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Sample records for determine cleavage-site recognition

  1. Substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by a single-subunit protein-only RNase P

    PubMed Central

    Brillante, Nadia; Gößringer, Markus; Lindenhofer, Dominik; Toth, Ursula; Rossmanith, Walter; Hartmann, Roland K.

    2016-01-01

    RNase P is the enzyme that removes 5′ extensions from tRNA precursors. With its diversity of enzyme forms—either protein- or RNA-based, ranging from single polypeptides to multi-subunit ribonucleoproteins—the RNase P enzyme family represents a unique model system to compare the evolution of enzymatic mechanisms. Here we present a comprehensive study of substrate recognition and cleavage-site selection by the nuclear single-subunit proteinaceous RNase P PRORP3 from Arabidopsis thaliana. Compared to bacterial RNase P, the best-characterized RNA-based enzyme form, PRORP3 requires a larger part of intact tRNA structure, but little to no determinants at the cleavage site or interactions with the 5′ or 3′ extensions of the tRNA. The cleavage site depends on the combined dimensions of acceptor stem and T domain, but also requires the leader to be single-stranded. Overall, the single-subunit PRORP appears mechanistically more similar to the complex nuclear ribonucleoprotein enzymes than to the simpler bacterial RNase P. Mechanistic similarity or dissimilarity among different forms of RNase P thus apparently do not necessarily reflect molecular composition or evolutionary relationship. PMID:26896801

  2. Matrix metalloproteinase-1 cleavage site recognition and binding in full-length human type III collagen.

    PubMed

    Williams, Kim E; Olsen, David R

    2009-07-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are essential for normal collagen turnover, recovery from fibrosis, and vascular permeability. In fibrillar collagens, MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-13 cleave a specific glycine-isoleucine or glycine-leucine bond, despite the presence of this sequence in other parts of the protein. This cut site specificity has been hypothesized to arise from a unique, relaxed super-secondary structure in this area due to local hydroxyproline poor character. In this study we examined the mechanism of interaction and cleavage of human type III collagen by fibroblast MMP-1 by using a panel of recombinant human type III collagens (rhCIIIs) containing engineered sequences in the vicinity of the cleavage site. Native and recombinant type III collagens had similar biochemical and structural characteristics, as indicated by transmission electron microscopy, circular dichroism spectropolarimetry, melting temperature and hydroxyproline analysis. A single amino acid change at the I785 cleavage site to proline resulted in partial MMP-1 resistance, but cuts were found in novel sites in the original cleavage region. However, the replacement of five Y-position residues by proline in this region, regardless of I785 variation, conferred complete resistance to MMP-1, MMP-8, MMP-13, trypsin, and elastase. MMP-1 had a decreased specific activity towards and reduced cleavage rate of rhCIII I785P but a K(m) similar to wild-type. Despite the reductions in protease sensitivity, MMP-1 bound to all of the engineered rhCIIIs with comparable affinity, indicating that MMP-1 binding is not sufficient for cleavage. The relaxed tertiary structure in the MMP cleavage region may permit local collagen unwinding by MMP-1 that enables site-specific proteolysis.

  3. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array*

    PubMed Central

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-01-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca2+-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10′ of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. The kcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5–1,710 M−1s−1. Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and −2 with a similar kcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5′. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P′-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achieved kcat/Km prediction with r = 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3′, and P4′ sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our

  4. Predictions of Cleavability of Calpain Proteolysis by Quantitative Structure-Activity Relationship Analysis Using Newly Determined Cleavage Sites and Catalytic Efficiencies of an Oligopeptide Array.

    PubMed

    Shinkai-Ouchi, Fumiko; Koyama, Suguru; Ono, Yasuko; Hata, Shoji; Ojima, Koichi; Shindo, Mayumi; duVerle, David; Ueno, Mika; Kitamura, Fujiko; Doi, Naoko; Takigawa, Ichigaku; Mamitsuka, Hiroshi; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki

    2016-04-01

    Calpains are intracellular Ca(2+)-regulated cysteine proteases that are essential for various cellular functions. Mammalian conventional calpains (calpain-1 and calpain-2) modulate the structure and function of their substrates by limited proteolysis. Thus, it is critically important to determine the site(s) in proteins at which calpains cleave. However, the calpains' substrate specificity remains unclear, because the amino acid (aa) sequences around their cleavage sites are very diverse. To clarify calpains' substrate specificities, 84 20-mer oligopeptides, corresponding to P10-P10' of reported cleavage site sequences, were proteolyzed by calpains, and the catalytic efficiencies (kcat/Km) were globally determined by LC/MS. This analysis revealed 483 cleavage site sequences, including 360 novel ones. Thekcat/Kms for 119 sites ranged from 12.5-1,710 M(-1)s(-1) Although most sites were cleaved by both calpain-1 and -2 with a similarkcat/Km, sequence comparisons revealed distinct aa preferences at P9-P7/P2/P5'. The aa compositions of the novel sites were not statistically different from those of previously reported sites as a whole, suggesting calpains have a strict implicit rule for sequence specificity, and that the limited proteolysis of intact substrates is because of substrates' higher-order structures. Cleavage position frequencies indicated that longer sequences N-terminal to the cleavage site (P-sites) were preferred for proteolysis over C-terminal (P'-sites). Quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) analyses using partial least-squares regression and >1,300 aa descriptors achievedkcat/Kmprediction withr= 0.834, and binary-QSAR modeling attained an 87.5% positive prediction value for 132 reported calpain cleavage sites independent of our model construction. These results outperformed previous calpain cleavage predictors, and revealed the importance of the P2, P3', and P4' sites, and P1-P2 cooperativity. Furthermore, using our binary-QSAR model

  5. Determination of the protease cleavage site repertoire—The RNase H but not the RT domain is essential for foamy viral protease activity

    SciTech Connect

    Spannaus, Ralf; Bodem, Jochen

    2014-04-15

    In contrast to orthoretroviruses, the foamy virus protease is only active as a protease-reverse transcriptase fusion protein and requires viral RNA for activation. Maturation of foamy viral proteins seems to be restricted to a single cleavage site in Gag and Pol. We provide evidence that unprocessed Gag is required for optimal infectivity, which is unique among retroviruses. Analyses of the cleavage site sequences of the Gag and Pol cleavage sites revealed a high similarity compared to those of Lentiviruses. We show that positions P2' and P2 are invariant and that Gag and Pol cleavage sites are processed with similar efficiencies. The RNase H domain is essential for protease activity, but can functionally be substituted by RNase H domains of other retroviruses. Thus, the RNase H domain might be involved in the stabilization of the protease dimer, while the RT domain is essential for RNA dependent protease activation. - Highlights: • Unprocessed Gag is required for optimal infectivity of foamy viruses. • Positions P2 and P2' are invariant in the foamy viral cleavage sites. • The RNaseH domain is essential for protease activity. • The RNaseH domains of other retroviruses support foamy viral protease activity.

  6. Fluorescence Based Primer Extension Technique to Determine Transcriptional Starting Points and Cleavage Sites of RNases In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Schuster, Christopher F.; Bertram, Ralph

    2014-01-01

    Fluorescence based primer extension (FPE) is a molecular method to determine transcriptional starting points or processing sites of RNA molecules. This is achieved by reverse transcription of the RNA of interest using specific fluorescently labeled primers and subsequent analysis of the resulting cDNA fragments by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Simultaneously, a traditional Sanger sequencing reaction is run on the gel to map the ends of the cDNA fragments to their exact corresponding bases. In contrast to 5'-RACE (Rapid Amplification of cDNA Ends), where the product must be cloned and multiple candidates sequenced, the bulk of cDNA fragments generated by primer extension can be simultaneously detected in one gel run. In addition, the whole procedure (from reverse transcription to final analysis of the results) can be completed in one working day. By using fluorescently labeled primers, the use of hazardous radioactive isotope labeled reagents can be avoided and processing times are reduced as products can be detected during the electrophoresis procedure. In the following protocol, we describe an in vivo fluorescent primer extension method to reliably and rapidly detect the 5' ends of RNAs to deduce transcriptional starting points and RNA processing sites (e.g., by toxin-antitoxin system components) in S. aureus, E. coli and other bacteria. PMID:25406941

  7. Sensitivity of hepatitis C virus RNA to the antiviral enzyme ribonuclease L is determined by a subset of efficient cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Han, Jian-Qiu; Wroblewski, Gerggory; Xu, Zan; Silverman, Robert H; Barton, David J

    2004-11-01

    Ribonuclease L (RNase L) cleaves RNA predominantly at single-stranded UA and UU dinucleotides. Intriguingly, hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNAs have a paucity of UA and UU dinucleotides, and relatively interferon (IFN)-resistant strains have fewer UA and UU dinucleotides than do more IFN-sensitive strains. In this study, we found that contextual features of UA and UU dinucleotides dramatically affected the efficiency of RNase L cleavage in HCV RNA. HCV genotype la RNA was cleaved by RNase L into fragments 200-1000 bases in length, consistent with 10-50 RNase L cleavage sites within the 9650-base long viral RNA. Using primer extension, we found that HCV RNA structures with multiple single-stranded UA and UU dinucleotides were cleaved most efficiently by RNase L. UA and UU dinucleotides with 3' proximal C or G residues were cleaved infrequently, whereas UA and UU dinucleotides within dsRNA structures were not cleaved. 5'-GUAC-3' and 5'-CUUC-3' were particularly unfavorable contexts for cleavage by RNase L. More than 60% of the UA and UU dinucleotides in HCV la RNA were not cleaved by RNase L because of these contextual features. The 10-30 most efficiently cleaved sites were responsible for approximately 50%-85% of all RNase L cleavage events. Our data indicate that a relatively small number of the UA and UU dinucleotides in HCV RNA mediate the overall sensitivity of HCV RNA to cleavage by RNase L.

  8. Dataset of cocoa aspartic protease cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Janek, Katharina; Niewienda, Agathe; Wöstemeyer, Johannes; Voigt, Jürgen

    2016-09-01

    The data provide information in support of the research article, "The cleavage specificity of the aspartic protease of cocoa beans involved in the generation of the cocoa-specific aroma precursors" (Janek et al., 2016) [1]. Three different protein substrates were partially digested with the aspartic protease isolated from cocoa beans and commercial pepsin, respectively. The obtained peptide fragments were analyzed by matrix-assisted laser-desorption/ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF-MS/MS) and identified using the MASCOT server. The N- and C-terminal ends of the peptide fragments were used to identify the corresponding in-vitro cleavage sites by comparison with the amino acid sequences of the substrate proteins. The same procedure was applied to identify the cleavage sites used by the cocoa aspartic protease during cocoa fermentation starting from the published amino acid sequences of oligopeptides isolated from fermented cocoa beans. PMID:27508221

  9. KLEAT: CLEAVAGE SITE ANALYSIS OF TRANSCRIPTOMES*

    PubMed Central

    Birol, Inanç; Raymond, Anthony; Chiu, Readman; Nip, Ka Ming; Jackman, Shaun D; Kreitzman, Maayan; Docking, T Roderick; Ennis, Catherine A; Robertson, A Gordon; Karsan, Aly

    2015-01-01

    In eukaryotic cells, alternative cleavage of 3’ untranslated regions (UTRs) can affect transcript stability, transport and translation. For polyadenylated (poly(A)) transcripts, cleavage sites can be characterized with short-read sequencing using specialized library construction methods. However, for large-scale cohort studies as well as for clinical sequencing applications, it is desirable to characterize such events using RNA-seq data, as the latter are already widely applied to identify other relevant information, such as mutations, alternative splicing and chimeric transcripts. Here we describe KLEAT, an analysis tool that uses de novo assembly of RNA-seq data to characterize cleavage sites on 3’ UTRs. We demonstrate the performance of KLEAT on three cell line RNA-seq libraries constructed and sequenced by the ENCODE project, and assembled using Trans-ABySS. Validating the KLEAT predictions with matched ENCODE RNA-seq and RNA-PET libraries, we show that the tool has over 90% positive predictive value when there are at least three RNA-seq reads supporting a poly(A) tail and requiring at least three RNA-PET reads mapping within 100 nucleotides as validation. We also compare the performance of KLEAT with other popular RNA-seq analysis pipelines that reconstruct 3’ UTR ends, and show that it performs favourably, based on an ROC-like curve. PMID:25592595

  10. Prediction of Signal Peptide Cleavage Sites with Subsite-Coupled and Template Matching Fusion Algorithm.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Shao-Wu; Zhang, Ting-He; Zhang, Jun-Nan; Huang, Yufei

    2014-03-01

    Fast and effective prediction of signal peptides (SP) and their cleavage sites is of great importance in computational biology. The approaches developed to predict signal peptide can be roughly divided into machine learning based, and sliding windows based. In order to further increase the prediction accuracy and coverage of organism for SP cleavage sites, we propose a novel method for predicting SP cleavage sites called Signal-CTF that utilizes machine learning and sliding windows, and is designed for N-termial secretory proteins in a large variety of organisms including human, animal, plant, virus, bacteria, fungi and archaea. Signal-CTF consists of three distinct elements: (1) a subsite-coupled and regularization function with a scaled window of fixed width that selects a set of candidates of possible secretion-cleavable segment for a query secretory protein; (2) a sum fusion system that integrates the outcomes from aligning the cleavage site template sequence with each of the aforementioned candidates in a scaled window of fixed width to determine the best candidate cleavage sites for the query secretory protein; (3) a voting system that identifies the ultimate signal peptide cleavage site among all possible results derived from using scaled windows of different width. When compared with Signal-3L and SignalP 4.0 predictors, the prediction accuracy of Signal-CTF is 4-12 %, 10-25 % higher than that of Signal-3L for human, animal and eukaryote, and SignalP 4.0 for eukaryota, Gram-positive bacteria and Gram-negative bacteria, respectively. Comparing with PRED-SIGNAL and SignalP 4.0 predictors on the 32 archaea secretory proteins of used in Bagos's paper, the prediction accuracy of Signal-CTF is 12.5 %, 25 % higher than that of PRED-SIGNAL and SignalP 4.0, respectively. The predicting results of several long signal peptides show that the Signal-CTF can better predict cleavage sites for long signal peptides than SignalP, Phobius, Philius, SPOCTOPUS, Signal

  11. Characterization of a Non-Canonical Signal Peptidase Cleavage Site in a Replication Protein from Tomato Ringspot Virus

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Ting; Chisholm, Joan

    2016-01-01

    The NTB-VPg polyprotein from tomato ringspot virus is an integral membrane replication protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes. A signal peptidase (SPase) cleavage was previously detected in the C-terminal region of NTB-VPg downstream of a 14 amino acid (aa)-long hydrophobic region (termed TM2). However, the exact location of the cleavage site was not determined. Using in vitro translation assays, we show that the SPase cleavage site is conserved in the NTB-VPg protein from various ToRSV isolates, although the rate of cleavage varies from one isolate to another. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage sites of two ToRSV isolates allowed the identification of sequences that affect cleavage efficiency. We also present evidence that SPase cleavage in the ToRSV-Rasp2 isolate occurs within a GAAGG sequence likely after the AAG (GAAG/G). Mutation of a downstream MAAV sequence to AAAV resulted in SPase cleavage at both the natural GAAG/G and the mutated AAA/V sequences. Given that there is a distance of seven aa between the two cleavage sites, this indicates that there is flexibility in the positioning of the cleavage sites relative to the inner surface of the membrane and the SPase active site. SPase cleavage sites are typically located 3–7 aa downstream of the hydrophobic region. However, the NTB-VPg GAAG/G cleavage site is located 17 aa downstream of the TM2 hydrophobic region, highlighting unusual features of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage site. A putative 11 aa-long amphipathic helix was identified immediately downstream of the TM2 region and five aa upstream of the GAAG/G cleavage site. Based on these results, we present an updated topology model in which the hydrophobic and amphipathic domains form a long tilted helix or a bent helix in the membrane lipid bilayer, with the downstream cleavage site(s) oriented parallel to the membrane inner surface. PMID:27589230

  12. Characterization of a Non-Canonical Signal Peptidase Cleavage Site in a Replication Protein from Tomato Ringspot Virus.

    PubMed

    Wei, Ting; Chisholm, Joan; Sanfaçon, Hélène

    2016-01-01

    The NTB-VPg polyprotein from tomato ringspot virus is an integral membrane replication protein associated with endoplasmic reticulum membranes. A signal peptidase (SPase) cleavage was previously detected in the C-terminal region of NTB-VPg downstream of a 14 amino acid (aa)-long hydrophobic region (termed TM2). However, the exact location of the cleavage site was not determined. Using in vitro translation assays, we show that the SPase cleavage site is conserved in the NTB-VPg protein from various ToRSV isolates, although the rate of cleavage varies from one isolate to another. Systematic site-directed mutagenesis of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage sites of two ToRSV isolates allowed the identification of sequences that affect cleavage efficiency. We also present evidence that SPase cleavage in the ToRSV-Rasp2 isolate occurs within a GAAGG sequence likely after the AAG (GAAG/G). Mutation of a downstream MAAV sequence to AAAV resulted in SPase cleavage at both the natural GAAG/G and the mutated AAA/V sequences. Given that there is a distance of seven aa between the two cleavage sites, this indicates that there is flexibility in the positioning of the cleavage sites relative to the inner surface of the membrane and the SPase active site. SPase cleavage sites are typically located 3-7 aa downstream of the hydrophobic region. However, the NTB-VPg GAAG/G cleavage site is located 17 aa downstream of the TM2 hydrophobic region, highlighting unusual features of the NTB-VPg SPase cleavage site. A putative 11 aa-long amphipathic helix was identified immediately downstream of the TM2 region and five aa upstream of the GAAG/G cleavage site. Based on these results, we present an updated topology model in which the hydrophobic and amphipathic domains form a long tilted helix or a bent helix in the membrane lipid bilayer, with the downstream cleavage site(s) oriented parallel to the membrane inner surface. PMID:27589230

  13. CASPASE-1 RECOGNIZES EXTENDED CLEAVAGE SITES IN ITS NATURAL SUBSTRATES

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jerry; Yin, Ying; Mai, Jietang; Xiong, Xinyu; Pansuria, Meghana; Liu, Jingshan; Maley, Erin; Saqib, Najam Us; Wang, Hong; Yang, Xiao-Feng

    2010-01-01

    Objective The preferred amino acids in the proteolytic sites have been considered to be similar between caspase-1 and caspase-9, which do not support their differential functions in inflammatory pyroptosis and apoptosis. We attempted to solve this problem. Methods We analyzed the flanking 20 amino acid residues in the cleavage sites in 34 caspase-1 and 11 capase-9 experimentally identified substrates. Results This study has made the following findings: first, we verified that caspase-1 and caspase-9 shared 100% aspartic acid in the P1 position. However, the structures in the cleavage sites of most caspase-1 substrates are different from that of caspase-9 substrates in the following three aspects, a) the amino acid residues with the statistically high frequencies; b) the hydrophobic amino acid occurrence frequencies; and c) the charged amino acid occurrence frequencies; second, the amino acid pairs P1-P1′ are different; third, our identified cleavage site patterns are useful in the prediction for the 91.4% cleavage sites of 35 new caspase-1 substrates. Conclusion Since most caspase-1 substrates are involved in vascular function, inflammation and atherogenesis, our novel structural patterns for the caspases’ substrates are significant in developing new diagnostics and therapeutics. PMID:20060974

  14. Identification of cleavage sites and substrate proteins for two mitochondrial intermediate peptidases in Arabidopsis thaliana

    PubMed Central

    Carrie, Chris; Venne, A. Saskia; Zahedi, René P.; Soll, Jürgen

    2015-01-01

    Most mitochondrial proteins contain an N-terminal targeting signal that is removed by specific proteases following import. In plant mitochondria, only mitochondrial processing peptidase (MPP) has been characterized to date. Therefore, we sought to determine the substrates and cleavage sites of the Arabidopsis thaliana homologues to the yeast Icp55 and Oct1 proteins, using the newly developed ChaFRADIC method for N-terminal protein sequencing. We identified 88 and seven putative substrates for Arabidopsis ICP55 and OCT1, respectively. It was determined that the Arabidopsis ICP55 contains an almost identical cleavage site to that of Icp55 from yeast. However, it can also remove a far greater range of amino acids. The OCT1 substrates from Arabidopsis displayed no consensus cleavage motif, and do not contain the classical –10R motif identified in other eukaryotes. Arabidopsis OCT1 can also cleave presequences independently, without the prior cleavage of MPP. It was concluded that while both OCT1 and ICP55 were probably acquired early on in the evolution of mitochondria, their substrate profiles and cleavage sites have either remained very similar or diverged completely. PMID:25732537

  15. 3C-like protease of rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus: identification of cleavage sites in the ORF1 polyprotein and analysis of cleavage specificity.

    PubMed Central

    Wirblich, C; Sibilia, M; Boniotti, M B; Rossi, C; Thiel, H J; Meyers, G

    1995-01-01

    Rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus, a positive-stranded RNA virus of the family Caliciviridae, encodes a trypsin-like cysteine protease as part of a large polyprotein. Upon expression in Escherichia coli, the protease releases itself from larger precursors by proteolytic cleavages at its N and C termini. Both cleavage sites were determined by N-terminal sequence analysis of the cleavage products. Cleavage at the N terminus of the protease occurred with high efficiency at an EG dipeptide at positions 1108 and 1109. Cleavage at the C terminus of the protease occurred with low efficiency at an ET dipeptide at positions 1251 and 1252. To study the cleavage specificity of the protease, amino acid substitutions were introduced at the P2, P1, and P1' positions at the cleavage site at the N-terminal boundary of the protease. This analysis showed that the amino acid at the P1 position is the most important determinant for substrate recognition. Only glutamic acid, glutamine, and aspartic acid were tolerated at this position. At the P1' position, glycine, serine, and alanine were the preferred substrates of the protease, but a number of amino acids with larger side chains were also tolerated. Substitutions at the P2 position had only little effect on the cleavage efficiency. Cell-free expression of the C-terminal half of the ORF1 polyprotein showed that the protease catalyzes cleavage at the junction of the RNA polymerase and the capsid protein. An EG dipeptide at positions 1767 and 1768 was identified as the putative cleavage site. Our data show that rabbit hemorrhagic disease virus encodes a trypsin-like cysteine protease that is similar to 3C proteases with regard to function and specificity but is more similar to 2A proteases with regard to size. PMID:7474137

  16. Mapping Homing Endonuclease Cleavage Sites Using In Vitro Generated Protein

    PubMed Central

    Belfort, Marlene

    2015-01-01

    Mapping the precise position of endonucleolytic cleavage sites is a fundamental experimental technique used to describe the function of a homing endonuclease. However, these proteins are often recalcitrant to cloning and over-expression in biological systems because of toxicity induced by spurious DNA cleavage events. In this chapter we outline the steps to successfully express a homing endonuclease in vitro and use this product in nucleotide-resolution cleavage assays. PMID:24510259

  17. Processing of peptide and hormone precursors at the dibasic cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Rholam, Mohamed; Fahy, Christine

    2009-07-01

    Many functionally important cellular peptides and proteins, including hormones, neuropeptides, and growth factors, are synthesized as inactive precursor polypeptides, which require post-translational proteolytic processing to become biologically active polypeptides. This is achieved by the action of a relatively small number of proteases that belong to a family of seven subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (PCs) including furin. In view of this, this review focuses on the importance of privileged secondary structures and of given amino acid residues around basic cleavage sites in substrate recognition by these endoproteases. In addition to their participation in normal cell functions, PCs are crucial for the initiation and progress of many important diseases. Hence, these proteases constitute potential drug targets in medicine. Accordingly, this review also discusses the approaches used to shed light on the cleavage preference and the substrate specificity of the PCs, a prerequisite to select which PCs are promising drug targets in each disease. PMID:19300906

  18. Processing of peptide and hormone precursors at the dibasic cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Rholam, Mohamed; Fahy, Christine

    2009-07-01

    Many functionally important cellular peptides and proteins, including hormones, neuropeptides, and growth factors, are synthesized as inactive precursor polypeptides, which require post-translational proteolytic processing to become biologically active polypeptides. This is achieved by the action of a relatively small number of proteases that belong to a family of seven subtilisin-like proprotein convertases (PCs) including furin. In view of this, this review focuses on the importance of privileged secondary structures and of given amino acid residues around basic cleavage sites in substrate recognition by these endoproteases. In addition to their participation in normal cell functions, PCs are crucial for the initiation and progress of many important diseases. Hence, these proteases constitute potential drug targets in medicine. Accordingly, this review also discusses the approaches used to shed light on the cleavage preference and the substrate specificity of the PCs, a prerequisite to select which PCs are promising drug targets in each disease.

  19. Sequence motif upstream of the Hendra virus fusion protein cleavage site is not sufficient to promote efficient proteolytic processing

    SciTech Connect

    Craft, Willie Warren; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis . E-mail: rdutc2@uky.edu

    2005-10-10

    The Hendra virus fusion (HeV F) protein is synthesized as a precursor, F{sub 0}, and proteolytically cleaved into the mature F{sub 1} and F{sub 2} heterodimer, following an HDLVDGVK{sub 109} motif. This cleavage event is required for fusogenic activity. To determine the amino acid requirements for processing of the HeV F protein, we constructed multiple mutants. Individual and simultaneous alanine substitutions of the eight residues immediately upstream of the cleavage site did not eliminate processing. A chimeric SV5 F protein in which the furin site was substituted for the VDGVK{sub 109} motif of the HeV F protein was not processed but was expressed on the cell surface. Another chimeric SV5 F protein containing the HDLVDGVK{sub 109} motif of the HeV F protein underwent partial cleavage. These data indicate that the upstream region can play a role in protease recognition, but is neither absolutely required nor sufficient for efficient processing of the HeV F protein.

  20. Specific cleavage sites of Nef proteins from human immunodeficiency virus types 1 and 2 for the viral proteases.

    PubMed Central

    Schorr, J; Kellner, R; Fackler, O; Freund, J; Konvalinka, J; Kienzle, N; Kräusslich, H G; Mueller-Lantzsch, N; Kalbitzer, H R

    1996-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2) Nef is proteolytically cleaved by the HIV-2-encoded protease. The proteolysis is not influenced by the absence or presence of the N-terminal myristoylation. The main cleavage site is located between residues 39 and 40, suggesting a protease recognition sequence, GGEY-SQFQ. As observed previously for Nef protein from HIV-1, a large, stable core domain with an apparent molecular mass of 30 kDa is produced by the proteolytic activity. Cleavage of Nef from HIV-1 in two domains by its own protease or the protease from HIV-2 is also independent of Nef myristoylation. However, processing of HIV-1 Nef by the HIV-2 protease is less selective than that by the HIV-1 protease: the obtained core fragment is heterogeneous at its N terminus and has an additional cleavage site between amino acids 99 and 100. Preliminary experiments suggest that the full-length Nef of HIV-2 and the core domain are part of the HIV-2 particles, analogous to the situation reported recently for HIV-1. PMID:8971042

  1. Evolutionarily distinct bacteriophage endolysins featuring conserved peptidoglycan cleavage sites protect mice from MRSA infection

    PubMed Central

    Schmelcher, Mathias; Shen, Yang; Nelson, Daniel C.; Eugster, Marcel R.; Eichenseher, Fritz; Hanke, Daniela C.; Loessner, Martin J.; Dong, Shengli; Pritchard, David G.; Lee, Jean C.; Becker, Stephen C.; Foster-Frey, Juli; Donovan, David M.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives In the light of increasing drug resistance in Staphylococcus aureus, bacteriophage endolysins [peptidoglycan hydrolases (PGHs)] have been suggested as promising antimicrobial agents. The aim of this study was to determine the antimicrobial activity of nine enzymes representing unique homology groups within a diverse class of staphylococcal PGHs. Methods PGHs were recombinantly expressed, purified and tested for staphylolytic activity in multiple in vitro assays (zymogram, turbidity reduction assay and plate lysis) and against a comprehensive set of strains (S. aureus and CoNS). PGH cut sites in the staphylococcal peptidoglycan were determined by biochemical assays (Park–Johnson and Ghuysen procedures) and MS analysis. The enzymes were tested for their ability to eradicate static S. aureus biofilms and compared for their efficacy against systemic MRSA infection in a mouse model. Results Despite similar modular architectures and unexpectedly conserved cleavage sites in the peptidoglycan (conferred by evolutionarily divergent catalytic domains), the enzymes displayed varying degrees of in vitro lytic activity against numerous staphylococcal strains, including cell surface mutants and drug-resistant strains, and proved effective against static biofilms. In a mouse model of systemic MRSA infection, six PGHs provided 100% protection from death, with animals being free of clinical signs at the end of the experiment. Conclusions Our results corroborate the high potential of PGHs for treatment of S. aureus infections and reveal unique antimicrobial and biochemical properties of the different enzymes, suggesting a high diversity of potential applications despite highly conserved peptidoglycan target sites. PMID:25630640

  2. Caspase Cleavage Sites in the Human Proteome: CaspDB, a Database of Predicted Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Sonu; van Raam, Bram J.; Salvesen, Guy S.; Cieplak, Piotr

    2014-01-01

    Caspases are enzymes belonging to a conserved family of cysteine-dependent aspartic-specific proteases that are involved in vital cellular processes and play a prominent role in apoptosis and inflammation. Determining all relevant protein substrates of caspases remains a challenging task. Over 1500 caspase substrates have been discovered in the human proteome according to published data and new substrates are discovered on a daily basis. To aid the discovery process we developed a caspase cleavage prediction method using the recently published curated MerCASBA database of experimentally determined caspase substrates and a Random Forest classification method. On both internal and external test sets, the ranking of predicted cleavage positions is superior to all previously developed prediction methods. The in silico predicted caspase cleavage positions in human proteins are available from a relational database: CaspDB. Our database provides information about potential cleavage sites in a verified set of all human proteins collected in Uniprot and their orthologs, allowing for tracing of cleavage motif conservation. It also provides information about the positions of disease-annotated single nucleotide polymorphisms, and posttranslational modifications that may modulate the caspase cleaving efficiency. PMID:25330111

  3. NMR structure of the active conformation of the Varkud satellite ribozyme cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Bernd; Mitchell, G. Thomas; Gendron, Patrick; Major, François; Andersen, Angela A.; Collins, Richard A.; Legault, Pascale

    2003-01-01

    Substrate cleavage by the Neurospora Varkud satellite (VS) ribozyme involves a structural change in the stem-loop I substrate from an inactive to an active conformation. We have determined the NMR solution structure of a mutant stem-loop I that mimics the active conformation of the cleavage site internal loop. This structure shares many similarities, but also significant differences, with the previously determined structures of the inactive internal loop. The active internal loop displays different base-pairing interactions and forms a novel RNA fold composed exclusively of sheared G-A base pairs. From chemical-shift mapping we identified two Mg2+ binding sites in the active internal loop. One of the Mg2+ binding sites forms in the active but not the inactive conformation of the internal loop and is likely important for catalysis. Using the structure comparison program mc-search, we identified the active internal loop fold in other RNA structures. In Thermus thermophilus 16S rRNA, this RNA fold is directly involved in a long-range tertiary interaction. An analogous tertiary interaction may form between the active internal loop of the substrate and the catalytic domain of the VS ribozyme. The combination of NMR and bioinformatic approaches presented here has identified a novel RNA fold and provides insights into the structural basis of catalytic function in the Neurospora VS ribozyme. PMID:12782785

  4. Cleavage Site Localization Differentially Controls Interleukin-6 Receptor Proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17

    PubMed Central

    Riethmueller, Steffen; Ehlers, Johanna C.; Lokau, Juliane; Düsterhöft, Stefan; Knittler, Katharina; Dombrowsky, Gregor; Grötzinger, Joachim; Rabe, Björn; Rose-John, Stefan; Garbers, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Limited proteolysis of the Interleukin-6 Receptor (IL-6R) leads to the release of the IL-6R ectodomain. Binding of the cytokine IL-6 to the soluble IL-6R (sIL-6R) results in an agonistic IL-6/sIL-6R complex, which activates cells via gp130 irrespective of whether the cells express the IL-6R itself. This signaling pathway has been termed trans-signaling and is thought to mainly account for the pro-inflammatory properties of IL-6. A Disintegrin And Metalloprotease 10 (ADAM10) and ADAM17 are the major proteases that cleave the IL-6R. We have previously shown that deletion of a ten amino acid long stretch within the stalk region including the cleavage site prevents ADAM17-mediated cleavage, whereas the receptor retained its full biological activity. In the present study, we show that deletion of a triple serine (3S) motif (Ser-359 to Ser-361) adjacent to the cleavage site is sufficient to prevent IL-6R cleavage by ADAM17, but not ADAM10. We find that the impaired shedding is caused by the reduced distance between the cleavage site and the plasma membrane. Positioning of the cleavage site in greater distance towards the plasma membrane abrogates ADAM17-mediated shedding and reveals a novel cleavage site of ADAM10. Our findings underline functional differences in IL-6R proteolysis by ADAM10 and ADAM17. PMID:27151651

  5. Molecular pathogenesis of H5 highly pathogenic avian influenza: the role of the haemagglutinin cleavage site motif.

    PubMed

    Luczo, Jasmina M; Stambas, John; Durr, Peter A; Michalski, Wojtek P; Bingham, John

    2015-11-01

    The emergence of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza has caused a heavy socio-economic burden through culling of poultry to minimise human and livestock infection. Although human infections with H5N1 have to date been limited, concerns for the pandemic potential of this zoonotic virus have been greatly intensified following experimental evidence of aerosol transmission of H5N1 viruses in a mammalian infection model. In this review, we discuss the dominance of the haemagglutinin cleavage site motif as a pathogenicity determinant, the host-pathogen molecular interactions driving cleavage activation, reverse genetics manipulations and identification of residues key to haemagglutinin cleavage site functionality and the mechanisms of cell and tissue damage during H5N1 infection. We specifically focus on the disease in chickens, as it is in this species that high pathogenicity frequently evolves and from which transmission to the human population occurs. With >75% of emerging infectious diseases being of zoonotic origin, it is necessary to understand pathogenesis in the primary host to explain spillover events into the human population. PMID:26467906

  6. Molecular pathogenesis of H5 highly pathogenic avian influenza: the role of the haemagglutinin cleavage site motif

    PubMed Central

    Luczo, Jasmina M.; Stambas, John; Durr, Peter A.; Michalski, Wojtek P.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The emergence of H5N1 highly pathogenic avian influenza has caused a heavy socio‐economic burden through culling of poultry to minimise human and livestock infection. Although human infections with H5N1 have to date been limited, concerns for the pandemic potential of this zoonotic virus have been greatly intensified following experimental evidence of aerosol transmission of H5N1 viruses in a mammalian infection model. In this review, we discuss the dominance of the haemagglutinin cleavage site motif as a pathogenicity determinant, the host‐pathogen molecular interactions driving cleavage activation, reverse genetics manipulations and identification of residues key to haemagglutinin cleavage site functionality and the mechanisms of cell and tissue damage during H5N1 infection. We specifically focus on the disease in chickens, as it is in this species that high pathogenicity frequently evolves and from which transmission to the human population occurs. With >75% of emerging infectious diseases being of zoonotic origin, it is necessary to understand pathogenesis in the primary host to explain spillover events into the human population. © 2015 The Authors. Reviews in Medical Virology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26467906

  7. Analysis of cleavage site mutations between the NC and PR Gag domains of Rous sarcoma virus.

    PubMed Central

    Schatz, G; Pichova, I; Vogt, V M

    1997-01-01

    In retroviruses, the viral protease (PR) is released as a mature protein by cleavage of Gag, Gag-Pro, or Gag-Pro-Pol precursor polypeptides. In avian sarcoma and leukemia viruses (ASLV), PR forms the C-terminal domain of Gag. Based on the properties of a mutation (cs22) in the cleavage site between the upstream NC domain and the PR domain, the proteolytic liberation of PR previously was inferred to be essential for processing of Gag and Pol proteins. To study this process in more detail, we have analyzed the effects that several mutations at the NC-PR cleavage site have on proteolytic processing in virus-like particles expressed in COS and quail cells. Mutant Gag proteins carrying the same mutations also were synthesized in vitro and tested for processing with purified PR. In both types of studies, N-terminal sequencing of the liberated PR domain was carried out to exactly identify the site of cleavage. Finally, synthetic peptides corresponding to the mutant proteins were assessed for the ability to act as substrates for PR. The results were all consistent and led to the following conclusions. (i) In vivo, if normal processing between NC and PR is prevented by mutations, limited cleavage occurs at a previously unrecognized alternative site three amino acids downstream, i.e., in PR. This N-terminally truncated PR is inactive as an enzyme, as inferred from the global processing defect in cs22 and a similar mutant. (ii) In Gag proteins translated in vitro, purified PR cleaves this alternative site as rapidly as it does the wild-type site. (iii) Contrary to previously accepted rules describing retroviral cleavage sites, an isoleucine residue placed at the P1 position of the NC-PR cleavage site does not hinder normal processing. (iv) A proline residue placed at the P2 position in this cleavage site blocks normal processing. PMID:8985369

  8. Expression of Viola cyclotides by liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry and tandem mass spectrometry sequencing of intercysteine loops after introduction of charges and cleavage sites by aminoethylation.

    PubMed

    Göransson, Ulf; Broussalis, Adriana M; Claeson, Per

    2003-07-01

    The expression of cyclotides-macrocyclic plant peptides-was profiled in six violets, Viola cotyledon, V. biflora, V. arvensis, V. tricolor, V. riviniana, and V. odorata, by LC-MS. All were found to express notably complex mixtures, with single species containing >50 cyclotides. To facilitate their sequencing by MS-MS, an analytical strategy is presented involving aminoethylation of cysteines. This overcomes a number of problems intimately associated with the cyclotide core structure-that is, their joined N and C termini, disulfide knot, and low or clustered content of positively charged amino acids and enzymatic cleavage sites. As a result, charges as well as cleavage sites are introduced at the most conserved part of their sequence, the cysteines. Combined with tryptic digestion, all intercysteine loops are then of suitable size and charge for MS-MS sequencing. The utility of this strategy is shown by the sequencing of two novel cyclotides isolated from V. cotyledon; vico A (cyclo-(AESCVYIPCFTGIAGCSCKNKVCYYNGSIPC)) and vico B (cyclo-(AESCVYIPCITGIAGCSCKNKVCYYNGSIPC)); their complete sequence could be determined by nanospray MS-MS. The strategy for converting conserved cysteines to enzymatic cleavage sites might also benefit the study of other peptides and proteins displaying similar structural problems for MS analysis.

  9. Pigeon paramyxovirus type 1 variants with polybasic F protein cleavage site but strikingly different pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Heiden, Sandra; Grund, Christian; Höper, Dirk; Mettenleiter, Thomas C; Römer-Oberdörfer, Angela

    2014-12-01

    Newcastle disease viruses (NDV) isolated from pigeons (pigeon paramyxovirus type 1; PPMV-1) are mostly of mesogenic pathotype and characterized by a polybasic amino acid sequence motif at the fusion protein (F) cleavage site. This feature also applies to isolate R75/98 from Germany. Its genome consists of 15,192 nucleotides and it specifies an intracerebral pathogenicity index (ICPI) of 1.1, as is typical for mesogenic NDV. Recombinant R75/98 (rR75/98) derived by reverse genetics also possesses a polybasic F protein cleavage site but exhibits ICPI of 0.28, indicating a lentogenic virus. While ten virus passages of rR75/98 on embryonated chicken eggs did not result in any alteration of virus characteristics, virus which had been re-isolated from the brain of an intracerebrally inoculated chicken showed an increase in virulence, characterized by an ICPI of 0.93. Comparison of whole genome sequences of rR75/98 and re-isolated rR75/98 (RrR75/98) demonstrated only two amino acid differences, one in the F protein (N472 K) and one in the polymerase protein (K2168R). This result indicates that only very few amino acid alterations are sufficient to modulate virus virulence in the presence of a polybasic amino acid sequence at the proteolytic F protein cleavage site.

  10. Ribonuclease L and metal-ion–independent endoribonuclease cleavage sites in host and viral RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Cooper, Daphne A.; Jha, Babal K.; Silverman, Robert H.; Hesselberth, Jay R.; Barton, David J.

    2014-01-01

    Ribonuclease L (RNase L) is a metal-ion–independent endoribonuclease associated with antiviral and antibacterial defense, cancer and lifespan. Despite the biological significance of RNase L, the RNAs cleaved by this enzyme are poorly defined. In this study, we used deep sequencing methods to reveal the frequency and location of RNase L cleavage sites within host and viral RNAs. To make cDNA libraries, we exploited the 2′, 3′-cyclic phosphate at the end of RNA fragments produced by RNase L and other metal-ion–independent endoribonucleases. We optimized and validated 2′, 3′-cyclic phosphate cDNA synthesis and Illumina sequencing methods using viral RNAs cleaved with purified RNase L, viral RNAs cleaved with purified RNase A and RNA from uninfected and poliovirus-infected HeLa cells. Using these methods, we identified (i) discrete regions of hepatitis C virus and poliovirus RNA genomes that were profoundly susceptible to RNase L and other single-strand specific endoribonucleases, (ii) RNase L-dependent and RNase L-independent cleavage sites within ribosomal RNAs (rRNAs) and (iii) 2′, 3′-cyclic phosphates at the ends of 5S rRNA and U6 snRNA. Monitoring the frequency and location of metal-ion–independent endoribonuclease cleavage sites within host and viral RNAs reveals, in part, how these enzymes contribute to health and disease. PMID:24500209

  11. Identification and Characterization of a Cleavage Site in the Proteolysis of Orf Virus 086 Protein

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoping; Xiao, Bin; Zhang, Jiafeng; Chen, Daxiang; Li, Wei; Li, Ming; Hao, Wenbo; Luo, Shuhong

    2016-01-01

    The orf virus (ORFV) is among the parapoxvirus genus of the poxviridae family, but little is known about the proteolytic pathways of ORFV encoding proteins. By contrast, the proteolysis mechanism of the vaccinia virus (VV) has been extensively explored. Vaccinia virus core protein P4a undergoes a proteolytic process that takes place at a conserved cleavage site Ala-Gly-X (where X is any amino acid) and participates in virus assembly. Bioinformatics analysis revealed that an ORFV encoding protein, ORFV086, has a similar structure to the vaccinia virus P4a core protein. In this study, we focus on the kinetic analysis and proteolysis mechanism of ORFV086. We found, via kinetic analysis, that ORFV086 is a late gene that starts to express at 8 h post infection at mRNA level and 12–24 h post infection at the protein level. The ORFV086 precursor and a 21 kDa fragment can be observed in mature ORFV virions. The same bands were detected at only 3 h post infection, suggesting that both the ORFV086 precursor and the 21 kDa fragment are viral structural proteins. ORFV086 was cleaved from 12 to 24 h post infection. The cleavage took place at different sites, resulting in seven bands with differing molecular weights. Sequence alignment revealed that five putative cleavage sites were predicted at C-terminal and internal regions of ORFV086. To investigate whether those cleavage sites are involved in proteolytic processing, full length and several deletion mutant ORFV086 recombinant proteins were expressed and probed. The GGS site that produced a 21 kDa cleavage fragment was confirmed by identification of N/C-terminal FLAG epitope recombinant proteins, site-directed mutagenesis and pulse-chase analysis. Interestingly, chase results demonstrated that, at late times, ORFV086 is partially cleaved. Taken together, we concluded that GGS is a cleavage site in ORFV086 and produces a 21 kDa fragment post infection. Both ORFV086 precursor and the 21 kDa fragment are structural proteins of

  12. Switching the Cleavage Sites in Palladium on Carbon-Catalyzed Carbon-Carbon Bond Disconnection.

    PubMed

    Hattori, Tomohiro; Takakura, Ryoya; Ichikawa, Tomohiro; Sawama, Yoshinari; Monguchi, Yasunari; Sajiki, Hironao

    2016-04-01

    We have demonstrated a palladium on carbon-catalyzed approach to regioselectively alter the cleavage sites of the C-C bonds of cinnamaldehyde derivatives by a slight change in the reaction conditions in isopropanol under an O2 atmosphere. Styrene derivatives could be selectively formed by the addition of Na2CO3 in association with the dissociation of carbon monoxide, while benzaldehyde derivatives were generated by the addition of CuCl and morpholine instead of Na2CO3. PMID:26944077

  13. Prediction of Protein Cleavage Site with Feature Selection by Random Forest

    PubMed Central

    Li, Bi-Qing; Cai, Yu-Dong; Feng, Kai-Yan; Zhao, Gui-Jun

    2012-01-01

    Proteinases play critical roles in both intra and extracellular processes by binding and cleaving their protein substrates. The cleavage can either be non-specific as part of degradation during protein catabolism or highly specific as part of proteolytic cascades and signal transduction events. Identification of these targets is extremely challenging. Current computational approaches for predicting cleavage sites are very limited since they mainly represent the amino acid sequences as patterns or frequency matrices. In this work, we developed a novel predictor based on Random Forest algorithm (RF) using maximum relevance minimum redundancy (mRMR) method followed by incremental feature selection (IFS). The features of physicochemical/biochemical properties, sequence conservation, residual disorder, amino acid occurrence frequency, secondary structure and solvent accessibility were utilized to represent the peptides concerned. Here, we compared existing prediction tools which are available for predicting possible cleavage sites in candidate substrates with ours. It is shown that our method makes much more reliable predictions in terms of the overall prediction accuracy. In addition, this predictor allows the use of a wide range of proteinases. PMID:23029276

  14. A python analytical pipeline to identify prohormone precursors and predict prohormone cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Southey, Bruce R; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides and hormones are signaling molecules that support cell-cell communication in the central nervous system. Experimentally characterizing neuropeptides requires significant efforts because of the complex and variable processing of prohormone precursor proteins into neuropeptides and hormones. We demonstrate the power and flexibility of the Python language to develop components of an bioinformatic analytical pipeline to identify precursors from genomic data and to predict cleavage as these precursors are en route to the final bioactive peptides. We identified 75 precursors in the rhesus genome, predicted cleavage sites using support vector machines and compared the rhesus predictions to putative assignments based on homology to human sequences. The correct classification rate of cleavage using the support vector machines was over 97% for both human and rhesus data sets. The functionality of Python has been important to develop and maintain NeuroPred (http://neuroproteomics.scs.uiuc.edu/neuropred.html), a user-centered web application for the neuroscience community that provides cleavage site prediction from a wide range of models, precision and accuracy statistics, post-translational modifications, and the molecular mass of potential peptides. The combined results illustrate the suitability of the Python language to implement an all-inclusive bioinformatics approach to predict neuropeptides that encompasses a large number of interdependent steps, from scanning genomes for precursor genes to identification of potential bioactive neuropeptides. PMID:19169350

  15. A python analytical pipeline to identify prohormone precursors and predict prohormone cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Southey, Bruce R; Sweedler, Jonathan V; Rodriguez-Zas, Sandra L

    2008-01-01

    Neuropeptides and hormones are signaling molecules that support cell-cell communication in the central nervous system. Experimentally characterizing neuropeptides requires significant efforts because of the complex and variable processing of prohormone precursor proteins into neuropeptides and hormones. We demonstrate the power and flexibility of the Python language to develop components of an bioinformatic analytical pipeline to identify precursors from genomic data and to predict cleavage as these precursors are en route to the final bioactive peptides. We identified 75 precursors in the rhesus genome, predicted cleavage sites using support vector machines and compared the rhesus predictions to putative assignments based on homology to human sequences. The correct classification rate of cleavage using the support vector machines was over 97% for both human and rhesus data sets. The functionality of Python has been important to develop and maintain NeuroPred (http://neuroproteomics.scs.uiuc.edu/neuropred.html), a user-centered web application for the neuroscience community that provides cleavage site prediction from a wide range of models, precision and accuracy statistics, post-translational modifications, and the molecular mass of potential peptides. The combined results illustrate the suitability of the Python language to implement an all-inclusive bioinformatics approach to predict neuropeptides that encompasses a large number of interdependent steps, from scanning genomes for precursor genes to identification of potential bioactive neuropeptides.

  16. Hemagglutinin-Neuraminidase Balance Influences the Virulence Phenotype of a Recombinant H5N3 Influenza A Virus Possessing a Polybasic HA0 Cleavage Site

    PubMed Central

    Diederich, Sandra; Berhane, Yohannes; Embury-Hyatt, Carissa; Hisanaga, Tamiko; Handel, Katherine; Cottam-Birt, Colleen; Ranadheera, Charlene; Kobasa, Darwyn

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Although a polybasic HA0 cleavage site is considered the dominant virulence determinant for highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5 and H7 viruses, naturally occurring virus isolates possessing a polybasic HA0 cleavage site have been identified that are low pathogenic in chickens. In this study, we generated a reassortant H5N3 virus that possessed the hemagglutinin (HA) gene from H5N1 HPAI A/swan/Germany/R65/2006 and the remaining gene segments from low pathogenic A/chicken/British Columbia/CN0006/2004 (H7N3). Despite possessing the HA0 cleavage site GERRRKKR/GLF, this rH5N3 virus exhibited a low pathogenic phenotype in chickens. Although rH5N3-inoculated birds replicated and shed virus and seroconverted, transmission to naive contacts did not occur. To determine whether this virus could evolve into a HPAI form, it underwent six serial passages in chickens. A progressive increase in virulence was observed with the virus from passage number six being highly transmissible. Whole-genome sequencing demonstrated the fixation of 12 nonsynonymous mutations involving all eight gene segments during passaging. One of these involved the catalytic site of the neuraminidase (NA; R293K) and is associated with decreased neuraminidase activity and resistance to oseltamivir. Although introducing the R293K mutation into the original low-pathogenicity rH5N3 increased its virulence, transmission to naive contact birds was inefficient, suggesting that one or more of the remaining changes that had accumulated in the passage number six virus also play an important role in transmissibility. Our findings show that the functional linkage and balance between HA and NA proteins contributes to expression of the HPAI phenotype. IMPORTANCE To date, the contribution that hemagglutinin-neuraminidase balance can have on the expression of a highly pathogenic avian influenza virus phenotype has not been thoroughly examined. Reassortment, which can result in new hemagglutinin

  17. Short communication: high natural polymorphism in the gag gene cleavage sites of non-B HIV type 1 isolates from Gabon.

    PubMed

    Liégeois, Florian; Reteno, Dorine Gaëlle Ikanga; Mouinga-Ondémé, Augustin; Sica, Jeanne; Rouet, François

    2013-08-01

    The main goal of the present study was to determine the frequency of substitutions in the cleavage sites (CS) of gag gene among non-B HIV-1 isolates from Gabon. Fifty plasma specimens, collected in 2010-2011, from HIV-1-infected patients failing first-line antiretroviral (ARV) regimens (constituted of two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors+one nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor) (n=38) and from HIV-1-infected individuals untreated with ARV (n=12) were analyzed in the gag and gag-pol cleavage sites. Compared to HXB2 reference sequence, the total median number of substitutions in gag and gag-pol CS was 10 (range, 5-18). The cleavage site p2/NC was the most variable of the four gag CS with 100% (50/50) isolates carrying at least 1 substitution (range, 1-9). The two gag-pol TFP/p6pol and p6pol/PR CS sites were also highly variable (at least one substitution, 50/50, 100% in both cases). Substitutions at position G381 (p2/NC), L449 (p1/p6gag), and K444 (TFP/p6pol) were significantly more frequent in CRF02_AG strains, compared to other non-B strains (30.4% vs. 3.7%, p=0.03; 87.0% vs. 59.3%, p=0.03; and 91.3% vs. 59.3%, p=0.01, respectively). Other non-B subtypes were significantly more likely to harbor substitutions at position N487 (p6pol) (70.4%) than CRF02_AG (39.1%) (p=0.02). In Gabon, gag and gag-pol cleavage sites were highly polymorphic in protease inhibitor-naive patients harboring non-B HIV-1 strains. In sub-Saharan Africa, further studies are definitively required to better understand the impact of gag mutations among subjects receiving second-line LPV/r-containing regimens (monotherapy or triple combinations).

  18. Effect of internal cleavage site mutations in human immunodeficiency virus type 1 capsid protein on its structure and function.

    PubMed

    Tóth, Ferenc; Kádas, János; Mótyán, János András; Tőzsér, József

    2016-08-01

    The capsid protein of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 has been found to be a substrate of the retroviral protease in vitro, and its processing was predicted to be strongly dependent on a pH-induced conformational change. Several protease cleavage sites have been identified within the capsid protein, but the importance of its cleavage by the viral protease at the early phase of infection is controversial. To confirm the relevance of this process, we aimed to design, produce, and characterize mutant capsid proteins, in which the protein susceptibility toward HIV-1 protease is altered without affecting other steps of the viral life cycle. Our results indicate that while the introduced mutations changed the cleavage rate at the mutated sites of the capsid protein by HIV-1 protease, some of them caused only negligible or moderate structural changes (A78V, L189F, and L189I). However, the effects of other mutations (W23A, A77P, and L189P) were dramatic, as assessed by secondary structure determination or cyclophilin A-binding assay. Based on our observations, the L189F mutant capsid remains structurally and functionally unchanged and may therefore be the best candidate for use in studies aimed at better understanding the role of the protease in the early postentry events of viral infection or retrovirus-mediated gene transduction. PMID:27516963

  19. Exosites determine macromolecular substrate recognition by prothrombinase.

    PubMed

    Krishnaswamy, S; Betz, A

    1997-10-01

    The prothrombinase complex, composed of factor Xa and factor Va assembled on a membrane surface, catalyzes the proteolytic formation of thrombin during blood coagulation. The molecular basis for the macromolecular substrate specificity of prothrombinase is poorly understood. By kinetic studies of prethrombin 2 cleavage by prothrombinase in the presence or absence of fragment 1.2, we show that occupation of the active site of the catalyst by inhibitors or alternate peptidyl substrates does not alter the affinity for prethrombin 2. Productive recognition of the macromolecular substrate therefore results from an initial interaction at enzymic sites (exosites) distinct from the active site, which largely determines substrate affinity. This interaction at exosites is evident even in the absence of activation peptide domains responsible for mediating the binding of the substrate to membranes or factor Va. Interactions at the active site with structures surrounding the scissile bond then precede bond cleavage and product release. The second binding step, which appears unfavorable, does not affect substrate affinity but contributes to the maximum catalytic rate. Therefore, binding specificity of prothrombinase for the macromolecular substrate is determined by exosites on the enzyme. We show that competitive inhibition of prethrombin 2 cleavage can be accomplished by interfering with the exosite binding step without obscuring the active site of the enzyme. These findings suggest limitations to the common approach of inferring the basis of factor Xa specificity with active site mutants or the targeting the active site of factor Xa with reversible inhibitors for therapeutic purposes. The achievement of distinctive macromolecular substrate specificities through exosite interactions and modulation of maximum catalytic rate through binding steps may also underlie the reactions catalyzed by the other coagulation complexes containing trypsin-like enzymes. PMID:9315846

  20. Identification of the cleavage sites of the RNA2-encoded polyproteins for two members of the genus Torradovirus by N-terminal sequencing of the virion capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Ferriol, I; Silva Junior, D M; Nigg, J C; Zamora-Macorra, E J; Falk, B W

    2016-11-01

    Torradoviruses, family Secoviridae, are emergent bipartite RNA plant viruses. RNA1 is ca. 7kb and has one open reading frame (ORF) encoding for the protease, helicase and RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp). RNA2 is ca. 5kb and has two ORFs. RNA2-ORF1 encodes for a putative protein with unknown function(s). RNA2-ORF2 encodes for a putative movement protein and three capsid proteins. Little is known about the replication and polyprotein processing strategies of torradoviruses. Here, the cleavage sites in the RNA2-ORF2-encoded polyproteins of two torradoviruses, Tomato marchitez virus isolate M (ToMarV-M) and tomato chocolate spot virus, were determined by N-terminal sequencing, revealing that the amino acid (aa) at the -1 position of the cleavage sites is a glutamine. Multiple aa sequence comparison confirmed that this glutamine is conserved among other torradoviruses. Finally, site-directed mutagenesis of conserved aas in the ToMarV-M RdRp and protease prevented substantial accumulation of viral coat proteins or RNAs.

  1. Avian paramyxovirus serotype 1 strains of low virulence with unusual fusion protein cleavage sites isolated from poultry species

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Avian paramyxo-serotype-1 viruses (APMV1) with fusion cleavage sites containing two basic amino acids and a phenylalanine (F) at position 117 have been isolated from poultry species in two states from 2007-2009. The intracerebral pathogenicity indices for these viruses are of low virulence at 0.00 ...

  2. The Identity of the Nucleophile Substitution may Influence Metal Interactions with the Cleavage Site of the Minimal Hammerhead Ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Osborne, Edith M.; Ward, W. Luke; Ruehle, Max Z.; DeRose, Victoria J.

    2010-01-01

    Potential metal interactions with the cleavage site of a minimal hammerhead ribozyme (mHHRz) were probed using 31P NMR-detected Cd2+ titration studies of HHRz constructs containing a phosphorothioate (PS) modification at the cleavage site. The mHHRz nucleophile position was replaced by either a 2′-F or a 2′-NH2 in order to block cleavage activity during the study. The 2′-F/PS cleavage site mHHRz construct, in which the 2′-F should closely imitate the atom size and electronegativity of a 2′OH, demonstrates low levels of metal ion association (<1 ppm 31P chemical shift changes). This observation indicates that having an atom size and electrostatic properties that are similar to the 2′-OH are not the governing factors in allowing metal interactions with the scissile phosphate of the mHHRz. With a 2′-NH2 substitution, a large upfield change in 31P NMR chemical shift of the phosphorothioate peak (Δ~3 ppm with 6 equivalents added Cd2+) indicates observable Cd2+ interactions with the substituted site. Since a 2′-NH2, but not a 2′-F, can serve as a metal ligand, these data suggest that a metal ion interaction with the HHRz cleavage site may include both the scissile phosphate and the 2′ nucleophile. Control samples in which the 2′-NH2/PS unit is placed either next to the mHHRz cleavage site (at U16.1), in a duplex, or in a amUPSU dinucleotide, show much weaker interactions with Cd2+. Results with these control samples indicate that simply the presence of a 2′-NH2/PS unit does not create a strong metal binding site, reinforcing the possibility that the 2′-NH2-moderated Cd-PS interaction is specific to the mHHRz cleavage site. Upfield chemical shifts of both 31P and H2′ 1H resonances in amUPSU are observed with addition of Cd2+, consistent with the predicted metal coordination to both 2′-NH2 and phosphorothioate ligands. These data suggest that metal ion association with the HHRz cleavage site may include an interaction with the 2

  3. Isolation of recombinant phage antibodies targeting the hemagglutinin cleavage site of highly pathogenic avian influenza virus.

    PubMed

    Dong, Jinhua; Sakurai, Akira; Nomura, Namiko; Park, Enoch Y; Shibasaki, Futoshi; Ueda, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 viruses, which have emerged in poultry and other wildlife worldwide, contain a characteristic multi-basic cleavage site (CS) in the hemagglutinin protein (HA). Because this arginine-rich CS is unique among influenza virus subtypes, antibodies against this site have the potential to specifically diagnose pathogenic H5N1. By immunizing mice with the CS peptide and screening a phage display library, we isolated four antibody Fab fragment clones that specifically bind the antigen peptide and several HPAI H5N1 HA proteins in different clades. The soluble Fab fragments expressed in Escherichia coli bound the CS peptide and the H5N1 HA protein with nanomolar affinity. In an immunofluorescence assay, these Fab fragments stained cells infected with HPAI H5N1 but not those infected with a less virulent strain. Lastly, all the Fab clones could detect the CS peptide and H5N1 HA protein by open sandwich ELISA. Thus, these recombinant Fab fragments will be useful novel reagents for the rapid and specific detection of HPAI H5N1 virus.

  4. CTAG-Containing Cleavage Site Profiling to Delineate Salmonella into Natural Clusters

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Le; Liu, Wei-Qiao; Fang, Xin; Sun, Qiang; Zhu, Song-Ling; Wang, Chun-Xiao; Wang, Xiao-Yu; Li, Yong-Guo; Zhu, Da-Ling; Sanderson, Kenneth E.; Johnston, Randal N.; Liu, Gui-Rong; Liu, Shu-Lin

    2014-01-01

    Background The bacterial genus Salmonella contains thousands of serotypes that infect humans or other hosts, causing mild gastroenteritis to potentially fatal systemic infections in humans. Pathogenically distinct Salmonella serotypes have been classified as individual species or as serological variants of merely one or two species, causing considerable confusion in both research and clinical settings. This situation reflects a long unanswered question regarding whether the Salmonella serotypes exist as discrete genetic clusters (natural species) of organisms or as phenotypic (e.g. pathogenic) variants of a single (or two) natural species with a continuous spectrum of genetic divergence among them. Our recent work, based on genomic sequence divergence analysis, has demonstrated that genetic boundaries exist among Salmonella serotypes, circumscribing them into clear-cut genetic clusters of bacteria. Methodologies/Principal Findings To further test the genetic boundary concept for delineating Salmonella into clearly defined natural lineages (e.g., species), we sampled a small subset of conserved genomic DNA sequences, i.e., the endonuclease cleavage sites that contain the highly conserved CTAG sequence such as TCTAGA for XbaI. We found that the CTAG-containing cleavage sequence profiles could be used to resolve the genetic boundaries as reliably and efficiently as whole genome sequence comparisons but with enormously reduced requirements for time and resources. Conclusions Profiling of CTAG sequence subsets reflects genetic boundaries among Salmonella lineages and can delineate these bacteria into discrete natural clusters. PMID:25137186

  5. Mutation in spike protein cleavage site and pathogenesis of feline coronavirus.

    PubMed

    Licitra, Beth N; Millet, Jean K; Regan, Andrew D; Hamilton, Brian S; Rinaldi, Vera D; Duhamel, Gerald E; Whittaker, Gary R

    2013-07-01

    Feline coronaviruses (FCoV) exist as 2 biotypes: feline enteric coronavirus (FECV) and feline infectious peritonitis virus (FIPV). FECV causes subclinical infections; FIPV causes feline infectious peritonitis (FIP), a systemic and fatal disease. It is thought that mutations in FECV enable infection of macrophages, causing FIP. However, the molecular basis for this biotype switch is unknown. We examined a furin cleavage site in the region between receptor-binding (S1) and fusion (S2) domains of the spike of serotype 1 FCoV. FECV sequences were compared with FIPV sequences. All FECVs had a conserved furin cleavage motif. For FIPV, there was a correlation with the disease and >1 substitution in the S1/S2 motif. Fluorogenic peptide assays confirmed that the substitutions modulate furin cleavage. We document a functionally relevant S1/S2 mutation that arises when FIP develops in a cat. These insights into FIP pathogenesis may be useful in development of diagnostic, prevention, and treatment measures against coronaviruses.

  6. A mutation abolishing the ZMPSTE24 cleavage site in prelamin A causes a progeroid disorder.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuexia; Lichter-Konecki, Uta; Anyane-Yeboa, Kwame; Shaw, Jessica E; Lu, Jonathan T; Östlund, Cecilia; Shin, Ji-Yeon; Clark, Lorraine N; Gundersen, Gregg G; Nagy, Peter L; Worman, Howard J

    2016-05-15

    In 1994 in the Journal of Cell Science, Hennekes and Nigg reported that changing valine to arginine at the endoproteolytic cleavage site in chicken prelamin A abolishes its conversion to lamin A. The consequences of this mutation in an organism have remained unknown. We now report that the corresponding mutation in a human subject leads to accumulation of prelamin A and causes a progeroid disorder. Next generation sequencing of the subject and her parents' exomes identified a de novo mutation in the lamin A/C gene (LMNA) that resulted in a leucine to arginine amino acid substitution at residue 647 in prelamin A. The subject's fibroblasts accumulated prelamin A, a farnesylated protein, which led to an increased percentage of cultured cells with morphologically abnormal nuclei. Treatment with a protein farnesyltransferase inhibitor improved abnormal nuclear morphology. This case demonstrates that accumulation of prelamin A, independent of the loss of function of ZMPSTE24 metallopeptidase that catalyzes processing of prelamin A, can cause a progeroid disorder and that a cell biology assay could be used in precision medicine to identify a potential therapy. PMID:27034136

  7. Protection of the Furin Cleavage Site in Low-Toxicity Immunotoxins Based on Pseudomonas Exotoxin A

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, Gilad; Lee, Fred; Onda, Masanori; Kolyvas, Emily; Bhardwaj, Gaurav; Baker, David; Pastan, Ira

    2016-01-01

    Recombinant immunotoxins (RITs) are fusions of an Fv-based targeting moiety and a toxin. Pseudomonas exotoxin A (PE) has been used to make several immunotoxins that have been evaluated in clinical trials. Immunogenicity of the bacterial toxin and off-target toxicity have limited the efficacy of these immunotoxins. To address these issues, we have previously made RITs in which the Fv is connected to domain III (PE24) by a furin cleavage site (FCS), thereby removing unneeded sequences of domain II. However, the PE24 containing RITs do not contain the naturally occurring disulfide bond around the furin cleavage sequence, because it was removed when domain II was deleted. This could potentially allow PE24 containing immunotoxins to be cleaved and inactivated before internalization by cell surface furin or other proteases in the blood stream or tumor microenvironment. Here, we describe five new RITs in which a disulfide bond is engineered to protect the FCS. The most active of these, SS1-Fab-DS3-PE24, shows a longer serum half-life than an RIT without the disulfide bond and has the same anti-tumor activity, despite being less cytotoxic in vitro. These results have significance for the production of de-immunized, low toxicity, PE24-based immunotoxins with a longer serum half-life. PMID:27463727

  8. A motivational determinant of facial emotion recognition: regulatory focus affects recognition of emotions in faces.

    PubMed

    Sassenrath, Claudia; Sassenberg, Kai; Ray, Devin G; Scheiter, Katharina; Jarodzka, Halszka

    2014-01-01

    Two studies examined an unexplored motivational determinant of facial emotion recognition: observer regulatory focus. It was predicted that a promotion focus would enhance facial emotion recognition relative to a prevention focus because the attentional strategies associated with promotion focus enhance performance on well-learned or innate tasks - such as facial emotion recognition. In Study 1, a promotion or a prevention focus was experimentally induced and better facial emotion recognition was observed in a promotion focus compared to a prevention focus. In Study 2, individual differences in chronic regulatory focus were assessed and attention allocation was measured using eye tracking during the facial emotion recognition task. Results indicated that the positive relation between a promotion focus and facial emotion recognition is mediated by shorter fixation duration on the face which reflects a pattern of attention allocation matched to the eager strategy in a promotion focus (i.e., striving to make hits). A prevention focus did not have an impact neither on perceptual processing nor on facial emotion recognition. Taken together, these findings demonstrate important mechanisms and consequences of observer motivational orientation for facial emotion recognition.

