    2015-01-01

    Orthotopic neobladder reconstruction is becoming an increasingly common urinary diversion following cystectomy for bladder cancer. This is in recognition of the potential benefits of neobladder surgery over creation of an ileal conduit related to quality of life (QoL), such as avoiding the need to form a stoma with its cosmetic, psychological and other potential complications. The PubMed database was searched using relevant search terms for articles published electronically between January 1994 and April 2014. Full-text articles in English or with English translation were assessed for relevance to the topic before being included in the review. Patients with neobladders have comparable or better post-operative sexual function than those with ileal conduits. They also have comparable QoL to those with ileal conduits. Orthotopic neobladder is a good alternative to ileal conduit in suitable patients who do not want a stoma and are motivated to comply with neobladder training. However, the selection of a neobladder as the urinary diversion of choice requires that patients have good renal and liver functions and are likely to be compliant with neobladder training. With benefits also come potential risks of neobladder formation. These include electrolyte abnormalities and nocturnal incontinence. This short review highlights current aspects of neobladder formation and its potential advantages. PMID:25657535

  5. Total airway reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Connor, Matthew P; Barrera, Jose E; Eller, Robert; McCusker, Scott; O'Connor, Peter

    2013-02-01

    We present a case of obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) that required multilevel surgical correction of the airway and literature review and discuss the role supraglottic laryngeal collapse can have in OSA. A 34-year-old man presented to a tertiary otolaryngology clinic for treatment of OSA. He previously had nasal and palate surgeries and a Repose tongue suspension. His residual apnea hypopnea index (AHI) was 67. He had a dysphonia associated with a true vocal cord paralysis following resection of a benign neck mass in childhood. He also complained of inspiratory stridor with exercise and intolerance to continuous positive airway pressure. Physical examination revealed craniofacial hypoplasia, full base of tongue, and residual nasal airway obstruction. On laryngoscopy, the paretic aryepiglottic fold arytenoid complex prolapsed into the laryngeal inlet with each breath. This was more pronounced with greater respiratory effort. Surgical correction required a series of operations including awake tracheostomy, supraglottoplasty, midline glossectomy, genial tubercle advancement, maxillomandibular advancement, and reconstructive rhinoplasty. His final AHI was 1.9. Our patient's supraglottic laryngeal collapse constituted an area of obstruction not typically evaluated in OSA surgery. In conjunction with treating nasal, palatal, and hypopharyngeal subsites, our patient's supraglottoplasty represented a key component of his success. This case illustrates the need to evaluate the entire upper airway in a complicated case of OSA. PMID:22965285

  6. Facial Reconstruction and Rehabilitation.

    PubMed

    Guntinas-Lichius, Orlando; Genther, Dane J; Byrne, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Extracranial infiltration of the facial nerve by salivary gland tumors is the most frequent cause of facial palsy secondary to malignancy. Nevertheless, facial palsy related to salivary gland cancer is uncommon. Therefore, reconstructive facial reanimation surgery is not a routine undertaking for most head and neck surgeons. The primary aims of facial reanimation are to restore tone, symmetry, and movement to the paralyzed face. Such restoration should improve the patient's objective motor function and subjective quality of life. The surgical procedures for facial reanimation rely heavily on long-established techniques, but many advances and improvements have been made in recent years. In the past, published experiences on strategies for optimizing functional outcomes in facial paralysis patients were primarily based on small case series and described a wide variety of surgical techniques. However, in the recent years, larger series have been published from high-volume centers with significant and specialized experience in surgical and nonsurgical reanimation of the paralyzed face that have informed modern treatment. This chapter reviews the most important diagnostic methods used for the evaluation of facial paralysis to optimize the planning of each individual's treatment and discusses surgical and nonsurgical techniques for facial rehabilitation based on the contemporary literature.

  7. Crystallographic image reconstruction problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    ten Eyck, Lynn F.

    1993-11-01

    The crystallographic X-ray diffraction experiment gives the amplitudes of the Fourier series expansion of the electron density distribution within the crystal. The 'phase problem' in crystallography is the determination of the phase angles of the Fourier coefficients required to calculate the Fourier synthesis and reveal the molecular structure. The magnitude of this task varies enormously as the size of the structures ranges from a few atoms to thousands of atoms, and the number of Fourier coefficients ranges from hundreds to hundreds of thousands. The issue is further complicated for large structures by limited resolution. This problem is solved for 'small' molecules (up to 200 atoms and a few thousand Fourier coefficients) by methods based on probabilistic models which depend on atomic resolution. These methods generally fail for larger structures such as proteins. The phase problem for protein molecules is generally solved either by laborious experimental methods or by exploiting known similarities to solved structures. Various direct methods have been attempted for very large structures over the past 15 years, with gradually improving results -- but so far no complete success. This paper reviews the features of the crystallographic image reconstruction problem which render it recalcitrant, and describes recent encouraging progress in the application of maximum entropy methods to this problem.

  8. Bayesian reconstruction of projection reconstruction NMR (PR-NMR).

    PubMed

    Yoon, Ji Won

    2014-11-01

    Projection reconstruction nuclear magnetic resonance (PR-NMR) is a technique for generating multidimensional NMR spectra. A small number of projections from lower-dimensional NMR spectra are used to reconstruct the multidimensional NMR spectra. In our previous work, it was shown that multidimensional NMR spectra are efficiently reconstructed using peak-by-peak based reversible jump Markov chain Monte Carlo (RJMCMC) algorithm. We propose an extended and generalized RJMCMC algorithm replacing a simple linear model with a linear mixed model to reconstruct close NMR spectra into true spectra. This statistical method generates samples in a Bayesian scheme. Our proposed algorithm is tested on a set of six projections derived from the three-dimensional 700 MHz HNCO spectrum of a protein HasA. PMID:25218584

  9. Tomographic reconstruction of binary fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roux, Stéphane; Leclerc, Hugo; Hild, François

    2012-09-01

    A novel algorithm is proposed for reconstructing binary images from their projection along a set of different orientations. Based on a nonlinear transformation of the projection data, classical back-projection procedures can be used iteratively to converge to the sought image. A multiscale implementation allows for a faster convergence. The algorithm is tested on images up to 1 Mb definition, and an error free reconstruction is achieved with a very limited number of projection data, saving a factor of about 100 on the number of projections required for classical reconstruction algorithms.

  10. Building the full fermion-photon vertex of QED by imposing multiplicative renormalizability of the Schwinger-Dyson equations for the fermion and photon propagators

    SciTech Connect

    Kizilersue, Ayse; Pennington, Michael R.

    2009-06-15

    In principle, calculation of a full Green's function in any field theory requires knowledge of the infinite set of multipoint Green's functions, unless one can find some way of truncating the corresponding Schwinger-Dyson equations. For the fermion and boson propagators in QED this requires an ansatz for the full 3-point vertex. Here we illustrate how the properties of gauge invariance, gauge covariance and multiplicative renormalizability impose severe constraints on this fermion-boson interaction, allowing a consistent truncation of the propagator equations. We demonstrate how these conditions imply that the 3-point vertex in the propagator equations is largely determined by the behavior of the fermion propagator itself and not by knowledge of the many higher-point functions. We give an explicit form for the fermion-photon vertex, which in the fermion and photon propagator fulfills these constraints to all orders in leading logarithms for massless QED, and accords with the weak coupling limit in perturbation theory at O({alpha}). This provides the first attempt to deduce nonperturbative Feynman rules for strong physics calculations of propagators in massless QED that ensure a more consistent truncation of the 2-point Schwinger-Dyson equations. The generalization to next-to-leading order and masses will be described in a longer publication.

  11. Skin waste, vertex angle, and scar length in excisional biopsies: comparing five excision patterns--fusiform ellipse, fusiform circle, rhomboid, mosque, and S-shaped.

    PubMed

    Raveh Tilleman, Tamara; Tilleman, Michael M; Krekels, Gertruud A M; Neumann, Martino H A

    2004-03-01

    The common excision skin pattern is either a fusiform ellipse or another pattern with dissimilar length and width. The purpose of this study was to define the most advantageous skin pattern regarding skin waste, vertex angle, and scar length. Five skin excision patterns used traditionally for closure of round lesions were analyzed: fusiform ellipse, fusiform circle, rhomboid, mosque, and S-shaped. In the analysis, the pattern characteristics were formulated by geometric principles, from which the results were compared. The smallest skin waste was found in rhomboid and mosque patterns, whereas the largest skin waste was found in the fusiform circle and ellipse. The vertex angle was found to decrease monotonously with the excision length-to-width ratio for all patterns except the mosque shape, which is zero per definition. The paradigm stating that a vertex angle of 30 degrees or less is maintained for length-to-width ratios below 4 in the surgical ellipse was found incorrect. It holds only for rhomboid and S-shaped excisions. The scar length was found almost independent of the pattern, with a variance of 3 percent. The authors conclude that the most advantageous surgical skin patterns are the rhomboid and mosque excisions.

  12. The Suramin Derivative NF449 Interacts with the 5-fold Vertex of the Enterovirus A71 Capsid to Prevent Virus Attachment to PSGL-1 and Heparan Sulfate

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yorihiro; McLaughlin, Noel P.; Pan, Jieyan; Goldstein, Sara; Hafenstein, Susan; Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Winkler, Jeffrey D.; Bergelson, Jeffrey M.

    2015-01-01

    NF449, a sulfated compound derived from the antiparasitic drug suramin, was previously reported to inhibit infection by enterovirus A71 (EV-A71). In the current work, we found that NF449 inhibits virus attachment to target cells, and specifically blocks virus interaction with two identified receptors—the P-selectin ligand, PSGL-1, and heparan sulfate glycosaminoglycan—with no effect on virus binding to a third receptor, the scavenger receptor SCARB2. We also examined a number of commercially available suramin analogues, and newly synthesized derivatives of NF449; among these, NF110 and NM16, like NF449, inhibited virus attachment at submicromolar concentrations. PSGL-1 and heparan sulfate, but not SCARB2, are both sulfated molecules, and their interaction with EV-A71 is thought to involve positively charged capsid residues, including a conserved lysine at VP1-244, near the icosahedral 5-fold vertex. We found that mutation of VP1-244 resulted in resistance to NF449, suggesting that this residue is involved in NF449 interaction with the virus capsid. Consistent with this idea, NF449 and NF110 prevented virus interaction with monoclonal antibody MA28-7, which specifically recognizes an epitope overlapping VP1-244 at the 5-fold vertex. Based on these observations we propose that NF449 and related compounds compete with sulfated receptor molecules for a binding site at the 5-fold vertex of the EV-A71 capsid. PMID:26430888

  13. Hologram-reconstruction signal enhancement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mezrich, R. S.

    1977-01-01

    Principle of heterodyne detection is used to combine object beam and reconstructed virtual image beam. All light valves in page composer are opened, and virtual-image beam is allowed to interfere with light from valves.

  14. [Reconstructing oneself after an amputation].

    PubMed

    Anne, M

    2015-03-01

    Anne, in her forties, was the victim of a serious road traffic accident resulting in the amputation of her foot. Demonstrating strength and modesty, she shares with us the main stages of her journey towards her reconstruction. PMID:26145134

  15. Vermilion Reconstruction with Genital Mucosa

    PubMed Central

    Weyandt, Gerhard H.; Woeckel, Achim; Kübler, Alexander C.

    2016-01-01

    Summary: Functional and aesthetical reconstruction, especially of the upper lip after ablative tumor surgery, can be very challenging. The skin of the lip might be sufficiently reconstructed by transpositional flaps from the nasolabial or facial area. Large defects of the lip mucosa, including the vestibule, are even more challenging due to the fact that flaps from the inner lining of the oral cavity often lead to functional impairments. We present a case of multiple vermilion and skin resections of the upper lip. At the last step, we had to resect even the whole vermilion mucosa, including parts of the oral mucosa of the vestibule, leaving a bare orbicularis oris muscle. To reconstruct the mucosal layer, we used a mucosal graft from the labia minora and placed it on the compromised lip and the former transpositional flaps for the reconstructed skin of the upper lip with very good functional and aesthetic results. PMID:27579226

  16. Vermilion Reconstruction with Genital Mucosa.

    PubMed

    Müller-Richter, Urs D A; Weyandt, Gerhard H; Woeckel, Achim; Kübler, Alexander C

    2016-05-01

    Functional and aesthetical reconstruction, especially of the upper lip after ablative tumor surgery, can be very challenging. The skin of the lip might be sufficiently reconstructed by transpositional flaps from the nasolabial or facial area. Large defects of the lip mucosa, including the vestibule, are even more challenging due to the fact that flaps from the inner lining of the oral cavity often lead to functional impairments. We present a case of multiple vermilion and skin resections of the upper lip. At the last step, we had to resect even the whole vermilion mucosa, including parts of the oral mucosa of the vestibule, leaving a bare orbicularis oris muscle. To reconstruct the mucosal layer, we used a mucosal graft from the labia minora and placed it on the compromised lip and the former transpositional flaps for the reconstructed skin of the upper lip with very good functional and aesthetic results. PMID:27579226

  17. SPECT reconstruction on the GPU

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vetter, Christoph; Westermann, Rüdiger

    2008-03-01

    With the increasing reliance of doctors on imaging procedures, not only visualization needs to be optimized, but the reconstruction of the volumes from the scanner output is another bottleneck. Accelerating the computationally intensive reconstruction process improves the medical work flow, matches the reconstruction speed to the acquisition speed, and allows fast batch processing and interactive or near-interactive parameter tuning. Recently, much effort has been focused on using the computational power of graphics processing units (GPUs) for general purpose computations. This paper presents a GPU-accelerated implementation of single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) reconstruction based on an ordered-subset expectation maximization algorithm. The algorithm uses models for the point-spread-function (PSF) to improve spatial resolution in the reconstruction images. Instead of computing the PSF directly, it is modeled as efficient blurring of slabs on the GPU in order to accelerate the process. The algorithm for the calculation of accumulated attenuation factors that allows correcting the generated volume according to the attenuation properties of the volume is optimized for processing on the GPU. Since these factors can be reused between different iterations, a cache is used that is adapted to different sizes of the video memory so that only those factors have to be recomputed that do not fit onto graphics memory. These improvements make the reconstruction of typical SPECT volume near interactive.

  18. Technical basis for dose reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Anspaugh, L.R.

    1996-01-31

    The purpose of this paper is to consider two general topics: technical considerations of why dose-reconstruction studies should or should not be performed and methods of dose reconstruction. The first topic is of general and growing interest as the number of dose-reconstruction studies increases, and one asks the question whether it is necessary to perform a dose reconstruction for virtually every site at which, for example, the Department of Energy (DOE) has operated a nuclear-related facility. And there is the broader question of how one might logically draw the line at performing or not performing dose-reconstruction (radiological and chemical) studies for virtually every industrial complex in the entire country. The second question is also of general interest. There is no single correct way to perform a dose-reconstruction study, and it is important not to follow blindly a single method to the point that cheaper, faster, more accurate, and more transparent methods might not be developed and applied.

  19. Costal Grafting in Mandibular Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Bourlet, Jerôme; Château, Joseph; Jacquemart, Mathieu; Dufour, Clémence; Mojallal, Ali; Gleizal, Arnaud

    2015-01-01

    Background: Reconstruction of mandibular bone defect is a common indication in craniomaxillofacial surgery, and free fibular flap is the gold standard for this indication. However, there are alternatives; nonvascular bone grafting is one of them, and we present the costal grafting for mandibular reconstruction, a classic technique that is reliable, efficient, and produced less morbidity than the technique of using composite free flaps. Method: A 9-year retrospective review of 54 patients treated surgically for mandibular reconstruction was performed. The criterion mainly analyzed was graft survival. The surgical technique was described in detail. Results: A total of 54 patients with mandibular bone defect were identified. Five symphysis, 46 corpus, and 20 ramus defects were considered. These patients underwent reconstruction by costal grafting, and the engrafting was successful in 92.6% of cases. Dental rehabilitation with dental implants was realized in 70% of cases. Conclusions: The approach described in this article allowed the authors to obtain good results with costal grafting for mandibular reconstruction and dental rehabilitation. Costal grafting is a good alternative for fibula free flap in specific indications. Reconstruction of mandibular bone defect is a common indication in craniomaxillofacial surgery. Since the 1980s, the gold standard for these defects is the use of free fibular flap.1 In some cases, this technique is contradicted; the surgeon then has several possibilities for the use of free osteomyocutaneous flaps (iliac crest, scapula, and serrato-costal flaps).2–8 PMID:26893990

  20. Lip Reconstruction after Tumor Ablation

    PubMed Central

    Ebrahimi, Ali; Kalantar Motamedi, Mohammad Hossein; Ebrahimi, Azin; Kazemi, Mohammad; Shams, Amin; Hashemzadeh, Haleh

    2016-01-01

    Approximately 25% of all oral cavity carcinomas involve the lips, and the primary management of these lesions is complete surgical resection. Loss of tissue in the lips after resection is treated with a variety of techniques, depending on the extension and location of the defect. Here we review highly accepted techniques of lip reconstruction and some of new trials with significant clinical results. Reconstruction choice is primarily depend to size of the defect, localization of defect, elasticity of tissues. But patient’s age, comorbidities, and motivation are also important. According to the defect location and size, different reconstruction methods can be used. For defects involved less than 30% of lips, primary closures are sufficient. In defects with 35–70% lip involvement, the Karapandzic, Abbe, Estlander, McGregor or Gillies’ fan flaps or their modifications can be used. When lip remaining tissues are insufficient, cheek tissue can be used in Webster and Bernard advancement flaps and their various modifications. Deltopectoral or radial forearm free flaps can be options for large defects of the lip extending to the Jaws. To achieve best functional and esthetic results, surgeons should be able to choose most appropriate reconstruction method. Considering defects’ size and location, patients’ expects and surgeon’s ability and knowledge, a variety of flaps are presented in order to reconstruct defects resulted from tumor ablation. It’s necessary for surgeons to trace the recent innovations in lip reconstruction to offer best choices to patients. PMID:27308236

  1. Study of cluster reconstruction and track fitting algorithms for CGEM-IT at BESIII

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Yue; Wang, Liang-Liang; Ju, Xu-Dong; Wu, Ling-Hui; Xiu, Qing-Lei; Wang, Hai-Xia; Dong, Ming-Yi; Hu, Jing-Ran; Li, Wei-Dong; Li, Wei-Guo; Liu, Huai-Min; Qun, Ou-Yang; Shen, Xiao-Yan; Yuan, Ye; Zhang, Yao

    2016-01-01

    Considering the effects of aging on the existing Inner Drift Chamber (IDC) of BESIII, a GEM-based inner tracker, the Cylindrical-GEM Inner Tracker (CGEM-IT), is proposed to be designed and constructed as an upgrade candidate for the IDC. This paper introduces a full simulation package for the CGEM-IT with a simplified digitization model, and describes the development of software for cluster reconstruction and track fitting, using a track fitting algorithm based on the Kalman filter method. Preliminary results for the reconstruction algorithms which are obtained using a Monte Carlo sample of single muon events in the CGEM-IT, show that the CGEM-IT has comparable momentum resolution and transverse vertex resolution to the IDC, and a better z-direction resolution than the IDC. Supported by National Key Basic Research Program of China (2015CB856700), National Natural Science Foundation of China (11205184, 11205182) and Joint Funds of National Natural Science Foundation of China (U1232201)

  2. Performance of Tracking, b-tagging and Jet/MET reconstruction at the CMS High Level Trigger

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosi, Mia

    2015-12-01

    The trigger systems of the LHC detectors play a crucial role in determining the physics capabilities of experiments. In 2015, the center-of-mass energy of proton-proton collisions will reach 13 TeV up to an unprecedented luminosity of 1 × 1034 cm-2s-1. A reduction of several orders of magnitude of the event rate is needed to reach values compatible with detector readout, offline storage and analysis capabilities. The CMS experiment has been designed with a two-level trigger system: the Level-1 Trigger (L1T), implemented on custom-designed electronics, and the High Level Trigger (HLT), a streamlined version of the offline reconstruction software running on a computer farm. A software trigger system requires a trade-off between the complexity of the algorithms, the sustainable output rate, and the selection efficiency. With the computing power available during the 2012 data taking the maximum reconstruction time at HLT was about 200 ms per event, at the nominal L1T rate of 100 kHz. Tracking algorithms are widely used in the HLT in the object reconstruction through particle-flow techniques as well as in the identification of b-jets and lepton isolation. Reconstructed tracks are also used to distinguish the primary vertex, which identifies the hard interaction process, from the pileup ones. This task is particularly important in the LHC environment given the large number of interactions per bunch crossing: on average 25 in 2012, and expected to be around 40 in Run II with a large contribution from out-of-time particles. In order to cope with tougher conditions the tracking and vertexing techniques used in 2012 have been largely improved in terms of timing and efficiency in order to keep the physics reach at the level of Run I conditions. We will present the performance of these newly developed algorithms, discussing their impact on the b-tagging performances as well as on the jet and missing transverse energy reconstruction.

