Science.gov

Sample records for determine strain-specific susceptibility

  1. Hyperinducibility of Ia antigen on astrocytes correlates with strain-specific susceptibility to experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.

    PubMed Central

    Massa, P T; ter Meulen, V; Fontana, A

    1987-01-01

    In search of a phenotypic marker determining genetically controlled susceptibility to delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) reactions in the brain--in particular, experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE)--we have compared the gamma-interferon (IFN-gamma) induction of Ia molecules on astrocytes and macrophages from rat and mouse strains that are susceptible or resistant to this disease. We focused on Ia expression because DTH reactions to self or foreign antigens are largely mediated by lymphocytes restricted by class II (Ia) antigens of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Our data demonstrate that Lewis (fully susceptible) and Brown Norway (BN) (fully resistant) rats are very different in that Lewis astrocytes express much higher levels of Ia than BN astrocytes. Similar data were obtained from an analysis of EAE-susceptible and -resistant mouse strains (SJL and BALB/c, respectively), which suggests that this phenomenon may be universal and not limited to only one mammalian species. At least one gene responsible for Ia hyperinduction is located outside the rat RT-1 or the mouse MHC locus. Animals congenic at the RT-1 or MHC locus of the resistant strain but with background genes of the susceptible strain exhibit intermediate levels of Ia compared to fully resistant and susceptible rodents, which fits well with the reduced EAE susceptibility of these congenic animals. Furthermore, hyperinduction of Ia is astrocyte specific, since peritoneal macrophages of susceptible and resistant strains exhibit identical profiles of Ia induction. Thus, astrocyte Ia hyperinducibility may be a major strain- and tissue-specific factor that contributes to Ia-restricted DTH reactions in the brain. Images PMID:3495802

  2. Evidence for strain-specific differences in benzene toxicity as a function of host target cell susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Neun, D J; Penn, A; Snyder, C A

    1992-01-01

    It has long been recognized that benzene exposure produces disparate toxic responses among different species or even among different strains within the same species. There is ample evidence that species- or strain-dependent differences in metabolic activity correlate with the disparate responses to benzene. However, bone marrow cells (the putative targets of benzene toxicity) may also exhibit species- or strain-dependent differences in susceptibility to the toxic effects of benzene. To investigate this hypothesis, two sets of companion experiments were performed. First, two strains of mice, Swiss Webster (SW) and C57B1/6J (C57), were exposed to 300 ppm benzene via inhalation and the effects of the exposures were determined on bone marrow cellularity and the development of bone marrow CFU-e (Colony Forming Unit-erythroid, an early red cell progenitor). Second, bone marrow cells from the same strains were exposed in vitro to five known benzene metabolites (1,4 benzoquinone, catechol, hydroquinone, muconic acid, and phenol) individually and in binary combinations. Benzene exposure, in vivo, reduced bone marrow cellularity and the development of CFU-e in both strains; however, reductions in both these endpoints were more severe in the SW strain. When bone marrow cells from the two strains were exposed in vitro to the five benzene metabolites individually, benzoquinone, hydroquinone, and catechol reduced the numbers of CFU-e in both strains in dose-dependent responses, phenol weakly reduced the numbers of the C57 CFU-e only and in a non-dose-dependent manner, and muconic acid was without effect on cells from either strain.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  3. A strain-specific catalase mutation and mutation of the metal-binding transporter gene mntC attenuate Neisseria gonorrhoeae in vivo but not by increasing susceptibility to oxidative killing by phagocytes.

    PubMed

    Wu, Hong; Soler-García, Angel A; Jerse, Ann E

    2009-03-01

    The hallmark of gonorrhea is an intense inflammatory response that is characterized by polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs) with intracellular gonococci. A redundancy of defenses may protect Neisseria gonorrhoeae from phagocyte-derived reactive oxygen species. Here we showed that a gonococcal catalase (kat) mutant in strain MS11 was more sensitive to H(2)O(2) than mutants in cytochrome c peroxidase (ccp), methionine sulfoxide reductase (msrA), or the metal-binding protein (mntC) of the MntABC transporter. kat ccp and kat ccp mntC mutants were significantly more sensitive to H(2)O(2) than mutants in any single factor. None of the mutants showed increased susceptibility to murine PMNs. Recovery of the mntC and kat ccp mntC mutants from the lower genital tract of BALB/c mice, but not the kat or kat ccp mutants, was significantly reduced relative to wild-type bacteria. Interestingly, unlike the MS11 kat mutant, a kat mutant of strain FA1090 was attenuated during competitive infection with wild-type FA1090 bacteria. The FA1090 kat mutant and MS11 mntC mutant were also attenuated in mice that are unable to generate a phagocytic respiratory burst. We conclude that inactivation of three well-characterized antioxidant genes (kat, ccp, and mntC) does not increase gonococcal susceptibility to the phagocytic respiratory burst during infection and that gonococcal catalase and the MntC protein confer an unidentified advantage in vivo. In the case of catalase, this advantage is strain specific. Finally, we also showed that an msrA mutant of strain MS11 demonstrated delayed attenuation in BALB/c but not C57BL/6 mice. Therefore, MsrA/B also appears to play a role in infection that is dependent on host genetic background.

  4. Preoperative determination of susceptibility to malignant hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Carson, J M; Van Sickels, J E

    1982-07-01

    A careful individual and family history is of utmost importance in evaluating MH susceptibility. Patients having myopathy with or without a significant family history of MH must be suspected of having the condition. The initial evaluation should include routine blood studies and CPK determinations in addition to an electrocardiogram. Full evaluation differentiating rigid from nonrigid types must include a muscle biopsy for microscopic and contraction studies. Platelet ATP depletion with exposure to halothane shows promise as a prescreening test. Susceptible patients can be given both general and local anesthetics if the surgeon and support personnel have a thorough understanding of MH and if proper precautions have been taken and preparation of facilities has been made. PMID:6953194

  5. Metabolic reconstruction identifies strain-specific regulation of virulence in Toxoplasma gondii

    PubMed Central

    Song, Carl; Chiasson, Melissa A; Nursimulu, Nirvana; Hung, Stacy S; Wasmuth, James; Grigg, Michael E; Parkinson, John

    2013-01-01

    Increasingly, metabolic potential is proving to be a critical determinant governing a pathogen's virulence as well as its capacity to expand its host range. To understand the potential contribution of metabolism to strain-specific infectivity differences, we present a constraint-based metabolic model of the opportunistic parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. Dominated by three clonal strains (Type I, II, and III demonstrating distinct virulence profiles), T. gondii exhibits a remarkably broad host range. Integrating functional genomic data, our model (which we term as iCS382) reveals that observed strain-specific differences in growth rates are driven by altered capacities for energy production. We further predict strain-specific differences in drug susceptibilities and validate one of these predictions in a drug-based assay, with a Type I strain demonstrating resistance to inhibitors that are effective against a Type II strain. We propose that these observed differences reflect an evolutionary strategy that allows the parasite to extend its host range, as well as result in a subsequent partitioning into discrete strains that display altered virulence profiles across different hosts, different organs, and even cell types. PMID:24247825

  6. MRP-1 expression levels determine strain-specific susceptibility to sodium arsenic-induced renal injury between C57BL/6 and BALB/c mice

    SciTech Connect

    Kimura, Akihiko; Ishida, Yuko; Wada, Takashi; Yokoyama, Hitoshi; Mukaida, Naofumi; Kondo, Toshikazu . E-mail: kondot@wakayama-med.ac.jp

    2005-02-15

    To clarify the pathophysiological mechanism underlying acute renal injury caused by acute exposure to arsenic, we subcutaneously injected both BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice with sodium arsenite (NaAs; 13.5 mg/kg). BALB/c mice exhibited exaggerated elevation of serum blood urea nitrogen (BUN) and creatinine (CRE) levels, compared with C57BL/6 mice. Moreover, half of BALB/c mice died by 24 h, whereas all C57BL/6 mice survived. Histopathological examination on kidney revealed severe hemorrhages, acute tubular necrosis, neutrophil infiltration, cast formation, and disappearance of PAS-positive brush borders in BALB/c mice, later than 10 h. These pathological changes were remarkably attenuated in C57BL/6 mice, accompanied with lower intrarenal arsenic concentrations, compared with BALB/c mice. Among heavy metal inducible proteins including multidrug resistance-associated protein (MRP)-1, multidrug resistance gene (MDR)-1, metallothionein (MT)-1, and arsenite inducible, cysteine- and histidine-rich RNA-associated protein (AIRAP), intrarenal MDR-1, MT-1, and AIRAP gene expression was enhanced to a similar extent in both strains, whereas NaAs challenge augmented intrarenal MRP-1 mRNA and protein expression levels in C57BL/6 but not BALB/c mice. Moreover, the administration of a specific inhibitor of MRP-1, MK-571, significantly exaggerated acute renal injury in C57BL/6 mice. Thus, MRP-1 is crucially involved in arsenic efflux and eventually prevention of acute renal injury upon acute exposure to NaAs.

  7. Strain-Specific Variation in Murine Natural Killer Gene Complex Contributes to Differences in Immunosurveillance for Urethane-Induced Lung Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Kreisel, Daniel; Gelman, Andrew E.; Higashikubo, Ryuji; Lin, Xue; Vikis, Haris G.; White, J. Michael; Toth, Kelsey A.; Deshpande, Charuhas; Carreno, Beatriz M.; You, Ming; Taffner, Samantha M.; Yokoyama, Wayne M.; Bui, Jack D.; Schreiber, Robert D.; Krupnick, Alexander S.

    2012-01-01

    Non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) is the leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide and results from a complex interaction between carcinogen exposure and inherent susceptibility. Despite its prevalence genetic factors that predispose to the development of lung cancer remain elusive. Inbred mouse models offer a unique and clinically relevant tool to study genetic factors that contribute to lung carcinogenesis due to the development of tumors that resemble human adenocarcinoma and broad strain-specific variation in cancer incidence after carcinogen administration. Here we set out to investigate whether strain-specific variability in tumor immunosurveillance contributes to differences in lung cancer. Using bone marrow transplantation we determined that hematopoietic cells from lung cancer-resistant mice could significantly impede the development of cancer in a susceptible strain. Furthermore, we show that this is not due to differences in tumor-promoting inflammatory changes or variability in immunosurveillance by the adaptive immune system, but results from strain-specific differences in natural killer cell (NK) cytotoxicity. Using a newly discovered congenic strain of mice we demonstrate a previously unrecognized role for strain-specific polymorphisms in the natural killer gene complex (NKC) in immunosurveillance for carcinogen-induced lung cancer. Since polymorphisms in the NKC are highly prevalent in man, our data may explain why certain individuals without obvious risk factors develop lung cancer while others remain resistant to the disease despite heavy environmental carcinogen exposure. PMID:22751136

  8. Determination of antimicrobial susceptibilities on infected urines without isolation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.; Deming, J. W.; Shrock, C. G.; Vellend, H.; Barza, M. J.; Weinstein, L. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A method is described for the quick determination of the susceptibilities of various unidentified bacteria contained in an aqueous physiological fluid sample, particularly urine, to one or more antibiotics. A bacterial adenosine triphosphate (ATP) assay is carried out after the elimination of non-bacterial ATP to determine whether an infection exists. If an infection does exist, a portion of the sample is further processed, including subjecting parts of the portion to one or more antibiotics. Growth of the bacteria in the parts are determined, again by an ATP assay, to determine whether the unidentified bacteria in the sample are susceptible to the antibiotic or antibiotics under test.

  9. Vaccinia virus A25 and A26 proteins are fusion suppressors for mature virions and determine strain-specific virus entry pathways into HeLa, CHO-K1, and L cells.

    PubMed

    Chang, Shu-Jung; Chang, Yu-Xun; Izmailyan, Roza; Tang, Yin-Liang; Chang, Wen

    2010-09-01

    Mature vaccinia virus enters cells through either fluid-phase endocytosis/macropinocytosis or plasma membrane fusion. This may explain the wide range of host cell susceptibilities to vaccinia virus entry; however, it is not known how vaccinia virus chooses between these two pathways and which viral envelope proteins determine such processes. By screening several recombinant viruses and different strains, we found that mature virions containing the vaccinia virus A25 and A26 proteins entered HeLa cells preferentially through a bafilomycin-sensitive entry pathway, whereas virions lacking these two proteins entered through a bafilomycin-resistant pathway. To investigate whether the A25 and A26 proteins contribute to entry pathway specificity, two mutant vaccinia viruses, WRDeltaA25L and WRDeltaA26L, were subsequently generated from the wild-type WR strain. In contrast to the WR strain, both the WRDeltaA25L and WRDeltaA26L viruses became resistant to bafilomycin, suggesting that the removal of the A25 and A26 proteins bypassed the low-pH endosomal requirement for mature virion entry. Indeed, WRDeltaA25L and WRDeltaA26L virus infections of HeLa, CHO-K1, and L cells immediately triggered cell-to-cell fusion at a neutral pH at 1 to 2 h postinfection (p.i.), providing direct evidence that viral fusion machinery is readily activated after the removal of the A25 and A26 proteins to allow virus entry through the plasma membrane. In summary, our data support a model that on vaccinia mature virions, the viral A25 and A26 proteins are low-pH-sensitive fusion suppressors whose inactivation during the endocytic route results in viral and cell membrane fusion. Our results also suggest that during virion morphogenesis, the incorporation of the A25 and A26 proteins into mature virions may help restrain viral fusion activity until the time of infections.

  10. Strain-specific antiviral activity of iminosugars against human influenza A viruses

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, S.; Miller, J. L.; Harvey, D. J.; Gu, Y.; Rosenthal, P. B.; Zitzmann, N.; McCauley, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives Drugs that target host cell processes can be employed to complement drugs that specifically target viruses, and iminosugar compounds that inhibit host α-glucosidases have been reported to show antiviral activity against multiple viruses. Here the effect and mechanism of two iminosugar α-glucosidase inhibitors, N-butyl-deoxynojirimycin (NB-DNJ) and N-nonyl-deoxynojirimycin (NN-DNJ), on human influenza A viruses was examined. Methods The viruses examined were a recently circulating seasonal influenza A(H3N2) virus strain A/Brisbane/10/2007, an older H3N2 strain A/Udorn/307/72, and A/Lviv/N6/2009, a strain representative of the currently circulating pandemic influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 virus. Results The inhibitors had the strongest effect on Brisbane/10 and NN-DNJ was more potent than NB-DNJ. Both compounds showed antiviral activity in cell culture against three human influenza A viruses in a strain-specific manner. Consistent with its action as an α-glucosidase inhibitor, NN-DNJ treatment resulted in an altered glycan processing of influenza haemagglutinin (HA) and neuraminidase (NA), confirmed by MS. NN-DNJ treatment was found to reduce the cell surface expression of the H3 subtype HA. The level of sialidase activity of NA was reduced in infected cells, but the addition of exogenous sialidase to the cells did not complement the NN-DNJ-mediated inhibition of virus replication. Using reassortant viruses, the drug susceptibility profile was determined to correlate with the origin of the HA. Conclusions NN-DNJ inhibits influenza A virus replication in a strain-specific manner that is dependent on the HA. PMID:25223974

  11. Thymineless Death in Escherichia coli: Strain Specificity

    PubMed Central

    Cummings, Donald J.; Mondale, Lee

    1967-01-01

    Thymineless death of various ultraviolet (UV)-sensitive strains of Escherichia coli B and K-12 was investigated. It was found that E. coli B, Bs−12, K-12 rec-21, and possibly K-12 Lon−, all sensitive to UV, were also sensitive to thymine starvation. However, other UV-sensitive strains of E. coli were found to display the typical resistant-type kinetics of thymineless death. The correlation of these results with various other cellular processes suggested that the filament-forming ability of the bacteria might be involved in the mechanism of thymineless death. It was apparent from the present results that capacity for host-cell reactivation, recombination ability, thymine dimer excision, and probably induction of a defective prophage had little to do with determining sensitivity to thymine deprivation. Images PMID:5337772

  12. Immune pressure selects for Plasmodium falciparum parasites presenting distinct red blood cell surface antigens and inducing strain-specific protection in Saimiri sciureus monkeys

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    The passive transfer of specific antibodies to a naive splenectomized Saimiri sciureus monkey infected with the Palo Alto FUP/SP strain of Plasmodium falciparum resulted in the emergence of parasites resistant to the transferred antibodies. Molecular typing indicated that the original and resistant parasites were isogenic. Saimiri monkeys primed with original parasites were fully susceptible to a challenge by the resistant ones, and vice versa. This absence of crossprotection indicates that strain-specific determinants would be the major targets of protective immunity developed in these monkeys. Phenotypic analysis showed that the surface of the infected red blood cells differed in both lines. Original parasites formed rosettes, autoagglutinated, presented characteristic knobs at the surface of the infected red blood cell, and did not agglutinate in the presence of a pool of human immune sera. In contrast, the resistant parasites did not form rosettes, did not spontaneously autoagglutinate, presented abnormal flattened knobs, and formed large aggregates in the presence of a pool of human immune sera. The presence of strain-specific determinants at the surface of the resistant parasites was confirmed by surface immunofluorescence and agglutination using homologous Saimiri serum. Neither the original nor the resistant parasites cytoadhered to an amelanotic melanoma cell line, suggesting that cytoadherence and agglutination can be dissociated. These results indicate that parasites that differ by the antigens exposed at the surface of the red blood cell induce strain- specific immunity. Furthermore they show that rosetting and nonrosetting parasites differ in their antigenic properties and do not crossprotect. PMID:7807008

  13. Strain-Specific Protective Effect of the Immunity Induced by Live Malarial Sporozoites under Chloroquine Cover

    PubMed Central

    Wijayalath, Wathsala; Cheesman, Sandra; Tanabe, Kazuyuki; Handunnetti, Shiroma; Carter, Richard; Pathirana, Sisira

    2012-01-01

    The efficacy of a whole-sporozoite malaria vaccine would partly be determined by the strain-specificity of the protective responses against malarial sporozoites and liver-stage parasites. Evidence from previous reports were inconsistent, where some studies have shown that the protective immunity induced by irradiated or live sporozoites in rodents or humans were cross-protective and in others strain-specific. In the present work, we have studied the strain-specificity of live sporozoite-induced immunity using two genetically and immunologically different strains of Plasmodium cynomolgi, Pc746 and PcCeylon, in toque monkeys. Two groups of monkeys were immunized against live sporozoites of either the Pc746 (n = 5), or the PcCeylon (n = 4) strain, by the bites of 2–4 sporozoite-infected Anopheles tessellates mosquitoes per monkey under concurrent treatments with chloroquine and primaquine to abrogate detectable blood infections. Subsequently, a group of non-immunized monkeys (n = 4), and the two groups of immunized monkeys were challenged with a mixture of sporozoites of the two strains by the bites of 2–5 infective mosquitoes from each strain per monkey. In order to determine the strain-specificity of the protective immunity, the proportions of parasites of the two strains in the challenge infections were quantified using an allele quantification assay, Pyrosequencing™, based on a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the parasites’ circumsporozoite protein gene. The Pyrosequencing™ data showed that a significant reduction of parasites of the immunizing strain in each group of strain-specifically immunized monkeys had occurred, indicating a stronger killing effect on parasites of the immunizing strain. Thus, the protective immunity developed following a single, live sporozoite/chloroquine immunization, acted specifically against the immunizing strain and was, therefore, strain-specific. As our experiment does not allow us to determine the

  14. STRAIN-SPECIFIC MODIFIER GENES GOVERNING CRANIOFACIAL PHENOTYPES

    PubMed Central

    Mukhopadhyay, Partha; Brock, Guy; Webb, Cynthia; Pisano, M. Michele; Greene, Robert M

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND The presence of strain-specific modifier genes is known to modulate the phenotype and pathophysiology of mice harboring genetically engineered mutations. Thus, identification of genetic modifier genes is requisite to understanding control of phenotypic expression. c-Ski is a transcriptional regulator. Ski−/− mice on a C57BL6J (B6) background exhibit facial clefting, while Ski−/− mice on a 129P3 (129) background present with exencephaly. METHODS In the present study, oligonucleotide-based gene expression profiling was utilized to identify potential strain-specific modifier gene candidates present in wild-type mice of B6 and 129 genetic backgrounds. Changes in gene expression were verified by TaqMan quantitative real-time PCR. RESULTS Steady-state levels of 89 genes demonstrated a significantly higher level of expression, and those of 68 genes demonstrated a significantly lower level of expression in the developing neural tubes from E8.5, B6 embryos when compared to expression levels in neural tubes derived from E8.5, 129 embryos. CONCLUSIONS Based on the results from the current comparative microarray study, and taking into consideration a number of relevant published reports, several potential strain-specific gene candidates, likely to modify the craniofacial phenotypes in various knockout mouse models have been identified. PMID:22371338

  15. Borrelia burgdorferi strain-specific Osp C-mediated immunity in mice.

    PubMed Central

    Bockenstedt, L K; Hodzic, E; Feng, S; Bourrel, K W; de Silva, A; Montgomery, R R; Fikrig, E; Radolf, J D; Barthold, S W

    1997-01-01

    Antibodies to the outer surface proteins (Osps) A, B, and C of the spirochete Borrelia burgdorferi can prevent infection in animal models of Lyme borreliosis. We have previously demonstrated that immune serum from mice infected with B. burgdorferi N40 can also prevent challenge infection and induce disease regression in infected mice. The antigens targeted by protective and disease-modulating antibodies are presently unknown, but they do not include Osp A or Osp B. Because Osp C antibodies are present in immune mouse serum, we investigated the ability of hyperimmune serum to recombinant Osp C (N40) to protect mice against challenge infection with N40 spirochetes. In both active and passive immunization studies, Osp C (N40) antiserum failed to protect mice from challenge infection with cultured organisms. Mice actively immunized with recombinant Osp C (N40) were susceptible to tick-borne challenge infection, and nymphal ticks remained infected after feeding on Osp C-hyperimmunized mice. In contrast, similar immunization studies performed with Osp C (PKo) antiserum prevented challenge infection of mice with a clone of PKo spirochetes pathogenic for mice. Both Osp C (N40) and Osp C (PKo) antisera showed minimal in vitro borreliacidal activity, and immunofluorescence studies localized Osp C beneath the outer membrane of both N40 and PKo spirochetes. We conclude that Osp C antibody-mediated immunity is strain specific and propose that differences in Osp C surface expression by spirochetes in vivo may account for strain-specific immunity. PMID:9353047

  16. Subtle variations in Pten dose determine cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Alimonti, Andrea; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Clohessy, John G; Trotman, Lloyd C; Nardella, Caterina; Egia, Ainara; Salmena, Leonardo; Sampieri, Katia; Haveman, William J; Brogi, Edi; Richardson, Andrea L; Zhang, Jiangwen; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-05-01

    Cancer susceptibility has been attributed to at least one heterozygous genetic alteration in a tumor suppressor gene (TSG). It has been hypothesized that subtle variations in TSG expression can promote cancer development. However, this hypothesis has not yet been definitively supported in vivo. Pten is a TSG frequently lost in human cancer and mutated in inherited cancer-predisposition syndromes. Here we analyze Pten hypermorphic mice (Pten(hy/+)), expressing 80% normal levels of Pten. Pten(hy/+) mice develop a spectrum of tumors, with breast tumors occurring at the highest penetrance. All breast tumors analyzed here retained two intact copies of Pten and maintained Pten levels above heterozygosity. Notably, subtle downregulation of Pten altered the steady-state biology of the mammary tissues and the expression profiles of genes involved in cancer cell proliferation. We present an alterative working model for cancer development in which subtle reductions in the dose of TSGs predispose to tumorigenesis in a tissue-specific manner.

  17. Determinants of in vitro drug susceptibility testing of Plasmodium vivax.

    PubMed

    Russell, B; Chalfein, F; Prasetyorini, B; Kenangalem, E; Piera, K; Suwanarusk, R; Brockman, A; Prayoga, P; Sugiarto, P; Cheng, Q; Tjitra, E; Anstey, N M; Price, R N

    2008-03-01

    In Papua, Indonesia, the antimalarial susceptibility of Plasmodium vivax (n = 216) and P. falciparum (n = 277) was assessed using a modified schizont maturation assay for chloroquine, amodiaquine, artesunate, lumefantrine, mefloquine, and piperaquine. The most effective antimalarial against P. vivax and P. falciparum was artesunate, with geometric mean 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) (95% confidence intervals [CI]) of 1.31 nM (1.07 to 1.59) and 0.64 nM (0.53 to 0.79), respectively. In contrast, the geometric mean chloroquine IC50 for P. vivax was 295 nM (227 to 384) compared to only 47.4 nM (42.2 to 53.3) for P. falciparum. Two factors were found to significantly influence the in vitro drug response of P. vivax: the initial stage of the parasite and the duration of the assay. Isolates of P. vivax initially at the trophozoite stage had significantly higher chloroquine IC50s (478 nM [95% CI, 316 to 722]) than those initially at the ring stage (84.7 nM [95% CI, 45.7 to 157]; P < 0.001). Synchronous isolates of P. vivax and P. falciparum which reached the target of 40% schizonts in the control wells within 30 h had significantly higher geometric mean chloroquine IC50s (435 nM [95% CI, 169 to 1,118] and 55.9 nM [95% CI, 48 to 64.9], respectively) than isolates that took more than 30 h (39.9 nM [14.6 to 110.4] and 36.9 nM [31.2 to 43.7]; P < 0.005). The results demonstrate the marked stage-specific activity of chloroquine with P. vivax and suggest that susceptibility to chloroquine may be associated with variable growth rates. These findings have important implications for the phenotypic and downstream genetic characterization of P. vivax.

  18. Subtle variations in Pten dose determine cancer susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Alimonti, Andrea; Carracedo, Arkaitz; Clohessy, John G; Trotman, Lloyd C; Nardella, Caterina; Egia, Ainara; Salmena, Leonardo; Sampieri, Katia; Haveman, William J; Brogi, Edi; Richardson, Andrea L; Zhang, Jiangwen; Pandolfi, Pier Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Cancer susceptibility has been attributed to at least one heterozygous genetic alteration in a tumor suppressor gene (TSG)1. It has been hypothesized that subtle variations in TSG expression can promote cancer development2,3. However, this hypothesis has not yet been definitively supported in vivo. PTEN is a TSG frequently lost in human cancer and mutated in inherited cancer-predisposition syndromes4. Here, we analyze Pten hypermorphic mice (Ptenhy/+), expressing 80% normal levels of Pten. Ptenhy/+ mice develop a spectrum of tumors, with breast tumors occurring at the highest penetrance. All breast tumors analyzed here retained two intact copies of Pten and maintained Pten levels above heterozygosis. Notably, subtle downregulation of Pten altered the steady-state biology of the mammary tissues and the expression profiles of genes involved in cancer cell proliferation. We present an alterative working model for cancer development in which subtle reductions in the dose of TSGs predispose to tumorigenesis in a tissue-specific manner. PMID:20400965

  19. The large mechanosensitive channel MscL determines bacterial susceptibility to the bacteriocin sublancin 168.

    PubMed

    Kouwen, Thijs R H M; Trip, Erik N; Denham, Emma L; Sibbald, Mark J J B; Dubois, Jean-Yves F; van Dijl, Jan Maarten

    2009-11-01

    Bacillus subtilis strain 168 produces the extremely stable and broad-spectrum lantibiotic sublancin 168. Known sublancin 168-susceptible organisms include important pathogens, such as Staphylococcus aureus. Nevertheless, since its discovery, the mode of action of sublancin 168 has remained elusive. The present studies were, therefore, aimed at the identification of cellular determinants for bacterial susceptibility toward sublancin 168. Growth inhibition and competition assays on plates and in liquid cultures revealed that sublancin 168-mediated growth inhibition of susceptible B. subtilis and S. aureus cells is affected by the NaCl concentration in the growth medium. Added NaCl did not influence the production, activity, or stability of sublancin 168 but, instead, lowered the susceptibility of sensitive cells toward this lantibiotic. Importantly, the susceptibility of B. subtilis and S. aureus cells toward sublancin 168 was shown to depend on the presence of the large mechanosensitive channel of conductance MscL. In contrast, MscL was not involved in susceptibility toward the bacteriocin nisin or Pep5. Taken together, our unprecedented results demonstrate that MscL is a critical and specific determinant in bacterial sublancin 168 susceptibility that may serve either as a direct target for this lantibiotic or as a gate of entry to the cytoplasm. PMID:19738010

  20. Strain-Specific Ureolytic Microbial Calcium Carbonate Precipitation

    PubMed Central

    Hammes, Frederik; Boon, Nico; de Villiers, Johan; Verstraete, Willy; Siciliano, Steven Douglas

    2003-01-01

    During a study of ureolytic microbial calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitation by bacterial isolates collected from different environmental samples, morphological differences were observed in the large CaCO3 crystal aggregates precipitated within bacterial colonies grown on agar. Based on these differences, 12 isolates were selected for further study. We hypothesized that the striking differences in crystal morphology were the result of different microbial species or, alternatively, differences in the functional attributes of the isolates selected. Sequencing of 16S rRNA genes showed that all of the isolates were phylogenetically closely related to the Bacillus sphaericus group. Urease gene diversity among the isolates was examined by using a novel application of PCR-denaturing gradient gel electrophoresis (DGGE). This approach revealed significant differences between the isolates. Moreover, for several isolates, multiple bands appeared on the DGGE gels, suggesting the apparent presence of different urease genes in these isolates. The substrate affinities (Km) and maximum hydrolysis rates (Vmax) of crude enzyme extracts differed considerably for the different strains. For certain isolates, the urease activity increased up to 10-fold in the presence of 30 mM calcium, and apparently this contributed to the characteristic crystal formation by these isolates. We show that strain-specific calcification occurred during ureolytic microbial carbonate precipitation. The specificity was mainly due to differences in urease expression and the response to calcium. PMID:12902285

  1. Strain-specific morphologies of yeast prion amyloid fibrils

    PubMed Central

    Diaz-Avalos, Ruben; King, Chih-Yen; Wall, Joseph; Simon, Martha; Caspar, Donald L. D.

    2005-01-01

    Mass per length (mpl) measurements on single amyloid fibrils that specifically propagate the [VH], [VK], and [VL] strains of the yeast prion [PSI] reveal unanticipated differences in their structures. Many fibrils have ≈1.0 prion molecule per 4.7-Å cross-β repeat period, which is consistent with a self-replicating model built by parallel β-sheet hydrogen-bonding of like prion peptide segments, but other fibrils are definitely heavier. The predominantly straight fibrils of the dominant [VH] strain have a bimodal mpl distribution, corresponding to components with ≈1.0 and 1.2 prions per repeat. Fibrils of the weaker [VK] strain, which are almost all wavy, have a monodisperse mpl distribution with a mean of 1.15 prions per repeat. The recessive [VL] strain sample has ≈1.05 prions per repeat in single fibrils and includes ≈10% double fibrils, which are rare in the duplicate [VH] and [VK] samples. All of these samples were assembled from purified recombinant Sup35 prion protein by seeded growth on nuclei extracted from yeast bearing the three [PSI] strains. Infectious and noninfectious spontaneously assembled fibrils of the recombinant prion protein also display different heterogeneous morphologies. The strain-specific morphological differences we have observed directly confirm the structural prediction of the protein-only prion theory but do not have an obvious molecular explanation. PMID:16006506

  2. In vitro antibiotic susceptibilities of Burkholderia mallei (causative agent of glanders) determined by broth microdilution and E-test.

    PubMed

    Heine, H S; England, M J; Waag, D M; Byrne, W R

    2001-07-01

    In vitro susceptibilities to 28 antibiotics were determined for 11 strains of Burkholderia mallei by the broth microdilution method. The B. mallei strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, macrolides, quinolones, doxycycline, piperacillin, ceftazidime, and imipenem. For comparison and evaluation, 17 antibiotic susceptibilities were also determined by the E-test. E-test values were always lower than the broth dilution values. Establishing and comparing antibiotic susceptibilities of specific B. mallei strains will provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents.

  3. Quantitative Microplate-Based Growth Assay for Determination of Antifungal Susceptibility of Histoplasma capsulatum Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Goughenour, Kristie D.; Balada-Llasat, Joan-Miquel

    2015-01-01

    Standardized methodologies for determining the antifungal susceptibility of fungal pathogens is central to the clinical management of invasive fungal disease. Yeast-form fungi can be tested using broth macrodilution and microdilution assays. Reference procedures exist for Candida species and Cryptococcus yeasts; however, no standardized methods have been developed for testing the antifungal susceptibility of yeast forms of the dimorphic systemic fungal pathogens. For the dimorphic fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum, susceptibility to echinocandins differs for the yeast and the filamentous forms, which highlights the need to employ Histoplasma yeasts, not hyphae, in antifungal susceptibility tests. To address this, we developed and optimized methodology for the 96-well microtiter plate-based measurement of Histoplasma yeast growth in vitro. Using optical density, the assay is quantitative for fungal growth with a dynamic range greater than 30-fold. Concentration and assay reaction time parameters were also optimized for colorimetric (MTT [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] reduction) and fluorescent (resazurin reduction) indicators of fungal vitality. We employed this microtiter-based assay to determine the antifungal susceptibility patterns of multiple clinical isolates of Histoplasma representing different phylogenetic groups. This methodology fulfills a critical need for the ability to monitor the effectiveness of antifungals on Histoplasma yeasts, the morphological form present in mammalian hosts and, thus, the form most relevant to disease. PMID:26246483

  4. In Vitro Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Yersinia pestis Determined by Broth Microdilution following CLSI Methods

    PubMed Central

    Hershfield, Jeremy; Marchand, Charles; Miller, Lynda; Halasohoris, Stephanie; Purcell, Bret K.; Worsham, Patricia L.

    2015-01-01

    In vitro susceptibilities to 45 antibiotics were determined for 30 genetically and geographically diverse strains of Yersinia pestis by the broth microdilution method at two temperatures, 28°C and 35°C, following Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) methods. The Y. pestis strains demonstrated susceptibility to aminoglycosides, quinolones, tetracyclines, β-lactams, cephalosporins, and carbapenems. Only a 1-well shift was observed for the majority of antibiotics between the two temperatures. Establishing and comparing antibiotic susceptibilities of a diverse but specific set of Y. pestis strains by standardized methods and establishing population ranges and MIC50 and MIC90 values provide reference information for assessing new antibiotic agents and also provide a baseline for use in monitoring any future emergence of resistance. PMID:25583720

  5. Determination of Receiver Susceptibility to Radio Frequency Interference from Portable Electronic Devices

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nguyen, Truong X.; Ely, Jay J.

    2002-01-01

    With the increasing pressures to allow wireless devices on aircraft, the susceptibility of aircraft receivers to interference from Portable Electronic Devices (PEDs) becomes an increasing concern. Many investigations were conducted in the past, with limited success, to quantify device emissions, path loss, and receiver interference susceptibility thresholds. This paper outlines the recent effort in determining the receiver susceptibility thresholds for ILS, VOR and GPS systems. The effort primarily consists of analysis of data available openly as reported in many RTCA and ICAO documents as well as manufacturers data on receiver sensitivity. Shortcomings with the susceptibility threshold data reported in the RTCA documents are presented, and an approach for an in-depth study is suggested. In addition, intermodulation products were observed and demonstrated in a laboratory experiment when multiple PEDs were in the proximity of each other. These intermodulation effects generate spurious frequencies that may fall within aircraft communication or navigation bands causing undesirable effects. Results from a preliminary analysis are presented that show possible harmful combinations of PEDs and the potentially affected aircraft bands.

  6. [Cancer pharmacogenetics: study of genetically determined variations on cancer susceptibility due to xenobiotic exposure].

    PubMed

    Quiñones, Luis; Lee, Kuen; Varela F, Nelson; Escala, Mario; García, Karen; Godoy, Loreto; Castro, Andrés; Soto, Jorge; Saavedra, Iván; Cáceres, Dante

    2006-04-01

    Pharmacogenetics is the study of genetically determined variations in the response to drugs and toxic agents, and their implications on disease. Recently, the discipline has acquired great relevancy due to the development of non-invasive molecular techniques that identify genetic variants in human beings. There is also a need to explain the individual differences in susceptibility to drug actions and disease risk. Genetic variants can modify the magnitude of a pharmacologic effect, toxicity threshold, secondary effects and drug interactions. There are approximately thirty families of drug-metabolizing enzymes with genetic variants that cause functional alterations and variations in pharmacologic activity. We summarize the general knowledge about genetic variants of biotransformation enzymes, their relationship with cancer risk and the role of ethnicity. Cancer pharmacogenetics is another promising and exciting research area that will explain why people with an almost identical group of genes, have a different susceptibility to cancer, whose etiology has genetic and environmental components.

  7. Apparatus and process for determining the susceptibility of microorganisms to antibiotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gibson, Sandra F. (Inventor); Fadler, Norman L. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    A process for determining the susceptibility of microorganisms to antibiotics involves introducing a diluted specimen into discrete quantities of a selective culture medium which favors a specific microorganism in that the microorganism is sustained by the medium and when so sustained will change the optical characteristics of the medium. Only the specific microorganism will alter the optical characteristics. Some of the discrete quantities are blended with known antibiotics, while at least one is not. If the specimen contains the microorganisms favored by the selective medium, the optical characteristics of the discrete quantity of pure selective medium, that is the one without antibiotics, will change. If the antibiotics in any of the other discrete quantities are ineffective against the favored microorganisms, the optical characteristics of those quantities will likewise change. No change in the optical characteristics of a discrete quantity indicates that the favored microorganism is susceptible to the antibiotic in the quantity.

  8. Development of an Accelerated Test Method for the Determination of Susceptibility to Atmospheric Corrosion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ambrose, John R.

    1991-01-01

    The theoretical rationale is presented for use of a repetitive cyclic current reversal voltammetric technique for characterization of localized corrosion processes, including atmospheric corrosion. Applicability of this proposed experimental protocol is applied to characterization of susceptibility to crevice and pitting corrosion, atmospheric corrosion and stress corrosion cracking. Criteria upon which relative susceptibility is based were determined and tested using two iron based alloys commonly in use at NASA-Kennedy; A36 (a low carbon steel) and 4130 (a low alloy steel). Practicality of the procedure was demonstrated by measuring changes in anodic polarization behavior during high frequency current reversal cycles of 25 cycles per second with 1 mA/sq cm current density amplitude in solutions containing Cl anions. The results demonstrated that, due to excessive polarization which affects conductivity of barrier corrosion product layers, A36 was less resistant to atmospheric corrosion than its 4130 counterpart; behavior which was also demonstrated during exposure tests.

  9. Viral Strain-Specific Differential Alterations in Arabidopsis Developmental Patterns.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, Flora; Manrique, Pilar; Mansilla, Carmen; Lunello, Pablo; Wang, Xiaowu; Rodrigo, Guillermo; López-González, Silvia; Jenner, Carol; González-Melendi, Pablo; Elena, Santiago F; Walsh, John; Ponz, Fernando

    2015-12-01

    Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV) infections affect many Arabidopsis developmental traits. This paper analyzes, at different levels, the development-related differential alterations induced by different strains of TuMV, represented by isolates UK 1 and JPN 1. The genomic sequence of JPN 1 TuMV isolate revealed highest divergence in the P1 and P3 viral cistrons, upon comparison with the UK 1 sequence. Infectious viral chimeras covering the whole viral genome uncovered the P3 cistron as a major viral determinant of development alterations, excluding the involvement of the PIPO open reading frame. However, constitutive transgenic expression of P3 in Arabidopsis did not induce developmental alterations nor modulate the strong effects induced by the transgenic RNA silencing suppressor HC-Pro from either strain. This highlights the importance of studying viral determinants within the context of actual viral infections. Transcriptomic and interactomic analyses at different stages of plant development revealed large differences in the number of genes affected by the different infections at medium infection times but no significant differences at very early times. Biological functions affected by UK 1 (the most severe strain) included mainly stress response and transport. Most cellular components affected cell-wall transport or metabolism. Hubs in the interactome were affected upon infection. PMID:26646245

  10. Genetic and environmental interactions determine seizure susceptibility in epileptic EL mice.

    PubMed

    Todorova, M T; Mantis, J G; Le, M; Kim, C Y; Seyfried, T N

    2006-10-01

    Gene identification has progressed rapidly for monogenic epilepsies, but complex gene-environmental interactions have hindered progress in gene identification for multifactorial epilepsies. We analyzed the role of environmental risk factors in the inheritance of multifactorial idiopathic generalized epilepsy in the EL mouse. Seizure susceptibility was evaluated in the EL (E) and seizure-resistant ABP/LeJ (A) parental mouse strains and in their AEF1 and AEF2 hybrid offspring using a handling-induced seizure test. The seizure test was administered in three environments (environments I, II and III) that differed with respect to the number of seizure tests administered (one test or four tests) and the age of the mice when tested (young or old). The inheritance of seizure susceptibility appeared dominant after repetitive seizure testing in young or old mice, but recessive after a single test in old mice. Heritability was high (0.67-0.77) in each environment. Significant quantitative trait loci (QTL) that were associated with environments I and III (repetitive testing) were found on chromosomes 2 and 9 and colocalized with previously mapped El2 and El4, respectively. The El2 QTL found in environment I associated only with female susceptibility. A novel QTL, El-N, for age-dependent predisposition to seizures was found on proximal chromosome 9 only in environment II. The findings indicate that environmental risk factors determine the genetic architecture of seizure susceptibility in EL mice and suggest that QTL for complex epilepsies should be defined in terms of the environment in which they are expressed.

  11. The importance of growth kinetic analysis in determining bacterial susceptibility against antibiotics and silver nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Theophel, Karsten; Schacht, Veronika J; Schlüter, Michael; Schnell, Sylvia; Stingu, Catalina-Suzana; Schaumann, Reiner; Bunge, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Routine antibiotics susceptibility testing still relies on standardized cultivation-based analyses, including measurement of inhibition zones in conventional agar diffusion tests and endpoint turbidity-based measurements. Here, we demonstrate that common off-line monitoring and endpoint determination after 18-24 h could be insufficient for reliable growth-dependent evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility. Different minimal inhibitory concentrations were obtained in 20- and 48 h microdilution plate tests using an Enterococcus faecium clinical isolate (strain UKI-MB07) as a model organism. Hence, we used an on-line kinetic assay for simultaneous cultivation and time-resolved growth analysis in a 96-well format instead of off-line susceptibility testing. Growth of the Enterococcus test organism was delayed up to 30 h in the presence of 0.25 μg mL(-1) of vancomycin and 8 μg mL(-1) of fosfomycin, after which pronounced growth was observed. Despite the delayed onset of growth, treatment with fosfomycin, daptomycin, fusidic acid, cefoxitin, or gentamicin resulted in higher maximum growth rates and/or higher final optical density values compared with antibiotic-free controls, indicating that growth stimulation and hormetic effects may occur with extended exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations. Whereas neither maximum growth rate nor final cell density correlated with antibiotic concentration, the lag phase duration for some antibiotics was a more meaningful indicator of dose-dependent growth inhibition. Our results also reveal that non-temporal growth profiles are only of limited value for cultivation-based antimicrobial silver nanoparticle susceptibility testing. The exposure to Ag(0) nanoparticles led to plasma membrane damage in a concentration-dependent manner and induced oxidative stress in Enterococcus faecium UKI-MB07, as shown by intracellular ROS accumulation. PMID:25426104

  12. The importance of growth kinetic analysis in determining bacterial susceptibility against antibiotics and silver nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Theophel, Karsten; Schacht, Veronika J.; Schlüter, Michael; Schnell, Sylvia; Stingu, Catalina-Suzana; Schaumann, Reiner; Bunge, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Routine antibiotics susceptibility testing still relies on standardized cultivation-based analyses, including measurement of inhibition zones in conventional agar diffusion tests and endpoint turbidity-based measurements. Here, we demonstrate that common off-line monitoring and endpoint determination after 18–24 h could be insufficient for reliable growth-dependent evaluation of antibiotic susceptibility. Different minimal inhibitory concentrations were obtained in 20- and 48 h microdilution plate tests using an Enterococcus faecium clinical isolate (strain UKI-MB07) as a model organism. Hence, we used an on-line kinetic assay for simultaneous cultivation and time-resolved growth analysis in a 96-well format instead of off-line susceptibility testing. Growth of the Enterococcus test organism was delayed up to 30 h in the presence of 0.25 μg mL-1 of vancomycin and 8 μg mL-1 of fosfomycin, after which pronounced growth was observed. Despite the delayed onset of growth, treatment with fosfomycin, daptomycin, fusidic acid, cefoxitin, or gentamicin resulted in higher maximum growth rates and/or higher final optical density values compared with antibiotic-free controls, indicating that growth stimulation and hormetic effects may occur with extended exposure to sublethal antibiotic concentrations. Whereas neither maximum growth rate nor final cell density correlated with antibiotic concentration, the lag phase duration for some antibiotics was a more meaningful indicator of dose-dependent growth inhibition. Our results also reveal that non-temporal growth profiles are only of limited value for cultivation-based antimicrobial silver nanoparticle susceptibility testing. The exposure to Ag(0) nanoparticles led to plasma membrane damage in a concentration-dependent manner and induced oxidative stress in Enterococcus faecium UKI-MB07, as shown by intracellular ROS accumulation. PMID:25426104

  13. Prion recognition elements govern nucleation, strain specificity and species barriers

    PubMed Central

    Tessier, Peter M.; Lindquist, Susan

    2007-01-01

    Prions are proteins that can switch to self-perpetuating, infectious conformations. The abilities of prions to replicate, form structurally distinct strains, and to establish and overcome transmission barriers between species are poorly understood. We exploit surface-bound peptides to overcome complexities of investigating such problems in solution. For the yeast prion Sup35, we find that the switch to the prion state is controlled with exquisite specificity by small elements of primary sequence. Strikingly, these same sequence elements govern the formation of distinct self-perpetuating conformations (prion strains) and determine species-specific seeding activities. A Sup35 chimera that traverses the transmission barrier between two yeast species possesses the critical sequence elements from both. Using this chimera, we show that the influence of environment and mutations on the formation of species-specific strains is driven by selective recognition of one or the other sequence element. Thus, critical aspects of prion conversion are enciphered by subtle differences between small, highly-specific recognition elements. PMID:17495929

  14. Technique for magnetic susceptibility determination in the highly doped semiconductors by electron spin resonance

    SciTech Connect

    Veinger, A. I.; Zabrodskii, A. G.; Tisnek, T. V.; Goloshchapov, S. I.; Semenikhin, P. V.

    2014-08-20

    A method for determining the magnetic susceptibility in the highly doped semiconductors is considered. It is suitable for the semiconductors near the metal - insulator transition when the conductivity changes very quickly with the temperature and the resonance line form distorts. A procedure that is based on double integration of the positive part of the derivative of the absorption line having a Dyson shape and takes into account the depth of the skin layer is described. Analysis is made for the example of arsenic-doped germanium samples at a rather high concentration corresponding to the insulator-metal phase transition.

  15. Strategies to develop strain-specific PCR based assays for probiotics.

    PubMed

    Treven, P

    2015-01-01

    Since health benefits conferred by probiotics are strain-specific, identification to the strain level is mandatory to allow the monitoring of the presence and the abundance of specific probiotic in a product or in a gastrointestinal tract. Compared to standard plate counts, the reduced duration of the assays and higher specificity makes PCR-based methods (standard PCR and quantitative PCR) very appropriate for detection or quantification of probiotics. Development of strain-specific assay consists of 4 main stages: (1) strain-specific marker identification; (2) construction of potential strain-specific primers; (3) validation on DNA from pure cultures of target and related strains; and (4) validation on spiked samples. The most important and also the most challenging step is the identification of strain-specific sequences, which can be subsequently targeted by specific primers or probes. Such regions can be identified on sequences derived from 16S-23S internally transcribed spacers, randomly amplified polymorphic DNA, representational difference analysis and suppression subtractive hybridisation. Already known phenotypic or genotypic characteristics of the target strain can also be used to develop the strain-specific assay. However, the initial stage of strain-specific assay development can be replaced by comparative genomics analysis of target genome with related genomes in public databases. Advances in whole genome sequencing (WGS) have resulted in a cost reduction for bacterial genome sequencing and consequently have made this approach available to most laboratories. In the present paper I reviewed the available literature on PCR and qPCR assays developed for detection of a specific probiotic strain and discussed future WGS and comparative genomics-based approaches.

  16. A Rapid Molecular Test for Determining Yersinia pestis Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin by the Quantification of Differentially Expressed Marker Genes

    PubMed Central

    Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Shifman, Ohad; Zvi, Anat; Ariel, Naomi; Beth-Din, Adi; Israeli, Ofir; Gur, David; Aftalion, Moshe; Maoz, Sharon; Ber, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Standard antimicrobial susceptibility tests used to determine bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are growth dependent and time consuming. The long incubation time required for standard tests may render susceptibility results irrelevant, particularly for patients infected with lethal bacteria that are slow growing on agar but progress rapidly in vivo, such as Yersinia pestis. Here, we present an alternative approach for the rapid determination of antimicrobial susceptibility, based on the quantification of the changes in the expression levels of specific marker genes following exposure to growth-inhibiting concentrations of the antibiotic, using Y. pestis and ciprofloxacin as a model. The marker genes were identified by transcriptomic DNA microarray analysis of the virulent Y. pestis Kimberley53 strain after exposure to specific concentrations of ciprofloxacin for various time periods. We identified several marker genes that were induced following exposure to growth-inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, and we confirmed the marker expression profiles at additional ciprofloxacin concentrations using quantitative RT-PCR. Eleven candidate marker transcripts were identified, of which four mRNA markers were selected for a rapid quantitative RT-PCR susceptibility test that correctly determined the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values and the categories of susceptibility of several Y. pestis strains and isolates harboring various ciprofloxacin MIC values. The novel molecular susceptibility test requires just 2 h of antibiotic exposure in a 7-h overall test time, in contrast to the 24 h of antibiotic exposure required for a standard microdilution test. PMID:27242774

  17. A Rapid Molecular Test for Determining Yersinia pestis Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin by the Quantification of Differentially Expressed Marker Genes.

    PubMed

    Steinberger-Levy, Ida; Shifman, Ohad; Zvi, Anat; Ariel, Naomi; Beth-Din, Adi; Israeli, Ofir; Gur, David; Aftalion, Moshe; Maoz, Sharon; Ber, Raphael

    2016-01-01

    Standard antimicrobial susceptibility tests used to determine bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics are growth dependent and time consuming. The long incubation time required for standard tests may render susceptibility results irrelevant, particularly for patients infected with lethal bacteria that are slow growing on agar but progress rapidly in vivo, such as Yersinia pestis. Here, we present an alternative approach for the rapid determination of antimicrobial susceptibility, based on the quantification of the changes in the expression levels of specific marker genes following exposure to growth-inhibiting concentrations of the antibiotic, using Y. pestis and ciprofloxacin as a model. The marker genes were identified by transcriptomic DNA microarray analysis of the virulent Y. pestis Kimberley53 strain after exposure to specific concentrations of ciprofloxacin for various time periods. We identified several marker genes that were induced following exposure to growth-inhibitory concentrations of ciprofloxacin, and we confirmed the marker expression profiles at additional ciprofloxacin concentrations using quantitative RT-PCR. Eleven candidate marker transcripts were identified, of which four mRNA markers were selected for a rapid quantitative RT-PCR susceptibility test that correctly determined the Minimal Inhibitory Concentration (MIC) values and the categories of susceptibility of several Y. pestis strains and isolates harboring various ciprofloxacin MIC values. The novel molecular susceptibility test requires just 2 h of antibiotic exposure in a 7-h overall test time, in contrast to the 24 h of antibiotic exposure required for a standard microdilution test. PMID:27242774

  18. Histamine H2 receptor signaling × environment interactions determine susceptibility to experimental allergic encephalomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Saligrama, Naresha; Case, Laure K.; Krementsov, Dimitry N.; Teuscher, Cory

    2014-01-01

    Histamine and its receptors are important in both multiple sclerosis and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE). C57BL/6J (B6) mice deficient for the histamine H2 receptor (H2RKO) are less susceptible to EAE and exhibit blunted Th1 responses. However, whether decreased antigen-specific T-cell effector responses in H2RKO mice were due to a lack of H2R signaling in CD4+ T cells or antigen-presenting cells has remained unclear. We generated transgenic mice expressing H2R specifically in T cells on the H2RKO background, and, using wild-type B6 and H2RKO mice as controls, induced EAE either in the presence or absence of the ancillary adjuvant pertussis toxin (PTX), which models the effects of infectious inflammatory stimuli on autoimmune disease. We monitored the mice for clinical signs of EAE and neuropathology, as well as effector T-cell responses using flow cytometry. EAE severity and neuropathology in H2RKO mice expressing H2R exclusively in T cells become equal to those in wild-type B6 mice only when PTX is used to elicit disease. EAE complementation was associated with frequencies of CD4+IFN-γ+ and CD4+IL-17+ cells that are equal to or greater than those in wild-type B6, respectively. Thus, the regulation of encephalitogenic T-cell responses and EAE susceptibility by H2R signaling in CD4+ T cells is dependent on gene × environment interactions.—Saligrama, N., Case, L. K., Krementsov, D. N., Teuscher, C. Histamine H2 receptor signaling × environment interactions determine susceptibility to experimental allergic encephalomyelitis. PMID:24371118

  19. Determination of host genetic susceptibility to genotoxic chemicals in hepatocyte cultures.

    PubMed

    McQueen, C A; Williams, G M

    1982-01-01

    The relationship between acetylator phenotype and genotoxicity, i.e., damage to DNA, has been investigated using freshly isolated hepatocytes, an in-vitro system representing the major organ of N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity. Hepatocytes were isolated from rapid and slow acetylator rabbits by enzymatic perfusion of the liver. Unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS), determined by autoradiography, was used as an indicator of DNA damage. Hydralazine (HDZ) elicited UDS in hepatocytes from slow acetylators but little or none in hepatocytes from rapid acetylators. However, hepatocytes from rapid acetylators were more sensitive to the effects of 2-aminofluorene (2-AF). A concentration of 10(-3) M 2-AF was toxic, and 10(-4) M elicited UDS in hepatocytes from rapid acetylators. Hepatocytes from slow acetylators showed UDS when exposed to 10(-3) M. No differences were observed between the two phenotypes in the amount of UDS elicited by 2-acetylaminofluorene. These results demonstrate a correlation between acetylator phenotype and genotoxicity of substrates of NAT. Moreover, as shown by the different responses to HDZ and 2-AF, the sensitive phenotype varies with chemical structure. Thus, the identification of phenotype-dependent differences in the amount of DNA damage in rabbit hepatocytes offers evidence for genetic susceptibility to genotoxic chemicals and indicates that a similar susceptibility would be displayed by humans who express the same polymorphism in NAT activity.

  20. Genetic and environmental determinants of the susceptibility of Amerindian derived populations for having hypertriglyceridemia

    PubMed Central

    Aguilar-Salinas, Carlos A.; Tusie-Luna, Teresa; Pajukanta, Päivi

    2014-01-01

    Here, we discuss potential explanations for the higher prevalence of hypertriglyceridemia in populations with an Amerindian background. Although environmental factors are the triggers, the search for the ethnic related factors that explains the increased susceptibility of the Amerindians is a promising area for research. The study of the genetics of hypertriglyceridemia in Hispanic populations faces several challenges. Ethnicity could be a major confounding variable to prove genetic associations. Despite that, the study of hypertriglyceridemia in Hispanics has resulted in significant contributions. Two GWAS reports have exclusively included Mexican mestizos. Fifty percent of the associations reported in Caucasians could be generalized to the Mexicans, but in many cases the Mexican lead SNP was different than that reported in Europeans. Both reports included new associations with apo B or triglycerides concentrations. The frequency of susceptibility alleles in Mexicans is higher than that found in Europeans for several of the genes with the greatest effect on triglycerides levels. An example is the SNP rs964184 in APOA5. The same trend was observed for ANGPTL3 and TIMD4 variants. In summary, we postulate that the study of the genetic determinants of hypertriglyceridemia in Amerindian populations which have major changes in their lifestyle, may prove to be a great resource to identify new genes and pathways associated with hypertriglyceridemia. PMID:24768220

  1. Determination of Second-Order Nonlinear Optical Susceptibility of GaN Films on Sapphire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujita, Takashi; Hasegawa, Tatsuo; Haraguchi, Masanobu; Okamoto, Toshihiro; Fukui, Masuo; Nakamura, Syuji

    2000-05-01

    The second-order nonlinear susceptibilities of GaN films on sapphire were determined by the Maker fringe technique. In deriving the second-harmonic intensity, the bound wave propagating from the GaN-air interface to the GaN-sapphire interface and that propagating in the opposite direction were taken into account. We obtained |χ(2)zxx|=14.7±0.2 pm/V, |χ(2)xzx|=14.4±0.2 pm/V and |χ(2)zzz|=29.7±0.7 pm/V for the GaN film with a thickness of 2.55 μm using fundamental light with a wavelength of 1.064 μm.

  2. Streptococcus agalactiae in Brazil: serotype distribution, virulence determinants and antimicrobial susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Group B Streptococcus (GBS) remains a major cause of neonatal sepsis and is also associated with invasive and noninvasive infections in pregnant women and non-pregnant adults, elderly and patients with underlying medical conditions. Ten capsular serotypes have been recognized, and determination of their distribution within a specific population or geographical region is important as they are major targets for the development of vaccine strategies. We have evaluated the characteristics of GBS isolates recovered from individuals with infections or colonization by this microorganism, living in different geographic regions of Brazil. Methods A total of 434 isolates were identified and serotyped by conventional phenotypic tests. The determination of antimicrobial susceptibility was performed by the disk diffusion method. Genes associated with resistance to erythromycin (ermA, ermB, mefA) and tetracycline (tetK, tetL, tetM, tetO) as well as virulence-associated genes (bac, bca, lmb, scpB) were investigated using PCR. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) was used to examine the genetic diversity of macrolide-resistant and of a number of selected macrolide-susceptible isolates. Results Overall, serotypes Ia (27.6%), II (19.1%), Ib (18.7%) and V (13.6%) were the most predominant, followed by serotypes IV (8.1%) and III (6.7%). All the isolates were susceptible to the beta-lactam antimicrobials tested and 97% were resistant to tetracycline. Resistance to erythromycin and clindamycin were found in 4.1% and 3% of the isolates, respectively. Among the resistance genes investigated, tetM (99.3%) and tetO (1.8%) were detected among tetracycline-resistant isolates and ermA (39%) and ermB (27.6%) were found among macrolide-resistant isolates. The lmb and scpB virulence genes were detected in all isolates, while bac and bca were detected in 57 (13.1%) and 237 (54.6%) isolates, respectively. Molecular typing by PFGE showed that resistance to erythromycin was associated

  3. Determination of the slow crack growth susceptibility coefficient of dental ceramics using different methods.

    PubMed

    Gonzaga, Carla Castiglia; Cesar, Paulo Francisco; Miranda, Walter Gomes; Yoshimura, Humberto Naoyuki

    2011-11-01

    This study compared three methods for the determination of the slow crack growth susceptibility coefficient (n) of two veneering ceramics (VM7 and d.Sign), two glass-ceramics (Empress and Empress 2) and a glass-infiltrated alumina composite (In-Ceram Alumina). Discs (n = 10) were prepared according to manufacturers' recommendations and polished. The constant stress-rate test was performed at five constant stress rates to calculate n(d) . For the indentation fracture test to determine n(IF) , Vickers indentations were performed and the crack lengths were measured under an optical microscope. For the constant stress test (performed only for d.Sign for the determination of n(s) ) four constant stresses were applied and held constant until the specimens' fracture and the time to failure was recorded. All tests were performed in artificial saliva at 37°C. The n(d) values were 17.2 for Empress 2, followed by d.Sign (20.5), VM7 (26.5), Empress (30.2), and In-Ceram Alumina (31.1). In-Ceram Alumina and Empress 2 showed the highest n(IF) values, 66.0 and 40.2, respectively. The n(IF) values determined for Empress (25.2), d.Sign (25.6), and VM7 (20.1) were similar. The n(s) value determined for d.Sign was 31.4. It can be concluded that the n values determined for the dental ceramics evaluated were significantly influenced by the test method used.

  4. Mapping and modeling of a strain-specific epitope in the Norwalk virus capsid inner shell.

    PubMed

    Parra, Gabriel I; Sosnovtsev, Stanislav V; Abente, Eugenio J; Sandoval-Jaime, Carlos; Bok, Karin; Dolan, Michael A; Green, Kim Y

    2016-05-01

    Noroviruses are diverse positive-strand RNA viruses associated with acute gastroenteritis. Cross-reactive epitopes have been mapped primarily to conserved sequences in the capsid VP1 Shell (S) domain, and strain-specific epitopes to the highly variable Protruding (P) domain. In this work, we investigated a strain-specific linear epitope defined by MAb NV10 that was raised against prototype (Genogroup I.1) strain Norwalk virus (NV). Using peptide scanning and mutagenesis, the epitope was mapped to amino acids 21-32 (LVPEVNASDPLA) of the NV S domain, and its specificity was verified by epitope transfer and reactivity with a recombinant MAb NV10 single-chain variable fragment (scFv). Comparative structural modeling of the NV10 strain-specific and the broadly cross-reactive TV20 epitopes identified two internal non-overlapping sites in the NV shell, corresponding to variable and conserved amino acid sequences among strains, respectively. The S domain, like the P domain, contains strain-specific epitopes that contribute to the antigenic diversity among the noroviruses. PMID:26971245

  5. Strain-Specific Changes in Locomotor Behavior in Larval Zebrafish Elicited by Cholinergic Challenge

    EPA Science Inventory

    Some studies have compared the baseline behavior of different strains of larval zebrafish (Danio rerio), but there is sparse information on strain-specific responses to chemical challenges. The following study examines both the basal activity and response to a pharmacological cha...

  6. In vitro susceptibilities of suspected periodontopathic anaerobes as determined by membrane transfer assay.

    PubMed Central

    Caufield, P W; Allen, D N; Childers, N K

    1987-01-01

    Attempts to devise an antimicrobial approach to combating dentomicrobial infections such as periodontal diseases continue to be hampered by the lack of a relevant in vitro method for determining the susceptibility of suspected periodontopathogens to topically applied antimicrobial agents. Proposed here is a novel in vitro method called the membrane transfer technique, which acknowledges those aspects unique to localized pathogenic infections, particularly those associated with anaerobic bacteria. Bacterial lawns representing six suspected periodontopathic bacteria were prepared on membranes and then placed in contact with different concentrations of antimicrobial agents for 5 min. After incubation for 12 to 24 h, MBCs were determined with the aid of a tetrazolium chloride indicator. Four antimicrobial agents (chlorhexidine, iodine, stannous fluoride, and sodium fluoride) were used to test the applicability of the proposed in vitro method. MBCs were derived for each agent except sodium fluoride against all or most of the six bacterial strains tested. The proposed method may also be useful for examining the bactericidal action of topically applied antimicrobial agents against nonoral infections. Images PMID:3439806

  7. Host genetics determine susceptibility to avian influenza infection and transmission dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Mwangi, William; Peroval, Marylene; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Ascough, Stephanie; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Boyd, Amy; McCauley, John; Smith, Adrian; Butter, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Host-genetic control of influenza virus infection has been the object of little attention. In this study we determined that two inbred lines of chicken differing in their genetic background , Lines 0 and C-B12, were respectively relatively resistant and susceptible to infection with the low pathogenicity influenza virus A/Turkey/England/647/77 as defined by substantial differences in viral shedding trajectories. Resistant birds, although infected, were unable to transmit virus to contact birds, as ultimately only the presence of a sustained cloacal shedding (and not oropharyngeal shedding) was critical for transmission. Restriction of within-bird transmission of virus occurred in the resistant line, with intra-nares or cloacal infection resulting in only local shedding and failing to transmit fully through the gastro-intestinal-pulmonary tract. Resistance to infection was independent of adaptive immune responses, including the expansion of specific IFNγ secreting cells or production of influenza-specific antibody. Genetic resistance to a novel H9N2 virus was less robust, though significant differences between host genotypes were still clearly evident. The existence of host-genetic determination of the outcome of influenza infection offers tools for the further dissection of this regulation and also for understanding the mechanisms of influenza transmission within and between birds. PMID:27279280

  8. Host genetics determine susceptibility to avian influenza infection and transmission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Mwangi, William; Peroval, Marylene; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Ascough, Stephanie; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Boyd, Amy; McCauley, John; Smith, Adrian; Butter, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Host-genetic control of influenza virus infection has been the object of little attention. In this study we determined that two inbred lines of chicken differing in their genetic background , Lines 0 and C-B12, were respectively relatively resistant and susceptible to infection with the low pathogenicity influenza virus A/Turkey/England/647/77 as defined by substantial differences in viral shedding trajectories. Resistant birds, although infected, were unable to transmit virus to contact birds, as ultimately only the presence of a sustained cloacal shedding (and not oropharyngeal shedding) was critical for transmission. Restriction of within-bird transmission of virus occurred in the resistant line, with intra-nares or cloacal infection resulting in only local shedding and failing to transmit fully through the gastro-intestinal-pulmonary tract. Resistance to infection was independent of adaptive immune responses, including the expansion of specific IFNγ secreting cells or production of influenza-specific antibody. Genetic resistance to a novel H9N2 virus was less robust, though significant differences between host genotypes were still clearly evident. The existence of host-genetic determination of the outcome of influenza infection offers tools for the further dissection of this regulation and also for understanding the mechanisms of influenza transmission within and between birds.

  9. Host genetics determine susceptibility to avian influenza infection and transmission dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Hernandez, Raul; Mwangi, William; Peroval, Marylene; Sadeyen, Jean-Remy; Ascough, Stephanie; Balkissoon, Devanand; Staines, Karen; Boyd, Amy; McCauley, John; Smith, Adrian; Butter, Colin

    2016-01-01

    Host-genetic control of influenza virus infection has been the object of little attention. In this study we determined that two inbred lines of chicken differing in their genetic background , Lines 0 and C-B12, were respectively relatively resistant and susceptible to infection with the low pathogenicity influenza virus A/Turkey/England/647/77 as defined by substantial differences in viral shedding trajectories. Resistant birds, although infected, were unable to transmit virus to contact birds, as ultimately only the presence of a sustained cloacal shedding (and not oropharyngeal shedding) was critical for transmission. Restriction of within-bird transmission of virus occurred in the resistant line, with intra-nares or cloacal infection resulting in only local shedding and failing to transmit fully through the gastro-intestinal-pulmonary tract. Resistance to infection was independent of adaptive immune responses, including the expansion of specific IFNγ secreting cells or production of influenza-specific antibody. Genetic resistance to a novel H9N2 virus was less robust, though significant differences between host genotypes were still clearly evident. The existence of host-genetic determination of the outcome of influenza infection offers tools for the further dissection of this regulation and also for understanding the mechanisms of influenza transmission within and between birds. PMID:27279280

  10. Epithelial-macrophage interactions determine pulmonary fibrosis susceptibility in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Young, Lisa R.; Gulleman, Peter M.; Short, Chelsi W.; Tanjore, Harikrishna; Sherrill, Taylor; Qi, Aidong; McBride, Andrew P.; Zaynagetdinov, Rinat; Benjamin, John T.; Lawson, William E.; Novitskiy, Sergey V.; Blackwell, Timothy S.

    2016-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial cell (AEC) dysfunction underlies the pathogenesis of pulmonary fibrosis in Hermansky-Pudlak syndrome (HPS) and other genetic syndromes associated with interstitial lung disease; however, mechanisms linking AEC dysfunction and fibrotic remodeling are incompletely understood. Since increased macrophage recruitment precedes pulmonary fibrosis in HPS, we investigated whether crosstalk between AECs and macrophages determines fibrotic susceptibility. We found that AECs from HPS mice produce excessive MCP-1, which was associated with increased macrophages in the lungs of unchallenged HPS mice. Blocking MCP-1/CCR2 signaling in HPS mice with genetic deficiency of CCR2 or targeted deletion of MCP-1 in AECs normalized macrophage recruitment, decreased AEC apoptosis, and reduced lung fibrosis in these mice following treatment with low-dose bleomycin. We observed increased TGF-β production by HPS macrophages, which was eliminated by CCR2 deletion. Selective deletion of TGF-β in myeloid cells or of TGF-β signaling in AECs through deletion of TGFBR2 protected HPS mice from AEC apoptosis and bleomycin-induced fibrosis. Together, these data reveal a feedback loop in which increased MCP-1 production by dysfunctional AECs results in recruitment and activation of lung macrophages that produce TGF-β, thus amplifying the fibrotic cascade through AEC apoptosis and stimulation of fibrotic remodeling. PMID:27777976

  11. FT-IR spectrometry utilization for determining changes in erythrocyte susceptibility to oxidative stress

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petibois, Cyril; Deleris, Gdrard Y. R.

    2004-07-01

    We tested the hypothesis that FT-IR spectrometry was useful for determining oxidative stress damage on erythrocytes. Endurance-trained subjects performed a standardized endurance-training session at 75% of maximal oxygen consumption each week over 19 consecutive weeks. Capillary blood samples were taken before and after test-sessions and plasma and erythrocytes were separately analyzed using Fourier-transform infrared spectrometry. Exercise-induced change in plasma concentrations and erythrocyte IR absorptivities (vC-Hn of fatty acyl moieties, vC=O and δN-H of proteins, vP=O of phospholipids, vCOO- of amino-acids, and vC-O of lactate) were monitored and compared to training level. First training weeks induced normalization of plasma concentration changes during exercise (unchanged for glucose, moderately increased for lactate, high increases for triglycerides, glycerol, and fatty acids) while erythrocyte phospholipids alteration remained elevated (P < 0.05). Further, training reduced the exercise-induced erythrocyte lactate content increase (vC-O; P < 0.05) and phospholipids alteration (vC-Hn and vP=O; P < 0.05) during exercise. These changes paralleled the lowering of exercise-induced hemoconcentration (P < 0.05) and plasma lactate concentration increase during exercise (P < 0.05). These correlated changes between plasma and erythrocyte parameters suggest that hemoconcentration and lactate acidosis (plasmatic and intracellular) are important factors contributing to reduce erythrocyte susceptibility to oxidative stress during chronic endurance training.

  12. Determination of arterial input function in dynamic susceptibility contrast MRI using group independent component analysis technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Sharon; Liu, Ho-Ling; Yang, Yihong; Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Chuang, Keh-Shih

    2006-12-01

    Quantification of cerebral blood flow (CBF) with dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) requires the determination of the arterial input function (AIF). The segmentation of surrounding tissue by manual selection is error-prone due to the partial volume artifacts. Independent component analysis (ICA) has the advantage in automatically decomposing the signals into interpretable components. Recently group ICA technique has been applied to fMRI study and showed reduced variance caused by motion artifact and noise. In this work, we investigated the feasibility and efficacy of the use of group ICA technique to extract the AIF. Both simulated and in vivo data were analyzed in this study. The simulation data of eight phantoms were generated using randomized lesion locations and time activity curves. The clinical data were obtained from spin-echo EPI MR scans performed in seven normal subjects. Group ICA technique was applied to analyze data through concatenating across seven subjects. The AIFs were calculated from the weighted average of the signals in the region selected by ICA. Preliminary results of this study showed that group ICA technique could not extract accurate AIF information from regions around the vessel. The mismatched location of vessels within the group reduced the benefits of group study.

  13. Properties of food folates determined by stability and susceptibility to intestinal pteroylpolyglutamate hydrolase action.

    PubMed

    Seyoum, E; Selhub, J

    1998-11-01

    The intestinal absorption of folate occurs at the monoglutamyl level, and an important measure of food folate bioavailability is how much folate from the food reaches the intestinal sites in forms that can readily be absorbed. In the absence of protecting agents, e.g., vitamin C and reduced thiols, many labile folates may be lost during cooking and during residence in the acid-peptic milieu of the stomach. On the other hand, the presence of polyglutamyl folate necessitates the action of intestinal hydrolases, which could be affected by food constituents. In this study, we developed an in vitro assay for the determination of an index of food folate availability. The index of folate availability in this study was defined as that proportion of folate that has been identified as monoglutamyl derivatives after tests for stability and susceptibility to an enzymatic hydrolysis. The index of folate availability varied widely among foods. The highest index was for egg yolk (72.2%), followed by cow's livers (55.7%), orange juice (21. 3%), cabbage (6.0%), lima beans (4.5%) and lettuce (2.9%). Yeast folate had the lowest index (0.3%). The availability indices generated by this study correlate with the indices of the bioavailability of the corresponding food folate observed in earlier studies, R2 = 0.529 (P = 0.068). Additional information is required on the bioavailability of other food products to test the usefulness of this in vitro approach for assessing food folate availability.

  14. Susceptibility to ulcerative colitis in Hungarian patients determined by gene-gene interactions

    PubMed Central

    Sarlos, Patricia; Varszegi, Dalma; Csongei, Veronika; Magyari, Lili; Jaromi, Luca; Nagy, Lajos; Melegh, Bela

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To study the inflammatory bowel disease-5 locus (IBD5) and interleukin-23 receptor (IL23R) gene variants in UC patients and test for gene-gene interaction. METHODS: The study population (n = 625) was comprised of 320 unrelated ulcerative colitis (UC) patients with Caucasian origin and 316 age- and gender-matched, healthy controls. Five variants in the IBD5 locus (IGR2198a_1 rs11739135, IGR2096a_1 rs12521868, IGR2230a_1 rs17622208, SLC22A4 rs1050152 and SLC22A5 rs2631367) and two of the IL23R gene (rs1004819, rs2201841) were analysed. PCR and restriction fragment length polymorphism methods were used for genotyping, the SLC22A4 rs1050152 genotypes were determined by direct sequencing. Interactions and specific genotype combinations of the seven variants were tested by binary logistic regression analysis. The IL23R genotypes were stratified by IBD5 genotypes for further interaction analyses. RESULTS: For the IL23R rs1004819 A allele we found significantly higher allele frequency (P = 0.032) in UC patients compared to control subjects. The SNP rs1004819 showed significant association with UC risk for carriers (P = 0.004, OR = 1.606; 95%CI: 1.160-2.223) and the SNP rs2201841 for homozygotes (P = 0.030, OR = 1.983; 95%CI: 1.069-3.678). Individually none of the IBD5 markers conferred risk to UC development. There was no evidence for statistical interaction either between IBD5 loci and IL23R genes using logistic regression analysis. After genotype stratification, we could detect a positive association on the background of rs1004819 A allele for SLC22A4 T, SLC22A5 C, IGR2198a_1 C or IGR2096a_1 T allele, the highest OR was calculated in the presence of SLC22A4 T allele (P = 0.005, OR = 2.015; 95%CI: 1.230-3.300). There was no association with UC for any combinations of rs1004819 and IGR2230a_1. The IL23R rs2201841 homozygous genotype and IBD5 carrier status together did not confer susceptibility for UC. CONCLUSION: The present study has shown that UC susceptibility

  15. Genetically Determined Susceptibility to Tuberculosis in Mice Causally Involves Accelerated and Enhanced Recruitment of Granulocytes

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Christine; Hoffmann, Reinhard; Lang, Roland; Brandau, Sven; Hermann, Corinna; Ehlers, Stefan

    2006-01-01

    Classical twin studies and recent linkage analyses of African populations have revealed a potential involvement of host genetic factors in susceptibility or resistance to Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection. In order to identify the candidate genes involved and test their causal implication, we capitalized on the mouse model of tuberculosis, since inbred mouse strains also differ substantially in their susceptibility to infection. Two susceptible and two resistant mouse strains were aerogenically infected with 1,000 CFU of M. tuberculosis, and the regulation of gene expression was examined by Affymetrix GeneChip U74A array with total lung RNA 2 and 4 weeks postinfection. Four weeks after infection, 96 genes, many of which are involved in inflammatory cell recruitment and activation, were regulated in common. One hundred seven genes were differentially regulated in susceptible mouse strains, whereas 43 genes were differentially expressed only in resistant mice. Data mining revealed a bias towards the expression of genes involved in granulocyte pathophysiology in susceptible mice, such as an upregulation of those for the neutrophil chemoattractant LIX (CXCL5), interleukin 17 receptor, phosphoinositide kinase 3 delta, or gamma interferon-inducible protein 10. Following M. tuberculosis challenge in both airways or peritoneum, granulocytes were recruited significantly faster and at higher numbers in susceptible than in resistant mice. When granulocytes were efficiently depleted by either of two regimens at the onset of infection, only susceptible mice survived aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis significantly longer than control mice. We conclude that initially enhanced recruitment of granulocytes contributes to susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:16790804

  16. A new approach to determine the susceptibility of bacteria to antibiotics directly from positive blood culture bottles in two hours.

    PubMed

    March, Gabriel A; García-Loygorri, María C; Simarro, María; Gutiérrez, María P; Orduña, Antonio; Bratos, Miguel A

    2015-02-01

    The rapid identification and antibiotic susceptibility test of bacteria causing bloodstream infections are given a very high priority by clinical laboratories. In an effort to reduce the time required for performing antibiotic susceptibility test (AST), we have developed a new method to be applied from positive blood culture bottles. The design of method was performed using blood culture bottles prepared artificially with five strains which have a known susceptibility. An aliquot of the blood culture was subcultured in the presence of specific antibiotics and bacterial counts were monitored using the Sysmex UF-1000i flow cytometer at different times up to 180min. Receiver operating curve (ROC) analysis allowed us to find out the cut-off point for differentiating between sensitive and resistant strains to the tested antibiotic. This procedure was then validated against standard commercial methods on a total of 100 positive blood culture bottles from patients. First, bacterial identification was performed by matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) directly from positive blood culture bottles as we have previously reported. Secondly, antibiotic susceptibility test was performed in the same way that was carried out in artificially prepared blood culture bottles. Our results indicate that antibiotic susceptibility test can be determined as early as 120min since a blood culture bottle is flagged as positive. The essential agreement between our susceptibility test and commercial methods (E-test, MicroScan and Vitek) was 99%. In summary, we conclude that reliable results on bacterial identification and antibiotic susceptibility test performed directly from positive blood culture bottles can be obtained within 3h.

  17. Quantification of Azospirillum brasilense FP2 Bacteria in Wheat Roots by Strain-Specific Quantitative PCR.

    PubMed

    Stets, Maria Isabel; Alqueres, Sylvia Maria Campbell; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton; Cruz, Leonardo Magalhães

    2015-10-01

    Azospirillum is a rhizobacterial genus containing plant growth-promoting species associated with different crops worldwide. Azospirillum brasilense strains exhibit a growth-promoting effect by means of phytohormone production and possibly by N2 fixation. However, one of the most important factors for achieving an increase in crop yield by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria is the survival of the inoculant in the rhizosphere, which is not always achieved. The objective of this study was to develop quantitative PCR protocols for the strain-specific quantification of A. brasilense FP2. A novel approach was applied to identify strain-specific DNA sequences based on a comparison of the genomic sequences within the same species. The draft genome sequences of A. brasilense FP2 and Sp245 were aligned, and FP2-specific regions were filtered and checked for other possible matches in public databases. Strain-specific regions were then selected to design and evaluate strain-specific primer pairs. The primer pairs AzoR2.1, AzoR2.2, AzoR5.1, AzoR5.2, and AzoR5.3 were specific for the A. brasilense FP2 strain. These primer pairs were used to monitor quantitatively the population of A. brasilense in wheat roots under sterile and nonsterile growth conditions. In addition, coinoculations with other plant growth-promoting bacteria in wheat were performed under nonsterile conditions. The results showed that A. brasilense FP2 inoculated into wheat roots is highly competitive and achieves high cell numbers (∼10(7) CFU/g [fresh weight] of root) in the rhizosphere even under nonsterile conditions and when coinoculated with other rhizobacteria, maintaining the population at rather stable levels for at least up to 13 days after inoculation. The strategy used here can be applied to other organisms whose genome sequences are available.