  9. Evolution of the R2 Retrotransposon Ribozyme and Its Self-Cleavage Site

    PubMed Central

    Eickbush, Danna G.; Burke, William D.; Eickbush, Thomas H.

    2013-01-01

    R2 is a non-long terminal repeat retrotransposon that inserts site-specifically in the tandem 28S rRNA genes of many animals. Previously, R2 RNA from various species of Drosophila was shown to self-cleave from the 28S rRNA/R2 co-transcript by a hepatitis D virus (HDV)-like ribozyme encoded at its 5' end. RNA cleavage was at the precise 5' junction of the element with the 28S gene. Here we report that RNAs encompassing the 5' ends of R2 elements from throughout its species range fold into HDV-like ribozymes. In vitro assays of RNA self-cleavage conducted in many R2 lineages confirmed activity. For many R2s, RNA self-cleavage was not at the 5' end of the element but at 28S rRNA sequences up to 36 nucleotides upstream of the junction. The location of cleavage correlated well with the types of endogenous R2 5' junctions from different species. R2 5' junctions were uniform for most R2s in which RNA cleavage was upstream in the rRNA sequences. The 28S sequences remaining on the first DNA strand synthesized during retrotransposition are postulated to anneal to the target site and uniformly prime second strand DNA synthesis. In species where RNA cleavage occurred at the R2 5' end, the 5' junctions were variable. This junction variation is postulated to result from the priming of second strand DNA synthesis by chance microhomologies between the target site and the first DNA strand. Finally, features of R2 ribozyme evolution, especially changes in cleavage site and convergence on the same active site sequences, are discussed. PMID:24066021

  10. Identification and mutagenesis of the TACE and γ-secretase cleavage sites in the colony-stimulating factor 1 receptor.

    PubMed

    Vahidi, Arrash; Glenn, Gary; van der Geer, Peter

    2014-07-18

    Stimulation of macrophages with phorbolesters, bacterial DNA, or lipopolysaccharides causes regulated intramembrane proteolysis or RIPping of the CSF-1 receptor. This process involves TACE-mediated cleavage in the extracellular domain, followed by γ-secretase-mediated cleavage within the transmembrane region. In the current study, we have identified the TACE cleavage site, which is present twelve residues from the carboxy-terminal end of the extracellular domain. Replacement of fourteen residues at the end of the extracellular domain blocked TACE cleavage. In addition, we identified the γ-secretase cleavage site, which is present four residues from the carboxy-terminal end of the transmembrane region. Replacement of six residues surrounding this site strongly reduced intramembrane cleavage. Our results provide new insights into the molecular physiology of the CSF-1 receptor and contribute to our understanding of substrate selection by TACE and γ-secretase.

  11. The silent point mutations at the cleavage site of 2A/2B have no effect on the self-cleavage activity of 2A of foot-and-mouth disease virus.

    PubMed

    Gao, Zong-liang; Zhou, Jian-hua; Zhang, Jie; Ding, Yao-zhong; Liu, Yong-sheng

    2014-12-01

    The 2A region of the foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) polyprotein is 18 amino acids in length, and 2A self-cleavage site (2A/2B) contains a conserved amino acid motif G2A/P2B. To investigate the synonymous codon usage for Glycine at the 2A/2B cleavage site of FMDV, 66 2A/2B1 nucleotide sequences were aligned and found that the synonymous codon usage of G2A is conserved and GGG was the most frequently used. To examine the role of synonymous codons for G2A in self-cleavage efficiency of 2A/2B, recombinant constructs which contains the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase protein (CAT) and enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) linked by the FMDV 2A sequence with four synonymous codons for G2A were produced. The activities of all the F2As based plasmids were determined in CHO cells. The results showed that the synonymous codon usage patterns for G2A at the cleavage site (2A/2B) have no effect on the cleavage efficiency. This suggests that the synonymous codon usage of 2A peptide has no effect on the cleavage efficiency of FMDV 2A element. PMID:25152485

  12. Characterization of an H4N2 Influenza Virus from Quails with a Multibasic Motif in the Hemagglutinin Cleavage Site

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sook-San; Yoon, Sun-Woo; Zanin, Mark; Song, Min-Suk; Oshansky, Christine; Zaraket, Hassan; Sonnberg, Stephanie; Rubrum, Adam; Seiler, Patrick; Ferguson, Angela; Krauss, Scott; Cardona, Carol; Webby, Richard J.; Crossley, Beate

    2014-01-01

    The cleavage motif in the hemagglutinin (HA) protein of highly pathogenic H5 and H7 subtypes of avian influenza viruses is characterized by a peptide insertion or a multibasic cleavage site (MBCS). Here, we isolated an H4N2 virus from quails (Quail/CA12) with two additional arginines in the HA cleavage site, PEKRRTR/G, forming an MBCS-like motif. Quail/CA12 is a reassortant virus with the HA and neuraminidase (NA) gene most similar to a duck-isolated H4N2 virus, PD/CA06 with a monobasic HA cleavage site. Quail/CA12 required exogenous trypsin for efficient growth in culture and caused no clinical illness in infected chickens. Quail/CA12 had high binding preference for α2,6-linked sialic acids and showed higher replication and transmission ability in chickens and quails than PD/CA06. Although the H4N2 virus remained low pathogenic, these data suggests that the acquisition of MBCS in the field is not restricted to H5 or H7 subtypes. PMID:25151061

  13. A Unique Multibasic Proteolytic Cleavage Site and Three Mutations in the HA2 Domain Confer High Virulence of H7N1 Avian Influenza Virus in Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Veits, Jutta; Tauscher, Kerstin; Ziller, Mario; Teifke, Jens P.; Stech, Jürgen; Mettenleiter, Thomas C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT In 1999, after circulation for a few months in poultry in Italy, low-pathogenic (LP) avian influenza (AI) H7N1 virus mutated into a highly pathogenic (HP) form by acquisition of a unique multibasic cleavage site (mCS), PEIPKGSRVRR*GLF (asterisk indicates the cleavage site), in the hemagglutinin (HA) and additional alterations with hitherto unknown biological function. To elucidate these virulence-determining alterations, recombinant H7N1 viruses carrying specific mutations in the HA of LPAI A/chicken/Italy/473/1999 virus (Lp) and HPAI A/chicken/Italy/445/1999 virus (Hp) were generated. Hp with a monobasic CS or carrying the HA of Lp induced only mild or no disease in chickens, thus resembling Lp. Conversely, Lp with the HA of Hp was as virulent and transmissible as Hp. While Lp with a multibasic cleavage site (Lp_CS445) was less virulent than Hp, full virulence was exhibited when HA2 was replaced by that of Hp. In HA2, three amino acid differences consistently detected between LP and HP H7N1 viruses were successively introduced into Lp_CS445. Q450L in the HA2 stem domain increased virulence and transmission but was detrimental to replication in cell culture, probably due to low-pH activation of HA. A436T and/or K536R restored viral replication in vitro and in vivo. Viruses possessing A436T and K536R were observed early in the HPAI outbreak but were later superseded by viruses carrying all three mutations. Together, besides the mCS, stepwise mutations in HA2 increased the fitness of the Italian H7N1 virus in vivo. The shift toward higher virulence in the field was most likely gradual with rapid optimization. IMPORTANCE In 1999, after 9 months of circulation of low-pathogenic (LP) avian influenza virus (AIV), a devastating highly pathogenic (HP) H7N1 AIV emerged in poultry, marking the largest epidemic of AIV reported in a Western country. The HPAIV possessed a unique multibasic cleavage site (mCS) complying with the minimum motif for HPAIV. The main finding

  14. In-line alignment and Mg2+ coordination at the cleavage site of the env22 twister ribozyme

    PubMed Central

    Ren, Aiming; Košutić, Marija; Rajashankar, Kanagalaghatta R.; Frener, Marina; Santner, Tobias; Westhof, Eric; Micura, Ronald; Patel, Dinshaw J.

    2015-01-01

    Small self-cleaving nucleolytic ribozymes contain catalytic domains that accelerate site-specific cleavage/ligation of phosphodiester backbones. We report on the 2.9-Å crystal structure of the env22 twister ribozyme, which adopts a compact tertiary fold stabilized by co-helical stacking, double-pseudoknot formation and long-range pairing interactions. The U-A cleavage site adopts a splayed-apart conformation with the modeled 2′-O of U positioned for in-line attack on the adjacent to-be-cleaved P-O5′ bond. Both an invariant guanosine and a Mg2+ are directly coordinated to the non-bridging phosphate oxygens at the U-A cleavage step, with the former positioned to contribute to catalysis and the latter to structural integrity. The impact of key mutations on cleavage activity identified an invariant guanosine that contributes to catalysis. Our structure of the in-line aligned env22 twister ribozyme is compared with two recently-reported twister ribozymes structures, which adopt similar global folds, but differ in conformational features around the cleavage site. PMID:25410397

  15. Determination of candidate subjects for better recognition of faces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xuansheng; Chen, Zhen; Teng, Zhongming

    2016-05-01

    In order to improve the accuracy of face recognition and to solve the problem of various poses, we present an improved collaborative representation classification (CRC) algorithm using original training samples and the corresponding mirror images. First, the mirror images are generated from the original training samples. Second, both original training samples and their mirror images are simultaneously used to represent the test sample via improved collaborative representation. Then, some classes which are "close" to the test sample are coarsely selected as candidate classes. At last, the candidate classes are used to represent the test sample again, and then the class most similar to the test sample can be determined finely. The experimental results show our proposed algorithm has more robustness than the original CRC algorithm and can effectively improve the accuracy of face recognition.

  16. Identification of endonucleolytic cleavage sites involved in decay of Escherichia coli trxA mRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Arraiano, C; Yancey, S D; Kushner, S R

    1993-01-01

    The degradation of individual mRNAs in Escherichia coli has been studied through the use of a multiple mutant carrying the pnp-7 (polynucleotide phosphorylase), rnb-500 (RNase II), and rne-1 (RNase E) alleles. In this triple mutant, discrete mRNA breakdown products are stabilized in vivo at the nonpermissive temperature (Arraiano, C. M., S. D. Yancey, and S. R. Kushner, J. Bacteriol. 170:4625-4633, 1988). In the case of thioredoxin (trxA) mRNA decay, degradation fragments accumulated at early times after a shift to the nonpermissive temperature. Using Northern (RNA) blots, S1 nuclease analysis, and primer extensions, we identified a series of specific endonucleolytic cleavage sites that occur throughout the transcript in both the triple mutant and a wild-type control. The implications of the complex decay patterns observed are discussed. Images PMID:7679384

  17. Drosophila topoisomerase II double-strand DNA cleavage: analysis of DNA sequence homology at the cleavage site.

    PubMed Central

    Sander, M; Hsieh, T S

    1985-01-01

    In order to study the sequence specificity of double-strand DNA cleavage by Drosophila topoisomerase II, we have mapped and sequenced 16 strong and 47 weak cleavage sites in the recombinant plasmid p pi 25.1. Analysis of the nucleotide and dinucleotide frequencies in the region near the site of phosphodiester bond breakage revealed a nonrandom distribution. The nucleotide frequencies observed would occur by chance with a probability less than 0.05. The consensus sequence we derived is 5'GT.A/TAY decrease ATT.AT..G 3', where a dot means no preferred nucleotide, Y is for pyrimidine, and the arrow shows the point of bond cleavage. On average, strong sites match the consensus better than weak sites. Images PMID:2987816

  18. SVM-based prediction of propeptide cleavage sites in spider toxins identifies toxin innovation in an Australian tarantula.

    PubMed

    Wong, Emily S W; Hardy, Margaret C; Wood, David; Bailey, Timothy; King, Glenn F

    2013-01-01

    Spider neurotoxins are commonly used as pharmacological tools and are a popular source of novel compounds with therapeutic and agrochemical potential. Since venom peptides are inherently toxic, the host spider must employ strategies to avoid adverse effects prior to venom use. It is partly for this reason that most spider toxins encode a protective proregion that upon enzymatic cleavage is excised from the mature peptide. In order to identify the mature toxin sequence directly from toxin transcripts, without resorting to protein sequencing, the propeptide cleavage site in the toxin precursor must be predicted bioinformatically. We evaluated different machine learning strategies (support vector machines, hidden Markov model and decision tree) and developed an algorithm (SpiderP) for prediction of propeptide cleavage sites in spider toxins. Our strategy uses a support vector machine (SVM) framework that combines both local and global sequence information. Our method is superior or comparable to current tools for prediction of propeptide sequences in spider toxins. Evaluation of the SVM method on an independent test set of known toxin sequences yielded 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Furthermore, we sequenced five novel peptides (not used to train the final predictor) from the venom of the Australian tarantula Selenotypus plumipes to test the accuracy of the predictor and found 80% sensitivity and 99.6% 8-mer specificity. Finally, we used the predictor together with homology information to predict and characterize seven groups of novel toxins from the deeply sequenced venom gland transcriptome of S. plumipes, which revealed structural complexity and innovations in the evolution of the toxins. The precursor prediction tool (SpiderP) is freely available on ArachnoServer (http://www.arachnoserver.org/spiderP.html), a web portal to a comprehensive relational database of spider toxins. All training data, test data, and scripts used are available from the Spider

  19. Cleavage site and Ectodomain of HA2 sub-unit sequence of three equine influenza virus isolated in Morocco

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The equine influenza (EI) is an infectious and contagious disease of the upper respiratory tract of horses. Two outbreaks were notified in Morocco during 1997 and 2004 respectively in Nador and Essaouira. The aims of the present study concern the amino acids sequences comparison with reference strain A/equine/Miami/1963(H3N8) of the HA2 subunit including the cleavage site of three equine influenza viruses (H3N8) isolated in Morocco: A/equine/Nador/1/1997(H3N8), A/equine/Essaouira/2/2004 (H3N8) and A/equine/Essaouira/3/2004 (H3N8). Results The obtained results demonstrated that the substitutions were located at Ectodomain (ED) and transmembrane domain (TD), and they have only one arginine in cleavage site (HA1-PEKQI-R329-GI-HA2). In the Ectodomain, the mutation N/154 2 /T deleted the NGT glycosylation site at position 154 for both strains A/equine/Essaouira/2/2004(H3N8) and A/equine/Essaouira/3/2004(H3N8). Except for mutation D/1602/Y of the A/equine/Nador/1/1997(H3N8) strain, the other mutations were involved in non conserved sites. While the transmembrane domain (TM) of the strain A/equine/Essaouira/3/2004(H3N8) exhibits a substitution at residue C/199 2 /F. For the A/equine/Nador/1/1997(H3N8) strain the HA2 shows a mutation at residue M/207 2 /L. Three Moroccan strains reveals a common substitution at the residue E/211 2 /Q located between transmembrane domain TM and the cytoplasmic domain (CD). Conclusion The given nature virulence of three Moroccan strains, the identified and reported mutations certainly played a permissive role of infection viral process. PMID:25016480

  20. SVM-based prediction of propeptide cleavage sites in spider toxins identifies toxin innovation in an Australian tarantula.

    PubMed

    Wong, Emily S W; Hardy, Margaret C; Wood, David; Bailey, Timothy; King, Glenn F

    2013-01-01

    Spider neurotoxins are commonly used as pharmacological tools and are a popular source of novel compounds with therapeutic and agrochemical potential. Since venom peptides are inherently toxic, the host spider must employ strategies to avoid adverse effects prior to venom use. It is partly for this reason that most spider toxins encode a protective proregion that upon enzymatic cleavage is excised from the mature peptide. In order to identify the mature toxin sequence directly from toxin transcripts, without resorting to protein sequencing, the propeptide cleavage site in the toxin precursor must be predicted bioinformatically. We evaluated different machine learning strategies (support vector machines, hidden Markov model and decision tree) and developed an algorithm (SpiderP) for prediction of propeptide cleavage sites in spider toxins. Our strategy uses a support vector machine (SVM) framework that combines both local and global sequence information. Our method is superior or comparable to current tools for prediction of propeptide sequences in spider toxins. Evaluation of the SVM method on an independent test set of known toxin sequences yielded 96% sensitivity and 100% specificity. Furthermore, we sequenced five novel peptides (not used to train the final predictor) from the venom of the Australian tarantula Selenotypus plumipes to test the accuracy of the predictor and found 80% sensitivity and 99.6% 8-mer specificity. Finally, we used the predictor together with homology information to predict and characterize seven groups of novel toxins from the deeply sequenced venom gland transcriptome of S. plumipes, which revealed structural complexity and innovations in the evolution of the toxins. The precursor prediction tool (SpiderP) is freely available on ArachnoServer (http://www.arachnoserver.org/spiderP.html), a web portal to a comprehensive relational database of spider toxins. All training data, test data, and scripts used are available from the Spider

  1. Characterization of the R572T point mutant of a putative cleavage site in human foamy virus Env.

    PubMed

    Bansal, A; Shaw, K L; Edwards, B H; Goepfert, P A; Mulligan, M J

    2000-03-01

    A putative cleavage site of the human foamy virus (HFV) envelope glycoprotein (Env) was altered. Transient env expression revealed that the R572T mutant Env was normally expressed and modified by asparagine-linked oligosaccharide chains. However, this single-amino-acid substitution was sufficient to abolish all detectable cleavage of the gp130 precursor polyprotein. Cell surface biotinylation demonstrated that the uncleaved mutant gp130 was transported to the plasma membrane. The uncleaved mutant protein was incapable of syncytium formation. Glycoprotein-driven virion budding, a unique aspect of HFV assembly, occurred despite the absence of Env cleavage. We then substituted the R572T mutant env into a replication-competent HFV molecular clone. Transfection of the mutant viral DNA into BHK-21 cells followed by viral titration with the FAB (foamy virus-activated beta-galactosidase expression) assay revealed that proteolysis of the HFV Env was essential for viral infectivity. Wild-type HFV Env partially complemented the defective virus phenotype. Taken together, these experimental results established the location of the HFV Env proteolytic site; the effects of cleavage on Env transport, processing, and function; and the importance of Env proteolysis for virus maturation and infectivity.

  2. Engineering D-Amino Acid Containing Collagen Like Peptide at the Cleavage Site of Clostridium histolyticum Collagenase for Its Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Velmurugan, Punitha; Jonnalagadda, Raghava Rao; Unni Nair, Balachandran

    2015-01-01

    Collagenase is an important enzyme which plays an important role in degradation of collagen in wound healing, cancer metastasis and even in embryonic development. However, the mechanism of this degradation has not yet been completely understood. In the field of biomedical and protein engineering, the design and development of new peptide based materials is of main concern. In the present work an attempt has been made to study the effect of DAla in collagen like peptide (imino-poor region of type I collagen) on the structure and stability of peptide against enzyme hydrolysis. Effect of replacement of DAla in the collagen like peptide has been studied using circular dichroic spectroscopy (CD). Our findings suggest that, DAla substitution leads to conformational changes in the secondary structure and favours the formation of polyproline II conformation than its L-counterpart in the imino-poor region of collagen like peptides. Change in the chirality of alanine at the cleavage site of collagenase in the imino-poor region inhibits collagenolytic activity. This may find application in design of peptides and peptidomimics for enzyme-substrate interaction, specifically with reference to collagen and other extra cellular matrix proteins. PMID:25973613

  3. Limited proteolysis and sequence analysis of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes from Escherichia coli. Cleavage sites and domains in the dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase components.

    PubMed Central

    Packman, L C; Perham, R N

    1987-01-01

    The structures of the dihydrolipoamide acyltransferase (E2) components of the 2-oxo acid dehydrogenase complexes from Escherichia coli were investigated by limited proteolysis. Trypsin and Staphylococcus aureus V8 proteinase were used to excise the three lipoyl domains from the E2p component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex and the single lipoyl domain from the E2o component of the 2-oxoglutarate dehydrogenase complex. The principal sites of action of these enzymes on each E2 chain were determined by sequence analysis of the isolated lipoyl fragments and of the truncated E2p and E2o chains. Each of the numerous cleavage sites (12 in E2p, six in E2o) fell within similar segments of the E2 chains, namely stretches of polypeptide rich in alanine, proline and/or charged amino acids. These regions are clearly accessible to proteinases of Mr 24,000-28,000 and, on the basis of n.m.r. spectroscopy, some of them have previously been implicated in facilitating domain movements by virtue of their conformational flexibility. The limited proteolysis data suggest that E2p and E2o possess closer architectural similarities than would be predicted from inspection of their amino acid sequences. As a result of this work, an error was detected in the sequence of E2o inferred from the previously published sequence of the encoding gene, sucB. The relevant peptides from E2o were purified and sequenced by direct means; an amended sequence is presented. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. PMID:3297046

  4. Mutation in the protease cleavage site of GDF9 increases ovulation rate and litter size in heterozygous ewes and causes infertility in homozygous ewes.

    PubMed

    Souza, C J H; McNeilly, A S; Benavides, M V; Melo, E O; Moraes, J C F

    2014-10-01

    Litter size (LS) in sheep is determined mainly by ovulation rate (OR). Several polymorphisms have been identified in the growth differentiation factor 9 (GDF9) gene that result in an increase in OR and prolificacy of sheep. Screening the databank of the Brazilian Sheep Breeders Association for triplet delivery, we identified flocks of prolific Ile de France ewes. After resequencing of GDF9, a point mutation (c.943C>T) was identified, resulting in a non-conservative amino acid change (p.Arg315Cys) in the cleavage site of the propeptide. This new allele was called Vacaria (FecG(v) ). A flock of half-sib ewes was evaluated for OR in the first three breeding seasons, and Vacaria heterozygotes had higher OR (P < 0.001), averaging 2.1 ± 0.1 when compared to 1.2 ± 0.1 in wild-type ewes. The OR was also influenced by age, increasing in the second and third breeding seasons (P < 0.001). In flocks segregating this allele, the LS was higher in mutant sheep (P < 0.001), averaging 1.61 ± 0.07 in heterozygotes and 1.29 ± 0.03 in wild-type ewes. Analysis of homozygote reproductive tract morphology revealed uterine and ovarian hypoplasia. Ovarian follicles continue to develop up to small antral stages, although with abnormal oocyte morphology and altered arrangement of granulosa cells. After the collapse of the oocyte in most follicles, the remaining cells formed clusters that persisted in the ovary. This SNP is useful to improve selection for dam prolificacy and also as a model to investigate GDF9 post-translation processing and the fate of the follicular cells that remain after the oocyte demise.

  5. Peptidase specificity from the substrate cleavage collection in the MEROPS database and a tool to measure cleavage site conservation

    PubMed Central

    Rawlings, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    One peptidase can usually be distinguished from another biochemically by its action on proteins, peptides and synthetic substrates. Since 1996, the MEROPS database (http://merops.sanger.ac.uk) has accumulated a collection of cleavages in substrates that now amounts to 66,615 cleavages. The total number of peptidases for which at least one cleavage is known is 1700 out of a total of 2457 different peptidases. This paper describes how the cleavages are obtained from the scientific literature, how they are annotated and how cleavages in peptides and proteins are cross-referenced to entries in the UniProt protein sequence database. The specificity profiles of 556 peptidases are shown for which ten or more substrate cleavages are known. However, it has been proposed that at least 40 cleavages in disparate proteins are required for specificity analysis to be meaningful, and only 163 peptidases (6.6%) fulfil this criterion. Also described are the various displays shown on the website to aid with the understanding of peptidase specificity, which are derived from the substrate cleavage collection. These displays include a logo, distribution matrix, and tables to summarize which amino acids or groups of amino acids are acceptable (or not acceptable) in each substrate binding pocket. For each protein substrate, there is a display to show how it is processed and degraded. Also described are tools on the website to help with the assessment of the physiological relevance of cleavages in a substrate. These tools rely on the hypothesis that a cleavage site that is conserved in orthologues is likely to be physiologically relevant, and alignments of substrate protein sequences are made utilizing the UniRef50 database, in which in each entry sequences are 50% or more identical. Conservation in this case means substitutions are permitted only if the amino acid is known to occupy the same substrate binding pocket from at least one other substrate cleaved by the same peptidase. PMID

  6. Children's Recognition of Unfamiliar Faces: Developments and Determinants.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Soppe, H. J. G.

    1986-01-01

    Eight- to 12-year-old primary school children and 13-year-old secondary school children were given a live and photographed face recognition task and several other figural tasks. While scores on most tasks increased with age, face recognition scores were affected by age, decreasing at age 12 (puberty onset). (Author/BB)

  7. Recognition determinants of broadly neutralizing human antibodies against dengue viruses.

    PubMed

    Rouvinski, Alexander; Guardado-Calvo, Pablo; Barba-Spaeth, Giovanna; Duquerroy, Stéphane; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Kikuti, Carlos M; Navarro Sanchez, M Erika; Dejnirattisai, Wanwisa; Wongwiwat, Wiyada; Haouz, Ahmed; Girard-Blanc, Christine; Petres, Stéphane; Shepard, William E; Desprès, Philippe; Arenzana-Seisdedos, Fernando; Dussart, Philippe; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip; Screaton, Gavin R; Rey, Félix A

    2015-04-01

    Dengue disease is caused by four different flavivirus serotypes, which infect 390 million people yearly with 25% symptomatic cases and for which no licensed vaccine is available. Recent phase III vaccine trials showed partial protection, and in particular no protection for dengue virus serotype 2 (refs 3, 4). Structural studies so far have characterized only epitopes recognized by serotype-specific human antibodies. We recently isolated human antibodies potently neutralizing all four dengue virus serotypes. Here we describe the X-ray structures of four of these broadly neutralizing antibodies in complex with the envelope glycoprotein E from dengue virus serotype 2, revealing that the recognition determinants are at a serotype-invariant site at the E-dimer interface, including the exposed main chain of the E fusion loop and the two conserved glycan chains. This 'E-dimer-dependent epitope' is also the binding site for the viral glycoprotein prM during virus maturation in the secretory pathway of the infected cell, explaining its conservation across serotypes and highlighting an Achilles' heel of the virus with respect to antibody neutralization. These findings will be instrumental for devising novel immunogens to protect simultaneously against all four serotypes of dengue virus. PMID:25581790

  8. Visual Flight Feedback as a Determiner of Motor Response Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Newell, K. M.

    1975-01-01

    In this study, over a series of learning trials of projecting a ball a criterion distance, the hypotheses were tested and confirmed that withdrawal of visual feedback of the flight of the ball would produce a decrement in response recognition but not recall. (JS)

  9. Development of a Novel Anti-HIV-1 Agent from within: Effect of Chimeric Vpr-Containing Protease Cleavage Site Residues on Virus Replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serio, D.; Rizvi, T. A.; Cartas, M.; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Weber, I. T.; Koprowski, H.; Srinivasan, A.

    1997-04-01

    Effective antiviral agents will be of great value in controlling virus replication and delaying the onset of HIV-1-related disease symptoms. Current therapy involves the use of antiviral agents that target the enzymatic functions of the virus, resulting in the emergence of resistant viruses to these agents, thus lowering their effectiveness. To overcome this problem, we have considered the idea of developing novel agents from within HIV-1 as inhibitors of virus replication. The specificity of the Vpr protein for the HIV-1 virus particle makes it an attractive molecule for the development of antiviral agents targeting the events associated with virus maturation. We have generated chimeric Vpr proteins containing HIV-1-specific sequences added to the C terminus of Vpr. These sequences correspond to nine cleavage sites of the Gag and Gag-Pol precursors of HIV-1. The chimeric Vpr constructs were introduced into HIV-1 proviral DNA to assess their effect on virus infectivity using single- and multiple-round replication assays. The virus particles generated exhibited a variable replication pattern depending on the protease cleavage site used as a fusion partner. Interestingly, the chimeric Vpr containing the cleavage sequences from the junction of p24 and p2, 24/2, completely abolished virus infectivity. These results show that chimeric proteins generated from within HIV-1 have the ability to suppress HIV-1 replication and make ideal agents for gene therapy or intracellular immunization to treat HIV-1 infection.

  10. sgRNAcas9: a software package for designing CRISPR sgRNA and evaluating potential off-target cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shengsong; Shen, Bin; Zhang, Chaobao; Huang, Xingxu; Zhang, Yonglian

    2014-01-01

    Although the CRISPR/Cas9/sgRNA system efficiently cleaves intracellular DNA at desired target sites, major concerns remain on potential "off-target" cleavage that may occur throughout the whole genome. In order to improve CRISPR-Cas9 specificity for targeted genome editing and transcriptional control, we describe a bioinformatics tool "sgRNAcas9", which is a software package developed for fast design of CRISPR sgRNA with minimized off-target effects. This package consists of programs to perform a search for CRISPR target sites (protospacers) with user-defined parameters, predict genome-wide Cas9 potential off-target cleavage sites (POT), classify the POT into three categories, batch-design oligonucleotides for constructing 20-nt (nucleotides) or truncated sgRNA expression vectors, extract desired length nucleotide sequences flanking the on- or off-target cleavage sites for designing PCR primer pairs to validate the mutations by T7E1 cleavage assay. Importantly, by identifying potential off-target sites in silico, the sgRNAcas9 allows the selection of more specific target sites and aids the identification of bona fide off-target sites, significantly facilitating the design of sgRNA for genome editing applications. sgRNAcas9 software package is publicly available at BiooTools website (www.biootools.com) under the terms of the GNU General Public License.

  11. Development of a novel anti-HIV-1 agent from within: effect of chimeric Vpr-containing protease cleavage site residues on virus replication.

    PubMed

    Serio, D; Rizvi, T A; Cartas, M; Kalyanaraman, V S; Weber, I T; Koprowski, H; Srinivasan, A

    1997-04-01

    Effective antiviral agents will be of great value in controlling virus replication and delaying the onset of HIV-1-related disease symptoms. Current therapy involves the use of antiviral agents that target the enzymatic functions of the virus, resulting in the emergence of resistant viruses to these agents, thus lowering their effectiveness. To overcome this problem, we have considered the idea of developing novel agents from within HIV-1 as inhibitors of virus replication. The specificity of the Vpr protein for the HIV-1 virus particle makes it an attractive molecule for the development of antiviral agents targeting the events associated with virus maturation. We have generated chimeric Vpr proteins containing HIV-1-specific sequences added to the C terminus of Vpr. These sequences correspond to nine cleavage sites of the Gag and Gag-Pol precursors of HIV-1. The chimeric Vpr constructs were introduced into HIV-1 proviral DNA to assess their effect on virus infectivity using single- and multiple-round replication assays. The virus particles generated exhibited a variable replication pattern depending on the protease cleavage site used as a fusion partner. Interestingly, the chimeric Vpr containing the cleavage sequences from the junction of p24 and p2, 24/2, completely abolished virus infectivity. These results show that chimeric proteins generated from within HIV-1 have the ability to suppress HIV-1 replication and make ideal agents for gene therapy or intracellular immunization to treat HIV-1 infection.

  12. Development of a novel anti-HIV-1 agent from within: Effect of chimeric Vpr-containing protease cleavage site residues on virus replication

    PubMed Central

    Serio, D.; Rizvi, T. A.; Cartas, M.; Kalyanaraman, V. S.; Weber, I. T.; Koprowski, H.; Srinivasan, A.

    1997-01-01

    Effective antiviral agents will be of great value in controlling virus replication and delaying the onset of HIV-1-related disease symptoms. Current therapy involves the use of antiviral agents that target the enzymatic functions of the virus, resulting in the emergence of resistant viruses to these agents, thus lowering their effectiveness. To overcome this problem, we have considered the idea of developing novel agents from within HIV-1 as inhibitors of virus replication. The specificity of the Vpr protein for the HIV-1 virus particle makes it an attractive molecule for the development of antiviral agents targeting the events associated with virus maturation. We have generated chimeric Vpr proteins containing HIV-1-specific sequences added to the C terminus of Vpr. These sequences correspond to nine cleavage sites of the Gag and Gag–Pol precursors of HIV-1. The chimeric Vpr constructs were introduced into HIV-1 proviral DNA to assess their effect on virus infectivity using single- and multiple-round replication assays. The virus particles generated exhibited a variable replication pattern depending on the protease cleavage site used as a fusion partner. Interestingly, the chimeric Vpr containing the cleavage sequences from the junction of p24 and p2, 24/2, completely abolished virus infectivity. These results show that chimeric proteins generated from within HIV-1 have the ability to suppress HIV-1 replication and make ideal agents for gene therapy or intracellular immunization to treat HIV-1 infection. PMID:9096396

  13. Probing the Specificity Determinants of Amino Acid Recognition by Arginase

    SciTech Connect

    Shishova, E.; Di Costanzo, L; Emig, F; Ash, D; Christianson, D

    2009-01-01

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that serves as a therapeutic target for the treatment of asthma, erectile dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the molecular basis of inhibitor affinity, we have employed site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray crystallography to probe the molecular recognition of the amino acid moiety (i.e., the ?-amino and ?-carboxylate groups) of substrate l-arginine and inhibitors in the active site of arginase I. Specifically, we focus on (1) a water-mediated hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and T135, (2) a direct hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-carboxylate and N130, and (3) a direct charged hydrogen bond between the substrate ?-amino group and D183. Amino acid substitutions for T135, N130, and D183 generally compromise substrate affinity as reflected by increased KM values but have less pronounced effects on catalytic function as reflected by minimal variations of kcat. As with substrate KM values, inhibitor Kd values increase for binding to enzyme mutants and suggest that the relative contribution of intermolecular interactions to amino acid affinity in the arginase active site is water-mediated hydrogen bond < direct hydrogen bond < direct charged hydrogen bond. Structural comparisons of arginase with the related binuclear manganese metalloenzymes agmatinase and proclavaminic acid amidinohydrolase suggest that the evolution of substrate recognition in the arginase fold occurs by mutation of residues contained in specificity loops flanking the mouth of the active site (especially loops 4 and 5), thereby allowing diverse guanidinium substrates to be accommodated for catalysis.

  14. The multibasic cleavage site of the hemagglutinin of highly pathogenic A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) avian influenza virus acts as a virulence factor in a host-specific manner in mammals.

    PubMed

    Suguitan, Amorsolo L; Matsuoka, Yumiko; Lau, Yuk-Fai; Santos, Celia P; Vogel, Leatrice; Cheng, Lily I; Orandle, Marlene; Subbarao, Kanta

    2012-03-01

    Highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) viruses of the H5 and H7 subtypes typically possess multiple basic amino acids around the cleavage site (MBS) of their hemagglutinin (HA) protein, a recognized virulence motif in poultry. To determine the importance of the H5 HA MBS as a virulence factor in mammals, recombinant wild-type HPAI A/Vietnam/1203/2004 (H5N1) viruses that possessed (H5N1) or lacked (ΔH5N1) the H5 HA MBS were generated and evaluated for their virulence in BALB/c mice, ferrets, and African green monkeys (AGMs) (Chlorocebus aethiops). The presence of the H5 HA MBS was associated with lethality, significantly higher virus titers in the respiratory tract, virus dissemination to extrapulmonary organs, lymphopenia, significantly elevated levels of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines, and inflammation in the lungs of mice and ferrets. In AGMs, neither H5N1 nor ΔH5N1 virus was lethal and neither caused clinical symptoms. The H5 HA MBS was associated with mild enhancement of replication and delayed virus clearance. Thus, the contribution of H5 HA MBS to the virulence of the HPAI H5N1 virus varies among mammalian hosts and is most significant in mice and ferrets and less remarkable in nonhuman primates. PMID:22205751

  15. Recognition and Specificity Determinants of the Human Cbx Chromodomains

    SciTech Connect

    Kaustov, Lilia; Ouyang, Hui; Amaya, Maria; Lemak, Alexander; Nady, Nataliya; Duan, Shili; Wasney, Gregory A.; Li, Zhihong; Vedadi, Masoud; Schapira, Matthieu; Min, Jinrong; Arrowsmith, Cheryl H.

    2011-08-17

    The eight mammalian Cbx proteins are chromodomain-containing proteins involved in regulation of heterochromatin, gene expression, and developmental programs. They are evolutionarily related to the Drosophila HP1 (dHP1) and Pc (dPc) proteins that are key components of chromatin-associated complexes capable of recognizing repressive marks such as trimethylated Lys-9 and Lys-27, respectively, on histone H3. However, the binding specificity and function of the human homologs, Cbx1-8, remain unclear. To this end we employed structural, biophysical, and mutagenic approaches to characterize the molecular determinants of sequence contextual methyllysine binding to human Cbx1-8 proteins. Although all three human HP1 homologs (Cbx1, -3, -5) replicate the structural and binding features of their dHP counterparts, the five Pc homologs (Cbx2, -4, -6, -7, -8) bind with lower affinity to H3K9me3 or H3K27me3 peptides and are unable to distinguish between these two marks. Additionally, peptide permutation arrays revealed a greater sequence tolerance within the Pc family and suggest alternative nonhistone sequences as potential binding targets for this class of chromodomains. Our structures explain the divergence of peptide binding selectivity in the Pc subfamily and highlight previously unrecognized features of the chromodomain that influence binding and specificity.

  16. Active site specificity profiling of the matrix metalloproteinase family: Proteomic identification of 4300 cleavage sites by nine MMPs explored with structural and synthetic peptide cleavage analyses.

    PubMed

    Eckhard, Ulrich; Huesgen, Pitter F; Schilling, Oliver; Bellac, Caroline L; Butler, Georgina S; Cox, Jennifer H; Dufour, Antoine; Goebeler, Verena; Kappelhoff, Reinhild; Keller, Ulrich Auf dem; Klein, Theo; Lange, Philipp F; Marino, Giada; Morrison, Charlotte J; Prudova, Anna; Rodriguez, David; Starr, Amanda E; Wang, Yili; Overall, Christopher M

    2016-01-01

    Secreted and membrane tethered matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are key homeostatic proteases regulating the extracellular signaling and structural matrix environment of cells and tissues. For drug targeting of proteases, selectivity for individual molecules is highly desired and can be met by high yield active site specificity profiling. Using the high throughput Proteomic Identification of protease Cleavage Sites (PICS) method to simultaneously profile both the prime and non-prime sides of the cleavage sites of nine human MMPs, we identified more than 4300 cleavages from P6 to P6' in biologically diverse human peptide libraries. MMP specificity and kinetic efficiency were mainly guided by aliphatic and aromatic residues in P1' (with a ~32-93% preference for leucine depending on the MMP), and basic and small residues in P2' and P3', respectively. A wide differential preference for the hallmark P3 proline was found between MMPs ranging from 15 to 46%, yet when combined in the same peptide with the universally preferred P1' leucine, an unexpected negative cooperativity emerged. This was not observed in previous studies, probably due to the paucity of approaches that profile both the prime and non-prime sides together, and the masking of subsite cooperativity effects by global heat maps and iceLogos. These caveats make it critical to check for these biologically highly important effects by fixing all 20 amino acids one-by-one in the respective subsites and thorough assessing of the inferred specificity logo changes. Indeed an analysis of bona fide MEROPS physiological substrate cleavage data revealed that of the 37 natural substrates with either a P3-Pro or a P1'-Leu only 5 shared both features, confirming the PICS data. Upon probing with several new quenched-fluorescent peptides, rationally designed on our specificity data, the negative cooperativity was explained by reduced non-prime side flexibility constraining accommodation of the rigidifying P3 proline with

  17. APASdb: a database describing alternative poly(A) sites and selection of heterogeneous cleavage sites downstream of poly(A) signals.

    PubMed

    You, Leiming; Wu, Jiexin; Feng, Yuchao; Fu, Yonggui; Guo, Yanan; Long, Liyuan; Zhang, Hui; Luan, Yijie; Tian, Peng; Chen, Liangfu; Huang, Guangrui; Huang, Shengfeng; Li, Yuxin; Li, Jie; Chen, Chengyong; Zhang, Yaqing; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing amounts of genes have been shown to utilize alternative polyadenylation (APA) 3'-processing sites depending on the cell and tissue type and/or physiological and pathological conditions at the time of processing, and the construction of genome-wide database regarding APA is urgently needed for better understanding poly(A) site selection and APA-directed gene expression regulation for a given biology. Here we present a web-accessible database, named APASdb (http://mosas.sysu.edu.cn/utr), which can visualize the precise map and usage quantification of different APA isoforms for all genes. The datasets are deeply profiled by the sequencing alternative polyadenylation sites (SAPAS) method capable of high-throughput sequencing 3'-ends of polyadenylated transcripts. Thus, APASdb details all the heterogeneous cleavage sites downstream of poly(A) signals, and maintains near complete coverage for APA sites, much better than the previous databases using conventional methods. Furthermore, APASdb provides the quantification of a given APA variant among transcripts with different APA sites by computing their corresponding normalized-reads, making our database more useful. In addition, APASdb supports URL-based retrieval, browsing and display of exon-intron structure, poly(A) signals, poly(A) sites location and usage reads, and 3'-untranslated regions (3'-UTRs). Currently, APASdb involves APA in various biological processes and diseases in human, mouse and zebrafish.

  18. Beneficial effect of antibodies against β- secretase cleavage site of APP on Alzheimer's-like pathology in triple-transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich-Nikitin, Inna; Rakover, Idan S; Becker, Maria; Solomon, Beka

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of amyloid β and tau, the two hallmark proteins in Alzheimer's disease (AD), has been extensively studied individually. Recently new data suggest their possible interactions and synergistic effects in the disease. In this study, we investigate the ability of antibodies against the β secretase cleavage site on APP, named BBS1, to affect tau pathology, besides their well established effect on intracellular Aβ and amyloid load. For this purpose we treated the triple transgenic mice model of AD (3x Tg-AD) with mAb BBS1 intracerebroventricularly, using mini osmotic pumps for one month. The experimental data demonstrated reduction in total and phosphorylated tau levels, explained by significant reduction in GSK3β which phosphorylates tau on sites recognized by antibodies against PHF1 and AT-8. The treatment increased the cognitive capabilities and reduced the brain inflammation levels which accompany AD pathology. The data showing that tau pathology was significantly reduced by BBS1 antibodies suggest a close interaction between tau and Aβ in the development of AD, and may serve as an efficient novel immunotherapy against both hallmarks of this disease. PMID:23071606

  19. Beneficial effect of antibodies against β- secretase cleavage site of APP on Alzheimer's-like pathology in triple-transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Rabinovich-Nikitin, Inna; Rakover, Idan S; Becker, Maria; Solomon, Beka

    2012-01-01

    The toxicity of amyloid β and tau, the two hallmark proteins in Alzheimer's disease (AD), has been extensively studied individually. Recently new data suggest their possible interactions and synergistic effects in the disease. In this study, we investigate the ability of antibodies against the β secretase cleavage site on APP, named BBS1, to affect tau pathology, besides their well established effect on intracellular Aβ and amyloid load. For this purpose we treated the triple transgenic mice model of AD (3x Tg-AD) with mAb BBS1 intracerebroventricularly, using mini osmotic pumps for one month. The experimental data demonstrated reduction in total and phosphorylated tau levels, explained by significant reduction in GSK3β which phosphorylates tau on sites recognized by antibodies against PHF1 and AT-8. The treatment increased the cognitive capabilities and reduced the brain inflammation levels which accompany AD pathology. The data showing that tau pathology was significantly reduced by BBS1 antibodies suggest a close interaction between tau and Aβ in the development of AD, and may serve as an efficient novel immunotherapy against both hallmarks of this disease.

  20. APASdb: a database describing alternative poly(A) sites and selection of heterogeneous cleavage sites downstream of poly(A) signals

    PubMed Central

    You, Leiming; Wu, Jiexin; Feng, Yuchao; Fu, Yonggui; Guo, Yanan; Long, Liyuan; Zhang, Hui; Luan, Yijie; Tian, Peng; Chen, Liangfu; Huang, Guangrui; Huang, Shengfeng; Li, Yuxin; Li, Jie; Chen, Chengyong; Zhang, Yaqing; Chen, Shangwu; Xu, Anlong

    2015-01-01

    Increasing amounts of genes have been shown to utilize alternative polyadenylation (APA) 3′-processing sites depending on the cell and tissue type and/or physiological and pathological conditions at the time of processing, and the construction of genome-wide database regarding APA is urgently needed for better understanding poly(A) site selection and APA-directed gene expression regulation for a given biology. Here we present a web-accessible database, named APASdb (http://mosas.sysu.edu.cn/utr), which can visualize the precise map and usage quantification of different APA isoforms for all genes. The datasets are deeply profiled by the sequencing alternative polyadenylation sites (SAPAS) method capable of high-throughput sequencing 3′-ends of polyadenylated transcripts. Thus, APASdb details all the heterogeneous cleavage sites downstream of poly(A) signals, and maintains near complete coverage for APA sites, much better than the previous databases using conventional methods. Furthermore, APASdb provides the quantification of a given APA variant among transcripts with different APA sites by computing their corresponding normalized-reads, making our database more useful. In addition, APASdb supports URL-based retrieval, browsing and display of exon-intron structure, poly(A) signals, poly(A) sites location and usage reads, and 3′-untranslated regions (3′-UTRs). Currently, APASdb involves APA in various biological processes and diseases in human, mouse and zebrafish. PMID:25378337

  1. Reliability of a Simple Method for Determining Salt Taste Detection and Recognition Thresholds.

    PubMed

    Giguère, Jean-François; Piovesana, Paula de Moura; Proulx-Belhumeur, Alexandra; Doré, Michel; Sampaio, Karina de Lemos; Gallani, Maria-Cecilia

    2016-03-01

    The aim of this study was to assess the reliability of a rapid analytical method to determine salt taste detection and recognition thresholds based on the ASTM E679 method. Reliability was evaluated according to criterion of temporal stability with a 1-week interval test-retest, with 29 participants. Thresholds were assessed by using the 3-AFC technique with 15 ascending concentrations of salt solution (1-292 mM, 1.5-fold steps) and estimated by 2 approaches: individual (geometric means) and group (graphical) thresholds. The proportion of agreement between the test and retest results was estimated using intraclass coefficient correlations. The detection and recognition thresholds calculated by the geometric mean were 2.8 and 18.6mM at session 1 and 2.3 and 14.5mM at session 2 and according to the graphical approach, 2.7 and 18.6mM at session 1 and 1.7 and 16.3mM at session 2. The proportion of agreement between test and retest for the detection and recognition thresholds was 0.430 (95% CI: 0.080-0.680) and 0.660 (95% CI: 0.400-0.830). This fast and simple method to assess salt taste detection and recognition thresholds demonstrated satisfactory evidence of reliability and it could be useful for large population studies. PMID:26733539

  2. The influence of socio-demographic indicators economic determinants and social recognition on sport participation in Germany.

    PubMed

    Hallmann, Kirstin; Breuer, Christoph

    2014-01-01

    This article analyses sport participation using a demographic-economic model which was extended by the construct 'social recognition'. Social recognition was integrated into the model on the understanding that it is the purpose of each individual to maximise his or her utility. A computer-assisted telephone interview survey was conducted in the city of Rheinberg, Germany, producing an overall sample of n=1934. Regression analyses were performed to estimate the impact of socio-demographic, economic determinants, and social recognition on sport participation. The results suggest that various socio-economic factors and social recognition are important determinants of sport participation on the one hand, and on sport frequency on the other. Social recognition plays a significant yet different role for both sport participation and sport frequency. While friends' involvement with sport influences one's sport participation, parents' involvement with sport influences one's sport frequency.

  3. Molecular determinants of prokaryotic voltage-gated sodium channels for recognition of local anesthetics.

    PubMed

    Shimomura, Takushi; Irie, Katsumasa; Fujiyoshi, Yoshinori

    2016-08-01

    Local anesthetics (LAs) inhibit mammalian voltage-gated Na(+) channels (Navs) and are thus clinically important. LAs also inhibit prokaryotic Navs (BacNavs), which have a simpler structure than mammalian Navs. To elucidate the detailed mechanisms of LA inhibition to BacNavs, we used NavBh, a BacNav from Bacillus halodurans, to analyze the interactions of several LAs and quaternary ammoniums (QAs). Based on the chemical similarity of QA with the tertiary-alkylamine (TAA) group of LAs, QAs were used to determine the residues required for the recognition of TAA by NavBh. We confirmed that two residues, Thr220 and Phe227, are important for LA binding; a methyl group of Thr220 is important for recognizing both QAs and LAs, whereas Phe227 is involved in holding blockers at the binding site. In addition, we found that NavBh holds blockers in a closed state, consistent with the large inner cavity observed in the crystal structures of BacNavs. These findings reveal the inhibition mechanism of LAs in NavBh, where the methyl group of Thr220 provides the main receptor site for the TAA group and the bulky phenyl group of Phe227 holds the blockers inside the large inner cavity. These two residues correspond to the two LA recognition residues in mammalian Navs, which suggests the relevance of the LA recognition between BacNavs and mammalian Navs. PMID:27273848

  4. Human cytomegalovirus maturational proteinase: expression in Escherichia coli, purification, and enzymatic characterization by using peptide substrate mimics of natural cleavage sites.

    PubMed Central

    Burck, P J; Berg, D H; Luk, T P; Sassmannshausen, L M; Wakulchik, M; Smith, D P; Hsiung, H M; Becker, G W; Gibson, W; Villarreal, E C

    1994-01-01

    The proteolytic processing of the human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) assembly protein, resulting in truncation of its C terminus, is an essential step in virion maturation. The proteinase responsible for this cleavage is the amino-terminal half of the protein encoded by the UL80a open reading fame. We have obtained high expression levels of this 256-amino-acid HCMV proteinase, assemblin, in Escherichia coli. In addition to the 28-kDa proteinase, a 15-kDa protein comprising the first 143 amino acids and a 13-kDa protein comprising the last 113 amino acids of the 28-kDa HCMV proteinase were present. Both the 28-kDa proteinase and the 15-kDa protein were purified by a two-step chromatographic procedure utilizing anion exchange in urea and dithiothreitol and size exclusion in NaSCN and dithiothreitol. Activation of the purified 28-kDa proteinase required denaturation in urea as well as complete reduction of all five cysteine residues in the molecule. Removal of the urea by dialysis with retention of the reducing agent yielded an active proteinase. Addition of glycerol to 50% enhanced the activity. The HCMV proteinase cleaved the peptides RGVVNASSRLAK and SYVKASVSPE, which are mimics of the maturational (M)- and release (R)-site sequences, respectively, in the UL80a-encoded protein. The cleavage site in the peptides was at the same Ala-Ser scissile bond as observed in the UL80a protein. The Km value for the cleavage of RGVVNASSRLAK (M-site mimic) by the proteinase was similar to that for SYVKASVSPE (R-site mimic), but the turnover (kcat) of the M-site peptide mimic substrate by the proteinase was six to eight times faster. The peptide homologs of the herpes simplex virus type 1 M- and R-site sequences in the UL26-encoded protein were also cleaved by the HCMV proteinase, although at rates slower than those for the HCMV substrates. The HCMV proteinase was inhibited by Zn2+ and by alkylating agents, but only at very high inhibitor concentrations. The purified 15-kDa protein

  5. Determination of hydralazine with flow injection chemiluminescence sensor using molecularly imprinted polymer as recognition element.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Zhou, Houjiang; Zhang, Zhujun; He, Deyong; He, Chao

    2006-06-01

    A novel flow injection chemiluminescence (CL) sensor for hydralazine determination using molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) as recognition element is reported. Hydralazine-MIP was prepared through non-covalent copolymerization using methacrylic acid (MAA) monomer, hydralazine template and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (EGDMA) cross-linker. Particles of the MIP were packed into a v-shape glass tube for on-line adsorption of the analyte of hydralazine. The adsorbed hydralazine could be sensed by its great enhancing effect on the CL reaction between luminol and periodate. The CL intensity is linear to hydralazine concentration in the range from 2x10(-9) to 8x10(-7) g/mL. The detection limit is 6x10(-10) g/mL (3sigma) and the relative standard deviation is 2.8% (n=7) for 8x10(-9) g/mL hydralazine. The selective experiment showed that the selectivity and sensitivity of the CL method could be greatly improved when MIP was used as recognition element in the flow-injection CL sensor. The sensor was reversible and reusable. It could be used for more than 100 times. It has been used directly to determine the hydralazine in human urine.

  6. Exon recognition and nucleocytoplasmic partitioning determine AMPD1 alternative transcript production.

    PubMed Central

    Mineo, I; Holmes, E W

    1991-01-01

    Two mature transcripts are produced from the rat AMP deaminase 1 (AMPD1) gene, one that retains exon 2 and one from which exon 2 has been removed. The ratio of these two transcripts is controlled by stage-specific and tissue-specific signals (I. Mineo, P. R. H. Clarke, R. L. Sabina, and E. W. Holmes, Mol. Cell. Biol. 10:5271-5278, 1990; R. L. Sabina, N. Ogasawara, and E. W. Holmes, Mol. Cell. Biol. 9:2244-2246, 1989). By using transfection studies with native, mutant, and chimeric minigene constructs, two steps in RNA processing that determine the ratio of these two transcripts have been identified. The first step is recognition of this exon in the primary transcript. The primary transcript is subject to alternative splicing in which exon 2 is either recognized and thereby included in the mature mRNA or is ignored and retained in a composite intron containing intron 1-exon 2-intron 2. The following properties of the primary transcript influence exon recognition. (i) Exon 2 is intrinsically difficult to recognize, possibly because of its small size (only 12 bases) and/or a suboptimal 5' donor site at the exon 2-intron 2 boundary. (ii) Intron 2 plays a permissive role in recognition of exon 2 because it is removed at a relatively slow rate, presumably because of the suboptimal polypyrimidine tract in the putative 3' branch site. The second step in RNA processing that influences the ratio of mature transcripts produced from the AMPD1 gene occurs subsequent to the ligation of exon 2 to exon 1. An RNA intermediate, composed of exon 1-exon 2-intron 2-exon 3, is produced in the first processing step, but it is variably retained in the nucleus. Retention of this intermediate in the nucleus is associated with accumulation of the mature mRNA containing exon 2, while cytoplasmic escape of this intermediate is reactions, exon recognition and nucleocytoplasmic partitioning, determine the relative abundance of alternative mRNAs derived from the AMPD1 gene. Images PMID:1922051

  7. Two Proteins Form a Heteromeric Bacterial Self-Recognition Complex in Which Variable Subdomains Determine Allele-Restricted Binding

    PubMed Central

    Cardarelli, Lia; Saak, Christina

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Self- versus nonself-recognition in bacteria has been described recently through genetic analyses in multiple systems; however, understanding of the biochemical properties and mechanisms of recognition-determinant proteins remains limited. Here we extend the molecular and biochemical understanding of two recognition-determinant proteins in bacteria. We have found that a heterotypic complex is formed between two bacterial self-recognition proteins, IdsD and IdsE, the genes of which have been shown to genetically encode the determinants for strain-specific identity in the opportunistic bacterial pathogen Proteus mirabilis. This IdsD-IdsE complex forms independently of other P. mirabilis-encoded self-recognition proteins. We have also shown that the binding between IdsD and IdsE is strain- and allele-specific. The specificity for interactions is encoded within a predicted membrane-spanning subdomain within each protein that contains stretches of unique amino acids in each P. mirabilis variant. Finally, we have demonstrated that this in vitro IdsD-IdsE binding interaction correlates to in vivo population identity, suggesting that the binding interactions between IdsD and IdsE are part of a cellular pathway that underpins self-recognition behavior in P. mirabilis and drives bacterial population sociality. PMID:26060269

  8. Determination of the base recognition positions of zinc fingers from sequence analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Jacobs, G H

    1992-01-01

    The CC/HH zinc finger is a small independently folded DNA recognition motif found in many eukaryotic proteins, which ligates zinc through two cysteine and two histidine ligands. A database of 1340 zinc fingers from 221 proteins has been constructed and a program for analysis of aligned sequences written. This paper describes sequence analysis aimed at determining the amino acid positions that recognize the DNA bases, by comparing two types of sequence variation. Using the idea that long runs of adjacent zinc fingers have arisen from internal gene duplication, the conservation of each position of the finger within the runs was calculated. The conservation of each position of the finger between homologous proteins from different species was also noted. A correlation of the two types of conservation showed clusters of related amino acids. One cluster of three positions was found to be especially variable within long runs, but highly conserved between corresponding fingers of homologous proteins; these positions are predicted to be the base contact positions. They match the amino acid positions that contact the bases in the co-crystal structure determined by Pavletich and Pabo [Science, 240, 809-817 (1991)]. An adjacent cluster of four positions on the plot may also be associated with DNA binding. This analysis shows that the base recognition positions can be identified even in the absence of a known structure for a zinc finger. These results are applicable to zinc fingers where the structure of the complex is unknown, in particular suggesting that the individual finger--DNA interaction seen in the Zif268--DNA structure has been conserved in many zinc finger--DNA interactions. Images PMID:1425585

  9. Structure of the DNA-Eco RI endonuclease recognition complex at 3 A resolution.

    PubMed

    McClarin, J A; Frederick, C A; Wang, B C; Greene, P; Boyer, H W; Grable, J; Rosenberg, J M

    1986-12-19

    The crystal structure of the complex between Eco RI endonuclease and the cognate oligonucleotide TCGCGAATTCGCG provides a detailed example of the structural basis of sequence-specific DNA-protein interactions. The structure was determined, to 3 A resolution, by the ISIR (iterative single isomorphous replacement) method with a platinum isomorphous derivative. The complex has twofold symmetry. Each subunit of the endonuclease is organized into an alpha/beta domain consisting a five-stranded beta sheet, alpha helices, and an extension, called the "arm," which wraps around the DNA. The large beta sheet consists of antiparallel and parallel motifs that form the foundations for the loops and alpha helices responsible for DNA strand scission and sequence-specific recognition, respectively. The DNA cleavage site is located in a cleft that binds the DNA backbone in the vicinity of the scissile bond. Sequence specificity is mediated by 12 hydrogen bonds originating from alpha helical recognition modules. Arg200 forms two hydrogen bonds with guanine while Glu144 and Arg145 form four hydrogen bonds to adjacent adenine residues. These interactions discriminate the Eco RI hexanucleotide GAATTC from all other hexanucleotides because any base substitution would require rupture of at least one of these hydrogen bonds.

  10. Ligand-dependent recruitment of the Arnt coregulator determines DNA recognition by the dioxin receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Whitelaw, M.; Pongratz, I.; Wilhelmsson, A.; Gustafsson, J.; Poellinger, L. )

    1993-04-01

    Signal transduction by dioxins is mediated by the intracellular dioxin or aryl hydrocarbon receptor. This receptor binds dioxin and its planar aromatic congeners in a saturable manner with high affinity. The extreme toxicity of dioxin has been demonstrated in animals but not in humans. In animals, dioxin causes thymic wasting, immune suppression, severe epithelial disorders and tumor promotion. On a molecular level, dioxins are inducers of transcription of a battery of target genes encoding xenobiotic metabolizing enzymes. Dioxin also appears to transcriptionally regulate the expression of the growth modulatory genes for interleukin-1 Beta and plasminogen activator inhibitor-2. The dioxin induction response is mediated by single or multiple copies of dioxin-inducible transcriptional control elements in target promoters. The research data detailed in this paper examines the ligand-dependent recruitment of the Arnt coregulator which determines DNA recognition by the dioxin receptor. This data suggests that dioxin receptor activity is governed by a complex pattern of combinatorial regulation involving repression by hsp90 and then by ligand-dependent recruitment of the positive coregulator Arnt and that the dioxin receptor system provides the first example of signal-controlled dimerization of bHLH factors.

  11. Molecular Determinants of T Cell Epitope Recognition to the Common Timothy Grass Allergen

    PubMed Central

    Oseroff, Carla; Sidney, John; Kotturi, Maya F.; Kolla, Ravi; Alam, Rafeul; Broide, David H.; Wasserman, Stephen I.; Weiskopf, Daniela; McKinney, Denise M.; Chung, Jo L.; Petersen, Arnd; Grey, Howard; Peters, Bjoern; Sette, Alessandro

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the molecular determinants of allergen-derived T cell epitopes in humans utilizing the Phleum pratense (Timothy grass) allergens (Phl p). PBMCs from allergic individuals were tested in ELISPOT assays with overlapping peptides spanning known Phl p allergens. A total of 43 distinct antigenic regions were recognized, illustrating the large breadth of grass-specific T cell epitopes. Th2 cytokines (as represented by IL-5) were predominant, whereas IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-17 were detected less frequently. Responses from specific immunotherapy treatment individuals were weaker and less consistent, yet similar in epitope specificity and cytokine pattern to allergic donors, whereas nonallergic individuals were essentially nonreactive. Despite the large breadth of recognition, nine dominant antigenic regions were defined, each recognized by multiple donors, accounting for 51% of the total response. Multiple HLA molecules and loci restricted the dominant regions, and the immunodominant epitopes could be predicted using bioinformatic algorithms specific for 23 common HLA-DR, DP, and DQ molecules. Immunodominance was also apparent at the Phl p Ag level. It was found that 52, 19, and 14% of the total response was directed to Phl p 5, 1, and 3, respectively. Interestingly, little or no correlation between Phl p-specific IgE levels and T cell responses was found. Thus, certain intrinsic features of the allergen protein might influence immunogenicity at the level of T cell reactivity. Consistent with this notion, different Phl p Ags were associated with distinct patterns of IL-5, IFN-γ, IL-10, and IL-17 production. PMID:20554959

  12. N-Glycosylation Improves the Pepsin Resistance of Histidine Acid Phosphatase Phytases by Enhancing Their Stability at Acidic pHs and Reducing Pepsin's Accessibility to Its Cleavage Sites.

    PubMed

    Niu, Canfang; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Wang, Yaru; Yang, Peilong; Yao, Bin

    2015-12-04

    N-Glycosylation can modulate enzyme structure and function. In this study, we identified two pepsin-resistant histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) phytases from Yersinia kristensenii (YkAPPA) and Yersinia rohdei (YrAPPA), each having an N-glycosylation motif, and one pepsin-sensitive HAP phytase from Yersinia enterocolitica (YeAPPA) that lacked an N-glycosylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to construct mutants by altering the N-glycosylation status of each enzyme, and the mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris for biochemical characterization. Compared with those of the N-glycosylation site deletion mutants and N-deglycosylated enzymes, all N-glycosylated counterparts exhibited enhanced pepsin resistance. Introduction of the N-glycosylation site into YeAPPA as YkAPPA and YrAPPA conferred pepsin resistance, shifted the pH optimum (0.5 and 1.5 pH units downward, respectively) and improved stability at acidic pH (83.2 and 98.8% residual activities at pH 2.0 for 1 h). Replacing the pepsin cleavage sites L197 and L396 in the immediate vicinity of the N-glycosylation motifs of YkAPPA and YrAPPA with V promoted their resistance to pepsin digestion when produced in Escherichia coli but had no effect on the pepsin resistance of N-glycosylated enzymes produced in P. pastoris. Thus, N-glycosylation may improve pepsin resistance by enhancing the stability at acidic pH and reducing pepsin's accessibility to peptic cleavage sites. This study provides a strategy, namely, the manipulation of N-glycosylation, for improvement of phytase properties for use in animal feed.

  13. D-Isonucleotide (isoNA) incorporation around cleavage site of passenger strand promotes the vibration of Ago2-PAZ domain and enhances in vitro potency of siRNA.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ye; Tian, Miao; Zhang, Yichao; Sheng, Gang; Chen, Zhuo; Ma, Yuan; Chen, Yue; Peng, Yihong; Zhao, Yi-Lei; Wang, Yanli; Zhang, Lihe; Yang, Zhenjun

    2015-11-28

    It has been demonstrated that passenger strand cleavage is important for the activation of RNA-induced silencing complex (RISC), which is a crucial step for siRNA-mediated gene silencing. Herein, we report that isonucleotide (isoNA) modification around the cleavage site of the passenger strand would affect the in vitro potency of modified siRNAs by altering the motion pattern of the Ago2-PAZ domain. According to western blotting, q-PCR and antiviral test results, we proved that D-isonucleotide (isoNA) modification at the position 8 of the passenger strand (siMek1-S08D), which is adjacent to the cleavage site, markedly improved the in vitro potency of the modified siRNA, whereas siRNAs with D-isoNA incorporation at position 9 (siMek1-S09D) or L-isoNA incorporation at positions 8 and 9 (siMek1-S08L, siMek1-S09L) displayed lower activity compared to native siRNA. Kinetics evaluation of passenger strand cleavage induced by T. thermophilus Ago (Tt-Ago) showed that D-isoNA modification at position 8 of the passenger strand had no significant influence on the cleavage rate, but L-isoNA modification at position 8 slowed the cleavage rate markedly. Moreover, the results of molecular dynamics simulations showed that D-isoNA modification at position 8 affected the open-close motion of the PAZ domain in the Ago/siRNA complex, which may promote the loading of RISC and release of a passenger strand cleavage product, and consequently accelerate the activation of RISC and enhance silencing activity. However, D-isoNA modification at position 9 or L-isoNA modification at position 8 or 9 exerted opposite influences on the motion of the Ago-PAZ domain.