  3. Reconstructing for joint angles on the shoulder and elbow from non-invasive electroencephalographic signals through electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Kyuwan

    2013-01-01

    In this study, first the cortical activities over 2240 vertexes on the brain were estimated from 64 channels electroencephalography (EEG) signals using the Hierarchical Bayesian estimation while 5 subjects did continuous arm reaching movements. From the estimated cortical activities, a sparse linear regression method selected only useful features in reconstructing the electromyography (EMG) signals and estimated the EMG signals of 9 arm muscles. Then, a modular artificial neural network was used to estimate four joint angles from the estimated EMG signals of 9 muscles: one for movement control and the other for posture control. The estimated joint angles using this method have the correlation coefficient (CC) of 0.807 (±0.10) and the normalized root-mean-square error (nRMSE) of 0.176 (±0.29) with the actual joint angles. PMID:24167469

  4. Alloplastic adjuncts in breast reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Cabalag, Miguel S.; Rostek, Marie; Miller, George S.; Chae, Michael P.; Quinn, Tam; Rozen, Warren M.

    2016-01-01

    Background There has been an increasing role of acellular dermal matrices (ADMs) and synthetic meshes in both single- and two-stage implant/expander breast reconstruction. Numerous alloplastic adjuncts exist, and these vary in material type, processing, storage, surgical preparation, level of sterility, available sizes and cost. However, there is little published data on most, posing a significant challenge to the reconstructive surgeon trying to compare and select the most suitable product. The aims of this systematic review were to identify, summarize and evaluate the outcomes of studies describing the use of alloplastic adjuncts for post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. The secondary aims were to determine their cost-effectiveness and analyze outcomes in patients who also underwent radiotherapy. Methods Using the PRSIMA 2009 statement, a systematic review was conducted to find articles reporting on the outcomes on the use of alloplastic adjuncts in post-mastectomy breast reconstruction. Multiple databases were searched independently by three authors (Cabalag MS, Miller GS and Chae MP), including: Ovid MEDLINE (1950 to present), Embase (1980 to 2015), PubMed and Cochrane Database of Systematic Reviews. Results Current published literature on available alloplastic adjuncts are predominantly centered on ADMs, both allogeneic and xenogeneic, with few outcome studies available for synthetic meshes. Outcomes on the 89 articles, which met the inclusion criteria, were summarized and analyzed. The reported outcomes on alloplastic adjunct-assisted breast reconstruction were varied, with most data available on the use of ADMs, particularly AlloDerm® (LifeCell, Branchburg, New Jersey, USA). The use of ADMs in single-stage direct-to-implant breast reconstruction resulted in lower complication rates (infection, seroma, implant loss and late revision), and was more cost effective when compared to non-ADM, two-stage reconstruction. The majority of studies demonstrated

  5. Ulnar Collateral Ligament Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Brandon J.; Bach, Bernard R.; Cohen, Mark S.; Bush-Joseph, Charles A.; Cole, Brian J.; Verma, Nikhil N.; Nicholson, Gregory P.; Romeo, Anthony A.

    2016-01-01

    Background: Ulnar collateral ligament reconstruction (UCLR) is a common surgery performed in professional, collegiate, and high school athletes. Purpose: To report patient demographics, surgical techniques, and outcomes of all UCLRs performed at a single institution from 2004 to 2014. Study Design: Case series; Level of evidence, 4. Methods: All patients who underwent UCLR from January 1, 2004, through December 31, 2014, at a single institution were identified. Charts were reviewed to determine patient age, sex, date of surgery, sport played, athletic level, surgical technique, graft type, and complications. Data were collected prospectively, and patients were contacted via phone calls to obtain the return-to-sport rate, Conway-Jobe score, Andrews-Timmerman score, and Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic (KJOC) Shoulder and Elbow score. Continuous variable data were reported as weighted means, and categorical variable data were reported as frequencies with percentages. Results: A total of 187 patients (188 elbows) underwent UCLR during the study period (92% male; mean age, 19.6 ± 4.7 years; 78.2% right elbows). There were 165 baseball players (87.8% of all patients), 155 of whom were pitchers (82.5% of all patients). Ninety-seven (51.6%) were college athletes, 68 (36.2%) high school athletes, and 7 (3.7%) professional athletes at the time of surgery. The docking technique was used in 110 (58.5%) patients while the double-docking technique was used in 78 (41.5%). An ipsilateral palmaris longus graft was used in 110 (58.5%) patients while a hamstring autograft was used in 48 (25.5%) patients. The ulnar nerve was subcutaneously transposed in 79 (42%) patients. Clinical follow-up data were available on 85 patients. Mean follow-up was 60 ± 30.8 months. Overall, 94.1% of patients were able to return to sport and had a Conway-Jobe score of good/excellent while 4.3% had a score of fair. The mean KJOC score was 90.4 ± 6.7 and mean Andrews-Timmerman score was 92.5 ± 7

  6. A herpes simplex virus scaffold peptide that binds the portal vertex inhibits early steps in viral replication.

    PubMed

    Yang, Kui; Wills, Elizabeth; Baines, Joel D

    2013-06-01

    Previous experiments identified a 12-amino-acid (aa) peptide that was sufficient to interact with the herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1) portal protein and was necessary to incorporate the portal into capsids. In the present study, cells were treated at various times postinfection with peptides consisting of a portion of the Drosophila antennapedia protein, previously shown to enter cells efficiently, fused to either wild-type HSV-1 scaffold peptide (YPYYPGEARGAP) or a control peptide that contained changes at positions 4 and 5. These 4-tyrosine and 5-proline residues are highly conserved in herpesvirus scaffold proteins and were previously shown to be critical for the portal interaction. Treatment early in infection with subtoxic levels of wild-type peptide reduced viral infectivity by over 1,000-fold, while the mutant peptide had little effect on viral yields. In cells infected for 3 h in the presence of wild-type peptide, capsids were observed to transit to the nuclear rim normally, as viewed by fluorescence microscopy. However, observation by electron microscopy in thin sections revealed an aberrant and significant increase of DNA-containing capsids compared to infected cells treated with the mutant peptide. Early treatment with peptide also prevented formation of viral DNA replication compartments. These data suggest that the antiviral peptide stabilizes capsids early in infection, causing retention of DNA within them, and that this activity correlates with peptide binding to the portal protein. The data are consistent with the hypothesis that the portal vertex is the conduit through which DNA is ejected to initiate infection.

  7. Shannon's, mutual, conditional and joint entropy information indices: generalization of global indices defined from local vertex invariants.

    PubMed

    Barigye, Stephen J; Marrero-Ponce, Yovani; Santiago, Oscar Martinez; López, Yoan Martinez; Pérez-Giménez, Facundo; Torrens, Francisco

    2013-06-01

    A new mathematical approach is proposed in the definition of molecular descriptors (MDs) based on the application of information theory concepts. This approach stems from a new matrix representation of a molecular graph (G) which is derived from the generalization of an incidence matrix whose row entries correspond to connected subgraphs of a given G, and the calculation of the Shannon's entropy, the negentropy and the standardized information content, plus for the first time, the mutual, conditional and joint entropy-based MDs associated with G. We also define strategies that generalize the definition of global or local invariants from atomic contributions (local vertex invariants, LOVIs), introducing related metrics (norms), means and statistical invariants. These invariants are applied to a vector whose components express the atomic information content calculated using the Shannon's, mutual, conditional and joint entropybased atomic information indices. The novel information indices (IFIs) are implemented in the program TOMOCOMDCARDD. A principal component analysis reveals that the novel IFIs are capable of capturing structural information not codified by IFIs implemented in the software DRAGON. A comparative study of the different parameters (e.g. subgraph orders and/or types, invariants and class of MDs) used in the definition of these IFIs reveals several interesting results. The mutual entropy-based indices give the best correlation results in modeling of a physicochemical property, namely the partition coefficient of the 34 derivatives of 2-furylethylenes, among the classes of indices investigated in this study. In a comparison with classical MDs it is demonstrated that the new IFIs give good results for various QSPR models.

  8. Non-Abelian quantum Hall states and their quasiparticles: From the pattern of zeros to vertex algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Lu Yuanming; Wang Ziqiang; Wen Xiaogang; Wang Zhenghan

    2010-03-15

    In the pattern-of-zeros approach to quantum Hall states, a set of data (n;m;S{sub a}|a=1,...,n;n,m,S{sub a} is n element of N) (called the pattern of zeros) is introduced to characterize a quantum Hall wave function. In this paper we find sufficient conditions on the pattern of zeros so that the data correspond to a valid wave function. Some times, a set of data (n;m;S{sub a}) corresponds to a unique quantum Hall state, while other times, a set of data corresponds to several different quantum Hall states. So in the latter cases, the pattern of zeros alone does not completely characterize the quantum Hall states. In this paper, we find that the following expanded set of data (n;m;S{sub a};c|a=1,...,n;n,m,S{sub a} is an element of N;c is an element of R) provides a more complete characterization of quantum Hall states. Each expanded set of data completely characterizes a unique quantum Hall state, at least for the examples discussed in this paper. The result is obtained by combining the pattern of zeros and Z{sub n} simple-current vertex algebra which describes a large class of Abelian and non-Abelian quantum Hall states PHI{sub Z{sub n}{sup sc}}. The more complete characterization in terms of (n;m;S{sub a};c) allows us to obtain more topological properties of those states, which include the central charge c of edge states, the scaling dimensions and the statistics of quasiparticle excitations.

  9. Regularization of the fermion self-energy and the electromagnetic vertex in the Yukawa model within light-front dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Karmanov, V. A.; Smirnov, A. V.; Mathiot, J.-F.

    2007-02-15

    In light-front dynamics, the regularization of amplitudes by traditional cutoffs imposed on the transverse and longitudinal components of particle momenta corresponds to restricting the integration volume by a nonrotationally invariant domain. The result depends not only on the size of this domain (i.e., on the cutoff values), but also on its orientation determined by the position of the light-front plane. Explicitly covariant formulation of light-front dynamics allows us to parametrize the latter dependence in a very transparent form. If we decompose the regularized amplitude in terms of independent invariant amplitudes, extra (nonphysical) terms should appear, with spin structures which explicitly depend on the orientation of the light-front plane. The number of form factors, i.e., the coefficients of this decomposition, therefore also increases. The spin-1/2 fermion self-energy is determined by three scalar functions, instead of the two standard ones, while for the elastic electromagnetic vertex the number of form factors increases from two to five. In the present paper we calculate perturbatively all these form factors in the Yukawa model. Then we compare the results obtained in the two following ways: (i) by using the light-front dynamics graph technique rules directly; (ii) by integrating the corresponding Feynman amplitudes in terms of the light-front variables. For each of these methods, we use two types of regularization: the transverse and longitudinal cutoffs, and the Pauli-Villars regularization. In the latter case, the dependence of amplitudes on the light-front plane orientation vanishes completely provided enough Pauli-Villars subtractions are made.

  10. System for routing messages in a vertex symmetric network by using addresses formed from permutations of the transmission line indicees

    DOEpatents

    Faber, Vance; Moore, James W.

    1992-01-01

    A network of interconnected processors is formed from a vertex symmetric graph selected from graphs .GAMMA..sub.d (k) with degree d, diameter k, and (d+1)!/(d-k+1)! processors for each d.gtoreq.k and .GAMMA..sub.d (k,-1) with degree 3-1, diameter k+1, and (d+1)!/(d-k+1)! processors for each d.gtoreq.k.gtoreq.4. Each processor has an address formed by one of the permutations from a predetermined sequence of letters chosen a selected number of letters at a time, and an extended address formed by appending to the address the remaining ones of the predetermined sequence of letters. A plurality of transmission channels is provided from each of the processors, where each processor has one less channel than the selected number of letters forming the sequence. Where a network .GAMMA..sub.d (k,-1) is provided, no processor has a channel connected to form an edge in a direction .delta..sub.1. Each of the channels has an identification number selected from the sequence of letters and connected from a first processor having a first extended address to a second processor having a second address formed from a second extended address defined by moving to the front of the first extended address the letter found in the position within the first extended address defined by the channel identification number. The second address is then formed by selecting the first elements of the second extended address corresponding to the selected number used to form the address permutations.

  11. [Indications and techniques of reconstruction after mastectomy].

    PubMed

    Koch, Nathalie; Delaloye, Jean-François; Raffoul, Wassim

    2012-10-24

    Reconstructive surgery takes an important place in breast cancer treatment. Immediate breast reconstruction is performed during the same operation as mastectomy. It is contraindicated following radiotherapy. Reconstruction performed after mastectomy is called differed breast reconstruction. It is completed 6 months after chemotherapy and 1 year after radiotherapy. Prosthetic breast reconstruction is indicated when tissues are of good qualities and breast are small. Autologous reconstruction is performed in case of radiotherapy or large breast. After breast reconstruction, imperfections can be corrected with autologous fat injection.

  12. Advances in breast reconstruction after mastectomy.

    PubMed

    Edlich, Richard F; Winters, Kathryne L; Faulkner, Brent C; Bill, Timothy J; Lin, Kant Y

    2005-01-01

    Over the past 40 years, surgical reconstruction of the breast following mastectomy has become an important aspect of the cancer patient's rehabilitation process. While the surgical emphasis remains on a cure for the cancer, experience with breast reconstruction has not demonstrated any increased rate of cancer recurrence, even when reconstruction is performed immediately following tumor resection. Advances in surgical technique and biotechnology have made post-mastectomy reconstruction possible. The development of silicone gel and saline-filled implants as well as tissue expanders has revolutionized breast reconstruction. The elucidation of musculocutaneous flaps now provides the surgeon with the ability to transfer adequate quantities of vascularized tissue to reconstruct the surgical defects. The advent of microsurgical techniques has provided an additional reconstructive option, with free tissue transfer allowing the plastic surgeon to move musculocutaneous flaps from remote or distant sites to reconstruct the defect. The option of having the reconstruction immediately following the mastectomy procedure is now available to the patient. When reviewing the anatomy of the breast region, the surgeon must consider the mammary gland, its vascular supply, and its lymphatic system. The surgical techniques involved in reconstruction after mastectomy include the use of breast implants and tissue expansion, as well as reconstruction with autogenous tissues. Reconstruction with autogenous tissues includes the use of latissimus dorsi musculocutaneous flap, transverse rectus abdominus musculocutaneous flap, free flap transfer, as well as nipple-areola reconstruction. Breast reconstruction after mastectomy should be undertaken by a plastic and reconstructive surgeon with considerable training and experience with these diversified procedures.

  13. Titanium template for scaphoid reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Haefeli, M; Schaefer, D J; Schumacher, R; Müller-Gerbl, M; Honigmann, P

    2015-06-01

    Reconstruction of a non-united scaphoid with a humpback deformity involves resection of the non-union followed by bone grafting and fixation of the fragments. Intraoperative control of the reconstruction is difficult owing to the complex three-dimensional shape of the scaphoid and the other carpal bones overlying the scaphoid on lateral radiographs. We developed a titanium template that fits exactly to the surfaces of the proximal and distal scaphoid poles to define their position relative to each other after resection of the non-union. The templates were designed on three-dimensional computed tomography reconstructions and manufactured using selective laser melting technology. Ten conserved human wrists were used to simulate the reconstruction. The achieved precision measured as the deviation of the surface of the reconstructed scaphoid from its virtual counterpart was good in five cases (maximal difference 1.5 mm), moderate in one case (maximal difference 3 mm) and inadequate in four cases (difference more than 3 mm). The main problems were attributed to the template design and can be avoided by improved pre-operative planning, as shown in a clinical case. PMID:25167978

  14. The reconstruction of inflationary potentials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Jianmang; Gao, Qing; Gong, Yungui

    2016-07-01

    The observational data on the anisotropy of the cosmic microwave background constraints the scalar spectral tilt ns and the tensor to scalar ratio r which depend on the first and second derivatives of the inflaton potential. The information can be used to reconstruct the inflaton potential in the polynomial form up to some orders. However, for some classes of potentials, ns and r behave as ns(N) and r(N) universally in terms of the number of e-folds N. The universal behaviour of ns(N) can be used to reconstruct a class of inflaton potentials. By parametrizing one of the parameters ns(N), ɛ(N) and φ(N), and fitting the parameters in the models to the observational data, we obtain the constraints on the parameters and reconstruct the classes of the inflationary models which include the chaotic inflation, T-model, hilltop inflation, s-dual inflation, natural inflation and R2 inflation.

  15. Reconstructing Ancient Forms of Life

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Benner, Steven A.

    1998-01-01

    Progress in the past three months has occurred in two areas, reconstruction of ancestral proteins and improved understanding of chemical features that are likely to be universal in generic matter regardless of its genesis. Ancestral ribonucleases have been reconstructed, and an example has been developed that shows how physiological function can be assigned to in vitro behaviors observed in biological systems. Sequence data have been collected to permit the reconstruction of src homology 2 domains that underwent radiative divergence at the time of the radiative divergence of chordates. New studies have been completed that show how genetic matter (or its remnants) might be detected on Mars (or other non-terrean locations.) Last, the first in vitro selection experiments have been completed using a nucleoside library carrying positively charged functionality, illustrating the importance of non-standard nucleotides to those attempting to obtain evidence for an "RNA world" as an early episode of life on earth.

  16. Upper Blepharoplasty for Areola Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Friedrich, O L; Heil, J; Golatta, M; Domschke, C; Sohn, C; Blumenstein, M

    2013-07-01

    Blepharoplasty is one of the most common rejuvenating facial plastic surgery procedures. The procedure has been described many times and has very few complications. The tissue removed from the upper eyelid during blepharoplasty can be used as a skin graft for areola reconstruction due to the tissue's similarity to the areola's natural skin. The present study investigated the use of upper blepharoplasty for areola reconstruction. Criteria were patient satisfaction, objective measurements and the assessment of cosmesis by a panel of physicians. All eight patients included in the study were very satisfied with the cosmetic result. Objective measurements and assessment by a panel of physicians using photographs of the reconstructed nipple-areola complex showed very good aesthetic results.