  18. Quantification of Azospirillum brasilense FP2 Bacteria in Wheat Roots by Strain-Specific Quantitative PCR

    PubMed Central

    Stets, Maria Isabel; Alqueres, Sylvia Maria Campbell; Souza, Emanuel Maltempi; Pedrosa, Fábio de Oliveira; Schmid, Michael; Hartmann, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Azospirillum is a rhizobacterial genus containing plant growth-promoting species associated with different crops worldwide. Azospirillum brasilense strains exhibit a growth-promoting effect by means of phytohormone production and possibly by N2 fixation. However, one of the most important factors for achieving an increase in crop yield by plant growth-promoting rhizobacteria is the survival of the inoculant in the rhizosphere, which is not always achieved. The objective of this study was to develop quantitative PCR protocols for the strain-specific quantification of A. brasilense FP2. A novel approach was applied to identify strain-specific DNA sequences based on a comparison of the genomic sequences within the same species. The draft genome sequences of A. brasilense FP2 and Sp245 were aligned, and FP2-specific regions were filtered and checked for other possible matches in public databases. Strain-specific regions were then selected to design and evaluate strain-specific primer pairs. The primer pairs AzoR2.1, AzoR2.2, AzoR5.1, AzoR5.2, and AzoR5.3 were specific for the A. brasilense FP2 strain. These primer pairs were used to monitor quantitatively the population of A. brasilense in wheat roots under sterile and nonsterile growth conditions. In addition, coinoculations with other plant growth-promoting bacteria in wheat were performed under nonsterile conditions. The results showed that A. brasilense FP2 inoculated into wheat roots is highly competitive and achieves high cell numbers (∼107 CFU/g [fresh weight] of root) in the rhizosphere even under nonsterile conditions and when coinoculated with other rhizobacteria, maintaining the population at rather stable levels for at least up to 13 days after inoculation. The strategy used here can be applied to other organisms whose genome sequences are available. PMID:26187960

  19. Mouse chromosome 11 harbors genetic determinants of hippocampal strain-specific nicotinic receptor expression.

    PubMed

    Rogers, Scott W; Weis, Janis J; Ma, Ying; Teuscher, Cory; Gahring, Lorise C

    2008-01-01

    Differences between isogenic mouse strains in cellular expression of the neuronal nicotinic acetylcholine (ACh) receptor subunit alpha 4 (nAChR alpha 4) by the dorsal hippocampus are well known. To investigate further the genetic basis of these variations, expression of the nAChR alpha 4 subunit was measured in congenic mouse lines derived from two strains exhibiting notable divergence in the expression of this subunit: C3H and C57BL/6. Congenic lines carrying reciprocally introgressed regions (quantitative trait loci; QTL) from chromosomes 4, 5, and 12 each retained the phenotype most closely associated with the parental strain. However, in congenic lines harboring the reciprocal transfer of a chromosome 11 QTL, a characteristic difference in the ratio of interneurons versus astrocytes expressing nAChR alpha 4 in the CA1 region is reversed relative to the parental strain. These finding suggest that this chromosomal segment harbors genes that regulate strain distinct hippocampal morphology that is revealed by nAChR alpha 4 expression.

  20. Phase Determination of Second-Order Surface Susceptibility Tensor of Liquid Crystal Monolayer Using Ultra-Thin Film Local Oscillator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sei, Masaki; Nagayama, Kohei; Kajikawa, Kotaro; Ishii, Hisao; Seki, Kazuhiko; Kondo, Katsumi; Matsumoto, Yoshiyasu; Ouchi, Yukio

    1998-04-01

    We demonstrated full determination of second-order nonlinear susceptibility of a 4‧-n-octyl-4-cyanobiphenyl (8CB) liquid crystal (LC) monolayer adsorbed on a second-harmonic (SH) active polyimide (PI) substrate. In order to separate the SH signal of the LC film from that of the PI film, we adopted an interferometry technique of second-harmonic generation (SHG) using an ultra-thin film local oscillator. We have found a variety of phases in the components of susceptibility: those of χzii and χizi are almost the same but the phase of χzzz differs by 80° from the other two. The phases of the components of the surface susceptibility tensor are not always identical. This fact indicates that the surface SH response is more complicated than what we expected.

  1. Food makes you a target: disentangling genetic, physiological, and behavioral effects determining susceptibility to infection.

    PubMed

    Seppälä, Otto; Karvonen, Anssi; Haataja, Maarit; Kuosa, Marja; Jokela, Jukka

    2011-05-01

    Genetics, physiology, and behavior are all expected to influence the susceptibility of hosts to parasites. Furthermore, interactions between genetic and other factors are suggested to contribute to the maintenance of genetic polymorphism in resistance when the relative susceptibility of host genotypes is context dependent. We used a maternal sibship design and long- and short-term food deprivation treatments to test the role of family-level genetic variation, body condition, physiological state, and foraging behavior on the susceptibility of Lymnaea stagnalis snails to infection by a trematode parasite that uses chemical cues to locate its hosts. In experimental exposures, we found that snails in the long-term food deprivation treatment contracted fewer parasites than snails that were continuously well-fed, possibly because well-fed snails grew larger and attracted more transmission stages. When we kept the long-term feeding rates the same, but manipulated the physiological state and foraging behavior of the snails with short-term food deprivation treatment, we found that snails that were fed before the exposure contracted more parasites than snails that were fed during the exposure. This suggests that direct physiological effects of food processing, but not foraging behavior, predisposed snails to infection. Feeding treatments also affected the family-level variation in snail susceptibility, suggesting that the relative susceptibility of host genotypes was context dependent.

  2. Comparative Proteomic Analyses of Avirulent, Virulent, and Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Identify Strain-specific Patterns*

    PubMed Central

    Jhingan, Gagan Deep; Kumari, Sangeeta; Jamwal, Shilpa V.; Kalam, Haroon; Arora, Divya; Jain, Neharika; Kumaar, Lakshmi Krishna; Samal, Areejit; Rao, Kanury V. S.; Kumar, Dhiraj; Nandicoori, Vinay Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis is an adaptable intracellular pathogen, existing in both dormant as well as active disease-causing states. Here, we report systematic proteomic analyses of four strains, H37Ra, H37Rv, and clinical isolates BND and JAL, to determine the differences in protein expression patterns that contribute to their virulence and drug resistance. Resolution of lysates of the four strains by liquid chromatography, coupled to mass spectrometry analysis, identified a total of 2161 protein groups covering ∼54% of the predicted M. tuberculosis proteome. Label-free quantification analysis of the data revealed 257 differentially expressed protein groups. The differentially expressed protein groups could be classified into seven K-means cluster bins, which broadly delineated strain-specific variations. Analysis of the data for possible mechanisms responsible for drug resistance phenotype of JAL suggested that it could be due to a combination of overexpression of proteins implicated in drug resistance and the other factors. Expression pattern analyses of transcription factors and their downstream targets demonstrated substantial differential modulation in JAL, suggesting a complex regulatory mechanism. Results showed distinct variations in the protein expression patterns of Esx and mce1 operon proteins in JAL and BND strains, respectively. Abrogating higher levels of ESAT6, an important Esx protein known to be critical for virulence, in the JAL strain diminished its virulence, although it had marginal impact on the other strains. Taken together, this study reveals that strain-specific variations in protein expression patterns have a meaningful impact on the biology of the pathogen. PMID:27151218

  3. Methodology for determining susceptibility of rough rice to Rhyzopertha dominica (L.) and Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Varieties of rough rice, Oryzae sativa (L)., were obtained from different sources in the south-central United States and evaluated for susceptibility to the lesser grain borer, Rhyzopertha dominica (Fab.), and the Angoumois grain moth, Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier), in laboratory studies. Adult R. ...

  4. Carbapenem Susceptibility Patterns for Clinical Isolates of Mycobacterium abscessus Determined by the Etest Method▿

    PubMed Central

    Chihara, Shingo; Smith, Geremy; Petti, Cathy A.

    2010-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is resistant to multiple antibiotics, creating treatment challenges. Carbapenems are tested to increase therapeutic alternatives. We performed in vitro susceptibility testing by Etest of four carbapenems for M. abscessus isolates. Imipenem demonstrated the most in vitro activity, and testing of other carbapenems provided no additional value. PMID:20018813

  5. Space Systems - Safety and Compatibility of Materials - Method to Determine the Ignition Susceptibility of Materials or Components to Particle Impact

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hirsch, David B.

    2011-01-01

    The scope of this International Technical Specification is to provide a method to determine the ignition susceptibility of materials and components to particle impact. The method can be used to determine the conditions at which ignition and consumption of a specimen material occurs when impacted by single or multiple particles entrained in a flow of gaseous oxygen (GOX). Alternatively, the method can be used to determine if a specific material or component is subject to ignition and sustained combustion in a given flow environment when impacted by single or multiple particles entrained in a flow of GOX.

  6. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains exhibit differential and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mvubu, Nontobeko Eunice; Pillay, Balakrishna; Gamieldien, Junaid; Bishai, William; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-12-01

    Although pulmonary epithelial cells are integral to innate and adaptive immune responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, global transcriptomic changes in these cells remain largely unknown. Changes in gene expression induced in pulmonary epithelial cells infected with M. tuberculosis F15/LAM4/KZN, F11, F28, Beijing and Unique genotypes were investigated by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform generated 50 bp reads that were mapped to the human genome (Hg19) using Tophat (2.0.10). Differential gene expression induced by the different strains in infected relative to the uninfected cells was quantified and compared using Cufflinks (2.1.0) and MeV (4.0.9), respectively. Gene expression varied among the strains with the total number of genes as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (1187), Beijing (1252), F11 (1639), F28 (870), Unique (886) and H37Rv (1179). A subset of 292 genes was commonly induced by all strains, where 52 genes were down-regulated while 240 genes were up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes were compared among the strains and the number of induced strain-specific gene signatures were as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (138), Beijing (52), F11 (255), F28 (55), Unique (186) and H37Rv (125). Strain-specific molecular gene signatures associated with functional pathways were observed only for the Unique and H37Rv strains while certain biological functions may be associated with other strain signatures. This study demonstrated that strains of M. tuberculosis induce differential gene expression and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells. Specific signatures induced by clinical strains of M. tuberculosis can be further explored for novel host-associated biomarkers and adjunctive immunotherapies. PMID:27497873

  7. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains exhibit differential and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mvubu, Nontobeko Eunice; Pillay, Balakrishna; Gamieldien, Junaid; Bishai, William; Pillay, Manormoney

    2016-12-01

    Although pulmonary epithelial cells are integral to innate and adaptive immune responses during Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection, global transcriptomic changes in these cells remain largely unknown. Changes in gene expression induced in pulmonary epithelial cells infected with M. tuberculosis F15/LAM4/KZN, F11, F28, Beijing and Unique genotypes were investigated by RNA sequencing (RNA-Seq). The Illumina HiSeq 2000 platform generated 50 bp reads that were mapped to the human genome (Hg19) using Tophat (2.0.10). Differential gene expression induced by the different strains in infected relative to the uninfected cells was quantified and compared using Cufflinks (2.1.0) and MeV (4.0.9), respectively. Gene expression varied among the strains with the total number of genes as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (1187), Beijing (1252), F11 (1639), F28 (870), Unique (886) and H37Rv (1179). A subset of 292 genes was commonly induced by all strains, where 52 genes were down-regulated while 240 genes were up-regulated. Differentially expressed genes were compared among the strains and the number of induced strain-specific gene signatures were as follows: F15/LAM4/KZN (138), Beijing (52), F11 (255), F28 (55), Unique (186) and H37Rv (125). Strain-specific molecular gene signatures associated with functional pathways were observed only for the Unique and H37Rv strains while certain biological functions may be associated with other strain signatures. This study demonstrated that strains of M. tuberculosis induce differential gene expression and strain-specific molecular signatures in pulmonary epithelial cells. Specific signatures induced by clinical strains of M. tuberculosis can be further explored for novel host-associated biomarkers and adjunctive immunotherapies.

  8. Determination of antifungal susceptibility patterns among the environmental isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Faezeh; Dehghan, Parvin; Nekoeian, Shahram; Hashemi, Seyed Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent years, triazole-resistant environmental isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus have emerged in Europe and Asia. Azole resistance has been reported in patients who are treated with long-term azole therapy or exposure of the fungus spores to the azole fungicides used in agriculture. To date, a wide range of mutations in A. fumigatus have been described conferring azole-resistance, which commonly involves modifications in the cyp51A gene. We investigated antifungal susceptibility pattern of environmental isolates of A. fumigatus. Materials and Methods: In this study, 170 environmental samples collected from indoors surfaces of three hospitals in Iran. It was used β-tubulin gene to confirm the all of A. fumigatus isolates, which was identified by conventional methods. Furthermore, the antifungal susceptibility of itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole was investigated using broth microdilution test, according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility testing reference method. Results: From a total of 158 environmental molds fungi obtained from the hospitals, 58 isolates were identified as A. fumigatus by amplification of expected size of β-tubulin gene (~500 bp). In this study, in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing has shown that there were not high minimum inhibitory concentration values of triazole antifungals in all of the 58 environmental isolates of A. fumigatus. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated that there was not azole-resistant among environmental isolates of A. fumigatus. Medical triazoles compounds have structural similarity with triazole fungicide compounds in agriculture, therefore, resistance development through exposure to triazole fungicide compounds in the environment is important but it sounds there is not a serious health problem in drug resistance in environmental isolates in Iran.

  9. Determination of antifungal susceptibility patterns among the environmental isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus in Iran

    PubMed Central

    Mohammadi, Faezeh; Dehghan, Parvin; Nekoeian, Shahram; Hashemi, Seyed Jamal

    2016-01-01

    Background: In recent years, triazole-resistant environmental isolates of Aspergillus fumigatus have emerged in Europe and Asia. Azole resistance has been reported in patients who are treated with long-term azole therapy or exposure of the fungus spores to the azole fungicides used in agriculture. To date, a wide range of mutations in A. fumigatus have been described conferring azole-resistance, which commonly involves modifications in the cyp51A gene. We investigated antifungal susceptibility pattern of environmental isolates of A. fumigatus. Materials and Methods: In this study, 170 environmental samples collected from indoors surfaces of three hospitals in Iran. It was used β-tubulin gene to confirm the all of A. fumigatus isolates, which was identified by conventional methods. Furthermore, the antifungal susceptibility of itraconazole, voriconazole, and posaconazole was investigated using broth microdilution test, according to European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility testing reference method. Results: From a total of 158 environmental molds fungi obtained from the hospitals, 58 isolates were identified as A. fumigatus by amplification of expected size of β-tubulin gene (~500 bp). In this study, in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing has shown that there were not high minimum inhibitory concentration values of triazole antifungals in all of the 58 environmental isolates of A. fumigatus. Conclusion: Our findings demonstrated that there was not azole-resistant among environmental isolates of A. fumigatus. Medical triazoles compounds have structural similarity with triazole fungicide compounds in agriculture, therefore, resistance development through exposure to triazole fungicide compounds in the environment is important but it sounds there is not a serious health problem in drug resistance in environmental isolates in Iran. PMID:27656605

  10. Genetic determinants of susceptibility to Mycobacterial infections: IRF8, a new kid on the block.

    PubMed

    Salem, S; Gros, P

    2013-01-01

    Genetic and population studies suggest that onset, progression and ultimate outcome of infection with Mycobacteria, including the agent of tuberculosis Mycobacterium tuberculosis, are strongly influenced by genetic factors. Family-based and case-control linkage and association studies have suggested a complex genetic component for susceptibility to tuberculosis. On the other hand, patients with inborn errors in the IL12/IFNγ circuit may develop disseminated mycobacterial infections following perinatal BCG vaccination. The study of such MSMD (Mendelian Susceptibility to Mycobacterial Diseases) patients has provided much insight into innate and acquired immune defenses against mycobacteria. Parallel genetic analyses in mouse models of mycobacterial infections have also indicated complex genetic control, and have provided candidate genes for parallel testing in humans. Recently, mutations in human IRF8 were discovered and shown to cause two distinct forms of a novel primary immunodeficiency and associated susceptibility to mycobacteria. Autosomal recessive IRF8 deficiency is caused by mutation K108E and associated with severe disease with complete depletion of monocytes and dendritic cells. Mutation T80A causes autosomal dominant IRF8 deficiency and a milder form of the disease with selective loss of a subset of dendritic cells. These findings have established that IRF8 is required for ontogeny of the myeloid lineage and for host response to mycobacteria. The ongoing study of the IRF8 transcriptome has shown promise for the identification of IRF8 dependent pathways that play a critical role in host defense against mycobacteria in particular, and against intracellular pathogens in general.

  11. Endogenous miRNA and target concentrations determine susceptibility to potential ceRNA competition.

    PubMed

    Bosson, Andrew D; Zamudio, Jesse R; Sharp, Phillip A

    2014-11-01

    Target competition (ceRNA crosstalk) within miRNA-regulated gene networks has been proposed to influence biological systems. To assess target competition, we characterize and quantitate miRNA networks in two cell types. Argonaute iCLIP reveals that hierarchical binding of high- to low-affinity miRNA targets is a key characteristic of in vivo activity. Quantification of cellular miRNA and mRNA/ncRNA target pool levels indicates that miRNA:target pool ratios and an affinity partitioned target pool accurately predict in vivo Ago binding profiles and miRNA susceptibility to target competition. Using single-cell reporters, we directly test predictions and estimate that ?3,000 additional high-affinity target sites can affect active miRNA families with low endogenous miRNA:target ratios, such as miR-92/25. In contrast, the highly expressed miR-294 and let-7 families are not susceptible to increases of nearly 10,000 sites. These results show differential susceptibility based on endogenous miRNA:target pool ratios and provide a physiological context for ceRNA competition in vivo.

  12. Determination of homozygous susceptible strain in Culex quinquefasciatus (Say), using single raft sib-selection method.

    PubMed

    Hidayati, H; Nazni, W A; Mohd, S A

    2008-04-01

    The standard laboratory strain was found to be heterozygous for susceptibility. Hence, an attempt was made to obtain a homozygous susceptible strain in Culex quinquefasciatus (Say) using single raft sib-selection method. Lab-bred females of Cx. quinquefasciatus from insectariums, Unit of Medical Entomology were used in the experiment. After blood feeding Cx. quinquefasciatus mosquitoes laid eggs in raft form, ten rafts selected randomly for the test. Each egg raft was introduced into a plastic tray from number one to number ten. Twenty-five third stage larvae from each tray were exposed to 17.5 microl from 500mg/l malathion in a paper cup label number 1 to number ten. In the bioassay, which had 100% mortality, the respective larva in that particular tray was bred to adult stage for the following generation. Less than 7days old female mosquitoes that emerged from F(0) were used in the test. The F(0) and the subsequent adult and larval stage generations were subjected to adult and larval bioassay. After selection for about 10 generations, a homozygous susceptible strain in Cx. quinquefasciatus was obtained.

  13. Endogenous miRNA and Target Concentrations Determine Susceptibility to Potential ceRNA Competition

    PubMed Central

    Bosson, Andrew D.; Zamudio, Jesse R.; Sharp, Phillip A.

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY Target competition (ceRNA crosstalk) within miRNA-regulated gene networks has been proposed to influence biological systems. To assess target competition, we characterize and quantitate miRNA networks in two cell types. Argonaute iCLIP reveals that hierarchical binding of high- to low-affinity miRNA targets is a key characteristic of in vivo activity. Quantification of cellular miRNA and mRNA/ncRNA target pool levels indicates that miRNA:target pool ratios and an affinity partitioned target pool accurately predict in vivo Ago binding profiles and miRNA susceptibility to target competition. Using single-cell reporters, we directly test predictions and estimate that ~3,000 additional high-affinity target sites can affect active miRNA families with low endogenous miRNA:target ratios, such as miR-92/25. In contrast, the highly expressed miR-294 and let-7 families are not susceptible to increases of nearly 10,000 sites. These results show differential susceptibility based on endogenous miRNA:target pool ratios and provide a physiological context for ceRNA competition in vivo. PMID:25449132

  14. Strain-Specific Inhibition of nod Gene Induction in Bradyrhizobium japonicum by Flavonoid Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Kosslak, Renee M.; Joshi, Rita S.; Bowen, Benjamin A.; Paaren, Herbert E.; Appelbaum, Edward R.

    1990-01-01

    A broad-host-range plasmid, pEA2-21, containing a Bradyrhizobium japonicum nodABC'-'lacZ translational fusion was used to identify strain-specific inhibitors of the genes required for soybean nodulation, the common nod genes. The responses of type strains of B. japonicum serogroups USDA 110, USDA 123, USDA 127, USDA 129, USDA 122, and USDA 138 to nod gene inhibitors were compared. Few compounds inhibited nod gene expression in B. japonicum USDA 110. In contrast, nod gene expression in strains belonging to several other serogroups was inhibited by most of the flavonoids tested. However, the application of two of these strain-specific compounds, chrysin and naringenin, had little effect on the pattern of competition between indigenous and inoculum strains of B. japonicum in greenhouse and field trials. Preliminary studies with radiolabeled chrysin and naringenin suggest that the different responses to nod gene inhibitors may be partly due to the degree to which plant flavonoids can be metabolized by each strain. PMID:16348186

  15. Rapid determination of antiviral drug susceptibility of herpes simplex virus types 1 and 2 by real-time PCR.

    PubMed

    Thi, Thuong Nguyen; Deback, Claire; Malet, Isabelle; Bonnafous, Pascale; Ait-Arkoub, Zaïna; Agut, Henri

    2006-03-01

    An antiviral drug susceptibility assay of herpes simplex virus (HSV) was developed using real-time PCR quantification of intracellular viral DNA load. The number of HSV DNA copies within Vero cells after 24 h infection was strongly correlated with the number of plaques obtained after 72 h infection. Antiviral drug susceptibility of HSV was determined after virus growth for 24h by measuring the reduction of intracellular HSV DNA in the presence of increasing concentrations of either acyclovir (ACV) or foscarnet (PFA). This assay required neither preliminary titration of infectious stock nor follow-up of cytopathic effect. The 50% inhibitory concentrations (IC50s) obtained with 27 isolates of HSV types 1 and 2 by using this test were significantly correlated with those obtained in parallel with plaque reduction assay taken as the reference method (r=0.91, p<0.0001 and r=0.51, p=0.009 for ACV and PFA, respectively). The threshold real-time PCR IC50s for ACV and PFA resistance did not differ according to HSV type and were determined to be 1.0 and 100 microM, respectively. The real-time PCR susceptibility assay reported here is rapid, reproducible, applicable for HSV-1 as well as HSV-2, and suitable for automation.

  16. Simultaneous Identification and Susceptibility Determination to Multiple Antibiotics of Staphylococcus aureus by Bacteriophage Amplification Detection Combined with Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Rees, Jon C; Pierce, Carrie L; Schieltz, David M; Barr, John R

    2015-07-01

    The continued advance of antibiotic resistance in clinically relevant bacterial strains necessitates the development and refinement of assays that can rapidly and cost-effectively identify bacteria and determine their susceptibility to a panel of antibiotics. A methodology is described herein that exploits the specificity and physiology of the Staphylococci bacteriophage K to identify Staphylococcus aureus (S. aureus) and determine its susceptibility to clindamycin and cefoxitin. The method uses liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry to monitor the replication of bacteriophage after it is used to infect samples thought to contain S. aureus. Amplification of bacteriophage K indicates the sample contains S. aureus, for it is only in the presence of a suitable host that bacteriophage K can amplify. If bacteriophage amplification is detected in samples containing the antibiotics clindamycin or cefoxitin, the sample is deemed to be resistant to these antibiotics, respectively, for bacteriophage can only amplify in a viable host. Thus, with a single work flow, S. aureus can be detected in an unknown sample and susceptibility to clindamycin and cefoxitin can be ascertained. This Article discusses implications for the use of bacteriophage amplification in the clinical laboratory.

  17. Automated determination of chemical functionalisation addition routes based on magnetic susceptibility and nucleus independent chemical shifts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Lier, G.; Ewels, C. P.; Geerlings, P.

    2008-07-01

    We present a modified version of our previously reported meta-code SACHA, for systematic analysis of chemical addition. The code automates the generation of structures, running of quantum chemical codes, and selection of preferential isomers based on chosen selection rules. While the selection rules for the previous version were based on the total system energy, predicting purely thermodynamic addition patterns, we examine here the possibility of using other system parameters, notably magnetic susceptibility as a descriptor of global aromaticity, and nucleus independent chemical shifts (NICS) as local aromaticity descriptor.

  18. Development of Similar Broth Microdilution Methods to Determine the Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Flavobacterium columnare and F. psychrophilum.

    PubMed

    Gieseker, Charles M; Crosby, Tina C; Mayer, Tamara D; Bodeis, Sonya M; Stine, Cynthia B

    2016-03-01

    Flavobacterium columnare and F. psychrophilum are major fish pathogens that cause diseases that may require antimicrobial therapy. Choice of appropriate treatment is dependent upon determining the antimicrobial susceptibility of isolates. Therefore we optimized methods for broth microdilution testing of F. columnare and F. psychrophilum to facilitate standardizing an antimicrobial susceptibility test. We developed adaptations to make reproducible broth inoculums and confirmed the proper incubation time and media composition. We tested the stability of potential quality-control bacteria and compared test results between different operators. Log phase occurred at 48 h for F. columnare and 72-96 h for F. psychrophilum, confirming the test should be incubated at 28°C for approximately 48 h and at 18°C for approximately 96 h, respectively. The most consistent susceptibility results were achieved with plain, 4-g/L, dilute Mueller-Hinton broth supplemented with dilute calcium and magnesium. Supplementing the broth with horse serum did not improve growth. The quality-control strains, Escherichia coli ATCC 25922 and Aeromonas salmonicida subsp. salmonicida ATCC 33658, yielded stable minimal inhibitory concentrations (MIC) against all seven antimicrobials tested after 30 passes at 28°C and 15 passes at 18°C. In comparison tests, most MICs of the isolates agreed 100% within one drug dilution for ampicillin, florfenicol, and oxytetracycline. The agreement was lower with the ormetoprim-sulfdimethoxine combination, but there was at least 75% agreement for all but one isolate. These experiments have provided methods to help standardize antimicrobial susceptibility testing of these nutritionally fastidious aquatic bacteria. Received June 24, 2015; accepted October 2, 2015.

  19. Species-specific PCR for the Diagnosis and Determination of Antibiotic Susceptibilities of Brucella Strains Isolated from Tehran, Iran

    PubMed Central

    Irajian, Gholam Reza; Masjedian Jazi, Faramarz; Mirnejad, Reza; Piranfar, Vahhab; Zahraei salehi, Taghi; Amir Mozafari, Noor; Ghaznavi-rad, Ehsanollah; Khormali, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    Background: Brucellosis is an endemic zoonotic disease in the Middle East. This study intended to design a uniplex PCR assay for the detection and differentiation of Brucella at the species level and determining the antibiotic susceptibility pattern of Brucella in Iran. Methods: Sixty-eight Brucella specimens (38 animal and 30 human specimens) were analyzed using PCR (using one pair of primers). Antibiotic susceptibility patterns were evaluated and compared using the E-Test and disk diffusion susceptibility test. Tigecycline susceptibility pattern was compared with other antibiotics. Results: Thirty six isolates of B. melitensis, 2 isolates of B. abortus and 1 isolate of B. suis from the 38 animal specimens, 24 isolates of B. melitensis and 6 isolates of B. abortus from the 30 human specimens were differentiated. The MIC50 values of doxycycline for human and animal specimens were 125 and 10 μg/ml, respectively, tigecycline 0.064 μg/ml for human specimens and 0.125μg/ml for animal specimens, and trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole and ciprofloxacin 0.065 and 0.125μg/ml, respectively, for both human and animal specimens. The highest MIC50 value of streptomycin in the human specimens was 0.5μg/ml and 1μg/ml for the animal specimens. The greatest resistance shown was to tetracycline and gentamicin, respectively. Conclusion: Uniplex PCR for the detection and differentiation of Brucella at the strain level is faster and less expensive than multiplex PCR, and the antibiotics doxycycline, rifampin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, ciprofloxacin, and ofloxacin are the most effective antibiotics for treating brucellosis. Resistance to tigecycline is increasing, and we recommend that it be used in a combination regimen. PMID:27799972

  20. Stability of transgene methylation patterns in mice: position effects, strain specificity and cellular mosaicism.

    PubMed

    Koetsier, P A; Mangel, L; Schmitz, B; Doerfler, W

    1996-07-01

    The methylation status of a transgene, which carried the adenovirus type 2 E2A late promoter linked to the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase gene, was studied in three transgenic mouse lines (5-8, 7-1 and 8-1). These lines were analysed over a large number of offspring generations beyond the founder animal. In mating experiments, the influence of the parent-of-origin and strain-specific backgrounds on the transgene methylation patterns were assessed and found to have no effect on the pre-established methylation patterns in mouse lines 5-8 and 8-1. The founder animal 7-1 carried two groups of a total of ten transgenes, which were located on two different chromosomes. These arrays of transgenes could be segregated into separate mouse lines 7-1A and 7-1B. The transgenes of 7-1A animals exhibited cellular mosaic methylation patterns that were demethylated in approximately 10% of the offspring in a mixed genetic background. Upon further transmission of these transgenes in a mixed genetic background, the grandparental methylation patterns were reestablished in most progeny. Mating to inbred DBA/2 mice resulted in maintenance of the demethylated pattern or in further demethylation of the transgenes in approximately 50% of the offspring. In contrast, an equal number of transgenic siblings from matings to C57BL/6 mice showed a return to the original methylation pattern. The mosaic methylation status of this locus was apparently controlled by mouse-strain-specific factors. The methylation patterns of the 7-1B transgenes were not cellular mosaic and remained stable in all offspring, as with lines 5-8 and 8-1. Hence, the strain-dependent and cellular mosaic transgene methylation patterns of 7-1A animals were probably a consequence of the chromosomal integration site of the transgenes (position effect).

  1. The establishment of sub-strain specific WHO Reference Reagents for BCG vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Dagg, Belinda; Hockley, Jason; Rigsby, Peter; Ho, Mei M.

    2014-01-01

    As the latest addition to the sub-strain specific WHO Reference Reagents of BCG vaccine, an international collaborative study was completed to evaluate the suitability of a candidate BCG Moreau-RJ sub-strain as a WHO Reference Reagent of BCG vaccine. This follows the recent replacement of the WHO 1st International Reference Preparation for BCG vaccine, by three sub-strain specific WHO Reference Reagents of BCG vaccine (Danish 1331, Tokyo 172-1 and Russian BCG-I) in order to complete the coverage of most predominant sub-strains used for BCG vaccine production and distribution for use worldwide. The study used cultural viable count and modified ATP assays to quantify the preparation and multiplex PCR to confirm the identity of the sub-strain. The establishment of this WHO Reference Reagent of BCG vaccine of Moreau-RJ sub-strain was approved by the WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization meeting in October 2012. This preparation is available for distribution by NIBSC-MHRA, UK. The data from real-time stability monitoring demonstrated that these Reference Reagents of BCG vaccine are very stable in storage condition at −20 °C. They serve as the valuable source of BCG Reference Reagents for use as comparators (1) for viability assays (such as cultural viable count and modified ATP assays); (2) for in vivo assays (such as the absence of virulent mycobacteria, dermal reactivity and protection assays) in the evaluation of candidate TB vaccines in non-clinical models; (3) for identity assays using molecular biology techniques. PMID:25312272

  2. Genetic assessment of strain-specific sources of lake trout recruitment in the Great Lakes

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Page, Kevin S.; Scribner, Kim T.; Bennett, Kristine R.; Garzel, Laura M.; Burnham-Curtis, Mary K.

    2003-01-01

    Populations of wild lake trout Salvelinus namaycush have been extirpated from nearly all their historical habitats across the Great Lakes. Efforts to restore self-sustaining lake trout populations in U.S. waters have emphasized the stocking of coded-wire-tagged juveniles from six hatchery strains (Seneca Lake, Lewis Lake, Green Lake, Apostle Islands, Isle Royale, and Marquette) into vacant habitats. Strain-specific stocking success has historically been based on estimates of the survival and catch rates of coded-wire-tagged adults returning to spawning sites. However, traditional marking methods and estimates of relative strain abundance provide no means of assessing strain fitness (i.e., the realized contributions to natural recruitment) except by assuming that young-of-the-year production is proportional to adult spawner abundance. We used microsatellite genetic data collected from six hatchery strains with likelihood-based individual assignment tests (IA) and mixed-stock analysis (MSA) to identify the strain composition of young of the year recruited each year. We show that strain classifications based on IA and MSA were concordant and that the accuracy of both methods varied based on strain composition. Analyses of young-of-the-year lake trout samples from Little Traverse Bay (Lake Michigan) and Six Fathom Bank (Lake Huron) revealed that strain contributions differed significantly from estimates of the strain composition of adults returning to spawning reefs. The Seneca Lake strain contributed the majority of juveniles produced on Six Fathom Bank and more young of the year than expected within Little Traverse Bay. Microsatellite markers provided a method for accurately classifying the lake trout hatchery strains used for restoration efforts in the Great Lakes and for assessment of strain-specific reproductive success.

  3. Virulence determinants, antimicrobial susceptibility, and molecular profiles of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains isolated from China.

    PubMed

    Ding, Yi; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhang, Jianmin; Yang, Longsheng; Wang, Xiangru; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2015-11-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the epidemiology, serotype, antibiotic sensitivity, and clonal structure of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains in China. Forty-eight strains were collected from seven provinces during the period from 2012 to 2013. Pulse-field electrophoresis identified 32 different patterns which were classified into clonal groups A–D. Most pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns were observed in clonal complex A and B, suggesting high diversity of genetic characterization in these two predominant clonal complexes. Antibiotic sensitivity test shows that all the stains were susceptible to ampicillin, erythromycin, and cefotaxime, and resistant to kanamycin, cefazolin, sulfadiazine, and amikacin. Erythromycin and ampicillin are recommended as first-line antibiotics for treatment of E. rhusiopathiae in China. The high variation in PFGE pattern among the main clonal groups shows that the E. rhusiopathiae in China may originate from different lineages and sources instead of from expansion of a single clonal lineage across different regions. PMID:26975059

  4. Virulence determinants, antimicrobial susceptibility, and molecular profiles of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains isolated from China

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Yi; Zhu, Dongmei; Zhang, Jianmin; Yang, Longsheng; Wang, Xiangru; Chen, Huanchun; Tan, Chen

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to understand the epidemiology, serotype, antibiotic sensitivity, and clonal structure of Erysipelothrix rhusiopathiae strains in China. Forty-eight strains were collected from seven provinces during the period from 2012 to 2013. Pulse-field electrophoresis identified 32 different patterns which were classified into clonal groups A–D. Most pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) patterns were observed in clonal complex A and B, suggesting high diversity of genetic characterization in these two predominant clonal complexes. Antibiotic sensitivity test shows that all the stains were susceptible to ampicillin, erythromycin, and cefotaxime, and resistant to kanamycin, cefazolin, sulfadiazine, and amikacin. Erythromycin and ampicillin are recommended as first-line antibiotics for treatment of E. rhusiopathiae in China. The high variation in PFGE pattern among the main clonal groups shows that the E. rhusiopathiae in China may originate from different lineages and sources instead of from expansion of a single clonal lineage across different regions. PMID:26975059

  5. Inhibition of chlamydiae by primary alcohols correlates with the strain-specific complement of plasticity zone phospholipase D genes.

    PubMed

    Nelson, David E; Crane, Deborah D; Taylor, Lacey D; Dorward, David W; Goheen, Morgan M; Caldwell, Harlan D

    2006-01-01

    Members of the genus Chlamydia are obligate intracellular pathogens that have a unique biphasic developmental cycle and interactions with host cells. Many genes that dictate host infection tropism and, putatively, pathogenic manifestations of disease are clustered in a hypervariable region of the genome termed the plasticity zone (PZ). Comparative genomics studies have determined that an uncharacterized family of PZ genes encoding orthologs of eukaryotic and prokaryotic members of the phospholipase D (PLD) enzyme family varies among chlamydiae. Here, we show that the PZ PLD (pzPLD) of Chlamydia trachomatis are transcribed during both normal and persistent infection and that the corresponding PLD proteins are predominantly localized in reticulate bodies on the inner leaflet of the inclusion membrane. Further, we show that strains of chlamydiae encoding the pzPLD, but not a strain lacking these genes, are inhibited by primary alcohols, potent PLD inhibitors, during growth in HeLa 229 cells. This inhibitory effect is amplified approximately 5,000-fold during recovery from persistent infection. These findings suggest that the chlamydial pzPLD may be important, strain-specific, pathogenesis factors in vivo.

  6. Adiponectin is critical in determining susceptibility to depressive behaviors and has antidepressant-like activity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Ming; Zhang, Di; Cheng, Shao-Ying; Liu, Meilian; Ding, Jun; Scherer, Philipp E; Liu, Feng; Lu, Xin-Yun

    2012-07-24

    Depression is a debilitating mental illness and is often comorbid with metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. Adiponectin is an adipocyte-derived hormone with antidiabetic and insulin-sensitizing properties. Here we show that adiponectin levels in plasma are reduced in a chronic social-defeat stress model of depression, which correlates with decreased social interaction time. A reduction in adiponectin levels caused by haploinsufficiency results in increased susceptibility to social aversion, "anhedonia," and learned helplessness and causes impaired glucocorticoid-mediated negative feedback on the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of an adiponectin neutralizing antibody precipitates stress-induced depressive-like behavior. Conversely, i.c.v. administration of exogenous adiponectin produces antidepressant-like behavioral effects in normal-weight mice and in diet-induced obese diabetic mice. Taken together, these results suggest a critical role of adiponectin in depressive-like behaviors and point to a potential innovative therapeutic approach for depressive disorders.

  7. Adiponectin is critical in determining susceptibility to depressive behaviors and has antidepressant-like activity

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jing; Guo, Ming; Zhang, Di; Cheng, Shao-Ying; Liu, Meilian; Ding, Jun; Scherer, Philipp E.; Liu, Feng; Lu, Xin-Yun

    2012-01-01

    Depression is a debilitating mental illness and is often comorbid with metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. Adiponectin is an adipocyte–derived hormone with antidiabetic and insulin-sensitizing properties. Here we show that adiponectin levels in plasma are reduced in a chronic social-defeat stress model of depression, which correlates with decreased social interaction time. A reduction in adiponectin levels caused by haploinsufficiency results in increased susceptibility to social aversion, “anhedonia,” and learned helplessness and causes impaired glucocorticoid-mediated negative feedback on the hypothalamic–pituitary–adrenal (HPA) axis. Intracerebroventricular (i.c.v.) injection of an adiponectin neutralizing antibody precipitates stress-induced depressive-like behavior. Conversely, i.c.v. administration of exogenous adiponectin produces antidepressant-like behavioral effects in normal-weight mice and in diet-induced obese diabetic mice. Taken together, these results suggest a critical role of adiponectin in depressive-like behaviors and point to a potential innovative therapeutic approach for depressive disorders. PMID:22778410

  8. Antifungal Susceptibility in Serum and Virulence Determinants of Candida Bloodstream Isolates from Hong Kong

    PubMed Central

    Seneviratne, Chaminda J.; Rajan, Suhasini; Wong, Sarah S. W.; Tsang, Dominic N. C.; Lai, Christopher K. C.; Samaranayake, Lakshman P.; Jin, Lijian

    2016-01-01

    Candida bloodstream infections (CBI) are one of the most common nosocomial infections globally, and they account for a high mortality rate. The increasing global prevalence of drug-resistant Candida strains has also been posing a challenge to clinicians. In this study, we comprehensively evaluated the biofilm formation and production of hemolysin and proteinase of 63 CBI isolates derived from a hospital setting in Hong Kong as well as their antifungal susceptibility both in the presence and in the absence of human serum, using standard methodology. Candida albicans was the predominant species among the 63 CBI isolates collected, and non-albicans Candida species accounted for approximately one third of the isolates (36.5%). Of them, Candida tropicalis was the most common non-albicans Candida species. A high proportion (31.7%) of the CBI isolates (40% of C. albicans isolates, 10% of C. tropicalis isolates, 11% of C. parapsilosis isolates, and 100% of C. glabrata isolates) were found to be resistant to fluconazole. One of the isolates (C. tropicalis) was resistant to amphotericin B. A rising prevalence of drug-resistance CBI isolates in Hong Kong was observed with reference to a previous study. Notably, all non-albicans Candida species, showed increased hemolytic activity relative to C. albicans, whilst C. albicans, C. tropicalis, and C. parapsilosis exhibited proteinase activities. Majority of the isolates were capable of forming mature biofilms. Interestingly, the presence of serum distorted the yeast sensitivity to fluconazole, but not amphotericin B. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that CBI isolates of Candida have the potential to express to varying extent their virulence attributes (e.g., biofilm formation, hemolysin production, and proteinase activity) and these, together with perturbations in their antifungal sensitivity in the presence of serum, may contribute to treatment complication in candidemia. The effect of serum on antifungal activity

  9. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Recent Cuban Mycoplasma genitalium Isolates Determined by a Modified Cell-Culture-Based Method

    PubMed Central

    Mondeja, Brian A.; Rodríguez, Nadia M.; Barroto, Brenda; Blanco, Orestes

    2016-01-01

    Isolation of Mycoplasma genitalium from clinical specimens remains difficult and few strains are available for antimicrobial susceptibility testing. We describe the antimicrobial susceptibility of M. genitalium strains grown in Vero cell culture with first- and second- line antibiotics, using a modified cell-culture-based method. Macrolide- and -fluoroquinolone resistance determinants were detected by sequencing of the 23S and parC genes, respectively. Seven strains were examined, including three new, genetically distinct M. genitalium strains isolated from endocervical and urethral swab specimens from Cuban patients together with four reference strains isolated from specimens collected from men in Denmark, Sweden and Australia. Azithromycin was the most active drug against two of the Cuban M. genitalium strains with MICs values of 0.008 mg/liter, however, one strain was macrolide resistant with an MIC of >8 mg/liter, and the A2059G resistant genotype. Ciprofloxacin was the least active antimicrobial drug and moxifloxacin was the most active fluoroquinolone against the new clinical strains, although an MIC of 1 mg/l was found for two strains. However, no relevant parC mutations were detected. MICs for tetracyclines were 0.5–4 mg/liter. Although the number of Cuban strains was low, the results suggest that a single-dose azithromycin treatment could be ineffective, and that a second-line treatment with moxifloxacin, should become an option in Cuba. To our knowledge, this is the first report of isolation and antibiotic susceptibility testing of M. genitalium strains from the Latin-American region, and the first detection of macrolide resistance in such strains. PMID:27679992

  10. Childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia: genetic determinants of susceptibility and disease outcome.

    PubMed

    Krajinovic, M; Labuda, D; Sinnett, D

    2001-01-01

    The origin of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), the most common pediatric cancer, can be explained by a combination of genetic factors and environmental exposure. The environmental toxicants to which an individual is exposed are biotransformed and eliminated from the body after metabolic conversion mediated by Phase I and Phase II xenobiotic-metabolizing enzymes. Phase I enzymes catalyze hydroxylation, reduction and oxidation reactions of xenobiotics (carcinogens/drugs), often converting them into more active or toxic compounds. Phase II enzymes catalyze conjugation reactions (glucuronidation, acetylation, methylation), thereby converting the metabolites into non-reactive, water-soluble products that are eliminated from the organism. The genetic polymorphism underlying the variation in enzyme activity can modify susceptibility to diverse adult cancers, probably by influencing the activation and removal of toxicants or drugs. Here we present an overview of the role of genetic variants of certain Phase I and Phase II enzymes in the development of childhood ALL, a good model for such studies because of its short latency period. The genetic contribution to the development of ALL is examined by association studies that analyze the loci of Phase I enzymes (cytochrome P-450, myeloperoxidase) and Phase II enzymes (quinone-oxidoreductase, glutathione-S-transferase, N-acetyltransferase). The loci of the enzyme variants CYPlA1, CYP2E1, NQO1, GSTM1, GSTP1, NAT2 are associated with disease development, and evidence of gene-gene interactions has emerged as well. Despite the improvements in treatment, resistant cases of ALL remain a leading cause of cancer-related death in children. Although the underlying mechanism of drug resistance is not well understood, differences in the capacity of ALL patients to process drugs and environmental carcinogens could play a role by modifying the risk of recurrent malignancy, as well as the response to therapy. Therefore, polymorphic genes

  11. Evaluation of strain-specific primers for identification of Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG.

    PubMed

    Endo, Akihito; Aakko, Juhani; Salminen, Seppo

    2012-12-01

    Lactobacillus rhamnosus strain GG (ATCC 53103) is one of the most widely studied and commercialized probiotic strains, and thus strain-specific identification for the strain is highly valuable. In this study, two published PCR-based identification methods for strain GG, a transposase gene-targeting system and a phage-related gene-targeting system, were evaluated. The former produced amplicons from eight of the 41 strains tested and the phage-related system from five of the tested strains, including the strain GG. Fingerprinting analysis indicated that the strains LMG 18025, LMG 18030, and LMG 18038, which had an amplicon by the former system but none by the latter, were genetically distinguishable from L. rhamnosus GG at strain level. Strains LMG 23320, LMG 23325, LMG 23534, and LMG 25859 showed profiles very similar to that of the strain GG, suggesting that these strains might be identical to GG or derivative strains of it. The results here indicated that the phage-related gene-targeting system is a good tool for accurate identification of L. rhamnosus GG. This system would be able to detect both the original L. rhamnosus GG and its derivative strains.

  12. Strain-specific antibodies reduce co-feeding transmission of the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia afzelii.

    PubMed

    Jacquet, Maxime; Durand, Jonas; Rais, Olivier; Voordouw, Maarten J

    2016-03-01

    Vector-borne pathogens use a diversity of strategies to evade the vertebrate immune system. Co-feeding transmission is a potential immune evasion strategy because the vector-borne pathogen minimizes the time spent in the vertebrate host. We tested whether the Lyme disease pathogen, Borrelia afzelii, can use co-feeding transmission to escape the acquired immune response in the vertebrate host. We induced a strain-specific, protective antibody response by immunizing mice with one of two variants of OspC (A3 and A10), the highly variable outer surface protein C of Borrelia pathogens. Immunized mice were challenged via tick bite with B. afzelii strains A3 or A10 and infested with larval ticks at days 2 and 34 post-infection to measure co-feeding and systemic transmission respectively. Antibodies against a particular OspC variant significantly reduced co-feeding transmission of the targeted (homologous) strain but not the non-targeted (heterologous) strain. Cross-immunity between OspC antigens had no effect in co-feeding ticks but reduced the spirochaete load twofold in ticks infected via systemic transmission. In summary, OspC-specific antibodies reduced co-feeding transmission of a homologous but not a heterologous strain of B. afzelii. Co-feeding transmission allowed B. afzelii to evade the negative consequences of cross-immunity on the tick spirochaete load.

  13. Strain-specific regulation of intracellular Wolbachia density in multiply infected insects.

    PubMed

    Mouton, L; Henri, H; Bouletreau, M; Vavre, F

    2003-12-01

    Vertically transmitted symbionts suffer a severe reduction in numbers when they pass through host generations, resulting in genetic homogeneity or even clonality of their populations. Wolbachia endosymbionts that induce cytoplasmic incompatibility in their hosts depart from this rule, because cytoplasmic incompatibility actively maintains multiple infection within hosts. Hosts and symbionts are thus probably under peculiar selective pressures that must shape the way intracellular bacterial populations are regulated. We studied the density and location of Wolbachia within adult Leptopilina heterotoma, a haplodiploid wasp that is parasitic on Drosophila and that is naturally infected with three Wolbachia strains, but for which we also obtained one simply infected and two doubly infected lines. Comparison of these four lines by quantitative polymerase chain reaction using a real-time detection system showed that total Wolbachia density varies according to the infection status of individuals, while the specific density of each Wolbachia strain remains constant regardless of the presence of other strains. This suggests that Wolbachia strains do not compete with one another within the same host individual, and that a strain-specific regulatory mechanism is operating. We discuss the regulatory mechanisms that are involved, and how this process might have evolved as a response to selective pressures acting on both partners. PMID:14629360

  14. Isolation of Rhizobium loti Strain-Specific DNA Sequences by Subtraction Hybridization

    PubMed Central

    Bjourson, A. J.; Cooper, J. E.

    1988-01-01

    Mixed-phase (heterogeneous) and single-phase (homogeneous) DNA subtraction-hybridization methods were used to isolate specific DNA probes for closely related Rhizobium loti strains. In the heterogeneous method, DNA from the prospective probe strain was repeatedly hybridized to a mixture of DNA from cross-hybridizing strains (subtracter DNA) which was immobilized on an epoxy-activated cellulose matrix. Probe strain sequences which shared homology with the matrix-bound subtracter DNA hybridized to it, leaving unique probe strain sequences in the mobile phase. In the homogeneous method, probe strain sequences were hybridized in solution to biotinylated, mercurated subtracter DNA. Biotinylated, mercurated subtracer DNA and probe strain sequences hybridized to it were removed by two-step affinity chromatography on streptavidin-agarose and thiol-Sepharose. The specificity of the sequences remaining after subtraction hybridization by both methods was assessed and compared by colony hybridization with R. loti strains. Both methods allowed the rapid isolation of strain-specific DNA fragments which were suitable for use as probes. Images PMID:16347782

  15. Conjugation between quinolone-susceptible bacteria can generate mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region, inducing quinolone resistance.

    PubMed

    Pitondo-Silva, André; Martins, Vinicius Vicente; Silva, Carolina Fávero da; Stehling, Eliana Guedes

    2015-02-01

    Quinolones are an important group of antibacterial agents that can inhibit DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV activity. DNA gyrase is responsible for maintaining bacteria in a negatively supercoiled state, being composed of subunits A and B. Topoisomerase IV is a homologue of DNA gyrase and consists of two subunits codified by the parC and parE genes. Mutations in gyrA and gyrB of DNA gyrase may confer resistance to quinolones, and the majority of resistant strains show mutations between positions 67 and 106 of gyrA, a region denoted the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR). The most frequent substitutions occur at positions 83 and 87, but little is known about the mechanisms promoting appearance of mutations in the QRDR. The present study proposes that some mutations in the QRDR could be generated as a result of the natural mechanism of conjugation between bacteria in their natural habitat. This event was observed following conjugation in vitro of two different isolates of quinolone-susceptible Pseudomonas aeruginosa, which transferred plasmids of different molecular weights to a recipient strain of Escherichia coli (HB101), also quinolone-susceptible, generating two different transconjugants that presented mutations in DNA gyrase and acquisition of resistance to all quinolones tested. PMID:25262036

  16. [The refractory susceptibility in determination of sulfur in organic drugs using the Schoniger method].

    PubMed

    Listov, S A; Arsamastsev, A P; Gamanina, G J

    1988-10-01

    Conventional methods of the determination of sulphur in organic drugs were studied (Schöniger method) and new methods developed. Emphasis was put on the disturbance effect of 5 elements, which often occur in the structure of organic drug compounds. It could be shown, that the disturbance effect of nitrogen and chlorine was overcome by the use of carbamide and ammonium carbonate in the absorption solution. The effect of fluorine was abolished by the use of boric acid and a special two-spiral technique of the analysis. Based on these studies concrete recommendations for the Schöniger method of sulphur determination in drugs of various composition of elements were given. PMID:3212013

  17. [The refractory susceptibility in determination of sulfur in organic drugs using the Schoniger method].

    PubMed

    Listov, S A; Arsamastsev, A P; Gamanina, G J

    1988-10-01

    Conventional methods of the determination of sulphur in organic drugs were studied (Schöniger method) and new methods developed. Emphasis was put on the disturbance effect of 5 elements, which often occur in the structure of organic drug compounds. It could be shown, that the disturbance effect of nitrogen and chlorine was overcome by the use of carbamide and ammonium carbonate in the absorption solution. The effect of fluorine was abolished by the use of boric acid and a special two-spiral technique of the analysis. Based on these studies concrete recommendations for the Schöniger method of sulphur determination in drugs of various composition of elements were given.

  18. In Vitro Amphotericin B Susceptibility of Malassezia pachydermatis Determined by the CLSI Broth Microdilution Method and Etest Using Lipid-Enriched Media

    PubMed Central

    Álvarez-Pérez, Sergio; Peláez, Teresa; Cutuli, Maite; García, Marta E.

    2014-01-01

    We determined the in vitro amphotericin B susceptibility of 60 Malassezia pachydermatis isolates by the CLSI broth microdilution method and the Etest using lipid-enriched media. All isolates were susceptible at MICs of ≤1 μg/ml, confirming the high activity of amphotericin B against this yeast species. Overall, the essential agreement between the tested methods was high (80% and 96.7% after 48 h and 72 h, respectively), and all discrepancies were regarded as nonsubstantial. PMID:24752258

  19. Determination of surface complex nonlinear optical susceptibilities and molecular orientational distribution functions using resonant surface second-harmonic generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Byoungchoo; Yoo, Jeong-Geun; Sakai, Takahiro; Hoshi, Hajime; Ishikawa, Ken; Takezoe, Hideo

    1998-10-01

    Using the resonant optical surface second-harmonic generation (SHG), we have determined the relative values of the complex nonlinear optical (NLO) components (χzzz, χzxx, and χxxz) at isotropic interfaces (C∞v) of a polymer with SHG active side chains. The introduced configuration of the SHG experiment was a polarizer-rotating quarter wave plate-sample-analyzer. It was shown that this configuration gives information on complex NLO coefficients without using the Kleinmann symmetry. For the experiments, we measured resonant surface SHG from the air-polymer and the substrate-polymer interfaces of a thick polymer film. By theoretically fitting the SHG data, we unambiguously determined the nonlinear susceptibility components at the both interfaces of the polymer film. Moreover, unbiased molecular orientational distribution functions (ODFs) at both interfaces were also determined using the modified maximum entropy method. The obtained ODFs were found to be quite different from the previous ones obtained by assuming the Kleinmann symmetry, indicating the important role of the imaginary part of χ's played when determining ODFs.

  20. Regulatory T cells control strain specific resistance to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis

    PubMed Central

    Breser, Maria L.; Lino, Andreia C.; Motrich, Ruben D.; Godoy, Gloria J.; Demengeot, Jocelyne; Rivero, Virginia E.

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility to autoimmune diseases results from the encounter of a complex and long evolved genetic context with a no less complex and changing environment. Major actors in maintaining health are regulatory T cells (Treg) that primarily dampen a large subset of autoreactive lymphocytes escaping thymic negative selection. Here, we directly asked whether Treg participate in defining susceptibility and resistance to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis (EAP). We analyzed three common laboratory strains of mice presenting with different susceptibility to autoimmune prostatitis upon immunization with prostate proteins. The NOD, the C57BL/6 and the BALB/c mice that can be classified along a disease score ranging from severe, mild and to undetectable, respectively. Upon mild and transient depletion of Treg at the induction phase of EAP, each model showed an increment along this score, most remarkably with the BALB/c mice switching from a resistant to a susceptible phenotype. We further show that disease associates with the upregulation of CXCR3 expression on effector T cells, a process requiring IFNγ. Together with recent advances on environmental factors affecting Treg, these findings provide a likely cellular and molecular explanation to the recent rise in autoimmune diseases incidence. PMID:27624792

  1. Regulatory T cells control strain specific resistance to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Breser, Maria L; Lino, Andreia C; Motrich, Ruben D; Godoy, Gloria J; Demengeot, Jocelyne; Rivero, Virginia E

    2016-01-01

    Susceptibility to autoimmune diseases results from the encounter of a complex and long evolved genetic context with a no less complex and changing environment. Major actors in maintaining health are regulatory T cells (Treg) that primarily dampen a large subset of autoreactive lymphocytes escaping thymic negative selection. Here, we directly asked whether Treg participate in defining susceptibility and resistance to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis (EAP). We analyzed three common laboratory strains of mice presenting with different susceptibility to autoimmune prostatitis upon immunization with prostate proteins. The NOD, the C57BL/6 and the BALB/c mice that can be classified along a disease score ranging from severe, mild and to undetectable, respectively. Upon mild and transient depletion of Treg at the induction phase of EAP, each model showed an increment along this score, most remarkably with the BALB/c mice switching from a resistant to a susceptible phenotype. We further show that disease associates with the upregulation of CXCR3 expression on effector T cells, a process requiring IFNγ. Together with recent advances on environmental factors affecting Treg, these findings provide a likely cellular and molecular explanation to the recent rise in autoimmune diseases incidence. PMID:27624792

  2. Regulatory T cells control strain specific resistance to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis.

    PubMed

    Breser, Maria L; Lino, Andreia C; Motrich, Ruben D; Godoy, Gloria J; Demengeot, Jocelyne; Rivero, Virginia E

    2016-09-14

    Susceptibility to autoimmune diseases results from the encounter of a complex and long evolved genetic context with a no less complex and changing environment. Major actors in maintaining health are regulatory T cells (Treg) that primarily dampen a large subset of autoreactive lymphocytes escaping thymic negative selection. Here, we directly asked whether Treg participate in defining susceptibility and resistance to Experimental Autoimmune Prostatitis (EAP). We analyzed three common laboratory strains of mice presenting with different susceptibility to autoimmune prostatitis upon immunization with prostate proteins. The NOD, the C57BL/6 and the BALB/c mice that can be classified along a disease score ranging from severe, mild and to undetectable, respectively. Upon mild and transient depletion of Treg at the induction phase of EAP, each model showed an increment along this score, most remarkably with the BALB/c mice switching from a resistant to a susceptible phenotype. We further show that disease associates with the upregulation of CXCR3 expression on effector T cells, a process requiring IFNγ. Together with recent advances on environmental factors affecting Treg, these findings provide a likely cellular and molecular explanation to the recent rise in autoimmune diseases incidence.

  3. Lgn1, a gene that determines susceptibility to Legionella pneumophila, maps to mouse chromosome 13

    SciTech Connect

    Dietrich, W.F.; Damron, D.M.; Lander, E.S.

    1995-04-10

    The intracellular pathogen Legionella pneumophila is unable to replicate in macrophages derived from most inbred mouse strains. Here, we report the mapping of a gene, called Lgn1, that determines whether mouse macrophages are permissive for the intracellular replication of L. pneumophila. Although Lgn1 has been previously reported to map to mouse chromosome 15, we show here that it actually maps to chromosome 13, between D13Mit128 and D13Mit70. In the absence of any regional candidates for Lgn1, this map position will facilitate positional cloning attempts directed at this gene. 22 refs., 2 figs., 2 tabs.

  4. Strain-specific colonization patterns and serum modulation of multi-species oral biofilm development.

    PubMed

    Biyikoğlu, Basak; Ricker, Austin; Diaz, Patricia I

    2012-08-01

    Periodontitis results from an ecological shift in the composition of subgingival biofilms. Subgingival community maturation is modulated by inter-organismal interactions and the relationship of communities with the host. In an effort to better understand this process, we evaluated biofilm formation, with oral commensal species, by three strains of the subgingivally prevalent microorganism Fusobacterium nucleatum and four strains of the periodontopathogen Porphyromonas gingivalis. We also tested the effect of serum, which resembles gingival exudates, on subgingival biofilms. Biofilms were allowed to develop in flow cells using salivary medium. We found that although not all strains of F. nucleatum were able to grow in mono-species biofilms, forming a community with health-associated partners Actinomyces oris and Veillonella parvula promoted biofilm growth of all F. nucleatum strains. Strains of P. gingivalis also showed variable ability to form mono-species biofilms. P. gingivalis W50 and W83 did not form biofilms, while ATCC 33277 and 381 formed biofilm structures, but only strain ATCC 33277 grew over time. Unlike the enhanced growth of F. nucleatum with the two health-associated species, no strain of P. gingivalis grew in three-species communities with A. oris and V. parvula. However, addition of F. nucleatum facilitated growth of P. gingivalis ATCC 33277 with health-associated partners. Importantly, serum negatively affected the adhesion of F. nucleatum, while it favored biofilm growth by P. gingivalis. This work highlights strain specificity in subgingival biofilm formation. Environmental factors such as serum alter the colonization patterns of oral microorganisms and could impact subgingival biofilms by selectively promoting pathogenic species.

  5. Strain-Specific Survival of Salmonella enterica in Peanut Oil, Peanut Shell, and Chia Seeds.

    PubMed

    Fong, Karen; Wang, Siyun

    2016-03-01

    In North America, outbreaks of Salmonella have been linked to low-water activity (aw) foods, such as nuts and seeds. These outbreaks have implicated an assortment of Salmonella serotypes. Some Salmonella serotypes (e.g., Enteritidis and Typhimurium) cause high proportions of salmonellosis. Nevertheless, there has recently been an emergence of uncommon Salmonella serotypes and strains (e.g., Tennessee, Hartford, and Thompson) in low-aw foods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival characteristics of Salmonella serotypes Enteritidis, Typhimurium, Tennessee, Hartford, and Thompson in three low-aw food ingredients with varying aw: peanut oil (aw = 0.521 ± 0.003), peanut shell (aw = 0.321 ± 0.20), and chia seeds (aw = 0.585 ± 0.003). The survival of individual Salmonella strains on each food matrix was monitored for a maximum of 150 days by spreading the bacterial cells onto Luria-Bertani and/or xylose lysine deoxycholate agar. Overall, Salmonella survived for the longest periods of time in peanut oil (96 ± 8 days), followed by chia seeds (94 ± 46 days). The survival period was substantially reduced on the surface of peanut shell (42 ± 49 h), although PCR after 70 days of incubation revealed the presence of Salmonella cells. In addition, Salmonella exhibited a strain-specific response in the three low-aw foods tested. Salmonella Hartford was identified as highly persistent in all low-aw food matrices, whereas Salmonella Typhimurium was the least persistent. The current research emphasizes the adaptable nature of Salmonella to low-aw food ingredients. This may pose additional problems owing to the downstream production of various end products. Additionally, unique survival characteristics among Salmonella strains highlight the need for tailored mitigation strategies regarding high-risk Salmonella strains in the food industry. PMID:26939645

  6. Strain-Specific Survival of Salmonella enterica in Peanut Oil, Peanut Shell, and Chia Seeds.

    PubMed

    Fong, Karen; Wang, Siyun

    2016-03-01

    In North America, outbreaks of Salmonella have been linked to low-water activity (aw) foods, such as nuts and seeds. These outbreaks have implicated an assortment of Salmonella serotypes. Some Salmonella serotypes (e.g., Enteritidis and Typhimurium) cause high proportions of salmonellosis. Nevertheless, there has recently been an emergence of uncommon Salmonella serotypes and strains (e.g., Tennessee, Hartford, and Thompson) in low-aw foods. The aim of this study was to evaluate the survival characteristics of Salmonella serotypes Enteritidis, Typhimurium, Tennessee, Hartford, and Thompson in three low-aw food ingredients with varying aw: peanut oil (aw = 0.521 ± 0.003), peanut shell (aw = 0.321 ± 0.20), and chia seeds (aw = 0.585 ± 0.003). The survival of individual Salmonella strains on each food matrix was monitored for a maximum of 150 days by spreading the bacterial cells onto Luria-Bertani and/or xylose lysine deoxycholate agar. Overall, Salmonella survived for the longest periods of time in peanut oil (96 ± 8 days), followed by chia seeds (94 ± 46 days). The survival period was substantially reduced on the surface of peanut shell (42 ± 49 h), although PCR after 70 days of incubation revealed the presence of Salmonella cells. In addition, Salmonella exhibited a strain-specific response in the three low-aw foods tested. Salmonella Hartford was identified as highly persistent in all low-aw food matrices, whereas Salmonella Typhimurium was the least persistent. The current research emphasizes the adaptable nature of Salmonella to low-aw food ingredients. This may pose additional problems owing to the downstream production of various end products. Additionally, unique survival characteristics among Salmonella strains highlight the need for tailored mitigation strategies regarding high-risk Salmonella strains in the food industry.

  7. Strain-Specific Interactions of Listeria monocytogenes with the Autophagy System in Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Stöckli, Martina; Higgins, Darren E.; Brumell, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Listeria monocytogenes is an intracellular bacterial pathogen that can replicate in the cytosol of host cells. These bacteria undergo actin-based motility in the cytosol via expression of ActA, which recruits host actin-regulatory proteins to the bacterial surface. L. monocytogenes is thought to evade killing by autophagy using ActA-dependent mechanisms. ActA-independent mechanisms of autophagy evasion have also been proposed, but remain poorly understood. Here we examined autophagy of non-motile (ΔactA) mutants of L. monocytogenes strains 10403S and EGD-e, two commonly studied strains of this pathogen. The ΔactA mutants displayed accumulation of ubiquitinated proteins and p62/SQSTM1 on their surface. However, only strain EGD-e ΔactA displayed colocalization with the autophagy marker LC3 at 8 hours post infection. A bacteriostatic agent (chloramphenicol) was required for LC3 recruitment to 10403S ΔactA, suggesting that these bacteria produce a factor for autophagy evasion. Internalin K was proposed to block autophagy of L. monocytogenes in the cytosol of host cells. However, deletion of inlK in either the wild-type or ΔactA background of strain 10403S had no impact on autophagy evasion by bacteria, indicating it does not play an essential role in evading autophagy. Replication of ΔactA mutants of strain EGD-e and 10403S was comparable to their parent wild-type strain in macrophages. Thus, ΔactA mutants of L. monocytogenes can block killing by autophagy at a step downstream of protein ubiquitination and, in the case of strain EGD-e, downstream of LC3 recruitment to bacteria. Our findings highlight the strain-specific differences in the mechanisms that L. monocytogenes uses to evade killing by autophagy in host cells. PMID:25970638

  8. Pneumocystis Elicits a STAT6-Dependent, Strain-Specific Innate Immune Response and Airway Hyperresponsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Meissner, Nicole N.; Siemsen, Dan W.; McInnerney, Kate; Harmsen, Allen G.

    2012-01-01

    It is widely held that exposure to pathogens such as fungi can be an agent of comorbidity, such as exacerbation of asthma or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Although many studies have examined allergic responses to fungi and their effects on pulmonary function, the possible pathologic implications of the early innate responses to fungal pathogens have not been explored. We examined early responses to the atypical fungus Pneumocystis in two common strains of mice in terms of overall immunological response and related pathology, such as cell damage and airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR). We found a strong strain-specific response in BALB/c mice that included recruitment of neutrophils, NK, NKT, and CD4 T cells. This response was accompanied by elevated indicators of lung damage (bronchoalveolar lavage fluid albumin and LDH) and profound AHR. This early response was absent in C57BL/6 mice, although both strains exhibited a later response associated with the clearance of Pneumocystis. We found that this AHR could not be attributed exclusively to the presence of recruited neutrophils, NKT, NK, or CD4 cells or to the actions of IFN-γ or IL-4. However, in the absence of STAT6 signaling, AHR and inflammatory cell recruitment were virtually absent. Gene expression analysis indicated that this early response included activation of several transcription factors that could be involved in pulmonary remodeling. These results show that exposure to a fungus such as Pneumocystis can elicit pulmonary responses that may contribute to morbidity, even without prior sensitization, in the context of certain genetic backgrounds. PMID:21960549

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy determines the susceptibility of melanoma cells to dabrafenib.

    PubMed

    Ji, Chao; Zhang, Ziping; Chen, Lihong; Zhou, Kunli; Li, Dongjun; Wang, Ping; Huang, Shuying; Gong, Ting; Cheng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the deadliest skin cancers and accounts for most skin-related deaths due to strong resistance to chemotherapy drugs. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of dabrafenib-induced drug resistance in human melanoma cell lines A375 and MEL624. Our studies support that both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy were induced in the melanoma cells after the treatment with dabrafenib. In addition, ER stress-induced autophagy protects melanoma cells from the toxicity of dabrafenib. Moreover, inhibition of both ER stress and autophagy promote the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. Taken together, the data suggest that ER stress-induced autophagy determines the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. These results provide us with promising evidence that the inhibition of autophagy and ER stress could serve a therapeutic effect for the conventional dabrafenib chemotherapy. PMID:27536070

  10. Endoplasmic reticulum stress-induced autophagy determines the susceptibility of melanoma cells to dabrafenib

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Chao; Zhang, Ziping; Chen, Lihong; Zhou, Kunli; Li, Dongjun; Wang, Ping; Huang, Shuying; Gong, Ting; Cheng, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the deadliest skin cancers and accounts for most skin-related deaths due to strong resistance to chemotherapy drugs. In the present study, we investigated the mechanisms of dabrafenib-induced drug resistance in human melanoma cell lines A375 and MEL624. Our studies support that both endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy were induced in the melanoma cells after the treatment with dabrafenib. In addition, ER stress-induced autophagy protects melanoma cells from the toxicity of dabrafenib. Moreover, inhibition of both ER stress and autophagy promote the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. Taken together, the data suggest that ER stress-induced autophagy determines the sensitivity of melanoma cells to dabrafenib. These results provide us with promising evidence that the inhibition of autophagy and ER stress could serve a therapeutic effect for the conventional dabrafenib chemotherapy. PMID:27536070

  11. Elucidation of strain-specific interaction of a GII-4 norovirus with HBGA receptors by site-directed mutagenesis study

    SciTech Connect

    Tan Ming |; Xia Ming; Cao Sheng; Huang Pengwei; Farkas, Tibor |; Meller, Jarek |; Hegde, Rashmi S. |; Li Xuemei; Rao Zihe; Jiang Xi |

    2008-09-30

    Noroviruses interact with histo-blood group antigen (HBGA) receptors in a strain-specific manner probably detecting subtle structural differences in the carbohydrate receptors. The specific recognition of types A and B antigens by various norovirus strains is a typical example. The only difference between the types A and B antigens is the acetamide linked to the terminal galactose of the A but not to the B antigen. The crystal structure of the P dimer of a GII-4 norovirus (VA387) bound to types A and B trisaccharides has elucidated the A/B binding site on the capsid but did not explain the binding specificity of the two antigens. In this study, using site-directed mutagenesis, we have identified three residues on the VA387 capsid that are sterically close to the acetamide and are required for binding to A but not B antigens, indicating that the acetamide determines the binding specificity between the A and B antigens. Further mutational analysis showed that a nearby open cavity may also be involved in binding specificity to HBGAs. In addition, a systematic mutational analysis of residues in and around the binding interface has identified a group of amino acids that are required for binding but do not have direct contact with the carbohydrate antigens, implying that these residues may be involved in the structural integrity of the receptor binding interface. Taken together, our study provides new insights into the carbohydrate/capsid interactions which are a valuable complement to the atomic structures in understanding the virus/host interaction and in the future design of antiviral agents.

  12. Comparative genome-scale modelling of Staphylococcus aureus strains identifies strain-specific metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Bosi, Emanuele; Monk, Jonathan M.; Aziz, Ramy K.; Fondi, Marco; Nizet, Victor; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.

    2016-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a preeminent bacterial pathogen capable of colonizing diverse ecological niches within its human host. We describe here the pangenome of S. aureus based on analysis of genome sequences from 64 strains of S. aureus spanning a range of ecological niches, host types, and antibiotic resistance profiles. Based on this set, S. aureus is expected to have an open pangenome composed of 7,411 genes and a core genome composed of 1,441 genes. Metabolism was highly conserved in this core genome; however, differences were identified in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis pathways between the strains. Genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolism were constructed for the 64 strains of S. aureus. These GEMs enabled a systems approach to characterizing the core metabolic and panmetabolic capabilities of the S. aureus species. All models were predicted to be auxotrophic for the vitamins niacin (vitamin B3) and thiamin (vitamin B1), whereas strain-specific auxotrophies were predicted for riboflavin (vitamin B2), guanosine, leucine, methionine, and cysteine, among others. GEMs were used to systematically analyze growth capabilities in more than 300 different growth-supporting environments. The results identified metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenic traits and virulence acquisitions. Such traits can be used to differentiate strains responsible for mild vs. severe infections and preference for hosts (e.g., animals vs. humans). Genome-scale analysis of multiple strains of a species can thus be used to identify metabolic determinants of virulence and increase our understanding of why certain strains of this deadly pathogen have spread rapidly throughout the world. PMID:27286824

  13. Spontaneous voiding by mice reveals strain-specific lower urinary tract function to be a quantitative genetic trait.

    PubMed

    Yu, Weiqun; Ackert-Bicknell, Cheryl; Larigakis, John D; MacIver, Bryce; Steers, William D; Churchill, Gary A; Hill, Warren G; Zeidel, Mark L

    2014-06-01

    Lower urinary tract (LUT) symptoms become prevalent with aging and affect millions; however, therapy is often ineffective because the etiology is unknown. Existing assays of LUT function in animal models are often invasive; however, a noninvasive assay is required to study symptom progression and determine genetic correlates. Here, we present a spontaneous voiding assay that is simple, reproducible, quantitative, and noninvasive. Young female mice from eight inbred mouse strains (129S1/SvImJ, A/J, C57BL/6J, NOD/ShiLtJ, NZO/H1LtJ, CAST/EiJ, PWK/PhJ, and WSB/EiJ) were tested for urination patterns on filter paper. Repeat testing at different times of the day showed minimal within-individual and within-strain variations, but all parameters (spot number, total volume, percent area in primary void, corner voiding, and center voiding) exhibited significant variations between strains. Calculation of the intraclass correlation coefficient, an estimate of broad-sense heritability, for each time of day and for each voiding parameter revealed highly significant heritability [spot number: 61%, percent urine in primary void: 90%, and total volume: 94% (afternoon data)]. Cystometrograms confirmed strong strain-specific urodynamic characteristics. Behavior-voiding correlation analysis showed no correlation with anxiety phenotypes. Diagnostically, the assay revealed LUT symptoms in several systems, including a demonstration of voiding abnormalities in older C57BL/6J mice (18-24 mo), in a model of protamine sulfate-induced urothelial damage and in a model of sucrose-induced diuresis. This assay may be used to derive pathophysiological LUT readouts from mouse models. Voiding characteristics are heritable traits, opening the way for genetic studies of LUT symptoms using outbred mouse populations. PMID:24717733

  14. Comparative genome-scale modelling of Staphylococcus aureus strains identifies strain-specific metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bosi, Emanuele; Monk, Jonathan M; Aziz, Ramy K; Fondi, Marco; Nizet, Victor; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2016-06-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is a preeminent bacterial pathogen capable of colonizing diverse ecological niches within its human host. We describe here the pangenome of S. aureus based on analysis of genome sequences from 64 strains of S. aureus spanning a range of ecological niches, host types, and antibiotic resistance profiles. Based on this set, S. aureus is expected to have an open pangenome composed of 7,411 genes and a core genome composed of 1,441 genes. Metabolism was highly conserved in this core genome; however, differences were identified in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis pathways between the strains. Genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolism were constructed for the 64 strains of S. aureus These GEMs enabled a systems approach to characterizing the core metabolic and panmetabolic capabilities of the S. aureus species. All models were predicted to be auxotrophic for the vitamins niacin (vitamin B3) and thiamin (vitamin B1), whereas strain-specific auxotrophies were predicted for riboflavin (vitamin B2), guanosine, leucine, methionine, and cysteine, among others. GEMs were used to systematically analyze growth capabilities in more than 300 different growth-supporting environments. The results identified metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenic traits and virulence acquisitions. Such traits can be used to differentiate strains responsible for mild vs. severe infections and preference for hosts (e.g., animals vs. humans). Genome-scale analysis of multiple strains of a species can thus be used to identify metabolic determinants of virulence and increase our understanding of why certain strains of this deadly pathogen have spread rapidly throughout the world.

  15. Comparative genome-scale modelling of Staphylococcus aureus strains identifies strain-specific metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Bosi, Emanuele; Monk, Jonathan M; Aziz, Ramy K; Fondi, Marco; Nizet, Victor; Palsson, Bernhard Ø

    2016-06-28

    Staphylococcus aureus is a preeminent bacterial pathogen capable of colonizing diverse ecological niches within its human host. We describe here the pangenome of S. aureus based on analysis of genome sequences from 64 strains of S. aureus spanning a range of ecological niches, host types, and antibiotic resistance profiles. Based on this set, S. aureus is expected to have an open pangenome composed of 7,411 genes and a core genome composed of 1,441 genes. Metabolism was highly conserved in this core genome; however, differences were identified in amino acid and nucleotide biosynthesis pathways between the strains. Genome-scale models (GEMs) of metabolism were constructed for the 64 strains of S. aureus These GEMs enabled a systems approach to characterizing the core metabolic and panmetabolic capabilities of the S. aureus species. All models were predicted to be auxotrophic for the vitamins niacin (vitamin B3) and thiamin (vitamin B1), whereas strain-specific auxotrophies were predicted for riboflavin (vitamin B2), guanosine, leucine, methionine, and cysteine, among others. GEMs were used to systematically analyze growth capabilities in more than 300 different growth-supporting environments. The results identified metabolic capabilities linked to pathogenic traits and virulence acquisitions. Such traits can be used to differentiate strains responsible for mild vs. severe infections and preference for hosts (e.g., animals vs. humans). Genome-scale analysis of multiple strains of a species can thus be used to identify metabolic determinants of virulence and increase our understanding of why certain strains of this deadly pathogen have spread rapidly throughout the world. PMID:27286824

  16. Antimicrobial activity of gallic acid against thermophilic Campylobacter is strain specific and associated with a loss of calcium ions.

    PubMed

    Sarjit, Amreeta; Wang, Yi; Dykes, Gary A

    2015-04-01

    Gallic acid has been suggested as a potential antimicrobial for the control of Campylobacter but its effectiveness is poorly studied. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) and minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC) of gallic acid against Campylobacter jejuni (n = 8) and Campylobacter coli (n = 4) strains was determined. Gallic acid inhibited the growth of five C. jejuni strains and three C. coli strains (MIC: 15.63-250 μg mL(-1)). Gallic acid was only bactericidal to two C. coli strains (MBC: 125 and 62.5 μg mL(-1)). The mechanism of the bactericidal effect against these two strains (and selected non-susceptible controls) was investigated by determining decimal reduction times and by monitoring the loss of cellular content and calcium ions, and changes in cell morphology. Gallic acid did not result in a loss of cellular content or morphological changes in the susceptible strains as compared to the controls. Gallic acid resulted in a loss of calcium ions (0.58-1.53 μg mL(-1) and 0.54-1.17 μg mL(-1), respectively, over a 180 min period) from the susceptible strains but not the controls. Gallic acid is unlikely to be an effective antimicrobial against Campylobacter in a practical sense unless further interventions to ensure an effective bactericidal mode of action against all strains are developed.