  14. N-Glycosylation Improves the Pepsin Resistance of Histidine Acid Phosphatase Phytases by Enhancing Their Stability at Acidic pHs and Reducing Pepsin's Accessibility to Its Cleavage Sites

    PubMed Central

    Niu, Canfang; Luo, Huiying; Shi, Pengjun; Huang, Huoqing; Wang, Yaru; Yang, Peilong

    2015-01-01

    N-Glycosylation can modulate enzyme structure and function. In this study, we identified two pepsin-resistant histidine acid phosphatase (HAP) phytases from Yersinia kristensenii (YkAPPA) and Yersinia rohdei (YrAPPA), each having an N-glycosylation motif, and one pepsin-sensitive HAP phytase from Yersinia enterocolitica (YeAPPA) that lacked an N-glycosylation site. Site-directed mutagenesis was employed to construct mutants by altering the N-glycosylation status of each enzyme, and the mutant and wild-type enzymes were expressed in Pichia pastoris for biochemical characterization. Compared with those of the N-glycosylation site deletion mutants and N-deglycosylated enzymes, all N-glycosylated counterparts exhibited enhanced pepsin resistance. Introduction of the N-glycosylation site into YeAPPA as YkAPPA and YrAPPA conferred pepsin resistance, shifted the pH optimum (0.5 and 1.5 pH units downward, respectively) and improved stability at acidic pH (83.2 and 98.8% residual activities at pH 2.0 for 1 h). Replacing the pepsin cleavage sites L197 and L396 in the immediate vicinity of the N-glycosylation motifs of YkAPPA and YrAPPA with V promoted their resistance to pepsin digestion when produced in Escherichia coli but had no effect on the pepsin resistance of N-glycosylated enzymes produced in P. pastoris. Thus, N-glycosylation may improve pepsin resistance by enhancing the stability at acidic pH and reducing pepsin's accessibility to peptic cleavage sites. This study provides a strategy, namely, the manipulation of N-glycosylation, for improvement of phytase properties for use in animal feed. PMID:26637601

  15. Size determines whether specialized expert processes are engaged for recognition of faces.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nan; Shafai, Fakhri; Oruc, Ipek

    2014-07-22

    Many influential models of face recognition postulate specialized expert processes that are engaged when viewing upright, own-race faces, as opposed to a general-purpose recognition route used for nonface objects and inverted or other-race faces. In contrast, others have argued that empirical differences do not stem from qualitatively distinct processing. We offer a potential resolution to this ongoing controversy. We hypothesize that faces engage specialized processes at large sizes only. To test this, we measured recognition efficiencies for a wide range of sizes. Upright face recognition efficiency increased with size. This was not due to better visibility of basic image features at large sizes. We ensured this by calculating efficiency relative to a specialized ideal observer unique to each individual that incorporated size-related changes in visibility and by measuring inverted efficiencies across the same range of face sizes. Inverted face recognition efficiencies did not change with size. A qualitative face inversion effect, defined as the ratio of relative upright and inverted efficiencies, showed a complete lack of inversion effects for small sizes up to 6°. In contrast, significant face inversion effects were found for all larger sizes. Size effects may stem from predominance of larger faces in the overall exposure to faces, which occur at closer viewing distances typical of social interaction. Our results offer a potential explanation for the contradictory findings in the literature regarding the special status of faces.

  16. Semantic and visual determinants of face recognition in a prosopagnosic patient.

    PubMed

    Dixon, M J; Bub, D N; Arguin, M

    1998-05-01

    Prosopagnosia is the neuropathological inability to recognize familiar people by their faces. It can occur in isolation or can coincide with recognition deficits for other nonface objects. Often, patients whose prosopagnosia is accompanied by object recognition difficulties have more trouble identifying certain categories of objects relative to others. In previous research, we demonstrated that objects that shared multiple visual features and were semantically close posed severe recognition difficulties for a patient with temporal lobe damage. We now demonstrate that this patient's face recognition is constrained by these same parameters. The prosopagnosic patient ELM had difficulties pairing faces to names when the faces shared visual features and the names were semantically related (e.g., Tonya Harding, Nancy Kerrigan, and Josee Chouinard -three ice skaters). He made tenfold fewer errors when the exact same faces were associated with semantically unrelated people (e.g., singer Celine Dion, actress Betty Grable, and First Lady Hillary Clinton). We conclude that prosopagnosia and co-occurring category-specific recognition problems both stem from difficulties disambiguating the stored representations of objects that share multiple visual features and refer to semantically close identities or concepts.

  17. Semantic and visual determinants of face recognition in a prosopagnosic patient.

    PubMed

    Dixon, M J; Bub, D N; Arguin, M

    1998-05-01

    Prosopagnosia is the neuropathological inability to recognize familiar people by their faces. It can occur in isolation or can coincide with recognition deficits for other nonface objects. Often, patients whose prosopagnosia is accompanied by object recognition difficulties have more trouble identifying certain categories of objects relative to others. In previous research, we demonstrated that objects that shared multiple visual features and were semantically close posed severe recognition difficulties for a patient with temporal lobe damage. We now demonstrate that this patient's face recognition is constrained by these same parameters. The prosopagnosic patient ELM had difficulties pairing faces to names when the faces shared visual features and the names were semantically related (e.g., Tonya Harding, Nancy Kerrigan, and Josee Chouinard -three ice skaters). He made tenfold fewer errors when the exact same faces were associated with semantically unrelated people (e.g., singer Celine Dion, actress Betty Grable, and First Lady Hillary Clinton). We conclude that prosopagnosia and co-occurring category-specific recognition problems both stem from difficulties disambiguating the stored representations of objects that share multiple visual features and refer to semantically close identities or concepts. PMID:9869710

  18. A new approach of recognition of ellipsoidal micro- and nanoparticles on AFM images and determination of their sizes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akhmadeev, Albert A.; Salakhov, Myakzyum Kh

    2016-10-01

    In this work we develop an approach of automatic recognition of ellipsoidal particles on the atomic force microscopy (AFM) image and determination of their size, which is based on image segmentation and the surface approximation by ellipsoids. In addition to the comparative simplicity and rapidity of processing, this method allows us to determine the size of particles, the surface of which is not completely visible on the image. The proposed method showed good results on simulated images including noisy ones. Using this algorithm the size distributions of silica particles on experimental AFM images have been determined.

  19. An Efficient and Robust Singular Value Method for Star Pattern Recognition and Attitude Determination

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Kim, Hye-Young; Junkins, John L.

    2003-01-01

    A new star pattern recognition method is developed using singular value decomposition of a measured unit column vector matrix in a measurement frame and the corresponding cataloged vector matrix in a reference frame. It is shown that singular values and right singular vectors are invariant with respect to coordinate transformation and robust under uncertainty. One advantage of singular value comparison is that a pairing process for individual measured and cataloged stars is not necessary, and the attitude estimation and pattern recognition process are not separated. An associated method for mission catalog design is introduced and simulation results are presented.

  20. Determining optimally orthogonal discriminant vectors in DCT domain for multiscale-based face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Yanmin; Wang, Xuchu

    2011-02-01

    This paper presents a new face recognition method that extracts multiple discriminant features based on multiscale image enhancement technique and kernel-based orthogonal feature extraction improvements with several interesting characteristics. First, it can extract more discriminative multiscale face feature than traditional pixel-based or Gabor-based feature. Second, it can effectively deal with the small sample size problem as well as feature correlation problem by using eigenvalue decomposition on scatter matrices. Finally, the extractor handles nonlinearity efficiently by using kernel trick. Multiple recognition experiments on open face data set with comparison to several related methods show the effectiveness and superiority of the proposed method.

  1. Molecular recognition of neonicotinoid insecticides: the determinants of life or death.

    PubMed

    Tomizawa, Motohiro; Casida, John E

    2009-02-17

    azidopyridinyl neonicotinoid and nicotinoid photoprobes bind in a single conformation with Aplysia AChBP; this is consistent with high-resolution crystal structures. Surprisingly, though, the electronegative nitro or cyano moiety of the neonicotinoid faced in a reversed orientation relative to the cationic nicotinoid functionality. For the Lymnaea AChBP, the azidoneonicotinoid probes modified two distinct and distant sites, while the azidonicotinoid probes, surprisingly, derivatized only one point. This meant that the neonicotinoids have two bound conformations in the vertebrate receptor model, which are completely inverted relative to each other, whereas nicotinoids appear buried in only one conserved conformation. Therefore, the unique binding conformations of nicotinic agonists in these insect and vertebrate receptor homologues define the basis for molecular recognition of neonicotinoid insecticides as the determinants of life or death.

  2. Recognition and reporting of suspected adverse drug reactions by surveyed healthcare professionals in Uganda: key determinants

    PubMed Central

    Kiguba, Ronald; Karamagi, Charles; Waako, Paul; Ndagije, Helen B; Bird, Sheila M

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess extent and determinants of past-month recognition of suspected adverse drug reactions (ADR) and past-year ADR reporting among healthcare professionals (HCPs) in Uganda. Setting Geographically diverse health facilities (public, private for-profit, private not-for-profit). Participants Of 2000 questionnaires distributed, 1345 were completed: return rate of 67%. Primary and secondary outcome measures Per cent HCPs who suspected ADR in the past month; reported ADR in the past year. Results Nurses were the majority (59%, 792/1345). Only half the respondents had heard about pharmacovigilance: 39% of nurses (295/763; 95% CI 35% to 42%), 70% otherwise (383/547; 95% CI 66% to 74%). One fifth (268/1289 or 21%; 95% CI 19% to 23%) had suspected an ADR in the previous 4 weeks, 111 of them were nurses; 15% (190/1296) had reported a suspected ADR in the past year, 103 of them were nurses. Past-month ADR suspicion was more likely by non-nurses (OR=1.7, 95% CI 1.16 to 2.40) and with medical research involvement (OR=1.5, 95% CI 1.05 to 2.15) but past-month receipt of patient ADR-complaint predominated (OR=19, 95% CI 14 to 28). Past-year ADR reporting was higher by hospital staff (OR=1.9, 95% CI 1.18 to 3.10), especially in medicine (OR=2.3, 95% CI 1.08 to 4.73); but lower from private for-profit health facilities (OR=0.5, 95% CI 0.28 to 0.77) and by older staff (OR=0.6, 95% CI 0.43 to 0.91); more likely by HCPs who had ever encountered a fatal ADR (OR=2.9, 95% CI 1.94 to 4.25), knew to whom to report (OR=1.7, 95% CI 1.18 to 2.46), or suggested how to improve ADR reporting (OR=1.6, 95% CI 1.04 to 2.49). Two attitudinal factors were important: diffidence and lethargy. Conclusions One in five HCPs suspected an ADR in the past-month and one in seven reported ADR in the previous year. Empowering patients could strengthen ADR detection and reporting in Africa. PMID:25421337

  3. Deformability in the cleavage site of primary microRNA is not sensed by the double-stranded RNA binding domains in the microprocessor component DGCR8.

    PubMed

    Quarles, Kaycee A; Chadalavada, Durga; Showalter, Scott A

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of double-stranded RNA (dsRNA) in eukaryotic cells has only recently been appreciated. Of interest here, RNA silencing begins with dsRNA substrates that are bound by the dsRNA-binding domains (dsRBDs) of their processing proteins. Specifically, processing of microRNA (miRNA) in the nucleus minimally requires the enzyme Drosha and its dsRBD-containing cofactor protein, DGCR8. The smallest recombinant construct of DGCR8 that is sufficient for in vitro dsRNA binding, referred to as DGCR8-Core, consists of its two dsRBDs and a C-terminal tail. As dsRBDs rarely recognize the nucleotide sequence of dsRNA, it is reasonable to hypothesize that DGCR8 function is dependent on the recognition of specific structural features in the miRNA precursor. Previously, we demonstrated that noncanonical structural elements that promote RNA flexibility within the stem of miRNA precursors are necessary for efficient in vitro cleavage by reconstituted Microprocessor complexes. Here, we combine gel shift assays with in vitro processing assays to demonstrate that neither the N-terminal dsRBD of DGCR8 in isolation nor the DGCR8-Core construct is sensitive to the presence of noncanonical structural elements within the stem of miRNA precursors, or to single-stranded segments flanking the stem. Extending DGCR8-Core to include an N-terminal heme-binding region does not change our conclusions. Thus, our data suggest that although the DGCR8-Core region is necessary for dsRNA binding and recruitment to the Microprocessor, it is not sufficient to establish the previously observed connection between RNA flexibility and processing efficiency.

  4. Structural interplay between germline and adaptive recognition determines TCR-peptide-MHC cross-reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Adams, Jarrett J.; Narayanan, Samanthi; Birnbaum, Michael E.; Sidhu, Sachdev S.; Blevins, Sydney J.; Gee, Marvin H.; Sibener, Leah V.; Baker, Brian M.; Kranz, David M.; Garcia, K. Christopher

    2015-01-01

    The T cell receptor - peptide-MHC interface is comprised of conserved and diverse regions, yet the relative contributions of each in shaping T cell recognition remain unclear. We isolated cross-reactive peptides with limited homology, allowing us to compare the structural properties of nine peptides for a single TCR-MHC pair. The TCR’s cross-reactivity is rooted in highly similar recognition of an apical ‘hotspot’ position in the peptide, while tolerating significant sequence variation at ancillary positions. Furthermore, we find a striking structural convergence onto a germline-mediated interaction between TCR CDR1α and the MHC α2 helix of twelve TCR-pMHC complexes. Our studies suggest that TCR-MHC germline-mediated constraints, together with a focus on a small peptide hotspot, may place limits on peptide antigen cross-reactivity. PMID:26523866

  5. Development of a Pattern Recognition Methodology for Determining Operationally Optimal Heat Balance Instrumentation Calibration Schedules

    SciTech Connect

    Kurt Beran; John Christenson; Dragos Nica; Kenny Gross

    2002-12-15

    The goal of the project is to enable plant operators to detect with high sensitivity and reliability the onset of decalibration drifts in all of the instrumentation used as input to the reactor heat balance calculations. To achieve this objective, the collaborators developed and implemented at DBNPS an extension of the Multivariate State Estimation Technique (MSET) pattern recognition methodology pioneered by ANAL. The extension was implemented during the second phase of the project and fully achieved the project goal.

  6. H9N2 avian influenza virus-derived natural reassortant H5N2 virus in swan containing the hemagglutinin segment from Eurasian H5 avian influenza virus with an in-frame deletion of four basic residues in the polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site.

    PubMed

    Wang, Youling; Yuan, Xiaoyuan; Qi, Lihong; Zhang, Yuxia; Xu, Huaiying; Yang, Jinxing; Ai, Wu; Qi, Wenbao; Liao, Ming; Wang, Dan; Song, Minxun; Li, Feng

    2016-06-01

    We isolated a novel H5N2 avian influenza virus from swans in China. The virus was derived from a widespread H9N2 avian influenza virus but acquired the hemagglutinin gene from Eurasian H5 subtype with a naturally occurring in-frame deletion of four basic residues in the polybasic hemagglutinin cleavage site. PMID:26910357

  7. Study to determine potential flight applications and human factors design guidelines for voice recognition and synthesis systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, R. W.; Parks, D. L.

    1985-01-01

    A study was conducted to determine potential commercial aircraft flight deck applications and implementation guidelines for voice recognition and synthesis. At first, a survey of voice recognition and synthesis technology was undertaken to develop a working knowledge base. Then, numerous potential aircraft and simulator flight deck voice applications were identified and each proposed application was rated on a number of criteria in order to achieve an overall payoff rating. The potential voice recognition applications fell into five general categories: programming, interrogation, data entry, switch and mode selection, and continuous/time-critical action control. The ratings of the first three categories showed the most promise of being beneficial to flight deck operations. Possible applications of voice synthesis systems were categorized as automatic or pilot selectable and many were rated as being potentially beneficial. In addition, voice system implementation guidelines and pertinent performance criteria are proposed. Finally, the findings of this study are compared with those made in a recent NASA study of a 1995 transport concept.

  8. Substrate recognition by complement convertases revealed in the C5–cobra venom factor complex

    PubMed Central

    Laursen, Nick S; Andersen, Kasper R; Braren, Ingke; Spillner, Edzard; Sottrup-Jensen, Lars; Andersen, Gregers R

    2011-01-01

    Complement acts as a danger-sensing system in the innate immune system, and its activation initiates a strong inflammatory response and cleavage of the proteins C3 and C5 by proteolytic enzymes, the convertases. These contain a non-catalytic substrate contacting subunit (C3b or C4b) in complex with a protease subunit (Bb or C2a). We determined the crystal structures of the C3b homologue cobra venom factor (CVF) in complex with C5, and in complex with C5 and the inhibitor SSL7 at 4.3 Å resolution. The structures reveal a parallel two-point attachment between C5 and CVF, where the presence of SSL7 only slightly affects the C5–CVF interface, explaining the IgA dependence for SSL7-mediated inhibition of C5 cleavage. CVF functions as a relatively rigid binding scaffold inducing a conformational change in C5, which positions its cleavage site in proximity to the serine protease Bb. A general model for substrate recognition by the convertases is presented based on the C5–CVF and C3b–Bb–SCIN structures. Prior knowledge concerning interactions between the endogenous convertases and their substrates is rationalized by this model. PMID:21217642

  9. Structural basis of lantibiotic recognition by the nisin resistance protein from Streptococcus agalactiae

    PubMed Central

    Khosa, Sakshi; Frieg, Benedikt; Mulnaes, Daniel; Kleinschrodt, Diana; Hoeppner, Astrid; Gohlke, Holger; Smits, Sander H. J.

    2016-01-01

    Lantibiotics are potent antimicrobial peptides. Nisin is the most prominent member and contains five crucial lanthionine rings. Some clinically relevant bacteria express membrane-associated resistance proteins that proteolytically inactivate nisin. However, substrate recognition and specificity of these proteins is unknown. Here, we report the first three-dimensional structure of a nisin resistance protein from Streptococcus agalactiae (SaNSR) at 2.2 Å resolution. It contains an N-terminal helical bundle, and protease cap and core domains. The latter harbors the highly conserved TASSAEM region, which lies in a hydrophobic tunnel formed by all domains. By integrative modeling, mutagenesis studies, and genetic engineering of nisin variants, a model of the SaNSR/nisin complex is generated, revealing that SaNSR recognizes the last C-terminally located lanthionine ring of nisin. This determines the substrate specificity of SaNSR and ensures the exact coordination of the nisin cleavage site at the TASSAEM region. PMID:26727488

  10. In vitro maturation of Drosophila melanogaster Spätzle protein with refolded Easter reveals a novel cleavage site within the prodomain.

    PubMed

    Ursel, Christian; Fandrich, Uwe; Hoffmann, Anita; Sieg, Torsten; Ihling, Christian; Stubbs, Milton T

    2013-08-01

    Dorsoventral patterning during Drosophila melanogaster embryogenesis is mediated by a well-defined gradient of the mature NGF-like ligand Spätzle. Easter, the ultimate protease of a ventrally-restricted serine protease cascade, plays a key role in the regulation of the morphogenic gradient, catalyzing the activation cleavage of proSpätzle. As a result of alternative splicing, proSpätzle exists in multiple isoforms, almost all of which differ only in their prodomain. Although this domain is unstructured in isolation, it has a stabilizing influence on the mature cystine knot domain and is involved in the binding to the Toll receptor. Here, we report the expression and refolding of Easter, and show that the renatured enzyme performs the activation cleavage of two Spätzle isoforms. We determine the affinity of the prodomain for the cystine knot domain, and show that Easter performs a previously unknown secondary cleavage in each prodomain.

  11. The determination of tRNALeu recognition nucleotides for Escherichia coli L/F transferase.

    PubMed

    Fung, Angela Wai Shan; Leung, Charles Chung Yun; Fahlman, Richard Peter

    2014-08-01

    Escherichia coli leucyl/phenylalanyl-tRNA protein transferase catalyzes the tRNA-dependent post-translational addition of amino acids onto the N-terminus of a protein polypeptide substrate. Based on biochemical and structural studies, the current tRNA recognition model by L/F transferase involves the identity of the 3' aminoacyl adenosine and the sequence-independent docking of the D-stem of an aminoacyl-tRNA to the positively charged cluster on L/F transferase. However, this model does not explain the isoacceptor preference observed 40 yr ago. Using in vitro-transcribed tRNA and quantitative MALDI-ToF MS enzyme activity assays, we have confirmed that, indeed, there is a strong preference for the most abundant leucyl-tRNA, tRNA(Leu) (anticodon 5'-CAG-3') isoacceptor for L/F transferase activity. We further investigate the molecular mechanism for this preference using hybrid tRNA constructs. We identified two independent sequence elements in the acceptor stem of tRNA(Leu) (CAG)-a G₃:C₇₀ base pair and a set of 4 nt (C₇₂, A₄:U₆₉, C₆₈)-that are important for the optimal binding and catalysis by L/F transferase. This maps a more specific, sequence-dependent tRNA recognition model of L/F transferase than previously proposed.

  12. The determination of tRNALeu recognition nucleotides for Escherichia coli L/F transferase

    PubMed Central

    Fung, Angela Wai Shan; Leung, Charles Chung Yun; Fahlman, Richard Peter

    2014-01-01

    Escherichia coli leucyl/phenylalanyl-tRNA protein transferase catalyzes the tRNA-dependent post-translational addition of amino acids onto the N-terminus of a protein polypeptide substrate. Based on biochemical and structural studies, the current tRNA recognition model by L/F transferase involves the identity of the 3′ aminoacyl adenosine and the sequence-independent docking of the D-stem of an aminoacyl-tRNA to the positively charged cluster on L/F transferase. However, this model does not explain the isoacceptor preference observed 40 yr ago. Using in vitro-transcribed tRNA and quantitative MALDI-ToF MS enzyme activity assays, we have confirmed that, indeed, there is a strong preference for the most abundant leucyl-tRNA, tRNALeu (anticodon 5′-CAG-3′) isoacceptor for L/F transferase activity. We further investigate the molecular mechanism for this preference using hybrid tRNA constructs. We identified two independent sequence elements in the acceptor stem of tRNALeu (CAG)—a G3:C70 base pair and a set of 4 nt (C72, A4:U69, C68)—that are important for the optimal binding and catalysis by L/F transferase. This maps a more specific, sequence-dependent tRNA recognition model of L/F transferase than previously proposed. PMID:24935875

  13. Acquisition of a novel eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site confers intracellular cleavage of an H7N7 influenza virus hemagglutinin

    SciTech Connect

    Hamilton, Brian S.; Sun, Xiangjie; Chung, Changik; Whittaker, Gary R.

    2012-12-05

    A critical feature of highly pathogenic avian influenza viruses (H5N1 and H7N7) is the efficient intracellular cleavage of the hemagglutinin (HA) protein. H7N7 viruses also exist in equine species, and a unique feature of the equine H7N7 HA is the presence of an eleven amino acid insertion directly N-terminal to a tetrabasic cleavage site. Here, we show that three histidine residues within the unique insertion of the equine H7N7 HA are essential for intracellular cleavage. An asparagine residue within the insertion-derived glycosylation site was also found to be essential for intracellular cleavage. The presence of the histidine residues also appear to be involved in triggering fusion, since mutation of the histidine residues resulted in a destabilizing effect. Importantly, the addition of a tetrabasic site and the eleven amino acid insertion conferred efficient intracellular cleavage to the HA of an H7N3 low pathogenicity avian influenza virus. Our studies show that acquisition of the eleven amino acid insertion offers an alternative mechanism for intracellular cleavage of influenza HA.

  14. Vγ2Vδ2 T Cell Receptor Recognition of Prenyl Pyrophosphates is Dependent on all Complementarity Determining Regions1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hong; Fang, Zhimei; Morita, Craig T.

    2010-01-01

    γδ T cells differ from αβ T cells in the antigens they recognize and their functions in immunity. While most αβ T cell receptors (TCR) recognize peptides presented by MHC class I or II, human γδ T cells expressing Vγ2Vδ2 TCRs recognize nonpeptide prenyl pyrophosphates. To define the molecular basis for this recognition, the effect of mutations in the TCR complementarity-determining regions (CDR) was assessed. Mutations in all CDR loops altered recognition and cover a large footprint. Unlike murine γδ TCR recognition of the MHC class Ib T22 protein, there was no CDR3δ motif required for recognition because only 1 residue is required. Instead, the length and sequence of CDR3γ was key. Although a potential prenyl pyrophosphate-binding site was defined by Lys109 in Jγ1.2 and Arg51 in CDR2δ, the area outlined by critical mutations is much larger. These results show that prenyl pyrophosphate recognition is primarily by germline-encoded regions of the γδ TCR, allowing a high proportion of Vγ2Vδ2 TCRs to respond. This underscores its parallels to innate immune receptors. Our results also provide strong evidence for the existence of an antigen-presenting molecule for prenyl pyrophosphates. This is an author-produced version of a manuscript accepted for publication in The Journal of Immunology (The JI). The American Association of Immunologists, Inc. (AAI), publisher of The JI, holds the copyright to this manuscript. This version of the manuscript has not yet been copyedited or subjected to editorial proofreading by The JI; hence, it may differ from the final version published in The JI (online and in print). AAI (The JI) is not liable for errors or omissions in this author-produced version of the manuscript or in any version derived from it by the U.S. National Institutes of Health or any other third party. The final, citable version of record can be found at www.jimmunol.org. PMID:20483784

  15. Determining and improving the fault tolerance of multilayer perceptrons in a pattern-recognition application.

    PubMed

    Emmerson, M D; Damper, R I

    1993-01-01

    We investigate empirically the performance under damage conditions of single- and multilayer perceptrons (MLP's), with various numbers of hidden units, in a representative pattern-recognition task. While some degree of graceful degradation was observed, the single-layer perceptron was considerably less fault tolerant than any of the multilayer perceptrons, including one with fewer adjustable weights. Our initial hypothesis that fault tolerance would be significantly improved for multilayer nets with larger numbers of hidden units proved incorrect. Indeed, there appeared to be a liability to having excess hidden units. A simple technique (called augmentation) is described, which was successful in translating excess hidden units into improved fault tolerance. Finally, our results were supported by applying singular value decomposition (SVD) analysis to the MLP's internal representations.

  16. Probing the Specificity Determinants of Amino Acid Recognition by Arginase†,‡

    PubMed Central

    Shishova, Ekaterina Y.; Di Costanzo, Luigi; Emig, Francis A.; Ash, David E.; Christianson, David W.

    2009-01-01

    Arginase is a binuclear manganese metalloenzyme that serves as a therapeutic target for the treatment of asthma, erectile dysfunction, and atherosclerosis. In order to better understand the molecular basis of inhibitor affinity, we have employed site-directed mutagenesis, enzyme kinetics, and X-ray crystallography to probe the molecular recognition of the amino acid moiety (i.e., the α-amino and α-carboxylate groups) of substrate l-arginine and inhibitors in the active site of human arginase I. Specifically, we focus on: (1) a water-mediated hydrogen bond between the substrate α-carboxylate and T135, (2) a direct hydrogen bond between the substrate α-carboxylate and N130, and (3) a direct charged hydrogen bond between the substrate α-amino group and D183. Amino acid substitutions for T135, N130, and D183 generally compromise substrate affinity as reflected by increased KM values, but have less pronounced effects on catalytic function as reflected by minimal variations of kcat. As with substrate KM values, inhibitor Kd values increase for binding to enzyme mutants and suggest that the relative contribution of intermolecular interactions to amino acid affinity in the arginase active site is: water-mediated hydrogen bond < direct hydrogen bond < direct charged hydrogen bond. Structural comparisons of arginase with the related binuclear manganese metalloenzymes agmatinase and proclavaminic acid amidinohydrolase suggest that the evolution of substrate recognition in the arginase fold occurs by mutation of residues contained in specificity loops flanking the mouth of the active site (especially loops 4 and 5), thereby allowing diverse guanidinium substrates to be accommodated for catalysis. PMID:19093830

  17. Molecular surface recognition: determination of geometric fit between proteins and their ligands by correlation techniques.

    PubMed Central

    Katchalski-Katzir, E; Shariv, I; Eisenstein, M; Friesem, A A; Aflalo, C; Vakser, I A

    1992-01-01

    A geometric recognition algorithm was developed to identify molecular surface complementarity. It is based on a purely geometric approach and takes advantage of techniques applied in the field of pattern recognition. The algorithm involves an automated procedure including (i) a digital representation of the molecules (derived from atomic coordinates) by three-dimensional discrete functions that distinguishes between the surface and the interior; (ii) the calculation, using Fourier transformation, of a correlation function that assesses the degree of molecular surface overlap and penetration upon relative shifts of the molecules in three dimensions; and (iii) a scan of the relative orientations of the molecules in three dimensions. The algorithm provides a list of correlation values indicating the extent of geometric match between the surfaces of the molecules; each of these values is associated with six numbers describing the relative position (translation and rotation) of the molecules. The procedure is thus equivalent to a six-dimensional search but much faster by design, and the computation time is only moderately dependent on molecular size. The procedure was tested and validated by using five known complexes for which the correct relative position of the molecules in the respective adducts was successfully predicted. The molecular pairs were deoxyhemoglobin and methemoglobin, tRNA synthetase-tyrosinyl adenylate, aspartic proteinase-peptide inhibitor, and trypsin-trypsin inhibitor. A more realistic test was performed with the last two pairs by using the structures of uncomplexed aspartic proteinase and trypsin inhibitor, respectively. The results are indicative of the extent of conformational changes in the molecules tolerated by the algorithm. Images PMID:1549581

  18. The Drosophila DPP signal is produced by cleavage of its proprotein at evolutionary diversified furin-recognition sites

    PubMed Central

    Künnapuu, Jaana; Björkgren, Ida; Shimmi, Osamu

    2009-01-01

    Maturation of bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) requires cleavage of their precursor proteins by furin-type proprotein convertases. Here, we find that cleavage sites of the BMP2/4/decapentaplegic (DPP) subfamily have been evolutionary diversified and can be categorized into 4 different types. Cnidaria BMP2/4/DPP is considered to be a prototype containing only 1 furin site. Bilateria BMP2/4/DPP acquired an additional cleavage site with either the combination of minimal–optimal or optimal–optimal furin sites. DPPs belonging to Diptera, such as Drosophila and mosquito, and Lepidoptera of silkworm contain a third cleavage site between the 2 optimal furin sites. We studied how the 3 furin sites (FSI–III) of Drosophila DPP coordinate maturation of ligands and contribute to signals in vivo. Combining mutational analysis of furin-recognition sites and RNAi experiments, we found that the Drosophila DPP precursor is initially cleaved at an upstream furin-recognition site (FSII), with consequent cleavages at 2 furin sites (FSI and FSIII). Both Dfurin1 and Dfurin2 are involved in the processing of DPP proproteins. Biochemical and genetic analyses using cleavage mutants of DPP suggest the first cleavage at FSII to be critical and sufficient for long-range DPP signaling. Our data suggest that the Drosophila DPP precursor is cleaved in a different manner from vertebrate BMP4 even though they are functional orthologs. This indicates that the furin-cleavage sites in BMP2/4/DPP precursors are tolerant to mutations acquired through evolution and have adapted to different systems in diversified species. PMID:19433798

  19. Cardiac-Oxidized Antigens Are Targets of Immune Recognition by Antibodies and Potential Molecular Determinants in Chagas Disease Pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Dhiman, Monisha; Zago, Maria Paola; Nunez, Sonia; Amoroso, Alejandro; Rementeria, Hugo; Dousset, Pierre; Burgos, Federico Nunez; Garg, Nisha Jain

    2012-01-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi elicits reactive oxygen species (ROS) of inflammatory and mitochondrial origin in infected hosts. In this study, we examined ROS-induced oxidative modifications in the heart and determined whether the resultant oxidized cardiac proteins are targets of immune response and of pathological significance in Chagas disease. Heart biopsies from chagasic mice, rats and human patients exhibited, when compared to those from normal controls, a substantial increase in protein 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), malondialdehyde (MDA), carbonyl, and 3-nitrotyrosine (3-NT) adducts. To evaluate whether oxidized proteins gain antigenic properties, heart homogenates or isolated cardiomyocytes were oxidized in vitro and one- or two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2D-GE)/Western blotting (WB) was performed to investigate the proteomic oxidative changes and recognition of oxidized proteins by sera antibodies in chagasic rodents (mice, rats) and human patients. Human cardiomyocytes exhibited LD50 sensitivity to 30 µM 4-HNE and 100 µM H2O2 at 6 h and 12 h, respectively. In vitro oxidation with 4-HNE or H2O2 resulted in a substantial increase in 4-HNE- and carbonyl-modified proteins that correlated with increased recognition of cardiac (cardiomyocytes) proteins by sera antibodies of chagasic rodents and human patients. 2D-GE/Western blotting followed by MALDI-TOF-MS/MS analysis to identify cardiac proteins that were oxidized and recognized by human chagasic sera yielded 82 unique proteins. We validated the 2D-GE results by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and WB and demonstrated that oxidation of recombinant titin enhanced its immunogenicity and recognition by sera antibodies from chagasic hosts (rats and humans). Treatment of infected rats with phenyl-α-tert-butyl nitrone (PBN, antioxidant) resulted in normalized immune detection of cardiac proteins associated with control of cardiac pathology and preservation of heart contractile function in chagasic rats. We

  20. Determination of association constant of host-guest supramolecular complex (molecular recognition of carbamazepine, antiseizure drug, with calix(4)arene).

    PubMed

    Meenakshi, C; Jayabal, P; Ramakrishnan, V

    2015-12-01

    The thermodynamic property of the host-guest, inclusion complex formed between p-t-butyl calix(4)arene which is a supramolecule, and the antiseizure drug, carbamazepine was studied. p-t-Butyl calix(4)arene has been used as a host molecule and carbamazepine as a guest molecule. Optical absorption spectral studies were carried out to investigate the molecular recognition properties of p-t-butyl calix(4)arene with carbamazepine. The stochiometry of the host-guest complexes formed and the association constant were determined. An interesting 1:2 stochiometric host-guest complex was formed. Job's continuous method of variation and Benesi-Hildebrand expression were used for the determination of binding constant and the stochiometry of the host-guest complex formed. Molecular dimension of the host molecule plays a vital role in the formation of the host-guest stochiometric complexes.

  1. Determination of CFTR densities in erythrocyte plasma membranes using recognition imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ebner, Andreas; Nikova, Dessy; Lange, Tobias; Häberle, Johannes; Falk, Sabine; Dübbers, Angelika; Bruns, Reimer; Hinterdorfer, Peter; Oberleithner, Hans; Schillers, Hermann

    2008-09-01

    CFTR (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator) is a cAMP-regulated chloride (Cl-) channel that plays an important role in salt and fluid movement across epithelia. Cystic fibrosis (CF), the most common genetic disease among Caucasians, is caused by mutations in the gene encoding CFTR. The most predominant mutation, F508del, disturbs CFTR protein trafficking, resulting in a reduced number of CFTR in the plasma membrane. Recent studies indicate that CFTR is not only found in epithelia but also in human erythrocytes. Although considerable attempts have been made to quantify CFTR in cells, conclusions on numbers of CFTR molecules localized in the plasma membrane have been drawn indirectly. AFM has the power to provide the needed information, since both sub-molecular spatial resolution and direct protein recognition via antibody-antigen interaction can be observed. We performed a quantification study of the CFTR copies in erythrocyte membranes at the single molecule level, and compared the difference between healthy donors and CF patients. We detected that the number of CFTR molecules is reduced by 70% in erythrocytes of cystic fibrosis patients.

  2. Environmental Determinants of Chronic Disease and Medical Approaches: Recognition, Avoidance, Supportive Therapy, and Detoxification

    PubMed Central

    Sears, Margaret E.; Genuis, Stephen J.

    2012-01-01

    The World Health Organization warns that chronic, noncommunicable diseases are rapidly becoming epidemic worldwide. Escalating rates of neurocognitive, metabolic, autoimmune and cardiovascular diseases cannot be ascribed only to genetics, lifestyle, and nutrition; early life and ongoing exposures, and bioaccumulated toxicants may also cause chronic disease. Contributors to ill health are summarized from multiple perspectives—biological effects of classes of toxicants, mechanisms of toxicity, and a synthesis of toxic contributors to major diseases. Healthcare practitioners have wide-ranging roles in addressing environmental factors in policy and public health and clinical practice. Public health initiatives include risk recognition and chemical assessment then exposure reduction, remediation, monitoring, and avoidance. The complex web of disease and environmental contributors is amenable to some straightforward clinical approaches addressing multiple toxicants. Widely applicable strategies include nutrition and supplements to counter toxic effects and to support metabolism; as well as exercise and sweating, and possibly medication to enhance excretion. Addressing environmental health and contributors to chronic disease has broad implications for society, with large potential benefits from improved health and productivity. PMID:22315626

  3. Cross-modal conflicts in object recognition: determining the influence of object category.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Jessica N; Titchener, Kirsteen

    2011-10-01

    Previous research examining cross-modal conflicts in object recognition has often made use of animal vocalizations and images, which may be considered natural and ecologically valid, thus strengthening the association in the congruent condition. The current research tested whether the same cross-modal conflict would exist for man-made object sounds as well as comparing the speed and accuracy of auditory processing across the two object categories. Participants were required to attend to a sound paired with a visual stimulus and then respond to a verification item (e.g., "Dog?"). Sounds were congruent (same object), neutral (unidentifiable image), or incongruent (different object) with the images presented. In the congruent and neutral condition, animals were recognized significantly faster and with greater accuracy than man-made objects. It was hypothesized that in the incongruent condition, no difference in reaction time or error rate would be found between animals and man-made objects. This prediction was not supported, indicating that the association between an object's sound and image may not be that disparate when comparing animals to man-made objects. The findings further support cross-modal conflict research for both the animal and man-made object category. The most important finding, however, was that auditory processing is enhanced for living compared to nonliving objects, a difference only previously found in visual processing. Implications relevant to both the neuropsychological literature and sound research are discussed. PMID:21912929

  4. Cross-modal conflicts in object recognition: determining the influence of object category.

    PubMed

    Vogler, Jessica N; Titchener, Kirsteen

    2011-10-01

    Previous research examining cross-modal conflicts in object recognition has often made use of animal vocalizations and images, which may be considered natural and ecologically valid, thus strengthening the association in the congruent condition. The current research tested whether the same cross-modal conflict would exist for man-made object sounds as well as comparing the speed and accuracy of auditory processing across the two object categories. Participants were required to attend to a sound paired with a visual stimulus and then respond to a verification item (e.g., "Dog?"). Sounds were congruent (same object), neutral (unidentifiable image), or incongruent (different object) with the images presented. In the congruent and neutral condition, animals were recognized significantly faster and with greater accuracy than man-made objects. It was hypothesized that in the incongruent condition, no difference in reaction time or error rate would be found between animals and man-made objects. This prediction was not supported, indicating that the association between an object's sound and image may not be that disparate when comparing animals to man-made objects. The findings further support cross-modal conflict research for both the animal and man-made object category. The most important finding, however, was that auditory processing is enhanced for living compared to nonliving objects, a difference only previously found in visual processing. Implications relevant to both the neuropsychological literature and sound research are discussed.

  5. The human G1m1 allotype associates with CD4+ T-cell responsiveness to a highly conserved IgG1 constant region peptide and confers an asparaginyl endopeptidase cleavage site

    PubMed Central

    Stickler, M M; Reddy, A; Xiong, J M; Hinton, P R; DuBridge, R; Harding, F A

    2011-01-01

    The human G1m1 allotype comprises two amino acids, D12 and L14, in the CH3 domain of IGHG1. Although the G1m1 allotype is prevalent in human populations, ∼40% of Caucasiods are homozygous for the nG1m1 allotype corresponding to E12 and M14. Peptides derived from the G1m1 region were tested for their ability to induce CD4+ T-cell proliferative responses in vitro. A peptide immediately downstream from the G1m1 sequence was recognized by CD4+ T cells in a large percentage of donors (peptide CH315−29). CD4+ T-cell proliferative responses to CH315−29 were found at an increased frequency in nG1m1 homozygous donors. Homozygous nG1m1 donors possessing the HLA-DRB1*07 allele displayed the highest magnitudes of proliferation. CD4+ T cells from donors homozygous for nG1m1 proliferated to G1m1-carrying Fc-fragment proteins, whereas CD4+ T cells from G1m1 homozygous donors did not. The G1m1 sequence creates an enzymatic cleavage site for asparaginyl endopeptidase in vitro. Proteolytic activity at D12 may allow the presentation of the CH315−29 peptide, which in turn may result in the establishment of tolerance to this peptide in G1m1-positive donors. Homozygous nG1m1 patients may be more likely to develop CD4+ T-cell-mediated immune responses to therapeutic antibodies carrying the G1m1 allotype. PMID:21326320

  6. What is it that color determinants determine? The relation between the rorschach inkblot method and cognitive object-recognition processes.

    PubMed

    Kron, Assaf; Cohen, Asher; Benziman, Hagit; Ben-Shakhar, Gershon

    2009-03-01

    We sought to demonstrate a relation between the Determinants in the Rorschach Inkblot Method (Rorschach, 1921) and fundamental properties of the participant's cognitive (visual) system by examining whether the report about Color Determinants is related to basic cognitive processes concerned with color of visual objects. In Experiment 1, we established an object-naming task that is sensitive to the objects' color. Participants were strongly influenced by the object's color, responding fastest when objects appeared in their typical color and slowest when the object's color was atypical. In Experiment 2, we examined the relationship between the Color Determinants in the Rorschach Inkblot Method and the magnitude of the color effect in the object-naming task of Experiment 1. It was found that the effect of color in the object-naming task was correlated with the type of color responses in the Rorschach Inkblot Method. The results support an "early" cognitive account of the Determinants. We discuss implications concerning the theory of the Rorschach and the relation between emotion, personality, and cognition. PMID:19205934

  7. Molecular Mechanisms of Viral and Host Cell Substrate Recognition by Hepatitis C Virus NS3/4A Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Romano, Keith P.; Laine, Jennifer M.; Deveau, Laura M.; Cao, Hong; Massi, Francesca; Schiffer, Celia A.

    2011-08-16

    Hepatitis C NS3/4A protease is a prime therapeutic target that is responsible for cleaving the viral polyprotein at junctions 3-4A, 4A4B, 4B5A, and 5A5B and two host cell adaptor proteins of the innate immune response, TRIF and MAVS. In this study, NS3/4A crystal structures of both host cell cleavage sites were determined and compared to the crystal structures of viral substrates. Two distinct protease conformations were observed and correlated with substrate specificity: (i) 3-4A, 4A4B, 5A5B, and MAVS, which are processed more efficiently by the protease, form extensive electrostatic networks when in complex with the protease, and (ii) TRIF and 4B5A, which contain polyproline motifs in their full-length sequences, do not form electrostatic networks in their crystal complexes. These findings provide mechanistic insights into NS3/4A substrate recognition, which may assist in a more rational approach to inhibitor design in the face of the rapid acquisition of resistance.

  8. Gender-Marked Determiners Help Dutch Learners' Word Recognition when Gender Information Itself Does Not

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van Heugten, Marieke; Johnson, Elizabeth K.

    2011-01-01

    Dutch, unlike English, contains two gender-marked forms of the definite article. Does the presence of multiple definite article forms lead Dutch learners to be delayed relative to English learners in the acquisition of their determiner system? Using the Preferential Looking Procedure, we found that Dutch-learning children aged 1 ; 7 to 2 ; 0 use…

  9. 78 FR 70329 - Modification to the Scopes of Recognition of Several NRTLs; Final Determination

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... . SUPPLEMENTARY INFORMATION: I. Background In a notice published in the Federal Register on June 26, 2013 (78 FR... capability to test and examine equipment \\1\\ and materials for workplace safety purposes and to determine conformance with the test standard for each relevant item of equipment or material that it lists, labels,...

  10. Nanosilica-based molecularly imprinted polymer nanoshell for specific recognition and determination of rhodamine B in red wine and beverages.

    PubMed

    Long, Zerong; Xu, Weiwei; Lu, Yi; Qiu, Hongdeng

    2016-09-01

    A new and facile rhodamine B (RhB)-imprinted polymer nanoshell coating for SiO2 nanoparticles was readily prepared by a combination of silica gel modification and molecular surface imprinting. The RhB-imprinted polymers (RhB-MIPs) were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy, and UV-vis spectroscopy; the binding properties and selectivity of these MIPs were investigated in detail. The uniformly imprinted nanoparticles displayed a rather thin shell thickness (23nm) with highly effective recognition sites, showing homogenous distribution and monolayer adsorption. The maximum MIP adsorption capacity (Qm) was as high as 45.2mgg(-1), with an adsorption equilibrium time of about 15min at ambient temperature. Dynamic rebinding experiments showed that chemical adsorption is crucial for RhB binding to RhB-MIPs. The adsorption isotherm for RhB-MIPs binding could also be described by the Langmuir equation at different temperatures and pH values. Increasing temperature led to an enhanced Qm, a decreased dissociation constant (K'd), and a more negative free energy (ΔG), indicating that adsorption is favored at higher temperatures. Moreover, the adsorption capacity of RhB was remarkably affected by pH. At pH>7, the adsorption of RhB was driven by hydrogen bonding interactions, while at pH<7 electrostatic forces were dominant. Additionally, the MIPs also showed specific recognition of RhB from the standard mixture solution containing five structurally analogs. This method was also successfully employed to determine RhB content in red wine and beverages using three levels of spiking, with recoveries in the range of 91.6-93.1% and relative standard deviations lower than 4.1%. PMID:27372912

  11. Reaction pathway and free energy profile determined for specific recognition of oligosaccharide moiety of carboxypeptidase Y.

    PubMed

    Senkara-Barwijuk, Elżbieta; Kobiela, Tomasz; Lebed, Kateryna; Lekka, Małgorzata

    2012-01-01

    The interaction of mannose specific lectin (from Lens culinaris, LcL) with the carbohydrate moiety of carboxypeptidase Y (CaY) was studied using both atomic force microscope (AFM) and quartz crystal microbalance with dissipation monitoring (QCM-D). The AFM enables to determine the positions of energy barriers present in the energy landscape of the single complex undergoing dissociation. The QCM-D measurements allow the estimation of the quantitative parameters characterizing the kinetics of the studied molecular interaction (namely the association and dissociation rate constants and the association constant). The use of both methods not only delivers the complementary characterization of kinetic and thermodynamic parameters but also permits to investigate the mechanism of the binding and unbinding of the molecules. The results for LcL were compared with those obtained for concanavalin A i.e. lectin, which interacts with the carbohydrate moiety on a similar way.

  12. Research progress in radiation detectors, pattern recognition programs, and radiation damage determination in DNA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baily, N. A.

    1973-01-01

    The radiological implications of statistical variations in energy deposition by ionizing radiation were investigated in the conduct of the following experiments: (1) study of the production of secondary particles generated by the passage of the primary radiation through bone and muscle; (2) the study of the ratio of nonreparable to reparable damage in DNA as a function of different energy deposition patterns generated by X rays versus heavy fast charged particles; (3) the use of electronic radiography systems for direct fluoroscopic tomography and for the synthesis of multiple planes and; (4) the determination of the characteristics of systems response to split fields having different contrast levels, and of minimum detectable contrast levels between the halves under realistic clinical situations.

  13. Visual determination of aliphatic diamines based on host-guest recognition of calix[4]arene derivatives capped gold nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yangyang; Zhang, Jiangjiang; Gao, Yanmin; Lee, Jaebeom; Chen, Hongxia; Yin, Yongmei

    2015-10-15

    Since amine compounds have been widespread pollutants in nature and they are extensively used in pharmaceutical industries and dye manufacturing, it is highly desirable to develop simple, effective and naked-eye available analytical methods for such aliphatic diamines determination. Calixarenes as macrocycles have drawn intensive interests for fields such as biomedicine, supramolecular chemistry and smart materials. Here, instead of the normal complicated modification strategy, a facile and efficient method for one-pot synthesis of calix[4]arene crown ether (CCE4) capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) is proposed. The as-prepared CCE4-AuNPs are not only high water dispersity and stability even after storage for 3 months, but also capable of host-guest recognition of diamines in aqueous systems. Size-selective encapsulation of amine group between CCE4 and diamines carry out the aggregation of CCE4-AuNPs. The determination of diamines such as hexamethylenediamine or spermine can be realized by the UV-vis absorbance change and visual color difference. PMID:26002014

  14. Air segmented amplitude modulated multiplexed flow analysis with software-based phase recognition: determination of phosphate ion.

    PubMed

    Ogusu, Takeshi; Uchimoto, Katsuya; Takeuchi, Masaki; Tanaka, Hideji

    2014-01-01

    Amplitude modulated multiplexed flow analysis (AMMFA) has been improved by introducing air segmentation and software-based phase recognition. Sample solutions, the flow rates of which are respectively varied at different frequencies, are merged. Air is introduced to the merged liquid stream in order to limit the dispersion of analytes within each liquid segment separated by air bubbles. The stream is led to a detector with no physical deaeration. Air signals are distinguished from liquid signals through the analysis of detector output signals, and are suppressed down to the level of liquid signals. Resulting signals are smoothed based on moving average computation. Thus processed signals are analyzed by fast Fourier transform. The analytes in the samples are respectively determined from the amplitudes of the corresponding wave components obtained. The developed system has been applied to the simultaneous determinations of phosphate ions in water samples by a Malachite Green method. The linearity of the analytical curve (0.0-31.0 μmol dm(-3)) is good (r(2)>0.999) and the detection limit (3.3 σ) at the modulation period of 30s is 0.52 μmol dm(-3). Good recoveries around 100% have been obtained for phosphate ions spiked into real water samples.

  15. Determining the threshold for usable speech within co-channel speech with the SPHINX automated speech recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hicks, William T.; Yantorno, Robert E.

    2004-10-01

    Much research has been and is continuing to be done in the area of separating the original utterances of two speakers from co-channel speech. This is very important in the area of automated speech recognition (ASR), where the current state of technology is not nearly as accurate as human listeners when the speech is co-channel. It is desired to determine what types of speech (voiced, unvoiced, and silence) and at what target to interference ratio (TIR) two speakers can speak at the same time and not reduce speech intelligibility of the target speaker (referred to as usable speech). Knowing which segments of co-channel speech are usable in ASR can be used to improve the reconstruction of single speaker speech. Tests were performed using the SPHINX ASR software and the TIDIGITS database. It was found that interfering voiced speech with a TIR of 6 dB or greater (on a per frame basis) did not significantly reduce the intelligibility of the target speaker in co-channel speech. It was further found that interfering unvoiced speech with a TIR of 18 dB or greater (on a per frame basis) did not significantly reduce the intelligibility of the target speaker in co-channel speech.

  16. Structural determinants of odorant recognition by the human olfactory receptors OR1A1 and OR1A2.

    PubMed

    Schmiedeberg, Kristin; Shirokova, Elena; Weber, Hans-Peter; Schilling, Boris; Meyerhof, Wolfgang; Krautwurst, Dietmar

    2007-09-01

    An interaction of odorants with olfactory receptors is thought to be the initial step in odorant detection. However, ligands have been reported for only 6 out of 380 human olfactory receptors, with their structural determinants of odorant recognition just beginning to emerge. Guided by the notion that amino acid positions that interact with specific odorants would be conserved in orthologs, but variable in paralogs, and based on the prediction of a set of 22 of such amino acid positions, we have combined site-directed mutagenesis, rhodopsin-based homology modelling, and functional expression in HeLa/Olf cells of receptors OR1A1 and OR1A2. We found that (i) their odorant profiles are centred around citronellic terpenoid structures, (ii) two evolutionary conserved amino acid residues in transmembrane domain 3 are necessary for the responsiveness of OR1A1 and the mouse ortholog Olfr43 to (S)-(-)-citronellol, (iii) changes at these two positions are sufficient to account for the differential (S)-(-)-citronellol responsiveness of the paralogs OR1A1 and OR1A2, and (iv) the interaction sites for (S)-(-)-citronellal and (S)-(-)-citronellol differ in both human receptors. Our results show that the orientation of odorants within a homology modelling-derived binding pocket of olfactory receptor orthologs is defined by evolutionary conserved amino acid positions.

  17. Molecular determinants required for the avirulence function of AvrPphB in bean and other plants.

    PubMed

    Tampakaki, Anastasia P; Bastaki, Marina; Mansfield, John W; Panopoulos, Nickolas J

    2002-03-01

    The avirulence gene avrPphB from Pseudomonas syringae pv. phaseolicola determines incompatibility, manifested as a hypersensitive reaction (HR), on bean cultivars carrying the R3 resistance gene and also confers avirulence on other plants. The AvrPphB protein carries an embedded consensus myristoylation motif and is cleaved in bacteria and certain plants to yield fragments of about 6 and 28 kDa. We investigated plant recognition and type III translocation determinants in AvrPphB by constructing three N-terminally truncated and two site-directed mutants carrying substitutions in the conserved G63 residue of the myristoylation motif, which lies adjacent to the proteolytic cleavage site. The peptides were either delivered to plant cells by pseudomonads or were expressed transiently in planta via the Agrobacterium tumefaciens or Potato virus X. The 63 amino terminal residues were required for type III-mediated translocation from Pseudomonas strains to the plant, but were partially dispensable for effector recognition following in planta expression. Substitution of the G63 residue resulted in differential HR phenotypes in two different R3 cultivars of bean and abolished effector processing in Pseudomonas strains. Agrobacterium-mediated expression of the mutant proteins elicited HR in resistant bean hosts and in tomato but elicited no reaction in Nicotiana species. PMID:11952132

  18. Proposed study to determine potential flight applications and human factors design guidelines of voice recognition/synthesis systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bergeron, H. P.

    1983-01-01

    An effort to evaluate the human factors aspects and potential of voice recognition/synthesis techniques and the application of present and near-future (5 years) voice recognition/synthesis systems as a pilot/aircraft cockpit interface capability in an operational environment is discussed. The analysis will emphasize applications for single pilot instrument flight rules operations but will also include applications for other categories of aircraft with various levels of complexity.

  19. A common type of the spectrin alpha I 46-50a-kD peptide abnormality in hereditary elliptocytosis and pyropoikilocytosis is associated with a mutation distant from the proteolytic cleavage site. Evidence for the functional importance of the triple helical model of spectrin.

    PubMed Central

    Gallagher, P G; Tse, W T; Coetzer, T; Lecomte, M C; Garbarz, M; Zarkowsky, H S; Baruchel, A; Ballas, S K; Dhermy, D; Palek, J

    1992-01-01

    We studied nine individuals from five unrelated families with alpha I/46-50a hereditary elliptocytosis (HE) or hereditary pyropoikilocytosis (HPP), including one of the original HHP probands first reported by Zarkowsky and colleagues (1975. Br. J. Haematol. 29:537-543). Biochemical analysis of erythrocyte membrane proteins from these patients revealed, as a common abnormality, the presence of the alpha I/46-50a peptide after limited tryptic digestion of spectrin. The polymerase chain reaction was utilized to study the structure of the DNA encoding the alpha I domain of spectrin in the affected individuals. The DNA sequence of the alpha-spectrin gene encoding the region of the alpha-spectrin chain surrounding the abnormal proteolytic cleavage site was normal. We identified a point mutation causing the replacement of a highly conserved leucine residue by proline at position 207 in the alpha-spectrin chain, a site 51 residues to the amino-terminal side of the abnormal proteolytic cleavage site. Analysis of the proposed triple helical model of spectrin repeats reveals that the mutation occurs in helix 2 at a position directly opposite the abnormal proteolytic cleavage site in helix 3, making this the first report of a mutation occurring in helix 2 of a repeat in the alpha I domain of spectrin. These results add to the molecular heterogeneity of mutations associated with HE/HPP and provide further support for the proposed triple helical model of spectrin. Disruption of this proposed alpha-helical structure by helix-breaking proline substitutions may result in a functionally defective spectrin chain. Images PMID:1541680

  20. Determinants that govern the recognition and uptake of Escherichia coli O157 : H7 by Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Jason W; Spacht, Drew; Koudelka, Gerald B

    2016-10-01

    Predation by phagocytic predators is a major source of bacterial mortality. The first steps in protozoan predation are recognition and consumption of their bacterial prey. However, the precise mechanisms governing prey recognition and phagocytosis by protists, and the identities of the molecular and cellular factors involved in these processes are, as yet, ill-characterized. Here, we show that that the ability of the phagocytic bacterivorous amoebae, Acanthamoeba castellanii, to recognize and internalize Escherichia coli, a bacterial prey, varies with LPS structure and composition. The presence of an O-antigen carbohydrate is not required for uptake of E. coli by A. castellanii. However, O1-antigen types, not O157 O-antigen types, inhibit recognition and uptake of bacteria by amoeba. This finding implies that O-antigen may function as an antipredator defence molecule. Recognition and uptake of E. coli by A. castellanii is mediated by the interaction of mannose-binding protein located on amoebae's surface with LPS carbohydrate. Phagocytic mammalian cells also use mannose-binding lectins to recognize and/or mediate phagocytosis of E. coli. Nonetheless, A. castellanii's mannose binding protein apparently displays no sequence similarity with any known metazoan mannose binding protein. Hence, the similarity in bacterial recognition mechanisms of amoebae and mammalian phagocytes may be a result of convergent evolution. PMID:26990156

  1. Determinants that govern the recognition and uptake of Escherichia coli O157 : H7 by Acanthamoeba castellanii.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Jason W; Spacht, Drew; Koudelka, Gerald B

    2016-10-01

    Predation by phagocytic predators is a major source of bacterial mortality. The first steps in protozoan predation are recognition and consumption of their bacterial prey. However, the precise mechanisms governing prey recognition and phagocytosis by protists, and the identities of the molecular and cellular factors involved in these processes are, as yet, ill-characterized. Here, we show that that the ability of the phagocytic bacterivorous amoebae, Acanthamoeba castellanii, to recognize and internalize Escherichia coli, a bacterial prey, varies with LPS structure and composition. The presence of an O-antigen carbohydrate is not required for uptake of E. coli by A. castellanii. However, O1-antigen types, not O157 O-antigen types, inhibit recognition and uptake of bacteria by amoeba. This finding implies that O-antigen may function as an antipredator defence molecule. Recognition and uptake of E. coli by A. castellanii is mediated by the interaction of mannose-binding protein located on amoebae's surface with LPS carbohydrate. Phagocytic mammalian cells also use mannose-binding lectins to recognize and/or mediate phagocytosis of E. coli. Nonetheless, A. castellanii's mannose binding protein apparently displays no sequence similarity with any known metazoan mannose binding protein. Hence, the similarity in bacterial recognition mechanisms of amoebae and mammalian phagocytes may be a result of convergent evolution.

  2. Structure of the propeptide of prothrombin containing the. gamma. -carboxylation recognition site determined by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Sanford, D.G.; Sudmeier, J.L.; Bachovchin, W.W.; Kanagy, C.; Furie, B.C.; Furie, B. )

    1991-10-15

    The propeptides of the vitamin K dependent blood clotting and regulatory proteins contain a {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site that directs precursor forms of these proteins for posttranslational {gamma}-carboxylation. Peptides corresponding to the propeptide of prothrombin were synthesized and examined by circular dichroism (CD) and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR). CD spectra indicate that these peptides have little or no secondary structure in aqueous solutions but that the addition of trifluoroethanol induces or stabilizes a structure containing {alpha}-helical character. The maximum helical content occurs at 35-40% trifluoroethanol. This trifluoroethanol-stabilized structure was solved by two-dimensional NMR spectroscopy. The NMR results demonstrate that residues {minus}13 to {minus}3 form an amphipathic {alpha}-helix. NMR spectra indicate that a similar structure is present at 5C, in the absence of trifluoroethanol. Of the residues previously implicated in defining the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site, four residues ({minus}18, {minus}17, {minus}16, and {minus}15) are adjacent to the helical region and one residue ({minus}10) is located within the helix. The potential role of the amphipathic {alpha}-helix in the {gamma}-carboxylation recognition site is discussed.

  3. Identification of determinants for tRNA substrate recognition by Escherichia coli C/U34 2'-O-methyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Mi; Long, Tao; Fang, Zhi-Peng; Zhou, Xiao-Long; Liu, Ru-Juan; Wang, En-Duo

    2015-01-01

    Post-transcriptional modifications bring chemical diversity to tRNAs, especially at positions 34 and 37 of the anticodon stem-loop (ASL). TrmL is the prokaryotic methyltransferase that catalyzes the transfer of the methyl group from S-adenosyl-L-methionine to the wobble base of tRNA(Leu)CAA and tRNA(Leu)UAA isoacceptors. This Cm34/Um34 modification affects codon-anticodon interactions and is essential for translational fidelity. TrmL-catalyzed 2'-O-methylation requires its homodimerization; however, understanding of the tRNA recognition mechanism by TrmL remains elusive. In the current study, by measuring tRNA methylation by TrmL and performing kinetic analysis of tRNA mutants, we found that TrmL exhibits a fine-tuned tRNA substrate recognition mechanism. Anticodon stem-loop minihelices with an extension of 2 base pairs are the minimal substrate for EcTrmL methylation. A35 is a key residue for TrmL recognition, while A36-A37-A38 are important either via direct interaction with TrmL or due to the necessity for prior isopentenylation (i(6)) at A37. In addition, TrmL only methylates pyrimidines but not purine residues at the wobble position, and the 2'-O-methylation relies on prior N(6)-isopentenyladenosine modification at position 37. PMID:26106808

  4. The Structure and Specificity of the Type III Secretion System Effector NleC Suggest a DNA Mimicry Mechanism of Substrate Recognition

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Many pathogenic bacteria utilize the type III secretion system (T3SS) to translocate effector proteins directly into host cells, facilitating colonization. In enterohemmorhagic Escherichia coli (EHEC), a subset of T3SS effectors is essential for suppression of the inflammatory response in hosts, including humans. Identified as a zinc protease that cleaves NF-κB transcription factors, NleC is one such effector. Here, we investigate NleC substrate specificity, showing that four residues around the cleavage site in the DNA-binding loop of the NF-κB subunit RelA strongly influence the cleavage rate. Class I NF-κB subunit p50 is cleaved at a reduced rate consistent with conservation of only three of these four residues. However, peptides containing 10 residues on each side of the scissile bond were not efficiently cleaved by NleC, indicating that elements distal from the cleavage site are also important for substrate recognition. We present the crystal structure of NleC and show that it mimics DNA structurally and electrostatically. Consistent with this model, mutation of phosphate-mimicking residues in NleC reduces the level of RelA cleavage. We propose that global recognition of NF-κB subunits by DNA mimicry combined with a high sequence selectivity for the cleavage site results in exquisite NleC substrate specificity. The structure also shows that despite undetectable similarity of its sequence to those of other Zn2+ proteases beyond its conserved HExxH Zn2+-binding motif, NleC is a member of the Zincin protease superfamily, albeit divergent from its structural homologues. In particular, NleC displays a modified Ψ-loop motif that may be important for folding and refolding requirements implicit in T3SS translocation. PMID:25040221

  5. Structural Determinants of Substrate Recognition in the HAD Superfamily Member D-glycero-D-manno-Heptose-1,7-bisphosphate Phosphatase (GmhB)

    SciTech Connect

    Nguyen, H.; Wang, L; Huang, H; Peisach, E; Dunaway-Mariano, D; Allen, K

    2010-01-01

    The haloalkanoic acid dehalogenase (HAD) enzyme superfamily is the largest family of phosphohydrolases. In HAD members, the structural elements that provide the binding interactions that support substrate specificity are separated from those that orchestrate catalysis. For most HAD phosphatases, a cap domain functions in substrate recognition. However, for the HAD phosphatases that lack a cap domain, an alternate strategy for substrate selection must be operative. One such HAD phosphatase, GmhB of the HisB subfamily, was selected for structure-function analysis. Herein, the X-ray crystallographic structures of Escherichia coli GmhB in the apo form (1.6 {angstrom} resolution), in a complex with Mg{sup 2+} and orthophosphate (1.8 {angstrom} resolution), and in a complex with Mg{sup 2+} and D-glycero-D-manno-heptose 1{beta},7-bisphosphate (2.2 {angstrom} resolution) were determined, in addition to the structure of Bordetella bronchiseptica GmhB bound to Mg{sup 2+} and orthophosphate (1.7 {angstrom} resolution). The structures show that in place of a cap domain, the GmhB catalytic site is elaborated by three peptide inserts or loops that pack to form a concave, semicircular surface around the substrate leaving group. Structure-guided kinetic analysis of site-directed mutants was conducted in parallel with a bioinformatics study of sequence diversification within the HisB subfamily to identify loop residues that serve as substrate recognition elements and that distinguish GmhB from its subfamily counterpart, the histidinol-phosphate phosphatase domain of HisB. We show that GmhB and the histidinol-phosphate phosphatase domain use the same design of three substrate recognition loops inserted into the cap domain yet, through selective residue usage on the loops, have achieved unique substrate specificity and thus novel biochemical function.

  6. A conserved motif in JNK/p38-specific MAPK phosphatases as a determinant for JNK1 recognition and inactivation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Chen-Song; Lu, Chang; Lin, Sheng-Cai; Wu, Jia-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), important in a large array of signalling pathways, are tightly controlled by a cascade of protein kinases and by MAPK phosphatases (MKPs). MAPK signalling efficiency and specificity is modulated by protein-protein interactions between individual MAPKs and the docking motifs in cognate binding partners. Two types of docking interactions have been identified: D-motif-mediated interaction and FXF-docking interaction. Here we report the crystal structure of JNK1 bound to the catalytic domain of MKP7 at 2.4-Å resolution, providing high-resolution structural insight into the FXF-docking interaction. The (285)FNFL(288) segment in MKP7 directly binds to a hydrophobic site on JNK1 that is near the MAPK insertion and helix αG. Biochemical studies further reveal that this highly conserved structural motif is present in all members of the MKP family, and the interaction mode is universal and critical for the MKP-MAPK recognition and biological function. PMID:26988444

  7. Pattern recognition and data mining techniques to identify factors in wafer processing and control determining overlay error

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lam, Auguste; Ypma, Alexander; Gatefait, Maxime; Deckers, David; Koopman, Arne; van Haren, Richard; Beltman, Jan

    2015-03-01

    On-product overlay can be improved through the use of context data from the fab and the scanner. Continuous improvements in lithography and processing performance over the past years have resulted in consequent overlay performance improvement for critical layers. Identification of the remaining factors causing systematic disturbances and inefficiencies will further reduce overlay. By building a context database, mappings between context, fingerprints and alignment & overlay metrology can be learned through techniques from pattern recognition and data mining. We relate structure (`patterns') in the metrology data to relevant contextual factors. Once understood, these factors could be moved to the known effects (e.g. the presence of systematic fingerprints from reticle writing error or lens and reticle heating). Hence, we build up a knowledge base of known effects based on data. Outcomes from such an integral (`holistic') approach to lithography data analysis may be exploited in a model-based predictive overlay controller that combines feedback and feedforward control [1]. Hence, the available measurements from scanner, fab and metrology equipment are combined to reveal opportunities for further overlay improvement which would otherwise go unnoticed.