  17. Upper Blepharoplasty for Areola Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Friedrich, O. L.; Heil, J.; Golatta, M.; Domschke, C.; Sohn, C.; Blumenstein, M.

    2013-01-01

    Blepharoplasty is one of the most common rejuvenating facial plastic surgery procedures. The procedure has been described many times and has very few complications. The tissue removed from the upper eyelid during blepharoplasty can be used as a skin graft for areola reconstruction due to the tissueʼs similarity to the areolaʼs natural skin. The present study investigated the use of upper blepharoplasty for areola reconstruction. Criteria were patient satisfaction, objective measurements and the assessment of cosmesis by a panel of physicians. All eight patients included in the study were very satisfied with the cosmetic result. Objective measurements and assessment by a panel of physicians using photographs of the reconstructed nipple-areola complex showed very good aesthetic results. PMID:24771929

  18. Shape Reconstruction from Generalized Projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Viikinkoski, Matti

    2016-01-01

    In this thesis we develop methods for recovering the three-dimensional shape of an object from generalized projections. We particularly focus on the problems encountered when data are presented as discrete image fields. We demonstrate the usefulness of the Fourier transform in transferring the image data and shape model projections to a domain more suitable for gradient based optimization. To substantiate the general applicability of our methods to observational astronomy, we reconstruct shape models for several asteroids observed with adaptive optics, thermal infrared interferometry, or range-Doppler radar. The reconstructions are carried out with the ADAM software package that we have designed for general use.

  19. Heminasal agenesis: a reconstructive challenge.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Mark; Zelken, Jonathan; Redett, Richard J

    2014-05-01

    Heminasal agenesis is a rare congenital malformation often associated with deformities of the eyes and lacrimal system, midface, and proboscis lateralis. Reconstruction is especially challenging because of missing lining, cartilage, and skin. We present a case of heminasal agenesis in a 5-year-old girl with concomitant hypertelorism, coloboma of the eyelids, and maxillary hypoplasia. The patient underwent facial bipartition for hypertelorism correction and cantilever bone graft. A forehead flap was designed using an anaplastic model from the patient's twin sister. Cartilage harvested from the conchal bowl and rib provided alar and dorsal support. Reconstructive goals, timing, and options are discussed. PMID:24777004

  20. Shape reconstruction from gradient data

    SciTech Connect

    Ettl, Svenja; Kaminski, Juergen; Knauer, Markus C.; Haeusler, Gerd

    2008-04-20

    We present a generalized method for reconstructing the shape of an object from measured gradient data. A certain class of optical sensors does not measure the shape of an object but rather its local slope. These sensors display several advantages, including high information efficiency, sensitivity, and robustness. For many applications, however, it is necessary to acquire the shape, which must be calculated from the slopes by numerical integration. Existing integration techniques show drawbacks that render them unusable in many cases. Our method is based on an approximation employing radial basis functions. It can be applied to irregularly sampled, noisy, and incomplete data, and it reconstructs surfaces both locally and globally with high accuracy.

  1. [Reconstructions after periorbital burn injuries].

    PubMed

    Klett, A; Rebane, R

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays burn patients who also have periocular symptoms are usually treated by reconstructive surgeons and the role of the ophthalmic surgeon has decreased.Although periocular complications occur in a minority of burned patients, they pose a greater challenge in surgical and non-surgical treatment. Chemical, electrical and thermal burns can lead to disfiguring scar formations and delayed treatment can lead to devastating ocular complications. Achieving a successful reconstruction requires a comprehensive approach, entailing many advanced techniques with an emphasis on preserving function and balancing intricate aesthetic requirements. The theory is illustrated in this article with clinical examples. PMID:23345146

  2. Actions of the quantum toroidal algebra of type sl2 on the space of vertex operators for U q ( g l 2 ̂ ) modules

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miki, Kei

    2016-07-01

    Highest weight modules for U q ( g l 2 ̂ ) are endowed with a structure of modules for the quantum toriodal algebra U κ of type sl2. Using this, we define U κ actions on the space of vertex operators for irreducible highest weight U q ( g l 2 ̂ ) modules. Highest or lowest weight vectors of the thus obtained U κ modules are expressed in terms of an intertwiner for U q ( s l 2 ̂ ) modules and an extra boson. The submodules generated by these vectors are investigated.

  3. Effective Lagrangian approach to fermion electric dipole moments induced by a CP-violating WW{gamma} vertex

    SciTech Connect

    Novales-Sanchez, H.; Toscano, J. J.

    2008-01-01

    The one-loop contribution of the two CP-violating components of the WW{gamma} vertex, {kappa}-tilde{sub {gamma}}W{sub {mu}}{sup +}W{sub {nu}}{sup -}F-tilde{sup {mu}}{sup {nu}} and ({lambda}-tilde{sub {gamma}}/m{sub W}{sup 2})W{sub {mu}}{sub {nu}}{sup +}W{sub {rho}}{sup -{nu}}F-tilde{sup {rho}}{sup {mu}}, on the electric dipole moment (EDM) of fermions is calculated using dimensional regularization and its impact at low energies reexamined in the light of the decoupling theorem. The Ward identities satisfied by these couplings are derived by adopting a SU{sub L}(2)xU{sub Y}(1)-invariant approach and their implications in radiative corrections discussed. Previous results on {kappa}-tilde{sub {gamma}}, whose bound is updated to |{kappa}-tilde{sub {gamma}}|<5.2x10{sup -5}, are reproduced, but disagreement with those existing for {lambda}-tilde{sub {gamma}} is found. In particular, the upper bound |{lambda}-tilde{sub {gamma}}|<1.9x10{sup -2} is found from the limit on the neutron EDM, which is more than 2 orders of magnitude less stringent than that of previous results. It is argued that this difference between the {kappa}-tilde{sub {gamma}} and {lambda}-tilde{sub {gamma}} bounds is the one that might be expected in accordance with the decoupling theorem. This argument is reinforced by analyzing carefully the low-energy behavior of the loop functions. The upper bounds on the W EDM, |d{sub W}|<6.2x10{sup -21} e{center_dot}cm, and the magnetic quadrupole moment, |Q-tilde{sub W}|<3x10{sup -36} e{center_dot}cm{sup 2}, are derived. The EDM of the second and third families of quarks and charged leptons are estimated. In particular, EDM as large as 10{sup -20} e{center_dot}cm and 10{sup -21} e{center_dot}cm are found for the t and b quarks, respectively.

  4. The Topological Vertex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aganagic, Mina; Klemm, Albrecht; Mariño, Marcos; Vafa, Cumrun

    2005-03-01

    We construct a cubic field theory which provides all genus amplitudes of the topological A-model for all non-compact toric Calabi-Yau threefolds. The topology of a given Feynman diagram encodes the topology of a fixed Calabi-Yau, with Schwinger parameters playing the role of Kähler classes of the threefold. We interpret this result as an operatorial computation of the amplitudes in the B-model mirror which is the quantum Kodaira-Spencer theory. The only degree of freedom of this theory is an unconventional chiral scalar on a Riemann surface. In this setup we identify the B-branes on the mirror Riemann surface as fermions related to the chiral boson by bosonization.

  5. The reconstructive microsurgery ladder in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Tintle, Scott M; Levin, L Scott

    2013-03-01

    Since the advent of the operating microscope by Julius Jacobson in 1960, reconstructive microsurgery has become an integral part of extremity reconstruction and orthopaedics. During World War I, with the influx of severe extremity trauma Harold Gillies introduced the concept of the reconstructive ladder for wound closure. The concept of the reconstructive ladder goes from simple to complex means of attaining wound closure. Over the last half century microsurgery has continued to evolve and progress. We now have a microsurgical reconstructive ladder. The microsurgical reconstruction ladder is based upon the early work on revascularization and replantation extending through the procedures that are described in this article.

  6. The reconstructive microsurgery ladder in orthopaedics.

    PubMed

    Tintle, Scott M; Levin, L Scott

    2013-03-01

    Since the advent of the operating microscope by Julius Jacobson in 1960, reconstructive microsurgery has become an integral part of extremity reconstruction and orthopaedics. During World War I, with the influx of severe extremity trauma Harold Gillies introduced the concept of the reconstructive ladder for wound closure. The concept of the reconstructive ladder goes from simple to complex means of attaining wound closure. Over the last half century microsurgery has continued to evolve and progress. We now have a microsurgical reconstructive ladder. The microsurgical reconstruction ladder is based upon the early work on revascularization and replantation extending through the procedures that are described in this article. PMID:23352571

  7. PRISM3/GISS Topographic Reconstruction

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sohl, Linda E.; Chandler, Mark A.; Schmunk, Robert B.; Mankoff, Ken; Jonas, Jeffrey A.; Foley, Kevin M.; Dowsett, Harry J.

    2009-01-01

    The PRISM3/GISS topographic reconstruction is one of the global data sets incorporated into a new reconstruction for the mid-Piacenzian warm interval of the Pliocene, at about 3.3 to 3.0 Ma. The PRISM3/GISS topography-gridded data set is a digitization of a graphical reconstruction, provided at 2 deg x 2 deg resolution and based on updated paleoaltimetry data and a refined land/ocean mask. Mid-Piacenzian topography as shown in this data set is generally quite similar to modern topography, with three notable differences: (1) the coastline as shown is 25 meters higher than modern sea level, reflecting the hypothesized reduction in ice sheet volume; (2) Hudson Bay is filled in to low elevation, in the absence of evidence for submergence at that time; and (3) the West Antarctic ice sheet is absent, permitting open seaways to exist in Ellsworth and Marie Byrd Lands. Two alternate ice sheet configurations with corresponding vegetation schemes are available; one is a minor modification of the PRISM2 ice reconstruction, and one is derived from the British Antarctic Survey Ice Sheet Model (BAS ISM).

  8. Reconstructing Death in Postmodern Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kastenbaum, Robert

    1993-01-01

    Examines interaction between emerging thanatological movement and its sociohistorical context. Notes that thanatology will take on new shape as individuals and society attempt to cope with postmodernistic forces and deconstructive mentality. Considers prospect for authentic solidarity against distress in reconstructed death system. (Author/NB)

  9. Poethical: Breaking Ground for Reconstruction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krojer, Jo; Holge-Hazelton, Bibi

    2008-01-01

    Departing from a methodological experiment performed by the authors, this article reflects on and discusses issues of ethics and politics in poetic strategies of "representation". In relation to the experiment the article questions how to conceive the notion of connectedness between empirical time and the reconstruction of it in poststructuralist…

  10. Microsurgical reconstruction of the hand.

    PubMed

    Gould, J S

    1987-12-01

    Microsurgical reconstruction of the hand includes methods of surface coverage, replacement of end organ sensibility, component restoration of tendons and joints, and composite transfers of toes and toe parts for digits and thumbs. In the past decade, these procedures have become available in most university medical centers.

  11. Ulysses S. Grant and Reconstruction.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David L.

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the role played by Ulysses S. Grant during the four years of Reconstruction before he became President of the United States. Describes the dynamics of the relationship between Grant and Andrew Johnson. Points out that Grant's attitude of service to the laws created by Congress submerged his desire to create a new South. (KO)

  12. Reconstruction: From the Students' Perspective.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schaeffer, Lys A.

    1989-01-01

    Presents two lesson plans for learning strategies employing the skills of empathy and reciprocity. The lessons cover the Black Codes developed during Reconstruction and the impeachment of Andrew Johnson. Lists objectives, instructional procedures, and makes suggestions for essay questions to be used in summative evaluation procedures. (KO)

  13. Ancestral reconstruction of tick lineages.

    PubMed

    Mans, Ben J; de Castro, Minique H; Pienaar, Ronel; de Klerk, Daniel; Gaven, Philasande; Genu, Siyamcela; Latif, Abdalla A

    2016-06-01

    Ancestral reconstruction in its fullest sense aims to describe the complete evolutionary history of a lineage. This depends on accurate phylogenies and an understanding of the key characters of each parental lineage. An attempt is made to delineate our current knowledge with regard to the ancestral reconstruction of the tick (Ixodida) lineage. Tick characters may be assigned to Core of Life, Lineages of Life or Edges of Life phenomena depending on how far back these characters may be assigned in the evolutionary Tree of Life. These include housekeeping genes, sub-cellular systems, heme processing (Core of Life), development, moulting, appendages, nervous and organ systems, homeostasis, respiration (Lineages of Life), specific adaptations to a blood-feeding lifestyle, including the complexities of salivary gland secretions and tick-host interactions (Edges of Life). The phylogenetic relationships of lineages, their origins and importance in ancestral reconstruction are discussed. Uncertainties with respect to systematic relationships, ancestral reconstruction and the challenges faced in comparative transcriptomics (next-generation sequencing approaches) are highlighted. While almost 150 years of information regarding tick biology have been assembled, progress in recent years indicates that we are in the infancy of understanding tick evolution. Even so, broad reconstructions can be made with relation to biological features associated with various lineages. Conservation of characters shared with sister and parent lineages are evident, but appreciable differences are present in the tick lineage indicating modification with descent, as expected for Darwinian evolutionary theory. Many of these differences can be related to the hematophagous lifestyle of ticks. PMID:26868413

  14. Genital reconstruction in exstrophy patients

    PubMed Central

    Nerli, R. B.; Shirol, S. S.; Guntaka, Ajay; Patil, Shivagouda; Hiremath, Murigendra B.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Surgery for bladder exstrophy has been evolving over the last four to five decades. Because survival has become almost universal, the focus has changed in the exstrophy-epispadias complex to improving quality of life. The most prevalent problem in the long-term function of exstrophy patients is the sexual activity of the adolescent and adult males. The penis in exstrophy patients appears short because of marked congenital deficiency of anterior corporal tissue. Many patients approach for genital reconstruction to improve cosmesis as well as to correct chordee. We report our series of male patients seeking genital reconstruction following exstrophy repair in the past. Materials and Methods: Fourteen adolescent/adult male patients attended urology services during the period January 2000-December 2009 seeking genital reconstruction following exstrophy repair in the past. Results: Three patients underwent epispadias repair, four patients had chordee correction with cosmetic excision of skin tags and seven patients underwent chordee correction with penile lengthening. All patients reported satisfaction in the answered questionnaire. Patients undergoing penile lengthening by partial corporal dissection achieved a mean increase in length of 1.614 ± 0.279 cm dorsally and 1.543 ± 0.230 cm ventrally. The satisfactory rate assessed by the Short Form-36 (SF-36) showed that irrespective of the different genital reconstructive procedures done, the patients were satisfied with cosmetic and functional outcome. Conclusions: Surgical procedures have transformed the management in these patients with bladder exstrophy. Bladders can be safely placed within the pelvis, with most patients achieving urinary continence and cosmetically acceptable external genitalia. Genital reconstruction in the form of correction of chordee, excision of ugly skin tags and lengthening of penis can be performed to give the patients a satisfactory cosmetic and functional system. PMID:23204655

  15. Stability indicators in network reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Filosi, Michele; Visintainer, Roberto; Riccadonna, Samantha; Jurman, Giuseppe; Furlanello, Cesare

    2014-01-01

    The number of available algorithms to infer a biological network from a dataset of high-throughput measurements is overwhelming and keeps growing. However, evaluating their performance is unfeasible unless a 'gold standard' is available to measure how close the reconstructed network is to the ground truth. One measure of this is the stability of these predictions to data resampling approaches. We introduce NetSI, a family of Network Stability Indicators, to assess quantitatively the stability of a reconstructed network in terms of inference variability due to data subsampling. In order to evaluate network stability, the main NetSI methods use a global/local network metric in combination with a resampling (bootstrap or cross-validation) procedure. In addition, we provide two normalized variability scores over data resampling to measure edge weight stability and node degree stability, and then introduce a stability ranking for edges and nodes. A complete implementation of the NetSI indicators, including the Hamming-Ipsen-Mikhailov (HIM) network distance adopted in this paper is available with the R package nettools. We demonstrate the use of the NetSI family by measuring network stability on four datasets against alternative network reconstruction methods. First, the effect of sample size on stability of inferred networks is studied in a gold standard framework on yeast-like data from the Gene Net Weaver simulator. We also consider the impact of varying modularity on a set of structurally different networks (50 nodes, from 2 to 10 modules), and then of complex feature covariance structure, showing the different behaviours of standard reconstruction methods based on Pearson correlation, Maximum Information Coefficient (MIC) and False Discovery Rate (FDR) strategy. Finally, we demonstrate a strong combined effect of different reconstruction methods and phenotype subgroups on a hepatocellular carcinoma miRNA microarray dataset (240 subjects), and we validate the

  16. What to Expect After Breast Reconstruction Surgery

    MedlinePlus

    ... Topic References What to expect after breast reconstruction surgery It’s important to have an idea of what ... regular mammograms. Possible risks during and after reconstruction surgery There are certain risks from any type of ...

  17. Muon Reconstruction and Identification in CMS

    SciTech Connect

    Everett, A.

    2010-02-10

    We present the design strategies and status of the CMS muon reconstruction and identification identification software. Muon reconstruction and identification is accomplished through a variety of complementary algorithms. The CMS muon reconstruction software is based on a Kalman filter technique and reconstructs muons in the standalone muon system, using information from all three types of muon detectors, and links the resulting muon tracks with tracks reconstructed in the silicon tracker. In addition, a muon identification algorithm has been developed which tries to identify muons with high efficiency while maintaining a low probability of misidentification. The muon identification algorithm is complementary by design to the muon reconstruction algorithm that starts track reconstruction in the muon detectors. The identification algorithm accepts reconstructed tracks from the inner tracker and attempts to quantify the muon compatibility for each track using associated calorimeter and muon detector hit information. The performance status is based on detailed detector simulations as well as initial studies using cosmic muon data.

  18. Measurement of the B{sup +} and B{sup 0} lifetimes with topological vertexing at SLD

    SciTech Connect

    Abe, K.; Abe, K.; Abt, I.; SLD Collaboration

    1996-07-01

    The lifetimes of the B{sup +} (B{sub u}) and B{sup 0} (B{sub d}) mesons have been measured using a sample of 150,000 hadronic Z{sup 0} decays collected by the SLD experiment at the SLC between 1993 and 1995. The analysis reconstructs the decay length and charge of the B meson using a novel topological technique. This method results in a high statistics sample of 6,033 (3,665) charged (neutral) vertices. The ratio of B{sup +}:B{sup 0} decays in the charged (neutral) sample is 1.8:1 (1:2.3).

  19. Correlation effects of π electrons on the band structures of conjugated polymers using the self-consistent GW approximation with vertex corrections.

    PubMed

    Chang, Yao-Wen; Jin, Bih-Yaw

    2012-01-14

    Many-body perturbation theory is used to investigate the effect of π-electron correlations on the quasi-particle band structures of conjugated polymers at the level of the Pariser-Parr-Pople model. The self-consistent GW approximation with vertex corrections to both the self-energy and the polarization in Hedin's equations is employed in order to eliminate self-interaction errors and include the effects of electron-hole attraction in screening processes. The dynamic inverse dielectric function is constructed from the generalized plasmon-pole approximation with the static dressed polarization given by the coupled-perturbed Hartree-Fock equation. The bandgaps of trans-polyacetylene, trans-polyphenylenevinylene and poly(para)phenylene are calculated by both the Hartree-Fock and GW approximation, and a lowering of bandgaps due to electron correlations is found. We conclude that both dielectric screening and vertex corrections are important for calculating the quasi-particle bandgaps of conjugated polymers.