  17. Evaluation of agar dilution and broth microdilution methods to determine the disinfectant susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guoyan; Yang, Qianru; Long, Mei; Guo, Lijuan; Li, Bei; Meng, Yue; Zhang, Anyun; Wang, Hongning; Liu, Shuliang; Zou, Likou

    2015-11-01

    A variety of disinfectants have been widely used in veterinary hygiene, food industries and environments, which could induce the development of bacterial resistance to disinfectants. The methods used to investigate antimicrobial effects of disinfectant vary considerably among studies, making comparisons difficult. In this study, agar dilution and broth microdilution methods were used to compare the antimicrobial activities of four quaternary ammonium compounds (QACs) against foodborne and zoonotic pathogens. The potential relationship between the presence of QACs resistance genes and phenotypic resistance to QACs was also investigated. Our results indicated that the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) determined by two methods might be different depended upon different QACs and bacteria applied. Regardless of the testing methods, Klebsiella pneumoniae was more tolerant among Gram-negative strains to four QACs, followed by Salmonella and Escherichia coli. The agreement between MICs obtained by the two methods was good, for benzalkonium chloride (78.15%), didecyldimethylammonium chloride (DDAC) (82.35%), cetylpyridinium chloride (CTPC) (97.48%) and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) (99.16%), respectively. Among all Gram-negative bacteria, 94.55% (n=52) of qacEΔ1-positive strains showed higher MICs (512 mg l(-1)) to CTAB. The qacEΔ1 gene was highly associated (P<0.05) with the high MICs of QACs (⩾512 mg l(-1)). In addition, DDAC remained as the most effective disinfectant against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. This is the first study that compared the agar dilution and broth microdilution methods to assess the antimicrobial activity of QACs. The study demonstrated the need to standardize method that would be used in evaluating QACs antimicrobial properties in the future.

  18. Preliminary AMS Study in Cretaceous Igneous Rocks of Valle Chico Complex, Uruguay: Statistical Determination of Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barcelona, H.; Mena, M.; Sanchez-Bettucci, L.

    2009-05-01

    The Valle Chico Complex, at southeast Uruguay, is related Paraná-Etendeka Province. The study involved basaltic lavas, quarz-syenites, and rhyolitic and trachytic dikes. Samples were taken from 18 sites and the AMS of 250 specimens was analyzed. The AMS is modeled by a second order tensor K and it graphical representation is a symmetric ellipsoid. The axes relations determine parameters which describe different properties like shape, lineation, and foliation, degree of anisotropy and bulk magnetic susceptibility. Under this perspective, one lava, dike, or igneous body can be considered a mosaic of magnetic susceptibility domains (MSD). The DSM is an area with specific degree of homogeneity in the distribution of parameters values and cinematic conditions. An average tensor would weigh only one MSD, but if the site is a mosaic, subsets of specimens with similar parameters can be created. Hypothesis tests can be used to establish parameter similarities. It would be suitable considered as a MSD the subsets with statistically significant differences in at least one of its means parameters, and therefore, be treated independently. Once defined the MSDs the tensor analysis continues. The basalt-andesitic lavas present MSD with an NNW magnetic foliation, dipping 10. The K1 are sub-horizontal, oriented E-W and reprsent the magmatic flow direction. The quartz-syenites show a variable magnetic fabric or prolate ellipsoids mayor axes dispose parallel to the flow direction (10 to the SSE). Deformed syenites show N300/11 magnetic foliation, consistent with the trend of fractures. The K1 is subvertical. The MSD defined in rhyolitic dikes have magnetic foliations consistent with the structural trend. The trachytic dikes show an important indetermination in the magnetic response. However, a 62/N90 magnetic lineation was defined. The MSDs obtained are consistent with the geological structures and contribute to the knowledge of the tectonic, magmatic and kinematic events.

  19. Differential effect of IL10 and TNFα genotypes on determining susceptibility to discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Suarez, A; Lopez, P; Mozo, L; Gutierrez, C

    2005-01-01

    Objective: To ascertain the possible involvement of functional interleukin 10 (IL10) and tumour necrosis α (TNFα) cytokine promoter polymorphisms on the susceptibility to discoid and systemic lupus erythematosus (DLE, SLE), and their associations with immunological features. Methods: Single nucleotide polymorphisms of the IL10 (–1082, –819, and –592) and TNFα (–308) genes were determined using allele specific probes in 248 lupus patients and 343 matched controls. To assess functional significance of genotypes, basal mRNA cytokine levels were quantified in 106 genotyped healthy controls by real time RT-PCR. Specific autoantibodies and cutaneous manifestations were analysed in SLE patients and associated with functional genotypes. Results: After analysing the distribution of IL10 and TNFα transcript levels according to promoter genotypes in healthy individuals, patients and controls were classified into functional single and combined genotypes according to the expected high or low constitutive cytokine production. High TNFα genotypes (–308AA or AG) were associated with SLE independently of IL10 alleles, whereas the risk of developing DLE and the prevalence of discoid lesion in SLE were higher in the high IL10/low TNFα producer group (–1082GG/–308GG). Cytokine interaction also influences the appearance of autoantibodies. Antibodies against Sm are prevalent among low producer patients for both cytokines, a genotype not associated with lupus incidence, whereas low IL10/high TNFα patients have the highest frequency of antibodies to SSa and SSb. Conclusions: IL10/TNFα interaction influences susceptibility to DLE and the appearance of specific autoantibodies in SLE patients, whereas high TNFα producer genotypes represent a significant risk factor for SLE. PMID:15800006

  20. Morphological characteristics of motor neurons do not determine their relative susceptibility to degeneration in a mouse model of severe spinal muscular atrophy.

    PubMed

    Thomson, Sophie R; Nahon, Joya E; Mutsaers, Chantal A; Thomson, Derek; Hamilton, Gillian; Parson, Simon H; Gillingwater, Thomas H

    2012-01-01

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a leading genetic cause of infant mortality, resulting primarily from the degeneration and loss of lower motor neurons. Studies using mouse models of SMA have revealed widespread heterogeneity in the susceptibility of individual motor neurons to neurodegeneration, but the underlying reasons remain unclear. Data from related motor neuron diseases, such as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), suggest that morphological properties of motor neurons may regulate susceptibility: in ALS larger motor units innervating fast-twitch muscles degenerate first. We therefore set out to determine whether intrinsic morphological characteristics of motor neurons influenced their relative vulnerability to SMA. Motor neuron vulnerability was mapped across 10 muscle groups in SMA mice. Neither the position of the muscle in the body, nor the fibre type of the muscle innervated, influenced susceptibility. Morphological properties of vulnerable and disease-resistant motor neurons were then determined from single motor units reconstructed in Thy.1-YFP-H mice. None of the parameters we investigated in healthy young adult mice - including motor unit size, motor unit arbor length, branching patterns, motor endplate size, developmental pruning and numbers of terminal Schwann cells at neuromuscular junctions - correlated with vulnerability. We conclude that morphological characteristics of motor neurons are not a major determinant of disease-susceptibility in SMA, in stark contrast to related forms of motor neuron disease such as ALS. This suggests that subtle molecular differences between motor neurons, or extrinsic factors arising from other cell types, are more likely to determine relative susceptibility in SMA.

  1. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R; Barany, Francis; Soper, Steven A

    2012-09-21

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft(3)). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic

  2. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R; Barany, Francis; Soper, Steven A

    2012-09-21

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft(3)). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic

  3. Modular microfluidic system fabricated in thermoplastics for the strain-specific detection of bacterial pathogens†

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yi-Wen; Wang, Hong; Hupert, Mateusz; Witek, Makgorzata; Dharmasiri, Udara; Pingle, Maneesh R.; Barany, Francis

    2015-01-01

    The recent outbreaks of a lethal E. coli strain in Germany have aroused renewed interest in developing rapid, specific and accurate systems for detecting and characterizing bacterial pathogens in suspected contaminated food and/or water supplies. To address this need, we have designed, fabricated and tested an integrated modular-based microfluidic system and the accompanying assay for the strain-specific identification of bacterial pathogens. The system can carry out the entire molecular processing pipeline in a single disposable fluidic cartridge and detect single nucleotide variations in selected genes to allow for the identification of the bacterial species, even its strain with high specificity. The unique aspect of this fluidic cartridge is its modular format with task-specific modules interconnected to a fluidic motherboard to permit the selection of the target material. In addition, to minimize the amount of finishing steps for assembling the fluidic cartridge, many of the functional components were produced during the polymer molding step used to create the fluidic network. The operation of the cartridge was provided by electronic, mechanical, optical and hydraulic controls located off-chip and packaged into a small footprint instrument (1 ft3). The fluidic cartridge was capable of performing cell enrichment, cell lysis, solid-phase extraction (SPE) of genomic DNA, continuous flow (CF) PCR, CF ligase detection reaction (LDR) and universal DNA array readout. The cartridge was comprised of modules situated on a fluidic motherboard; the motherboard was made from polycarbonate, PC, and used for cell lysis, SPE, CF PCR and CF LDR. The modules were task-specific units and performed universal zip-code array readout or affinity enrichment of the target cells with both made from poly(methylmethacrylate), PMMA. Two genes, uidA and sipB/C, were used to discriminate between E. coli and Salmonella, and evaluated as a model system. Results showed that the fluidic system

  4. Susceptibility testing of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae in Denmark. Evaluation of three different media of MIC-determinations and tablet diffusion tests.

    PubMed

    Aarestrup, F M; Jensen, N E

    1999-02-12

    This study was conducted to compare the applicability of three different media in sensitivity testing of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae by means of MIC and tablet diffusion tests. The media used were: modified PPLO agar, chocolatized Mueller-Hinton-II and Columbia agar supplemented with NAD. Seven antimicrobial agents were tested: ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, penicillin, spectinomycin, tiamulin, trimethoprim + sulfadiazine and tylosin, against 40 randomly selected A. pleuropneumoniae isolates. In general, good agreement was found between results obtained with all combinations of media, most antimicrobials tested and the two-test systems. Some variations between media were observed for spectinomycin, tiamulin and tylosin. For ceftiofur and trimethoprim + sulfadiazine some isolates with low MIC-values were classified as resistant using tablet diffusion, indicating that the break points of resistance for these antimicrobials using the tablet diffusion tests need adjustment. Using current break points for resistance with MIC-determinations, all isolates tested susceptible to ceftiofur, enrofloxacin, penicillin, tiamulin and trimethoprim + sulfadiazine. A larger number of isolates tested resistant to spectinomycin and tylosin on all three media using both MIC determinations and tablet diffusion. PMID:10063535

  5. Susceptibility Testing

    MedlinePlus

    ... page helpful? Also known as: Sensitivity Testing; Drug Resistance Testing; Culture and Sensitivity; C & S; Antimicrobial Susceptibility Formal name: Bacterial and Fungal Susceptibility Testing Related tests: Urine Culture ; ...

  6. Strain-Specific Virolysis Patterns of Human Noroviruses in Response to Alcohols.

    PubMed

    Park, Geun Woo; Collins, Nikail; Barclay, Leslie; Hu, Liya; Prasad, B V Venkataram; Lopman, Benjamin A; Vinjé, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are widely used to disinfect hands to prevent the spread of pathogens including noroviruses. Alcohols inactivate norovirus by destruction of the viral capsid, resulting in the leakage of viral RNA (virolysis). Since conflicting results have been reported on the susceptibility of human noroviruses against alcohols, we exposed a panel of 30 human norovirus strains (14 GI and 16 GII strains) to different concentrations (50%, 70%, 90%) of ethanol and isopropanol and tested the viral RNA titer by RT-qPCR. Viral RNA titers of 10 (71.4%), 14 (100%), 3 (21.4%) and 7 (50%) of the 14 GI strains were reduced by > 1 log10 RNA copies/ml after exposure to 70% and 90% ethanol, and 70% and 90% isopropanol, respectively. RNA titers of 6 of the 7 non-GII 4 strains remained unaffected after alcohol exposure. Compared to GII strains, GI strains were more susceptible to ethanol than to isopropanol. At 90%, both alcohols reduced RNA titers of 8 of the 9 GII.4 strains by ≥ 1 log10 RNA copies/ml. After exposure to 70% ethanol, RNA titers of GII.4 Den Haag and Sydney strains decreased by ≥ 1.9 log10, whereas RNA reductions for GII.4 New Orleans strains were < 0.5 log10. To explain these differences, we sequenced the complete capsid gene of the 9 GII.4 strains and identified 17 amino acid substitutions in the P2 region among the 3 GII.4 variant viruses. When comparing with an additional set of 200 GII.4 VP1 sequences, only S310 and P396 were present in all GII.4 New Orleans viruses but not in the ethanol-sensitive GII.4 Sydney and GII.4 Den Haag viruses Our data demonstrate that alcohol susceptibility patterns between different norovirus genotypes vary widely and that virolysis data for a single strain or genotype are not representative for all noroviruses. PMID:27337036

  7. Strain-Specific Virolysis Patterns of Human Noroviruses in Response to Alcohols

    PubMed Central

    Park, Geun Woo; Collins, Nikail; Barclay, Leslie; Hu, Liya; Prasad, B. V. Venkataram; Lopman, Benjamin A.; Vinjé, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Alcohol-based hand sanitizers are widely used to disinfect hands to prevent the spread of pathogens including noroviruses. Alcohols inactivate norovirus by destruction of the viral capsid, resulting in the leakage of viral RNA (virolysis). Since conflicting results have been reported on the susceptibility of human noroviruses against alcohols, we exposed a panel of 30 human norovirus strains (14 GI and 16 GII strains) to different concentrations (50%, 70%, 90%) of ethanol and isopropanol and tested the viral RNA titer by RT-qPCR. Viral RNA titers of 10 (71.4%), 14 (100%), 3 (21.4%) and 7 (50%) of the 14 GI strains were reduced by > 1 log10 RNA copies/ml after exposure to 70% and 90% ethanol, and 70% and 90% isopropanol, respectively. RNA titers of 6 of the 7 non-GII 4 strains remained unaffected after alcohol exposure. Compared to GII strains, GI strains were more susceptible to ethanol than to isopropanol. At 90%, both alcohols reduced RNA titers of 8 of the 9 GII.4 strains by ≥ 1 log10 RNA copies/ml. After exposure to 70% ethanol, RNA titers of GII.4 Den Haag and Sydney strains decreased by ≥ 1.9 log10, whereas RNA reductions for GII.4 New Orleans strains were < 0.5 log10. To explain these differences, we sequenced the complete capsid gene of the 9 GII.4 strains and identified 17 amino acid substitutions in the P2 region among the 3 GII.4 variant viruses. When comparing with an additional set of 200 GII.4 VP1 sequences, only S310 and P396 were present in all GII.4 New Orleans viruses but not in the ethanol-sensitive GII.4 Sydney and GII.4 Den Haag viruses Our data demonstrate that alcohol susceptibility patterns between different norovirus genotypes vary widely and that virolysis data for a single strain or genotype are not representative for all noroviruses. PMID:27337036

  8. Evaluation of spectrophotometric and HPLC methods for shikimic acid determination in plants: models in glyphosate-resistant and -susceptible crops.

    PubMed

    Zelaya, Ian A; Anderson, Jennifer A H; Owen, Micheal D K; Landes, Reid D

    2011-03-23

    Endogenous shikimic acid determinations are routinely used to assess the efficacy of glyphosate in plants. Numerous analytical methods exist in the public domain for the detection of shikimic acid, yet the most commonly cited comprise spectrophotometric and high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) methods. This paper compares an HPLC and two spectrophotometric methods (Spec 1 and Spec 2) and assesses the effectiveness in the detection of shikimic acid in the tissues of glyphosate-treated plants. Furthermore, the study evaluates the versatility of two acid-based shikimic acid extraction methods and assesses the longevity of plant extract samples under different storage conditions. Finally, Spec 1 and Spec 2 are further characterized with respect to (1) the capacity to discern between shikimic acid and chemically related alicyclic hydroxy acids, (2) the stability of the chromophore (t1/2), (3) the detection limits, and (4) the cost and simplicity of undertaking the analytical procedure. Overall, spectrophotometric methods were more cost-effective and simpler to execute yet provided a narrower detection limit compared to HPLC. All three methods were specific to shikimic acid and detected the compound in the tissues of glyphosate-susceptible crops, increasing exponentially in concentration within 24 h of glyphosate application and plateauing at approximately 72 h. Spec 1 estimated more shikimic acid in identical plant extract samples compared to Spec 2 and, likewise, HPLC detection was more effective than spectrophotometric determinations. Given the unprecedented global adoption of glyphosate-resistant crops and concomitant use of glyphosate, an effective and accurate assessment of glyphosate efficacy is important. Endogenous shikimic acid determinations are instrumental in corroborating the efficacy of glyphosate and therefore have numerous applications in herbicide research and related areas of science as well as resolving many commercial issues as a consequence of

  9. Laboratory bioassay studies to determine methoprene susceptibility in a natural population of Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus from the Florida keys.

    PubMed

    Floore, Omas G; Smith, John P; Shaffer, Kenneth R; Schreiber, Eric T

    2002-06-01

    Larvae of Florida Keys Ochlerotatus taeniorhynchus collected from No Name Key were colonized and evaluated against technical S-methoprene in laboratory beaker tests. Glassware was treated with a silanizing reagent before testing to prevent methoprene attachment to the glassware. The No Name Key strain was compared with a susceptible laboratory strain of Oc. taeniorhynchus. Five serial dilutions (0.0100, 0.0050, 0.0010, 0.0005, and 0.0001 microg/ml) and an untreated control were evaluated. Tests were conducted in water baths with a constant water temperature of 27+/-1 degrees C and 250 ml of 3 per thousand salt water. Twenty-five late 3rd-stage larvae were placed in each beaker. Bioassay samples were analyzed by probit analysis and the median lethal concentration (LC50), 90% lethal concentration (LC90), and 95% lethal concentration (LC95) values; confidence limits; chi2 value; slope; and standard error were determined. The Florida Keys No Name Key strain exhibited no significant differences at the LC50, LC90, and LC95 levels from the laboratory strain in these studies.

  10. Candida colonization in urine samples of ICU patients: determination of etiology, antifungal susceptibility testing and evaluation of associated risk factors.

    PubMed

    Singla, Nidhi; Gulati, Neelam; Kaistha, Neelam; Chander, Jagdish

    2012-08-01

    The presence of Candida in urine presents a therapeutic challenge for the physician as it is often asymptomatic, and management guidelines have not been clearly laid down on this issue. The presence of Candida in urine may represent contamination of clinical sample, actual colonization of the lower urinary tract or may be a true indicator of invasive infection of lower and/or upper urinary tract. In a clinical setting like the ICU, multiple risk factors for Candida colonization may be present in the same patient, thereby increasing the chances of candiduria, manifold. In the present study on 80 patients in ICU, high rate of Candida colonization (57.5%) was found in urine samples of ICU patients with C. tropicalis (57.3%) being the predominant species. We also isolated 8 strains of Trichosporon species, all of these presented as a mixed infection along with Candida species. Among the various risk factors studied, urinary catheterization and previous antibiotic therapy were identified as statistically significant (P value <0.05). The minimum inhibitory concentration of the isolates was determined for amphotericin B, fluconazole and itraconazole by E-test. Most of the isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B. The C. parapsilosis strains did not show any drug resistance; however, resistance to fluconazole was observed 18.6, 27.27, 50 and 25% in C. tropicalis, C. albicans, C. glabrata and Trichosporon species, respectively.

  11. Antimicrobial susceptibility, virulence determinant carriage and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with skin and soft tissue infections.

    PubMed

    Yu, Fangyou; Liu, Yunling; Lv, Jinnan; Qi, Xiuqin; Lu, Chaohui; Ding, Yu; Li, Dan; Liu, Huanle; Wang, Liangxing

    2015-01-01

    A better understanding of the antimicrobial susceptibility, carriage of virulence determinants and molecular characteristics of Staphylococcus aureus isolates associated with skin and soft tissue infections (SSTIs) may provide further insights related to clinical outcomes with these infections. From January 2012 to September 2013, a total of 128 non-duplicate S. aureus isolates were recovered from patients with SSTIs. All 128 S. aureus SSTI isolates carried at least five virulence genes tested. Virulence genes detected among at least 70% of all tested isolates included hld (100%), hla (95.3%), icaA (96.9%), clf (99.2%), sdrC (79.7%), sdrD (70.3%), and sdrE (72.7%). The prevalence of MRSA isolates with 10 virulence genes tested (54.4%, 31/56) was significantly higher than that among MSSA isolates (35.2%, 25/71) (p<0.05). The positive rates of seb, sen, sem, sdrE and pvl among MRSA isolates were significantly higher than among MSSA isolates (p<0.05). ST7 and ST630 accounting for 10.9% were found to be the predominant STs. The most prevalent spa type was t091 (8.6%). MRSA-ST59-SCCmec IV was the most common clone (12.3%) among MRSA isolates whereas among MSSA isolates the dominant clone was MSSA-ST7 (15.5%). Six main clonal complexes (CCs) were found, including CC5 (52.3%), CC7 (11.7%), CC59 (8.6%), CC88 (6.3%), CC398 (4.7%), and CC121 (3.1%). A higher carriage of seb and sec was found among CC59 isolates. In comparison to CC5 and CC7 isolates, those with the highest carriage rates (>80.0%) of sdrC and sdrD, CC59 isolates had lower prevalence of these two virulence genes. All CC59 isolates were susceptible to gentamicin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, while CC5 and CC7 isolates had resistance rates to these two antimicrobials of 25.4% and 20.9%, and 40.0% and 40.0%, respectively. The resistance rates for tetracycline, clindamycin, and erythromycin among CC5 isolates were lower than among CC7 and CC59 isolates. In conclusion, the molecular typing of S. aureus SSTI

  12. Automated Determination of Arterial Input Function for Dynamic Susceptibility Contrast MRI from Regions around Arteries Using Independent Component Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lai, Jui-Jen; Chang, Chin-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Quantitative cerebral blood flow (CBF) measurement using dynamic susceptibility contrast- (DSC-) MRI requires accurate estimation of the arterial input function (AIF). The present work utilized the independent component analysis (ICA) method to determine the AIF in the regions adjacent to the middle cerebral artery (MCA) by the alleviated confounding of partial volume effect. Materials and Methods. A series of spin-echo EPI MR scans were performed in 10 normal subjects. All subjects received 0.2 mmol/kg Gd-DTPA contrast agent. AIFs were calculated by two methods: (1) the region of interest (ROI) selected manually and (2) weighted average of each component selected by ICA (weighted-ICA). The singular value decomposition (SVD) method was then employed to deconvolve the AIF from the tissue concentration time curve to obtain quantitative CBF values. Results. The CBF values calculated by the weighted-ICA method were 41.1 ± 4.9 and 22.1 ± 2.3 mL/100 g/min for cortical gray matter (GM) and deep white matter (WM) regions, respectively. The CBF values obtained based on the manual ROIs were 53.6 ± 12.0 and 27.9 ± 5.9 mL/100 g/min for the same two regions, respectively. Conclusion. The weighted-ICA method allowed semiautomatic and straightforward extraction of the ROI adjacent to MCA. Through eliminating the partial volume effect to minimum, the CBF thus determined may reflect more accurate physical characteristics of the T2⁎ signal changes induced by the contrast agent. PMID:27547451

  13. Strain-specific variations in Toxoplasma gondii GRA1, GRA5, GRA6, GRA8, and GRA14

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haryati, S.; Sari, Y.; Prasetyo, A. A.; Sariyatun, R.

    2016-02-01

    Diagnosis and identification of the genetic group of T. gondii (Toxoplasma gondii) are important to control better the T. gondii infection, particularly in immunocompromised people as HIV patients. This study aimed to identify strain-specific variations in T. gondii GRA1, GRA5, GRA6, GRA8, and GRA14 in order to help design such diagnostic tool to detect and characterize the parasite. Forty-three T. gondii GRA1, GRA5, GRA6, GRA8, and GRA14 sequences deposited in GenBank were aligned. A number of positions in the gene sequences were highly conserved. All GRA sequences had strain-specific positions, however, only GRA1, GRA5, and GRA6, which contained specific variations for each T. gondii lineage. In conclusion, T. gondii GRA1, GRA5, GRA6, GRA8, and GRA14 are predicted to contain highly conserved regions and positions with strain-specific variation, which might be useful for the design of diagnostic tools detecting and distinguishing T. gondiistrains.

  14. [Comparison of microdilution and disk diffusion methods for the detection of fluconazole and voriconazole susceptibility against clinical Candida glabrata isolates and determination of changing susceptibility with new CLSI breakpoints].

    PubMed

    Hazırolan, Gülşen; Sarıbaş, Zeynep; Arıkan Akdağlı, Sevtap

    2016-07-01

    Candida albicans is the most frequently isolated species as the causative agent of Candida infections. However, in recent years, the isolation rate of non-albicans Candida species have increased. In many centers, Candida glabrata is one of the commonly isolated non-albicans species of C.glabrata infections which are difficult-to-treat due to decreased susceptibility to fluconazole and cross-resistance to other azoles. The aims of this study were to determine the in vitro susceptibility profiles of clinical C.glabrata isolates against fluconazole and voriconazole by microdilution and disk diffusion methods and to evaluate the results with both the previous (CLSI) and current species-specific CLSI (Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute) clinical breakpoints. A total of 70 C.glabrata strains isolated from clinical samples were included in the study. The identification of the isolates was performed by morphologic examination on cornmeal Tween 80 agar and assimilation profiles obtained by using ID32C (BioMérieux, France). Broth microdilution and disk diffusion methods were performed according to CLSI M27-A3 and CLSI M44-A2 documents, respectively. The results were evaluated according to CLSI M27-A3 and M44-A2 documents and new vs. species-specific CLSI breakpoints. By using both previous and new CLSI breakpoints, broth microdilution test results showed that voriconazole has greater in vitro activity than fluconazole against C.glabrata isolates. For the two drugs tested, very major error was not observed with disk diffusion method when microdilution method was considered as the reference method. Since "susceptible" category no more exists for fluconazole vs. C.glabrata, the isolates that were interpreted as susceptible by previous breakpoints were evaluated as susceptible-dose dependent by current CLSI breakpoints. Since species-specific breakpoints remain yet undetermined for voriconazole, comparative analysis was not possible for this agent. The results obtained

  15. Detecting bacteria and Determining Their Susceptibility to Antibiotics by Stochastic Confinement in Nanoliter Droplets using Plug-Based Microfluidics

    SciTech Connect

    Boedicker, J.; Li, L; Kline, T; Ismagilov, R

    2008-01-01

    This article describes plug-based microfluidic technology that enables rapid detection and drug susceptibility screening of bacteria in samples, including complex biological matrices, without pre-incubation. Unlike conventional bacterial culture and detection methods, which rely on incubation of a sample to increase the concentration of bacteria to detectable levels, this method confines individual bacteria into droplets nanoliters in volume. When single cells are confined into plugs of small volume such that the loading is less than one bacterium per plug, the detection time is proportional to plug volume. Confinement increases cell density and allows released molecules to accumulate around the cell, eliminating the pre-incubation step and reducing the time required to detect the bacteria. We refer to this approach as stochastic confinement. Using the microfluidic hybrid method, this technology was used to determine the antibiogram - or chart of antibiotic sensitivity - of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) to many antibiotics in a single experiment and to measure the minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of the drug cefoxitin (CFX) against this strain. In addition, this technology was used to distinguish between sensitive and resistant strains of S. aureus in samples of human blood plasma. High-throughput microfluidic techniques combined with single-cell measurements also enable multiple tests to be performed simultaneously on a single sample containing bacteria. This technology may provide a method of rapid and effective patient-specific treatment of bacterial infections and could be extended to a variety of applications that require multiple functional tests of bacterial samples on reduced timescales.

  16. Determining the Efficacy of Magnetic Susceptibility as an Analytical Tool in the Middle Devonian Gas Bearing Shale of Taylor County, West Virginia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baird, John

    The magnetic susceptibility of two Middle Devonian shale units, the Mahantango Formation and Marcellus Shale, was recorded in order to determine if magnetic susceptibility could be used to predict (1) transgressive and regressive cycles, (2) brittleness, and (3) total organic content (TOC). A core from Taylor County, West Virginia was selected for this purpose. Transgressive and regressive cycles were detected through variations of magnetic susceptibility values with maximum flooding surfaces indicated by troughs in the data and maximum regressive surfaces indicated by peaks. A sequence stratigraphic framework based upon variations in gamma ray and density measurements was used to establish a standard to gauge the accuracy of predictions made through magnetic susceptibility. It was found that the accuracy of the magnetic susceptibility method was similar to the gamma-density method in detecting a large 2nd order cycle, when both shale units were evaluated together. When the units were evaluated separately, it was found that both methods detected the same 3rd order cycles. However, within the Mahantango Formation the magnetic susceptibility method was more accurate recording 4th order cycles that the gamma-density method did not. Conversely, within the Marcellus Shale, the gamma-density method was more accurate recording 4th order cycles that the magnetic susceptibility method did not. It was concluded that the increased accuracy of the gamma-density method in the Marcellus shale was due to an increased sensitivity in the gamma ray and density logs as a response to the large amounts of TOC in the formation This increased sensitivity allowed for smaller variations to be more easily detected. The Mahantango Formation does not have large quantities of TOC. This diminished the sensitivity of the gamma and density logs allowing for the magnetic susceptibility method to be more accurate. It was assumed that variations in brittleness are driven by transgressive and

  17. Determinants of Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Baseline Susceptibility to the Fusion Inhibitors Enfuvirtide and T-649 Reside outside the Peptide Interaction Site

    PubMed Central

    Heil, Marintha L.; Decker, Julie M.; Sfakianos, Jeffrey N.; Shaw, George M.; Hunter, Eric; Derdeyn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    The peptide fusion inhibitor (PFI) enfuvirtide is the first of a new class of entry inhibitors to receive FDA approval. We previously determined the susceptibility of 55 PFI-naïve-patient isolates to enfuvirtide and a second peptide inhibitor, T-649. Seven of the 55 viral isolates were insusceptible to enfuvirtide, T-649, or both inhibitors in the absence of prior exposure. To determine the molecular basis of the insusceptible phenotypes, we PCR amplified and cloned five PFI-insusceptible and one PFI-susceptible, full-length, biologically functional env genes and characterized viruses pseudotyped with the Env proteins in a single-round drug sensitivity assay. Overall, the mean 50% inhibitory concentrations of enfuvirtide and T-649 for the PFI-insusceptible Env pseudotypes were 1.4 to 1.7 log10 and 1.2 to 1.8 log10 greater, respectively, than those for a PFI-susceptible lab strain, NLHX; however, all of the PFI-insusceptible Env proteins conserved the sequence of a critical enfuvirtide interaction site (residues 36 to 38 of gp41, GIV) in HR-1. In contrast, multiple amino acid changes were observed C-terminal to HR-1, many of which were located in regions of HR-2 corresponding to the PFI. Nevertheless, peptides based on patient-derived HR-2 sequences were not more potent inhibitors than enfuvirtide or T-649, arguing that the basis of PFI susceptibility is not a higher-affinity, competitive HR-1/HR-2 interaction. These results demonstrate that regions of Env outside the enfuvirtide interaction site can significantly impact the PFI susceptibility of patient-derived Env, even prior to drug exposure. We hypothesize that both gp120 gene- and gp41 gene-encoded determinants that minimize the window of opportunity for PFI to bind provide a growth advantage and possibly a predisposition to resistance to this new class of drugs in vivo. PMID:15220433

  18. Validation of Six Genetic Determinants of Susceptibility to Estrogen-Induced Mammary Cancer in the Rat and Assessment of Their Relevance to Breast Cancer Risk in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Colletti, John A.; Leland-Wavrin, Kristin M.; Kurz, Scott G.; Hickman, Maureen Peters; Seiler, Nicole L.; Samanas, Nyssa Becker; Eckert, Quincy A.; Dennison, Kirsten L.; Ding, Lina; Schaffer, Beverly S.; Shull, James D.

    2014-01-01

    When treated with 17β-estradiol, female ACI rats (Rattus norvegicus) rapidly develop mammary cancers that share multiple phenotypes with luminal breast cancers. Seven distinct quantitative trait loci that harbor genetic determinants of susceptibility to 17β-estradiol−induced mammary cancer have been mapped in reciprocal intercrosses between susceptible ACI rats and resistant Brown Norway (BN) rats. A panel of unique congenic rat strains has now been generated and characterized to confirm the existence of these quantitative trait loci, designated Emca3 through Emca9, and to quantify their individual effects on susceptibility to 17β-estradiol−induced mammary cancer. Each congenic strain carries BN alleles spanning an individual Emca locus, introgressed onto the ACI genetic background. Data presented herein indicate that BN alleles at Emca3, Emca4, Emca5, Emca6, and Emca9 reduce susceptibility to 17β-estradiol−induced mammary cancer, whereas BN alleles at Emca7 increase susceptibility, thereby confirming the previous interval mapping data. All of these Emca loci are orthologous to regions of the human genome that have been demonstrated in genome-wide association studies to harbor genetic variants that influence breast cancer risk. Moreover, four of the Emca loci are orthologous to loci in humans that have been associated with mammographic breast density, a biomarker of breast cancer risk. This study further establishes the relevance of the ACI and derived congenic rat models of 17β-estradiol−induced mammary cancer for defining the genetic bases of breast cancer susceptibility and elucidating the mechanisms through which 17β-estradiol contributes to breast cancer development. PMID:24875630

  19. Coronavirus induction of class I major histocompatibility complex expression in murine astrocytes is virus strain specific

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Neurotropic strains of mouse hepatitis viruses (MHV) such as MHV-A59 (A59) and MHV-4 (JHMV) cause acute and chronic encephalomyelitis and demyelination in susceptible strains of mice and rats. They are widely used as models of human demyelinating diseases such as multiple sclerosis (MS), in which immune mechanisms are thought to participate in the development of lesions in the central nervous system (CNS). The effects of MHV infection on target cell functions in the CNS are not well understood, but A59 has been shown to induce the expression of MHC class I molecules in glial cells after in vivo and in vitro infection. Changes in class I expression in infected cells may contribute to the immunopathogenesis of MHV infection in the CNS. In this communication, a large panel of MHV strains was tested for their ability to stimulate class I expression in primary astrocytes in vitro. The data show that the more hepatotropic strains, such as MHV-A59, MHV-1, MHV-2, MHV-3, MHV-D, MHV-K, and MHV-NuU, were potent inducers of class I expression in astrocytes during acute infection, measured by radioimmunoassay. The Kb molecule was preferentially expressed over Db. By contrast, JHMV and several viral strains derived from it did not stimulate the expression of class I molecules. Assays of virus infectivity indicated that the class I-inducing activity did not correlate with the ability of the individual viral strain to replicate in astrocytes. However, exposure of the viruses or the supernatants from infected astrocytes to ultraviolet light abolished the class I-inducing activity, indicating that infectious virus is required for class I expression. These data also suggest that class I expression was induced directly by virus infection, and not by the secretion of a soluble substance into the medium by infected astrocytes. Finally, analyses of A59/JHMV recombinant viral strains suggest that class I-inducing activity resides in one of the A59 structural genes. PMID:8064222

  20. Strain specific genotype-environment interactions and evolutionary potential for body mass in brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis).

    PubMed

    Crespel, Amélie; Bernatchez, Louis; Audet, Céline; Garant, Dany

    2013-03-01

    Discriminating between genetic and environmental causes of phenotypic variation is an essential requirement for understanding the evolutionary potential of populations. However, the extent to which genetic variation differs among conspecific groups and environments during ontogeny has rarely been investigated. In this study, the genetic basis of body mass was measured in three divergent strains of brook charr (Salvelinus fontinalis) in different rearing environments and at different time periods. The results indicate that body mass was a heritable trait in all strains but that the level of heritability greatly differed among strains. Moreover, heritability estimates of each strain varied differently according to environmental rearing conditions, and cross-environments correlations were all significantly lower than unity, indicating strain-specific patterns of genotype-environment interactions. Heritability estimates also varied throughout ontogeny and decreased by 50% from 9 to 21 months of age. This study highlights the divergence in genetic architecture and evolutionary potential among these strains and emphasizes the importance of considering the strain-specific potential of the response to selection according to environmental variation.

  1. Structural conservation of prion strain specificities in recombinant prion protein fibrils in real-time quaking-induced conversion.

    PubMed

    Sano, Kazunori; Atarashi, Ryuichiro; Nishida, Noriyuki

    2015-01-01

    A major unsolved issue of prion biology is the existence of multiple strains with distinct phenotypes and this strain phenomenon is postulated to be associated with the conformational diversity of the abnormal prion protein (PrP(Sc)). Real-time quaking-induced conversion (RT-QUIC) assay that uses Escherichia coli-derived recombinant prion protein (rPrP) for the sensitive detection of PrP(Sc) results in the formation of rPrP-fibrils seeded with various strains. We demonstrated that there are differences in the secondary structures, especially in the β-sheets, and conformational stability between 2 rPrP-fibrils seeded with either Chandler or 22L strains in the first round of RT-QUIC. In particular, the differences in conformational properties of these 2 rPrP-fibrils were common to those of the original PrP(Sc). However, the strain specificities of rPrP-fibrils seen in the first round were lost in subsequent rounds. Instead, our findings suggest that nonspecific fibrils became the major species, probable owing to their selective growth advantage in the RT-QUIC. This study shows that at least some strain-specific conformational properties of the original PrP(Sc) can be transmitted to rPrP-fibrils in vitro, but further conservation appears to require unknown cofactors or environmental conditions or both.

  2. Structural basis for epitope masking and strain specificity of a conserved epitope in an intrinsically disordered malaria vaccine candidate

    PubMed Central

    Morales, Rodrigo A. V.; MacRaild, Christopher A.; Seow, Jeffrey; Krishnarjuna, Bankala; Drinkwater, Nyssa; Rouet, Romain; Anders, Robin F.; Christ, Daniel; McGowan, Sheena; Norton, Raymond S.

    2015-01-01

    Merozoite surface protein 2 (MSP2) is an intrinsically disordered, membrane-anchored antigen of the malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum. MSP2 can elicit a protective, albeit strain-specific, antibody response in humans. Antibodies are generated to the conserved N- and C-terminal regions but many of these react poorly with the native antigen on the parasite surface. Here we demonstrate that recognition of a conserved N-terminal epitope by mAb 6D8 is incompatible with the membrane-bound conformation of that region, suggesting a mechanism by which native MSP2 escapes antibody recognition. Furthermore, crystal structures and NMR spectroscopy identify transient, strain-specific interactions between the 6D8 antibody and regions of MSP2 beyond the conserved epitope. These interactions account for the differential affinity of 6D8 for the two allelic families of MSP2, even though 6D8 binds to a fully conserved epitope. These results highlight unappreciated mechanisms that may modulate the specificity and efficacy of immune responses towards disordered antigens. PMID:25965408

  3. Strain-specific and pooled genome sequences for populations of Drosophila melanogaster from three continents.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Casey M; Haddrill, Penelope R

    2015-01-01

    To contribute to our general understanding of the evolutionary forces that shape variation in genome sequences in nature, we have sequenced genomes from 50 isofemale lines and six pooled samples from populations of Drosophila melanogaster on three continents. Analysis of raw and reference-mapped reads indicates the quality of these genomic sequence data is very high. Comparison of the predicted and experimentally-determined Wolbachia infection status of these samples suggests that strain or sample swaps are unlikely to have occurred in the generation of these data. Genome sequences are freely available in the European Nucleotide Archive under accession ERP009059. Isofemale lines can be obtained from the Drosophila Species Stock Center.

  4. A rapid method for the determination of microbial susceptibility using the firefly luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M.; Weinstein, L.; Picciolo, G. L.; Chappelle, E. W.

    1975-01-01

    Luciferase assay for adenosine triphosphate (ATP) was optimized for pure bacteria in broth in order to evaluate if changes in bacterial ATP content could be used as a rapid measure of antibiotic effect on microorganisms. Broth cultures of log phase bacteria were incubated at 310 K (37 C) for 2.5 hours at antimicrobial concentrations which resulted in the best discrimination between sensitive and resistant strains. Eighty-seven strains of 11 bacterial species were studied for their susceptibility to 12 commonly used antimicrobial agents: ampicillin, Penicillin G, nafcillin, carbenicillin, cephalothin, tetracycline, erythromycin, clindamycin, gentamicin, nitrofurantoin, colistin, and chloramplenicol. The major advantage of the ATP system over existing methods of rapid microbial susceptibility testing is that the assay can be made specific for bacterial ATP.

  5. Strain-specific regulation of striatal phenotype in Drd2-eGFP BAC transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Chan, C Savio; Peterson, Jayms D; Gertler, Tracy S; Glajch, Kelly E; Quintana, Ruth E; Cui, Qiaoling; Sebel, Luke E; Plotkin, Joshua L; Shen, Weixing; Heiman, Myriam; Heintz, Nathaniel; Greengard, Paul; Surmeier, D James

    2012-07-01

    Mice carrying bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) transgenes have become important tools for neuroscientists, providing a powerful means of dissecting complex neural circuits in the brain. Recently, it was reported that one popular line of these mice--mice possessing a BAC transgene with a D(2) dopamine receptor (Drd2) promoter construct coupled to an enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP) reporter--had abnormal striatal gene expression, physiology, and motor behavior. Unlike most of the work using BAC mice, this interesting study relied upon mice backcrossed on the outbred Swiss Webster (SW) strain that were homozygous for the Drd2-eGFP BAC transgene. The experiments reported here were conducted to determine whether mouse strain or zygosity was a factor in the reported abnormalities. As reported, SW mice were very sensitive to transgene expression. However, in more commonly used inbred strains of mice (C57BL/6, FVB/N) that were hemizygous for the transgene, the Drd2-eGFP BAC transgene did not alter striatal gene expression, physiology, or motor behavior. Thus, the use of inbred strains of mice that are hemizygous for the Drd2 BAC transgene provides a reliable tool for studying basal ganglia function.

  6. Digital Quantification of DNA Replication and Chromosome Segregation Enables Determination of Antimicrobial Susceptibility after only 15 Minutes of Antibiotic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Schoepp, Nathan G; Khorosheva, Eugenia M; Schlappi, Travis S; Curtis, Matthew S; Humphries, Romney M; Hindler, Janet A; Ismagilov, Rustem F

    2016-08-01

    Rapid antimicrobial susceptibility testing (AST) would decrease misuse and overuse of antibiotics. The "holy grail" of AST is a phenotype-based test that can be performed within a doctor visit. Such a test requires the ability to determine a pathogen's susceptibility after only a short antibiotic exposure. Herein, digital PCR (dPCR) was employed to test whether measuring DNA replication of the target pathogen through digital single-molecule counting would shorten the required time of antibiotic exposure. Partitioning bacterial chromosomal DNA into many small volumes during dPCR enabled AST results after short exposure times by 1) precise quantification and 2) a measurement of how antibiotics affect the states of macromolecular assembly of bacterial chromosomes. This digital AST (dAST) determined susceptibility of clinical isolates from urinary tract infections (UTIs) after 15 min of exposure for all four antibiotic classes relevant to UTIs. This work lays the foundation to develop a rapid, point-of-care AST and strengthen global antibiotic stewardship.

  7. Comparative evaluation of three Lactobacilli with strain-specific activities for rats when supplied in drinking water.

    PubMed

    Guo, Xiao-Hua; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Nam, Hyang-Mi; Kim, Jae-Myung

    2012-11-01

    To test the in vivo benefits of three lactobacilli and to compare their different efficacies based on strain-specific activities by using rats as an experimental model, a growth-promotion and a challenge trial were conducted. The three strains, Lactobacillus salivarius G1-1, Lactobacillus reuteri G22-2, and Lactobacillus reuteri G8-5 shared antimicrobial, bile-salt-hydrolase and amylolytic activities in vitro, respectively. In the 17 day growth-promotion trial, 48 rats were allotted to four treatments with 12 replicates per treatment: a control group, which received saline, as well as three experimental groups, which received 10(8) cells/ml of one of the three lactobacilli in saline suspension. The results showed that compared with the control group, L. reuteri G8-5 significantly improved feed efficiency and decreased fecal pH values on days 8 and 17, concomitant with reduced faecal coliform counts on d 17 (p < 0.05). All treatments with lactobacilli caused an increase in the moisture content of the faeces and a decrease in the serum total cholesterol and blood urea nitrogen levels. High-density lipoprotein cholesterol was only elevated for rats which received L. reuteri G22-2. In the Salmonella-challenge trial, 40 rats were allotted to five treatments (8 replicates per treatment) which consisted of a positive control (infected, no Lactobacillus pretreatment), a negative control (uninfected, no Lactobacillus pretreatment) and three Lactobacillus-pretreated groups (10(9) cells/ml in saline). The results showed that rats in all Lactobacillus pretreated groups were protected from infection with significantly higher weight gain, feed intake and feed efficiency compared with positive control rats (p < 0.05). Rats treated with L. salivarius G1-1 and L. reuteri G22-2 tended to exhibit higher weight gains than those pretreated with L. reuteri G8-5. Significantly lower Salmonella shedding in faeces, Salmonella numbers in the spleen and the relative weight of the spleen

  8. Glutamine Synthetase Regulation, Adenylylation State, and Strain Specificity Analyzed by Polyacrylamide Gel Electrophoresis

    PubMed Central

    Bender, Robert A.; Streicher, Stanley L.

    1979-01-01

    We used polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis to examine the regulation and adenylylation states of glutamine synthetases (GSs) from Escherichia coli (GSE) and Klebsiella aerogenes (GSK). In gels containing sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), we found that GSK had a mobility which differed significantly from that of GSE. In addition, for both GSK and GSE, adenylylated subunits (GSK-adenosine 5′-monophosphate [AMP] and GSE-AMP) had lesser mobilities in SDS gels than did the corresponding non-adenylylated subunits. The order of mobilities was GSK-AMP < GSK < GSE-AMP < GSE. We were able to detect these mobility differences with purified and partially purified preparations of GS, crude cell extracts, and whole cell lysates. SDS gel electrophoresis thus provided a means of estimating the adenylylation state and the quantity of GS present independent of enzymatic activity measurements and of determining the strain origin. Using SDS gels, we showed that: (i) the constitutively produced GS in strains carrying the glnA4 allele was mostly adenylylated, (ii) the GS-like polypeptide produced by strains carrying the glnA51 allele was indistinguishable from wild-type GSK, and (iii) strains carrying the glnA10 allele contained no polypeptide having the mobility of GSK or GSK-AMP. Using native polyacrylamide gels, we detected the increased amount of dodecameric GS present in cells grown under nitrogen limitation compared with cells grown under conditions of nitrogen excess. In native gels there was neither a significant difference in the mobilities of adenylylated and non-adenylylated GSs nor a GS-like protein in cells carrying the glnA10 allele. Images PMID:33958

  9. Anisotropy of out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility of rocks as a tool for direct determination of magnetic sub-fabrics of some minerals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hrouda, Frantisek; Chadima, Martin; Jezek, Josef; Pokorny, Jiri

    2015-04-01

    The magnetic susceptibility measured in alternating field can in general be resolved into a component that is in-phase with the applied field and a component that is out-of-phase. While in diamagnetic, paramagnetic and many ferromagnetic materials the phase is effectively zero, in some ferromagnetic minerals, such as pyrrhotite, hematite, titanomagnetite or ultra-fine magnetically viscous grains of magnetite, it is clearly non-zero. The anisotropy of out-of-phase susceptibility (opAMS) offers itself as a tool for the direct determination of the magnetic sub-fabrics of the minerals with non-zero phase. The SAFYR program, originally destined for computing the in-phase AMS (ipAMS) measured with the MFK1-FA Kappabridge, was modified in such a way that it calculates also the opAMS using exactly the same calculus; the ipAMS and opAMS are determined in one measuring process. Five groups of specimens showing clearly non-zero phase were used to investigate the precisions in determining both the ipAMS and opAMS as well as the relationship between the ipAMS and opAMS. In the specimens investigated, the out-of-phase susceptibility is one to two orders of magnitude lower than the in-phase susceptibility. If the mean out-of-phase susceptibility is higher than 5 × 10-5 [SI], the accuracy in determination of the opAMS, expressed in terms of fitting error and confidence angles, is comparable to or only slightly worse than that of the ipAMS. In the specimens whose magnetism is dominantly carried by a mineral with non-zero phase, the ellipsoids of opAMS and ipAMS show similar shapes and orientations of respective principal directions. The degree of anisotropy, however, is significantly higher in opAMS than in ipAMS. The reasons for this phenomenon are not fully known, one of them can be masking effect of the minerals with zero-phase. In the specimens possessing non-coaxial magnetic sub-fabrics of the minerals with non-zero and zero-phase, not only the degrees of AMS, but also

  10. Use of Randomly Amplified Polymorphic DNA as a Means of Developing Genus- and Strain-Specific Streptomyces DNA Probes

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Mark A.; Crawford, Don L.

    2000-01-01

    We have analyzed 20 randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) primers against 36 Streptomyces strains, including 17 taxonomically undefined strains, 25 nonstreptomycete actinomycetes, and 12 outgroups consisting of gram-positive and -negative species. Most of the primers were useful in identifying unique DNA polymorphisms of all strains tested. We have used RAPD techniques to develop a genus-specific probe, one not necessarily targeting the ribosomal gene, for Streptomyces, and a strain-specific probe for the biological control agent Streptomyces lydicus WYEC108. In the course of these investigations, small-scale DNA isolations were also developed for efficiently isolating actinomycete DNA. Various modifications of isolation procedures for soil DNA were compared, and the reliability and specificity of the RAPD methodology were tested by specifically detecting the S. lydicus WYEC108 in DNA isolated from soil. PMID:10831438

  11. The Impact of Lactobacillus casei on the Composition of the Cecal Microbiota and Innate Immune System Is Strain Specific

    PubMed Central

    Aktas, Busra; De Wolfe, Travis J.; Safdar, Nasia; Darien, Benjamin J.; Steele, James L.

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic function to impact human health is thought to be related to their ability to alter the composition of the gut microbiota and modulate the human innate immune system. The ability to function as a probiotic is believed to be strain specific. Strains of Lactobacillus casei are commonly utilized as probiotics that when consumed alter the composition of the gut microbiota and modulate the host immune response. L. casei strains are known to differ significantly in gene content. The objective of this study was to investigate seven different L. casei strains for their ability to alter the murine gut microbiota and modulate the murine immune system. C57BL/6 mice were fed L. casei strains at a dose of 108 CFU/day/mouse for seven days and sacrificed 3.5h after the last administration. The cecal content and the ileum tissue were collected for microbiota analysis and immune profiling, respectively. While 5 of the L. casei strains altered the gut microbiota in a strain specific manner, two of the strains did not alter the overall cecal microbiota composition. The observed changes cluster into three groups containing between 1 and 2 strains. Two strains that did not affect the gut microbiota composition cluster together with the control in their impact on pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expression, suggesting that the ability to alter the cecal microbiota correlates with the ability to alter PRR expression. They also cluster together in their impact on the expression of intestinal antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). This result suggests that a relationship exists between the capability of a L. casei strains to alter the composition of the gut microbiota, PRR regulation, and AMP regulation. PMID:27244133

  12. Strain-specific differences in the grazing sensitivities of closely related ultramicrobacteria affiliated with the Polynucleobacter cluster.

    PubMed

    Boenigk, Jens; Stadler, Peter; Wiedlroither, Anneliese; Hahn, Martin W

    2004-10-01

    Ultramicrobacteria (cell volume < 0.1 microm(3)) are the numerically dominant organisms in the plankton of marine and freshwater habitats. Flagellates and other protists are assumed to be the most important predators of these ultramicrobacteria as well as of larger planktonic bacteria. However, due to controversial observations conducted previously, it is not clear as to whether fractions of the ultramicrobacteria are resistant to flagellate predation. Furthermore, it is not known if closely related bacteria vary significantly in their sensitivity to flagellate predation. We investigated the sensitivity of ultramicrobacteria affiliated with the cosmopolitan Polynucleobacter cluster to grazing by Spumella-like nanoflagellates. Laboratory grazing experiments with four closely related (> or =99.6% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity) bacteria and three closely related (100% 18S rRNA gene sequence similarity) flagellates were performed. In comparison to larger bacteria, predation on the ultramicrobacterial Polynucleobacter strains was weak, and the growth of the predating flagellates was slow. Specific clearance rates ranged between 0.14 x 10(5) and 2.8 x 10(5) units of predator size h(-1). Feeding rates strongly depended on the flagellate and bacterial strain (P < 0.001). Grazing mortality rates of the three flagellate strains investigated varied for the same prey strain by up to almost fourfold. We conclude that (i) ultramicrobacteria affiliated with the Polynucleobacter cluster are not protected from grazing, (ii) strain-specific variations in grazing sensitivity even between closely related bacteria are high, and (iii) strain-specific differences in predator-prey interaction could be an important factor in the evolution and maintenance of microbial microdiversity.

  13. The Impact of Lactobacillus casei on the Composition of the Cecal Microbiota and Innate Immune System Is Strain Specific.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Busra; De Wolfe, Travis J; Safdar, Nasia; Darien, Benjamin J; Steele, James L

    2016-01-01

    The probiotic function to impact human health is thought to be related to their ability to alter the composition of the gut microbiota and modulate the human innate immune system. The ability to function as a probiotic is believed to be strain specific. Strains of Lactobacillus casei are commonly utilized as probiotics that when consumed alter the composition of the gut microbiota and modulate the host immune response. L. casei strains are known to differ significantly in gene content. The objective of this study was to investigate seven different L. casei strains for their ability to alter the murine gut microbiota and modulate the murine immune system. C57BL/6 mice were fed L. casei strains at a dose of 108 CFU/day/mouse for seven days and sacrificed 3.5h after the last administration. The cecal content and the ileum tissue were collected for microbiota analysis and immune profiling, respectively. While 5 of the L. casei strains altered the gut microbiota in a strain specific manner, two of the strains did not alter the overall cecal microbiota composition. The observed changes cluster into three groups containing between 1 and 2 strains. Two strains that did not affect the gut microbiota composition cluster together with the control in their impact on pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) expression, suggesting that the ability to alter the cecal microbiota correlates with the ability to alter PRR expression. They also cluster together in their impact on the expression of intestinal antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). This result suggests that a relationship exists between the capability of a L. casei strains to alter the composition of the gut microbiota, PRR regulation, and AMP regulation. PMID:27244133

  14. Antifungal susceptibility of clinical and environmental isolates of Cryptococcus neoformans to four antifungal drugs determined by two techniques.

    PubMed

    Moraes, E M P; Prímola, N S; Hamdan, Júnia Soares

    2003-06-01

    A total of 64 Cryptococcus neoformans strains, including clinical and environmental Brazilian isolates var. neoformans and var. gattii, were tested for susceptibility to amphotericin B, 5-flucytosine, fluconazole and itraconazole. The tests were performed according to the recommendations of National Committee of Clinical Laboratory Standards and the method of macrodilution in liquid medium of Shadomy et al. [Manual de Microbiologia Clínica, 4th ed. Buenos Aires: Editorial Medica Panamericana, 1987: 1229-38]. For most drugs there was a significant difference between the readings taken at 24 and 48 h with both methods. When the minimum inhibitory concentrations obtained by the two techniques were compared, significant differences were observed for amphotericin B and fluconazole. Overall, differences in drug susceptibility with respect to the origin of the isolates or the variety of the fungus were not observed. As an exception, the gattii variety exhibited a high resistance rate to amphotericin B when the technique of Shadomy et al. was applied, a fact possibly related to the greater difficulty for treatment of the disease caused by this fungal variety.

  15. Sex-determined susceptibility and differential MUC2 mRNA expression during the course of murine intestinal eimeriosis.

    PubMed

    Dkhil, Mohamed A

    2015-01-01

    Parasitic diseases differ in prevalence, course, and severity between males and females. The study was designed to compare males with females for the susceptibility to Eimeria papillata infection as well as the expression of the mucin gene, MUC2. Oocysts output was detected to be more in the feces of male mice (3.5 × 10(4) ± 4000 oocysts/g feces) than in females (2 × 10(4) ± 2000 oocysts/g feces). In addition, infected males showed a significant higher number of meronts, gamonts, and developing oocysts compared to infected female mice. Moreover, E. papillata induced a marked goblet cell hypoplasia where the jejuna of infected male mice contained lower numbers of goblet cells per ten villus-crypt units compared to infected females. Also, the expression of MUC2 mRNA is found to be more expressed in infected females than males. In addition, testosterone, nitric oxide, and inducible nitric oxide synthase activities were found to be higher in infected male mice than in infected females. In general, male Swiss albino mice have been shown to be relatively more susceptible to infection with E. papilaata when compared with female mice.

  16. Basal-subtype and MEK-Pl3K feedback signaling determine susceptibility of breast cancer cells to MEK inhibition

    SciTech Connect

    Mirzoeva, Olga K.; Das, Debopriya; Heiser, Laura M.; Bhattacharya, Sanchita; Siwak, Doris; Gendelman, Rina; Bayani, Nora; Wang, Nicholas J.; Neve, Richard M.; Knight, Zachary; Feiler, Heidi S.; Gascard, Philippe; Parvin, Bahram; Spellman, Paul T.; Shokat, Kevan M.; Wyrobek, Andrew J.; Bissell, Mina J.; McCormick, Frank; Kuo, Wen-Lin; Mills, Gordon B.; Gray, Joe W.; Korn, W. Michael

    2009-01-23

    Specific inhibitors of MEK have been developed that efficiently inhibit the oncogenic RAF-MEK-ERK pathway. We employed a systems-based approach to identify breast cancer subtypes particularly susceptible to MEK inhibitors and to understand molecular mechanisms conferring resistance to such compounds. Basal-type breast cancer cells were found to be particularly susceptible to growth-inhibition by small-molecule MEK inhibitors. Activation of the PI3 kinase pathway in response to MEK inhibition through a negative MEK-EGFR-PI3 kinase feedback loop was found to limit efficacy. Interruption of this feedback mechanism by targeting MEK and PI3 kinase produced synergistic effects, including induction of apoptosis and, in some cell lines, cell cycle arrest and protection from apoptosis induced by proapoptotic agents. These findings enhance our understanding of the interconnectivity of oncogenic signal transduction circuits and have implications for the design of future clinical trials of MEK inhibitors in breast cancer by guiding patient selection and suggesting rational combination therapies.

  17. Genetically determined difference in the antiviral action of alpha/beta interferon in cells from mice resistant or susceptible to herpes simplex virus type 2.

    PubMed

    Ellermann-Eriksen, S; Justesen, J; Mogensen, S C

    1986-09-01

    Resistance of mice to infection with herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) is genetically determined. Embryonic cells from susceptible BALB/c and resistant C57BL/6 mice were equally sensitive to infection with HSV-2 as judged by plaque area, plaquing efficiency, endpoint titration and virus yield. Cells from C57BL/6 mice showed a higher sensitivity than cells from BALB/c mice to the protective action of two preparations of alpha/beta interferon against challenge with HSV-2. This was evident both from c.p.e. inhibition and yield reduction experiments. The difference in sensitivity was dependent on virus dose and was greatest (up to 50-fold) with low virus doses. An analysis of the genetics of the alpha/beta interferon sensitivity in cells from embryos of parental mice and embryos derived from reciprocal matings between HSV-2-resistant and -susceptible mice suggested that interferon sensitivity is inherited as a co-dominant autosomal trait. The induction of the interferon-induced enzyme 2'-5'-oligoadenylate synthetase was also different in cells from the two mouse strains, since significant levels were only detected in cells from C57BL/6 mice. It is suggested that differential interferon sensitivity of cells from HSV-2-resistant and -susceptible mice might be a factor of importance for the course of the infection.

  18. Strain specificity and binding affinity requirements of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies to the C4 domain of gp120 from human immunodeficiency virus type 1.

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, G R; Byrn, R; Wilkes, D M; Fox, J A; Hobbs, M R; Hastings, R; Wessling, H C; Norcross, M A; Fendly, B M; Berman, P W

    1993-01-01

    The binding properties of seven CD4-blocking monoclonal antibodies raised against recombinant gp120 of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 strain MN (HIV-1MN) and two CD4-blocking monoclonal antibodies to recombinant envelope glycoproteins gp120 and gp160 of substrain IIIB of HIVLAI were analyzed. With a panel of recombinant gp120s from seven diverse HIV-1 isolates, eight of the nine antibodies were found to be strain specific and one was broadly cross-reactive. Epitope mapping revealed that all nine antibodies bound to epitopes located in the fourth conserved domain (C4) of gp120. Within this region, three distinct epitopes could be identified: two were polymorphic between HIV-1 strains, and one was highly conserved. Studies with synthetic peptides demonstrated that the conserved epitope, recognized by antibody 13H8, was located between residues 431 and 439. Site-directed mutagenesis of gp120 demonstrated that residue 429 and/or 432 was critical for the binding of the seven antibodies to gp120 from HIV-1MN. Similarly, residues 423 and 429 were essential for the binding of monoclonal antibody 5C2 raised against gp120 from HIV-1IIIB. The amino acids located at positions 423 and 429 were found to vary between strains of HIV-1 as well as between molecular clones derived from the MN and LAI isolates of HIV-1. Polymorphism at these positions prevented the binding of virus-neutralizing monoclonal antibodies and raised the possibility that HIV-1 neutralization serotypes may be defined on the basis of C4 domain sequences. Analysis of the binding characteristics of the CD4-blocking antibodies demonstrated that their virus-neutralizing activity was directly proportional to their gp120-binding affinity. These studies account for the strain specificity of antibodies to the C4 domain of gp120 and demonstrate for the first time that antibodies to this region can be as effective as those directed to the principal neutralizing determinant (V3 domain) in neutralizing HIV-1

  19. Agreement between the cell culture titrations of canine minute virus determined by two susceptibility-testing methods.

    PubMed

    Pratelli, A; Colao, V

    2013-09-01

    The correct diagnosis of canine minute virus is critical in dog breeding. In this study, the Bland Altman test was used to compare the performance of two susceptibility-testing methods, namely polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and indirect immunofluorescence assay (IFA). The agreement between IFA and PCR in monocytes revealed a mean difference of -1752.16 with 95% confidence and an interval ranging from -3229.80 to -274.53 (SD=2325.62). The agreement between IFA and PCR in Walter Reed canine cells (WRCC) revealed a mean difference of -2396.55 with 95% confidence and an interval ranging from -3774.63 to -1018.48 (SD=2168.93). The Bland Altman test confirmed the overall accuracy of PCR vs IFA and the plot showed that all points were not randomly arranged in the range of average ± 1.96 × SD of the differences.

  20. Developmental Origin of Oligodendrocyte Lineage Cells Determines Response to Demyelination and Susceptibility to Age-Associated Functional Decline

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, Abbe H.; Tripathi, Richa B.; Richardson, William D.; Franklin, Robin J.M.

    2016-01-01

    Summary Oligodendrocyte progenitors (OPs) arise from distinct ventral and dorsal domains within the ventricular germinal zones of the embryonic CNS. The functional significance, if any, of these different populations is not known. Using dual-color reporter mice to distinguish ventrally and dorsally derived OPs, we show that, in response to focal demyelination of the young adult spinal cord or corpus callosum, dorsally derived OPs undergo enhanced proliferation, recruitment, and differentiation as compared with their ventral counterparts, making a proportionally larger contribution to remyelination. However, with increasing age (up to 13 months), the dorsally derived OPs become less able to differentiate into mature oligodendrocytes. Comparison of dorsally and ventrally derived OPs in culture revealed inherent differences in their migration and differentiation capacities. Therefore, the responsiveness of OPs to demyelination, their contribution to remyelination, and their susceptibility to age-associated functional decline are markedly dependent on their developmental site of origin in the developing neural tube. PMID:27149850

  1. Respiratory protease/antiprotease balance determines susceptibility to viral infection and can be modified by nutritional antioxidants

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Megan

    2015-01-01

    The respiratory epithelium functions as a central orchestrator to initiate and organize responses to inhaled stimuli. Proteases and antiproteases are secreted from the respiratory epithelium and are involved in respiratory homeostasis. Modifications to the protease/antiprotease balance can lead to the development of lung diseases such as emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Furthermore, altered protease/antiprotease balance, in favor for increased protease activity, is associated with increased susceptibility to respiratory viral infections such as influenza virus. However, nutritional antioxidants induce antiprotease expression/secretion and decrease protease expression/activity, to protect against viral infection. As such, this review will elucidate the impact of this balance in the context of respiratory viral infection and lung disease, to further highlight the role epithelial cell-derived proteases and antiproteases contribute to respiratory immune function. Furthermore, this review will offer the use of nutritional antioxidants as possible therapeutics to boost respiratory mucosal responses and/or protect against infection. PMID:25888573

  2. Respiratory protease/antiprotease balance determines susceptibility to viral infection and can be modified by nutritional antioxidants.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Megan; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-06-15

    The respiratory epithelium functions as a central orchestrator to initiate and organize responses to inhaled stimuli. Proteases and antiproteases are secreted from the respiratory epithelium and are involved in respiratory homeostasis. Modifications to the protease/antiprotease balance can lead to the development of lung diseases such as emphysema or chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Furthermore, altered protease/antiprotease balance, in favor for increased protease activity, is associated with increased susceptibility to respiratory viral infections such as influenza virus. However, nutritional antioxidants induce antiprotease expression/secretion and decrease protease expression/activity, to protect against viral infection. As such, this review will elucidate the impact of this balance in the context of respiratory viral infection and lung disease, to further highlight the role epithelial cell-derived proteases and antiproteases contribute to respiratory immune function. Furthermore, this review will offer the use of nutritional antioxidants as possible therapeutics to boost respiratory mucosal responses and/or protect against infection.

  3. Presence of plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance determinants and mutations in gyrase and topoisomerase in Salmonella enterica isolates with resistance and reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin.

    PubMed

    Casas, Monique Ribeiro Tiba; Camargo, Carlos Henrique; Soares, Flávia Barrosa; da Silveira, Wanderley Dias; Fernandes, Sueli Aparecida

    2016-05-01

    In recent decades, the emergence and spread of resistance to nalidixic acid are usually associated with reduced susceptibility to ciprofloxacin among Salmonella serotypes. The aims of this study were to investigate the mechanisms associated with resistance to fluoroquinolone and the clonal relatedness of Salmonella strains isolated from human and nonhuman origins, in a 5-year period in São Paulo, Brazil. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing for Salmonella isolates was performed. PCR and DNA sequencing were accomplished to identify mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining regions of the topoisomerase genes and to determine the fluoroquinolone determinants. The strains presented MIC to ciprofloxacin ranging from 0.125 to 8.0 mg/L (all nonsusceptible). From these, 16 strains (17.5%) were resistant to ciprofloxacin (MIC ≥1 mg/L) and belonging to serotypes Typhimurium, I. 4,5,12:i:-, Enteritidis, and Heidelberg. Amplification and DNA sequencing of topoisomerases genes identified multiple amino acid substitutions in GyrA and ParC. No mutations were identified in GyrB, and 1 amino acid substitution was identified in ParE. Among the 16 Salmonella strains resistant to ciprofloxacin, 8 S. I. 4,5,12:i:- presenting mutations in gyrA and parE genes were grouped into the same pulsotype. Plasmid-mediated quinolone resistance (PMQR) determinants: qnrB, aac(6')-lb-cr, and oqxA/B were detected among 13 strains. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work to report Salmonella isolates resistant to ciprofloxacin in Brazil. Indeed, this is the first detection of PMQR determinants in Salmonella strains from Sao Paulo State. These findings alert for the potential spread of quinolone resistance of Salmonella strains, particularly in S. I. 4,5,12:i:-, a prevalent serotype implicated in human disease and foodborne outbreaks.

  4. Properties of magnetoelectric susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhai, Junyi; Li, Jiefang; Viehland, Dwight; Bichurin, M. I.

    2006-03-01

    The magnetoelectric (ME) susceptibility is the principle property of ME materials, determining the connection between polarization (or electric induction) and an external magnetic field. Since measurement of the ME susceptibility over a wide frequency range [1] and the design of new ME devices require more information about the ME susceptibility, the present work has focused on this property in detail. First, we consider the ME susceptibility as a complex parameter with both real and the imaginary parts, advancing a methodology for measurement of these values. Second, we have analyzed the ME susceptibility, for example a trilayer laminate composite of Terfenol-D/PZT, Terfenol-D, and found a maximum value of ˜3.5x10-7s/m in the electromechanical resonance range. In addition, we have studied the internal structure of the ME susceptibility: i.e., its dependencies on phase volume fractions, layer thickness, and choice of materials couple. Our results for the ME susceptibility will allow it to be more correctly used both as a fundamental materials property and also in potential ME device applications. [1] M.I. Bichurin, V.M. Petrov,Yu.V. Kiliba, and G. Srinivasan. Phys. Rev. B 66, 134404 (2002).

  5. Epistatic interactions between Tgfb1 and genetic loci, Tgfbm2 and Tgfbm3, determine susceptibility to an asthmatic stimulus.

    PubMed

    Freimuth, Julia; Clermont, Frederic F; Huang, Xiaozhu; DeSapio, Angela; Tokuyasu, Taku A; Sheppard, Dean; Akhurst, Rosemary J

    2012-10-30

    TGFβ activation and signaling have been extensively studied in experimental models of allergen-induced asthma as potential therapeutic targets during chronic or acute phases of the disease. Outcomes of experimental manipulation of TGFβ activity have been variable, in part due to use of different model systems. Using an ovalbumin (OVA)-induced mouse model of asthma, we here show that innate variation within TGFβ1 genetic modifier loci, Tgfbm2 and Tgfbm3, alters disease susceptibility. Specifically, Tgfbm2(129) and Tgfbm3(C57) synergize to reverse accentuated airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) caused by low TGFβ1 levels in Tgfb1(+/-) mice of the NIH/OlaHsd strain. Moreover, epistatic interaction between Tgfbm2(129) and Tgfbm3(C57) uncouples the inflammatory response to ovalbumin from those of airway remodeling and airway hyperresponsiveness, illustrating independent genetic control of these responses. We conclude that differential inheritance of genetic variants of Tgfbm genes alters biological responses to reduced TGFβ1 signaling in an experimental asthma model. TGFβ antagonists for treatment of lung diseases might therefore give diverse outcomes, dependent on genetic variation. PMID:23064636

  6. Is correction necessary when clinically determining quantitative cerebral perfusion parameters from multi-slice dynamic susceptibility contrast MR studies?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salluzzi, M.; Frayne, R.; Smith, M. R.

    2006-01-01

    Several groups have modified the standard singular value decomposition (SVD) algorithm to produce delay-insensitive cerebral blood flow (CBF) estimates from dynamic susceptibility contrast (DSC) perfusion studies. However, new dependences of CBF estimates on bolus arrival times and slice position in multi-slice studies have been recently recognized. These conflicting findings can be reconciled by accounting for several experimental and algorithmic factors. Using simulation and clinical studies, the non-simultaneous measurement of arterial and tissue concentration curves (relative slice position) in a multi-slice study is shown to affect time-related perfusion parameters, e.g. arterial-tissue-delay measurements. However, the current clinical impact of relative slice position on amplitude-related perfusion parameters, e.g. CBF, can be expected to be small unless any of the following conditions are present individually or in combination: (a) high concentration curve signal-to-noise ratios, (b) small tissue mean transit times, (c) narrow arterial input functions or (d) low temporal resolution of the DSC image sequence. Recent improvements in magnetic resonance (MR) technology can easily be expected to lead to scenarios where these effects become increasingly important sources of inaccuracy for all perfusion parameter estimates. We show that using Fourier interpolated (high temporal resolution) residue functions reduces the systematic error of the perfusion parameters obtained from multi-slice studies. Preliminary results associated with this paper were presented at ISMRM 12th Scientific Meeting and Exhibition, Kyoto, Japan, 2004.

  7. A plastic SQSTM1/p62-dependent autophagic reserve maintains proteostasis and determines proteasome inhibitor susceptibility in multiple myeloma cells

    PubMed Central

    Milan, Enrico; Perini, Tommaso; Resnati, Massimo; Orfanelli, Ugo; Oliva, Laura; Raimondi, Andrea; Cascio, Paolo; Bachi, Angela; Marcatti, Magda; Ciceri, Fabio; Cenci, Simone

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is the paradigmatic proteasome inhibitor (PI) responsive cancer, but many patients fail to respond. An attractive target to enhance sensitivity is (macro)autophagy, recently found essential to bone marrow plasma cells, the normal counterpart of MM. Here, integrating proteomics with hypothesis-driven strategies, we identified the autophagic cargo receptor and adapter protein, SQSTM1/p62 as an essential component of an autophagic reserve that not only synergizes with the proteasome to maintain proteostasis, but also mediates a plastic adaptive response to PIs, and faithfully reports on inherent PI sensitivity. Lentiviral engineering revealed that SQSTM1 is essential for MM cell survival and affords specific PI protection. Under basal conditions, SQSTM1-dependent autophagy alleviates the degradative burden on the proteasome by constitutively disposing of substantial amounts of ubiquitinated proteins. Indeed, its inhibition or stimulation greatly sensitized to, or protected from, PI-induced protein aggregation and cell death. Moreover, under proteasome stress, myeloma cells selectively enhanced SQSTM1 de novo expression and reset its vast endogenous interactome, diverting SQSTM1 from signaling partners to maximize its association with ubiquitinated proteins. Saturation of such autophagic reserve, as indicated by intracellular accumulation of undigested SQSTM1-positive aggregates, specifically discriminated patient-derived myelomas inherently susceptible to PIs from primarily resistant ones. These aggregates correlated with accumulation of the endoplasmic reticulum, which comparative proteomics identified as the main cell compartment targeted by autophagy in MM. Altogether, the data integrate autophagy into our previously established proteasome load-versus-capacity model, and reveal SQSTM1 aggregation as a faithful marker of defective proteostasis, defining a novel prognostic and therapeutic framework for MM. PMID:26043024

  8. Determination of methicillin-resistant and methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus bacteria in blood by capillary zone electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Horká, Marie; Tesařová, Marie; Karásek, Pavel; Růžička, Filip; Holá, Veronika; Sittová, Martina; Roth, Michal

    2015-04-01

    Serious bloodstream infections are a significant complication in critically ill patients. The treatment of these infections has become more difficult because of the increasing prevalence of multiresistant strains, especially methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA). Rapid differentiation of low number of MRSA from methicillin-susceptible S. aureus (MSSA) cells (10(1)-10(2) cells mL(-1)) in blood is necessary for fast effective antibiotic therapy. Currently, three groups of techniques, phenotyping, genotyping, and mass spectrometry, are used for MRSA and MSSA strains differentiation. Most of these techniques are time-consuming. PCR and other molecular techniques allow the detection and differentiation between MSSA and MRSA directly from blood cultures. These methods alone are rapid and they have good reproducibility and repeatability. Potential disadvantages of the genotyping methods include their discrimination ability, technical complexity, financial costs, and difficult interpretation of the results. Recently, capillary electrophoresis (CZE) was successfully used to differentiate between the agar-cultivated MRSA and MSSA strains in fused silica capillaries etched with supercritical water and modified with (3-glycidyloxypropyl)trimethoxysilane. The possible use of CZE as a fast and low-cost method for distinguishing between the blood-incubated MRSA or MSSA cells has been tested in this manuscript. Our goal was to test low amounts of bacteria (∼10(2) cell mL(-1)) similar to those in clinical samples. The migration times of the purified blood-incubated cells and the agar-cultivated cells were different from each other. However, their isoelectric point was the same for all strains.

  9. CADM1/TSLC1 Identifies HTLV-1-Infected Cells and Determines Their Susceptibility to CTL-Mediated Lysis

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuetsu; Taylor, Graham P.; Bangham, Charles R. M.

    2016-01-01

    Human T cell lymphotropic virus-1 (HTLV-1) primarily infects CD4+ T cells, causing inflammatory disorders or a T cell malignancy in 5% to 10% of carriers. The cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) response is a key factor that controls the viral load and thus the risk of disease. The ability to detect the viral protein Tax in primary cells has made it possible to estimate the rate at which Tax-expressing infected cells are eliminated by CTLs in persistently infected people. However, most HTLV-1-infected cells are Tax–at a given time, and their immunophenotype is poorly defined. Here, we aimed to identify a cell-surface molecule expressed by both Tax+ and Tax–HTLV-1-infected cells and use it to analyse the CTL response in fresh peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1/TSLC1) was the best single marker of HTLV-1 infection, identifying HTLV-1-infected cells with greater sensitivity and specificity than CD25, CCR4 or ICAM-1. CADM1+CD4+ T cells carried a median of 65% of proviral copies in peripheral blood. In a cohort of 23 individuals, we quantified the rate of CTL-mediated killing of Tax+ and Tax−CADM1+ cells. We show that CADM1 expression is associated with enhanced susceptibility of infected cells to CTL lysis: despite the immunodominance of Tax in the CTL response, Tax+CADM1– cells were inefficiently lysed by CTLs. Upregulation of the CADM1 ligand CRTAM on CD8+ T cells correlated with efficient lysis of infected cells. Tax–CADM1+ cells were lysed at a very low rate by autologous CTLs, however, were efficiently killed when loaded with exogenous peptide antigen. High expression of CADM1 on most HTLV-1-infected cells in the face of enhanced CTL counterselection implies that CADM1 confers a strong benefit on the virus. PMID:27105228

  10. Ultrastructural and Metabolic Determinants of Resistance to Azo-dye and Susceptibility to Nitrosamine Carcinogenesis of the Guinea-pig

    PubMed Central

    Bryant, G. M.; Sohal, R. S.; Argus, M. F.; Arcos, J. C.