  8. A conserved motif in JNK/p38-specific MAPK phosphatases as a determinant for JNK1 recognition and inactivation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xin; Zhang, Chen-Song; Lu, Chang; Lin, Sheng-Cai; Wu, Jia-Wei; Wang, Zhi-Xin

    2016-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs), important in a large array of signalling pathways, are tightly controlled by a cascade of protein kinases and by MAPK phosphatases (MKPs). MAPK signalling efficiency and specificity is modulated by protein–protein interactions between individual MAPKs and the docking motifs in cognate binding partners. Two types of docking interactions have been identified: D-motif-mediated interaction and FXF-docking interaction. Here we report the crystal structure of JNK1 bound to the catalytic domain of MKP7 at 2.4-Å resolution, providing high-resolution structural insight into the FXF-docking interaction. The 285FNFL288 segment in MKP7 directly binds to a hydrophobic site on JNK1 that is near the MAPK insertion and helix αG. Biochemical studies further reveal that this highly conserved structural motif is present in all members of the MKP family, and the interaction mode is universal and critical for the MKP-MAPK recognition and biological function. PMID:26988444

  9. Unraveling a Hotspot for TCR Recognition on HLA-A2: Evidence Against the Existence of Peptide-independent TCR Binding Determinants

    SciTech Connect

    Gagnon, Susan J.; Borbulevych, Oleg Y.; Davis-Harrison, Rebecca L.; Baxter, Tiffany K.; Clemens, John R.; Armstrong, Kathryn M.; Turner, Richard V.; Damirjian, Marale; Biddison, William E.; Baker, Brian M.

    2010-07-19

    T cell receptor (TCR) recognition of peptide takes place in the context of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecule, which accounts for approximately two-thirds of the peptide/MHC buried surface. Using the class I MHC HLA-A2 and a large panel of mutants, we have previously shown that surface mutations that disrupt TCR recognition vary with the identity of the peptide. The single exception is Lys66 on the HLA-A2 {alpha}1 helix, which when mutated to alanine disrupts recognition for 93% of over 250 different T cell clones or lines, independent of which peptide is bound. Thus, Lys66 could serve as a peptide-independent TCR binding determinant. Here, we have examined the role of Lys66 in TCR recognition of HLA-A2 in detail. The structure of a peptide/HLA-A2 molecule with the K66A mutation indicates that although the mutation induces no major structural changes, it results in the exposure of a negatively charged glutamate (Glu63) underneath Lys66. Concurrent replacement of Glu63 with glutamine restores TCR binding and function for T cells specific for five different peptides presented by HLA-A2. Thus, the positive charge on Lys66 does not serve to guide all TCRs onto the HLA-A2 molecule in a manner required for productive signaling. Furthermore, electrostatic calculations indicate that Lys66 does not contribute to the stability of two TCR-peptide/HLA-A2 complexes. Our findings are consistent with the notion that each TCR arrives at a unique solution of how to bind a peptide/MHC, most strongly influenced by the chemical and structural features of the bound peptide. This would not rule out an intrinsic affinity of TCRs for MHC molecules achieved through multiple weak interactions, but for HLA-A2 the collective mutational data place limits on the role of any single MHC amino acid side-chain in driving TCR binding in a peptide-independent fashion.

  10. A Combined NMR and Computational Approach to Determine the RGDechi-hCit-αv β3 Integrin Recognition Mode in Isolated Cell Membranes.

    PubMed

    Farina, Biancamaria; de Paola, Ivan; Russo, Luigi; Capasso, Domenica; Liguoro, Annamaria; Gatto, Annarita Del; Saviano, Michele; Pedone, Paolo V; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Malgieri, Gaetano; Zaccaro, Laura; Fattorusso, Roberto

    2016-01-11

    The critical role of integrins in tumor progression and metastasis has stimulated intense efforts to identify pharmacological agents that can modulate integrin function. In recent years, αv β3 and αv β5 integrin antagonists were demonstrated to be effective in blocking tumor progression. RGDechi-hCit, a chimeric peptide containing a cyclic RGD motif linked to an echistatin C-terminal fragment, is able to recognize selectively αv β3 integrin both in vitro and in vivo. High-resolution molecular details of the selective αv β3 recognition of the peptide are certainly required, nonetheless RGDechi-hCit internalization limited the use of classical in cell NMR experiments. To overcome such limitations, we used WM266 isolated cellular membranes to accomplish a detailed NMR interaction study that, combined with a computational analysis, provides significant structural insights into αv β3 molecular recognition by RGDechi-hCit. Remarkably, on the basis of the identified molecular determinants, we design a RGDechi-hCit mutant that is selective for αv β5 integrin. PMID:26548575

  11. Progress in fold recognition.

    PubMed

    Flöckner, H; Braxenthaler, M; Lackner, P; Jaritz, M; Ortner, M; Sippl, M J

    1995-11-01

    The prediction experiment reveals that fold recognition has become a powerful tool in structural biology. We applied our fold recognition technique to 13 target sequences. In two cases, replication terminating protein and prosequence of subtilisin, the predicted structures are very similar to the experimentally determined folds. For the first time, in a public blind test, the unknown structures of proteins have been predicted ahead of experiment to an accuracy approaching molecular detail. In two other cases the approximate folds have been predicted correctly. According to the assessors there were 12 recognizable folds among the target proteins. In our postprediction analysis we find that in 7 cases our fold recognition technique is successful. In several of the remaining cases the predicted folds have interesting features in common with the experimental results. We present our procedure, discuss the results, and comment on several fundamental and technical problems encountered in fold recognition.

  12. Critical determinants for substrate recognition and catalysis in the M. tuberculosis class II AP-endonuclease/3'-5' exonuclease III.

    PubMed

    Khanam, Taran; Shukla, Ankita; Rai, Niyati; Ramachandran, Ravishankar

    2015-05-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis AP-endonuclease/3'-5' exodeoxyribonuclease (MtbXthA) is an important player in DNA base excision repair (BER). We demonstrate that the enzyme has robust apurinic/apyrimidinic (AP) endonuclease activity, 3'-5' exonuclease, phosphatase, and phosphodiesterase activities. The enzyme functions as an AP-endonuclease at high ionic environments, while the 3'-5'-exonuclease activity is predominant at low ionic environments. Our molecular modelling and mutational experiments show that E57 and D251 are critical for catalysis. Although nicked DNA and gapped DNA are fair substrates of MtbXthA, the gap-size did not affect the excision activity and furthermore, a substrate with a recessed 3'-end is preferred. To understand the determinants of abasic-site recognition, we examined the possible roles of (i) the base opposite the abasic site, (ii) the abasic ribose ring itself, (iii) local distortions in the AP-site, and (iv) conserved residues located near the active site. Our experiments demonstrate that the first three determinants do not play a role in MtbXthA, and in fact the enzyme exhibits robust endonucleolytic activity against single-stranded AP DNA also. Regarding the fourth determinant, it is known that the catalytic-site of AP endonucleases is surrounded by conserved aromatic residues and intriguingly, the exact residues that are directly involved in abasic site recognition vary with the individual proteins. We therefore, used a combination of mutational analysis, kinetic assays, and structure-based modelling, to identify that Y237, supported by Y137, mediates the formation of the MtbXthA-AP-DNA complex and AP-site incision. PMID:25748880

  13. Genetic specificity of face recognition.

    PubMed

    Shakeshaft, Nicholas G; Plomin, Robert

    2015-10-13

    Specific cognitive abilities in diverse domains are typically found to be highly heritable and substantially correlated with general cognitive ability (g), both phenotypically and genetically. Recent twin studies have found the ability to memorize and recognize faces to be an exception, being similarly heritable but phenotypically substantially uncorrelated both with g and with general object recognition. However, the genetic relationships between face recognition and other abilities (the extent to which they share a common genetic etiology) cannot be determined from phenotypic associations. In this, to our knowledge, first study of the genetic associations between face recognition and other domains, 2,000 18- and 19-year-old United Kingdom twins completed tests assessing their face recognition, object recognition, and general cognitive abilities. Results confirmed the substantial heritability of face recognition (61%), and multivariate genetic analyses found that most of this genetic influence is unique and not shared with other cognitive abilities.

  14. New potentiometric sensors based on selective recognition sites for determination of ephedrine in some pharmaceuticals and biological fluids.

    PubMed

    Hassan, Saad S M; Kamel, Ayman H; Abd El-Naby, Heba

    2013-01-15

    New cost-effective potentiometric membrane sensors with cylindrical configuration responsive to ephedrine are described. The sensors setup is, based on the use of triacetyl-β-cyclodextrin [(triacetyl-β-CD)] as a neutral ionophore embedded in a plasticized poly (vinyl chloride) (PVC) matrix (sensor I) and carboxylated poly(vinyl chloride) [(PVC-COOH)] as a simultaneous plastic matrix and ion exchanger (sensor II). Both sensors showed significant enhancement of response towards ephedrinium cation (EPD(+)) over a concentration range of 3.0 × 10(-5)-8.0 × 10(-3) mol L(-1) at pH 4-9 and 3-8 with low detection limits of 5.7 × 10(-6) and 6.2 × 10(-6) mol L(-1) for sensors (I) and (II), respectively. The sensors displayed near-Nernstian cationic slope of 57.0 and 55.6 mV decade(-1) for EPD(+) and the effects of lipophilic salts and various foreign common ions were examined. The sensors were also satisfactorily used as tubular detectors in a double channel flow injection system. The intrinsic characteristics of the detectors in a low dispersion manifold under hydrodynamic mode of operation were determined and compared with data obtained under batch mode of operation. Validation of the method revealed good performance characteristics including long life span, good selectivity for EPD(+) over a wide variety of other organic compounds, long term stability, high reproducibility, fast response, low detection limit, wide measurement range, acceptable accuracy and precision. Applications of the sensors to the determination of EPD(+) in pharmaceutical formulations and spiked biological fluid samples were carried out and compared with standard techniques. Notably, the sensors introduced offer several advantages over many of those previously described that are amenable to quality control/quality assurance assessment of the homogeneity, stability and purity of ephedrine drug tablets.

  15. The identification of inanna with the planet venus: A criterion for the time determination of the recognition of constellations in ancient mesopotamia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurtik, G. E.

    The author of the paper believes that the identification of Inanna with Venus as the morning or evening star chronologically preceded the time when the first constellations began to be recognized in Ancient Mesopotamia. If this is correct, the date of identification can be used as a reference point for the determination of the earliest probable limit for the epoch when in Mesopotamia the process of constellation recognition have been started. The earliest known images with the symbol of Inanna date from the period of archaic Uruk. They can be divided into two groups: (1) the images on seals and ceramics where there are no astral attributes; (2) the pictographic texts where the picture of a star and the signs of a sunrise or a sunset are placed alongside the symbol of Inanna. The pictographic texts, however, admit also a non-astral interpretation, if the picture of a star is a determinative of a deity. The astral nature of Inanna for the Uruk period therefore cannot be considered as finally proved. The identification of Inanna with Venus is reliably certified on seals of the Early Dynastic Period where there are at once three astral symbols - the crescent, the solar disk and the star of Inanna.

  16. Recognition of the different structural forms of the capsid protein determines the outcome following infection with porcine circovirus type 2.

    PubMed

    Trible, Benjamin R; Suddith, Andrew W; Kerrigan, Maureen A; Cino-Ozuna, Ada G; Hesse, Richard A; Rowland, Raymond R R

    2012-12-01

    Porcine circovirus type 2 (PCV2) capsid protein (CP) is the only protein necessary for the formation of the virion capsid, and recombinant CP spontaneously forms virus-like particles (VLPs). Located within a single CP subunit is an immunodominant epitope consisting of residues 169 to 180 [CP(169-180)], which is exposed on the surface of the subunit, but, in the structural context of the VLP, the epitope is buried and inaccessible to antibody. High levels of anti-CP(169-180) activity are associated with porcine circovirus-associated disease (PCVAD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of the immune response to monomer CP in the development of PCVAD. The approach was to immunize pigs with CP monomer, followed by challenge with PCV2 and porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV). To maintain the CP immunogen as a stable monomer, CP(43-233) was fused to ubiquitin (Ub-CP). Size exclusion chromatography showed that Ub-CP was present as a single 33-kDa protein. Pigs immunized with Ub-CP developed a strong antibody response to PCV2, including antibodies against CP(169-180). However, only low levels of virus neutralizing activity were detected, and viremia levels were similar to those of nonimmunized pigs. As a positive control, immunization with baculovirus-expressed CP (Bac-CP) resulted in high levels of virus neutralizing activity, small amounts of anti-CP(169-180) activity, and the absence of viremia in pigs following virus challenge. The data support the role of CP(169-180) as an immunological decoy and illustrate the importance of the structural form of the CP immunogen in determining the outcome following infection.

  17. Substrate recognition mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin-cleaving clostridial neurotoxins.

    PubMed

    Sikorra, Stefan; Henke, Tina; Galli, Thierry; Binz, Thomas

    2008-07-25

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) inhibit neurotransmitter release by proteolyzing a single peptide bond in one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors SNAP-25, syntaxin, and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin. TeNT and BoNT/B, D, F, and G of the seven known BoNTs cleave the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP/synaptobrevin. Except for BoNT/B and TeNT, they cleave unique peptide bonds, and prior work suggested that different substrate segments are required for the interaction of each toxin. Although the mode of SNAP-25 cleavage by BoNT/A and E has recently been studied in detail, the mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin proteolysis is fragmentary. Here, we report the determination of all substrate residues that are involved in the interaction with BoNT/B, D, and F and TeNT by means of systematic mutagenesis of VAMP/synaptobrevin. For each of the toxins, three or more residues clustered at an N-terminal site remote from the respective scissile bond are identified that affect solely substrate binding. These exosites exhibit different sizes and distances to the scissile peptide bonds for each neurotoxin. Substrate segments C-terminal of the cleavage site (P4-P4') do not play a role in the catalytic process. Mutation of residues in the proximity of the scissile bond exclusively affects the turnover number; however, the importance of individual positions at the cleavage sites varied for each toxin. The data show that, similar to the SNAP-25 proteolyzing BoNT/A and E, VAMP/synaptobrevin-specific clostridial neurotoxins also initiate substrate interaction, employing an exosite located N-terminal of the scissile peptide bond.

  18. Determining the optimal window length for pattern recognition-based myoelectric control: balancing the competing effects of classification error and controller delay

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Lauren H.; Hargrove, Levi J.; Lock, Blair A.; Kuiken, Todd A.

    2014-01-01

    Pattern recognition–based control of myoelectric prostheses has shown great promise in research environments, but has not been optimized for use in a clinical setting. To explore the relationship between classification error, controller delay, and real-time controllability, 13 able-bodied subjects were trained to operate a virtual upper-limb prosthesis using pattern recognition of electromyogram (EMG) signals. Classification error and controller delay were varied by training different classifiers with a variety of analysis window lengths ranging from 50 to 550 ms and either two or four EMG input channels. Offline analysis showed that classification error decreased with longer window lengths (p < 0.01). Real-time controllability was evaluated with the Target Achievement Control (TAC) Test, which prompted users to maneuver the virtual prosthesis into various target postures. The results indicated that user performance improved with lower classification error (p<0.01) and was reduced with longer controller delay (p<0.01), as determined by the window length. Therefore, both of these effects should be considered when choosing a window length; it may be beneficial to increase the window length if this results in a reduced classification error, despite the corresponding increase in controller delay. For the system employed in this study, the optimal window length was found to be between 150 and 250 ms, which is within acceptable controller delays for conventional multi-state amplitude controllers. PMID:21193383

  19. Localization of the papain cleavage site of H-2 glycoproteins.

    PubMed Central

    Ewenstein, B M; Freed, J H; Mole, L E; Nathenson, S G

    1976-01-01

    The antigenic products of the murine H-2K and H-2D genes are glycoproteins of about 45,000 molecular weight which are tightly integrated within the cell surface membrane. A glycoprotein fragment (FAg, antigenic fragment) of 37,000 daltons carrying the carbohydrate, antigenic sites, and the associated putative beta2-microglobulin of 12,000 daltons can be generated by papain cleavage either of the native molecules in the cell membrane or of immune precipitates made from the antigen solubilized by nonionic detergent. Partial NH2-terminal sequence analyses of the native H-2 glycoprotein and of the papain-cleaved glycoprotein fragment establish that the fragment is, in fact, the NH2-terminal portion of the native molecule. Thus, the cleavage by papain proteolysis is near the COOH-terminus, and removal of the COOH-terminal portion (Fm, membrane fragment) converts the glycoprotein to a water-soluble form. This observation suggests that the NH2-terminus of the native glycoprotein extends out of the hydrophobic bilayer of the cell membrane, and that the COOH-terminus contains the membrane binding region and is buried within the bilayer. PMID:1062805

  20. In vitro evolution of preferred topoisomerase II DNA cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Burden, D A; Osheroff, N

    1999-02-19

    Topoisomerase II is an essential enzyme that is the target for several clinically important anticancer drugs. Although this enzyme must create transient double-stranded breaks in the genetic material in order to carry out its indispensable DNA strand passage reaction, the factors that underlie its nucleotide cleavage specificity remain an enigma. Therefore, to address the critical issue of enzyme specificity, a modified systematic evolution of ligands by exponential enrichment (SELEX) protocol was employed to select/evolve DNA sequences that were preferentially cleaved by Drosophila melanogaster topoisomerase II. Levels of DNA scission rose substantially (from 3 to 20%) over 20 rounds of SELEX. In vitro selection/evolution converged on an alternating purine/pyrmidine sequence that was highly AT-rich (TATATATACATATATATA). The preference for this sequence was more pronounced for Drosophila topoisomerase II over other species and was increased in the presence of DNA cleavage-enhancing anticancer drugs. Enhanced cleavage appeared to be based on higher rates of DNA scission rather than increased binding affinity or decreased religation rates. The preferred sequence for topoisomerase II-mediated DNA cleavage is dramatically overrepresented ( approximately 10,000-fold) in the euchromatic genome of D. melanogaster, implying that it may be a site for the physiological action of this enzyme.

  1. Androgenic control of male-typical behavior, morphology and sex recognition is independent of the mode of sex determination: A case study on Lichtenfelder's gecko (Eublepharidae: Goniurosaurus lichtenfelderi).

    PubMed

    Golinski, Alison; Kubička, Lukáš; John-Alder, Henry; Kratochvíl, Lukáš

    2015-06-01

    Previous work on lizards has shown that many sexually dimorphic traits depend on testosterone (T), but the details of this control can vary among species. Here, we tested the role of T on the expression of morphological, physiological, and behavioral traits in Lichtenfelder's gecko (Goniurosaurus lichtenfelderi), from the lizard family Eublepharidae notable for interspecific variation in sexually dimorphic traits and the mode of sex determination. Experiments included three groups of males (intact control, surgically castrated, castrated with T replacement) and two groups of females (intact control, T supplemented). In males, castration caused reductions in 1) the size of hemipenes, 2) offensive aggression, 3) male sexual behavior in a neutral arena, 4) activity of precloacal glands, and 5) loss of male chemical cues for sex recognition. These reductions were not observed in castrated males with T replacement. Interestingly, castrated males performed sexual behavior in their home cages, which shows that the effect of T depends on the environmental context. Notably, tail vibration, previously reported as a courtship behavior in other eublepharids, is displayed by males of G. lichtenfelderi during interactions with conspecifics of both sexes, suggesting an evolutionary shift in the meaning of this signal. In females, T induced growth of hemipenes and male-typical courtship but did not induce precloacal pore activity, aggression, or mounting. In comparison to previous reports on Eublepharis macularius, our results indicate that effects of T do not depend on the mode of sex determination. Further, our results extend our understanding of the complexity of control of male traits and illustrate how lability in the effects of T can be a general mechanism causing evolutionary changes in the components of suites of functionally correlated traits.

  2. Nine Crystal Structures Determine the Substrate Envelope of the MDR HIV-1 Protease

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Zhigang; Wang, Yong; Brunzelle, Joseph; Kovari, Iulia A.; Kovari, Ladislau C.

    2012-03-27

    Under drug selection pressure, emerging mutations render HIV-1 protease drug resistant, leading to the therapy failure in anti-HIV treatment. It is known that nine substrate cleavage site peptides bind to wild type (WT) HIV-1 protease in a conserved pattern. However, how the multidrug-resistant (MDR) HIV-1 protease binds to the substrate cleavage site peptides is yet to be determined. MDR769 HIV-1 protease (resistant mutations at residues 10, 36, 46, 54, 62, 63, 71, 82, 84, and 90) was selected for present study to understand the binding to its natural substrates. MDR769 HIV-1 protease was co-crystallized with nine substrate cleavage site hepta-peptides. Crystallographic studies show that MDR769 HIV-1 protease has an expanded substrate envelope with wide open flaps. Furthermore, ligand binding energy calculations indicate weaker binding in MDR769 HIV-1 protease-substrate complexes. These results help in designing the next generation of HIV-1 protease inhibitors by targeting the MDR HIV-1 protease.

  3. Individual recognition between mother and infant bats (Myotis)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Turner, D.; Shaughnessy, A.; Gould, E.

    1972-01-01

    The recognition process and the basis for that recognition, in brown bats, between mother and infant are analyzed. Two parameters, ultrasonic communication and olfactory stimuli, are investigated. The test animals were not allowed any visual contact. It was concluded that individual recognition between mother and infant occurred. However, it could not be determined if the recognition was based on ultrasonic signals or olfactory stimuli.

  4. Recognition Tunneling

    PubMed Central

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-01-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically-functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode (“tethered molecule-pair” configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the “free analyte” configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules. PMID:20522930

  5. Recognition of Teaching Excellence*

    PubMed Central

    Piascik, Peggy; Medina, Melissa; Pittenger, Amy; Rose, Renee; Creekmore, Freddy; Soltis, Robert; Bouldin, Alicia; Schwarz, Lindsay; Scott, Steven

    2010-01-01

    The 2008-2009 Task Force for the Recognition of Teaching Excellence was charged by the AACP Council of Faculties Leadership to examine teaching excellence by collecting best practices from colleges and schools of pharmacy, evaluating the literature to identify evidence-based criteria for excellent teaching, and recommending appropriate means to acknowledge and reward teaching excellence. This report defines teaching excellence and discusses a variety of ways to assess it, including student, alumni, peer, and self-assessment. The task force identifies important considerations that colleges and schools must address when establishing teaching recognition programs including the purpose, criteria, number and mix of awards, frequency, type of award, and method of nominating and determining awardees. The report concludes with recommendations for the academy to consider when establishing and revising teaching award programs. PMID:21301598

  6. Recognition of teaching excellence.

    PubMed

    Hammer, Dana; Piascik, Peggy; Medina, Melissa; Pittenger, Amy; Rose, Renee; Creekmore, Freddy; Soltis, Robert; Bouldin, Alicia; Schwarz, Lindsay; Scott, Steven

    2010-11-10

    The 2008-2009 Task Force for the Recognition of Teaching Excellence was charged by the AACP Council of Faculties Leadership to examine teaching excellence by collecting best practices from colleges and schools of pharmacy, evaluating the literature to identify evidence-based criteria for excellent teaching, and recommending appropriate means to acknowledge and reward teaching excellence. This report defines teaching excellence and discusses a variety of ways to assess it, including student, alumni, peer, and self-assessment. The task force identifies important considerations that colleges and schools must address when establishing teaching recognition programs including the purpose, criteria, number and mix of awards, frequency, type of award, and method of nominating and determining awardees. The report concludes with recommendations for the academy to consider when establishing and revising teaching award programs.

  7. The chemoenzymatic synthesis of clofarabine and related 2'-deoxyfluoroarabinosyl nucleosides: the electronic and stereochemical factors determining substrate recognition by E. coli nucleoside phosphorylases.

    PubMed

    Fateev, Ilja V; Antonov, Konstantin V; Konstantinova, Irina D; Muravyova, Tatyana I; Seela, Frank; Esipov, Roman S; Miroshnikov, Anatoly I; Mikhailopulo, Igor A

    2014-01-01

    Two approaches to the synthesis of 2-chloro-9-(2-deoxy-2-fluoro-β-D-arabinofuranosyl)adenine (1, clofarabine) were studied. The first approach consists in the chemical synthesis of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-α-D-arabinofuranose-1-phosphate (12a, (2F)Ara-1P) via three step conversion of 1,3,5-tri-O-benzoyl-2-deoxy-2-fluoro-α-D-arabinofuranose (9) into the phosphate 12a without isolation of intermediary products. Condensation of 12a with 2-chloroadenine catalyzed by the recombinant E. coli purine nucleoside phosphorylase (PNP) resulted in the formation of clofarabine in 67% yield. The reaction was also studied with a number of purine bases (2-aminoadenine and hypoxanthine), their analogues (5-aza-7-deazaguanine and 8-aza-7-deazahypoxanthine) and thymine. The results were compared with those of a similar reaction with α-D-arabinofuranose-1-phosphate (13a, Ara-1P). Differences of the reactivity of various substrates were analyzed by ab initio calculations in terms of the electronic structure (natural purines vs analogues) and stereochemical features ((2F)Ara-1P vs Ara-1P) of the studied compounds to determine the substrate recognition by E. coli nucleoside phosphorylases. The second approach starts with the cascade one-pot enzymatic transformation of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose into the phosphate 12a, followed by its condensation with 2-chloroadenine thereby affording clofarabine in ca. 48% yield in 24 h. The following recombinant E. coli enzymes catalyze the sequential conversion of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose into the phosphate 12a: ribokinase (2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinofuranose-5-phosphate), phosphopentomutase (PPN; no 1,6-diphosphates of D-hexoses as co-factors required) (12a), and finally PNP. The substrate activities of D-arabinose, D-ribose and D-xylose in the similar cascade syntheses of the relevant 2-chloroadenine nucleosides were studied and compared with the activities of 2-deoxy-2-fluoro-D-arabinose. As expected, D-ribose exhibited the best substrate activity

  8. Fluency and response speed in recognition judgments.

    PubMed

    Poldrack, R A; Logan, G D

    1997-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that perceptual fluency can contribute to recognition judgments. In this study, we examined whether fluency in recognition is based upon the speed of preceding operations, as suggested by studies of perceptual fluency. Subjects studied items in both lexical decision and naming tasks, and were then tested on two blocks of lexical decision trials with probe recognition trials. Jacoby's process dissociation procedure was used, and results from this procedure suggested that recognition judgments in the task were based largely upon familiarity. However, the estimated discriminability available from response time distributions was significantly less than the observed recognition discriminability. Simulated memory operating characteristics confirmed this under determination of recognition by response times. The results demonstrate, contrary to previous suggestions, that fluency in recognition is not based upon speed.

  9. Structural requirements for recognition of the HLA-Dw14 class II epitope: A key HLA determinant associated with rheumatoid arthritis

    SciTech Connect

    Hiraiwa, Akikazu; Yamanaka, Katsuo; Kwok, W.W.; Nepom, G.T. ); Mickelson, E.M.; Masewicz, S.; Hansen, J.A. ); Radka, S.F. )

    1990-10-01

    Although HLA genes have been shown to be associated with certain diseases, the basis for this association is unknown. Recent studies, however, have documented patterns of nucleotide sequence variation among some HLA genes associated with a particular disease. For rheumatoid arthritis, HLA genes in most patients have a shared nucleotide sequence encoding a key structural element of an HLA class II polypeptide; this sequence element is critical for the interaction of the HLA molecule with antigenic peptides and with responding T cells, suggestive of a direct role for this sequence element in disease susceptibility. The authors describe the serological and cellular immunologic characteristics encoded by this rheumatoid arthritis-associated sequence element. Site-directed mutagenesis of the DRB1 gene was used to define amino acids critical for antibody and T-cell recognition of this structural element, focusing on residues that distinguish the rheumatoid arthritis-associated alleles Dw4 and Dw14 from a closely related allele, Dw10, not associated with disease. Both the gain and loss of rheumatoid arthritis-associated epitopes were highly dependent on three residues within a discrete domain of the HLA-DR molecule. Recognition was most strongly influenced by the following amino acids (in order): 70 > 71 > 67. Some alloreactive T-cell clones were also influenced by amino acid variation in portions of the DR molecule lying outside the shared sequence element.

  10. Sign and Word Recognition: A First Comparison.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Grosjean, Francois

    1981-01-01

    The results of a word recognition study are compared to those of a sign recognition study in order to determine which aspects of lexical access are comparable in speech and sign, and which are specific to each of the two language modalities. The "gating paradigm" was used in both studies. (Author/AMH)

  11. Xa21D encodes a receptor-like molecule with a leucine-rich repeat domain that determines race-specific recognition and is subject to adaptive evolution.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, G L; Ruan, D L; Song, W Y; Sideris, S; Chen, L; Pi, L Y; Zhang, S; Zhang, Z; Fauquet, C; Gaut, B S; Whalen, M C; Ronald, P C

    1998-01-01

    The rice Xa21 gene confers resistance to Xanthomonas oryzae pv oryzae in a race-specific manner. Analysis of the inheritance patterns and resistance spectra of transgenic plants carrying six Xa21 gene family members indicated that one member, designated Xa21D, displayed a resistance spectrum identical to that observed for Xa21 but conferred only partial resistance. Xa21D encodes a receptor-like protein carrying leucine-rich repeat (LRR) motifs in the presumed extracellular domain. The Xa21D transcript terminates shortly after the stop codon introduced by the retrotransposon Retrofit. Comparison of nucleotide substitutions in the LRR coding regions of Xa21 and Xa21D provided evidence of adaptive selection. Both functional and evolutionary evidence indicates that the Xa21D LRR domain controls race-specific pathogen recognition. PMID:9596635

  12. Substrate Recognition Mechanism of VAMP/Synaptobrevin-cleaving Clostridial Neurotoxins*S⃞

    PubMed Central

    Sikorra, Stefan; Henke, Tina; Galli, Thierry; Binz, Thomas

    2008-01-01

    Botulinum neurotoxins (BoNTs) and tetanus neurotoxin (TeNT) inhibit neurotransmitter release by proteolyzing a single peptide bond in one of the three soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors SNAP-25, syntaxin, and vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)/synaptobrevin. TeNT and BoNT/B, D, F, and G of the seven known BoNTs cleave the synaptic vesicle protein VAMP/synaptobrevin. Except for BoNT/B and TeNT, they cleave unique peptide bonds, and prior work suggested that different substrate segments are required for the interaction of each toxin. Although the mode of SNAP-25 cleavage by BoNT/A and E has recently been studied in detail, the mechanism of VAMP/synaptobrevin proteolysis is fragmentary. Here, we report the determination of all substrate residues that are involved in the interaction with BoNT/B, D, and F and TeNT by means of systematic mutagenesis of VAMP/synaptobrevin. For each of the toxins, three or more residues clustered at an N-terminal site remote from the respective scissile bond are identified that affect solely substrate binding. These exosites exhibit different sizes and distances to the scissile peptide bonds for each neurotoxin. Substrate segments C-terminal of the cleavage site (P4-P4′) do not play a role in the catalytic process. Mutation of residues in the proximity of the scissile bond exclusively affects the turnover number; however, the importance of individual positions at the cleavage sites varied for each toxin. The data show that, similar to the SNAP-25 proteolyzing BoNT/A and E, VAMP/synaptobrevin-specific clostridial neurotoxins also initiate substrate interaction, employing an exosite located N-terminal of the scissile peptide bond. PMID:18511418

  13. Building Group Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chartier, George

    1994-01-01

    Discusses the value of name recognition for theater companies. Describes steps toward identity and recognition, analyzing the group, the mission statement, symbolic logic, designing and identity, developing a communications plan, and meaningful activities. (SR)

  14. Speech recognition and understanding

    SciTech Connect

    Vintsyuk, T.K.

    1983-05-01

    This article discusses the automatic processing of speech signals with the aim of finding a sequence of works (speech recognition) or a concept (speech understanding) being transmitted by the speech signal. The goal of the research is to develop an automatic typewriter that will automatically edit and type text under voice control. A dynamic programming method is proposed in which all possible class signals are stored, after which the presented signal is compared to all the stored signals during the recognition phase. Topics considered include element-by-element recognition of words of speech, learning speech recognition, phoneme-by-phoneme speech recognition, the recognition of connected speech, understanding connected speech, and prospects for designing speech recognition and understanding systems. An application of the composition dynamic programming method for the solution of basic problems in the recognition and understanding of speech is presented.

  15. Profiles of Discourse Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singer, Murray

    2013-01-01

    A discourse recognition theory derived from more general memory formulations would be broad in its psychological implications. This study compared discourse recognition with some established profiles of item recognition. Participants read 10 stories either once or twice each. They then rated their confidence in recognizing explicit, paraphrased,…

  16. The Hidden Conformation of Lewis x, a Human Histo-Blood Group Antigen, Is a Determinant for Recognition by Pathogen Lectins.

    PubMed

    Topin, Jérémie; Lelimousin, Mickaël; Arnaud, Julie; Audfray, Aymeric; Pérez, Serge; Varrot, Annabelle; Imberty, Anne

    2016-07-15

    Histo-blood group epitopes are fucosylated branched oligosaccharides with well-defined conformations in solution that are recognized by receptors, such as lectins from pathogens. We report here the results of a series of experimental and computational endeavors revealing the unusual distortion of histo-blood group antigens by bacterial and fungal lectins. The Lewis x trisaccharide adopts a rigid closed conformation in solution, while crystallography and molecular dynamics reveal several higher energy open conformations when bound to the Ralstonia solanacearum lectin, which is in agreement with thermodynamic and kinetic measurements. Extensive molecular dynamics simulations confirm rare transient Le(x) openings in solution, frequently assisted by distortion of the central N-acetyl-glucosamine ring. Additional directed molecular dynamic trajectories revealed the role of a conserved tryptophan residue in guiding the fucose into the binding site. Our findings show that conformational adaptation of oligosaccharides is of paramount importance in cell recognition and should be considered when designing anti-infective glyco-compounds. PMID:27198630

  17. Structure and DNA-Binding Sites of the SWI1 AT-rich Interaction Domain (ARID) Suggest Determinants for Sequence-Specific DNA Recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Suhkmann; Zhang, Ziming; Upchurch, Sean; Isern, Nancy G.; Chen, Yuan

    2004-04-16

    2 ARID is a homologous family of DNA-binding domains that occur in DNA binding proteins from a wide variety of species, ranging from yeast to nematodes, insects, mammals and plants. SWI1, a member of the SWI/SNF protein complex that is involved in chromatin remodeling during transcription, contains the ARID motif. The ARID domain of human SWI1 (also known as p270) does not select for a specific DNA sequence from a random sequence pool. The lack of sequence specificity shown by the SWI1 ARID domain stands in contrast to the other characterized ARID domains, which recognize specific AT-rich sequences. We have solved the three-dimensional structure of human SWI1 ARID using solution NMR methods. In addition, we have characterized non-specific DNA-binding by the SWI1 ARID domain. Results from this study indicate that a flexible long internal loop in ARID motif is likely to be important for sequence specific DNA-recognition. The structure of human SWI1 ARID domain also represents a distinct structural subfamily. Studies of ARID indicate that boundary of the DNA binding structural and functional domains can extend beyond the sequence homologous region in a homologous family of proteins. Structural studies of homologous domains such as ARID family of DNA-binding domains should provide information to better predict the boundary of structural and functional domains in structural genomic studies. Key Words: ARID, SWI1, NMR, structural genomics, protein-DNA interaction.

  18. A comparison of iron extraction methods for the determination of degree of pyritisation and the recognition of iron-limited pyrite formation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Raiswell, R.; Canfield, D. E.; Berner, R. A.

    1994-01-01

    Measurements of degree of pyritisation require an estimate of sediment iron which is capable of reaction with dissolved sulphide to form pyrite, either directly or indirectly via iron monosulphide precursors. Three dissolution techniques (buffered dithionite, cold 1 M HCl, boiling 12 M HCl) were examined for their capacity to extract iron from a variety of iron minerals, and iron-bearing sediments, as a function of different extraction times and different grain sizes. All the iron oxides studied are quantitatively extracted by dithionite and boiling HCl (but not by cold HCl). Both HCl techniques extract more iron from silicates than does dithionite but probably about the same amounts as are potentially capable of sulphidation. Modern sediment studies indicate that most sedimentary pyrite is formed rapidly from iron oxides, with smaller amounts formed more slowly from iron silicates (if sufficient geologic time is available). It is therefore recommended that the degree of pyritisation be defined with respect to the dithionite-extractable (mainly iron oxide) pool and/or the boiling HCl-extractable pool (which includes some silicate iron) for the recognition of iron-limited pyritisation.

  19. Face recognition for uncontrolled environments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Podilchuk, Christine; Hulbert, William; Flachsbart, Ralph; Barinov, Lev

    2010-04-01

    A new face recognition algorithm has been proposed which is robust to variations in pose, expression, illumination and occlusions such as sunglasses. The algorithm is motivated by the Edit Distance used to determine the similarity between strings of one dimensional data such as DNA and text. The key to this approach is how to extend the concept of an Edit Distance on one-dimensional data to two-dimensional image data. The algorithm is based on mapping one image into another and using the characteristics of the mapping to determine a two-dimensional Pictorial-Edit Distance or P-Edit Distance. We show how the properties of the mapping are similar to insertion, deletion and substitution errors defined in an Edit Distance. This algorithm is particularly well suited for face recognition in uncontrolled environments such as stand-off and other surveillance applications. We will describe an entire system designed for face recognition at a distance including face detection, pose estimation, multi-sample fusion of video frames and identification. Here we describe how the algorithm is used for face recognition at a distance, present some initial results and describe future research directions.(

  20. Computational analysis of siRNA recognition by the Ago2 PAZ domain and identification of the determinants of RNA-induced gene silencing.

    PubMed

    Kandeel, Mahmoud; Kitade, Yukio

    2013-01-01

    RNA interference (RNAi) is a highly specialized process of protein-siRNA interaction that results in the regulation of gene expression and cleavage of target mRNA. The PAZ domain of the Argonaute proteins binds to the 3' end of siRNA, and during RNAi the attaching end of the siRNA switches between binding and release from its binding pocket. This biphasic interaction of the 3' end of siRNA with the PAZ domain is essential for RNAi activity; however, it remains unclear whether stronger or weaker binding with PAZ domain will facilitate or hinder the overall RNAi process. Here we report the correlation between the binding of modified siRNA 3' overhang analogues and their in vivo RNAi efficacy. We found that higher RNAi efficacy was associated with the parameters of lower Ki value, lower total intermolecular energy, lower free energy, higher hydrogen bonding, smaller total surface of interaction and fewer van der Waals interactions. Electrostatic interaction was a minor contributor to compounds recognition, underscoring the presence of phosphate groups in the modified analogues. Thus, compounds with lower binding affinity are associated with better gene silencing. Lower binding strength along with the smaller interaction surface, higher hydrogen bonding and fewer van der Waals interactions were among the markers for favorable RNAi activity. Within the measured parameters, the interaction surface, van der Waals interactions and inhibition constant showed a statistically significant correlation with measured RNAi efficacy. The considerations provided in this report will be helpful in the design of new compounds with better gene silencing ability.

  1. Global identification of target recognition and cleavage by the Microprocessor in human ES cells.

    PubMed

    Seong, Youngmo; Lim, Do-Hwan; Kim, Augustine; Seo, Jae Hong; Lee, Young Sik; Song, Hoseok; Kwon, Young-Soo

    2014-11-10

    The Microprocessor plays an essential role in canonical miRNA biogenesis by facilitating cleavage of stem-loop structures in primary transcripts to yield pre-miRNAs. Although miRNA biogenesis has been extensively studied through biochemical and molecular genetic approaches, it has yet to be addressed to what extent the current miRNA biogenesis models hold true in intact cells. To address the issues of in vivo recognition and cleavage by the Microprocessor, we investigate RNAs that are associated with DGCR8 and Drosha by using immunoprecipitation coupled with next-generation sequencing. Here, we present global protein-RNA interactions with unprecedented sensitivity and specificity. Our data indicate that precursors of canonical miRNAs and miRNA-like hairpins are the major substrates of the Microprocessor. As a result of specific enrichment of nascent cleavage products, we are able to pinpoint the Microprocessor-mediated cleavage sites per se at single-nucleotide resolution. Unexpectedly, a 2-nt 3' overhang invariably exists at the ends of cleaved bases instead of nascent pre-miRNAs. Besides canonical miRNA precursors, we find that two novel miRNA-like structures embedded in mRNAs are cleaved to yield pre-miRNA-like hairpins, uncoupled from miRNA maturation. Our data provide a framework for in vivo Microprocessor-mediated cleavage and a foundation for experimental and computational studies on miRNA biogenesis in living cells.

  2. Determination of the recognition site for adenine-specific methylase of Shigella sonnei 47 by hydazinolysis of DNA, followed by separation of the purine oligonucleotides by thin-layer chromatography on DEAE-cellulose

    SciTech Connect

    Lopatina, N.G.; Kirnos, M.D.; Suchkov, S.V.; Vanyushin, B.F.; Nikol'skaya, I.I.; Debov, S.S.

    1985-09-20

    A method has been developed for the separation of oligopurine units according to length and composition by two-dimensional thin-layer chromatography on plates with DEAE-cellulose, permitting a comparative analysis of the content of various purine isopliths in DNA of different origin. In the case of the analysis of methylated DNA, the method permits a comparison of the substrate specificity of various enzymes of methylation of the adenine residues in DNA. In conjunction with enzymatic treatment of labeled methylated isopliths, the method permits determination of the methylatable sequence and in a number of cases an ascertainment of the recognition site for adenine-specific methylase as a whole. The proposed method was used to establish the fact that the methylase Ssol recognizes the sequence 5'...G-A-A-T-T-C...3' and methylates the adenine residue closest to its 5'-end.

  3. Molecular dynamics investigations of ozone on an ab initio potential energy surface with the utilization of pattern-recognition neural network for accurate determination of product formation.

    PubMed

    Le, Hung M; Dinh, Thach S; Le, Hieu V

    2011-10-13

    The singlet-triplet transformation and molecular dissociation of ozone (O(3)) gas is investigated by performing quasi-classical molecular dynamics (MD) simulations on an ab initio potential energy surface (PES) with visible and near-infrared excitations. MP4(SDQ) level of theory with the 6-311g(2d,2p) basis set is executed for three different electronic spin states (singlet, triplet, and quintet). In order to simplify the potential energy function, an approximation is adopted by ignoring the spin-orbit coupling and allowing the molecule to switch favorably and instantaneously to the spin state that is more energetically stable (lowest in energy among the three spin states). This assumption has previously been utilized to study the SiO(2) system as reported by Agrawal et al. (J. Chem. Phys. 2006, 124 (13), 134306). The use of such assumption in this study probably makes the upper limits of computed rate coefficients the true rate coefficients. The global PES for ozone is constructed by fitting 5906 ab initio data points using a 60-neuron two-layer feed-forward neural network. The mean-absolute error and root-mean-squared error of this fit are 0.0446 eV (1.03 kcal/mol) and 0.0756 eV (1.74 kcal/mol), respectively, which reveal very good fitting accuracy. The parameter coefficients of the global PES are reported in this paper. In order to identify the spin state with high confidence, we propose the use of a pattern-recognition neural network, which is trained to predict the spin state of a given configuration (with a prediction accuracy being 95.6% on a set of testing data points). To enhance the prediction effectiveness, a buffer series of five points are validated to confirm the spin state during the MD process to gain better confidence. Quasi-classical MD simulations from 1.2 to 2.4 eV of total internal energy (including zero-point energy) result in rate coefficients of singlet-triplet transformation in the range of 0.027 ps(-1) to 1.21 ps(-1). Also, we find very

  4. Multimodal eye recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhi; Du, Yingzi; Thomas, N. L.; Delp, Edward J., III

    2010-04-01

    Multimodal biometrics use more than one means of biometric identification to achieve higher recognition accuracy, since sometimes a unimodal biometric is not good enough used to do identification and classification. In this paper, we proposed a multimodal eye recognition system, which can obtain both iris and sclera patterns from one color eye image. Gabor filter and 1-D Log-Gabor filter algorithms have been applied as the iris recognition algorithms. In sclera recognition, we introduced automatic sclera segmentation, sclera pattern enhancement, sclera pattern template generation, and sclera pattern matching. We applied kernelbased matching score fusion to improve the performance of the eye recognition system. The experimental results show that the proposed eye recognition method can achieve better performance compared to unimodal biometric identification, and the accuracy of our proposed kernel-based matching score fusion method is higher than two classic linear matching score fusion methods: Principal Component Analysis (PCA) and Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA).

  5. Kin Recognition in Bacteria.

    PubMed

    Wall, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    The ability of bacteria to recognize kin provides a means to form social groups. In turn these groups can lead to cooperative behaviors that surpass the ability of the individual. Kin recognition involves specific biochemical interactions between a receptor(s) and an identification molecule(s). Recognition specificity, ensuring that nonkin are excluded and kin are included, is critical and depends on the number of loci and polymorphisms involved. After recognition and biochemical perception, the common ensuing cooperative behaviors include biofilm formation, quorum responses, development, and swarming motility. Although kin recognition is a fundamental mechanism through which cells might interact, microbiologists are only beginning to explore the topic. This review considers both molecular and theoretical aspects of bacterial kin recognition. Consideration is also given to bacterial diversity, genetic relatedness, kin selection theory, and mechanisms of recognition. PMID:27359217

  6. Low-resolution gait recognition.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Junping; Pu, Jian; Chen, Changyou; Fleischer, Rudolf

    2010-08-01

    Unlike other biometric authentication methods, gait recognition is noninvasive and effective from a distance. However, the performance of gait recognition will suffer in the low-resolution (LR) case. Furthermore, when gait sequences are projected onto a nonoptimal low-dimensional subspace to reduce the data complexity, the performance of gait recognition will also decline. To deal with these two issues, we propose a new algorithm called superresolution with manifold sampling and backprojection (SRMS), which learns the high-resolution (HR) counterparts of LR test images from a collection of HR/LR training gait image patch pairs. Then, we incorporate SRMS into a new algorithm called multilinear tensor-based learning without tuning parameters (MTP) for LR gait recognition. Our contributions include the following: 1) With manifold sampling, the redundancy of gait image patches is remarkably decreased; thus, the superresolution procedure is more efficient and reasonable. 2) Backprojection guarantees that the learned HR gait images and the corresponding LR gait images can be more consistent. 3) The optimal subspace dimension for dimension reduction is automatically determined without introducing extra parameters. 4) Theoretical analysis of the algorithm shows that MTP converges. Experiments on the USF human gait database and the CASIA gait database show the increased efficiency of the proposed algorithm, compared with previous algorithms. PMID:20199936

  7. Diagnostic odor recognition

    PubMed

    Rosenblatt; Phan; Desandre; Lobon; Hsu

    2000-10-01

    Many diseases, toxic ingestions, and intoxications have characteristic odors. These odors may provide diagnostic clues that affect rapid treatment long before laboratory confirmation or clinical deterioration. Odor recognition skills, similar to auscultation and palpation skills, require teaching and practical exposure. Dr. Goldfrank and colleagues recognized the importance of teaching odor recognition to emergency service providers. They proposed the "sniffing bar" method for odor recognition training. OBJECTIVES: (1) To identify the recognition rates of medically important odors among emergency care providers. (2) To investigate the effectiveness of teaching odor recognition. Hypothesis: The recognition rates of medically important odors will increase after teaching exposure. METHODS: The study exposed emergency care providers to 11 tubes of odors. Identifications of each substance were recorded. After corrective feedback, subjects were re-tested on their ability to identify the odors. Analysis of odor recognition improvement after teaching was done via chi-square test. RESULTS: Improvement in identification after teaching was seen in all odors. However, the improvement was significant only in the lesscommon substances because their initial recognition was especially low. Significant changes may improve with a larger sample size. Subjects often confuse the odors of alcohol with acetone, and wintergreen with camphor. CONCLUSIONS: The recognition rates are higher for the more-common odors, and lower for the less-common odors. Teaching exposures to the less well-known odors are effective and can significantly improve the recognition rate of these substances. Because odor recognition may affect rapid diagnosis and treatment of certain medical emergencies such as toxic ingestion, future studies should investigate the correlation between odor recognition and the ability to identify corresponding medical emergencies.

  8. On three dimensional object recognition and pose-determination: An abstraction based approach. Ph.D. Thesis - Michigan Univ. Final Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Quek, Kok How Francis

    1990-01-01

    A method of computing reliable Gaussian and mean curvature sign-map descriptors from the polynomial approximation of surfaces was demonstrated. Such descriptors which are invariant under perspective variation are suitable for hypothesis generation. A means for determining the pose of constructed geometric forms whose algebraic surface descriptors are nonlinear in terms of their orienting parameters was developed. This was done by means of linear functions which are capable of approximating nonlinear forms and determining their parameters. It was shown that biquadratic surfaces are suitable companion linear forms for cylindrical approximation and parameter estimation. The estimates provided the initial parametric approximations necessary for a nonlinear regression stage to fine tune the estimates by fitting the actual nonlinear form to the data. A hypothesis-based split-merge algorithm for extraction and pose determination of cylinders and planes which merge smoothly into other surfaces was developed. It was shown that all split-merge algorithms are hypothesis-based. A finite-state algorithm for the extraction of the boundaries of run-length regions was developed. The computation takes advantage of the run list topology and boundary direction constraints implicit in the run-length encoding.

  9. Moreland Recognition Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moreland Elementary School District, San Jose, CA.

    THE FOLLOWING IS THE FULL TEXT OF THIS DOCUMENT: Recognition for special effort and achievement has been noted as a component of effective schools. Schools in the Moreland School District have effectively improved standards of discipline and achievement by providing forty-six different ways for children to receive positive recognition. Good…

  10. Infant Visual Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rose, Susan A.; Feldman, Judith F.; Jankowski, Jeffery J.

    2004-01-01

    Visual recognition memory is a robust form of memory that is evident from early infancy, shows pronounced developmental change, and is influenced by many of the same factors that affect adult memory; it is surprisingly resistant to decay and interference. Infant visual recognition memory shows (a) modest reliability, (b) good discriminant…

  11. The impact of subjective recognition experiences on recognition heuristic use: a multinomial processing tree approach.

    PubMed

    Castela, Marta; Kellen, David; Erdfelder, Edgar; Hilbig, Benjamin E

    2014-10-01

    The recognition heuristic (RH) theory states that, in comparative judgments (e.g., Which of two cities has more inhabitants?), individuals infer that recognized objects score higher on the criterion (e.g., population) than unrecognized objects. Indeed, it has often been shown that recognized options are judged to outscore unrecognized ones (e.g., recognized cities are judged as larger than unrecognized ones), although different accounts of this general finding have been proposed. According to the RH theory, this pattern occurs because the binary recognition judgment determines the inference and no other information will reverse this. An alternative account posits that recognized objects are chosen because knowledge beyond mere recognition typically points to the recognized object. A third account can be derived from the memory-state heuristic framework. According to this framework, underlying memory states of objects (rather than recognition judgments) determine the extent of RH use: When two objects are compared, the one associated with a "higher" memory state is preferred, and reliance on recognition increases with the "distance" between their memory states. The three accounts make different predictions about the impact of subjective recognition experiences-whether an object is merely recognized or recognized with further knowledge-on RH use. We estimated RH use for different recognition experiences across 16 published data sets, using a multinomial processing tree model. Results supported the memory-state heuristic in showing that RH use increases when recognition is accompanied by further knowledge. PMID:24638825

  12. Window Size Impact in Human Activity Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Banos, Oresti; Galvez, Juan-Manuel; Damas, Miguel; Pomares, Hector; Rojas, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Signal segmentation is a crucial stage in the activity recognition process; however, this has been rarely and vaguely characterized so far. Windowing approaches are normally used for segmentation, but no clear consensus exists on which window size should be preferably employed. In fact, most designs normally rely on figures used in previous works, but with no strict studies that support them. Intuitively, decreasing the window size allows for a faster activity detection, as well as reduced resources and energy needs. On the contrary, large data windows are normally considered for the recognition of complex activities. In this work, we present an extensive study to fairly characterize the windowing procedure, to determine its impact within the activity recognition process and to help clarify some of the habitual assumptions made during the recognition system design. To that end, some of the most widely used activity recognition procedures are evaluated for a wide range of window sizes and activities. From the evaluation, the interval 1–2 s proves to provide the best trade-off between recognition speed and accuracy. The study, specifically intended for on-body activity recognition systems, further provides designers with a set of guidelines devised to facilitate the system definition and configuration according to the particular application requirements and target activities. PMID:24721766

  13. Window size impact in human activity recognition.

    PubMed

    Banos, Oresti; Galvez, Juan-Manuel; Damas, Miguel; Pomares, Hector; Rojas, Ignacio

    2014-01-01

    Signal segmentation is a crucial stage in the activity recognition process; however, this has been rarely and vaguely characterized so far. Windowing approaches are normally used for segmentation, but no clear consensus exists on which window size should be preferably employed. In fact, most designs normally rely on figures used in previous works, but with no strict studies that support them. Intuitively, decreasing the window size allows for a faster activity detection, as well as reduced resources and energy needs. On the contrary, large data windows are normally considered for the recognition of complex activities. In this work, we present an extensive study to fairly characterize the windowing procedure, to determine its impact within the activity recognition process and to help clarify some of the habitual assumptions made during the recognition system design. To that end, some of the most widely used activity recognition procedures are evaluated for a wide range of window sizes and activities. From the evaluation, the interval 1-2 s proves to provide the best trade-off between recognition speed and accuracy. The study, specifically intended for on-body activity recognition systems, further provides designers with a set of guidelines devised to facilitate the system definition and configuration according to the particular application requirements and target activities. PMID:24721766

  14. Molecular Recognition and Ligand Association

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baron, Riccardo; McCammon, J. Andrew

    2013-04-01

    We review recent developments in our understanding of molecular recognition and ligand association, focusing on two major viewpoints: (a) studies that highlight new physical insight into the molecular recognition process and the driving forces determining thermodynamic signatures of binding and (b) recent methodological advances in applications to protein-ligand binding. In particular, we highlight the challenges posed by compensating enthalpic and entropic terms, competing solute and solvent contributions, and the relevance of complex configurational ensembles comprising multiple protein, ligand, and solvent intermediate states. As more complete physics is taken into account, computational approaches increase their ability to complement experimental measurements, by providing a microscopic, dynamic view of ensemble-averaged experimental observables. Physics-based approaches are increasingly expanding their power in pharmacology applications.

  15. A novel RNA-binding mode of the YTH domain reveals the mechanism for recognition of determinant of selective removal by Mmi1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chongyuan; Zhu, Yuwei; Bao, Hongyu; Jiang, Yiyang; Xu, Chao; Wu, Jihui; Shi, Yunyu

    2016-01-01

    The YTH domain-containing protein Mmi1, together with other factors, constitutes the machinery used to selectively remove meiosis-specific mRNA during the vegetative growth of fission yeast. Mmi1 directs meiotic mRNAs to the nuclear exosome for degradation by recognizing their DSR (determinant of selective removal) motif. Here, we present the crystal structure of the Mmi1 YTH domain in the apo state and in complex with a DSR motif, demonstrating that the Mmi1 YTH domain selectively recognizes the DSR motif. Intriguingly, Mmi1 also contains a potential m6A (N6-methyladenine)-binding pocket, but its binding of the DSR motif is dependent on a long groove opposite the m6A pocket. The DSR-binding mode is distinct from the m6A RNA-binding mode utilized by other YTH domains. Furthermore, the m6A pocket cannot bind m6A RNA. Our structural and biochemical experiments uncover the mechanism of the YTH domain in binding the DSR motif and help to elucidate the function of Mmi1. PMID:26673708

  16. Face and body recognition show similar improvement during childhood.

    PubMed

    Bank, Samantha; Rhodes, Gillian; Read, Ainsley; Jeffery, Linda

    2015-09-01

    Adults are proficient in extracting identity cues from faces. This proficiency develops slowly during childhood, with performance not reaching adult levels until adolescence. Bodies are similar to faces in that they convey identity cues and rely on specialized perceptual mechanisms. However, it is currently unclear whether body recognition mirrors the slow development of face recognition during childhood. Recent evidence suggests that body recognition develops faster than face recognition. Here we measured body and face recognition in 6- and 10-year-old children and adults to determine whether these two skills show different amounts of improvement during childhood. We found no evidence that they do. Face and body recognition showed similar improvement with age, and children, like adults, were better at recognizing faces than bodies. These results suggest that the mechanisms of face and body memory mature at a similar rate or that improvement of more general cognitive and perceptual skills underlies improvement of both face and body recognition.

  17. Surface-loop residue Lys316 in blood coagulation Factor IX is a major determinant for Factor X but not antithrombin recognition.

    PubMed

    Kolkman, J A; Mertens, K

    2000-09-15

    The active site of activated Factor IX (FIXa) and related blood-coagulation enzymes is surrounded by a number of highly variable surface loops, which contribute to the characteristic substrate specificity of each individual enzyme. FIX residue Lys(316) is located in one of these loops and mutation of this residue to Glu is associated with haemophilia B. In the present study we investigated the functional role of Lys(316) in human FIXa by analysing the purified and activated FIX mutants FIXa-K316E and FIXa-K316A. FIXa-K316E was indistinguishable from normal FIXa in binding the competitive active-site inhibitor p-aminobenzamidine. In addition, substitution of Glu for Lys(316) had no significant effect on the reactivity towards various synthetic tripeptide substrates. Inhibition by the macromolecular inhibitor antithrombin was only slightly reduced for both FIXa mutants (less than 2-fold). In contrast, proteolytic activity of FIXa-K316E towards the natural substrate Factor X (FX) was virtually lacking, while the Lys(316) to Ala mutation resulted in a more than 10-fold reduction in FX activation. Thus residue Lys(316) plays a key role in FIXa activity towards FX. The requirement for Lys at position 316 for FX activation was also evident in the presence of the cofactor activated Factor VIII, although to a lesser extent than in its absence. These data demonstrate that Lys(316) specifically determines the reactivity of FIXa towards its natural substrate FX, but not to synthetic peptide substrates or antithrombin. PMID:10970782

  18. PCA facial expression recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    El-Hori, Inas H.; El-Momen, Zahraa K.; Ganoun, Ali

    2013-12-01

    This paper explores and compares techniques for automatically recognizing facial actions in sequences of images. The comparative study of Facial Expression Recognition (FER) techniques namely Principal Component's analysis (PCA) and PCA with Gabor filters (GF) is done. The objective of this research is to show that PCA with Gabor filters is superior to the first technique in terms of recognition rate. To test and evaluates their performance, experiments are performed using real database by both techniques. The universally accepted five principal emotions to be recognized are: Happy, Sad, Disgust and Angry along with Neutral. The recognition rates are obtained on all the facial expressions.

  19. Visual recognition of permuted words

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rashid, Sheikh Faisal; Shafait, Faisal; Breuel, Thomas M.

    2010-02-01

    In current study we examine how letter permutation affects in visual recognition of words for two orthographically dissimilar languages, Urdu and German. We present the hypothesis that recognition or reading of permuted and non-permuted words are two distinct mental level processes, and that people use different strategies in handling permuted words as compared to normal words. A comparison between reading behavior of people in these languages is also presented. We present our study in context of dual route theories of reading and it is observed that the dual-route theory is consistent with explanation of our hypothesis of distinction in underlying cognitive behavior for reading permuted and non-permuted words. We conducted three experiments in lexical decision tasks to analyze how reading is degraded or affected by letter permutation. We performed analysis of variance (ANOVA), distribution free rank test, and t-test to determine the significance differences in response time latencies for two classes of data. Results showed that the recognition accuracy for permuted words is decreased 31% in case of Urdu and 11% in case of German language. We also found a considerable difference in reading behavior for cursive and alphabetic languages and it is observed that reading of Urdu is comparatively slower than reading of German due to characteristics of cursive script.

  20. Pattern recognition technique

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hong, J. P.

    1971-01-01

    Technique operates regardless of pattern rotation, translation or magnification and successfully detects out-of-register patterns. It improves accuracy and reduces cost of various optical character recognition devices and page readers and provides data input to computer.

  1. Context based gait recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazazian, Shermin; Gavrilova, Marina

    2012-06-01

    Gait recognition has recently become a popular topic in the field of biometrics. However, the main hurdle is the insufficient recognition rate in the presence of low quality samples. The main focus of this paper is to investigate how the performance of a gait recognition system can be improved using additional information about behavioral patterns of users and the context in which samples have been taken. The obtained results show combining the context information with biometric data improves the performance of the system at a very low cost. The amount of improvement depends on the distinctiveness of the behavioral patterns and the quality of the gait samples. Using the appropriate distinctive behavioral models it is possible to achieve a 100% recognition rate.

  2. CASE Recognition Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 1985

    1985-01-01

    A total of 294 schools, colleges, and universities received prizes in this year's CASE Recognition program. Awards were given in: public relations programs, student recruitment, marketing, program pulications, news writing, fund raising, radio programming, school periodicals, etc. (MLW)

  3. [Electrocardiograph beat pattern recognition].

    PubMed

    Zhou, Qunyi; Lu, Xudong; Duan, Huiling

    2005-02-01

    It is very important to recognize arrhythmia in clinical electrocardiography (ECG) analysis. The fundamental of beat pattern recognition is presented in this paper. Various prevalent methods for arrhythmia recognitiion are categorized and summarized, based on which the advantages and disadvantages among the methods are compared, and the main problems are discussed in depth. At last, the development trend of arrhythmia recognition technology is pointed out.

  4. Object recognition by artificial cortical maps.

    PubMed

    Plebe, Alessio; Domenella, Rosaria Grazia

    2007-09-01

    Object recognition is one of the most important functions of the human visual system, yet one of the least understood, this despite the fact that vision is certainly the most studied function of the brain. We understand relatively well how several processes in the cortical visual areas that support recognition capabilities take place, such as orientation discrimination and color constancy. This paper proposes a model of the development of object recognition capability, based on two main theoretical principles. The first is that recognition does not imply any sort of geometrical reconstruction, it is instead fully driven by the two dimensional view captured by the retina. The second assumption is that all the processing functions involved in recognition are not genetically determined or hardwired in neural circuits, but are the result of interactions between epigenetic influences and basic neural plasticity mechanisms. The model is organized in modules roughly related to the main visual biological areas, and is implemented mainly using the LISSOM architecture, a recent neural self-organizing map model that simulates the effects of intercortical lateral connections. This paper shows how recognition capabilities, similar to those found in brain ventral visual areas, can develop spontaneously by exposure to natural images in an artificial cortical model.

  5. Page Recognition: Quantum Leap In Recognition Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Larry

    1989-07-01

    No milestone has proven as elusive as the always-approaching "year of the LAN," but the "year of the scanner" might claim the silver medal. Desktop scanners have been around almost as long as personal computers. And everyone thinks they are used for obvious desktop-publishing and business tasks like scanning business documents, magazine articles and other pages, and translating those words into files your computer understands. But, until now, the reality fell far short of the promise. Because it's true that scanners deliver an accurate image of the page to your computer, but the software to recognize this text has been woefully disappointing. Old optical-character recognition (OCR) software recognized such a limited range of pages as to be virtually useless to real users. (For example, one OCR vendor specified 12-point Courier font from an IBM Selectric typewriter: the same font in 10-point, or from a Diablo printer, was unrecognizable!) Computer dealers have told me the chasm between OCR expectations and reality is so broad and deep that nine out of ten prospects leave their stores in disgust when they learn the limitations. And this is a very important, very unfortunate gap. Because the promise of recognition -- what people want it to do -- carries with it tremendous improvements in our productivity and ability to get tons of written documents into our computers where we can do real work with it. The good news is that a revolutionary new development effort has led to the new technology of "page recognition," which actually does deliver the promise we've always wanted from OCR. I'm sure every reader appreciates the breakthrough represented by the laser printer and page-makeup software, a combination so powerful it created new reasons for buying a computer. A similar breakthrough is happening right now in page recognition: the Macintosh (and, I must admit, other personal computers) equipped with a moderately priced scanner and OmniPage software (from Caere

  6. Probabilistic Open Set Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jain, Lalit Prithviraj

    Real-world tasks in computer vision, pattern recognition and machine learning often touch upon the open set recognition problem: multi-class recognition with incomplete knowledge of the world and many unknown inputs. An obvious way to approach such problems is to develop a recognition system that thresholds probabilities to reject unknown classes. Traditional rejection techniques are not about the unknown; they are about the uncertain boundary and rejection around that boundary. Thus traditional techniques only represent the "known unknowns". However, a proper open set recognition algorithm is needed to reduce the risk from the "unknown unknowns". This dissertation examines this concept and finds existing probabilistic multi-class recognition approaches are ineffective for true open set recognition. We hypothesize the cause is due to weak adhoc assumptions combined with closed-world assumptions made by existing calibration techniques. Intuitively, if we could accurately model just the positive data for any known class without overfitting, we could reject the large set of unknown classes even under this assumption of incomplete class knowledge. For this, we formulate the problem as one of modeling positive training data by invoking statistical extreme value theory (EVT) near the decision boundary of positive data with respect to negative data. We provide a new algorithm called the PI-SVM for estimating the unnormalized posterior probability of class inclusion. This dissertation also introduces a new open set recognition model called Compact Abating Probability (CAP), where the probability of class membership decreases in value (abates) as points move from known data toward open space. We show that CAP models improve open set recognition for multiple algorithms. Leveraging the CAP formulation, we go on to describe the novel Weibull-calibrated SVM (W-SVM) algorithm, which combines the useful properties of statistical EVT for score calibration with one-class and binary

  7. Toward hyperspectral face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robila, Stefan A.

    2008-02-01

    Face recognition continues to meet significant challenges in reaching accurate results and still remains one of the activities where humans outperform technology. An attractive approach in improving face identification is provided by the fusion of multiple imaging sources such as visible and infrared images. Hyperspectral data, i.e. images collected over hundreds of narrow contiguous light spectrum intervals constitute a natural choice for expanding face recognition image fusion, especially since it may provide information beyond the normal visible range, thus exceeding the normal human sensing. In this paper we investigate the efficiency of hyperspectral face recognition through an in house experiment that collected data in over 120 bands within the visible and near infrared range. The imagery was produced using an off the shelf sensor in both indoors and outdoors with the subjects being photographed from various angles. Further processing included spectra collection and feature extraction. Human matching performance based on spectral properties is discussed.