  20. IR Hall measurements in overdoped Pr2-xCexCuO4: evidence for magnon induced current-vertex corrections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, Gregory S.; Schmadel, Don C.; Greene, R. L.; Drew, H. D.; Fournier, P.; Kontani, H.

    2009-03-01

    In overdoped Pr2-xCexCuO4, the dc Hall coefficient achieves its expected value RH1+x consistent with the large hole-like Fermi surface observed in ARPES, but only at low temperatures. As temperature is raised, the dc Hall coefficient falls off and becomes negative at a temperature that increases with x. We have measured the IR Hall angle of two overdoped Pr2-xCexCuO4 samples at sufficiently low optical excitation energies (below 10meV) to directly probe the Fermi-surface properties. The observed large deviations from the classical result correspond to the addition of electron-like contributions to σxy, even at T=0, due to the finite frequency. Results of a model developed by H. Kontani of the low frequency IR Hall response which incorporates current-vertex corrections induced by magnon scattering are directly compared to the data. The model fully captures the salient features of the measured Hall response as a function of doping, temperature, and frequency. These results demonstrate that the anomalous Hall effect in the cuprates is a consequence of current vertex corrections to σxy.

  1. Measurements and simulations of MAPS (Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors) response to charged particles - a study towards a vertex detector at the ILC

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maczewski, Lukasz

    2010-05-01

    The International Linear Collider (ILC) is a project of an electron-positron (e+e-) linear collider with the centre-of-mass energy of 200-500 GeV. Monolithic Active Pixel Sensors (MAPS) are one of the proposed silicon pixel detector concepts for the ILC vertex detector (VTX). Basic characteristics of two MAPS pixel matrices MIMOSA-5 (17 μm pixel pitch) and MIMOSA-18 (10 μm pixel pitch) are studied and compared (pedestals, noises, calibration of the ADC-to-electron conversion gain, detector efficiency and charge collection properties). The e+e- collisions at the ILC will be accompanied by intense beamsstrahlung background of electrons and positrons hitting inner planes of the vertex detector. Tracks of this origin leave elongated clusters contrary to those of secondary hadrons. Cluster characteristics and orientation with respect to the pixels netting are studied for perpendicular and inclined tracks. Elongation and precision of determining the cluster orientation as a function of the angle of incidence were measured. A simple model of signal formation (based on charge diffusion) is proposed and tested using the collected data.

  2. Maximum entropy image reconstruction from projections

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bara, N.; Murata, K.

    1981-07-01

    The maximum entropy method is applied to image reconstruction from projections, of which angular view is restricted. The relaxation parameters are introduced to the maximum entropy reconstruction and after iteration the median filtering is implemented. These procedures improve the quality of the reconstructed image from noisy projections

  3. Reconstructing Deweyan Pragmatism: A Review Essay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Neubert, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    In this essay Stefan Neubert argues that John Dewey was a philosopher of reconstruction and that the best use we can make of him today is to reconstruct his work in and for our own contexts. Neubert distinguishes three necessary and equally important components of the overall project of reconstructing Deweyan pragmatism: first, to make strong and…

  4. Fingerprint reconstruction: from minutiae to phase.

    PubMed

    Feng, Jianjiang; Jain, Anil K

    2011-02-01

    Fingerprint matching systems generally use four types of representation schemes: grayscale image, phase image, skeleton image, and minutiae, among which minutiae-based representation is the most widely adopted one. The compactness of minutiae representation has created an impression that the minutiae template does not contain sufficient information to allow the reconstruction of the original grayscale fingerprint image. This belief has now been shown to be false; several algorithms have been proposed that can reconstruct fingerprint images from minutiae templates. These techniques try to either reconstruct the skeleton image, which is then converted into the grayscale image, or reconstruct the grayscale image directly from the minutiae template. However, they have a common drawback: Many spurious minutiae not included in the original minutiae template are generated in the reconstructed image. Moreover, some of these reconstruction techniques can only generate a partial fingerprint. In this paper, a novel fingerprint reconstruction algorithm is proposed to reconstruct the phase image, which is then converted into the grayscale image. The proposed reconstruction algorithm not only gives the whole fingerprint, but the reconstructed fingerprint contains very few spurious minutiae. Specifically, a fingerprint image is represented as a phase image which consists of the continuous phase and the spiral phase (which corresponds to minutiae). An algorithm is proposed to reconstruct the continuous phase from minutiae. The proposed reconstruction algorithm has been evaluated with respect to the success rates of type-I attack (match the reconstructed fingerprint against the original fingerprint) and type-II attack (match the reconstructed fingerprint against different impressions of the original fingerprint) using a commercial fingerprint recognition system. Given the reconstructed image from our algorithm, we show that both types of attacks can be successfully launched against

  5. Markov random field surface reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Paulsen, Rasmus R; Baerentzen, Jakob Andreas; Larsen, Rasmus

    2010-01-01

    A method for implicit surface reconstruction is proposed. The novelty in this paper is the adaptation of Markov Random Field regularization of a distance field. The Markov Random Field formulation allows us to integrate both knowledge about the type of surface we wish to reconstruct (the prior) and knowledge about data (the observation model) in an orthogonal fashion. Local models that account for both scene-specific knowledge and physical properties of the scanning device are described. Furthermore, how the optimal distance field can be computed is demonstrated using conjugate gradients, sparse Cholesky factorization, and a multiscale iterative optimization scheme. The method is demonstrated on a set of scanned human heads and, both in terms of accuracy and the ability to close holes, the proposed method is shown to have similar or superior performance when compared to current state-of-the-art algorithms.

  6. X-Ray Tomographic Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnie Schmittberger

    2010-08-25

    Tomographic scans have revolutionized imaging techniques used in medical and biological research by resolving individual sample slices instead of several superimposed images that are obtained from regular x-ray scans. X-Ray fluorescence computed tomography, a more specific tomography technique, bombards the sample with synchrotron x-rays and detects the fluorescent photons emitted from the sample. However, since x-rays are attenuated as they pass through the sample, tomographic scans often produce images with erroneous low densities in areas where the x-rays have already passed through most of the sample. To correct for this and correctly reconstruct the data in order to obtain the most accurate images, a program employing iterative methods based on the inverse Radon transform was written. Applying this reconstruction method to a tomographic image recovered some of the lost densities, providing a more accurate image from which element concentrations and internal structure can be determined.

  7. Direct reconstruction of dark energy.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Chris; Zunckel, Caroline

    2010-05-28

    An important issue in cosmology is reconstructing the effective dark energy equation of state directly from observations. With so few physically motivated models, future dark energy studies cannot only be based on constraining a dark energy parameter space. We present a new nonparametric method which can accurately reconstruct a wide variety of dark energy behavior with no prior assumptions about it. It is simple, quick and relatively accurate, and involves no expensive explorations of parameter space. The technique uses principal component analysis and a combination of information criteria to identify real features in the data, and tailors the fitting functions to pick up trends and smooth over noise. We find that we can constrain a large variety of w(z) models to within 10%-20% at redshifts z≲1 using just SNAP-quality data. PMID:20867085

  8. Direct reconstruction of dark energy.

    PubMed

    Clarkson, Chris; Zunckel, Caroline

    2010-05-28

    An important issue in cosmology is reconstructing the effective dark energy equation of state directly from observations. With so few physically motivated models, future dark energy studies cannot only be based on constraining a dark energy parameter space. We present a new nonparametric method which can accurately reconstruct a wide variety of dark energy behavior with no prior assumptions about it. It is simple, quick and relatively accurate, and involves no expensive explorations of parameter space. The technique uses principal component analysis and a combination of information criteria to identify real features in the data, and tailors the fitting functions to pick up trends and smooth over noise. We find that we can constrain a large variety of w(z) models to within 10%-20% at redshifts z≲1 using just SNAP-quality data.

  9. Ear Reconstruction in Young Children.

    PubMed

    Reinisch, John

    2015-12-01

    The use of a porous high-density polyethylene ear implant, rather than a costal cartilage framework, allows ear reconstruction in young children before they enter school. The fact that the growth of the normal ear matures early allows for good symmetry. If the implant is covered completely with a large, well-vascularized superficial parietal fascia flap and appropriately color-matched skin, an ear with excellent projection and definition can be obtained with minimal complications and long-term viability. Ear reconstruction in young children is preferred by the author because the necessary fascial flap coverage is thinner, easier to harvest than in older patients, and can be done in a single outpatient procedure with minimal discomfort or psychological trauma. PMID:26667634

  10. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-09-01

    This monthly report summarizes the technical progress and project status for the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project being conducted at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of a Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP is composed of experts in numerous technical fields related to this project and represents the interests of the public. The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demographics, agriculture, food habits, environmental pathways and dose estimates. 3 figs.

  11. Reconstruction of the Genesis Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Qualls, Garry D.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2005-01-01

    This paper provides an overview of the findings from a reconstruction analysis of the Genesis capsule entry. First, a comparison of the atmospheric properties (density and winds) encountered during the entry to the pre-entry profile is presented. The analysis that was performed on the video footage (obtained from the tracking stations at UTTR) during the descent is then described from which the Mach number at the onset of the capsule tumble was estimated following the failure of the drogue parachute deployment. Next, an assessment of the Genesis capsule aerodynamics that was extracted from the video footage is discussed, followed by a description of the capsule hypersonic attitude that must have occurred during the entry based on examination of the recovered capsule heatshield. Lastly, the entry trajectory reconstruction that was performed is presented.

  12. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms; environmental transport environmental monitoring data; demographics, agriculture, food habits; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  13. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-02-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  14. Craniofacial reconstruction following oncologic resection.

    PubMed

    Hanasono, Matthew M; Hofstede, Theresa M

    2013-01-01

    The ability to reliably reconstruct complex and sizable wounds has decreased the morbidity of skull base surgery substantially, preventing major complications and allowing treatment of tumors previously considered inoperable. Addressing facial nerve function with static and dynamic procedures as well as fabrication of craniofacial prostheses to replace delicate facial landmarks has further increased surgeons' ability to restore the appearance and function of the face. PMID:23174362

  15. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-10-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates):Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  16. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source Terms, Environmental Transport, Environmental Monitoring Data, Demography, Food Consumption, and Agriculture, and Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  17. Reconstructing propagation networks with temporal similarity

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An

    2015-01-01

    Node similarity significantly contributes to the growth of real networks. In this paper, based on the observed epidemic spreading results we apply the node similarity metrics to reconstruct the underlying networks hosting the propagation. We find that the reconstruction accuracy of the similarity metrics is strongly influenced by the infection rate of the spreading process. Moreover, there is a range of infection rate in which the reconstruction accuracy of some similarity metrics drops nearly to zero. To improve the similarity-based reconstruction method, we propose a temporal similarity metric which takes into account the time information of the spreading. The reconstruction results are remarkably improved with the new method. PMID:26086198

  18. Reconstructing propagation networks with temporal similarity.

    PubMed

    Liao, Hao; Zeng, An

    2015-01-01

    Node similarity significantly contributes to the growth of real networks. In this paper, based on the observed epidemic spreading results we apply the node similarity metrics to reconstruct the underlying networks hosting the propagation. We find that the reconstruction accuracy of the similarity metrics is strongly influenced by the infection rate of the spreading process. Moreover, there is a range of infection rate in which the reconstruction accuracy of some similarity metrics drops nearly to zero. To improve the similarity-based reconstruction method, we propose a temporal similarity metric which takes into account the time information of the spreading. The reconstruction results are remarkably improved with the new method. PMID:26086198

  19. Photogrammetric Reconstruction with Bayesian Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masiero, A.; Fissore, F.; Guarnieri, A.; Pirotti, F.; Vettore, A.

    2016-06-01

    Nowadays photogrammetry and laser scanning methods are the most wide spread surveying techniques. Laser scanning methods usually allow to obtain more accurate results with respect to photogrammetry, but their use have some issues, e.g. related to the high cost of the instrumentation and the typical need of high qualified personnel to acquire experimental data on the field. Differently, photogrammetric reconstruction can be achieved by means of low cost devices and by persons without specific training. Furthermore, the recent diffusion of smart devices (e.g. smartphones) embedded with imaging and positioning sensors (i.e. standard camera, GNSS receiver, inertial measurement unit) is opening the possibility of integrating more information in the photogrammetric reconstruction procedure, in order to increase its computational efficiency, its robustness and accuracy. In accordance with the above observations, this paper examines and validates new possibilities for the integration of information provided by the inertial measurement unit (IMU) into the photogrammetric reconstruction procedure, and, to be more specific, into the procedure for solving the feature matching and the bundle adjustment problems.

  20. PRP Augmentation for ACL Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Andriolo, Luca; Di Matteo, Berardo; Kon, Elizaveta; Filardo, Giuseppe; Venieri, Giulia; Marcacci, Maurilio

    2015-01-01

    Current research is investigating new methods to enhance tissue healing to speed up recovery time and decrease the risk of failure in Anterior Cruciate Ligament (ACL) reconstructive surgery. Biological augmentation is one of the most exploited strategies, in particular the application of Platelet Rich Plasma (PRP). Aim of the present paper is to systematically review all the preclinical and clinical papers dealing with the application of PRP as a biological enhancer during ACL reconstructive surgery. Thirty-two studies were included in the present review. The analysis of the preclinical evidence revealed that PRP was able to improve the healing potential of the tendinous graft both in terms of histological and biomechanical performance. Looking at the available clinical evidence, results were not univocal. PRP administration proved to be a safe procedure and there were some evidences that it could favor the donor site healing in case of ACL reconstruction with patellar tendon graft and positively contribute to graft maturation over time, whereas the majority of the papers did not show beneficial effects in terms of bony tunnels/graft area integration. Furthermore, PRP augmentation did not provide superior functional results at short term evaluation. PMID:26064903

  1. Environment reconstruction for robot navigation

    SciTech Connect

    Bohn, S.; Thornton, E.

    1994-04-01

    The United State Department of Energy (DOE) is facing a large task in characterizing and remediating waste tanks and their contents. Because of the hazardous materials inside the waste tanks, all of the work must be done remotely. The purpose of this paper is to show how to reconstruct an enclosed environment from various scans of a Laser Range Finder (LRF). The reconstructed environment can then be used by a robot for path planning, and by an operator to monitor the progress of the waste remediation process. Environment reconstruction consists of two tasks: image processing and laser sculpting. The image processing task focuses first on reducing the quantity of low-confidence data and on smoothing random fluctuations in the data. Then the processed range data must be converted into an XYZ Cartesian coordinate space, a process for which we examined two methods. The first method is a geometrical transform of the LRF data. The second uses an artificial neural network to transform the data to XYZ coordinates. Once an XYZ data set is computed, laser sculpting can be performed. Laser sculpting employs a hierarchical tree structure formally called an octree. The octree structure allows efficient storage of volumetric data and the ability to fuse multiple data sets. Our research has allowed us to examine the difficulties of fusing multiple LRF scans into an octree and to develop algorithms for converting an octree structure into a representation of polygon surfaces.

  2. Reconstruction of FXR Beam Conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Nexen, W E; Scarpetti, R D; Zentler, J

    2001-05-31

    Beam-envelope radius, envelope angle, and beam emittance can be derived from measurements of beam radius for at least three different transport conditions. We have used this technique to reconstruct exit parameters from the FXR injector and accelerator. We use a diamagnetic loop (DML) to measure the magnetic moment of the high current beam. With no assumptions about radial profile, we can derive the beam mean squire radius from the moment under certain easily met conditions. Since it is this parameter which is required for the reconstruction, it is evident that the DML is the ideal diagnostic for this technique. The simplest application of this technique requires at least three shots for a reconstruction but in reality requires averaging over many more shots because of shot to shot variation. Since DML measurements do not interfere with the beam, single shot time resolved measurements of the beam parameters appear feasible if one uses an array of at least three DMLs separated by known transport conditions.

  3. CMB temperature lensing power reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, Duncan; Efstathiou, George; Challinor, Anthony; Bielewicz, Pawel

    2011-02-15

    We study the reconstruction of the lensing potential power spectrum from CMB temperature data, with an eye to the Planck experiment. We work with the optimal quadratic estimator of Okamoto and Hu, which we characterize thoroughly in an application to the reconstruction of the lensing power spectrum. We find that at multipoles L<250, our current understanding of this estimator is biased at the 15% level by beyond-gradient terms in the Taylor expansion of lensing effects. We present the full lensed trispectrum to fourth order in the lensing potential to explain this effect. We show that the low-L bias, as well as a previously known bias at high L, is relevant to the determination of cosmology and must be corrected for in order to avoid significant parameter errors. We also investigate the covariance of the reconstructed power, finding broad correlations of {approx_equal}0.1%. Finally, we discuss several small improvements which may be made to the optimal estimator to mitigate these problems.

  4. Revisiting the Least-squares Procedure for Gradient Reconstruction on Unstructured Meshes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, Dimitri J.; Thomas, James L. (Technical Monitor)

    2003-01-01

    The accuracy of the least-squares technique for gradient reconstruction on unstructured meshes is examined. While least-squares techniques produce accurate results on arbitrary isotropic unstructured meshes, serious difficulties exist for highly stretched meshes in the presence of surface curvature. In these situations, gradients are typically under-estimated by up to an order of magnitude. For vertex-based discretizations on triangular and quadrilateral meshes, and cell-centered discretizations on quadrilateral meshes, accuracy can be recovered using an inverse distance weighting in the least-squares construction. For cell-centered discretizations on triangles, both the unweighted and weighted least-squares constructions fail to provide suitable gradient estimates for highly stretched curved meshes. Good overall flow solution accuracy can be retained in spite of poor gradient estimates, due to the presence of flow alignment in exactly the same regions where the poor gradient accuracy is observed. However, the use of entropy fixes has the potential for generating large but subtle discretization errors.

  5. Graft impingement in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Iriuchishima, Takanori; Shirakura, Kenji; Fu, Freddie H

    2013-03-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) graft impingement is one of the most troubling complications in ACL reconstruction. In the previous strategy of isometric "non-anatomical" ACL reconstruction, posterior tibial tunnel placement and notchplasty were recommended to avoid graft impingement. Recently, the strategy of ACL reconstruction is shifting towards "anatomical" reconstruction. In anatomical ACL reconstruction, the potential risk of graft impingement is higher than in non-anatomical reconstruction because the tibial tunnel is placed at a more anterior portion on the tibia. However, there have been few studies reporting on graft impingement in anatomical ACL reconstruction. This study will provide a review of graft impingement status in both non-anatomical and the more recent anatomical ACL reconstruction techniques. In conclusion, with the accurate creation of bone tunnels within ACL native footprint, the graft impingement might not happen in anatomical ACL reconstruction. For the clinical relevance, to prevent graft impingement, surgeons should pay attention of creating correct anatomical tunnels when they perform ACL reconstruction. Level of evidence IV.