    1977-01-01

    During diethylnitrosamine (DEN) administration, a distinctive difference was observed between rats and guinea-pigs in the sequence of ultrastructural changes in the hepatic endoplasmic reticulum (ER). In DEN-induced hepatic tumour cells in the guinea-pig there was extensive proliferation of the rough ER, while the smooth ER was quite sparse; in the premalignant liver the opposite was noted. This is in contrast to the rat, in which administration of either DEN or 3′-methyl-4-dimethylaminoazobenzene (3′-Me-DAB) brings about, in both premalignant and malignant hepatic tissue, proliferation of the smooth ER and sparsity of the rough ER. Yet, as in the rat, the number of ribosomes on the outer surface of the guinea-pig liver rough ER is greatly reduced and this is paralleled by a 49% decrease of the RNA/protein ratio as early as 4 weeks of nitrosamine administration. The decrease of RNA/protein ratio and ultrastructurally observed loss of ribosomes from the ER, following nitrosamine administration, correlate with a decrease of photometric response of microsomal suspensions to the sulphydryl probe, p-chloromercuribenzoate. While azo-dye-reductase activity is higher in untreated rats than in untreated guinea-pigs, feeding 3′-Me-DAB for 6 weeks brings about a 76% decrease in the rat, but no significant decrease in the guinea-pig, which is refractory to azo-dye carcinogenesis. Thus, the ability of the liver to inactivate the dye is greatly decreased in the rat, but not in the guinea-pig, as administration progresses toward the threshold dose for tumorigenesis. On the other hand, constitutive levels of nitrosamine dealkylase are identical in the 2 species and remain essentially unchanged following administration of DEN for 10 weeks. Inasmuch as nitrosamine dealkylation represents activating metabolism, this provides a rationale for the comparable susceptibility of the rat and guinea-pig to DEN carcinogenesis. Of the 2 enzymes in the 2 species, it is only azo

  11. Determining surface magnetic susceptibility of loess-paleosol sections based on spectral features: Application to a UHD 185 hyperspectral image

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cui, Jing; Zhang, Shimin; Zhang, Jingfa; Liu, Xudong; Ding, Rui; Liu, Hanyong

    2016-08-01

    Magnetic susceptibility (MS) records of loess-paleosol sequences have been considered a measure of the degree of pedogenic activity and are considered to be excellent proxies for terrestrial climatic fluctuations. However, the MS of single (vertical) path variations occasionally represents site-specific influences rather than monsoonal changes (depending on the position of the path). Few studies have used remote sensing techniques to map the surface MS information of loess-paleosol sections. Hyperspectral techniques provide an efficient, economical and quantitative alternative. In this study, stepwise regression was used to build MS estimation models based on spectral features. Six MS models based on spectral features were established. Test datasets indicated that our models are very successful, all resulting in R2 > 0.92 and RMSEs ranging from 4.5736 to 6.80475. The slope change between 810 nm and 880 nm (b880/b810) observed in all models played an important role in MS estimation. Models 5 and 6 have higher RMSEs and relatively lower SAM values, although the R2 values are both above 0.95. The RMSEs of the first four models are similar. Therefore, the first four models were thought to be more stable and useful. UHD 185, a new generation of commercial hyperspectral imaging sensor, was used for surface MS mapping of a loess-paleosol section by model 1 and model 2. The MS map corresponded well to the loess sequences. The MS values obtained from the UHD 185 data are convincing and consistent with the measured data (R2 > 0.85). The trend in changing MS values is clear, suggesting that model 1 and model 2 could produce reasonable loess-paleosol section surface maps from the UHD 185 image, although there is a linear offset between the estimated MS and the measured MS. The methodology proposed here can be used to map MS on a much larger scale. Because of the limit of the spectral range, the performances of model 3 and model 4 with the image were not discussed. However

  12. Determinants of Default from Tuberculosis Treatment among Patients with Drug-Susceptible Tuberculosis in Karachi, Pakistan: A Mixed Methods Study

    PubMed Central

    Chida, Natasha; Ansari, Zara; Hussain, Hamidah; Jaswal, Maria; Symes, Stephen; Khan, Aamir J.; Mohammed, Shama

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Non-adherence to tuberculosis therapy can lead to drug resistance, prolonged infectiousness, and death; therefore, understanding what causes treatment default is important. Pakistan has one of the highest burdens of tuberculosis in the world, yet there have been no qualitative studies in Pakistan that have specifically examined why default occurs. We conducted a mixed methods study at a tuberculosis clinic in Karachi to understand why patients with drug-susceptible tuberculosis default from treatment, and to identify factors associated with default. Patients attending this clinic pick up medications weekly and undergo family-supported directly observed therapy. Methods In-depth interviews were administered to 21 patients who had defaulted. We also compared patients who defaulted with those who were cured, had completed, or had failed treatment in 2013. Results Qualitative analyses showed the most common reasons for default were the financial burden of treatment, and medication side effects and beliefs. The influence of finances on other causes of default was also prominent, as was concern about the effect of treatment on family members. In quantitative analysis, of 2120 patients, 301 (14.2%) defaulted. Univariate analysis found that male gender (OR: 1.34, 95% CI: 1.04–1.71), being 35–59 years of age (OR: 1.54, 95% CI: 1.14–2.08), or being 60 years of age or older (OR: 1.84, 95% CI: 1.17–2.88) were associated with default. After adjusting for gender, disease site, and patient category, being 35–59 years of age (aOR: 1.49, 95% CI: 1.10–2.03) or 60 years of age or older (aOR: 1.76, 95% CI: 1.12–2.77) were associated with default. Conclusions In multivariate analysis age was the only variable associated with default. This lack of identifiable risk factors and our qualitative findings imply that default is complex and often due to extrinsic and medication-related factors. More tolerable medications, improved side effect management, and innovative

  13. Genetic Variants of Retinoic Acid Receptor-Related Orphan Receptor Alpha Determine Susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Han Chinese

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yuwei; Liu, Yulan; Liu, Yin; Zhang, Yanjie; Su, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) plays a key role in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism and insulin expression that are implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the effects of genetic variants in the RORA gene on the susceptibility to T2DM remain unknown. Nine tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were screened by using the SNaPshot method in 427 patients with T2DM and 408 normal controls. Association between genotypes and haplotypes derived from these SNPs with T2DM was analyzed using different genetic models. Allele and genotype frequencies at rs10851685 were significantly different between T2DM patients and control subjects (allele: p = 0.009, Odds ratios (OR) = 1.36 [95% Confidence intervals (CI) = 1.08–1.72]; genotype: p = 0.029). The minor allele T, at rs10851685, was potentially associated with an increased risk of T2DM in the dominant model, displaying OR of 1.38 (95% CI: 1.04–1.82, p = 0.025) in subjects with genotypes TA+TT vs. AA. In haplotype analysis, we observed that haplotypes GGTGTAACT, GGTGTAACC, and GATATAACT were significantly associated with increased risk of T2DM, while haplotypes GATGAAGTT, AGTGAAGTT, and AATGAAATT were protective against T2DM. These data suggest that the genetic variation in RORA might determine a Chinese Han individual’s susceptibility to T2DM. PMID:27556492

  14. Genetic Variants of Retinoic Acid Receptor-Related Orphan Receptor Alpha Determine Susceptibility to Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus in Han Chinese.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yuwei; Liu, Yulan; Liu, Yin; Zhang, Yanjie; Su, Zhiguang

    2016-01-01

    Retinoic acid receptor-related orphan receptor alpha (RORA) plays a key role in the regulation of lipid and glucose metabolism and insulin expression that are implicated in the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). However, the effects of genetic variants in the RORA gene on the susceptibility to T2DM remain unknown. Nine tagging single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were screened by using the SNaPshot method in 427 patients with T2DM and 408 normal controls. Association between genotypes and haplotypes derived from these SNPs with T2DM was analyzed using different genetic models. Allele and genotype frequencies at rs10851685 were significantly different between T2DM patients and control subjects (allele: p = 0.009, Odds ratios (OR) = 1.36 [95% Confidence intervals (CI) = 1.08-1.72]; genotype: p = 0.029). The minor allele T, at rs10851685, was potentially associated with an increased risk of T2DM in the dominant model, displaying OR of 1.38 (95% CI: 1.04-1.82, p = 0.025) in subjects with genotypes TA+TT vs. AA. In haplotype analysis, we observed that haplotypes GGTGTAACT, GGTGTAACC, and GATATAACT were significantly associated with increased risk of T2DM, while haplotypes GATGAAGTT, AGTGAAGTT, and AATGAAATT were protective against T2DM. These data suggest that the genetic variation in RORA might determine a Chinese Han individual's susceptibility to T2DM. PMID:27556492

  15. Strain-specific probiotics properties of Lactobacillus fermentum, Lactobacillus plantarum and Lactobacillus brevis isolates from Brazilian food products.

    PubMed

    Ramos, Cíntia Lacerda; Thorsen, Line; Schwan, Rosane Freitas; Jespersen, Lene

    2013-10-01

    A total of 234 LAB isolates from Brazilian food products were initially screened for their ability to survive at pH 2.0. Fifty one of the isolates survived and were selected. They were characterized by phenotypic methods, rep-PCR and identified using 16S rRNA gene sequencing as Lactobacillus fermentum (34 isolates), Lactobacillus plantarum (10) and Lactobacillus brevis (7). Based on being either highly tolerant to bile, showing an ability for auto-aggregation and/or hydrophobic properties, one L. fermentum (CH58), three L. plantarum (CH3, CH41 and SAU96) and two L. brevis (SAU105 and FFC199) were selected. The highest co-aggregation ability with Escherichia coli was observed to L. plantarum CH41. L. brevis SAU105 and FFC199 and L. fermentum CH58 exhibited antagonistic activity towards the pathogens Listeria monocytogenes and Staphylococcus aureus. L. plantarum CH3 and CH41 and L. brevis FFC199 showed adhesion ability to Caco-2 cells (1.6, 1.1 and 0.9%, respectively) similar to the commercial probiotic, Lactobacillus rhamnosus GG (1.5%). They were able to increase the transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER) of Caco-2 cells over 24 h (p < 0.05). The present work showed that the probiotic characteristics were strain-specific and that the isolates L. plantarum CH3 and CH41 (cocoa) and L. brevis FFC199 (cauim) exhibited potential probiotics properties.

  16. Development of a strain-specific real-time PCR assay for enumeration of a probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri in chicken feed and intestine.

    PubMed

    Sattler, Verity Ann; Mohnl, Michaela; Klose, Viviana

    2014-01-01

    A strain-specific real-time PCR assay was developed for quantification of a probiotic Lactobacillus reuteri (DSM 16350) in poultry feed and intestine. The specific primers were designed based on a genomic sequence of the strain derived from suppression subtractive hybridization with the type strain L. reuteri DSM 20016. Specificity was tested using a set of non-target strains from several sources. Applicability of the real-time PCR assay was evaluated in a controlled broiler feeding trial by using standard curves specific for feed and intestinal matrices. The amount of the probiotic L. reuteri was determined in feed from three feeding phases and in intestinal samples of the jejunum, ileum, and caecum of three, 14, and 39 day old birds. L. reuteri DSM 16350 cells were enumerated in all feeds supplemented with the probiotic close to the inclusion rate of 7.0 × 10(3) cfu/g, however, were not detected in L. reuteri DSM 16350 free feed. In three day old birds L. reuteri DSM 16350 was only detected in intestinal samples from probiotic fed animals ranging from 8.2 ± 7.8 × 10(5) cfu/g in the jejunum, 1.0 ± 1.1×10(7) cfu/g in the ileum, and 2.5 ± 5.7 × 10(5) cfu/g in the caecum. Similar results were obtained for intestinal samples of older birds (14 and 39 days). With increasing age of the animals the amount of L. reuteri signals in the control animals, however, also increased, indicating the appearance of highly similar bacterial genomes in the gut microbiota. The L. reuteri DSM 16350 qPCR assay could be used in future for feeding trials to assure the accurate inclusion of the supplement to the feed and to monitor it's uptake into the GIT of young chicken.

  17. VP2 capsid domain of the H-1 parvovirus determines susceptibility of human cancer cells to H-1 viral infection.

    PubMed

    Cho, I-R; Kaowinn, S; Song, J; Kim, S; Koh, S S; Kang, H-Y; Ha, N-C; Lee, K H; Jun, H-S; Chung, Y-H

    2015-05-01

    Although H-1 parvovirus is used as an antitumor agent, not much is known about the relationship between its specific tropism and oncolytic activity. We hypothesize that VP2, a major capsid protein of H-1 virus, determines H-1-specific tropism. To assess this, we constructed chimeric H-1 viruses expressing Kilham rat virus (KRV) capsid proteins, in their complete or partial forms. Chimeric H-1 viruses (CH1, CH2 and CH3) containing the whole KRV VP2 domain could not induce cytolysis in HeLa, A549 and Panc-1 cells. However, the other chimeric H-1 viruses (CH4 and CH5) expressing a partial KRV VP2 domain induced cytolysis. Additionally, the significant cytopathic effect caused by CH4 and CH5 infection in HeLa cells resulted from preferential viral amplification via DNA replication, RNA transcription and protein synthesis. Modeling of VP2 capsid protein showed that two variable regions (VRs) (VR0 and VR2) of H-1 VP2 protein protrude outward, because of the insertion of extra amino-acid residues, as compared with those of KRV VP2 protein. This might explain the precedence of H-1 VP2 protein over KRV in determining oncolytic activity in human cancer cells. Taking these results together, we propose that the VP2 protein of oncolytic H-1 parvovirus determines its specific tropism in human cancer cells.

  18. NMR determination of the orientation of the magnetic susceptibility tensor in cyanometmyoglobin: A new probe of steric tilt of bound ligand

    SciTech Connect

    Emerson, S.D.; La Mar, G.N. )

    1990-02-13

    The experimentally determined paramagnetic dipolar shifts for noncoordinated amino acid side-chain protons in the heme pocket of sperm whale cyanometmyoglobin were used to determine in solution the orientation of the principal axes for the paramagnetic susceptibility tensor relative to the heme iron molecular coordinates. The determination was made by a least-squares search for the unique Euler rotation angles which convert the geometric factors in the molecular (crystal) coordinates to ones that correctly predict each of 41 known dipolar shifts by using the magnetic anisotropies computed previously. An excellent fit to experimental shifts was obtained, which also provided predictions that allowed subsequent new assignments to be made. The magnetic axes are oriented so that the z axis is tipped {approximately}15{degree} from the heme normal toward the heme {delta}-meso-H and coincides approximately with the characterized FeCO tilt axis in the isostructural MbCO complex. Since the FeCO and FeCN units are isostructural, the authors propose that the dominant protein constraint that tips the magnetic z axis from the heme normal is the tilt of the FeCN by steric interactions with the distal residues. It is shown that the proximal His ring nonlabile proton hyperfine shifts provide direct and exquisitely sensitive indicators of the degree of the z axis tilt that may serve as a valuable probe for characterizing variable steric interactions in the distal pocket of both point mutants and natural genetic variants of myoglobin.

  19. Determination of anisotropy of diamagnetic susceptibility for nematics and polar anchoring energy coefficient for nematics: substrate systems by wedge cell method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kedzierski, Jerzy; Raszewski, Zbigniew; Kojdecki, Marek A.; Zielinski, Jerzy; Miszczyk, Emilia; Lipinska, Ludwika

    2004-09-01

    A wedge cell of the wedge angle of order of few milliradians was used to measure threshold magnetic fields for the magnetic Freedericksz transition. A nematic liquid crystal filling the cell was of planar orientation enforced by the treatment of the flat boundary plates. A system of interference fringes appeared in the cell placed in normally incident light between analyzer and polarizer crossed. In the vicinity of each fringe the cell could be considered as a flat-parallel one and hence it was equivalent to a system of flat cells of different precisely determined thickness. The threshold magnetic field magnitudes were interpreted as eigenvalues of the boundary eigenvalue problem for the operator of second derivative; the interaction between the nematics and the substrate was described by the Rapini-Papoular formula (i.e. weak coupling was considered). The resulting formulae were used to determine the polar anchoring energy coefficient and the anisotropy of diamagnetic susceptibility after the threshold fields measured. The method was applied to characterize the nematic liquid crystal PCB and the coupling between it and the substrates made of poly(amic acid) MP2. The estimates of material parameters agreed pretty well with those determined by the composite method.

  20. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Genotypes Determined by Spoligotyping to Be Circulating in Colombia between 1999 and 2012 and Their Possible Associations with Transmission and Susceptibility to First-Line Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Puerto, Gloria; Erazo, Lina; Wintaco, Maira; Castro, Claudia; Ribón, Wellman; Guerrero, Martha Inírida

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Tuberculosis (TB) remains a primary public health problem worldwide. The number of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR TB) cases has increased in recent years in Colombia. Knowledge of M. tuberculosis genotypes defined by spoligotyping can help determine the circulation of genotypes that must be controlled to prevent the spread of TB. Objective To describe the genotypes of M. tuberculosis using spoligotyping in resistant and drug-sensitive isolates and their possible associations with susceptibility to first-line drugs. Methods An analytical observational study was conducted that included 741 isolates of M. tuberculosis from patients. The isolates originated from 31 departments and were obtained by systematic surveillance between 1999 and 2012. Results In total 61.94% of the isolates were resistant to 1 or more drugs, and 147 isolates were MDR. In total, 170 genotypes were found in the population structure of Colombian M. tuberculosis isolates. The isolates were mainly represented by four families: LAM (39.9%), Haarlem (19%), Orphan (17%) and T (9%). The SIT42 (LAM 9) was the most common genotype and contained 24.7% of the isolates, followed by the genotypes SIT62 (Haarlem1), SIT53 (T1), and SIT50 (H3). A high clustering of isolates was evident with 79.8% of the isolates classified into 32 groups. The Beijing family was associated with resistant isolates, whereas the Haarlem and T families were associated with sensitive isolates. The Haarlem family was also associated with grouped isolates (p = 0.031). Conclusions A high proportion (approximately 80%) of isolates was found in clusters; these clusters were not associated with resistance to first-line drugs. The Beijing family was associated with drug resistance, whereas the T and Haarlem families were associated with susceptibility in the Colombian isolates studied. PMID:26066494

  1. Topoisomerase II and IV quinolone resistance-determining regions in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia clinical isolates with different levels of quinolone susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Valdezate, Sylvia; Vindel, Ana; Echeita, Aurora; Baquero, Fernando; Cantó, Rafael

    2002-03-01

    The quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of topoisomerase II and IV genes from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ATCC 13637 were sequenced and compared with the corresponding regions of 32 unrelated S. maltophilia clinical strains for which ciprofloxacin MICs ranged from 0.1 to 64 microg/ml. GyrA (Leu-55 to Gln-155, Escherichia coli numbering), GyrB (Met-391 to Phe-513), ParC (Ile-34 to Arg-124), and ParE (Leu-396 to Leu-567) fragments from strain ATCC 13637 showed high degrees of identity to the corresponding regions from the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa, with the degrees of identity ranging from 85.0 to 93.5%. Lower degrees of identity to the corresponding regions from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (70.9 to 88.6%) and E. coli (73.0 to 88.6%) were observed. Amino acid changes were present in GyrA fragments from 9 of the 32 strains at positions 70, 85, 90, 103, 112, 113, 119, and 124; but there was no consistent relation to higher ciprofloxacin MICs. The absence of changes at positions 83 and 87, commonly involved in quinolone resistance in gram-negative bacteria, was unexpected. The GyrB sequences were identical in all strains, and only one strain (ciprofloxacin MIC, 16 microg/ml) showed a ParC amino acid change (Ser-80-->Arg). In contrast, a high frequency (16 of 32 strains) of amino acid replacements was present in ParE. The frequencies of alterations at positions 437, 465, 477, and 485 were higher (P < 0.05) in strains from cystic fibrosis patients, but these changes were not linked with high ciprofloxacin MICs. An efflux phenotype, screened by the detection of decreases of at least twofold doubling dilutions of the ciprofloxacin MIC in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (0.5 microg/ml) or reserpine (10 microg/ml), was suspected in seven strains. These results suggest that topoisomerases II and IV may not be the primary targets involved in quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia.

  2. Topoisomerase II and IV Quinolone Resistance-Determining Regions in Stenotrophomonas maltophilia Clinical Isolates with Different Levels of Quinolone Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Valdezate, Sylvia; Vindel, Ana; Echeita, Aurora; Baquero, Fernando; Cantó, Rafael

    2002-01-01

    The quinolone resistance-determining regions (QRDRs) of topoisomerase II and IV genes from Stenotrophomonas maltophilia ATCC 13637 were sequenced and compared with the corresponding regions of 32 unrelated S. maltophilia clinical strains for which ciprofloxacin MICs ranged from 0.1 to 64 μg/ml. GyrA (Leu-55 to Gln-155, Escherichia coli numbering), GyrB (Met-391 to Phe-513), ParC (Ile-34 to Arg-124), and ParE (Leu-396 to Leu-567) fragments from strain ATCC 13637 showed high degrees of identity to the corresponding regions from the phytopathogen Xylella fastidiosa, with the degrees of identity ranging from 85.0 to 93.5%. Lower degrees of identity to the corresponding regions from Pseudomonas aeruginosa (70.9 to 88.6%) and E. coli (73.0 to 88.6%) were observed. Amino acid changes were present in GyrA fragments from 9 of the 32 strains at positions 70, 85, 90, 103, 112, 113, 119, and 124; but there was no consistent relation to higher ciprofloxacin MICs. The absence of changes at positions 83 and 87, commonly involved in quinolone resistance in gram-negative bacteria, was unexpected. The GyrB sequences were identical in all strains, and only one strain (ciprofloxacin MIC, 16 μg/ml) showed a ParC amino acid change (Ser-80→Arg). In contrast, a high frequency (16 of 32 strains) of amino acid replacements was present in ParE. The frequencies of alterations at positions 437, 465, 477, and 485 were higher (P < 0.05) in strains from cystic fibrosis patients, but these changes were not linked with high ciprofloxacin MICs. An efflux phenotype, screened by the detection of decreases of at least twofold doubling dilutions of the ciprofloxacin MIC in the presence of carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (0.5 μg/ml) or reserpine (10 μg/ml), was suspected in seven strains. These results suggest that topoisomerases II and IV may not be the primary targets involved in quinolone resistance in S. maltophilia. PMID:11850246

  3. Comparative analysis of virulence determinants, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and serogrouping of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli versus typical enteropathogenic E. coli in India.

    PubMed

    Malvi, Supriya; Appannanavar, Suma; Mohan, Balvinder; Kaur, Harsimran; Gautam, Neha; Bharti, Bhavneet; Kumar, Yashwant; Taneja, Neelam

    2015-10-01

    The epidemiology of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and the significance of isolation of atypical EPEC (aEPEC) in childhood diarrhoea have not been well studied in an Indian context. A comparative study was undertaken to investigate virulence determinants, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and serogrouping of typical EPEC (tEPEC) versus aEPEC causing diarrhoea in children. A total of 400 prospective and 500 retrospective E. coli isolates were included. PCR was performed for eae, bfpA, efa, nleB, nleE, cdt, ehxA and paa genes. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute's disc diffusion test was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility. Phenotypic screening of extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), AmpC and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) production, and molecular detection of bla(NDM-1), bla(VIM), bla(CTX-M-15), bla(IMP) and bla(KPC) were performed. aEPEC (57.6 %) were more common as compared with tEPEC (42.3 %). The occurrence of virulence genes was observed to be three times higher in aEPEC as compared with tEPEC, efa1 (14.7 % of aEPEC, 4 % of tEPEC) being the most common. Most of the isolates did not belong to the classical EPEC O-serogroups. The highest resistance was observed against amoxicillin (93.22 %) followed by quinolones (83 %), cephalosporins (37.28 %), cotrimoxazole (35.59 %) and carbapenems (30.5 %). Overall equal numbers of aEPEC (41.17 %) and tEPEC (40 %) were observed to be multidrug-resistant. Fifteen EPEC strains demonstrated presence of ESBLs, five produced AmpC and four each produced metallo-β-lactamases and KPC-type carbapenemases; eight, seven and one isolate(s) each were positive for bla(VIM), bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(NDM-1), respectively. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time on carbapenem resistance and the presence of bla(NDM-1) and bla(CTX-M-15) in EPEC isolates from India. PMID:26233663

  4. Comparative analysis of virulence determinants, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and serogrouping of atypical enteropathogenic Escherichia coli versus typical enteropathogenic E. coli in India.

    PubMed

    Malvi, Supriya; Appannanavar, Suma; Mohan, Balvinder; Kaur, Harsimran; Gautam, Neha; Bharti, Bhavneet; Kumar, Yashwant; Taneja, Neelam

    2015-10-01

    The epidemiology of enteropathogenic Escherichia coli (EPEC) and the significance of isolation of atypical EPEC (aEPEC) in childhood diarrhoea have not been well studied in an Indian context. A comparative study was undertaken to investigate virulence determinants, antibiotic susceptibility patterns and serogrouping of typical EPEC (tEPEC) versus aEPEC causing diarrhoea in children. A total of 400 prospective and 500 retrospective E. coli isolates were included. PCR was performed for eae, bfpA, efa, nleB, nleE, cdt, ehxA and paa genes. The Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute's disc diffusion test was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility. Phenotypic screening of extended spectrum β-lactamases (ESBLs), AmpC and Klebsiella pneumoniae carbapenemase (KPC) production, and molecular detection of bla(NDM-1), bla(VIM), bla(CTX-M-15), bla(IMP) and bla(KPC) were performed. aEPEC (57.6 %) were more common as compared with tEPEC (42.3 %). The occurrence of virulence genes was observed to be three times higher in aEPEC as compared with tEPEC, efa1 (14.7 % of aEPEC, 4 % of tEPEC) being the most common. Most of the isolates did not belong to the classical EPEC O-serogroups. The highest resistance was observed against amoxicillin (93.22 %) followed by quinolones (83 %), cephalosporins (37.28 %), cotrimoxazole (35.59 %) and carbapenems (30.5 %). Overall equal numbers of aEPEC (41.17 %) and tEPEC (40 %) were observed to be multidrug-resistant. Fifteen EPEC strains demonstrated presence of ESBLs, five produced AmpC and four each produced metallo-β-lactamases and KPC-type carbapenemases; eight, seven and one isolate(s) each were positive for bla(VIM), bla(CTX-M-15) and bla(NDM-1), respectively. Here, to the best of our knowledge, we report for the first time on carbapenem resistance and the presence of bla(NDM-1) and bla(CTX-M-15) in EPEC isolates from India.

  5. A novel method to measure HLA-DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHC class II molecules based on peptide binding competition assay and differential IC(50) determination.

    PubMed

    Yin, Liusong; Stern, Lawrence J

    2014-04-01

    HLA-DM (DM) functions as a peptide editor that mediates the exchange of peptides loaded onto MHCII molecules by accelerating peptide dissociation and association kinetics. The relative DM-susceptibility of peptides bound to MHCII molecules correlates with antigen presentation and immunodominance hierarchy, and measurement of DM-susceptibility has been a key effort in this field. Current assays of DM-susceptibility, based on differential peptide dissociation rates measured for individually labeled peptides over a long time base, are difficult and cumbersome. Here, we present a novel method to measure DM-susceptibility based on peptide binding competition assays performed in the presence and absence of DM, reported as a delta-IC(50) (change in 50% inhibition concentration) value. We simulated binding competition reactions of peptides with various intrinsic and DM-catalyzed kinetic parameters and found that under a wide range of conditions the delta-IC(50) value is highly correlated with DM-susceptibility as measured in off-rate assay. We confirmed experimentally that DM-susceptibility measured by delta-IC(50) is comparable to that measured by traditional off-rate assay for peptides with known DM-susceptibility hierarchy. The major advantage of this method is that it allows simple, fast and high throughput measurement of DM-susceptibility for a large set of unlabeled peptides in studies of the mechanism of DM action and for identification of CD4+ T cell epitopes.

  6. Development of a Sequence-Characterized Amplified Region Marker-Targeted Quantitative PCR Assay for Strain-Specific Detection of Oenococcus oeni during Wine Malolactic Fermentation▿

    PubMed Central

    Solieri, Lisa; Giudici, Paolo

    2010-01-01

    Control over malolactic fermentation (MLF) is a difficult goal in winemaking and needs rapid methods to monitor Oenococcus oeni malolactic starters (MLS) in a stressful environment such as wine. In this study, we describe a novel quantitative PCR (QPCR) assay enabling the detection of an O. oeni strain during MLF without culturing. O. oeni strain LB221 was used as a model to develop a strain-specific sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR) marker derived from a discriminatory OPA20-based randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) band. The 5′ and 3′ flanking regions and the copy number of the SCAR marker were characterized using inverse PCR and Southern blotting, respectively. Primer pairs targeting the SCAR sequence enabled strain-specific detection without cross amplification of other O. oeni strains or wine species of lactic acid bacteria (LAB), acetic acid bacteria (AAB), and yeasts. The SCAR-QPCR assay was linear over a range of cell concentrations (7 log units) and detected as few as 2.2 × 102 CFU per ml of red wine with good quantification effectiveness, as shown by the correlation of QPCR and plate counting results. Therefore, the cultivation-independent monitoring of a single O. oeni strain in wine based on a SCAR marker represents a rapid and effective strain-specific approach. This strategy can be adopted to develop easy and rapid detection techniques for monitoring the implantation of inoculated O. oeni MLS on the indigenous LAB population, reducing the risk of unsuccessful MLF. PMID:20935116

  7. Tracking a Tuberculosis Outbreak Over 21 Years: Strain-Specific Single-Nucleotide Polymorphism Typing Combined With Targeted Whole-Genome Sequencing

    PubMed Central

    Stucki, David; Ballif, Marie; Bodmer, Thomas; Coscolla, Mireia; Maurer, Anne-Marie; Droz, Sara; Butz, Christa; Borrell, Sonia; Längle, Christel; Feldmann, Julia; Furrer, Hansjakob; Mordasini, Carlo; Helbling, Peter; Rieder, Hans L.; Egger, Matthias; Gagneux, Sébastien; Fenner, Lukas

    2015-01-01

    Background. Whole-genome sequencing (WGS) is increasingly used in molecular-epidemiological investigations of bacterial pathogens, despite cost- and time-intensive analyses. We combined strain-specific single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and targeted WGS to investigate a tuberculosis cluster spanning 21 years in Bern, Switzerland. Methods. On the basis of genome sequences of 3 historical outbreak Mycobacterium tuberculosis isolates, we developed a strain-specific SNP-typing assay to identify further cases. We screened 1642 patient isolates and performed WGS on all identified cluster isolates. We extracted SNPs to construct genomic networks. Clinical and social data were retrospectively collected. Results. We identified 68 patients associated with the outbreak strain. Most received a tuberculosis diagnosis in 1991–1995, but cases were observed until 2011. Two thirds were homeless and/or substance abusers. Targeted WGS revealed 133 variable SNP positions among outbreak isolates. Genomic network analyses suggested a single origin of the outbreak, with subsequent division into 3 subclusters. Isolates from patients with confirmed epidemiological links differed by 0–11 SNPs. Conclusions. Strain-specific SNP genotyping allowed rapid and inexpensive identification of M. tuberculosis outbreak isolates in a population-based strain collection. Subsequent targeted WGS provided detailed insights into transmission dynamics. This combined approach could be applied to track bacterial pathogens in real time and at high resolution. PMID:25362193

  8. Methods and procedures for use of complement-fixation technique in type- and strain-specific diagnosis of influenza*†

    PubMed Central

    Lief, Florence S.; Henle, Werner

    1959-01-01

    It is now well established that there are two kinds of complement-fixing antigens of influenza virus: the soluble, type-specific, antigens, found mainly in infected tissue but also within the virus particle; and the virus, strain-specific, antigens, closely linked with the haemagglutinating component. For true results in complement-fixation testing in influenza, antigens or antisera of the one kind must be free of the other kind. This paper describes in detail the preparation of reagents for such testing and a variety of basic aspects of test procedures. PMID:13651922

  9. Quantitative Differences in Salivary Pathogen Load during Tick Transmission Underlie Strain-Specific Variation in Transmission Efficiency of Anaplasma marginale

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The relative fitness of arthropod-borne pathogens within the vector can be a major determinant of pathogen prevalence within the mammalian host population. Strains of the tick-borne rickettsia Anaplasma marginale differ markedly in transmission efficiency with consequent impact on pathogen strain st...

  10. Diagnosis of the Earliest Strain-Specific Interactions between Tobacco Mosaic Virus and Chloroplasts of Tobacco Leaves in Vivo by Means of Chlorophyll Fluorescence Imaging.

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, S.; Osmond, C. B.; Daley, P. F.

    1994-01-01

    Fluorescence imaging was used to diagnose early stages of the strain-specific interactions between tobacco mosaic virus (strain PV230) and chloroplasts following infection of tobacco leaves (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi). The earliest indication of interaction in tissues that ultimately become chlorotic was a reduction in chlorophyll fluorescence, and there was little fluorescence quenching compared with adjacent healthy tissues. Subsequently, fluorescence increased but remained unquenched. In the late stages fluorescence declined again in chlorotic regions as the chloroticmosaic symptoms developed. These in vivo data showing altered fluorescence yields confirm strain-specific interaction of virus coat protein with photosystem II (PSII) components in vitro, leading to photoinhibition and photooxidation of chlorophyll in infected cells and the development of visible chlorotic-mosaic symptoms. Although mechanisms leading to the low, unquenched fluorescence condition are not known, the intermediate high, unquenched fluorescence condition is consistent with impaired PSII electron transport as measured in vitro. Fluorescence lesions appear more rapidly and develop more extensively in high light, consistent with the faster and larger extent of symptom formation in high-light-grown leaves than in low-light-grown leaves. PMID:12232149

  11. Bacterial antibiotic resistance studies using in vitro dynamic models: Population analysis vs. susceptibility testing as endpoints of mutant enrichment.

    PubMed

    Firsov, Alexander A; Strukova, Elena N; Portnoy, Yury A; Shlykova, Darya S; Zinner, Stephen H

    2015-09-01

    Emergence of bacterial antibiotic resistance is usually characterised either by population analysis or susceptibility testing. To compare these endpoints in their ability to demonstrate clear relationships with the ratio of 24-h area under the concentration-time curve (AUC24) to the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), enrichment of ciprofloxacin-resistant mutants of four clinical isolates of Pseudomonas aeruginosa was studied in an in vitro dynamic model that simulates mono-exponential pharmacokinetics of ciprofloxacin over a wide range of the AUC24/MIC ratios. Each organism was exposed to twice-daily ciprofloxacin for 3 days. Amplification of resistant mutants was monitored by plating on media with 2×, 4×, 8× and 16× MIC of ciprofloxacin. Population analysis data were expressed by the area under the bacterial mutant concentration-time curve (AUBCM). Changes in P. aeruginosa susceptibility were examined by daily MIC determinations. To account for the different susceptibilities of P. aeruginosa strains, post-exposure MICs (MICfinal) were related to the MICs determined with the starting inoculum (MICinitial). For each organism, AUC24/MIC relationships both with AUBCM and MICfinal/MICinitial were bell-shaped, but the latter were more strain-specific than the former. Using combined data on all four isolates, AUBCM showed a better correlation than MICfinal/MICinitial (r(2)=0.75 vs. r(2)=0.53). The shift of MICfinal/MICinitial relative to AUBCM vs. AUC24/MIC curves resulted in a weak correlation between AUBCM and MICfinal/MICinitial (r(2)=0.41). These data suggest that population analysis is preferable to susceptibility testing in bacterial resistance studies and that these endpoints should not be considered interchangeable.

  12. Transgenic Mouse Bioassay: Evidence That Rabbits Are Susceptible to a Variety of Prion Isolates.

    PubMed

    Vidal, Enric; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Pintado, Belén; Eraña, Hasier; Ordóñez, Montserrat; Márquez, Mercedes; Chianini, Francesca; Fondevila, Dolors; Sánchez-Martín, Manuel A; Andreoletti, Olivier; Dagleish, Mark P; Pumarola, Martí; Castilla, Joaquín

    2015-08-01

    Interspecies transmission of prions is a well-established phenomenon, both experimentally and under field conditions. Upon passage through new hosts, prion strains have proven their capacity to change their properties and this is a source of strain diversity which needs to be considered when assessing the potential risks associated with consumption of prion contaminated protein sources. Rabbits were considered for decades to be a prion resistant species until proven otherwise recently. To determine the extent of rabbit susceptibility to prions and to assess the effects of passage of different prion strains through this species a transgenic mouse model overexpressing rabbit PrPC was developed (TgRab). Intracerebral challenges with prion strains originating from a variety of species including field isolates (ovine SSBP/1 scrapie, Nor98- scrapie; cattle BSE, BSE-L and cervid CWD), experimental murine strains (ME7 and RML) and experimentally obtained ruminant (sheepBSE) and rabbit (de novo NZW) strains were performed. On first passage TgRab were susceptible to the majority of prions (Cattle BSE, SheepBSE, BSE-L, de novo NZW, ME7 and RML) tested with the exception of SSBP/1 scrapie, CWD and Nor98 scrapie. Furthermore, TgRab were capable of propagating strain-specific features such as differences in incubation periods, histological brain lesions, abnormal prion (PrPd) deposition profiles and proteinase-K (PK) resistant western blotting band patterns. Our results confirm previous studies proving that rabbits are not resistant to prion infection and show for the first time that rabbits are susceptible to PrPd originating in a number of other species. This should be taken into account when choosing protein sources to feed rabbits.

  13. Transgenic Mouse Bioassay: Evidence That Rabbits Are Susceptible to a Variety of Prion Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Pintado, Belén; Eraña, Hasier; Ordóñez, Montserrat; Márquez, Mercedes; Chianini, Francesca; Fondevila, Dolors; Sánchez-Martín, Manuel A.; Andreoletti, Olivier; Dagleish, Mark P.; Pumarola, Martí; Castilla, Joaquín

    2015-01-01

    Interspecies transmission of prions is a well-established phenomenon, both experimentally and under field conditions. Upon passage through new hosts, prion strains have proven their capacity to change their properties and this is a source of strain diversity which needs to be considered when assessing the potential risks associated with consumption of prion contaminated protein sources. Rabbits were considered for decades to be a prion resistant species until proven otherwise recently. To determine the extent of rabbit susceptibility to prions and to assess the effects of passage of different prion strains through this species a transgenic mouse model overexpressing rabbit PrPC was developed (TgRab). Intracerebral challenges with prion strains originating from a variety of species including field isolates (ovine SSBP/1 scrapie, Nor98- scrapie; cattle BSE, BSE-L and cervid CWD), experimental murine strains (ME7 and RML) and experimentally obtained ruminant (sheepBSE) and rabbit (de novo NZW) strains were performed. On first passage TgRab were susceptible to the majority of prions (Cattle BSE, SheepBSE, BSE-L, de novo NZW, ME7 and RML) tested with the exception of SSBP/1 scrapie, CWD and Nor98 scrapie. Furthermore, TgRab were capable of propagating strain-specific features such as differences in incubation periods, histological brain lesions, abnormal prion (PrPd) deposition profiles and proteinase-K (PK) resistant western blotting band patterns. Our results confirm previous studies proving that rabbits are not resistant to prion infection and show for the first time that rabbits are susceptible to PrPd originating in a number of other species. This should be taken into account when choosing protein sources to feed rabbits. PMID:26247589

  14. Human brain atlas for automated region of interest selection in quantitative susceptibility mapping: application to determine iron content in deep gray matter structures.

    PubMed

    Lim, Issel Anne L; Faria, Andreia V; Li, Xu; Hsu, Johnny T C; Airan, Raag D; Mori, Susumu; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this paper is to extend the single-subject Eve atlas from Johns Hopkins University, which currently contains diffusion tensor and T1-weighted anatomical maps, by including contrast based on quantitative susceptibility mapping. The new atlas combines a "deep gray matter parcellation map" (DGMPM) derived from a single-subject quantitative susceptibility map with the previously established "white matter parcellation map" (WMPM) from the same subject's T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging data into an MNI coordinate map named the "Everything Parcellation Map in Eve Space," also known as the "EvePM." It allows automated segmentation of gray matter and white matter structures. Quantitative susceptibility maps from five healthy male volunteers (30 to 33 years of age) were coregistered to the Eve Atlas with AIR and Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (LDDMM), and the transformation matrices were applied to the EvePM to produce automated parcellation in subject space. Parcellation accuracy was measured with a kappa analysis for the left and right structures of six deep gray matter regions. For multi-orientation QSM images, the Kappa statistic was 0.85 between automated and manual segmentation, with the inter-rater reproducibility Kappa being 0.89 for the human raters, suggesting "almost perfect" agreement between all segmentation methods. Segmentation seemed slightly more difficult for human raters on single-orientation QSM images, with the Kappa statistic being 0.88 between automated and manual segmentation, and 0.85 and 0.86 between human raters. Overall, this atlas provides a time-efficient tool for automated coregistration and segmentation of quantitative susceptibility data to analyze many regions of interest. These data were used to establish a baseline for normal magnetic susceptibility measurements for over 60 brain structures of 30- to 33-year-old males. Correlating the average susceptibility with age-based iron concentrations in gray

  15. Human brain atlas for automated region of interest selection in quantitative susceptibility mapping: application to determine iron content in deep gray matter structures.

    PubMed

    Lim, Issel Anne L; Faria, Andreia V; Li, Xu; Hsu, Johnny T C; Airan, Raag D; Mori, Susumu; van Zijl, Peter C M

    2013-11-15

    The purpose of this paper is to extend the single-subject Eve atlas from Johns Hopkins University, which currently contains diffusion tensor and T1-weighted anatomical maps, by including contrast based on quantitative susceptibility mapping. The new atlas combines a "deep gray matter parcellation map" (DGMPM) derived from a single-subject quantitative susceptibility map with the previously established "white matter parcellation map" (WMPM) from the same subject's T1-weighted and diffusion tensor imaging data into an MNI coordinate map named the "Everything Parcellation Map in Eve Space," also known as the "EvePM." It allows automated segmentation of gray matter and white matter structures. Quantitative susceptibility maps from five healthy male volunteers (30 to 33 years of age) were coregistered to the Eve Atlas with AIR and Large Deformation Diffeomorphic Metric Mapping (LDDMM), and the transformation matrices were applied to the EvePM to produce automated parcellation in subject space. Parcellation accuracy was measured with a kappa analysis for the left and right structures of six deep gray matter regions. For multi-orientation QSM images, the Kappa statistic was 0.85 between automated and manual segmentation, with the inter-rater reproducibility Kappa being 0.89 for the human raters, suggesting "almost perfect" agreement between all segmentation methods. Segmentation seemed slightly more difficult for human raters on single-orientation QSM images, with the Kappa statistic being 0.88 between automated and manual segmentation, and 0.85 and 0.86 between human raters. Overall, this atlas provides a time-efficient tool for automated coregistration and segmentation of quantitative susceptibility data to analyze many regions of interest. These data were used to establish a baseline for normal magnetic susceptibility measurements for over 60 brain structures of 30- to 33-year-old males. Correlating the average susceptibility with age-based iron concentrations in gray

  16. X-Ray-Induced Damage to the Submandibular Salivary Glands in Mice: An Analysis of Strain-Specific Responses

    PubMed Central

    Kamiya, Mana; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Hayama, Kazuhide; Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Radiation therapy for head and neck cancers often causes xerostomia (dry mouth) by acutely damaging the salivary glands through the induction of severe acute inflammation. By contrast, the mechanism underlying the X-ray-induced delayed salivary dysfunction is unknown and has attracted increasing attention. To identify and develop a mouse model that distinguishes the delayed from the acute effects, we examined three different mouse strains (C57BL/6, ICR, and ICR-nu/nu) that showed distinct T-cell activities to comparatively analyze their responses to X-ray irradiation. Three strains were irradiated with X-rays (25 Gy), and functional changes of the submandibular glands were examined by determining pilocarpine-induced saliva secretion. Structural changes were evaluated using histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations of CD3, cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and Bcl-xL. In C57BL/6 mice, the X-ray irradiation induced acute inflammation accompanied by severe inflammatory cell infiltration at 4 days postirradiation, causing substantial destruction and significant dysfunction at 2 weeks. Fibrotic repair was observed at 16 weeks. In ICR-nu/nu mice, the inflammation and organ destruction were much milder than in the other mice strains, but increased apoptotic cells and a significant reduction in salivary secretion were observed at 4 and 8 weeks and beyond, respectively. These results suggest that in C57BL/6 mice, X-ray-induced functional and structural damage to the salivary glands is caused mainly by acute inflammation. By contrast, although neither acute inflammation nor organ destruction was observed in ICR-nu/nu mice, apoptotic cell death preceded the dysfunction in salivary secretion in the later phase. These data suggest that the X-ray-irradiated ICR-nu/nu mouse may be a useful animal model for developing more specific therapeutic methods for the delayed dysfunction of salivary glands. PMID:26309806

  17. Studies of plant colonisation by closely related Bacillus amyloliquefaciens biocontrol agents using strain specific quantitative PCR assays.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Anna H; Bejai, Sarosh; Niazi, Adnan; Manzoor, Shahid; Bongcam-Rudloff, Erik; Meijer, Johan

    2014-12-01

    Certain strains of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens can colonize plants and improve growth and stress management. In order to study these effects, bacterial growth dynamics on plants and in the rhizosphere are of interest calling for specific analytical tools. For that purpose, quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) assays were developed in order to differentiate among three closely related B. amyloliquefaciens subsp. plantarum strains (UCMB5033, UCMB5036, UCMB5113) and to determine their levels with high accuracy. Oligonucleotide primers were designed for strain unique gene sequences and used for SYBR green based qPCR analysis. Standard curves covered a wide linear range (10(6)) of DNA amounts with the lowest detection level at 50 fg. Post-reaction melting curve analysis showed only a single product. Accurate threshold cycles were obtained, even in the presence of high excess of related Bacillus strains and total bacterial DNA from soil. Analysis of Bacillus colonisation after seed treatment of two oilseed rape cultivars (Oase and Ritz) grown on agar support showed a time dependent effect but that the bacteria mostly were found on root tissues and little on green tissues. The colonisation on plants grown in soil varied among the Bacillus strains where Oase seemed to house more bacteria than Ritz. Applied as a mixture, all three Bacillus strains co-existed on the roots of plants grown in soil. The qPCR assay in combination with other techniques will be a powerful tool to study plant interactions of these B. amyloliquefaciens biocontrol agents to further understand the requirements for successful interactions and improvement of plant properties.

  18. Loss of the mu opioid receptor induces strain-specific alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis and spatial learning.

    PubMed

    Cominski, T P; Ansonoff, M A; Turchin, C E; Pintar, J E

    2014-10-10

    Alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis affect spatial learning, though, the relative contributions of cell proliferation and cell survival on this process are poorly understood. The current study utilized mu opioid receptor (MOR-1) knockout (KO) mice on two background strains, C57BL/6 and 129S6, to assess cell survival as well as determine the impact on spatial learning using the Morris water maze. These experiments were designed to extend prior work showing that both C57BL/6 and 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice have an increased number of proliferating cells in the dentate gyrus (DG) when compared to wild-type (WT) mice. The current study indicates that newly born neurons in the DG of C57BL/6 MOR-1 KO mice exhibit enhanced survival when compared to WT mice, while new neurons in the DG of 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice do not. In addition, C57BL/6 MOR-1 KO mice have a lower number of apoptotic cells in the DG compared to WT mice while, in contrast, 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice have a higher number of apoptotic cells in this region. These alterations collectively contribute to an increase in the granule cell number in the DG of C57BL/6 MOR-1 KO mice, while the total number of granule cells in 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice is unchanged. Thus, although C57BL/6 and 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice both exhibit increased cell proliferation in the DG, the impact of the MOR-1 mutation on cell survival differs between strains. Furthermore, the decrease in DG cell survival displayed by 129S6 MOR-1 KO mice is correlated with functional deficits in spatial learning, suggesting that MOR-1-dependent alterations in the survival of new neurons in the DG, and not MOR-1-dependent changes in proliferation of progenitor cells in the DG, is important for spatial learning. PMID:25086317

  19. X-Ray-Induced Damage to the Submandibular Salivary Glands in Mice: An Analysis of Strain-Specific Responses.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Mana; Kawase, Tomoyuki; Hayama, Kazuhide; Tsuchimochi, Makoto; Okuda, Kazuhiro; Yoshie, Hiromasa

    2015-01-01

    Radiation therapy for head and neck cancers often causes xerostomia (dry mouth) by acutely damaging the salivary glands through the induction of severe acute inflammation. By contrast, the mechanism underlying the X-ray-induced delayed salivary dysfunction is unknown and has attracted increasing attention. To identify and develop a mouse model that distinguishes the delayed from the acute effects, we examined three different mouse strains (C57BL/6, ICR, and ICR-nu/nu) that showed distinct T-cell activities to comparatively analyze their responses to X-ray irradiation. Three strains were irradiated with X-rays (25 Gy), and functional changes of the submandibular glands were examined by determining pilocarpine-induced saliva secretion. Structural changes were evaluated using histopathological and immunohistochemical examinations of CD3, cleaved poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP), and Bcl-xL. In C57BL/6 mice, the X-ray irradiation induced acute inflammation accompanied by severe inflammatory cell infiltration at 4 days postirradiation, causing substantial destruction and significant dysfunction at 2 weeks. Fibrotic repair was observed at 16 weeks. In ICR-nu/nu mice, the inflammation and organ destruction were much milder than in the other mice strains, but increased apoptotic cells and a significant reduction in salivary secretion were observed at 4 and 8 weeks and beyond, respectively. These results suggest that in C57BL/6 mice, X-ray-induced functional and structural damage to the salivary glands is caused mainly by acute inflammation. By contrast, although neither acute inflammation nor organ destruction was observed in ICR-nu/nu mice, apoptotic cell death preceded the dysfunction in salivary secretion in the later phase. These data suggest that the X-ray-irradiated ICR-nu/nu mouse may be a useful animal model for developing more specific therapeutic methods for the delayed dysfunction of salivary glands. PMID:26309806

  20. Determination of the orientational order parameter of a binary mixture showing an induced smectic A(d) phase from magnetic susceptibility measurements.

    PubMed

    Roy, Prithwi Dev; Das, Banani; Das, Malay Kumar

    2009-08-19

    The diamagnetic susceptibility anisotropy (Δχ) measurement of a binary mixture comprising of a strongly polar mesogen (CPPCC) and a weakly polar mesogen (ME6O.5) showing an induced smectic A(d) phase is reported here. Assuming an axially symmetric molecule, the temperature dependence of the orientational order parameter ⟨P(2)⟩ has been investigated from the anisotropy of the susceptibility at different temperatures throughout the entire composition range. The results are compared with x-ray and optical birefringence measurements along with the mean-field theory of the smectic A phase. The maximum in the stability of the smectic A(d) phase (at x(CPPCC) = 0.33) corresponds to the minimum in the order parameter values. The order of the smectic to nematic phase transition has also been discussed.

  1. The Differential Expression of Immune Genes between Water Buffalo and Yellow Cattle Determines Species-Specific Susceptibility to Schistosoma japonicum Infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Jianmei; Fu, Zhiqiang; Hong, Yang; Wu, Haiwei; Jin, Yamei; Zhu, Chuangang; Li, Hao; Lu, Ke; Shi, Yaojun; Yuan, Chunxiu; Cheng, Guofeng; Feng, Xingang; Liu, Jinming; Lin, Jiaojiao

    2015-01-01

    Water buffalo are less susceptible to Schistosoma japonicum infection than yellow cattle. The factors that affect such differences in susceptibility remain unknown. A Bos taurus genome-wide gene chip was used to analyze gene expression profiles in the peripheral blood of water buffalo and yellow cattle pre- and post-infection with S. japonicum. This study showed that most of the identified differentially expressed genes (DEGs) between water buffalo and yellow cattle pre- and post-infection were involved in immune-related processes, and the expression level of immune genes was lower in water buffalo. The unique DEGs (390) in yellow cattle were mainly associated with inflammation pathways, while the unique DEGs (2,114) in water buffalo were mainly associated with immune-related factors. The 83 common DEGs may be the essential response genes during S. japonicum infection, the highest two gene ontology (GO) functions were associated with the regulation of fibrinolysis. The pathway enrichment analysis showed that the DEGs constituted similar immune-related pathways pre- and post-infection between the two hosts. This first analysis of the transcriptional profiles of natural hosts has enabled us to gain new insights into the mechanisms that govern their susceptibility or resistance to S. japonicum infections.

  2. Strain-Specific Variation of the Decorin-Binding Adhesin DbpA Influences the Tissue Tropism of the Lyme Disease Spirochete

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Benoit, Vivian; Yang, Xiuli; Martínez-Herranz, Raúl; Pal, Utpal; Leong, John M.

    2014-01-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes demonstrate strain- and species-specific differences in tissue tropism. For example, the three major Lyme disease spirochete species, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and B. afzelii, are each most commonly associated with overlapping but distinct spectra of clinical manifestations. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the most common Lyme spirochete in the U.S., is closely associated with arthritis. The attachment of microbial pathogens to cells or to the extracellular matrix of target tissues may promote colonization and disease, and the Lyme disease spirochete encodes several surface proteins, including the decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding adhesin DbpA, which vary among strains and have been postulated to contribute to strain-specific differences in tissue tropism. DbpA variants differ in their ability to bind to its host ligands and to cultured mammalian cells. To directly test whether variation in dbpA influences tissue tropism, we analyzed murine infection by isogenic B. burgdorferi strains that encode different dbpA alleles. Compared to dbpA alleles of B. afzelii strain VS461 or B. burgdorferi strain N40-D10/E9, dbpA of B. garinii strain PBr conferred the greatest decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding activity, promoted the greatest colonization at the inoculation site and heart, and caused the most severe carditis. The dbpA of strain N40-D10/E9 conferred the weakest decorin- and GAG-binding activity, but the most robust joint colonization and was the only dbpA allele capable of conferring significant joint disease. Thus, dbpA mediates colonization and disease by the Lyme disease spirochete in an allele-dependent manner and may contribute to the etiology of distinct clinical manifestations associated with different Lyme disease strains. This study provides important support for the long-postulated model that strain-specific variations of Borrelia surface proteins influence tissue tropism. PMID:25079227

  3. Strain-specific variation of the decorin-binding adhesin DbpA influences the tissue tropism of the lyme disease spirochete.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yi-Pin; Benoit, Vivian; Yang, Xiuli; Martínez-Herranz, Raúl; Pal, Utpal; Leong, John M

    2014-07-01

    Lyme disease spirochetes demonstrate strain- and species-specific differences in tissue tropism. For example, the three major Lyme disease spirochete species, Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, B. garinii, and B. afzelii, are each most commonly associated with overlapping but distinct spectra of clinical manifestations. Borrelia burgdorferi sensu stricto, the most common Lyme spirochete in the U.S., is closely associated with arthritis. The attachment of microbial pathogens to cells or to the extracellular matrix of target tissues may promote colonization and disease, and the Lyme disease spirochete encodes several surface proteins, including the decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding adhesin DbpA, which vary among strains and have been postulated to contribute to strain-specific differences in tissue tropism. DbpA variants differ in their ability to bind to its host ligands and to cultured mammalian cells. To directly test whether variation in dbpA influences tissue tropism, we analyzed murine infection by isogenic B. burgdorferi strains that encode different dbpA alleles. Compared to dbpA alleles of B. afzelii strain VS461 or B. burgdorferi strain N40-D10/E9, dbpA of B. garinii strain PBr conferred the greatest decorin- and dermatan sulfate-binding activity, promoted the greatest colonization at the inoculation site and heart, and caused the most severe carditis. The dbpA of strain N40-D10/E9 conferred the weakest decorin- and GAG-binding activity, but the most robust joint colonization and was the only dbpA allele capable of conferring significant joint disease. Thus, dbpA mediates colonization and disease by the Lyme disease spirochete in an allele-dependent manner and may contribute to the etiology of distinct clinical manifestations associated with different Lyme disease strains. This study provides important support for the long-postulated model that strain-specific variations of Borrelia surface proteins influence tissue tropism.

  4. Susceptibility to decubitus ulcer formation.

    PubMed

    Meijer, J H; Germs, P H; Schneider, H; Ribbe, M W

    1994-03-01

    The hypothesis of blood-flow recovery time after pressure relief was prospectively evaluated as a measure of a patient's susceptibility to develop decubitus ulcers. This blood-flow recovery time was measured using the noninvasive pressure-temperature-time (PTT) method, which uses a 10-minute test-pressure stimulus. The blood-flow response after pressure relief was measured by means of skin-temperature measurements. The evaluation was performed in a group of 109 elderly nursing home patients. A pressure-index was used as a measure for the intensity and duration of pressure and shear forces, to which a patient was exposed, to measure a set of external determinants that are independent of the susceptibility. Both the blood-flow recovery time and the pressure-index were found to correlate significantly with the risk to develop decubitus. A conceptualization of the relationship between the risk, on the one hand, and the susceptibility and the external determinants, on the other hand, is presented, assuming independence (orthogonality) of both sets of determinants. Based on this conceptualization, a three-dimensional risk-relationship was constructed. It is concluded that the blood-flow recovery time can be considered to be a measure for the susceptibility. Further, the conceptualization provides valuable insight into the risk-relationships and forms a base for future research with regard to susceptibility. PMID:8129586

  5. Disparity between timed-kill and checkerboard methods for determination of in vitro bactericidal interactions of vancomycin plus rifampin versus methicillin-susceptible and -resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    PubMed

    Bayer, A S; Morrison, J O

    1984-08-01

    The role of rifampin as an adjunctive agent to vancomycin in the therapy of serious systemic staphylococcal infections remains controversial. Several in vitro studies utilizing differing methodologies to define the bactericidal interactions of vancomycin plus rifampin versus Staphylococcus aureus have yielded markedly disparate results. The in vitro bactericidal synergistic activities of vancomycin plus rifampin were examined versus 48 clinical isolates of S. aureus, both methicillin susceptible and resistant. Each strain was tested simultaneously in timed-kill curve and checkerboard systems. By timed-kill curve, vancomycin plus rifampin usually had either an indifferent (67%) or synergistic (19 to 29%) effect, with a frequency dependent on sampling times; bactericidal antagonism was infrequently noted after 48 h of incubation (4%). Indifference was seen as a prevention of rifampin resistance by vancomycin. Synergy was more commonly noted at 48 than at 24 h of incubation. The bactericidal interaction results were similar for both methicillin-susceptible and -resistant strains. In contrast to the killing curve data, the checkerboard technique uniformly demonstrated bactericidal antagonism of vancomycin plus rifampin against all 48 staphylococci. We conclude that the nature of the in vitro bactericidal interactions of vancomycin plus rifampin against S. aureus is difficult to establish in vitro. This fact relates to the markedly disparate findings, which depended on both the synergy technique utilized and the test system conditions employed. In vivo studies are required to delineate the bactericidal interaction potentials of vancomycin plus rifampin versus S. aureus.

  6. Association of elevated rotavirus-specific antibody titers with HBGA secretor status in Swedish individuals: The FUT2 gene as a putative susceptibility determinant for infection.

    PubMed

    Günaydın, Gökçe; Nordgren, Johan; Sharma, Sumit; Hammarström, Lennart

    2016-01-01

    The histo-blood group antigens (HBGAs) have recently been suggested to serve as attachment factors for rotavirus VP8* (P-genotype) in vitro and associated with susceptibility in vivo. We thus investigated whether rotavirus antibody titers and genotype specific neutralization titers correlate with HBGA status in Swedish individuals. We investigated the effect of inactivating mutations in the secretor FUT2 (rs601338) and Lewis FUT3 genes (rs28362459, rs3894326, rs812936 and rs778986) on serum IgG antibody titers and neutralizing antibody titers to rotavirus strains of the P[8] and P[6] genotypes in Swedish healthy blood donors and patients with IgA deficiency using genotyping, enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and a neutralization assay. Rotavirus-specific serum IgG and neutralizing antibody titers to the Wa strain (G1P[8]), but not to the ST3 (G4P[6]) strain, were significantly higher in secretors (with at least one functional FUT2 gene) than in non-secretors (P<0.001) (with homozygous nonsense mutation in the FUT2 gene). Thus, our results represent that secretors show elevated rotavirus specific serum antibodies, suggesting a higher susceptibility to rotavirus infections, as compared to non-secretors in Sweden.

  7. The Association between Carbohydrate-Rich Foods and Risk of Cardiovascular Disease Is Not Modified by Genetic Susceptibility to Dyslipidemia as Determined by 80 Validated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Sonestedt, Emily; Hellstrand, Sophie; Schulz, Christina-Alexandra; Wallström, Peter; Drake, Isabel; Ericson, Ulrika; Gullberg, Bo; Hedblad, Bo; Orho-Melander, Marju

    2015-01-01

    Background It is still unclear whether carbohydrate consumption is associated with cardiovascular disease (CVD) risk. Genetic susceptibility might modify the associations between dietary intakes and disease risk. Objectives The aim was to examine the association between the consumption of carbohydrate-rich foods (vegetables, fruits and berries, juice, potatoes, whole grains, refined grains, cookies and cakes, sugar and sweets, and sugar-sweetened beverages) and the risk of incident ischemic CVD (iCVD; coronary events and ischemic stroke), and whether these associations differ depending on genetic susceptibility to dyslipidemia. Methods Among 26,445 individuals (44–74 years; 62% females) from the Malmö Diet and Cancer Study cohort, 2,921 experienced an iCVD event during a mean follow-up time of 14 years. At baseline, dietary data were collected using a modified diet history method, and clinical risk factors were measured in 4,535 subjects. We combined 80 validated genetic variants associated with triglycerides and HDL-C or LDL-C, into genetic risk scores and examined the interactions between dietary intakes and genetic risk scores on the incidence of iCVD. Results Subjects in the highest intake quintile for whole grains had a 13% (95% CI: 3–23%; p-trend: 0.002) lower risk for iCVD compared to the lowest quintile. A higher consumption of foods rich in added sugar (sugar and sweets, and sugar-sweetened beverages) had a significant cross-sectional association with higher triglyceride concentrations and lower HDL-C concentrations. A stronger positive association between a high consumption of sugar and sweets on iCVD risk was observed among those with low genetic risk score for triglycerides (p-interaction=0.05). Conclusion In this prospective cohort study that examined food sources of carbohydrates, individuals with a high consumption of whole grains had a decreased risk of iCVD. No convincing evidence of an interaction between genetic susceptibility for

  8. Suppression subtractive hybridisation and real-time PCR for strain-specific quantification of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis BAN in broiler feed.

    PubMed

    Fibi, Silvia; Klose, Viviana; Mohnl, Michaela; Weber, Barbara; Haslberger, Alexander G; Sattler, Verity Ann

    2016-04-01

    To ensure quality management during the production processes of probiotics and for efficacy testing in vivo, accurate tools are needed for the identification and quantification of probiotic strains. In this study, a strain-specific qPCR assay based on Suppression Subtractive Hybridisation (SSH) for identifying unique sequences, was developed to quantify the strain Bifidobacterium animalis BAN in broiler feed. Seventy potential BAN specific sequences were obtained after SSH of the BAN genome, with a pool of closely related strain genomes and subsequent differential screening by dot blot hybridisation. Primers were designed for 30 sequences which showed no match with any sequence database entry, using BLAST and FASTA. Primer specificity was assessed by qPCR using 45 non-target strains and species in a stepwise approach. Primer T39_S2 was the only primer pair without any unspecific binding properties and it showed a PCR efficiency of 80% with a Cq value of 17.32 for 20 ng BAN DNA. Optimised feed-matrix dependent calibration curve for the quantification of BAN was generated, ranging from 6.28 × 10(3)cfu g(-1) to 1.61 × 10(6)cfu g(-1). Limit of detection of the qPCR assay was 2 × 10(1)cfu g(-1) BAN. Applicability of the strain-specific qPCR assay was confirmed in a spiking experiment which added BAN to the feed in two concentrations, 2 × 10(6)cfu g(-1) and 2 × 10(4)cfu g(-1). Results showed BAN mean recovery rates in feed of 1.44 × 10(6) ± 4.39 × 10(5)cfu g(-1) and 1.59 × 10(4) ± 1.69 × 10(4)cfu g(-1), respectively. The presented BAN-specific qPCR assay can be applied in animal feeding trials, in order to control the correct inclusion rates of the probiotic to the feed, and it could further be adapted, to monitor the uptake of the probiotic into the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens. PMID:26883620

  9. Suppression subtractive hybridisation and real-time PCR for strain-specific quantification of the probiotic Bifidobacterium animalis BAN in broiler feed.

    PubMed

    Fibi, Silvia; Klose, Viviana; Mohnl, Michaela; Weber, Barbara; Haslberger, Alexander G; Sattler, Verity Ann

    2016-04-01

    To ensure quality management during the production processes of probiotics and for efficacy testing in vivo, accurate tools are needed for the identification and quantification of probiotic strains. In this study, a strain-specific qPCR assay based on Suppression Subtractive Hybridisation (SSH) for identifying unique sequences, was developed to quantify the strain Bifidobacterium animalis BAN in broiler feed. Seventy potential BAN specific sequences were obtained after SSH of the BAN genome, with a pool of closely related strain genomes and subsequent differential screening by dot blot hybridisation. Primers were designed for 30 sequences which showed no match with any sequence database entry, using BLAST and FASTA. Primer specificity was assessed by qPCR using 45 non-target strains and species in a stepwise approach. Primer T39_S2 was the only primer pair without any unspecific binding properties and it showed a PCR efficiency of 80% with a Cq value of 17.32 for 20 ng BAN DNA. Optimised feed-matrix dependent calibration curve for the quantification of BAN was generated, ranging from 6.28 × 10(3)cfu g(-1) to 1.61 × 10(6)cfu g(-1). Limit of detection of the qPCR assay was 2 × 10(1)cfu g(-1) BAN. Applicability of the strain-specific qPCR assay was confirmed in a spiking experiment which added BAN to the feed in two concentrations, 2 × 10(6)cfu g(-1) and 2 × 10(4)cfu g(-1). Results showed BAN mean recovery rates in feed of 1.44 × 10(6) ± 4.39 × 10(5)cfu g(-1) and 1.59 × 10(4) ± 1.69 × 10(4)cfu g(-1), respectively. The presented BAN-specific qPCR assay can be applied in animal feeding trials, in order to control the correct inclusion rates of the probiotic to the feed, and it could further be adapted, to monitor the uptake of the probiotic into the gastrointestinal tract of broiler chickens.

  10. Strain-specific Plasmodium falciparum multifunctional CD4(+) T cell cytokine expression in Malian children immunized with the FMP2.1/AS02A vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Graves, Shawna F; Kouriba, Bourema; Diarra, Issa; Daou, Modibo; Niangaly, Amadou; Coulibaly, Drissa; Keita, Yamoussa; Laurens, Matthew B; Berry, Andrea A; Vekemans, Johan; Ripley Ballou, W; Lanar, David E; Dutta, Sheetij; Gray Heppner, D; Soisson, Lorraine; Diggs, Carter L; Thera, Mahamadou A; Doumbo, Ogobara K; Plowe, Christopher V; Sztein, Marcelo B; Lyke, Kirsten E

    2016-05-17

    Based on Plasmodium falciparum (Pf) apical membrane antigen 1 (AMA1) from strain 3D7, the malaria vaccine candidate FMP2.1/AS02A showed strain-specific efficacy in a Phase 2 clinical trial in 400 Malian children randomized to 3 doses of the AMA1 vaccine candidate or control rabies vaccine on days 0, 30 and 60. A subset of 10 Pf(-) (i.e., no clinical malaria episodes) AMA1 recipients, 11 Pf(+) (clinical malaria episodes with parasites with 3D7 or Fab9-type AMA1 cluster 1 loop [c1L]) AMA1 recipients, and 10 controls were randomly chosen for analysis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated on days 0, 90 and 150 were stimulated with full-length 3D7 AMA1 and c1L from strains 3D7 (c3D7) and Fab9 (cFab9). Production of IFN-γ, TNF-α, IL-2, and/or IL-17A was analyzed by flow cytometry. Among AMA1 recipients, 18/21 evaluable samples stimulated with AMA1 demonstrated increased IFN-γ, TNF-α, and IL-2 derived from CD4(+) T cells by day 150 compared to 0/10 in the control group (p<0.0001). Among AMA1 vaccines, CD4(+) cells expressing both TNF-α and IL-2 were increased in Pf(-) children compared to Pf(+) children. When PBMCs were stimulated with c3D7 and cFab9 separately, 4/18 AMA1 recipients with an AMA1-specific CD4(+) response had a significant response to one or both c1L. This suggests that recognition of the AMA1 antigen is not dependent upon c1L alone. In summary, AMA1-specific T cell responses were notably increased in children immunized with an AMA1-based vaccine candidate. The role of CD4(+)TNF-α(+)IL-2(+)-expressing T cells in vaccine-induced strain-specific protection against clinical malaria requires further exploration. Clinicaltrials.gov Identifier: NCT00460525. PMID:27087149

  11. Local quantum thermal susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    De Pasquale, Antonella; Rossini, Davide; Fazio, Rosario; Giovannetti, Vittorio

    2016-01-01

    Thermodynamics relies on the possibility to describe systems composed of a large number of constituents in terms of few macroscopic variables. Its foundations are rooted into the paradigm of statistical mechanics, where thermal properties originate from averaging procedures which smoothen out local details. While undoubtedly successful, elegant and formally correct, this approach carries over an operational problem, namely determining the precision at which such variables are inferred, when technical/practical limitations restrict our capabilities to local probing. Here we introduce the local quantum thermal susceptibility, a quantifier for the best achievable accuracy for temperature estimation via local measurements. Our method relies on basic concepts of quantum estimation theory, providing an operative strategy to address the local thermal response of arbitrary quantum systems at equilibrium. At low temperatures, it highlights the local distinguishability of the ground state from the excited sub-manifolds, thus providing a method to locate quantum phase transitions. PMID:27681458

  12. Strain-specific differences in cell proliferation and differentiation in the dentate gyrus of C57BL/6N and C3H/HeN mice fed a high fat diet.

    PubMed

    Hwang, In Koo; Kim, Il Yong; Kim, Dae Won; Yoo, Ki-Yeon; Kim, Yo Na; Yi, Sun Shin; Won, Moo-Ho; Lee, In Se; Yoon, Yeo Sung; Seong, Je Kyung

    2008-11-19

    The authors investigated strain-specific cell proliferation and differentiation differences in the dentate gyri of C57BL/6N (susceptible strain to obesity) and C3H/HeN (resistant strain to obesity) mice. In addition, the influences of a high fat diet (HD) on neuronal differentiation in C57BL/6N and C3H/HeN mice fed a low-fat diet (LD) or HD for 4 or 12 weeks were investigated. Body weight and body weight gains were significantly higher in HD-fed C57BL/6N and C3H/HeN mice than in LD-fed C57BL/6N and C3H/HeN mice. In particular, body weight gains were significantly higher in C57BL/6N mice than in C3H/HeN mice. In both of HD- and LD-fed C57BL/6N and C3H/HeN mice for 4 weeks, some Ki67 and many DCX immunoreactive cells were detected in the subgranular zone of the dentate gyrus. In HD-fed C57BL/6N and C3H/HeN mice, the number of Ki67 immunoreactive cells and DCX immunoreactivities in the dentate gyri were significantly lower than in LD-fed C57BL/6N and C3H/HeN mice. However, the number of Ki67 immunoreactive cells and DCX immunoreactivities in HD-fed C57BL/6N mice were significantly lower than in HD-fed C3H/HeN mice. These results suggest that C57BL/6N mice are more vulnerable to HD induced obesity than C3H/HeN mice. In addition, the feeding of HD was found to exacerbate reduced cell proliferation and differentiation in the dentate gyri of C57BL/6N mice as compared with that in C3H/HeN mice.

  13. Fast and low-cost decentralized surveillance of transmission of tuberculosis based on strain-specific PCRs tailored from whole genome sequencing data: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Lago, L; Martínez Lirola, M; Herranz, M; Comas, I; Bouza, E; García-de-Viedma, D

    2015-03-01

    Molecular epidemiology has transformed our knowledge of how tuberculosis (TB) is transmitted. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) has reached unprecedented levels of accuracy. However, it has increased technical requirements and costs, and analysis of data delays results. Our objective was to find a way to reconcile speed and ease of implementation with the high resolution of WGS. The targeted regional allele-specific oligonucleotide PCR (TRAP) assay presented here is based on allele-specific PCR targeting strain-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms, identified from WGS, and makes it possible to track actively transmitted Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. A TRAP assay was optimized to track the most actively transmitted strains in a population in Almería, Southeast Spain, with high rates of TB. TRAP was transferred to the local laboratory where transmission was occurring. It performed well from cultured isolates and directly from sputa, enabling new secondary cases of infection from the actively transmitted strains to be detected. TRAP constitutes a fast, simple and low-cost tool that could modify surveillance of TB transmission. This pilot study could help to define a new model to survey TB transmission based on a decentralized multinodal network of local laboratories applying fast and low-cost TRAPs, which are developed by central reference centres, tailored to the specific demands of transmission at each local node.

  14. Comparative Proteomics Reveals Strain-Specific β-TrCP Degradation via Rotavirus NSP1 Hijacking a Host Cullin-3-Rbx1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Siyuan; Mooney, Nancie; Li, Bin; Kelly, Marcus R.; Feng, Ningguo; Loktev, Alexander V.; Sen, Adrish; Patton, John T.; Jackson, Peter K.; Greenberg, Harry B.

    2016-01-01

    Rotaviruses (RVs) are the leading cause of severe gastroenteritis in young children, accounting for half a million deaths annually worldwide. RV encodes non-structural protein 1 (NSP1), a well-characterized interferon (IFN) antagonist, which facilitates virus replication by mediating the degradation of host antiviral factors including IRF3 and β-TrCP. Here, we utilized six human and animal RV NSP1s as baits and performed tandem-affinity purification coupled with high-resolution mass spectrometry to comprehensively characterize NSP1-host protein interaction network. Multiple Cullin-RING ubiquitin ligase (CRL) complexes were identified. Importantly, inhibition of cullin-3 (Cul3) or RING-box protein 1 (Rbx1), by siRNA silencing or chemical perturbation, significantly impairs strain-specific NSP1-mediated β-TrCP degradation. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that NSP1 localizes to the Golgi with the host Cul3-Rbx1 CRL complex, which targets β-TrCP and NSP1 for co-destruction at the proteasome. Our study uncovers a novel mechanism that RV employs to promote β-TrCP turnover and provides molecular insights into virus-mediated innate immunity inhibition. PMID:27706223

  15. Direct contact transmission of three different foot-and-mouth disease virus strains in swine demonstrates important strain-specific differences.

    PubMed

    Pacheco, Juan M; Tucker, Meghan; Hartwig, Ethan; Bishop, Elizabeth; Arzt, Jonathan; Rodriguez, Luis L

    2012-08-01

    A novel direct contact transmission model for the study of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) infection of swine was utilized to investigate transmission characteristics of three FMDV strains belonging to serotypes A, O and Asia1. Each strain demonstrated distinct transmission characteristics and required different exposure times to achieve successful contact transmission. While a 4h exposure was sufficient for strain A24 Cruzeiro (A24Cru), both O1 Manisa and Asia1 Shamir transmission required 18 h or more. Viral excretion levels from donors (for all three strains) and virus present in room air (for A24Cru and O1 Manisa) were evaluated and associated with clinical signs and observed transmission pattern. Although all directly inoculated donor animals showed acute FMD, A24Cru had the highest levels of viral shedding in saliva and nasal swabs followed by O1 Manisa and Asia1 Shamir. Virus levels in room air were higher and were detected longer for A24Cru than for O1 Manisa. These results provide direct evidence for important strain-specific variation in transmission characteristics and emphasize the need for thorough evaluation of different FMDV viral strains using a well defined contact transmission methodology. This information is critical for vaccine and biotherapeutic efficacy testing, pathogenesis and disease modeling of FMDV transmission.

  16. Monitoring Lysobacter capsici AZ78 using strain specific qPCR reveals the importance of the formulation for its survival in vineyards.

    PubMed

    Segarra, Guillem; Puopolo, Gerardo; Porcel-Rodríguez, Elena; Giovannini, Oscar; Pertot, Ilaria

    2016-02-01

    Survival in the phyllosphere is a critical feature for biofungicides based on non-spore forming bacteria. Moreover, knowledge of their persistence on plants is important to design effective formulations and application techniques. With this scope, the aim of this work was to develop a specific method to monitor the fate in the environment of Lysobacter capsici AZ78, a biocontrol agent of Plasmopara viticola, and to evaluate the contribution of formulation in its persistence on grapevine leaves. A strain-specific primer pair derived from REP-PCR fingerprinting was used in quantitative PCR experiments to track the evolution of L. capsici AZ78 population in vineyards. The population reached between 5 and 6 log10 cells gram of leaf(-1) after application and decreased by more than 100 times in one week. Multiple regression analysis showed that unfavourable temperature was the main environmental factor correlating with the decrease of L. capsici AZ78 persistence on grapevine leaves. Importantly, the use of formulation additives protected L. capsici AZ78 against environmental factors and improved its persistence on the leaves by more than 10 times compared to nude cells. Formulation and the knowledge about the persistence of L. capsici AZ78 in vineyards will be useful to develop commercial biofungicides for foliar application. PMID:26691736

  17. Diagnosis of amebic dysentery by detection of Entamoeba histolytica fecal antigen by an invasive strain-specific, monoclonal antibody-based enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Ruiz, A; Haque, R; Rehman, T; Aguirre, A; Hall, A; Guhl, F; Warhurst, D C; Miles, M A

    1994-01-01

    An invasive strain-specific monoclonal antibody against Entamoeba histolytica has been used in a capture enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of invasive E. histolytica fecal antigen in clinical specimens and for the diagnosis of amebic dysentery in patients from Bangladesh. The fecal antigen capture ELISA (FAC-ELISA) did not cross-react with other parasite species in the clinical specimens or with noninvasive E. histolytica present in those specimens and in experimentally seeded stools. The limit of detection of the assay for invasive E. histolytica crude antigen diluted in phosphate-buffered saline or in stools was 0.58 and 3.9 micrograms/ml, respectively, which is the equivalent of approximately 72 and 487 E. histolytica trophozoites per well, respectively. The sensitivity, specificity, and efficiency of the FAC-ELISA were 87, 100, and 98%, respectively, for the detection of invasive E. histolytica antigens and 100, 100, and 100%, respectively, for the diagnosis of amebic dysentery. The FAC-ELISA is a potential alternative for the field diagnosis of amebic dysentery and for epidemiological studies to define the distribution of invasive E. histolytica. PMID:8027351

  18. Monitoring Lysobacter capsici AZ78 using strain specific qPCR reveals the importance of the formulation for its survival in vineyards.

    PubMed

    Segarra, Guillem; Puopolo, Gerardo; Porcel-Rodríguez, Elena; Giovannini, Oscar; Pertot, Ilaria

    2016-02-01

    Survival in the phyllosphere is a critical feature for biofungicides based on non-spore forming bacteria. Moreover, knowledge of their persistence on plants is important to design effective formulations and application techniques. With this scope, the aim of this work was to develop a specific method to monitor the fate in the environment of Lysobacter capsici AZ78, a biocontrol agent of Plasmopara viticola, and to evaluate the contribution of formulation in its persistence on grapevine leaves. A strain-specific primer pair derived from REP-PCR fingerprinting was used in quantitative PCR experiments to track the evolution of L. capsici AZ78 population in vineyards. The population reached between 5 and 6 log10 cells gram of leaf(-1) after application and decreased by more than 100 times in one week. Multiple regression analysis showed that unfavourable temperature was the main environmental factor correlating with the decrease of L. capsici AZ78 persistence on grapevine leaves. Importantly, the use of formulation additives protected L. capsici AZ78 against environmental factors and improved its persistence on the leaves by more than 10 times compared to nude cells. Formulation and the knowledge about the persistence of L. capsici AZ78 in vineyards will be useful to develop commercial biofungicides for foliar application.