  8. A Single Amino Acid Substitution Prevents Recognition of a Dominant Human Aquaporin-4 Determinant in the Context of HLA-DRB1*03:01 by a Murine TCR

    PubMed Central

    Arellano, Benjamine; Hussain, Rehana; Miller-Little, William A.; Herndon, Emily; Lambracht-Washington, Doris; Eagar, Todd N.; Lewis, Robert; Healey, Don; Vernino, Steven; Greenberg, Benjamin M.; Stüve, Olaf

    2016-01-01

    Background Aquaporin 4 (AQP4) is considered a putative autoantigen in patients with Neuromyelitis optica (NMO), an autoinflammatory disorder of the central nervous system (CNS). HLA haplotype analyses of patients with NMO suggest a positive association with HLA-DRB1* 03:01. We previously showed that the human (h) AQP4 peptide 281–300 is the dominant immunogenic determinant of hAQP4 in the context of HLA-DRB1*03:01. This immunogenic peptide stimulates a strong Th1 and Th17 immune response. AQP4281-300-specific encephalitogenic CD4+ T cells should initiate CNS inflammation that results in a clinical phenotype in HLA-DRB1*03:01 transgenic mice. Methods Controlled study with humanized experimental animals. HLA-DRB1*03:01 transgenic mice were immunized with hAQP4281-300, or whole-length hAQP4 protein emulsified in complete Freund’s adjuvant. Humoral immune responses to both antigens were assessed longitudinally. In vivo T cell frequencies were assessed by tetramer staining. Mice were followed clinically, and the anterior visual pathway was tested by pupillometry. CNS tissue was examined histologically post-mortem. Flow cytometry was utilized for MHC binding assays and to immunophenotype T cells, and T cell frequencies were determined by ELISpot assay. Results Immunization with hAQP4281-300 resulted in an in vivo expansion of antigen-specific CD4+ T cells, and an immunoglobulin isotype switch. HLA-DRB1*03:01 TG mice actively immunized with hAQP4281-300, or with whole-length hAQP4 protein were resistant to developing a neurological disease that resembles NMO. Experimental mice show no histological evidence of CNS inflammation, nor change in pupillary responses. Subsequent analysis reveals that a single amino acid substitution from aspartic acid in hAQP4 to glutamic acid in murine (m)AQP4 at position 290 prevents the recognition of hAQP4281-300 by the murine T cell receptor (TCR). Conclusion Induction of a CNS inflammatory autoimmune disorder by active immunization of

  9. Recognition for Employed Inventors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sanders, Howard J.

    1980-01-01

    Presents arguments for monetary rewards and other forms of recognition by employers for inventions of employed inventors, particularly as the concept applies to stimulating innovativeness in America. Discusses the controversy of federally mandated compensation for employed inventors. The efforts of the American Chemical Society along these lines…

  10. Units of Word Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Santa, Carol M.; And Others

    Both psychologists and reading specialists have been interested in whether words are processed letter by letter or in larger units. A reaction time paradigm was used to evaluate these options with interest focused on potential units of word recognition which might be functional within single syllable words. The basic paradigm involved presenting…

  11. Optical Character Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Converso, L.; Hocek, S.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes computer-based optical character recognition (OCR) systems, focusing on their components (the computer, the scanner, the OCR, and the output device); how the systems work; and features to consider in selecting a system. A list of 26 questions to ask to evaluate systems for potential purchase is included. (JDD)

  12. [Facial recognition and autism].

    PubMed

    Assumpçäo Júnior, F B; Sprovieri, M H; Kuczynski, E; Farinha, V

    1999-12-01

    Through the presentation of four facial expressions' illustrations, we evaluate the capacity of autistic children recognition, comparing with normal intelligence children and adults. The comparison of results was accomplished through the qui-square test. The differences observed were significant, showing that a disturbance of the facial expressions' perception is present in autistic children, and that it interferes directly in the social relationships.

  13. Recognition Memory for Pseudowords

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Greene, Robert L.

    2004-01-01

    Participants are more likely to give positive responses on a recognition test to pseudowords (pronounceable nonwords) than words. A series of experiments suggests that this difference reflects the greater overall familiarity of pseudowords than of words. Pseudowords receive higher ratings of similarity to a studied list than do words. Pseudowords…

  14. Microprocessor for speech recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Ishizuka, H.; Watari, M.; Sakoe, H.; Chiba, S.; Iwata, T.; Matsuki, T.; Kawakami, Y.

    1983-01-01

    A new single-chip microprocessor for speech recognition has been developed utilizing multi-processor architecture and pipelined structure. By DP-matching algorithm, the processor recognizes up to 340 isolated words or 40 connected words in realtime. 6 references.

  15. 1987 CASE Recognition Awards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Currents, 1987

    1987-01-01

    The 1987 CASE Recognition Awards are presented for: general excellence in programs; student recruitment marketing improvement; video public service announcements, news, and commercial spots; total publications; magazines of the decade; improvement in periodicals; photocommunications via print; designer of the year and series; and imagination in…

  16. Pattern recognition in bioinformatics.

    PubMed

    de Ridder, Dick; de Ridder, Jeroen; Reinders, Marcel J T

    2013-09-01

    Pattern recognition is concerned with the development of systems that learn to solve a given problem using a set of example instances, each represented by a number of features. These problems include clustering, the grouping of similar instances; classification, the task of assigning a discrete label to a given instance; and dimensionality reduction, combining or selecting features to arrive at a more useful representation. The use of statistical pattern recognition algorithms in bioinformatics is pervasive. Classification and clustering are often applied to high-throughput measurement data arising from microarray, mass spectrometry and next-generation sequencing experiments for selecting markers, predicting phenotype and grouping objects or genes. Less explicitly, classification is at the core of a wide range of tools such as predictors of genes, protein function, functional or genetic interactions, etc., and used extensively in systems biology. A course on pattern recognition (or machine learning) should therefore be at the core of any bioinformatics education program. In this review, we discuss the main elements of a pattern recognition course, based on material developed for courses taught at the BSc, MSc and PhD levels to an audience of bioinformaticians, computer scientists and life scientists. We pay attention to common problems and pitfalls encountered in applications and in interpretation of the results obtained.

  17. Molecular Basis for the Recognition and Cleavages of IGF-II, TGF-[alpha], and Amylin by Human Insulin-Degrading Enzyme

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Qing; Manolopoulou, Marika; Bian, Yao; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2010-02-11

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is involved in the clearance of many bioactive peptide substrates, including insulin and amyloid-{beta}, peptides vital to the development of diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. IDE can also rapidly degrade hormones that are held together by intramolecular disulfide bond(s) without their reduction. Furthermore, IDE exhibits a remarkable ability to preferentially degrade structurally similar peptides such as the selective degradation of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-II and transforming growth factor-{alpha} (TGF-{alpha}) over IGF-I and epidermal growth factor, respectively. Here, we used high-accuracy mass spectrometry to identify the cleavage sites of human IGF-II, TGF-{alpha}, amylin, reduced amylin, and amyloid-{beta} by human IDE. We also determined the structures of human IDE-IGF-II and IDE-TGF-{alpha} at 2.3 {angstrom} and IDE-amylin at 2.9 {angstrom}. We found that IDE cleaves its substrates at multiple sites in a biased stochastic manner. Furthermore, the presence of a disulfide bond in amylin allows IDE to cut at an additional site in the middle of the peptide (amino acids 18-19). Our amylin-bound IDE structure offers insight into how the structural constraint from a disulfide bond in amylin can alter IDE cleavage sites. Together with NMR structures of amylin and the IGF and epidermal growth factor families, our work also reveals the structural basis of how the high dipole moment of substrates complements the charge distribution of the IDE catalytic chamber for the substrate selectivity. In addition, we show how the ability of substrates to properly anchor their N-terminus to the exosite of IDE and undergo a conformational switch upon binding to the catalytic chamber of IDE can also contribute to the selective degradation of structurally related growth factors.

  18. Molecular basis for the recognition and cleavages of IGF-II, TGF-α, and amylin by human insulin degrading enzyme

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Qing; Manolopoulou, Marika; Bian, Yao; Schilling, Alexander B.; Tang, Wei-Jen

    2009-01-01

    Insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) is involved in the clearance of many bioactive peptide substrates, including insulin and amyloid-β (Aβ), peptides vital to the development of diabetes and Alzheimer's disease, respectively. IDE can also rapidly degrade hormones that are held together by intra-molecular disulfide bond(s) without their reduction. Furthermore, IDE exhibits a remarkable ability to preferentially degrade structurally similar peptides such as the selective degradation of insulin-growth factor-II (IGF-II) and transforming growth factor-α (TGF-α) over IGF-I and epidermal growth factor (EGF), respectively. Here, we used high accuracy mass spectrometry to identify the cleavage sites of human IGF-II, TGF-α, amylin, reduced amylin, and Aβ by human IDE. We also determined the structures of human IDE-IGF-II and IDE-TGF-α at 2.3 Å and IDE-amylin at 2.9 Å. We found that IDE cleaves its substrates at multiple sites in a biased stochastic manner. Furthermore, the presence of a disulfide bond in amylin allows IDE to cut at an additional site in the middle of the peptide (aa 18-19). Our amylin-bound IDE structure offers insight into how the structural constraint from a disulfide bond in amylin can alter IDE cleavage sites. Together with NMR structures of amylin and the IGF and EGF families, our work also reveals the structural basis of how the high dipole moment of substrates complements the charge distribution of the IDE catalytic chamber for the substrate selectivity. In addition, we show how the ability of substrates to properly anchor their N-terminus to the exosite of IDE and undergo a conformational switch upon binding to the catalytic chamber of IDE can also contribute to the selective degradation of structurally related growth factors. PMID:19896952

  19. Speech recognition: Acoustic, phonetic and lexical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zue, V. W.

    1985-10-01

    Our long-term research goal is the development and implementation of speaker-independent continuous speech recognition systems. It is our conviction that proper utilization of speech-specific knowledge is essential for advanced speech recognition systems. With this in mind, we have continued to make progress on the acquisition of acoustic-phonetic and lexical knowledge. We have completed the development of a continuous digit recognition system. The system was constructed to investigate the utilization of acoustic phonetic knowledge in a speech recognition system. Some of the significant development of this study includes a soft-failure procedure for lexical access, and the discovery of a set of acoustic-phonetic features for verification. We have completed a study of the constraints provided by lexical stress on word recognition. We found that lexical stress information alone can, on the average, reduce the number of word candidates from a large dictionary by more than 80%. In conjunction with this study, we successfully developed a system that automatically determines the stress pattern of a word from the acoustic signal.

  20. Supporting Quality Teachers with Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Andrews, Hans A.

    2011-01-01

    Value has been found in providing recognition and awards programs for excellent teachers. Research has also found a major lack of these programs in both the USA and in Australia. Teachers receiving recognition and awards for their teaching have praised recognition programs as providing motivation for them to continue high-level instruction.…

  1. Word Recognition in Auditory Cortex

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeWitt, Iain D. J.

    2013-01-01

    Although spoken word recognition is more fundamental to human communication than text recognition, knowledge of word-processing in auditory cortex is comparatively impoverished. This dissertation synthesizes current models of auditory cortex, models of cortical pattern recognition, models of single-word reading, results in phonetics and results in…

  2. Visual Recognition Memory across Contexts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Emily J. H.; Pascalis, Olivier; Eacott, Madeline J.; Herbert, Jane S.

    2011-01-01

    In two experiments, we investigated the development of representational flexibility in visual recognition memory during infancy using the Visual Paired Comparison (VPC) task. In Experiment 1, 6- and 9-month-old infants exhibited recognition when familiarization and test occurred in the same room, but showed no evidence of recognition when…

  3. Age of Acquisition and Sensitivity to Gender in Spanish Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Foote, Rebecca

    2014-01-01

    Speakers of gender-agreement languages use gender-marked elements of the noun phrase in spoken-word recognition: A congruent marking on a determiner or adjective facilitates the recognition of a subsequent noun, while an incongruent marking inhibits its recognition. However, while monolinguals and early language learners evidence this…

  4. Direct mass spectrometric determination of the stoichiometry and binding affinity of the complexes between nucleocapsid protein and RNA stem-loop hairpins of the HIV-1 Psi-recognition element.

    PubMed

    Hagan, Nathan; Fabris, Daniele

    2003-09-16

    The formation of noncovalent complexes between the HIV-1 nucleocapsid protein p7 (NC) and RNA hairpins SL2-SL4 of the Psi-recognition element was investigated by direct infusion electrospray ionization-Fourier transform mass spectrometry (ESI-FTMS). The high resolution afforded by this method provided the unambiguous characterization of the stoichiometry and composition of complexes formed by multiple equilibria in solution. For each hairpin, the formation of a 1:1 complex was found to be the primary binding mode in solutions of intermediate salt content (150 mM ammonium acetate). Binding of multiple units of NC was observed with lower affinity and a maximum stoichiometry matching the limit calculated from the number of nucleotides in the construct and the size of the footprint of NC onto single-stranded nucleic acids, thus implying the defolding of the hairpin three-dimensional (3D) structure. Dissociation constants of 62 +/- 22 nM, 178 +/- 64 nM, and 1.3 +/- 0.5 microM were determined for SL2, SL3-2, and SL4, respectively, which are similar to values obtained by spectroscopic and calorimetric methods with the additional confidence offered by a direct, rather than inferred, knowledge of the binding stoichiometry. Competitive binding experiments carried out in solutions of intermediate ionic strength, which has the effect of weakening the electrostatic interactions in solution, provided a direct way of evaluating the stabilizing contributions of H-bonding and hydrophobic interactions that are more sensitive to the sequence and structural context of the different hairpins. The relative scale of binding affinity obtained in this environment reflects the combination of contributions provided by the different structures of both the tetraloop and the double-stranded stem. The importance of the stem 3D structure in modulating the binding activity was tested by a competitive binding experiment that included the SL3-2 RNA construct, a DNA analogue of SL3 (SL3(DNA)), and a

  5. Emotion recognition following pediatric traumatic brain injury: longitudinal analysis of emotional prosody and facial emotion recognition.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Adam T; Hanten, Gerri R; Li, Xiaoqi; Orsten, Kimberley D; Levin, Harvey S

    2010-08-01

    Children with closed head injuries often experience significant and persistent disruptions in their social and behavioral functioning. Studies with adults sustaining a traumatic brain injury (TBI) indicate deficits in emotion recognition and suggest that these difficulties may underlie some of the social deficits. The goal of the current study was to examine if children sustaining a TBI exhibit difficulties with emotion recognition in terms of emotional prosody and face emotion recognition and to determine (1) how these abilities change over time and (2) what, if any, additional factors such as sex, age, and socioeconomic status (SES) affected the findings. Results provide general support for the idea that children sustaining a TBI exhibit deficits in emotional prosody and face emotion recognition performance. Further, although some gains were noted in the TBI group over the two-years following injury, factors such as SES and age at injury influenced the trajectory of recovery. The current findings indicate the relationship between TBI and emotion recognition is complex and may be influenced by a number of developmental and environmental factors. Results are discussed in terms of their similarity to previous investigations demonstrating the influence of environmental factors on behavioral recovery following pediatric TBI, and with regard to future investigations that can further explore the link between emotion recognition deficits and long-term behavioral and psychosocial recovery.

  6. Audio-visual gender recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Ming; Xu, Xun; Huang, Thomas S.

    2007-11-01

    Combining different modalities for pattern recognition task is a very promising field. Basically, human always fuse information from different modalities to recognize object and perform inference, etc. Audio-Visual gender recognition is one of the most common task in human social communication. Human can identify the gender by facial appearance, by speech and also by body gait. Indeed, human gender recognition is a multi-modal data acquisition and processing procedure. However, computational multimodal gender recognition has not been extensively investigated in the literature. In this paper, speech and facial image are fused to perform a mutli-modal gender recognition for exploring the improvement of combining different modalities.

  7. Robust facial expression recognition algorithm based on local metric learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Bin; Jia, Kebin

    2016-01-01

    In facial expression recognition tasks, different facial expressions are often confused with each other. Motivated by the fact that a learned metric can significantly improve the accuracy of classification, a facial expression recognition algorithm based on local metric learning is proposed. First, k-nearest neighbors of the given testing sample are determined from the total training data. Second, chunklets are selected from the k-nearest neighbors. Finally, the optimal transformation matrix is computed by maximizing the total variance between different chunklets and minimizing the total variance of instances in the same chunklet. The proposed algorithm can find the suitable distance metric for every testing sample and improve the performance on facial expression recognition. Furthermore, the proposed algorithm can be used for vector-based and matrix-based facial expression recognition. Experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm could achieve higher recognition rates and be more robust than baseline algorithms on the JAFFE, CK, and RaFD databases.

  8. Human motion recognition based on features and models selected HMM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Haixiang; Zhou, Hongjun

    2015-03-01

    This paper research on the motion recognition based on HMM with Kinect. Kinect provides skeletal data consist of 3D body joints with its lower price and convenience. In this work, several methods are used to determine the optimal subset of features among Cartesian coordinates, distance to hip center, velocity, angle and angular velocity, in order to improve the recognition rate. K-means is used for vector quantization and HMM is used as recognition method. HMM is an effective signal processing method which contains time calibration, provides a learning mechanism and recognition ability. Cluster numbers of K-means, structure and state numbers of HMM are optimized as well. The proposed methods are applied to the MSR Action3D dataset. Results show that the proposed methods obtain better recognition accuracy than the state of the art methods.

  9. Smart pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfalou, A.; Brosseau, C.; Alam, M. S.

    2013-03-01

    The purpose of this paper is to test correlation methods for pattern recognition applications. A broad overview of the main correlation architectures is first given. Many correlation data are compared with those obtained from standard pattern recognition methods. We used our simulations to predict improved decisional performance from correlation methods. More specifically, we are focused on the POF filter and composite filter family. We present an optimized composite correlation filter, called asymmetric segmented phase-only filter (ASPOF) for mobile target recognition applications. The main objective is to find a compromise between the number of references to be merged in the correlation filter and the time needed for making a decision. We suggest an all-numerical implementation of a VanderLugt (VLC) type composite filter. The aim of this all-numerical implementation is to take advantage of the benefits of the correlation methods and make the correlator easily reconfigurable for various scenarios. The use of numerical implementation of the optical Fourier transform improves the decisional performance of the correlator. Further, it renders the correlator less sensitive to the saturation phenomenon caused by the increased number of references used for fabricating the composite filter. Different tests are presented making use of the peak-to-correlation energy criterion and ROC curves. These tests confirm the validity ofour technique. Elderly fall detection and underwater mine detection are two applications which are considered for illustrating the benefits of our approach. The present work is motivated by the need for detailed discussions of the choice of the correlation architecture for these specific applications, pre-processing in the input plane and post processing in the output plane techniques for such analysis.

  10. Laptop Computer - Based Facial Recognition System Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    R. A. Cain; G. B. Singleton

    2001-03-01

    The objective of this project was to assess the performance of the leading commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) facial recognition software package when used as a laptop application. We performed the assessment to determine the system's usefulness for enrolling facial images in a database from remote locations and conducting real-time searches against a database of previously enrolled images. The assessment involved creating a database of 40 images and conducting 2 series of tests to determine the product's ability to recognize and match subject faces under varying conditions. This report describes the test results and includes a description of the factors affecting the results. After an extensive market survey, we selected Visionics' FaceIt{reg_sign} software package for evaluation and a review of the Facial Recognition Vendor Test 2000 (FRVT 2000). This test was co-sponsored by the US Department of Defense (DOD) Counterdrug Technology Development Program Office, the National Institute of Justice, and the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA). Administered in May-June 2000, the FRVT 2000 assessed the capabilities of facial recognition systems that were currently available for purchase on the US market. Our selection of this Visionics product does not indicate that it is the ''best'' facial recognition software package for all uses. It was the most appropriate package based on the specific applications and requirements for this specific application. In this assessment, the system configuration was evaluated for effectiveness in identifying individuals by searching for facial images captured from video displays against those stored in a facial image database. An additional criterion was that the system be capable of operating discretely. For this application, an operational facial recognition system would consist of one central computer hosting the master image database with multiple standalone systems configured with duplicates of the master operating in

  11. [Comparative studies of face recognition].

    PubMed

    Kawai, Nobuyuki

    2012-07-01

    Every human being is proficient in face recognition. However, the reason for and the manner in which humans have attained such an ability remain unknown. These questions can be best answered-through comparative studies of face recognition in non-human animals. Studies in both primates and non-primates show that not only primates, but also non-primates possess the ability to extract information from their conspecifics and from human experimenters. Neural specialization for face recognition is shared with mammals in distant taxa, suggesting that face recognition evolved earlier than the emergence of mammals. A recent study indicated that a social insect, the golden paper wasp, can distinguish their conspecific faces, whereas a closely related species, which has a less complex social lifestyle with just one queen ruling a nest of underlings, did not show strong face recognition for their conspecifics. Social complexity and the need to differentiate between one another likely led humans to evolve their face recognition abilities.

  12. Image recognition and consistency of response

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haygood, Tamara M.; Ryan, John; Liu, Qing Mary A.; Bassett, Roland; Brennan, Patrick C.

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: To investigate the connection between conscious recognition of an image previously encountered in an experimental setting and consistency of response to the experimental question.
    Materials and Methods: Twenty-four radiologists viewed 40 frontal chest radiographs and gave their opinion as to the position of a central venous catheter. One-to-three days later they again viewed 40 frontal chest radiographs and again gave their opinion as to the position of the central venous catheter. Half of the radiographs in the second set were repeated images from the first set and half were new. The radiologists were asked of each image whether it had been included in the first set. For this study, we are evaluating only the 20 repeated images. We used the Kruskal-Wallis test and Fisher's exact test to determine the relationship between conscious recognition of a previously interpreted image and consistency in interpretation of the image.
    Results. There was no significant correlation between recognition of the image and consistency in response regarding the position of the central venous catheter. In fact, there was a trend in the opposite direction, with radiologists being slightly more likely to give a consistent response with respect to images they did not recognize than with respect to those they did recognize.
    Conclusion: Radiologists' recognition of previously-encountered images in an observer-performance study does not noticeably color their interpretation on the second encounter.

  13. Speech recognition: Acoustic, phonetic and lexical knowledge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zue, V. W.

    1985-08-01

    During this reporting period we continued to make progress on the acquisition of acoustic-phonetic and lexical knowledge. We completed development of a continuous digit recognition system. The system was constructed to investigate the use of acoustic-phonetic knowledge in a speech recognition system. The significant achievements of this study include the development of a soft-failure procedure for lexical access and the discovery of a set of acoustic-phonetic features for verification. We completed a study of the constraints that lexical stress imposes on word recognition. We found that lexical stress information alone can, on the average, reduce the number of word candidates from a large dictionary by more than 80 percent. In conjunction with this study, we successfully developed a system that automatically determines the stress pattern of a word from the acoustic signal. We performed an acoustic study on the characteristics of nasal consonants and nasalized vowels. We have also developed recognition algorithms for nasal murmurs and nasalized vowels in continuous speech. We finished the preliminary development of a system that aligns a speech waveform with the corresponding phonetic transcription.

  14. Partial face recognition: alignment-free approach.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shengcai; Jain, Anil K; Li, Stan Z

    2013-05-01

    Numerous methods have been developed for holistic face recognition with impressive performance. However, few studies have tackled how to recognize an arbitrary patch of a face image. Partial faces frequently appear in unconstrained scenarios, with images captured by surveillance cameras or handheld devices (e.g., mobile phones) in particular. In this paper, we propose a general partial face recognition approach that does not require face alignment by eye coordinates or any other fiducial points. We develop an alignment-free face representation method based on Multi-Keypoint Descriptors (MKD), where the descriptor size of a face is determined by the actual content of the image. In this way, any probe face image, holistic or partial, can be sparsely represented by a large dictionary of gallery descriptors. A new keypoint descriptor called Gabor Ternary Pattern (GTP) is also developed for robust and discriminative face recognition. Experimental results are reported on four public domain face databases (FRGCv2.0, AR, LFW, and PubFig) under both the open-set identification and verification scenarios. Comparisons with two leading commercial face recognition SDKs (PittPatt and FaceVACS) and two baseline algorithms (PCA+LDA and LBP) show that the proposed method, overall, is superior in recognizing both holistic and partial faces without requiring alignment.

  15. Simplified Pattern Recognition Based On Multiaperture Optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schneider, Richard T.; Lin, Shih-Chao

    1987-05-01

    Multiaperture optics systems are similar in design to the concepts applying to the insect eye. Digitizing at the detector level is inherent in these systems. The fact that each eyelet forms one pixel of the overall image lends itself to optical preprocessing. There-fore a simplified pattern recognition scheme can be used in connection with multiaperture optics systems. The pattern recognition system used is based on the conjecture that all shapes encountered can be dissected into a set of rectangles. This is accomplished by creating a binary image and comparing each row of numbers starting at the top of the frame with the next row below. A set of rules is established which decides if the binary ones of the next row are to be incorporated in the present rectangle or start a new rectangle. The number and aspect ratios of the rectangles formed constitute a recognition code. These codes are kept and updated in a library. Since the same shape may give rise to different recognition codes depending on the attitude of the shape in respect to the detector grid, all shapes are rotated and normalized prior to dissecting. The rule is that the pattern is turned to maximize the number of straight edges which line up with the detector grid. The mathematical mechanism for rotation of the shape is described. Assuming a-priori knowledge of the size of the object exists, the normalization procedure can be used for distance determination. The description of the hardware for acquisition of the image is provided.

  16. Partial face recognition: alignment-free approach.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shengcai; Jain, Anil K; Li, Stan Z

    2013-05-01

    Numerous methods have been developed for holistic face recognition with impressive performance. However, few studies have tackled how to recognize an arbitrary patch of a face image. Partial faces frequently appear in unconstrained scenarios, with images captured by surveillance cameras or handheld devices (e.g., mobile phones) in particular. In this paper, we propose a general partial face recognition approach that does not require face alignment by eye coordinates or any other fiducial points. We develop an alignment-free face representation method based on Multi-Keypoint Descriptors (MKD), where the descriptor size of a face is determined by the actual content of the image. In this way, any probe face image, holistic or partial, can be sparsely represented by a large dictionary of gallery descriptors. A new keypoint descriptor called Gabor Ternary Pattern (GTP) is also developed for robust and discriminative face recognition. Experimental results are reported on four public domain face databases (FRGCv2.0, AR, LFW, and PubFig) under both the open-set identification and verification scenarios. Comparisons with two leading commercial face recognition SDKs (PittPatt and FaceVACS) and two baseline algorithms (PCA+LDA and LBP) show that the proposed method, overall, is superior in recognizing both holistic and partial faces without requiring alignment. PMID:23520259

  17. New FASB standard addresses revenue recognition considerations.

    PubMed

    McKee, Thomas E

    2015-12-01

    Healthcare organizations are expected to apply the following steps in revenue recognition under the new standard issued in May 2014 by the Financial Accounting Standards Board: Identify the customer contract. Identify the performance obligations in the contract. Determine the transaction price. Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract. Recognize revenue when--or in some circumstances, as--the entity satisfies the performance obligation.

  18. A Fuzzy Aproach For Facial Emotion Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gîlcă, Gheorghe; Bîzdoacă, Nicu-George

    2015-09-01

    This article deals with an emotion recognition system based on the fuzzy sets. Human faces are detected in images with the Viola - Jones algorithm and for its tracking in video sequences we used the Camshift algorithm. The detected human faces are transferred to the decisional fuzzy system, which is based on the variable fuzzyfication measurements of the face: eyebrow, eyelid and mouth. The system can easily determine the emotional state of a person.

  19. New FASB standard addresses revenue recognition considerations.

    PubMed

    McKee, Thomas E

    2015-12-01

    Healthcare organizations are expected to apply the following steps in revenue recognition under the new standard issued in May 2014 by the Financial Accounting Standards Board: Identify the customer contract. Identify the performance obligations in the contract. Determine the transaction price. Allocate the transaction price to the performance obligations in the contract. Recognize revenue when--or in some circumstances, as--the entity satisfies the performance obligation. PMID:26793947

  20. Retina vascular network recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tascini, Guido; Passerini, Giorgio; Puliti, Paolo; Zingaretti, Primo

    1993-09-01

    The analysis of morphological and structural modifications of the retina vascular network is an interesting investigation method in the study of diabetes and hypertension. Normally this analysis is carried out by qualitative evaluations, according to standardized criteria, though medical research attaches great importance to quantitative analysis of vessel color, shape and dimensions. The paper describes a system which automatically segments and recognizes the ocular fundus circulation and micro circulation network, and extracts a set of features related to morphometric aspects of vessels. For this class of images the classical segmentation methods seem weak. We propose a computer vision system in which segmentation and recognition phases are strictly connected. The system is hierarchically organized in four modules. Firstly the Image Enhancement Module (IEM) operates a set of custom image enhancements to remove blur and to prepare data for subsequent segmentation and recognition processes. Secondly the Papilla Border Analysis Module (PBAM) automatically recognizes number, position and local diameter of blood vessels departing from optical papilla. Then the Vessel Tracking Module (VTM) analyses vessels comparing the results of body and edge tracking and detects branches and crossings. Finally the Feature Extraction Module evaluates PBAM and VTM output data and extracts some numerical indexes. Used algorithms appear to be robust and have been successfully tested on various ocular fundus images.

  1. Complex Event Recognition Architecture

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, William A.; Firby, R. James

    2009-01-01

    Complex Event Recognition Architecture (CERA) is the name of a computational architecture, and software that implements the architecture, for recognizing complex event patterns that may be spread across multiple streams of input data. One of the main components of CERA is an intuitive event pattern language that simplifies what would otherwise be the complex, difficult tasks of creating logical descriptions of combinations of temporal events and defining rules for combining information from different sources over time. In this language, recognition patterns are defined in simple, declarative statements that combine point events from given input streams with those from other streams, using conjunction, disjunction, and negation. Patterns can be built on one another recursively to describe very rich, temporally extended combinations of events. Thereafter, a run-time matching algorithm in CERA efficiently matches these patterns against input data and signals when patterns are recognized. CERA can be used to monitor complex systems and to signal operators or initiate corrective actions when anomalous conditions are recognized. CERA can be run as a stand-alone monitoring system, or it can be integrated into a larger system to automatically trigger responses to changing environments or problematic situations.

  2. Sudden Event Recognition: A Survey

    PubMed Central

    Suriani, Nor Surayahani; Hussain, Aini; Zulkifley, Mohd Asyraf

    2013-01-01

    Event recognition is one of the most active research areas in video surveillance fields. Advancement in event recognition systems mainly aims to provide convenience, safety and an efficient lifestyle for humanity. A precise, accurate and robust approach is necessary to enable event recognition systems to respond to sudden changes in various uncontrolled environments, such as the case of an emergency, physical threat and a fire or bomb alert. The performance of sudden event recognition systems depends heavily on the accuracy of low level processing, like detection, recognition, tracking and machine learning algorithms. This survey aims to detect and characterize a sudden event, which is a subset of an abnormal event in several video surveillance applications. This paper discusses the following in detail: (1) the importance of a sudden event over a general anomalous event; (2) frameworks used in sudden event recognition; (3) the requirements and comparative studies of a sudden event recognition system and (4) various decision-making approaches for sudden event recognition. The advantages and drawbacks of using 3D images from multiple cameras for real-time application are also discussed. The paper concludes with suggestions for future research directions in sudden event recognition. PMID:23921828

  3. Frequency-Based Fingerprint Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aguilar, Gualberto; Sánchez, Gabriel; Toscano, Karina; Pérez, Héctor

    abstract Fingerprint recognition is one of the most popular methods used for identification with greater success degree. Fingerprint has unique characteristics called minutiae, which are points where a curve track ends, intersects, or branches off. In this chapter a fingerprint recognition method is proposed in which a combination of Fast Fourier Transform (FFT) and Gabor filters is used for image enhancement. A novel recognition stage using local features for recognition is also proposed. Also a verification stage is introduced to be used when the system output has more than one person.

  4. [Faces affect recognition in schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Prochwicz, Katarzyna; Rózycka, Jagoda

    2012-01-01

    Clinical observations and the results of many experimental researches indicate that individuals suffering from schizophrenia reveal difficulties in the recognition of emotional states experienced by other people; however the causes and the range of these problems have not been clearly described. Despite early research results confirming that difficulties in emotion recognition are related only to negative emotions, the results of the researches conducted over the lat 30 years indicate that emotion recognition problems are a manifestation of a general cognitive deficit, and they do not concern specific emotions. The article contains a review of the research on face affect recognition in schizophrenia. It discusses the causes of these difficulties, the differences in the accuracy of the recognition of specific emotions, the relationship between the symptoms of schizophrenia and the severity of problems with face perception, and the types of cognitive processes which influence the disturbances in face affect recognition. Particular attention was paid to the methodology of the research on face affect recognition, including the methods used in control tasks relying on the identification of neutral faces designed to assess the range of deficit underlying the face affect recognition problems. The analysis of methods used in particular researches revealed some weaknesses. The article also deals with the question of the possibilities of improving the ability to recognise the emotions, and briefly discusses the efficiency of emotion recognition training programs designed for patients suffering from schizophrenia.

  5. Detection of a gonococcal endo-beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase and its peptidoglycan cleavage site.

    PubMed Central

    Gubish, E R; Chen, K C; Buchanan, T M

    1982-01-01

    Neisseria gonorrhoeae contains several hydrolases which may be responsible for gonococcal cell lysis. One of these enzymes, an endo-beta-N-acetyl-D-glucosaminidase, has been extracted from supernatants of sonicated gonococci and partially purified by ammonium sulfate precipitation and affinity and ion-exchange chromatography. This enzyme has a different specificity than egg white lysozyme and cleaves the beta 1 leads to 4 glycosidic linkage between N-acetylglucosamine and N-acetylmuramic acid in gonococcal peptidoglycan. Images PMID:6806239

  6. Lead cleavage sites in the core structure of group I intron-RNA.

    PubMed Central

    Streicher, B; von Ahsen, U; Schroeder, R

    1993-01-01

    Self-splicing of group I introns requires divalent metal ions to promote catalysis as well as for the correct folding of the RNA. Lead cleavage has been used to probe the intron RNA for divalent metal ion binding sites. In the conserved core of the intron, only two sites of Pb2+ cleavage have been detected, which are located close to the substrate binding sites in the junction J8/7 and at the bulged nucleotide in the P7 stem. Both lead cleavages can be inhibited by high concentrations of Mg2+ and Mn2+ ions, suggesting that they displace Pb2+ ions from the binding sites. The RNA is protected from lead cleavage by 2'-deoxyGTP, a competitive inhibitor of splicing. The two major lead induced cleavages are both located in the conserved core of the intron and at phosphates, which had independently been demonstrated to interact with magnesium ions and to be essential for splicing. Thus, we suggest that the conditions required for lead cleavage occur mainly at those sites, where divalent ions bind that are functionally involved in catalysis. We propose lead cleavage analysis of functional RNA to be a useful tool for mapping functional magnesium ion binding sites. Images PMID:7680116

  7. Proteolytic regulation of epithelial sodium channels by urokinase plasminogen activator: cutting edge and cleavage sites.

    PubMed

    Ji, Hong-Long; Zhao, Runzhen; Komissarov, Andrey A; Chang, Yongchang; Liu, Yongfeng; Matthay, Michael A

    2015-02-27

    Plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) level is extremely elevated in the edematous fluid of acutely injured lungs and pleurae. Elevated PAI-1 specifically inactivates pulmonary urokinase-type (uPA) and tissue-type plasminogen activators (tPA). We hypothesized that plasminogen activation and fibrinolysis may alter epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) activity, a key player in clearing edematous fluid. Two-chain urokinase (tcuPA) has been found to strongly stimulate heterologous human αβγ ENaC activity in a dose- and time-dependent manner. This activity of tcuPA was completely ablated by PAI-1. Furthermore, a mutation (S195A) of the active site of the enzyme also prevented ENaC activation. By comparison, three truncation mutants of the amino-terminal fragment of tcuPA still activated ENaC. uPA enzymatic activity was positively correlated with ENaC current amplitude prior to reaching the maximal level. In sharp contrast to uPA, neither single-chain tPA nor derivatives, including two-chain tPA and tenecteplase, affected ENaC activity. Furthermore, γ but not α subunit of ENaC was proteolytically cleaved at ((177)GR↓KR(180)) by tcuPA. In summary, the underlying mechanisms of urokinase-mediated activation of ENaC include release of self-inhibition, proteolysis of γ ENaC, incremental increase in opening rate, and activation of closed (electrically "silent") channels. This study for the first time demonstrates multifaceted mechanisms for uPA-mediated up-regulation of ENaC, which form the cellular and molecular rationale for the beneficial effects of urokinase in mitigating mortal pulmonary edema and pleural effusions.

  8. A fungal anticodon nuclease ribotoxin exploits a secondary cleavage site to evade tRNA repair.

    PubMed

    Meineke, Birthe; Kast, Alene; Schwer, Beate; Meinhardt, Friedhelm; Shuman, Stewart; Klassen, Roland

    2012-09-01

    PaOrf2 and γ-toxin subunits of Pichia acaciae toxin (PaT) and Kluyveromyces lactis zymocin are tRNA anticodon nucleases. These secreted ribotoxins are assimilated by Saccharomyces cerevisiae, wherein they arrest growth by depleting specific tRNAs. Toxicity can be recapitulated by induced intracellular expression of PaOrf2 or γ-toxin in S. cerevisiae. Mutational analysis of γ-toxin has identified amino acids required for ribotoxicity in vivo and RNA transesterification in vitro. Here, we report that PaOrf2 residues Glu9 and His287 (putative counterparts of γ-toxin Glu9 and His209) are essential for toxicity. Our results suggest a similar basis for RNA transesterification by PaOrf2 and γ-toxin, despite their dissimilar primary structures and distinctive tRNA target specificities. PaOrf2 makes two sequential incisions in tRNA, the first of which occurs 3' from the mcm(5)s(2)U wobble nucleoside and depends on mcm(5). A second incision two nucleotides upstream results in the net excision of a di-nucleotide. Expression of phage and plant tRNA repair systems can relieve PaOrf2 toxicity when tRNA cleavage is restricted to the secondary site in elp3 cells that lack the mcm(5) wobble U modification. Whereas the endogenous yeast tRNA ligase Trl1 can heal tRNA halves produced by PaOrf2 cleavage in elp3 cells, its RNA sealing activity is inadequate to complete the repair. Compatible sealing activity can be provided in trans by plant tRNA ligase. The damage-rescuing ability of tRNA repair systems is lost when PaOrf2 can break tRNA at both sites. These results highlight the logic of a two-incision mechanism of tRNA anticodon damage that evades productive repair by tRNA ligases. PMID:22836353

  9. Rapid identification of efficient target cleavage sites using a hammerhead ribozyme library in an iterative manner.

    PubMed

    Pan, Wei-Hua; Xin, Ping; Bui, Vuong; Clawson, Gary A

    2003-01-01

    A major limitation to the effectiveness of ribozymes is definition of accessible sites in targeted RNAs. Although library selection procedures have been developed, they are generally difficult to perform and have not been widely employed. Here we describe a selection technology that utilizes a randomized, active hammerhead ribozyme (Rz) library in an iterative manner. After two rounds of binding under inactive conditions, the selected, active Rz library is incubated with target RNA, and the sites of cleavage are identified on sequencing gels. We performed this library-selection protocol using human papillomavirus type 16 E6/E7 mRNA as target and constructed Rz targeted to the identified sites. Rz targeted to sites identified with this procedure were generally highly active in vitro and, more importantly, they were highly active in cell culture, whereas their catalytically inactive counterparts were not. This protocol can be used to identify a set of potential target sites within a relatively short time.

  10. A vitellogenin polyserine cleavage site: highly disordered conformation protected from proteolysis by phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Havukainen, Heli; Underhaug, Jarl; Wolschin, Florian; Amdam, Gro; Halskau, Øyvind

    2012-06-01

    Vitellogenin (Vg) is an egg-yolk precursor protein in most oviparous species. In honeybee (Apis mellifera), the protein (AmVg) also affects social behavior and life-span plasticity. Despite its manifold functions, the AmVg molecule remains poorly understood. The subject of our structure-oriented AmVg study is its polyserine tract - a little-investigated repetitive protein segment mostly found in insects. We previously reported that AmVg is tissue specifically cleaved in the vicinity of this tract. Here, we show that, despite its potential for an open, disordered structure, AmVg is unexpectedly resistant to trypsin/chymotrypsin digestion at the tract. Our findings suggest that multiple phosphorylation plays a role in this resilience. Sequence variation is highly pronounced at the polyserine region in insect Vgs. We demonstrate that sequence differences in this region can lead to structural variation, as NMR and circular dichroism (CD) evidence assign different conformational propensities to polyserine peptides from the honeybee and the jewel wasp Nasonia vitripennis; the former is extended and disordered and the latter more compact and helical. CD analysis of the polyserine region of bumblebee Bombus ignitus and wasp Pimpla nipponica supports a random coil structure in these species. The spectroscopic results strengthen our model of the AmVg polyserine tract as a flexible domain linker shielded by phosphorylation. PMID:22573762

  11. Evolutionarily distinct bacteriophage endolysins featuring conserved peptidoglycan cleavage sites protect mice from MRSA infection

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Staphylococcus aureus is a Gram-positive pathogen relevant for both human and animal health. With multi-drug resistant S. aureus strains becoming increasingly prevalent, alternative therapeutics are urgently needed. Bacteriophage endolysins (peptidoglycan hydrolases, PGH) are capable of killing Gra...

  12. NMR-based analysis of aminoglycoside recognition by the resistance enzyme ANT(4'): the pattern of OH/NH3(+) substitution determines the preferred antibiotic binding mode and is critical for drug inactivation.

    PubMed

    Revuelta, Julia; Vacas, Tatiana; Torrado, Mario; Corzana, Francisco; Gonzalez, Carlos; Jiménez-Barbero, Jesús; Menendez, Margarita; Bastida, Agatha; Asensio, Juan Luis

    2008-04-16

    The most significant mechanism of bacterial resistance to aminoglycosides is the enzymatic inactivation of the drug. Herein, we analyze several key aspects of the aminoglycoside recognition by the resistance enzyme ANT(4') from Staphylococcus aureus, employing NMR complemented with site-directed mutagenesis experiments and measurements of the enzymatic activity on newly synthesized kanamycin derivatives. From a methodological perspective, this analysis provides the first example reported for the use of transferred NOE (trNOE) experiments in the analysis of complex molecular recognition processes, characterized by the existence of simultaneous binding events of the ligand to different regions of a protein receptor. The obtained results show that, in favorable cases, these overlapping binding processes can be isolated employing site-directed mutagenesis and then independently analyzed. From a molecular recognition perspective, this work conclusively shows that the enzyme ANT(4') displays a wide tolerance to conformational variations in the drug. Thus, according to the NMR data, kanamycin-A I/II linkage exhibits an unusual anti-Psi orientation in the ternary complex, which is in qualitative agreement with the previously reported crystallographic complex. In contrast, closely related, kanamycin-B is recognized by the enzyme in the syn-type arrangement for both glycosidic bonds. This observation together with the enzymatic activity displayed by ANT(4') against several synthetic kanamycin derivatives strongly suggests that the spatial distribution of positive charges within the aminoglycoside scaffold is the key feature that governs its preferred binding mode to the protein catalytic region and also the regioselectivity of the adenylation reaction. In contrast, the global shape of the antibiotic does not seem to be a critical factor. This feature represents a qualitative difference between the target A-site RNA and the resistance enzyme ANT(4') as aminoglycoside

  13. The neural correlates of visual self-recognition.

    PubMed

    Devue, Christel; Brédart, Serge

    2011-03-01

    This paper presents a review of studies that were aimed at determining which brain regions are recruited during visual self-recognition, with a particular focus on self-face recognition. A complex bilateral network, involving frontal, parietal and occipital areas, appears to be associated with self-face recognition, with a particularly high implication of the right hemisphere. Results indicate that it remains difficult to determine which specific cognitive operation is reflected by each recruited brain area, in part due to the variability of used control stimuli and experimental tasks. A synthesis of the interpretations provided by previous studies is presented. The relevance of using self-recognition as an indicator of self-awareness is discussed. We argue that a major aim of future research in the field should be to identify more clearly the cognitive operations induced by the perception of the self-face, and search for dissociations between neural correlates and cognitive components.

  14. Determination of polychlorinated biphenyl levels in the serum of residents and in the homogenates of seafood from the New Bedford, Massachusetts Area: A comparison of exposure sources through pattern recognition techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Burse, V.W.; Groce, D.F.; Caudill, S.P.; Korver, M.P.; Phillips, D.L.

    1994-01-01

    Gas chromatographic patterns of polychlorinated biophenyls (PCBs) found in the serum of New Bedford, MA residents with high serum PCBs were compared to patterns found in lobsters and bluefish taken from local waters, and goats fed selected technical Aroclors (e.g., Aroclors 1016, 1242, 1254, or 1260) using Jaccard measures of similarity and Principal Component Analysis. Pattern in humans were silimar to patterns in lobsters and both were more similar to those in the goat fed Aroclor 1254 as demonstrated by both pattern recognition techniques. However, patterns observed in humans, lobsters and bluefish all exhibited some presence of PCBs more characteristic of Aroclors 1016 and/or 1242 or 1260.

  15. Defining protein electrostatic recognition processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Getzoff, Elizabeth D.; Roberts, Victoria A.

    The objective is to elucidate the nature of electrostatic forces controlling protein recognition processes by using a tightly coupled computational and interactive computer graphics approach. The TURNIP program was developed to determine the most favorable precollision orientations for two molecules by systematic search of all orientations and evaluation of the resulting electrostatic interactions. TURNIP was applied to the transient interaction between two electron transfer metalloproteins, plastocyanin and cytochrome c. The results suggest that the productive electron-transfer complex involves interaction of the positive region of cytochrome c with the negative patch of plastocyanin, consistent with experimental data. Application of TURNIP to the formation of the stable complex between the HyHEL-5 antibody and its protein antigen lysozyme showed that long-distance electrostatic forces guide lysozyme toward the HyHEL-5 binding site, but do not fine tune its orientation. Determination of docked antigen/antibody complexes requires including steric as well as electrostatic interactions, as was done for the U10 mutant of the anti-phosphorylcholine antibody S107. The graphics program Flex, a convenient desktop workstation program for visualizing molecular dynamics and normal mode motions, was enhanced. Flex now has a user interface and was rewritten to use standard graphics libraries, so as to run on most desktop workstations.

  16. The Legal Recognition of Sign Languages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    De Meulder, Maartje

    2015-01-01

    This article provides an analytical overview of the different types of explicit legal recognition of sign languages. Five categories are distinguished: constitutional recognition, recognition by means of general language legislation, recognition by means of a sign language law or act, recognition by means of a sign language law or act including…

  17. Teaching and the Dialectic of Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huttunen, Rauno; Heikkinen, Hannu L. T.

    2004-01-01

    In this article, the processes of recognition within education are discussed. Frequently, recognition is reduced to polite behaviour or etiquette. Another narrow view of recognition is, behaviouristically speaking, to regard it as mere feedback. We claim that authentic recognition is a different matter. Receiving recognition, as Charles Taylor has…

  18. Chemical recognition of gases and gas mixtures with terahertz waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jacobsen, R. H.; Mittleman, D. M.; Nuss, M. C.

    1996-12-01

    A time-domain chemical-recognition system for classifying gases and analyzing gas mixtures is presented. We analyze the free induction decay exhibited by gases excited by far-infrared (terahertz) pulses in the time domain, using digital signal-processing techniques. A simple geometric picture is used for the classification of the waveforms measured for unknown gas species. We demonstrate how the recognition system can be used to determine the partial pressures of an ammonia-water gas mixture.

  19. Amygdala damage impairs emotion recognition from music.

    PubMed

    Gosselin, Nathalie; Peretz, Isabelle; Johnsen, Erica; Adolphs, Ralph

    2007-01-28

    The role of the amygdala in recognition of danger is well established for visual stimuli such as faces. A similar role in another class of emotionally potent stimuli -- music -- has been recently suggested by the study of epileptic patients with unilateral resection of the anteromedian part of the temporal lobe [Gosselin, N., Peretz, I., Noulhiane, M., Hasboun, D., Beckett, C., & Baulac, M., et al. (2005). Impaired recognition of scary music following unilateral temporal lobe excision. Brain, 128(Pt 3), 628-640]. The goal of the present study was to assess the specific role of the amygdala in the recognition of fear from music. To this aim, we investigated a rare subject, S.M., who has complete bilateral damage relatively restricted to the amygdala and not encompassing other sectors of the temporal lobe. In Experiment 1, S.M. and four matched controls were asked to rate the intensity of fear, peacefulness, happiness, and sadness from computer-generated instrumental music purposely created to express those emotions. Subjects also rated the arousal and valence of each musical stimulus. An error detection task assessed basic auditory perceptual function. S.M. performed normally in this perceptual task, but was selectively impaired in the recognition of scary and sad music. In contrast, her recognition of happy music was normal. Furthermore, S.M. judged the scary music to be less arousing and the peaceful music less relaxing than did the controls. Overall, the pattern of impairment in S.M. is similar to that previously reported in patients with unilateral anteromedial temporal lobe damage. S.M.'s impaired emotional judgments occur in the face of otherwise intact processing of musical features that are emotionally determinant. The use of tempo and mode cues in distinguishing happy from sad music was also spared in S.M. Thus, the amygdala appears to be necessary for emotional processing of music rather than the perceptual processing itself.

  20. Chemical recognition software

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.H. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-06-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures, even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  1. Chemical recognition software

    SciTech Connect

    Wagner, J.S.; Trahan, M.W.; Nelson, W.E.; Hargis, P.J. Jr.; Tisone, G.C.

    1994-12-01

    We have developed a capability to make real time concentration measurements of individual chemicals in a complex mixture using a multispectral laser remote sensing system. Our chemical recognition and analysis software consists of three parts: (1) a rigorous multivariate analysis package for quantitative concentration and uncertainty estimates, (2) a genetic optimizer which customizes and tailors the multivariate algorithm for a particular application, and (3) an intelligent neural net chemical filter which pre-selects from the chemical database to find the appropriate candidate chemicals for quantitative analyses by the multivariate algorithms, as well as providing a quick-look concentration estimate and consistency check. Detailed simulations using both laboratory fluorescence data and computer synthesized spectra indicate that our software can make accurate concentration estimates from complex multicomponent mixtures. even when the mixture is noisy and contaminated with unknowns.

  2. Early recognition of speech

    PubMed Central

    Remez, Robert E; Thomas, Emily F

    2013-01-01

    Classic research on the perception of speech sought to identify minimal acoustic correlates of each consonant and vowel. In explaining perception, this view designated momentary components of an acoustic spectrum as cues to the recognition of elementary phonemes. This conceptualization of speech perception is untenable given the findings of phonetic sensitivity to modulation independent of the acoustic and auditory form of the carrier. The empirical key is provided by studies of the perceptual organization of speech, a low-level integrative function that finds and follows the sensory effects of speech amid concurrent events. These projects have shown that the perceptual organization of speech is keyed to modulation; fast; unlearned; nonsymbolic; indifferent to short-term auditory properties; and organization requires attention. The ineluctably multisensory nature of speech perception also imposes conditions that distinguish language among cognitive systems. WIREs Cogn Sci 2013, 4:213–223. doi: 10.1002/wcs.1213 PMID:23926454

  3. Recognition Using Hybrid Classifiers.

    PubMed

    Osadchy, Margarita; Keren, Daniel; Raviv, Dolev

    2016-04-01

    A canonical problem in computer vision is category recognition (e.g., find all instances of human faces, cars etc., in an image). Typically, the input for training a binary classifier is a relatively small sample of positive examples, and a huge sample of negative examples, which can be very diverse, consisting of images from a large number of categories. The difficulty of the problem sharply increases with the dimension and size of the negative example set. We propose to alleviate this problem by applying a "hybrid" classifier, which replaces the negative samples by a prior, and then finds a hyperplane which separates the positive samples from this prior. The method is extended to kernel space and to an ensemble-based approach. The resulting binary classifiers achieve an identical or better classification rate than SVM, while requiring far smaller memory and lower computational complexity to train and apply.

  4. TOPICAL REVIEW: Recognition tunneling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lindsay, Stuart; He, Jin; Sankey, Otto; Hapala, Prokop; Jelinek, Pavel; Zhang, Peiming; Chang, Shuai; Huang, Shuo

    2010-07-01

    Single molecules in a tunnel junction can now be interrogated reliably using chemically functionalized electrodes. Monitoring stochastic bonding fluctuations between a ligand bound to one electrode and its target bound to a second electrode ('tethered molecule-pair' configuration) gives insight into the nature of the intermolecular bonding at a single molecule-pair level, and defines the requirements for reproducible tunneling data. Simulations show that there is an instability in the tunnel gap at large currents, and this results in a multiplicity of contacts with a corresponding spread in the measured currents. At small currents (i.e. large gaps) the gap is stable, and functionalizing a pair of electrodes with recognition reagents (the 'free-analyte' configuration) can generate a distinct tunneling signal when an analyte molecule is trapped in the gap. This opens up a new interface between chemistry and electronics with immediate implications for rapid sequencing of single DNA molecules.

  5. Automatic speech recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espy-Wilson, Carol

    2005-04-01

    Great strides have been made in the development of automatic speech recognition (ASR) technology over the past thirty years. Most of this effort has been centered around the extension and improvement of Hidden Markov Model (HMM) approaches to ASR. Current commercially-available and industry systems based on HMMs can perform well for certain situational tasks that restrict variability such as phone dialing or limited voice commands. However, the holy grail of ASR systems is performance comparable to humans-in other words, the ability to automatically transcribe unrestricted conversational speech spoken by an infinite number of speakers under varying acoustic environments. This goal is far from being reached. Key to the success of ASR is effective modeling of variability in the speech signal. This tutorial will review the basics of ASR and the various ways in which our current knowledge of speech production, speech perception and prosody can be exploited to improve robustness at every level of the system.

  6. Computer image processing and recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, E. L.

    1979-01-01

    A systematic introduction to the concepts and techniques of computer image processing and recognition is presented. Consideration is given to such topics as image formation and perception; computer representation of images; image enhancement and restoration; reconstruction from projections; digital television, encoding, and data compression; scene understanding; scene matching and recognition; and processing techniques for linear systems.

  7. Methods of Teaching Speech Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rader, Martha H.; Bailey, Glenn A.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: This article introduces the history and development of speech recognition, addresses its role in the business curriculum, outlines related national and state standards, describes instructional strategies, and discusses the assessment of student achievement in speech recognition classes. Methods: Research methods included a synthesis of…

  8. Sign Facilitation in Word Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wauters, Loes N.; Knoors, Harry E. T.; Vervloed, Mathijs P. J.; Aarnoutse, Cor A. J.

    2001-01-01

    This study examined whether use of sign language would facilitate reading word recognition by 16 deaf children (6- to 1 years-old) in the Netherlands. Results indicated that if words were learned through speech, accompanied by the relevant sign, accuracy of word recognition was greater than if words were learned solely through speech. (Contains…

  9. Word Recognition and Critical Reading.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Groff, Patrick

    1991-01-01

    This article discusses the distinctions between literal and critical reading and explains the role that word recognition ability plays in critical reading behavior. It concludes that correct word recognition provides the raw material on which higher order critical reading is based. (DB)

  10. Recognition without Rewards: Building Connections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Caren; Tate, Betty; MacNaughton, Daphne; Politano, Colleen

    Noting that the use of rewards in the form of stickers, trophies, prizes, points, tokens, and grades is commonplace in elementary education today, this book explores the differences between rewards and recognition and shows how teachers can build student confidence, motivate learning, and develop skills for lifelong learning through recognition.…

  11. Face recognition performance with superresolution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuowen; Maschal, Robert; Young, S Susan; Hong, Tsai Hong; Phillips, P Jonathon

    2012-06-20

    With the prevalence of surveillance systems, face recognition is crucial to aiding the law enforcement community and homeland security in identifying suspects and suspicious individuals on watch lists. However, face recognition performance is severely affected by the low face resolution of individuals in typical surveillance footage, oftentimes due to the distance of individuals from the cameras as well as the small pixel count of low-cost surveillance systems. Superresolution image reconstruction has the potential to improve face recognition performance by using a sequence of low-resolution images of an individual's face in the same pose to reconstruct a more detailed high-resolution facial image. This work conducts an extensive performance evaluation of superresolution for a face recognition algorithm using a methodology and experimental setup consistent with real world settings at multiple subject-to-camera distances. Results show that superresolution image reconstruction improves face recognition performance considerably at the examined midrange and close range. PMID:22722306

  12. Face recognition performance with superresolution.

    PubMed

    Hu, Shuowen; Maschal, Robert; Young, S Susan; Hong, Tsai Hong; Phillips, P Jonathon

    2012-06-20

    With the prevalence of surveillance systems, face recognition is crucial to aiding the law enforcement community and homeland security in identifying suspects and suspicious individuals on watch lists. However, face recognition performance is severely affected by the low face resolution of individuals in typical surveillance footage, oftentimes due to the distance of individuals from the cameras as well as the small pixel count of low-cost surveillance systems. Superresolution image reconstruction has the potential to improve face recognition performance by using a sequence of low-resolution images of an individual's face in the same pose to reconstruct a more detailed high-resolution facial image. This work conducts an extensive performance evaluation of superresolution for a face recognition algorithm using a methodology and experimental setup consistent with real world settings at multiple subject-to-camera distances. Results show that superresolution image reconstruction improves face recognition performance considerably at the examined midrange and close range.

  13. 26 CFR 1.1312-8 - Law applicable in determination of error.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... inclusion, exclusion, omission, allowance, disallowance, recognition, or nonrecognition is determined under... inclusion, exclusion, omission, allowance, disallowance, recognition, or nonrecognition, as the case may be, was made. The fact that the inclusion, exclusion, omission, allowance, disallowance, recognition,...

  14. Photonics: From target recognition to lesion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Henry, E. Michael

    1994-01-01

    Since 1989, Martin Marietta has invested in the development of an innovative concept for robust real-time pattern recognition for any two-dimensioanal sensor. This concept has been tested in simulation, and in laboratory and field hardware, for a number of DOD and commercial uses from automatic target recognition to manufacturing inspection. We have now joined Rose Health Care Systems in developing its use for medical diagnostics. The concept is based on determining regions of interest by using optical Fourier bandpassing as a scene segmentation technique, enhancing those regions using wavelet filters, passing the enhanced regions to a neural network for analysis and initial pattern identification, and following this initial identification with confirmation by optical correlation. The optical scene segmentation and pattern confirmation are performed by the same optical module. The neural network is a recursive error minimization network with a small number of connections and nodes that rapidly converges to a global minimum.

  15. Mental transformation in a visual recognition task.

    PubMed

    Bartusevicius, E; Vanagas, V; Radil-Weiss, T

    1981-01-01

    Rectangular geometrical patterns with equal number of lines, identical relations between their vertical and horizontal components, identical angles, line crossing knots and free ends of lines were presented tachistoscopically to human subjects with a restricted recognition time caused by backward masking. Symmetrical linear transformation with respect to the Y or X axes and rotations of the patterns were performed and the correctness of their reproduction was measured in psychophysical experiments. A mental pattern transformation was a fast operation (under 100 ms) not directly linked to a graphic or a verbal expression of the results of reproduction. Mental transformation is probably determined by the recognition process. Symmetrical transformations are easier than rotational, whereas the most difficult is a detection of a pattern differing in its form from those considered within a predetermined group of samples.

  16. Speech Recognition: How Do We Teach It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barksdale, Karl

    2002-01-01

    States that growing use of speech recognition software has made voice writing an essential computer skill. Describes how to present the topic, develop basic speech recognition skills, and teach speech recognition outlining, writing, proofreading, and editing. (Contains 14 references.) (SK)

  17. Bifunctional TaqII restriction endonuclease: redefining the prototype DNA recognition site and establishing the Fidelity Index for partial cleaving

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The TaqII enzyme is a member of the Thermus sp. enzyme family that we propounded previously within Type IIS restriction endonucleases, containing related thermophilic bifunctional endonucleases-methyltransferases from various Thermus sp.: TaqII, Tth111II, TthHB27I, TspGWI, TspDTI and TsoI. These enzymes show significant nucleotide and amino acid sequence similarities, a rare phenomenon among restriction endonucleases, along with similarities in biochemical properties, molecular size, DNA recognition sequences and cleavage sites. They also feature some characteristics of Types I and III. Results Barker et al. reported the Type IIS/IIC restriction endonuclease TaqII as recognizing two distinct cognate site variants (5'-GACCGA-3' and 5'-CACCCA-3') while cleaving 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We used four independent methods, namely, shotgun cloning and sequencing, restriction pattern analysis, digestion of particular custom substrates and GeneScan analysis, to demonstrate that the recombinant enzyme recognizes only 5'-GACCGA-3' sites and cleaves 11/9 nucleotides downstream. We did not observe any 5'-CACCCA-3' cleavage under a variety of conditions and site arrangements tested. We also characterized the enzyme biochemically and established new digestion conditions optimal for practical enzyme applications. Finally, we developed and propose a new version of the Fidelity Index - the Fidelity Index for Partial Cleavage (FI-PC). Conclusions The DNA recognition sequence of the bifunctional prototype TaqII endonuclease-methyltransferase from Thermus aquaticus has been redefined as recognizing only 5'-GACCGA-3' cognate sites. The reaction conditions (pH and salt concentrations) were designed either to minimize (pH = 8.0 and 10 mM ammonium sulphate) or to enhance star activity (pH = 6.0 and no salt). Redefinition of the recognition site and reaction conditions makes this prototype endonuclease a useful tool for DNA manipulation; as yet, this enzyme has no practical

  18. Accuracy enhanced thermal face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chun-Fu; Lin, Sheng-Fuu

    2013-11-01

    Human face recognition has been generally researched for the last three decades. Face recognition with thermal image has begun to attract significant attention gradually since illumination of environment would not affect the recognition performance. However, the recognition performance of traditional thermal face recognizer is still insufficient in practical application. This study presents a novel thermal face recognizer employing not only thermal features but also critical facial geometric features which would not be influenced by hair style to improve the recognition performance. A three-layer back-propagation feed-forward neural network is applied as the classifier. Traditional thermal face recognizers only use the indirect information of the topography of blood vessels like thermogram as features. To overcome this limitation, the proposed thermal face recognizer can use not only the indirect information but also the direct information of the topography of blood vessels which is unique for every human. Moreover, the recognition performance of the proposed thermal features would not decrease even if the hair of frontal bone varies, the eye blinks or the nose breathes. Experimental results show that the proposed features are significantly more effective than traditional thermal features and the recognition performance of thermal face recognizer is improved.

  19. Macromolecular recognition: Recognition of polymer side chains by cyclodextrin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashidzume, Akihito; Harada, Akira

    2015-12-01

    The interaction of cyclodextrins (CD) with water soluble polymers possessing guest residues has been investigated as model systems in biological molecular recognition. The selectivity of interaction of CD with polymer-carrying guest residues is controlled by polymer chains, i.e., the steric effect of polymer main chain, the conformational effect of polymer main chain, and multi-site interaction. Macroscopic assemblies have been also realized based on molecular recognition using polyacrylamide-based gels possessing CD and guest residues.

  20. Quantifying facial expression recognition across viewing conditions.

    PubMed

    Goren, Deborah; Wilson, Hugh R

    2006-04-01

    Facial expressions are key to social interactions and to assessment of potential danger in various situations. Therefore, our brains must be able to recognize facial expressions when they are transformed in biologically plausible ways. We used synthetic happy, sad, angry and fearful faces to determine the amount of geometric change required to recognize these emotions during brief presentations. Five-alternative forced choice conditions involving central viewing, peripheral viewing and inversion were used to study recognition among the four emotions. Two-alternative forced choice was used to study affect discrimination when spatial frequency information in the stimulus was modified. The results show an emotion and task-dependent pattern of detection. Facial expressions presented with low peak frequencies are much harder to discriminate from neutral than faces defined by either mid or high peak frequencies. Peripheral presentation of faces also makes recognition much more difficult, except for happy faces. Differences between fearful detection and recognition tasks are probably due to common confusions with sadness when recognizing fear from among other emotions. These findings further support the idea that these emotions are processed separately from each other. PMID:16364393

  1. Gait Recognition and Walking Exercise Intensity Estimation

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Bor-Shing; Liu, Yu-Ting; Yu, Chu; Jan, Gene Eu; Hsiao, Bo-Tang

    2014-01-01

    Cardiovascular patients consult doctors for advice regarding regular exercise, whereas obese patients must self-manage their weight. Because a system for permanently monitoring and tracking patients’ exercise intensities and workouts is necessary, a system for recognizing gait and estimating walking exercise intensity was proposed. For gait recognition analysis, αβ filters were used to improve the recognition of athletic attitude. Furthermore, empirical mode decomposition (EMD) was used to filter the noise of patients’ attitude to acquire the Fourier transform energy spectrum. Linear discriminant analysis was then applied to this energy spectrum for training and recognition. When the gait or motion was recognized, the walking exercise intensity was estimated. In addition, this study addressed the correlation between inertia and exercise intensity by using the residual function of the EMD and quadratic approximation to filter the effect of the baseline drift integral of the acceleration sensor. The increase in the determination coefficient of the regression equation from 0.55 to 0.81 proved that the accuracy of the method for estimating walking exercise intensity proposed by Kurihara was improved in this study. PMID:24714057

  2. Pattern Recognition in Pharmacokinetic Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Gabrielsson, Johan; Meibohm, Bernd; Weiner, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition is a key element in pharmacokinetic data analyses when first selecting a model to be regressed to data. We call this process going from data to insight and it is an important aspect of exploratory data analysis (EDA). But there are very few formal ways or strategies that scientists typically use when the experiment has been done and data collected. This report deals with identifying the properties of a kinetic model by dissecting the pattern that concentration-time data reveal. Pattern recognition is a pivotal activity when modeling kinetic data, because a rigorous strategy is essential for dissecting the determinants behind concentration-time courses. First, we extend a commonly used relationship for calculation of the number of potential model parameters by simultaneously utilizing all concentration-time courses. Then, a set of points to consider are proposed that specifically addresses exploratory data analyses, number of phases in the concentration-time course, baseline behavior, time delays, peak shifts with increasing doses, flip-flop phenomena, saturation, and other potential nonlinearities that an experienced eye catches in the data. Finally, we set up a series of equations related to the patterns. In other words, we look at what causes the shapes that make up the concentration-time course and propose a strategy to construct a model. By practicing pattern recognition, one can significantly improve the quality and timeliness of data analysis and model building. A consequence of this is a better understanding of the complete concentration-time profile.