  6. Densely calculated facial soft tissue thickness for craniofacial reconstruction in Chinese adults.

    PubMed

    Shui, Wuyang; Zhou, Mingquan; Deng, Qingqiong; Wu, Zhongke; Ji, Yuan; Li, Kang; He, Taiping; Jiang, Haiyan

    2016-09-01

    Craniofacial reconstruction (CFR) is used to recreate a likeness of original facial appearance for an unidentified skull; this technique has been applied in both forensics and archeology. Many CFR techniques rely on the average facial soft tissue thickness (FSTT) of anatomical landmarks, related to ethnicity, age, sex, body mass index (BMI), etc. Previous studies typically employed FSTT at sparsely distributed anatomical landmarks, where different landmark definitions may affect the contrasting results. In the present study, a total of 90,198 one-to-one correspondence skull vertices are established on 171 head CT-scans and the FSTT of each corresponding vertex is calculated (hereafter referred to as densely calculated FSTT) for statistical analysis and CFR. Basic descriptive statistics (i.e., mean and standard deviation) for densely calculated FSTT are reported separately according to sex and age. Results show that 76.12% of overall vertices indicate that the FSTT is greater in males than females, with the exception of vertices around the zygoma, zygomatic arch and mid-lateral orbit. These sex-related significant differences are found at 55.12% of all vertices and the statistically age-related significant differences are depicted between the three age groups at a majority of all vertices (73.31% for males and 63.43% for females). Five non-overlapping categories are given and the descriptive statistics (i.e., mean, standard deviation, local standard deviation and percentage) are reported. Multiple appearances are produced using the densely calculated FSTT of various age and sex groups, and a quantitative assessment is provided to examine how relevant the choice of FSTT is to increasing the accuracy of CFR. In conclusion, this study provides a new perspective in understanding the distribution of FSTT and the construction of a new densely calculated FSTT database for craniofacial reconstruction. PMID:27544400

  7. Reconstruction of Anacostia wetlands: success?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hammerschlag, R.S.; Perry, M.C.

    2002-01-01

    Historically, the tidal Anacostia River in Washington, D.C. had been an extensive system of freshwater tidal marshes replete with a full array of wetland vegetation dominated by wild rice. The local Nacochtank Indians had found the abundant fish and wildlife sufficient to sustain their daily lives. White man's intrusion upon the landscape gradually brought about deterioration of the natural (and associated cultural) system. Total demise followed mid-20th century dredge and fill channelization, which was conducted from the confluence of the Anacostia with the Potomac near the heart of Washington, D.C. to the terminus of the tidal regime at Bladensburg, Maryland. The National Park Service (NPS) became the manager for much of the land along the Anacostia, particularly the eastern bank. As part of its planning effort, the NPS envisioned returning portions of the Anacostia under its control to a natural system as a vignette. The concept was based on bringing back as comprehensive a collection of vegetation and wildlife as possible through the reestablishment of tidal marshes at Kenilworth and Kingman. The resultant wetlands were to be made accessible to the public both logistically and through a well designed interpretative program. In fact, this vision has been realized due to an impressive cooperative effort among a number of Federal and local agencies and organizations. In 1993, 32 acres of freshwater tidal marsh were reconstructed at Kenilworth. Based upon the 5-year monitoring program that has been in place since reconstruction, several generalizations may be made concerning the degree of success of the marsh reconstruction. Water quality in the marsh system and nearby tidal waters has not been noticeably improved. The poor quality may be clue to the overwhelmingly high loads (e.g., sediment, nutrients, etc.) brought in on the twice daily tidal cycle from the Anacostia and to the relatively small volume of water which actually interacts with the emergent marsh

  8. Fast-digitizing and track-finding electronics for the vertex detector in the Opal experiment at the Large Electron Positron Collider (LEP) at Cern

    SciTech Connect

    Jaroslawski, S.; Jeffs, M.; Matson, R.; Milborrow, R.; White, D. )

    1990-10-01

    The vertex front-end electronics is described. It comprises fast analog-to-digital conversion circuits and a fast programmable track trigger processor. The function of the electronics is to examine, within one LEP beam crossing (22 {mu}s), data generated in the detector for the evidence of charged particle tracks. Measurements of ionization drift times are based on a gated 93-MHz oscillator synchronized to a precision crystal clock and give points in space. The axial positions of these points along the detector are found by analyzing the difference in time of arrivals of signals at the ends of the detector ({ital z} by timing). Particle tracks are found by 36 track finders operating in parallel and are matched by semicuston coincidence chips. The track information is used in the first stage of data reduction in Opal (the first-level trigger).

  9. B_c B_c J/ψ vertex form factor at finite temperature in the framework of QCD sum rules approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yazici, E.; Sundu, H.; Veliev, E. Veli

    2016-02-01

    The strong form factor of the Bc BcJ/Ψ vertex is calculated in the framework of the QCD sum rules method at finite temperature. Taking into account additional operators appearing at finite temperature, a thermal Wilson expansion is obtained and QCD sum rules are derived. While increasing the temperature, the strong form factor remains unchanged up to T˜eq 100 MeV but slightly increases after this point. After T˜eq 160 MeV, the form factor suddenly decreases up to T˜eq 170 MeV. The obtained result of the coupling constant by fitting the form factor at Q^2=-m^2_{offshell} at T=0 is in a very good agreement with the QCD sum rules calculations in the case of vacuum. Our prediction can be checked in future experiments.

  10. Origin of the anomalous Hall effect in the overdoped n -type superconductor Pr2-xCexCuo4 : Current-vertex corrections due to antiferromagnetic fluctuations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jenkins, G. S.; Schmadel, D. C.; Bach, P. L.; Greene, R. L.; Béchamp-Laganière, X.; Roberge, G.; Fournier, P.; Kontani, Hiroshi; Drew, H. D.

    2010-01-01

    The anomalous magnetotransport properties in electron doped ( n -type) cuprates were investigated using Hall measurements at THz frequencies. The complex Hall angle was measured in overdoped Pr2-xCexCuO4 samples ( x=0.17 and 0.18) as a continuous function of temperature above Tc at excitation energies 5.24 and 10.5 meV. The results, extrapolated to low temperatures, show that inelastic scattering introduces electronlike contributions to the Hall response. First-principle calculations of the Hall angle that include current-vertex corrections (CVC) induced by electron interactions mediated by magnetic fluctuations in the Hall conductivity reproduce the temperature, frequency, and doping dependence of the experimental data. These results show that Fermi-liquid CVC effects are the source of the anomalous Hall transport properties in overdoped n -type cuprates.

  11. Application of the Vertex Exchange Method to estimate a semi-parametric mixture model for the MIC density of Escherichia coli isolates tested for susceptibility against ampicillin.

    PubMed

    Jaspers, Stijn; Verbeke, Geert; Böhning, Dankmar; Aerts, Marc

    2016-01-01

    In the last decades, considerable attention has been paid to the collection of antimicrobial resistance data, with the aim of monitoring non-wild-type isolates. This monitoring is performed based on minimum inhibition concentration (MIC) values, which are collected through dilution experiments. We present a semi-parametric mixture model to estimate the entire MIC density on the continuous scale. The parametric first component is extended with a non-parametric second component and a new back-fitting algorithm, based on the Vertex Exchange Method, is proposed. Our data example shows how to estimate the MIC density for Escherichia coli tested for ampicillin and how to use this estimate for model-based classification. A simulation study was performed, showing the promising behavior of the new method, both in terms of density estimation as well as classification.

  12. Semiclassical computation of three-point functions of closed string vertex operators in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5}

    SciTech Connect

    Roiban, R.; Tseytlin, A. A.

    2010-11-15

    We consider the leading large string tension correction to correlation functions of three vertex operators of particular massive string states in AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} string theory. We assume that two of these states are 'heavy' carrying large spins (of order string tension) and thus can be treated semiclassically while the third state is 'light' having fixed quantum numbers. We study several examples. In the case when the 'heavy' states are described by a folded string with large-spin in AdS{sub 5} the 3-point function scales as a semiclassical spin parameter of the 'heavy' state in power of the string level of the 'light' massive string state. We observe similar behavior in the case of 'heavy' states which admit a small angular momentum limit, which may thus represent creatures of three quantum massive string states.

  13. Review of jet reconstruction algorithms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Atkin, Ryan

    2015-10-01

    Accurate jet reconstruction is necessary for understanding the link between the unobserved partons and the jets of observed collimated colourless particles the partons hadronise into. Understanding this link sheds light on the properties of these partons. A review of various common jet algorithms is presented, namely the Kt, Anti-Kt, Cambridge/Aachen, Iterative cones and the SIScone, highlighting their strengths and weaknesses. If one is interested in studying jets, the Anti-Kt algorithm is the best choice, however if ones interest is in the jet substructures then the Cambridge/Aachen algorithm would be the best option.

  14. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1992-06-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Battelle Pacific Northwest Laboratories under contract with the Centers for Disease Control. The independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP) provides technical direction. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): source terms; environmental transport; environmental monitoring data; demography, food consumption, and agriculture; environmental pathways and dose estimates.

  15. Reconstruction of fundamental SUSY parameters

    SciTech Connect

    P. M. Zerwas et al.

    2003-09-25

    We summarize methods and expected accuracies in determining the basic low-energy SUSY parameters from experiments at future e{sup +}e{sup -} linear colliders in the TeV energy range, combined with results from LHC. In a second step we demonstrate how, based on this set of parameters, the fundamental supersymmetric theory can be reconstructed at high scales near the grand unification or Planck scale. These analyses have been carried out for minimal supergravity [confronted with GMSB for comparison], and for a string effective theory.

  16. The Arthroscopic Superior Capsular Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Adams, Christopher R; Denard, Patrick J; Brady, Paul C; Hartzler, Robert U; Burkhart, Stephen S

    2016-01-01

    In a subset of patients with rotator cuff tears, the glenohumeral joint has minimal degenerative changes and the rotator cuff tendon is either irreparable or very poor quality and unlikely to heal. Reverse shoulder arthroplasty (RSA) is often considered for these patients despite the lack of glenohumeral arthritis. However, due to the permanent destruction of the glenohumeral articular surfaces, complication rates, and concerns about implant longevity with RSA, we believe the superior capsular reconstruction (SCR) is a viable alternative. In this article, we describe our technique for the SCR. PMID:27552457

  17. Reconstruction of coded aperture images

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bielefeld, Michael J.; Yin, Lo I.

    1987-01-01

    Balanced correlation method and the Maximum Entropy Method (MEM) were implemented to reconstruct a laboratory X-ray source as imaged by a Uniformly Redundant Array (URA) system. Although the MEM method has advantages over the balanced correlation method, it is computationally time consuming because of the iterative nature of its solution. Massively Parallel Processing, with its parallel array structure is ideally suited for such computations. These preliminary results indicate that it is possible to use the MEM method in future coded-aperture experiments with the help of the MPP.

  18. [Reconstruction of facial burn sequelae].

    PubMed

    Foyatier, J L; Comparin, J P; Boulos, J P; Bichet, J C; Jacquin, F

    2001-06-01

    The deep burns of the face can lead to horrible scars functionally and aesthetically. Treatment of these scars need several surgical interventions frequently and during many years. In our region we deal with this type of wounds as team work, multidisciplinary approach carrying out many process starting by emergency treatment of acute burns till the social rehabilitation. The expansion technique was great help in improving the shape of scars, by using the expanding skin as full thickness grafts. Reconstruction of the anatomical units and application of aesthetic techniques (like rhinoplasty, lifting, tattooing and autologous fat injections) participate equally in improving the quality of results. Many examples of treatments of burns scars are shown.

  19. Method for position emission mammography image reconstruction

    DOEpatents

    Smith, Mark Frederick

    2004-10-12

    An image reconstruction method comprising accepting coincidence datat from either a data file or in real time from a pair of detector heads, culling event data that is outside a desired energy range, optionally saving the desired data for each detector position or for each pair of detector pixels on the two detector heads, and then reconstructing the image either by backprojection image reconstruction or by iterative image reconstruction. In the backprojection image reconstruction mode, rays are traced between centers of lines of response (LOR's), counts are then either allocated by nearest pixel interpolation or allocated by an overlap method and then corrected for geometric effects and attenuation and the data file updated. If the iterative image reconstruction option is selected, one implementation is to compute a grid Siddon retracing, and to perform maximum likelihood expectation maiximization (MLEM) computed by either: a) tracing parallel rays between subpixels on opposite detector heads; or b) tracing rays between randomized endpoint locations on opposite detector heads.

  20. Inverse Problem of Vortex Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protas, Bartosz; Danaila, Ionut

    2014-11-01

    This study addresses the following question: given incomplete measurements of the velocity field induced by a vortex, can one determine the structure of the vortex? Assuming that the flow is incompressible, inviscid and stationary in the frame of reference moving with the vortex, the ``structure'' of the vortex is uniquely characterized by the functional relation between the streamfunction and vorticity. To focus attention, 3D axisymmetric vortex rings are considered. We show how this inverse problem can be framed as an optimization problem which can then be efficiently solved using variational techniques. More precisely, we use measurements of the tangential velocity on some contour to reconstruct the function defining the streamfunction-vorticity relation in a continuous setting. Two test cases are presented, involving Hill's and Norbury vortices, in which very good reconstructions are obtained. A key result of this study is the application of our approach to obtain an optimal inviscid vortex model in an actual viscous flow problem based on DNS data which leads to a number of nonintuitive findings.

  1. Stereo reconstruction from multiperspective panoramas.

    PubMed

    Li, Yin; Shum, Heung-Yeung; Tang, Chi-Keung; Szeliski, Richard

    2004-01-01

    A new approach to computing a panoramic (360 degrees) depth map is presented in this paper. Our approach uses a large collection of images taken by a camera whose motion has been constrained to planar concentric circles. We resample regular perspective images to produce a set of multiperspective panoramas and then compute depth maps directly from these resampled panoramas. Our panoramas sample uniformly in three dimensions: rotation angle, inverse radial distance, and vertical elevation. The use of multiperspective panoramas eliminates the limited overlap present in the original input images and, thus, problems as in conventional multibaseline stereo can be avoided. Our approach differs from stereo matching of single-perspective panoramic images taken from different locations, where the epipolar constraints are sine curves. For our multiperspective panoramas, the epipolar geometry, to the first order approximation, consists of horizontal lines. Therefore, any traditional stereo algorithm can be applied to multiperspective panoramas with little modification. In this paper, we describe two reconstruction algorithms. The first is a cylinder sweep algorithm that uses a small number of resampled multiperspective panoramas to obtain dense 3D reconstruction. The second algorithm, in contrast, uses a large number of multiperspective panoramas and takes advantage of the approximate horizontal epipolar geometry inherent in multiperspective panoramas. It comprises a novel and efficient 1D multibaseline matching technique, followed by tensor voting to extract the depth surface. Experiments show that our algorithms are capable of producing comparable high quality depth maps which can be used for applications such as view interpolation. PMID:15382685

  2. Genetic reconstructions of invasion history.

    PubMed

    Cristescu, Melania E

    2015-05-01

    A diverse array of molecular markers and constantly evolving analytical approaches have been employed to reconstruct the invasion histories of the most notorious invasions. Detailed information on the source(s) of introduction, invasion route, type of vectors, number of independent introductions and pathways of secondary spread has been corroborated for a large number of biological invasions. In this review, I present the promises and limitations of current techniques while discussing future directions. Broad phylogeographic surveys of native and introduced populations have traced back invasion routes with surprising precision. These approaches often further clarify species boundaries and reveal complex patterns of genetic relationships with noninvasive relatives. Moreover, fine-scale analyses of population genetics or genomics allow deep inferences on the colonization dynamics across invaded ranges and can reveal the extent of gene flow among populations across various geographical scales, major demographic events such as genetic bottlenecks as well as other important evolutionary events such as hybridization with native taxa, inbreeding and selective sweeps. Genetic data have been often corroborated successfully with historical, geographical and ecological data to enable a comprehensive reconstruction of the invasion process. The advent of next-generation sequencing, along with the availability of extensive databases of repository sequences generated by barcoding projects opens the opportunity to broadly monitor biodiversity, to identify early invasions and to quantify failed invasions that would otherwise remain inconspicuous to the human eye. PMID:25703061

  3. Locomotive wheel 3D reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guan, Xin; Luo, Zhisheng; Gao, Xiaorong; Wu, Jianle

    2010-08-01

    In the article, a system, which is used to reconstruct locomotive wheels, is described, helping workers detect the condition of a wheel through a direct view. The system consists of a line laser, a 2D camera, and a computer. We use 2D camera to capture the line-laser light reflected by the object, a wheel, and then compute the final coordinates of the structured light. Finally, using Matlab programming language, we transform the coordinate of points to a smooth surface and illustrate the 3D view of the wheel. The article also proposes the system structure, processing steps and methods, and sets up an experimental platform to verify the design proposal. We verify the feasibility of the whole process, and analyze the results comparing to standard date. The test results show that this system can work well, and has a high accuracy on the reconstruction. And because there is still no such application working in railway industries, so that it has practical value in railway inspection system.

  4. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S. M.; McMakin, A. H.

    1991-09-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation dose that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is divided into five technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (i.e., dose estimates). The Source Terms Task develops estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The Environmental Transport Task reconstructs the movements of radioactive particles from the areas of release to populations. The Environmental Monitoring Data Task assemblies, evaluates and reports historical environmental monitoring data. The Demographics, Agriculture and Food Habits Task develops the data needed to identify the populations that could have been affected by the releases. The Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates Task used the information derived from the other Tasks to estimate the radiation doses individuals could have received from Hanford radiation. This document lists the progress on this project as of September 1991. 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  5. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.

    1990-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on humans (dose estimates). The Source Terms Task develops estimates of radioactive emissions from Hanford facilities since 1944. The Environmental Transport Task reconstructs the movement of radioactive materials from the areas of release to populations. The Environmental Monitoring Data Task assembles, evaluates, and reports historical environmental monitoring data. The Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits Task develops the data needed to identify the populations that could have been affected by the releases. In addition to population and demographic data, the food and water resources and consumption patterns for populations are estimated because they provide a primary pathway for the intake of radionuclides. The Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates Task use the information produced by the other tasks to estimate the radiation doses populations could have received from Hanford radiation. Project progress is documented in this monthly report, which is available to the public. 3 figs., 3 tabs.

  6. Bayes Estimators for Phylogenetic Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, P. M.; Li, W.; Haws, D.; Friedrich, T.; Liu, J.; Yoshida, R.

    2011-01-01

    Tree reconstruction methods are often judged by their accuracy, measured by how close they get to the true tree. Yet, most reconstruction methods like maximum likelihood (ML) do not explicitly maximize this accuracy. To address this problem, we propose a Bayesian solution. Given tree samples, we propose finding the tree estimate that is closest on average to the samples. This “median” tree is known as the Bayes estimator (BE). The BE literally maximizes posterior expected accuracy, measured in terms of closeness (distance) to the true tree. We discuss a unified framework of BE trees, focusing especially on tree distances that are expressible as squared euclidean distances. Notable examples include Robinson–Foulds (RF) distance, quartet distance, and squared path difference. Using both simulated and real data, we show that BEs can be estimated in practice by hill-climbing. In our simulation, we find that BEs tend to be closer to the true tree, compared with ML and neighbor joining. In particular, the BE under squared path difference tends to perform well in terms of both path difference and RF distances. PMID:21471560

  7. Prosthetic breast reconstruction: indications and update

    PubMed Central

    Quinn, Tam T.; Miller, George S.; Rostek, Marie; Cabalag, Miguel S.; Rozen, Warren M.