  19. Fast and low-cost decentralized surveillance of transmission of tuberculosis based on strain-specific PCRs tailored from whole genome sequencing data: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Lago, L; Martínez Lirola, M; Herranz, M; Comas, I; Bouza, E; García-de-Viedma, D

    2015-03-01

    Molecular epidemiology has transformed our knowledge of how tuberculosis (TB) is transmitted. Whole genome sequencing (WGS) has reached unprecedented levels of accuracy. However, it has increased technical requirements and costs, and analysis of data delays results. Our objective was to find a way to reconcile speed and ease of implementation with the high resolution of WGS. The targeted regional allele-specific oligonucleotide PCR (TRAP) assay presented here is based on allele-specific PCR targeting strain-specific single nucleotide polymorphisms, identified from WGS, and makes it possible to track actively transmitted Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains. A TRAP assay was optimized to track the most actively transmitted strains in a population in Almería, Southeast Spain, with high rates of TB. TRAP was transferred to the local laboratory where transmission was occurring. It performed well from cultured isolates and directly from sputa, enabling new secondary cases of infection from the actively transmitted strains to be detected. TRAP constitutes a fast, simple and low-cost tool that could modify surveillance of TB transmission. This pilot study could help to define a new model to survey TB transmission based on a decentralized multinodal network of local laboratories applying fast and low-cost TRAPs, which are developed by central reference centres, tailored to the specific demands of transmission at each local node. PMID:25614157

  20. Characterization of carbapenemases, extended spectrum β-lactamases, quinolone resistance and aminoglycoside resistance determinants in carbapenem-non-susceptible Escherichia coli from a teaching hospital in Chongqing, Southwest China.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuanming; Xu, Xiuyu; Pu, Shuli; Huang, Shifeng; Sun, Jide; Yang, Shuangshuang; Zhang, Liping

    2014-10-01

    Carbapenem-resistant Escherichiacoli isolates harboring carbapenemases or combining an extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL) enzyme with loss of porins present an increasingly urgent clinical danger. Combined resistance to aminoglycosides and fluoroquinolones in carbapeneme non-susceptible (CNS) isolates will inevitably create problems. In the current study, we characterized the carbapenemases and ESBLs, and the prevalence of quinolone resistance determinants and aminoglycoside resistance determinants in carbapenem-non-susceptible (CNS) E.coli isolates from a teaching hospital in Chongqing, Southwest China in 2012. Thirty non-duplicated CNS E.coli isolates were screened via antimicrobial susceptibility testing, and the drug resistance profiles of the 30 strains were analyzed. Carbapenemase genes blaKPC-2, ESBL genes including blaCTX-M-3, blaCTX-M-14, blaCTX-M-55 and blaTEM, ARD genes including aac(6')-Ib, armA and rmtB, and QRD genes including qnrA, qnrB, qnrC, qnrD, qnrS and aac(6')-Ib-cr were identified and clonal relatedness was investigated by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis. Of the 30 isolates, 2 (6.7%) harbored carbapenemase gene blaKPC-2; 29 (96.7%) carried ESBLs; 20 (66.7%) were QRD positive; and 11 (36.7%) were ARD positive. Between the two blaKPC-2 positive strains, one contained ESBL, QRD and ARD genes, while the other expressed ESBL genes but was negative for both QRD and ARD genes. Of the 29 ESBLs positive isolates, 2 (6.9%) were carbapenemase positive, 19 (65.5%) were QRD positive, and 11 (37.9%) were ARD positive. PFGE revealed genetic diversity among the 30 isolates, indicating that the high prevalence of CNS E. coli isolates was not caused by clonal dissemination. Production of ESBLs was associated with the carbapenem resistance and QRD genes were highly prevalent among the CNS E. coli isolates. Multiple resistant genes were co-expressed in the same isolates. This is the first report of a multidrug resistant carbapenem-non-susceptible E.coli co

  1. Determination of basinwide paleocurrent patterns in a shale succession from anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS): A case study of the Mid-Proterozoic Newland Formation, Montana

    SciTech Connect

    Schieber, J.; Ellwood, B.B. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-09-01

    In shales of the Mid-Proterozoic Newland Formation, magnetic fabrics can be used as indicators of paleoflow direction. The long axis of the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS) ellipsoid parallels paleoflow and is inclined in the upcurrent direction (Schieber and Ellwood 1988). To apply the AMS paleocurrent method to shales on a basinwide scale, oriented samples from the two members of the Newland Formation and its lateral equivalents were collected over the entire southeastern Belt basin. For the lower member of the Newland Formation the data show a parallel-bipolar and north-south-oriented paleoflow pattern. The pattern for the upper member of the Newland Formation is more complex: it indicates the presence of a northern and southern shoreline from where sediment is transferred deeper into the basin (parallel-unimodal pattern), as well as a central zone of overlap with a parallel-bipolar pattern. The results of the study show that AMS-based paleocurrent patterns support paleogeographic reconstructions based on stratigraphic and sedimentologic studies, and that tectonic deformation did not significantly alter primary fabrics. In the upper member of the Newland Formation, shore-normal vs. shore-oblique sediment transport for sandy and muddy storm deposits, respectively, is in agreement with a recently opposed depositional model for storm deposits.

  2. The prevalence of genotypes that determine resistance to macrolides, lincosamides, and streptogramins B compared with spiramycin susceptibility among erythromycin-resistant Staphylococcus epidermidis.

    PubMed

    Juda, Marek; Chudzik-Rzad, Beata; Malm, Anna

    2016-03-01

    Coagulase-negative staphylococci, particularly Staphylococcus epidermidis, can be regarded as potential reservoirs of resistance genes for pathogenic strains, e.g., Staphylococcus aureus. The aim of this study was to assess the prevalence of different resistance phenotypes to macrolide, lincosamide, and streptogramins B (MLSB) antibiotics among erythromycin-resistant S. epidermidis, together with the evaluation of genes promoting the following different types of MLSB resistance:ermA, ermB, ermC,msrA, mphC, and linA/A'. Susceptibility to spiramycin was also examined. Among 75 erythromycin-resistantS. epidermidis isolates, the most frequent phenotypes were macrolides and streptogramins B (MSB) and constitutive MLSB (cMLSB). Moreover, all strains with the cMLSB phenotype and the majority of inducible MLSB (iMLSB) isolates were resistant to spiramycin, whereas strains with the MSB phenotype were sensitive to this antibiotic. The D-shape zone of inhibition around the clindamycin disc near the spiramycin disc was found for some spiramycin-resistant strains with the iMLSB phenotype, suggesting an induction of resistance to clindamycin by this 16-membered macrolide. The most frequently isolated gene was ermC, irrespective of the MLSB resistance phenotype, whereas the most often noted gene combination wasermC, mphC, linA/A'. The results obtained showed that the genes responsible for different mechanisms of MLSB resistance in S. epidermidis generally coexist, often without the phenotypic expression of each of them.

  3. Determination of the Threshold of Gravity for the Susceptibility to Kinetosis in Fish - a Centrifuge Experiment in the ZARM Drop-Tower employing gradually reduced Gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anken, R.; Hilbig, R.

    In the course of earlier experiments at diminished gravity conditions we have successfully used larval cichlid fish Oreochromis mossambicus as a vertebrate model system in investigating the basic cause of susceptibility to motion sickness kinetosis It was observed that most animals of a given batch reveal kinetoses i e performing looping responses LR or spinning movements SM at high quality microgravity 10-6g ZARM drop-tower whereas comparatively few individuals swim kinetotically at low quality microgravity LQM 0 03-0 05g during parabolic aircraft flights Anken and Hilbig Microgravity Sci Technol 15 52-57 2004 In order to gain further insights into a possible threshold of gravity for inducing motion sickness animals were subjected to drop-tower flights within a centrifuge The levels of gravity applied ranged from 0 009g until 0 3g The lowest level of gravity under which few normally swimming fish were observed ranged around 0 015g Since this is a very low level of gravity the normally swimming fish have to be considered to be either extremely sensitive to any force of gravity in order to use it as a cue for postural control or they use cues other than the residual gravity for maintaining equilibrium Most of the remaining kinetotically swimming animals showed LR whereas few exhibited SM With increasing gravity the ratio of normally swimming and spinning specimens increased accompanied by a decrease in the number of looping larvae Regarding the ratio a shift from LR to SM took place at around 0 02g At 0 3g all animals behaved

  4. Sensitivity of the Green Alga Pediastrum duplex Meyen to Allelochemicals Is Strain-Specific and Not Related to Co-Occurrence with Allelopathic Macrophytes

    PubMed Central

    Eigemann, Falk; Vanormelingen, Pieter; Hilt, Sabine

    2013-01-01

    Interspecific differences in the response of microalgae to stress have numerous ecological implications. However, little is known of intraspecific sensitivities and the potential role of local genetic adaptation of populations. We compared the allelochemical sensitivity of 23 Pediastrum duplex Meyen strains, a common component of the freshwater phytoplankton. In order to test for local genetic adaptation, strains were isolated from water bodies with and without the allelopathically-active submerged macrophyte Myriophyllum. Strains were assigned to P. duplex on the basis of cell shape and colony morphology and only P. duplex strains that belonged to the same lineage in an ITS rDNA phylogeny were used. Inhibition of strain growth rates and maximum quantum yields of photosystem II were measured after exposure to tannic acid (TA) and co-culture with Myriophyllum spicatum. Growth rate inhibition varied over one order of magnitude between the P. duplex strains. There was no correlation between the presence of Myriophyllum in the source location and the sensitivity of the strains to TA or the presence of Myriophyllum, suggesting that at least strong unidirectional local adaptation to Myriophyllum had not taken place in the studied water bodies. The maximum quantum yield of photosystem II of TA exposed algae decreased, whereas the yield of algae exposed to M. spicatum was slightly higher than that of the controls. The ranking of P. duplex strain sensitivities differed between the types of exposure (single additions of TA versus co-existence with M. spicatum) and the parameter measured (growth rate versus maximum quantum yield), emphasizing the importance of measuring multiple traits when analysing strain-specific sensitivities towards allelochemicals. The observation that sensitivities to allelochemicals vary widely among strains of a single freshwater algal species should be taken into account if evaluating ecological consequences of allelopathic interactions. PMID

  5. Bifidobacterium longum CCM 7952 Promotes Epithelial Barrier Function and Prevents Acute DSS-Induced Colitis in Strictly Strain-Specific Manner

    PubMed Central

    Srutkova, Dagmar; Schwarzer, Martin; Hudcovic, Tomas; Zakostelska, Zuzana; Drab, Vladimir; Spanova, Alena; Rittich, Bohuslav; Kozakova, Hana; Schabussova, Irma

    2015-01-01

    Background Reduced microbial diversity has been associated with inflammatory bowel disease (IBD) and probiotic bacteria have been proposed for its prevention and/or treatment. Nevertheless, comparative studies of strains of the same subspecies for specific health benefits are scarce. Here we compared two Bifidobacterium longum ssp. longum strains for their capacity to prevent experimental colitis. Methods Immunomodulatory properties of nine probiotic bifidobacteria were assessed by stimulation of murine splenocytes. The immune responses to B. longum ssp. longum CCM 7952 (Bl 7952) and CCDM 372 (Bl 372) were further characterized by stimulation of bone marrow-derived dendritic cell, HEK293/TLR2 or HEK293/NOD2 cells. A mouse model of dextran sulphate sodium (DSS)-induced colitis was used to compare their beneficial effects in vivo. Results The nine bifidobacteria exhibited strain-specific abilities to induce cytokine production. Bl 372 induced higher levels of both pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines in spleen and dendritic cell cultures compared to Bl 7952. Both strains engaged TLR2 and contain ligands for NOD2. In a mouse model of DSS-induced colitis, Bl 7952, but not Bl 372, reduced clinical symptoms and preserved expression of tight junction proteins. Importantly, Bl 7952 improved intestinal barrier function as demonstrated by reduced FITC-dextran levels in serum. Conclusions We have shown that Bl 7952, but not Bl 372, protected mice from the development of experimental colitis. Our data suggest that although some immunomodulatory properties might be widespread among the genus Bifidobacterium, others may be rare and characteristic only for a specific strain. Therefore, careful selection might be crucial in providing beneficial outcome in clinical trials with probiotics in IBD. PMID:26218526

  6. Complete Genome Sequence of the Biocontrol Strain Pseudomonas protegens Cab57 Discovered in Japan Reveals Strain-Specific Diversity of This Species

    PubMed Central

    Takeuchi, Kasumi; Noda, Naomi; Someya, Nobutaka

    2014-01-01

    The biocontrol strain Pseudomonas sp. Cab57 was isolated from the rhizosphere of shepherd’s purse growing in a field in Hokkaido by screening the antibiotic producers. The whole genome sequence of this strain was obtained by paired-end and whole-genome shotgun sequencing, and the gaps between the contigs were closed using gap-spanning PCR products. The P. sp. Cab57 genome is organized into a single circular chromosome with 6,827,892 bp, 63.3% G+C content, and 6,186 predicted protein-coding sequences. Based on 16S rRNA gene analysis and whole genome analysis, strain Cab57 was identified as P. protegens. As reported in P. protegens CHA0 and Pf-5, four gene clusters (phl, prn, plt, and hcn) encoding the typical antibiotic metabolites and the reported genes associated with Gac/Rsm signal transduction pathway of these strains are fully conserved in the Cab57 genome. Actually strain Cab57 exhibited typical Gac/Rsm activities and antibiotic production, and these activities were enhanced by knocking out the retS gene (for a sensor kinase acting as an antagonist of GacS). Two large segments (79 and 115 kb) lacking in the Cab57 genome, as compared with the Pf-5 genome, accounted for the majority of the difference (247 kb) between these genomes. One of these segments was the complete rhizoxin analog biosynthesis gene cluster (ca. 79 kb) and another one was the 115-kb mobile genomic island. A whole genome comparison of those relative strains revealed that each strain has unique gene clusters involved in metabolism such as nitrite/nitrate assimilation, which was identified in the Cab57 genome. These findings suggest that P. protegens is a ubiquitous bacterium that controls its biocontrol traits while building up strain-specific genomic repertoires for the biosynthesis of secondary metabolites and niche adaptation. PMID:24695768

  7. NOX5-L can stimulate proliferation and apoptosis depending on its levels and cellular context, determining cancer cell susceptibility to cisplatin

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Eun-Soo; Lim, Jae Cheong; Park, Sung Sup; Kwon, Ki-Sun

    2015-01-01

    The NADPH oxidase, NOX5, is known to stimulate cell proliferation in some cancers by generating reactive oxygen species (ROS). We show here that the long form of NOX5 (NOX5-L) also promotes cell death, and thus determines the balance of proliferation and death, in skin, breast and lung cancer cells. Moderate expression of NOX5-L induced cell proliferation accompanied by AKT and ERK phosphorylation, whereas an increase in NOX5-L above a certain threshold promoted cancer cell death accompanied by caspase-3 activation. Notably, cisplatin treatment increased NOX5-L levels through CREB activation and enhanced NOX5-L activity through augmentation of Ca2+ release and c-Abl expression, ultimately triggering ROS-mediated cancer cell death—a distinct pathway absent in normal cells. These results indicate that NOX5-L determines cellular responses in a concentration- and context-dependent manner. PMID:26513170

  8. Immunogenicity, reactogenicity, and safety of a P1.7b,4 strain-specific serogroup B meningococcal vaccine given to preteens.

    PubMed

    Hosking, Jamie; Rasanathan, Kumanan; Mow, Florina Chan; Jackson, Catherine; Martin, Diana; O'Hallahan, Jane; Oster, Philipp; Ypma, Ellen; Reid, Stewart; Aaberge, Ingeborg; Crengle, Sue; Stewart, Joanna; Lennon, Diana

    2007-11-01

    New Zealand (NZ) has experienced a Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B epidemic since 1991. MeNZB, a strain-specific outer membrane vesicle vaccine made using an NZ epidemic strain isolate, NZ98/254 (B:4:P1.7b,4), from two manufacturing sites, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH) and Chiron Vaccines (CV; now Novartis), was evaluated for safety, immunogenicity, and reactogenicity in this observer-blind trial with 8- to 12-year-old children. In year 1, cohort A (n = 302) was randomized 4:1 for receipt of NIPH-MeNZB or MenBvac (Norwegian parent vaccine strain 44/76; B:15:P1.7,16). In year 2, cohort B (n = 313) was randomized 4:1 for receipt of CV-MeNZB or NIPH-MeNZB. Participants all received three vaccinations 6 weeks apart. Local and systemic reactions were monitored for 7 days. Seroresponse was defined as a fourfold or greater rise in the serum bactericidal antibody titer from the baseline titer as measured by a serum bactericidal assay. Those with baseline titers of <1:4 required titers of >/=1:8 to serorespond. Intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) analyses are presented. In cohort A, 74% (ITT) and 73% (PP) of NIPH-MeNZB recipients demonstrated seroresponses against NZ98/254 after three doses, versus 32% (ITT and PP) of MenBvac recipients. In cohort B, seroresponses against NZ98/254 after three doses occurred in 79% (ITT and PP) of CV-MeNZB versus 75% (ITT) and 76% (PP) of NIPH-MeNZB recipients. Vaccines were tolerable, with no vaccine-related serious adverse events. In conclusion, the NZ strain meningococcal B vaccine (MeNZB) from either manufacturing site was immunogenic against New Zealand epidemic vaccine strain meningococci with no safety concerns when given in three doses to these 8- to 12-year-old children.

  9. Immunogenicity, reactogenicity, and safety of a P1.7b,4 strain-specific serogroup B meningococcal vaccine given to preteens.

    PubMed

    Hosking, Jamie; Rasanathan, Kumanan; Mow, Florina Chan; Jackson, Catherine; Martin, Diana; O'Hallahan, Jane; Oster, Philipp; Ypma, Ellen; Reid, Stewart; Aaberge, Ingeborg; Crengle, Sue; Stewart, Joanna; Lennon, Diana

    2007-11-01

    New Zealand (NZ) has experienced a Neisseria meningitidis serogroup B epidemic since 1991. MeNZB, a strain-specific outer membrane vesicle vaccine made using an NZ epidemic strain isolate, NZ98/254 (B:4:P1.7b,4), from two manufacturing sites, the Norwegian Institute of Public Health (NIPH) and Chiron Vaccines (CV; now Novartis), was evaluated for safety, immunogenicity, and reactogenicity in this observer-blind trial with 8- to 12-year-old children. In year 1, cohort A (n = 302) was randomized 4:1 for receipt of NIPH-MeNZB or MenBvac (Norwegian parent vaccine strain 44/76; B:15:P1.7,16). In year 2, cohort B (n = 313) was randomized 4:1 for receipt of CV-MeNZB or NIPH-MeNZB. Participants all received three vaccinations 6 weeks apart. Local and systemic reactions were monitored for 7 days. Seroresponse was defined as a fourfold or greater rise in the serum bactericidal antibody titer from the baseline titer as measured by a serum bactericidal assay. Those with baseline titers of <1:4 required titers of >/=1:8 to serorespond. Intention-to-treat (ITT) and per protocol (PP) analyses are presented. In cohort A, 74% (ITT) and 73% (PP) of NIPH-MeNZB recipients demonstrated seroresponses against NZ98/254 after three doses, versus 32% (ITT and PP) of MenBvac recipients. In cohort B, seroresponses against NZ98/254 after three doses occurred in 79% (ITT and PP) of CV-MeNZB versus 75% (ITT) and 76% (PP) of NIPH-MeNZB recipients. Vaccines were tolerable, with no vaccine-related serious adverse events. In conclusion, the NZ strain meningococcal B vaccine (MeNZB) from either manufacturing site was immunogenic against New Zealand epidemic vaccine strain meningococci with no safety concerns when given in three doses to these 8- to 12-year-old children. PMID:17898183

  10. A new method for the characterization of strain-specific conformational stability of protease-sensitive and protease-resistant PrPSc.

    PubMed

    Pirisinu, Laura; Di Bari, Michele; Marcon, Stefano; Vaccari, Gabriele; D'Agostino, Claudia; Fazzi, Paola; Esposito, Elena; Galeno, Roberta; Langeveld, Jan; Agrimi, Umberto; Nonno, Romolo

    2010-09-14

    Although proteinacious in nature, prions exist as strains with specific self-perpetuating biological properties. Prion strains are thought to be associated with different conformers of PrP(Sc), a disease-associated isoform of the host-encoded cellular protein (PrP(C)). Molecular strain typing approaches have been developed which rely on the characterization of protease-resistant PrP(Sc). However, PrP(Sc) is composed not only of protease-resistant but also of protease-sensitive isoforms. The aim of this work was to develop a protocol for the molecular characterization of both, protease-resistant and protease-sensitive PrP(Sc) aggregates. We first set up experimental conditions which allowed the most advantageous separation of PrP(C) and PrP(Sc) by means of differential centrifugation. The conformational solubility and stability assay (CSSA) was then developed by measuring PrP(Sc) solubility as a function of increased exposure to GdnHCl. Brain homogenates from voles infected with human and sheep prion isolates were analysed by CSSA and showed strain-specific conformational stabilities, with mean [GdnHCl](1/2) values ranging from 1.6 M for MM2 sCJD to 2.1 for scrapie and to 2.8 M for MM1/MV1 sCJD and E200K gCJD. Interestingly, the rank order of [GdnHCl](1/2) values observed in the human and sheep isolates used as inocula closely matched those found following transmission in voles, being MM1 sCJD the most resistant (3.3 M), followed by sheep scrapie (2.2 M) and by MM2 sCJD (1.6 M). In order to test the ability of CSSA to characterise protease-sensitive PrP(Sc), we analysed sheep isolates of Nor98 and compared them to classical scrapie isolates. In Nor98, insoluble PrP(Sc) aggregates were mainly protease-sensitive and showed a conformational stability much lower than in classical scrapie. Our results show that CSSA is able to reveal strain-specified PrP(Sc) conformational stabilities of protease-resistant and protease-sensitive PrP(Sc) and that it is a valuable tool for

  11. A New Method for the Characterization of Strain-Specific Conformational Stability of Protease-Sensitive and Protease-Resistant PrPSc

    PubMed Central

    Pirisinu, Laura; Di Bari, Michele; Marcon, Stefano; Vaccari, Gabriele; D'Agostino, Claudia; Fazzi, Paola; Esposito, Elena; Galeno, Roberta; Langeveld, Jan; Agrimi, Umberto; Nonno, Romolo

    2010-01-01

    Although proteinacious in nature, prions exist as strains with specific self-perpetuating biological properties. Prion strains are thought to be associated with different conformers of PrPSc, a disease-associated isoform of the host-encoded cellular protein (PrPC). Molecular strain typing approaches have been developed which rely on the characterization of protease-resistant PrPSc. However, PrPSc is composed not only of protease-resistant but also of protease-sensitive isoforms. The aim of this work was to develop a protocol for the molecular characterization of both, protease-resistant and protease-sensitive PrPSc aggregates. We first set up experimental conditions which allowed the most advantageous separation of PrPC and PrPSc by means of differential centrifugation. The conformational solubility and stability assay (CSSA) was then developed by measuring PrPSc solubility as a function of increased exposure to GdnHCl. Brain homogenates from voles infected with human and sheep prion isolates were analysed by CSSA and showed strain-specific conformational stabilities, with mean [GdnHCl]1/2 values ranging from 1.6 M for MM2 sCJD to 2.1 for scrapie and to 2.8 M for MM1/MV1 sCJD and E200K gCJD. Interestingly, the rank order of [GdnHCl]1/2 values observed in the human and sheep isolates used as inocula closely matched those found following transmission in voles, being MM1 sCJD the most resistant (3.3 M), followed by sheep scrapie (2.2 M) and by MM2 sCJD (1.6 M). In order to test the ability of CSSA to characterise protease-sensitive PrPSc, we analysed sheep isolates of Nor98 and compared them to classical scrapie isolates. In Nor98, insoluble PrPSc aggregates were mainly protease-sensitive and showed a conformational stability much lower than in classical scrapie. Our results show that CSSA is able to reveal strain-specified PrPSc conformational stabilities of protease-resistant and protease-sensitive PrPSc and that it is a valuable tool for strain typing in natural

  12. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma hyorhinis.

    PubMed

    Wu, C C; Shryock, T R; Lin, T L; Faderan, M; Veenhuizen, M F

    2000-09-15

    A broth microdilution technique was used to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility of 15 field isolates of Mycoplasma hyorhinis to 10 antimicrobial agents, representative of different classes, and contrasting newer agents to existing ones. For the macrolides, the MIC(90) for tylosin and tilmicosin was 1 and 4 microg/ml, respectively, but was > or = 16 microg/ml for erythromycin. Tetracycline, lincomycin and enrofloxacin each had an MIC(90) of 2 microg/ml. The mycoplasma had similar levels of susceptibility to the aminoglycoside and aminocyclictol classes exhibiting an MIC(90) of 4 microg/ml for gentamicin and 2 microg/ml for spectinomycin. The isolates exhibited high MICs to trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole with an MIC(90) > or = 16/304 microg/ml. In summary, M. hyorhinis isolates from the US had low MICs against a variety of antimicrobials tested, with the exception of erythromycin and trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole. PMID:10925038

  13. Antifungal susceptibility testing.

    PubMed Central

    Rex, J H; Pfaller, M A; Rinaldi, M G; Polak, A; Galgiani, J N

    1993-01-01

    Unlike antibacterial susceptibility testing, reliable antifungal susceptibility testing is still largely in its infancy. Many methods have been described, but they produce widely discrepant results unless such factors as pH, inoculum size, medium formulation, incubation time, and incubation temperature are carefully controlled. Even when laboratories agree upon a common method, interlaboratory agreement may be poor. As a result of numerous collaborative projects carried out both independently and under the aegis of the Subcommittee on Antifungal Susceptibility Testing of the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards, the effects of varying these factors have been extensively studied and a standard method which minimizes interlaboratory variability during the testing of Candida spp. and Cryptococcus neoformans has been proposed. This review summarizes this work, reviews the strengths and weaknesses of the proposed susceptibility testing standard, and identifies directions for future work. PMID:8269392

  14. Magnetic Susceptibility in Liquid In Se System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Itoh, Keiji; Usuki, Takeshi; Tamaki, Shigeru

    1998-09-01

    The magnetic susceptibility of the liquid In1-xSex system have been measured as functions of concentration and temperature. The magnetic susceptibility of the system shows a broad diamagnetic maximum near x=0.58. This behaviour corresponds to the concentration variation of electronic conductivity reported previously and supports our previous suggestion of the valence fluctuation of In ions. By using the data of magnetic susceptibility with known electronic conductivity and thermoelectric power data, the density of state N(E) have been determined and the diamagnetic susceptibility due to ion core, χd, has also been obtained. The obtained value of χd suggests the occurrence of monovalent In ion near the composition x=0.58.

  15. Rubella susceptibility predicts measles susceptibility: implications for postpartum immunization.

    PubMed

    Libman, M D; Behr, M A; Martel, N; Ward, B J

    2000-12-01

    Measles and mumps antibody titers were measured in 262 pregnant women who were either positive (n=128) or negative (n=134) for rubella antibodies. Susceptibility to measles and mumps was detected in 4.6% (12/262) and 7.6% (14/184) of the women, respectively. Of the rubella-susceptible group, 8.2% were also measles susceptible, whereas only 0.8% of the rubella-immune women were measles susceptible. Susceptibility to mumps was evenly divided between rubella-susceptible (7.8%) and rubella-immune (7.4%) groups.

  16. Results from the ARTEMIS DISK Global Antifungal Surveillance Study, 1997 to 2005: an 8.5-Year Analysis of Susceptibilities of Candida Species and Other Yeast Species to Fluconazole and Voriconazole Determined by CLSI Standardized Disk Diffusion Testing▿

    PubMed Central

    Pfaller, M. A.; Diekema, D. J.; Gibbs, D. L.; Newell, V. A.; Meis, J. F.; Gould, I. M.; Fu, W.; Colombo, A. L.; Rodriguez-Noriega, E.

    2007-01-01

    Fluconazole in vitro susceptibility test results for 205,329 yeasts were collected from 134 study sites in 40 countries from June 1997 through December 2005. Data were collected for 147,776 yeast isolates tested with voriconazole from 2001 through 2005. All investigators tested clinical yeast isolates by the CLSI M44-A disk diffusion method. Test plates were automatically read and results recorded with a BIOMIC image analysis system. Species, drug, zone diameter, susceptibility category, and quality control results were collected quarterly. Duplicate (same patient, same species, and same susceptible-resistant biotype profile during any 7-day period) and uncontrolled test results were not analyzed. Overall, 90.1% of all Candida isolates tested were susceptible (S) to fluconazole; however, 10 of the 22 species identified exhibited decreased susceptibility (<75% S) on the order of that seen with the resistant (R) species C. glabrata and C. krusei. Among 137,487 isolates of Candida spp. tested against voriconazole, 94.8% were S and 3.1% were R. Less than 30% of fluconazole-resistant isolates of C. albicans, C. glabrata, C. tropicalis, and C. rugosa remained S to voriconazole. The non-Candida yeasts (8,821 isolates) were generally less susceptible to fluconazole than Candida spp. but, aside from Rhodotorula spp., remained susceptible to voriconazole. This survey demonstrates the broad spectrum of these azoles against the most common opportunistic yeast pathogens but identifies several less common yeast species with decreased susceptibility to antifungal agents. These organisms may pose a future threat to optimal antifungal therapy and emphasize the importance of prompt and accurate species identification. PMID:17442797

  17. Optimal magnetic susceptibility matching in 3D.

    PubMed

    Jia, Feng; Kumar, Rajesh; Korvink, Jan G

    2013-04-01

    When an object is inserted into the strong homogeneous magnetic field of a magnetic resonance magnet, its intrinsic relative susceptibility can cause unwanted local magnetic field inhomogeneities in the space surrounding the object. As is known, this effect can be partially countered by selectively adding material layers with opposing sign in susceptibility to the part. The determination of an optimal magnetic susceptibility distribution is an inverse problem, in which the susceptibility-induced inhomogeneity of the magnetic field inside a region of interest is reduced by redistributing the placement of materials in the design domain. This article proposes an efficient numerical topology optimization method for obtaining an optimal magnetic susceptibility distribution, in particular, for which the induced spatial magnetic field inhomogeneity is minimized. Using a material density function as a design variable, the value of the magnetic field inside a computational domain is determined using a finite element method. The first-order sensitivity of the objective function is calculated using an adjoint equation method. Numerical examples on a variety of design domain geometries illustrate the effectiveness of the optimization method. The method is of specific interest for the design of interventional magnetic resonance devices. It is a particularly useful method if passive shimming of magnetic resonance equipment is aimed for. PMID:22576319

  18. Assessment of susceptibility to measles and rubella.

    PubMed

    Preblud, S R; Gross, F; Halsey, N A; Hinman, A R; Herrmann, K L; Koplan, J P

    1982-02-26

    We conducted a serological and questionnaire study of 755 US Merchant Marine Academy cadets (aged 16 to 29 years) and their parents to determine the cadets' susceptibility rate to measles and rubella and to see if there was any difference in the accuracy of cadet and parental histories of previous infection and vaccination. Approximately 4% of the cadets were susceptibility. We also determined the costs and the effectiveness of three alternative strategies for vaccinating susceptible adolescents and young adults: (1) vaccinating all persons regardless of past history; (2) serologically screening all persons and vaccinating only those who were susceptible; and (3) vaccinating all individuals who do not have physician-documented proof of proper vaccination, past infection (measles only), or serological immunity. The cost savings among the three alternatives are dependent on the proportion of potential vaccinees with records available for review and must be balanced against the proportion of susceptible persons protected by each alternative. We also found that a combined vaccination program for both measles and rubella is less costly than a program aimed at providing immunity to only one of the two diseases. PMID:7057602

  19. Marijuana Usage and Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Franzini, Louis R.; McDonald, Roy D.

    1973-01-01

    Anonymous self-reported drug usage data and hypnotic susceptibility scores were obtained from 282 college students. Frequent marijuana users (more than 10 times) showed greater susceptibility to hypnosis than nonusers. (Author)

  20. Electron spin susceptibility of superconductors

    SciTech Connect

    Levitov, L.S.; Nazarov, Y.V.; Eliashberg, G.M.

    1985-03-10

    The effect of spin polarization due to the Meissner currents on the electron spin susceptibility of a superconductor is studied. This effect accounts for a susceptibility considerably stronger than that of a normal metal. The spin distribution is discussed.

  1. Fast measurement of bacterial susceptibility to antibiotics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Schrock, C. G.

    1977-01-01

    Method, based on photoanalysis of adenosine triphosphate using light-emitting reaction with luciferase-luciferin technique, saves time by eliminating isolation period required by conventional methods. Technique is also used to determine presence of infection as well as susceptibilities to several antibiotics.

  2. Identification of a Universally Primed-PCR-Derived Sequence-Characterized Amplified Region Marker for an Antagonistic Strain of Clonostachys rosea and Development of a Strain-Specific PCR Detection Assay

    PubMed Central

    Bulat, Sergey A.; Lübeck, Mette; Alekhina, Irina A.; Jensen, Dan Funck; Knudsen, Inge M. B.; Lübeck, Peter Stephensen

    2000-01-01

    We developed a PCR detection method that selectively recognizes a single biological control agent and demonstrated that universally primed PCR (UP-PCR) can identify strain-specific markers. Antagonistic strains of Clonostachys rosea (syn. Gliocladium roseum) were screened by UP-PCR, and a strain-specific marker was identified for strain GR5. No significant sequence homology was found between this marker and any other sequences in the databases. Southern blot analysis of the PCR product revealed that the marker represented a single-copy sequence specific for strain GR5. The marker was converted into a sequence-characterized amplified region (SCAR), and a specific PCR primer pair was designed. Eighty-two strains, isolated primarily from Danish soils, and 31 soil samples, originating from different localities, were tested, and this specificity was confirmed. Two strains responded to the SCAR primers under suboptimal PCR conditions, and the amplified sequences from these strains were similar, but not identical, to the GR5 marker. Soil assays in which total DNA was extracted from GR5-infested and noninoculated field soils showed that the SCAR primers could detect GR5 in a pool of mixed DNA and that no other soil microorganisms present contained sequences amplified by the primers. The assay developed will be useful for monitoring biological control agents released into natural field soil. PMID:11055920

  3. [Rapid antibiotic susceptibility test in Clinical Microbiology].

    PubMed

    March Rosselló, Gabriel Alberto; Bratos Pérez, Miguel Ángel

    2016-01-01

    The most widely used antibiotic susceptibility testing methods in Clinical Microbiology are based on the phenotypic detection of antibiotic resistance by measuring bacterial growth in the presence of the antibiotic being tested. These conventional methods take typically 24hours to obtain results. A review is presented here of recently developed techniques for the rapid determination of antibiotic susceptibility. Data obtained with different methods such as molecular techniques, flow cytometry, chemiluminescence, mass spectrometry, commercial methods used in routine work, colorimetric methods, nephelometry, microarrays, microfluids, and methods based on cell disruption and sequencing, are analyzed and discussed in detail.

  4. Comparison of cefadroxil and cephalothin disk susceptibility test results.

    PubMed Central

    Barry, A L; Jones, R N

    1989-01-01

    Diffusion susceptibility tests with 30-micrograms cefadroxil disks and 30-micrograms cephalothin disks were evaluated. For both agents, the same zone size interpretive criteria were recommended (less than or equal to 14 mm for resistance and greater than or equal to 18 mm for susceptibility). Tests were performed with 904 bacterial isolates, and the data were examined to determine whether the two cephalosporins might be used interchangeably for purposes of in vitro susceptibility testing. When Haemophilus influenzae, Listeria monocytogenes, and methicillin-resistant staphylococci were evaluated, the two agents differed significantly. For testing other species, a cephalothin disk or cephalothin MIC could be used for predicting susceptibility or resistance to cefadroxil. PMID:2504768

  5. Determination of the magnetic ground state in the martensite phase of Ni-Mn-Z (Z = In, Sn and Sb) off-stoichiometric Heusler alloys by nonlinear AC susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Umetsu, R Y; Fujita, A; Ito, W; Kanomata, T; Kainuma, R

    2011-08-17

    DC and AC magnetic measurements were carried out to clarify the difference in the magnetic ground state depending on the kinds of Z element used in the martensite phase in Ni-Mn-Z (Z = In, Sn and Sb) off-stoichiometric Heusler alloys. Magnetic field cooling effects were observed in the DC thermomagnetization curves in the low temperature regions, and a frequency dependence on AC susceptibility was also observed in both real and imaginary parts of the susceptibility. Negative divergence was clearly observed in nonlinear AC susceptibility only for the Ni(50)Mn(40)Sb(10) alloy, suggesting that the magnetic feature of its ground state is the spin-glass state. The magnetic ground state of the martensite phase in these alloys would relate to the magnetic configuration of the Mn atoms in the ferromagnetic austenite phase.

  6. Magnetic susceptibility of nanoscale Kondo systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skomski, R.; Zhang, R.; Kharel, P.; Enders, A.; Liou, S.-H.; Sellmyer, D. J.

    2010-05-01

    The mesoscopic Kondo effect in metallic nanoparticles containing a magnetic impurity is investigated by model calculations. A Maxwell-Garnett approach is used to approximately determine the resistivity of doped nanoparticles in a matrix, and the magnetic susceptibility is estimated from the confinement of the conduction electrons. Conductivity measurements of nanoparticles embedded in a matrix are difficult to realize, because metallic matrices distort the Kondo cloud, whereas insulating or semiconducting matrices yield a very weak signal. By comparison, susceptibility measurements do not suffer from these shortcomings. The Kondo effect survives in nanoparticles even if the cluster size is much smaller than the Kondo screening cloud, but the effective Curie constant becomes constant below a particle-size dependent transition temperature and the temperature dependence of the susceptibility is no longer universal.

  7. Calorie restriction and susceptibility to intact pathogens

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    Long-term calorie restriction (CR) causes numerous physiological changes that ultimately increase mean and maximum lifespan of most species examined to date. One physiological change that occurs with CR is enhanced immune function, as tested using antigens and mitogens to stimulate an immune response. Fewer studies have used intact pathogen exposure to test whether the enhanced capacity of the immune response during CR actually decreases susceptibility of hosts to their pathogens. So far, studies using intact bacteria, virus, and helminth worm exposure indicate that, despite similar or enhanced immune system function, CR hosts are more susceptible to infection by intact pathogens than their fully fed counterparts. Long-term CR studies that examine susceptibility to a variety of parasite taxa will help determine if direct CR or CR mimetics will be beneficial to people living in pathogen-rich environments. PMID:19424864

  8. Alate susceptibility in ants

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Eddie K H; Frederickson, Megan E

    2014-01-01

    Pathogens are predicted to pose a particular threat to eusocial insects because infections can spread rapidly in colonies with high densities of closely related individuals. In ants, there are two major castes: workers and reproductives. Sterile workers receive no direct benefit from investing in immunity, but can gain indirect fitness benefits if their immunity aids the survival of their fertile siblings. Virgin reproductives (alates), on the other hand, may be able to increase their investment in reproduction, rather than in immunity, because of the protection they receive from workers. Thus, we expect colonies to have highly immune workers, but relatively more susceptible alates. We examined the survival of workers, gynes, and males of nine ant species collected in Peru and Canada when exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. For the seven species in which treatment with B. bassiana increased ant mortality relative to controls, we found workers were significantly less susceptible compared with both alate sexes. Female and male alates did not differ significantly in their immunocompetence. Our results suggest that, as with other nonreproductive tasks in ant colonies like foraging and nest maintenance, workers have primary responsibility for colony immunity, allowing alates to specialize on reproduction. We highlight the importance of colony-level selection on individual immunity in ants and other eusocial organisms. PMID:25540683

  9. Alate susceptibility in ants.

    PubMed

    Ho, Eddie K H; Frederickson, Megan E

    2014-11-01

    Pathogens are predicted to pose a particular threat to eusocial insects because infections can spread rapidly in colonies with high densities of closely related individuals. In ants, there are two major castes: workers and reproductives. Sterile workers receive no direct benefit from investing in immunity, but can gain indirect fitness benefits if their immunity aids the survival of their fertile siblings. Virgin reproductives (alates), on the other hand, may be able to increase their investment in reproduction, rather than in immunity, because of the protection they receive from workers. Thus, we expect colonies to have highly immune workers, but relatively more susceptible alates. We examined the survival of workers, gynes, and males of nine ant species collected in Peru and Canada when exposed to the entomopathogenic fungus Beauveria bassiana. For the seven species in which treatment with B. bassiana increased ant mortality relative to controls, we found workers were significantly less susceptible compared with both alate sexes. Female and male alates did not differ significantly in their immunocompetence. Our results suggest that, as with other nonreproductive tasks in ant colonies like foraging and nest maintenance, workers have primary responsibility for colony immunity, allowing alates to specialize on reproduction. We highlight the importance of colony-level selection on individual immunity in ants and other eusocial organisms. PMID:25540683

  10. Sensitivity to the seizure-inducing effects of nicotine is associated with strain-specific variants of the alpha 5 and alpha 7 nicotinic receptor subunit genes.

    PubMed

    Stitzel, J A; Blanchette, J M; Collins, A C

    1998-03-01

    Restriction fragment length polymorphisms (rflps) have been identified for the nicotinic ACh receptor subunit genes alpha 5 and alpha 7 between two mouse strains (C3H/2ibg and DBA/2ibg) that differ in sensitivity to the convulsant effects of nicotine. In the study reported here, F2 animals derived from these two parental stains were tested for their sensitivity to the convulsant effects of nicotine as measured by seizure frequency and overall sensitivity score. Subsequently, the animals were genotyped for the alpha 5 and alpha 7 rflps. In addition, levels of alpha-bungarotoxin (alpha-BTX) binding were measured in four brain regions (colliculi, hippocampus, hypothalamus and striatum) to determine whether there is a correlation among alpha-BTX binding levels, sensitivity to nicotine and nicotinic ACh receptor subunit genotype. A significant relationship was observed between alpha 5 and alpha 7 genotype and sensitivity to nicotine. In addition, the alpha 7 rflp significantly correlated with levels of alpha-BTX binding in hippocampus, colliculi and striatum. The alpha 5 rflp did not correlate with alpha-BTX binding levels in any brain region. Levels of alpha-BTX binding did not correlate with nicotine-induced seizure sensitivity or overall nicotine sensitivity score in any of the four brain regions examined.

  11. Recombinant HA1 produced in E. coli forms functional oligomers and generates strain-specific SRID potency antibodies for pandemic influenza vaccines.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Surender; Larkin, Christopher; Verma, Swati; Joshi, Manju B; Fontana, Juan; Steven, Alasdair C; King, Lisa R; Manischewitz, Jody; McCormick, William; Gupta, Rajesh K; Golding, Hana

    2011-08-01

    Vaccine production and initiation of mass vaccination is a key factor in rapid response to new influenza pandemic. During the 2009-2010 H1N1 pandemic, several bottlenecks were identified, including the delayed availability of vaccine potency reagents. Currently, antisera for the single-radial immunodiffusion (SRID) potency assay are generated in sheep immunized repeatedly with HA released and purified after bromelain-treatment of influenza virus grown in eggs. This approach was a major bottleneck for pandemic H1N1 (H1N1pdm09) potency reagent development in 2009. Alternative approaches are needed to make HA immunogens for generation of SRID reagents in the shortest possible time. In this study, we found that properly folded recombinant HA1 globular domain (rHA1) from several type A viruses including H1N1pdm09 and two H5N1 viruses could be produced efficiently using a bacterial expression system and subsequent purification. The rHA1 proteins were shown to form functional oligomers of trimers, similar to virus derived HA, and elicited high titer of neutralizing antibodies in rabbits and sheep. Importantly, the immune sera formed precipitation rings with reference antigens in the SRID assay in a dose-dependent manner. The HA contents in multiple H1N1 vaccine products from different manufacturers (and in several lots) as determined with the rHA1-generated sheep sera were similar to the values obtained with a traditionally generated sheep serum from NIBSC. We conclude that bacterially expressed recombinant HA1 proteins can be produced rapidly and used to generate SRID potency reagents shortly after new influenza strains with pandemic potential are identified.

  12. Genetic susceptibility to endomyocardial fibrosis

    PubMed Central

    Beaton, Andrea; Sable, Craig; Brown, Juliette; Hoffman, Joshua; Mungoma, Michael; Mondo, Charles; Cereb, Nezith; Brown, Colin; Summar, Marshall; Freers, Jurgen; Ferreira, Maria Beatriz; Yacoub, Magdi; Mocumbi, Ana Olga

    2014-01-01

    Background: Endomyocardial fibrosis (EMF) is the most common form of restrictive cardiomyopathy worldwide. It has been linked to poverty and various environmental factors, but—for unknown reasons—only some people who live in similar conditions develop the disease. EMF cases cluster within both families and ethnic groups, suggesting a role for a genetic factor in host susceptibility. The human leukocyte antigen (HLA) system is associated with predisposition to various diseases. This two-center study was designed to investigate variation in the HLA system between EMF patients and unaffected controls. We provide the first genetic investigation of patients with EMF, as well as a comprehensive review of the literature. Methods: HLA class I (HLA-A, -B, -C) and class II (DRB1, DQB1) types were determined in 71 patients with severe EMF and 137 controls from Uganda and Mozambique. Chi Square analysis was used to identify any significant difference in frequency of class I and class II HLA types between cases and controls. Results: Compared to ethnically matched controls, HLA-B*58 occurred more frequently in Mozambique patients with EMF and HLA-A*02:02 occurred more frequently in Ugandan patients with EMF. Conclusions: Ample subjective evidence in the historical literature suggests the importance of a genetically susceptible host in EMF development. In this first formal genetic study, we found HLA alleles associated with cases of EMF in two populations from sub-Saharan Africa, with EMF patients being more likely than controls to have the HLA-B*58 allele in Mozambique (p-0.03) and the HLA-A*02:02 in Uganda (p = 0.005). Further investigations are needed to more fully understand the role of genetics in EMF development. PMID:25780800

  13. Baseline Susceptibility of Western Corn Rootworm (Coleoptera: Chrysomelidae) to Clothianidin

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Western corn rootworm, Diabrotica virgifera virgifera LeConte, neonate susceptibility to clothianidin, a highly effective contact and systemic neonicotinoid insecticide, was determined from both laboratory and field collected populations. Neonates were exposed to filter paper treated with increasing...

  14. Genetic, phenotypic and matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry-based identification of anaerobic bacteria and determination of their antimicrobial susceptibility at a University Hospital in Japan.

    PubMed

    Yunoki, Tomoyuki; Matsumura, Yasufumi; Nakano, Satoshi; Kato, Karin; Hotta, Go; Noguchi, Taro; Yamamoto, Masaki; Nagao, Miki; Takakura, Shunji; Ichiyama, Satoshi

    2016-05-01

    The accuracies of matrix-assisted laser desorption ionization time-of-flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF MS) and the phenotypic method using VITEK 2 were compared to the accuracy of 16S rRNA sequence analysis for the identification of 170 clinically isolated anaerobes. The antimicrobial susceptibility of the isolates was also evaluated. Genetic analysis identified 21 Gram-positive species in 14 genera and 29 Gram-negative species in 11 genera. The most frequently isolated genera were Prevotella spp. (n = 46), Bacteroides spp. (n = 25) and Clostridium spp. (n = 25). MALDI-TOF MS correctly identified more isolates compared with VITEK 2 at the species (80 vs. 58%, respectively; p < 0.01) and genus (85 vs. 71%, respectively; p < 0.01) levels. More than 90% of the isolates of the three major genera identified (Prevotella, Bacteroides, and Clostridium species other than Clostridium difficile) were susceptible to beta-lactam/beta-lactamase inhibitor combinations, carbapenems, metronidazole and chloramphenicol. MALDI-TOF MS provided better identification results than VITEK2. Commonly used anti-anaerobic agents indicated that the isolates of the three most frequently identified anaerobic genera exhibited good antimicrobial susceptibility. PMID:26898667

  15. Ferrimagnetic susceptibility contrast agents.

    PubMed

    Bach-Gansmo, T

    1993-01-01

    Contrast agents based on superparamagnetic particles have been in clinical development for more than 5 years, and the complexity of their effects is still not elucidated. The relaxivities are frequently used to give an idea of their efficacy, but these parameters can only be used if they are concentration independent. For large superparamagnetic systems, the evolution of the transverse magnetization is biexponential, after an initial loss of magnetization. Both these characteristics of large superparamagnetic systems should lead to prudence in using the relaxivities as indicators of contrast medium efficacy. Susceptibility induced artefacts have been associated with the use of superparamagnetic contrast agents since the first imaging evaluation took place. The range of concentrations where good contrast effect was achieved without inducing artefacts, as well as blurring and metal artefacts were evaluated. The influence of motion on the induction of artefacts was studied, and compared to the artefacts induced by a paramagnetic agent subject to motion. With a suitable concentration of a negative contrast agent, a signal void could be achieved in the region prone to motion, and no artefacts were induced. If the concentration was too high, a displacement of the region close to the contrast agent was observed. The artefacts occurred in a volume surrounding the contrast agent, i.e., also outside the imaging plane. In comparison a positive, paramagnetic contrast agent induced heavy artefacts in the phase encoding direction, appearing as both high intensity regions and black holes, in a mosaic pattern. Clinical trials of the oral contrast agent OMP for abdominal MR imaging showed this agent to be safe and efficacious. OMP increased the diagnostic efficacy of abdominal MR imaging in 2 of 3 cases examined, with a significant decrease in motion artefacts. Susceptibility contrast agents may also be of use in the evaluation of small lesions in the liver. Particulate material

  16. Altered coriolis stress susceptibility in essential hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lockette, W; Shepard, N; Lyos, A; Boismier, T; Mers, A

    1991-08-01

    Patients with hypertension frequently have vague complaints of dizziness and many other symptoms experienced by healthy individuals with motion sickness. We examined vestibular function in patients with essential hypertension, and we determined whether patients with essential hypertension are more prone to motion sickness using Coriolis stress testing. Vestibular function and Coriolis stress susceptibility were measured in 12 normotensive (NT) and seven asymptomatic patients with mild essential hypertension (HT). The Coriolis stress susceptibility index (CSSI) was calculated from the number of head movements in the four cardinal directions an individual could complete while being rotated in a computerized chair at increasing velocity before they developed motion sickness. The patients with hypertension had normal vestibular function and normal vestibuloocular responses as measured by standard techniques. Subjects with hypertension had significantly decreased Coriolis stress susceptibility scores compared to normotensive subjects (NT, 29.70 +/- 4.8; v HT, 5.48 +/- 2.0, P less than .001) and significantly decreased suppression of postrotatory nystagmus (NT, 44.5% +/- 3.8; v HT, 19.1% +/- 6.9, P less than .05). Medical treatment of hypertension did not result in an increased tolerance to provocative stimuli for motion sickness. It is suggested from our data that an increased susceptibility to motion sickness and abnormal vestibular responses to normal motion may account for many of the vague symptoms of "dizziness" reported by a large number of hypertensive patients.

  17. Susceptibility of pathogenic and nonpathogenic Naegleria ssp

    SciTech Connect

    Whiteman, L.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The susceptibility of four species of Naegleria amoebae to complement-mediated lysis was determined. The amoebicidal activity of normal human serum (NHS) and normal guinea pig serum (NGPS) for Naegleria amoebae was measured by an in vitro cytotoxicity assay. Release of radioactivity from amoebae labeled with {sup 3}H-uridine and visual observation with a compound microscope were used as indices of lysis. Susceptibility or resistance to complement-mediated lysis in vitro correlated with the in vivo pathogenic potential. Nonpathogenic Naegleria amoebae were lysed at a faster rate and at higher cell concentrations than were pathogenic amoebae. Electrophoretic analysis of NHS incubated with pathogenic or nonpathogenic Naegleria spp. demonstrated that amoebae activate the complement cascade resulting in the production of C3 and C5 complement cleavage products. Treatment with papain or trypsin for 1 h, but not with sialidase, increase the susceptibility of highly pathogenic, mouse-passaged N. fowleri to lysis. Treatment with actinomycin D, cycloheximide or various protease inhibitors for 4 h did not increase susceptibility to lysis. Neither a repair process involving de novo protein synthesis nor a complement-inactivating protease appear to account for the increase resistance of N. fowleri amoebae to complement-mediated lysis. A binding study with {sup 125}I radiolabeled C9 indicated that the terminal complement component does not remain stably bound to the membrane of pathogenic amoebae.

  18. A transcriptional network underlies susceptibility to kidney disease progression

    PubMed Central

    Laouari, Denise; Burtin, Martine; Phelep, Aurélie; Bienaime, Frank; Noel, Laure-Hélène; Lee, David C; Legendre, Christophe; Friedlander, Gérard; Pontoglio, Marco; Terzi, Fabiola

    2012-01-01

    The molecular networks that control the progression of chronic kidney diseases (CKD) are poorly defined. We have recently shown that the susceptibility to development of renal lesions after nephron reduction is controlled by a locus on mouse chromosome 6 and requires epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) activation. Here, we identified microphthalmia-associated transcription factor A (MITF-A), a bHLH-Zip transcription factor, as a modifier of CKD progression. Sequence analysis revealed a strain-specific mutation in the 5′ UTR that decreases MITF-A protein synthesis in lesion-prone friend virus B NIH (FVB/N) mice. More importantly, we dissected the molecular pathway by which MITF-A modulates CKD progression. MITF-A interacts with histone deacetylases to repress the transcription of TGF-α, a ligand of EGFR, and antagonizes transactivation by its related partner, transcription factor E3 (TFE3). Consistent with the key role of this network in CKD, Tgfa gene inactivation protected FVB/N mice from renal deterioration after nephron reduction. These data are relevant to human CKD, as we found that the TFE3/MITF-A ratio was increased in patients with damaged kidneys. Our study uncovers a novel transcriptional network and unveils novel potential prognostic and therapeutic targets for preventing human CKD progression. PMID:22711280

  19. Determining the coordinate dependence of some components of the cubic susceptibility tensor {chi}-hat{sub yyyy}{sup (3)}(z, {omega}, -{omega}, {omega}, {omega}) of a one-dimensionally inhomogeneous absorbing plate at an arbitrary frequency dispersion

    SciTech Connect

    Golubkov, A A; Makarov, Vladimir A

    2010-12-29

    The possibility of unique reconstruction of the spatial profile of the cubic nonlinear susceptibility tensor component {chi}-hat{sub yyyy}{sup (3)}(z, {omega}, -{omega}, {omega}, {omega}) of a one-dimensionally inhomogeneous plate whose medium has a symmetry plane m{sub y} perpendicular to its surface is proved for the first time and the unique reconstruction algorithm is proposed. The amplitude complex coefficients of reflection and transmission (measured in some range of angles of incidence) as well as of conversion of an s-polarised plane signal monochromatic wave into two waves propagating on both sides of the plate make it possible to reconstruct the profile. These two waves result from nonlinear interaction of a signal wave with an intense plane wave incident normally on the plate. All the waves under consideration have the same frequency {omega}, and so its variation helps study the frequency dispersion of the cubic nonlinear susceptibility tensor component {chi}-hat{sub yyyy}{sup (3)}(z, {omega}, -{omega}, {omega}, {omega}). For media with additional symmetry axes 2{sub z}, 4{sub z}, 6{sub z}, or {infinity}{sub z} that are perpendicular to the plate surface, the proposed method can be used to reconstruct the profile and to examine the frequency dispersion of about one third of all independent complex components of the tensor {chi}-hat{sup (3)}. (nonlinear-optics phenomena)

  20. In vitro susceptibility of Bacillus spp. to selected antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Weber, D J; Saviteer, S M; Rutala, W A; Thomann, C A

    1988-01-01

    Although often dismissed as contaminants when isolated from blood cultures, Bacillus spp. are increasingly recognized as capable of causing serious systemic infections. As part of a clinical-microbiological study, 89 strains of Bacillus spp. isolated from clinical blood cultures between 1981 and 1985 had their species determined and were tested for antimicrobial agent susceptibility to 18 antibiotics. Species of isolates were determined by the API 50CH and API 20E systems. Bacillus cereus (54 strains) was the most common species isolated, followed by B. megaterium (13 strains), B. polymyxa (5 strains), B. pumilus (4 strains), B. subtilis (4 strains), B. circulans (3 strains), B. amyloliquefaciens (2 strains), B. licheniformis (1 strain), and Bacillus spp. (3 strains). Microdilution MIC susceptibility tests revealed all B. cereus strains to be susceptible to imipenem, vancomycin, chloramphenicol, gentamicin, and ciprofloxacin. Non-B. cereus strains were most susceptible to imipenem, vancomycin, LY146032, and ciprofloxacin. Disk susceptibility testing suggested that B. cereus was rarely susceptible to penicillins, semisynthetic penicillins, or cephalosporins with the exception of mezlocillin. In contrast, many non-B. cereus strains were susceptible to penicillins, semisynthetic penicillins, and cephalosporins, but marked variability was noted among species. PMID:3395100

  1. [Antimicrobial susceptibility in Chile 2012].

    PubMed

    Cifuentes-D, Marcela; Silva, Francisco; García, Patricia; Bello, Helia; Briceño, Isabel; Calvo-A, Mario; Labarca, Jaime

    2014-04-01

    Bacteria antimicrobial resistance is an uncontrolled public health problem that progressively increases its magnitude and complexity. The Grupo Colaborativo de Resistencia, formed by a join of experts that represent 39 Chilean health institutions has been concerned with bacteria antimicrobial susceptibility in our country since 2008. In this document we present in vitro bacterial susceptibility accumulated during year 2012 belonging to 28 national health institutions that represent about 36% of hospital discharges in Chile. We consider of major importance to report periodically bacteria susceptibility so to keep the medical community updated to achieve target the empirical antimicrobial therapies and the control measures and prevention of the dissemination of multiresistant strains.

  2. Magnetization and magnetic susceptibility of kunzite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartkowska, J. A.; Cisowski, J.; Voiron, J.; Heimann, J.; Czaja, M.; Mazurak, Z.

    2000-11-01

    We have studied the high-field magnetization up to 14.5 T and magnetic susceptibility in the temperature range 1.6-400 K of three different samples of natural kunzite crystals, being a variety of spodumene (LiAlSi 2O 6) and containing transition metal ions. It appears that the total magnetization and susceptibility consist of the paramagnetic contribution following from the temperature-dependent Brillouin-type behavior of magnetic ions and temperature-independent diamagnetic contribution of the spodumene matrix which we have found as being equal to -3.5×10 -7 emu/g. We have identified the Mn 2+ ions as the dominant ones in the kunzites studied and we have determined the molar concentration of these ions as lying in the range 0.2-0.4%.

  3. In vitro susceptibility testing of Dientamoeba fragilis.

    PubMed

    Nagata, N; Marriott, D; Harkness, J; Ellis, J T; Stark, D

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a commonly encountered trichomonad which has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease in humans. Despite the frequency of reports recording infections with this parasite, little research has been undertaken in terms of antimicrobial susceptibility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of D. fragilis to several commonly used antiparasitic agents: diloxanide furoate, furazolidone, iodoquinol, metronidazole, nitazoxanide, ornidazole, paromomycin, secnidazole, ronidazole, tetracycline, and tinidazole. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed on four clinical strains of D. fragilis, designated A, E, M, and V, respectively. Molecular testing followed, and all strains were determined to be genotype 1. The activities of antiprotozoal compounds at concentrations ranging from 2 μg/ml to 500 μg/ml were determined via cell counts of D. fragilis trophozoites grown in dixenic culture. Minimum lethal concentrations (MLCs) were as follows: ornidazole, 8 to 16 μg/ml; ronidazole, 8 to 16 μg/ml; tinidazole, 31 μg/ml; metronidazole, 31 μg/ml; secnidazole, 31 to 63 μg/ml; nitazoxanide, 63 μg/ml; tetracycline, 250 μg/ml; furazolidone, 250 to 500 μg/ml; iodoquinol, 500 μg/ml; paromomycin, 500 μg/ml; and diloxanide furoate, >500 μg/ml. This is the first study to report the profiles of susceptibility to a wide range of commonly used treatments for clinical isolates of D. fragilis. Our study indicated 5-nitroimidazole derivatives to be the most active compounds in vitro against D. fragilis. PMID:22024820

  4. In Vitro Susceptibility Testing of Dientamoeba fragilis

    PubMed Central

    Nagata, N.; Marriott, D.; Harkness, J.; Ellis, J. T.

    2012-01-01

    Dientamoeba fragilis is a commonly encountered trichomonad which has been implicated as a cause of gastrointestinal disease in humans. Despite the frequency of reports recording infections with this parasite, little research has been undertaken in terms of antimicrobial susceptibility. The aim of this study was to evaluate the susceptibility of D. fragilis to several commonly used antiparasitic agents: diloxanide furoate, furazolidone, iodoquinol, metronidazole, nitazoxanide, ornidazole, paromomycin, secnidazole, ronidazole, tetracycline, and tinidazole. Antibiotic susceptibility testing was performed on four clinical strains of D. fragilis, designated A, E, M, and V, respectively. Molecular testing followed, and all strains were determined to be genotype 1. The activities of antiprotozoal compounds at concentrations ranging from 2 μg/ml to 500 μg/ml were determined via cell counts of D. fragilis trophozoites grown in dixenic culture. Minimum lethal concentrations (MLCs) were as follows: ornidazole, 8 to 16 μg/ml; ronidazole, 8 to 16 μg/ml; tinidazole, 31 μg/ml; metronidazole, 31 μg/ml; secnidazole, 31 to 63 μg/ml; nitazoxanide, 63 μg/ml; tetracycline, 250 μg/ml; furazolidone, 250 to 500 μg/ml; iodoquinol, 500 μg/ml; paromomycin, 500 μg/ml; and diloxanide furoate, >500 μg/ml. This is the first study to report the profiles of susceptibility to a wide range of commonly used treatments for clinical isolates of D. fragilis. Our study indicated 5-nitroimidazole derivatives to be the most active compounds in vitro against D. fragilis. PMID:22024820

  5. Cognitive Factors in Hypnotic Susceptibility

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmer, Robert D.; Field, Peter B.

    1971-01-01

    This research explored the influence of cognitive variables on susceptibility to hypnosis. The three variables of concern in the present study are automatization, attention, and body experience. The results are summarized. (Author)

  6. Complex genetic control of susceptibility to malaria: positional cloning of the Char9 locus

    PubMed Central

    Min-Oo, Gundula; Fortin, Anny; Pitari, Giuseppina; Tam, Mifong; Stevenson, Mary M.; Gros, Philippe

    2007-01-01

    Mouse strains AcB55 and AcB61 are resistant to malaria by virtue of a mutation in erythrocyte pyruvate kinase (PklrI90N). Linkage analysis in [AcB55 × A/J] F2 mice detected a second locus (Char9; logarithm of odds = 4.74) that regulates the blood-stage replication of Plasmodium chabaudi AS independently of Pklr. We characterized the 77 genes of the Char9 locus for tissue-specific expression, strain-specific alterations in gene expression, and polymorphic variants that are possibly associated with differential susceptibility. We identified Vnn1/Vnn3 as the likely candidates responsible for Char9. Vnn3/Vnn1 map within a conserved haplotype block and show expression levels that are strictly cis-regulated by this haplotype. The absence of Vnn messenger RNA expression and lack of pantetheinase protein activity in tissues are associated with susceptibility to malaria and are linked to a complex rearrangement in the Vnn3 promoter region. The A/J strain also carries a unique nonsense mutation that leads to a truncated protein. Vanin genes code for a pantetheinase involved in the production of cysteamine, a key regulator of host responses to inflammatory stimuli. Administration of cystamine in vivo partially corrects susceptibility to malaria in A/J mice, as measured by reduced blood parasitemia and decreased mortality. These studies suggest that pantetheinase is critical for the host response to malaria. PMID:17312006

  7. Agreement Assessment of Tigecycline Susceptibilities Determined by the Disk Diffusion and Broth Microdilution Methods among Commonly Encountered Resistant Bacterial Isolates: Results from the Tigecycline In Vitro Surveillance in Taiwan (TIST) Study, 2008 to 2010

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jien-Wei; Ko, Wen-Chien; Huang, Cheng-Hua; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Lu, Chin-Te; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Tsao, Shih-Ming; Chen, Yao-Shen; Liu, Yung-Ching; Chen, Wei-Yu; Jang, Tsrang-Neng; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Chen, Chih-Ming; Shi, Zhi-Yuan; Pan, Sung-Ching; Yang, Jia-Ling; Kung, Hsiang-Chi; Liu, Chun-Eng; Cheng, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lu, Po-Liang; Sun, Wu; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Chiang, Ping-Cherng; Lee, Ming-Hsun; Lee, Chun-Ming; Hsu, Gwo-Jong

    2012-01-01

    The Tigecycline In Vitro Surveillance in Taiwan (TIST) study, initiated in 2006, is a nationwide surveillance program designed to longitudinally monitor the in vitro activity of tigecycline against commonly encountered drug-resistant bacteria. This study compared the in vitro activity of tigecycline against 3,014 isolates of clinically important drug-resistant bacteria using the standard broth microdilution and disk diffusion methods. Species studied included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; n = 759), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE; n = 191), extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli (n = 602), ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 736), and Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 726) that had been collected from patients treated between 2008 and 2010 at 20 hospitals in Taiwan. MICs and inhibition zone diameters were interpreted according to the currently recommended U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) criteria. The MIC90 values of tigecycline against MRSA, VRE, ESBL-producing E. coli, ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, and A. baumannii were 0.5, 0.125, 0.5, 2, and 8 μg/ml, respectively. The total error rates between the two methods using the FDA criteria were high: 38.4% for ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and 33.8% for A. baumannii. Using the EUCAST criteria, the total error rate was also high (54.6%) for A. baumannii isolates. The total error rates between these two methods were <5% for MRSA, VRE, and ESBL-producing E. coli. For routine susceptibility testing of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and A. baumannii against tigecycline, the broth microdilution method should be used because of the poor correlation of results between these two methods. PMID:22155819

  8. Agreement assessment of tigecycline susceptibilities determined by the disk diffusion and broth microdilution methods among commonly encountered resistant bacterial isolates: results from the Tigecycline In Vitro Surveillance in Taiwan (TIST) study, 2008 to 2010.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jien-Wei; Ko, Wen-Chien; Huang, Cheng-Hua; Liao, Chun-Hsing; Lu, Chin-Te; Chuang, Yin-Ching; Tsao, Shih-Ming; Chen, Yao-Shen; Liu, Yung-Ching; Chen, Wei-Yu; Jang, Tsrang-Neng; Lin, Hsiu-Chen; Chen, Chih-Ming; Shi, Zhi-Yuan; Pan, Sung-Ching; Yang, Jia-Ling; Kung, Hsiang-Chi; Liu, Chun-Eng; Cheng, Yu-Jen; Chen, Yen-Hsu; Lu, Po-Liang; Sun, Wu; Wang, Lih-Shinn; Yu, Kwok-Woon; Chiang, Ping-Cherng; Lee, Ming-Hsun; Lee, Chun-Ming; Hsu, Gwo-Jong; Hsueh, Po-Ren

    2012-03-01

    The Tigecycline In Vitro Surveillance in Taiwan (TIST) study, initiated in 2006, is a nationwide surveillance program designed to longitudinally monitor the in vitro activity of tigecycline against commonly encountered drug-resistant bacteria. This study compared the in vitro activity of tigecycline against 3,014 isolates of clinically important drug-resistant bacteria using the standard broth microdilution and disk diffusion methods. Species studied included methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA; n = 759), vancomycin-resistant Enterococcus faecium (VRE; n = 191), extended-spectrum β-lactamase (ESBL)-producing Escherichia coli (n = 602), ESBL-producing Klebsiella pneumoniae (n = 736), and Acinetobacter baumannii (n = 726) that had been collected from patients treated between 2008 and 2010 at 20 hospitals in Taiwan. MICs and inhibition zone diameters were interpreted according to the currently recommended U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) criteria and the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) criteria. The MIC(90) values of tigecycline against MRSA, VRE, ESBL-producing E. coli, ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae, and A. baumannii were 0.5, 0.125, 0.5, 2, and 8 μg/ml, respectively. The total error rates between the two methods using the FDA criteria were high: 38.4% for ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and 33.8% for A. baumannii. Using the EUCAST criteria, the total error rate was also high (54.6%) for A. baumannii isolates. The total error rates between these two methods were <5% for MRSA, VRE, and ESBL-producing E. coli. For routine susceptibility testing of ESBL-producing K. pneumoniae and A. baumannii against tigecycline, the broth microdilution method should be used because of the poor correlation of results between these two methods.

  9. Structural proteins of West Nile virus are a major determinant of infectious particle production and fitness in astrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Hussmann, Katherine L.; Vandergaast, Rianna; Zheng, Kang; Hoover, Lisa I.

    2014-01-01

    The molecular basis for the increased resistance of astrocytes to a non-neuropathogenic strain of West Nile virus (WNV), WNV-MAD78, compared with the neuropathogenic strain WNV-NY remains unclear. Here, we demonstrated that the reduced susceptibility of astrocytes to WNV-MAD78 is due to a combination of both cellular activities as well as viral determinants. Analyses of the viral particle indicated that astrocyte-derived WNV-MAD78 particles were less infectious than those of WNV-NY. Additionally, inhibition of cellular furin-like proteases increased WNV-MAD78 infectious particle production in astrocytes, suggesting that high levels of furin-like protease activity within these cells acted in a cell- and strain-specific manner to inhibit WNV-MAD78 replication. Moreover, analysis of recombinant viruses indicated that the structural proteins of WNV-MAD78 were responsible for decreased particle infectivity and the corresponding reduction in infectious particle production compared with WNV-NY. Thus, the composition of the WNV virion was also a major determinant for viral fitness within astrocytes and may contribute to WNV propagation within the central nervous system. Whether the WNV-MAD78 structural genes reduce virus replication and particle infectivity through the same mechanism as the cellular furin-like protease activity or whether these two determinants function through distinct pathways remains to be determined. PMID:24920724

  10. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping: Contrast Mechanisms and Clinical Applications

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunlei; Wei, Hongjiang; Gong, Nan-Jie; Cronin, Matthew; Dibb, Russel; Decker, Kyle

    2016-01-01

    Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) is a recently developed MRI technique for quantifying the spatial distribution of magnetic susceptibility within biological tissues. It first uses the frequency shift in the MRI signal to map the magnetic field profile within the tissue. The resulting field map is then used to determine the spatial distribution of the underlying magnetic susceptibility by solving an inverse problem. The solution is achieved by deconvolving the field map with a dipole field, under the assumption that the magnetic field is a result of the superposition of the dipole fields generated by all voxels and that each voxel has its unique magnetic susceptibility. QSM provides improved contrast to noise ratio for certain tissues and structures compared to its magnitude counterpart. More importantly, magnetic susceptibility is a direct reflection of the molecular composition and cellular architecture of the tissue. Consequently, by quantifying magnetic susceptibility, QSM is becoming a quantitative imaging approach for characterizing normal and pathological tissue properties. This article reviews the mechanism generating susceptibility contrast within tissues and some associated applications. PMID:26844301

  11. Accuracy of MRI-based Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russek, Stephen; Erdevig, Hannah; Keenan, Kathryn; Stupic, Karl

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is increasingly used to map tissue susceptibility to identify microbleeds associated with brain injury and pathologic iron deposits associated with neurologic diseases such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's disease. Field distortions with a resolution of a few parts per billion can be measured using MRI phase maps. The field distortion map can be inverted to obtain a quantitative susceptibility map. To determine the accuracy of MRI-based susceptibility measurements, a set of phantoms with paramagnetic salts and nano-iron gels were fabricated. The shapes and orientations of features were varied. Measured susceptibility of 1.0 mM GdCl3 solution in water as a function of temperature agreed well with the theoretical predictions, assuming Gd+3 is spin 7/2. The MRI susceptibility measurements were compared with SQUID magnetometry. The paramagnetic susceptibility sits on top of the much larger diamagnetic susceptibility of water (-9.04 x 10-6), which leads to errors in the SQUID measurements. To extract out the paramagnetic contribution using standard magnetometry, measurements must be made down to low temperature (2K). MRI-based susceptometry is shown to be as or more accurate than standard magnetometry and susceptometry techniques.

  12. Susceptibility Genes in Thyroid Autoimmunity

    PubMed Central

    Ban, Yoshiyuki; Tomer, Yaron

    2005-01-01

    The autoimmune thyroid diseases (AITD) are complex diseases which are caused by an interaction between susceptibility genes and environmental triggers. Genetic susceptibility in combination with external factors (e.g. dietary iodine) is believed to initiate the autoimmune response to thyroid antigens. Abundant epidemiological data, including family and twin studies, point to a strong genetic influence on the development of AITD. Various techniques have been employed to identify the genes contributing to the etiology of AITD, including candidate gene analysis and whole genome screening. These studies have enabled the identification of several loci (genetic regions) that are linked with AITD, and in some of these loci, putative AITD susceptibility genes have been identified. Some of these genes/loci are unique to Graves' disease (GD) and Hashimoto's thyroiditis (HT) and some are common to both the diseases, indicating that there is a shared genetic susceptibility to GD and HT. The putative GD and HT susceptibility genes include both immune modifying genes (e.g. HLA, CTLA-4) and thyroid specific genes (e.g. TSHR, Tg). Most likely, these loci interact and their interactions may influence disease phenotype and severity. PMID:15712599

  13. Transcriptomic analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and K-12 cultures exposed to inorganic and organic acids in stationary phase reveals acidulant- and strain-specific acid tolerance responses.

    PubMed

    King, Thea; Lucchini, Sacha; Hinton, Jay C D; Gobius, Kari

    2010-10-01

    The food-borne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 is commonly exposed to organic acid in processed and preserved foods, allowing adaptation and the development of tolerance to pH levels otherwise lethal. Since little is known about the molecular basis of adaptation of E. coli to organic acids, we studied K-12 MG1655 and O157:H7 Sakai during exposure to acetic, lactic, and hydrochloric acid at pH 5.5. This is the first analysis of the pH-dependent transcriptomic response of stationary-phase E. coli. Thirty-four genes and three intergenic regions were upregulated by both strains during exposure to all acids. This universal acid response included genes involved in oxidative, envelope, and cold stress resistance and iron and manganese uptake, as well as 10 genes of unknown function. Acidulant- and strain-specific responses were also revealed. The acidulant-specific response reflects differences in the modes of microbial inactivation, even between weak organic acids. The two strains exhibited similar responses to lactic and hydrochloric acid, while the response to acetic acid was distinct. Acidulant-dependent differences between the strains involved induction of genes involved in the heat shock response, osmoregulation, inorganic ion and nucleotide transport and metabolism, translation, and energy production. E. coli O157:H7-specific acid-inducible genes were identified, suggesting that the enterohemorrhagic E. coli strain possesses additional molecular mechanisms contributing to acid resistance that are absent in K-12. While E. coli K-12 was most resistant to lactic and hydrochloric acid, O157:H7 may have a greater ability to survive in more complex acidic environments, such as those encountered in the host and during food processing.

  14. Magnetic Susceptibility Measurements for in Situ Characterization of Lunar Soil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oder, R. R.

    1992-01-01

    Magnetic separation is a viable method for concentration of components of lunar soils and rocks for use as feedstocks for manufacture of metals, oxygen, and for recovery of volatiles such as He-3. Work with lunar materials indicates that immature soils are the best candidates for magnetic beneficiation. The magnetic susceptibility at which selected soil components such as anorthite, ilmenite, or metallic iron are separated is not affected by soil maturity, but the recovery of the concentrated components is. Increasing soil maturity lowers recovery. Mature soils contain significant amounts of glass-encased metallic iron. Magnetic susceptibility, which is sensitive to metallic iron content, can be used to measure soil maturity. The relationship between the ratio of magnetic susceptibility and iron oxide and the conventional maturity parameter, I(sub s)/FeO, ferromagnetic resonant intensity divided by iron oxide content is given. The magnetic susceptibilities were determined using apparatus designed for magnetic separation of the lunar soils.

  15. Separation of magnetic susceptibility components from magnetization curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosareva, L.; Nourgaliev, D.; Kuzina, D.; Spassov, S.; Fattakhov, A.

    2014-12-01

    Modern lake sediments are a unique source of information for climate changes, regionally and globally, because all environmental variations are recorded by these sediments with high resolution. The magnetic properties of Chernyshov Bay (Aral Sea) sediments we investigated from core number 4 (N45o57'04.2''; E59o17'14.3'') are taken at far water depth of 9.5 m. The length of the core is 4.16 m. Samples for measurements were taken to plastic sample boxes with internal dimensions 2x2x2 cm. Remanent magnetization curves were measured by coercivity spectrometer for the separate determination of the different contributions to the total bulk magnetic susceptibility. There was measured also magnetic susceptibility using MS2 susceptibility meter. Those operations were done for data comparison between 2 susceptibilities obtained from different equipment. Our goal is to decipher the magnetic susceptibility signal in lake sediments by decomposing the bulk susceptibility signal of a lake sediment sequence into ferromagnetic (χf), dia-/paramagnetic (χp) and superparamagnetic (χsp) components using data from remanent and indused magnetization curves Each of these component has a different origin: paramagnetic minerals are usually attributed to terrigenous sediment input, ferromagnetics are of biogenic origin, and superparamagnetic minerals may be of either biogenic or terrigenous origin. Comparison between susceptibility measurements of MS2-Bartington susceptometer and of the coercivity spectrometer has shown good correlation. The susceptibility values measured in two different equipment are fairly close and indicate thus the reliability the proposed method. In research also has shown water level changes in Aral Sea based on magnetic susceptibility. The work is performed according to the Russian Government Program of Competitive Growth of Kazan Federal University also by RFBR research projects No. 14-05-31376 - а, 14-05-00785- а.

  16. Antibiotic resistance genes & susceptibility patterns in staphylococci

    PubMed Central

    Duran, Nizami; Ozer, Burcin; Duran, Gulay Gulbol; Onlen, Yusuf; Demir, Cemil

    2012-01-01

    Background & objectives: This study was carried out to evaluate the association between the antibiotic susceptibility patterns and the antibiotic resistance genes in staphylococcal isolates obtained from various clinical samples of patients attending a teaching hospital in Hatay, Turkey. Methods: A total of 298 staphylococci clinical isolates were subjected to antimicrobial susceptibility testing. The genes implicated in resistance to oxacillin (mecA), gentamicin (aac(6’)/aph(2”), aph(3’-IIIa, ant(4’)-Ia), erythromycin (ermA, ermB, ermC, and msrA), tetracyclin (tetK, tetM), and penicillin (blaZ) were amplified using multiplex PCR method. Results: Methicillin resistance rate among 139 Staphlococcus aureus isolates was 16.5 and 25.9 per cent of S. aureus carried mecA gene. Of the 159 CoNS isolates, methicillin resistance rate was 18.9 and 29.6 per cent carried mecA gene. Ninety four isolates identified as gentamicin resistant phenotypically, contained at least one of the gentamicin resistance genes [aac(6’)/aph(2”), aph(3’)-IIIa, ant(4’)-Ia], 17 gentamicin-susceptible isolates were found as positive in terms of one or more resistance genes [aac(6’)/aph(2”), aph(3’)-IIIa, ant(4’)-Ia] by multiplex PCR. A total of 165 isolates were resistant to erythromycin, and contained at least one of the erythromycin resistance genes (ermA, ermB, ermC and msrA). Phenotypically, 106 staphylococcal isolates were resistant to tetracycline, 121 isolates carried either tetK or tetM or both resistance genes. The majority of staphylococci tested possessed the blaZ gene (89.9%). Interpretation & conclusions: The present results showed that the phenotypic antibiotic susceptibility patterns were not similar to those obtained by genotyping done by multiplex PCR. Rapid and reliable methods for antibiotic susceptibility are important to determine the appropriate therapy decisions. Multiplex PCR can be used for confirmation of the results obtained by conventional

  17. Antibacterial susceptibility of plaque bacteria.

    PubMed

    Newman, M G; Hulem, C; Colgate, J; Anselmo, C

    1979-07-01

    Selected anaerobic, capnophilic and facultative bacteria isolated from patients with various forms of periodontal health and disease were tested for their susceptibility to antibiotics and antimicrobial agents. Specific bactericidal and minimum inhibitory concentrations were compared to disc zone diameters, thereby generating new standards for the potential selection of antimicrobial agents. PMID:286720

  18. Antibacterial susceptibility of plaque bacteria.

    PubMed

    Newman, M G; Hulem, C; Colgate, J; Anselmo, C

    1979-07-01

    Selected anaerobic, capnophilic and facultative bacteria isolated from patients with various forms of periodontal health and disease were tested for their susceptibility to antibiotics and antimicrobial agents. Specific bactericidal and minimum inhibitory concentrations were compared to disc zone diameters, thereby generating new standards for the potential selection of antimicrobial agents.