  3. Gesture recognition on smart cameras

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dziri, Aziz; Chevobbe, Stephane; Darouich, Mehdi

    2013-02-01

    Gesture recognition is a feature in human-machine interaction that allows more natural interaction without the use of complex devices. For this reason, several methods of gesture recognition have been developed in recent years. However, most real time methods are designed to operate on a Personal Computer with high computing resources and memory. In this paper, we analyze relevant methods found in the literature in order to investigate the ability of smart camera to execute gesture recognition algorithms. We elaborate two hand gesture recognition pipelines. The first method is based on invariant moments extraction and the second on finger tips detection. The hand detection method used for both pipeline is based on skin color segmentation. The results obtained show that the un-optimized versions of invariant moments method and finger tips detection method can reach 10 fps on embedded processor and use about 200 kB of memory.

  4. Face recognition based tensor structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, De-qiang; Ye, Zhi-xia; Zhao, Yang; Liu, Li-mei

    2012-01-01

    Face recognition has broad applications, and it is a difficult problem since face image can change with photographic conditions, such as different illumination conditions, pose changes and camera angles. How to obtain some invariable features for a face image is the key issue for a face recognition algorithm. In this paper, a novel tensor structure of face image is proposed to represent image features with eight directions for a pixel value. The invariable feature of the face image is then obtained from gradient decomposition to make up the tensor structure. Then the singular value decomposition (SVD) and principal component analysis (PCA) of this tensor structure are used for face recognition. The experimental results from this study show that many difficultly recognized samples can correctly be recognized, and the recognition rate is increased by 9%-11% in comparison with same type of algorithms.

  5. Processing orientation and emotion recognition.

    PubMed

    Martin, Douglas; Slessor, Gillian; Allen, Roy; Phillips, Louise H; Darling, Stephen

    2012-02-01

    There is evidence that some emotional expressions are characterized by diagnostic cues from individual face features. For example, an upturned mouth is indicative of happiness, whereas a furrowed brow is associated with anger. The current investigation explored whether motivating people to perceive stimuli in a local (i.e., feature-based) rather than global (i.e., holistic) processing orientation was advantageous for recognizing emotional facial expressions. Participants classified emotional faces while primed with local and global processing orientations, via a Navon letter task. Contrary to previous findings for identity recognition, the current findings are indicative of a modest advantage for face emotion recognition under conditions of local processing orientation. When primed with a local processing orientation, participants performed both significantly faster and more accurately on an emotion recognition task than when they were primed with a global processing orientation. The impacts of this finding for theories of emotion recognition and face processing are considered. PMID:21842989

  6. A unique serpin P1' glutamate and a conserved β-sheet C arginine are key residues for activity, protease recognition and stability of serpinA12 (vaspin).

    PubMed

    Ulbricht, David; Pippel, Jan; Schultz, Stephan; Meier, René; Sträter, Norbert; Heiker, John T

    2015-09-15

    SerpinA12 (vaspin) is thought to be mainly expressed in adipose tissue and has multiple beneficial effects on metabolic, inflammatory and atherogenic processes related to obesity. KLK7 (kallikrein 7) is the only known protease target of vaspin to date and is inhibited with a moderate inhibition rate. In the crystal structure, the cleavage site (P1-P1') of the vaspin reactive centre loop is fairly rigid compared with the flexible residues before P2, possibly supported by an ionic interaction of P1' glutamate (Glu(379)) with an arginine residue (Arg(302)) of the β-sheet C. A P1' glutamate seems highly unusual and unfavourable for the protease KLK7. We characterized vaspin mutants to investigate the roles of these two residues in protease inhibition and recognition by vaspin. Reactive centre loop mutations changing the P1' residue or altering the reactive centre loop conformation significantly increased inhibition parameters, whereas removal of the positive charge within β-sheet C impeded the serpin-protease interaction. Arg(302) is a crucial contact to enable vaspin recognition by KLK7 and it supports moderate inhibition of the serpin despite the presence of the detrimental P1' Glu(379), which clearly represents a major limiting factor for vaspin-inhibitory activity. We also show that the vaspin-inhibition rate for KLK7 can be modestly increased by heparin and demonstrate that vaspin is a heparin-binding serpin. Noteworthily, we observed vaspin as a remarkably thermostable serpin and found that Glu(379) and Arg(302) influence heat-induced polymerization. These structural and functional results reveal the mechanistic basis of how reactive centre loop sequence and exosite interaction in vaspin enable KLK7 recognition and regulate protease inhibition as well as stability of this adipose tissue-derived serpin.

  7. The neuroecology of competitor recognition.

    PubMed

    Grether, Gregory F

    2011-11-01

    Territorial animals can be expected to distinguish among the types of competitors and noncompetitors that they encounter on a regular basis, including prospective mates and rivals of their own species, but they may not correctly classify individuals of other species. Closely related species often have similar phenotypes and this can cause confusion when formerly allopatric populations first come into contact. Errors in recognizing competitors can have important ecological and evolutionary effects. I review what is known about the mechanisms of competitor recognition in animals generally, focusing on cases in which the targets of recognition include other species. Case studies include damselflies, ants, skinks, salamanders, reef fishes, and birds. In general, recognition systems consist of a phenotypic cue (e.g., chemical, color, song), a neural template against which cues are compared, a motor response (e.g., aggression), and sensory integration circuits for context dependency of the response (if any). Little is known about how competitor recognition systems work at the neural level, but inferences about specificity of cues and about sensory integration can be drawn from the responses of territory residents to simulated intruders. Competitor recognition often involves multiple cues in the same, or different, sensory modalities. The same cues and templates are often, but not always, used for intraspecific and interspecific recognition. Experiments have shown that imprinting on local cues is common, which may enable templates to track evolved changes in cues automatically. The dependence of aggression and tolerance on context is important even in the simplest systems. Species in which mechanisms of competitor recognition are best known offer untapped opportunities to examine how competitor-recognition systems evolve (e.g., by comparing allopatric and sympatric populations). Cues that are gene products (peptides, proteins) may provide insights into rates of evolution

  8. On Tangut Historical Documents Recognition*

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Changqing

    As the Tangut studies have made progress, a considerable number of Tangut historical documents' copies have been published. It is of great importance to carry out digitalization and domestication of these copies. The paper firstly makes an initial processing of images by global threshold, then dissect the photocopies by scanning. Finally adopts the recognition approach of principal component analysis. The experiment shows that a better recognition can be achieved by calculation without extra time.

  9. Gait recognition based on Kinect sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmed, Mohammed; Al-Jawad, Naseer; Sabir, Azhin T.

    2014-05-01

    This paper presents gait recognition based on human skeleton and trajectory of joint points captured by Microsoft Kinect sensor. In this paper Two sets of dynamic features are extracted during one gait cycle: the first is Horizontal Distance Features (HDF) that is based on the distances between (Ankles, knees, hands, shoulders), the second set is the Vertical Distance Features (VDF) that provide significant information of human gait extracted from the height to the ground of (hand, shoulder, and ankles) during one gait cycle. Extracting these two sets of feature are difficult and not accurate based on using traditional camera, therefore the Kinect sensor is used in this paper to determine the precise measurements. The two sets of feature are separately tested and then fused to create one feature vector. A database has been created in house to perform our experiments. This database consists of sixteen males and four females. For each individual, 10 videos have been recorded, each record includes in average two gait cycles. The Kinect sensor is used here to extract all the skeleton points, and these points are used to build up the feature vectors mentioned above. K-nearest neighbor is used as the classification method based on Cityblock distance function. Based on the experimental result the proposed method provides 56% as a recognition rate using HDF, while VDF provided 83.5% recognition accuracy. When fusing both of the HDF and VDF as one feature vector, the recognition rate increased to 92%, the experimental result shows that our method provides significant result compared to the existence methods.

  10. Mapping the development of facial expression recognition.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Helen; Vizioli, Luca; Ouyang, Xinyi; Caldara, Roberto

    2015-11-01

    Reading the non-verbal cues from faces to infer the emotional states of others is central to our daily social interactions from very early in life. Despite the relatively well-documented ontogeny of facial expression recognition in infancy, our understanding of the development of this critical social skill throughout childhood into adulthood remains limited. To this end, using a psychophysical approach we implemented the QUEST threshold-seeking algorithm to parametrically manipulate the quantity of signals available in faces normalized for contrast and luminance displaying the six emotional expressions, plus neutral. We thus determined observers' perceptual thresholds for effective discrimination of each emotional expression from 5 years of age up to adulthood. Consistent with previous studies, happiness was most easily recognized with minimum signals (35% on average), whereas fear required the maximum signals (97% on average) across groups. Overall, recognition improved with age for all expressions except happiness and fear, for which all age groups including the youngest remained within the adult range. Uniquely, our findings characterize the recognition trajectories of the six basic emotions into three distinct groupings: expressions that show a steep improvement with age - disgust, neutral, and anger; expressions that show a more gradual improvement with age - sadness, surprise; and those that remain stable from early childhood - happiness and fear, indicating that the coding for these expressions is already mature by 5 years of age. Altogether, our data provide for the first time a fine-grained mapping of the development of facial expression recognition. This approach significantly increases our understanding of the decoding of emotions across development and offers a novel tool to measure impairments for specific facial expressions in developmental clinical populations.

  11. Mapping the development of facial expression recognition.

    PubMed

    Rodger, Helen; Vizioli, Luca; Ouyang, Xinyi; Caldara, Roberto

    2015-11-01

    Reading the non-verbal cues from faces to infer the emotional states of others is central to our daily social interactions from very early in life. Despite the relatively well-documented ontogeny of facial expression recognition in infancy, our understanding of the development of this critical social skill throughout childhood into adulthood remains limited. To this end, using a psychophysical approach we implemented the QUEST threshold-seeking algorithm to parametrically manipulate the quantity of signals available in faces normalized for contrast and luminance displaying the six emotional expressions, plus neutral. We thus determined observers' perceptual thresholds for effective discrimination of each emotional expression from 5 years of age up to adulthood. Consistent with previous studies, happiness was most easily recognized with minimum signals (35% on average), whereas fear required the maximum signals (97% on average) across groups. Overall, recognition improved with age for all expressions except happiness and fear, for which all age groups including the youngest remained within the adult range. Uniquely, our findings characterize the recognition trajectories of the six basic emotions into three distinct groupings: expressions that show a steep improvement with age - disgust, neutral, and anger; expressions that show a more gradual improvement with age - sadness, surprise; and those that remain stable from early childhood - happiness and fear, indicating that the coding for these expressions is already mature by 5 years of age. Altogether, our data provide for the first time a fine-grained mapping of the development of facial expression recognition. This approach significantly increases our understanding of the decoding of emotions across development and offers a novel tool to measure impairments for specific facial expressions in developmental clinical populations. PMID:25704672

  12. Holistic processing predicts face recognition.

    PubMed

    Richler, Jennifer J; Cheung, Olivia S; Gauthier, Isabel

    2011-04-01

    The concept of holistic processing is a cornerstone of face-recognition research. In the study reported here, we demonstrated that holistic processing predicts face-recognition abilities on the Cambridge Face Memory Test and on a perceptual face-identification task. Our findings validate a large body of work that relies on the assumption that holistic processing is related to face recognition. These findings also reconcile the study of face recognition with the perceptual-expertise work it inspired; such work links holistic processing of objects with people's ability to individuate them. Our results differ from those of a recent study showing no link between holistic processing and face recognition. This discrepancy can be attributed to the use in prior research of a popular but flawed measure of holistic processing. Our findings salvage the central role of holistic processing in face recognition and cast doubt on a subset of the face-perception literature that relies on a problematic measure of holistic processing.

  13. Structure of the sulfated alpha-L-fucan from the egg jelly coat of the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus franciscanus: patterns of preferential 2-O- and 4-O-sulfation determine sperm cell recognition.

    PubMed

    Vilela-Silva, A C; Alves, A P; Valente, A P; Vacquier, V D; Mourão, P A

    1999-09-01

    The egg jelly coats of sea urchins contains sulfated polysaccharides responsible for inducing the sperm acrosome reaction which is an obligatory event for sperm binding to, and fusion with, the egg. Here, we extend our study to the sea urchin Strongylocentrotus franciscanus. The egg jelly of this species contains a homofucan composed of 2- O -sulfated, 3-linked units which is the simplest structure ever reported for a sulfated fucan. This polysaccharide was compared with other sulfated alpha-L-fucans as inducers of acrosome reaction in conspecific and heterospecific sperm. Although all these fucans are linear polymers composed of 3-linked alpha-L-fucopyranosyl units, they differ in the proportions of 2-O- and 4-O-sulfation. The reactivity of the sperm of each species is more sensitive to the egg jelly sulfated fucan found in their own species. The reactivity of the sperm does not correlate with the charge density of the fucan, but with the proportion of 2-O- and 4-O-sulfation. The pattern of sulfation may be an important feature for recognition of fucans by the sperm receptor contributing to the species-specificity of fertilization.

  14. Pattern recognition characterizations of micromechanical and morphological materials states via analytical quantitative ultrasonics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, J. H., Jr.; Lee, S. S.

    1986-01-01

    One potential approach to the quantitative acquisition of discriminatory information that can isolate a single structural state is pattern recognition. The pattern recognition characterizations of micromechanical and morphological materials states via analytical quantiative ultrasonics are outlined. The concepts, terminology, and techniques of statistical pattern recognition are reviewed. Feature extraction and classification and states of the structure can be determined via a program of ultrasonic data generation.

  15. Document Form and Character Recognition using SVM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Sang-Sung; Shin, Young-Geun; Jung, Won-Kyo; Ahn, Dong-Kyu; Jang, Dong-Sik

    2009-08-01

    Because of development of computer and information communication, EDI (Electronic Data Interchange) has been developing. There is OCR (Optical Character Recognition) of Pattern recognition technology for EDI. OCR contributed to changing many manual in the past into automation. But for the more perfect database of document, much manual is needed for excluding unnecessary recognition. To resolve this problem, we propose document form based character recognition method in this study. Proposed method is divided into document form recognition part and character recognition part. Especially, in character recognition, change character into binarization by using SVM algorithm and extract more correct feature value.

  16. Enhanced Chiral Recognition by Cyclodextrin Dimers

    PubMed Central

    Voskuhl, Jens; Schaepe, Kira; Ravoo, Bart Jan

    2011-01-01

    In this article we investigate the effect of multivalency in chiral recognition. To this end, we measured the host-guest interaction of a β-cyclodextrin dimer with divalent chiral guests. We report the synthesis of carbohydrate-based water soluble chiral guests functionalized with two borneol, menthol, or isopinocampheol units in either (+) or (−) configuration. We determined the interaction of these divalent guests with a β-cyclodextrin dimer using isothermal titration calorimetry. It was found that—in spite of a highly unfavorable conformation—the cyclodextrin dimer binds to guest dimers with an increased enantioselectivity, which clearly reflects the effect of multivalency. PMID:21845101

  17. Pattern recognition monitoring of PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, Mark Alexander

    1999-01-01

    The CO-concentration in the H.sub.2 feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and voltage behavior patterns from an auxiliary cell attached to the end of the stack. The auxiliary cell is connected to the same oxygen and hydrogen feed manifolds that supply the stack, and discharges through a constant load. Pattern recognition software compares the current and voltage patterns from the auxiliary cell to current and voltage signature determined from a reference cell similar to the auxiliary cell and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO-concentrations in the H.sub.2 fuel stream.

  18. Statistical pattern recognition algorithms for autofluorescence imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulas, Zbigniew; Bereś-Pawlik, Elżbieta; Wierzbicki, Jarosław

    2009-02-01

    In cancer diagnostics the most important problems are the early identification and estimation of the tumor growth and spread in order to determine the area to be operated. The aim of the work was to design of statistical algorithms helping doctors to objectively estimate pathologically changed areas and to assess the disease advancement. In the research, algorithms for classifying endoscopic autofluorescence images of larynx and intestine were used. The results show that the statistical pattern recognition offers new possibilities for endoscopic diagnostics and can be of a tremendous help in assessing the area of the pathological changes.

  19. Pattern recognition monitoring of PEM fuel cell

    DOEpatents

    Meltser, M.A.

    1999-08-31

    The CO-concentration in the H{sub 2} feed stream to a PEM fuel cell stack is monitored by measuring current and voltage behavior patterns from an auxiliary cell attached to the end of the stack. The auxiliary cell is connected to the same oxygen and hydrogen feed manifolds that supply the stack, and discharges through a constant load. Pattern recognition software compares the current and voltage patterns from the auxiliary cell to current and voltage signature determined from a reference cell similar to the auxiliary cell and operated under controlled conditions over a wide range of CO-concentrations in the H{sub 2} fuel stream. 4 figs.

  20. Evaluation of convolutional neural networks for visual recognition.

    PubMed

    Nebauer, C

    1998-01-01

    Convolutional neural networks provide an efficient method to constrain the complexity of feedforward neural networks by weight sharing and restriction to local connections. This network topology has been applied in particular to image classification when sophisticated preprocessing is to be avoided and raw images are to be classified directly. In this paper two variations of convolutional networks--neocognitron and a modification of neocognitron--are compared with classifiers based on fully connected feedforward layers (i.e., multilayer perceptron, nearest neighbor classifier, auto-encoding network) with respect to their visual recognition performance. Beside the original neocognitron a modification of the neocognitron is proposed which combines neurons from perceptron with the localized network structure of neocognitron. Instead of training convolutional networks by time-consuming error backpropagation, in this work a modular procedure is applied whereby layers are trained sequentially from the input to the output layer in order to recognize features of increasing complexity. For a quantitative experimental comparison with standard classifiers two very different recognition tasks have been chosen: handwritten digit recognition and face recognition. In the first example on handwritten digit recognition the generalization of convolutional networks is compared to fully connected networks. In several experiments the influence of variations of position, size, and orientation of digits is determined and the relation between training sample size and validation error is observed. In the second example recognition of human faces is investigated under constrained and variable conditions with respect to face orientation and illumination and the limitations of convolutional networks are discussed.

  1. Determination of the Specificity Landscape for Ribonuclease P Processing of Precursor tRNA 5' Leader Sequences.

    PubMed

    Niland, Courtney N; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Hsuan-Chun; Anderson, David R; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Harris, Michael E

    2016-08-19

    Maturation of tRNA depends on a single endonuclease, ribonuclease P (RNase P), to remove highly variable 5' leader sequences from precursor tRNA transcripts. Here, we use high-throughput enzymology to report multiple-turnover and single-turnover kinetics for Escherichia coli RNase P processing of all possible 5' leader sequences, including nucleotides contacting both the RNA and protein subunits of RNase P. The results reveal that the identity of N(-2) and N(-3) relative to the cleavage site at N(1) primarily control alternative substrate selection and act at the level of association not the cleavage step. As a consequence, the specificity for N(-1), which contacts the active site and contributes to catalysis, is suppressed. This study demonstrates high-throughput RNA enzymology as a means to globally determine RNA specificity landscapes and reveals the mechanism of substrate discrimination by a widespread and essential RNA-processing enzyme. PMID:27336323

  2. Determination of the Specificity Landscape for Ribonuclease P Processing of Precursor tRNA 5' Leader Sequences.

    PubMed

    Niland, Courtney N; Zhao, Jing; Lin, Hsuan-Chun; Anderson, David R; Jankowsky, Eckhard; Harris, Michael E

    2016-08-19

    Maturation of tRNA depends on a single endonuclease, ribonuclease P (RNase P), to remove highly variable 5' leader sequences from precursor tRNA transcripts. Here, we use high-throughput enzymology to report multiple-turnover and single-turnover kinetics for Escherichia coli RNase P processing of all possible 5' leader sequences, including nucleotides contacting both the RNA and protein subunits of RNase P. The results reveal that the identity of N(-2) and N(-3) relative to the cleavage site at N(1) primarily control alternative substrate selection and act at the level of association not the cleavage step. As a consequence, the specificity for N(-1), which contacts the active site and contributes to catalysis, is suppressed. This study demonstrates high-throughput RNA enzymology as a means to globally determine RNA specificity landscapes and reveals the mechanism of substrate discrimination by a widespread and essential RNA-processing enzyme.

  3. Geometric hashing and object recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stiller, Peter F.; Huber, Birkett

    1999-09-01

    We discuss a new geometric hashing method for searching large databases of 2D images (or 3D objects) to match a query built from geometric information presented by a single 3D object (or single 2D image). The goal is to rapidly determine a small subset of the images that potentially contain a view of the given object (or a small set of objects that potentially match the item in the image). Since this must be accomplished independent of the pose of the object, the objects and images, which are characterized by configurations of geometric features such as points, lines and/or conics, must be treated using a viewpoint invariant formulation. We are therefore forced to characterize these configurations in terms of their 3D and 2D geometric invariants. The crucial relationship between the 3D geometry and its 'residual' in 2D is expressible as a correspondence (in the sense of algebraic geometry). Computing a set of generating equations for the ideal of this correspondence gives a complete characterization of the view of independent relationships between an object and all of its possible images. Once a set of generators is in hand, it can be used to devise efficient recognition algorithms and to give an efficient geometric hashing scheme. This requires exploiting the form and symmetry of the equations. The result is a multidimensional access scheme whose efficiency we examine. Several potential directions for improving this scheme are also discussed. Finally, in a brief appendix, we discuss an alternative approach to invariants for generalized perspective that replaces the standard invariants by a subvariety of a Grassmannian. The advantage of this is that one can circumvent many annoying general position assumptions and arrive at invariant equations (in the Plucker coordinates) that are more numerically robust in applications.

  4. Bidirectional Modulation of Recognition Memory

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Jonathan W.; Poeta, Devon L.; Jacobson, Tara K.; Zolnik, Timothy A.; Neske, Garrett T.; Connors, Barry W.

    2015-01-01

    Perirhinal cortex (PER) has a well established role in the familiarity-based recognition of individual items and objects. For example, animals and humans with perirhinal damage are unable to distinguish familiar from novel objects in recognition memory tasks. In the normal brain, perirhinal neurons respond to novelty and familiarity by increasing or decreasing firing rates. Recent work also implicates oscillatory activity in the low-beta and low-gamma frequency bands in sensory detection, perception, and recognition. Using optogenetic methods in a spontaneous object exploration (SOR) task, we altered recognition memory performance in rats. In the SOR task, normal rats preferentially explore novel images over familiar ones. We modulated exploratory behavior in this task by optically stimulating channelrhodopsin-expressing perirhinal neurons at various frequencies while rats looked at novel or familiar 2D images. Stimulation at 30–40 Hz during looking caused rats to treat a familiar image as if it were novel by increasing time looking at the image. Stimulation at 30–40 Hz was not effective in increasing exploration of novel images. Stimulation at 10–15 Hz caused animals to treat a novel image as familiar by decreasing time looking at the image, but did not affect looking times for images that were already familiar. We conclude that optical stimulation of PER at different frequencies can alter visual recognition memory bidirectionally. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Recognition of novelty and familiarity are important for learning, memory, and decision making. Perirhinal cortex (PER) has a well established role in the familiarity-based recognition of individual items and objects, but how novelty and familiarity are encoded and transmitted in the brain is not known. Perirhinal neurons respond to novelty and familiarity by changing firing rates, but recent work suggests that brain oscillations may also be important for recognition. In this study, we showed that

  5. Cognitive object recognition system (CORS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raju, Chaitanya; Varadarajan, Karthik Mahesh; Krishnamurthi, Niyant; Xu, Shuli; Biederman, Irving; Kelley, Troy

    2010-04-01

    We have developed a framework, Cognitive Object Recognition System (CORS), inspired by current neurocomputational models and psychophysical research in which multiple recognition algorithms (shape based geometric primitives, 'geons,' and non-geometric feature-based algorithms) are integrated to provide a comprehensive solution to object recognition and landmarking. Objects are defined as a combination of geons, corresponding to their simple parts, and the relations among the parts. However, those objects that are not easily decomposable into geons, such as bushes and trees, are recognized by CORS using "feature-based" algorithms. The unique interaction between these algorithms is a novel approach that combines the effectiveness of both algorithms and takes us closer to a generalized approach to object recognition. CORS allows recognition of objects through a larger range of poses using geometric primitives and performs well under heavy occlusion - about 35% of object surface is sufficient. Furthermore, geon composition of an object allows image understanding and reasoning even with novel objects. With reliable landmarking capability, the system improves vision-based robot navigation in GPS-denied environments. Feasibility of the CORS system was demonstrated with real stereo images captured from a Pioneer robot. The system can currently identify doors, door handles, staircases, trashcans and other relevant landmarks in the indoor environment.

  6. An audiovisual emotion recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Yi; Wang, Guoyin; Yang, Yong; He, Kun

    2007-12-01

    Human emotions could be expressed by many bio-symbols. Speech and facial expression are two of them. They are both regarded as emotional information which is playing an important role in human-computer interaction. Based on our previous studies on emotion recognition, an audiovisual emotion recognition system is developed and represented in this paper. The system is designed for real-time practice, and is guaranteed by some integrated modules. These modules include speech enhancement for eliminating noises, rapid face detection for locating face from background image, example based shape learning for facial feature alignment, and optical flow based tracking algorithm for facial feature tracking. It is known that irrelevant features and high dimensionality of the data can hurt the performance of classifier. Rough set-based feature selection is a good method for dimension reduction. So 13 speech features out of 37 ones and 10 facial features out of 33 ones are selected to represent emotional information, and 52 audiovisual features are selected due to the synchronization when speech and video fused together. The experiment results have demonstrated that this system performs well in real-time practice and has high recognition rate. Our results also show that the work in multimodules fused recognition will become the trend of emotion recognition in the future.

  7. Alzheimer's disease-associated mutations increase amyloid precursor protein resistance to γ-secretase cleavage and the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio.

    PubMed

    Xu, Ting-Hai; Yan, Yan; Kang, Yanyong; Jiang, Yi; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene and the aberrant cleavage of APP by γ-secretase are associated with Alzheimer's disease (AD). Here we have developed a simple and sensitive cell-based assay to detect APP cleavage by γ-secretase. Unexpectedly, most familial AD (FAD)-linked APP mutations make APP partially resistant to γ-secretase. Mutations that alter residues N terminal to the γ-secretase cleavage site Aβ42 have subtle effects on cleavage efficiency and cleavage-site selectivity. In contrast, mutations that alter residues C terminal to the Aβ42 site reduce cleavage efficiency and dramatically shift cleavage-site specificity toward the aggregation-prone Aβ42. Moreover, mutations that remove positive charge at residue 53 greatly reduce the APP cleavage by γ-secretase. These results suggest a model of γ-secretase substrate recognition, in which the APP region C terminal to the Aβ42 site and the positively charged residue at position 53 are the primary determinants for substrate binding and cleavage-site selectivity. We further demonstrate that this model can be extended to γ-secretase processing of notch receptors, a family of highly conserved cell-surface signaling proteins. PMID:27625790

  8. Alzheimer’s disease-associated mutations increase amyloid precursor protein resistance to γ-secretase cleavage and the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting-Hai; Yan, Yan; Kang, Yanyong; Jiang, Yi; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene and the aberrant cleavage of APP by γ-secretase are associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we have developed a simple and sensitive cell-based assay to detect APP cleavage by γ-secretase. Unexpectedly, most familial AD (FAD)-linked APP mutations make APP partially resistant to γ-secretase. Mutations that alter residues N terminal to the γ-secretase cleavage site Aβ42 have subtle effects on cleavage efficiency and cleavage-site selectivity. In contrast, mutations that alter residues C terminal to the Aβ42 site reduce cleavage efficiency and dramatically shift cleavage-site specificity toward the aggregation-prone Aβ42. Moreover, mutations that remove positive charge at residue 53 greatly reduce the APP cleavage by γ-secretase. These results suggest a model of γ-secretase substrate recognition, in which the APP region C terminal to the Aβ42 site and the positively charged residue at position 53 are the primary determinants for substrate binding and cleavage-site selectivity. We further demonstrate that this model can be extended to γ-secretase processing of notch receptors, a family of highly conserved cell-surface signaling proteins.

  9. Alzheimer’s disease-associated mutations increase amyloid precursor protein resistance to γ-secretase cleavage and the Aβ42/Aβ40 ratio

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Ting-Hai; Yan, Yan; Kang, Yanyong; Jiang, Yi; Melcher, Karsten; Xu, H Eric

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the amyloid precursor protein (APP) gene and the aberrant cleavage of APP by γ-secretase are associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Here we have developed a simple and sensitive cell-based assay to detect APP cleavage by γ-secretase. Unexpectedly, most familial AD (FAD)-linked APP mutations make APP partially resistant to γ-secretase. Mutations that alter residues N terminal to the γ-secretase cleavage site Aβ42 have subtle effects on cleavage efficiency and cleavage-site selectivity. In contrast, mutations that alter residues C terminal to the Aβ42 site reduce cleavage efficiency and dramatically shift cleavage-site specificity toward the aggregation-prone Aβ42. Moreover, mutations that remove positive charge at residue 53 greatly reduce the APP cleavage by γ-secretase. These results suggest a model of γ-secretase substrate recognition, in which the APP region C terminal to the Aβ42 site and the positively charged residue at position 53 are the primary determinants for substrate binding and cleavage-site selectivity. We further demonstrate that this model can be extended to γ-secretase processing of notch receptors, a family of highly conserved cell-surface signaling proteins. PMID:27625790

  10. Asymmetric Reinstatement Effects in Recognition.

    PubMed

    Shahabuddin, Shaan S; Smith, Steven M

    2016-01-01

    Our experiment examined two questions: (1) Does reinstating a studied context affect recognition of an associated word, and (2) Does reinstating a studied word affect recognition of an associated context? After encoding 75 words, each of which was shown superimposed over a different 5-sec video of an environment (e.g., a playground, a traffic scene, or a grocery store), participants were asked to recognize 50 of the words and 50 of the video scenes. On the test, half of the studied words were shown superimposed over the same video contexts that had been present at encoding, and half were shown over new scenes. Similarly, videos were presented with either old or new words. Context reinstatement increased hits and reduced false alarms for words, but word reinstatement did not affect recognition of video contexts. The results suggest that the associations that bind word events with their contexts may not be bidirectional. PMID:27649359

  11. Palmprint Recognition across Different Devices

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Wei; Hu, Rong-Xiang; Gui, Jie; Zhao, Yang; Ren, Xiao-Ming

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, the problem of Palmprint Recognition Across Different Devices (PRADD) is investigated, which has not been well studied so far. Since there is no publicly available PRADD image database, we created a non-contact PRADD image database containing 12,000 grayscale captured from 100 subjects using three devices, i.e., one digital camera and two smart-phones. Due to the non-contact image acquisition used, rotation and scale changes between different images captured from a same palm are inevitable. We propose a robust method to calculate the palm width, which can be effectively used for scale normalization of palmprints. On this PRADD image database, we evaluate the recognition performance of three different methods, i.e., subspace learning method, correlation method, and orientation coding based method, respectively. Experiments results show that orientation coding based methods achieved promising recognition performance for PRADD. PMID:22969380

  12. DNA recognition by synthetic constructs.

    PubMed

    Pazos, Elena; Mosquera, Jesús; Vázquez, M Eugenio; Mascareñas, José L

    2011-09-01

    The interaction of transcription factors with specific DNA sites is key for the regulation of gene expression. Despite the availability of a large body of structural data on protein-DNA complexes, we are still far from fully understanding the molecular and biophysical bases underlying such interactions. Therefore, the development of non-natural agents that can reproduce the DNA-recognition properties of natural transcription factors remains a major and challenging goal in chemical biology. In this review we summarize the basics of double-stranded DNA recognition by transcription factors, and describe recent developments in the design and preparation of synthetic DNA binders. We mainly focus on synthetic peptides that have been designed by following the DNA interaction of natural proteins, and we discuss how the tools of organic synthesis can be used to make artificial constructs equipped with functionalities that introduce additional properties to the recognition process, such as sensing and controllability.

  13. Emotion-independent face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Silva, Liyanage C.; Esther, Kho G. P.

    2000-12-01

    Current face recognition techniques tend to work well when recognizing faces under small variations in lighting, facial expression and pose, but deteriorate under more extreme conditions. In this paper, a face recognition system to recognize faces of known individuals, despite variations in facial expression due to different emotions, is developed. The eigenface approach is used for feature extraction. Classification methods include Euclidean distance, back propagation neural network and generalized regression neural network. These methods yield 100% recognition accuracy when the training database is representative, containing one image representing the peak expression for each emotion of each person apart from the neutral expression. The feature vectors used for comparison in the Euclidean distance method and for training the neural network must be all the feature vectors of the training set. These results are obtained for a face database consisting of only four persons.

  14. Mandarin recognition over the telephone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kao, Yuhung

    1996-06-01

    Mandarin Chinese is the official language in China and Taiwan, it is the native language of a quarter of the world population. As the services enabled by speech recognition technology (e.g. telephone voice dialing, information query) become more popular in English, we would like to extend this capability to other languages. Mandarin is one of the major languages under research in our laboratory. This paper describes how we extend our work in English speech recognition into Mandarin. We will described the corpus: Voice Across Taiwan, the training of a complete set of Mandarin syllable models, preliminary performance results and error analysis. A fast prototyping system was built, where a user can write any context free grammar with no restriction of vocabulary, then the grammar can be compiled into recognition models. It enables user to quickly test the performance of a new vocabulary.

  15. Ignorance- versus Evidence-Based Decision Making: A Decision Time Analysis of the Recognition Heuristic

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hilbig, Benjamin E.; Pohl, Rudiger F.

    2009-01-01

    According to part of the adaptive toolbox notion of decision making known as the recognition heuristic (RH), the decision process in comparative judgments--and its duration--is determined by whether recognition discriminates between objects. By contrast, some recently proposed alternative models predict that choices largely depend on the amount of…

  16. Relations among Linguistic and Cognitive Skills and Spoken Word Recognition in Adults with Cochlear Implants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collison, Elizabeth A.; Munson, Benjamin; Carney, Arlene Earley

    2004-01-01

    This study examined spoken word recognition in adults with cochlear implants (CIs) to determine the extent to which linguistic and cognitive abilities predict variability in speech-perception performance. Both a traditional consonant-vowel-consonant (CVC)-repetition measure and a gated-word recognition measure (F. Grosjean, 1996) were used.…

  17. Use of Authentic-Speech Technique for Teaching Sound Recognition to EFL Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sersen, William J.

    2011-01-01

    The main objective of this research was to test an authentic-speech technique for improving the sound-recognition skills of EFL (English as a foreign language) students at Roi-Et Rajabhat University. The secondary objective was to determine the correlation, if any, between students' self-evaluation of sound-recognition progress and the actual…

  18. 10 CFR 431.19 - Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies. 431.19 Section 431.19 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR... Methods of Determining Efficiency § 431.19 Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies....

  19. 10 CFR 431.19 - Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies. 431.19 Section 431.19 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR... Methods of Determining Efficiency § 431.19 Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies....

  20. 10 CFR 431.19 - Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies. 431.19 Section 431.19 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR... Methods of Determining Efficiency § 431.19 Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies....

  1. 10 CFR 431.19 - Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies. 431.19 Section 431.19 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR... Methods of Determining Efficiency § 431.19 Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies....

  2. 10 CFR 431.19 - Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies. 431.19 Section 431.19 Energy DEPARTMENT OF ENERGY ENERGY CONSERVATION ENERGY EFFICIENCY PROGRAM FOR... Methods of Determining Efficiency § 431.19 Department of Energy recognition of accreditation bodies....

  3. Emotion Recognition in Fathers and Mothers at High-Risk for Child Physical Abuse

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Asla, Nagore; de Paul, Joaquin; Perez-Albeniz, Alicia

    2011-01-01

    Objective: The present study was designed to determine whether parents at high risk for physical child abuse, in comparison with parents at low risk, show deficits in emotion recognition, as well as to examine the moderator effect of gender and stress on the relationship between risk for physical child abuse and emotion recognition. Methods: Based…

  4. Syntactic neural network for character recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jaravine, Viktor A.

    1992-08-01

    This article presents a synergism of syntactic 2-D parsing of images and multilayered, feed- forward network techniques. This approach makes it possible to build a written text reading system with absolute recognition rate for unambiguous text strings. The Syntactic Neural Network (SNN) is created during image parsing process by capturing the higher order statistical structure in the ensemble of input image examples. Acquired knowledge is stored in the form of hierarchical image elements dictionary and syntactic network. The number of hidden layers and neuron units is not fixed and is determined by the structural complexity of the teaching set. A proposed syntactic neuron differs from conventional numerical neuron by its symbolic input/output and usage of the dictionary for determining the output. This approach guarantees exact recognition of an image that is a combinatorial variation of the images from the training set. The system is taught to generalize and to make stochastic parsing of distorted and shifted patterns. The generalizations enables the system to perform continuous incremental optimization of its work. New image data learned by SNN doesn''t interfere with previously stored knowledge, thus leading to unlimited storage capacity of the network.

  5. Familiar Person Recognition: Is Autonoetic Consciousness More Likely to Accompany Face Recognition Than Voice Recognition?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barsics, Catherine; Brédart, Serge

    2010-11-01

    Autonoetic consciousness is a fundamental property of human memory, enabling us to experience mental time travel, to recollect past events with a feeling of self-involvement, and to project ourselves in the future. Autonoetic consciousness is a characteristic of episodic memory. By contrast, awareness of the past associated with a mere feeling of familiarity or knowing relies on noetic consciousness, depending on semantic memory integrity. Present research was aimed at evaluating whether conscious recollection of episodic memories is more likely to occur following the recognition of a familiar face than following the recognition of a familiar voice. Recall of semantic information (biographical information) was also assessed. Previous studies that investigated the recall of biographical information following person recognition used faces and voices of famous people as stimuli. In this study, the participants were presented with personally familiar people's voices and faces, thus avoiding the presence of identity cues in the spoken extracts and allowing a stricter control of frequency exposure with both types of stimuli (voices and faces). In the present study, the rate of retrieved episodic memories, associated with autonoetic awareness, was significantly higher from familiar faces than familiar voices even though the level of overall recognition was similar for both these stimuli domains. The same pattern was observed regarding semantic information retrieval. These results and their implications for current Interactive Activation and Competition person recognition models are discussed.

  6. Group collaboration in recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Clark, S E; Hori, A; Putnam, A; Martin, T P

    2000-11-01

    Group collaboration was examined in item and associative recognition. The present study distinguishes between group effects versus collaborative processes and defines the latter as interactive information exchange among group members. By that definition, many group effects do not involve collaboration. For example, group performance can exceed individual performance by pooling the increased resources of the group. Specifically, a group advantage can be obtained by deferring to a majority vote or to the group's best member. For both item and associative recognition, a group advantage was obtained that could not be accounted for by resource pooling. Collaborative facilitation was shown reliably in recognizing targets but not for rejecting distractors. PMID:11185784

  7. Importance of the NCp7-like domain in the recognition of pre-let-7g by the pluripotency factor Lin28.

    PubMed

    Desjardins, Alexandre; Yang, Ao; Bouvette, Jonathan; Omichinski, James G; Legault, Pascale

    2012-02-01

    The pluripotency factor Lin28 is a highly conserved protein comprising a unique combination of RNA-binding motifs, an N-terminal cold-shock domain and a C-terminal region containing two retroviral-type CCHC zinc-binding domains. An important function of Lin28 is to inhibit the biogenesis of the let-7 family of microRNAs through a direct interaction with let-7 precursors. Here, we systematically characterize the determinants of the interaction between Lin28 and pre-let-7 g by investigating the effect of protein and RNA mutations on in vitro binding. We determine that Lin28 binds with high affinity to the extended loop of pre-let-7 g and that its C-terminal domain contributes predominantly to the affinity of this interaction. We uncover remarkable similarities between this C-terminal domain and the NCp7 protein of HIV-1, not only in terms of primary structure but also in their modes of RNA binding. This NCp7-like domain of Lin28 recognizes a G-rich bulge within pre-let-7 g, which is adjacent to one of the Dicer cleavage sites. We hypothesize that the NCp7-like domain initiates RNA binding and partially unfolds the RNA. This partial unfolding would then enable multiple copies of Lin28 to bind the extended loop of pre-let-7 g and protect the RNA from cleavage by the pre-microRNA processing enzyme Dicer. PMID:22013165

  8. Importance of the NCp7-like domain in the recognition of pre-let-7g by the pluripotency factor Lin28

    PubMed Central

    Desjardins, Alexandre; Yang, Ao; Bouvette, Jonathan; Omichinski, James G.; Legault, Pascale

    2012-01-01

    The pluripotency factor Lin28 is a highly conserved protein comprising a unique combination of RNA-binding motifs, an N-terminal cold-shock domain and a C-terminal region containing two retroviral-type CCHC zinc-binding domains. An important function of Lin28 is to inhibit the biogenesis of the let-7 family of microRNAs through a direct interaction with let-7 precursors. Here, we systematically characterize the determinants of the interaction between Lin28 and pre-let-7g by investigating the effect of protein and RNA mutations on in vitro binding. We determine that Lin28 binds with high affinity to the extended loop of pre-let-7g and that its C-terminal domain contributes predominantly to the affinity of this interaction. We uncover remarkable similarities between this C-terminal domain and the NCp7 protein of HIV-1, not only in terms of primary structure but also in their modes of RNA binding. This NCp7-like domain of Lin28 recognizes a G-rich bulge within pre-let-7g, which is adjacent to one of the Dicer cleavage sites. We hypothesize that the NCp7-like domain initiates RNA binding and partially unfolds the RNA. This partial unfolding would then enable multiple copies of Lin28 to bind the extended loop of pre-let-7g and protect the RNA from cleavage by the pre-microRNA processing enzyme Dicer. PMID:22013165

  9. Toward a Unified Theory of Similarity and Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ashby, F. Gregory; Perrin, Nancy A.

    1988-01-01

    Using general recognition theory, a new theory of similarity is developed, postulating that perceived similarity is determined by distributional overlap. This theory is related to existing theories of similarity. Three experiments using a total of 19 university students are presented, testing the empirical validity of the theory. (SLD)

  10. Video Educational Intervention Improves Reporting of Concussion and Symptom Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunt, Tamerah N.

    2015-01-01

    Context: Concussion management is potentially complicated by the lack of reporting due to poor educational intervention in youth athletics. Objective: Determine if a concussion-education video developed for high school athletes will increase the reporting of concussive injuries and symptom recognition in this group. Design: Cross-sectional,…

  11. Evolutionary-Rough Feature Selection for Face Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazumdar, Debasis; Mitra, Soma; Mitra, Sushmita

    Elastic Bunch Graph Matching is a feature-based face recognition algorithm which has been used to determine facial attributes from an image. However the dimension of the feature vectors, in case of EBGM, is quite high. Feature selection is a useful preprocessing step for reducing dimensionality, removing irrelevant data, improving learning accuracy and enhancing output comprehensibility.

  12. Recognition of Emotions in Autism: A Formal Meta-Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uljarevic, Mirko; Hamilton, Antonia

    2013-01-01

    Determining the integrity of emotion recognition in autistic spectrum disorder is important to our theoretical understanding of autism and to teaching social skills. Previous studies have reported both positive and negative results. Here, we take a formal meta-analytic approach, bringing together data from 48 papers testing over 980 participants…

  13. Evaluating a county-based Healthy nail Salon Recognition Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    To determine whether nail solons that participate in the SF recognition program have reduced measured levels of toluene, methyl methacrylate (MMA), and total volatile organic compounds (TVOC)as compared to nail salons that do not participate. We also evaluated changes in worker ...

  14. Neural Correlates of Music Recognition in Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Virji-Babul, N.; Moiseev, A.; Sun, W.; Feng, T.; Moiseeva, N.; Watt, K. J.; Huotilainen, M.

    2013-01-01

    The brain mechanisms that subserve music recognition remain unclear despite increasing interest in this process. Here we report the results of a magnetoencephalography experiment to determine the temporal dynamics and spatial distribution of brain regions activated during listening to a familiar and unfamiliar instrumental melody in control adults…

  15. Orientation biases for facial emotion recognition during childhood and adulthood.

    PubMed

    Balas, Benjamin; Huynh, Carol; Saville, Alyson; Schmidt, Jamie

    2015-12-01

    Facial emotion recognition develops slowly, with continuing changes in performance observable up to 10 years of age and beyond. In the current study, we chose to examine how the use of specific low-level visual features for emotion recognition may change during childhood. Adults exhibit information biases for face recognition; specific spatial frequency and orientation sub-bands make a larger contribution to recognition than others. This means that depending on the specific task (e.g., identification, emotion recognition), participants will perform worse when some features are removed from the original image and better when those features are included. One example of such an information bias for face recognition is the differential contribution of horizontal orientation energy relative to vertical orientation energy; adult participants are better able to recognize faces and categorize their emotional expressions when horizontal information is included than when only vertical information is included. Although several recent studies have demonstrated various ways in which horizontal orientation energy (and so-called "bar-codes" for face appearance) contribute to adult face processing, there have been as yet no studies describing how such a bias emerges developmentally that may offer insight into the mechanisms underlying the slow development of facial emotion recognition. In the current study, we compared children's (5- and 6-year-olds and 7- and 8-year-olds) and adults' performance in a simple emotion categorization task using orientation-filtered faces to determine the extent to which horizontal and vertical orientation energy contributed to recognition as a function of age. We found that although all three participant groups exhibited a clear bias favoring the use of horizontal orientation energy, the nature of this bias differed as a function of age. Specifically, 5- and 6-year-olds exhibited a disproportionate performance cost when vertical orientation energy

  16. Binary optical filters for scale invariant pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reid, Max B.; Downie, John D.; Hine, Butler P.

    1992-01-01

    Binary synthetic discriminant function (BSDF) optical filters which are invariant to scale changes in the target object of more than 50 percent are demonstrated in simulation and experiment. Efficient databases of scale invariant BSDF filters can be designed which discriminate between two very similar objects at any view scaled over a factor of 2 or more. The BSDF technique has considerable advantages over other methods for achieving scale invariant object recognition, as it also allows determination of the object's scale. In addition to scale, the technique can be used to design recognition systems invariant to other geometric distortions.

  17. View dependencies in the visual recognition of social interactions.

    PubMed

    de la Rosa, Stephan; Mieskes, Sarah; Bülthoff, Heinrich H; Curio, Cristóbal

    2013-01-01

    Recognizing social interactions, e.g., two people shaking hands, is important for obtaining information about other people and the surrounding social environment. Despite the visual complexity of social interactions, humans have often little difficulties to visually recognize social interactions. What is the visual representation of social interactions and the bodily visual cues that promote this remarkable human ability? Viewpoint dependent representations are considered to be at the heart of the visual recognition of many visual stimuli including objects (Bülthoff and Edelman, 1992), and biological motion patterns (Verfaillie, 1993). Here we addressed the question whether complex social actions acted out between pairs of people, e.g., hugging, are also represented in a similar manner. To this end, we created 3-D models from motion captured actions acted out by two people, e.g., hugging. These 3-D models allowed to present the same action from different viewpoints. Participants' task was to discriminate a target action from distractor actions using a one-interval-forced-choice (1IFC) task. We measured participants' recognition performance in terms of reaction times (RT) and d-prime (d'). For each tested action we found one view that led to superior recognition performance compared to other views. This finding demonstrates view-dependent effects of visual recognition, which are in line with the idea of a view-dependent representation of social interactions. Subsequently, we examined the degree to which velocities of joints are able to predict the recognition performance of social interactions in order to determine candidate visual cues underlying the recognition of social interactions. We found that the velocities of the arms, both feet, and hips correlated with recognition performance. PMID:24155731

  18. Comparison of emotion recognition from facial expression and music.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Tina; Labor, Marina; Jurić, Iva; Dumancić, Dijana; Ilakovac, Vesna; Heffer, Marija

    2011-01-01

    The recognition of basic emotions in everyday communication involves interpretation of different visual and auditory clues. The ability to recognize emotions is not clearly determined as their presentation is usually very short (micro expressions), whereas the recognition itself does not have to be a conscious process. We assumed that the recognition from facial expressions is selected over the recognition of emotions communicated through music. In order to compare the success rate in recognizing emotions presented as facial expressions or in classical music works we conducted a survey which included 90 elementary school and 87 high school students from Osijek (Croatia). The participants had to match 8 photographs of different emotions expressed on the face and 8 pieces of classical music works with 8 offered emotions. The recognition of emotions expressed through classical music pieces was significantly less successful than the recognition of emotional facial expressions. The high school students were significantly better at recognizing facial emotions than the elementary school students, whereas girls were better than boys. The success rate in recognizing emotions from music pieces was associated with higher grades in mathematics. Basic emotions are far better recognized if presented on human faces than in music, possibly because the understanding of facial emotions is one of the oldest communication skills in human society. Female advantage in emotion recognition was selected due to the necessity of their communication with the newborns during early development. The proficiency in recognizing emotional content of music and mathematical skills probably share some general cognitive skills like attention, memory and motivation. Music pieces were differently processed in brain than facial expressions and consequently, probably differently evaluated as relevant emotional clues.

  19. Comparison of emotion recognition from facial expression and music.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Tina; Labor, Marina; Jurić, Iva; Dumancić, Dijana; Ilakovac, Vesna; Heffer, Marija

    2011-01-01

    The recognition of basic emotions in everyday communication involves interpretation of different visual and auditory clues. The ability to recognize emotions is not clearly determined as their presentation is usually very short (micro expressions), whereas the recognition itself does not have to be a conscious process. We assumed that the recognition from facial expressions is selected over the recognition of emotions communicated through music. In order to compare the success rate in recognizing emotions presented as facial expressions or in classical music works we conducted a survey which included 90 elementary school and 87 high school students from Osijek (Croatia). The participants had to match 8 photographs of different emotions expressed on the face and 8 pieces of classical music works with 8 offered emotions. The recognition of emotions expressed through classical music pieces was significantly less successful than the recognition of emotional facial expressions. The high school students were significantly better at recognizing facial emotions than the elementary school students, whereas girls were better than boys. The success rate in recognizing emotions from music pieces was associated with higher grades in mathematics. Basic emotions are far better recognized if presented on human faces than in music, possibly because the understanding of facial emotions is one of the oldest communication skills in human society. Female advantage in emotion recognition was selected due to the necessity of their communication with the newborns during early development. The proficiency in recognizing emotional content of music and mathematical skills probably share some general cognitive skills like attention, memory and motivation. Music pieces were differently processed in brain than facial expressions and consequently, probably differently evaluated as relevant emotional clues. PMID:21648329

  20. Emotion recognition during cocaine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, K P C; Steenbergen, L; Theunissen, E L; Toennes, S W; Ramaekers, J G

    2015-11-01

    Chronic or repeated cocaine use has been linked to impairments in social skills. It is not clear whether cocaine is responsible for this impairment or whether other factors, like polydrug use, distort the observed relation. We aimed to investigate this relation by means of a placebo-controlled experimental study. Additionally, associations between stressor-related activity (cortisol, cardiovascular parameters) induced by the biological stressor cocaine, and potential cocaine effects on emotion recognition were studied. Twenty-four healthy recreational cocaine users participated in this placebo-controlled within-subject study. Participants were tested between 1 and 2 h after treatment with oral cocaine (300 mg) or placebo. Emotion recognition of low and high intensity expressions of basic emotions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, and happiness) was tested. Findings show that cocaine impaired recognition of negative emotions; this was mediated by the intensity of the presented emotions. When high intensity expressions of Anger and Disgust were shown, performance under influence of cocaine 'normalized' to placebo-like levels while it made identification of Sadness more difficult. The normalization of performance was most notable for participants with the largest cortisol responses in the cocaine condition compared to placebo. It was demonstrated that cocaine impairs recognition of negative emotions, depending on the intensity of emotion expression and cortisol response. PMID:26328908

  1. The Army word recognition system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hadden, David R.; Haratz, David

    1977-01-01

    The application of speech recognition technology in the Army command and control area is presented. The problems associated with this program are described as well as as its relevance in terms of the man/machine interactions, voice inflexions, and the amount of training needed to interact with and utilize the automated system.

  2. Enduring voice recognition in bonobos.

    PubMed

    Keenan, Sumir; Mathevon, Nicolas; Stevens, Jeroen M G; Guéry, Jean Pascal; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Levréro, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Long-term social recognition is vital for species with complex social networks, where familiar individuals can encounter one another after long periods of separation. For non-human primates who live in dense forest environments, visual access to one another is often limited, and recognition of social partners over distances largely depends on vocal communication. Vocal recognition after years of separation has never been reported in any great ape species, despite their complex societies and advanced social intelligence. Here we show that bonobos, Pan paniscus, demonstrate reliable vocal recognition of social partners, even if they have been separated for five years. We experimentally tested bonobos' responses to the calls of previous group members that had been transferred between captive groups. Despite long separations, subjects responded more intensely to familiar voices than to calls from unknown individuals - the first experimental evidence that bonobos can identify individuals utilising vocalisations even years after their last encounter. Our study also suggests that bonobos may cease to discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar individuals after a period of eight years, indicating that voice representations or interest could be limited in time in this species. PMID:26911199

  3. Output Interference in Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Criss, Amy H.; Malmberg, Kenneth J.; Shiffrin, Richard M.

    2011-01-01

    Dennis and Humphreys (2001) proposed that interference in recognition memory arises solely from the prior contexts of the test word: Interference does not arise from memory traces of other words (from events prior to the study list or on the study list, and regardless of similarity to the test item). We evaluate this model using output…

  4. Enduring voice recognition in bonobos

    PubMed Central

    Keenan, Sumir; Mathevon, Nicolas; Stevens, Jeroen MG; Guéry, Jean Pascal; Zuberbühler, Klaus; Levréro, Florence

    2016-01-01

    Long-term social recognition is vital for species with complex social networks, where familiar individuals can encounter one another after long periods of separation. For non-human primates who live in dense forest environments, visual access to one another is often limited, and recognition of social partners over distances largely depends on vocal communication. Vocal recognition after years of separation has never been reported in any great ape species, despite their complex societies and advanced social intelligence. Here we show that bonobos, Pan paniscus, demonstrate reliable vocal recognition of social partners, even if they have been separated for five years. We experimentally tested bonobos’ responses to the calls of previous group members that had been transferred between captive groups. Despite long separations, subjects responded more intensely to familiar voices than to calls from unknown individuals - the first experimental evidence that bonobos can identify individuals utilising vocalisations even years after their last encounter. Our study also suggests that bonobos may cease to discriminate between familiar and unfamiliar individuals after a period of eight years, indicating that voice representations or interest could be limited in time in this species. PMID:26911199

  5. Emotion recognition during cocaine intoxication.

    PubMed

    Kuypers, K P C; Steenbergen, L; Theunissen, E L; Toennes, S W; Ramaekers, J G

    2015-11-01

    Chronic or repeated cocaine use has been linked to impairments in social skills. It is not clear whether cocaine is responsible for this impairment or whether other factors, like polydrug use, distort the observed relation. We aimed to investigate this relation by means of a placebo-controlled experimental study. Additionally, associations between stressor-related activity (cortisol, cardiovascular parameters) induced by the biological stressor cocaine, and potential cocaine effects on emotion recognition were studied. Twenty-four healthy recreational cocaine users participated in this placebo-controlled within-subject study. Participants were tested between 1 and 2 h after treatment with oral cocaine (300 mg) or placebo. Emotion recognition of low and high intensity expressions of basic emotions (fear, anger, disgust, sadness, and happiness) was tested. Findings show that cocaine impaired recognition of negative emotions; this was mediated by the intensity of the presented emotions. When high intensity expressions of Anger and Disgust were shown, performance under influence of cocaine 'normalized' to placebo-like levels while it made identification of Sadness more difficult. The normalization of performance was most notable for participants with the largest cortisol responses in the cocaine condition compared to placebo. It was demonstrated that cocaine impairs recognition of negative emotions, depending on the intensity of emotion expression and cortisol response.

  6. Structural determinants of miR156a precursor processing in temperature-responsive flowering in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Wanhui; Kim, Hee-Eun; Jun, A Rim; Jung, Myeong Gyo; Jin, Suhyun; Lee, Joon-Hwa; Ahn, Ji Hoon

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs originate from primary transcripts (pri-miRNAs) containing hairpin structures. Plant pri-miRNAs have highly variable structures and little is known about the information encoded in their secondary structures. Arabidopsis miR156 is an ambient temperature-responsive miRNA and plays an important role in regulating flowering time. To identify the structural determinants for miR156 processing, we analyzed the effects of mutations introduced in the upper stem of pri-miR156a on its temperature-dependent processing and flowering time. The levels of pri-miR156a and mature miR156 were opposite at different temperatures. Mutations in the upper stem, especially the region closer to the miR156a/miR156a* duplex, reduced miR156 processing at 23 °C and 16 °C and caused a less severe phenotype compared with the un-mutated construct. Mutation in the second stem near the first cleavage site of pri-miR156a affected miR156 processing at 23 °C, but not at 16 °C. This was also seen in pri-miR172a, another ambient temperature-responsive miRNA. Replacement of the upper stem of pri-miR156a with that of pri-miR172a severely affected miR156 processing and flowering time. These results suggested that the upper stem of pri-miR156a is important for miR156 processing at different temperatures. In particular, the second stem adjacent to the first cleavage site plays a role in the regulation of ambient temperature-responsive flowering. PMID:27335452

  7. Method and System for Object Recognition Search

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan A. (Inventor); Duong, Vu A. (Inventor); Stubberud, Allen R. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A method for object recognition using shape and color features of the object to be recognized. An adaptive architecture is used to recognize and adapt the shape and color features for moving objects to enable object recognition.

  8. A Taxonomy of 3D Occluded Objects Recognition Techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soleimanizadeh, Shiva; Mohamad, Dzulkifli; Saba, Tanzila; Al-ghamdi, Jarallah Saleh

    2016-03-01

    The overall performances of object recognition techniques under different condition (e.g., occlusion, viewpoint, and illumination) have been improved significantly in recent years. New applications and hardware are shifted towards digital photography, and digital media. This faces an increase in Internet usage requiring object recognition for certain applications; particularly occulded objects. However occlusion is still an issue unhandled, interlacing the relations between extracted feature points through image, research is going on to develop efficient techniques and easy to use algorithms that would help users to source images; this need to overcome problems and issues regarding occlusion. The aim of this research is to review recognition occluded objects algorithms and figure out their pros and cons to solve the occlusion problem features, which are extracted from occluded object to distinguish objects from other co-existing objects by determining the new techniques, which could differentiate the occluded fragment and sections inside an image.

  9. Low Energy Physical Activity Recognition System on Smartphones

    PubMed Central

    Morillo, Luis Miguel Soria; Gonzalez-Abril, Luis; Ramirez, Juan Antonio Ortega; de la Concepcion, Miguel Angel Alvarez

    2015-01-01

    An innovative approach to physical activity recognition based on the use of discrete variables obtained from accelerometer sensors is presented. The system first performs a discretization process for each variable, which allows efficient recognition of activities performed by users using as little energy as possible. To this end, an innovative discretization and classification technique is presented based on the χ2 distribution. Furthermore, the entire recognition process is executed on the smartphone, which determines not only the activity performed, but also the frequency at which it is carried out. These techniques and the new classification system presented reduce energy consumption caused by the activity monitoring system. The energy saved increases smartphone usage time to more than 27 h without recharging while maintaining accuracy. PMID:25742171

  10. Distance sets for shape filters and shape recognition.

    PubMed

    Grigorescu, Cosmin; Petkov, Nicolai

    2003-01-01

    We introduce a novel rich local descriptor of an image point, we call the (labeled) distance set, which is determined by the spatial arrangement of image features around that point. We describe a two-dimensional (2D) visual object by the set of (labeled) distance sets associated with the feature points of that object. Based on a dissimilarity measure between (labeled) distance sets and a dissimilarity measure between sets of (labeled) distance sets, we address two problems that are often encountered in object recognition: object segmentation, for which we formulate a distance sets shape filter, and shape matching. The use of the shape filter is illustrated on printed and handwritten character recognition and detection of traffic signs in complex scenes. The shape comparison procedure is illustrated on handwritten character classification, COIL-20 database object recognition and MPEG-7 silhouette database retrieval. PMID:18237892

  11. Kin recognition in Drosophila: the importance of ecology and gut microbiota.

    PubMed

    Lizé, Anne; McKay, Raegan; Lewis, Zenobia

    2014-02-01

    The animal gut commonly contains a large reservoir of symbiotic microbes. Although these microbes have obvious functions in digestion and immune defence, gut microbes can also affect behaviour. Here, we explore whether gut microbiota has a role in kin recognition. We assessed whether relatedness, familiarity and food eaten during development altered copulation investment in three species of Drosophila with diverse ecologies. We found that a monandrous species exhibited true kin recognition, whereas familiarity determined kin recognition in a species living in dense aggregations. Finally, in a food generalist species, food eaten during development masked kin recognition. The effect of food type on copulation duration, in addition to the removal of this effect via antibiotic treatment, suggests the influence of bacteria associated with the gut. Our results provide the first evidence that varied ecologically determined mechanisms of kin recognition occur in Drosophila, and that gut bacteria are likely to have a key role in these mechanisms.

  12. Kin recognition in Drosophila: the importance of ecology and gut microbiota

    PubMed Central

    Lizé, Anne; McKay, Raegan; Lewis, Zenobia

    2014-01-01

    The animal gut commonly contains a large reservoir of symbiotic microbes. Although these microbes have obvious functions in digestion and immune defence, gut microbes can also affect behaviour. Here, we explore whether gut microbiota has a role in kin recognition. We assessed whether relatedness, familiarity and food eaten during development altered copulation investment in three species of Drosophila with diverse ecologies. We found that a monandrous species exhibited true kin recognition, whereas familiarity determined kin recognition in a species living in dense aggregations. Finally, in a food generalist species, food eaten during development masked kin recognition. The effect of food type on copulation duration, in addition to the removal of this effect via antibiotic treatment, suggests the influence of bacteria associated with the gut. Our results provide the first evidence that varied ecologically determined mechanisms of kin recognition occur in Drosophila, and that gut bacteria are likely to have a key role in these mechanisms. PMID:24030598

  13. A Markov Random Field Groupwise Registration Framework for Face Recognition.

    PubMed

    Liao, Shu; Shen, Dinggang; Chung, Albert C S

    2014-04-01

    In this paper, we propose a new framework for tackling face recognition problem. The face recognition problem is formulated as groupwise deformable image registration and feature matching problem. The main contributions of the proposed method lie in the following aspects: (1) Each pixel in a facial image is represented by an anatomical signature obtained from its corresponding most salient scale local region determined by the survival exponential entropy (SEE) information theoretic measure. (2) Based on the anatomical signature calculated from each pixel, a novel Markov random field based groupwise registration framework is proposed to formulate the face recognition problem as a feature guided deformable image registration problem. The similarity between different facial images are measured on the nonlinear Riemannian manifold based on the deformable transformations. (3) The proposed method does not suffer from the generalizability problem which exists commonly in learning based algorithms. The proposed method has been extensively evaluated on four publicly available databases: FERET, CAS-PEAL-R1, FRGC ver 2.0, and the LFW. It is also compared with several state-of-the-art face recognition approaches, and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method consistently achieves the highest recognition rates among all the methods under comparison.

  14. A Markov Random Field Groupwise Registration Framework for Face Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Shu; Shen, Dinggang; Chung, Albert C.S.

    2014-01-01

    In this paper, we propose a new framework for tackling face recognition problem. The face recognition problem is formulated as groupwise deformable image registration and feature matching problem. The main contributions of the proposed method lie in the following aspects: (1) Each pixel in a facial image is represented by an anatomical signature obtained from its corresponding most salient scale local region determined by the survival exponential entropy (SEE) information theoretic measure. (2) Based on the anatomical signature calculated from each pixel, a novel Markov random field based groupwise registration framework is proposed to formulate the face recognition problem as a feature guided deformable image registration problem. The similarity between different facial images are measured on the nonlinear Riemannian manifold based on the deformable transformations. (3) The proposed method does not suffer from the generalizability problem which exists commonly in learning based algorithms. The proposed method has been extensively evaluated on four publicly available databases: FERET, CAS-PEAL-R1, FRGC ver 2.0, and the LFW. It is also compared with several state-of-the-art face recognition approaches, and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method consistently achieves the highest recognition rates among all the methods under comparison. PMID:25506109

  15. Emotion and language: Valence and arousal affect word recognition

    PubMed Central

    Brysbaert, Marc; Warriner, Amy Beth

    2014-01-01

    Emotion influences most aspects of cognition and behavior, but emotional factors are conspicuously absent from current models of word recognition. The influence of emotion on word recognition has mostly been reported in prior studies on the automatic vigilance for negative stimuli, but the precise nature of this relationship is unclear. Various models of automatic vigilance have claimed that the effect of valence on response times is categorical, an inverted-U, or interactive with arousal. The present study used a sample of 12,658 words, and included many lexical and semantic control factors, to determine the precise nature of the effects of arousal and valence on word recognition. Converging empirical patterns observed in word-level and trial-level data from lexical decision and naming indicate that valence and arousal exert independent monotonic effects: Negative words are recognized more slowly than positive words, and arousing words are recognized more slowly than calming words. Valence explained about 2% of the variance in word recognition latencies, whereas the effect of arousal was smaller. Valence and arousal do not interact, but both interact with word frequency, such that valence and arousal exert larger effects among low-frequency words than among high-frequency words. These results necessitate a new model of affective word processing whereby the degree of negativity monotonically and independently predicts the speed of responding. This research also demonstrates that incorporating emotional factors, especially valence, improves the performance of models of word recognition. PMID:24490848

  16. Odor recognition memory: two encoding trials are better than one.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Lauren A; Ober, Beth A; Shenaut, Gregory K

    2012-10-01

    The primary purpose of this study was to determine the effect of one versus two encoding trials in the classical yes/no recognition memory paradigm using olfactory stimuli. A group of 24 young adults rated 18 standard microencapsulated odorant targets for familiarity (first encoding block) or pleasantness (second encoding block). Once-encoded targets were in only one block and twice-encoded targets were in both, with items counterbalanced across participants. Participants performed a 20-min nonverbal distractor task followed by a yes/no recognition test incorporating 18 additional odors as foils. Memory performance for twice-encoded targets was superior to that for once-encoded targets. For once-encoded targets, performance did not differ between those rated for familiarity versus those rated for pleasantness. Less pleasant odors produced overall better recognition, with a tendency for less familiar odors to produce overall better recognition. There was a tendency for the second encoding trial to have a larger effect for less pleasant or familiar odors than for more pleasant or familiar odors. The main conclusion is that recognition memory for odors is better for items encoded two times than for items encoded only once. Implications of these findings and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:22843762

  17. Receptor Recognition Mechanisms of Coronaviruses: a Decade of Structural Studies

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Receptor recognition by viruses is the first and essential step of viral infections of host cells. It is an important determinant of viral host range and cross-species infection and a primary target for antiviral intervention. Coronaviruses recognize a variety of host receptors, infect many hosts, and are health threats to humans and animals. The receptor-binding S1 subunit of coronavirus spike proteins contains two distinctive domains, the N-terminal domain (S1-NTD) and the C-terminal domain (S1-CTD), both of which can function as receptor-binding domains (RBDs). S1-NTDs and S1-CTDs from three major coronavirus genera recognize at least four protein receptors and three sugar receptors and demonstrate a complex receptor recognition pattern. For example, highly similar coronavirus S1-CTDs within the same genus can recognize different receptors, whereas very different coronavirus S1-CTDs from different genera can recognize the same receptor. Moreover, coronavirus S1-NTDs can recognize either protein or sugar receptors. Structural studies in the past decade have elucidated many of the puzzles associated with coronavirus-receptor interactions. This article reviews the latest knowledge on the receptor recognition mechanisms of coronaviruses and discusses how coronaviruses have evolved their complex receptor recognition pattern. It also summarizes important principles that govern receptor recognition by viruses in general. PMID:25428871

  18. Dynamics of alpha oscillations elucidate facial affect recognition in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Popov, Tzvetan G; Rockstroh, Brigitte S; Popova, Petia; Carolus, Almut M; Miller, Gregory A

    2014-03-01

    Impaired facial affect recognition is characteristic of schizophrenia and has been related to impaired social function, but the relevant neural mechanisms have not been fully identified. The present study sought to identify the role of oscillatory alpha activity in that deficit during the process of facial emotion recognition. Neuromagnetic brain activity was monitored while 44 schizophrenia patients and 44 healthy controls viewed 5-s videos showing human faces gradually changing from neutral to fearful or happy expressions or from the neutral face of one poser to the neutral face of another. Recognition performance was determined separately by self-report. Relative to prestimulus baseline, controls exhibited a 10- to 15-Hz power increase prior to full recognition and a 10- to 15-Hz power decrease during the postrecognition phase. These results support recent proposals about the function of alpha-band oscillations in normal stimulus evaluation. The patients failed to show this sequence of alpha power increase and decrease and also showed low 10- to 15-Hz power and high 10- to 15-Hz connectivity during the prestimulus baseline. In light of the proposal that a combination of alpha power increase and functional disconnection facilitates information intake and processing, the finding of an abnormal association of low baseline alpha power and high connectivity in schizophrenia suggests a state of impaired readiness that fosters abnormal dynamics during facial affect recognition.