    2016-01-01

    Background Despite 82% of patients reporting psychosocial improvement following breast reconstruction, only 33% patients choose to undergo surgery. Implant reconstruction outnumbers autologous reconstruction in many centres. Methods A systematic review of the literature was undertaken. Inclusion required: (I) Meta-analyses or review articles; (II) adult patients aged 18 years or over undergoing alloplastic breast reconstruction; (III) studies including outcome measures; (IV) case series with more than 10 patients; (V) English language; and (VI) publication after 1st January, 2000. Results After full text review, analysis and data extraction was conducted for a total of 63 articles. Definitive reconstruction with an implant can be immediate or delayed. Older patients have similar or even lower complication rates to younger patients. Complications include capsular contracture, hematoma and infection. Obesity, smoking, large breasts, diabetes and higher grade tumors are associated with increased risk of wound problems and reconstructive failure. Silicone implant patients have higher capsular contracture rates but have higher physical and psychosocial function. There were no associations made between silicone implants and cancer or systemic disease. There were no differences in outcomes or complications between round and shaped implants. Textured implants have a lower risk of capsular contracture than smooth implants. Smooth implants are more likely to be displaced as well as having higher rates of infection. Immediate breast reconstruction (IBR) gives the best aesthetic outcome if radiotherapy is not required but has a higher rate of capsular contracture and implant failure. Delayed-immediate reconstruction patients can achieve similar aesthetic results to IBR whilst preserving the breast skin if radiotherapy is required. Delayed breast reconstruction (DBR) patients have fewer complications than IBR patients. Conclusions Implant reconstruction is a safe and popular

  8. Irradiation autogenous mandibular grafts in primary reconstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Hamaker, R.C.

    1981-07-01

    The procedure, irradiated mandibular autografts, for primary reconstruction, is presented with an immediate success rate of 88%. Eight cases have undergone primary mandibular reconstruction with the tumorous mandible irradiated to 10,000 rads in a single dose. The longest follow-up is 2 3/4 years. The autograft has proven to be an ideal implant. Major resections of the mandible in conjunction with large myocutaneous flaps have been reconstructed utilizing this implant.

  9. Advances in Bioprinting Technologies for Craniofacial Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Dafydd O; Farré-Guasch, Elisabet; Helder, Marco N; Gibbs, Susan; Forouzanfar, Tymour; van Zuijlen, Paul P; Wolff, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in craniofacial reconstruction have shown important advances in both the materials and methods used. While autogenous tissue is still considered to be the gold standard for these reconstructions, the harvesting procedure remains tedious and in many cases causes significant donor site morbidity. These limitations have subsequently led to the development of less invasive techniques such as 3D bioprinting that could offer possibilities to manufacture patient-tailored bioactive tissue constructs for craniofacial reconstruction. Here, we discuss the current technological and (pre)clinical advances of 3D bioprinting for use in craniofacial reconstruction and highlight the challenges that need to be addressed in the coming years.

  10. Advances in Bioprinting Technologies for Craniofacial Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Visscher, Dafydd O; Farré-Guasch, Elisabet; Helder, Marco N; Gibbs, Susan; Forouzanfar, Tymour; van Zuijlen, Paul P; Wolff, Jan

    2016-09-01

    Recent developments in craniofacial reconstruction have shown important advances in both the materials and methods used. While autogenous tissue is still considered to be the gold standard for these reconstructions, the harvesting procedure remains tedious and in many cases causes significant donor site morbidity. These limitations have subsequently led to the development of less invasive techniques such as 3D bioprinting that could offer possibilities to manufacture patient-tailored bioactive tissue constructs for craniofacial reconstruction. Here, we discuss the current technological and (pre)clinical advances of 3D bioprinting for use in craniofacial reconstruction and highlight the challenges that need to be addressed in the coming years. PMID:27113634

  11. Normal lid margin after eyelid reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cies, W A; Baylis, H I

    1977-04-01

    To prevent corneal damage, the central lid margin must have a normal skin-conjunctiva interface following the lid reconstruction. A two-step procedure may be employed: In the lower lid an initial Hughes reconstruction should be tried. If this is unacceptable, a subsequent block excision of the segment is performed. The important step in both phases is a thorough lateral cantholysis. In the upper lid, the central defect is immediately reconstructed by sliding the lateral lid remnant to the medial remnant. The resulting lateral defect is reconstructed with a Hughes procedure. In both cases, a physiologic lid margin is insured, because normal lid is sutured to normal lid.

  12. Uncertainty estimation in reconstructed deformable models

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, K.M.; Cunningham, G.S.; McKee, R.

    1996-12-31

    One of the hallmarks of the Bayesian approach to modeling is the posterior probability, which summarizes all uncertainties regarding the analysis. Using a Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique, it is possible to generate a sequence of objects that represent random samples drawn from the posterior distribution. We demonstrate this technique for reconstructions of two-dimensional objects from noisy projections taken from two directions. The reconstructed object is modeled in terms of a deformable geometrically-defined boundary with a constant interior density yielding a nonlinear reconstruction problem. We show how an MCMC sequence can be used to estimate uncertainties in the location of the edge of the reconstructed object.

  13. Reconstruction of Congenital Defects of the Vagina

    PubMed Central

    Eldor, Liron; Friedman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Congenital absence of the vagina is a relatively rare condition most commonly associated with Mayer-Rokitansky-Kuster-Hauser (MRKH) syndrome. Historically, several reconstructive techniques have been described to provide for functional vaginal reconstruction on these patients, both operative and nonoperative. Although there are many advantages and disadvantages of the various procedures, one experience with the use of split thickness skin grafts to reconstruct the vagina has produced acceptable functional results with limited donor site morbidity. Careful planning and timing of this form of reconstruction can produce predictable results in patients who are nearing sexual maturity. PMID:22547971

  14. Effect of concurrent mental nerve reconstruction at the same time as mandibular reconstruction using a fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Fumiaki; Ooatari, Miwako; Uehara, Miyuki; Takahashi, Yoshihiro; Kawano, Kenji

    2015-09-01

    The damage of inferior alveolar nerve causes some functional problem including numbness of lower lip and drooling. During segmental mandibulectomy, inferior alveolar nerve commonly resected, therefore, it is ideal to reconstruct the nerve to get better functional result. Sensory recovery was assessed after mandibular reconstruction using free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap in thirteen cases. In six cases, the mental nerve reconstruction was performed simultaneously, and in seven cases, the mental nerve reconstruction was not performed. In the case that the mental nerve was reconstructed simultaneously, unilateral mental nerve reconstruction was performed in five cases, and bilateral mental nerve reconstruction was performed in one cases. More than one year after the reconstruction, sensory recovery was assessed and compared between the group that the mental nerve was reconstructed and the group that was not reconstructed. Our results showed almost a normal sensory recovery of the lips on the reconstructed side more than one year after the reconstruction in reconstructed group. In contrast, sensory recovery was poor in non-reconstructed group and non-reconstructed side. These results showed that mental nerve reconstruction at the same time as mandibular reconstruction affects the postoperative mandibular function. The sural nerve can be harvested from the same donor site of the free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap and such mental nerve reconstruction with nerve grafting can be completed within an hour. Most cases of mandibular reconstruction using a free fibula osteoseptocutaneous flap transfer can therefore be candidates for mental nerve reconstruction at the time of mandibular reconstruction. PMID:26051850

  15. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    Finch, S.M.; McMakin, A.H.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The project is being managed and conducted by the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) under the direction of an independent Technical Steering Panel (TSP). The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon and Washington, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed, from release to impact on human (dose estimates): Source Terms; Environmental Transport; Environmental Monitoring Data; Demographics, Agriculture, Food Habits and; Environmental Pathways and Dose Estimates.

  16. Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction Project

    SciTech Connect

    McMakin, A.H.; Cannon, S.D.; Finch, S.M.

    1992-07-01

    The objective of the Hanford Environmental Dose Reconstruction (HEDR) Project is to estimate the radiation doses that individuals and populations could have received from nuclear operations at Hanford since 1944. The TSP consists of experts in environmental pathways, epidemiology, surface-water transport, ground-water transport, statistics, demography, agriculture, meteorology, nuclear engineering, radiation dosimetry, and cultural anthropology. Included are appointed technical members representing the states of Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, a representative of Native American tribes, and an individual representing the public. The project is divided into the following technical tasks. These tasks correspond to the path radionuclides followed from release to impact on humans (dose estimates): Source terms, environmental transport, environmental monitoring data, demography, food consumption, and agriculture, and environmental pathways and dose estimates. Progress is discussed.

  17. Reconstruction of nonlinear wave propagation

    DOEpatents

    Fleischer, Jason W; Barsi, Christopher; Wan, Wenjie

    2013-04-23

    Disclosed are systems and methods for characterizing a nonlinear propagation environment by numerically propagating a measured output waveform resulting from a known input waveform. The numerical propagation reconstructs the input waveform, and in the process, the nonlinear environment is characterized. In certain embodiments, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment facilitates determination of an unknown input based on a measured output. Similarly, knowledge of the characterized nonlinear environment also facilitates formation of a desired output based on a configurable input. In both situations, the input thus characterized and the output thus obtained include features that would normally be lost in linear propagations. Such features can include evanescent waves and peripheral waves, such that an image thus obtained are inherently wide-angle, farfield form of microscopy.

  18. Evolution of orthopaedic reconstructive care.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Mark E; Watson, J Tracy; Gaines, Robert J; O'Toole, Robert V

    2012-01-01

    The patterns and severity of injury sustained by service members have continuously evolved over the past 10 years of combat in Iraq and Afghanistan. The 2010 surge of combat troops into Afghanistan, combined with a transition to counterinsurgency tactics with an emphasis on dismounted operations, resulted in increased exposure of US service members to improvised explosive devices and a new pattern of injury termed dismounted complex blast injury. This constellation of injuries typically includes multiple extremity injuries, high bilateral transfemoral amputations, amputated or mangled upper extremities, open pelvis fractures, and injury to the perineal and/or genital regions. These polytraumatized patients frequently present with head, abdominal, and genitourinary injuries, as well. Traditional methods of reconstruction must be optimized because tissue availability may be limited.

  19. Bayesian tomographic reconstruction of microsystems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salem, Sofia Fekih; Vabre, Alexandre; Mohammad-Djafari, Ali

    2007-11-01

    The microtomography by X ray transmission plays an increasingly dominating role in the study and the understanding of microsystems. Within this framework, an experimental setup of high resolution X ray microtomography was developed at CEA-List to quantify the physical parameters related to the fluids flow in microsystems. Several difficulties rise from the nature of experimental data collected on this setup: enhanced error measurements due to various physical phenomena occurring during the image formation (diffusion, beam hardening), and specificities of the setup (limited angle, partial view of the object, weak contrast). To reconstruct the object we must solve an inverse problem. This inverse problem is known to be ill-posed. It therefore needs to be regularized by introducing prior information. The main prior information we account for is that the object is composed of a finite known number of different materials distributed in compact regions. This a priori information is introduced via a Gauss-Markov field for the contrast distributions with a hidden Potts-Markov field for the class materials in the Bayesian estimation framework. The computations are done by using an appropriate Markov Chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) technique. In this paper, we present first the basic steps of the proposed algorithms. Then we focus on one of the main steps in any iterative reconstruction method which is the computation of forward and adjoint operators (projection and backprojection). A fast implementation of these two operators is crucial for the real application of the method. We give some details on the fast computation of these steps and show some preliminary results of simulations.

  20. Digital reconstruction of optically-induced potentials.

    PubMed

    Barsi, Christopher; Fleischer, Jason W

    2009-12-01

    The holographic reconstruction of optically-induced objects typically assumes that the object is axially thin. Here, we demonstrate a simple approach that works for axially thick objects which evolve dynamically. Results are verified by reconstructing linear scattering experiments in a self-defocusing photorefractive crystal.

  1. Exploring the topology of dynamical reconstructions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garland, Joshua; Bradley, Elizabeth; Meiss, James D.

    2016-11-01

    Computing the state-space topology of a dynamical system from scalar data requires accurate reconstruction of those dynamics and construction of an appropriate simplicial complex from the results. The reconstruction process involves a number of free parameters and the computation of homology for a large number of simplices can be expensive. This paper is a study of how to compute the homology efficiently and effectively without a full (diffeomorphic) reconstruction. Using trajectories from the classic Lorenz system, we reconstruct the dynamics using the method of delays, then build a simplicial complex whose vertices are a small subset of the data: the "witness complex". Surprisingly, we find that the witness complex correctly resolves the homology of the underlying invariant set from noisy samples of that set even if the reconstruction dimension is well below the thresholds for assuring topological conjugacy between the true and reconstructed dynamics that are specified in the embedding theorems. We conjecture that this is because the requirements for reconstructing homology are less stringent: a homeomorphism is sufficient-as opposed to a diffeomorphism, as is necessary for the full dynamics. We provide preliminary evidence that a homeomorphism, in the form of a delay-coordinate reconstruction map, may exist at a lower dimension than that required to achieve an embedding.

  2. Some Factors Affecting Time Reversal Signal Reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prevorovsky, Z.; Kober, J.

    Time reversal (TR) ultrasonic signal processing is now broadly used in a variety of applications, and also in NDE/NDT field. TR processing is used e.g. for S/N ratio enhancement, reciprocal transducer calibration, location, identification, and reconstruction of unknown sources, etc. TR procedure in con-junction with nonlinear elastic wave spectroscopy NEWS is also useful for sensitive detection of defects (nonlinearity presence). To enlarge possibilities of acoustic emission (AE) method, we proposed the use of TR signal reconstruction ability for detected AE signals transfer from a structure with AE source onto a similar remote model of the structure (real or numerical), which allows easier source analysis under laboratory conditions. Though the TR signal reconstruction is robust regarding the system variations, some small differences and changes influence space-time TR focus and reconstruction quality. Experiments were performed on metallic parts of both simple and complicated geometry to examine effects of small changes of temperature or configuration (body shape, dimensions, transducers placement, etc.) on TR reconstruction quality. Results of experiments are discussed in this paper. Considering mathematical similarity between TR and Coda Wave Interferometry (CWI), prediction of signal reconstruction quality was possible using only the direct propagation. The results show how some factors like temperature or stress changes may deteriorate the TR reconstruction quality. It is also shown that sometimes the reconstruction quality is not enhanced using longer TR signal (S/N ratio may decrease).

  3. 40 CFR 60.488a - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Organic Chemicals Manufacturing Industry for Which Construction, Reconstruction, or Modification Commenced After November 7, 2006 § 60.488a Reconstruction. For the purposes of this subpart: (a) The cost of the... “fixed capital cost of the new components” or the “fixed capital costs that would be required...

  4. 40 CFR 60.706 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reconstruction. 60.706 Section 60.706 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF... Synthetic Organic Chemical Manufacturing Industry (SOCMI) Reactor Processes § 60.706 Reconstruction. (a)...

  5. 40 CFR 60.673 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reconstruction. 60.673 Section 60.673 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF....673 Reconstruction. (a) The cost of replacement of ore-contact surfaces on processing equipment...

  6. 40 CFR 60.673 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reconstruction. 60.673 Section 60.673 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF....673 Reconstruction. (a) The cost of replacement of ore-contact surfaces on processing equipment...

  7. 40 CFR 60.673 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reconstruction. 60.673 Section 60.673 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF....673 Reconstruction. (a) The cost of replacement of ore-contact surfaces on processing equipment...

  8. 40 CFR 60.673 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reconstruction. 60.673 Section 60.673 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF....673 Reconstruction. (a) The cost of replacement of ore-contact surfaces on processing equipment...

  9. 40 CFR 60.383 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Reconstruction. 60.383 Section 60.383 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF....383 Reconstruction. (a) The cost of replacement of ore-contact surfaces on processing equipment...

  10. 40 CFR 60.383 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reconstruction. 60.383 Section 60.383 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF....383 Reconstruction. (a) The cost of replacement of ore-contact surfaces on processing equipment...

  11. 40 CFR 60.383 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Reconstruction. 60.383 Section 60.383 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF....383 Reconstruction. (a) The cost of replacement of ore-contact surfaces on processing equipment...

  12. 40 CFR 60.383 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Reconstruction. 60.383 Section 60.383 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF....383 Reconstruction. (a) The cost of replacement of ore-contact surfaces on processing equipment...

  13. 40 CFR 60.383 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 7 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Reconstruction. 60.383 Section 60.383 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF....383 Reconstruction. (a) The cost of replacement of ore-contact surfaces on processing equipment...

  14. 40 CFR 60.673 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 6 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Reconstruction. 60.673 Section 60.673 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) AIR PROGRAMS (CONTINUED) STANDARDS OF....673 Reconstruction. (a) The cost of replacement of ore-contact surfaces on processing equipment...

  15. Innovations in diabetic foot reconstruction using supermicrosurgery.

    PubMed

    Suh, Hyun Suk; Oh, Tae Suk; Hong, Joon Pio

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of diabetic foot ulceration is complex with multiple factors involved, and it may often lead to limb amputation. Hence, a multidisciplinary approach is warranted to cover the spectrum of treatment for diabetic foot, but in complex wounds, surgical treatment is inevitable. Surgery may involve the decision to preserve the limb by reconstruction or to amputate it. Reconstruction involves preserving the limb with secure coverage. Local flaps usually are able to provide sufficient coverage for small or moderate sized wound, but for larger wounds, soft tissue coverage involves flaps that are distantly located from the wound. Reconstruction of distant flap usually involves microsurgery, and now, further innovative methods such as supermicrosurgery have further given complex wounds a better chance to be reconstructed and limbs salvaged. This article reviews the microsurgery involved in reconstruction and introduces the new method of supermicrosurgery.

  16. Virtual Surgical Planning for Orbital Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Susarla, Srinivas M.; Duncan, Katherine; Mahoney, Nicholas R.; Merbs, Shannath L.; Grant, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    The advent of computer-assisted technology has revolutionized planning for complex craniofacial operations, including orbital reconstruction. Orbital reconstruction is ideally suited for virtual planning, as it allows the surgeon to assess the bony anatomy and critical neurovascular structures within the orbit, and plan osteotomies, fracture reductions, and orbital implant placement with efficiency and predictability. In this article, we review the use of virtual surgical planning for orbital decompression, posttraumatic midface reconstruction, reconstruction of a two-wall orbital defect, and reconstruction of a large orbital floor defect with a custom implant. The surgeon managing orbital pathology and posttraumatic orbital deformities can benefit immensely from utilizing virtual planning for various types of orbital pathology. PMID:26692714

  17. Bayesian image reconstruction: Application to emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Nunez, J.; Llacer, J.

    1989-02-01

    In this paper we propose a Maximum a Posteriori (MAP) method of image reconstruction in the Bayesian framework for the Poisson noise case. We use entropy to define the prior probability and likelihood to define the conditional probability. The method uses sharpness parameters which can be theoretically computed or adjusted, allowing us to obtain MAP reconstructions without the problem of the grey'' reconstructions associated with the pre Bayesian reconstructions. We have developed several ways to solve the reconstruction problem and propose a new iterative algorithm which is stable, maintains positivity and converges to feasible images faster than the Maximum Likelihood Estimate method. We have successfully applied the new method to the case of Emission Tomography, both with simulated and real data. 41 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. High-resolution reconstruction for terahertz imaging.