  19. Experimental approach for bacteriophage susceptibility testing of planktonic and sessile bacterial populations – Study protocol

    PubMed Central

    Neguţ, Alina Cristina; Săndulescu, Oana; Popa, Marcela; Streinu-Cercel, Anca; Alavidze, Zemphira; Berciu, Ioana; Bleotu, Coralia; Popa, Mircea Ioan; Chifiriuc, Mariana Carmen; Streinu-Cercel, Adrian

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Antimicrobial resistance is a growing threat for all clinical branches. This phenomenon poses important challenges in controlling infectious diseases. However, multidrug resistance is not the only issue, as bacteria that are otherwise susceptible to common antibiotics express other patterns for evading antibiotherapy, for example they can aggregate within a self-produced matrix to form biofilm. Methods We intend to perform a prospective laboratory study of the germs isolated from different samples collected from patients admitted with infectious pathology in reference hospitals in Romania. We will perform antibiotic resistance testing as well as phage testing, both on solid and liquid growth medium, for Staphylococcus spp., Enterococcus spp., and Pseudomonas spp. We intend to collect data for 150 patients with different infections with these identified pathogens. Phage susceptibility testing will be performed using 5 types of strain-specific bacteriophage mixtures: PYO, INTESTI, STAPHYLOCOCCAL (Eliava BioPreparations, Tbilisi, Georgia), PHAGYO, PHAGESTI (JSC “Biochimpharm”, Tbilisi, Georgia). For phage-susceptible strains, we will evaluate biofilm formation in the presence of phages, as well as phage effect on already formed biofilm. Expected results Through this study, we intend to provide the first set of results on bacteriophage-susceptibility of bacteria isolated from patients with hard to treat infections, from reference hospitals in Romania. By evaluating a large number of bacterial strains we aim to predict and project biofilm kinetics, while adding binary phage dilutions at key timepoints during biofilm formation. Acknowledgments POSDRU/159/1.5/S/141531; Carol Davila University of Medicine and Pharmacy, Young Researchers Grant no. 28341/2013. PMID:25505742

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolated from 21 Polish farms.

    PubMed

    Zmudzki, J; Szczotka, A; Nowak, A; Strzelecka, H; Grzesiak, A; Pejsak, Z

    2012-01-01

    Swine dysentery (SD) is a common disease among pigs worldwide, which contributes to major production losses. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of B. hyodysenteriae, the etiological agent of SD, is mainly performed by the agar dilution method. This method has certain limitations due to difficulties in interpretation of results. The aim of this study was the analysis of antimicrobial susceptibility of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae (B. hyodysenteriae) Polish field isolates by broth microdilution procedure. The study was performed on 21 isolates of B. hyodysenteriae, collected between January 2006 to December 2010 from cases of swine dysentery. VetMIC Brachyspira panels with antimicrobial agents (tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, lincomycin, tylosin and ampicillin) were used for susceptibility testing of B. hyodysenteriae. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by the broth dilution procedure. The lowest antimicrobial activity was demonstrated for tylosin and lincomycin, with inhibition of bacterial growth using concentrations > 128 microg/ml and 32 microg/ml, respectively. In the case of doxycycline, the MIC values were < or = 2.0 microg/ml. No decreased susceptibility to tiamulin was found among the Polish isolates and MIC values for this antibiotic did not exceed 1.0 microg/ml. The results of the present study confirmed that Polish B. hyodysenteriae isolates were susceptible to the main antibiotics (tiamulin and valnemulin) used in treatment of swine dysentery. Further studies are necessary to evaluate a possible slow decrease in susceptibility to tiamulin and valnemulin of B. hyodysenteriae strains in Poland. PMID:22844703

  1. Aquifer susceptibility in Virginia, 1998-2000

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nelms, David L.; Harlow,, George E.; Plummer, L. Niel; Busenberg, Eurybiades

    2003-01-01

    The U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), in cooperation with the Virginia Department of Health, sampled water from 171 wells and springs across the Commonwealth of Virginia between 1998 and 2000 as part of the Virginia Aquifer Susceptibility study. Most of the sites sampled are public water supplies that are part of the comprehensive Source Water Assessment Program for the Commonwealth. The fundamental premise of the study was that the identification of young waters (less than 50 years) by multiple environmental tracers could be used as a guide for classifying aquifers in terms of susceptibility to contamination from near-surface sources. Environmental tracers, including chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), sulfur hexafluoride (SF6), tritium (3H), and tritium/helium-3 (3H/3He), and carbon isotopes (14C and d13C) were used to determine the age of water discharging from wells and springs. Concentrations of CFCs greater than 5 picograms per kilogram and 3H concentrations greater than 0.6 tritium unit were used as thresholds to indicate that parts of the aquifer sampled have a component of young water and are, therefore, susceptible to near-surface contamination. Concentrations of CFCs exceeded the susceptibility threshold in 22 percent of the wells and in one spring sampled in the Coastal Plain regional aquifer systems. About 74 percent of the samples from wells with the top of the first water zone less than 100 feet below land surface exceeded the threshold values, and water supplies developed in the upper 100 feet of the Coastal Plain are considered to be susceptible to contamination from near-surface sources. The maximum depth to the top of the screened interval for wells that contained CFCs was less than 150 feet. Wells completed in the deep confined aquifers in the Coastal Plain generally contain water older than 1,000 years, as indicated by carbon-14 dating, and are not considered to be susceptible to contamination under natural conditions. All of the water samples from wells

  2. Linking landslide susceptibility to sediment yield in the Romanian Carpathians

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Broeckx, Jente; Vanmaercke, Matthias; Bǎlteanu, Dan; Chendeş, Viorel; Sima, Mihaela; Enciu, Petru; Poesen, Jean

    2016-04-01

    Recent studies revealed the importance of seismic activity in explaining regional patterns of catchment sediment yield (SY). This relation is often explained by the fact that seismic activity induces landslides that contribute to SY. Nevertheless, only a few studies focused on the effects of landslides on SY and even fewer studies have explored the potential of landslide susceptibility as a predictor for SY. The objective of this study is therefore to explore the potential of landslide susceptibility maps to explain the spatial variation of SY in the Romanian Carpathians, a region with moderate to high seismicity. 133 catchments, covering 63% of Romania, for which SY was measured during a period of at least 10 years and for which SY was not significantly affected by upstream reservoirs, were compiled and selected. 78 of these catchments were 'less disturbed', being covered for at least 50% by forest and semi-natural areas and confined to the Carpathian mountains. Landslide susceptibility in each catchment was assessed, using an earlier published state of the art landslide susceptibility map of Romania. Mean landslide susceptibility for each catchment shows a highly significant correlation with SY (r² = 0.44). This indicates that landslides are an important contributor to SY in Romania and suggests that regional and national landslide susceptibility maps can indeed be a useful tool to predict SY. Nevertheless, the susceptibility map did not explain much more of the observed variance in SY than some other individual catchment characteristics such as seismicity (r² = 0.40) and lithology (r² = 0.33). Also taking into account the spatial patterns of landslide susceptibility within the catchment did not significantly improve the observed correlations. Surprisingly, topography showed a nonsignificant correlation with SY, which can be attributed to the overwhelming effect of seismicity and lithology. Overall, our results suggest that seismicity is indeed a highly

  3. Enhanced sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 expression underlies female CNS autoimmunity susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Cruz-Orengo, Lillian; Daniels, Brian P.; Dorsey, Denise; Basak, Sarah Alison; Grajales-Reyes, José G.; McCandless, Erin E.; Piccio, Laura; Schmidt, Robert E.; Cross, Anne H.; Crosby, Seth D.; Klein, Robyn S.

    2014-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is an inflammatory disease of the CNS that is characterized by BBB dysfunction and has a much higher incidence in females. Compared with other strains of mice, EAE in the SJL mouse strain models multiple features of MS, including an enhanced sensitivity of female mice to disease; however, the molecular mechanisms that underlie the sex- and strain-dependent differences in disease susceptibility have not been described. We identified sphingosine-1-phosphate receptor 2 (S1PR2) as a sex- and strain-specific, disease-modifying molecule that regulates BBB permeability by destabilizing adherens junctions. S1PR2 expression was increased in disease-susceptible regions of the CNS of both female SJL EAE mice and female patients with MS compared with their male counterparts. Pharmacological blockade or lack of S1PR2 signaling decreased EAE disease severity as the result of enhanced endothelial barrier function. Enhanced S1PR2 signaling in an in vitro BBB model altered adherens junction formation via activation of Rho/ROCK, CDC42, and caveolin endocytosis-dependent pathways, resulting in loss of apicobasal polarity and relocation of abluminal CXCL12 to vessel lumina. Furthermore, S1PR2-dependent BBB disruption and CXCL12 relocation were observed in vivo. These results identify a link between S1PR2 signaling and BBB polarity and implicate S1PR2 in sex-specific patterns of disease during CNS autoimmunity. PMID:24812668

  4. CONDENSED MATTER: STRUCTURAL, MECHANICAL, AND THERMAL PROPERTIES: Reduced Fidelity Susceptibility in One-Dimensional Transverse Field Ising Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Jian; Xu, Lei; Wang, Xiao-Guang

    2010-01-01

    We study critical behaviors of the reduced fidelity susceptibility for two neighboring sites in the one-dimensional transverse field Ising model. It is found that the divergent behaviors of the susceptibility take the form of square of logarithm, in contrast with the global ground-state fidelity susceptibility which is power divergence. In order to perform a scaling analysis, we take the square root of the susceptibility and determine the scaling exponent analytically and the result is further confirmed by numerical calculations.

  5. Biofilm susceptibility to metal toxicity.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Joe J; Ceri, Howard; Stremick, Carol A; Turner, Raymond J

    2004-12-01

    This study compared bacterial biofilm and planktonic cell susceptibility to metal toxicity by evaluating the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC), the planktonic minimum bactericidal concentration (MBC), and minimum biofilm eradication concentration (MBEC) using the MBEC device. In total, 17 metal cations and oxyanions, chosen to represent groups VIB to VIA of the periodic table, were each tested on biofilm and planktonic cultures of Escherichia coli JM109, Staphylococcus aureus ATCC 29213, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 27853. In contrast to control antibiotic assays, where biofilm cultures were 2 to 64 times less susceptible to killing than logarithmically growing planktonic bacteria, metal compounds killed planktonic and biofilm cultures at the same concentration in the vast majority of combinations. Our data indicate that, under the conditions reported, growth in a biofilm does not provide resistance to bacteria against killing by metal cations or oxyanions.

  6. Characterization of Staphylococcus aureus mutants expressing reduced susceptibility to common house-cleaners

    PubMed Central

    Davis, A.O.; O’Leary, J.O.; Muthaiyan, A.; Langevin, M.J.; Delgado, A.; Abalos, A.T.; Fajardo, A.R.; Marek, J.; Wilkinson, B.J.; Gustafson, J.E.

    2013-01-01

    Aims To characterize mutants of Staphylococcus aureus expressing reduced susceptibility to house cleaners (HC), assess the impact of the alternative sigma factor SigB on HC susceptibility, and determine the MIC of clinical methicillin-resistant S. aureus (MRSA) to a HC. Methods and Results Susceptibility to HC, HC components, H2O2, vancomycin and oxacillin and physiological parameters were determined for HC-reduced susceptibility (HCRS) mutants, parent strain COL and COLsigB::kan. HCRS mutants selected with three HC expressed reduced susceptibility to multiple HC, HC components, H2O2 and vancomycin. Two unique HCRS mutants also lost the methicillin resistance determinant. In addition, all HCRS mutants exhibited better growth at two temperatures, and one HCRS mutant expressed reduced carotenoid production. COLsigB::kan demonstrated increased susceptibility to all HC and many HC components. sigB operon mutations were not detected in one HCRS mutant background. Of 76 clinical MRSA, 20 exhibited reduced susceptibility to a HC. Conclusions HCRS mutants demonstrate altered susceptibility to multiple antimicrobials. While sigB is required for full HC resistance, one HCRS mechanism does not involve sigB operon mutations. Clinical MRSA expressing reduced susceptibility to a common HC were detected. Significance and Impact of the Study This study suggests that HCRS mutants are not protected against, nor selected by, practical HC concentrations. PMID:15659191

  7. Susceptibilities of algae and Legionella pneumophila to cooling tower biocides

    SciTech Connect

    Soracco, R.J.; Gill, H.K.; Fliermans, C.B.; Pope, D.H.

    1983-04-01

    Nine algal strains and nine Legionella pneumophila strains were tested in laboratory culture for their susceptibility to inhibition by a variety of commercially available microbiocides. The responses ranged from ineffective to effective at 1/100 the manufacturers' recommended pulse doses. Tests were also performed to determine whether the action of the microbiocide was bacteriostatic or bacteriocidal.

  8. Predictors of Collegiate Student-Athletes' Susceptibility to Stereotype Threat

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Feltz, Deborah L.; Schneider, Richard; Hwang, Seunghyun; Skogsberg, Nikolaus J.

    2013-01-01

    The present investigation sought to determine the extent to which collegiate student-athletes are susceptible to stereotype threat and the factors that predict it. We proposed a structural equation model (SEM) by which a perceived coach's positive regard for an athlete's academic ability, athletic identity, and academic identity predicts the…

  9. Theory of Orbital Susceptibility on Excitonic Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuura, Hiroyasu; Ogata, Masao

    2016-09-01

    We study the temperature dependence of the orbital susceptibility of an excitonic insulator on the basis of a two-band model. It is shown that a drastic change (an anomalous enhancement) in susceptibility as a function of temperature occurs owing to the occurrence of additional orbital susceptibility due to the excitonic gap. We calculate explicitly the temperature dependence of orbital susceptibility for a model of Ta2NiSe5, and show that the result is consistent with experimental results.

  10. [Genetic susceptibility to herpes simplex encephalitis].

    PubMed

    Rozenberg, F

    2013-01-01

    Herpes simplex encephalitis (HSE) is a rare but severe complication of frequent and mostly benign infection with herpes simplex virus (HSV). Although rapid and sensitive diagnosis tools and active antiviral drugs are available, HSE morbidity/mortality levels remain unsatisfactory. Molecular and cellular determinants of HSE are incompletely understood. The rarity and severity of the disease have suggested an increased susceptibility of some subjects to HSV infection. Numerous experimental studies have investigated the respective role of host and viral factors in HSE. The results of these studies have illustrated the major role of the innate immune response, in particular interferons (IFNs), in limiting access of the virus into and/or virus replication in the central nervous system (CNS). In a few children with HSE, specific defects of the immune innate response have been identified, which impair the IFN-α/β and IFN-λ production of fibroblasts and/or neurons infected with HSV and render these cells more permissive to infection. The mutations affect proteins involved in the IFN pathway induced by stimulation of the TLR3 receptor. The patients' susceptibility to infection is restricted to HSV CNS invasion, underlining the major role of TLR3 in CNS protection against viral infection. The incomplete clinical penetrance of these molecular defects suggests that other factors (age, infectious dose) are involved in HSE. Whether pathogenesis of adult HSE is similar has not been investigated.

  11. Electoral Susceptibility and Entropically Driven Interactions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caravan, Bassir; Levine, Gregory

    2013-03-01

    In the United States electoral system the election is usually decided by the electoral votes cast by a small number of ``swing states'' where the two candidates historically have roughly equal probabilities of winning. The effective value of a swing state is determined not only by the number of its electoral votes but by the frequency of its appearance in the set of winning partitions of the electoral college. Since the electoral vote values of swing states are not identical, the presence or absence of a state in a winning partition is generally correlated with the frequency of appearance of other states and, hence, their effective values. We quantify the effective value of states by an electoral susceptibility, χj, the variation of the winning probability with the ``cost'' of changing the probability of winning state j. Associating entropy with the logarithm of the number of appearances of a state within the set of winning partitions, the entropy per state (in effect, the chemical potential) is not additive and the states may be said to ``interact.'' We study χj for a simple model with a Zipf's law type distribution of electoral votes. We show that the susceptibility for small states is largest in ``one-sided'' electoral contests and smallest in close contests. This research was supported by Department of Energy DE-FG02-08ER64623, Research Corporation CC6535 (GL) and HHMI Scholar Program (BC)

  12. Genetic Variants Associated with Colorectal Adenoma Susceptibility

    PubMed Central

    Abulí, Anna; Castells, Antoni; Bujanda, Luis; Lozano, Juan José; Bessa, Xavier; Hernández, Cristina; Álvarez-Urturi, Cristina; Pellisé, Maria; Esteban-Jurado, Clara; Hijona, Elizabeth; Burón, Andrea; Macià, Francesc; Grau, Jaume; Guayta, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Background Common low-penetrance genetic variants have been consistently associated with colorectal cancer risk. Aim To determine if these genetic variants are associated also with adenoma susceptibility and may improve selection of patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity (≥ 3 adenomas). Methods We selected 1,326 patients with increased risk for advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity and 1,252 controls with normal colonoscopy from population-based colorectal cancer screening programs. We conducted a case-control association study analyzing 30 colorectal cancer susceptibility variants in order to investigate the contribution of these variants to the development of subsequent advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity. Results We found that 14 of the analyzed genetic variants showed a statistically significant association with advanced adenomas and/or multiplicity: the probability of developing these lesions increased with the number of risk alleles reaching a 2.3-fold risk increment in individuals with ≥ 17 risk alleles. Conclusions Nearly half of the genetic variants associated with colorectal cancer risk are also related to advanced adenoma and/or multiplicity predisposition. Assessing the number of risk alleles in individuals within colorectal cancer screening programs may help to identify better a subgroup with increased risk for advanced neoplasia and/or multiplicity in the general population. PMID:27078840

  13. Tetracycline Susceptibility in Chlamydia suis Pig Isolates.

    PubMed

    Donati, Manuela; Balboni, Andrea; Laroucau, Karine; Aaziz, Rachid; Vorimore, Fabien; Borel, Nicole; Morandi, Federico; Vecchio Nepita, Edoardo; Di Francesco, Antonietta

    2016-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to assess the prevalence of Chlamydia suis in an Italian pig herd, determine the tetracycline susceptibility of C. suis isolates, and evaluate tet(C) and tetR(C) gene expression. Conjunctival swabs from 20 pigs were tested for C. suis by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and 55% (11) were positive. C. suis was then isolated from 11 conjunctival swabs resampled from the same herd. All positive samples and isolates were positive for the tet(C) resistance gene. The in vitro susceptibility to tetracycline of the C. suis isolates showed MIC values ranging from 0.5 to 4 μg/mL. Tet(C) and tetR(C) transcripts were found in all the isolates, cultured both in the absence and presence of tetracycline. This contrasts with other Gram-negative bacteria in which both genes are repressed in the absence of the drug. Further investigation into tet gene regulation in C. suis is needed.

  14. In vitro susceptibility of Prototheca spp. to gentamicin.

    PubMed Central

    Shahan, T A; Pore, R S

    1991-01-01

    One hundred strains of Prototheca zopfii, Prototheca wickerhamii, Prototheca moriformis, Prototheca stagnora, and Prototheca ulmnea; five strains of Chlorella protothecoides; and two strains of Candida albicans were obtained from a number of different clinical and environmental sources and were tested for their in vitro susceptibility to the antibacterial agent gentamicin. All Prototheca strains were susceptible to gentamicin at concentrations between 0.3 and 0.9 micrograms/ml. A modified macrobroth dilution MIC assay with a colorimeter and a microbroth dilution assay with a 96-well plate reader were the two methods used to determine the MICs. PMID:1804021

  15. Effect of temperature on antimicrobial susceptibilities of Pseudomonas maltophilia.

    PubMed Central

    Wheat, P F; Winstanley, T G; Spencer, R C

    1985-01-01

    After a case of peritonitis caused by Pseudomonas maltophilia had occurred 20 strains of the organism were investigated and the minimum inhibitory concentrations of a variety of antibiotics determined at 30 degrees C and 37 degrees C. There was a significant difference in susceptibility between 30 degrees C (most resistant) and 37 degrees C (most susceptible) for aminoglycosides and polymyxin B. No difference was seen with the other agents or in strains of Ps aeruginosa and Enterobacteriaceae tested under similar conditions. The possible mechanisms of this phenomenon are discussed below. Images PMID:4044874

  16. Progress in vacuum susceptibilities and their applications to the chiral phase transition of QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Cui, Zhu-Fang; Hou, Feng-Yao; Shi, Yuan-Mei; Wang, Yong-Long; Zong, Hong-Shi

    2015-07-15

    The QCD vacuum condensates and various vacuum susceptibilities are all important parameters which characterize the nonperturbative properties of the QCD vacuum. In the QCD sum rules external field formula, various QCD vacuum susceptibilities play important roles in determining the properties of hadrons. In this paper, we review the recent progress in studies of vacuum susceptibilities together with their applications to the chiral phase transition of QCD. The results of the tensor, the vector, the axial–vector, the scalar, and the pseudo-scalar vacuum susceptibilities are shown in detail in the framework of Dyson–Schwinger equations.

  17. Susceptibility of progeny from crosses among three stocks of coho salmon to infection by Ceratomyxa shasta

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hemmingsen, A.R.; McIntyre, J.D.; Fryer, J.L.

    1986-01-01

    Crossbred coho salmon Oncorhynchus kisutch were produced from all possible crosses among three stocks. The relative susceptibility of the progeny to infection by the myxosporean parasite Ceratomyxa shasta was determined by exposure of juvenile fish to Willamette River water that contained the infective stage of the parasite. Susceptibility of coho salmon native to the Columbia River basin to the disease ceratomyxosis was relatively low whereas that of coho salmon from remote locations was relatively high. Susceptibility of crossbred progeny nearly always was intermediate between the susceptibilities of fish from the parental stocks.

  18. Nurses and Dietitians Differ in Food Safety Information Provided to Highly Susceptible Clients

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buffer, Janet; Kendall, Patricia; Medeiros, Lydia; Schroeder, Mary; Sofos, John

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine content, education channels, and motivational factors that influence what health professionals teach about safe food handling to populations who are highly susceptible for foodborne illnesses. To assess the differences in information provided by health professionals to highly susceptible populations. Design: Descriptive,…

  19. Differential Susceptibility to the Environment: Are Developmental Models Compatible with the Evidence from Twin Studies?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Del Giudice, Marco

    2016-01-01

    According to models of differential susceptibility, the same neurobiological and temperamental traits that determine increased sensitivity to stress and adversity also confer enhanced responsivity to the positive aspects of the environment. Differential susceptibility models have expanded to include complex developmental processes in which genetic…

  20. Decline in Decreased Cephalosporin Susceptibility and Increase in Azithromycin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Canada

    PubMed Central

    Sawatzky, P.; Liu, G.; Allen, V; Lefebvre, B.; Hoang, L.; Drews, S.; Horsman, G.; Wylie, J.; Haldane, D.; Garceau, R.; Ratnam, S.; Wong, T.; Archibald, C.; Mulvey, M.R.

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance profiles were determined for Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains isolated in Canada during 2010–2014. The proportion of isolates with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins declined significantly between 2011 and 2014, whereas azithromycin resistance increased significantly during that period. Continued surveillance of antimicrobial drug susceptibilities is imperative to inform treatment guidelines. PMID:26689114

  1. Decline in Decreased Cephalosporin Susceptibility and Increase in Azithromycin Resistance in Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Canada.

    PubMed

    Martin, I; Sawatzky, P; Liu, G; Allen, V; Lefebvre, B; Hoang, L; Drews, S; Horsman, G; Wylie, J; Haldane, D; Garceau, R; Ratnam, S; Wong, T; Archibald, C; Mulvey, M R

    2016-01-01

    Antimicrobial resistance profiles were determined for Neisseria gonorrhoeae strains isolated in Canada during 2010-2014. The proportion of isolates with decreased susceptibility to cephalosporins declined significantly between 2011 and 2014, whereas azithromycin resistance increased significantly during that period. Continued surveillance of antimicrobial drug susceptibilities is imperative to inform treatment guidelines.

  2. Stress corrosion cracking susceptibility of 18 Ni maraging steel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphries, T. S.; Nelson, E. E.

    1974-01-01

    The stress corrosion cracking (SCC) resistance of 18Ni maraging steel (grades 200, 250, 300, and 350) was determined in 3.5 percent salt (NaCl) solution, synthetic sea water, high humidity, and outside MSFC atmosphere. All grades of the maraging steel were found to be susceptible to SCC in varying degrees according to their strengths, with the lowest strength steel (grade 200) being the least susceptible and the highest strength steel (grade 350), the most susceptible to SCC. The SCC resistance of 250 grade maraging steel was also evaluated in salt and salt-chromate solutions using fracture mechanics techniques. The threshold value, K sub SCC, was found to be approximately 44 MN/sq m square root m, (40 ksi square root in.) or 40 percent of the K sub Q value.

  3. Antimicrobial resistance in campylobacter: susceptibility testing methods and resistance trends.

    PubMed

    Ge, Beilei; Wang, Fei; Sjölund-Karlsson, Maria; McDermott, Patrick F

    2013-10-01

    Most Campylobacter infections are self-limiting but antimicrobial treatment (e.g., macrolides, fluoroquinolones) is necessary in severe or prolonged cases. Susceptibility testing continues to play a critical role in guiding therapy and epidemiological monitoring of resistance. The methods of choice for Campylobacter recommended by the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) are agar dilution and broth microdilution, while a disk diffusion method was recently standardized by the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST). Macrolides, quinolones, and tetracyclines are among the common antimicrobials recommended for testing. Molecular determination of Campylobacter resistance via DNA sequencing or PCR-based methods has been performed. High levels of resistance to tetracycline and ciprofloxacin are frequently reported by many national surveillance programs, but resistance to erythromycin and gentamicin in Campylobacter jejuni remains low. Nonetheless, variations in susceptibility observed over time underscore the need for continued public health monitoring of Campylobacter resistance from humans, animals, and food.

  4. Orbital diamagnetic susceptibility in excitonic condensation phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugimoto, Koudai; Ohta, Yukinori

    2016-08-01

    We study the orbital diamagnetic susceptibility in excitonic condensation phase using the mean-field approximation for a two-band model defined on a square lattice. We find that, in semiconductors, the excitonic condensation acquires a finite diamagnetic susceptibility due to spontaneous hybridization between the valence and the conduction bands, whereas in semimetals, the diamagnetic susceptibility in the normal phase is suppressed by the excitonic condensation. We also study the orbital diamagnetic and Pauli paramagnetic susceptibilities of Ta2NiSe5 using a two-dimensional three-band model and find that the calculated temperature dependence of the magnetic susceptibility is in qualitative agreement with experiment.

  5. Biomphalaria glabrata transcriptome: cDNA microarray profiling identifies resistant- and susceptible-specific gene expression in haemocytes from snail strains exposed to Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Lockyer, Anne E; Spinks, Jenny; Kane, Richard A; Hoffmann, Karl F; Fitzpatrick, Jennifer M; Rollinson, David; Noble, Leslie R; Jones, Catherine S

    2008-01-01

    Background Biomphalaria glabrata is an intermediate snail host for Schistosoma mansoni, one of the important schistosomes infecting man. B. glabrata/S. mansoni provides a useful model system for investigating the intimate interactions between host and parasite. Examining differential gene expression between S. mansoni-exposed schistosome-resistant and susceptible snail lines will identify genes and pathways that may be involved in snail defences. Results We have developed a 2053 element cDNA microarray for B. glabrata containing clones from ORESTES (Open Reading frame ESTs) libraries, suppression subtractive hybridization (SSH) libraries and clones identified in previous expression studies. Snail haemocyte RNA, extracted from parasite-challenged resistant and susceptible snails, 2 to 24 h post-exposure to S. mansoni, was hybridized to the custom made cDNA microarray and 98 differentially expressed genes or gene clusters were identified, 94 resistant-associated and 4 susceptible-associated. Quantitative PCR analysis verified the cDNA microarray results for representative transcripts. Differentially expressed genes were annotated and clustered using gene ontology (GO) terminology and Kyoto Encyclopaedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG) pathway analysis. 61% of the identified differentially expressed genes have no known function including the 4 susceptible strain-specific transcripts. Resistant strain-specific expression of genes implicated in innate immunity of invertebrates was identified, including hydrolytic enzymes such as cathepsin L, a cysteine proteinase involved in lysis of phagocytosed particles; metabolic enzymes such as ornithine decarboxylase, the rate-limiting enzyme in the production of polyamines, important in inflammation and infection processes, as well as scavenging damaging free radicals produced during production of reactive oxygen species; stress response genes such as HSP70; proteins involved in signalling, such as importin 7 and copine 1

  6. Antimicrobial susceptibility of Staphylococcus intermedius and Staphylococcus schleiferi isolated from dogs.

    PubMed

    Vanni, M; Tognetti, R; Pretti, C; Crema, F; Soldani, G; Meucci, V; Intorre, L

    2009-10-01

    The susceptibility to 23 antimicrobial agents was determined in 114 isolates of Staphylococcus intermedius and eight isolates of Staphylococcus schleiferi of canine origin. Overall, 73% of S. intermedius isolates and 37.5% of S. schleiferi isolates were susceptible to all the 23 antimicrobials tested. The large majority of S. intermedius strains retained susceptibility to antimicrobials currently employed in treatment of pyoderma (cephalosporins, cotrimoxazole and association amoxicillin-clavulanic acid) as well as to those effective against staphylococci (fusidic acid, rifampicin and fluoroquinolones). Resistance in S. intermedius was observed mainly against macrolides, chloramphenicol and lincosamides, while S. schleiferi isolates retained susceptibility to all antimicrobials except three of six fluoroquinolones. Although, our results confirm susceptibility to antimicrobials currently employed in pyoderma treatment, the several different resistance patterns observed for S. intermedius emphasize the importance of antimicrobial susceptibility testing of canine staphylococci to choose the most appropriate treatment of infections and to allow the prudent use of antimicrobial drugs in companion animals.

  7. Temperature dependence of magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transformation in ferromagnetic shape memory alloys.

    PubMed

    Zablotskii, V; Pérez-Landazábal, J I; Recarte, V; Gómez-Polo, C

    2010-08-11

    Temperature dependences of low-field quasistatic magnetic susceptibility in the vicinity of martensitic transitions in an NiFeGa alloy are studied both by experiment and analytically. Pronounced reversible jumps of the magnetic susceptibility were observed near the martensitic transition temperature. A general description of the temperature dependences of the susceptibility in ferromagnetic austenite and martensite phases and the susceptibility jump at the transition is suggested. As a result, the main factors governing the temperature dependences of the magnetic susceptibility in the magnetic shape memory alloys are revealed. The magnetic susceptibility jump value is found to be related to changes of: (i) magnetic anisotropy; (ii) magnetic domain wall geometrical constraints (those determined by the alignment and size of twin variants) and (iii) mean magnetic domain spacing.

  8. Genetics of RA susceptibility, what comes next?

    PubMed Central

    Ding, James; Eyre, Stephen; Worthington, Jane

    2015-01-01

    Summary Genome-wide association studies (GWASs) have been used to great effect to identify genetic susceptibility loci for complex disease. A series of GWAS and meta-analyses have informed the discovery of over 100 loci for rheumatoid arthritis (RA). In common with findings in other autoimmune diseases the lead signals for the majority of these loci do not map to known gene sequences. In order to realise the benefit of investment in GWAS studies it is vital we determine how disease associated alleles function to influence disease processes. This is leading to rapid development in our knowledge as to the function of non-coding regions of the genome. Here we consider possible functional mechanisms for intergenic RA-associated variants which lie within lncRNA sequences. PMID:26509058

  9. In vitro antimicrobial susceptibility of Mycoplasma bovis isolated in Israel from local and imported cattle.

    PubMed

    Gerchman, Irena; Levisohn, Sharon; Mikula, Inna; Lysnyansky, Inna

    2009-06-12

    Monitoring of susceptibility to antibiotics in field isolates of pathogenic bovine mycoplasmas is important for appropriate choice of treatment. Our study compared in vitro susceptibility profiles of Mycoplasma bovis clinical strains, isolated during 2005-2007 from Israeli and imported calves. Minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) values were determined for macrolides by the microbroth dilution test, for aminoglycosides by commercial Etest, and for fluoroquinolones and tetracyclines by both methods. Notably, although correlation between the methods was generally good, it was not possible to determine the MIC endpoint for enrofloxacin-resistant strains (MIC > or =2.5 microg/ml in the microtest) by Etest. Comparison of antibiotic susceptibility profiles between local and imported M. bovis strains revealed that local strains were significantly more resistant to macrolides than most isolates from imported animals, with MIC(50) of 128 microg/ml vs. 2 microg/ml for tilmicosin and 8 microg/ml vs. 1 microg/ml for tylosin, respectively. However, local strains were more susceptible than most imported strains to fluoroquinolones and spectinomycin. Difference in susceptibility to tetracycline, doxycycline and oxytetracycline between local and imported strains was expressed in MIC(90) values for imported strains in the susceptible range compared to intermediate susceptibility for local strains. The marked difference in susceptibility profiles of M. bovis strains isolated from different geographical regions seen in this study emphasizes the necessity for performing of the antimicrobial susceptibility testing periodically and on a regional basis. PMID:19250777

  10. High diversity of bacterial pathogens and antibiotic resistance in salmonid fish farm pond water as determined by molecular identification employing 16S rDNA PCR, gene sequencing and total antibiotic susceptibility techniques.

    PubMed

    Moore, John E; Huang, Junhua; Yu, Pengbo; Ma, Chaofeng; Moore, Peter Ja; Millar, Beverley C; Goldsmith, Colin E; Xu, Jiru

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the microbiological and related parameters (antibiotic resistance and pathogen identification) of water at two salmonid fish farms in Northern Ireland. Total Bacterial Counts at the Movanagher Fish Farm was 1730 colony forming units (cfu)/ml water (log10 3.24cfu/ml) and 3260cfu/ml (log10 3.51cfu/ml) at the Bushmills Salmon Station. Examination of resulting organisms revealed 10 morphological phenotypes, which were subsequently sequenced to determine their identification. All these organisms were Gram-negative and no Gram-positive organisms were isolated from any water sample. From these phenotypes, eight different genera were identified including Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Chryseobacterium, Erwinia, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas and Rheinheimera. One unnamed novel taxon was identified from water at the Movanagher Fish Farm, belonging to the genus Acinetobacter and has been tentatively named Acinetobacter movanagherensis. No other novel taxa were observed. All but one of these environmental organisms (Erwinia) are potential pathogens of fish disease. Total antibiotic resistance was observed to varying degrees in water specimens. The most resistant populations were observed in water taken from the Bushmills Salmon Station inlet, followed by water from the Movanagher Fish Farm. No resistance was observed against tetracycline and there was only one occurrence of resistance against ciprofloxacin. Overall, this study indicates that potential fish pathogens made up the majority of environmental organisms identified, even in the absence of recorded fish disease. There was also relatively high levels of total antibiotic resistance in the bacterial water populations examined, where tetracycline was the only antibiotic with zero resistance. These data indicate that the threat of bacterial disease is relatively close due to the indigenous colonization of farm water and that husbandry standards should be maintained at a high standard to avert

  11. High diversity of bacterial pathogens and antibiotic resistance in salmonid fish farm pond water as determined by molecular identification employing 16S rDNA PCR, gene sequencing and total antibiotic susceptibility techniques.

    PubMed

    Moore, John E; Huang, Junhua; Yu, Pengbo; Ma, Chaofeng; Moore, Peter Ja; Millar, Beverley C; Goldsmith, Colin E; Xu, Jiru

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the microbiological and related parameters (antibiotic resistance and pathogen identification) of water at two salmonid fish farms in Northern Ireland. Total Bacterial Counts at the Movanagher Fish Farm was 1730 colony forming units (cfu)/ml water (log10 3.24cfu/ml) and 3260cfu/ml (log10 3.51cfu/ml) at the Bushmills Salmon Station. Examination of resulting organisms revealed 10 morphological phenotypes, which were subsequently sequenced to determine their identification. All these organisms were Gram-negative and no Gram-positive organisms were isolated from any water sample. From these phenotypes, eight different genera were identified including Acinetobacter, Aeromonas, Chryseobacterium, Erwinia, Flavobacterium, Pseudomonas and Rheinheimera. One unnamed novel taxon was identified from water at the Movanagher Fish Farm, belonging to the genus Acinetobacter and has been tentatively named Acinetobacter movanagherensis. No other novel taxa were observed. All but one of these environmental organisms (Erwinia) are potential pathogens of fish disease. Total antibiotic resistance was observed to varying degrees in water specimens. The most resistant populations were observed in water taken from the Bushmills Salmon Station inlet, followed by water from the Movanagher Fish Farm. No resistance was observed against tetracycline and there was only one occurrence of resistance against ciprofloxacin. Overall, this study indicates that potential fish pathogens made up the majority of environmental organisms identified, even in the absence of recorded fish disease. There was also relatively high levels of total antibiotic resistance in the bacterial water populations examined, where tetracycline was the only antibiotic with zero resistance. These data indicate that the threat of bacterial disease is relatively close due to the indigenous colonization of farm water and that husbandry standards should be maintained at a high standard to avert

  12. Spacecraft materials HCl susceptibility assessments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, C.-T.; Liu, De-Ling; Kim, Hyun; Alaan, Diana R.

    2014-09-01

    The susceptibility of spacecraft materials to HCl exposure was investigated in light of concerns to potential contamination during evolved expendable launch vehicle (EELV) overflight scenarios. Overflight refers to the circumstance where one spacecraft, resident on a launch pad, may be exposed to HCl generated from an earlier solid rocket launch at an adjacent pad. One aspect of the overflight risk assessments involves spacecraft materials susceptibility to HCl exposure. This study examined a wide range of spacecraft materials after being exposed to HCl vapor in a well-characterized facility. Sample thermal/optical and electrostatic dissipation properties, as well as surface chemical and morphological features, were characterized before and after the HCl exposure. All materials tested, except for indium tin oxide (ITO) coated Kapton film, showed no significant degradation after HCl exposure of up to 4800 ppb-hr. The ITO coated Kapton sample showed slight signs of degradation after being exposed to 500 ppb-hr HCl, as the surface resistance was increased by a factor of 5. However, the potential HCl dose inside the payload fairing (PLF) was estimated to be far below 500 ppb-hr in an EELV overflight event. These results, along with other relevant laboratory test data on the HCl removal efficiency of the filtration media used on the launch sites, provide the technical rationale that properly filtered air as the PLF purge should pose little risk in terms of HCl contamination under EELV overflight scenarios.

  13. Susceptibility of Pittsburgh pneumonia agent (Legionella micdadei) and other newly recognized members of the genus Legionella to nineteen antimicrobial agents.

    PubMed Central

    Pasculle, A W; Dowling, J N; Weyant, R S; Sniffen, J M; Cordes, L G; Gorman, G M; Feeley, J C

    1981-01-01

    The susceptibilities of 11 strains representing the five recognized species of Legionella were determined by agar dilution testing on buffered charcoal-yeast extract agar. All of the legionellae tested were susceptible to rifampin, erythromycin, rosaramycin, chloramphenicol, and the aminoglycosides and were resistant to clindamycin and vancomycin. Susceptibilities to penicillins and cephalosporins were variable. Legionella micdadei, Legionella bozemanii, and Legionella gormanii were susceptible to these agents, but minimal inhibitory concentrations for each species were different. Legionella dumoffii resembled Legionella pneumophila in being resistant to penicillin, cephalothin, and cephamandole and susceptible to moxalactam and cefoxitin. All species except L. micdadei produced beta-lactamase. PMID:7325645

  14. Optical measurement of anisotropic magnetic susceptibility for diamagnetic fine particles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitamura, Naoyuki; Takahashi, Kohki; Mogi, Iwao; Awaji, Satoshi; Watanabe, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    We have developed an apparatus that allows the observation of the transient rotational motion of fine particles under a high magnetic field in order to determine anisotropic magnetic susceptibility. The anisotropic susceptibilities of spherical nanoparticles of bismuth and commercially available carbon nanofibers were determined. The estimated Δχ = 3.9 × 10-5 of spherical bismuth nanoparticles with a diameter of 370 nm was fairly consistent with the value determined previously by the magnetic field dependence of diffraction peak intensity in the X-ray diffraction (XRD) pattern, but was slightly smaller than the value for the bulk crystal. In contrast, the transient behavior of carbon nanofibers did not obey the theoretical motion of a single crystal. The wide distribution of fiber lengths, the irregularity of the structure in the fiber, and the connections between the fibers are suggested for the anomalous behavior.

  15. The Diamagnetic Susceptibility of the Tubulin Dimer

    PubMed Central

    Torbet, James; Diakun, Gregory P.; Rikken, Geert L. J. A.; Diaz, J. Fernando

    2014-01-01

    An approximate value of the diamagnetic anisotropy of the tubulin dimer, Δχdimer, has been determined assuming axial symmetry and that only the α-helices and β-sheets contribute to the anisotropy. Two approaches have been utilized: (a) using the value for the Δχα for an α-helical peptide bond given by Pauling (1979) and (b) using the previously determined anisotropy of fibrinogen as a calibration standard. The Δχdimer ≈ 4 × 10−27 JT−2 obtained from these measurements are similar to within 20%. Although Cotton-Mouton measurements alone cannot be used to estimate Δχ directly, the value we measured, CMdimer = (1.41 ± 0.03) × 10−8 T−2cm2mg−1, is consistent with the above estimate for Δχdimer. The method utilized for the determination of the tubulin dimer diamagnetic susceptibility is applicable to other proteins and macromolecular assemblies as well. PMID:24701206

  16. Ineffectiveness of historical data in predicting measles susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Scott, R M; Butler, A B; Schydlower, M; Rawlings, P

    1984-06-01

    The Immunization Practices Advisory Committee ( ACIP ) has devised noninvasive, historical criteria for determining individuals who are susceptible to measles. These criteria, which involve proof of vaccination, are incorporated into school entrance regulations and are used to indicate people who require vaccination during outbreaks. In a recent measles epidemic in El Paso , TX, 120,000 records were screened using these criteria, and as a result 13,000 students were vaccinated. During this outbreak, 91 adolescents, who were susceptible to measles by ACIP criteria, were serologically tested for measles antibody. Although none of these students had documentation of vaccination, only 11.0% of them lacked measles hemagglutination-inhibiting (HAI) antibody at a titer of 5. Assuming a minimum cost for vaccine of +2.60 per dose, a conservative estimate of the cost to the El Paso Health Department for 20,000 doses of measles vaccine would be +52,000. If these data can be extrapolated to the total student population, then upwards of 85% of vaccinated students were already immune. Thus, +44,200 was spent unnecessarily. In addition, as the ACIP criteria did not select for measles susceptibility, an estimated 12,000 students in El Paso were not protected against measles. Other methods to determine measles susceptibility should be developed for optimal control of future outbreaks.

  17. Optimal control in a model of malaria with differential susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hincapié, Doracelly; Ospina, Juan

    2014-06-01

    A malaria model with differential susceptibility is analyzed using the optimal control technique. In the model the human population is classified as susceptible, infected and recovered. Susceptibility is assumed dependent on genetic, physiological, or social characteristics that vary between individuals. The model is described by a system of differential equations that relate the human and vector populations, so that the infection is transmitted to humans by vectors, and the infection is transmitted to vectors by humans. The model considered is analyzed using the optimal control method when the control consists in using of insecticide-treated nets and educational campaigns; and the optimality criterion is to minimize the number of infected humans, while keeping the cost as low as is possible. One first goal is to determine the effects of differential susceptibility in the proposed control mechanism; and the second goal is to determine the algebraic form of the basic reproductive number of the model. All computations are performed using computer algebra, specifically Maple. It is claimed that the analytical results obtained are important for the design and implementation of control measures for malaria. It is suggested some future investigations such as the application of the method to other vector-borne diseases such as dengue or yellow fever; and also it is suggested the possible application of free software of computer algebra like Maxima.

  18. Flavivirus susceptibility in Aedes aegypti.

    PubMed

    Black, William C; Bennett, Kristine E; Gorrochótegui-Escalante, Norma; Barillas-Mury, Carolina V; Fernández-Salas, Ildefonso; de Lourdes Muñoz, María; Farfán-Alé, José A; Olson, Ken E; Beaty, Barry J

    2002-01-01

    Aedes aegypti is the primary vector of yellow fever (YF) and dengue fever (DF) flaviviruses worldwide. In this review we focus on past and present research on genetic components and environmental factors in Aedes aegypti that appear to control flavivirus transmission. We review genetic relationships among Ae. aegypti populations throughout the world and discuss how variation in vector competence is correlated with overall genetic differences among populations. We describe current research into how genetic and environmental factors jointly affect distribution of vector competence in natural populations. Based on this information, we propose a population genetic model for vector competence and discuss our recent progress in testing this model. We end with a discussion of approaches being taken to identify the genes that may control flavivirus susceptibility in Ae. aegypti.

  19. Exploring Genetic Susceptibility to Fibromyalgia

    PubMed Central

    Park, Dong-Jin; Kang, Ji-Hyoun; Yim, Yi-Rang; Kim, Ji-Eun; Lee, Jeong-Won; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Wen, Lihui; Kim, Tae-Jong; Park, Yong-Wook

    2015-01-01

    Fibromyalgia (FM) affects 1% to 5% of the population, and approximately 90% of the affected individuals are women. FM patients experience impaired quality of life and the disorder places a considerable economic burden on the medical care system. With the recognition of FM as a major health problem, many recent studies have evaluated the pathophysiology of FM. Although the etiology of FM remains unknown, it is thought to involve some combination of genetic susceptibility and environmental exposure that triggers further alterations in gene expression. Because FM shows marked familial aggregation, most previous research has focused on genetic predisposition to FM and has revealed associations between genetic factors and the development of FM, including specific gene polymorphisms involved in the serotonergic, dopaminergic, and catecholaminergic pathways. The aim of this review was to discuss the current evidence regarding genetic factors that may play a role in the development and symptom severity of FM. PMID:26306300

  20. Susceptibility of Primary Sensory Cortex to Spreading Depolarizations

    PubMed Central

    Bogdanov, Volodymyr B.; Middleton, Natalie A.; Theriot, Jeremy J.; Parker, Patrick D.; Abdullah, Osama M.; Ju, Y. Sungtaek; Hartings, Jed A.

    2016-01-01

    Spreading depolarizations (SDs) are recognized as actors in neurological disorders as diverse as migraine and traumatic brain injury (TBI). Migraine aura involves sensory percepts, suggesting that sensory cortices might be intrinsically susceptible to SDs. We used optical imaging, MRI, and field potential and potassium electrode recordings in mice and electrocorticographic recordings in humans to determine the susceptibility of different brain regions to SDs. Optical imaging experiments in mice under isoflurane anesthesia showed that both cortical spreading depression and terminal anoxic depolarization arose preferentially in the whisker barrel region of parietal sensory cortex. MRI recordings under isoflurane, ketamine/xylazine, ketamine/isoflurane, and urethane anesthesia demonstrated that the depolarizations did not propagate from a subcortical source. Potassium concentrations showed larger increases in sensory cortex, suggesting a mechanism of susceptibility. Sensory stimulation biased the timing but not the location of depolarization onset. In humans with TBI, there was a trend toward increased incidence of SDs in parietal/temporal sensory cortex compared with other regions. In conclusion, SDs are inducible preferentially in primary sensory cortex in mice and most likely in humans. This tropism can explain the predominant sensory phenomenology of migraine aura. It also demonstrates that sensory cortices are vulnerable in brain injury. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Spreading depolarizations (SDs) are involved in neurologic disorders as diverse as migraine and traumatic brain injury. In migraine, the nature of aura symptoms suggests that sensory cortex may be preferentially susceptible. In brain injury, SDs occur at a vulnerable time, during which the issue of sensory stimulation is much debated. We show, in mouse and human, that sensory cortex is more susceptible to SDs. We find that sensory stimulation biases the timing but not the location of the depolarizations

  1. SUSCEPTIBILITY TO OZONE-INDUCED INJURY AND ANTIOXIDANT COMPENSATION IN RAT MODELS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Increased oxidative stress and compromised antioxidant status are common pathologic factors of cardiovascular diseases (CVD). It is hypothesized that individuals with chronic CVD are more susceptible to environmental exposures due to underlying oxidative stress. To determine the ...

  2. Isolation Method (direct plating or enrichment) does not affect Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Campylobacter from Chicken Carcasses

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    To determine if Campylobacter isolation method influenced antimicrobial susceptibility results, the minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of nine antimicrobials were compared for 291 pairs of Campylobacter isolates recovered from chicken carcass rinse samples using direct plating and an enrichment...

  3. Baseline susceptibility of Bemisia tabaci B biotype (Hemiptera: Aleyrodidae) populations from California and Arizona to spiromesifen

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Susceptibility to spiromesifen, a tetronic acid derivative, was determined for three imidacloprid-resistant strains and 12 geographically discrete natural populations of Bemisia tabaci (Gennadius) (= Bemisia argentifolii Bellows and Perring) from California and Arizona by laboratory bioassays. Newl...

  4. Individual susceptibility to alcoholic pancreatitis.

    PubMed

    Apte, Minoti V; Pirola, Romano C; Wilson, Jeremy S

    2008-03-01

    The observation that only a minority of heavy drinkers develop pancreatitis has prompted an intensive search for a trigger factor/cofactor/susceptibility factor that may precipitate a clinical attack. Putative susceptibility factors examined so far include diet, smoking, amount and type of alcohol consumed, the pattern of drinking and lipid intolerance. In addition, a range of inherited factors have been assessed including blood group antigens, human leukocyte antigen serotypes, alpha-1-antitrypsin phenotypes and several genotypes. The latter group comprises mutations/polymorphisms in genes related to alcohol-metabolizing enzymes, detoxifying enzymes, pancreatic digestive enzymes, pancreatic enzyme inhibitors, cystic fibrosis and cytokines. Disappointingly, despite this concerted research effort, no clear association has been established between the above factors and alcoholic pancreatitis. Experimentally, the secretagogue cholecystokinin (CCK) has been investigated as a candidate 'trigger' for alcoholic pancreatitis. However, the clinical relevance of CCK as a trigger factor has to be questioned, as it is difficult to envisage a situation in humans where abnormally high levels of CCK would be released into the circulation to trigger pancreatitis in alcoholics. In contrast, bacterial endotoxemia is a candidate cofactor that does have relevance to the clinical situation. Plasma lipopolysaccharide (LPS, an endotoxin) levels are significantly higher in drinkers (either after chronic alcohol intake or a single binge) compared to non-drinkers. We have recently shown that alcohol-fed animals challenged with otherwise innocuous doses of LPS exhibit significant pancreatic injury. Moreover, repeated LPS exposure in alcohol-fed rats leads to progressive injury to the gland characterized by significant pancreatic fibrosis. These studies support the concept that endotoxin may be an important factor in the initiation and progression of alcoholic pancreatitis. Scope remains for

  5. Differences in the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Moraxella bovis, M. bovoculi and M. ovis

    PubMed Central

    Maboni, Grazieli; Gressler, Leticia T.; Espindola, Julia P.; Schwab, Marcelo; Tasca, Caiane; Potter, Luciana; de Vargas, Agueda Castagna

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to determine the differences in the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of Moraxella bovis, M. bovoculi and M. ovis. Thirty-two strains of Moraxella spp. isolated from cattle and sheep with infectious keratoconjunctivitis were tested via broth microdilution method to determine their susceptibility to ampicillin, cefoperazone, ceftiofur, cloxacillin, enrofloxacin, florfenicol, gentamicin, neomycin, oxytetracycline and penicillin. The results demonstrated that Moraxella spp. strains could be considered sensitive for most of the antimicrobials tested in this study, but differences between the antimicrobial susceptibility profiles of these three Moraxella species were found. M. bovis might differ from other species due to the higher MIC and MBC values it presented. PMID:26273272

  6. Real-time PCR analysis of candidate imprinted genes on mouse chromosome 11 shows balanced expression from the maternal and paternal chromosomes and strain-specific variation in expression levels.

    PubMed

    Tuskan, Robert G; Tsang, Shirley; Sun, Zhonghe; Baer, Jessica; Rozenblum, Ester; Wu, Xiaolin; Munroe, David J; Reilly, Karlyne M

    2008-01-01

    Imprinted genes are monoallelically expressed from either the maternal or paternal genome. Because cancer develops through genetic and epigenetic alterations, imprinted genes affect tumorigenesis depending on which parental allele undergoes alteration. We have shown previously in a mouse model of neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) that inheriting mutant alleles of Nf1 and Trp53 on chromosome 11 from the mother or father dramatically changes the tumor spectrum of mutant progeny, likely due to alteration in an imprinted gene(s) linked to Nf1 and Trp53. In order to identify imprinted genes on chromosome 11 that are responsible for differences in susceptibility, we tested candidate imprinted genes predicted by a bioinformatics approach and an experimental approach. We have tested 30 candidate genes (Havcr2, Camk2b, Ccdc85a, Cntnap1, Ikzf1, 5730522E02Rik, Gria1, Zfp39, Sgcd, Jup, Nxph3, Spnb2, Asb3, Rasd1, Map2k3, Map2k4, Trp53, Serpinf1, Crk, Rasl10b, Itga3, Hoxb5, Cbx1, Pparbp, Igfbp4, Smarce1, Stat3, Atp6v0a1, Nbr1 and Meox1), two known imprinted genes (Grb10 and Impact) and Nf1, which has not been previously identified as an imprinted gene. Although we confirmed the imprinting of Grb10 and Impact, we found no other genes imprinted in the brain. We did, however, find strain-biased expression of Camk2b, 5730522E02Rik, Havcr2, Map2k3, Serpinf1, Rasl10b, Itga3, Asb3, Trp53, Nf1, Smarce1, Stat3, Cbx1, Pparbp and Cntnap1. These results suggest that the prediction of imprinted genes is complicated and must be individually validated. This manuscript includes supplementary data listing primer sequences for Taqman assays and Ct values for Taqman PCR. PMID:18188004

  7. Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing of Gram-Negative Nonfermentative Bacilli

    PubMed Central

    Ruddell, K. A.; Anselmo, C. R.

    1975-01-01

    A study was undertaken to determine if current methods of antibiotic susceptibility testing could be successfully applied to the gram-negative nonfermentative bacilli. Using clinical isolates and reference strains, experiments were conducted on the inherent reliability of the Bauer-Kirby method, as well as the effect of certain modifications on the method such as elimination of the 2- to 5-h incubation in broth and use of different agar media. Results obtained using these modifications were compared to the results obtained by the standard method. It was shown that the two modifications investigated had a significant effect on the interpretation of zone diameters. It was further shown that the standard Bauer-Kirby method with some exceptions correlates with minimal inhibitory concentrations as determined by broth dilution methods. Results suggest that the Bauer-Kirby method may be a reliable technique for testing the antibiotic susceptibility of the nonfermentative bacilli. PMID:1147576

  8. Temporal interactions facilitate endemicity in the susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Speidel, Leo; Klemm, Konstantin; Eguíluz, Víctor M.; Masuda, Naoki

    2016-07-01

    Data of physical contacts and face-to-face communications suggest temporally varying networks as the media on which infections take place among humans and animals. Epidemic processes on temporal networks are complicated by complexity of both network structure and temporal dimensions. Theoretical approaches are much needed for identifying key factors that affect dynamics of epidemics. In particular, what factors make some temporal networks stronger media of infection than other temporal networks is under debate. We develop a theory to understand the susceptible-infected-susceptible epidemic model on arbitrary temporal networks, where each contact is used for a finite duration. We show that temporality of networks lessens the epidemic threshold such that infections persist more easily in temporal networks than in their static counterparts. We further show that the Lie commutator bracket of the adjacency matrices at different times is a key determinant of the epidemic threshold in temporal networks. The effect of temporality on the epidemic threshold, which depends on a data set, is approximately predicted by the magnitude of a commutator norm.

  9. Genetic susceptibility to malignant diseases--ethical issues. Minireview.

    PubMed

    Munzarová, M

    2002-01-01

    Ethical problems connected with genetic testing with the intention of the measurement of the susceptibility or predisposition to malignant tumors are presented (respect for autonomy, beneficence, nonmaleficence, confidentiality, privacy, veracity and truth-telling, informed consent, right to know, right not to know, informational self-determination, etc.). Various aspects dealing with ethics of screening and research projects involving human subjects are discussed as well.

  10. BSAC standardized disc susceptibility testing method (version 10).

    PubMed

    Andrews, J M; Howe, R A

    2011-12-01

    The BSAC standardized disc susceptibility testing method remains unchanged, but there are considerable changes to the interpretative criteria due to continuing harmonization with the European Committee on Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) MIC breakpoints. There are a number of agents for which interpretative criteria have been removed. These MIC and/or zone diameter breakpoints will be published on the BSAC web site as a 'Legacy' table; they may be used for research or comparative purposes, but are not recommended for clinical management. Notably, testing of staphylococci for susceptibility to glycopeptides by disc diffusion has been removed because this method has been found to be unreliable, particularly for the detection of low-level resistance; low-level vancomycin resistance in staphylococci is increasingly deemed to be of clinical relevance. The tables for anaerobes have been expanded to include MIC breakpoints that have been determined by EUCAST. There are currently no zone diameter breakpoints for these organisms and an MIC method is recommended if susceptibility testing is required.

  11. Probing of susceptibility structures through the distant dipolar field effect.

    PubMed

    Wong, Chung Ki

    2013-07-01

    In this paper, the utilization of the distant dipolar field (DDF) signal to extract the properties of susceptibility structures over a subvoxel length scale is investigated. Numerical simulations are performed to study a system of randomly distributed blood vessels with a susceptibility offset inside a voxel. It is shown that the DDF signal of the system as a function of the strength of the correlation gradient field manifests a peak that depends on the volume ratio, size, and susceptibility offset of the blood vessels. In particular, the location of the signal peak is found to vary as powers of these parameters. As a result, by varying the strength of the correlation gradient field, the characteristic properties of the blood vessels can be extracted from the peak position of the DDF signal. It is also found that, for a given volume ratio of the blood vessels, a smaller size of the blood vessels can be probed when the susceptibility offset is increased. Nevertheless, it is demonstrated that, owing to the broad width of the signal peak, the DDF effect generally cannot be used for the preferential selection of the signal arising from the blood vessels on the length scale determined by the correlation length. PMID:23643159

  12. Susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria: myth, magic, or method?

    PubMed Central

    Wexler, H M

    1991-01-01

    The demand for susceptibility testing of anaerobes has increased, yet consensus as to procedure and interpretation in this area has not been achieved. While routine testing of anaerobic isolates is not needed, certain isolates in specific clinical settings should be tested. Also, laboratories may monitor their local antibiograms by doing periodic surveillance batch testing. The National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards has published a protocol of methods approved for susceptibility testing of anaerobic bacteria. Both agar and broth microdilution are included; however, the broth disk elution method is no longer approved by the National Committee for Clinical Laboratory Standards because of method-related interpretive errors. A number of newer methods are undergoing evaluation and seem promising. Clinicians and microbiologists reviewing susceptibility reports should be aware of sources of variability in the test results. Variables in susceptibility testing of anaerobes include the media and methods used, organisms chosen for testing, breakpoints chosen for interpretation, antibiotic, and determination of endpoint. Clustering of MICs around the breakpoint may lead to significant variability in test results. Adherence of testing laboratories to approved methods and careful descriptions of the method and the breakpoints used for interpretation would facilitate interlaboratory comparisons and allow problems of emerging resistance to be noted. A variety of resistance mechanisms occurs in anaerobic bacteria, including the production of beta-lactamase and other drug-inactivating enzymes, alteration of target proteins, and inability of the drug to penetrate the bacterial wall. Antimicrobial resistance patterns in the United States and abroad are described. PMID:1747863

  13. Antifungal susceptibilities of Candida species isolated from urine culture.

    PubMed

    Toka Özer, Türkan; Durmaz, Süleyman; Yula, Erkan

    2016-09-01

    Candida spp. are the most common opportunistic mycosis worldwide. Although Candida albicans is the most common cause of urinary tract infections, the frequency of non-albicans Candida species is increasing with common use of antifungal in the prophylaxis and treatment. This may lead to difficulties in treatment. Antifungal tests should be applied with identification of species for effective treatment. In this study, identification of Candida species isolated from urine culture and investigation of susceptibility of these strains to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole was aimed. In this study, 58 Candida strains isolated from urine cultures at Osmaniye State Hospital between January 2012 and April 2013 were included. Urine culture and antifungal susceptibility tests were applied. Incidence rate of Candida spp. was determined as C. albicans (56.9%), Candida glabrata (20.6%), Candida tropicalis (10.3%), Candida parapsilosis (7%), Candida krusei (3.4%), Candida kefyr (1.8%). Most of the isolates were susceptible to amphotericin B, flucytosine, fluconazole, voriconazole. Twenty three (39.7%) Candida strains were isolated from internal medical branches and Intensive Care Unit and 12 (20.6%) from the Surgical Medical Branches. C. albicans and C. glabrata species were isolated most frequently as a candiduria factor in this hospital between January 2012 and April 2013. The analysis of antifungal susceptibility profile shows no significant resistance to antifungals.

  14. Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae) susceptibility to Deltamethrin in Madagascar.

    PubMed

    Boyer, Sebastien; Miarinjara, Adélaïde; Elissa, Nohal

    2014-01-01

    The incidence of bubonic plague in Madagascar is high. This study reports the susceptibility of 32 different populations of a vector, the flea Xenopsylla cheopis (Siphonaptera: Pulicidae), to the insecticide Deltamethrin. Despite the use of Deltamethrin against fleas, plague epidemics have re-emerged in Madagascar. The majority of the study sites were located in the Malagasy highlands where most plague cases have occurred over the last 10 years. X. cheopis fleas were tested for susceptibility to Deltamethrin (0.05%): only two populations were susceptible to Deltamethrin, four populations were tolerant and 26 populations were resistant. KD50 (50% Knock-Down) and KD90 (90% Knock-Down) times were determined, and differed substantially from 9.4 to 592.4 minutes for KD50 and 10.4 min to 854.3 minutes for KD90. Susceptibility was correlated with latitude, but not with longitude, history of insecticide use nor date of sampling. Combined with the number of bubonic plague cases, our results suggest that an immediate switch to an insecticide other than Deltamethrin is required for plague vector control in Madagascar.

  15. Susceptibility of Legionella strains to the chlorinated biocide, monochloramine.

    PubMed

    Jakubek, Delphine; Guillaume, Carole; Binet, Marie; Leblon, Gérard; DuBow, Michael; Le Brun, Matthieu

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Legionella genus find suitable conditions for their growth and survival in nuclear power plant cooling circuits. To limit the proliferation of Legionella pathogenic bacteria in nuclear power plant cooling circuits, and ensure that levels remain below regulatory thresholds, monochloramine treatment can be used. Although the treatment is highly effective, i.e. it reduces Legionella numbers by over 99%, Legionella bacteria can still be detected at low concentrations and rapid re-colonisation of circuits can occur after the treatment has ceased. The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro methodology for determining the intrinsic susceptibility of L. pneumophila strains, collected from various nuclear power plant cooling circuits subjected to different treatment conditions. The methodology was developed by using an original approach based on response surface methodology (RSM) combined with a multifactorial experimental design. The susceptibility was evaluated by the Ct factor. The susceptibility of environmental strains varies widely and is, for some strains, greater than that of known tolerant species; however, strain susceptibility was not related to treatment conditions. Selection pressure induced by monochloramine use did not result in the selection of more tolerant Legionella strains and did not explain the detection of Legionella during treatment or the rapid re-colonisation of cooling circuits after disinfection has ceased.

  16. Exposure to automotive pollution increases plasma susceptibility to oxidation.

    PubMed

    Sharman, James E; Coombes, Jeff S; Geraghty, Dominic P; Fraser, David I

    2002-01-01

    Low-density lipoprotein oxidation is implicated in the development of atherosclerosis. Plasma susceptibility to oxidation may be used as a marker of low-density lipoprotein oxidation and thus predict atherosclerotic risk. In this study the authors investigated the relationship between plasma susceptibility to oxidation and exposure to automotive pollution in a group of automobile mechanics (n = 16) exposed to high levels of automotive pollution, vs. matched controls (n = 13). The authors induced plasma oxidation by a free radical initiator and they determined susceptibility to oxidation by (1) change in absorbance at 234 nm, (2) lag time to conjugated diene formation, and (3) linear slope of the oxidation curve. Mechanics had significantly higher values (mean +/- standard error) for change in absorbance (1.60 +/- 0.05 vs. 1.36 +/- 0.05; p < .002), and slope (1.6 x 10(-3) +/- 0.1 x 10(-3) vs. 1.3 x 10(-3) +/- 0.1 x 10(-3); p < .001), compared with controls. These results indicate that regular exposure to automotive pollutants increases plasma susceptibility to oxidation and may, in the long-term, increase the risk of developing atherosclerosis.

  17. Susceptibility of Legionella Strains to the Chlorinated Biocide, Monochloramine

    PubMed Central

    Jakubek, Delphine; Guillaume, Carole; Binet, Marie; Leblon, Gérard; DuBow, Michael; Le Brun, Matthieu

    2013-01-01

    Members of the Legionella genus find suitable conditions for their growth and survival in nuclear power plant cooling circuits. To limit the proliferation of Legionella pathogenic bacteria in nuclear power plant cooling circuits, and ensure that levels remain below regulatory thresholds, monochloramine treatment can be used. Although the treatment is highly effective, i.e. it reduces Legionella numbers by over 99%, Legionella bacteria can still be detected at low concentrations and rapid re-colonisation of circuits can occur after the treatment has ceased. The aim of this study was to develop an in vitro methodology for determining the intrinsic susceptibility of L. pneumophila strains, collected from various nuclear power plant cooling circuits subjected to different treatment conditions. The methodology was developed by using an original approach based on response surface methodology (RSM) combined with a multifactorial experimental design. The susceptibility was evaluated by the Ct factor. The susceptibility of environmental strains varies widely and is, for some strains, greater than that of known tolerant species; however, strain susceptibility was not related to treatment conditions. Selection pressure induced by monochloramine use did not result in the selection of more tolerant Legionella strains and did not explain the detection of Legionella during treatment or the rapid re-colonisation of cooling circuits after disinfection has ceased. PMID:24005820

  18. Is acetylcholinesterase a biomarker of susceptibility in Daphnia magna (Crustacea, Cladocera) after deltamethrin exposure?

    PubMed

    Toumi, Héla; Boumaiza, Moncef; Millet, Maurice; Radetski, Claudemir Marcos; Felten, Vincent; Férard, Jean François

    2015-02-01

    In the present study, we explored the possibility of using the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) as a biomarker after deltamethrin (pyrethroid insecticide) exposure with three strains of the cladoceran Daphnia magna. Four calculated time-weighted deltamethrin concentrations (20.1, 40.3, 80.6 and 161.3 ng L(-1)) were compared against control acetylcholinesterase activity. Our results showed that after 48 h of deltamethrin exposure, all treatments induced a significant decrease of AChE activities whatever the three considered strains. However, diverse responses were registered in terms of lowest observed effect concentrations (LOEC: 80.6 ng L(-1) for strain 1 and 20.1 ng L(-1) for strains 2 and 3) revealing differences in sensitivity among the three tested strains of D. magna. Our results suggest that after deltamethrin exposure, the AChE activity responses can be also used as a biomarker of susceptibility (i.e., variation of strain specific response). Moreover, our results show that strain 1 is the less sensitive in terms of IC50-48 h of AChE, whereas it became the most sensitive when considering the EC50-48 h estimated in the standard ecotoxicity test.

  19. Metabolic polymorphisms and cancer susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Smith, G; Stanley, L A; Sim, E; Strange, R C; Wolf, C R

    1995-01-01

    The vast majority of cancers arise as a consequence of exposure to environmental agents that are toxic or mutagenic. In response to this, all higher organisms have evolved complex mechanisms by which they can protect themselves from environmental challenge. In many cases, this involves an adaptive response in which the levels of expression of enzymes active in the metabolism and detoxification of the foreign chemical are induced. The best characterized of these enzyme systems are the cytochrome P450s, the GSTs and the NATs. An unfortunate consequence of many of these reactions, however, is the creation of a toxic or mutagenic reaction product from chemicals that require metabolic activation before realizing their full carcinogenic potential. Altered expression of one or more of these drug metabolizing enzymes can therefore be predicted to have profound toxicological consequences. Genetic polymorphisms with well defined associated phenotypes have now been characterized in P450, GST and NAT genes. Indeed, many of these polymorphisms have been associated with decreased or increased metabolism of many tumour promoters and chemical carcinogens and hence offer protection against or increased susceptibility to many distinct tumour types.

  20. Susceptibility genes in movement disorders.

    PubMed

    Scholz, Sonja; Singleton, Andrew

    2008-05-15

    During the last years, remarkable progress in our understanding of molecular genetic mechanisms underlying movement disorders has been achieved. The successes of linkage studies, followed by positional cloning, have dominated the last decade and several genes underlying monogenic disorders have been discovered. The pathobiological understanding garnered from these mutations has laid the foundation for much of the search for genetic loci that confer risk for, rather than cause, disease. With the introduction of whole genome association studies as a novel tool to investigate genetic variation underlying common, complex diseases, a new era in neurogenomics has just begun. As the field rapidly moves forward several new challenges and critical questions in clinical care have to be addressed. In this review, we summarize recent advances in the discovery of susceptibility loci underlying major movement disorders, explain the newest methodologies and tools employed for finding and characterizing genes and discuss how insights into the molecular genetic basis of neurological disorders will impact therapeutic concepts in patient care.

  1. Susceptibility of irradiated bovine aortic endothelial cells to injury

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou, M.H.; Dong, Q.; Ts'ao, C.

    1988-11-01

    Using cultured bovine aortic endothelial cells (BAEC), the authors attempted to determine whether prior irradiation would alter the susceptibility of these cells to three known injurious stimuli and, if so, whether the alteration would be related to radiation dose. BAEC were irradiated with 0, 5, or 10 Gy of gamma rays and, on the third postirradiation day, exposed to fibrin, nicotine, or bacterial endotoxin (lipopolysaccharide, LPS). Release of prelabeled 51Cr, representing cell lysis, cell detachment, or a combination of the two, was determined. Significant differences between irradiated and control cells were determined by using paired Student's t-tests. Irradiation did not appear to have altered the sensitivity of BAEC to fibrin-induced injury. Cells irradiated with 10 Gy of gamma rays, but generally not those irradiated with half this dose, showed a heightened susceptibility to nicotine. Contrary to the nicotine results, irradiated cells showed less cell detachment and lysis after exposure to LPS. These results suggest that the susceptibility of irradiated BAEC to harmful stimuli depends largely on the nature of the stimulus as well as the radiation dose.

  2. Non-contact measurement of diamagnetic susceptibility change by a magnetic levitation technique

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Takahashi, K.; Mogi, I.; Awaji, S.; Watanabe, K.

    2011-03-01

    A new method for measuring the temperature dependence of the diamagnetic susceptibility is described. It is based on the Faraday method and employs a magnetic levitation technique. The susceptibility of a magnetically levitating diamagnetic sample is determined from the product of the magnetic flux density and the field gradient at the levitating position observed using a micro CCD camera. The susceptibility of a sample during containerless melting and solidification can be measured to a precision of better than ±0.05%. The temperature dependence of the susceptibility of paraffin wax was measured by the magnetic levitation technique with an accuracy of ±0.25%. This method enables sensitive and contactless measurements of the diamagnetic susceptibility across the melting point with in situ observations.

  3. Non-susceptible landslide areas in Italy and in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesini, I.; Ardizzone, F.; Alvioli, M.; Rossi, M.; Guzzetti, F.

    2014-04-01

    We used landslide information for 13 study areas in Italy and morphometric information obtained from the 3 arc-second SRTM DEM to determine areas where landslide susceptibility is expected to be null or negligible in Italy, and in the landmasses surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. The morphometric information consisted in the local terrain slope computed in a square 3 × 3 cell moving window, and in the regional relative relief computed in a circular 15 × 15 cell moving window. We tested three different models to determine the non-susceptible landslide areas, including a linear model (LR), a quantile linear model (QLR), and a quantile non-linear model (QNL). We tested the performance of the three models using independent landslide information represented by the Italian Landslide Inventory (Inventario Fenomeni Franosi in Italia - IFFI). Best results were obtained using the QNL model. The corresponding zonation of non-susceptible landslide areas was intersected in a GIS with geographical census data for Italy. The result allowed determining that 57.5% of the population of Italy (in 2001) was located in areas where landslide susceptibility is expected to be null or negligible, and that the remaining 42.5% was located in areas where some landslide susceptibility is expected. We applied the QNL model to the landmasses surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, and we tested the synoptic non-susceptibility zonation using independent landslide information for three study areas in Spain. Results proved that the QNL model was capable of determining where landslide susceptibility is expected to be negligible in the Mediterranean area. We expect our results to be applicable in similar study areas, facilitating the identification of non-susceptible and susceptible landslide areas, at the synoptic scale.

  4. Differential IL-1 synthesis by astrocytes from Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus-susceptible and -resistant strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Rubio, N; Capa, L

    1993-07-01

    Increasing evidence shows that interleukin-1 (IL-1) contributes to inflammatory processes, such as experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) and virus-induced demyelination, inside the central nervous system (CNS). Using primary cultures of mouse astrocytes, we show that these glial cells can be induced to produce IL-1 alpha when infected with Theiler's murine encephalomyelitis virus (TMEV). This was true for astrocytes from SJL/J mice, a strain susceptible to TMEV-induced demyelination. Conversely, BALB/c astrocytes, derived from animals genetically resistant to demyelination, did not produce IL-1 alpha in detectable amounts. Therefore, a differential IL-1 gene expression, which is strain specific, is demonstrated after TMEV infection in astrocytes. The release of IL-1 alpha by SJL astrocytes was studied from kinetic, infectivity, and immunochemical points of view. Since IL-1 plays a critical role in the immune response, its production by astrocytes in some strains of mice may contribute to virus-induced susceptibility and to inflammation associated with this experimental model of multiple sclerosis.

  5. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Brachyspira Species Isolated from Swine Herds in the United States.

    PubMed

    Mirajkar, Nandita S; Davies, Peter R; Gebhart, Connie J

    2016-08-01

    Outbreaks of swine dysentery, caused by Brachyspira hyodysenteriae and the recently discovered "Brachyspira hampsonii," have reoccurred in North American swine herds since the late 2000s. Additionally, multiple Brachyspira species have been increasingly isolated by North American diagnostic laboratories. In Europe, the reliance on antimicrobial therapy for control of swine dysentery has been followed by reports of antimicrobial resistance over time. The objectives of our study were to determine the antimicrobial susceptibility trends of four Brachyspira species originating from U.S. swine herds and to investigate their associations with the bacterial species, genotypes, and epidemiological origins of the isolates. We evaluated the susceptibility of B. hyodysenteriae, B. hampsonii, Brachyspira pilosicoli, and Brachyspira murdochii to tiamulin, valnemulin, doxycycline, lincomycin, and tylosin by broth microdilution and that to carbadox by agar dilution. In general, Brachyspira species showed high susceptibility to tiamulin, valnemulin, and carbadox, heterogeneous susceptibility to doxycycline, and low susceptibility to lincomycin and tylosin. A trend of decreasing antimicrobial susceptibility by species was observed (B. hampsonii > B. hyodysenteriae > B. murdochii > B. pilosicoli). In general, Brachyspira isolates from the United States were more susceptible to these antimicrobials than were isolates from other countries. Decreased antimicrobial susceptibility was associated with the genotype, stage of production, and production system from which the isolate originated, which highlights the roles of biosecurity and husbandry in disease prevention and control. Finally, this study also highlights the urgent need for Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute-approved clinical breakpoints for Brachyspira species, to facilitate informed therapeutic and control strategies. PMID:27252458

  6. Antifungal susceptibility of 175 Aspergillus isolates from various clinical and environmental sources.

    PubMed

    Sabino, Raquel; Carolino, Elisabete; Veríssimo, Cristina; Martinez, Marife; Clemons, Karl V; Stevens, David A

    2016-10-01

    Some environmental Aspergillus spp. isolates have been described as resistant to antifungals, potentially causing an emerging medical problem. In the present work, the antifungal susceptibility profile of 41 clinical and 134 environmental isolates of Aspergillus was determined using the CLSI microdilution method. The aim of this study was to compare environmental and clinical isolates with respect to their susceptibility, and assess the potential implications for therapy of isolates encountered in different environments. To our knowledge, this is the first report comparing antifungal susceptibility profiles of Aspergillus collected from different environmental sources (poultries, swineries, beach sand, and hospital environment). Significant differences were found in the distribution of the different species sections for the different sources. Significant differences were also found in the susceptibility profile of the different Aspergillus sections recovered from the various sources. Clear differences were found between the susceptibility of clinical and environmental isolates for caspofungin, amphotericin B and posaconazole, with clinical isolates showing overall greater susceptibility, except for caspofungin. In comparison to clinical isolates, hospital environmental isolates showed significantly less susceptibility to amphotericin B and posaconazole. These data indicate that species section identity and the site from which the isolate was recovered influence the antifungal susceptibility profile, which may affect initial antifungal choices.

  7. Dynamic insecticide susceptibility changes in Florida populations of Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Psyllidae).

    PubMed

    Tiwari, Siddharth; Killiny, Nabil; Stelinski, Lukasz L

    2013-02-01

    Five field populations of Diaphorina citri Kuwayama from various regions of Florida were evaluated in 2011 for resistance to commonly used insecticides. Three diagnostic doses (LD50, LD75, and LD95), developed in 2009 using a laboratory susceptible population, were used to measure changes in susceptibility levels of field-collected populations as compared with a susceptible laboratory population. Further reductions in the susceptibility levels of D. citri to chlorpyriphos and fenpropathrin were determined, compared with results obtained in 2010. Mean percent mortality obtained from all five locations was significantly lower than observed with the laboratory susceptible population for all insecticides tested. Previously, expression of five CYP4 genes was implicated in contributing to insecticide metabolism in D. citri. In the current study, we compared the relative expression of these five CYP4 genes and their associated levels of protein expression among field-collected and laboratory susceptible populations. Expression of all CYP4 genes investigated was higher in field-collected populations when normalized against the laboratory susceptible population. There was an increased signal of a band corresponding to a 45 kDa protein in four of the five field populations as measured by the Western blot assay, which suggests increased production of cytochrome P450 enzymes. The current results indicate that insecticide resistance continues to increase in Florida populations ofD. citri, particularly to chlorpyriphos and fenpropathrin. However, there was no further decrease in susceptibility of Florida populations of D. citri to neonicotinoid insecticides in 2011 as compared with previous years.