  19. A propositional theory of recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Anderson, J R; Bower, G H

    1974-05-01

    This paper modifies the Anderson and Bower (1972) theory of recognition memory for words. A propositional representation is outlined for the contextual information underlying word recognition. Logical arguments are offered for preferring this representation over the undifferentiated associative representation used earlier. The propositional representation is used to interpret effects of verbal context upon recognition memory. The implications of these context effects are considered for two-process models of recall and recognition. PMID:21274765

  20. Conformational Recognition of an Intrinsically Disordered Protein

    PubMed Central

    Krieger, James M.; Fusco, Giuliana; Lewitzky, Marc; Simister, Philip C.; Marchant, Jan; Camilloni, Carlo; Feller, Stephan M.; De Simone, Alfonso

    2014-01-01

    There is a growing interest in understanding the properties of intrinsically disordered proteins (IDPs); however, the characterization of these states remains an open challenge. IDPs appear to have functional roles that diverge from those of folded proteins and revolve around their ability to act as hubs for protein-protein interactions. To gain a better understanding of the modes of binding of IDPs, we combined statistical mechanics, calorimetry, and NMR spectroscopy to investigate the recognition and binding of a fragment from the disordered protein Gab2 by the growth factor receptor-bound protein 2 (Grb2), a key interaction for normal cell signaling and cancer development. Structural ensemble refinement by NMR chemical shifts, thermodynamics measurements, and analysis of point mutations indicated that the population of preexisting bound conformations in the free-state ensemble of Gab2 is an essential determinant for recognition and binding by Grb2. A key role was found for transient polyproline II (PPII) structures and extended conformations. Our findings are likely to have very general implications for the biological behavior of IDPs in light of the evidence that a large fraction of these proteins possess a specific propensity to form PPII and to adopt conformations that are more extended than the typical random-coil states. PMID:24739176

  1. Forgetting induced by recognition of visual images

    PubMed Central

    Maxcey, Ashleigh M.; Woodman, Geoffrey F.

    2015-01-01

    Retrieval-induced forgetting is a phenomenon in which groups of stimuli are initially learned, but then a subset of those stimuli are subsequently remembered via retrieval practice, causing the forgetting of the other initially learned items. This phenomenon has almost exclusively been studied using linguistic stimuli. The goal of the present study was to determine whether our memory for simultaneously learned visual stimuli was subject to a similar type of memory impairment. Participants were shown real-world objects, then they practiced recognizing a subset of these remembered objects, and finally their memory was tested for all learned objects. We found that practicing recognition of a subset of items resulted in forgetting of other objects in the group. However, impaired recognition did not spread to new objects belonging to the same category. Our findings have important implications for how our memories operate in real-world tasks, where remembering one object or aspect of a visual scene can cause us to forget other information encoded at the same time. PMID:25729314

  2. 77 FR 9590 - Recognition and Accreditation

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-17

    ...; ] DEPARTMENT OF JUSTICE 8 CFR Part 1292 RIN 1125-AA72 Recognition and Accreditation AGENCY: Executive Office... the recognition of organizations and accreditation of representatives who appear before EOIR. EOIR... discuss these regulations. The first meeting will be limited to a discussion of the recognition...

  3. Relationship between amygdala volume and emotion recognition in adolescents at ultra-high risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Bartholomeusz, Cali F; Whittle, Sarah L; Pilioussis, Eleanor; Allott, Kelly; Rice, Simon; Schäfer, Miriam R; Pantelis, Christos; Amminger, G Paul

    2014-12-30

    Amygdala volume has been proposed as a neural risk biomarker for psychotic illness, but findings in the ultra-high risk for psychosis (UHR) population have been somewhat inconsistent, which may be related to underlying social cognitive abilities. The current study investigated whether amygdala volumes were related to emotion-recognition impairments in UHR individuals, and whether volumes differed by sex. Secondary aims were to assess whether (a) emotion-recognition performance was associated with interhemispheric amygdala volume asymmetry and (b) amgydala volume and volume asymmetry acted as a mediator between emotion-recognition and outcome measures. The amygdala was manually delineated from magnetic resonance images for 39 UHR individuals who had also completed facial and prosody emotion-recognition tasks. Partial correlations were conducted to examine associations between amydgala volume/asymmetry and recognition of negative emotions. Mediation analyses were conducted using regression and bootstrapping techniques. Amygdala volume was positively correlated with sadness emotion recognition, in particular prosody, for females only. Left amygdala volume mediated the effect of sadness recognition on depressive symptoms, negative symptoms, overall psychopathology, and global functioning in females. Findings suggest a complex relationship between emotion recognition, the structure of the amygdala and illness outcome, where recognition of sadness appears to be the precipitator of this relationship in UHR females. Further research is needed to determine illness specificity and to confirm our sex- and emotion-specific results.

  4. Face age and sex modulate the other-race effect in face recognition.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Jennifer; Lipp, Ottmar V; Vanman, Eric J

    2012-11-01

    Faces convey a variety of socially relevant cues that have been shown to affect recognition, such as age, sex, and race, but few studies have examined the interactive effect of these cues. White participants of two distinct age groups were presented with faces that differed in race, age, and sex in a face recognition paradigm. Replicating the other-race effect, young participants recognized young own-race faces better than young other-race faces. However, recognition performance did not differ across old faces of different races (Experiments 1, 2A). In addition, participants showed an other-age effect, recognizing White young faces better than White old faces. Sex affected recognition performance only when age was not varied (Experiment 2B). Overall, older participants showed a similar recognition pattern (Experiment 3) as young participants, displaying an other-race effect for young, but not old, faces. However, they recognized young and old White faces on a similar level. These findings indicate that face cues interact to affect recognition performance such that age and sex information reliably modulate the effect of race cues. These results extend accounts of face recognition that explain recognition biases (such as the other-race effect) as a function of dichotomous ingroup/outgroup categorization, in that outgroup characteristics are not simply additive but interactively determine recognition performance.

  5. Face age and sex modulate the other-race effect in face recognition.

    PubMed

    Wallis, Jennifer; Lipp, Ottmar V; Vanman, Eric J

    2012-11-01

    Faces convey a variety of socially relevant cues that have been shown to affect recognition, such as age, sex, and race, but few studies have examined the interactive effect of these cues. White participants of two distinct age groups were presented with faces that differed in race, age, and sex in a face recognition paradigm. Replicating the other-race effect, young participants recognized young own-race faces better than young other-race faces. However, recognition performance did not differ across old faces of different races (Experiments 1, 2A). In addition, participants showed an other-age effect, recognizing White young faces better than White old faces. Sex affected recognition performance only when age was not varied (Experiment 2B). Overall, older participants showed a similar recognition pattern (Experiment 3) as young participants, displaying an other-race effect for young, but not old, faces. However, they recognized young and old White faces on a similar level. These findings indicate that face cues interact to affect recognition performance such that age and sex information reliably modulate the effect of race cues. These results extend accounts of face recognition that explain recognition biases (such as the other-race effect) as a function of dichotomous ingroup/outgroup categorization, in that outgroup characteristics are not simply additive but interactively determine recognition performance. PMID:22933042

  6. Relationship between amygdala volume and emotion recognition in adolescents at ultra-high risk for psychosis.

    PubMed

    Bartholomeusz, Cali F; Whittle, Sarah L; Pilioussis, Eleanor; Allott, Kelly; Rice, Simon; Schäfer, Miriam R; Pantelis, Christos; Amminger, G Paul

    2014-12-30

    Amygdala volume has been proposed as a neural risk biomarker for psychotic illness, but findings in the ultra-high risk for psychosis (UHR) population have been somewhat inconsistent, which may be related to underlying social cognitive abilities. The current study investigated whether amygdala volumes were related to emotion-recognition impairments in UHR individuals, and whether volumes differed by sex. Secondary aims were to assess whether (a) emotion-recognition performance was associated with interhemispheric amygdala volume asymmetry and (b) amgydala volume and volume asymmetry acted as a mediator between emotion-recognition and outcome measures. The amygdala was manually delineated from magnetic resonance images for 39 UHR individuals who had also completed facial and prosody emotion-recognition tasks. Partial correlations were conducted to examine associations between amydgala volume/asymmetry and recognition of negative emotions. Mediation analyses were conducted using regression and bootstrapping techniques. Amygdala volume was positively correlated with sadness emotion recognition, in particular prosody, for females only. Left amygdala volume mediated the effect of sadness recognition on depressive symptoms, negative symptoms, overall psychopathology, and global functioning in females. Findings suggest a complex relationship between emotion recognition, the structure of the amygdala and illness outcome, where recognition of sadness appears to be the precipitator of this relationship in UHR females. Further research is needed to determine illness specificity and to confirm our sex- and emotion-specific results. PMID:25456521

  7. Lateralized processes in face recognition.

    PubMed

    Rhodes, G

    1985-05-01

    In this paper a model is presented in which face recognition is analysed into several stages, each of which may be independently lateralized. Evidence is reviewed which suggests that lateralization is important at all stages of processing a face. Early visuospatial processing, and the creation and comparison of facial representations, appear to be carried out more efficiently by the right hemisphere. Comparisons based on discrete, namable features of faces may yield a left hemisphere advantage. It is also proposed that faces may activate semantic information, including names, more efficiently in the left hemisphere. The model is useful in resolving inconsistencies in the degree and direction of asymmetries found in face-recognition tasks. Suggestions are also made for future research.

  8. Turbo Processing for Speech Recognition.

    PubMed

    Moon, Todd K; Gunther, Jacob H; Broadus, Cortnie; Hou, Wendy; Nelson, Nils

    2014-01-01

    Speech recognition is a classic example of a human/machine interface, typifying many of the difficulties and opportunities of human/machine interaction. In this paper, speech recognition is used as an example of applying turbo processing principles to the general problem of human/machine interface. Speech recognizers frequently involve a model representing phonemic information at a local level, followed by a language model representing information at a nonlocal level. This structure is analogous to the local (e.g., equalizer) and nonlocal (e.g., error correction decoding) elements common in digital communications. Drawing from the analogy of turbo processing for digital communications, turbo speech processing iteratively feeds back the output of the language model to be used as prior probabilities for the phonemic model. This analogy is developed here, and the performance of this turbo model is characterized by using an artificial language model. Using turbo processing, the relative error rate improves significantly, especially in high-noise settings.

  9. Immune recognition of citrullinated epitopes.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hai; James, Eddie A

    2016-10-01

    Conversion of arginine into citrulline is a post-translational modification that is observed in normal physiological processes. However, abnormal citrullination can provoke autoimmunity by generating altered self-epitopes that are specifically targeted by autoantibodies and T cells. In this review we discuss the recognition of citrullinated antigens in human autoimmune diseases and the role that this modification plays in increasing antigenic diversity and circumventing tolerance mechanisms. Early published work demonstrated that citrullinated proteins are specifically targeted by autoantibodies in rheumatoid arthritis and that citrullinated peptides are more readily presented to T cells by arthritis-susceptible HLA class II 'shared epitope' proteins. Emerging data support the relevance of citrullinated epitopes in other autoimmune diseases, including type 1 diabetes and multiple sclerosis, whose susceptible HLA haplotypes also preferentially present citrullinated peptides. In these settings, autoimmune patients have been shown to have elevated responses to citrullinated epitopes derived from tissue-specific antigens. Contrasting evidence implicates autophagy or perforin and complement-mediated membrane attack as inducers of ectopic citrullination. In either case, the peptidyl deiminases responsible for citrullination are activated in response to inflammation or insult, providing a mechanistic link between this post-translational modification and interactions with the environment and infection. As such, it is likely that immune recognition of citrullinated epitopes also plays a role in pathogen clearance. Indeed, our recent data suggest that responses to citrullinated peptides facilitate recognition of novel influenza strains. Therefore, increased understanding of responses to citrullinated epitopes may provide important insights about the initiation of autoimmunity and recognition of heterologous viruses. PMID:27531825

  10. Immune recognition of protein antigens

    SciTech Connect

    Laver, W.G.; Air, G.M.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains 33 papers. Some of the titles are: Antigenic Structure of Influenze Virus Hemagglutinin; Germ-line and Somatic Diversity in the Antibody Response to the Influenza Virus A/PR/8/34 Hemagglutinin; Recognition of Cloned Influenza A Virus Gene Products by Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes; Antigenic Structure of the Influenza Virus N2 Neuraminidase; and The Molecular and Genetic Basis of Antigenic Variation in Gonococcal Pillin.

  11. Image processing for drawing recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feyzkhanov, Rustem; Zhelavskaya, Irina

    2014-03-01

    The task of recognizing edges of rectangular structures is well known. Still, almost all of them work with static images and has no limit on work time. We propose application of conducting homography for the video stream which can be obtained from the webcam. We propose algorithm which can be successfully used for this kind of application. One of the main use cases of such application is recognition of drawings by person on the piece of paper before webcam.

  12. Determination of the utility of remote sensing data for land use/cover analysis in the lower Appalachia region: Assessing the utility of remote sensing data for archeological site recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weber, N. V.

    1983-01-01

    Thematic Mapper Simulator (TMS) data were gathered by NASA/ERL over a portion of the lower Ohio River and the middle Mississippi River valleys on April 11, 1982. CIR imagery accompanied the 10 and 30 meter resolution TMS data sets. This area is somewhat unique archeologically as there exists a concentration of sites with major features such as mounds, earthworks, and villages. It was the primary purpose of this study to determine the utility of TMS data in identifying signatures which are distinctly archeological. TMS data were processed using the NASA/ERL software package ELAS. No signatures that were distinctly archeological were detected, due in large part to the complexity of the land cover and land use practices. However, as more sophisticated classification techniques were employed, the classes which were related to archeological features were narrowed. TMS data could certainly be of assistance to a trained archeologist/interpreter in narrowing an area which has to be field-surveyed as anomalous features can be recognized within a particular environmental context.

  13. Face Recognition Incorporating Ancillary Information

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sang-Ki; Toh, Kar-Ann; Lee, Sangyoun

    2007-12-01

    Due to vast variations of extrinsic and intrinsic imaging conditions, face recognition remained to be a challenging computer vision problem even today. This is particularly true when the passive imaging approach is considered for robust applications. To advance existing recognition systems for face, numerous techniques and methods have been proposed to overcome the almost inevitable performance degradation due to external factors such as pose, expression, occlusion, and illumination. In particular, the recent part-based method has provided noticeable room for verification performance improvement based on the localized features which have good tolerance to variation of external conditions. The part-based method, however, does not really stretch the performance without incorporation of global information from the holistic method. In view of the need to fuse the local information and the global information in an adaptive manner for reliable recognition, in this paper we investigate whether such external factors can be explicitly estimated and be used to boost the verification performance during fusion of the holistic and part-based methods. Our empirical evaluations show noticeable performance improvement adopting the proposed method.

  14. Human recognition of familiar voices.

    PubMed

    Wenndt, Stanley J

    2016-08-01

    Recognizing familiar voices is something we do every day. In quiet environments, it is usually easy to recognize a familiar voice. In noisier environments, this can become a difficult task. This paper examines how robust listeners are at identifying familiar voices in noisy, changing environments and what factors may affect their recognition rates. While there is previous research addressing familiar speaker recognition, the research is limited due to the difficulty in obtaining appropriate data that eliminates speaker dependent traits, such as word choice, along with having corresponding listeners who are familiar with the speakers. The data used in this study were collected in such a fashion to mimic conversational, free-flow dialogue, but in a way to eliminate many variables such as word choice, intonation, or non-verbal cues. These data provide some of the most realistic test scenarios to-date for familiar speaker identification. A pure-tone hearing test was used to separate listeners into normal hearing and hearing impaired groups. It is hypothesized that the results of the Normal Hearing Group will be statistically better. Additionally, the aspect of familiar speaker recognition is addressed by having each listener rate his or her familiarity with each speaker. Two statistical approaches showed that the more familiar a listener is with a speaker, the more likely the listener will recognize the speaker. PMID:27586746

  15. Additive attacks on speaker recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farrokh Baroughi, Alireza; Craver, Scott

    2014-02-01

    Speaker recognition is used to identify a speaker's voice from among a group of known speakers. A common method of speaker recognition is a classification based on cepstral coefficients of the speaker's voice, using a Gaussian mixture model (GMM) to model each speaker. In this paper we try to fool a speaker recognition system using additive noise such that an intruder is recognized as a target user. Our attack uses a mixture selected from a target user's GMM model, inverting the cepstral transformation to produce noise samples. In our 5 speaker data base, we achieve an attack success rate of 50% with a noise signal at 10dB SNR, and 95% by increasing noise power to 0dB SNR. The importance of this attack is its simplicity and flexibility: it can be employed in real time with no processing of an attacker's voice, and little computation is needed at the moment of detection, allowing the attack to be performed by a small portable device. For any target user, knowing that user's model or voice sample is sufficient to compute the attack signal, and it is enough that the intruder plays it while he/she is uttering to be classiffed as the victim.

  16. Fingerprint recognition using image processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dholay, Surekha; Mishra, Akassh A.

    2011-06-01

    Finger Print Recognition is concerned with the difficult task of matching the images of finger print of a person with the finger print present in the database efficiently. Finger print Recognition is used in forensic science which helps in finding the criminals and also used in authentication of a particular person. Since, Finger print is the only thing which is unique among the people and changes from person to person. The present paper describes finger print recognition methods using various edge detection techniques and also how to detect correct finger print using a camera images. The present paper describes the method that does not require a special device but a simple camera can be used for its processes. Hence, the describe technique can also be using in a simple camera mobile phone. The various factors affecting the process will be poor illumination, noise disturbance, viewpoint-dependence, Climate factors, and Imaging conditions. The described factor has to be considered so we have to perform various image enhancement techniques so as to increase the quality and remove noise disturbance of image. The present paper describe the technique of using contour tracking on the finger print image then using edge detection on the contour and after that matching the edges inside the contour.

  17. Infant Visual Attention and Object Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Reynolds, Greg D.

    2015-01-01

    This paper explores the role visual attention plays in the recognition of objects in infancy. Research and theory on the development of infant attention and recognition memory are reviewed in three major sections. The first section reviews some of the major findings and theory emerging from a rich tradition of behavioral research utilizing preferential looking tasks to examine visual attention and recognition memory in infancy. The second section examines research utilizing neural measures of attention and object recognition in infancy as well as research on brain-behavior relations in the early development of attention and recognition memory. The third section addresses potential areas of the brain involved in infant object recognition and visual attention. An integrated synthesis of some of the existing models of the development of visual attention is presented which may account for the observed changes in behavioral and neural measures of visual attention and object recognition that occur across infancy. PMID:25596333

  18. Automatic speech recognition technology development at ITT Defense Communications Division

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, George M.

    1977-01-01

    An assessment of the applications of automatic speech recognition to defense communication systems is presented. Future research efforts include investigations into the following areas: (1) dynamic programming; (2) recognition of speech degraded by noise; (3) speaker independent recognition; (4) large vocabulary recognition; (5) word spotting and continuous speech recognition; and (6) isolated word recognition.

  19. Predator Recognition in Rainbowfish, Melanotaenia duboulayi, Embryos

    PubMed Central

    Oulton, Lois Jane; Haviland, Vivian; Brown, Culum

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to olfactory cues during embryonic development can have long term impacts on birds and amphibians behaviour. Despite the vast literature on predator recognition and responses in fishes, few researchers have determined how fish embryos respond to predator cues. Here we exposed four-day-old rainbowfish (Melanotaenia duboulayi) embryos to cues emanating from a novel predator, a native predator and injured conspecifics. Their response was assessed by monitoring heart rate and hatch time. Results showed that embryos have an innate capacity to differentiate between cues as illustrated by faster heart rates relative to controls. The greatest increase in heart rate occurred in response to native predator odour. While we found no significant change in the time taken for eggs to hatch, all treatments experienced slight delays as expected if embryos are attempting to reduce exposure to larval predators. PMID:24146817

  20. Fragrant pear sexuality recognition with machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Benxue; Ying, Yibin

    2006-10-01

    In this research, a method to identify Kuler fragrant pear's sexuality with machine vision was developed. Kuler fragrant pear has male pear and female pear. They have an obvious difference in favor. To detect the sexuality of Kuler fragrant pear, images of fragrant pear were acquired by CCD color camera. Before feature extraction, some preprocessing is conducted on the acquired images to remove noise and unnecessary contents. Color feature, perimeter feature and area feature of fragrant pear bottom image were extracted by digital image processing technique. And the fragrant pear sexuality was determined by complexity obtained from perimeter and area. In this research, using 128 Kurle fragrant pears as samples, good recognition rate between the male pear and the female pear was obtained for Kurle pear's sexuality detection (82.8%). Result shows this method could detect male pear and female pear with a good accuracy.

  1. Beyond Memorability: Visualization Recognition and Recall.

    PubMed

    Borkin, Michelle A; Bylinskii, Zoya; Kim, Nam Wook; Bainbridge, Constance May; Yeh, Chelsea S; Borkin, Daniel; Pfister, Hanspeter; Oliva, Aude

    2016-01-01

    In this paper we move beyond memorability and investigate how visualizations are recognized and recalled. For this study we labeled a dataset of 393 visualizations and analyzed the eye movements of 33 participants as well as thousands of participant-generated text descriptions of the visualizations. This allowed us to determine what components of a visualization attract people's attention, and what information is encoded into memory. Our findings quantitatively support many conventional qualitative design guidelines, including that (1) titles and supporting text should convey the message of a visualization, (2) if used appropriately, pictograms do not interfere with understanding and can improve recognition, and (3) redundancy helps effectively communicate the message. Importantly, we show that visualizations memorable "at-a-glance" are also capable of effectively conveying the message of the visualization. Thus, a memorable visualization is often also an effective one. PMID:26390488

  2. New Algorithms For Automated Symmetry Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paul, Jody; Kilgore, Tammy Elaine; Klinger, Allen

    1988-02-01

    In this paper we present new methods for computer-based symmetry identification that combine elements of group theory and pattern recognition. Detection of symmetry has diverse applications including: the reduction of image data to a manageable subset with minimal information loss, the interpretation of sensor data,1 such as the x-ray diffraction patterns which sparked the recent discovery of a new "quasicrystal" phase of solid matter,2 and music analysis and composition.3,4,5 Our algorithms are expressed as parallel operations on the data using the matrix representation and manipulation features of the APL programming language. We demonstrate the operation of programs that characterize symmetric and nearly-symmetric patterns by determining the degree of invariance with respect to candidate symmetry transformations. The results are completely general; they may be applied to pattern data of arbitrary dimension and from any source.

  3. Acquired prosopagnosia without word recognition deficits.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Tirta; Wright, Victoria; Tree, Jeremy J; Duchaine, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    It has long been suggested that face recognition relies on specialized mechanisms that are not involved in visual recognition of other object categories, including those that require expert, fine-grained discrimination at the exemplar level such as written words. But according to the recently proposed many-to-many theory of object recognition (MTMT), visual recognition of faces and words are carried out by common mechanisms [Behrmann, M., & Plaut, D. C. ( 2013 ). Distributed circuits, not circumscribed centers, mediate visual recognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 17, 210-219]. MTMT acknowledges that face and word recognition are lateralized, but posits that the mechanisms that predominantly carry out face recognition still contribute to word recognition and vice versa. MTMT makes a key prediction, namely that acquired prosopagnosics should exhibit some measure of word recognition deficits. We tested this prediction by assessing written word recognition in five acquired prosopagnosic patients. Four patients had lesions limited to the right hemisphere while one had bilateral lesions with more pronounced lesions in the right hemisphere. The patients completed a total of seven word recognition tasks: two lexical decision tasks and five reading aloud tasks totalling more than 1200 trials. The performances of the four older patients (3 female, age range 50-64 years) were compared to those of 12 older controls (8 female, age range 56-66 years), while the performances of the younger prosopagnosic (male, 31 years) were compared to those of 14 younger controls (9 female, age range 20-33 years). We analysed all results at the single-patient level using Crawford's t-test. Across seven tasks, four prosopagnosics performed as quickly and accurately as controls. Our results demonstrate that acquired prosopagnosia can exist without word recognition deficits. These findings are inconsistent with a key prediction of MTMT. They instead support the hypothesis that face

  4. Acquired prosopagnosia without word recognition deficits.

    PubMed

    Susilo, Tirta; Wright, Victoria; Tree, Jeremy J; Duchaine, Bradley

    2015-01-01

    It has long been suggested that face recognition relies on specialized mechanisms that are not involved in visual recognition of other object categories, including those that require expert, fine-grained discrimination at the exemplar level such as written words. But according to the recently proposed many-to-many theory of object recognition (MTMT), visual recognition of faces and words are carried out by common mechanisms [Behrmann, M., & Plaut, D. C. ( 2013 ). Distributed circuits, not circumscribed centers, mediate visual recognition. Trends in Cognitive Sciences, 17, 210-219]. MTMT acknowledges that face and word recognition are lateralized, but posits that the mechanisms that predominantly carry out face recognition still contribute to word recognition and vice versa. MTMT makes a key prediction, namely that acquired prosopagnosics should exhibit some measure of word recognition deficits. We tested this prediction by assessing written word recognition in five acquired prosopagnosic patients. Four patients had lesions limited to the right hemisphere while one had bilateral lesions with more pronounced lesions in the right hemisphere. The patients completed a total of seven word recognition tasks: two lexical decision tasks and five reading aloud tasks totalling more than 1200 trials. The performances of the four older patients (3 female, age range 50-64 years) were compared to those of 12 older controls (8 female, age range 56-66 years), while the performances of the younger prosopagnosic (male, 31 years) were compared to those of 14 younger controls (9 female, age range 20-33 years). We analysed all results at the single-patient level using Crawford's t-test. Across seven tasks, four prosopagnosics performed as quickly and accurately as controls. Our results demonstrate that acquired prosopagnosia can exist without word recognition deficits. These findings are inconsistent with a key prediction of MTMT. They instead support the hypothesis that face

  5. Emotion recognition deficits associated with ventromedial prefrontal cortex lesions are improved by gaze manipulation.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Richard C; Pujara, Maia; Baskaya, Mustafa K; Koenigs, Michael

    2016-09-01

    Facial emotion recognition is a critical aspect of human communication. Since abnormalities in facial emotion recognition are associated with social and affective impairment in a variety of psychiatric and neurological conditions, identifying the neural substrates and psychological processes underlying facial emotion recognition will help advance basic and translational research on social-affective function. Ventromedial prefrontal cortex (vmPFC) has recently been implicated in deploying visual attention to the eyes of emotional faces, although there is mixed evidence regarding the importance of this brain region for recognition accuracy. In the present study of neurological patients with vmPFC damage, we used an emotion recognition task with morphed facial expressions of varying intensities to determine (1) whether vmPFC is essential for emotion recognition accuracy, and (2) whether instructed attention to the eyes of faces would be sufficient to improve any accuracy deficits. We found that vmPFC lesion patients are impaired, relative to neurologically healthy adults, at recognizing moderate intensity expressions of anger and that recognition accuracy can be improved by providing instructions of where to fixate. These results suggest that vmPFC may be important for the recognition of facial emotion through a role in guiding visual attention to emotionally salient regions of faces. PMID:27423116

  6. Recognition and processing of logic diagrams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darwish, Ahmed M.; Bashandy, Ahmed R.

    1996-03-01

    In this paper we present a vision system that is capable of interpreting schematic logic diagrams, i.e. determine the output as a logic function of the inputs. The system is composed of a number of modules each designed to perform a specific subtask. Each module bears a minor contribution in the form of a new mixture of known algorithms or extensions to handle actual real life image imperfections which researchers tend to ignore when they develop their theoretical foundations. The main contribution, thus, is not in any individual module, it is rather in their integration to achieve the target job. The system is organized more or less in a classical fashion. Aside from the image acquisition and preprocessing modules, interesting modules include: the segmenter, the identifier, the connector and the grapher. A good segmentation output is one reason for the success of the presented system. Several novelties exist in the presented approach. Following segmentation the type of each logic gate is determined and its topological connectivity. The logic diagram is then transformed to a directed acyclic graph in which the final node is the output logic gate. The logic function is then determined by backtracking techniques. The system is not only aimed at recognition applications. In fact its main usage may be to target other processing applications such as storage compression and graphics modification and manipulation of the diagram as is explained.

  7. Face Processing: Models For Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turk, Matthew A.; Pentland, Alexander P.

    1990-03-01

    The human ability to process faces is remarkable. We can identify perhaps thousands of faces learned throughout our lifetime and read facial expression to understand such subtle qualities as emotion. These skills are quite robust, despite sometimes large changes in the visual stimulus due to expression, aging, and distractions such as glasses or changes in hairstyle or facial hair. Computers which model and recognize faces will be useful in a variety of applications, including criminal identification, human-computer interface, and animation. We discuss models for representing faces and their applicability to the task of recognition, and present techniques for identifying faces and detecting eye blinks.

  8. Speech recognition technology: a critique.

    PubMed Central

    Levinson, S E

    1995-01-01

    This paper introduces the session on advanced speech recognition technology. The two papers comprising this session argue that current technology yields a performance that is only an order of magnitude in error rate away from human performance and that incremental improvements will bring us to that desired level. I argue that, to the contrary, present performance is far removed from human performance and a revolution in our thinking is required to achieve the goal. It is further asserted that to bring about the revolution more effort should be expended on basic research and less on trying to prematurely commercialize a deficient technology. PMID:7479808

  9. Handwritten digits recognition based on immune network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yangyang; Wu, Yunhui; Jiao, Lc; Wu, Jianshe

    2011-11-01

    With the development of society, handwritten digits recognition technique has been widely applied to production and daily life. It is a very difficult task to solve these problems in the field of pattern recognition. In this paper, a new method is presented for handwritten digit recognition. The digit samples firstly are processed and features extraction. Based on these features, a novel immune network classification algorithm is designed and implemented to the handwritten digits recognition. The proposed algorithm is developed by Jerne's immune network model for feature selection and KNN method for classification. Its characteristic is the novel network with parallel commutating and learning. The performance of the proposed method is experimented to the handwritten number datasets MNIST and compared with some other recognition algorithms-KNN, ANN and SVM algorithm. The result shows that the novel classification algorithm based on immune network gives promising performance and stable behavior for handwritten digits recognition.

  10. Studies of human vision recognition: some improvements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Bo-Wen; Fang, Yi-Chin; Chang, Lin-Song

    2010-01-01

    This paper proposes a new method to improve human recognition by artificial intelligence, specifically of images without the interference of high frequencies. The human eye is the most delicate optical system. Notwithstanding the dramatic progression of its structure and functions through a long evolution, the capability of visual recognition is not yet close to perfection. This paper is a study, based on the limitations of recognition by the human eye, of image recognition through the application of artificial intelligence. Those aspects which have been explored focus on human eye modeling, including aberration analysis, creative models of the human eye, human vision recognition characteristics and various mathematical models for verification. By using images consisting of four black and white bands and modulation transfer function (MTF) curve evaluation recognition capability on all the studied models, the optimum model most compatible with the physiology of the human eye is found.

  11. Speech recognition with amplitude and frequency modulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Fan-Gang; Nie, Kaibao; Stickney, Ginger S.; Kong, Ying-Yee; Vongphoe, Michael; Bhargave, Ashish; Wei, Chaogang; Cao, Keli

    2005-02-01

    Amplitude modulation (AM) and frequency modulation (FM) are commonly used in communication, but their relative contributions to speech recognition have not been fully explored. To bridge this gap, we derived slowly varying AM and FM from speech sounds and conducted listening tests using stimuli with different modulations in normal-hearing and cochlear-implant subjects. We found that although AM from a limited number of spectral bands may be sufficient for speech recognition in quiet, FM significantly enhances speech recognition in noise, as well as speaker and tone recognition. Additional speech reception threshold measures revealed that FM is particularly critical for speech recognition with a competing voice and is independent of spectral resolution and similarity. These results suggest that AM and FM provide independent yet complementary contributions to support robust speech recognition under realistic listening situations. Encoding FM may improve auditory scene analysis, cochlear-implant, and audiocoding performance. auditory analysis | cochlear implant | neural code | phase | scene analysis

  12. Document recognition serving people with disabilities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fruchterman, James R.

    2007-01-01

    Document recognition advances have improved the lives of people with print disabilities, by providing accessible documents. This invited paper provides perspectives on the author's career progression from document recognition professional to social entrepreneur applying this technology to help people with disabilities. Starting with initial thoughts about optical character recognition in college, it continues with the creation of accurate omnifont character recognition that did not require training. It was difficult to make a reading machine for the blind in a commercial setting, which led to the creation of a nonprofit social enterprise to deliver these devices around the world. This network of people with disabilities scanning books drove the creation of Bookshare.org, an online library of scanned books. Looking forward, the needs for improved document recognition technology to further lower the barriers to reading are discussed. Document recognition professionals should be proud of the positive impact their work has had on some of society's most disadvantaged communities.

  13. Encoding and reinstatement of threat: recognition potentials.

    PubMed

    Weymar, Mathias; Bradley, Margaret M; Hamm, Alfons O; Lang, Peter J

    2014-01-01

    On a recognition test, stimuli originally encoded in the context of shock threat show an enhanced late parietal positivity during later recognition compared to stimuli encoded during safety, particularly for emotionally arousing stimuli. The present study investigated whether this ERP old/new effect is further influenced when a threat context is reinstated during the recognition test. ERPs were measured in a yes-no recognition test for words rated high or low in emotional arousal that were encoded and recognized in the context of cues that signaled threat of shock or safety. Correct recognition of words encoded under threat, irrespective of reinstatement, was associated with an enhanced old-new ERP difference (500-700ms; centro-parietal), and this difference was only reliable for emotionally arousing words. Taken together, the data suggest that information processed in a stressful context are associated with better recollection on later recognition, an effect that was not modulated by reinstating the stressful context at retrieval.

  14. Familiar people recognition disorders: an introductory review.

    PubMed

    Gainotti, Guido

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this introduction is to provide a general background for the individual contributions dealing with different aspects of familiar people recognition disorders. Following are the main points considered in this survey: 1) the cognitive models proposed to explain the functional architecture of processes subsuming familiar people recognition; 2) the different roles of the right and left hemisphere in identifying people by face voice and name; 3) the anatomical structures and the cognitive processes involved in face and voice recognition; 4) the interactions that exist among the perceptual processes subsuming face and voice recognition, but not people's faces, voices and proper names; 5) the patterns of multimodal defects of familiar people recognition and their implications for current cognitive models. Finally, there is a short discussion of two models advanced to explain the role of the anterior temporal lobes in people recognition.

  15. A Modified Exoskeleton for 3D Shape Description and Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipikorn, Rajalida; Shimizu, Akinobu; Hagihara, Yoshihiro; Kobatake, Hidefumi

    Three-dimensional(3D) shape representation is a powerful tool in object recognition that is an essential process in an image processing and analysis system. Skeleton is one of the most widely used representations for object recognition, nevertheless most of the skeletons obtained from conventional methods are susceptible to rotation and noise disturbances. In this paper, we present a new 3D object representation called a modified exoskeleton (mES) which preserves skeleton properties including significant characteristics about an object that are meaningful for object recognition, and is more stable and less susceptible to rotation and noise than the skeletons. Then a 3D shape recognition methodology which determines the similarity between an observed object and other known objects in a database is introduced. Through a number of experiments on 3D artificial objects and real volumetric lung tumors extracted from CT images, it can be verified that our proposed methodology based on the mES is a simple yet efficient method that is less sensitive to rotation, noise, and independent of orientation and size of the objects.

  16. Automated leukocyte recognition using fuzzy divergence.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Madhumala; Das, Devkumar; Chakraborty, Chandan; Ray, Ajoy K

    2010-10-01

    This paper aims at introducing an automated approach to leukocyte recognition using fuzzy divergence and modified thresholding techniques. The recognition is done through the segmentation of nuclei where Gamma, Gaussian and Cauchy type of fuzzy membership functions are studied for the image pixels. It is in fact found that Cauchy leads better segmentation as compared to others. In addition, image thresholding is modified for better recognition. Results are studied and discussed.

  17. Simultaneous Electro-Optical Tracking for Nanoparticle Recognition and Counting.

    PubMed

    Angeli, Elena; Volpe, Andrea; Fanzio, Paola; Repetto, Luca; Firpo, Giuseppe; Guida, Patrizia; Lo Savio, Roberto; Wanunu, Meni; Valbusa, Ugo

    2015-09-01

    We present the first detailed experimental observation and analysis of nanoparticle electrophoresis through a nanochannel obtained with synchronous high-bandwidth electrical and camera recordings. Optically determined particle diffusion coefficients agree with values extracted from fitting electrical transport measurements to distributions from 1D Fokker-Planck diffusion-drift theory. This combined tracking strategy enables optical recognition and electrical characterization of nanoparticles in solution, which can have a broad range of applications in biology and materials science.

  18. Some results on contractive mappings as related to pattern recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, D. R.; Malley, M. J.

    1975-01-01

    Several of the techniques used in pattern recognition are reformulated as the problem of determining fixed points of a function. If x sub 0 is a fixed point of f and if f is contractive at x sub 0, then, for any y belonging to a sufficiently small neighborhood of x sub 0 the orbit of y will converge to x sub 0. Several general results regarding contractive mappings are developed with emphasis on functions.

  19. Surface versus Edge-Based Determinants of Visual Recognition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Biederman, Irving; Ju, Ginny

    1988-01-01

    The latency at which objects could be identified by 126 subjects was compared through line drawings (edge-based) or color photography (surface depiction). The line drawing was identified about as quickly as the photograph; primal access to a mental representation of an object can be modeled from an edge-based description. (SLD)

  20. Determinants of nucleotide sugar recognition in an archaeon DNA polymerase.

    PubMed

    Gardner, A F; Jack, W E

    1999-06-15

    Vent DNA polymerase normally discriminates strongly against incorporation of ribonucleotides, 3'-deoxyribonucleotides (such as cordycepin) and 2',3'-dideoxyribonucleotides. To explore the basis for this discrimination we have generated a family of variants with point mutations of residues in conserved Regions II and III and assayed incorporation of nucleo-tides with modified sugars by these variants, all of which were created in an exonuclease-deficient form of the enzyme. A Y412V variant incorporates ribonucleotides at least 200-fold more efficiently than the wild-type enzyme, consistent with Y412 acting as a 'steric gate' to specifically exclude ribonucleotides. The most striking variants tested involved changes to A488, a residue predicted to be facing away from the nucleotide binding site. The pattern of relaxed specificity at this position roughly correlates with the size of the substituted amino acid sidechain and affects a variety of modified nucleotide sugars. PMID:10352184

  1. Ordinal measures for iris recognition.

    PubMed

    Sun, Zhenan; Tan, Tieniu

    2009-12-01

    Images of a human iris contain rich texture information useful for identity authentication. A key and still open issue in iris recognition is how best to represent such textural information using a compact set of features (iris features). In this paper, we propose using ordinal measures for iris feature representation with the objective of characterizing qualitative relationships between iris regions rather than precise measurements of iris image structures. Such a representation may lose some image-specific information, but it achieves a good trade-off between distinctiveness and robustness. We show that ordinal measures are intrinsic features of iris patterns and largely invariant to illumination changes. Moreover, compactness and low computational complexity of ordinal measures enable highly efficient iris recognition. Ordinal measures are a general concept useful for image analysis and many variants can be derived for ordinal feature extraction. In this paper, we develop multilobe differential filters to compute ordinal measures with flexible intralobe and interlobe parameters such as location, scale, orientation, and distance. Experimental results on three public iris image databases demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed ordinal feature models. PMID:19834142

  2. Sonority contours in word recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McLennan, Sean

    2003-04-01

    Contrary to the Generativist distinction between competence and performance which asserts that speech or perception errors are due to random, nonlinguistic factors, it seems likely that errors are principled and possibly governed by some of the same constraints as language. A preliminary investigation of errors modeled after the child's ``Chain Whisper'' game (a degraded stimulus task) suggests that a significant number of recognition errors can be characterized as an improvement in syllable sonority contour towards the linguistically least-marked, voiceless-stop-plus-vowel syllable. An independent study of sonority contours showed that approximately half of the English lexicon can be uniquely identified by their contour alone. Additionally, ``sororities'' (groups of words that share a single sonority contour), surprisingly, show no correlation to familiarity or frequency in either size or membership. Together these results imply that sonority contours may be an important factor in word recognition and in defining word ``neighborhoods.'' Moreover, they suggest that linguistic markedness constraints may be more prevalent in performance-related phenomena than previously accepted.

  3. Longitudinal study of fingerprint recognition

    PubMed Central

    Yoon, Soweon; Jain, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Human identification by fingerprints is based on the fundamental premise that ridge patterns from distinct fingers are different (uniqueness) and a fingerprint pattern does not change over time (persistence). Although the uniqueness of fingerprints has been investigated by developing statistical models to estimate the probability of error in comparing two random samples of fingerprints, the persistence of fingerprints has remained a general belief based on only a few case studies. In this study, fingerprint match (similarity) scores are analyzed by multilevel statistical models with covariates such as time interval between two fingerprints in comparison, subject’s age, and fingerprint image quality. Longitudinal fingerprint records of 15,597 subjects are sampled from an operational fingerprint database such that each individual has at least five 10-print records over a minimum time span of 5 y. In regard to the persistence of fingerprints, the longitudinal analysis on a single (right index) finger demonstrates that (i) genuine match scores tend to significantly decrease when time interval between two fingerprints in comparison increases, whereas the change in impostor match scores is negligible; and (ii) fingerprint recognition accuracy at operational settings, nevertheless, tends to be stable as the time interval increases up to 12 y, the maximum time span in the dataset. However, the uncertainty of temporal stability of fingerprint recognition accuracy becomes substantially large if either of the two fingerprints being compared is of poor quality. The conclusions drawn from 10-finger fusion analysis coincide with the conclusions from single-finger analysis. PMID:26124106

  4. Innate Immune Recognition of EBV.

    PubMed

    Lünemann, Anna; Rowe, Martin; Nadal, David

    2015-01-01

    The ability of Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) to establish latency despite specific immune responses and to successfully persist lifelong in the human host shows that EBV has developed powerful strategies and mechanisms to exploit, evade, abolish, or downsize otherwise effective immune responses to ensure its own survival. This chapter focuses on current knowledge on innate immune responses against EBV and its evasion strategies for own benefit and summarizes the questions that remain to be tackled. Innate immune reactions against EBV originate both from the main target cells of EBV and from nontarget cells, which are elements of the innate immune system. Thus, we structured our review accordingly but with a particular focus on the innate recognition of EBV in its two stages in its life cycle, latent state and lytic replication. Specifically, we discuss (I) innate sensing and resulting innate immune responses against EBV by its main target cells, focusing on (i) EBV transmission between epithelial cells and B cells and their life cycle stages; and (ii) elements of innate immunity in EBV's target cells. Further, we debate (II) the innate recognition and resulting innate immune responses against EBV by cells other than the main target cells, focusing on (iii) myeloid cells: dendritic cells, monocytes, macrophages, and neutrophil granulocytes; and (iv) natural killer cells. Finally, we address (III) how EBV counteracts or exploits innate immunity in its latent and lytic life cycle stages, concentrating on (v) TLRs; (vi) EBERs; and (vii) microRNAs. PMID:26428378

  5. Dynamic chemistry of anion recognition

    SciTech Connect

    Custelcean, Radu

    2012-01-01

    In the past 40 years, anion recognition by synthetic receptors has grown into a rich and vibrant research topic, developing into a distinct branch of Supramolecular Chemistry. Traditional anion receptors comprise organic scaffolds functionalized with complementary binding groups that are assembled by multistep organic synthesis. Recently, a new approach to anion receptors has emerged, in which the host is dynamically self-assembled in the presence of the anionic guest, via reversible bond formation between functional building units. While coordination bonds were initially employed for the self-assembly of the anion hosts, more recent studies demonstrated that reversible covalent bonds can serve the same purpose. In both cases, due to their labile connections, the molecular constituents have the ability to assemble, dissociate, and recombine continuously, thereby creating a dynamic combinatorial library (DCL) of receptors. The anionic guests, through specific molecular recognition, may then amplify (express) the formation of a particular structure among all possible combinations (real or virtual) by shifting the equilibria involved towards the most optimal receptor. This approach is not limited to solution self-assembly, but is equally applicable to crystallization, where the fittest anion-binding crystal may be selected. Finally, the pros and cons of employing dynamic combinatorial chemistry (DCC) vs molecular design for developing anion receptors, and the implications of both approaches to selective anion separations, will be discussed.

  6. Longitudinal study of fingerprint recognition.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Soweon; Jain, Anil K

    2015-07-14

    Human identification by fingerprints is based on the fundamental premise that ridge patterns from distinct fingers are different (uniqueness) and a fingerprint pattern does not change over time (persistence). Although the uniqueness of fingerprints has been investigated by developing statistical models to estimate the probability of error in comparing two random samples of fingerprints, the persistence of fingerprints has remained a general belief based on only a few case studies. In this study, fingerprint match (similarity) scores are analyzed by multilevel statistical models with covariates such as time interval between two fingerprints in comparison, subject's age, and fingerprint image quality. Longitudinal fingerprint records of 15,597 subjects are sampled from an operational fingerprint database such that each individual has at least five 10-print records over a minimum time span of 5 y. In regard to the persistence of fingerprints, the longitudinal analysis on a single (right index) finger demonstrates that (i) genuine match scores tend to significantly decrease when time interval between two fingerprints in comparison increases, whereas the change in impostor match scores is negligible; and (ii) fingerprint recognition accuracy at operational settings, nevertheless, tends to be stable as the time interval increases up to 12 y, the maximum time span in the dataset. However, the uncertainty of temporal stability of fingerprint recognition accuracy becomes substantially large if either of the two fingerprints being compared is of poor quality. The conclusions drawn from 10-finger fusion analysis coincide with the conclusions from single-finger analysis.

  7. Effect of spectral resolution on pattern recognition analysis using passive fourier transform infrared sensor data

    SciTech Connect

    Bangalore, Arjun S.; Demirgian, Jack C.; Boparai, Amrit S.; Small, Gary W.

    1999-11-01

    The Fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) spectral data of two nerve agent simulants, diisopropyl methyl phosphonate (DIMP) and dimethyl methyl phosphonate (DMMP), are used as test cases to determine the spectral resolution that gives optimal pattern recognition performance. DIMP is used as the target analyte for detection, while DMMP is used to test the ability of the automated pattern recognition methodology to detect the analyte selectively. Interferogram data are collected by using a Midac passive FT-IR instrument. The methodology is based on the application of pattern recognition techniques to short segments of single-beam spectra obtained by Fourier processing the collected interferogram data. The work described in this article evaluates the effect of varying spectral resolution on the pattern recognition results. The objective is to determine the optimal spectral resolution to be used for data collection. The results of this study indicate that the data with a nominal spectral resolution of 16 cm{sup -1} provide sufficient selectivity to give pattern recognition results comparable to that obtained by using higher resolution data. We found that, while higher resolution does not increase selectivity sufficiently to provide better pattern recognition results, lower resolution decreases selectivity and degrades the pattern recognition results. These results can be used as guidelines to maximize detection sensitivity, to minimize the time needed for data collection, and to reduce data storage requirements. (c) 2000 Society for Applied Spectroscopy.

  8. Toward the ultimate synthesis/recognition system.

    PubMed Central

    Furui, S

    1995-01-01

    This paper predicts speech synthesis, speech recognition, and speaker recognition technology for the year 2001, and it describes the most important research problems to be solved in order to arrive at these ultimate synthesis and recognition systems. The problems for speech synthesis include natural and intelligible voice production, prosody control based on meaning, capability of controlling synthesized voice quality and choosing individual speaking style, multilingual and multidialectal synthesis, choice of application-oriented speaking styles, capability of adding emotion, and synthesis from concepts. The problems for speech recognition include robust recognition against speech variations, adaptation/normalization to variations due to environmental conditions and speakers, automatic knowledge acquisition for acoustic and linguistic modeling, spontaneous speech recognition, naturalness and ease of human-machine interaction, and recognition of emotion. The problems for speaker recognition are similar to those for speech recognition. The research topics related to all these techniques include the use of articulatory and perceptual constraints and evaluation methods for measuring the quality of technology and systems. Images Fig. 3 PMID:7479723

  9. 26 CFR 1.355-7 - Recognition of gain on certain distributions of stock or securities in connection with an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Recognition of gain on certain distributions of... Shareholders and Security Holders § 1.355-7 Recognition of gain on certain distributions of stock or securities... meaningful voice in the governance of the corporation. For purposes of determining whether a person...

  10. 26 CFR 1.355-7 - Recognition of gain on certain distributions of stock or securities in connection with an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Recognition of gain on certain distributions of...) Effects on Shareholders and Security Holders § 1.355-7 Recognition of gain on certain distributions of... meaningful voice in the governance of the corporation. For purposes of determining whether a person...

  11. 26 CFR 1.355-7 - Recognition of gain on certain distributions of stock or securities in connection with an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Recognition of gain on certain distributions of...) Effects on Shareholders and Security Holders § 1.355-7 Recognition of gain on certain distributions of... meaningful voice in the governance of the corporation. For purposes of determining whether a person...

  12. 26 CFR 1.355-7 - Recognition of gain on certain distributions of stock or securities in connection with an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Recognition of gain on certain distributions of...) Effects on Shareholders and Security Holders § 1.355-7 Recognition of gain on certain distributions of... meaningful voice in the governance of the corporation. For purposes of determining whether a person...

  13. 26 CFR 1.355-7 - Recognition of gain on certain distributions of stock or securities in connection with an...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 4 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Recognition of gain on certain distributions of... Shareholders and Security Holders § 1.355-7 Recognition of gain on certain distributions of stock or securities... meaningful voice in the governance of the corporation. For purposes of determining whether a person...

  14. Mobility in the European Chemicals Industry Sector: The Role of Transparency and Recognition of Vocational Qualifications. CEDEFOP Panorama Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rolfe, Heather

    Research was conducted in Europe to determine the following: (1) the current situation in the chemicals industry in regard to transparency, recognition, and transfer of qualifications; (2) the obstacles to transparency and recognition of qualifications in the industry; and (3) the key areas for future action and possible measures to promote…

  15. Automatic micropropagation of plants--the vision-system: graph rewriting as pattern recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schwanke, Joerg; Megnet, Roland; Jensch, Peter F.

    1993-03-01

    The automation of plant-micropropagation is necessary to produce high amounts of biomass. Plants have to be dissected on particular cutting-points. A vision-system is needed for the recognition of the cutting-points on the plants. With this background, this contribution is directed to the underlying formalism to determine cutting-points on abstract-plant models. We show the usefulness of pattern recognition by graph-rewriting along with some examples in this context.

  16. Wavelet-based ground vehicle recognition using acoustic signals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Howard C.; Karlsen, Robert E.; Gerhart, Grant R.; Meitzler, Thomas J.

    1996-03-01

    We present, in this paper, a wavelet-based acoustic signal analysis to remotely recognize military vehicles using their sound intercepted by acoustic sensors. Since expedited signal recognition is imperative in many military and industrial situations, we developed an algorithm that provides an automated, fast signal recognition once implemented in a real-time hardware system. This algorithm consists of wavelet preprocessing, feature extraction and compact signal representation, and a simple but effective statistical pattern matching. The current status of the algorithm does not require any training. The training is replaced by human selection of reference signals (e.g., squeak or engine exhaust sound) distinctive to each individual vehicle based on human perception. This allows a fast archiving of any new vehicle type in the database once the signal is collected. The wavelet preprocessing provides time-frequency multiresolution analysis using discrete wavelet transform (DWT). Within each resolution level, feature vectors are generated from statistical parameters and energy content of the wavelet coefficients. After applying our algorithm on the intercepted acoustic signals, the resultant feature vectors are compared with the reference vehicle feature vectors in the database using statistical pattern matching to determine the type of vehicle from where the signal originated. Certainly, statistical pattern matching can be replaced by an artificial neural network (ANN); however, the ANN would require training data sets and time to train the net. Unfortunately, this is not always possible for many real world situations, especially collecting data sets from unfriendly ground vehicles to train the ANN. Our methodology using wavelet preprocessing and statistical pattern matching provides robust acoustic signal recognition. We also present an example of vehicle recognition using acoustic signals collected from two different military ground vehicles. In this paper, we will

  17. Intelligent Facial Recognition Systems: Technology advancements for security applications

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, C.L.

    1993-07-01

    Insider problems such as theft and sabotage can occur within the security and surveillance realm of operations when unauthorized people obtain access to sensitive areas. A possible solution to these problems is a means to identify individuals (not just credentials or badges) in a given sensitive area and provide full time personnel accountability. One approach desirable at Department of Energy facilities for access control and/or personnel identification is an Intelligent Facial Recognition System (IFRS) that is non-invasive to personnel. Automatic facial recognition does not require the active participation of the enrolled subjects, unlike most other biological measurement (biometric) systems (e.g., fingerprint, hand geometry, or eye retinal scan systems). It is this feature that makes an IFRS attractive for applications other than access control such as emergency evacuation verification, screening, and personnel tracking. This paper discusses current technology that shows promising results for DOE and other security applications. A survey of research and development in facial recognition identified several companies and universities that were interested and/or involved in the area. A few advanced prototype systems were also identified. Sandia National Laboratories is currently evaluating facial recognition systems that are in the advanced prototype stage. The initial application for the evaluation is access control in a controlled environment with a constant background and with cooperative subjects. Further evaluations will be conducted in a less controlled environment, which may include a cluttered background and subjects that are not looking towards the camera. The outcome of the evaluations will help identify areas of facial recognition systems that need further development and will help to determine the effectiveness of the current systems for security applications.

  18. Object Recognition using Feature- and Color-Based Methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duong, Tuan; Duong, Vu; Stubberud, Allen

    2008-01-01

    An improved adaptive method of processing image data in an artificial neural network has been developed to enable automated, real-time recognition of possibly moving objects under changing (including suddenly changing) conditions of illumination and perspective. The method involves a combination of two prior object-recognition methods one based on adaptive detection of shape features and one based on adaptive color segmentation to enable recognition in situations in which either prior method by itself may be inadequate. The chosen prior feature-based method is known as adaptive principal-component analysis (APCA); the chosen prior color-based method is known as adaptive color segmentation (ACOSE). These methods are made to interact with each other in a closed-loop system to obtain an optimal solution of the object-recognition problem in a dynamic environment. One of the results of the interaction is to increase, beyond what would otherwise be possible, the accuracy of the determination of a region of interest (containing an object that one seeks to recognize) within an image. Another result is to provide a minimized adaptive step that can be used to update the results obtained by the two component methods when changes of color and apparent shape occur. The net effect is to enable the neural network to update its recognition output and improve its recognition capability via an adaptive learning sequence. In principle, the improved method could readily be implemented in integrated circuitry to make a compact, low-power, real-time object-recognition system. It has been proposed to demonstrate the feasibility of such a system by integrating a 256-by-256 active-pixel sensor with APCA, ACOSE, and neural processing circuitry on a single chip. It has been estimated that such a system on a chip would have a volume no larger than a few cubic centimeters, could operate at a rate as high as 1,000 frames per second, and would consume in the order of milliwatts of power.

  19. Facial recognition at the CIA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gragg, Susan

    1997-01-01

    Law enforcement agencies need to identify suspects as they travel around the world. Terrorists and others change all sorts of information about themselves but their faces remain the same. The first operational facial recognition system (face trace) was developed at the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) in the late eighties. It combines image analysis technology with collateral information to create an 'electronic mug book.' Using some simple collateral information about a suspect (height, age and sex) and a photograph, the system gives users the ability to identify an unknown person with a reasonable probability. The system matches information extracted from the photographs with similar information extracted from a database of photographs of existing suspects. The technology was subsequently transferred to the Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS) for use by the Border Patrol.

  20. Opportunity recognition in complex environments

    SciTech Connect

    Pryor, L.

    1996-12-31

    An agent operating in an unpredictable world must be able to take advantage of opportunities but cannot afford to perform a detailed analysis of the effects of every nuance of the current situation on its goals if it is to respond in a timely manner. This paper describes a filtering mechanism that enables the effective recognition of opportunities. The mechanism is based on a characterization of the world in terms of reference features, features that are both cheap and functional and that appear to be prevalent in everyday life. Its use enables the plan execution system PARETO to recognize types of opportunities that other systems cannot. Reference features can also play a role in the detection of threats, and may be involved in the development of expertise.

  1. Place recognition using batlike sonar.

    PubMed

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map. PMID:27481189

  2. Plant pattern-recognition receptors.

    PubMed

    Zipfel, Cyril

    2014-07-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to would-be pathogens in their immediate environment. Yet, despite relying on innate immunity only, plants are resistant to most microbes. They employ pattern-recognition receptors (PRRs) for sensitive and rapid detection of the potential danger caused by microbes and pests. Plant PRRs are either surface-localized receptor kinases (RKs) or receptor-like proteins (RLPs) containing various ligand-binding ectodomains that perceive pathogen-associated molecular patterns (PAMPs) or damage-associated molecular patterns (DAMPs). In this review, I summarize our current knowledge of plant PRRs and their ligands, illustrating the multiple molecular strategies employed by plant PRRs to activate innate immune signaling to survive.

  3. Aircraft recognition and tracking device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Filis, Dimitrios P.; Renios, Christos I.

    2011-11-01

    The technology of aircraft recognition and tracking has various applications in all areas of air navigation, be they civil or military, spanning from air traffic control and regulation at civilian airports to anti-aircraft weapon handling and guidance for military purposes.1, 18 The system presented in this thesis is an alternative implementation of identifying and tracking flying objects, which benefits from the optical spectrum by using an optical camera built into a servo motor (pan-tilt unit). More specifically, through the purpose-developed software, when a target (aircraft) enters the field of view of the camera18, it is both detected and identified.5, 22 Then the servo motor, being provided with data on target position and velocity, tracks the aircraft while it is in constant communication with the camera (Fig. 1). All the features are so designed as to operate under real time conditions.

  4. Recognition of Handwriting from Electromyography

    PubMed Central

    Linderman, Michael; Lebedev, Mikhail A.; Erlichman, Joseph S.

    2009-01-01

    Handwriting – one of the most important developments in human culture – is also a methodological tool in several scientific disciplines, most importantly handwriting recognition methods, graphology and medical diagnostics. Previous studies have relied largely on the analyses of handwritten traces or kinematic analysis of handwriting; whereas electromyographic (EMG) signals associated with handwriting have received little attention. Here we show for the first time, a method in which EMG signals generated by hand and forearm muscles during handwriting activity are reliably translated into both algorithm-generated handwriting traces and font characters using decoding algorithms. Our results demonstrate the feasibility of recreating handwriting solely from EMG signals – the finding that can be utilized in computer peripherals and myoelectric prosthetic devices. Moreover, this approach may provide a rapid and sensitive method for diagnosing a variety of neurogenerative diseases before other symptoms become clear. PMID:19707562

  5. Task-oriented situation recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bauer, Alexander; Fischer, Yvonne

    2010-04-01

    From the advances in computer vision methods for the detection, tracking and recognition of objects in video streams, new opportunities for video surveillance arise: In the future, automated video surveillance systems will be able to detect critical situations early enough to enable an operator to take preventive actions, instead of using video material merely for forensic investigations. However, problems such as limited computational resources, privacy regulations and a constant change in potential threads have to be addressed by a practical automated video surveillance system. In this paper, we show how these problems can be addressed using a task-oriented approach. The system architecture of the task-oriented video surveillance system NEST and an algorithm for the detection of abnormal behavior as part of the system are presented and illustrated for the surveillance of guests inside a video-monitored building.

  6. Place recognition using batlike sonar.

    PubMed

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map.

  7. Recognition of movement object collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Hsiao Tsu; Sun, Geng-tian; Zhang, Yan

    1991-03-01

    The paper explores the collision recognition of two objects in both crisscross and revolution motions A mathematical model has been established based on the continuation theory. The objects of any shape may be regarded as being built of many 3siniplexes or their convex hulls. Therefore the collision problem of two object in motion can be reduced to the collision of two corresponding 3siinplexes on two respective objects accordingly. Thus an optimized algorithm is developed for collision avoidance which is suitable for computer control and eliminating the need for vision aid. With this algorithm computation time has been reduced significantly. This algorithm is applicable to the path planning of mobile robots And also is applicable to collision avoidance of the anthropomorphic arms grasping two complicated shaped objects. The algorithm is realized using LISP language on a VAX8350 minicomputer.

  8. Proline-rich Sequence Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Schlundt, Andreas; Sticht, Jana; Piotukh, Kirill; Kosslick, Daniela; Jahnke, Nadin; Keller, Sandro; Schuemann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Freund, Christian

    2009-01-01

    The tumor maintenance protein Tsg101 has recently gained much attention because of its involvement in endosomal sorting, virus release, cytokinesis, and cancerogenesis. The ubiquitin-E2-like variant (UEV) domain of the protein interacts with proline-rich sequences of target proteins that contain P(S/T)AP amino acid motifs and weakly binds to the ubiquitin moiety of proteins committed to sorting or degradation. Here we performed peptide spot analysis and phage display to refine the peptide binding specificity of the Tsg101 UEV domain. A mass spectrometric proteomics approach that combines domain-based pulldown experiments, binding site inactivation, and stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) was then used to delineate the relative importance of the peptide and ubiquitin binding sites. Clearly “PTAP” interactions dominate target recognition, and we identified several novel binders as for example the poly(A)-binding protein 1 (PABP1), Sec24b, NFκB2, and eIF4b. For PABP1 and eIF4b the interactions were confirmed in the context of the corresponding full-length proteins in cellular lysates. Therefore, our results strongly suggest additional roles of Tsg101 in cellular regulation of mRNA translation. Regulation of Tsg101 itself by the ubiquitin ligase TAL (Tsg101-associated ligase) is most likely conferred by a single PSAP binding motif that enables the interaction with Tsg101 UEV. Together with the results from the accompanying article (Kofler, M., Schuemann, M., Merz, C., Kosslick, D., Schlundt, A., Tannert, A., Schaefer, M., Lührmann, R., Krause, E., and Freund, C. (2009) Proline-rich sequence recognition: I. Marking GYF and WW domain assembly sites in early spliceosomal complexes. Mol. Cell. Proteomics 8, 2461–2473) on GYF and WW domain pathways our work defines major proline-rich sequence-mediated interaction networks that contribute to the modular assembly of physiologically relevant protein complexes. PMID:19542561

  9. Neural mechanisms for voice recognition.

    PubMed

    Andics, Attila; McQueen, James M; Petersson, Karl Magnus; Gál, Viktor; Rudas, Gábor; Vidnyánszky, Zoltán

    2010-10-01

    We investigated neural mechanisms that support voice recognition in a training paradigm with fMRI. The same listeners were trained on different weeks to categorize the mid-regions of voice-morph continua as an individual's voice. Stimuli implicitly defined a voice-acoustics space, and training explicitly defined a voice-identity space. The pre-defined centre of the voice category was shifted from the acoustic centre each week in opposite directions, so the same stimuli had different training histories on different tests. Cortical sensitivity to voice similarity appeared over different time-scales and at different representational stages. First, there were short-term adaptation effects: increasing acoustic similarity to the directly preceding stimulus led to haemodynamic response reduction in the middle/posterior STS and in right ventrolateral prefrontal regions. Second, there were longer-term effects: response reduction was found in the orbital/insular cortex for stimuli that were most versus least similar to the acoustic mean of all preceding stimuli, and, in the anterior temporal pole, the deep posterior STS and the amygdala, for stimuli that were most versus least similar to the trained voice-identity category mean. These findings are interpreted as effects of neural sharpening of long-term stored typical acoustic and category-internal values. The analyses also reveal anatomically separable voice representations: one in a voice-acoustics space and one in a voice-identity space. Voice-identity representations flexibly followed the trained identity shift, and listeners with a greater identity effect were more accurate at recognizing familiar voices. Voice recognition is thus supported by neural voice spaces that are organized around flexible 'mean voice' representations. PMID:20553895

  10. Cortical dynamics of word recognition.

    PubMed

    Mainy, Nelly; Jung, Julien; Baciu, Monica; Kahane, Philippe; Schoendorff, Benjamin; Minotti, Lorella; Hoffmann, Dominique; Bertrand, Olivier; Lachaux, Jean-Philippe

    2008-11-01

    While functional neuroimaging studies have helped elucidate major regions implicated in word recognition, much less is known about the dynamics of the associated activations or the actual neural processes of their functional network. We used intracerebral electroencephalography recordings in 10 patients with epilepsy to directly measure neural activity in the temporal and frontal lobes during written words' recognition, predominantly in the left hemisphere. The patients were presented visually with consonant strings, pseudo-words, and words and performed a hierarchical paradigm contrasting semantic processes (living vs. nonliving word categorization task), phonological processes (rhyme decision task on pseudo-words), and visual processes (visual analysis of consonant strings). Stimuli triggered a cascade of modulations in the gamma-band (>40 Hz) with reproducible timing and task-sensitivity throughout the functional reading network: the earliest gamma-band activations were observed for all stimuli in the mesial basal temporal lobe at 150 ms, reaching the word form area in the mid fusiform gyrus at 200 ms, evidencing a superiority effect for word-like stimuli. Peaks of gamma-band activations were then observed for word-like stimuli after 400 ms in the anterior and middle portion of the superior temporal gyrus (BA 38 and BA 22 respectively), in the pars triangularis of Broca's area for the semantic task (BAs 45 and 47), and in the pars opercularis for the phonological task (BA 44). Concurrently, we observed a two-pronged effect in the prefrontal cortex (BAs 9 and 46), with nonspecific sustained dorsal activation related to sustained attention and, more ventrally, a strong reflex deactivation around 500 ms, possibly due to semantic working memory reset. PMID:17712785

  11. The Commission on Magnet® Recognition.

    PubMed

    Moran, Janice W

    2016-09-01

    The American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC) Commission on Magnet® Recognition is a voluntary governing body that oversees the Magnet Recognition Program®. Commission members are appointed by the ANCC Board of Directors and are expert representatives from various sectors of the nursing community. In addition, 1 commission member represents public consumers. PMID:27556648

  12. Adult Word Recognition and Visual Sequential Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holmes, V. M.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments were conducted investigating the role of visual sequential memory skill in the word recognition efficiency of undergraduate university students. Word recognition was assessed in a lexical decision task using regularly and strangely spelt words, and nonwords that were either standard orthographically legal strings or items made from…

  13. Performing speech recognition research with hypercard

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shepherd, Chip

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to describe a HyperCard-based system for performing speech recognition research and to instruct Human Factors professionals on how to use the system to obtain detailed data about the user interface of a prototype speech recognition application.