    PubMed

    Xu, Li-Min; Fan, Wen-Hui; Liu, Jia

    2014-11-20

    We present a high-resolution (HR) reconstruction model and algorithms for terahertz imaging, taking advantage of super-resolution methodology and algorithms. The algorithms used include projection onto a convex sets approach, iterative backprojection approach, Lucy-Richardson iteration, and 2D wavelet decomposition reconstruction. Using the first two HR reconstruction methods, we successfully obtain HR terahertz images with improved definition and lower noise from four low-resolution (LR) 22×24 terahertz images taken from our homemade THz-TDS system at the same experimental conditions with 1.0 mm pixel. Using the last two HR reconstruction methods, we transform one relatively LR terahertz image to a HR terahertz image with decreased noise. This indicates potential application of HR reconstruction methods in terahertz imaging with pulsed and continuous wave terahertz sources.

  19. Individualized anatomic anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    van Eck, Carola F; Widhalm, Harrald; Murawski, Christopher; Fu, Freddie H

    2015-02-01

    Anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injuries are often seen in young participants in sports such as soccer, football, and basketball. Treatment options include conservative management as well as surgical intervention, with the goal of enabling the patient to return to cutting and pivoting sports and activities. Individualized anatomic ACL reconstruction is a surgical technique that tailors the procedure to the individual patient using preoperative measurements on plain radiographs and magnetic resonance imaging and intraoperative measurement to map the patients' native ACL anatomy in order to replicate it as closely as possible. Anatomic ACL reconstruction, therefore, is defined as reconstruction of the ACL to its native dimensions, collagen orientation, and insertion site. The surgical reconstruction is followed by a specific rehabilitation protocol that is designed to enable the patient to regain muscle strength and proprioception while facilitating healing of the reconstructed ACL prior to the patient's returning to sports activities.

  20. Electronic noise modeling in statistical iterative reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jingyan; Tsui, Benjamin M W

    2009-06-01

    We consider electronic noise modeling in tomographic image reconstruction when the measured signal is the sum of a Gaussian distributed electronic noise component and another random variable whose log-likelihood function satisfies a certain linearity condition. Examples of such likelihood functions include the Poisson distribution and an exponential dispersion (ED) model that can approximate the signal statistics in integration mode X-ray detectors. We formulate the image reconstruction problem as a maximum-likelihood estimation problem. Using an expectation-maximization approach, we demonstrate that a reconstruction algorithm can be obtained following a simple substitution rule from the one previously derived without electronic noise considerations. To illustrate the applicability of the substitution rule, we present examples of a fully iterative reconstruction algorithm and a sinogram smoothing algorithm both in transmission CT reconstruction when the measured signal contains additive electronic noise. Our simulation studies show the potential usefulness of accurate electronic noise modeling in low-dose CT applications.

  1. Maxillary reconstruction: Current concepts and controversies

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Subramania; Thankappan, Krishnakumar

    2014-01-01

    Maxillary reconstruction is still an evolving art when compared to the reconstruction of the mandible. The defects of maxilla apart from affecting the functions of the speech, swallowing and mastication also cause cosmetic disfigurement. Rehabilitation of the form and function in patients with maxillary defects is either by using an obturator prosthesis or by a surgical reconstruction. Literature is abundant with a variety of reconstructive methods. The classification systems are also varied, with no universal acceptance of any one of them. The oncologic safety of these procedures is still debated, and conclusive evidence in this regard has not emerged yet. Management of the orbit is also not yet addressed properly. Tissue engineering, that has been hyped to be one of the possible solutions for this vexing reconstructive problem, has not come out with reliable and reproducible results so far. This review article discusses the rationale and oncological safety of the reconstructing the maxillary defects, critically analyzes the classification systems, offers the different reconstructive methods and touches upon the controversies in this subject. The management of the retained and exenterated orbit associated with maxillectomy is reviewed. The surgical morbidity, complications and the recent advances in this field are also looked into. An algorithm, based on our experience, is presented. PMID:24987199

  2. Live ultrasound volume reconstruction using scout scanning

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Amelie; Lasso, Andras; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Ultrasound-guided interventions often necessitate scanning of deep-seated anatomical structures that may be hard to visualize. Visualization can be improved using reconstructed 3D ultrasound volumes. High-resolution 3D reconstruction of a large area during clinical interventions is challenging if the region of interest is unknown. We propose a two-stage scanning method allowing the user to perform quick low-resolution scouting followed by high-resolution live volume reconstruction. METHODS Scout scanning is accomplished by stacking 2D tracked ultrasound images into a low-resolution volume. Then, within a region of interest defined in the scout scan, live volume reconstruction can be performed by continuous scanning until sufficient image density is achieved. We implemented the workflow as a module of the open-source 3D Slicer application, within the SlicerIGT extension and building on the PLUS toolkit. RESULTS Scout scanning is performed in a few seconds using 3 mm spacing to allow region of interest definition. Live reconstruction parameters are set to provide good image quality (0.5 mm spacing, hole filling enabled) and feedback is given during live scanning by regularly updated display of the reconstructed volume. DISCUSSION Use of scout scanning may allow the physician to identify anatomical structures. Subsequent live volume reconstruction in a region of interest may assist in procedures such as targeting needle interventions or estimating brain shift during surgery. PMID:26005249

  3. Data-Parallel Octrees for Surface Reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kun Zhou; Minmin Gong; Xin Huang; Baining Guo

    2011-05-01

    We present the first parallel surface reconstruction algorithm that runs entirely on the GPU. Like existing implicit surface reconstruction methods, our algorithm first builds an octree for the given set of oriented points, then computes an implicit function over the space of the octree, and finally extracts an isosurface as a watertight triangle mesh. A key component of our algorithm is a novel technique for octree construction on the GPU. This technique builds octrees in real time and uses level-order traversals to exploit the fine-grained parallelism of the GPU. Moreover, the technique produces octrees that provide fast access to the neighborhood information of each octree node, which is critical for fast GPU surface reconstruction. With an octree so constructed, our GPU algorithm performs Poisson surface reconstruction, which produces high-quality surfaces through a global optimization. Given a set of 500 K points, our algorithm runs at the rate of about five frames per second, which is over two orders of magnitude faster than previous CPU algorithms. To demonstrate the potential of our algorithm, we propose a user-guided surface reconstruction technique which reduces the topological ambiguity and improves reconstruction results for imperfect scan data. We also show how to use our algorithm to perform on-the-fly conversion from dynamic point clouds to surfaces as well as to reconstruct fluid surfaces for real-time fluid simulation.

  4. Live ultrasound volume reconstruction using scout scanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, Amelie; Lasso, Andras; Ungi, Tamas; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2015-03-01

    Ultrasound-guided interventions often necessitate scanning of deep-seated anatomical structures that may be hard to visualize. Visualization can be improved using reconstructed 3D ultrasound volumes. High-resolution 3D reconstruction of a large area during clinical interventions is challenging if the region of interest is unknown. We propose a two-stage scanning method allowing the user to perform quick low-resolution scouting followed by high-resolution live volume reconstruction. Scout scanning is accomplished by stacking 2D tracked ultrasound images into a low-resolution volume. Then, within a region of interest defined in the scout scan, live volume reconstruction can be performed by continuous scanning until sufficient image density is achieved. We implemented the workflow as a module of the open-source 3D Slicer application, within the SlicerIGT extension and building on the PLUS toolkit. Scout scanning is performed in a few seconds using 3 mm spacing to allow region of interest definition. Live reconstruction parameters are set to provide good image quality (0.5 mm spacing, hole filling enabled) and feedback is given during live scanning by regularly updated display of the reconstructed volume. Use of scout scanning may allow the physician to identify anatomical structures. Subsequent live volume reconstruction in a region of interest may assist in procedures such as targeting needle interventions or estimating brain shift during surgery.

  5. Helical surface reconstruction based on CMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhikang; Zhu, Lianqing; Chen, Qingshan; Guo, Yangkuan

    2011-05-01

    The reconstruction of helical surface plays an important role in many engineering and scientific applications. This paper tends to establish an effective processing scheme of surface reconstruction of scatter 3D points, and make an in-depth exploration for the preprocessing technology of scatter points set and the algorithm of three-dimension model surface reconstruction. This paper has three main aspects: data acquisition, data preprocess and surface reconstruction. First, by comparing several measuring equipments, the screw parts are scanned via CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine). Initial 3D point clouds are obtained by setting the scanning route according to the shape of the targets. Second, Using "3σ" criteria point de-noising is applied to the initial data points. Then Heap Sort is used to sort these points, being convenient for saving data and reconstructing the surface. Third, this paper presents a surface reconstruction method based on triangulation algorithm. The triangular meshes are generated based on Delaunay triangulation technique in two dimensions. And Loop Subdivision is adopted in order to get manifold meshes. Finally the surface reconstruction of an involute worm and an Archimedes worm shows that this approach is feasible.

  6. Helical surface reconstruction based on CMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhikang; Zhu, Lianqing; Chen, Qingshan; Guo, Yangkuan

    2010-12-01

    The reconstruction of helical surface plays an important role in many engineering and scientific applications. This paper tends to establish an effective processing scheme of surface reconstruction of scatter 3D points, and make an in-depth exploration for the preprocessing technology of scatter points set and the algorithm of three-dimension model surface reconstruction. This paper has three main aspects: data acquisition, data preprocess and surface reconstruction. First, by comparing several measuring equipments, the screw parts are scanned via CMM (Coordinate Measuring Machine). Initial 3D point clouds are obtained by setting the scanning route according to the shape of the targets. Second, Using "3σ" criteria point de-noising is applied to the initial data points. Then Heap Sort is used to sort these points, being convenient for saving data and reconstructing the surface. Third, this paper presents a surface reconstruction method based on triangulation algorithm. The triangular meshes are generated based on Delaunay triangulation technique in two dimensions. And Loop Subdivision is adopted in order to get manifold meshes. Finally the surface reconstruction of an involute worm and an Archimedes worm shows that this approach is feasible.

  7. Carboniferous paleogeographic and paleoclimatic reconstructions

    SciTech Connect

    Scotese, C.R. . Dept. of Geology); Raymond, A. . Dept. Geology)

    1992-01-01

    The Carboniferous was an important transitional period in earth history. The Paleozoic oceans separating the continents of Gondwana, Laurentia, Baltica, Kazakhstan, and Siberia had closed by the late Carboniferous forming the late Paleozoic supercontinent of Pangea. Plate motions which appear to have been rapid during the Early Carboniferous (6--10 cm/yr), slowed to a temperature gradient increased as the Earth's climate changed from hot-house to ice-house conditions. Sea level, which stood high during the Early Carboniferous, fell as a result of continental collision and mountain-building, and then began to rise and fall rhythmically as the South Polar ice-cap waxed and waned. These environmental changes intersected important evolutionary events, namely, the explosive colonization of the emergent land areas by plants and the rise of terrestrial vertebrates. In this paper the authors present paleogeographic reconstructions for 6 intervals during the Carboniferous. These maps illustrate the latitudinal position of the continents deduced from paleomagnetic data and the distribution of climatically restricted lithofacies (coal, bauxite, evaporite, calcrete, and tillite), the inferred location of active plate boundaries, and the changing configuration of mountains, land, shallow seas, and deep ocean basins. For each of these paleogeographic maps a climatic simulation was run using the Parametric Climate Model. These simulations predict the distribution of high and low pressure cells, prevailing wind directions, pole-to-equator temperature gradient, relative wetness/dryness, as well as zones of coastal upwelling.

  8. High-Performance Phylogeny Reconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Tiffani L. Williams

    2004-11-10

    Under the Alfred P. Sloan Fellowship in Computational Biology, I have been afforded the opportunity to study phylogenetics--one of the most important and exciting disciplines in computational biology. A phylogeny depicts an evolutionary relationship among a set of organisms (or taxa). Typically, a phylogeny is represented by a binary tree, where modern organisms are placed at the leaves and ancestral organisms occupy internal nodes, with the edges of the tree denoting evolutionary relationships. The task of phylogenetics is to infer this tree from observations upon present-day organisms. Reconstructing phylogenies is a major component of modern research programs in many areas of biology and medicine, but it is enormously expensive. The most commonly used techniques attempt to solve NP-hard problems such as maximum likelihood and maximum parsimony, typically by bounded searches through an exponentially-sized tree-space. For example, there are over 13 billion possible trees for 13 organisms. Phylogenetic heuristics that quickly analyze large amounts of data accurately will revolutionize the biological field. This final report highlights my activities in phylogenetics during the two-year postdoctoral period at the University of New Mexico under Prof. Bernard Moret. Specifically, this report reports my scientific, community and professional activities as an Alfred P. Sloan Postdoctoral Fellow in Computational Biology.

  9. Advances in thermographic signal reconstruction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shepard, Steven M.; Frendberg Beemer, Maria

    2015-05-01

    Since its introduction in 2001, the Thermographic Signal Reconstruction (TSR) method has emerged as one of the most widely used methods for enhancement and analysis of thermographic sequences, with applications extending beyond industrial NDT into biomedical research, art restoration and botany. The basic TSR process, in which a noise reduced replica of each pixel time history is created, yields improvement over unprocessed image data that is sufficient for many applications. However, examination of the resulting logarithmic time derivatives of each TSR pixel replica provides significant insight into the physical mechanisms underlying the active thermography process. The deterministic and invariant properties of the derivatives have enabled the successful implementation of automated defect recognition and measurement systems. Unlike most approaches to analysis of thermography data, TSR does not depend on flawbackground contrast, so that it can also be applied to characterization and measurement of thermal properties of flaw-free samples. We present a summary of recent advances in TSR, a review of the underlying theory and examples of its implementation.

  10. Surgical Reconstruction of Radiation Injuries

    PubMed Central

    Fujioka, Masaki

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Patients with cancer receive benefits from radiation therapy; however, it may have adverse effects on normal tissue such as causing radiation-induced ulcer and osteoradionecrosis. The most reliable method to treat a radiation ulcer is wide excision of the affected tissue, followed by coverage with well-vascularized tissue. As usual, radiation-induced skin ulcers are due to therapeutic irradiation for residual cancer or lymph nodes; the locations of radiation ulcers are relatively limited, including the head, neck, chest wall, lumbar, groin, and sacral areas. Thus, suitable reconstructive methods vary according to functional and aesthetic conditions. I reviewed the practices and surgical results for radiation ulcers over the past 30 years, and present the recommended surgical methods for these hard-to-heal ulcers. Recent Advances: At a minimum, flaps are required to treat radiation ulcers. Surgeons can recommend earlier debridement, followed by immediate coverage with axial-pattern musculocutaneous and fasciocutaneous flaps. Free flaps are also a useful soft tissue coverage option. The choice of flap varies with the location and size of the wounds. Critical Issues: The most crucial procedure is the complete resection of the radiation-affected area, followed by coverage with well-vascularized tissue. Future Directions: Recent developments in perforator flap techniques, which are defined as flaps with a blood supply from isolated perforating vessels of a stem artery, have allowed the surgeons to successfully resurface these difficult wounds with reduced morbidity. PMID:24761342

  11. Reconstructing HST Images of Asteroids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Storrs, A. D.; Bank, S.; Gerhardt, H.; Makhoul, K.

    2003-12-01

    We present reconstructions of images of 22 large main belt asteroids that were observed by Hubble Space Telescope with the Wide-Field/Planetary cameras. All images were restored with the MISTRAL program (Mugnier, Fusco, and Conan 2003) at enhanced spatial resolution. This is possible thanks to the well-studied and stable point spread function (PSF) on HST. We present some modeling of this process and determine that the Strehl ratio for WF/PC (aberrated) images can be improved to 130 ratio of 80 We will report sizes, shapes, and albedos for these objects, as well as any surface features. Images taken with the WFPC-2 instrument were made in a variety of filters so that it should be possible to investigate changes in mineralogy across the surface of the larger asteroids in a manner similar to that done on 4 Vesta by Binzel et al. (1997). Of particular interest are a possible water of hydration feature on 1 Ceres, and the non-observation of a constriction or gap between the components of 216 Kleopatra. Reduction of this data was aided by grant HST-GO-08583.08A from the Space Telescope Science Institute. References: Mugnier, L.M., T. Fusco, and J.-M. Conan, 2003. JOSA A (submitted) Binzel, R.P., Gaffey, M.J., Thomas, P.C., Zellner, B.H., Storrs, A.D., and Wells, E.N. 1997. Icarus 128 pp. 95-103

  12. Reconstruction of the Genesis Entry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Desai, Prasun N.; Qualls, Garry D.; Schoenenberger, Mark

    2007-01-01

    An overview of the reconstruction analyses performed for the Genesis capsule entry is described. The results indicate that the actual entry prior to the drogue deployment failure was very close to the pre-entry predictions. The capsule landed 8.3 km south of the desired target at Utah Test and Training Range. Analysis on infrared video footage (obtained from the tracking stations) during the descent estimated the onset of the capsule tumble at Mach 0.9. Frequency analysis on the infrared video data indicates that the aerodynamics generated for the Genesis capsule reasonably predicted the drag and static stability. Observations of the heatshield support the pre-entry simulation estimates of a small hypersonic angles-of-attack, since there is very little, if any, charring of the shoulder region or the aftbody. Through this investigation, an overall assertion can be made that all the data gathered from the Genesis entry is consistent with flight performance that was close to the nominal preentry prediction. Consequently, the design principles and methodologies utilized for the flight dynamics, aerodynamics, and aerothermodynamics analyses have been corroborated.

  13. Osteogenic Scaffolds for Bone Reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ling-jiang; Liu, Ning; Liu, Qing; Jia, Lian-shun; Yuan, Wen

    2012-01-01

    Abstract A highly osteogenic hybrid bioabsorbable scaffold was developed for bone reconstruction/augmentation. Through the use of a solid free-form fabrication technology, a bioabsorbable polycaprolactone (PCL) cage scaffold with a desired size and shape was produced and then filled with osteogenic bone graft particles, that is, morselized autologous bone chips. A rabbit total lamina defect model was chosen to demonstrate its efficacy in regenerating bone with a complicated anatomic shape. Both iliac bone and morselized iliac bone grafts were used in this study for comparison purposes. Serum osteocalcin and collagen type I cross-linked C-terminal telopeptide (CTx) determination showed that active bone remodeling occurred after bone grafts were implanted. X-ray images showed that the bony defects were completely filled with bone mass in all the groups with bone grafts. However, biomechanical tests showed that only the iliac bone and hybrid scaffold groups could restore the mechanical properties to the normal level after 10 weeks of implantation. A histology study showed that both iliac and hybrid scaffold groups had extensive new bone formation, and no adhesion and fibrosis were found. These results indicated that this osteogenic hybrid scaffold can be a good alternative to autologous iliac bone, because it does not need a second iliac bone-harvesting surgery, and thus the morbidity and the possible infections that are often associated with the bone harvesting surgery can be avoided. PMID:23515416

  14. Reconstruction of complex cracks by exterior measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krutitskii, Pavel; Liu, Jijun; Sini, Mourad

    2008-11-01

    In this paper, we deal with the acoustic inverse scattering problem for reconstructing complex cracks from the far field map, which models the diffraction of waves by thin two-sided cylindrical screens. A complex crack is characterized by its shape, the type of boundary data and the boundary coefficients (surface impedance). We give explicit formulas which can be used to reconstruct the shape of the crack, distinguish its type of boundary conditions and reconstruct the possible material coefficients on it by using the far-field map. Some numerical examples are also presented. Similar results could be given using near field measurements.