  8. Further characterization of porcine Brachyspira hyodysenteriae isolates with decreased susceptibility to tiamulin.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, M; Aspán, A; Landén, A; Franklin, A

    2004-04-01

    Brachyspira hyodysenteriae is the causative agent of swine dysentery, a severe diarrhoeal disease in pigs. Few drugs are available to treat the disease, owing to both antimicrobial resistance and withdrawal of drugs authorized for use in pigs. Tiamulin is the drug of choice in many countries, but isolates with decreased susceptibility have recently been reported. The mechanism of tiamulin resistance in B. hyodysenteriae is not known and this facet is essential to understand the dissemination of the trait. To study the resistance epidemiology of B. hyodysenteriae, further characterization of a set of isolates from Germany (n = 16) and the UK (n = 6) with decreased susceptibility to tiamulin was performed. The relatedness between the isolates was studied by comparing PFGE patterns, and the in vitro susceptibility to five other antimicrobials (aivlosin, doxycycline, salinomycin, chloramphenicol and avilamycin) was also determined. For comparison of the antimicrobial-susceptibility pattern, Swedish (n = 20) and British (n = 4) tiamulin-susceptible isolates were tested. The German isolates represented several different PFGE patterns, indicating that tiamulin usage has been sufficient to select clones with decreased tiamulin susceptibility at different farms in Germany. The PFGE pattern for the six British isolates with decreased tiamulin susceptibility was identical to that of the German isolates, and they had a similar antimicrobial-susceptibility pattern, except for resistance to aivlosin, which was only found in a few German isolates. No other co-resistance with tiamulin was found.

  9. High susceptibility of the endangered dusky gopher frog to ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Sutton, William B; Gray, Matthew J; Hardman, Rebecca H; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Kouba, Andrew J; Miller, Debra L

    2014-11-13

    Amphibians are one of the most imperiled vertebrate groups, with pathogens playing a role in the decline of some species. Rare species are particularly vulnerable to extinction because populations are often isolated and exist at low abundance. The potential impact of pathogens on rare amphibian species has seldom been investigated. The dusky gopher frog Lithobates sevosus is one of the most endangered amphibian species in North America, with 100-200 individuals remaining in the wild. Our goal was to determine whether adult L. sevosus were susceptible to ranavirus, a pathogen responsible for amphibian die-offs worldwide. We tested the relative susceptibility of adult L. sevosus to ranavirus (103 plaque-forming units) isolated from a morbid bullfrog via 3 routes of exposure: intra-coelomic (IC) injection, oral (OR) inoculation, and water bath (WB) exposure. We observed 100% mortality of adult L. sevosus in the IC and WB treatments after 10 and 19 d, respectively. Ninety-five percent mortality occurred in the OR treatment over the 28 d evaluation period. No mortality was observed in the control treatment after 28 d. Our results indicate that L. sevosus is susceptible to ranavirus, and if adults in the wild are exposed to this pathogen, significant mortality could occur. Additionally, our study demonstrates that some adult amphibian species can be very susceptible to ranavirus, which has been often overlooked in North American studies. We recommend that conservation planners consider testing the susceptibility of rare amphibian species to ranavirus and that the adult age class is included in future challenge experiments. PMID:25392038

  10. High susceptibility of the endangered dusky gopher frog to ranavirus.

    PubMed

    Sutton, William B; Gray, Matthew J; Hardman, Rebecca H; Wilkes, Rebecca P; Kouba, Andrew J; Miller, Debra L

    2014-11-13

    Amphibians are one of the most imperiled vertebrate groups, with pathogens playing a role in the decline of some species. Rare species are particularly vulnerable to extinction because populations are often isolated and exist at low abundance. The potential impact of pathogens on rare amphibian species has seldom been investigated. The dusky gopher frog Lithobates sevosus is one of the most endangered amphibian species in North America, with 100-200 individuals remaining in the wild. Our goal was to determine whether adult L. sevosus were susceptible to ranavirus, a pathogen responsible for amphibian die-offs worldwide. We tested the relative susceptibility of adult L. sevosus to ranavirus (103 plaque-forming units) isolated from a morbid bullfrog via 3 routes of exposure: intra-coelomic (IC) injection, oral (OR) inoculation, and water bath (WB) exposure. We observed 100% mortality of adult L. sevosus in the IC and WB treatments after 10 and 19 d, respectively. Ninety-five percent mortality occurred in the OR treatment over the 28 d evaluation period. No mortality was observed in the control treatment after 28 d. Our results indicate that L. sevosus is susceptible to ranavirus, and if adults in the wild are exposed to this pathogen, significant mortality could occur. Additionally, our study demonstrates that some adult amphibian species can be very susceptible to ranavirus, which has been often overlooked in North American studies. We recommend that conservation planners consider testing the susceptibility of rare amphibian species to ranavirus and that the adult age class is included in future challenge experiments.

  11. Distribution and antifungal susceptibility of Candida species causing nosocomial candiduria.

    PubMed

    Ozhak-Baysan, Betil; Ogunc, Dilara; Colak, Dilek; Ongut, Gozde; Donmez, Levent; Vural, Tumer; Gunseren, Filiz

    2012-07-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate the distribution of Candida species isolated from urine specimens of hospitalized patients in Akdeniz University Hospital, Antalya, Turkey, as well as their susceptibilities to antifungal agents. A total of 100 patients who had nosocomial candiduria between March 2003 and May 2004 at the facility were included in the study. Organisms were identified by conventional methods and the use of API ID 32C strips. Susceptibilities of the isolates to amphotericin B were determined by Etest, whereas the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) values of these same strains to fluconazole, voriconazole and caspofungin were assessed using the broth microdilution method. The most common species recovered was C. albicans 44% of all yeasts, followed by C. tropicalis (20%), C. glabrata (18%), C. krusei (6%), C. famata (5%), C. parapsilosis (4%), C. kefyr (2%) and C. guilliermondii (1%). A total of nine (9%) of the isolates, including five C. krusei and four C. glabrata isolates were susceptible dose-dependent (SDD) to fluconazole. In constrast, only two C. glabrata and one C. krusei isolates were resistant to this antifungal. The voriconazole MICs for all Candida isolates were ≤0.5 μg/ml, except for one C. glabrata isolate with a MIC value of 2 μg/ml. Among all isolates, 94% were susceptible to amphotericin B with MIC values of <1 μg/ml and all isolates were susceptible to caspofungin with MIC values of ≤0.5 μg/ml. Future studies are needed to define better treatment regimens for those patients who have fluconazole-resistant Candida urinary tract infections.

  12. In vitro susceptibility of Malassezia furfur.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, A; Rühl-Hörster, B

    1996-04-01

    Malassezia (M.) furfur is an anthropophilic fungus with complex growth requirements. Apart from its physiological appearance on human skin it is the causative agent of several skin disorders. A method for in vitro antifungal susceptibility testing of M. furfur in a microtiter plate assay has been developed. Read-out was performed colorimetrically in modified Leeming-Notman medium after incubation with alamarBlue. Twenty-two strains of M. furfur were tested, minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined for climbazole, piroctone-olamine, selenium disulfide, zinc pyrithione. These substances are of common use in topical therapy of M. furfur-associated skin conditions. For climbazole, the range of MICs was between < 0.03 and 2 micrograms/ml with an empirical median mean of 0.03 micrograms/ml. For piroctoneolamine the range of MICs was between 16 and 64 micrograms/ml (mean = 64 micrograms/ml), for selenium disulfide between 2 and 64 micrograms/ml (mean = 8 micrograms/ml), and for zinc pyrithione between 0.12 and 8 micrograms/ml (mean = 1 micrograms/ml). These data indicate the high in vitro activity of climbazole against M. furfur, followed by zinc pyrithione. Selenium disulfide and piroctone-olamine were less active. PMID:8740097

  13. Physically-Based Shallow Landslide Susceptibility Mapping, NW of Portugal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teixeira, Manuel; Bateira, Carlos; Soares, Laura

    2013-04-01

    Two physically-based models - Shallow Landslide Stability Analysis (SHALSTAB) and Safety Factor (SF) - are applied in Serra da Peneda (northwest of Portugal) to evaluate shallow landslide susceptibility in Tibo drainage basin. This small basin is located in an area of granitic and metasedimentary substrate, covered by different types of surficial formations (weathering mantles and slope deposits). The application of the selected models requires the determination of a set of mechanical and hydrological parameters, and the use of high resolution topographic information to create an accurate DTM. To fulfill this goal we have applied the Shallow Landslide Stability Analysis (SHALSTAB) and the SF (Safety Factor) models. The shallow landslide area was inventoried on the field. The cohesion was assessed by back analysis and the other mechanical and hydrological soil parameters were assessed on the field survey. Several susceptibility scenarios were tested with SHALSTAB model. The best SHALSTAB scenario used to assess the susceptibility is achieved using the following parameters: cohesion (c) = 2000 N/m2, soil thickness (z) = 1,2 m, internal friction (?)=32o and soil weight (?s)=14,7 KN/m3. Shallow landslide susceptibility mapping using the SF model, was based on the cartography of the factors registered on the field survey and used the following parameters: cohesion (c) = 2000 - 6000 N/m2, soil thickness (z) =1,2 m, internal friction (?)=30 - 40o; soil volumic weight (?m) = 13,7 - 15,7 KN/m3 and Hydraulic conductivity = 0 - 3,9-03 kfs. SHALSTAB scenarios were validated by overlaying the shallow landslide area (scar concentration) and selected the better susceptibility modeling. The parameters used on the SF model applied spatially variable values registered in the field survey (using the superficial formation cartography). To validate the SF model we used the AUC (Area Under the Curve) method. The two models were compared by the scar concentration and landslide potential

  14. Non-Susceptible Landslide Areas in Italy and in the Mediterranean Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alvioli, Massimiliano; Ardizzone, Francesca; Guzzetti, Fausto; Marchesini, Ivan; Rossi, Mauro

    2014-05-01

    Landslide susceptibility is the likelihood of a landslide occurring in a given area. Over the past three decades, researchers, and planning and environmental organisations have worked to assess landslide susceptibility at different geographical scales, and to produce maps portraying landslide susceptibility zonation. Little effort was made to determine where landslides are not expected, where susceptibility is null, or negligible. This is surprising because planners and decision makers are also interesting in knowing where landslides are not foreseen, or cannot occur in an area. We propose a method for the definition of non-susceptible landslide areas, at the synoptic scale. We applied the method in Italy and to the territory surrounding the Mediterranean Sea and we produced two synoptic-scale maps showing areas where landslides are not expected in Italy and in the Mediterranean area. To construct the method we used digital terrain elevation and landslide information. The digital terrain consisted in the 3-arc-second SRTM DEM, the landslide information was obtained for 13 areas in Italy where landslide inventory maps were available to us. We tested three different models to determine the non-susceptible landslide areas, including a linear model (LR), a quantile linear model (QLR), and a quantile non-linear model (QNL). Model performances have been evaluated using independent landslide information represented by the Italian Landslide Inventory (Inventario Fenomeni Franosi in Italia - IFFI). Best results were obtained using the QNL model. The corresponding zonation of non- susceptible landslide areas was intersected in a GIS with geographical census data for Italy. The results show that the 57.5% of the population of Italy (in 2001) was located in areas where landslide susceptibility was expected to be null or negligible, while the remaining 42.5% in areas where some landslide susceptibility was significant or not negligible. We applied the QNL model to the

  15. Antimicrobial Stewardship in the Microbiology Laboratory: Impact of Selective Susceptibility Reporting on Ciprofloxacin Utilization and Susceptibility of Gram-Negative Isolates to Ciprofloxacin in a Hospital Setting.

    PubMed

    Langford, B J; Seah, J; Chan, A; Downing, M; Johnstone, J; Matukas, L M

    2016-09-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the impact of selective susceptibility reporting on ciprofloxacin utilization and Gram-negative susceptibility to ciprofloxacin in a hospital setting. Historically at our institution, the microbiology laboratory practice was to report ciprofloxacin susceptibility for all Enterobacteriaceae regardless of susceptibility to other agents. A selective reporting policy was implemented which involved the suppression of ciprofloxacin susceptibility to Enterobacteriaceae when there was lack of resistance to the antibiotics on the Gram-negative panel. Ciprofloxacin utilization (measured in defined daily doses [DDD] per 1,000 patient days) was collected before and after the intervention and compared to moxifloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, nitrofurantoin, and amoxicillin-clavulanate. Monthly susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli to ciprofloxacin was tabulated. An interrupted time series analysis using segmented regression was performed. The mean monthly ciprofloxacin utilization decreased from 87 (95% CI, 83.7 to 91.2) to 39 (95% CI, 35.0 to 44.0) DDD per 1,000 patient days before and after the implementation of selective reporting, respectively. There was an immediate and sustained reduction in ciprofloxacin usage at 1, 3, 6, 12, and 24 months postintervention (P < 0.001). A compensatory increase in amoxicillin-clavulanate use was noted starting at 6 months postintervention and persisted for the study period (P < 0.027). Susceptibility of E. coli, but not that of P. aeruginosa, to ciprofloxacin was higher than predicted starting 12 months after the intervention (P < 0.05). In conclusion, selective reporting of ciprofloxacin susceptibly may be a useful intervention to reduce targeted antimicrobial utilization and improve Gram-negative susceptibility to ciprofloxacin. This approach should be considered as part of a broader multimodal antimicrobial stewardship program.

  16. Anisotropy of the magnetic susceptibility of gallium

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pankey, T.

    1960-01-01

    The bulk magnetic susceptibilities of single gallium crystals and polycrystalline gallium spheres were measured at 25??C. The following anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibilities were found: a axis (-0.119??0. 001)??10-6 emu/g, b axis (-0.416??0.002)??10 -6 emu/g, and c axis (-0.229??0.001) emu/g. The susceptibility of the polycrystalline spheres, assumed to be the average value for the bulk susceptibility of gallium, was (-0.257??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at 25??C, and (-0.299??0.003)??10-6 emu/g at -196??C. The susceptibility of liquid gallium was (0.0031??0.001) ??10-6 emu/g at 30??C and 100??C. Rotational diagrams of the susceptibilities in the three orthogonal planes of the unit cell were not sinusoidal. The anisotropy in the single crystals was presumably caused by the partial overlap of Brillouin zone boundaries by the Fermi-energy surface. The large change in susceptibility associated with the change in state was attributed to the absence of effective mass influence in the liquid state. ?? 1960 The American Institute of Physics.

  17. Haematite natural crystals: non-linear initial susceptibility at low temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guerrero-Suarez, S.; Martín-Hernández, F.

    2016-06-01

    Several works have reported that haematite has non-linear initial susceptibility at room temperature, like pyrrhotite or titanomagnetite, but there is no explanation for the observed behaviours yet. This study sets out to determine which physical property (grain size, foreign cations content and domain walls displacements) controls the initial susceptibility. The performed measurements include microprobe analysis to determine magnetic phases different to haematite; initial susceptibility (300 K); hysteresis loops, SIRM and backfield curves at 77 and 300 K to calculate magnetic parameters and minor loops at 77 K, to analyse initial susceptibility and magnetization behaviours below Morin transition. The magnetic moment study at low temperature is completed with measurements of zero field cooled-field cooled and AC susceptibility in a range from 5 to 300 K. The minor loops show that the non-linearity of initial susceptibility is closely related to Barkhausen jumps. Because of initial magnetic susceptibility is controlled by domain structure it is difficult to establish a mathematical model to separate magnetic subfabrics in haematite-bearing rocks.

  18. Application of luciferase assay for ATP to antimicrobial drug susceptibility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chappelle, E. W.; Picciolo, G. L.; Vellend, H.; Tuttle, S. A.; Barza, M. J.; Weinstein, L. (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    The susceptibility of bacteria, particularly those derived from body fluids, to antimicrobial agents is determined in terms of an ATP index measured by culturing a bacterium in a growth medium. The amount of ATP is assayed in a sample of the cultured bacterium by measuring the amount of luminescent light emitted when the bacterial ATP is reacted with a luciferase-luciferin mixture. The sample of the cultured bacterium is subjected to an antibiotic agent. The amount of bacterial adenosine triphosphate is assayed after treatment with the antibiotic by measuring the luminescent light resulting from the reaction. The ATP index is determined from the values obtained from the assay procedures.

  19. Magnetic susceptibility of tetragonal titanium dioxide

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Senftle, F.E.; Pankey, T.; Grant, F.A.

    1960-01-01

    Careful measurements have been made of the magnetic susceptibility of the rutile and anatase crystalline forms of titanium dioxide. The magnetic susceptibility of a single crystal of high-purity rutile was found to be (0.067??0.0015)??10-6 emu per gram, and was temperature-independent from 55??to 372??K. Difficulty was encountered in obtaining a good value of the magnetic susceptibility of anatase because of impurities. However, a value of 0.02??10-6 emu per gram was obtained as a maximum value for anatase powder. A discussion is given for the different values obtained for anatase and rutile. ?? 1960 The American Physical Society.

  20. Absolute method of measuring magnetic susceptibility

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Thorpe, A.; Senftle, F.E.

    1959-01-01

    An absolute method of standardization and measurement of the magnetic susceptibility of small samples is presented which can be applied to most techniques based on the Faraday method. The fact that the susceptibility is a function of the area under the curve of sample displacement versus distance of the magnet from the sample, offers a simple method of measuring the susceptibility without recourse to a standard sample. Typical results on a few substances are compared with reported values, and an error of less than 2% can be achieved. ?? 1959 The American Institute of Physics.

  1. Current susceptibility status of Malaysian Culex quinquefasciatus (Diptera: Culicidae) against DDT, propoxur, malathion, and permethrin.

    PubMed

    Low, V L; Chen, C D; Lee, H L; Lim, P E; Leong, C S; Sofian-Azirun, M

    2013-01-01

    A nationwide investigation was carried out to determine the current susceptibility status of Culex quinquefasciatus Say populations against four active ingredients representing four major insecticide classes: DDT, propoxur, malathion, and permethrin. Across 14 study sites, both larval and adult bioassays exhibited dissimilar trends in susceptibility. A correlation between propoxur and malathion resistance and between propoxur and permethrin resistance in larval bioassays was found. The results obtained from this study provide baseline information for vector control programs conducted by local authorities. The susceptibility status of this mosquito should be monitored from time to time to ensure the effectiveness of current vector control operations in Malaysia.

  2. Glutathion S-transferase activity and DDT-susceptibility of Malaysian mosquitos.

    PubMed

    Lee, H L; Chong, W L

    1995-03-01

    Comparative DDT-susceptibility status and glutathion s-transferase (GST) activity of Malaysian Anopheles maculatus, Culex quinquefasciatus and Aedes aegypti was investigated to ascertain the role of this enzyme in DDT resistance. The standardised WHO dose-mortality bioassay tests were used to determine DDT susceptibility in these mosquitos, whilst GST microassay (Brogdon and Barber, 1990) was conducted to measure the activity of this enzyme in mosquito homogenate. It appeared that DDT susceptibility status of Malaysian mosquitos was not correlated with GST activity.

  3. Comparison of Dimethyl Sulfoxide and Water as Solvents for Echinocandin Susceptibility Testing by the EUCAST Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Alastruey-Izquierdo, Ana; Gómez-López, Alicia; Arendrup, Maiken C.; Lass-Florl, Cornelia; Hope, William W.; Perlin, David S.; Rodriguez-Tudela, Juan L.

    2012-01-01

    Ninety-six strains of Candida, including 29 resistant and 67 susceptible isolates with mutations in the FKS1 and FKS2 genes were tested by the European Committee on Antibiotic Susceptibility Testing EDef 7.1 and 7.2 methodologies to determine the impact on the MIC when water was replaced with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as the solvent for caspofungin and micafungin. The MICs were significantly lower and the MIC ranges were narrower when DMSO was used as the solvent. The use of DMSO may help to better discriminate between susceptible and resistant populations. PMID:22535988

  4. Lysosomal Disorders Drive Susceptibility to Tuberculosis by Compromising Macrophage Migration

    PubMed Central

    Berg, Russell D.; Levitte, Steven; O’Sullivan, Mary P.; O’Leary, Seónadh M.; Cambier, C.J.; Cameron, James; Takaki, Kevin K.; Moens, Cecilia B.; Tobin, David M.; Keane, Joseph; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2016-01-01

    Summary A zebrafish genetic screen for determinants of susceptibility to Mycobacterium marinum identified a hypersusceptible mutant deficient in lysosomal cysteine cathepsins that manifests hallmarks of human lysosomal storage diseases. Under homeostatic conditions, mutant macrophages accumulate undigested lysosomal material, which disrupts endocytic recycling and impairs their migration to, and thus engulfment of, dying cells. This causes a buildup of unengulfed cell debris. During mycobacterial infection, macrophages with lysosomal storage cannot migrate toward infected macrophages undergoing apoptosis in the tuberculous granuloma. The unengulfed apoptotic macrophages undergo secondary necrosis, causing granuloma breakdown and increased mycobacterial growth. Macrophage lysosomal storage similarly impairs migration to newly infecting mycobacteria. This phenotype is recapitulated in human smokers, who are at increased risk for tuberculosis. A majority of their alveolar macrophages exhibit lysosomal accumulations of tobacco smoke particulates and do not migrate to Mycobacterium tuberculosis. The incapacitation of highly microbicidal first-responding macrophages may contribute to smokers’ susceptibility to tuberculosis. PMID:27015311

  5. Antibiotic susceptibility of different lactic acid bacteria strains.

    PubMed

    Karapetkov, N; Georgieva, R; Rumyan, N; Karaivanova, E

    2011-12-01

    Five lactic acid bacteria (LAB) strains belonging to species Lactobacillus acidophilus, Lactobacillus helveticus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus, Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. lactis and Streptococcus thermophilus were tested for their susceptibility to 27 antibiotics. The minimum inhibitory concentrations of each antimicrobial were determined using a microdilution test. Among the strains a high susceptibility was detected for most of the cell-wall synthesis inhibitors (penicillins, cefoxitin and vancomycin) and resistance toward inhibitors of DNA synthesis (trimethoprim/sulfonamides and fluoroquinolones). Generally, the Lactobacillus strains were inhibited by antibiotics such as chloramphenicol, erythromycin and tetracycline at breakpoint levels lower or equal to the levels defined by the European Food Safety Authority. Despite the very similar profile of S. thermophilus LC201 to lactobacilli, the detection of resistance toward erythromycin necessitates the performance of additional tests in order to prove the absence of transferable resistance genes.

  6. Sulfide stress cracking susceptibility of nickel containing steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payer, J. H.; Pednekar, S. P.; Boyd, W. K.

    1986-09-01

    A systematic evaluation of the sulfide-stress cracking (SSC) behavior of five steels with nickel contents ranging from 0 to 3 pct was conducted in an acidified chloride solution saturated with H2S at room temperature (NACE solution). All of the steels were low-alloy, structural, or pressure vessel steels that are heat treatable to high strength levels with high toughness. All of the steels were heat treated to yield strength of approximately 690 MPa (100 ksi) and evaluated by identical test methods. The relative cracking susceptibility of the steels was determined from threshold stresses in constant-load tension tests and threshold stress intensities shown by precracked double-cantilever-beam specimens. Tempering treatment was a decisive factor in SSC susceptibility of low-nickel steels. When double tempered, low-Ni steels with greater than 1 pct Ni can be equivalent in SSC resistance to nominally nickel-free 4130 steel.

  7. Giant Magnetic Susceptibility of Gold Nanorods Detected by Magnetic Alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Rhee, P. G.; Zijlstra, P.; Verhagen, T. G. A.; Aarts, J.; Katsnelson, M. I.; Maan, J. C.; Orrit, M.; Christianen, P. C. M.

    2013-09-01

    We have determined the magnetic properties of single-crystalline Au nanorods in solution using an optically detected magnetic alignment technique. The rods exhibit a large anisotropy in the magnetic volume susceptibility (ΔχV). ΔχV increases with decreasing rod size and increasing aspect ratio and corresponds to an average volume susceptibility (χV), which is drastically enhanced relative to bulk Au. This high value of χV is confirmed by SQUID magnetometry and is temperature independent (between 5 and 300 K). Given this peculiar size, shape, and temperature dependence, we speculate that the enhanced χV is the result of orbital magnetism due to mesoscopic electron trajectories within the nanorods.

  8. Comparing fault susceptibility of multiple ISAs and operating systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chyłek, Sławomir

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents a research that aims to compare effects of faults on different configurations of computer systems. The study covers comparison of susceptibility to faults of x86, AMD64, ARM, PowerPC, MIPS architectures and Linux, FreeBSD, Minix operating systems. An emulation based software implemented fault injection technique was used to perform experiments. The problem of choosing an adequate number of tests in experiments is followed by report with collected results where multiple aspects of test runs were analyzed: providing correct computation result, availability of the system under test and error messages. The research allows to determine characteristics of susceptibility to faults of each platform and is a first step towards designing new fault tolerance solutions and assessing their effectiveness.

  9. Topological susceptibility at high temperature on the lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frison, J.; Kitano, R.; Matsufuru, H.; Mori, S.; Yamada, N.

    2016-09-01

    QCD topological susceptibility at high temperature, χ t ( T ), provides an important input for the estimate of the axion abundance in the present Universe. While the model independent determination of χ t ( T ) should be possible from the first principles using lattice QCD, existing methods fail at high temperature, since not only the probability that non-trivial topological sectors appear in the configuration generation process but also the local topological fluctuations get strongly suppressed. We propose a novel method to calculate the temperature dependence of topological susceptibility at high temperature. A feasibility test is performed on a small lattice in the quenched approximation, and the results are compared with the prediction of the dilute instanton gas approximation. It is found that the method works well especially at very high temperature and the result is consistent with the instanton calculus down to T ˜ 2 T c within the statistical uncertainty.

  10. Preliminary soil-slip susceptibility maps, southwestern California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Morton, Douglas M.; Alvarez, Rachel M.; Campbell, Russell H.; Digital preparation by Bovard, Kelly R.; Brown, D.T.; Corriea, K.M.; Lesser, J.N.

    2003-01-01

    This group of maps shows relative susceptibility of hill slopes to the initiation sites of rainfall-triggered soil slip-debris flows in southwestern California. As such, the maps offer a partial answer to one part of the three parts necessary to predict the soil-slip/debris-flow process. A complete prediction of the process would include assessments of “where”, “when”, and “how big”. These maps empirically show part of the “where” of prediction (i.e., relative susceptibility to sites of initiation of the soil slips) but do not attempt to show the extent of run out of the resultant debris flows. Some information pertinent to “when” the process might begin is developed. “When” is determined mostly by dynamic factors such as rainfall rate and duration, for which local variations are not amenable to long-term prediction. “When” information is not provided on the maps but is described later in this narrative. The prediction of “how big” is addressed indirectly by restricting the maps to a single type of landslide process—soil slip-debris flows. The susceptibility maps were created through an iterative process from two kinds of information. First, locations of sites of past soil slips were obtained from inventory maps of past events. Aerial photographs, taken during six rainy seasons that produced abundant soil slips, were used as the basis for soil slip-debris flow inventory. Second, digital elevation models (DEM) of the areas that were inventoried were used to analyze the spatial characteristics of soil slip locations. These data were supplemented by observations made on the ground. Certain physical attributes of the locations of the soil-slip debris flows were found to be important and others were not. The most important attribute was the mapped bedrock formation at the site of initiation of the soil slip. However, because the soil slips occur in surficial materials overlying the bedrocks units, the bedrock formation can only serve as

  11. Statistical analysis for assessing shallow-landslide susceptibility in South Tyrol (south-eastern Alps, Italy)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piacentini, Daniela; Troiani, Francesco; Soldati, Mauro; Notarnicola, Claudia; Savelli, Daniele; Schneiderbauer, Stefan; Strada, Claudia

    2012-05-01

    This paper conducts a statistical analysis to determine shallow-landslide susceptibility in an approximately 7500-km2 region of the south-eastern Alps (South Tyrol, Italy). The study applies the weight of evidence (WofE) method, which is useful in determining landslide susceptibility in large areas with complex geological and geomorphological settings. The statistical analysis and landslide susceptibility mapping are based on 882 past landslides, three geometric/topographic factors and two anthropogenic factors, which are the most relevant landslide predisposing factors. The quality of the proposed model, particularly the fitting performance, was assessed; the landslide database was divided into a training set to obtain the model and a validation set to estimate the model quality. The results show that the developed susceptibility model predicts an acceptable percentage (75%) of landslides. Therefore, the model can be useful and reliable for land planners and decision makers also due to its cost-effectiveness ratio.

  12. Reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility in Salmonella enterica serotypes in travelers returning from Southeast Asia.

    PubMed Central

    Hakanen, A.; Kotilainen, P.; Huovinen, P.; Helenius, H.; Siitonen, A.

    2001-01-01

    During 1995 to 1999, we collected 1,210 Salmonella isolates; 629 were from Finnish travelers returning from abroad. These isolates were tested for susceptibility by determining MICs to ciprofloxacin, nalidixic acid, and seven additional antimicrobial agents. From 1995 to 1999, the annual proportion of reduced ciprofloxacin susceptibility (MIC > 0.125 microg/mL) among all travelers' isolates increased from 3.9% to 23.5% (p<0.001). The increasing trend was outstanding among the isolates from Southeast Asia; isolates from Thailand alone increased from 5.6% to 50.0% (p<0.001). The reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility was nonclonal in character and significantly associated with multidrug resistance. A point mutation in the quinolone resistance-determining region of gyrA was present in all isolates with reduced susceptibility. These data provide further evidence for the rapid spread of multidrug-resistant pathogens from one continent to another. PMID:11747728

  13. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Environmental Streptococci Recovered from Bovine Milk Samples in the Maritime Provinces of Canada

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Marguerite; Saab, Matthew; Heider, Luke; McClure, J Trenton; Rodriguez-Lecompte, Juan Carlos; Sanchez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Determination of antimicrobial susceptibility of bovine mastitis pathogens is important for guiding antimicrobial treatment decisions and for the detection of emerging resistance. Environmental streptococci are ubiquitous in the farm environment and are a frequent cause of mastitis in dairy cows. The aim of the study was to determine patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility among species of environmental streptococci isolated from dairy cows in the Maritime Provinces of Canada. The collection consisted of 192 isolates identified in milk samples collected from 177 cows originating from 18 dairy herds. Results were aggregated into: (1) Streptococcus uberis (n = 70), (2) Streptococcus dysgalactiae (n = 28), (3) other Streptococci spp. (n = 35), (4), Lactococcus spp. (n = 32), and (5) Enterococcus spp. (n = 27). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using the Sensititre microdilution system and mastitis plate format. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to analyze the data, with antimicrobial susceptibility as the outcome. The proportion of susceptible S. uberis ranged from 23% (for penicillin) to 99% (for penicillin/novobiocin), with a median of 82%. All S. dysgalactiae were susceptible to all antimicrobials except for penicillin (93% susceptible) and tetracycline (18% susceptible). The range of susceptibility for other Streptococcus spp. was 43% (for tetracycline) to 100%, with a median percent susceptibility of 92%. Lactococcus spp. isolates displayed percent susceptibilities ranging from 0% (for penicillin) to 97% (for erythromycin), median 75%. For the antimicrobials tested, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were higher for Enterococcus spp. than for the other species. According to the multilevel models, there was a significant interaction between antimicrobial and bacterial species, indicating that susceptibility against a particular antimicrobial varied among the species of environmental streptococci and vice

  14. Antimicrobial Susceptibility Patterns of Environmental Streptococci Recovered from Bovine Milk Samples in the Maritime Provinces of Canada

    PubMed Central

    Cameron, Marguerite; Saab, Matthew; Heider, Luke; McClure, J Trenton; Rodriguez-Lecompte, Juan Carlos; Sanchez, Javier

    2016-01-01

    Determination of antimicrobial susceptibility of bovine mastitis pathogens is important for guiding antimicrobial treatment decisions and for the detection of emerging resistance. Environmental streptococci are ubiquitous in the farm environment and are a frequent cause of mastitis in dairy cows. The aim of the study was to determine patterns of antimicrobial susceptibility among species of environmental streptococci isolated from dairy cows in the Maritime Provinces of Canada. The collection consisted of 192 isolates identified in milk samples collected from 177 cows originating from 18 dairy herds. Results were aggregated into: (1) Streptococcus uberis (n = 70), (2) Streptococcus dysgalactiae (n = 28), (3) other Streptococci spp. (n = 35), (4), Lactococcus spp. (n = 32), and (5) Enterococcus spp. (n = 27). Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined using the Sensititre microdilution system and mastitis plate format. Multilevel logistic regression models were used to analyze the data, with antimicrobial susceptibility as the outcome. The proportion of susceptible S. uberis ranged from 23% (for penicillin) to 99% (for penicillin/novobiocin), with a median of 82%. All S. dysgalactiae were susceptible to all antimicrobials except for penicillin (93% susceptible) and tetracycline (18% susceptible). The range of susceptibility for other Streptococcus spp. was 43% (for tetracycline) to 100%, with a median percent susceptibility of 92%. Lactococcus spp. isolates displayed percent susceptibilities ranging from 0% (for penicillin) to 97% (for erythromycin), median 75%. For the antimicrobials tested, the minimum inhibitory concentrations were higher for Enterococcus spp. than for the other species. According to the multilevel models, there was a significant interaction between antimicrobial and bacterial species, indicating that susceptibility against a particular antimicrobial varied among the species of environmental streptococci and vice

  15. Susceptibility of spinosad in Musca domestica (Diptera: Muscidae) field populations.

    PubMed

    Kristensen, Michael; Jespersen, Jørgen B

    2004-06-01

    The toxicity of spinosad was determined in one susceptible and five insecticide-resistant laboratory strains of house fly, Musca domestica L. Spinosad was relatively slow-acting, but highly toxic to house flies. In a feeding bioassay, spinosad LC50 at 72 h was 0.51 microg of spinosad per gram of sugar, making it 6.3- and 3.5-fold more toxic to house flies compared with azamethiphos and methomyl, respectively. In topical application bioassay, the LD50 at 48 h of spinosad in susceptible house flies was 40 ng per 20 mg of house fly, making spinosad less toxic than the pyrethroid bioresmethrin synergized by piperonyl butoxide and the organophosphate dimethoate. The insecticide-resistant laboratory strains had resistance factors to spinosad at LC50 in feeding bioassay from 1.5 to 5.5 and at LD50 in topical application bioassay from 2.5 to 4.7, indicating that in house fly cross-resistance to the major insecticide classes will not initially be of major concern for the use of spinosad for house fly control. The toxicity of spinosad was also evaluated against 31 field populations of house flies collected from livestock farms across Denmark. The field populations were 2.2- to 7.5-fold resistant to spinosad at 72 h in feeding bioassay, but based on steep slopes in the bioassay and the limited variation of spinosad toxicity against the various field populations, we consider the field populations to be spinosad-susceptible. We propose a diagnostic dose of 12 microg of spinosad per gram of sugar in feeding bioassay with impregnated sugar for determination of resistant house flies, which is 10x the LC95 of the susceptible strain WHO and approximately = 2x the LD95 of the field populations. Spinosad showed no substantial cross-resistance to the pyrethroid bioresmethrin synergized by piperonyl butoxide, the anticholinesterases dimethoate, azamethiphos, methomyl, and spinosad in house fly field populations.

  16. Fitness of Escherichia coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline

    PubMed Central

    Linkevicius, Marius; Anderssen, Jytte Mark; Sandegren, Linus; Andersson, Dan I.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The objective of this study was to determine the fitness of Escherichia coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline after exposure to adverse conditions in vitro and in vivo. Methods Survival in response to low pH, bile salts, oxidative stress and human serum was examined for E. coli mutants with reduced susceptibility to tigecycline due to single mutations that caused increased efflux (marR, lon) or impaired LPS (rfaC, rfaE, lpcA). An in vitro competition assay was used to determine growth fitness defects. Competitive fitness was assessed using mouse infection models. MICs, exponential growth rates and expression levels of efflux-related genes were measured for genetically reconstructed double and triple mutants. Results The LPS mutants were 48–85-fold more susceptible to bile salts compared with the ERN mutants and the WT. As shown by in vitro competitions, the fitness reduction was 0.3%–13% for ERN mutants and ∼24% for LPS mutants. During in vivo survival experiments, LPS mutants were outcompeted by the WT strain in the thigh infection model. Constructed double ERN and LPS mutants showed additive and synergistic increases in tigecycline MICs. Conclusions Generally, reduced susceptibility to tigecycline caused a decrease in fitness under stressful in vitro and in vivo conditions with ERN mutants being fitter than LPS mutants. When combined, ERN mutations caused a synergistic increase in the MIC of tigecycline. These findings could explain why clinical resistance to tigecycline in E. coli is mainly associated with up-regulation of the AcrAB efflux system. PMID:26851608

  17. Macaque models of enhanced susceptibility to HIV.

    PubMed

    Henning, Tara R; McNicholl, Janet M; Vishwanathan, Sundaram A; Kersh, Ellen N

    2015-01-01

    There are few nonhuman primate models of enhanced HIV susceptibility. Such models can improve comprehension of HIV acquisition risk factors and provide rigorous testing platforms for preclinical prevention strategies. This paper reviews past, current, and proposed research on macaque HIV acquisition risk models and identifies areas where modeling is significantly lacking. We compare different experimental approaches and provide practical considerations for designing macaque susceptibility studies. Modifiable (mucosal and systemic coinfections, hormonal contraception, and rectal lubricants) and non-modifiable (hormonal fluctuations) risk factors are highlighted. Risk acquisition models via vaginal, rectal, and penile challenge routes are discussed. There is no consensus on the best statistical model for evaluating increased susceptibility, and additional research is required. The use of enhanced susceptibility macaque models would benefit multiple facets of the HIV research field, including basic acquisition and pathogenesis studies as well as the vaccine and other biomedical preventions pipeline.

  18. Dynamic spin susceptibility of interacting electron systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zyuzin, Vladimir; Maslov, Dmitrii

    2015-03-01

    We study the dynamic spin susceptibility of interacting electrons in spatial dimensions from one to three. In all cases, backscattering processes result in non-zero imaginary part of the spin susceptibility above the particle-hole continuum of non-interacting electrons. In one dimension, we employ the renormalization group to go beyond the second order and obtain a general expression for the spin susceptibility. In higher dimensions, we show that the imaginary part of the spin susceptibility arises from the same mechanism as non-analytic corrections to the Fermi-liquid theory. We relate the obtained results to the lifetime of collective spin modes. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation via Grant NSF DMR-1308972.

  19. Exploratory studies of physiological components of motion sickness: Cardiopulmonary differences between high and low susceptibles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naifeh, K.

    1985-01-01

    A comprehensive examination of cardiovascular autonomic response to motion sickness was studied and whether differences in cardiopulmonary function exist in high and low susceptibility groups were determined. Measurement techniques were developed as was test equipment for its ability to provide accurately new measures of interest and to test the adequately of these new measures in differentiating between susceptibility groups. It was concluded that these groups can be differentiated using simple, brief stressors and measurements of cardiodynamic function.

  20. Assessing magnetic nanoparticle aggregation in polymer melts by dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sierra-Bermúdez, Sergio; Maldonado-Camargo, Lorena P.; Orange, François; Guinel, Maxime J.-F.; Rinaldi, Carlos

    2015-03-01

    Aggregation of magnetic nanoparticles in polymer melts was assessed using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. Magnetic nanocomposites consisting of polybutadiene/CoFe2O4 and polystyrene/CoFe2O4 mixtures were prepared using different techniques and characterized using dynamic magnetic susceptibility measurements. The presence of nanoparticle aggregates determined using magnetic measurements was confirmed with transmission electron microscopy examinations. The results were in good agreement with predictions from the Flory-Huggins interaction parameters.

  1. Intermediate Susceptibility to Ciprofloxacin among Salmonella enterica Serovar Typhi Isolates in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Lejon, Veerle; Horna, Gertrudis; Astocondor, Lizeth; Vanhoof, Raymond; Bertrand, Sophie; Jacobs, Jan

    2014-01-01

    Thirty-three Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi blood isolates from Lima, Peru (2008 to 2012), were fully susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, chloramphenicol, ceftriaxone, and tetracycline; 8/33 (24.2%) showed intermediate susceptibility to ciprofloxacin carrying mutations in the quinolone resistance-determining region of the gyrA gene (Ser83-Phe and Asp87-Asn) and in the gyrB gene (Ser464-Phe). PMID:24371234

  2. Landslide susceptibility map: from research to application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fiorucci, Federica; Reichenbach, Paola; Ardizzone, Francesca; Rossi, Mauro; Felicioni, Giulia; Antonini, Guendalina

    2014-05-01

    Susceptibility map is an important and essential tool in environmental planning, to evaluate landslide hazard and risk and for a correct and responsible management of the territory. Landslide susceptibility is the likelihood of a landslide occurring in an area on the basis of local terrain conditions. Can be expressed as the probability that any given region will be affected by landslides, i.e. an estimate of "where" landslides are likely to occur. In this work we present two examples of landslide susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region and for the Perugia Municipality. These two maps were realized following official request from the Regional and Municipal government to the Research Institute for the Hydrogeological Protection (CNR-IRPI). The susceptibility map prepared for the Umbria Region represents the development of previous agreements focused to prepare: i) a landslide inventory map that was included in the Urban Territorial Planning (PUT) and ii) a series of maps for the Regional Plan for Multi-risk Prevention. The activities carried out for the Umbria Region were focused to define and apply methods and techniques for landslide susceptibility zonation. Susceptibility maps were prepared exploiting a multivariate statistical model (linear discriminant analysis) for the five Civil Protection Alert Zones defined in the regional territory. The five resulting maps were tested and validated using the spatial distribution of recent landslide events that occurred in the region. The susceptibility map for the Perugia Municipality was prepared to be integrated as one of the cartographic product in the Municipal development plan (PRG - Piano Regolatore Generale) as required by the existing legislation. At strategic level, one of the main objectives of the PRG, is to establish a framework of knowledge and legal aspects for the management of geo-hydrological risk. At national level most of the susceptibility maps prepared for the PRG, were and still are obtained

  3. DOE/Simplec magnetic susceptibility logging system

    SciTech Connect

    Emilia, D.A.; Allen, J.W.; Chessmore, R.B.; Wilson, R.B.

    1981-03-01

    A magnetic susceptibility logging system has been developed which is relatively stable under normal field logging conditions and which produces logs that accurately represent in situ variations in magnetic susceptibility. However, both field and laboratory tests indicate the need for further improvement of temperature stabilization and bridge compensation; a new generation system designed by Simplec may fill that need. A cubic granite block with a magnetic susceptibility of 385 ..mu..CGS is designated as the primary calibration standard and is available for public use at the DOE facility in Grand Junction, Colorado. Models are also available for characterization of magnetic susceptibility systems. These include models to provide borehole size correction factors, thin layer interpretation parameters, reproducibility limits, longitudinal resolution, and radius of investigation. The DOE/Simplec system has a 99-percent radius of investigation, approximately equal to the coil length (15 inches), and a 99-percent thickness of investigation, approximately equal to two coil lengths. The true magnetic susceptibility and thickness of isolated layers less than two coil lengths in thickness can be obtained through use of parameters measured from their log responses. Field tests show that the system has a reproducibility of at least 5 ..mu..CGS and that logging at 25 ft/min is a good compromise between speed of operation and keeping the probe on the sidewall. Comparison of log and core magnetic susceptibility measurements confirms the fact that the logging system samples a rather large volume and that interpretive aids are necessary to unfold the true variation of magnetic susceptibility with depth. Finally, logs from known uranium-favorable environments show that magnetic susceptibility measurements can give an indication of the degree of geochemical alteration, which is one of the uranium-favorable haloes sought by exploration geologists.

  4. [Measles and chickenpox susceptibility among immigrants].

    PubMed

    Gétaz, Laurent; Casillas, Alejandra; Wolff, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Exposure of immigrants to infectious diseases in their country of origin influences their susceptibility to infections later in life. Susceptibility to certain infections may significantly differs between immigrants depending on their regions of origin. Both measles and chickenpox (varicella) are conditions for which the level of exposure in the country of origin influences the preventive measures that immigrant health providers should propose. Through these two illustrative examples, this article summarizes the practical implications for clinicians who care for immigrants originating from southern countries.

  5. An investigation on magnetic susceptibility of hazardous saline-alkaline soils from the contaminated Hai River Basin, China.

    PubMed

    Yang, Pingguo; Mao, Renzhao; Shao, Hongbo

    2009-12-15

    Magnetic susceptibility can provide rich environmental information, especially for hazardous heavy metals and saline-alkaline in the contaminated soils. Magnetic susceptibility in four vertical profiles from saline-alkaline soils in lower Hai River basin was investigated. Soil sites were extended from alluvial fan to coastal plain areas. They are aligned along a latitudinal strip. Magnetic parameters including low/high frequency susceptibility, frequency-dependent susceptibility was measured. Moreover, some standard pedological parameters such as pH value and organic matter content were also determined. The results showed that low frequency magnetic susceptibility values is very high at the surface and decreases with the profile to a low value. In all profiles from alluvial fan frequency-dependent susceptibility greater than 3% may suggest the presence of relatively more super-paramagnetic particles. Magnetic susceptibility showed obvious vertical distribution in alluvial fan higher than coastal plain. No significant correlations between organic matter, pH and low frequency magnetic susceptibility were found, while there is a negative correlation between organic matter and frequency-dependent susceptibility. A positive correlation between pH and frequency-dependent susceptibility was found in the study areas. PMID:19643536

  6. Trends in antibacterial susceptibility of mastitis pathogens during a seven-year period.

    PubMed

    Erskine, R J; Walker, R D; Bolin, C A; Bartlett, P C; White, D G

    2002-05-01

    Milk samples collected from dairy cattle suspected of having mastitis were submitted to the Microbiology Laboratory of the Animal Health Diagnostic Laboratory, Michigan State University, for bacteriologic culture. A total of 2778 isolates, from the years 1994 to 2000, were isolated, identified, and subjected to in vitro antimicrobial susceptibility testing using the disk diffusion method, in accordance with National Committee on Clinical Laboratory Standards (NCCLS) standards. Isolates included in this study were Streptococcus uberis, Streptococcus dysgalactiae, Streptococcus agalactiae, Staphylococcus aureus, Escherichia coli, Klebsiella pneumoniae, Serratia marcesens, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The proportion of bacterial isolates determined to be susceptible did not change during the 7-yr period for the majority of bacterial-antibacterial interactions tested. However, analysis for linear trend in proportions determined that there were increases in the proportion of S. aureus isolates that were susceptible to ampicillin, penicillin, and erythromycin. For Strep. uberis, increases in the proportion of susceptible isolates occurred for oxacillin, sulfa-trimethoprim, gentamicin, and pirlimycin, and a decrease in the proportion of susceptible isolates occurred with penicillin. For Strep. dysgalactiae, increases in the proportion of susceptible isolates occurred with erythromycin, gentamicin, sulfa-trimethoprim, and tetracycline. For Strep. agalactiae, increases in the proportion of susceptible isolates occurred with sulfa-trimethoprim. Among E. coli isolates, there was an increase in the proportion that were susceptible to ampicillin and cephalothin. Among K pneumoniae isolates, there was an increase in the proportion that were susceptible to ceftiofur. Overall, there was no indication of increased resistance of mastitis isolates to antibacterials that are commonly used in dairy cattle.

  7. Surveillance of influenza isolates for susceptibility to neuraminidase inhibitors during the 2000-2002 influenza seasons.

    PubMed

    Mungall, Bruce A; Xu, Xiyan; Klimov, Alexander

    2004-07-01

    Neuraminidase (NA) inhibitors (NI) have recently been licensed for the prophylaxis and treatment of influenza virus infection in humans. This study has utilized a new chemiluminescent (CL) neuraminidase assay to routinely monitor more than a thousand influenza field isolates collected worldwide during the 2000-2002 seasons for susceptibility to both licensed NIs, zanamivir, and oseltamivir by determining the 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50). Our data demonstrated that influenza A viruses of the N2 subtype were less susceptible to zanamivir, but not oseltamivir, than those of the N1 subtype such that 41 of 45 confirmed H1N2 isolates could be reliably differentiated from H1N1 viruses based on their zanamivir susceptibility. Pre-titration of influenza A viruses appeared to have no effect on IC50 determined for either NI, while pre-titration of influenza B viruses significantly reduced oseltamivir IC50 and increased zanamivir IC50. Influenza B viruses were less susceptible to either compound than type A isolates. The CL assay is a rapid and reliable method for screening large numbers of influenza isolates for NI susceptibility. Reassortant viruses of the H1N2 subtype that started to circulate worldwide during the 2001-2002 season can be reliably separated from H1N1 viruses based on their zanamivir susceptibility, enabling large scale screening of H1 isolates for determining the prevalence of such reassortants.

  8. MR measurement of alloy magnetic susceptibility: Towards developing tissue-susceptibility matched metals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astary, Garrett W.; Peprah, Marcus K.; Fisher, Charles R.; Stewart, Rachel L.; Carney, Paul R.; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Meisel, Mark W.; Manuel, Michele V.; Mareci, Thomas H.

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to relate structure to function mapped with high-temporal resolution electrophysiological recordings using metal electrodes. Additionally, MRI may be used to guide the placement of electrodes or conductive cannula in the brain. However, the magnetic susceptibility mismatch between implanted metals and surrounding brain tissue can severely distort MR images and spectra, particularly in high magnetic fields. In this study, we present a modified MR method of characterizing the magnetic susceptibility of materials that can be used to develop biocompatible, metal alloys that match the susceptibility of host tissue in order to eliminate MR distortions proximal to the implant. This method was applied at 4.7 T and 11.1 T to measure the susceptibility of a model solid-solution alloy of Cu and Sn, which is inexpensive but not biocompatible. MR-derived relative susceptibility values of four different compositions of Cu-Sn alloy deviated by less than 3.1% from SQUID magnetometry absolute susceptibility measurements performed up to 7 T. These results demonstrate that the magnetic susceptibility varies linearly with atomic percentage in these solid-solution alloys, but are not simply the weighted average of Cu and Sn magnetic susceptibilities. Therefore susceptibility measurements are necessary when developing susceptibility-matched, solid-solution alloys for the elimination of susceptibility artifacts in MR. This MR method does not require any specialized equipment and is free of geometrical constraints, such as sample shape requirements associated with SQUID magnetometry, so the method can be used at all stages of fabrication to guide the development of a susceptibility matched, biocompatible device.

  9. MR measurement of alloy magnetic susceptibility: towards developing tissue-susceptibility matched metals.

    PubMed

    Astary, Garrett W; Peprah, Marcus K; Fisher, Charles R; Stewart, Rachel L; Carney, Paul R; Sarntinoranont, Malisa; Meisel, Mark W; Manuel, Michele V; Mareci, Thomas H

    2013-08-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can be used to relate structure to function mapped with high-temporal resolution electrophysiological recordings using metal electrodes. Additionally, MRI may be used to guide the placement of electrodes or conductive cannula in the brain. However, the magnetic susceptibility mismatch between implanted metals and surrounding brain tissue can severely distort MR images and spectra, particularly in high magnetic fields. In this study, we present a modified MR method of characterizing the magnetic susceptibility of materials that can be used to develop biocompatible, metal alloys that match the susceptibility of host tissue in order to eliminate MR distortions proximal to the implant. This method was applied at 4.7T and 11.1T to measure the susceptibility of a model solid-solution alloy of Cu and Sn, which is inexpensive but not biocompatible. MR-derived relative susceptibility values of four different compositions of Cu-Sn alloy deviated by less than 3.1% from SQUID magnetometry absolute susceptibility measurements performed up to 7T. These results demonstrate that the magnetic susceptibility varies linearly with atomic percentage in these solid-solution alloys, but are not simply the weighted average of Cu and Sn magnetic susceptibilities. Therefore susceptibility measurements are necessary when developing susceptibility-matched, solid-solution alloys for the elimination of susceptibility artifacts in MR. This MR method does not require any specialized equipment and is free of geometrical constraints, such as sample shape requirements associated with SQUID magnetometry, so the method can be used at all stages of fabrication to guide the development of a susceptibility matched, biocompatible device.

  10. Genome-wide association study identifies nox3 as a critical gene for susceptibility to noise-induced hearing loss.

    PubMed

    Lavinsky, Joel; Crow, Amanda L; Pan, Calvin; Wang, Juemei; Aaron, Ksenia A; Ho, Maria K; Li, Qingzhong; Salehide, Pehzman; Myint, Anthony; Monges-Hernadez, Maya; Eskin, Eleazar; Allayee, Hooman; Lusis, Aldons J; Friedman, Rick A

    2015-04-01

    In the United States, roughly 10% of the population is exposed daily to hazardous levels of noise in the workplace. Twin studies estimate heritability for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) of approximately 36%, and strain specific variation in sensitivity has been demonstrated in mice. Based upon the difficulties inherent to the study of NIHL in humans, we have turned to the study of this complex trait in mice. We exposed 5 week-old mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP) to a 10 kHz octave band noise at 108 dB for 2 hours and assessed the permanent threshold shift 2 weeks post exposure using frequency specific stimuli. These data were then used in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using the Efficient Mixed Model Analysis (EMMA) to control for population structure. In this manuscript we describe our GWAS, with an emphasis on a significant peak for susceptibility to NIHL on chromosome 17 within a haplotype block containing NADPH oxidase-3 (Nox3). Our peak was detected after an 8 kHz tone burst stimulus. Nox3 mutants and heterozygotes were then tested to validate our GWAS. The mutants and heterozygotes demonstrated a greater susceptibility to NIHL specifically at 8 kHz both on measures of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) and on auditory brainstem response (ABR). We demonstrate that this sensitivity resides within the synaptic ribbons of the cochlea in the mutant animals specifically at 8 kHz. Our work is the first GWAS for NIHL in mice and elucidates the power of our approach to identify tonotopic genetic susceptibility to NIHL. PMID:25880434

  11. Genome-Wide Association Study Identifies Nox3 as a Critical Gene for Susceptibility to Noise-Induced Hearing Loss

    PubMed Central

    Lavinsky, Joel; Crow, Amanda L.; Pan, Calvin; Wang, Juemei; Aaron, Ksenia A.; Ho, Maria K.; Li, Qingzhong; Salehide, Pehzman; Myint, Anthony; Monges-Hernadez, Maya; Eskin, Eleazar; Allayee, Hooman; Lusis, Aldons J.; Friedman, Rick A.

    2015-01-01

    In the United States, roughly 10% of the population is exposed daily to hazardous levels of noise in the workplace. Twin studies estimate heritability for noise-induced hearing loss (NIHL) of approximately 36%, and strain specific variation in sensitivity has been demonstrated in mice. Based upon the difficulties inherent to the study of NIHL in humans, we have turned to the study of this complex trait in mice. We exposed 5 week-old mice from the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel (HMDP) to a 10 kHz octave band noise at 108 dB for 2 hours and assessed the permanent threshold shift 2 weeks post exposure using frequency specific stimuli. These data were then used in a genome-wide association study (GWAS) using the Efficient Mixed Model Analysis (EMMA) to control for population structure. In this manuscript we describe our GWAS, with an emphasis on a significant peak for susceptibility to NIHL on chromosome 17 within a haplotype block containing NADPH oxidase-3 (Nox3). Our peak was detected after an 8 kHz tone burst stimulus. Nox3 mutants and heterozygotes were then tested to validate our GWAS. The mutants and heterozygotes demonstrated a greater susceptibility to NIHL specifically at 8 kHz both on measures of distortion product otoacoustic emissions (DPOAE) and on auditory brainstem response (ABR). We demonstrate that this sensitivity resides within the synaptic ribbons of the cochlea in the mutant animals specifically at 8 kHz. Our work is the first GWAS for NIHL in mice and elucidates the power of our approach to identify tonotopic genetic susceptibility to NIHL. PMID:25880434

  12. Genetics of canine diabetes mellitus: are the diabetes susceptibility genes identified in humans involved in breed susceptibility to diabetes mellitus in dogs?

    PubMed

    Catchpole, Brian; Adams, Jamie P; Holder, Angela L; Short, Andrea D; Ollier, William E R; Kennedy, Lorna J

    2013-02-01

    Diabetes mellitus is a common endocrinopathy in companion animals, characterised by hyperglycaemia, glycosuria and weight loss, resulting from an absolute or relative deficiency in the pancreatic hormone insulin. There are breed differences in susceptibility to diabetes mellitus in dogs, with the Samoyed breed being overrepresented, while Boxers are relatively absent in the UK population of diabetic dogs, suggesting that genetic factors play an important role in determining susceptibility to the disease. A number of genes, linked with susceptibility to diabetes mellitus in humans, are associated with an increased risk of diabetes mellitus in dogs, some of which appear to be relatively breed-specific. Diabetes mellitus in dogs has been associated with major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II genes (dog leucocyte antigen; DLA), with similar haplotypes and genotypes being identified in the most susceptible breeds. A region containing a variable number of tandem repeats (VNTR) and several polymorphisms have been identified in the canine insulin gene, with some alleles associated with susceptibility or resistance to diabetes mellitus in a breed-specific manner. Polymorphisms in the canine CTLA4 promoter and in other immune response genes are associated with susceptibility to diabetes mellitus in a number of pedigree breeds. Genome wide association studies are currently underway that should shed further light on the genetic factors responsible for the breed profile seen in the diabetic dog population.

  13. Differences in susceptibility of inbred mice to Bacillus anthracis.

    PubMed Central

    Welkos, S L; Keener, T J; Gibbs, P H

    1986-01-01

    Animal species differ in their resistance both to infection by Bacillus anthracis and to anthrax toxin. A mouse model was developed to study the basis of the host differences and the pathogenesis of infection. When mice were infected with the virulent B. anthracis strain Vollum 1B, low 50% lethal dose (LD50) values (5 to 30 spores) were found for all 10 strains of inbred mice tested. However, analysis of time-to-death data revealed significant differences among the strains, which could be divided into three groups: most susceptible (A/J and DBA/2J); least susceptible (CBA/J, BALB/cJ, and C57BR/cdJ); and intermediate (the remaining five strains). In contrast, the mice were distinctly susceptible or resistant to lethal infection by the toxigenic, nonencapsulated Sterne vaccine strain. The LD50 for the susceptible A/J and DBA/2J mice was approximately 10(3) spores of the Sterne strain, whereas the remaining eight relatively resistant strains were killed only by 10(6) or more spores. F1 hybrid and backcross studies suggested that resistance to the Sterne strain is determined by a single dominant gene or gene complex. Mice lethally infected with B. anthracis showed an acute course of infection, characterized by extensive gelatinous edema and large concentrations of bacilli in the blood and organs (e.g., 10(9) CFU/g of spleen). The susceptibility of A/J and CBA/J mice to intravenously injected anthrax toxin components appeared to differ from their susceptibility to infection. The toxin LD50 values for both strains were similar. However, CBA/J mice died sooner than did A/J mice, with mean time to death of 0.9 and 3.7 days, respectively, in mice given 4 LD50 of toxin. The mouse model appears to be useful in studies on host resistance to anthrax and on the pathogenesis of the infection. PMID:3081444

  14. [Streptococcus pyogenes: penicillin and erythromycin susceptibility in the cities of Neuquen and Cipolletti].

    PubMed

    Soriano, S V; Brasili, S; Saiz, M; Carranza, C; Vidal, P; Calderón, J; Lopardo, H A

    2000-01-01

    Penicillin resistance has not yet been detected in Streptococcus pyogenes. However macrolide-resistant streptococci have emerged in several countries. Only low rates of erythromycin-resistant S. pyogenes were reported in Argentina, with the exception of a 11.1% observed in Mendoza. The aim of the present study was to determine the susceptibility to penicillin and to erythromycin of 251 consecutive clinically-significant isolates of S. pyogenes obtained from four centers of Cipolletti and Neuquén during the period April-December 1998. The double disk test with erythromycin and clindamycin disks was employed as a screening method to detect ERY-resistant streptococci and to determine the phenotype of macrolide resistance. Disk diffusion was also employed for determining penicillin susceptibility. Macrolide-resistant isolates were also tested for penicillin, ceftriaxone, erythromycin, clindamycin and azithromycin susceptibility by the agar dilution method. Additionally they were also tested for erythromycin susceptibility by E-test (AB Biodisk, Solna, Sweden). All streptococci studied were susceptible to penicillin and thirty of them (12.0%) were resistant to erythromycin. All these resistant isolates were also resistant to azithromycin but susceptible to ceftriaxone and clindamycin. They showed the phenotype M (probably efflux-mediated mechanism) and the MICs of erythromycin ranged between 8 and 16 micrograms/ml. According to these results we conclude that in spite of universal susceptibility to penicillin in S. pyogenes, macrolide resistance is a matter of concern in Neuquén and Cipolletti. At least in those cities it appears to be necessary to routinely perform macrolide susceptibility tests in beta-hemolytic streptococci.

  15. Nonlinear Susceptibility Magnitude Imaging of Magnetic Nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2014-01-01

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R2 = 0.99, CNR = 84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R2 > 0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI. PMID:25505816

  16. Nonlinear susceptibility magnitude imaging of magnetic nanoparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ficko, Bradley W.; Giacometti, Paolo; Diamond, Solomon G.

    2015-03-01

    This study demonstrates a method for improving the resolution of susceptibility magnitude imaging (SMI) using spatial information that arises from the nonlinear magnetization characteristics of magnetic nanoparticles (mNPs). In this proof-of-concept study of nonlinear SMI, a pair of drive coils and several permanent magnets generate applied magnetic fields and a coil is used as a magnetic field sensor. Sinusoidal alternating current (AC) in the drive coils results in linear mNP magnetization responses at primary frequencies, and nonlinear responses at harmonic frequencies and intermodulation frequencies. The spatial information content of the nonlinear responses is evaluated by reconstructing tomographic images with sequentially increasing voxel counts using the combined linear and nonlinear data. Using the linear data alone it is not possible to accurately reconstruct more than 2 voxels with a pair of drive coils and a single sensor. However, nonlinear SMI is found to accurately reconstruct 12 voxels (R2=0.99, CNR=84.9) using the same physical configuration. Several time-multiplexing methods are then explored to determine if additional spatial information can be obtained by varying the amplitude, phase and frequency of the applied magnetic fields from the two drive coils. Asynchronous phase modulation, amplitude modulation, intermodulation phase modulation, and frequency modulation all resulted in accurate reconstruction of 6 voxels (R2>0.9) indicating that time multiplexing is a valid approach to further increase the resolution of nonlinear SMI. The spatial information content of nonlinear mNP responses and the potential for resolution enhancement with time multiplexing demonstrate the concept and advantages of nonlinear SMI.

  17. Phylogenetic Relationships Matter: Antifungal Susceptibility among Clinically Relevant Yeasts

    PubMed Central

    Schmalreck, A. F.; Becker, K.; Fegeler, W.; Czaika, V.; Ulmer, H.; Lass-Flörl, C.

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was 2-fold: to evaluate whether phylogenetically closely related yeasts share common antifungal susceptibility profiles (ASPs) and whether these ASPs can be predicted from phylogeny. To address this question, 9,627 yeast strains were collected and tested for their antifungal susceptibility. Isolates were reidentified by considering recent changes in taxonomy and nomenclature. A phylogenetic (PHYLO) code based on the results of multilocus sequence analyses (large-subunit rRNA, small-subunit rRNA, translation elongation factor 1α, RNA polymerase II subunits 1 and 2) and the classification of the cellular neutral sugar composition of coenzyme Q and 18S ribosomal DNA was created to group related yeasts into PHYLO groups. The ASPs were determined for fluconazole, itraconazole, and voriconazole in each PHYLO group. The majority (95%) of the yeast strains were Ascomycetes. After reclassification, a total of 23 genera and 54 species were identified, resulting in an increase of 64% of genera and a decrease of 5% of species compared with the initial identification. These taxa were assigned to 17 distinct PHYLO groups (Ascomycota, n = 13; Basidiomycota, n = 4). ASPs for azoles were similar among members of the same PHYLO group and different between the various PHYLO groups. Yeast phylogeny may be an additional tool to significantly enhance the assessment of MIC values and to predict antifungal susceptibility, thereby more rapidly initiating appropriate patient management. PMID:24366735

  18. Immediate susceptibility to visual illusions after sight onset.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Tapan; Kalia, Amy; Ganesh, Suma; Sinha, Pawan

    2015-05-01

    The dominant accounts of many visual illusions are based on experience-driven development of sensitivity to certain visual cues. According to such accounts, learned associations between observed two-dimensional cues (say, converging lines) and the real three-dimensional structures they represent (a surface receding in depth) render us susceptible to misperceiving some images that are cleverly contrived to contain those two-dimensional cues. While this explanation appears reasonable, it lacks direct experimental validation. To contrast it with an account that dispenses with the need for visual experience, it is necessary to determine whether susceptibility to the illusion is present immediately after birth; however, eliciting reliable responses from newborns is fraught with operational difficulties, and studies with older infants are incapable of resolving this issue. Our work with children who gain sight after extended early-onset blindness, as part of Project Prakash, provides a potential way forward. We report here that the newly sighted children, ranging in age from 8 through 16 years, exhibit susceptibility to two well-known geometrical visual illusions, Ponzo [1] and Müller-Lyer [2], immediately after the onset of sight. This finding has implications not only for the likely explanations of these illusions, but more generally, for the nature-nurture argument as it relates to some key aspects of visual processing. PMID:25942545

  19. Antimicrobial susceptibility of equine and environmental isolates of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Båverud, V; Gunnarsson, A; Karlsson, M; Franklin, A

    2004-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of 50 Clostridium difficile isolates, 36 of them from horse feces and 14 from environmental sites, was determined by broth microdilution. The antimicrobial agents tested were avilamycin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamicin, neomycin, oxacillin, oxytetracycline, penicillin, spiramycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, and virginiamycin. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin (MIC 16 microg/ml), oxytetracycline (MIC >/=32 microg/ml), spiramycin (MIC > 16 microg/ml), and virginiamycin (MIC 8-16 microg/ml) were higher for 18 isolates. Those were mainly isolated from horses at animal hospitals and further from environmental sites at a stud farm. In contrast, all isolates, except one, from healthy foals had low MICs of erythromycin, spiramycin, virginiamycin, and oxytetracycline. The isolates from soil in public parks had also low MICs of these antimicrobial agents. Broth microdilution appeared both reliable and reproducible for susceptibility testing of C. difficile. The method was also readily performed and the MIC endpoints were easily read.

  20. Influences of the circadian clock on neuronal susceptibility to excitotoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Karmarkar, Sumedha W.; Tischkau, Shelley A.

    2013-01-01

    Stroke is the third leading cause of death and the primary cause of morbidity in the United States, thus posing an enormous burden on the healthcare system. The factors that determine the risk of an individual toward precipitation of an ischemic event possess a strong circadian component as does the ischemic event itself. This predictability provided a window of opportunity toward the development of chronopharmaceuticals which provided much better clinical outcomes. Experiments from our lab showed for the first time that neuronal susceptibility to ischemic events follows a circadian pattern; hippocampal neurons being most susceptible to an ischemic insult occurring during peak activity in a rodent model of global cerebral ischemia. We also demonstrated that the SCN2.2 cells (like their in vivo counterpart) are resistant to excitotoxicity by glutamate and that this was dependent on activation of ERK signaling. We are currently working on elucidating the complete neuroprotective pathway that provides a barricade against glutamate toxicity in the SCN2.2 cells. Our future experiments will be engaged in hijacking the neuroprotective mechanism in the SCN2.2 cells and applying it to glutamate-susceptible entities in an effort to prevent their death in the presence of excitotoxicity. Despite the advancement in chronopharmaceuticals, optimal clinical outcome with minimal adverse events are difficult to come by at an affordable price. Superior treatment options require a better understanding of molecular mechanisms that define the disease, including the role of the circadian clock. PMID:24204346

  1. Antimicrobial susceptibility of equine and environmental isolates of Clostridium difficile.

    PubMed

    Båverud, V; Gunnarsson, A; Karlsson, M; Franklin, A

    2004-01-01

    The antimicrobial susceptibility of 50 Clostridium difficile isolates, 36 of them from horse feces and 14 from environmental sites, was determined by broth microdilution. The antimicrobial agents tested were avilamycin, cephalothin, chloramphenicol, clindamycin, erythromycin, gentamicin, neomycin, oxacillin, oxytetracycline, penicillin, spiramycin, streptomycin, trimethoprim/sulfamethoxazole, vancomycin, and virginiamycin. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin (MIC 16 microg/ml), oxytetracycline (MIC >/=32 microg/ml), spiramycin (MIC > 16 microg/ml), and virginiamycin (MIC 8-16 microg/ml) were higher for 18 isolates. Those were mainly isolated from horses at animal hospitals and further from environmental sites at a stud farm. In contrast, all isolates, except one, from healthy foals had low MICs of erythromycin, spiramycin, virginiamycin, and oxytetracycline. The isolates from soil in public parks had also low MICs of these antimicrobial agents. Broth microdilution appeared both reliable and reproducible for susceptibility testing of C. difficile. The method was also readily performed and the MIC endpoints were easily read. PMID:15140395

  2. Antimicrobial susceptibility testing of Spanish field isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae.

    PubMed

    Hidalgo, A; Carvajal, A; García-Feliz, C; Osorio, J; Rubio, P

    2009-08-01

    This study is the first conducted in Spain to evaluate antimicrobial susceptibility of field isolates of Brachyspira hyodysenteriae. One hundred and eight isolates of the bacterium, recovered from different Spanish swine farms between 2000 and 2007, were investigated. The minimum inhibitory concentrations (MIC) of erythromycin, tylosin, tiamulin, valnemulin, clindamycin and lincomycin were determined using a broth microdilution technique. Most of the isolates showed poor susceptibility to erythromycin (MIC(90)>256 microg/ml), tylosin (MIC(90)>256 microg/ml), clindamycin (MIC(90)>4 microg/ml) and lincomycin (MIC(90)=128 microg/ml). Reduced susceptibility to tiamulin and valnemulin was observed with a MIC>2 microg/ml in 17.6% and 7.41% of the B. hyodysenteriae isolates, respectively. Moreover, a survival analysis permitted the detection of an increasing trend in the MIC values for almost all the antimicrobials used in the treatment of swine dysentery when comparing recent isolates (from 2006 to 2007) with those recovered in earlier years (between 2000 and 2004). PMID:19084246

  3. Immediate susceptibility to visual illusions after sight onset.

    PubMed

    Gandhi, Tapan; Kalia, Amy; Ganesh, Suma; Sinha, Pawan

    2015-05-01

    The dominant accounts of many visual illusions are based on experience-driven development of sensitivity to certain visual cues. According to such accounts, learned associations between observed two-dimensional cues (say, converging lines) and the real three-dimensional structures they represent (a surface receding in depth) render us susceptible to misperceiving some images that are cleverly contrived to contain those two-dimensional cues. While this explanation appears reasonable, it lacks direct experimental validation. To contrast it with an account that dispenses with the need for visual experience, it is necessary to determine whether susceptibility to the illusion is present immediately after birth; however, eliciting reliable responses from newborns is fraught with operational difficulties, and studies with older infants are incapable of resolving this issue. Our work with children who gain sight after extended early-onset blindness, as part of Project Prakash, provides a potential way forward. We report here that the newly sighted children, ranging in age from 8 through 16 years, exhibit susceptibility to two well-known geometrical visual illusions, Ponzo [1] and Müller-Lyer [2], immediately after the onset of sight. This finding has implications not only for the likely explanations of these illusions, but more generally, for the nature-nurture argument as it relates to some key aspects of visual processing.

  4. Comparing seismic susceptibility models of the Himalayan terrain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Som, S. K.; Dasarwar, P.; Mohan, Murali; Hindayar, J. N.; Kumar, N. Thrideep; Chowdhuri, S. N.; Darmwal, G. S.; Singh, Harbans

    2016-07-01

    The ongoing intra-continental collision between the Indian and Eurasian plates along the Himalayas has resulted in many damaging earthquakes with severe damages to man-made structures and natural landscapes due to ground shaking and ground failure, which in turn depends on geomorphological, geological and geophysical variables. Seismic susceptibility models are developed for Gangtok City by combining all the three variables using both knowledge-driven and data-driven methods on facet and grid cell terrain units. Finally, the results are critically evaluated by validation with the earthquake intensity data recorded during earthquake events. First-stage modelling attempt using different knowledge-driven methods on different terrain units shows bi-modal data distribution with low predictability due to extremely rugged topography with wide altitudinal variations within short distances. Second-stage modelling of separated population by using the same methodologies increases model predictability in which one model method describes the higher topographic levels better and the other model method is found to be better for lower topographic levels. Seismic susceptibility of the area is best described by composite models, combining different best methods of fine classification for lower and higher topographic levels having the same mapping/terrain units. Comparison of the composite models shows that the terrain unit does not play a significant role but the type of models selected determines the best possible seismic susceptibility map of the area.

  5. [Subclinical atherosclerosis. An objective index of susceptibility and vascular risk].

    PubMed

    Werba, P; Cuniberti, L A; Martínez, V; Rey, R H

    1999-01-01

    Clinical data suggest that the individual susceptibility to atherosclerosis is not accounted for only by exposure to classical or "emerging" vascular risk factors. Although recent investigations with transgenic animals have revealed new genetic determinants of susceptibility, little is known concerning this situation in human beings. Even though the human genome project might uncover specific genetic markers in the future, the only early and objective method to identify the susceptible individual at present is to detect atherosclerosis non-invasively. High resolution B-mode ultrasonography of superficial arteries coupled with advanced computer-assisted image processing systems is a highly reproducible method to perform a quali-quantitative early evaluation of already developed wall lesions. Clinically more significant, the detection of silent atherosclerosis has an additional value for risk factor assessment in the prediction of global vascular risk, a relevant index for decision-making in cardiovascular prevention. It is conceivable that the introduction of non-invasive measures of the atherosclerotic burden in risk stratification of asymptomatic subjects will help to target interventions for more rational risk factor control and to reduce the cost/benefit ratio of primary prevention.

  6. Ciprofloxacin susceptibility of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolates from keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Lomholt, J A; Kilian, M

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To examine the ciprofloxacin susceptibility of 106 Pseudomonas aeruginosa eye isolates from the United Kingdom, Denmark, India, the United States, and Australia, and to determine the molecular mechanisms of resistance. Methods: Ciprofloxacin susceptibility was tested by an agar dilution method; genomic DNA corresponding to the quinolone target genes gyrA and parC, and the regulatory genes mexR and nfxB controlling drug efflux systems, was amplified by PCR and sequenced; multilocus enzyme electrophoresis was performed to examine the genetic relation among resistant strains. Results: Three out of 90 keratitis isolates (3.3%), one from the United Kingdom and two from India, exhibited MIC values of 16 mg/l or 32 mg/l. The UK isolate had a mutation in gyrA (Thr83Ile), whereas the two Indian isolates showed mutations in both gyrA (Thr83Ile) and parC (Ser87Leu). The remaining isolates from keratitis, endophthalmitis, contact lens associated red eye (CLARE), and contact lens storage cases showed MIC values below 1 mg/l. Several allelic forms of gyrA and a single variation in the mexR gene product were detected in 10 ciprofloxacin susceptible strains. Conclusions: The vast majority of eye isolates of P aeruginosa from European countries are fully susceptible to ciprofloxacin and the concentration of ciprofloxacin eye drops used for local treatment (3000 mg/l) exceeds MIC values for strains recorded as resistant. Mutations in more than one target gene were associated with higher MIC values. PMID:14507757

  7. Adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context.

    PubMed

    Schriber, Roberta A; Guyer, Amanda E

    2016-06-01

    Adolescence has been characterized as a period of heightened sensitivity to social contexts. However, adolescents vary in how their social contexts affect them. According to neurobiological susceptibility models, endogenous, biological factors confer some individuals, relative to others, with greater susceptibility to environmental influences, whereby more susceptible individuals fare the best or worst of all individuals, depending on the environment encountered (e.g., high vs. low parental warmth). Until recently, research guided by these theoretical frameworks has not incorporated direct measures of brain structure or function to index this sensitivity. Drawing on prevailing models of adolescent neurodevelopment and a growing number of neuroimaging studies on the interrelations among social contexts, the brain, and developmental outcomes, we review research that supports the idea of adolescent neurobiological susceptibility to social context for understanding why and how adolescents differ in development and well-being. We propose that adolescent development is shaped by brain-based individual differences in sensitivity to social contexts - be they positive or negative - such as those created through relationships with parents/caregivers and peers. Ultimately, we recommend that future research measure brain function and structure to operationalize susceptibility factors that moderate the influence of social contexts on developmental outcomes. PMID:26773514

  8. Integrating Susceptibility into Environmental Policy: An Analysis of the National Ambient Air Quality Standard for Lead

    PubMed Central

    Chari, Ramya; Burke, Thomas A.; White, Ronald H.; Fox, Mary A.

    2012-01-01

    Susceptibility to chemical toxins has not been adequately addressed in risk assessment methodologies. As a result, environmental policies may fail to meet their fundamental goal of protecting the public from harm. This study examines how characterization of risk may change when susceptibility is explicitly considered in policy development; in particular we examine the process used by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) to set a National Ambient Air Quality Standard (NAAQS) for lead. To determine a NAAQS, EPA estimated air lead-related decreases in child neurocognitive function through a combination of multiple data elements including concentration-response (CR) functions. In this article, we present alternative scenarios for determining a lead NAAQS using CR functions developed in populations more susceptible to lead toxicity due to socioeconomic disadvantage. The use of CR functions developed in susceptible groups resulted in cognitive decrements greater than original EPA estimates. EPA’s analysis suggested that a standard level of 0.15 µg/m3 would fulfill decision criteria, but by incorporating susceptibility we found that options for the standard could reasonably be extended to lower levels. The use of data developed in susceptible populations would result in the selection of a more protective NAAQS under the same decision framework applied by EPA. Results are used to frame discussion regarding why cumulative risk assessment methodologies are needed to help inform policy development. PMID:22690184

  9. Susceptibilities of Candida albicans mouth isolates to antifungal agents, essentials oils and mouth rinses.

    PubMed

    Carvalhinho, Sara; Costa, Ana Margarida; Coelho, Ana Cláudia; Martins, Eugénio; Sampaio, Ana

    2012-07-01

    Forty Candida albicans strains isolated from patient's mouth with fixed orthodontic appliances were analyzed to their susceptibilities to antifungal agents, mouth rinses and essential oils. Susceptibility to fluconazole, econazole, miconazole and ketoconazole, amphotericin B and nystatin was assessed by the disk diffusion (DD) method based on the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute M44-A protocol, and by Etest (fluconazole and amphotericin B). The susceptibilities to mouth rinses and essential oils were also determined by the DD technique. All isolates tested were susceptible (S) to amphotericin B, nystatin and fluconazole. The overall concordance between the DD and the Etest was 100% for amphotericin and fluconazole. One isolate was resistant to econazole (2.5%) and the other to ketoconazole (2.5%). Econazole and ketoconazole had the highest percentages of susceptible dose dependent (SDD), 55 and 95%, respectively. Regarding to the susceptibility isolates profile, seven phenotypes were detected, and the 3 more represented (90% of the isolates) of them were SDD to one, two or three azoles. The study of mouth rinses showed a high variability of efficacy against C. albicans. The results showed that the isolates susceptibility to essential oils differed (P < 0.05). The profile activity was: cinnamon > laurel > mint > eucalyptus > rosemary > lemon > myrrh > tangerine. The main finding was that the susceptibility to cinnamon and laurel varied among the three more representative antifungal phenotypes (P < 0.05). The susceptibility of econazole-SDD isolates to cinnamon and lemon was higher than those of the econazole-S yeasts (P < 0.05). In contrast, econazole-SDD isolates were less affected by laurel than econazole-S counterparts (P < 0.05).