  14. Voice Recognition: A New Assessment Tool?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Darla

    2005-01-01

    This article presents the results of a study conducted in Anchorage, Alaska, that evaluated the accuracy and efficiency of using voice recognition (VR) technology to collect oral reading fluency data for classroom-based assessments. The primary research question was as follows: Is voice recognition technology a valid and reliable alternative to…

  15. The Status of Voice Recognition Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miller, Ruth

    1986-01-01

    After examining the historical view of voice recognition, voice recognition technology today, the future of this technology, and information processing applications, the author states that educators must begin to prepare for tomorrow's technology now by researching current literature, analyzing hardware and software needs, and emphasizing oral…

  16. Short-Term Recognition Memory in Children

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Calfee, Robert C.

    1970-01-01

    A series of studies indicated that performance on serial recognition memory tasks was relatively constant over a wide range of age and IQ, and except for response biases and forgetting rate, recognition memory processes of normal and retarded children appeared to be identical with those of adults. (Author/DR)

  17. Sources of Interference in Recognition Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Annis, Jeffrey; Malmberg, Kenneth J.; Criss, Amy H.; Shiffrin, Richard M.

    2013-01-01

    Recognition memory accuracy is harmed by prior testing (a.k.a., output interference [OI]; Tulving & Arbuckle, 1966). In several experiments, we interpolated various tasks between recognition test trials. The stimuli and the tasks were more similar (lexical decision [LD] of words and nonwords) or less similar (gender identification of male and…

  18. Object Recognition Memory and the Rodent Hippocampus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broadbent, Nicola J.; Gaskin, Stephane; Squire, Larry R.; Clark, Robert E.

    2010-01-01

    In rodents, the novel object recognition task (NOR) has become a benchmark task for assessing recognition memory. Yet, despite its widespread use, a consensus has not developed about which brain structures are important for task performance. We assessed both the anterograde and retrograde effects of hippocampal lesions on performance in the NOR…

  19. Discovery and Recognition of the Artistically Talented.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wenner, Gene C.

    1985-01-01

    The National Foundation for the Advancement of the Arts, a program designed to provide national recognition and support for artistically talented youth, sponsors the Arts Recognition and Talent Search Program (ARTS). ARTS addresses areas of theater, visual arts, writing, dance, and music. The judging process is described. (Author/CL)

  20. Rapid Naming Speed and Chinese Character Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Liao, Chen-Huei; Georgiou, George K.; Parrila, Rauno

    2008-01-01

    We examined the relationship between rapid naming speed (RAN) and Chinese character recognition accuracy and fluency. Sixty-three grade 2 and 54 grade 4 Taiwanese children were administered four RAN tasks (colors, digits, Zhu-Yin-Fu-Hao, characters), and two character recognition tasks. RAN tasks accounted for more reading variance in grade 4 than…

  1. Robotic CCD microscope for enhanced crystal recognition

    DOEpatents

    Segelke, Brent W.; Toppani, Dominique

    2007-11-06

    A robotic CCD microscope and procedures to automate crystal recognition. The robotic CCD microscope and procedures enables more accurate crystal recognition, leading to fewer false negative and fewer false positives, and enable detection of smaller crystals compared to other methods available today.

  2. Sleep Enhances Explicit Recollection in Recognition Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drosopoulos, Spyridon; Wagner, Ullrich; Born, Jan

    2005-01-01

    Recognition memory is considered to be supported by two different memory processes, i.e., the explicit recollection of information about a previous event and an implicit process of recognition based on a contextual sense of familiarity. Both types of memory supposedly rely on distinct memory systems. Sleep is known to enhance the consolidation of…

  3. Syllable Transposition Effects in Korean Word Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Chang H.; Kwon, Youan; Kim, Kyungil; Rastle, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Research on the impact of letter transpositions in visual word recognition has yielded important clues about the nature of orthographic representations. This study investigated the impact of syllable transpositions on the recognition of Korean multisyllabic words. Results showed that rejection latencies in visual lexical decision for…

  4. The first crystal structure of human RNase 6 reveals a novel substrate-binding and cleavage site arrangement

    PubMed Central

    Prats-Ejarque, Guillem; Arranz-Trullén, Javier; Blanco, Jose A.; Pulido, David; Nogués, M. Victòria; Moussaoui, Mohammed; Boix, Ester

    2016-01-01

    Human RNase 6 is a cationic secreted protein that belongs to the RNase A superfamily. Its expression is induced in neutrophils and monocytes upon bacterial infection, suggesting a role in host defence. We present here the crystal structure of RNase 6 obtained at 1.72 Å (1 Å=0.1 nm) resolution, which is the first report for the protein 3D structure and thereby setting the basis for functional studies. The structure shows an overall kidney-shaped globular fold shared with the other known family members. Three sulfate anions bound to RNase 6 were found, interacting with residues at the main active site (His15, His122 and Gln14) and cationic surface-exposed residues (His36, His39, Arg66 and His67). Kinetic characterization, together with prediction of protein–nucleotide complexes by molecular dynamics, was applied to analyse the RNase 6 substrate nitrogenous base and phosphate selectivity. Our results reveal that, although RNase 6 is a moderate catalyst in comparison with the pancreatic RNase type, its structure includes lineage-specific features that facilitate its activity towards polymeric nucleotide substrates. In particular, enzyme interactions at the substrate 5′ end can provide an endonuclease-type cleavage pattern. Interestingly, the RNase 6 crystal structure revealed a novel secondary active site conformed by the His36–His39 dyad that facilitates the polynucleotide substrate catalysis. PMID:27013146

  5. Articulation effects in melody recognition memory.

    PubMed

    Wee Hun Lim, Stephen; Goh, Winston D

    2013-09-01

    Various surface features-timbre, tempo, and pitch-influence melody recognition memory, but articulation format effects, if any, remain unknown. For the first time, these effects were examined. In Experiment 1, melodies that remained in the same, or appeared in a different but similar, articulation format from study to test were recognized better than were melodies that were presented in a distinct format at test. A similar articulation format adequately induced matching processes to enhance recognition. Experiment 2 revealed that melodies rated as perceptually dissimilar on the basis of the location of the articulation mismatch did not impair recognition performance, suggesting an important boundary condition for articulation format effects on memory recognition-the matching of the memory trace and recognition probe may depend more on the overall proportion, rather than the temporal location, of the mismatch. The present findings are discussed in terms of a global matching advantage hypothesis. PMID:23410265

  6. Review of chart recognition in document images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yan; Lu, Xiaoqing; Qin, Yeyang; Tang, Zhi; Xu, Jianbo

    2013-01-01

    As an effective information transmitting way, chart is widely used to represent scientific statistics datum in books, research papers, newspapers etc. Though textual information is still the major source of data, there has been an increasing trend of introducing graphs, pictures, and figures into the information pool. Text recognition techniques for documents have been accomplished using optical character recognition (OCR) software. Chart recognition techniques as a necessary supplement of OCR for document images are still an unsolved problem due to the great subjectiveness and variety of charts styles. This paper reviews the development process of chart recognition techniques in the past decades and presents the focuses of current researches. The whole process of chart recognition is presented systematically, which mainly includes three parts: chart segmentation, chart classification, and chart Interpretation. In each part, the latest research work is introduced. In the last, the paper concludes with a summary and promising future research direction.

  7. Modal-Power-Based Haptic Motion Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kasahara, Yusuke; Shimono, Tomoyuki; Kuwahara, Hiroaki; Sato, Masataka; Ohnishi, Kouhei

    Motion recognition based on sensory information is important for providing assistance to human using robots. Several studies have been carried out on motion recognition based on image information. However, in the motion of humans contact with an object can not be evaluated precisely by image-based recognition. This is because the considering force information is very important for describing contact motion. In this paper, a modal-power-based haptic motion recognition is proposed; modal power is considered to reveal information on both position and force. Modal power is considered to be one of the defining features of human motion. A motion recognition algorithm based on linear discriminant analysis is proposed to distinguish between similar motions. Haptic information is extracted using a bilateral master-slave system. Then, the observed motion is decomposed in terms of primitive functions in a modal space. The experimental results show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  8. Gender recognition from point-light walkers.

    PubMed

    Pollick, Frank E; Kay, Jim W; Heim, Katrin; Stringer, Rebecca

    2005-12-01

    Point-light displays of human gait provide information sufficient to recognize the gender of a walker and are taken as evidence of the exquisite tuning of the visual system to biological motion. The authors revisit this topic with the goals of quantifying human efficiency at gender recognition. To achieve this, the authors first derive an ideal observer for gender recognition on the basis of center of moment (J. E. Cutting, D. R. Proffitt, & L. T. Kozlowski, 1978) and, with the use of anthropometric data from various populations, show optimal recognition of approximately 79% correct. Next, they perform a meta-analysis of 21 experiments examining gender recognition, obtaining accuracies of 66% correct for a side view and 71% for other views. Finally, results of the meta-analysis and the ideal observer are combined to obtain estimates of human efficiency at gender recognition of 26% for the side view and 47% for other views. PMID:16366787

  9. Domain swapping between homologous bacterial small RNAs dissects processing and Hfq binding determinants and uncovers an aptamer for conditional RNase E cleavage

    PubMed Central

    Göpel, Yvonne; Khan, Muna Ayesha; Görke, Boris

    2016-01-01

    In E. coli, small RNA GlmZ activates the glmS mRNA by base-pairing in an Hfq dependent manner. When not required, GlmZ is bound by adaptor protein RapZ and recruited to RNase E, which cleaves GlmZ in its base-pairing sequence. Small RNA GlmY counteracts cleavage of GlmZ by sequestration of RapZ. Although both sRNAs are highly homologous, only GlmZ specifically binds Hfq and undergoes cleavage by RNase E. We used domain swapping to identify the responsible modules. Two elements, the 3′ terminal oligo(U) stretch and the base-pairing region enable GlmZ to interact with Hfq. Accordingly, Hfq inhibits cleavage of GlmZ, directing it to base-pairing. Intriguingly, the central stem loop of GlmZ is decisive for cleavage, whereas the sequence comprising the actual cleavage site is dispensable. Assisted by RapZ, RNase E cleaves any RNA fused to the 3′ end of this module. These results suggest a novel mode for RNase E recognition, in which one of the required handholds in the substrate is replaced by an RNA binding protein. This device can generate RNAs of interest in their 5′ monophosphorylated form on demand. As these species are rapidly degraded, this tool allows to regulate gene expression post-transcriptionally by modulation of RapZ levels. PMID:26531825

  10. Practical automatic Arabic license plate recognition system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mohammad, Khader; Agaian, Sos; Saleh, Hani

    2011-02-01

    Since 1970's, the need of an automatic license plate recognition system, sometimes referred as Automatic License Plate Recognition system, has been increasing. A license plate recognition system is an automatic system that is able to recognize a license plate number, extracted from image sensors. In specific, Automatic License Plate Recognition systems are being used in conjunction with various transportation systems in application areas such as law enforcement (e.g. speed limit enforcement) and commercial usages such as parking enforcement and automatic toll payment private and public entrances, border control, theft and vandalism control. Vehicle license plate recognition has been intensively studied in many countries. Due to the different types of license plates being used, the requirement of an automatic license plate recognition system is different for each country. [License plate detection using cluster run length smoothing algorithm ].Generally, an automatic license plate localization and recognition system is made up of three modules; license plate localization, character segmentation and optical character recognition modules. This paper presents an Arabic license plate recognition system that is insensitive to character size, font, shape and orientation with extremely high accuracy rate. The proposed system is based on a combination of enhancement, license plate localization, morphological processing, and feature vector extraction using the Haar transform. The performance of the system is fast due to classification of alphabet and numerals based on the license plate organization. Experimental results for license plates of two different Arab countries show an average of 99 % successful license plate localization and recognition in a total of more than 20 different images captured from a complex outdoor environment. The results run times takes less time compared to conventional and many states of art methods.

  11. Machine parts recognition using a trinary associative memory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Awwal, Abdul Ahad S.; Karim, Mohammad A.; Liu, Hua-Kuang

    1989-01-01

    The convergence mechanism of vectors in Hopfield's neural network in relation to recognition of partially known patterns is studied in terms of both inner products and Hamming distance. It has been shown that Hamming distance should not always be used in determining the convergence of vectors. Instead, inner product weighting coefficients play a more dominant role in certain data representations for determining the convergence mechanism. A trinary neuron representation for associative memory is found to be more effective for associative recall. Applications of the trinary associative memory to reconstruct machine part images that are partially missing are demonstrated by means of computer simulation as examples of the usefulness of this approach.

  12. Recognition of Endogenous Nucleic Acids by the Innate Immune System.

    PubMed

    Roers, Axel; Hiller, Björn; Hornung, Veit

    2016-04-19

    Recognition of DNA and RNA by endosomal and cytosolic sensors constitutes a central element in the detection of microbial invaders by the innate immune system. However, the capacity of these sensors to discriminate between microbial and endogenous nucleic acids is limited. Over the past few years, evidence has accumulated to suggest that endogenous DNA or RNA species can engage nucleic-acid-sensing pattern-recognition receptors that can trigger or sustain detrimental pathology. Here, we review principles of how the activation of innate sensors by host nucleic acids is prevented in the steady state and discuss four important determinants of whether a nucleic-acid-driven innate response is mounted. These include structural features of the ligand being sensed, the subcellular location and quantity of pathogen-derived or endogenous nucleic acids, and the regulation of sensor-activation thresholds. Furthermore, we emphasize disease mechanisms initiated by failure to discriminate self from non-self in nucleic acid detection.

  13. CD1 mediated T cell recognition of glycolipids

    PubMed Central

    Zajonc, Dirk M.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2007-01-01

    Summary Specialized subsets of T lymphocytes can distinguish the carbohydrate portions of microbial and self-glycolipids when they are presented by proteins in the CD1 family of antigen presenting molecules. Recent immunochemical and structural analyses indicate that the chemical composition of the presented carbohydrate, together with its precise orientation above the CD1 binding groove, determines if a particular T cell is activated. More recently, however, it has been shown that the lipid backbone of the glycolipid, buried inside the CD1 protein, also can have an impact on T cell activation. While glycolipid recognition is a relatively new category of T cell specificity, the powerful combination of microbial antigen discovery and structural biochemistry has provided great insight into the mechanism of carbohydrate recognition. PMID:17951048

  14. Target Recognition Using Neural Networks for Model Deformation Measurements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ross, Richard W.; Hibler, David L.

    1999-01-01

    Optical measurements provide a non-invasive method for measuring deformation of wind tunnel models. Model deformation systems use targets mounted or painted on the surface of the model to identify known positions, and photogrammetric methods are used to calculate 3-D positions of the targets on the model from digital 2-D images. Under ideal conditions, the reflective targets are placed against a dark background and provide high-contrast images, aiding in target recognition. However, glints of light reflecting from the model surface, or reduced contrast caused by light source or model smoothness constraints, can compromise accurate target determination using current algorithmic methods. This paper describes a technique using a neural network and image processing technologies which increases the reliability of target recognition systems. Unlike algorithmic methods, the neural network can be trained to identify the characteristic patterns that distinguish targets from other objects of similar size and appearance and can adapt to changes in lighting and environmental conditions.

  15. Model Based Object Recognition Using LORD LTS-300 Touch Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roach, J. W.; Paripati, P. K.; Wade, M.

    1988-03-01

    This paper reports the result of a model driven touch sensor recognition experiment. The touch sensor employed is a large field tactile array. Object features appropriate for touch sensor recognition are extracted from a geometric model of an object, the dual spherical image. Both geometric and dynamic features are used to identify objects and their position and orientation on the touch sensor. Experiments show that geometric features extracted from the model are effective but that dynamic features must be determined empirically. Correct object identification rates even for very similar objects exceed ninety percent, a success rate much higher than we would have expected from only two-dimensional contact patterns. Position and orientation of objects once identified are very reliable. We conclude that large field tactile sensors could prove very useful in the automatic palletizing problem when object models (from a CAD system, for example) can be utilized.

  16. Endonuclease recognition sites mapped on Zea mays chloroplast DNA

    PubMed Central

    Bedbrook, John R.; Bogorad, Lawrence

    1976-01-01

    The closed-circular DNA molecules of 85 × 106 daltons from Zea mays chloroplasts were isolated, digested with the restriction endonucleases Sal I, Bam I, and EcoRI, and the resulting fragments sized by agarose gel electrophoresis. A map of maize chloroplast DNA showing the relative location of all the Sal I recognition sequences and many of the Bam I and EcoRI recognition sites was determined. A DNA sequence representing approximately 15% of the Zea mays chloroplast genome is repeated. The two copies of this sequence are in an inverted orientation with respect to one another and are separated by a nonhomologous sequence representing approximately 10% of the genome length. The inverted repeats contain the genes for chloroplast ribosomal RNAs. Images PMID:16592373

  17. Helix formation in arrestin accompanies recognition of photoactivated rhodopsin.

    PubMed

    Feuerstein, Sophie E; Pulvermüller, Alexander; Hartmann, Rudolf; Granzin, Joachim; Stoldt, Matthias; Henklein, Peter; Ernst, Oliver P; Heck, Martin; Willbold, Dieter; Koenig, Bernd W

    2009-11-17

    Binding of arrestin to photoactivated phosphorylated rhodopsin terminates the amplification of visual signals in photoreceptor cells. Currently, there is no crystal structure of a rhodopsin-arrestin complex available, although structures of unbound rhodopsin and arrestin have been determined. High-affinity receptor binding is dependent on distinct arrestin sites responsible for recognition of rhodopsin activation and phosphorylation. The loop connecting beta-strands V and VI in rod arrestin has been implicated in the recognition of active rhodopsin. We report the structure of receptor-bound arrestin peptide Arr(67-77) mimicking this loop based on solution NMR data. The peptide binds photoactivated rhodopsin in the unphosphorylated and phosphorylated form with similar affinities and stabilizes the metarhodopsin II photointermediate. A largely alpha-helical conformation of the receptor-bound peptide is observed. PMID:19835414

  18. Core promoter recognition complex changes accompany liver development.

    PubMed

    D'Alessio, Joseph A; Ng, Raymond; Willenbring, Holger; Tjian, Robert

    2011-03-01

    Recent studies of several key developmental transitions have brought into question the long held view of the basal transcriptional apparatus as ubiquitous and invariant. In an effort to better understand the role of core promoter recognition and coactivator complex switching in cellular differentiation, we have examined changes in transcription factor IID (TFIID) and cofactor required for Sp1 activation/Mediator during mouse liver development. Here we show that the differentiation of fetal liver progenitors to adult hepatocytes involves a wholesale depletion of canonical cofactor required for Sp1 activation/Mediator and TFIID complexes at both the RNA and protein level, and that this alteration likely involves silencing of transcription factor promoters as well as protein degradation. It will be intriguing for future studies to determine if a novel and as yet unknown core promoter recognition complex takes the place of TFIID in adult hepatocytes and to uncover the mechanisms that down-regulate TFIID during this critical developmental transition. PMID:21368148

  19. Markov sequential pattern recognition : dependency and the unknown class.

    SciTech Connect

    Malone, Kevin Thomas; Haschke, Greg Benjamin; Koch, Mark William

    2004-10-01

    The sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) minimizes the expected number of observations to a decision and can solve problems in sequential pattern recognition. Some problems have dependencies between the observations, and Markov chains can model dependencies where the state occupancy probability is geometric. For a non-geometric process we show how to use the effective amount of independent information to modify the decision process, so that we can account for the remaining dependencies. Along with dependencies between observations, a successful system needs to handle the unknown class in unconstrained environments. For example, in an acoustic pattern recognition problem any sound source not belonging to the target set is in the unknown class. We show how to incorporate goodness of fit (GOF) classifiers into the Markov SPRT, and determine the worse case nontarget model. We also develop a multiclass Markov SPRT using the GOF concept.

  20. Parallel algorithm for target recognition using a multiclass hash database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Uddin, Mosleh; Myler, Harley R.

    1998-07-01

    A method for recognition of unknown targets using large databases of model targets is discussed. Our approach is based on parallel processing of multi-class hash databases that are generated off-line. A geometric hashing technique is used on feature points of model targets to create each class database. Bit level coding is then performed to represent the models in an image format. Parallelism is achieved during the recognition phase. Feature points of an unknown target are passed to parallel processors each accessing an individual class database. Each processor reads a particular class of hash data base and indexes feature points of the unknown target. A simple voting technique is applied to determine the best match model with the unknown. The paper discusses our technique and the results from testing with unknown FLIR targets.

  1. Crop species recognition and mensuration in the Sacramento Valley

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomson, F. J.

    1973-01-01

    The goal of the second recognition map was to delineate various crop species in a portion of the Sacramento Valley, and at the same time to determine how accurately each could be classified and measured from ERTS-1 data. The new recognition map, a new and concise display of the old map, and classification and mensuration accuracy data are presented and discussed. The mensuration accuracy, in particular, is affected by the presence of an edge effect one resolution wide surrounding nearly all fields. Points on the edge are misclassified because they contain a mixture of, crop and bare soil. Using a processing technique to estimate the proportions of unresolved objects in this edge region, a much improved mensuration capability will be demonstrated.

  2. Apply lightweight recognition algorithms in optical music recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pham, Viet-Khoi; Nguyen, Hai-Dang; Nguyen-Khac, Tung-Anh; Tran, Minh-Triet

    2015-02-01

    The problems of digitalization and transformation of musical scores into machine-readable format are necessary to be solved since they help people to enjoy music, to learn music, to conserve music sheets, and even to assist music composers. However, the results of existing methods still require improvements for higher accuracy. Therefore, the authors propose lightweight algorithms for Optical Music Recognition to help people to recognize and automatically play musical scores. In our proposal, after removing staff lines and extracting symbols, each music symbol is represented as a grid of identical M ∗ N cells, and the features are extracted and classified with multiple lightweight SVM classifiers. Through experiments, the authors find that the size of 10 ∗ 12 cells yields the highest precision value. Experimental results on the dataset consisting of 4929 music symbols taken from 18 modern music sheets in the Synthetic Score Database show that our proposed method is able to classify printed musical scores with accuracy up to 99.56%.

  3. Recognition of a signal peptide by the signal recognition particle

    PubMed Central

    Janda, Claudia Y.; Li, Jade; Oubridge, Chris; Hernández, Helena; Robinson, Carol V.; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2010-01-01

    Targeting of proteins to appropriate sub-cellular compartments is a crucial process in all living cells. Secretory and membrane proteins usually contain an N-terminal signal peptide, which is recognised by the signal recognition particle (SRP) when nascent polypeptide chains emerge from the ribosome. The SRP-ribosome nascent chain complex is then targeted through its GTP-dependent interaction with SRP-receptor to the protein-conducting channel on endoplasmic reticulum membrane in eukaryotes or plasma membrane in bacteria. A universally conserved component of SRP1, 2, SRP54 or its bacterial homolog, fifty-four homolog (Ffh), binds the signal peptides which have a highly divergent sequence divisible into a positively charged n-region, an h-region commonly containing 8-20 hydrophobic residues and a polar c-region 3-5. No structure has been reported that exemplified SRP54 binding of any signal sequence. We have produced a fusion protein between Sulfolobus solfataricus SRP54 and a signal peptide connected via a flexible linker. This fusion protein oligomerises in solution, through interaction between the SRP54 and signal peptide moieties belonging to different chains, and it is functional, able to bind SRP RNA and SRP-receptor FtsY. Here we present the crystal structure at 3.5 Å resolution of an SRP54-signal peptide complex in the dimer, which reveals how a signal sequence is recognised by SRP54. PMID:20364120

  4. A new paradigm for pattern recognition of drugs.

    PubMed

    Potemkin, Vladimir A; Grishina, Maria A

    2008-01-01

    A new paradigm is suggested for pattern recognition of drugs. The approach is based on the combined application of the 4D/3D quantitative structure-activity relationship (QSAR) algorithms BiS and ConGO. The first algorithm, BiS/MC (multiconformational), is used for the search for the conformers interacting with a receptor. The second algorithm, ConGO, has been suggested for the detailed study of the selected conformers' electron density and for the search for the electron structure fragments that determine the pharmacophore and antipharmacophore parts of the compounds. In this work we suggest using a new AlteQ method for the evaluation of the molecular electron density. AlteQ describes the experimental electron density (determined by low-temperature highly accurate X-ray analysis) much better than a number of quantum approaches. Herein this is shown using a comparison of the computed electron density with the results of highly accurate X-ray analysis. In the present study the desirability function is used for the first time for the analysis of the effects of the electron structure in the process of pattern recognition of active and inactive compounds. The suggested method for pattern recognition has been used for the investigation of various sets of compounds such as DNA-antimetabolites, fXa inhibitors, 5-HT(1A), and alpha(1)-AR receptors inhibitors. The pharmacophore and antipharmacophore fragments have been found in the electron structures of the compounds. It has been shown that the pattern recognition cross-validation quality for the datasets is unity.

  5. The Structural Basis of Antibody-Antigen Recognition

    PubMed Central

    Sela-Culang, Inbal; Kunik, Vered; Ofran, Yanay

    2013-01-01

    The function of antibodies (Abs) involves specific binding to antigens (Ags) and activation of other components of the immune system to fight pathogens. The six hypervariable loops within the variable domains of Abs, commonly termed complementarity determining regions (CDRs), are widely assumed to be responsible for Ag recognition, while the constant domains are believed to mediate effector activation. Recent studies and analyses of the growing number of available Ab structures, indicate that this clear functional separation between the two regions may be an oversimplification. Some positions within the CDRs have been shown to never participate in Ag binding and some off-CDRs residues often contribute critically to the interaction with the Ag. Moreover, there is now growing evidence for non-local and even allosteric effects in Ab-Ag interaction in which Ag binding affects the constant region and vice versa. This review summarizes and discusses the structural basis of Ag recognition, elaborating on the contribution of different structural determinants of the Ab to Ag binding and recognition. We discuss the CDRs, the different approaches for their identification and their relationship to the Ag interface. We also review what is currently known about the contribution of non-CDRs regions to Ag recognition, namely the framework regions (FRs) and the constant domains. The suggested mechanisms by which these regions contribute to Ag binding are discussed. On the Ag side of the interaction, we discuss attempts to predict B-cell epitopes and the suggested idea to incorporate Ab information into B-cell epitope prediction schemes. Beyond improving the understanding of immunity, characterization of the functional role of different parts of the Ab molecule may help in Ab engineering, design of CDR-derived peptides, and epitope prediction. PMID:24115948

  6. The coevolution of recognition and social behavior.

    PubMed

    Smead, Rory; Forber, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of behavioral types can facilitate the evolution of cooperation by enabling altruistic behavior to be directed at other cooperators and withheld from defectors. While much is known about the tendency for recognition to promote cooperation, relatively little is known about whether such a capacity can coevolve with the social behavior it supports. Here we use evolutionary game theory and multi-population dynamics to model the coevolution of social behavior and recognition. We show that conditional harming behavior enables the evolution and stability of social recognition, whereas conditional helping leads to a deterioration of recognition ability. Expanding the model to include a complex game where both helping and harming interactions are possible, we find that conditional harming behavior can stabilize recognition, and thereby lead to the evolution of conditional helping. Our model identifies a novel hypothesis for the evolution of cooperation: conditional harm may have coevolved with recognition first, thereby helping to establish the mechanisms necessary for the evolution of cooperation. PMID:27225673

  7. [Face recognition in patients with schizophrenia].

    PubMed

    Doi, Hirokazu; Shinohara, Kazuyuki

    2012-07-01

    It is well known that patients with schizophrenia show severe deficiencies in social communication skills. These deficiencies are believed to be partly derived from abnormalities in face recognition. However, the exact nature of these abnormalities exhibited by schizophrenic patients with respect to face recognition has yet to be clarified. In the present paper, we review the main findings on face recognition deficiencies in patients with schizophrenia, particularly focusing on abnormalities in the recognition of facial expression and gaze direction, which are the primary sources of information of others' mental states. The existing studies reveal that the abnormal recognition of facial expression and gaze direction in schizophrenic patients is attributable to impairments in both perceptual processing of visual stimuli, and cognitive-emotional responses to social information. Furthermore, schizophrenic patients show malfunctions in distributed neural regions, ranging from the fusiform gyrus recruited in the structural encoding of facial stimuli, to the amygdala which plays a primary role in the detection of the emotional significance of stimuli. These findings were obtained from research in patient groups with heterogeneous characteristics. Because previous studies have indicated that impairments in face recognition in schizophrenic patients might vary according to the types of symptoms, it is of primary importance to compare the nature of face recognition deficiencies and the impairments of underlying neural functions across sub-groups of patients.

  8. The coevolution of recognition and social behavior

    PubMed Central

    Smead, Rory; Forber, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Recognition of behavioral types can facilitate the evolution of cooperation by enabling altruistic behavior to be directed at other cooperators and withheld from defectors. While much is known about the tendency for recognition to promote cooperation, relatively little is known about whether such a capacity can coevolve with the social behavior it supports. Here we use evolutionary game theory and multi-population dynamics to model the coevolution of social behavior and recognition. We show that conditional harming behavior enables the evolution and stability of social recognition, whereas conditional helping leads to a deterioration of recognition ability. Expanding the model to include a complex game where both helping and harming interactions are possible, we find that conditional harming behavior can stabilize recognition, and thereby lead to the evolution of conditional helping. Our model identifies a novel hypothesis for the evolution of cooperation: conditional harm may have coevolved with recognition first, thereby helping to establish the mechanisms necessary for the evolution of cooperation. PMID:27225673

  9. Textual emotion recognition for enhancing enterprise computing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quan, Changqin; Ren, Fuji

    2016-05-01

    The growing interest in affective computing (AC) brings a lot of valuable research topics that can meet different application demands in enterprise systems. The present study explores a sub area of AC techniques - textual emotion recognition for enhancing enterprise computing. Multi-label emotion recognition in text is able to provide a more comprehensive understanding of emotions than single label emotion recognition. A representation of 'emotion state in text' is proposed to encompass the multidimensional emotions in text. It ensures the description in a formal way of the configurations of basic emotions as well as of the relations between them. Our method allows recognition of the emotions for the words bear indirect emotions, emotion ambiguity and multiple emotions. We further investigate the effect of word order for emotional expression by comparing the performances of bag-of-words model and sequence model for multi-label sentence emotion recognition. The experiments show that the classification results under sequence model are better than under bag-of-words model. And homogeneous Markov model showed promising results of multi-label sentence emotion recognition. This emotion recognition system is able to provide a convenient way to acquire valuable emotion information and to improve enterprise competitive ability in many aspects.

  10. Social justice and the politics of recognition.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Comments on the original article, "Psychology and social justice: Why we do what we do" by M. J. T. Vasquez (see record 2012-18676-002). Vasquez pointed to numerous initiatives and task forces that the American Psychological Association (APA) has established to address the marginalization and subordination of various groups. There is little doubt that the concerns addressed by these initiatives and task forces are important and play a central role in the development of a just society. Although Vasquez noted that "social realities are important determinants of distress" she failed to appreciate the extent to which our social relations emerge against the background of specific political and economic structures. The cost of this oversight is the perpetuation of a politics of recognition that does little to address the economic inequalities that are a defining feature of unjust societies. Were APA to restrict its attention to psychological distress or access to resources, it would place APA in the service of maintaining rather than transforming the existing structure of society. APA should consider developing initiatives and task forces to investigate the role that capitalism plays in the perpetuation of inequality and exploitation. It may also be time to reflect on why an institution that claims to be dedicated to social justice has had so little to say about one of the dominant features of modern society. PMID:24016125

  11. Automatic target recognition apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Baumgart, Chris W.; Ciarcia, Christopher A.

    2000-01-01

    An automatic target recognition apparatus (10) is provided, having a video camera/digitizer (12) for producing a digitized image signal (20) representing an image containing therein objects which objects are to be recognized if they meet predefined criteria. The digitized image signal (20) is processed within a video analysis subroutine (22) residing in a computer (14) in a plurality of parallel analysis chains such that the objects are presumed to be lighter in shading than the background in the image in three of the chains and further such that the objects are presumed to be darker than the background in the other three chains. In two of the chains the objects are defined by surface texture analysis using texture filter operations. In another two of the chains the objects are defined by background subtraction operations. In yet another two of the chains the objects are defined by edge enhancement processes. In each of the analysis chains a calculation operation independently determines an error factor relating to the probability that the objects are of the type which should be recognized, and a probability calculation operation combines the results of the analysis chains.

  12. Automatic recognition of harmonic bird sounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heller, Jason R.; Pinezich, John D.

    2005-09-01

    The method of sound recognition relies on a transformation of a sound into a spectrogram followed by extraction of the harmonics as curves. The extracted curves are called frequency tracks. A procedure called find-feasible-sets is used to extract sets of tracks that may correspond to harmonic sounds. If a set of tracks overlap each other sufficiently in time, then the set is designated a feasible set. Following the extraction of the feasible sets, the procedure find-maximal-subsets is applied to each feasible set. This procedure uses a function called harmonic-relate that determines if two tracks are harmonically related. All tracks that are not harmonically related to any other tracks in the feasible set are discarded. Furthermore, the feasible set is divided into maximal subsets. A maximal subset is a subset of the feasible set in which every track is harmonically related to one fixed track in the set called the reference track but no other tracks in the feasible set are related to the reference track. Each frequency track in a track set is transformed into a feature vector whose components describe the frequency, slope, and shape of the track. The species of birds analyzed are bluejay and herring gull.

  13. Emotions affect the recognition of hand gestures

    PubMed Central

    Vicario, Carmelo M.; Newman, Anica

    2013-01-01

    The body is closely tied to the processing of social and emotional information. The purpose of this study was to determine whether a relationship between emotions and social attitudes conveyed through gestures exists. Thus, we tested the effect of pro-social (i.e., happy face) and anti-social (i.e., angry face) emotional primes on the ability to detect socially relevant hand postures (i.e., pictures depicting an open/closed hand). In particular, participants were required to establish, as quickly as possible, if the test stimulus (i.e., a hand posture) was the same or different, compared to the reference stimulus (i.e., a hand posture) previously displayed in the computer screen. Results show that facial primes, displayed between the reference and the test stimuli, influence the recognition of hand postures, according to the social attitude implicitly related to the stimulus. We found that perception of pro-social (i.e., happy face) primes resulted in slower RTs in detecting the open hand posture as compared to the closed hand posture. Vice-versa, perception of the anti-social (i.e., angry face) prime resulted in slower RTs in detecting the closed hand posture compared to the open hand posture. These results suggest that the social attitude implicitly conveyed by the displayed stimuli might represent the conceptual link between emotions and gestures. PMID:24421763

  14. Social justice and the politics of recognition.

    PubMed

    Arfken, Michael

    2013-09-01

    Comments on the original article, "Psychology and social justice: Why we do what we do" by M. J. T. Vasquez (see record 2012-18676-002). Vasquez pointed to numerous initiatives and task forces that the American Psychological Association (APA) has established to address the marginalization and subordination of various groups. There is little doubt that the concerns addressed by these initiatives and task forces are important and play a central role in the development of a just society. Although Vasquez noted that "social realities are important determinants of distress" she failed to appreciate the extent to which our social relations emerge against the background of specific political and economic structures. The cost of this oversight is the perpetuation of a politics of recognition that does little to address the economic inequalities that are a defining feature of unjust societies. Were APA to restrict its attention to psychological distress or access to resources, it would place APA in the service of maintaining rather than transforming the existing structure of society. APA should consider developing initiatives and task forces to investigate the role that capitalism plays in the perpetuation of inequality and exploitation. It may also be time to reflect on why an institution that claims to be dedicated to social justice has had so little to say about one of the dominant features of modern society.

  15. Support vector machine-based facial-expression recognition method combining shape and appearance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Eun Jung; Kang, Byung Jun; Park, Kang Ryoung; Lee, Sangyoun

    2010-11-01

    Facial expression recognition can be widely used for various applications, such as emotion-based human-machine interaction, intelligent robot interfaces, face recognition robust to expression variation, etc. Previous studies have been classified as either shape- or appearance-based recognition. The shape-based method has the disadvantage that the individual variance of facial feature points exists irrespective of similar expressions, which can cause a reduction of the recognition accuracy. The appearance-based method has a limitation in that the textural information of the face is very sensitive to variations in illumination. To overcome these problems, a new facial-expression recognition method is proposed, which combines both shape and appearance information, based on the support vector machine (SVM). This research is novel in the following three ways as compared to previous works. First, the facial feature points are automatically detected by using an active appearance model. From these, the shape-based recognition is performed by using the ratios between the facial feature points based on the facial-action coding system. Second, the SVM, which is trained to recognize the same and different expression classes, is proposed to combine two matching scores obtained from the shape- and appearance-based recognitions. Finally, a single SVM is trained to discriminate four different expressions, such as neutral, a smile, anger, and a scream. By determining the expression of the input facial image whose SVM output is at a minimum, the accuracy of the expression recognition is much enhanced. The experimental results showed that the recognition accuracy of the proposed method was better than previous researches and other fusion methods.

  16. Investigating gait recognition in the short-wave infrared (SWIR) spectrum: dataset and challenges

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    DeCann, Brian; Ross, Arun; Dawson, Jeremy

    2013-05-01

    In the biometrics community, challenge datasets are often released to determine the robustness of state-of-the- art algorithms to conditions that can confound recognition accuracy. In the context of automated human gait recognition, evaluation has predominantly been conducted on video data acquired in the active visible spectral band, although recent literature has explored recognition in the passive thermal band. The advent of sophisticated sensors has piqued interest in performing gait recognition in other spectral bands such as short-wave infrared (SWIR), due to their use in military-based tactical applications and the possibility of operating in nighttime environments. Further, in many operational scenarios, the environmental variables are not controlled, thereby posing several challenges to traditional recognition schemes. In this work, we discuss the possibility of performing gait recognition in the SWIR spectrum by first assembling a dataset, referred to as the WVU Outdoor SWIR Gait (WOSG) Dataset, and then evaluate the performance of three gait recognition algorithms on the dataset. The dataset consists of 155 subjects and represents gait information acquired under multiple walking paths in an uncontrolled, outdoor environment. Detailed experimental analysis suggests the benefits of distributing this new challenging dataset to the broader research community. In particular, the following observations were made: (a) the importance of SWIR imagery in acquiring data covertly for surveillance applications; (b) the difficulty in extracting human silhouettes in low-contrast SWIR imagery; (c) the impact of silhouette quality on overall recognition accuracy; (d) the possibility of matching gait sequences pertaining to different walking trajectories; and (e) the need for developing sophisticated gait recognition algorithms to handle data acquired in unconstrained environments.

  17. The species recognition system: a new corollary for the human fetoembryonic defense system hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Clark, G F; Dell, A; Morris, H R; Patankar, M S; Easton, R L

    2001-01-01

    We have previously suggested that the human fetus is protected during human development by a system of both soluble and cell surface associated glycoconjugates that utilize their carbohydrate sequences as functional groups to enable them to evoke tolerance. The proposed model has been referred to as the human fetoembryonic defense system hypothesis (hu-FEDS). In this paradigm, it has previously been proposed that similar oligosaccharides are used to mediate crucial recognition events required during both human sperm-egg binding and immune-inflammatory cell interactions. This vertical integration suggested to us that the sperm-egg binding itself is related to universal recognition events that occur between immune and inflammatory cells, except that in this case recognition of 'species' rather than recognition of 'self' is being manifested. In this paper, we have designated this component of hu-FEDS as the species recognition system (SRS). We propose that the SRS is an integral component of the hu-FEDS used to enable sperm-egg recognition and protection of the gametes from potential immune responses. Recent structural data indicates that the glycan sequences implicated in mediating murine gamete recognition are also expressed on CD45 in activated murine T lymphocytes and cytotoxic T lymphocytes. This overlap supports our contention that there is an overlap between the immune and gamete recognition systems. Therefore the hu-FEDS paradigm may be a subset of a larger model that also applies to other placental mammals. We therefore propose that the hu-FEDS model for protection should in the future be referred to as the eutherian fetoembryonic defense system hypothesis (eu-FEDS) to account for this extension. The possibility exists that the SRS component of eu-FEDS could predate eutherians and extend to all sexually reproducing organisms. Future investigation of the interactions between the immune and gamete recognition system will be required to determine the degree of

  18. Recognition in a Social Symbiosis: Chemical Phenotypes and Nestmate Recognition Behaviors of Neotropical Parabiotic Ants

    PubMed Central

    Emery, Virginia J.; Tsutsui, Neil D.

    2013-01-01

    Social organisms rank among the most abundant and ecologically dominant species on Earth, in part due to exclusive recognition systems that allow cooperators to be distinguished from exploiters. Exploiters, such as social parasites, manipulate their hosts’ recognition systems, whereas cooperators are expected to minimize interference with their partner’s recognition abilities. Despite our wealth of knowledge about recognition in single-species social nests, less is known of the recognition systems in multi-species nests, particularly involving cooperators. One uncommon type of nesting symbiosis, called parabiosis, involves two species of ants sharing a nest and foraging trails in ostensible cooperation. Here, we investigated recognition cues (cuticular hydrocarbons) and recognition behaviors in the parabiotic mixed-species ant nests of Camponotus femoratus and Crematogaster levior in North-Eastern Amazonia. We found two sympatric, cryptic Cr. levior chemotypes in the population, with one type in each parabiotic colony. Although they share a nest, very few hydrocarbons were shared between Ca. femoratus and either Cr. levior chemotype. The Ca. femoratus hydrocarbons were also unusually long–chained branched alkenes and dienes, compounds not commonly found amongst ants. Despite minimal overlap in hydrocarbon profile, there was evidence of potential interspecific nestmate recognition –Cr. levior ants were more aggressive toward Ca. femoratus non-nestmates than Ca. femoratus nestmates. In contrast to the prediction that sharing a nest could weaken conspecific recognition, each parabiotic species also maintains its own aggressive recognition behaviors to exclude conspecific non-nestmates. This suggests that, despite cohabitation, parabiotic ants maintain their own species-specific colony odors and recognition mechanisms. It is possible that such social symbioses are enabled by the two species each using their own separate recognition cues, and that interspecific

  19. Symmetry, probability, and recognition in face space.

    PubMed

    Sirovich, Lawrence; Meytlis, Marsha

    2009-04-28

    The essential midline symmetry of human faces is shown to play a key role in facial coding and recognition. This also has deep and important connections with recent explorations of the organization of primate cortex, as well as human psychophysical experiments. Evidence is presented that the dimension of face recognition space for human faces is dramatically lower than previous estimates. One result of the present development is the construction of a probability distribution in face space that produces an interesting and realistic range of (synthetic) faces. Another is a recognition algorithm that by reasonable criteria is nearly 100% accurate.

  20. Cortical Networks for Visual Self-Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugiura, Motoaki

    This paper briefly reviews recent developments regarding the brain mechanisms of visual self-recognition. A special cognitive mechanism for visual self-recognition has been postulated based on behavioral and neuropsychological evidence, but its neural substrate remains controversial. Recent functional imaging studies suggest that multiple cortical mechanisms play self-specific roles during visual self-recognition, reconciling the existing controversy. Respective roles for the left occipitotemporal, right parietal, and frontal cortices in symbolic, visuospatial, and conceptual aspects of self-representation have been proposed.

  1. Modelling of DNA-protein recognition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rein, R.; Garduno, R.; Colombano, S.; Nir, S.; Haydock, K.; Macelroy, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Computer model-building procedures using stereochemical principles together with theoretical energy calculations appear to be, at this stage, the most promising route toward the elucidation of DNA-protein binding schemes and recognition principles. A review of models and bonding principles is conducted and approaches to modeling are considered, taking into account possible di-hydrogen-bonding schemes between a peptide and a base (or a base pair) of a double-stranded nucleic acid in the major groove, aspects of computer graphic modeling, and a search for isogeometric helices. The energetics of recognition complexes is discussed and several models for peptide DNA recognition are presented.

  2. Learning curve of speech recognition.

    PubMed

    Kauppinen, Tomi A; Kaipio, Johanna; Koivikko, Mika P

    2013-12-01

    Speech recognition (SR) speeds patient care processes by reducing report turnaround times. However, concerns have emerged about prolonged training and an added secretarial burden for radiologists. We assessed how much proofing radiologists who have years of experience with SR and radiologists new to SR must perform, and estimated how quickly the new users become as skilled as the experienced users. We studied SR log entries for 0.25 million reports from 154 radiologists and after careful exclusions, defined a group of 11 experienced radiologists and 71 radiologists new to SR (24,833 and 122,093 reports, respectively). Data were analyzed for sound file and report lengths, character-based error rates, and words unknown to the SR's dictionary. Experienced radiologists corrected 6 characters for each report and for new users, 11. Some users presented a very unfavorable learning curve, with error rates not declining as expected. New users' reports were longer, and data for the experienced users indicates that their reports, initially equally lengthy, shortened over a period of several years. For most radiologists, only minor corrections of dictated reports were necessary. While new users adopted SR quickly, with a subset outperforming experienced users from the start, identification of users struggling with SR will help facilitate troubleshooting and support.

  3. Distributed nestmate recognition in ants

    PubMed Central

    Esponda, Fernando; Gordon, Deborah M.

    2015-01-01

    We propose a distributed model of nestmate recognition, analogous to the one used by the vertebrate immune system, in which colony response results from the diverse reactions of many ants. The model describes how individual behaviour produces colony response to non-nestmates. No single ant knows the odour identity of the colony. Instead, colony identity is defined collectively by all the ants in the colony. Each ant responds to the odour of other ants by reference to its own unique decision boundary, which is a result of its experience of encounters with other ants. Each ant thus recognizes a particular set of chemical profiles as being those of non-nestmates. This model predicts, as experimental results have shown, that the outcome of behavioural assays is likely to be variable, that it depends on the number of ants tested, that response to non-nestmates changes over time and that it changes in response to the experience of individual ants. A distributed system allows a colony to identify non-nestmates without requiring that all individuals have the same complete information and helps to facilitate the tracking of changes in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles, because only a subset of ants must respond to provide an adequate response. PMID:25833853

  4. Recurrent Processing during Object Recognition

    PubMed Central

    O’Reilly, Randall C.; Wyatte, Dean; Herd, Seth; Mingus, Brian; Jilk, David J.

    2013-01-01

    How does the brain learn to recognize objects visually, and perform this difficult feat robustly in the face of many sources of ambiguity and variability? We present a computational model based on the biology of the relevant visual pathways that learns to reliably recognize 100 different object categories in the face of naturally occurring variability in location, rotation, size, and lighting. The model exhibits robustness to highly ambiguous, partially occluded inputs. Both the unified, biologically plausible learning mechanism and the robustness to occlusion derive from the role that recurrent connectivity and recurrent processing mechanisms play in the model. Furthermore, this interaction of recurrent connectivity and learning predicts that high-level visual representations should be shaped by error signals from nearby, associated brain areas over the course of visual learning. Consistent with this prediction, we show how semantic knowledge about object categories changes the nature of their learned visual representations, as well as how this representational shift supports the mapping between perceptual and conceptual knowledge. Altogether, these findings support the potential importance of ongoing recurrent processing throughout the brain’s visual system and suggest ways in which object recognition can be understood in terms of interactions within and between processes over time. PMID:23554596

  5. Distributed nestmate recognition in ants.

    PubMed

    Esponda, Fernando; Gordon, Deborah M

    2015-05-01

    We propose a distributed model of nestmate recognition, analogous to the one used by the vertebrate immune system, in which colony response results from the diverse reactions of many ants. The model describes how individual behaviour produces colony response to non-nestmates. No single ant knows the odour identity of the colony. Instead, colony identity is defined collectively by all the ants in the colony. Each ant responds to the odour of other ants by reference to its own unique decision boundary, which is a result of its experience of encounters with other ants. Each ant thus recognizes a particular set of chemical profiles as being those of non-nestmates. This model predicts, as experimental results have shown, that the outcome of behavioural assays is likely to be variable, that it depends on the number of ants tested, that response to non-nestmates changes over time and that it changes in response to the experience of individual ants. A distributed system allows a colony to identify non-nestmates without requiring that all individuals have the same complete information and helps to facilitate the tracking of changes in cuticular hydrocarbon profiles, because only a subset of ants must respond to provide an adequate response.

  6. Object recognition by active fusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prantl, Manfred; Kopp-Borotschnig, Hermann; Ganster, Harald; Sinclair, David; Pinz, Axel J.

    1996-10-01

    Today's computer vision applications often have to deal with multiple, uncertain, and incomplete visual information. In this paper, we apply a new method, termed 'active fusion', to the problem of generic object recognition. Active fusion provides a common framework for active selection and combination of information from multiple sources in order to arrive at a reliable result at reasonable costs. In our experimental setup we use a camera mounted on a 2m by 1.5m x/z-table observing objects placed on a rotating table. Zoom, pan, tilt, and aperture setting of the camera can be controlled by the system. We follow a part-based approach, trying to decompose objects into parts, which are modeled as geons. The active fusion system starts from an initial view of the objects placed on the table and is continuously trying to refine its current object hypotheses by requesting additional views. The implementation of active fusion on the basis of probability theory, Dempster-Shafer's theory of evidence and fuzzy set theory is discussed. First results demonstrating segmentation improvements by active fusion are presented.

  7. Viral cell recognition and entry.

    PubMed Central

    Rossmann, M. G.

    1994-01-01

    Rhinovirus infection is initiated by the recognition of a specific cell-surface receptor. The major group of rhinovirus serotypes attach to intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1). The attachment process initiates a series of conformational changes resulting in the loss of genomic RNA from the virion. X-ray crystallography and sequence comparisons suggested that a deep crevice or canyon is the site on the virus recognized by the cellular receptor molecule. This has now been verified by electron microscopy of human rhinovirus 14 (HRV14) and HRV16 complexed with a soluble component of ICAM-1. A hydrophobic pocket underneath the canyon is the site of binding of various hydrophobic drug compounds that can inhibit attachment and uncoating. This pocket is also associated with an unidentified, possibly cellular in origin, "pocket factor." The pocket factor binding site overlaps the binding site of the receptor. It is suggested that competition between the pocket factor and receptor regulates the conformational changes required for the initiation of the entry of the genomic RNA into the cell. PMID:7849588

  8. Place recognition using batlike sonar

    PubMed Central

    Vanderelst, Dieter; Steckel, Jan; Boen, Andre; Peremans, Herbert; Holderied, Marc W

    2016-01-01

    Echolocating bats have excellent spatial memory and are able to navigate to salient locations using bio-sonar. Navigating and route-following require animals to recognize places. Currently, it is mostly unknown how bats recognize places using echolocation. In this paper, we propose template based place recognition might underlie sonar-based navigation in bats. Under this hypothesis, bats recognize places by remembering their echo signature - rather than their 3D layout. Using a large body of ensonification data collected in three different habitats, we test the viability of this hypothesis assessing two critical properties of the proposed echo signatures: (1) they can be uniquely classified and (2) they vary continuously across space. Based on the results presented, we conclude that the proposed echo signatures satisfy both criteria. We discuss how these two properties of the echo signatures can support navigation and building a cognitive map. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14188.001 PMID:27481189

  9. Flavivirus enzyme-substrate interactions studied with chimeric proteinases: identification of an intragenic locus important for substrate recognition.

    PubMed

    Preugschat, F; Lenches, E M; Strauss, J H

    1991-09-01

    The proteins of flaviviruses are translated as a single long polyprotein which is co- and posttranslationally processed by both cellular and viral proteinases. We have studied the processing of flavivirus polyproteins in vitro by a viral proteinase located within protein NS3 that cleaves at least three sites within the nonstructural region of the polyprotein, acting primarily autocatalytically. Recombinant polyproteins in which part of the polyprotein is derived from yellow fever virus and part from dengue virus were used. We found that polyproteins containing the yellow fever virus cleavage sites were processed efficiently by the yellow fever virus enzyme, by the dengue virus enzyme, and by various chimeric enzymes. In contrast, dengue virus cleavage sites were cleaved inefficiently by the dengue virus enzyme and not at all by the yellow fever virus enzyme. Studies with chimeric proteinases and with site-directed mutants provided evidence for a direct interaction between the cleavage sites and the proposed substrate-binding pocket of the enzyme. We also found that the efficiency and order of processing could be altered by site-directed mutagenesis of the proposed substrate-binding pocket.

  10. Temporal regulation of kin recognition maintains recognition-cue diversity and suppresses cheating.

    PubMed

    Ho, Hsing-I; Shaulsky, Gad

    2015-05-28

    Kin recognition, the ability to distinguish kin from non-kin, can facilitate cooperation between relatives. Evolutionary theory predicts that polymorphism in recognition cues, which is essential for effective recognition, would be unstable. Individuals carrying rare recognition cues would benefit less from social interactions than individuals with common cues, leading to loss of the genetic-cue diversity. We test this evolutionary hypothesis in Dictyostelium discoideum, which forms multicellular fruiting bodies by aggregation and utilizes two polymorphic membrane proteins to facilitate preferential cooperation. Surprisingly, we find that rare recognition variants are tolerated and maintain their frequencies among incompatible majority during development. Although the rare variants are initially excluded from the aggregates, they subsequently rejoin the aggregate and produce spores. Social cheating is also refrained in late development, thus limiting the cost of chimerism. Our results suggest a potential mechanism to sustain the evolutionary stability of kin-recognition genes and to suppress cheating.

  11. Perspective projection for variance pose face recognition from camera calibration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fakhir, M. M.; Woo, W. L.; Chambers, J. A.; Dlay, S. S.

    2016-04-01

    Variance pose is an important research topic in face recognition. The alteration of distance parameters across variance pose face features is a challenging. We provide a solution for this problem using perspective projection for variance pose face recognition. Our method infers intrinsic camera parameters of the image which enable the projection of the image plane into 3D. After this, face box tracking and centre of eyes detection can be identified using our novel technique to verify the virtual face feature measurements. The coordinate system of the perspective projection for face tracking allows the holistic dimensions for the face to be fixed in different orientations. The training of frontal images and the rest of the poses on FERET database determine the distance from the centre of eyes to the corner of box face. The recognition system compares the gallery of images against different poses. The system initially utilises information on position of both eyes then focuses principally on closest eye in order to gather data with greater reliability. Differentiation between the distances and position of the right and left eyes is a unique feature of our work with our algorithm outperforming other state of the art algorithms thus enabling stable measurement in variance pose for each individual.

  12. Auditory orientation in crickets: Pattern recognition controls reactive steering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulet, James F. A.; Hedwig, Berthold

    2005-10-01

    Many groups of insects are specialists in exploiting sensory cues to locate food resources or conspecifics. To achieve orientation, bees and ants analyze the polarization pattern of the sky, male moths orient along the females' odor plume, and cicadas, grasshoppers, and crickets use acoustic signals to locate singing conspecifics. In comparison with olfactory and visual orientation, where learning is involved, auditory processing underlying orientation in insects appears to be more hardwired and genetically determined. In each of these examples, however, orientation requires a recognition process identifying the crucial sensory pattern to interact with a localization process directing the animal's locomotor activity. Here, we characterize this interaction. Using a sensitive trackball system, we show that, during cricket auditory behavior, the recognition process that is tuned toward the species-specific song pattern controls the amplitude of auditory evoked steering responses. Females perform small reactive steering movements toward any sound patterns. Hearing the male's calling song increases the gain of auditory steering within 2-5 s, and the animals even steer toward nonattractive sound patterns inserted into the speciesspecific pattern. This gain control mechanism in the auditory-to-motor pathway allows crickets to pursue species-specific sound patterns temporarily corrupted by environmental factors and may reflect the organization of recognition and localization networks in insects. localization | phonotaxis

  13. Statistical Evaluation of Biometric Evidence in Forensic Automatic Speaker Recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drygajlo, Andrzej

    Forensic speaker recognition is the process of determining if a specific individual (suspected speaker) is the source of a questioned voice recording (trace). This paper aims at presenting forensic automatic speaker recognition (FASR) methods that provide a coherent way of quantifying and presenting recorded voice as biometric evidence. In such methods, the biometric evidence consists of the quantified degree of similarity between speaker-dependent features extracted from the trace and speaker-dependent features extracted from recorded speech of a suspect. The interpretation of recorded voice as evidence in the forensic context presents particular challenges, including within-speaker (within-source) variability and between-speakers (between-sources) variability. Consequently, FASR methods must provide a statistical evaluation which gives the court an indication of the strength of the evidence given the estimated within-source and between-sources variabilities. This paper reports on the first ENFSI evaluation campaign through a fake case, organized by the Netherlands Forensic Institute (NFI), as an example, where an automatic method using the Gaussian mixture models (GMMs) and the Bayesian interpretation (BI) framework were implemented for the forensic speaker recognition task.

  14. A Fast Goal Recognition Technique Based on Interaction Estimates

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    E-Martin, Yolanda; R-Moreno, Maria D.; Smith, David E.

    2015-01-01

    Goal Recognition is the task of inferring an actor's goals given some or all of the actor's observed actions. There is considerable interest in Goal Recognition for use in intelligent personal assistants, smart environments, intelligent tutoring systems, and monitoring user's needs. In much of this work, the actor's observed actions are compared against a generated library of plans. Recent work by Ramirez and Geffner makes use of AI planning to determine how closely a sequence of observed actions matches plans for each possible goal. For each goal, this is done by comparing the cost of a plan for that goal with the cost of a plan for that goal that includes the observed actions. This approach yields useful rankings, but is impractical for real-time goal recognition in large domains because of the computational expense of constructing plans for each possible goal. In this paper, we introduce an approach that propagates cost and interaction information in a plan graph, and uses this information to estimate goal probabilities. We show that this approach is much faster, but still yields high quality results.

  15. Hand posture recognition using jointly optical flow and dimensionality reduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boughnim, Nabil; Marot, Julien; Fossati, Caroline; Bourennane, Salah

    2013-12-01

    Hand posture recognition is generally addressed by using either YC b C r (luminance and chrominance components) or HSV (hue, saturation, value) mappings which assume that a hand can be distinguished from the background from some colorfulness and luminance properties. This can hardly be used when a dark hand, or a hand of any color, is under study. In addition, existing recognition processes rely on descriptors or geometric shapes which can be reliable; this comes at the expense of an increased computational complexity. To cope with these drawbacks, this paper proposes a four-step method recognition technique consisting of (i) a pyramidal optical flow for the detection of large movements and hence determine the region of interest containing the expected hand, (ii) a preprocessing step to compute the hand contour while ensuring geometric and illumination invariance, (iii) an image scanning method providing a signature which characterizes non-star-shaped contours with a one-pixel precision, and (iv) a posture classification method where a sphericity criterion preselects a set of candidate postures, principal component analysis reduces the dimensionality of the data, and Mahalanobis distance is used as a criterion to identify the hand posture in any test image. The proposed technique has been assessed in terms of its performances including the computational complexity using both visual and statistical results.

  16. Apramycin Recognition by the Human Ribosomal Decoding Site

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann,T.; Tereshko, V.; Skripkin, E.; Patel, D.

    2007-01-01

    Aminoglycoside antibiotics bind specifically to the bacterial ribosomal decoding-site RNA and thereby interfere with fidelity but not efficiency of translation. Apramycin stands out among aminoglycosides for its mechanism of action which is based on blocking translocation and its ability to bind also to the eukaryotic decoding site despite differences in key residues required for apramycin recognition by the bacterial target. To elucidate molecular recognition of the eukaryotic decoding site by apramycin we have determined the crystal structure of an oligoribonucleotide containing the human sequence free and in complex with the antibiotic at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution. The drug binds in the deep groove of the RNA which forms a continuously stacked helix comprising non-canonical C{center_dot}A and G{center_dot}A base pairs and a bulged-out adenine. The binding mode of apramycin at the human decoding-site RNA is distinct from aminoglycoside recognition of the bacterial target, suggesting a molecular basis for the actions of apramycin in eukaryotes and bacteria.

  17. Improving representation-based classification for robust face recognition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hongzhi; Zhang, Zheng; Li, Zhengming; Chen, Yan; Shi, Jian

    2014-06-01

    The sparse representation classification (SRC) method proposed by Wright et al. is considered as the breakthrough of face recognition because of its good performance. Nevertheless it still cannot perfectly address the face recognition problem. The main reason for this is that variation of poses, facial expressions, and illuminations of the facial image can be rather severe and the number of available facial images are fewer than the dimensions of the facial image, so a certain linear combination of all the training samples is not able to fully represent the test sample. In this study, we proposed a novel framework to improve the representation-based classification (RBC). The framework first ran the sparse representation algorithm and determined the unavoidable deviation between the test sample and optimal linear combination of all the training samples in order to represent it. It then exploited the deviation and all the training samples to resolve the linear combination coefficients. Finally, the classification rule, the training samples, and the renewed linear combination coefficients were used to classify the test sample. Generally, the proposed framework can work for most RBC methods. From the viewpoint of regression analysis, the proposed framework has a solid theoretical soundness. Because it can, to an extent, identify the bias effect of the RBC method, it enables RBC to obtain more robust face recognition results. The experimental results on a variety of face databases demonstrated that the proposed framework can improve the collaborative representation classification, SRC, and improve the nearest neighbor classifier.

  18. Recognition of Graphs with Convex Quadratic Stability Number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pacheco, Maria F.; Cardoso, Domingos M.

    2009-09-01

    A stable set of a graph is a set of mutually non-adjacent vertices. The determination of a maximum size stable set, which is called maximum stable set, and the determination of its size, which is called stability number, are central combinatorial optimization problems. However, given a nonnegative integer k, to determine if a graph G has a stable set of size k is NP-complete. In this paper we deal with graphs for which the stability number can be determined by solving a convex quadratic programming problem. Such graphs were introduced in [13] and are called graphs with convex-QP stability number. A few algorithmic techniques for the recognition of this type of graphs in particular families are presented.

  19. Adaptive pattern recognition and neural networks

    SciTech Connect

    Pao, Yohhan.

    1989-01-01

    The application of neural-network computers to pattern-recognition tasks is discussed in an introduction for advanced students. Chapters are devoted to the nature of the pattern-recognition task, the Bayesian approach to the estimation of class membership, the fuzzy-set approach, patterns with nonnumeric feature values, learning discriminants and the generalized perceptron, recognition and recall on the basis of partial cues, associative memories, self-organizing nets, the functional-link net, fuzzy logic in the linking of symbolic and subsymbolic processing, and adaptive pattern recognition and its applications. Also included are C-language programs for (1) a generalized delta-rule net for supervised learning and (2) unsupervised learning based on the discovery of clustered structure. 183 refs.

  20. Face recognition based on fringe pattern analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Hong; Huang, Peisen

    2010-03-01

    Two-dimensional face-recognition techniques suffer from facial texture and illumination variations. Although 3-D techniques can overcome these limitations, the reconstruction and storage expenses of 3-D information are extremely high. We present a novel face-recognition method that directly utilizes 3-D information encoded in face fringe patterns without having to reconstruct 3-D geometry. In the proposed method, a digital video projector is employed to sequentially project three phase-shifted sinusoidal fringe patterns onto the subject's face. Meanwhile, a camera is used to capture the distorted fringe patterns from an offset angle. Afterward, the face fringe images are analyzed by the phase-shifting method and the Fourier transform method to obtain a spectral representation of the 3-D face. Finally, the eigenface algorithm is applied to the face-spectrum images to perform face recognition. Simulation and experimental results demonstrate that the proposed method achieved satisfactory recognition rates with reduced computational complexity and storage expenses.