  15. Reconstruction and Reinvention in Quantum Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Michael

    2015-10-01

    I consider the fact that there are a number of interesting ways to `reconstruct' quantum theory, and suggest that, very broadly speaking, a form of `instrumentalism' makes good sense of the situation. This view runs against some common wisdom, which dismisses instrumentalism as `cheap'. In contrast, I consider how an instrumentalist might think about the reconstruction theorems, and, having made a distinction between `reconstructing' quantum theory and `reinventing' quantum theory, I suggest that there is an adequate (not `cheap') instrumentalist approach to the theory (and to these theorems) that invokes both.

  16. Wavefront reconstruction from tangential and sagittal curvature.

    PubMed

    Canales, Javier; Barbero, Sergio; Portilla, Javier; López-Alonso, José Manuel

    2014-12-10

    In a previous contribution [Appl. Opt.51, 8599 (2012)], a coauthor of this work presented a method for reconstructing the wavefront aberration from tangential refractive power data measured using dynamic skiascopy. Here we propose a new regularized least squares method where the wavefront is reconstructed not only using tangential but also sagittal curvature data. We prove that our new method provides improved quality reconstruction for typical and also for highly aberrated wavefronts, under a wide range of experimental error levels. Our method may be applied to any type of wavefront sensor (not only dynamic skiascopy) able to measure either just tangential or tangential plus sagittal curvature data.

  17. Essentially nonoscillatory (ENO) reconstructions via extrapolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Suresh, Ambady; Jorgenson, Philip C. E.

    1995-01-01

    In this paper, the algorithm for determining the stencil of a one-dimensional Essentially Nonoscillatory (ENO) reconstruction scheme on a uniform grid is reinterpreted as being based on extrapolation. This view leads to another extension of ENO reconstruction schemes to two-dimensional unstructured triangular meshes. The key idea here is to select several cells of the stencil in one step based on extrapolation rather than one cell at a time. Numerical experiments confirm that the new scheme yields sharp nonoscillatory reconstructions and that it is about five times faster than previous schemes.

  18. The total nasal defect and reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cannady, Steven B; Cook, Ted A; Wax, Mark K

    2009-05-01

    The structures of the nose are arguably the most complex within the face to reconstitute when absent. Total nasal reconstruction has evolved to encompass advanced surgical techniques in an effort to achieve increasingly satisfactory cosmetic results while restoring nasal function that mimics the function of a patient's natural nose. In this article, the history of total nasal defects and their reconstruction, relevant nasal anatomy, etiologies of the defect, and the surgical approaches to reconstructing each of the three-layered structure of the nose (ie, nasal skin, cartilage/bone, and lining mucosa) are explored.

  19. Allograft safety in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven B; Sekiya, Jon K

    2007-10-01

    Allograft tissue seems to provide an excellent option for reconstruction of the ACL in the primary and revision setting. Although in general the risks of using allograft tissue in ACL reconstruction are low, the consequences of complications associated with disease or infection transmission or of recurrent instability secondary to graft failure are large. Surgeons should provide patients with the information available regarding allograft risks and should have thorough knowledge of the source and preparation of the grafts by their tissue bank before implantation for ACL reconstruction.

  20. Categorical aspects of reconstructing quantum theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lal, Raymond; Coecke, Bob

    2012-02-01

    We present steps towards a new understanding of reconstructions of quantum theory. Chiribella, D'Ariano, and Perinotti (CDP) have recently produced a fascinating reconstruction of the formalism of quantum theory, which brings to light its operational origins. We use parts of the formalism of categorical quantum mechanics to expose the underlying mathematical structures of information flow in the CDP reconstruction. Our results include an elegant relation between teleportation and local tomography, and an equivalence betweeen a purely category-theoretic description of the purification of a mixed state, and the purification axiom of CDP.

  1. Optimal reconstruction of images from localized phase.

    PubMed

    Urieli, S; Porat, M; Cohen, N

    1998-01-01

    The importance of localized phase in signal representation is investigated. The convergence rate of the POCS algorithm (projection onto convex sets) used for image reconstruction from spectral phase is defined and analyzed, and the characteristics of images optimally reconstructed from phase-only information are presented. It is concluded that images of geometric form are most efficiently reconstructed from their spectral phase, whereas images of symmetric form have the poorest convergence characteristics. The transition between the two extremes is shown to be continuous. The results provide a new approach and analysis of the previously reported advantages of the localized phase representation over the global approach, and suggest possible compression schemes.

  2. Material Interface Reconstruction in VisIt

    SciTech Connect

    Meredith, J S

    2005-01-27

    In this paper, we first survey a variety of approaches to material interface reconstruction and their applicability to visualization, and we investigate the details of the current reconstruction algorithm in the VisIt scientific analysis and visualization tool. We then provide a novel implementation of the original VisIt algorithm that makes use of a wide range of the finite element zoo during reconstruction. This approach results in dramatic improvements in quality and performance without sacrificing the strengths of the VisIt algorithm as it relates to visualization.

  3. Reconstruction and Visualization of Human Gastrointestinal Tract

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Rong-guo; Guo, Xu-dong; Xu, Changqing

    2012-01-01

    Background: Converting the two-dimensional (2D) cross-sectional photographs into an intuitive three-dimensional (3D) model is a basic task for medical imaging data for auxiliary disease-linked diagnosis purpose. Methods: Reconstruction and visualization process of gastrointestinal cross-sectional photographs includes image preparation, image registration, image segmentation, 3D surface-rendering reconstruction, and implementation of 3D digital visualization. Results: Using the visualization toolkit (VTK), we implemented 3D digital reconstruction and visualization of gastrointestinal tract, whose visualized model can be zoomed, paned, and rotated, including the stomach, the small intestine, and the large intestine. PMID:23675253

  4. Allograft safety in anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Cohen, Steven B; Sekiya, Jon K

    2007-10-01

    Allograft tissue seems to provide an excellent option for reconstruction of the ACL in the primary and revision setting. Although in general the risks of using allograft tissue in ACL reconstruction are low, the consequences of complications associated with disease or infection transmission or of recurrent instability secondary to graft failure are large. Surgeons should provide patients with the information available regarding allograft risks and should have thorough knowledge of the source and preparation of the grafts by their tissue bank before implantation for ACL reconstruction. PMID:17920955

  5. All-inside anterior cruciate ligament reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Blackman, Andrew J; Stuart, Michael J

    2014-10-01

    All-inside anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction has undergone a series of modifications over the past 20 years. Current techniques offer the advantages of improved cosmesis, less postoperative pain, decreased bone removal, and gracilis preservation. Few all-inside ACL reconstruction outcome studies are available; therefore, additional research is necessary to compare the results to conventional techniques. The purpose of this article is to review the evolution of all-inside ACL reconstruction, the advantages and disadvantages, our preferred technique, and clinical experience to date.

  6. Gating of the vertex somatosensory and auditory evoked potential P50 and the correlation to skin conductance orienting response in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Arnfred, S M; Eder, D N; Hemmingsen, R P; Glenthøj, B Y; Chen, A C

    2001-04-15

    A defect in auditory evoked potential (AEP) P50 gating supports the theory of information-processing deficits in schizophrenia. The relationship between gating of the mid-latency evoked potentials (EP) in the somatosensory and the auditory modalities has not been studied together before. In schizophrenia, we might expect the processing deficits to act on multiple modalities. We have examined the gating of median nerve somatosensory EP (SEP) following paired stimulation identical to the AEP P50 gating paradigm using interstimulus intervals (ISI) of 500, 750 and 1000 ms and the correlation of gating to the skin conductance orienting response (SCOR) in 20 healthy men. We measured mid-latency vertex components (SEP: P50, N65, P85 and N100; AEP: P30, N45, P50 and N80). The gating was most pronounced at ISI 500 ms where the SEP P50 and N100 gating were 0.59 and 0.37, respectively, as compared to a gating of 0.61 in P30, 0.33 in P50 and 0.45 in N80 in the AEP. Repetition effects in the two modalities were not correlated. AEP P50 gating was correlated to skin conductance level (SCL). The combination of recording repetition effects on the mid-latency EP in two modalities could provide a method for investigating if deficits of information processing in schizophrenia are cross-modal.

  7. Development and aging of superficial white matter myelin from young adulthood to old age: Mapping by vertex-based surface statistics (VBSS).

    PubMed

    Wu, Minjie; Kumar, Anand; Yang, Shaolin

    2016-05-01

    Superficial white matter (SWM) lies immediately beneath cortical gray matter and consists primarily of short association fibers. The characteristics of SWM and its development and aging were seldom examined in the literature and warrant further investigation. Magnetization transfer imaging is sensitive to myelin changes in the white matter. Using an innovative multimodal imaging analysis approach, vertex-based surface statistics (VBSS), the current study vertexwise mapped age-related changes of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in SWM from young adulthood to old age (30-85 years, N = 66). Results demonstrated regionally selective and temporally heterochronologic changes of SWM MTR with age, including (1) inverted U-shaped trajectories of SWM MTR in the rostral middle frontal, medial temporal, and temporoparietal regions, suggesting continuing myelination and protracted maturation till age 40-50 years and accelerating demyelination at age 60 and beyond, (2) linear decline of SWM MTR in the middle and superior temporal, and pericalcarine areas, indicating early maturation and less acceleration in age-related degeneration, and (3) no significant changes of SWM MTR in the primary motor, somatosensory and auditory regions, suggesting resistance to age-related deterioration. We did not observe similar patterns of changes in cortical thickness in our sample, suggesting the observed SWM MTR changes are not due to cortical atrophy. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1759-1769, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Asymptotic normalization coefficients (nuclear vertex constants) for p + 7Be → 8B and the direct 7Be( p, γ)8B astrophysical S factors at solar energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Igamov, S. B.; Yarmukhamedov, R.

    2008-10-01

    A new analysis of the precise experimental astrophysical S factors for the direct-capture reaction 7Be( p, γ)8B [A.J. Junghans et al., Phys. Rev. C 68, 065803 (2003) and L.T. Baby et al., Phys. Rev. C 67, 065805 (2003)] is carried out on the basis of a modified two-body potential approach in which the direct astrophysical S factor, S 17( E), is expressed in terms of the asymptotic normalization constants for p + 7Be → 8B and two additional conditions are involved to verify the peripheral character of the reaction under consideration. The Woods-Saxon potential form is used for the bound-( p + 7Be)-state wave function and for p 7Be-scattering wave function. New estimates are obtained for the “indirectly measured” values of the asymptotic normalization constants (the nuclear vertex constants) for the p + 7Be → 8B and S 17( E) at E ≤ 115 keV, including E = 0. These values of S 17( E) and asymptotic normalization constants have been used for obtaining the indirectly measured values of the s-wave average scattering length and the p-wave effective-range parameters for p 7Be scattering.

  9. Revealing changes in molecular composition of plant cell walls on the micron-level by Raman mapping and vertex component analysis (VCA).

    PubMed

    Gierlinger, Notburga

    2014-01-01

    At the molecular level the plant cell walls consist of a few nanometer thick semi-crystalline cellulose fibrils embedded in amorphous matrix polymers such as pectins, hemicelluloses, and lignins. The arrangement of these molecules within the cell wall in different plant tissues, cells and cell wall layers is of crucial importance for a better understanding and thus optimized utilization of plant biomass. During the last years Confocal Raman microscopy evolved as a powerful method in plant science by revealing the different molecules in context with the microstructure. In this study two-dimensional spectral maps have been acquired of micro-cross-sections of spruce (softwood) and beech (hardwood). Raman images have been derived by using univariate (band integration, height ratios) and multivariate methods [vertex component analysis (VCA)]. While univariate analysis only visualizes changes in selected band heights or areas, VCA separates anatomical regions and cell wall layers with the most different molecular structures. Beside visualization of the distinguished regions and features the underlying molecular structure can be derived based on the endmember spectra. VCA revealed that the lumen sided S3 layer has a similar molecular composition as the pit membrane, both revealing a clear change in lignin composition compared to all other cell wall regions. Within the S2 layer a lamellar structure was visualized, which was elucidated to derive from slight changes in lignin composition and content and might be due to successive but not uniform lignification during growth. PMID:25071792

  10. Development and aging of superficial white matter myelin from young adulthood to old age: Mapping by vertex-based surface statistics (VBSS).

    PubMed

    Wu, Minjie; Kumar, Anand; Yang, Shaolin

    2016-05-01

    Superficial white matter (SWM) lies immediately beneath cortical gray matter and consists primarily of short association fibers. The characteristics of SWM and its development and aging were seldom examined in the literature and warrant further investigation. Magnetization transfer imaging is sensitive to myelin changes in the white matter. Using an innovative multimodal imaging analysis approach, vertex-based surface statistics (VBSS), the current study vertexwise mapped age-related changes of magnetization transfer ratio (MTR) in SWM from young adulthood to old age (30-85 years, N = 66). Results demonstrated regionally selective and temporally heterochronologic changes of SWM MTR with age, including (1) inverted U-shaped trajectories of SWM MTR in the rostral middle frontal, medial temporal, and temporoparietal regions, suggesting continuing myelination and protracted maturation till age 40-50 years and accelerating demyelination at age 60 and beyond, (2) linear decline of SWM MTR in the middle and superior temporal, and pericalcarine areas, indicating early maturation and less acceleration in age-related degeneration, and (3) no significant changes of SWM MTR in the primary motor, somatosensory and auditory regions, suggesting resistance to age-related deterioration. We did not observe similar patterns of changes in cortical thickness in our sample, suggesting the observed SWM MTR changes are not due to cortical atrophy. Hum Brain Mapp 37:1759-1769, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26955787

  11. Dynamics and control at feedback vertex sets. II: a faithful monitor to determine the diversity of molecular activities in regulatory networks.

    PubMed

    Mochizuki, Atsushi; Fiedler, Bernold; Kurosawa, Gen; Saito, Daisuke

    2013-10-21

    Modern biology provides many networks describing regulations between many species of molecules. It is widely believed that the dynamics of molecular activities based on such regulatory networks are the origin of biological functions. However, we currently have a limited understanding of the relationship between the structure of a regulatory network and its dynamics. In this study we develop a new theory to provide an important aspect of dynamics from information of regulatory linkages alone. We show that the "feedback vertex set" (FVS) of a regulatory network is a set of "determining nodes" of the dynamics. The theory is powerful to study real biological systems in practice. It assures that (i) any long-term dynamical behavior of the whole system, such as steady states, periodic oscillations or quasi-periodic oscillations, can be identified by measurements of a subset of molecules in the network, and that (ii) the subset is determined from the regulatory linkage alone. For example, dynamical attractors possibly generated by a signal transduction network with 113 molecules can be identified by measurement of the activity of only 5 molecules, if the information on the network structure is correct. Our theory therefore provides a rational criterion to select key molecules to control a system. We also demonstrate that controlling the dynamics of the FVS is sufficient to switch the dynamics of the whole system from one attractor to others, distinct from the original.

  12. Defining event reconstruction of digital crime scenes.

    PubMed

    Carrier, Brian D; Spafford, Eugene H

    2004-11-01

    Event reconstruction plays a critical role in solving physical crimes by explaining why a piece of physical evidence has certain characteristics. With digital crimes, the current focus has been on the recognition and identification of digital evidence using an object's characteristics, but not on the identification of the events that caused the characteristics. This paper examines digital event reconstruction and proposes a process model and procedure that can be used for a digital crime scene. The model has been designed so that it can apply to physical crime scenes, can support the unique aspects of a digital crime scene, and can be implemented in software to automate part of the process. We also examine the differences between physical event reconstruction and digital event reconstruction. PMID:15568702

  13. Medial Patellofemoral Ligament Reconstruction: A Comprehensive Review

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Hee-June

    2015-01-01

    It has been suggested that in the majority of patellar dislocation cases, the medial patellofemoral ligament (MPFL) is disrupted with a high recurrence rate especially in female patients. Although MPFL tear is not the primary cause of instability, MPFL reconstruction is effective for stabilizing the knee and may alone prevent lateral patellar dislocation. There is limited but growing evidence that MPFL reconstruction for patellofemoral instability leads to excellent functional outcomes. Growing awareness of the biomechanical contribution of the MPFL has led to an upsurge in the publication of techniques and trials dealing with reconstructive techniques, warranting a review that includes the most recent evidence. The aim of this article was to review and summarize the recent literatures concerning MPFL reconstruction and provide a comprehensive review of previous studies ranging from basic science to current surgical techniques and results. PMID:26389065

  14. Image Reconstruction Using Analysis Model Prior.

    PubMed

    Han, Yu; Du, Huiqian; Lam, Fan; Mei, Wenbo; Fang, Liping

    2016-01-01

    The analysis model has been previously exploited as an alternative to the classical sparse synthesis model for designing image reconstruction methods. Applying a suitable analysis operator on the image of interest yields a cosparse outcome which enables us to reconstruct the image from undersampled data. In this work, we introduce additional prior in the analysis context and theoretically study the uniqueness issues in terms of analysis operators in general position and the specific 2D finite difference operator. We establish bounds on the minimum measurement numbers which are lower than those in cases without using analysis model prior. Based on the idea of iterative cosupport detection (ICD), we develop a novel image reconstruction model and an effective algorithm, achieving significantly better reconstruction performance. Simulation results on synthetic and practical magnetic resonance (MR) images are also shown to illustrate our theoretical claims. PMID:27379171

  15. Belief-propagation reconstruction for discrete tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouillart, E.; Krzakala, F.; Mézard, M.; Zdeborová, L.

    2013-03-01

    We consider the reconstruction of a two-dimensional discrete image from a set of tomographic measurements corresponding to the Radon projection. Assuming that the image has a structure where neighbouring pixels have a larger probability of taking the same value, we follow a Bayesian approach and introduce a fast message-passing reconstruction algorithm based on belief propagation. For numerical results, we specialize to the case of binary tomography. We test the algorithm on binary synthetic images with different length scales and compare our results against a more usual convex optimization approach. We investigate the reconstruction error as a function of the number of tomographic measurements, corresponding to the number of projection angles. The belief-propagation algorithm turns out to be more efficient than the convex-optimization algorithm, both in terms of recovery bounds for noise-free projections and reconstruction quality when moderate Gaussian noise is added to the projections.

  16. 40 CFR 60.733 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... § 60.733 Reconstruction. The cost of replacement of equipment subject to high temperatures and abrasion... facility” under § 60.15. Calciner and dryer equipment subject to high temperatures and abrasion are: end seals, flights, and refractory lining....

  17. 40 CFR 60.733 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... § 60.733 Reconstruction. The cost of replacement of equipment subject to high temperatures and abrasion... facility” under § 60.15. Calciner and dryer equipment subject to high temperatures and abrasion are: end seals, flights, and refractory lining....

  18. 40 CFR 60.733 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... § 60.733 Reconstruction. The cost of replacement of equipment subject to high temperatures and abrasion... facility” under § 60.15. Calciner and dryer equipment subject to high temperatures and abrasion are: end seals, flights, and refractory lining....

  19. 40 CFR 60.733 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... § 60.733 Reconstruction. The cost of replacement of equipment subject to high temperatures and abrasion... facility” under § 60.15. Calciner and dryer equipment subject to high temperatures and abrasion are: end seals, flights, and refractory lining....

  20. 40 CFR 60.733 - Reconstruction.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... § 60.733 Reconstruction. The cost of replacement of equipment subject to high temperatures and abrasion... facility” under § 60.15. Calciner and dryer equipment subject to high temperatures and abrasion are: end seals, flights, and refractory lining....