  10. Radiative Susceptibility of Cloudy Atmospheres to Droplet Number Perturbations: 2. Global analysis from MODIS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oreopoulos, Lazaros; Platnick, Steven

    2008-01-01

    Global distributions of albedo susceptibility for areas covered by liquid clouds are presented for 4 months in 2005. The susceptibility estimates are based on expanded definitions presented in a companion paper and include relative cloud droplet number concentration (CDNC) changes, perturbations in cloud droplet asymmetry parameter and single-scattering albedo, atmospheric/surface effects, and incorporation of the full solar spectrum. The cloud properties (optical thickness and effective radius) used as input in the susceptibility calculations come from MODIS Terra and Aqua Collection 5 gridded data. Geographical distributions of susceptibility corresponding to absolute ( absolute cloud susceptibility ) and relative ( relative cloud susceptibility ) CDNC changes are markedly different indicating that the detailed nature of the cloud microphysical perturbation is important for determining the radiative forcing associated with the first indirect aerosol effect. However, both types of susceptibility exhibit common characteristics such as significant reductions when perturbations in single-scattering properties are omitted, significant increases when atmospheric absorption and surface albedo effects are ignored, and the tendency to decrease with latitude, to be higher over ocean than over land, and to be statistically similar between the morning and afternoon MODIS overpasses. The satellite-based susceptibility analysis helps elucidate the role of present-day cloud and land surface properties in indirect aerosol forcing responses. Our realistic yet moderate CDNC perturbations yield forcings on the order of 1-2 W/sq m for cloud optical property distributions and land surface spectral albedos observed by MODIS. Since susceptibilities can potentially be computed from model fields, these results have practical application in assessing the reasonableness of model-generated estimates of the aerosol indirect radiative forcing.

  11. Susceptibility-Weighted Imaging and Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Chunlei; Li, Wei; Tong, Karen A.; Yeom, Kristen W.; Kuzminski, Samuel

    2015-01-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that enhances image contrast by using the susceptibility differences between tissues. It is created by combining both magnitude and phase in the gradient echo data. SWI is sensitive to both paramagnetic and diamagnetic substances which generate different phase shift in MRI data. SWI images can be displayed as a minimum intensity projection that provides high resolution delineation of the cerebral venous architecture, a feature that is not available in other MRI techniques. As such, SWI has been widely applied to diagnose various venous abnormalities. SWI is especially sensitive to deoxygenated blood and intracranial mineral deposition and, for that reason, has been applied to image various pathologies including intracranial hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, and multiple sclerosis. SWI, however, does not provide quantitative measures of magnetic susceptibility. This limitation is currently being addressed with the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). While QSM treats susceptibility as isotropic, STI treats susceptibility as generally anisotropic characterized by a tensor quantity. This article reviews the basic principles of SWI, its clinical and research applications, the mechanisms governing brain susceptibility properties, and its practical implementation, with a focus on brain imaging. PMID:25270052

  12. Differential Susceptibility Experiments: Going beyond Correlational Evidence--Comment on beyond Mental Health, Differential Susceptibility Articles

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    van IJzendoorn, Marinus H.; Bakermans-Kranenburg, Marian J.

    2012-01-01

    Reviewing the studies on differential susceptibility presented in this section, we argue that the time is ripe to go beyond correlational designs to differential susceptibility experiments. In such experiments, randomization prevents hidden moderator effects on the environment and guarantees the independence of moderator and outcome, while the…

  13. Susceptibility-weighted imaging and quantitative susceptibility mapping in the brain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunlei; Li, Wei; Tong, Karen A; Yeom, Kristen W; Kuzminski, Samuel

    2015-07-01

    Susceptibility-weighted imaging (SWI) is a magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) technique that enhances image contrast by using the susceptibility differences between tissues. It is created by combining both magnitude and phase in the gradient echo data. SWI is sensitive to both paramagnetic and diamagnetic substances which generate different phase shift in MRI data. SWI images can be displayed as a minimum intensity projection that provides high resolution delineation of the cerebral venous architecture, a feature that is not available in other MRI techniques. As such, SWI has been widely applied to diagnose various venous abnormalities. SWI is especially sensitive to deoxygenated blood and intracranial mineral deposition and, for that reason, has been applied to image various pathologies including intracranial hemorrhage, traumatic brain injury, stroke, neoplasm, and multiple sclerosis. SWI, however, does not provide quantitative measures of magnetic susceptibility. This limitation is currently being addressed with the development of quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and susceptibility tensor imaging (STI). While QSM treats susceptibility as isotropic, STI treats susceptibility as generally anisotropic characterized by a tensor quantity. This article reviews the basic principles of SWI, its clinical and research applications, the mechanisms governing brain susceptibility properties, and its practical implementation, with a focus on brain imaging.

  14. In vitro susceptibility of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale to several antimicrobial drugs.

    PubMed

    Soriano, V E; Vera, N A; Salado, C R; Fernández, R P; Blackall, P J

    2003-01-01

    As part of the basic characterization of Ornithobacterium rhinotracheale, the minimal inhibitory concentrations of 10 antimicrobial drugs were determined for reference strains and Mexican isolates by a broth microdilution method. For optimal growth of the organisms, a supplemented brain-heart infusion broth was used. The susceptibility of O. rhinotracheale to amoxicillin, enrofloxacin, and oxytetracycline was variable. However, consistent higher minimal inhibitory concentrations values were obtained for gentamicin, fosfomycin, trimethoprim, sulfamethazine, sulfamerazine, sulfaquinoxaline, and sulfachloropyridazine. Obtained results among Mexican isolates indicate a marked antimicrobial drug resistance trend. PMID:12887209

  15. Magnetic Susceptibility in the Vertebral Column

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schick, F.; Nagele, T.; Lutz, O.; Pfeffer, K.; Giehl, J.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetic resonance method is described which provides good-quality field-mapping images of the spine, although the in vivo signals from red bone marrow of the vertebral bodies exhibit similar fractions of lipid and water protons with their chemical-shift difference of 3.4 ppm. The susceptibilities of bone marrow and intervertebral disks were examined in 20 cadaveric human spines, 9 healthy volunteers, and 9 patients with degenerative disk alterations. The influence of geometrical properties was studied in cylindrical spine phantoms of different size and contents with different susceptibility. The measurements reveal interindividual differences of the susceptibility of the intervertebral disks in healthy subjects. Three out of nine degenerated disks with low signal in T2-weighted spin-echo images showed irregularities of the field distribution within the nucleus pulposus.

  16. Light scalar susceptibilities and isospin breaking

    SciTech Connect

    Andres, R. Torres; Nicola, A. Gomez

    2010-12-28

    Making a thermal analysis in the context of NLO SU(3) Chiral Perturbation Theory we see that isospin breaking (IB) corrections (both electromagnetic and QCD ones) to quark condensates are of order O(e{sup 2}) and O({epsilon}), with {epsilon} the {pi}{sup 0}-{eta} mixing angle. However the combination {chi}{sub uu}-{chi}{sub ud} of flavour breaking susceptibilities, which vanishes in the isospin limit and can be identified essentially with the connected susceptibility, has an order O(1) contribution enhanced with T because of the {pi}{sup 0}-{eta}) mixing. Finally we present a thermal sum rule that relates quark condensate ratios and the light scalar susceptibility without IB, {chi}(T)-{chi}(0).

  17. Endocrine correlates of susceptibility to motion sickness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kohl, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    Motion sickness releases ACTH, epinerphrine, and norepinephrine. The endocrine responses to motion sickness, adaptive responses leading to the resolution of the syndrome, and the way in which antimotion-sickness drugs influence the endocrine responses were studied. Susceptible or insusceptible subjects were administered antimotion-sickness drugs prior to stressful stimulation. Insusceptible subjects displayed more pronounced elevations of ACTH, epinephrine, and norepinephrine after stressful motion. Predrug levels of ACTH were higher in insusceptible subjects (p less than 0.01). Acute blockade of hormone responses to stressful motion or alteration of levels of ACTH by drugs were not correlated with individual susceptibility. No correlation was apparent between epinephrine and ACTH release. These endocrine differences may represent neurochemical markers for susceptibility to motion, stress, or general adaptability, and it may be that the chronic modulation of their levels might be more effective in preventing motion sickness than the acute blockage or stimulation of specific receptors.

  18. Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum strains to antimicrobial agents in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    ter Laak, E A; Noordergraaf, J H; Verschure, M H

    1993-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the susceptibility of various strains of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum, which are prevalent causes of pneumonia in calves, to 16 antimicrobial agents in vitro. The MICs of the antimicrobial agents were determined by a serial broth dilution method for 16 field strains and the type strain of M. bovis, for 19 field strains and the type strain of M. dispar, and for 17 field strains of U. diversum. Final MICs for M. bovis and M. dispar were read after 7 days and final MICs for U. diversum after 1 to 2 days. All strains tested were susceptible to tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin but were resistant to nifuroquine and streptomycin. Most strains of U. diversum were intermediately susceptible to oxytetracycline but fully susceptible to chlortetracycline; most strains of M. bovis and M. dispar, however, were resistant to both agents. Strains of M. dispar and U. diversum were susceptible to doxycycline and minocycline, but strains of M. bovis were only intermediately susceptible. Susceptibility or resistance to chloramphenicol, spiramycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, or enrofloxacin depended on the species but was not equal for the three species. The type strains of M. bovis and M. dispar were more susceptible to various antimicrobial agents, including tetracyclines, than the field strains. This finding might indicate that M. bovis and M. dispar strains are becoming resistant to these agents. Antimicrobial agents that are effective in vitro against all three mycoplasma species can be considered for treating mycoplasma infections in pneumonic calves. Therefore, tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin may be preferred over oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline. PMID:8452363

  19. Susceptibilities of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum strains to antimicrobial agents in vitro.

    PubMed

    ter Laak, E A; Noordergraaf, J H; Verschure, M H

    1993-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the susceptibility of various strains of Mycoplasma bovis, Mycoplasma dispar, and Ureaplasma diversum, which are prevalent causes of pneumonia in calves, to 16 antimicrobial agents in vitro. The MICs of the antimicrobial agents were determined by a serial broth dilution method for 16 field strains and the type strain of M. bovis, for 19 field strains and the type strain of M. dispar, and for 17 field strains of U. diversum. Final MICs for M. bovis and M. dispar were read after 7 days and final MICs for U. diversum after 1 to 2 days. All strains tested were susceptible to tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin but were resistant to nifuroquine and streptomycin. Most strains of U. diversum were intermediately susceptible to oxytetracycline but fully susceptible to chlortetracycline; most strains of M. bovis and M. dispar, however, were resistant to both agents. Strains of M. dispar and U. diversum were susceptible to doxycycline and minocycline, but strains of M. bovis were only intermediately susceptible. Susceptibility or resistance to chloramphenicol, spiramycin, spectinomycin, lincomycin, or enrofloxacin depended on the species but was not equal for the three species. The type strains of M. bovis and M. dispar were more susceptible to various antimicrobial agents, including tetracyclines, than the field strains. This finding might indicate that M. bovis and M. dispar strains are becoming resistant to these agents. Antimicrobial agents that are effective in vitro against all three mycoplasma species can be considered for treating mycoplasma infections in pneumonic calves. Therefore, tylosin, kitasamycin, and tiamulin may be preferred over oxytetracycline and chlortetracycline.

  20. Antimicrobial susceptibility monitoring of bacterial pathogens isolated from respiratory tract infections in dogs and cats across Europe: ComPath results.

    PubMed

    Morrissey, Ian; Moyaert, Hilde; de Jong, Anno; El Garch, Farid; Klein, Ulrich; Ludwig, Carolin; Thiry, Julien; Youala, Myriam

    2016-08-15

    ComPath is a pan-European resistance monitoring programme collecting bacterial pathogens from dogs and cats. We present data for respiratory tract infection (RTI) isolates collected between 2008 and 2010. Antimicrobial minimal inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined and susceptibility calculated following Clinical Laboratory Standards Institute (CLSI) standards for veterinary medicine. The main pathogen from dogs was Staphylococcus intermedius Group (49/215, 22.8%) which was >90% susceptible to most antimicrobials (including oxacillin - 93.9%; 3 isolates confirmed mecA-positive) but only 59.2%, 73.5% and 87.8% susceptible to tetracycline, chloramphenicol and penicillin. Bordetella bronchiseptica (48/215, 22.3%), streptococci (36/215, 16.7%), Escherichia coli (24/215, 11.2%) and Pasteurella multocida (23/215, 10.7%) were also found in dog RTI. There are no breakpoints for Bordetella bronchiseptica. Most streptococci were penicillin- chloramphenicol-, ampicillin- and pradofloxacin-susceptible. None were enrofloxacin-resistant but 6 isolates (16.7%) were of intermediate susceptibility. The least active agent against streptococci was tetracycline (47.2% susceptible). For E. coli, 37.5% were ampicillin-susceptible but 83.3% were amoxicillin/clavulanic acid-susceptible. Only chloramphenicol showed susceptibility>90% against E. coli, with 66.7% tetracycline-susceptible and 79.2% to 87.5% susceptibility to enrofloxacin, trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole or pradofloxacin. P. multocida were susceptible to pradofloxacin (no other breakpoints are available). The main pathogen from cats was P. multocida (82/186, 44.1%), where only pradofloxacin has breakpoints (100% susceptible). Streptococci were also collected from cats (25/186, 13.4%) and were >90% susceptible to all antimicrobials except tetracycline (36% susceptible). Most susceptibility was calculated with human-derived breakpoints and some antimicrobials had no breakpoints. Therefore predictions of clinical utility

  1. Genetic susceptibility to ischemic stroke

    PubMed Central

    Meschia, James F.; Worrall, Bradford B.; Rich, Stephen S.

    2014-01-01

    Clinicians who treat patients with stroke need to be aware of several single-gene disorders that have ischemic stroke as a major feature, including sickle cell disease, Fabry disease, cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, and retinal vasculopathy with cerebral leukodystrophy. The reported genome-wide association studies of ischemic stroke and several related phenotypes (for example, ischemic white matter disease) have shown that no single common genetic variant imparts major risk. Larger studies with samples numbering in the thousands are ongoing to identify common variants with smaller effects on risk. Pharmacogenomic studies have uncovered genetic determinants of response to warfarin, statins and clopidogrel. Despite increasing knowledge of stroke genetics, incorporating this new knowledge into clinical practice remains a challenge. The goals of this article are to review common single-gene disorders relevant to ischemic stroke, summarize the status of candidate gene and genome-wide studies aimed at discovering genetic stroke risk factors, and to briefly discuss pharmacogenomics related to stroke treatment. PMID:21629240

  2. Methods for broth dilution susceptibility testing of bacteria isolated from aquatic animals; approved guideline-second edition

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Antimicrobial susceptibility testing is recommended to determine which antimicrobial agents should be considered for treating a bacterial pathogen. Many bacteria that cause disease in aquatic animals require growth conditions that vary substantially from routine terrestrial pathogens. It has thus ...

  3. Quantitative Susceptibility Mapping in Parkinson's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Seiler, Stephan; Deistung, Andreas; Schweser, Ferdinand; Franthal, Sebastian; Homayoon, Nina; Katschnig-Winter, Petra; Koegl-Wallner, Mariella; Pendl, Tamara; Stoegerer, Eva Maria; Wenzel, Karoline; Fazekas, Franz; Ropele, Stefan; Reichenbach, Jürgen Rainer; Schmidt, Reinhold; Schwingenschuh, Petra

    2016-01-01

    Background Quantitative susceptibility mapping (QSM) and R2* relaxation rate mapping have demonstrated increased iron deposition in the substantia nigra of patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease (PD). However, the findings in other subcortical deep gray matter nuclei are converse and the sensitivity of QSM and R2* for morphological changes and their relation to clinical measures of disease severity has so far been investigated only sparsely. Methods The local ethics committee approved this study and all subjects gave written informed consent. 66 patients with idiopathic Parkinson’s disease and 58 control subjects underwent quantitative MRI at 3T. Susceptibility and R2* maps were reconstructed from a spoiled multi-echo 3D gradient echo sequence. Mean susceptibilities and R2* rates were measured in subcortical deep gray matter nuclei and compared between patients with PD and controls as well as related to clinical variables. Results Compared to control subjects, patients with PD had increased R2* values in the substantia nigra. QSM also showed higher susceptibilities in patients with PD in substantia nigra, in the nucleus ruber, thalamus, and globus pallidus. Magnetic susceptibility of several of these structures was correlated with the levodopa-equivalent daily dose (LEDD) and clinical markers of motor and non-motor disease severity (total MDS-UPDRS, MDS-UPDRS-I and II). Disease severity as assessed by the Hoehn & Yahr scale was correlated with magnetic susceptibility in the substantia nigra. Conclusion The established finding of higher R2* rates in the substantia nigra was extended by QSM showing superior sensitivity for PD-related tissue changes in nigrostriatal dopaminergic pathways. QSM additionally reflected the levodopa-dosage and disease severity. These results suggest a more widespread pathologic involvement and QSM as a novel means for its investigation, more sensitive than current MRI techniques. PMID:27598250

  4. National landslide susceptibility map for Germany

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glade, T.; Dikau, R.; Bell, R.

    2003-04-01

    Landslide susceptibility is generally based on historical data and field mapping, Resulting maps usually cover regions ranging between local and regional scales. However, also national scale analysis is important to delineate regions most prone to landsliding. Herein it is crucial to define the parameters, which are most important within this scale, and indeed, which can be derived from national data sets. This study aims to demonstrate a method on how to obtain national scale landslide susceptibility maps. In this study, German landslide literature was extensively reviewed. Due to the varying nature of the different sources and publications, only the information on lithology and slope angle was compiled. To include local knowledge, returned questionnaires send to experts in landslide research were evaluated and respective information summarized. For regions with no information, generalized geotechnical properties for existing lithology were applied. Additionally, a geological map at a scale of 1:1.000.000 and a nationwide digital terrain model with a resolution of 25 m x 25 m were available. The combination of slope angle and lithology was qualitatively classified in negligible, minor, moderate and high landslide susceptibility classes and applied to the data. Due to the resolution of the geology map, the 25 m resolution has been aggregated to 150 m, which seemed appropriate considering the extend of most of the landslides. Coastal landslide susceptibility has been derived from an existing data set. The map delineates areas of different landslide susceptibilities. The regions include cuestas, steep slopes in rolling midland topography and in the Alps, as well as slopes of deeply dissected rivers. Work in progress includes an evaluation of the calculated landslide susceptibility map using regional data sets. Although it is a preliminary result, this study presents the potential of such maps for planning and management purposes.

  5. [Measles and chickenpox susceptibility among immigrants].

    PubMed

    Gétaz, Laurent; Casillas, Alejandra; Wolff, Hans

    2016-05-01

    Exposure of immigrants to infectious diseases in their country of origin influences their susceptibility to infections later in life. Susceptibility to certain infections may significantly differs between immigrants depending on their regions of origin. Both measles and chickenpox (varicella) are conditions for which the level of exposure in the country of origin influences the preventive measures that immigrant health providers should propose. Through these two illustrative examples, this article summarizes the practical implications for clinicians who care for immigrants originating from southern countries. PMID:27323481

  6. Susceptibility of large populations of coupled oscillators.

    PubMed

    Daido, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    It is an important and interesting problem to elucidate how the degree of phase order in a large population of coupled oscillators responds to a synchronizing periodic force from the outside. Here this problem is studied analytically as well as numerically by introducing the concept of susceptibility for globally coupled phase oscillators with either nonrandom or random interactions. It is shown that the susceptibility diverges at the critical point in the nonrandom case with Widom's equality satisfied, while it exhibits a cusp in the most random case.

  7. [Pattern of antimicrobial susceptibility of enterococci strains].

    PubMed

    Hoyos, A; Gutiérrez, J; Piédrola, G

    1995-04-01

    Enterococci resistance to antimicrobials has increased lately. We studied the susceptibility to 12 antimicrobials of 150 enterococci strains coming from hospitalized and outpatients, using the agar dilution method. Teicoplanin, followed by imipenem and amoxicilin-clavulanic acid had the lower minimal inhibitory concentrations. No strains of E faecalis was resistant to ampicillin, whereas 14% of E faecium had minimal inhibitory concentrations over 8 micrograms/ml. The high minimal inhibitory concentrations of cefpirome (64 micrograms/ml) renders this antimicrobial useless in the treatment of enterococcal infections. Betalactamase production and resistance to glucopeptides were not detected. Antimicrobial susceptibility of strains coming for hospitalized or outpatients were similar.

  8. Strain Specific Factors Control Effector Gene Silencing in Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sirjana Devi; Chapman, Patrick; Zhang, Yun; Gijzen, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Phytophthora sojae avirulence gene Avr3a encodes an effector that is capable of triggering immunity on soybean plants carrying the resistance gene Rps3a. P. sojae strains that express Avr3a are avirulent to Rps3a plants, while strains that do not are virulent. To study the inheritance of Avr3a expression and virulence towards Rps3a, genetic crosses and self-fertilizations were performed. A cross between P. sojae strains ACR10 X P7076 causes transgenerational gene silencing of Avr3a allele, and this effect is meiotically stable up to the F5 generation. However, test-crosses of F1 progeny (ACR10 X P7076) with strain P6497 result in the release of silencing of Avr3a. Expression of Avr3a in the progeny is variable and correlates with the phenotypic penetrance of the avirulence trait. The F1 progeny from a direct cross of P6497 X ACR10 segregate for inheritance for Avr3a expression, a result that could not be explained by parental imprinting or heterozygosity. Analysis of small RNA arising from the Avr3a gene sequence in the parental strains and hybrid progeny suggests that the presence of small RNA is necessary but not sufficient for gene silencing. Overall, we conclude that inheritance of the Avr3a gene silenced phenotype relies on factors that are variable among P. sojae strains.

  9. Strain Specific Factors Control Effector Gene Silencing in Phytophthora sojae.

    PubMed

    Shrestha, Sirjana Devi; Chapman, Patrick; Zhang, Yun; Gijzen, Mark

    2016-01-01

    The Phytophthora sojae avirulence gene Avr3a encodes an effector that is capable of triggering immunity on soybean plants carrying the resistance gene Rps3a. P. sojae strains that express Avr3a are avirulent to Rps3a plants, while strains that do not are virulent. To study the inheritance of Avr3a expression and virulence towards Rps3a, genetic crosses and self-fertilizations were performed. A cross between P. sojae strains ACR10 X P7076 causes transgenerational gene silencing of Avr3a allele, and this effect is meiotically stable up to the F5 generation. However, test-crosses of F1 progeny (ACR10 X P7076) with strain P6497 result in the release of silencing of Avr3a. Expression of Avr3a in the progeny is variable and correlates with the phenotypic penetrance of the avirulence trait. The F1 progeny from a direct cross of P6497 X ACR10 segregate for inheritance for Avr3a expression, a result that could not be explained by parental imprinting or heterozygosity. Analysis of small RNA arising from the Avr3a gene sequence in the parental strains and hybrid progeny suggests that the presence of small RNA is necessary but not sufficient for gene silencing. Overall, we conclude that inheritance of the Avr3a gene silenced phenotype relies on factors that are variable among P. sojae strains. PMID:26930612

  10. Validation of antibiotic susceptibility testing guidelines in a routine clinical microbiology laboratory exemplifies general key challenges in setting clinical breakpoints.

    PubMed

    Hombach, Michael; Courvalin, Patrice; Böttger, Erik C

    2014-07-01

    This study critically evaluated the new European Committee for Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing (EUCAST) antibiotic susceptibility testing guidelines on the basis of a large set of disk diffusion diameters determined for clinical isolates. We report several paradigmatic problems that illustrate key issues in the selection of clinical susceptibility breakpoints, which are of general importance not only for EUCAST but for all guidelines systems, i.e., (i) the need for species-specific determinations of clinical breakpoints/epidemiological cutoffs (ECOFFs), (ii) problems arising from pooling data from various sources, and (iii) the importance of the antibiotic disk content for separating non-wild-type and wild-type populations.

  11. Blood Pressure Modifies Retinal Susceptibility to Intraocular Pressure Elevation

    PubMed Central

    He, Zheng; Nguyen, Christine T. O.; Armitage, James A.; Vingrys, Algis J.; Bui, Bang V.

    2012-01-01

    Primary open angle glaucoma affects more than 67 million people. Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a risk factor for glaucoma and may reduce nutrient availability by decreasing ocular perfusion pressure (OPP). An interaction between arterial blood pressure and IOP determines OPP; but the exact contribution that these factors have for retinal function is not fully understood. Here we sought to determine how acute modifications of arterial pressure will affect the susceptibility of neuronal function and blood flow to IOP challenge. Anaesthetized (ketamine:xylazine) Long-Evan rats with low (∼60 mmHg, sodium nitroprusside infusion), moderate (∼100 mmHg, saline), or high levels (∼160 mmHg, angiotensin II) of mean arterial pressure (MAP, n = 5–10 per group) were subjected to IOP challenge (10–120 mmHg, 5 mmHg steps every 3 minutes). Electroretinograms were measured at each IOP step to assess bipolar cell (b-wave) and inner retinal function (scotopic threshold response or STR). Ocular blood flow was measured using laser-Doppler flowmetry in groups with similar MAP level and the same IOP challenge protocol. Both b-wave and STR amplitudes decreased with IOP elevation. Retinal function was less susceptible to IOP challenge when MAP was high, whereas the converse was true for low MAP. Consistent with the effects on retinal function, higher IOP was needed to attenuated ocular blood flow in animals with higher MAP. The susceptibility of retinal function to IOP challenge can be ameliorated by acute high BP, and exacerbated by low BP. This is partially mediated by modifications in ocular blood flow. PMID:22359566

  12. Non-susceptible landslide areas in Italy and in the Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchesini, I.; Ardizzone, F.; Alvioli, M.; Rossi, M.; Guzzetti, F.

    2014-08-01

    We used landslide information for 13 study areas in Italy and morphometric information obtained from the 3-arcseconds shuttle radar topography mission digital elevation model (SRTM DEM) to determine areas where landslide susceptibility is expected to be negligible in Italy and in the landmasses surrounding the Mediterranean Sea. The morphometric information consisted of the local terrain slope which was computed in a square 3 × 3-cell moving window, and in the regional relative relief computed in a circular 15 × 15-cell moving window. We tested three different models to classify the "non-susceptible" landslide areas, including a linear model (LNR), a quantile linear model (QLR), and a quantile, non-linear model (QNL). We tested the performance of the three models using independent landslide information presented by the Italian Landslide Inventory (Inventario Fenomeni Franosi in Italia - IFFI). Best results were obtained using the QNL model. The corresponding zonation of non-susceptible landslide areas was intersected in a geographic information system (GIS) with geographical census data for Italy. The result determined that 57.5% of the population of Italy (in 2001) was located in areas where landslide susceptibility is expected to be negligible. We applied the QNL model to the landmasses surrounding the Mediterranean Sea, and we tested the synoptic non-susceptibility zonation using independent landslide information for three study areas in Spain. Results showed that the QNL model was capable of determining where landslide susceptibility is expected to be negligible in the validation areas in Spain. We expect our results to be applicable in similar study areas, facilitating the identification of non-susceptible landslide areas, at the synoptic scale.

  13. Individual Differences in Susceptibility to Inattentional Blindness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seegmiller, Janelle K.; Watson, Jason M.; Strayer, David L.

    2011-01-01

    Inattentional blindness refers to the finding that people do not always see what appears in their gaze. Though inattentional blindness affects large percentages of people, it is unclear if there are individual differences in susceptibility. The present study addressed whether individual differences in attentional control, as reflected by…

  14. AGE-RELATED SUSCEPTIBILITY: A GENOMICS APPROACH.

    EPA Science Inventory

    By the year 2030 more than 70 million Americans will be over the age of 65. These older adults are a subpopulation that may have special susceptibility to toxic insult due to critical characteristics of their life-stage. Current EPA testing guidelines do not identify the elderl...

  15. Parasitism enhances tilapia susceptibility to Flavobacterium columnare

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Flavobacterium columnare, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of columnaris disease. Many commercially important freshwater fish worldwide are susceptible to columnaris disease that can result in high fish mortality. Ichthyophthirius multifiliis (Ich) is a protozoan parasite in many ...

  16. The magnetic susceptibility of European agricultural soils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fabian, K.; Reimann, C.

    2012-04-01

    The GEMAS (Geochemical mapping of agricultural soils) project, a cooperation project between EuroGeoSurveys and Eurometaux, aims at providing soil quality data for Europe. Samples of arable soil were taken during 2008 at an average density of 1 site/2500 km2 covering the member states of the European Union (except Malta and Romania) and several neighbouring countries (e.g., Norway, Serbia, Ukraine). While the primary aim of the GEMAS project is to produce REACH (Registration, Evaluation and Authorisation of CHemicals - EC, 2006) consistent soil geochemistry data at the continental scale, the data set is also optimally apt to provide the first continental scale overview of magnetic properties in European soils. Soil samples from the upper 20 cm were taken as composites from 5 sites spread over a ca. 100 m2 area in a large agricultural field (Ap-sample). The samples were air dried and sieved to pass a 2 mm nylon screen. Weight normalized magnetic susceptibility of these dried samples was measured using a Sapphire Instruments SI2B susceptibility meter with dynamic background removal. The here presented maps of magnetic susceptibility in relation to geochemical composition and geological structures for the first time allow to outline the large scale influence of tectonics and climate on magnetic mineral concentration in European soils. The data set also provides the background variability for regional studies aiming to relate magnetic susceptibility of soils to local contamination sources.

  17. Climate change and corn susceptibility to mycotoxins

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Maize is an essential part of the world’s grain supply, but climate change has the potential to increase maize susceptibility to mycotoxigenic fungal pathogens and reduce food security and safety. While rising atmospheric [CO2] is a driving force of climate change, our understanding of how elevated ...

  18. Update in genetic susceptibility in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Potrony, Miriam; Badenas, Celia; Aguilera, Paula; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Carrera, Cristina; Malvehy, Josep; Puig, Susana

    2015-09-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly of the common skin cancers and its incidence is rapidly increasing. Approximately 10% of cases occur in a familial context. To date, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), which was identified as the first melanoma susceptibility gene more than 20 years ago, is the main high-risk gene for melanoma. A few years later cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) was also identified as a melanoma susceptibility gene. The technologic advances have allowed the identification of new genes involved in melanoma susceptibility: Breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) associated protein 1 (BAP1), CXC genes, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), protection of telomeres 1 (POT1), ACD and TERF2IP, the latter four being involved in telomere maintenance. Furthermore variants in melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) give a moderately increased risk to develop melanoma. Melanoma genetic counseling is offered to families in order to better understand the disease and the genetic susceptibility of developing it. Genetic counseling often implies genetic testing, although patients can benefit from genetic counseling even when they do not fulfill the criteria for these tests. Genetic testing for melanoma predisposition mutations can be used in clinical practice under adequate selection criteria and giving a valid test interpretation and genetic counseling to the individual.

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL FACTORS AFFECTING BREAST CANCER SUSCEPTIBILITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    Environmental Factors Affecting Breast Cancer Susceptibility
    Suzanne. E. Fenton
    US EPA, ORD, MD-67 NHEERL, Reproductive Toxicology Division, Research Triangle Park, NC 27711.

    Breast cancer is still the most common malignancy afflicting women in the Western world. Alt...

  20. Update in genetic susceptibility in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Potrony, Miriam; Badenas, Celia; Aguilera, Paula; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Carrera, Cristina; Malvehy, Josep; Puig, Susana

    2015-09-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly of the common skin cancers and its incidence is rapidly increasing. Approximately 10% of cases occur in a familial context. To date, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), which was identified as the first melanoma susceptibility gene more than 20 years ago, is the main high-risk gene for melanoma. A few years later cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) was also identified as a melanoma susceptibility gene. The technologic advances have allowed the identification of new genes involved in melanoma susceptibility: Breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) associated protein 1 (BAP1), CXC genes, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), protection of telomeres 1 (POT1), ACD and TERF2IP, the latter four being involved in telomere maintenance. Furthermore variants in melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) give a moderately increased risk to develop melanoma. Melanoma genetic counseling is offered to families in order to better understand the disease and the genetic susceptibility of developing it. Genetic counseling often implies genetic testing, although patients can benefit from genetic counseling even when they do not fulfill the criteria for these tests. Genetic testing for melanoma predisposition mutations can be used in clinical practice under adequate selection criteria and giving a valid test interpretation and genetic counseling to the individual. PMID:26488006

  1. Update in genetic susceptibility in melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Potrony, Miriam; Badenas, Celia; Aguilera, Paula; Puig-Butille, Joan Anton; Carrera, Cristina; Malvehy, Josep

    2015-01-01

    Melanoma is the most deadly of the common skin cancers and its incidence is rapidly increasing. Approximately 10% of cases occur in a familial context. To date, cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor 2A (CDKN2A), which was identified as the first melanoma susceptibility gene more than 20 years ago, is the main high-risk gene for melanoma. A few years later cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) was also identified as a melanoma susceptibility gene. The technologic advances have allowed the identification of new genes involved in melanoma susceptibility: Breast cancer 1 (BRCA1) associated protein 1 (BAP1), CXC genes, telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), protection of telomeres 1 (POT1), ACD and TERF2IP, the latter four being involved in telomere maintenance. Furthermore variants in melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF) give a moderately increased risk to develop melanoma. Melanoma genetic counseling is offered to families in order to better understand the disease and the genetic susceptibility of developing it. Genetic counseling often implies genetic testing, although patients can benefit from genetic counseling even when they do not fulfill the criteria for these tests. Genetic testing for melanoma predisposition mutations can be used in clinical practice under adequate selection criteria and giving a valid test interpretation and genetic counseling to the individual. PMID:26488006

  2. Quantitative trait locus analysis, pathway analysis, and consomic mapping show genetic variants of Tnni3k, Fpgt, or H28 control susceptibility to viral myocarditis.

    PubMed

    Wiltshire, Sean A; Leiva-Torres, Gabriel André; Vidal, Silvia M

    2011-06-01

    Coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3) infection is the most common cause of viral myocarditis. The pathogenesis of viral myocarditis is strongly controlled by host genetic factors. Although certain indispensable components of immunity have been identified, the genes and pathways underlying natural variation between individuals remain unclear. Previously, we isolated the viral myocarditis susceptibility 1 (Vms1) locus on chromosome 3, which influences pathogenesis. We hypothesized that confirmation and further study of Vms1 controlling CVB3-mediated pathology, combined with pathway analysis and consomic mapping approaches, would elucidate both pathological and protective mechanisms accounting for natural variation in response to CVB3 infection. Vms1 was originally mapped to chromosome 3 using a segregating cross between susceptible A/J and resistant B10.A mice. To validate Vms1, C57BL/6J-Chr 3(A)/NaJ (a chromosome substitution strain that carries a diploid A/J chromosome 3) were used to replicate susceptibility compared with resistant C57BL/6J (B6). A second segregating F2 cross was generated between these, confirming both the localization and effects of Vms1. Microarray analysis of the four strains (A/J, B10.A, C57BL/6J, and C57BL/6J-Chr 3(A)/NaJ) illuminated a core program of response to CVB3 in all strains that is comprised mainly of IFN-stimulated genes. Microarray analysis also revealed strain-specific differential expression programs and genes that may be prognostic or diagnostic of susceptibility to CVB3 infection. A combination of analyses revealed very strong evidence for the existence and location of Vms1. Differentially expressed pathways were identified by microarray, and candidate gene analysis revealed Fpgt, H28, and Tnni3k as likely candidates for Vms1.

  3. Enhanced susceptibility of B lymphoma cells to measles virus by Epstein-Barr virus type III latency that upregulates CD150/signaling lymphocytic activation molecule.

    PubMed

    Takeda, Satoshi; Kanbayashi, Daiki; Kurata, Takako; Yoshiyama, Hironori; Komano, Jun

    2014-02-01

    Measles virus (MV) is one of the candidates for the application of oncolytic virotherapy (OVT). Although an advanced clinical study has been reported on a T-cell lymphoma, the potential of MV OVT against B-cell lymphomas remains to be clarified. We found that an EBV-transformed B lymphoblastoid cell line, a model for diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, and EBV-positive Burkitt's lymphoma cells bearing type III latency were highly susceptible to the cytolysis induced by an MV vaccine strain CAM-70. As analyzed by EBV-positive and -negative counterparts of the same cytogenetic background, type III EBV latency, not type I, was shown to augment the susceptibility of B lymphoma cells to MV-induced cytolysis. Cell surface levels of CD150/signaling lymphocytic activation molecule, a receptor of MV, were upregulated in B lymphoma cell lines with type III EBV latency by 3.8-fold, on average. The cytolytic activity of CD150-tropic WT MV was akin to that of CD46- and CD150-tropic CAM-70, suggesting that CD150 is critical for the susceptibility to MV-induced cytolysis. Among EBV-encoded genes, latent membrane protein 1 was responsible for the CD150 upregulation. It was notable that the majority of B lymphoma cell lines of type III EBV latency showed higher susceptibility to the non-Edmonston-derived CAM-70 than to the Edmonston-derived Schwarz strain. This is the first report indicating the potential of non-Edmonston MV strain for the application of OVT. Furthermore, a cellular regulator of MV replication was implicated that functions in a vaccine strain-specific fashion. Altogether, the MV OVT should serve as an alternative therapy against EBV-positive diffuse large B-cell lymphoma with type III EBV latency.

  4. Magnetic susceptibility of petroleum reservoir fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivakhnenko, Oleksandr P.; Potter, David K.

    A knowledge of the magnetic properties of petroleum reservoir fluids may provide new techniques for improved reservoir characterisation, petroleum exploration and production. However, magnetic information is currently scarce for the vast majority of reservoir fluids. For instance, there is little in the literature concerning basic magnetic susceptibility values of crude oils or formation waters. We have therefore measured the mass magnetic susceptibility ( χm) of several crude oils, refined oil fractions, and formation waters from local and world-wide sites. All the fluids measured were diamagnetic, however there were distinct differences in magnitude between the different fluid types. In particular, χm for the crude oils was more negative than for the formation waters of the same locality. The magnetic susceptibility of the oils appears to be related to their main physical and chemical properties. The results correlated with the density, residue content, API (American Petroleum Institute) gravity, viscosity, sulphur content and metal concentration of the fluids. Light fractions of crude oil were the most diamagnetic. The magnetic measurements potentially allow physical and chemical differences between the fluids to be rapidly characterised. The results suggest other possible applications, such as passive in situ magnetic susceptibility sensors for fluid monitoring (for example, the onset of water breakthrough, or the detection of migrating fines) in reservoirs, which would provide an environmentally friendly alternative to radioactive tracers. The mass magnetic susceptibilities of the fluids in relation to typical reservoir minerals may also play a role in fluid-rock interactions, such as studies of wettability. The χm of crude oil from the various world-wide oil provinces that were tested also showed some differences, possibly reflecting broad physical and chemical features of the geological history of each province.

  5. Antiviral susceptibility of influenza viruses isolated from patients pre- and post-administration of favipiravir.

    PubMed

    Takashita, Emi; Ejima, Miho; Ogawa, Rie; Fujisaki, Seiichiro; Neumann, Gabriele; Furuta, Yousuke; Kawaoka, Yoshihiro; Tashiro, Masato; Odagiri, Takato

    2016-08-01

    Favipiravir, a viral RNA-dependent RNA polymerase inhibitor, has recently been approved in Japan for influenza pandemic preparedness. Here, we conducted a cell-based screening system to evaluate the susceptibility of influenza viruses to favipiravir. In this assay, the antiviral activity of favipiravir is determined by inhibition of virus-induced cytopathic effect, which can be measured by using a colorimetric cell proliferation assay. To demonstrate the robustness of the assay, we compared the favipiravir susceptibilities of neuraminidase (NA) inhibitor-resistant influenza A(H1N1)pdm09, A(H3N2), A(H7N9) and B viruses and their sensitive counterparts. No significant differences in the favipiravir susceptibilities were found between NA inhibitor-resistant and sensitive viruses. We, then, examined the antiviral susceptibility of 57 pairs of influenza viruses isolated from patients pre- and post-administration of favipiravir in phase 3 clinical trials. We found that there were no viruses with statistically significant reduced susceptibility to favipiravir or NA inhibitors, although two of 20 paired A(H1N1)pdm09, one of 17 paired A(H3N2) and one of 20 paired B viruses possessed amino acid substitutions in the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase subunits, PB1, PB2 and PA, after favipiravir administration. This is the first report on the antiviral susceptibility of influenza viruses isolated from patients after favipiravir treatment.

  6. Sex-specific differences in pathogen susceptibility in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Retschnig, Gina; Williams, Geoffrey R; Mehmann, Marion M; Yañez, Orlando; de Miranda, Joachim R; Neumann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sex-related differences in susceptibility to pathogens are a common phenomenon in animals. In the eusocial Hymenoptera the two female castes, workers and queens, are diploid and males are haploid. The haploid susceptibility hypothesis predicts that haploid males are more susceptible to pathogen infections compared to females. Here we test this hypothesis using adult male (drone) and female (worker) honey bees (Apis mellifera), inoculated with the gut endoparasite Nosema ceranae and/or black queen cell virus (BQCV). These pathogens were chosen due to previously reported synergistic interactions between Nosema apis and BQCV. Our data do not support synergistic interactions between N. ceranae and BQCV and also suggest that BQCV has limited effect on both drone and worker health, regardless of the infection level. However, the data clearly show that, despite lower levels of N. ceranae spores in drones than in workers, Nosema-infected drones had both a higher mortality and a lower body mass than non-infected drones, across all treatment groups, while the mortality and body mass of worker bees were largely unaffected by N. ceranae infection, suggesting that drones are more susceptible to this pathogen than workers. In conclusion, the data reveal considerable sex-specific differences in pathogen susceptibility in honey bees and highlight the importance of ultimate measures for determining susceptibility, such as mortality and body quality, rather than mere infection levels.

  7. Differential susceptibility to the environment: Are developmental models compatible with the evidence from twin studies?

    PubMed

    Del Giudice, Marco

    2016-08-01

    According to models of differential susceptibility, the same neurobiological and temperamental traits that determine increased sensitivity to stress and adversity also confer enhanced responsivity to the positive aspects of the environment. Differential susceptibility models have expanded to include complex developmental processes in which genetic variation interacts with exposure to early environmental factors, such as prenatal stress hormones and family conflict. In this study I employed a simulation approach to explore whether, and under what conditions, developmental models of differential susceptibility are compatible with the cumulative findings from twin studies of personality and behavior, which consistently show sizable effects of genetic and nonshared environmental factors and small to negligible effects of the shared environment. Simulation results showed that, to a first approximation, current alternative models of differential susceptibility are all equally compatible with the evidence from twin research; that sizable interaction effects involving individual differences in plasticity are plausible, but only if direct environmental effects are correspondingly weak; and that a major role of shared environmental factors is plausible in early development (consistent with the developmental mechanisms postulated in the differential susceptibility literature) but not in later development. These results support the general plausibility of differential susceptibility models and suggest some realistic constraints on their assumptions. (PsycINFO Database Record PMID:27455408

  8. Genetic diversity and antimicrobial susceptibility of Nocardia species among patients with nocardiosis

    PubMed Central

    Hashemi-Shahraki, Abodolrazagh; Heidarieh, Parvin; Bostanabad, Saeed Zaker; Hashemzadeh, Mohamad; Feizabadi, Mohamad Mehdi; Schraufnagel, Dean; Mirsaeidi, Mehdi

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this multicenter study was to determine the genetic diversity and antibiotic susceptibility of clinically isolated Nocardia species. One hundred twenty-seven patients with nocardiosis were randomly selected from 5 provinces of Iran. Molecular diagnosis of Nocardia species was performed using multilocus sequence analysis of gyrase B of the β subunit of DNA topoisomerase (gyrB), and 16S rRNA and subunit A of SecA preproteintranslocase (secA1). Antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed following the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute recommendations. Thirty-five N. cyriacigeorgica, 30 N. asteroides, 26 N. farcinica, 12 N. otitidiscaviarum, and 10 N. abscessus cultures were studied. All isolates were susceptible to linezolid. All isolates of N. cyriacigeorgica, N. asteroides, N. abscessus, and N. otitidiscaviarum were susceptible to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole, while 8% of N. farcinica isolates were resistant to this drug. All N. otitidiscaviarum isolates were highly resistant to imipenem, but N. cyriacigeorgica, N. asteroides, N. farcinica, and N. abscessus were only moderate resistant. The susceptibility patterns vary with different species of Nocardia. Resistance to trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole in Iran is low and this drug should be first line therapy, unless drug susceptibility testing shows resistance. Linezolid also covers Nocardia well and could be a second line agent. PMID:26638771

  9. Sex-specific differences in pathogen susceptibility in honey bees (Apis mellifera).

    PubMed

    Retschnig, Gina; Williams, Geoffrey R; Mehmann, Marion M; Yañez, Orlando; de Miranda, Joachim R; Neumann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sex-related differences in susceptibility to pathogens are a common phenomenon in animals. In the eusocial Hymenoptera the two female castes, workers and queens, are diploid and males are haploid. The haploid susceptibility hypothesis predicts that haploid males are more susceptible to pathogen infections compared to females. Here we test this hypothesis using adult male (drone) and female (worker) honey bees (Apis mellifera), inoculated with the gut endoparasite Nosema ceranae and/or black queen cell virus (BQCV). These pathogens were chosen due to previously reported synergistic interactions between Nosema apis and BQCV. Our data do not support synergistic interactions between N. ceranae and BQCV and also suggest that BQCV has limited effect on both drone and worker health, regardless of the infection level. However, the data clearly show that, despite lower levels of N. ceranae spores in drones than in workers, Nosema-infected drones had both a higher mortality and a lower body mass than non-infected drones, across all treatment groups, while the mortality and body mass of worker bees were largely unaffected by N. ceranae infection, suggesting that drones are more susceptible to this pathogen than workers. In conclusion, the data reveal considerable sex-specific differences in pathogen susceptibility in honey bees and highlight the importance of ultimate measures for determining susceptibility, such as mortality and body quality, rather than mere infection levels. PMID:24465518

  10. The intersection between cell wall disassembly, ripening, and fruit susceptibility to Botrytis cinerea

    PubMed Central

    Cantu, D.; Vicente, A. R.; Greve, L. C.; Dewey, F. M.; Bennett, A. B.; Labavitch, J. M.; Powell, A. L. T.

    2008-01-01

    Fruit ripening is characterized by processes that modify texture and flavor but also by a dramatic increase in susceptibility to necrotrophic pathogens, such as Botrytis cinerea. Disassembly of the major structural polysaccharides of the cell wall (CW) is a significant process associated with ripening and contributes to fruit softening. In tomato, polygalacturonase (PG) and expansin (Exp) are among the CW proteins that cooperatively participate in ripening-associated CW disassembly. To determine whether endogenous CW disassembly influences the ripening-regulated increase in necrotropic pathogen susceptibility, B. cinerea susceptibility was assessed in transgenic fruit with suppressed polygalacturonase (LePG) and expansin (LeExp1) expression. Suppression of either LePG or LeExp1 alone did not reduce susceptibility but simultaneous suppression of both dramatically reduced the susceptibility of ripening fruit to B. cinerea, as measured by fungal biomass accumulation and by macerating lesion development. These results demonstrate that altering endogenous plant CW disassembly during ripening influences the course of infection by B. cinerea, perhaps by changing the structure or the accessibility of CW substrates to pathogen CW-degrading enzymes. Recognition of the role of ripening-associated CW metabolism in postharvest pathogen susceptibility may be useful in the design and development of strategies to limit pathogen losses during fruit storage, handling, and distribution. PMID:18199833

  11. Survey of marbofloxacin susceptibility of bacteria isolated from cattle with respiratory disease and mastitis in Europe.

    PubMed

    Kroemer, S; Galland, D; Guérin-Faublée, V; Giboin, H; Woehrlé-Fontaine, F

    2012-01-01

    A monitoring programme conducted in Europe since 1994 to survey the marbofloxacin susceptibility of bacterial pathogens isolated from cattle has established the susceptibility of bacterial strains isolated before any antibiotic treatment from bovine mastitis and bovine respiratory disease (BRD) cases between 2002 and 2008. Minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) was determined by a standardised microdilution technique. For respiratory pathogens, Pasteurella multocida and Mannheimia haemolytica isolates (751 and 514 strains, respectively) were highly susceptible to marbofloxacin (MIC≤0.03 µg/ml for 77.39 per cent of the strains) and only 1.75 per cent of M haemolytica strains were resistant (MIC≥4 µg/ml). Histophilus somni isolates (73 strains) were highly susceptible to marbofloxacin (0.008 to 0.06 µg/ml). Mycoplasma bovis MIC (171 strains) ranged from 0.5 to 4 µg/ml. For mastitis pathogens, the majority of Escherichia coli isolates were highly susceptible to marbofloxacin (95.8 per cent of 617 strains). Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative staphylococci (568 and 280 strains) had a homogenous population with MIC centred on 0.25 µg/ml. Streptococcus uberis and Streptococcus dysgalactiae (660 and 217 strains) were moderately susceptible with MIC centred on 1 µg/ml. Marbofloxacin MIC for these various pathogens appeared stable over the seven years of the monitoring programme and was similar to previously published MIC results.

  12. Sex-Specific Differences in Pathogen Susceptibility in Honey Bees (Apis mellifera)

    PubMed Central

    Retschnig, Gina; Williams, Geoffrey R.; Mehmann, Marion M.; Yañez, Orlando; de Miranda, Joachim R.; Neumann, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Sex-related differences in susceptibility to pathogens are a common phenomenon in animals. In the eusocial Hymenoptera the two female castes, workers and queens, are diploid and males are haploid. The haploid susceptibility hypothesis predicts that haploid males are more susceptible to pathogen infections compared to females. Here we test this hypothesis using adult male (drone) and female (worker) honey bees (Apis mellifera), inoculated with the gut endoparasite Nosema ceranae and/or black queen cell virus (BQCV). These pathogens were chosen due to previously reported synergistic interactions between Nosema apis and BQCV. Our data do not support synergistic interactions between N. ceranae and BQCV and also suggest that BQCV has limited effect on both drone and worker health, regardless of the infection level. However, the data clearly show that, despite lower levels of N. ceranae spores in drones than in workers, Nosema-infected drones had both a higher mortality and a lower body mass than non-infected drones, across all treatment groups, while the mortality and body mass of worker bees were largely unaffected by N. ceranae infection, suggesting that drones are more susceptible to this pathogen than workers. In conclusion, the data reveal considerable sex-specific differences in pathogen susceptibility in honey bees and highlight the importance of ultimate measures for determining susceptibility, such as mortality and body quality, rather than mere infection levels. PMID:24465518

  13. Biomarkers of susceptibility: State of the art and implications for occupational exposure to engineered nanomaterials.

    PubMed

    Iavicoli, Ivo; Leso, Veruscka; Schulte, Paul A

    2016-05-15

    Rapid advances and applications in nanotechnology are expected to result in increasing occupational exposure to nano-sized materials whose health impacts are still not completely understood. Scientific efforts are required to identify hazards from nanomaterials and define risks and precautionary management strategies for exposed workers. In this scenario, the definition of susceptible populations, which may be at increased risk of adverse effects may be important for risk assessment and management. The aim of this review is to critically examine available literature to provide a comprehensive overview on susceptibility aspects potentially affecting heterogeneous responses to nanomaterials workplace exposure. Genetic, genotoxic and epigenetic alterations induced by nanomaterials in experimental studies were assessed with respect to their possible function as determinants of susceptibility. Additionally, the role of host factors, i.e. age, gender, and pathological conditions, potentially affecting nanomaterial toxicokinetic and health impacts, were also analysed. Overall, this review provides useful information to obtain insights into the nanomaterial mode of action in order to identify potentially sensitive, specific susceptibility biomarkers to be validated in occupational settings and addressed in risk assessment processes. The findings of this review are also important to guide future research into a deeper characterization of nanomaterial susceptibility in order to define adequate risk communication strategies. Ultimately, identification and use of susceptibility factors in workplace settings has both scientific and ethical issues that need addressing. PMID:26724381

  14. Executive Summary: variation in susceptibility to ozone-induced health effects in rodent models of cardiometabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Dye, Janice A; Costa, Daniel L; Kodavanti, Urmila P

    2015-01-01

    Seven million premature deaths occur annually due to air pollution worldwide, of which ∼80% are attributed to exacerbation of cardiovascular disease (CVD), necessitating greater attention to understanding the causes of susceptibility to air pollution in this sector of population. We used rat models of CVD with or without obesity and compared them to healthy strains to examine the risk factors of ozone-induced lung injury and inflammation. We examined functional, biochemical and molecular changes in several organs to evaluate how physiological factors as well as compensatory antioxidant reserves modulate processes by which ozone injury is influenced by underlying disease. In this study, we highlight key findings of this series of reports. We show that underlying cardiopulmonary insufficiency in genetically predisposed rats appears to increase the effective ozone dose; thus dosimetry is one factor contributing to exacerbated ozone effects. We further show that antioxidant reserve in airway lining fluid modulates ozone-induced damage such that strains with the least antioxidant reserve incur the greatest injury. And finally, we show that the inflammatory response to ozone is governed by a cluster of genes involved in regulating cytokine release, trafficking of inflammatory cells and processes related to cellular apoptosis and growth. All such processes are influenced not only by ozone dosimetry and the lung antioxidant milieu but also by the strain-specific genetic factors. In using a comprehensive systems biology research approach, our data reveal key risk factors for--and strategies to reduce risk of--air pollution mortality among those with CVD.

  15. Assessment of the susceptibility of Streptococcus pneumoniae to cefaclor and loracarbef in 13 countries.

    PubMed

    Bandak, S I; Turnak, M R; Allen, B S; Bolzon, L D; Preston, D A

    2000-08-01

    Between July 1998 and July 1999, 2,644 clinical isolates of Streptococcus pneumoniae were collected from 27 study centers in 13 countries and their susceptibilities to penicillin, cefaclor and loracarbef were determined by E-test" (AB BIODISK, Solna, Sweden). Overall, 96.3% of isolates were penicillin-susceptible (79.8%) or -intermediate (16.6%) (MIC, < or = 1 microg/ml). Rates of penicillin-resistant S. pneumoniae isolation varied widely and were highest in the study centers tested in New Zealand (10.9%), Canada (10.0%), Mexico (9.1%) and the United States (5.1%). Low rates of penicillin-resistance were found in the study centers tested in Russia (0%), Turkey (0%), Brazil (0.5%), Germany (0.6%), Philippines (1.6%), Italy (2.1%), United Kingdom (2.3%), Australia (3.0%) and Poland (3.1%). Using recently published NCCLS interpretative breakpoints (M100-S10, 2000), 87.2% (median) of all isolates tested were cefaclor-susceptible and 87.8% (median) of all isolates tested were loracarbef-susceptible. Of the penicillin-susceptible S. pneumoniae isolates, 99.5% were susceptible to both cefaclor and loracarbef. Susceptibility to cefaclor and loracarbef was also retained by 30.8% and 32.9% of penicillin-intermediate isolates, respectively. These findings are in contrast to recent publications reporting lower cefaclor and loracarbef activities using non-validated interpretative criteria. In conclusion, rates of penicillin resistance among recent clinical isolates of pneumococci remain low in many centers worldwide. Cefaclor and loracarbef demonstrated excellent in vitro activity against recent clinical isolates of penicillin-susceptible and many isolates of penicillin-intermediate S. pneumoniae. PMID:10949979

  16. Nosocomial Infections and Drug Susceptibility Patterns in Methicillin Sensitive and Methicillin Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Nitish Kumar; Garg, Raina; Baliga, Shrikala; Bhat K., Gopalkrishna

    2013-01-01

    Aim: Staphylococcus aureus is one of the leading causes of nosocomial infections and is known for its ability to develop resistance to antibiotics. The drug susceptibility pattern of Methicillin Sensitive S. aureus (MSSA) and Methicillin Resistant S. aureus (MRSA) may vary. Aims and Objectives: This study was carried out to determine and compare the drug susceptibility patterns in nosocomial MSSA and MRSA. Material and Methods: The study was conducted between September 2009 and August 2011. Standard conventional methods were used for the isolation and identification of S. aureus. MRSA was identified by the cefoxitin (30 μg) disk method. Antibiotic susceptibility test was done using Kirby-Bauer disk diffusion method and the interpretation of the results was done using CLSI guidelines. Results: Out of 685 strains of S. aureus studied, 173(25.25%) were MRSA and 512 (74.25%) were MSSA. Out of 173 MRSA strains, 114(65.89%) were isolated from pus, 22(12.71%) from vaginal swab, 18(10.40%) from central catheter tip and the remaining from other specimens. All isolates were susceptible to vancomycin and least number of isolates were susceptible to penicillin. MRSA displayed significantly higher resistance to other antibiotics. 45.7% of MRSA strains were resistant to clindamycin, 64.7% to ciprofloxacin, 87.3% to cotrimoxazole, 54.3% to erythromycin, 17.3% to gentamicin, 16.8% to netilmycin, and 58.38% to tetracycline. Inducible clindamycin resistance was detected in 37 (21.38%) strains of MRSA. Conclusion: Nosocomial infections caused by MRSA is a significant problem. MRSA and MSSA differ with their susceptibility to antibiotics. All MRSA isolates in our hospitals were susceptible to vancomycin. Proper selection of the antibiotics based on antibiotic susceptibility test results is needed for effective treatment and prevention of emergence of resistance in MRSA and MSSA. PMID:24298469

  17. Comparison of Antimicrobial Susceptibility of Urogenital Neisseria gonorrhoeae Isolates Obtained from Women and Men

    PubMed Central

    Kidd, Sarah; Moore, Page C.; Kirkcaldy, Robert D.; Philip, Susan S.; Wiesenfeld, Harold C.; Papp, John R.; Kerndt, Peter R.; Venkatasubramanian, Lalitha; Ghanem, Khalil G.; Hook, Edward W.

    2015-01-01

    Background The United States’ (US) system for gonococcal antimicrobial susceptibility surveillance monitors trends exclusively among men with urethral infection, the population from whom the yield of gonococcal culture is highest. Little is known about the susceptibility of female urogenital isolates, and it is unclear whether gonococcal susceptibility among men who report sex exclusively with women (MSW) is representative of susceptibility among women. Methods Using isolates collected during a recent treatment trial in five US cities, we performed a secondary analysis to compare antimicrobial susceptibilities of N. gonorrhoeae urogenital isolates obtained from women, MSW, and men who have sex with men (MSM). Pre-treatment isolates were collected from trial participants; minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) were determined by agar dilution. Geometric mean MICs were adjusted for geographic location using general linear models. Results Susceptibility data for urogenital isolates from 56 women, 252 MSW, and 170 MSM were studied. The adjusted geometric mean ceftriaxone MIC was similar among women (0.0067 μg/ml, 95% CI 0.0049–0.0092 μg/ml) and MSW (0.0060 μg/ml, 95% CI 0.0053–0.0066 μg/ml). In contrast, the adjusted geometric mean ceftriaxone MIC was higher among MSM (0.0098 μg/ml, 95% CI 0.0082–0.0119 μg/ml) than MSW. This same pattern was observed for other antimicrobials, including cefixime and azithromycin Conclusions Ceftriaxone, cefixime, and azithromycin MICs were higher among MSM than MSW, but were similar among women and MSW. These findings suggest that gonococcal antimicrobial susceptibility surveillance based on urethral isolates from MSW may adequately represent susceptibility of urogenital N. gonorrhoeae in women. PMID:26165435

  18. Susceptibility of Recently Collected Spanish Pneumococci Nonsusceptible to Oral Penicillin from Serotypes Not Included in the 7-Valent Conjugate Vaccine▿

    PubMed Central

    Fenoll, Asunción; Aguilar, Lorenzo; Giménez, María-José; Vicioso, María-Dolores; Robledo, Olga; Granizo, Juan-José; Coronel, Pilar

    2010-01-01

    The susceptibilities of pneumococci recently collected (up to June 2009) in Spain (500 isolates nonsusceptible to oral penicillin and 150 susceptible isolates) from serotypes not included in the conjugate vaccine were determined. Most nonsusceptible isolates (53.6%) belonged to serotype 19A. Susceptibility rates in serotype 19A penicillin-intermediate (n = 201)/penicillin-resistant (n = 67) isolates were <33%/≤6.0% (erythromycin and oral cephalosporins with defined breakpoints), 85.1%/11.9% (amoxicillin), and 96.0%/52.2% (cefotaxime), respectively. Low susceptibility to common oral β-lactams was also found in serotypes 11A (95.5% susceptibility to cefotaxime and erythromycin) and 35B. PMID:20308373

  19. 12th meeting of the Scientific Group on Methodologies for the Safety Evaluation of Chemicals: susceptibility to environmental hazards.

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, J C; Vainio, H; Peakall, D; Goldstein, B D

    1997-01-01

    The 12th meeting of the Scientific Group on Methodologies for the Safety Evaluation of Chemicals (SGOMSEC) considered the topic of methodologies for determining human and ecosystem susceptibility to environmental hazards. The report prepared at the meeting describes measurement of susceptibility through the use of biological markers of exposure, biological markers of effect, and biomarkers directly indicative of susceptibility of humans or of ecosystems. The utility and validity of these biological markers for the study of susceptibility are evaluated, as are opportunities for developing newer approaches for the study of humans or of ecosystems. For the first time a SGOMSEC workshop also formally considered the issue of ethics in relation to methodology, an issue of particular concern for studies of susceptibility. PMID:9255554

  20. Impact of Long-Term Irrigation with Treated Sewage on Soil Magnetic Susceptibility and Organic Matter Content in North China.

    PubMed

    Yang, P G; Yang, M; Mao, R Z; Byrne, J M

    2015-07-01

    This study assessed the effect on magnetic susceptibility and organic matter content of arable soil by irrigation with either treated sewage or groundwater. Results indicated that organic matter and magnetic susceptibility values in the soil irrigated with sewage were increased by 7.1 % and 13.5 %, respectively, compared to agricultural soil that irrigated with groundwater. Both the sewage and groundwater irrigated soils contained a significant fraction of ultrafine superpara magnetic grains, as indicated by high frequency dependent susceptibility (χfd > 6 %). The enhancement of soil magnetic properties was determined to be caused by anthropogenic sewage irrigation and agrochemical use by investigation of vertical soil profiles. Magnetic susceptibility parameters were shown to be significantly correlated with organic matter content (y = 0.0057x + 1.3439, R(2) = 0.09, p < 0.05). This work indicates that measurements of magnetic susceptibility may offer a rapid first step for identifying the potential pollution in arable soils. PMID:25985871

  1. Diversity and antifungal susceptibility of Norwegian Candida glabrata clinical isolates

    PubMed Central

    Andersen, Kari-Mette; Kristoffersen, Anne Karin; Ingebretsen, André; Vikholt, Katharina Johnsen; Örtengren, Ulf Thore; Olsen, Ingar; Enersen, Morten; Gaustad, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Background Increasing numbers of immunocompromised patients have resulted in greater incidence of invasive fungal infections with high mortality. Candida albicans infections dominate, but during the last decade, Candida glabrata has become the second highest cause of candidemia in the United States and Northern Europe. Reliable and early diagnosis, together with appropriate choice of antifungal treatment, is needed to combat these challenging infections. Objectives To confirm the identity of 183 Candida glabrata isolates from different human body sites using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization time-of-flight (MALDI-TOF) and VITEK®2, and to analyze isolate protein profiles and antifungal susceptibility. The minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) of seven antifungal drugs was determined for the isolates to elucidate susceptibility. Design A total of 183 C. glabrata isolates obtained between 2002 and 2012 from Norwegian health-care units were analyzed. For species verification and differentiation, biochemical characterization (VITEK®2) and mass spectrometry (MALDI–TOF) were used. MIC determination for seven antifungal drugs was undertaken using E-tests®. Results Using VITEK®2, 92.9% of isolates were identified as C. glabrata, while all isolates (100%) were identified as C. glabrata using MALDI-TOF. Variation in protein spectra occurred for all identified C. glabrata isolates. The majority of isolates had low MICs to amphotericin B (≤1 mg/L for 99.5%) and anidulafungin (≤0.06 mg/L for 98.9%). For fluconazole, 18% of isolates had MICs >32 mg/L and 82% had MICs in the range ≥0.016 mg/L to ≤32 mg/L. Conclusions Protein profiles and antifungal susceptibility characteristics of the C. glabrata isolates were diverse. Clustering of protein profiles indicated that many azole resistant isolates were closely related. In most cases, isolates had highest susceptibility to amphotericin B and anidulafungin. The results confirmed previous observations of high

  2. A demonstration of the susceptibility of clinical isolates obtained from cystic fibrosis patients to manuka honey.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Rowena; Wootton, Mandy; Howe, Robin; Cooper, Rose

    2015-05-01

    Pseudomonas and Burkholderia pose a significant health threat to people with chronic respiratory conditions; the resistance inherent in these bacteria indicates that new antimicrobial strategies are required. Susceptibility of 56 strains of P. aeruginosa and 55 strains of Burkholderia to manuka honey, tobramycin and colistin using microbroth dilution and E strip was determined. MICs of antibiotics with honey were determined to search for synergistic combinations against two representative strains of each genus. All strains exhibited susceptibility to honey ≤10 % (w/v); mean susceptibility of Burkholderia (4.6 % w/v) was lower than P. aeruginosa (7.3 % w/v). Synergistic or additive combinations were found with all four strains tested. Combinations of manuka honey with antibiotics can be used to lower the MIC need to successfully inhibit both P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia. The use of honey as a combination agent may be possible for the management of P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia. PMID:25680398

  3. A demonstration of the susceptibility of clinical isolates obtained from cystic fibrosis patients to manuka honey.

    PubMed

    Jenkins, Rowena; Wootton, Mandy; Howe, Robin; Cooper, Rose

    2015-05-01

    Pseudomonas and Burkholderia pose a significant health threat to people with chronic respiratory conditions; the resistance inherent in these bacteria indicates that new antimicrobial strategies are required. Susceptibility of 56 strains of P. aeruginosa and 55 strains of Burkholderia to manuka honey, tobramycin and colistin using microbroth dilution and E strip was determined. MICs of antibiotics with honey were determined to search for synergistic combinations against two representative strains of each genus. All strains exhibited susceptibility to honey ≤10 % (w/v); mean susceptibility of Burkholderia (4.6 % w/v) was lower than P. aeruginosa (7.3 % w/v). Synergistic or additive combinations were found with all four strains tested. Combinations of manuka honey with antibiotics can be used to lower the MIC need to successfully inhibit both P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia. The use of honey as a combination agent may be possible for the management of P. aeruginosa and B. cepacia.

  4. Susceptibility testing of urinary isolates of Escherichia coli to mecillinam using NCCLS methodology.

    PubMed

    Skov, Robert; Frimodt-Moller, Niels; Menday, Paul; Espersen, Frank

    2005-03-01

    Criteria for susceptibility testing of mecillinam against 533 isolates of Escherichia coli and a further 309 Enterobacteriaceae, according to NCCLS methodology, were determined. Correlation of MIC to inhibition zones was good for all species. For urinary isolates of E. coli, the following agar dilution breakpoints and corresponding interpretive zone diameters seem appropriate: < or = 8 mg/L/> or = 15 mm for susceptible; 16 mg/L/12-14 mm for intermediate susceptible and > or = 32 mg/L/< or = 11 mm for resistant. The appearance of isolated colonies within the inhibition zone was sometimes noted with disc diffusion, particularly for non-E. coli Enterobacteriaceae. The relevance of these colonies to clinical (bacteriological) efficacy was determined and the results suggested that they could be ignored when testing urinary E. coli.

  5. INCREASED SUSCEPTIBILITY OF ADULTS FOLLOWING DEVELOPMENT EXPOSURE TO NEUROTOXICANTS: ANOTHER SUSCEPTIBLE POPULATION?

    EPA Science Inventory

    There is considerable public and regulatory interest in the adverse outcomes of developmental exposure to toxicants. The 1996 Food Quality Protection Act spurred research on understanding potential neurotoxic, immunotoxic, and endocrine outcomes in susceptible populations, parti...

  6. Magnetic Susceptibility of Wet vs. Dry Sediment and Mass Normalized vs. Volume Normalized Magnetic Susceptibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kletetschka, G.; Hruba, J.; Nabelek, L.

    2015-12-01

    The measurement of magnetic susceptibility in sediments represents a fast and non-destructive technique that can be used to deduce the concentration of magnetic minerals [1, 2]. Magnetic minerals change their magnetic properties with temperature [3]. Heating (during a fire, laboratory, with the purpose of manufacturing a product, etc.) can modify a number of sediment properties [4, 5]. Heat-induced sediment mineralogical changes may cause irreversible changes in the sediment mineral structure and composition, and they occur at a wide range of temperature [6]. We provided measurements of magnetic susceptibility on samples from the Stara Jimka (SJ) paleo lacustrine site in the Bohemian Forest using magnetic susceptibility meter MS-30. Sediment samples of approximately 0.2 cm thickness were weighed and put into plastic containers. First, measurements of magnetic susceptibility were taken on wet samples. Then the containers were put into the oven and sediment was dried at temperature of 110°C. After drying and cooling to room temperature, measurements of magnetic susceptibility were repeated. Dry samples were also weighed. Comparison of magnetic susceptibility of dry versus wet samples showed higher values of magnetic susceptibility of dry samples. This enhancement was probably caused during oven-drying, when constituents of sediment (mainly clays) underwent heat-induced changes. We also compared volume normalized values of magnetic susceptibility with mass normalized values. Mass normalized magnetic susceptibility was burdened by greater noise. References: [1] QUIJANO, L. et al. 2001. Magnetic Susceptibilty in Topsoils and Bulk Cores of Cultivated Calcisols. [2] DEARING, J. A. 1994. Environmental Magnetic Susceptibility. [3] HANESCH, M. and SCHOLGER, R. 2005. The Influence of Soil Type on the Magnetic Susceptibility Measured throughout Soil Profiles. [4] FARWIG, V. J. et al. 2004. The Effects of Heating on Mineral Magnetic Enhancement of Soils. [5] KLETETSCHKA, G

  7. KLY5 Kappabridge: High sensitivity susceptibility and anisotropy meter precisely decomposing in-phase and out-of-phase components

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pokorny, Petr; Pokorny, Jiri; Chadima, Martin; Hrouda, Frantisek; Studynka, Jan; Vejlupek, Josef

    2016-04-01

    The KLY5 Kappabridge is equipped, in addition to standard measurement of in-phase magnetic susceptibility and its anisotropy, for precise and calibrated measurement of out-of-phase susceptibility and its anisotropy. The phase angle is measured in "absolute" terms, i.e. without any residual phase error. The measured value of the out-of-phase susceptibility is independent on both the magnitude of the complex susceptibility and intensity of the driving magnetic field. The precise decomposition of the complex susceptibility into the in-phase and out-of-phase components is verified through presumably zero out-of-phase susceptibility of pure gadolinium oxide. The outstanding sensitivity in measurement of weak samples is achieved by newly developed drift compensation routine in addition to the latest models of electronic devices. In rocks, soils, and environmental materials, in which it is usually due to viscous relaxation, the out-of-phase susceptibility is able to substitute the more laborious frequency-dependent susceptibility routinely used in magnetic granulometry. Another new feature is measurement of the anisotropy of out-of-phase magnetic susceptibility (opAMS), which is also performed simultaneously and automatically with standard (in-phase) AMS measurement. The opAMS enables the direct determination of the magnetic sub-fabrics of the minerals that show non-zero out-of-phase susceptibility either due to viscous relaxation (ultrafine grains of magnetite or maghemite), or due to weak-field hysteresis (titanomagnetite, hematite, pyrrhotite), or due to eddy currents (in conductive minerals). Using the 3D rotator, the instrument performs the measurement of both the AMS and opAMS by only one insertion of the specimen into the specimen holder. In addition, fully automated measurement of the field variation of the AMS and opAMS is possible. The instrument is able to measure, in conjunction with the CS-4 Furnace and CS-L Cryostat, the temperature variation of

  8. Debris-flow susceptibility map of Slovenia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Komac, M.; Kumelj, Š.; Ribičič, M.

    2009-04-01

    Until now debris-flow susceptibility was relatively poorly investigated in Slovenia. Regarding lack of such studies »Map of debris-flow susceptibility in Slovenia in scale 1.250.000« was elaborated using GIS and the latest spatial data was used; among them the latest lithological map of Slovenia in scale 1:250.000. For the creation of debris-flow susceptibility map of Slovenia in scale 1:250.000 seven considered most important factors were used that were divided into two groups: 1) initial factors that precondition debris-flows: lithology, slope angle, slope potential, 48-hours precipitation and 2) transport factors that contribute to higher probability of the transport of debris-flow material: terrain convexity, energy potential of streams, distance to surface water. Using linear weighted sum the precondition information layer was derived, and the same principal was used to derive transport information layer. Both layers were joined into final susceptibility assessment, again with consideration of their importance to contribute to debris-flow occurrence. Different weights were applied to chosen parameters, which resulted in several different models that were evaluated according to historical or recent debris-flow phenomena. Expert estimation was used to define the torrential areas with high probability of the debris-flow occurrence. The emphasis was on location rather than on the time of the debris-flow occurrence. There were unfortunately no adequate representative data about debris-flow in Slovenia (debris flow cadastre does not exist and not many historical studies have been done so far) for the quantitative statistical analysis. Hence only expert estimation approach was possible, based on the experience and historical events gathered from chronicles and eyewitness. Such an approach is mainly limited by subjectivity and has difficulties with sound argumentation, but at the given state it was the only possible approach. Based upon spatial analyses of four

  9. A Microfluidic Channel Method for Rapid Drug-Susceptibility Testing of Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Yoshimi; Grushnikov, Andrey; Kikuchi, Kazuma; Noji, Hiroyuki; Yamaguchi, Akihito; Yagi, Yasushi

    2016-01-01

    The recent global increase in the prevalence of antibiotic-resistant bacteria and lack of development of new therapeutic agents emphasize the importance of selecting appropriate antimicrobials for the treatment of infections. However, to date, the development of completely accelerated drug susceptibility testing methods has not been achieved despite the availability of a rapid identification method. We proposed an innovative rapid method for drug susceptibility testing for Pseudomonas aeruginosa that provides results within 3 h. The drug susceptibility testing microfluidic (DSTM) device was prepared using soft lithography. It consisted of five sets of four microfluidic channels sharing one inlet slot, and the four channels are gathered in a small area, permitting simultaneous microscopic observation. Antimicrobials were pre-introduced into each channel and dried before use. Bacterial suspensions in cation-adjusted Mueller–Hinton broth were introduced from the inlet slot and incubated for 3 h. Susceptibilities were microscopically evaluated on the basis of differences in cell numbers and shapes between drug-treated and control cells, using dedicated software. The results of 101 clinically isolated strains of P. aeruginosa obtained using the DSTM method strongly correlated with results obtained using the ordinary microbroth dilution method. Ciprofloxacin, meropenem, ceftazidime, and piperacillin caused elongation in susceptible cells, while meropenem also induced spheroplast and bulge formation. Morphological observation could alternatively be used to determine the susceptibility of P. aeruginosa to these drugs, although amikacin had little effect on cell shape. The rapid determination of bacterial drug susceptibility using the DSTM method could also be applicable to other pathogenic species, and it could easily be introduced into clinical laboratories without the need for expensive instrumentation. PMID:26872134

  10. An integrated mass wasting susceptibility assesment by geographical information systems and remote sensing applications: Example from North Turkey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akgün, Aykut

    2016-04-01

    The Northern part of Turkey have been suffering from both landslides and snow avalanches due to the steep topography and climatological characteristics triggering the processes. In order to manage these natural hazard phenomenons, regional hazards assessments are both crucial and essential for the region. In this context, an integrated hazard assesment including landslide and snow avalanche was carried out for a selected area at North Turkey. Caykara (Trabzon) district was one of the most suitable areas for such a purpose, because several landslide and snow avalanche cases occured in the area during the last two decades. To inspect the landslide and snow avalanche susceptibility of the area, geographical information systems and remote sensing based assessments were applied to the area. To produce a landslide susceptibility map, logistic regression model was used by using lithological, topographical and environmental data set. To obtain a snow avalanche susceptibility map, topograhical data such as slope gradient, slope aspect and slope curvature, environmental data such as normaliazed vegetation index (NDVI), snow accumlation areas and landcover were taken into account, and these data set were analyzed by a 2D modelling tool, called as CONEFALL. By obtaining the landslide and snow avalanche susceptibility maps, five susceptibility classes from very low to very high were differentiated in the area. The both susceptibility maps were also verified by the actual field data as well, and it was determined that the obtained maps were successful. Then, the both susceptibility maps were overlaid, and finally an integrated mass wasting susceptibility map was created. In this final map, total susceptible areas to both landslide and snow avalanche occurrence were determined. The final susceptibility map is believed and expected to be used by the govermental and local authorities as a decision makers to mitigate the landslide and snow avalanche based hazards in the area.

  11. Sporothrix schenckii complex in Iran: Molecular identification and antifungal susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Mahmoudi, Shahram; Zaini, Farideh; Kordbacheh, Parivash; Safara, Mahin; Heidari, Mansour

    2016-08-01

    Sporotrichosis is a global subcutaneous fungal infection caused by the Sporothrix schenckii complex. Sporotrichosis is an uncommon infection in Iran, and there have been no phenotypic, molecular typing or antifungal susceptibility studies of Sporothrix species. This study aimed to identify nine Iranian isolates of the S. schenckii complex to the species level using colony morphology, carbohydrate assimilation tests, and PCR-sequencing of the calmodulin gene. The antifungal susceptibilities of these Sporothrix isolates to five antifungal agents (amphotericin B (AMB), voriconazole (VRC), itraconazole (ITC), fluconazole (FLC), and terbinafine (TRB)) were also evaluated according to the M27-A3 and M38-A2 protocols of the Clinical and Laboratory Standards Institute for yeast and mycelial phases, respectively. Five of seven clinical isolates were identified as S. schenckii